WorldWideScience

Sample records for wall chamber dynamics

  1. Liquid Wall Chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, W R

    2011-02-24

    The key feature of liquid wall chambers is the use of a renewable liquid layer to protect chamber structures from target emissions. Two primary options have been proposed and studied: wetted wall chambers and thick liquid wall (TLW) chambers. With wetted wall designs, a thin layer of liquid shields the structural first wall from short ranged target emissions (x-rays, ions and debris) but not neutrons. Various schemes have been proposed to establish and renew the liquid layer between shots including flow-guiding porous fabrics (e.g., Osiris, HIBALL), porous rigid structures (Prometheus) and thin film flows (KOYO). The thin liquid layer can be the tritium breeding material (e.g., flibe, PbLi, or Li) or another liquid metal such as Pb. TLWs use liquid jets injected by stationary or oscillating nozzles to form a neutronically thick layer (typically with an effective thickness of {approx}50 cm) of liquid between the target and first structural wall. In addition to absorbing short ranged emissions, the thick liquid layer degrades the neutron flux and energy reaching the first wall, typically by {approx}10 x x, so that steel walls can survive for the life of the plant ({approx}30-60 yrs). The thick liquid serves as the primary coolant and tritium breeding material (most recent designs use flibe, but the earliest concepts used Li). In essence, the TLW places the fusion blanket inside the first wall instead of behind the first wall.

  2. Chamber wall response to target implosion in inertial fusion reactors : new and critical assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassanein, A.; Morozov, V.

    2002-01-01

    The chamber walls in inertial fusion energy (IFE) reactors are exposed to harsh conditions following each target implosion. Key issues of the cyclic IFE operation include intense photon and ion deposition, wall thermal and hydrodynamic evolution, wall erosion and fatigue lifetime, and chamber clearing and evacuation to ensure desirable conditions prior to target implosion. Several methods for wall protection have been proposed in the past, each having its own advantages and disadvantages. These methods include use of solid bare walls, gas-filled cavities, and liquid walls/jets. Detailed models have been developed for reflected laser light, emitted photons, and target debris deposition and interaction with chamber components and have been implemented in the comprehensive HEIGHTS software package. The hydrodynamic response of gas filled cavities and photon radiation transport of the deposited energy has been calculated by means of new and advanced numerical techniques. Fragmentation models of liquid jets as a result of the deposited energy have also been developed, and the impact on chamber clearing dynamics has been evaluated. Th focus of this study is to critically assess the reliability and the dynamic response of chamber walls in various proposed protection methods for IFE systems. Of particular concern is the effect on wall erosion lifetime of various erosion mechanisms, such as vaporization, chemical and physical sputtering, melt/liquid splashing and explosive erosion, and fragmentation of liquid walls

  3. Operational Windows for Dry-Wall and Wetted-Wall IFE Chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najmabadi, F.; Raffray, A.R.; Bromberg, L.

    2004-01-01

    The ARIES-IFE study was an integrated study of inertial fusion energy (IFE) chambers and chamber interfaces with the driver and target systems. Detailed analysis of various subsystems was performed parametrically to uncover key physics/technology uncertainties and to identify constraints imposed by each subsystem. In this paper, these constraints (e.g., target injection and tracking, thermal response of the first wall, and driver propagation and focusing) were combined to understand the trade-offs, to develop operational windows for chamber concepts, and to identify high-leverage research and development directions for IFE research. Some conclusions drawn in this paper are (a) the detailed characterization of the target yield and spectrum has a major impact on the chamber; (b) it is prudent to use a thin armor instead of a monolithic first wall for dry-wall concepts; (c) for dry-wall concepts with direct-drive targets, the most stringent constraint is imposed by target survival during the injection process; (d) for relatively low yield targets (<250 MJ), an operational window with no buffer gas may exist; (e) for dry-wall concepts with indirect-drive targets, a high buffer gas pressure would be necessary that may preclude propagation of the laser driver and require assisted pinch transport for the heavy-ion driver; and (f) generation and transport of aerosols in the chamber is the key feasibility issue for wetted-wall concepts

  4. Chamber wall response to target implosion in inertial fusion reactors: new and critical assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassanein, A.; Morozov, V.

    2002-01-01

    The chamber walls in inertial fusion energy (IFE) reactors are exposed to harsh conditions following each target implosion. Key issues of the cyclic IFE operation include intense photon and ion deposition, wall thermal and hydrodynamic evolution, wall erosion and fatigue lifetime, and chamber clearing and evacuation to ensure desirable conditions prior to next target implosion. Several methods for wall protection have been proposed in the past, each having its own advantages and disadvantages. These methods include use of solid bare walls, gas-filled cavities, and liquid walls/jets. Detailed models have been developed for reflected laser light, emitted photons, and target debris deposition and interaction with chamber components and have been implemented in the comprehensive HEIGHTS software package. The focus of this study is to critically assess the reliability and the dynamic response of chamber walls in IFE systems. Of particular concern is the effect on wall erosion lifetime due to various erosion mechanisms, such as vaporization, chemical and physical sputtering, melt/liquid splashing and explosive erosion, and fragmentation of liquid walls

  5. Chamber and Wall Response to Target Implosion in Inertial and Z-Pinch Fusion and Lithography Devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassanein, A.; Konkashbaev, I.; Morozov, V.; Sizyuk, V.

    2006-01-01

    The chamber walls, both solid and liquid, in inertial fusion energy (IFE) and Z-pinch reactors and Lithography devices are exposed to harsh conditions following each target implosion or pinching of plasma. Key issues of the cyclic IFE operation include intense photon and ion deposition, wall thermal and hydrodynamic evolution, wall erosion and fatigue lifetime, and chamber clearing and evacuation to ensure desirable conditions prior to target implosion. Detailed models have been developed for reflected laser light, emitted photons, neutrons, and target debris deposition and interaction with chamber components and have been implemented in the comprehensive HEIGHTS software package. The hydrodynamic response of chamber walls in bare or in gas-filled cavities and the photon transport of the deposited energy has been calculated by means of new and advanced numerical techniques for accurate shock treatment and propagation. These models include detail media hydrodynamics, non-LTE multi-group for both continuum and line radiation transport, and dynamics of eroded debris resulting from the intense energy deposition. The focus of this study is to critically assess the reliability and the dynamic response of chamber walls in various proposed protection methods for IFE systems. Key requirements are that: (i) the chamber wall accommodates the cyclic energy deposition while providing the required lifetime due to various erosion mechanisms, such as vaporization, chemical and physical sputtering, melt/liquid splashing and explosive erosion, and fragmentation of liquid walls, and (ii) after each shot the chamber is cleared and returned to a quiescent state in preparation for the target injection and the firing of the driver for the subsequent shot. This paper investigates in details these two important issues and found that the required operating frequency of the IFE reactors for power production may be severely limited due to these two requirements. (author)

  6. An open-walled ionization chamber appropriate to tritium monitoring for glovebox

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Zhilin; Chang Ruiming; Mu Long; Song Guoyang; Wang Heyi; Wu Guanyin; Wei Xiye

    2010-01-01

    An open-walled ionization chamber is developed to monitor the tritium concentration in gloveboxes in tritium processing systems. Two open walls are used to replace the sealed wall in common ionization chambers, through which the tritium gas can diffuse into the chamber without the aid of pumps and pipelines. Some basic properties of the chamber are examined to evaluate its performance. Results turn out that an open-walled chamber of 1 l in volume shows a considerably flat plateau over 700 V for a range of tritium concentration. The chamber also gives a good linear response to gamma fields over 4 decades under a pressure condition of 1 atm. The pressure dependence characteristics show that the ionization current is only sensitive at low pressures. The pressure influence becomes weaker as the pressure increases mainly due to the decrease in the mean free path of β particles produced by tritium decay. The minimum detection limit of the chamber is 3.7x10 5 Bq/m 3 .

  7. Progress towards realization of a laser IFE solid wall chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raffray, A.R.; Blanchard, J.; Latkowski, J.; Najmabadi, F.; Renk, T.; Sethian, J.; Sharafat, S.; Snead, L.

    2006-01-01

    The high average power laser (HAPL) program aims at developing laser inertial fusion energy (Laser IFE) based on lasers, direct drive targets and a solid wall chamber. The preferred first wall configuration is based on tungsten and ferritic steel as armor and structural materials, respectively. A key concern is the survival of the first wall under the X-ray and ion energy deposition from the fusion micro-explosion. The HAPL design and R and D effort in the chamber and material area is focused toward understanding and resolving the key armor survival issues. This includes modeling and experimental testing of the armor thermo-mechanical behavior in facilities utilizing ion, X-rays and laser sources to simulate IFE conditions. Helium management is addressed by conducting implantation experiments along with modeling of He behavior in tungsten. This paper summarizes the HAPL chamber activities. The first wall/armor configuration and design analysis are described, key chamber issues are discussed, and the R and D to address them is highlighted

  8. Plasma interactions with the outboard chamber wall in DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudakov, D.L.; Boedo, J.A.; Yu, J.H.; Brooks, N.H.; Fenstermacher, M.E.; Groth, M.; Hollmann, E.M.; Lasnier, C.J.; McLean, A.G.; Moyer, R.A.; Stangeby, P.C.; Tynan, G.R.; Wampler, W.R.; Watkins, J.G.; West, W.P.; Wong, C.P.C.; Bastasz, R.J.; Buchenauer, D.; Whaley, J.

    2009-01-01

    Erosion of the main chamber plasma-facing components is of concern for ITER. Plasma interaction with the outboard chamber wall is studied in DIII-D using Langmuir probes and optical diagnostics. Fast camera data shows that edge localized modes (ELMs) feature helical filamentary structures propagating towards the outboard wall. Upon reaching the wall, filaments result in regions of local intense plasma-material interaction (PMI) where peak incident particle and heat fluxes are up to two orders of magnitude higher than those between ELMs. In low density/collisionality H-mode discharges, PMI at the outboard wall is almost entirely due to ELMs. A moderate change of the gap between the separatrix and the outer wall strongly affects PMI intensity at the wall. Material samples exposed near the outboard wall showed net carbon deposition in high-density discharges (near the Greenwald limit) and tendency towards net erosion in lower density discharges (∼0.45 of the Greenwald limit).

  9. Wall attenuation and scatter corrections for ion chambers: measurements versus calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, D W.O.; Bielajew, A F [National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Div. of Physics

    1990-08-01

    In precision ion chamber dosimetry in air, wall attenuation and scatter are corrected for A{sub wall} (K{sub att} in IAEA terminology, K{sub w}{sup -1} in standards laboratory terminology). Using the EGS4 system the authors show that Monte Carlo calculated A{sub wall} factors predict relative variations in detector response with wall thickness which agree with all available experimental data within a statistical uncertainty of less than 0.1%. They calculated correction factors for use in exposure and air kerma standards are different by up to 1% from those obtained by extrapolating these same measurements. Using calculated correction factors would imply increases of 0.7-1.0% in the exposure and air kerma standards based on spherical and large diameter, large length cylindrical chambers and decreases of 0.3-0.5% for standards based on large diameter pancake chambers. (author).

  10. Pressurized air ionization chamber with aluminium walls for radiometric dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, R.G.S.; Pela, C.A.; Netto, T.G.

    1996-01-01

    A pressurized air ionization chamber with 23 cm 3 and aluminium walls is evaluated concerning its sensitiveness in low exposure rate. Considering conventional ionization chambers, this chamber shows a better performance since the air pressure of 2500 kPa minimizes the energy dependence to less than 5% between 40 and 1.250 keV

  11. Plasma Chamber and First Wall of the Ignitor Experiment^*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucchiaro, A.; Coppi, B.; Bianchi, A.; Lucca, F.

    2005-10-01

    The new designs of the Plasma Chamber (PC) and of the First Wall (FW) system are based on updated scenarios for vertical plasma disruption (VDE) as well as estimates for the maximum thermal wall loadings at ignition. The PC wall thickness has been optimized to reduce the deformation during the worst disruption event without sacrificing the dimensions of the plasma column. A non linear dynamic analysis of the PC has been performed on a 360^o model of it, taking into account possible toroidal asymmetries of the halo current. Radial EM loads obtained by scaling JET measurements have been also considered. The low-cycle fatigue analysis confirms that the PC is able to meet a lifetime of few thousand cycles for the most extreme combinations of magnetic fields and plasma currents. The FW, made of Molybdenum (TZM) tiles covering the entire inner surface of the PC, has been designed to withstand thermal and EM loads, both under normal operating conditions and in case of disruption. Detailed elasto-plastic structural analyses of the most (EM) loaded tile-carriers show that these are compatible with the adopted fabrication requirements. ^*Sponsored in part by ENEA of Italy and by the U.S. DOE.

  12. Modeling of Uneven Flow and Electromagnetic Field Parameters in the Combustion Chamber of Liquid Rocket Engine with a Near-wall Layer Available

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Rudinskii

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper concerns modeling of an uneven flow and electromagnetic field parameters in the combustion chamber of the liquid rocket engine with a near-wall layer available.The research objective was to evaluate quantitatively influence of changing model chamber mode of the liquid rocket engine on the electro-physical characteristics of the hydrocarbon fuel combustion by-products.The main method of research was based on development of a final element model of the flowing path of the rocket engine chamber and its adaptation to the boundary conditions.The paper presents a developed two-dimensional non-stationary mathematical model of electro-physical processes in the liquid rocket engine chamber using hydrocarbon fuel. The model takes into consideration the features of a gas-dynamic contour of the engine chamber and property of thermo-gas-dynamic characteristics of the ionized products of combustion of hydrocarbonic fuel. Distributions of magnetic field intensity and electric conductivity received and analyzed taking into account a low-temperature near-wall layer. Special attention is paid to comparison of obtained calculation values of the electric current, which is taken out from intrachamber space of the engine with earlier published data of other authors.

  13. Method and apparatus for active control of combustion rate through modulation of heat transfer from the combustion chamber wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Jr., Charles E.; Chadwell, Christopher J.

    2004-09-21

    The flame propagation rate resulting from a combustion event in the combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine is controlled by modulation of the heat transfer from the combustion flame to the combustion chamber walls. In one embodiment, heat transfer from the combustion flame to the combustion chamber walls is mechanically modulated by a movable member that is inserted into, or withdrawn from, the combustion chamber thereby changing the shape of the combustion chamber and the combustion chamber wall surface area. In another embodiment, heat transfer from the combustion flame to the combustion chamber walls is modulated by cooling the surface of a portion of the combustion chamber wall that is in close proximity to the area of the combustion chamber where flame speed control is desired.

  14. Simulations of fusion chamber dynamics and first wall response in a Z-pinch driven fusion–fission hybrid power reactor (Z-FFR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, J.M., E-mail: qjm06@sina.com [Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Energy (LANE), Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621999 (China); Center for Fusion Energy Science and Technology (CFEST), China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621999 (China); Wang, Z., E-mail: wangz_es@caep.cn [Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Energy (LANE), Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621999 (China); Center for Fusion Energy Science and Technology (CFEST), China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621999 (China); Chu, Y.Y., E-mail: chuyanyun@caep.cn [Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Energy (LANE), Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621999 (China); Center for Fusion Energy Science and Technology (CFEST), China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621999 (China); Li, Z.H., E-mail: lee_march@sina.com [Laboratory of Advanced Nuclear Energy (LANE), Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621999 (China)

    2016-03-15

    Highlights: • Z-FFR utilizes DT neutrons to drive a sub-critical fission blanket to produce energy. • A metal shell and Ar gas are employed in the fusion chamber for shock mitigation. • Massive materials can effectively mitigate the thermal heats on the chamber wall. • The W-coated Zr-alloy first wall exhibits good viability as a long-lived component. - Abstract: In a Z-pinch driven fusion–fission hybrid power reactor (Z-FFR), the fusion target will produce enormous energy of ∼1.5 GJ per pulse at a frequency of 0.1 Hz. Almost 20% of the fusion energy yield, approximately 300 MJ, is released in forms of pulsed X-rays. To prevent the first wall from fatal damages by the intense X-rays, a thin spherical metal shell and rare Ar buffer gas are introduced to mitigate the transient X-ray bursts. Radiation hydrodynamics in the fusion chamber were investigated by MULTI-1D simulations, and the corresponding thermal and mechanical loads on the first wall were also obtained. The simulations indicated that by optimizing the design parameters of the metal shell and Ar buffer gas, peak power flux of the thermal heats on the first wall could be mitigated to less than 10{sup 4} W/cm{sup 2} within a time scale of several milliseconds, while peak overpressures of the mechanical loads varying from 0.6 to 0.7 MPa. In addition, the thermomechanical response in a W–coated Zr-alloy first wall was performed by FWDR1D calculations using the derived thermal and mechanical loads as inputs. The temperature and stress fields were analyzed, and the corresponding elastic strains were conducted for primary lifetime estimations by using the Coffin–Manson relationships of both W and Zr-alloy. It was shown that the maximum temperature rises and stresses in the first wall were less than 50 K and 130 MPa respectively, and lifetime of the first wall would be in excess of 10{sup 9} cycles. The chamber exhibits good viability as a long-lived component to sustain the Z-FFR conceptual

  15. Pressure vessel rupture within a chamber: the pressure history on the chamber wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, M.R.

    1989-04-01

    Generally there is a large number of pressure vessels containing high pressure gas on power stations and chemical plant. In many instances, particularly on power plant, these vessels are within the main building. If a pressure vessel were to fail, the surrounding structures would be exposed to blast loads and the forces resulting from jets of fluid issuing from the breached vessel. In the case where the vessel is in a relatively closed chamber there would also be a general overpressurisation of the chamber. At the design stage it is therefore essential to demonstrate that the plant could be safely shut down in the event of a pressure vessel failure, that is, it must be shown that the chamber will not collapse thus putting the building at risk or hazarding equipment essential for a safe shut down. Such an assessment requires the loads applied to the chamber walls, roof, etc. to be known. (author)

  16. A multi-component parallel-plate flow chamber system for studying the effect of exercise-induced wall shear stress on endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan-Xia; Xiang, Cheng; Liu, Bo; Zhu, Yong; Luan, Yong; Liu, Shu-Tian; Qin, Kai-Rong

    2016-12-28

    In vivo studies have demonstrated that reasonable exercise training can improve endothelial function. To confirm the key role of wall shear stress induced by exercise on endothelial cells, and to understand how wall shear stress affects the structure and the function of endothelial cells, it is crucial to design and fabricate an in vitro multi-component parallel-plate flow chamber system which can closely replicate exercise-induced wall shear stress waveforms in artery. The in vivo wall shear stress waveforms from the common carotid artery of a healthy volunteer in resting and immediately after 30 min acute aerobic cycling exercise were first calculated by measuring the inner diameter and the center-line blood flow velocity with a color Doppler ultrasound. According to the above in vivo wall shear stress waveforms, we designed and fabricated a parallel-plate flow chamber system with appropriate components based on a lumped parameter hemodynamics model. To validate the feasibility of this system, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) line were cultured within the parallel-plate flow chamber under abovementioned two types of wall shear stress waveforms and the intracellular actin microfilaments and nitric oxide (NO) production level were evaluated using fluorescence microscope. Our results show that the trends of resting and exercise-induced wall shear stress waveforms, especially the maximal, minimal and mean wall shear stress as well as oscillatory shear index, generated by the parallel-plate flow chamber system are similar to those acquired from the common carotid artery. In addition, the cellular experiments demonstrate that the actin microfilaments and the production of NO within cells exposed to the two different wall shear stress waveforms exhibit different dynamic behaviors; there are larger numbers of actin microfilaments and higher level NO in cells exposed in exercise-induced wall shear stress condition than resting wall shear stress condition

  17. Effect of Chamber Wall Proximity on Radiometer Force Production (Preprint)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Selden, N. P; Gimelshein, N. E; Gimelshein, S. F; Ketsdever, A. D

    2008-01-01

    ... on a given radiometer configuration in both the free molecule and transitional regimes. The contribution of the chamber walls to both the flowfield structure and radiometric force production were examined for helium, argon, and nitrogen test gases...

  18. The thin-wall tube drift chamber operating in vacuum (prototype)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexeev, G. D.; Glonti, L. N.; Kekelidze, V. D.; Malyshev, V. L.; Piskun, A. A.; Potrbenikov, Yu. K.; Rodionov, V. K.; Samsonov, V. A.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Shkarovskiy, S. N.

    2013-08-01

    The goal of this work was to design drift tubes and a chamber operating in vacuum, and to develop technologies for tubes independent assembly and mounting in the chamber. These design and technology were tested on the prototype. The main features of the chamber are the following: the drift tubes are made of flexible mylar film (wall thickness 36 μm, diameter 9.80 mm, length 2160 mm) using ultrasonic welding along the generatrix; the welding device and methods were developed at JINR. Drift tubes with end plugs, anode wires and spacers were completely assembled outside the chamber. "Self-centering" spacers and bushes were used for precise setting of the anode wires and tubes. The assembled tubes were sealed with O-rings in their seats in the chamber which simplified the chamber assembling. Moreover the tube assembly and the chamber manufacture can be performed independently and in parallel; this sufficiently reduces the total time of chamber manufacture and assembling, its cost and allows tubes to be tested outside the chamber. The technology of independent tube assembling is suitable for a chamber of any shape but a round chamber is preferable for operation in vacuum. Single channel amplifier-discriminator boards which are more stable against cross talks were used for testing the tubes. Independently assembled tubes were mounted into the chamber prototype and its performance characteristic measured under the vacuum conditions. The results showed that both the structure and the tubes themselves normally operate. They are suitable for making a full-scale drift chamber for vacuum.

  19. The thin-wall tube drift chamber operating in vacuum (prototype)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexeev, G.D.; Glonti, L.N.; Kekelidze, V.D.; Malyshev, V.L.; Piskun, A.A.; Potrbenikov, Yu.K.; Rodionov, V.K.; Samsonov, V.A.; Tokmenin, V.V.; Shkarovskiy, S.N.

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this work was to design drift tubes and a chamber operating in vacuum, and to develop technologies for tubes independent assembly and mounting in the chamber. These design and technology were tested on the prototype. The main features of the chamber are the following: the drift tubes are made of flexible mylar film (wall thickness 36 μm, diameter 9.80 mm, length 2160 mm) using ultrasonic welding along the generatrix; the welding device and methods were developed at JINR. Drift tubes with end plugs, anode wires and spacers were completely assembled outside the chamber. “Self-centering” spacers and bushes were used for precise setting of the anode wires and tubes. The assembled tubes were sealed with O-rings in their seats in the chamber which simplified the chamber assembling. Moreover the tube assembly and the chamber manufacture can be performed independently and in parallel; this sufficiently reduces the total time of chamber manufacture and assembling, its cost and allows tubes to be tested outside the chamber. The technology of independent tube assembling is suitable for a chamber of any shape but a round chamber is preferable for operation in vacuum. Single channel amplifier-discriminator boards which are more stable against cross talks were used for testing the tubes. Independently assembled tubes were mounted into the chamber prototype and its performance characteristic measured under the vacuum conditions. The results showed that both the structure and the tubes themselves normally operate. They are suitable for making a full-scale drift chamber for vacuum

  20. The thin-wall tube drift chamber operating in vacuum (prototype)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexeev, G.D. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Glonti, L.N., E-mail: glonti@sunse.jinr.ru [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Kekelidze, V.D.; Malyshev, V.L.; Piskun, A.A.; Potrbenikov, Yu.K.; Rodionov, V.K.; Samsonov, V.A.; Tokmenin, V.V.; Shkarovskiy, S.N. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation)

    2013-08-01

    The goal of this work was to design drift tubes and a chamber operating in vacuum, and to develop technologies for tubes independent assembly and mounting in the chamber. These design and technology were tested on the prototype. The main features of the chamber are the following: the drift tubes are made of flexible mylar film (wall thickness 36 μm, diameter 9.80 mm, length 2160 mm) using ultrasonic welding along the generatrix; the welding device and methods were developed at JINR. Drift tubes with end plugs, anode wires and spacers were completely assembled outside the chamber. “Self-centering” spacers and bushes were used for precise setting of the anode wires and tubes. The assembled tubes were sealed with O-rings in their seats in the chamber which simplified the chamber assembling. Moreover the tube assembly and the chamber manufacture can be performed independently and in parallel; this sufficiently reduces the total time of chamber manufacture and assembling, its cost and allows tubes to be tested outside the chamber. The technology of independent tube assembling is suitable for a chamber of any shape but a round chamber is preferable for operation in vacuum. Single channel amplifier-discriminator boards which are more stable against cross talks were used for testing the tubes. Independently assembled tubes were mounted into the chamber prototype and its performance characteristic measured under the vacuum conditions. The results showed that both the structure and the tubes themselves normally operate. They are suitable for making a full-scale drift chamber for vacuum.

  1. Dynamic wall demonstration project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakatsui, L.; Mayhew, W.

    1990-12-01

    The dynamic wall concept is a ventilation strategy that can be applied to a single family dwelling. With suitable construction, outside air can be admitted through the exterior walls of the house to the interior space to function as ventilation air. The construction and performance monitoring of a demonstration house built to test the dynamic wall concept in Sherwood Park, Alberta, is described. The project had the objectives of demonstrating and assessing the construction methods; determining the cost-effectiveness of the concept in Alberta; analyzing the operation of the dynamic wall system; and determining how other components and systems in the house interact with the dynamic wall. The exterior wall construction consisted of vinyl siding, spun-bonded polyolefin-backed (SBPO) rigid fiberglass sheathing, 38 mm by 89 mm framing, fiberglass batt insulation and 12.7 mm drywall. The mechanical system was designed to operate in the dynamic (negative pressure) mode, however flexibility was provided to allow operation in the static (balanced pressure) mode to permit monitoring of the walls as if they were in a conventional house. The house was monitored by an extensive computerized monitoring system. Dynamic wall operation was dependent on pressure and temperature differentials between indoor and outdoor as well as wind speed and direction. The degree of heat gain was found to be ca 74% of the indoor-outdoor temperature differential. Temperature of incoming dynamic air was significantly affected by solar radiation and measurement of indoor air pollutants found no significant levels. 4 refs., 34 figs., 11 tabs.

  2. The influence of wall resonances on the levitation of objects in a single-axis acoustic processing chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, B. B.

    1980-01-01

    Instabilities were observed in high temperature, single axis acoustic processing chambers. At certain temperatures, strong wall resonances were generated within the processing chamber itself and these transverse resonances were thought sufficient to disrupt the levitation well. These wall resonances are apparently not strong enough to cause instabilities in the levitation well.

  3. Resistive wall heating due to image current on the beam chamber for a superconducting undulator.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S. H. (Accelerator Systems Division (APS))

    2012-03-27

    The image-current heating on the resistive beam chamber of a superconducting undulator (SCU) was calculated based on the normal and anomalous skin effects. Using the bulk resistivity of copper for the beam chamber, the heat loads were calculated for the residual resistivity ratios (RRRs) of unity at room temperature to 100 K at a cryogenic temperature as the reference. Then, using the resistivity of the specific aluminum alloy 6053-T5, which will be used for the SCU beam chamber, the heat loads were calculated. An electron beam stored in a storage ring induces an image current on the inner conducting wall, mainly within a skin depth, of the beam chamber. The image current, with opposite charge to the electron beam, travels along the chamber wall in the same direction as the electron beam. The average current in the storage ring consists of a number of bunches. When the pattern of the bunched beam is repeated according to the rf frequency, the beam current may be expressed in terms of a Fourier series. The time structure of the image current is assumed to be the same as that of the beam current. For a given resistivity of the chamber inner wall, the application ofthe normal or anomalous skin effect will depend on the harmonic numbers of the Fourier series of the beam current and the temperature of the chamber. For a round beam chamber with a ratius r, much larger than the beam size, one can assume that the image current density as well as the density square, may be uniform around the perimeter 2{pi}r. For the SCU beam chamber, which has a relatively narrow vertical gap compared to the width, the effective perimeter was estimated since the heat load should be proportional to the inverse of the perimeter.

  4. First-wall-coating candidates for ICF reactor chambers using dry-wall protection only

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sink, D.A.

    1983-01-01

    Twenty pure metals were considered as potential candidates for first-wall coatings of ICF reactor chambers. Seven were found to merit further consideration based on the results of computer-code calculations of figures-of-merit. The seven are rhenium, iridium, molybdenum, chromium, tungsten, tantalum, and niobium (listed in order of decreasing values of figures-of-merit). The calculations are based on mechanical, thermal, and vacuum vaporization engineering constraints. A number of alloys of these seven metals are suggested as additional candidates

  5. Identification of the heart wall and chamber based on temporal change of ultrasonic scatterer distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kohei; Taki, Hirofumi; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2017-07-01

    In most current methods for evaluating the cardiac function by ultrasound, the heart wall area is identified manually by an examiner. To eliminate examiner dependence and to improve usability, an automatic heart wall identification method is desirable. Identification based on only echogenicity often fails because of low echogenicity of some areas of the heart wall. In the present study, to determine more essential features, we focused on the relative temporal change of ultrasonic scatterer distribution and proposed three features for identification of the heart wall and the chamber: cross-correlation of RF signals, that of envelopes, and spatial dispersion of movement vectors in small regions. In an in vivo experiment, using echogenicity and the three features, we identified the heart wall and the chamber in the left ventricular long-axis view, resulting in criteria of separability J of 1.69, 1.40, and 3.02 using these features compared with the result of 0.979 using echogenicity.

  6. HYLIFE-II reactor chamber design refinements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    House, P.A.

    1994-06-01

    Mechanical design features of the reactor chamber for the HYLIFE-II inertial confinement fusion power plant are presented. A combination of oscillating and steady, molten salt streams (Li 2 BeF 4 ) are used for shielding and blast protection of the chamber walls. The system is designed for a 6 Hz repetition rate. Beam path clearing, between shots, is accomplished with the oscillating flow. The mechanism for generating the oscillating streams is described. A design configuration of the vessel wall allows adequate cooling and provides extra shielding to reduce thermal stresses to tolerable levels. The bottom portion of the reactor chamber is designed to minimize splash back of the high velocity (>12 m/s) salt streams and also recover up to half of the dynamic head. Cost estimates for a 1 GWe and 2 GWe reactor chamber are presented

  7. Lean premixed reacting flows with swirl and wall-separation zones in a contracting chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuxin; Rusak, Zvi; Wang, Shixiao

    2017-11-01

    Low Mach number lean premixed reacting swirling flows with wall-separation zones in a contracting circular finite-length open chamber are studied. Assuming a complete reaction with high activation energy and chemical equilibrium behind the reaction zone, a nonlinear partial differential equation is derived for the solution of the flow stream function behind the reaction zone in terms of the inlet total enthalpy for a reacting flow, specific entropy and the circulation functions. Bifurcation diagrams of steady flows are described as the inlet swirl level is increased at fixed chamber contraction and reaction heat release. The approach is applied to an inlet solid-body rotation flow with constant profiles of the axial velocity, temperature and mixture reactant mass fraction. The computed results provide predictions of the critical inlet swirl levels for the first appearance of wall-separation states and for the size of the separation zone as a function of the inlet swirl ratio, Mach number, chamber contraction and heat release of the reaction. The methodology developed in this paper provides a theoretical feasibility for the development of the technology of swirl-assisted combustion where the reaction zone is supported and stabilized by a wall-separation zone.

  8. PREFACE: Domain wall dynamics in nanostructures Domain wall dynamics in nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrows, C. H.; Meier, G.

    2012-01-01

    Domain structures in magnetic materials are ubiquitous and have been studied for decades. The walls that separate them are topological defects in the magnetic order parameter and have a wide variety of complex forms. In general, their investigation is difficult in bulk materials since only the domain structure on the surface of a specimen is visible. Cutting the sample to reveal the interior causes a rearrangement of the domains into a new form. As with many other areas of magnetism, the study of domain wall physics has been revitalised by the advent of nanotechnology. The ability to fabricate nanoscale structures has permitted the formation of simplified and controlled domain patterns; the development of advanced microscopy methods has permitted them to be imaged and then modelled; subjecting them to ultrashort field and current pulses has permitted their dynamics to be explored. The latest results from all of these advances are described in this special issue. Not only has this led to results of great scientific beauty, but also to concepts of great applicability to future information technologies. In this issue the reader will find the latest results for these domain wall dynamics and the high-speed processes of topological structures such as domain walls and magnetic vortices. These dynamics can be driven by the application of magnetic fields, or by flowing currents through spintronic devices using the novel physics of spin-transfer torque. This complexity has been studied using a wide variety of experimental techniques at the edge of the spatial and temporal resolution currently available, and can be described using sophisticated analytical theory and computational modelling. As a result, the dynamics can be engineered to give rise to finely controlled memory and logic devices with new functionality. Moreover, the field is moving to study not only the conventional transition metal ferromagnets, but also complex heterostructures, novel magnets and even other

  9. Observation of plasma-facing-wall via high dynamic range imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villamayor, Michelle Marie S.; Rosario, Leo Mendel D.; Viloan, Rommel Paulo B.

    2013-01-01

    Pictures of plasmas and deposits in a discharge chamber taken by varying shutter speeds have been integrated into high dynamic range (HDR) images. The HDR images of a graphite target surface of a compact planar magnetron (CPM) discharge device have clearly indicated the erosion pattern of the target, which are correlated to the light intensity distribution of plasma during operation. Based upon the HDR image technique coupled to colorimetry, a formation history of dust-like deposits inside of the CPM chamber has been recorded. The obtained HDR images have shown how the patterns of deposits changed in accordance with discharge duration. Results show that deposition takes place near the evacuation ports during the early stage of the plasma discharge. Discoloration of the plasma-facing-walls indicating erosion and redeposition eventually spreads at the periphery after several hours of operation. (author)

  10. Laser fusion reactor design in a fast ignition with a dry wall chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Yichi; Goto, Takuya; Ninomiya, Daisuke; Hiwatari, Ryoji; Asaoka, Yoshiyuki; Okano, Kunihiko

    2007-01-01

    One of the critical issues in laser fusion reactor design is high pulse heat load on the first wall by the X-rays and the fast/debris ions from fusion burn. There are mainly two concepts for the first wall of laser fusion reactor, a dry wall and a liquid metal wall. We should notice that the fast ignition method can achieve sufficiently high pellet gain with smaller (about 1/10 of the conventional central ignition method) input energy. To take advantage of this property, the design of a laser fusion reactor with a small size dry wall chamber may become possible. Since a small fusion pulse leads to a small electric power, high repetition of laser irradiation is required to keep sufficient electric power. Then we tried to design a laser fusion reactor with a dry wall chamber and a high repetition laser. This is a new challenging path to realize a laser fusion plant. Based on the point model of the core plasma, we have estimated that fusion energy in one pulse can be reduced to be 40 MJ with a pellet gain around G>100. To evaluate the validity of this simple estimation and to optimize the pellet design and the pulse shaping for the fast ignition scenario, we have introduced 1-D hydrodynamic simulation code ILESTA-1D and carried out implosion simulations. Since the code is one-dimensional, the detailed physics process of fast heating cannot be reproduced. Thus the fast heating is reflected in the code as the additional artificial heating source in the energy equation. It is modeled as a homogeneous heating of electrons in core region at the time just before when the maximum compression is achieved. At present we obtained the pellet gain G∝100 with the same input energy as the above estimation by a simple point model (350kJ for implosion, 50kJ for heating and assuming 20% coupling of heating laser). A dry wall is exposed to several threats due to the cyclic load by the high energy X-ray and charged particles: surface melting, physical and chemical sputtering

  11. HYLIFE-II reactor chamber mechanical design: Update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    House, P.A.

    1992-01-01

    Mechanical design features of the reactor chamber for the HYLIFE-II inertial confinement fusion power plant are presented. A combination of oscillating and steady, molten salt streams (Li 2 BeF 4 ) are used for shielding and blast protection of the chamber walls. The system is designed for a 6 Hz repetition rate. Beam path clearing, between shots, is accomplished with the oscillating flow. The mechanism for generating the oscillating streams is described. A design configuration of the vessel wall allows adequate cooling and provides extra shielding to reduce thermal stresses to tolerable levels. The bottom portion of the reactor chamber is designed to minimize splash back of the high velocity (17 m/s) salt streams and also recover up to half of the dynamic head. Cost estimates for a 1 GW e and 2 GW e reactor chamber are presented

  12. Ultrasonically induced dynamics of a contrast agent microbubble between two parallel elastic walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doinikov, Alexander A; Bouakaz, Ayache

    2013-01-01

    This work presents the derivation of a Rayleigh–Plesset-like equation that describes the radial oscillation of a contrast agent microbubble between two elastic walls, assuming that the bubble is attached to one of them. The obtained equation is then used in numerical simulations in order to establish how the presence of the second wall affects the resonance properties and the scattered echo of the contrast microbubble. The effect of encapsulation on the dynamics of the microbubble is simulated by the Marmottant shell model which is commonly used for the modeling of the dynamics of lipid-shelled contrast agents. Two cases are examined. In the first, the mechanical properties of the walls are set to correspond to OptiCell chambers which are widely used in experiments on microbubble contrast agents. In the second, the properties of the walls correspond to walls of blood vessels. It is shown that the presence of the second wall increases the resonance frequency of the contrast microbubble and decreases the amplitudes of the radial oscillation and the scattered echo of the microbubble as compared to the case that the second wall is absent. It is also shown that the presence of the second wall can change noticeably the intensity of the second harmonic in the spectrum of the scattered pressure. It is demonstrated that, depending on the value of the driving frequency, the presence of the second wall can either increase or decrease the intensity of the second harmonic as compared to its intensity in the case that the second wall is absent. (paper)

  13. Mini-chamber, an advanced protection concept for NIF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, P.F.; Scott, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) target debris and ablated near-target materials pose the primary threat to the National Ignition Facility (NIF) final optics debris shields, as well as a major challenge in future inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plants. This work discusses a NIF 'mini-chamber,' designed to mitigate the debris threat. Although the NIF base-line design protects against debris using a frost-protected target positioner and refractory first-wall coatings, the mini-chamber provides important flexibility in three areas: debris-shield protection from beyond-design basis shots (i.e. heavy hohlraums, special diagnostics, shields); fielding of large experiments with significant surface ablation; and studying key ablation and gas-dynamics issues for liquid-wall IFE power plants. Key mini-chamber modeling results are presented, followed by discussion of equipment requirements for fielding a NIF mini-chamber. 7 refs., 3 figs

  14. Modelling of action of X-ray radiation on cellular structures of walls of the chamber of pulse nuclear power devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solov'ev, V.O.; Khristoforov, B.D.

    2008-01-01

    One elaborated both mathematical and test procedures to simulate wave processes in blasting chamber walls of the pulsed nuclear power plants under the strong X-ray irradiation by explosion and shock. The comparison results of the test and the calculated parameters of the shock waves under the explosion and the shock loading of different materials demonstrated their satisfactory compatibility. Making use of the elaborated procedures one investigated into behaviour of Li 17 Pb 83 made liquid heat-reflecting film at the explosion chamber wall when the evaporation caused recoil pulse was the load basic factor. One studied possibilities to reduce the explosion loads by changing of the charge lead cladding thickness and by making cellular structures and porous materials a part of chamber walls [ru

  15. Target activation and radiological response of ARIES-IFE dry wall chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Guebaly, L.A.; Henderson, D.L.; Wilson, P.P.H.; Abdou, A.E.

    2002-01-01

    The choice of target coating and hohlraum wall materials is among the most critical decisions to be made for inertial fusion energy (IFE) designs. Gold and gold/gadolinium have long been considered to be the coating and hohlraum wall materials of choice for direct drive (DD) and indirect drive (ID) targets, respectively, offering high target performance and low beam energy losses. More recently, a variety of other materials have been considered, including W, Pb, Pt, Pd, and Ag for the DD target coating and Au, W, Pb, Hg, Ta, Cs, and Hf for the hohlraum wall of the ID target. The choice of the coating/hohlraum material is a tradeoff between the target design elements such as safety, target physics, economics, etc. We identified the key safety issues and have investigated the neutron-induced irradiation effects of the candidate coating/hohlraum materials using the radiation chamber conditions of the ARIES-IFE dry wall concept. The safety requirements have specific impacts in terms of the coating/hohlraum materials choice

  16. Radial force on the vacuum chamber wall during thermal quench in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pustovitov, V. D., E-mail: pustovitov-vd@nrcki.ru [National Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    The radial force balance during a thermal quench in tokamaks is analyzed. As a rule, the duration τ{sub tp} of such events is much shorter than the resistive time τ{sub w} of the vacuum chamber wall. Therefore, the perturbations of the magnetic field B produced by the evolving plasma cannot penetrate the wall, which makes different the magnetic pressures on its inner and outer sides. The goal of this work is the analytical estimation of the resulting integral radial force on the wall. The plasma is considered axially symmetric; for the description of radial forces on the wall, the results of V.D. Shafranov’s classical work [J. Nucl. Energy C 5, 251 (1963)] are used. Developed for tokamaks, the standard equilibrium theory considers three interacting systems: plasma, poloidal field coils, and toroidal field coils. Here, the wall is additionally incorporated with currents driven by ∂B/∂t≠0 accompanying the fast loss of the plasma thermal energy. It is shown that they essentially affect the force redistribution, thereby leading to large loads on the wall. The estimates prove that these loads have to be accounted for in the disruptive scenarios in large tokamaks.

  17. Experimental determination of temperatures of the inner wall of a boiler combustion chamber for the purpose of verification of a CFD model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Trávníček

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on the non-destructive method of determination of temperatures in the boiler combustion chamber. This method proves to be significant mainly as regards CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics simulations of combustion processes, in case of which it is subsequently advisable to verify the data calculated using CFD software application with the actually measured data. Verification of the method was based on usage of reference combustion equipment (130 kW which performs combustion of a mixture of waste sawdust and shavings originating in the course of production of wooden furniture. Measuring of temperatures inside the combustion chamber is – considering mainly the high temperature values – highly demanding and requires a special type of temperature sensors. Furthermore, as regards standard operation, it is not possible to install such sensors without performing structural alterations of the boiler. Therefore, for the purpose of determination of these temperatures a special experimental device was constructed while exploiting a thermal imaging system used for monitoring of the surface temperature of outer wall of the reference boiler. Temperatures on the wall of the boiler combustion chamber were determined on the basis of data measured using the experimental device as well as data from the thermal imaging system. These values might serve for verification of the respective CFD model of combustion equipment.

  18. Open-air ionisation chambers with walls of soft-tissue equivalent material for measuring photon doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vialettes, H.; Anceau, J.C.; Grand, M.; Petit, G.

    1968-01-01

    The ionisation chambers presented in this report constitute a contribution to research into methods of carrying out correct determinations in the field of health physics. The use of a mixture of teflon containing 42.5 per cent by weight of carbon for the chamber walls makes it possible to measure directly the dose absorbed in air through 300 mg/cm 2 of soft tissue and, consequently, the dose absorbed in the soft tissues with a maximum error of 10 per cent for photon energies of between 10 keV and 10 MeV. Furthermore since this material does not contain hydrogen, the chamber has a sensitivity to neutrons which is much less than other chambers in current use. Finally the shape of these chambers has been studied with a view to obtaining a satisfactory measurement from the isotropy point of view; for example for gamma radiation of 27 keV, the 3 litre chamber is isotropic to within 10 per cent over 270 degrees, and the 12 litre chamber is isotropic to within 10 per cent over 300 degrees; for 1.25 MeV gamma radiation this range is extended over 330 degrees for the 3 litre chamber, and 360 degrees for the 12 litre chamber. This report presents the measurements carried out with these chambers as well as the results obtained. These results are then compared to those obtained with other chambers currently used in the field of health physics. (authors) [fr

  19. Measurement of radon concentration in air employing Lucas chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machaj, B.

    1997-01-01

    The results of investigations aimed to determine the main features of radon concentration gauge in air, employing 0.17 L Lucas chamber, and air sample forced by an air pump are presented. For two hour sampling and measuring cycle time the dynamic error in the worst case (first read out) equals 5 % relative to the step jump of radon concentration. This is due to the increase of activity of the decay products in the chamber. It was observed that the short lived radon decay products (Po-218, Pb-214, Bi-214) are depositing on the walls of the chamber and they are not removed by flushing the chamber with air. (author)

  20. Detailed Measurement of ORSC Main Chamber Injector Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedard, Michael J.

    Improving fidelity in simulation of combustion dynamics in rocket combustors requires an increase in experimental measurement fidelity for validation. In a model rocket combustor, a chemiluminescence based spectroscopy technique was used to capture flame light emissions for direct comparison to a computational simulation of the production of chemiluminescent species. The comparison indicated that high fidelity models of rocket combustors can predict spatio-temporal distribution of chemiluminescent species with trend-wise accuracy. The comparison also indicated the limited ability of OH* and CH* emission to indicate flame heat release. Based on initial spectroscopy experiments, a photomultiplier based chemiluminescence sensor was designed to increase the temporal resolution of flame emission measurements. To apply developed methodologies, an experiment was designed to investigate the flow and combustion dynamics associated with main chamber injector elements typical of the RD-170 rocket engine. A unique feature of the RD-170 injector element is the beveled expansion between the injector recess and combustion chamber. To investigate effects of this geometry, a scaling methodology was applied to increase the physical scale of a single injector element while maintaining traceability to the RD-170 design. Two injector configurations were tested, one including a beveled injector face and the other a flat injector face. This design enabled improved spatial resolution of pressure and light emission measurements densely arranged in the injector recess and near-injector region of the chamber. Experimental boundary conditions were designed to closely replicate boundary conditions in simulations. Experimental results showed that the beveled injector face had a damping effect on pressure fluctuations occurring near the longitudinal resonant acoustic modes of the chamber, implying a mechanism for improved overall combustion stability. Near the injector, the beveled geometry

  1. Indication chamber of liquid metal fired steam generators with double wall for heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matal, O.; Martoch, J.

    1982-01-01

    The double wall of the steam generator consists of inner and outer tubes anchored in a tube plate. Between the tubes are indication spaces which end in recesses formed at least in one of the tube plates and coaxial with the outer tubes. The recesses interconnected with channels form the indication chamber to which is connected at least one sensor of the alarm signal equipment. (B.S.)

  2. Final report for NIF chamber dynamics studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnham, A; Peterson, P F; Scott, J M

    1998-01-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), a 1.8 MJ, 192 laser beam facility, will have anticipated fusion yields of up to 20 MJ from D-T pellets encased in a gold hohlraum target. The energy emitted from the target in the form of x rays, neutrons, target debris kinetic energy, and target shrapnel will be contained in a 5 m. radius spherical target chamber. various diagnostics will be stationed around the target at varying distances from the target. During each shot, the target will emit x rays that will vaporize nearby target facing surfaces including those of the diagnostics, the target positioner, and other chamber structures. This ablated vapor will be transported throughout the chamber, and will eventually condense and deposit on surfaces in the chamber, including the final optics debris shields. The research at the University of California at Berkeley relates primarily to the NIF chamber dynamics. The key design issues are the ablation of the chamber structures, transport of the vapor through the chamber and the condensation or deposition processes of those vaporized materials. An understanding of these processes is essential in developing a concept for protecting the fina optics debris shields from an excessive coating (> 10 A) of target debris and ablated material, thereby prolonging their lifetime between change-outs. At Berkeley, we have studied the physical issues of the ablation process and the effects of varying materials, the condensation process of the vaporized material, and design schemes that can lower the threat posed to the debris shields by these processes. The work or portions of the work completed this year have been published in several papers and a dissertation [l-5

  3. Type I ELM filament heat fluxes on the KSTAR main chamber wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.-K. Bae

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Heat loads deposited on the first wall by mitigated Type I ELMs are expected to be the dominant contributor to the total thermal plasma wall load of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER, particularly in the upper main chamber regions during the baseline H-mode magnetic equilibrium, due to the fast radial convective heat propagation of ELM filaments before complete loss to the divertor. Specific Type I ELMing H-mode discharges have been performed with a lower single null magnetic geometry, where the outboard separatrix position is slowly (∼7s scanned over a radial distance of 7cm, reducing the wall probe–separatrix distance to a minimum of ∼9cm, and allowing the ELM filament heat loss to the wall to be analyzed as a function of radial propagation distance. A fast reciprocating probe (FRP head is separately held at fixed position toroidally close and 4.7cm radially in front of the wall probe. This FRP monitors the ELM ion fluxes, allowing an average filament radial propagation speed, found to be independent of ELM energy, of 80–100ms−1 to be extracted. Radial dependence of the peak filament wall parallel heat flux is observed to be exponential, with the decay length of λq, ELM ∼25 ± 4mm and with the heat flux of q∥, ELM= 0.05MWm−2 at the wall, corresponding to q∥ ∼ 7.5MWm−2 at the second separatrix. Along with the measured radial propagation speed and the calculated radial profile of the magnetic connection lengths across the SOL, these data could be utilized to analyze filament energy loss model for the future machines.

  4. Biofiltration of airborne VOCs with green wall systems-Microbial and chemical dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkonen, A; Li, T; Vesala, M; Saarenheimo, J; Ahonen, V; Kärenlampi, S; Blande, J D; Tiirola, M; Tervahauta, A

    2018-05-06

    Botanical air filtration is a promising technology for reducing indoor air contaminants, but the underlying mechanisms need better understanding. Here, we made a set of chamber fumigation experiments of up to 16 weeks of duration, to study the filtration efficiencies for seven volatile organic compounds (VOCs; decane, toluene, 2-ethylhexanol, α-pinene, octane, benzene, and xylene) and to monitor microbial dynamics in simulated green wall systems. Biofiltration functioned on sub-ppm VOC levels without concentration-dependence. Airflow through the growth medium was needed for efficient removal of chemically diverse VOCs, and the use of optimized commercial growth medium further improved the efficiency compared with soil and Leca granules. Experimental green wall simulations using these components were immediately effective, indicating that initial VOC removal was largely abiotic. Golden pothos plants had a small additional positive impact on VOC filtration and bacterial diversity in the green wall system. Proteobacteria dominated the microbiota of rhizosphere and irrigation water. Airborne VOCs shaped the microbial communities, enriching potential VOC-utilizing bacteria (especially Nevskiaceae and Patulibacteraceae) in the irrigation water, where much of the VOC degradation capacity of the biofiltration systems resided. These results clearly show the benefits of active air circulation and optimized growth media in modern green wall systems. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Model tests on dynamic performance of RC shear walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagashima, Toshio; Shibata, Akenori; Inoue, Norio; Muroi, Kazuo.

    1991-01-01

    For the inelastic dynamic response analysis of a reactor building subjected to earthquakes, it is essentially important to properly evaluate its restoring force characteristics under dynamic loading condition and its damping performance. Reinforced concrete shear walls are the main structural members of a reactor building, and dominate its seismic behavior. In order to obtain the basic information on the dynamic restoring force characteristics and damping performance of shear walls, the dynamic test using a large shaking table, static displacement control test and the pseudo-dynamic test on the models of a shear wall were conducted. In the dynamic test, four specimens were tested on a large shaking table. In the static test, four specimens were tested, and in the pseudo-dynamic test, three specimens were tested. These tests are outlined. The results of these tests were compared, placing emphasis on the restoring force characteristics and damping performance of the RC wall models. The strength was higher in the dynamic test models than in the static test models mainly due to the effect of loading rate. (K.I.)

  6. Conceptual design of a fast-ignition laser fusion reactor based on a dry wall chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Y; Goto, T; Okano, K; Asaoka, Y; Hiwatari, R; Someya, Y

    2008-01-01

    The fast ignition is quite attractive for a compact laser fusion reactor, because a sufficiently high pellet gain is available with a small input energy. We designed an inertial fusion reactor based on Fast-ignition Advanced Laser fusion reactor CONcept, called FALCON-D, where a dry wall is employed for a chamber wall. A simple point model shows that the pellet gain G∼100 is available with laser energies of 350kJ for implosion, 50kJ for heating. This results in the fusion yield of 40 MJ in one shot. By increasing the repetition rate up to 30 Hz, the fusion power of 1.2 GWth becomes available. Plant system analysis shows the net electric power to be about 0.4 GWe In the fast ignition it is available to employ a low aspect ratio pellet, which is favorable for the stability during the implosion phase. Here the pellet aspect ratio is reduced to be 2 ∼ 4, and the optimization of the pulse shape for the implosion laser are carried out by using the 1-D hydrodynamic simulation code ILESTA-1D. A ferritic steel with a tungsten armour is employed for the chamber wall. The feasibility of this dry wall concept is studied from various engineering aspects such as surface melting, physical and chemical sputtering, blistering and exfoliation by helium retention, and thermo-mechanical fatigue, and it is found that blistering and exfoliation due to the helium retention and fatigue failure due to cyclic thermal load are major concerns. The cost analysis shows that the construction cost is moderate but the cost of electricity is slightly expensive

  7. Conceptual design of a fast-ignition laser fusion reactor based on a dry wall chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Y [High Temperature Plasma Center, University of Tokyo, Chiba (Japan); Goto, T; Okano, K [Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, University of Tokyo, Chiba (Japan); Asaoka, Y; Hiwatari, R [Central Research Institute for Electric Power Industry, Komae, Tokyo (Japan); Someya, Y [Graduate School of Engineering, Musashi Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan)], E-mail: ogawa@ppl.k.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2008-05-15

    The fast ignition is quite attractive for a compact laser fusion reactor, because a sufficiently high pellet gain is available with a small input energy. We designed an inertial fusion reactor based on Fast-ignition Advanced Laser fusion reactor CONcept, called FALCON-D, where a dry wall is employed for a chamber wall. A simple point model shows that the pellet gain G{approx}100 is available with laser energies of 350kJ for implosion, 50kJ for heating. This results in the fusion yield of 40 MJ in one shot. By increasing the repetition rate up to 30 Hz, the fusion power of 1.2 GWth becomes available. Plant system analysis shows the net electric power to be about 0.4 GWe In the fast ignition it is available to employ a low aspect ratio pellet, which is favorable for the stability during the implosion phase. Here the pellet aspect ratio is reduced to be 2 {approx} 4, and the optimization of the pulse shape for the implosion laser are carried out by using the 1-D hydrodynamic simulation code ILESTA-1D. A ferritic steel with a tungsten armour is employed for the chamber wall. The feasibility of this dry wall concept is studied from various engineering aspects such as surface melting, physical and chemical sputtering, blistering and exfoliation by helium retention, and thermo-mechanical fatigue, and it is found that blistering and exfoliation due to the helium retention and fatigue failure due to cyclic thermal load are major concerns. The cost analysis shows that the construction cost is moderate but the cost of electricity is slightly expensive.

  8. Conceptual design of a fast-ignition laser fusion reactor based on a dry wall chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Y.; Goto, T.; Okano, K.; Asaoka, Y.; Hiwatari, R.; Someya, Y.

    2008-05-01

    The fast ignition is quite attractive for a compact laser fusion reactor, because a sufficiently high pellet gain is available with a small input energy. We designed an inertial fusion reactor based on Fast-ignition Advanced Laser fusion reactor CONcept, called FALCON-D, where a dry wall is employed for a chamber wall. A simple point model shows that the pellet gain G~100 is available with laser energies of 350kJ for implosion, 50kJ for heating. This results in the fusion yield of 40 MJ in one shot. By increasing the repetition rate up to 30 Hz, the fusion power of 1.2 GWth becomes available. Plant system analysis shows the net electric power to be about 0.4 GWe In the fast ignition it is available to employ a low aspect ratio pellet, which is favorable for the stability during the implosion phase. Here the pellet aspect ratio is reduced to be 2 ~ 4, and the optimization of the pulse shape for the implosion laser are carried out by using the 1-D hydrodynamic simulation code ILESTA-1D. A ferritic steel with a tungsten armour is employed for the chamber wall. The feasibility of this dry wall concept is studied from various engineering aspects such as surface melting, physical and chemical sputtering, blistering and exfoliation by helium retention, and thermo-mechanical fatigue, and it is found that blistering and exfoliation due to the helium retention and fatigue failure due to cyclic thermal load are major concerns. The cost analysis shows that the construction cost is moderate but the cost of electricity is slightly expensive.

  9. Effects of ionization chamber construction on dose measurements in a heterogeneity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauceri, T.; Kase, K.

    1987-01-01

    Traditionally, measurements have been made in heterogeneous phantoms to determine the factors which should be applied to dose calculations, when calculating a dose to a heterogeneous medium. Almost all measurements have relied on relatively thin-walled ion chambers, with no attempt to match ion chamber wall material to the measuring medium. The recent AAPM dosimetry protocol has established that a mismatch between ion chamber wall and phantom material can have an effect on dose measurement. To investigate the affect of this mismatch of ion chamber wall material to phantom material, two parallel-plate ion chambers were constructed. One ion chamber from solid water, for measurements in a solid water phantom and the other from plastic lung material, for measurements in a plastic lung material phantom. Correction factors measured by matching ion chamber to media were compared to correction factors measured by using a thin-walled cavity ion chamber with no regard for matching wall and media for cobalt-60, 6-, 10- and 20-MV photon beams. The results demonstrated that the matching of ion chamber to measuring media can be ignored, provided that a small, approximately tissue-equivalent, thin-walled ion chamber is used for measuring the correction factors

  10. Transverse resistive wall instability of an off-axis ribbon beam in a circular chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courant, E.D.; Month, M.

    1978-06-01

    High energy proton storage rings are designed to make maximal use of the available vacuum chamber aperture. This is dictated primarily by economic considerations. The accumulation of current in a typical high energy ring creates a rather unusual beam configuration: in particular, a ribbon beam in a circular chamber set well off the central axis. The result is an enhanced resistive wall instability. This could be anticipated from the strong dependence of the current threshold on the chamber radius for a centered beam. For an off-centered beam, one might expect that the relevant replacement for the radius would be the distance of closest approach. The case of a wide ribbon-type beam is treated. The current threshold is obtained as a solution to a coupled oscillator eigenvalue problem. When the beam is small as occurs near the beginning of current stack formation, the problem is reduced to a dispersion relation. Results are expressed in terms of ISABELLE parameters. Some conclusions relevant to the ISABELLE design are presented

  11. HYLIFE-II reactor chamber mechanical design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    House, P.A.

    1992-01-01

    Mechanical design features of the reactor chamber for the HYLIFE-11 inertial confinement fusion power plant are presented. A combination of oscillating and steady, molten salt streams are used for shielding and blast protection. The system is designed for an 8 Hz repetition rate. Beam path clearing, between shots, is accomplished with the oscillating flow. The mechanism for generating the oscillating streams is described. A design configuration of the vessel wall allows adequate cooling and provides extra shielding to reduce thermal stresses to tolerable levels. The bottom portion of the reactor chamber is designed to minimize splash back of the high velocity (20 m/s) salt streams and also recover up to half of the dynamic head

  12. Hot wire production of single-wall and multi-wall carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, Anne C.; Mahan, Archie H.; Alleman, Jeffrey L.

    2010-10-26

    Apparatus (210) for producing a multi-wall carbon nanotube (213) may comprise a process chamber (216), a furnace (217) operatively associated with the process chamber (216), and at least one filament (218) positioned within the process chamber (216). At least one power supply (220) operatively associated with the at least one filament (218) heats the at least one filament (218) to a process temperature. A gaseous carbon precursor material (214) operatively associated with the process chamber (216) provides carbon for forming the multi-wall carbon nanotube (213). A metal catalyst material (224) operatively associated with the process (216) catalyzes the formation of the multi-wall carbon nanotube (213).

  13. Operation method for wall surface of pressure suppression chamber of reactor container and floating scaffold used for the method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuzaki, Tetsuo; Kounomaru, Toshimi; Saito, Koichi.

    1996-01-01

    A floating scaffold is provisionally disposed in adjacent with the wall surface of pool water of a pressure suppression chamber while being floated on the surface of the pool water before the drainage of the pool water from the pressure vessel. The floating scaffold has guide rollers sandwiching a bent tube of an existent facility so that the horizontal movement is restrained, and is movable only in a vertical direction depending on the change of water level of the pool water. In addition, a handrail for preventing dropping, and a provisional illumination light are disposed. When pool water in the pressure suppression chamber is drained, the water level of the pool water is lowered in accordance with the amount of drained water. The floating scaffold floating on the water surface is lowered while being guided by the bent tube, and the operation position is lowered. An operator riding on the floating scaffold inspects the wall surfaces of the pressure chamber and conducts optional repair and painting. (I.N.)

  14. Climate Chamber Experiment-Based Thermal Analysis and Design Improvement of Traditional Huizhou Masonry Walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Dong

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Supported by thousands of years of history, traditional Huizhou buildings have played a vital role, both functionally and culturally, as residential buildings in China. Masonry walls are one of the key building components of a Huizhou building; however, the traditional Huizhou masonry wall structure, predominantly a hollow brick structure, cannot meet the local building energy code requirements, and thus needs to be improved. Within this context, the present research measures the actual thermal performance of traditional Huizhou masonry walls for historical buildings and new-built buildings, which results in mean thermal transmittances of 1.892 W/m2·K and 2.821 W/m2·K, respectively, while the local building energy code requires a minimum thermal transmittance of 1.500 W/m2·K. In order to improve the thermal performance of traditional Huizhou masonry walls, four design scenarios for wall insulation are proposed and tested in a climate chamber: (1 hollow brick wall with inorganic interior insulation mortar, (2 solid brick wall with inorganic interior insulation mortar, (3 hollow brick wall with foamed concrete, and (4 hollow brick wall with foamed concrete plus inorganic interior insulation mortar. The experiment results indicate that, among the four proposed design scenarios, only scenario 4 can significantly improve the thermal performance of Huizhou masonry walls and meet the building energy code requirements, with a mean thermal transmittance of 1.175 W/m2·K. This research lays the foundation for improving the thermal performance of Huizhou masonry walls with new insulation and construction technology, thereby helping to improve the quality of life of Huizhou residents while respecting the cultural significance of the traditional Huizhou building.

  15. A new visible spectroscopy diagnostic for the JET ITER-like wall main chamber

    OpenAIRE

    Maggi, C. F.; Brezinsek, S.; Zastrow, K.-D.; JET-EFDA Contributors; Stamp, M. F.; Griph, S.; Heesterman, P.; Hogben, C.; Horton, A.; Meigs, A.; Morlock, C.; Studholme, W.

    2012-01-01

    In preparation for ITER, JET has been upgraded with a new ITER-like wall (ILW), whereby the main plasma facing components, previously of carbon, have been replaced by mainly Be in the main chamber and W in the divertor. As part of the many diagnostic enhancements, a new, survey, visible spectroscopy diagnostic has been installed for the characterization of the ILW. An array of eight lines-of-sight (LOS) view radially one of the two JET neutral beam shine through areas (W coated carbon fibre c...

  16. A new visible spectroscopy diagnostic for the JET ITER-like wall main chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maggi, C. F.; Brezinsek, S.; Stamp, M. F.; Griph, S.; Heesterman, P.; Hogben, C.; Horton, A.; Meigs, A.; Studholme, W.; Zastrow, K.-D.; Morlock, C.

    2012-01-01

    In preparation for ITER, JET has been upgraded with a new ITER-like wall (ILW), whereby the main plasma facing components, previously of carbon, have been replaced by mainly Be in the main chamber and W in the divertor. As part of the many diagnostic enhancements, a new, survey, visible spectroscopy diagnostic has been installed for the characterization of the ILW. An array of eight lines-of-sight (LOS) view radially one of the two JET neutral beam shine through areas (W coated carbon fibre composite tiles) at the inner wall. In addition, one vertical LOS views the solid W tile at the outer divertor. The light emitted from the plasma is coupled to a series of compact overview spectrometers, with overall wavelength range of 380–960 nm and to one high resolution Echelle overview spectrometer covering the wavelength range 365–720 nm. The new survey diagnostic has been absolutely calibrated in situ by means of a radiometric light source placed inside the JET vessel in front of the whole optical path and operated by remote handling. The diagnostic is operated in every JET discharge, routinely monitoring photon fluxes from intrinsic and extrinsic impurities (e.g., Be, C, W, N, and Ne), molecules (e.g., BeD, D 2 , ND) and main chamber and divertor recycling (typically Dα, Dβ, and Dγ). The paper presents a technical description of the diagnostic and first measurements during JET discharges.

  17. Evaluation of Wall Correction Factor of INER's Air-Kerma Primary Standard Chamber and Dose Variation by Source Displacement for HDR 192Ir Brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H. Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to estimate the wall effect of the self-made spherical graphite-walled cavity chamber with the Monte Carlo method for establishing the air-kerma primary standard of high-dose-rate (HDR 192Ir brachytherapy sources at the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER, Taiwan. The Monte Carlo method established in this paper was also employed to respectively simulate wall correction factors of the 192Ir air-kerma standard chambers used at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST, USA and the National Physical Laboratory (NPL, UK for comparisons and verification. The chamber wall correction calculation results will be incorporated into INER's HDR 192Ir primary standard in the future. For the brachytherapy treatment in the esophagus or in the bronchi, the position of the isotope may have displacement in the cavity. Thus the delivered dose would differ from the prescribed dose in the treatment plan. We also tried assessing dose distribution due to the position displacement of HDR 192Ir brachytherapy source in a phantom with a central cavity by the Monte Carlo method. The calculated results could offer a clinical reference for the brachytherapy within the human organs with cavity.

  18. Dynamics of strings between walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eto, Minoru; Fujimori, Toshiaki; Nagashima, Takayuki; Nitta, Muneto; Ohashi, Keisuke; Sakai, Norisuke

    2009-01-01

    Configurations of vortex strings stretched between or ending on domain walls were previously found to be 1/4 Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield (BPS) states in N=2 supersymmetric gauge theories in 3+1 dimensions. Among zero modes of string positions, the center of mass of strings in each region between two adjacent domain walls is shown to be non-normalizable whereas the rests are normalizable. We study dynamics of vortex strings stretched between separated domain walls by using two methods, the moduli space (geodesic) approximation of full 1/4 BPS states and the charged particle approximation for string end points in the wall effective action. In the first method we explicitly obtain the effective Lagrangian in the strong coupling limit, which is written in terms of hypergeometric functions, and find the 90 deg. scattering for head-on collision. In the second method the domain wall effective action is assumed to be U(1) N gauge theory, and we find a good agreement between two methods for well-separated strings.

  19. Evaporation and condensation heat transfer in a suppression chamber of the water wall type passive containment cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Tadashi; Kataoka, Yoshiyuki; Murase, Michio

    1996-01-01

    To evaluate the system pressure response of a water wall type containment cooling system, which is one of the passive safety systems, the evaporation and condensation behaviors in a suppression chamber have been experimentally examined. In the system, the suppression pool water evaporates from the pool surface, passing into the wetwell due to pool temperature rise, while steam in the wetwell condenses on the steel containment vessel wall due to the heat release through the wall. The wetwell is a gas phase region in the suppression chamber and its pressure, which is expressed as the sum of the noncondensable gas pressure and saturated steam pressure, is strongly affected by the evaporation heat transfer from the suppression pool surface and condensation heat transfer on the containment vessel wall. Based on the measured temperature profiles near the heat transfer surface and the wetwell pressure using two apparatuses, evaporation and condensation heat transfer coefficients were evaluated. The following results were obtained. (1) Both heat transfer coefficients increased as the ratio of the steam partial pressure to the total pressure increased. (2) Comparison of the results from two types of test apparatuses confirmed that the size of the heat transfer surface did not affect the heat transfer characteristics within these tests. (3) The heat transfer coefficients were expressed by the ratio of the steam to noncondensable gas logarithmic mean concentration, which considered the steam and gas concentration gradient from the heat transfer surface to the wetwell bulk. (author)

  20. Numerical simulations of mixing conditions and aerosol dynamics in the CERN CLOUD chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Voigtländer, J; Rondo, L; Kürten, A; Stratmann, F

    2012-01-01

    To study the effect of galactic cosmic rays on aerosols and clouds, the Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets (CLOUD) project was established. Experiments are carried out at a 26.1 m3 tank at CERN (Switzerland). In the experiments, the effect of ionizing radiation on H2SO4 particle formation and growth is investigated. To evaluate the experimental configuration, the experiment was simulated using a coupled multidimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) – particle model. In the model the coupled fields of gas/vapor species, temperature, flow velocity and particle properties were computed to investigate mixing state and mixing times of the CLOUD tank's contents. Simulation results show that a 1-fan configuration, as used in first experiments, may not be sufficient to ensure a homogeneously mixed chamber. To mix the tank properly, two fans and sufficiently high fan speeds are necessary. The 1/e response times for instantaneous changes of wall temperature and saturation ratio were found to be in the order of fe...

  1. The Dynamic Similitude Design Method of Thin Walled Structures and Experimental Validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Luo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available For the applicability of dynamic similitude models of thin walled structures, such as engine blades, turbine discs, and cylindrical shells, the dynamic similitude design of typical thin walled structures is investigated. The governing equation of typical thin walled structures is firstly unified, which guides to establishing dynamic scaling laws of typical thin walled structures. Based on the governing equation, geometrically complete scaling law of the typical thin walled structure is derived. In order to determine accurate distorted scaling laws of typical thin walled structures, three principles are proposed and theoretically proved by combining the sensitivity analysis and governing equation. Taking the thin walled annular plate as an example, geometrically complete and distorted scaling laws can be obtained based on the principles of determining dynamic scaling laws. Furthermore, the previous five orders’ accurate distorted scaling laws of thin walled annular plates are presented and numerically validated. Finally, the effectiveness of the similitude design method is validated by experimental annular plates.

  2. A dynamical model for plant cell wall architecture formation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, B.M.; Emons, A.M.C.

    2001-01-01

    We discuss a dynamical mathematical model to explain cell wall architecture in plant cells. The highly regular textures observed in cell walls reflect the spatial organisation of the cellulose microfibrils (CMFs), the most important structural component of cell walls. Based on a geometrical theory

  3. Impedances in lossy elliptical vacuum chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piwinski, A.

    1994-04-01

    The wake fields of a bunched beam caused by the resistivity of the chamber walls are investigated for a vacuum chamber with elliptical cross section. The longitudinal and transverse impedances are calculated for arbitrary energies and for an arbitrary position of the beam in the chamber. (orig.)

  4. Arabidopsis Regenerating Protoplast: A Powerful Model System for Combining the Proteomics of Cell Wall Proteins and the Visualization of Cell Wall Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Ryusuke; Kuki, Hiroaki; Kuroha, Takeshi; Nishitani, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    The development of a range of sub-proteomic approaches to the plant cell wall has identified many of the cell wall proteins. However, it remains difficult to elucidate the precise biological role of each protein and the cell wall dynamics driven by their actions. The plant protoplast provides an excellent means not only for characterizing cell wall proteins, but also for visualizing the dynamics of cell wall regeneration, during which cell wall proteins are secreted. It therefore offers a unique opportunity to investigate the de novo construction process of the cell wall. This review deals with sub-proteomic approaches to the plant cell wall through the use of protoplasts, a methodology that will provide the basis for further exploration of cell wall proteins and cell wall dynamics. PMID:28248244

  5. 46 CFR 59.15-5 - Stayed furnaces and combustion chambers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Stayed furnaces and combustion chambers. 59.15-5 Section... and combustion chambers. (a) Where the plate forming the walls of stayed furnaces or combustion... wall of a stayed furnace or combustion chamber, the defective portion of the plate shall be cut away...

  6. Dynamic consideration of smog chamber experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Wayne K.; Donahue, Neil M.

    2017-08-01

    Recent studies of the α-pinene + ozone reaction that address particle nucleation show relatively high molar yields of highly oxidized multifunctional organic molecules with very low saturation concentrations that can form and grow new particles on their own. However, numerous smog-chamber experiments addressing secondary organic aerosol (SOA) mass yields, interpreted via equilibrium partitioning theory, suggest that the vast majority of SOA from α-pinene is semivolatile. We explore this paradox by employing a dynamic volatility basis set (VBS) model that reproduces the new-particle growth rates observed in the CLOUD experiment at CERN and then modeling SOA mass yield experiments conducted at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU). We find that the base-case simulations do overpredict observed SOA mass but by much less than an equilibrium analysis would suggest; this is because delayed condensation of vapors suppresses the apparent mass yields early in the chamber experiments. We further find that a second VBS model featuring substantial oligomerization of semivolatile monomers can match the CLOUD growth rates with substantially lower SOA mass yields; this is because the lighter monomers have a higher velocity and thus a higher condensation rate for a given mass concentration. The oligomerization simulations are a closer match to the CMU experiments than the base-case simulations, though they overpredict the observations somewhat. However, we also find that if the chemical conditions in CLOUD and the CMU chamber were identical, substantial nucleation would have occurred in the CMU experiments when in fact none occurred. This suggests that the chemical mechanisms differed in the two experiments, perhaps because the high oxidation rates in the SOA formation experiments led to rapid termination of peroxy radical chemistry.

  7. Vacuum Chambers for LEP sections

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    The picture shows sections of the LEP vacuum chambers to be installed in the dipole magnets (left) and in the quadrupoles (right). The dipole chamber has three channels: the beam chamber, the pumping duct where the NEG (non-evaporabe getter) is installed and the water channel for cooling (on top in the picture). The pumping duct is connected to the beam chamber through holes in the separating wall. The thick lead lining to shield radiation can also be seen. These chambers were manufactured as extruded aluminium alloy profiles.

  8. Evaluation of thermal stress in the anode chamber wall of a large volume magnetic bucket ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, Russell; Horiike, Hiroshi; Kuriyama, Masaaki; Ohara, Yoshihiro

    1984-02-01

    Thermal stress analysis was performed on the plasma chamber of the Large Volume Magnetic Multipole Bucket Ion Source (LVB) designed for use on the JT-60 NBI system. The energy absorbed by the walls of the plasma chambers of neutral beam injectors is of the order of 1% of the accelerator electrical drain power. A previous study indicates that a moderately high heat flux, of about 600W/cm 2 , is concentrated on the magnetic field cusp lines during normal full power operation. Abnormal arc discharges during conditioning of a stainless steel LVB produced localized melting of the stainless steel at several locations near the cusps lines. The power contained in abnormal arc discharges (arc spots) was estimated from the observed melting. Thermal stress analysis was performed numerically on representative sections of the copper LVB design for both stable and abnormal arc discharge conditions. Results show that this chamber should not fail due to thermal fatigue stesses arising from normal arc discharges. However, fatigue failure may occur after several hundred to a few thousand arc spots of 30mS duration at any one location. Limited arc discharge operation of the copper bucket was performed to partially verify the chamber's durability. (author)

  9. Monte Carlo modeling of ion chamber performance using MCNP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, J D

    2012-12-01

    Ion Chambers have a generally flat energy response with some deviations at very low (2 MeV) energies. Some improvements in the low energy response can be achieved through use of high atomic number gases, such as argon and xenon, and higher chamber pressures. This work looks at the energy response of high pressure xenon-filled ion chambers using the MCNP Monte Carlo package to develop geometric models of a commercially available high pressure ion chamber (HPIC). The use of the F6 tally as an estimator of the energy deposited in a region of interest per unit mass, and the underlying assumptions associated with its use are described. The effect of gas composition, chamber gas pressure, chamber wall thickness, and chamber holder wall thicknesses on energy response are investigated and reported. The predicted energy response curve for the HPIC was found to be similar to that reported by other investigators. These investigations indicate that improvements to flatten the overall energy response of the HPIC down to 70 keV could be achieved through use of 3 mm-thick stainless steel walls for the ion chamber.

  10. Dynamics of cylindrical domain walls in smectic C liquid crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, I W; Wigham, E J

    2009-01-01

    An analysis of the dynamics of cylindrical domain walls in planar aligned samples of smectic C liquid crystals is presented. A circular magnetic field, induced by an electric current, drives a time-dependent reorientation of the corresponding radially dependent director field. Nonlinear approximations to the relevant nonlinear dynamic equation, derived from smectic continuum theory, are solved in a comoving coordinated frame: exact solutions are found for a π-wall and numerical solutions are calculated for π/2-walls. Each calculation begins with an assumed initial state for the director that is a prescribed cylindrical domain wall. Such an initial wall will proceed to expand or contract as its central core propagates radially inwards or outwards, depending on the boundary conditions for the director, the elastic constants, the magnitude of the field and the sign of the magnetic anisotropy of the liquid crystal

  11. Measurement of radon concentration in air employing Lucas chamber; Pomiar koncentracji radonu za pomoca komory Lucasa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machaj, B.

    1997-12-31

    The results of investigations aimed to determine the main features of radon concentration gauge in air, employing 0.17 L Lucas chamber, and air sample forced by an air pump are presented. For two hour sampling and measuring cycle time the dynamic error in the worst case (first read out) equals 5 % relative to the step jump of radon concentration. This is due to the increase of activity of the decay products in the chamber. It was observed that the short lived radon decay products (Po-218, Pb-214, Bi-214) are depositing on the walls of the chamber and they are not removed by flushing the chamber with air. (author). 4 refs, 19 figs, 2 tabs.

  12. Pencil-shaped radiation detection ionization chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, A.

    1979-01-01

    A radiation detection ionization chamber is described. It consists of an elongated cylindrical pencil-shaped tubing forming an outer wall of the chamber and a center electrode disposed along the major axis of the tubing. The length of the chamber is substantially greater than the diameter. A cable connecting portion at one end of the chamber is provided for connecting the chamber to a triaxial cable. An end support portion is connected at the other end of the chamber for supporting and tensioning the center electrode. 17 claims

  13. Arabidopsis Regenerating Protoplast: A Powerful Model System for Combining the Proteomics of Cell Wall Proteins and the Visualization of Cell Wall Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Yokoyama, Ryusuke; Kuki, Hiroaki; Kuroha, Takeshi; Nishitani, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    The development of a range of sub-proteomic approaches to the plant cell wall has identified many of the cell wall proteins. However, it remains difficult to elucidate the precise biological role of each protein and the cell wall dynamics driven by their actions. The plant protoplast provides an excellent means not only for characterizing cell wall proteins, but also for visualizing the dynamics of cell wall regeneration, during which cell wall proteins are secreted. It therefore offers a uni...

  14. Dynamic consideration of smog chamber experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. K. Chuang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies of the α-pinene + ozone reaction that address particle nucleation show relatively high molar yields of highly oxidized multifunctional organic molecules with very low saturation concentrations that can form and grow new particles on their own. However, numerous smog-chamber experiments addressing secondary organic aerosol (SOA mass yields, interpreted via equilibrium partitioning theory, suggest that the vast majority of SOA from α-pinene is semivolatile. We explore this paradox by employing a dynamic volatility basis set (VBS model that reproduces the new-particle growth rates observed in the CLOUD experiment at CERN and then modeling SOA mass yield experiments conducted at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU. We find that the base-case simulations do overpredict observed SOA mass but by much less than an equilibrium analysis would suggest; this is because delayed condensation of vapors suppresses the apparent mass yields early in the chamber experiments. We further find that a second VBS model featuring substantial oligomerization of semivolatile monomers can match the CLOUD growth rates with substantially lower SOA mass yields; this is because the lighter monomers have a higher velocity and thus a higher condensation rate for a given mass concentration. The oligomerization simulations are a closer match to the CMU experiments than the base-case simulations, though they overpredict the observations somewhat. However, we also find that if the chemical conditions in CLOUD and the CMU chamber were identical, substantial nucleation would have occurred in the CMU experiments when in fact none occurred. This suggests that the chemical mechanisms differed in the two experiments, perhaps because the high oxidation rates in the SOA formation experiments led to rapid termination of peroxy radical chemistry.

  15. Numerical investigations of cooling holes system role in the protection of the walls of a gas turbine combustion chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben Sik Ali, Ahlem; Kriaa, Wassim; Mhiri, Hatem [Ecole Nationale D' Ingenieurs de Monastir, Unite de Thermique et Thermodynamique des Procedes industriels, Monastir (Tunisia); Bournot, Philippe [IUSTI, UMR CNRS 6595, Marseille (France)

    2012-05-15

    Numerical simulations in a gas turbine Swirl stabilized combustor were conducted to investigate the effectiveness of a cooling system in the protection of combustor walls. The studied combustion chamber has a high degree of geometrical complexity related to the injection system as well as the cooling system based on a big distribution of small holes (about 3,390 holes) bored on the flame tube walls. Two cases were considered respectively the flame tube without and with its cooling system. The calculations were carried out using the industrial CFD code FLUENT 6.2. The various simulations made it possible to highlight the role of cooling holes in the protection of the flame tube walls against the high temperatures of the combustion products. In fact, the comparison between the results of the two studied cases demonstrated that the walls temperature can be reduced by about 800 C by the mean of cooling holes technique. (orig.)

  16. Dynamics of one-dimensional domain walls interacting with disorder potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krusin-Elbaum, L.; Shibauchi, T.; Argyle, B.; Gignac, L.; Zabel, T.; Weller, D.

    2001-01-01

    Dynamics of 1D perpendicular-anisotropy domain walls in a few monolayer-thin Co films is imaged by polar Kerr microscopy. When domain walls, driven by a square-pulsed magnetic fields, travel through a random disordered potential landscape, they display Gaussian-distributed roughness characteristic of this landscape. Average velocity of the domain wall driven by a constant magnetic field strongly depends on a strain field which modifies (increases) the elastic energy of the wall and reduces the wall velocity

  17. Molecular Dynamics Analyses on Microscopic Contact Angle - Effect of Wall Atom Configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahiro Ito; Yosuke Hirata; Yutaka Kukita

    2006-01-01

    Boiling or condensing phenomena of liquid on the solid surface is greatly affected by the wetting condition of the liquid to the solid. Although the contact angle is one of the most important parameter to represent the wetting condition, the behavior of the contact angle is not understood well, especially in the dynamic condition. In this study we made molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the microscopic contact angle behavior under several conditions on the numerical density of the wall atoms. In the analyses, when the number density of the wall is lower, the changing rate of the dynamics contact angles for the variation of ΔV was higher than those for the case where the wall density is higher. This is mainly due to the crystallization of the fluid near the wall and subsequent decrease in the slip between the fluid and the wall. The analyses also show that the static contact angle decreases with increase in the number density of the wall. This was mainly induced by the increase in the number density of the wall itself. (authors)

  18. Conceptual Engineering Method for Attenuating He Ion Interactions on First Wall Components in the Fusion Test Facility (FTF) Employing a Low-Pressure Noble Gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gentile, C.A.; Blanchard, W.R.; Kozub, T.; Priniski, C.; Zatz, I.; Obenschain, S.

    2009-01-01

    It has been shown that post detonation energetic helium ions can drastically reduce the useful life of the (dry) first wall of an IFE reactor due to the accumulation of implanted helium. For the purpose of attenuating energetic helium ions from interacting with first wall components in the Fusion Test Facility (FTF) target chamber, several concepts have been advanced. These include magnetic intervention (MI), deployment of a dynamically moving first wall, use of a sacrificial shroud, designing the target chamber large enough to mitigate the damage caused by He ions on the target chamber wall, and the use of a low pressure noble gas resident in the target chamber during pulse power operations. It is proposed that employing a low-pressure (∼ 1 torr equivalent) noble gas in the target chamber will thermalize energetic helium ions prior to interaction with the wall. The principle benefit of this concept is the simplicity of the design and the utilization of (modified) existing technologies for pumping and processing the noble ambient gas. Although the gas load in the system would be increased over other proposed methods, the use of a 'gas shield' may provide a cost effective method of greatly extending the first wall of the target chamber. An engineering study has been initiated to investigate conceptual engineering methods for implementing a viable gas shield strategy in the FTF.

  19. Phakic iris-fixated intraocular lens placement in the anterior chamber: effects on aqueous flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repetto, Rodolfo; Pralits, Jan O; Siggers, Jennifer H; Soleri, Paolo

    2015-05-01

    Phakic intraocular lenses (pIOLs) are used for correcting vision; in this paper we investigate the fluid dynamical effects of an iris-fixated lens in the anterior chamber. In particular, we focus on changes in the wall shear stress (WSS) on the cornea and iris, which could be responsible for endothelial and pigment cell loss, respectively, and also on the possible increase of the intraocular pressure, which is known to correlate with the incidence of secondary glaucoma. We use a mathematical model to study fluid flow in the anterior chamber in the presence of a pIOL. The governing equations are solved numerically using the open source software OpenFOAM. We use an idealized standard geometry for the anterior chamber and a realistic geometric description of the pIOL. We consider separately the main mechanisms that produce fluid flow in the anterior chamber. The numerical simulations allow us to obtain a detailed description of the velocity and pressure distribution in the anterior chamber, and indicated that implantation of the pIOL significantly modifies the fluid dynamics in the anterior chamber. However, lens implantation has negligible influence on the intraocular pressure and does not produce a significant increase of the shear stress on the cornea, while the shear stress on the iris, although increased, is not enough to cause detachment of cells. We conclude that alterations in the fluid dynamics in the anterior chamber as a result of lens implantation are unlikely to be the cause of medical complications associated with its use.

  20. Chamber technology concepts for inertial fusion energy: Three recent examples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meier, W.R.; Moir, R.W.; Abdou, M.A.

    1997-01-01

    The most serious challenges in the design of chambers for inertial fusion energy (IFE) are 1) protecting the first wall from fusion energy pulses on the order of several hundred megajoules released in the form of x rays, target debris, and high energy neutrons, and 2) operating the chamber at a pulse repetition rate of 5-10 Hz (i.e., re-establishing, the wall protection and chamber conditions needed for beam propagation to the target between pulses). In meeting these challenges, designers have capitalized on the ability to separate the fusion burn physics from the geometry and environment of the fusion chamber. Most recent conceptual designs use gases or flowing liquids inside the chamber. Thin liquid layers of molten salt or metal and low pressure, high-Z gases can protect the first wall from x rays and target debris, while thick liquid layers have the added benefit of protecting structures from fusion neutrons thereby significantly reducing the radiation damage and activation. The use of thick liquid walls is predicted to 1) reduce the cost of electricity by avoiding the cost and down time of changing damaged structures, and 2) reduce the cost of development by avoiding the cost of developing a new, low-activation material. Various schemes have been proposed to assure chamber clearing and renewal of the protective features at the required pulse rate. Representative chamber concepts are described, and key technical feasibility issues are identified for each class of chamber. Experimental activities (past, current, and proposed) to address these issues and technology research and development needs are discussed

  1. Electromechanical dynamic analysis for the drum driving system of the long-wall shearer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changzhao Liu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The drum driving system is one of the weakest parts of the long-wall shearer, and some methods are also needed to monitor and control the long-wall shearer to adapt to the important trend of unmanned operation in future mining systems. Therefore, it is essential to conduct an electromechanical dynamic analysis for the drum driving system of the long-wall shearer. First, a torsional dynamic model of planetary gears is proposed which is convenient to be connected to the electric motor model for electromechanical dynamic analysis. Next, an electromechanical dynamic model for the drum driving system is constructed including the electric motor, the gear transmission system, and the drum. Then, the electromechanical dynamic characteristics are simulated when the shock loads are acted on the drum driving system. Finally, some advices are proposed for improving the reliability, monitoring the operating state, and choosing the control signals of the long-wall shearer based on the simulation.

  2. Results from the MAC Vertex chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, H.N.

    1987-05-01

    The design, construction, and performance characteristics of a high precision gaseous drift chamber made of thin walled proportional tubes are described. The device achieved an average spatial resolution of 45 μm in use for physics analysis with the MAC detector. The B-lifetime result obtained with this chamber is discussed

  3. Dynamical correlations for vicious random walk with a wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagao, Taro

    2003-01-01

    A one-dimensional system of nonintersecting Brownian particles is constructed as the diffusion scaling limit of Fisher's vicious random walk model. N Brownian particles start from the origin at time t=0 and undergo mutually avoiding motion until a finite time t=T. Dynamical correlation functions among the walkers are exactly evaluated in the case with a wall at the origin. Taking an asymptotic limit N→∞, we observe discontinuous transitions in the dynamical correlations. It is further shown that the vicious walk model with a wall is equivalent to a parametric random matrix model describing the crossover between the Bogoliubov-deGennes universality classes

  4. A statistical state dynamics approach to wall turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, B F; Gayme, D F; Ioannou, P J

    2017-03-13

    This paper reviews results obtained using statistical state dynamics (SSD) that demonstrate the benefits of adopting this perspective for understanding turbulence in wall-bounded shear flows. The SSD approach used in this work employs a second-order closure that retains only the interaction between the streamwise mean flow and the streamwise mean perturbation covariance. This closure restricts nonlinearity in the SSD to that explicitly retained in the streamwise constant mean flow together with nonlinear interactions between the mean flow and the perturbation covariance. This dynamical restriction, in which explicit perturbation-perturbation nonlinearity is removed from the perturbation equation, results in a simplified dynamics referred to as the restricted nonlinear (RNL) dynamics. RNL systems, in which a finite ensemble of realizations of the perturbation equation share the same mean flow, provide tractable approximations to the SSD, which is equivalent to an infinite ensemble RNL system. This infinite ensemble system, referred to as the stochastic structural stability theory system, introduces new analysis tools for studying turbulence. RNL systems provide computationally efficient means to approximate the SSD and produce self-sustaining turbulence exhibiting qualitative features similar to those observed in direct numerical simulations despite greatly simplified dynamics. The results presented show that RNL turbulence can be supported by as few as a single streamwise varying component interacting with the streamwise constant mean flow and that judicious selection of this truncated support or 'band-limiting' can be used to improve quantitative accuracy of RNL turbulence. These results suggest that the SSD approach provides new analytical and computational tools that allow new insights into wall turbulence.This article is part of the themed issue 'Toward the development of high-fidelity models of wall turbulence at large Reynolds number'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  5. A mathematical model of aerosol holding chambers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zak, M; Madsen, J; Berg, E

    1999-01-01

    A mathematical model of aerosol delivery from holding chambers (spacers) was developed incorporating tidal volume (VT), chamber volume (Vch), apparatus dead space (VD), effect of valve insufficiency and other leaks, loss of aerosol by immediate impact on the chamber wall, and fallout of aerosol...... in the chamber with time. Four different spacers were connected via filters to a mechanical lung model, and aerosol delivery during "breathing" was determined from drug recovery from the filters. The formula correctly predicted the delivery of budesonide aerosol from the AeroChamber (Trudell Medical, London...

  6. Lifetime survivability of contaminated target-chamber optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rainer, F.; Anderson, A.; Burnham, A.; Milam, D.; Turner, R.

    1996-11-01

    Target chambers used for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) expose laser optics to a very hostile environment, not only from high-fluence laser irradiation but also x-ray irradiation and particulate debris from targets and chamber wall materials. Expendable debris shields provide the first line of defense to more costly optics upstream in the laser beam path to contaminants generated within the target chamber. However, the replacement of a large number of debris shields is also an expensive proposition so that extending their usable lifetime within the chamber is important. We have conducted tests to show that optics can both be cleaned and damaged by laser irradiation at 355 nm after being contaminated with potential chamber-wall materials such as B 4 C and Al 2 O 3 . Such optics can survive from one to hundreds of laser shots, depending on degree of contamination and laser fluence levels. Similarly, we have studied the survivability of optics that have been exposed to direct contamination from representative target materials irradiated in the target chamber. We have also studied the effects on optics that were not directly exposed to targets, yet received secondary exposure from the above directly-exposed samples

  7. One-dimensional flame instability and control of burning in fire-chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor E. Volkov

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The flame stability with regard to one-dimensional exponential perturbations both for the combustion in the fire-chamber and the flame propagating in closed tubes or chambers is investigated. It is proved that both stability and instability are possible for the combustion process. At the same time the one-dimensional flame instability is guaranteed near the front wall of the fire-chamber where the fuel supply is realized. Therefore the control of combustion in the fire-chamber leads to support of the flame at the maximum possible distance from the front wall of the fire-chamber to prevent the vibratory combustion or to diminish intensity of pulsations if these pulsations are inevitable.

  8. Thermal dynamic simulation of wall for building energy efficiency under varied climate environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuejin; Zhang, Yujin; Hong, Jing

    2017-08-01

    Aiming at different kind of walls in five cities of different zoning for thermal design, using thermal instantaneous response factors method, the author develops software to calculation air conditioning cooling load temperature, thermal response factors, and periodic response factors. On the basis of the data, the author gives the net work analysis about the influence of dynamic thermal of wall on air-conditioning load and thermal environment in building of different zoning for thermal design regional, and put forward the strategy how to design thermal insulation and heat preservation wall base on dynamic thermal characteristic of wall under different zoning for thermal design regional. And then provide the theory basis and the technical references for the further study on the heat preservation with the insulation are in the service of energy saving wall design. All-year thermal dynamic load simulating and energy consumption analysis for new energy-saving building is very important in building environment. This software will provide the referable scientific foundation for all-year new thermal dynamic load simulation, energy consumption analysis, building environment systems control, carrying through farther research on thermal particularity and general particularity evaluation for new energy -saving walls building. Based on which, we will not only expediently design system of building energy, but also analyze building energy consumption and carry through scientific energy management. The study will provide the referable scientific foundation for carrying through farther research on thermal particularity and general particularity evaluation for new energy saving walls building.

  9. Bicone vacuum chamber for ISR intersection

    CERN Multimedia

    1975-01-01

    This is one of the bicone chambers made of titanium for experiment R 702. The central corrugated part had a very thin titanium wall (0.28 mm). The first of these chambers collapsed in its central part when baked at 300 C (August 1975). After an intensive effort to develop better quality and reproducible welds for this special material, the ISR workshop was able to build two new chambers of this type. One of them was installed at I 7 for R 702 in 1976 and worked perfectly. It was at that time the most "transparent" intersection vacuum chamber. See also 7609219, 7609221.

  10. Crystallization sequence of the Upper Border Series of the Skaergaard Intrusion: Revised subdivision and implications for Chamber-Scale Magma Homogeneity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salmonsen, Lars Peter; Tegner, Christian

    2013-01-01

    from the roof of the magma chamber, differs from that in the Layered Series formed at the floor. The proposed deviation would require chemical stratification of the magma, and a reexamination of the crystallization sequence therefore has important implications for understanding the dynamics...... of the crystallization sequences and the anorthite contents of plagioclase cores in the three series imply that the Skaergaard magma chamber solidified by in situ crystallization along the floor, walls and roof from one, largely homogenous, convecting magma body....

  11. Ion chamber instrument

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephan, D.H.

    1975-01-01

    An electrical ionization chamber is described having a self-supporting wall of cellular material which is of uniform areal density and formed of material, such as foamed polystyrene, having an average effective atomic number between about 4 and about 9, and easily replaceable when on the instrument. (auth)

  12. Near wall combustion modeling in spark ignition engines. Part A: Flame–wall interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demesoukas, Sokratis; Caillol, Christian; Higelin, Pascal; Boiarciuc, Andrei; Floch, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A model for flame–wall interaction in addition to flame wrinkling by turbulence is proposed. • Two sparkplug positions and two lengths are used in a test engine for model validation. • Flame–wall interaction decreases the maximum values of cylinder pressure and heat release rates. • The impact of combustion chamber geometry is taken into account by the flame–wall interaction model. - Abstract: Research and design in the field of spark ignition engines seek to achieve high performance while conserving fuel economy and low pollutant emissions. For the evaluation of various engine configurations, numerical simulations are favored, since they are quick and less expensive than experiments. Various zero-dimensional combustion models are currently used. Both flame front reactions and post-flame processes contribute to the heat release rate. The first part of this study focuses on the role of the flame front on the heat release rate, by modeling the interaction of the flame front with the chamber wall. Post-flame reactions are dealt with in Part B of the study. The basic configurations of flame quenching in laminar flames are also applicable in turbulent flames, which is the case in spark ignition engines. A simplified geometric model of the combustion chamber was used to calculate the mean flame surface, the flame volume and the distribution of flame surface as a function of the distance from the wall. The flame–wall interaction took into account the geometry of the combustion chamber and of the flame, aerodynamic turbulence and the in-cylinder pressure and temperature conditions, through a phenomenological attenuation function of the wrinkling factor. A modified global wrinkling factor as a function of the mean surface distance distribution from the wall was calculated. The impact of flame–wall interaction was simulated for four configurations of the sparkplug position and length: centered and lateral position, and standard and projected

  13. Pre-eruptive magmatic processes re-timed using a non-isothermal approach to magma chamber dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrone, Chiara Maria; Bugatti, Giuseppe; Braschi, Eleonora; Tommasini, Simone

    2016-10-05

    Constraining the timescales of pre-eruptive magmatic processes in active volcanic systems is paramount to understand magma chamber dynamics and the triggers for volcanic eruptions. Temporal information of magmatic processes is locked within the chemical zoning profiles of crystals but can be accessed by means of elemental diffusion chronometry. Mineral compositional zoning testifies to the occurrence of substantial temperature differences within magma chambers, which often bias the estimated timescales in the case of multi-stage zoned minerals. Here we propose a new Non-Isothermal Diffusion Incremental Step model to take into account the non-isothermal nature of pre-eruptive processes, deconstructing the main core-rim diffusion profiles of multi-zoned crystals into different isothermal steps. The Non-Isothermal Diffusion Incremental Step model represents a significant improvement in the reconstruction of crystal lifetime histories. Unravelling stepwise timescales at contrasting temperatures provides a novel approach to constraining pre-eruptive magmatic processes and greatly increases our understanding of magma chamber dynamics.

  14. Nuclear design considerations for Z-IFE chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, W.R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-641, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States)]. E-mail: meier5@llnl.gov; Schmitt, R.C. [Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory, Pittsburgh, PA 15203 (United States); Abbott, R.P. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-641, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Latkowski, J.F. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-641, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Reyes, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, L-641, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States)

    2006-02-15

    Z-pinch driven IFE (Z-IFE) requires the design of a repetitive target insertion system that allows coupling of the pulsed power to the target with adequate standoff, and a chamber that can withstand blast and radiation effects from large yield targets. The present strategy for Z-IFE is to use high yield targets ({approx}2-3 GJ/shot), low repetition rate per chamber ({approx}0.1 Hz), and 10 chambers per power plant. In this study, we propose an alternative power plant configuration that uses very high yield targets (20 GJ/shot) in a single chamber operating at 0.1 Hz. A thick-liquid-wall chamber is proposed to absorb the target emission (X-rays, debris and neutrons) and mitigate the blast effects on the chamber wall. The target is attached to the end of a conical shaped recyclable transmission line (RTL) made from a solid coolant (e.g., frozen flibe), or a material that is easily separable from the coolant (e.g., steel). The RTL/target assembly is inserted through a single opening at the top of the chamber for each shot. This study looks at the RTL material choice from a safety and environmental point of view. Materials were assessed according to waste disposal rating (WDR) and contact dose rate (CDR). Neutronics calculations, using the TART2002 Monte Carlo code from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), were performed for the RTL and Z-IFE chamber, and key results reported here.

  15. Investigation on the electron flux to the wall in the VENUS ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thuillier, T., E-mail: thuillier@lpsc.in2p3.fr; Angot, J. [LPSC, Université Grenoble-Alpes, CNRS/IN2P3, 53 rue des Martyrs, 38026 Grenoble Cedex (France); Benitez, J. Y.; Hodgkinson, A.; Lyneis, C. M.; Todd, D. S.; Xie, D. Z. [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    The long-term operation of high charge state electron cyclotron resonance ion sources fed with high microwave power has caused damage to the plasma chamber wall in several laboratories. Porosity, or a small hole, can be progressively created in the chamber wall which can destroy the plasma chamber over a few year time scale. A burnout of the VENUS plasma chamber is investigated in which the hole formation in relation to the local hot electron power density is studied. First, the results of a simple model assuming that hot electrons are fully magnetized and strictly following magnetic field lines are presented. The model qualitatively reproduces the experimental traces left by the plasma on the wall. However, it is too crude to reproduce the localized electron power density for creating a hole in the chamber wall. Second, the results of a Monte Carlo simulation, following a population of scattering hot electrons, indicate a localized high power deposited to the chamber wall consistent with the hole formation process. Finally, a hypervapotron cooling scheme is proposed to mitigate the hole formation in electron cyclotron resonance plasma chamber wall.

  16. Fusion energy research with lasers, direct drive targets, and dry wall chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sethian, J.D.; Obenschain, S.P.; Myers, M.

    2003-01-01

    We are carrying out a coordinated, focused effort to develop Laser Inertial Fusion Energy. The key components are developed in concert with one another and the science and engineering issues are addressed concurrently. Significant progress has been made in this program: We are evaluating target designs that show it could be possible to achieve the high gains (>100) needed for a practical fusion system. These have a low density CH foam that is wicked with solid DT, and over coated with a thin high-Z layer. Significant advances have been made with the two types of laser are being developed: Krypton Fluoride (KrF) gas lasers and Diode Pumped Solid State Lasers (DPPSL). Both have the potential to meet the fusion energy requirements for rep-rate, efficiency, durability and cost. This paper also presents the advances in development of chamber operating windows (target survival plus no wall erosion), final optics (aluminum at grazing incidence has high reflectivity and exceeds required laser damage threshold), target fabrication (advanced foams and high Z overcoats), and target injection (new facility for target injection and tracking studies). (author)

  17. Segmental front line dynamics of randomly pinned ferroelastic domain walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puchberger, S.; Soprunyuk, V.; Schranz, W.; Carpenter, M. A.

    2018-01-01

    Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) measurements as a function of temperature, frequency, and dynamic force amplitude are used to perform a detailed study of the domain wall motion in LaAlO3. In previous DMA measurements Harrison et al. [Phys. Rev. B 69, 144101 (2004), 10.1103/PhysRevB.69.144101] found evidence for dynamic phase transitions of ferroelastic domain walls in LaAlO3. In the present work we focus on the creep-to-relaxation region of domain wall motion using two complementary methods. We determine, in addition to dynamic susceptibility data, waiting time distributions of strain jerks during slowly increasing stress. These strain jerks, which result from self-similar avalanches close to the depinning threshold, follow a power-law behavior with an energy exponent ɛ =1.7 ±0.1 . Also, the distribution of waiting times between events follows a power law N (tw) ∝tw-(n +1 ) with an exponent n =0.9 , which transforms to a power law of susceptibility S (ω ) ∝ω-n . The present dynamic susceptibility data can be well fitted with a power law, with the same exponent (n =0.9 ) up to a characteristic frequency ω ≈ω* , where a crossover from stochastic DW motion to the pinned regime is well described using the scaling function of Fedorenko et al. [Phys. Rev. B 70, 224104 (2004), 10.1103/PhysRevB.70.224104].

  18. Localization of vector field on dynamical domain wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masafumi Higuchi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In the previous works (arXiv:1202.5375 and arXiv:1402.1346, the dynamical domain wall, where the four dimensional FRW universe is embedded in the five dimensional space–time, has been realized by using two scalar fields. In this paper, we consider the localization of vector field in three formulations. The first formulation was investigated in the previous paper (arXiv:1510.01099 for the U(1 gauge field. In the second formulation, we investigate the Dvali–Shifman mechanism (arXiv:hep-th/9612128, where the non-abelian gauge field is confined in the bulk but the gauge symmetry is spontaneously broken on the domain wall. In the third formulation, we investigate the Kaluza–Klein modes coming from the five dimensional graviton. In the Randall–Sundrum model, the graviton was localized on the brane. We show that the (5,μ components (μ=0,1,2,3 of the graviton are also localized on the domain wall and can be regarded as the vector field on the domain wall. There are, however, some corrections coming from the bulk extra dimension if the domain wall universe is expanding.

  19. Assessment of condensation of water vapor in the mixing chamber by CFD method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojkůvková Petra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The analyzed topic belongs to the field of design and operation of HVAC systems, focusing mainly on mixing chambers. The paper deals with problems of condensation and freezing of water vapour on walls of mixing chambers in a special case, when the partial pressure of the final resulting state of the mixture of warm moist air and colder air is located above the saturation limit. Experimental in situ methods and computer computational fluid dynamics (CFD modelling method were used for processing. The main contribution of this work is the finding that partial condensation and freezing of water vapour may occur in local parts of the mixing chamber. It causes problems in terms of hygienic safety and service life of these devices. In particular it has been found that condensation and freezing of water vapour may occur even if relative humidity of the resulting mixture is about 70 %.

  20. A computational approach for inferring the cell wall properties that govern guard cell dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolfenden, Hugh C; Bourdais, Gildas; Kopischke, Michaela; Miedes, Eva; Molina, Antonio; Robatzek, Silke; Morris, Richard J

    2017-10-01

    Guard cells dynamically adjust their shape in order to regulate photosynthetic gas exchange, respiration rates and defend against pathogen entry. Cell shape changes are determined by the interplay of cell wall material properties and turgor pressure. To investigate this relationship between turgor pressure, cell wall properties and cell shape, we focused on kidney-shaped stomata and developed a biomechanical model of a guard cell pair. Treating the cell wall as a composite of the pectin-rich cell wall matrix embedded with cellulose microfibrils, we show that strong, circumferentially oriented fibres are critical for opening. We find that the opening dynamics are dictated by the mechanical stress response of the cell wall matrix, and as the turgor rises, the pectinaceous matrix stiffens. We validate these predictions with stomatal opening experiments in selected Arabidopsis cell wall mutants. Thus, using a computational framework that combines a 3D biomechanical model with parameter optimization, we demonstrate how to exploit subtle shape changes to infer cell wall material properties. Our findings reveal that proper stomatal dynamics are built on two key properties of the cell wall, namely anisotropy in the form of hoop reinforcement and strain stiffening. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Experimental Biology.

  1. Combustion Chamber Fluid Dynamics and Hypergolic Gel Propellant Chemistry Simulations for Selectable Thrust Rocket Engines

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nusca, Michael J; Chen, Chiung-Chu; McQuaid, Michael J

    2007-01-01

    .... Computational fluid dynamics is employed to model the chemically reacting flow within a system's combustion chamber, and computational chemistry is employed to characterize propellant physical and reactive properties...

  2. Determination of the Kwall correction factor for a cylindrical ionization chamber to measure air-kerma in 60Co gamma beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laitano, R.F.; Toni, M.P.; Pimpinella, M.; Bovi, M.

    2002-01-01

    The factor K wall to correct for photon attenuation and scatter in the wall of ionization chambers for 60 Co air-kerma measurement has been traditionally determined by a procedure based on a linear extrapolation of the chamber current to zero wall thickness. Monte Carlo calculations by Rogers and Bielajew (1990 Phys. Med. Biol. 35 1065-78) provided evidence, mostly for chambers of cylindrical and spherical geometry, of appreciable deviations between the calculated values of K wall and those obtained by the traditional extrapolation procedure. In the present work an experimental method other than the traditional extrapolation procedure was used to determine the K wall factor. In this method the dependence of the ionization current in a cylindrical chamber was analysed as a function of an effective wall thickness in place of the physical (radial) wall thickness traditionally considered in this type of measurement. To this end the chamber wall was ideally divided into distinct regions and for each region an effective thickness to which the chamber current correlates was determined. A Monte Carlo calculation of attenuation and scatter effects in the different regions of the chamber wall was also made to compare calculation to measurement results. The K wall values experimentally determined in this work agree within 0.2% with the Monte Carlo calculation. The agreement between these independent methods and the appreciable deviation (up to about 1%) between the results of both these methods and those obtained by the traditional extrapolation procedure support the conclusion that the two independent methods providing comparable results are correct and the traditional extrapolation procedure is likely to be wrong. The numerical results of the present study refer to a cylindrical cavity chamber like that adopted as the Italian national air-kerma standard at INMRI-ENEA (Italy). The method used in this study applies, however, to any other chamber of the same type. (author)

  3. Scale testing of a partially confined blast chamber

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Grundling, W

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available in pressure readings. A scale model of the blast chamber, Emily, was constructed with the addition of a pendulum plate hanging concentrically covering 65% of the open area. PURPOSE OF SCALED BLAST CHAMBER The purpose of this particular test is to evaluate... PHASE Illustrated in Figure 3 and 4 are the results obtained during testing of the scaled blast chamber. In both cases the pressure dissipates over time, showing pulsating behaviour as the shockwaves reflect off the chamber walls. By looking...

  4. Bench measurement of vacuum chamber impedances with wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shafer, R.E.

    1979-01-01

    Particle beams travelling in an accelerator or storage ring vacuum chamber produce electric and magnetic fields which interact with the walls of the chamber. The induced wall currents in turn generate secondary fields which can interact with the beam, giving rise to both energy loss and other effects which can cause beam instability. In many simple geometries these effects can be calculated. In more complex geometries the calculations are difficult and very approximate. For this reason it is important that the effects be measured if possible prior to installation. As accelerators become larger and the number of vacuum chamber components more numerous, and as more severe beam intensity and stability requirements are placing lower limits on the longitudinal and transverse impedances, a less than adequate component will be more likely to limit machine performance

  5. Skin effect modifications of the Resistive Wall Mode dynamics in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villone, Fabio, E-mail: villone@unicas.it [Ass. Euratom/ENEA/CREATE, DIEI, Università di Cassino e del Lazio Meridionale, Via Di Biasio 43, 03043 Cassino, FR (Italy); Pustovitov, Vladimir D. [Institute of Tokamak Physics, National Research Centre ‘Kurchatov Institute’, Pl. Kurchatova 1, Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation)

    2013-11-22

    We present the first evidence of the skin-effect modification of the Resistive Wall Mode (RWM) dynamics in a tokamak. The computations are performed with the CarMa code, using its unique ability of treating volumetric 3D conducting structures. The results prove that conventional thin-wall models and codes, assuming the thin equivalent wall located on the inner side of a real (thick) wall, may fail to get accurate estimates of RWM growth rates, since the inclusion of the skin effect makes the growth rates always larger than otherwise. The difference is noticeable even for the conventional slow RWMs and becomes substantial for faster modes. Some possible equivalent thin-wall modeling approaches are also discussed.

  6. Lifetime tests for MAC vertex chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, H.

    1986-01-01

    A vertex chamber for MAC was proposed in fall 1983 to increase precision in the measurement of the B hadron and tau lepton lifetimes. The chamber had to be placed within the existing central drift chamber, making access for repairs difficult and costly. Therefore for detector elements thin-walled aluminized mylar drift tubes (straws) were used because of their simplicity and robustness. The diameter of the drift tubes was 6.9 mm. The radial extent of the proposed chamber was from 3 cm to 10 cm, the inner wall of the central drift. It was clear that radiation levels, from synchrotron x-rays and overfocussed electrons, were potentially high. Since the drift distance is short in the straws, it was desirable to operate them at the highest possible gas gain, to achieve the best spatial resolution. There was a likelihood of drawing large currents in the chamber and thus causing radiation damage. Therefore a study of radiation hardness under the conditions of their proposed design was undertaken. In tests, argon-hydrocarbon mixtures consistently became unusable at ∼0.05 C/cm collected charge, due to anode buildup. Argon-CO 2 mixtures, while underquenched, were operational to 0.25 C/cm, at which point loss of cathode material became intolerable. Argon-xenon-CO 2 proved to be quenched as well as argon-hydrocarbons, but was limited by cathode damage. The MAC vertex chamber has operated at a distance of 4.6 cm from the e + e - interaction point at PEP for two years and has shown no aging effects

  7. Charged domain-wall dynamics in doped antiferromagnets and spin fluctuations in cuprate superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaanen, J.; Horbach, M.L.; van Saarloos, W.

    1996-01-01

    Evidence is accumulating that the electron liquid in the cuprate superconductors is characterized by many-hole correlations of the charged magnetic domain-wall type. Here we focus on the strong-coupling limit where all holes are bound to domain walls. We assert that at high temperatures a classical domain-wall fluid is realized and show that the dynamics of such a fluid is characterized by spatial and temporal crossover scales set by temperature itself. The fundamental parameters of this fluid are such that the domain-wall motions dominate the low-frequency spin fluctuations and we derive predictions for the behavior of the dynamical magnetic susceptibility. We argue that a crossover occurs from a high-temperature classical to a low-temperature quantum regime, in direct analogy with helium. We discuss some general characteristics of the domain-wall quantum liquid, realized at low temperatures. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  8. Conceptual design of the fast ignition laser fusion power plant (KOYO-Fast). 6. Design of chamber and reactor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozaki, Yasuji; Norimatsu, Takayoshi; Furukawa, Hiroyuki; Hayashi, Takumi; Souman, Yoshihito; Nishikawa, Masabumi; Tomabechi, Ken

    2007-01-01

    A conceptual design of the reactor chamber system with LiPb liquid wall based on the fast ignition cone target design and the related reactor systems with exhaust system, laser beam shutter, blanket and cooling system are summarized. The multi overflow fall method was investigated as the structure of chamber and repeating 4 Hz pulse potential. The ablation depth of LiPb liquid wall was estimated and the conditions of repeat of operation were evaluated. The basic design of chamber, selection and conditions of liquid wall chamber, recycle type multi overflow fall (MOF) wall, LiPb two layers blanket structure, basic specification of reactor system, laser beam line shutter, design of chamber exhaust system, cooling system, tritium recovery system, power plant total design and arrangement of chamber and laser beam, and issues are stated. (S.Y.)

  9. Dynamic behavior and functional integrity tests on RC shear walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akino, Kinji; Nasuda, Toshiaki; Shibata, Akenori.

    1991-01-01

    A project consisting of seven subprojects has been conducted to study the dynamic behavior and functional integrity of reinforced concrete (RC) shear walls in reactor buildings. The objective of this project is to obtain the data to improve and prepare the seismic analysis code regarding the nonlinear structural behavior and integrity of reactor buildings during and after earthquakes. The project started in April, 1986, and will end in March, 1994. Seven subprojects are strain rate test, damping characteristic test, ultimate state response test and the verification test for the test of restoring force characteristics regarding dynamic restoring force characteristics and damping performance; the restoring force characteristic test on the shear walls with openings; and pull-out strength test and the test on air leakage through concrete cracks regarding the functional integrity. The objectives of respective subprojects, the test models and the interim results are reported. Three subprojects have been completed by March, 1990. The results of these projects will be used for the overall evaluation. The strain rate test showed that the ultimate strength of shear walls increased with strain rate. A formula for estimating air flow through the cracks in walls was given by the leakage test. (K.I.)

  10. Conceptual design strategy for liquid-metal-wall inertial-fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monsler, M.J.; Meier, W.R.

    1981-02-01

    The liquid-metal-wall chamber has emerged as an attractive reactor concept for inertial fusion energy conversion. The principal feature of this concept is a thick, free-flowing blanket of liquid metal used to protect the structure of the reactor. The development and design of liquid-metal-wall chambers over the past decade provides a basis for formulating a conceptual design strategy for such chambers. Both the attractive and unattractive features of a LMW chamber are enumerated, and a design strategy is formulated which accommodates the engineering constraints while minimizing the liquid-metal flow rate

  11. Conceptual design strategy for liquid-metal-wall inertial-fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monsler, M.J.; Meier, W.R.

    1981-02-01

    The liquid-metal-wall chamber has emerged as an attractive reactor concept for inertial fusion energy conversion. The principal feature of this concept is a thick, free-flowing blanket of liquid metal used to protect the structure of the reactor. The development and design of liquid-metal-wall chambers over the past decade provides a basis for formulating a conceptual design strategy for such chambers. Both the attractive and unattractive features of a LMW chamber are enumerated, and a design strategy is formulated which accommodates the engineering constraints while minimizing the liquid-metal flow rate.

  12. Combined effect of upstream surge chamber and sloping ceiling tailrace tunnel on dynamic performance of turbine regulating system of hydroelectric power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Wencheng; Yang, Jiandong

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Nonlinear mathematical model and Hopf bifurcation analysis of turbine regulating system are presented. • Dynamic performance of turbine regulating system under 0.5 times Thoma sectional area is analyzed and a novel dynamic performance is revealed. • Relationship between two bifurcation lines and wave superposition is studied. • Combined effect mechanisms of upstream surge chamber and sloping ceiling tailrace tunnel on stability are revealed and optimization methods are proposed. - Abstract: Based on the nonlinear mathematical model of the turbine regulating system of hydroelectric power plant with upstream surge chamber and sloping ceiling tailrace tunnel and the Hopf bifurcation theory, this paper firstly studies the dynamic performance of the turbine regulating system under 0.5 times Thoma sectional area of surge chamber, and reveals a novel dynamic performance. Then, the relationship between the two bifurcation lines and the wave superposition of upstream surge chamber and sloping ceiling tailrace tunnel is analyzed. Finally, the effect mechanisms of the wave superposition on the system stability are investigated, and the methods to improve the system stability are proposed. The results indicate that: Under the combined effect of upstream surge chamber and sloping ceiling tailrace tunnel, the dynamic performance of the turbine regulating system of hydroelectric power plant shows an obvious difference on the two sides of the critical sectional area of surge chamber. There are two bifurcation lines for the condition of 0.5 times Thoma sectional area, i.e. Bifurcation line 1 and Bifurcation line 2, which represent the stability characteristics of the flow oscillation of “penstock-sloping ceiling tailrace tunnel” and the water-level fluctuation in upstream surge chamber, respectively. The stable domain of the system is determined by Bifurcation line 2. The effect of upstream surge chamber mainly depends on its sectional area, while the

  13. Domain-wall dynamics in glass-coated magnetic microwires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varga, R.; Zhukov, A.; Usov, N.; Blanco, J.M.; Gonzalez, J.; Zhukova, V.; Vojtanik, P.

    2007-01-01

    Glass-coated magnetic microwires with positive magnetostriction show peculiar domain structure that consists mostly of one large domain with magnetization-oriented axially. It was shown that small closure domains appear at the end of the microwire in order to decrease the stray fields. As a result of such domain structure, the magnetization reversal in axial direction runs through the depinning of one of such closure domains and subsequent propagation of the corresponding domain wall. Quite unusual domain-wall (DW) dynamics of the DW propagation predicted previously from the theory has been found in such amorphous microwires. In this paper, we are dealing with the DW dynamics of glass-coated microwires with small positive magnetostriction. The DW damping coming from the structural relaxation dominates at low temperatures as a result of the decrease of the mobility of the structural atomic-level defects. Negative critical propagation field points to the possible DW propagation without applied magnetic field. Probable explanation could be in terms of the effective mass of the DW

  14. Comparing calibration methods of electron beams using plane-parallel chambers with absorbed-dose to water based protocols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, K.J.; Seuntjens, J.P.

    2002-01-01

    Recent absorbed-dose-based protocols allow for two methods of calibrating electron beams using plane-parallel chambers, one using the N D,w Co for a plane-parallel chamber, and the other relying on cross-calibration of the plane-parallel chamber in a high-energy electron beam against a cylindrical chamber which has an N D,w Co factor. The second method is recommended as it avoids problems associated with the P wall correction factors at 60 Co for plane-parallel chambers which are used in the determination of the beam quality conversion factors. In this article we investigate the consistency of these two methods for the PTW Roos, Scanditronics NACP02, and PTW Markus chambers. We processed our data using both the AAPM TG-51 and the IAEA TRS-398 protocols. Wall correction factors in 60 Co beams and absorbed-dose beam quality conversion factors for 20 MeV electrons were derived for these chambers by cross-calibration against a cylindrical ionization chamber. Systematic differences of up to 1.6% were found between our values of P wall and those from the Monte Carlo calculations underlying AAPM TG-51, and up to 0.6% when comparing with the IAEA TRS-398 protocol. The differences in P wall translate directly into differences in the beam quality conversion factors in the respective protocols. The relatively large spread in the experimental data of P wall , and consequently the absorbed-dose beam quality conversion factor, confirms the importance of the cross-calibration technique when using plane-parallel chambers for calibrating clinical electron beams. We confirmed that for well-guarded plane-parallel chambers, the fluence perturbation correction factor at d max is not significantly different from the value at d ref . For the PTW Markus chamber the variation in the latter factor is consistent with published fits relating it to average energy at depth

  15. Dynamic analysis of the Nova Target Chamber to assess alignment errors due to ambient noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCallen, D.B.; Murray, R.C.

    1984-01-01

    We performed a study to determine the dynamic behavior of the Nova Target Chamber. We conducted a free vibration analysis to determine the natural frequencies of vibration and the corresponding modeshapes of the target chamber. Utilizing the free vibration results, we performed forced vibration analysis to predict the displacements of the chamber due to ambient vibration. The input support motion for the forced vibration analysis was defined by a white noise acceleration spectrum which was based on previous measurements of ground noise near the Nova site. A special purpose computer program was prepared to process the results of the forced vibration analysis. The program yields distances by which the lines of sight of the various laser beams miss the target as a result of ambient vibrations. We also performed additional estimates of miss distance to provide bounds on the results. A description of the finite element model of the chamber, the input spectrum, and the results of the analyses are included

  16. Optical wall dynamics induced by coexistence of monostable and bistable spatial regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odent, V; Louvergneaux, E; Clerc, M G; Andrade-Silva, I

    2016-11-01

    When nonequilibrium extended homogeneous systems exhibit multistability, it leads to the presence of domain walls between the existing equilibria. Depending on the stability of the steady states, the dynamics differs. Here, we consider the interface dynamics in the case of a spatially inhomogeneous system, namely, an optical system where the control parameter is spatially Gaussian. Then interfaces connect the monostable and the bistable nonuniform states that are associated with two distinct spatial regions. The coexistence of these two regions of different stability induces relaxation dynamics and the propagation of a wall with a time-dependent speed. We emphasize analytically these two dynamical behaviors using a generic bistable model. Experimentally, an inhomogeneous Gaussian light beam traveling through either a dye-doped liquid crystal cell or a Kerr cavity depicts these behaviors, in agreement with the theoretical predictions.

  17. IFE chamber dry wall materials response to pulsed X-rays and ions at power-plant level fluences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renk, T.J. E-mail: tjrenk@sandia.gov; Olson, C.L.; Tanaka, T.J.; Ulrickson, M.A.; Rochau, G.A.; Peterson, R.R.; Golovkin, I.E.; Thompson, M.O.; Knowles, T.R.; Raffray, A.R.; Tillack, M.S

    2003-04-01

    We have begun a collaborative investigation of the response of candidate first-wall inertial fusion energy (IFE) reactor chamber drywall materials to X-rays on the Z facility, and to ions on RHEPP-1, both located at Sandia National Laboratories. Dose levels are comparable to those anticipated in future direct-drive reactors. Due to the 5-10 Hz repetition rate expected in such reactors, per-pulse effects such as material removal must be negligible. The primary wall materials investigated here are graphite and tungsten in various forms. After exposure on either RHEPP or Z, materials were analyzed for roughening and/or material removal (ablation) as a function of dose. Graphite is observed to undergo significant ablation/sublimation in response to ion exposure at the 3-4 J/cm{sup 2} level, significantly below doses expected in future dry-wall power plants. Evidence of thermomechanical stresses resulting in material loss occurs for both graphite and tungsten, and is probably related to the pulsed nature of the energy delivery. These effects are not seen in typical magnetic fusion energy (MFE) conditions where these same kinds of materials are used. Results are presented for thresholds below which no roughening or ablation occurs. Use of graphite in a 'velvet' two-dimensional form may mitigate the effects seen with the flat material, and alloying tungsten with rhenium may reduce its roughening due to the increased ductility of the alloy.

  18. Development of Aluminium Vacuum Chambers for the LHC Experiments at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Gallilee, M; Costa-Pinto, P; Lepeule, P; Perez-Espinos, J; Marques Antunes Ferreira, L; Prever-Loiri, L; Sapountzis, A

    2014-01-01

    Beam losses may cause activation of vacuum chamber walls, in particular those of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experiments. For the High Luminosity (HL-LHC), the activation of such vacuum chambers will increase. It is therefore necessary to use a vacuum chamber material which interacts less with the circulating beam. While beryllium is reserved for the collision point, a good compromise between cost, availability and transparency is obtained with aluminium alloys; such materials are a preferred choice with respect to austenitic stainless steel. Manufacturing a thin-wall aluminium vacuum chamber presents several challenges as the material grade needs to be machinable, weldable, leak-tight for small thicknesses, and able to withstand heating to 250°C for extended periods of time. This paper presents some of the technical challenges during the manufacture of these vacuum chambers and the methods for overcoming production difficulties, including surface treatments and Non-Evaporable Getter (NEG) thin-film coat...

  19. Studies of tungsten erosion at the inner and outer main chamber wall of the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabasso, A.; Maier, H.; Roth, J.; Krieger, K.; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2001-03-01

    A critical issue for the choice of main chamber first wall materials in future fusion devices such as ITER is the erosion rate due to bombardment by charge-exchange (CX) neutrals. Due to the relatively small flux density of impacting particles, respective measurements are only possible using long term samples (LTS) exposed for a full experimental campaign. In ASDEX Upgrade, CX erosion has been studied extensively for tungsten on the inner heat shield by placing four W coated tiles at different poloidal positions in one toroidal sector. During the same campaign, several LTS were placed at different poloidal and toroidal positions of the outer wall. 13C and Cu coated graphite probes were also used in order to test and compare W low and medium Z alternatives. The erosion results from the probes are compared with the calculated erosion [W. Eckstein, C. Garcia-Rosales, J. Roth, W. Ottenberger IPP Report, IPP 9/82]; [H. Verbeek, J. Stober, D. Coster, W. Eckstein, R. Schneider Nucl. Fus. 38 (1998) 12] and a figure of merit (F. of M.) between several materials is proposed which also takes into account the plasma isotope effect in CX erosion.

  20. Studies of tungsten erosion at the inner and outer main chamber wall of the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabasso, A.; Maier, H.; Roth, J.; Krieger, K.

    2001-01-01

    A critical issue for the choice of main chamber first wall materials in future fusion devices such as ITER is the erosion rate due to bombardment by charge-exchange (CX) neutrals. Due to the relatively small flux density of impacting particles, respective measurements are only possible using long term samples (LTS) exposed for a full experimental campaign. In ASDEX Upgrade, CX erosion has been studied extensively for tungsten on the inner heat shield by placing four W coated tiles at different poloidal positions in one toroidal sector. During the same campaign, several LTS were placed at different poloidal and toroidal positions of the outer wall. 13 C and Cu coated graphite probes were also used in order to test and compare W low and medium Z alternatives. The erosion results from the probes are compared with the calculated erosion [W. Eckstein, C. Garcia-Rosales, J. Roth, W. Ottenberger IPP Report, IPP 9/82]; [H. Verbeek, J. Stober, D. Coster, W. Eckstein, R. Schneider Nucl. Fus. 38 (1998) 12] and a figure of merit (F. of M.) between several materials is proposed which also takes into account the plasma isotope effect in CX erosion

  1. Gravitational domain walls and the dynamics of the gravitational constant G

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunster, Claudio; Gomberoff, Andrés

    2017-07-01

    From the point of view of elementary particle physics, the gravitational constant G is extraordinarily small. This has led to asking whether it could have decayed to its present value from an initial one commensurate with microscopical units. A mechanism that leads to such a decay is proposed herein. It is based on assuming that G may take different values within regions of the universe separated by a novel kind of domain wall, a "G -wall." The idea is implemented by introducing a gauge potential Aμ ν ρ, and its conjugate D , which determines the value of G as an integration constant rather than a fundamental constant. The value of G jumps when one goes through a G -wall. The procedure extends one previously developed for the cosmological constant, but the generalization is far from straightforward: (i) The intrinsic geometry of a G -wall is not the same as seen from its two sides because the second law of black hole thermodynamics mandates that the jump in G must cause a discontinuity in the scale of length. (ii) The size of the decay step in G is controlled by a function G (D ) which may be chosen so as to diminish the value of G towards the asymptote G =0 . It is shown that: (i) The dynamics of the gravitational field with G treated as a dynamical variable, coupled to G -walls and matter, follows from an action principle, which is given. (ii) A particle that impinges on a G -wall may be refracted or reflected. (iii) The various forces between two particles change when a G -wall is inserted in between them. (iv) G -walls may be nucleated trough tunneling and thermal effects, whose semiclassical probabilities are evaluated. (v) If the action principle is constructed properly, the entropy of a black hole increases when the value of the gravitational constant is changed through the absorption of a G-wall by the hole.

  2. Impact of beam transport method on chamber and driver design for heavy ion inertial fusion energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, D.V.; Welch, D.R.; Olson, C.L.; Yu, S.S.; Neff, S.; Sharp, W.M.

    2002-12-01

    In heavy ion inertial fusion energy systems, intense beams of ions must be transported from the exit of the final focus magnet system through the target chamber to hit millimeter spot sizes on the target. In this paper, we examine three different modes of beam propagation: neutralized ballistic transport, assisted pinched transport, and self-pinched transport. The status of our understanding of these three modes is summarized, and the constraints imposed by beam propagation upon the chamber environment, as well as their compatibility with various chamber and target concepts, are considered. We conclude that, on the basis of our present understanding, there is a reasonable range of parameter space where beams can propagate in thick-liquid wall, wetted-wall, and dry-wall chambers.

  3. Characterization and modeling of magnetic domain wall dynamics using reconstituted hysteresis loops from Barkhausen noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ducharne, B., E-mail: Benjamin.ducharne@insa-lyon.fr; Le, M.Q.; Sebald, G.; Cottinet, P.J.; Guyomar, D.; Hebrard, Y.

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Barkhausen noise energy versus excitation field hysteresis cycles MBN{sub energy}(H). • Difference in the dynamics of the induction field B and of the MBN{sub energy}. • Dynamic behavior of MBN{sub energy}(H) cycles is first-order. • Dynamic behavior of B(H) cycles is non-entire order. - Abstract: By means of a post-processing technique, we succeeded in plotting magnetic Barkhausen noise energy hysteresis cycles MBN{sub energy}(H). These cycles were compared to the usual hysteresis cycles, displaying the evolution of the magnetic induction field B versus the magnetic excitation H. The divergence between these comparisons as the excitation frequency was increased gave rise to the conclusion that there was a difference in the dynamics of the induction field and of the MBN{sub energy} related to the domain wall movements. Indeed, for the MBN{sub energy} hysteresis cycle, merely the domain wall movements were involved. On the other hand, for the usual B(H) cycle, two dynamic contributions were observed: domain wall movements and diffusion of the magnetic field excitation. From a simulation point of view, it was demonstrated that over a large frequency bandwidth a correct dynamic behavior of the domain wall movement MBN{sub energy}(H) cycle could be taken into account using first-order derivation whereas fractional orders were required for the B(H) cycles. The present article also gives a detailed description of how to use the developed process to obtain the MBN{sub energy}(H) hysteresis cycle as well as its evolution as the frequency increases. Moreover, this article provides an interesting explanation of the separation of magnetic loss contributions through a magnetic sample: a wall movement contribution varying according to first-order dynamics and a diffusion contribution which in a lump model can be taken into account using fractional order dynamics.

  4. Proposal to negotiate a collaboration agreement for the design and prototyping of a machine for laser treatment of metallic vacuum chamber walls for electron cloud mitigation at the High Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Proposal to negotiate a collaboration agreement for the design and prototyping of a machine for laser treatment of metallic vacuum chamber walls for electron cloud mitigation at the High Luminosity LHC

  5. High vacuum test of the dynamic components of the cyclotron dee chamber at the 224 cm variable energy cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chintalapudi, S.N.; Bandopadhyay, D.K.; Ghosh, D.K.; Gowariker, S.R.

    1979-01-01

    The 224 cm Variable Energy Cyclotron constructed and commissioned at Calcutta comprises a number of dynamic components in the high vacuum Dee Chamber. The static and dynamic conditions of these components have to be tested for high vacuum worthiness prior to their installation in the Dee Tank. A special set up was fabricated and used for simulating the Dee Chamber conditions and testing the components. A high vacuum of the order of 1 x 10 -5 torr was achieved under both dynamic and static conditions with and without coolant hydraulic pressures. The details of the set up, methods employed for the various tests carried out and the results obtained are described. (auth.)

  6. Mapping of the seasonal dynamic properties of building walls in actual periodic conditions and effects produced by solar radiation incident on the outer and inner surfaces of the wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazzeo, D.; Oliveti, G.; Arcuri, N.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Dynamic thermal behaviour of building walls subjected to actual periodic loadings. • Dynamic parameters of wall in terms of energy and of heat flux are defined. • Different solar absorption coefficients and orientations of wall are considered. • On the internal surface is present or absent a shortwave radiant field. • Seasonal thermal characteristics for different plant operating regime are provided. - Abstract: In this work, the dynamic characteristics of the external walls of air-conditioned buildings subject to the joint action of periodic non-sinusoidal external and internal loadings are determined. The dynamic parameters used are the energy decrement factor, which is evaluated by means of the fluctuating heat flux in a semi-period exiting and entering the wall, the decrement factor of the maximum peak and minimum peak of the heat flux in a period and the relative time lags. The fluctuating heat flux in the wall in steady periodic regime conditions is determined with an analytical model obtained by resolving the equivalent electrical circuit. The preceding parameters are used for a study of the influence of solar radiation on the dynamic characteristics of the walls in summer and winter air-conditioning. Solar radiation is considered as operating on the external surface and on the internal surface due to the presence in the indoor environments of a shortwave radiant field. The absorbed solar heat flux by the external surface varies, modifying the solar absorption coefficient and wall orientation. Indoors, we considered a continuous operating regime of the plant and a regime with nocturnal attenuation. The results obtained, relating to 1152 different boundary conditions, were used for the construction of maps of dynamic characteristics, different on variation of the plant functioning regime and of the shortwave radiant load on the internal surface. The maps show the dependence of the decrement factors and of the time lags on variation of

  7. Modeling and simulation of combustion chamber and propellant dynamics and issues in active control of combustion instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isella, Giorgio Carlo

    A method for a comprehensive approach to analysis of the dynamics of an actively controlled combustion chamber, with detailed analysis of the combustion models for the case of a solid rocket propellant, is presented here. The objective is to model the system as interconnected blocks describing the dynamics of the chamber, combustion and control. The analytical framework for the analysis of the dynamics of a combustion chamber is based on spatial averaging, as introduced by Culick. Combustion dynamics are analyzed for the case of a solid propellant. Quasi-steady theory is extended to include the dynamics of the gas-phase and also of a surface layer. The models are constructed so that they produce a combustion response function for the solid propellant that can be immediately introduced in the our analytical framework. The principal objective mechanisms responsible for the large sensitivity, observed experimentally, of propellant response to small variations. We show that velocity coupling, and not pressure coupling, has the potential to be the mechanism responsible for that high sensitivity. We also discuss the effect of particulate modeling on the global dynamics of the chamber and revisit the interpretation of the intrinsic stability limit for burning of solid propellants. Active control is also considered. Particular attention is devoted to the effect of time delay (between sensing and actuation); several methods to compensate for it are discussed, with numerical examples based on the approximate analysis produced by our framework. Experimental results are presented for the case of a Dump Combustor. The combustor exhibits an unstable burning mode, defined through the measurement of the pressure trace and shadowgraph imaging. The transition between stable and unstable modes of operation is characterized by the presence of hysteresis, also observed in other experimental works, and hence not a special characteristic of this combustor. Control is introduced in the

  8. Gravity-induced dynamics of a squirmer microswimmer in wall proximity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rühle, Felix; Blaschke, Johannes; Kuhr, Jan-Timm; Stark, Holger

    2018-02-01

    We perform hydrodynamic simulations using the method of multi-particle collision dynamics and a theoretical analysis to study a single squirmer microswimmer at high Péclet number, which moves in a low Reynolds number fluid and under gravity. The relevant parameters are the ratio α of swimming to bulk sedimentation velocity and the squirmer type β. The combination of self-propulsion, gravitational force, hydrodynamic interactions with the wall, and thermal noise leads to a surprisingly diverse behavior. At α > 1 we observe cruising states, while for α < 1 the squirmer resides close to the bottom wall with the motional state determined by stable fixed points in height and orientation. They strongly depend on the squirmer type β. While neutral squirmers permanently float above the wall with upright orientation, pullers float for α larger than a threshold value {α }th} and are pinned to the wall below {α }th}. In contrast, pushers slide along the wall at lower heights, from which thermal orientational fluctuations drive them into a recurrent floating state with upright orientation, where they remain on the timescale of orientational persistence.

  9. Nonlinear Dynamics of a Bubble Contrast Agent Oscillating near an Elastic Wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garashchuk, Ivan R.; Sinelshchikov, Dmitry I.; Kudryashov, Nikolay A.

    2018-05-01

    Contrast agent microbubbles, which are encapsulated gas bubbles, are widely used to enhance ultrasound imaging. There are also several new promising applications of the contrast agents such as targeted drug delivery and noninvasive therapy. Here we study three models of the microbubble dynamics: a nonencapsulated bubble oscillating close to an elastic wall, a simple coated bubble and a coated bubble near an elastic wall.We demonstrate that complex dynamics can occur in these models. We are particularly interested in the multistability phenomenon of bubble dynamics. We show that coexisting attractors appear in all of these models, but for higher acoustic pressures for the models of an encapsulated bubble.We demonstrate how several tools can be used to localize the coexisting attractors. We provide some considerations why the multistability can be undesirable for applications.

  10. Radon progeny distribution in cylindrical diffusion chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pressyanov, Dobromir S.

    2008-01-01

    An algorithm to model the diffusion of radioactive decay chain atoms is presented. Exact mathematical solutions in cylindrical geometry are given. They are used to obtain expressions for the concentrations of 222 Rn progeny atoms in the volume and deposited on the wall surface in cylindrical diffusion chambers. The dependence of volume fractions of 222 Rn progeny and chamber sensitivity on the coefficient of diffusion of 222 Rn progeny atoms in air is modeled.

  11. Asymmetric driven dynamics of Dzyaloshinskii domain walls in ultrathin ferromagnetic strips with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sánchez-Tejerina, L. [Dpto. Electricidad y Electrónica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Valladolid, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Alejos, Ó., E-mail: oscaral@ee.uva.es [Dpto. Electricidad y Electrónica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Valladolid, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Martínez, E. [Dpto. Física Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Salamanca, 37011 Salamanca (Spain); Muñoz, J.M. [Dpto. Electricidad y Electrónica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Valladolid, 47011 Valladolid (Spain)

    2016-07-01

    The dynamics of domain walls in ultrathin ferromagnetic strips with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy is studied from both numerical and analytical micromagnetics. The influence of a moderate interfacial Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction associated to a bi-layer strip arrangement has been considered, giving rise to the formation of Dzyaloshinskii domain walls. Such walls possess under equilibrium conditions an inner magnetization structure defined by a certain orientation angle that make them to be considered as intermediate configurations between Bloch and Néel walls. Two different dynamics are considered, a field-driven and a current-driven dynamics, in particular, the one promoted by the spin torque due to the spin-Hall effect. Results show an inherent asymmetry associated with the rotation of the domain wall magnetization orientation before reaching the stationary regime, characterized by a constant terminal speed. For a certain initial DW magnetization orientation at rest, the rotation determines whether the reorientation of the DW magnetization prior to reach stationary motion is smooth or abrupt. This asymmetry affects the DW motion, which can even reverse for a short period of time. Additionally, it is found that the terminal speed in the case of the current-driven dynamics may depend on either the initial DW magnetization orientation at rest or the sign of the longitudinally injected current. - Highlights: • The asymmetric response of domain walls in bilayer strips with PMA is studied. • Out-of-plane fields and SHE longitudinal currents are applied. • The response is associated to the rotation of the domain wall inner magnetization. • Clockwise and counter-clockwise magnetization rotations are not equivalent. • The asymmetry results in different travelled distances and/or terminal speeds.

  12. Asymmetric driven dynamics of Dzyaloshinskii domain walls in ultrathin ferromagnetic strips with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sánchez-Tejerina, L.; Alejos, Ó.; Martínez, E.; Muñoz, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of domain walls in ultrathin ferromagnetic strips with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy is studied from both numerical and analytical micromagnetics. The influence of a moderate interfacial Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction associated to a bi-layer strip arrangement has been considered, giving rise to the formation of Dzyaloshinskii domain walls. Such walls possess under equilibrium conditions an inner magnetization structure defined by a certain orientation angle that make them to be considered as intermediate configurations between Bloch and Néel walls. Two different dynamics are considered, a field-driven and a current-driven dynamics, in particular, the one promoted by the spin torque due to the spin-Hall effect. Results show an inherent asymmetry associated with the rotation of the domain wall magnetization orientation before reaching the stationary regime, characterized by a constant terminal speed. For a certain initial DW magnetization orientation at rest, the rotation determines whether the reorientation of the DW magnetization prior to reach stationary motion is smooth or abrupt. This asymmetry affects the DW motion, which can even reverse for a short period of time. Additionally, it is found that the terminal speed in the case of the current-driven dynamics may depend on either the initial DW magnetization orientation at rest or the sign of the longitudinally injected current. - Highlights: • The asymmetric response of domain walls in bilayer strips with PMA is studied. • Out-of-plane fields and SHE longitudinal currents are applied. • The response is associated to the rotation of the domain wall inner magnetization. • Clockwise and counter-clockwise magnetization rotations are not equivalent. • The asymmetry results in different travelled distances and/or terminal speeds.

  13. Investigation of thermal and temporal responses of ionization chambers in radiation dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlMasri, Hussein; Funyu, Akira; Kakinohana, Yasumasa; Murayama, Sadayuki

    2012-07-01

    The ionization chamber is a primary dosimeter that is used in radiation dosimetry. Generally, the ion chamber response requires temperature/pressure correction according to the ideal gas law. However, this correction does not consider the thermal volume effect of chambers. The temporal and thermal volume effects of various chambers (CC01, CC13, NACP parallel-plate, PTW) with different wall and electrode materials have been studied in a water phantom. Measurements were done after heating the water with a suitable heating system, and chambers were submerged for a sufficient time to allow for temperature equilibrium. Temporal results show that all chambers equilibrate quickly in water. The equilibration time was between 3 and 5 min for all chambers. Thermal results show that all chambers expanded in response to heating except for the PTW, which contracted. This might be explained by the differences in the volumes of all chambers and also by the difference in wall material composition of PTW from the other chambers. It was found that the smallest chamber, CC01, showed the greatest expansion. The magnitude of the expansion was ~1, 0.8, and 0.9% for CC01, CC13, and parallel-plate chambers, respectively, in the temperature range of 295-320 K. The magnitude of the detected contraction was <0.3% for PTW in the same temperature range. For absolute dosimetry, it is necessary to make corrections for the ion chamber response, especially for small ion chambers like the CC01. Otherwise, room and water phantom temperatures should remain within a close range.

  14. Combined centroid-envelope dynamics of intense, magnetically focused charged beams surrounded by conducting walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiuza, K.; Rizzato, F.B.; Pakter, R.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we analyze the combined envelope-centroid dynamics of magnetically focused high-intensity charged beams surrounded by conducting walls. Similar to the case where conducting walls are absent, it is shown that the envelope and centroid dynamics decouple from each other. Mismatched envelopes still decay into equilibrium with simultaneous emittance growth, but the centroid keeps oscillating with no appreciable energy loss. Some estimates are performed to analytically obtain characteristics of halo formation seen in the full simulations

  15. ELM-Induced Plasma Wall Interactions in DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudakov, D.L.; Boedo, J.A.; Yu, J.H.; Brooks, N.H.; Fenstermacher, M.E.; Groth, M.; Hollmann, E.M.; Lasnier, C.J.; McLean, A.G.; Moyer, R.A.; Stangeby, P.C.; Tynan, G.R.; Wampler, W.R.; Watkins, J.G.; West, W.P.; Wong, C.C.; Zeng, L.; Bastasz, R.J.; Buchenauer, D.; Whaley, J.

    2008-01-01

    Intense transient fluxes of particles and heat to the main chamber components induced by edge localized modes (ELMs) are of serious concern for ITER. In DIII-D, plasma interaction with the outboard chamber wall is studied using Langmuir probes and optical diagnostics including a fast framing camera. Camera data shows that ELMs feature helical filamentary structures localized at the low field side of the plasma and aligned with the local magnetic field. During the nonlinear phase of an ELM, multiple filaments are ejected from the plasma edge and propagate towards the outboard wall with velocities of 0.5-0.7 km/s. When reaching the wall, filaments result in 'hot spots'--regions of local intense plasma-material interaction (PMI) where the peak incident particle and heat fluxes are up to 2 orders of magnitude higher than those between ELMs. This interaction pattern has a complicated geometry and is neither toroidally nor poloidally symmetric. In low density/collisionality H-mode discharges, PMI at the outboard wall is almost entirely due to ELMs. In high density/collisionality discharges, contributions of ELMs and inter-ELM periods to PMI at the wall are comparable. A Midplane Material Evaluation Station (MiMES) has been recently installed in order to conduct in situ measurements of erosion/redeposition at the outboard chamber wall, including those caused by ELMs

  16. Technical Note: A numerical test-bed for detailed ice nucleation studies in the AIDA cloud simulation chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. J. Cotton

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The AIDA (Aerosol Interactions and Dynamics in the Atmosphere aerosol and cloud chamber of Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe can be used to test the ice forming ability of aerosols. The AIDA chamber is extensively instrumented including pressure, temperature and humidity sensors, and optical particle counters. Expansion cooling using mechanical pumps leads to ice supersaturation conditions and possible ice formation. In order to describe the evolving chamber conditions during an expansion, a parcel model was modified to account for diabatic heat and moisture interactions with the chamber walls. Model results are shown for a series of expansions where the initial chamber temperature ranged from −20°C to −60°C and which used desert dust as ice forming nuclei. During each expansion, the initial formation of ice particles was clearly observed. For the colder expansions there were two clear ice nucleation episodes. In order to test the ability of the model to represent the changing chamber conditions and to give confidence in the observations of chamber temperature and humidity, and ice particle concentration and mean size, ice particles were simply added as a function of time so as to reproduce the observations of ice crystal concentration. The time interval and chamber conditions over which ice nucleation occurs is therefore accurately known, and enables the model to be used as a test bed for different representations of ice formation.

  17. Design and performance of a straw tube drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, S.H.; Wesson, D.K.; Cooke, J.; Goshaw, A.T.; Robertson, W.J.; Walker, W.D.

    1991-01-01

    The design and performance of the straw drift chambers used in E735 is reported. The chambers are constructed from 2.5 cm radius aluminized mylar straw tubes with wall thickness less than 0.2 mm. Also, presented are the results of tests with 2 mm radius straw tubes. The small tube has a direct detector application at the Superconducting Super Collider. (orig.)

  18. Design and performance of a straw tube drift chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, S. H.; Wesson, D. K.; Cooke, J.; Goshaw, A. T.; Robertson, W. J.; Walker, W. D.

    1991-06-01

    The design and performance of the straw drift chambers used in E735 is reported. The chambers are constructed from 2.5 cm radius aluminized mylar straw tubes with wall thickness less than 0.2 mm. Also, presented are the results of tests with 2 mm radius straw tubes. The small tube has a direct detector application at the Superconducting Super Collider.

  19. The Impedance of Multi-layer Vacuum Chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Vos, L

    2003-01-01

    Many components of the LHC vacuum chamber have multi-layered walls : the copper coated cold beam screen, the titanium coated ceramic chamber of the dump kickers, the ceramic chamber of the injection kickers coated with copper stripes, only to name a few. Theories and computer programs are available for some time already to evaluate the impedance of these elements. Nevertheless, the algorithm developed in this paper is more convenient in its application and has been used extensively in the design phase of multi-layer LHC vacuum chamber elements. It is based on classical transmission line theory. Closed expressions are derived for simple layer configurations, while beam pipes involving many layers demand a chain calculation. The algorithm has been tested with a number of published examples and was verified with experimental data as well.

  20. In-situ testing of aircraft and satellites using a transportable reverberation chamber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leferink, Frank Bernardus Johannes

    2009-01-01

    A transportable reverberation chamber with vibrating walls to create high field strength has been developed, called Vibrating Intrinsic Reverberation Chamber (VIRC). It creates a statistically uniform electromagnetic field without the use of a rotating mode stirrer, resulting in a better homogeneity

  1. Structural behavior and dynamics of an anomalous fluid between attractive and repulsive walls: templating, molding, and superdiffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leoni, Fabio; Franzese, Giancarlo

    2014-11-07

    Confinement can modify the dynamics, the thermodynamics, and the structural properties of liquid water, the prototypical anomalous liquid. By considering a generic model for anomalous liquids, suitable for describing solutions of globular proteins, colloids, or liquid metals, we study by molecular dynamics simulations the effect that an attractive wall with structure and a repulsive wall without structure have on the phases, the crystal nucleation, and the dynamics of the fluid. We find that at low temperatures the large density of the attractive wall induces a high-density, high-energy structure in the first layer ("templating" effect). In turn, the first layer induces a "molding" effect on the second layer determining a structure with reduced energy and density, closer to the average density of the system. This low-density, low-energy structure propagates further through the layers by templating effect and can involve all the existing layers at the lowest temperatures investigated. Therefore, although the high-density, high-energy structure does not self-reproduce further than the first layer, the structured wall can have a long-range influence thanks to a sequence of templating, molding, and templating effects through the layers. We find that the walls also have an influence on the dynamics of the liquid, with a stronger effect near the attractive wall. In particular, we observe that the dynamics is largely heterogeneous (i) among the layers, as a consequence of the sequence of structures caused by the walls presence, and (ii) within the same layer, due to superdiffusive liquid veins within a frozen matrix of particles near the walls at low temperature and high density. Hence, the partial freezing of the first layer does not correspond necessarily to an effective reduction of the channel's section in terms of transport properties, as suggested by other authors.

  2. Pulsed fusion space propulsion: Computational Magneto-Hydro Dynamics of a multi-coil parabolic reaction chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanelli, Gherardo; Mignone, Andrea; Cervone, Angelo

    2017-10-01

    Pulsed fusion propulsion might finally revolutionise manned space exploration by providing an affordable and relatively fast access to interplanetary destinations. However, such systems are still in an early development phase and one of the key areas requiring further investigations is the operation of the magnetic nozzle, the device meant to exploit the fusion energy and generate thrust. One of the last pulsed fusion magnetic nozzle design is the so called multi-coil parabolic reaction chamber: the reaction is thereby ignited at the focus of an open parabolic chamber, enclosed by a series of coaxial superconducting coils that apply a magnetic field. The field, beside confining the reaction and preventing any contact between hot fusion plasma and chamber structure, is also meant to reflect the explosion and push plasma out of the rocket. Reflection is attained thanks to electric currents induced in conductive skin layers that cover each of the coils, the change of plasma axial momentum generates thrust in reaction. This working principle has yet to be extensively verified and computational Magneto-Hydro Dynamics (MHD) is a viable option to achieve that. This work is one of the first detailed ideal-MHD analysis of a multi-coil parabolic reaction chamber of this kind and has been completed employing PLUTO, a freely distributed computational code developed at the Physics Department of the University of Turin. The results are thus a preliminary verification of the chamber's performance. Nonetheless, plasma leakage through the chamber structure has been highlighted. Therefore, further investigations are required to validate the chamber design. Implementing a more accurate physical model (e.g. Hall-MHD or relativistic-MHD) is thus mandatory, and PLUTO shows the capabilities to achieve that.

  3. Numerical analysis of the thermo-fluid-dynamic field in the combustion chamber of an incinerator plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, M.; Dell'Isola, M.; Massarotti, N.

    2009-01-01

    As the interest for energy recovery from waste incineration has increased over the years, concern for the impact such processes have on the environment has also grown. To reduce such an impact, the legislation enforced in Italy and Europe imposes important restrictions on the temperature of the exhausts in the combustion chamber, which must be kept above certain values depending on the type of waste that is being incinerated, for a given period of time. Such conditions can be rather difficult and certainly very expensive to monitor with acceptable accuracy. In this work, a numerical approach is presented for modelling waste combustion in a full scale incineration plant. Both solid and gas phase reactions are considered. Various modes of heat and mass transfer between the waste bed, the air and the combustion products are taken into account, as well as radiation from the combustion chamber walls and the combustion products. The temperature distribution in the combustion chamber is obtained considering either forced or mixed convection. It is therefore shown that neglecting buoyancy effects may lead to appreciable errors. Verification of the code performance is based on comparison with the results of an experimental campaign at a full scale plant in Italy.

  4. Dynamic modeling and response of soil-wall systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veletsos, A.S.; Younan, A.H.

    1993-10-01

    The study reported herein is the third in a series of investigations motivated by need to gain improved understanding of the responses to earthquakes of deeply embedded and underground tanks storing radioactive wastes, and to develop rational but simple methods of analysis and design for such systems. Following a brief review of the errors that may result from the use of a popular model for evaluating the dynamic soil forces induced in a base-excited rigid wall retaining an elastic stratum, the sources of the errors are identified and a modification is proposed which defines correctly the action of the system. In the proposed modification, the stratum is modeled by a series of elastically supported, semi-infinite horizontal bars with distributed mass instead of massless springs. The concepts involved are introduced by reference to a system composed of a fixed-based wall and a homogeneous elastic stratum, and are then applied to the analysis of more complex soil-wall systems. Both harmonic and transient excitations are considered, and comprehensive numerical solutions are presented which elucidate the actions involved and the effects and relative importance of the relevant parameters

  5. Sympathetic stimulation alters left ventricular relaxation and chamber size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burwash, I G; Morgan, D E; Koilpillai, C J; Blackmore, G L; Johnstone, D E; Armour, J A

    1993-01-01

    Alterations in left ventricular (LV) contractility, relaxation, and chamber dimensions induced by efferent sympathetic nerve stimulation were investigated in nine anesthetized open-chest dogs in sinus rhythm. Supramaximal stimulation of acutely decentralized left stellate ganglia augmented heart rate, LV systolic pressure, and rate of LV pressure rise (maximum +dP/dt, 1,809 +/- 191 to 6,304 +/- 725 mmHg/s) and fall (maximum -dP/dt, -2,392 +/- 230 to -4,458 +/- 482 mmHg/s). It also reduced the time constant of isovolumic relaxation, tau (36.5 +/- 4.8 to 14.9 +/- 1.1 ms). Simultaneous two-dimensional echocardiography recorded reductions in end-diastolic and end-systolic LV cross-sectional chamber areas (23 and 31%, respectively), an increase in area ejection fraction (32%), and increases in end-diastolic and end-systolic wall thicknesses (14 and 13%, respectively). End-systolic and end-diastolic wall stresses were unchanged by stellate ganglion stimulation (98 +/- 12 to 95 +/- 9 dyn x 10(3)/cm2; 6.4 +/- 2.4 to 2.4 +/- 0.3 dyn x 10(3)/cm2, respectively). Atrial pacing to similar heart rates did not alter monitored indexes of contractility. Dobutamine and isoproterenol induced changes similar to those resulting from sympathetic neuronal stimulation. These data indicate that when the efferent sympathetic nervous system increases left ventricular contractility and relaxation, concomitant reductions in systolic and diastolic dimensions of that chamber occur that are associated with increasing wall thickness such that LV wall stress changes are minimized.

  6. Excitons in Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes and Their Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amori, Amanda R.; Hou, Zhentao; Krauss, Todd D.

    2018-04-01

    Understanding exciton dynamics in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is essential to unlocking the many potential applications of these materials. This review summarizes recent progress in understanding exciton photophysics and, in particular, exciton dynamics in SWCNTs. We outline the basic physical and electronic properties of SWCNTs, as well as bright and dark transitions within the framework of a strongly bound one-dimensional excitonic model. We discuss the many facets of ultrafast carrier dynamics in SWCNTs, including both single-exciton states (bright and dark) and multiple-exciton states. Photophysical properties that directly relate to excitons and their dynamics, including exciton diffusion lengths, chemical and structural defects, environmental effects, and photoluminescence photon statistics as observed through photon antibunching measurements, are also discussed. Finally, we identify a few key areas for advancing further research in the field of SWCNT excitons and photonics.

  7. Dynamics of premixed flames in a narrow channel with a step-wise wall temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurdyumov, Vadim N. [Department of Energy, CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Pizza, Gianmarco [Aerothermochemistry and Combustion Systems Laboratory, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich CH-8092 (Switzerland); Combustion Research, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen CH-5232 (Switzerland); Frouzakis, Christos E. [Aerothermochemistry and Combustion Systems Laboratory, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich CH-8092 (Switzerland); Mantzaras, John [Combustion Research, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen CH-5232 (Switzerland)

    2009-11-15

    The effect of channel height, inflow velocity and wall temperature on the dynamics and stability of unity Lewis number premixed flames in channels with specified wall temperature is investigated with steady and transient numerical simulations using a two-dimensional thermo-diffusive model. The simplified model is capable of capturing many of the transitions and the combustion modes observed experimentally and in direct numerical simulations in micro- and meso-scale channels, and indicates that the thermal flame/wall interaction is the mechanism leading to the observed flame instabilities. Finally, an ad-hoc one-dimensional model based on the flame-sheet approximation is tested in its capacity to reproduce some of the flame dynamics of the two-dimensional thermo-diffusive model. (author)

  8. Determination of non-uniformity correction factors for cylindrical ionization chambers close to 192Ir brachytherapy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toelli, H.; Bielajew, A. F.; Mattsson, O.; Sernbo, G.

    1995-01-01

    When ionization chambers are used in brachytherapy dosimetry, the measurements must be corrected for the non-uniformity of the incident photon fluence. The theory for determination of non-uniformity correction factors, developed by Kondo and Randolph (Rad. Res. 1960) assumes that the electron fluence within the air cavity is isotropic and does not take into account material differences in the chamber wall. The theory was extended by Bielajew (PMB 1990) using an anisotropic electron angular fluence in the cavity. In contrast to the theory by Kondo and Randolph, the anisotropic theory predicts a wall material dependence in the non-uniformity correction factors. This work presents experimental determination of non-uniformity correction factors at distances between 10 and 140 mm from an Ir-192 source. The experimental work makes use of a PTW23331-chamber and Farmer-type chambers (NE2571 and NE2581) with different materials in the walls. The results of the experiments agree well with the anisotropic theory. Due to the geometrical shape of the NE-type chambers, it is shown that the full length of the these chambers, 24.1mm, is not an appropriate input parameter when theoretical non-uniformity correction factors are evaluated

  9. Resolvent-based modeling of passive scalar dynamics in wall-bounded turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Scott; Saxton-Fox, Theresa; McKeon, Beverley

    2017-11-01

    The resolvent formulation of the Navier-Stokes equations expresses the system state as the output of a linear (resolvent) operator acting upon a nonlinear forcing. Previous studies have demonstrated that a low-rank approximation of this linear operator predicts many known features of incompressible wall-bounded turbulence. In this work, this resolvent model for wall-bounded turbulence is extended to include a passive scalar field. This formulation allows for a number of additional simplifications that reduce model complexity. Firstly, it is shown that the effect of changing scalar diffusivity can be approximated through a transformation of spatial wavenumbers and temporal frequencies. Secondly, passive scalar dynamics may be studied through the low-rank approximation of a passive scalar resolvent operator, which is decoupled from velocity response modes. Thirdly, this passive scalar resolvent operator is amenable to approximation by semi-analytic methods. We investigate the extent to which this resulting hierarchy of models can describe and predict passive scalar dynamics and statistics in wall-bounded turbulence. The support of AFOSR under Grant Numbers FA9550-16-1-0232 and FA9550-16-1-0361 is gratefully acknowledged.

  10. Absorbed dose to the urinary bladder wall for different radiopharmaceuticals using dynamic S-values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, M.; Minarik, D.; Mattsson, S.; Leide-Svegborn; Johansson, L.

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. Aim and background: the urinary bladder wall is a radiosensitive organ that can receive a high absorbed dose from radiopharmaceuticals used in diagnostic nuclear medicine. Current dynamic models estimate the photon and electron absorbed dose at the inner surface of the bladder wall. The aim of this work has been to create a more realistic estimation of the mean absorbed dose to the urinary bladder wall from different radiopharmaceuticals. This calculation also uses dynamic specific absorption fractions (SAF) that changes with bladder volume and are gender specific. Materials and Methods: the volume of the urinary bladder content was calculated using a spherical approximation with a urinary inflow of 1.0 ml/min and 0.5 ml/min during day and night time, respectively. The activity in the bladder content was described using a bi-exponential extraction from the body. The absorbed dose to the bladder wall was estimated using linear interpolation of SAF values from different bladder volumes, ranging from 10 ml to 800 ml. Administration of the activity was assumed to start at 09:00 with an initial voiding after 40 minutes and a voiding interval of 3.5 hours during the day. A six hour night gap, starting at midnight, with a voiding right before and after the night period, was used. Calculations were made, with the same assumptions, for an earlier dynamic bladder model and with a static SAF value from the ICRP/ICRU adult reference computational phantoms for a bladder containing 200 ml. Values for the absorbed dose per unit administered activity for 19 commonly used radiopharmaceuticals were calculated, e.g. 18 F-FDG, 99m Tc-pertechnetate, 99m Tc-MAG3 and 123 I-NaI. Results and conclusion: the results of the estimates of the absorbed doses to the inner bladder wall were a factor of ten higher than the estimates mean absorbed doses. The mean absorbed doses to the bladder wall were slightly higher for females than males, due to a smaller female

  11. Magnetic domain wall gratings for magnetization reversal tuning and confined dynamic mode localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trützschler, Julia; Sentosun, Kadir; Mozooni, Babak; Mattheis, Roland; McCord, Jeffrey

    2016-08-04

    High density magnetic domain wall gratings are imprinted in ferromagnetic-antiferromagnetic thin films by local ion irradiation by which alternating head-to-tail-to-head-to-tail and head-to-head-to-tail-to-tail spatially overlapping domain wall networks are formed. Unique magnetic domain processes result from the interaction of anchored domain walls. Non-linear magnetization response is introduced by the laterally distributed magnetic anisotropy phases. The locally varying magnetic charge distribution gives rise to localized and guided magnetization spin-wave modes directly constrained by the narrow domain wall cores. The exchange coupled multiphase material structure leads to unprecedented static and locally modified dynamic magnetic material properties.

  12. Dynamic Fungal Cell Wall Architecture in Stress Adaptation and Immune Evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopke, Alex; Brown, Alistair J P; Hall, Rebecca A; Wheeler, Robert T

    2018-04-01

    Deadly infections from opportunistic fungi have risen in frequency, largely because of the at-risk immunocompromised population created by advances in modern medicine and the HIV/AIDS pandemic. This review focuses on dynamics of the fungal polysaccharide cell wall, which plays an outsized role in fungal pathogenesis and therapy because it acts as both an environmental barrier and as the major interface with the host immune system. Human fungal pathogens use architectural strategies to mask epitopes from the host and prevent immune surveillance, and recent work elucidates how biotic and abiotic stresses present during infection can either block or enhance masking. The signaling components implicated in regulating fungal immune recognition can teach us how cell wall dynamics are controlled, and represent potential targets for interventions designed to boost or dampen immunity. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Simulated Field Trials Using an Indoor Aerosol Test Chamber

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Semler, D. D; Roth, A. P; Semler, K. A; Nolan, P. M

    2004-01-01

    .... In this method, the aerosol chamber control software manipulates circulation fan speeds, chamber vacuum and agent spray times to produce a simulated dynamic cloud within the aerosol test chamber...

  14. Simulated Field Trials Using An Indoor Aerosol Test Chamber

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Semler, D. D; Roth, A. P; Semler, K. A; Nolan, P. M

    2004-01-01

    .... In this method, the aerosol chamber control software manipulates circulation fan speeds, chamber vacuum and agent spray times to produce a simulated dynamic cloud within the aerosol test chamber...

  15. A low dimensional dynamical system for the wall layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubry, N.; Keefe, L. R.

    1987-01-01

    Low dimensional dynamical systems which model a fully developed turbulent wall layer were derived.The model is based on the optimally fast convergent proper orthogonal decomposition, or Karhunen-Loeve expansion. This decomposition provides a set of eigenfunctions which are derived from the autocorrelation tensor at zero time lag. Via Galerkin projection, low dimensional sets of ordinary differential equations in time, for the coefficients of the expansion, were derived from the Navier-Stokes equations. The energy loss to the unresolved modes was modeled by an eddy viscosity representation, analogous to Heisenberg's spectral model. A set of eigenfunctions and eigenvalues were obtained from direct numerical simulation of a plane channel at a Reynolds number of 6600, based on the mean centerline velocity and the channel width flow and compared with previous work done by Herzog. Using the new eigenvalues and eigenfunctions, a new ten dimensional set of ordinary differential equations were derived using five non-zero cross-stream Fourier modes with a periodic length of 377 wall units. The dynamical system was integrated for a range of the eddy viscosity prameter alpha. This work is encouraging.

  16. A drift chamber constructed of aluminized mylar tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baringer, P.; Jung, C.; Ogren, H. O.; Rust, D. R.

    1987-03-01

    A thin reliable drift chamber has been constructed to be used near the interaction point of the PEP storage ring in the HRS detector. It is composed of individual drift tubes with aluminized mylar walls.

  17. Mechanosensation Dynamically Coordinates Polar Growth and Cell Wall Assembly to Promote Cell Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davì, Valeria; Tanimoto, Hirokazu; Ershov, Dmitry; Haupt, Armin; De Belly, Henry; Le Borgne, Rémi; Couturier, Etienne; Boudaoud, Arezki; Minc, Nicolas

    2018-04-23

    How growing cells cope with size expansion while ensuring mechanical integrity is not known. In walled cells, such as those of microbes and plants, growth and viability are both supported by a thin and rigid encasing cell wall (CW). We deciphered the dynamic mechanisms controlling wall surface assembly during cell growth, using a sub-resolution microscopy approach to monitor CW thickness in live rod-shaped fission yeast cells. We found that polar cell growth yielded wall thinning and that thickness negatively influenced growth. Thickness at growing tips exhibited a fluctuating behavior with thickening phases followed by thinning phases, indicative of a delayed feedback promoting thickness homeostasis. This feedback was mediated by mechanosensing through the CW integrity pathway, which probes strain in the wall to adjust synthase localization and activity to surface growth. Mutants defective in thickness homeostasis lysed by rupturing the wall, demonstrating its pivotal role for walled cell survival. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Modelling the contribution of biogenic VOCs to new particle formation in the Jülich plant atmosphere chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, L.; Dal Maso, M.; Mogensen, D.; Roldin, P.; Rusanen, A.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Mentel, T. F.; Wildt, J.; Kleist, E.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Tillmann, R.; Ehn, M.; Kulmala, M.; Boy, M.

    2014-11-01

    We used the MALTE-BOX model including near-explicit air chemistry and detailed aerosol dynamics to study the mechanisms of observed new particle formation events in the Jülich Plant Atmosphere Chamber. The modelled and measured H2SO4 (sulfuric acid) concentrations agreed within a factor of two. The modelled total monoterpene concentration was in line with PTR-MS observations, and we provided the distributions of individual isomers of terpenes, when no measurements were available. The aerosol dynamic results supported the hypothesis that H2SO4 is one of the critical compounds in the nucleation process. However, compared to kinetic H2SO4 nucleation, nucleation involving OH oxidation products of monoterpenes showed a better agreement with the measurements, with R2 up to 0.97 between modelled and measured total particle number concentrations. The nucleation coefficient for kinetic H2SO4 nucleation was 2.1 × 10-11 cm3 s-1, while the organic nucleation coefficient was 9.0 × 10-14 cm3 s-1. We classified the VOC oxidation products into two sub-groups including extremely low-volatility organic compounds (ELVOCs) and semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs). These ELVOCs and SVOCs contributed approximately equally to the particle volume production, whereas only ELVOCs made the smallest particles to grow in size. The model simulations revealed that the chamber walls constitute a major net sink of SVOCs on the first experiment day. However, the net wall SVOC uptake was gradually reduced because of SVOC desorption during the following days. Thus, in order to capture the observed temporal evolution of the particle number size distribution, the model needs to consider reversible gas-wall partitioning.

  19. Field- and current-driven domain wall dynamics: An experimental picture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beach, G.S.D.; Knutson, C.; Tsoi, M.; Erskine, J.L.

    2007-01-01

    Field- and current-driven domain wall velocities are measured and discussed in terms of existing spin-torque models. A reversal in the roles of adiabatic and non-adiabatic spin-torque is shown to arise in those models below and above Walker breakdown. The measured dependence of velocity on current is the same in both regimes, indicating both spin-torque components have similar magnitude. However, the models on which these conclusions are based have serious quantitative shortcomings in describing the observed field-driven wall dynamics, for which they were originally developed. Hence, the applicability of simple one-dimensional models to most experimental conditions may be limited

  20. Dynamic changes in transcriptome and cell wall composition underlying brassinosteroid-mediated lignification of switchgrass suspension cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Xiaolan; Shen, Hui; Pattathil, Sivakumar; Hahn, Michael G; Gelineo-Albersheim, Ivana; Mohnen, Debra; Pu, Yunqiao; Ragauskas, Arthur J; Chen, Xin; Chen, Fang; Dixon, Richard A

    2017-01-01

    Plant cell walls contribute the majority of plant biomass that can be used to produce transportation fuels. However, the complexity and variability in composition and structure of cell walls, particularly the presence of lignin, negatively impacts their deconstruction for bioenergy. Metabolic and genetic changes associated with secondary wall development in the biofuel crop switchgrass ( Panicum virgatum ) have yet to be reported. Our previous studies have established a cell suspension system for switchgrass, in which cell wall lignification can be induced by application of brassinolide (BL). We have now collected cell wall composition and microarray-based transcriptome profiles for BL-induced and non-induced suspension cultures to provide an overview of the dynamic changes in transcriptional reprogramming during BL-induced cell wall modification. From this analysis, we have identified changes in candidate genes involved in cell wall precursor synthesis, cellulose, hemicellulose, and pectin formation and ester-linkage generation. We have also identified a large number of transcription factors with expression correlated with lignin biosynthesis genes, among which are candidates for control of syringyl (S) lignin accumulation. Together, this work provides an overview of the dynamic compositional changes during brassinosteroid-induced cell wall remodeling, and identifies candidate genes for future plant genetic engineering to overcome cell wall recalcitrance.

  1. A drift chamber constructed of aluminized mylar tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baringer, P.; Jung, C.; Ogren, H.O.; Rust, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    A thin reliable drift chamber has been constructed to be used near the interaction point of the PEP storage ring in the HRS detector. It is composed of individual drift tubes with aluminized mylar walls. (orig.)

  2. Extending the Dynamic Range of a Time Projection Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estee, Justin; S πRIT Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    The use of Time Projection Chambers (TPCs) in intermediate heavy ion reactions faces some challenges in addressing the energy losses that range from the small energy loss of relativistic pions to the large energy loss of slow moving heavy ions. A typical trade-off can be to set the smallest desired signals to be well within the lower limits of the dynamic range of the electronics while allowing for some larger signals to saturate the electronics. With wire plane anodes, signals from readout pads further away from the track remain unsaturated and allow signals from tracks with saturated pads to be accurately recovered. We illustrate this technique using data from the SAMURAI Pion-Reconstruction and Ion-Tracker (S πRIT) TPC , which recently measured pions and light charged particles in collisions of Sn+Sn isotopes. Our method exploits knowledge of how the induced charge distribution depends on the distance from the track to smoothly extend dynamic range even when some of the pads in the track are saturated. To accommodate the analysis of slow moving heavy ions, we have extended the Bichsel energy loss distributions to handle slower moving ions as well. In this talk, I will discuss a combined approach which successfully extends the dynamic range of the TPC electronics. This work is supported by the U.S. DOE under Grant Nos. DE-SC0014530, DE-NA0002923, US NSF Grant No. PHY-1565546 and the Japan MEXT KAKENHI Grant No. 24105004.

  3. Bound eigenstate dynamics under a sudden shift of the well's wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granot, Er'el; Marchewka, Avi

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of the eigenstate of an infinite well under an abrupt shift of the well's wall. It is shown that when the shift is small compared to the initial well's dimensions, the short-time behavior changes from the well-known t 3/2 behavior to t 1/2 . It is also shown that the complete dynamical picture converges to a universal function, which has fractal structure with dimensionality D=1.25.

  4. Lattice Boltzmann simulations for wall-flow dynamics in porous ceramic diesel particulate filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Da Young; Lee, Gi Wook; Yoon, Kyu; Chun, Byoungjin; Jung, Hyun Wook

    2018-01-01

    Flows through porous filter walls of wall-flow diesel particulate filter are investigated using the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). The microscopic model of the realistic filter wall is represented by randomly overlapped arrays of solid spheres. The LB simulation results are first validated by comparison to those from previous hydrodynamic theories and constitutive models for flows in porous media with simple regular and random solid-wall configurations. We demonstrate that the newly designed randomly overlapped array structures of porous walls allow reliable and accurate simulations for the porous wall-flow dynamics in a wide range of solid volume fractions from 0.01 to about 0.8, which is beyond the maximum random packing limit of 0.625. The permeable performance of porous media is scrutinized by changing the solid volume fraction and particle Reynolds number using Darcy's law and Forchheimer's extension in the laminar flow region.

  5. Application of dynamic slip wall modeling to a turbine nozzle guide vane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Sanjeeb; Talnikar, Chaitanya; Blonigan, Patrick; Wang, Qiqi

    2015-11-01

    Resolution of near-wall turbulent structures is computational prohibitive necessitating the need for wall-modeled large-eddy simulation approaches. Standard wall models are often based on assumptions of equilibrium boundary layers, which do not necessarily account for the dissimilarity of the momentum and thermal boundary layers. We investigate the use of the dynamic slip wall boundary condition (Bose and Moin, 2014) for the prediction of surface heat transfer on a turbine nozzle guide vane (Arts and de Rouvroit, 1992). The heat transfer coefficient is well predicted by the slip wall model, including capturing the transition to turbulence. The sensitivity of the heat transfer coefficient to the incident turbulence intensity will additionally be discussed. Lastly, the behavior of the thermal and momentum slip lengths will be contrasted between regions where the strong Reynolds analogy is invalid (near transition on the suction side) and an isothermal, zero pressure gradient flat plate boundary layer (Wu and Moin, 2010).

  6. Lifetime tests for MAC vertex chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, H.N.

    1986-07-01

    A vertex chamber for MAC was proposed to increase precision in the measurement of the B hadron and tau lepton lifetimes. Thin-walled aluminized mylar drift tubes were used for detector elements. A study of radiation hardness was conducted under the conditions of the proposed design using different gases and different operating conditions

  7. Final report for NIF chamber dynamics studies. Final report (May 1997), Subcontract No. B291847

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, P.F.; Jin, H.; Scott, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), a 1.8 MJ, 192 laser beam facility, will have anticipated fusion yields of up to 20 MJ from D-T pellets encased in a gold hohlraum target. The energy emitted from the target in the form of x rays, neutrons, target debris kinetic energy, and target shrapnel will be contained in a 5 m. radius spherical target chamber. Various diagnostics will be stationed around the target at varying distances from the target. During each shot, the target will emit x rays that will vaporize nearby target facing surfaces including those of the diagnostics, the target positioner, and other chamber structures. This ablated vapor will be transported throughout the chamber, and will eventually condense and deposit on surfaces in the chamber, including the final optics debris shields. The research at the University of California at Berkeley relates primarily to the NIF chamber dynamics. The key design issues are the ablation of the chamber structures, transport of the vapor through the chamber and the condensation or deposition processes of those vaporized materials. An understanding of these processes is essential in developing a concept for protecting the final optics debris shields from an excessive coating (> 10 Angstrom) of target debris and ablated material, thereby prolonging their lifetime between change- outs. At Berkeley, we have studied the physical issues of the ablation process and the effects of varying materials, the condensation process of the vaporized material, and design schemes that can lower the threat posed to the debris shields by these processes. In addition to the work described briefly above, we performed extensive analysis of the target-chamber thermal response to in- chamber CO 2 Cleaning and of work performed to model the behavior of silica vapor. The work completed this year has been published in several papers and a dissertation -6 This report provides a summary of the work completed this year, as well as copies of

  8. Optimization of electret ionization chambers for dosimetry in mixed neutron-gamma fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doerschel, B.; Pretzsch, G.

    1984-01-01

    The properties of combination dosemeters consisting of two air-filled electret ionization chambers in mixed neutron-gamma fields have been investigated. The first chamber, polyethylene-walled, is sensitive to neutrons and gamma rays, the second, having walls of teflon, is sensitive to gamma rays only. The properties of the dosemeters are determined by the resulting errors and the measuring range. As both properties depend on the dimensions of the electret ionization chambers they have been taken into account in optimizing the dimensions. The results show that with the use of the dosemeters the effective dose equivalent in mixed neutron-gamma fields can be determined nearly independently of the spectra. The lower detection limit is less than 1 mSv and the maximum uncertainty of dose measurements about 12%. (author)

  9. Electret ionization chamber: a new method for detection and dosimetry of thermal neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghilardi, A.J.P.

    1988-01-01

    An electret ionization chamber with boron coated walls is presented as a new method for detecting thermal neutrons. The efficiency of electret ionization chambers with different wall materials for the external electrode was inferred from the results. Detection of slow neutrons with discrimination against the detection of γ-rays and energetic neutrons was shown to depend on the selection of these materials. The charge stability over a long period of time and the charge decay owing to natural radiation were also studied. Numerical analysis was developed by the use of a micro-computer PC-XT. Both the experimental and numerical results show that the sensitivity of the electret ionization chamber for detection of thermal neutrons is comparable with that of the BF 3 ionization chamber and that new technologies for deposition of the boron layer will produce higher efficiency detectors. (author). 102 refs, 32 fig, 10 tabs

  10. The effect of build-up cap materials on the response of an ionization chamber to 60Co gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocha, M.P.O.; Almeida, C.E. de

    1993-01-01

    Knowledge of the effect of wall and build-up cap materials on ionization chamber response is necessary to determine absorbed dose in a medium using a calibration factor based on exposure or kerma in air. Attenuation and scattering effects of 60 Co gamma rays in the ionization chamber wall and build-up cap, as well as their non-equivalence to air, were studied with an OFS ionization chamber (Delrin wall) and a set of build-up caps specially built for this purpose. Results for a specific material were plotted as functions of wall and cap total thickness, extrapolated to zero wall thickness, then corrected for mean centre of electron production in the wall (= 0.136 g cm -2 ). Correction factors for a specific thickness were analysed in relation to cap material, and to relative responses compared with values calculated by using AAPM, SEFM and IAEA formalisms for cap effects. A Monte Carlo calculation was performed to compare the experimental and theoretical values. Calculations showed an agreement within 0.1% with experimental values and a wall effect of approximately 1.6%. (Author)

  11. Mechanisms of differentiation in the Skaergaard magma chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tegner, C.; Lesher, C. E.; Holness, M. B.; Jakobsen, J. K.; Salmonsen, L. P.; Humphreys, M. C. S.; Thy, P.

    2012-04-01

    The Skaergaard intrusion is a superb natural laboratory for studying mechanisms of magma chamber differentiation. The magnificent exposures and new systematic sample sets of rocks that solidified inwards from the roof, walls and floor of the chamber provide means to test the relative roles of crystal settling, diffusion, convection, liquid immiscibility and compaction in different regions of the chamber and in opposite positions relative to gravity. Examination of the melt inclusions and interstitial pockets has demonstrated that a large portion of intrusion crystallized from an emulsified magma chamber composed of immiscible silica- and iron-rich melts. The similarity of ratios of elements with opposite partitioning between the immiscible melts (e.g. P and Rb) in wall, floor and roof rocks, however, indicate that large-scale separation did not occur. Yet, on a smaller scale of metres to hundred of metres and close to the interface between the roof and floor rocks (the Sandwich Horizon), irregular layers and pods of granophyre hosted by extremely iron-rich cumulates point to some separation of the two liquid phases. Similar proportions of the primocryst (cumulus) minerals in roof, wall and floor rocks indicate that crystal settling was not an important mechanism. Likewise, the lack of fractionation of elements with different behavior indicate that diffusion and fluid-driven metasomatism played relatively minor roles. Compositional convection and/or compaction within the solidifying crystal mush boundary layer are likely the most important mechanisms. A correlation of low trapped liquid fractions (calculated from strongly incompatible elements) in floor rocks with high fractionation density (the density difference between the crystal framework and the liquid) indicate that compaction is the dominating process in expelling evolved liquid from the crystal mush layer. This is supported by high and variable trapped liquid contents in the roof rocks, where gravity

  12. Bound eigenstate dynamics under a sudden shift of the well's wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granot, Er'El; Marchewka, Avi

    2010-03-01

    We investigate the dynamics of the eigenstate of an infinite well under an abrupt shift of the well’s wall. It is shown that when the shift is small compared to the initial well’s dimensions, the short-time behavior changes from the well-known t3/2 behavior to t1/2. It is also shown that the complete dynamical picture converges to a universal function, which has fractal structure with dimensionality D=1.25.

  13. The Kaon B-parameter from Two-Flavour Dynamical Domain Wall Fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawson, C.

    2005-01-01

    We report on the calculation of the kaon B-parameter using two dynamical flavours of domain wall fermions. Our analysis is based on three ensembles of configurations, each consisting of about 5,000 HMC trajectories, with a lattice spacing of approximately 1.7 GeV for 16 3 x32 lattices; dynamical quark masses range from approximately the strange quark mass to half of that. Both degenerate and non-degenerate quark masses are used for the kaons

  14. Imaging the Dynamics of Cell Wall Polymer Deposition in the Unicellular Model Plant, Penium margaritaceum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domozych, David; Lietz, Anna; Patten, Molly; Singer, Emily; Tinaz, Berke; Raimundo, Sandra C

    2017-01-01

    The unicellular green alga, Penium margaritaceum, represents a novel and valuable model organism for elucidating cell wall dynamics in plants. This organism's cell wall contains several polymers that are highly similar to those found in the primary cell walls of land plants. Penium is easily grown in laboratory culture and is effectively manipulated in various experimental protocols including microplate assays and correlative microscopy. Most importantly, Penium can be live labeled with cell wall-specific antibodies or other probes and returned to culture where specific cell wall developmental events can be monitored. Additionally, live cells can be rapidly cryo-fixed and cell wall surface microarchitecture can be observed with variable pressure scanning electron microscopy. Here, we describe the methodology for maintaining Penium for experimental cell wall enzyme studies.

  15. Coupled Dzyaloshinskii walls and their current-induced dynamics by the spin Hall effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez, Eduardo, E-mail: edumartinez@usal.es [Dpto. de Fisica Aplicada, Universidad de Salamanca, Plaza de los Caídos s/n, E-37008 Salamanca (Spain); Alejos, Óscar [Dpto. de Electricidad y Electrónica, Universidad de Valladolid, Paseo de Belén, 7, E-47011 Valladolid (Spain)

    2014-07-14

    The nucleation of domain walls in ultrathin ferromagnetic/heavy-metal bilayers is studied by means of micromagnetic simulations. In the presence of interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction, the nucleated walls naturally adopt a homochiral configuration with internal magnetization pointing antiparallely. The interaction between these walls was analyzed and described in terms of a classical dipolar force between the magnetic moments of the walls, which couples their dynamics. Additionally, the current-induced motion of two homochiral walls in the presence of longitudinal fields was also studied by means of a simple one-dimensional model and micromagnetic modeling, considering both one free-defect strip and another one with random edge roughness. It is evidenced that in the presence of pinning due to edge roughness, the in-plane longitudinal field introduces an asymmetry in the current-induced depinning, in agreement with recent experimental results.

  16. Coupled Dzyaloshinskii walls and their current-induced dynamics by the spin Hall effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martínez, Eduardo; Alejos, Óscar

    2014-01-01

    The nucleation of domain walls in ultrathin ferromagnetic/heavy-metal bilayers is studied by means of micromagnetic simulations. In the presence of interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction, the nucleated walls naturally adopt a homochiral configuration with internal magnetization pointing antiparallely. The interaction between these walls was analyzed and described in terms of a classical dipolar force between the magnetic moments of the walls, which couples their dynamics. Additionally, the current-induced motion of two homochiral walls in the presence of longitudinal fields was also studied by means of a simple one-dimensional model and micromagnetic modeling, considering both one free-defect strip and another one with random edge roughness. It is evidenced that in the presence of pinning due to edge roughness, the in-plane longitudinal field introduces an asymmetry in the current-induced depinning, in agreement with recent experimental results.

  17. The JET ITER-like wall experiment: First results and lessons for ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horton, Lorne, E-mail: Lorne.Horton@jet.efda.org [EFDA-CSU Culham, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); European Commission, B-1049 Brussels (Belgium)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► JET has recently completed the installation of an ITER-like wall. ► Important operational aspects have changed with the new wall. ► Initial experiments have confirmed the expected low fuel retention. ► Disruption dynamics have change dramatically. ► Development of wall-compatible, ITER-relevant regimes of operation has begun. -- Abstract: The JET programme is strongly focused on preparations for ITER construction and exploitation. To this end, a major programme of machine enhancements has recently been completed, including a new ITER-like wall, in which the plasma-facing armour in the main vacuum chamber is beryllium while that in the divertor is tungsten—the same combination of plasma-facing materials foreseen for ITER. The goal of the initial experimental campaigns is to fully characterise operation with the new wall, concentrating in particular on plasma-material interactions, and to make direct comparisons of plasma performance with the previous, carbon wall. This is being done in a progressive manner, with the input power and plasma performance being increased in combination with the commissioning of a comprehensive new real-time protection system. Progress achieved during the first set of experimental campaigns with the new wall, which took place from September 2011 to July 2012, is reported.

  18. Diagnostic techniques for measuring temperature transients and stress transients in the first wall of an ICF reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melamed, N.T.; Taylor, L.H.

    1983-01-01

    The primary challenge in the design of an Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) power reactor is to make the first wall survive the frequent explosions of the pellets. Westinghouse has proposed a dry wall design consisting of steel tubes coated with tantalum. This report describes the design of a test chamber and two diagnostic procedures for experimentally determining the reliability of the Westinghouse design. The test chamber simulates the x-ray and ion pulse irradiation of the wall due to a pellet explosion. The diagnostics consist of remote temperature sensing and surface deformation measurements. The chamber and diagnostics can also be used to test other first-wall designs

  19. A conceptual design strategy for liquid-metal-wall inertial fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monsler, M.J.; Meier, W.R.

    1981-01-01

    The liquid-metal-wall chamber has emerged as an attractive reactor concept for inertial fusion energy conversion. The principal feature of this concept is a thick, free-flowing blanket of liquid metal used to protect the structure of the reactor. The development and design of liquid-metal-wall chambers over the past decade are reviewed from the perspective of formulating a conceptual design strategy for such chambers. The basis for the design strategy is set by enumerating both the attractive and unattractive features of a LMW chamber. Past concepts are then reviewed to identify conceptual design approaches and physical configurations that enhance the positive aspects and minimize the negative aspects. A detailed description of the engineering considerations is given, including such topics as the selection of a liquid metal, control of radiation damage, selection of structural material, control of tritium breeding and extraction, control of wall stress, and designing for a given rep-rate. Finally, a design strategy is formulated which accomodates the engineering constraints while minimizing the liquid-metal flow rate. (orig.)

  20. Pressure distribution due to steam bubble collapse in a BWR suppression chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giencke, E.

    1979-01-01

    For the pressure time history at the walls of a suppression chamber due to a steam bubble collaps at the condenser pipes interests, expecially the influence of the wall elasticity and the position of the condenser pipes. Two problems are to solve: the pressure time history in the steam bubble and at the walls during the collaps and the pressure distribution at the walls. Both problems are coupled with each other, but the influence of the wall elasticity on the pressure time history in the steam bubble is usually small. Thus the two problems may be solved one after each other. For simplifying the analysis the steam bubble surface may be idealized as a sphere during the whole collaps time. Then the resulting pressure time history is be put on the fluid-structure-system. To show the influence of the containment-elasticity it is favourable to investigate both the rigid and the elastic containment. Because the condenser pipes are arranged in a regular scheme, two limit loading cases are to distinguish. Collapses occur simultaneously with the same intensity at all condenser pipes and a strong collaps occurs only at one condenser pipe or a small group of pipes. When including wall elasticity first the modes of the fluid-structure-system are to analyse and then the dynamical responses of the modes. The coupling effects between the pressure time history in the bubble and at the walls are discussed and then how the membrane and bending stiffness of the walls and the buttomstructure influence the pressure distribution, both for steel and concrete structure. Finally simple models for the analysis are derived and the analytical results are compared with experiments. (orig.)

  1. Substrate clamping effects on irreversible domain wall dynamics in lead zirconate titanate thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griggio, F; Jesse, S; Kumar, A; Ovchinnikov, O; Kim, H; Jackson, T N; Damjanovic, D; Kalinin, S V; Trolier-McKinstry, S

    2012-04-13

    The role of long-range strain interactions on domain wall dynamics is explored through macroscopic and local measurements of nonlinear behavior in mechanically clamped and released polycrystalline lead zirconate-titanate (PZT) films. Released films show a dramatic change in the global dielectric nonlinearity and its frequency dependence as a function of mechanical clamping. Furthermore, we observe a transition from strong clustering of the nonlinear response for the clamped case to almost uniform nonlinearity for the released film. This behavior is ascribed to increased mobility of domain walls. These results suggest the dominant role of collective strain interactions mediated by the local and global mechanical boundary conditions on the domain wall dynamics. The work presented in this Letter demonstrates that measurements on clamped films may considerably underestimate the piezoelectric coefficients and coupling constants of released structures used in microelectromechanical systems, energy harvesting systems, and microrobots.

  2. Temperature uniformity in the CERN CLOUD chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Dias

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets experiment at CERN (European Council for Nuclear Research investigates the nucleation and growth of aerosol particles under atmospheric conditions and their activation into cloud droplets. A key feature of the CLOUD experiment is precise control of the experimental parameters. Temperature uniformity and stability in the chamber are important since many of the processes under study are sensitive to temperature and also to contaminants that can be released from the stainless steel walls by upward temperature fluctuations. The air enclosed within the 26 m3 CLOUD chamber is equipped with several arrays (strings of high precision, fast-response thermometers to measure its temperature. Here we present a study of the air temperature uniformity inside the CLOUD chamber under various experimental conditions. Measurements were performed under calibration conditions and run conditions, which are distinguished by the flow rate of fresh air and trace gases entering the chamber at 20 and up to 210 L min−1, respectively. During steady-state calibration runs between −70 and +20 °C, the air temperature uniformity is better than ±0.06 °C in the radial direction and ±0.1 °C in the vertical direction. Larger non-uniformities are present during experimental runs, depending on the temperature control of the make-up air and trace gases (since some trace gases require elevated temperatures until injection into the chamber. The temperature stability is ±0.04 °C over periods of several hours during either calibration or steady-state run conditions. During rapid adiabatic expansions to activate cloud droplets and ice particles, the chamber walls are up to 10 °C warmer than the enclosed air. This results in temperature differences of ±1.5 °C in the vertical direction and ±1 °C in the horizontal direction, while the air returns to its equilibrium temperature with a time constant of about 200 s.

  3. Numerical Investigation on Dynamic Crushing Behavior of Auxetic Honeycombs with Various Cell-Wall Angles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-chun Zhang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Auxetic honeycombs have proven to be an attractive advantage in actual engineering applications owing to their unique mechanical characteristic and better energy absorption ability. The in-plane dynamic crushing behaviors of the honeycombs with various cell-wall angles are studied by means of explicit dynamic finite element simulation. The influences of the cell-wall angle, the impact velocity, and the edge thickness on the macro/microdeformation behaviors, the plateau stresses, and the specific energy absorption of auxetic honeycombs are discussed in detail. Numerical results show, that except for the impact velocity and the edge thickness, the in-plane dynamic performances of auxetic honeycombs also rely on the cell-wall angle. The “> <”-mode local deformation bands form under low- or moderate-velocity impacting, which results in lateral compression shrinkage and shows negative Poisson's ratio during the crushing. For the given impact velocity, the plateau stress at the proximal end and the energy-absorbed ability can be improved by increasing the negative cell angle, the relative density, the impact velocity, and the matrix material strength. When the microcell parameters are the constant, the plateau stresses are proportional to the square of impact velocity.

  4. Super-resolution microscopy reveals cell wall dynamics and peptidoglycan architecture in ovococcal bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Richard; Mesnage, Stéphane; Boneca, Ivo G; Hobbs, Jamie K; Foster, Simon J

    2011-12-01

    Cell morphology and viability in Eubacteria is dictated by the architecture of peptidoglycan, the major and essential structural component of the cell wall. Although the biochemical composition of peptidoglycan is well understood, how the peptidoglycan architecture can accommodate the dynamics of growth and division while maintaining cell shape remains largely unknown. Here, we elucidate the peptidoglycan architecture and dynamics of bacteria with ovoid cell shape (ovococci), which includes a number of important pathogens, by combining biochemical analyses with atomic force and super-resolution microscopies. Atomic force microscopy analysis showed preferential orientation of the peptidoglycan network parallel to the short axis of the cell, with distinct architectural features associated with septal and peripheral wall synthesis. Super-resolution three-dimensional structured illumination fluorescence microscopy was applied for the first time in bacteria to unravel the dynamics of peptidoglycan assembly in ovococci. The ovococci have a unique peptidoglycan architecture and growth mode not observed in other model organisms. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Monitoring tritium in air containing other beta-emitters using ion chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jalbert, R.A.

    1975-01-01

    A flow-through ionization chamber instrument is described which is capable of measuring tritium in air containing high concentrations of other beta emitters. The instrument employs a separate concentric chamber with a thin common wall opaque only to tritium betas. Currents produced in the two chambers are subtracted leaving only the current due to tritium. With a 1.6-l sampling chamber and an 18-s time constant, tritium concentrations of 10 -6 μCi/ml to 10 -4 μCi/ml are measured with 2 sigma confidence in background beta concentrations of 4 x 10 -5 μCi/ml to 0.4 muCi/ml, respectively. (auth)

  6. 2D edge plasma modeling extended up to the main chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dekeyser, W., E-mail: wouter.dekeyser@mech.kuleuven.be [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 300A, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Baelmans, M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 300A, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Reiter, D.; Boerner, P.; Kotov, V. [Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, EURATOM-Association, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, D-52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2011-08-01

    Far SOL plasma flow, and hence main chamber recycling and plasma surface interaction, are today still only very poorly described by current 2D fluid edge codes, such as B2, UEDGE or EDGE2D, due to a common technical limitation. We have extended the B2 plasma fluid solver in the current ITER version of B2-EIRENE (SOLPS4.3) to allow plasma solutions to be obtained up to the 'real vessel wall', at least on the basis of ad hoc far SOL transport models. We apply here the kinetic Monte Carlo Code EIRENE on such plasma solutions to study effects of this model refinement on main chamber fluxes and sputtering, for an ITER configuration. We show that main chamber sputtering may be significantly modified both due to thermalization of CX neutrals in the far SOL and poloidally highly asymmetric plasma wall contact, as compared to hitherto applied teleportation of particle fluxes across this domain.

  7. Microemulsions as model fluids for enhanced oil recovery: dynamics adjacent to planar hydrophilic walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattauch S.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available After the dynamics of microemulsions adjacent to a planar hydrophilic wall have been characterized using grazing incidence neutron spin echo spectroscopy, the model of Seifert was employed to explain the discovered acceleration for the surface near lamellar ordered membranes. Reflections of hydrodynamic waves by the wall – or the volume conservation between the membrane and the wall – explain faster relaxations and, therefore, a lubrication effect that is important for flow fields in narrow pores. The whole scenery is now spectated by using different scenarios of a bicontinuous microemulsion exposed to clay particles and of a lamellar microemulsion adjacent to a planar wall. The Seifert concept could successfully be transferred to the new problems.

  8. An extended CFD model to predict the pumping curve in low pressure plasma etch chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ning; Wu, Yuanhao; Han, Wenbin; Pan, Shaowu

    2014-12-01

    Continuum based CFD model is extended with slip wall approximation and rarefaction effect on viscosity, in an attempt to predict the pumping flow characteristics in low pressure plasma etch chambers. The flow regime inside the chamber ranges from slip wall (Kn ˜ 0.01), and up to free molecular (Kn = 10). Momentum accommodation coefficient and parameters for Kn-modified viscosity are first calibrated against one set of measured pumping curve. Then the validity of this calibrated CFD models are demonstrated in comparison with additional pumping curves measured in chambers of different geometry configurations. More detailed comparison against DSMC model for flow conductance over slits with contraction and expansion sections is also discussed.

  9. Algorithm for study on the stressed-strained state of thermonuclear device vacuum chambers under dynamic loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuravleva, A.M.; Litvinov, V.B.

    1982-01-01

    The problem of dynamic analysis of stressed-strained state of vacuum chambers is vital for large thermonuclear devices during the stall of the plasma-filament apd other tpansitional operation regimes when loading for a chamber are nonstationary. To plot a mathematical model the design of the vacuum chamber is discreted on the basis of the method of final elements. To approximate vacuum shell, a plate triangular element with 3 joint points and 5 parameters in the joint is used. It is obtained due to the unity of the bemded element and the element for the flat problem. To investigate nonstationary oscillations of vacuum chambers discreted on the basis of the method of final elements, it is suggested to use the numeric conversion of the Japlace transformation. On the basis of the algorithm suggested a program of numerical function conversion is developed. Test calculations have shown a good stability of the algorithm when selecting the values of transformation parameter in the range of lower intrinsic system frequencies. The advantage of the above method is in the fact that the time-structure shift function is found instantly in the form of the series for the whole time interval and does not require temporary steps, which bring about large expenses of counting time and error accumulation

  10. Numerical analysis of whole-body cryotherapy chamber design improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yerezhep, D.; Tukmakova, A. S.; Fomin, V. E.; Masalimov, A.; Asach, A. V.; Novotelnova, A. V.; Baranov, A. Yu

    2018-05-01

    Whole body cryotherapy is a state-of-the-art method that uses cold for treatment and prevention of diseases. The process implies the impact of cryogenic gas on a human body that implements in a special cryochamber. The temperature field in the chamber is of great importance since local integument over-cooling may occur. Numerical simulation of WBC has been carried out. Chamber design modification has been proposed in order to increase the uniformity of the internal temperature field. The results have been compared with the ones obtained for a standard chamber design. The value of temperature gradient formed in the chamber containing curved wall with certain height has been decreased almost twice in comparison with the results obtained for the standard design. The modification proposed may increase both safety and comfort of cryotherapy.

  11. Hygrothermal behavior for a clay brick wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allam, R.; Issaadi, N.; Belarbi, R.; El-Meligy, M.; Altahrany, A.

    2018-06-01

    In Egypt, the clay brick is the common building materials which are used. By studying clay brick walls behavior for the heat and moisture transfer, the efficient use of the clay brick can be reached. So, this research studies the hygrothermal transfer in this material by measuring the hygrothermal properties and performing experimental tests for a constructed clay brick wall. We present the model for the hygrothermal transfer in the clay brick which takes the temperature and the vapor pressure as driving potentials. In addition, this research compares the presented model with previous models. By constructing the clay brick wall between two climates chambers with different boundary conditions, we can validate the numerical model and analyze the hygrothermal transfer in the wall. The temperature and relative humidity profiles within the material are measured experimentally and determined numerically. The numerical and experimental results have a good convergence with 3.5% difference. The surface boundary conditions, the ground effect, the infiltration from the closed chambers and the material heterogeneity affects the results. Thermal transfer of the clay brick walls reaches the steady state very rapidly than the moisture transfer. That means the effect of using only the external brick wall in the building in hot climate without increase the thermal resistance for the wall, will add more energy losses in the clay brick walls buildings. Also, the behavior of the wall at the heat and mass transfer calls the three-dimensional analysis for the whole building to reach the real behavior.

  12. Hygrothermal behavior for a clay brick wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allam, R.; Issaadi, N.; Belarbi, R.; El-Meligy, M.; Altahrany, A.

    2018-01-01

    In Egypt, the clay brick is the common building materials which are used. By studying clay brick walls behavior for the heat and moisture transfer, the efficient use of the clay brick can be reached. So, this research studies the hygrothermal transfer in this material by measuring the hygrothermal properties and performing experimental tests for a constructed clay brick wall. We present the model for the hygrothermal transfer in the clay brick which takes the temperature and the vapor pressure as driving potentials. In addition, this research compares the presented model with previous models. By constructing the clay brick wall between two climates chambers with different boundary conditions, we can validate the numerical model and analyze the hygrothermal transfer in the wall. The temperature and relative humidity profiles within the material are measured experimentally and determined numerically. The numerical and experimental results have a good convergence with 3.5% difference. The surface boundary conditions, the ground effect, the infiltration from the closed chambers and the material heterogeneity affects the results. Thermal transfer of the clay brick walls reaches the steady state very rapidly than the moisture transfer. That means the effect of using only the external brick wall in the building in hot climate without increase the thermal resistance for the wall, will add more energy losses in the clay brick walls buildings. Also, the behavior of the wall at the heat and mass transfer calls the three-dimensional analysis for the whole building to reach the real behavior.

  13. Dynamic film thickness between bubbles and wall in a narrow channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Daisuke; Damsohn, Manuel; Prasser, Horst-Michael; Aritomi, Masanori

    2011-09-01

    The present paper describes a novel technique to characterize the behavior of the liquid film between gas bubbles and the wall in a narrow channel. The method is based on the electrical conductance. Two liquid film sensors are installed on both opposite walls in a narrow rectangular channel. The liquid film thickness underneath the gas bubbles is recorded by the first sensor, while the void fraction information is obtained by measuring the conductance between the pair of opposite sensors. Both measurements are taken on a large two-dimensional domain and with a high speed. This makes it possible to obtain the two-dimensional distribution of the dynamic liquid film between the bubbles and the wall. In this study, this method was applied to an air-water flow ranging from bubbly to churn regimes in the narrow channel with a gap width of 1.5 mm.

  14. Magnetic hysteresis and domain wall dynamics in single chain magnets with antiferromagnetic interchain coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bukharov, A A; Ovchinnikov, A S; Baranov, N V [Department of Physics, Ural State University, Ekaterinburg, 620083 (Russian Federation); Inoue, K [Institute for Advanced Materials Research, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan)

    2010-11-03

    Using Monte Carlo simulations we investigate magnetic hysteresis in two- and three-dimensional systems of weakly antiferromagnetically coupled spin chains based on a scenario of domain wall (kink) motion within the chains. By adapting the model of walkers to simulate the domain wall dynamics and using the Ising-like dipole-dipole model, we study the effects of interchain coupling, temperature and anisotropy axis direction on hysteresis curves.

  15. Structure and dynamics of TIP3P, TIP4P, and TIP5P water near smooth and atomistic walls of different hydroaffinity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrach, Michael F.; Drossel, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    We perform molecular dynamics simulations to observe the structure and dynamics of water using different water models (TIP3P, TIP4P, TIP5P) at ambient conditions, constrained by planar walls, which are either modeled by smooth potentials or regular atomic lattices, imitating the honeycomb-structure of graphene. We implement walls of different hydroaffinity, different lattice constant, and different types of interaction with the water molecules. We find that in the hydrophobic regime the smooth wall generally represents a good abstraction of the atomically rough walls, while in the hydrophilic regime there are noticeable differences in structure and dynamics between all stages of wall roughness. For a small lattice constant however the smooth and the atomically rough wall still share a number of structural and dynamical similarities. Out of the three water models, TIP5P water shows the largest degree of tetrahedral ordering and is often the one that is least perturbed by the presence of the wall

  16. Structural stability analysis considerations in fusion reactor plasma chamber design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delaney, M.J.; Cramer, B.A.

    1978-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to analyzing a toroidal plasma chamber for the prevention of both static and dynamic buckling. Results of stability analyses performed for the doublet shaped plasma chamber of the General Atomic 3.8 meter radius TNS ignition test reactor are presented. Load conditions are the static external atmospheric pressure load and the dynamic plasma disruption pulse load. Methods for analysis of plasma chamber structures are presented for both types of load. Analysis for static buckling is based on idealizing the plasma chamber into standard structural shapes and applying classical cylinder and circular torus buckling equations. Results are verified using the Buckling of Shells of Revolution (BOSOR4) finite difference computer code. Analysis for the dynamic loading is based on a pulse buckling analysis method for circular cylinders

  17. Potentials and challenges associated with automated closed dynamic chamber measurements of soil CO2 fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Görres, Carolyn-Monika; Kammann, Claudia; Ceulemans, Reinhart

    2015-04-01

    Soil respiration fluxes are influenced by natural factors such as climate and soil type, but also by anthropogenic activities in managed ecosystems. As a result, soil CO2 fluxes show a large intra- and interannual as well as intra- and intersite variability. Most of the available soil CO2 flux data giving insights into this variability have been measured with manually closed static chambers, but technological advances in the past 15 years have also led to an increased use of automated closed chamber systems. The great advantage of automated chambers in comparison to manually operated chambers is the higher temporal resolution of the flux data. This is especially important if we want to better understand the effects of short-term events, e.g. fertilization or heavy rainfall, on soil CO2 flux variability. However, the chamber method is an invasive measurement method which can potentially alter soil CO2 fluxes and lead to biased measurement results. In the peer-reviewed literature, many papers compare the field performance and results of different closed static chamber designs, or compare manual chambers with automated chamber systems, to identify potential biases in CO2 flux measurements, and thus help to reduce uncertainties in the flux data. However, inter-comparisons of different automated closed dynamic chamber systems are still lacking. Here we are going to present a field comparison of the most-cited automated chamber system, the LI-8100A Automated Soil Flux System, with the also commercially available Greenhouse Gas Monitoring System AGPS. Both measurement systems were installed side by side at a recently harvested poplar bioenergy plantation (POPFULL, http://uahost.uantwerpen.be/popfull/) from April 2014 until August 2014. The plantation provided optimal comparison conditions with a bare field situation after the harvest and a regrowing canopy resulting in a broad variety of microclimates. Furthermore, the plantation was planted in a double-row system with

  18. Dynamics of domain wall networks with junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avelino, P. P.; Oliveira, J. C. R. E.; Martins, C. J. A. P.; Menezes, J.; Menezes, R.

    2008-01-01

    We use a combination of analytic tools and an extensive set of the largest and most accurate three-dimensional field theory numerical simulations to study the dynamics of domain wall networks with junctions. We build upon our previous work and consider a class of models which, in the limit of large number N of coupled scalar fields, approaches the so-called ''ideal'' model (in terms of its potential to lead to network frustration). We consider values of N between N=2 and N=20, and a range of cosmological epochs, and we also compare this class of models with other toy models used in the past. In all cases we find compelling evidence for a gradual approach to scaling, strongly supporting our no-frustration conjecture. We also discuss the various possible types of junctions (including cases where there is a hierarchy of them) and their roles in the dynamics of the network. Finally, we provide a cosmological Zel'dovich-type bound on the energy scale of this kind of defect network: it must be lower than 10 keV.

  19. The central drift chamber for the D0 experiment: Design, construction and test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behnke, Ties [State Univ. of New York (SUNY), Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    1989-08-01

    A cylindrical drift chamber has been designed and built at the State University of New York at Stony Brook. This chamber is to be installed in the D0 detector which is being completed at the Fermi National Accelerator. In this dissertation the design, construction and testing of this chamber are described. The characteristic features of this chamber are cells formed by solid walls and a modular structure. Much discussion is given to the performance of and results from a chamber made from three final modules which was installed in the D0 interaction region during the 1988/1989 collider run. Using this chamber proton anti-proton interactions were measured at the D0 interaction point.

  20. The central drift chamber for the D0 experiment: Design, construction and test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behnke, T.

    1989-08-01

    A cylindrical drift chamber has been designed and built at the State University of New York at Stony Brook. This chamber is to be installed in the D0 detector which is being completed at the Fermi National Accelerator. In this dissertation the design, construction and testing of this chamber are described. The characteristic features of this chamber are cells formed by solid walls and a modular structure. Much discussion is given to the performance of and results from a chamber made from three final modules which was installed in the D0 interaction region during the 1988/1989 collider run. Using this chamber proton anti-proton interactions were measured at the D0 interaction point

  1. Influence of Dissipative Particle Dynamics parameters and wall models on planar micro-channel flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuyi; She, Jiangwei; Zhou, Zhe-Wei; microflow Group Team

    2017-11-01

    Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) is a very effective approach in simulating mesoscale hydrodynamics. The influence of solid boundaries and DPD parameters are typically very strong in DPD simulations. The present work studies a micro-channel Poisseuille flow. Taking the neutron scattering experiment and molecular dynamics simulation result as bench mark, the DPD results of density distribution and velocity profile are systematically studied. The influence of different levels of coarse-graining, the number densities of wall and fluid, conservative force coefficients, random and dissipative force coefficients, different wall model and reflective boundary conditions are discussed. Some mechanisms behind such influences are discussed and the artifacts in the simulation are identified with the bench mark. Chinese natural science foundation (A020405).

  2. Pea border cell maturation and release involve complex cell wall structural dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mravec, Jozef; Guo, Xiaoyuan; Hansen, Aleksander Riise

    2017-01-01

    The adhesion of plant cells is vital for support and protection of the plant body and is maintained by a variety of molecular associations between cell wall components. In some specialized cases though, plant cells are programmed to detach and root cap-derived border cells are examples of this....... Border cells (in some species known as border-like cells) provide an expendable barrier between roots and the environment. Their maturation and release is an important but poorly characterized cell separation event. To gain a deeper insight into the complex cellular dynamics underlying this process, we...... undertook a systematic, detailed analysis of pea (Pisum sativum) root tip cell walls. Our study included immuno-carbohydrate microarray profiling, monosaccharide composition determination, Fourier-transformed infrared microspectroscopy (FT-IR), quantitative RT-PCR of cell wall biosynthetic genes, analysis...

  3. Numerical study of acoustically driven bubble cloud dynamics near a rigid wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jingsen; Hsiao, Chao-Tsung; Chahine, Georges L

    2018-01-01

    The dynamics of a bubble cloud excited by a sinusoidal pressure field near a rigid wall is studied using a novel Eulerian/Lagrangian two-phase flow model. The effects of key parameters such as the amplitude and frequency of the excitation pressure, the cloud and bubble sizes, the void fraction, and the initial standoff distance on the bubbles' collective behavior and the resulting pressure loads on the nearby wall are investigated. The study shows that nonlinear bubble cloud dynamics becomes more pronounced and results in higher pressure loading at the wall as the excitation pressure amplitude increases. The strongest collective bubble behavior occurs at a preferred resonance frequency. At this resonance frequency, pressure peaks orders of magnitudes higher than the excitation pressure result from the bubble interaction when the amplitude of the pressure excitation is high. The numerically obtained resonance frequency is significantly different from the reported natural frequency of a spherical cloud derived from linear theory, which assumes small amplitude oscillations in an unbounded medium. At high amplitudes of the excitation, the resonance frequency decreases almost linearly with the ratio of excitation pressure amplitude to ambient pressure until the ratio is larger than one. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. DEVELOPMENT OF TITANIUM NITRIDE COATING FOR SNS RING VACUUM CHAMBERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HE, P.; HSEUH, H.C.; MAPES, M.; TODD, R.; WEISS, D.

    2001-01-01

    The inner surface of the ring vacuum chambers of the US Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) will be coated with ∼100 nm of Titanium Nitride (TiN). This is to minimize the secondary electron yield (SEY) from the chamber wall, and thus avoid the so-called e-p instability caused by electron multipacting as observed in a few high-intensity proton storage rings. Both DC sputtering and DC-magnetron sputtering were conducted in a test chamber of relevant geometry to SNS ring vacuum chambers. Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES) and Rutherford Back Scattering (RBS) were used to analyze the coatings for thickness, stoichiometry and impurity. Excellent results were obtained with magnetron sputtering. The development of the parameters for the coating process and the surface analysis results are presented

  5. Dynamic analysis of horizontal axis wind turbine by thin-walled beam theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianhong; Qin, Datong; Lim, Teik C.

    2010-08-01

    A mixed flexible-rigid multi-body mathematical model is applied to predict the dynamic performance of a wind turbine system. Since the tower and rotor are both flexible thin-walled structures, a consistent expression for their deformations is applied, which employs a successive series of transformations to locate any point on the blade and tower relative to an inertial coordinate system. The kinetic and potential energy terms of each flexible body and rigid body are derived for use in the Lagrange approach to formulate the wind turbine system's governing equation. The mode shapes are then obtained from the free vibration solution, while the distributions of dynamic stress and displacement of the tower and rotor are computed from the forced vibration response analysis. Using this dynamic model, the influence of the tower's stiffness on the blade tip deformation is studied. From the analysis, it is evident that the proposed model not only inherits the simplicity of the traditional 1-D beam element, but also able to provide detailed information about the tower and rotor response due to the incorporation of the flexible thin-walled beam theory.

  6. Using the Nova target chamber for high-yield targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitts, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    The existing 2.2-m-radius Nova aluminum target chamber, coated and lined with boron-seeded carbon shields, is proposed for use with 1000-MJ-yield targets in the next laser facility. The laser beam and diagnostic holes in the target chamber are left open and the desired 10 -2 Torr vacuum is maintained both inside and outside the target chamber; a larger target chamber room is the vacuum barrier to the atmosphere. The hole area available is three times that necessary to maintain a maximum fluence below 12 J/cm 2 on optics placed at a radius of 10 m. Maximum stress in the target chamber wall is 73 MPa, which complies with the intent of the ASME Pressure Vessel Code. However, shock waves passing through the inner carbon shield could cause it to comminute. We propose tests and analyses to ensure that the inner carbon shield survives the environment. 13 refs

  7. Space shuttle orbit maneuvering engine reusable thrust chamber program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senneff, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    Reusable thrust chamber and injector concepts were evaluated for the space shuttle orbit maneuvering engine (OME). Parametric engine calculations were carried out by computer program for N2O4/amine, LOX/amine and LOX/hydrocarbon propellant combinations for engines incorporating regenerative cooled and insulated columbium thrust chambers. The calculation methods are described including the fuel vortex film cooling method of combustion gas temperature control, and performance prediction. A method of acceptance of a regeneratively cooled heat rejection reduction using a silicone oil additive was also demonstrated by heated tube heat transfer testing. Regeneratively cooled thrust chamber operation was also demonstrated where the injector was characterized for the OME application with a channel wall regenerative thrust chamber. Bomb stability testing of the demonstration chambers/injectors demonstrated recovery for the nominal design of acoustic cavities. Cavity geometry changes were also evaluated to assess their damping margin. Performance and combustion stability was demonstrated of the originally developed 10 inch diameter combustion pattern operating in an 8 inch diameter thrust chamber.

  8. Thermomechanical effects in a laser IFE first wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchard, James P.; Martin, Carl J.

    2005-01-01

    Laser fusion chamber walls will experience large, pulsed heat loads at frequencies of several hertz. The heating, consisting of X-rays, neutrons, and ions, occurs over a few microseconds and is deposited volumetrically over the first few microns of the wall. For a reasonable chamber radius, the heating will be such that the surface temperature is a significant fraction of the melt temperature of the wall, and significant plasticity can be expected in ductile wall materials. This paper presents results for the transient temperatures and stresses in a tungsten-coated steel first wall for a laser fusion device. Failure analyses are carried out using both fatigue and fracture mechanics methodologies. The simulations predict that surface cracks are expected in the tungsten, but the cracks will arrest before reaching the substrate if the crack spacing is sufficiently small. In addition, the thermal and stress fields are compared for a laser fusion device with several simulation experiments. It is shown that the simulations can reproduce the peak surface temperatures, but the corresponding spatial distributions of the stress and temperature will be shallower than the reactor case

  9. A model of cell-wall dynamics during sporulation in Bacillus subtilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Li-Wei; Endres, Robert G.

    To survive starvation, Bacillus subtilis forms durable spores. After asymmetric cell division, the septum grows around the forespore in a process called engulfment, but the mechanism of force generation is unknown. Here, we derived a novel biophysical model for the dynamics of cell-wall remodeling during engulfment based on a balancing of dissipative, active, and mechanical forces. By plotting phase diagrams, we predict that sporulation is promoted by a line tension from the attachment of the septum to the outer cell wall, as well as by an imbalance in turgor pressures in the mother-cell and forespore compartments. We also predict that significant mother-cell growth hinders engulfment. Hence, relatively simple physical principles may guide this complex biological process.

  10. Improvement of Swirl Chamber Structure of Swirl-Chamber Diesel Engine Based on Flow Field Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenhua Yuan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve combustion characteristic of swirl chamber diesel engine, a simulation model about a traditional cylindrical flat-bottom swirl chamber turbulent combustion diesel engine was established within the timeframe of the piston motion from the bottom dead centre (BDC to the top dead centre (TDC with the fluent dynamic mesh technique and flow field vector of gas in swirl chamber and cylinder; the pressure variation and temperature variation were obtained and a new type of swirl chamber structure was proposed. The results reveal that the piston will move from BDC; air in the cylinder is compressed into the swirl chamber by the piston to develop a swirl inside the chamber, with the ongoing of compression; the pressure and temperature are also rising gradually. Under this condition, the demand of diesel oil mixing and combusting will be better satisfied. Moreover, the new structure will no longer forma small fluid retention zone at the lower end outside the chamber and will be more beneficial to the mixing of fuel oil and air, which has presented a new idea and theoretical foundation for the design and optimization of swirl chamber structure and is thus of good significance of guiding in this regard.

  11. Experimental Studies on Wave Interactions of Partially Perforated Wall under Obliquely Incident Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-In Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents wave height distribution in terms of stem wave evolution phenomena on partially perforated wall structures through three-dimensional laboratory experiments. The plain and partially perforated walls were tested to understand their effects on the stem wave evolution under the monochromatic and random wave cases with the various wave conditions, incident angle (from 10 to 40 degrees, and configurations of front and side walls. The partially perforated wall reduced the relative wave heights more effectively compared to the plain wall structure. Partially perforated walls with side walls showed a better performance in terms of wave height reduction compared to the structure without the side wall. Moreover, the relative wave heights along the wall were relatively small when the relative chamber width is large, within the range of the chamber width in this study. The wave spectra showed a frequency dependency of the wave energy dissipation. In most cases, the existence of side wall is a more important factor than the porosity of the front wall in terms of the wave height reduction even if the partially perforated wall was still effective compared to the plain wall.

  12. Wave energy conversion utilizing vertical motion of water in the array of water chambers aligned in the direction of wave propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kesayoshi Hadano

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available As a new technical approach, wave energy converter by using vertical motion of water in the multiple water chambers were developed to realize actual wave power generation as eco-environmental renewable energy. And practical use of wave energy converter was actually to require the following conditions: (1 setting up of the relevant device and its application to wave power generation in case that severe wave loading is avoided; (2 workability in installation and maintenance operations; (3 high energy conversion potential; and (4 low cost. In this system, neither the wall(s of the chambers nor the energy conversion device(s are exposed to the impulsive load due to water wave. Also since this system is profitable when set along the jetty or along a long floating body, installation and maintenance are done without difficulty and the cost is reduced. In this paper, we describe the system which consists of a float, a shaft connected with another shaft, a rack and pinion arrangement, a ratchet mechanism, and rotary type generator(s. Then, we present the dynamics model for evaluating the output electric power, and the results of numerical calculation including the effect of the phase shift of up/down motion of the water in the array of water chambers aligned along the direction of wave propagation.

  13. Conceptual design study of the hylife lithium fall laser fusion chamber. FY 1979 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    In FY 1979, the basic configuration of FY 1978 was used as a reference point. Many studies were then made to either generate more design information concerning this design or to produce new concepts that would lead to a superior configuration. Among these activities were a detailed weight analysis, an assembly sequence, a chamber vibration analysis, a splash baffle stress study, and an analysis of first wall thermal stresses. Then some new concepts were introduced that pertained to the first wall, the lithium inlet nozzle, the chamber supports, the inlet piping, and pressure vessel

  14. Experimental determination of pcav factors for cylindrical ionisation chambers in electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palm, Aa.; Mattsson, O.

    2000-01-01

    The electron beam method recommended for calibrating plane parallel ionisation chambers involves cavity correction factors for cylindrical chambers. The cavity correction factors in the IAEA TRS-381 Code of Practice are based on measurements at R 100 in a PMMA phantom using PMMA cylindrical chambers having different cavity radii. In the present work the recommended data were confirmed for electron beams delivered by modern medical accelerators by using the very same phantom and ionisation chambers that were used in the original work. From another series of measurements, using four specially designed wall-less chambers in a graphite phantom, the linear relation between p cav and the chamber radius that is the basis for the experimental method, was verified. The method was also used to determine the cavity correction factors for a set of Farmer-like graphite chambers placed in water. Compared to the TRS-381 Code of Practice a smaller correction was found for the cavity perturbation for the graphite chambers used in water. (author)

  15. Deployment and testing of a second prototype expandable surgical chamber in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, Sanford M.; Rock, John A.

    1991-01-01

    During microgravity exposure, two separate expandable surgical chambers were tested. Both chambers had been modified to fit the microgravity work station without extending over the sides of the table. Both chambers were attached to a portable laminar flow generator which served two purposes: to keep the chambers expanded during use; and to provide an operative area environment free of contamination. During the tests, the chambers were placed on various parts of a total body moulage to simulate management of several types of trauma. The tests consisted of cleansing contusions, debridement of burns, and suturing of lacerations. Also, indigo carmine dye was deliberately injected into the chamber during the tests to determine the ease of cleansing the chamber walls after contamination by escaping fluids. Upon completion of the tests, the expandable surgical chambers were deflated, folded, and placed in a flattened state back into their original containers for storage and later disposal. Results are briefly discussed.

  16. Domain walls dynamics in the amorphous ribbon with a helical magnetic anisotropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhmetko, D.N.; Savin, V.V.; Lemish, P.V.; Troschenkov, Y.N.

    2006-01-01

    The damping mechanism for motion of domain walls, which form the sandwich structure and move from the middle plane of the ribbon to opposite surfaces during the dynamic magnetization reversal, have been investigated. The difference between the real and ideal sandwich domain structure, the actual distribution of the anisotropy easy directions through the ribbon thickness and the M-bar s deviation from local easy directions under the action of applied magnetic field have been taken into account. It was revealed that the maximum of the total damping coefficient β tot (x) near the half-way of the domain wall run is due to the influence of the magnetic stray fields. These fields have a character of irregular oscillations and are directed approximately perpendicular to the local easy direction of the ribbon layer through which the domain wall propagates. The damping coefficient β e.c. (x) determined by eddy-currents has the maximal value close to the ribbon middle and decreases linearly to zero when the domain wall approaches the ribbon surface

  17. Interplay of domain walls and magnetization rotation on dynamic magnetization process in iron/polymer–matrix soft magnetic composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobák, Samuel, E-mail: samuel.dobak@student.upjs.sk [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Science, Pavol Jozef Šafárik University, Park Angelinum 9, 041 54 Košice (Slovakia); Füzer, Ján; Kollár, Peter [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Science, Pavol Jozef Šafárik University, Park Angelinum 9, 041 54 Košice (Slovakia); Fáberová, Mária; Bureš, Radovan [Institute of Materials Research, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Watsonova 47, 043 53 Košice (Slovakia)

    2017-03-15

    This study sheds light on the dynamic magnetization process in iron/resin soft magnetic composites from the viewpoint of quantitative decomposition of their complex permeability spectra into the viscous domain wall motion and magnetization rotation. We present a comprehensive view on this phenomenon over the broad family of samples with different average particles dimension and dielectric matrix content. The results reveal the pure relaxation nature of magnetization processes without observation of spin resonance. The smaller particles and higher amount of insulating resin result in the prevalence of rotations over domain wall movement. The findings are elucidated in terms of demagnetizing effects rising from the heterogeneity of composite materials. - Highlights: • A first decomposition of complex permeability into domain wall and rotation parts in soft magnetic composites. • A pure relaxation nature of dynamic magnetization processes. • A complete loss separation in soft magnetic composites. • The domain walls activity is considerably suppressed in composites with smaller iron particles and higher matrix content. • The demagnetizing field acts as a significant factor at the dynamic magnetization process.

  18. A Facility for Long-Term Mars Simulation Experiments: The Mars Environmental Simulation Chamber (MESCH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Lars Liengaard; Merrison, Jonathan; Hansen, Aviaja Anna; Mikkelsen, Karina Aarup; Kristoffersen, Tommy; Nørnberg, Per; Lomstein, Bente Aagaard; Finster, Kai

    2008-06-01

    We describe the design, construction, and pilot operation of a Mars simulation facility comprised of a cryogenic environmental chamber, an atmospheric gas analyzer, and a xenon/mercury discharge source for UV generation. The Mars Environmental Simulation Chamber (MESCH) consists of a double-walled cylindrical chamber. The double wall provides a cooling mantle through which liquid N2 can be circulated. A load-lock system that consists of a small pressure-exchange chamber, which can be evacuated, allows for the exchange of samples without changing the chamber environment. Fitted within the MESCH is a carousel, which holds up to 10 steel sample tubes. Rotation of the carousel is controlled by an external motor. Each sample in the carousel can be placed at any desired position. Environmental data, such as temperature, pressure, and UV exposure time, are computer logged and used in automated feedback mechanisms, enabling a wide variety of experiments that include time series. Tests of the simulation facility have successfully demonstrated its ability to produce temperature cycles and maintain low temperature (down to -140°C), low atmospheric pressure (5 10 mbar), and a gas composition like that of Mars during long-term experiments.

  19. Space shuttle maneuvering engine reusable thrust chamber program. Task 11: Low epsilon stability test report data dump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauckert, R. P.

    1974-01-01

    The stability characteristics of the like-doublet injector were defined over the range of OME chamber pressures and mixture ratios. This was accomplished by bomb testing the injector and cavity configurations in solid wall thrust chamber hardware typical of a flight contour with fuel heated to regenerative chamber outlet temperatures. It was found that stability in the 2600-2800 Hz region depends upon injector hydraulics and on chamber acoustics.

  20. Numerical simulation of performance of heavy ion inertial confinement fusion target with ellipsoidal chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basin, A.A.; Vatulin, V.V.; Vakhlamova, L.L.; Vinokurov, P.A.; Dement'ev, Yu.A.; Eliseev, G.M.; Ermolovich, V.F.; Morenko, L.Z.; Morenko, A.I.; Remizov, G.N.; Romanov, Yu.A.; Ryabikina, N.A.; Skrypnik, S.I.; Skidan, G.I.; Tikhomirov, B.P.; Shagaliev, R.M.

    1996-01-01

    To solve the design problem of an inertial thermonuclear fusion facility requires the united efforts of scientists in various countries. In the field of heavy ion fusion a collaboration between scientists in Germany and Russia is under successful development. VNIIEF possesses advanced software for numerical simulation of the processes in thermonuclear target operation. This paper describes a target design suggested and being studied by scientists of Frankfurt University and GSI which is based on 2D non-stationary calculation of the X-ray energy transport and capsule compression. The target consists of a spherical capsule with DT fuel and an ellipsoidal chamber containment. The ion beam energy is released in two fixed converters located on the chamber axis symmetricall with respect to the capsule. The X-ray field is formed on the capsule surface with a set of special shields. The basic aim of our research is to estimate the effect of gas dynamic expansion of the chamber walls, shields and capsule on the target operation. To increase the reliability of the obtained results and the assessment of probable errors in predicting radiation field parameters and the capsule state, the calculations were accomplished in a kinetic arrangement with various techniques. (orig.)

  1. Study the nature of changes in the dynamic viscosity of milk and fruit products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Ostrikov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The variation of the dynamic viscosity of dairy products and fruit puree with the free run-off on the vertical wall of the vacuum chamber with a two-stage vacuum evaporation was studied. The effect of evaporation temperature and product moisture on the rheological properties of milk and fruit blends was investigated.

  2. Coupled Static and Dynamic Buckling Modelling of Thin-Walled Structures in Elastic Range Review of Selected Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kołakowski Zbigniew

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A review of papers that investigate the static and dynamic coupled buckling and post-buckling behaviour of thin-walled structures is carried out. The problem of static coupled buckling is sufficiently well-recognized. The analysis of dynamic interactive buckling is limited in practice to columns, single plates and shells. The applications of finite element method (FEM or/and analytical-numerical method (ANM to solve interaction buckling problems are on-going. In Poland, the team of scientists from the Department of Strength of Materials, Lodz University of Technology and co-workers developed the analytical-numerical method. This method allows to determine static buckling stresses, natural frequencies, coefficients of the equation describing the post-buckling equilibrium path and dynamic response of the plate structure subjected to compression load and/or bending moment. Using the dynamic buckling criteria, it is possible to determine the dynamic critical load. They presented a lot of interesting results for problems of the static and dynamic coupled buckling of thin-walled plate structures with complex shapes of cross-sections, including an interaction of component plates. The most important advantage of presented analytical-numerical method is that it enables to describe all buckling modes and the post-buckling behaviours of thin-walled columns made of different materials. Thin isotropic, orthotropic or laminate structures were considered.

  3. Molecular dynamic simulation of Ar-Kr mixture across a rough walled nanochannel: Velocity and temperature profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pooja,; Ahluwalia, P. K.; Pathania, Y.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the results from a molecular dynamics simulation of mixture of argon and krypton in the Poiseuille flow across a rough walled nanochannel. The roughness effect on liquid nanoflows has recently drawn attention The computational software used for carrying out the molecular dynamics simulations is LAMMPS. The fluid flow takes place between two parallel plates and is bounded by horizontal rough walls in one direction and periodic boundary conditions are imposed in the other two directions. Each fluid atom interacts with other fluid atoms and wall atoms through Leenard-Jones (LJ) potential with a cut off distance of 5.0. To derive the flow a constant force is applied whose value is varied from 0.1 to 0.3 and velocity profiles and temperature profiles are noted for these values of forces. The velocity profile and temperature profiles are also looked at different channel widths of nanochannel and at different densities of mixture. The velocity profile and temperature profile of rough walled nanochannel are compared with that of smooth walled nanochannel and it is concluded that mean velocity increases with increase in channel width, force applied and decrease in density also with introduction of roughness in the walls of nanochannel mean velocity again increases and results also agree with the analytical solution of a Poiseuille flow

  4. Laminar boundary layer near the rotating end wall of a confined vortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakespeare, W. J.; Levy, E. K.

    1982-06-01

    The results of an experimental and theoretical investigation of the fluid mechanics in a confined vortex are discussed with particular emphasis on behavior away from the axis of symmetry and near the end walls. The vortex is generated in a rotating cylindrical chamber with an exit opening in one end. Both end walls rotate. For the range of flow rates and swirl ratios (S between 1 and 5) of interest here, the flow field far from the end walls behaves as inviscid and irrotational; and the end wall boundary layers are thin and laminar. Measurements and calculations of tangential and radial velocity in the end wall region show the development of a secondary flow resulting in a strong velocity 'overshoot' in the radial component. Results illustrating the nature of the velocity variations on the end walls are presented; and it is shown that the mass flow rate through the end wall boundary layers, while only a small fraction of the total flow, increases with increasing swirl and with decreasing total flow rate through the chamber.

  5. Development of EEM based silicon–water and silica–water wall potentials for non-reactive molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Junghan; Iype, Eldhose; Frijns, Arjan J.H.; Nedea, Silvia V.; Steenhoven, Anton A. van

    2014-07-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of heat transfer in gases are computationally expensive when the wall molecules are explicitly modeled. To save computational time, an implicit boundary function is often used. Steele's potential has been used in studies of fluid–solid interface for a long time. In this work, the conceptual idea of Steele's potential was extended in order to simulate water–silicon and water–silica interfaces. A new wall potential model is developed by using the electronegativity-equalization method (EEM), a ReaxFF empirical force field and a non-reactive molecular dynamics package PumMa. Contact angle simulations were performed in order to validate the wall potential model. Contact angle simulations with the resulting tabulated wall potentials gave a silicon–water contact angle of 129°, a quartz–water contact angle of 0°, and a cristobalite–water contact angle of 40°, which are in reasonable agreement with experimental values.

  6. The cell wall of Arabidopsis thaliana influences actin network dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolmie, Frances; Poulet, Axel; McKenna, Joseph; Sassmann, Stefan; Graumann, Katja; Deeks, Michael; Runions, John

    2017-07-20

    In plant cells, molecular connections link the cell wall-plasma membrane-actin cytoskeleton to form a continuum. It is hypothesized that the cell wall provides stable anchor points around which the actin cytoskeleton remodels. Here we use live cell imaging of fluorescently labelled marker proteins to quantify the organization and dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton and to determine the impact of disrupting connections within the continuum. Labelling of the actin cytoskeleton with green fluorescent protein (GFP)-fimbrin actin-binding domain 2 (FABD2) resulted in a network composed of fine filaments and thicker bundles that appeared as a highly dynamic remodelling meshwork. This differed substantially from the GFP-Lifeact-labelled network that appeared much more sparse with thick bundles that underwent 'simple movement', in which the bundles slightly change position, but in such a manner that the structure of the network was not substantially altered during the time of observation. Label-dependent differences in actin network morphology and remodelling necessitated development of two new image analysis techniques. The first of these, 'pairwise image subtraction', was applied to measurement of the more rapidly remodelling actin network labelled with GFP-FABD2, while the second, 'cumulative fluorescence intensity', was used to measure bulk remodelling of the actin cytoskeleton when labelled with GFP-Lifeact. In each case, these analysis techniques show that the actin cytoskeleton has a decreased rate of bulk remodelling when the cell wall-plasma membrane-actin continuum is disrupted either by plasmolysis or with isoxaben, a drug that specifically inhibits cellulose deposition. Changes in the rate of actin remodelling also affect its functionality, as observed by alteration in Golgi body motility. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Role of plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition reactor wall conditions on radical and ion substrate fluxes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sowa, Mark J., E-mail: msowa@ultratech.com [Ultratech/Cambridge NanoTech, 130 Turner Street, Building 2, Waltham, Massachusetts 02453 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    Chamber wall conditions, such as wall temperature and film deposits, have long been known to influence plasma source performance on thin film processing equipment. Plasma physical characteristics depend on conductive/insulating properties of chamber walls. Radical fluxes depend on plasma characteristics as well as wall recombination rates, which can be wall material and temperature dependent. Variations in substrate delivery of plasma generated species (radicals, ions, etc.) impact the resulting etch or deposition process resulting in process drift. Plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition is known to depend strongly on substrate radical flux, but film properties can be influenced by other plasma generated phenomena, such as ion bombardment. In this paper, the chamber wall conditions on a plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition process are investigated. The downstream oxygen radical and ion fluxes from an inductively coupled plasma source are indirectly monitored in temperature controlled (25–190 °C) stainless steel and quartz reactors over a range of oxygen flow rates. Etch rates of a photoresist coated quartz crystal microbalance are used to study the oxygen radical flux dependence on reactor characteristics. Plasma density estimates from Langmuir probe ion saturation current measurements are used to study the ion flux dependence on reactor characteristics. Reactor temperature was not found to impact radical and ion fluxes substantially. Radical and ion fluxes were higher for quartz walls compared to stainless steel walls over all oxygen flow rates considered. The radical flux to ion flux ratio is likely to be a critical parameter for the deposition of consistent film properties. Reactor wall material, gas flow rate/pressure, and distance from the plasma source all impact the radical to ion flux ratio. These results indicate maintaining chamber wall conditions will be important for delivering consistent results from plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition

  8. Acoustic Sensor Design for Dark Matter Bubble Chamber Detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felis, Ivan; Martínez-Mora, Juan Antonio; Ardid, Miguel

    2016-06-10

    Dark matter bubble chamber detectors use piezoelectric sensors in order to detect and discriminate the acoustic signals emitted by the bubbles grown within the superheated fluid from a nuclear recoil produced by a particle interaction. These sensors are attached to the outside walls of the vessel containing the fluid. The acoustic discrimination depends strongly on the properties of the sensor attached to the outer wall of the vessel that has to meet the requirements of radiopurity and size. With the aim of optimizing the sensor system, a test bench for the characterization of the sensors has been developed. The sensor response for different piezoelectric materials, geometries, matching layers, and backing layers have been measured and contrasted with FEM simulations and analytical models. The results of these studies lead us to have a design criterion for the construction of specific sensors for the next generation of dark matter bubble chamber detectors (250 L).

  9. Acoustic Sensor Design for Dark Matter Bubble Chamber Detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Felis

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Dark matter bubble chamber detectors use piezoelectric sensors in order to detect and discriminate the acoustic signals emitted by the bubbles grown within the superheated fluid from a nuclear recoil produced by a particle interaction. These sensors are attached to the outside walls of the vessel containing the fluid. The acoustic discrimination depends strongly on the properties of the sensor attached to the outer wall of the vessel that has to meet the requirements of radiopurity and size. With the aim of optimizing the sensor system, a test bench for the characterization of the sensors has been developed. The sensor response for different piezoelectric materials, geometries, matching layers, and backing layers have been measured and contrasted with FEM simulations and analytical models. The results of these studies lead us to have a design criterion for the construction of specific sensors for the next generation of dark matter bubble chamber detectors (250 L.

  10. Conditioning of vacuum chamber by RF plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elizondo, J.I.; Nascimento, I.C. do

    1985-01-01

    A new conditioning vaccum chamber system is presented. It consists in hydrogen plasm generation by microwaves with low electronic temperature (Te approx. 5eV) and low ionization degree. The ions and neutral atoms generated in the reaction: e + H 2 -> H+ H+ e, bomb the chamber walls combinig themselves to impurities of surface and generating several compounds: H 2 O, CO, CH 4 , CO 2 etc. The vacuum system operates continuosly and remove these compounds. A microwave system using magnetron valve (f=2,45 GHz, P=800W) was constructed for TBR (Brazilian tokamak). The gas partial pressures were monitored before, during and after conditioning showing the efficiency of the process. (M.C.K.) [pt

  11. The Solar Dynamic Buffer Zone (SDBZ) curtain wall: Validation and design of a solar air collector curtain wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richman, Russell Corey

    Given the increases in both the environmental and economic costs of energy, there is a need to design and building more sustainable and low-energy building systems now. Curtain wall assemblies show great promise---the spandrel panels within them can be natural solar collectors. By using a Solar Dynamic Buffer Zone (SDBZ) in the spandrel cavity, solar energy can be efficiently gathered using the movement of air. There is a need for a numerical model capable of predicting performance of an SDBZ Curtain Wall system. This research designed, constructed and quantified a prototype SDBZ curtain wall system through by experimental testing in a laboratory environment. The laboratory experiments focussed on three main variables: air flow through the system, incoming radiation and collector surface type. Results from the experimental testing were used to validate a one-dimensional numerical model of the prototype. Results from this research show a SDBZ curtain wall system as an effective means of reducing building heating energy consumption through the preheating of incoming exterior ventilation air during the heating season in cold climates. The numerical model showed good correlation with experimental results at higher operating flows and at lower flows when using an apparent velocity at the heat transfer boundary layer. A seasonal simulation for Toronto, ON predicted energy savings of 205 kWh/m2 with an average seasonal efficiency of 28%. This is considered in the upper range when compared to other solar air collectors. Given the lack of published literature for similar systems, this research acts to introduce a simple, innovative approach to collect solar energy that would otherwise be lost to the exterior using already existing components within a curtain wall. Specifically, the research has provided: results from experiments and simulation, a first generation numerical model, aspects of design and construction of the SDBZ curtain wall and specific directions for further

  12. Predicting the elastic properties of double-walled carbon nanotubes by molecular dynamics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Chenli; Shen Huishen

    2008-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation is performed on a double-walled carbon nanotube (DWCNT) to predict its elastic properties based on a double-walled shear deformable shell model. By direct buckling measurement, we present here a method for uniquely determining the effective wall thickness for the shell model. Accounting for two different kinds of DWCNTs by adding an inner or outer tube to a fiducial tube, the mechanical properties of DWCNTs are carefully investigated as compared with those of the fiducial tube. It is found that the predicted values of Young's and shear moduli depend strongly on the construction and helicity of DWCNTs, while the dependence on nanotube length is relatively small. The results also confirm that the temperature variation has a significant effect on the elastic properties of DWCNTs

  13. Influence of reaction chamber shape on cast-iron spheroidization process in-mold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pietrowski

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a results concerning the influence of reaction chamber shape on cast – iron spheroidization process in form. The volume of the tested reaction chambers was about 118000mm3. Reaction chambers in the shape of: rectangular, cylinder and spherical cap were examined. It has been shown that the best graphite spheroidizing process was provided by spherical cap chamber shape. The reaction of cast – iron with magnesium in reaction chamber depends on the flow of cast – iron in the chamber. In rectangular and cylinder shape chambers proceed the impact of diphase stream on flat bottom wall. It causes the creation on its surface film, called: cast – iron “film”, where single grains of magnesium master alloy exist. The largest part of master alloy is drifted by liquid cast – iron to the top and only there graphite spheroidization process proceed. In the spherical cap shape reaction chamber, as a result of rotation movement of liquid cast – iron throughout its volume, graphite spheroidization process proceed. Apart from the reaction chamber shape, applying of mixing chamber ensure full cast – iron spheroidization process.

  14. Integrated Chamber Design for the Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) Engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latkowski, J.F.; Kramer, K.J.; Abbott, R.P.; Morris, K.R.; DeMuth, J.; Divol, L.; El-Dasher, B.; Lafuente, A.; Loosmore, G.; Reyes, S.; Moses, G.A.; Fratoni, M.; Flowers, D.; Aceves, S.; Rhodes, M.; Kane, J.; Scott, H.; Kramer, R.; Pantano, C.; Scullard, C.; Sawicki, R.; Wilks, S.; Mehl, M.

    2010-01-01

    The Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) concept is being designed to operate as either a pure fusion or hybrid fusion-fission system. A key component of a LIFE engine is the fusion chamber subsystem. The present work details the chamber design for the pure fusion option. The fusion chamber consists of the first wall and blanket. This integrated system must absorb the fusion energy, produce fusion fuel to replace that burned in previous targets, and enable both target and laser beam transport to the ignition point. The chamber system also must mitigate target emissions, including ions, x-rays and neutrons and reset itself to enable operation at 10-15 Hz. Finally, the chamber must offer a high level of availability, which implies both a reasonable lifetime and the ability to rapidly replace damaged components. An integrated LIFE design that meets all of these requirements is described herein.

  15. Integrated Chamber Design for the Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) Engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latkowski, J F; Kramer, K J; Abbott, R P; Morris, K R; DeMuth, J; Divol, L; El-Dasher, B; Lafuente, A; Loosmore, G; Reyes, S; Moses, G A; Fratoni, M; Flowers, D; Aceves, S; Rhodes, M; Kane, J; Scott, H; Kramer, R; Pantano, C; Scullard, C; Sawicki, R; Wilks, S; Mehl, M

    2010-12-07

    The Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) concept is being designed to operate as either a pure fusion or hybrid fusion-fission system. A key component of a LIFE engine is the fusion chamber subsystem. The present work details the chamber design for the pure fusion option. The fusion chamber consists of the first wall and blanket. This integrated system must absorb the fusion energy, produce fusion fuel to replace that burned in previous targets, and enable both target and laser beam transport to the ignition point. The chamber system also must mitigate target emissions, including ions, x-rays and neutrons and reset itself to enable operation at 10-15 Hz. Finally, the chamber must offer a high level of availability, which implies both a reasonable lifetime and the ability to rapidly replace damaged components. An integrated LIFE design that meets all of these requirements is described herein.

  16. Spherical ionization chamber of 14 liter for precise measurement of environmental radiation dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagaoka, Toshi; Saito, Kimiaki; Moriuchi, Shigeru

    1991-05-01

    A spherical ionization chamber of 14 liter filled with 1 atm. nitrogen gas was arranged aiming at precise measurement of dose rate due to environmental gamma rays and cosmic rays. Ionization current-dose rate conversion factor for this ionization chamber was derived from careful consideration taking into account the attenuation by chamber wall, ionization current due to alpha particles and so on. Experiments at calibrated gamma ray fields and intercomparison with NaI(Tl) scintillation detector were also performed, which confirmed this ionization chamber using the conversion factor can measure the dose rate with an error of only a few percent. This ionization chamber will be used for measurement of environmental gamma ray and cosmic ray dose rate. (author)

  17. Dynamic control of magnetic nanowires by light-induced domain-wall kickoffs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heintze, Eric; El Hallak, Fadi; Clauß, Conrad; Rettori, Angelo; Pini, Maria Gloria; Totti, Federico; Dressel, Martin; Bogani, Lapo

    2013-03-01

    Controlling the speed at which systems evolve is a challenge shared by all disciplines, and otherwise unrelated areas use common theoretical frameworks towards this goal. A particularly widespread model is Glauber dynamics, which describes the time evolution of the Ising model and can be applied to any binary system. Here we show, using molecular nanowires under irradiation, that Glauber dynamics can be controlled by a novel domain-wall kickoff mechanism. In contrast to known processes, the kickoff has unambiguous fingerprints, slowing down the spin-flip attempt rate by several orders of magnitude, and following a scaling law. The required irradiance is very low, a substantial improvement over present methods of magneto-optical switching. These results provide a new way to control and study stochastic dynamic processes. Being general for Glauber dynamics, they can be extended to different kinds of magnetic nanowires and to numerous fields, ranging from social evolution to neural networks and chemical reactivity.

  18. [Characterization of photochemical smog chamber and initial experiments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Long; Xu, Yong-Fu; Shi, Yu-Zhen

    2011-02-01

    A self-made new indoor environmental chamber facility for the study of atmospheric processes leading to the formation of ozone and secondary organic aerosols has been introduced and characterized. The characterization experiments include the measurements of wall effects for reactive species and the determination of chamber dependent * OH radical sources by CO-NO(x) irradiation experiments. Preliminary ethene-NO(x) and benzene-NO(x) experiments were conducted as well. The results of characterization experiments show that the wall effects for O3 and NO2 in a new reactor are not obvious. Relative humidity has a great effect on the wall losses in the old reactor, especially for O3. In the old reactor, the rate constant for O3 wall losses is obtained to be 1.0 x 10(-5) s(-1) (RH = 5%) and 4.0 x10(-5) s(-1) (RH = 91%), whereas for NO2, it is 1.0 x 10(-6) s(-1) (RH = 5%) and 0.6 x 10(-6) s(-1) (RH = 75%). The value for k(NO2 --> HONO) determined by CO-NO(x) irradiation experiments is (4.2-5.2) x 10(-5) s(-1) and (2.3-2.5) x 10(-5) s(-1) at RH = 5% and RH 75% -77%, respectively. The average *OH concentration is estimated to be (2.1 +/- 0.4) x 10(6) molecules/cm3 by using a reaction rate coefficient of CO and * OH. The sensitivity of chamber dependent auxiliary reactions to the O3 formation is discussed. Results show that NO2 --> HONO has the greatest impact on the O3 formation during the initial stage, N2O5 + H2O --> 2HNO3 has a minus effect to maximum O3 concentration, and that the wall losses of both O3 and NO2 have little impact on the O3 formation. The results from the ethene-NO(x) and benzene-NO(x) experiments are in good agreement with those from the MCM simulation, which reflects that the facility for the study of the formation of secondary pollution of ozone and secondary organic aerosols is reliable. This demonstrates that our facility can be further used in the deep-going study of chemical processes in the atmosphere.

  19. Experimental Investigation of Chatter Dynamics in Thin-walled Tubular Parts Turning

    OpenAIRE

    GERASIMENKO, Artem; GUSKOV, Mikhail; LORONG, Philippe; DUCHEMIN, Jérôme; GOUSKOV, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Chatter prediction is nowadays frequently carried out for machining operations involving deformable parts or tools. These analyses are commonly based on the uncoupled elements of the system: frequency response of the deformable parts under non-rotating conditions and cutting law. The present investigation puts forward the dynamics of a thin-walled tubular part during straight axial turning undergoing chatter instability. Studied system’s peculiarities include quasi-static nominal cutting cond...

  20. A Concept for a Low Pressure Noble Gas Fill Intervention in the IFE Fusion Test Facility (FTF) Target Chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gentile, C.A.; Blanchard, W.R.; Kozub, T.A.; Aristova, M.; McGahan, C.; Natta, S.; Pagdon, K.; Zelenty, J.

    2010-01-01

    An engineering evaluation has been initiated to investigate conceptual engineering methods for implementing a viable gas shield strategy in the Fusion Test Facility (FTF) target chamber. The employment of a low pressure noble gas in the target chamber to thermalize energetic helium ions prior to interaction with the wall could dramatically increase the useful life of the first wall in the FTF reactor1. For the purpose of providing flexibility, two target chamber configurations are addressed: a five meter radius sphere and a ten meter radius sphere. Experimental studies at Nike have indicated that a low pressure, ambient gas resident in the target chamber during laser pulsing does not appear to impair the ability of laser light from illuminating targets2. In addition, current investigations into delivering, maintaining, and processing low pressure gas appear to be viable with slight modification to current pumping and plasma exhaust processing technologies3,4. Employment of a gas fill solution for protecting the dry wall target chamber in the FTF may reduce, or possibly eliminate the need for other attenuating technologies designed for keeping He ions from implanting in first wall structures and components. The gas fill concept appears to provide an effective means of extending the life of the first wall while employing mostly commercial off the shelf (COTS) technologies. Although a gas fill configuration may provide a methodology for attenuating damage inflicted on chamber surfaces, issues associated with target injection need to be further analyzed to ensure that the gas fill concept is viable in the integrated FTF design5. In the proposed system, the ambient noble gas is heated via the energetic helium ions produced by target detonation. The gas is subsequently cooled by the chamber wall to approximately 800oC, removed from the chamber, and processed by the chamber gas processing system (CGPS). In an optimized scenario of the above stated concept, the chamber

  1. Nonlinear Dynamics Mechanism of Rock Burst Induced by the Instability of the Layer-Crack Plate Structure in the Coal Wall in Deep Coal Mining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanlong Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The instability of layer-crack plate structure in coal wall is one of the causes of rock burst. In the present paper, we investigate the formation and instability processes of layer-crack plate structure in coal wall by experiments and theoretical analysis. The results reveal that layer-crack plate structure formed near the free surface of the coal wall during the loading. During the formation of the layer-crack plate structure, the lateral displacement curve of the coal wall experiences a jagged variation, which suggests the nonlinear instability failure of the coal wall with a sudden release of the elastic energy. Then, a dynamic model for the stability analysis of the layer-crack plate structure was proposed, which takes consideration of the dynamic disturbance factor. Based on the dynamic model, the criterion for dynamic instability of the layer-crack plate structure was determined and demonstrated by an example. According to the analytical results, some control methods of dynamic stability of the layer-crack plate structure was put forward.

  2. Deflection Prediction of No-Fines Lightweight Concrete Wall Using Neural Network Caused Dynamic Loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ridho Bayuaji

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available No-fines lightweight concrete wall with horizontal reinforcement refers to an alternative material for wall construction with an aim of improving the wall quality towards horizontal loads. This study is focused on artificial neural network (ANN application to predicting the deflection deformation caused by dynamic loads. The ANN method is able to capture the complex interactions among input/output variables in a system without any knowledge of interaction nature and without any explicit assumption to model form. This paper explains the existing data research, data selection and process of ANN modelling training process and validation. The results of this research show that the deformation can be predicted more accurately, simply and quickly due to the alternating horizontal loads.

  3. Dynamical scaling, domain-growth kinetics, and domain-wall shapes of quenched two-dimensional anisotropic XY models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouritsen, Ole G.; Praestgaard, Eigil

    1988-01-01

    obeys dynamical scaling and the shape of the dynamical scaling function pertaining to the structure factor is found to depend on P. Specifically, this function is described by a Porod-law behavior, q-ω, where ω increases with the wall softness. The kinetic exponent, which describes how the linear domain...... infinite to zero temperature as well as to nonzero temperatures below the ordering transition. The continuous nature of the spin variables causes the domain walls to be ‘‘soft’’ and characterized by a finite thickness. The steady-state thickness of the walls can be varied by a model parameter, P. At zero...... size varies with time, R(t)∼tn, is for both models at zero temperature determined to be n≃0.25, independent of P. At finite temperatures, the growth kinetics is found to cross over to the Lifshitz-Allen-Cahn law characterized by n≃0.50. The results support the idea of two separate zero...

  4. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) applications in rocket propulsion analysis and design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcconnaughey, P. K.; Garcia, R.; Griffin, L. W.; Ruf, J. H.

    1993-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) has been used in recent applications to affect subcomponent designs in liquid propulsion rocket engines. This paper elucidates three such applications for turbine stage, pump stage, and combustor chamber geometries. Details of these applications include the development of a high turning airfoil for a gas generator (GG) powered, liquid oxygen (LOX) turbopump, single-stage turbine using CFD as an integral part of the design process. CFD application to pump stage design has emphasized analysis of inducers, impellers, and diffuser/volute sections. Improvements in pump stage impeller discharge flow uniformity have been seen through CFD optimization on coarse grid models. In the area of combustor design, recent CFD analysis of a film cooled ablating combustion chamber has been used to quantify the interaction between film cooling rate, chamber wall contraction angle, and geometry and their effects of these quantities on local wall temperature. The results are currently guiding combustion chamber design and coolant flow rate for an upcoming subcomponent test. Critical aspects of successful integration of CFD into the design cycle includes a close-coupling of CFD and design organizations, quick turnaround of parametric analyses once a baseline CFD benchmark has been established, and the use of CFD methodology and approaches that address pertinent design issues. In this latter area, some problem details can be simplified while retaining key physical aspects to maintain analytical integrity.

  5. Noise analysis based validation of the dynamics of in-core flux detectors and ion chambers used in SDS and RRS systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gloeckler, O.; Cooke, D.; Tulett, M.V.

    1996-01-01

    The paper concentrates on some of the recent applications of reactor noise analysis in Ontario Hydro's CANDU stations, related to the dynamics of in-core flux detectors (ICFDs) and ion chambers. These applications include (1) detecting anomalies in the dynamics of ICFDs and ion chambers, (2) estimating the effective prompt fractions of ICFDs in power rundown tests and in noise measurement, (3) detecting the mechanical vibration of ICFD instrument tubes induced by moderator flow, (4) detecting the mechanical vibration of fuel channels induced by coolant flow, (5) identifying the cause of excessive signal fluctuations in certain flux detectors, (6) validating the dynamic coupling between liquid zone control signals. Some of these applications are performed on a regular basis. The noise analysis program, in the Pickering-B station alone, has saved Ontario Hydro millions of dollars during its first three years. The results of the noise analysis program have been also reviewed by the AECB with favorable results. The AECB have expressed interest in Ontario Hydro further exploiting the use of noise analysis technology (author)

  6. Prediction of dynamic contact angle histories of a bubble growing at a wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geld, Cees W.M. van der

    2004-01-01

    A fast growing boiling bubble at the verge of detaching from a plane wall is usually shaped as a truncated sphere, and experiences various hydrodynamic forces due to its expansion and the motion of its center of mass. In a homogeneous flow field, one of the forces is the so-called bubble growth force that is essentially due to inertia. This force is usually evaluated with the aid of approximate expressions [Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer 36 (1993) 651, Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer 38 (1995) 2075]. In the present study an exact expression for the expansion force is derived for the case of a truncated sphere attached to a plane, infinite wall. The Lagrange-Thomson formalism is applied. Two Euler-Lagrange equations are derived, one governing the motion of the center of mass, the other governing expansion a kind of extended Rayleigh-Plesset equation. If a constitutive equation for the gas-vapor content of the bubble is given, initial conditions and these two differential equations determine the dynamics of the growing truncated sphere that has its foot on a plane, infinite wall. Simulations are carried out for a given expansion rate to predict the history of the dynamic contact angle. The simulations increase the understanding of mechanisms controlling detachment, and yield realistic times of detachment

  7. Influence of Housing Wall Compliance on Shock Absorbers in the Context of Vehicle Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulvirenti, G.; Faria, C.

    2017-10-01

    Shock absorbers play a key role in vehicle dynamics. Researchers have spent significant effort in order to understand phenomena associated with this component, but there are still several issues to address, in part because new technology development and design trends continually lead to new challenges, among which weight reduction is crucial. For shock absorbers, weight reduction is related to the use of new materials (e.g. composite) or new design paradigms (e.g. more complex geometry, wall thickness, etc.). All of them are directly linked to wall compliance values higher than the actual ones. The present article proposes a first analysis of the phenomena introduced by a high wall compliance, through a modelling approach and various simulations in order to understand the vehicle behaviour changes. It is shown that high values of wall compliance lead to increased hysteresis in the force-velocity curve. However, comfort, handling and ride performances are not significantly affected by this designing parameter.

  8. True and measured outgassing rates of a vacuum chamber with a reversibly adsorbed phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akaishi, K. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Nakasuga, M. [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto Univ., Uji, Kyoto (Japan); Funato, Y. [Suzuka National College of Technology, Suzuka, Mie (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    A pump down model for a vacuum chamber with a reversibly adsorbed phase is presented. The outgassing equation which predicts the variation of coverage at the wall surface of a vacuum chamber with time is derived. Then the measured and the true outgassing rates are defined. The theoretical measured outgassing rate shows only a very weak dependence for pumping speed. This prediction is opposite to the experimental result that the measured outgassing rate depends significantly on pumping speed. It is discussed that the experimental measured outgassing rate must be described as the product of the effective pumping speed and the measured pressure in the pumped chamber, in which the measured pressure is equivalent to the equilibrium pressure of the wall surface described by the equilibrium adsorption isotherm as a function of the shifted surface coverage {theta}-{delta}{theta} by a small coverage {delta}{theta} from the coverage of a pumping point {delta}. (author)

  9. True and measured outgassing rates of a vacuum chamber with a reversibly adsorbed phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akaishi, K.; Nakasuga, M.; Funato, Y.

    2000-03-01

    A pump down model for a vacuum chamber with a reversibly adsorbed phase is presented. The outgassing equation which predicts the variation of coverage at the wall surface of a vacuum chamber with time is derived. Then the measured and the true outgassing rates are defined. The theoretical measured outgassing rate shows only a very weak dependence for pumping speed. This prediction is opposite to the experimental result that the measured outgassing rate depends significantly on pumping speed. It is discussed that the experimental measured outgassing rate must be described as the product of the effective pumping speed and the measured pressure in the pumped chamber, in which the measured pressure is equivalent to the equilibrium pressure of the wall surface described by the equilibrium adsorption isotherm as a function of the shifted surface coverage θ-Δθ by a small coverage Δθ from the coverage of a pumping point Δ. (author)

  10. Global particle balance and wall recycling properties of long duration discharges on TRIAM-1M

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, M.; Yuno, M.; Itoh, S.

    2003-01-01

    The longest tokamak discharge with the duration of 11406 s (3 h 10 min) was achieved. The global particle balance has been investigated. In the longest discharge, the global balance between the particle absorption and release of the wall was achieved around t∼30 min and then the fueling was automatically stopped. After that the plasma density was maintained by the recycling flux alone until the end of the discharge. The maximum wall inventory is about 3.6 x 10 20 H at t ∼ 30 min but it is finally released from the wall at the end of the discharge. The global balance seems to be caused by the increase in the hydrogen release from the main chamber resulting from its temperature rise. Moreover, it has been observed a large difference between properties of wall recycling in the continuous gas feed case (i.e. static condition) and the additional gas puff case (i.e. dynamic condition). In the static condition, the effective particle confinement time increases almost linearly to about 10 s during the one-minute discharge. In the dynamic condition, the decay time of the electron density just after the gas puff, i.e. the effective particle confinement time, is 0.2 to 0.3 s during the one-minute discharge. The large difference was also reproduced in the longest discharge. It is considered that the enhanced wall pumping is caused by the increase in fluxes of the diffused ions and charge exchange neutrals due to the additional gas puff. (author)

  11. Mega-bicone vacuum chamber for ISR intersections

    CERN Document Server

    CERN PhotoLab

    1975-01-01

    The cylindrical central part covered the collision region allowing secondary particles emitted at large angle to escape thanks to its very thin wall.The two conical parts are terminated by "transparent" thin windows for letting out forward emitted secondary particles. Vacuum chambers of this shape were made in their thin parts out of 0.3 mm stainless steel or 0.28 mm titanium alloy sheet. See also 7609219, 7609221, 7507132X.

  12. Chamber science and technology key question No.1: liquid walls in MFE and IFE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moir, R.; Morley, N.

    1999-01-01

    For some time now people have thought of liquid walls as an attractive solution to the technology problems of high power density plasma configurations for MFE, and as (nearly) essential for the pulsed wall-loading conditions in IFE. A flowing, renewable surface could be eroded, evaporated and even be broken apart with no permanent adverse effects on a structure requiring frequent maintenance and replacement. Alpha particle energy could be removed without conduction through a solid wall and the associated thermal stress and creep failure modes, and the energy could be extracted at high temperatures for efficient energy conversion. If a liquid wall of sufficient depth could be formed, radiation damage and waste disposal issues for solid structures could be significantly ameliorated. All these benefits are indeed possible, if only liquid walls could be made to work. As we will see, there are many issues associated with the successful and attractive implementation of liquid walls

  13. A model for near-wall dynamics in turbulent Rayleigh Bénard convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theerthan, S. Ananda; Arakeri, Jaywant H.

    1998-10-01

    Experiments indicate that turbulent free convection over a horizontal surface (e.g. Rayleigh Bénard convection) consists of essentially line plumes near the walls, at least for moderately high Rayleigh numbers. Based on this evidence, we propose here a two-dimensional model for near-wall dynamics in Rayleigh Bénard convection and in general for convection over heated horizontal surfaces. The model proposes a periodic array of steady laminar two-dimensional plumes. A plume is fed on either side by boundary layers on the wall. The results from the model are obtained in two ways. One of the methods uses the similarity solution of Rotem & Classen (1969) for the boundary layer and the similarity solution of Fuji (1963) for the plume. We have derived expressions for mean temperature and temperature and velocity fluctuations near the wall. In the second approach, we compute the two-dimensional flow field in a two-dimensional rectangular open cavity. The number of plumes in the cavity depends on the length of the cavity. The plume spacing is determined from the critical length at which the number of plumes increases by one. The results for average plume spacing and the distribution of r.m.s. temperature and velocity fluctuations are shown to be in acceptable agreement with experimental results.

  14. Pea Border Cell Maturation and Release Involve Complex Cell Wall Structural Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mravec, Jozef; Guo, Xiaoyuan; Hansen, Aleksander Riise; Schückel, Julia; Kračun, Stjepan Krešimir; Mikkelsen, Maria Dalgaard; Mouille, Grégory; Johansen, Ida Elisabeth; Ulvskov, Peter; Domozych, David S; Willats, William George Tycho

    2017-06-01

    The adhesion of plant cells is vital for support and protection of the plant body and is maintained by a variety of molecular associations between cell wall components. In some specialized cases, though, plant cells are programmed to detach, and root cap-derived border cells are examples of this. Border cells (in some species known as border-like cells) provide an expendable barrier between roots and the environment. Their maturation and release is an important but poorly characterized cell separation event. To gain a deeper insight into the complex cellular dynamics underlying this process, we undertook a systematic, detailed analysis of pea ( Pisum sativum ) root tip cell walls. Our study included immunocarbohydrate microarray profiling, monosaccharide composition determination, Fourier-transformed infrared microspectroscopy, quantitative reverse transcription-PCR of cell wall biosynthetic genes, analysis of hydrolytic activities, transmission electron microscopy, and immunolocalization of cell wall components. Using this integrated glycobiology approach, we identified multiple novel modes of cell wall structural and compositional rearrangement during root cap growth and the release of border cells. Our findings provide a new level of detail about border cell maturation and enable us to develop a model of the separation process. We propose that loss of adhesion by the dissolution of homogalacturonan in the middle lamellae is augmented by an active biophysical process of cell curvature driven by the polarized distribution of xyloglucan and extensin epitopes. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Use of commercial radon monitors for low level radon measurements in dynamically operated VOC emission test chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, M.; Richter, M.; Jann, O.

    2017-01-01

    Compared to the intended EU reference level of 300 Bq m -3 for indoor radon concentrations, the contribution of building materials appears to be low. Considering the recommended limit of 100 Bq m -3 by WHO, their contribution is supposed to be relevant, especially at low air exchange rates. This study as part of a two-part research project investigated the suitability of direct low level 222 Rn measurement under simulated indoor conditions with commercial radon monitors and dynamically operated emission test chambers. Active measuring devices based on ionisation or scintillation chambers with 1-σ uncertainties below 8.6% at 20 Bq m -3 were found to be best suitable for a practical test procedure for the determination of radon exhalation rates of building materials. For the measurement of such low concentrations, the knowledge of the accurate device background level is essential. (authors)

  16. Development of a Novel Contamination Resistant Ion Chamber for Process Tritium Measurement and Use in the JET First Trace Tritium Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worth, L.B.C.; Pearce, R.J.H.; Bruce, J.; Banks, J.; Scales, S.

    2005-01-01

    The accuracy of process measurements of tritium with conventional ion chambers is often affected by surface tritium contamination. The measurement of tritium in the exhaust of the JET torus is particularly difficult due to surface contamination with highly tritiated hydrocarbons. JET's first unsuccessful attempt to overcome the contamination problem was to use an ion chamber, with a heating element as the chamber wall so that it could be periodically decontaminated by baking. The newly developed ion chamber works on the principle of minimising the surface area within the boundary of the anode and cathode.This paper details the design of the ion chamber, which utilises a grid of 50-micron tungsten wire to define the ion chamber wall and the collector electrode. The effective surface area which, by contamination, is able to effect the measurement of tritium within the process gas has been reduced by a factor of ∼200 over a conventional ion chamber. It is concluded that the new process ion chamber enables sensitive accurate tritium measurements free from contamination issues. It will be a powerful new tool for future tritium experiments both to improve tritium tracking and to help in the understanding of tritium retention issues

  17. Impact of the resistive wall impedance on beam dynamics in the Future Circular e^{+}e^{-} Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Migliorati

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The Future Circular Collider study, which aims at designing post-LHC particle accelerator options, is entering in the final stage, which foresees a conceptual design report containing the basic requirements for a hadron and a lepton collider, as well as options for an electron-proton machine. Due to the high beam intensities of these accelerators, collective effects have to be carefully analyzed. Among them, the finite conductivity of the beam vacuum chamber represents a major source of impedance for the electron-positron collider. By using numerical and analytical tools, a parametric study of longitudinal and transverse instabilities caused by the resistive wall is performed in this paper for the case of the Future Circular Collider lepton machine, by taking into account also the effects of coating, used to fight the electron cloud build up. It will be proved that under certain assumptions the coupling impedance of a two layer system does not depend on the conductivity of the coating and this property represents an important characteristic for the choice of the material itself. The results and findings of this study have an impact on the machine design in several aspects. In particular the quite low threshold of single bunch instabilities with respect to the nominal beam current and the not negligible power losses due to the resistive wall are shown, together with the necessity of a new feedback system to counteract the fast transverse coupled bunch instability. The importance of a round vacuum chamber to avoid the quadrupolar tune shift is also discussed. Finally the crucial importance of the beam pipe material coating and thickness choice for the above results is underlined.

  18. Impact of the resistive wall impedance on beam dynamics in the Future Circular e+e- Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliorati, M.; Belli, E.; Zobov, M.

    2018-04-01

    The Future Circular Collider study, which aims at designing post-LHC particle accelerator options, is entering in the final stage, which foresees a conceptual design report containing the basic requirements for a hadron and a lepton collider, as well as options for an electron-proton machine. Due to the high beam intensities of these accelerators, collective effects have to be carefully analyzed. Among them, the finite conductivity of the beam vacuum chamber represents a major source of impedance for the electron-positron collider. By using numerical and analytical tools, a parametric study of longitudinal and transverse instabilities caused by the resistive wall is performed in this paper for the case of the Future Circular Collider lepton machine, by taking into account also the effects of coating, used to fight the electron cloud build up. It will be proved that under certain assumptions the coupling impedance of a two layer system does not depend on the conductivity of the coating and this property represents an important characteristic for the choice of the material itself. The results and findings of this study have an impact on the machine design in several aspects. In particular the quite low threshold of single bunch instabilities with respect to the nominal beam current and the not negligible power losses due to the resistive wall are shown, together with the necessity of a new feedback system to counteract the fast transverse coupled bunch instability. The importance of a round vacuum chamber to avoid the quadrupolar tune shift is also discussed. Finally the crucial importance of the beam pipe material coating and thickness choice for the above results is underlined.

  19. Flux measurements with a sniffer probe near the wall in ASDEX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poschenrieder, W.; Venus, G.; Wang, Y.G.; Mueller, E.R.; Bartiromo, R.; Becker, G.; Bosch, H.S.; Brocken, H.; Eberhagen, A.; Fussmann, G.; Gehre, O.; Gernhardt, J.; Gierke, G. v.; Glock, E.; Gruber, O.; Haas, G.; Janeschitz, G.; Karger, F.; Kotze, P.B.; Keilhacker, M.; Klueber, O.; Kornherr, M.; Lackner, K.; Lenoci, M.; Lisitano, G.; Mayer, H.M.; McCormick, K.; Meisel, D.; Mertens, V.; Murmann, H.; Niedermeyer, H.; Rapp, H.; Roehr, H.; Ryter, F.; Schneider, F.; Siller, G.; Smeulders, P.; Soeldner, F.; Speth, E.; Steuer, K.H.; Vollmer, O.; Wagner, F.

    1985-01-01

    For a detailed assessment of particle recycling in a tokamak it is necessary to know quality and quantity of the particle fluxes directed to the elements of the wall. In a divertor machine like ASDEX we have to differentiate between at least four distinct elements: main chamber wall, protective limiters, collector plates, and divertor walls. Relevant data about the divertor region are obtained from pressure and flux measurements. (orig./GG)

  20. The Direct Effect of Flexible Walls on Fontan Connection Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tree, Mike; Fagan, Kiley; Yoganathan, Ajit

    2014-11-01

    The current standard treatment for sufferers of congenital heart defects is the palliative Fontan procedure. The Fontan procedure results in an anastomosis of major veins directly to the branched pulmonary arteries bypassing the dysfunctional ventricle. This total cavopulmonary connection (TCPC) extends life past birth, but Fontan patients still suffer long-term complications like decreased exercise capacity, protein-losing enteropathy, and pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVM). These complications have direct ties to fluid dynamics within the connection. Previous experimental and computation studies of Fontan connection fluid dynamics employed rigid vessel models. More recent studies utilize flexible models, but a direct comparison of the fundamental fluid dynamics between rigid and flexible vessels only exists for a computational model, without a direct experimental validation. Thus, this study was a direct comparison of fluid dynamics within a rigid and two compliant idealized TCPCs. 2D particle image velocimetry measurements were collected at the connection center plane. Results include power loss, hepatic flow distribution, fluid shear stress, and flow structure recognition. The effect of flexible walls on these values and clinical impact will be discussed.

  1. Nanopore wall-liquid interaction under scope of molecular dynamics study: Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukanov, A. A.; Psakhie, S. G.

    2017-12-01

    The present review is devoted to the analysis of recent molecular dynamics based on the numerical studies of molecular aspects of solid-fluid interaction in nanoscale channels. Nanopore wall-liquid interaction plays the crucial role in such processes as gas separation, water desalination, liquids decontamination, hydrocarbons and water transport in nano-fractured geological formations. Molecular dynamics simulation is one of the most suitable tools to study molecular level effects occurred in such multicomponent systems. The nanopores are classified by their geometry to four groups: nanopore in nanosheet, nanotube-like pore, slit-shaped nanopore and soft-matter nanopore. The review is focused on the functionalized nanopores in boron nitride nanosheets as novel selective membranes and on the slit-shaped nanopores formed by minerals.

  2. Cultivable anaerobic and aerobic bacterial communities in the fermentation chambers of Holotrichia parallela (coleoptera: scarabaeidae) larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhen-Yu; Yuan, Yimin; Ali, Muhammad Waqar; Peng, Tao; Peng, Wei; Raza, Muhammad Fahim; Zhao, Yongshun; Zhang, Hongyu

    2018-01-01

    As important pests, scarab beetle larvae survive on plant biomass and the microbiota of the fermentation chamber play an important role in the digestion of lignocellulose-rich diets. However, the cultivable microbes, especially the anaerobic cultivable microbes, are still largely unknown. Here, both cultivable anaerobic and aerobic bacterial communities associated with the fermentation chamber of Holotrichia parallela larvae were investigated. In total bacteria cells directly enumerated by the 4', 6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining method, the viable plate counts of cultivable bacteria in the fermentation chamber accounted for 0.92% of proportion. These cultivable bacteria were prone to attach to the fermentation chamber wall (88.41%) compared to the chamber contents. Anaerobic bacteria were dominant in the cultivable bacteria attaching to the fermentation chamber wall (70.20%), while the quantities of anaerobes and aerobes were similar in the chamber contents. Polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE), fingerprinting and sequence analysis of isolated colonies revealed that the cultivable bacteria are affiliated with class γ-Proteobacteria, Bacteroidia, Actinobacteria, Clostridia and β-Proteobacteria. γ-Proteobacteria was the major type of anaerobic cultivable bacteria and even the only one type of aerobic cultivable bacteria. Taken together, our results suggest, for the first time, that anaerobic microbiota are dominant in cultivable bacteria in the special anoxia niche of the fermentation chamber from H. parallela larvae. These bacterial isolates could be a treasure trove for screening lignocellulytic microbes which are essential for the plant biomass digestion of this scarab species.

  3. Cultivable anaerobic and aerobic bacterial communities in the fermentation chambers of Holotrichia parallela (coleoptera: scarabaeidae) larvae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Muhammad Waqar; Peng, Tao; Peng, Wei; Raza, Muhammad Fahim; Zhao, Yongshun; Zhang, Hongyu

    2018-01-01

    As important pests, scarab beetle larvae survive on plant biomass and the microbiota of the fermentation chamber play an important role in the digestion of lignocellulose-rich diets. However, the cultivable microbes, especially the anaerobic cultivable microbes, are still largely unknown. Here, both cultivable anaerobic and aerobic bacterial communities associated with the fermentation chamber of Holotrichia parallela larvae were investigated. In total bacteria cells directly enumerated by the 4’, 6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining method, the viable plate counts of cultivable bacteria in the fermentation chamber accounted for 0.92% of proportion. These cultivable bacteria were prone to attach to the fermentation chamber wall (88.41%) compared to the chamber contents. Anaerobic bacteria were dominant in the cultivable bacteria attaching to the fermentation chamber wall (70.20%), while the quantities of anaerobes and aerobes were similar in the chamber contents. Polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE), fingerprinting and sequence analysis of isolated colonies revealed that the cultivable bacteria are affiliated with class γ-Proteobacteria, Bacteroidia, Actinobacteria, Clostridia and β-Proteobacteria. γ-Proteobacteria was the major type of anaerobic cultivable bacteria and even the only one type of aerobic cultivable bacteria. Taken together, our results suggest, for the first time, that anaerobic microbiota are dominant in cultivable bacteria in the special anoxia niche of the fermentation chamber from H. parallela larvae. These bacterial isolates could be a treasure trove for screening lignocellulytic microbes which are essential for the plant biomass digestion of this scarab species. PMID:29304141

  4. Conceptual design of low activation target chamber and components for the National Ignition Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streckert, H.H.; Schultz, K.R.; Sager, G.T.; Kantner, R.D.

    1996-01-01

    The baseline design for the target chamber and chamber components for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) consists of aluminum alloy structural material. Low activation composite chamber and components have important advantages including enhanced environmental and safety characteristics and improved accessibility due to reduced neutron-induced radioactivity. A low activation chamber can be fabricated from carbon fiber reinforced epoxy using thick wall laminate technology similar to submarine bow dome fabrication for the U.S. Navy. A risk assessment analysis indicates that a composite chamber has a reasonably high probability of success, but that an aluminum alloy chamber represents a lower risk. Use of low activation composite materials for several chamber components such as the final optics assemblies, the target positioner and inserter, the diagnostics manipulator tubes, and the optics beam tubes would offer an opportunity to make significant reductions in post-shot radiation dose rate with smaller, less immediate impact on the NIF design. 7 refs., 3 figs

  5. A computational fluid dynamics modeling study of guide walls for downstream fish passage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Kevin; Towler, Brett; Haro, Alexander J.; Ahlfeld, David P.

    2017-01-01

    A partial-depth, impermeable guidance structure (or guide wall) for downstream fish passage is typically constructed as a series of panels attached to a floating boom and anchored across a water body (e.g. river channel, reservoir, or power canal). The downstream terminus of the wall is generally located nearby to a fish bypass structure. If guidance is successful, the fish will avoid entrainment in a dangerous intake structure (i.e. turbine intakes) while passing from the headpond to the tailwater of a hydroelectric facility through a safer passage route (i.e. the bypass). The goal of this study is to determine the combination of guide wall design parameters that will most likely increase the chance of surface-oriented fish being successfully guided to the bypass. To evaluate the flow field immediately upstream of a guide wall, a parameterized computational fluid dynamics model of an idealized power canal was constructed in © ANSYS Fluent v 14.5 (ANSYS Inc., 2012). The design parameters investigated were the angle and depth of the guide wall and the average approach velocity in the power canal. Results call attention to the importance of the downward to sweeping flow ratio and demonstrate how a change in guide wall depth and angle can affect this important hydraulic cue to out-migrating fish. The key findings indicate that a guide wall set at a small angle (15° is the minimum in this study) and deep enough such that sweeping flow dominant conditions prevail within the expected vertical distribution of fish approaching the structure will produce hydraulic conditions that are more likely to result in effective passage.

  6. Test Model for Dynamic Characteristics of a Cantilevered Simple Cylindrical Structure Submerged in a Liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Chang Gyu; Kim, Tae Sung; Kim, Hoe Woong; Kim, Jong Bum

    2013-01-01

    A coolant free surface level is dependent on the operating conditions, and thus the fluid added mass caused by contacting sodium with the structure affects the dynamic characteristic of the UIS. In this study, a numerical analysis model was proposed and a feasibility study was performed through structural testing. The dynamic characteristics for a simple cylindrical structure simulating the UIS outer cylinder will be tested. Currently, the FE analyses were carried out to confirm the effect of water chamber structure on the natural frequency of the test model. The submerged condition of a UIS cylinder affects its natural frequency. A test model of a simple cylindrical structure was prepared to conduct a dynamic test, and each structure component of the test equipment may affect the natural frequency. A cup-shaped cylindrical structure was applied to develop the numerical analysis method for a structure submerged in water and it was verified through a structural test. With this numerical analysis model, the effect of the water chamber material for a simple cylindrical structure was studied. The candidate materials for water chamber were acryl and 316SS with different thicknesses. Both materials showed a higher natural frequency than the reference model. A water chamber made of 316SS with a thick wall gave a closer result to the reference natural frequency than an acryl chamber. The expected natural frequency of the test facility has about a 4% difference based on the reference value, considering a water chamber with a 1 cm thickness. This result will be verified through an ongoing future structural test activity

  7. Mechanical Models of the Dynamics of Vitreous Substitutes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystyna Isakova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss some aspects of the fluid dynamics of vitreous substitutes in the vitreous chamber, focussing on the flow induced by rotations of the eye bulb. We use simple, yet not trivial, theoretical models to highlight mechanical concepts that are relevant to understand the dynamics of vitreous substitutes and also to identify ideal properties for vitreous replacement fluids. We first recall results by previous authors, showing that the maximum shear stress on the retina grows with increasing viscosity of the fluid up to a saturation value. We then investigate how the wall shear stress changes if a thin layer of aqueous humour is present in the vitreous chamber, separating the retina from the vitreous replacement fluid. The theoretical predictions show that the existence of a thin layer of aqueous is sufficient to substantially decrease the shear stress on the retina. We finally discuss a theoretical model that predicts the stability conditions of the interface between the aqueous and a vitreous substitute. We discuss the implications of this model to understand the mechanisms leading to the formation of emulsion in the vitreous chamber, showing that instability of the interface is possible in a range of parameters relevant for the human eye.

  8. Technical note: drifting versus anchored flux chambers for measuring greenhouse gas emissions from running waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorke, A.; Bodmer, P.; Noss, C.; Alshboul, Z.; Koschorreck, M.; Somlai-Haase, C.; Bastviken, D.; Flury, S.; McGinnis, D. F.; Maeck, A.; Müller, D.; Premke, K.

    2015-12-01

    Stream networks have recently been discovered to be major but poorly constrained natural greenhouse gas (GHG) sources. A fundamental problem is that several measurement approaches have been used without cross-comparisons. Flux chambers represent a potentially powerful methodological approach if robust and reliable ways to use chambers on running water can be defined. Here we compare the use of anchored and freely drifting chambers on various streams with different flow velocities. The study clearly shows that (1) anchored chambers enhance turbulence under the chambers and thus elevate fluxes, (2) drifting chambers have a very small impact on the water turbulence under the chamber and thus generate more reliable fluxes, (3) the bias of the anchored chambers greatly depends on chamber design and sampling conditions, and (4) there is a promising method to reduce the bias from anchored chambers by using a flexible plastic foil collar to seal the chambers to the water surface, rather than having rigid chamber walls penetrating into the water. Altogether, these results provide novel guidance on how to apply flux chambers in running water, which will have important consequences for measurements to constrain the global GHG balances.

  9. Dosimetry with tissue-equivalent ionisation chambers in fast neutron fields for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoetelief, J.; Broerse, J.J.

    1983-01-01

    The use of calibrated tissue-equivalent (TE) ionisation chambers is commonly considered to be the most practical method for total absorbed dose determinations in mixed neutron-photon fields for biomedical applications. The total absorbed dose can be derived from the charge produced within the cavity of an ionisation chamber employing a number of physical parameters. To arrive at the charge produced in the cavity several correction factors have to be introduced which are related to the operational characteristics of the chambers. Information on the operational characteristics of four TE ionisation chambers is presented in relation to ion collection, density and composition of gas in the cavity, wall thickness and effective point of measurement. In addition, some recent results from an ionisation chamber operated at high gas pressures are presented. The total absorbed doses derived from TE ionisation chambers show agreement within the uncertainty limits with results from other independent dosimetry methods, i.e., differential fluence measurements and a TE calorimeter. Conscientious experimentation and a common data base can provide dosimetry results with TE ionisation chambers with variations of less than +-2%. (author)

  10. Absorbed dose calibration factors for parallel-plate chambers in high energy photon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McEwen, M.R.; Duane, S.; Thomas, R.A.S.

    2002-01-01

    parallel-plate chambers, which is discussed below. The small difference (around 0.3%) between the NACP and Roos chambers at the highest photon energies is within the measurement uncertainties but may indicate a slight difference in chamber response. A number of chambers were recalibrated six months later to investigate chamber stability. It was found that the repeatability was generally better than 0.5% and the variations in time appear to be random. These differences are larger than for thimble chambers, where we have found stability at better than the 0.3% level over several years. Parallel-plate chambers in electron beams have also showed high stability (McEwen et al, 2001), which would indicate that parallel-plate chambers are sensitive to small variations in the beam quality of photon beams that do not affect thimble chambers. This data can also be used to derive relative wall correction factors for the Roos and NACP. Good agreement (within 0.3%) was found with previous data (Palm et al, 2000; Nystrom et al, 1993). These measurements would seem to confirm that p wall for the Roos chamber given in TRS-381 is too low by around 0.5%. Parallel-plate chambers can be calibrated in terms of absorbed dose to water, but with an uncertainty larger than for thimble chambers. Chamber stability also appears to be worse than for thimble chambers. Polarity corrections must always be measured and applied, as the polarity effect for a particular chamber is difficult to predict

  11. Potential design modifications for the High Yield Lithium Injection Fusion Energy (HYLIFE) reaction chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitts, J.H.; Hovingh, J.; Meier, W.R.; Monsler, M.J.; Powell, E.G.; Walker, P.E.

    1979-01-01

    Generation of electric power from inertial confinement fusion requires a reaction chamber. One promising type, the High Yield Lithium Injection Fusion Energy (HYLIFE) chamber, includes a falling array of liquid lithium jets. These jets act as: (1) a renewable first wall and blanket to shield metal components from x-ray and neutron exposure, (2) a tritium breeder to replace tritium burned during the fusion process, and (3) an absorber and transfer medium for fusion energy. Over 90% of the energy produced in the reaction chamber is absorbed in the lithium jet fall. Design aspects are included

  12. Technical Note: Drifting vs. anchored flux chambers for measuring greenhouse gas emissions from running waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorke, A.; Bodmer, P.; Noss, C.; Alshboul, Z.; Koschorreck, M.; Somlai, C.; Bastviken, D.; Flury, S.; McGinnis, D. F.; Maeck, A.; Müller, D.; Premke, K.

    2015-09-01

    Stream networks were recently discovered as major but poorly constrained natural greenhouse gas (GHG) sources. A fundamental problem is that several measurement approaches have been used without cross comparisons. Flux chambers represent a potentially powerful methodological approach if robust and reliable ways to use chambers on running water can be defined. Here we compare the use of anchored and freely drifting chambers on various streams having different flow velocities. The study clearly shows that (1) drifting chambers have a very small impact on the water turbulence under the chamber and thus generate more reliable fluxes, (2) anchored chambers enhance turbulence under the chambers and thus elevate fluxes, (3) the bias of the anchored chambers greatly depends on chamber design and sampling conditions, and (4) there is a promising method to reduce the bias from anchored chambers by using a flexible plastic foil seal to the water surface rather than having rigid chamber walls penetrating into the water. Altogether, these results provide novel guidance on how to apply flux chambers in running water, which will have important consequences for measurements to constrain the global GHG balances.

  13. Visualizing the growth dynamics of individual single-wall carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Jakob Birkedal; Zhang, Lili; He, Maoshuai

    In order to meet the increasing demand of faster and more flexible electronics and optical devices and at the same time decrease the use of the critical metals, carbon based devices are in fast development. Single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) based electronics is a way of addressing...... around the studied sample at elevated temperature gives a unique way of monitoring gas-solid interactions such as CNT growth. Here we show the direct experimental evidence on the growth dynamics of SW-CNTs from Co/MgO catalysts using CO as carbon source inside the environmental TEM. The evolution...

  14. CFD modelling wall heat transfer inside a combustion chamber using ANSYS forte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plengsa-ard, C.; Kaewbumrung, M.

    2018-01-01

    A computational model has been performed to analyze a wall heat transfer in a single cylinder, direct injection and four-stroke diesel engine. A direct integration using detailed chemistry CHEMKIN is employed in a combustion model and the Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) turbulence model is used to simulate the flow in the cylinder. To obtain heat flux results, a modified classical variable-density wall heat transfer model is also performed. The model is validated using experimental data from a CUMMINs engine operated with a conventional diesel combustion. One operating engine condition is simulated. Comparisons of simulated in-cylinder pressure and heat release rates with experimental data shows that the model predicts the cylinder pressure and heat release rates reasonably well. The contour plot of instantaneous temperature are presented. Also, the contours of predicted heat flux results are shown. The magnitude of peak heat fluxes as predicted by the wall heat transfer model is in the range of the typical measure values in diesel combustion.

  15. Oman Drilling Project GT3 site survey: dynamics at the roof of an oceanic magma chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    France, L.; Nicollet, C.; Debret, B.; Lombard, M.; Berthod, C.; Ildefonse, B.; Koepke, J.

    2017-12-01

    Oman Drilling Project (OmanDP) aims at bringing new constraints on oceanic crust accretion and evolution by drilling Holes in the whole ophiolite section (mantle and crust). Among those, operations at GT3 in the Sumail massif drilled 400 m to sample the dike - gabbro transition that corresponds to the top (gabbros) and roof (dikes) of the axial magma chamber, an interface where hydrothermal and magmatic system interacts. Previous studies based on oceanic crust formed at present day fast-spreading ridges and preserved in ophiolites have highlighted that this interface is a dynamic horizon where the axial melt lens that top the main magma chamber can intrude, reheat, and partially assimilate previously hydrothermally altered roof rocks. Here we present the preliminary results obtained in GT3 area that have allowed the community to choose the drilling site. We provide a geological and structural map of the area, together with new petrographic and chemical constraints on the dynamics of the dike - gabbro transition. Our new results allow us to quantify the dynamic processes, and to propose that 1/ the intrusive contact of the varitextured gabbro within the dikes highlights the intrusion of the melt lens top in the dike rooting zone, 2/ both dikes and previously crystallized gabbros are reheated, and recrystallized by underlying melt lens dynamics (up to 1050°C, largely above the hydrous solidus temperature of altered dikes and gabbros), 3/ the reheating range can be > 200°C, 4/ the melt lens depth variations for a given ridge position is > 200m, 5/ the reheating stage and associated recrystallization within the dikes occurred under hydrous conditions, 6/ the reheating stage is recorded at the root zone of the sheeted dike complex by one of the highest stable conductive thermal gradient ever recorded on Earth ( 3°C/m), 7/ local chemical variations in recrystallized dikes and gabbros are highlighted and used to quantify crystallization and anatectic processes, and the

  16. Dynamics of plane-symmetric thin walls in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, A.

    1992-01-01

    Plane walls (including plane domain walls) without reflection symmetry are studied in the framework of Einstein's general relativity. Using the distribution theory, all the Einstein field equations and Bianchi identities are split into two groups: one holding in the regions outside of the wall and the other holding at the wall. The Einstein field equations at the wall are found to take a very simple form, and given explicitly in terms of the discontinuities of the metric coefficients and their derivatives. The Bianchi identities at the wall are also given explicitly. Using the latter, the interaction of a plane wall with gravitational waves and some specific matter fields is studied. In particular, it is found that, when a gravitational plane wave passes through a wall, if the wall has no reflection symmetry, the phenomena, such as reflection, stimulation, or absorption, in general, occur. It is also found that, unlike for gravitational waves, a massless scalar wave or an electromagnetic wave continuously passes through a wall without any reflection. The repulsion and attraction of a plane wall are also studied. It is found that the acceleration of an observer who is at rest relative to the wall usually consists of three parts: one is due to the force produced by the wall, the second is due to the force produced by the space-time curvature, which is zero if the wall has reflection symmetry, and the last is due to the accelerated motion of the wall. As a result, a repulsive (attractive) plane wall may not be repulsive (attractive) at all. Finally, the collision and interaction among the walls are studied

  17. Bluetooth Communication Interface for EEG Signal Recording in Hyperbaric Chambers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastena, Lucio; Formaggio, Emanuela; Faralli, Fabio; Melucci, Massimo; Rossi, Marco; Gagliardi, Riccardo; Ricciardi, Lucio; Storti, Silvia F

    2015-07-01

    Recording biological signals inside a hyperbaric chamber poses technical challenges (the steel walls enclosing it greatly attenuate or completely block the signals as in a Faraday cage), practical (lengthy cables creating eddy currents), and safety (sparks hazard from power supply to the electronic apparatus inside the chamber) which can be overcome with new wireless technologies. In this technical report we present the design and implementation of a Bluetooth system for electroencephalographic (EEG) recording inside a hyperbaric chamber and describe the feasibility of EEG signal transmission outside the chamber. Differently from older systems, this technology allows the online recording of amplified signals, without interference from eddy currents. In an application of this technology, we measured EEG activity in professional divers under three experimental conditions in a hyperbaric chamber to determine how oxygen, assumed at a constant hyperbaric pressure of 2.8 ATA , affects the bioelectrical activity. The EEG spectral power estimated by fast Fourier transform and the cortical sources of the EEG rhythms estimated by low-resolution brain electromagnetic analysis were analyzed in three different EEG acquisitions: breathing air at sea level; breathing oxygen at a simulated depth of 18 msw, and breathing air at sea level after decompression.

  18. Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulations of Gas-Phase Radial Dispersion in Fixed Beds with Wall Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony G. Dixon

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The effective medium approach to radial fixed bed dispersion models, in which radial dispersion of mass is superimposed on axial plug flow, is based on a constant effective dispersion coefficient, DT. For packed beds of a small tube-to-particle diameter ratio (N, the experimentally-observed decrease in this parameter near the tube wall is accounted for by a lumped resistance located at the tube wall, the wall mass transfer coefficient km. This work presents validated computational fluid dynamics (CFD simulations to obtain detailed radial velocity and concentration profiles for eight different computer-generated packed tubes of spheres in the range 5.04 ≤ N ≤ 9.3 and over a range of flow rates 87 ≤ Re ≤ 870 where Re is based on superficial velocity and the particle diameter dp. Initial runs with pure air gave axial velocity profiles vz(r averaged over the length of the packing. Then, simulations with the tube wall coated with methane yielded radial concentration profiles. A model with only DT could not describe the radial concentration profiles. The two-parameter model with DT and km agreed better with the bed-center concentration profiles, but not with the sharp decreases in concentration close to the tube wall. A three-parameter model based on classical two-layer mixing length theory, with a wall-function for the decrease in transverse radial convective transport in the near-wall region, showed greatly improved ability to reproduce the near-wall concentration profiles.

  19. Mush Column Magma Chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, B. D.

    2002-12-01

    Magma chambers are a necessary concept in understanding the chemical and physical evolution of magma. The concept may well be similar to a transfer function in circuit or time series analysis. It does what needs to be done to transform source magma into eruptible magma. In gravity and geodetic interpretations the causative body is (usually of necessity) geometrically simple and of limited vertical extent; it is clearly difficult to `see' through the uppermost manifestation of the concentrated magma. The presence of plutons in the upper crust has reinforced the view that magma chambers are large pots of magma, but as in the physical representation of a transfer function, actual magma chambers are clearly distinct from virtual magma chambers. Two key features to understanding magmatic systems are that they are vertically integrated over large distances (e.g., 30-100 km), and that all local magmatic processes are controlled by solidification fronts. Heat transfer considerations show that any viable volcanic system must be supported by a vertically extensive plumbing system. Field and geophysical studies point to a common theme of an interconnected stack of sill-like structures extending to great depth. This is a magmatic Mush Column. The large-scale (10s of km) structure resembles the vertical structure inferred at large volcanic centers like Hawaii (e.g., Ryan et al.), and the fine scale (10s to 100s of m) structure is exemplified by ophiolites and deeply eroded sill complexes like the Ferrar dolerites of the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. The local length scales of the sill reservoirs and interconnecting conduits produce a rich spectrum of crystallization environments with distinct solidification time scales. Extensive horizontal and vertical mushy walls provide conditions conducive to specific processes of differentiation from solidification front instability to sidewall porous flow and wall rock slumping. The size, strength, and time series of eruptive behavior

  20. Numerical and experimental investigation of wave dynamics on a land-fixed OWC device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ning, De-Zhi; Wang, Rong-Quan; Gou, Ying; Zhao, Ming; Teng, Bin

    2016-01-01

    An Oscillating Water Column (OWC) Wave Energy Converter (WEC) is a device that converts the energy of ocean waves to electrical energy. When an OWC is designed, both its energy efficiency and the wave loads on it should be considered. Most attentions have been paid to the energy efficiency of an OWC device in the past several decades. In the present study, the fully nonlinear numerical wave model developed by Ning et al. (2015) [1] is extended to simulate the dynamic wave forces on the land-fixed OWC device by using the acceleration potential method, and the experimental tests are also carried out. The comparisons between numerical results and experimental data are performed. Then the effects of wave conditions and chamber geometry on the wave force on the front wall of the chamber are investigated. The results indicate that the total wave force decreases with the increase of the wavelength and increases with the increase of the incident wave height. The wave force is also strongly influenced by the opening ratio, i.e., in the low-frequency region, the larger the opening ratio, the smaller the wave force and it shows an opposite tendency in the high-frequency region. - Highlights: • The wave dynamics on a land-fixed OWC device is numerically and experimentally studied. • The largest wave pressure occurs on the outside of the front wall on the free surface under the action of the wave crest. • The total horizontal wave load on the front wall decreases with the increase of the wavelength. • The opening ratio greatly influences the wave force on the front wall.

  1. Quantifying Intracranial Aneurysm Wall Permeability for Risk Assessment Using Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakil, P; Ansari, S A; Cantrell, C G; Eddleman, C S; Dehkordi, F H; Vranic, J; Hurley, M C; Batjer, H H; Bendok, B R; Carroll, T J

    2015-05-01

    Pathological changes in the intracranial aneurysm wall may lead to increases in its permeability; however the clinical significance of such changes has not been explored. The purpose of this pilot study was to quantify intracranial aneurysm wall permeability (K(trans), VL) to contrast agent as a measure of aneurysm rupture risk and compare these parameters against other established measures of rupture risk. We hypothesized K(trans) would be associated with intracranial aneurysm rupture risk as defined by various anatomic, imaging, and clinical risk factors. Twenty-seven unruptured intracranial aneurysms in 23 patients were imaged with dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging, and wall permeability parameters (K(trans), VL) were measured in regions adjacent to the aneurysm wall and along the paired control MCA by 2 blinded observers. K(trans) and VL were evaluated as markers of rupture risk by comparing them against established clinical (symptomatic lesions) and anatomic (size, location, morphology, multiplicity) risk metrics. Interobserver agreement was strong as shown in regression analysis (R(2) > 0.84) and intraclass correlation (intraclass correlation coefficient >0.92), indicating that the K(trans) can be reliably assessed clinically. All intracranial aneurysms had a pronounced increase in wall permeability compared with the paired healthy MCA (P risk in anatomic (P = .02) and combined anatomic/clinical (P = .03) groups independent of size. We report the first evidence of dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging-modeled contrast permeability in intracranial aneurysms. We found that contrast agent permeability across the aneurysm wall correlated significantly with both aneurysm size and size-independent anatomic risk factors. In addition, K(trans) was a significant and size-independent predictor of morphologically and clinically defined high-risk aneurysms. © 2015 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  2. Eddy Current Effect of the BNL-AGS Vacuum Chamber on the Optics of the BNL-AGS Synchrotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsoupas, N.; Ahrens, L.; Brown, K. A.; Glenn, J. W.; Gardner, K.

    1999-01-01

    During the acceleration cycle of the AGS synchrotron, eddy currents are generated within the walls of the vacuum chambers of the AGS main magnets. The vacuum chambers have elliptical cross section, are made of inconel material with a wall thickness of 2 mm and are placed within the gap of the combined-function main magnets of the AGS synchrotron. The generation of eddy currents in the walls of the vacuum chambers, creates various magnetic multipoles, which affect the optics of the AGS machine. In this report these magnetic multipoles are calculated for various time interval starting at the acceleration cycle, where the magnetic field of the main magnet is ∼0.1 T, and ending before the beam extraction process, where the magnetic field of the main magnet is almost constant at ∼ 1.1 T. The calculations show that the magnetic multipoles generated by the eddy-currents affect the optics of the AGS synchrotron during the acceleration cycle and in particular at low magnetic fields of the main magnet. Their effect is too weak to affect the optics of the AGS machine during beam extraction at the nominal energies

  3. An open-flow pulse ionization chamber for alpha spectrometry of large-area samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansson, L.; Roos, B.; Samuelsson, C.

    1992-01-01

    The presented open-flow pulse ionization chamber was developed to make alpha spectrometry on large-area surfaces easy. One side of the chamber is left open, where the sample is to be placed. The sample acts as a chamber wall and therby defeins the detector volume. The sample area can be as large as 400 cm 2 . To prevent air from entering the volume there is a constant gas flow through the detector, coming in at the bottom of the chamber and leaking at the sides of the sample. The method results in good energy resolution and has considerable applicability in the retrospective radon research. Alpha spectra obtained in the retrospective measurements descend from 210 Po, built up in the sample from the radon daughters recoiled into a glass surface. (au)

  4. High concentration tritium gas measurement with small volume ionization chambers for fusion fuel gas monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uda, Tatsuhiko; Okuno, Kenji; Matsuda, Yuji; Naruse, Yuji

    1991-01-01

    To apply ionization chambers to fusion fuel gas processing systems, high concentration tritium gas was experimentally measured with small volume 0.16 and 21.6 cm 3 ionization chambers. From plateau curves, the optimum electric field strength was obtained as 100∼200 V/cm. Detection efficiency was confirmed as dependent on the ionization ability of the filled gas, and moreover on its stopping power, because when the range of the β-rays was shortened, the probability of energy loss by collisions with the electrode and chamber wall increased. Loss of ions by recombination was prevented by using a small volume ionization chamber. For example the 0.16 cm 3 ionization chamber gave measurement with linearity to above 40% tritium gas. After the tritium gas measurements, the concentration levels inside the chamber were estimated from their memory currents. Although more than 1/4,000 of the maximum, current was observed as a memory effect, the smaller ionization chamber gave a smaller memory effect. (author)

  5. Computational fluid dynamics simulation of the combustion process, emission formation and the flow field in an in-direct injection diesel engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barzegar Ramin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, the combustion process and emission formation in the Lister 8.1 I.D.I Diesel engine have been investigated using a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD code. The utilized model includes detailed spray atomization, mixture formation and distribution model which enable modeling the combustion process in spray/wall and spray/swirl interactions along with flow configurations. The analysis considers both part load and full load states. The global properties are presented separately resolved for the swirl chamber (pre-chamber and the main chamber. The results of model verify the fact that the equal amount of the fuel is burned in the main and pre-chamber at full load state while at part load the majority of the fuel is burned in the main chamber. Also, it is shown that the adherence of fuel spray on the pre-chamber walls is due to formation of a stagnation zone which prevents quick spray evaporation and plays an important role in the increase of soot mass fractions at this zone at full load conditions. The simulation results, such as the mean in-cylinder pressure, heat release rate and exhaust emissions are compared with the experimental data and show good agreement. This work also demonstrates the usefulness of multidimensional modeling for complex chamber geometries, such as in I.D.I Diesel engines, to gain more insight into the flow field, combustion process and emission formation.

  6. Coating requirements for an ICF dry-wall design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, L.H.; Sucov, E.W.

    1981-01-01

    A new concept for protecting the first wall of an ICF reactor has been developed which relies heavily on a coating to protect the steel tubes which comprise the first wall. This coating must survive the pellet explosion, be ductile, and be compatible with the materials in the ICF pellet. Calculations indicate that tantalum is the best choice for the coating material and that tantalum coated steel tubes can handle fusion thermal powers of 3500 MW in a 10 m radius spherical chamber

  7. Mimicking Mars: a vacuum simulation chamber for testing environmental instrumentation for Mars exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobrado, J M; Martín-Soler, J; Martín-Gago, J A

    2014-03-01

    We have built a Mars environmental simulation chamber, designed to test new electromechanical devices and instruments that could be used in space missions. We have developed this environmental system aiming at validating the meteorological station Rover Environment Monitoring Station of NASA's Mars Science Laboratory mission currently installed on Curiosity rover. The vacuum chamber has been built following a modular configuration and operates at pressures ranging from 1000 to 10(-6) mbars, and it is possible to control the gas composition (the atmosphere) within this pressure range. The device (or sample) under study can be irradiated by an ultraviolet source and its temperature can be controlled in the range from 108 to 423 K. As an important improvement with respect to other simulation chambers, the atmospheric gas into the experimental chamber is cooled at the walls by the use of liquid-nitrogen heat exchangers. This chamber incorporates a dust generation mechanism designed to study Martian-dust deposition while modifying the conditions of temperature, and UV irradiated.

  8. A drift chamber with a new type of straws for operation in vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azorskiy, N.; Glonti, L.; Gusakov, Yu.; Elsha, V.; Enik, T.; Kakurin, S.; Kekelidze, V.; Kislov, E.; Kolesnikov, A.; Madigozhin, D.; Movchan, S.; Polenkevich, I.; Potrebenikov, Yu.; Samsonov, V.; Shkarovskiy, S.; Sotnikov, S.; Zinchenko, A.; Danielsson, H.; Bendotti, J.; Degrange, J.; Dixon, N.; Lichard, P.; Morant, J.; Palladino, V.; Gomez, F. Perez; Ruggiero, G.; Vergain, M.

    2016-07-01

    A 2150×2150 mm2 registration area drift chamber capable of working in vacuum is presented. Thin-wall tubes (straws) of a new type are used in the chamber. A large share of these 9.80 mm diameter drift tubes are made in Dubna from metalized 36 μm Mylar film welded along the generatrix using an ultrasonic welding machine created at JINR. The main features of the chamber and some characteristics of the drift tubes are described. Four such chambers with the X, Y, U, V coordinates each, containing 7168 straws in total, are designed and produced at JINR and CERN. They are installed in the vacuum volume of the NA62 setup in order to study the ultra-rare decay K+ →π+ vv bar and to search for and study rare meson decays. In autumn 2014 the chambers were used for the first time for the data taking in the experimental run of the NA62 at CERN's SPS.

  9. Scaling of the flow field in a combustion chamber with a gas–gas injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao-Wei, Wang; Guo-Biao, Cai; Ping, Jin

    2010-01-01

    The scaling of the flow field in a gas–gas combustion chamber is investigated theoretically, numerically and experimentally. To obtain the scaling criterion of the gas–gas combustion flowfield, formulation analysis of the three-dimensional (3D) Navier–Stokes equations for a gaseous multi-component mixing reaction flow is conducted and dimensional analysis on the gas–gas combustion phenomena is also carried out. The criterion implies that the size and the pressure of the gas–gas combustion chamber can be changed. Based on the criterion, multi-element injector chambers with different geometric sizes and at different chamber pressures ranging from 3 MPa to 20 MPa are numerically simulated. A multi-element injector chamber is designed and hot-fire tested at five chamber pressures from 1.64 MPa to 3.68 MPa. Wall temperature measurements are used to understand the similarity of combustion flowfields in the tests. The results have verified the similarities between combustion flowfields under different chamber pressures and geometries, with the criterion applied. (geophysics, astronomy and astrophysics)

  10. Ionization chamber gradient effects in nonstandard beam configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchard, Hugo; Seuntjens, Jan; Carrier, Jean-Francois; Kawrakow, Iwan

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: For the purpose of nonstandard beam reference dosimetry, the current concept of reporting absorbed dose at a point in water located at a representative position in the chamber volume is investigated in detail. As new nonstandard beam reference dosimetry protocols are under development, an evaluation of the role played by the definition of point of measurement could lead to conceptual improvements prior to establishing measurement procedures. Methods: The present study uses the current definition of reporting absorbed dose to calculate ionization chamber perturbation factors for two cylindrical chamber models (Exradin A12 and A14) using the Monte Carlo method. The EGSnrc based user-code EGS lowbar chamber is used to calculate chamber dose responses of 14 IMRT beams chosen to cause considerable dose gradients over the chamber volume as previously used by Bouchard and Seuntjens [''Ionization chamber-based reference dosimetry of intensity modulated radiation beams,'' Med. Phys. 31(9), 2454-5465 (2004)]. Results: The study shows conclusively the relative importance of each physical effect involved in the nonstandard beam correction factors of 14 IMRT beams. Of all correction factors involved in the dosimetry of the beams studied, the gradient perturbation correction factor has the highest magnitude, on average, 11% higher compared to reference conditions for the Exradin A12 chamber and about 5% higher for the Extradin A14 chamber. Other perturbation correction factors (i.e., P wall , P stem , and P cel ) are, on average, less than 0.8% different from reference conditions for the chambers and beams studied. The current approach of reporting measured absorbed dose at a point in water coinciding with the location of the centroid of the chamber is the main factor responsible for large correction factors in nonstandard beam deliveries (e.g., intensity modulated radiation therapy) reported in literature. Conclusions: To reduce or eliminate the magnitude of

  11. Dynamic Behavior of Nanocomposites Reinforced with Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNTs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Yu Lai

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The influence of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT on the structural dynamic behavior of MWCNT/epoxy nanocomposites was investigated. Two different types of MWCNTs, pristine MWCNT and functionalized MWCNT, were used in this study. Carboxylic acid-functionalized MWCNTs (MWCNT-COOH were obtained by oxidation pristine MWCNTs via sonication in sulfuric-nitric acid and characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR. Dynamic behaviors of the MWCNT reinforced nanocomposite including the natural frequency and damping ratio were determined using free vibration test. Experimental results showed that the damping ratio of the nanocomposite decreases with the increase of the MWCNT addition, while the natural frequency is increasing with the increase of the MWCNT addition. Functionalized MWCNTs improved the interfacial bonding between the nanotubes and epoxy resin resulting in the reduction of the interfacial energy dissipation ability and enhancement of the stiffness.

  12. Hall effect thruster with an AlN chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barral, S.; Jayet, Y.; Mazouffre, S.; Veron, E.; Echegut, P.; Dudeck, M.

    2005-01-01

    The plasma discharge of a Hall-effect thruster (SPT) is strongly depending of the plasma-insulated wall interactions. These interactions are mainly related to the energy deposition, potential sheath effect and electron secondary emission rate (e.s.e.). In usual SPT, the annular channel is made of BN-SiO 2 . The SPT100-ML (laboratory model will be tested with an AlN chamber in the French test facility Pivoine in the laboratoire d'Aerothermique (Orleans-France). The different parameters such as discharge current, thrust, plasma oscillations and wall temperature will studied for several operating conditions. The results will be compared with a fluid model developed in IPPT (Warsaw-Poland) taking into account electron emission from the internal and external walls and using previous experimental measurements of e.s.e. for AlN from ONERA (Toulouse-France). The surface state of AlN will be analysed before and after experiments by an Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope and by a Strength Electron Microscope. (author)

  13. Determination of the thermal and epithermal neutron sensitivities of an LBO chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Endo, Satoru; Kotani, Kei; Kajimoto, Tsuyoshi; Tanaka, Kenichi [Hiroshima University, Quantum Energy Applications, Graduate School of Engineering, Higashi-Hiroshima (Japan); Sato, Hitoshi; Nakajima, Erika [Ibaraki Prefectural University of Health Science, Radiological Sciences, Ibaraki (Japan); Shimazaki, Takuto [Hiroshima University, Quantum Energy Applications, Graduate School of Engineering, Higashi-Hiroshima (Japan); Delta Kogyo Co., Ltd., Hiroshima (Japan); Suda, Mitsuru; Hamano, Tsuyoshi [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba-Shi, Chiba (Japan); Hoshi, Masaharu [Hiroshima University, Institute for Peace Science, Hiroshima (Japan)

    2017-08-15

    An LBO (Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}) walled ionization chamber was designed to monitor the epithermal neutron fluence in boron neutron capture therapy clinical irradiation. The thermal and epithermal neutron sensitivities of the device were evaluated using accelerator neutrons from the {sup 9}Be(d, n) reaction at a deuteron energy of 4 MeV (4 MeV d-Be neutrons). The response of the chamber in terms of the electric charge induced in the LBO chamber was compared with the thermal and epithermal neutron fluences measured using the gold-foil activation method. The thermal and epithermal neutron sensitivities obtained were expressed in units of pC cm{sup 2}, i.e., from the chamber response divided by neutron fluence (cm{sup -2}). The measured LBO chamber sensitivities were 2.23 x 10{sup -7} ± 0.34 x 10{sup -7} (pC cm{sup 2}) for thermal neutrons and 2.00 x 10{sup -5} ± 0.12 x 10{sup -5} (pC cm{sup 2}) for epithermal neutrons. This shows that the LBO chamber is sufficiently sensitive to epithermal neutrons to be useful for epithermal neutron monitoring in BNCT irradiation. (orig.)

  14. Pea Border Cell Maturation and Release Involve Complex Cell Wall Structural Dynamics1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The adhesion of plant cells is vital for support and protection of the plant body and is maintained by a variety of molecular associations between cell wall components. In some specialized cases, though, plant cells are programmed to detach, and root cap-derived border cells are examples of this. Border cells (in some species known as border-like cells) provide an expendable barrier between roots and the environment. Their maturation and release is an important but poorly characterized cell separation event. To gain a deeper insight into the complex cellular dynamics underlying this process, we undertook a systematic, detailed analysis of pea (Pisum sativum) root tip cell walls. Our study included immunocarbohydrate microarray profiling, monosaccharide composition determination, Fourier-transformed infrared microspectroscopy, quantitative reverse transcription-PCR of cell wall biosynthetic genes, analysis of hydrolytic activities, transmission electron microscopy, and immunolocalization of cell wall components. Using this integrated glycobiology approach, we identified multiple novel modes of cell wall structural and compositional rearrangement during root cap growth and the release of border cells. Our findings provide a new level of detail about border cell maturation and enable us to develop a model of the separation process. We propose that loss of adhesion by the dissolution of homogalacturonan in the middle lamellae is augmented by an active biophysical process of cell curvature driven by the polarized distribution of xyloglucan and extensin epitopes. PMID:28400496

  15. NEG coating of the non-standard LSS vacuum chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Costa-Pinto, P

    2005-01-01

    The vacuum chambers of nearly all the warm magnets of the LHC (MBXW, MQW, MSI, MSD, etc…) will be coated with a Ti-Zr-V thin film by magnetron sputtering. The NEG coating is necessary to provide uniform pumping speed along the chambers and to suppress electron cloud instabilities and dynamic outgassing. The about 300 chambers will be coated using the existing facility, developed for the production of the standard LSS chambers, after minor modifications mainly due to the different cross sections. In order to cope with the present installation schedule, the production planning will allow processing of different families of chambers in parallel by using two or three coating systems simultaneously. After a brief introduction to the Ti-Zr-V characteristics and performances, the coating facility and strategy will be illustrated as well as the possible conflicts due to uncertainties in the planning of the experimental beam pipes and the standard LSS chambers.

  16. A new gaseous detector for tracking: The blade chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambrosi, G.; Battiston, R.; Levi, G.; Barillari, T.; Susinno, G.; Bergsma, F.; Contin, A.; Labbe, J.C.; Laurenti, G.; Mattern, D.; Simonet, G.; Williams, M.C.S.; Zichichi, A.; Boscherini, D.; Bruni, G.; De Pasquale, S.; Giusti, P.; Maccarrone, G.; Nania, R.; O'Shea, V.; Castro, H.; Galvez, J.; Rivera, F.; Schioppa, M.; Sharma, A.

    1990-01-01

    As part of the LAA project at CERN a prototype of a streamer-chamber in which a blade, instead of a wire, is used as the amplification electrode has been built. A big advantage is that the blade can be bent to follow a curve so that a chamber can be built with cells ideally matched to the geometry of the experiment. Moreover, a blade is very rugged, it can withstand severe mechanical shocks and it is also resistant to damage by sparks. The drift time has been measured and a spatial resolution of 250μm has been achieved. Left-right ambiguity can be solved by measuring the charge asymmetry on the walls. The coordinate along the blade is read by external pickup strips. (orig.)

  17. The characterisation of blood rotation in a human heart chamber based on statistical analysis of vorticity maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Kelvin K. L.; Kelso, Richard M.; Worthley, Stephen G.; Sanders, Prashanthan; Mazumdar, Jagannath; Abbott, Derek

    2008-12-01

    Modelling of non-stationary cardiac structures is complicated by the complexity of their intrinsic and extrinsic motion. The first known study of haemodynamics due to the beating of heart was made by Leonardo Da Vinci, giving the idea of fluid-solid interaction by describing how vortices develop during cardiac structural interaction with the blood. Heart morphology affects in changes of cardio dynamics during the systolic and diastolic phrases. In a chamber of the heart, vortices are discovered to exist as the result of the unique morphological changes of the cardiac chamber wall by using flow-imaging techniques such as phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging. The first part of this paper attempts to quantify vortex characteristics by means of calculating vorticity numerically and devising two dimensional vortical flow maps. The technique relies on determining the properties of vorticity using a statistical quantification of the flow maps and comparison of these quantities based on different scenarios. As the characteristics of our vorticity maps vary depending on the phase of a cardiac cycle, there is a need for robust quantification method to analyse vorticity. In the second part of the paper, the approach is then utilised for examining vortices within the human right atrium. Our study has shown that a proper quantification of vorticity for the flow field can indicate the strength and number of vortices within a heart chamber.

  18. Dynamic modelling of the expansion cylinder of an open Joule cycle Ericsson engine: A bond graph approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Creyx, M.; Delacourt, E.; Morin, C.; Desmet, B.

    2016-01-01

    A dynamic model using the bond graph formalism of the expansion cylinder of an open Joule cycle Ericsson engine intended for a biomass-fuelled micro-CHP system is presented. Dynamic phenomena, such as the thermodynamic evolution of air, the instantaneous air mass flow rates linked to pressure drops crossing the valves, the heat transferred through the expansion cylinder wall and the mechanical friction losses, are included in the model. The influence on the Ericsson engine performances of the main operating conditions (intake air pressure and temperature, timing of intake and exhaust valve closing, rotational speed, mechanical friction losses and heat transfer at expansion cylinder wall) is studied. The operating conditions maximizing the performances of the Ericsson engine used in the a biomass-fuelled micro-CHP unit are an intake air pressure between 6 and 8 bar, a maximized intake air temperature, an adjustment of the intake and exhaust valve closing corresponding to an expansion cycle close to the theoretical Joule cycle, a rotational speed close to 800 rpm. The heat transfer at the expansion cylinder wall reduces the engine performances. - Highlights: • A bond graph dynamic model of the Ericsson engine expansion cylinder is presented. • Dynamic aspects are modelled: pressure drops, friction losses, wall heat transfer. • Influent factors and phenomena on the engine performances are investigated. • Expansion cycles close to the theoretical Joule cycle maximize the performances. • The heat transfer at the expansion chamber wall reduces the performances.

  19. Roles of membrane trafficking in plant cell wall dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuo eEbine

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The cell wall is one of the characteristic components of plant cells. The cell wall composition differs among cell types and is modified in response to various environmental conditions. To properly generate and modify the cell wall, many proteins are transported to the plasma membrane or extracellular space through membrane trafficking, which is one of the key protein transport mechanisms in eukaryotic cells. Given the diverse composition and functions of the cell wall in plants, the transport of the cell wall components and proteins that are involved in cell wall-related events could be specialized for each cell type, i.e., the machinery for cell wall biogenesis, modification, and maintenance could be transported via different trafficking pathways. In this review, we summarize the recent progress in the current understanding of the roles and mechanisms of membrane trafficking in plant cells and focus on the biogenesis and regulation of the cell wall.

  20. Dynamical evolution of domain walls in an expanding universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Press, William H.; Ryden, Barbara S.; Spergel, David N.

    1989-01-01

    Whenever the potential of a scalar field has two or more separated, degenerate minima, domain walls form as the universe cools. The evolution of the resulting network of domain walls is calculated for the case of two potential minima in two and three dimensions, including wall annihilation, crossing, and reconnection effects. The nature of the evolution is found to be largely independent of the rate at which the universe expands. Wall annihilation and reconnection occur almost as fast as causality allows, so that the horizon volume is 'swept clean' and contains, at any time, only about one, fairly smooth, wall. Quantitative statistics are given. The total area of wall per volume decreases as the first power of time. The relative slowness of the decrease and the smoothness of the wall on the horizon scale make it impossible for walls to both generate large-scale structure and be consistent with quadrupole microwave background anisotropy limits.

  1. Spherical domain wall formed by field dynamics of Hawking radiation and spontaneous charging-up of black hole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagatani, Yukinori

    2004-01-01

    We investigate the Hawking radiation in the gauge Higgs-Yukawa theory. The ballistic model is proposed as an effective description of the system. We find that a spherical domain wall around the black hole is formed by field dynamics rather than thermal phase transition. The formation is a general property of the black hole whose Hawking temperature is equal to or greater than the energy scale of the theory. The formation of the electroweak wall and that of the GUT wall are shown. We also find a phenomenon of the spontaneous charging-up of the black hole by the wall. The Hawking radiation drives a mechanism of the charge transportation into the black hole when C- and CP-violation are assumed. The mechanism can strongly transport the hyper-charge into a black hole of the electroweak scale

  2. The role of spatial and temporal radiation deposition in inertial fusion chambers: the case of HiPER¿

    OpenAIRE

    Alvarez Ruiz, Jesus; Garoz Gómez, David; Gonzalez Arrabal, Raquel; Rivera de Mena, Antonio; Perlado Martín, José Manuel

    2011-01-01

    The first wall armour for the reactor chamber of HiPER will have to face short energy pulses of 5 to 20 MJ mostly in the form of x-rays and charged particles at a repetition rate of 5–10 Hz. Armour material and chamber dimensions have to be chosen to avoid/minimize damage to the chamber, ensuring the proper functioning of the facility during its planned lifetime. The maximum energy fluence that the armour can withstand without risk of failure, is determined by temporal and spatial deposition of...

  3. Characterization of fluid dynamic behaviour and channel wall effects in microtube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celata, G.P.; Cumo, M.; McPhail, S.; Zummo, G.

    2006-01-01

    Sometimes contradictory results available for fluid flow in micropipes show that much is yet to be verified in microfluid dynamics. In this study the influence of channel wall roughness and of channel wall hydrophobicity on adiabatic flow in circular microchannels is investigated, varying in diameter from 70 μm to 326 μm. The hydrodynamic behaviour of water in smooth tubes down to 30 μm inner diameter (ID) is also ascertained. Within the current experimental accuracy it is found that the classical Hagen-Poiseuille law for friction factor vs. Reynolds number is respected for all diameters measured and Re > 300. With degassed water, no effect of slip flow due to hydrophobic channel walls was noted even at 70 μm ID, which might suggest that the liquid slip flow phenomenon is associated with local desorption of dissolved gases on the hydrophobic surface, as reported elsewhere in the literature. For roughened glass channels, an increase in Darcy friction factor above 64/Re was observed only at the smallest diameter measured, 126 μm. Although the roughness levels of these channels were up to 10 times coarser than the untreated, smooth glass tubes, probably the higher factor was caused by actual deformation of channel circularity, rather than increased friction at the rougher wall, as similar behaviour was observed in a Teflon tube, also of imperfect circularity of cross-section. For all experiments, no anticipated transition to turbulent flow was observed, which means that the transitional Reynolds number was always found between Re ∼ 2000 and Re ∼ 3000. Finally, an introduction to the importance of viscous dissipation in microchannels is added, with quantitative indications of its influence on hydrodynamic properties. It is put forward as being an alternative to pressure measurements in the characterization of the behaviour of microscopic flow

  4. Dynamic thermal reaction analysis of wall structures in various cooling operation conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Biao; Long, Enshen; Meng, Xi

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Four different envelop structures are separately built in the same test building. • Cooling temperature and operation time were chosen as perturbations. • State Space Method is used to analyze the influence of wall sequence order. • The numerical models are validated by the comparisons of theory and test results. • The contrast of temperature change of different envelop structures was stark. - Abstract: This paper proposes a methodology of performance assessing of envelops under different cooling operation conditions, by focusing on indoor temperature change and dynamic thermal behavior performance of walls. To obtain a general relationship between the thermal environment change and the reaction of envelop, variously insulated walls made with the same insulation material are separately built in the same wall of a testing building with the four different structures, namely self-heat insulation (full insulation material), exterior insulation, internal insulation and intermediate insulation. The advantage of this setting is that the test targets are exposed to the same environmental variables, and the tests results are thus comparable. The target responses to two types of perturbations, cooling temperature and operation time were chosen as the important variations in the tests. Parameters of cooling set temperature of 22 °C and 18 °C, operation and restoring time 10 min and 15 min are set in the test models, and discussed with simulation results respectively. The results reveal that the exterior insulation and internal insulation are more sensitive to thermal environment change than self-heat insulation and intermediate insulation.

  5. Novel single-cell mega-size chambers for electrochemical etching of panorama position-sensitive polycarbonate ion image detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohrabi, Mehdi

    2017-11-01

    A novel development is made here by inventing panorama single-cell mega-size electrochemical etching (MS-ECE) chamber systems for processing panorama position-sensitive mega-size polycarbonate ion image detectors (MS-PCIDs) of potential for many neutron and ion detection applications in particular hydrogen ions or proton tracks and images detected for the first time in polycarbonates in this study. The MS-PCID is simply a large polycarbonate sheet of a desired size. The single-cell MS-ECE invented consists of two large equally sized transparent Plexiglas sheets as chamber walls holding a MS-PCID and the ECE chamber components tightly together. One wall has a large flat stainless steel electrode (dry cell) attached to it which is directly in contact with the MS-PCID and the other wall has a rod electrode with two holes to facilitate feeding and draining out the etching solution from the wet cell. A silicon rubber washer plays the role of the wet cell to hold the etchant and the electrical insulator to isolate the dry cell from the wet cell. A simple 50 Hz-HV home-made generator provides an adequate field strength through the two electrodes across the MS-ECE chamber. Two panorama single-cell MS-ECE chamber systems (circular and rectangular shapes) constructed were efficiently applied to processing the MS-PCIDs for 4π ion emission image detection of different gases in particular hydrogen ions or protons in a 3.5 kJ plasma focus device (PFD as uniquely observed by the unaided eyes). The panorama MS-PCID/MS-ECE image detection systems invented are novel with high potential for many applications in particular as applied to 4π panorama ion emission angular distribution image detection studies in PFD space, some results of which are presented and discussed.

  6. Dynamics of domain wall driven by spin-transfer torque

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chureemart, P.; Evans, R. F. L.; Chantrell, R. W.

    2011-01-01

    Spin-torque switching of magnetic devices offers new technological possibilities for data storage and integrated circuits. We have investigated domain-wall motion in a ferromagnetic thin film driven by a spin-polarized current using an atomistic spin model with a modified Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation including the effect of the spin-transfer torque. The presence of the spin-transfer torque is shown to create an out-of-plane domain wall, in contrast to the external-field-driven case where an in-plane wall is found. We have investigated the effect of the spin torque on domain-wall displacement, domain-wall velocity, and domain-wall width, as well as the equilibration time in the presence of the spin-transfer torque. We have shown that the minimum spin-current density, regarded as the critical value for domain-wall motion, decreases with increasing temperature.

  7. Water calorimetry and ionization chamber dosimetry in an 85-MeV clinical proton beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmans, H; Seuntjens, J; Verhaegen, F; Denis, J M; Vynckier, S; Thierens, H

    1996-05-01

    In recent years, the increased use of proton beams for clinical purposes has enhanced the demand for accurate absolute dosimetry for protons. As calorimetry is the most direct way to establish the absorbed dose and because water has recently been accepted as standard material for this type of beam, the importance of water calorimetry is obvious. In this work we report water calorimeter operation in an 85-MeV proton beam and a comparison of the absorbed dose to water measured by ionometry with the dose resulting from water calorimetric measurements. To ensure a proper understanding of the heat defect for defined impurities in water for this type of radiation, a relative response study was first done in comparison with theoretical calculations of the heat defect. The results showed that pure hypoxic water and hydrogen-saturated water yielded the same response with practically zero heat defect, in agreement with the model calculations. The absorbed dose inferred from these measurements was then compared with the dose derived from ionometry by applying the European Charged Heavy Particle Dosimetry (ECHED) protocol. Restricting the comparison to chambers recommended in the protocol, the calorimeter dose was found to be 2.6% +/- 0.9% lower than the average ionometry dose. In order to estimate the significance of chamber-dependent effects in this deviation, measurements were performed using a set of ten ionization chambers of five different types. The maximum internal deviation in the ionometry results amounted to 1.1%. We detected no systematic chamber volume dependence, but observed a small but systematic effect of the chamber wall thickness. The observed deviation between calorimetry and ionometry can be attributed to a combination of the value of (Wair/e)p for protons, adopted in the ECHED protocol, the mass stopping power ratios of water to air for protons, and possibly small ionization chamber wall effects.

  8. The dorsal skinfold chamber: window into the dynamic interaction of biomaterials with their surrounding host tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MW Laschke

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The implantation of biomaterials into the human body has become an indispensable part of almost all fields of modern medicine. Accordingly, there is an increasing need for appropriate approaches, which can be used to evaluate the suitability of different biomaterials for distinct clinical indications. The dorsal skinfold chamber is a sophisticated experimental model, which has been proven to be extremely valuable for the systematic in vivo analysis of the dynamic interaction of small biomaterial implants with the surrounding host tissue in rats, hamsters and mice. By means of intravital fluorescence microscopy, this chronic model allows for repeated analyses of various cellular, molecular and microvascular mechanisms, which are involved in the early inflammatory and angiogenic host tissue response to biomaterials during the initial 2-3 weeks after implantation. Therefore, the dorsal skinfold chamber has been broadly used during the last two decades to assess the in vivo performance of prosthetic vascular grafts, metallic implants, surgical meshes, bone substitutes, scaffolds for tissue engineering, as well as for locally or systemically applied drug delivery systems. These studies have contributed to identify basic material properties determining the biocompatibility of the implants and vascular ingrowth into their surface or internal structures. Thus, the dorsal skinfold chamber model does not only provide deep insights into the complex interactions of biomaterials with the surrounding soft tissues of the host but also represents an important tool for the future development of novel biomaterials aiming at an optimisation of their biofunctionality in clinical practice.

  9. Numerical Simulation of a Turbulent Flow Over a Backward Facing Step With Heated Wall: Effect of Pulsating Velocity and Oscillating Wall

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pozarlik, Artur Krzysztof; Kok, Jacobus B.W.

    2012-01-01

    An accurate prediction of the flow and the thermal boundary layer is required to properly simulate gas to wall heat transfer in a turbulent flow. This is studied with a view to application to gas turbine combustors. A typical gas turbine combustion chamber flow presents similarities with the

  10. Granular packings with moving side walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landry, James W.; Grest, Gary Stephen

    2004-01-01

    The effects of movement of the side walls of a confined granular packing are studied by discrete element, molecular dynamics simulations. The dynamical evolution of the stress is studied as a function of wall movement both in the direction of gravity as well as opposite to it. For all wall velocities explored, the stress in the final state of the system after wall movement is fundamentally different from the original state obtained by pouring particles into the container and letting them settle under the influence of gravity. The original packing possesses a hydrostaticlike region at the top of the container which crosses over to a depth-independent stress. As the walls are moved in the direction opposite to gravity, the saturation stress first reaches a minimum value independent of the wall velocity, then increases to a steady-state value dependent on the wall velocity. After wall movement ceases and the packing reaches equilibrium, the stress profile fits the classic Janssen form for high wall velocities, while some deviations remain for low wall velocities. The wall movement greatly increases the number of particle-wall and particle-particle forces at the Coulomb criterion. Varying the wall velocity has only small effects on the particle structure of the final packing so long as the walls travel a similar distance.

  11. Mimicking Mars: A vacuum simulation chamber for testing environmental instrumentation for Mars exploration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobrado, J. M., E-mail: sobradovj@inta.es; Martín-Soler, J. [Centro de Astrobiología (CAB), INTA-CSIC, Torrejón de Ardoz, 28850 Madrid (Spain); Martín-Gago, J. A. [Centro de Astrobiología (CAB), INTA-CSIC, Torrejón de Ardoz, 28850 Madrid (Spain); Instituto de Ciencias de Materiales de Madrid (ICMM-CSIC), Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-03-15

    We have built a Mars environmental simulation chamber, designed to test new electromechanical devices and instruments that could be used in space missions. We have developed this environmental system aiming at validating the meteorological station Rover Environment Monitoring Station of NASA's Mars Science Laboratory mission currently installed on Curiosity rover. The vacuum chamber has been built following a modular configuration and operates at pressures ranging from 1000 to 10{sup −6} mbars, and it is possible to control the gas composition (the atmosphere) within this pressure range. The device (or sample) under study can be irradiated by an ultraviolet source and its temperature can be controlled in the range from 108 to 423 K. As an important improvement with respect to other simulation chambers, the atmospheric gas into the experimental chamber is cooled at the walls by the use of liquid-nitrogen heat exchangers. This chamber incorporates a dust generation mechanism designed to study Martian-dust deposition while modifying the conditions of temperature, and UV irradiated.

  12. A more modern look for the Council Chamber exhibition

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    When the Council Chamber was renovated, the old photographs displayed on the walls were taken down... they've now been replaced by new panels printed on Plexiglas. The theme of the exhibition is still the history of CERN, but it now features the very latest from graphic design. Fabienne Marcastel, who designed it, tells us more. Two of the new panels recently installed in the Council Chamber. The presentation is simple and elegant. The content is based essentially on the accelerators and the aim of the graphic design is not to attract the public's attention to the panels but rather to provide a pleasant décor for the Chamber's users. "The old photographs stopped at the LEP. The new panels show the history of CERN but also what the Laboratory is like today. Visually, the plan is the starting point, the key to understanding how CERN has changed. It shows how CERN occupies the land it is built on," explains Fabienne Marcastel, the exhibition's graphic designer. The four panels a...

  13. The Role of the Spatial and Temporal Radiation Deposition in Inertial Fusion Chambers: The case of HiPER

    OpenAIRE

    Alvarez Ruiz, Jesus; Garoz Gómez, David; Gonzalez Arrabal, Raquel; Rivera de Mena, Antonio; Perlado Martín, José Manuel

    2010-01-01

    The first wall armour for the reactor chamber of HiPER will have to face short energy pulses of 5 to 20 MJ mostly in the form of x-rays and charged particles at a repetition rate of 5–10 Hz. Armour material and chamber dimensions have to be chosen to avoid/minimize damage to the chamber, ensuring the proper functioning of the facility during its planned lifetime. The maximum energy fluence that the armour can withstand without risk of failure, is determined by temporal and spatial deposition ...

  14. Dual-chamber/dual-anode proportional counter incorporating an intervening thin-foil solid neutron converter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boatner, Lynn A.; Neal, John S.; Blackston, Matthew A.; Kolopus, James A.; Ramey, Joanne O.

    2012-01-01

    A dual-chamber/dual-anode gas proportional counter utilizing thin solid 6 LiF or 10 B neutron converters coated on a 2-micon-thick Mylar film that is positioned between the two counter chambers and anodes has been designed, fabricated, and tested using a variety of fill gases—including naturally abundant helium. In this device, neutron conversion products emitted from both sides of the coated converter foil are detected—rather than having half of the products absorbed in the wall of a conventional tube-type counter where the solid neutron converter is deposited on the tube wall. Geant4-based radiation transport calculations were used to determine the optimum neutron converter coating thickness for both isotopes. Solution methods for applying these optimized-thickness coatings on a Mylar film were developed that were carried out at room temperature without any specialized equipment and that can be adapted to standard coating methods such as silk screen or ink jet printing. The performance characteristics of the dual-chamber/dual-anode neutron detector were determined for both types of isotopically enriched converters. The experimental performance of the 6 LiF-converter-based detector was described well by modeling results from Geant4. Additional modeling studies of multiple-foil/multiple-chamber/anode configurations addressed the basic issue of the relatively longer absorption range of neutrons versus the shorter range of the conversion products for 6 LiF and 10 B. Combined with the experimental results, these simulations indicate that a high-performance neutron detector can be realized in a single device through the application of these multiple-foil/solid converter, multiple-chamber detector concepts.

  15. Two-chambered right ventricle resulting from aberrant muscle bundles: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, T. H.; Ko, K. H.; Im, C. K.; Han, M. C.; Chi, J. G

    1979-01-01

    The 'Two-chambered right ventricle' is a rare, but unique congenital cardiac anomaly characterized by subdivision of the right ventricle into proximal high pressure chamber and distal low pressure chamber by hypertrophied aberrant muscle bundles. The aberrant muscle bundles traverse the right ventricle from the region of crista supraventricular is to the lower part of the anterior wall of the right ventricle. The ' Two-chambered right ventricle' is usually associated with other congenital cardiac anomalies such as ventricular septal defect, pulmonary valvular stenosis, etc. Therefore this anomaly could be mistakenly diagnosed as Tetralogy of Fallot or isolated interventricular septal defect. The need to separate this entity from other types of infundibular stenosis is emphasized because of the important surgical implications. Authors recently experienced a case of the T wo-chambered right ventricle' resulting from aberrant muscle bundles, that are associated with other cardiac anomalies i.e., pulmonary valvular stenosis, aysplastic tricuspid valve with regurgitation and partial anomalous pulmonary venous return to the right atrium. Here we present the findings of E.K.G., cardiac catheterization, simple chest pa, cine-right ventriculography, and autopsy together with a review of related articles.

  16. Two-chambered right ventricle resulting from aberrant muscle bundles: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, T. H.; Ko, K. H.; Im, C. K.; Han, M. C.; Chi, J. G [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1979-12-15

    The 'Two-chambered right ventricle' is a rare, but unique congenital cardiac anomaly characterized by subdivision of the right ventricle into proximal high pressure chamber and distal low pressure chamber by hypertrophied aberrant muscle bundles. The aberrant muscle bundles traverse the right ventricle from the region of crista supraventricular is to the lower part of the anterior wall of the right ventricle. The ' Two-chambered right ventricle' is usually associated with other congenital cardiac anomalies such as ventricular septal defect, pulmonary valvular stenosis, etc. Therefore this anomaly could be mistakenly diagnosed as Tetralogy of Fallot or isolated interventricular septal defect. The need to separate this entity from other types of infundibular stenosis is emphasized because of the important surgical implications. Authors recently experienced a case of the {sup T}wo-chambered right ventricle' resulting from aberrant muscle bundles, that are associated with other cardiac anomalies i.e., pulmonary valvular stenosis, aysplastic tricuspid valve with regurgitation and partial anomalous pulmonary venous return to the right atrium. Here we present the findings of E.K.G., cardiac catheterization, simple chest pa, cine-right ventriculography, and autopsy together with a review of related articles.

  17. Dynamical implications of sample shape for avalanches in 2-dimensional random-field Ising model with saw-tooth domain wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadić, Bosiljka

    2018-03-01

    We study dynamics of a built-in domain wall (DW) in 2-dimensional disordered ferromagnets with different sample shapes using random-field Ising model on a square lattice rotated by 45 degrees. The saw-tooth DW of the length Lx is created along one side and swept through the sample by slow ramping of the external field until the complete magnetisation reversal and the wall annihilation at the open top boundary at a distance Ly. By fixing the number of spins N =Lx ×Ly = 106 and the random-field distribution at a value above the critical disorder, we vary the ratio of the DW length to the annihilation distance in the range Lx /Ly ∈ [ 1 / 16 , 16 ] . The periodic boundary conditions are applied in the y-direction so that these ratios comprise different samples, i.e., surfaces of cylinders with the changing perimeter Lx and height Ly. We analyse the avalanches of the DW slips between following field updates, and the multifractal structure of the magnetisation fluctuation time series. Our main findings are that the domain-wall lengths materialised in different sample shapes have an impact on the dynamics at all scales. Moreover, the domain-wall motion at the beginning of the hysteresis loop (HLB) probes the disorder effects resulting in the fluctuations that are significantly different from the large avalanches in the central part of the loop (HLC), where the strong fields dominate. Specifically, the fluctuations in HLB exhibit a wide multi-fractal spectrum, which shifts towards higher values of the exponents when the DW length is reduced. The distributions of the avalanches in this segments of the loops obey power-law decay and the exponential cutoffs with the exponents firmly in the mean-field universality class for long DW. In contrast, the avalanches in the HLC obey Tsallis density distribution with the power-law tails which indicate the new categories of the scale invariant behaviour for different ratios Lx /Ly. The large fluctuations in the HLC, on the other

  18. Manufacturing Process Developments for Regeneratively-Cooled Channel Wall Rocket Nozzles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gradl, Paul; Brandsmeier, Will

    2016-01-01

    Regeneratively cooled channel wall nozzles incorporate a series of integral coolant channels to contain the coolant to maintain adequate wall temperatures and expand hot gas providing engine thrust and specific impulse. NASA has been evaluating manufacturing techniques targeting large scale channel wall nozzles to support affordability of current and future liquid rocket engine nozzles and thrust chamber assemblies. The development of these large scale manufacturing techniques focus on the liner formation, channel slotting with advanced abrasive water-jet milling techniques and closeout of the coolant channels to replace or augment other cost reduction techniques being evaluated for nozzles. NASA is developing a series of channel closeout techniques including large scale additive manufacturing laser deposition and explosively bonded closeouts. A series of subscale nozzles were completed evaluating these processes. Fabrication of mechanical test and metallography samples, in addition to subscale hardware has focused on Inconel 625, 300 series stainless, aluminum alloys as well as other candidate materials. Evaluations of these techniques are demonstrating potential for significant cost reductions for large scale nozzles and chambers. Hot fire testing is planned using these techniques in the future.

  19. Characteristics Air Flow in Room Chamber Test Refrigerator Household Energy Consumption with Inlet Flow Variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susanto, Edy; Idrus Alhamid, M.; Nasruddin; Budihardjo

    2018-03-01

    Room Chamber is the most important in making a good Testing Laboratory. In this study, the 2-D modeling conducted to assess the effect placed the inlet on designing a test chamber room energy consumption of household refrigerators. Where the geometry room chamber is rectangular and approaching the enclosure conditions. Inlet varied over the side parallel to the outlet and compared to the inlet where the bottom is made. The purpose of this study was to determine and define the characteristics of the airflow in the room chamber using CFD simulation. CFD method is used to obtain flow characteristics in detail, in the form of vector flow velocity and temperature distribution inside the chamber room. The result found that the position of the inlet parallel to the outlet causes air flow cannot move freely to the side of the floor, even flow of air moves up toward the outlet. While by making the inlet is below, the air can move freely from the bottom up to the side of the chamber room wall as well as to help uniform flow.

  20. Spin-motive Force Induced by Domain Wall Dynamics in the Antiferromagnetic Spin Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugano, Ryoko; Ichimura, Masahiko; Takahashi, Saburo; Maekawa, Sadamichi; Crest Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    In spite of no net magnetization in antiferromagnetic (AF) textures, the local magnetic properties (Neel magnetization) can be manipulated in a similar fashion to ferromagnetic (F) ones. It is expected that, even in AF metals, spin transfer torques (STTs) lead to the domain wall (DW) motion and that the DW motion induces spin-motive force (SMF). In order to study the Neel magnetization dynamics and the resultant SMF, we treat the nano-structured F1/AF/F2 junction. The F1 and F2 leads behave as a spin current injector and a detector, respectively. Each F lead is fixed in the different magnetization direction. Torsions (DW in AF) are introduced reflecting the fixed magnetization of two F leads. We simulated the STT-induced Neel magnetization dynamics with the injecting current from F1 to F2 and evaluate induced SMF. Based on the adiabatic electron dynamics in the AF texture, Langevin simulations are performed at finite temperature. This research was supported by JST, CREST, Japan.

  1. Effects of relative humidity on the characterization of a photochemical smog chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Gaoshuo; Xu, Yongfu; Jia, Long

    2011-01-01

    Water vapor plays an important role in many atmospheric chemical reactions. A self-made indoor environmental smog chamber was used to investigate the effects of relative humidity (RH) on its characterization, which included the wall effects of reactive species such as 03 and NOx, and the determination of chamber-dependent OH radicals in terms of CO-NOx irradiation experiments. Results showed that the rate constant of O3 wall losses increased with increasing RH, and that their relationship was linearly significant. Although RH affected the rate constant of NOx wall losses, their relationship was not statistically significant. Background air generated a small amount of ozone at both high and low RH. When RH varied from 5% to 79%, the apparent rate constant kNO2-->HONO for the conversion of NO2 into gas phase HONO was estimated in the range of 0.70 x 10(-3)-2.5 x 10(-3) min(-1). A linear relationship between kNO2-->HONO and RH was obtained as kNO2-->HONO (10(-3) min(-1)) = -0.0255RH + 2.64, with R2 and P value being 0.978 and < 0.01. To our knowledge, this is the first report on their relationship. The generation mechanism for HONO and OH was also discussed in this work.

  2. Gas Enrichment at Liquid-Wall Interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dammer, S.M.; Lohse, Detlef

    2006-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of Lennard-Jones systems are performed to study the effects of dissolved gas on liquid-wall and liquid-gas interfaces. Gas enrichment at walls, which for hydrophobic walls can exceed more than 2 orders of magnitude when compared to the gas density in the bulk liquid,

  3. Explosion-induced combustion of hydrocarbon clouds in a chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuwald, P; Reichenbach, H; Kuhl, A L

    2001-01-01

    The interaction of the detonation of a solid HE-charge with a non-premixed cloud of hydro-carbon fuel in a chamber was studied in laboratory experiments. Soap bubbles filled with a flammable gas were subjected to the blast wave created by the detonation of PETN-charges (0.2 g < mass < 0.5 g). The dynamics of the combustion system were investigated by means of high-speed photography and measurement of the quasi-static chamber pressure

  4. Technique for measuring the losses of alpha particles to the wall in TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    England, A.C.

    1984-03-01

    It is proposed to measure the losses of alpha particles to the wall in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) or any large deuterium-tritium (D-T) burning tokamak by a nuclear technique. For this purpose, a chamber containing a suitable fluid would be mounted near the wall of the tokamak. Alpha particles would enter the chamber through a thin window and cause nuclear reactions in the fluid. The material would then be transported through a tube to a remote, low-background location for measurement of the activity. The most favorable reaction suggested here is 10 B(α,n) 13 N, although 14 N(α,γ) 18 F and others may be possible. The system, the sensitivity, the probe design, and the sources of error are described

  5. Tissue holding device for use during surgical procedure, has contact body with suction foot and suction mouth that is surrounded by rim, and suction pipe connected to suction chamber

    OpenAIRE

    Vonck, D.; Goossens, R.H.M.; Flipsen, S.F.J.; Jakimowicz, J.J.; Van der Putten, E.P.W.

    2009-01-01

    The device has a locking ring (5), a connector (6), and a contact body (1) with a suction foot and a suction mouth (8), where the mouth is surrounded by a rim (10), which is substantially located in a plane of the suction foot. A suction chamber (9) has a sieve-shaped inner wall (2) and a transparent side wall, and a suction pipe (11) is connected to the chamber.

  6. Influence of shear on microbial adhesion to PEO-brushes and glass by convective-diffusion and sedimentation in a parallel plate flow chamber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roosjen, A; Boks, NP; van der Mei, HC; Busscher, HJ; Norde, W

    2005-01-01

    Microbial adhesion to surfaces often occurs despite high wall shear rates acting on the adhering microorganisms. In this paper, we compare the wall shear rates needed to prevent microbial adhesion to bare glass and poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO)-brush coated glass in a parallel plate flow chamber.

  7. Relaxation processes and glass transition of confined polymer melts: A molecular dynamics simulation of 1,4-polybutadiene between graphite walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solar, M; Binder, K; Paul, W

    2017-05-28

    Molecular dynamics simulations of a chemically realistic model for 1,4-polybutadiene in a thin film geometry confined by two graphite walls are presented. Previous work on melts in the bulk has shown that the model faithfully reproduces static and dynamic properties of the real material over a wide temperature range. The present work studies how these properties change due to nano-confinement. The focus is on orientational correlations observable in nuclear magnetic resonance experiments and on the local intermediate incoherent neutron scattering function, F s (q z , z, t), for distances z from the graphite walls in the range of a few nanometers. Temperatures from about 2T g down to about 1.15T g , where T g is the glass transition temperature in the bulk, are studied. It is shown that weakly attractive forces between the wall atoms and the monomers suffice to effectively bind a polymer coil that is near the wall. For a wide regime of temperatures, the Arrhenius-like adsorption/desorption kinetics of the monomers is the slowest process, while very close to T g the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann-like α-relaxation takes over. The α-process is modified only for z≤1.2 nm due to the density changes near the walls, less than expected from studies of coarse-grained (bead-spring-type) models. The weakness of the surface effects on the glass transition in this case is attributed to the interplay of density changes near the wall with the torsional potential. A brief discussion of pertinent experiments is given.

  8. Experimental studies of tearing mode and resistive wall mode dynamics in the reversed field pinch configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malmberg, Jenny-Ann

    2003-06-01

    It is relatively straightforward to establish equilibrium in magnetically confined plasmas, but the plasma is frequently susceptible to a variety of instabilities that are driven by the free energy in the magnetic field or in the pressure gradient. These unstable modes exhibit effects that affect the particle, momentum and heat confinement properties of the configuration. Studies of the dynamics of several of the most important modes are the subject of this thesis. The studies are carried out on plasmas in the reversed field pinch (RFP) configuration. One phenomenon commonly observed in RFPs is mode wall locking. The localized nature of these phase- and wall locked structures results in localized power loads on the wall which are detrimental for confinement. A detailed study of the wall locked mode phenomenon is performed based on magnetic measurements from three RFP devices. The two possible mechanisms for wall locking are investigated. Locking as a result of tearing modes interacting with a static field error and locking due to the presence of a non-ideal boundary. The characteristics of the wall locked mode are qualitatively similar in a device with a conducting shell system (TPE-RX) compared to a device with a resistive shell (Extrap T2). A theoretical model is used for evaluating the threshold values for wall locking due to eddy currents in the vacuum vessel in these devices. A good correlation with experiment is observed for the conducting shell device. The possibility of successfully sustaining discharges in a resistive shell RFP is introduced in the recently rebuilt device Extrap T2R. Fast spontaneous mode rotation is observed, resulting in low magnetic fluctuations, low loop voltage and improved confinement. Wall locking is rarely observed. The low tearing mode amplitudes allow for the theoretically predicted internal non-resonant on-axis resistive wall modes to be observed. These modes have not previously been distinguished due to the formation of wall

  9. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) investigation of thermal uniformity in a thermal cycling based calibration chamber for MEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Xulong; Luo, Xiaobing; Wang, Xiaoping; Liu, Sheng

    2015-12-01

    Micro-electrical-mechanical system (MEMS) has become important for many industries such as automotive, home appliance, portable electronics, especially with the emergence of Internet of Things. Volume testing with temperature compensation has been essential in order to provide MEMS based sensors with repeatability, consistency, reliability, and durability, but low cost. Particularly, in the temperature calibration test, temperature uniformity of thermal cycling based calibration chamber becomes more important for obtaining precision sensors, as each sensor is different before the calibration. When sensor samples are loaded into the chamber, we usually open the door of the chamber, then place fixtures into chamber and mount the samples on the fixtures. These operations may affect temperature uniformity in the chamber. In order to study the influencing factors of sample-loading on the temperature uniformity in the chamber during calibration testing, numerical simulation work was conducted first. Temperature field and flow field were simulated in empty chamber, chamber with open door, chamber with samples, and chamber with fixtures, respectively. By simulation, it was found that opening chamber door, sample size and number of fixture layers all have effects on flow field and temperature field. By experimental validation, it was found that the measured temperature value was consistent with the simulated temperature value.

  10. Physical modelling of near-wall phenomena in entrained-flow coal gasifiers

    OpenAIRE

    Troiano, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Combustion and gasification under slagging conditions are key aspects of the design of modern entrained-flow reactors for thermal conversion of solid fuels, aimed at increasing the overall energy efficiency. In these systems, solid particles migrate toward the reactor walls, due to swirled/tangential flow induced in the reaction chamber and to turbophoresis, generating, thanks to the very high operating temperatures, a slag layer that flows along the reactor internal walls and is drained to t...

  11. Lead-glass wall addition to the SPEAR Mark 1 magnetic detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feller, J.M.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Dorfan, J.M.; Ely, R.; Feldman, G.J.; Fong, A.; Gobbi, B.; Hanson, G.; Heile, F.B.; Jaros, J.A.; Kwan, B.P.; Lecomte, P.; Litke, A.M.; Luke, D.; Madaras, R.J.; Martin, J.B.

    1978-01-01

    A ''Lead-Glass Wall,'' consisting of 318 lead-glass Cherenkov shower counters and three wire spark chambers, has been added to one octant of the SPEAR Mark I Magnetic Detector. The wall covers a solid angle of approximately 6% of 4π steradians and has been used to identify and measure the energies of electrons and photons produced in electron-positron collisions. The design, calibration, gain-monitoring, and performance of the system are described. 3 refs

  12. Dismantling method for reactor shielding wall and device therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akagawa, Katsuhiko.

    1995-01-01

    A ring member having an outer diameter slightly smaller than an inner diameter of a reactor shielding wall to be dismantled is lowered in the inside of the reactor shielding wall while keeping a horizontal posture. A cutting device is disposed at the lower peripheral edge of the ring member. The cutting device can move along the peripheral edge of the circular shape of the ring member. The ring member is urged against the inner surface of the reactor shielding wall by using an urging member to immobilize the ring member. Then, the cutting device is operated to cut the reactor shielding wall into a plurality of ring-like blocks at a plurality of inner horizontal ribs or block connection ribs. Then, the blocks of the cut reactor shielding wall are supported by the ring member, and transported out of the reactor container by a lift. The cut blocks transported to the outside are finely dismantled for every block in a closed chamber. (I.N.)

  13. Gas dynamic laser device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Born, G.

    1975-01-01

    The gas dynamic laser device is provided with an expansion chamber arranged between a heating chamber for the CO-gas and the resonance chamber. The expansion chamber is initially evacuated for producing a rarefaction wave. Between the heating chamber and the expansion chamber there are arranged rapid release means such as a valve or a diaphragm. Pressure recovering means are connected to the other side of the resonance chamber

  14. Multi-photon UV photolysis of gaseous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: Extinction spectra and dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, A. J.; Gash, E. W.; Mansfield, M. W. D. [Physics Department, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); Ruth, A. A. [Physics Department, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); Environmental Research Institute, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland)

    2013-08-07

    The extinction spectra of static naphthalene and static biphenylene vapor, each buffered with a noble gas at room temperature, were measured as a function of time in the region between 390 and 850 nm after UV multi-photon laser photolysis at 308 nm. Employing incoherent broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (IBBCEAS), the spectra were found to be unstructured with a general lack of isolated features suggesting that the extinction was not solely based on absorption but was in fact dominated by scattering from particles formed in the photolysis of the respective polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon. Following UV multi-photon photolysis, the extinction dynamics of the static (unstirred) closed gas-phase system exhibits extraordinary quasi-periodic and complex oscillations with periods ranging from seconds to many minutes, persisting for up to several hours. Depending on buffer gas type and pressure, several types of dynamical responses could be generated (classified as types I, II, and III). They were studied as a function of temperature and chamber volume for different experimental conditions and possible explanations for the oscillations are discussed. A conclusive model for the observed phenomena has not been established. However, a number of key hypotheses have made based on the measurements in this publication: (a) Following the multi-photon UV photolysis of naphthalene (or biphenylene), particles are formed on a timescale not observable using IBBCEAS. (b) The observed temporal behavior cannot be described on basis of a chemical reaction scheme alone. (c) The pressure dependence of the system's responses is due to transport phenomena of particles in the chamber. (d) The size distribution and the refractive indices of particles are time dependent and evolve on a timescale of minutes to hours. The rate of particle coagulation, involving coalescent growth and particle agglomeration, affects the observed oscillations. (e) The walls of the chamber act as a

  15. Proposal of a Self-baking Single-wall Design for the VI Section of the ATLAS Beam Pipe

    CERN Document Server

    Marco Olcese, MO

    2002-01-01

    A single-wall design for the VI section of the ATLAS beam vacuum chamber is presented. This design would allow for a major cost saving with respect to the current double-wall baseline. All the thermal implications and impact on the B-layer mudules are discussed.

  16. Prototype drift chamber for high energy heavy ions with a large dynamic range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, T.; Bieser, F.; Crawford, H.; Lindstrom, P.; Baumgartner, M.; Greiner, D.

    1985-01-01

    The authors have constructed and tested a small prototype drift chamber designed for high energy heavy ions. When a drift chamber is used as a tracking detector for heavy projectile fragments from high energy nucleus-nucleus reactions, the major problem comes from the many spurious hits due to delta-rays. Three methods have been developed to solve this problem. The first one is to use a constant fraction discriminator to pick up the timing signal from the core ionization under the large background of delta-rays. The second one is to use pulse height information from the drift chamber to find the cell hit by the heavy ion. The last one is the idea of distributed planes. Modular planes (12 in this case) are distributed 10 cm apart on a rigid base plate to provide accurate relative positioning of the wires. The performance of the prototype chamber has been measured as a function of the high voltage bias and of the charge of the heavy ion from protons up to uranium at around 1 GeV/nucleon

  17. Development and performance of resistive seamless straw-tube gas chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takubo, Y.; Aoki, M.; Ishihara, A.; Ishii, J.; Kuno, Y.; Maeda, F.; Nakahara, K.; Nosaka, N.; Sakamoto, H.; Sato, A.; Terai, K.; Igarashi, Y.; Yokoi, T.

    2005-01-01

    A new straw-tube gas chamber which is made of seamless straw-tubes, instead of ordinary wound-type straw-tubes is developed. Seamless straw-tubes have various advantages over ordinary wound-type ones, in particular, in terms of mechanical strength and lesser wall thickness. Our seamless straw-tubes are fabricated to be resistive so that the hit positions along the straw axis can be read by cathode planes placed outside the straw-tube chambers, where the cathode strips run transverse to the straw axis. A beam test was carried out at KEK to study their performance. As a result of the beam test, the position resolution of the cathode strips of 220μm is achieved, and an anode position resolution of 112μm is also obtained

  18. Design of ITER neutron monitor using micro fission chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishitani, Takeo; Ebisawa, Katsuyuki; Ando, Toshiro; Kasai, Satoshi; Johnson, L.C.; Walker, C.

    1998-08-01

    We are designing micro fission chambers, which are pencil size gas counters with fissile material inside, to be installed in the vacuum vessel as neutron flux monitors for ITER. We found that the 238 U micro fission chambers are not suitable because the detection efficiency will increase up to 50% in the ITER life time by breading 239 Pu. We propose to install 235 U micro fission chambers on the front side of the back plate in the gap between adjacent blanket modules and behind the blankets at 10 poloidal locations. One chamber will be installed in the divertor cassette just under the dome. Employing both pulse counting mode and Campbelling mode in the electronics, we can accomplish the ITER requirement of 10 7 dynamic range with 1 ms temporal resolution, and eliminate the effect of gamma-rays. We demonstrate by neutron Monte Carlo calculation with three-dimensional modeling that we avoid those detection efficiency changes by installing micro fission chambers at several poloidal locations inside the vacuum vessel. (author)

  19. Thick domain wall spacetimes with and without reflection symmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melfo, Alejandra; Pantoja, Nelson; Skirzewski, Aureliano

    2003-01-01

    We show that different thick domain wall spacetimes, for which the scalar field configuration and the potential are the same, can be found as solutions to the coupled Einstein-scalar field equations, depending on whether or not reflection symmetry on the wall is imposed. Spacetimes with reflection symmetry may be dynamic or static, while the asymmetric ones are static. Asymmetric walls are asymptotically flat on one side and reduce to the Taub spacetime on the other. Examples of asymmetric thick walls in D-dimensional spacetimes are given, and previous analysis on the distributional thin-wall limit of the dynamic symmetric thick walls are extended to the asymmetric case. A new family of reflection symmetric, static thick domain wall spacetimes, including previously known Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield walls, is presented

  20. Far SOL transport and main wall plasma interaction in DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudakov, D.L.; Boedo, J.A.; Moyer, R.A.; Doerner, R.P.; Hollmann, E.M.; Krasheninnikov, S.I.; Pigarov, A.Yu.; Stangeby, P.C.; McLean, A.G.; Watkins, J.G.; Wampler, W.R.; Whyte, D.G.; McKee, G.R.; Zeng, L.; Wang, G.; Brooks, N.H.; Evans, T.E.; Leonard, A.W.; Mahdavi, M.A.; West, W.P.; Wong, C.P.C.; Fenstermacher, M.E.; Groth, M.; Lasnier, C.J.

    2005-01-01

    Far scrape-off layer (SOL) and near-wall plasma parameters in DIII-D depend strongly on the discharge parameters and confinement regime. In L-mode discharges cross-field transport increases with the average discharge density and flattens far SOL profiles, thus increasing plasma-wall contact. In H-mode between edge localized modes (ELMs), plasma-wall contact is generally weaker than in L-mode. During ELMs plasma fluxes to the wall increase to, or above the L-mode levels. Depending on the discharge conditions ELMs are responsible for 30-90% of the ion flux to the outboard chamber wall. Cross-field fluxes in far SOL are dominated by large amplitude intermittent transport events that may propagate all the way to the outer wall and cause sputtering. A Divertor Material Evaluation System (DiMES) probe containing samples of several ITER-relevant materials including carbon, beryllium and tungsten was exposed to a series of upper single null (USN) discharges as a proxy to measure the first wall erosion. (author)

  1. Möbius domain-wall fermions on gradient-flowed dynamical HISQ ensembles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkowitz, Evan; Bouchard, Chris; Chang, Chia Cheng; Clark, M. A.; Joó, Bálint; Kurth, Thorsten; Monahan, Christopher; Nicholson, Amy; Orginos, Kostas; Rinaldi, Enrico; Vranas, Pavlos; Walker-Loud, André

    2017-09-01

    We report on salient features of a mixed lattice QCD action using valence Möbius domain-wall fermions solved on the dynamical Nf=2 +1 +1 highly improved staggered quark sea-quark ensembles generated by the MILC Collaboration. The approximate chiral symmetry properties of the valence fermions are shown to be significantly improved by utilizing the gradient-flow scheme to first smear the highly improved staggered quark configurations. The greater numerical cost of the Möbius domain-wall inversions is mitigated by the highly efficient QUDA library optimized for NVIDIA GPU accelerated compute nodes. We have created an interface to this optimized QUDA solver in Chroma. We provide tuned parameters of the action and performance of QUDA using ensembles with the lattice spacings a ≃{0.15 ,0.12 ,0.09 } fm and pion masses mπ≃{310 ,220 ,130 } MeV . We have additionally generated two new ensembles with a ˜0.12 fm and mπ˜{400 ,350 } MeV . With a fixed flow time of tg f=1 in lattice units, the residual chiral symmetry breaking of the valence fermions is kept below 10% of the light quark mass on all ensembles, mres≲0.1 ×ml , with moderate values of the fifth dimension L5 and a domain-wall height M5≤1.3 . As a benchmark calculation, we perform a continuum, infinite volume, physical pion and kaon mass extrapolation of FK±/Fπ± and demonstrate our results are independent of flow time and consistent with the FLAG determination of this quantity at the level of less than one standard deviation.

  2. The atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR: a tool for the investigation of photochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauers, T.; Bohn, B.; Johnen, F.-J.; Rohrer, R.; Rodriguez Bares, S.; Tillmann, R.; Wahner, A.

    2003-04-01

    On the campus of the Forschungszentrum Jülich we constructed SAPHIR (Simulation of Atmospheric PHotochemistry In a large Reaction Chamber) which was accomplished in fall 2001. The chamber consists of a 280-m^3 double-wall Teflon bag of cylindrical shape that is held by a steel frame. Typically 75% of the outside actinic flux (290~nm~--~420~nm) is available inside the chamber. A louvre system allows switching between full sun light and dark within 40 s giving the opportunity to study relaxation processes of the photo chemical system. The SAPHIR chamber is equipped with a comprehensive set of sensitive instruments including the measurements of OH, HO_2, CO, hydrocarbons, aldehydes, nitrogen-oxides and solar radiation. Moreover, the modular concept of SAPHIR allows fast and flexible integration of new instruments and techniques. In this paper we will show the unique and new features of the SAPHIR chamber, namely the clean air supply and high purity water vapor supply providing a wide range of trace gas concentrations being accessible through the experiments. We will also present examples from the first year of SAPHIR experiment showing the scope of application from high quality instrument inter-comparison and kinetic studies to the simulation of complex mixtures of trace gases at ambient concentrations.

  3. Bed-To-Wall Heat Transfer in a Supercritical Circulating Fluidised Bed Boiler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Błaszczuk Artur

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work is to find a correlation for heat transfer to walls in a 1296 t/h supercritical circulating fluidised bed (CFB boiler. The effect of bed-to-wall heat transfer coefficient in a long active heat transfer surface was discussed, excluding the radiation component. Experiments for four different unit loads (i.e. 100% MCR, 80% MCR, 60% MCR and 40% MCR were conducted at a constant excess air ratio and high level of bed pressure (ca. 6 kPa in each test run. The empirical correlation of the heat transfer coefficient in a large-scale CFB boiler was mainly determined by two key operating parameters, suspension density and bed temperature. Furthermore, data processing was used in order to develop empirical correlation ranges between 3.05 to 5.35 m·s-1 for gas superficial velocity, 0.25 to 0.51 for the ratio of the secondary to the primary air, 1028 to 1137K for bed temperature inside the furnace chamber of a commercial CFB boiler, and 1.20 to 553 kg·m-3 for suspension density. The suspension density was specified on the base of pressure measurements inside the boiler’s combustion chamber using pressure sensors. Pressure measurements were collected at the measuring ports situated on the front wall of the combustion chamber. The obtained correlation of the heat transfer coefficient is in agreement with the data obtained from typical industrial CFB boilers.

  4. Ionization chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jilbert, P.H.

    1975-01-01

    The invention concerns ionization chambers with particular reference to air-equivalent ionization chambers. In order to ensure that similar chambers have similar sensitivities and responses the surface of the chamber bounding the active volume carries a conducting material, which may be a colloidal graphite, arranged in the form of lines so that the area of the conducting material occupies only a small proportion of the area of said surface. (U.S.)

  5. Fuel retention under elevated wall temperature in KSTAR with a carbon wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, B.; Hong, S. H.

    2018-03-01

    The fuel retention during KSTAR discharges with elevated wall temperature (150 °C) has been studied by using the method of global particle balance. The results show that the elevated wall temperature could reduce the dynamic retention via implantation and absorption, especially for the short pulse shots with large injected fuel particles. There is no signature changing of long-term retention, which related to co-deposition, under elevated wall temperature. For soft-landing shots (normal shots), the exhausted fuel particles during discharges is larger with elevated wall temperature than without, but the exhausted particles after discharges within 90 s looks similar. The outgassing particles because of disruption could be exhausted within 15 s.

  6. Shape and dimensions of cardiac chambers: Importance of CT section thickness and orientation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, E.A.; Ritman, E.L.

    1985-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT) scan data were used to quantitate the geometry of all heart chambers. The Dynamic Spatial Reconstructor (DSR) was used to scan dogs with in situ casts of the cardiac chambers. Chamber volumes estimated from DSR images were accurate within 5% of water displacement volume measurements of the actual casts for chambers greater than 11 ml and within 10% of water displacement volumes for chambers less than 11 ml. Anatomic features of the actual cast correlated closely with anatomy visible in computer-generated surface images of the 3D DSR image data. The important effect of reconstructed section thickness and orientation on the fidelity of 3D cardiac geometry is demonstrated

  7. Quantification and Control of Wall Effects in Porous Media Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, E. J.; Mays, D. C.; Neupauer, R.; Crimaldi, J. P.

    2017-12-01

    Fluid flow dynamics in porous media are dominated by media heterogeneity. This heterogeneity can create preferential pathways in which local seepage velocities dwarf system seepage velocities, further complicating an already incomplete understanding of dispersive processes. In physical models of porous media flows, apparatus walls introduce preferential flow paths (i.e., wall effects) that may overwhelm other naturally occurring preferential pathways within the apparatus, leading to deceptive results. We used planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) in conjunction with refractive index matched (RIM) porous media and pore fluid to observe fluid dynamics in the porous media, with particular attention to the region near the apparatus walls in a 17 cm x 8 cm x 7 cm uniform flow cell. Hexagonal close packed spheres were used to create an isotropic, homogenous porous media field in the interior of the apparatus. Visualization of the movement of a fluorescent dye revealed the influence of the wall in creating higher permeability preferential flow paths in an otherwise homogenous media packing. These preferential flow paths extended approximately one half of one sphere diameter from the wall for homogenously packed regions, with a quickly diminishing effect on flow dynamics for homogenous media adjacent to the preferential pathway, but with major influence on flow dynamics for adjoining heterogeneous regions. Multiple approaches to mitigate wall effects were investigated, and a modified wall was created such that the fluid dynamics near the wall mimics the fluid dynamics within the homogenous porous media. This research supports the design of a two-dimensional experimental apparatus that will simulate engineered pumping schemes for use in contaminant remediation. However, this research could benefit the design of fixed bed reactors or other engineering challenges in which vessel walls contribute to unwanted preferential flow.

  8. Dynamic lift measurements on a FX79W151A airfoil via pressure distribution on the wind tunnel walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolken-Moehlmann, Gerrit [ForWind - Center for Wind Energy Research, University of Oldenburg (Germany); Knebel, Pascal [ForWind - Center for Wind Energy Research, University of Oldenburg (Germany); Barth, Stephan [ECN Wind Energy, Energy research Centre of the (Netherlands); Peinke, Joachim [ForWind - Center for Wind Energy Research, University of Oldenburg (Germany)

    2007-07-15

    We report on an experimental setup for measurements of dynamic stall for airfoils via the pressure distribution over wind tunnel walls. This measuring technique, hitherto used for lift measurements under static conditions, is also an adequate method for dynamic conditions until stall occurs. A step motor is used, allowing for sinusoidal as well as non-sinusoidal and stochastic pitching to simulate fast fluctuating flow conditions. Measurements with sinusoidal pitching and constant angular velocities were done and show dynamic stall characteristics. Under dynamic stall conditions, maximum lift coefficients were up to 80% higher than the maximum for static lift.

  9. Analysis of Dynamic Coupling Characteristics of the Slope Reinforced by Sheet Pile Wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. L. Qu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Large deformation of slope caused by earthquake can lead to the loss of stability of slope and its retaining structures. At present, there have been some research achievements about the slope reinforcement of stabilizing piles. However, due to the complexity of the structural system, the coupling relationship between soil and pile is still not well understood. Hence it is of great necessity to study its dynamic characteristics further. In view of this, a numerical model was established by FLAC3D in this paper, and the deformation and stress nephogram of sheet pile wall in peak ground motion acceleration (PGA at 0.1 g, 0.2 g, and 0.4 g were obtained. Through the analysis, some conclusions were obtained. Firstly, based on the nephogram of motion characteristics and the positions of the slip surface and the retaining wall, the reinforced slope can be divided into 6 sections approximatively, namely, the sliding body parts of A, B, C, D, and E and the bedrock part F. Secondly, the deformation and stress distributions of slope reinforced by sheet pile wall were carefully studied. Based on the results of deformation calculation from time history analysis, the interaction force between structure and soil can be estimated by the difference of peak horizontal displacements, and the structure-soil coupling law under earthquake can be studied by this approach.

  10. Glove box chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, M.E.; Cox, M.E.

    1975-01-01

    An environmental chamber is described which enables an operator's hands to have direct access within the chamber without compromising a special atmosphere within such chamber. A pair of sleeves of a flexible material are sealed to the chamber around associated access apertures and project outwardly from such chamber. Each aperture is closed by a door which is openable from within the sleeve associated therewith so that upon an operator inserting his hand and arm through the sleeve, the operator can open the door to have access to the interior of the chamber. A container which is selectively separable from the remainder of the chamber is also provided to allow objects to be transferred from the chamber without such objects having to pass through the ambient atmosphere. An antechamber permitting objects to be passed directly into the chamber from the ambient atmosphere is included. (auth)

  11. ICRF heating in JET during initial operations with the ITER-like wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacquet, P.; Brix, M.; Graham, M.; Mayoral, M.-L.; Meigs, A.; Monakhov, I.; Sirinelli, A. [Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Bobkov, V.; Drewelow, P.; Pütterich, T. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM-Assoziation, Garching (Germany); Brezinsek, S. [IEK-4, Forschungszentrum Jülich, Association EURATOM-FZJ (Germany); Campergue, A-L. [Ecole Nationale des Ponts et Chaussées, F77455 Marne-la-Vallée (France); Colas, L. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Czarnecka, A. [Association Euratom-IPPLM, Hery 23, 01-497 Warsaw (Poland); Klepper, C. C. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6169 (United States); Lerche, E.; Van-Eester, D. [Association EURATOM-Belgian State, ERM-KMS, Brussels (Belgium); Milanesio, D. [Politecnico di Torino, Department of Electronics, Torino (Italy); Mlynar, J. [Association EURATOM-IPP.CR, Za Slovankou 3, 182 21 Praha 8 (Czech Republic); Collaboration: JET-EFDA Contributors

    2014-02-12

    In 2011/12, JET started operation with its new ITER-Like Wall (ILW) made of a tungsten (W) divertor and a beryllium (Be) main chamber wall. The impact of the new wall material on the JET Ion Cyclotron Resonance Frequency (ICRF) operation was assessed and also the properties of JET plasmas heated with ICRF were studied. No substantial change of the antenna coupling resistance was observed with the ILW as compared with the carbon wall. Heat-fluxes on the protecting limiters close the antennas quantified using Infra-Red (IR) thermography (maximum 4.5 MW/m{sup 2} in current drive phasing) are within the wall power load handling capabilities. A simple RF sheath rectification model using the antenna near-fields calculated with the TOPICA code can well reproduce the heat-flux pattern around the antennas. ICRF heating results in larger tungsten and nickel (Ni) contents in the plasma and in a larger core radiation when compared to Neutral Beam Injection (NBI) heating. Some experimental facts indicate that main-chamber W components could be an important impurity source: the divertor W influx deduced from spectroscopy is comparable when using RF or NBI at same power and comparable divertor conditions; the W content is also increased in ICRF-heated limiter plasmas; and Be evaporation in the main chamber results in a strong and long lasting reduction of the impurity level. The ICRF specific high-Z impurity content decreased when operating at higher plasma density and when increasing the hydrogen concentration from 5% to 20%. Despite the higher plasma bulk radiation, ICRF exhibited overall good plasma heating efficiency; The ICRF power can be deposited at plasma centre and the radiation is mainly from the outer part of the plasma. Application of ICRF heating in H-mode plasmas started, and the beneficial effect of ICRF central electron heating to prevent W accumulation in the plasma core could be observed.

  12. wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    Proportional multi-wire chamber. Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle. Proportional wire chambers allow a much quicker reading than the optical or magnetoscriptive readout wire chambers.

  13. Automation and instrument control applied to an experimental study of electron transport dynamics in an avalanche mode resistive plater chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ridenti, Marco A.; Pascholati, Paulo R.

    2009-01-01

    In this work it is presented a computer based instrumentation system which was developed to perform data acquisition and integrate the control of different devices in an experimental study of electron transport dynamics in an avalanche mode resistive plate chamber detector in the Radiation Technology Center (CTR) at IPEN/CNEN-SP. System control and data acquisition was performed by a computer program called RPCLabOperator written in MatLab environment running on a LeCroy WavePro 7000 digital oscilloscope. (author)

  14. Solid-State NMR on bacterial cells: selective cell wall signal enhancement and resolution improvement using dynamic nuclear polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Hiroki; Bardet, Michel; De Paepe, Gael; Hediger, Sabine; Ayala, Isabel; Simorre, Jean-Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) enhanced solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has recently emerged as a powerful technique for the study of material surfaces. In this study, we demonstrate its potential to investigate cell surface in intact cells. Using Bacillus subtilis bacterial cells as an example, it is shown that the polarizing agent 1-(TEMPO-4-oxy)-3-(TEMPO-4-amino)propan-2-ol (TOTAPOL) has a strong binding affinity to cell wall polymers (peptidoglycan). This particular interaction is thoroughly investigated with a systematic study on extracted cell wall materials, disrupted cells, and entire cells, which proved that TOTAPOL is mainly accumulating in the cell wall. This property is used on one hand to selectively enhance or suppress cell wall signals by controlling radical concentrations and on the other hand to improve spectral resolution by means of a difference spectrum. Comparing DNP-enhanced and conventional solid-state NMR, an absolute sensitivity ratio of 24 was obtained on the entire cell sample. This important increase in sensitivity together with the possibility of enhancing specifically cell wall signals and improving resolution really opens new avenues for the use of DNP-enhanced solid-state NMR as an on-cell investigation tool. (authors)

  15. Solid-state NMR on bacterial cells: selective cell wall signal enhancement and resolution improvement using dynamic nuclear polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hiroki; Ayala, Isabel; Bardet, Michel; De Paëpe, Gaël; Simorre, Jean-Pierre; Hediger, Sabine

    2013-04-03

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) enhanced solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has recently emerged as a powerful technique for the study of material surfaces. In this study, we demonstrate its potential to investigate cell surface in intact cells. Using Bacillus subtilis bacterial cells as an example, it is shown that the polarizing agent 1-(TEMPO-4-oxy)-3-(TEMPO-4-amino)propan-2-ol (TOTAPOL) has a strong binding affinity to cell wall polymers (peptidoglycan). This particular interaction is thoroughly investigated with a systematic study on extracted cell wall materials, disrupted cells, and entire cells, which proved that TOTAPOL is mainly accumulating in the cell wall. This property is used on one hand to selectively enhance or suppress cell wall signals by controlling radical concentrations and on the other hand to improve spectral resolution by means of a difference spectrum. Comparing DNP-enhanced and conventional solid-state NMR, an absolute sensitivity ratio of 24 was obtained on the entire cell sample. This important increase in sensitivity together with the possibility of enhancing specifically cell wall signals and improving resolution really opens new avenues for the use of DNP-enhanced solid-state NMR as an on-cell investigation tool.

  16. Test chamber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leferink, Frank Bernardus Johannes

    2009-01-01

    A test chamber for measuring electromagnetic radiation emitted by an apparatus to be tested or for exposing an apparatus to be tested to an electromagnetic radiation field. The test chamber includes a reverberation chamber made of a conductive tent fabric. To create a statistically uniform field in

  17. Fabrication process of ionization chamber multidetector and multidetector got by this process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tirelli, M.; Lecolant, R.; Hecquet, R.

    1986-01-01

    The multidetector ionization chamber walls are fixed one related to the others and carried together with a tool above a resin bath to polymerize. After resin hardening, the detector includes resin basis. To contain the resin bath, the realization of a mould cut in a massive resin block are been provided for. This allows for its manutention all along the process without any deterioration risk [fr

  18. Direct Measurements of Gas/Particle Partitioning and Mass Accommodation Coefficients in Environmental Chambers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krechmer, Jordan E; Day, Douglas A; Ziemann, Paul J; Jimenez, Jose L

    2017-10-17

    Secondary organic aerosols (SOA) are a major contributor to fine particulate mass and wield substantial influences on the Earth's climate and human health. Despite extensive research in recent years, many of the fundamental processes of SOA formation and evolution remain poorly understood. Most atmospheric aerosol models use gas/particle equilibrium partitioning theory as a default treatment of gas-aerosol transfer, despite questions about potentially large kinetic effects. We have conducted fundamental SOA formation experiments in a Teflon environmental chamber using a novel method. A simple chemical system produces a very fast burst of low-volatility gas-phase products, which are competitively taken up by liquid organic seed particles and Teflon chamber walls. Clear changes in the species time evolution with differing amounts of seed allow us to quantify the particle uptake processes. We reproduce gas- and aerosol-phase observations using a kinetic box model, from which we quantify the aerosol mass accommodation coefficient (α) as 0.7 on average, with values near unity especially for low volatility species. α appears to decrease as volatility increases. α has historically been a very difficult parameter to measure with reported values varying over 3 orders of magnitude. We use the experimentally constrained model to evaluate the correction factor (Φ) needed for chamber SOA mass yields due to losses of vapors to walls as a function of species volatility and particle condensational sink. Φ ranges from 1-4.

  19. Ion chamber repairs in Bruce A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millard, J.; Edwards, T.; Kerker, J.; Pletch, R.; Edwards, T.

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses identification and successful remediation of leakage of shield tank water on vertical and horizontal Ion Chambers in Bruce A. In doing so, it discusses real events moving from the initial investigation to understand the problem, through looking at options for solutions, and moving to site work and actual resolution.. In multiunit 900 MW class CANDU® reactors, the calandria vessel is suspended within a larger shield tank. Due to temperature changes or changes in moderator fluid levels in the calandria, the calandria can move relative to the shield tank and its reactivity deck. Thimbles which contain the reactivity sensors and controls connect the two vessels and allow the reactivity drives and controls connections to be placed on the deck structure on the top of the reactor assembly for RRS and SDS1 and horizontally for SDS2. These thimbles have expansion joints with metal bellows where they meet the deck structure or shield tank walls. The deck structure lies on a vault containment boundary. The horizontal ion chambers are not in the containment boundary as they connect the outside of the calandria and shield tank around mid plane in the reactor vault, but due to geometry difference provides a more challenging work environment. Bruce had a beetle alarm (1-63851-MIA2-ME30 in alarm state (vertical IC housing)) at the start of April 2012 on Unit 1 channel F vertical Ion chamber expansion joint at the deck connection. This occurred after the moderator levels had been raised after the several years long refurbishment outage and the expansion joint had a significant travel. The investigation showed shield tank water in the collection chamber at the beetle. In addition, Channel J of the horizontal ion chamber had a seized instrument, which on removal was found to relate to oxide build up as a result of minor water leakage into the site. Repairs in both cases were performed as part of the long Bruce 1 & 2 refurbishment outage to completely stop the

  20. Dynamics of a Dispersion-Managed Passively Mode-Locked Er-Doped Fiber Laser Using Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norihiko Nishizawa

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the dynamics of a dispersion-managed, passively mode-locked, ultrashort-pulse, Er-doped fiber laser using a single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT device. A numerical model was constructed for analysis of the SWNT fiber laser. The initial process of passive mode-locking, the characteristics of the output pulse, and the dynamics inside the cavity were investigated numerically for soliton, dissipative-soliton, and stretched-pulse mode-locking conditions. The dependencies on the total dispersion and recovery time of the SWNTs were also examined. Numerical results showed similar behavior to experimental results.

  1. Characteristics of compressed natural gas jet and jet-wall impingement using the Schlieren imaging technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ismael, M A; Heikal, M R; Baharom, M B

    2013-01-01

    An experimental study was performed to investigate the compressed natural gas jet characteristics and jet-wall impingement using the Schlieren imaging technique and image processing. An injector driver was used to drive the natural gas injector and synchronized with camera triggering. A constant-volume optical chamber was designed to facilitate maximum optical access for the study of the jet macroscopic characteristics and jet-wall impingement at different injection pressures and injectors-wall distances. Measurement of the jet tip penetration and cone angle at different conditions are presented in this paper together with temporal presentation of the jet radial travel along the wall.

  2. Emission of ammonia from indoor concrete wall and assessment of human exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Z; Dong, Y; Wang, Z; Zhu, T

    2006-04-01

    Addition of urea-based antifreeze admixtures during cement mixing can make it possible to produce concrete cement in construction of buildings in cold weather; this, however, has led to increasing indoor air pollution due to continuous transformation and emission from urea to gaseous ammonia in indoor concrete wall. It is believed that ammonia is harmful to human body and exposure to ammonia can cause some serious symptoms such as headaches, burns, and even permanent damage to the eyes and lungs. In order to understand the emission of ammonia from indoor concrete wall in civil building and assess the health risk of people living in these buildings, the experimental pieces of concrete wall were first prepared by concreting cement and urea-based antifreeze admixtures to simulate the indoor wall in civil building in this work. Then environmental chamber was adopted for studying the effect of temperature, relative humility and air exchange rate on emission of ammonia from experimental pieces of concrete wall. Also the field experiment was made at selected rooms in given civil buildings. Exposure and potential dose of adult and children exposed to indoor/outdoor ammonia in summer and in winter are calculated and evaluated by using Scenario Evaluation Approach. The results indicated that high air exchange rate leads to decreased ammonia concentration, and elevation of temperature causes increasing ammonia concentration and volatilizing rate in chamber. The complete emission of ammonia from the wall containing urea-based antifreeze admixtures needs more than 10 years in general. Ventilating or improving air exchange can play a significant role in reducing ammonia concentration in actual rooms in field experiments. Urea-based antifreeze admixtures in concrete wall can give rise to high exposure and potential dose, especially in summer. Generally, adults have a high potential dose than children, while children have personal average dose rate beyond adults in the same

  3. Dynamic Breast Magnetic Resonance Imaging without Complications in a Patient with Dual-Chamber Demand Pacemaker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sardanelli, F.; Lupo, P.; Esseridou, A.; Fausto, A.; Quarenghi, M.

    2006-01-01

    Mammography and ultrasound indicated a cancer of the right breast in a 77-year-old woman with a dual-chamber demand pacemaker. The patient was not pacemaker-dependent. She underwent breast 1.5T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (dynamic gradient echo sequence with Gd-DOTA 0.1 mmol/kg). Before the patient entered the MR room, the configuration of the device was changed (the response to magnet was switched from asynchronous to off and the rate-responsive algorithm was disabled). No relevant modifications of heart rhythm or rate were observed during the MR examination. No symptom was reported. Immediately after the examination, the pacemaker interrogation showed neither program changes nor alert warnings. MRI detected a bifocal cancer in the right breast which allowed tailored breast-conserving treatment to be initiated. Histopathology confirmed a bifocal invasive ductal carcinoma

  4. Dynamic Breast Magnetic Resonance Imaging without Complications in a Patient with Dual-Chamber Demand Pacemaker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sardanelli, F.; Lupo, P.; Esseridou, A.; Fausto, A.; Quarenghi, M. [Policlinico San Donato, San Donato Milanese, Milan (Italy). Depts. of Radiology, Arrhythmia and Electrophysiology Center

    2006-02-15

    Mammography and ultrasound indicated a cancer of the right breast in a 77-year-old woman with a dual-chamber demand pacemaker. The patient was not pacemaker-dependent. She underwent breast 1.5T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (dynamic gradient echo sequence with Gd-DOTA 0.1 mmol/kg). Before the patient entered the MR room, the configuration of the device was changed (the response to magnet was switched from asynchronous to off and the rate-responsive algorithm was disabled). No relevant modifications of heart rhythm or rate were observed during the MR examination. No symptom was reported. Immediately after the examination, the pacemaker interrogation showed neither program changes nor alert warnings. MRI detected a bifocal cancer in the right breast which allowed tailored breast-conserving treatment to be initiated. Histopathology confirmed a bifocal invasive ductal carcinoma.

  5. Observations on resistive wall modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerwin, R.A.; Finn, J.M.

    1996-01-01

    Several results on resistive wall modes and their application to tokamaks are presented. First, it is observed that in the presence of collisional parallel dynamics there is an exact cancellation to lowest order of the dissipative and sound wave effects for an ideal Ohm's law. This is easily traced to the fact that the parallel dynamics occurs along the perturbed magnetic field lines for such electromagnetic modes. Such a cancellation does not occur in the resistive layer of a tearing-like mode. The relevance to models for resistive wall modes using an electrostatic Hammett-Perkins type operator to model Landau damping will be discussed. Second, we observe that with an ideal Ohm's law, resistive wall modes can be destabilized by rotation in that part of parameter space in which the ideal MHD modes are stable with the wall at infinity. This effect can easily be explained by interpreting the resistive wall instability in terms of mode coupling between the backward stable MHD mode and a stable mode locked into the wall. Such an effect can occur for very small rotation for tearing-resistive wall modes in which inertia dominates viscosity in the layer, but the mode is stabilized by further rotation. For modes for which viscosity dominates in the layer, rotation is purely stabilizing. For both tearing models, a somewhat higher rotation frequency gives stability essentially whenever the tearing mode is stable with a perfectly conducting wall. These tearing/resistive wall results axe also simply explained in terms of mode coupling. It has been shown that resonant external ideal modes can be stabilized in the presence of resistive wall and resistive plasma with rotation of order the nominal tearing mode growth rate. We show that these modes behave as resistive wall tearing modes in the sense above. This strengthens the suggestion that rotational stabilization of the external kink with a resistive wall is due to the presence of resistive layers, even for ideal modes

  6. Simulating secondary organic aerosol in a regional air quality model using the statistical oxidation model – Part 2: Assessing the influence of vapor wall losses

    OpenAIRE

    Cappa, Christopher D.; Jathar, Shantanu H.; Kleeman, Michael J.; Docherty, Kenneth S.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Seinfeld, John H.; Wexler, Anthony S.

    2016-01-01

    The influence of losses of organic vapors to chamber walls during secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation experiments has recently been established. Here, the influence of such losses on simulated ambient SOA concentrations and properties is assessed in the UCD/CIT regional air quality model using the statistical oxidation model (SOM) for SOA. The SOM was fit to laboratory chamber data both with and without accounting for vapor wall losses following the approa...

  7. Detailed investigation on the effect of wall spring stiffness on velocity profile in molecular dynamics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namvar, S; Karimian, S M H

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, motion of 576 monatomic argon molecules is studied in a channel with two 2-layered wall molecules. The effect of wall spring stiffness (K) on maximum value of velocity profile is investigated in the channel. It was observed that for K −2 , there is a decrease in the maximum value of velocity profile with an increase in K. This observation has been already reported by Sofos et al. To investigate a wider range of spring stiffness, in this paper the value of K was increased to more than 500εσ −2 . In this range of wall spring stiffness the behavior of maximum value of velocity profile changed; it increased with an increase in K. In a separate simulation the external force applied to the molecules was also increased and the same non-monotonic behavior of maximum value of velocity was observed. To clarify the reason of this behavior, the concepts of original and effective wall are introduced and through several test it is inferred that the mentioned concepts are not successful to demonstrate the reason of such behavior. It is suggested to obtain non-dimensional parameters governing the simulation in order to investigate the effect of every involved parameter on such a behavior. It is finally concluded that while wall spring stiffness affects the maximum velocity magnitude within the flow, the interaction of the two has not been clearly shown yet. The behavior of the maximum velocity is non-monotonic with the change of K. This is why no specific criterion has been reported for suitable value of wall spring stiffness in molecular dynamics simulation.

  8. Study on the L–H transition power threshold with RF heating and lithium-wall coating on EAST

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Leifeng; Xu, G.S.; Nielsen, Anders Henry

    2016-01-01

    The power threshold for low (L) to high (H) confinement mode transition achieved by radio-frequency (RF) heating and lithium-wall coating is investigated experimentally on EAST for two sets of walls: an all carbon wall (C) and molybdenum chamber and a carbon divertor (Mo/C). For both sets of walls...... Ploss increases with neutral density near the lower X-point in EAST with the Mo/C wall, consistent with previous results in the C wall (Xu et al 2011 Nucl. Fusion 51 072001). These findings suggest that the edge neutral density, the ion ∇B drift as well as the divertor pumping capability play important...

  9. Neutron-transparent first wall for module testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuller, G.M.; Cramer, B.A.; Haines, J.R.; Kirchner, J.; Engholm, B.A.; Seki, M.

    1983-01-01

    Major design goals for FED-R are the achievement of: (1) a high level of neutron exposure of the test modules and (2) a capability for rapid changeout of test modules. A major factor in rapid changeout is perceived to be the location of the vacuum boundary. In FED-R this boundary was set at the first wall so that module changeout did not require the plasma chamber to be brought up to atmosphere. Efforts to realize these goals in the design resulted in a neutronically thin outboard wall for the vacuum vessel constructed of 316 stainless steel (SS) with helium as a coolant. A normalized 14-MeV neutron transmission of 0.82 is expected, with an inlet pressure of 2 MPa and a pumping power requirement of 8.7 MW. Other options considered in the study were aluminum as a wall material and water and sodium potassium (NaK) as coolants

  10. Electret ionization chamber: a new method for detection and dosimetry of thermal neutrons; Camara de ionizacao de eletretos: um novo metodo para deteccao e dosimetria de neutrons termicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghilardi, A J.P.

    1988-12-31

    An electret ionization chamber with boron coated walls is presented as a new method for detecting thermal neutrons. The efficiency of electret ionization chambers with different wall materials for the external electrode was inferred from the results. Detection of slow neutrons with discrimination against the detection of {gamma}-rays and energetic neutrons was shown to depend on the selection of these materials. The charge stability over a long period of time and the charge decay owing to natural radiation were also studied. Numerical analysis was developed by the use of a micro-computer PC-XT. Both the experimental and numerical results show that the sensitivity of the electret ionization chamber for detection of thermal neutrons is comparable with that of the BF{sub 3} ionization chamber and that new technologies for deposition of the boron layer will produce higher efficiency detectors. (author). 102 refs, 32 fig, 10 tabs.

  11. An experimental and theoretical investigation of the liquefaction dynamics of a phase change material in a normal gravity environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, R. L.; Stermole, F. J.; Golden, J. O.

    1972-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical investigations were undertaken to determine the role of gravity-induced free convection upon the liquefaction dynamics of a cylindrical paraffin slab under normal gravity conditions. The experimental equipment consisted of a test cell, a fluid-loop heating system, and a multipoint recorder. The test chamber was annular in shape with an effective radius of 1.585 cm and a length of 5.08 cm. The heating chamber was a 1.906 cm diameter tube going through the center of the test chamber, and connected to the fluid loop heating system. All experimental runs were made with the longitudinal axis of the test cell in the vertical direction to insure that convection was not a function of the angular axis of the cell. Ten melting runs were made at various hot wall temperatures. Also, two pure conduction solidification runs were made to determine an experimental latent heat of fusion.

  12. Study on the Temperature Separation Phenomenon in a Vortex Chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, A Ran; Guang, Zhang; Kim, Heuy Dong [Andong National University, Andong (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    A vortex chamber is a simple device that separates compressed gas into a high-temperature stream and a low-temperature stream. It is increasing in popularity as a next-generation heat exchanger, but the flow physics associated with it is not yet well understood. In the present study, both experimental and numerical analyses were performed to investigate the temperature separation phenomenon inside the vortex chamber. Static pressures and temperatures were measured using high-sensitivity pressure transducers and thermocouples, respectively. Computational fluid dynamics was applied to simulate 3D unsteady compressible flows. The simulation results showed that the temperature separation is strongly dependent on the diameter of the vortex chamber and the supply pressure at the inlet ports, where the latter is closely related to the viscous work. The previous concept of a pressure gradient wave may not be a reasoning for temperature separation phenomenon inside the vortex chamber.

  13. Simulation studies on a prototype ionization chamber for measurement of personal dose equivalent, Hp(10)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardoso, J.; Oliveira, C.; Carvalho, A.F.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: The Metrological Laboratory of lonizing Radiation and Radioactivity (LMRIR) of Nuclear and Technological Institute (ITN) has designed and constructed a prototype ionization chamber for direct measurement of the personal dose equivalent, H p (10), similar to the developed by the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) and now commercialized by PTW. Tests already performed had shown that the behaviour of this chamber is very close to the PTB chamber, namely the energy dependence for the x-ray radiation qualities of the ISO 4037-1 narrow series N-30, N-40, N-60, N-80, N-100 and N-120 and also for gamma radiation of 137 Cs and 60 Co. However, the results obtained also show a high dependence on the energy for some incident radiation angles and a low magnitude of the electrical response of the ionization chamber. In order to try to optimize the performance of the chamber, namely to decrease the energy dependence and to improve the magnitude of the electrical response of the ionization chamber, the LMRIR initiated numerical simulation of this ionization chamber using a Monte-Carlo method for simulation of radiation transport using, in a first step, the MCNPX code. So, simulation studies of some physical parameters are been performed in order to optimize the response of the ionization chamber, namely the diameter of the central electrode of the ionization chamber, the thickness of the front wall of the ionization chamber, among others. Preliminary results show that probably the actual geometry of the ionization chamber is not yet the optimized configuration. The simulation study will carry on in order to find the optimum geometry. (author)

  14. Tasks related to increase of RA reactor exploitation and experimental potential, 01. Designing the protection chamber in the RA reactor hall for handling the radioactive experimental equipment (I-II) Part II, Vol. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavicevic, M.

    1963-07-01

    This second volume of the project for construction of the protection chamber in the RA reactor hall for handling the radioactive devices includes the technical description of the chamber, calculation of the shielding wall thickness, bottom lead plate, horizontal stability of the chamber, cost estimation, and the engineering drawings

  15. Thermal and radiation loads on the first wall and divertor plates in the KTM tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azizov, Eh.A.; Buzhinskij, O.I.; Gladush, G.G.; Darmagraj, V.V.; Priyampol'skij, I.R.; Dvorkin, N.Ya.; Lejkin, I.N.; Tazhibaeva, I.L.; Shestakov, V.P.

    2001-01-01

    The constructing of the KTM tokamak is intended for wide scale studies of behavior both inner-chamber element materials and structures (first wall, limiters, divertor, hf-antennas, etc.) under conditions approaching to the ITER-FEAT and a future thermonuclear reactors. The KTM tokamak is designed for maintain of interaction conditions of plasma-wall, plasma flows and divertor field, stimulating conditions of ITER-FEAT; and for examination of a future tokamaks' materials. In the work the thermal loads on the first wall, divertor plates are presented

  16. Cold vacuum chamber for diagnostics: Instrumentation and first results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Gerstl

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available For a proper design of the cryogenic layout of superconducting insertion devices it is necessary to take into account the heat load from the beam to the cold beam tube. In order to measure and possibly understand the beam heat load to a cold bore, a cold vacuum chamber for diagnostics (COLDDIAG has been built. COLDDIAG is designed in a flexible way, to allow its installation in different light sources. In order to study the beam heat load and the influence of the cryosorbed gas layer, the instrumentation comprises temperature sensors, pressure gauges, and mass spectrometers as well as retarding field analyzers with which it is possible to measure the beam heat load, total pressure, and gas content as well as the flux of particles hitting the chamber walls. In this paper we describe the experimental equipment, the installation of COLDDIAG in the Diamond Light Source and selected examples of the measurements performed to show the capabilities of this unique instrument.

  17. Cold vacuum chamber for diagnostics: Instrumentation and first results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerstl, S.; Voutta, R.; Casalbuoni, S.; Grau, A. W.; Holubek, T.; de Jauregui, D. Saez; Bartolini, R.; Cox, M. P.; Longhi, E. C.; Rehm, G.; Schouten, J. C.; Walker, R. P.; Sikler, G.; Migliorati, M.; Spataro, B.

    2014-10-01

    For a proper design of the cryogenic layout of superconducting insertion devices it is necessary to take into account the heat load from the beam to the cold beam tube. In order to measure and possibly understand the beam heat load to a cold bore, a cold vacuum chamber for diagnostics (COLDDIAG) has been built. COLDDIAG is designed in a flexible way, to allow its installation in different light sources. In order to study the beam heat load and the influence of the cryosorbed gas layer, the instrumentation comprises temperature sensors, pressure gauges, and mass spectrometers as well as retarding field analyzers with which it is possible to measure the beam heat load, total pressure, and gas content as well as the flux of particles hitting the chamber walls. In this paper we describe the experimental equipment, the installation of COLDDIAG in the Diamond Light Source and selected examples of the measurements performed to show the capabilities of this unique instrument.

  18. Wall Shear Stress Estimation of Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Febina

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available An attempt has been made to evaluate the effects of wall shear stress (WSS on thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD. Aneurysm is an excessive localized swelling of the arterial wall due to many physiological factors and it may rupture causing shock or sudden death. The existing imaging modalities such as MRI and CT assist in the visualization of anomalies in internal organs. However, the expected dynamic behaviour of arterial bulge under stressed condition can only be effectively evaluated through mathematical modelling. In this work, a 3D aneurysm model is reconstructed from the CT scan slices and eventually the model is imported to Star CCM+ (Siemens, USA for intensive CFD analysis. The domain is discretized using polyhedral mesh with prism layers to capture the weakening boundary more accurately. When there is flow reversal in TAA as seen in the velocity vector plot, there is a chance of cell damage causing clots. This is because of the shear created in the system due to the flow pattern. It is observed from the proposed mathematical modelling that the deteriorating WSS is an indicator for possible rupture and its value oscillates over a cardiac cycle as well as over different stress conditions. In this model, the vortex formation pattern and flow reversals are also captured. The non-Newtonian model, including a pulsatile flow instead of a steady average flow, does not overpredict the WSS (15.29 Pa compared to 16 Pa for the Newtonian model. Although in a cycle the flow behaviour is laminar-turbulent-laminar (LTL, utilizing the non-Newtonian model along with LTL model also overpredicted the WSS with a value of 20.1 Pa. The numerical study presented here provides good insight of TAA using a systematic approach to numerical modelling and analysis.

  19. Dynamic wedge, electron energy and beam profile Q.A. using an ionization chamber linear array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenny, M.B.; Todd, S.P.

    1996-01-01

    Since the introduction of multi-modal linacs the quality assurance workload of a Physical Sciences department has increased dramatically. The advent of dynamic wedges has further complicated matters because of the need to invent accurate methods to perform Q.A. in a reasonable time. We have been using an ionization chamber linear array, the Thebes 7000 TM by Victoreen, Inc., for some years to measure X-ray and electron beam profiles. Two years ago we developed software to perform Q.A. on our dynamic wedges using the array and more recently included a routine to check electron beam energies using the method described by Rosenow, U.F. et al., Med. Phys. 18(1) 19-25. The integrated beam and profile management system has enabled us to maintain a comprehensive quality assurance programme on all our linaccs. Both our efficiency and accuracy have increased to the point where we are able to keep up with the greater number of tests required without an increase in staff or hours spent in quality assurance. In changing the processor from the Z80 of the Thebes console to the 486 of the PC we have also noticed a marked increase in the calibration stability of the array. (author)

  20. Dissecting the regulation of pollen tube growth by modelling the interplay of hydrodynamics, cell wall and ion dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junli eLiu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Hydrodynamics, cell wall and ion dynamics are all important properties that regulate pollen tube growth. Currently, the two main pollen tube growth models, the cell wall model and the hydrodynamic model do not appear to be reconcilable. Here we develop an integrative model for pollen tube growth and show that our model reproduces key experimental observations: 1 that the hypertonic condition leads to a much longer oscillatory period and that the hypotonic condition halves the oscillatory period; 2 that oscillations in turgor are experimentally undetectable; 3 that increasing the extracellular calcium concentration or decreasing the pH decreases the growth oscillatory amplitude; 4 that knockout of Raba4d, a member of the Rab family of small GTPase proteins, decreases pollen tube length after germination for 24 hours. Using the model generated here, we reveal that 1 when cell wall extensibility is large, pollen tube may sustain growth at different volume changes and maintain relatively stable turgor; 2 turgor increases if cell wall extensibility decreases; 3 increasing turgor due to decrease in osmolarity in the media, although very small, increases volume change . However, increasing turgor due to decrease in cell wall extensibility decreases volume change. In this way regulation of pollen tube growth by turgor is context dependent. By changing the osmolarity in the media, the main regulatory points are extracellular osmolarity for water flow and turgor for the volume encompassed by the cell wall. However, if the viscosity of cell wall changes, the main regulatory points are turgor for water flow and wall extensibility for the volume encompassed by the cell wall. The novel methodology developed here reveals the underlying context-dependent regulatory principle of pollen tube growth.

  1. Study of the replacement correction factors for ionization chamber dosimetry by Monte Carlo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lilie

    In ionization chamber radiation dosimetry, the introduction of the ion chamber into medium will unavoidably distort the radiation field near the chamber because the chamber cavity material (air) is different from the medium. A replacement correction factor, Prepl was introduced in order to correct the chamber readings to give an accurate radiation dose in the medium without the presence of the chamber. Generally it is very hard to measure the values of Prepl since they are intertwined with the chamber wall effect. In addition, the P repl values always come together with the stopping-power ratio of the two media involved. This makes the problem of determining the P repl values even more complicated. Monte Carlo simulation is an ideal method to investigate the replacement correction factors. In this study, four different methods of calculating the values of Prepl by Monte Carlo simulation are discussed. Two of the methods are designated as 'direct' methods in the sense that the evaluation of the stopping-power ratio is not necessary. The systematic uncertainties of the two direct methods are estimated to be about 0.1-0.2% which comes from the ambiguous definition of the energy cutoff Delta used in the Spencer-Attix cavity theory. The two direct methods are used to calculate the values of P repl for both plane-parallel chambers and cylindrical thimble chambers in either electron beams or photon beams. The calculation results are compared to measurements. For electron beams, good agreements are obtained. For thimble chambers in photon beams, significant discrepancies are observed between calculations and measurements. The experiments are thus investigated and the procedures are simulated by the Monte Carlo method. It is found that the interpretation of the measured data as the replacement correction factors in dosimetry protocols are not correct. In applying the calculation to the BIPM graphite chamber in a 60Co beam, the calculated values of P repl differ from those

  2. The Mobile Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharfstein, Gregory; Cox, Russell

    2012-01-01

    A document discusses a simulation chamber that represents a shift from the thermal-vacuum chamber stereotype. This innovation, currently in development, combines the capabilities of space simulation chambers, the user-friendliness of modern-day electronics, and the modularity of plug-and-play computing. The Mobile Chamber is a customized test chamber that can be deployed with great ease, and is capable of bringing payloads at temperatures down to 20 K, in high vacuum, and with the desired metrology instruments integrated to the systems control. Flexure plans to lease Mobile Chambers, making them affordable for smaller budgets and available to a larger customer base. A key feature of this design will be an Apple iPad-like user interface that allows someone with minimal training to control the environment inside the chamber, and to simulate the required extreme environments. The feedback of thermal, pressure, and other measurements is delivered in a 3D CAD model of the chamber's payload and support hardware. This GUI will provide the user with a better understanding of the payload than any existing thermal-vacuum system.

  3. Simulation of the heat transfer around the ATLAS muon chambers

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    This 2D simulation recently carried out on the ATLAS muon chambers by a small team of CERN engineers specialises in the numerical computation of fluid dynamics, in other words the flow of fluids and heat.

  4. Design, construction, prototype tests and performance of a vertex chamber for the MAC detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ash, W.W.; Band, H.R.; Bloom, E.D.; Bosman, M.; Camporesi, T.; Chadwick, G.B.; Delfino, M.C.; De Sangro, R.; Ford, W.T.; Gettner, M.W.; Goderre, G.P.; Godfrey, G.L.; Groom, D.E.; Hurst, R.B.; Johnson, J.R.; Lau, K.H.; Lavine, T.L.; Leedy, R.E.; Lippi, I.; Maruyama, T.; Messner, R.L.; Moromisato, J.H.; Moss, L.J.; Muller, F.; Nelson, H.N.; Peruzzi, I.; Piccolo, M.; Prepost, R.; Pyrlik, J.; Qi, N.; Read, A.L. Jr.; Ritson, D.M.; Rosenberg, L.J.; Shambroom, W.D.; Sleeman, J.C.; Smith, J.G.; Venuti, J.P.; Verdini, P.G.; Goeler, E. von; Wald, H.B.; Weinstein, R.; Wiser, D.E.; Zdarko, R.W.; Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Frascati; Houston Univ., TX; Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA; Stanford Univ., CA; Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, CA; Utah Univ., Salt Lake City; Wisconsin Univ., Madison

    1987-01-01

    The design considerations, construction techniques, prototype tests and performance characteristics of a pressurized drift chamber used in the MAC detector at PEP are described. The chamber consists of 324 aluminized mylar tubes of 6.9 mm diameter with wall thickness of 100 μm. With appropriate shielding it operates successfully at 4.6 cm from the beam line. It was simple to construct and was configured to permit any malfunctioning tubes to be remotely disconnected without affecting operation. The chamber operated without problems for two years in the PEP environmental with a gas mixture of 49.5% argon, 49.5% CO 2 , 1% CH 4 , at 4 atm absolute pressure. The mean spatial resolution averaged over all tubes was 45 μm. The time to distance relation for this gas mixture, along with the geometric positioning of individual wires relative to the central tracking chamber, was obtained with data from Bhabha scattering events. We also describe resolution studies performed with a prototype chamber in a SLAC test beam. A wide range of gases, gas pressures, and electronic parameters were explored. These studies proved that resolutions in the 10-50 μm range were possible. Our experience demonstrates that chambers of this type provide high precision tracking and are particularly suited for operation in regions with difficult physical access and/or high ambient radiation levels. (orig.)

  5. Design, construction, prototype tests and performance of a vertex chamber for the MAC detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ash, W. W.; Band, H. R.; Bloom, E. D.; Bosman, M.; Camporesi, T.; Chadwick, G. B.; Delfino, M. C.; De Sangro, R.; Ford, W. T.; Gettner, M. W.; Goderre, G. P.; Godfrey, G. L.; Groom, D. E.; Hurst, R. B.; Johnson, J. R.; Lau, K. H.; Lavine, T. L.; Leedy, R. E.; Lippi, I.; Maruyama, T.; Messner, R. L.; Moromisato, J. H.; Moss, L. J.; Muller, F.; Nelson, H. N.; Peruzzi, I.; Piccolo, M.; Prepost, R.; Pyrlik, J.; Qi, N.; Read, A. L.; Ritson, D. M.; Rosenberg, L. J.; Shambroom, W. D.; Sleeman, J. C.; Smith, J. G.; Venuti, J. P.; Verdini, P. G.; Von Goeler, E.; Wald, H. B.; Weinstein, R.; Wiser, D. E.; Zdarko, R. W.

    1987-11-01

    The design considerations, construction techniques, prototype tests and performance characteristics of a pressurized drift chamber used in the MAC detector at PEP are described. The chamber consists of 324 aluminized mylar tubes of 6.9 mm diameter with wall thickness of 100 μm. With appropriate shielding it operates successfully at 4.6 cm from the beam line. It was simple to construct and was configured to permit any malfunctioning tubes to be remotely disconnected without affecting operation. The chamber operated without problems for two years in the PEP environment with a gas mixture of 49.5% argon, 49.5% CO 2, 1% CH 4, at 4 atm absolute pressure. The mean spatial resolution averaged over all tubes was 45 μm. The time to distance relation for this gas mixture, along with the geometric positioning of individual wires relative to the central tracking chamber, was obtained with data from Bhabha scattering events. We also describe resolution studies performed with a prototype chamber in a SLAC test beam. A wide range of gases, gas pressures, and electronic parameters were explored. These studies proved that resolutions in the 10-50 μm range were possible. Our experience demonstrates that chambers of this type provide high precision tracking and are particularly suited for operation in regions with difficult physical access and/or high ambient radiation levels.

  6. Contact forces between a particle and a wet wall at both quasi-static and dynamic state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Huang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The contact regime of particle-wall is investigated by the atomic force microscope (AFM and theoretical models. First, AFM is used to measure the cohesive force between a micron-sized grain and a glass plate at quasi-static state under various humidity. It is found out that the cohesive force starts to grow slowly and suddenly increase rapidly beyond a critical Relative Humidity (RH. Second, mathematical models of contacting forces are presented to depict the dynamic process that a particle impacts on a wet wall. Then the energy loss of a falling grain is calculated in comparison with the models and the experimental data from the previous references. The simulation results show that the force models presented here are adaptive for both low and high viscosity fluid films with different thickness.

  7. Breaking of chiral symmetry in vortex domain wall propagation in ferromagnetic nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otálora, J.A.; López-López, J.A.; Landeros, P.; Vargas, P.; Núñez, A.S.

    2013-01-01

    This paper is focused to the field-induced dynamics of vortex-like domain walls (VDWs) in magnetic nanotubes (MNTs). Based on a dissipative Lagrangian formalism that fully includes damping as well as exchange and dipole–dipole coupling, it is shown that VDW motion is very sensitive to the chirality, giving rise to a chiral asymmetry in the vortex wall propagation. As a consequence, the dynamics of the wall is fundamentally different to that of nanostripes and solid nanowires. Besides the well-known Walker breakdown that stands at the onset of the precessional wall motion, it is found an additional breakdown field (called here the chiral breakdown) that modifies the steady regime of VDWs. We also show outstanding VDWs dynamical properties at low applied fields, as low-field mobilities (∼10km/(sT)) and very short relaxation times (∼1ns), offering a reliable fast control of VDWs velocities (∼1000m/s at applied fields of 0.7 mT). - Highlights: • We model analytically the dynamics of vortex domain walls in magnetic nanotubes. • We fully include damping, exchange and dipole–dipole coupling. • The wall dynamics is fundamentally different to that of nanostripes. • We report and describe an extra dynamical instability, the Chiral Breakdown field. • We report outstanding dynamical properties at weak magnetic fields

  8. Breaking of chiral symmetry in vortex domain wall propagation in ferromagnetic nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otálora, J.A., E-mail: jorge.otalora@usm.cl [Departamento de Física, Universidad Técnica Federico Santa María, Avenida España 1680, Valparaíso (Chile); López-López, J.A.; Landeros, P.; Vargas, P. [Departamento de Física, Universidad Técnica Federico Santa María, Avenida España 1680, Valparaíso (Chile); Núñez, A.S. [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad de Chile, Blanco Encalada 2008, Santiago (Chile)

    2013-09-15

    This paper is focused to the field-induced dynamics of vortex-like domain walls (VDWs) in magnetic nanotubes (MNTs). Based on a dissipative Lagrangian formalism that fully includes damping as well as exchange and dipole–dipole coupling, it is shown that VDW motion is very sensitive to the chirality, giving rise to a chiral asymmetry in the vortex wall propagation. As a consequence, the dynamics of the wall is fundamentally different to that of nanostripes and solid nanowires. Besides the well-known Walker breakdown that stands at the onset of the precessional wall motion, it is found an additional breakdown field (called here the chiral breakdown) that modifies the steady regime of VDWs. We also show outstanding VDWs dynamical properties at low applied fields, as low-field mobilities (∼10km/(sT)) and very short relaxation times (∼1ns), offering a reliable fast control of VDWs velocities (∼1000m/s at applied fields of 0.7 mT). - Highlights: • We model analytically the dynamics of vortex domain walls in magnetic nanotubes. • We fully include damping, exchange and dipole–dipole coupling. • The wall dynamics is fundamentally different to that of nanostripes. • We report and describe an extra dynamical instability, the Chiral Breakdown field. • We report outstanding dynamical properties at weak magnetic fields.

  9. Non-financial Results of Performance Indicators of Trade and Industry Chambers in Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdana V. Aleksandrova

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with non-financial results review of Trade and Industry Chamber, the assessment of competitiveness in the Ukrainian market. To achieve the desired goal we should do the following: 1.\tIdentify categories of research 2.\tSystemize available statistics. 3.\tTo evaluate dynamics of main categories 4.\tConduct an assessment of non-financial indicators of Trade and Industry Chamber 5.\tIdentify the level of competitiveness of Trade and Industry Chamber of Ukraine on domestic market. Methods used by author to address these issues: index-linked, method of correlation analysis, method of expert assessment. As a result of the study, non-financial indicators of organization’s activities have been analyzed, the dynamics of membership base and the scope of delivered services have been identified as well as the level of organization’s competitiveness. The most promising services have been highlighted.

  10. Drift chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inagaki, Yosuke

    1977-01-01

    Drift chamber is becoming an important detector in high energy physics as a precision and fast position detector because of its high spatial resolution and count-rate. The basic principle is that it utilizes the drift at constant speed of electrons ionized along the tracks of charged particles towards the anode wire in the nearly uniform electric field. The method of measuring drift time includes the analog and digital ones. This report describes about the construction of and the application of electric field to the drift chamber, mathematical analysis on the electric field and equipotential curve, derivation of spatial resolution and the factor for its determination, and selection of gas to be used. The performance test of the chamber was carried out using a small test chamber, the collimated β source of Sr-90, and 500 MeV/C electron beam from the 1.3 GeV electron synchrotron in the Institute of Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo. Most chambers to date adopted one dimensional read-out, but it is very advantageous if the two dimensional read-out is feasible with one chamber when the resolution in that direction is low. The typical methods of delay line and charge division for two dimensional read-out are described. The development of digital read-out system is underway, which can process the signal of a large scale drift chamber at high speed. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  11. Multiple chamber ionization detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomon, E.E.

    1980-01-01

    A multi-chambered ionisation detector enables the amount of radiation entering each chamber from a single radioactive, eg β, source to be varied by altering the proportion of the source protruding into each chamber. Electrodes define chambers and an extended radioactive source is movable to alter the source length in each chamber. Alternatively, the source is fixed relative to outer electrodes but the central electrode may be adjusted by an attached support altering the chamber dimensions and hence the length of source in each. Also disclosed are a centrally mounted source tiltable towards one or other chamber and a central electrode tiltable to alter chamber dimensions. (U.K.)

  12. Model-based dynamic resistive wall mode identification and feedback control in the DIII-D tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In, Y.; Kim, J.S.; Edgell, D.H.; Strait, E.J.; Humphreys, D.A.; Walker, M.L.; Jackson, G.L.; Chu, M.S.; Johnson, R.; La Haye, R.J.; Okabayashi, M.; Garofalo, A.M.; Reimerdes, H.

    2006-01-01

    A new model-based dynamic resistive wall mode (RWM) identification and feedback control algorithm has been developed. While the overall RWM structure can be detected by a model-based matched filter in a similar manner to a conventional sensor-based scheme, it is significantly influenced by edge-localized-modes (ELMs). A recent study suggested that such ELM noise might cause the RWM control system to respond in an undesirable way. Thus, an advanced algorithm to discriminate ELMs from RWM has been incorporated into this model-based control scheme, dynamic Kalman filter. Specifically, the DIII-D [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] resistive vessel wall was modeled in two ways: picture frame model or eigenmode treatment. Based on the picture frame model, the first real-time, closed-loop test results of the Kalman filter algorithms during DIII-D experimental operation are presented. The Kalman filtering scheme was experimentally confirmed to be effective in discriminating ELMs from RWM. As a result, the actuator coils (I-coils) were rarely excited during ELMs, while retaining the sensitivity to RWM. However, finding an optimized set of operating parameters for the control algorithm requires further analysis and design. Meanwhile, a more advanced Kalman filter based on a more accurate eigenmode model has been developed. According to this eigenmode approach, significant improvement in terms of control performance has been predicted, while maintaining good ELM discrimination

  13. Office-like Test Chambers to Measure Cool Roof Energy Savings in Four Indian Climates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arumugam, Rathish [Saint Gobain Research India Pvt. Ltd. (India); B, Sasank [Saint Gobain Research India Pvt. Ltd. (India); T, Rajappa [Saint Gobain Research India Pvt. Ltd. (India); N, Vinay [Saint Gobain Research India Pvt. Ltd. (India); Garg, Vishal [International Inst. of Information Technology, Hyderabad (India); Reddy, Niranjan [International Inst. of Information Technology, Hyderabad (India); Levinson, Ronnen [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-08-21

    Selecting a high albedo (solar reflectance) waterproofing layer on the top of a roof helps lower the roof’s surface temperature and reduce the air conditioning energy consumption in the top floor of a building. The annual energy savings depend on factors including weather, internal loads, and building operation schedule. To demonstrate the energy saving potential of high albedo roofs, an apparatus consisting of two nearly identical test chambers (A and B) has been built in four Indian climates: Chennai (hot & humid), Bangalore (temperate), Jhagadia (Hot & dry) and Delhi (composite). Each chamber has well-insulated walls to mimic the core of an office building. Both chambers have the same construction, equipment, and operating schedule, differing only in roof surface. The reinforced cement concrete roof of Chamber A is surfaced with a low-albedo cement layer, while that of Chamber B is surfaced with a high-albedo water proof membrane (change in solar reflectance of 0.28). The experiment will be carried out for one year to explore seasonal variations in energy savings. Initial results in the month of July (post summer) shows that savings from high albedo roof ranges from 0.04 kWh/m2/day in temperate climates, to 0.08 kWh/m2/day in hot & dry climate.

  14. TH-AB-201-08: Ion Chamber Dose Measurements - Problems with the Temperature-Pressure Correction Factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourgouin, A [Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); McEwen, M [National Research Council, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the behavior of ionization chambers over a wide pressure range. Methods: Three cylindrical and two parallel-plate designs of ion chamber were investigated. The ion chambers were placed in vessel where the pressure was varied from atmospheric (101 kPa) down to 5 kPa. Measurements were made using 60Co and high-energy electron beams. The pressure was measured to better than 0.1% and multiple data sets were obtained for each chamber at both polarities to investigate pressure cycling and dependency on the sign of the charge collected. Results: For all types of chamber, the ionization current, corrected using the standard PTP, showed a similar behaviour. Deviations from the standard theory were generally small for Co-60 but very significant for electron beams, up to 20 % below P = 10 kPa. The effect was found to be always larger when collecting negative charge, suggesting a dependence on free-electron collection. The most likely source of such electrons is low-energy electrons emitted from the electrodes. This signal would be independent of air pressure within the chamber cavity. The data was analyzed to extract this signal and it was found to be a non-negligible component of the ionization current at atmospheric pressure. In the case of the parallel plate chambers, the effect was approximately 0.25 %. For the cylindrical chambers the effect was larger - up to 1.2 % - and dependent on the chamber type, which would be consistent with electron emission from different wall materials. For the electron beams, the correction factor was dependent on the electron energy and approximately double that observed in 60Co. Conclusion: Measurements have indicated significant deviations of the standard pressure correction that are consistent with electron emission from chamber electrodes. This has implications for both primary standard and reference ion chamber-based dosimetry.

  15. Intermittency and scaling laws for wall bounded turbulence

    OpenAIRE

    Benzi, R.; Amati, G.; Casciola, C. M.; Toschi, F.; Piva, R.

    1998-01-01

    Well defined scaling laws clearly appear in wall bounded turbulence, even very close to the wall, where a distinct violation of the refined Kolmogorov similarity hypothesis (RKSH) occurs together with the simultaneous persistence of scaling laws. A new form of RKSH for the wall region is here proposed in terms of the structure functions of order two which, in physical terms, confirms the prevailing role of the momentum transfer towards the wall in the near wall dynamics.

  16. Doriot Climatic Chambers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Doriot Climatic Chambers are two, 60-feet long, 11-feet high, 15-feet wide chambers that are owned and operated by NSRDEC. The Doriot Climatic Chambers are among...

  17. Ionization chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    An improved ionization chamber type X-ray detector comprises a heavy gas at high pressure disposed between an anode and a cathode. An open grid structure is placed next to the anode and is maintained at a voltage intermediate between the cathode and anode potentials. The electric field which is produced by positive ions drifting towards the cathode is thus shielded from the anode. Current measuring circuits connected to the anode are, therefore, responsive only to electron current flow within the chamber and the recovery time of the chamber is shortened. The grid structure also serves to shield the anode from electrical currents which might otherwise be induced by mechanical vibrations in the ionization chamber structure

  18. Use of Computational Fluid Dynamics for improving freeze-dryers design and process understanding. Part 1: Modelling the lyophilisation chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barresi, Antonello A; Rasetto, Valeria; Marchisio, Daniele L

    2018-05-15

    This manuscript shows how computational models, mainly based on Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), can be used to simulate different parts of an industrial freeze-drying equipment and to properly design them; in particular, the freeze-dryer chamber and the duct connecting the chamber with the condenser, with the valves and vanes eventually present are analysed in this work. In Part 1, it will be shown how CFD can be employed to improve specific designs, to perform geometry optimization, to evaluate different design choices and how it is useful to evaluate the effect on product drying and batch variance. Such an approach allows an in-depth process understanding and assessment of the critical aspects of lyophilisation. This can be done by running either steady-state or transient simulations with imposed sublimation rates or with multi-scale approaches. This methodology will be demonstrated on freeze-drying equipment of different sizes, investigating the influence of the equipment geometry and shelf inter-distance. The effect of valve type (butterfly and mushroom) and shape on duct conductance and critical flow conditions will be instead investigated in Part 2. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Magma chamber interaction giving rise to asymmetric oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walwer, D.; Ghil, M.; Calais, E.

    2017-12-01

    Geodetic time series at four volcanoes (Okmok, Akutan, Shishaldin, and Réunion) are processed using Multi-channel Singular Spectrum Analysis (M-SSA) and reveal sawtooth-shaped oscillations ; the latter are characterized by short intervals of fast inflations followed by longer intervals of slower deflations. At Okmok and Akutan, the oscillations are first damped and then accentuated. At Okmok, the increase in amplitude of the oscillations is followed by an eruption. We first show that the dynamics of these four volcanoes bears similarities with that of a simple nonlinear, dissipative oscillator, indicating that the inflation-deflation episodes are relaxation oscillations. These observations imply that ab initio dynamical models of magma chambers should possess an asymmetric oscillatory regime. Next, based on the work of Whitehead and Helfrich [1991], we show that a model of two magma chambers — connected by a cylindrical conduit in which the magma viscosity depends on temperature — gives rise to asymmetric overpressure oscillations in the magma reservoirs. These oscillations lead to surface deformations that are consistent with those observed at the four volcanoes in this study. This relaxation oscillation regime occurs only when the vertical temperature gradient in the host rock between the two magma chambers is large enough and when the magma flux entering the volcanic system is sufficiently high. The magma being supplied by a deeper source region, the input flux depends on the pressure difference between the source and the deepest reservoir. When this difference is not sufficiently high, the magma flux exponentially decreases, leading to damped oscillations as observed at Akutan and Okmok. The combination of observational and modeling results clearly supports the role of relaxation oscillations in the dynamics of volcanic systems.

  20. Small molecule probes for plant cell wall polysaccharide imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian eWallace

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Plant cell walls are composed of interlinked polymer networks consisting of cellulose, hemicelluloses, pectins, proteins, and lignin. The ordered deposition of these components is a dynamic process that critically affects the development and differentiation of plant cells. However, our understanding of cell wall synthesis and remodeling, as well as the diverse cell wall architectures that result from these processes, has been limited by a lack of suitable chemical probes that are compatible with live-cell imaging. In this review, we summarize the currently available molecular toolbox of probes for cell wall polysaccharide imaging in plants, with particular emphasis on recent advances in small molecule-based fluorescent probes. We also discuss the potential for further development of small molecule probes for the analysis of cell wall architecture and dynamics.

  1. Motional Effect on Wall Shear Stresses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kock, Samuel Alberg; Torben Fründ, Ernst; Yong Kim, Won

    Atherosclerosis is the leading cause of death and severe disability. Wall Shear Stress (WSS), the stress exerted on vessel walls by the flowing blood is a key factor in the development of atherosclerosis. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is widely used for WSS estimations. Most CFD simulations...... are based on static models to ease computational burden leading to inaccurate estimations. The aim of this work was to estimate the effect of vessel wall deformations (expansion and bending) on WSS levels....

  2. Condensation of ablated first-wall materials in the cascade inertial confinement fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladd, A.J.C.

    1985-01-01

    This report concerns problems involved in recondensing first-wall materials vaporized by x rays and pellet debris in the Cascade inertial confinement fusion reactor. It examines three proposed first-wall materials, beryllium oxide (BeO), silicon carbide (SiO), and pyrolytic graphite (C), paying particular attention to the chemical equilibrium and kinetics of the vaporized gases. The major results of this study are as follows. Ceramic materials composed of diatomic molecules, such as BeO and SiC, exist as highly dissociated species after vaporization. The low gas density precludes significant recombination during times of interest (i.e., less than 0.1 s). The dissociated species (Be, O, Si, and C) are, except for carbon, quite volatile and are thermodynamically stable as a vapor under the high temperature and low density found in Cascade. These materials are thus unsuitable as first-wall materials. This difficulty is avoided with pyrolytic graphite. Since the condensation coefficient of monatomic carbon vapor (approx. 0.5) is greater than that of the polyatomic vapor (<0.1), recondensation is assisted by the expected high degree of dissociation. The proposed 10-layer granular carbon bed is sufficient to condense all the carbon vapor before it penetrates to the BeO layer below. The effective condensation coefficient of the porous bed is about 50% greater than that of a smooth wall. An estimate of the mass flux leaving the chamber results in a condensation time for a carbon first wall of about 30 to 50 ms. An experiment to investigate condensation in a Cascade-like chamber is proposed

  3. Low-rise shear wall failure modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrar, C.R.; Hashimoto, P.S.; Reed, J.W.

    1991-01-01

    A summary of the data that are available concerning the structural response of low-rise shear walls is presented. This data will be used to address two failure modes associated with the shear wall structures. First, data concerning the seismic capacity of the shear walls with emphasis on excessive deformations that can cause equipment failure are examined. Second, data concerning the dynamic properties of shear walls (stiffness and damping) that are necessary to compute the seismic inputs to attached equipment are summarized. This case addresses the failure of equipment when the structure remains functional. 23 refs

  4. 2003 Plant Cell Walls Gordon Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel J. Cosgrove

    2004-09-21

    This conference will address recent progress in many aspects of cell wall biology. Molecular, genetic, and genomic approaches are yielding major advances in our understanding of the composition, synthesis, and architecture of plant cell walls and their dynamics during growth, and are identifying the genes that encode the machinery needed to make their biogenesis possible. This meeting will bring together international scientists from academia, industry and government labs to share the latest breakthroughs and perspectives on polysaccharide biosynthesis, wood formation, wall modification, expansion and interaction with other organisms, and genomic & evolutionary analyses of wall-related genes, as well as to discuss recent ''nanotechnological'' advances that take wall analysis to the level of a single cell.

  5. Nucleon structure in lattice QCD with dynamical domain-wall fermions quarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huey-Wen Lin; Shigemi Ohta

    2006-01-01

    We report RBC and RBC/UKQCD lattice QCD numerical calculations of nucleon electroweak matrix elements with dynamical domain-wall fermions (DWF) quarks. The first, RBC, set of dynamical DWF ensembles employs two degenerate flavors of DWF quarks and the DBW2 gauge action. Three sea quark mass values of 0.04, 0.03 and 0.02 in lattice units are used with about 200 gauge configurations each. The lattice cutoff is about 1.7 GeV and the spatial volume is about (1.9 fm) 3 . Despite the small volume, the ratio of the isovector vector and axial charges g A /g V and that of structure function moments u-d / Δ u-Δ d are in agreement with experiment, and show only very mild quark mass dependence. The second, RBC/UK, set of ensembles employs one strange and two degenerate (up and down) dynamical DWF quarks and Iwasaki gauge action. The strange quark mass is set at 0.04, and three up/down mass values of 0.03, 0.02 and 0.01 in lattice units are used. The lattice cutoff is about 1.6 GeV and the spatial volume is about (3.0 fm) 3 . Even with preliminary statistics of 25-30 gauge configurations, the ratios g A /g V and u-d / Δu - Δd are consistent with experiment and show only very mild quark mass dependence. Another structure function moment, d 1 , though yet to be renormalized, appears small in both sets

  6. NUCLEON STRUCTURE IN LATTICE QCD WITH DYNAMICAL DOMAIN--WALL FERMIONS QUARKS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LIN, H.W.; OHTA, S.

    2006-01-01

    We report RBC and RBC/UKQCD lattice QCD numerical calculations of nucleon electroweak matrix elements with dynamical domain-wall fermions (DWF) quarks. The first, RBC, set of dynamical DWF ensembles employs two degenerate flavors of DWF quarks and the DBW2 gauge action. Three sea quark mass values of 0.04, 0.03 and 0.02 in lattice units are used with 220 gauge configurations each. The lattice cutoff is a -1 ∼ 1.7GeV and the spatial volume is about (1.9fm) 3 . Despite the small volume, the ratio of the isovector vector and axial charges g A /g V and that of structure function moments u-d / Δu-Δd are in agreement with experiment, and show only very mild quark mass dependence. The second, RBC/UK, set of ensembles employs one strange and two degenerate (up and down) dynamical DWF quarks and Iwasaki gauge action. The strange quark mass is set at 0.04, and three up/down mass values of 0.03, 0.02 and 0.01 in lattice units are used. The lattice cutoff is a -1 ∼ 1.6GeV and the spatial volume is about (3.0fm) 3 . Even with preliminary statistics of 25-30 gauge configurations, the ratios g A /g V and u-d / Δu-Δd are consistent with experiment and show only very mild quark mass dependence. Another structure function moment, d 1 , though yet to be renormalized, appears small in both sets

  7. Pseudo-dynamic tests on masonry residential buildings seismically retrofitted by precast steel reinforced concrete walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenfeng; Wang, Tao; Chen, Xi; Zhong, Xiang; Pan, Peng

    2017-07-01

    A retrofitting technology using precast steel reinforced concrete (PSRC) panels is developed to improve the seismic performance of old masonry buildings. The PSRC panels are built up as an external PSRC wall system surrounding the existing masonry building. The PSRC walls are well connected to the existing masonry building, which provides enough confinement to effectively improve the ductility, strength, and stiffenss of old masonry structures. The PSRC panels are prefabricated in a factory, significantly reducing the situ work and associated construction time. To demonstrate the feasibility and mechanical effectivenss of the proposed retrofitting system, a full-scale five-story specimen was constructed. The retrofitting process was completed within five weeks with very limited indoor operation. The specimen was then tested in the lateral direction, which could potentially suffer sigifnicant damage in a large earthquake. The technical feasibility, construction workability, and seismic performance were thoroughly demonstrated by a full-scale specimen construction and pseudo-dynamic tests.

  8. Erosion and redeposition of divertor and wall materials during abnormal events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassanein, A.

    1990-09-01

    High energy deposition to in-vessel components of fusion reactors is expected to occur during abnormal operating conditions. This high energy dump in short times may result in very high surface temperatures and can cause severe erosion as a result of melting and vaporization of these components. One abnormal operating condition results from plasma disruptions where the plasma loses confinement and dumps its energy on reactor components. Another abnormal condition occurs when a neutral beam used in heating the plasma shines through the vacuum vessel to parts of the wall with no plasma present in the chamber. A third abnormal event that results in high energy deposition is caused by the runaway electrons to chamber components following a disruption. The failure of these components under the expected high heat loads can severely limit the operation of the fusion device. The redeposition of the eroded materials from these abnormal events over the first wall and other components may cause additional problems. Such problems are associated with tritium accumulation in the freshly deposited materials, charge exchange sputtering and additional impurity sources, and material compatibility issues

  9. Edge dynamics in pellet-fuelled inner-wall jet discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, S.A.; Ehrenberg, J.; Bartlett, D.V.

    1987-01-01

    This paper reports on the density behavior in JET during pellet-fuelled inner-wall discharges without auxiliary heating. Certain discharges, characterized by minor disruptions at the q = 2 surface, show a ten times more rapid decay of the plasma density than previously observed. It is shown that this is related to the combined effects of plasma and wall properties

  10. Ionization chamber for high dose measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues Junior, Ary de Araujo

    2005-01-01

    Industrial gamma irradiators facilities are designed for processing large amounts of products, which are exposed to large doses of gamma radiation. The irradiation, in industrial scale, is usually carried out in a dynamic form, where the products go through a 60 Co gamma source with activity of TBq to P Bq (k Ci to MCi). The dose is estimated as being directly proportional to the time that the products spend to go through the source. However, in some situations, mainly for research purposes or for validation of customer process following the ISO 11137 requirements, it is required to irradiate small samples in a static position with fractional deliver doses. The samples are put inside the irradiation room at a fixed distance from the source and the dose is usually determined using dosimeters. The dose is only known after the irradiation, by reading the dosimeter. Nevertheless, in the industrial irradiators, usually different kinds of products with different densities go through between the source and the static position samples. So, the dose rate varies in function of the product density. A suitable methodology would be to monitor the samples dose in real time, measuring the dose on line with a radiation detector, which would improve the dose accuracy and avoid the overdose. A cylindrical ionization chamber of 0.9 cm 3 has been developed for high-doses real-time monitoring, during the sample irradiation at a static position in a 60 Co gamma industrial plant. Nitrogen and argon gas at pressure of 10 exp 5 Pa (1 bar) was utilized to fill the ionization chamber, for which an appropriate configuration was determined to be used as a detector for high-dose measurements. To transmit the signal generated in the ionization chamber to the associated electronic and processing unit, a 20 m mineral insulated cable was welded to the ionization chamber. The signal to noise ratio produced by the detector was about 100. The dosimeter system was tested at a category I gamma

  11. Wall conditioning of the TBR-1 Tokamak by plasma generated by microwaves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elizondo, J.I.

    1986-01-01

    A new system of vaccum chamber wall conditioning in the TBR-1 Tokamak, using electron cyclotron resonance plasma of hydrogen for the discharge cleaning process is presented. The construction and performance of equipments are described, and the cleaning process to otimize the conditioning efficiency by chase of plasma parameters. (author) [pt

  12. Design of a new multi-phase experimental simulation chamber for atmospheric photosmog, aerosol and cloud chemistry research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Wang

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A new simulation chamber has been built at the Interuniversitary Laboratory of Atmospheric Systems (LISA. The CESAM chamber (French acronym for Experimental Multiphasic Atmospheric Simulation Chamber is designed to allow research in multiphase atmospheric (photo- chemistry which involves both gas phase and condensed phase processes including aerosol and cloud chemistry. CESAM has the potential to carry out variable temperature and pressure experiments under a very realistic artificial solar irradiation. It consists of a 4.2 m3 stainless steel vessel equipped with three high pressure xenon arc lamps which provides a controlled and steady environment. Initial characterization results, all carried out at 290–297 K under dry conditions, concerning lighting homogeneity, mixing efficiency, ozone lifetime, radical sources, NOy wall reactivity, particle loss rates, background PM, aerosol formation and cloud generation are given. Photolysis frequencies of NO2 and O3 related to chamber radiation system were found equal to (4.2 × 10−3 s−1 for JNO2 and (1.4 × 10−5 s−1 for JO1D which is comparable to the solar radiation in the boundary layer. An auxiliary mechanism describing NOy wall reactions has been developed. Its inclusion in the Master Chemical Mechanism allowed us to adequately model the results of experiments on the photo-oxidation of propene-NOx-Air mixtures. Aerosol yields for the α-pinene + O3 system chosen as a reference were determined and found in good agreement with previous studies. Particle lifetime in the chamber ranges from 10 h to 4 days depending on particle size distribution which indicates that the chamber can provide high quality data on aerosol aging processes and their effects. Being evacuable, it is possible to generate in this new chamber

  13. Research on insulating material affecting the property of gas ionization chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Liqiang; Wang Zhentao; Zheng Jian

    2014-01-01

    The insulating material in ionization chamber affects the internal gas pressure and ionic pulse shape in the research process of the ion drift velocity in high pressure gas ionization chamber. It will affect the ion drift velocity measurement. It is required to isolate by insulating material between electrode to electrode and between electrodes to the shell of gas ionization chamber. Insulating material in gas ionization chamber is indispensable. Therefore it needs to carefully study the insulating material affecting the performance of gas ionization chamber. First of all, it is found that Teflon can slowly adsorb the working gas in ionization chamber, and the gas pressure in it is reduced when we measure the sensitivity of gas ionization chamber over time. It is verified by experiment that insulating materials absorbing and releasing gas is dynamically reversible process. Then the adsorbing gas property of 95% aluminium oxide ceramic and Teflon is studied through experimental comparision. Gas adsorption equilibrium time of ceramic material is faster, generally it is about a few hours, and the gas adsorption capacity is relatively less. Gas adsorption equilibrium time of Teflon is slower, it is about a few days, and the gas adsorption capacity is relatively more. It is found that Teflon will release part of the gas at higher temperature through experimental research on the influence of Teflon adsorbing gas. Finally it is studied that the distribution of insulation in ionization chamber affects the time response speed of ionization chamber by measuring the signal pulse shape of ionization chamber under the pulse X-ray. Through these experimental research, it is presented that it need to pay attention to select insulation material and to design the internal structure and arrangement of insulating material when we design gas ionization chamber. (authors)

  14. A benchmark study for the crown-type splashing dynamics of one- and two-component droplet wall-film interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geppert, A.; Terzis, A.; Lamanna, G.; Marengo, M.; Weigand, B.

    2017-12-01

    The present paper investigates experimentally the impact dynamics of crown-type splashing for miscible two- and one-component droplet wall-film interactions over a range of Weber numbers and dimensionless film thicknesses. The splashing outcome is parametrised in terms of a set of quantifiable parameters, such as crown height, top and base diameter, wall inclination, number of fingers, and secondary droplet properties. The results show that the outcome of a splashing event is not affected by the choice of similar or dissimilar fluids, provided the dimensionless film thickness is larger than 0.1. Below this threshold, distinctive features of two-component interactions appear, such as hole formation and crown bottom breakdown. The observation of different crown shapes (e.g. V-shaped, cylindrical, and truncated-cone) confirms that vorticity production induces changes in the crown wall inclination, thus affecting the evolution of the crown height and top diameter. The evolution of the crown base diameter, instead, is mainly dependent on the relative importance of liquid inertia and viscous losses in the wall-film. The maximum number of liquid fingers decreases with increasing wall, film thickness, due to the enhanced attenuation of the effect of surface properties on the fingering process. The formation of secondary droplets is also affected by changes in the crown wall inclination. In particular, for truncated-cone shapes the occurrence of crown rim contraction induces a large scatter in the secondary droplet properties. Consequently, empirical models for the maximum number and mean diameter of the secondary droplets are derived for V-shaped crowns, as observed for the hexadecane-Hyspin interactions.

  15. The profile of the domain walls in amorphous glass-covered microwires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, F.; Rigue, J.N. [Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Campus Cachoeira do Sul, RS (Brazil); Carara, M., E-mail: carara@smail.ufsm.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil)

    2017-08-01

    Highlights: • Glass-covered microwires with positive magnetostriction were studied. • The single domain wall dynamics was studied under different conditions. • We have evaluated the profile and shape of the moving domain walls. • The domain wall evolves from a bell shape to a parabolic one when a current is applied. - Abstract: We have studied the domain wall dynamics in Joule-annealed amorphous glass-covered microwires with positive magnetostriction in the presence of an electric current, in order to evaluate the profile and shape of the moving domain wall. Such microwires are known to present magnetic bi-stability when axially magnetized. The single domain wall dynamics was evaluated under different conditions, under an axially applied stress and an electric current. We have observed the well known increasing of the domain wall damping with the applied stress due to the increase in the magnetoelastic anisotropy and, when the current is applied, depending on the current intensity and direction, a modification on the axial domain wall damping. When the orthogonal motion of the domain wall is considered, we have observed that the associated velocity present a smaller dependence on the applied current intensity. It was observed a modification on both the domain wall shape and length. In a general way, the domain wall evolves from a bell shape to a parabolic shape as the current intensity is increased. The results were explained in terms of the change in the magnetic energy promoted by the additional Oersted field.

  16. Intragroup Processes and Teamwork within a Successful Chamber Choir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirrane, Melrona; O'Connor, Cliodhna; Dunne, Ann-Marie; Moriarty, Patricia

    2017-01-01

    Despite the ubiquity of choirs across time and cultures, relatively little is known about the internal dynamics of these social systems. This article examines the group processes involved in a small European chamber choir. The research adopted a mixed-methods qualitative approach that combined individual interviews (n = 13) with ethnographic…

  17. Peltier-based cloud chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nar, Sevda Yeliz; Cakir, Altan

    2018-02-01

    Particles produced by nuclear decay, cosmic radiation and reactions can be identified through various methods. One of these methods that has been effective in the last century is the cloud chamber. The chamber makes visible cosmic particles that we are exposed to radiation per second. Diffusion cloud chamber is a kind of cloud chamber that is cooled by dry ice. This traditional model has some application difficulties. In this work, Peltier-based cloud chamber cooled by thermoelectric modules is studied. The new model provided uniformly cooled base of the chamber, moreover, it has longer lifetime than the traditional chamber in terms of observation time. This gain has reduced the costs which spent each time for cosmic particle observation. The chamber is an easy-to-use system according to traditional diffusion cloud chamber. The new model is portable, easier to make, and can be used in the nuclear physics experiments. In addition, it would be very useful to observe Muons which are the direct evidence for Lorentz contraction and time expansion predicted by Einsteins special relativity principle.

  18. Elastic-plastic dynamic behavior of guard pipes due to sudden opening of longitudinal cracks in the inner pipe and crash to the guard pipe wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theuer, E.; Heller, M.

    1979-01-01

    Integrity of guard pipes is an important parameter in the design of nuclear steam supply systems. A guard pipe shall withstand all kinds of postulated inner pipe breaks without failure. Sudden opening of a crack in the inner pipe and crash of crack borders to the guard pipe wall represent a shock problem where complex phenomena of dynamic plastification as well as dynamic behavior of the entire system have to be taken in consideration. The problem was analyzed by means of Finite Element computation using the general purpose program MARC. Equation of motion was resolved by direct integration using the Newmark β-operator. Analysis shows that after 1,2 m sec crack borders touch the guard pipe wall for the first time. At this moment a considerable amount of local plastification appears in the inner pipe wall, while the guard pipe is nearly unstressed. After initial touching, the crack borders begin to slip along the guard pipe wall. Subsequently, a short withdrawal of the crack borders and a new crash occur, while the inner pipe rolls along the guard pipe wall. The analysis procedure described is suitable for designing numerous guard pipe geometries as well as U-Bolt restraint systems which have to withstand high-energy pipe rupture impact. (orig.)

  19. An oligogalacturonide-derived molecular probe demonstrates the dynamics of calcium-mediated pectin complexation in cell walls of tip-growing structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mravec, Jozef; Kracun, Stjepan Kresimir; Rydahl, Maja Gro

    2017-01-01

    walls and in mediating cell-to-cell adhesion. Current immunological methods enable only steady-state detection of egg box formation in situ. Here we present a tool for efficient real-time visualisation of available sites for HG crosslinking within cell wall microdomains. Our approach is based on calcium-mediated...... thermodynamic model. Using defined carbohydrate microarrays, we show that the long OG probe binds exclusively to HG that has a very low degree of esterification and in the presence of divalent ions. We used this probe to study real-time dynamics of HG during elongation of Arabidopsis pollen tubes and root hairs...

  20. Failure modes of low-rise shear walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrar, C.R.; Reed, J.W.; Salmon, M.W.

    1993-01-01

    A summary of available data concerning the structural response of low-rise shear walls is presented. These data will be used to address two failure modes associated with shear wall structures. First, the data concerning the seismic capacity of the shear walls are examined, with emphasis on excessive deformations that can cause equipment failure. Second, the data concerning the dynamic properties of shear walls (stiffness and damping) that are necessary for computing the seismic inputs to attached equipment are summarized. This case addresses the failure of equipment when the structure remains functional

  1. Retention of Proanthocyanidin in Wine-like Solution Is Conferred by a Dynamic Interaction between Soluble and Insoluble Grape Cell Wall Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindon, Keren A; Li, Sijing; Kassara, Stella; Smith, Paul A

    2016-11-09

    For better understanding of the factors that impact proanthocyanidin (PA) adsorption by insoluble cell walls or interaction with soluble cell wall-derived components, application of a commercial polygalacturonase enzyme preparation was investigated to modify grape cell wall structure. Soluble and insoluble cell wall material was isolated from the skin and mesocarp components of Vitis vinifera Shiraz grapes. It was observed that significant depolymerization of the insoluble grape cell wall occurred following enzyme application to both grape cell wall fractions, with increased solubilization of rhamnogalacturonan-enriched, low molecular weight polysaccharides. However, in the case of grape mesocarp, the solubilization of protein from cell walls (in buffer) was significant and increased only slightly by the enzyme treatment. Enzyme treatment significantly reduced the adsorption of PA by insoluble cell walls, but this effect was observed only when material solubilized from grape cell walls had been removed. The loss of PA through interaction with the soluble cell wall fraction was observed to be greater for mesocarp than skin cell walls. Subsequent experiments on the soluble mesocarp cell wall fraction confirmed a role for protein in the precipitation of PA. This identified a potential mechanism by which extracted grape PA may be lost from wine during vinification, as a precipitate with solubilized grape mesocarp proteins. Although protein was a minor component in terms of total concentration, losses of PA via precipitation with proteins were in the order of 50% of available PA. PA-induced precipitation could proceed until all protein was removed from solution and may account for the very low levels of residual protein observed in red wines. The results point to a dynamic interaction of grape insoluble and soluble components in modulating PA retention in wine.

  2. R(and)D on full tungsten divertor and beryllium wall for JET ITER-like Wall Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirai, T.; Maier, H.; Rubel, M.

    2006-01-01

    The ITER-like Wall Project was initiated at JET, with the goal of testing the reference material combination chosen for ITER: beryllium (Be) in the main chamber (wall and limiters) and tungsten (W) in the divertor. The major aims are to study the tritium retention, material mixing, melt layer behavior and to optimize plasma operation scenarios with a full metal wall. The project requires major design and engineering efforts in R(and)D: (i) bulk W tile, (ii) W coatings on carbon fibre composites (CFC) (iii) Be coatings on Inconel, (iv) Be marker tiles. For the W divertor, two R(and)D tasks were initiated: (1) development of a conceptual design for a bulk W tile as the main outer divertor target plate, and (2) W coating selection from 14 different samples produced by various techniques for the other divertor plates and neutral beam shine. The bulk W tile must withstand power loads of 7 MW/m 2 for 10 s. JET divertor plates are not actively cooled, therefore, heat capacity of the tiles is an important design parameter. In addition to power handling, mechanical structural stability under electromagnetic forces and compatibility with remote handling are the key requirements in the design. The design has been completed. The test-tile survived 100 pulses at 7 MW/m 2 for 10 s in the electron beam facility, JUDITH. The W coatings with different thickness, thin ( 2 and 200 pulses at 10 MW/m 2 for 5 s. In all tested samples cracks developed perpendicularly to the fiber bundles in CFC because of contraction of the coating in the cooling phase. Coatings were also exposed to 1000 ELM-like loading pulses. The thin coatings showed fatigue leading to delamination, whereas for thick coatings better resistance in ELM-like loading. As a result of R(and)D a full W divertor was decided: bulk metal at the outer divertor and W coating at other areas. Be-related R(and)D activities are in two areas. Production of 8-9 μm layers on inner wall cladding Inconel tiles ensures the full coating of

  3. Plate-out rates of radon progeny and particles in a spherical chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Y.S.; Chen, B.T.

    1990-01-01

    In indoor and mining environments, deposition or ''plate-out'' of radon progeny onto walls occurs simultaneously with attachment of the radon progeny to airborne particles. Attachment and plate-out processes affect the atmosphere in which radon exposures takes place by reducing concentrations and shifting activity size distributions. Both processes have important consequences in determining the deposition pattern and initial dose of inhaled radon progeny. Theoretical deposition models show that turbulence and natural convection in a room are the major factors that influence plate-out rates. Here we describe plate-out measurements for radon progeny and aerosol particles in a spherical chamber under controlled laboratory conditions. The temperature and velocity profiles in still and turbulent air were monitored. A 161-liter spherical aluminum chamber was used to study the mixing. During mixing, air velocity was detected when rotational speeds were higher than 500 rpm. Monodisperse silver aerosols and polystyrene latex particles in the size range of 5 nm to 2 μm were used in the deposition study. Radon-220 progeny were generated by passing Rn-220 gas into the chamber and letting the gas decay into 212 Pb. The deposition rates of the particles and radon progeny ( 212 Pb) in the chamber were determined by monitoring the concentration decay of the aerosol as a function of time

  4. Setting up and validating a complex model for a simple homogeneous wall

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naveros, I.; Bacher, Peder; Ruiz, D. P.

    2014-01-01

    the regression averages method for estimation of parameters which describe the thermal behaviour of the wall. Solar irradiance and long-wave radiation balance terms are added in the heat balance equation besides modelling of wind speed effect to achieve a complete description of the relevant phenomena which......The present paper describes modelling of the thermal dynamics of a real wall tested in dynamic outdoor weather conditions, to identify all the parameters needed for its characterisation. Specifically, the U value, absorptance and effective heat capacity are estimated for the wall using grey......-box modelling based on statistical methods and known physical dynamic energy balance equations, related to the heat flux density through a simple and homogeneous wall. The experimental test was carried out in a hot-temperature climate for nine months. This study aims at proposing a dynamic method improving...

  5. The use of plane-parallel chambers for the dosimetry of electron beams in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nahum, A.E.; Thwaites, D.I.

    1996-01-01

    This paper reviews the use of plane-parallel chambers for the absolute determination of absorbed dose in water at the reference depth in low-energy electron beams. The geometrical and electrical properties of the most commonly used commercial designs of chamber are described. It is shown that there is now firm experimental evidence that the perturbation factors for two commonly used chamber designs differ significantly from unity below E-bar z ≅ 5 MeV. Furthermore, there is also mounting evidence that the material behind the air cavity can influence the chamber signal due to differences in backscattering compared to that of the phantom material. The theoretical work on the perturbation in electron beams caused by gas cavities in condensed media has been critically examined. It is argued that none of the existing analytical approaches convincingly models the physics except at small depths, but that these limitations will be overcome by Monte-Carlo simulations in the near future. The different approaches to calibration of plane-parallel chambers are discussed. The failure of simple models to give k u,pp and p wall values at 60 Co which agree with experimental determinations is emphasized. A recent compilation of the measured values of these correction factors for a wide range of chamber types and experimental conditions is given. New Monte Carlo work which largely explains and correctly predicts the experimentally observed behaviour of chambers of non-homogeneous construction in a 60 Co beam is described. It is concluded that the most reliable method of obtaining the N D,pp factor is still by intercomparison with a cylindrical chamber in a high-energy electron beam. Finally problems with the use of non-water, i.e. plastic, phantoms are reviewed, including charge-storage effects and fluence conversion factors. (author). 63 refs, 5 figs, 4 tabs

  6. Dual ionization chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallory, J.; Turlej, Z.

    1981-01-01

    Dual ionization chambers are provided for use with an electronic smoke detector. The chambers are separated by electrically-conductive partition. A single radiation source extends through the partition into both chambers, ionizing the air in each. The mid-point current of the device may be balanced by adjusting the position of the source

  7. Plasma monitoring and PECVD process control in thin film silicon-based solar cell manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Onno

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A key process in thin film silicon-based solar cell manufacturing is plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD of the active layers. The deposition process can be monitored in situ by plasma diagnostics. Three types of complementary diagnostics, namely optical emission spectroscopy, mass spectrometry and non-linear extended electron dynamics are applied to an industrial-type PECVD reactor. We investigated the influence of substrate and chamber wall temperature and chamber history on the PECVD process. The impact of chamber wall conditioning on the solar cell performance is demonstrated.

  8. Characterization of a multiculture in-vitro cell exposure chamber for assessing the biological impact of diesel engine exhaust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asimakopoulou, Akrivi; Daskalos, Manos; Chasapidis, Leonidas; Akritidis, Theofilaktos; Vlachos, Nickolaos D; Papaioannou, Eleni; Konstandopoulos, Athanasios G

    2011-01-01

    In order to study the various health influencing parameters related to particulate as well as to gas-phase pollutants emitted by Diesel engine exhaust, there is an urgent need for appropriate sampling devices and methods for cell exposure studies and associated biological and toxicological tests. In a previous paper [1], a specific concept for a cell culture exposure chamber was introduced to allow the uniform exposure of cell cultures to diesel aerosols. In the present work, this cell culture exposure chamber is evaluated and characterized with state-of-the-art nanoparticles measurement instrumentation to assess the local deposition of soot aggregates on the cell cultures and any losses due to particle deposition on the cell culture exposure chamber walls, and in addition an upgraded Multiculture Exposure Chamber (MEC) for in vitro continuous flow cell exposure tests is introduced with improved, compared to the previous version, features. Analysis and design of the MEC employs CFD and true to geometry representations of soot particle aggregates.

  9. Particle balance under global wall saturation in long-pulse discharges of JT-60U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, T.; Asakura, N.; Takenaga, H.; Kubo, H.; Shimizu, K.; Kawashima, H.

    2007-01-01

    During 30s-ELMy H-mode discharges, the wall-pumping rate decreases with a decay constant of several seconds and then becomes constant. During the constant wall-pumping phase, in discharges with a density of 65% of the Greenwald density, the wall-pumping rate is negative, in other words, outgassing. It has been found that this outgassing rate correlates with an increase in the tile temperature around the outer strike point. In discharges with a density of 80% of the Greenwald density, the wall-pumping rate is positive. Unless a high net deposition rate (>60%) of hydrocarbon is assumed, the positive wall-pumping rate cannot be explained only by the co-deposition of deuterium with carbon even if the outgassing rate is assumed to be zero. The vessel deuterium inventory decreases by 1.1 x 10 24 on one experimental day with 17 long discharges. The main chamber wall is suggested as the deuterium source for the decrease of the inventory

  10. Spin wave dynamics in Heisenberg ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic single-walled nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mi, Bin-Zhou, E-mail: mbzfjerry2008@126.com [Department of Basic Curriculum, North China Institute of Science and Technology, Beijing 101601 (China); Department of Physics, School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2016-09-15

    The spin wave dynamics, including the magnetization, spin wave dispersion relation, and energy level splitting, of Heisenberg ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic single-walled nanotubes are systematically calculated by use of the double-time Green’s function method within the random phase approximation. The role of temperature, diameter of the tube, and wave vector on spin wave energy spectrum and energy level splitting are carefully analyzed. There are two categories of spin wave modes, which are quantized and degenerate, and the total number of independent magnon branches is dependent on diameter of the tube, caused by the physical symmetry of nanotubes. Moreover, the number of flat spin wave modes increases with diameter of the tube rising. The spin wave energy and the energy level splitting decrease with temperature rising, and become zero as temperature reaches the critical point. At any temperature, the energy level splitting varies with wave vector, and for a larger wave vector it is smaller. When pb=π, the boundary of first Brillouin zone, spin wave energies are degenerate, and the energy level splittings are zero.

  11. Wire Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    Magnetoscriptive readout wire chamber. Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  12. Wire chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1967-01-01

    Magnetoscriptive readout wire chamber.Multi-wire detectors contain layers of positively and negatively charged wires enclosed in a chamber full of gas. A charged particle passing through the chamber knocks negatively charged electrons out of atoms in the gas, leaving behind positive ions. The electrons are pulled towards the positively charged wires. They collide with other atoms on the way, producing an avalanche of electrons and ions. The movement of these electrons and ions induces an electric pulse in the wires which is collected by fast electronics. The size of the pulse is proportional to the energy loss of the original particle.

  13. Gas dynamics in the central cavity of HYLIFE-II reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, X.M.; Schrock, V.E.; Peterson, P.F.; Colella, P.

    1992-01-01

    In a HYLIFE-II ICF reactor, the microfusion of the D-T capsule in the center of the chamber produces X-rays that can ablate a thin layer off the liquid blanket which protects the first structural wall Thisablated material will implode toward the center line of the central cavity due to the initial vacuum and cylindrical geometry, and then rebound back to the liquid blanket vent through it and exert a pressure ''impulse'' onto the structural wall. The initial ablation occurs in a very short period with very small characteristic length and the implosion and rebounding processes feature very high pressures and temperatures. The proper design of the chamber relies on the reasonably accurate analysis of the gas dynamics in the central cavity and the gas-liquid interaction. In this paper, a second order Godunov numerical method is used to solve the compressible flow equations in the central cavity. The rarefaction and shock phenomena are very well captured by the numerical calculation. The equation of state for Flibe vapor is used in the calculation along with the parameters for the HYLIFE-II design. Since the radiation transport has not yet been included in the current calculations, the vapor possesses higher energy and therefore temperature. The total mass vaporized will also be underestimated in the later time of the calculation. The incorporation of a radiation calculation into this code is our next goal

  14. The dorsal shell wall structure of Mesozoic ammonoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregor Radtke

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The study of pristine preserved shells of Mesozoic Ammonoidea shows different types of construction and formation of the dorsal shell wall. We observe three major types: (i The vast majority of Ammonoidea, usually planispirally coiled, has a prismatic reduced dorsal shell wall which consists of an outer organic component (e.g., wrinkle layer, which is the first layer to be formed, and the subsequently formed dorsal inner prismatic layer. The dorsal mantle tissue suppresses the formation of the outer prismatic layer and nacreous layer. With the exception of the outer organic component, secretion of a shell wall is omitted at the aperture. A prismatic reduced dorsal shell wall is always secreted immediately after the hatching during early teleoconch formation. Due to its broad distribution in (planispiral Ammonoidea, the prismatic reduced dorsal shell wall is probably the general state. (ii Some planispirally coiled Ammonoidea have a nacreous reduced dorsal shell wall which consists of three mineralized layers: two prismatic layers (primary and secondary dorsal inner prismatic layer and an enclosed nacreous layer (secondary dorsal nacreous layer. The dorsal shell wall is omitted at the aperture and was secreted in the rear living chamber. Its layers are a continuation of an umbilical shell doubling (reinforcement by additional shell layers that extends towards the ventral crest of the preceding whorl. The nacreous reduced dorsal shell wall is formed in the process of ontogeny following a prismatic reduced dorsal shell wall. (iii Heteromorph and some planispirally coiled taxa secrete a complete dorsal shell wall which forms a continuation of the ventral and lateral shell layers. It is formed during ontogeny following a prismatic reduced dorsal shell wall or a priori. The construction is identical with the ventral and lateral shell wall, including a dorsal nacreous layer. The wide distribution of the ability to form dorsal nacre indicates that it is

  15. The development and application of advanced analytical methods to commercial ICF reactor chambers. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cousseau, P.; Engelstad, R.; Henderson, D.L. [and others

    1997-10-01

    Progress is summarized in this report for each of the following tasks: (1) multi-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics computer code development; (2) 2D radiation-hydrodynamic code development; (3) ALARA: analytic and Laplacian adaptive radioactivity analysis -- a complete package for analysis of induced activation; (4) structural dynamics modeling of ICF reactor chambers; and (5) analysis of self-consistent target chamber clearing.

  16. The development and application of advanced analytical methods to commercial ICF reactor chambers. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cousseau, P.; Engelstad, R.; Henderson, D.L.

    1997-10-01

    Progress is summarized in this report for each of the following tasks: (1) multi-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics computer code development; (2) 2D radiation-hydrodynamic code development; (3) ALARA: analytic and Laplacian adaptive radioactivity analysis -- a complete package for analysis of induced activation; (4) structural dynamics modeling of ICF reactor chambers; and (5) analysis of self-consistent target chamber clearing

  17. Intraoperative CT in the assessment of posterior wall acetabular fracture stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Brian; Jackson, Kelly; Ortega, Gil

    2014-04-01

    Posterior wall acetabular fractures that involve 10% to 40% of the posterior wall may or may not require an open reduction and internal fixation. Dynamic stress examination of the acetabular fracture under fluoroscopy has been used as an intraoperative method to assess joint stability. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the value of intraoperative ISO computed tomography (CT) examination using the Siemens ISO-C imaging system (Siemens Corp, Malvern, Pennsylvania) in the assessment of posterior wall acetabular fracture stability during stress examination under anesthesia. In 5 posterior wall acetabular fractures, standard fluoroscopic images (including anteroposterior pelvis and Judet radiographs) with dynamic stress examinations were compared with the ISO-C CT imaging system to assess posterior wall fracture stability during stress examination. After review of standard intraoperative fluoroscopic images under dynamic stress examination, all 5 cases appeared to demonstrate posterior wall stability; however, when the intraoperative images from the ISO-C CT imaging system demonstrated that 1 case showed fracture instability of the posterior wall segment during stress examination, open reduction and internal fixation was performed. The use of intraoperative ISO CT imaging has shown an initial improvement in the surgeon's ability to assess the intraoperative stability of posterior wall acetabular fractures during stress examination when compared with standard fluoroscopic images. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  18. Ionization chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boag, J.W.

    1987-01-01

    Although a variety of solid-state and chemical methods for measuring radiation dose have been developed in recent decades and calorimetry can now provide an absolute standard of reference, ionization dosimetry retains its position as the most widely used, most convenient, and, in most situations, most accurate method of measuring either exposure or absorbed dose. The ionization chamber itself is the central element in this system of dosimetry. In this chapter the principles governing the construction and operation of ionization chambers of various types are examined. Since the ionization chambers now in general use are nearly all of commercial manufacture, the emphasis is on operating characteristics and interpretation of measurements rather than on details of construction, although some knowledge of the latter is often required when applying necessary corrections to the measured quantities. Examples are given of the construction of typical chambers designed for particular purposes, and the methods of calibrating them are discussed

  19. Gas microstrip chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McIntyre, P.M.; Barasch, E.F.; Bowcock, T.J.V.; Demroff, H.P.; Elliott, S.M.; Howe, M.R.; Lee, B.; Mazumdar, T.K.; Pang, Y.; Smith, D.D.; Wahl, J.; Wu, Y.; Yue, W.K.; Gaedke, R.M.; Vanstraelen, G.

    1992-01-01

    The gas microstrip chamber has been developed from concept to experimental system during the past three years. A pattern of anode and grid lines are microfabricated onto a dielectric substrate and configured as a high-resolution MWPC. Four recent developments are described: Suitable plastic substrates and lithography techniques for large-area chambers; non-planar silicon-based chambers for 20 μm resolution; integrated on-board synchronous front-end electronics and data buffering; and a porous silicon active cathode for enhanced efficiency and time response. The microstrip chamber appears to be a promising technology for applications in microvertex, tracking spectrometer, muon spectrometer, and transition radiation detection. (orig.)

  20. Technical Note: Scanning of parallel-plate ionization chamber and diamond detector for measurements of water-dose profiles in the vicinity of a narrow x-ray microbeam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nariyama, Nobuteru

    2017-12-01

    Scanning of dosimeters facilitates dose distribution measurements with fine spatial resolutions. This paper presents a method of conversion of the scanning results to water-dose profiles and provides an experimental verification. An Advanced Markus chamber and a diamond detector were scanned at a resolution of 6 μm near the beam edges during irradiation with a 25-μm-wide white narrow x-ray beam from a synchrotron radiation source. For comparison, GafChromic films HD-810 and HD-V2 were also irradiated. The conversion procedure for the water dose values was simulated with Monte Carlo photon-electron transport code as a function of the x-ray incidence position. This method was deduced from nonstandard beam reference-dosimetry protocols used for high-energy x-rays. Among the calculated nonstandard beam correction factors, P wall , which is the ratio of the absorbed dose in the sensitive volume of the chamber with water wall to that with a polymethyl methacrylate wall, was found to be the most influential correction factor in most conditions. The total correction factor ranged from 1.7 to 2.7 for the Advanced Markus chamber and from 1.15 to 1.86 for the diamond detector as a function of the x-ray incidence position. The water dose values obtained with the Advanced Markus chamber and the HD-810 film were in agreement in the vicinity of the beam, within 35% and 18% for the upper and lower sides of the beam respectively. The beam width obtained from the diamond detector was greater, and the doses out of the beam were smaller than the doses of the others. The comparison between the Advanced Markus chamber and HD-810 revealed that the dose obtained with the scanned chamber could be converted to the water dose around the beam by applying nonstandard beam reference-dosimetry protocols. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  1. The effect of low-energy electrons on the response of ion chambers to ionizing photon beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Russa, Daniel J.

    Cavity ionization chambers are one of the most popular and widely used devices for quantifying ionizing photon beams. This popularity originates from the precision of these devices and the relative ease with which ionization measurements are converted to quantities of interest in therapeutic radiology or radiation protection, collectively referred to as radiation dosimetry. The formalisms used for these conversions, known as cavity theory, make several assumptions about the electron spectrum in the low-energy range resulting from the incident photon beam. These electrons often account for a significant fraction of the ion chamber response. An inadequate treatment of low-energy electrons can therefore significantly effect calculated quantities of interest. This thesis sets out to investigate the effect of low-energy electrons on (1) the use of Spencer-Attix cavity theory with 60Co beams; and (2) the standard temperature-pressure correction factor, P TP, used to relate the measured ionization to a set of reference temperature and pressure conditions for vented ion chambers. Problems with the PTP correction are shown to arise when used with kilovoltage x rays, where ionization measurements are due primarily to electrons that do not have enough energy to cross the cavity. A combination of measurements and Monte Carlo calculations using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code demonstrate the breakdown of PTP in these situations when used with non-air-equivalent chambers. The extent of the breakdown is shown to depend on cavity size, energy of the incident photons, and the composition of the chamber. In the worst case, the standard P TP factor overcorrects the response of an aluminum chamber by ≈12% at an air density typical of Mexico City. The response of a more common graphite-walled chamber with similar dimensions at the same air density is undercorrected by ≈ 2%. The EGSnrc Monte Carlo code is also used to investigate Spencer-Attix cavity theory as it is used in the

  2. Plasma Perturbations in High-Speed Probing of Hall Thruster Discharge Chambers: Quantification and Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorns, Benjamin A.; Goebel, Dan M.; Hofer, Richard R.

    2015-01-01

    An experimental investigation is presented to quantify the effect of high-speed probing on the plasma parameters inside the discharge chamber of a 6-kW Hall thruster. Understanding the nature of these perturbations is of significant interest given the importance of accurate plasma measurements for characterizing thruster operation. An array of diagnostics including a high-speed camera and embedded wall probes is employed to examine in real time the changes in electron temperature and plasma potential induced by inserting a high-speed reciprocating Langmuir probe into the discharge chamber. It is found that the perturbations onset when the scanning probe is downstream of the electron temperature peak, and that along channel centerline, the perturbations are best characterized as a downstream shift of plasma parameters by 15-20% the length of the discharge chamber. A parametric study is performed to investigate techniques to mitigate the observed probe perturbations including varying probe speed, probe location, and operating conditions. It is found that the perturbations largely disappear when the thruster is operated at low power and low discharge voltage. The results of this mitigation study are discussed in the context of recommended methods for generating unperturbed measurements of the discharge chamber plasma.

  3. The HYLIFE-II inertial fusion energy power plant concept and implications for IFE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moir, R.W.

    1994-01-01

    HYLIFE-II is based on nonflammable, renewable-liquid-wall fusion target chambers formed with Li 2 BeF 4 molten-salt jets, a heavy-ion driver, and single-sided illumination of indirect-drive targets. Building fusion chambers from existing materials with life-of-plant structural walls behind the liquid walls, while still meeting non-nuclear grade construction and low-level waste requirements, has profound implications for IFE development. Fluid-flow work and computational fluid dynamics predict chamber clearing adequate for 6-Hz pulse rates. Predicted electricity cost is reduced about 30% to 4.4 cents/kWh at 1 GWe. Development can be foreshortened and cost reduced by obviating expensive neutron sources to develop first-wall materials. The driver and chamber can be upgraded in stages, avoiding separate and sequential facilities. The most important features of a practical inertial fusion power plant are sufficient ignition and gain in targets; a low-cost, efficient, rep-ratable driver; and low-cost targets

  4. Dynamic mechanical analysis of single walled carbon nanotubes/polymethyl methacrylate nanocomposite films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badawi, Ali; Al Hosiny, N.

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic mechanical properties of nanocomposite films with different ratios of single walled carbon nanotubes/polymethyl methacrylate (SWCNTs/PMMA) are studied. Nanocomposite films of different ratios (0, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 weight percent (wt%)) of SWCNTs/PMMA are fabricated by using a casting technique. The morphological and structural properties of both SWCNT powder and SWCNTs/PMMA nanocomposite films are investigated by using a high resolution transmission electron microscope and x-ray diffractometer respectively. The mechanical properties including the storage modulus, loss modulus, loss factor (tan δ) and stiffness of the nanocomposite film as a function of temperature are recorded by using a dynamic mechanical analyzer at a frequency of 1 Hz. Compared with pure PMMA film, the nanocomposite films with different ratios of SWCNTs/PMMA are observed to have enhanced storage moduli, loss moduli and high stiffness, each of which is a function of temperature. The intensity of the tan δ peak for pure PMMA film is larger than those of the nanocomposite films. The glass transition temperature (T g ) of SWCNTs/PMMA nanocomposite film shifts towards the higher temperature side with respect to pure PMMA film from 91.2 °C to 99.5 °C as the ratio of SWCNTs/PMMA increases from 0 to 2.0 wt%. (paper)

  5. Numerical investigation of the influence of particle-particle and particle-wall collisions in turbulent wall-bounded flows at high mass loadings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alletto, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The present work deals with the simulation of turbulent particle-laden flows at high mass loadings. In order to achieve this goal, the fluid flow is described by means of the eddy-resolving concept known as Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) and the particles are described in a Lagrangian frame of reference. Special emphasis is placed on the interparticle collisions and the impact of solid particles on rough walls. Both mechanisms are shown to be crucial for the correct description of the particle dynamics in wall-bounded flows. In order to distinguish the present methodology from the variety of methods available in the literature to treat turbulent flows laden with solid particles, the thesis starts with an overview of different simulation techniques to calculate this class of flows. In this overview special care is taken to underline the parameter space, where the different simulation methods are valid. After that, the governing equations and the boundary conditions applied for the continuous phase of the Euler-Lagrange approach used in the present thesis are given. In the subsequent section the governing equations for the solid particles and their interaction with smooth and rough walls are discussed. Here a new wall roughness model for the particles which incorporates an amplitude parameter used in technical applications such as the mean roughness height or the root-mean-squared roughness is presented. After that, the coupling mechanisms between the phases and the algorithmic realization are discussed. Furthermore, a new agglomeration model capable to treat interparticle collisions with friction is presented. However, the agglomeration model is not evaluated in such a detail as the interparticle collisions and the particle-wall collisions. The reason is that it does not represent a central aspect of this thesis. The numerical methods for the continuous and the disperse phase are presented in the subsequent section. The efficient algorithm to detect the interparticle

  6. Numerical investigation of the influence of particle-particle and particle-wall collisions in turbulent wall-bounded flows at high mass loadings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alletto, Michael

    2014-05-16

    The present work deals with the simulation of turbulent particle-laden flows at high mass loadings. In order to achieve this goal, the fluid flow is described by means of the eddy-resolving concept known as Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) and the particles are described in a Lagrangian frame of reference. Special emphasis is placed on the interparticle collisions and the impact of solid particles on rough walls. Both mechanisms are shown to be crucial for the correct description of the particle dynamics in wall-bounded flows. In order to distinguish the present methodology from the variety of methods available in the literature to treat turbulent flows laden with solid particles, the thesis starts with an overview of different simulation techniques to calculate this class of flows. In this overview special care is taken to underline the parameter space, where the different simulation methods are valid. After that, the governing equations and the boundary conditions applied for the continuous phase of the Euler-Lagrange approach used in the present thesis are given. In the subsequent section the governing equations for the solid particles and their interaction with smooth and rough walls are discussed. Here a new wall roughness model for the particles which incorporates an amplitude parameter used in technical applications such as the mean roughness height or the root-mean-squared roughness is presented. After that, the coupling mechanisms between the phases and the algorithmic realization are discussed. Furthermore, a new agglomeration model capable to treat interparticle collisions with friction is presented. However, the agglomeration model is not evaluated in such a detail as the interparticle collisions and the particle-wall collisions. The reason is that it does not represent a central aspect of this thesis. The numerical methods for the continuous and the disperse phase are presented in the subsequent section. The efficient algorithm to detect the interparticle

  7. Double chamber ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uman, M.F.; Winnard, J.R.; Winters, H.F.

    1978-01-01

    The ion source is comprised of two discharge chambers one of which is provided with a filament and an aperture leading into the other chamber which in turn has an extraction orifice. A low voltage arc discharge is operated in an inert gas atmosphere in the filament chamber while an arc of higher voltage is operated in the second ionization chamber which contains a vapor which will give the desired dopant ion species. The entire source is immersed in an axial magnetic field parallel to a line connecting the filament, the aperture between the two chambers and the extraction orifice. (author)

  8. Ussing Chamber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhout, J.; Wortelboer, H.; Verhoeckx, K.

    2015-01-01

    The Ussing chamber system is named after the Danish zoologist Hans Ussing, who invented the device in the 1950s to measure the short-circuit current as an indicator of net ion transport taking place across frog skin (Ussing and Zerahn, Acta Physiol Scand 23:110-127, 1951). Ussing chambers are

  9. Design of In-vessel neutron monitor using micro fission chambers for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishitani, Takeo; Kasai, Satoshi

    2001-10-01

    A neutron monitor using micro fission chambers to be installed inside the vacuum vessel has been designed for compact ITER (ITER-FEAT). We investigated the responses of the micro fission chambers to find the suitable position of micro fission chambers by a neutron Monte Carlo calculation using MCNP version 4b code. It was found that the averaged output of the micro fission chambers behind blankets at upper outboard and lower outboard is insensitive to the changes in the plasma position and the neutron source profile. A set of 235 U micro fission chamber and ''blank'' detector which is a fissile material free detector to identify noise issues such as from γ-rays are installed behind blankets. Employing both pulse counting mode and Campbelling mode in the electronics, the ITER requirement of 10 7 dynamic range with 1 ms temporal resolution can be accomplished. The in-situ calibration has been simulated by MCNP calculation, where a point source of 14 MeV neutrons is moving on the plasma axis. It was found that the direct calibration is possible by using a neutron generator with an intensity of 10 11 n/s. The micro fission chamber system can meet the required 10% accuracy for a fusion power monitor. (author)

  10. The Role of Auxin in Cell Wall Expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majda, Mateusz; Robert, Stéphanie

    2018-03-22

    Plant cells are surrounded by cell walls, which are dynamic structures displaying a strictly regulated balance between rigidity and flexibility. Walls are fairly rigid to provide support and protection, but also extensible, to allow cell growth, which is triggered by a high intracellular turgor pressure. Wall properties regulate the differential growth of the cell, resulting in a diversity of cell sizes and shapes. The plant hormone auxin is well known to stimulate cell elongation via increasing wall extensibility. Auxin participates in the regulation of cell wall properties by inducing wall loosening. Here, we review what is known on cell wall property regulation by auxin. We focus particularly on the auxin role during cell expansion linked directly to cell wall modifications. We also analyze downstream targets of transcriptional auxin signaling, which are related to the cell wall and could be linked to acid growth and the action of wall-loosening proteins. All together, this update elucidates the connection between hormonal signaling and cell wall synthesis and deposition.

  11. DELPHI Barrel Muon Chamber Module

    CERN Multimedia

    1989-01-01

    The module was used as part of the muon identification system on the barrel of the DELPHI detector at LEP, and was in active use from 1989 to 2000. The module consists of 7 individual muons chambers arranged in 2 layers. Chambers in the upper layer are staggered by half a chamber width with respect to the lower layer. Each individual chamber is a drift chamber consisting of an anode wire, 47 microns in diameter, and a wrapped copper delay line. Each chamber provided 3 signal for each muon passing through the chamber, from which a 3D space-point could be reconstructed.

  12. A proportional chamber to measure the screening potential in sup 3 H beta decay

    CERN Document Server

    Paterson, D J; Batkin, I S

    1999-01-01

    A gas proportional chamber has been assembled to make precise observations of the low-energy region of the sup 3 H beta spectrum. Backgrounds have been measured and understood, and are maintained at approx 2% of the data rate. Wall effects have been simulated for this chamber and are predicted at <0.5% of events. Systematic effects which may introduce errors into the observed spectrum have been carefully measured at a level below approx 10 sup - sup 4 per ADC channel. This apparatus will be used to make precise measurements of the effects of screening of the nuclear charge by orbital electrons on the beta spectrum of sup 3 H, and to attempt to observe the effect of a hypothesized admixture of heavy neutrinos in the sup 3 H spectrum.

  13. Role of chamber dimension in fluorocarbon based deposition and etching of SiO2 and its effects on gas and surface-phase chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joseph, E. A.; Zhou, B.-S.; Sant, S. P.; Overzet, L. J.; Goeckner, M. J.

    2008-01-01

    It is well understood that chamber geometry is an influential factor governing plasma processing of materials. Simple models suggest that a large fraction of this influence is due to changes in basic plasma properties, namely, density, temperature, and potential. However, while such factors do play an important role, they only partly describe the observed differences in process results. Therefore, to better elucidate the role of chamber geometry in this work, the authors explore the influence of plasma chemistry and its symbiotic effect on plasma processing by decoupling the plasma density, temperature, and potential from the plasma-surface (wall) interactions. Specifically, a plasma system is used with which the authors can vary the chamber dimension so as to vary the plasma-surface interaction directly. By varying chamber wall diameter, 20-66 cm, and source-platen distance, 4-6 cm, the etch behavior of SiO 2 (or the deposition behavior of fluorocarbon polymer) and the resulting gas-phase chemistry change significantly. Results from in situ spectroscopic ellipsometry show significant differences in etch characteristics, with etch rates as high as 350 nm/min and as low as 75 nm/min for the same self-bias voltage. Fluorocarbon deposition rates are also highly dependent on chamber dimension and vary from no net deposition to deposition rates as high as 225 nm/min. Etch yields, however, remain unaffected by the chamber size variations. From Langmuir probe measurements, it is clear that chamber geometry results in significant shifts in plasma properties such as electron and ion densities. Indeed, such measurements show that on-wafer processes are limited at least in part by ion flux for high energy reactive ion etch. However, in situ multipass Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy reveals that the line-averaged COF 2 , SiF 4 , CF 2 , and CF 3 gas-phase densities are also dependent on chamber dimension at high self-bias voltage and also correlate well to the CF x

  14. Researching the Performance of Dual-Chamber Fire-Tube Boiler Furnace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaustov Sergei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Autonomous heating systems equipped with fire-tube or shell boilers show high effectiveness, consistent performance and great technical parameters. But there is a significant limitation of its thermal productivity due to the complexity of durable large diameter fire-tube bottoms implementation. Optimization of combustion aerodynamics can be the way to expand the fire-tube boilers performance limit. In this case lots of problems connected with reducing emissions of toxic substances, providing of burning stability, local heat stresses and aerodynamic resistances should be solved. To resolve the indicated problems, a modified model of dual-chamber fire-tube boiler furnace is proposed. The performance of suggested flame-tube was simulated using the proven computer-aided engineering software ANSYS Multiphysics. Results display proposed flame tube completely filled with moving medium without stagnant zones. Turbulent vortical combustion is observed even with the straight-through fuel supply. Active flue gas recirculation in suggested dual-chamber furnace reduces emissions of pollutants. Diminution of wall heat fluxes allows boiler operation at lower water treatment costs.

  15. Gridded ionization chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houston, J.M.

    1977-01-01

    An improved ionization chamber type x-ray detector comprises a heavy gas at high pressure disposed between an anode and a cathode. An open grid structure is disposed adjacent the anode and is maintained at a voltsge intermediate between the cathode and anode potentials. The electric field which is produced by positive ions drifting toward the cathode is thus shielded from the anode. Current measuring circuits connected to the anode are, therefore, responsive only to electron current flow within the chamber and the recovery time of the chamber is shortened. The grid structure also serves to shield the anode from electrical currents which might otherwise be induced by mechanical vibrations in the ionization chamber structure

  16. Secondary magnetic field harmonics dependence on vacuum beam chamber geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Y. Shim

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The harmonic magnetic field properties due to eddy currents have been studied with respect to the geometry of the vacuum beam chamber. We derived a generalized formula enabling the precise prediction of any field harmonics generated by eddy currents in beam tubes with different cross-sectional geometries. Applying our model to study the properties of field harmonics in beam tubes with linear dipole magnetic field ramping clearly proved that the circular cross section tube generates only a dipole field from eddy currents. The elliptic tube showed noticeable magnitudes of sextupole and dipole fields. We demonstrate theoretically that it is feasible to suppress the generation of the sextupole field component by appropriately varying the tube wall thickness as a function of angle around the tube circumference. This result indicates that it is possible to design an elliptical-shaped beam tube that generates a dipole field component with zero magnitude of sextupole. In a rectangular-shaped beam tube, one of the selected harmonic fields can be prevented if an appropriate wall thickness ratio between the horizontal and vertical tube walls is properly chosen. Our generalized formalism can be used for optimization of arbitrarily complex-shaped beam tubes, with respect to suppression of detrimental field harmonics.

  17. Dynamic behavior of radiant cooling system based on capillary tubes in walls made of high performance concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikeska, Tomás; Svendsen, Svend

    2015-01-01

    elements made of high performance concrete. The influence of the radiant cooling system on the indoor climate of the test room in terms of the air, surface and operative temperatures and velocities was investigated.The results show that the temperature of the room air can be kept in a comfortable range...... using cooling water for the radiant cooling system with a temperature only about 4K lower than the temperature of the room air. The relatively high speed reaction of the designed system is a result of the slim construction of the sandwich wall elements made of high performance concrete. (C) 2015...... the small amount of fresh air required by standards to provide a healthy indoor environment.This paper reports on experimental analyses evaluating the dynamic behavior of a test room equipped with a radiant cooling system composed of plastic capillary tubes integrated into the inner layer of sandwich wall...

  18. Experimental Study on the Hygrothermal Behavior of a Coated Sprayed Hemp Concrete Wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Magueresse

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemp concrete is a sustainable lightweight concrete that became popular in the field of building construction because of its thermal and environmental properties. However; available experimental data on its hygrothermal behavior are rather scarce in the literature. This paper describes the design of a large-scale experiment developed to investigate the hygrothermal behavior of hemp concrete cast around a timber frame through a spraying process; and then coated with lime-based plaster. The equipment is composed of two climatic chambers surrounding the tested wall. The experiment consists of maintaining the indoor climate at constant values and applying incremental steps of temperature; relative humidity or vapor pressure in the outdoor chamber. Temperature and relative humidity of the room air and on various depths inside the wall are continuously registered during the experiments and evaporation phenomena are observed. The influence of the plaster on the hygrothermal behavior of hemp concrete is investigated. Moreover; a comparison of experimental temperatures with numerical results obtained from a purely conductive thermal model is proposed. Comparing the model with the measured data gave satisfactory agreement.

  19. Surgical management of anterior chamber epithelial cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, Julia A; Stark, Walter J; Azab, Amr; Thomsen, Robert W; Gottsch, John D

    2003-03-01

    To review management strategies for treatment of anterior chamber epithelial cysts. Retrospective review of consecutive interventional case series. Charts of patients treated for epithelial ingrowth over a 10-year period by a single surgeon were reviewed. Cases of anterior chamber epithelial cysts were identified and recorded, including details of ocular history, preoperative and postoperative acuity, intraocular pressure (IOP), and ocular examination, type of surgical intervention, and details of further procedures performed. Seven eyes with epithelial cysts were identified. Patient age ranged from 1.5 to 53 years at presentation. Four patients were children. In four eyes, cysts were secondary to trauma, one case was presumably congenital, one case developed after corneal perforation in an eye with Terrien's marginal degeneration, and one case developed after penetrating keratoplasty (PK). Three eyes were treated with vitrectomy, en bloc resection of the cyst and associated tissue, fluid-air exchange and cryotherapy. The last four eyes were treated with a new conservative strategy of cyst aspiration (three cases) or local excision (one keratin "pearl" cyst), and endolaser photocoagulation of the collapsed cyst wall/base. All epithelial tissue was successfully eradicated by clinical criteria; one case required repeat excision (follow-up, 9 to 78 months, mean 45). Two eyes required later surgery for elevated IOP, two for cataract extraction and one for repeat PK. Final visual acuity ranged from 20/20 to hand motions, depending on associated ocular damage. Best-corrected visual results were obtained in the more conservatively managed eyes. Anterior chamber epithelial cysts can be managed conservatively in selected cases with good results. This strategy may be particularly useful in children's eyes, where preservation of the lens, iris, and other structures may facilitate amblyopia management. Copyright 2003 by Elsevier Science Inc.

  20. Thin-walled beam tubes for the SIS. Construction and manufacturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malwitz, E.

    1985-06-01

    The vacuum system of the SIS consists essentially of torus-shaped vacuum chamber with an annulus-circumference of 216 m which is composed by several beam-tube and chamber elements. In order to reach the desired final pressure of -11 mbar (5 . 10 -9 Pa) a heating of the whole vacuum system to 300 0 C is required. The beam tubes within magnets have regularly an elliptic tube cross section. Within bending magnets the beam tubes are curved in a plane through the large ellipse axis with a bending radius of 10 m. During the development work for the beam tubes within magnets to construction variants were studied until construction maturity. Generally thin-walled beam tubes with elliptic tube cross section are fabricated similarly to spring bellows as corrugated tubes. In this report however beam tubes with elliptic tube cross section are discussed the tube walls of which are smooth and stabilized against the atmospheric pressure by hard-soldered ribs. The report reproduces mainly the most important know how respectively serves as instruction for new constructions. Such beam tubes are planned for the dipole magnets and the quadrupole group consisting of two long quadrupoles, a short quadrupole, and a sextupole. (orig./HSI) [de

  1. Dynamics of chest wall volume regulation during constant work rate exercise in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takara, L.S.; Cunha, T.M.; Barbosa, P.; Rodrigues, M.K.; Oliveira, M.F.; Nery, L.E. [Setor de Função Pulmonar e Fisiologia Clínica do Exercício, Disciplina de Pneumologia, Departamento de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Neder, J.A. [Setor de Função Pulmonar e Fisiologia Clínica do Exercício, Disciplina de Pneumologia, Departamento de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Division of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON (Canada)

    2012-10-15

    This study evaluated the dynamic behavior of total and compartmental chest wall volumes [(V{sub CW}) = rib cage (V{sub RC}) + abdomen (V{sub AB})] as measured breath-by-breath by optoelectronic plethysmography during constant-load exercise in patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Thirty males (GOLD stages II-III) underwent a cardiopulmonary exercise test to the limit of tolerance (Tlim) at 75% of peak work rate on an electronically braked cycle ergometer. Exercise-induced dynamic hyperinflation was considered to be present when end-expiratory (EE) V{sub CW} increased in relation to resting values. There was a noticeable heterogeneity in the patterns of V{sub CW} regulation as EEV{sub CW} increased non-linearly in 17/30 “hyperinflators” and decreased in 13/30 “non-hyperinflators” (P < 0.05). EEV{sub AB} decreased slightly in 8 of the “hyperinflators”, thereby reducing and slowing the rate of increase in end-inspiratory (EI) V{sub CW} (P < 0.05). In contrast, decreases in EEV{sub CW} in the “non-hyperinflators” were due to the combination of stable EEV{sub RC} with marked reductions in EEV{sub AB}. These patients showed lower EIV{sub CW} and end-exercise dyspnea scores but longer Tlim than their counterparts (P < 0.05). Dyspnea increased and Tlim decreased non-linearly with a faster rate of increase in EIV{sub CW} regardless of the presence or absence of dynamic hyperinflation (P < 0.001). However, no significant between-group differences were observed in metabolic, pulmonary gas exchange and cardiovascular responses to exercise. Chest wall volumes are continuously regulated during exercise in order to postpone (or even avoid) their migration to higher operating volumes in patients with COPD, a dynamic process that is strongly dependent on the behavior of the abdominal compartment.

  2. Contact angle dependence on the fluid-wall dispersive energy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horsch, M.; Heitzig, M.; Dan, C.M.; Harting, J.D.R.; Hasse, H.; Vrabec, J.

    2010-01-01

    Menisci of the truncated and shifted Lennard-Jones fluid between parallel planar walls are investigated by molecular dynamics simulation. Thereby, the characteristic energy of the unlike dispersive interaction between fluid molecules and wall atoms is systematically varied to determine its influence

  3. Seismic behavior of reinforced concrete shear walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, F.; Gantenbein, F.

    1989-01-01

    Reinforced concrete shear walls have an important contribution to building stiffness. So, it is necessary to know their behavior under seismic loads. The ultimate behavior study of shear walls subjected to dynamic loadings includes: - a description of the nonlinear global model based on cyclic static tests, - nonlinear time history calculations for various forcing functions. The comparison of linear and nonlinear results shows important margins related to the ductility when the bandwidth of the forcing function is narrow and centred on the wall natural frequency

  4. Semi-active engine mount design using auxiliary magneto-rheological fluid compliance chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, H.; Arzanpour, S.; Golnaraghi, M. F.; Parameswaran, A. M.

    2011-03-01

    Engine mounts are used in the automotive industry to isolate engine and chassis by reducing the noise and vibration imposed from one to the other. This paper describes modelling, simulation and design of a semi-active engine mount that is designed specifically to address the complicated vibration pattern of variable displacement engines (VDE). The ideal isolation for VDE requires the stiffness to be switchable upon cylinder activation/deactivation operating modes. In order to have a modular design, the same hydraulic engine mount components are maintained and a novel auxiliary magneto-rheological (MR) fluid chamber is developed and retrofitted inside the pumping chamber. The new compliance chamber is a controllable pressure regulator, which can effectively alter the dynamic performance of the mount. Switching between different modes happens by turning the electrical current to the MR chamber magnetic coil on and off. A model has been developed for the passive hydraulic mount and then it is extended to include the MR auxiliary chamber as well. A proof-of-concept prototype of the design has been fabricated which validates the mathematical model. The results demonstrate unique capability of the developed semi-active mount to be used for VDE application.

  5. Neutronics and activation of the preliminary reaction chamber of HiPER reactor based in a SCLL blanket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juárez, Rafael, E-mail: rafael.juarez@upm.es [Instituto de Fusión Nuclear, UPM, Madrid (Spain); Escuela Técnica Superior de Ingenieros Industriales, UNED, Madrid (Spain); Sanz, Javier; Lopez-Revelles, A.J. [Escuela Técnica Superior de Ingenieros Industriales, UNED, Madrid (Spain); Perlado, José Manuel [Instituto de Fusión Nuclear, UPM, Madrid (Spain)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • Neutronic study of a proposal of a reaction chamber for HiPER reactor. • Two options for the blanket size, thin and thick, are studied and compared. • The thin blanket performs better than the thick blanket. • The proposed Vacuum Vessel is unviable as lifetime component in both cases. • Likely solutions for the Vacuum Vessel lifetime extension are explored. -- Abstract: The HiPER reactor design is exploring different reaction chambers. In this study, we tackle the neutronics and activation studies of a preliminary reaction chamber based in the following technologies: unprotected dry wall for the First Wall, self-cooled lead lithium blanket, and independent low activation steel Vacuum Vessel. The most critical free parameter in this stage is the blanket thickness, as a function of the {sup 6}Li enrichment. After a parametric study, we select for study both a “thin” and “thick” blanket, with “high” and “low” {sup 6}Li enrichment respectively, to reach a TBR = 1.1. To help to make a choice, we compute, for both blanket options, in addition to the TBR, the energy amplification factor, the tritium partial pressure, the {sup 203}Hg and {sup 210}Po total activity in the LiPb loop, and the Vacuum Vessel thickness required to guarantee the reweldability during its lifetime. The thin blanket shows a superior performance in the safety related issues and structural viability, but it operates at higher {sup 6}Li enrichment. It is selected for further improvements. The Vacuum Vessel shows to be unviable in both cases, with the thickness varying between 39 and 52 cm. Further chamber modifications, such as the introduction of a neutron reflector, are required to exploit the benefits of the thin blanket with a reasonable Vacuum Vessel.

  6. Flow Dynamics of green sand in the DISAMATIC moulding process using Discrete element method (DEM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hovad, E; Walther, J H; Thorborg, J; Hattel, J H; Larsen, P

    2015-01-01

    The DISAMATIC casting process production of sand moulds is simulated with DEM (discrete element method). The main purpose is to simulate the dynamics of the flow of green sand, during the production of the sand mould with DEM. The sand shot is simulated, which is the first stage of the DISAMATIC casting process. Depending on the actual casting geometry the mould can be geometrically quite complex involving e.g. shadowing effects and this is directly reflected in the sand flow during the moulding process. In the present work a mould chamber with “ribs” at the walls is chosen as a baseline geometry to emulate some of these important conditions found in the real moulding process. The sand flow is simulated with the DEM and compared with corresponding video footages from the interior of the chamber during the moulding process. The effect of the rolling resistance and the static friction coefficient is analysed and discussed in relation to the experimental findings. (paper)

  7. Quantum dynamics of a particle in a tracking chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figari, Rodolfo; INFN, Napoli; Teta, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    In the original formulation of quantum mechanics the existence of a precise border between a microscopic world, governed by quantum mechanics, and a macroscopic world, described by classical mechanics was assumed. Modern theoretical and experimental physics has moved that border several times, carefully investigating its definition and making available to observation larger and larger quantum systems. The present book examines a paradigmatic case of the transition from quantum to classical behavior: A quantum particle is revealed in a tracking chamber as a trajectory obeying the laws of classical mechanics. The authors provide here a purely quantum-mechanical description of this behavior, thus helping to illuminate the nature of the border between the quantum and the classical.

  8. Dynamics of capillary infiltration of liquids into a highly aligned multi-walled carbon nanotube film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sławomir Boncel

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The physical compatibility of a highly aligned carbon nanotube (HACNT film with liquids was established using a fast and convenient experimental protocol. Two parameters were found to be decisive for the infiltration process. For a given density of nanotube packing, the thermodynamics of the infiltration process (wettability were described by the contact angle between the nanotube wall and a liquid meniscus (θ. Once the wettability criterion (θ < 90° was met, the HACNT film (of free volume equal to 91% was penetrated gradually by the liquid in a rate that can be linearly correlated to dynamic viscosity of the liquid (η. The experimental results follow the classical theory of capillarity for a steady process (Lucas–Washburn law, where the nanoscale capillary force, here supported by gravity, is compensated by viscous drag. This most general theory of capillarity can be applied in a prediction of both wettability of HACNT films and the dynamics of capillary rise in the intertube space in various technological applications.

  9. Radiometric measurements of wall temperatures in the 800 K to 1150 K range for a quartz radiant heating tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blevins, L.G.; Sivathanu, Y.R.; Gore, J.P.; Shahien, M.A.

    1995-01-01

    Many industrial applications require heat transfer to a load in an inert environment, which can be achieved by using gas-fired radiant tubes. A radiant tube consists of a flame confined in a cylindrical metal or ceramic chamber. The flame heats the tube wall, which in turn radiates to the load. One important characteristic of radiant heating tubes is wall temperature uniformity. Numerical models of radiant tubes have been used to predict wall temperatures, but there is a lack of experimental data for validation. Recently, Namazian et al., Singh and Gorski, and Peters et al. have measured wall temperature profiles of radiant tubes using thermocouples. 13 refs., 3 figs

  10. Metrology of the radon in air volume activity at the italian radon reference chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sciocchetti, G.; Cotellessa, G.; Soldano, E.; Pagliari, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Metrologia delle Radiazioni Ionizzanti, ENEA Centro Ricerche Casaccia Roma (Italy)

    2006-07-01

    The approach of the Italian National Institute of Ionising Radiations (I.N.M.R.I.-ENEA) on radon metrology has been based on a complete and integrated system which can be used to calibrate the main types of {sup 222}Rn in air measuring instruments with international traceability. The Italian radon reference chamber is a research and calibration facility developed at the Casaccia Research Center in Roma. This facility has an inner volume of one m{sup 3}. The wall is a cylindrical stainless steel vessel coupled with an automated climate apparatus operated both at steady and dynamic conditions. The control and data acquisition equipment is based on Radotron system, developed to automate the multitasking management of different sets of radon monitors and climatic sensors. A novel approach for testing passive radon monitors with an alpha track detector exposure standard has been developed. It is based on the direct measurement of radon exposure with a set of passive integrating monitors based on the new ENEA piston radon exposure meter. This paper describes the methodological approach on radon metrology, the status-of-art of experimental apparatus and the standardization procedures. (authors)

  11. Metrology of the radon in air volume activity at the italian radon reference chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sciocchetti, G.; Cotellessa, G.; Soldano, E.; Pagliari, M.

    2006-01-01

    The approach of the Italian National Institute of Ionising Radiations (I.N.M.R.I.-ENEA) on radon metrology has been based on a complete and integrated system which can be used to calibrate the main types of 222 Rn in air measuring instruments with international traceability. The Italian radon reference chamber is a research and calibration facility developed at the Casaccia Research Center in Roma. This facility has an inner volume of one m 3 . The wall is a cylindrical stainless steel vessel coupled with an automated climate apparatus operated both at steady and dynamic conditions. The control and data acquisition equipment is based on Radotron system, developed to automate the multitasking management of different sets of radon monitors and climatic sensors. A novel approach for testing passive radon monitors with an alpha track detector exposure standard has been developed. It is based on the direct measurement of radon exposure with a set of passive integrating monitors based on the new ENEA piston radon exposure meter. This paper describes the methodological approach on radon metrology, the status-of-art of experimental apparatus and the standardization procedures. (authors)

  12. A film-based wall shear stress sensor for wall-bounded turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amili, Omid; Soria, Julio

    2011-07-01

    In wall-bounded turbulent flows, determination of wall shear stress is an important task. The main objective of the present work is to develop a sensor which is capable of measuring surface shear stress over an extended region applicable to wall-bounded turbulent flows. This sensor, as a direct method for measuring wall shear stress, consists of mounting a thin flexible film on the solid surface. The sensor is made of a homogeneous, isotropic, and incompressible material. The geometry and mechanical properties of the film are measured, and particles with the nominal size of 11 μm in diameter are embedded on the film's surface to act as markers. An optical technique is used to measure the film deformation caused by the flow. The film has typically deflection of less than 2% of the material thickness under maximum loading. The sensor sensitivity can be adjusted by changing the thickness of the layer or the shear modulus of the film's material. The paper reports the sensor fabrication, static and dynamic calibration procedure, and its application to a fully developed turbulent channel flow at Reynolds numbers in the range of 90,000-130,000 based on the bulk velocity and channel full height. The results are compared to alternative wall shear stress measurement methods.

  13. DRAGON: a new 18 GHz RT ECRIS with a large plasma chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, W.; Xie, D.Z.; Zhang, X.Z.; Zhao, H.W.; Ruan, L.; Song, F.C.; Xiong, B.; Yu, S.; Yuan, J.

    2012-01-01

    Building a strong radial magnetic field with a permanent sextupole magnet for an ECRIS is extremely challenging so that the conventional wisdom recommends a small but not optimal plasma chamber that is typically of ID less or equal to 80 mm. A new 18 GHz RT ECRIS, DRAGON, with a large bore permanent sextupole has been designed and is under construction at IMP (Institute of Modern Physics, Lanzhou, China). Its plasma chamber is of ID 126 mm, the same as that of the superconducting ion source SECRAL, with maximum radial field strength reaching 1.5 T at the plasma chamber wall. The overall magnetic strengths of DRAGON, with maximum axial fields of 2.7 T at the injection and 1.3 T at the extraction, are very similar to those of SECRAL operating at 18 GHz and hopefully its performance. The source solenoid magnets are cooled by medium evaporation at about 50 C. In addition, the source is thickly insulated for beam extraction at 50 kV and higher voltage up to 100 kV can be explored. This article will present the design details and discussions of this new ion source. It is followed by the associated poster. (authors)

  14. Electromagnetic reverberation chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Besnier, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Dedicated to a complete presentation on all aspects of reverberation chambers, this book provides the physical principles behind these test systems in a very progressive manner. The detailed panorama of parameters governing the operation of electromagnetic reverberation chambers details various applications such as radiated immunity, emissivity, and shielding efficiency experiments.In addition, the reader is provided with the elements of electromagnetic theory and statistics required to take full advantage of the basic operational rules of reverberation chambers, including calibration proc

  15. Overview of experimental preparation for the ITER-Like Wall at JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brezinsek, S., E-mail: s.brezinsek@fz-juelich.de [Institut fuer Energieforschung-Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich, Association EURATOM-FZJ, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Fundamenski, W. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Eich, T. [Association EURATOM-Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Coad, J.P.; Giroud, C.; Huber, A. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Jachmich, S. [LPP-ERM/KMS, Association EURATOM-Belgian State (Belgium); Joffrin, E. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Krieger, K.; McCormick, K. [Association EURATOM-Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Lehnen, M. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Loarer, T. [Association EURATOM-CEA, CEA Cadarache, 13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Luna, E. de la [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusion, Asociacion EURATOM/CIEMAT, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Maddison, G.; Matthews, G.F.; Mertens, Ph. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Nunes, I. [Instituto de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear, Associaccao EURATOM-IST, Lisboa (Portugal); Philipps, V.; Riccardo, V. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Rubel, M. [Alfven Laboratory, Royal Institute of Technology, Association EURATOM-VR, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2011-08-01

    Experiments in JET with carbon-based plasma-facing components have been carried out in preparation of the ITER-Like Wall with beryllium main chamber and full tungsten divertor. The preparatory work was twofold: (i) development of techniques, which ensure safe operation with the new wall and (ii) provision of reference plasmas, which allow a comparison of operation with carbon and metallic wall. (i) Compatibility with the W divertor with respect to energy loads could be achieved in N{sub 2} seeded plasmas at high densities and low temperatures, finally approaching partial detachment, with only moderate confinement reduction of 10%. Strike-point sweeping increases the operational space further by re-distributing the load over several components. (ii) Be and C migration to the divertor has been documented with spectroscopy and QMBs under different plasma conditions providing a database which will allow a comparison of the material transport to remote areas with metallic walls. Fuel retention rates of 1.0-2.0 x 10{sup 21} D s{sup -1} were obtained as references in accompanied gas balance studies.

  16. Occupant feedback based model predictive control for thermal comfort and energy optimization: A chamber experimental evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Xiao; Wang, Qian; Srebric, Jelena

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • This study evaluates an occupant-feedback driven Model Predictive Controller (MPC). • The MPC adjusts indoor temperature based on a dynamic thermal sensation (DTS) model. • A chamber model for predicting chamber air temperature is developed and validated. • Experiments show that MPC using DTS performs better than using Predicted Mean Vote. - Abstract: In current centralized building climate control, occupants do not have much opportunity to intervene the automated control system. This study explores the benefit of using thermal comfort feedback from occupants in the model predictive control (MPC) design based on a novel dynamic thermal sensation (DTS) model. This DTS model based MPC was evaluated in chamber experiments. A hierarchical structure for thermal control was adopted in the chamber experiments. At the high level, an MPC controller calculates the optimal supply air temperature of the chamber heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system, using the feedback of occupants’ votes on thermal sensation. At the low level, the actual supply air temperature is controlled by the chiller/heater using a PI control to achieve the optimal set point. This DTS-based MPC was also compared to an MPC designed based on the Predicted Mean Vote (PMV) model for thermal sensation. The experiment results demonstrated that the DTS-based MPC using occupant feedback allows significant energy saving while maintaining occupant thermal comfort compared to the PMV-based MPC.

  17. Dorsal skinfold chamber models in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schreiter, Jeannine

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/purpose: The use of dorsal skinfold chamber models has substantially improved the understanding of micro-vascularisation in pathophysiology over the last eight decades. It allows pathophysiological studies of vascularisation over a continuous period of time. The dorsal skinfold chamber is an attractive technique for monitoring the vascularisation of autologous or allogenic transplants, wound healing, tumorigenesis and compatibility of biomaterial implants. To further reduce the animals’ discomfort while carrying the dorsal skinfold chamber, we developed a smaller chamber (the Leipzig Dorsal Skinfold Chamber and summarized the commercial available chamber models. In addition we compared our model to the common chamber. Methods: The Leipzig Dorsal Skinfold Chamber was applied to female mice with a mean weight of 22 g. Angiogenesis within the dorsal skinfold chamber was evaluated after injection of fluorescein isothiocyanate dextran with an Axio Scope microscope. The mean vessel density within the dorsal skinfold chamber was assessed over a period of 21 days at five different time points. The gained data were compared to previous results using a bigger and heavier dorsal skinfold model in mice. A PubMed and a patent search were performed and all papers related to “dorsal skinfold chamber” from 1 of January 2006 to 31 of December 2015 were evaluated regarding the dorsal skinfold chamber models and their technical improvements. The main models are described and compared to our titanium Leipzig Dorsal Skinfold Chamber model.Results: The Leipzig Dorsal Skinfold Chamber fulfils all requirements of continuous models known from previous chamber models while reducing irritation to the mice. Five different chamber models have been identified showing substantial regional diversity. The newly elaborated titanium dorsal skinfold chamber may replace the pre-existing titanium chamber model used in Germany so far, as it is smaller and lighter

  18. A combination drift chamber/pad chamber for very high readout rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiegel, L.; Cataldi, G.; Elia, V.; Mazur, P.; Murphy, C.T.; Smith, R.P.; Yang, W.; Alexopoulos, T.; Durandet, C.; Erwin, A.; Jennings, J.; Antoniazzi, L.; Introzzi, G.; Lanza, A.; Liguori, G.; Torre, P.; Arenton, M.; Conetti, S.; Cox, B.; Dukes, E.; Golovatyuk, V.; Hanlet, P.; McManus, A.; Nelson, K.; Recagni, M.; Segal, J.; Sun, J.; Ballagh, C.; Bingham, H.; Kaeding, T.; Lys, J.; Misawa, S.; Blankman, A.; Borodin, S.; Kononenko, W.; Newcomer, M.; Selove, W.; Trojak, T.; VanBerg, R.; Zhang, S.N.; Block, M.; Corti, G.; LeCompte, T.; Rosen, J.; Yao, T.; Boden, A.; Cline, D.; Ramachandran, S.; Rhoades, J.; Tokar, S.; Budagov, J.; Tsyganov, E.; Cao, Z.L.; He, M.; Wang, C.; Wei, C.; Zhang, N.; Chen, T.Y.; Yao, N.; Clark, K.; Jenkins, M.; Cooper, M.; Creti, P.; Gorini, E.; Grancagnolo, F.; Panareo, M.; Fortney, L.; Kowald, W.; Haire, M.; Judd, D.; Turnbull, L.; Wagoner, D.; Lau, K.; Mo, G.; Trischuk, J.

    1991-11-01

    Six medium-sized (∼1 x 2 m 2 ) drift chambers with pad and stripe readout have been constructed for and are presently operating in Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory experiment E-771. Each chamber module actually represents a pair of identical planes: two sets of anode wires, two sets of stripes, and two sets of pads. The wire planes are read out separately and represent X measurements in the coordinate system of the experiment. The twin stripe and pad planes are internally paired within the chamber modules; stripe signals represent Y measurements and pad signals combination X and Y measurements. Signals which develop on the stripes and pads are mirror (but inverted) images of what is seen on the wires. In addition to being used in the off-line pattern recognition, pad signals are also used as inputs to an on-line high transverse momentum (pt) trigger processor. While the techniques involved in the design and construction of the chambers are not novel, they may be of interest to experiments contemplating very large area, high rate chambers for future spectrometers

  19. A combination drift chamber/pad chamber for very high readout rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spiegel, L.; Cataldi, G.; Elia, V.; Mazur, P.; Murphy, C.T.; Smith, R.P.; Yang, W. (Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States)); Alexopoulos, T.; Durandet, C.; Erwin, A.; Jennings, J. (Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States)); Antoniazzi, L.; Introzzi, G.; Lanza, A.; Liguori, G.; Torre, P. (Pavia Univ. (Italy) Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Rome (Italy)); Arenton, M.; Conetti, S.

    1991-11-01

    Six medium-sized ({approx}1 {times} 2 m{sup 2}) drift chambers with pad and stripe readout have been constructed for and are presently operating in Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory experiment E-771. Each chamber module actually represents a pair of identical planes: two sets of anode wires, two sets of stripes, and two sets of pads. The wire planes are read out separately and represent X measurements in the coordinate system of the experiment. The twin stripe and pad planes are internally paired within the chamber modules; stripe signals represent Y measurements and pad signals combination X and Y measurements. Signals which develop on the stripes and pads are mirror (but inverted) images of what is seen on the wires. In addition to being used in the off-line pattern recognition, pad signals are also used as inputs to an on-line high transverse momentum (pt) trigger processor. While the techniques involved in the design and construction of the chambers are not novel, they may be of interest to experiments contemplating very large area, high rate chambers for future spectrometers.

  20. Combustion chamber heat transfer characterization of LOX/hydrocarbon-type propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenman, Leonard

    1987-01-01

    The gas-side heat transfer rates for LOX/propane and LOX/ethanol are experimentally characterized using a 1000 lb thrust water-cooled calorimeter chamber. The effects of injector element type and fuel film cooling are defined as a function of mixture ratio. The interaction of fuel injected through the resonator cavities on heat transfer and wall soot buildup are displayed as a function of time, axial distance, fuel coolant flow rate, and mixture ratio. Comparisons between clean-burning ethanol and sooting propane show a large difference between the two fuels and significantly higher than expected heat flux levels for ethanol in the throat region.

  1. Comparison of measurements of absorbed dose to water using a water calorimeter and ionization chambers for clinical radiotherapy photon and electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marles, A.E.M.

    1981-01-01

    With the development of the water calorimeter direct measurement of absorbed dose in water becomes possible. This could lead to the establishment of an absorbed dose rather than an exposure related standard for ionization chambers for high energy electrons and photons. In changing to an absorbed dose standard it is necessary to investigate the effect of different parameters, among which are the energy dependence, the air volume, wall thickness and material of the chamber. The effect of these parameters is experimentally studied and presented for several commercially available chambers and one experimental chamber, for photons up to 25 MV and electrons up to 20 MeV, using a water calorimeter as the absorbed dose standard and the most recent formalism to calculate the absorbed dose with ion chambers. For electron beams, the dose measured with the calorimeter was 1% lower than the dose calculated with the chambers, independent of beam energy and chamber. For photon beams, the absorbed dose measured with the calorimeter was 3.8% higher than the absorbed dose calculated from the chamber readings. Such differences were found to be chamber and energy independent. The results for the photons were found to be statistically different from the results with the electron beams. Such difference could not be attributed to a difference in the calorimeter response

  2. Review of wire chamber aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Va'Vra, J.

    1986-02-01

    This paper makes an overview of the wire chamber aging problems as a function of various chamber design parameters. It emphasizes the chemistry point of view and many examples are drawn from the plasma chemistry field as a guidance for a possible effort in the wire chamber field. The paper emphasizes the necessity of variable tuning, the importance of purity of the wire chamber environment, as well as it provides a practical list of presently known recommendations. In addition, several models of the wire chamber aging are qualitatively discussed. The paper is based on a summary talk given at the Wire Chamber Aging Workshop held at LBL, Berkeley on January 16-17, 1986. Presented also at Wire Chamber Conference, Vienna, February 25-28, 1986. 74 refs., 18 figs., 11 tabs

  3. Fail-safe ion chamber errant beam detector tailored for personnel protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plum, M.A.; Browman, A.A.; Brown, D.; Lee, D.M.; McCabe, C.W.

    1989-01-01

    This fail-safe ion chamber system is designed to be part of the personnel safety system (PSS) for the Los Alamos neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Its job is to protect the occupants of the experimental areas from large radiation doses caused by errant beam conditions during beam transport from the Proton Storage Ring (PSR) to the LANSCE neutron spallation target. Due to limited shielding between the beam transport line and the experimental area only if the beam losses in the transport line are very low. The worst case beam spill scenario is calculated to result in a personnel exposure of about 0.01 Gys/s (1 rad/s). Although the preferred solution is to increase the bulk shielding between the beam line and the experimental area, the physical dimensions of the site do not permit an adequate amount of shielding to be added. The solution adopted is a layered system of three types of highly reliable detector systems: a current limiter system located in the beam line, a neutron detector system located in the experimental areas, and an ion chamber system located on the walls of the beam line tunnels. The ion chamber system is capable of shutting off the beam in less than 0.5 s, resulting in a worst case personnel exposure of 0.005 Gys (0.5 rad). 4 figs

  4. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of a Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube Based Gear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jie; Globus, Al; Srivastava, Deepak; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    We used molecular dynamics to investigate the properties of a multi-walled carbon nanotube based gear. Previous work computationally suggested that molecular gears fashioned from (14,0) single-walled carbon nanotubes operate well at 50-100 gigahertz. The gears were formed from nanotubes with teeth added via a benzyne reaction known to occur with C60. A modified, parallelized version of Brenner's potential was used to model interatomic forces within each molecule. A Leonard-Jones 6-12 potential was used for forces between molecules. The gear in this study was based on the smallest multi-walled nanotube supported by some experimental evidence. Each gear was a (52,0) nanotube surrounding a (37,10) nanotube with approximate 20.4 and 16,8 A radii respectively. These sizes were chosen to be consistent with inter-tube spacing observed by and were slightly larger than graphite inter-layer spacings. The benzyne teeth were attached via 2+4 cycloaddition to exterior of the (52,0) tube. 2+4 bonds were used rather than the 2+2 bonds observed by Hoke since 2+4 bonds are preferred by naphthalene and quantum calculations by Jaffe suggest that 2+4 bonds are preferred on carbon nanotubes of sufficient diameter. One gear was 'powered' by forcing the atoms near the end of the outside buckytube to rotate to simulate a motor. A second gear was allowed to rotate by keeping the atoms near the end of its outside buckytube on a cylinder. The ends of both gears were constrained to stay in an approximately constant position relative to each other, simulating a casing, to insure that the gear teeth meshed. The stiff meshing aromatic gear teeth transferred angular momentum from the powered gear to the driven gear. The simulation was performed in a vacuum and with a software thermostat. Preliminary results suggest that the powered gear had trouble turning the driven gear without slip. The larger radius and greater mass of these gears relative to the (14,0) gears previously studied requires a

  5. A new type of resistive plate chamber: The multigap RPC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerron Zeballos, E.; Crotty, I.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Lamas Valverde, J.; Neupane, S.; Williams, M.C.S.; Zichichi, A.

    1996-01-01

    This Letter describes the multigap resistive plate chamber (RPC). The goal is to obtain a much improved time resolution, keeping the advantages of the wide gap RPC in comparison with the conventional narrow gap RPC (smaller dynamic range and thus lower charge per avalanche which gives higher rate capability and lower power dissipation in the gas gap). (orig.)

  6. A new type of resistive plate chamber the multigap RPC

    CERN Document Server

    Cerron-Zeballos, E; Hatzifotiadou, D; Lamas-Valverde, J; Neupane, S; Williams, M C S; Zichichi, Antonino

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the multigap resistive plate chamber (RPC). The goal is to obtain a much improved time resolution, keeping the advantages of the wide gap RPC in comparison with the conventional narrow gap RPC (smaller dynamic range and thus lower charge per avalanche which gives higher rate capability and lower power dissipation in the gas gap).

  7. Falling liquid film flow along cascade-typed first wall of laser-fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunugi, T.; Nakai, T.; Kawara, Z.

    2007-01-01

    To protect from high energy/particle fluxes caused by nuclear fusion reaction such as extremely high heat flux, X rays, Alpha particles and fuel debris to a first wall of an inertia fusion reactor, a 'cascade-typed' first wall with a falling liquid film flow is proposed as the 'liquid wall' concept which is one of the reactor chamber cooling and wall protection schemes: the reactor chamber can protect by using a liquid metal film flow (such as Li 17 Pb 83 ) over the wall. In order to investigate the feasibility of this concept, we conducted the numerical analyses by using the STREAM code and also conducted the flow visualization experiments. The numerical results suggested that the cascade structure design should be improved, so that we redesigned the cascade-typed first wall and performed the flow visualization as a POP (proof-of-principle) experiment. In the numerical analyses, the water is used as the working liquid and an acrylic plate as the wall. These selections are based on two reasons: (1) from the non-dimensional analysis approach, the Weber number (We=ρu 2 δ/σ: ρ is density, u is velocity, δ is film thickness, σ is surface tension coefficient) should be the same between the design (Li 17 Pb 83 flow) and the model experiment (water flow) because of the free-surface instability, (2) the SiC/SiC composite would be used as the wall material, so that the wall may have the less wettability: the acrylic plate has the similar feature. The redesigned cascade-typed first wall for one step (30 cm height corresponding to 4 Hz laser duration) consists of a liquid tank having a free-surface for keeping the constant water-head located at the backside of the first wall, and connects to a slit which is composed of two plates: one plate is the first wall, and the other is maintaining the liquid level. This design solved the trouble of the previous design. The test section for the flow visualization has the same structure and the same height as the reactor design

  8. Change of Pressing Chamber Conicalness at Briquetting Process in Briquetting Machine Pressing Chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Križan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we will present the impact of the conical shape of a pressing chamber, an important structural parameter. Besides the known impact of the technological parameters of pressing chambers, it is also very important to pay attention to their structural parameters. In the introduction, we present a theoretical analysis of pressing chamber conicalness. An experiment aimed at detecting this impact was performed at our institute, and it showed that increasing the conicalness of a pressing chamber improves the quality of the final briquettes. The conicalness of the pressing chamber has a significanteffect on the final briquette quality and on the construction of briquetting machines. The experimental findings presented here show the importance of this parameter in the briquetting process.

  9. Effect of historical earthquakes on pre-stressed anchor tie back diaphragm wall and on near-by building

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal Mohamed Hafez Ismail Ibrahim

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Pre-stressed tie back anchored diaphragm walls are considered one of the safest lateral supports which help in overall stability when there is a significant difference in land level between back and front of these walls. Permanent lateral supports to these walls are frequently represented by supporting it laterally with foundation and floor slabs of the building. In this paper a special study of one raw anchor diaphragm wall subjected to different earthquake dynamic loads will be presented. The wall retains an excavation of 9.5 m and supports laterally a near-by 5 floor building. Five historical strong motions with different fundamental frequencies are subjected on the wall. The wall displacement, straining actions, anchor extreme force and the influence of variation of anchor stiffness are calculated using a dynamic Plaxis finite element program. The soil is considered as elasto-plastic material and represented using Mohr–Coulomb criteria, the wall and the anchor are considered to behave elastically. Prescribed displacement at the lower bottom boundary represents the earthquake motion. Far left and right absorbent boundaries are assumed to prevent dynamic wave reflection. Four static phases representing construction procedure and one dynamic loading phase are considered. It is found that the straining actions of different historical earthquakes match in shape with each other, the only change is in the amplitude which is affected by earthquake fundamental frequency and its intensity. The maximum dynamic lateral displacement of the wall is at its free top. The near-by building shows a differential settlement towards the wall which causes a change in the sign and amplitude of the straining actions. Increasing the stiffness of anchor was also studied and it was found that it reduces too much the maximum dynamic top wall lateral displacement.

  10. Quantum dynamics of a particle in a tracking chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Figari, Rodolfo

    2014-01-01

    In the original formulation of quantum mechanics the existence of a precise border between a microscopic world, governed by quantum mechanics, and a macroscopic world, described by classical mechanics was assumed. Modern theoretical and experimental physics has moved that border several times, carefully investigating its definition and making available to observation larger and larger quantum systems. The present book examines a paradigmatic case of the transition from quantum to classical behavior: A quantum particle is revealed in a tracking chamber as a trajectory obeying the laws of classical mechanics. The authors provide here a purely quantum-mechanical description of this behavior, thus helping to illuminate the nature of the border between the quantum and the classical.

  11. Robust Low Cost Liquid Rocket Combustion Chamber by Advanced Vacuum Plasma Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Richard; Elam, Sandra; Ellis, David L.; McKechnie, Timothy; Hickman, Robert; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Next-generation, regeneratively cooled rocket engines will require materials that can withstand high temperatures while retaining high thermal conductivity. Fabrication techniques must be cost efficient so that engine components can be manufactured within the constraints of shrinking budgets. Three technologies have been combined to produce an advanced liquid rocket engine combustion chamber at NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) using relatively low-cost, vacuum-plasma-spray (VPS) techniques. Copper alloy NARloy-Z was replaced with a new high performance Cu-8Cr-4Nb alloy developed by NASA-Glenn Research Center (GRC), which possesses excellent high-temperature strength, creep resistance, and low cycle fatigue behavior combined with exceptional thermal stability. Functional gradient technology, developed building composite cartridges for space furnaces was incorporated to add oxidation resistant and thermal barrier coatings as an integral part of the hot wall of the liner during the VPS process. NiCrAlY, utilized to produce durable protective coating for the space shuttle high pressure fuel turbopump (BPFTP) turbine blades, was used as the functional gradient material coating (FGM). The FGM not only serves as a protection from oxidation or blanching, the main cause of engine failure, but also serves as a thermal barrier because of its lower thermal conductivity, reducing the temperature of the combustion liner 200 F, from 1000 F to 800 F producing longer life. The objective of this program was to develop and demonstrate the technology to fabricate high-performance, robust, inexpensive combustion chambers for advanced propulsion systems (such as Lockheed-Martin's VentureStar and NASA's Reu