WorldWideScience

Sample records for wall determinants impacts

  1. Impact effects in thin-walled structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zukas, J.A.; Gaskill, B.

    1996-01-01

    A key parameter in the design of protective structures is the critical impact velocity, also known as the ballistic limit. This is the velocity below which a striker will fail to penetrate a barrier or some protective device. For strikers with regular shapes, such as cylinders (long and short), spheres and cones, analytical and empirical formulations for the determination of a ballistic limit exist at impact velocities ranging from 250 m/s to 6 km/s or higher. For non-standard shapes, two- and three-dimensional wave propagation codes (hydrocodes) can be valuable adjuncts to experiments in ballistic limit determinations. This is illustrated with the help of the ZeuS code in determining the ballistic limit of a short, tubular projectile striking a thin aluminum barrier and contrasting it to the value of the ballistic limit of a spherical projectile of equal mass against the same target. Several interesting features of the debris cloud generated by a tubular projectile striking a Whipple shield at hypervelocity are also pointed out. The paper concludes with a consideration of hydrodynamic ram effects in fluid-filled thin-walled structures. Where possible, comparisons are made of computed results with experimental data

  2. Impact of Thin-Walled Projectiles with Concrete Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rayment E. Moxley

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available An experimental program to determine the response of thin-walled steel projectiles to the impact with concrete targets was recently conducted. The projectiles were fired against 41-MPa concrete targets at an impact velocity of 290 m/s. This article contains an outline of the experimental program, an examination of the results of a typical test, and predictions of projectile deformation by classical shell theory and computational simulation. Classical shell analysis of the projectile indicated that the predicted impact loads would result in circumferential buckling. A computational simulation of a test was conducted with an impact/penetration model created by linking a rigid-body penetration trajectory code with a general-purpose finite element code. Scientific visualization of the resulting data revealed that circumferential buckling was induced by the impact conditions considered.

  3. Determination of seismic performance factors for CLT shear wall systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. Omar Amini; John W. van de Lindt; Douglas Rammer; Shiling Pei; Philip Line; Marjan Popovski

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents selected results of connector testing and wall testing which were part of a Forest Products Lab-funded project undertaken at Colorado State University in an effort to determine seismic performance factors for cross laminated timber (CLT) shear walls in the United States. Archetype development, which is required as part of the process, is also...

  4. Droplet-Wall/Film Impact in IC Engine Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-14

    Report: Droplet-Wall/ Film Impact in IC Engine Applications (ARO Topic 1.4.1 under ARO’s Dr. Ralph A. Anthenien) The views, opinions and/or findings...Participants: RPPR Final Report as of 12-Oct-2017 Agreement Number: W911NF-16-1-0449 Organization: Princeton University Title: Droplet-Wall/ Film Impact...droplets impacting a wet surface under various film thickness, which plays a critical role in controlling the efficiency of applications such as those

  5. Implantation measurements to determine tritium permeation in first wall structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, D.F.; Causey, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    A principal safety concern for a D-T burning fusion reactor is release of tritium during routine operation. Tritium implantation into first wall structures, and subsequent permeation into coolants, is potentially an important source of tritium loss. This paper reports on an experiment in which an ion accelerator was used to implant deuterium atoms in a stainless steel disk to simulate tritium implantation in first wall structures. The permeation rate was measured under various operating conditions. These results were used in the TMAP computer code to determine potential tritium loss rates for fusion reactors

  6. Fragility assessment method of Concrete Wall Subjected to Impact Loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahm, Daegi; Shin, Sang Shup; Choi, In-Kil

    2014-01-01

    These studies have been aimed to verify and ensure the safety of the targeted walls and structures especially in the viewpoint of the deterministic approach. However, recently, the regulation and the assessment of the safety of the nuclear power plants (NPPs) against to an aircraft impact are strongly encouraged to adopt a probabilistic approach, i.e., the probabilistic risk assessment of an aircraft impact. In Korea, research to develop aircraft impact risk quantification technology was initiated in 2012 by Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). In this paper, for the one example of the probabilistic safety assessment approach, a method to estimate the failure probability and fragility of concrete wall subjected to impact loading caused by missiles or engine parts of aircrafts will be introduced. This method and the corresponding results will be used for the total technical roadmap and the procedure to assess the aircraft impact risk (Fig.1). A method and corresponding results of the estimation of the failure probability and fragility for a concrete wall subjected to impact loadings caused by missiles or engine parts of aircrafts was introduced. The detailed information of the target concrete wall in NPP, and the example aircraft engine model is considered safeguard information (SGI), and is not contained in this paper

  7. Soft impact testing of a wall-floor-wall reinforced concrete structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vepsä, Ari, E-mail: ari.vepsa@vtt.fi; Calonius, Kim; Saarenheimo, Arja; Aatola, Seppo; Halonen, Matti

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • A wall-floor-wall reinforced concrete structure was built. • The structure was subjected to three almost identical soft impact tests. • Response was measured with accelerometers, displacement sensors and strain gauges. • Modal tests was also carried out with the same structure in different conditions. • The results are meant to be used for validation of computational methods and models. - Abstract: Assessing the safety of the reactor building of a nuclear power plant against the crash of an airplane calls for valid computational tools such as finite element models and material constitutive models. Validation of such tools and models in turn calls for reliable and relevant experimental data. The problem is that such data is scarcely available. One of the aspects of such a crash is vibrations that are generated by the impact. These vibrations tend to propagate from the impact point to the internal parts of the building. If strong enough, these vibrations may cause malfunction of the safety-critical equipment inside the building. To enable validation of computational models for this type of behaviour, we have conducted a series of three tests with a wall-floor-wall reinforced concrete structure under soft impact loading. The response of the structure was measured with accelerometers, displacement sensors and strain gauges. In addition to impact tests, the structure was subjected to modal tests under different conditions. The tests yielded a wealth of useful data for validation of computational models and better understanding about shock induced vibration physics especially in reinforced concrete structures.

  8. Knowledge dissemination: Determining impact

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Molapo, D

    2007-07-17

    Full Text Available , efficiency, effectiveness, impact and sustainability may be used respectively. Techniques of analyzing applied knowledge data abound. Two techniques of applied knowledge analysis which are used in the CSIR namely, Cost-Benefit Analysis and Cost...

  9. Automobile impact forces on concrete wall panels. Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiapetta, R.L.; Pang, E.C.

    1982-06-01

    The objective of this study was to develop force-time impact signature data for use in the design or evaluation of nuclear power plant structures subject to tornado-borne automotive vehicle impact. The approach was based on the use of analytical vehicle models to calculate imact forces. To assess the significance of vehicle/structure interaction for head-on impact force-histories, a lumped-mass model of a reinforced concrete wall panel was coupled to a one-dimensional vehicle model for numerous panel design configurations within the range of practical interest. Vehicle-structure interaction was found to have relatively little effect on the force histories

  10. Finite element modeling of tornado missile impact on reinforced concrete wall panels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Y.; Vallabhan, C.V.G.; McDonald, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a finite element model for the impact of large tornado-generated missiles with reinforced concrete wall panels. The analysis predicts the dynamic response of a wall panel when impacted by a missile with a large contact area such as an automobile. Quadratic finite elements are used to discretize the domain of the wall panel. Fundamental assumptions are based on the Mindlin and the related Reinsser plate theories. An 'embedded' model is employed to account for the reinforcing bars. The nonlinear behavior of concrete and steel bars are analyzed by means of time-dependent constitutive relationships. A model is proposed to describe the initial and subsequent yield surfaces of concrete material, which avoids underestimation of the effect of high hydrostatic stresses on the yielding behavior of concrete. Ottosen's four-parameter failure criterion is used to define the failure surface of concrete. A crack monitoring algorithm accounts for post-cracking and post-crushing behavior of concrete. Explicit time step integration of nonlinear dynamic equations are carried out using the finite element discretization of a concrete wall panel. As a practical application of the analysis technique, the contact failure pressure for a particular panel geometry can be calculated. The contact failure pressure and the elapsed time to failure after missile contact define a rectangular or triangular impulse loading to produce failure of the panel. Since automobile crashes are known to produce triangular impulse loads, the two pulses (failure and impact) can be compared to determine if a particular impact will fail the panels. Thus, a particular concrete panel can be analyzed to determine if it will fail under a postulated missile impact

  11. Modelling of radiation impact on ITER Beryllium wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landman, I. S.; Janeschitz, G.

    2009-04-01

    In the ITER H-Mode confinement regime, edge localized instabilities (ELMs) will perturb the discharge. Plasma lost after each ELM moves along magnetic field lines and impacts on divertor armour, causing plasma contamination by back propagating eroded carbon or tungsten. These impurities produce enhanced radiation flux distributed mainly over the beryllium main chamber wall. The simulation of the complicated processes involved are subject of the integrated tokamak code TOKES that is currently under development. This work describes the new TOKES model for radiation transport through confined plasma. Equations for level populations of the multi-fluid plasma species and the propagation of different kinds of radiation (resonance, recombination and bremsstrahlung photons) are implemented. First simulation results without account of resonance lines are presented.

  12. Modelling of radiation impact on ITER Beryllium wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landman, I.S. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, IHM, FUSION, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)], E-mail: igor.landman@ihm.fzk.de; Janeschitz, G. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, IHM, FUSION, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2009-04-30

    In the ITER H-Mode confinement regime, edge localized instabilities (ELMs) will perturb the discharge. Plasma lost after each ELM moves along magnetic field lines and impacts on divertor armour, causing plasma contamination by back propagating eroded carbon or tungsten. These impurities produce enhanced radiation flux distributed mainly over the beryllium main chamber wall. The simulation of the complicated processes involved are subject of the integrated tokamak code TOKES that is currently under development. This work describes the new TOKES model for radiation transport through confined plasma. Equations for level populations of the multi-fluid plasma species and the propagation of different kinds of radiation (resonance, recombination and bremsstrahlung photons) are implemented. First simulation results without account of resonance lines are presented.

  13. Investigation of Plant Cell Wall Properties: A Study of Contributions from the Nanoscale to the Macroscale Impacting Cell Wall Recalcitrance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Jacob Dillon

    Biochemical conversion of lignocellulosic biomass to fuel ethanol is one of a few challenging, yet opportune technologies that can reduce the consumption of petroleum-derived transportation fuels, while providing parallel reductions in greenhouse gas emissions. Biomass recalcitrance, or resistance to deconstruction, is a major technical challenge that limits effective conversion of biomass to fermentable sugars, often requiring a costly thermochemical pretreatment step to improve biomass deconstruction. Biomass recalcitrance is imparted largely by the secondary cell wall, a complex polymeric matrix of cell wall polysaccharides and aromatic heteropolymers, that provides structural stability to cells and enables plant upright growth. Polymers within the cell wall can vary both compositionally and structurally depending upon plant species and anatomical fraction, and have varied responses to thermochemical pretreatments. Cell wall properties impacting recalcitrance are still not well understood, and as a result, the goal of this dissertation is to investigate structural features of the cell wall contributing to recalcitrance (1) in diverse anatomical fractions of a single species, (2) in response to diverse pretreatments, and (3) resulting from genetic modification. In the first study, feedstock cell wall heterogeneity was investigated in anatomical (stem, leaf sheaths, and leaf blades) and internode fractions of switchgrass at varying tissue maturities. Lignin content was observed as the key contributor to recalcitrance in maturing stem tissues only, with non-cellulosic substituted glucuronoarabinoxylans and pectic polysaccharides contributing to cell wall recalcitrance in leaf sheath and leaf blades. Hydroxycinnamate (i.e., saponifiable p-coumarate and ferulate) content along with xylan and pectin extractability decreased with tissue maturity, suggesting lignification is only one component imparting maturity specific cell wall recalcitrance. In the second study

  14. Determination of the Airborne Sound Insulation of a Straw Bale Partition Wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teslík, Jiří; Fabian, Radek; Hrubá, Barbora

    2017-06-01

    This paper describes the results of a scientific project focused on determining of the Airborne Sound Insulation of a peripheral non-load bearing wall made of straw bales expressed by Weighted Sound Reduction Index. Weighted Sound Reduction Index was determined by measuring in the certified acoustic laboratory at the Faculty of Mechanical Engineering at Brno University of Technology. The measured structure of the straw wall was modified in combinations with various materials, so the results include a wide range of possible compositions of the wall. The key modification was application of plaster on both sides of the straw bale wall. This construction as is frequently done in actual straw houses. The additional measurements were performed on the straw wall with several variants of additional wall of slab materials. The airborne sound insulation value has been also measured in separate stages of the construction. Thus it is possible to compare and determinate the effect of the single layers on the airborne sound insulation.

  15. Impact significance determination-Back to basics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence, David P.

    2007-01-01

    Impact significance determination is widely recognized as a vital and critical EIA activity. But impact significance related concepts are poorly understood. And the quality of approaches for impact significance determination in EIA practice remains highly variable. This article seeks to help establish a sound and practical conceptual foundation for formulating and evaluating impact significance determination approaches. It addresses the nature (what is impact significance?), the core characteristics (what are the major properties of significance determination?), the rationale (why are impact significance determinations necessary?), the procedural and substantive objectives (what do impact significance determinations seek to achieve?), and the process for making impact significance judgments (how is impact significance determination conducted?). By identifying fundamental attributes and key distinctions associated with impact significance determinations, a basis is provided for designing and evaluating impact significance determination procedures at both the regulatory and applied levels

  16. Preliminary study of impact fragility to RC wall subjected to aircraft impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Sang Shup; Hahm, Dae Gi; Choi, In Kil

    2012-01-01

    International experience has shown that internal and external hazards such as fires, earthquakes, and aircraft impacts can be significant safety contributors to the risk to infrastructures such as nuclear power plants. Since the aircraft accident at the World Trade Center (WTC) on September 11, 2001, an aircraft impact problem has been increasingly of the interest and is one of important categories of an unexpected external hazard field. To date, aircraft impact analyses has most focused on the response analysis to the target structures. However, this preliminary study carried out an impact fragility analysis to reinforced concrete (RC) wall subjected to an aircraft impact. The aircraft velocity is used as the important variable of this study. The impact analysis of the applied Ri era's forcing function is used by Abaqus/Explicit

  17. Hidden Liquidity: Determinants and Impact

    OpenAIRE

    Gökhan Cebiroglu; Ulrich Horst

    2012-01-01

    We cross-sectionally analyze the presence of aggregated hidden depth and trade volume in the S&P 500 and identify its key determinants. We find that the spread is the main predictor for a stock’s hidden dimension, both in terms of traded and posted liquidity. Our findings moreover suggest that large hidden orders are associated with larger transaction costs, higher price impact and increased volatility. In particular, as large hidden orders fail to attract (latent) liquidity to the market, ...

  18. Determination of wall shear stress from mean velocity and Reynolds shear stress profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volino, Ralph J.; Schultz, Michael P.

    2018-03-01

    An analytical method is presented for determining the Reynolds shear stress profile in steady, two-dimensional wall-bounded flows using the mean streamwise velocity. The method is then utilized with experimental data to determine the local wall shear stress. The procedure is applicable to flows on smooth and rough surfaces with arbitrary pressure gradients. It is based on the streamwise component of the boundary layer momentum equation, which is transformed into inner coordinates. The method requires velocity profiles from at least two streamwise locations, but the formulation of the momentum equation reduces the dependence on streamwise gradients. The method is verified through application to laminar flow solutions and turbulent DNS results from both zero and nonzero pressure gradient boundary layers. With strong favorable pressure gradients, the method is shown to be accurate for finding the wall shear stress in cases where the Clauser fit technique loses accuracy. The method is then applied to experimental data from the literature from zero pressure gradient studies on smooth and rough walls, and favorable and adverse pressure gradient cases on smooth walls. Data from very near the wall are not required for determination of the wall shear stress. Wall friction velocities obtained using the present method agree with those determined in the original studies, typically to within 2%.

  19. Impact of turbulence anisotropy near walls in room airflow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schälin, A.; Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm

    2004-01-01

    The influence of different turbulence models used in computational fluid dynamics predictions is studied in connection with room air movement. The turbulence models used are the high Re-number k–e model and the high Re- number Reynolds stress model (RSM). The three-dimensional wall jet is selected...... in a three- dimensional wall jet by the k–e turbulence model. Furthermore, it is shown that the growth rate can be predicted to a certain extent by the RSM with wall reflection terms. The flow in a deep room can be strongly influenced by details as the growth rate of a three-dimensional wall jet. Predictions...... for the work. The growth rate parallel to the wall in a three-dimensional wall jet is large compared with the growth rate perpendicular to the wall, and it is large compared with the growth rate in a free circular jet. It is shown that it is not possible to predict the high growth rate parallel with a surface...

  20. Methods for determining the wall thickness variation of tubular heaters used in thermalhydraulic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cubizolles, G.; Garnier, J.; Groeneveld, D.; Tanase, A.

    2009-01-01

    Fuel bundle simulators used in thermalhydraulic studies typically consist of bundles of directly heated tubes. It is usually assumed that the heater tubes have a uniform circumferential heat flux distribution. In practice, this heat flux distribution is never exactly uniform because of wall thickness variations and bore eccentricity. Ignoring the non-uniformity in wall thickness can lead to under-estimating the local heat transfer coefficients. During nucleate boiling tests in a 5x5 PWR-type bundle subassembly at CEA-Grenoble, a sinusoidal temperature distribution was observed around the inside circumference of the heater rods. These heater rods were equipped with high-accuracy sliding thermocouple probes that permit the detailed measurement of the internal wall temperature distribution, both axially and circumferentially. The sinusoidal temperature distribution strongly suggests a variation in wall thickness. A methodology was subsequently derived to determine the circumferential wall thickness variation. The method is based on the principle that for directly heated fuel-element simulators, the nucleate boiling wall superheat at high pressures is nearly uniform around the heater rod circumference. The results show wall thickness variations of up to ±4% which was confirmed by subsequent ultrasonic wall-thickness measurements performed after bundle disassembly. Non-uniformities in circumferential temperature distributions were also observed during parallel thermalhydraulic tests at the University of Ottawa (UofO) on an electrically heated tube cooled internally by R-134a and equipped with fixed thermocouples on the outside. From the measured wall temperatures and knowledge of the inside heat transfer coefficient or wall temperature distribution, the variations in wall thickness and surface heat flux to the coolant were evaluated by solving conduction equations using three separate sets of data (1) single phase heat transfer data, (2) nucleate boiling data, and (3

  1. A preliminary study on the local impact behavior of Steel-plate Concrete walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kap-sun; Moon, Il-hwan; Choi, Hyung-jin; Nam, Deok-woo

    2017-01-01

    International regulations for nuclear power plants strictly prescribe the design requirements for local impact loads, such as aircraft engine impact, and internal and external missile impact. However, the local impact characteristics of Steel-plate Concrete (SC) walls are not easy to evaluate precisely because the dynamic impact behavior of SC walls which include external steel plate, internal concrete, tie-bars, and studs, is so complex. In this study, dynamic impact characteristics of SC walls subjected to local missile impact load are investigated via actual high-speed impact test and numerical simulation. Three velocity checkout tests and four SC wall tests were performed at the Energetic Materials Research and Testing Center (EMRTC) site in the USA. Initial and residual velocity of the missile, strain and acceleration of the back plate, local failure mode (penetration, bulging, splitting and perforation) and deformation size, etc. were measured to study the local behavior of the specimen using high speed cameras and various other instrumentation devices. In addition, a more advanced and applicable numerical simulation method using the finite element (FE) method is proposed and verified by the experimental results. Finally, the experimental results are compared with the local failure evaluation formula for SC walls recently proposed, and future research directions for the development of a refined design method for SC walls are reviewed.

  2. Impact of exercise training on arterial wall thickness in humans.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thijssen, D.H.J.; Cable, N.T.; Green, D.J.

    2012-01-01

    Thickening of the carotid artery wall has been adopted as a surrogate marker of pre-clinical atherosclerosis, which is strongly related to increased cardiovascular risk. The cardioprotective effects of exercise training, including direct effects on vascular function and lumen dimension, have been

  3. Impact significance determination-Pushing the boundaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence, David P.

    2007-01-01

    Impact significance determination practice tends to be highly variable. Too often insufficient consideration is given to good practice insights. Also, impact significance determinations are frequently narrowly defined addressing, for example, only individual, negative impacts, focusing on bio-physical impacts, and not seeking to integrate either the Precautionary Principle or sustainability. This article seeks to extend the boundaries of impact significance determination practice by providing an overview of good general impact significance practices, together with stakeholder roles and potential methods for addressing significance determination challenges. Relevant thresholds, criteria, contextual considerations and support methods are also highlighted. The analysis is then extended to address how impact significance determination practices change for positive as compared with negative impacts, for cumulative as compared with individual impacts, for socio-economic as compared with bio-physical impacts, when the Precautionary Principle is integrated into the process, and when sustainability contributions drive the EIA process and related impact significance determinations. These refinements can assist EIA practitioners in ensuring that the scope and nature of impact significance determinations reflect the broadened scope of emerging EIA requirements and practices. Suggestions are included for further refining and testing of the proposed changes to impact significance determination practice

  4. Determination of the Airborne Sound Insulation of a Straw Bale Partition Wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teslík Jiří

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the results of a scientific project focused on determining of the Airborne Sound Insulation of a peripheral non-load bearing wall made of straw bales expressed by Weighted Sound Reduction Index. Weighted Sound Reduction Index was determined by measuring in the certified acoustic laboratory at the Faculty of Mechanical Engineering at Brno University of Technology. The measured structure of the straw wall was modified in combinations with various materials, so the results include a wide range of possible compositions of the wall. The key modification was application of plaster on both sides of the straw bale wall. This construction as is frequently done in actual straw houses. The additional measurements were performed on the straw wall with several variants of additional wall of slab materials. The airborne sound insulation value has been also measured in separate stages of the construction. Thus it is possible to compare and determinate the effect of the single layers on the airborne sound insulation.

  5. Mars Climate History: Insights From Impact Crater Wall Slope Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreslavsky, Mikhail A.; Head, James W.

    2018-02-01

    We use the global distribution of the steepest slopes on crater walls derived from Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter profile data to assess the magnitudes of degradational processes with latitude, altitude, and time. We independently confirm that Amazonian polar/high-latitude crater slope modification is substantial, but that craters in the low latitudes have essentially escaped significant slope modification since the Early Hesperian. We find that the total amount of crater wall degradation in the Late Noachian is very small in comparison to the circumpolar regions in the Late Amazonian, an observation that we interpret to mean that the Late Noachian climate was not characterized by persistent and continuous warm and wet conditions. A confirmed elevational zonality in degradation in the Early Hesperian is interpreted to mean that the atmosphere was denser than today.

  6. Local Impact Simulation of SC Wall Structures using Aircraft Engine Projectile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Chulhun; Lee, Jungwhee; Lee, Hanjoo; Jung, Raeyoung; Hyun, Changhun

    2013-01-01

    SC wall structure developed for nuclear power plant buildings consists of plain concrete and two steel plates on both surface of the concrete, while RC structure consists of re bar and concrete. SC structure has higher scabbing resistance than RC structure due to the action of steel plate on the rear side of impact. Therefore SC structure is known as more effective structure from the viewpoint of aircraft crash than RC structure. However, most of the recent researches and experiments about local impact damage deal with RC structures, and the effect of re bar and steel plate is not considered reasonably. Although Walter et al. and Make-work et al. suggested a formula for evaluating perforation depth of steel plate covered RC walls, most of the previous researches about SC structure are focused on perforation and scabbing due to the impact of hard projectile, rather than soft projectile such as an aircraft. In this research a soft projectile, i. e. aircraft engine, is utilized for impact simulation of RC and SC walls. To evaluate local damage of SC wall structures, parametric study with the variables of wall thickness and steel ratio of the cover plate is performed, and the results are compared with those of RC structures. Since scabbing was prevented by the steel plates, penetration mode of damage was observed in SC walls while scabbing damage was occurred in RC walls. It is confirmed that the rear steel plate not only contains concrete debris, but also reduces the internal damage of the concrete walls. Penetration depth of SC walls did not largely vary due to the increasing steel ratio, and similar results to RC walls were observed when the wall thickness is larger than a certain value since the impact resistance of SC wall is mainly governed by the thickness of concrete part. Therefore, it is expected that similar level of impact resistance to RC structure can be produced with the minimum thickness of steel plates of SC structure. According to these results, SC

  7. The impact of alterations in lignin deposition on cellulose organization of the plant cell wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jiliang; Kim, Jeong Im; Cusumano, Joanne C.; Chapple, Clint; Venugopalan, Nagarajan; Fischetti, Robert F.; Makowski, Lee

    2016-06-17

    Background: Coordination of synthesis and assembly of the polymeric components of cell walls is essential for plant growth and development. Given the degree of co-mingling and cross-linking among cell wall components, cellulose organization must be dependent on the organization of other polymers such as lignin. Here we seek to identify aspects of that codependency by studying the structural organization of cellulose fibrils in stems from Arabidopsis plants harboring mutations in genes encoding enzymes involved in lignin biosynthesis. Plants containing high levels of G-lignin, S-lignin, H-lignin, aldehyde-rich lignin, and ferulic acid-containing lignin, along with plants with very low lignin content were grown and harvested and longitudinal sections of stem were prepared and dried. Scanning X-ray microdiffraction was carried out using a 5-micron beam that moved across the sections in 5-micron steps and complete diffraction patterns were collected at each raster point. Approximately, 16,000 diffraction patterns were analyzed to determine cellulose fibril orientation and order within the tissues making up the stems. Results: Several mutations-most notably those exhibiting (1) down-regulation of cinnamoyl CoA reductase which leads to cell walls deficient in lignin and (2) defect of cinnamic acid 4-hydroxylase which greatly reduces lignin content-exhibited significant decrease in the proportion of oriented cellulose fibrils in the cell wall. Distinctions between tissues were maintained in all variants and even in plants exhibiting dramatic changes in cellulosic order the trends between tissues (where apparent) were generally maintained. The resilience of cellulose to degradative processes was investigated by carrying out the same analysis on samples stored in water for 30 days prior to data collection. This treatment led to significant loss of cellulosic order in plants rich in aldehyde or H-lignin, less change in wild type, and essentially no change in samples with

  8. Static resistance function for steel-plate composite (SC) walls subject to impactive loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruhl, Jakob C., E-mail: jbruhl@purdue.edu; Varma, Amit H., E-mail: ahvarma@purdue.edu; Kim, Joo Min, E-mail: kim1493@purdue.edu

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • An idealized static resistance function for SC walls is proposed. • The influence of design parameters on static resistance is explained. • SDOF models can accurately estimate global response of SC walls to missile impact. - Abstract: Steel-plate composite (SC) walls consist of a plain concrete core reinforced with two steel faceplates on the surfaces. Modules (consisting of steel faceplates, shear connectors and tie-bars) can be shop-fabricated and shipped to the site for erection and concrete casting, which expedites construction schedule and thus economy. SC structures have recently been used in nuclear power plant designs and are being considered for the next generation of small modular reactors. Design for impactive and impulsive loading is an important consideration for SC walls in safety-related nuclear facilities. The authors have previously developed design methods to prevent local failure (perforation) of SC walls due to missile impact. This paper presents the development of static resistance functions for use in single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) analyses to predict the maximum displacement response of SC walls subjected to missile impact and designed to resist local failure (perforation). The static resistance function for SC walls is developed using results of numerical analyses and parametric studies conducted using benchmarked 3D finite element (FE) models. The influence of various design parameters are discussed and used to develop idealized bilinear resistance functions for SC walls with fixed edges and simply supported edges. Results from dynamic non-linear FE analysis of SC panels subjected to rigid missile impact are compared with the maximum displacements predicted by SDOF analyses using the bilinear resistance function.

  9. Static resistance function for steel-plate composite (SC) walls subject to impactive loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruhl, Jakob C.; Varma, Amit H.; Kim, Joo Min

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • An idealized static resistance function for SC walls is proposed. • The influence of design parameters on static resistance is explained. • SDOF models can accurately estimate global response of SC walls to missile impact. - Abstract: Steel-plate composite (SC) walls consist of a plain concrete core reinforced with two steel faceplates on the surfaces. Modules (consisting of steel faceplates, shear connectors and tie-bars) can be shop-fabricated and shipped to the site for erection and concrete casting, which expedites construction schedule and thus economy. SC structures have recently been used in nuclear power plant designs and are being considered for the next generation of small modular reactors. Design for impactive and impulsive loading is an important consideration for SC walls in safety-related nuclear facilities. The authors have previously developed design methods to prevent local failure (perforation) of SC walls due to missile impact. This paper presents the development of static resistance functions for use in single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) analyses to predict the maximum displacement response of SC walls subjected to missile impact and designed to resist local failure (perforation). The static resistance function for SC walls is developed using results of numerical analyses and parametric studies conducted using benchmarked 3D finite element (FE) models. The influence of various design parameters are discussed and used to develop idealized bilinear resistance functions for SC walls with fixed edges and simply supported edges. Results from dynamic non-linear FE analysis of SC panels subjected to rigid missile impact are compared with the maximum displacements predicted by SDOF analyses using the bilinear resistance function.

  10. Experimental determination of damping factors for walls of masonry and reinforced concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buttman, P.

    1983-01-01

    'Damping' is a fundamental parameter for the determination of the internal force with a given acceleration response spectrum when designing and dimensioning masonry and reinforced concrete walls for the loading case earthquake. The actual dampings of masonry and reinforced concrete walls are determined on a scale of 1:1 by means of a horizontal excitation at a chosen test setup. The test specimen have the dimensions b/h/d=100/200/11,5 cm and 24 cm. The horizontal and sinusoidal excitation of the test specimen is effected by a dynamic oscillating excitation with a maximum power of 20 kN. The evaluation of the measurements shows that the assumed damping values of 4% for the operating basis earthquake are realistic. In case of amplitudes corresponding to the loadings of the safe shutdown earthquake, however, dampings of 11% for reinforced concrete walls and of 24% for masonry walls were determined. This real damping behavior of reinforced concrete and masonry walls was documented by means of measurements, films and pictures. (orig.)

  11. Determination of strength behaviour of slope supported by vegetated crib walls using centrifuge model testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudan Acharya, Madhu

    2010-05-01

    The crib retaining structures made of wooden/bamboo logs with live plants inside are called vegetative crib walls which are now becoming popular due to their advantages over conventional civil engineering walls. Conventionally, wooden crib walls were dimensioned based on past experiences. At present, there are several guidelines and design standards for machine finished wooden crib walls, but only few guidelines for the design and construction of vegetative log crib walls are available which are generally not sufficient for an economic engineering design of such walls. Analytical methods are generally used to determine the strength of vegetated crib retaining walls. The crib construction is analysed statically by satisfying the condition of static equilibrium with acceptable level of safety. The crib wall system is checked for internal and external stability using conventional monolithic and silo theories. Due to limitations of available theories, the exact calculation of the strength of vegetated wooden/bamboo crib wall cannot be made in static calculation. Therefore, experimental measurements are generally done to verify the static analysis. In this work, a model crib construction (1:20) made of bamboo elements is tested in the centrifuge machine to determine the strength behaviour of the slope supported by vegetated crib retaining wall. A geotechnical centrifuge is used to conduct model tests to study geotechnical problems such as the strength, stiffness and bearing capacity of different structures, settlement of embankments, stability of slopes, earth retaining structures etc. Centrifuge model testing is particularly well suited to modelling geotechnical events because the increase in gravitational force creates stresses in the model that are equivalent to the much larger prototype and hence ensures that the mechanisms of ground movements observed in the tests are realistic. Centrifuge model testing provides data to improve our understanding of basic mechanisms

  12. Implantation measurements to determine tritium permeation in first-wall structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, D.F.; Causey, R.A.; Sattler, M.L.

    1983-01-01

    A principal safety concern for a D-T burning fusion reactor is release of tritium during routine operation. Tritium implantation into first-wall structures, and subsequent permeation into coolants, is potentially an important source of tritium loss. This paper reports on an experiment in which an ion accelerator was used to implant deuterium atoms in a stainless steel disk to simulate tritium implantation in first-wall structures. The permeation rate was measured under various operating conditions. These results were used in the TMAP computer code to determine potential tritium loss rates for fusion reactors

  13. Determination of wall wear of glassmelting furnaces by a nuclear technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harsanyi, Gyoergy; Kodolanyi, Andras; Leitner, Laszlo

    1984-01-01

    A new in-service inspection technique of glassmelting furnaces is reported. Isotope-labelled refractory tank blocks were prepared, tested experimentally, and built into the furnace. Sup(60)Co isotope tracer was used. The residual wall thickness of the labelled blocks were determined by periodical radiation dose measurements. No environmental or health damage is caused by the specific activity of 3.7 - 4 Bq/g of the labelled furnace blocks, the dose rate in a distance of 1 m from the wall was as low as 0.05 mR/h. (P.J.)

  14. Impact of a drop onto a wetted wall: description of crown formation and propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roisman, I. V.; Tropea, C.

    2002-12-01

    The impact of a drop onto a liquid film with a relatively high impact velocity, leading to the formation of a crown-like ejection, is studied theoretically. The motion of a kinematic discontinuity in the liquid film on the wall due to the drop impact, the formation of the upward jet at this kinematic discontinuity and its elevation are analysed. Four main regions of the drop and film are considered: the perturbed liquid film on the wall inside the crown, the unperturbed liquid film on the wall outside the crown, the upward jet forming a crown, and the free rim bounding this jet. The theory of Yarin & Weiss (1995) for the propagation of the kinematic discontinuity is generalized here for the case of arbitrary velocity vectors in the inner and outer liquid films on the wall. Next, the mass, momentum balance and Bernoulli equations at the base of the crown are considered in order to obtain the velocity and the thickness of the jet on the wall. Furthermore, the dynamic equations of motion of the crown are developed in the Lagrangian form. An analytical solution for the crown shape is obtained in the asymptotic case of such high impact velocities that the surface tension and the viscosity effects can be neglected in comparison to inertial effects. The edge of the crown is described by the motion of a rim, formed due to the surface tension.

  15. Quantitative determination of arterial wall mechanics with pulse oximetric finger plethysmography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, R; Sato, J; Iuchi, T; Higuchi, Y

    1999-10-30

    The plethysmographic wave of pulse oximetry reflects arterial pulsation at the fingertip. Since arterial pressure and the pulsatile component of the arterial cross section represent the input and output of the fingertip arterial system, respectively, arterial wall mechanics may be delineated from their relationship. We aimed to construct a mathematical model of the fingertip arterial wall from the relationship between the plethysmographic wave and arterial pressure. The pulse oximetric plethysmographic signal at the forefinger and pressure at the ipsilateral radial artery were measured. Employing the data, simple mathematical models with one to four mechanical elements were tested in terms of the goodness of fit and the physiological implications. The determined model was applied to the data obtained during administration of vasoactive agents in anesthetized patients. The mathematical model suited for describing arterial wall mechanics was a four-element, two-compartment model. The two compartments represent passive mechanical and active contractile properties, respectively. In the application of the model to the anesthetized patients, the vasoactive agents produced changes in the model parameters that implied mechanical alterations in the arterial wall. These findings suggest the benefit of the four-element, two-compartment model in analyzing peripheral vascular wall mechanics influenced by various stimuli in intensive care and anesthesia.

  16. Analysis of domain wall dynamics based on skewness of magnetic Barkhausen noise for applied stress determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Song [College of Electrical Engineering and Control Science, Nanjing Tech University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 211816 (China); School of Automation Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210016 (China); Tian, GuiYun, E-mail: tian280@hotmail.com [School of Automation Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210016 (China); School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Merz Court, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, Newcastle NE1 7RU (United Kingdom); Dobmann, Gerd; Wang, Ping [School of Automation Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210016 (China)

    2017-01-01

    Skewness of Magnetic Barkhausen Noise (MBN) signal is used as a new feature for applied stress determination. After experimental studies, skewness presents its ability for measuring applied tensile stress compared with conventional feature, meanwhile, a non-linear behavior of this new feature and an independence of the excitation conditions under compressive stress are found and discussed. Effective damping during domain wall motion influencing the asymmetric shape of the MBN statistical distribution function is discussed under compressive and tensile stress variation. Domain wall (DW) energy and distance between pinning edges of the DW are considered altering the characteristic relaxation time, which is the reason for the non-linear phenomenon of skewness. - Highlights: • The skewness of magnetic Barkhausen noise profile is proposed as a new feature for applied stress determination. • The skewness is sensitive to applied stress and independent to excitation frequency. • Domain wall energy and pinning distance influence the relaxation time of domain wall, which leads to a non-linear behavior of skewness under compressive stress.

  17. Determining the sub-cellular localization of proteins within Caenorhabditis elegans body wall muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissner, Barbara; Rogalski, Teresa; Viveiros, Ryan; Warner, Adam; Plastino, Lorena; Lorch, Adam; Granger, Laure; Segalat, Laurent; Moerman, Donald G

    2011-01-01

    Determining the sub-cellular localization of a protein within a cell is often an essential step towards understanding its function. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the relatively large size of the body wall muscle cells and the exquisite organization of their sarcomeres offer an opportunity to identify the precise position of proteins within cell substructures. Our goal in this study is to generate a comprehensive "localizome" for C. elegans body wall muscle by GFP-tagging proteins expressed in muscle and determining their location within the cell. For this project, we focused on proteins that we know are expressed in muscle and are orthologs or at least homologs of human proteins. To date we have analyzed the expression of about 227 GFP-tagged proteins that show localized expression in the body wall muscle of this nematode (e.g. dense bodies, M-lines, myofilaments, mitochondria, cell membrane, nucleus or nucleolus). For most proteins analyzed in this study no prior data on sub-cellular localization was available. In addition to discrete sub-cellular localization we observe overlapping patterns of localization including the presence of a protein in the dense body and the nucleus, or the dense body and the M-lines. In total we discern more than 14 sub-cellular localization patterns within nematode body wall muscle. The localization of this large set of proteins within a muscle cell will serve as an invaluable resource in our investigation of muscle sarcomere assembly and function.

  18. Bubble jet impact on a rigid wall of different stand-off parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, S; Wang, S P; Zhang, A M

    2015-01-01

    One of the key features of the dynamics of a bubble near a rigid wall is the development of a high liquid jet, generating highly localized pressure on the wall. In present study, the boundary integral method is employed to simulate this phenomenon, and the vortex ring model is introduced to handle the discontinued potential of the toroidal bubble. Meanwhile, the pressure induced in the whole process is calculated by an auxiliary function. The effect of the stand-off parameter on the bubble dynamics and the pressure on the wall is investigated, and a double-peaked structure occurs in the pressure profile after the jet impact in some cases, which is associated with the jet impact and the high internal pressure inside the bubble

  19. Daylighting and Cooling of Atrium Buildings in Warm Climates: Impact of the Top-Fenestration and Wall Mass Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atif, Morad Rachid

    1992-01-01

    Sun-lighting and daylighting contribute greatly to the aesthetic value of an atrium. However, today's atria are often found either over-lit with extensive cooling loads, or under-lit requiring increased artificial lighting loads. The increase of the top-glazing area increases the cooling loads and decreases the lighting loads. The increase of the mass in the atrium walls decreases the maximum atrium temperature and the cooling loads. Furthermore, the mass distribution and its reflectance affect the lighting levels at the atrium floor. The purpose of this study is to investigate the simultaneous impact of the top-fenestration and the mass and reflectance of atrium walls on the cooling and daylighting performance of atria in warm climates. It attempts to determine the optimum top-fenestration for efficient daylighting and low cooling loads. The daylighting performance was evaluated through illumination measurements in physical models in a sky simulator. The cooling performance was evaluated using the software TRNSYS 13.1. Two types of top-fenestration were tested: horizontal and vertical south-facing, each with three alternate areas. The variations of the atrium walls included materials (standard frame and heavyweight concrete) and percentage and reflectance of the solid area. Two and four-story atria were considered, each with square and linear configuration. The performance was evaluated for three warm climates. The optimum top-fenestration for efficient daylighting was determined. The daylighting prediction algorithm was extended to include the effective reflectance of the atrium walls. The increase of mass in the atrium walls significantly decreased the atrium temperature range, the maximum atrium temperature, and the cooling loads. This impact decreased from horizontal to vertical south-facing top-glazing. The vertical south-facing top-glazing and, to a lesser degree, the reduction of the glazed atrium cover by 50% had more cooling benefits than increasing the

  20. Using Mobile Learning: Determinates Impacting Behavioral Intention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowenthal, Jeffrey N.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the factors or determinates that impact the behavioral intention of students to use mobile learning (m-learning) technology. These determinates include performance expectancy, effort expectancy, and self-management of learning, all mediated by age, gender, or both. Regression coefficients showed strong and significant…

  1. Effects of Moat Wall Impact on the Seismic Response of Base Isolated Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Min Kyu; Kim, Jung Han; Mosqueda, Gilberto; Sarebanhab, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study are to examine the effects of impact on the response of seismically isolated NPPs and identify characteristics of the isolation hardware and hard stop that minimize these effects. Considering variable distances to the hard stop and properties of the moat wall, the amplification in response is reported for acceleration and floor spectral accelerations at different points along the height of a NPP containment structure. Base isolation can be an effective strategy to protect critical facilities such as Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) from the damaging effects of horizontal earthquake ground shaking. To be effective in reducing accelerations and deformations of the structure above, the seismic isolation bearings can be subjected to large displacements. In the case of an extreme earthquake, bearing displacements need to be limited by a hard stop in order to prevent failure of the bearings. Impact to the hard stop, which is often the moat wall at the basement level, is also of significant concern due to the potential for increased transfer of forces and amplification in response of the structural system, piping and other contents. However, the consequences of impact or factors important to mitigate its effects are not very well understood. The main findings of this study are related to modeling of NPP with moat wall in OpenSees and LSDyna as well as observations resulting from the parametric study of the performance of the NPP under different intensity levels of seismic excitations for different properties of the moat wall and bearings. • Variation in the isolator properties should be considered when examining seismic pounding. For BDBE even, 58.5 % cases result to the impact for lower bound properties while this value was 5.5 % for upper bound properties. Since the impact results are dependent to the assumed bearing properties, a better range of properties can be obtained from experimental testing of the bearing under large shear strains.

  2. Determination of exhalation rate of radon from walls and indoor radon by CR-39 detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasidov, A.; Tillaev, T.S.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: The knowledge of true value exhalation rate of radon gas from building materials represents scientific and practical interest in environmental radiation protection. This point of view in the paper exhalation rate of radon gas from building materials and a surface of walls with different constructions were determined by detectors CR-39. The values of the exhalation rate of radon per unit area of the granite, concrete, fired and unfired bricks, sand, cement, alabaster varied 0.091 - 0.1 Bq·m -2 ·h -1 . The surface of walls of dwellings constructed from different building materials the exhalation rate of radon are within in limits of 0.083-1.12 Bq·m -2 ·h -1 . Were measurements with CR-39 detectors a level of radon within 50-520 Bq/m 3 in air of rooms constructed of the different building materials

  3. Abdominal wall sinus due to impacting gallstone during laparoscopic cholecystectomy: an unusual complication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlidis, T E; Papaziogas, B T; Koutelidakis, I M; Papaziogas, T B

    2002-02-01

    During laparoscopic cholecystectomy, perforation of the gallbladder can occurs in extraction of the gallbladder. The fate of such lost gallstones, which can lead to the formation of an abscess, an abdominal wall mass, or a persistent sinus, has not been studied adequately. Herein we report the case of a persistent sinus of the abdominal wall after an emergent laparoscopic cholecystectomy in an 82-year-old woman with gangrenous cholecystitis and perforation of the friable wall in association with an empyema of the gallbladder. The culture of the obtained pus was positive for Escherichia coli. After a small leak of dirty fluid from the wound of the epigastric port site of 4 months' duration, surgical exploration under local anesthesia revealed that the sinus was caused by spilled gallstones impacting into the abdominal wall between the posterior sheath and left rectus abdominalis muscle. The removal of the stones resulted in complete healing. Long-term complications after laparoscopic cholecystectomy involving the abdominal wall are rare but important possible consequences that could be avoided.

  4. Impact of a narrow limiter SOL heat flux channel on the ITER first wall panel shaping

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kocan, M.; Pitts, R.A.; Arnoux, G.; Balboa, I.; de Vries, P.C.; Dejarnac, Renaud; Furno, I.; Goldston, R.J.; Gribov, Y.; Horáček, Jan; Komm, Michael; Labit, B.; LaBombard, B.; Lasnier, C.J.; Mitteau, R.; Nespoli, F.; Pace, D.; Pánek, Radomír; Stangeby, P.C.; Terry, J.L.; Tsui, C.; Vondráček, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 3 (2015), 033019-033019 ISSN 0029-5515 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP205/12/2327; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011021 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : plasma * tokamak * ITER * first wall panel Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 4.040, year: 2015 http://iopscience.iop.org/0029-5515/55/3/033019/pdf/0029-5515_55_3_033019.pdf

  5. Impact of the wall conditioning program on plasma performance in NSTX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kugel, H.W.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Bell, M.; Blanchard, W.; Gates, D.; LeBlanc, B.; Maingi, R.; Mueller, D.; Na, H.K.; Paul, S.; Skinner, C.H.; Stutman, D.; Wampler, W.R.

    2003-01-01

    High performance operating regimes have been achieved on NSTX through impurity control and wall conditioning techniques. These techniques include HeGDC-aided boronization using deuterated trimethylboron, inter-discharge HeGDC, 350 deg. C PFC bake-out followed by D 2 and HeGDC, and experiments to test fueling discharges with either a He-trimethylboron mixture or pure trimethylboron. The impact of this impurity and density control program on recent advances in NSTX plasma performance is discussed

  6. On the determination of proper modes in waveguides with wall losses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlberg, E.

    1977-02-01

    Various attempts at determining the proper modes (propagating with exponential attenuation but without change of form) in a straight waveguide with wall losses are discussed. It appears that for a general cross section a stringent treatment would require a quadruple series expansion along lines indicated by C.C. Johnson in 'Field and wave electrodynamics (McGraw-Hill, 1965). For the most usual cross sections, circular and rectangular, valid derivations can however be made using simpler means. Earlier, incomplete, treatments seem to have caused several widely accepted misconceptions, some of which are discussed. Detailed calculations for a rectangular guide are given in a companion note

  7. Study of the effect of hard projectiles impacting reinforced concrete walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berriaud, C.; Sokolovsky, A.

    1977-01-01

    Among the risks examined in the framework of nuclear safety in France, quite unlikely events are examined as constituting a safety cover. This type of event includes the possible impact of aircrafts, or rotor splinters. Research on the limit strength of a wall under the impact of a hard projectile presently gives incentive results. First, a good agreement appears between works performed in parallel directions by EDF and CEA. Secondly, the special field of aerial projectiles is much better known as it was with previous formulations. Third, such research highly contributes to the knowledge of the mechanical strength of reinforced concrete structures [fr

  8. Impact of wall potential on the fluid-wall interaction in a cylindrical capillary and a generalized Kelvin equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakubov, T.S.; Mainwaring, D.E.

    2006-01-01

    In the present work a generalized Kelvin equation for a fluid confined in thick-walled cylindrical capillary is developed. This has been accomplished by including the potential energy function for interaction between a solid wall of a capillary and a confined fluid into the Kelvin equation. Using the Lennard-Jones 12-6 potential, an explicit form of the potential energy functions as expressed by hypergeometrical functions have been derived-firstly, for the interaction between a solid wall and a test atom placed at an arbitrary point in a long open-end capillary, and thereafter for the body-body interaction between the solid wall and a confined Lennard-Jones fluid. Further, this generalized Kelvin equation has been applied to detailed description hysteresis phenomena in such capillaries. All numerical calculations have been carried out for the model argon-graphite system at 90 K

  9. Suppression of CCR impacts metabolite profile and cell wall composition in Pinus radiata tracheary elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Armin; Tobimatsu, Yuki; Goeminne, Geert; Phillips, Lorelle; Flint, Heather; Steward, Diane; Torr, Kirk; Donaldson, Lloyd; Boerjan, Wout; Ralph, John

    2013-01-01

    Suppression of the lignin-related gene cinnamoyl-CoA reductase (CCR) in the Pinus radiata tracheary element (TE) system impacted both the metabolite profile and the cell wall matrix in CCR-RNAi lines. UPLC-MS/MS-based metabolite profiling identified elevated levels of p-coumaroyl hexose, caffeic acid hexoside and ferulic acid hexoside in CCR-RNAi lines, indicating a redirection of metabolite flow within phenylpropanoid metabolism. Dilignols derived from coniferyl alcohol such as G(8-5)G, G(8-O-4)G and isodihydrodehydrodiconiferyl alcohol (IDDDC) were substantially depleted, providing evidence for CCR's involvement in coniferyl alcohol biosynthesis. Severe CCR suppression almost halved lignin content in TEs based on a depletion of both H-type and G-type lignin, providing evidence for CCR's involvement in the biosynthesis of both lignin types. 2D-NMR studies revealed minor changes in the H:G-ratio and consequently a largely unchanged interunit linkage distribution in the lignin polymer. However, unusual cell wall components including ferulate and unsaturated fatty acids were identified in TEs by thioacidolysis, pyrolysis-GC/MS and/or 2D-NMR in CCR-RNAi lines, providing new insights into the consequences of CCR suppression in pine. Interestingly, CCR suppression substantially promoted pyrolytic breakdown of cell wall polysaccharides, a phenotype most likely caused by the incorporation of acidic compounds into the cell wall matrix in CCR-RNAi lines.

  10. Calculation of Ground State Rotational Populations for Kinetic Gas Homonuclear Diatomic Molecules including Electron-Impact Excitation and Wall Collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farley, David R.

    2010-01-01

    A model has been developed to calculate the ground-state rotational populations of homonuclear diatomic molecules in kinetic gases, including the effects of electron-impact excitation, wall collisions, and gas feed rate. The equations are exact within the accuracy of the cross sections used and of the assumed equilibrating effect of wall collisions. It is found that the inflow of feed gas and equilibrating wall collisions can significantly affect the rotational distribution in competition with non-equilibrating electron-impact effects. The resulting steady-state rotational distributions are generally Boltzmann for N (ge) 3, with a rotational temperature between the wall and feed gas temperatures. The N = 0,1,2 rotational level populations depend sensitively on the relative rates of electron-impact excitation versus wall collision and gas feed rates.

  11. Preliminary Study on Evaluation of Impact Resistance Performance of Fiber Reinforced Concrete Walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Byeong Moo; Lee, Yun Seok; Kim, Young Jin; Jeon, Se Jin

    2012-01-01

    As the safety assessments of nuclear power plants for the hypothetical large civil aircraft crash should be made mandatory, studies on large aircraft-nuclear power plant impact analyses and assessments studies are actively in progress. For the safety assessment of nuclear power plants against large civil aircraft crash, it is practically impossible to conduct full-scale experiments. Therefore, analysis using general purpose numerical analysis program accompanied by scale model experiments and element experiments has been adopted for the safety assessment. The safety of nuclear power plants against large civil aircraft crash is able to be accomplished by enhancement of the impact resistance performance, such as increasing the wall thickness, increasing the strength of concrete and using the fiber reinforced concrete which is able to be acquired by relatively simple process of adding fibers to a concrete mix without significant change of design and construction. A research for the enhancement of impact resistance performance depending upon design parameters for fiber reinforced concrete, such as type of fibers and application rate, is in progress. In this study, before the safety assessment of nuclear power plants against large civil aircraft crash, we assess the impact resistance performance of concrete wall depending upon type of fibers and impact velocity of objects

  12. Preliminary Study on Evaluation of Impact Resistance Performance of Fiber Reinforced Concrete Walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Byeong Moo; Lee, Yun Seok; Kim, Young Jin [Daewoo E and C Co. Ltd., Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Se Jin [Ajou University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    As the safety assessments of nuclear power plants for the hypothetical large civil aircraft crash should be made mandatory, studies on large aircraft-nuclear power plant impact analyses and assessments studies are actively in progress. For the safety assessment of nuclear power plants against large civil aircraft crash, it is practically impossible to conduct full-scale experiments. Therefore, analysis using general purpose numerical analysis program accompanied by scale model experiments and element experiments has been adopted for the safety assessment. The safety of nuclear power plants against large civil aircraft crash is able to be accomplished by enhancement of the impact resistance performance, such as increasing the wall thickness, increasing the strength of concrete and using the fiber reinforced concrete which is able to be acquired by relatively simple process of adding fibers to a concrete mix without significant change of design and construction. A research for the enhancement of impact resistance performance depending upon design parameters for fiber reinforced concrete, such as type of fibers and application rate, is in progress. In this study, before the safety assessment of nuclear power plants against large civil aircraft crash, we assess the impact resistance performance of concrete wall depending upon type of fibers and impact velocity of objects

  13. Determination of Optimum Window to External Wall Ratio for Offices in a Hot and Humid Climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halil Alibaba

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Heat loss and gain through windows has a very high impact on the thermal comfort of offices. This paper analyzes a standard low energy consumption university office that has a standard envelope. Dynamic thermal simulations with EDSL Tas software, a predicted mean vote (PMV, and a predicted percentage of dissatisfied (PPD with all local discomfort as stated in ASHRAE, ISO 7730: 2005, EN 15251: 2007 were used for thermal sensation, in order to optimize the best window to external wall proportion in a hot and humid climate that exists in the Famagusta case study. A simulated office building is oriented east to west in order to take advantage of the wind direction. In May 45% (PPD < 6%–0.7% open window, 93% (PPD < 10–0.2 open window, and 97% (PPD < 15%–0.1% open window thermal comfort scores are obtained when the window to external wall ratio (WWR is 10%. In October 43% (PPD < 6%–0.7% open window, 86% (PPD < 10–0.2 open window, and 92% (PPD < 15%–0.1% open window thermal comfort scores are obtained when the WWR is 10%. In September 49% (PPD < 10% full open window and 51% (PPD < 15%–0.1% open window thermal comfort scores are obtained when the WWR is 10%.

  14. Analytical calculation on the determination of steep side wall angles from far field measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisotto, Luca; Pereira, Silvania F.; Urbach, H. Paul

    2018-06-01

    In the semiconductor industry, the performance and capabilities of the lithographic process are evaluated by measuring specific structures. These structures are often gratings of which the shape is described by a few parameters such as period, middle critical dimension, height, and side wall angle (SWA). Upon direct measurement or retrieval of these parameters, the determination of the SWA suffers from considerable inaccuracies. Although the scattering effects that steep SWAs have on the illumination can be obtained with rigorous numerical simulations, analytical models constitute a very useful tool to get insights into the problem we are treating. In this paper, we develop an approach based on analytical calculations to describe the scattering of a cliff and a ridge with steep SWAs. We also propose a detection system to determine the SWAs of the structures.

  15. Cell wall elongation mode in Gram-negative bacteria is determined by peptidoglycan architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Robert D; Hurd, Alexander F; Cadby, Ashley; Hobbs, Jamie K; Foster, Simon J

    2013-01-01

    Cellular integrity and morphology of most bacteria is maintained by cell wall peptidoglycan, the target of antibiotics essential in modern healthcare. It consists of glycan strands, cross-linked by peptides, whose arrangement determines cell shape, prevents lysis due to turgor pressure and yet remains dynamic to allow insertion of new material, and hence growth. The cellular architecture and insertion pattern of peptidoglycan have remained elusive. Here we determine the peptidoglycan architecture and dynamics during growth in rod-shaped Gram-negative bacteria. Peptidoglycan is made up of circumferentially oriented bands of material interspersed with a more porous network. Super-resolution fluorescence microscopy reveals an unexpected discontinuous, patchy synthesis pattern. We present a consolidated model of growth via architecture-regulated insertion, where we propose only the more porous regions of the peptidoglycan network that are permissive for synthesis.

  16. Multiple-Criteria Decision-Making in the Design of Innovative Lock Walls for Barge Impact; Phase 1

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lambert, James

    2001-01-01

    .... This research project consists of two phases: Phase 1, which culminates with this report, investigated the use of multiple-criteria decision-making in the design process of lock approach walls to consider barge impact and earthquake loads...

  17. High resolution MR imaging of bladder cancer: new criteria for determining depth of wall invasion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, Chang Hae; Kressel, Herbert Y

    1993-01-01

    To establish new criteria to determine the depth of bladder cancer as well as to obtain the findings of each stage of bladder cancer we reviewed high resolution MR images of 18 bladder cancer patients including seven cases (26%) with superficial bladder wall invasion. All MR scans were done before biopsy or surgery. Multiple layers of the bladder wall (inner black, middle white, outer black) were demonstrated in 11 cases out of a total 18 cases. Thickening of the middle layer caused by tumor infiltration or edema of lamina propria was seen in 8 of 12 patients with stage T2 or greater, and was suggestive of superficial muscle invasion when multiple layers were demonstrated. Disruption of outer layer (as well as inner layer) and external protrusion of tumor itself were indicative of perivesical invasion. When multiple layers were not demonstrated, the depth of tumor invasion could not be judged. High resolution MR imaging can depict submucosal invasion, muscle invasion, and perivesical invasion secondary to bladder cancer

  18. Impact of lithium on the plasma performance in the all-metal-wall tokamak ASDEX upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lang, P.T.; Moreno Quicios, R.; Arredondo Parra, R.; Ploeckl, B.; McDermott, R.; Neu, R.; Wolfrum, E. [MPI fuer Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Maingi, R.; Mansfield, D.K.; Diallo, A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Collaboration: ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2016-07-01

    Several tokamaks reported improvement in key plasma parameters concurrent with the presence of lithium in the plasma. At ASDEX Upgrade explorative experiments have been performed to find out if such effects can be observed when operating with an all-metal-wall. A gas gun launcher was developed capable to inject pellets containing about 1.6 x 10{sup 20} Li atoms at 2 Hz. The speed of about 600 m/s is sufficient to achieve core penetration and to create a homogeneous Li concentration of up to 10 %. With a typical sustainment time on the order of 100 ms, only transient Li presence without any pile up was achieved. Deposition of Li on plasma facing components, which remained for several discharges after injection, was observed. This short lived wall conditioning showed beneficial effects during plasma start-up. However, the accompanying surface contamination negatively impacted some diagnostics. The Li impact on the confinement was investigated in a dedicated plasma scenario with a proven sensitivity to nitrogen and helium. In phases with N seeding enhancing the confinement by about 30 %, Li injection resulted in a very modest, transient loss of confinement (about 5 %). No Li impact was found for pure Deuterium plasmas.

  19. Experimental Study of Dry Granular Flow and Impact Behavior Against a Rigid Retaining Wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yuan-Jun; Towhata, Ikuo

    2013-07-01

    Shallow slope failure in mountainous regions is a common and emergent hazard in terms of its damage to important traffic routes and local communities. The impact of dry granular flows consisting of rock fragments and other particles resulting from shallow slope failures on retaining structures has yet to be systematically researched and is not covered by current design codes. As a preliminary study of the impact caused by dry granular flows, a series of dry granular impact experiments were carried out for one model of a retaining wall. It was indirectly verified that the total normal force exerted on a retaining wall consists of a drag force ( F d), a gravitational and frictional force ( F gf), and a passive earth force ( F p), and that the calculation of F d can be based on the empirical formula defined in NF EN Eurocode 1990 ( Eurocode structuraux. Base de calcul des structures, AFNOR La plaine Saint Denis, 2003). It was also indirectly verified that, for flow with Froude number from 6 to 11, the drag coefficient ( C d) can be estimated using the previously proposed empirical parameters.

  20. Impact of the Wall Conditioning Program on Plasma Performance in NSTX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    H.W. Kuge; V. Soukhanovskii; M. Bell; , W. Blanchard; D. Gates; B. LeBlanc; R. Maingi; D. Mueller; H.K. Na; S. Paul; C.H. Skinner; D. Stutman; and W.R. Wampler

    2002-01-01

    High performance operating regimes have been achieved on NSTX (National Spherical Torus Experiment) through impurity control and wall-conditioning techniques. These techniques include HeGDC-aided boronization using deuterated trimethylboron, inter-discharge HeGDC, 350 C PFC bake-out followed by D2 and HeGDC, and experiments to test fueling discharges with either a He-trimethylboron mixture or pure trimethylboron. The impact of this impurity and density control program on recent advances in NSTX plasma performance is discussed

  1. Ion target impact energy during Type I edge localized modes in JET ITER-like Wall

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Guillemaut, C.; Jardin, A.; Horáček, Jan; Autrique, A.; Arnoux, G.; Boom, J.; Brezinsek, S.; Coenen, J.W.; De La Luna, E.; Devaux, S.; Eich, T.; Giroud, C.; Harting, D.; Kirschner, A.; Lipschutz, B.; Matthews, G.F.; Moulton, D.; O’Mullane, M.; Stamp, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 8 (2015), č. článku 085006. ISSN 0741-3335 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LG14002 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 633053 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : magnetic confinement fusion * edge localized modes * JET ITER-like wall * plasma * tokamak Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) Impact factor: 2.404, year: 2015 http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/0741-3335/57/8/085006

  2. Impact of cell wall encapsulation of almonds on in vitro duodenal lipolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundy, Myriam M L; Wilde, Peter J; Butterworth, Peter J; Gray, Robert; Ellis, Peter R

    2015-10-15

    Although almonds have a high lipid content, their consumption is associated with reduced risk of cardiovascular disease. One explanation for this paradox could be limited bioaccessibility of almond lipids due to the cell wall matrix acting as a physical barrier to digestion in the upper gastrointestinal tract. We aimed to measure the rate and extent of lipolysis in an in vitro duodenum digestion model, using raw and roasted almond materials with potentially different degrees of bioaccessibility. The results revealed that a decrease in particle size led to an increased rate and extent of lipolysis. Particle size had a crucial impact on lipid bioaccessibility, since it is an indicator of the proportion of ruptured cells in the almond tissue. Separated almond cells with intact cell walls showed the lowest levels of digestibility. This study underlines the importance of the cell wall for modulating lipid uptake and hence the positive health benefits underlying almond consumption. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Determining experimentally the parameters of the unsteady thermal behaviour of homogeneously layered walls by the reference plates method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beron, Rodolphe

    1988-01-01

    In this work, we introduce an experimental determination method of parameters which are characteristics of the transfer functions of walls in buildings by the use of an easy equipment which use needs no significant constraint. This method called 'reference plates method' is based on the working out of the thermo-grams which result from any thermal perturbation. The first part of our work deals with the theoretical development of the methods of working out the measures used for both single-Iayered and multi-layered walls. The second part discusses the applying of the method on single-Iayered sample. The values of thermophysical characteristics of the wall is based on the working out of the heat equation written in terms an integral transformation which we take as Laplace's transformation. The case of multi-Iayered wall which we discuss in the third part, lead to the determination of 'z transforms coefficients' of the transfer functions of the studied wall. In addition to the theoretical study, we analyse the results of prospective experiments in the fourth part of our work and show the usefulness of such a measurement method. The last part is devoted to the presentation of the application of our work to the determination of thermal parameters of more general wall's configurations. (author) [fr

  4. Environmental Impacts from Photovoltaic Solar Cells Made with Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Ilke; Mason, Brooke E; Phillips, Adam B; Heben, Michael J; Apul, Defne

    2017-04-18

    An ex-ante life cycle inventory was developed for single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) PV cells, including a laboratory-made 1% efficient device and an aspirational 28% efficient four-cell tandem device. The environmental impact of unit energy generation from the mono-Si PV technology was used as a reference point. Compared to monocrystalline Si (mono-Si), the environmental impacts from 1% SWCNT was ∼18 times higher due mainly to the short lifetime of three years. However, even with the same short lifetime, the 28% cell had lower environmental impacts than mono-Si. The effects of lifetime and efficiency on the environmental impacts were further examined. This analysis showed that if the SWCNT device efficiency had the same value as the best efficiency of the material under comparison, to match the total normalized impacts of the mono- and poly-Si, CIGS, CdTe, and a-Si devices, the SWCNT devices would need a lifetime of 2.8, 3.5, 5.3, 5.1, and 10.8 years, respectively. It was also found that if the SWCNT PV has an efficiency of 4.5% or higher, its energy payback time would be lower than other existing and emerging PV technologies. The major impacts of SWCNT PV came from the cell's materials synthesis.

  5. Impact significance determination-Designing an approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence, David P.

    2007-01-01

    The question of how best to go about determining the significance of impacts has, to date, only been addressed in a partial and preliminary way. The assumption tends to be made that it is either only necessary to provide explicit, justified reasons for a judgment about significance and/or to explicitly apply a prescribed procedure-a procedure usually involving the staged application of thresholds and/or criteria. The detailed attributes, strengths and limitations of such approaches and possible alternative approaches have yet to be explored systematically. This article addresses these deficiencies by analyzing the characteristics, specific methods and positive and negative tendencies of three general impact significance determination approaches-the technical approach, the collaborative approach and the reasoned argumentation approach. A range of potential composite approaches are also described. With an enhanced understanding of these approaches, together with potential combinations, EIA practitioners and other EIA participants can be in a better position to select an approach appropriate to their needs, to reinforce the positive tendencies and offset the negative tendencies of the selected approach and to combine the best qualities of more than one approach

  6. Numerical Determination of Natural Frequencies and Modes of the Vibrations of a Thick-Walled Cylindrical Shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigorenko, A. Ya.; Borisenko, M. Yu.; Boichuk, E. V.; Prigoda, A. P.

    2018-01-01

    The dynamic characteristics of a thick-walled cylindrical shell are determined numerically using the finite-element method implemented with licensed FEMAR software. The natural frequencies and modes are compared with those obtained earlier experimentally by the method of stroboscopic holographic interferometry. Frequency coefficients demonstrating how the natural frequency depends on the physical and mechanical parameters of the material are determined.

  7. Electrocatalytic oxidative determination of reserpine at electrochemically functionalized single walled carbon nanotube with polyaniline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dar, Riyaz Ahmad; Naikoo, Gowhar Ahmad; Pitre, Krishna Sadashive

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Electrode oxidation mechanism of reserpine at PANI modified-SWCNT/CPE. -- Highlights: • Electropolymerization of polyaniline at SWCNT/CPE. • CV, EIS, CC SEM techniques were used for characterization of electrode. • Electrode showed electrocatalytic activity towards anodic oxidation of reserpine. • Oxidation process as irreversible and adsorption-controlled. • Reserpine in bark of Rauwolfia serpentina and in its pharmaceutical formulations. -- Abstract: In the present work a polyaniline film was successfully deposited by electropolymerization on single walled carbon nanotube paste electrode. The electrode was characterized using cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, chronocoulometry and scanning electron microscopy. The modified electrode showed electrocatalytic behaviour towards the anodic oxidation of reserpine. The adsorptive stripping voltammetric behaviour of reserpine at polyaniline film modified single walled carbon nanotube paste electrode (modified-SWCNTPE) was investigated and validated in pharmaceuticals and biological fluids by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and adsorptive stripping differential pulse voltammetry (AdSDPV) in 0.02 M phosphate buffer in the pH range of 2.5–8.5. Cyclic voltammetry has shown that the oxidation process is irreversible over the pH range studied and exhibited an adsorption-controlled behaviour. Further, the overall electrode process is mainly diffusion controlled with adsorption effects. The proposed more sensitive AdSDPV method allow quantitation over the range 0.085 μg mL −1 to 0.87 μg mL −1 with the detection limit of 0.407 ng mL −1 and has been successfully used to determine reserpine in bark of Rauwolfia serpentina and in its pharmaceutical formulations

  8. The impact of thermal bridges on the energy demand of buildings with double brick wall constructions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theodosiou, T.G. [Department of Engineering and Management of Energy Resources, University of Western Macedonia, GR-50100 Kozani (Greece); Papadopoulos, A.M. [Laboratory of Heat Transfer and Environmental Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aristotle University Thessaloniki, GR-54124 Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2008-07-01

    The implementation of the European Directive on the Energy Performance of Buildings (EPBD) is a milestone towards the improvement of energy efficiency in the building sector. However, even in cases where impressive measures can be implemented in the densely built urban environment, the less glamorous measure of building's envelope thermal insulation remains a prerequisite towards the improvement of the building's energy efficiency. Despite the insulation requirements specified by national regulations, thermal bridges in the building's envelope remain a weak spot in the constructions. Moreover, in many countries construction practices tend to implement only partially the insulation measures foreseen by regulations. As a result, thermal losses are in practice greater than those predicted during the design stage. This paper presents a study on representative wall thermal insulation configurations used in Greek buildings, in order to investigate the impact of the thermal bridges on the energy consumption. The double wall construction, used widely in Greece and not only there, is rather susceptible to the occurrence of thermal bridges, in contrast to a typical thermal insulating facade, like the one applied in Central Europe. The analysis of the thermal bridges' impact will in that sense also highlight the potential for energy renovation measures in older buildings. (author)

  9. Impact of flame-wall interaction on premixed flame dynamics and transfer function characteristics

    KAUST Repository

    Kedia, K.S.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we numerically investigate the response of a perforated-plate stabilized laminar methane-air premixed flame to imposed inlet velocity perturbations. A flame model using detailed chemical kinetics mechanism is applied and heat exchange between the burner plate and the gas mixture is incorporated. Linear transfer functions, for low mean inlet velocity oscillations, are analyzed for different equivalence ratio, mean inlet velocity, plate thermal conductivity and distance between adjacent holes. The oscillations of the heat exchange rate at the top of the burner surface plays a critical role in driving the growth of the perturbations over a wide range of conditions, including resonance. The flame response to the perturbations at its base takes the form of consumption speed oscillations in this region. Flame stand-off distance increases/decreases when the flame-wall interaction strengthens/weakens, impacting the overall dynamics of the heat release. The convective lag between the perturbations and the flame base response govern the phase of heat release rate oscillations. There is an additional convective lag between the perturbations at the flame base and the flame tip which has a weaker impact on the heat release rate oscillations. At higher frequencies, the flame-wall interaction is weaker and the heat release oscillations are driven by the flame area oscillations. The response of the flame to higher amplitude oscillations are used to gain further insight into the mechanisms. © 2010 Published by Elsevier Inc. on behalf of The Combustion Institute. All rights reserved.

  10. Method for determining optimal intracavitary radiotherapy conditions for carcinoma of the uterine cervix with tumor infiltration of the vaginal wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabushi, Katsuyoshi; Obata, Yasunori; Itoh, Susumu; Sakura, Mizuyoshi; Kato, Singo; Kazumoto, Tomoko; Nakamura, Yuzuru; Iinuma, T.A.; Arai, Tatsuo.

    1997-01-01

    Stage III carcinoma of the uterine cervix is occasionally accompanied by tumor infiltration of the vaginal wall. Currently, the vaginal wall has to be irradiated in the same manner as the uterine cervix. The authors have developed a system for determining the optimal irradiation conditions for treating the two regions, uterine cervix and vaginal wall, at the same time. A comparison of two methods is shown in simulation, and then a clinical case is reported. The first method consists of two treatment plans, one for the uterine cervix without tumor infiltration of the vaginal wall, and the other for the vaginal wall without carcinoma of the uterine cervix. The second, newly developed method considers the two regions together. Irradiation times of ovoid sources obtained with the second method are 15-25% less than those of the first method. Isodose curves obtained with the two methods are very different and thus the uterine cervix and vaginal wall must be considered together in order to determine irradiation conditions. (author)

  11. Analyzing the Determinants of Job Satisfaction among Jordanian Hospital Employees Using The Warr-Cook-Wall Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Anamaria Davidescu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims to identify the main determinants of job satisfaction in Jordanian hospitals using a sample of 325 employees from six hospitals at the level of the year 2015. In order to do that, we used Warr-Cook-Wall scale to assess job satisfaction based on four dimensions: extrinsic job satisfaction, and intrinsic job satisfaction, working conditions satisfaction, employee relations satisfaction applying the multivariate regression analysis to highlight the predictors of job satisfaction. The empirical results revealed that the main determinants of job satisfaction among Jordanian employees are related to the intrinsic job satisfaction and employee relations satisfaction and the wage have a relatively small impact on this. The findings revealed that the financial incentives have their significance but they are not fundamental, the non-financial incentives being really important in enhancing motivation among health employees. So, in order to improve the overall degree of retention, the managers need to reinforce the importance of non-financial factors like the freedom to choose the working methods, the recognition for a good work, the responsibility, the chance for promotion, the opportunity to use the abilities, the attention paid to the suggestions and the level of variety in the job.

  12. Determination of wall tension in cerebral artery aneurysms by numerical simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isaksen, J.G.; Bazilevs, Y.; Kvamsdal, T.

    2008-01-01

    a computational model for simulation of fluid-structure interaction in cerebral aneurysms based on patient specific lesion geometry, with special emphasis on wall tension. METHODS: An advanced isogeometric fluid-structure analysis model incorporating flexible aneurysm wall based on patient specific computed...

  13. ECG-gated blood pool tomography in the determination of left ventricular volume, ejection fraction, and wall motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Underwood, S.R.; Ell, P.J.; Jarritt, P.H.; Emanuel, R.W.; Swanton, R.H.

    1984-01-01

    ECG-gated blood pool tomography promises to provide a ''gold standard'' for noninvasive measurement of left ventricular volume, ejection fraction, and wall motion. This study compares these measurements with those from planar radionuclide imaging and contrast ventriculography. End diastolic and end systolic blood pool images were acquired tomographically using an IGE400A rotating gamma camera and Star computer, and slices were reconstructed orthogonal to the long axis of the heart. Left ventricular volume was determined by summing the areas of the slices, and wall motion was determined by comparison of end diastolic and end systolic contours. In phantom experiments this provided an accurate measurement of volume (r=0.98). In 32 subjects who were either normal or who had coronary artery disease left ventricular volume (r=0.83) and ejection fraction (r=0.89) correlated well with those using a counts based planar technique. In 16 of 18 subjects who underwent right anterior oblique X-ray contrast ventriculography, tomographic wall motion agreed for anterior, apical, and inferior walls, but abnormal septal motion which was not apparent by contrast ventriculography, was seen in 12 subjects tomographically. All 12 had disease of the left anterior descending coronary artery and might have been expected to have abnormal septal motion. ECG-gated blood pool tomography can thus determine left ventricular volume and ejection fraction accurately, and provides a global description of wall motion in a way that is not possible from any single planar image

  14. Determination of Groundwater Velocity and Dispersion Parameters by Borehole Wall Multielectrode Geoelectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessels, W.; Wuttke, M. W.

    2007-05-01

    A single well technique to determine groundwater flow values and transport parameters is presented. Multielectrode arrays are placed at the filtered casing depth by an inflatable packer or are installed on the borehole wall behind the casing.Tracer water with a higher or lower specific electrical conductivity (salinity) which is injected between the electrodes. This tracer plume then moves into the natural groundwater flow field. The observation of this movement by geoelectric logging enables the determination of the groundwater velocity and salinity. The transport parameters "effective porosity" and "dispersion length" can also be derived. The geoelectric logging uses n borehole electrodes and two grounding electrodes. Thus, either n independent two point measurements or n*(n-1)/2 pole-to-pole measurements can be conducted to obtain a full set of geoelectric measurements. This set is used to derive all electrode combinations by applying the law of superposition and reciprocity. The tracer distribution around the borehole during and after injection depends on the hydraulic and transport parameters of the aquifer and the filter sand. The transport parameter "porosity" plus the total injected tracer volume determines the tracer distribution around the borehole. The transport parameter "dispersivity" determines the abruptness of the tracer front. The method was tested by undertaking measurements in a lab aquifer filled with sand. The results are discussed and the limitations of the method are shown. Multielectrode installations behind casing were tested in situ in the two scientific boreholes CAT-LUD-1 and CAT- LUD-1A drilled in the northern part of Germany. A multielectrode packer system was designed, built and tested in these boreholes. The results are compared with colloid observations in the borehole and hydraulic triangulation in surrounded observation wells. Here, the interpretation of these in situ measurements is mainly restricted to two point geoelectric

  15. Development of serial measurement system for three-dimensional stress determination by over-coring the strains on borehole wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itamoto, Masaharu; Kuwabara, Kazumichi; Tanno, Takeo; Nakayama, Yoshiki; Mizuta, Yoshiaki

    2007-01-01

    In order to determine the three-dimensional stress state in serial order, the authors developed the serial measurement system for three-dimensional stress determination by over-coring the strains on the borehole wall. The serial stress measurements give the value of the stresses with high accuracy and bring the regional stress variations. In this paper, the authors describe the studies through FEM analysis on the effect of over-coring diameter, the influence of strain gauge length and the behavior of strain on the borehole wall, induced by biaxial external loading. We developed the multi-strain gauge mounted packer and examined it by measuring the strains on the borehole wall through biaxial loading test. The Laboratory tests showed its applicability to practical use. (author)

  16. Desorption of 1,3,5-Trichlorobenzene from Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes: Impact of Solution Chemistry and Surface Chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheikh Uddin

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The strong affinity of carbon nanotubes (CNTs to environmental contaminants has raised serious concern that CNTs may function as a carrier of environmental pollutants and lead to contamination in places where the environmental pollutants are not expected. However, this concern will not be realized until the contaminants are desorbed from CNTs. It is well recognized that the desorption of environmental pollutants from pre-laden CNTs varies with the environmental conditions, such as the solution pH and ionic strength. However, comprehensive investigation on the influence of solution chemistry on the desorption process has not been carried out, even though numerous investigations have been conducted to investigate the impact of solution chemistry on the adsorption of environmental pollutants on CNTs. The main objective of this study was to determine the influence of solution chemistry (e.g., pH, ionic strength and surface functionalization on the desorption of preloaded 1,3,5-trichlorobenzene (1,3,5-TCB from multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs. The results suggested that higher pH, ionic strength and natural organic matter in solution generally led to higher desorption of 1,3,5-TCB from MWNTs. However, the extent of change varied at different values of the tested parameters (e.g., pH 7. In addition, the impact of these parameters varied with MWNTs possessing different surface functional groups, suggesting that surface functionalization could considerably alter the environmental behaviors and impact of MWNTs.

  17. Cropping system impact on soil quality determinants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. VESTBERG

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Worldwide interest in soil quality evaluation has increased rapidly throughout the past decade, prompting us to evaluate the long-term impact of four cropping systems on several biological, chemical and physical determinants of soil quality. We hypothesized that after 17 years several of the determinants would show significant differences between conventional cereal and low input/organic rotations. Four crop rotations were imposed on a silt soil from 1982 through 1999. Rotation A was a conventionally managed cereal rotation that received 100% of the recommended mineral fertilizer each year. Rotation B was also managed conventionally from 1982 until 1993, although it received only 50% of the recommended mineral fertilizer. From 1994 through 1999, rotation B was managed as an organic rotation. Rotations C and D were low-input rotations with plant residues returned either untreated (Cor composted (Dfrom 1982 until 1994.From 1994 through 1999,they were also anaged organically. Significant decreases in extractable phosphorus (Pand potassium were observed in rotations C and D compared with rotation A, presumably because their yearly nutrient inputs were somewhat lower. The amount of soil organic carbon (Corg, soil water holding capacity, the numbers and biomass of earthworms and the microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen were or tended to be higher in low input/organic than in conventionally managed plots. These effects may be in connection with the slightly increased levels of Corg in soil of the organic rotations. Activities of twelve enzymes were strongly affected by sampling time (early-versus late-summer, but much less by long-term management. Litter decomposition, numbers of soil nematodes, arbuscular mycorrhizal (AMfungal diversity,AM spore density and AM functioning were little affected by rotation. However,AM spore density correlated positively with the high amounts of extractable calcium and P which were a result from excessive liming applied

  18. Impact of single-walled carbon nanotubes on the embryo: a brief review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Moustafa AE

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ala-Eddin Al Moustafa,1–4 Etienne Mfoumou,5 Dacian E Roman,3 Vahe Nerguizian,6 Anas Alazzam,7 Ion Stiharu,3 Amber Yasmeen8 1College of Medicine & Biomedical Research Centre, Qatar University, Doha, Qatar; 2Oncology Department, McGill University, 3Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Department, Concordia University, Montreal, QC, Canada; 4Syrian Research Cancer Centre of the Syrian Society against Cancer, Aleppo, Syria; 5Nova Scotia Community College, Dartmouth, NS, 6École de Technologie Supérieure, Montreal, QC, Canada; 7Department of Mechanical Engineering, Khalifa University, Abu Dhabi, UAE; 8Segal Cancer Centre, Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research of the Sir Mortimer B. Davis-Jewish General Hospital, Montreal, QC, Canada Abstract: Carbon nanotubes (CNTs are considered one of the most interesting materials in the 21st century due to their unique physiochemical characteristics and applicability to various industrial products and medical applications. However, in the last few years, questions have been raised regarding the potential toxicity of CNTs to humans and the environment; it is believed that the physiochemical characteristics of these materials are key determinants of CNT interaction with living cells and hence determine their toxicity in humans and other organisms as well as their embryos. Thus, several recent studies, including ours, pointed out that CNTs have cytotoxic effects on human and animal cells, which occur via the alteration of key regulator genes of cell proliferation, apoptosis, survival, cell–cell adhesion, and angiogenesis. Meanwhile, few investigations revealed that CNTs could also be harmful to the normal development of the embryo. In this review, we will discuss the toxic role of single-walled CNTs in the embryo, which was recently explored by several groups including ours. Keywords: single-walled carbon nanotubes, embryo, toxicity

  19. Determination of pigments in colour layers on walls of some selected historical buildings using optical and scanning electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skapin, A. Sever; Ropret, P.; Bukovec, P.

    2007-01-01

    For successful restoration of painted walls and painted coloured finishing coats it is necessary to determine the composition of the original colour layers. Identification of the pigments used in The Cistercian Abbey of Sticna and The Manor of Novo Celje was carried out using optical and scanning electron microscopy. Selected samples of wall paintings were inspected by the combined application of an optical microscope and a low-vacuum Scanning Electron Microscope to determine their colour and structural features and to identify the position of individual pigment grains. Energy dispersive spectroscopy was used to determine the elemental distribution on selected surfaces and elemental composition of individual pigments. It was found that the most abundantly used pigments were iron oxide red, cinnabar, green earth, umber, calcium carbonate white, ultramarine, yellow ochre and carbon black. These identifications have allowed us to compare the use of various pigments in buildings from different historical periods

  20. Comparison between methods using copper, lanthanum, and colorimetry for the determination of the cation exchange capacity of plant cell walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehr, J Bernhard; Blamey, F Pax C; Menzies, Neal W

    2010-04-28

    The determination of the cation exchange capacity (CEC) of plant cell walls is important for many physiological studies. We describe the determination of cell wall CEC by cation binding, using either copper (Cu) or lanthanum (La) ions, and by colorimetry. Both cations are strongly bound by cell walls, permitting fast and reproducible determinations of the CEC of small samples. However, the dye binding methods using two cationic dyes, Methylene Blue and Toluidine Blue, overestimated the CEC several-fold. Column and centrifugation methods are proposed for CEC determination by Cu or La binding; both provide similar results. The column method involves packing plant material (2-10 mg dry mass) in a chromatography column (10 mL) and percolating with 20 bed volumes of 1 mM La or Cu solution, followed by washing with deionized water. The centrifugation method uses a suspension of plant material (1-2 mL) that is centrifuged, and the pellet is mixed three times with 10 pellet volumes of 1 mM La or Cu solution followed by centrifugation and final washing with deionized water. In both methods the amount of La or Cu bound to the material was determined by spectroscopic methods.

  1. Determination of optimum insulation thicknesses of the external walls and roof (ceiling) for Turkey's different degree-day regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sisman, Nuri; Kahya, Emin; Aras, Nil; Aras, Haydar

    2007-01-01

    The external walls and roof of a building are the interface between its interior and the outdoor environment. Insulation of the external walls and roof is the most cost-effective way of controlling the outside elements to make homes more comfortable. Although insulation is generally accepted as a factor increasing the building costs, with the calculations we have shown that this is not the case. Fuel consumption and operational costs are reduced by increasing the thickness of the external walls and roof (ceiling), despite an increase in the investment costs. According to Turkish Standard Number 825 (TS 825), there are four different degree-day (DD) regions, and the required heat loads for the buildings in these regions exhibit large differences. Therefore, a method based on costs is needed for the determination of optimum insulation thicknesses of different DD regions. In this study, optimum insulation thicknesses for different DD regions of Turkey, namely, Izmir (DD: 1450), Bursa (DD: 2203), Eskisehir (DD: 3215) and Erzurum (DD: 4856), have been determined for a lifetime of N years, maximizing the present worth value of annual energy savings for insulated external walls

  2. Influence of slice thickness on the determination of left ventricular wall thickness and dimension by magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohnishi, Shusaku; Fukui, Sugao; Atsumi, Chisato and others

    1989-02-01

    Wall thickness of the ventricular septum and left ventricle, and left ventricular cavity dimension were determined on magnetic resonance (MR) images with slices 5 mm and 10 mm in thickness. Subjects were 3 healthy volunteers and 7 patients with hypertension (4), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (one) or valvular heart disease (2). In visualizing the cardiac structures such as left ventricular papillary muscle and right and left ventricles, 5 mm-thick images were better than 10 mm-thick images. Edges of ventricular septum and left ventricular wall were more clearly visualized on 5 mm-thick images than 10 mm-thick images. Two mm-thick MR images obtained from 2 patients yielded the most excellent visualization in end-systole, but failed to reveal cardiac structures in detail in end-diastole. Phantom studies revealed no significant differences in image quality of 10 mm and 5 mm in thickness in the axial view 80 degree to the long axis. In the axial view 45 degree to the long axis, 10 mm-thick images were inferior to 5 mm-thick images in detecting the edge of the septum and the left ventricular wall. These results indicate that the selection of slice thickness is one of the most important determinant factors in the measurement of left ventricular wall thickness and cavity dimension. (Namekawa, K).

  3. Influence of slice thickness on the determination of left ventricular wall thickness and dimension by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnishi, Shusaku; Fukui, Sugao; Atsumi, Chisato

    1989-01-01

    Wall thickness of the ventricular septum and left ventricle, and left ventricular cavity dimension were determined on magnetic resonance (MR) images with slices 5 mm and 10 mm in thickness. Subjects were 3 healthy volunteers and 7 patients with hypertension (4), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (one) or valvular heart disease (2). In visualizing the cardiac structures such as left ventricular papillary muscle and right and left ventricles, 5 mm-thick images were better than 10 mm-thick images. Edges of ventricular septum and left ventricular wall were more clearly visualized on 5 mm-thick images than 10 mm-thick images. Two mm-thick MR images obtained from 2 patients yielded the most excellent visualization in end-systole, but failed to reveal cardiac structures in detail in end-diastole. Phantom studies revealed no significant differences in image quality of 10 mm and 5 mm in thickness in the axial view 80 degree to the long axis. In the axial view 45 degree to the long axis, 10 mm-thick images were inferior to 5 mm-thick images in detecting the edge of the septum and the left ventricular wall. These results indicate that the selection of slice thickness is one of the most important determinant factors in the measurement of left ventricular wall thickness and cavity dimension. (Namekawa, K)

  4. Determination of the displacement cross section in single-walled carbon nanotubes under gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leyva, A.; Pinnera, I.; Cruz, C.; Abreu, Y.; Leyva, D.

    2009-01-01

    Using the threshold energy value reported in literature for C atoms in single-walled carbon nanotube and taking into account the McKinley-Feshbach approach, the effective atomic displacement cross-section in nanotubes exposed to the gamma rays was estimated. In this calculation the Kinchin-Pease approximation for the damage function was considered. (Author)

  5. Determinants And Impacts Of Poultry Production Technologies On ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Determinants And Impacts Of Poultry Production Technologies On Productivity ... unbalanced feeding of poultry and low level of education of poultry farmers. ... were suggested by the study as a means of consolidating the gains of the impact.

  6. Analyzing the Determinants of Job Satisfaction among Jordanian Hospital Employees Using The Warr-Cook-Wall Scale

    OpenAIRE

    Adriana Anamaria Davidescu; Marji Tania Issa Eid; Cristina Sacală

    2016-01-01

    The paper aims to identify the main determinants of job satisfaction in Jordanian hospitals using a sample of 325 employees from six hospitals at the level of the year 2015. In order to do that, we used Warr-Cook-Wall scale to assess job satisfaction based on four dimensions: extrinsic job satisfaction, and intrinsic job satisfaction, working conditions satisfaction, employee relations satisfaction applying the multivariate regression analysis to highlight the predictors of job satisfaction. ...

  7. Standard guide for mutual inductance bridge applications for wall thickness determinations in boiler tubing

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This guide describes a procedure for obtaining relative wall thickness indications in ferromagnetic and non-ferromagnetic steels using the mutual inductance bridge method. The procedure is intended for use with instruments capable of inducing two substantially identical magnetic fields and noting the change in inductance resulting from differing amounts of steel. It is used to distinguish acceptable wall thickness conditions from those which could place tubular vessels or piping at risk of bursting under high temperature and pressure conditions. 1.2 This guide is intended to satisfy two general needs for users of industrial Mutual Inductance Bridge (MIB) equipment: (1) the need for a tutorial guide addressing the general principles of Mutual Inductance Bridges as they apply to industrial piping; and (2) the need for a consistent set of MIB performance parameter definitions, including how these performance parameters relate to MIB system specifications. Potential users and buyers, as well as experienced M...

  8. A multifunctional mannosyltransferase family in Candida albicans determines cell wall mannan structure and host-fungus interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora-Montes, Héctor M; Bates, Steven; Netea, Mihai G; Castillo, Luis; Brand, Alexandra; Buurman, Ed T; Díaz-Jiménez, Diana F; Jan Kullberg, Bart; Brown, Alistair J P; Odds, Frank C; Gow, Neil A R

    2010-04-16

    The cell wall proteins of fungi are modified by N- and O-linked mannosylation and phosphomannosylation, resulting in changes to the physical and immunological properties of the cell. Glycosylation of cell wall proteins involves the activities of families of endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi-located glycosyl transferases whose activities are difficult to infer through bioinformatics. The Candida albicans MNT1/KRE2 mannosyl transferase family is represented by five members. We showed previously that Mnt1 and Mnt2 are involved in O-linked mannosylation and are required for virulence. Here, the role of C. albicans MNT3, MNT4, and MNT5 was determined by generating single and multiple MnTDelta null mutants and by functional complementation experiments in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. CaMnt3, CaMnt4, and CaMnt5 did not participate in O-linked mannosylation, but CaMnt3 and CaMnt5 had redundant activities in phosphomannosylation and were responsible for attachment of approximately half of the phosphomannan attached to N-linked mannans. CaMnt4 and CaMnt5 participated in N-mannan branching. Deletion of CaMNT3, CaMNT4, and CaMNT5 affected the growth rate and virulence of C. albicans, affected the recognition of the yeast by human monocytes and cytokine stimulation, and led to increased cell wall chitin content and exposure of beta-glucan at the cell wall surface. Therefore, the MNT1/KRE2 gene family participates in three types of protein mannosylation in C. albicans, and these modifications play vital roles in fungal cell wall structure and cell surface recognition by the innate immune system.

  9. Identifying new lignin bioengineering targets: 1. Monolignol-substitute impacts on lignin formation and cell wall fermentability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Fachuang

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent discoveries highlighting the metabolic malleability of plant lignification indicate that lignin can be engineered to dramatically alter its composition and properties. Current plant biotechnology efforts are primarily aimed at manipulating the biosynthesis of normal monolignols, but in the future apoplastic targeting of phenolics from other metabolic pathways may provide new approaches for designing lignins that are less inhibitory toward the enzymatic hydrolysis of structural polysaccharides, both with and without biomass pretreatment. To identify promising new avenues for lignin bioengineering, we artificially lignified cell walls from maize cell suspensions with various combinations of normal monolignols (coniferyl and sinapyl alcohols plus a variety of phenolic monolignol substitutes. Cell walls were then incubated in vitro with anaerobic rumen microflora to assess the potential impact of lignin modifications on the enzymatic degradability of fibrous crops used for ruminant livestock or biofuel production. Results In the absence of anatomical constraints to digestion, lignification with normal monolignols hindered both the rate and extent of cell wall hydrolysis by rumen microflora. Inclusion of methyl caffeate, caffeoylquinic acid, or feruloylquinic acid with monolignols considerably depressed lignin formation and strikingly improved the degradability of cell walls. In contrast, dihydroconiferyl alcohol, guaiacyl glycerol, epicatechin, epigallocatechin, and epigallocatechin gallate readily formed copolymer-lignins with normal monolignols; cell wall degradability was moderately enhanced by greater hydroxylation or 1,2,3-triol functionality. Mono- or diferuloyl esters with various aliphatic or polyol groups readily copolymerized with monolignols, but in some cases they accelerated inactivation of wall-bound peroxidase and reduced lignification; cell wall degradability was influenced by lignin content and the degree

  10. Null mutants of individual RABA genes impact the proportion of different cell wall components in stem tissue of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Lunn

    Full Text Available In Arabidopsis, and other plants, the RABA GTPases (orthologous to the Rab11a of mammals have expanded in number and diversity and have been shown to belong to eight sub clades, some of which have been implicated in controlling vesicles that traffic cell wall polymers and enzymes that synthesise or modify them to the cell wall. In order to investigate this, we have investigated whether T-DNA insertion knockouts of individual RABA genes belonging to different sub clades, impact on the composition of the plant cell wall. Single gene knockouts of the RABA1, RABA2 and RABA4 sub clades primarily affected the percentage composition of pectin, cellulose and hemicellulose within the cell wall, respectively, despite having no obvious phenotype in the whole plant. We hypothesise that vesicles carrying specific types of cargoes from the Golgi to the cell surface may be regulated by particular sub types of RABA proteins, a finding that could have wider implications for how trafficking systems work and could be a useful tool in cell wall research and other fields of plant biology.

  11. Chemical analysis of isolated cell walls of Gram-positive bacteria and the determination of the cell wall to cell mass ratio.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wal, van der A.; Norde, W.; Bendinger, B.; Zehnder, A.J.B.; Lyklema, J.

    1997-01-01

    Cell walls of five Gram-positive bacterial strains, including four coryneforms and a Bacillus brevis strain were isolated and subsequently chemically analysed. The wall contribution to the total cell mass is calculated from a comparison of D-Lactate concentrations in hydrolysates of whole cells and

  12. Multi-walled Carbon Nanotubes/Graphite Nanosheets Modified Glassy Carbon Electrode for the Simultaneous Determination of Acetaminophen and Dopamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Susu; He, Ping; Zhang, Guangli; Lei, Wen; He, Huichao

    2015-01-01

    Graphite nanosheets prepared by thermal expansion and successive sonication were utilized for the construction of a multi-walled carbon nanotubes/graphite nanosheets based amperometric sensing platform to simultaneously determine acetaminophen and dopamine in the presence of ascorbic acid in physiological conditions. The synergistic effect of multi-walled carbon nanotubes and graphite nanosheets catalyzed the electrooxidation of acetaminophen and dopamine, leading to a remarkable potential difference up to 200 mV. The as-prepared modified electrode exhibited linear responses to acetaminophen and dopamine in the concentration ranges of 2.0 × 10(-6) - 2.4 × 10(-4) M (R = 0.999) and 2.0 × 10(-6) - 2.0 × 10(-4) M (R = 0.998), respectively. The detection limits were down to 2.3 × 10(-7) M for acetaminophen and 3.5 × 10(-7) M for dopamine (S/N = 3). Based on the simple preparation and prominent electrochemical properties, the obtained multi-walled carbon nanotubes/graphite nanosheets modified electrode would be a good candidate for the determination of acetaminophen and dopamine without the interference of ascorbic acid.

  13. Impact of left ventricular assist device speed adjustment on exercise tolerance and markers of wall stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, Christopher S; Salamonsen, Robert; Keogh, Anne M; Woodard, John; Ayre, Peter; Prichard, Roslyn; Kotlyar, Eugene; Macdonald, Peter S; Jansz, Paul; Spratt, Phillip

    2015-09-01

    Left ventricular assist devices are crucial in rehabilitation of patients with end-stage heart failure. Whether cardiopulmonary function is enhanced with higher pump output is unknown. 10 patients (aged 39±16 years, mean±SD) underwent monitored adjustment of pump speed to determine minimum safe low speed and maximum safe high speed at rest. Patients were then randomized to these speed settings and underwent three 6-minute walk tests (6MWT) and symptom-limited cardiopulmonary stress tests (CPX) on separate days. Pump speed settings (low, normal and high) resulted in significantly different resting pump flows of 4.43±0.6, 5.03±0.94, and 5.72±1.2 l/min (Pexercise (Pexercise time (p=.27). Maximum workload achieved and peak oxygen consumption were significantly different comparing low to high pump speed settings only (Prelease was significantly reduced at higher pump speed with exercise (Prelease consistent with lower myocardial wall stress. This did not, however, improve exercise tolerance.

  14. Impact of plasma tube wall thickness on power coupling in ICP sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nawaz, Anuscheh; Herdrich, Georg

    2009-01-01

    The inductively heated plasma source at the Institute of Space Systems was investigated with respect to the wall thickness of the plasma tube using an air plasma. For this, the wall thickness of the quartz tube was reduced in steps from 2.5 to 1.25 mm. The significance of reducing the wall thickness was analyzed with respect to both the maximum allowable tube cooling power and the coupling efficiency. While the former results from thermal stresses in the tube's wall, the latter results from a minimization of magnetic field losses near the coil turns of the inductively coupled plasma (ICP) source. Analysis of the thermal stress could be validated by experimental data, i.e. the measurement of the tube cooling power when the respective tube structure failed. The coupling efficiency could be assessed qualitatively by simplified models, and the experimental data recorded show that coupling was improved far more than predicted.

  15. Determining Vulnerability Importance in Environmental Impact Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toro, Javier; Duarte, Oscar; Requena, Ignacio; Zamorano, Montserrat

    2012-01-01

    The concept of vulnerability has been used to describe the susceptibility of physical, biotic, and social systems to harm or hazard. In this sense, it is a tool that reduces the uncertainties of Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) since it does not depend exclusively on the value assessments of the evaluator, but rather is based on the environmental state indicators of the site where the projects or activities are being carried out. The concept of vulnerability thus reduces the possibility that evaluators will subjectively interpret results, and be influenced by outside interests and pressures during projects. However, up until now, EIA has been hindered by a lack of effective methods. This research study analyzes the concept of vulnerability, defines Vulnerability Importance and proposes its inclusion in qualitative EIA methodology. The method used to quantify Vulnerability Importance is based on a set of environmental factors and indicators that provide a comprehensive overview of the environmental state. The results obtained in Colombia highlight the usefulness and objectivity of this method since there is a direct relation between this value and the environmental state of the departments analyzed. - Research Highlights: ► The concept of vulnerability could be considered defining Vulnerability Importance included in qualitative EIA methodology. ► The use of the concept of environmental vulnerability could reduce the subjectivity of qualitative methods of EIA. ► A method to quantify the Vulnerability Importance proposed provides a comprehensive overview of the environmental state. ► Results in Colombia highlight the usefulness and objectivity of this method.

  16. DEM analysis of the effect of particle-wall impact on the dispersion performance in carrier-based dry powder inhalers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiecheng; Wu, Chuan-Yu; Adams, Michael

    2015-06-20

    The impact between particles or agglomerates and a device wall is considered as an important mechanism controlling the dispersion of active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) particles in dry powder inhalers (DPIs). In order to characterise the influencing factors and better understand the impact induced dispersion process for carrier-based DPIs, the impact behaviour between an agglomerate and a wall is systematically investigated using the discrete element method. In this study, a carrier-based agglomerate is initially formed and then allowed to impact with a target wall. The effects of impact velocity, impact angle and work of adhesion on the dispersion performance are analysed. It is shown that API particles in the near-wall regions are more likely to be dispersed due to the deceleration of the carrier particle resulted from the impact with the wall. It is also revealed that the dispersion ratio increases with increasing impact velocity and impact angle, indicating that the normal component of the impact velocity plays a dominant role on the dispersion. Furthermore, the impact induced dispersion performance for carrier-based DPI formulations can be well approximated using a cumulative Weibull distribution function that is governed by the ratio of overall impact energy and adhesion energy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. An experimental and theoretical investigation of particle–wall impacts in a T-junction

    KAUST Repository

    Vigolo, D.; Griffiths, I. M.; Radl, S.; Stone, H. A.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the behaviour of particles entrained in a fluid flow upon changes in flow direction is crucial in problems where particle inertia is important, such as the erosion process in pipe bends. We present results on the impact of particles in a T-shaped channel in the laminar-turbulent transitional regime. The impacting event for a given system is described in terms of the Reynolds number and the particle Stokes number. Experimental results for the impact are compared with the trajectories predicted by theoretical particle-tracing models for a range of configurations to determine the role of the viscous boundary layer in retarding the particles and reducing the rate of collision with the substrate. In particular, a two-dimensional model based on a stagnation-point flow is used together with three-dimensional numerical simulations. We show how the simple two-dimensional model provides a tractable way of understanding the general collision behaviour, while more advanced three-dimensional simulations can be helpful in understanding the details of the flow. © 2013 Cambridge University Press.

  18. An experimental and theoretical investigation of particle–wall impacts in a T-junction

    KAUST Repository

    Vigolo, D.

    2013-07-01

    Understanding the behaviour of particles entrained in a fluid flow upon changes in flow direction is crucial in problems where particle inertia is important, such as the erosion process in pipe bends. We present results on the impact of particles in a T-shaped channel in the laminar-turbulent transitional regime. The impacting event for a given system is described in terms of the Reynolds number and the particle Stokes number. Experimental results for the impact are compared with the trajectories predicted by theoretical particle-tracing models for a range of configurations to determine the role of the viscous boundary layer in retarding the particles and reducing the rate of collision with the substrate. In particular, a two-dimensional model based on a stagnation-point flow is used together with three-dimensional numerical simulations. We show how the simple two-dimensional model provides a tractable way of understanding the general collision behaviour, while more advanced three-dimensional simulations can be helpful in understanding the details of the flow. © 2013 Cambridge University Press.

  19. Determination of optimum insulation thicknesses using economical analyse for exterior walls of buildings with different masses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okan Kon

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, five different cities were selected from the five climatic zones according to Turkish standard TS 825, and insulation thicknesses of exterior walls of sample buildings were calculated by using optimization. Vertical perforated bricks with density of 550 kg/m3 and 1000 kg/m3 were chosen within the study content. Glass wool, expanded polystyrene (XPS, extruded polystyrene (EPS were considered as insulation materials. Additionally, natural gas, coal, fuel oil and LPG were utilized as fuel for heating process while electricity was used for cooling.  Life cycle cost (LCC analysis and degree-day method were the approaches for optimum insulation thickness calculations. As a result, in case of usage vertical perforated bricks with density of 550 kg/m3 and 1000 kg/m3 resulted different values in between 0.005-0.007 m (5-7 mm in the optimum insulation thickness calculations under different insulation materials.  Minimum optimum insulation thickness was calculated in case XPS was preferred as insulation material, and the maximum one was calculated in case of using glass wool.

  20. Simplified model for determining local heat flux boundary conditions for slagging wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bingzhi Li; Anders Brink; Mikko Hupa [Aabo Akademi University, Turku (Finland). Process Chemistry Centre

    2009-07-15

    In this work, two models for calculating heat transfer through a cooled vertical wall covered with a running slag layer are investigated. The first one relies on a discretization of the velocity equation, and the second one relies on an analytical solution. The aim is to find a model that can be used for calculating local heat flux boundary conditions in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis of such processes. Two different cases where molten deposits exist are investigated: the black liquor recovery boiler and the coal gasifier. The results show that a model relying on discretization of the velocity equation is more flexible in handling different temperature-viscosity relations. Nevertheless, a model relying on an analytical solution is the one fast enough for a potential use as a CFD submodel. Furthermore, the influence of simplifications to the heat balance in the model is investigated. It is found that simplification of the heat balance can be applied when the radiation heat flux is dominant in the balance. 9 refs., 7 figs., 10 tabs.

  1. Determination of chitin content in fungal cell wall: an alternative flow cytometric method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa-de-Oliveira, Sofia; Silva, Ana P; Miranda, Isabel M; Salvador, Alexandre; Azevedo, Maria M; Munro, Carol A; Rodrigues, Acácio G; Pina-Vaz, Cidália

    2013-03-01

    The conventional methods used to evaluate chitin content in fungi, such as biochemical assessment of glucosamine release after acid hydrolysis or epifluorescence microscopy, are low throughput, laborious, time-consuming, and cannot evaluate a large number of cells. We developed a flow cytometric assay, efficient, and fast, based on Calcofluor White staining to measure chitin content in yeast cells. A staining index was defined, its value was directly related to chitin amount and taking into consideration the different levels of autofluorecence. Twenty-two Candida spp. and four Cryptococcus neoformans clinical isolates with distinct susceptibility profiles to caspofungin were evaluated. Candida albicans clinical isolate SC5314, and isogenic strains with deletions in chitin synthase 3 (chs3Δ/chs3Δ) and genes encoding predicted GlycosylPhosphatidylInositol (GPI)-anchored proteins (pga31Δ/Δ and pga62Δ/Δ), were used as controls. As expected, the wild-type strain displayed a significant higher chitin content (P relationship between chitin content and antifungal drug susceptibility phenotype was found, an association was established between the paradoxical growth effect in the presence of high caspofungin concentrations and the chitin content. This novel flow cytometry protocol revealed to be a simple and reliable assay to estimate cell wall chitin content of fungi. Copyright © 2013 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  2. 24 CFR 58.37 - Environmental impact statement determinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Environmental impact statement... Classification § 58.37 Environmental impact statement determinations. (a) An EIS is required when the project is... and Urban Development ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW PROCEDURES FOR ENTITIES ASSUMING HUD ENVIRONMENTAL...

  3. Electrochemical determination of cadmium and lead on pristine single-walled carbon nanotube electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Minh-Phuong Ngoc; Li, Cheng Ai; Han, Kwi Nam; Pham, Xuan-Hung; Seong, Gi Hun

    2012-01-01

    A flexible, transparent, single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) film electrode was prepared by vacuum filtering methods, followed by photolithographic patterning of a photoresist polymer on the SWCNT surface. The morphology of the SWCNT film electrode surface was characterized using a field-emission scanning electron microscope coupled to an energy-dispersive X-ray spectrophotometer. The electrodes were successfully used as a mercury-free electrochemical sensor for individual and simultaneous detection of cadmium (Cd(2+)) and lead (Pb(2+)) in 0.02 M HCl by square-wave stripping voltammetry. Some important operational parameters, including deposition time, deposition potential, square-wave amplitude, and square wave-frequency were optimized for the detection of Cd(2+) and Pb(2+). The newly developed sensor showed good linear behavior in the examined concentration. For individual Cd(2+) and Pb(2+) ion detection, the linear range was found from 0.033 to 0.228 ppm with detection limits of 0.7 ppb (R(2) = 0.985) for Cd(2+) and 0.8 ppb (R(2) = 0.999) for Pb(2+). For simultaneous detection, the linear range was found from 0.033 to 0.280 ppm with a limit of detection of 2.2 ppb (R(2) = 0.976) and 0.6 ppb (R(2) = 0.996) for Cd(2+) and Pb(2+), respectively. SWCNT film electrodes offered favorable reproducibility of ± 5.4% and 4.3% for Cd(2+) and Pb(2+), respectively. The experiments demonstrated the applicability of carbon nanotubes, specifically in the preparation of SWCNT films. The results suggest that the proposed flexible SWCNT film electrodes can be applied as simple, efficient, cost-effective, and/or disposable electrodes for simultaneous detection of heavy metal ions.

  4. GeoWall use in an Introductory Geology laboratory: Impacts in Student Understanding of Field Mapping Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, L. E.; Kelly, M.; Springer, A. E.

    2003-12-01

    In the Fall semester of 2003, Northern Arizona University will introduce the GeoWall to its introductory geology courses. This presents an opportunity to assess the impact of this new technology on students' understanding of basic topographic concepts and the spatial relationships between geology, topography, and hydrology on a field trip. Introductory Geology fulfills the Lab Science component of the Liberal Studies Program at Northern Arizona University. The class is open to all Northern Arizona University students, and is most commonly taken by non-science majors. In this class students learn to: locate their position using maps, identify common minerals and rocks, recognize the relationship between geology and geomorphology, visualize how rocks exposed at the surface continue into the subsurface, and to draw conclusions about possible geologic hazards in different settings. In this study we will report how a GeoWall 3D visualization technology was used in a field study of a graben south of Flagstaff. The goal of the field exercise is to improve students' ability to synthesize data collected at field stops into a conceptual model of the graben, linking geology, geomorphology and hydrology. We plan to present a quantitative assessment of the GeoWall learning objectives from data collected from a paired test and control group of students. Teaching assistants (TAs) with two or more lab classes have been identified; these TAs will participate in both GeoWall and non-GeoWall lab exercises. The GeoWall use will occur outside of normal lab hours to avoid disrupting the lab schedule during the eighth week of lab. This field preparation exercise includes a 3D visualization of the Lake Mary graben rendered with the ROMA software. The following week, all students attend the graben field trip; immediately following the trip, students will interviewed about their gain in understanding of the geologic features illustrated during the field trip. The results of the post

  5. Variable impact of CSF flow suppression on quantitative 3.0T intracranial vessel wall measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogswell, Petrice M; Siero, Jeroen C W; Lants, Sarah K; Waddle, Spencer; Davis, L Taylor; Gilbert, Guillaume; Hendrikse, Jeroen; Donahue, Manus J

    2018-03-31

    Flow suppression techniques have been developed for intracranial (IC) vessel wall imaging (VWI) and optimized using simulations; however, simulation results may not translate in vivo. To evaluate experimentally how IC vessel wall and lumen measurements change in identical subjects when evaluated using the most commonly available blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow suppression modules and VWI sequences. Prospective. Healthy adults (n = 13; age = 37 ± 15 years) were enrolled. A 3.0T 3D T 1 /proton density (PD)-weighted turbo-spin-echo (TSE) acquisition with post-readout anti-driven equilibrium module, with and without Delay-Alternating-with-Nutation-for-Tailored-Excitation (DANTE) was applied. DANTE flip angle (8-12°) and TSE refocusing angle (sweep = 40-120° or 50-120°) were varied. Basilar artery and internal carotid artery (ICA) wall thicknesses, CSF signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and signal ratio (SR) were assessed. Measurements were made by two readers (radiology resident and board-certified neuroradiologist). A Wilcoxon signed-rank test was applied with corrected two-sided P CSF suppression. Addition of the DANTE preparation reduced CSF SNR from 17.4 to 6.7, thereby providing significant (P CSF suppression. The DANTE preparation also resulted in a significant (P CSF CNR improvement (P = 0.87). There was a trend for a difference in blood SNR with vs. without DANTE (P = 0.05). The outer vessel wall diameter and wall thickness values were lower (P CSF suppression and CNR of the approaches evaluated. However, improvements are heterogeneous, likely owing to intersubject vessel pulsatility and CSF flow variations, which can lead to variable flow suppression efficacy in these velocity-dependent modules. 2 Technical Efficacy: Stage 1 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2018. © 2018 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  6. Impact of wind-driven rain on historic brick wall buildings in a moderately cold and humid climate: Numerical analyses of mould growth risk, indoor climate and energy consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masaru, Abuku; Janssen, Hans; Roels, Staf

    2009-01-01

    This paper gives an onset to whole building hygrothermal modelling in which the interaction between interior and exterior climates via building enclosures is simulated under a moderately cold and humid climate. The focus is particularly on the impact of wind-driven rain (WDR) oil the hygrothermal...... response, mould growth at interior wall surfaces, indoor climate and energy consumption. First the WDR load oil the facades of a 4 m x 4 m x 10 m tower is determined. Then the hygrothermal behaviour of the brick walls is analysed oil a horizontal slice through the tower. The simulations demonstrate...

  7. High-speed schlieren videography of vortex-ring impact on a wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissner, Benjamin; Hargather, Michael; Settles, Gary

    2011-11-01

    Ring vortices of approximately 20 cm diameter are generated through the use of an Airzooka toy. To make the vortex visible, it is seeded with difluoroethane gas, producing a refractive-index difference with the air. A 1-meter-diameter, single-mirror, double-pass schlieren system is used to visualize the ring-vortex motion, and also to provide the wall with which the vortex collides. High-speed imaging is provided by a Photron SA-1 digital video camera. The Airzooka is fired toward the mirror almost along the optical axis of the schlieren system, so that the view of the vortex-mirror collision is normal to the path of vortex motion. Vortex-wall interactions similar to those first observed by Walker et al. (JFM 181, 1987) are recorded at high speed. The presentation will consist of a screening and discussion of these video results.

  8. Two-leaf wall structures under 'soft' impact load - aircraft crash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eibl, J.; Block, K.

    1982-01-01

    The article describes a mechanical model with which the load conditions associated with aircraft crash on a two-leaf wall or roof structure can be analysed quite simply. The necessary assumptions for the material behaviour governing the contact of the two slabs and, in general, the maximum limit deformations of reinforced concrete slabs are more particularly dealt with. Treating the problem the authors make use, inter alia, of some of their own experimental results. (orig.)

  9. Impact of wall materials and seeding gases on the pedestal and on core plasma performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Wolfrum

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Plasmas in machines with all metal plasma facing components have a lower Zeff, less radiation cooling in the scrape-off layer and divertor regions and are prone to impurity accumulation in the core. Higher gas puff and the seeding of low-Z impurities are applied to prevent impurity accumulation, to increase the frequency of edge localised modes and to cool the divertor. A lower power threshold for the transition from low-confinement mode to high confinement mode has been found in all metal wall machines when compared to carbon wall machines. The application of lithium before or during discharges can lead to ELM free H-modes. The seeding of high-Z impurities increases core radiation, reduces the power flux across the separatrix and, if applied in the right amount, does not lead to deterioration of the confinement. All these effects have in common that they can often be explained by the shape or position of the density profile. Not only the peakedness of the density profile in the core but also the position of the edge pressure gradient influences global confinement. It is shown how (i ionisation in the pedestal region due to higher reflection of deuterium from high-Z walls, (ii reduced recycling in consequence of lithium wall conditioning, (iii the fostering of edge modes with lithium dropping, (iv increased gas puff and (v the cooling of the scrape-off layer by medium-Z impurities such as nitrogen affect the edge density profile. The consequence is a shift in the pressure profile relative to the separatrix, leading to improved pedestal stability of H-mode plasmas when the direction is inwards.

  10. Rapid determination of nitrophenol isomers in polluted water based on multi-walled carbon nanotubes modified screen-printed electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Essy Kouadio Fodjo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A sensitive screen-printed electrode modified with multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs/SPE was applied to determine simultaneously m-nitrophenol, o-nitrophenol and p-nitrophenol. The electrochemical response showed that o-nitrophenol, m-nitrophenol and p-nitrophenol were entirely separated at the MWCNTs/SPE interface. Under the optimized conditions, it was found that the detection limits were 8.1×10-8 , 5.5×10-7 and 2.0×10-7 M and the linear calibration ranges were 1.0×10-6 ~1.9×10-5 M, 2.5×10-6 ~2.1×10-5 M and 2.0×10-6 ~2.0×10-5 M for m-nitrophenol, o-nitrophenol and p-nitrophenol respectively, proving that the electrode presented here could be easily used to determine nitrophenol isomers simultaneously with high sensitivity within pH range from 4.8 to 8.0. The applications in water samples showed that no interferences appeared with deviations below 5% to the determination of nitrophenol isomers with 1000 fold excess, indicating a good response of this method for nitrophenol isomers detection. This disposable modified SPE combining with a portable electrochemical device were performed for wastewater samples on-field rapid determination.

  11. Determination of extra and intracellular content from some lytic enzymes related with carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus L. root cell wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sixta Tulia Martínez Peralta

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The presence of some enzymes related to cell wall (polygalacturonase, the pectate lyase, protease and xylanase in carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus L. roots as well as the activity levels were determined. These levels were analyzed in different cellular places: the intercellular fluid that is part of apoplast, the symplast, and the total level (apoplast and symplast in carnation roots. Two methods were tested to extract the intercellular fluid. To obtain the intracellular content (symplast and total extract (apoplast+symplast, three methods were tested, using as extracting solution  i phosphate buffer, ii phosphate buffer + PVPP,  iii before the extraction with phosphate buffer, the carnation roots were washed with acetone.  The results showed the effect of different extracting solutions in the enzymatic activities and in the protein content. A new only one step method is proposed to extract the four enzymes and make the comparative analysis of enzymatic activity.

  12. Determination of Optimum Thermal Insulation Thicknesses for External Walls Considering the Heating, Cooling and Annual Energy Requirement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ömer KAYNAKLI

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, optimization of thermal insulation thickness applied to the external walls of buildings has been carried out comparatively based on the seasonal (space-heating and cooling and the annual energy requirements considering solar radiation effect. This study has been performed for four degree-day regions of Turkey, namely, Iskenderun (in the first region, Istanbul (in the second region, Ankara (in the third region and Ardahan (in the fourth region. By determining the sol-air temperatures for each region and maximizing the present worth value of seasonal and annual energy savings, the optimum thermal insulation thicknesses have been calculated. The effects of solar radiation on heating-cooling energy requirements, the variation of optimum insulation thicknesses and payback periods with respect to degree-day regions, the differences between the analyses based on seasonal and annual have been presented in tabular and graphical form.

  13. Sonographic determination of the irradiated pulmonary volume in case of irradiation of the thoracic wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wittich, G.; Hohenberg, G.; Seitz, W.; Vienna Univ.

    1983-01-01

    In order to determine the irradiated pulmonary volume, comparative examinations by sonography and computed tomography were made in ten patients submitted to postoperative radiotherapy for mammary carcinoma. The physical and anatomical conditions of sonographic volumetry are discussed. In all cases irradiated with tangential contralateral fields, the irradiated pulmonary volume was less than 200 ccm (118 ccm on an average). The sonographic results did not differ essentially from those of computed tomography, so that the sonographic examination can be offered as a simple and sufficient precise method of documentation within the frame of an individual therapy planning. (orig.) [de

  14. Determination of stress-strain state of the wooden church log walls with software package

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chulkova Anastasia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The restoration of architectural monuments is going on all over the world today. The main aim of restoration is the renewal of stable functioning of building constructions in normal state. In this article, we have tried to figure out with special software the bearing capacity of log cabins of the Church of Transfiguration on Kizhi island. As shown in research results, determination of stress-strain stage with software package is necessary for the bearing capacity computation as well as field tests.

  15. Impact parameter determination in experimental analysis using neural network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haddad, F.; David, C.; Freslier, M.; Aichelin, J.; Haddad, F.; Hagel, K.; Li, J.; Mdeiwayeh, N.; Natowitz, J.B.; Wada, R.; Xiao, B.

    1997-01-01

    A neural network is used to determine the impact parameter in 40 Ca + 40 Ca reactions. The effect of the detection efficiency as well as the model dependence of the training procedure have been studied carefully. An overall improvement of the impact parameter determination of 25 % is obtained using this technique. The analysis of Amphora 40 Ca+ 40 Ca data at 35 MeV per nucleon using a neural network shows two well separated classes of events among the selected 'complete' events. (authors)

  16. Radiotherapy of the chest wall following mastectomy for early-stage breast cancer: impact on local recurrence and overall survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janni, Wolfgang; Dimpfl, Thomas; Braun, Stephan; Knobbe, Angelika; Peschers, Ursula; Rjosk, Dorothea; Lampe, Bjoern; Genz, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    Introduction: Recent studies have renewed an old controversy about the efficacy of adjuvant radiotherapy following mastectomy for breast cancer. Radiotherapy is usually recommended for advanced disease, but whether or not to use it in pT1-T2 pN0 situations is still being debated. This study was designed to clarify whether or not routine radiotherapy of the chest wall following mastectomy reduces the risk of local recurrence and if it influences the overall survival rate. Methods: Retrospective analysis of patients treated with mastectomy for pT1-T2 pN0 tumors and no systemic treatment. Patients treated with radiotherapy of the chest wall following mastectomy (Group A) are compared with those treated with mastectomy alone (Group B). Results: A total of 918 patients underwent mastectomy. Patients who received adjuvant radiotherapy after mastectomy (n = 114) had a significantly lower risk for local recurrence. Ten years after the primary diagnosis, 98.1% of the patients with radiotherapy were disease free compared to 86.4% of the patients without radiotherapy. The average time interval from primary diagnosis until local recurrence was 8.9 years in Group A and 2.8 years in Group B. The Cox regression analysis including radiotherapy, tumor size and tumor grading found the highest risk for local recurrence for patients without radiotherapy (p < 0.0004). In terms of overall survival however, the Kaplan-Meier analysis showed no difference between the two groups (p = 0.8787) and the Cox regression analysis failed to show any impact on overall survival. Conclusion: With observation spanning over 35 years, this study shows that adjuvant radiotherapy of the chest wall following mastectomy reduces the risk for local recurrence in node-negative patients with pT1-T2 tumors but has no impact on the overall survival rate

  17. Electrochemical Behavior and Determination of Chlorogenic Acid Based on Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Modified Screen-Printed Electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyan Ma

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the multi-walled carbon nanotubes modified screen-printed electrode (MWCNTs/SPE was prepared and the MWCNTs/SPE was employed for the electrochemical determination of the antioxidant substance chlorogenic acids (CGAs. A pair of well-defined redox peaks of CGA was observed at the MWCNTs/SPE in 0.10 mol/L acetic acid-sodium acetate buffer (pH 6.2 and the electrode process was adsorption-controlled. Cyclic voltammetry (CV and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV methods for the determination of CGA were proposed based on the MWCNTs/SPE. Under the optimal conditions, the proposed method exhibited linear ranges from 0.17 to 15.8 µg/mL, and the linear regression equation was Ipa (µA = 4.1993 C (×10−5 mol/L + 1.1039 (r = 0.9976 and the detection limit for CGA could reach 0.12 µg/mL. The recovery of matrine was 94.74%–106.65% (RSD = 2.92% in coffee beans. The proposed method is quick, sensitive, reliable, and can be used for the determination of CGA.

  18. Determinants of capital structure and financial crisis impact: evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Proença, Pedro Miguel Correia

    2012-01-01

    Mestrado em contabilidade The objectives of this empirical work are to investigate the determinants of Portuguese SMEs capital structure, evaluate whether and how the impacts of those determinants affect the debt ratios and examine the effects of financial crisis and industry on Portuguese SMEs capital structure. The sample used considers the period 2007-2010, resulting in 12.857 Portugues e SMEs per year observations. R...

  19. 3-D MDT with spherical targets by bilinear interpolation for determining blood velocity profiles including the vessel wall effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choomphon-anomakhun, Natthaphon; Natenapit, Mayuree

    2018-02-01

    A numerical simulation of three-dimensional (3-D) implant assisted-magnetic drug targeting (IA-MDT) using ferromagnetic spherical targets, including the effect from the vessel wall on the blood flow, is presented. The targets were implanted within arterioles and subjected to an externally uniform applied magnetic field in order to increase the effectiveness of targeting magnetic drug carrier particles (MDCPs). The capture area (As) of the MDCPs was determined by inspection of the particle trajectories simulated from the particle equations of motion. The blood flow velocities at any particle position around the target were obtained by applying bilinear interpolation to the numerical blood velocity data. The effects on As of the type of ferromagnetic materials in the targets and MDCPs, average blood flow rates, mass fraction of the ferromagnetic material in the MDCPs, average radii of MDCPs (Rp) and the externally applied magnetic field strength (μ0H0) were evaluated. Furthermore, the appropriate μ0H0 and Rp for the IA-MDT design is suggested. In the case of the SS409 target and magnetite MDCPs, dimensionless capture areas ranging from 4.1- to 12.4 and corresponding to particle capture efficiencies of 31-94% were obtained with Rp ranging from 100- to 500 nm, weight fraction of 80%, μ0H0 of 0.6 T and an average blood flow rate of 0.01 ms-1. In addition, the more general 3-D modelling of IA-MDT in this work is applicable to IA-MDT using spherical targets implanted within blood vessels for both laminar and potential blood flows including the wall effect.

  20. Dynamic material behavior determination using single fiber impact

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heru Utomo, B.D.; Broos, J.P.F.

    2007-01-01

    Mechanical properties of fiber materials are used as input data for amongst others impact simulations on fiber based structures to predict their behavior. Accurate predictions for such materials are still not possible, because the mechanical properties are usually determined (quasi-)statically or

  1. Determination of true optical absorption and scattering coefficient of wooden cell wall substance by time-of-flight near infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Ryunosuke; Inagaki, Tetsuya; Tsuchikawa, Satoru

    2016-02-22

    The true absorption coefficient (μa) and reduced scattering coefficient (μ´s) of the cell wall substance in Douglas fir were determined using time-of-flight near infrared spectroscopy. Samples were saturated with hexane, toluene or quinolone to minimize the multiple reflections of light on the boundary between pore-cell wall substance in wood. μ´s exhibited its minimum value when the wood was saturated with toluene because the refractive index of toluene is close to that of the wood cell wall substance. The optical parameters of the wood cell wall substance calculated were μa = 0.030 mm(-1) and μ´s= 18.4 mm(-1). Monte Carlo simulations using these values were in good agreement with the measured time-resolved transmittance profiles.

  2. Neutron bombardment of single wall carbon nanohorn (SWCNH). DSC determination of the stored Wigner-Szilard energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franco Cataldo; Susana Iglesias-Groth; Yaser Hafez; Giancarlo Angelini

    2014-01-01

    Single wall carbon nanohorn (SWCNH) were neutron-bombarded to a dose of 3.28 × 10 16 n/cm 2 . The Wigner or stored energy was determined by a differential scanning calorimeter and was found 5.49 J/g, 50 times higher than the Wigner energy measured on graphite flakes treated at the same neutron dose. The activation energy for the thermal annealing of the accumulated radiation damage in SWCNH was determined in the range 6.3-6.6 eV against a typical activation energy for the annealing of the radiation-damaged graphite which is in the range of 1.4-1.5 eV. Furthermore the stored energy in neutron-damaged SWCNH is released at 400-430 deg C while the main peak in the neutron-damaged graphite occurs at 200-220 deg C. The radiation damaged SWCNH were examined with FT-IR spectroscopy showing the formation of acetylenic and aliphatic moieties suggesting the aromatic C=C breakdown caused by the neutron bombardment. (author)

  3. Voltammetric determination of In3+ based on the bifunctionality of a multi-walled carbon nanotubes-nafion modified electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junhua; Zhang, Fuxing; Wang, Jianqiu; Xu, Zhifeng; Zeng, Rongying

    2009-05-01

    Due to the strong cation-exchange ability of Nafion and the excellent properties of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), a highly sensitive and mercury-free method of determining trace levels of In(3+) has been established based on the bifunctionality of a MWCNTs/Nafion modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE). The MWCNTs/Nafion modified GCE detects In(3+) in a 0.01 M HAc-NaAc buffer solution at pH 5.0 using anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV). The experimental results suggest that a sensitive anodic stripping peak appears at -0.58 V on anodic stripping voltammograms, which can be used as an analytical signal for the determination of In(3+). A good linear relationship between the stripping peak currents and the In(3+) concentration is obtained, covering the concentration range from 5.0 x 10(-10) to 2.0 x 10(-7) M, with a correlation coefficient of 0.999; the detection limit is 1.0 x 10(-11) M. This proposed method has been applied to detect In(3+) as a new way.

  4. Voltammetric determination of Cd{sup 2+} based on the bifunctionality of single-walled carbon nanotubes-Nafion film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Dong [Department of Pharmacy, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou 325000 (China) and Department of Chemistry, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)]. E-mail: sun_dong11@163.com; Xie Xiafeng [Department of Pharmacy, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou 325000 (China); Cai Yuepiao [Department of Pharmacy, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou 325000 (China); Zhang Huajie [Department of Pharmacy, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou 325000 (China); Wu Kangbing [Department of Chemistry, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2007-01-02

    In the presence of Nafion, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were easily dispersed into ethanol, resulting in a homogeneous SWNTs/Nafion suspension. After evaporating ethanol, a SWNTs/Nafion film with bifunctionality was constructed onto glassy carbon electrode (GCE) surface. Attributing to the strong cation-exchange ability of Nafion and excellent properties of SWNTs, the SWNTs/Nafion film-coated GCE remarkably enhances the sensitivity of determination of Cd{sup 2+}. Based on this, an electrochemical method was developed for the determination of trace levels of Cd{sup 2+} by anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV). In pH 5.0 NaAc-HAc buffer, Cd{sup 2+} was firstly exchanged and adsorbed onto SWNTs/Nafion film surface, and then reduce at -1.10 V. During the positive potential sweep, reduced cadmium was oxidized, and a well-defined stripping peak appeared at -0.84 V, which can be used as analytical signal for Cd{sup 2+}. The linear range is found to be from 4.0 x 10{sup -8} to 4.0 x 10{sup -6} mol L{sup -1}, and the lowest detectable concentration is estimated to be 4.0 x 10{sup -9} mol L{sup -1}. Finally, this method was successfully employed to detect Cd{sup 2+} in water samples.

  5. Voltammetric determination of Cd2+ based on the bifunctionality of single-walled carbon nanotubes-Nafion film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Dong; Xie Xiafeng; Cai Yuepiao; Zhang Huajie; Wu Kangbing

    2007-01-01

    In the presence of Nafion, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were easily dispersed into ethanol, resulting in a homogeneous SWNTs/Nafion suspension. After evaporating ethanol, a SWNTs/Nafion film with bifunctionality was constructed onto glassy carbon electrode (GCE) surface. Attributing to the strong cation-exchange ability of Nafion and excellent properties of SWNTs, the SWNTs/Nafion film-coated GCE remarkably enhances the sensitivity of determination of Cd 2+ . Based on this, an electrochemical method was developed for the determination of trace levels of Cd 2+ by anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV). In pH 5.0 NaAc-HAc buffer, Cd 2+ was firstly exchanged and adsorbed onto SWNTs/Nafion film surface, and then reduce at -1.10 V. During the positive potential sweep, reduced cadmium was oxidized, and a well-defined stripping peak appeared at -0.84 V, which can be used as analytical signal for Cd 2+ . The linear range is found to be from 4.0 x 10 -8 to 4.0 x 10 -6 mol L -1 , and the lowest detectable concentration is estimated to be 4.0 x 10 -9 mol L -1 . Finally, this method was successfully employed to detect Cd 2+ in water samples

  6. A multifunctional mannosyltransferase family in Candida albicans determines cell wall mannan structure and host-fungus interactions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mora-Montes, H.M.; Bates, S.; Netea, M.G.; Castillo, L.; Brand, A.; Buurman, E.T.; Diaz-Jimenez, D.F.; Kullberg, B.J.; Brown, A.J.; Odds, F.C.; Gow, N.A.

    2010-01-01

    The cell wall proteins of fungi are modified by N- and O-linked mannosylation and phosphomannosylation, resulting in changes to the physical and immunological properties of the cell. Glycosylation of cell wall proteins involves the activities of families of endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi-located

  7. Ballistic Limit Equation for Single Wall Titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratliff, J. M.; Christiansen, Eric L.; Bryant, C.

    2009-01-01

    Hypervelocity impact tests and hydrocode simulations were used to determine the ballistic limit equation (BLE) for perforation of a titanium wall, as a function of wall thickness. Two titanium alloys were considered, and separate BLEs were derived for each. Tested wall thicknesses ranged from 0.5mm to 2.0mm. The single-wall damage equation of Cour-Palais [ref. 1] was used to analyze the Ti wall's shielding effectiveness. It was concluded that the Cour-Palais single-wall equation produced a non-conservative prediction of the ballistic limit for the Ti shield. The inaccurate prediction was not a particularly surprising result; the Cour-Palais single-wall BLE contains shield material properties as parameters, but it was formulated only from tests of different aluminum alloys. Single-wall Ti shield tests were run (thicknesses of 2.0 mm, 1.5 mm, 1.0 mm, and 0.5 mm) on Ti 15-3-3-3 material custom cut from rod stock. Hypervelocity impact (HVI) tests were used to establish the failure threshold empirically, using the additional constraint that the damage scales with impact energy, as was indicated by hydrocode simulations. The criterion for shield failure was defined as no detached spall from the shield back surface during HVI. Based on the test results, which confirmed an approximately energy-dependent shield effectiveness, the Cour-Palais equation was modified.

  8. Anodic stripping voltammetric determination of mercury using multi-walled carbon nanotubes film coated glassy carbon electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Hongchao [Department of Environmental Engineering, Hubei Agriculture College, 434103, Jingzhou (China)

    2003-10-01

    An electrochemical method for the determination of trace levels of mercury based on a multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) film coated glassy carbon electrode (GCE) is described. In 0.1 mol L{sup -1} HCl solution containing 0.02 mol L{sup -1} KI, Hg{sup 2+} was firstly preconcentrated at the MWNT film and then reduced at -0.60 V. During the anodic potential sweep, reduced mercury was oxidized, and then a sensitive and well-defined stripping peak at about -0.20 V appeared. Under identical conditions, a MWNT film coated GCE greatly enhances the stripping peak current of mercury in contrast to a bare GCE. Low concentrations of I{sup -} remarkably improve the determining sensitivity, since this increases the accumulation efficiency of Hg{sup 2+} at the MWNT film coated GCE. The stripping peak current is proportional to the concentration of Hg{sup 2+} over the range 8 x 10{sup -10}-5 x 10{sup -7} mol L{sup -1}. The lowest detectable concentration of Hg{sup 2+} is 2 x 10{sup -10} mol L{sup -1} at 5 min accumulation. The relative standard deviation (RSD) at 1 x 10{sup -8} mol L{sup -1} Hg{sup 2+} was about 6% (n=10). By using this proposed method, Hg{sup 2+} in some water samples was determined, and the results were compared with those obtained by atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). The two results are similar, suggesting that the MWNT-film coated GCE has great potential in practical analysis. (orig.)

  9. Impact of concentration and rate of intraluminal drug delivery on absorption and gut wall metabolism of verapamil in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaeser, Hartmut; Drescher, Siegfried; Hofmann, Ute; Heinkele, Georg; Somogyi, Andrew A; Eichelbaum, Michel; Fromm, Martin F

    2004-09-01

    In humans gut wall metabolism can be quantitatively as important as hepatic drug metabolism in limiting the systemic exposure to drugs after oral administration. However, it has been proposed that the role of gut wall metabolism might be overemphasized, because high luminal drug concentrations would lead to a saturation of gut wall metabolism. Therefore we investigated the impact of concentration and rate of intraluminal drug delivery on absorption (F(abs)) and gastrointestinal extraction (E(GI)) of a luminally administered cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4 substrate (verapamil) using a multilumen perfusion catheter in combination with a stable isotope technique. Two 20-cm-long, adjacent jejunal segments were isolated with the multilumen perfusion catheter in 7 subjects. In this study 80 mg of unlabeled verapamil (d0-verapamil 15 min) was infused into one segment over a 15-minute period, 80 mg of 3-fold deuterated verapamil (d3-verapamil 240 min) was administered over a 240-minute period into the other segment, and simultaneously, 5 mg of 7-fold deuterated verapamil (d7-verapamil) was injected intravenously over a 15-minute period. The rate of intraluminal drug delivery had only a modest effect on bioavailability of the verapamil isotopes (after correction for F abs ) (F/F abs d3-verapamil 240 min versus d0-verapamil 15 min, 0.24 +/- 0.10 versus 0.20 +/- 0.09; P d3-verapamil 240 min was 0.50 +/- 0.18 compared with 0.59 +/- 0.14 for d0 -verapamil 15 min ( P d0-verapamil 15 min ) correlated strongly with E GI (d3-verapamil 240 min ) (r = 0.94, P d0-verapamil 15 min /d3-verapamil 240 min (r = 0.62, P =.03). Substantial gut wall metabolism of verapamil occurs in humans and can be predicted from ex vivo data by use of shed enterocytes. The different intraluminal concentrations and rates of intraluminal drug delivery did not lead to a pronounced saturation of intestinal drug metabolism.

  10. The Impact of Sonication on the Surface Quality of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Byumseok; Cheng, Wei

    2015-08-01

    Sonication process is regularly adopted for dispersing single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in an aqueous medium. This can be achieved by either covalent functionalization of SWCNTs with strong acid or by noncovalent functionalization using dispersants that adsorb onto the surface of SWCNTs during dispersion. Because the dispersion process is usually performed using sonication, unintentional free radical formation during sonication process may induce covalent modification of SWCNT surface. Herein, we have systematically investigated the status of SWCNT surface modification under various sonication conditions using Raman spectroscopy. Comparing ID /IG (Raman intensities between D and G bands) ratio of SWCNTs under various sonication conditions suggests that typical sonication conditions (1-6 h bath sonication with sonication power between 3 and 80 W) in aqueous media do not induce covalent modification of SWCNT surface. In addition, we confirm that SWCNT dispersion with single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) involves noncovalent adsorption of ssDNA onto the surface of SWCNTs, but not covalent linkage between ssDNA and SWCNT surface. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  11. On the Impact of Particulate Matter Distribution on Pressure Drop of Wall-Flow Particulate Filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicente Bermúdez

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Wall-flow particulate filters are a required exhaust aftertreatment system to abate particulate matter emissions and meet current and incoming regulations applying worldwide to new generations of diesel and gasoline internal combustion engines. Despite the high filtration efficiency covering the whole range of emitted particle sizes, the porous substrate constitutes a flow restriction especially relevant as particulate matter, both soot and ash, is collected. The dependence of the resulting pressure drop, and hence the fuel consumption penalty, on the particulate matter distribution along the inlet channels is discussed in this paper taking as reference experimental data obtained in water injection tests before the particulate filter. This technique is demonstrated to reduce the particulate filter pressure drop without negative effects on filtration performance. In order to justify these experimental data, the characteristics of the particulate layer are diagnosed applying modeling techniques. Different soot mass distributions along the inlet channels are analyzed combined with porosity change to assess the new properties after water injection. Their influence on the subsequent soot loading process and regeneration is assessed. The results evidence the main mechanisms of the water injection at the filter inlet to reduce pressure drop and boost the interest for control strategies able to force the re-entrainment of most of the particulate matter towards the inlet channels’ end.

  12. DETERMINANTS OF NETWORK OUTCOMES: THE IMPACT OF MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ysa, Tamyko; Sierra, Vicenta; Esteve, Marc

    2014-09-01

    The literature on network management is extensive. However, it generally explores network structures, neglecting the impact of management strategies. In this article we assess the effect of management strategies on network outcomes, providing empirical evidence from 119 urban revitalization networks. We go beyond current work by testing a path model for the determinants of network outcomes and considering the interactions between the constructs: management strategies, trust, complexity, and facilitative leadership. Our results suggest that management strategies have a strong effect on network outcomes and that they enhance the level of trust. We also found that facilitative leadership has a positive impact on network management as well as on trust in the network. Our findings also show that complexity has a negative impact on trust. A key finding of our research is that managers may wield more influence on network dynamics than previously theorized.

  13. CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles decorated multi-walled carbon nanotubes for electrochemical determination of guanine and adenine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei Yan [College of Chemistry and Materials Sciences, Anhui Normal University, Wuhu 241000 (China); Department of Chemistry, Wannan Medical College, Wuhu 241002 (China); Huang Qinan [Department of Chemistry, Wannan Medical College, Wuhu 241002 (China); Li Maoguo [College of Chemistry and Materials Sciences, Anhui Normal University, Wuhu 241000 (China); Huang Xingjiu [Institute of Intelligent Machines, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Fang Bin, E-mail: binfang_47@yahoo.com.cn [College of Chemistry and Materials Sciences, Anhui Normal University, Wuhu 241000 (China); Wang Lun, E-mail: wanglun@mail.ahnu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry and Materials Sciences, Anhui Normal University, Wuhu 241000 (China)

    2011-10-01

    Sub-10 nm CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles decorated multi-walled carbon nanotubes has been constructed for electrochemial determination of guanine and adenine. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to characterize the nanoparticles CeO{sub 2}/MWCNTs. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to characterize the electrode modifying process. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) were used to study the electrocatalytic activity toward the electrochemical oxidation of guanine and adenine. The detection limit (S/N = 3) for adenine and guanine was found to be 20 and 10 nM, respectively. The obtained sensitivity toward guanine and adenine was 1.26 and 1.13 {mu}A/{mu}M in the linear concentration range 5-50 {mu}M and 5-35 {mu}M, respectively. These results demonstrate that the carbon nanotubes could provide huge locations and facilitate the adsorptive accumulation of the guanine and adenine, and the CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles are promising substrates for the development of high-performance electrocatalysts for biosensing.

  14. Determinant and impacts of dynamic inflation in Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Biresaw, Temesgen Tezera

    2014-01-01

    This thesis uses quarterly data for the period 1998-2010 to investigate the determinant and impacts of dynamic inflation in Ethiopia. By using Granger causality model approach four testable hypotheses are investigated: (1) does the money supply growth Granger-cause inflation? (2) Does currency devaluation Granger cause inflation? (3) Does inflation affect economic growth? And (4) Does oil price Granger cause of inflation? The empirical results suggest that there existed a bi-directional ...

  15. ['FLEXIBLE WALLS' IN HOSPITALS - ASSESSING THE 'VALUE' OF SOCIAL IMPACT ON ARCHITECTURE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tal, Orna; Tal, Shy-Lee

    2018-05-01

    : The development of hospital architecture is influenced by social trends, with mutual influence. Architecture enables 'organic-design' that leads to development, growth and adaptation of the structure to changing functions. A literature review reveals different perceptions of the flexibility of adapting hospital structure to changing needs, focusing on external forces pressures (expensive technologies, budgetary constraints limiting innovation implementation and regulatory barriers), as well as patients' demands. The degree of contribution of structural changes to the measured or perceived benefit to the patient and staff, has not yet been fully assessed. Expressions of this benefit are infection-control and increasing operational efficiency by energy saving and sustainability. To examine workers' perceptions towards value-based-architecture in relation to the patient or staff in a hospital setting. A survey was conducted among health care workers who underwent management training, using a structured questionnaire. Sixty responders ranked hospital leadership and relevant professionals (engineers and architects) as key players in the decision to change architecture in a hospital; economists, doctors and nurses were ranked as less important, while patients and families were ranked the lowest. Among the factors that contribute to the 'value' of the decision were the agility to adapt to emergency, and to changing morbidity trends in an efficient way. Factors ranked as being of medium importance were the contribution to hospital profitability and, to a lesser extent, the contribution to branding and improved service. 'Flexible walls' (shifting rooms between departments according to clinical need) can provide a response to morbidity changes. Hospital workers can play a role in the process of value-based architecture, thereby improving decisions concerning hospital construction and increasing their commitment to additional quality processes.

  16. Clinical impact of ' in-treatment' wall motion abnormalities in hypertensive patients with left ventricular hypertrophy: the LIFE study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cicala, S.; Simone, G. de; Wachtell, K.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives Left ventricular systolic wall motion abnormalities have prognostic value. Whether wall motion detected by serial echocardiographic examinations predicts prognosis in hypertensive patients with left ventricular hypertrophy ( LVH) without clinically recognized atherosclerotic disease ha...

  17. Assessment of the impact of degraded shear wall stiffnesses on seismic plant risk and seismic design loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klamerus, E.W.; Bohn, M.P.; Johnson, J.J.; Asfura, A.P.; Doyle, D.J.

    1994-02-01

    Test results sponsored by the USNRC have shown that reinforced shear wall (Seismic Category I) structures exhibit stiffnesses and natural frequencies which are smaller than those calculated in the design process. The USNRC has sponsored Sandia National Labs to perform an evaluation of the effects of the reduced frequencies on several existing seismic PRAs in order to determine the seismic risk implications inherent in these test results. This report presents the results for the re-evaluation of the seismic risk for three nuclear power plants: the Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station, the Zion Nuclear Power Plant, and Arkansas Nuclear One -- Unit 1 (ANO-1). Increases in core damage frequencies for seismic initiated events at Peach Bottom were 25 to 30 percent (depending on whether LLNL or EPRI hazard curves were used). At the ANO-1 site, the corresponding increases in plant risk were 10 percent (for each set of hazard curves). Finally, at Zion, there was essentially no change in the computed core damage frequency when the reduction in shear wall stiffness was included. In addition, an evaluation of deterministic ''design-like'' structural dynamic calculations with and without the shear stiffness reductions was made. Deterministic loads calculated for these two cases typically increased on the order of 10 to 20 percent for the affected structures

  18. Determination of multi-walled carbon nanotube bioaccumulation in earthworms measured by a microwave-based detection technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reliable quantification techniques for carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are limited. In this study, a new procedure was developed for quantifying multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) in earthworms (Eisenia fetida) based on freeze drying and microwave-induced heating. Specifically, earthw...

  19. Financial Transaction Tax: Determination of Economic Impact Under DSGE Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Solilová

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The discussion about the possible taxation of the financial sector has started in the European Union as a result of the financial crisis which has spread to the Europe from the United States in 2008 and consequently of the massive financial interventions by governments made in favour of the financial sector. On 14 February 2013, after rejection of the draft of the directive introducing a common system of financial transaction tax in 2011, the European Commission introduced the financial transaction tax through enhanced cooperation. The aim of the paper is to research economic impact of financial transaction tax on EU (EU27 or EU11 with respect to the DSGE model which was used for the determination of impacts. Based on our analysis the DSGE model can be considered as underestimated in case of the impact on economic growth and an overestimated in case of the revenue collection. Particularly, the overall impact of the financial transaction tax considering cascade effects of securities (tax rate 2.2% and derivatives (tax rate 0.2% is ranged between −4.752 and 1.472 percent points of GDP. And further, is assumed that the relocation effects of business/trade can be in average 40% causes a decline of expected tax revenues in the amount of 13bn EUR. Thus, at a time of fragile economic growth across the EU and the increased risk of recession in Europe, the introduction of the FTT should be undesirable.

  20. SU-F-T-517: Determining the Tissue Equivalence of a Brass Mesh Bolus in a Reconstructed Chest Wall Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shekel, E; Epstein, D; Levin, D [Dept of radiotherapy, Assuta Medical Centers, Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To determine the tissue equivalence of a brass mesh bolus (RPD) in the setting of a reconstructed chest wall irradiation Methods: We measured breast skin dose delivered by a tangential field plan on an anthropomorphic phantom using Mosfet and nanoDot (Landauer) dosimeters in five different locations on the breast. We also measured skin dose using no bolus, 5mm and 10 mm superflab bolus. In the Eclipse treatment planning system (Varian, Palo Alto, CA) we calculated skin dose for different bolus thicknesses, ranging from 0 to 10 mm, in order to evaluate which calculation best matches the brass mesh measurements, as the brass mesh cannot be simulated due to artefacts.Finally, we measured depth dose behavior with the brass mesh bolus to verify that the bolus does not affect the dose to the breast itself beyond the build-up region. Results: Mosfet and nanoDot measurements were consistent with each other.As expected, skin dose measurements with no bolus had the least agreement with Eclipse calculation, while measurements for 5 and 10 mm agreed well with the calculation despite the difficulty in conforming superflab bolus to the breast contour. For the brass mesh the best agreement was for 3 mm bolus Eclipse calculation. For Mosfets, the average measurement was 90.8% of the expected dose, and for nanoDots 88.33% compared to 83.34%, 88.64% and 93.94% (2,3 and 5 mm bolus calculation respectively).The brass mesh bolus increased skin dose by approximately 25% but there was no dose increase beyond the build-up region. Conclusion: Brass mesh bolus is most equivalent to a 3 mm bolus, and does not affect the dose beyond the build-up region. The brass mesh cannot be directly calculated in Eclipse, hence a 3mm bolus calculation is a good reflection of the dose response to the brass mesh bolus.

  1. The impact of transcatheter aortic valve implantation on left ventricular performance and wall thickness – single-centre experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymański, Piotr; Dąbrowski, Maciej; Zakrzewski, Dariusz; Michałek, Piotr; Orłowska-Baranowska, Ewa; El-Hassan, Kamal; Chmielak, Zbigniew; Witkowski, Adam; Hryniewiecki, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is a treatment alternative for the elderly population with severe symptomatic aortic stenosis (AS) at high risk for surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR). Aim To assess the impact of TAVI on echocardiographic parameters of left ventricular (LV) performance and wall thickness in patients subjected to the procedure in a single-centre between 2009 and 2013. Material and methods The initial group consisted of 170 consecutive patients with severe AS unsuitable for SAVR. Logistic European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation (EuroSCORE) was 21.73 ±12.42% and mean age was 79.9 ±7.5 years. Results The TAVI was performed in 167 (98.2%) patients. Mean aortic gradient decreased significantly more rapidly after the procedure (from 58.6 ±16.7 mm Hg to 11.9 ±4.9 mm Hg, p < 0.001). The LV ejection fraction (LVEF) significantly increased in both short-term and long-term follow-up (57 ±14% vs. 59 ±13%, p < 0.001 and 56 ±14% vs. 60 ±12%, p < 0.001, respectively). Significant regression of interventricular septum diameter at end-diastole (IVSDD) and end-diastolic posterior wall thickness (EDPWth) was noted in early (15.0 ±2.4 mm vs. 14.5 ±2.3 mm, p < 0.001 and 12.7 ±2.1 mm vs. 12.4 ±1.9 mm, p < 0.028, respectively) and late post-TAVI period (15.1 ±2.5 mm to 14.3 ±2.5 mm, p < 0.001 and 12.8 ±2.0 mm to 12.4 ±1.9 mm, p < 0.007, respectively). Significant paravalvular leak (PL) was noted in 21 (13.1%) patients immediately after TAVI and in 13 (9.6%) patients in follow-up (p < 0.001). Moderate or severe mitral regurgitation (msMR) was seen in 24 (14.9%) patients from the initial group and in 19 (11.8%) patients after TAVI (p < 0.001). Conclusions The TAVI had an immediate beneficial effect on LVEF, LV walls thickness, and the incidence of msMR. The results of the procedure are comparable with those described in other centres. PMID:25848369

  2. Impact of the resistive wall impedance on beam dynamics in the Future Circular e^{+}e^{-} Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Migliorati

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The Future Circular Collider study, which aims at designing post-LHC particle accelerator options, is entering in the final stage, which foresees a conceptual design report containing the basic requirements for a hadron and a lepton collider, as well as options for an electron-proton machine. Due to the high beam intensities of these accelerators, collective effects have to be carefully analyzed. Among them, the finite conductivity of the beam vacuum chamber represents a major source of impedance for the electron-positron collider. By using numerical and analytical tools, a parametric study of longitudinal and transverse instabilities caused by the resistive wall is performed in this paper for the case of the Future Circular Collider lepton machine, by taking into account also the effects of coating, used to fight the electron cloud build up. It will be proved that under certain assumptions the coupling impedance of a two layer system does not depend on the conductivity of the coating and this property represents an important characteristic for the choice of the material itself. The results and findings of this study have an impact on the machine design in several aspects. In particular the quite low threshold of single bunch instabilities with respect to the nominal beam current and the not negligible power losses due to the resistive wall are shown, together with the necessity of a new feedback system to counteract the fast transverse coupled bunch instability. The importance of a round vacuum chamber to avoid the quadrupolar tune shift is also discussed. Finally the crucial importance of the beam pipe material coating and thickness choice for the above results is underlined.

  3. Impact of the resistive wall impedance on beam dynamics in the Future Circular e+e- Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliorati, M.; Belli, E.; Zobov, M.

    2018-04-01

    The Future Circular Collider study, which aims at designing post-LHC particle accelerator options, is entering in the final stage, which foresees a conceptual design report containing the basic requirements for a hadron and a lepton collider, as well as options for an electron-proton machine. Due to the high beam intensities of these accelerators, collective effects have to be carefully analyzed. Among them, the finite conductivity of the beam vacuum chamber represents a major source of impedance for the electron-positron collider. By using numerical and analytical tools, a parametric study of longitudinal and transverse instabilities caused by the resistive wall is performed in this paper for the case of the Future Circular Collider lepton machine, by taking into account also the effects of coating, used to fight the electron cloud build up. It will be proved that under certain assumptions the coupling impedance of a two layer system does not depend on the conductivity of the coating and this property represents an important characteristic for the choice of the material itself. The results and findings of this study have an impact on the machine design in several aspects. In particular the quite low threshold of single bunch instabilities with respect to the nominal beam current and the not negligible power losses due to the resistive wall are shown, together with the necessity of a new feedback system to counteract the fast transverse coupled bunch instability. The importance of a round vacuum chamber to avoid the quadrupolar tune shift is also discussed. Finally the crucial importance of the beam pipe material coating and thickness choice for the above results is underlined.

  4. THE IMPACT OF WALL ROUGHNESS OF THE UNDERGROUND AIRWAYS ON THE VALUE OF HYDRAULIC FRICTION FACTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Rendulić

    1991-12-01

    Full Text Available The studies of turbulent flows in round pipes resulted in many hydraulic formulas up to these days, which can also serve in projecting to calculate the resistance to the air flow in underground openings. The report discusses the way of establishing the hydraulic friction factor of untimbered underground workings when the value of equivalent roughness is obtained by measuring the ventilation parameters in a similar working of some other mine. A double reticular nomogram has been constructed for the fast determination of friction coefficient from the known roughness of an underground working (the paper is published in Croatian.

  5. Biomass enzymatic saccharification is determined by the non-KOH-extractable wall polymer features that predominately affect cellulose crystallinity in corn.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Jia

    Full Text Available Corn is a major food crop with enormous biomass residues for biofuel production. Due to cell wall recalcitrance, it becomes essential to identify the key factors of lignocellulose on biomass saccharification. In this study, we examined total 40 corn accessions that displayed a diverse cell wall composition. Correlation analysis showed that cellulose and lignin levels negatively affected biomass digestibility after NaOH pretreatments at p<0.05 & 0.01, but hemicelluloses did not show any significant impact on hexoses yields. Comparative analysis of five standard pairs of corn samples indicated that cellulose and lignin should not be the major factors on biomass saccharification after pretreatments with NaOH and H2SO4 at three concentrations. Notably, despite that the non-KOH-extractable residues covered 12%-23% hemicelluloses and lignin of total biomass, their wall polymer features exhibited the predominant effects on biomass enzymatic hydrolysis including Ara substitution degree of xylan (reverse Xyl/Ara and S/G ratio of lignin. Furthermore, the non-KOH-extractable polymer features could significantly affect lignocellulose crystallinity at p<0.05, leading to a high biomass digestibility. Hence, this study could suggest an optimal approach for genetic modification of plant cell walls in bioenergy corn.

  6. Automatic determination of the dynamic geometry of abdominal aortic aneurysm from MR with application to wall stress simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putter, de S.; Breeuwer, M.; Kose, U.; Vosse, van de F.N.; Gerritsen, F.A.; Lemke, H.U.

    2005-01-01

    The current surgical intervention criterion for abdominal aortic aneurysm is based on the maximum transverse diameter of the aorta. Recent research advances indicate that a better rupture predictor may be derived from the wall stress, which can be computed with the finite element method. An

  7. Impact of competitive flow on wall shear stress in coronary surgery: computational fluid dynamics of a LIMA-LAD model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordgaard, Håvard; Swillens, Abigail; Nordhaug, Dag; Kirkeby-Garstad, Idar; Van Loo, Denis; Vitale, Nicola; Segers, Patrick; Haaverstad, Rune; Lovstakken, Lasse

    2010-12-01

    Competitive flow from native coronary vessels is considered a major factor in the failure of coronary bypass grafts. However, the pathophysiological effects are not fully understood. Low and oscillatory wall shear stress (WSS) is known to induce endothelial dysfunction and vascular disease, like atherosclerosis and intimal hyperplasia. The aim was to investigate the impact of competitive flow on WSS in mammary artery bypass grafts. Using computational fluid dynamics, WSS was calculated in a left internal mammary artery (LIMA) graft to the left anterior descending artery in a three-dimensional in vivo porcine coronary artery bypass graft model. The following conditions were investigated: high competitive flow (non-significant coronary lesion), partial competitive flow (significant coronary lesion), and no competitive flow (totally occluded coronary vessel). Time-averaged WSS of LIMA at high, partial, and no competitive flow were 0.3-0.6, 0.6-3.0, and 0.9-3.0 Pa, respectively. Further, oscillatory WSS quantified as the oscillatory shear index (OSI) ranged from (maximum OSI = 0.5 equals zero net WSS) 0.15 to 0.35, OSI similar to the no competitive flow condition. Graft flow is highly dependent on the degree of competitive flow. High competitive flow was found to produce unfavourable WSS consistent with endothelial dysfunction and subsequent graft narrowing and failure. Partial competitive flow, however, may be better tolerated as it was found to be similar to the ideal condition of no competitive flow.

  8. An Applied Method for Predicting the Load-Carrying Capacity in Compression of Thin-Wall Composite Structures with Impact Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrofanov, O.; Pavelko, I.; Varickis, S.; Vagele, A.

    2018-03-01

    The necessity for considering both strength criteria and postbuckling effects in calculating the load-carrying capacity in compression of thin-wall composite structures with impact damage is substantiated. An original applied method ensuring solution of these problems with an accuracy sufficient for practical design tasks is developed. The main advantage of the method is its applicability in terms of computing resources and the set of initial data required. The results of application of the method to solution of the problem of compression of fragments of thin-wall honeycomb panel damaged by impacts of various energies are presented. After a comparison of calculation results with experimental data, a working algorithm for calculating the reduction in the load-carrying capacity of a composite object with impact damage is adopted.

  9. Determining long-term regional erosion rates using impact craters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hergarten, Stefan; Kenkmann, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    More than 300,000 impact craters have been found on Mars, while the surface of Moon's highlands is even saturated with craters. In contrast, only 184 impact craters have been confirmed on Earth so far with only 125 of them exposed at the surface. The spatial distribution of these impact craters is highly inhomogeneous. Beside the large variation in the age of the crust, consumption of craters by erosion and burial by sediments are the main actors being responsible for the quite small and inhomogeneous crater record. In this study we present a novel approach to infer long-term average erosion rates at regional scales from the terrestrial crater inventory. The basic idea behind this approach is a dynamic equilibrium between the production of new craters and their consumption by erosion. It is assumed that each crater remains detectable until the total erosion after the impact exceeds a characteristic depth depending on the crater's diameter. Combining this model with the terrestrial crater production rate, i.e., the number of craters per unit area and time as a function of their diameter, allows for a prediction of the expected number of craters in a given region as a function of the erosion rate. Using the real crater inventory, this relationship can be inverted to determine the regional long-term erosion rate and its statistical uncertainty. A limitation by the finite age of the crust can also be taken into account. Applying the method to the Colorado Plateau and the Deccan Traps, both being regions with a distinct geological history, yields erosion rates in excellent agreement with those obtained by other, more laborious methods. However, these rates are formally exposed to large statistical uncertainties due to the small number of impact craters. As higher crater densities are related to lower erosion rates, smaller statistical errors can be expected when large regions in old parts of the crust are considered. Very low long-term erosion rates of less than 4

  10. LIME REQUIREMENT DETERMINATION AND LIMING IMPACT ON SOIL NUTRIENT STATUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krunoslav Karalić

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of conducted research was to determine the influence of liming, mineral and organic fertilization on soil chemical properties and nutrient availability in the soil, yield height and mineral composition of alfalfa. Results were used to create regression models for prediction of liming impact on soil chemical properties. Liming and fertilization experiment was sat up in 20 L volume plastic pots with two types of acid soils with different texture from two sites. Ten liming and fertilization treatments were applied in four repetitions. Lime treatments increased soil pH values and decreased hydrolytic acidity. Mineral and organic fertilization affected additional soil acidification. Application of lime intensified mineralization and humus decomposition, while organic fertilization raised humus content. The results showed significant increase of AL-P2O5 and K2O availability. The treatments increased soil Ca concentrations, but at the same time decreased exchangeable Mg concentrations. Soil pH increase resulted in lower Fe, Mn, Zn and Cu availability. Soil CEC was increased by applied treatments. Lime rates increased number and height of alfalfa plants, as well as yield of leaf, stalk increased concentrations of N, P, K and Ca in alfalfa leaf and stalk, but decreased leaf Mg and Fe, Mn, Zn and Cu concentrations. Regression computer models predicted with adequate accuracy P, Fe, Mn, Zn and Cu availability and final pH value as a result of liming and fertilization impact.

  11. Simultaneous Determination of Parathion, Malathion, Diazinon, and Pirimiphos Methyl in Dried Medicinal Plants Using Solid-Phase Microextraction Fibre Coated with Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Ahmadkhaniha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A reliable and sensitive headspace solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method for simultaneous determination of different organophosphorus pesticides in dried medicinal plant samples is described. The analytes were extracted by single-walled carbon nanotubes as a new solid-phase microextraction adsorbent. The developed method showed good performance. For diazinon and pirimiphos methyl calibration, curves were linear (r2≥0.993 over the concentration ranges from 1.5 to 300 ng g−1, and the limit of detection at signal-to-noise ratio of 3 was 0.3 ng g−1. For parathion and malathion, the linear range and limit of detection were 2.5–300 (r2≥0.991 and 0.5 ng g−1, respectively. In addition, a comparative study between the single-walled carbon nanotubes and a commercial polydimethylsiloxane fibre for the determination of target analytes was carried out. Single-walled carbon nanotubes fibre showed higher extraction capacity, better thermal stability (over 350∘C, and longer lifespan (over 250 times than the commercial polydimethylsiloxane fibre. The developed method was successfully applied to determine target organophosphorus pesticides in real samples.

  12. Cell wall glycans and soluble factors determine the interactions between the hyphae of Candida albicans and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Alexandra; Barnes, Julia D; Mackenzie, Kevin S; Odds, Frank C; Gow, Neil A R

    2008-10-01

    The fungus, Candida albicans, and the bacterium, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, are opportunistic human pathogens that have been coisolated from diverse body sites. Pseudomonas aeruginosa suppresses C. albicans proliferation in vitro and potentially in vivo but it is the C. albicans hyphae that are killed while yeast cells are not. We show that hyphal killing involves both contact-mediated and soluble factors. Bacterial culture filtrates contained heat-labile soluble factors that killed C. albicans hyphae. In cocultures, localized points of hyphal lysis were observed, suggesting that adhesion and subsequent bacteria-mediated cell wall lysis is involved in the killing of C. albicans hyphae. The glycosylation status of the C. albicans cell wall affected the rate of contact-dependent killing because mutants with severely truncated O-linked, but not N-linked, glycans were hypersensitive to Pseudomonas-mediated killing. Deletion of HWP1, ALS3 or HYR1, which encode major hypha-associated cell wall proteins, had no effect on fungal susceptibility.

  13. Overexpression of SbMyb60 impacts phenylpropanoid biosynthesis and alters secondary cell wall composition in sorghum bicolor

    Science.gov (United States)

    The phenylpropanoid biosynthesis pathway that generates lignin subunits represents a significant target to alter the abundance and composition of lignin. The major regulators of phenylpropanoid metabolism are myb transcription factors, which have been shown to modulate secondary cell wall compositi...

  14. Impact of vessel wall lesions and vascular stenoses on cerebrovascular reactivity in patients with intracranial stenotic disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cogswell, Petrice M; Davis, Taylor L; Strother, Megan K; Faraco, Carlos C; Scott, Allison O; Jordan, Lori C; Fusco, Matthew R; Frederick, Blaise deB; Hendrikse, Jeroen; Donahue, Manus J

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: To compare cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) and CVR lagtimes in flow territories perfused by vessels with vs. without proximal arterial wall disease and/or stenosis, separately in patients with atherosclerotic and nonatherosclerotic (moyamoya) intracranial stenosis. MATERIALS AND METHODS:

  15. Impact of Pore–Walls Ligand Assembly on the Biodegradation of Mesoporous Organosilica Nanoparticles for Controlled Drug Delivery

    KAUST Repository

    Omar, Haneen; Moosa, Basem; Alamoudi, Kholod; Anjum, Dalaver H.; Emwas, Abdul-Hamid M.; El Tall, Omar; Vu, Binh; Tamanoi, Fuyu; AlMalik, Abdulaziz; Khashab, Niveen M.

    2018-01-01

    -assembly of the organic linkers provides a crystal-like pore wall. However, unlike metal coordination, specific geometries cannot be predicted because of the competitive and dynamic nature of noncovalent interactions. Herein, we study the influence of competing

  16. Extracellular Vesicle-Associated Transitory Cell Wall Components and Their Impact on the Interaction of Fungi with Host Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimrichter, Leonardo; de Souza, Marcio M; Del Poeta, Maurizio; Nosanchuk, Joshua D; Joffe, Luna; Tavares, Patricia de M; Rodrigues, Marcio L

    2016-01-01

    Classic cell wall components of fungi comprise the polysaccharides glucans and chitin, in association with glycoproteins and pigments. During the last decade, however, system biology approaches clearly demonstrated that the composition of fungal cell walls include atypical molecules historically associated with intracellular or membrane locations. Elucidation of mechanisms by which many fungal molecules are exported to the extracellular space suggested that these atypical components are transitorily located to the cell wall. The presence of extracellular vesicles (EVs) at the fungal cell wall and in culture supernatants of distinct pathogenic species suggested a highly functional mechanism of molecular export in these organisms. Thus, the passage of EVs through fungal cell walls suggests remarkable molecular diversity and, consequently, a potentially variable influence on the host antifungal response. On the basis of information derived from the proteomic characterization of fungal EVs from the yeasts Cryptoccocus neoformans and Candida albicans and the dimorphic fungi Histoplasma capsulatum and Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, our manuscript is focused on the clear view that the fungal cell wall is much more complex than previously thought.

  17. Magnetization reversal in ferromagnetic spirals via domain wall motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumm, Ryan D.; Kunz, Andrew

    2016-11-01

    Domain wall dynamics have been investigated in a variety of ferromagnetic nanostructures for potential applications in logic, sensing, and recording. We present a combination of analytic and simulated results describing the reliable field driven motion of a domain wall through the arms of a ferromagnetic spiral nanowire. The spiral geometry is capable of taking advantage of the benefits of both straight and circular wires. Measurements of the in-plane components of the spirals' magnetization can be used to determine the angular location of the domain wall, impacting the magnetoresistive applications dependent on the domain wall location. The spirals' magnetization components are found to depend on the spiral parameters: the initial radius and spacing between spiral arms, along with the domain wall location. The magnetization is independent of the parameters of the rotating field used to move the domain wall, and therefore the model is valid for current induced domain wall motion as well. The speed of the domain wall is found to depend on the frequency of the rotating driving field, and the domain wall speeds can be reliably varied over several orders of magnitude. We further demonstrate a technique capable of injecting multiple domain walls and show the reliable and unidirectional motion of domain walls through the arms of the spiral.

  18. Experimental–theoretical methodology for determination of inertial pressure drop distribution and pore structure properties in wall-flow diesel particulate filters (DPFs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Payri, F.; Broatch, A.; Serrano, J.R.; Piqueras, P.

    2011-01-01

    Wall-flow particulate filters have been placed as a standard technology for Diesel engines because of the increasing restrictions to soot emissions. The inclusion of this system within the exhaust line requires the development of computational tools to properly simulate its flow dynamics and acoustics behaviour. These aspects become the key to understand the influence on engine performance and driveability as a function of the filter placement. Since the pressure drop and the filtration process are strongly depending on the pore structure properties – permeability, porosity and pore size – a reliable definition of these characteristics is essential for model development. In this work a methodology is proposed to determine such properties based on the combination of the pressure drop rement in a steady flow test rig and two theoretical approaches. The later are a lumped model and a one-dimensional (1D) unsteady compressible flow model. The purpose is to simplify the integration of particulate filters into the global engine modelling and development processes avoiding the need to resort to specific and expensive characterisation tests. The proposed methodology was validated against measurements of the response of an uncoated diesel particulate filter (DPF) under different flow conditions as cold steady flow, impulsive flow and hot pulsating flow. -- Highlights: ► Experimental and modelling tools to characterise wall-flow DPFs pressure drop. ► Decomposition of inertial pressure drop contributions in canned DPFs. ► Methodology to define pore structure properties in clean wall-flow DPFs. ► Evaluation of specific permeability, porosity and mean pore diameter. ► Significant influence of slip-flow effect on uncoated wall-flow DPFs.

  19. A Novel of Multi-wall Carbon Nanotubes/Chitosan Electrochemical Sensor for Determination of Cupric ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Funeng; Li, Lei

    2018-03-01

    A multi-wall carbon nanotubes/Chitosan electrochemical sensor had been fabricated by dropping CHS/MWNT solution directly onto the GC surface. The sensor was charactered by cyclic voltammetry and AC impedance with K3Fe(CN)6 as a electrochemical probe; Cyclic voltammograms(CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy(EIS) indicated that the active area and electrochemical behavior of the sensor increased and improved significantly after the electrode was modified by carbon nanotubes dispersed by the chitosan. The sensor showed good electrocatalytic activity of K3Fe(CN)6. Also, from the cyclic voltammograms, we can see the process was diffusion controlled on the bare electrode and kinetics and diffusion controlled on the modified electrode. Finally Cu2+ responsed sensitively at the sensor which supplied a new method for the detection of Cu2+.

  20. Arterial bending angle and wall morphology correlate with slow coronary flow: Determination with multidetector CT coronary angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kantarci, Mecit; Guendogdu, Fuat; Doganay, Selim; Duran, Cihan; Kalkan, M. Emin; Sagsoz, M. Erdem; Kucuk, Osman; Karakaya, Afak; Kucuk, Ahmet; Akguen, Metin

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess angulations and vessel wall morphology that could lead to bending head loss in the RCA and LMCA arteries of patients with slow coronary flow (SCF) evaluated by MDCT coronary angiography. Methods: The study involved 51 patients (45 males, mean age: 59.6 years) who were diagnosed with SCF by coronary angiography. Diagnosis of SCF was based on thrombolysis in myocardial infarction (TIMI) frame count. Fifty-one patients with absence of slow flow were selected as the control group. The angulations of the main coronary arteries with the aorta were measured from the axial images obtained through MDCT coronary angiography, and the findings were recorded. In addition, the coronary artery walls of these patients were evaluated. For statistical analysis, SPSS for Windows 10.0 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL) was used. For comparisons of the angles, either independent samples t test or the Mann-Whitney U test was used where appropriate. Results: The results of the study indicated that 38 patients had SCF in the LAD. Comparisons of patients with SCF with the controls revealed that in the patients with SCF, the mean angle of the LMCA with the aorta (40.9 ± 20.5 o ) was statistically significantly smaller than the mean angle of the LMCA with the aorta in the control cases (71.8 ± 11 o ). In 12 patients, slow flow was detected in the RCA. Those with slow flow in the RCA had significantly smaller angles (mean: 33.2 ± 20.4 o ) than the other cases (mean: 78.9 ± 10.7 o ). Conclusion: A small angle of origin of the main coronary arteries from the aorta, measured on MDCT examinations is correlated with slow blood flow in those vessels, as calculated by the TIMI frame count in catheter coronary angiography.

  1. Arterial bending angle and wall morphology correlate with slow coronary flow: Determination with multidetector CT coronary angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kantarci, Mecit, E-mail: akkanrad@hotmail.com [Department of Radiology, Medical Faculty, Atatuerk University, Erzurum (Turkey); Guendogdu, Fuat [Department of Cardiology, Medical Faculty, Atatuerk University, Erzurum (Turkey); Doganay, Selim [Department of Radiology, Medical Faculty, Erciyes University, Kayseri (Turkey); Duran, Cihan [Department of Radiology, Bilim University, Florence Nightingale Hospital, Istanbul (Turkey); Kalkan, M. Emin [Department of Cardiology, Medical Faculty, Atatuerk University, Erzurum (Turkey); Sagsoz, M. Erdem [Department of Radiology, Medical Faculty, Atatuerk University, Erzurum (Turkey); Kucuk, Osman [Department of Electronic Engineering, Engineering Faculty, Atatuerk University, Erzurum (Turkey); Karakaya, Afak [Department of Radiology, Medical Faculty, Atatuerk University, Erzurum (Turkey); Kucuk, Ahmet [Department of Mathematics, Science Faculty, Atatuerk University, Erzurum (Turkey); Akguen, Metin [Department of Chest, Medical Faculty, Atatuerk University, Erzurum (Turkey)

    2011-01-15

    Background and purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess angulations and vessel wall morphology that could lead to bending head loss in the RCA and LMCA arteries of patients with slow coronary flow (SCF) evaluated by MDCT coronary angiography. Methods: The study involved 51 patients (45 males, mean age: 59.6 years) who were diagnosed with SCF by coronary angiography. Diagnosis of SCF was based on thrombolysis in myocardial infarction (TIMI) frame count. Fifty-one patients with absence of slow flow were selected as the control group. The angulations of the main coronary arteries with the aorta were measured from the axial images obtained through MDCT coronary angiography, and the findings were recorded. In addition, the coronary artery walls of these patients were evaluated. For statistical analysis, SPSS for Windows 10.0 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL) was used. For comparisons of the angles, either independent samples t test or the Mann-Whitney U test was used where appropriate. Results: The results of the study indicated that 38 patients had SCF in the LAD. Comparisons of patients with SCF with the controls revealed that in the patients with SCF, the mean angle of the LMCA with the aorta (40.9 {+-} 20.5{sup o}) was statistically significantly smaller than the mean angle of the LMCA with the aorta in the control cases (71.8 {+-} 11{sup o}). In 12 patients, slow flow was detected in the RCA. Those with slow flow in the RCA had significantly smaller angles (mean: 33.2 {+-} 20.4{sup o}) than the other cases (mean: 78.9 {+-} 10.7{sup o}). Conclusion: A small angle of origin of the main coronary arteries from the aorta, measured on MDCT examinations is correlated with slow blood flow in those vessels, as calculated by the TIMI frame count in catheter coronary angiography.

  2. Determining the Financial Impact of Flood Hazards in Ungaged Basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotterman, K. A.; Gutenson, J. L.; Pradhan, N. R.; Byrd, A.

    2017-12-01

    Many portions of the Earth lack adequate authoritative or in situ data that is of great value in determining natural hazard vulnerability from both anthropogenic and physical perspective. Such locations include the majority of developing nations, which do not possess adequate warning systems and protective infrastructure. The lack of warning and protection from natural hazards make these nations vulnerable to the destructive power of events such as floods. The goal of this research is to demonstrate an initial workflow with which to characterize flood financial hazards with global datasets and crowd-sourced, non-authoritative data in ungagged river basins. This workflow includes the hydrologic and hydraulic response of the watershed to precipitation, characterized by the physics-based modeling application Gridded Surface-Subsurface Hydrologic Analysis (GSSHA) model. In addition, data infrastructure and resources are available to approximate the human impact of flooding. Open source, volunteer geographic information (VGI) data can provide global coverage of elements at risk of flooding. Additional valuation mechanisms can then translate flood exposure into percentage and financial damage to each building. The combinations of these tools allow the authors to remotely assess flood hazards with minimal computational, temporal, and financial overhead. This combination of deterministic and stochastic modeling provides the means to quickly characterize watershed flood vulnerability and will allow emergency responders and planners to better understand the implications of flooding, both spatially and financially. In either a planning, real-time, or forecasting scenario, the system will assist the user in understanding basin flood vulnerability and increasing community resiliency and preparedness.

  3. Defining and determining the significance of impacts: concepts and methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, S.W.; Van Winkle, W.; Mattice, J.S.

    1975-01-01

    The term impact is conceptually and mathematically defined to be the difference in the state or value of an ecosystem with versus without the source of impact. Some resulting problems associated with the measurement of impacts based on comparisons of baseline and operational data are discussed briefly. The concept of a significant adverse impact on a biological system is operationally defined in terms of an adverse impact which, according to a proposed decision-tree, justifies rejection of a project or a change in its site, design, or mode of operation. A gradient of increasing difficulty in the prediction of impacts exists as the scope of the assessment is expanded to consider long-term, far-field impacts with respect to higher levels of biological organization (e.g., communities or ecosystems). The analytical methods available for predicting short-term, near-field impacts are discussed. Finally, the role of simulation modeling as an aid to professional judgment in predicting the long-term, far-field consequences of impacts is considered, and illustrated with an example. (U.S.)

  4. The Magma Chamber Simulator: Modeling the Impact of Wall Rock Composition on Mafic Magmas during Assimilation-Fractional Crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creamer, J. B.; Spera, F. J.; Bohrson, W. A.; Ghiorso, M. S.

    2012-12-01

    Although stoichiometric titration is often used to model the process of concurrent Assimilation and Fractional Crystallization (AFC) within a compositionally evolving magma body, a more complete treatment of the problem involves simultaneous and self-consistent determination of stable phase relationships and separately evolving temperatures of both Magma (M) and Wall Rock (WR) that interact as a composite M-WR system. Here we present results of M-WR systems undergoing AFC forward modeled with the Magma Chamber Simulator (MCS), which uses the phase modeling capabilities of MELTS (Ghiorso & Sack 1995) as the thermodynamic basis. Simulations begin with one of a variety of mafic magmas (e.g. HAB, MORB, AOB) intruding a set mass of Wall Rock (e.g. lherzolite, gabbro, diorite, granite, metapelite), and heat is exchanged as the M-WR system proceeds towards thermal equilibrium. Depending on initial conditions, the early part of the evolution can involve closed system FC while the WR heats up. The WR behaves as a closed system until it is heated beyond the solidus to critical limit for melt fraction extraction (fc), ranging between 0.08 and 0.12 depending on WR characteristics including composition and, rheology and stress field. Once fc is exceeded, a portion of the anatectic liquid is assimilated into the Magma. The MCS simultaneously calculates mass and composition of the mineral assemblage (Magma cumulates and WR residue) and melt (anatectic and Magma) at each T along the equilibration trajectory. Sensible and latent heat lost or gained plus mass gained by the Magma are accounted for by the MCS via governing Energy Constrained- Recharge Assimilation Fractional Crystallization (EC-RAFC) equations. In a comparison of two representative MCS results, consider a granitic WR intruded by HAB melt (51 wt. % SiO2) at liquidus T in shallow crust (0.1 GPa) with a WR/M ratio of 1.25, fc of 0.1 and a QFM oxygen buffer. In the first example, the WR begins at a temperature of 100o

  5. Experimental determination of temperatures of the inner wall of a boiler combustion chamber for the purpose of verification of a CFD model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Trávníček

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on the non-destructive method of determination of temperatures in the boiler combustion chamber. This method proves to be significant mainly as regards CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics simulations of combustion processes, in case of which it is subsequently advisable to verify the data calculated using CFD software application with the actually measured data. Verification of the method was based on usage of reference combustion equipment (130 kW which performs combustion of a mixture of waste sawdust and shavings originating in the course of production of wooden furniture. Measuring of temperatures inside the combustion chamber is – considering mainly the high temperature values – highly demanding and requires a special type of temperature sensors. Furthermore, as regards standard operation, it is not possible to install such sensors without performing structural alterations of the boiler. Therefore, for the purpose of determination of these temperatures a special experimental device was constructed while exploiting a thermal imaging system used for monitoring of the surface temperature of outer wall of the reference boiler. Temperatures on the wall of the boiler combustion chamber were determined on the basis of data measured using the experimental device as well as data from the thermal imaging system. These values might serve for verification of the respective CFD model of combustion equipment.

  6. Voltammetric determination of bisphenol A in food package by a glassy carbon electrode modified with carboxylated multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, J.; Kuang, D.; Feng, Y.; Zhang, F.; Liu, M.

    2011-01-01

    A highly sensitive and mercury-free method for determination of bisphenol A (BPA) was established using a glassy carbon electrode that was modified with carboxylated multi-walled carbon nanotubes. A sensitive oxidation peak is found at 550 mV in linear sweep voltammograms at pH 7. Based on this finding, trace levels of bisphenol A can be determined over a concentration range that is linear from 10 nM to 104 nM, the correlation coefficient being 0.9983, and the detection limit (S/N = 3) being 5.0 nM. The method was successfully applied to the determination of BPA in food package. (author)

  7. Reducing the Impact of Electroconductivity and the Gap between the Pipe and the Transducer at Measuring Thickness of Electroconductive Pipe Walls using the Eddy-Current Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yakimov Evgeny

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes a dual-frequency method for reducing the impact of changes in the gap size between the eddy-current transducer and the pipe, as well as the pipe electrical conductivity on the eddy-current thickness gauge readings. A block-diagram of the dual-frequency eddycurrent thickness gauge is proposed for light-alloy drill pipes. The amplitude and signal phase dependencies on the wall thickness in the range from 6 to 17 mm and the gap in the range from 0 to 13.5 mm were studied, the results are presented. The digital signal processing algorithms based on the piecewise-linear approximation of low-frequency and high-frequency signal phase dependencies on the wall thickness are proposed. It is shown that the proposed correction algorithms can reduce the error caused by variations of electrical conductivity and the gap between the transducer and the pipe.

  8. Simulation and analysis of collapsing vapor-bubble clusters with special emphasis on potentially erosive impact loads at walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogloblina, Daria; Schmidt, Steffen J.; Adams, Nikolaus A.

    2018-06-01

    Cavitation is a process where a liquid evaporates due to a pressure drop and re-condenses violently. Noise, material erosion and altered system dynamics characterize for such a process for which shock waves, rarefaction waves and vapor generation are typical phenomena. The current paper presents novel results for collapsing vapour-bubble clusters in a liquid environment close to a wall obtained by computational fluid mechanics (CFD) simulations. The driving pressure initially is 10 MPa in the liquid. Computations are carried out by using a fully compressible single-fluid flow model in combination with a conservative finite volume method (FVM). The investigated bubble clusters (referred to as "clouds") differ by their initial vapor volume fractions, initial stand-off distances to the wall and by initial bubble radii. The effects of collapse focusing due to bubble-bubble interaction are analysed by investigating the intensities and positions of individual bubble collapses, as well as by the resulting shock-induced pressure field at the wall. Stronger interaction of the bubbles leads to an intensification of the collapse strength for individual bubbles, collapse focusing towards the center of the cloud and enhanced re-evaporation. The obtained results reveal collapse features which are common for all cases, as well as case-specific differences during collapse-rebound cycles. Simultaneous measurements of maximum pressures at the wall and within the flow field and of the vapor volume evolution show that not only the primary collapse but also subsequent collapses are potentially relevant for erosion.

  9. Determination of left ventricular wall motility injury by factor analysis in patients with advanced ischemic heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasalicky, J.; Kidery, J.; Vavrejn, B.; Surova, H.; Malek, I.

    1989-01-01

    Left ventricular phase and amplitude images (Fourier analysis, PAI) and factor analysis images (FAI) from gated radionuclide ventriculography were obtained in 235 patients after myocardial infarction (MI) and in 44 patients with well documented ischemic heart disease (IHD) in order to assess areas of regional left ventricular motility injury (LVMI). The sensitivity of FAI for LVMI detection was higher than with PAI (36.3% vs 22.7% in patients without MI; 76.6% vs 68% in those after anterior MI; and 53.2% vs 31.9% after posterior MI, respectively). In 2.9% of all patients PAI were unclear due to small time activity amplitudes and heart rate irregularity, whereas FAI could be easily assessed. Significantly decreased left ventricular ejection fraction was observed predominantly after anterior MI in connection with distinct signs of LVMI in a large area of anterior wall or in the anteroseptal and/or apical region. Areas of LVMI could be sharply delineated in FAI; however, in contrast to PAI, FAI is unable to distinguish between dyskinetic and akinetic regions. The use of both PAI and FAI is recommended for more detailed detection of regional LVMI in patients with IHD. (orig.)

  10. Impact of noncovalent interactions between apple condensed tannins and cell walls on their transfer from fruit to juice: studies in model suspensions and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bourvellec, Carine; Le Quere, Jean-Michel; Renard, Catherine M G C

    2007-09-19

    The adsorption of procyanidins (condensed tannins) on cell-wall material was quantified by bringing into contact solutions of procyanidins and suspensions of cell-wall material. A model was developed on the basis of the Langmuir isotherm formulation and a factorial experimental design. The parameters that influenced the adsorption were the concentration and molecular weight of the procyanidins, the ionic strength of the solution, the temperature, and the apple cell-wall concentration. The model was applied to partitioning of procyanidins from apple between juice and mash. The parameters to be taken into account are the composition of the apples and, specifically, (i) the concentration and molecular weight of the procyanidins, (ii) their acidity and pH as a determinant of the ionic strength, and (iii) their cell-wall content and the temperature at pressing. To estimate the ability of the model to relate procyanidin concentrations in the juice to their concentration in the apple, apples of three varieties of widely different procyanidin compositions were pressed in conditions that prevent oxidation. In these conditions, yields in the juice were >80% for phenolic acids or catechin monomers but <50% for procyanidins, with the lowest rates obtained for the higher polymers in accordance with the model.

  11. Determination of barge impact probabilities for bridge design : [summary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    University of Florida researchers developed a revised barge impact probability expression applicable for the design of bridge structures located on Florida waterways. University of Florida researchers obtained barge flotilla traffic data and barge-to...

  12. Analytical determination of package response to severe impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludwigsen, J.S.; Ammerman, D.J.

    1995-01-01

    One important part of radioactive material transport risk assessments is amount of release from packages in accidents more severe than design basis accident (US NRC 10CFR71 1995). In order to remove some of the conservatism from current risk assessments, an effort is ongoing to qualify the finite element method for predicting cask performance by comparing analytical results to test measurements of the Structural Evaluation Test Unit (SETU) cask. Comparisons of deformed shapes, strains, and accelerations were made for impact velocities of 13.4, 20.1, and 26.8 m/s (30, 45, and 60 mph). The 13.4 m/s impact corresponds to the regulatory 9 m (30 ft) free fall, and the others correspond to impacts with 2.25 and 4 times the kinetic energy of the regulatory impact. One other analysis at an impact velocity of 38.0 m/s (85 mph) or 8 times regulatory impact kinetic energy was also done

  13. Gold nanoparticle/multi-walled carbon nanotube modified glassy carbon electrode as a sensitive voltammetric sensor for the determination of diclofenac sodium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afkhami, Abbas; Bahiraei, Atousa; Madrakian, Tayyebeh

    2016-02-01

    A simple and highly sensitive sensor for the determination of diclofenac sodium based on gold nanoparticle/multi-walled carbon nanotube modified glassy carbon electrode is reported. Scanning electron microscopy along with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry and square wave voltammetry was used to characterize the nanostructure and performance of the sensor and the results were compared with those obtained at the multi-walled carbon nanotube modified glassy carbon electrode and bare glassy carbon electrode. Under the optimized experimental conditions diclofenac sodium gave linear response over the range of 0.03-200μmolL(-1). The lower detection limits were found to be 0.02μmolL(-1). The effect of common interferences on the current response of DS was investigated. The practical application of the modified electrode was demonstrated by measuring the concentration of diclofenac sodium in urine and pharmaceutical samples. This revealed that the gold nanoparticle/multiwalled carbon nanotube modified glassy carbon electrode shows excellent analytical performance for the determination of diclofenac sodium in terms of a very low detection limit, high sensitivity, very good accuracy, repeatability and reproducibility. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Determination of melatonin in wine and plant extracts by capillary electrochromatography with immobilized carboxylic multi-walled carbon nanotubes as stationary phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stege, Patricia W; Sombra, Lorena L; Messina, Germán; Martinez, Luis D; Silva, María F

    2010-07-01

    The finding of melatonin, the often called "hormone of darkness" in plants opens an interesting perspective associated to the plethora of health benefits related to the moderate consumption of red wine. In this study, the implementation of a new method for the determination of melatonin in complex food matrices by CEC with immobilized carboxylic multi-walled carbon nanotubes as stationary phase is demonstrated. The results indicated high electrochromatographic resolution, good capillary efficiencies and improved sensitivity respect to those obtained with conventional capillaries. In addition, it was demonstrated highly reproducible results between runs, days and columns. The LOD for melatonin was 0.01 ng/mL. The method was successfully applied to the determination of melatonin in red and white wine, grape skin and plant extracts of Salvia officinalis L.

  15. Difficult Myotomy Is Not Determined by Preoperative Therapy and Does Not Impact Outcome

    OpenAIRE

    Cowgill, Sarah M.; Villadolid, Desiree V.; Al-Saadi, Sam; Rosemurgy, Alexander S.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: The impact of preoperative endoscopic therapy on the difficulty of laparoscopic Heller myotomy and the impact of the difficulty of the myotomy on long-term outcome has not been determined. This study was undertaken to determine whether preoperative therapy impacts the difficulty of laparoscopic Heller myotomy and whether preoperative therapy or difficulty of myotomy impacts long-term outcomes. Methods: Since 1992, 305 patients, 56% male, median age 49 years, underwent laparoscopic...

  16. Gold nanoparticle/multi-walled carbon nanotube modified glassy carbon electrode as a sensitive voltammetric sensor for the determination of diclofenac sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afkhami, Abbas; Bahiraei, Atousa; Madrakian, Tayyebeh

    2016-01-01

    A simple and highly sensitive sensor for the determination of diclofenac sodium based on gold nanoparticle/multi-walled carbon nanotube modified glassy carbon electrode is reported. Scanning electron microscopy along with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry and square wave voltammetry was used to characterize the nanostructure and performance of the sensor and the results were compared with those obtained at the multi-walled carbon nanotube modified glassy carbon electrode and bare glassy carbon electrode. Under the optimized experimental conditions diclofenac sodium gave linear response over the range of 0.03–200 μmol L −1 . The lower detection limits were found to be 0.02 μmol L −1 . The effect of common interferences on the current response of DS was investigated. The practical application of the modified electrode was demonstrated by measuring the concentration of diclofenac sodium in urine and pharmaceutical samples. This revealed that the gold nanoparticle/multiwalled carbon nanotube modified glassy carbon electrode shows excellent analytical performance for the determination of diclofenac sodium in terms of a very low detection limit, high sensitivity, very good accuracy, repeatability and reproducibility. - Highlights: • GCE was modified with multiwalled carbon nanotube and gold nanoparticles. • AuNP/MWCNT/GCE was used for the determination of diclofenac sodium. • Modified electrode was characterized by SEM, EDS and EIS. • The proposed method showed excellent analytical figures of merit. • This sensor was used for the determination of diclofenac sodium in real samples.

  17. Gold nanoparticle/multi-walled carbon nanotube modified glassy carbon electrode as a sensitive voltammetric sensor for the determination of diclofenac sodium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afkhami, Abbas, E-mail: afkhami@basu.ac.ir; Bahiraei, Atousa; Madrakian, Tayyebeh

    2016-02-01

    A simple and highly sensitive sensor for the determination of diclofenac sodium based on gold nanoparticle/multi-walled carbon nanotube modified glassy carbon electrode is reported. Scanning electron microscopy along with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry and square wave voltammetry was used to characterize the nanostructure and performance of the sensor and the results were compared with those obtained at the multi-walled carbon nanotube modified glassy carbon electrode and bare glassy carbon electrode. Under the optimized experimental conditions diclofenac sodium gave linear response over the range of 0.03–200 μmol L{sup −1}. The lower detection limits were found to be 0.02 μmol L{sup −1}. The effect of common interferences on the current response of DS was investigated. The practical application of the modified electrode was demonstrated by measuring the concentration of diclofenac sodium in urine and pharmaceutical samples. This revealed that the gold nanoparticle/multiwalled carbon nanotube modified glassy carbon electrode shows excellent analytical performance for the determination of diclofenac sodium in terms of a very low detection limit, high sensitivity, very good accuracy, repeatability and reproducibility. - Highlights: • GCE was modified with multiwalled carbon nanotube and gold nanoparticles. • AuNP/MWCNT/GCE was used for the determination of diclofenac sodium. • Modified electrode was characterized by SEM, EDS and EIS. • The proposed method showed excellent analytical figures of merit. • This sensor was used for the determination of diclofenac sodium in real samples.

  18. Ambiguous walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mody, Astrid

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) in the built environment has encouraged myriad applications, often embedded in surfaces as an integrated part of the architecture. Thus the wall as responsive luminous skin is becoming, if not common, at least familiar. Taking into account how wall...

  19. Impact of Pore–Walls Ligand Assembly on the Biodegradation of Mesoporous Organosilica Nanoparticles for Controlled Drug Delivery

    KAUST Repository

    Omar, Haneen

    2018-05-14

    Porous materials with molecular-scale ordering have attracted major attention mainly because of the possibility to engineer their pores for selective applications. Periodic mesoporous organosilica is a class of hybrid materials where self-assembly of the organic linkers provides a crystal-like pore wall. However, unlike metal coordination, specific geometries cannot be predicted because of the competitive and dynamic nature of noncovalent interactions. Herein, we study the influence of competing noncovalent interactions in the pore walls on the biodegradation of organosilica frameworks for drug delivery application. These results support the importance of studying self-assembly patterns in hybrid frameworks to better engineer the next generation of dynamic or “soft” porous materials.

  20. Ambiguous walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mody, Astrid

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) in the built environment has encouraged myriad applications, often embedded in surfaces as an integrated part of the architecture. Thus the wall as responsive luminous skin is becoming, if not common, at least familiar. Taking into account how walls...... have encouraged architectural thinking of enclosure, materiality, construction and inhabitation in architectural history, the paper’s aim is to define new directions for the integration of LEDs in walls, challenging the thinking of inhabitation and program. This paper introduces the notion...... of “ambiguous walls” as a more “critical” approach to design [1]. The concept of ambiguous walls refers to the diffuse status a lumious and possibly responsive wall will have. Instead of confining it can open up. Instead of having a static appearance, it becomes a context over time. Instead of being hard...

  1. Impact of Voltage Mapping to Guide Whether to Perform Ablation of the Posterior Wall in Patients With Persistent Atrial Fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutler, Michael J; Johnson, Jeremy; Abozguia, Khalid; Rowan, Shane; Lewis, William; Costantini, Otto; Natale, Andrea; Ziv, Ohad

    2016-01-01

    Fibrosis as a substrate for atrial fibrillation (AF) has been shown in numerous preclinical models. Voltage mapping enables in vivo assessment of scar in the left atrium (LA), which can be targeted with catheter ablation. We hypothesized that using the presence or absence of low voltage to guide ablation beyond pulmonary vein antral isolation (PVAI) will improve atrial arrhythmia (AF/AT)-free survival in persistent AF. Single-center retrospective analysis of 2 AF ablation strategies: (1) standard ablation (SA) versus (2) voltage-guided ablation (VGA). PVAI was performed in both groups. With SA, additional lesions beyond PVAI were performed at the discretion of the operator. With VGA, additional lesions to isolate the LA posterior wall were performed if voltage mapping of this region in sinus rhythm showed scar (LA voltage atrial size. Posterior wall ablation was performed in 57% of patient with SA compared to 42% with VGA. VGA ablation increased 1-year AF-/AT-free survival in patients when compared to SA (80% vs. 57%; P = 0.005). In a multivariate analysis, VGA was the only independent predictor of AF-/AT-free survival (hazard ratio of 0.30; P = 0.002). The presence of LA posterior wall scar may be an important ablation target in persistent AF. A prospective randomized trial is needed to confirm these data. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Impact of Age and Aerobic Exercise Training on Conduit Artery Wall Thickness: Role of the Shear Pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanahashi, Koichiro; Kosaki, Keisei; Sawano, Yuriko; Yoshikawa, Toru; Tagawa, Kaname; Kumagai, Hiroshi; Akazawa, Nobuhiko; Maeda, Seiji

    2017-01-01

    Hemodynamic shear stress is the frictional force of blood on the arterial wall. The shear pattern in the conduit artery affects the endothelium and may participate in the development and progression of atherosclerosis. We investigated the role of the shear pattern in age- and aerobic exercise-induced changes in conduit artery wall thickness via cross-sectional and interventional studies. In a cross-sectional study, we found that brachial shear rate patterns and brachial artery intima-media thickness (IMT) correlated with age. Additionally, brachial artery shear rate patterns were associated with brachial artery IMT in 102 middle-aged and older individuals. In an interventional study, 39 middle-aged and older subjects were divided into 2 groups: control and exercise. The exercise group completed 12 weeks of aerobic exercise training. Aerobic exercise training significantly increased the antegrade shear rate and decreased the retrograde shear rate and brachial artery IMT. Moreover, changes in the brachial artery antegrade shear rate and the retrograde shear rate correlated with the change in brachial artery IMT. The results of the present study indicate that changes in brachial artery shear rate patterns may contribute to age- and aerobic exercise training-induced changes in brachial artery wall thickness. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. What determines the impact of context on sequential action?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruitenberg, M.F.L.; Verwey, Willem B.; Abrahamse, E.L.

    2015-01-01

    In the current study we build on earlier observations that memory-based sequential action is better in the original learning context than in other contexts. We examined whether changes in the perceptual context have differential impact across distinct processing phases (preparation versus execution

  4. Comparison of sample digestion techniques for the determination of trace and residual catalyst metal content in single-wall carbon nanotubes by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grinberg, Patricia, E-mail: patricia.grinberg@nrc.ca [Measurement Science and Standards, National Research Council Canada, Ottawa (Canada); Sturgeon, Ralph E. [Measurement Science and Standards, National Research Council Canada, Ottawa (Canada); Diehl, Liange de O.; Bizzi, Cezar A. [Measurement Science and Standards, National Research Council Canada, Ottawa (Canada); Chemistry Department, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria (Brazil); Flores, Erico M.M. [Chemistry Department, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria (Brazil)

    2015-03-01

    A single-wall carbon nanotube material produced by laser ablation of renewable biochar in the presence of Ni and Co catalyst was characterized for residual catalyst (Co and Ni) as well as trace metal impurity content (Fe, Mo, Cr, Pb and Hg) by isotope dilution ICP-MS following sample digestion. Several matrix destruction procedures were evaluated, including a multi-step microwave-assisted acid digestion, dry ashing at 450 °C and microwave-induced combustion with oxygen. Results were benchmarked against those derived from neutron activation analysis and also supported by solid sampling continuum source GF-AAS for several of the elements. Although laborious to execute, the multi-step microwave-assisted acid digestion proved to be most reliable for recovery of the majority of the analytes, although content of Cr remained biased low for each approach, likely due to its presence as refractory carbide. - Highlights: • Determination of trace and residual catalyst metal content in Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry. • Comparative study of digestion methodology combined with high precision isotope dilution ICP-MS for quantitation of elements of toxicologic relevance. • Results were benchmarked against those derived from neutron activation analysis and also supported by solid sampling continuum source GF-AAS for several of the elements.

  5. Nonmassive acute pulmonary embolism: evaluation of the impact of pulmonary arterial wall distensibility on the assessment of the CT obstruction score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigot, Julien; Rémy-Jardin, Martine; Duhamel, Alain; Gorgos, Andréi-Bogdan; Faivre, Jean-Baptiste; Rémy, Jacques

    2010-02-01

    To evaluate the impact of pulmonary arterial wall distensibility on the assessment of a computed tomography (CT) score in patients with nonmassive pulmonary embolism (PE) (ie, Mastora score). The arterial wall distensibility of five central pulmonary arteries (pulmonary artery trunk, right and left main pulmonary arteries, right and left interlobar pulmonary arteries) was studied on ECG-gated CT angiographic studies of the chest in 15 patients with no pulmonary arterial hypertension (group 1; mean pulmonary artery pressure: 17.2 mm Hg) and 9 patients with nonmassive PE (group 2), using 2D reconstructions at every 10% of the R-R interval. The systolic and diastolic reconstruction time windows of the examined arteries were identical in the 2 groups, obtained at 20% and 80% of the R-R interval, respectively. No statistically significant difference was observed between the mean values of the pulmonary arterial wall distensibility between the 2 groups, varying between 20.5% and 24% in group 1 and between 23.3% and 25.9% in group 2. The coefficients of variation of the average arterial surfaces were found to vary between 4.30% and 6.50% in group 1 and 4.2% and 8.4% in group 2. Except the pulmonary artery trunk in group 2, all the intraclass correlation coefficients were around 0.8 or greater than 0.8, that is the cutoff for good homogeneity of measurements. The pulmonary arterial wall systolic-diastolic distensibility does not interfere with the assessment of a CT obstruction score in the setting of nonmassive PE.

  6. Impact of the surface quality on the thermal shock performance of beryllium armor tiles for first wall applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spilker, B., E-mail: b.spilker@fz-juelich.de; Linke, J.; Pintsuk, G.; Wirtz, M.

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Different surface qualities of S-65 beryllium are tested under high heat flux conditions. • After 1000 thermal shocks, the loaded area exhibits a crucial destruction. • Stress accelerated grain boundary oxidation/dynamic embrittlement effects are linked to the thermal shock performance of beryllium. • Thermally induced cracks form between 1 and 10 pulses and grow wider and deeper between 10 and 100 pulses. • Thermally induced cracks form and propagate independently from surface grooves and the surface quality. - Abstract: Beryllium will be applied as first wall armor material in ITER. The armor has to sustain high steady state and transient power fluxes. For transient events like edge localized modes, these transient power fluxes rise up to 1.0 GW m{sup −2} with a duration of 0.5–0.75 ms in the divertor region and a significant fraction of this power flux is deposited on the first wall as well. In the present work, the reference beryllium grade for the ITER first wall application S-65 was prepared with various surface conditions and subjected to transient power fluxes (thermal shocks) with ITER relevant loading parameters. After 1000 thermal shocks, a crucial destruction of the entire loaded area was observed and linked to the stress accelerated grain boundary oxidation (SAGBO)/dynamic embrittlement (DE) effect. Furthermore, the study revealed that the majority of the thermally induced cracks formed between 1 and 10 pulses and then grew wider and deeper with increasing pulse number. The surface quality did not influence the cracking behavior of beryllium in any detectable way. However, the polished surface demonstrated the highest resistance against the observed crucial destruction mechanism.

  7. The impact of different multi-walled carbon nanotubes on the X-band microwave absorption of their epoxy nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Bien Dong; Nguyen, Bao Quoc; Nguyen, Le-Thu T; Nguyen, Ha Tran; Nguyen, Viet Quoc; Van Le, Thang; Nguyen, Nieu Huu

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) characteristics, besides the processing conditions, can change significantly the microwave absorption behavior of CNT/polymer composites. In this study, we investigated the influence of three commercial multi-walled CNT materials with various diameters and length-to-diameter aspect ratios on the X-band microwave absorption of epoxy nanocomposites with CNT contents from 0.125 to 2 wt%, prepared by two dispersion methods, i.e. in solution with surfactant-aiding and via ball-milling. The laser diffraction particle size and TEM analysis showed that both methods produced good dispersions at the microscopic level of CNTs. Both a high aspect ratio resulting in nanotube alignment trend and good infiltration of the matrix in the individual nanotubes, which was indicated by high Brookfield viscosities at low CNT contents of CNT/epoxy dispersions, are important factors to achieve composites with high microwave absorption characteristics. The multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) with the largest aspect ratio resulted in composites with the best X-band microwave absorption performance, which is considerably better than that of reported pristine CNT/polymer composites with similar or lower thicknesses and CNT loadings below 4 wt%. A high aspect ratio of CNTs resulting in microscopic alignment trend of nanotubes as well as a good level of micro-scale CNT dispersion resulting from good CNT-matrix interactions are crucial to obtain effective microwave absorption performance. This study demonstrated that effective radar absorbing MWCNT/epoxy nanocomposites having small matching thicknesses of 2-3 mm and very low filler contents of 0.25-0.5 wt%, with microwave energy absorption in the X-band region above 90% and maximum absorption peak values above 97%, could be obtained via simple processing methods, which is promising for mass production in industrial applications. Graphical AbstractComparison of the X-band microwave reflection loss of epoxy composites of

  8. Impact of scaffold micro and macro architecture on Schwann cell proliferation under dynamic conditions in a rotating wall vessel bioreactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valmikinathan, Chandra M.; Hoffman, John; Yu, Xiaojun

    2011-01-01

    Over the last decade tissue engineering has emerged as a powerful alternative to regenerate lost tissues owing to trauma or tumor. Evidence shows that Schwann cell containing scaffolds have improved performance in vivo as compared to scaffolds that depend on cellularization post implantation. However, owing to limited supply of cells from the patients themselves, several approaches have been taken to enhance cell proliferation rates to produce complete and uniform cellularization of scaffolds. The most common approach is the application of a bioreactor to enhance cell proliferation rate and therefore reduce the time needed to obtain sufficiently significant number of glial cells, prior to implantation. In this study, we show the application of a rotating wall bioreactor system for studying Schwann cell proliferation on nanofibrous spiral shaped scaffolds, prepared by solvent casting and salt leaching techniques. The scaffolds were fabricated from polycaprolactone (PCL), which has ideal mechanical properties and upon degradation does not produce acidic byproducts. The spiral scaffolds were coated with aligned or random nanofibers, produced by electrospinning, to provide a substrate that mimics the native extracellular matrix and the essential contact guidance cues. At the 4 day time point, an enhanced rate of cell proliferation was observed on the open structured nanofibrous spiral scaffolds in a rotating wall bioreactor, as compared to static culture conditions. However, the cell proliferation rate on the other contemporary scaffolds architectures such as the tubular and cylindrical scaffolds show reduced cell proliferation in the bioreactor as compared to static conditions, at the same time point. Moreover, the rotating wall bioreactor does not alter the orientation or the phenotype of the Schwann cells on the aligned nanofiber containing scaffolds, wherein, the cells remain aligned along the length of the scaffolds. Therefore, these open structured spiral

  9. Impact of cell-voltage on energy and power performance of supercapacitors with single-walled carbon nanotube electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izadi-Najafabadi, Ali; Yamada, Takeo; Futaba, Don N.; Iijima, Sumio [Nanotube Research Center, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba (Japan); Hatori, Hiroaki [Project Headquarters, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba (Japan); Hata, Kenji [Japan Science and Technology Agency JST, Kawaguchi (Japan)

    2010-12-15

    We report the energy and power voltage-dependencies of supercapacitors using single-walled carbon nanotube electrodes. The energy density was dependent on the cell-voltage cubed (up to 4 V: E = 1.43 x V{sup 3}). The cubic relationship was attributed to the linear increase of the capacitance as a function of voltage, enabled by electrochemical doping. Furthermore, while up to 3.5 V, the maximum power rating of the nanotube electrodes increased as a function of the cell-voltage squared, beyond 3.5 V, a decline in power was observed as a result of depletion of the electrolyte's ions. (author)

  10. Using of multi-walled carbon nanotubes electrode for adsorptive stripping voltammetric determination of ultratrace levels of RDX explosive in the environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, Behzad; Damiri, Sajjad

    2010-11-15

    A study of the electrochemical behavior and determination of RDX, a high explosive, is described on a multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) using adsorptive stripping voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) techniques. The results indicated that MWCNTs electrode remarkably enhances the sensitivity of the voltammetric method and provides measurements of this explosive down to the sub-mg/l level in a wide pH range. The operational parameters were optimized and a sensitive, simple and time-saving cyclic voltammetric procedure was developed for the analysis of RDX in ground and tap water samples. Under optimized conditions, the reduction peak have two linear dynamic ranges of 0.6-20.0 and 8.0-200.0 mM with a detection limit of 25.0 nM and a precision of <4% (RSD for 8 analysis). Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Amperometric determination of 6-mercaptopurine on functionalized multi-wall carbon nanotubes modified electrode by liquid chromatography coupled with microdialysis and its application to pharmacokinetics in rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xu-Ni; Lin, Li; Zhou, Yu-Yan; Shi, Guo-Yue; Zhang, Wen; Yamamoto, Katsunobu; Jin, Li-Tong

    2003-07-27

    In this paper, multi-wall carbon nanotubes functionalized with carboxylic groups modified electrode (MWNT-COOH CME) was fabricated. This chemically modified electrode (CME) can be used as the working electrode in the liquid chromatography for the determination of 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP). The results indicate that the CME exhibits efficiently electrocatalytic oxidation for 6-MP with relatively high sensitivity, stability and long-life. The peak currents of 6-MP are linear to its concentrations ranging from 4.0 x 10(-7) to 1.0 x 10(-4) mol l(-1) with the calculated detection limit (S/N=3) of 2.0 x 10(-7) mol l(-1). Coupled with microdialysis, the method has been successfully applied to the pharmacokinetic study of 6-MP in rabbit blood. This method provides a fast, sensible and simple technique for the pharmacokinetic study of 6-MP in vivo.

  12. Wall Turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanratty, Thomas J.

    1980-01-01

    This paper gives an account of research on the structure of turbulence close to a solid boundary. Included is a method to study the flow close to the wall of a pipe without interferring with it. (Author/JN)

  13. Graphene/multi-walled carbon nanotubes functionalized with an amine-terminated ionic liquid for determination of (Z)-3-(chloromethylene)-6-fluorothiochroman-4-one in urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huanhuan; Yuan, Yanan; Xiang, Can; Yan, Hongyuan; Han, Yehong; Qiao, Fengxia

    2016-11-25

    A new type of amine-terminated-ionic-liquid-functionalized graphene/multi-walled carbon nanotubes hybrid material (IL-G/MWCNTs) was synthesized and used as an adsorbent in miniaturized pipette tip solid-phase extraction (PT-SPE) coupled with liquid chromatography for the isolation and determination of (Z)-3-(chloromethylene)-6-fluorothiochroman-4-one (CMFT) in urine. Parameters for the preparation of IL-G/MWCNTs and the PT-SPE procedure, including the mass ratio of graphene oxide and oxidized multi-walled carbon nanotubes, the mass ratio of graphene oxide and the ionic liquid, and the type and volume of washing and elution solvents were optimized to achieve higher extraction efficiency. Good linearity of the method was achieved in the range 0.03-5.0μgmL -1 with a coefficient of determination (r 2 ) of 0.9999. The limits of detection and quantification were 0.009 and 0.030μgmL -1 , respectively. The intra- and inter-day precisions, expressed as relative standard deviations (RSDs), were evaluated by performing replicate analyses of samples spiked at 0.1μgmL -1 on the same day (n=6) and over three consecutive days, and were 4.8 and 5.5%, respectively. Recoveries between 73.9 and 93.9% were obtained at three spiking levels, with RSDs≤7.9%. Five batches of the adsorbent were investigated to confirm the reliability of the preparation method. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Natural Gas and Cellulosic Biomass: A Clean Fuel Combination? Determining the Natural Gas Blending Wall in Biofuel Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    M Wright, Mark; Seifkar, Navid; Green, William H; Román-Leshkov, Yuriy

    2015-07-07

    Natural gas has the potential to increase the biofuel production output by combining gas- and biomass-to-liquids (GBTL) processes followed by naphtha and diesel fuel synthesis via Fischer-Tropsch (FT). This study reflects on the use of commercial-ready configurations of GBTL technologies and the environmental impact of enhancing biofuels with natural gas. The autothermal and steam-methane reforming processes for natural gas conversion and the gasification of biomass for FT fuel synthesis are modeled to estimate system well-to-wheel emissions and compare them to limits established by U.S. renewable fuel mandates. We show that natural gas can enhance FT biofuel production by reducing the need for water-gas shift (WGS) of biomass-derived syngas to achieve appropriate H2/CO ratios. Specifically, fuel yields are increased from less than 60 gallons per ton to over 100 gallons per ton with increasing natural gas input. However, GBTL facilities would need to limit natural gas use to less than 19.1% on a LHV energy basis (7.83 wt %) to avoid exceeding the emissions limits established by the Renewable Fuels Standard (RFS2) for clean, advanced biofuels. This effectively constitutes a blending limit that constrains the use of natural gas for enhancing the biomass-to-liquids (BTL) process.

  15. Determining the Publication Impact of a Digital Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Nancy R.; Nelson, Michael L.

    2000-01-01

    We attempt to assess the publication impact of a digital library (DL) of aerospace scientific and technical information (STI). The Langley Technical Report Server (LTRS) is a digital library of over 1,400 electronic publications authored by NASA Langley Research Center personnel or contractors and has been available in its current World Wide Web (WWW) form since 1994. In this study, we examine calendar year 1997 usage statistics of LTRS and the Center for AeroSpace Information (CASI), a facility that archives and distributes hard copies of NASA and aerospace information. We also perform a citation analysis on some of the top publications distributed by LTRS. We find that although LTRS distributes over 71,000 copies of publications (compared with an estimated 24,000 copies from CASI), citation analysis indicates that LTRS has almost no measurable publication impact. We discuss the caveats of our investigation, speculate on possible different models of usage facilitated by DLs , and suggest retrieval analysis as a complementary metric to citation analysis. While our investigation failed to establish a relationship between LTRS and increased citations and raises at least as many questions as it answers, we hope it will serve as a invitation to, and guide for, further research in the use of DLs.

  16. Single specimen fracture toughness determination procedure using instrumented impact test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rintamaa, R.

    1993-04-01

    In the study a new single specimen test method and testing facility for evaluating dynamic fracture toughness has been developed. The method is based on the application of a new pendulum type instrumented impact tester equipped with and optical crack mouth opening displacement (COD) extensometer. The fracture toughness measurement technique uses the Double Displacement Ratio (DDR) method, which is based on the assumption that the specimen is deformed as two rigid arms that rotate around an apparent centre of rotation. This apparent moves as the crack grows, and the ratio of COD versus specimen displacement changes. As a consequence the onset ductile crack initiation can be detected on the load-displacement curve. Thus, an energy-based fracture toughness can be calculated. In addition the testing apparatus can use specimens with the Double ligament size as compared with the standard Charpy specimen which makes the impact testing more appropriate from the fracture mechanics point of view. The novel features of the testing facility and the feasibility of the new DDR method has been verified by performing an extensive experimental and analytical study. (99 refs., 91 figs., 27 tabs.)

  17. Fiscal impacts of energy efficiency programmes—The example of solid wall insulation investment in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenow, Jan; Platt, Reg; Demurtas, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Programmes supporting the installation of energy efficiency measures typically incur a cost in the form of subsidies as well as lost VAT income due to reduced energy consumption. Those costs are to some extent offset by the tax receipts and other revenue streams generated as a result of the activities promoted under the programme. In this paper we analyse the budgetary effects of energy efficiency programmes focusing on the example of solid wall insulation in the UK. Three distinct subsidy options have been defined and modelled for the purpose of this research including two policies with varying degrees of direct subsidy and a low interest loan scheme. Our analysis shows that a significant amount of the cost of a scheme funding solid wall insulation would be offset by increased revenues and savings. A loan scheme, due to the high leverage, achieves not only budget neutrality but generates additional revenue for the Exchequer. - Highlights: • First assessment of fiscal effects of subsidising energy efficiency technologies in the UK. • Contribution to debate around wider benefits of funding energy efficiency. • Original economic modelling

  18. The impact of lithium wall coatings on NSTX discharges and the engineering of the Lithium Tokamak eXperiment (LTX)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majeski, R.; Kugel, H.; Kaita, R.; Avasarala, S.; Bell, M.G.; Bell, R.E.; Berzak, L.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Gerhardt, S.P.; Gransted, E.; Gray, T.; Jacobson, C.; Kallman, J.; Kaye, S.; Kozub, T.; LeBlanc, B.P.; Lepson, J.; Lundberg, D.P.; Maingi, R.; Mansfield, D.; Paul, S.F.; Pereverzev, G.V.; Schneider, H.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Strickler, T.; Stotler, D.; Timberlake, J.; Zakharov, L.E.

    2010-01-01

    Recent experiments on the National Spherical Torus eXperiment (NSTX) have shown the benefits of solid lithium coatings on carbon PFC's to diverted plasma performance, in both L- and H-mode confinement regimes. Better particle control, with decreased inductive flux consumption, and increased electron temperature, ion temperature, energy confinement time, and DD neutron rate were observed. Successive increases in lithium coverage resulted in the complete suppression of ELM activity in H-mode discharges. A liquid lithium divertor (LLD), which will employ the porous molybdenum surface developed for the LTX shell, is being installed on NSTX for the 2010 run period, and will provide comparisons between liquid walls in the Lithium Tokamak eXperiment (LTX) and liquid divertor targets in NSTX. LTX, which recently began operations at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, is the world's first confinement experiment with full liquid metal plasma-facing components (PFCs). All materials and construction techniques in LTX are compatible with liquid lithium. LTX employs an inner, heated, stainless steel-faced liner or shell, which will be lithium-coated. In order to ensure that lithium adheres to the shell, it is designed to operate at up to 500-600 degrees C to promote wetting of the stainless by the lithium, providing the first hot wall in a tokamak to Operate at reactor-relevant temperatures. The engineering of LTX will be discussed.

  19. Tornado missile impact study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, J.R.

    1991-01-01

    UCRL-15910 specifies wind and tornado missiles for moderate- and high-hazard DOE facilities. Wall-barrier specimens have been tested at the Tornado Missile Impact Facility at Texas Tech University. The facility has an air-activated tornado missile cannon capable of firing 2x4 timber planks weighing 12 lb at speeds up to 150 mph and 3-in-diameter steel pipes weighing 75 lb at speeds to 7 5 mph. Wall barriers tested to date include reinforced concrete walls from 4-in. to 10-in. thick; 8-in. and 12-in. walls of reinforced concrete masonry units (CMU); two other masonry wall configurations consisting of an 8-in. CMU with a 4-in. clay-brick veneer and a 10-in. composite wall with two wythes of 4-in. clay brick. The impact test series is designed to determine the impact speed that will produce backface spall of each wall barrier. A set of 15 wall sections has been constructed and tested at this time. Preliminary finding suggest that all cells of CMU walls must be grouted to prevent missile penetration. Walls recommended in the workshop on UCRL-15910 provide acceptable protection if cracking can be accepted

  20. Determining the impact of brand equity on consumer purchase intention

    OpenAIRE

    Özçifçi, Vesile

    2017-01-01

    In this study, it was attempted to determine whichbrand equity element is more effective regarding the mobile phone purchase ofuniversity students. Brand equity is defined in three dimensions which arebrand awareness, perceived quality and brand loyalty. Data was collected by1190 subjects studying at the faculties of Aksaray University. The data wastested by Structural Equation Modeling. As a result of the research, it wasfound that brand awareness affects perceived quality, but it does not a...

  1. Determinants and Duration of Impact of Early Gut Bacterial Colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Christine Ann

    2017-01-01

    An increasing number of studies show low diversity of the gut microbiome in those with chronic diseases such as obesity, inflammatory bowel disease, and allergy. Manipulation of the microbiota may promote health. However, the adult microbiota is stable and may be difficult to change. Understanding the fixed and modifiable factors, which determine colonization in early life, may provide strategies for acquisition of a health-promoting microbiome. Not enough is known about the long-term effects of established determinants of gut colonization, including delivery mode, perinatal antibiotics, and infant diet. It has been suggested that weaning onto solid diet containing non-digestible carbohydrates and cessation of breastfeeding are key stages in the colonization process. In addition, the microbiome of the placenta, amniotic fluid, and breast milk, alongside vaginal and fecal bacteria, may aid the transfer of maternal bacteria to the infant. However, methodological issues such as contamination during collection and/or analysis should be considered. Key Messages: The factors determining early colonization are becoming more evident. However, longitudinal studies of microbiome maturation into late childhood and adulthood are required. The nutrition and health status of the mother before, during, and after birth may be major factors in the early colonization of the infant. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Mercury-free simultaneous determination of cadmium and lead at a glassy carbon electrode modified with multi-wall carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Kangbing; Hu Shengshui; Fei Junjie; Bai Wen

    2003-01-01

    A multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWNT) modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) was described for the simultaneous determination of trace levels of cadmium and lead by anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV). In pH 4.5 NaAc-HAc buffer containing 0.02 mol/l KI, Cd 2+ and Pb 2+ first adsorb onto the surface of a MWNT film coated GCE and then reduce at -1.20 V. During the positive potential sweep, reduced cadmium and lead were oxidized, and two well-defined stripping peaks appeared at -0.88 and -0.62 V. Compared with a bare GCE, a MWNT film coated GCE greatly improves the sensitivity of determining cadmium and lead. Low concentration of I - significantly enhances the stripping peak currents since it induces Cd 2+ and Pb 2+ to adsorb at the electrode surface. The striping peak currents change linearly with the concentration of Cd 2+ from 2.5x10 -8 to 1x10 -5 mol/l and with that of Pb 2+ from 2x10 -8 to 1x10 -5 mol/l. The lowest detectable concentrations of Cd 2+ and Pb 2+ are estimated to be 6x10 -9 and 4x10 -9 mol/l, respectively. The high sensitivity, selectivity, and stability of this MWNT film coated electrode demonstrated its practical application for a simple, rapid and economical determination of trace levels of Cd 2+ and Pb 2+ in water samples

  3. A glassy carbon electrode modified with an amphiphilic, electroactive and photosensitive polymer and with multi-walled carbon nanotubes for simultaneous determination of dopamine and paracetamole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Ren; Zeng, Xuebiao; Liu, Jingcheng; Luo, Jing; Zheng, Yuanyi; Liu, Xiaoya

    2016-01-01

    The article describes an electrochemical sensor for simultaneous determination of dopamine (DA) and paracetamole (PAT). It is based on the use of an electroactive polymer (referred to as BPVCM) to functionalize multi-walled carbon nanotubes. BPVCM is a branched amphiphilic photo-sensitive and electroactive polymer that was obtained by copolymerization of a vinyl benzyl carbazole, maleic acid anhydride, 4-vinyl benzylthiol and a vinylbenzyl oxycoumarin. BPVCM efficiently disperses MWCNT in aqueous solution. The electropolymerization of the carbazole moieties of the BPVCM enhances the current response. It also facilitates electron transfer in the MWCNT-BPVCM hybrid as evidenced by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. A glassy carbon electrode modified with the nanocomposite displays outstanding electrocatalytic activity towards DA and PAT. DA can be determined, best at a working voltage of 0.2 V (vs. SCE), in the 5 to 1000 μM concentration range with a 2.3 μM detection limit. PAT can be determined in parallel, at a working voltage of 0.39 V (vs. SCE), in the same concentration range with a 3.5 μM detection limit. This analytical range of this method is wider than that of most alternative methods. (author)

  4. eWALL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyriazakos, Sofoklis; Mihaylov, Mihail; Anggorojati, Bayu

    2016-01-01

    challenge with impact in multiple sectors. In this paper we present an innovative ICT solution, named eWALL, that aims to address these challenges by means of an advanced ICT infrastructure and home sensing environment; thus differentiating from existing eHealth and eCare solutions. The system of e...

  5. Impact and determinants of sex preference in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, Tiziana; Matthews, Zoë; Dalla Zuanna, Gianpiero

    2003-06-01

    Gender discrimination and son preference are key demographic features of South Asia and are well documented for India. However, gender bias and sex preference in Nepal have received little attention. 1996 Nepal Demographic and Health Survey data on ever-married women aged 15-49 who did not desire any more children were used to investigate levels of gender bias and sex preference. The level of contraceptive use and the total fertility rate in the absence of sex preference were estimated, and logistic regression was performed to analyze the association between socioeconomic and demographic variables and stopping childbearing after the birth of a son. Commonly used indicators of gender bias, such as sex ratio at birth and sex-specific immunization rates, do not suggest a high level of gender discrimination in Nepal. However, sex preference decreases contraceptive use by 24% and increases the total fertility rate by more than 6%. Women's contraceptive use, exposure to the media, parity, last birth interval, educational level and religion are linked to stopping childbearing after the birth of a boy, as is the ethnic makeup of the local area. The level of sex preference in Nepal is substantial. Sex preference is an important barrier to the increase of contraceptive use and decline of fertility in the country; its impact will be greater as desired family size declines.

  6. Financial reporting reliability concept and impact factors in its determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vygivska I.М.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The article sets the goal to assess the reliability of financial reporting essence and summarize the factors that affect it. The article grounds the reliability of financial reporting urgency and characterizes its dual nature (on one hand, it is accounting containing reliable, reasonable data, characterized by the absence of errors and can be correctly perceived by users, on the other hand, reliable financial statements are considered to be formed according to the rules regulated by normative documents. It is proved that making decisions by interested users based on financial statements is closely related to information risk that arises because of the restrictions affect the flow of information on which management decisions are taken (accounting information that is difficult to understand by unskilled users, the impact of human factor, the level of information importance. The author establishes that the reliability of financial reporting is affected by many factors whose influence can be seen both outside, and within an enterprise. The main factors include: informational, political, legal, human, organizational and financial and they should be taken into account while making management decisions.

  7. A Data Model for Determining Weather's Impact on Travel Time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ove; Torp, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Accurate estimating travel times in road networks is a complex task because travel times depends on factors such as the weather. In this paper, we present a generic model for integrating weather data with GPS data to improve the accuracy of the estimated travel times. First, we present a data model...... for storing and map-matching GPS data, and integrating this data with detailed weather data. The model is generic in the sense that it can be used anywhere GPS data and weather data is available. Next, we analyze the correlation between travel time and the weather classes dry, fog, rain, and snow along...... with winds impact on travel time. Using a data set of 1.6 billion GPS records collected from 10,560 vehicles, over a 5 year period from all of Denmark, we show that snow can increase the travel time up to 27% and strong headwind can increase the travel time with up to 19% (compared to dry calm weather...

  8. Dynamic wall demonstration project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakatsui, L.; Mayhew, W.

    1990-12-01

    The dynamic wall concept is a ventilation strategy that can be applied to a single family dwelling. With suitable construction, outside air can be admitted through the exterior walls of the house to the interior space to function as ventilation air. The construction and performance monitoring of a demonstration house built to test the dynamic wall concept in Sherwood Park, Alberta, is described. The project had the objectives of demonstrating and assessing the construction methods; determining the cost-effectiveness of the concept in Alberta; analyzing the operation of the dynamic wall system; and determining how other components and systems in the house interact with the dynamic wall. The exterior wall construction consisted of vinyl siding, spun-bonded polyolefin-backed (SBPO) rigid fiberglass sheathing, 38 mm by 89 mm framing, fiberglass batt insulation and 12.7 mm drywall. The mechanical system was designed to operate in the dynamic (negative pressure) mode, however flexibility was provided to allow operation in the static (balanced pressure) mode to permit monitoring of the walls as if they were in a conventional house. The house was monitored by an extensive computerized monitoring system. Dynamic wall operation was dependent on pressure and temperature differentials between indoor and outdoor as well as wind speed and direction. The degree of heat gain was found to be ca 74% of the indoor-outdoor temperature differential. Temperature of incoming dynamic air was significantly affected by solar radiation and measurement of indoor air pollutants found no significant levels. 4 refs., 34 figs., 11 tabs.

  9. GNSS satellite transmit power and its impact on orbit determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steigenberger, Peter; Thoelert, Steffen; Montenbruck, Oliver

    2018-06-01

    Antenna thrust is a small acceleration acting on Global Navigation Satellite System satellites caused by the transmission of radio navigation signals. Knowledge about the transmit power and the mass of the satellites is required for the computation of this effect. The actual transmit power can be obtained from measurements with a high-gain antenna and knowledge about the properties of the transmit and receive antennas as well as losses along the propagation path. Transmit power measurements for different types of GPS, GLONASS, Galileo, and BeiDou-2 satellites were taken with a 30-m dish antenna of the German Aerospace Center (DLR) located at its ground station in Weilheim. For GPS, total L-band transmit power levels of 50-240 W were obtained, 20-135 W for GLONASS, 95-265 W for Galileo, and 130-185 W for BeiDou-2. The transmit power differs usually only slightly for individual spacecraft within one satellite block. An exception are the GLONASS-M satellites where six subgroups with different transmit power levels could be identified. Considering the antenna thrust in precise orbit determination of GNSS satellites decreases the orbital radius by 1-27 mm depending on the transmit power, the satellite mass, and the orbital period.

  10. An electrochemical sensor modified with poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-wrapped multi-walled carbon nanotubes for enzyme inhibition-based determination of organophosphates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaur, Navpreet; Thakur, Himkusha; Prabhakar, Nirmal; Kumar, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    We report on an acetylcholinesterase (AChE) based sensor for the determination of organophosphates (OPs). A nanocomposite consisting of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT; a conducting polymer) and functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (f-MWCNTs) was used as a host matrix for covalent immobilization of AChE. The unique properties of PEDOT and f-MWCNTs proved to be highly efficient for retaining the activity and stability of AChE. The effects of pH value of the phosphate buffer, concentration of enzyme, substrate concentration and incubation time were optimized using chlorpyrifos-methyl as a model OP as it exerts a strong inhibitory effect on AChE. Differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) analysis performed at +0.15 V revealed a linear relation of current in respect to chlorpyrifos-methyl concentration range (0.001 to 50 ppb) with 0.001 ppb as a detection limit. The sensor can be regenerated to 97% of its activity by applying 2-pyridine aldoxime methiodide (2-PAM) as a regenerating agent. It can be re-used up to six times and stored up to one month. The sensor was applied to the determination of chlorpyrifos-methyl in spiked lettuce where it gave recoveries ranging between 95 and 97%. (author)

  11. A DNA biosensor based on gold nanoparticle decorated on carboxylated multi-walled carbon nanotubes for gender determination of Arowana fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeedfar, Kasra; Heng, Lee Yook; Chiang, Chew Poh

    2017-12-01

    Multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were modified to design a new DNA biosensor. Functionalized MWCNTs were equipped with gold nanoparticles (GNPs) (~15nm) (GNP-MWCNTCOOH) to construct DNA biosensors based on carbon-paste screen-printed (SPE) electrodes. GNP attachment onto functionalized MWCNTs was carried out by microwave irradiation and was confirmed by spectroscopic studies and surface analysis. DNA biosensors based on differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) were constructed by immobilizing thiolated single-stranded DNA probes onto GNP-MWCNTCOOH. Ruthenium (III) chloride hexaammoniate [Ru(NH 3 ) 6 ,2Cl - ] (RuHex) was used as hybridization redox indicator. RuHex and MWCNT interaction was low in compared to other organic redox hybridization indicators. The linear response range for DNA determination was 1×10 -21 to 1×10 -9 M with a lower detection limit of 1.55×10 -21 M. Thus, the attachment of GNPs onto functionalized MWCNTs yielded sensitive DNA biosensor with low detection limit and stability more than 30days. Constructed electrode was used to determine gender of arowana fish. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. An enhanced electrochemical platform based on graphene oxide and multi-walled carbon nanotubes nanocomposite for sensitive determination of Sunset Yellow and Tartrazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Xinlan; Lu, Limin; Leng, Jing; Yu, Yongfang; Wang, Wenmin; Jiang, Min; Bai, Ling

    2016-01-01

    A novel electrochemical platform was designed for the simultaneous determination of Sunset Yellow (SY) and Tartrazine (TT), synthetic food dyes, by combining the signal amplification properties of graphene oxide (GO) and the excellent electronic and antifouling properties of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Stable dispersion of GO/MWCNTs composite was produced by sonication mixing. Compared with glassy carbon, MWCNTs and GO electrodes, GO/MWCNTs electrode exhibited strong enhancement effect and greatly increased the oxidation signal of SY and TT. Under optimized conditions, the enhanced anodic peak currents represented the excellent analytical performance of simultaneous detection of SY and TT in the range of 0.09-8.0 μM, with a low limit of detection of 0.025 μM for SY and 0.01 μM for TT (S/N = 3), respectively. To further validate its possible application, the proposed method was successfully used for the determination of SY and TT in orange juice with satisfactory results. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Age determination of vessel wall hematoma in spontaneous cervical artery dissection: A multi-sequence 3T Cardiovascular Magnetic resonance study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habs Maximilian

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previously proposed classifications for carotid plaque and cerebral parenchymal hemorrhages are used to estimate the age of hematoma according to its signal intensities on T1w and T2w MR images. Using these classifications, we systematically investigated the value of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR in determining the age of vessel wall hematoma (VWH in patients with spontaneous cervical artery dissection (sCAD. Methods 35 consecutive patients (mean age 43.6 ± 9.8 years with sCAD received a cervical multi-sequence 3T CMR with fat-saturated black-blood T1w-, T2w- and TOF images. Age of sCAD was defined as time between onset of symptoms (stroke, TIA or Horner's syndrome and the CMR scan. VWH were categorized into hyperacute, acute, early subacute, late subacute and chronic based on their signal intensities on T1w- and T2w images. Results The mean age of sCAD was 2.0, 5.8, 15.7 and 58.7 days in patients with acute, early subacute, late subacute and chronic VWH as classified by CMR (p Conclusions Signal intensities of VWH in sCAD vary over time and multi-sequence CMR can help to determine the age of an arterial dissection. Furthermore, findings of this study suggest that the time course of carotid hematomas differs from that of cerebral hematomas.

  14. Selective Determination of Serotonin on Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxy pyrrole)-single-walled Carbon Nanotube-Modified Glassy Carbon Electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seul Ki; Bae, Si Ra; Ahmed, Mohammad Shamsuddin; You, Jung Min; Jeon, Seung Won

    2011-01-01

    An electrochemically-modified electrode [P(EDOP-SWNTs)/GCE] was prepared by electropolymerization of 3,4-ethylenedioxy pyrrole (EDOP) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) on the surface of a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) and characterized by SEM, CV, and DPV. This modified electrode was employed as an electrochemical biosensor for the selective determination of serotonin concentrations at pH 7.4 and exhibited a typical enhanced effect on the current response of serotonin with a lower oxidation overpotential. The linear response was in the range of 1.0 x 10"-"7 to 1.0 x 10"-"5 M, with a correlation coefficient of 0.998 on the anodic current. The lower detection limit was calculated as 5.0 nM. Due to the relatively low currents and difference of potentials in the electrochemical responses of uric acid (UA), ascorbic acid (AA), and dopamine (DA), the modified electrode was a useful and effective sensing device for the selective and sensitive serotonin determination in the presence of UA, AA, and DA

  15. Selective Determination of Serotonin on Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxy pyrrole)-single-walled Carbon Nanotube-Modified Glassy Carbon Electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seul Ki; Bae, Si Ra; Ahmed, Mohammad Shamsuddin; You, Jung Min; Jeon, Seung Won [Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-04-15

    An electrochemically-modified electrode [P(EDOP-SWNTs)/GCE] was prepared by electropolymerization of 3,4-ethylenedioxy pyrrole (EDOP) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) on the surface of a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) and characterized by SEM, CV, and DPV. This modified electrode was employed as an electrochemical biosensor for the selective determination of serotonin concentrations at pH 7.4 and exhibited a typical enhanced effect on the current response of serotonin with a lower oxidation overpotential. The linear response was in the range of 1.0 x 10{sup -7} to 1.0 x 10{sup -5} M, with a correlation coefficient of 0.998 on the anodic current. The lower detection limit was calculated as 5.0 nM. Due to the relatively low currents and difference of potentials in the electrochemical responses of uric acid (UA), ascorbic acid (AA), and dopamine (DA), the modified electrode was a useful and effective sensing device for the selective and sensitive serotonin determination in the presence of UA, AA, and DA.

  16. Determination of the radiological impact of radioisotope waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-09-01

    The Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) controls the uses of radioisotopes and the management of wastes resulting from radioisotope use through licences. In most cases, wastes generated through the use of radioisotopes are required by licence condition to be sent to Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories for storage but if the amounts of radioisotope are very small, have a low activity or a very short half-life, the radioisotope is permitted to be released to regular waste management systems. The AECB commissioned this study to determine the doses to individuals working in municipal waste management systems and to populations of cities where small amounts of radioisotopes are disposed of through the municipal waste managment systems. The Hamilton-Burlington area surrounding Hamilton Harbour was selected as the study area. The pathways and dosimetry models were put into a computer spread sheet, to give the model flexibility so that it could be easily modified to model other cities. Within the occupational critical group, the maximum doses were calculated for the Hamilton sewage treatment plant aeration worker at 1.2E-6 Sv/a. If this individual were also a member of the critical group in the general population, the maximum dose would be 2.0E-6 Sv/a. Individual doses to the critical group within the general population were calculated as 7.7E-7 Sv/a for adults and 6.8E-8 Sv/a for infants. These compare to AECB regulatory limits of 5.0E-2 Sv/a per person for atomic radiation workers and 5.0E-3 Sv/a per person for the general public. The collective population dose for the study area was 1.37E-1 person-Sv/a or an average dose of 2.6E-7 Sv/a per person for the 525,000 population

  17. Determination of the radiological impact of radioisotope waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-09-01

    The AECB commissioned this study to determine the doses to individuals working in municipal waste management systems and to populations of cities where small amounts of radioisotopes are disposed of through the municipal waste management systems. To carry out this study, it was necessary to select a city having: (1) a population size representative of many cities in Canada, (2) many different types of radioisotope users, (3) all the possible municipal waste management systems, (4) a well established data base on its waste management systems. Using this criteria, the Hamilton-Burlington area surrounding Hamilton Harbour was selected. The pathways and dosimetry models were put into a computer spread sheet, to give the model flexibility so that it could be easily modified to model other cities. The model was developed using conservative assumptions and conservative estimates for some parameter values so that the doses calculated by the model are over estimates. Within the occupational critical group, the maximum doses were calculated for the Hamilton sewage treatment plant sludge worker at 1.4E-6 Sv/a. If this individual were also a member of the critical group in the general population the maximum dose would be 2.2E-6 Sv/a. Individual doses to the critical group within the general population were calculated as 7.7E-7 Sv/a for adults and 6.8E-8 Sv/a for infants. These compare to AECB regulatory limits of 5.0E-2 Sv/a per person for atomic radiation workers and 5.0E-3 Sv/a per person for the general public. The collective population dose for the study area was 1.37E-1 person-Sv/a for the 525,000 population

  18. Direct electrodeposition of gold nanotube arrays of rough and porous wall by cyclic voltammetry and its applications of simultaneous determination of ascorbic acid and uric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Guangming; Li Ling; Jiang Jinhe; Yang Yunhui

    2012-01-01

    Gold nanotube arrays of rough and porous wall has been synthesized by direct electrodeposition with cyclic voltammetry utilizing anodic aluminum oxide template (AAO) and polycarbonate membrane (PC) during short time (only 3 min and 2 min, respectively). The mechanism of the direct electrodeposition of gold nanotube arrays by cyclic voltammetry (CV) has been discussed. The morphological characterizations of the gold nanotube arrays have been investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). A simultaneous determination of ascorbic acid (AA) and uric acid (UA) by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) was constructed by attaching gold nanotube arrays (using AAO) onto the surface of a glassy carbon electrode (GCE). The electrochemical behavior of AA and UA at this modified electrode has been studied by CV and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). The sensor offers an excellent response for AA and UA and the linear response range for AA and UA were 1.02 × 10 −7 –5.23 × 10 −4 mol L −1 and 1.43 × 10 −7 –4.64 × 10 −4 mol L −1 , the detection limits were 1.12 × 10 −8 mol L −1 and 2.24 × 10 −8 mol L −1 , respectively. This sensor shows good regeneration, stability and selectivity and has been used for the determination of AA and UA in real human urine and serum samples with satisfied results. - Graphical abstract: The schematic diagram of formation of Au nanotube arrays (a) and the stepwise procedure of the sensor (b). Highlights: ► Gold nanotubes array has been synthesized by cyclic voltammetry. ► The mechanism of deposition of gold nanotube has been discussed. ► A determination of ascorbic acid and uric acid was constructed by gold array. ► A satisfied determination of samples can be obtained by this sensor.

  19. Nanomolar simultaneous determination of levodopa and serotonin at a novel carbon ionic liquid electrode modified with Co(OH)2 nanoparticles and multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babaei, Ali; Taheri, Ali Reza; Aminikhah, Majid

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► A novel modified carbon ionic liquid electrode is fabricated as Nafion/Co(OH) 2 –MWCNTs/CILE. ► The modified electrode was used as the new sensor for nanomolar simultaneous determinations of L-dopa and serotonin. ► The electrode was impermeable to uric acid and ascorbic acid and other anionic species as electroactive coexistent compounds. ► Several techniques as cyclic voltammetry, differential pulse voltammetry and chronoamperometry were used for investigations. ► The proposed sensor showed a wide linear range, low detection limit, high stability and good reproducibility. -- Abstract: A novel modified carbon ionic liquid electrode is prepared as an electrochemical sensor for simultaneous determination of levodopa (L-dopa) and serotonin (5-HT). The experimental results suggest that a carbon ionic liquid electrode modified with multi-walled carbon nanotubes and cobalt hydroxide nanoparticles, and coated with Nafion (Nafion/Co(OH) 2 –MWCNTs/CILE), accelerates the electron transfer reactions of L-dopa and 5-HT. In addition it shows no significant interferences of uric acid and ascorbic acid as electroactive coexistent compounds with L-dopa and 5-HT in biological systems. The fabricated sensor revealed some advantages such as convenient preparation, good stability and high sensitivity toward 5-HT and L-dopa determination. The DPV data showed that the obtained anodic peak currents were linearly dependent on the L-dopa and 5-HT concentrations in the range of 0.25–225 and 0.05–75 μmol L −1 , respectively. The applicability of the modified electrode was demonstrated by simultaneous determination of 5-HT and L-dopa in human serum

  20. The reliability of finite element analysis results of the low impact test in predicting the energy absorption performance of thin-walled structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alipour, R.; Nejadx, Farokhi A.; Izman, S. [Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Johor Bahru (Malaysia)

    2015-05-15

    The application of dual phase steels (DPS) such as DP600 in the form of thin-walled structure in automotive components is being continuously increased as vehicle designers utilize modern steel grades and low weight structures to improve structural performance, make automotive light and reinforce crash performance. Preventing cost enhancement of broad investigations in this area can be gained by using computers in structural analysis in order to substitute lots of experiments with finite element analysis (FEA). Nevertheless, it necessitates to be certified that selected method including element type and solution methodology is capable of predicting real condition. In this paper, numerical and experimental studies are done to specify the effect of element type selection and solution methodology on the results of finite element analysis in order to investigate the energy absorption behavior of a DP600 thin-walled structure with three different geometries under a low impact loading. The outcomes indicated the combination of implicit method and solid elements is in better agreement with the experiments. In addition, using a combination of shell element types with implicit method reduces the time of simulation remarkably, although the error of results compared to the experiments increased to some extent.

  1. Determining the impact of a design change on system availability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitoi, Mirela; Apostol, Minodora

    2003-01-01

    Reliability based approaches together with the use of plant operating experience have an important role in all stages of safety analyses. The assessment and the checking of the nuclear power plant safety is one of the safety principles; its application is intended to lead to the improvement of safety in all the states that have operating nuclear power plants. The applications of probabilistic safety analysis, PSA, studies can be used: -as source for the risk knowledge; - in assessment of plant design; - in accident management -in risk analyses (risk assessment); - in operating applications; - in component maintenance and testing prioritization. The PSA is an efficient system analysis method, which is used to assess the risk of operation of nuclear power plants. The PSA study can be used in order to evaluate the design of a plant, to highlight some design changes, or to evaluate the impact of the design changes implementation. The paper presents a case study regarding the design change of boiler level control station system, by studying the effect of implementation of a design change regarding the motorized valves of the feed water auxiliary circuit. The sensitivity analyses are a part of the probabilistic safety evaluation of the Cernavoda nuclear plant safety. The study presents the sensitivity analysis performed for the following top event: the failure of SG level control station, after loss of BLC or both computers (in case of blackout). The analyzed design change notice (DCN451) consists in the implementation of automatic closure of the auxiliary feedwater motorized valves of the boiler level control stations on a high level signal. Failure criteria appears to be any SG unsupplied, in cooldown, using small flow lines under manual control for a mission time of 24 hours The major function of the BLC system is to maintain the steam generators level as close as it can to the setpoint value, in normal and abnormal operating conditions. The system should operate

  2. Impaction and Prediction: Does Ureteral Wall Thickness Affect the Success of Medical Expulsive Therapy in Pediatric Ureteral Stones?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuerxun, Aierken; Batuer, Abudukahaer; Erturhan, Sakip; Eryildirim, Bilal; Camur, Emre; Sarica, Kemal

    2017-01-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the predictive value of ureteral wall thickness (UWT) and stone-related parameters for medical expulsive therapy (MET) success with an alpha blocker in pediatric upper ureteral stones. A total of 35 children receiving MET ureteral stones (Hounsfield unit), degree of hydronephrosis, and UWT were evaluated with patient demographics and recorded. The possible predictive value of these parameters in success rates and time to stone expulsion were evaluated in a comparative manner between the 2 groups. The overall mean patient age and stone size values were 5.40 ± 0.51 years and 6.24 ± 0.28 mm, respectively. Regarding the predictive values of these parameters for the success of MET, while stone size and UWT were found to be highly predictive for MET success, patients age, body mass index, stone density, and degree of hydronephrosis had no predictive value on this aspect. Our findings indicated that some stone and anatomical factors may be used to predict the success of MET in pediatric ureteral stones in an effective manner. With this approach, unnecessary use of these drugs that may cause a delay in removing the stone will be avoided, and the possible adverse effects of obstruction as well as stone-related clinical symptoms could be minimized. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Drop Weight Impact Behavior of Al-Si-Cu Alloy Foam-Filled Thin-Walled Steel Pipe Fabricated by Friction Stir Back Extrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hangai, Yoshihiko; Nakano, Yukiko; Utsunomiya, Takao; Kuwazuru, Osamu; Yoshikawa, Nobuhiro

    2017-02-01

    In this study, Al-Si-Cu alloy ADC12 foam-filled thin-walled stainless steel pipes, which exhibit metal bonding between the ADC12 foam and steel pipe, were fabricated by friction stir back extrusion. Drop weight impact tests were conducted to investigate the deformation behavior and mechanical properties of the foam-filled pipes during dynamic compression tests, which were compared with the results of static compression tests. From x-ray computed tomography observation, it was confirmed that the fabricated foam-filled pipes had almost uniform porosity and pore size distributions. It was found that no scattering of the fragments of collapsed ADC12 foam occurred for the foam-filled pipes owing to the existence of the pipe surrounding the ADC12 foam. Preventing the scattering of the ADC12 foam decreases the drop in stress during dynamic compression tests and therefore improves the energy absorption properties of the foam.

  4. Simultaneous determination of mycophenolate mofetil and its active metabolite, mycophenolic acid, by differential pulse voltammetry using multi-walled carbon nanotubes modified glassy carbon electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madrakian, Tayyebeh, E-mail: madrakian@basu.ac.ir; Soleimani, Mohammad; Afkhami, Abbas

    2014-09-01

    A highly sensitive electrochemical sensor for the simultaneous determination of mycophenolate mofetil (MPM) and mycophenolic acid (MPA) was fabricated by multi-walled carbon nanotubes modified glassy carbon electrode (MWCNTs/GCE). The electrochemical behavior of these two drugs was studied at the modified electrode using cyclic voltammetry and adsorptive differential pulse voltammetry. MPM and MPA were oxidized at the GCE during an irreversible process. DPV analysis showed two oxidation peaks at 0.87 V and 1.1 V vs. Ag/AgCl for MPM and an oxidation peak at 0.87 V vs. Ag/AgCl for MPA in phosphate buffer solution of pH 5.0. The MWCNTs/GCE displayed excellent electrochemical activities toward oxidation of MPM and MPA relative to the bare GCE. The experimental design algorithm was used for optimization of DPV parameters. The electrode represents linear responses in the range 5.0 × 10{sup −6} to 1.6 × 10{sup −4} mol L{sup −1} and 2.5 × 10{sup −6} mol L{sup −1} to 6.0 × 10{sup −5} mol L{sup −1} for MPM and MPA, respectively. The detection limit was found to be 9.0 × 10{sup −7} mol L{sup −1} and 4.0 × 10{sup −7} mol L{sup −1} for MPM and MPA, respectively. The modified electrode showed a good sensitivity and stability. It was successfully applied to the simultaneous determination of MPM and MPA in plasma and urine samples. - Highlights: • A new modified electrochemical sensor was constructed and used. • Multiwalled carbon nanotubes were used as the modifiers. • MPM and MPA were measured simultaneously at the low levels. • The sensor was used to the determination of MPA and MPM in real samples.

  5. Mercury-free simultaneous determination of cadmium and lead at a glassy carbon electrode modified with multi-wall carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Kangbing; Hu Shengshui; Fei Junjie; Bai Wen

    2003-08-18

    A multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWNT) modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) was described for the simultaneous determination of trace levels of cadmium and lead by anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV). In pH 4.5 NaAc-HAc buffer containing 0.02 mol/l KI, Cd{sup 2+} and Pb{sup 2+} first adsorb onto the surface of a MWNT film coated GCE and then reduce at -1.20 V. During the positive potential sweep, reduced cadmium and lead were oxidized, and two well-defined stripping peaks appeared at -0.88 and -0.62 V. Compared with a bare GCE, a MWNT film coated GCE greatly improves the sensitivity of determining cadmium and lead. Low concentration of I{sup -} significantly enhances the stripping peak currents since it induces Cd{sup 2+} and Pb{sup 2+} to adsorb at the electrode surface. The striping peak currents change linearly with the concentration of Cd{sup 2+} from 2.5x10{sup -8} to 1x10{sup -5} mol/l and with that of Pb{sup 2+} from 2x10{sup -8} to 1x10{sup -5} mol/l. The lowest detectable concentrations of Cd{sup 2+} and Pb{sup 2+} are estimated to be 6x10{sup -9} and 4x10{sup -9} mol/l, respectively. The high sensitivity, selectivity, and stability of this MWNT film coated electrode demonstrated its practical application for a simple, rapid and economical determination of trace levels of Cd{sup 2+} and Pb{sup 2+} in water samples.

  6. Tests for determining impact resistance and strength of glass used for nuclear waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunnell, L.R.

    1979-05-01

    Tests are described for determining the impact resistance (Section A) and static tensile strength (Section B) of glasses containing simulated or actual nuclear wastes. This report describes the development and use of these tests to rank different glasses, to assess effects of devitrification, and to examine the effect of impact energy on resulting surface area. For clarity this report is divided into two sections, Impact Resistance and Tensile Strength

  7. Enhanced wall pumping in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrenberg, J.; Harbour, P.J.

    1991-01-01

    The enhanced wall pumping phenomenon in JET is observed for hydrogen or deuterium plasmas which are moved from the outer (larger major radius) limiter position either to the inner wall or to the top/bottom wall of the vacuum vessel. This phenomenon is analysed by employing a particle recycling model which combines plasma particle transport with particle re-emission from and retention within material surfaces. The model calculates the important experimentally observable quantities, such as particle fluxes, global particle confinement time, plasma density and density profile. Good qualitative agreement is found and, within the uncertainties, the agreement is quantitative if the wall pumping is assumed to be caused by two simultaneously occurring effects: (1) Neutral particle screening at the inner wall and the top/bottom wall is larger than that at the outer limiter because of different magnetic topologies at different poloidal positions; and (2) although most of the particles (≥ 90%) impacting on the wall can be promptly re-emitted, a small fraction (≤ 10%) of them must be retained in the wall for a period of time which is similar to or larger than the global plasma particle confinement time. However, the wall particle retention time need not be different from that of the outer limiter, i.e. pumping can occur when there is no difference between the material properties of the limiter and those of the wall. (author). 45 refs, 18 figs

  8. Cheap versus expensive trades: Assessing the determinants of market impact costs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bikker, J.A.; Spierdijk, L.; van der Sluis, P.J.

    2005-01-01

    This paper assesses the determinants of market impact costs of institutional equity trades, using unique data from the world's second largest pension fund. We allow the impact of trade characteristics and market conditions on trading costs to depend on the level of trading costs itself and establish

  9. Molecularly imprinted electrochemical biosensor based on Fe@Au nanoparticles involved in 2-aminoethanethiol functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes for sensitive determination of cefexime in human plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yola, Mehmet Lütfi; Eren, Tanju; Atar, Necip

    2014-10-15

    The molecular imprinting technique depends on the molecular recognition. It is a polymerization method around the target molecule. Hence, this technique creates specific cavities in the cross-linked polymeric matrices. In present study, a sensitive imprinted electrochemical biosensor based on Fe@Au nanoparticles (Fe@AuNPs) involved in 2-aminoethanethiol (2-AET) functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (f-MWCNs) modified glassy carbon (GC) electrode was developed for determination of cefexime (CEF). The results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS) confirmed the formation of the developed surfaces. CEF imprinted film was constructed by cyclic voltammetry (CV) for 9 cycles in the presence of 80 mM pyrrole in phosphate buffer solution (pH 6.0) containing 20mM CEF. The developed electrochemical biosensor was validated according to the International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH) guideline and found to be linear, sensitive, selective, precise and accurate. The linearity range and the detection limit were obtained as 1.0 × 10(-10)-1.0 × 10(-8)M and 2.2 × 10(-11)M, respectively. The developed CEF imprinted sensor was successfully applied to real samples such as human plasma. In addition, the stability and reproducibility of the prepared molecular imprinted electrode were investigated. The excellent long-term stability and reproducibility of the prepared CEF imprinted electrodes make them attractive in electrochemical sensors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Determination of thiol compounds by solid-phase extraction using multi-walled carbon nanotubes as adsorbent coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography-fluorescence detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, K.J.; Han, C.H.; Han, C.Q.; Li, J.; Wu, Z.W.; Liu, Y.M.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a method for solid-phase extraction of biogenic thiols using multi-walled carbon nanotubes as adsorbent, and their subsequent determination via HPLC and fluorescence detection. The fluorogenic reagent N-(4,4-difluoro-5,7-dimethyl-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene-3-yl)methyl) iodoacetamide was applied to derivatizate the thiols. The type of eluent and its volume, the sample pH, extraction time and sample volume were optimized. The calibration curves of the thiols are linear in the range from 0. 5 to 200 nM (for glutathione), 0. 02 to 5 nM (for cysteine), and 2 to 500 nM (for acetylcysteine), and the correlation coefficients range between 0. 9955 and 0. 9997. The respective limits of detection are 20 pM, 4 pM and 80 pM (at an SNR of 3), and the limits of quatification are 67 pM, 13 pM, and 267 pM (at an SNR of 10). Recoveries range from 85.0% to 113.1% for human urine and plasma samples spiked with the three thiols, and relative standard deviations are in the range from 2.1 to 7.4%. (author)

  11. The long-term behavior of lightweight and heavyweight meshes used to repair abdominal wall defects is determined by the host tissue repair process provoked by the mesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual, Gemma; Hernández-Gascón, Belén; Rodríguez, Marta; Sotomayor, Sandra; Peña, Estefania; Calvo, Begoña; Bellón, Juan M

    2012-11-01

    Although heavyweight (HW) or lightweight (LW) polypropylene (PP) meshes are widely used for hernia repair, other alternatives have recently appeared. They have the same large-pore structure yet are composed of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). This study compares the long-term (3 and 6 months) behavior of meshes of different pore size (HW compared with LW) and composition (PP compared with PTFE). Partial defects were created in the lateral wall of the abdomen in New Zealand White rabbits and then repaired by the use of a HW or LW PP mesh or a new monofilament, large-pore PTFE mesh (Infinit). At 90 and 180 days after implantation, tissue incorporation, gene and protein expression of neocollagens (reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction/immunofluorescence), macrophage response (immunohistochemistry), and biomechanical strength were determined. Shrinkage was measured at 90 days. All three meshes induced good host tissue ingrowth, yet the macrophage response was significantly greater in the PTFE implants (P .05). Host collagen deposition is mesh pore size dependent whereas the macrophage response induced is composition dependent with a greater response shown by PTFE. In the long term, macroporous meshes show comparable biomechanical behavior regardless of their pore size or composition. Copyright © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Dual-opposite multi-walled carbon nanotube modified carbon fiber microelectrode for microfluidic chip-capillary electrophoresis determination of methyl parathion metabolites in human urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Fuying; Fung, Ying-Sing

    2018-03-03

    Methyl parathion (MP) is a highly toxic organophosphate and its exposure may lead to substantial adverse effects to human health. The existence of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) in the form of free phenol, glucuronide (4-NP-G) or as a sulfate ester (4-NP-S) can be used as biomarkers to assess the duration and extent of MP exposure. In this work, a MC-CE device incorporating post-CE amperometric detection using multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) modified carbon fiber microelectrode (CFME) was fabricated and assessed for simultaneous determination of 4-NP, 4-NP-G, and 4-NP-S in human urine. The detection sensitivity and stability was greatly enhanced by the modification of MWNTs. The capability of the MC-CE device with dual MWNTs modified CFME for detecting impurity was assessed and reliability established by high recoveries from 95 to 97% for spiked MP biomarkers. The method developed is shown to provide a simple, sensitive, and reliable means for monitoring 4-NP, 4-NP-G, and 4-NP-S in human urine. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Age determination of vessel wall hematoma in spontaneous cervical artery dissection: A multi-sequence 3T Cardiovascular Magnetic resonance study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Previously proposed classifications for carotid plaque and cerebral parenchymal hemorrhages are used to estimate the age of hematoma according to its signal intensities on T1w and T2w MR images. Using these classifications, we systematically investigated the value of cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) in determining the age of vessel wall hematoma (VWH) in patients with spontaneous cervical artery dissection (sCAD). Methods 35 consecutive patients (mean age 43.6 ± 9.8 years) with sCAD received a cervical multi-sequence 3T CMR with fat-saturated black-blood T1w-, T2w- and TOF images. Age of sCAD was defined as time between onset of symptoms (stroke, TIA or Horner's syndrome) and the CMR scan. VWH were categorized into hyperacute, acute, early subacute, late subacute and chronic based on their signal intensities on T1w- and T2w images. Results The mean age of sCAD was 2.0, 5.8, 15.7 and 58.7 days in patients with acute, early subacute, late subacute and chronic VWH as classified by CMR (p hematomas with Cohen's kappa of 0.74 (p hematomas differs from that of cerebral hematomas. PMID:22122756

  14. Turbine airfoil with outer wall thickness indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, John J; James, Allister W; Merrill, Gary B

    2013-08-06

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine and including a depth indicator for determining outer wall blade thickness. The airfoil may include an outer wall having a plurality of grooves in the outer surface of the outer wall. The grooves may have a depth that represents a desired outer surface and wall thickness of the outer wall. The material forming an outer surface of the outer wall may be removed to be flush with an innermost point in each groove, thereby reducing the wall thickness and increasing efficiency. The plurality of grooves may be positioned in a radially outer region of the airfoil proximate to the tip.

  15. Determination of the impact of glycolate on ARP and MCU operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor-Pashow, K. M.L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Peters, T. B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Fondeur, F. F. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Shehee, T. C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Washington, A. L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-05-17

    Savannah River Remediation (SRR) is evaluating an alternate flowsheet for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) using glycolic acid as a reductant. An important aspect of the development of the glycolic acid flowsheet is determining if glycolate has any detrimental downstream impacts. Testing was performed to determine if there is any impact to the strontium and actinide sorption by monosodium titanate (MST) and modified monosodium titanate (mMST) or if there is an impact to the cesium removal, phase separation, or coalescer performance at the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Processing Unit (MCU).

  16. A novel voltammetric sensor based on gold nanoparticles involved in p-aminothiophenol functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes: Application to the simultaneous determination of quercetin and rutin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yola, Mehmet Lütfi; Atar, Necip

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The p-MWCNs and AuNPs/p-MWCNs nanocomposites were synthesized. • The prepared nanocomposites were characterized. • The nanocomposites were applied to simultaneous determination of flavanoids. • The developed electrodes showed long-term stability and reproducibility. - Abstract: Carbon nanotubes are expected to play a significant role in the design and manufacture of many nano-material devices in the future. Carbon nanotubes exhibit many unique properties which generate strong interests in studying their applications. In addition, certain properties of gold nanoparticles (e.g., conductivity, catalytic and photocatalytic activity) suggest that gold-nanoparticle-functionalized carbon nanotubes may prove applicable in future fabrication of nanodevices. In this study, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with the mean diameters of 20-25 nm were self-assembled onto the surfaces of p-aminothiophenol functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (p-MWCNs) sheets. The p-MWCNs and AuNPs/p-MWCNs nanocomposites were characterized by reflection–absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS), transmission electron microscope (TEM), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and x-ray diffraction (XRD) method. The simultaneous determination of quercetin (QR) and rutin (RT) was performed by square wave voltammetry (SWV) on glassy carbon electrode (GCE) modified with AuNPs/p-MWCNs nanocomposite (AuNPs/p-MWCNs-GCE). QR presented two oxidation steps at E a1 of 270 mV and E a2 of 450 mV and RT presented only one oxidation step at E a of 360 mV at AuNPs/p-MWCNs-GCE. The linearity ranges and the detection limits of QR and RT were 1.0 × 10 −9 - 5.0 × 10 −8 M and 3.3 × 10 −10 . The application of the prepared nanocomposite to the analysis of real sample was also investigated

  17. Simulation of a Local Collision of SC Wall Using High Energy Absorbing Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, H. K.; Chung, C. H.; Park, J.; Lee, J. W. [Dankook University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Kim, S. Y. [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    Local damage evaluations for nuclear power plant(NPP) design are performed against turbine impact, tornado impact, airplane engine impact, etc., where turbine is a internal source of impact, whereas tornado and airplane engine are external sources of impact. The thickness of NPP wall structure is determined at initial design stage not to be penetrated by local impacts. This study investigated the local damage of NPP substructure against internal turbine impact. Simulation of local collisions of SC wall in NPP structure, which consists of two models: one using general steel and the other using high energy absorbing steel, were performed. The performance of SC wall using ductile high energy absorbing steel can be greatly improved on local collisions when compared with that of general steel

  18. Simulation of a Local Collision of SC Wall Using High Energy Absorbing Steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, H. K.; Chung, C. H.; Park, J.; Lee, J. W.; Kim, S. Y.

    2011-01-01

    Local damage evaluations for nuclear power plant(NPP) design are performed against turbine impact, tornado impact, airplane engine impact, etc., where turbine is a internal source of impact, whereas tornado and airplane engine are external sources of impact. The thickness of NPP wall structure is determined at initial design stage not to be penetrated by local impacts. This study investigated the local damage of NPP substructure against internal turbine impact. Simulation of local collisions of SC wall in NPP structure, which consists of two models: one using general steel and the other using high energy absorbing steel, were performed. The performance of SC wall using ductile high energy absorbing steel can be greatly improved on local collisions when compared with that of general steel

  19. Direct electrodeposition of gold nanotube arrays of rough and porous wall by cyclic voltammetry and its applications of simultaneous determination of ascorbic acid and uric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Guangming, E-mail: yangguangmingbs@126.com [Department of Resources and Environment, Baoshan University, Baoshan 678000 (China); Ling, Li [Department of Resources and Environment, Baoshan University, Baoshan 678000 (China); Jinhe, Jiang; Yunhui, Yang [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Yunnan Normal University, Kunming 650092 (China)

    2012-08-01

    Gold nanotube arrays of rough and porous wall has been synthesized by direct electrodeposition with cyclic voltammetry utilizing anodic aluminum oxide template (AAO) and polycarbonate membrane (PC) during short time (only 3 min and 2 min, respectively). The mechanism of the direct electrodeposition of gold nanotube arrays by cyclic voltammetry (CV) has been discussed. The morphological characterizations of the gold nanotube arrays have been investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). A simultaneous determination of ascorbic acid (AA) and uric acid (UA) by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) was constructed by attaching gold nanotube arrays (using AAO) onto the surface of a glassy carbon electrode (GCE). The electrochemical behavior of AA and UA at this modified electrode has been studied by CV and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). The sensor offers an excellent response for AA and UA and the linear response range for AA and UA were 1.02 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7}-5.23 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} mol L{sup -1} and 1.43 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7}-4.64 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} mol L{sup -1}, the detection limits were 1.12 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} mol L{sup -1} and 2.24 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} mol L{sup -1}, respectively. This sensor shows good regeneration, stability and selectivity and has been used for the determination of AA and UA in real human urine and serum samples with satisfied results. - Graphical abstract: The schematic diagram of formation of Au nanotube arrays (a) and the stepwise procedure of the sensor (b). Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gold nanotubes array has been synthesized by cyclic voltammetry. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mechanism of deposition of gold nanotube has been discussed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A determination of ascorbic acid and uric acid was constructed by gold array. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A satisfied determination of samples can be obtained by this sensor.

  20. 75 FR 8299 - Draft Environmental Impact Statement; Determination of Regulated Status of Alfalfa Genetically...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-24

    ...] Draft Environmental Impact Statement; Determination of Regulated Status of Alfalfa Genetically... making a determination on the status of the Monsanto Company and Forage Genetics International alfalfa... status of the Monsanto Company and Forage Genetics International alfalfa lines designated as events J101...

  1. Biomass Enzymatic Saccharification Is Determined by the Non-KOH-Extractable Wall Polymer Features That Predominately Affect Cellulose Crystallinity in Corn

    OpenAIRE

    Jia, Jun; Yu, Bin; Wu, Leiming; Wang, Hongwu; Wu, Zhiliang; Li, Ming; Huang, Pengyan; Feng, Shengqiu; Chen, Peng; Zheng, Yonglian; Peng, Liangcai

    2014-01-01

    Corn is a major food crop with enormous biomass residues for biofuel production. Due to cell wall recalcitrance, it becomes essential to identify the key factors of lignocellulose on biomass saccharification. In this study, we examined total 40 corn accessions that displayed a diverse cell wall composition. Correlation analysis showed that cellulose and lignin levels negatively affected biomass digestibility after NaOH pretreatments at p

  2. Moisture Research - Optimizing Wall Assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arena, L.; Mantha, P.

    2013-05-01

    The Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) evaluated several different configurations of wall assemblies to determine the accuracy of moisture modeling and make recommendations to ensure durable, efficient assemblies. WUFI and THERM were used to model the hygrothermal and heat transfer characteristics of these walls.

  3. Enhanced washout of {sup 99m}Tc-tetrofosmin in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: quantitative comparisons with regional {sup 123}I-BMIPP uptake and wall thickness determined by MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thet-Thet-Lwin, Tohoru; Takeda, Jin; Wu, Yuko; Fumikura, Keiji; Iida, Satoru; Kawano, Iwao; Yamaguchi, Yuji; Itai [Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Tennodai 1-1-1, 305-8575, Tsukuba-shi, Ibaraki-ken (Japan)

    2003-07-01

    The diagnostic value of technetium-99m tetrofosmin (TF) washout in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) was examined by investigating its relation to the metabolic abnormality depicted by iodine-123 {beta}-methyl-p-iodophenylpentadecanoic acid (BMIPP) uptake and the left ventricular (LV) myocardial wall thickness as measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). TF washout was evaluated in 31 patients with HCM and 23 normal control subjects using 30-min (early) and 3-h (delayed) TF single-photon emission tomography images. The LV myocardial wall was divided into 19 segments and the percentage TF washout, regional BMIPP uptake and LV wall thickness were measured in each segment. Mean TF washout in the patients with HCM was significantly faster than that in normal control subjects (23.7{+-}5.7 vs 13.4{+-}4.1, P<0.0001). In the patients with HCM, TF washout showed an excellent correlation with MRI wall thickness (r=0.82, P<0.0001) and a good inverse correlation with regional BMIPP uptake (r=-0.72, P<0.0001). In addition, a good linear correlation was observed between TF uptake and MRI wall thickness in the 19 regional segments. In conclusion, the degree of TF washout corresponds well with the severity of myocardial wall thickness and the degree of metabolic abnormality in patients with HCM. These results suggest that enhanced TF washout might provide additional clinical information regarding metabolic alterations in HCM. (orig.)

  4. Enhanced washout of 99mTc-tetrofosmin in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: quantitative comparisons with regional 123I-BMIPP uptake and wall thickness determined by MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thet-Thet-Lwin, Tohoru; Takeda, Jin; Wu, Yuko; Fumikura, Keiji; Iida, Satoru; Kawano, Iwao; Yamaguchi, Yuji; Itai

    2003-01-01

    The diagnostic value of technetium-99m tetrofosmin (TF) washout in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) was examined by investigating its relation to the metabolic abnormality depicted by iodine-123 β-methyl-p-iodophenylpentadecanoic acid (BMIPP) uptake and the left ventricular (LV) myocardial wall thickness as measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). TF washout was evaluated in 31 patients with HCM and 23 normal control subjects using 30-min (early) and 3-h (delayed) TF single-photon emission tomography images. The LV myocardial wall was divided into 19 segments and the percentage TF washout, regional BMIPP uptake and LV wall thickness were measured in each segment. Mean TF washout in the patients with HCM was significantly faster than that in normal control subjects (23.7±5.7 vs 13.4±4.1, P<0.0001). In the patients with HCM, TF washout showed an excellent correlation with MRI wall thickness (r=0.82, P<0.0001) and a good inverse correlation with regional BMIPP uptake (r=-0.72, P<0.0001). In addition, a good linear correlation was observed between TF uptake and MRI wall thickness in the 19 regional segments. In conclusion, the degree of TF washout corresponds well with the severity of myocardial wall thickness and the degree of metabolic abnormality in patients with HCM. These results suggest that enhanced TF washout might provide additional clinical information regarding metabolic alterations in HCM. (orig.)

  5. Enhanced washout of 99mTc-tetrofosmin in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: quantitative comparisons with regional 123I-BMIPP uptake and wall thickness determined by MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thet-Thet-Lwin; Takeda, Tohoru; Wu, Jin; Fumikura, Yuko; Iida, Keiji; Kawano, Satoru; Yamaguchi, Iwao; Itai, Yuji

    2003-07-01

    The diagnostic value of technetium-99m tetrofosmin (TF) washout in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) was examined by investigating its relation to the metabolic abnormality depicted by iodine-123 beta-methyl- p-iodophenylpentadecanoic acid (BMIPP) uptake and the left ventricular (LV) myocardial wall thickness as measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). TF washout was evaluated in 31 patients with HCM and 23 normal control subjects using 30-min (early) and 3-h (delayed) TF single-photon emission tomography images. The LV myocardial wall was divided into 19 segments and the percentage TF washout, regional BMIPP uptake and LV wall thickness were measured in each segment. Mean TF washout in the patients with HCM was significantly faster than that in normal control subjects (23.7+/-5.7 vs 13.4+/-4.1, P<0.0001). In the patients with HCM, TF washout showed an excellent correlation with MRI wall thickness ( r=0.82, P<0.0001) and a good inverse correlation with regional BMIPP uptake ( r=-0.72, P<0.0001). In addition, a good linear correlation was observed between TF uptake and MRI wall thickness in the 19 regional segments. In conclusion, the degree of TF washout corresponds well with the severity of myocardial wall thickness and the degree of metabolic abnormality in patients with HCM. These results suggest that enhanced TF washout might provide additional clinical information regarding metabolic alterations in HCM.

  6. Accumulation of Peptidoglycan O-Acetylation Leads to Altered Cell Wall Biochemistry and Negatively Impacts Pathogenesis Factors of Campylobacter jejuni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Reuben; Frirdich, Emilisa; Sychantha, David; Biboy, Jacob; Taveirne, Michael E; Johnson, Jeremiah G; DiRita, Victor J; Vollmer, Waldemar; Clarke, Anthony J; Gaynor, Erin C

    2016-10-21

    Campylobacter jejuni is a leading cause of bacterial gastroenteritis in the developed world. Despite its prevalence, its mechanisms of pathogenesis are poorly understood. Peptidoglycan (PG) is important for helical shape, colonization, and host-pathogen interactions in C. jejuni Therefore, changes in PG greatly impact the physiology of this organism. O-acetylation of peptidoglycan (OAP) is a bacterial phenomenon proposed to be important for proper cell growth, characterized by acetylation of the C6 hydroxyl group of N-acetylmuramic acid in the PG glycan backbone. The OAP gene cluster consists of a PG O-acetyltransferase A (patA) for translocation of acetate into the periplasm, a PG O-acetyltransferase B (patB) for O-acetylation, and an O-acetylpeptidoglycan esterase (ape1) for de-O-acetylation. In this study, reduced OAP in ΔpatA and ΔpatB had minimal impact on C. jejuni growth and fitness under the conditions tested. However, accumulation of OAP in Δape1 resulted in marked differences in PG biochemistry, including O-acetylation, anhydromuropeptide levels, and changes not expected to result directly from Ape1 activity. This suggests that OAP may be a form of substrate level regulation in PG biosynthesis. Ape1 acetylesterase activity was confirmed in vitro using p-nitrophenyl acetate and O-acetylated PG as substrates. In addition, Δape1 exhibited defects in pathogenesis-associated phenotypes, including cell shape, motility, biofilm formation, cell surface hydrophobicity, and sodium deoxycholate sensitivity. Δape1 was also impaired for chick colonization and adhesion, invasion, intracellular survival, and induction of IL-8 production in INT407 cells in vitro The importance of Ape1 in C. jejuni biology makes it a good candidate as an antimicrobial target. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. An electrochemical sensor prepared by sonochemical one-pot synthesis of multi-walled carbon nanotube-supported cobalt nanoparticles for the simultaneous determination of paracetamol and dopamine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutluay, Aysegul; Aslanoglu, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A GCE was modified with carbon nanotubes and cobalt nanoparticles. • The composite material was obtained using an ultrasonic chemical deposition method. • The CoNPs/MWCNT/GCE was applied for the simultaneous determination of PAR and DA. • The presence of AA and UA did not affect the responses of PAR and DA. • Lower detection limits were obtained using the CoNPs/MWCNT/GCE. - Abstract: Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) functionalized by cobalt nanoparticles were obtained using a single step chemical deposition method in an ultrasonic bath. The composite material was characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). The electroactivity of the cobalt-functionalized MWCNTs was assessed in respect to the electrooxidation of paracetamol (PAR) and dopamine (DA). It was found that the carbon nanotube supported cobalt nanoparticles have significantly higher catalytic properties. The proposed electrode has been applied for the simultaneous determination of PAR and DA. The modified electrode could resolve the overlapped voltammetric waves of PAR and DA into two well-defined voltammetric peaks with peak to peak separation of about 203 mV. On the other hand, the presence of potential drug interfering compounds AA and UA did not affect the voltammetric responses of PAR and DA. The current of oxidation peaks showed a linear dependent on the concentrations of PAR and DA in the range of 5.2 × 10 −9 –4.5 × 10 −7 M (R 2 = 0.9987) and 5.0 × 10 −8 –3.0 × 10 −6 M (R 2 = 0.9999), respectively. The detection limits of 1.0 × 10 −9 M and 1.5 × 10 −8 M were obtained for PAR and DA, respectively. The proposed electrode showed good stability (peak current change: 4.9% with and RSD of 2.6% for PAR; 5.5% with and RSD of 3.0% for DA over 3 weeks), reproducibility (RSD 2.3% for PAR and RSD 1.5% for DA), repeatability (RSD 2.25% for PAR and RSD 2.50% for DA) and high recovery (99.7% with an RSD of 1

  8. An electrochemical sensor prepared by sonochemical one-pot synthesis of multi-walled carbon nanotube-supported cobalt nanoparticles for the simultaneous determination of paracetamol and dopamine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kutluay, Aysegul; Aslanoglu, Mehmet, E-mail: maslanoglu@harran.edu.tr

    2014-08-11

    Highlights: • A GCE was modified with carbon nanotubes and cobalt nanoparticles. • The composite material was obtained using an ultrasonic chemical deposition method. • The CoNPs/MWCNT/GCE was applied for the simultaneous determination of PAR and DA. • The presence of AA and UA did not affect the responses of PAR and DA. • Lower detection limits were obtained using the CoNPs/MWCNT/GCE. - Abstract: Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) functionalized by cobalt nanoparticles were obtained using a single step chemical deposition method in an ultrasonic bath. The composite material was characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). The electroactivity of the cobalt-functionalized MWCNTs was assessed in respect to the electrooxidation of paracetamol (PAR) and dopamine (DA). It was found that the carbon nanotube supported cobalt nanoparticles have significantly higher catalytic properties. The proposed electrode has been applied for the simultaneous determination of PAR and DA. The modified electrode could resolve the overlapped voltammetric waves of PAR and DA into two well-defined voltammetric peaks with peak to peak separation of about 203 mV. On the other hand, the presence of potential drug interfering compounds AA and UA did not affect the voltammetric responses of PAR and DA. The current of oxidation peaks showed a linear dependent on the concentrations of PAR and DA in the range of 5.2 × 10{sup −9}–4.5 × 10{sup −7} M (R{sup 2} = 0.9987) and 5.0 × 10{sup −8}–3.0 × 10{sup −6} M (R{sup 2} = 0.9999), respectively. The detection limits of 1.0 × 10{sup −9} M and 1.5 × 10{sup −8} M were obtained for PAR and DA, respectively. The proposed electrode showed good stability (peak current change: 4.9% with and RSD of 2.6% for PAR; 5.5% with and RSD of 3.0% for DA over 3 weeks), reproducibility (RSD 2.3% for PAR and RSD 1.5% for DA), repeatability (RSD 2.25% for PAR and RSD 2.50% for DA) and

  9. The Cu-MOF-199/single-walled carbon nanotubes modified electrode for simultaneous determination of hydroquinone and catechol with extended linear ranges and lower detection limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Jian; Li, Xi; Yang, Linlin; Yan, Songlin; Wang, Mengmeng; Cheng, Dan; Chen, Qi; Dong, Yulin; Liu, Peng; Cai, Weiquan; Zhang, Chaocan

    2015-01-01

    A novel electrochemical sensor based on Cu-MOF-199 [Cu-MOF-199 = Cu 3 (BTC) 2 (BTC = 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylicacid)] and SWCNTs (single-walled carbon nanotubes) was fabricated for the simultaneous determination of hydroquinone (HQ) and catechol (CT). The modification procedure was carried out through casting SWCNTs on the bare glassy carbon electrode (GCE) and followed by the electrodeposition of Cu-MOF-199 on the SWCNTs modified electrode. Cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were performed to characterize the electrochemical performance and surface characteristics of the as-prepared sensor. The composite electrode exhibited an excellent electrocatalytic activity with increased electrochemical signals towards the oxidation of HQ and CT, owing to the synergistic effect of SWCNTs and Cu-MOF-199. Under the optimized condition, the linear response range were from 0.1 to 1453 μmol L −1 (R HQ  = 0.9999) for HQ and 0.1–1150 μmol L −1 (R CT  = 0.9990) for CT. The detection limits for HQ and CT were as low as 0.08 and 0.1 μmol L −1 , respectively. Moreover, the modified electrode presented the good reproducibility and the excellent anti-interference performance. The analytical performance of the developed sensor for the simultaneous detection of HQ and CT had been evaluated in practical samples with satisfying results. - Highlights: • Cu-MOF-199/SWCNTs/GCE was facilely fabricated by the electrodeposition on SWCNTs/GCE. • An electrochemical sensor for detecting HQ and CT was constructed based on this modified electrode. • The proposed electrochemical sensor showed an extended linear range and lower detection limits. • The proposed electrochemical sensor had an excellent stability and reproducibility.

  10. Improving Station Performance by Building Isolation Walls in the Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yan; Horn, Nikolaus; Leohardt, Roman

    2014-05-01

    Conrad Observatory is situated far away from roads and industrial areas on the Trafelberg in Lower Austria. At the end of the seismic tunnel, the main seismic instrument of the Observatory with a station code CONA is located. This station is one of the most important seismic stations in the Austrian Seismic Network (network code OE). The seismic observatory consists of a 145m long gallery and an underground laboratory building with several working areas. About 25 meters away from the station CONA, six temporary seismic stations were implemented for research purposes. Two of them were installed with the same equipment as CONA, while the remaining four stations were set up with digitizers having lower noise and higher resolution (Q330HR) and sensors with the same type (STS-2). In order to prevent possible disturbances by air pressure and temperature fluctuation, three walls were built inside of the tunnel. The first wall is located ca 63 meters from the tunnel entrance, while a set of double walls with a distance of 1.5 meters is placed about 53 meters from the first isolation wall but between the station CONA and the six temporary stations. To assess impact of the isolation walls on noise reduction and detection performance, investigations are conducted in two steps. The first study is carried out by comparing the noise level and detection performance between the station CONA behind the double walls and the stations in front of the double walls for verifying the noise isolation by the double walls. To evaluate the effect of the single wall, station noise level and detection performance were studied by comparing the results before and after the installation of the wall. Results and discussions will be presented. Additional experiment is conducted by filling insulation material inside of the aluminium boxes of the sensors (above and around the sensors). This should help us to determine an optimal insulation of the sensors with respect to pressure and temperature

  11. Characteristics of wall pressure over wall with permeable coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Woo Seog; Shin, Seungyeol; Lee, Seungbae [Inha Univ., Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    Fluctuating wall pressures were measured using an array of 16 piezoelectric transducers beneath a turbulent boundary layer. The coating used in this experiment was an open cell, urethane type foam with a porosity of approximately 50 ppi. The ultimate objective of the coating is to provide a mechanical filter to reduce the wall pressure fluctuations. The ultimate objective of the coating is to provide a mechanical filter to reduce the wall pressure fluctuations. The boundary layer on the flat plate was measured by using a hot wire probe, and the CPM method was used to determine the skin friction coefficient. The wall pressure autospectra and streamwise wavenumber frequency spectra were compared to assess the attenuation of the wall pressure field by the coating. The coating is shown to attenuate the convective wall pressure energy. However, the relatively rough surface of the coating in this investigation resulted in a higher mean wall shear stress, thicker boundary layer, and higher low frequency wall pressure spectral levels compared to a smooth wall.

  12. CosmoQuest: Supporting Subject Matter Experts in Broadening the Impacts of their Work beyond their Institutional Walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel-Storr, J.; Buxner, S.; Grier, J.; Gay, P.

    2016-12-01

    CosmoQuest is a virtual research facility, which, like its physical counterparts, provides tools for scientists to acquire reduced data products (thanks to our cadre of citizen scientists working to analyze images and produce results online), and also to participate in education and outreach activities either directly through CosmoQuest activities (such as CosmoAcademy and the Educators' Zone) or with the support of CosmoQuest. Here, we present our strategies to inspire, engage and support Subject Matter Experts (SMEs - Scientists, Engineers, Technologists and Mathematicians) in activities outside of their institutions, and beyond college classroom teaching. We provide support for SMEs who are interested in increasing the impacts of their science knowledge and expertise by interacting with people online, or in other venues outside of their normal work environment. This includes a broad spectrum of opportunities for those interested in hosting webinars; running short courses for the public; using Facebook, Twitter or other social media to communicate science; or other diverse activities such as supporting an open house, science fair, or star party. As noted by Katheryn Woods-Townsend and colleagues, "...face-to-face interactions with scientists allowed students to view scientists as approachable and normal people, and to begin to understand the range of scientific areas and careers that exist. Scientists viewed the scientist-student interactions as a vehicle for science communication" (2015). As CosmoQuest fosters these relationships, it We present a framework for SMEs which combine opportunities for continuing professional development (virtually and in person at conferences) with ongoing online support, creating a dynamic professional learning network. The goal of this is to deepen SME capacity-knowledge, attitudes and behaviors-both encouraging and empowering them to connect to broader audiences in new ways.

  13. Determinants of Shift Work impacting Job Satisfaction: A study on Service Sector Organizations in Pakistan

    OpenAIRE

    Wasim Abbas Awan

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the impact of determinants of shift work on job satisfaction in service sector organizations of Pakistan. History reveals that the invention of Thomas Edison brought the change in working environment and industrial revolution results in the birth of shift works. A great number of theories in Management are there to define Job satisfaction. All of them show the relationship between ability to perform and the productivity. In order to investigate their impact d...

  14. Determinants of online trust and their impact on online purchase intention

    OpenAIRE

    Kooli, Kaouther; Ben Mansour, K.; Rizky , Utama

    2014-01-01

    Abundant literature has examined online trust. However the different approaches were scarcely integrated to address the determinants of online trust and their impacts on online purchase intention. An integrative approach to online trust is adopted in this paper. A survey is carried out on a sample of 401 online consumers in Indonesia. The findings show that purchase intention is significantly influenced by online trust. Besides, there is significant impact of personality based trust (benevole...

  15. Parameter studies to determine sensitivity of slug impact loads to properties of core surrounding structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gvildys, J.

    1985-01-01

    A sensitivity study of the HCDA slug impact response of fast reactor primary containment to properties of core surrounding structures was performed. Parameters such as the strength of the radial shield material, mass, void, and compressibility properties of the gas plenum material, mass of core material, and mass and compressibility properties of the coolant were used as variables to determine the magnitude of the slug impact loads. The response of the reactor primary containment and the partition of energy were also given. A study was also performed using water as coolant to study the difference in slug impact loads

  16. Biomass enzymatic saccharification is determined by the non-KOH-extractable wall polymer features that predominately affect cellulose crystallinity in corn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Jun; Yu, Bin; Wu, Leiming; Wang, Hongwu; Wu, Zhiliang; Li, Ming; Huang, Pengyan; Feng, Shengqiu; Chen, Peng; Zheng, Yonglian; Peng, Liangcai

    2014-01-01

    Corn is a major food crop with enormous biomass residues for biofuel production. Due to cell wall recalcitrance, it becomes essential to identify the key factors of lignocellulose on biomass saccharification. In this study, we examined total 40 corn accessions that displayed a diverse cell wall composition. Correlation analysis showed that cellulose and lignin levels negatively affected biomass digestibility after NaOH pretreatments at pcorn samples indicated that cellulose and lignin should not be the major factors on biomass saccharification after pretreatments with NaOH and H2SO4 at three concentrations. Notably, despite that the non-KOH-extractable residues covered 12%-23% hemicelluloses and lignin of total biomass, their wall polymer features exhibited the predominant effects on biomass enzymatic hydrolysis including Ara substitution degree of xylan (reverse Xyl/Ara) and S/G ratio of lignin. Furthermore, the non-KOH-extractable polymer features could significantly affect lignocellulose crystallinity at pcorn.

  17. Impact of climate change on Taiwanese power market determined using linear complementarity model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tung, Ching-Pin; Tseng, Tze-Chi; Huang, An-Lei; Liu, Tzu-Ming; Hu, Ming-Che

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Impact of climate change on average temperature is estimated. ► Temperature elasticity of demand is measured. ► Impact of climate change on Taiwanese power market determined. -- Abstract: The increase in the greenhouse gas concentration in the atmosphere causes significant changes in climate patterns. In turn, this climate change affects the environment, ecology, and human behavior. The emission of greenhouse gases from the power industry has been analyzed in many studies. However, the impact of climate change on the electricity market has received less attention. Hence, the purpose of this research is to determine the impact of climate change on the electricity market, and a case study involving the Taiwanese power market is conducted. First, the impact of climate change on temperature is estimated. Next, because electricity demand can be expressed as a function of temperature, the temperature elasticity of demand is measured. Then, a linear complementarity model is formulated to simulate the Taiwanese power market and climate change scenarios are discussed. Therefore, this paper establishes a simulation framework for calculating the impact of climate change on electricity demand change. In addition, the impact of climate change on the Taiwanese market is examined and presented.

  18. Impact parameter determination for 40Ca + 40Ca reactions using a neural network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haddad, F.; Hagel, K.; Li, J.; Mdeiwayeh, N.; Natowitz, J.B.; Wada, R.; Xiao, B.; David, C.; Freslier, M.; Aichelin, J.

    1995-01-01

    A neural network is used for the impact parameter determination in 40 Ca + 40 Ca reactions at energies between 35 and 70 AMeV. A special attention is devoted to the effect of experimental constraints such as the detection efficiency. An overall improvement of the impact parameter determination of 25% is obtained with the neural network. The neural network technique is then used in the analysis of the Ca+Ca data at 35 AMeV and allows separation of three different class of events among the selected 'complete' events. (authors). 8 refs., 5 figs

  19. High-speed lithium pellet injector commissioning in ASDEX Upgrade to investigate impact of Li in an all-metal wall tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arredondo Parra, Rodrigo; Lang, Peter Thomas; Ploeckl, Bernhard [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Cardella, Antonino [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Fusion for Energy, Garching (Germany); Macian Juan, Rafael [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Neu, Rudolf [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Garching (Germany)

    2015-05-01

    Encouraging results with respect to plasma performance have been observed in several tokamak devices (TFTR, NSTX, etc) when injecting Lithium. Recently, a pedestal broadening resulting in an enhanced energy content during transient ELM-free H-mode phases was achieved in DIII-D. Experiments are planned at ASDEX Upgrade, aiming to investigate the impact of Li in an all-metal wall tokamak and to enhance the pedestal operational space. For this purpose, a Lithium pellet injector has been developed, capable of injecting pellets with a particle content up to 1.64 . 10{sup 20} atoms (1.89 mg) at a foreseen maximum repetition rate of 3 Hz. Free flight launch from the torus outboard side without a guiding tube is envisaged. A transfer efficiency exceeding 90 % was achieved in the test bed. Pellets will be accelerated in a gas gun; hence special care must be taken to avoid deleterious effects by the propellant gas pulse, this being the main plasma gas, leading to speeds ranging from 500 (m)/(s) to 800 (m)/(s). Additionally, a large expansion volume equipped with a cryopump is added in to the flight path. The injector is expected to commence operation by May 2015.

  20. Construction and characterization of a new high current ion source for research of impact of hydrogen irradiation on wall materials for use in nuclear fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arredondo Parra, Rodrigo; Neu, Rudolf [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Garching (Germany); Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Oberkofler, Martin; Schmid, Klaus; Weghorn, Arno [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Garching (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The HSQ (HochStromQuelle) is a high current DuoPIGatron type ion source used for research in surface properties of wall materials for nuclear fusion reactors. The existing HSQ-I will be replaced by the conceptually identical HSQ-II, currently under construction. Varying the acceleration potential and optimizing gas inflow and beam focusing grid voltage, ion currents before the deflecting magnet between 10 and 875 μA were reached for acceleration voltages of 0.7 to 8 kV. The ion beam footprint will be characterized, and ion optics will be installed before and after the deflecting magnet, capable of bending 10 keV Ar. A monoenergetic beam of a single species (e.g. D{sub 3}{sup +}) will finally be used for irradiation of samples in the separate implantation chamber at a base pressure of 10{sup -8} mbar. The energy of the impinging particles ranges from 200 eV/D to several keV/D. Fluxes of 10{sup 15} D/cm{sup 2}/s to the target are expected. The temperature of the sample is varied via electron impact heating and the sample weight can be assessed in situ by means of a magnetic suspension balance.

  1. What determines positive, neutral, and negative impacts of Solidago canadensis invasion on native plant species richness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Li-Jia; Yu, Hong-Wei; He, Wei-Ming

    2015-11-17

    Whether plant invasions pose a great threat to native plant diversity is still hotly debated due to conflicting findings. More importantly, we know little about the mechanisms of invasion impacts on native plant richness. We examined how Solidago canadensis invasion influenced native plants using data from 291 pairs of invaded and uninvaded plots covering an entire invaded range, and quantified the relative contributions of climate, recipient communities, and S. canadensis to invasion impacts. There were three types of invasion consequences for native plant species richness (i.e., positive, neutral, and negative impacts). Overall, the relative contributions of recipient communities, S. canadensis and climate to invasion impacts were 71.39%, 21.46% and 7.15%, respectively; furthermore, the roles of recipient communities, S. canadensis and climate were largely ascribed to plant diversity, density and cover, and precipitation. In terms of direct effects, invasion impacts were negatively linked to temperature and native plant communities, and positively to precipitation and soil microbes. Soil microbes were crucial in the network of indirect effects on invasion impacts. These findings suggest that the characteristics of recipient communities are the most important determinants of invasion impacts and that invasion impacts may be a continuum across an entire invaded range.

  2. Biomass Enzymatic Saccharification Is Determined by the Non-KOH-Extractable Wall Polymer Features That Predominately Affect Cellulose Crystallinity in Corn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Leiming; Wang, Hongwu; Wu, Zhiliang; Li, Ming; Huang, Pengyan; Feng, Shengqiu; Chen, Peng; Zheng, Yonglian; Peng, Liangcai

    2014-01-01

    Corn is a major food crop with enormous biomass residues for biofuel production. Due to cell wall recalcitrance, it becomes essential to identify the key factors of lignocellulose on biomass saccharification. In this study, we examined total 40 corn accessions that displayed a diverse cell wall composition. Correlation analysis showed that cellulose and lignin levels negatively affected biomass digestibility after NaOH pretreatments at pbiomass saccharification after pretreatments with NaOH and H2SO4 at three concentrations. Notably, despite that the non-KOH-extractable residues covered 12%–23% hemicelluloses and lignin of total biomass, their wall polymer features exhibited the predominant effects on biomass enzymatic hydrolysis including Ara substitution degree of xylan (reverse Xyl/Ara) and S/G ratio of lignin. Furthermore, the non-KOH-extractable polymer features could significantly affect lignocellulose crystallinity at pbiomass digestibility. Hence, this study could suggest an optimal approach for genetic modification of plant cell walls in bioenergy corn. PMID:25251456

  3. 12 A multi-centre randomised feasibility study evaluating the impact of a prognostic model for management of blunt chest wall trauma patients: stumbl trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battle, Ceri; Hutchings, Hayley; Abbott, Zoe; O'neill, Claire; Groves, Sam; Watkins, Alan; Lecky, Fiona; Jones, Sally; Gagg, James; Body, Rick; Evans, Phillip

    2017-12-01

    A new prognostic model has been developed and externally validated, the aim of which is to assist in the management of the blunt chest wall trauma patient in the Emergency Department (ED). A definitive randomised controlled trial (impact trial), is required to assess the clinical and cost effectiveness of the new model, before it can be accepted in clinical practice. The purpose of this trial is to assess the feasibility and acceptability of such a definitive trial and inform its design. This feasibility trial is designed to test the methods of a multi-centre, cluster-randomised (stepped wedge) trial, with a substantial qualitative component. Four EDs in England and Wales will collect data for all blunt chest wall trauma patients over a five month period; in the initial period acting as the controls (normal care) and the second period, acting as the interventions (in which the new model will be used). Baseline measurements including completion of the SF-12v2 will be obtained on initial assessment in the ED. Patient outcome data will then be collected for any subsequent hospitalisations. Data collection will conclude with a six week follow-up completion of two surveys (SF-12v2 and Client Services Receipt Inventory).Analysis of outcomes will focus on feasibility, acceptability and trial processes and will include recruitment and retention rates, attendance at clinician training rates and use of model in the ED. Qualitative feedback will be obtained through clinician interviews and a research nurse focus group. An evaluation of the feasibility of health economics outcomes data will be completed. Wales Research Ethics Committee 6 granted approval for the trial in September 2016. Health Care Research Wales Research Permissions and the HRA have granted approval for the study. Patient recruitment commenced in February 2017. Planned dissemination is through publication in a peer-reviewed Emergency Medicine Journal, presentation at appropriate conferences and to

  4. Protocol for a multicentre randomised feasibility STUdy evaluating the impact of a prognostic model for Management of BLunt chest wall trauma patients: STUMBL trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battle, Ceri; Abbott, Zoe; Hutchings, Hayley A; O'Neill, Claire; Groves, Sam; Watkins, Alan; Lecky, Fiona E; Jones, Sally; Gagg, James; Body, Richard; Evans, Philip A

    2017-07-10

    A new prognostic model has been developed and externally validated, the aim of which is to assist in the management of the blunt chest wall trauma patient in the emergency department (ED). A definitive randomised controlled trial (impact trial) is required to assess the clinical and cost effectiveness of the new model before it can be accepted in clinical practice. The purpose of this trial is to assess the feasibility and acceptability of such a definitive trial and inform its design. This feasibility trial is designed to test the methods of a multicentre, cluster-randomised (stepped- wedge) trial, with a substantial qualitative component. Four EDs in England and Wales will collect data for all blunt chest wall trauma patients over a 5-month period; in the initial period acting as the controls (normal care), and in the second period acting as the interventions (in which the new model will be used). Baseline measurements including completion of the SF-12v2 will be obtained on initial assessment in the ED. Patient outcome data will then be collected for any subsequent hospitalisations. Data collection will conclude with a 6-week follow-up completion of two surveys (SF-12v2 and Client Services Receipt Inventory). Analysis of outcomes will focus on feasibility, acceptability and trial processes and will include recruitment and retention rates, attendance at clinician training rates and use of model in the ED. Qualitative feedback will be obtained through clinician interviews and a research nurse focus group. An evaluation of the feasibility of health economics outcomes data will be completed. Wales Research Ethics Committee 6 granted approval for the trial in September 2016. Patient recruitment will commence in February 2017. Planned dissemination is through publication in a peer-reviewed Emergency Medicine Journal , presentation at appropriate conferences and to stakeholders at professional meetings. ISRCTN95571506; Pre-results. © Article author(s) (or their

  5. Difficult Myotomy Is Not Determined by Preoperative Therapy and Does Not Impact Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villadolid, Desiree V.; Al-Saadi, Sam; Rosemurgy, Alexander S.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: The impact of preoperative endoscopic therapy on the difficulty of laparoscopic Heller myotomy and the impact of the difficulty of the myotomy on long-term outcome has not been determined. This study was undertaken to determine whether preoperative therapy impacts the difficulty of laparoscopic Heller myotomy and whether preoperative therapy or difficulty of myotomy impacts long-term outcomes. Methods: Since 1992, 305 patients, 56% male, median age 49 years, underwent laparoscopic Heller myotomy and were prospectively followed. The difficulty of the laparoscopic Heller myotomy was scored by the operating surgeon for the most recent 170 consecutive patients on a scale of 1 (easiest) to 5 (most difficult). Patients scored their symptoms before and after myotomy using a Likert scale from 0 (never/not bothersome) to 10 (always/very bothersome). Results: Before myotomy, 66% of patients underwent endoscopic therapy: 33% dilation, 11% Botox, and 22% both. Preoperative endoscopic therapy did not correlate with the difficulty of the myotomy (P=NS). Median follow-up was 25 months. Regardless of the difficulty of the myotomy, dysphagia improved with myotomy (Pmyotomy. Conclusions: Laparoscopic Heller myotomy improves the frequency and severity of dysphagia. The difficulty of laparoscopic Heller myotomy is not impacted by preoperative therapy, and neither preoperative therapy nor difficulty of the myotomy impact long-term outcome. PMID:17931516

  6. Theory of topological edges and domain walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bais, F.A.; Slingerland, J.K.; Haaker, S.M.

    2009-01-01

    We investigate domain walls between topologically ordered phases in two spatial dimensions. We present a method which allows for the determination of the superselection sectors of excitations of such walls and which leads to a unified description of the kinematics of a wall and the two phases to

  7. The Valence of Self-Generated (Status Updates) and Other-Generated (Wall-Posts) Information Determines Impression Formation on Facebook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal-Stott, Harriet E. S.; Dicks, Rea E.; Fielding, Lois S.

    2015-01-01

    We examined whether self-generated (status updates) or other-generated (wall-posts) information on Facebook influenced the impression formed of the target individual. Along with examining reliance on particular types of information, we explored the valence (positive/ neutral/ negative) of the information, as reliance on self-generated or other-generated information may depend on whether self-presentation is perceived (i.e., presenting oneself positively / not negatively). Self-presentation may be perceived if the targets have positive/ neutral statuses, while negative statuses would indicate a lack of self-presentation. In line with previous research, participants should rely on other-generated information (wall-posts) to form an impression when participants are viewed to have self-presented (positive / neutral status updates), as this information could be viewed as unreliable. Forty participants rated nine Facebook profiles where statuses and wall-posts portrayed personality traits varying in valence. Each profile consisted of a neutral profile photo, three status updates (all positive, negative, or neutral) and three wall-posts (all positive, negative, or neutral). Materials were established in two pilots. Impression formation was measured as perceived social, task, and physical attractiveness of the target individual. Participants also ranked the profiles for likeability. Supporting our expectations, other-generated information (wall-posts) dominated impression formation for social attractiveness when self-generated information (status updates) was positive/ neutral. Task attractiveness was affected by information valence, regardless of source (self or other). Despite the inclusion of neutral photos, physical attractiveness was affected by self-generated information, with negative statuses lowering physical attractiveness. We suggest that these findings have implications for impression formation beyond the Facebook setting. The 557 traits analyzed in Pilot 1 are

  8. What determines video game use? The impact of users’ habits, addictive tendencies, and intentions to play

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartmann, T.; Jung, Y.; Vorderer, P.A.

    2012-01-01

    The present study explores the role of intentions, habits, and addictive tendencies in people's video game use. Although both habits and addictive tendencies may determine higher amounts of video game use, the present study examines whether the impact of habits and addictive tendencies on video game

  9. 75 FR 1585 - Draft Environmental Impact Statement; Determination of Regulated Status of Alfalfa Genetically...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-12

    ...] Draft Environmental Impact Statement; Determination of Regulated Status of Alfalfa Genetically... and Forage Genetics International alfalfa lines designated as events J101 and J163 as regulated... International (FGI) alfalfa events J101 and J163 were no longer considered regulated articles under the...

  10. Determinants of Shift Work impacting Job Satisfaction: A study on Service Sector Organizations in Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wasim Abbas Awan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to investigate the impact of determinants of shift work on job satisfaction in service sector organizations of Pakistan. History reveals that the invention of Thomas Edison brought the change in working environment and industrial revolution results in the birth of shift works. A great number of theories in Management are there to define Job satisfaction. All of them show the relationship between ability to perform and the productivity. In order to investigate their impact descriptive study is taken in to account in which survey research method is used to collect data. On the basis of quantitative analysis this study reveals that determinants of shift work has positive impact on job satisfaction. Finally recommendations are made to increase shift work in service sector organizations of Pakistan so that people may upraise their standards of living.

  11. Modeling the determinants of the social impacts of agricultural development projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmadvand, Mostafa; Karami, Ezatollah; Iman, Mohammad Taghi

    2011-01-01

    In an attempt to help policy-makers improve the social sustainability of development projects, this study identifies the key determinants of farmers' attitudes relating to the social impacts of the floodwater spreading project (FWSP) on the Gareh-Bygone plain in Iran. In order to analyze the links between the various factors that affect the experience of social impact, a theoretical framework was developed. Stratified random sampling was used to survey 138 farm households from the four villages in the region. One male and one female from each house were interviewed face-to-face using a questionnaire, resulting in a total of 276 interviews. Structural factors were found to be the largest contribution to stakeholders' attitudes relating to the social impacts of the project. Results from a cluster analysis suggested that the level of floodwater information, level of participation, water access, ownership change, and environmental worldview were the most important factors explaining attitude towards social impact of the FWSP.

  12. First wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omori, Junji.

    1991-01-01

    Graphite and C/C composite are used recently for the first wall of a thermonuclear device since materials with small atom number have great impurity allowable capacity for plasmas. Among them, those materials having high thermal conduction are generally anisotropic and have an upper limit for the thickness upon production. Then, anisotropic materials are used for a heat receiving plate, such that the surfaces of the heat receiving plate on the side of lower heat conductivity are brought into contact with each other, and the side of higher thermal conductivity is arranged in parallel with small radius direction and the toroidal direction of the thermonuclear device. As a result, the incident heat on an edge portion can be transferred rapidly to the heat receiving plate, which can suppress the temperature elevation at the surface to thereby reduce the amount of abrasion. Since the heat expansion coefficient of the anisotropic materials is great in the direction of the lower heat conductivity and small in the direction of the higher heat conductivity, the gradient of a thermal load distribution in the direction of the higher heat expansion coefficient is small, and occurrence of thermal stresses due to temperature difference is reduced, to improve the reliability. (N.H.)

  13. Falling walls

    CERN Multimedia

    It was 20 years ago this week that the Berlin wall was opened for the first time since its construction began in 1961. Although the signs of a thaw had been in the air for some time, few predicted the speed of the change that would ensue. As members of the scientific community, we can take a moment to reflect on the role our field played in bringing East and West together. CERN’s collaboration with the East, primarily through links with the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, JINR, in Dubna, Russia, is well documented. Less well known, however, is the role CERN played in bringing the scientists of East and West Germany together. As the Iron curtain was going up, particle physicists on both sides were already creating the conditions that would allow it to be torn down. Cold war historian Thomas Stange tells the story in his 2002 CERN Courier article. It was my privilege to be in Berlin on Monday, the anniversary of the wall’s opening, to take part in a conference entitled &lsquo...

  14. Determining the Conditions for the Hydraulic Impacts Emergence at Hydraulic Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazurenko A.S.

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This research aim is to develop a method for modeling the conditions for the critical hydrau-lic impacts emergence on thermal and nuclear power plants’ pipeline systems pressure pumps depart-ing from the general provisions of the heat and hydrodynamic instability theory. On the developed method basis, the conditions giving rise to the reliability-critical hydraulic impacts emergence on pumps for the thermal and nuclear power plants’ typical pipeline system have been determined. With the flow characteristic minimum allowable (critical sensitivity, the flow velocity fluctuations ampli-tude reaches critical values at which the pumps working elements’ failure occurs. The critical hydrau-lic impacts emergence corresponds to the transition of the vibrational heat-hydrodynamic instability into an aperiodic one. As research revealed, a highly promising approach as to the preventing the criti-cal hydraulic impacts related to the foreground use of pumps having the most sensitive consumption (at supply network performance (while other technical characteristics corresponding to that parame-ter. The research novelty refers to the suggested method elaborated by the authors’ team, which, in contrast to traditional approaches, is efficient in determining the pump hydraulic impact occurrence conditions when the vibrational heat-hydrodynamic instability transition to the aperiodic instability.

  15. Novel Methods to Determine Feeder Locational PV Hosting Capacity and PV Impact Signatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reno, Matthew J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Coogan, Kyle [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Seuss, John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Broderick, Robert Joseph [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Often PV hosting capacity analysis is performed for a limited number of distribution feeders. For medium - voltage distribution feeders, previous results generally analyze less than 20 feeders, and then the results are extrapolated out to similar types of feeders. Previous hosting capacity research has often focused on determining a single value for the hosting capacity for the entire feeder, whereas this research expands previous hosting capacity work to investigate all the regions of the feeder that may allow many different hosting capacity values wit h an idea called locational hosting capacity (LHC)to determine the largest PV size that can be interconnected at different locations (buses) on the study feeders. This report discusses novel methods for analyzing PV interconnections with advanced simulati on methods. The focus is feeder and location - specific impacts of PV that determine the locational PV hosting capacity. Feeder PV impact signature are used to more precisely determine the local maximum hosting capacity of individual areas of the feeder. T he feeder signature provides improved interconnection screening with certain zones that show the risk of impact to the distribution feeder from PV interconnections.

  16. Analysis of the impact of chest wall constraints on eligibility for a randomized trial of stereotactic body radiotherapy of peripheral stage 1 non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siva, Shankar; Shaw, Mark; Gill, Suki; David, Ball; Chesson, Brent

    2012-01-01

    Chest wall toxicities are recognized complications of stereotactic radiotherapy (SBRT) in non-small cell lung cancer. To minimize toxicity, the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG) 09.02 ‘CHISEL’ study protocol excluded patients with tumours within 1cm of the chest wall. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the implication of chest wall proximity constraints on patient eligibility, toxicity and potential accrual. Exclusion zones of 1cm beyond the mediastinum and 2cm beyond the bifurcation of the lobar bronchi were incorporated into the CHISEL credentialing CT dataset. Volumes of lung within which tumours varying from 1cm to 5cm in diameter may occupy and remain eligible for the CHISEL study were calculated. These volumes were compared to a hypothetical model in which the 1cm chest wall proximity restriction was removed. The percentage of lung area in which a tumour mass can occupy and be suitable for CHISEL in the left and right lung were 54% and 60% respectively. Removing the constraint increased the percentage of available lung to 83% and 87% respectively. Considering a 2cm spherical tumour, only 21% and 31% of tumours in the left and right lung would be eligible with the chest wall constraint, whilst 39% and 50% respectively would be eligible without the constraint. The exclusion of tumours less than 1cm to chest wall significantly reduces the proportion of patients eligible for the CHISEL protocol. A review of the literature pertaining to chest wall toxicity after stereotactic radiotherapy supports a change in chest wall exclusion criteria for the CHISEL study.

  17. Rain water drop impact as a laboratory methodology to determinate the soils structural stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arias, Dora M; Amezquita E

    1999-01-01

    To avoid degradation, it is necessary to have (sufficiently) sensitive parameter to the use actions, so that it is possible to determine what negative changes are happening and to take the soil management measures that avoid the degradation. One of the main causes of degradation in the areas of hillside of Colombia is the erosion, which begins with the impact of the drop of rainwater on the bare soil. For this research samples of an oxic dystropepts were taken at two depths (0-2.5 and 2.5-5 cm) to studying the susceptibility of its structure, to the impact of the drop falling from 2000 mm high. The samples were subjected to drop impact, in a special assembly apparatus that generated drops falling on samples that were 2-m below rotating in a rotations apparatus of generation of drops. As the time of impact advanced, the changes in the hydraulic conductivity were determined. This as parameter was used as an indicator appraiser of the structural resistance of the soils. The results show that the used methodology was sensitive to the situations of use of the soils. The initial hydraulic conductivity was higher in the production systems less intervened (natural forest, leucaena, with mulch, without mulch) and smaller in la those ones most intervened (monocrops of corn, bean, yuca), showing that human intervention has promotes a decay in the stability of soil structure

  18. The Impact of Fiscal Policies on the Socioeconomic Determinants of Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosquera, Isabel; González-Rábago, Yolanda; Bacigalupe, Amaia; Suhrcke, Marc

    2017-04-01

    There has been considerable recent debate around the alleged impact of discretionary fiscal policies - especially austerity policies - on health and health inequalities. Assuming that most of the impact will have to run via the effect of fiscal policies on socioeconomic determinants of health (SDH), it is of interest to gain a further understanding of the relationship between fiscal policies and SDH. Therefore, the aim of this article is to review the recent evidence on the impact of discretionary fiscal policies on key SDH, i.e. income, poverty, education, and employment, in high income OECD countries. We find that there are no simple answers as to how fiscal policy affects those determinants of health. The effects of contractionary and expansionary fiscal policies on the analyzed SDH vary considerably across countries and will largely depend on the pre-crisis situation. Contractionary fiscal policies seem to have increased poverty, while their impact on income inequality will be influenced by the composition of the implemented measures. More empirical research trying to directly link fiscal policies to health outcomes, while taking into account of some of the mechanisms encountered here, would be worthwhile.

  19. Perturbative determination of mass-dependent renormalization and improvement coefficients for the heavy-light vector and axial-vector currents with relativistic heavy and domain-wall light quarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Norikazu; Aoki, Sinya; Kuramashi, Yoshinobu

    2005-01-01

    We determine the mass-dependent renormalization as well as improvement coefficients for the heavy-light vector and axial-vector currents consisting of the relativistic heavy and the domain-wall light quarks through the standard matching procedure. The calculation is carried out perturbatively at the one-loop level to remove the systematic error of O(α s (am Q ) n ap) as well as O(α s (am Q ) n ) (n>=0), where p is a typical momentum scale in the heavy-light system. We point out that renormalization and improvement coefficients of the heavy-light vector current agree with those of the axial-vector current, thanks to the exact chiral symmetry for the light quark. The results obtained with three different gauge actions, plaquette, Iwasaki and DBW2, are presented as a function of heavy quark mass and domain-wall height

  20. Implementing Green Walls in Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Michael B; Martin, Michael D; Sajady, Mollika A

    2018-01-01

    Numerous studies in applied pedagogical design have shown that, at all educational levels, direct exposure to the natural environment can enhance learning by improving student attention and behaviors. Implementing green walls-a "vertical garden," or "living wall" interior wall that typically includes greenery, a growing medium (soil or substrate) and a water delivery system-provides environmental health benefits, but also provides a practical application within classrooms for minimizing directed attention fatigue in students by connecting them to "outdoor nature" within the indoor environment. Hands-on "project-based" learning is another pedagogical strategy that has proved to be effective across the spectrum of educational levels and across subject areas. Green walls have the potential to inspire critical thinking through a combination of project-based learning strategies and environmental education. The authors have outlined a curriculum involving the implementation of an indoor living wall system within a classroom-learning environment, incorporating project-based learning modules that interact with the wall. In conjunction with the passive health benefits of a green wall, project-based curriculum models can connect students interactively with indoor nature and have the potential to inspire real-world thinking related to science, technology, engineering, art, and mathematics fields within the indoor learning environment. Through a combination of these passive and interactive modes, students are connected to nature in the indoor environment regardless of weather conditions outdoors. Future research direction could include post-construction studies of the effectiveness of project-based curricula related to living walls, and the long-term impacts of implementing green walls in classrooms on school achievement and student behaviors.

  1. Determination of minimum impact parameter by modified touching spheres schemes for intermediate energy Coulomb excitation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Rajiv; Sharma, Shagun; Singh, Pradeep; Kharab, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    The energy-independent touching spheres schemes commonly used for the determination of the safe minimum value of the impact parameter for Coulomb excitation experiments are modified through the inclusion of an energy-dependent term. The touching spheres+3fm scheme after modification emerges out to be the best one while touching spheres+4fm scheme is found to be better in its unmodified form. (orig.)

  2. Linking apple farmers to markets: Determinants and impacts of marketing contracts in China

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Wanglin; Abdulai, Awudu

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the determinants of marketing contract choices and the related impact on farm net returns of apple farmers in China. We employ a two-stage selection correction approach (BFG) for the multinomial logit model. On the basis of the BFG estimation, we also use an endogenous switching regression model and a propensity score matching technique to estimate the causal effects of marketing contract choices on net returns. The empirical results reveal that written contracts incre...

  3. Highly sensitive simultaneous electrochemical determination of trace amounts of Pb(II) and Cd(II) using a carbon paste electrode modified with multi-walled carbon nanotubes and a newly synthesized Schiff base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afkhami, Abbas; Ghaedi, Hamed; Madrakian, Tayyebeh; Rezaeivala, Majid

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► A new chemically modified carbon paste electrode was constructed and used. ► A new Schiff base and multi-walled carbon nanotube was used as modifiers. ► The electrochemical properties of the modified electrode were studied. ► The electrode was used to the simultaneous determination of Pb 2+ and Cd 2+ . -- Abstract: A new chemically modified electrode was constructed for rapid, simple, accurate, selective and highly sensitive simultaneous determination of lead and cadmium using square wave anodic stripping voltammetry (SWASV). The electrode was prepared by incorporation of new synthesized Schiff base and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) in carbon paste electrode. The limit of detection was found to be 0.25 ng mL −1 and 0.74 ng mL −1 for Pb 2+ and Cd 2+ , respectively. The stability constants of the complexes of the ligand with several metal cations in ethanol medium were determined. The effects of different cations and anions on the simultaneous determination of metal ions were studied and it was found that the electrode is highly selective. The proposed chemically modified electrode was used for the determination of lead and cadmium in several foodstuffs and water samples

  4. Determine ISS Soyuz Orbital Module Ballistic Limits for Steel Projectiles Hypervelocity Impact Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Frankel

    2013-01-01

    A new orbital debris environment model (ORDEM 3.0) defines the density distribution of the debris environment in terms of the fraction of debris that are low-density (plastic), medium-density (aluminum) or high-density (steel) particles. This hypervelocity impact (HVI) program focused on assessing ballistic limits (BLs) for steel projectiles impacting the enhanced Soyuz Orbital Module (OM) micrometeoroid and orbital debris (MMOD) shield configuration. The ballistic limit was defined as the projectile size on the threshold of failure of the OM pressure shell as a function of impact speeds and angle. The enhanced OM shield configuration was first introduced with Soyuz 30S (launched in May 2012) to improve the MMOD protection of Soyuz vehicles docked to the International Space Station (ISS). This test program provides HVI data on U.S. materials similar in composition and density to the Russian materials for the enhanced Soyuz OM shield configuration of the vehicle. Data from this test program was used to update ballistic limit equations used in Soyuz OM penetration risk assessments. The objective of this hypervelocity impact test program was to determine the ballistic limit particle size for 440C stainless steel spherical projectiles on the Soyuz OM shielding at several impact conditions (velocity and angle combinations). This test report was prepared by NASA-JSC/ HVIT, upon completion of tests.

  5. Role of endothelial permeability hotspots and endothelial mitosis in determining age-related patterns of macromolecule uptake by the rabbit aortic wall near branch points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chooi, K Yean; Comerford, Andrew; Cremers, Stephanie J; Weinberg, Peter D

    2016-07-01

    Transport of macromolecules between plasma and the arterial wall plays a key role in atherogenesis. Scattered hotspots of elevated endothelial permeability to macromolecules occur in the aorta; a fraction of them are associated with dividing cells. Hotspots occur particularly frequently downstream of branch points, where lesions develop in young rabbits and children. However, the pattern of lesions varies with age, and can be explained by similar variation in the pattern of macromolecule uptake. We investigated whether patterns of hotspots and mitosis also change with age. Evans' Blue dye-labeled albumin was injected intravenously into immature or mature rabbits and its subsequent distribution in the aortic wall around intercostal branch ostia examined by confocal microscopy and automated image analysis. Mitosis was detected by immunofluorescence after adding 5-bromo-2-deoxiuridine to drinking water. Hotspots were most frequent downstream of branches in immature rabbits, but a novel distribution was observed in mature rabbits. Neither pattern was explained by mitosis. Hotspot uptake correlated spatially with the much greater non-hotspot uptake (p hotspots were considered. The pattern of hotspots changes with age. The data are consistent with there being a continuum of local permeabilities rather than two distinct mechanisms. The distribution of the dye, which binds to elastin and collagen, was similar to that of non-binding tracers and to lesions apart from a paucity at the lateral margins of branches that can be explained by lower levels of fibrous proteins in those regions. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  6. Impact Analysis of Window-Wall Ratio on Heating and Cooling Energy Consumption of Residential Buildings in Hot Summer and Cold Winter Zone in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiaoxia Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to assess the optimal window-wall ratio and the proper glazing type in different air conditioning system operation modes of residential buildings for each orientation in three typical cities in hot summer and cold winter zone: Chongqing, Shanghai, and Wuhan simulation models were built and analyzed using Designer’s Simulation Toolkit (DeST. The study analyzed the variation of annual heating energy demand, annual cooling energy demand, and the annual total energy consumption in different conditions, including different orientations, patterns of utilization of air conditioning system, window-wall ratio, and types of windows. The results show that the total energy consumption increased when the window-wall ratio is also increased. It appears more obvious when the window orientation is east or west. Furthermore, in terms of energy efficiency, low-emissivity (Low-E glass performs better than hollow glass. From this study, it can be concluded that the influence and sensitivity of window-wall ratio on the total energy consumption are related to the operation mode of air conditioning system, the orientation of outside window, and the glazing types of window. The influence of the factors can be regarded as reference mode for the window-wall ratio when designing residential buildings.

  7. Geographical Detector-Based Identification of the Impact of Major Determinants on Aeolian Desertification Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Ziqiang; Xu, Xiaoming; Zhang, Hong; Wu, Zhitao; Liu, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Arid and semi-arid areas in North China are facing the challenge of a rising aeolian desertification risk (ADR) due to the intertwined effects of complex natural processes and intensified anthropogenic activities. An accurate quantitative assessment of the relationship between ADR and its determinants is beneficial for understanding the driving mechanisms of aeolian desertification and for controlling future desertification. Previous studies have failed to quantify the relative role of determinants driving ADR and have been limited in assessing their interactive impacts. In this study, a spatial variance analysis-based geographical detector methodology is used to quantify the effects of geological, physical, and human factors on the occurrence of ADR in an area characterized by mountains and hills in northern China. It is found that soil type, precipitation, and wind velocity are the major determinants of ADR, which implies that geological and physical elements (e.g., soil attribute) and climatic factors (e.g., precipitation and wind velocity) rather than human activities have played a greater role in the incidence of ADR. Particularly, the results show that the interaction of various determinants causes significant non-linearly enhanced impacts on the ADR. The findings of our study will assist local inhabitants and policy makers in developing measures for wind prevention and sand control to mitigate the effects of desertification in the region.

  8. Quantification of the impact of PSI:Biology according to the annotations of the determined structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePietro, Paul J; Julfayev, Elchin S; McLaughlin, William A

    2013-10-21

    Protein Structure Initiative:Biology (PSI:Biology) is the third phase of PSI where protein structures are determined in high-throughput to characterize their biological functions. The transition to the third phase entailed the formation of PSI:Biology Partnerships which are composed of structural genomics centers and biomedical science laboratories. We present a method to examine the impact of protein structures determined under the auspices of PSI:Biology by measuring their rates of annotations. The mean numbers of annotations per structure and per residue are examined. These are designed to provide measures of the amount of structure to function connections that can be leveraged from each structure. One result is that PSI:Biology structures are found to have a higher rate of annotations than structures determined during the first two phases of PSI. A second result is that the subset of PSI:Biology structures determined through PSI:Biology Partnerships have a higher rate of annotations than those determined exclusive of those partnerships. Both results hold when the annotation rates are examined either at the level of the entire protein or for annotations that are known to fall at specific residues within the portion of the protein that has a determined structure. We conclude that PSI:Biology determines structures that are estimated to have a higher degree of biomedical interest than those determined during the first two phases of PSI based on a broad array of biomedical annotations. For the PSI:Biology Partnerships, we see that there is an associated added value that represents part of the progress toward the goals of PSI:Biology. We interpret the added value to mean that team-based structural biology projects that utilize the expertise and technologies of structural genomics centers together with biological laboratories in the community are conducted in a synergistic manner. We show that the annotation rates can be used in conjunction with established metrics, i

  9. Fandom and the fourth wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenna Kathryn Ballinger

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available I use the Teen Wolf fandom as an example to examine the ways social media has created a more complicated, nuanced relationship with fans. The collapse of the fourth wall between fans and The Powers That Be can have both positive and negative impacts, depending on the willingness of participants to maintain mutual respect and engage in meaningful dialogue.

  10. Prioritizing health: a systematic approach to scoping determinants in health impact assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay McCallum

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The determinants of health are those factors that have the potential to affect health, either positively or negatively, and include a range of personal, social, economic, and environmental factors. In the practice of Health Impact Assessment (HIA, the stage at which the determinants of health are considered for inclusion is during the scoping step. The scoping step is intended to identify how the HIA will be carried out and to set the boundaries (e.g., temporal and geographical for the assessment. There are several factors that can help to inform the scoping process, many of which are considered in existing HIA tools and guidance; however, a systematic method of prioritizing determinants was found to be lacking. In order to analyze existing HIA scoping tools that are available, a systematic literature review was conducted including both primary and grey literature. A total of 10 HIA Scoping tools met the inclusion/exclusion criteria and were carried forward for comparative analysis. The analysis focused on minimum elements and practice standards of HIA scoping that have been established in the field. The analysis determined that existing approaches lack a clear, systematic method of prioritization of health determinants for inclusion in HIA. This finding led to the development of a Systematic HIA Scoping tool that addressed this gap. The decision matrix tool uses factors such as impact, public concern and data availability to prioritize health determinants. Additionally, the tool allows for identification of data gaps and provides a transparent method for budget allocation and assessment planning. In order to increase efficiency and improve utility, the tool was programmed into Microsoft Excel. Future work in the area of HIA methodology development is vital to the ongoing success of the practice and utilization of HIA as a reliable decision-making tool.

  11. Determination of significance in Ecological Impact Assessment: Past change, current practice and future improvements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briggs, Sam; Hudson, Malcolm D., E-mail: mdh@soton.ac.uk

    2013-01-15

    Ecological Impact Assessment (EcIA) is an important tool for conservation and achieving sustainable development. 'Significant' impacts are those which disturb or alter the environment to a measurable degree. Significance is a crucial part of EcIA, our understanding of the concept in practice is vital if it is to be effective as a tool. This study employed three methods to assess how the determination of significance has changed through time, what current practice is, and what would lead to future improvements. Three data streams were collected: interviews with expert stakeholders, a review of 30 Environmental Statements and a broad-scale survey of the United Kingdom Institute of Ecology and Environmental Management (IEEM) members. The approach taken in the determination of significance has become more standardised and subjectivity has become constrained through a transparent framework. This has largely been driven by a set of guidelines produced by IEEM in 2006. The significance of impacts is now more clearly justified and the accuracy with which it is determined has improved. However, there are limitations to accuracy and effectiveness of the determination of significance. These are the quality of baseline survey data, our scientific understanding of ecological processes and the lack of monitoring and feedback of results. These in turn are restricted by the limited resources available in consultancies. The most notable recommendations for future practice are the implementation of monitoring and the publication of feedback, the creation of a central database for baseline survey data and the streamlining of guidance. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The assessment of significance has changed markedly through time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The IEEM guidelines have driven a standardisation of practice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Currently limited by quality of baseline data and scientific understanding. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Monitoring

  12. Impact of social determinants on well-being of urban construction workers of Hyderabad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bala, Sudha; Valsangkar, Sameer; Lakshman Rao, Reshaboyina Lakshmi Narayana; Surya Prabha, Manem Lakshmi

    2016-01-01

    Hyderabad has witnessed one of the largest labor immigration in recent years and these construction workers are highly vulnerable in terms of health. Social determinants of health (SDH) arise from conditions in which they live and these factors interact with each other to produce direct impact on health. (1) To evaluate the sociodemographic and job characteristics of the construction workers. (2) To assess the impact of social determinants on well-being. A sample size of 135 construction workers working at three sites of HITEC city were interviewed using semi-structured questionnaire. Health perception and the impact on well-being was measured using the Healthy Days Module and Kessler's Psychological Distress Scale. SDH were measured on a 27-item questionnaire with responses on a Likert scale ranging from 0 to 4. Proportions, percentages, P values, and mean scores were obtained. The mean age of the sample was 35.4 ± 11.94 years. Seventeen (12.6%) of the workers reported a high risk score on the Kessler's Psychological Distress Scale. Binary logistic regression analysis was used to identify significant domains of social determinants independently associated with the well being of construction workers and significant among the nine domains of social determinants were addiction score domain with odds of 2.259 and a P value of 0.015 and the distress domain with odds of 1.108 and a P < 0.001. There is a significant impairment of physical and mental health due to various factors including SDH, such as addictive habits and psychological distress, which are amenable to prevention.

  13. Impact of Sampling and Cellular Separation on Amino Acid Determinations in Drosophila Hemolymph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabay, Marissa R; Harris, Jasmine C; Shippy, Scott A

    2018-04-03

    The fruit fly is a frequently used model system with a high degree of human disease-related genetic homology. The quantitative chemical analysis of fruit fly tissues and hemolymph uniquely brings chemical signaling and compositional information to fly experimentation. The work here explores the impact of measured chemical content of hemolymph with three aspects of sample collection and preparation. Cellular content of hemolymph was quantitated and removed to determine hemolymph composition changes for seven primary amine analytes. Hemolymph sampling methods were adapted to determine differences in primary amine composition of hemolymph collected from the head, antenna, and abdomen. Also, three types of anesthesia were employed with hemolymph collection to quantitate effects on measured amino acid content. Cell content was found to be 45.4 ± 22.1 cells/nL of hemolymph collected from both adult and larvae flies. Cell-concentrated fractions of adult, but not larvae, hemolymph were found to have higher and more variable amine content. There were amino acid content differences found between all three areas indicating a robust method to characterize chemical markers from specific regions of a fly, and these appear related to physiological activity. Methods of anesthesia have an impact on hemolymph amino acid composition related to overall physiological impact to fly including higher amino acid content variability and oxygen deprivation effects. Together, these analyses identify potential complications with Drosophila hemolymph analysis and opportunities for future studies to relate hemolymph content with model physiological activity.

  14. Acetylation of cell wall is required for structural integrity of the leaf surface and exerts a global impact on plant stress responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nafisi, Majse; Stranne, Maria; Fimognari, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    The epidermis on leaves protects plants from pathogen invasion and provides a waterproof barrier. It consists of a layer of cells that is surrounded by thick cell walls, which are partially impregnated by highly hydrophobic cuticular components. We show that the Arabidopsis T-DNA insertion mutants...... to abiotic stress, particularly detoxification of reactive oxygen species and defense against microbial pathogens (e.g., lipid transfer proteins, peroxidases). In accordance, peroxidase activities were found to be elevated in rwa2 as compared to the wild type. These results indicate that cell wall...

  15. Determining the minimally important difference for the Oral Health Impact Profile-20.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Allen, P Finbarr

    2009-04-01

    In the context of clinical trials, measurement of change is critical. The aim of this study was to determine the minimally important difference (MID) for the Oral Health Impact Profile-20 (OHIP-20) when used with partially dentate patients undergoing treatment that included the provision of removable partial dentures. In a prospective clinical trial, 51 consecutive patients were provided with removable partial dentures. In addition to demographic and dental status data, patients completed an OHIP-20 prior to treatment. One month postoperatively, patients completed a post-treatment OHIP-20 and a global transition scale. Domains assessed in the global transition scale were appearance, ability to chew food, oral comfort, and speech. The MID for the OHIP-20 was calculated using the anchor-based approach. From the initial sample of 51 patients, 44 completed post-treatment questionnaires and were included in the analysis. Change scores in the four transition domains indicated that new dentures had a positive impact in the majority of subjects, especially in perceived impact on chewing and appearance. The study provided a guideline as to what constitutes the MID for the OHIP-20. This benchmark can be used when interpreting the impact of clinical intervention for replacing missing teeth and for power calculation in statistical analyses.

  16. Determining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahram Andarzian

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Wheat production in the south of Khuzestan, Iran is constrained by heat stress for late sowing dates. For optimization of yield, sowing at the appropriate time to fit the cultivar maturity length and growing season is critical. Crop models could be used to determine optimum sowing window for a locality. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the Cropping System Model (CSM-CERES-Wheat for its ability to simulate growth, development, grain yield of wheat in the tropical regions of Iran, and to study the impact of different sowing dates on wheat performance. The genetic coefficients of cultivar Chamran were calibrated for the CSM-CERES-Wheat model and crop model performance was evaluated with experimental data. Wheat cultivar Chamran was sown on different dates, ranging from 5 November to 9 January during 5 years of field experiments that were conducted in the Khuzestan province, Iran, under full and deficit irrigation conditions. The model was run for 8 sowing dates starting on 25 October and repeated every 10 days until 5 January using long-term historical weather data from the Ahvaz, Behbehan, Dezful and Izeh locations. The seasonal analysis program of DSSAT was used to determine the optimum sowing window for different locations as well. Evaluation with the experimental data showed that performance of the model was reasonable as indicated by fairly accurate simulation of crop phenology, biomass accumulation and grain yield against measured data. The normalized RMSE were 3%, 2%, 11.8%, and 3.4% for anthesis date, maturity date, grain yield and biomass, respectively. Optimum sowing window was different among locations. It was opened and closed on 5 November and 5 December for Ahvaz; 5 November and 15 December for Behbehan and Dezful;and 1 November and 15 December for Izeh, respectively. CERES-Wheat model could be used as a tool to evaluate the effect of sowing date on wheat performance in Khuzestan conditions. Further model evaluations

  17. Study of mesanchymal stem cells derived from human umbilical cord vein wall and determining the Process of differentiation to cartilage and bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MohammadAli Zare

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs comprise a rare population of multipotent progenitors capable of supporting hematopoiesis and differentiating into three (osteogenic, adipogenic, and chondrogenic or more (myogenic, cardiomyogenic, etc. lineages. Due to this ability, MSCs appear to be an attractive tool in the context of tissue engineering and cell-based therapy. Currently, bone marrow represents the main source of MSCs for both experimental and clinical studies. The purpose of this study was isolation and quantitative comparison of mesenchymal stem cells derived from umbilical vein. Materials and Methods: In this study, 35 samples of umbilical cord of healthy full- term newborn were studied. Results: The cells had fibroblastoid like appearance and had revealed the potential to differentiate into three linage of bone, Adipose and cartilage. Surface markers for mesenchymal nature were their demonstratives. Conclusion: Based on our findings the mesenchymal stem cells, from umbilical vein wall can be isolated, cultured and differentiated into three categories of bone, cartilage and adipose.

  18. Detection of Anomalies in Diaphragm Walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spruit, R.; Van Tol, F.; Broere, W.

    2015-01-01

    If a calamity with a retaining wall occurs, the impact on surrounding buildings and infrastructure is at least an order of magnitude more severe than without the calamity. In 2005 and 2006 major leaks in the retaining walls of underground stations in Amsterdam and Rotterdam occurred. After these

  19. Acoustic emission measurements during impacts tests for determining ductile fracture data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, H.

    2000-09-01

    The document reports work for further development of methods and tests to obtain better information on the crack initiation toughness (J id ) under impact loading conditions, by acoustic emission measurements. The applicability of the acoustic emission tests for the given purpose was proven by instrumented Charpy tests using modified ISO-V specimens. The physical crack initiation toughness served as the reference value for reliable evaluation of the characteristic data obtained. This reference value is derived from the crack resistance curve determined by the multi-specimen cleavage fracture method combined with data from measurements of the stretching zone width. Verification of the acoustic emission-defined initiation value included a variety of tests, as e.g. additional dynamic single-specimen methods (L-COD, magnetic emission), and supplementary tests (D3PB, pendulum impact testing machine). The test materials are various steels with different strength/toughness properties. (orig./CB) [de

  20. DETERMINATION OF OPERATOR’S IMPACT ON THE MEASUREMENT DONE USING COORDINATE TECHNIQUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ksenia Ostrowska

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Coordinate measuring arms (CMAs are devices which more and more often replace conventional coordinate measuring machines because of their undoubted advantages, such as mobility, the opportunity to increase the measuring volume, the opportunity to connect the optical probe, and above all, good price-quality ratio. Because these devices are handheld and redundant, what has the greatest impact on the measurement result accuracy are the operator, the machine kinematics and its ability to obtain repeatable measurement results; despite the fact that one point can be obtained from an infinite number of shoulders’ positions. In this paper it was determined by using R&R method how significant are the impacts of both the operator and the measuring device on the accuracy of measurements done with CMA, both with rigid switch probe and optical probe.

  1. The impact and determinants of the energy paradigm on economic growth in European Union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrei, Jean Vasile; Mieila, Mihai; Panait, Mirela

    2017-01-01

    Contemporary economies are strongly reliant on energy and analyzing the determining factors that trigger the changes in energy paradigm and their impact upon economic growth is a topical research subject. Our contention is that energy paradigm plays a major role in achieving the sustainable development of contemporary economies. In order to prove this the panel data methodology of research was employed, namely four panel unit root tests (LLC, IPS, F-ADF and F-PP) aiming to reveal the connections and relevance among 17 variables denoting energy influence on economic development. Moreover, it was introduced a specific indicator to express energy consumption per capita. Our findings extend the classical approach of the changes in energy paradigm and their impact upon economic growth and offer a comprehensive analysis which surpasses the practices and policy decisions in the field.

  2. Determination of the dynamical behaviour of biological materials during impact using a pendulum device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Zeebroeck, M.; Tijskens, E.; Van Liedekerke, P.; Deli, V.; De Baerdemaeker, J.; Ramon, H.

    2003-09-01

    A pendulum device has been developed to measure contact force, displacement and displacement rate of an impactor during its impact on the sample. Displacement, classically measured by double integration of an accelerometer, was determined in an alternative way using a more accurate incremental optical encoder. The parameters of the Kuwabara-Kono contact force model for impact of spheres have been estimated using an optimization method, taking the experimentally measured displacement, displacement rate and contact force into account. The accuracy of the method was verified using a rubber ball. Contact force parameters for the Kuwabara-Kono model have been estimated with success for three biological materials, i.e., apples, tomatoes and potatoes. The variability in the parameter estimations for the biological materials was quite high and can be explained by geometric differences (radius of curvature) and by biological variation of mechanical tissue properties.

  3. ROLE CONFLICT AND ROLE AMBIGUITY ON LOCAL GOVERNMENT INTERNAL AUDITORS: THE DETERMINANT AND IMPACTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agil Novriansa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The bureaucratic reform at the local government level in Indonesia that was instituted in 2012 has turned local government internal auditors into an important part of government governance systems. The role of local government internal auditors has been expanded to include not only the area of audit oversight, but also the areas of anti-corruption-related and consulting activities. These fundamental changes may potentially induce role conflict and role ambiguity among internal auditors. The objective of this study is to examine empirically the determinants and consequences of role conflict and role ambiguity among local government internal auditors. More specifically, this study attempts to examine the extent to which formalization determines role conflict and role ambiguity; it further tests the impact of role conflict and role ambiguity on commitment to independence and job performance. Questionnaires were distributed to 248 local government internal auditors from 12 Regional Inspectorates in the provinces of Yogyakarta, South Sumatra, and East Java. A total of 176 responses were received, and 124 useable responses from the 176 responses were analysed to test the hypotheses. Using Structural Equation Modelling-Partial Least Square the results show that: formalization is negatively related to role conflict and role ambiguity; role ambiguity has a negative impact on commitment to independence; role conflict has a positive impact on job performance; and role ambiguity has a negative impact on job performance. These findings serve as important external validity evidence on the phenomena associated with role conflict and role ambiguity that occur in the public sector, especially among internal auditors at local government institutions.

  4. A tool to determine financial impact of adverse events in health care: healthcare quality calculator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarbrough, Wendell G; Sewell, Andrew; Tickle, Erin; Rhinehardt, Eric; Harkleroad, Rod; Bennett, Marc; Johnson, Deborah; Wen, Li; Pfeiffer, Matthew; Benegas, Manny; Morath, Julie

    2014-12-01

    Hospital leaders lack tools to determine the financial impact of poor patient outcomes and adverse events. To provide health-care leaders with decision support for investments to improve care, we created a tool, the Healthcare Quality Calculator (HQCal), which uses institution-specific financial data to calculate impact of poor patient outcomes or quality improvement on present and future margin. Excel and Web-based versions of the HQCal were based on a cohort study framework and created with modular components including major drivers of cost and reimbursement. The Healthcare Quality Calculator (HQCal) compares payment, cost, and profit/loss for patients with and without poor outcomes or quality issues. Cost and payment information for groups with and without quality issues are used by the HQCal to calculate profit or loss. Importantly, institution-specific payment and cost data are used to calculate financial impact and attributable cost associated with poor patient outcomes, adverse events, or quality issues. Because future cost and reimbursement changes can be forecast, the HQCal incorporates a forward-looking component. The flexibility of the HQCal was demonstrated using surgical site infections after abdominal surgery and postoperative surgical airway complications. The Healthcare Quality Calculator determines financial impact of poor patient outcomes and the benefit of initiatives to improve quality. The calculator can identify quality issues that would provide the largest financial benefit if improved; however, it cannot identify specific interventions. The calculator provides a tool to improve transparency regarding both short- and long-term financial consequences of funding, or failing to fund, initiatives to close gaps in quality or improve patient outcomes.

  5. Research on the HYLIFE liquid-first-wall concept for future laser-fusion reactors: liquid jet impact experiments. Final report No. 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, M.A.

    1982-08-01

    The goal of this initial scoping study was to evaluate the transient and steady state drag of a single bar and of some selected arrays of bars and to determine the momentum removed from impacting liquid slugs. In order to achieve this aim, use has been made of both the published literature and experimental data obtained from a small-scale experimental apparatus. The implications of two possible scaling laws for use in designing the small-scale experiment are discussed. The use of near-universal curves to evaluate the momentum removed during the initial transient period is described. The small-scale apparatus used to obtain steady-state drag data is described. Finally, these results are applied to the HYLIFE fusion reactor

  6. Determination of the Impact of Glycolate on ARP and MCU Operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor-Pashow, K.; Peters, T.; Shehee, T.

    2012-01-01

    Savannah River Remediation (SRR) is evaluating an alternate flowsheet for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) using glycolic acid as a reductant. An important aspect of the development of the glycolic acid flowsheet is determining if glycolate has any detrimental downstream impacts. Testing was performed to determine if there is any impact to the strontium and actinide sorption by monosodium titanate (MST) and modified monosodium titanate (mMST) or if there is an impact to the cesium removal at the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Processing Unit (MCU). Sorption testing was performed using both MST and modified MST (mMST) in the presence of 5,000 and 10,000 ppm (mass basis) glycolate. 10,000 ppm is the estimated bounding concentration expected in the DWPF recycle stream based on DWPF melter flammable gas model results. The presence of glycolate was found to slow the removal of Sr and Pu by MST, while increasing the removal rate of Np. Results indicate that the impact is a kinetic effect, and the overall capacity of the material is not affected. There was no measurable effect on U removal at either glycolate concentration. The slower removal rates for Sr and Pu at 5,000 and 10,000 ppm glycolate could result in lower DF values for these sorbates in ARP based on the current (12 hours) and proposed (8 hours) contact times. For the highest glycolate concentration used in this study, the percentage of Sr removed at 6 hours of contact decreased by 1% and the percentage of Pu removed decreased by nearly 7%. The impact may prove insignificant if the concentration of glycolate that is returned to the tank farm is well below the concentrations tested in this study. The presence of glycolate also decreased the removal rates for all three sorbates (Sr, Pu, and Np) by mMST. Similarly to MST, the results for mMST indicate that the impact is a kinetic effect, and the overall capacity of the material is not affected. The presence of glycolate did not change the lack

  7. Impact of the cameras radiometric resolution on the accuracy of determining spectral reflectance coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orych, A.; Walczykowski, P.; Jenerowicz, A.; Zdunek, Z.

    2014-11-01

    Nowadays remote sensing plays a very important role in many different study fields, i.e. environmental studies, hydrology, mineralogy, ecosystem studies, etc. One of the key areas of remote sensing applications is water quality monitoring. Understanding and monitoring of the water quality parameters and detecting different water contaminants is an important issue in water management and protection of whole environment and especially the water ecosystem. There are many remote sensing methods to monitor water quality and detect water pollutants. One of the most widely used method for substance detection with remote sensing techniques is based on usage of spectral reflectance coefficients. They are usually acquired using discrete methods such as spectrometric measurements. These however can be very time consuming, therefore image-based methods are used more and more often. In order to work out the proper methodology of obtaining spectral reflectance coefficients from hyperspectral and multispectral images, it is necessary to verify the impact of cameras radiometric resolution on the accuracy of determination of them. This paper presents laboratory experiments that were conducted using two monochromatic XEVA video sensors (400-1700 nm spectral data registration) with two different radiometric resolutions (12 and 14 bits). In view of determining spectral characteristics from images, the research team used set of interferometric filters. All data collected with multispectral digital video cameras were compared with spectral reflectance coefficients obtained with spectroradiometer. The objective of this research is to find the impact of cameras radiometric resolution on reflectance values in chosen wavelength. The main topic of this study is the analysis of accuracy of spectral coefficients from sensors with different radiometric resolution. By comparing values collected from images acquired with XEVA sensors and with the curves obtained with spectroradiometer it

  8. Determining the Surfactant Consistent with Concrete in order to Achieve the Maximum Possible Dispersion of Multi walled Carbon Nano tubes in Keeping the Plain Concrete Properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adresi, M.; Hassani, A.; Javadian, S.; Tulliani, J. M.

    2016-01-01

    A new surfactant combination compatible with concrete formulation is proposed to avoid unwanted air bubbles created during mixing process in the absence of a defoamer and to achieve the uniform and the maximum possible dispersion of multi walled carbon nano tubes (MWCNTs) in water and subsequently in concrete. To achieve this goal, three steps have been defined: (1) concrete was made with different types and amount of surfactants containing a constant amount of MWCNTs (0.05 wt%) and the air bubbles were eliminated with a proper defoamer. (2) Finding a compatible surfactant with concrete compositions and eliminating unwanted air bubbles in the absence of a common defoamer are of fundamental importance to significantly increase concrete mechanical properties. In this step, the results showed that the poly carboxylate super plasticizer (SP-C) (as a compatible surfactant) dispersed MWCNTs worse than SDS/DTAB but unwanted air bubbles were removed, so the defoamer can be omitted in the mixing process. (3) To solve the problem, a new compatible surfactant composition was developed and different ratios of surfactants were tested and evaluated by means of performance criteria mentioned above. The results showed that the new surfactant composition (SDS and SP-C) can disperse MWCNTs around 24% more efficiently than the other surfactant compositions.

  9. The impact of Adverse Childhood Experiences on social determinants among Saudi adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almuneef, Maha; ElChoueiry, Nathalie; Saleheen, Hassan; Al-Eissa, Majid

    2017-12-27

    Early exposure to violence has deleterious effect on the child's brain development. The aims for this project were to assess the prevalence of Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) and their impact on social determinants in Saudi Arabia (SA). A cross-sectional, national study conducted in all regions of SA using the World Health Organization-ACE-International Questionnaire to determine the association between ACEs and socioeconomic outcomes. A total of 10 156 participants completed the questionnaire with five main ACE categories (abuse, neglect, family dysfunction, peer and community violence). Over half of the sample (52%) experienced emotional abuse, followed by physical abuse (42%), bullying (39%), neglect (29%) and sexual abuse (21%). The most common family dysfunction was witnessing domestic violence against any household member (57%) and the least prevalent was living with a substance abuser (9%). Low educational attainment, disruption in marital life and substance abuse were significantly affected by all ACE categories. However, unemployment was marginally affected only by neglect and household dysfunction. ACEs are highly prevalent in SA and have significant negative impact on life opportunities. National preventive programs should be implemented to reduce ACE and their deleterious outcomes. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Faculty of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  10. Simultaneous trace-levels determination of Hg(II) and Pb(II) ions in various samples using a modified carbon paste electrode based on multi-walled carbon nanotubes and a new synthesized Schiff base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afkhami, Abbas; Bagheri, Hasan; Khoshsafar, Hosein; Saber-Tehrani, Mohammad; Tabatabaee, Masoumeh; Shirzadmehr, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A new chemically modified carbon paste electrode was constructed and used. ► A new Schiff base and multi-walled carbon nanotube was used as a modifier. ► The electrochemical properties of the modified electrode were studied. ► The electrode was used to the simultaneous determination of Pb 2+ and Hg 2+ . - Abstract: A modified carbon paste electrode based on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and 3-(4-methoxybenzylideneamino)-2-thioxothiazolodin-4-one as a new synthesized Schiff base was constructed for the simultaneous determination of trace amounts of Hg(II) and Pb(II) by square wave anodic stripping voltammetry. The modified electrode showed an excellent selectivity and stability for Hg(II) and Pb(II) determinations and for accelerated electron transfer between the electrode and the analytes. The electrochemical properties and applications of the modified electrode were studied. Operational parameters such as pH, deposition potential and deposition time were optimized for the purpose of determination of traces of metal ions at pH 3.0. Under optimal conditions the limits of detection, based on three times the background noise, were 9.0 × 10 −4 and 6.0 × 10 −4 μmol L −1 for Hg(II) and Pb(II) with a 90 s preconcentration, respectively. In addition, the modified electrode displayed a good reproducibility and selectivity, making it suitable for the simultaneous determination of Hg(II) and Pb(II) in real samples such as sea water, waste water, tobacco, marine and human teeth samples.

  11. Implementing Green Walls in Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael B. McCullough

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies in applied pedagogical design have shown that, at all educational levels, direct exposure to the natural environment can enhance learning by improving student attention and behaviors. Implementing green walls—a “vertical garden,” or “living wall” interior wall that typically includes greenery, a growing medium (soil or substrate and a water delivery system—provides environmental health benefits, but also provides a practical application within classrooms for minimizing directed attention fatigue in students by connecting them to “outdoor nature” within the indoor environment. Hands-on “project-based” learning is another pedagogical strategy that has proved to be effective across the spectrum of educational levels and across subject areas. Green walls have the potential to inspire critical thinking through a combination of project-based learning strategies and environmental education. The authors have outlined a curriculum involving the implementation of an indoor living wall system within a classroom-learning environment, incorporating project-based learning modules that interact with the wall. In conjunction with the passive health benefits of a green wall, project-based curriculum models can connect students interactively with indoor nature and have the potential to inspire real-world thinking related to science, technology, engineering, art, and mathematics fields within the indoor learning environment. Through a combination of these passive and interactive modes, students are connected to nature in the indoor environment regardless of weather conditions outdoors. Future research direction could include post-construction studies of the effectiveness of project-based curricula related to living walls, and the long-term impacts of implementing green walls in classrooms on school achievement and student behaviors.

  12. Numerical analysis of plasma-wall interaction for an oblique magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chodura, R.

    1982-01-01

    A numerical code is used to calculate energy and incidence angle of plasma ions and electrons impinging on an absorbing wall. Plasma particles coming from a plasma of given density and temperature traverse a transition layer with an electric space charge field perpendicular to the wall and a given magnetic field of arbitrary angle before being adsorbed in the wall. The 1d electrostatic particle code determines the electric field and the change of particle velocity distributions in the transition layer. When the incidence angle psi of the magnetic field is varied from 0 0 (normal) to 90 0 (tangential), the impact energies W of ions and electrons at the wall stay nearly unchanged. Electrons reach the wall according to an isotropic Maxwellian distribution except for large angles psi where only electrons travelling along the magnetic field have a chance to escape the plasma. Ions hit the wall at increasing angles theta for increasing psi. The incidence angle of cold ions (Tsub(i0) = 0) is always steeper than that of the magnetic field. For nearly grazing incidence angle of the magnetic field psi →90 0 the ion incidence angle theta becomes grazing as well. After the distribution function is determined the sputtering yield of wall incident ions is calculated for different magnetic field angles psi showing maximum yield for psi near to 90 0 . (orig.)

  13. Investigation of the Geometry of Metal Tube Walls after Necking in Uniaxial Tension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Li

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: In order to characterize the deformation and true stress–strain relation of metal tubes, the geometry of tube walls after necking in uniaxial tension need to be determined. The paper investigated the necking process of metal tube. A large number of tensile tests and finite element analysis of 1Cr18Ni9Ti tubes with different sizes were conducted. It was found that the geometry of outer tube wall in the necking region can be described using a logistic regression model. The final geometry of the tube is determined by original tube diameter and wall thickness. The offset of tube walls are affected by two competing factors: volume constancy and necking. The offset distances of outer and inner walls are mainly affected by original wall thickness. The length of the necking zone is more influenced by original tube diameter. Tube elongation at fracture increases slightly as tube diameter gets larger, while the wall thickness has almost no impact on the elongation.

  14. Structural and biochemical changes induced by pulsed electric field treatments on Cabernet Sauvignon grape berry skins: impact on cell wall total tannins and polysaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cholet, Céline; Delsart, Cristèle; Petrel, Mélina; Gontier, Etienne; Grimi, Nabil; L'hyvernay, Annie; Ghidossi, Remy; Vorobiev, Eugène; Mietton-Peuchot, Martine; Gény, Laurence

    2014-04-02

    Pulsed electric field (PEF) treatment is an emerging technology that is arousing increasing interest in vinification processes for its ability to enhance polyphenol extraction performance. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of PEF treatment on grape skin histocytological structures and on the organization of skin cell wall polysaccharides and tannins, which, until now, have been little investigated. This study relates to the effects of two PEF treatments on harvested Cabernet Sauvignon berries: PEF1 (medium strength (4 kV/cm); short duration (1 ms)) and PEF2 (low intensity (0.7 kV/cm); longer duration (200 ms)). Histocytological observations and the study of levels of polysaccharidic fractions and total amounts of tannins allowed differentiation between the two treatments. Whereas PEF1 had little effect on the polyphenol structure and pectic fraction, PEF2 profoundly modified the organization of skin cell walls. Depending on the PEF parameters, cell wall structure was differently affected, providing variable performance in terms of polyphenol extraction and wine quality.

  15. Determination of the distribution and reaction of polysaccharides in wood cell walls by the isotope tracer technique, 6: Selective radio-labeling of mannan in ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imai, T.; Terashima, N.; Yasuda, S.

    1997-01-01

    D-Mannose-[2-H-3] and GDP (guanosine diphosphate)-D-mannose-[mannose-1-H-3] were administered to the shoots of ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba L.) tolabel mannan selectively in the cell walls. To suppress the incorporation of radioactivity into the lignin and cellulose, the precursors were administered in the presence of the inhibitor of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL): namely, L-alpha-aminooxy-beta-phenylpropionic acid (AOPP) and the inhibitor of glucan synthesis: namely, 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG) and 2.6-dichlorobenzonitrile (2.6-DCB). When D-mannose-[2-H-3] was administered in the absence of the inhibitors, great radioactivities were found in the mannose and glucose obtained by sulfuric acid hydrolysis of the newly-formed xylem, and also in the vanillin obtained by nitrobenzene oxidation. These results indicate that the radioactivity was incorporated not only into mannan but also into cellulose and lignin. When D-mannose-[2-H-3] was administered in the presence of both AOPP and 2-DG, the radioactivities of vanillin and glucose were decreased but that of mannose was not decreased. These results indicate that the incorporations of radioactivities into lignin and cellulose were suppressed by the inhibitors, but the incorporation into mannan was not interfered with. The treatment with 2,6-DCB lessened the incorporations of radioactivity into vanillin, xylose, mannose, and glucose of the newly formed xylem considerably which indicated that 2,6-DCB disturbed the metabolic activities of the plant fatally. Consequently, the selective radiolabeling of mannan in ginkgo was achieved by the administration of D-mannose-[2-H-3], in the presence of both AOPP and 2-DG, toa growing stem. In the case of GDP-D-mannose-[mannose-1-H-3], the radioactivity incorporated into the newly-formed xylem was very little, and the selectivity in labeling and the effects of the inhibitors were not clear

  16. Simultaneous determination of adenine guanine and thymine at multi-walled carbon nanotubes incorporated with poly(new fuchsin) composite film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang Ching; Yogeswaran, Umasankar [Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, National Taipei University of Technology, No.1, Section 3, Chung-Hsiao East Road, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Chen, S.-M. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, National Taipei University of Technology, No.1, Section 3, Chung-Hsiao East Road, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: smchen78@ms15.hinet.net

    2009-03-16

    A composite film (MWCNTs-PNF) which contains multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) along with the incorporation of poly(new fuchsin) (PNF) has been synthesized on glassy carbon electrode (GCE), gold (Au) and indium tin oxide (ITO) by potentiostatic methods. The presence of MWCNTs in the composite film enhances surface coverage concentration ({gamma}) of PNF to {approx}176.5%, and increases the electron transfer rate constant (k{sub s}) to {approx}346%. The composite film also exhibits promising enhanced electrocatalytic activity towards the mixture of biochemical compounds such as adenine (AD), guanine (GU) and thymine (THY). The surface morphology of the composite film deposited on ITO has been studied using scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. These two techniques reveal that the PNF incorporated on MWCNTs. Electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance study reveals the enhancement in the functional properties of MWCNTs and PNF. The electrocatalytic responses of analytes at MWCNTs and MWCNTs-PNF films were measured using both cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). From electrocatalysis studies, well separated voltammetric peaks have been obtained at the composite film for AD, GU and THY, with the peak separation of 320.3 and 132.7 mV between GU-AD and AD-THY respectively. The sensitivity of the composite film towards AD, GU and THY in DPV technique is 218.18, 12.62 and 78.22 mA M{sup -1} cm{sup -2} respectively, which are higher than MWCNTs film. Further, electroanalytical studies of AD, GU and THY present in single-strand deoxyribonucleic acid (ssDNA) have been carried out using semi-derivative CV and DPV.

  17. Catalytic properties of the Gas family β-(1,3)-glucanosyltransferases active in fungal cell-wall biogenesis as determined by a novel fluorescent assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazáň, Marián; Ragni, Enrico; Popolo, Laura; Farkaš, Vladimír

    2011-09-01

    BGTs [β-(1,3)-glucanosyltransglycosylases; EC 2.4.1.-] of the GH72 (family 72 of glycosylhydrolases) are GPI (glycosylphosphatidylinositol)-anchored proteins that play an important role in the biogenesis of fungal cell walls. They randomly cleave glycosidic linkages in β-(1,3)-glucan chains and ligate the polysaccharide portions containing newly formed reducing ends to C(3)(OH) at non-reducing ends of other β-(1,3)-glucan molecules. We have developed a sensitive fluorescence-based method for the assay of transglycosylating activity of GH72 enzymes. In the new assay, laminarin [β-(1,3)-glucan] is used as the glucanosyl donor and LamOS (laminarioligosaccharides) fluorescently labelled with SR (sulforhodamine) serve as the acceptors. The new fluorescent assay was employed for partial biochemical characterization of the heterologously expressed Gas family proteins from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. All the Gas enzymes specifically used laminarin as the glucanosyl donor and a SR-LamOS of DP (degree of polymerization) ≥5 as the acceptors. Gas proteins expressed in distinct stages of the yeast life cycle showed differences in their pH optima. Gas1p and Gas5p, which are expressed during vegetative growth, had the highest activity at pH 4.5 and 3.5 respectively, whereas the sporulation-specific Gas2p and Gas4p were most active between pH 5 and 6. The novel fluorescent assay provides a suitable tool for the screening of potential glucanosyltransferases or their inhibitors.

  18. Modification of glassy carbon electrode with poly(hydroxynaphthol blue)/multi-walled carbon nanotubes composite and construction a new voltammetric sensor for the simultaneous determination of hydroquinone, catechol, and resorcinol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshinejad, Hassan; Arab Chamjangali, Mansour; Goudarzi, Nasser; Hossain Amin, Amir

    2018-03-01

    A novel voltammetric sensor is developed based on a poly(hydroxynaphthol blue)/multi-walled carbon nanotubes-modified glassy carbon electrode for the simultaneous determination of the dihydroxybenzene isomers hydroquinone (HQ), catechol (CC), and resorcinol (RS). The preparation and basic electrochemical performance of the sensor are investigated in details. The electrochemical behavior of the dihydroxybenzene isomers at the sensor is studied by the cyclic and differential pulse voltammetric techniques. The results obtained show that this new electrochemical sensor exhibits an excellent electro-catalytic activity towards oxidation of the three isomers. The mechanism of this electro-catalytic activity is discussed. Using the optimum parameters, limit of detection obtained 0.24, 0.24, and 0.26 μmol L-1 for HQ, CC, and RS, respectively. The modified electrode is also successfully applied to the simultaneous determination of dihydroxybenzene in water samples.

  19. Determination of elastic-plastic properties of Alporas foam at the cell-wall level using microscale-cantilever bending tests

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Doktor, Tomáš; Kytýř, Daniel; Koudelka_ml., Petr; Zlámal, Petr; Fíla, Tomáš; Jiroušek, Ondřej

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 2 (2015), s. 203-206 ISSN 1580-2949 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP105/12/0824 Institutional support: RVO:68378297 Keywords : aluminium foam * cantilever bending * micromechanics * optical strain measurement Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials Impact factor: 0.439, year: 2015 http://mit.imt.si/Revija/izvodi/mit152/doktor.pdf

  20. "Great Ideas" in Russian Psychology: Personality Impact on Psychophysiological Functions and Causal Approach to Self- determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina A. Mironenko

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Russian psychology has brought into the world science at least two great ideas: the conditioned reflex (Pavlov and the zone of proximal development (Vygotsky. These concepts were formulated before “iron curtain” fell. Since then Russian science dropped out from the view of western colleagues for decades. Now it is challenged to re-join international mainstream. Are we in a position to contribute?A key concept for Russian psychology is personality impact on psycho-physiological functions and causal approach to self-determination. The concept of selfdetermination appeared in Western theories in 1980-es and since then it has been developed in the context of teleological humanitarian approach. In Russian science the concept of self-determination dates back to 1934, when it was defined by Rubinstein as “sub’ekt”. Self-determination of ontogenesis of psycho physiological functions resulting from confluence of ontogenesis and social development was explicated by Russian scientists whose theoretical reasoning and empirical results are compared to Western counterparts.

  1. Impacts of Urban Agriculture on the Determinants of Health: Scoping Review Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audate, Pierre Paul; Fernandez, Melissa A; Cloutier, Geneviève; Lebel, Alexandre

    2018-03-27

    Since the 1990s, urban agriculture (UA) has contributed to improving food security in low- and middle- income countries. Now, it is implemented as a multifunctional intervention that can influence various determinants of health (eg, food security, social relationships). Studies of interest stem from several research disciplines, use a wide range of methods, and show results that are sometimes inconsistent. Current studies have not summarized the overall effects of UA on health and its determinants. The objective of this protocol is to develop a research strategy for a scoping review that characterizes studies of beneficial and adverse impacts of UA on health and its determinants in a wide range of disciplines. Initially, with the help of a library specialist, a list of publications will be obtained through a systematic search of seven electronic bibliographic databases: PubMed, Embase, MEDLINE (Embase), CINAHL Plus with full text, Academic Search Premier (EBSCO host), CAB Abstract (Ovid), and Web of Science. Secondly, a three-step screening by two independent reviewers will lead to a list of relevant publications that meet eligibility and inclusion criteria. Finally, data on the bibliography, type of participants, type of study, results of study, and countries will be extracted from included articles and analyzed to be presented in a peer-reviewed article. The findings are expected to identify research gaps that will inform needs for UA research in specific fields (eg, mental health), among certain population groups (eg, adults) or within different economic contexts (eg, low-, middle-, or high-income countries). Furthermore, the findings are expected to identify knowledge gaps and direct future research needs. This is an original study that seeks to integrate beneficial and adverse effects of UA on health at different level of influence (individuals, households, and community) in order to facilitate a better understanding of UA impacts. This protocol is a first of

  2. Cell walls of the dimorphic fungal pathogens Sporothrix schenckii and Sporothrix brasiliensis exhibit bilaminate structures and sloughing of extensive and intact layers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila M Lopes-Bezerra

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Sporotrichosis is a subcutaneous mycosis caused by pathogenic species of the Sporothrix genus. A new emerging species, Sporothrix brasiliensis, is related to cat-transmitted sporotrichosis and has severe clinical manifestations. The cell wall of pathogenic fungi is a unique structure and impacts directly on the host immune response. We reveal and compare the cell wall structures of Sporothrix schenckii and S. brasiliensis using high-pressure freezing electron microscopy to study the cell wall organization of both species. To analyze the components of the cell wall, we also used infrared and 13C and 1H NMR spectroscopy and the sugar composition was determined by quantitative high-performance anion-exchange chromatography. Our ultrastructural data revealed a bi-layered cell wall structure for both species, including an external microfibrillar layer and an inner electron-dense layer. The inner and outer layers of the S. brasiliensis cell wall were thicker than those of S. schenckii, correlating with an increase in the chitin and rhamnose contents. Moreover, the outer microfibrillar layer of the S. brasiliensis cell wall had longer microfibrils interconnecting yeast cells. Distinct from those of other dimorphic fungi, the cell wall of Sporothrix spp. lacked α-glucan component. Interestingly, glycogen α-particles were identified in the cytoplasm close to the cell wall and the plasma membrane. The cell wall structure as well as the presence of glycogen α-particles varied over time during cell culture. The structural differences observed in the cell wall of these Sporothrix species seemed to impact its uptake by monocyte-derived human macrophages. The data presented here show a unique cell wall structure of S. brasiliensis and S. schenckii during the yeast parasitic phase. A new cell wall model for Sporothrix spp. is therefore proposed that suggests that these fungi molt sheets of intact cell wall layers. This observation may have significant

  3. Cell walls of the dimorphic fungal pathogens Sporothrix schenckii and Sporothrix brasiliensis exhibit bilaminate structures and sloughing of extensive and intact layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Louise A.; Niño-Vega, Gustavo; Mora-Montes, Héctor M.; Neves, Gabriela W. P.; Villalobos-Duno, Hector; Barreto, Laura; Garcia, Karina; Franco, Bernardo; Martínez-Álvarez, José A.; Munro, Carol A.; Gow, Neil A. R.

    2018-01-01

    Sporotrichosis is a subcutaneous mycosis caused by pathogenic species of the Sporothrix genus. A new emerging species, Sporothrix brasiliensis, is related to cat-transmitted sporotrichosis and has severe clinical manifestations. The cell wall of pathogenic fungi is a unique structure and impacts directly on the host immune response. We reveal and compare the cell wall structures of Sporothrix schenckii and S. brasiliensis using high-pressure freezing electron microscopy to study the cell wall organization of both species. To analyze the components of the cell wall, we also used infrared and 13C and 1H NMR spectroscopy and the sugar composition was determined by quantitative high-performance anion-exchange chromatography. Our ultrastructural data revealed a bi-layered cell wall structure for both species, including an external microfibrillar layer and an inner electron-dense layer. The inner and outer layers of the S. brasiliensis cell wall were thicker than those of S. schenckii, correlating with an increase in the chitin and rhamnose contents. Moreover, the outer microfibrillar layer of the S. brasiliensis cell wall had longer microfibrils interconnecting yeast cells. Distinct from those of other dimorphic fungi, the cell wall of Sporothrix spp. lacked α-glucan component. Interestingly, glycogen α-particles were identified in the cytoplasm close to the cell wall and the plasma membrane. The cell wall structure as well as the presence of glycogen α-particles varied over time during cell culture. The structural differences observed in the cell wall of these Sporothrix species seemed to impact its uptake by monocyte-derived human macrophages. The data presented here show a unique cell wall structure of S. brasiliensis and S. schenckii during the yeast parasitic phase. A new cell wall model for Sporothrix spp. is therefore proposed that suggests that these fungi molt sheets of intact cell wall layers. This observation may have significant effects on localized and

  4. Inverse measurement of wall pressure field in flexible-wall wind tunnels using global wall deformation data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kenneth; Brown, Julian; Patil, Mayuresh; Devenport, William

    2018-02-01

    The Kevlar-wall anechoic wind tunnel offers great value to the aeroacoustics research community, affording the capability to make simultaneous aeroacoustic and aerodynamic measurements. While the aeroacoustic potential of the Kevlar-wall test section is already being leveraged, the aerodynamic capability of these test sections is still to be fully realized. The flexibility of the Kevlar walls suggests the possibility that the internal test section flow may be characterized by precisely measuring small deflections of the flexible walls. Treating the Kevlar fabric walls as tensioned membranes with known pre-tension and material properties, an inverse stress problem arises where the pressure distribution over the wall is sought as a function of the measured wall deflection. Experimental wall deformations produced by the wind loading of an airfoil model are measured using digital image correlation and subsequently projected onto polynomial basis functions which have been formulated to mitigate the impact of measurement noise based on a finite-element study. Inserting analytic derivatives of the basis functions into the equilibrium relations for a membrane, full-field pressure distributions across the Kevlar walls are computed. These inversely calculated pressures, after being validated against an independent measurement technique, can then be integrated along the length of the test section to give the sectional lift of the airfoil. Notably, these first-time results are achieved with a non-contact technique and in an anechoic environment.

  5. Relationship between determinant factors of disclosure of information on environmental impacts of Brazilian companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara Vogt

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at analyzing the relationship between determinant factors of disclosure of information on environmental impacts of Brazilian companies. A descriptive, documental and quantitative research was conducted through a sample of 97 Brazilian companies. In the Sustainability Reports and in the Annual Reports information, five environmental aspects were collected: emissions, effluents, wastes, products and services; and transport, which were used to measure the degree of environmental disclosure. This concludes that there is a relationship between the variables investigated in all analyzed years. The size, audit and Global Reporting Initiative (GRI are associated with disclosure and the Corporate Sustainability Index (CSI, Pollution Potential (POTEN, governance, stocks, Return on Assets (ROA and Return on Equity (ROE are not.

  6. Determining the inventory impact of extended-shelf-life platelets with a network simulation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, John T

    2017-12-01

    The regulatory shelf life for platelets (PLTs) in many jurisdictions is 5 days. PLT shelf life can be extended to 7 days with an enhanced bacterial detection algorithm. Enhanced testing, however, comes at a cost, which may be offset by reductions in wastage due to longer shelf life. This article describes a method for estimating systemwide reductions in PLT outdates after PLT shelf life is extended. A simulation was used to evaluate the impact of an extended PLT shelf life within a national blood network. A network model of the Canadian Blood Services PLT supply chain was built and validated. PLT shelf life was extended from 5 days to 6, 7, and 8 days and runs were completed to determine the impact on outdates. Results suggest that, in general, a 16.3% reduction in PLT wastage can be expected with each additional day that PLT shelf life is extended. Both suppliers and hospitals will experience fewer outdating units, but wastage will decrease at a faster rate at hospitals. No effect was seen by blood group, but there was some evidence that supplier site characteristics influences both the number of units wasted and the site's ability to benefit from extended-shelf-life PLTs. Extended-shelf-life PLTs will reduce wastage within a blood supply chain. At 7 days, an improvement of 38% reduction in wastage can be expected with outdates being equally distributed between suppliers and hospital customers. © 2017 AABB.

  7. The DEMO wall load challenge

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wenninger, R.; Albanese, R.; Ambrosino, R.; Arbeiter, F.; Aubert, J.; Bachmann, C.; Barbato, L.; Barrett, T.; Beckers, M.; Biel, W.; Boccaccini, L.; Carralero, D.; Coster, D.; Eich, T.; Fasoli, A.; Federici, G.; Firdaouss, M.; Graves, J.; Horáček, Jan; Kovari, M.; Lanthaler, S.; Loschiavo, V.; Lowry, C.; Lux, H.; Maddaluno, G.; Maviglia, F.; Mitteau, R.; Neu, R.; Pfefferle, D.; Schmid, K.; Siccinio, M.; Sieglin, B.; Silva, C.; Snicker, A.; Subba, F.; Varje, J.; Zohm, H.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 4 (2017), č. článku 046002. ISSN 0029-5515 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 633053 - EUROfusion Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : DEMO * power loads * first wall Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) Impact factor: 3.307, year: 2016 http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1741-4326/aa4fb4

  8. An interplay between plasticity and parental phenotype determines impacts of ocean acidification on a reef fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schunter, Celia; Welch, Megan J; Nilsson, Göran E; Rummer, Jodie L; Munday, Philip L; Ravasi, Timothy

    2018-02-01

    The impacts of ocean acidification will depend on the ability of marine organisms to tolerate, acclimate and eventually adapt to changes in ocean chemistry. Here, we use a unique transgenerational experiment to determine the molecular response of a coral reef fish to short-term, developmental and transgenerational exposure to elevated CO 2 , and to test how these responses are influenced by variations in tolerance to elevated CO 2 exhibited by the parents. Within-generation responses in gene expression to end-of-century predicted CO 2 levels indicate that a self-amplifying cycle in GABAergic neurotransmission is triggered, explaining previously reported neurological and behavioural impairments. Furthermore, epigenetic regulator genes exhibited a within-generation specific response, but with some divergence due to parental phenotype. Importantly, we find that altered gene expression for the majority of within-generation responses returns to baseline levels following parental exposure to elevated CO 2 conditions. Our results show that both parental variation in tolerance and cross-generation exposure to elevated CO 2 are crucial factors in determining the response of reef fish to changing ocean chemistry.

  9. Determining the Impact of Steady-State PV Fault Current Injections on Distribution Protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seuss, John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Reno, Matthew J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Broderick, Robert Joseph [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Grijalva, Santiago [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-05-01

    This report investigates the fault current contribution from a single large PV system and the impact it has on existing distribution overcurrent protection devices. Assumptions are made about the modeling of the PV system under fault to perform exhaustive steady - state fault analyses throughout distribution feeder models. Each PV interconnection location is tested to determine how the size of the PV system affects the fault current measured by each protection device. This data is then searched for logical conditions that indicate whether a protection device has operated in a manner that will cause more customer outages due to the addition of the PV system. This is referred to as a protection issue , and there are four unique types of issues that have been identified in the study. The PV system size at which any issues occur are recorded to determine the feeder's PV hosting capacity limitations due to interference with protection settings. The analysis is carried out on six feeder models. The report concludes with a discussion of the prevalence and cause of each protection issue caused by PV system fault current.

  10. An interplay between plasticity and parental phenotype determines impacts of ocean acidification on a reef fish

    KAUST Repository

    Schunter, Celia Marei

    2017-12-15

    The impacts of ocean acidification will depend on the ability of marine organisms to tolerate, acclimate and eventually adapt to changes in ocean chemistry. Here, we use a unique transgenerational experiment to determine the molecular response of a coral reef fish to short-term, developmental and transgenerational exposure to elevated CO2, and to test how these responses are influenced by variations in tolerance to elevated CO2 exhibited by the parents. Within-generation responses in gene expression to end-of-century predicted CO2 levels indicate that a self-amplifying cycle in GABAergic neurotransmission is triggered, explaining previously reported neurological and behavioural impairments. Furthermore, epigenetic regulator genes exhibited a within-generation specific response, but with some divergence due to parental phenotype. Importantly, we find that altered gene expression for the majority of within-generation responses returns to baseline levels following parental exposure to elevated CO2 conditions. Our results show that both parental variation in tolerance and cross-generation exposure to elevated CO2 are crucial factors in determining the response of reef fish to changing ocean chemistry.

  11. An interplay between plasticity and parental phenotype determines impacts of ocean acidification on a reef fish

    KAUST Repository

    Schunter, Celia Marei; Welch, Megan J.; Nilsson, Gö ran E.; Rummer, Jodie L.; Munday, Philip L.; Ravasi, Timothy

    2017-01-01

    The impacts of ocean acidification will depend on the ability of marine organisms to tolerate, acclimate and eventually adapt to changes in ocean chemistry. Here, we use a unique transgenerational experiment to determine the molecular response of a coral reef fish to short-term, developmental and transgenerational exposure to elevated CO2, and to test how these responses are influenced by variations in tolerance to elevated CO2 exhibited by the parents. Within-generation responses in gene expression to end-of-century predicted CO2 levels indicate that a self-amplifying cycle in GABAergic neurotransmission is triggered, explaining previously reported neurological and behavioural impairments. Furthermore, epigenetic regulator genes exhibited a within-generation specific response, but with some divergence due to parental phenotype. Importantly, we find that altered gene expression for the majority of within-generation responses returns to baseline levels following parental exposure to elevated CO2 conditions. Our results show that both parental variation in tolerance and cross-generation exposure to elevated CO2 are crucial factors in determining the response of reef fish to changing ocean chemistry.

  12. Determination of the Impact of Urbanization on Agricultural Lands using Multi-temporal Satellite Sensor Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, S.; Alganci, U.; Sertel, E.; Ustundag, B.

    2015-12-01

    Throughout the history, agricultural activities have been performed close to urban areas. Main reason behind this phenomenon is the need of fast marketing of the agricultural production to urban residents and financial provision. Thus, using the areas nearby cities for agricultural activities brings out advantage of easy transportation of productions and fast marketing. For decades, heavy migration to cities has directly and negatively affected natural grasslands, forests and agricultural lands. This pressure has caused agricultural lands to be changed into urban areas. Dense urbanization causes increase in impervious surfaces, heat islands and many other problems in addition to destruction of agricultural lands. Considering the negative impacts of urbanization on agricultural lands and natural resources, a periodic monitoring of these changes becomes indisputably important. At this point, satellite images are known to be good data sources for land cover / use change monitoring with their fast data acquisition, large area coverages and temporal resolution properties. Classification of the satellite images provides thematic the land cover / use maps of the earth surface and changes can be determined with GIS based analysis multi-temporal maps. In this study, effects of heavy urbanization over agricultural lands in Istanbul, metropolitan city of Turkey, were investigated with use of multi-temporal Landsat TM satellite images acquired between 1984 and 2011. Images were geometrically registered to each other and classified using supervised maximum likelihood classification algorithm. Resulting thematic maps were exported to GIS environment and destructed agricultural lands by urbanization were determined using spatial analysis.

  13. Immersion Refractometry of Isolated Bacterial Cell Walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquis, Robert E.

    1973-01-01

    Immersion-refractometric and light-scattering measurements were adapted to determinations of average refractive indices and physical compactness of isolated bacterial cell walls. The structures were immersed in solutions containing various concentrations of polymer molecules that cannot penetrate into wall pores, and then an estimate was made of the polymer concentration or the refractive index of the polymer solution in which light scattering was reduced to zero. Because each wall preparation was heterogeneous, the refractive index of the medium for zero light scattering had to be estimated by extrapolation. Refractive indices for walls suspended in bovine serum albumin solutions ranged from 1.348 for walls of the rod form of Arthrobacter crystallopoietes to 1.382 for walls of the teichoic acid deficient, 52A5 strain of Staphylococcus aureus. These indices were used to calculate approximate values for solids content per milliliter, and the calculated values agreed closely with those estimated from a knowledge of dextran-impermeable volumes per gram, dry weight, of the walls. When large molecules such as dextrans or serum albumin were used for immersion refractometry, the refractive indices obtained were for entire walls, including both wall polymers and wall water. When smaller molecules that can penetrate wall pores to various extents were used with Micrococcus lysodeikticus walls, the average, apparent refractive index of the structures increased as the molecular size of probing molecules was decreased. It was possible to obtain an estimate of 1.45 to 1.46 for the refractive index of wall polymers, predominantly peptidoglycans in this case, by extrapolating the curve for refractive index versus molecular radius to a value of 0.2 nm, the approximate radius of a water molecule. This relatively low value for polymer refractive index was interpreted as evidence in favor of the amorphous, elastic model of peptidoglycan structure and against the crystalline, rigid

  14. The impact of GPS receiver modifications and ionospheric activity on Swarm baseline determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, X.; Visser, P. N. A. M.; van den IJssel, J.

    2018-05-01

    The European Space Agency (ESA) Swarm mission is a satellite constellation launched on 22 November 2013 aiming at observing the Earth geomagnetic field and its temporal variations. The three identical satellites are equipped with high-precision dual-frequency Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers, which make the constellation an ideal test bed for baseline determination. From October 2014 to August 2016, a number of GPS receiver modifications and a new GPS Receiver Independent Exchange Format (RINEX) converter were implemented. Moreover, the on-board GPS receiver performance has been influenced by the ionospheric scintillations. The impact of these factors is assessed for baseline determination of the pendulum formation flying Swarm-A and -C satellites. In total 30 months of data - from 15 July 2014 to the end of 2016 - is analyzed. The assessment includes analysis of observation residuals, success rate of GPS carrier phase ambiguity fixing, a consistency check between the so-called kinematic and reduced-dynamic baseline solution, and validations of orbits by comparing with Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) observations. External baseline solutions from The German Space Operations Center (GSOC) and Astronomisches Institut - Universität Bern (AIUB) are also included in the comparison. Results indicate that the GPS receiver modifications and RINEX converter changes are effective to improve the baseline determination. This research eventually shows a consistency level of 9.3/4.9/3.0 mm between kinematic and reduced-dynamic baselines in the radial/along-track/cross-track directions. On average 98.3% of the epochs have kinematic solutions. Consistency between TU Delft and external reduced-dynamic baseline solutions is at a level of 1 mm level in all directions.

  15. Thermal load determination in the mixing TEE impacted by a turbulent flow generated by two fluids at large gap of temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braillard, O.

    2005-01-01

    A 304L mixing tee mock-up is instrumented to assess the fluctuating temperature in the mixing area generated by two fluids (water) at large gap of temperature meet. The turbulent mixing layer impacts the structure wall and creates stresses, which lead to the damages. The case studied in this paper corresponds to the 'swinging streak' within a flow rate ratio of 25 %. The instrumentation is specifically planned to measure the fluctuating temperature in the fluid close to the internal skin and inside the wall too. This experiment is performed using a new sensor 'fluxmeter' which is non intrusive and typically designed to catch the fluctuation without any signal attenuation, within a frequency range 0-25Hz. The facility called 'Fatherino' supplies an available delta T of 70 degree C in water at 4 m/s mixture velocity in a mixing tee mock-up 50 mm in diameter. The flow features generate a large turbulent flow in the mixing layer and favour the heat flux transfer to the wall. By applying an inverse heat conduction method applied to the output data given by the fluxmeter, both the heat flux is deduced and the temperature (mean and fluctuating values) at the internal surface can be accurately determined. In addition, a calculation using the Trio U code (thermal hydraulic code) within the large eddy simulation module is computed to assess the fluid temperature distribution in the mixing area close to the internal surface. The output data in mean and standard deviation are compared with the Fatherino measurements. The comparison consists in analysing the main parameters as the mean and standard deviation in the fluid along the main axis and in a circumferential view. The mixing layer geometry and the frequency of the fluctuation are also analysed. These experiments added to the calculation allow us improving the state of the knowledge in the mixing tees and the thermal load to be used in the industrial mixing tees in operating for the long lifetime assessment or for the

  16. A highly sensitive and selective sensor on the basis of 4-hydroxy-2-(triphenylphosphonio)phenolate and multi-wall carbon nanotubes for electrocatalytic determination of folic acid in presence of ascorbic acid and uric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zare, Hamid R.; Shishehbore, M. Reza; Nematollahi, Davood

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► HTP has been used as modifier for electrocatalytic oxidation of FA. ► The oxidation mechanism of FA at the modified electrode surface is an E i C ′ i mechanism. ► Combination of carbon nanotubes and the modifier causes a dramatic enhancement in the sensitivity of FA quantification. ► The sensor could separate AA, FA and UA signals into three well-defined voltammetric peaks. - Abstract: In this study, a highly sensitive and selective sensor was fabricated on the basis of 4-hydroxy-2-(triphenylphosphonio)phenolate (HTP) and a multi-wall carbon nanotubes paste electrode (HTP-MWCNT-CPE) for the trace amounts quantification of folic acid (FA). The results show that the combination of multi-wall carbon nanotubes and a modifier causes a dramatic enhancement in the sensitivity of FA quantification. Kinetic parameters such as the electron transfer coefficient, α, and the catalytic electron transfer rate constant, k′, for the oxidation of FA at the modified electrode were estimated using cyclic voltammetry. The detection limit of 0.036 μM and two linear calibration ranges of 0.2–8.0 μM and 8.0–175.0 μM were obtained for FA determination at HTP-MWCNT-CPE using the differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). By DPV, the modified electrode could separate ascorbic acid (AA), FA, and uric acid (UA) signals into three well-defined voltammetric peaks. Finally, HTP-MWCNT-CPE proved to have good sensitivity and stability, and was successfully applied for the determination of FA in wheat flour and pharmaceutical samples, FA and AA in fruits, and AA, FA and UA in human urine samples.

  17. Abdominal wall fat pad biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amyloidosis - abdominal wall fat pad biopsy; Abdominal wall biopsy; Biopsy - abdominal wall fat pad ... is the most common method of taking an abdominal wall fat pad biopsy . The health care provider cleans the ...

  18. HVI Ballistic Performance Characterization of Non-Parallel Walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohl, William; Miller, Joshua; Christiansen, Eric

    2012-01-01

    The Double-Wall, "Whipple" Shield [1] has been the subject of many hypervelocity impact studies and has proven to be an effective shield system for Micro-Meteoroid and Orbital Debris (MMOD) impacts for spacecraft. The US modules of the International Space Station (ISS), with their "bumper shields" offset from their pressure holding rear walls provide good examples of effective on-orbit use of the double wall shield. The concentric cylinder shield configuration with its large radius of curvature relative to separation distance is easily and effectively represented for testing and analysis as a system of two parallel plates. The parallel plate double wall configuration has been heavily tested and characterized for shield performance for normal and oblique impacts for the ISS and other programs. The double wall shield and principally similar Stuffed Whipple Shield are very common shield types for MMOD protection. However, in some locations with many spacecraft designs, the rear wall cannot be modeled as being parallel or concentric with the outer bumper wall. As represented in Figure 1, there is an included angle between the two walls. And, with a cylindrical outer wall, the effective included angle constantly changes. This complicates assessment of critical spacecraft components located within outer spacecraft walls when using software tools such as NASA's BumperII. In addition, the validity of the risk assessment comes into question when using the standard double wall shield equations, especially since verification testing of every set of double wall included angles is impossible.

  19. Crowdsourcing as an IT help tool to determine impact in the health sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López Juan Diego

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to propose a solution which applies the Crowdsourcing concept as the use of Information Technology to determine the perception of a social environment, which can perform a raised topic by an entity. In this case, the perception of Ruben Cruz Velez hospital with respect to: What opinion would you give about the Hospital Prevention and Promotion program?, in order to evaluate throughout Crowdsourcing, the Monitoring and Control Inspection (IVC mechanisms for the provision of health services and component effectiveness, processes and standards of the Mandatory Quality Assurance System and their impact on provision of health services to users in an accessible and equitable manner.It is important to highlight that the development of a web platform that allows citizen participation to evaluate the mechanisms of Inspection of Monitoring and Control (IVC of the provision of health services, analyzing the effectiveness of corrective actions and their impact on The provision of services to users in an accessible and equitable manner. Undoubtedly, in order to understand the current development and situation of traditional medicine in diverse geographical and cultural contexts, the way it adapts to its environment, and the type of health care available, it is necessary to locate it in the context of the models Health care in which it is inserted. The analysis of the current situation of traditional health systems, seen as subsystems of the total system, serves as a starting point for a more detailed reflection of their dynamics in Colombia, so thanks to the development of the CROWDSOURCING methodology as a tool To understand the current situation will help us to make valuable decisions for the future of the health sector particularly the beneficiary entities.

  20. Investigating methods for determining mismatch in near side vehicle impacts - biomed 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftis, Kathryn; Martin, R Shayn; Meredith, J Wayne; Stitzel, Joel

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates vehicle mismatch in severe side-impact motor vehicle collisions. Research conducted by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety has determined that vehicle mismatch often leads to very severe injuries for occupants in the struck vehicle, because the larger striking vehicle does not engage the lower sill upon impact, resulting in severe intrusions into the occupant compartment. Previous studies have analyzed mismatched collisions according to vehicle type, not by the difference in vehicle height and weight. It is hypothesized that the combination of a heavier striking vehicle at a taller height results in more intrusion for the struck vehicle and severe injury for the near side occupant. By analyzing Crash Injury Research and Engineering Network (CIREN) data and occupant injury severity, it is possible to study intrusion and injuries that occur due to vehicle mismatch. CIREN enrolls seriously injured occupants involved in motor vehicle crashes (MVC) across the United States. From the Toyota-Wake Forest University CIREN center, 23 near side impact cases involving two vehicles were recorded. Only 3 of these seriously injured occupant cases were not considered mismatched according to vehicle curb weight, and only 2 were not considered vehicle mismatched according to height differences. The mismatched CIREN cases had an average difference in vehicle curb weight of 737.0 kg (standard deviation of 646.8) and an average difference in vehicle height of 16.38 cm (standard deviation of 7.186). There were 13 occupants with rib fractures, 12 occupants with pelvic fractures, 9 occupants with pulmonary contusion, and 5 occupants with head injuries, among other multiple injuries. The average Injury Severity Score (ISS) for these occupants was 27, with a standard deviation of 16. The most serious injuries resulted in an Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) of 5, which included 3 occupants. Each of these AIS 5 injuries were to different body regions on different

  1. Liquid Wall Chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, W R

    2011-02-24

    The key feature of liquid wall chambers is the use of a renewable liquid layer to protect chamber structures from target emissions. Two primary options have been proposed and studied: wetted wall chambers and thick liquid wall (TLW) chambers. With wetted wall designs, a thin layer of liquid shields the structural first wall from short ranged target emissions (x-rays, ions and debris) but not neutrons. Various schemes have been proposed to establish and renew the liquid layer between shots including flow-guiding porous fabrics (e.g., Osiris, HIBALL), porous rigid structures (Prometheus) and thin film flows (KOYO). The thin liquid layer can be the tritium breeding material (e.g., flibe, PbLi, or Li) or another liquid metal such as Pb. TLWs use liquid jets injected by stationary or oscillating nozzles to form a neutronically thick layer (typically with an effective thickness of {approx}50 cm) of liquid between the target and first structural wall. In addition to absorbing short ranged emissions, the thick liquid layer degrades the neutron flux and energy reaching the first wall, typically by {approx}10 x x, so that steel walls can survive for the life of the plant ({approx}30-60 yrs). The thick liquid serves as the primary coolant and tritium breeding material (most recent designs use flibe, but the earliest concepts used Li). In essence, the TLW places the fusion blanket inside the first wall instead of behind the first wall.

  2. Detection and quantification by deformation imaging of the functional impact of septal compared to free wall preexcitation in the Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Boeck, Bart W L; Teske, Arco J; Leenders, Geert E; Mohamed Hoesein, Firdaus A A; Loh, Peter; van Driel, Vincent J; Doevendans, Pieter A; Prinzen, Frits W; Cramer, Maarten J

    2010-08-15

    Pacing experiments in healthy animal hearts have suggested a larger detrimental effect of septal compared to free wall preexcitation. We investigated the intrinsic relation among the site of electrical preexcitation, mechanical dyssynchrony, and dysfunction in human patients. In 33 patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome and 18 controls, regional myocardial deformation was assessed by speckle tracking mapping (ST-Map) to assess the preexcitation site, shortening sequences and dyssynchrony, and the extent of local and global ejecting shortening. The ST-Map data in patients with accessory atrioventricular pathways correctly diagnosed as located in the interventricular septum (IVS) (n = 11) or left ventricular free wall (LFW) (n = 12) were compared to the corresponding control values. A local ejecting shortening of <2 SD of the control values identified hypokinetic segments. The localization of the atrioventricular pathways by ST-Map matched with the invasive electrophysiology findings in 23 of 33 patients and was one segment different in 5 of 33 patients. In both WPW-IVS and WPW-LFW, local ejecting shortening was impaired at the preexcitation site (p <0.01). However, at similar electrical and mechanical dyssynchrony, WPW-IVS had more extensive hypokinesia than did WPW-LFW (3.6 +/- 0.9 vs 1.8 +/- 1.3 segments, p <0.01). Compared to controls, the left ventricular function was significantly reduced only in WPW-IVS (global ejecting shortening 17 +/- 2% vs 19 +/- 2%, p = 0.01; ejection fraction 55 +/- 5% vs 59 +/- 3%, p = 0.02). In conclusion, preexcitation is associated with local hypokinesia, which at comparable preexcitation is more extensive in WPW-IVS than in WPW-LFW and could adversely affect ventricular function. ST-Map might have a future role in detecting and guiding treatment of septal pathways with significant mechanical effects.

  3. Key determinants of AIDS impact in Southern sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shandera, Wayne Xavier

    2007-11-01

    To investigate why Southern sub-Saharan Africa is more severely impacted by HIV and AIDS than other parts of sub-Saharan Africa, I conducted a review of the literature that assessed viral, host and transmission (societal) factors. This narrative review evaluates: 1) viral factors, in particular the aggregation of subtype-C HIV infections in Southern sub-Saharan Africa; 2) host factors, including unique behaviour patterns, concomitant high prevalence of sexually transmitted diseases, circumcision patterns, average age at first marriage and immunogenetic determinants; and, 3) transmission and societal factors, including levels of poverty, degrees of literacy, migrations of people, extent of political corruption, and the usage of contaminated injecting needles in community settings. HIV prevalence data and published indices on wealth, fertility, and governmental corruption were correlated using statistical software. The high prevalence of HIV in Southern sub-Saharan Africa is not explained by the unusual prevalence of subtype-C HIV infection. Many host factors contribute to HIV prevalence, including frequency of genital ulcerating sexually transmitted infections, absence of circumcision (compiled odds ratios suggest a protective effect of between 40% and 60% from circumcision), and immunogenetic loci, but no factor alone explains the high prevalence of HIV in the region. Among transmission and societal factors, the wealthiest, most literate and most educated, but also the most income-disparate, nations of sub-Saharan Africa show the highest HIV prevalence. HIV prevalence is also highest within societies experiencing significant migration and conflict as well as in those with government systems experiencing a high degree of corruption. The interactions between poverty and HIV transmission are complex. Epidemiologic studies currently do not suggest a strong role for the community usage of contaminated injecting needles. Areas meriting additional study include clade type

  4. Hygrothermal behavior for a clay brick wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allam, R.; Issaadi, N.; Belarbi, R.; El-Meligy, M.; Altahrany, A.

    2018-06-01

    In Egypt, the clay brick is the common building materials which are used. By studying clay brick walls behavior for the heat and moisture transfer, the efficient use of the clay brick can be reached. So, this research studies the hygrothermal transfer in this material by measuring the hygrothermal properties and performing experimental tests for a constructed clay brick wall. We present the model for the hygrothermal transfer in the clay brick which takes the temperature and the vapor pressure as driving potentials. In addition, this research compares the presented model with previous models. By constructing the clay brick wall between two climates chambers with different boundary conditions, we can validate the numerical model and analyze the hygrothermal transfer in the wall. The temperature and relative humidity profiles within the material are measured experimentally and determined numerically. The numerical and experimental results have a good convergence with 3.5% difference. The surface boundary conditions, the ground effect, the infiltration from the closed chambers and the material heterogeneity affects the results. Thermal transfer of the clay brick walls reaches the steady state very rapidly than the moisture transfer. That means the effect of using only the external brick wall in the building in hot climate without increase the thermal resistance for the wall, will add more energy losses in the clay brick walls buildings. Also, the behavior of the wall at the heat and mass transfer calls the three-dimensional analysis for the whole building to reach the real behavior.

  5. Hygrothermal behavior for a clay brick wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allam, R.; Issaadi, N.; Belarbi, R.; El-Meligy, M.; Altahrany, A.

    2018-01-01

    In Egypt, the clay brick is the common building materials which are used. By studying clay brick walls behavior for the heat and moisture transfer, the efficient use of the clay brick can be reached. So, this research studies the hygrothermal transfer in this material by measuring the hygrothermal properties and performing experimental tests for a constructed clay brick wall. We present the model for the hygrothermal transfer in the clay brick which takes the temperature and the vapor pressure as driving potentials. In addition, this research compares the presented model with previous models. By constructing the clay brick wall between two climates chambers with different boundary conditions, we can validate the numerical model and analyze the hygrothermal transfer in the wall. The temperature and relative humidity profiles within the material are measured experimentally and determined numerically. The numerical and experimental results have a good convergence with 3.5% difference. The surface boundary conditions, the ground effect, the infiltration from the closed chambers and the material heterogeneity affects the results. Thermal transfer of the clay brick walls reaches the steady state very rapidly than the moisture transfer. That means the effect of using only the external brick wall in the building in hot climate without increase the thermal resistance for the wall, will add more energy losses in the clay brick walls buildings. Also, the behavior of the wall at the heat and mass transfer calls the three-dimensional analysis for the whole building to reach the real behavior.

  6. Chest Wall tumor: combined management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao Bhaskar, N.

    1997-01-01

    Cancer is relatively rare disease among children and adolescents. The incidence of solid tumors other than CNS is less than 2/100,000. Tumors of the chest wall can arise either from the somatic tissue or ribs. These are rare, so either institutional reviews or multi institutional studies should determine optimal therapeutic management. Of the bony chest wall, Ewing's sarcoma or the family of tumor (peripheral neuro epithelioma, Askin tumor), are the most common. These lesions are lytic and have associated large extra pleural component. This large extra pleural component often necessitates major chest wall resection (3 or more ribs), and when lower ribs are involved, this entails resection of portion of diaphragm. Despite this resection, survival in the early 1970 was 10-20%. Since 1970 multi agent chemotherapy has increased survival rates. of importance, however, is these regimens have caused significant reduction of these extra pleural components so that major chest wall resections have become a rarity. With improved survival and decreased morbidity preoperative chemotherapy followed by surgery is now the accepted modality of treatment. Another major advantage of this regimen is that potential radiation therapy may be obviated. The most common chest wall lesion is rhabdomyosarcoma. In the IRS study of 1620 RMS patients, in 141 (9%) the primary lesion was in the chest wall. these are primarily alveolar histology. when lesions were superficial, wide local excision with supplemental radiation therapy was associated with low morbidity and good overall survival. however, a majority have significant intra- thoracic components. in these circumstances the resectability rate is less than 30% and the survival poor. Other lesions include non rhabdomyosarcomas, eosinophilic granuloma, chondrosarcoma, and osteomyelitis. The management of these lesions varies according to extent, histology, and patient characteristics

  7. Molecularly imprinted polymers coated on multi-walled carbon nanotubes through a simple indirect method for the determination of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid in environmental water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Weijie; Jiao, Feipeng; Zhou, Lei; Chen, Xiaoqing; Jiang, Xinyu

    2013-11-01

    A new and facile method was presented to graft molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) for 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) analysis. In brief, CNTs were firstly coated with a layer of vinyl group modified silica, followed by a common precipitation polymerization with 2,4-D as the template, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) as the crosslinker and 2,2-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as the initiator. The imprinted effects obtained by using different monomers were investigated, and the results showed that acrylamide (AM) and styrene as mixed monomers was the best choice. This functionalized material was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermogravimetry (TG), which demonstrated a successful polymerization reaction on CNTs with MIPs grafting ratio of about 80%. The results of static adsorption experiments indicated the imprinted material possessed fast kinetics and good selectivity for 2,4-D molecules. A corresponding analytical method was developed and demonstrated to be applicable for the determination of 2,4-D in environmental water. The recoveries were in the range from 74.6% to 81.2% with relative standard deviation below 7.0%. To be emphasized, the method for MIPs coating proposed herein also provides a significant reference for other radical polymerization reactions based on CNTs.

  8. US Nuclear Non-Proliferation Policy: impact on exports and nuclear industry could not be determined

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staats, E.B.

    1980-01-01

    The Nuclear Non-Proliferation Act of 1978 established new measures to prevent the diversion to weapons use of peaceful nuclear exports. It also created a policy to confirm US reliability as a nuclear supplier. GAO did not identify any export sales lost as a result of the Act, but did find indications that nonprofileration policies can influence export sales. Based on avavailable data, GAO could not determine the impact of the Act on the competitiveness of US nuclear exports. However, US companies are at some disadvantage because importers perceive that implementation of the Act may result in delayed export licenses. The United States dominated the nuclear export market through the early 1970s. However, foreign competitors, some aided by US technology transfers, emerged to monopolize home markets and complete for third-country business. Further, the market has been depressed since 1974 and prospects for US nuclear power plant exports have dimmed greatly. However, US companies continue to view exports as important to sustain production capacity

  9. A proposed analytic framework for determining the impact of an antimicrobial resistance intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grohn, Yrjo T; Carson, Carolee; Lanzas, Cristina; Pullum, Laura; Stanhope, Michael; Volkova, Victoriya

    2017-06-01

    Antimicrobial use (AMU) is increasingly threatened by antimicrobial resistance (AMR). The FDA is implementing risk mitigation measures promoting prudent AMU in food animals. Their evaluation is crucial: the AMU/AMR relationship is complex; a suitable framework to analyze interventions is unavailable. Systems science analysis, depicting variables and their associations, would help integrate mathematics/epidemiology to evaluate the relationship. This would identify informative data and models to evaluate interventions. This National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis AMR Working Group's report proposes a system framework to address the methodological gap linking livestock AMU and AMR in foodborne bacteria. It could evaluate how AMU (and interventions) impact AMR. We will evaluate pharmacokinetic/dynamic modeling techniques for projecting AMR selection pressure on enteric bacteria. We study two methods to model phenotypic AMR changes in bacteria in the food supply and evolutionary genotypic analyses determining molecular changes in phenotypic AMR. Systems science analysis integrates the methods, showing how resistance in the food supply is explained by AMU and concurrent factors influencing the whole system. This process is updated with data and techniques to improve prediction and inform improvements for AMU/AMR surveillance. Our proposed framework reflects both the AMR system's complexity, and desire for simple, reliable conclusions.

  10. Impact of Distance Determinations on Galactic Structure. I. Young and Intermediate-Age Tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Noriyuki; Bono, Giuseppe; Chen, Xiaodian; de Grijs, Richard; Inno, Laura; Nishiyama, Shogo

    2018-06-01

    Here we discuss impacts of distance determinations on the Galactic disk traced by relatively young objects. The Galactic disk, ˜40 kpc in diameter, is a cross-road of studies on the methods of measuring distances, interstellar extinction, evolution of galaxies, and other subjects of interest in astronomy. A proper treatment of interstellar extinction is, for example, crucial for estimating distances to stars in the disk outside the small range of the solar neighborhood. We'll review the current status of relevant studies and discuss some new approaches to the extinction law. When the extinction law is reasonably constrained, distance indicators found in today and future surveys are telling us stellar distribution and more throughout the Galactic disk. Among several useful distance indicators, the focus of this review is Cepheids and open clusters (especially contact binaries in clusters). These tracers are particularly useful for addressing the metallicity gradient of the Galactic disk, an important feature for which comparison between observations and theoretical models can reveal the evolution of the disk.

  11. Impact of functional determinants on 5.5-year mortality in Amazon riparian elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago C. Antonini

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective To ascertain whether modifiable physical performance–based measurements predicted 5.5-year mortality in a riparian elderly cohort in the Amazon rainforest region. Methods A longitudinal study evaluating the impact of functional determinants on 5.5-year mortality in a riparian elderly cohort from Maués City in the state of Amazonas, Brazil, was performed. The study was a follow-up of a previous observational investigation that evaluated various fitness tests in 630 Amazonian riparian elderly (291 males and 339 females aged 72.3 ± 8.0 (60–99 years old. The cohort was selected for its adverse environmental conditions, which increased the risk of falls yet required maintenance of good physical condition for carrying out relatively rigorous daily activities, and restricted access to specialized health services. Official death records were obtained from the Maués Municipal Health Department. Results A total of 80 study participants (12.7% died over the 5.5-year study period. Kaplan-Meier regression analysis showed significant association between Timed Up and Go (TUG test scores ≥ 14 seconds and mortality risk, independent of sex, age, and other health variables. Conclusions The study results suggest that the TUG test can be used as an indicator for initiating therapeutic and preventive actions, including conducting exercises or physical activities adapted to the health and functional conditions of the elderly, by identifying elderly people with a higher relative risk of mortality.

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbar spine: determining clinical impact and potential harm from overuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wnuk, Nathan M; Alkasab, Tarik K; Rosenthal, Daniel I

    2018-04-18

    Lumbar spine MRI is frequently said to be "overused" in the evaluation of low-back pain, yet data concerning the extent of overuse and on potential harmful effects are lacking. To determine the proportion of examinations with a detectable impact on patient care (actionable outcomes). Retrospective cohort study PATIENT SAMPLE: 5,365 outpatient lumbar spine MR examinations OUTCOME MEASURES: Actionable outcomes included: 1) findings leading to an intervention making use of anatomical information such as surgery; 2) new diagnoses of cancer, infection, or fracture; or 3) following known lumbar spine pathology. Potential harm was assessed by identifying examinations where suspicion of cancer or infection was raised but no positive diagnosis made. A medical record aggregation/search system was used to identify lumbar spine MR examinations with positive outcome measures. Patient notes were examined to verify outcomes. A random sample was manually inspected to identify missed positive outcomes. The proportion of actionable lumbar spine MRIs was 13%, although 93% were appropriate according to American College of Radiology guidelines. Of 36 suspected cases of cancer/infection 81% were false positives. Further investigations were ordered on 59% of suspicious exams, 86% of which were false positives. The proportion of lumbar spine MR examinations that inform management is small. The false positive rate and proportion of false positives involving further investigation is high. Further study to improve the efficiency of imaging is warranted. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Cell Wall Remodeling Enzymes Modulate Fungal Cell Wall Elasticity and Osmotic Stress Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ene, Iuliana V; Walker, Louise A; Schiavone, Marion; Lee, Keunsook K; Martin-Yken, Hélène; Dague, Etienne; Gow, Neil A R; Munro, Carol A; Brown, Alistair J P

    2015-07-28

    The fungal cell wall confers cell morphology and protection against environmental insults. For fungal pathogens, the cell wall is a key immunological modulator and an ideal therapeutic target. Yeast cell walls possess an inner matrix of interlinked β-glucan and chitin that is thought to provide tensile strength and rigidity. Yeast cells remodel their walls over time in response to environmental change, a process controlled by evolutionarily conserved stress (Hog1) and cell integrity (Mkc1, Cek1) signaling pathways. These mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways modulate cell wall gene expression, leading to the construction of a new, modified cell wall. We show that the cell wall is not rigid but elastic, displaying rapid structural realignments that impact survival following osmotic shock. Lactate-grown Candida albicans cells are more resistant to hyperosmotic shock than glucose-grown cells. We show that this elevated resistance is not dependent on Hog1 or Mkc1 signaling and that most cell death occurs within 10 min of osmotic shock. Sudden decreases in cell volume drive rapid increases in cell wall thickness. The elevated stress resistance of lactate-grown cells correlates with reduced cell wall elasticity, reflected in slower changes in cell volume following hyperosmotic shock. The cell wall elasticity of lactate-grown cells is increased by a triple mutation that inactivates the Crh family of cell wall cross-linking enzymes, leading to increased sensitivity to hyperosmotic shock. Overexpressing Crh family members in glucose-grown cells reduces cell wall elasticity, providing partial protection against hyperosmotic shock. These changes correlate with structural realignment of the cell wall and with the ability of cells to withstand osmotic shock. The C. albicans cell wall is the first line of defense against external insults, the site of immune recognition by the host, and an attractive target for antifungal therapy. Its tensile strength is conferred by

  14. Determination of the correction factor for attenuation, dispersion and production of electrons (K{sub wall}) in the wall of graphite of a ionization chamber Pattern National Type CC01 in fields of gamma radiation of {sup 60}Co; Determinacion del factor de correccion por atenuacion, dispersion y produccion de electrones (K{sub wall}) en la pared de grafito de una Camara de Ionizacion Patron Nacional Tipo CC01 en campos de radiacion gamma de {sup 60} Co

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez R, J.T.; Morales P, J.; Cruz E, P. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2001-12-15

    It was determined the Kwall correction factor for the wall of graphite of the chamber of the pattern national type CC01 series 133 for a radiation field Gamma of {sup 60}Co. With this end to measured the currents of ionization l(x) as function of the thickness of the wall of the chamber: X=4,8,12,16 and 20 mm.The mensurations for each thickness consisting of three groups, of sizes n = 30 or 60 data for each group; obtaining 8 complete groups of mensurations independent in eight different dates.The determinate the factor carried out using three regression models: lineal, logarithmic and quadratic, models that were tried to validate with the tests of : i) Shapiro-Wilk and {chi}{sup 2} for the normality of the entrance data ii) Tests of Bartlett for variances homogeneity among groups for each thickness iii) The tests of Duncan for the stockings among groups of each thickness, and iv) The tests of adjustment lack (LOF) for the models used. Nevertheless, alone the models of the group of corresponding mensurations at 01-03-2000 17-08-2001 they can be validated by LOF, but not for tests of normality and homogeneity of variances. Among other assignable causes of variation we have: i) The values captured by the system of mensuration of the variables of it influences: pressure, temperature and relative humidity don{sup t} belong together with the existent ones to the moment to capture the l(x). ii) The mensuration room presents flows of air, for what was suited o diminish their volume and to eliminate the flows of air. iii) A protocol settled down of taking of measures that it consisted in: - Pre-irradiation 5 minutes the chamber after the change of polarity and hood change, with a period of stabilization of 5 minutes after the pre-irradiation. - Pre-irradiation for 5 minutes before the taking of the readings, with the object of eliminating variation sources assigned to currents of escapes or due variations to transitory. iv) To realize corrections for relative humidity of

  15. New synthesis of poly ortho-methoxyaniline nanostructures and its application to construct modified multi-wall carbon nanotube/graphite paste electrode for simultaneous determination of uric acid and folic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajabi, Hossein, E-mail: h.rajabi8086@gmail.com; Noroozifar, Meissam

    2017-06-01

    Uric acid (UA) and folic acid (FA) are compounds of biomedical interest. In humans, about 70% of daily uric acid disposal occurs via the kidneys, and in 5–25% of humans, impaired renal (kidney) excretion leads to hyperuricemia. Folate is another form folic acid of which is known as, is one of the B vitamins. It is used as a supplement by women to prevent neural tube defects developing during pregnancy. Polyortho-methoxyaniline nanostructures (POMANS) was synthesized with a new two phase (organic-water) synthesis method. The POMANS was characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Fourier transform IR (FTIR). This polymer was used to construct a modified multi-wall carbon nanotube, graphite paste electrode (POMANS-MWCNT/GPE). Linear sweep voltammograms (LSV), cyclic voltammetry (CV) and chronoamperometry were used to investigate the suitability of polyortho-methoxyaniline with multi-wall carbon nanotubes paste electrode as a modifier for the electrocatalytic oxidation of UA and FA in aqueous solutions with various pHs. The results showed that POMANS-MWCNT/GPE had high anodic peak currents for the electrooxidation of UA and FA in pH 6.0.Under the optimized conditions, The catalytic peak currents obtained, was linearly dependent on the UA and FA concentrations in the range of 0.6–52 and 0.5–68 μM with two segments and the detection limits 0.157 and 0.113 μM for UA and FA were, respectively. Finally, the proposed method was also examined as a sensitive, simple and inexpensive electrochemical sensor for the simultaneous determination of UA and FA in real samples such as urine and serum. - Highlights: • For the first time, POMANS was synthesized with a new method of two-phase organic & water. • POMANS-MWCNT/GPE was used for simultaneous determination of UA and FA at optimum pH 6.0. • Parameters n and α were also determined for UA and FA. • Electrochemical simultaneous determination of UA and FA with modified electrode real samples.

  16. When direct health-care professional communications have an impact on inappropriate and unsafe use of medicines : A retrospective analysis of determinants of impact of safety warnings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reber, K.C.; Piening, S.; Wieringa, J.E.; Straus, S.M.J.M.; Raine, J.M.; de Graeff, Pauline; Haaijer-Ruskamp, F.M.; Mol, Peter G. M.

    Serious safety issues relating to drugs are communicated to health-care professionals via Direct Health-Care Professional Communications (DHPCs). We explored which characteristics determined the impact of DHPCs issued in the Netherlands for ambulatory-care drugs (2001-2008). With multiple linear

  17. Full scale tests of moisture buffer capacity of wall materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Lone Hedegaard; Rode, Carsten; Peuhkuri, Ruut Hannele

    2005-01-01

    that are harmful such as growth of house dust mites, surface condensation and mould growth. Therefore a series of experiments has been carried out in a full scale test facility to determine the moisture buffer effect of interior walls of cellular concrete and plaster board constructions. For the cellular concrete......Moisture buffer capacity of hygroscopic materials can be used to moderate peaks in the relative humidity (RH) of indoor air as well as moisture content variations in building materials and furnishing. This can help to ensure healthier indoor environments by preventing many processes...... of the changes of moisture content in specimens of the wall composites exposed to the same environment. It was found that the finishes had a big impact on the buffer performance of the underlying materials. Even though the untreated cellular concrete had a very high buffer capacity, the effect was strongly...

  18. Comparing determinants of alien bird impacts across two continents: implications for risk assessment and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Thomas; Kumschick, Sabrina; Dyer, Ellie; Blackburn, Tim

    2014-07-01

    Invasive alien species can have serious adverse impacts on both the environment and the economy. Being able to predict the impacts of an alien species could assist in preventing or reducing these impacts. This study aimed to establish whether there are any life history traits consistently correlated with the impacts of alien birds across two continents, Europe and Australia, as a first step toward identifying life history traits that may have the potential to be adopted as predictors of alien bird impacts. A recently established impact scoring system was used in combination with a literature review to allocate impact scores to alien bird species with self-sustaining populations in Australia. These scores were then tested for correlation with a series of life history traits. The results were compared to data from a previous study in Europe, undertaken using the same methodology, in order to establish whether there are any life history traits consistently correlated with impact across both continents. Habitat generalism was the only life history trait found to be consistently correlated with impact in both Europe and Australia. This trait shows promise as a potential predictor of alien bird impacts. The results support the findings of previous studies in this field, and could be used to inform decisions regarding the prevention and management of future invasions.

  19. Determining the impact of wind on system costs via the temporal patterns of load and wind generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, Clay D.; Gotham, Douglas J.; Preckel, Paul V.; Liu, Andrew L.

    2013-01-01

    Ambitious targets have been set for expanding electricity generation from renewable sources, including wind. Expanding wind power impacts needs for other electricity generating resources. As states plan for increasing levels of wind generation in their portfolio of generation resources it is important to consider how this intermittent resource impacts the need for other generation resources. A case study for Indiana estimates the value of wind capacity and demonstrates how to optimize its level and the levels of other generation resources. Changes are driven by temporal patterns of wind power output and load. System wide impacts are calculated for energy, capacity, and costs under multiple wind expansion scenarios which highlight the geographic characteristics of a systems portfolio of wind generation. The impacts of carbon prices, as proposed in the Bingaman Bill, are considered. Finally, calculations showing the effect increasing levels of wind generation will have on end use Indiana retail rates are included. - Highlights: • We estimate the value of wind capacity. • We determine wind generation's impact on the optimal mix of non-wind generation. • Optimal levels of wind and non-wind generation are determined. • We consider the impact of a carbon price on the optimal mix of resources. • The impact of additional wind capacity on Indiana residential rates is calculated

  20. Scaling of reactor cavity wall loads and stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohachevsky, I.O.

    1977-11-01

    Scalings of reactor cavity wall loads and stresses are determined by deriving an analytic expression in terms of relevant parameters for each loading induced in the reactor cavity walls by fuel pellet microexplosion and by deriving associated expressions relating resulting stresses to shell thicknesses. Also identified are problems that require additional investigations to obtain satisfactory explicit stress estimates for the reactor cavity walls

  1. The potential impact of carboxylic-functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes on trypsin: A Comprehensive spectroscopic and molecular dynamics simulation study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Noordadi

    Full Text Available In this study, we report a detailed experimental, binding free energy calculation and molecular dynamics (MD simulation investigation of the interactions of carboxylic-functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (COOH-f-MWCNTs with porcine trypsin (pTry. The enzyme exhibits decreased thermostability at 330K in the presence of COOH-f-MWCNTs. Furthermore, the activity of pTry also decreases in the presence of COOH-f-MWCNTs. The restricted diffusion of the substrate to the active site of the enzyme was observed in the experiment. The MD simulation analysis suggested that this could be because of the blocking of the S1 pocket of pTry, which plays a vital role in the substrate selectivity. The intrinsic fluorescence of pTry is quenched with increase in the COOH-f-MWCNTs concentration. Circular dichroism (CD and UV-visible absorption spectroscopies indicate the ability of COOH-f-MWCNTs to experience conformational change in the native structure of the enzyme. The binding free energy calculations also show that electrostatics, π-cation, and π-π stacking interactions play important roles in the binding of the carboxylated CNTs with pTry. The MD simulation results demonstrated that the carboxylated CNTs adsorb to the enzyme stronger than the CNT without the-COOH groups. Our observations can provide an example of the nanoscale toxicity of COOH-f-MWCNTs for proteins, which is a critical issue for in vivo application of COOH-f-MWCNTs.

  2. Determination of Acreage Thermal Protection Foam Loss From Ice and Foam Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, Kelly S.; Lawrence, Charles

    2015-01-01

    A parametric study was conducted to establish Thermal Protection System (TPS) loss from foam and ice impact conditions similar to what might occur on the Space Launch System. This study was based upon the large amount of testing and analysis that was conducted with both ice and foam debris impacts on TPS acreage foam for the Space Shuttle Project External Tank. Test verified material models and modeling techniques that resulted from Space Shuttle related testing were utilized for this parametric study. Parameters varied include projectile mass, impact velocity and impact angle (5 degree and 10 degree impacts). The amount of TPS acreage foam loss as a result of the various impact conditions is presented.

  3. Shear wall ultimate drift limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffey, T.A.; Goldman, A.; Farrar, C.R.

    1994-04-01

    Drift limits for reinforced-concrete shear walls are investigated by reviewing the open literature for appropriate experimental data. Drift values at ultimate are determined for walls with aspect ratios ranging up to a maximum of 3.53 and undergoing different types of lateral loading (cyclic static, monotonic static, and dynamic). Based on the geometry of actual nuclear power plant structures exclusive of containments and concerns regarding their response during seismic (i.e.,cyclic) loading, data are obtained from pertinent references for which the wall aspect ratio is less than or equal to approximately 1, and for which testing is cyclic in nature (typically displacement controlled). In particular, lateral deflections at ultimate load, and at points in the softening region beyond ultimate for which the load has dropped to 90, 80, 70, 60, and 50 percent of its ultimate value, are obtained and converted to drift information. The statistical nature of the data is also investigated. These data are shown to be lognormally distributed, and an analysis of variance is performed. The use of statistics to estimate Probability of Failure for a shear wall structure is illustrated

  4. Square-wave adsorptive stripping voltammetric determination of nanomolar levels of bezafibrate using a glassy carbon electrode modified with multi-walled carbon nanotubes within a dihexadecyl hydrogen phosphate film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardila, Jorge Armando; Oliveira, Geiser Gabriel; Medeiros, Roberta Antigo; Fatibello-Filho, Orlando

    2014-04-07

    A highly sensitive method for bezafibrate determination using a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) modified with multi-walled carbon nanotubes within a dihexadecyl hydrogen phosphate film based on square-wave adsorptive stripping voltammetry (SWAdSV) is proposed. The electrochemical behaviour of bezafibrate has been studied by cyclic voltammetry, showing an irreversible anodic peak at a potential of 1.09 V in 0.1 mol L(-1) phosphate buffer solution (pH 2.0). A study of the scan rate showed that the oxidation of bezafibrate is an adsorptive-controlled process, involving the transfer of two electrons and two protons per molecule. The analytical curve was linear over a bezafibrate concentration range from 50 to 910 nmol L(-1), with a detection limit of 16 nmol L(-1). This analytical method was successfully applied for benzafibrate determination in pharmaceutical formulations, with results showing good agreement with those obtained using a comparative spectrophotometric method, and has the potential for field application.

  5. Sensitive determination of bisphenol A and bisphenol F in canned food using a solid-phase microextraction fibre coated with single-walled carbon nanotubes before GC/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastkari, N; Ahmadkhaniha, R; Yunesian, M; Baleh, L J; Mesdaghinia, A

    2010-10-01

    A reliable and sensitive method for simultaneous determination of bisphenol A (BPA) and bisphenol F (BPF) in canned food by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) is described after extraction and pre-concentration by a new solid-phase microextraction (SPME) adsorbent. The potential of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as SPME adsorbent for the pre-concentration of environmental contaminants has been investigated in recent years. This work was carried out to investigate the feasibility of SWCNTs as a headspace SPME adsorbent for the determination of bisphenol derivatives in canned food. Potential factors affecting the extraction efficiency, including extraction time, extraction temperature, desorption time, desorption temperature, and salinity were optimized. Calibration curves were linear (r(2)> or = 0.994) over the concentration range from 0.30 to 60 microg kg(-1). For both target analytes, the limit of detection (LOD) at signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio of 3 was 0.10 microg kg(-1). In addition, a comparative study between the SWCNT and a commercial polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) SPME fibre for the determination of bisphenol derivatives in canned food was conducted. SWCNT fibre showed higher extraction capacity, better thermal stability (over 350 degrees C) and longer life span (over 150 times) than the commercial PDMS fibre. The method was successfully applied to determine BPA in canned food samples which were purchased from local markets. BPA was found in some of the samples within the concentration range from 0.5 to 5.2 microg kg(-1).

  6. Highly sensitive voltammetric sensor based on immobilization of bisphosphoramidate-derivative and quantum dots onto multi-walled carbon nanotubes modified gold electrode for the electrocatalytic determination of olanzapine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammadi-Behzad, Leila [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Gholivand, Mohammad Bagher, E-mail: mbgholivand@yahoo.com [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shamsipur, Mojtaba [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Gholivand, Khodayar [Department of Chemistry, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Barati, Ali [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Gholami, Akram [Department of Chemistry, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-03-01

    In the present paper, a new bisphosphoramidate derivative compound, 1, 4-bis(N-methyl)-benzene-bis(N-phenyl, N-benzoylphosphoramidate) (BMBPBP), was synthesized and used as a mediator for the electrocatalytic oxidation of olanzapine. The electro-oxidation of olanzapine at the surface of the BMBPBP/CdS-quantum dots/multi-walled carbon nanotubes (BMBPBP/CdS-QDs/MWCNTs) modified gold electrode was studied using cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. This sensor showed an excellent electrocatalytic oxidation activity toward olanzapine at less positive potential, pronounced current response, and good sensitivity. The diffusion coefficient and kinetic parameters (such as electron transfer coefficient and the heterogeneous rate constant) were determined for olanzapine oxidation, using the electrochemical approaches. Surface morphology and electrochemical properties of the prepared modified electrode were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy techniques. The hydrodynamic amperometry at rotating modified electrode at constant potential versus reference electrode was used for detection of olanzapine. Under optimized conditions, the calibration plot was linear in the concentration range of 20 nM to 100 μM and detection limit was found to be 6 nM. The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of olanzapine in pharmaceuticals and human serum samples. - Highlights: • A highly sensitive sensor for OLZ determination was developed. • The sensor constructed based on immobilization of BMBPBP on CdS-QDs/MWCNTs Au electrode • The morphology of the modified electrode was examined by SEM. • The prepared sensor shows stable electrochemical behavior at a wide pH range. • The proposed sensor is used for trace determination of OLZ in real samples.

  7. Yeast cell wall chitin reduces wine haze formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndlovu, Thulile; Divol, Benoit; Bauer, Florian F

    2018-04-27

    Protein haze formation in bottled wines is a significant concern for the global wine industry and wine clarification before bottling is therefore a common but expensive practice. Previous studies have shown that wine yeast strains can reduce haze formation through the secretion of certain mannoproteins, but it has been suggested that other yeast-dependent haze protective mechanisms exist. On the other hand, addition of chitin has been shown to reduce haze formation, likely because grape chitinases have been shown to be the major contributors to haze. In this study, Chardonnay grape must fermented by various yeast strains resulted in wines with different protein haze levels indicating differences in haze protective capacities of the strains. The cell wall chitin levels of these strains were determined, and a strong correlation between cell wall chitin levels and haze protection capability was observed. To further evaluate the mechanism of haze protection, Escherichia coli -produced GFP-tagged grape chitinase was shown to bind efficiently to yeast cell walls in a cell wall chitin concentration-dependent manner, while commercial chitinase was removed from synthetic wine in quantities also correlated with the cell wall chitin levels of the strains. Our findings suggest a new mechanism of reducing wine haze, and propose a strategy for optimizing wine yeast strains to improve wine clarification. Importance In this study, we establish a new mechanism by which wine yeast strains can impact on the protein haze formation of wines, and demonstrate that yeast cell wall chitin binds grape chitinase in a chitin-concentration dependent manner. We also show that yeast can remove this haze-forming protein from wine. Chitin has in the past been shown to efficiently reduce wine haze formation when added to the wine in high concentration as a clarifying agent. Our data suggest that the selection of yeast strains with high levels of cell wall chitin can reduce protein haze. We also

  8. Optimization of multiplane ?PIV for wall shear stress and wall topography characterization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossi, M.; Lindken, R.; Westerweel, J.

    2009-01-01

    Multiplane ?PIV can be utilized to determine the wall shear stress and wall topology from the measured flow over a structured surface. A theoretical model was developed to predict the measurement error for the surface topography and shear stress, based on a theoretical analysis of the precision in

  9. Wall Finishes; Carpentry: 901895.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    The course outline is designed to provide instruction in selecting, preparing, and installing wall finishing materials. Prerequisites for the course include mastery of building construction plans, foundations and walls, and basic mathematics. Intended for use in grades 11 and 12, the course contains five blocks of study totaling 135 hours of…

  10. Wall Construction; Carpentry: 901892.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    The curriculum guide outlines a course designed to provide instruction in floor and wall layout, and in the diverse methods and construction of walls. Upon completion of this course the students should have acquired a knowledge of construction plans and structural foundations in addition to a basic knowledge of mathematics. The course consists of…

  11. International Divider Walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruis, A.; Sneller, Lineke

    2013-01-01

    The subject of this teaching case is the Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) system implementation at International Divider Walls, the world market leader in design, production, and sales of divider walls. The implementation in one of the divisions of this multinational company had been successful,

  12. Supersymmetric domain walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergshoeff, Eric A.; Kleinschmidt, Axel; Riccioni, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    We classify the half-supersymmetric "domain walls," i.e., branes of codimension one, in toroidally compactified IIA/IIB string theory and show to which gauged supergravity theory each of these domain walls belong. We use as input the requirement of supersymmetric Wess-Zumino terms, the properties of

  13. The impact of a massive transfusion protocol (1:1:1) on major hepatic injuries: does it increase abdominal wall closure rates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Chad G; Dente, Christopher J; Shaz, Beth; Wyrzykowski, Amy D; Nicholas, Jeffrey M; Kirkpatrick, Andrew W; Feliciano, David V

    2013-10-01

    Massive transfusion protocols (MTPs) using high plasma and platelet ratios for exsanguinating trauma patients are increasingly popular. Major liver injuries often require massive resuscitations and immediate hemorrhage control. Current published literature describes outcomes among patients with mixed patterns of injury. We sought to identify the effects of an MTP on patients with major liver trauma. Patients with grade 3, 4 or 5 liver injuries who required a massive blood component transfusion were analyzed. We compared patients with high plasma:red blood cell:platelet ratio (1:1:1) transfusions (2007-2009) with patients injured before the creation of an institutional MTP (2005-2007). Among 60 patients with major hepatic injuries, 35 (58%) underwent resuscitation after the implementation of an MTP. Patient and injury characteristics were similar between cohorts. Implementation of the MTP significantly improved plasma: red blood cell:platelet ratios and decreased crystalloid fluid resuscitation (p = 0.026). Rapid improvement in early acidosis and coagulopathy was superior with an MTP (p = 0.009). More patients in the MTP group also underwent primary abdominal fascial closure during their hospital stay (p = 0.021). This was most evident with grade 4 injuries (89% vs. 14%). The mean time to fascial closure was 4.2 days. The overall survival rate for all major liver injuries was not affected by an MTP (p = 0.61). The implementation of a formal MTP using high plasma and platelet ratios resulted in a substantial increase in abdominal wall approximation. This occurred concurrently to a decrease in the delivered volume of crystalloid fluid.

  14. Determinants and impacts of international remittances on household welfare in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfau, Wade Donald; Giang, Long Thanh

    2009-01-01

    Remittances can potentially help to promote economic development by providing a mechanism to share risks, reduce poverty and improve equality. However, from the viewpoint of economic theory the overall impacts of remittances are uncertain, as different mechanisms lead to opposite impacts. Since the 1990s Vietnam has experienced a dramatic growth in remittance flows from abroad. Vietnam is a unique case for study, as economic motives historically played a smaller role in outward migration than in other countries. Fortunately, household survey data are available for this time period, allowing for a detailed analysis of the impacts of international remittances on Vietnam. Specifically, we examine the characteristics of recipients and the impacts of international remittances on economic inequality and poverty. We conclude that international remittances are helping to improve equality. For this reason, new development policies must also account for their potential impacts on remittance flows.

  15. Determination of the correction factor for attenuation, dispersion and production of electrons (Kwall) in the wall of graphite of a ionization chamber Pattern National Type CC01 in fields of gamma radiation of 60Co

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez R, J.T.; Morales P, J.; Cruz E, P.

    2001-12-01

    It was determined the Kwall correction factor for the wall of graphite of the chamber of the pattern national type CC01 series 133 for a radiation field Gamma of 60 Co. With this end to measured the currents of ionization l(x) as function of the thickness of the wall of the chamber: X=4,8,12,16 and 20 mm.The mensurations for each thickness consisting of three groups, of sizes n = 30 or 60 data for each group; obtaining 8 complete groups of mensurations independent in eight different dates.The determinate the factor carried out using three regression models: lineal, logarithmic and quadratic, models that were tried to validate with the tests of : i) Shapiro-Wilk and χ 2 for the normality of the entrance data ii) Tests of Bartlett for variances homogeneity among groups for each thickness iii) The tests of Duncan for the stockings among groups of each thickness, and iv) The tests of adjustment lack (LOF) for the models used. Nevertheless, alone the models of the group of corresponding mensurations at 01-03-2000 17-08-2001 they can be validated by LOF, but not for tests of normality and homogeneity of variances. Among other assignable causes of variation we have: i) The values captured by the system of mensuration of the variables of it influences: pressure, temperature and relative humidity don t belong together with the existent ones to the moment to capture the l(x). ii) The mensuration room presents flows of air, for what was suited o diminish their volume and to eliminate the flows of air. iii) A protocol settled down of taking of measures that it consisted in: - Pre-irradiation 5 minutes the chamber after the change of polarity and hood change, with a period of stabilization of 5 minutes after the pre-irradiation. - Pre-irradiation for 5 minutes before the taking of the readings, with the object of eliminating variation sources assigned to currents of escapes or due variations to transitory. iv) To realize corrections for relative humidity of agreement with the

  16. An Empirical Investigation of Students' Motivational Impact upon University Service Quality Perception: A Self-Determination Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Yit Sean; Ahmed, Pervaiz K.

    2012-01-01

    Based on Deci and Ryan's self-determination theory, this study examines the impact of an individual's motivation in pursuing higher education towards university service quality perception, with the individual's learning style posited as the moderator of the proposed relationship. The consequent effects upon satisfaction and behavioural intentions…

  17. Standard Test Method for Determining Resistance of Photovoltaic Modules to Hail by Impact with Propelled Ice Balls

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This test method provides a procedure for determining the ability of photovoltaic modules to withstand impact forces of falling hail. Propelled ice balls are used to simulate falling hailstones. 1.2 This test method defines test specimens and methods for mounting specimens, specifies impact locations on each test specimen, provides an equation for determining the velocity of any size ice ball, provides a method for impacting the test specimens with ice balls, provides a method for determining changes in electrical performance, and specifies parameters that must be recorded and reported. 1.3 This test method does not establish pass or fail levels. The determination of acceptable or unacceptable levels of ice ball impact resistance is beyond the scope of this test method. 1.4 The size of the ice ball to be used in conducting this test is not specified. This test method can be used with various sizes of ice balls. 1.5 This test method may be applied to concentrator and nonconcentrator modules. 1.6 The v...

  18. Cognitive Load and Self-Determination Theories Applied to E-Learning : Impact on Students' Participation and Academic Performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Araujo Guerra Grangeia, Tiago; de Jorge, Bruno; Franci, Daniel; Martins Santos, Thiago; Vellutini Setubal, Maria Silvia; Schweller, Marcelo; de Carvalho-Filho, Marco Antonio

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Emergency clerkships expose students to a stressful environment that require multiple tasks, which may have a direct impact on cognitive load and motivation for learning. To address this challenge, Cognitive Load Theory and Self Determination Theory provided the conceptual frameworks to

  19. Using global variables for impact parameter determination in nucleus-nucleus collisions below 100 MeV/u

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peter, J.; Cussol, D.; Bizard, G.; Brou, R.; Louvel, M.; Patry, J.P.; Regimbart, R.; Steckmeyer, J.C.; Sullivan, J.P.; Tamain, B.; Motobayashi, T.; Cassagnou, Y.; Legrain, R.; Hagel, K.; Jin, G.M.; Crema, E.

    1990-04-01

    Several global variables are tested for determining the impact parameter in 4π measurements of charged products. For the system Ar+Al from 25 to 85 MeV/u, simulated reactions are used to study the correlation between the real impact parameter value and the experimentally determined one. Even with an imaginary perfect detector, the total multiplicity and the mid-rapidity charge give a poor correlation. Filtering through the acceptance of an actual detector (Mur+Tonneau at GANIL) provides a poor correlation with the total charge, and an acceptable one with the total perpendicular momentum. The average (mass weighted) parallel velocity V av gives the best correlation and is less sensitive to the incident energy and to the mechanisms used in the simulation. Measurements extending to very forward angles are needed to obtain a good impact parameter sorting. 5 figs

  20. On the experimental determination of the efficiency of piezoelectric impact-type energy harvesters using a rotational flywheel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janphuang, P; Lockhart, R; Briand, D; De Rooij, N F; Henein, S

    2013-01-01

    This paper demonstrates a novel methodology using a rotational flywheel to determine the energy conversion efficiency of the impact based piezoelectric energy harvesters. The influence of the impact speed and additional proof mass on the efficiency is presented here. In order to convert low frequency mechanical oscillations into usable electrical energy, a piezoelectric harvester is coupled to a rotating gear wheel driven by flywheel. The efficiency is determined from the ratio of the electrical energy generated by the harvester to the mechanical energy dissipated by the flywheel. The experimental results reveal that free vibrations of the harvester after plucking contribute significantly to the efficiency. The efficiency and output energy can be greatly improved by adding a proof mass to the harvester. Under certain conditions, the piezoelectric harvesters have an impact energy conversion efficiency of 1.2%

  1. Investigation of impact phenomena on the marine structures: Part I - On the behaviour of thin-walled double bottom tanker during rock-structure interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabowo, A. R.; Cho, H. J.; Byeon, J. H.; Bae, D. M.; Sohn, J. M.

    2018-01-01

    Predicted loads, such as crew, cargo, and structure have been applied as main inputs during ship design and analysis. However, unexpected events on the sea has high possibility to deliver remarkable losses for ship, industry, and environment. Previous oil spill incident by the Exxon Valdez in Alaska is the perfect example which an environmental damage and industry loss are initiated by an impact phenomenon on the ship, i.e. grounding. Even though hull arrangement has adopted double hull system, grounding may threaten ship safety in various scenarios. This situation pushes society to demand sustainable investigation for impact phenomena on water transportation mode to update understanding in the phenomenon and ensure structural safety during ship operation. This work aimed to study structural behaviour of chemical tanker as a marine structure under impact, namely ship grounding. Bottom raking case was considered to be calculated by virtual experiment. The study was performed using nonlinear finite element (FE) method and an idealised geometry of seabed rock would be deployed to be hard obstruction. Observation on the selected crashworthiness criteria, i.e. internal energy and crushing force indicated that as advanced penetration occurred on the ship structure, the absorbed strain energy continued to increase, while major fluctuation appeared during the initial contact between obstruction and ship happened. Damage extent of several structural members during the crushing process was shown, which concluded that the bottom plating had the largest severity in forms of tearing mode among of all members on the bottom structure.

  2. Solar Walls in tsbi3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wittchen, Kim Bjarne

    tsbi3 is a user-friendly and flexible computer program, which provides support to the design team in the analysis of the indoor climate and the energy performance of buildings. The solar wall module gives tsbi3 the capability of simulating solar walls and their interaction with the building....... This version, C, of tsbi3 is capable of simulating five types of solar walls say: mass-walls, Trombe-walls, double Trombe-walls, internally ventilated walls and solar walls for preheating ventilation air. The user's guide gives a description of the capabilities and how to simulate solar walls in tsbi3....

  3. Determining perception-based impacts of noxious facilities on wage rates and property values

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nieves, L.A.; Clark, D.E.

    1992-02-01

    This document, written for the US Department of Energy, discusses current information and the need for future research on estimating the impacts on wages and property values that could result from people's perceptions of the risks associated with noxious facilities. Psychometric studies indicate that the US population is averse to living near noxious facilities, nuclear-related facilities in particular. Contingent valuation and hedonic studies find that the net economic impacts of proximity to noxious facilities are generally negative and often substantial. Most of these studies are limited in scope, and none estimate the impacts derived from public perceptions of such facilities. This study examines the mechanisms by which negative public perceptions result in economic impacts reflected in wages and property values. On the basis of these mechanisms, it develops a predictive model of perception-based impacts and identifies the data and methods needed to implement it. The key to predicting perception-based impacts lies in combining psychometric and hedonic methods. The reliability of psychometric measures as indicators of aversive stimuli that precipitate economic impacts can be empirically tested. To test the robustness of the findings, alternative estimation methods an be employed in the hedonic analysis. Contingent valuation methods can confirm the results.

  4. Determining perception-based impacts of noxious facilities on wage rates and property values

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nieves, L.A.; Clark, D.E.

    1992-02-01

    This document, written for the US Department of Energy, discusses current information and the need for future research on estimating the impacts on wages and property values that could result from people`s perceptions of the risks associated with noxious facilities. Psychometric studies indicate that the US population is averse to living near noxious facilities, nuclear-related facilities in particular. Contingent valuation and hedonic studies find that the net economic impacts of proximity to noxious facilities are generally negative and often substantial. Most of these studies are limited in scope, and none estimate the impacts derived from public perceptions of such facilities. This study examines the mechanisms by which negative public perceptions result in economic impacts reflected in wages and property values. On the basis of these mechanisms, it develops a predictive model of perception-based impacts and identifies the data and methods needed to implement it. The key to predicting perception-based impacts lies in combining psychometric and hedonic methods. The reliability of psychometric measures as indicators of aversive stimuli that precipitate economic impacts can be empirically tested. To test the robustness of the findings, alternative estimation methods an be employed in the hedonic analysis. Contingent valuation methods can confirm the results.

  5. Spatial patterns of agricultural expansion determine impacts on biodiversity and carbon storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaplin-Kramer, Rebecca; Sharp, Richard P; Mandle, Lisa; Sim, Sarah; Johnson, Justin; Butnar, Isabela; Milà I Canals, Llorenç; Eichelberger, Bradley A; Ramler, Ivan; Mueller, Carina; McLachlan, Nikolaus; Yousefi, Anahita; King, Henry; Kareiva, Peter M

    2015-06-16

    The agricultural expansion and intensification required to meet growing food and agri-based product demand present important challenges to future levels and management of biodiversity and ecosystem services. Influential actors such as corporations, governments, and multilateral organizations have made commitments to meeting future agricultural demand sustainably and preserving critical ecosystems. Current approaches to predicting the impacts of agricultural expansion involve calculation of total land conversion and assessment of the impacts on biodiversity or ecosystem services on a per-area basis, generally assuming a linear relationship between impact and land area. However, the impacts of continuing land development are often not linear and can vary considerably with spatial configuration. We demonstrate what could be gained by spatially explicit analysis of agricultural expansion at a large scale compared with the simple measure of total area converted, with a focus on the impacts on biodiversity and carbon storage. Using simple modeling approaches for two regions of Brazil, we find that for the same amount of land conversion, the declines in biodiversity and carbon storage can vary two- to fourfold depending on the spatial pattern of conversion. Impacts increase most rapidly in the earliest stages of agricultural expansion and are more pronounced in scenarios where conversion occurs in forest interiors compared with expansion into forests from their edges. This study reveals the importance of spatially explicit information in the assessment of land-use change impacts and for future land management and conservation.

  6. Towards a theoretical determination of the geographical probability distribution of meteoroid impacts on Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuluaga, Jorge I.; Sucerquia, Mario

    2018-06-01

    Tunguska and Chelyabinsk impact events occurred inside a geographical area of only 3.4 per cent of the Earth's surface. Although two events hardly constitute a statistically significant demonstration of a geographical pattern of impacts, their spatial coincidence is at least tantalizing. To understand if this concurrence reflects an underlying geographical and/or temporal pattern, we must aim at predicting the spatio-temporal distribution of meteoroid impacts on Earth. For this purpose we designed, implemented, and tested a novel numerical technique, the `Gravitational Ray Tracing' (GRT) designed to compute the relative impact probability (RIP) on the surface of any planet. GRT is inspired by the so-called ray-casting techniques used to render realistic images of complex 3D scenes. In this paper we describe the method and the results of testing it at the time of large impact events. Our findings suggest a non-trivial pattern of impact probabilities at any given time on the Earth. Locations at 60-90° from the apex are more prone to impacts, especially at midnight. Counterintuitively, sites close to apex direction have the lowest RIP, while in the antapex RIP are slightly larger than average. We present here preliminary maps of RIP at the time of Tunguska and Chelyabinsk events and found no evidence of a spatial or temporal pattern, suggesting that their coincidence was fortuitous. We apply the GRT method to compute theoretical RIP at the location and time of 394 large fireballs. Although the predicted spatio-temporal impact distribution matches marginally the observed events, we successfully predict their impact speed distribution.

  7. Environmental impacts of modern agricultural technology diffusion in Bangladesh: an analysis of farmers' perceptions and their determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Sanzidur

    2003-06-01

    Farmers' perception of the environmental impacts of modern agricultural technology diffusion and factors determining such awareness were examined using survey data from 21 villages in three agro-ecological regions of Bangladesh. Results reveal that farmers are well aware of the adverse environmental impacts of modern agricultural technology, although their awareness remains confined within visible impacts such as soil fertility, fish catches, and health effects. Their perception of intangible impacts such as, toxicity in water and soils is weak. Level and duration of modern agricultural technology adoption directly influence awareness of its adverse effects. Education and extension contacts also play an important role in raising awareness. Awareness is higher among farmers in developed regions, fertile locations and those with access to off-farm income sources. Promotion of education and strengthening extension services will boost farmers' environmental awareness. Infrastructure development and measures to replenish depleting soil fertility will also play a positive role in raising awareness.

  8. Método para a Determinação de Ácidos Fenólicos na Parede Celular de Forragens Method for Phenolic Acid Determination in Forage Cell Wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Carlos Deschamps

    2002-07-01

    be facilitated by the availability of sensible methods that permit processing large amounts of samples. The present paper describes a method for determining phenolic acids in forage cell wall through high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. Sugar cane bagasse, elephant grass and cassava leaves were used as experimental samples. To remove soluble low molecular weight products, ethanol 80% and neutral detergent were essayed to determine their effects on the recovery of molecules and other benefits to chromatography profile. The sample solubilization with NaOH 1 mol/L, 20ºC for 24 hours, was used to obtain the free phenolic acids. The method described proved appropriate showing great sensibility and lab productivity. To minimize the effects of salt formation as a consequence of acid neutralization, sample dilution and reduced injection volumes (5uL are suggested. The action of ethanol 80% and neutral detergent differ between grasses and legumes. The amount of extractives in cassava leaves was greater than in other materials.The method described in the present paper is an important tool to study phenolic acids in tropical forage cell wall.

  9. A pilot study of the impact of high-frequency chest wall oscillation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients with mucus hypersecretion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chakravorty I

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Indranil Chakravorty1, Kamaljit Chahal2, Gillian Austin21St George's Hospital, London, 2East and North Hertfordshire NHS Trust, Lister Hospital and Primary Care Trust, Stevenage, Hertfordshire, UKIntroduction: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD patients with mucus hypersecretion tend to demonstrate increased frequency of infective exacerbations and a steeper slope of decline in lung function. Enhanced mucociliary clearance with high-frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO devices previously used in cystic fibrosis and bronchiectasis patients may offer the opportunity for community-based, self-managed therapy to improve quality of life and lung function.Study design and methods: A randomized controlled crossover pilot study of HFCWO compared with conventional treatment was conducted in 22 patients with moderate to severe COPD and mucus hypersecretion. Patients spent 4 weeks using an HFCWO (SmartVest® device and 4 weeks in a conventional phase with a 2-week washout. Eleven patients started with HFCWO and changed to conventional treatment, whereas the other eleven patients started conventional treatment and crossed over to HFCWO.Results: The patients were elderly with a mean age of 71 (standard deviation [SD] 10 years and were at the upper end of the normal range of body mass index (25 [SD 4.2] kg/m2. The majority of patients had moderate to severe COPD with a mean percentage predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 second of 41 (SD 15.6 and percentage predicted forced vital capacity of 73 (SD 17.7. Baseline sputum production was negatively correlated to lung function and positively to St George's Respiratory Questionnaire. Symptom scores and St George's Respiratory Questionnaire symptom dimension improved significantly (-8, P < 0.05. Sputum production showed a declining trend in the HFCWO phase, although not reaching statistical significance. The HFCWO device was well tolerated with good reported compliance.Conclusion: This pilot study

  10. Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids: Structural and Functional Effects on the Vascular Wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michela Zanetti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA consumption is associated with reduced cardiovascular disease risk. Increasing evidence demonstrating a beneficial effect of n-3 PUFA on arterial wall properties is progressively emerging. We reviewed the recent available evidence for the cardiovascular effects of n-3 PUFA focusing on structural and functional properties of the vascular wall. In experimental studies and clinical trials n-3 PUFA have shown the ability to improve arterial hemodynamics by reducing arterial stiffness, thus explaining some of its cardioprotective properties. Recent studies suggest beneficial effects of n-3 PUFA on endothelial activation, which are likely to improve vascular function. Several molecular, cellular, and physiological pathways influenced by n-3 PUFA can affect arterial wall properties and therefore interfere with the atherosclerotic process. Although the relative weight of different physiological and molecular mechanisms and the dose-response on arterial wall properties have yet to be determined, n-3 PUFA have the potential to beneficially impact arterial wall remodeling and cardiovascular outcomes by targeting arterial wall stiffening and endothelial dysfunction.

  11. Impact of ITRS 2014 realizations on altimeter satellite precise orbit determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelensky, Nikita P.; Lemoine, Frank G.; Beckley, Brian D.; Chinn, Douglas S.; Pavlis, Despina E.

    2018-01-01

    This paper evaluates orbit accuracy and systematic error for altimeter satellite precise orbit determination on TOPEX, Jason-1, Jason-2 and Jason-3 by comparing the use of four SLR/DORIS station complements from the International Terrestrial Reference System (ITRS) 2014 realizations with those based on ITRF2008. The new Terrestrial Reference Frame 2014 (TRF2014) station complements include ITRS realizations from the Institut National de l'Information Géographique et Forestière (IGN) ITRF2014, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) JTRF2014, the Deutsche Geodätisches Forschungsinstitut (DGFI) DTRF2014, and the DORIS extension to ITRF2014 for Precise Orbit Determination, DPOD2014. The largest source of error stems from ITRF2008 station position extrapolation past the 2009 solution end time. The TRF2014 SLR/DORIS complement impact on the ITRF2008 orbit is only 1-2 mm RMS radial difference between 1992-2009, and increases after 2009, up to 5 mm RMS radial difference in 2016. Residual analysis shows that station position extrapolation error past the solution span becomes evident even after two years, and will contribute to about 3-4 mm radial orbit error after seven years. Crossover data show the DTRF2014 orbits are the most accurate for the TOPEX and Jason-2 test periods, and the JTRF2014 orbits for the Jason-1 period. However for the 2016 Jason-3 test period only the DPOD2014-based orbits show a strong and statistically significant margin of improvement. The positive results with DTRF2014 suggest the new approach to correct station positions or normal equations for non-tidal loading before combination is beneficial. We did not find any compelling POD advantage in using non-linear over linear station velocity models in our SLR & DORIS orbit tests on the Jason satellites. The JTRF2014 proof-of-concept ITRS realization demonstrates the need for improved SLR+DORIS orbit centering when compared to the Ries (2013) CM annual model. Orbit centering error is seen as an annual

  12. Impacts of the precision agricultural technologies in Iran: An analysis experts' perception & their determinants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somayeh Tohidyan Far

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays agricultural methods developments that are productively, economically, environmentally and socially sustainable are required immediately. The concept of precision agriculture is becoming an attractive idea for managing natural resources and realizing modern sustainable agricultural development. The purpose of this study was to investigate factors influencing impacts of precision agriculture from the viewpoints of Boushehr Province experts. The research method was a cross sectional survey and multi-stage random sampling was used to collect data from 115 experts in Boushehr province. According to the results, experts found underground and surface waters conservation, rural areas development, increase of productivity and increasing income as the most important impacts of precision agricultural technologies. Experts’ attitudes indicate their positive view toward these kinds of impacts. Also behavioral attitude has the most effect on impacts.

  13. Determination of elemental abundances in impact materials by micro-PIXE and micro-SRXRF methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uzonyi, I.; Szabo, Gy.; Kiss, A.Z.; Szoeoer, Gy.; Rozsa, P.

    2004-01-01

    The most famous and well-preserved meteorite crater in the world is the Barringer Meteor Crater (Arizona, USA). The meteorite is supposed to be a fragment of a small asteroid of our solar system. During the impact event the matter of the projectile mixed with that of the target rocks forming breccias, slag and spherules. For the non-destructive characterization of the impact materials a combined micro-PIXE and micro-SRXRF technique was applied. (N.T.)

  14. Plasma-wall interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behrisch, Rainer

    1978-01-01

    The plasma wall interactions for two extreme cases, the 'vacuum model' and the 'cold gas blanket' are outlined. As a first step for understanding the plasma wall interactions the elementary interaction processes at the first wall are identified. These are energetic ion and neutral particle trapping and release, ion and neutral backscattering, ion sputtering, desorption by ions, photons and electrons and evaporation. These processes have only recently been started to be investigated in the parameter range of interest for fusion research. The few measured data and their extrapolation into regions not yet investigated are reviewed

  15. Fast wall of thermonuclear device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamura, Kazunori.

    1990-01-01

    A protruding molten metal reservoir is disposed to a sealing vessel embedded in the armour tile of fast walls, and molten metal of low melting point such as tin, lead or alloy thereof is filled in the sealing vessel. The volume of the molten metal reservoir is determined such that the surface level of the molten metal is kept within the molten metal reservoir even when the sealed low melting point metal is solidified at room temperature. When the temperature is lowered during plasma interruption period and the sealed low melting molten metal is solidified to reduce the volume, most of the molten metal reservoir regioin constitutes a vacuum gap. However, the inner wall of the sealing vessel other than the molten metal reservior region can be kept into contact with the sealed metal. Accordingly, the temperature and the sublimation loss of the armour tile can be kept low even upon plasma heat application. (I.N.)

  16. Determination of type A trichothecenes in coix seed by magnetic solid-phase extraction based on magnetic multi-walled carbon nanotubes coupled with ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Maofeng; Si, Wenshuai; Wang, Weimin; Bai, Bing; Nie, Dongxia; Song, Weiguo; Zhao, Zhihui; Guo, Yirong; Han, Zheng

    2016-09-01

    Magnetic solid-phase extraction (m-SPE) is a promising sample preparation approach due to its convenience, speed, and simplicity. For the first time, a rapid and reliable m-SPE approach using magnetic multi-walled carbon nanotubes (m-MWCNTs) as the adsorbent was proposed for purification of type A trichothecenes including T-2 toxins (T2), HT-2 toxins (HT-2), diacetoxyscirpenol (DAS), and neosolaniol (NEO) in coix seed. The m-MWCNTs were synthesized by assembling the magnetic nanoparticles (Fe3O4) with MWCNTs by sonication through an aggregation wrap mechanism, and characterized by transmission electron microscope. Several key parameters affecting the performance of the procedure were extensively investigated including extraction solutions, desorption solvents, and m-MWCNT amounts. Under the optimal sample preparation conditions followed by analysis with ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS), high sensitivity (limit of quantification in the range of 0.3-1.5 μg kg(-1)), good linearity (R (2) > 0.99), satisfactory recovery (73.6-90.6 %), and acceptable precision (≤2.5 %) were obtained. The analytical performance of the developed method has also been successfully evaluated in real coix seed samples. Graphical Abstract Flow chart of determination of type A trichothecenes in coix seed by magnetic solid-phase extraction coupled with ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

  17. Multi-residue determination of 171 pesticides in cowpea using modified QuEChERS method with multi-walled carbon nanotubes as reversed-dispersive solid-phase extraction materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yongtao; Song, Le; Zou, Nan; Chen, Ronghua; Qin, Yuhong; Pan, Canping

    2016-09-15

    A rapid and sensitive method for the determination of 171 pesticides in cowpea was developed using multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as reversed-dispersive solid-phase (r-DSPE) extraction materials. The clean-up performance of MWCNTs was proved to be obviously superior to PSA and GCB. This method was validated on cowpea spiked at 0.01 and 0.1mgkg(-1) with five replicates. The mean recoveries for 169 pesticides ranged from 74% to 129% with relative standard deviations (RSDs) (n=5) lower than 16.4%, except diflufenican and quizalofop-ethyl. Good linearity for all pesticides was obtained with the calibration curve coefficients (R(2)) larger than 0.9970. The limit of detection (LODs) and limit of quantification (LOQs) for the 171 pesticides ranged from 0.001 to 0.003mgkg(-1) and from 0.002 to 0.009mgkg(-1), respectively. The method was demonstrated to be reliable and sensitive for the routine monitoring of the 171 pesticides in cowpea samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The electrocatalytic activity of a supramolecular assembly of CoTsPc/FeT4MPyP on multi-walled carbon nanotubes towards L-glutathione, and its determination in human erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luz, R.C.S.; Maroneze, C.M.; Tanaka, A.A.; Kubota, L.T.; Gushikem, Y.; Damos, F.S.

    2010-01-01

    The electrocatalytic activity of a supramolecular complex based on cobalt(II) phthalocyanine tetrasulfonate and iron(III) tetra-(N-methyl-4-pyridyl)-porphyrin adsorbed on multi-walled carbon nanotubes for the oxidation of L-glutathione (GSH) was investigated at pH 7.4. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry were used to characterize the morphologies and composition of the materials. The modified electrode displayed efficient electrocatalytic activity in terms of oxidation of GSH at an oxidation potential of 0 V (versus Ag/AgCl). Cyclic voltammetry and amperometry indicated that the oxidation involves 2-electrons, with a heterogeneous rate constant of 4.9 x 10 5 mol -1 L s -1 . The response is linear from 2 to 210 μmol L -1 , the sensitivity is 1570 μA L mmol -1 , the detection limit is 0.03 μmol L -1 , and the relative standard deviation of 110 μmol L -1 GSH was 2.6% (n=10). The modified electrode was applied to the determination of GSH in erythrocytes and the results were in agreement with those obtained by a method reported in the literature. (author)

  19. Determination of twelve herbicides in tobacco by a combination of solid–liquid–solid dispersive extraction using multi-walled carbon nanotubes, dispersive liquid-liquid micro-extraction, and detection by GC with triple quadrupole mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, Qie Gen; Zhou, Yao Min; Luo, Lin Guang; Wang, Li Bing; Feng, Xiao Hu

    2014-01-01

    We report on a method for the determination of twelve herbicides using solid–liquid–solid dispersive extraction (SLSDE), followed by dispersive liquid-liquid micro-extraction (DLLME) and quantitation by gas chromatography with triple quadrupole mass spectrometric detection. SLSDE was applied to the extraction of herbicides from tobacco samples using multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as clean-up adsorbents. The effect of the quantity of MWCNTs on SLSDE, and of type and volume of extraction and disperser solvents and of salt effect on DLLME were optimized. Good linearity is obtained in the 5.0 - 500 μg kg −1 concentration range, with regression coefficients of >0.99. Intra-day and inter-day repeatability, expressed as relative standard deviations, are between 3 and 9 %. The recoveries in case of herbicide-spiked tobacco at concentration levels of 20.0, 50.0 and 100.0 g kg −1 ranged from 79 to 105 %, and LODs are between 1.5 and 6.1 μg kg −1 . All the tobacco samples were found to contain butralin and pendimethalin at levels ranging from 15.8 to 500.0 μg kg −1 . (author)

  20. Bloch walls in a nickel single crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, J.; Treimer, W.

    2001-01-01

    We present a consistent theory for the dependence of the magnetic structure in bulk samples on external static magnetic fields and corresponding experimental results. We applied the theory of micromagnetism to this crystal and calculated the Bloch wall thickness as a function of external magnetic fields. The theoretical results agree well with the experimental data, so that the Bloch wall thickness of a 71 deg. nickel single crystal was definitely determined with some hundred of nanometer

  1. Lateral resistance of plybamboo wall-panels

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzalez Beltran, G.E.; Herwijnen, van, F.; Janssen, J.J.A.; Moonen, S.P.G.; Gutierrez, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    This paper deals with the experimental and theoretical behavior of plybamboo (kind of plywood made out of bamboo) wall-panels subjected to lateral load. The wall-panels are part of a house design method proposed in the author's PhD thesis for prefabricated social housing in developing countries. Sixteen fullscaled wallpanels with or without window and door openings were tested and their theoretical capacities estimated. Design wind and seismic loads were determined according to the Internatio...

  2. Nonsingular walls in plane cholesteric layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belyakov, V A; Osipov, M A; Stewart, I W

    2006-01-01

    The structure of a straight interface (wall) between regions with differing values of the pitch in planar cholesteric layers with finite strength of the surface anchoring is investigated theoretically. It is found that the shape and strength of the anchoring potential influences essentially the structure of the wall and a motionless wall between thermodynamically stable regions without a singularity in the director distribution in the layer can exist for sufficiently weak anchoring only. More specifically, for the existence of such a wall the dimensionless parameter S d = K 22 /Wd (where W is the depth of the anchoring potential, K 22 is the elastic twist modulus and d is the layer thickness) should exceed its critical value, which is dependent on the shape of the anchoring potential. General equations describing the director distribution in the wall are presented. Detailed analysis of these equations is carried out for the case of infinitely strong anchoring at one surface and finite anchoring strength at the second layer surface. It is shown that the wall width L is directly dependent upon the shape and strength of the anchoring potential and that its estimate ranges from d to (dL p ) 1/2 (where L p = K 22 /W is the penetration length), corresponding to different anchoring strengths and shape potentials. The dependence of the director distribution in the wall upon all three Frank elastic moduli is analytically found for some specific limiting cases of the model anchoring potentials. Motion of the wall is briefly investigated and the corresponding calculations performed under the assumption that the shape of a moving wall is the same as a motionless one. It is noted that experimental investigation of the walls in planar cholesteric layers can be used for the determination of the actual shape of surface anchoring potentials

  3. Standard Practice for Determining Resistance of Solar Collector Covers to Hail by Impact With Propelled Ice Balls

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1992-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers a procedure for determining the ability of cover plates for flat-plate solar collectors to withstand impact forces of falling hail. Propelled ice balls are used to simulate falling hailstones. This practice is not intended to apply to photovoltaic cells or arrays. 1.2 This practice defines two types of test specimens, describes methods for mounting specimens, specifies impact locations on each test specimen, provides an equation for determining the velocity of any size ice ball, provides a method for impacting the test specimens with ice balls, and specifies parameters that must be recorded and reported. 1.3 This practice does not establish pass or fail levels. The determination of acceptable or unacceptable levels of ice-ball impact resistance is beyond the scope of this practice. 1.4 The size of ice ball to be used in conducting this test is not specified in this practice. This practice can be used with various sizes of ice balls. 1.5 The categories of solar collector cover plat...

  4. Evaluating the impact of new observational constraints on P-S/IVOC emissions, multi-generation oxidation, and chamber wall losses on SOA modeling for Los Angeles, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Prettiny K.; Zhao, Yunliang; Robinson, Allen L.; Worton, David R.; Goldstein, Allen H.; Ortega, Amber M.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Zotter, Peter; Prévôt, André S. H.; Szidat, Sönke; Hayes, Patrick L.

    2017-08-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is an important contributor to fine particulate matter (PM) mass in polluted regions, and its modeling remains poorly constrained. A box model is developed that uses recently published literature parameterizations and data sets to better constrain and evaluate the formation pathways and precursors of urban SOA during the CalNex 2010 campaign in Los Angeles. When using the measurements of intermediate-volatility organic compounds (IVOCs) reported in Zhao et al. (2014) and of semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) reported in Worton et al. (2014) the model is biased high at longer photochemical ages, whereas at shorter photochemical ages it is biased low, if the yields for VOC oxidation are not updated. The parameterizations using an updated version of the yields, which takes into account the effect of gas-phase wall losses in environmental chambers, show model-measurement agreement at longer photochemical ages, even though some low bias at short photochemical ages still remains. Furthermore, the fossil and non-fossil carbon split of urban SOA simulated by the model is consistent with measurements at the Pasadena ground site. Multi-generation oxidation mechanisms are often employed in SOA models to increase the SOA yields derived from environmental chamber experiments in order to obtain better model-measurement agreement. However, there are many uncertainties associated with these aging mechanisms. Thus, SOA formation in the model is compared to data from an oxidation flow reactor (OFR) in order to constrain SOA formation at longer photochemical ages than observed in urban air. The model predicts similar SOA mass at short to moderate photochemical ages when the aging mechanisms or the updated version of the yields for VOC oxidation are implemented. The latter case has SOA formation rates that are more consistent with observations from the OFR though. Aging mechanisms may still play an important role in SOA chemistry, but the

  5. Thinner regions of intracranial aneurysm wall correlate with regions of higher wall shear stress: a 7.0 tesla MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankena, Roos; Kleinloog, Rachel; Verweij, Bon H.; van Ooij, Pim; ten Haken, Bennie; Luijten, Peter R.; Rinkel, Gabriel J.E.; Zwanenburg, Jaco J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To develop a method for semi-quantitative wall thickness assessment on in vivo 7.0 tesla (7T) MRI images of intracranial aneurysms for studying the relation between apparent aneurysm wall thickness and wall shear stress. Materials and Methods Wall thickness was analyzed in 11 unruptured aneurysms in 9 patients, who underwent 7T MRI with a TSE based vessel wall sequence (0.8 mm isotropic resolution). A custom analysis program determined the in vivo aneurysm wall intensities, which were normalized to signal of nearby brain tissue and were used as measure for apparent wall thickness (AWT). Spatial wall thickness variation was determined as the interquartile range in AWT (the middle 50% of the AWT range). Wall shear stress was determined using phase contrast MRI (0.5 mm isotropic resolution). We performed visual and statistical comparisons (Pearson’s correlation) to study the relation between wall thickness and wall shear stress. Results 3D colored AWT maps of the aneurysms showed spatial AWT variation, which ranged from 0.07 to 0.53, with a mean variation of 0.22 (a variation of 1.0 roughly means a wall thickness variation of one voxel (0.8mm)). In all aneurysms, AWT was inversely related to WSS (mean correlation coefficient −0.35, P<0.05). Conclusions A method was developed to measure the wall thickness semi-quantitatively, using 7T MRI. An inverse correlation between wall shear stress and AWT was determined. In future studies, this non-invasive method can be used to assess spatial wall thickness variation in relation to pathophysiologic processes such as aneurysm growth and –rupture. PMID:26892986

  6. Advanced walling systems

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Villiers, A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The question addressed by this chapter is: How should advanced walling systems be planned, designed, built, refurbished, and end their useful lives, to classify as smart, sustainable, green or eco-building environments?...

  7. Fusion: first wall problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behrisch, R.

    1976-01-01

    Some of the relevant elementary atomic processes which are expected to be of significance to the first wall of a fusion reactor are reviewed. Up to the present, most investigations have been performed at relatively high ion energies, typically E greater than 5 keV, and even in this range the available data are very poor. If the plasma wall interaction takes place at energies of E greater than 1 keV the impurity introduction and first wall erosion which will take place predominantly by sputtering, will be large and may severely limit the burning time of the plasma. The wall bombardment and surface erosion will presumably not decrease substantially by introducing a divertor. The erosion can only be kept low if the energy of the bombarding ions and neutrals can be kept below the threshold for sputtering of 1 to 10 eV. 93 refs

  8. Plasma-wall interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reichle, R.

    2004-01-01

    This document gathers the 43 slides presented in the framework of the week long lecture 'hot plasmas 2004' and dedicated to plasma-wall interaction in a tokamak. This document is divided into 4 parts: 1) thermal load on the wall, power extraction and particle recovery, 2) basic edge plasma physics, 3) processes that drive the plasma-solid interaction, and 4) material conditioning (surface treatment...) for ITER

  9. Orbital wall fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iinuma, Toshitaka; Ishio, Ken-ichirou; Yoshinami, Hiroyoshi; Kuriyama, Jun-ichi; Hirota, Yoshiharu.

    1993-01-01

    A total of 59 cases of mild facial fractures (simple orbital wall fractures, 34 cases, other facial fractures, 25 cases) with the clinical suspects of orbital wall fractures were evaluated both by conventional views (Waters' and Caldwell views) and coronal CT scans. Conventional views were obtained, as an average, after 4 days and CT after 7 days of injuries. Both the medial wall and the floor were evaluated at two sites, i.e., anterior and posterior. The ethmoid-maxillary plate was also included in the study. The degree of fractures was classified as, no fractures, fractures of discontinuity, dislocation and fragmentation. The coronal CT images in bone window condition was used as reference and the findings were compared between conventional views and CT. The correct diagnosis was obtained as follows: orbital floor (anterior, 78%, posterior, 73%), medial orbital wall (anterior, 72%, posterior, 72%) and ethmoid-maxillary plate (64%). The false positive diagnosis was as follows: orbital floor (anterior only, 13%), medial orbital wall (anterior only, 7%) and ethmoid-maxillary plate (11%). The false negative diagnosis was as follows: orbital floor (anterior, 9%, posterior, 10%), medial orbital wall (anterior, 21%, posterior, 28%) and ethmoid-maxillary plate (21%). The results were compared with those of others in the past. (author)

  10. Key Factors for Determining Risk of Groundwater Impacts Due to Leakage from Geologic Carbon Sequestration Reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carroll, Susan [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Keating, Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mansoor, Kayyum [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dai, Zhenue [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sun, Yunwei [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Trainor-Guitton, Whitney [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Brown, Chris [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bacon, Diana [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-01-06

    The National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP) is developing a science-based toolset for the analysis of potential impacts to groundwater chemistry from CO2 injection (www.netldoe.gov/nrap). The toolset adopts a stochastic approach in which predictions address uncertainties in shallow underwater and leakage scenarios. It is derived from detailed physics and chemistry simulation results that are used to train more computationally efficient models,l referred to here as reduced-order models (ROMs), for each component system. In particular, these tools can be used to help regulators and operators understand the expected sizes and longevity of plumes in pH, TDS, and dissolved metals that could result from a leakage of brine and/or CO2 from a storage reservoir into aquifers. This information can inform, for example, decisions on monitoring strategies that are both effective and efficient. We have used this approach to develop predictive reduced-order models for two common types of reservoirs, but the approach could be used to develop a model for a specific aquifer or other common types of aquifers. In this paper we describe potential impacts to groundwater quality due to CO2 and brine leakage, discuss an approach to calculate thresholds under which "no impact" to groundwater occurs, describe the time scale for impact on groundwater, and discuss the probability of detecting a groundwater plume should leakage occur.

  11. 75 FR 29969 - Environmental Impact Statement; Determination of Nonregulated Status of Sugar Beet Genetically...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-28

    ... glyphosate affect the socioeconomic value of food or feed or its nutritional quality? What are the impacts, if any, on food or feed socioeconomic value or its nutritional quality from the use of glyphosate... of establishing, growing, harvesting, and marketing sugar beet, including selling prices and premiums...

  12. Maximum attainable power density and wall load in tokamaks underlying reactor relevant constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borrass, K.; Buende, R.

    1979-09-01

    The characteristic data of tokamaks optimized with respect to their power density or wall load are determined. Reactor relevant constraints are imposed, such as a fixed plant net power output, a fixed blanket thickness and the dependence of the maximum toroidal field on the geometry and conductor material. The impact of finite burn times is considered. Various scaling laws of the toroidal beta with the aspect ratio are discussed. (orig.) 891 GG/orig. 892 RDG [de

  13. KETERASINGAN DALAM FILM WALL-E

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahmadya Putra Nugraha

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Modern society nowadays technological advances at first create efficiency in human life. Further development of the technology thus drown human in a routine and automation of work created. The State is to be one of the causes of man separated from fellow or the outside world and eventually experiencing alienation. The movie as a mass media function to obtain the movie and entertainment can be informative or educative function is contained, even persuasive. The purpose of this research was conducted to find out the alienation in the movie Wall E. The concepts used to analyze the movie Wall E this is communication, movie, and alienation. The concept of alienation of human alienation from covering its own products of human alienation from its activities, the human alienation from nature of his humanity and human alienation from each other. Paradigm used is a critical paradigm with type a descriptive research with qualitative approach. The method used is the analysis of semiotics Roland Barthes to interpretation the scope of social alienation and fellow humans in the movie.This writing research results found that alienation of humans with other humans influenced the development of the technology and how the human it self represented of technology, not from our fellow human beings. Masyarakat modern saat ini kemajuan teknologi pada awalnya membuat efisiensi dalam kehidupan manusia. Perkembangan selanjutnya teknologi justru menenggelamkan manusia dalam suatu rutinitas dan otomatisasi kerja yang diciptakan. Keadaan itulah yang menjadi salah satu penyebab manusia terpisah dari sesama atau dunia luar dan akhirnya mengalami keterasingan. Film sebagai media massa berfungsi untuk memperoleh hiburan dan dalam film dapat terkandung fungsi informatif maupun edukatif, bahkan persuasif. Tujuan Penelitian ini dilakukan untuk mengetahui Keterasingan dalam film Wall E. Konsep-konsep yang digunakan untuk menganalisis film Wall E ini adalah komunikasi, film, dan

  14. Thermal insulation properties of walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhukov Aleksey Dmitrievich

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Heat-protective qualities of building structures are determined by the qualities of the used materials, adequate design solutions and construction and installation work of high quality. This rule refers both to the structures made of materials similar in their structure and nature and mixed, combined by a construction system. The necessity to ecaluate thermal conductivity is important for a product and for a construction. Methods for evaluating the thermal protection of walls are based on the methods of calculation, on full-scale tests in a laboratory or on objects. At the same time there is a reason to believe that even deep and detailed calculation may cause deviation of the values from real data. Using finite difference method can improve accuracy of the results, but it doesn’t solve all problems. The article discusses new approaches to evaluating thermal insulation properties of walls. The authors propose technique of accurate measurement of thermal insulation properties in single blocks and fragments of walls and structures.

  15. Optimizing {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT imaging of vessel wall inflammation: the impact of {sup 18}F-FDG circulation time, injected dose, uptake parameters, and fasting blood glucose levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bucerius, Jan [Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Translational and Molecular Imaging Institute, One Gustave L. Levy Place, P.O. Box 1234, New York, NY (United States); Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University Medical Center, Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht (CARIM), Maastricht (Netherlands); University Hospital, RWTH Aachen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany); Mani, Venkatesh; Fayad, Zahi A. [Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Translational and Molecular Imaging Institute, One Gustave L. Levy Place, P.O. Box 1234, New York, NY (United States); Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Department of Cardiology, Zena and Michael A. Weiner Cardiovascular Institute and Marie-Josee and Henry R. Kravis Cardiovascular Health Center, New York, NY (United States); Moncrieff, Colin [Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Translational and Molecular Imaging Institute, One Gustave L. Levy Place, P.O. Box 1234, New York, NY (United States); Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Machac, Josef [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Fuster, Valentin [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Department of Cardiology, Zena and Michael A. Weiner Cardiovascular Institute and Marie-Josee and Henry R. Kravis Cardiovascular Health Center, New York, NY (United States); The Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares (CNIC), Madrid (Spain); Farkouh, Michael E. [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Department of Cardiology, Zena and Michael A. Weiner Cardiovascular Institute and Marie-Josee and Henry R. Kravis Cardiovascular Health Center, New York, NY (United States); Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Cardiovascular Imaging Clinical Trials Unit, New York, NY (United States); Tawakol, Ahmed [Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard University, Cardiac MR PET CT Program, Boston, MA (United States); Rudd, James H.F. [Cambridge University, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-15

    {sup 18}F-FDG PET is increasingly used for imaging of vessel wall inflammation. However, limited data are available on the impact of methodological variables, i.e. prescan fasting glucose, FDG circulation time and injected FDG dose, and of different FDG uptake parameters, in vascular FDG PET imaging. Included in the study were 195 patients who underwent vascular FDG PET/CT of the aorta and the carotids. Arterial standardized uptake values ({sub mean}SUV{sub max}), target-to-background ratios ({sub mean}TBR{sub max}) and FDG blood-pool activity in the superior vena cava (SVC) and the jugular veins (JV) were quantified. Vascular FDG uptake values classified according to the tertiles of prescan fasting glucose levels, the FDG circulation time, and the injected FDG dose were compared using ANOVA. Multivariate regression analyses were performed to identify the potential impact of all variables described on the arterial and blood-pool FDG uptake. Tertile analyses revealed FDG circulation times of about 2.5 h and prescan glucose levels of less than 7.0 mmol/l, showing a favorable relationship between arterial and blood-pool FDG uptake. FDG circulation times showed negative associations with aortic{sub mean}SUV{sub max} values as well as SVC and JV FDG blood-pool activity, but positive correlations with aortic and carotid{sub mean}TBR{sub max} values. Prescan glucose levels were negatively associated with aortic and carotid{sub mean}TBR{sub max} and carotid{sub mean}SUV{sub max} values, but were positively correlated with SVC blood-pool uptake. The injected FDG dose failed to show any significant association with vascular FDG uptake. FDG circulation times and prescan blood glucose levels significantly affect FDG uptake in the aortic and carotid walls and may bias the results of image interpretation in patients undergoing vascular FDG PET/CT. The injected FDG dose was less critical. Therefore, circulation times of about 2.5 h and prescan glucose levels less than 7.0 mmol

  16. Global variables and impact parameter determination in nucleus-nucleus collisions below 100 MeV/u

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peter, J.; Cussol, D.; Bizard, G.; Brou, R.; Louvel, M.; Patry, J.P.; Regimbart, R.; Steckmeyer, J.C.; Sullivan, J.P.; Tamain, B.; Cassagnou, Y.; Legrain, R.; Rosato, E.; Hagel, K.; Jin, G.M.; Crema, E.

    1990-03-01

    Several global variables are tested for determining the impact parameter in 4π measurements of charged products. For the system Ar+Al from 25 to 85 MeV/u, simulated reactions are used to study the correlation between the real impact parameter value and the experimentally determined one. Even with a perfect detector, the total multiplicity and the mid-rapidity charge give a poor correlation. Filtering through the acceptance of an actual detector (Mur+Tonneau at GANIL) provides a poor correlation with the total charge, and an acceptable one with the total perpendicular momentum. The average (mass weighted) parallel velocity V gives the best correlation and is less sensitive to the incident energy and to the mechanisms used in the simulation. Measurements extending to very forward angles are needed to accurately sort events by impact parameter. Real data are used to study the variation of other global variables versus V: they exhibit the expected average trend, with broad fluctuations. The excentricity and flow angle allow the evolution of central reactions with the incident energy to be followed. The proportion of relative motion transformed into energy perpendicular to the beam direction decreases when the incident energy increases; its absolute value, however, doubles from 25 to 65 MeV/u. In experimental studies where good separation between participant (pre-equilibrium) and spectator (equilibrium) particles is wanted in addition to good impact parameter sorting, the projectile mass should be in the range 1.2 - 2.5 times the target mass

  17. A comparison of the impact of CPOE implementation and organizational determinants on doctor-nurse communications and cooperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelayo, Sylvia; Anceaux, Françoise; Rogalski, Janine; Elkin, Peter; Beuscart-Zephir, Marie-Catherine

    2013-12-01

    To compare the impact of CPOE implementation and of the workplace organizational determinants on the doctor-nurse cooperation and communication processes. A first study was undertaken in eight different wards aimed to identify the different workplace organizations that support doctor-nurse communications'. A second study compared the impact of these organizations and of a CPOE on medication-related doctor-nurse communications. The doctor-nurse communications could be structured into three typical workplace organizations: the common round, the briefing and the opportunistic exchange organizations. The results (i) confirmed the impact of the organizational determinants on the cooperative activities and (ii) demonstrated the CPOE system has no significant impact within a given workplace organization. The success of the implementation of HIT applications relies partly on the identification of the actual (and sometimes hidden) structuring variables of teamwork and ultimately on their control at the time of implementation to ensure the quality and safety of the patient care provided. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Impact determination of strength and resistance training on Glycoside hemoglobin and blood sugar on patients with type II diabetes”

    OpenAIRE

    Bahman Hasanvand; Kobra Karami; Abdollah Khodadi; Mehdi Valipour

    2011-01-01

    Background : This study determined the impact of strength and resistance training on hemoglobin Glycoside and glucose in type II diabetic patients in Khorramabad in 2009. Materials and Methods: This quasi-experimental study was carried out on 30 men with type 2 diabetes referred to laboratories in Khorramabad, selected by screening and interview and purposeful sampling . After the subjects completed questionnaires of medical records and written consent, they were randomly divided into th...

  19. Physics of resistive wall modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igochine, V.

    2012-01-01

    The advanced tokamak regime is a promising candidate for steady-state tokamak operation which is desirable for a fusion reactor. This regime is characterized by a high bootstrap current fraction and a flat or reversed safety factor profile, which leads to operation close to the pressure limit. At this limit, an external kink mode becomes unstable. This external kink is converted into the slowly growing resistive wall mode (RWM) by the presence of a conducting wall. Reduction of the growth rate allows one to act on the mode and to stabilize it. There are two main factors which determine the stability of the RWM. The first factor comes from external magnetic perturbations (error fields, resistive wall, feedback coils, etc). This part of RWM physics is the same for tokamaks and reversed field pinch configurations. The physics of this interaction is relatively well understood and based on classical electrodynamics. The second ingredient of RWM physics is the interaction of the mode with plasma flow and fast particles. These interactions are particularly important for tokamaks, which have higher plasma flow and stronger trapped particle effects. The influence of the fast particles will also be increasingly more important in ITER and DEMO which will have a large fraction of fusion born alpha particles. These interactions have kinetic origins which make the computations challenging since not only particles influence the mode, but also the mode acts on the particles. Correct prediction of the ‘plasma–RWM’ interaction is an important ingredient which has to be combined with external field's influence (resistive wall, error fields and feedback) to make reliable predictions for RWM behaviour in tokamaks. All these issues are reviewed in this paper. (special topic)

  20. Remnant Cholesterol Elicits Arterial Wall Inflammation and a Multilevel Cellular Immune Response in Humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernelot Moens, Sophie J.; Verweij, Simone L.; Schnitzler, Johan G.; Stiekema, Lotte C. A.; Bos, Merijn; Langsted, Anne; Kuijk, Carlijn; Bekkering, Siroon; Voermans, Carlijn; Verberne, Hein J.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Stroes, Erik S. G.; Kroon, Jeffrey

    2017-01-01

    Mendelian randomization studies revealed a causal role for remnant cholesterol in cardiovascular disease. Remnant particles accumulate in the arterial wall, potentially propagating local and systemic inflammation. We evaluated the impact of remnant cholesterol on arterial wall inflammation,

  1. Tracer tests to determine the impact of industrial activities on groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaspar, R.D.

    1995-01-01

    The drinking water supply from drains of Iasi town is vulnerable to pollution because of the human activities developed in the supply area. To assess the vulnerability, the transfer functions of pollutants were determined using activable tracer and fluorescent dyes. Tracer techniques have been applied in very permeable sediments and in surface waters for the determination of the dynamic parameters of groundwater movements such as flow vectors and dispersion. To determine the residence time distribution of the pollutants, the mathematical models for surface water pollution and an axial dispersion model for the porous medium between the pollution source and catchment were used. Tracer techniques also allowed the determination of water losses under the drain. (author) 7 figs., 1 tab., 12 refs

  2. An innovative method for automatic determination of time of arrival for Lamb waves excited by impact events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Junxiao; Parvasi, Seyed Mohammad; Ho, Siu Chun Michael; Patil, Devendra; Ge, Maochen; Li, Hongnan; Song, Gangbing

    2017-05-01

    Lamb waves have great potential as a diagnostic tool in the application of structural health monitoring. Propagation properties of Lamb waves are affected by the state of the structure that the waves are traveling upon. Thus Lamb waves can carry information about the structure as they travel across a structure. However, the dispersive, multimodal and attenuation characteristics of Lamb waves make it difficult to determine the time of arrival of Lamb waves. To deal with these characteristics, an innovative method to automatically determine the time of arrival for impact-induced Lamb waves without human intervention is proposed in this paper. Lead zirconate titanate sensors mounted on the surface of an aluminum plate were used to measure the Lamb waves excited by an impact. The time of arrival was determined based on wavelet decomposition, Hilbert transform and statistics (Grubbs’ test and maximum likelihood estimation). Both of numerical analysis and physical measurements have verified the accuracy of this method for impacts on an aluminum plate.

  3. Distributional impacts of car road pricing. Settlement structures determine divergence across countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalinowska, Dominika; Steininger, Karl W.

    2009-01-01

    Social questions of distribution and equity are of major importance for the political acceptance of car road pricing. The argument that kilometre-based private vehicle charging disadvantages the poor is often the core reason for opposing its introduction. An article in this journal [Steininger, K.W., Friedl, B., Gebetsroither, B., 2007. Sustainability impacts of car road pricing: a computable general equilibrium analysis for Austria. Ecological Economics 63, pp. 59-69] proved the opposite for one European country, i.e. that the rich bear most of the burden. In the present paper we use the very same model structure and apply it in a simulation to the data of another country. While macroeconomic and environmental conclusions are similar, we find a different distributional impact of car road pricing in our case. This issue is also of relevance in the analysis of the distributional implications concerning (recently significant) gasoline price increases. (author)

  4. Determinants of Green Innovation: The Impact of Internal and External Knowledge

    OpenAIRE

    Stucki, Tobias; Wörter, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Based on a comprehensive data set comprising 13 countries, 22 industries and a period of 30 years we investigate the impact of internal and external knowledge pools of both green and 'other than green' technologies on green patent activities. It turned out that the internal green knowledge stock is positively related to green patent activities with a considerably large marginal value. The country's green knowledge stock and the green knowledge stock of the same industry in other countries are...

  5. The determinants and impact of business corruption : evidence from establishments in Eastern Europe and Central Asia

    OpenAIRE

    Hjelvik, Ellinor

    2016-01-01

    As corruption gains public attention, there is an increased acknowledgement of its impact on business. Circumstances around a corrupt may act differ, but thesis seeks to understand some common factors. Corruption might be embedded in a country or occur sporadically. One of the many ways a business can participate in corrupt acts, willingly or reluctantly, is via bribery of public officials. This thesis seeks to examine corruption and bribery in relation to the government from t...

  6. Impact of measurement uncertainties on determination of chlorophyll-specific absorption coefficient for marine phytoplankton

    OpenAIRE

    McKee, D.; Röttgers, R.; Neukermans, G.; Calzado, V.S.; Trees, C.; Ampolo-Rella, M.; Neil, C.; Cunningham, A.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding variability in the chlorophyll-specific absorption of marine phytoplankton, aph*Chl (λ), is essential for primary production modelling, calculation of underwater light field characteristics, and development of algorithms for remote sensing of chlorophyll concentrations. Previous field and laboratory studies have demonstrated significant apparent variability in aph*Chl (λ) for natural samples and algal cultures. However, the potential impact of measurement uncertain...

  7. Determinants Of Urban Residents' Perceived Tourism Impacts: A Study on the Williamsburg and Virginia Beach Areas

    OpenAIRE

    Yoon, Yooshik

    1998-01-01

    ABSTRACT The existing research in the field of tourism has exhibited a clearer understanding of how residents perceive the dynamic and complex phenomena of tourism. Since the goals of tourism planning and development are to seek maximization of benefits and minimization of the costs of tourism, it is apparent that the effective evaluation of tourism impacts will be valuable information in successful strategies for tourism product development and operation. With these perspectives, this...

  8. Probabilistic Decision Tools for Determining Impacts of Agricultural Development Policy on Household Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, Cory W.; Lanzanova, Denis; Muchiri, Caroline; Shepherd, Keith D.; Rosenstock, Todd S.; Krawinkel, Michael; Tabuti, John R. S.; Luedeling, Eike

    2018-03-01

    Governments around the world have agreed to end hunger and food insecurity and to improve global nutrition, largely through changes to agriculture and food systems. However, they are faced with a lot of uncertainty when making policy decisions, since any agricultural changes will influence social and biophysical systems, which could yield either positive or negative nutrition outcomes. We outline a holistic probability modeling approach with Bayesian Network (BN) models for nutritional impacts resulting from agricultural development policy. The approach includes the elicitation of expert knowledge for impact model development, including sensitivity analysis and value of information calculations. It aims at a generalizable methodology that can be applied in a wide range of contexts. To showcase this approach, we develop an impact model of Vision 2040, Uganda's development strategy, which, among other objectives, seeks to transform the country's agricultural landscape from traditional systems to large-scale commercial agriculture. Model results suggest that Vision 2040 is likely to have negative outcomes for the rural livelihoods it intends to support; it may have no appreciable influence on household hunger but, by influencing preferences for and access to quality nutritional foods, may increase the prevalence of micronutrient deficiency. The results highlight the trade-offs that must be negotiated when making decisions regarding agriculture for nutrition, and the capacity of BNs to make these trade-offs explicit. The work illustrates the value of BNs for supporting evidence-based agricultural development decisions.

  9. Determinants and impacts of public agricultural research in Japan: Product level evidence on agricultural Kosetsushi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukugawa, Nobuya

    2017-12-01

    The public sector is an important source of agricultural research as the agricultural sector in many countries consists of a number of individual farmers who have difficulty in bearing the cost of research and development. Public institutes for testing and research called Kosetsushi help agriculture and manufacturing improve labor productivity through technology transfer activities, whereby constituting an important component of regional innovation systems in Japan. This study establishes panel data of agricultural Kosetsushi and examines whether their research activities are responsive to local needs and which type of research effort is conducive to the promotion of agricultural product innovations. Estimation results reveal variations across plants in the impacts of agricultural clusters on research on the plant conducted by Kosetsushi located in the cluster. A positive impact is observed only for vegetable while negative or statistically insignificant relationships are found for rice, fruit, and flower. The impact of research on plant breeding on agricultural product innovations also varies across plants. Policy implications of the major findings are discussed.

  10. The origin of 'Great Walls'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shandarin, Sergei F.

    2009-01-01

    A new semi-analytical model that explains the formation and sizes of the 'great walls' - the largest structures observed in the universe is suggested. Although the basis of the model is the Zel'dovich approximation it has been used in a new way very different from the previous studies. Instead of traditional approach that evaluates the nonlinear density field it has been utilized for identification of the regions in Lagrangian space that after the mapping to real or redshift space (depending on the kind of structure is studied) end up in the regions where shell-crossing occurs. The set of these regions in Lagrangian space form the progenitor of the structure and after the mapping it determines the pattern of the structure in real or redshift space. The particle trajectories have crossed in such regions and the mapping is no longer unique there. The progenitor after mapping makes only one stream in the multi-stream flow regions therefore it does not comprise all the mass. Nevertheless, it approximately retains the shape of the structure. The progenitor of the structure in real space is determined by the linear density field along with two non-Gaussian fields derived from the initial potential. Its shape in Eulerian space is also affected by the displacement field. The progenitor of the structure in redshift space also depends on these fields but in addition it is strongly affected by two anisotropic fields that determine the pattern of great walls as well as their huge sizes. All the fields used in the mappings are derived from the linear potential smoothed at the current scale of nonlinearity which is R nl = 2.7 h −1 Mpc for the adopted parameters of the ΛCDM universe normalized to σ 8 = 0.8. The model predicts the existence of walls with sizes significantly greater than 500 h −1 Mpc that may be found in sufficiently large redshift surveys

  11. CHARACTERIZATION OF TANK 18F WALL AND SCALE SAMPLES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hay, Michael; Click, Damon; Diprete, C.; Diprete, David

    2010-01-01

    Samples from the wall of Tank 18F were obtained to determine the associated source term using a special wall sampling device. Two wall samples and a scale sample were obtained and characterized at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). All the analyses of the Tank 18F wall and scale samples met the targeted detection limits. The upper wall samples show ∼2X to 6X higher concentrations for U, Pu, and Np on an activity per surface area basis than the lower wall samples. On an activity per mass basis, the upper and lower wall samples show similar compositions for U and Pu. The Np activity is still ∼2.5X higher in the upper wall sample on a per mass basis. The scale sample contains 2-3X higher concentrations of U, Pu, and Sr-90 than the wall samples on an activity per mass basis. The plutonium isotopics differ for all three wall samples (upper, lower, and scale samples). The Pu-238 appears to increase as a proportion of total plutonium as you move up the tank wall from the lowest sample (scale sample) to the upper wall sample. The elemental composition of the scale sample appears similar to other F-Area PUREX sludge compositions. The composition of the scale sample is markedly different than the material on the floor of Tank 18F. However, the scale sample shows elevated Mg and Ca concentrations relative to typical PUREX sludge as do the floor samples.

  12. Electrochemical sensor based on molecularly imprinted polymer film via sol-gel technology and multi-walled carbon nanotubes-chitosan functional layer for sensitive determination of quinoxaline-2-carboxylic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yukun; Fang, Guozhen; Liu, Guiyang; Pan, Mingfei; Wang, Xiaomin; Kong, Lingjie; He, Xinlei; Wang, Shuo

    2013-09-15

    Quinoxaline-2-carboxylic acid (QCA) is difficult to measure since only trace levels are present in commercial meat products. In this study, a rapid, sensitive and selective molecularly imprinted electrochemical sensor for QCA determination was successfully constructed by combination of a novel modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). The GCE was fabricated via stepwise modification of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs)-chitosan (CS) functional composite and a sol-gel molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) film on the surface. MWNTs-CS composite was used to enhance the electron transfer rate and expand electrode surface area, and consequently amplify QCA reduction electrochemical response. The imprinted mechanism and experimental parameters affecting the performance of MIP film were discussed in detail. The resulting MIP/sol-gel/MWNTs-CS/GCE was characterized using various electrochemical methods involving cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and DPV. The sensor using MIP/sol-gel/MWNTs-CS/GCE as working electrode showed a linear current response to the target QCA concentration in the wide range from 2.0×10(-6) to 1.0×10(-3)molL(-1) with a low detection limit of 4.4×10(-7)molL(-1) (S/N=3). The established sensor with excellent reproductivity and stability was applied to evaluate commercial pork products. At five concentration levels, the recoveries and standard deviations were calculated as 93.5-98.6% and 1.7-3.3%, respectively, suggesting the proposed sensor is promising for the accurate quantification of QCA at trace levels in meat samples. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Linking expression of fructan active enzymes, cell wall invertases and sucrose transporters with fructan profiles in growing taproot of chicory (Cichorium intybus: Impact of hormonal and environmental cues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongbin Wei

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In chicory taproot, the inulin-type fructans serve as carbohydrate reserve. Inulin metabolism is mediated by fructan active enzymes (FAZYs: sucrose:sucrose 1-fructosyltransferase (1-SST; fructan synthesis, fructan:fructan-1-fructosyltransferase (1-FFT; fructan synthesis and degradation, and fructan 1-exohydrolases (1-FEH1/2a/2b; fructan degradation. In developing taproot, fructan synthesis is affected by source-to-sink sucrose transport and sink unloading. In the present study, expression of FAZYs, sucrose transporter and CWI isoforms, vacuolar invertase and sucrose synthase was determined in leaf blade, petiole and taproot of young chicory plants (taproot diameter: 2cm and compared with taproot fructan profiles for the following scenarios: i N-starvation, ii abscisic acid (ABA treatment, iii ethylene treatment (via 1-aminoyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid [ACC], and iv cold treatment. Both N-starvation and ABA treatment induced an increase in taproot oligofructans. However, while under N-starvation this increase reflected de novo synthesis, under ABA treatment gene expression profiles indicated a role for both de novo synthesis and degradation of long-chain fructans. Conversely, under ACC and cold treatment oligofructans slightly decreased, correlating with reduced expression of 1-SST and 1-FFT and increased expression of FEHs and VI. Distinct SUT and CWI expression profiles were observed, indicating a functional alignment of SUT and CWI expression with taproot fructan metabolism under different source-sink scenarios.

  14. Degree of coupling in high-rise mixed shear walls structures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A simple method of analysis is presented to determine the influence of single shear walls (SSW) on the degree of coupling DoC and on the peak shear demand PSD for beams of coupled shear walls (CSW) in mixed shear wall structures (MSW). Non-coupled lateral load resisting structures such as singular planar walls and ...

  15. Kinetic wall from Israel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godolphin, D.

    1985-05-01

    An unusual solar mass wall is described. At the turn of a handle it can change from a solar energy collector to a heat-blocker. An appropriate name for it might be the rotating prism wall. An example of the moving wall is at work in an adobe test home in Sede Boqer. Behind a large south-facing window stand four large adobe columns that are triangular in plan. One face of each of them is painted black to absorb sunlight, a second is covered with panels of polystyrene insulation, and a third is painted to match the room decor. These columns can rotate. On winter nights, the insulated side faces the glass, keeping heat losses down. The same scheme works in summer to keep heat out of the house. Small windows provide ventilation.

  16. On the determining role of microstructure of niobium-microalloyed steels with differences in impact toughness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anumolu, R.; Kumar, B. Ravi; Misra, R.D.K.; Mannering, T.; Panda, D.; Jansto, S.G.

    2008-01-01

    The relationship between microstructure and impact toughness was investigated for niobium-microalloyed steels with similar yield strength. The nominal steel composition was similar and any variation in processing history was unintentional. The general microstructure of the investigated steel was similar and consisted of 85% polygonal ferrite and 15% pearlite. Despite these similarities, they exhibited variation in toughness and were classified as high- and low-toughness steels. Detailed microstructural investigation including stereological analysis and electron microscopy implied that toughness is strongly influenced by mean intercept length of polygonal ferrite and pearlite colony, and their distribution, interlamellar spacing, and degenerated pearlite

  17. On the determining role of microstructure of niobium-microalloyed steels with differences in impact toughness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anumolu, R. [Center for Structural and Functional Materials, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, LA 70504-4130 (United States); Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, Lafayette, LA 70504-4130 (United States); Kumar, B. Ravi [Center for Structural and Functional Materials, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, LA 70504-4130 (United States); Misra, R.D.K. [Center for Structural and Functional Materials, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, LA 70504-4130 (United States); Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, Lafayette, LA 70504-4130 (United States)], E-mail: dmisra@louisiana.edu; Mannering, T.; Panda, D. [Nucor-Yamato Steel, P.O. Box 1228, 5929 East State Highway 18, Blytheville, AR 72316 (United States); Jansto, S.G. [Reference Metals, 1000 Old Pond Road, Bridgeville, PA 15017 (United States)

    2008-09-15

    The relationship between microstructure and impact toughness was investigated for niobium-microalloyed steels with similar yield strength. The nominal steel composition was similar and any variation in processing history was unintentional. The general microstructure of the investigated steel was similar and consisted of 85% polygonal ferrite and 15% pearlite. Despite these similarities, they exhibited variation in toughness and were classified as high- and low-toughness steels. Detailed microstructural investigation including stereological analysis and electron microscopy implied that toughness is strongly influenced by mean intercept length of polygonal ferrite and pearlite colony, and their distribution, interlamellar spacing, and degenerated pearlite.

  18. Determining the impacts of trawling on benthic function in European waters : a biological traits approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolam, Stefan; Kenny, Andrew; Garcia, Clement

    characteristics, have allowed us to better understand the interactions between the benthic fauna and their environment at a functional level. We present the initial findings of work conducted under the auspices of the EU-funded project ‘BENTHIS’ which aims to improve our understanding of the impacts of trawling...... on benthic ecosystem functioning over much larger spatial scales than previously undertaken. Biological traits information from 887 stations across European waters (Norwegian, UK, Belgian, Dutch, Danish waters, the Mediterranean and Black Sea) were analysed to: i) quantify the relationships between infaunal...

  19. Promoting Enjoyment in Girls' Physical Education: The Impact of Goals, Beliefs, and Self-Determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, C. K. John; Liu, W. C.

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the network of relationships between sport ability beliefs, achievement goals, self-determination and female students' enjoyment in school physical education (PE). Female secondary students (n = 343) from a single-sex secondary school in Singapore participated in the survey. They were assessed on sport ability beliefs, goal…

  20. New’ Performance Measures: Determinants of Their Use and Their Impact on Performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.H.M. Verbeeten (Frank)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractThis study investigates the extent to which Dutch organizations use ‘new’ performance measures to deal with the perceived inadequacies of traditional accounting performance measures. In addition, the determinants of the use of these ‘new’ performance measures are documented; finally, the

  1. Little Words, Big Impact: Determiners Begin to Bootstrap Reference by 12 Months

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedar, Yarden; Casasola, Marianella; Lust, Barbara; Parmet, Yisrael

    2017-01-01

    We tested 12- and 18-month-old English-learning infants on a preferential-looking task which contrasted grammatically correct sentences using the determiner "the" vs. three ungrammatical conditions in which "the" was substituted by another English function word, a nonsense word, or omitted. Our design involved strict controls…

  2. PR-Index: Using the h-Index and PageRank for Determining True Impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Chao; Wang, Zhen; Li, Xianghua; Zhang, Zili; Zeng, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Several technical indicators have been proposed to assess the impact of authors and institutions. Here, we combine the h-index and the PageRank algorithm to do away with some of the individual limitations of these two indices. Most importantly, we aim to take into account value differences between citations-evaluating the citation sources by defining the h-index using the PageRank score rather than with citations. The resulting PR-index is then constructed by evaluating source popularity as well as the source publication authority. Extensive tests on available collections data (i.e., Microsoft Academic Search and benchmarks on the SIGKDD innovation award) show that the PR-index provides a more balanced impact measure than many existing indices. Due to its simplicity and similarity to the popular h-index, the PR-index may thus become a welcome addition to the technical indices already in use. Moreover, growth dynamics prior to the SIGKDD innovation award indicate that the PR-index might have notable predictive power.

  3. PR-Index: Using the h-Index and PageRank for Determining True Impact.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Gao

    Full Text Available Several technical indicators have been proposed to assess the impact of authors and institutions. Here, we combine the h-index and the PageRank algorithm to do away with some of the individual limitations of these two indices. Most importantly, we aim to take into account value differences between citations-evaluating the citation sources by defining the h-index using the PageRank score rather than with citations. The resulting PR-index is then constructed by evaluating source popularity as well as the source publication authority. Extensive tests on available collections data (i.e., Microsoft Academic Search and benchmarks on the SIGKDD innovation award show that the PR-index provides a more balanced impact measure than many existing indices. Due to its simplicity and similarity to the popular h-index, the PR-index may thus become a welcome addition to the technical indices already in use. Moreover, growth dynamics prior to the SIGKDD innovation award indicate that the PR-index might have notable predictive power.

  4. Timber frame walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ernst Jan de Place; Brandt, Erik

    2010-01-01

    A ventilated cavity is usually considered good practice for removing moisture behind the cladding of timber framed walls. Timber frame walls with no cavity are a logical alternative as they are slimmer and less expensive to produce and besides the risk of a two-sided fire behind the cladding....... It was found that the specific damages made to the vapour barrier as part of the test did not have any provable effect on the moisture content. In general elements with an intact vapour barrier did not show a critical moisture content at the wind barrier after four years of exposure....

  5. Strengthening masonry walls made of brick blocks with FRCM composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radovanović Željka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Results of testing more types of masonry walls made of brick blocks with the aim to define their mechanical characteristics and possibilities of external strengthening of walls with FRCM composites are presented in this paper. The characteristic compressive strengths, elasticity modulus and shear strengths of the various types of the walls were obtained on the basis of these testing results. Comparison between experimental results and values obtained by analytical approach in accordance with the current standard, European standards EN 1996 and the American standard ACI 530 is presented in this paper. After testing walls with application of compressive forces on the walls diagonal the cracked walls samples have been strengthened with selected types of FRCM composites. It was determined that the shear resistance of the walls after strengthening has increased significantly.

  6. Linking invasive exotic vertebrates and their ecosystem impacts in Tierra del Fuego to test theory and determine action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela, Alejandro E. J.; Anderson, Christopher B.; Fasola, Laura; Cabello, José L.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding processes and impacts of biological invasions is fundamental for ecology and management. Recent reviews summarized the mechanisms by which invasive species alter entire ecosystems, but quantitative assessments of these mechanisms are lacking for actual assemblages to determine their relative importance, frequency and patterns. We updated information on introduced vertebrates in the Tierra del Fuego Archipelago (TDF) via an exhaustive literature review and new data to evaluate ecosystem impact mechanisms and provide management recommendations. To date, 24 exotic vertebrates have naturalized in TDF, outnumbering natives nearly 2:1, with the North American beaver (Castor canadensis) and muskrat (Ondatra zibethica) being the most widely distributed species and also impacting the ecosystem through the greatest number of mechanisms. Introduced vertebrates occupied most parts of the archipelago with human-inhabited islands having greater taxa richness. All exotics potentially altered ecosystems by one or more mechanisms: 100% food webs, 92% invasional meltdown, 42% habitat modification, 38% disease or parasite transmission, 21% soil property and disturbance regime changes. Impact to habitat structure was the main clustering criterion for this assemblage. Within the species that physically alter habitats, we found two sub-groups: 1) large herbivores and 2) "others" including beavers and muskrats. Species that did not alter habitat were divided further into those with predatory trophic effects (carnivorous mammals and trout, sub-group 4) and the rest with assorted impacts (sub-group 3). By establishing high quality information on archipelago-wide assemblage, distribution, impacts and mechanisms for exotic vertebrates, we recommend, based on ecological criteria, prioritizing the management of sub-group 2. A secondary priority might be given to the carnivores in sub-group 4, while species in sub-groups 1 and 3 are less urgent. As the first systematic survey of

  7. Tokamak first-wall coating program development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, M.J.; Langley, R.A.; Prevender, T.S.

    1977-08-01

    The development of a research program to study coatings for control of impurities originating from the first wall of a Tokamak reactor is extensively discussed. The first wall environment and sputtering, temperature, surface chemical, and bulk radiation damage effects are reviewed. Candidate materials and application techniques are discussed. The philosophy and flow chart of a recommended coating development plan are presented and discussed. Projected impacts of the proposed plan include benefits to other aspects of confinement experiments. A list of 45 references is appended

  8. Interaction of aberrations, diffraction, and quantal fluctuations determine the impact of pupil size on visual quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Renfeng; Wang, Huachun; Thibos, Larry N; Bradley, Arthur

    2017-04-01

    Our purpose is to develop a computational approach that jointly assesses the impact of stimulus luminance and pupil size on visual quality. We compared traditional optical measures of image quality and those that incorporate the impact of retinal illuminance dependent neural contrast sensitivity. Visually weighted image quality was calculated for a presbyopic model eye with representative levels of chromatic and monochromatic aberrations as pupil diameter was varied from 7 to 1 mm, stimulus luminance varied from 2000 to 0.1  cd/m2, and defocus varied from 0 to -2 diopters. The model included the effects of quantal fluctuations on neural contrast sensitivity. We tested the model's predictions for five cycles per degree gratings by measuring contrast sensitivity at 5  cyc/deg. Unlike the traditional Strehl ratio and the visually weighted area under the modulation transfer function, the visual Strehl ratio derived from the optical transfer function was able to capture the combined impact of optics and quantal noise on visual quality. In a well-focused eye, provided retinal illuminance is held constant as pupil size varies, visual image quality scales approximately as the square root of illuminance because of quantum fluctuations, but optimum pupil size is essentially independent of retinal illuminance and quantum fluctuations. Conversely, when stimulus luminance is held constant (and therefore illuminance varies with pupil size), optimum pupil size increases as luminance decreases, thereby compensating partially for increased quantum fluctuations. However, in the presence of -1 and -2 diopters of defocus and at high photopic levels where Weber's law operates, optical aberrations and diffraction dominate image quality and pupil optimization. Similar behavior was observed in human observers viewing sinusoidal gratings. Optimum pupil size increases as stimulus luminance drops for the well-focused eye, and the benefits of small pupils for improving defocused image

  9. LESSONS FROM THE IMPACT OF INTERNAL AND MACROECONOMIC DETERMINANTS OF BAD LOANS IN CEE BANKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Florin FILIP

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims identifying and analysing the determinants of bad loans in the banks from Central and Eastern Europe, while their accumulation may lead to malfunctions on macroeconomic level. Analysing 38 of the most representative banks in the region during 2004-2013, we found significant positive linkages of bad loans ratio with cost to income ratio, unemployment and crisis, but also significant negative linkages with bank size, activity mix, bank risk taking behaviour, real GDP growth and inflation. Moreover, using Panel Least Squares Fixed Effects Method, we found that the main determinants of bad loans ratio increase are bank size, crisis, unemployment and cost to income ratio. Contrary, activity mix, bank risk taking behaviour, real GDP growth and inflation proved to act against bad loans accumulation. The results offer important lessons which may be useful in the future both for the banks and also for the governments from this region.

  10. Non-linear interactions determine the impact of sea-level rise on estuarine benthic biodiversity and ecosystem processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Tsuyuko; Raffaelli, David; White, Piran C L

    2013-01-01

    Sea-level rise induced by climate change may have significant impacts on the ecosystem functions and ecosystem services provided by intertidal sediment ecosystems. Accelerated sea-level rise is expected to lead to steeper beach slopes, coarser particle sizes and increased wave exposure, with consequent impacts on intertidal ecosystems. We examined the relationships between abundance, biomass, and community metabolism of benthic fauna with beach slope, particle size and exposure, using samples across a range of conditions from three different locations in the UK, to determine the significance of sediment particle size beach slope and wave exposure in affecting benthic fauna and ecosystem function in different ecological contexts. Our results show that abundance, biomass and oxygen consumption of intertidal macrofauna and meiofauna are affected significantly by interactions among sediment particle size, beach slope and wave exposure. For macrofauna on less sloping beaches, the effect of these physical constraints is mediated by the local context, although for meiofauna and for macrofauna on intermediate and steeper beaches, the effects of physical constraints dominate. Steeper beach slopes, coarser particle sizes and increased wave exposure generally result in decreases in abundance, biomass and oxygen consumption, but these relationships are complex and non-linear. Sea-level rise is likely to lead to changes in ecosystem structure with generally negative impacts on ecosystem functions and ecosystem services. However, the impacts of sea-level rise will also be affected by local ecological context, especially for less sloping beaches.

  11. [Weight parameters of water quality impact and risk grade determination of water environmental sensitive spots in Jiashan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Rong-Rong; Pang, Yong; Zhang, Qian; Chen, Ke; Sun, Ming-Yuan

    2012-07-01

    For the safety of the water environment in Jiashan county in Zhejiang Province, one-dimensional hydrodynamic and water quality models are established based on three large-scale monitoring of hydrology and water quality in Jiashan county, three water environmental sensitive spots including Hongqitang dam Chijia hydrological station and Luxie pond are selected to investigate weight parameters of water quality impact and risk grade determination. Results indicate as follows (1) Internal pollution impact in Jiashan areas was greater than the external, the average weight parameters of internal chemical oxygen demand (COD) pollution is 55.3%, internal ammonia nitrogen (NH(4+)-N) is 67.4%, internal total phosphor (TP) is 63.1%. Non-point pollution impact in Jiashan areas was greater than point pollution impact, the average weight parameters of non-point COD pollutions is 53.7%, non-point NH(4+)-N is 65.9%, non-point TP is 57.8%. (2) The risk of Hongqitang dam and Chijia hydrological station are in the middle risk. The risk of Luxie pond is also in the middle risk in August, and in April and December the risk of Luxie pond is low. The strategic decision will be suggested to guarantee water environment security and social and economic security in the study.

  12. PCVs Estimation and their Impacts on Precise Orbit Determination of LEOs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chunmei, Z.; WANG, X.

    2017-12-01

    In the last decade the precise orbit determination (POD) based on GNSS, such as GPS, has been considered as one of the efficient methods to derive orbits of Low Earth Orbiters (LEOs) that demand accuracy requirements. The Earth gravity field recovery and its related researches require precise dynamic orbits of LEOs. With the improvements of GNSS satellites' orbit and clock accuracy, the algorithm optimization and the refinement of perturbation force models, the antenna phase-center variations (PCVs) of space-borne GNSS receiver have become an increasingly important factor that affects POD accuracy. A series of LEOs such as HY-2, ZY-3 and FY-3 with homebred space-borne GNSS receivers have been launched in the past several years in China. Some of these LEOs load dual-mode GNSS receivers of GPS and BDS signals. The reliable performance of these space-borne receivers has been establishing an important foundation for the future launches of China gravity satellites. Therefore, we first evaluate the data quality of on-board GNSS measurement by examining integrity, multipath error, cycle slip ratio and other quality indices. Then we determine the orbits of several LEOs at different altitudes by the reduced dynamic orbit determination method. The corresponding ionosphere-free carrier phase post-fit residual time series are obtained. And then we establish the PCVs model by the ionosphere-free residual approach and analyze the effects of antenna phase-center variation on orbits. It is shown that orbit accuracy of LEO satellites is greatly improved after in-flight PCV calibration. Finally, focus on the dual-mode receiver of FY-3 satellite we analyze the quality of onboard BDS data and then evaluate the accuracy of the FY-3 orbit determined using only BDS measurement onboard. The accuracy of LEO satellites orbit based on BDS would be well improved with the global completion of BDS by 2020.

  13. [Analysis of proximate determinants and impact of type of employment on fertility in peruvian women].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enríquez-Canto, Yordanis; Ortiz-Romaní, Katherine; Ortiz-Montalvo, Yonathan

    2017-04-20

    To estimate the predictive capacity of proximate determinants and type of employment with respect to reduced fertility in Peruvian women of childbearing age. Secondary analysis of Peru's Demographic and Family Health Survey (ENDES) for 2014. The sample consisted of 20 396 women aged 15 to 49 years who had been sexually active during the four-week period immediately before the interview. The dependent variable was the total number of live births, and the main independent variables were type of employment, ideal number of offspring, highest educational level attained, and wealth quintile. Odds ratios (OR) were used to estimate the strength of the associations between proximate determinants and type of employment on the one hand and fertility on the other in logistic regression models. The goodness of fit of the models was estimated using the Hosmer-Lemeshow test and its discriminatory capacity, based on receiver operating characteristic curves. Desired fertility (2.5 children per woman) was higher than actual fertility (2.1). The factors most strongly associated with reduced fertility were higher educational attainment (OR = 0.03; 95% CI: 0.02-0.04); ideal number of offspring between 0 and 2 (OR = 0.13; 95% CI: 0.11-0.15); and dependent employment (OR = 0.31; 95% CI: 0.28-0.34). The models' areas under the curve were 0.908 (95% CI: 0.898-0.917) and 0.91 (95% CI: 0.891-0.928), respectively. Older age at first sexual intercourse and older age when first married (direct determinants) delay childbearing, whereas higher educational level and belonging to the highest wealth quintile (indirect determinants) indicate greater economic autonomy, which, in turn, is associated with low fertility. Similarly, the more dependent the work, the lower the fertility of the women surveyed.

  14. Statistical Determination of Impact of Property Attributes for Weak Measurement Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doszyń Mariusz

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Many of the property attributes are measured on weak scales (nominal and ordinal scale. For example, land allocation in the development plan is measured on a nominal scale and such categories as proximity, equipment, access to means of communication, location, and soil and water conditions, are measured on an ordinal scale. The use of statistical measures appropriate for interval or quotient scales is wrong in such cases. Therefore, the article presents statistical measures that allow specifying the impact of the attributes on real estate prices, which can be used for the weaker scales, mainly for the ordinal scale. In the empirical illustration the proposed measures will be calculated by using the actual database of transaction prices.

  15. Understanding the determinants of electricity prices and the impact of the German Nuclear Moratorium in 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thoenes, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    This paper shows how the effect of fuel prices varies with the level of electricity demand. It analyzes the relationship between daily prices of electricity, natural gas and carbon emission allowances with a vector error correction model and a semiparametric varying smooth coefficient model. The results indicate that the electricity price adapts to fuel price changes in a long-term cointegration relationship. Different electricity generation technologies have distinct fuel price dependencies, which allows estimating the structure of the power plant portfolio by exploiting market prices. The semiparametric model indicates a technology switch from coal to gas at roughly 85% of maximum demand. It is used to analyze the market impact of the nuclear moratorium by the German Government in March 2011. Futures prices show that the market efficiently accounts for the suspended capacity and expects that several nuclear plants will not be switched on after the moratorium.

  16. Persuasive communication about AIDS prevention: need for cognition determines the impact of message format.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, A B

    1999-04-01

    Adolescents were classified as being high or low in need for cognition (NFC) (Cacioppo & Petty, 1982) and expressed their knowledge about AIDS, attitudes toward condom use, and perceived supportive norms after being exposed to a cartoon or a written message about safe sex. Both messages have a positive impact on knowledge and attitudes. Theoretically interesting is the finding that the cartoon message is more effective in bringing about change in attitudes and subjective norms than the written message for low-NFC adolescents, and that the written message is more effective than the cartoon message for high-NFC adolescents. These results are consistent with the theory-based prediction that a persuasive communication will be most effective when the format of the message is tailored to people's information-processing proclivities. The practical implications of the findings for AIDS education are discussed.

  17. Regulatory, design and methodological impacts in determining tidal-in-stream power resource potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atwater, Joel F.; Lawrence, Gregory A.

    2011-01-01

    Tidal-in-Stream energy has been heralded by many as a significant potential source for clean power, a scheme where kinetic energy is extracted from tidal currents. A number of estimates have suggested that tidal power may become a sizeable fraction of overall electricity generation, however these estimates have been largely based on a resource assessment methodology that dramatically oversimplifies the physical phenomenon at play. This paper develops a model that considers the effect of energy extraction on the bulk flow, showing that tidal energy inventories that assess solely kinetic energy flux may represent both an order-of-magnitude overestimation of the resource and a significant oversimplification of regulatory impacts. The interplay between the characteristics of a flow and the regulatory and economic issues will likely limit tidal power generation to levels significantly below the physical maximums. Permitted flow reduction, turbine design and staging of development all have significant and predictable impacts on the extractible resource. Energy planners must therefore understand these relationships in order to appropriately assess the magnitude of generation that can be realistically be produced from tidal energy. - Research highlights: → Inventorying kinetic energy is not appropriate for assessing the tidal energy potential and may overestimate the resource by orders of magnitude. → The physical maximum for tidal power extraction is 38% of the total fluid power of a channel and causes a flow reduction of 42%. → Any amount of tidal power generation will reduce the flow rate in a channel. → Limiting the permitted reduction in flow significantly reduces the available resource. → Turbine efficiency is important as extraneous resistance depletes the resource without providing power generation.

  18. Determining air quality and greenhouse gas impacts of hydrogen infrastructure and fuel cell vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens-Romero, Shane; Carreras-Sospedra, Marc; Brouwer, Jacob; Dabdub, Donald; Samuelsen, Scott

    2009-12-01

    Adoption of hydrogen infrastructure and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles (HFCVs) to replace gasoline internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles has been proposed as a strategy to reduce criteria pollutant and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the transportation sector and transition to fuel independence. However, it is uncertain (1) to what degree the reduction in criteria pollutants will impact urban air quality, and (2) how the reductions in pollutant emissions and concomitant urban air quality impacts compare to ultralow emission gasoline-powered vehicles projected for a future year (e.g., 2060). To address these questions, the present study introduces a "spatially and temporally resolved energy and environment tool" (STREET) to characterize the pollutant and GHG emissions associated with a comprehensive hydrogen supply infrastructure and HFCVs at a high level of geographic and temporal resolution. To demonstrate the utility of STREET, two spatially and temporally resolved scenarios for hydrogen infrastructure are evaluated in a prototypical urban airshed (the South Coast Air Basin of California) using geographic information systems (GIS) data. The well-to-wheels (WTW) GHG emissions are quantified and the air quality is established using a detailed atmospheric chemistry and transport model followed by a comparison to a future gasoline scenario comprised of advanced ICE vehicles. One hydrogen scenario includes more renewable primary energy sources for hydrogen generation and the other includes more fossil fuel sources. The two scenarios encompass a variety of hydrogen generation, distribution, and fueling strategies. GHG emissions reductions range from 61 to 68% for both hydrogen scenarios in parallel with substantial improvements in urban air quality (e.g., reductions of 10 ppb in peak 8-h-averaged ozone and 6 mug/m(3) in 24-h-averaged particulate matter concentrations, particularly in regions of the airshed where concentrations are highest for the gasoline scenario).

  19. Analysis of the South African input-output table to determine sector specific economic impacts: A study on real estate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douw Gert Brand Boshoff

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Input-output analysis is a well known method of analysing specific economic activity and the influence of different sectors on the economy and on one another. This study investigates the ability of input-output analysis to consider the importance of commercial real estate on the economy. It analyses the economic activity, contribution to GDP, employment created and taxes generated with reference to direct, indirect and induced impacts. The research shows the contribution of the specific sector on the economy and highlights the ability of input-output analysis to determine the impact of different types of property and locational analysis. The interaction of property with the economy is discussed, which also enables the use of the analysis reported here for short term future forecasting, whereby expected real estate activity is used to forecast the direct, indirect and induced effects on the economy.

  20. Abdominal wall surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as liposuction , which is another way to remove fat. But, abdominal wall surgery is sometimes combined with liposuction. ... from the middle and lower sections of your abdomen to make it firmer ... removes excess fat and skin (love handles) from the sides of ...

  1. Occupy Wall Street

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Michael J.; Bang, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    This article analyzes the political form of Occupy Wall Street on Twitter. Drawing on evidence contained within the profiles of over 50,000 Twitter users, political identities of participants are characterized using natural language processing. The results find evidence of a traditional...

  2. Endometriosis Abdominal wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, M.; Carriquiry, L.

    2003-01-01

    Endometriosis of abdominal wall is a rare entity wi ch frequently appears after gynecological surgery. Case history includes three cases of parietal endometriosis wi ch were treated in Maciel Hospital of Montevideo. The report refers to etiological diagnostic aspects and highlights the importance of total resection in order to achieve definitive healing

  3. Local wall power loading variations in thermonuclear fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carroll, M.C.; Miley, G.H.

    1989-01-01

    A 2 1/2-dimensional geometric model is presented that allows calculation of power loadings at various points on the first wall of a thermonuclear fusion device. Given average wall power loadings for brems-strahlung, cyclotron radiation charged particles, and neutrons, which are determined from various plasma-physics computation models, local wall heat loads are calculated by partitioning the plasma volume and surface into cells and superimposing the heating effects of the individual cells on selected first-wall differential areas. Heat loads from the entire plasma are thus determined as a function of position on the first-wall surface. Significant differences in local power loadings were found for most fusion designs, and it was therefore concluded that the effect of local power loading variations must be taken into account when calculating temperatures and heat transfer rates in fusion device first walls

  4. Impacts of talent development environments on athlete burnout: a self-determination perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunxiao; Wang, Chee Keng John; Pyun, Do Young

    2017-09-01

    Guided by Deci and Ryan's (2000) self-determination theory, this survey study aimed to examine the effects of the talent development environmental factors on athlete burnout. Talented adolescent athletes (n = 691) filled out a survey form measuring the talent development environmental factors, needs satisfaction and burnout. The findings showed that three talent environmental factors (i.e., long-term development focus, holistic quality preparation and communication) were negative predictors of burnout via needs satisfaction. It was concluded that the three talent development environmental factors may be important for facilitating athletes' needs satisfaction and preventing burnout.

  5. Chronic Abdominal Wall Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koop, Herbert; Koprdova, Simona; Schürmann, Christine

    2016-01-29

    Chronic abdominal wall pain is a poorly recognized clinical problem despite being an important element in the differential diagnosis of abdominal pain. This review is based on pertinent articles that were retrieved by a selective search in PubMed and EMBASE employing the terms "abdominal wall pain" and "cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome," as well as on the authors' clinical experience. In 2% to 3% of patients with chronic abdominal pain, the pain arises from the abdominal wall; in patients with previously diagnosed chronic abdominal pain who have no demonstrable pathological abnormality, this likelihood can rise as high as 30% . There have only been a small number of clinical trials of treatment for this condition. The diagnosis is made on clinical grounds, with the aid of Carnett's test. The characteristic clinical feature is strictly localized pain in the anterior abdominal wall, which is often mischaracterized as a "functional" complaint. In one study, injection of local anesthesia combined with steroids into the painful area was found to relieve pain for 4 weeks in 95% of patients. The injection of lidocaine alone brought about improvement in 83-91% of patients. Long-term pain relief ensued after a single lidocaine injection in 20-30% of patients, after repeated injections in 40-50% , and after combined lidocaine and steroid injections in up to 80% . Pain that persists despite these treatments can be treated with surgery (neurectomy). Chronic abdominal wall pain is easily diagnosed on physical examination and can often be rapidly treated. Any physician treating patients with abdominal pain should be aware of this condition. Further comparative treatment trials will be needed before a validated treatment algorithm can be established.

  6. Impact of theoretical assumptions in the determination of the neutrino effective number from future CMB measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capparelli, Ludovico; Di Valentino, Eleonora; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Chluba, Jens

    2018-03-01

    One of the major goals of future cosmic microwave background (CMB) measurements is the accurate determination of the effective number of neutrinos Neff. Reaching an experimental sensitivity of Δ Neff=0.013 could indeed falsify the presence of any nonstandard relativistic particles at 95% C.L. In this paper, we test how this future constraint can be affected by the removal of two common assumptions: a negligible running of the inflationary spectral index nrun and a precise determination of the neutron lifetime τn. We first show that the constraints on Neff could be significantly biased by the unaccounted presence of a running of the spectral index. Considering the Stage-IV experiment, a negative running of d n /d ln k =-0.002 could mimic a positive variation of Δ Neff=0.03 . Moreover, given the current discrepancies between experimental measurements of the neutron lifetime τn, we show that the assumption of a conservative error of Δ τn˜10 s could cause a systematic error of Δ Neff=0.02 . Complementary cosmological constraints on the running of the spectral index and a solution to the neutron lifetime discrepancy are therefore needed for an accurate and reliable future CMB bound of Neff at the percent level.

  7. Dispensing processes impact apparent biological activity as determined by computational and statistical analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Ekins

    Full Text Available Dispensing and dilution processes may profoundly influence estimates of biological activity of compounds. Published data show Ephrin type-B receptor 4 IC50 values obtained via tip-based serial dilution and dispensing versus acoustic dispensing with direct dilution differ by orders of magnitude with no correlation or ranking of datasets. We generated computational 3D pharmacophores based on data derived by both acoustic and tip-based transfer. The computed pharmacophores differ significantly depending upon dispensing and dilution methods. The acoustic dispensing-derived pharmacophore correctly identified active compounds in a subsequent test set where the tip-based method failed. Data from acoustic dispensing generates a pharmacophore containing two hydrophobic features, one hydrogen bond donor and one hydrogen bond acceptor. This is consistent with X-ray crystallography studies of ligand-protein interactions and automatically generated pharmacophores derived from this structural data. In contrast, the tip-based data suggest a pharmacophore with two hydrogen bond acceptors, one hydrogen bond donor and no hydrophobic features. This pharmacophore is inconsistent with the X-ray crystallographic studies and automatically generated pharmacophores. In short, traditional dispensing processes are another important source of error in high-throughput screening that impacts computational and statistical analyses. These findings have far-reaching implications in biological research.

  8. Impact parameter determination for the passage of cosmic heavy ions through mesoscopic biological test organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Facius, R.; Reitz, G.; Buecker, H.; Nevzgodina, L.V.; Maximova, E.N.

    1992-01-01

    Seeds of the plant Lactuca sativa as a prototype of a mesoscopic, i.e. neither micro- nor truly macroscopic, biological test organism, were exposed during the Biocosmos 9 mission to cosmic heavy ions within stacks of visual track detectors in order to explore the not yet properly understood radiobiological effects of single heavy ions. In such an investigation, the establishment of the geometrical correlation between the ion trajectories and the location of radiation-sensitive biological substructures is an essential task. We describe how this was achieved for biological test organisms, whose location and orientation had to be derived from contact photographs displaying their outlines and those of the holder plates only. The overall qualitative and quantitative precision achieved, as well as the contributing sources of uncertainties are discussed in detail. A precision of ≅ 10μm was accomplished for the coordinates of particle trajectories, which is near the limit set by the mechanical precision and stability of the detector material. The precision of the impact parameter is limited by the uncertainty in the location of the internal structures, which at best is around 50 and at worst around 150 μm, but is still acceptable when compared with the extension of the sensitive structures. (author)

  9. Impact parameter determination for the passage of cosmic heavy ions through mesoscopic biological test organisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Facius, R.; Reitz, G.; Buecker, H. (Deutsche Forschungsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DLR), Koeln (Germany)); Nevzgodina, L.V.; Maximova, E.N. (Institute of Biomedical Problems, Moscow (USSR))

    1992-01-01

    Seeds of the plant Lactuca sativa as a prototype of a mesoscopic, i.e. neither micro- nor truly macroscopic, biological test organism, were exposed during the Biocosmos 9 mission to cosmic heavy ions within stacks of visual track detectors in order to explore the not yet properly understood radiobiological effects of single heavy ions. In such an investigation, the establishment of the geometrical correlation between the ion trajectories and the location of radiation-sensitive biological substructures is an essential task. We describe how this was achieved for biological test organisms, whose location and orientation had to be derived from contact photographs displaying their outlines and those of the holder plates only. The overall qualitative and quantitative precision achieved, as well as the contributing sources of uncertainties are discussed in detail. A precision of {approx equal} 10{mu}m was accomplished for the coordinates of particle trajectories, which is near the limit set by the mechanical precision and stability of the detector material. The precision of the impact parameter is limited by the uncertainty in the location of the internal structures, which at best is around 50 and at worst around 150 {mu}m, but is still acceptable when compared with the extension of the sensitive structures. (author).

  10. Sensitive stripping voltammetric determination of Cd(II) and Pb(II) by a Bi/multi-walled carbon nanotube-emeraldine base polyaniline-Nafion composite modified glassy carbon electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Guo; Yin, Yuan; Wang, Hui; Liu, Gang; Wang, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A MWCNT-EBP-NA composite film modified GCE was fabricated and characterized. • The GCE modified with the MWCNT-EBP-NA composite film exhibited excellent performance in the analysis of Cd(II) and Pb(II) by SWASV. • The Cd(II) and Pb(II) detection limits of the developed electrode were approximately 0.06 μg/L and 0.08 μg/L, respectively. • Bi/MWCNT-EBP-NA/GCE was successfully used to determine metal ions in soil samples. - Abstract: In this study, a multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)-emeraldine base polyaniline (EBP)-Nafion (NA) composite modified glassy carbon electrode (MWCNT-EBP-NA/GCE) was prepared and used for the sensitive detection of trace Pb(II) and Cd(II), with a detection limit of 0.06 μg/L for Cd(II) and 0.08 μg/L for Pb(II) (S/N = 3), by square wave anodic stripping voltammetry (SWASV). A bismuth film was prepared through the in situ plating of bismuth on the MWCNT-EBP-NA/GCE. The morphologies and electrochemical properties of the modified electrode were characterized by SWASV, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). The parameters affecting the stripping current response were investigated and optimized. The formed MWCNTs in the composite film enlarged the specific surface area of the electrode and significantly promoted electron transferring, and the formed polyaniline (PANI) enhanced the ion-exchange capacity and prevented the macromolecules in real samples from absorbing onto the surface of the electrode. The presence of NA effectively increased the stability and adhesion of the composite film, enhanced the cation-exchange capacity and improved the ability to preconcentrate metal ions. Under the optimized conditions, a linear range of 1.0 to 50.0 μg/L was achieved for both metal ions, with a detection limit of 0.06 μg/L for Cd(II) and 0.08 μg/L for Pb(II) (S/N = 3), offering good repeatability. Finally, the Bi/MWCNT-EBP-NA/GCE was used for the

  11. Determining the impact of computer-aided control of educational achievements for the health of students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. Savonova

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The problem of the health of students during the control of knowledge on the example of studying valeological disciplines. In the experiment involved 186 students. Age 17-19 years. The positive effect of regular thematic automated monitoring the health of students. In particular, during unit of knowledge and at exam time. Showed a statistically significant reduction in the average level of reactive anxiety in students of the experimental group, compared to its initial values (before the final test, it fell by 37.91. For comparison, before final testing of the control group, it only reduced by 10.42%. It was determined that a regular automated testing knowledge can be used to organize healthkeeping support professional development of future teachers.

  12. The impact of education on wage determination between workers in southern and central-northern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agovino Massimiliano

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to examine the earnings dynamic in Italy, in order to explain earnings differences between southern Italy and centralnorthern Italy. In our analysis we use different techniques: ordinary least squares (OLS, quantile regression models and the algorithm developed by Machado and Mata (2005. In particular, the Machado and Mata (2005 algorithm allows us to examine the relative importance of both differences in workers’ characteristics and in their returns in explaining southern, central and northern Italy earnings differences at a point in time, as well as across time within each macro-area. We focus on the role of differences in educational endowment and returns to education, one of the most important components of human capital in the stylised literature. The level of education determines the substantial disparities in terms of wage returns. However, this holds only for levels of education related to compulsory education.

  13. Impact of income inequality and other social determinants on suicide rate in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Daiane Borges; Rasella, Davide; Dos Santos, Darci Neves

    2015-01-01

    To analyze whether income inequality and other social determinants are associated with suicide rate in Brazil. This study used panel data from all 5,507 Brazilian municipalities from 2000 to 2011. Suicide rates were calculated by sex and standardized by age for each municipality and year. The independent variables of the regression model included the Gini Index, per capita income, percentage of individuals with up to eight years of education, urbanization, average number of residents per household, percentage of divorced people, of Catholics, Pentecostals, and Evangelicals. A multivariable negative binomial regression for panel data with fixed-effects specification was performed. The Gini index was positively associated with suicide rates; the rate ratio (RR) was 1.055 (95% CI: 1.011-1.101). Of the other social determinants, income had a significant negative association with suicide rates (RR: 0.968, 95% CI: 0.948-0.988), whereas a low-level education had a positive association (RR: 1.015, 95% CI: 1.010-1.021). Income inequality represents a community-level risk factor for suicide rates in Brazil. The decrease in income inequality, increase in income per capita, and decrease in the percentage of individuals who did not complete basic studies may have counteracted the increase in suicides in the last decade. Other changes, such as the decrease in the mean residents per household, may have contributed to their increase. Therefore, the implementation of social policies that may improve the population's socioeconomic conditions and reduce income inequality in Brazil, and in other low and middle-income countries, can help to reduce suicide rates.

  14. Impact of income inequality and other social determinants on suicide rate in Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daiane Borges Machado

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To analyze whether income inequality and other social determinants are associated with suicide rate in Brazil. METHOD: This study used panel data from all 5,507 Brazilian municipalities from 2000 to 2011. Suicide rates were calculated by sex and standardized by age for each municipality and year. The independent variables of the regression model included the Gini Index, per capita income, percentage of individuals with up to eight years of education, urbanization, average number of residents per household, percentage of divorced people, of Catholics, Pentecostals, and Evangelicals. A multivariable negative binomial regression for panel data with fixed-effects specification was performed. RESULTS: The Gini index was positively associated with suicide rates; the rate ratio (RR was 1.055 (95% CI: 1.011-1.101. Of the other social determinants, income had a significant negative association with suicide rates (RR: 0.968, 95% CI: 0.948-0.988, whereas a low-level education had a positive association (RR: 1.015, 95% CI: 1.010-1.021. CONCLUSIONS: Income inequality represents a community-level risk factor for suicide rates in Brazil. The decrease in income inequality, increase in income per capita, and decrease in the percentage of individuals who did not complete basic studies may have counteracted the increase in suicides in the last decade. Other changes, such as the decrease in the mean residents per household, may have contributed to their increase. Therefore, the implementation of social policies that may improve the population's socioeconomic conditions and reduce income inequality in Brazil, and in other low and middle-income countries, can help to reduce suicide rates.

  15. Studies and determination of heavy metals in waste tyres and their impacts on the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shakya, P.R.; Shrestha, P.; Tamrakar, C.S.; Bhattarai, P.

    2006-01-01

    Uncontrolled burning of waste vehicle tyres causing environmental pollution has become a popular practice in developing countries like Nepal. Such activities were banned in many countries considering the environment and public health hazards but the official ban was ignored in many countries like Nepal. An experiment was conducted in a laboratory scale in an attempt to understand the potential discharge of trace metals content in Kathmandu Valley due to scrap tyre fires. For this purpose, four tyre types viz., CYCN, CSKR, BTIN and BBJP were collected representing the first two categories from passenger car and the last two from motorbike. An Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer (AAS) was used for determination of metal concentration. Among the five heavy metals determined, Zn was detected in significantly high levels in all the tested tyre samples whereas Cd and Cr were found significantly less in many of them. The concentrations of Cd, Cr, Fe, Pb and Zn ranged from 0.020 - 27.1 micro g/g, 0.14 - 1.18 micro g/g, 17.8 - 381 micro g/g, 0.96 - 458 micro g/g and 3.95 - 8.21 micro g/g respectively. It was found that the metal concentration also varied with the tyre types and qualities. The potential discharge of the metals per representative scrap tyre mass was also estimated. Results indicate that the metal pollutants due to the uncontrolled burning of the scrap tyres could significantly contribute to deteriorate the environmental condition of the Valley. (author)

  16. Phase Error Modeling and Its Impact on Precise Orbit Determination of GRACE Satellites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Tu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Limiting factors for the precise orbit determination (POD of low-earth orbit (LEO satellite using dual-frequency GPS are nowadays mainly encountered with the in-flight phase error modeling. The phase error is modeled as a systematic and a random component each depending on the direction of GPS signal reception. The systematic part and standard deviation of random part in phase error model are, respectively, estimated by bin-wise mean and standard deviation values of phase postfit residuals computed by orbit determination. By removing the systematic component and adjusting the weight of phase observation data according to standard deviation of random component, the orbit can be further improved by POD approach. The GRACE data of 1–31 January 2006 are processed, and three types of orbit solutions, POD without phase error model correction, POD with mean value correction of phase error model, and POD with phase error model correction, are obtained. The three-dimensional (3D orbit improvements derived from phase error model correction are 0.0153 m for GRACE A and 0.0131 m for GRACE B, and the 3D influences arisen from random part of phase error model are 0.0068 m and 0.0075 m for GRACE A and GRACE B, respectively. Thus the random part of phase error model cannot be neglected for POD. It is also demonstrated by phase postfit residual analysis, orbit comparison with JPL precise science orbit, and orbit validation with KBR data that the results derived from POD with phase error model correction are better than another two types of orbit solutions generated in this paper.

  17. Sentiment analysis to determine the impact of online messages on smokers' choices to use varenicline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Nathan K; Mays, Darren; Graham, Amanda L

    2013-12-01

    Social networks are a prominent component of online smoking cessation interventions. This study applied sentiment analysis-a data processing technique that codes textual data for emotional polarity-to examine how exposure to messages about the cessation drug varenicline affects smokers' decision making around its use. Data were from QuitNet, an online social network dedicated to smoking cessation and relapse prevention. Self-reported medication choice at registration and at 30 days was coded among new QuitNet registrants who participated in at least one forum discussion mentioning varenicline between January 31, 2005 and March 9, 2008. Commercially available software was used to code the sentiment of forum messages mentioning varenicline that occurred during this time frame. Logistic regression analyses examined whether forum message exposure predicted medication choice. The sample of 2132 registrants comprised mostly women (78.3%), white participants (83.4%), averaged 41.2 years of age (SD = 10.9), and smoked on average 21.5 (SD = 9.7) cigarettes/day. After adjusting for potential confounders, as exposure to positive varenicline messages outweighed negative messages, the odds of switching to varenicline (odds ratio = 2.05, 95% confidence interval = 1.66 to 2.54) and continuing to use varenicline (odds ratio = 2.46, 95% confidence interval = 1.96 to 3.10) statistically significantly increased. Sentiment analysis is a useful tool for analyzing text-based data to examine their impact on behavior change. Greater exposure to positive sentiment in online conversations about varenicline is associated with a greater likelihood that smokers will choose to use varenicline in a quit attempt.

  18. Biotechnological approaches to determine the impact of viruses in the energy crop plant Jatropha curcas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Geminiviruses infect a wide range of plant species including Jatropha and cassava both belonging to family Euphorbiaceae. Cassava is traditionally an important food crop in Sub - Saharan countries, while Jatropha is considered as valuable biofuel plant with great perspectives in the future. Results A total of 127 Jatropha samples from Ethiopia and Kenya and 124 cassava samples from Kenya were tested by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) for RNA viruses and polymerase chain reaction for geminiviruses. Jatropha samples from 4 different districts in Kenya and Ethiopia (analyzed by ELISA) were negative for all three RNA viruses tested: Cassava brown streak virus (CBSV), Cassava common mosaic virus, Cucumber mosaic virus, Three cassava samples from Busia district (Kenya) contained CBSV. Efforts to develop diagnostic approaches allowing reliable pathogen detection in Jatropha, involved the amplification and sequencing of the entire DNA A molecules of 40 Kenyan isolates belonging to African cassava mosaic virus (ACMV) and East African cassava mosaic virus - Uganda. This information enabled the design of novel primers to address different questions: a) primers amplifying longer sequences led to a phylogenetic tree of isolates, allowing some predictions on the evolutionary aspects of Begomoviruses in Jatrophia; b) primers amplifying shorter sequences represent a reliable diagnostic tool. This is the first report of the two Begomoviruses in J. curcas. Two cassava samples were co - infected with cassava mosaic geminivirus and CBSV. A Defective DNA A of ACMV was found for the first time in Jatropha. Conclusion Cassava geminiviruses occurring in Jatropha might be spread wider than anticipated. If not taken care of, this virus infection might negatively impact large scale plantations for biofuel production. Being hosts for similar pathogens, the planting vicinity of the two crop plants needs to be handled carefully. PMID:21812981

  19. Biotechnological approaches to determine the impact of viruses in the energy crop plant Jatropha curcas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maghuly Fatemeh

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Geminiviruses infect a wide range of plant species including Jatropha and cassava both belonging to family Euphorbiaceae. Cassava is traditionally an important food crop in Sub - Saharan countries, while Jatropha is considered as valuable biofuel plant with great perspectives in the future. Results A total of 127 Jatropha samples from Ethiopia and Kenya and 124 cassava samples from Kenya were tested by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA for RNA viruses and polymerase chain reaction for geminiviruses. Jatropha samples from 4 different districts in Kenya and Ethiopia (analyzed by ELISA were negative for all three RNA viruses tested: Cassava brown streak virus (CBSV, Cassava common mosaic virus, Cucumber mosaic virus, Three cassava samples from Busia district (Kenya contained CBSV. Efforts to develop diagnostic approaches allowing reliable pathogen detection in Jatropha, involved the amplification and sequencing of the entire DNA A molecules of 40 Kenyan isolates belonging to African cassava mosaic virus (ACMV and East African cassava mosaic virus - Uganda. This information enabled the design of novel primers to address different questions: a primers amplifying longer sequences led to a phylogenetic tree of isolates, allowing some predictions on the evolutionary aspects of Begomoviruses in Jatrophia; b primers amplifying shorter sequences represent a reliable diagnostic tool. This is the first report of the two Begomoviruses in J. curcas. Two cassava samples were co - infected with cassava mosaic geminivirus and CBSV. A Defective DNA A of ACMV was found for the first time in Jatropha. Conclusion Cassava geminiviruses occurring in Jatropha might be spread wider than anticipated. If not taken care of, this virus infection might negatively impact large scale plantations for biofuel production. Being hosts for similar pathogens, the planting vicinity of the two crop plants needs to be handled carefully.

  20. Determination of the impact of RGB points cloud attribute quality on color-based segmentation process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartłomiej Kraszewski

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of research on the effect that radiometric quality of point cloud RGB attributes have on color-based segmentation. In the research, a point cloud with a resolution of 5 mm, received from FAROARO Photon 120 scanner, described the fragment of an office’s room and color images were taken by various digital cameras. The images were acquired by SLR Nikon D3X, and SLR Canon D200 integrated with the laser scanner, compact camera Panasonic TZ-30 and a mobile phone digital camera. Color information from images was spatially related to point cloud in FAROARO Scene software. The color-based segmentation of testing data was performed with the use of a developed application named “RGB Segmentation”. The application was based on public Point Cloud Libraries (PCL and allowed to extract subsets of points fulfilling the criteria of segmentation from the source point cloud using region growing method.Using the developed application, the segmentation of four tested point clouds containing different RGB attributes from various images was performed. Evaluation of segmentation process was performed based on comparison of segments acquired using the developed application and extracted manually by an operator. The following items were compared: the number of obtained segments, the number of correctly identified objects and the correctness of segmentation process. The best correctness of segmentation and most identified objects were obtained using the data with RGB attribute from Nikon D3X images. Based on the results it was found that quality of RGB attributes of point cloud had impact only on the number of identified objects. In case of correctness of the segmentation, as well as its error no apparent relationship between the quality of color information and the result of the process was found.[b]Keywords[/b]: terrestrial laser scanning, color-based segmentation, RGB attribute, region growing method, digital images, points cloud

  1. Bowel wall visualisation at CT colonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svensson, M.H.; Hellstroem, M.; Svensson, E.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the quality of bowel wall visualisation at CT colonography and the impact of examination in the supine and prone positions. Material and Methods: After bowel preparation, 111 patients underwent CT colonography. Air distension, degree of fluid redistribution with change in body position (supine and prone), influence of residual stool on bowel wall assessability, and quality of overall colon visualisation were evaluated using scales. Results: Thirty of 110 patients (27%) had complete overall visualisation of the colon wall and 52 (47%) had subtotal visualisation of a limited part of the colon. The entire colon was more often air-filled in the prone position (46%) than in the supine position (18%). Joint review of supine and prone data showed that for all colon segments, except the sigmoid (86%), 95% of the patients had complete air filling. All patients had residual fluid. In 75% to 99%, depending on segment, fluid did not interfere with the bowel wall visualisation in the combined evaluation of supine and prone data sets. Thirty-one patients had residual stool with potential negative influence on polyp detection. Conclusions: The colon wall was completely, or almost completely, visualised in 75% of the patients, and examination in the supine and prone positions was necessary for complete visualisation

  2. Wind tunnels with adapted walls for reducing wall interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganzer, U.

    1979-01-01

    The basic principle of adaptable wind tunnel walls is explained. First results of an investigation carried out at the Aero-Space Institute of Berlin Technical University are presented for two dimensional flexible walls and a NACA 0012 airfoil. With five examples exhibiting very different flow conditions it is demonstrated that it is possible to reduce wall interference and to avoid blockage at transonic speeds by wall adaptation.

  3. Rising damp in building walls: the wall base ventilation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimaraes, A.S.; Delgado, J.M.P.Q.; Freitas, V.P. de [Faculdade de Engenharia da Universidade do Porto, Laboratorio de Fisica das Construcoes (LFC), Departamento de Engenharia Civil, Porto (Portugal)

    2012-12-15

    This work intends to validate a new system for treating rising damp in historic buildings walls. The results of laboratory experiments show that an efficient way of treating rising damp is by ventilating the wall base, using the HUMIVENT technique. The analytical model presented describes very well the observed features of rising damp in walls, verified by laboratory tests, who contributed for a simple sizing of the wall base ventilation system that will be implemented in historic buildings. (orig.)

  4. Determination of zenith hydrostatic delay and its impact on GNSS-derived integrated water vapor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Wang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Surface pressure is a necessary meteorological variable for the accurate determination of integrated water vapor (IWV using Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS. The lack of pressure observations is a big issue for the conversion of historical GNSS observations, which is a relatively new area of GNSS applications in climatology. Hence the use of the surface pressure derived from either a blind model (e.g., Global Pressure and Temperature 2 wet, GPT2w or a global atmospheric reanalysis (e.g., ERA-Interim becomes an important alternative solution. In this study, pressure derived from these two methods is compared against the pressure observed at 108 global GNSS stations at four epochs (00:00, 06:00, 12:00 and 18:00 UTC each day for the period 2000–2013. Results show that a good accuracy is achieved from the GPT2w-derived pressure in the latitude band between −30 and 30° and the average value of 6 h root-mean-square errors (RMSEs across all the stations in this region is 2.5 hPa. Correspondingly, an error of 5.8 mm and 0.9 kg m−2 in its resultant zenith hydrostatic delay (ZHD and IWV is expected. However, for the stations located in the mid-latitude bands between −30 and −60° and between 30 and 60°, the mean value of the RMSEs is 7.3 hPa, and for the stations located in the high-latitude bands from −60 to −90° and from 60 to 90°, the mean value of the RMSEs is 9.9 hPa. The mean of the RMSEs of the ERA-Interim-derived pressure across at the selected 100 stations is 0.9 hPa, which will lead to an equivalent error of 2.1 mm and 0.3 kg m−2 in the ZHD and IWV, respectively, determined from this ERA-Interim-derived pressure. Results also show that the monthly IWV determined using pressure from ERA-Interim has a good accuracy − with a relative error of better than 3 % on a global scale; thus, the monthly IWV resulting from ERA-Interim-derived pressure has the potential to be used for climate studies

  5. High-R Walls for Remodeling: Wall Cavity Moisture Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiehagen, J.; Kochkin, V.

    2012-12-01

    The focus of the study is on the performance of wall systems, and in particular, the moisture characteristics inside the wall cavity and in the wood sheathing. Furthermore, while this research will initially address new home construction, the goal is to address potential moisture issues in wall cavities of existing homes when insulation and air sealing improvements are made.

  6. High-R Walls for Remodeling. Wall Cavity Moisture Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiehagen, J. [NAHB Research Center Industry Partnership, Upper Marlboro, MD (United States); Kochkin, V. [NAHB Research Center Industry Partnership, Upper Marlboro, MD (United States)

    2012-12-01

    The focus of the study is on the performance of wall systems, and in particular, the moisture characteristics inside the wall cavity and in the wood sheathing. Furthermore, while this research will initially address new home construction, the goal is to address potential moisture issues in wall cavities of existing homes when insulation and air sealing improvements are made.

  7. Analytical determination of bifurcations of periodic solution in three-degree-of-freedom vibro-impact systems with clearance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yongbao; Wang, Qiang; Xu, Huidong

    2017-01-01

    The smooth bifurcation and non-smooth grazing bifurcation of periodic solution of three-degree-of-freedom vibro-impact systems with clearance are studied in this paper. Firstly, six-dimensional Poincaré maps are established through choosing suitable Poincaré section and solving periodic solutions of vibro-impact system. Then, as the analytic expressions of all eigenvalues of Jacobi matrix of six-dimensional map are unavailable, the numerical calculations to search for the critical bifurcation values point by point is a laborious job based on the classical critical criterion described by the properties of eigenvalues. To overcome the difficulty from the classical bifurcation criteria, the explicit critical criterion without using eigenvalues calculation of high-dimensional map is applied to determine bifurcation points of Co-dimension-one bifurcations and Co-dimension-two bifurcations, and then local dynamical behaviors of these bifurcations are further analyzed. Finally, the existence of the grazing periodic solution of the vibro-impact system and grazing bifurcation point are analyzed, the discontinuous grazing bifurcation behavior is studied based on the compound normal form map near the grazing point, the discontinuous jumping phenomenon and the co-existing multiple solutions near the grazing bifurcation point are revealed.

  8. Contemporary nutritional transition: determinants of diet and its impact on body composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popkin, Barry M.

    2010-01-01

    The world has experienced a marked shift in the global BMI distribution towards reduced undernutrition and increased obesity. The collision between human biology, shaped over the millennia and modern technology, globalization, government policies and food industry practices have worked to create far-reaching energy imbalance across the globe. A prime example is the clash between our drinking habits and our biology. The shift from water and breast milk as the only beverages available, to a vast array of caloric beverages was very rapid, shaped both by our tastes and aggressive marketing of the beverage industry. Our biology, shaped over millennia by daily consumption of water and seasonal availability of food, was not ready to compensate for the liquid energies. Other dietary changes were similarly significant, particularly the shift towards increased frequency of eating and larger portions. The roles of the food and beverage production, distribution and marketing sectors in not only shaping our diet but also accelerating these changes must be understood. Apart from the role of beverages, there is much less consensus about the role of various components of our diet in energy imbalance. Understanding the determinants of change in the key components of our diet through an array of research provides insights into some of the options we face in attempting to attain a great balance between energy intake and expenditures while creating an overall healthier dietary pattern. A few countries are systematically addressing the causes of poor dietary and physical activity patterns and high energy imbalance. PMID:21092363

  9. Cell wall composition throughout development for the model grass Brachypodium distanchyon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eRancour

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Temperate perennial grasses are important worldwide as a livestock nutritive energy source and a potential feedstock for lignocellulosic biofuel production. The annual temperate grass Brachypodium distanchyon has been championed as a useful model system to facilitate biological research in agriculturally important temperate forage grasses based on phylogenetic relationships. To physically corroborate genetic predictions, we determined the chemical composition profiles of organ-specific cell walls throughout the development of two common diploid accessions of Brachypodium distanchyon, Bd21-3 and Bd21. Chemical analysis was performed on cell walls isolated from distinct organs (i.e. leaves, sheaths, stems and roots at three developmental stages of 1 12-day seedling, 2 vegetative-to-reproductive transition, and 3 mature seed-fill. In addition, we have included cell wall analysis of embryonic callus used for genetic transformations. Composition of cell walls based on components lignin, hydroxycinnamates, uronosyls, neutral sugars, and protein suggests that Brachypodium distanchyon is similar chemically to agriculturally important forage grasses. There were modest compositional differences in hydroxycinnamate profiles between accessions Bd21-3 and Bd21. In addition, when compared to agronomical important C3 grasses, more mature Brachypodium stem cell walls have a relative increase in glucose of 48% and a decrease in lignin of 36%. Though differences exists between Brachypodium and agronomical important C3 grasses, Brachypodium distanchyon should be still a useful model system for genetic manipulation of cell wall composition to determine the impact upon functional characteristics such as rumen digestibility or energy conversion efficiency for bioenergy production.

  10. Cell wall composition throughout development for the model grass Brachypodium distachyon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rancour, David M.; Marita, Jane M.; Hatfield, Ronald D.

    2012-01-01

    Temperate perennial grasses are important worldwide as a livestock nutritive energy source and a potential feedstock for lignocellulosic biofuel production. The annual temperate grass Brachypodium distachyon has been championed as a useful model system to facilitate biological research in agriculturally import