WorldWideScience

Sample records for wall area volume

  1. Modulation of chest wall intermuscular coherence: effects of lung volume excursion and transcranial direct current stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomczak, Corey R; Greidanus, Krista R; Boliek, Carol A

    2013-08-01

    Chest wall muscle recruitment varies as a function of the breathing task performed. However, the cortical control of the chest wall muscles during different breathing tasks is not known. We studied chest wall intermuscular coherence during various task-related lung volume excursions in 10 healthy adults (34 ± 15 yr; 2 men, 8 women) and determined if transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) could modulate chest wall intermuscular coherence during these tasks. Simultaneous assessment of regional intercostal and oblique electromyographic activity was measured while participants performed standardized tidal breathing, speech, maximum phonation, and vital capacity tasks. Lung volume and chest wall kinematics were determined using variable inductance plethysmography. We found that chest wall area of intermuscular coherence was greater during tidal and speech breathing compared with phonation and vital capacity (all P < 0.05) and between tidal breathing compared with speech breathing (P < 0.05). Anodal tDCS increased chest wall area of intermuscular coherence from 0.04 ± 0.09 prestimulation to 0.18 ± 0.19 poststimulation for vital capacity (P < 0.05). Sham tDCS and cathodal tDCS had no effect on coherence during lung volume excursions. Chest wall kinematics were not affected by tDCS. Our findings indicate that lung volume excursions about the midrange of vital capacity elicit a greater area of chest wall intermuscular coherence compared with lung volume excursions spanning the entire range of vital capacity in healthy adults. Our findings also demonstrate that brief tDCS may modulate the cortical control of the chest wall muscles in a stimulation- and lung volume excursion task-dependent manner but does not affect chest wall kinematics in healthy adults.

  2. Wall Vegetation Characteristics of Urban and Sub-Urban Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emrah Yalcinalp

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Unfortunately, we live in a greedy little world and horizontal areas are often too expensive to leave to nature on them. Therefore, creating gardens on vertical surfaces of urban areas has recently been very important to supporting sustainability because these surfaces are still found to be commercially useless compared with green areas which are generally under pressure from commercial demands and politics. However, these artificial vertical green surfaces are still too far from being common, while too many ordinary walls are spontaneously covered with vegetation already. In this study, we try to address the dynamics of wall vegetation as it has a great potential to make the cities more sustainable. Totally 70 walls (35 in urban and 35 in sub-urban areas in Trabzon city were examined regarding their ecological, physical and vegetation characteristics. Having identified 1540 plant samples collected from the walls during a year-round intensive field study, we performed statistical analyzes to enumerate the wall vegetation depending on the ecological characteristics; to evaluate if there are different wall vegetation compositions in urban and sub-urban areas; and finally to evaluate growth conditions and basic challenges for the wall vegetation.

  3. Osmosis and Surface Area to Volume Ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, D. R. B.

    1984-01-01

    Describes an experiment designed to help students understand the concepts of osmosis and surface area to volume ratio (SA:VOL). The task for students is to compare water uptake in different sizes of potato cubes and relate differences to their SA:VOL ratios. (JN)

  4. Volumes and surface areas of pendular rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, W.

    1958-01-01

    A packing of spheres is taken as a suitable model of porous media. The packing may be regular and the sphere size may be uniform, but in general, both should be random. Approximations are developed to give the volumes and surface areas of pendular rings that exist at points of sphere contact. From these, the total free volume and interfacial specific surface area are derived as expressive of the textural character of the packing. It was found that the log-log plot of volumes and surface areas of pendular rings vary linearly with the angle made by the line joining the sphere centers and the line from the center of the largest sphere to the closest edge of the pendular ring. The relationship, moreover, was found not to be very sensitive to variation in the size ratio of the spheres in contact. It also was found that the addition of pendular ring material to various sphere packings results in an unexpected decrease in the surface area of the boundaries that confine the resulting pore space. ?? 1958 The American Institute of Physics.

  5. Surface area-volume ratios in insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühsel, Sara; Brückner, Adrian; Schmelzle, Sebastian; Heethoff, Michael; Blüthgen, Nico

    2017-10-01

    Body mass, volume and surface area are important for many aspects of the physiology and performance of species. Whereas body mass scaling received a lot of attention in the literature, surface areas of animals have not been measured explicitly in this context. We quantified surface area-volume (SA/V) ratios for the first time using 3D surface models based on a structured light scanning method for 126 species of pollinating insects from 4 orders (Diptera, Hymenoptera, Lepidoptera, and Coleoptera). Water loss of 67 species was measured gravimetrically at very dry conditions for 2 h at 15 and 30 °C to demonstrate the applicability of the new 3D surface measurements and relevance for predicting the performance of insects. Quantified SA/V ratios significantly explained the variation in water loss across species, both directly or after accounting for isometric scaling (residuals of the SA/V ∼ mass2/3 relationship). Small insects with a proportionally larger surface area had the highest water loss rates. Surface scans of insects to quantify allometric SA/V ratios thus provide a promising method to predict physiological responses, improving the potential of body mass isometry alone that assume geometric similarity. © 2016 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  6. The thick left ventricular wall of the giraffe heart normalises wall tension, but limits stroke volume and cardiac output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smerup, Morten; Damkjær, Mads; Brøndum, Emil; Baandrup, Ulrik T; Kristiansen, Steen Buus; Nygaard, Hans; Funder, Jonas; Aalkjær, Christian; Sauer, Cathrine; Buchanan, Rasmus; Bertelsen, Mads Frost; Østergaard, Kristine; Grøndahl, Carsten; Candy, Geoffrey; Hasenkam, J Michael; Secher, Niels H; Bie, Peter; Wang, Tobias

    2016-02-01

    Giraffes--the tallest extant animals on Earth--are renowned for their high central arterial blood pressure, which is necessary to secure brain perfusion. Arterial pressure may exceed 300 mmHg and has historically been attributed to an exceptionally large heart. Recently, this has been refuted by several studies demonstrating that the mass of giraffe heart is similar to that of other mammals when expressed relative to body mass. It thus remains unexplained how the normal-sized giraffe heart generates such massive arterial pressures. We hypothesized that giraffe hearts have a small intraventricular cavity and a relatively thick ventricular wall, allowing for generation of high arterial pressures at normal left ventricular wall tension. In nine anaesthetized giraffes (495±38 kg), we determined in vivo ventricular dimensions using echocardiography along with intraventricular and aortic pressures to calculate left ventricular wall stress. Cardiac output was also determined by inert gas rebreathing to provide an additional and independent estimate of stroke volume. Echocardiography and inert gas-rebreathing yielded similar cardiac outputs of 16.1±2.5 and 16.4±1.4 l min(-1), respectively. End-diastolic and end-systolic volumes were 521±61 ml and 228±42 ml, respectively, yielding an ejection fraction of 56±4% and a stroke volume of 0.59 ml kg(-1). Left ventricular circumferential wall stress was 7.83±1.76 kPa. We conclude that, relative to body mass, a small left ventricular cavity and a low stroke volume characterizes the giraffe heart. The adaptations result in typical mammalian left ventricular wall tensions, but produce a lowered cardiac output. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  7. Effect of Wall Impingement on Volumes of Diesel Sprays and their Concentrations

    OpenAIRE

    高, 炅男; 樅山, 智裕; 新井, 雅隆

    2001-01-01

    Diesel spray impinged normally on a flat wall was investigated. Spray tip penetration and spray volumes of before and after impingement were measured on high speed photographs of the sprays which were injected by a single shot injection system into a high pressure chamber of cold state. The effects of the spray tip penetration, spray volume, entrainment mass and air-fuel ratio were discussed on the sprays of before and after impingement. The volume of the post-impingement spray was calculated...

  8. Wall Area of Influence and Growing Wall Heat Transfer due to Sliding Bubbles in Subcooled Boiling Flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Junsoo; Estrada-Perez, Carlos E.; Hassan, Yassin A.

    2016-04-01

    A variety of dynamical features of sliding bubbles and their impact on wall heat transfer were observed at subcooled flow boiling conditions in a vertical square test channel. Among the wide range of parameters observed, we particularly focus in this paper on (i) the sliding bubbles’ effect on wall heat transfer (supplemantry discussion to the authors’ previous work in Yoo et al. (2016a,b)) and (ii) the wall area influenced by sliding bubbles in subcooled boiling flow. At first, this study reveals that the degree of wall heat transfer improvement due to sliding bubbles depended less on the wall superheat condition as the mass flux increased. Also, the sliding bubble trajectory was found to be one of the critical factors in order to properly describe the wall heat transfer associated with sliding bubbles. In particular, the wall area influenced by sliding bubbles depended strongly on both sliding bubble trajectory and sliding bubble size; the sliding bubble trajectory was also observed to be closely related to the sliding bubble size. Importantly, these results indicate the limitation of current approach in CFD analyses especially for the wall area of bubble influence. In addition, the analyses on the temporal fraction of bubbles’ residence (FR) along the heated wall show that the sliding bubbles typically travel through narrow path with high frequency while the opposite was observed downstream. That is, both FR and sliding bubble trajectory depended substantially on the distance from nucleation site, which is expected to be similar for the quenching heat transfer mode induced by sliding bubbles.

  9. Measurement of angioplasty lumen volume and wall compliance: a laboratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, A; Allen, V

    1997-02-01

    We have developed a device and technique for measuring the pressure-volume characteristics of an arterial segment from a standard angioplasty balloon, enabling us in this laboratory study to investigate the ability of the technique to measure changes in lumen volume and wall compliance. Percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) is a valuable clinical procedure for alleviating arterial stenosis, but the long-term success of the technique is less than ideal. The ability to monitor the effect of the balloon on the artery during inflations could lead to improvements in the technique. In this study, 10 different lumen diameters (1.6 to 3.4 mm) were produced in a Perspex block, and six different wall compliances produced with silicone tubes of constant inner diameter (2.0 mm) but different outer diameters (3.5 to 6.0 mm) A standard PTCA balloon was inflated under automatic control at a constant rate of 0.05 ml s-1 to 800 kPa (8 bar). Pressure and volume data were recorded to computer continuously throughout the procedure. Differences in lumen volume of +/-0.01 ml and wall compliance of +/-5% could be differentiated with greater than 95% confidence. We conclude that our technique allows small changes in lumen volume and wall compliance to be differentiated using a standard angioplasty catheter and balloon.

  10. Effects of uncertainty in model predictions of individual tree volume on large area volume estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronald E. McRoberts; James A. Westfall

    2014-01-01

    Forest inventory estimates of tree volume for large areas are typically calculated by adding model predictions of volumes for individual trees. However, the uncertainty in the model predictions is generally ignored with the result that the precision of the large area volume estimates is overestimated. The primary study objective was to estimate the effects of model...

  11. Effects of Air Stacking Maneuver on Cough Peak Flow and Chest Wall Compartmental Volumes of Subjects With Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmento, Antonio; Resqueti, Vanessa; Dourado-Júnior, Mario; Saturnino, Lailane; Aliverti, Andrea; Fregonezi, Guilherme; de Andrade, Armele Dornelas

    2017-11-01

    To assess the acute effects of air stacking on cough peak flow (CPF) and chest wall compartmental volumes of persons with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) versus healthy subjects positioned at 45° body inclination. Cross-sectional study with a matched-pair design. University hospital. Persons (N=24) with ALS (n=12) and age-matched healthy subjects (n=12). CPF, chest wall compartmental inspiratory capacity, chest wall vital capacity, chest wall tidal volume and operational volumes, breathing pattern, and percentage of contribution of the compartments to the inspired volume were measured by optoelectronic plethysmography. Compared with healthy subjects, significantly lower CPF (P=.007), chest wall compartmental inspiratory capacity (P<.001), chest wall vital capacity (P<.001), and chest wall tidal volume (P<.001) were found in subjects with ALS. Immediately after air stacking, CPF (P<.001) and chest wall compartmental inspiratory capacity (P<.001) significantly increased in both groups, with values returning to basal only in healthy subjects. After air stacking, the abdominal compartment (P=.004) was determined to be responsible for the inspired volume in subjects with ALS. Significantly higher chest wall vital capacity (P=.05) was observed in subjects with ALS 5 minutes after air stacking, with the rib cage compartment (P=.049) being responsible for volume change. No differences were found in chest wall vital capacity and compartmental volumes of healthy subjects. Chest wall tidal volume (P<.001) significantly increased during the protocol in the healthy subjects, mainly because of end-inspiratory (P<.001) and abdominal volumes (P=.008). No significant differences were observed in percentage of contribution of the compartments to the inspired volume and end-expiratory volume of both groups. No significant differences were found in chest wall tidal volume, operational volume, and breathing pattern in persons with ALS. Air stacking is effective in increasing CPF

  12. Estimating wood volume from canopy area in deciduous woodlands ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study we tested the predictive ability of canopy area in estimating wood volume in deciduous woodlands of Zimbabwe. The study was carried out in four sites of different climatic conditions. We used regression analysis to statistically quantify the prediction of wood volume from canopy area at species and stand level ...

  13. ISABELLE. Volume 3. Experimental areas, large detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-01-01

    This section presents the papers which resulted from work in the Experimental Areas portion of the Workshop. The immediate task of the group was to address three topics. The topics were dictated by the present state of ISABELLE experimental areas construction, the possibility of a phased ISABELLE and trends in physics and detectors.

  14. Automatic Thickness and Volume Estimation of Sprayed Concrete on Anchored Retaining Walls from Terrestrial LIDAR Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Sánchez, J.; Puente, I.; GonzálezJorge, H.; Riveiro, B.; Arias, P.

    2016-06-01

    When ground conditions are weak, particularly in free formed tunnel linings or retaining walls, sprayed concrete can be applied on the exposed surfaces immediately after excavation for shotcreting rock outcrops. In these situations, shotcrete is normally applied conjointly with rock bolts and mesh, thereby supporting the loose material that causes many of the small ground falls. On the other hand, contractors want to determine the thickness and volume of sprayed concrete for both technical and economic reasons: to guarantee their structural strength but also, to not deliver excess material that they will not be paid for. In this paper, we first introduce a terrestrial LiDAR-based method for the automatic detection of rock bolts, as typically used in anchored retaining walls. These ground support elements are segmented based on their geometry and they will serve as control points for the co-registration of two successive scans, before and after shotcreting. Then we compare both point clouds to estimate the sprayed concrete thickness and the expending volume on the wall. This novel methodology is demonstrated on repeated scan data from a retaining wall in the city of Vigo (Spain), resulting in a rock bolts detection rate of 91%, that permits to obtain a detailed information of the thickness and calculate a total volume of 3597 litres of concrete. These results have verified the effectiveness of the developed approach by increasing productivity and improving previous empirical proposals for real time thickness estimation.

  15. AUTOMATIC THICKNESS AND VOLUME ESTIMATION OF SPRAYED CONCRETE ON ANCHORED RETAINING WALLS FROM TERRESTRIAL LIDAR DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Martínez-Sánchez

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available When ground conditions are weak, particularly in free formed tunnel linings or retaining walls, sprayed concrete can be applied on the exposed surfaces immediately after excavation for shotcreting rock outcrops. In these situations, shotcrete is normally applied conjointly with rock bolts and mesh, thereby supporting the loose material that causes many of the small ground falls. On the other hand, contractors want to determine the thickness and volume of sprayed concrete for both technical and economic reasons: to guarantee their structural strength but also, to not deliver excess material that they will not be paid for. In this paper, we first introduce a terrestrial LiDAR-based method for the automatic detection of rock bolts, as typically used in anchored retaining walls. These ground support elements are segmented based on their geometry and they will serve as control points for the co-registration of two successive scans, before and after shotcreting. Then we compare both point clouds to estimate the sprayed concrete thickness and the expending volume on the wall. This novel methodology is demonstrated on repeated scan data from a retaining wall in the city of Vigo (Spain, resulting in a rock bolts detection rate of 91%, that permits to obtain a detailed information of the thickness and calculate a total volume of 3597 litres of concrete. These results have verified the effectiveness of the developed approach by increasing productivity and improving previous empirical proposals for real time thickness estimation.

  16. Comparison of thoracic and abdominal cavity volumes during abdominal CO2 insufflation and abdominal wall lift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Courtney; Fransson, Boel A; Ragle, Claude A; Mattoon, John; Gay, John M

    2013-06-01

    To compare thoracic and abdominal cavity volumes during abdominal CO2 insufflation and abdominal wall lift (AWL) conditions. In vitro cadaveric study. Mature medium-to-large breed fresh canine cadavers (n = 6). Each cadaver was imaged with computed tomography (CT) under baseline, abdominal CO2 insufflation, and AWL conditions. Measurements of thoracic and abdominal cavities were performed for each condition using image-analyzing software. Resulting volumes for each cadaver were converted to percent change from baseline to normalize the data. The t-tests were used to compare percent changes of both thoracic and abdominal volumes. Thoracic volume significantly decreased from baseline during CO2 insufflation (P thoracic volume occurred with AWL when compared with baseline. Abdominal volume increased by 80% with CO2 insufflation (95% CI: 56.4-107.0%) but only 25% with AWL (95% CI: 12.3-37.8%). Abdominal CO2 insufflation results in decreased thoracic volume when compared with baseline. AWL preserved thoracic volume similar to baseline. Abdominal volumes achieved with abdominal CO2 insufflation are significantly greater than those attained with AWL. © Copyright 2012 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  17. Area Expansivity Moduli of Regenerating Plant Protoplast Cell Walls Exposed to Shear Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimura, Yuu; Iino, Masaaki; Watanabe, Ugai

    2005-05-01

    To control the elasticity of the plant cell wall, protoplasts isolated from cultured Catharanthus roseus cells were regenerated in shear flows of 115 s-1 (high shear) and 19.2 s-1 (low shear, as a control). The surface area expansivity modulus and the surface breaking strength of these regenerating protoplasts were measured by a micropipette aspiration technique. Cell wall synthesis was also measured using a cell wall-specific fluorescent dye. High shear exposure for 3 h doubled both the surface area modulus and breaking strength observed under low shear, significantly decreased cell wall synthesis, and roughly quadrupled the moduli of the cell wall. Based on the cell wall synthesis data, we estimated the three-dimensional modulus of the cell wall to be 4.1± 1.2 GPa for the high shear, and 0.35± 0.2 GPa for the low shear condition, using the surface area expansivity modulus divided by the cell wall thickness, which is identical with the Young’s modulus divided by 2(1-σ), where σ is Poisson's ratio. We concluded that high shear exposure considerably strengthens the newly synthesized cell wall.

  18. Increased arterial wall stiffness limits flow volume in the lower extremities in type 2 diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, E; Kashiwagi, A; Nishio, Y; Egawa, K; Shimizu, S; Maegawa, H; Haneda, M; Yasuda, H; Morikawa, S; Inubushi, T; Kikkawa, R

    2001-12-01

    To document an association between arterial wall stiffness and reduced flow volume in the lower-extremity arteries of diabetic patients. We recruited 60 consecutive type 2 diabetic patients who had no history or symptoms of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in the lower extremities and normal ankle/brachial systolic blood pressure index at the time of the study (non-PAD group) and 20 age-matched nondiabetic subjects (control group). We used an automatic device to measure pulse wave velocity (PWV) in the lower extremities as an index of arterial wall stiffness. At the popliteal artery, we evaluated flow volume and the resistive index as an index of arterial resistance to blood flow using gated two-dimensional cine-mode phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging. Consistent with previous reports, we confirmed that the non-PAD group had an abnormally higher PWV compared with that of the control group (P lower extremities of diabetic patients.

  19. Acute effects of volume-oriented incentive spirometry on chest wall volumes in patients after a stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Illia Ndf; Fregonezi, Guilherme Af; Melo, Rodrigo; Cabral, Elis Ea; Aliverti, Andrea; Campos, Tânia F; Ferreira, Gardênia Mh

    2014-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess how volume-oriented incentive spirometry applied to patients after a stroke modifies the total and compartmental chest wall volume variations, including both the right and left hemithoraces, compared with controls. Twenty poststroke patients and 20 age-matched healthy subjects were studied by optoelectronic plethysmography during spontaneous quiet breathing (QB), during incentive spirometry, and during the recovery period after incentive spirometry. Incentive spirometry was associated with an increased chest wall volume measured at the pulmonary rib cage, abdominal rib cage and abdominal compartment (P = .001) and under 3 conditions (P spirometry, and postincentive spirometry, respectively. Under all 3 conditions, the contribution of the abdominal compartment to VT was greater in the stroke subjects (54.1, 43.2, and 48.9%) than in the control subjects (43.7, 40.8, and 46.1%, P = .039). In the vast majority of subjects (13/20 and 18/20 during QB and incentive spirometry, respectively), abdominal expansion precedes rib cage expansion during inspiration. Greater asymmetry between the right and left hemithoracic expansions occurred in stroke subjects compared with control subjects, but it decreased during QB (62.5%, P = .002), during incentive spirometry (19.7%), and postincentive spirometry (67.6%, P = .14). Incentive spirometry promotes increased expansion in all compartments of the chest wall and reduces asymmetric expansion between the right and left parts of the pulmonary rib cage; therefore, it should be considered as a tool for rehabilitation. Copyright © 2014 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  20. Wall Vegetation Characteristics of Urban and Sub-Urban Areas

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Emrah Yalcinalp; Alperen Meral

    2017-01-01

    ... on them. Therefore, creating gardens on vertical surfaces of urban areas has recently been very important to supporting sustainability because these surfaces are still found to be commercially useless...

  1. A novel optical method for estimating the near-wall volume fraction in granular flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarno, Luca; Nicolina Papa, Maria; Carleo, Luigi; Tai, Yih-Chin

    2016-04-01

    Geophysical phenomena, such as debris flows, pyroclastic flows and rock avalanches, involve the rapid flow of granular mixtures. Today the dynamics of these flows is far from being deeply understood, due to their huge complexity compared to clear water or monophasic fluids. To this regard, physical models at laboratory scale represent important tools for understanding the still unclear properties of granular flows and their constitutive laws, under simplified experimental conditions. Beside the velocity and the shear rate, the volume fraction is also strongly interlinked with the rheology of granular materials. Yet, a reliable estimation of this quantity is not easy through non-invasive techniques. In this work a novel cost-effective optical method for estimating the near-wall volume fraction is presented and, then, applied to a laboratory study on steady-state granular flows. A preliminary numerical investigation, through Monte-Carlo generations of grain distributions under controlled illumination conditions, allowed to find the stochastic relationship between the near-wall volume fraction, c3D, and a measurable quantity (the two-dimensional volume fraction), c2D, obtainable through an appropriate binarization of gray-scale images captured by a camera placed in front of the transparent boundary. Such a relation can be well described by c3D = aexp(bc2D), with parameters only depending on the angle of incidence of light, ζ. An experimental validation of the proposed approach is carried out on dispersions of white plastic grains, immersed in various ambient fluids. The mixture, confined in a box with a transparent window, is illuminated by a flickering-free LED lamp, placed so as to form a given ζ with the measuring surface, and is photographed by a camera, placed in front of the same window. The predicted exponential law is found to be in sound agreement with experiments for a wide range of ζ (10° digital scale at the channel outlet for measuring the mass flow

  2. Comparison of different levels of positive expiratory pressure on chest wall volumes in healthy children and patients with fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Brilhante, Silvia Angélica; Florêncio, Rêcio Bento; Gualdi, Lucien Peroni; Resqueti,Vanessa Regiane; Aliverti,Andrea; Andrade, Armele de Fátima Dornelas de; Fregonezi, Guilherme Augusto de Freitas

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Positive Expiratory Pressure (PEP) improves lung function, however, PEP-induced changes are not fully established. The aim of this study was to assess the acute effects of different PEP levels on chest wall volumes and the breathing pattern in children with Cystic Fibrosis (CF). Anthropometric data, lung function values, and respiratory muscle strength were collected. Chest wall volumes were assessed by Optoelectronic plethysmography at rest and during the use of different PEP levels...

  3. Calculus Students' Understanding of Area and Volume Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorko, Allison; Speer, Natasha

    2015-01-01

    Units of measure are critical in many scientific fields. While instructors often note that students struggle with units, little research has been conducted about the nature and extent of these difficulties or why they exist. We investigated calculus students' unit use in area and volume computations. Seventy-three percent of students gave…

  4. Nanomaterial containing wall paints can increase radon concentration in houses located in radon prone areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghani, M; Mortazavi, S M J; Faghihi, R; Mehdizadeh, S; Moradgholi, J; Darvish, L; Fathi-Pour, E; Ansari, L; Ghanbar-Pour, M R

    2013-09-01

    Nowadays, extensive technological advancements have made it possible to use nanopaints which show exciting properties. In IR Iran excessive radon levels (up to 3700 Bq m-3) have been reported in homes located in radon prone areas. Over the past decades, concerns have been raised about the risk posed by residential radon exposure. This study aims at investigating the effect of using nanomaterial containing wall paints on radon concentration in homes. Two wooden model houses were used in this study. Soil samples from Ramsar high background radiation areas were used for simulating the situation of a typical house in radon-prone areas. Conventional water-soluble wall paint was used for painting the walls of the 1st house model; while the 2nd house model was painted with the same wall paint with montmorillonitenanoclay. Three days after sealing the house models, radon level was measured by using a portable radon survey meter. The mean radon level inside the 1st house model (conventional paint) was 515.3 ± 17.8 Bq/m(3) while the mean radon concentration in the 2nd house model (nano-painted house model) was 570.8 ± 18.5 Bq/m(3). The difference between these means was statistically significant (P<0.001). To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first investigation on the effect of nano-material containing wall paints on indoor radon concentrations.  It can be concluded that nano-material-containing wall paints should not be used in houses with wooden walls located in radon prone areas. Although the mechanism of this effect is not clearly known, decreased porosity in nano-paints might be a key factor in increasing the radon concentration in homes.

  5. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP ENTITLED - DOMAIN WALL FERMIONS AT TEN YEARS (VOLUME 84)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BLUM,T.; SONI,A.

    2007-03-15

    The workshop was held to mark the 10th anniversary of the first numerical simulations of QCD using domain wall fermions initiated at BNL. It is very gratifying that in the intervening decade widespread use of domain wall and overlap fermions is being made. It therefore seemed appropriate at this stage for some ''communal introspection'' of the progress that has been made, hurdles that need to be overcome, and physics that can and should be done with chiral fermions. The meeting was very well attended, drawing about 60 registered participants primarily from Europe, Japan and the US. It was quite remarkable that pioneers David Kaplan, Herbert Neuberger, Rajamani Narayanan, Yigal Shamir, Sinya Aoki, and Pavlos Vranas all attended the workshop. Comparisons between domain wall and overlap formulations, with their respective advantages and limitations, were discussed at length, and a broad physics program including pion and kaon physics, the epsilon regime, nucleon structure, and topology, among others, emerged. New machines and improved algorithms have played a key role in realizing realistic dynamical fermion lattice simulations (small quark mass, large volume, and so on), so much in fact that measurements are now as costly. Consequently, ways to make the measurements more efficient were also discussed. We were very pleased to see the keen and ever growing interest in chiral fermions in our community and the significant strides our colleagues have made in bringing chiral fermions to the fore of lattice QCD calculations. Their contributions made the workshop a success, and we thank them deeply for sharing their time and ideas. Finally, we must especially acknowledge Norman Christ and Bob Mawhinney for their early and continued collaboration without which the success of domain wall fermions would not have been possible.

  6. Geometry of lengths, areas, and volumes two-dimensional spaces, volume 1

    CERN Document Server

    Cannon, James W

    2017-01-01

    This is the first of a three volume collection devoted to the geometry, topology, and curvature of 2-dimensional spaces. The collection provides a guided tour through a wide range of topics by one of the twentieth century's masters of geometric topology. The books are accessible to college and graduate students and provide perspective and insight to mathematicians at all levels who are interested in geometry and topology. The first volume begins with length measurement as dominated by the Pythagorean Theorem (three proofs) with application to number theory; areas measured by slicing and scaling, where Archimedes uses the physical weights and balances to calculate spherical volume and is led to the invention of calculus; areas by cut and paste, leading to the Bolyai-Gerwien theorem on squaring polygons; areas by counting, leading to the theory of continued fractions, the efficient rational approximation of real numbers, and Minkowski's theorem on convex bodies; straight-edge and compass constructions, giving c...

  7. Investigation of thermal lensing in nuclear combined wall/volume pumped lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petra, Maria

    1997-09-01

    Thermal lensing is a key issue for high power Nuclear Pumped Laser (NPL) applications. Lensing is caused by pumping nonuniformities in the laser gas that result in temperature, density and index of refraction gradients in the medium. Thermal lensing prevents efficient extraction of laser energy and can even terminate lasing. This thesis presents results on the behavior of thermal lensing in a combined wall/volume pumped cavity. The concept of combined pumping as a means of controlling the optical inhomogeneities in the NPL gas is proposed and investigated for the first time. Combined pumping results show that quite uniform pumping profiles can be achieved under carefully selected operating conditions. The type and concentration of the volume source (that is sp3He, BFsb{3} and UFsb6) is limited if influence with the laser kinetics occurs. The degree to which the pumping uniformity is controlled depends strongly on the type of volume source. This is due to differences in the reaction cross section with the neutrons as well as in the energy released in the nuclear reaction involved. The product of the pressure-cell radius is an additional key factor in the achievable pumping uniformity. Combined pumping experiments were performed using a test cell pumped with neutrons during pulses of the University of Illinois TRIGA reactor. A laser beam deflection technique was used to probe the dynamics of the optical inhomogeneities in the gas during the pulse. For cases where combined pumping was not used to even out the pumping profile a strong deflection of the probe beams was observed. However, in addition, a rotation (at a rate of 3sp°/ms) of one of the probe laser beams was observed at 2 Atm Ne under sp{10}B wall pumping. It is thought that this is due to radiative cooling. Finally, a radioisotope powered gas medium is proposed for the first time as a method to produce gas lenses for potential industrial applications.

  8. Optimal catchment area and primary PCI centre volume revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoos, Mikkel Malby; Pedersen, Frants; Holmvang, Lene

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: The currently stated optimal catchment population for a pPCI centre is 300,000-1,100,000, resulting in 200-800 procedures/year. pPCI centres are increasing in number even within small geographic areas. We describe the organisation and quality of care after merging two high-volume centres....... The quality of a centre reflects governance, training, resources and pre-hospital triage, rather than catchment population and STEMI incidence, as long as a minimum volume is guaranteed. Resources can be utilised better by merging neighbouring centres, without negative effects on quality of care....... stable at 32 minutes. Up to 75.1% of patients were directly transferred by pre-hospital triage, of whom 82.7% had ECG-to-balloon volume...

  9. wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irshad Kashif

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Maintaining indoor climatic conditions of buildings compatible with the occupant comfort by consuming minimum energy, especially in a tropical climate becomes a challenging problem for researchers. This paper aims to investigate this problem by evaluating the effect of different kind of Photovoltaic Trombe wall system (PV-TW on thermal comfort, energy consumption and CO2 emission. A detailed simulation model of a single room building integrated with PV-TW was modelled using TRNSYS software. Results show that 14-35% PMV index and 26-38% PPD index reduces as system shifted from SPV-TW to DGPV-TW as compared to normal buildings. Thermal comfort indexes (PMV and PPD lie in the recommended range of ASHARE for both DPV-TW and DGPV-TW except for the few months when RH%, solar radiation intensity and ambient temperature were high. Moreover PVTW system significantly reduces energy consumption and CO2 emission of the building and also 2-4.8 °C of temperature differences between indoor and outdoor climate of building was examined.

  10. Minerals Yearbook, volume II, Area Reports—Domestic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2018-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Minerals Yearbook discusses the performance of the worldwide minerals and materials industries and provides background information to assist in interpreting that performance. Content of the individual Minerals Yearbook volumes follows:Volume I, Metals and Minerals, contains chapters about virtually all metallic and industrial mineral commodities important to the U.S. economy. Chapters on survey methods, summary statistics for domestic nonfuel minerals, and trends in mining and quarrying in the metals and industrial mineral industries in the United States are also included.Volume II, Area Reports: Domestic, contains a chapter on the mineral industry of each of the 50 States and Puerto Rico and the Administered Islands. This volume also has chapters on survey methods and summary statistics of domestic nonfuel minerals.Volume III, Area Reports: International, is published as four separate reports. These regional reports contain the latest available minerals data on more than 180 foreign countries and discuss the importance of minerals to the economies of these nations and the United States. Each report begins with an overview of the region’s mineral industries during the year. It continues with individual country chapters that examine the mining, refining, processing, and use of minerals in each country of the region and how each country’s mineral industry relates to U.S. industry. Most chapters include production tables and industry structure tables, information about Government policies and programs that affect the country’s mineral industry, and an outlook section.The USGS continually strives to improve the value of its publications to users. Constructive comments and suggestions by readers of the Minerals Yearbook are welcomed.

  11. Minerals Yearbook, volume III, Area Reports—International

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2018-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Minerals Yearbook discusses the performance of the worldwide minerals and materials industries and provides background information to assist in interpreting that performance. Content of the individual Minerals Yearbook volumes follows:Volume I, Metals and Minerals, contains chapters about virtually all metallic and industrial mineral commodities important to the U.S. economy. Chapters on survey methods, summary statistics for domestic nonfuel minerals, and trends in mining and quarrying in the metals and industrial mineral industries in the United States are also included.Volume II, Area Reports: Domestic, contains a chapter on the mineral industry of each of the 50 States and Puerto Rico and the Administered Islands. This volume also has chapters on survey methods and summary statistics of domestic nonfuel minerals.Volume III, Area Reports: International, is published as four separate reports. These regional reports contain the latest available minerals data on more than 180 foreign countries and discuss the importance of minerals to the economies of these nations and the United States. Each report begins with an overview of the region’s mineral industries during the year. It continues with individual country chapters that examine the mining, refining, processing, and use of minerals in each country of the region and how each country’s mineral industry relates to U.S. industry. Most chapters include production tables and industry structure tables, information about Government policies and programs that affect the country’s mineral industry, and an outlook section.The USGS continually strives to improve the value of its publications to users. Constructive comments and suggestions by readers of the Minerals Yearbook are welcomed.

  12. Regular Topologies for Gigabit Wide-Area Networks. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shacham, Nachum; Denny, Barbara A.; Lee, Diane S.; Khan, Irfan H.; Lee, Danny Y. C.; McKenney, Paul

    1994-01-01

    In general terms, this project aimed at the analysis and design of techniques for very high-speed networking. The formal objectives of the project were to: (1) Identify switch and network technologies for wide-area networks that interconnect a large number of users and can provide individual data paths at gigabit/s rates; (2) Quantitatively evaluate and compare existing and proposed architectures and protocols, identify their strength and growth potentials, and ascertain the compatibility of competing technologies; and (3) Propose new approaches to existing architectures and protocols, and identify opportunities for research to overcome deficiencies and enhance performance. The project was organized into two parts: 1. The design, analysis, and specification of techniques and protocols for very-high-speed network environments. In this part, SRI has focused on several key high-speed networking areas, including Forward Error Control (FEC) for high-speed networks in which data distortion is the result of packet loss, and the distribution of broadband, real-time traffic in multiple user sessions. 2. Congestion Avoidance Testbed Experiment (CATE). This part of the project was done within the framework of the DARTnet experimental T1 national network. The aim of the work was to advance the state of the art in benchmarking DARTnet's performance and traffic control by developing support tools for network experimentation, by designing benchmarks that allow various algorithms to be meaningfully compared, and by investigating new queueing techniques that better satisfy the needs of best-effort and reserved-resource traffic. This document is the final technical report describing the results obtained by SRI under this project. The report consists of three volumes: Volume 1 contains a technical description of the network techniques developed by SRI in the areas of FEC and multicast of real-time traffic. Volume 2 describes the work performed under CATE. Volume 3 contains the source

  13. The thick left ventricular wall of the giraffe heart normalises wall tension, but limits stroke volume and cardiac output

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smerup, Morten Holdgaard; Damkjær, Mads; Brøndum, Emil

    2016-01-01

    by several studies demonstrating that the mass of giraffe heart is similar to that of other mammals when expressed relative to body mass. It remains enigmatic, however, how the normal-sized giraffe heart generates such massive arterial pressures.We hypothesized that giraffe hearts have a small...... intraventricular cavity and a relatively thick ventricular wall, allowing for generation of high arterial pressures at normal left ventricular wall tension. In nine anaesthetized giraffes (495±38 kg), we determined in vivo ventricular dimensions using echocardiography along with intraventricular and aortic...

  14. Ultrasonographic gastric antral area and gastric contents volume in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Achim; Thomas, Schraner; Melanie, Fruehauf; Rabia, Liamlahi; Klaghofer, Richard; Weiss, Markus; Kellenberger, Christian

    2012-02-01

    Cross-sectional gastric antral area (GAA) measurements by ultrasonography (US) have been proposed for preoperative assessment of gastric volume in adults but not been validated in children. This study investigates whether in children gastric volumes can be predicted by US performed in different patient positions. Gastric fluid and air volumes were examined by magnetic resonance imaging before or up to 120 min after ingestion of 7 ml·kg(-1) diluted raspberry syrup in healthy volunteers who had fasted overnight. GAA was measured with US three times each in supine (SUP), elevated 45° degree supine (E45) and right decubital (RDC) position using imaging planes defined by vascular landmarks. Correlation coefficients (Pearson) between GAA and gastric volumes were calculated and Bland-Altman analysis performed. Sixteen children aged from 6.4 to 12.8 (9.2) years were included in 23 examinations: 6 after overnight fasting, 3 directly after, and 14 with a delay of 74 ± 35 min after fluid intake. GAA was 221 ± 116, 218 ± 112, and 347 ± 188 mm(2) for SUP, E45, and RDC position, respectively. The best correlation between body weight corrected total gastric/gastric fluid volume (TGV(w)/GFV(w)) with GAA was found for RDC position (R = 0.79; P TGV(w) or GFV(w) in children are best in the RDC position, but not sufficient to predict GFV(w) with a given GAA. Interpretation of isolated GAA values may be misleading. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Effect of volume-oriented versus flow-oriented incentive spirometry on chest wall volumes, inspiratory muscle activity, and thoracoabdominal synchrony in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunardi, Adriana C; Porras, Desiderio C; Barbosa, Renata Cc; Paisani, Denise M; Marques da Silva, Cibele C B; Tanaka, Clarice; Carvalho, Celso R F

    2014-03-01

    Aging causes physiological and functional changes that impair pulmonary function. Incentive spirometry is widely used for lung expansion, but the effects of volume-oriented incentive spirometry (VIS) versus flow-oriented incentive spirometry (FIS) on chest wall volumes, inspiratory muscle activity, and thoracoabdominal synchrony in the elderly are poorly understood. We compared VIS and FIS in elderly subjects and healthy adult subjects. Sixteen elderly subjects (9 women, mean ± SD age 70.6 ± 3.9 y, mean ± SD body mass index 23.8 ± 2.5 kg/m(2)) and 16 healthy adults (8 women, mean ± age 25.9 ± 4.3 y, mean ± body mass index 23.6 ± 2.4 kg/m(2)) performed quiet breathing, VIS, and FIS in randomized sequence. Chest wall kinematics (via optoelectronic plethysmography) and inspiratory muscle activity (via surface electromyography) were assessed simultaneously. Synchrony between the superior thorax and abdominal motion was calculated (phase angle). In the elderly subjects both types of incentive spirometry increased chest wall volumes similarly, whereas in the healthy adult subjects VIS increased the chest wall volume more than did FIS. FIS and VIS triggered similar lower thoracoabdominal synchrony in the elderly subjects, whereas in the healthy adults FIS induced lower synchrony than did VIS. FIS required more muscle activity in the elderly subjects to create an increase in chest wall volume. Incentive spirometry performance is influenced by age, and the differences between elderly and healthy adults response should be considered in clinical practice.

  16. Numerical simulation of the effect of groundwater salinity on artificial freezing wall in coastal area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Rui; Liu, Quan

    2017-04-01

    During the engineering projects with artificial ground freezing (AFG) techniques in coastal area, the freezing effect is affected by groundwater salinity. Based on the theories of artificially frozen soil and heat transfer in porous material, and with the assumption that only the variations of total dissolved solids (TDS) impact on freezing point and thermal conductivity, a numerical model of an AFG project in a saline aquifer was established and validated by comparing the simulated temperature field with the calculated temperature based on the analytic solution of rupak (reference) for single-pipe freezing temperature field T. The formation and development of freezing wall were simulated with various TDS. The results showed that the variety of TDS caused the larger temperature difference near the frozen front. With increasing TDS in the saline aquifer (1 35g/L), the average thickness of freezing wall decreased linearly and the total formation time of the freezing wall increased linearly. Compared with of the scenario of fresh-water (<1g/L), the average thickness of frozen wall decreased by 6% and the total formation time of the freezing wall increased by 8% with each increasing TDS of 7g/L. Key words: total dissolved solids, freezing point, thermal conductivity, freezing wall, numerical simulation Reference D.J.Pringel, H.Eicken, H.J.Trodahl, etc. Thermal conductivity of landfast Antarctic and Arctic sea ice[J]. Journal of Geophysical Research, 2007, 112: 1-13. Lukas U.Arenson, Dave C.Sego. The effect of salinity on the freezing of coarse- grained sand[J]. Canadian Geotechnical Journal, 2006, 43: 325-337. Hui Bing, Wei Ma. Laboratory investigation of the freezing point of saline soil[J]. Cold Regions Science and Technology, 2011, 67: 79-88.

  17. Methods to assess area and volume of wounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Line Bisgaard; Sørensen, Jens Ahm; Jemec, Gregor B E

    2016-01-01

    Wound measurement is important in monitoring the healing process of chronic wounds and in evaluating the effect of treatment. The objective of this systematic review was to evaluate evidence from the literature on accuracy, agreement, reliability and feasibility of wound measurement techniques...... described since 1994. Studies were identified by searching the electronic databases PubMed, Embase and Cochrane Library. Of the 12 013 studies identified, 43 were included in the review. A total of 30 papers evaluated techniques for measuring wound area and 13 evaluated techniques for measuring wound volume....... The six approaches for measuring wound area were simple ruler method (10 papers), mathematical models (5 papers), manual planimetry (10 papers), digital planimetry (16 papers), stereophotogrammetry (2 papers) and digital imaging method (20 papers). Of these studies, 10 evaluated accuracy, 15 agreement, 17...

  18. Georeferenced Scanning System to Estimate the Leaf Wall Area in Tree Crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio del-Moral-Martínez

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the use of a terrestrial light detection and ranging (LiDAR system to scan the vegetation of tree crops to estimate the so-called pixelated leaf wall area (PLWA. Scanning rows laterally and considering only the half-canopy vegetation to the line of the trunks, PLWA refers to the vertical projected area without gaps detected by LiDAR. As defined, PLWA may be different depending on the side from which the LiDAR is applied. The system is completed by a real-time kinematic global positioning system (RTK-GPS sensor and an inertial measurement unit (IMU sensor for positioning. At the end, a total leaf wall area (LWA is computed and assigned to the X, Y position of each vertical scan. The final value of the area depends on the distance between two consecutive scans (or horizontal resolution, as well as the number of intercepted points within each scan, since PLWA is only computed when the laser beam detects vegetation. To verify system performance, tests were conducted related to the georeferencing task and synchronization problems between GPS time and central processing unit (CPU time. Despite this, the overall accuracy of the system is generally acceptable. The Leaf Area Index (LAI can then be estimated using PLWA as an explanatory variable in appropriate linear regression models.

  19. Crack opening area estimates in pressurized through-wall cracked elbows under bending

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franco, C.; Gilles, P.; Pignol, M.

    1997-04-01

    One of the most important aspects in the leak-before-break approach is the estimation of the crack opening area corresponding to potential through-wall cracks at critical locations during plant operation. In order to provide a reasonable lower bound to the leak area under such loading conditions, numerous experimental and numerical programs have been developed in USA, U.K. and FRG and widely discussed in literature. This paper aims to extend these investigations on a class of pipe elbows characteristic of PWR main coolant piping. The paper is divided in three main parts. First, a new simplified estimation scheme for leakage area is described, based on the reference stress method. This approach mainly developed in U.K. and more recently in France provides a convenient way to account for the non-linear behavior of the material. Second, the method is carried out for circumferential through-wall cracks located in PWR elbows subjected to internal pressure. Finite element crack area results are presented and comparisons are made with our predictions. Finally, in the third part, the discussion is extended to elbows under combined pressure and in plane bending moment.

  20. Preliminary Results Of Hydrodynamic Responses To Ship Movements And Weather Conditions Along The Coastal Walls Of Shallow Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acar, Dursun; Alpar, Bedri; Cagatay, Namık; Ozeren, Sinan; Sarı, Erol; Eris, Kadir; Vardar, Denizhan; Arslan, Tugce; Basegmez, Koray

    2016-04-01

    flat bases. The spreading properties of water volumes together with the water level differences along the coastal walls were measured under the influence of a linear-turbine fan positioned above the model to simulate the dynamic wind pressure. The most severe water distributions and highest water-level losses have been observed on the model with +60° angular walls. Contrary, the model with reverse sloped (-60°) seawalls demonstrated the most oscillating level at the coast but has kept the water-level rather stable in the central part. This causes the waves to be reflected back to the wall as fast as it has been observed during the experiment. If compared to the other structures such a construction is quite costly to be made. However, the water depth in this model has been preserved at the shallow areas, since it is able to reflect the waves and its energy-absorbing feature is good with less "Ekman Condition" effect. Keywords: Shallow channel, coastal waters, atmospheric pressure, Ekman Condition, squat

  1. Noninvasive Evaluation of Bladder Wall Mechanical Properties as a Function of Filling Volume: Potential Application in Bladder Compliance Assessment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Nenadic

    Full Text Available We propose a novel method to monitor bladder wall mechanical properties as a function of filling volume, with the potential application to bladder compliance assessment. The proposed ultrasound bladder vibrometry (UBV method uses ultrasound to excite and track Lamb waves on the bladder wall from which its mechanical properties are derived by fitting measurements to an analytical model. Of particular interest is the shear modulus of bladder wall at different volumes, which we hypothesize, is similar to measuring the compliance characteristics of the bladder.Three experimental models were used: 1 an ex vivo porcine model where normal and aberrant (stiffened by formalin bladders underwent evaluation by UBV; 2 an in vivo study to evaluate the performance of UBV on patients with clinically documented compliant and noncompliant bladders undergoing UDS; and 3 a noninvasive UBV protocol to assess bladder compliance using oral hydration and fractionated voiding on three healthy volunteers.The ex vivo studies showed a high correlation between the UBV parameters and direct pressure measurement (R2 = 0.84-0.99. A similar correlation was observed for 2 patients with compliant and noncompliant bladders (R2 = 0.89-0.99 undergoing UDS detrusor pressure-volume measurements. The results of UBV on healthy volunteers, performed without catheterization, were comparable to a compliant bladder patient.The utility of UBV as a method to monitor changes in bladder wall mechanical properties is validated by the high correlation with pressure measurements in ex vivo and in vivo patient studies. High correlation UBV and UDS in vivo studies demonstrated the potential of UBV as a bladder compliance assessment tool. Results of studies on healthy volunteers with normal bladders demonstrated that UBV could be performed noninvasively. Further studies on a larger cohort are needed to fully validate the use of UBV as a clinical tool for bladder compliance assessment.

  2. The normal growth of the tracheal wall in human foetuses

    OpenAIRE

    Szpinda, Micha?; Daroszewski, Marcin; Szpinda, Anna; Wo?niak, Alina; Mila-Kierzenkowska, Celestyna; Flisi?ski, Piotr; Wi?niewski, Marcin

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Tracheal wall thickness is a substantial indicator in various pathological changes. The present study was performed to compile normative data and formulae for the tracheal wall thickness and volume at varying gestational age. Material and methods Using anatomical dissection, digital image analysis and statistics a range of the wall thickness, proximal internal-to-external cross-sectional area ratio, and wall volume for the trachea in 73 spontaneously aborted human fetuses aged 14...

  3. determination of area and volume from dredged geodata set

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    dredging and it is often used to estimate payment. The need for an accurate and ... based on digital elevation models [10]. The end are a method of ... multibeam system. The volume of the dredged sediments can also be computed using ArcGIS by ESRI, using TIN differences tool in 3D analyst and Surfer software packages ...

  4. Dynamics of chest wall volume regulation during constant work rate exercise in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takara, L.S.; Cunha, T.M.; Barbosa, P.; Rodrigues, M.K.; Oliveira, M.F.; Nery, L.E. [Setor de Função Pulmonar e Fisiologia Clínica do Exercício, Disciplina de Pneumologia, Departamento de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Neder, J.A. [Setor de Função Pulmonar e Fisiologia Clínica do Exercício, Disciplina de Pneumologia, Departamento de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Division of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON (Canada)

    2012-10-15

    This study evaluated the dynamic behavior of total and compartmental chest wall volumes [(V{sub CW}) = rib cage (V{sub RC}) + abdomen (V{sub AB})] as measured breath-by-breath by optoelectronic plethysmography during constant-load exercise in patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Thirty males (GOLD stages II-III) underwent a cardiopulmonary exercise test to the limit of tolerance (Tlim) at 75% of peak work rate on an electronically braked cycle ergometer. Exercise-induced dynamic hyperinflation was considered to be present when end-expiratory (EE) V{sub CW} increased in relation to resting values. There was a noticeable heterogeneity in the patterns of V{sub CW} regulation as EEV{sub CW} increased non-linearly in 17/30 “hyperinflators” and decreased in 13/30 “non-hyperinflators” (P < 0.05). EEV{sub AB} decreased slightly in 8 of the “hyperinflators”, thereby reducing and slowing the rate of increase in end-inspiratory (EI) V{sub CW} (P < 0.05). In contrast, decreases in EEV{sub CW} in the “non-hyperinflators” were due to the combination of stable EEV{sub RC} with marked reductions in EEV{sub AB}. These patients showed lower EIV{sub CW} and end-exercise dyspnea scores but longer Tlim than their counterparts (P < 0.05). Dyspnea increased and Tlim decreased non-linearly with a faster rate of increase in EIV{sub CW} regardless of the presence or absence of dynamic hyperinflation (P < 0.001). However, no significant between-group differences were observed in metabolic, pulmonary gas exchange and cardiovascular responses to exercise. Chest wall volumes are continuously regulated during exercise in order to postpone (or even avoid) their migration to higher operating volumes in patients with COPD, a dynamic process that is strongly dependent on the behavior of the abdominal compartment.

  5. Dynamics of chest wall volume regulation during constant work rate exercise in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.S. Takara

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the dynamic behavior of total and compartmental chest wall volumes [(V CW = rib cage (V RC + abdomen (V AB] as measured breath-by-breath by optoelectronic plethysmography during constant-load exercise in patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Thirty males (GOLD stages II-III underwent a cardiopulmonary exercise test to the limit of tolerance (Tlim at 75% of peak work rate on an electronically braked cycle ergometer. Exercise-induced dynamic hyperinflation was considered to be present when end-expiratory (EE V CW increased in relation to resting values. There was a noticeable heterogeneity in the patterns of V CW regulation as EEV CW increased non-linearly in 17/30 "hyperinflators" and decreased in 13/30 "non-hyperinflators" (P < 0.05. EEV AB decreased slightly in 8 of the "hyperinflators", thereby reducing and slowing the rate of increase in end-inspiratory (EI V CW (P < 0.05. In contrast, decreases in EEV CW in the "non-hyperinflators" were due to the combination of stable EEV RC with marked reductions in EEV AB. These patients showed lower EIV CW and end-exercise dyspnea scores but longer Tlim than their counterparts (P < 0.05. Dyspnea increased and Tlim decreased non-linearly with a faster rate of increase in EIV CW regardless of the presence or absence of dynamic hyperinflation (P < 0.001. However, no significant between-group differences were observed in metabolic, pulmonary gas exchange and cardiovascular responses to exercise. Chest wall volumes are continuously regulated during exercise in order to postpone (or even avoid their migration to higher operating volumes in patients with COPD, a dynamic process that is strongly dependent on the behavior of the abdominal compartment.

  6. Subsurface Contamination Focus Area technical requirements. Volume 1: Requirements summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nickelson, D.; Nonte, J.; Richardson, J.

    1996-10-01

    This document summarizes functions and requirements for remediation of source term and plume sites identified by the Subsurface Contamination Focus Area. Included are detailed requirements and supporting information for source term and plume containment, stabilization, retrieval, and selective retrieval remedial activities. This information will be useful both to the decision-makers within the Subsurface Contamination Focus Area (SCFA) and to the technology providers who are developing and demonstrating technologies and systems. Requirements are often expressed as graphs or charts, which reflect the site-specific nature of the functions that must be performed. Many of the tradeoff studies associated with cost savings are identified in the text.

  7. Application of soil block without burning process and calcium silicate panels as building wall in mountainous area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noerwasito, Vincentius Totok; Nasution, Tanti Satriana Rosary

    2017-11-01

    Utilization of local building materials in a residential location in mountainous area is very important, considering local material as a low-energy building material because of low transport energy. The local building materials used in this study are walls made from soil blocks. The material was made by the surrounding community from compacted soil without burning process. To maximize the potential of soil block to the outdoor temperature in the mountains, it is necessary to add non-local building materials as an insulator from the influence of the outside air. The insulator was calcium silicate panel. The location of the research is Trawas sub-district, Mojokerto regency, which is a mountainous area. The research problem is on applying the composition of local materials and calcium silicate panels that it will be able to meet the requirements as a wall building material and finding to what extent the impact of the wall against indoor temperature. The result from this research was the application of soil block walls insulated by calcium silicate panels in a building model. Besides, because of the utilization of those materials, the building has a specific difference between indoor and outdoor temperature. Thus, this model can be applied in mountainous areas in Indonesia.

  8. Wood decay by brown-rot fungi : changes in pore structure and cell wall volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas S. Flournoy; T. Kent Kirk; T.L. Highley

    1991-01-01

    Sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua L.) wood blocks were decayed by Postia (= Poria) placenta in soilblock cultures. Decay was terminated at various weight losses, and the pore volumes available to four low molecular weight molecules, (water, 4 Å,; glucose, 8 Å,; maltose, 10 Å; and raffinose, 128,) and three dextrans (Mr 6,000, 38 Å; 11,200, 51 Å; nd 17,500, 61 Å) were...

  9. Managing Leaf Area for Maximum Volume Production in a Loblolly Pine Plantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shufang Yu; Quang V. Cao; Jim L. Chambers; Zhenmin Tang; James D. Haywood

    1999-01-01

    To manage loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) stands for maximum volume growth, the relationships between volume growth and leaf area at the tree and stand level under different cultural practices (thinning and fertilization) were examined. Forty-eight trees were harvested in 1995, six years after treatment, for individual tree measurements, and 336...

  10. Calculation of the rockfall scar volume distribution using a Terrestrial Laser Scanner in the Montsec Area (Eastern Pyrenees, Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domènech, Guillem; Mavrouli, Olga; Corominas, Jordi; Abellán, Antonio

    2014-05-01

    Magnitude-frequency relations are a key issue when evaluating the rockfall hazard. It is a common practice to calculate them using databases of past events. However, in some cases, they are not available or complete. Alternatively, the analysis of the scar volume distribution on the wall face provides useful information on the slope's rockfall activity. The Montsec range, located in the Eastern Pyrenees, Spain, is a limestone cliff from upper cretaceous. In some parts, clear evidences of rockfall activities are present: Large recent rockfall scars are distinguished by their orange colour in comparison with grey non active surfaces on the slope face. To identify the scars and analyse their volume distribution, a methodology has been carried out (Santana et al. 2011) which is based on the elaboration of data from a high resolution Digital Elevation Model (DEM) obtained with Terrestrial Laser Scanner (TLS). This methodology requires a point cloud of the slope and it includes the following steps: a) identification of discontinuity sets b) generation of discontinuity surfaces c) calculation of areas of the exposed discontinuity surfaces and rockfall scar heights, and d) calculation of the rockfall scar volume distribution. Three discontinuity sets were identified on the point cloud. To generate the discontinuity surfaces, SEFL software was used. The input data for accepting that two neighbouring points of the point cloud belong to the same surface, was a minimum spacing of 0.4m. The resulting planes were visually checked. Assuming that the discontinuities of set 1 preserve the basal shape of the rockfall scars and the altitude is parallel to the discontinuities of set 2, the volume can be calculated as the product of the area of surfaces of set 1 with the length of the surfaces of set 2 using the afore mentioned SEFL software. Areas were found to follow a Lognormal distribution and lengths a Pearson6 one. The volume calculation was then made probabilistically by means

  11. Effects of positive expiratory pressure on chest wall volumes in subjects with stroke compared to healthy controls: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, Elis E A; Resqueti, Vanessa R; Lima, Illia N D F; Gualdi, Lucien P; Aliverti, Andrea; Fregonezi, Guilherme A F

    2017-07-08

    Alterations in respiratory system kinematics in stroke lead to restrictive pattern associated with decreased lung volumes. Chest physical therapy, such as positive expiratory pressure, may be useful in the treatment of these patients; however, the optimum intensity to promote volume and motion changes of the chest wall remains unclear. To assess the effect of different intensities of positive expiratory pressure on chest wall kinematics in subjects with stroke compared to healthy controls. 16 subjects with chronic stroke and 16 healthy controls matched for age, gender, and body mass index were recruited. Chest wall volumes were assessed using optoelectronic plethysmography during quiet breathing, 5 minutes, and recovery. Three different intensities of positive expiratory pressure (10, 15, and 20cmH2O) were administered in a random order with a 30 minutes rest interval between intensities. During positive expiratory pressure, tidal chest wall expansion increased in both groups compared to quiet breathing; however, this increase was not significant in the subjects with stroke (0.41 vs. 1.32L, 0.56 vs. 1.54L, 0.52 vs. 1.8L, at 10, 15, 20cmH2O positive expiratory pressure, for stroke and control groups; p<0.001). End-expiratory chest wall volume decreased in controls, mainly due to the abdomen, and increased in the stroke group, mainly due the pulmonary rib cage. Positive expiratory pressure administration facilitates acute lung expansion of the chest wall and its compartments in restricted subjects with stroke. Positive expiratory pressure intensities above 10cmH2O should be used with caution as the increase in end-expiratory volume led to hyperinflation in subjects with stroke. Copyright © 2017 Associação Brasileira de Pesquisa e Pós-Graduação em Fisioterapia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  12. Reproducibility of mean nuclear volume and correlation with mean nuclear area in breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baak, J P; Ladekarl, M; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt

    1994-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that quantitative, histopathologic features obtained from a carefully selected area in the tumor section ("selective" approach) have a strong prognostic value in breast cancer. On the other hand, it was found that mean nuclear volume estimation in the whole area...... of the tumor section by means of "unbiased" stereologic techniques is of great value in predicting the clinical outcome as well. In the present study the results of the two different (ie, selective and random, systematic) sampling methods in assessing mean nuclear volume have been compared...... as to their intraobserver and interobserver reproducibility in 22 invasive breast cancer cases. The mean nuclear volume (nuclear vv) was assessed both in the most atypical area (AREA) (selected on morphologic criteria) and in the whole tumor section (TOTAL). Furthermore, the correlation with mean nuclear (profile) area...

  13. Condylar volume and condylar area in class I, class II and class III young adult subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saccucci Matteo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aim Aim of this study was to compare the volume and the shape of mandibular condyles in a Caucasian young adult population, with different skeletal pattern. Material and methods 200 Caucasian patients (15–30 years old, 95 male and 105 females were classified in three groups on the base of ANB angle: skeletal class I (65 patients, skeletal class II (70 patients and skeletal class III (65 patients. Left and right TMJs of each subject were evaluated independently with CBCT (Iluma. TMJ evaluation included: condylar volume; condylar area; morphological index (MI. Condylar volumes were calculated by using the Mimics software. The condylar volume, the area and the morphological index (MI were compared among the three groups, by using non-parametric tests. Results The Kruskal-Wallis test and the Mann Whitney test revealed that: no significant difference was observed in the whole sample between the right and the left condylar volume; subjects in skeletal class III showed a significantly higher condylar volume, respect to class I and class II subjects (p 3 in males and 663.5 ± 81.3 mm3 in females; p 2 in males and 389.76 ± 61.15 mm2 in females; p  Conclusion Skeletal class appeared to be associated to the mandibular condylar volume and to the mandibular condylar area in the Caucasian orthodontic population.

  14. Volume-area scaling approach versus flowline model in glacier volume projections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Radic, V.; Hock, Regine; Oerlemans, J.

    2007-01-01

    Volume–area scaling provides a practical alternative to ice-flow modelling to account for glacier size changes when modelling the future evolution of glaciers; however, uncertainties remain as to the validity of this approach under non-steady conditions. We address these uncertainties by deriving

  15. Post-stratified estimation of forest area and growing stock volume using lidar-based stratifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronald E. McRoberts; Terje Gobakken; Erik. Næsset

    2012-01-01

    National forest inventories report estimates of parameters related to forest area and growing stock volume for geographic areas ranging in size from municipalities to entire countries. Landsat imagery has been shown to be a source of auxiliary information that can be used with stratified estimation to increase the precision of estimates, although the increase is...

  16. A Charged Particle Veto Wall for the Large Area Neutron Array (LANA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, K.; Chajecki, Z.; Anderson, C.; Bromell, J.; Brown, K.; Crosby, J.; Kodali, S.; Lynch, W. G.; Morfouace, P.; Sweany, S.; Tsang, M. B.; Tsang, C.; Brett, J. J.; Swaim, J. L.

    2017-09-01

    Comparison of neutrons and protons emitted in heavy ion collisions is one of the observables to probe symmetry energy, which is related to the properties of neutron star. In general, neutrons are difficult to measure and neutron detectors are not as easy to use or as widely available as charged particle detectors. Two neutron walls (NW) called LANA exist at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory. Although the NSCL NW attains excellent discrimination of γ rays and neutron, it fails to discriminate charged particles from neutrons. To ensure near 100% rejection of charged particles, a Charged Particle Veto Wall (VW) is being jointly built by Michigan State University and Western Michigan University. It will be placed in front of one NW. To increase efficiency in detecting neutrons, the second neutron wall is stacked behind it. In this presentation, I will discuss the design, construction and testing of the VW together with the LANA in preparation of two approved NSCL experiments to probe the density and momentum dependence of the symmetry energy potentials in the equation state of the asymmetric nuclear matter. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. PHY 1565546.

  17. Condylar volume and condylar area in class I, class II and class III young adult subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saccucci, Matteo; D'Attilio, Michele; Rodolfino, Daria; Festa, Felice; Polimeni, Antonella; Tecco, Simona

    2012-12-14

    Aim of this study was to compare the volume and the shape of mandibular condyles in a Caucasian young adult population, with different skeletal pattern. 200 Caucasian patients (15-30 years old, 95 male and 105 females) were classified in three groups on the base of ANB angle: skeletal class I (65 patients), skeletal class II (70 patients) and skeletal class III (65 patients). Left and right TMJs of each subject were evaluated independently with CBCT (Iluma). TMJ evaluation included: condylar volume; condylar area; morphological index (MI). Condylar volumes were calculated by using the Mimics software. The condylar volume, the area and the morphological index (MI) were compared among the three groups, by using non-parametric tests. The Kruskal-Wallis test and the Mann Whitney test revealed that: no significant difference was observed in the whole sample between the right and the left condylar volume; subjects in skeletal class III showed a significantly higher condylar volume, respect to class I and class II subjects (p condylar volume was observed in class II subjects, respect to class I and class III (p condylar volume (699.8 ± 63.07 mm3 in males and 663.5 ± 81.3 mm3 in females; p condylar surface (423.24 ± 63.03 mm2 in males and 389.76 ± 61.15 mm2 in females; p condylar volume and to the mandibular condylar area in the Caucasian orthodontic population.

  18. Hydrogeology of the 200 Areas low-level burial grounds: An interim report: Volume 2, Appendixes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Last, G.V.; Bjornstad, B.N.; Bergeron, M.P.; Wallace, D.W.; Newcomer, D.R.; Schramke, J.A.; Chamness, M.A.; Cline, C.S.; Airhart, S.P.; Wilbur, J.S.

    1989-01-01

    This report presents information derived form the installation of 35 ground-water monitoring wells around six low-level radioactive/hazardous waste burial grounds located in the 200 Areas of the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. This information was collected between May 20, 1987 and August 1, 1988. The contents of this report have been divided into two volumes. Volume 1 contains the main text. This Volume contains the appendixes, including data and supporting information that verify content and results found in the main text.

  19. A scanning electron microscopy evaluation of the cleanliness of un-instrumented areas of canal walls after root canal preparation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah J Dohaithem

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cleanliness of the canal space is the ultimate goal of its preparation. Nevertheless, some portion of the canal walls are left un-instrumented during preparation. Therefore, the aim of this ex vivo study was to evaluate the cleanliness of un-instrumented canal walls after root canal preparation for the presence or absence of debris and smear layer. Materials and Methods: A total of 24 single-rooted extracted teeth were prepared with the crown-down technique using Protaper universal rotary file system. Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT was used to scan the specimens before and after instrumentation. The un-instrumented area was measured and localized. The roots were split longitudinally and then subjected to scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The presence of debris and smear layer in the instrumented and un-instrumented areas of the canal were evaluated by analysing the SEM images with a five-score evaluation system based on the reference photographs. Results: High levels of root canal cleanliness (≤ score 2 were found for the instrumented areas were detected (P = 0.003. Conclusions: Under the condition of this study, un-instrumented areas of the canal were less clean in comparison to instrumented portion.

  20. Is the Volume of the Caudate Nuclei Associated With Area of Secondary Hyperalgesia?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten Sejer; Asghar, Mohammad Sohail; Wetterslev, Jørn

    2016-01-01

    volunteers with differences in size of the area of secondary hyperalgesia following a standardized burn injury. OBJECTIVE: We aim to investigate the degree of association between the volume of pain-relevant structures in the brain and the size of the area of secondary hyperalgesia following brief thermal...... sensitization. METHODS: The study consists of one experimental day, in which whole-brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans will be conducted including T1-weighed three-dimensional anatomy scan, diffusion tensor imaging, and resting state functional MRI. Before the experimental day, all included......: The association between the volume of pain-relevant structures in the brain and the area of secondary hyperalgesia will be investigated by linear regression of the estimated best linear unbiased predictors on the individual volumes of the pain relevant brain structures. CONCLUSIONS: We plan to investigate...

  1. Visceral adipose tissue area measurement at a single level: can it represent visceral adipose tissue volume?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noumura, Yusuke; Kamishima, Tamotsu; Sutherland, Kenneth; Nishimura, Hideho

    2017-08-01

    Measurement of visceral adipose tissue (VAT) needs to be accurate and sensitive to change for risk monitoring. The purpose of this study is to determine the CT slice location where VAT area can best reflect changes in VAT volume and body weight. 60 plain abdominal CT images from 30 males [mean age (range) 51 (41-68) years, mean body weight (range) 71.1 (101.9-50.9) kg] who underwent workplace screenings twice within a 1-year interval were evaluated. Automatically calculated and manually corrected areas of the VAT of various scan levels using "freeform curve" region of interest on CT were recorded and compared with body weight changes. The strongest correlations of VAT area with VAT volume and body weight changes were shown in a slice 3 cm above the lower margin of L3 with r values of 0.853 and 0.902, respectively. VAT area measurement at a single level 3 cm above the lower margin of the L3 vertebra is feasible and can reflect changes in VAT volume and body weight. Advances in knowledge: As VAT area at a CT slice 3cm above the lower margin of L3 can best reflect interval changes in VAT volume and body weight, VAT area measurement should be selected at this location.

  2. Reproducibility of mean nuclear volume and correlation with mean nuclear area in breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baak, J P; Ladekarl, M; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt

    1994-01-01

    (MNA) was studied. Mean nuclear (profile) area was determined in the AREA only. With bivariate correlation analysis the two sampling methods showed high correlation for the nuclear vv values (range of the correlation coefficient, 0.92 to 0.97). There were no systematic intraobserver differences between...... as to their intraobserver and interobserver reproducibility in 22 invasive breast cancer cases. The mean nuclear volume (nuclear vv) was assessed both in the most atypical area (AREA) (selected on morphologic criteria) and in the whole tumor section (TOTAL). Furthermore, the correlation with mean nuclear (profile) area...... for MNA determinations in the AREA was longer than for nuclear vv assessments in the AREA (15 v 10 minutes). Nuclear vv and MNA (both assessed in the AREA) were (log distributed) significantly correlated (r = .77). Thus, nuclear vv determination in the AREA is the fastest method, and it is also well...

  3. Quantifying [{sup 18}F]fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in the arterial wall: the effects of dual time-point imaging and partial volume effect correction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blomberg, Bjoern A. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Odense University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Odense (Denmark); Bashyam, Arjun; Ramachandran, Abhinay; Gholami, Saeid; Houshmand, Sina; Salavati, Ali; Werner, Tom; Alavi, Abass [Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Zaidi, Habib [Geneva University Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Geneva (Switzerland); University of Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2015-08-15

    The human arterial wall is smaller than the spatial resolution of current positron emission tomographs. Therefore, partial volume effects should be considered when quantifying arterial wall {sup 18}F-FDG uptake. We evaluated the impact of a novel method for partial volume effect (PVE) correction with contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) assistance on quantification of arterial wall {sup 18}F-FDG uptake at different imaging time-points. Ten subjects were assessed by CECT imaging and dual time-point PET/CT imaging at approximately 60 and 180 min after {sup 18}F-FDG administration. For both time-points, uptake of {sup 18}F-FDG was determined in the aortic wall by calculating the blood pool-corrected maximum standardized uptake value (cSUV{sub MAX}) and cSUV{sub MEAN}. The PVE-corrected SUV{sub MEAN} (pvcSUV{sub MEAN}) was also calculated using {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT and CECT images. Finally, corresponding target-to-background ratios (TBR) were calculated. At 60 min, pvcSUV{sub MEAN} was on average 3.1 times greater than cSUV{sub MAX} (P <.0001) and 8.5 times greater than cSUV{sub MEAN} (P <.0001). At 180 min, pvcSUV{sub MEAN} was on average 2.6 times greater than cSUV{sub MAX} (P <.0001) and 6.6 times greater than cSUV{sub MEAN} (P <.0001). This study demonstrated that CECT-assisted PVE correction significantly influences quantification of arterial wall {sup 18}F-FDG uptake. Therefore, partial volume effects should be considered when quantifying arterial wall {sup 18}F-FDG uptake with PET. (orig.)

  4. Underground Test Area Subproject Phase I Data Analysis Task. Volume VII - Tritium Transport Model Documentation Package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1996-12-01

    Volume VII of the documentation for the Phase I Data Analysis Task performed in support of the current Regional Flow Model, Transport Model, and Risk Assessment for the Nevada Test Site Underground Test Area Subproject contains the tritium transport model documentation. Because of the size and complexity of the model area, a considerable quantity of data was collected and analyzed in support of the modeling efforts. The data analysis task was consequently broken into eight subtasks, and descriptions of each subtask's activities are contained in one of the eight volumes that comprise the Phase I Data Analysis Documentation.

  5. Underground Test Area Subproject Phase I Data Analysis Task. Volume VIII - Risk Assessment Documentation Package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1996-12-01

    Volume VIII of the documentation for the Phase I Data Analysis Task performed in support of the current Regional Flow Model, Transport Model, and Risk Assessment for the Nevada Test Site Underground Test Area Subproject contains the risk assessment documentation. Because of the size and complexity of the model area, a considerable quantity of data was collected and analyzed in support of the modeling efforts. The data analysis task was consequently broken into eight subtasks, and descriptions of each subtask's activities are contained in one of the eight volumes that comprise the Phase I Data Analysis Documentation.

  6. Underground Test Area Subproject Phase I Data Analysis Task. Volume VI - Groundwater Flow Model Documentation Package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1996-11-01

    Volume VI of the documentation for the Phase I Data Analysis Task performed in support of the current Regional Flow Model, Transport Model, and Risk Assessment for the Nevada Test Site Underground Test Area Subproject contains the groundwater flow model data. Because of the size and complexity of the model area, a considerable quantity of data was collected and analyzed in support of the modeling efforts. The data analysis task was consequently broken into eight subtasks, and descriptions of each subtask's activities are contained in one of the eight volumes that comprise the Phase I Data Analysis Documentation.

  7. Short-axis epicardial volume change is a measure of cardiac left ventricular short-axis function, which is independent of myocardial wall thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugander, Martin; Carlsson, Marcus; Arheden, Håkan

    2010-02-01

    Fractional shortening (FS) by echocardiography is considered to represent the short-axis contribution to the stroke volume (SV), also called short-axis function. However, FS is mathematically coupled to the amount of myocardium, since it rearranges during atrioventricular plane displacement (AVPD). The SV is the sum of the volumes generated by 1) reduction in outer volume of the heart, and 2) inner AVPD. The long-axis contribution to the SV is generated by AVPD, and thus the short-axis contribution is the remaining outer volume change of the heart, which should be unrelated to myocardial wall thickness. We hypothesized that both endocardial and midwall shortening indexed to SV are dependent on myocardial wall thickness, whereas epicardial volume change (EVC) indexed to SV is not. Twelve healthy volunteers (normals), 12 athletes, and 12 patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (ejection fraction EVC was defined as SV minus long-axis function. Endocardial and midwall shortening were measured in a midventricular short-axis slice. Endocardial shortening/SV and midwall shortening/SV both varied in relation to end-diastolic myocardial wall thickness (R(2) = 0.16, P = 0.008 and R(2) = 0.14, P = 0.012, respectively), whereas EVC/SV did not (R(2) = 0.00, P = 0.37). FS is dependent on myocardial wall thickness, whereas EVC is not and therefore represents true short-axis function. This is not surprising considering that FS is mainly caused by rearrangement of myocardium secondary to long-axis function. FS is therefore not synonymous with short-axis function.

  8. Reproducibility of Left Ventricular Dimension Versus Area Versus Volume Measurements in Pediatric Patients With Dilated Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selamet Tierney, Elif Seda; Hollenbeck-Pringle, Danielle; Lee, Caroline K; Altmann, Karen; Dunbar-Masterson, Carolyn; Golding, Fraser; Lu, Minmin; Miller, Stephen G; Molina, Kimberly; Natarajan, Shobha; Taylor, Carolyn L; Trachtenberg, Felicia; Colan, Steven D

    2017-11-01

    Multiple echocardiographic methods are used to measure left ventricular size and function. Clinical management is based on individual evaluations and longitudinal trends. The Pediatric Heart Network VVV study (Ventricular Volume Variability) in pediatric patients with dilated cardiomyopathy has reported reproducibility of several of these measures, and how disease state and number of beats impact their reproducibility. In this study, we investigated the impact of observer and sonographer variation on reproducibility of dimension, area, and volume methods to determine the best method for both individual and sequential evaluations. In 8 centers, echocardiograms were obtained on 169 patients prospectively. During the same visit, 2 different sonographers acquired the same imaging protocol on each patient. Each acquisition was analyzed by 2 different observers; first observer analyzed the first acquisition twice. Intraobserver, interobserver, interacquisition, and interobserver-acquisition (different observers and different acquisition) reproducibility were assessed on measurements of left ventricular end-diastolic dimension, area, and volume. Left ventricular shortening fraction, ejection fraction, mass, and fractional area change were calculated. Percent difference was calculated as (interobservation difference/mean)×100. Interobserver reproducibility for both acquisitions was better for both volume and dimension measurements (P≤0.002) compared with area measurements, whereas intraobserver, interacquisition (for both observers), and interobserver-acquisition reproducibilities (for both observer-acquisition sets) were best for volume measurements (P≤0.01). Overall, interobserver-acquisition percent differences were significantly higher than interobserver and interacquisition percent differences (Pdimension and area methods, left ventricular measurements by volume method have the best reproducibility in settings where assessment is not performed by the same

  9. Investigation of thermal effect on exterior wall surface of building material at urban city area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Md Din, Mohd Fadhil; Dzinun, Hazlini; Ponraj, M.; Chelliapan, Shreeshivadasan; Noor, Zainura Zainun [Institute of Environmental Water Resources and Management (IPASA), Faculty of Civil Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM Skudai, Johor (Malaysia); Remaz, Dilshah [Faculty of Built Environment, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM Skudai, Johor (Malaysia); Iwao, Kenzo [Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya (Japan)

    2012-07-01

    This paper describes the investigation of heat impact on the vertical surfaces of buildings based on their thermal behavior. The study was performed based on four building materials that is commonly used in Malaysia; brick, concrete, granite and white concrete tiles. The thermal performances on the building materials were investigated using a surface temperature sensor, data logging system and infrared thermography. Results showed that the brick had the capability to absorb and store heat greater than other materials during the investigation period. The normalized heat (total heat/solar radiation) of the brick was 0.093 and produces high heat (51% compared to granite), confirming a substantial amount of heat being released into the atmosphere through radiation and convection. The most sensitive material that absorbs and stores heat was in the following order: brick > concrete > granite > white concrete tiles. It was concluded that the type of exterior wall material used in buildings had significant impact to the environment.

  10. Infection on the meshes implantation area in the abdominal wall of rats with induced bacterial peritonitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebben Geraldo Alberto

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Evaluate incidence of bacterial growth on implanted meshes in the abdominal wall of rats after to induce bacterial peritonitis. METHODS: 36 rats were used. They were allocated in two groups: group B, experiment group (n =18 and group S, control group (n =18. They were submitted to the implant of polypropylene meshes on the abdominal wall, at the preperitoneal space. Then, in the animals of the experiment group, the induction of peritonitis was made through the inoculation in the peritoneal cavity of standardized solution of Escherichia coli. In the animals of the control group it was made through the inoculation of physiologic solution. The animals of both groups were reallocated in three subgroups of six animals and observed until the reoperations time, for evaluation of the implantation sites, collection of the meshes for cultures, evaluation of the abdominal cavity and peritoneal lavage for cultures. The reoperations occurred in 24, 48 and 72 hours. RESULTS: All the animals of the experiment group presented clinical symptoms of peritonitis. The cultures of the meshes taken off from the implantation sites were positive in 83% of the animals when the moment of the evaluations was of 24 hours, decreasing to 33% in 48 hours and 17% in 72 hours. Globally, it was of 44%. In the animals of the control group there was no case of positive culture neither in the meshes, nor in the peritoneal lavages. CONCLUSIONS: The experimental model used was effective, producing 100% of peritonitis. The incidence of bacterial growth on the implanted polypropylene meshes was 83% in 24 hours, decreasing with the time.

  11. Efficient gaussian density formulation of volume and surface areas of macromolecules on graphical processing units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Baofeng; Kilburg, Denise; Eastman, Peter; Pande, Vijay S; Gallicchio, Emilio

    2017-04-15

    We present an algorithm to efficiently compute accurate volumes and surface areas of macromolecules on graphical processing unit (GPU) devices using an analytic model which represents atomic volumes by continuous Gaussian densities. The volume of the molecule is expressed by means of the inclusion-exclusion formula, which is based on the summation of overlap integrals among multiple atomic densities. The surface area of the molecule is obtained by differentiation of the molecular volume with respect to atomic radii. The many-body nature of the model makes a port to GPU devices challenging. To our knowledge, this is the first reported full implementation of this model on GPU hardware. To accomplish this, we have used recursive strategies to construct the tree of overlaps and to accumulate volumes and their gradients on the tree data structures so as to minimize memory contention. The algorithm is used in the formulation of a surface area-based non-polar implicit solvent model implemented as an open source plug-in (named GaussVol) for the popular OpenMM library for molecular mechanics modeling. GaussVol is 50 to 100 times faster than our best optimized implementation for the CPUs, achieving speeds in excess of 100 ns/day with 1 fs time-step for protein-sized systems on commodity GPUs. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Preliminary Assessment/Site Investigation: Tooele Army Depot, Utah. Volume 2. South Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-12-29

    Classification) Preliminary Assessment/Site Investigation, Toefle Army Depot., Utah; Volume ’fl-South Area Q2 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Andris Lapins CPG, Li 3a...Health Agency AFSC Air Force Systems Command ALS Above land surface AMCR Army Material Command Regulation ASTM American Society of Testing and...southeastern, southwestern, and northwestern perimeter area of S-TEAD and to conduct aquifer testing on selected wells, such that potential travel

  13. Cortical Thickness, Surface Area and Subcortical Volume Differentially Contribute to Cognitive Heterogeneity in Parkinson's Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels J H M Gerrits

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is often associated with cognitive deficits, although their severity varies considerably between patients. Recently, we used voxel-based morphometry (VBM to show that individual differences in gray matter (GM volume relate to cognitive heterogeneity in PD. VBM does, however, not differentiate between cortical thickness (CTh and surface area (SA, which might be independently affected in PD. We therefore re-analyzed our cohort using the surface-based method FreeSurfer, and investigated (i CTh, SA, and (subcortical GM volume differences between 93 PD patients and 45 matched controls, and (ii the relation between these structural measures and cognitive performance on six neuropsychological tasks within the PD group. We found cortical thinning in PD patients in the left pericalcarine gyrus, extending to cuneus, precuneus and lingual areas and left inferior parietal cortex, bilateral rostral middle frontal cortex, and right cuneus, and increased cortical surface area in the left pars triangularis. Within the PD group, we found negative correlations between (i CTh of occipital areas and performance on a verbal memory task, (ii SA and volume of the frontal cortex and visuospatial memory performance, and, (iii volume of the right thalamus and scores on two verbal fluency tasks. Our primary findings illustrate that i CTh and SA are differentially affected in PD, and ii VBM and FreeSurfer yield non-overlapping results in an identical dataset. We argue that this discrepancy is due to technical differences and the subtlety of the PD-related structural changes.

  14. Selenium status, thyroid volume, and multiple nodule formation in an area with mild iodine deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lone Banke; Schomburg, Lutz; Köhrle, Josef

    2011-01-01

    The objective was to study the associations between serum selenium concentration and thyroid volume, as well as the association between serum selenium concentration and risk for an enlarged thyroid gland in an area with mild iodine deficiency before and after iodine fortification was introduced....... Another objective was to examine the association between serum selenium concentration and prevalence of thyroid nodules....

  15. A Study on Sixth Grade Students' Misconceptions and Errors in Spatial Measurement: Length, Area, and Volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan Sisman, Gulcin; Aksu, Meral

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to portray students' misconceptions and errors while solving conceptually and procedurally oriented tasks involving length, area, and volume measurement. The data were collected from 445 sixth grade students attending public primary schools in Ankara, Türkiye via a test composed of 16 constructed-response…

  16. Regional brain differences in cortical thickness, surface area and subcortical volume in individuals with Williams syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashwath A Meda

    Full Text Available Williams syndrome (WS is a rare genetic neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by increased non-social anxiety, sensitivity to sounds and hypersociability. Previous studies have reported contradictory findings with regard to regional brain variation in WS, relying on only one type of morphological measure (usually volume in each study. The present study aims to contribute to this body of literature and perhaps elucidate some of these discrepancies by examining concurrent measures of cortical thickness, surface area and subcortical volume between WS subjects and typically-developing (TD controls. High resolution MRI scans were obtained on 31 WS subjects and 50 typically developing control subjects. We derived quantitative regional estimates of cortical thickness, cortical surface area, and subcortical volume using FreeSurfer software. We evaluated between-group ROI differences while controlling for total intracranial volume. In post-hoc exploratory analyses within the WS group, we tested for correlations between regional brain variation and Beck Anxiety Inventory scores. Consistent with our hypothesis, we detected complex patterns of between-group cortical variation, which included lower surface area in combination with greater thickness in the following cortical regions: post central gyrus, cuneus, lateral orbitofrontal cortex and lingual gyrus. Additional cortical regions showed between-group differences in one (but not both morphological measures. Subcortical volume was lower in the basal ganglia and the hippocampus in WS versus TD controls. Exploratory correlations revealed that anxiety scores were negatively correlated with gray matter surface area in insula, OFC, rostral middle frontal, superior temporal and lingual gyrus. Our results were consistent with previous reports showing structural alterations in regions supporting the socio-affective and visuospatial impairments in WS. However, we also were able to effectively capture novel and

  17. Effect of degassing temperature on specific surface area and pore volume measurements of biochar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigmund, Gabriel; Hüffer, Thorsten; Kah, Melanie; Hofmann, Thilo

    2017-04-01

    Specific surface area, pore volume, and pore size distribution are key biochar properties that have been related to water and nutrient cycling, microbial activity as well as sorption potential for organic compounds. Specific surface area and pore volume are commonly determined by measurement of physisorption of N2 and/or CO2. The measurement requires prior degassing of the samples, which may change the structure of the materials. Information on degassing temperature is rarely reported in literature, and recommendations differ considerably between existing guidelines for biochar characterization. Therefore, the influence of degassing temperature on N2 and CO2physisorption measurements was investigated by systematically degassing a range of materials, including four biochars, Al2O3 and carbon nanotubes at different temperatures (105 ˚ C, 150 ˚ C, 200 ˚ C, 250 ˚ C and 300 ˚ C for ≥ 14 h each). Measured specific surface area and pore volume increased with increasing degassing temperature for all biochars. Additional surface area and pore volume may have become available as components in biochars volatilized during the degassing phase. The results of our study showed that (i) degassing conditions change material properties, and influence physisorption measurements for biochar (ii) comparison between parameters derived from different degassing protocols may not be appropriate, and (iii) degassing protocols should be harmonized in the biochar community [1]. [1] Sigmund, et al. (2016), "Biochar total surface area and total pore volume determined by N2 and CO2 physisorption are strongly influenced by degassing temperature", STOTEN, doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.12.023.

  18. Radiotherapy of breast or left wall and of ganglionary areas including the internal mammary chain: dosimetric comparison of different ballistics; Radiotherapie du sein ou de la paroi gauche et des aires ganglionnaires incluant la chaine mammaire interne: comparaison dosimetrique de differentes balistiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regnault de la Mothe, P.; Berger, A.; Bensadoun, R.J. [PRC, 86 - Poitiers (France)

    2010-10-15

    As the irradiation of the mammary chain is still a matter of controversy because of non negligible toxicity risks, the authors report the comparison of three different irradiation ballistics for the breast or left wall as well as for ganglionary areas: short ballistics of internal mammary chains, long ballistics of internal mammary chains, and ballistics in tangential beams. Target volumes and organs at risk have been delineated, and dose-volume histograms have been compared. Short communication

  19. Remedial Investigation Report. Volume 11. North Central Study Area, Section 1.0 Text. Version 3.3

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-07-01

    110 3.3.5 Organosulfur Compounds - Mustard-Agent Related (OSCM)......... ................... .... 3-118 3.3.6 Orzanosulfur Co _unds - Herbicid-S...Potentially Contaminated Soil Areas and Volumes for Organosulfur Compounds, Mustard-Agent Related ......... NCSA 3.4-6 Potentially Contaminated Soil Areas and...Volumes for Organosulfur Compounds, Herbicide Related ............ NCSA 3.4-7 Potentially Contm-inated Soil Areas and Volumes for Organophosphorous

  20. Primary collector wall local temperature fluctuations in the area of water-steam phase boundary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matal, O.; Klinga, J.; Simo, T. [Energovyzkum Ltd., Brno (Switzerland)

    1995-12-31

    A limited number of temperature sensors could be installed at the primary collector surface in the area of water - steam phase boundary. The surface temperatures as well WWER 440 steam generator process data were measured and stored for a long time and off-line evaluated. Selected results are presented in the paper. (orig.). 2 refs.

  1. Impact of the radiotherapy technique on the correlation between dose-volume histograms of the bladder wall defined on MRI imaging and dose-volume/surface histograms in prostate cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggio, Angelo; Carillo, Viviana; Cozzarini, Cesare; Perna, Lucia; Rancati, Tiziana; Valdagni, Riccardo; Gabriele, Pietro; Fiorino, Claudio

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation between the ‘true’ absolute and relative dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the bladder wall, dose-wall histogram (DWH) defined on MRI imaging and other surrogates of bladder dosimetry in prostate cancer patients, planned both with 3D-conformal and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) techniques. For 17 prostate cancer patients, previously treated with radical intent, CT and MRI scans were acquired and matched. The contours of bladder walls were drawn by using MRI images. External bladder surfaces were then used to generate artificial bladder walls by performing automatic contractions of 5, 7 and 10 mm. For each patient a 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and an IMRT treatment plan was generated with a prescription dose of 77.4 Gy (1.8 Gy/fr) and DVH of the whole bladder of the artificial walls (DVH-5/10) and dose-surface histograms (DSHs) were calculated and compared against the DWH in absolute and relative value, for both treatment planning techniques. A specific software (VODCA v. 4.4.0, MSS Inc.) was used for calculating the dose-volume/surface histogram. Correlation was quantified for selected dose-volume/surface parameters by the Spearman correlation coefficient. The agreement between %DWH and DVH5, DVH7 and DVH10 was found to be very good (maximum average deviations below 2%, SD < 5%): DVH5 showed the best agreement. The correlation was slightly better for absolute (R = 0.80-0.94) compared to relative (R = 0.66-0.92) histograms. The DSH was also found to be highly correlated with the DWH, although slightly higher deviations were generally found. The DVH was not a good surrogate of the DWH (R < 0.7 for most of parameters). When comparing the two treatment techniques, more pronounced differences between relative histograms were seen for IMRT with respect to 3DCRT (p < 0.0001).

  2. LIFE Materials: Topical Assessment Report for LIFE Volume 1 TOPIC: Solid First Wall and Structural Components TASK: Radiation Effects on First Wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caro, A

    2008-11-26

    This report consists of the following chapters: CHAPTER A: LIFE Requirements for Materials. Part 1: The structure of the First Wall--Basic requirements; A qualitative view of the challenge; The candidate materials; and Base-line material's properties. CHAPTER B: Summary of Existing Knowledge--Brief historical introduction; Design window; The temperature window; Evolution of the design window with damage; Damage calculations; He and H production; Swelling resistance; Incubation dose for swelling; Design criterion No. 1, Strength; Design criterion No. 2, Corrosion resistance; Design criterion No. 3, Creep resistance; Design criterion No. 4, Radiation induced embrittlement; and Conclusions. CHAPTER C: Identification of Gaps in Knowledge & Vulnerabilities. CHAPTER D: Strategy and Future Work.

  3. Geomorphological Investigation of the Atchafalaya Basin, Area West, Atchafalaya Delta, and Terrebonne Marsh. Volume 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-04-01

    SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES Available from National Technical Information Service, 5285 Port Royal Road, Springfield, Virginia 22161. IN. KEY WORDS FCDoI.o. o,, ,- i...quadrangles presented in Volume II. Approach 4. During this investigation an attempt was made to extrik t teco t e st amount of geomorphic information ...flank of the Teche Ridge (Lakes Fausse Point, Grand, and Six Mile) has masked former distributary channels in the western Atchafalaya Basin area

  4. Mixed waste focus area integrated technical baseline report. Phase I, Volume 2: Revision 0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-01-16

    This document (Volume 2) contains the Appendices A through J for the Mixed Waste Focus Area Integrated Technical Baseline Report Phase I for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Included are: Waste Type Managers` Resumes, detailed information on wastewater, combustible organics, debris, unique waste, and inorganic homogeneous solids and soils, and waste data information. A detailed list of technology deficiencies and site needs identification is also provided.

  5. Surface area and the seabed area, volume, depth, slope, and topographic variation for the world's seas, oceans, and countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, Mark John; Cheung, Alan; De Hauwere, Nathalie

    2010-12-01

    Depth and topography directly and indirectly influence most ocean environmental conditions, including light penetration and photosynthesis, sedimentation, current movements and stratification, and thus temperature and oxygen gradients. These parameters are thus likely to influence species distribution patterns and productivity in the oceans. They may be considered the foundation for any standardized classification of ocean ecosystems and important correlates of metrics of biodiversity (e.g., species richness and composition, fisheries). While statistics on ocean depth and topography are often quoted, how they were derived is rarely cited, and unless calculated using the same spatial resolution the resulting statistics will not be strictly comparable. We provide such statistics using the best available resolution (1-min) global bathymetry, and open source digital maps of the world's seas and oceans and countries' Exclusive Economic Zones, using a standardized methodology. We created a terrain map and calculated sea surface and seabed area, volume, and mean, standard deviation, maximum, and minimum, of both depth and slope. All the source data and our database are freely available online. We found that although the ocean is flat, and up to 71% of the area has a ocean volume exceeds 1.3 billion km(3) (or 1.3 sextillion liters), and sea surface and seabed areas over 354 million km(2). We propose the coefficient of variation of slope as an index of topographic heterogeneity. Future studies may improve on this database, for example by using a more detailed bathymetry, and in situ measured data. The database could be used to classify ocean features, such as abyssal plains, ridges, and slopes, and thus provide the basis for a standards based classification of ocean topography.

  6. Mass-independent area (or entropy) and thermodynamic volume products in conformal gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Parthapratim

    2017-06-01

    In this work, we investigate the thermodynamic properties of conformal gravity in four dimensions. We compute the area (or entropy) functional relation for this black hole (BH). We consider both de Sitter (dS) and anti-de Sitter (AdS) cases. We derive the Cosmic-Censorship-Inequality which is an important relation in general relativity that relates the total mass of a spacetime to the area of all the BH horizons. Local thermodynamic stability is studied by computing the specific heat. The second-order phase transition occurs at a certain condition. Various types of second-order phase structure have been given for various values of a and the cosmological constant Λ in the Appendix. When a = 0, one obtains the result of Schwarzschild-dS and Schwarzschild-AdS cases. In the limit aM ≪ 1, one obtains the result of Grumiller spacetime, where a is nontrivial Rindler parameter or Rindler acceleration and M is the mass parameter. The thermodynamic volume functional relation is derived in the extended phase space, where the cosmological constant is treated as a thermodynamic pressure and its conjugate variable as a thermodynamic volume. The mass-independent area (or entropy) functional relation and thermodynamic volume functional relation that we have derived could turn out to be a universal quantity.

  7. Relation between intracranial volume and the surface area of the foramen magnum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acer, Niyazi; Sahin, Bünyamin; Ekinci, Nihat; Ergür, Hayati; Basaloglu, Hulki

    2006-03-01

    Several investigators have estimated the intracranial volume (ICV) in the past which indirectly reflects the brain volume. Most of these studies have been made on the dry skulls using linear dimensions, packing methods or occasionally radiological methods. It is also reported that the etiology of cerebellar tonsillar herniation is closely related to the size of the foramen magnum (FM). In the present study the ICVs have been estimated in 28 dry skulls using filling water method and the surface area of FMs were measured planimetry method. The estimated mean ICV was 1,311 +/- 133 cm. Surface area of FM was 760 +/- 144 mm. Antero-posterior and lateral direct roentgenograms of the skulls were also taken and the width, height and length (WHL) of the skull were measured by means of the cephalometry on radiograms. The relationship between the ICV, WHL and surface area of FM were analyzed statistically. The ICV, WHL and surface area of FM was correlated well (r = 0.271, P step, we took roentgenograms of skulls and obtain ICV measuring the width, length and height of skulls by means of cephalometry and investigate the relation between the findings of cephalometry and surface area of FM. The cephalometry could apply on living subjects and, thereby, our findings could provide some data to evaluate the etiology of Arnold Chiari malformation and achondroplasia for living subjects.

  8. Minerals Yearbook, volume III, Area Reports—International—Africa and the Middle East

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2018-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Minerals Yearbook discusses the performance of the worldwide minerals and materials industries and provides background information to assist in interpreting that performance. Content of the individual Minerals Yearbook volumes follows:Volume I, Metals and Minerals, contains chapters about virtually all metallic and industrial mineral commodities important to the U.S. economy. Chapters on survey methods, summary statistics for domestic nonfuel minerals, and trends in mining and quarrying in the metals and industrial mineral industries in the United States are also included.Volume II, Area Reports: Domestic, contains a chapter on the mineral industry of each of the 50 States and Puerto Rico and the Administered Islands. This volume also has chapters on survey methods and summary statistics of domestic nonfuel minerals.Volume III, Area Reports: International, is published as four separate reports. These regional reports contain the latest available minerals data on more than 180 foreign countries and discuss the importance of minerals to the economies of these nations and the United States. Each report begins with an overview of the region’s mineral industries during the year. It continues with individual country chapters that examine the mining, refining, processing, and use of minerals in each country of the region and how each country’s mineral industry relates to U.S. industry. Most chapters include production tables and industry structure tables, information about Government policies and programs that affect the country’s mineral industry, and an outlook section.The USGS continually strives to improve the value of its publications to users. Constructive comments and suggestions by readers of the Minerals Yearbook are welcomed.

  9. Minerals Yearbook, volume III, Area Reports—International—Europe and Central Eurasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geological Survey, U.S.

    2018-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Minerals Yearbook discusses the performance of the worldwide minerals and materials industries and provides background information to assist in interpreting that performance. Content of the individual Minerals Yearbook volumes follows:Volume I, Metals and Minerals, contains chapters about virtually all metallic and industrial mineral commodities important to the U.S. economy. Chapters on survey methods, summary statistics for domestic nonfuel minerals, and trends in mining and quarrying in the metals and industrial mineral industries in the United States are also included.Volume II, Area Reports: Domestic, contains a chapter on the mineral industry of each of the 50 States and Puerto Rico and the Administered Islands. This volume also has chapters on survey methods and summary statistics of domestic nonfuel minerals.Volume III, Area Reports: International, is published as four separate reports. These regional reports contain the latest available minerals data on more than 180 foreign countries and discuss the importance of minerals to the economies of these nations and the United States. Each report begins with an overview of the region’s mineral industries during the year. It continues with individual country chapters that examine the mining, refining, processing, and use of minerals in each country of the region and how each country’s mineral industry relates to U.S. industry. Most chapters include production tables and industry structure tables, information about Government policies and programs that affect the country’s mineral industry, and an outlook section.The USGS continually strives to improve the value of its publications to users. Constructive comments and suggestions by readers of the Minerals Yearbook are welcomed.

  10. Minerals Yearbook, volume III, Area Reports—International—Latin America and Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2018-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Minerals Yearbook discusses the performance of the worldwide minerals and materials industries and provides background information to assist in interpreting that performance. Content of the individual Minerals Yearbook volumes follows:Volume I, Metals and Minerals, contains chapters about virtually all metallic and industrial mineral commodities important to the U.S. economy. Chapters on survey methods, summary statistics for domestic nonfuel minerals, and trends in mining and quarrying in the metals and industrial mineral industries in the United States are also included.Volume II, Area Reports: Domestic, contains a chapter on the mineral industry of each of the 50 States and Puerto Rico and the Administered Islands. This volume also has chapters on survey methods and summary statistics of domestic nonfuel minerals.Volume III, Area Reports: International, is published as four separate reports. These regional reports contain the latest available minerals data on more than 180 foreign countries and discuss the importance of minerals to the economies of these nations and the United States. Each report begins with an overview of the region’s mineral industries during the year. It continues with individual country chapters that examine the mining, refining, processing, and use of minerals in each country of the region and how each country’s mineral industry relates to U.S. industry. Most chapters include production tables and industry structure tables, information about Government policies and programs that affect the country’s mineral industry, and an outlook section.The USGS continually strives to improve the value of its publications to users. Constructive comments and suggestions by readers of the Minerals Yearbook are welcomed.

  11. Minerals Yearbook, volume III, Area Reports—International—Asia and the Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geological Survey, U.S.

    2018-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Minerals Yearbook discusses the performance of the worldwide minerals and materials industries and provides background information to assist in interpreting that performance. Content of the individual Minerals Yearbook volumes follows:Volume I, Metals and Minerals, contains chapters about virtually all metallic and industrial mineral commodities important to the U.S. economy. Chapters on survey methods, summary statistics for domestic nonfuel minerals, and trends in mining and quarrying in the metals and industrial mineral industries in the United States are also included.Volume II, Area Reports: Domestic, contains a chapter on the mineral industry of each of the 50 States and Puerto Rico and the Administered Islands. This volume also has chapters on survey methods and summary statistics of domestic nonfuel minerals.Volume III, Area Reports: International, is published as four separate reports. These regional reports contain the latest available minerals data on more than 180 foreign countries and discuss the importance of minerals to the economies of these nations and the United States. Each report begins with an overview of the region’s mineral industries during the year. It continues with individual country chapters that examine the mining, refining, processing, and use of minerals in each country of the region and how each country’s mineral industry relates to U.S. industry. Most chapters include production tables and industry structure tables, information about Government policies and programs that affect the country’s mineral industry, and an outlook section.The USGS continually strives to improve the value of its publications to users. Constructive comments and suggestions by readers of the Minerals Yearbook are welcomed.

  12. Summary of Synoptic Meteorological Observations. Indonesian Coastal Marine Areas. Volume 1. Area 1 - Southeast Sumatra. Area 2 - Christmas Island. Area 3 - Sunda Strait. Area 4 - Northwest Java Sea. Area 5 - Bangka Island Northwest. Area 6 - Natuna Island. Area 7 - Sarawak

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-04-01

    N *. AAAAAAA AAAAAA AAAAAAAAAA A 0) 0 OD 0 C . C N N NqCl Cli t- N t C it- N - :3 wU2 tD ( t-- 1 OD00)M0) ,.4-1 m -1 14 14 ’. 4,4.-r 0 00 00 0000...55 6 8o 109 PABE IS? OC¶OMER PEkIODI (PRIMARY) 1863-1971 AREA 0002 CHRISTMAS ISLAND COVE-AILL) 1654-1971 7ABLE 17 1O.OS 105.01 POT FRSO 08 AIR TD ...ZC.RE\\’E -f 9.^S l.ITý:L! PRECIPITATION% VS AIR-SEA TEHPERA!. J8E DI;FERENCE IOSG Fi 429.000 73 77 81 t9 89 0T .T - YOP :1; 78 80 84 66 92 C 8 .0 .0 .C .0

  13. MR imaging of the heart in patients after myocardial infarction: effect of increasing intersection gap on measurements of left ventricular volume, ejection fraction, and wall thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottin, Y; Touzery, C; Guy, F; Lalande, A; Ressencourt, O; Roy, S; Walker, P M; Louis, P; Brunotte, F; Wolf, J E

    1999-11-01

    To determine the extent to which the number of planes imaged at magnetic resonance (MR) imaging could be reduced without modifying the calculated volume and thickness of the left ventricle. Sixty-one patients were examined after a myocardial infarction. The whole left ventricle was imaged by using 5-mm contiguous breath-hold cine MR short-axis sections with no gap (SAng) (two-dimensional fast low-angle shot sequence, 9/4.8 [repetition time msec/echo time msec]). The effect of omitting one section in two (short-axis sections with 5-mm gap [SA5 mm]) or two sections in three (short-axis sections with 10-mm gap [SA10 mm]) was studied. In the comparison of SA5 mm or SA10 mm with respect to the reference SAng, the standard error of the estimate (SEE) for the diastolic volume did not exceed the 6.1% interobserver SEE, and the SEE for the ejection fraction remained lower than the 3% interobserver SEE. The measured wall thickness was not affected. In addition, six simple geometric models were compared with SAng and yielded an SEE of 9.5%-28.1% for the diastolic volume and 3.8%-13.3% for the ejection fraction. In the study of left ventricles with heterogeneous contractility, short-axis imaging is more accurate than geometric modeling and permits wall thickness measurements when an intersection gap of 5 or 10 mm is used.

  14. New model for estimating the relationship between surface area and volume in the human body using skeletal remains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasabova, Boryana E; Holliday, Trenton W

    2015-04-01

    A new model for estimating human body surface area and body volume/mass from standard skeletal metrics is presented. This model is then tested against both 1) "independently estimated" body surface areas and "independently estimated" body volume/mass (both derived from anthropometric data) and 2) the cylindrical model of Ruff. The model is found to be more accurate in estimating both body surface area and body volume/mass than the cylindrical model, but it is more accurate in estimating body surface area than it is for estimating body volume/mass (as reflected by the standard error of the estimate when "independently estimated" surface area or volume/mass is regressed on estimates derived from the present model). Two practical applications of the model are tested. In the first test, the relative contribution of the limbs versus the trunk to the body's volume and surface area is compared between "heat-adapted" and "cold-adapted" populations. As expected, the "cold-adapted" group has significantly more of its body surface area and volume in its trunk than does the "heat-adapted" group. In the second test, we evaluate the effect of variation in bi-iliac breadth, elongated or foreshortened limbs, and differences in crural index on the body's surface area to volume ratio (SA:V). Results indicate that the effects of bi-iliac breadth on SA:V are substantial, while those of limb lengths and (especially) the crural index are minor, which suggests that factors other than surface area relative to volume are driving morphological variation and ecogeographical patterning in limb prorportions. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Remedial Investigation Report. Volume 7. Eastern Study Area, Section 1. 0, Version 3.2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-05-01

    Halogenated Organics 3-48 3.3.2 Volatile Hydrocarbons and Related Compounds 3-52 3.3.3 Volatile Aromatic Oranics 3-53 3.3.4 Organosulfur Compounds. Mustard...Agent Related 3-56 3.3.5 Organosulfur Compounds. Herbicide Related 3-59 3.3.6 Organophosphorus Compounds. GB-Agent Related 3-61 3.3.7...Aromatic Organics ESA 3.4-4 Potentially Contaminated Soil Areas and Volumes for Organosulfur Compounds, Mustard-Agent Related ESA 3.4-5 Potentially

  16. Very Large Area/Volume Microwave ECR Plasma and Ion Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, John E. (Inventor); Patterson, Michael J. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention is an apparatus and method for producing very large area and large volume plasmas. The invention utilizes electron cyclotron resonances in conjunction with permanent magnets to produce dense, uniform plasmas for long life ion thruster applications or for plasma processing applications such as etching, deposition, ion milling and ion implantation. The large area source is at least five times larger than the 12-inch wafers being processed to date. Its rectangular shape makes it easier to accommodate to materials processing than sources that are circular in shape. The source itself represents the largest ECR ion source built to date. It is electrodeless and does not utilize electromagnets to generate the ECR magnetic circuit, nor does it make use of windows.

  17. Ethnomathematics study: uncovering units of length, area, and volume in Kampung Naga Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Septianawati, T.; Turmudi; Puspita, E.

    2017-02-01

    During this time, mathematics is considered as something neutral and not associated with culture. It can be seen from mathematics learning in the school which adopt many of foreign mathematics learning are considered more advanced (western). In fact, Indonesia is a rich country in cultural diversity. In the cultural activities, there are mathematical ideas that were considered a important thing in the mathematics learning. A study that examines the idea or mathematical practices in a variety of cultural activities are known as ethnomathematics. In Indonesia, there are some ethnic maintain their ancestral traditions, one of them is Kampung Naga. Therefore, this study was conducted in Kampung Naga. This study aims to uncover units of length, area, and volume used by Kampung Naga society. This study used a qualitative approach and ethnography methods. In this research, data collection is done through the principles of ethnography such as observation, interviews, documentation, and field notes. The results of this study are units of length, area, and volume used by Kampung Naga society and its conversion into standard units. This research is expected to give information to the public that mathematics has a relationship with culture and become recommendation to mathematics curriculum in Indonesia.

  18. Hydrogen maser - Measurement of wall shift with a flexible bulb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, D.

    1970-01-01

    Flexible bulb is squeezed to change mean free path of hydrogen atoms, and to change bulb's volume without changing its surface area. Volumes in the different configurations are measured to learn the change in mean free path and calculate wall shift. Various bulb coating materials are described.

  19. Phase contrast imaging reveals low lung volumes and surface areas in the developing marsupial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon J Simpson

    Full Text Available Marsupials are born with immature lungs when compared to eutherian mammals and rely, to various extents, on cutaneous gas exchange in order to meet metabolic requirements. Indeed, the fat-tailed dunnart is born with lungs in the canalicular stage of development and relies almost entirely on the skin for gas exchange at birth; consequently undergoing the majority of lung development in air. Plane radiographs and computed tomography data sets were acquired using phase contrast imaging with a synchrotron radiation source for two marsupial species, the fat-tailed dunnart and the larger tammar wallaby, during the first weeks of postnatal life. Phase contrast imaging revealed that only two lung sacs contain air after the first hour of life in the fat-tailed dunnart. While the lung of the tammar wallaby was comparatively more developed, both species demonstrated massive increases in air sac number and architectural complexity during the postnatal period. In addition, both the tammar wallaby and fat-tailed dunnart had lower lung volumes and parenchymal surface areas than were expected from morphometrically determined allometric equations relating these variables to body mass during the neonatal period. However, lung volume is predicted to scale with mass as expected after the neonatal marsupial reaches a body mass of ∼1 g and no longer relies on the skin for gas exchange. Decreased lung volume in the marsupial neonate further supports the maxim that cutaneous gas exchange occurs in the marsupial neonate because the respiratory apparatus is not yet capable of meeting the gas exchange requirements of the newborn.

  20. Proper Accounting for Surface Area to Solution Volume Ratios in Exaggerated Extractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenke, Dennis R; Rabinow, Barrett E

    2017-01-01

    When drug products contact plastic manufacturing components, packaging systems, and/or delivery devices, leachables from the plastics can accumulate in the drug product, potentially affecting its key quality attributes. Given practical issues associated with screening drug products for leachables, potential leachables are frequently surfaced as extractables revealed in extraction studies. To facilitate extractables discovery and identification and to shorten extraction times, extraction studies can be exaggerated and/or accelerated. One means of exaggerating an extraction is to increase the test article's extracted surface area to extraction solution volume ratio (SA/V), as it is generally accepted that an extractable's concentration in an extract is proportional to SA/V in a 1 to 1 manner. However, as the relationship between an extractable's concentration and SA/V depends on the extractable's plastic/solvent partition coefficient (kp/l), the effect of SA/V on the extractable's concentrations can be either under- or over-estimated if a 1 to 1 proportion is used. This article presents the theoretical relationship between SA/V, concentration, and kp/l; illustrates theory with a case study; and suggests proper exaggeration strategies.LAY ABSTRACT: When drug products are manufactured, stored, or delivered in systems that contain plastics, substances can be leached from the plastics and remain in the drug product, where they might affect the product's key quality attributes. To discover and identify these leached substances, the plastics are extracted under laboratory conditions and the extracts are appropriately tested. To facilitate this process, extracts may be generated under laboratory conditions that exaggerate or accelerate the drug product's clinical conditions of manufacturing or use. The proper use of the ratio of the extracted item's surface area to the volume of the extracting solution as an exaggeration parameter is discussed in this paper. © PDA, Inc

  1. The Area-Time-Integral Technique to Estimate Convective Rain Volumes over Areas Applied to Satellite Data--A Preliminary Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doneaud, André A.; Miller, James R., Jr.; Johnson, L. Ronald; Vonder Haar, Thomas H.; Laybe, Patrick

    1987-01-01

    Early work attempting to apply GOES rapid scan satellite data to a recently developed simple radar technique used to estimate convective rain volumes over areas in a semiarid environment (the northern Great Plains) is described.Called the Area-Time-Integral (ATI) technique, it provides a means of estimating total rain volumes over fixed and floating target areas. The basis of the method is the existence of a strong correlation between the radar echo area coverage integrated over the lifetime of the storm and the radar estimated rain volume. The technique does not require the consideration of the structure of the radar intensities to generate rain volumes. but only the area covered by radar echoes. This fact might reduce the source of errors generated by the structure differences between the radar and the satellite signatures above given thresholds.Satellite and radar data from the 1981 Cooperative Convective Precipitation Experiment (CCOPE) and the North Dakota Cloud Modification Project (NDCMP) are used. Consecutive time steps with both radar reflectivities and satellite (VIS and IR) rapid wan data were considered during the evolution of six convective clusters: three on 12 June, and three on 2 July 1981. Radar echoes with reflectivity values 25 dBZ were used to define the area of rainfall and the respective digital unit thresholds within the satellite data delineating the rainy part of the cloud area. Correlation of the ATI versus IR digital count values was obtained for every time step and for the storm lifetime, respectively.A comparison of the stepwise evolution of radar parameters such as echo areas maximum echo heights, maximum reflectivities and satellite parameters such as threshold count values and coldest cloud top temperature is presented graphically and reflects the multicell characteristics of the convective clusters. Also, a comparison of radar and satellite parameters for the cluster lifetime is made. Satellite parameters pertaining to the cluster

  2. The normal growth of the tracheal wall in human foetuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szpinda, Michał; Daroszewski, Marcin; Szpinda, Anna; Woźniak, Alina; Mila-Kierzenkowska, Celestyna; Flisiński, Piotr; Wiśniewski, Marcin

    2013-10-31

    Tracheal wall thickness is a substantial indicator in various pathological changes. The present study was performed to compile normative data and formulae for the tracheal wall thickness and volume at varying gestational age. Using anatomical dissection, digital image analysis and statistics a range of the wall thickness, proximal internal-to-external cross-sectional area ratio, and wall volume for the trachea in 73 spontaneously aborted human fetuses aged 14-25 weeks was examined. No significant male-female differences were found. The values of tracheal wall thickness ranged from 0.36 ±0.01 mm for the 14-week group to 1.23 ±0.17 mm for the 25-week group of gestation, according to the linear function y = -0.823 + 0.083 × age ± 0.087. The tracheal lumen rate, expressed as the proximal internal-to-external cross-sectional area ratio, decreased from 42.61 ±1.11% to 26.78 ±4.95%, according to the function y = 62.239 - 1.487 × age ±3.119. The tracheal wall volume rose from 16.28 ±4.18 mm(3) in fetuses aged 14 weeks to 269.22 ±29.26 mm(3) in fetuses aged 25 weeks, according to the quintic function y = 0.000052 × age(4.894). The tracheal wall parameters show no sexual dimorphism. The tracheal wall grows linearly in its length, and according to a quintic function in its volume. A relative decrease in the tracheal lumen at the expense of an increase in both the wall thickness and wall volume of the trachea is found during gestation.

  3. SND2, a NAC transcription factor gene, regulates genes involved in secondary cell wall development in Arabidopsis fibres and increases fibre cell area in Eucalyptus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussey Steven G

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background NAC domain transcription factors initiate secondary cell wall biosynthesis in Arabidopsis fibres and vessels by activating numerous transcriptional regulators and biosynthetic genes. NAC family member SND2 is an indirect target of a principal regulator of fibre secondary cell wall formation, SND1. A previous study showed that overexpression of SND2 produced a fibre cell-specific increase in secondary cell wall thickness in Arabidopsis stems, and that the protein was able to transactivate the cellulose synthase8 (CesA8 promoter. However, the full repertoire of genes regulated by SND2 is unknown, and the effect of its overexpression on cell wall chemistry remains unexplored. Results We overexpressed SND2 in Arabidopsis and analyzed homozygous lines with regards to stem chemistry, biomass and fibre secondary cell wall thickness. A line showing upregulation of CesA8 was selected for transcriptome-wide gene expression profiling. We found evidence for upregulation of biosynthetic genes associated with cellulose, xylan, mannan and lignin polymerization in this line, in agreement with significant co-expression of these genes with native SND2 transcripts according to public microarray repositories. Only minor alterations in cell wall chemistry were detected. Transcription factor MYB103, in addition to SND1, was upregulated in SND2-overexpressing plants, and we detected upregulation of genes encoding components of a signal transduction machinery recently proposed to initiate secondary cell wall formation. Several homozygous T4 and hemizygous T1 transgenic lines with pronounced SND2 overexpression levels revealed a negative impact on fibre wall deposition, which may be indirectly attributable to excessive overexpression rather than co-suppression. Conversely, overexpression of SND2 in Eucalyptus stems led to increased fibre cross-sectional cell area. Conclusions This study supports a function for SND2 in the regulation of cellulose and

  4. Groundwater contaminant plume maps and volumes, 100-K and 100-N Areas, Hanford Site, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kenneth H.

    2016-09-27

    extents are shown graphically and in tabular form for comparison to previous estimates. Plume data also were interpolated to a finer grid (10 × 10 m) for some processing, particularly to estimate volumes of contaminated groundwater. However, hydrogeologic transport modeling was not considered for the interpolation. The compilation of plume extents for each contaminant also allowed estimates of overlap of the plumes or areas with more than one contaminant above regulatory standards.A mapping of saturated aquifer thickness also was derived across the 100-K and 100–N study area, based on the vertical difference between the groundwater level (water table) at the top and the altitude of the top of the Ringold Upper Mud geologic unit, considered the bottom of the uppermost unconfined aquifer. Saturated thickness was calculated for each cell in the finer (10 × 10 m) grid. The summation of the cells’ saturated thickness values within each polygon of plume regulatory exceedance provided an estimate of the total volume of contaminated aquifer, and the results also were checked using a SURFER® volumetric integration procedure. The total volume of contaminated groundwater in each plume was derived by multiplying the aquifer saturated thickness volume by a locally representative value of porosity (0.3).Estimates of the uncertainty of the plume delineation also are presented. “Upper limit” plume delineations were calculated for each contaminant using the same procedure as the “average” plume extent except with values at each well that are set at a 95-percent upper confidence limit around the log-normally transformed mean concentrations, based on the standard error for the distribution of the mean value in that well; “lower limit” plumes are calculated at a 5-percent confidence limit around the geometric mean. These upper- and lower-limit estimates are considered unrealistic because the statistics were increased or decreased at each well simultaneously and were not

  5. Stabilization of endangered part of structures by building dry brunt brick buttressing, critical case study of plane wall in DKG-North Area, Mohenjo daro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Shaikh

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available 'World Heritage Sites' are places or buildings of outstanding universal value recognized as constituting a world heritage 'for whose protection it is the duty of the international community as a whole to co-operate'. The concept of World Heritage is at the core of the World Heritage Convention, adopted by Heritage List as a means of identifying, protecting, conserving and presenting those parts of the world's natural and cultural heritage that are of sufficient 'outstanding universal value' to be the responsibility of the international community as a whole. By joining the Convention, nation states are pledged to safeguard the WH S by protecting their national heritage. UNESCO in 1972, to which 160 nations have now been adhered. The Convention came into force in 1975 and established a Site in their territory as part of a universally agreed policy for World. Moenjodaro site covering an area of 555 Acres out of which only 10 % of it has been excavated by exposing 50 Kilometer standing walls. The wall of the main street of DK G Area, Mohen jo Daro partially deformed, due to the torque effects this is studied here on a lateral cross wall in the chief house. Furthermore, the resulting behaviour of the bucking wall demonstrates the significant loadbearing capacity of the structure under service conditions and its high sensitivity to imposed changes of the geometry. Although the tensile stresses exceeded the flexural strength at the vertices and the length of the wall, hence both the geometry and condition of this area are critical for the safety of the wall. The results of this study can improve the assessment and thus help in the preservation of many important structures of the metropolitan city. Here the hydrous characteristic of the brick is studied as a general phenomenon, it is observed that the remains of the sites located in Sindh suffered a lot mostly due to age, human neglect variations of atmospheric condition, severe temperature and natural

  6. Love Canal Emergency Declaration Area habitability study. Volume 1. Introduction and decision-making documentation. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-05-01

    Environmental studies were conducted to provide data that could be used by the Commissioner of Health for the State of New York in determining whether the Emergency Declaration Area surrounding the Love Canal hazardous-waste site is habitable. Volume I of the five-volume series summarizes the main elements and the key decision points in the Habitability Study as an introduction to the series.

  7. Love Canal Emergency Declaration Area habitability study. Volume 5. Peer review summary: TRC (Technical Review Committee) responses. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-07-01

    Environmental studies were conducted to provide data that could be used by the Commissioner of Health for the State of New York in determining whether the Emergency Declaration Area surrounding the Love Canal hazardous-waste site is habitable. These volumes (II through IV) were reviewed by a peer-review panel of expert scientists. The scientists concluded that each of the three environmental studies was well planned and well executed. Volume V summarizes the peer review and gives additional information or clarifications as requested during the peer review. Volume V also provides additional supplemental statistical analyses requested by the peer reviewer panel.

  8. Intra-rater and Inter-rater Reliability of Rehabilitative Ultrasound Imaging of Multifidus Muscle Thickness, Cross Section Area and Bladder Wall Displacement in Multiparous Women

    OpenAIRE

    Zahra Teymuri; Mohammad Hosseinifar; Alireza Ansari-Moghaddam; Ahmadreza Askari Ashtiani; Fateme Ghiasi; Asghar Akbari

    2016-01-01

    Background. Pregnancy related changes can affect the role of multifidus (MF) and pelvic floor muscles (PFM) in the spinal stability and load transfer mechanism. Rehabilitative ultrasound imaging (RUSI) is a powerful tool that provides unavailable information about the myofascial system. Objective. This study aimed to determine intra-rater and inter-rater reliability of ultrasound imaging in the measurement of MF thickness, cross section area (CSA) and bladder wall displacement as a reflect...

  9. Underground Test Area Subproject Phase I Data Analysis Task. Volume V - Transport Parameter and Source Term Data Documentation Package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1996-12-01

    Volume V of the documentation for the Phase I Data Analysis Task performed in support of the current Regional Flow Model, Transport Model, and Risk Assessment for the Nevada Test Site Underground Test Area Subproject contains the transport parameter and source term data. Because of the size and complexity of the model area, a considerable quantity of data was collected and analyzed in support of the modeling efforts. The data analysis task was consequently broken into eight subtasks, and descriptions of each subtask's activities are contained in one of the eight volumes that comprise the Phase I Data Analysis Documentation.

  10. Reliable nanomaterial classification of powders using the volume-specific surface area method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wohlleben, Wendel, E-mail: wendel.wohlleben@basf.com [Department of Material Physics, BASF SE (Germany); Mielke, Johannes [BAM–Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (Germany); Bianchin, Alvise [MBN Nanomaterialia s.p.a (Italy); Ghanem, Antoine [R& I Centre Brussels, Solvay (Belgium); Freiberger, Harald [Department of Material Physics, BASF SE (Germany); Rauscher, Hubert [European Commission, Nanobiosciences Unit, Joint Research Centre (Italy); Gemeinert, Marion; Hodoroaba, Vasile-Dan, E-mail: dan.hodoroaba@bam.de [BAM–Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (Germany)

    2017-02-15

    The volume-specific surface area (VSSA) of a particulate material is one of two apparently very different metrics recommended by the European Commission for a definition of “nanomaterial” for regulatory purposes: specifically, the VSSA metric may classify nanomaterials and non-nanomaterials differently than the median size in number metrics, depending on the chemical composition, size, polydispersity, shape, porosity, and aggregation of the particles in the powder. Here we evaluate the extent of agreement between classification by electron microscopy (EM) and classification by VSSA on a large set of diverse particulate substances that represent all the anticipated challenges except mixtures of different substances. EM and VSSA are determined in multiple labs to assess also the level of reproducibility. Based on the results obtained on highly characterized benchmark materials from the NanoDefine EU FP7 project, we derive a tiered screening strategy for the purpose of implementing the definition of nanomaterials. We finally apply the screening strategy to further industrial materials, which were classified correctly and left only borderline cases for EM. On platelet-shaped nanomaterials, VSSA is essential to prevent false-negative classification by EM. On porous materials, approaches involving extended adsorption isotherms prevent false positive classification by VSSA. We find no false negatives by VSSA, neither in Tier 1 nor in Tier 2, despite real-world industrial polydispersity and diverse composition, shape, and coatings. The VSSA screening strategy is recommended for inclusion in a technical guidance for the implementation of the definition.

  11. Resonant RF network antennas for large-area and large-volume inductively coupled plasma sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollenstein, Ch; Guittienne, Ph; Howling, A. A.

    2013-10-01

    Large-area and large-volume radio frequency (RF) plasmas are produced by different arrangements of an elementary electrical mesh consisting of two conductors interconnected by a capacitor at each end. The obtained cylindrical and planar RF networks are resonant and generate very high RF currents. The input impedance of such RF networks shows the behaviour of an RLC parallel resonance equivalent circuit. The real impedance at the resonance frequency is of great advantage for power matching compared with conventional inductive devices. Changes in the RLC equivalent circuit during the observed E-H transition will allow future interpretation of the plasma-antenna coupling. Furthermore, high power transfer efficiencies are found during inductively coupled plasma (ICP) operation. For the planar RF antenna network it is shown that the E-H transition occurs simultaneously over the entire antenna. The underlying physics of these discharges induced by the resonant RF network antenna is found to be identical to that of the conventional ICP devices described in the literature. The resonant RF network antenna is a new versatile plasma source, which can be adapted to applications in industry and research.

  12. FIBRIN-TYPE FIBRINOID IN HUMAN PLACENTA: A STEREOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF ITS ASSOCIATION WITH INTERVILLOUS VOLUME AND VILLOUS SURFACE AREA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terry M Mayhew

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Stereological methods were used to examine fibrin-type fibrinoid deposition in the intervillous spaces of human placentas collected during gestation (12-41 weeks and from term pregnancies at low (400 m and high (3.6 km altitude. The main aim was to test predictions about the relationships between fibrinoid deposits and either the volume of intervillous space or the surface area of (intermediate + terminal villi. Fields of view on Masson trichrome-stained paraffin sections were selected as part of a systematic sampling design which randomised section location and orientation. Relative and absolute volumes were estimated by test point counting and surfaces by intersection counting. Apparent differences were tested by analyses of variance and relationships by correlation and regression analysis. Fibrinoid volume increased during gestation and correlated positively with intervillous volume and villous surface area. However, relative to intervillous volume, the main increase in fibrinoid occurred towards term (36-41 weeks. At high altitude, placentas contained more intervillous space but less fibrinoid. At both altitudes, there were significant correlations between fibrinoid volume and villous surface area. In all cases, changes in fibrinoid volume were commensurate with changes in villous surface area. Whilst findings lend support to the notion that fibrinoid deposition during normal gestation is influenced by the quality of vascular perfusion, they also emphasise that the extent of the villous surface is a more generally important factor. The villous surface may influence the steady state between coagulation and fibrinolysis since some pro-coagulatory events operate at the trophoblastic epithelium. They occur notably at sites of trophoblast de-epithelialisation and these arise following trauma or during the extrusion phase of normal epithelial turnover.

  13. Effect of finishing instrumentation using NiTi hand files on volume, surface area and uninstrumented surfaces in C-shaped root canal systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoroso-Silva, P; Alcalde, M P; Hungaro Duarte, M A; De-Deus, G; Ordinola-Zapata, R; Freire, L G; Cavenago, B C; De Moraes, I G

    2017-06-01

    To assess the effect of 90°-oscillatory instrumentation with hand files on several morphological parameters (volume, surface area and uninstrumented surface) in C-shaped root canals after instrumentation using a single-file reciprocation system (Reciproc; VDW, Munich, Germany) and a Self-Adjusting File System (SAF; ReDent Nova, Ra'anana, Israel). Twenty mandibular second molars with C-shaped canals and C1 canal configurations were divided into two groups (n = 10) and instrumented with Reciproc and SAF instruments. A size 30 NiTi hand K-file attached to a 90°-oscillatory motion handpiece was used as final instrumentation in both groups. The specimens were scanned using micro-computed tomography after all procedures. Volume, surface area increase and uninstrumented root canal surface were analysed using CTAn software (Bruker-microCT, Kontich, Belgium). Also, the uninstrumented root canal surface was calculated for each canal third. All values were compared between groups using the Mann-Whitney test and within groups using the Wilcoxon's signed-rank test. Instrumentation with Reciproc significantly increased canal volume compared with instrumentation with SAF. Additionally, the canal volumes were significantly increased after 90°-oscillatory instrumentation (between and within group comparison; (P instrumentation protocols, statistical analysis only revealed significant differences in the within groups comparison (P instrumentation yielded an uninstrumented root canal surface of 28% and 34%, respectively, which was not significantly different (P > 0.05). Final oscillatory instrumentation significantly reduced the uninstrumented root canal surface from 28% to 9% (Reciproc) and from 34% to 15% (SAF; P instrumentation that was significantly reduced after oscillatory instrumentation (P instrumentation of mandibular second molars with C-shaped canals except for a higher canal volume increase in the Reciproc group compared to the SAF. Furthermore, the final use

  14. Estimation of the Cultured Cells' Volume and Surface Area: Application of Stereological Methods on Vero Cells Infected by Rubella Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noorafshan, Ali; Motamedifar, Mohammad; Karbalay-Doust, Saied

    2016-01-01

    Morphological changes of the cells infected with rubella virus cannot be observed easily. Estimation of the size of the cultured cells can be a valuable parameter in this condition. This study was conducted to find answers to the following questions: How much time after infection with rubella virus, the volume and surface area of the Vero cells and their nuclei get started to change?How is it possible to apply stereological methods to estimate the volume and surface area of the cultured cells using the invariator, nucleator, and surfactor techniques? The cultured Vero cells were infected with rubella virus. The cells of the control and experimental groups were harvested at 2, 4, 8, 24, and 48 hours following the incubation period. The cells were processed and embedded in paraffin. Invariator, nucleator, and surfactor were applied to estimate the size of the Vero cells and their nuclei. The cell volume was decreased by 15-24%, 48 hours after the infection in comparison to the non-infected cells. Besides, the cell surface area was decreased by 13%, 48 hours after the infection. However, no changes were detected in the nuclei. The values of the standard deviation and coefficient of variation of the cells, estimated by invariator, were lower compared to those measured by the nucleator or surfactor. In this study, the volume and surface area of the Vero cells were reduced by rubella virus 48 hours after infection. Invariator is a more precise method compared to nucleator or surfactor.

  15. Corpus Callosum Area and Brain Volume in Autism Spectrum Disorder: Quantitative Analysis of Structural MRI from the ABIDE Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucharsky Hiess, R.; Alter, R.; Sojoudi, S.; Ardekani, B. A.; Kuzniecky, R.; Pardoe, H. R.

    2015-01-01

    Reduced corpus callosum area and increased brain volume are two commonly reported findings in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). We investigated these two correlates in ASD and healthy controls using T1-weighted MRI scans from the Autism Brain Imaging Data Exchange (ABIDE). Automated methods were used to segment the corpus callosum and intracranial…

  16. Quantifying changes and trends in glacier area and volume in the Austrian Ötztal Alps (1969-1997-2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Abermann

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study we apply a simple and reliable method to derive recent changes in glacier area and volume by taking advantage of high resolution LIDAR (light detection and ranging DEMs (digital elevation models from the year 2006. Together with two existing glacier inventories (1969 and 1997 the new dataset enables us to quantify area and volume changes over the past 37 years at three dates. This has been done for 81 glaciers (116 km2 in the Ötztal Alps which accounts for almost one third of Austria's glacier extent. Glacier area and volume have reduced drastically with significant differences within the individual size classes. Between 1997 and 2006 an overall area loss of 10.5 km2 or 8.2% occurred. Volume has reduced by 1.0 km3 which accounts for a mean thickness change of −8.2 m. The availability of three comparable inventories allows a comprehensive size and altitude dependent analysis of glacier changes but lacks a high temporal resolution. For the comparison of rates of changes between the two different periods (1969 to 1997 with 1997 to 2006 we propose two approaches in this study: a to estimate mean overall rates of changes (including a period of advance and b to extract periods of net-retreat by using additional information (length change and mass balance measurements. Analysis of the resulting acceleration factors reveals that the retreat of volume and mean thickness changes has accelerated significantly more than that of area changes.

  17. Ultrasound-Assessed Gastric Antral Area Correlates With Aspirated Tube Feed Volume in Enterally Fed Critically Ill Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vibhu; Gudivada, Deepthi; Gueret, Renaud; Bailitz, John

    2017-04-01

    Enteral tube feed (ETF) intolerance occurs frequently in hospitalized patients and more so in critically ill patients. Most critical care nurses continue to assess gastric residual volume (GRV), especially among those with a history of ETF intolerance. We hypothesized that ultrasound assessment of GRV correlates directly with aspirated tube feed volume. This was a prospective cohort study of a convenience sample of critically ill mechanically ventilated patients admitted to an intensive care unit receiving ETF. The gastric antrum was imaged using the aorta and inferior vena cava (IVC) as landmarks concurrently and simultaneously using a curvilinear probe in the midline. All ultrasound measurements were performed at 30 degrees head up, in the supine position, and prior to the assessment of GRV by nursing staff blinding the ultrasonographer to gastric volume aspirated. Gastric antral area was determined by assessing anteroposterior (AP) and craniocaudal (CC) diameters of the gastric antrum. Gastric cross-sectional area (CSA) using IVC as a landmark ( R2 = 0.92, P < .0001) and aorta as a landmark ( R2 = 0.86, P < .0001) correlated with aspirated volume. CC diameter of the stomach measured using the aorta as a landmark correlated with aspirated volume and increased linearly with increasing GRV ( R2 = 0.78, P < .0001). A CC diameter of <10 cm using the aorta as a landmark predicted a gastric volume of <500 mL. Ultrasound assessment provides accurate assessment of gastric volume in real-life settings, and the CC diameter of the gastric antrum provides a simple surrogate of GRV.

  18. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Waste Area Groups 1-7 and 10 Technology Logic Diagram. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Brien, M.C.; Meservey, R.H.; Little, M.; Ferguson, J.S.; Gilmore, M.C.

    1993-09-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) was developed to provide a decision support tool that relates Environmental Restoration (ER) and Waste Management (WM) problems at the INEL to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation needed to develop these technologies to a state that allows technology transfer and application to an environmental restoration need. It is essential that follow-on engineering and system studies be conducted to build on the output of this project. These studies will begin by selecting the most promising technologies identified in this TLD and finding an optimum mix of technologies that will provide a socially acceptable balance between cost and risk to meet the site windows of opportunity. The TLD consists of three separate volumes: Volume I includes the purpose and scope of the TLD, a brief history of the INEL Waste Area Groups, and environmental problems they represent. A description of the TLD, definitions of terms, a description of the technology evaluation process, and a summary of each subelement, is presented. Volume II (this volume) describes the overall layout and development of the TLD in logic diagram format. This section addresses the environmental restoration of contaminated INEL sites. Specific INEL problem areas/contaminants are identified along with technology solutions, the status of the technologies, precise science and technology needs, and implementation requirements. Volume III provides the Technology Evaluation Data Sheets (TEDS) for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) activities that are referenced by a TEDS codenumber in Volume II. Each of these sheets represents a single logic trace across the TLD. These sheets contain more detail than provided for technologies in Volume II.

  19. Cortical thickness, surface area and volume measures in Parkinson's disease, multiple system atrophy and progressive supranuclear palsy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Worker

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD, Multiple System Atrophy (MSA and Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP are neurodegenerative diseases that can be difficult to distinguish clinically. The objective of the current study was to use surface-based analysis techniques to assess cortical thickness, surface area and grey matter volume to identify unique morphological patterns of cortical atrophy in PD, MSA and PSP and to relate these patterns of change to disease duration and clinical features.High resolution 3D T1-weighted MRI volumes were acquired from 14 PD patients, 18 MSA, 14 PSP and 19 healthy control participants. Cortical thickness, surface area and volume analyses were carried out using the automated surface-based analysis package FreeSurfer (version 5.1.0. Measures of disease severity and duration were assessed for correlation with cortical morphometric changes in each clinical group.Results show that in PSP, widespread cortical thinning and volume loss occurs within the frontal lobe, particularly the superior frontal gyrus. In addition, PSP patients also displayed increased surface area in the pericalcarine. In comparison, PD and MSA did not display significant changes in cortical morphology.These results demonstrate that patients with clinically established PSP exhibit distinct patterns of cortical atrophy, particularly affecting the frontal lobe. These results could be used in the future to develop a useful clinical application of MRI to distinguish PSP patients from PD and MSA patients.

  20. Large-area fluidic assembly of single-walled carbon nanotubes through dip-coating and directional evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Pilnam; Kang, Tae June

    2017-12-01

    We present a simple and scalable fluidic-assembly approach, in which bundles of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are selectively aligned and deposited by directionally controlled dip-coating and solvent evaporation processes. The patterned surface with alternating regions of hydrophobic polydimethyl siloxane (PDMS) (height 100 nm) strips and hydrophilic SiO2 substrate was withdrawn vertically at a constant speed ( 3 mm/min) from a solution bath containing SWCNTs ( 0.1 mg/ml), allowing for directional evaporation and subsequent selective deposition of nanotube bundles along the edges of horizontally aligned PDMS strips. In addition, the fluidic assembly was applied to fabricate a field effect transistor (FET) with highly oriented SWCNTs, which demonstrate significantly higher current density as well as high turn-off ratio (T/O ratio 100) as compared to that with randomly distributed carbon nanotube bundles (T/O ratio <10).

  1. Characterization of the intragranular water regime within subsurface sediments: pore volume, surface area, and mass transfer limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Michael B.; Stoliker, Deborah L.; Davis, James A.; Zachara, John M.

    2011-01-01

    Although "intragranular" pore space within grain aggregates, grain fractures, and mineral surface coatings may contain a relatively small fraction of the total porosity within a porous medium, it often contains a significant fraction of the reactive surface area, and can thus strongly affect the transport of sorbing solutes. In this work, we demonstrate a batch experiment procedure using tritiated water as a high-resolution diffusive tracer to characterize the intragranular pore space. The method was tested using uranium-contaminated sediments from the vadose and capillary fringe zones beneath the former 300A process ponds at the Hanford site (Washington). Sediments were contacted with tracers in artificial groundwater, followed by a replacement of bulk solution with tracer-free groundwater and the monitoring of tracer release. From these data, intragranular pore volumes were calculated and mass transfer rates were quantified using a multirate first-order mass transfer model. Tritium-hydrogen exchange on surface hydroxyls was accounted for by conducting additional tracer experiments on sediment that was vacuum dried after reaction. The complementary ("wet" and "dry") techniques allowed for the simultaneous determination of intragranular porosity and surface area using tritium. The Hanford 300A samples exhibited intragranular pore volumes of ~1% of the solid volume and intragranular surface areas of ~20%–35% of the total surface area. Analogous experiments using bromide ion as a tracer yielded very different results, suggesting very little penetration of bromide into the intragranular porosity.

  2. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Waste Area Groups 1-7 and 10 Technology Logic Diagram. Volume 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Brien, M.C.; Meservey, R.H.; Little, M.; Ferguson, J.S.; Gilmore, M.C.

    1993-09-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) was developed to provide a decision support tool that relates Environmental Restoration (ER) and Waste Management (WM) problems at the INEL to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation needed to develop these technologies to a state that allows technology transfer and application to an environmental restoration need. It is essential that follow-on engineering and system studies be conducted to build on the output of this project. These studies will begin by selecting the most promising technologies identified in this TLD and finding an optimum mix of technologies that will provide a socially acceptable balance between cost and risk to meet the site windows of opportunity. The TLD consists of three separate volumes: Volume I includes the purpose and scope of the TLD, a brief history of the INEL Waste Area Groups, and environmental problems they represent. A description of the TLD, definitions of terms, a description of the technology evaluation process, and a summary of each subelement, is presented. Volume II describes the overall layout and development of the TLD in logic diagram format. This section addresses the environmental restoration of contaminated INEL sites. Volume III (this volume) provides the Technology Evaluation Data Sheets (TEDS) for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) activities that are reference by a TEDS code number in Volume II. Each of these sheets represents a single logic trace across the TLD. These sheets contain more detail than provided for technologies in Volume II. Data sheets are arranged alphanumerically by the TEDS code number in the upper right corner of each sheet.

  3. Static allometry of unicellular green algae: scaling of cellular surface area and volume in the genus Micrasterias (Desmidiales).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neustupa, J

    2016-02-01

    The surface area-to-volume ratio of cells is one of the key factors affecting fundamental biological processes and, thus, fitness of unicellular organisms. One of the general models for allometric increase in surface-to-volume scaling involves fractal-like elaboration of cellular surfaces. However, specific data illustrating this pattern in natural populations of the unicellular organisms have not previously been available. This study shows that unicellular green algae of the genus Micrasterias (Desmidiales) have positive allometric surface-to-volume scaling caused by changes in morphology of individual species, especially in the degree of cell lobulation. This allometric pattern was also detected within most of the cultured and natural populations analysed. Values of the allometric S:V scaling within individual populations were closely correlated to the phylogenetic structure of the clade. In addition, they were related to species-specific cellular morphology. Individual populations differed in their allometric patterns, and their position in the allometric space was strongly correlated with the degree of allometric S:V scaling. This result illustrates that allometric shape patterns are an important correlate of the capacity of individual populations to compensate for increases in their cell volumes by increasing the surface area. However, variation in allometric patterns was not associated with phylogenetic structure. This indicates that the position of the populations in the allometric space was not evolutionarily conserved and might be influenced by environmental factors. © 2015 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2015 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  4. Root Growth and Water distribution in living walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Lars

    Living walls is a way of bringing plants and green areas into cities, and offer both positive environmental and aesthetical effects. A prerequisite for optimal performance of a living wall is that the plant cover is properly established why the individual plant should have optimal conditions...... walls; the vertical orientation of the growing medium, plants are growing vertically above or below each other in a limited rooting volume; there is an increased exposure to weather and the plants can react differently to water conditions and competition from other plants. Plant growth is the core...

  5. Sulcal Morphology and Volume of Broca's Area Linked to Handedness and Sex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Joanne L.; Kemp, Graham J.; Roberts, Neil; Garcia-Finana, Marta

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the effect of handedness and sex on: (i) sulcal contours defining PO and PTR and (ii) volume estimates of PO and PTR subfields in 40 left- and 42 right-handers. Results show an effect of handedness on discontinuity of the inferior frontal sulcus (IFS: P less than 0.01). Discontinuity of IFS was observed in: 43% left- and 62% right…

  6. Seasonal Changes in the Inundation Area and Water Volume of the Tonle Sap River and Its Floodplain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokly Siev

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Flood pulses occur annually along the Tonle Sap River (TSR due to the large volume of water flowing from Tonle Sap Lake (TSL, its tributaries, and the Mekong River (MR. This study describes the seasonal changes in inundation area and water volume in the floodplain along the TSR over three years. The method employed time series remote sensing images of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS satellite data, the digital elevation model (DEM of the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM, bathymetric data, and observed water level data. Adding normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI as a “third band” in the maximum likelihood classification (MLC provided higher accuracy compared to thresholding NDVI and pure MLC (two bands only. The results showed that the inundation area ranged from 123.8 to 3251.2 km2 (mean: 1028.5 km2 with overall accuracy of 96.9%. The estimated water volume ranged from 418.3 to 2223.9 million m3 (mean: 917.3 million m3 from the dry to wet season, respectively. Seasonally, the TSR floodplain accounted for up to 5.3% and 3.2% of the mean annual inflow and outflow of the TSR, respectively. In addition to the TSL water reservoir, the TSR and its floodplain exchanged and stabilized the flow of the MR and its downstream delta, respectively. Overall, the obtained results have enhanced our understanding of the TSR, supporting further studies on river connectivity and reversal flow in this study area.

  7. Selenium status, thyroid volume, and multiple nodule formation in an area with mild iodine deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lone Banke; Schomburg, Lutz; Kohrle, Josef

    2011-01-01

    ) introduction of iodine fortification. Serum selenium concentration and urinary iodine were measured, and the thyroid gland was examined by ultrasonography in the same subjects. Associations between serum selenium concentration and thyroid parameters were examined in multiple linear regression models...... or logistic regression models.Results: Serum selenium concentration was found to be significantly, negatively associated with thyroid volume (P=0.006), and a low selenium status significantly increased the risk for thyroid enlargement (P=0.007). Furthermore, low serum selenium status had a tendency...... to increase the risk for development of multiple nodules (P=0.087).Conclusions: Low serum selenium concentration was associated with a larger thyroid volume and a higher prevalence of thyroid enlargement....

  8. Probability and volume of potential postwildfire debris flows in the 2012 Waldo Canyon Burn Area near Colorado Springs, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdin, Kristine L.; Dupree, Jean A.; Elliott, John G.

    2012-01-01

    This report presents a preliminary emergency assessment of the debris-flow hazards from drainage basins burned by the 2012 Waldo Canyon fire near Colorado Springs in El Paso County, Colorado. Empirical models derived from statistical evaluation of data collected from recently burned basins throughout the intermountain western United States were used to estimate the probability of debris-flow occurrence and potential volume of debris flows along the drainage network of the burned area and to estimate the same for 22 selected drainage basins along U.S. Highway 24 and the perimeter of the burned area. Input data for the models included topographic parameters, soil characteristics, burn severity, and rainfall totals and intensities for a (1) 2-year-recurrence, 1-hour-duration rainfall, referred to as a 2-year storm (29 millimeters); (2) 10-year-recurrence, 1-hour-duration rainfall, referred to as a 10-year storm (42 millimeters); and (3) 25-year-recurrence, 1-hour-duration rainfall, referred to as a 25-year storm (48 millimeters). Estimated debris-flow probabilities at the pour points of the the drainage basins of interest ranged from less than 1 to 54 percent in response to the 2-year storm; from less than 1 to 74 percent in response to the 10-year storm; and from less than 1 to 82 percent in response to the 25-year storm. Basins and drainage networks with the highest probabilities tended to be those on the southern and southeastern edge of the burn area where soils have relatively high clay contents and gradients are steep. Nine of the 22 drainage basins of interest have greater than a 40-percent probability of producing a debris flow in response to the 10-year storm. Estimated debris-flow volumes for all rainfalls modeled range from a low of 1,500 cubic meters to a high of greater than 100,000 cubic meters. Estimated debris-flow volumes increase with basin size and distance along the drainage network, but some smaller drainages were also predicted to produce

  9. Condylar volume and condylar area in class I, class II and class III young adult subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Saccucci Matteo; D’Attilio Michele; Rodolfino Daria; Festa Felice; Polimeni Antonella; Tecco Simona

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Aim Aim of this study was to compare the volume and the shape of mandibular condyles in a Caucasian young adult population, with different skeletal pattern. Material and methods 200 Caucasian patients (15–30 years old, 95 male and 105 females) were classified in three groups on the base of ANB angle: skeletal class I (65 patients), skeletal class II (70 patients) and skeletal class III (65 patients). Left and right TMJs of each subject were evaluated independently with CBCT (Iluma). ...

  10. Effect of structural modifications on the drying kinetics of foods: changes in volume, surface area and product shape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio De Michelis

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Macro and micro-structural changes take place during food dehydration. Macro-structural changes encompass modifications in shape, area and volume. Studies of such changes are important because dehydration kinetics (essential for calculating industrial dryers may be highly influenced by changes in food shape and dimensions. The overall changes in volume, surface area (“shrinkage” and shape (Heywood factor, with provides a close description of food shape were determined experimentally, and the results were correlated with simple expressions. Hence, although dehydration kinetics can be modeled with simplified overall shrinkage expressions, the possibility of selecting a suitable geometry and predicting the characteristics dimensions will provide higher accuracy. An additional unresolved problem is the lack of a general model that predicts macro-structural changes for various foods and diverse geometries. In this work, based on experimental data of sweet and sour cherries, and rose hip fruits, a simplified general model to predict changes in volume and surface area are proposed. To estimate how the changes in characteristic dimensions affect the kinetic studies, experimental drying curves for the three fruits by means of a diffusional model considered the following variants for the characteristic dimensions: (i The radius of the fresh food, assumed constant; (ii The radius of the partially dehydrated product; (iii The radius predicted by the correlation for structural changes, especially volume, obtained in this work and generalized for the three fruits, and (iv to demonstrate the need to study the macro-structural changes for all dehydrated foods, also be present the case of a restructured food.

  11. Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS). Volume 3, Subject Area reference manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreck, R.I.

    1994-01-14

    The Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS) Subject Area manuals are designed as reference guides, that is, each chapter provides the information needed to make best use of each subject area, its tables, and reporting capabilities. Each subject area is documented in a chapter in one of the subject area manuals. Because these are reference manuals, most of the information is also available in the online help system as well. See Section 5.4.2 of the HEIS User`s Guide (DOE-RL 1994a) for a detailed description of the online help.

  12. Hydrogeology, distribution, and volume of saline groundwater in the southern midcontinent and adjacent areas of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, Noël I.; Smith, S. Jerrod; Seger, Christian H.

    2013-01-01

    The hydrogeology, distribution, and volume of saline water in 22 aquifers in the southern midcontinent of the United States were evaluated to provide information about saline groundwater resources that may be used to reduce dependency on freshwater resources. Those aquifers underlie six States in the southern midcontinent—Arkansas, Kansas, Louisiana, Missouri, Oklahoma, and Texas—and adjacent areas including all or parts of Alabama, Colorado, Florida, Illinois, Kentucky, Mississippi, Nebraska, New Mexico, South Dakota, Tennessee, and Wyoming and some offshore areas of the Gulf of Mexico. Saline waters of the aquifers were evaluated by defining salinity zones; digitizing data, primarily from the Regional Aquifer-System Analysis Program of the U.S. Geological Survey; and computing the volume of saline water in storage. The distribution of saline groundwater in the southern midcontinent is substantially affected by the hydrogeology and groundwater-flow systems of the aquifers. Many of the aquifers in the southern midcontinent are underlain by one or more aquifers, resulting in vertically stacked aquifers containing groundwaters of varying salinity. Saline groundwater is affected by past and present hydrogeologic conditions. Spatial variation of groundwater salinity in the southern midcontinent is controlled primarily by locations of recharge and discharge areas, groundwater-flow paths and residence time, mixing of freshwater and saline water, and interactions with aquifer rocks and sediments. The volume calculations made for the evaluated aquifers in the southern midcontinent indicate that about 39,900 million acre-feet (acre-ft) of saline water is in storage. About 21,600 million acre-ft of the water in storage is slightly to moderately saline (1,000–10,000 milligrams per liter [mg/L] dissolved solids), and about 18,300 million acre-ft is very saline (10,000–35,000 mg/L dissolved solids). The largest volumes of saline water are in the coastal lowlands (about

  13. Savannah River Plant, Project 8980: Engineering and design history of No. 400 Area. Volume 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1957-01-01

    The description and development, selection and descriptions of processes, design, and specialized design problems are presented for the 400-D Area at the Savannah River Plant. These facilities were used for the production of high purity heavy water for use as a moderator and coolant in the 100 Areas. Also, deuterium gas and hydrogen sulfide were produced here.

  14. Probability and volume of potential postwildfire debris flows in the 2012 High Park Burn Area near Fort Collins, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdin, Kristine L.; Dupree, Jean A.; Elliott, John G.

    2012-01-01

    This report presents a preliminary emergency assessment of the debris-flow hazards from drainage basins burned by the 2012 High Park fire near Fort Collins in Larimer County, Colorado. Empirical models derived from statistical evaluation of data collected from recently burned basins throughout the intermountain western United States were used to estimate the probability of debris-flow occurrence and volume of debris flows along the burned area drainage network and to estimate the same for 44 selected drainage basins along State Highway 14 and the perimeter of the burned area. Input data for the models included topographic parameters, soil characteristics, burn severity, and rainfall totals and intensities for a (1) 2-year-recurrence, 1-hour-duration rainfall (25 millimeters); (2) 10-year-recurrence, 1-hour-duration rainfall (43 millimeters); and (3) 25-year-recurrence, 1-hour-duration rainfall (51 millimeters). Estimated debris-flow probabilities along the drainage network and throughout the drainage basins of interest ranged from 1 to 84 percent in response to the 2-year-recurrence, 1-hour-duration rainfall; from 2 to 95 percent in response to the 10-year-recurrence, 1-hour-duration rainfall; and from 3 to 97 in response to the 25-year-recurrence, 1-hour-duration rainfall. Basins and drainage networks with the highest probabilities tended to be those on the eastern edge of the burn area where soils have relatively high clay contents and gradients are steep. Estimated debris-flow volumes range from a low of 1,600 cubic meters to a high of greater than 100,000 cubic meters. Estimated debris-flow volumes increase with basin size and distance along the drainage network, but some smaller drainages were also predicted to produce substantial volumes of material. The predicted probabilities and some of the volumes predicted for the modeled storms indicate a potential for substantial debris-flow impacts on structures, roads, bridges, and culverts located both within and

  15. Probability and volume of potential postwildfire debris flows in the 2010 Fourmile burn area, Boulder County, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruddy, Barbara C.; Stevens, Michael R.; Verdin, Kristine

    2010-01-01

    This report presents a preliminary emergency assessment of the debris-flow hazards from drainage basins burned by the Fourmile Creek fire in Boulder County, Colorado, in 2010. Empirical models derived from statistical evaluation of data collected from recently burned basins throughout the intermountain western United States were used to estimate the probability of debris-flow occurrence and volumes of debris flows for selected drainage basins. Data for the models include burn severity, rainfall total and intensity for a 25-year-recurrence, 1-hour-duration rainstorm, and topographic and soil property characteristics. Several of the selected drainage basins in Fourmile Creek and Gold Run were identified as having probabilities of debris-flow occurrence greater than 60 percent, and many more with probabilities greater than 45 percent, in response to the 25-year recurrence, 1-hour rainfall. None of the Fourmile Canyon Creek drainage basins selected had probabilities greater than 45 percent. Throughout the Gold Run area and the Fourmile Creek area upstream from Gold Run, the higher probabilities tend to be in the basins with southerly aspects (southeast, south, and southwest slopes). Many basins along the perimeter of the fire area were identified as having low probability of occurrence of debris flow. Volume of debris flows predicted from drainage basins with probabilities of occurrence greater than 60 percent ranged from 1,200 to 9,400 m3. The predicted moderately high probabilities and some of the larger volumes responses predicted for the modeled storm indicate a potential for substantial debris-flow effects to buildings, roads, bridges, culverts, and reservoirs located both within these drainages and immediately downstream from the burned area. However, even small debris flows that affect structures at the basin outlets could cause considerable damage.

  16. Characterization of the intragranular water regime within subsurface sediments: Pore volume, surface area, and mass transfer limitations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hay, Michael B.; Stoliker, Deborah L.; Davis, James A.; Zachara, John M.

    2011-10-29

    Although 'intragranular' pore space within grain aggregates, grain fractures, and mineral 24 surface coatings may contain a relatively small fraction of the total porosity within a porous 25 medium, it often contains a significant fraction of the reactive surface area, and can thus strongly 26 affect the transport of sorbing solutes. In this work, we demonstrate a batch experiment 27 procedure using tritium and bromide as high-resolution diffusive tracers to characterize the 28 intragranular pore space. The method was tested using uranium-contaminated sediments from 29 the vadose and capillary fringe zones beneath the former 300A process ponds at the Hanford site 30 (Washington State, USA). Sediments were contacted with tracers in artificial groundwater, 31 followed by replacement of bulk solution with tracer-free groundwater and monitoring of tracer 32 release. From these data, intragranular pore volumes were calculated and mass transfer rates 33 were quantified using a multirate first-order mass transfer model. Tritium-hydrogen exchange 34 on surface hydroxyls was accounted for by conducting additional tracer experiments on sediment 35 that was vacuum dried after reaction. The complementary ('wet' and 'dry') techniques allowed 36 for the simultaneous determination of intragranular porosity and surface area using tritium. The 37 Hanford 300A samples exhibited intragranular pore volumes of {approx}1% of the solid volume and 38 intragranular surface areas of {approx}20-30% of the total surface area. Comparison with N2 gas 39 adsorption suggests that this pore space includes both 'micropores' (< 2 nm diameter) and 40 'mesopores' (> 2 nm). Intragranular porosity estimates obtained using bromide were 41 significantly smaller, likely due to anion exclusion of Br- from pores with negatively charged 42 surfaces.

  17. Technical area status report for chemical/physical treatment. Volume 2, Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, C.H. Jr. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Schwinkendorf, W.E. [BDM Federal, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States)

    1993-08-01

    These Appendices describe various technologies that may be applicable to the Mixed Waste Treatment Plant (MWTP) Chemical/Physical Treatment System (CPTS). These technologies were identified by the CPTS Technical Support Group (TSG) as potentially applicable to a variety of separation, volume reduction, and decontamination requirements. The purpose was to identify all available and developing technologies, and their characteristics, for subsequent evaluation for specific requirements identified for the CPTS. However, the technologies described herein are not necessarily all inclusive, nor are they necessarily all applicable.

  18. Breckinridge Project, initial effort. Report XI, Volume III. Critical design areas. [Identification of critical design areas; design or materials problems, trade-off areas, items affecting operability and reliability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1982-01-01

    Several meetings have been held with representatives from Ashland Synthetic Fuels, Inc.; Airco Energy Company, Inc.; Bechtel Group, Inc.; and HRI Engineering, Inc. to identify critical design areas in the Phase Zero work. (Critical design areas are defined as those requiring additional data or further work to finalize design or material selection, to optimize the trade-off between capital investment and operating cost, or to enhance system operability and reliability.) The critical design areas so identified are summarized by plant in this volume of Report XI. Items of a proprietary nature have been omitted from this report, but are included in the limited access version.

  19. Technical area status report for low-level mixed waste final waste forms. Volume 2, Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayberry, J.L.; Huebner, T.L. [Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Ross, W. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Nakaoka, R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Schumacher, R. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Cunnane, J.; Singh, D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Darnell, R. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Greenhalgh, W. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1993-08-01

    This report presents information on low-level mixed waste forms.The descriptions of the low-level mixed waste (LLMW) streams that are considered by the Mixed Waste Integrated Program (MWIP) are given in Appendix A. This information was taken from descriptions generated by the Mixed Waste Treatment Program (MWTP). Appendix B provides a list of characteristic properties initially considered by the Final Waste Form (FWF) Working Group (WG). A description of facilities available to test the various FWFs discussed in Volume I of DOE/MWIP-3 are given in Appendix C. Appendix D provides a summary of numerous articles that were reviewed on testing of FWFS. Information that was collected by the tests on the characteristic properties considered in this report are documented in Appendix D. The articles reviewed are not a comprehensive list, but are provided to give an indication of the data that are available.

  20. Sacramento River Flood Control Project, California Mid-Valley Area, Phase 3. Design Memorandum Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-06-01

    California lists the Swainson’s hawk, western yellow-billed cuckoo, bank swallow, and giant garter snake as threatened and Mason’s lilaeopsis as rare... lilaeopsis , little mousetail, and Colusa grass. No sites in the study area are listed in the National Register of Historic Places. Records of

  1. Aloha - Rigolette Area, Louisiana, Agricultural Flood Control. Volume 1. Main Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-06-01

    protection would reduce the financial risks involved in agricultural enterprises in the area. Agricultural lands could be used more efficiently and other...Secretary of the Army. The present administration is reviewing project cost sharinF and financing across the entire spectrum of water resources

  2. Angiosperms evolved a higher mesophyll surface area per volume to maximize exchange surface under a low CO2 world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Théroux-Rancourt, Guillaume; Mason Earles, J.; Gilbert, Matthew E.; Zwieniecki, Maciej A.; Boyce, C. Kevin; McElrone, Andrew; Brodersen, Craig

    2017-04-01

    Variation in leaf mesophyll structure strongly affects CO2 diffusion and photosynthetic rates. One key trait is the surface of mesophyll cells exposed to intercellular airspace (Sm) which increases mesophyll conductance. Consequently, Sm is a key control of CO2 diffusion among species and genotypes. Using Sm values from the literature (> 200 species with 500 data points) and from our high-resolution X-ray computed tomography (μCT) dataset (currently 117 species), Sm shows little variation from pteridophytes to early angiosperms, while eudicots show the greatest structural diversity. However, Sm increases with total thickness of the mesophyll. By considering the exposed surface of the mesophyll to the intercellular air space (IAS) on a leaf or mesophyll volume (Ames/V mes) rather than leaf area basis (Sm), we demonstrate that angiosperms, and most specifically commelinids and non-basal eudicots, have constructed leaves with more surface per volume, while gymnosperms keep a constant Ames/V mes ratio. Thus, this strong phylogenetic signal suggests that angiosperms have developed IAS properties favoring leaves with higher surface to volume ratio, trait that allowed for the potential of high productivity even as atmospheric CO2 declined over the Cenozoic.

  3. Love Canal Emergency Declaration Area habitability study. Volume 3. Soil assessment: indicator chemicals. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-05-01

    Environmental studies were conducted to provide data that could be used by the Commissioner of Health for the State of New York in determining whether the Emergency Declaration Area (EDA) surrounding the Love Canal hazardous-waste site is habitable. The soil assessment compared concentrations of the Love Canal Indicator Chemicals found in the EDA to concentrations found in similar western New York communities. An analytical technique was developed to detect the indicator chemicals at very low levels, i.e. 1.0 ppb. The analytical technique utilized a gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer operating in the selected ion monitoring mode. The analytical results were statistically compared between the EDA and the comparison areas using a modified Wilcoxon rank sum test.

  4. Love Canal Emergency Declaration Area habitability study. Volume 2. Air assessment: indicator chemicals. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-02-01

    Environmental studies were conducted to provide data that could be used by the Commissioner of Health for the State of New York in determining whether the Emergency Declaration Area (EDA) surrounding the Love Canal hazardous-waste site is habitable. An air assessment was conducted for Love Canal Indicator Chemicals. Homes throughout the EDA were sampled using the Trace Atmospheric Gas Analyzer Model 6000E.

  5. Archaeological Investigations at the Grant River Public Use Area. Volume 1. Narrative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-12-01

    archaeological site (47 Gt 24), the Osceola Site, a purported Old Copper" mortuary component (Ritzenthaler 1946), from planned recreational facilities. In part...Ontario. Second, the mortuary contexts at Osceola are unique in many respects when compared to sites such as Reigh, Oconto, Riverside, and others. The...improvements such as pit toilets and a play- ground area. As a result of these investigations, it has been determined that no significant impact on

  6. Al Sahawa - The Awakening. Volume 4: Al Anbar Province, Area of Operations Topeka, Ramadi

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    accommodate different teach - ing and learning styles.13 The project presents the Awakening movement’s phases from devel- opment of the insurgency in 2003 to the...is a multimedia instructional package to accom- modate different teaching and learning styles. B. Collection Interviews were conducted in the...in the larger context of Iraq? • Are they transferable to other areas such as Afghanistan or Africa ? • Should they be incorporated into doctrine

  7. Interventricular delay measurement using equilibrium radionuclide angiography before resynchronization therapy should be performed outside the area of segmental wall motion abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courtehoux, Maxime [Service EFMP CHU Trousseau, Chambray les Tours (France); Zannad, Noura; Fauchier, Laurent; Babuty, Dominique [Service Cardiologie B CHU Trousseau, Tours (France); Eder, Veronique [Service EFMP CHU Trousseau, Chambray les Tours (France); EA3852 University Francois Rabelais, Tours (France)

    2011-02-15

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate that only mechanical dyssynchrony outside the area of segmental wall motion abnormalities (WMA) can be reduced by cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). Included in the study were 28 consecutive patients with nonischaemic cardiomyopathy selected for CRT. Equilibrium radionuclide angiography (ERNA) was carried out before and after implantation of a multisite pacemaker. Patients were separated into two groups depending on the presence or absence of segmental WMA. A reduction in QRS duration was observed in all patients after CRT. The interventricular delay (IVD) decreased significantly after CRT only in patients without WMA (homogeneous contraction, HG group; IVD 44 {+-} 11.4 vs. 17 {+-} 3.1 , p = 0.04). In contrast, no significant decrease was observed in patients with WMA (WMA group; IVD 51 {+-} 6 vs. 38 {+-} 6 , p NS). However, when dyssynchrony was considered outside the WMA area, a significant reduction in IVD was obtained, in the same range as in the HG group (IVD 32 {+-} 3 vs. 19 {+-} 3 , p = 0.04). In 9 of 15 patients (60%) with a reduction in IVD after CRT, the left ventricle ejection fraction (LVEF) increased by about +10%. In contrast, in 13 of 13 patients (100%) with no reduction in IVD, no modification of LVEF was obtained. In the presence of segmental WMA without significant delays outside the WMA area, no reduction in IVD was observed and LVEF did not increase (IVD 34 {+-} 5 before CRT vs. 37 {+-} 7 after CRT; LVEF 19 {+-} 4% before CRT vs. 22 {+-} 3% after CRT, p NS). ERNA can be used to predict good mechanical resynchronization (decrease in IVD) in patients after pacing. IVD has to be determined excluding the area of WMA in order to select patients who will show an increase in their left ventricle function after CRT. (orig.)

  8. F-Area Seepage Basins groundwater monitoring report: First and second quarters 1993. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    During the first half of 1993, the groundwater at the F-Area Seepage Basins (FASB) was monitored in compliance with South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations, R61-79.265, Subpart F. Eighty-seven wells provided samples from the three hydrostratigraphic units that make up the uppermost aquifer beneath the FASB. A detailed description of the uppermost aquifer is included in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Part B Post-Closure Care Permit Application for the F-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility submitted to the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) in December 1990. Beginning in the first quarter of 1993, the standard for comparison is the SCDHEC Groundwater Protection Standard (GWPS) specified in the approved F-Area Seepage Basins Part B Permit (November 1992). Currently and historically, gross alpha, nitrate, nonvolatile beta, and tritium are among the primary constituents to exceed standards. Numerous other radionuclides and hazardous constituents also exceeded the GWPS in the groundwater at the FASB during the first half of 1993, notably aluminum, iodine-129, technetium-99, and zinc. The elevated constituents are found primarily in Aquifer Zone IIB{sub 2} (Water Table) and Aquifer Zone IIB{sub 1}, (Barnwell/McBean) wells. However, several Aquifer Unit IIA (Congaree) wells also contain elevated levels of constituents.

  9. Age of second language acquisition in multilinguals has an impact on gray matter volume in language-associated brain areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Anelis; Eppenberger, Leila S; Smieskova, Renata; Borgwardt, Stefan; Kuenzli, Esther; Radue, Ernst-Wilhelm; Nitsch, Cordula; Bendfeldt, Kerstin

    2015-01-01

    Numerous structural studies have established that experience shapes and reshapes the brain throughout a lifetime. The impact of early development, however, is still a matter of debate. Further clues may come from studying multilinguals who acquired their second language at different ages. We investigated adult multilinguals who spoke three languages fluently, where the third language was learned in classroom settings, not before the age of 9 years. Multilinguals exposed to two languages simultaneously from birth (SiM) were contrasted with multinguals who acquired their first two languages successively (SuM). Whole brain voxel based morphometry revealed that, relative to SuM, SiM have significantly lower gray matter volume in several language-associated cortical areas in both hemispheres: bilaterally in medial and inferior frontal gyrus, in the right medial temporal gyrus and inferior posterior parietal gyrus, as well as in the left inferior temporal gyrus. Thus, as shown by others, successive language learning increases the volume of language-associated cortical areas. In brains exposed early on and simultaneously to more than one language, however, learning of additional languages seems to have less impact. We conclude that - at least with respect to language acquisition - early developmental influences are maintained and have an effect on experience-dependent plasticity well into adulthood.

  10. A triaxial tensile deformation-induced nanoporous structure of aluminium: estimation of surface area, solid volume, and dimensionless aspect ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sunil; Das, Suchandan K

    2017-08-09

    Nanoporous aluminium has great importance for large scale production of automobile and aerospace spare parts due to its lightweight and non-corrosive nature. It is also suitable for various packaging applications of edible things, electronic components, and medicines. We have used triaxial tensile deformation methodology to create a nanoporous structure of aluminium using molecular dynamics simulation. The surface area and solid volume have been calculated to characterize the 3-D nanoporous structure of aluminium. We have quantitatively characterized the growth and coalescences of the nanoporous structure via estimation of the number of nanopores, nanopore diameters, and dimensionless aspect-ratios (surface area to volume ratio). A high aspect ratio indicates a large number of tiny nanopores in the 3-D nanoporous structure of aluminium. We have found that crystalline aluminium (under ambient condition) significantly depicts a smaller aspect ratio as compared to amorphous aluminium during triaxial tensile deformation. We believe that the results of this study will provide new understanding to the researchers for the design and characterization of nanoporous metals.

  11. Age of second language acquisition in multilinguals has an impact on grey matter volume in language-associated brain areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anelis eKaiser

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Numerous structural studies have established that experience shapes and reshapes the brain throughout a lifetime. The impact of early development, however, is still a matter of debate. Further clues may come from studying multilinguals who acquired their second language at different ages. We investigated adult multilinguals who spoke three languages fluently, where the third language was learned in classroom settings, not before the age of 9 years. Multilinguals exposed to 2 languages simultaneously from birth (SiM were contrasted with multinguals who acquired their first two languages successively (SuM. Whole brain voxel based morphometry revealed that, relative to SuM, SiM have significantly lower grey matter volume in several language-associated cortical areas in both hemispheres: bilaterally in medial and inferior frontal gyrus, in the right medial temporal gyrus and inferior posterior parietal gyrus, as well as in the left inferior frontal gyrus. Thus, as shown by others, successive language learning increases the volume of language-associated cortical areas. In brains exposed early on and simultaneously to more than one language, however, learning of additional languages seems to have less impact. We conclude that - at least with respect to language acquisition - early developmental influences are maintained and influence experience-dependent plasticity well into adulthood.

  12. F-Area Seepage Basins groundwater monitoring report -- third and fourth quarters 1993. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, C.T.

    1994-03-01

    During the second half of 1993, the groundwater at the F-Area Seepage Basins (FASB) was monitored in compliance with Module 3, Section C, of South Carolina Hazardous Waste Permit SC1-890-008-989, effective November 2, 1992. The monitoring well network is composed of 87 FSB wells screened in the three hydrostratigraphic units that make up the uppermost aquifer beneath the FASB. A detailed description of the uppermost aquifer is included in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Part B post-closure care permit application for the F-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility submitted to the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) in December 1990. Beginning in the first quarter of 1993, the standard for comparison became the SCDHEC Groundwater Protection Standard (GWPS) specified in the approved F-Area Seepage Basins Part B permit. Currently and historically, gross alpha, nitrate, nonvolatile beta, and tritium are among the primary constituents to exceed standards. Numerous other radionuclides and hazardous constituents also exceeded the GWPS in the groundwater at the FASB during the second half of 1993, notably aluminum, iodine-129, and zinc. The elevated constituents are found primarily in Aquifer Zone 2B{sub 2} and Aquifer Zone 2B{sub 1} wells. However, several Aquifer Unit 2A wells also contain elevated levels of constituents. Isoconcentration/isoactivity maps included in this report indicate both the concentration/activity and extent of the primary contaminants in each of the three hydrostratigraphic units. Water-level maps indicate that the groundwater flow rates and directions at the FASB have remained relatively constant since the basins ceased to be active in 1988.

  13. The Italian Eastern Border: About Lines, Areas and Volumes Confine orientale: di linee, aree e volumi

    OpenAIRE

    Ivan Verč

    2011-01-01

    A border encompasses three different meanings: a line to be defended or crossed, an empty area to avoid contact and a space which produces new meanings. Since the unification of Italy its eastern border has mostly been perceived as a line of conflict. Only for a few decades has it been devoid of violence. Its conflictual character is to be sought in a general cultural process which from the 6th to the 8th century saw Slav populations sett...

  14. Closure report for CAU 93: Area 6 steam cleaning effluent ponds, Nevada Test Site. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    The Steam Cleaning Effluent Ponds (SCEP) waste unit is located in Area 6 at the Nevada Test Site. The SCEPs are evaporation basins formerly used for the disposal of untreated liquid effluent discharged from steam cleaning activities associated with Buildings 6-623 and 6-800. This closure report documents the strategy and analytical results that support the clean closure or closure in place of each of the components within CAU 93. In addition, the report documents all deviations from the approved closure plan and provides rationale for all deviations.

  15. Traffic Volumes and Manoeuvring Area Capacities at European Capital City Airports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislav Pavlin

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Capital city airports in the European countries realise trafficvolume of several thousands to several hundred thousandaircraft operations i. e. landings and takeoffs annually. In itsAirport Planning Manual, the International Civil Aviation Organizationrecommends that the capital city airports have atleast two runways in order to avoid complete closing down ofthe airport in cases of aircraft accidents on the runway or therunway strip, due to repair or maintenance of the runway, removalof snow, unlawful interference in civil aviation etc. Thepaper analyses the current situation in traffic and the capacitiesof the manoeuvring areas at the European capital city airports.

  16. H-Area Seepage Basins groundwater monitoring report. Volume 1, First and second quarters 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    During the first half of 1993, the groundwater at the H-Area Seepage Basins (HASB) was monitored in compliance with the September 30, 1992, modification of South Carolina Hazardous Waste Permit. Samples were collected from 130 wells that monitor the three separate hydrostratigraphic units that make up the uppermost aquifer beneath the HASB. A detailed description of the uppermost aquifer is included in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Part B Post-Closure Care Permit Application for the H-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility submitted to the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) in December 1990. HASB`s Groundwater Protection Standard is the standard for comparison. Historically, as well as currently, gross alpha, nitrate, nonvolatile beta, and tritium have been among the primary constituents to exceed standards. Other radionuclides and hazardous constituents also exceeded the GWPS in the groundwater at the HASB, notably aluminum, iodine-129, mercury, nickel-63, strontium-89, strontium-90, technetium-99, and zinc during the first half of 1993. Elevated constituents are found primarily in Aquifer Zone IIB{sub 2} (Water Table) and in the upper portion of Aquifer Zone IIB{sub 1}. However, constituents exceeding standards also occur in several wells screened in the lower portion of Aquifer Zone IIB{sub 1} and Aquifer Unit IIA.

  17. Surface-based morphometry of the cortical architecture of autism spectrum disorders: volume, thickness, area, and gyrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libero, Lauren E; DeRamus, Thomas P; Deshpande, Hrishikesh D; Kana, Rajesh K

    2014-09-01

    Structural neuroimaging studies of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have uncovered widespread neuroanatomical abnormalities, which may have a significant impact on brain function, connectivity, and on behavioral symptoms of autism. The findings of previous structural MRI studies have largely been distributed across several brain areas, with limited consistency. The current study examined neuroanatomical abnormalities by comparing surface-based measures of cortical morphology (CT: cortical thickness, CSA: cortical surface area, CV: cortical volume, and GI: gyrification index) in 55 high-functioning children and adults with ASD to 60 age-and-IQ-matched typically developing (TD) peers. A few brain areas, the fusiform gyrus (FG), middle temporal gyrus (MTG), and inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), emerged to be primarily different in their morphology between the two groups. Compared to TD participants, ASD participants had significantly smaller CV in left MTG, reduced CSA in bilateral MTG and FG, reduced GI in left supramarginal gyrus, and significantly increased CT in the pars opercularis of the IFG. As a function of age, ASD participants had significant reductions in: CT in the pars opercularis, CSA of the left rostral middle frontal gyrus, and GI for left supramarginal gyrus. Thus, alterations in cortical morphology in ASD were seen primarily in regions that are considered part of the social brain. Overall, these findings point to: neuroanatomical alterations in social brain areas, developmental differences in neuroanatomy, and the need to study neuroanatomy at multiple levels in order to better characterize the cortical architecture of ASD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The Italian Eastern Border: About Lines, Areas and Volumes Confine orientale: di linee, aree e volumi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Verč

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available

    A border encompasses three different meanings: a line to be defended or crossed, an empty area to avoid contact and a space which produces new meanings. Since the unification of Italy its eastern border has mostly been perceived as a line of conflict. Only for a few decades has it been devoid of violence. Its conflictual character is to be sought in a general cultural process which from the 6th to the 8th century saw Slav populations settle on the periphery of what was then the “centre” of the civilised world (Rome and Byzantium. The Slavs demanded recognition on an equal footing with the dominant model of civilisation, which considered the “Slav presence” as inferior. To move beyond a deep-rooted conflict it will be necessary to reconsider the border as a space with positive potential.

    A border encompasses three different meanings: a line to be defended or crossed, an empty area to avoid contact and a space which produces new meanings. Since the unification of Italy its eastern border has mostly been perceived as a line of conflict. Only for a few decades has it been devoid of violence. Its conflictual character is to be sought in a general cultural process which from the 6th to the 8th century saw Slav populations settle on the periphery of what was then the “centre” of the civilised world (Rome and Byzantium. The Slavs demanded recognition on an equal footing with the dominant model of civilisation, which considered the “Slav presence” as inferior. To move beyond a deep-rooted conflict it will be necessary to reconsider the border as a space with positive potential.

  19. H-Area Seepage Basins groundwater monitoring report -- third and fourth quarters 1993. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, C.T.

    1994-03-01

    During the second half of 1993, the groundwater at the H-Area Seepage Basins (HASB) was monitored in compliance with the September 30, 1992, modification of South Carolina Hazardous Waste Permit SC1-890-008-989. A detailed description of the uppermost aquifer is included in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Part B post-closure care permit application for the H-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility submitted to the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) in December 1990. Beginning first quarter 1993, the HASB`s Groundwater Protection Standard (GWPS), established in Appendix 3D-A of the cited permit, became the standard for comparison. Historically as well as currently, nitrate, nonvolatile beta, and tritium have been among the primary constituents to exceed standards. Other radionuclides and hazardous constitutents also exceeded the GWPS in the groundwater at the HASB (notably aluminum, iodine-129, strontium-90, technetium-99, and zinc) during the second half of 1993. Elevated constituents were found primarily in Aquifer Zone 2B{sub 2} and in the upper portion of Aquifer Zone 2B{sub 1}. However, constituents exceeding standards also occurred in several wells screened in the lower portion of Aquifer Zone 2B{sub 1} and Aquifer Unit 2A. Isoconcentration/isoactivity maps include in this report indicate both the concentration/activity and extent of the primary contaminants in each of the three hydrostratigraphic units during the second half of 1993. Water-level maps indicate that the groundwater flow rates and directions at the HASB have remained relatively constant since the basins ceased to be active in 1988.

  20. Technical area status report for low-level mixed waste final waste forms. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayberry, J.L.; DeWitt, L.M. [Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Darnell, R. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)] [and others

    1993-08-01

    The Final Waste Forms (FWF) Technical Area Status Report (TASR) Working Group, the Vitrification Working Group (WG), and the Performance Standards Working Group were established as subgroups to the FWF Technical Support Group (TSG). The FWF TASR WG is comprised of technical representatives from most of the major DOE sites, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the EPA Office of Solid Waste, and the EPA`s Risk Reduction Engineering Laboratory (RREL). The primary activity of the FWF TASR Working Group was to investigate and report on the current status of FWFs for LLNM in this TASR. The FWF TASR Working Group determined the current status of the development of various waste forms described above by reviewing selected articles and technical reports, summarizing data, and establishing an initial set of FWF characteristics to be used in evaluating candidate FWFS; these characteristics are summarized in Section 2. After an initial review of available information, the FWF TASR Working Group chose to study the following groups of final waste forms: hydraulic cement, sulfur polymer cement, glass, ceramic, and organic binders. The organic binders included polyethylene, bitumen, vinyl ester styrene, epoxy, and urea formaldehyde. Section 3 provides a description of each final waste form. Based on the literature review, the gaps and deficiencies in information were summarized, and conclusions and recommendations were established. The information and data presented in this TASR are intended to assist the FWF Production and Assessment TSG in evaluating the Technical Task Plans (TTPs) submitted to DOE EM-50, and thus provide DOE with the necessary information for their FWF decision-making process. This FWF TASR will also assist the DOE and the MWIP in establishing the most acceptable final waste forms for the various LLMW streams stored at DOE facilities.

  1. Technical area status report for chemical/physical treatment. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, C.H. Jr. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Schwinkendorf, W.E. [BDM Federal, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States)

    1993-08-01

    The Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) was established by the Department of Energy (DOE) to direct and coordinate waste management and site remediation programs and activities throughout the DOE Complex. The Mixed Waste Integrated Program (MWIP) was created by the DOE Office of Technology Development (OTD) to develop, deploy, and complete appropriate technologies for the treatment of an DOE low-level mixed waste (LLMW). The MWIP mission includes development of strategies related to enhanced waste form production, improvements to and testing of the EM-30 baseline flowsheet for mixed waste treatment, programmatic oversight for ongoing technical projects, and specific technical tasks related to the site specific Federal Facilities Compliance Agreement (FFCA). The MWIP has established five Technical Support Groups (TSGs) based on primary functional areas of the Mixed Waste Treatment Plant) identified by EM-30. These TSGs are: (1) Front-End Waste Handling, (2) Chemical/Physical Treatment, (3) Waste Destruction and Stabilization, (4) Second-stage Destruction and Offgas Treatment, and (5) Final Waste Forms. The focus of this document is the Chemical/Physical Treatment System (CPTS). The CPTS performs the required pretreatment and/or separations on the waste streams passing through the system for discharge to the environment or efficient downstream processing. Downstream processing can include all system components except Front-End Waste Handling. The primary separations to be considered by the CPTS are: (1) removal of suspended and dissolved solids from aqueous and liquid organic streams, (2) separation of water from organic liquids, (3) treatment of wet and dry solids, including separation into constituents as required, for subsequent thermal treatment and final form processing, (4) mercury removal and control, and (5) decontamination of equipment and waste classified as debris.

  2. Using snowflake surface-area-to-volume ratio to model and interpret snowfall triple-frequency radar signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gergely

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The snowflake microstructure determines the microwave scattering properties of individual snowflakes and has a strong impact on snowfall radar signatures. In this study, individual snowflakes are represented by collections of randomly distributed ice spheres where the size and number of the constituent ice spheres are specified by the snowflake mass and surface-area-to-volume ratio (SAV and the bounding volume of each ice sphere collection is given by the snowflake maximum dimension. Radar backscatter cross sections for the ice sphere collections are calculated at X-, Ku-, Ka-, and W-band frequencies and then used to model triple-frequency radar signatures for exponential snowflake size distributions (SSDs. Additionally, snowflake complexity values obtained from high-resolution multi-view snowflake images are used as an indicator of snowflake SAV to derive snowfall triple-frequency radar signatures. The modeled snowfall triple-frequency radar signatures cover a wide range of triple-frequency signatures that were previously determined from radar reflectivity measurements and illustrate characteristic differences related to snow type, quantified through snowflake SAV, and snowflake size. The results show high sensitivity to snowflake SAV and SSD maximum size but are generally less affected by uncertainties in the parameterization of snowflake mass, indicating the importance of snowflake SAV for the interpretation of snowfall triple-frequency radar signatures.

  3. Using snowflake surface-area-to-volume ratio to model and interpret snowfall triple-frequency radar signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gergely, Mathias; Cooper, Steven J.; Garrett, Timothy J.

    2017-10-01

    The snowflake microstructure determines the microwave scattering properties of individual snowflakes and has a strong impact on snowfall radar signatures. In this study, individual snowflakes are represented by collections of randomly distributed ice spheres where the size and number of the constituent ice spheres are specified by the snowflake mass and surface-area-to-volume ratio (SAV) and the bounding volume of each ice sphere collection is given by the snowflake maximum dimension. Radar backscatter cross sections for the ice sphere collections are calculated at X-, Ku-, Ka-, and W-band frequencies and then used to model triple-frequency radar signatures for exponential snowflake size distributions (SSDs). Additionally, snowflake complexity values obtained from high-resolution multi-view snowflake images are used as an indicator of snowflake SAV to derive snowfall triple-frequency radar signatures. The modeled snowfall triple-frequency radar signatures cover a wide range of triple-frequency signatures that were previously determined from radar reflectivity measurements and illustrate characteristic differences related to snow type, quantified through snowflake SAV, and snowflake size. The results show high sensitivity to snowflake SAV and SSD maximum size but are generally less affected by uncertainties in the parameterization of snowflake mass, indicating the importance of snowflake SAV for the interpretation of snowfall triple-frequency radar signatures.

  4. County-Level Climate Uncertainty for Risk Assessments: Volume 20 Appendix S - Historical Sea Ice Area Fraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backus, George A.; Lowry, Thomas Stephen; Jones, Shannon M; Walker, La Tonya Nicole; Roberts, Barry L; Malczynski, Leonard A.

    2017-06-01

    This report uses the CMIP5 series of climate model simulations to produce country- level uncertainty distributions for use in socioeconomic risk assessments of climate change impacts. It provides appropriate probability distributions, by month, for 169 countries and autonomous-areas on temperature, precipitation, maximum temperature, maximum wind speed, humidity, runoff, soil moisture and evaporation for the historical period (1976-2005), and for decadal time periods to 2100. It also provides historical and future distributions for the Arctic region on ice concentration, ice thickness, age of ice, and ice ridging in 15-degree longitude arc segments from the Arctic Circle to 80 degrees latitude, plus two polar semicircular regions from 80 to 90 degrees latitude. The uncertainty is meant to describe the lack of knowledge rather than imprecision in the physical simulation because the emphasis is on unfalsified risk and its use to determine potential socioeconomic impacts. The full report is contained in 27 volumes.

  5. County-Level Climate Uncertainty for Risk Assessments: Volume 21 Appendix T - Forecast Sea Ice Area Fraction.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backus, George A.; Lowry, Thomas Stephen; Jones, Shannon M; Walker, La Tonya Nicole; Roberts, Barry L; Malczynski, Leonard A.

    2017-06-01

    This report uses the CMIP5 series of climate model simulations to produce country- level uncertainty distributions for use in socioeconomic risk assessments of climate change impacts. It provides appropriate probability distributions, by month, for 169 countries and autonomous-areas on temperature, precipitation, maximum temperature, maximum wind speed, humidity, runoff, soil moisture and evaporation for the historical period (1976-2005), and for decadal time periods to 2100. It also provides historical and future distributions for the Arctic region on ice concentration, ice thickness, age of ice, and ice ridging in 15-degree longitude arc segments from the Arctic Circle to 80 degrees latitude, plus two polar semicircular regions from 80 to 90 degrees latitude. The uncertainty is meant to describe the lack of knowledge rather than imprecision in the physical simulation because the emphasis is on unfalsified risk and its use to determine potential socioeconomic impacts. The full report is contained in 27 volumes.

  6. The treatment of spine and chest wall deformities with fused ribs by expansion thoracostomy and insertion of vertical expandable prosthetic titanium rib: growth of thoracic spine and improvement of lung volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emans, John B; Caubet, Jean François; Ordonez, Claudia L; Lee, Edward Y; Ciarlo, Michelle

    2005-09-01

    Prospective clinical trial of vertical expandable prosthetic titanium rib (VEPTR) in patients with combined spine and chest wall deformity with scoliosis and fused ribs. Report the efficacy and safety of expansion thoracostomy and VEPTR surgery in the treatment of thoracic insufficiency syndrome (TIS) associated with fused ribs. Traditional attitudes toward early-onset combined chest and spine deformity assume that thoracic deformity is best controlled by treatment directed at spine deformity, often involving early spinal arthrodesis. Campbell and others have heightened awareness of the interrelationship between lung, chest, and spine development during growth and characterized TIS as the inability of the thorax to support normal respiration or lung growth. Expansion thoracostomy and VEPTR insertion was developed to directly control both spine and chest wall deformity during growth, while permitting continued vertebral column and chest growth at an early stage. Multidisciplinary evaluation of children with combined spine and chest wall deformity included pediatric pulmonologist, thoracic, and orthopedic surgeon evaluations. One or more opening wedge expansion thoracostomies and placement of VEPTR devices were performed as described by Campbell, with repeated device lengthenings during growth. Parameters measured included Cobb angle, length of thoracic spine, CT-derived lung volumes, and in older children pulmonary function tests. Thirty-one patients with fused ribs and TIS were treated, 4 of whom had undergone prior spinal arthrodesis at other institutions with continued progression of deformity. In 30 patients, the spinal deformity was controlled and growth continued in the thoracic spine during treatment at rates similar to normals. Increased volume of the constricted hemithorax and total lung volumes obtained during expansion thoracostomy were maintained at follow-up. Complications included device migration, infection, and brachial plexus palsy. Expansion

  7. Ambiguous walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mody, Astrid

    2012-01-01

    of “ambiguous walls” as a more “critical” approach to design [1]. The concept of ambiguous walls refers to the diffuse status a lumious and possibly responsive wall will have. Instead of confining it can open up. Instead of having a static appearance, it becomes a context over time. Instead of being hard...... and flat, “ambiguous walls” combine softness, tectonics and three-dimensionality. The paper considers a selection of luminious surfaces and reflects on the extent of their ambiguous qualities. Initial ideas for new directions for the wall will be essayed through the discussion....

  8. Changes in glacier area and volume in Terskey Ala-Too Range in the second half of XX century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Kutuzov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Changes in the extent of glaciers and rates of glacier termini retreat in the eastern Terskey-Alatoo Range, the Tien Shan Mountains, Central Asia have been evaluated using the remote sensing techniques. Changes in the extent of 109 glaciers between 1965, 1990 and 2003 have been estimated through the delineation of glacier outlines on the topographic maps, Landsat TM and ASTER imagery for 1965, 1990 and 2003 respectively. Glacier surface area has decreased by 12.6% of the 1965 value between 1965 and 2003. Detailed mapping of 10 glaciers using historical maps and aerial photographs from the 1943–1977 period, has enabled glacier extent variations over the 20th century to be identified with a higher temporal resolution. Glacial retreat was slow in the early 20th century but increased considerably between 1943 and 1956 and then again after 1977. The post-1990 period has been marked by the most rapid glacier retreat since the end of the LIA. For the selected 13 glaciers volume reduction has been evaluated using a time step digital elevation models. DEM obtained from the 1:25 000 topographic maps of 1965 and 1977 were compared to SRTM data. The observed changes in the extent of glaciers are in line with the observed climatic warming. The regional weather stations have revealed a strong climatic warming during the ablation season since the 1950s at a rate of 0.02–0.03 oC a-¹. At the higher elevations in the study area represented by the Tien Shan meteorological station, the summer warming was accompanied by negative anomalies in annual precipitation in the 1990s enhancing glacier retreat. However, trends in precipitation in the post-1997 period cannot be evaluated due to the change in observational practices at this station. Neither station in the study area exhibits significant long-term trends in precipitation.

  9. Assessing forest resources in Denmark using wall-to-wall remote sensing data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schumacher, Johannes

    then be applied to estimate resources on both small and large scales. Numerous studies have investigated the possibilities of using remote sensing data for forest monitoring at plot or single tree levels. However, experience of estimating these properties for larger areas, for example regional or country...... assessments, is lacking. In this thesis wall-to-wall remote sensing data (from aerial images, airborne LiDAR, and space-borne SAR) were combined with ground reference data (from NFI plots and tree species experiments) to build and evaluate models estimating properties such as basal area, timber volume......, the thesis extends the application of remote sensing methods to estimate important variables with relevance to water catchment management....

  10. Summary of Synoptic Meteorological Observations (SSMO). South America and Selected Island Coastal Marine Areas, East Coast. Volume 2. Area 9-Rio de Janeiro, Area 10-Florianopolis, Area 11-Porto Alegre, Area 12-Buenos Aires, Area 13-Bahia Blanca, Area 14-Rawson, Area 15-Puerto Deseado, Area 16-Magellan Strain East.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-06-01

    lolI AREA 0012 SUMNS ASSES (OVER-ALL’ .057-1970 TAILF 0 34.45 92.7v 1~~:r~PACIPITATION WITH AYN LIS1 O 1VIiiTY P1 n a 0 . 9 .9 07 ,6 3.0 3.0 .0 ~.0 7.1...7.1 It’. OCTS*LL Fil OF WIND 1PISO (ITS) rAND 91B CTO VIU]I AOTS( 1No? 1.) 4-1 11-11 Its,)$ 14-47 45* PCT 1-3 4.10 11.21 22-33 34.47 45. PCT 41 .0 1.4

  11. Lower limb muscle volume estimation from maximum cross-sectional area and muscle length in cerebral palsy and typically developing individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanmechelen, Inti M; Shortland, Adam P; Noble, Jonathan J

    2018-01-01

    Deficits in muscle volume may be a significant contributor to physical disability in young people with cerebral palsy. However, 3D measurements of muscle volume using MRI or 3D ultrasound may be difficult to make routinely in the clinic. We wished to establish whether accurate estimates of muscle volume could be made from a combination of anatomical cross-sectional area and length measurements in samples of typically developing young people and young people with bilateral cerebral palsy. Lower limb MRI scans were obtained from the lower limbs of 21 individuals with cerebral palsy (14.7±3years, 17 male) and 23 typically developing individuals (16.8±3.3years, 16 male). The volume, length and anatomical cross-sectional area were estimated from six muscles of the left lower limb. Analysis of Covariance demonstrated that the relationship between the length*cross-sectional area and volume was not significantly different depending on the subject group. Linear regression analysis demonstrated that the product of anatomical cross-sectional area and length bore a strong and significant relationship to the measured muscle volume (R2 values between 0.955 and 0.988) with low standard error of the estimates of 4.8 to 8.9%. This study demonstrates that muscle volume may be estimated accurately in typically developing individuals and individuals with cerebral palsy by a combination of anatomical cross-sectional area and muscle length. 2D ultrasound may be a convenient method of making these measurements routinely in the clinic. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of lung volume on airway luminal area assessed by computed tomography in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenta Kambara

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although airway luminal area (Ai is affected by lung volume (LV, how is not precisely understood. We hypothesized that the effect of LV on Ai would differ by airway generation, lung lobe, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD severity. METHODS: Sixty-seven subjects (15 at risk, 18, 20, and 14 for COPD stages 1, 2, and 3 underwent pulmonary function tests and computed tomography scans at full inspiration and expiration (at functional residual capacity. LV and eight selected identical airways were measured in the right lung. Ai was measured at the mid-portion of the 3(rd, the segmental bronchus, to 6(th generation of the airways, leading to 32 measurements per subject. RESULTS: The ratio of expiratory to inspiratory LV (LV E/I ratio and Ai (Ai E/I ratio was defined for evaluation of changes. The LV E/I ratio increased as COPD severity progressed. As the LV E/I ratio was smaller, the Ai E/I ratio was smaller at any generation among the subjects. Overall, the Ai E/I ratios were significantly smaller at the 5(th (61.5% and 6(th generations (63.4% and than at the 3(rd generation (73.6%, p<0.001 for each, and also significantly lower in the lower lobe than in the upper or middle lobe (p<0.001 for each. And, the Ai E/I ratio decreased as COPD severity progressed only when the ratio was corrected by the LV E/I ratio (at risk v.s. stage 3 p<0.001, stage 1 v.s. stage 3 p<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: From full inspiration to expiration, the airway luminal area shrinks more at the distal airways compared with the proximal airways and in the lower lobe compared with the other lobes. Generally, the airways shrink more as COPD severity progresses, but this phenomenon becomes apparent only when lung volume change from inspiration to expiration is taken into account.

  13. Vastus medialis cross-sectional area is positively associated with patella cartilage and bone volumes in a pain-free community-based population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Patricia A; Teichtahl, Andrew J; Galevska-Dimitrovska, Ana; Hanna, Fahad S; Wluka, Anita E; Wang, Yuanyuan; Urquhart, Donna M; English, Dallas R; Giles, Graham G; Cicuttini, Flavia M

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Although vastus medialis and lateralis are important determinants of patellofemoral joint function, their relationship with patellofemoral joint structure is unknown. The aim of this study was to examine potential determinants of vastus medialis and lateralis cross-sectional areas and the relationship between the cross-sectional area and patella cartilage and bone volumes. Methods Two hundred ninety-seven healthy adult subjects had magnetic resonance imaging of their dominant knee. Vastus medialis and lateralis cross-sectional areas were measured 37.5 mm superior to the quadriceps tendon insertion at the proximal pole of the patella. Patella cartilage and bone volumes were measured from these images. Demographic data and participation in vigorous physical activity were assessed by questionnaire. Results The determinants of increased vastus medialis and lateralis cross-sectional areas were older age (P ≤ 0.002), male gender (P patella cartilage volume (beta 0.6; 95% CI 0.23, 0.94) (P = 0.001) and bone volume (beta 3.0; 95% CI 1.40, 4.68) (P patella cartilage and bone volumes may benefit patellofemoral joint health and reduce the long-term risk of patellofemoral pathology. PMID:19077298

  14. Bronchial wall measurements in patients after lung transplantation: evaluation of the diagnostic value for the diagnosis of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Dettmer

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To prospectively evaluate quantitative airway wall measurements of thin-section CT for the diagnosis of Bronchiolitis Obliterans Syndrome (BOS following lung transplantation. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In 141 CT examinations, bronchial wall thickness (WT, the wall area percentage (WA% calculated as the ratio of the bronchial wall area and the total area (sum of bronchial wall area and bronchial lumen area and the difference of the WT on inspiration and expiration (WTdiff were automatically measured in different bronchial generations. The measurements were correlated with the lung function parameters. WT and WA% in CT examinations of patients with (n = 25 and without (n = 116 BOS, were compared using the unpaired t-test and univariate analysis of variance, while also considering the differing lung volumes. RESULTS: Measurements could be performed in 2,978 bronchial generations. WT, WA%, and WTdiff did not correlate with the lung function parameters (r<0.5. The WA% on inspiration was significantly greater in patients with BOS than in patients without BOS, even when considering the dependency of the lung volume on the measurements. WT on inspiration and expiration and WA% on expiration did not show significant differences between the groups. CONCLUSION: WA% on inspiration was significantly greater in patients with than in those without BOS. However, WA% measurements were significantly dependent on lung volume and showed a high variability, thus not allowing the sole use of bronchial wall measurements to differentiate patients with from those without BOS.

  15. Cell wall biology: perspectives from cell wall imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kieran J D; Marcus, Susan E; Knox, J Paul

    2011-03-01

    Polysaccharide-rich plant cell walls are important biomaterials that underpin plant growth, are major repositories for photosynthetically accumulated carbon, and, in addition, impact greatly on the human use of plants. Land plant cell walls contain in the region of a dozen major polysaccharide structures that are mostly encompassed by cellulose, hemicelluloses, and pectic polysaccharides. During the evolution of land plants, polysaccharide diversification appears to have largely involved structural elaboration and diversification within these polysaccharide groups. Cell wall chemistry is well advanced and a current phase of cell wall science is aimed at placing the complex polysaccharide chemistry in cellular contexts and developing a detailed understanding of cell wall biology. Imaging cell wall glycomes is a challenging area but recent developments in the establishment of cell wall molecular probe panels and their use in high throughput procedures are leading to rapid advances in the molecular understanding of the spatial heterogeneity of individual cell walls and also cell wall differences at taxonomic levels. The challenge now is to integrate this knowledge of cell wall heterogeneity with an understanding of the molecular and physiological mechanisms that underpin cell wall properties and functions.

  16. Polymorphism of Lipid-Water Systems: Epitaxial Relationships, Area-per-Volume Ratios, Polar-Apolar Partition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luzzati, Vittorio

    1995-11-01

    The original purpose of this work was to seek an explanation of the empirical observation that pairs of phases in thermodynamic equilibrium often display an epitaxial relationship. Considering that the polar/apolar interfacial interactions appear to play a predominant role among all the forces that stabilize the phases, there is ground for the proposition that the two phases involved in any particular phase transition consist of structure elements whose area/volume ratio is invariant. Volume and area of the structure elements can be expressed as functions of the water content and the cell parameters of the two coexisting phases: their values can thus be determined experimentally. The volume ratio (structure elements)/(lipid molecules) is equivalent to a partition coefficient. These ideas were applied to a large variety of data available in the literature. The partition coefficient was found to display wide variations, remarkably correlated with the chemical and the physical parameters of the system, suggesting that the segregation of the hydrocarbon chains away from the polar headgroups is not as sharp as it is commonly assumed. The notion of a variable polar/apolar partition is a novelty in the field; moreover, this partition coefficient may well turn into an interesting thermodynamic parameter. As to the significance of the epitaxial relationships, a search through the literature shows that its very existence has many exceptions. In order to explain these observations the conjecture is put forward that the epitaxial coincidences have a kinetic effect on the phase transitions. In particular, it is suggested that any transition involving epitaxially related phases is unlikely to display metastable states. The possibility is also evoked that a selective advantage (be it technological, biological or experimental) may be associated with the existence of epitaxial relationships. This conjecture is illustrated by several examples drawn from the literature. De nombreuses

  17. Volume and contact surface area analysis of bony tunnels in single and double bundle anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using autograft tendons: in vivo three-dimensional imaging analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jae-Hyuk; Chang, Minho; Kwak, Dai-Soon; Wang, Joon Ho

    2014-09-01

    Regarding reconstruction surgery of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), there is still a debate whether to perform a single bundle (SB) or double bundle (DB) reconstruction. The purpose of this study was to analyze and compare the volume and surface area of femoral and tibial tunnels during transtibial SB versus transportal DB ACL reconstruction. A consecutive series of 26 patients who underwent trantibial SB ACL reconstruction and 27 patients with transportal DB ACL reconstruction using hamstring autograft from January 2010 to October 2010 were included in this study. Three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) was taken within one week after operation. The CT bone images were segmented with use of Mimics software v14.0. The obtained digital images were then imported in the commercial package Geomagic Studio v10.0 and SketchUp Pro v8.0 for processing. The femoral and tibial tunnel lengths, diameters, volumes and surface areas were evaluated. A comparison between the two groups was performed using the independent-samples t-test. A p-value less than the significance value of 5% (p tunnels, a significant difference was not found between the tunnel volume for SB technique (1,496.51 ± 396.72 mm(3)) and the total tunnel volume for DB technique (1,593.81 ± 469.42 mm(3); p = 0.366). However, the total surface area for femoral tunnels was larger in DB technique (919.65 ± 201.79 mm(2)) compared to SB technique (810.02 ± 117.98 mm(2); p = 0.004). For tibia tunnels, there was a significant difference between tunnel volume for the SB technique (2,070.43 ± 565.07 mm(3)) and the total tunnel volume for the DB technique (2,681.93 ± 668.09 mm(3); p ≤ 0.001). The tibial tunnel surface area for the SB technique (958.84 ± 147.50 mm(2)) was smaller than the total tunnel surface area for the DB technique (1,493.31 ± 220.79 mm(2); p ≤ 0.001). Although the total femoral tunnel volume was similar between two techniques, the total surface area was larger in the DB technique

  18. Soil Properties of USSR Strategic Areas. Volume I. Soil Property Comparisons for Selected USSR and U.S. Soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-12-01

    8 - Kazakh ; Volume 1 - Far East; Volume 12 - Central Siberia; Volume 13 - Northwest and Central Regions of Non-Chernozem Zones of the RSFSR; Volume 14...CONTINUED) Fedorin, Y. V., Soils of Kazakh SSR: The North-Kazakhstan Region, Academy of Sciences of the Kazakh SSR - Institute of Soil Science, 1960...17 Loess & loess-like loam 0.0040 0.0017-0.0059 6 Blanket loam & clay 0.0030 0.0027-0.0034 2 Chernozem 0.0062 0.0024-0.0090 4 Tundra 0.0060 0.0053

  19. UCN storage in fluid walled bottles: A method for a neutron lifetime measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ageron, P.; Mampe, W.; Bates, J. C.; Pendlebury, J. M.

    1986-09-01

    Ultracold neutron storage in fluid walled bottles with different volume to surface area ratios has been investigated with respect to a possible neutron lifetime experiment. A statistics-limited result τβ = (850 ± 60) s demonstrates the promise of the method.

  20. Environmental, scanning electron and optical microscope image analysis software for determining volume and occupied area of solid-state fermentation fungal cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osma, Johann F; Toca-Herrera, José L; Rodríguez-Couto, Susana

    2011-01-01

    Here we propose a software for the estimation of the occupied area and volume of fungal cultures. This software was developed using a Matlab platform and allows analysis of high-definition images from optical, electronic or atomic force microscopes. In a first step, a single hypha grown on potato dextrose agar was monitored using optical microscopy to estimate the change in occupied area and volume. Weight measurements were carried out to compare them with the estimated volume, revealing a slight difference of less than 1.5%. Similarly, samples from two different solid-state fermentation cultures were analyzed using images from a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and an environmental SEM (ESEM). Occupied area and volume were calculated for both samples, and the results obtained were correlated with the dry weight of the cultures. The difference between the estimated volume ratio and the dry weight ratio of the two cultures showed a difference of 10%. Therefore, this software is a promising non-invasive technique to determine fungal biomass in solid-state cultures.

  1. An assessment of uncertainties in using volume-area modelling for computing the twenty-first century glacier contribution to sea-level change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slangen, A.B.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314189386; van de Wal, R.S.W.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/101899556

    2011-01-01

    A large part of present-day sea-level change is formed by the melt of glaciers and ice caps (GIC). This study focuses on the uncertainties in the calculation of the GIC contribution on a century timescale. The model used is based on volume-area scaling, 5 combined with the mass balance sensitivity

  2. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia: 2D lung area and 3D lung volume measurements of the contralateral lung to predict postnatal outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerards, F.A.; Twisk, J.W.; Tibboel, D.; van Vugt, J.M.G.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the study was to evaluate the prognostic utility of 2D lung area and 3D lung volume measurements of the contralateral lung in infants with congenital diaphragmatic hernia. Methods: At 18-37 weeks' gestation between 1 and 5 scans of the contralateral fetal lung were obtained in

  3. Sex determination using discriminant analysis of upper and lower extremity bones: New approach using the volume and surface area of digital model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, U-Young; Kim, In-Beom; Kwak, Dai-Soon

    2015-08-01

    This study used 110 CT images taken from donated Korean cadavers to create 3-D models of the following upper and lower limb bones: the clavicle, scapula, humerus, radius, ulna, hip bone (os coxa), femur, patella (knee cap), tibia, talus, and calcaneus. In addition, the bone volume and surface area were calculated to determine sex differences using discriminant analysis. Significant sex differences were found in all bones with respect to volume and surface area (phip bone>tibia>humerus>scapula), although the order of surface area was different. The largest surface area in men was the femur and in women was the hip bone (pdiscriminant equation of surface area; female<0volume and surface area of extremity bones can be used for sex determination. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Cortical thickness, cortical surface area and subcortical volumes in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder patients with cannabis use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartberg, Cecilie Bhandari; Lange, Elisabeth H; Lagerberg, Trine Vik; Haukvik, Unn K; Andreassen, Ole A; Melle, Ingrid; Agartz, Ingrid

    2018-01-01

    Cannabis is associated with increased risk for severe mental illness and is commonly used among individuals with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. In this study we investigated associations between cannabis use and brain structures among patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorders. Magnetic resonance imaging scans were obtained for 77 schizophrenia and 55 bipolar patients with a history of cannabis use (defined as lifetime use >10 times during one month or abuse/dependence), and 97 schizophrenia, 85 bipolar disorder patients and 277 healthy controls without any previous cannabis use. Cortical thickness, cortical surface area and subcortical volumes were compared between groups. Both hypothesis-driven region-of-interest analyses from 11 preselected brain regions in each hemisphere and exploratory point-by-point analyses were performed. We tested for diagnostic interactions and controlled for potential confounders. After controlling for confounders such as tobacco use and alcohol use disorders we found reduced cortical thickness in the caudal middle frontal gyrus compared to non-user patients and healthy controls. The findings were not significant when patients with co-morbid alcohol and illicit drug use were excluded from the analyses, but onset of cannabis use before illness onset was associated with cortical thinning in the caudal middle frontal gyrus. To conclude, we found no structural brain changes associated with cannabis use among patients with severe mental illness, but the findings indicate excess cortical thinning among those who use cannabis before illness onset. The present findings support the understanding that cannabis use is associated with limited brain effects in schizophrenia as well as bipolar disorder. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  5. The effects of the glass surface area/solution volume ratio on glass corrosion: A critical review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebert, W.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemical Technology Div.

    1995-03-01

    This report reviews and summarizes the present state of knowledge regarding the effects of the glass surface area/solution volume (SA/V) ratio on the corrosion behavior of borosilicate waste glasses. The SA/V ratio affects the rate of glass corrosion through the extent of dilution of corrosion products released from the glass into the leachate solution: glass corrosion products are diluted more in tests conducted at low SA/V ratios than they are in tests conducted at high SA/V ratios. Differences in the solution chemistries generated in tests conducted at different SA/V ratios then affect the observed glass corrosion behavior. Therefore, any testing parameter that affects the solution chemistry will also affect the glass corrosion rate. The results of static leach tests conducted to assess the effects of the SA/V are discussed with regard to the effects of SA/V on the solution chemistry. Test results show several remaining issues with regard to the long-term glass corrosion behavior: can the SA/V ratio be used as an accelerating parameter to characterize the advanced stages of glass corrosion relevant to long disposal times; is the alteration of the glass surface the same in tests conducted at different SA/V, and in tests conducted with monolithic and crushed glass samples; what are the effects of the SA/V and the extent of glass corrosion on the disposition of released radionuclides? These issues will bear on the prediction of the long-term performance of waste glasses during storage. The results of an experimental program conducted at ANL to address these and other remaining issues regarding the effects of SA/V on glass corrosion are described. 288 refs., 59 figs., 16 tabs.

  6. Quantification of chronic functional mitral regurgitation by automated 3-dimensional peak and integrated proximal isovelocity surface area and stroke volume techniques using real-time 3-dimensional volume color Doppler echocardiography: in vitro and clinical validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thavendiranathan, Paaladinesh; Liu, Shizhen; Datta, Saurabh; Rajagopalan, Sanjay; Ryan, Thomas; Igo, Stephen R; Jackson, Matthew S; Little, Stephen H; De Michelis, Nathalie; Vannan, Mani A

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the accuracy of an automated 3-dimensional (3D) proximal isovelocity surface area (PISA) (in vitro and patients) and stroke volume technique (patients) to assess mitral regurgitation (MR) severity using real-time volume color flow Doppler transthoracic echocardiography. Using an in vitro model of MR, the effective regurgitant orifice area and regurgitant volume (RVol) were measured by the PISA technique using 2-dimensional (2D) and 3D (automated true 3D PISA) transthoracic echocardiography. The mean anatomic regurgitant orifice area (0.35±0.10 cm(2)) was underestimated to a greater degree by the 2D (0.12±0.05 cm(2)) than the 3D method (0.25±0.10 cm(2); PPISA (20±19 mL) was underestimated (PPISA-based (38±14 mL) RVol were comparable (P>0.05 for both). In patients (n=30, functional MR), 3D effective regurgitant orifice area correlated well with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging RVol r=0.84 and regurgitant fraction r=0.80. Compared with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging RVol (33±22 mL), the integrated PISA RVol (34±26 mL; P=0.42) was not significantly different; however, the peak PISA RVol was higher (48±27 mL; Pechocardiography was not significantly different from cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (34±21 versus 33±22 mL; P=0.33). Automated real-time 3D volume color flow Doppler based 3D PISA is more accurate than the 2D PISA method to quantify MR. In patients with functional MR, the 3D RVol by integrated PISA is more accurate than a peak PISA technique. Automated 3D stroke volume measurement can also be used as an adjunctive method to quantify MR severity.

  7. Wall Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinley, Connie Q.

    2004-01-01

    The author of this article, an art teacher at Monarch High School in Louisville, Colorado, describes how her experience teaching in a new school presented an exciting visual challenge for an art teacher--monotonous brick walls just waiting for decoration. This school experienced only minimal instances of graffiti, but as an art teacher, she did…

  8. Differential longitudinal changes in cortical thickness, surface area and volume across the adult life span: regions of accelerating and decelerating change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storsve, Andreas B; Fjell, Anders M; Tamnes, Christian K; Westlye, Lars T; Overbye, Knut; Aasland, Hilde W; Walhovd, Kristine B

    2014-06-18

    Human cortical thickness and surface area are genetically independent, emerge through different neurobiological events during development, and are sensitive to different clinical conditions. However, the relationship between changes in the two over time is unknown. Additionally, longitudinal studies have almost invariably been restricted to older adults, precluding the delineation of adult life span trajectories of change in cortical structure. In this longitudinal study, we investigated changes in cortical thickness, surface area, and volume after an average interval of 3.6 years in 207 well screened healthy adults aged 23-87 years. We hypothesized that the relationships among metrics are dynamic across the life span, that the primary contributor to cortical volume reductions in aging is cortical thinning, and that magnitude of change varies with age and region. Changes over time were seen in cortical area (mean annual percentage change [APC], -0.19), thickness (APC, -0.35), and volume (APC, -0.51) in most regions. Volume changes were primarily explained by changes in thickness rather than area. A negative relationship between change in thickness and surface area was found across several regions, where more thinning was associated with less decrease in area, and vice versa. Accelerating changes with increasing age was seen in temporal and occipital cortices. In contrast, decelerating changes were seen in prefrontal and anterior cingulate cortices. In conclusion, a dynamic relationship between cortical thickness and surface area changes exists throughout the adult life span. The mixture of accelerating and decelerating changes further demonstrates the importance of studying these metrics across the entire adult life span. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/348488-11$15.00/0.

  9. Imaging of olfactory bulb and gray matter volumes in brain areas associated with olfactory function in patients with Parkinson's disease and multiple system atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shun; Tan, Hong-yu; Wu, Zhuo-hua; Sun, Chong-peng; He, Jian-xun; Li, Xin-chun; Shao, Ming

    2014-03-01

    We explored if magnetic resonance imaging sequences might aid in the clinical differential diagnosis of idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD) and multiple system atrophy (MSA). We measured the volumes of the olfactory bulb, the olfactory tract, and olfaction-associated cortical gray matter in 20 IPD patients, 14 MSA patients, and 12 normal subjects, using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging sequences in combination with voxel-based statistical analysis. We found that, compared to normal subjects and MSA patients, the volumes of the olfactory bulb and tract were significantly reduced in IPD patients. The gray matter volume of IPD patients decreased in the following order: the olfactory area to the right of the piriform cortex, the right amygdala, the left entorhinal cortex, and the left occipital lobe. Further, the total olfactory bulb volume of IPD patients was associated with the duration of disease. The entorhinal cortical gray matter volume was negatively associated with the UPDRS III score. Structural volumes measured by high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging may potentially be used for differential diagnosis of IPD from MSA. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Imaging of olfactory bulb and gray matter volumes in brain areas associated with olfactory function in patients with Parkinson's disease and multiple system atrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Shun, E-mail: shchen_2013@163.com [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical College (China); Tan, Hong-yu, E-mail: honhyutan@21cn.com [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical College (China); Wu, Zhuo-hua, E-mail: zhh88@126.com [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical College (China); Sun, Chong-peng, E-mail: Suncp2002@gmail.com [Imaging Center, The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical College (China); He, Jian-xun, E-mail: xundog@163.com [Imaging Center, The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical College (China); Li, Xin-chun, E-mail: xinchunli@163.com [Imaging Center, The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical College (China); Shao, Ming, E-mail: yimshao@126.com [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical College (China)

    2014-03-15

    We explored if magnetic resonance imaging sequences might aid in the clinical differential diagnosis of idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD) and multiple system atrophy (MSA). We measured the volumes of the olfactory bulb, the olfactory tract, and olfaction-associated cortical gray matter in 20 IPD patients, 14 MSA patients, and 12 normal subjects, using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging sequences in combination with voxel-based statistical analysis. We found that, compared to normal subjects and MSA patients, the volumes of the olfactory bulb and tract were significantly reduced in IPD patients. The gray matter volume of IPD patients decreased in the following order: the olfactory area to the right of the piriform cortex, the right amygdala, the left entorhinal cortex, and the left occipital lobe. Further, the total olfactory bulb volume of IPD patients was associated with the duration of disease. The entorhinal cortical gray matter volume was negatively associated with the UPDRS III score. Conclusion: Structural volumes measured by high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging may potentially be used for differential diagnosis of IPD from MSA.

  11. Preliminary fundamental aspects on the thyroid volume and function in the population of long term heavily polluted area in East Slovakia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langer, P. [Institute of Experimental Endocrinology, SAS, Bratislava (Slovakia); Tajtakova, M. [Safarik Univ., Kosice (Slovakia). First Clinic of Internal Medicine; Kocan, A. [Slovak Health Univ. - IPCM, Bratislava (SK). Research Base] (and others)

    2004-09-15

    Our previous examinations of employees of chemical factory formerly producing polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) repeatedly showed increased thyroid volume as measured by ultrasound as well as increased frequency of thyroperoxidase, thyroglobulin and thyrotropin (TSH) receptor autoantibodies. At the same time a considerable PCB pollution of soil, waters and food chain in large area surrounding that chemical factory was found. The aim of present preliminary evaluation of data obtained within the EC project PCBRISK was to search for further interrelations between long-term organochlorine pollution and fundamental markers of thyroid volume and function in large cohorts of population from three districts of East Slovakia.

  12. Al Sahawa - The Awakening, Volume 4-A: Area of Operations Topeka, East Ramadi and the Shark Fins

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Another account from Jim Michaels in his book A Chance in Hell (St. Martin’s Press, June 2010) says that Lechner told Jassim No because Coalition forces...formation continued forward, they came upon an abatis obstacle laced with IEDs. The enemy had cut down large palm trees as a barrier . Knowing that they...Engineer Platoon to install the wall. The point of the barriers was, obviously, to block off insurgent escape and infiltration routes. The barriers

  13. Environmental Inventory and Analysis for Pine Bluff, Arkansas. Volume I. Pine Bluff Metropolitan Area, Arkansas Urban Water Management Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-10-03

    Bicycling 395 Boating 380 Cultural Activities: Arts and Crafts, Music, Fairs, etc. 376 Hiking 174 Horseback Riding 142 Bird-Watching and Nature Study 120...Church in Arkansas. Construction was begun in 1863 but was interrupted by the Civil War. It was not completed until 1871. It is a simple Gothic Revival...structure with buttressed masonry walls supporting a roof with two pitches, steep over the nave, shallow over the aisles. Stained glass, Gothic -style

  14. Wall Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-14

    Sydney, Australia. December 6, 1990. Lumley, J. L. A dynamical-systems-theory approach to the wall region. Environmental Engineering Laboratory, CSIRO...Nonlinear Science. Holmes, P. Editor in Chief, Nonlinear Scinece Today. Holmes, P. Reviewer for Physica D, J. Sound Vib., J. Phys., Q. Appl. Math, Phys...Spring, 1994; Organizing committee member. Holmes, P. Editorial Board Member: Archive for Rational Mechanics and Analysis; Journal of Nonlinear Scinece

  15. CLIMBING WALL

    CERN Multimedia

    1999-01-01

    The FIRE AND RESCUE Group of TIS Commission informs that the climbing wall in the yard of the Fire-fighters Station, is intended for the sole use of the members of that service, and recalls that access to this installation is forbidden for safety reasons to all persons not belonging to the Service.CERN accepts no liability for damage or injury suffered as a result of failure to comply with this interdiction.TIS/DI

  16. Acute Infarct Extracellular Volume Mapping to Quantify Myocardial Area at Risk and Chronic Infarct Size on Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Pankaj; Broadbent, David A; Swoboda, Peter P; Foley, James R J; Fent, Graham J; Musa, Tarique A; Ripley, David P; Erhayiem, Bara; Dobson, Laura E; McDiarmid, Adam K; Haaf, Philip; Kidambi, Ananth; van der Geest, Rob J; Greenwood, John P; Plein, Sven

    2017-07-01

    Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) imaging overestimates acute infarct size. The main aim of this study was to investigate whether acute extracellular volume (ECV) maps can reliably quantify myocardial area at risk (AAR) and final infarct size (IS). Fifty patients underwent cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging acutely (24-72 hours) and at convalescence (3 months). The cardiovascular magnetic resonance protocol included cines, T2-weighted imaging, native T1 maps, 15-minute post-contrast T1 maps, and LGE. Optimal AAR and IS ECV thresholds were derived in a validation group of 10 cases (160 segments). Eight hundred segments (16 per patient) were analyzed to quantify AAR/IS by ECV maps (ECV thresholds for AAR is 33% and IS is 46%), T2-weighted imaging, T1 maps, and acute LGE. Follow-up LGE imaging was used as the reference standard for final IS and viability assessment. The AAR derived from ECV maps (threshold of >33) demonstrated good agreement with T2-weighted imaging-derived AAR (bias, 0.18; 95% confidence interval [CI], -1.6 to 1.3) and AAR derived from native T1 maps (bias=1; 95% CI, -0.37 to 2.4). ECV demonstrated the best linear correlation to final IS at a threshold of >46% (R=0.96; 95% CI, 0.92-0.98; Pmaps demonstrated better agreement with final IS than acute IS on LGE (ECV maps: bias, 1.9; 95% CI, 0.4-3.4 versus LGE imaging: bias, 10; 95% CI, 7.7-12.4). On multiple variable regression analysis, the number of nonviable segments was independently associated with IS by ECV maps (β=0.86; Pmaps can reliably quantify AAR and final IS in reperfused acute myocardial infarction. Acute ECV maps were superior to acute LGE in terms of agreement with final IS. IS quantified by ECV maps are independently associated with viability at follow-up. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Permanent effects of postnatal administration of beta-adrenergic ligands on the volume of sexually dimorphic nucleus of the preoptic area (SDN-POA) in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izdebska-Straszak, Grazyna; Gubala, Elzbieta; Jedrzejowska-Szypulka, Halina; Klencki, Mariusz; Wiczkowski, Andrzej; Jarzab, Barbara

    2006-01-01

    beta-adrenergic ligands have been shown to influence sexual differentiation of the brain. In the present study we document that short postnatal treatment with beta-adrenergic agonists or antagonists may permanently reverse the morphological sex of the brain, as judged by the volume of sexually dimorphic nucleus of the preoptic area (SDN-POA). Female rats treated by beta(2)-adrenergic stimulating ligands exhibit an increased, male type SDN-POA volume while male rats treated by beta1-adrenergic antagonists show a decreased, female type of SDN-POA volume. To analyze the volume of SDN-POA of adult rats after postnatal administration of betaadrenergic ligands. From the second day of life, over 5 consecutive days, all the neonates were injected subcutaneously with the following drugs: isoproterenol, salbutamol, metoprolol alprenolol or saline. SDN-POA volumes were estimated planimetrically on serial brain slides. In male rats the mean volume of SDN-POA was 9.97 +/- 1.66 x 10(-3) mm(3), in female rats the respective volume reached 4.02 +/- 1.26 x 10(-3) mm(3) only and was 2.5 times lower, the difference being highly statistically significant. Postnatal administration of isoproterenol remained without effect in male rats but diminished the SDN-POA volume in female rats, thus increasing the sexual dimorphism. The disappearance of sexual dimorphism was noted in rats treated postnatally with salbutamol. This effect was due to the increase in SDN-POA volumes in female rats, up to 9.81 +/- 2.64 x 10(-3) mm(3), the levels approaching the male type of POA differentiation. Postnatal alprenolol treatment influenced the sexual dimorphism of the brain by decreasing the SDN-POA volume reached by adult males. In fact, in rats treated postnatally with alprenolol, the volume of the nucleus reached only 4,44 +/- 1,61 x 10(-3) mm(3), being not statistically different from female nuclei. The effect of metoprolol pretreatment was similar to alprenolol. Male volumes of SDN-POA were restored

  18. Simulated impacts of artificial groundwater recharge and discharge of the source area and source volume of an Atlantic Coastal Plain Stream, Delaware, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Joshua W.; Denver, Judish M.; McKenna, Thomas E.; Ullman, William J.

    2010-01-01

    A numerical groundwater-flow model was used to characterize the source area and volume of Phillips Branch, a baseflow-dominated stream incising a highly permeable unconfined aquifer on the low relief Delmarva Peninsula, USA. Particle-tracking analyses indicate that the source area (5.51 km2) is ~20% smaller than the topographically defined watershed (6.85 km2), and recharge entering ~37% of the surface watershed does not discharge to Phillips Branch. Groundwater residence time within the source volume ranges from a few days to almost 100 years, with 95% of the volume "flushing" within 50 years. Artificial discharge from groundwater pumping alters the shape of the source area and reduces baseflow due to the interception of stream flow paths, but has limited impacts on the residence time of groundwater discharged as baseflow. In contrast, artificial recharge from land-based wastewater disposal substantially reduces the source area, lowers the range in residence time due to the elimination of older flow paths to the stream, and leads to increased discharge to adjacent surface-water bodies. This research suggests that, in this and similar hydrogeologic settings, the "watershed" approach to water-resource management may be limited, particularly where anthropogenic stresses alter the transport of soluble contaminants through highly permeable unconfined aquifers.

  19. Advanced transportation system studies technical area 2 (TA-2): Heavy lift launch vehicle development. volume 3; Program Cost estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCurry, J. B.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of the TA-2 contract was to provide advanced launch vehicle concept definition and analysis to assist NASA in the identification of future launch vehicle requirements. Contracted analysis activities included vehicle sizing and performance analysis, subsystem concept definition, propulsion subsystem definition (foreign and domestic), ground operations and facilities analysis, and life cycle cost estimation. The basic period of performance of the TA-2 contract was from May 1992 through May 1993. No-cost extensions were exercised on the contract from June 1993 through July 1995. This document is part of the final report for the TA-2 contract. The final report consists of three volumes: Volume 1 is the Executive Summary, Volume 2 is Technical Results, and Volume 3 is Program Cost Estimates. The document-at-hand, Volume 3, provides a work breakdown structure dictionary, user's guide for the parametric life cycle cost estimation tool, and final report developed by ECON, Inc., under subcontract to Lockheed Martin on TA-2 for the analysis of heavy lift launch vehicle concepts.

  20. Orbitofrontal cortex volume in area 11/13 predicts reward devaluation, but not reversal learning performance, in young and aged monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Sara N; Thome, Alex; Plange, Kojo; Engle, James R; Trouard, Theodore P; Gothard, Katalin M; Barnes, Carol A

    2014-07-23

    The orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and amygdala are both necessary for decisions based on expected outcomes. Although behavioral and imaging data suggest that these brain regions are affected by advanced age, the extent to which aging alters appetitive processes coordinated by the OFC and the amygdala is unknown. In the current experiment, young and aged bonnet macaques were trained on OFC- and amygdala-dependent tasks that test the degree to which response selection is guided by reward value and can be adapted when expected outcomes change. To assess whether the structural integrity of these regions varies with levels of performance on reward devaluation and object reversal tasks, volumes of areas 11/13 and 14 of the OFC, central/medial (CM), and basolateral (BL) nuclei of the amygdala were determined from high-resolution anatomical MRIs. With age, there were significant reductions in OFC, but not CM and BL, volume. Moreover, the aged monkeys showed impairments in the ability to associate an object with a higher value reward, and to reverse a previously learned association. Interestingly, greater OFC volume of area 11/13, but not 14, was significantly correlated with an animal's ability to anticipate the reward outcome associated with an object, and smaller BL volume was predictive of an animal's tendency to choose a higher value reward, but volume of neither region correlated with reversal learning. Together, these data indicate that OFC volume has an impact on monkeys' ability to guide choice behavior based on reward value but does not impact ability to reverse a previously learned association. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/349905-12$15.00/0.

  1. General separations area large maps for the F- and H-area seepage basins groundwater monitoring reports. First and second quarters 1995, Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    This document contains the Large Maps for the F-Area and H-Area Seepage Basins Groundwater Monitoring Reports for the Savannah River Plant in Aiken, South Carolina. The maps contain the ground-water concentrations of various heavy metals and radionuclides in the vicinity of the seepage basins for the dates sampled.

  2. Preoperative volume calculation of the hepatic venous draining areas with multi-detector row CT in adult living donor liver transplantation: impact on surgical procedure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frericks, Bernd B.J. [Hanover Medical School, Departments of Radiology and Surgery, Hannover (Germany); University of Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Charite - University Medicine Berlin, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Berlin (Germany); Kirchhoff, Timm D.; Shin, Hoen-Oh; Stamm, Georg; Merkesdal, Sonja; Abe, Takehiko; Galanski, Michael [Hanover Medical School, Departments of Radiology and Surgery, Hannover (Germany); Hanover Medical School, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Hannover (Germany); Schenk, Andrea; Peitgen, Heinz-Otto [Hanover Medical School, Departments of Radiology and Surgery, Hannover (Germany); MeVis - Center for Medical Diagnostic Systems and Visualization, Bremen (Germany); Klempnauer, Juergen [Hanover Medical School, Departments of Radiology and Surgery, Hannover (Germany); Hanover Medical School, Department of Visceral- and Transplantation Surgery, Hannover (Germany); Nashan, Bjoern [Hanover Medical School, Departments of Radiology and Surgery, Hannover (Germany); Hanover Medical School, Department of Visceral- and Transplantation Surgery, Hannover (Germany); Dalhousie University, Multi Organ Transplant Program, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada)

    2006-12-15

    The purpose was to assess the volumes of the different hepatic territories and especially the drainage of the right paramedian sector in adult living donor liver transplantation (ALDLT). CT was performed in 40 potential donors of whom 28 underwent partial living donation. Data sets of all potential donors were postprocessed using dedicated software for segmentation, volumetric analysis and visualization of liver territories. During an initial period, volumes and shapes of liver parts were calculated based on the individual portal venous perfusion areas. After partial hepatic congestion occurring in three grafts, drainage territories with special regard to MHV tributaries from the right paramedian sector, and the IRHV were calculated additionally. Results were visualized three-dimensionally and compared to the intraoperative findings. Calculated graft volumes based on hepatic venous drainage and graft weights correlated significantly (r=0.86,P<0.001). Mean virtual graft volume was 930 ml and drained as follows: RHV: 680 ml, IRHV: 170 ml (n=11); segment 5 MHV tributaries: 100 ml (n=16); segment 8 MHV tributaries: 110 ml (n=20). When present, the mean aberrant venous drainage fraction of the right liver lobe was 28%. The evaluated protocol allowed a reliable calculation of the hepatic venous draining areas and led to a change in the hepatic venous reconstruction strategy at our institution. (orig.)

  3. Evaluating the exact infinitesimal values of area of Sierpinski's carpet and volume of Menger's sponge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sergeyev, Yaroslav D. [Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informatica e Sistemistica, Universita della Calabria, Via P. Bucci, Cubo 42-C, 87030 Rende (Italy)], E-mail: yaro@si.deis.unical.it

    2009-12-15

    Very often traditional approaches studying dynamics of self-similarity processes are not able to give their quantitative characteristics at infinity and, as a consequence, use limits to overcome this difficulty. For example, it is well known that the limit area of Sierpinski's carpet and volume of Menger's sponge are equal to zero. It is shown in this paper that recently introduced infinite and infinitesimal numbers allow us to use exact expressions instead of limits and to calculate exact infinitesimal values of areas and volumes at various points at infinity even if the chosen moment of the observation is infinitely faraway on the time axis from the starting point. It is interesting that traditional results that can be obtained without the usage of infinite and infinitesimal numbers can be produced just as finite approximations of the new ones. The importance of the possibility to have this kind of quantitative characteristics for E-Infinity theory is emphasized.

  4. To detect anomalies in diaphragm walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spruit, R.

    2015-01-01

    Diaphragm walls are potentially ideal retaining walls for deep excavations in densely built-up areas, as they cause no vibrations during their construction and provide structural elements with high strength and stiffness. In the recent past, however, several projects using diaphragm walls as soil

  5. Estimating Pinus palustris tree diameter and stem volume from tree height, crown area and stand-level parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    C.A. Gonzalez-Benecke; Salvador A. Gezan; Lisa J. Samuelson; Wendell P. Cropper; Daniel J. Leduc; Timothy A. Martin

    2014-01-01

    Accurate and efficient estimation of forest growth and live biomass is a critical element in assessing potential responses to forest management and environmental change. The objective of this study was to develop models to predict longleaf pine tree diameter at breast height (dbh) and merchantable stem volume (V) using data obtained from field measurements. We used...

  6. The Importance of Aging in Gray Matter Changes Within Tinnitus Patients Shown in Cortical Thickness, Surface Area and Volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Hye Bin; De Ridder, Dirk; Vanneste, Sven

    2016-11-01

    Aging and sensorineural hearing loss are known to be involved in the development of chronic tinnitus. This study explores the structural changes of gray matter using surface base methods and focuses more specifically on changes in cortical thickness in 127 tinnitus patients. The linear relationships between cortical thickness and behavioral measures including aging, tinnitus loudness, tinnitus duration, tinnitus distress, and hearing loss were analyzed. Three dimensional T1-weighted MR images were acquired and cortical gray matter volumes were segmented using FreeSurfer on Talairach space. The results showed that cortical thickness and volume are negatively correlated to age in widespread regions of frontal cortices, and positively to bilateral entorhinal cortex and left rostral anterior cingulate cortex. The cortical thickness changes related to hearing loss overlap with those related to normal aging. The gray matter volumes of bilateral amygdalae, hippocampi, nuclei accumbens, and thalami are all significantly negatively correlated to age. Tinnitus-related distress level and subjective loudness were negatively correlated only to the thalamic volume. The results suggest that the primary factor of long-term structural changes in chronic tinnitus patients is age and age related hearing loss, rather than hearing loss per se. Tinnitus related factors such as subjective tinnitus loudness, tinnitus duration, and the level of chronic tinnitus related distress were not correlated to important morphometric changes in this study.

  7. Seismologically-consistent prediction of earthquake induced landsliding: Towards near-real time prediction of total landslide volume, total landslide area and regional area affected by earthquake-induced landsliding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marc, Odin; Hovius, Niels; Meunier, Patrick

    2017-04-01

    Earthquakes are an important trigger of landslides and can contribute significantly to sedimentary and organic matter fluxes. We present a new seismologically-consistent expression for the prediction of total area and volume of populations of earthquake-induced landslides (Marc et al., 2016) as well as for their regional area of occurrence (Marc et al., 2017). This model implements essential seismic processes, linking key parameters such as ground acceleration, fault size, earthquake source depth and seismic moment. To assess the model we have compiled and normalized estimates of total landslide volume, total landslide area and regional area affected by landslides for 40, 17 and 83 earthquakes, respectively. We have found that low landscape steepness systematically leads to overprediction of the total area and volume of landslides. When this effect is accounted for, the model is able to predict within a factor of 2 the landslide areas and associated volumes for about 70% of the cases in our databases. The prediction of regional area affected do not require a calibration for the landscape steepness and gives a prediction within a factor of 2 for 60% of the database. For 7 out of 10 comprehensive inventories we show that our prediction compares well with the smallest region around the fault containing 95% of the total landslide area. This is a significant improvement on a previously published empirical expression based only on earthquake moment. We discuss some additional parameters that seem required in the model to explain some outliers, such as exceptional rock mass strength in the epicentral area, shaking duration and other seismic source complexities ignored by the model. However, most cases in our catalogue seem to be relatively unaffected by these effects despite the variety of lithologies and tectonic settings they cover. This makes the model suitable for integration into landscape evolution models, and application to the assessment of secondary hazards and

  8. An assessment of uncertainties in using volume-area modelling for computing the twenty-first century glacier contribution to sea-level change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B. A. Slangen

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available A large part of present-day sea-level change is formed by the melt of glaciers and ice caps (GIC. This study focuses on the uncertainties in the calculation of the GIC contribution on a century timescale. The model used is based on volume-area scaling, combined with the mass balance sensitivity of the GIC. We assess different aspects that contribute to the uncertainty in the prediction of the contribution of GIC to future sea-level rise, such as (1 the volume-area scaling method (scaling factor, (2 the glacier data, (3 the climate models, and (4 the emission scenario. Additionally, a comparison of the model results to the 20th century GIC contribution is presented.

    We find that small variations in the scaling factor cause significant variations in the initial volume of the glaciers, but only limited variations in the glacier volume change. If two existing glacier inventories are tuned such that the initial volume is the same, the GIC sea-level contribution over 100 yr differs by 0.027 m or 18 %. It appears that the mass balance sensitivity is also important: variations of 20 % in the mass balance sensitivity have an impact of 17 % on the resulting sea-level projections. Another important factor is the choice of the climate model, as the GIC contribution to sea-level change largely depends on the temperature and precipitation taken from climate models. Connected to this is the choice of emission scenario, used to drive the climate models. Combining all the uncertainties examined in this study leads to a total uncertainty of 0.052 m or 35 % in the GIC contribution to global mean sea level. Reducing the variance in the climate models and improving the glacier inventories will significantly reduce the uncertainty in calculating the GIC contributions, and are therefore crucial actions to improve future sea-level projections.

  9. Near-wall serpentine cooled turbine airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ching-Pang

    2013-09-17

    A serpentine coolant flow path (54A-54G) formed by inner walls (50, 52) in a cavity (49) between pressure and suction side walls (22, 24) of a turbine airfoil (20A). A coolant flow (58) enters (56) an end of the airfoil, flows into a span-wise channel (54A), then flows forward (54B) over the inner surface of the pressure side wall, then turns behind the leading edge (26), and flows back along a forward part of the suction side wall, then follows a loop (54E) forward and back around an inner wall (52), then flows along an intermediate part of the suction side wall, then flows into an aft channel (54G) between the pressure and suction side walls, then exits the trailing edge (28). This provides cooling matched to the heating topography of the airfoil, minimizes differential thermal expansion, revives the coolant, and minimizes the flow volume needed.

  10. Risk factors associated with the loss of cartilage volume on weight-bearing areas in knee osteoarthritis patients assessed by quantitative magnetic resonance imaging: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, Jean-Pierre; Raynauld, Jean-Pierre; Berthiaume, Marie-Josée; Abram, François; Choquette, Denis; Haraoui, Boulos; Beary, John F; Cline, Gary A; Meyer, Joan M; Martel-Pelletier, Johanne

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify, on a symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (OA) cohort, the risk factors associated with the progression of the disease. More specifically, we investigated the correlation between knee cartilage volume loss from subregions over the span of 24 months by means of quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (qMRI) with demographic, clinical, radiological, and MRI structural changes. A cohort of 107 patients with knee OA selected from a large trial evaluating the effect of a bisphosphonate underwent x-rays and MRI of the knee at baseline and 24 months. Joint space width (JSW) and joint space narrowing (JSN) and cartilage volume loss over time in subregions of the tibial plateaus and femoral condyles were quantitated. Structural changes in the subchondral bone (hypersignal) and in the menisci (tear and extrusion) were also evaluated. The greatest cartilage volume loss was found in the medial compartment, and risk factors included female gender, JSW, meniscal lesions, and bone changes at baseline. Subregion analysis revealed that the greatest cartilage volume loss at 24 months was found in the central area of the medial tibial plateau (15%; p < 0.0001) and of the medial femoral condyle (12%; p < 0.0001). These findings were associated with the presence at baseline of meniscal extrusion, particularly severe meniscal extrusion, medial and severe meniscal tear, bone hypersignal, high body mass index (BMI), smaller JSW, increases in Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) pain and patient global scores over time, and greater JSN. Parameters predicting medial central femoral condyle cartilage volume loss at 24 months were lateral meniscal tear, SF-36 and BMI at baseline, and JSN. At the medial central tibial plateau, the parameters were severe meniscal extrusion, severe lateral meniscal tear, and bone hypersignal in the lateral compartment at baseline, and WOMAC pain change. Meniscal damage and bone changes are

  11. Technical issues associated with in situ vitrification of the INEL Subsurface Disposal Area. Volume 2, Application of technical issues to the Acid Pit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoots, C.M.; Bates, S.O.; Callow, R.A.; Campbell, K.A.; Farnsworth, R.K.; Gratson, G.K.; McKellar, M.G.; Nickelson, D.F.; Slater, C.E.

    1992-01-01

    In situ vitrification (ISV) has been identified as an alternative technology for remediation of the Acid Pit and Transuranic Pits and Trenches (TRU-PTs) that are present at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA). However, a number of technical issues exist that must be resolved before ISV can be considered applicable to these waste sites. To assist in the ISV technology evaluation, an ISV Steering Committee was formed to identify, prioritize, and develop closure roadmaps for technical issues associated with ISV application at the INEL SDA. The activities of the ISV Steering Committee are summarized in three volumes of this report. Volume 1 identifies the systematic approach used to identify and prioritize the ISV technical issues, and briefly discusses the methodology that will be employed to resolve these issues. This document Volume 2 and Volume 3 discusses each technical issue in greater detail and suggest specific closure roadmaps to be used in resolving technical issues associated with ISV at the SDA Acid Pit and TRU-PTs, respectively.

  12. Investigation of Plant Cell Wall Properties: A Study of Contributions from the Nanoscale to the Macroscale Impacting Cell Wall Recalcitrance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Jacob Dillon

    , alkaline hydrogen peroxide and liquid hot water pretreatments were shown to alter structural properties impacting nanoscale porosity in corn stover. Delignification by alkaline hydrogen peroxide pretreatment decreased cell wall rigidity, with subsequent cell wall swelling resulting in increased nanoscale porosity and improved enzymatic hydrolysis compared to limited swelling and increased accessible surface areas observed in liquid hot water pretreated biomass. The volume accessible to a 90 A dextran probe within the cell wall was found to be positively correlated to both enzyme binding and glucose hydrolysis yields, indicating cell wall porosity is a key contributor to effective hydrolysis yields. In the third study, the effect of altered xylan content and structure was investigated in irregular xylem (irx) Arabidopsis thaliana mutants to understand the role xylan plays in secondary cell wall development and organization. Higher xylan extractability and lower cellulose crystallinity observed in irx9 and irx15 irx15-L mutants compared to wild type indicated altered xylan integration into the secondary cell wall. Nanoscale cell wall organization observed using multiple microscopy techniques was impacted to some extent in all irx mutants, with disorganized cellulose microfibril layers in sclerenchyma secondary cell walls likely resulting from irregular xylan structure and content. Irregular secondary cell wall microfibril layers showed heterogeneous nanomechanical properties compared to wild type, which translated to mechanical deficiencies observed in stem tensile tests. These results suggest nanoscale defects in cell wall strength can correspond to macroscale phenotypes.

  13. Savannah River Plant engineering and design history. Volume 4: 300/700 Areas & general services and facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1957-01-01

    The primary function of the 300 Area is the production and preparation of the fuel and target elements required for the 100 Area production reactors. Uranium slugs and lithium-aluminium alloy control and blanket rods are prepared in separate structures. Other facilities include a test pile, a physics assembly laboratory, an office and change house, an electrical substation, and various service facilities such as rail lines, roads, sewers, steam and water distribution lines, etc. The 700 Area contains housing and facilities for plant management, general plant services, and certain technical activities. The technical buildings include the Main Technical Laboratory, the Waste Concentration Building, the Health Physics Headquarters, and the Health Physics Calibration building. Sections of this report describe the following: development of the 300-M Area; selection and description of process; design of main facilities of the 300 Area; development of the 700-A Area; design of the main facilities of the 700 Area; and general services and facilities, including transportation, plant protection, waste disposal and drainage, site work, pilot plants, storage, and furniture and fixtures.

  14. H-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility groundwater monitoring report. Third and fourth quarters 1996, Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    The groundwater in the uppermost aquifer beneath the H-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF), also known as the H-Area Seepage Basins, at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is monitored periodically for various hazardous and radioactive constituents as required by Module III, Section D, of the 1995 Resource Conservation and Recovery ACT (RCRA) Renewal Permit (South Carolina Hazardous and Mixed Waste Permit SC1-890-008-989), effective October 5, 1995. Currently, the H-Area HWMF monitoring network consists of 130 wells of the HSB series and 8 wells of the HSL series screened in the three hydrostratigraphic units that make up the uppermost aquifer beneath the H-Area HWMF. This report presents the results of the required groundwater monitoring program as identified in provision IIIDH.11.c

  15. Probability and volume of potential postwildfire debris flows in the 2011 Indian Gulch burn area, near Golden, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruddy, Barbara C.

    2011-01-01

    This report presents an assessment of the debris-flow hazards from drainage basins burned in 2011 by the Indian Gulch wildfire near Golden, Colorado. Empirical models derived from statistical evaluation of data collected from recently burned drainage basins throughout the intermountain western United States were used to estimate the probability of debris-flow occurrence and debris-flow volumes for selected drainage basins. Input for the models include measures of burn severity, topographic characteristics, soil properties, and rainfall total and intensity for a (1) 2-year-recurrence, 1-hour-duration rainfall, (2) 10-year-recurrence, 1-hour-duration rainfall, and (3) 25-year-recurrence, 1-hour-duration rainfall. Estimated debris-flow probabilities in the drainage basins of interest ranged from 2 percent in response to the 2-year-recurrence, 1-hour-duration rainfall to a high of 76 percent in response to the 25-year-recurrence, 1-hour-duration rainfall. Estimated debris-flow volumes ranged from a low of 840 cubic meters to a high of 26,000 cubic meters, indicating a considerable hazard should debris flows occur.

  16. Effects of age, breast density and volume on breast cancer diagnosis: a retrospective comparison of sensitivity of mammography and ultrasonography in China's rural areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng-Liang; Chen, Fei; Yin, Hong; Xu, Nan; Wu, Xiao-Xiang; Ma, Jing-Jing; Gao, Shen; Tang, Jin-Hai; Lu, Cheng

    2013-01-01

    Mammography has been confirmed as the only effective mode to improve the prognosis of patients with breast cancer in Western developed countries, but might not be a good choice in other areas of the world. One of the major challenges in China is to determine an optimal imaging modality for breast cancer screening. This study was designed to clarify the sensitivity of ultrasonography compared with that of mammography in rural China. We retrospectively studied the sensitivity of mammography and ultrasonography based on 306 breast cancer patients detected by the program of "screening for cervical cancer and breast cancer" performed in Chinese rural areas between January 2009 and December 2011, and analyzed the effects of age, breast density and volume on the sensitivity. Stratified analysis showed that the sensitivity of breast ultrasonography was significantly higher than that of mammography in premenopausal patients (81.4% vs. 61.1%, p=0.02), in women ≤ 55 years of age (82.2% vs. 63.4%, pbreast density group (American College of Radiology [ACR] levels 3-4) (85.9% vs. 60.6%, pbreast volume group (≤ 400 ml) (87.1% vs. 66.7%, pAge had a significant effect on sensitivity of mammography (breast density and volume-adjusted odds ratio, 6.39; 95% confidence interval, 2.8-14.4 in age group > 55 compared to age group ≤ 45), but not that of ultrasonography. Neither breast density nor volume had significant effect on sensitivity of mammography or ultrasonography. Ultrasonography is more sensitive than mammography in detecting breast cancer in women under 55 year-old Chinese, especially in those with high-density and relatively small breasts.

  17. Reproducibility of thoracic and abdominal aortic wall measurements with three-dimensional, variable flip angle (SPACE) MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihai, Georgeta; Varghese, Juliet; Lu, Bo; Zhu, Hong; Simonetti, Orlando P; Rajagopalan, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the reproducibility and repeatability of high-resolution, isotropic thoracic and abdominal aortic wall measurements, and determine the implications they have on the number of subjects necessary for future clinical trials. Using a T1-weighted three-dimensional MRI SPACE sequence, we evaluated the interobserver, intraobserver, and scan-rescan variability of isotropic thoracic and abdominal aortic wall measurements in 15 cardiovascular diseased patients and 6 normal volunteers. Main outcome analyses were intracorrelation coefficient (ICC), mean relative error (mRE), and sample size calculation at 80% power to be used to compare placebo group and treatment group means in future two-arm randomized clinical trials. Excellent reliability, ICC > 0.8 (P measures: lumen area (LA), outer wall area (OWA), wall area (VWA), total wall volume (TWV), and percentage wall volume (%WV). Sample size calculation revealed slightly different sample size per treatment arm for thoracic and abdominal aorta segments (maximum number of subjects: 352 subjects for thoracic segment versus 421 subjects for abdominal segment for LA at 5% difference, and minimum of 3 thoracic versus 4 abdominal subjects needed for %WV evaluation at 25% difference). Our study demonstrates the reproducibility and repeatability of SPACE aortic plaque measurements, and gives insight into the number of subjects needed for the design of therapeutic studies in aortic atherosclerosis. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Falling walls

    CERN Multimedia

    It was 20 years ago this week that the Berlin wall was opened for the first time since its construction began in 1961. Although the signs of a thaw had been in the air for some time, few predicted the speed of the change that would ensue. As members of the scientific community, we can take a moment to reflect on the role our field played in bringing East and West together. CERN’s collaboration with the East, primarily through links with the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, JINR, in Dubna, Russia, is well documented. Less well known, however, is the role CERN played in bringing the scientists of East and West Germany together. As the Iron curtain was going up, particle physicists on both sides were already creating the conditions that would allow it to be torn down. Cold war historian Thomas Stange tells the story in his 2002 CERN Courier article. It was my privilege to be in Berlin on Monday, the anniversary of the wall’s opening, to take part in a conference entitled &lsquo...

  19. Estimated probabilities, volumes, and inundation areas depths of potential postwildfire debris flows from Carbonate, Slate, Raspberry, and Milton Creeks, near Marble, Gunnison County, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Michael R.; Flynn, Jennifer L.; Stephens, Verlin C.; Verdin, Kristine L.

    2011-01-01

    During 2009, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Gunnison County, initiated a study to estimate the potential for postwildfire debris flows to occur in the drainage basins occupied by Carbonate, Slate, Raspberry, and Milton Creeks near Marble, Colorado. Currently (2010), these drainage basins are unburned but could be burned by a future wildfire. Empirical models derived from statistical evaluation of data collected from recently burned basins throughout the intermountain western United States were used to estimate the probability of postwildfire debris-flow occurrence and debris-flow volumes for drainage basins occupied by Carbonate, Slate, Raspberry, and Milton Creeks near Marble. Data for the postwildfire debris-flow models included drainage basin area; area burned and burn severity; percentage of burned area; soil properties; rainfall total and intensity for the 5- and 25-year-recurrence, 1-hour-duration-rainfall; and topographic and soil property characteristics of the drainage basins occupied by the four creeks. A quasi-two-dimensional floodplain computer model (FLO-2D) was used to estimate the spatial distribution and the maximum instantaneous depth of the postwildfire debris-flow material during debris flow on the existing debris-flow fans that issue from the outlets of the four major drainage basins. The postwildfire debris-flow probabilities at the outlet of each drainage basin range from 1 to 19 percent for the 5-year-recurrence, 1-hour-duration rainfall, and from 3 to 35 percent for 25-year-recurrence, 1-hour-duration rainfall. The largest probabilities for postwildfire debris flow are estimated for Raspberry Creek (19 and 35 percent), whereas estimated debris-flow probabilities for the three other creeks range from 1 to 6 percent. The estimated postwildfire debris-flow volumes at the outlet of each creek range from 7,500 to 101,000 cubic meters for the 5-year-recurrence, 1-hour-duration rainfall, and from 9,400 to 126,000 cubic meters for

  20. Integrated mined-area reclamation and land use planning. Volume 4. A bibliography of integrated mined-area reclamation and land use planning, with annotations. [424 citations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, L R; LaFevers, J R; Perry, A O; Rice, W Jr

    1976-12-01

    This bibliography has been compiled for use by planners who, within their areas of responsibility, deal with the problems presented by surface mining and reclamation. Every effort has been made to identify and to annotate those entries considered most useful in the development of plans for reclamation and after-mining land use. The coverage of varied surface mining and reclamation studies is intended to access the reader to documents and works related to legal, economic, and technological aspects: materials that treat with procedural, planning, and regulatory factors pertaining to land use and reclamation. The technical level of each annotated entry has been assessed to rank skills required for the comprehension and utilization of the work in question. This bibliography has been formulated to be used as a tool by municipal, county, and regional planners in a field of study in which guidelines are as yet few and diverse in approach.

  1. Lung stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR): dosimetric considerations for chest wall toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Louise; Karakaya, Ebru; Hinsley, Samantha; Naisbitt, Mitchell; Lilley, John; Snee, Michael; Clarke, Katy; Musunuru, Hima B; Ramasamy, Satiavani; Turner, Rob

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate chest wall pain in patients with peripheral early stage lung cancer treated with stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR), and to identify factors predictive of Common Terminology Criteria of Adverse Events Grade 2 + chest wall pain. Methods: Patients who received 55 Gy in five fractions were included. A chest wall structure was retrospectively defined on planning scans, and chest wall dosimetry and tumour-related factors recorded. Logistic regression was performed to identify factors predictive of ≥Grade 2 chest wall pain. Results: 182 patients and 187 tumours were included. There were 20 (10.9%) episodes of ≥Grade 2 chest wall pain. Multivariate logistic regression demonstrated that the maximum dose received by 1 cm3 of chest wall (Dmax1 cm3) and tumour size were significant predictors of ≥Grade 2 chest wall pain [Dmax1 cm3 odds ratio : 1.104, 95% confidence interval : 1.012–1.204, p = 0.025; tumour size (mm) odds ratio : 1.080, 95% confidence interval : 1.026–1.136, p = 0.003]. This model was an adequate fit to the data (Hosmer and Lemeshow test non-significant) and a fair discriminator for chest wall pain (area under receiver-operating characteristic curve: 0.74). Using the multivariate logistic regression model, parameters for Dmax1 cm3 are provided, which predict <10% and <20% risks of ≥Grade 2 chest wall pain for different tumour sizes. Conclusion: Grade 2+ chest wall pain is an uncommon side effect of lung SABR. Larger tumour size and increasing Dmax1 cm3 are significant predictors of ≥Grade 2 chest wall pain. When planning lung SABR, it is prudent to try to avoid hot volumes in the chest wall, particularly for larger tumours. Advances in knowledge: This article demonstrates that Grade 2 or greater chest wall pain following lung SABR is more common when the tumour is larger in size and the Dmax1 cm3 of the chest wall is higher. When planning lung SABR, the risk of chest

  2. Invisible Walls: A Study of Racial Division and the Challenge of Building Bridges of Understanding in the St. Paul, MN Area Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    People for the American Way, Washington, DC.

    This is a report of a 6-month study of race relations in three public schools in the Saint Paul (Minnesota) metropolitan area. The study is intended to be the first phase of an attempt to improve intergroup relations and the social climate in Saint Paul, Roseville, and South St. Paul schools. Based on 154 interviews, 10 focus groups, and a written…

  3. Summary of Synoptic Meteorological Observations (SSMO), Central American Coastal Marine Areas, West Coast. Volume 2. Area 6 - Manzanillo SE, Area 7 - Acapulco South, Area 8 - Gulf of Tehuantepec, Area 9 - Guatemala SW Coast, Area 10 - Nicaragua SW Coast, Area 11 - Punta Burica

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-02-01

    0 C0.D 100.0 000.0 000.0 000.0 PAGE 037 FEBRQUARY PERIODl: :,"ARYL, 1953-:1919 AREA000 Pobl �L 1 20 a. At1 4& 24619971 9 27.65 102.9 PERCENTAGE...1-0 .3t 67 300.0 REA I SEC I NO CA, ~ ~ ~ ~ 𔃺 9032.1 1. 22. t,~--.- -7 .3 2.6 -4.2 2-’ D : 0 1: .: - ~ ~0 P091002 i290198451 1000.2199 ACLA 00ll PUTT

  4. Glacier area and volume changes of Hidden Valley, Mustang, Nepal from ~1980s to 2010 based on remote sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Lama

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Glaciers are one of the important natural resources of freshwater and sources of water for hydropower, agriculture and drinking whenever the water is scarce. This mapping and change analysis helps to understand the status and decadal changes of glaciers in Hidden Valley, Mustang district, Nepal. The investigation is carried out using Landsat images of the years 1977 (~1980s, 1990, 2000 and 2010. We mapped 10 glaciers of the Hidden Valley covering an area of 19.79 km2 based on the object-based image classification method using an automatic method and manual delineation by a Geographic Information System (GIS, separately. The glacier outlines for 2010, 2000, 1990 and 1980s in both methods are delineated from the multispectral Landsat images of the respective years. The total area losses of the glaciers from the automatic method are 1.713 and 0.625 km2 between 1990−2000 and 2000−2010 and from manual delineation are 2.021, 1.264, 1.041 km2 between ~1980s−1990, 1990−2000 and 2000−2010. The amount of average estimated glacier ice reserves lost is 0.326 km3 (26.26 % and the total glacier area loss is 4.33 km2 (21.87 % from the 1980s to 2010 based on manual delineation. The glaciers of Hidden Valley are shrinking and fragmented due to decrease in glacier area and ice reserves.

  5. User Delay Cost Model and Facilities Maintenance Cost Model for a Terminal Control Area : Volume 1. Model Formulation and Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-05-01

    The User Delay Cost Model (UDCM) is a Monte Carlo computer simulation of essential aspects of Terminal Control Area (TCA) air traffic movements that would be affected by facility outages. The model can also evaluate delay effects due to other factors...

  6. Preliminary environmental assessment of selected geopressured - geothermal prospect areas: Louisiana Gulf Coast Region. Volume II. Environmental baseline data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newchurch, E.J.; Bachman, A.L.; Bryan, C.F.; Harrison, D.P.; Muller, R.A.; Newman, J.P. Jr.; Smith, C.G. Jr.; Bailey, J.I. Jr.; Kelly, G.G.; Reibert, K.C.

    1978-10-15

    A separate section is presented for each of the six prospect areas studied. Each section includes a compilation and discussion of environmental baseline data derived from existing sources. The data are arranged as follows: geology and geohydrology, air quality, water resources and flood hazards, ecological systems, and land use. When data specific to the prospect were not available, regional data are reported. (MHR)

  7. M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility groundwater monitoring and corrective-action report. Second quarter 1995, Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    This report describes the corrective-action program at the M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) at the Savannah River Site during second quarter 1995. Topics include: changes in sampling, analysis, and reporting; water levels; remedial action of groundwater; and hydrology of the affected aquifer zones.

  8. Sacramento River Flood Control Project, California, Mid-Valley Area, Phase III. Design Memorandum, Volume 1 of 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-08-01

    cuckoo, bank swallow, and giant garter snake as threatened and Mason’s lilaeopsis as rare; these may also be in the study area. The Federal list of...the Suisun aster, heart-scale, California hibiscus, delta tule-pea, Mason’s lilaeopsis , little mousetail, and Colusa grass. No sites in the study

  9. A comparison of the effect of age on levator ani and obturator internus muscle cross-sectional areas and volumes in nulliparous women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Vikky C; Murray, Meghan P; Delancey, John O L; Ashton-Miller, James A

    2012-04-01

    Functional tests have demonstrated minimal loss of vaginal closure force with age. So we tested the null hypotheses that age neither affects the maximum cross-sectional area (CSA) nor the volume of the levator muscle. Corresponding hypotheses were also tested in the adjacent obturator internus muscle, which served as a control for the effect of age on appendicular muscle in these women. Magnetic resonance images of 15 healthy younger (aged 21-25 years) and 12 healthy older nulliparous women (aged >63 years) were selected to avoid the confounding effect of childbirth. Models were created from tracing outlines of the levator ani muscle in the coronal plane, and obturator internus in the axial plane using 3D Slicer v. 3.4. Muscle volumes were calculated using Slicer, while CSA was measured using Imageware™ at nine locations. The hypotheses were tested using repeated measures analysis of variance with P obturator internus muscle maximum CSA and volume (24.5% and 28.2%, P obturator internus, the levator ani muscle in healthy nullipara does not show evidence of significant age-related atrophy. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Reanalysis of multi-temporal aerial images of Storglaciären, Sweden (1959-99) - Part 1: Determination of length, area, and volume changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koblet, T.; Gärtner-Roer, I.; Zemp, M.; Jansson, P.; Thee, P.; Haeberli, W.; Holmlund, P.

    2010-09-01

    Storglaciären, located in the Kebnekaise massif in northern Sweden, has a long history of glaciological research. Early photo documentations date back to the late 19th century. Measurements of front position variations and distributed mass balance have been carried out since 1910 and 1945/46, respectively. In addition to these in-situ measurements, aerial photographs have been taken at decadal intervals since the beginning of the mass balance monitoring program and were used to produce topographic glacier maps. Inaccuracies in the maps were a challenge to early attempts to derive glacier volume changes and resulted in major differences when compared to the direct glaciological mass balances. In this study, we reanalyzed dia-positives of the original aerial photographs of 1959, -69, -80, -90 and -99 based on consistent photogrammetric processing. From the resulting digital elevation models and orthophotos, changes in length, area, and volume of Storglaciären were computed between the survey years, including an assessment of related errors. Between 1959 and 1999, Storglaciären lost an ice volume of 19×106 m3, which corresponds to a cumulative ice thickness loss of 5.69 m and a mean annual loss of 0.14 m. This ice loss resulted largely from a strong volume loss during the period 1959-80 and was partly compensated during the period 1980-99. As a consequence, the glacier shows a strong retreat in the 1960s, a slowing in the 1970s, and pseudo-stationary conditions in the 1980s and 1990s.

  11. Determination of length, area, and volume changes at Storglaciären, Sweden, from multi-temporal aerial images (1959-1999)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koblet, T.; Gärtner-Roer, I.; Zemp, M.; Jansson, P.; Thee, P.; Haeberli, W.; Homlund, P.

    2010-03-01

    Storglaciären, located in the Kebnekaise massif in northern Sweden, has a long history of glaciological research. Early photo documentations date back to the late 19th century. Measurements of front position variations and distributed mass balance have been carried out since 1910 and 1945/46, respectively. In addition to these in-situ measurements, aerial photographs have been taken at decadal intervals since the beginning of the mass balance monitoring program and were used to produce glaciological maps. Inaccuracies in the maps were a challenge to early attempts to derive glacier volume changes and resulted in major differences when compared to the direct glaciological mass balances. In this study, we reanalyzed dia-positives of the original aerial photographs of 1959, -69, -80, -90 and -99 based on consistent photogrammetric processing. From the resulting digital elevation models and orthophotos, changes in length, area, and volume of Storglaciären are computed between the survey years, including an assessment of related errors. Between 1959 and 1999, Storglaciären lost an ice volume of 19×106 m3, which corresponds to a cumulative ice thickness loss of 5.69 m and a mean annual loss of 0.14 m. This ice loss resulted largely from a strong volume loss during the period 1959-1980 and was partly compensated during the period 1980-1999. As a consequence, the glacier shows a strong retreat in the 1960s, a slowing in the 1970s, and pseudo-stationary conditions in the 1980s and 1990s.

  12. Reanalysis of multi-temporal aerial images of Storglaciären, Sweden (1959–99 – Part 1: Determination of length, area, and volume changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Haeberli

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Storglaciären, located in the Kebnekaise massif in northern Sweden, has a long history of glaciological research. Early photo documentations date back to the late 19th century. Measurements of front position variations and distributed mass balance have been carried out since 1910 and 1945/46, respectively. In addition to these in-situ measurements, aerial photographs have been taken at decadal intervals since the beginning of the mass balance monitoring program and were used to produce topographic glacier maps. Inaccuracies in the maps were a challenge to early attempts to derive glacier volume changes and resulted in major differences when compared to the direct glaciological mass balances. In this study, we reanalyzed dia-positives of the original aerial photographs of 1959, -69, -80, -90 and -99 based on consistent photogrammetric processing. From the resulting digital elevation models and orthophotos, changes in length, area, and volume of Storglaciären were computed between the survey years, including an assessment of related errors. Between 1959 and 1999, Storglaciären lost an ice volume of 19×106 m3, which corresponds to a cumulative ice thickness loss of 5.69 m and a mean annual loss of 0.14 m. This ice loss resulted largely from a strong volume loss during the period 1959–80 and was partly compensated during the period 1980–99. As a consequence, the glacier shows a strong retreat in the 1960s, a slowing in the 1970s, and pseudo-stationary conditions in the 1980s and 1990s.

  13. Altered sexually dimorphic nucleus of the preoptic area (SDN-POA) volume in adult Long-Evans rats by dietary soy phytoestrogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, T D; Rhees, R W; Setchell, K D; Lephart, E D

    2001-09-28

    Naturally occurring estrogen-like molecules in plants (phytoestrogens), present via soy, in animal diets can alter morphology and physiology in rodents. Phytoestrogens have the ability to bind estrogen receptors and exert many of the biological responses evoked by physiological estrogens. This study characterized the effects of dietary phytoestrogens on the expression of body and prostate weight, circulating testosterone and estradiol levels, puberty onset, vaginal cyclicity, and volume of the sexually dimorphic nucleus of the preoptic area (SDN-POA) in Long-Evans rats. Using different experimental protocols, animals were fed either a phytoestrogen-rich (Phyto-600) or a phytoestrogen-free (Phyto-free) diet. Animals fed the Phyto-600 diet displayed significantly decreased body weights (in males and females), prostate weights and delayed puberty in females compared to that of animals fed the Phyto-free diet. Circulating testosterone or estradiol levels in males or estrous cyclicity were not altered by the diets. The volume of the SDN-POA was significantly altered by a change in diet at 80 days of age where one-half of the males or females fed the Phyto-600 diet (from birth) were switched to the Phyto-free diet until 120 days of age. Males initially fed a Phyto-600 diet but changed to a Phyto-free diet had significantly smaller SDN-POA volumes compared to males fed the Phyto-600 diet (long-term). These data suggest that consumption of phytoestrogens via a soy diet, significantly: (1) decreases body and prostate weight, (2) delays puberty onset, and (3) alters SDN-POA volumes during adulthood.

  14. F-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility groundwater monitoring report, Third and fourth quarters 1995: Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    Groundwater at the F-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) is monitored in compliance with applicable regulations. Monitoring results are compared to the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) Groundwater Protection Standard (GWPS). Historically and currently, gross alpha, nitrates, nonvolatile beta, and tritium are among the primary constituents to exceed standards. Numerous other radionuclides and hazardous constituents also exceed the GWPS in the groundwater during the second half of 1995, notably cadmium, lead, radium-226, radium-228, strontium-90, and total alpha-emitting radium. The elevated constituents were found primarily in the water table (aquifer zone IIB{sub 2}), however, several other aquifer unit monitoring wells contained elevated levels of constituents. Water-level maps indicate that the groundwater flow rates and directions at the F-Area HWMF have remained relatively constant since the basins ceased to be active in 1988.

  15. Site investigation report for Waste Area Grouping 4 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Volume 1, Text: Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 4 is one of 17 WAGs within and associated with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). WAG 4 is located south of the main facility along Lagoon Road. WAG 4 consists of three separate areas: Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 4, a shallow-land-burial ground containing radioactive and potentially hazardous wastes; an experimental Pilot Pit Area, which includes a pilot-scale testing pit; and sections of two abandoned underground pipelines used for transporting liquid, low-level, radioactive waste. SWSA 4 is the largest site at WAG 4, covering approximately 23 acres. In the 1950s, SWSA 4 received a variety of low- and high-activity wastes, including transuranic wastes, all buried in trenches and auger holes. Recent surface water data, collected during monitoring of the tributary to White Oak Creek as part of WAG 2 investigations as well as during previous studies conducted at WAG 4, indicate that a significant amount of {sup 90}Sr is being released from the old burial trenches in SWSA 4. This release represents a significant portion of the ORNL off-site risk (DOE 1993). With recent corrective measures the proportion of the release has increased in 1995. A detailed discussion of the site history and previous investigations is presented in the WAG 4 Preliminary Assessment Report, ORNL/ER-271 (Energy Systems 1994b). In an effort to control the sources of the {sup 90}Sr release and to reduce the off-site risk, a site investigation was initiated to pinpoint those trenches that are the most prominent {sup 90}Sr sources.

  16. Environmental Inventory Report. East St. Louis and Vicinity, Cahokia Canal Drainage Area, Madison and St. Clair Counties, Illinois. Volume 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-05-01

    1890’s. In terms of total poundage they are probably the most important fish in the area. Although not highly regarded as a sport fish they are an...normal black bullheads. This is the only report of albinism in this species. Channel catfish is a wide ranging species often cultivated as food fish...They are a desirable sport fish for many anglers though they lack the promotional glamour associated with largemouth bass. They were present, as

  17. Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects Electric Power Marketing. Draft environmental impact statement: Volume 4, Appendixes B-D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-01

    The Salt Lake City Area Office of the Western Area Power Administration (Western) markets electricity produced at hydroelectric facilities operated by the Bureau of Reclamation. The facilities are known collectively as the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects (SLCA/IP) and include dams equipped for power generation on the Green, Gunnison, Rio Grande, and Colorado rivers and on Deer and Plateau creeks in the states of Wyoming, Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico. Of these facilities, only the Glen Canyon Unit, the Flaming Gorge Unit, and the Aspinall Unit (which includes Blue Mesa, Morrow Point, and Crystal dams;) are influenced by Western power scheduling and transmission decisions. The EIS alternatives, called commitment-level alternatives, reflect combinations of capacity and energy that would feasibly and reasonably fulfill Westerns firm power marketing responsibilities, needs, and statutory obligations. The viability of these alternatives relates directly to the combination of generation capability of the SLCA/IP with energy purchases and interchange. The economic and natural resource assessments in this environmental impact statement (EIS) include an analysis of commitment-level alternatives. Impacts of the no-action alternative are also assessed. Supply options, which include combinations of electrical power purchases and hydropower operational scenarios reflecting different operations of the dams, are also assessed. The EIS evaluates the impacts of these scenarios relative to socioeconomics, air resources, water resources, ecological resources, cultural resources, land use, recreation, and visual resources.

  18. Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects Electric Power Marketing. Draft environmental impact statement: Volume 3, Appendix A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-01

    The Salt Lake City Area Office of the Western Area Power Administration (Western) markets electricity produced at hydroelectric facilities operated by the Bureau of Reclamation. The facilities are known collectively as the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects (SLCA/IP) and include dams equipped for power generation on the Green, Gunnison, Rio Grande, and Colorado rivers and on Deer and Plateau creeks in the states of Wyoming, Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico. Of these facilities, only the Glen Canyon Unit, the Flaming Gorge Unit, and the Aspinall Unit (which includes Blue Mesa, Morrow Point, and Crystal dams;) are influenced by Western power scheduling and transmission decisions. The EIS alternatives, called commitment-level alternatives, reflect combinations of capacity and energy that would feasibly and reasonably fulfill Westerns firm power marketing responsibilities, needs, and statutory obligations. The viability of these alternatives relates directly to the combination of generation capability of the SLCA/IP with energy purchases and interchange. The economic and natural resource assessments in this environmental impact statement (EIS) include an analysis of commitment-level alternatives. Impacts of the no-action alternative are also assessed. Supply options, which include combinations of electrical power purchases and hydropower operational scenarios reflecting different operations of the dams, are also assessed. The EIS evaluates the impacts of these scenarios relative to socioeconomics, air resources, water resources, ecological resources, cultural resources, land use, recreation, and visual resources.

  19. Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects Electric Power Marketing. Draft environmental impact statement: Volume 2, Sections 1-16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-01

    The Salt Lake City Area Office of the Western Area Power Administration (Western) markets electricity produced at hydroelectric facilities operated by the Bureau of Reclamation. The facilities are known collectively as the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects (SLCA/IP) and include dams equipped for power generation on the Green, Gunnison, Rio Grande, and Colorado rivers and on Deer and Plateau creeks in the states of Wyoming, Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico. Of these facilities, only the Glen Canyon Unit, the Flaming Gorge Unit, and the Aspinall Unit (which includes Blue Mesa, Morrow Point, and Crystal dams;) are influenced by Western power scheduling and transmission decisions. The EIS alternatives, called commitment-level alternatives, reflect combinations of capacity and energy that would feasibly and reasonably fulfill Westerns firm power marketing responsibilities, needs, and statutory obligations. The viability of these alternatives relates directly to the combination of generation capability of the SLCA/IP with energy purchases and interchange. The economic and natural resource assessments in this environmental impact statement (EIS) include an analysis of commitment-level alternatives. Impacts of the no-action alternative are also assessed. Supply options, which include combinations of electrical power purchases and hydropower operational scenarios reflecting different operations of the dams, are also assessed. The EIS evaluates the impacts of these scenarios relative to socioeconomics, air resources, water resources, ecological resources, cultural resources, land use, recreation, and visual resources.

  20. Assessment of dry-stone terrace wall degradation with a 3D approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djuma, Hakan; Camera, Corrado; Faka, Marina; Bruggeman, Adriana; Hermon, Sorin

    2016-04-01

    In the Mediterranean basin, terracing is a common element of agricultural lands. Terraces retained by dry-stone walls are used to conserve arable soil, delay erosion processes and retain rainfall runoff. Currently, agricultural land abandonment is widespread in the Mediterranean region leading to terrace wall failure due to lack of maintenance and consequently an increase in soil erosion. The objective of this study is to test the applicability of digital 3D documentation on mountainous agricultural areas for assessing changes in terrace wall geometry, including terrace wall failures and associated soil erosion. The study area is located at 800-1100 m above sea level, in the Ophiolite complex of the Troodos Mountains in Cyprus. Average annual precipitation is 750 mm. Two sites with dry-stone terraces were selected for this study. The first site had a sequence of three terrace walls that were surveyed. The uppermost terrace wall was collapsed at several locations; the middle at few locations; and the lowest was still intact. Three fieldwork campaigns were conducted at this site: during the dry season (initial conditions), the middle and end of the wet season. The second site had one terrace wall that was almost completely collapsed. This terrace was restored during a communal terrace rehabilitation event. Two fieldwork campaigns were conducted for this terrace: before and after the terrace wall restoration. Terrace walls were documented with a set of digital images, and transformed into a 3D point cloud (using web-based services and commercial software - Autodesk 123D catch and Menci Software uMap, respectively). A set of points, registered with the total station and geo-referenced with a GPS, enabled the scaling of the 3D model and aligning the terrace walls within the same reference system. The density (distance between each point) of the reconstructed point clouds is 0.005 m by Umap and 0.025 m by 123D Catch. On the first site, the model analysis identified wall

  1. Assessment of area, volume and ELA of glacial systems in Northeast Russia from satellite images in the beginning of XXI century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. D. Ananicheva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper compares remotely sensed glacier inventories of the Byrranga, Suntar-Khayata, and Chersky ranges (2003, Koryak Highland and Chukotka mountains (2008 with data from the Inventory of Glaciers of the USSR (1945–1985. We studied changes in glacier area since the Inventory, which was primarily based on aerial photos and field research. The glaciers have been classified by orientation (aspect and morphological type. Overall the glacierization of the Chersky Range (1970–2003, Suntar-Khayata (1945–2003, Byrranga (1967–2003, Koryak Highland (1950–2003 and Meynypilginsky Range (1984–2008 reduced by about 30, 20, 15, 60 (debatable value and 25% respectively due to summer temperature rise. Calculation of glacier volumes for the dates indicated in the USSR Glacier Inventory and satellite imagery: during this period in sum for 5 studied glacier regions the area, covered by ice, has decreased by 225.2 km², and ice volume – by 8.7 Gtg. Construction of spatial patterns (maps of current ELA for 3 different by climate mountain regions – the Suntar-Khayata Mountains– Chersky Range, and Meynypilgynsky Range ( North Far East, showed that despite of retreat of the glaciers, the mean ELA change for the first studied region is not large compared with the data from the Glacier Inventory (100 m , and significant for the second (100–150 m.

  2. Research on wall shear stress considering wall roughness when shear swirling flow vibration cementing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Zhihua; Ai, Chi; Feng, Fuping

    2017-01-01

    When shear swirling flow vibration cementing, the casing is revolving periodically and eccentrically, which leads to the annulus fluid in turbulent swirling flow state. The wall shear stress is more than that in laminar flow field when conventional cementing. The paper mainly studied the wall shear stress distribution on the borehole wall when shear swirling flow vibration cementing based on the finite volume method. At the same time, the wall roughness affected and changed the turbulent flow near the borehole wall and the wall shear stress. Based on the wall function method, the paper established boundary conditions considering the wall roughness and derived the formula of the wall shear stress. The results showed that the wall roughness significantly increases the wall shear stress. However, the larger the wall roughness, the greater the thickness of mud cake, which weakening the cementing strength. Considering the effects in a comprehensive way, it is discovered that the particle size of solid phase in drilling fluid is about 0.1 mm to get better cementing quality.

  3. Area and volume loss of the glaciers in the Ortles-Cevedale group (Eastern Italian Alps: controls and imbalance of the remaining glaciers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Carturan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A widespread loss of glacier area and volume has been observed in the European Alps since the 1980s. In addition to differences among various regions of the Alps, different responses to climate change characterize neighboring glaciers within the same region. In this study we describe the glacier changes in the Ortles-Cevedale group, the largest glacierized area in the Italian Alps. We analyze the spatial variability, the drivers, and the main factors controlling the current loss of ice in this region, by comparing mean elevation changes derived from two digital terrain models (DTMs, along with glacier extents and snow-covered areas derived from Landsat images acquired in 1987 and 2009, to various topographic factors. Glacier outlines were obtained using the band ratio method with manual corrections. Snow was classified from a near-infrared image after topographic correction. The total glacierized area shrank by 23.4 ± 3% in this period, with no significant changes in the mean altitude of the glaciers. In 2009 the snowline was 240 m higher than in the 1960s and 1970s. From the snow-covered area at the end of summer 2009, which fairly represents the extent and local variability of the accumulation areas in the 2000s, we estimate that approximately 50% of the remaining glacier surfaces have to melt away to re-establish balanced mass budgets with present climatic conditions. The average geodetic mass budget rate, calculated for 112 ice bodies by differencing two DTMs, ranged from −0.18 ± 0.04 to −1.43 ± 0.09 m w.e. a−1, averaging −0.69 ± 0.12 m w.e. a−1. The correlation analysis of mass budgets vs. topographic variables emphasized the important role of hypsometry in controlling the area and volume loss of larger glaciers, whereas a higher variability characterizes smaller glaciers, which is likely due to the higher importance of local topo-climatic conditions.

  4. Summary of marine mammal and seabird surveys of the Southern California Bight area, 1975-1978. Volume III - investigators' reports. Part III. Seabirds - book II. Reproductive ecology and foraging habits of breeding seabirds. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, G.L. Jr.; Pitman, R.L.; Naughton, M.; Winnett, K.; Newman, A.

    1981-04-01

    This volume contains the findings of a three year study of the breeding seabirds of the Southern California Bight (SCB) area. The distribution, abundance, reproductive ecology, foods and foraging distribution of seabirds breeding in the SCB are discussed.

  5. Summary of marine mammal and seabird surveys of the Southern California Bight area, 1975-1978. Volume III - investigators' reports. Part II - cetacea of the Southern California Bight. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dohl, T.P.; Norris, K.S.; Guess, R.C.; Bryant, J.D.; Honig, M.W.

    1981-04-01

    This volume contains the findings of a three year study of the cetacea of the Southern California Bight (SCB) area. The distribution, abundance, movements, seasonality and reproductive status of cetacea of the SCB are discussed.

  6. Draft Environmental Impact Statement. MX Deployment Area Selection and Land Withdrawal/Acquisition DEIS. Volume II. Comparative Analysis of Alternatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-12-01

    vnat od de p (oymoni area. 4-0 1 9130 94W 176 1 73 56 63 101A - 6EUREKA WHIE PIE 5(4 777 soN LYO 12 2 14 5 124. IIO lo 0 13 UTAH W~rTE PW 6’ UA II INoy...a northwest-southeast direction transversing Chavez and DeBaca counties within the Texas/New Mexico region. Arco plans to build a pipeline to...Proposed Action. The Beryl OB occupies parts of four allotments (Tilly Creek, Bennion Spring, Del Vecchio, and Mule Spring). Losses from direct

  7. F-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility Semiannual Corrective Action Report, First and Second Quarter 1998, Volume I and II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chase, J.

    1998-10-30

    This report addresses groundwater quality and monitoring data during first and second quarter 1998 for the F-Area Hazardous Waste management Facility (HWMF). The report fulfills the semiannual reporting requirements of Module III, Section D, of the 1995 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Renewal Permit (South Carolina Hazardous and Mixed Waste Permit SC1-890-008-989), effective October 5, 1995 (hereafter referred to as the RCRA permit), and Section C of the Underground Injection Control Permit Application hereafter referred to as the Section C of the Underground Injection Control Permit Application (hereafter referred to as the UIC permit). The HWMF is described in the Introduction to Module III, Section C, of the RCRA permit.

  8. Remedial investigation report on Waste Area Grouping 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1: Technical summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    A remedial investigation (RI) was performed to support environmental restoration activities for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 5 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The WAG 5 RI made use of the observational approach, which concentrates on collecting only information needed to assess site risks and support future cleanup work. This information was interpreted and is presented using the framework of the site conceptual model, which relates contaminant sources and release mechanisms to migration pathways and exposure points that are keyed to current and future environmental risks for both human and ecological receptors. The site conceptual model forms the basis of the WAG 5 remedial action strategy and remedial action objectives. The RI provided the data necessary to verify this model and allows recommendations to be made to accomplish those objectives.

  9. Remedial investigation report on Waste Area Group 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1: Technical summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-03-01

    A remedial investigation (RI) was performed to support environmental restoration activities for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 5 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The WAG 5 RI made use of the observational approach, which concentrates on collecting only information needed to assess site risks and support future cleanup work. This information was interpreted and is presented using the framework of the site conceptual model, which relates contaminant sources and release mechanisms to migration pathways and exposure points that are keyed to current and future environmental risks for both human and ecological receptors. The site conceptual model forms the basis of the WAG 5 remedial action strategy and remedial action objectives. The RI provided the data necessary to verify this model and allows recommendations to be made to accomplish those objectives.

  10. Immersion Refractometry of Isolated Bacterial Cell Walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquis, Robert E.

    1973-01-01

    Immersion-refractometric and light-scattering measurements were adapted to determinations of average refractive indices and physical compactness of isolated bacterial cell walls. The structures were immersed in solutions containing various concentrations of polymer molecules that cannot penetrate into wall pores, and then an estimate was made of the polymer concentration or the refractive index of the polymer solution in which light scattering was reduced to zero. Because each wall preparation was heterogeneous, the refractive index of the medium for zero light scattering had to be estimated by extrapolation. Refractive indices for walls suspended in bovine serum albumin solutions ranged from 1.348 for walls of the rod form of Arthrobacter crystallopoietes to 1.382 for walls of the teichoic acid deficient, 52A5 strain of Staphylococcus aureus. These indices were used to calculate approximate values for solids content per milliliter, and the calculated values agreed closely with those estimated from a knowledge of dextran-impermeable volumes per gram, dry weight, of the walls. When large molecules such as dextrans or serum albumin were used for immersion refractometry, the refractive indices obtained were for entire walls, including both wall polymers and wall water. When smaller molecules that can penetrate wall pores to various extents were used with Micrococcus lysodeikticus walls, the average, apparent refractive index of the structures increased as the molecular size of probing molecules was decreased. It was possible to obtain an estimate of 1.45 to 1.46 for the refractive index of wall polymers, predominantly peptidoglycans in this case, by extrapolating the curve for refractive index versus molecular radius to a value of 0.2 nm, the approximate radius of a water molecule. This relatively low value for polymer refractive index was interpreted as evidence in favor of the amorphous, elastic model of peptidoglycan structure and against the crystalline, rigid

  11. The State of the GeoWall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, P. J.; Leigh, J.; van Keken, P.; Johnson, A.

    2003-12-01

    The GeoWall stereo projection technology has been widely adopted within Earth Science. Over 20,000 undergraduate students per year use a GeoWall in classroom and lab settings at over 80 institutions around the world using over 200 GeoWalls. We believe that critical mass for this technology has been reached in the Earth Science. Many collaborations have been initiated. With Iris, GeoWall is exploring new ways to monitor seismic networks in real-time and to visualize extremely large, whole Earth seismic simulations. We are also working with a number of drilling organizations including JOI, DOSECC and LacCore to bring modern visualization technology to core interpretation and drill site selection. Also, over 15 museums now have or are building GeoWalls for informal education. Much of the science that is being performed on the GeoWall is finding its way directly into the classroom and science museum. One of the success stories has been the GeoWall Consortium's interaction with industry. The basic hardware for the GeoWall has been spun off to companies that now sell variations of the hardware. In addition, many software companies including ESRI and Dynamic Graphics have added support for the GeoWall in their products. The future of GeoWall is four fold. Curriculum development will bring more material to all GeoWall users. Assessment of the curriculum and educational psychology will give us GeoWall best practices. In technology development, the GeoWall 2 is a 20+ million pixel, tiled display which brings more resolution to the Earth Sciences than ever. To support research the consortium is developing a volume rendering application to visualize extremely large datasets.

  12. Application of Explosion Area Control Volume in MELCOR Code for Safety Analysis of Hydrogen and Dust Explosion Accident in ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Soo Min; Moon, Sung Bo; Bang, In Cheol [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Nuclear fusion power is said to be one of the most promising energy sources to generate large amount of energy with less radioactive waste or less radiological hazard due to nuclear accidents. However, the nuclear fusion device still confronts the tritium management tasks because they hold considerable amount of tritium for fusion reaction. In so-called 'Hypothetical events,' the beyond the design basis accidents in nuclear fusion reactors, a radiological material release may occur. Therefore, safety analysis for hydrogen mitigation and management should be performed to demonstrate the ultimate safety margin of the design to evade from situations such as the Fukushima accident. For ITER facility, accident analysis report (AAR) demonstrates the analysis of selected postulated accident scenarios holding the most challenging in terms of expected radiological consequences including beyond design basis accidents. Hydrogen and dust explosion in the ITER vacuum vessel using explosion area was modeled with MELCOR code. The vacuum vessel confinement was ruptured making a penetration line between vacuum vessel and port/NBI cell. The overall pressure transient of the accident was similar with the ITER accident analysis report (AAR) results, however, amount of tungsten dust release into the environment was significantly different.

  13. The role of ground reference data collection in the prediction of stem volume with LiDAR data in mountain areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalponte, Michele; Martinez, Cristina; Rodeghiero, Mirco; Gianelle, Damiano

    2011-11-01

    Ground reference data collection represents an important element in the prediction of stem volume with LiDAR-derived variables, and at present it is the most expensive part of such analyses. In this paper two aspects of ground reference data collection were analyzed: (1) the positioning error of the ground plots; and (2) the optimal number of training plots. A system for the prediction of stem volume at area-based level was adopted. LiDAR data were preprocessed and 13 variables describing both height and coverage were extracted. Models were defined using a stepwise ordinary least square (OLS) regression. Three experiments were conducted: (i) the role of the plots positioning error on prediction accuracy; (ii) the influence of random downsampling of plot numbers on prediction accuracy; and (iii) the influence of a stratified downsampling of plot numbers on prediction accuracy based on LiDAR-derived variables. A dataset comprising 799 ground plots was used. They were distributed throughout a mountainous area in the Southern Alps, where the presence of a complex landscape increases the uncertainty of the Global Positioning System (GPS) accuracy, and where a large variety of tree forest species and climatic environments make it necessary to have a large number of sample plots for accurate characterization of the study area. All the experiments provided important indications for LiDAR based forest inventories: the GPS error did not significantly influence the prediction accuracy and it was possible to reduce the number of training samples without compromising the generalization ability of the prediction model. Leading on from these findings, a new ground sampling protocol based on genetic algorithms was proposed. The new protocol allowed us to obtain promising results for the considered dataset: using only 53 training plots, instead of 534 in the original dataset, we obtained the same results for the validation set. These results, obtained in a complex mountainous area

  14. Cell Wall Remodeling Enzymes Modulate Fungal Cell Wall Elasticity and Osmotic Stress Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ene, Iuliana V; Walker, Louise A; Schiavone, Marion; Lee, Keunsook K; Martin-Yken, Hélène; Dague, Etienne; Gow, Neil A R; Munro, Carol A; Brown, Alistair J P

    2015-07-28

    The fungal cell wall confers cell morphology and protection against environmental insults. For fungal pathogens, the cell wall is a key immunological modulator and an ideal therapeutic target. Yeast cell walls possess an inner matrix of interlinked β-glucan and chitin that is thought to provide tensile strength and rigidity. Yeast cells remodel their walls over time in response to environmental change, a process controlled by evolutionarily conserved stress (Hog1) and cell integrity (Mkc1, Cek1) signaling pathways. These mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways modulate cell wall gene expression, leading to the construction of a new, modified cell wall. We show that the cell wall is not rigid but elastic, displaying rapid structural realignments that impact survival following osmotic shock. Lactate-grown Candida albicans cells are more resistant to hyperosmotic shock than glucose-grown cells. We show that this elevated resistance is not dependent on Hog1 or Mkc1 signaling and that most cell death occurs within 10 min of osmotic shock. Sudden decreases in cell volume drive rapid increases in cell wall thickness. The elevated stress resistance of lactate-grown cells correlates with reduced cell wall elasticity, reflected in slower changes in cell volume following hyperosmotic shock. The cell wall elasticity of lactate-grown cells is increased by a triple mutation that inactivates the Crh family of cell wall cross-linking enzymes, leading to increased sensitivity to hyperosmotic shock. Overexpressing Crh family members in glucose-grown cells reduces cell wall elasticity, providing partial protection against hyperosmotic shock. These changes correlate with structural realignment of the cell wall and with the ability of cells to withstand osmotic shock. The C. albicans cell wall is the first line of defense against external insults, the site of immune recognition by the host, and an attractive target for antifungal therapy. Its tensile strength is conferred by

  15. Is Neighborhood Green Space Protective against Associations between Child Asthma, Neighborhood Traffic Volume and Perceived Lack of Area Safety? Multilevel Analysis of 4447 Australian Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqi Feng

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Heavy traffic is a source of air pollution and a safety concern with important public health implications. We investigated whether green space lowers child asthma risk by buffering the effects of heavy traffic and a lack of neighborhood safety. Multilevel models were used to analyze affirmative asthma cases in nationally representative cross-sectional data from 4447 children aged 6–7 years old in Australia. Case-finding was based upon a triangulation of affirmative responses to three questions on doctor-diagnosed asthma, asthma-related medications and illness with wheezing lasting for at least 1 week within the 12 months prior. Among children considered to be exposed to high traffic volumes and areas with 0 to 20% green space quantity, the odds ratio of affirmative asthma was 1.87 (95% CI 1.37 to 2.55. However, the association between heavy traffic and asthma was significantly lower for participants living in areas with over 40% green space coverage (odds ratio for interaction 0.32, 95% CI 0.12 to 0.84. No association between affirmative asthma and green space coverage was observed for participants not exposed to heavy traffic, nor for the area safety variable. Protecting existing and investing in new green space may help to promote child respiratory health through the buffering of traffic-related air pollution.

  16. Is Neighborhood Green Space Protective against Associations between Child Asthma, Neighborhood Traffic Volume and Perceived Lack of Area Safety? Multilevel Analysis of 4447 Australian Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiaoqi; Astell-Burt, Thomas

    2017-05-19

    Heavy traffic is a source of air pollution and a safety concern with important public health implications. We investigated whether green space lowers child asthma risk by buffering the effects of heavy traffic and a lack of neighborhood safety. Multilevel models were used to analyze affirmative asthma cases in nationally representative cross-sectional data from 4447 children aged 6-7 years old in Australia. Case-finding was based upon a triangulation of affirmative responses to three questions on doctor-diagnosed asthma, asthma-related medications and illness with wheezing lasting for at least 1 week within the 12 months prior. Among children considered to be exposed to high traffic volumes and areas with 0 to 20% green space quantity, the odds ratio of affirmative asthma was 1.87 (95% CI 1.37 to 2.55). However, the association between heavy traffic and asthma was significantly lower for participants living in areas with over 40% green space coverage (odds ratio for interaction 0.32, 95% CI 0.12 to 0.84). No association between affirmative asthma and green space coverage was observed for participants not exposed to heavy traffic, nor for the area safety variable. Protecting existing and investing in new green space may help to promote child respiratory health through the buffering of traffic-related air pollution.

  17. 1984-1995 Evolution of Stratospheric Aerosol Size, Surface Area, and Volume Derived by Combining SAGE II and CLAES Extinction Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Philip B.; Bauman, Jill J.

    2000-01-01

    This SAGE II Science Team task focuses on the development of a multi-wavelength, multi- sensor Look-Up-Table (LUT) algorithm for retrieving information about stratospheric aerosols from global satellite-based observations of particulate extinction. The LUT algorithm combines the 4-wavelength SAGE II extinction measurements (0.385 extinction measurements from the Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer (CLAES) instrument, thus increasing the information content available from either sensor alone. The algorithm uses the SAGE II/CLAES composite spectra in month-latitude-altitude bins to retrieve values and uncertainties of particle effective radius R(sub eff), surface area S, volume V and size distribution width sigma(sub g).

  18. Single-well and inter-well dual-tracer test design for quantifying phase volumes and interface areas in subsurface flow and transport systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghergut, I.; Behrens, H.; Licha, T.; Maier, F.; Nottebohm, M.; Schaffer, M.; Sauter, M.

    2012-04-01

    Technology-relevant georeservoirs in the realm of energy production (such as: spent-radionuclide repositories, gas-storage, geothermal, as well as CCS candidate reservoirs) contain mobile and immobile fluid regions, and often also different fluid and solid phases. The lifetime of a particular reservoir (from a hydraulic, thermal, geomechanical and/or hydrogeochemical point of view) depends on the volumes and/or interface areas of some of these regions and/or phases. Mostly, their lifetime-effective values cannot be measured by geophysical and hydraulic methods. Since they essentially relate to fluid-based transport processes, attempting to measure them by tracer tests is a sensible endeavour. However, in designing and dimensioning such tracer tests, one should keep in mind that not every tracer test is sensitive w. r. to every fluid transport parameter. A certain complementarity exists, w. r. to parameter sensitivity, between single-well and inter-well methods, between equilibrium and kinetic exchange processes, between volume and area parameters. Mobile-fluid volumes can be measured from inter-well conservative-tracer tests, whereas single-well push-pull tests are generally insensitive w. r. to mobile-fluid volumes. Immobile-fluid volumes, in single-phase systems, are rather difficult to measure, by either kind of test. Different-phase volumes can be determined from inter-well tests using partitioning tracers at equilibrium exchange between phases; whereas single-well tracer push-pull tests are rather insensitive w. r. to tracer exchange processes at equilibrium. Im-/mobile fluid, or inter-phase interface areas can be determined from single-well tracer push-pull tests relying on kinetic exchange processes between compartments or phases. Single-well tests are often believed to be more sensitive w. r. to such processes than w. r. to advective-dispersive processes, and than inter-well tests. Inter-well tests are not physically insensitive w. r. to kinetic exchange

  19. Domain walls riding the wave.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karapetrov, G.; Novosad, V.; Materials Science Division

    2010-11-01

    Recent years have witnessed a rapid proliferation of electronic gadgets around the world. These devices are used for both communication and entertainment, and it is a fact that they account for a growing portion of household energy consumption and overall world consumption of electricity. Increasing the energy efficiency of these devices could have a far greater and immediate impact than a gradual switch to renewable energy sources. The advances in the area of spintronics are therefore very important, as gadgets are mostly comprised of memory and logic elements. Recent developments in controlled manipulation of magnetic domains in ferromagnet nanostructures have opened opportunities for novel device architectures. This new class of memories and logic gates could soon power millions of consumer electronic devices. The attractiveness of using domain-wall motion in electronics is due to its inherent reliability (no mechanical moving parts), scalability (3D scalable architectures such as in racetrack memory), and nonvolatility (retains information in the absence of power). The remaining obstacles in widespread use of 'racetrack-type' elements are the speed and the energy dissipation during the manipulation of domain walls. In their recent contribution to Physical Review Letters, Oleg Tretiakov, Yang Liu, and Artem Abanov from Texas A&M University in College Station, provide a theoretical description of domain-wall motion in nanoscale ferromagnets due to the spin-polarized currents. They find exact conditions for time-dependent resonant domain-wall movement, which could speed up the motion of domain walls while minimizing Ohmic losses. Movement of domain walls in ferromagnetic nanowires can be achieved by application of external magnetic fields or by passing a spin-polarized current through the nanowire itself. On the other hand, the readout of the domain state is done by measuring the resistance of the wire. Therefore, passing current through the

  20. Features Analysis of Dry Stone Walls of Tuscany (Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Agnoletti

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Terraced systems currently represent an indubitable added value for Tuscany, as well as for other Italian regions and for several Mediterranean countries. This value goes beyond their original function of hosting new areas for cultivation. The hydrological functions performed by these systems, including control of erosion, stabilisation of the slopes, prolongation of runoff times and the possible reduction of the volumes of surface runoff, are well-known. In addition, they also play a strategic role in the conservation of biodiversity and in maintaining local identity. At a national level, the terraced agricultural systems fall within the scope of actions scheduled in the National Strategic Plan for Rural Development 2007–2013, and the standards of Good Agricultural and Environmental Conditions (GAECs envisages that they be maintained through the granting of economic aid as laid down in the Rural Development Plans 2007–2013 and 2014–2020. Eighteen sample areas, previously selected on the basis of the terracing intensity index (defined as the ratio between the lines representing the walls and the surface of 1 ha, were subjected for on-site surveys to determine the geo-typological features through the identification and measurement of the main technical-construction parameters of the dry stone walls. This analysis also enabled assessments of the overall state of conservation of the dry stone walls in order to suggest operations for safeguarding and protection.

  1. Wall compliance and violin cavity modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissinger, George

    2003-03-01

    Violin corpus wall compliance, which has a substantial effect on cavity mode frequencies, was added to Shaw's two-degree-of-freedom (2DOF) network model for A0 ("main air") and A1 (lowest length mode included in "main wood") cavity modes. The 2DOF model predicts a V(-0.25) volume dependence for A0 for rigid violin-shaped cavities, to which a semiempirical compliance correction term, V(-x(c)) (optimization parameter x(c)) consistent with cavity acoustical compliance and violin-based scaling was added. Optimizing x(c) over A0 and A1 frequencies measured for a Hutchins-Schelleng violin octet yielded x(c) approximately 0.08. This markedly improved A0 and A1 frequency predictions to within approximately +/- 10% of experiment over a range of about 4.5:1 in length, 10:1 in f-hole area, 3:1 in top plate thickness, and 128:1 in volume. Compliance is a plausible explanation for A1 falling close to the "main wood" resonance, not increasingly higher for the larger instruments, which were scaled successively shorter compared to the violin for ergonomic and practical reasons. Similarly incorporating compliance for A2 and A4 (lowest lower-/upper-bout modes, respectively) improves frequency predictions within +/-20% over the octet.

  2. Inhibition of cell wall synthesis--is this the mechanism of action of penicillins?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghooi, R B; Thatte, S M

    1995-02-01

    Penicillins have been shown to inhibit bacterial cell wall synthesis, and interact with penicillin binding proteins, leading to bacterial lysis. These two mechanisms, the former more than the latter are believed to be responsible for their therapeutic potential. It has further been demonstrated that only actively multiplying cells are susceptible to bactericidal effects of the antibiotic, which is in accordance with the suggested mechanism of action. Bacterial growth takes place in terms of size and number, both requiring additional cell wall. An increase in bacterial size is due to an increase in the volume of cytosol and area of the cell wall. Presently there is no proof that the former is the cause of the latter or vice versa. Penicillin by inhibiting cell wall synthesis would inhibit both growth and multiplication. Since the antibiotic is bactericidal to rapidly multiplying cells, its effect on cell wall would interfere with its bactericidal action. As per the present understanding penicillin acts principally by inhibiting cell wall synthesis. There is however a discrepancy between its observed effects and what should logically be expected, which forces us to reexamine the mechanism of action of penicillin. We believe that the present understanding of the action of penicillin is incomplete if not outright faulty. It would be expedient to radically modify the same in view of its implication, for example on drug development.

  3. Effect of Yeast Cell Morphology, Cell Wall Physical Structure and Chemical Composition on Patulin Adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ying; Wang, Jianguo; Liu, Bin; Wang, Zhouli; Yuan, Yahong; Yue, Tianli

    2015-01-01

    The capability of yeast to adsorb patulin in fruit juice can aid in substantially reducing the patulin toxic effect on human health. This study aimed to investigate the capability of yeast cell morphology and cell wall internal structure and composition to adsorb patulin. To compare different yeast cell morphologies, cell wall internal structure and composition, scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope and ion chromatography were used. The results indicated that patulin adsorption capability of yeast was influenced by cell surface areas, volume, and cell wall thickness, as well as 1,3-β-glucan content. Among these factors, cell wall thickness and 1,3-β-glucan content serve significant functions. The investigation revealed that patulin adsorption capability was mainly affected by the three-dimensional network structure of the cell wall composed of 1,3-β-glucan. Finally, patulin adsorption in commercial kiwi fruit juice was investigated, and the results indicated that yeast cells could adsorb patulin from commercial kiwi fruit juice efficiently. This study can potentially simulate in vitro cell walls to enhance patulin adsorption capability and successfully apply to fruit juice industry.

  4. Effect of Yeast Cell Morphology, Cell Wall Physical Structure and Chemical Composition on Patulin Adsorption.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Luo

    Full Text Available The capability of yeast to adsorb patulin in fruit juice can aid in substantially reducing the patulin toxic effect on human health. This study aimed to investigate the capability of yeast cell morphology and cell wall internal structure and composition to adsorb patulin. To compare different yeast cell morphologies, cell wall internal structure and composition, scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope and ion chromatography were used. The results indicated that patulin adsorption capability of yeast was influenced by cell surface areas, volume, and cell wall thickness, as well as 1,3-β-glucan content. Among these factors, cell wall thickness and 1,3-β-glucan content serve significant functions. The investigation revealed that patulin adsorption capability was mainly affected by the three-dimensional network structure of the cell wall composed of 1,3-β-glucan. Finally, patulin adsorption in commercial kiwi fruit juice was investigated, and the results indicated that yeast cells could adsorb patulin from commercial kiwi fruit juice efficiently. This study can potentially simulate in vitro cell walls to enhance patulin adsorption capability and successfully apply to fruit juice industry.

  5. Large Area Mapping of Boreal Growing Stock Volume on an Annual and Multi-Temporal Level Using PALSAR L-Band Backscatter Mosaics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Wilhelm

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The forests of the Russian Taiga can be described as an enormous biomass and carbon reservoir. Therefore, they are of utmost importance for the global carbon cycle. Large-area forest inventories in these mostly remote regions are associated with logistical problems and high financial efforts. Remotely-sensed data from satellite platforms may have the capability to provide such huge amounts of information. This study presents an application-oriented approach to derive aboveground growing stock volume (GSV maps using the annual large-area L-band backscatter mosaics provided by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA. Furthermore, a multi-temporal map has been created to improve GSV estimation accuracy. Based on information from Russian forest inventory data, the maps were generated using the machine learning algorithm, RandomForest. The results showed the high potential of this method for an operational, large-scale and high-resolution biomass estimation over boreal forests. An RMSE from 55.2 to 63.3 m3/ha could be obtained for the annual maps. Using the multi-temporal approach, the error could be slightly reduced to 54.4 m3/ha.

  6. The glaciers of Sierra Segundera (Zamora, NW Spain) during their Maximum Ice Extent: area, volume, Glacial Equilibrium Line Altitude and paleo-climatic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    María Fernández, Jose; Ubeda, Jose; Palacios, David

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to reconstruct the Quaternary glaciers which formed the eastern sector of the Sierra Segundera ice-cap (NW Iberian Peninsula) during its Maximum Ice Extent (MIE) local phase (33 ka) in a surface area of 165 km2, to estimate the ice volumes and Equilibrium Line Altitudes (ELAs). The study area presents a wide altimetric range of approx. 1200 m, from the Tera glacier front to the Peña Trevinca (42°14'33'' N, 6°47'46'' W; 2127 m) and Peña Negra (42°14'58'' N, 6°47'39'' W; 2121 m) horns, covering a wide plateau at an altitude of over 1700 m. The reconstruction of the MIE paleoglaciers used a combination of various tools: a rheological numerical model which describes the ice flow, GIS and geomorphological field work to validate the results. The model used here allowed the reconstruction of the surface topography of the paleoglacial ice, even though there is no existing geomorphologic evidence to reveal the thickness of the ice at that time. The GIS enabled the creation of Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) and the estimation of thicknesses and volumes. The reconstructed topography and the delimitation of the geomorphologic features were used to estimate the ELA using the following methods: Area x Altitude Balance Ratio (AABR), Accumulation Area Ratio (AAR), Terminus Headwall Altitude Ratio (THAR) and Maximum Elevation of Lateral Moraines (MELM). The DEM reconstructed for the surface of the paleoglaciers obtained an estimated maximum ice thickness of over 450 m during the MIE, and a total ice volume of 2.63 x 10(10)m3 for the eastern half of the ice-cap. When estimating the paleo-ELAs, the AABR and AAR methods obtain more logical values. The AABR method obtains BR=1, which questions the BR=2 assumed as representative for medium latitude glaciers with oceanic influence; the paleo-ELA AABR was 1739 m. Applying the AAR method with the ratio 0.65 gives the result 1735 m. The THAR and MELM methods give values of 1637 m and 1651 m respectively for

  7. January 1998 Volume II 1996 Field Investigation Report Ecological Risk Assessment of the Marsh Area of the LCP Chemical Site in Brunswick, Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volume II contains the data tables and quality assurance review summaries cited in Volume I of the Ecological Risk Assessment for the Marsh (Estuarine) Operable Unit of the LCP Chemicals Site in Brunswick, Georgia.

  8. Turbulent channel flows over complex walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosti, Marco Edoardo; Brandt, Luca

    2017-11-01

    We perform numerical simulations of turbulent channel flows over porous walls and deformable hyper-elastic walls. The flow over porous walls is simulated using volume-averaged Navier ``Stokes equations within the porous layers, while the multiphase flow over deformable walls is solved with a one-continuum formulation which allows the use of a fully Eulerian formulation. New insights on the effect of these complex walls on the turbulent flows in terms of friction, statistics and flow structures are discussed using a number of post-processing techniques. The turbulent flow in the channel is affected by the porous and moving walls in a similar manner even at low values of porosity and elasticity due to the non-zero fluctuations of vertical velocity at the interface that influence the flow dynamics. The near-wall streaks and the associated quasi-streamwise vortices are strongly reduced near porous and deformable isotropic wall while the flow becomes more correlated in the spanwise direction. On the contrary, an opposite behavior is noticed in the case of anisotropic porous layers, with an increase of streamwise correlation due to a strengthening of the low- and high-speed streaks.

  9. Great Wall of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    This ASTER sub-image covers a 12 x 12 km area in northern Shanxi Province, China, and was acquired January 9, 2001. The low sun angle, and light snow cover highlight a section of the Great Wall, visible as a black line running diagonally through the image from lower left to upper right. The Great Wall is over 2000 years old and was built over a period of 1000 years. Stretching 4500 miles from Korea to the Gobi Desert it was first built to protect China from marauders from the north.This image is located at 40.2 degrees north latitude and 112.8 degrees east longitude.Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is the U.S. Science team leader; Moshe Pniel of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The primary goal of the ASTER mission is to obtain high-resolution image data in 14 channels over the entire land surface, as well as black and white stereo images. With revisit time of between 4 and 16 days, ASTER will provide the capability for repeat coverage of changing areas on Earth's surface.The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats, monitoring potentially active volcanoes, identifying crop stress, determining cloud morphology and physical properties, wetlands Evaluation, thermal pollution monitoring, coral reef degradation, surface temperature mapping of soils and geology, and measuring surface

  10. Charged Domain Walls

    OpenAIRE

    Campanelli, L.; Cea, P.; Fogli, G. L.; Tedesco, L.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we investigate Charged Domain Walls (CDW's), topological defects that acquire surface charge density $Q$ induced by fermion states localized on the walls. The presence of an electric and magnetic field on the walls is also discussed. We find a relation in which the value of the surface charge density $Q$ is connected with the existence of such topological defects.

  11. Human Foramen Magnum Area and Posterior Cranial Fossa Volume Growth in Relation to Cranial Base Synchondrosis Closure in the Course of Child Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coll, Guillaume; Lemaire, Jean-Jacques; Di Rocco, Federico; Barthélémy, Isabelle; Garcier, Jean-Marc; De Schlichting, Emmanuel; Sakka, Laurent

    2016-11-01

    To date, no study has compared the evolution of the foramen magnum area (FMA) and the posterior cranial fossa volume (PCFV) with the degree of cranial base synchondrosis ossification. To illustrate these features in healthy children. The FMA, the PCFV, and the ossification of 12 synchondroses according to the Madeline and Elster scale were retrospectively analyzed in 235 healthy children using millimeter slices on a computed tomography scan. The mean FMA of 6.49 cm in girls was significantly inferior to the FMA of 7.67 cm in boys (P < .001). In both sexes, the growth evolved in a 2-phase process, with a phase of rapid growth from birth to 3.75 years old (yo) followed by a phase of stabilization. In girls, the first phase was shorter (ending at 2.6 yo) than in boys (ending at 4.33 yo) and proceeded at a higher rate. PCFV was smaller in girls (P < .001) and displayed a biphasic pattern in the whole population, with a phase of rapid growth from birth to 3.58 yo followed by a phase of slow growth until 16 yo. In girls, the first phase was more active and shorter (ending at 2.67 yo) than in boys (ending at 4.5 yo). The posterior interoccipital synchondroses close first, followed by the anterior interoccipital and occipitomastoidal synchondroses, the lambdoid sutures simultaneously, then the petro-occipital and spheno-occipital synchondroses simultaneously. The data provide a chronology of synchondrosis closure. We showed that FMA and PCFV are constitutionally smaller in girls at birth (P ≤ .02) and suggest that a sex-related difference in the FMA is related to earlier closure of anterior interoccipital synchondroses in girls (P = .01). AIOS, anterior interoccipital synchondrosesFMA, foramen magnum areaLS, lambdoid suturesOMS, occipitomastoidal synchondrosesPCFV, posterior cranial fossa volumePIOS, posterior interoccipital synchondrosesPOS, petro-occipital synchondrosesSOS, spheno-occipital synchondrosisyo, years old.

  12. Water Walls for Life Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Michael T. (Inventor); Gormly, Sherwin J. (Inventor); Hammoudeh, Mona (Inventor); Richardson, Tra-My Justine (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A method and associated system for processing waste gases, liquids and solids, produced by human activity, to separate (i) liquids suitable for processing to produce potable water, (ii) solids and liquids suitable for construction of walls suitable for enclosing a habitat volume and for radiation shielding, and (iii) other fluids and solids that are not suitable for processing. A forward osmosis process and a reverse osmosis process are sequentially combined to reduce fouling and to permit accumulation of different processable substances. The invention may be used for long term life support of human activity.

  13. Ultrasonic deagglomeration of aluminum nanopowders with multi-walled carbon nanotube mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozulin, Alexander A., E-mail: kozulyn@ftf.tsu.ru; Vorozhtsov, Sergey A., E-mail: vorn1985@gmail.com; Kulkov, Sergey S.; Kulkov, Sergey N. [National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); Teipel, U. [Georg Simon Ohm University of Applied Sciences, Nuremberg (Germany)

    2015-10-27

    Comprehensive investigations of aluminum nanopowders, multi-walled carbon nanotubes, and aluminum mixtures with multi-walled carbon nanotubes subjected to ultrasonic deagglomeration in a liquid medium were performed, using microstructural, X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric, and calorimetric analyses, and specific surface area measurements. The regime of ultrasonic deagglomeration of aluminum nanopowders with multi-walled carbon nanotubes in a liquid medium is described, during which the division of large agglomerates and creation of homogeneous distribution of mixtures components in the volume takes place. It was determined that ultrasonic treatment influences the morphology and crystalline structure of investigated mixtures, contributes to the appearance of X-ray amorphous phase, decreases the specific surface area of the aluminum nanopowder from 13 to 12 m{sup 2}/g, and increases the pore volume and average size from 0.04 to 0.06 cm{sup 3}/g and from 12 to 19 nm, respectively. The size of coherently-diffracting domain was determined by the X-ray diffraction analysis is close to that estimated from the specific surface area and corresponds to average crystallites size in the materials under study.

  14. Comments on the article by A. J. Lecloux (J Nanopart Res (2015) 17:447) regarding the use of volume-specific surface area (VSSA) to classify nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibson, Neil, E-mail: neil.gibson@ec.europa.eu; Rauscher, Hubert [Joint Research Centre of the European Commission, Directorate for Health, Consumers and Reference Materials (Italy); Roebben, Gert [Joint Research Centre of the European Commission, Directorate for Health, Consumers and Reference Materials (Belgium)

    2016-08-15

    In November 2015, an article by A. J. Lecloux was published in this journal (J Nanopart Res, 17:447, 2015). The article focused on the use of volume-specific surface area (VSSA) for the implementation of the European Commission’s recommended definition of “nanomaterial”. In that paper, VSSA values were calculated for polydisperse particulate materials using a particle number-based averaging method which do not agree with earlier results of VSSA simulations of polydisperse materials reported in 2014 by the Joint Research Centre (JRC) of the European Commission (EC). In this contribution, we explain the difference between traditional view of VSSA which was used by the JRC and the proposed model of Lecloux. Through the use of some simple examples for polydisperse materials, it is demonstrated that the latter produces values which neither correspond to the generally accepted definition of VSSA nor relate to the commonly used experimental methods for determining VSSA using gas adsorption. Lecloux’s model therefore does not constitute a basis for practical implementation of the EC’s definition of nanomaterial using gas adsorption techniques.

  15. Effect of Exposed Surface Area, Volume and Environmental pH on the Calcium Ion Release of Three Commercially Available Tricalcium Silicate Based Dental Cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivaprakash Rajasekharan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Tricalcium silicate cements (TSC are used in dental traumatology and endodontics for their bioactivity which is mostly attributed to formation of calcium hydroxide during TSC hydration and its subsequent release of calcium and hydroxide ions. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of volume (Vol, exposed surface area (ESA and pH of surrounding medium on calcium ion release. Three commercially available hydraulic alkaline dental cements were mixed and condensed into cylindrical tubes of varying length and diameter (n = 6/group. For the effect of ESA and Vol, tubes were immersed in 10 mL of deionized water. To analyze the effect of environmental pH, the tubes were randomly immersed in 10 mL of buffer solutions with varying pH (10.4, 7.4 or 4.4. The solutions were collected and renewed at various time intervals. pH and/or calcium ion release was measured using a pH glass electrode and atomic absorption spectrophotometer respectively. The change of pH, short-term calcium ion release and rate at which calcium ion release reaches maximum were dependent on ESA (p < 0.05 while maximum calcium ion release was dependent on Vol of TSC (p < 0.05. Maximum calcium ion release was significantly higher in acidic solution followed by neutral and alkaline solution (p < 0.05.

  16. Comments on the article by A. J. Lecloux (J Nanopart Res (2015) 17:447) regarding the use of volume-specific surface area (VSSA) to classify nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Neil; Rauscher, Hubert; Roebben, Gert

    In November 2015, an article by A. J. Lecloux was published in this journal (J Nanopart Res, 17:447, 2015). The article focused on the use of volume-specific surface area (VSSA) for the implementation of the European Commission's recommended definition of "nanomaterial". In that paper, VSSA values were calculated for polydisperse particulate materials using a particle number-based averaging method which do not agree with earlier results of VSSA simulations of polydisperse materials reported in 2014 by the Joint Research Centre (JRC) of the European Commission (EC). In this contribution, we explain the difference between traditional view of VSSA which was used by the JRC and the proposed model of Lecloux. Through the use of some simple examples for polydisperse materials, it is demonstrated that the latter produces values which neither correspond to the generally accepted definition of VSSA nor relate to the commonly used experimental methods for determining VSSA using gas adsorption. Lecloux's model therefore does not constitute a basis for practical implementation of the EC's definition of nanomaterial using gas adsorption techniques.

  17. Effect of Exposed Surface Area, Volume and Environmental pH on the Calcium Ion Release of Three Commercially Available Tricalcium Silicate Based Dental Cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasekharan, Sivaprakash; Vercruysse, Chris; Martens, Luc; Verbeeck, Ronald

    2018-01-13

    Tricalcium silicate cements (TSC) are used in dental traumatology and endodontics for their bioactivity which is mostly attributed to formation of calcium hydroxide during TSC hydration and its subsequent release of calcium and hydroxide ions. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of volume (Vol), exposed surface area (ESA) and pH of surrounding medium on calcium ion release. Three commercially available hydraulic alkaline dental cements were mixed and condensed into cylindrical tubes of varying length and diameter ( n = 6/group). For the effect of ESA and Vol, tubes were immersed in 10 mL of deionized water. To analyze the effect of environmental pH, the tubes were randomly immersed in 10 mL of buffer solutions with varying pH (10.4, 7.4 or 4.4). The solutions were collected and renewed at various time intervals. pH and/or calcium ion release was measured using a pH glass electrode and atomic absorption spectrophotometer respectively. The change of pH, short-term calcium ion release and rate at which calcium ion release reaches maximum were dependent on ESA ( p < 0.05) while maximum calcium ion release was dependent on Vol of TSC ( p < 0.05). Maximum calcium ion release was significantly higher in acidic solution followed by neutral and alkaline solution ( p < 0.05).

  18. Comments on the article by A. J. Lecloux (J Nanopart Res (2015) 17:447) regarding the use of volume-specific surface area (VSSA) to classify nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Neil; Rauscher, Hubert; Roebben, Gert

    2016-08-01

    In November 2015, an article by A. J. Lecloux was published in this journal (J Nanopart Res, 17:447, 2015). The article focused on the use of volume-specific surface area (VSSA) for the implementation of the European Commission's recommended definition of "nanomaterial". In that paper, VSSA values were calculated for polydisperse particulate materials using a particle number-based averaging method which do not agree with earlier results of VSSA simulations of polydisperse materials reported in 2014 by the Joint Research Centre (JRC) of the European Commission (EC). In this contribution, we explain the difference between traditional view of VSSA which was used by the JRC and the proposed model of Lecloux. Through the use of some simple examples for polydisperse materials, it is demonstrated that the latter produces values which neither correspond to the generally accepted definition of VSSA nor relate to the commonly used experimental methods for determining VSSA using gas adsorption. Lecloux's model therefore does not constitute a basis for practical implementation of the EC's definition of nanomaterial using gas adsorption techniques.

  19. Traumatic abdominal wall hernia secondary to motorcycle handle bar injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R S Jamabo

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion: We recommend a high level of clinical suspicion for traumatic abdominal wall herniation in all patients with traumatic abdominal wall injuries. It is instructive that the area be explored with primary repair of the hernia and other tissue planes of the abdominal wall.

  20. Development of the ventral body wall in the human embryo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mekonen, Hayelom K.; Hikspoors, Jill P. J. M.; Mommen, Greet; Köhler, S. Eleonore; Lamers, Wouter H.

    2015-01-01

    Migratory failure of somitic cells is the commonest explanation for ventral body wall defects. However, the embryo increases ~ 25-fold in volume in the period that the ventral body wall forms, so that differential growth may, instead, account for the observed changes in topography. Human embryos

  1. Abdominal wall fat pad biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amyloidosis - abdominal wall fat pad biopsy; Abdominal wall biopsy; Biopsy - abdominal wall fat pad ... method of taking an abdominal wall fat pad biopsy . The health care provider cleans the skin on ...

  2. False positive reduction for wall thickness-based detection of colonic flat polyps via CT colonography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomeroy, Marc; Li, Lihong C.; Han, Hao; Wei, Xinzhou; Pickhardt, Perry J.; Liang, Zhengrong

    2017-03-01

    Computer-aided detection (CAD) of flat polyps, in contrast to other polyp types, is challenging due to their lack of projections from the colonic surface and limited geometrical features that can be extracted from such polyps. In this paper, we present a new approach for CAD of flat polyps via colon wall thickness mapping, texture feature extraction and analysis. First, we integrated our previous work of detecting flat polyp candidates via colon wall thickness mapping into this study for automated detection of initial polyp candidates (IPCs). The colon wall segmentation is established on a coupled level-set method after the lumen is electronically cleansed by a sophisticated statistical algorithm, which considers the partial volume effect to preserve the mucosa layer details. The IPC detection was performed based on the wall thickness local pattern. From each IPC volume, we extracted the 14 Haralick texture features and 16 additional features that were previously demonstrated to improve polyp classification performance. Then, we adopted the Rpackage "randomForest" to classify the features for false positive (FP) reduction. We evaluated our method via 16 patient datasets. The proposed scheme achieved a high capacity in terms of the well-known area under the curve value of 0.930. The FPs was reduced to less than 3 FPs/per polyp. The experiment results demonstrate the feasibility of our method in achieving computer aided detection of flat polyps, therefore, improving the screening capability of computed tomography cololongraphy.

  3. Ferroelectric charged domain walls in an applied electric field

    OpenAIRE

    Gureev, M. Y.; Mokry, P.; Tagantsev, A. K.; Setter, N.

    2012-01-01

    The interaction of electric field with charged domain walls in ferroelectrics is theoretically addressed. Ageneral expression for the force acting per unit area of a charged domain wall carrying free charge is derived. It is shown that, in proper ferroelectrics, the free charge carried by the wall is dependent on the size of the adjacent domains. As a result, the mobility of such domain wall (with respect to the applied field) is sensitive to the parameters of the domain pattern containing th...

  4. Turbine airfoil having near-wall cooling insert

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Jr., Nicholas F.; Wiebe, David J.

    2017-09-12

    A turbine airfoil is provided with at least one insert positioned in a cavity in an airfoil interior. The insert extends along a span-wise extent of the turbine airfoil and includes first and second opposite faces. A first near-wall cooling channel is defined between the first face and a pressure sidewall of an airfoil outer wall. A second near-wall cooling channel is defined between the second face and a suction sidewall of the airfoil outer wall. The insert is configured to occupy an inactive volume in the airfoil interior so as to displace a coolant flow in the cavity toward the first and second near-wall cooling channels. A locating feature engages the insert with the outer wall for supporting the insert in position. The locating feature is configured to control flow of the coolant through the first or second near-wall cooling channel.

  5. Decrease of pulmonary blood flow detected by phase contrast MRI is correlated with a decrease in lung volume and increase of lung fibrosis area determined by computed tomography in interstitial lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Nanae; Yamashiro, Tsuneo; Murayama, Sadayuki

    2016-09-01

    Lung volume and pulmonary blood flow decrease in patients with interstitial lung disease (ILD). The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship between pulmonary blood flow and lung volume in ILD patients. This research was approved by the institutional review board. Twenty-seven patients (9 men, 18 women; mean age, 59 years; range, 24-79 years) with ILD were included. Blood flow was assessed in the pulmonary trunk and the left and right pulmonary arteries by phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Lung volume and the computed tomography (CT) visual score that indicates the severity of ILD were assessed on the left and right sides by thin-section CT scanning. Lung volume was automatically measured by lung analysis software (VINCENT Ver. 4). The CT visual score was measured by averaging the proportion of abnormal lung area at five anatomic levels. Pearson's correlation coefficient was used to determine the relationship between pulmonary blood flow and lung volume. Pulmonary blood flow showed a significant correlation with lung volume (both: r=0.52, p=0.006; left: r=0.61, p=0.001; right: r=0.54, p=0.004) and CT visual score (both: r=-0.39, p=0.04; left: r=-0.48, p=0.01; right: r=-0.38, p=0.04). Partial correlation analysis, controlled for age, height and weight, showed a significant correlation between pulmonary blood flow and lung volume (both: r=0.43, p=0.03; left: r=0.55, p=0.005; right: r=0.48, p=0.01) and CT visual score (both: r=-0.58, p=0.003; left: r=-0.51, p=0.01; right: r=-0.64, p=0.001). In ILD, reduced pulmonary blood flow is associated with reduced lung volume and increased abnormal lung area. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Green walls in Vancouver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharp, R. [Sharp and Diamond Landscape Architecture Inc., Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2007-07-01

    With the renewed interest in design for microclimate control and energy conservation, many cities are implementing clean air initiatives and sustainable planning policies to mitigate the effects of urban climate and the urban heat island effect. Green roofs, sky courts and green walls must be thoughtfully designed to withstand severe conditions such as moisture stress, extremes in temperature, tropical storms and strong desiccating winds. This paper focused on the installation of green wall systems. There are 2 general types of green walls systems, namely facade greening and living walls. Green facades are trellis systems where climbing plants can grow vertically without attaching to the surface of the building. Living walls are part of a building envelope system where plants are actually planted and grown in a wall system. A modular G-SKY Green Wall Panel was installed at the Aquaquest Learning Centre at the Vancouver Aquarium in Stanley Park in September 2006. This green wall panel, which was originally developed in Japan, incorporates many innovative features in the building envelope. It provides an exterior wall covered with 8 species of plants native to the Coastal Temperate Rain Forest. The living wall is irrigated by rainwater collected from the roof, stored in an underground cistern and fed through a drip irrigation system. From a habitat perspective, the building imitates an escarpment. Installation, support systems, irrigation, replacement of modules and maintenance are included in the complete wall system. Living walls reduce the surface temperature of buildings by as much as 10 degrees C when covered with vegetation and a growing medium. The project team is anticipating LEED gold certification under the United States-Canada Green Building Council. It was concluded that this technology of vegetated building envelopes is applicable for acoustical control at airports, biofiltration of indoor air, greywater treatment, and urban agriculture and vertical

  7. Volume calculation of CT lung lesions based on Halton low-discrepancy sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shusheng; Wang, Liansheng; Li, Shuo

    2017-03-01

    Volume calculation from the Computed Tomography (CT) lung lesions data is a significant parameter for clinical diagnosis. The volume is widely used to assess the severity of the lung nodules and track its progression, however, the accuracy and efficiency of previous studies are not well achieved for clinical uses. It remains to be a challenging task due to its tight attachment to the lung wall, inhomogeneous background noises and large variations in sizes and shape. In this paper, we employ Halton low-discrepancy sequences to calculate the volume of the lung lesions. The proposed method directly compute the volume without the procedure of three-dimension (3D) model reconstruction and surface triangulation, which significantly improves the efficiency and reduces the complexity. The main steps of the proposed method are: (1) generate a certain number of random points in each slice using Halton low-discrepancy sequences and calculate the lesion area of each slice through the proportion; (2) obtain the volume by integrating the areas in the sagittal direction. In order to evaluate our proposed method, the experiments were conducted on the sufficient data sets with different size of lung lesions. With the uniform distribution of random points, our proposed method achieves more accurate results compared with other methods, which demonstrates the robustness and accuracy for the volume calculation of CT lung lesions. In addition, our proposed method is easy to follow and can be extensively applied to other applications, e.g., volume calculation of liver tumor, atrial wall aneurysm, etc.

  8. Shock Tunnel Tests of Arched Wall Panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-07-01

    Post-test photographs of this test are given in Figures A-3 A and B. Figure A-3 A shows the amount of debris which landed in the casement a...spreading debris to 80 feet (the far wall of the casement ) as shown in the post-test photograph in Figure A-7. Displacement gauge data...10 psi) . The wall failed atastrophically, with debris scattered throughout the tunnel and casement area. Approxi- mately 10 percent

  9. Supersymmetric domain walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergshoeff, Eric A.; Kleinschmidt, Axel; Riccioni, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    We classify the half-supersymmetric "domain walls," i.e., branes of codimension one, in toroidally compactified IIA/IIB string theory and show to which gauged supergravity theory each of these domain walls belong. We use as input the requirement of supersymmetric Wess-Zumino terms, the properties of

  10. Thin Wall Iron Castings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.F. Cuttino; D.M. Stefanescu; T.S. Piwonka

    2001-10-31

    Results of an investigation made to develop methods of making iron castings having wall thicknesses as small as 2.5 mm in green sand molds are presented. It was found that thin wall ductile and compacted graphite iron castings can be made and have properties consistent with heavier castings. Green sand molding variables that affect casting dimensions were also identified.

  11. Timber frame walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ernst Jan de Place; Brandt, Erik

    2010-01-01

    A ventilated cavity is usually considered good practice for removing moisture behind the cladding of timber framed walls. Timber frame walls with no cavity are a logical alternative as they are slimmer and less expensive to produce and besides the risk of a two-sided fire behind the cladding...

  12. International Divider Walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruis, A.; Sneller, A.C.W.(L.)

    2013-01-01

    The subject of this teaching case is the Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) system implementation at International Divider Walls, the world market leader in design, production, and sales of divider walls. The implementation in one of the divisions of this multinational company had been successful,

  13. Channel Wall Landslides

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] The multiple landslides in this VIS image occur along a steep channel wall. Note the large impact crater in the context image. The formation of the crater may have initially weakened that area of the surface prior to channel formation. Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -2.7, Longitude 324.8 East (35.2 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution. Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  14. Scale resolving computation of submerged wall jets on flat wall with different roughness heights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paik, Joongcheol; Bombardelli, Fabian

    2014-11-01

    Scale-adaptive simulation is used to investigate the response of velocity and turbulence in submerged wall jets to abrupt changes from smooth to rough beds. The submerged wall jets were experimentally investigated by Dey and Sarkar [JFM, 556, 337, 2006] at the Reynolds number of 17500 the Froude number of 4.09 and the submergence ratio of 1.12 on different rough beds that were generated by uniform sediments of different median diameters The SAS is carried out by means of a second-order-accurate finite volume method in space and time and the effect of bottom roughness is treated by the approach of Cebeci (2004). The evolution of free surface is captured by employing the two-phase volume of fluid (VOF) technique. The numerical results obtained by the SAS approach, incorporated with the VOF and the rough wall treatment, are in good agreement with the experimental measurements. The computed turbulent boundary layer grows more quickly and the depression of the free surface is more increased on the rough wall than those on smooth wall. The size of the fully developed zone shrinks and the decay rate of maximum streamwise velocity and Reynolds stress components are faster with increase in the wall roughness. Supported by NSF and NRF of Korea.

  15. A comparative study on effect of plain-and wavy-wall confinement on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Bluff body; wake; flow separation; wavy-wall confinement; CFD simulation; finite volume method. Abstract. A first attempt is made for identifying the wake characteristics of circular cylinder confined by a wavy wall at laminar flow regime. Numerical study of flow characteristics past circular cylinder with wavy-wall ...

  16. Solar Walls in tsbi3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wittchen, Kim Bjarne

    tsbi3 is a user-friendly and flexible computer program, which provides support to the design team in the analysis of the indoor climate and the energy performance of buildings. The solar wall module gives tsbi3 the capability of simulating solar walls and their interaction with the building....... This version, C, of tsbi3 is capable of simulating five types of solar walls say: mass-walls, Trombe-walls, double Trombe-walls, internally ventilated walls and solar walls for preheating ventilation air. The user's guide gives a description of the capabilities and how to simulate solar walls in tsbi3....

  17. Influence of the wall on the droplet evaporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misyura S. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Evaporative influence of the wall material and its thickness has been investigated in the present study. The wall influence for heat exchangers is particularly important in the boiling transition regime and in the event of the Leidenfrost temperature. The experimental points significantly diverge in the transition area of the boiling crisis. This fact can be explained by a different residence time of droplet on the wall surface. The discrepancy between the experimental data also takes place at the Leidenfrost temperature. The lower the thermal diffusivity of the wall material (high thermal inertia, the more the wall is cooled under a droplet.

  18. Timber frame walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ernst Jan de Place; Brandt, Erik

    2010-01-01

    A ventilated cavity is usually considered good practice for removing moisture behind the cladding of timber framed walls. Timber frame walls with no cavity are a logical alternative as they are slimmer and less expensive to produce and besides the risk of a two-sided fire behind the cladding...... is reduced. To investigate the possibilities, full-size wall elements with wooden cladding and different cavity design, type of cladding and type of wind barrier were exposed to natural climate on the outside and to a humid indoor climate on the inside. During the exposure period parts of the vapour barrier...

  19. The Shoreline Management Tool, an ArcMap Tool for Analyzing Water Depth, Inundated Area, Volume, and Selected Habitats, with an Example for the Lower Wood River Valley, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, D. T.; Haluska, T. L.; Respini-Irwin, D.

    2012-12-01

    The Shoreline Management Tool is a GIS-based program developed to assist water- and land-resource managers in assessing the benefits and impacts of changes in surface-water stage on water depth, inundated area, and water volume. In addition, the tool can be used to identify aquatic or terrestrial habitat areas where conditions may be suitable for specific plants or animals as defined by user-specified criteria, including water depth, land-surface slope, and land-surface aspect or to delineate areas for use in determining a variety of hydrologic budget components such as surface-water storage, precipitation, runoff, or evapotranspiration. The Shoreline Management Tool consists of two parts, a graphical user interface for use with ArcMap GIS software to interact with the user to define scenarios and map results, and a spreadsheet in Microsoft Excel® developed to display tables and graphs of the results. The graphical user interface allows the user to define a scenario consisting of an inundation level (stage), land areas (parcels), and habitats (areas meeting user-specified conditions) based on water depth, slope, and aspect criteria. The tool uses data consisting of land-surface elevation, tables of stage/volume and stage/area, and delineated parcel boundaries to produce maps (data layers) of inundated areas and areas that meet the habitat criteria. The tool can be run in a Single-Time Scenario mode or in a Time-Series Scenario mode which uses an input file of dates and associated stages. The spreadsheet portion of the tool uses a macro to process the results from the graphical user interface to create tables and graphs of inundated water volume, inundated area, dry area, and mean water depth for each land parcel based on the user-specified stage. The macro also creates tables and graphs of the area, perimeter, and number of polygons comprising the user-specified habitat areas within each parcel. The Shoreline Management Tool is designed to be highly transferable

  20. The Shoreline Management Tool - an ArcMap tool for analyzing water depth, inundated area, volume, and selected habitats, with an example for the lower Wood River Valley, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Daniel T.; Haluska, Tana L.; Respini-Irwin, Darius

    2013-01-01

    The Shoreline Management Tool is a geographic information system (GIS) based program developed to assist water- and land-resource managers in assessing the benefits and effects of changes in surface-water stage on water depth, inundated area, and water volume. Additionally, the Shoreline Management Tool can be used to identify aquatic or terrestrial habitat areas where conditions may be suitable for specific plants or animals as defined by user-specified criteria including water depth, land-surface slope, and land-surface aspect. The tool can also be used to delineate areas for use in determining a variety of hydrologic budget components such as surface-water storage, precipitation, runoff, or evapotranspiration. The Shoreline Management Tool consists of two parts, a graphical user interface for use with Esri™ ArcMap™ GIS software to interact with the user to define scenarios and map results, and a spreadsheet in Microsoft® Excel® developed to display tables and graphs of the results. The graphical user interface allows the user to define a scenario consisting of an inundation level (stage), land areas (parcels), and habitats (areas meeting user-specified conditions) based on water depth, slope, and aspect criteria. The tool uses data consisting of land-surface elevation, tables of stage/volume and stage/area, and delineated parcel boundaries to produce maps (data layers) of inundated areas and areas that meet the habitat criteria. The tool can be run in a Single-Time Scenario mode or in a Time-Series Scenario mode, which uses an input file of dates and associated stages. The spreadsheet part of the tool uses a macro to process the results from the graphical user interface to create tables and graphs of inundated water volume, inundated area, dry area, and mean water depth for each land parcel based on the user-specified stage. The macro also creates tables and graphs of the area, perimeter, and number of polygons comprising the user-specified habitat areas

  1. Anterior vaginal wall repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may have you: Learn pelvic floor muscle exercises ( Kegel exercises ) Use estrogen cream in your vagina Try ... repair; Urinary incontinence - vaginal wall repair Patient Instructions Kegel exercises - self-care Self catheterization - female Suprapubic catheter ...

  2. Advanced walling systems

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Villiers, A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The question addressed by this chapter is: How should advanced walling systems be planned, designed, built, refurbished, and end their useful lives, to classify as smart, sustainable, green or eco-building environments?...

  3. The Digital Evolution of Occupy Wall Street

    OpenAIRE

    Conover, Michael D.; Ferrara, Emilio; Menczer, Filippo; Flammini, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    We examine the temporal evolution of digital communication activity relating to the American anti-capitalist movement Occupy Wall Street. Using a high-volume sample from the microblogging site Twitter, we investigate changes in Occupy participant engagement, interests, and social connectivity over a fifteen month period starting three months prior to the movement's first protest action. The results of this analysis indicate that, on Twitter, the Occupy movement tended to elicit participation ...

  4. Applications of Green Walls in Urban Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtudes, Ana; Manso, Maria

    2016-10-01

    Green walls are a choice towards achieving sustainable urban rehabilitation, due to the lack of free space in the consolidated urban fabric. Nowadays, green walls are considered to be an innovation in the fields of ecology, horticulture or buildings. Nevertheless, in the domain of urban design, they are still surprising and unexpected ideas. Thus, this research aims to reflect on green walls as a feature in urban design and rehabilitation, identifying the advantages of their utilization as an enhancement of the quality of city's image, especially in dense urban areas. It aims to demonstrate some practical applications of green walls in urban design proposals, showing model solutions and their real application in several architectural examples.

  5. Relationship between trait impulsivity and cortical volume, thickness and surface area in male cocaine users and non-drug using controls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaag, A.M.; Crunelle, C.L.; van Wingen, G.A.; Homberg, J.; van den Brink, W.; Reneman, L.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Trait impulsivity is commonly associated with cocaine dependence. The few studies that have investigated the relation between trait impulsivity and cortical morphometry, have shown a distinct relation between impulsivity and cortical volume (CV) of temporal, frontal and insula cortex. As

  6. Laboratory Evaluation of In Situ Chemical Oxidation for Groundwater Remediation, Test Area North, Operable Unit 1-07B, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Volume Three - Appendix F

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cline, S.R.; Denton, D.L.; Giaquinto, J.M.; McCracken, M.K.; Starr, R.C.

    1999-04-01

    This appendix supports the results and discussion of the laboratory work performed to evaluate the feasibility of in situ chemical oxidation for Idaho National Environmental and Engineering Laboratory's (INEEL) Test Area North (TAN) which is contained in ORNL/TM-13711/V1. This volume contains Appendix F. Appendix F is essentially a photocopy of the ORNL researchers' laboratory notebooks from the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) and the Radioactive Materials Analytical Laboratory (RMAL).

  7. Environmental Inventory and Analysis for Pine Bluff, Arkansas. Volume II. Appendices. Pine Bluff Metropolitan Area, Arkansas Urban Water Management Study. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-10-01

    Moonseed MORACEAE Broussonetia papyrifera Cultivated, roadsides K Paper Mulberry Maclura pomifera Edge of fields, open areas C Osage Orange Morus...Sycamore cultivated POLEMONT-ACEAE Phlox glaberrima Fields, roadsides C Phlox Phlox pilosa Fields, roadsides C Phlox POLYGALACEAE Polygala sanguinea ...Occasional+ Verm-ivora pinus Tennessee Warbler Wooded areas Migrant Common+ Vermivora peregrina Orang ,_>-crowned Warbler Brushy areas Winter Uncommon

  8. How might the Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and Modernization Act of 2003 affect the financial viability of rural pharmacies? An analysis of preimplementation prescription volume and payment sources in rural and urban areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraher, Erin P; Slifkin, Rebecca T; Smith, Laura; Randolph, Randy; Rudolf, Matthew; Holmes, George M

    2005-01-01

    Passage of the Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and Modernization Act of 2003 (MMA) has created interest in how the legislation will affect access to prescription drugs among rural beneficiaries. Policy attention has focused to a much lesser degree on the implications of the MMA for the financial viability of rural pharmacies. This article presents descriptive information on mail-order prescriptions, volume, and payer type of retail prescriptions in rural vs urban areas. Together, these data provide a baseline for evaluating how implementation of the MMA may affect the financial viability of rural independent pharmacies. Projections of prescriptions dispensed from retail and mail-order pharmacies in 2002 for the total US and a sample of 17 states were obtained from IMS Health. The volume of mail-order prescriptions is small. Rural providers prescribed fewer retail and mail-order prescriptions per person, but more units per person. Rural areas have a higher percentage of prescriptions paid for by cash (18% vs 13%) and Medicaid (16% vs 10%) and a lower percentage of third-party payers than urban areas. Significant variation in volume and payer type exists between states. Rural, independent pharmacies may be negatively affected by MMA implementation as business shifts from cash to third-party reimbursement. The high degree of variation between states also has potentially important implications for the implementation of Prescription Drug Plan regions under MMA.

  9. Programa Estrategico do desenvolvimento 1968-70: Area Estrategica IX. Infra-estructura Social. Educacao e Recursos Humanos, 1 e 2 (Strategic Development Program 1968-1970: Strategic Area IX. Education and Human Resources, Volumes 1 & 2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazil.

    This document is an English-language abstract (approximately 1,500 words) of a two volume work dealing with education and human resources as part of the Brazilian Government's Strategic Development Program 1968-70. It offers an integral view of education as an instrument of social transformation and an exposition of the quantitative and…

  10. Addendum to the remedial investigation report on Bear Creek Valley Operable Unit 2 (Rust Spoil Area, Spoil Area 1, and SY-200 Yard) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1: Main text

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    This addendum to the Remedial Investigation (RI) Report on Bear Creek Valley Operable Unit (OU) 2 at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant was prepared in accordance with requirements under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) for reporting the results of a site characterization for public review. This addendum is a supplement to a document that was previously issued in January 1995 and that provided the Environmental Restoration Program with information about the results of the 1993 investigation performed at OU 2. The January 1995 D2 version of the RI Report on Bear Creek Valley OU 2 included information on risk assessments that have evaluated impacts to human health and the environment. Information provided in the document formed the basis for the development of the Feasibility Study Report. This addendum includes revisions to four chapters of information that were a part of the document issued in January 1995. Specifically, it includes revisions to Chaps. 2, 3, 4, and 9. Volume 1 of this document is not being reissued in its entirety as a D3 version because only the four chapters just mentioned have been affected by requested changes. Note also that Volume 2 of this RI Report on Bear Creek Valley OU 2 is not being reissued in conjunction with Volume 1 of this document because there have been no changes requested or made to the previously issued version of Volume 2 of this document.

  11. KETERASINGAN DALAM FILM WALL-E

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahmadya Putra Nugraha

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Modern society nowadays technological advances at first create efficiency in human life. Further development of the technology thus drown human in a routine and automation of work created. The State is to be one of the causes of man separated from fellow or the outside world and eventually experiencing alienation. The movie as a mass media function to obtain the movie and entertainment can be informative or educative function is contained, even persuasive. The purpose of this research was conducted to find out the alienation in the movie Wall E. The concepts used to analyze the movie Wall E this is communication, movie, and alienation. The concept of alienation of human alienation from covering its own products of human alienation from its activities, the human alienation from nature of his humanity and human alienation from each other. Paradigm used is a critical paradigm with type a descriptive research with qualitative approach. The method used is the analysis of semiotics Roland Barthes to interpretation the scope of social alienation and fellow humans in the movie.This writing research results found that alienation of humans with other humans influenced the development of the technology and how the human it self represented of technology, not from our fellow human beings. Masyarakat modern saat ini kemajuan teknologi pada awalnya membuat efisiensi dalam kehidupan manusia. Perkembangan selanjutnya teknologi justru menenggelamkan manusia dalam suatu rutinitas dan otomatisasi kerja yang diciptakan. Keadaan itulah yang menjadi salah satu penyebab manusia terpisah dari sesama atau dunia luar dan akhirnya mengalami keterasingan. Film sebagai media massa berfungsi untuk memperoleh hiburan dan dalam film dapat terkandung fungsi informatif maupun edukatif, bahkan persuasif. Tujuan Penelitian ini dilakukan untuk mengetahui Keterasingan dalam film Wall E. Konsep-konsep yang digunakan untuk menganalisis film Wall E ini adalah komunikasi, film, dan

  12. Impacts of the 2003 and 2015 summer heatwaves on permafrost-affected rock-walls in the Mont Blanc massif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravanel, L; Magnin, F; Deline, P

    2017-12-31

    Rockfall is one of the main geomorphological processes that affects the evolution and stability of rock-walls. At high elevations, rockfall is largely climate-driven, very probably because of the warming of rock-wall permafrost. So with the ongoing global warming that drives the degradation of permafrost, the related hazards for people and infrastructure could continue to increase. The heatwave of summer 2015, which affected Western Europe from the end of June to August, had a serious impact on the stability of high-altitude rock-walls, including those in the Mont Blanc massif. A network of observers allowed us to survey the frequency and intensity of rock-wall morphodynamics in 2015, and to verify its relationship with permafrost. These observations were compared with those of the 2003 summer heatwave, identified and quantified by remote sensing. A comparison between the two years shows a fairly similar rockfall pattern in respect of total volumes and high frequencies (about 160 rockfalls >100m3) but the total volume for 2003 is higher than the 2015 one (about 300,000m3 and 170,000m3 respectively). In both cases, rockfalls were numerous but with a low magnitude and occurred in permafrost-affected areas. This suggests a sudden and remarkable deepening of the active layer during these two summers, rather than a longer-term warming of the permafrost body. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) Atlas: Rhode Island, Connecticut, and the New York-New Jersey Metropolitan Area - Volume 1, Geographic Information Systems data and Volume 2, Maps in Portable Document Format (NODC Accession 0014792)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) data for Rhode Island, Connecticut, and the New York - New Jersey Metropolitan Area from 1999 to...

  14. Maxwell-Stefan modeling for mixture volume and property prediction in the area of batching interface in multiple pipeline systems; Modelagem Maxwell-Stefan para predicao de propriedades e volume de mistura na regiao de interface debateladas em sistemas polidutos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, Hellen Patricia Moreira; Medeiros, Jose Luis; Araujo, Ofelia de Q.F. [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Escola de Quimica. Lab. SDV]. E-mails: hellen_carvalho@petrobras.com.br; jlm@eq.ufrj.br; ofelia@eq.ufrj.br

    2003-06-01

    Multiple pipelines are simple ducts for transporting multiple fluids through long distance runs and long trip times. A critical factor regarding their operation and operational optimization is related to the level of part specification loss of carried load due to a mutual contamination between adjacent fluids, requiring operational maneuvers, extra tankages and re-processing costs. This phenomenon occurs due to mass transfer at the limit zone of the products. The extent of this mutual contamination - mixture volume - depends on turbulence in the transport of the involved fluids and the contact time between them. In text books, there are no references on prediction methods for mixture volumes. When they exist, such methods invariably are of limited scope, especially in regard to compositional description of oil fluids and to mass transfer modeling in a multiple component context. Presented herein is the determination of mixture effects in multiple pipelines, with total emphasis on the above aspects. The employed approach is based on: compositional modeling of oil fractions via reconciliation with characterizes of transported products; spatio-temporal mass transfer modeling via the Maxwell-Stefan theory; and calculation of severe thermodynamical effects via state equations. (author)

  15. Nanomaterial Containing Wall Paints Can Increase Radon Concentration in Houses Located in Radon Prone Areas Haghani M.2 , Mortazavi S. M. J.1, 2*, Faghihi R.3, Mehdizadeh S.3, Moradgholi J.4, Darvish L.5, Fathi-Pour E.5, Ansari L.5, Ghanbar-pour M. R.3 1The Center for Radiological Research, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran 2Department of Med

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haghani M.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nowadays, extensive technological advancements have made it possible to use nanopaints which show exciting properties. In IR Iran excessive radon levels (up to 3700 Bq m–3 have been reported in homes located in radon prone areas. Over the past decades, concerns have been raised about the risk posed by residential radon exposure. Objective: This study aims at investigating the effect of using nanomaterial containing wall paints on radon concentration in homes. Methods: Two wooden model houses were used in this study. Soil samples from Ramsar high background radiation areas were used for simulating the situation of a typical house in radon-prone areas. Conventional water-soluble wall paint was used for painting the walls of the 1st house model; while the 2nd house model was painted with the same wall paint with montmorillonite nanoclay. Results: Three days after sealing the house models, radon level was measured by using a portable radon survey meter. The mean radon level inside the 1st house model (conventional paint was 515.3 ± 17.8 Bq/m3 while the mean radon concentration in the 2nd house model (nano-painted house model was 570.8 ± 18.5 Bq/m3. The difference between these means was statistically signifcant (P<0.001. Conclusion: To the best of our knowledge, this study is the frst investigation on the effect of nano-material containing wall paints on indoor radon concentrations. It can be concluded that nano-material-containing wall paints should not be used in houses with wooden walls located in radon prone areas. Although the mechanism of this effect is not clearly known, decreased porosity in nano-paints might be a key factor in increasing the radon concentration in homes.

  16. Integers annual volume 2013

    CERN Document Server

    Landman, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    ""Integers"" is a refereed online journal devoted to research in the area of combinatorial number theory. It publishes original research articles in combinatorics and number theory. This work presents all papers of the 2013 volume in book form.

  17. Electroweak bubble wall speed limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bödeker, Dietrich; Moore, Guy D.

    2017-05-01

    In extensions of the Standard Model with extra scalars, the electroweak phase transition can be very strong, and the bubble walls can be highly relativistic. We revisit our previous argument that electroweak bubble walls can "run away," that is, achieve extreme ultrarelativistic velocities γ ~ 1014. We show that, when particles cross the bubble wall, they can emit transition radiation. Wall-frame soft processes, though suppressed by a power of the coupling α, have a significance enhanced by the γ-factor of the wall, limiting wall velocities to γ ~ 1/α. Though the bubble walls can move at almost the speed of light, they carry an infinitesimal share of the plasma's energy.

  18. Thin-walled reinforcement lattice structure for hollow CMC buckets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Diego, Peter

    2017-06-27

    A hollow ceramic matrix composite (CMC) turbine bucket with an internal reinforcement lattice structure has improved vibration properties and stiffness. The lattice structure is formed of thin-walled plies made of CMC. The wall structures are arranged and located according to high stress areas within the hollow bucket. After the melt infiltration process, the mandrels melt away, leaving the wall structure to become the internal lattice reinforcement structure of the bucket.

  19. Experiment and Simulation Study on the Amorphous Silicon Photovoltaic Walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjie Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on comparative study on two amorphous silicon photovoltaic walls (a-Si PV walls, the temperature distribution and the instant power were tested; and with EnergyPlus software, similar models of the walls were built to simulate annual power generation and air conditioning load. On typical sunshine day, the corresponding position temperature of nonventilated PV wall was generally 0.5~1.5°C higher than that of ventilated one, while the power generation was 0.2%~0.4% lower, which was consistent with the simulation results with a difference of 0.41% in annual energy output. As simulation results, in summer, comparing the PV walls with normal wall, the heat per unit area of these two photovoltaic walls was 5.25 kWh/m2 (nonventilated and 0.67 kWh/m2 (ventilated higher, respectively. But in winter the heat loss of nonventilated one was smaller, while ventilated PV wall was similar to normal wall. To annual energy consumption of heating and cooling, the building with ventilated PV wall and normal wall was also similar but slightly better than nonventilated one. Therefore, it is inferred that, at low latitudes, such as Zhuhai, China, air gap ventilation is suitable, while the length to thickness ratio of the air gap needs to be taken into account.

  20. Wall functions for numerical modeling of laminar MHD flows

    CERN Document Server

    Widlund, O

    2003-01-01

    general wall function treatment is presented for the numerical modeling of laminar magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flows. The wall function expressions are derived analytically from the steady-state momentum and electric potential equations, making use only of local variables of the numerical solution. No assumptions are made regarding the orientation of the magnetic field relative to the wall, nor of the magnitude of the Hartmann number, or the wall conductivity. The wall functions are used for defining implicit boundary conditions for velocity and electric potential, and for computing mass flow and electrical currents in near wall-cells. The wall function treatment was validated in a finite volume formulation, and compared with an analytic solution for a fully developed channel flow in a transverse magnetic field. For the case with insulating walls, a uniform 20 x 20 grid, and Hartmann numbers Ha = [10,30,100], the accuracy of pressure drop and wall shear stress predictions was [1.1%,1.6%,0.5%], respectively. Com...

  1. RCRA Facility Investigation report for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 3. Appendixes 1 through 8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1991-09-01

    This report presents compiled information concerning a facility investigation of waste area group 6(WAG-6), of the solid waste management units (SWMU'S) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The WAG is a shallow ground disposal area for low-level radioactive wastes and chemical wastes. The report contains information on hydrogeological data, contaminant characterization, radionuclide concentrations, risk assessment from doses to humans and animals and associated cancer risks, exposure via food chains, and historical data. (CBS)

  2. RCRA Facility Investigation report for Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 2. Sections 4 through 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1991-09-01

    This report presents compiled information concerning a facility investigation of waste area group 6(WAG-6), of the solid waste management units (SWMU's) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The WAG is a shallow ground disposal area for low-level radioactive wastes and chemical wastes. The report contains information on hydrogeological data, contaminant characterization, radionuclide concentrations, risk assessment and baseline human health evaluation including a toxicity assessment, and a baseline environmental evaluation.

  3. CONDUCTING AND ANALYZING THE RESULTS OF THE EXPERIMENTAL BOX TEST OF RETAINING WALL MODELS WITHOUT PILES AND ON THE PILE FOUNDATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Lisnevskyi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Taking into consideration that the bearing capacity of the foundation may be insufficient, in the study it is assumed that pile foundation can be used to reduce the impact of the construction of new retaining structures on roads and railways near the existing buildings or in areas of dense urban development and ensure the stability of the foundation. To reduce the volume of excavation it is necessary to choose the economic structure of the retaining wall. To do this, one should explore stress-strain state (SSS of the retaining walls, to develop methods to improve their strength and stability, as well as to choose the most appropriate method of their analysis. Methodology. In the design of retaining walls foundation mat and piles are considered as independent elements. Since the combined effect of the retaining wall, piles and foundation mat as well as the effect of soil or rock foundation on the structure are considered not fully, so there are some limitations in the existing design techniques. To achieve the purpose the box tests of retaining walls models without piles and with piles for studying their interaction with the surrounding soil massif were conducted. Findings. Laboratory simulation of complex systems «surrounding soil – retaining wall – pile» was carried out and on the basis of the box test results were analyzed strains and its main parameters of the stress-strain state. Analysis of the results showed that the structure of a retaining wall with piles is steady and stable. Originality. So far, in Ukraine has not been carried out similar experimental box tests with models of retaining walls in such combinations. In the article has been presented unique photos and test results, as well as their analysis. Practical value. Using the methodology of experimental tests of the retaining wall models with piles and without them gives a wider opportunity to study stress-strain state of such structures.

  4. Remedial investigation report on Bear Creek Valley Operable Unit 2 (rust spoil area, spoil area 1, and SY-200 yard) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 2. Appendixes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-01

    This document contains the appendices to the Remedial Investigation Report on Bear Creek Valley Operable Unit 2 (Rust Spoil Area, Spoil Area 1, and SY-200 Yard) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The appendices include Current and historical soil boring and groundwater monitoring well information, well construction logs, and field change orders; Analytical data; Human health risk assessment data; and Data quality.

  5. Seasonal chemical composition of wall barley ( Hodreum murinum L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Wall barley (Hodreum murinum L.) is an annual cool-season grass species that grows in areas with a Mediterranean climate. It has potential as a forage source in Jordan. The objective was to determine seasonal chemical composition of wall barley grown under sub-humid Mediterranean conditions. A field trial

  6. Resource management plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation. Volume 30, Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park natural areas and reference areas--Oak Ridge Reservation environmentally sensitive sites containing special plants, animals, and communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pounds, L.R. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (US); Parr, P.D.; Ryon, M.G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1993-08-01

    Areas on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) that contain rare plant or animal species or are special habitats are protected through National Environmental Research Park Natural Area (NA) or Reference Area (RA) designations. The US Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park program is responsible for identifying species of vascular plants that are endangered, threatened, or rare and, as much as possible, for conserving those areas in which such species grow. This report includes a listing of Research Park NAs and RAs with general habitat descriptions and a computer-generated map with the areas identified. These are the locations of rare plant or animal species or special habitats that are known at this time. As the Reservation continues to be surveyed, it is expected that additional sites will be designated as Research Park NAs or RAs. This document is a component of a larger effort to identify environmentally sensitive areas on ORR. This report identifies the currently known locations of rare plant species, rare animal species, and special biological communities. Floodplains, wetlands (except those in RAs or NAs), and cultural resources are not included in this report.

  7. White Oak Creek Watershed: Melton Valley Area Remedial Investigation Report, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee: Volume 3 Appendix C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-11-01

    This report provides details on the baseline ecological risk assessment conducted in support of the Remedial Investigation (RI) Report for the Melton Valley areas of the White Oak Creek watershed (WOCW). The RI presents an analysis meant to enable the US Department of Energy (DOE) to pursue a series of remedial actions resulting in site cleanup and stabilization. The ecological risk assessment builds off of the WOCW screening ecological risk assessment. All information available for contaminated sites under the jurisdiction of the US Department of Energy`s Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Federal Facilities Agreement within the White Oak Creek (WOC) RI area has been used to identify areas of potential concern with respect to the presence of contamination posing a potential risk to ecological receptors within the Melton Valley area of the White Oak Creek watershed. The risk assessment report evaluates the potential risks to receptors within each subbasin of the watershed as well as at a watershed-wide scale. The WOC system has been exposed to contaminant releases from Oak Ridge National Laboratory and associated operations since 1943 and continues to receive contaminants from adjacent waste area groupings.

  8. Contribution of CT quantified emphysema, air trapping and airway wall thickness on pulmonary function in male smokers with and without COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed Hoesein, Firdaus A A; de Jong, Pim A; Lammers, Jan-Willem J; Mali, Willem P Th M; Mets, Onno M; Schmidt, Michael; de Koning, Harry J; Aalst, Carlijn van der; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; Ginneken, Bram van; van Rikxoort, Eva M; Zanen, Pieter

    2014-09-01

    Emphysema, airway wall thickening and air trapping are associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). All three can be quantified by computed tomography (CT) of the chest. The goal of the current study is to determine the relative contribution of CT derived parameters on spirometry, lung volume and lung diffusion testing. Emphysema, airway wall thickening and air trapping were quantified automatically on CT in 1,138 male smokers with and without COPD. Emphysema was quantified by the percentage of voxels below -950 Hounsfield Units (HU), airway wall thickness by the square root of wall area for a theoretical airway with 10 mm lumen perimeter (Pi10) and air trapping by the ratio of mean lung density at expiration and inspiration (E/I-ratio). Spirometry, residual volume to total lung capacity (RV/TLC) and diffusion capacity (Kco) were obtained. Standardized regression coefficients (β) were used to analyze the relative contribution of CT changes to pulmonary function measures. The independent contribution of the three CT measures differed per lung function parameter. For the FEV1 airway wall thickness was the most contributing structural lung change (β = -0.46), while for the FEV1/FVC this was emphysema (β = -0.55). For the residual volume (RV) air trapping was most contributing (β = -0.35). Lung diffusion capacity was most influenced by emphysema (β = -0.42). In a cohort of smokers with and without COPD the effect of different CT changes varies per lung function measure and therefore emphysema, airway wall thickness and air trapping need to be taken in account.

  9. Laboratory Evaluation of In Situ Chemical Oxidation for Groundwater Remediation, Test Area North, Operable Unit 1-07B, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Volume Four - Appendix G

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cline, S.R.; Denton, D.L.; Giaquinto, J.M.; McCracken, M.K.; Starr, R.C.

    1999-04-01

    This appendix supports the results and discussion of the laboratory work performed to evaluate the feasibility of in situ chemical oxidation for Idaho National Environmental and Engineering Laboratory's (INEEL) Test Area North (TAN) which is contained in ORNL/TM-13711/V1. This volume contains Appendix G. Appendix G is a presentation of VOC chromatography data collected during the study. Information on the calibration curves and calibration checks used as well as the sample GC reports themselves are included here. The concentration values presented on the GC reports are calculation using the data from the applicable calibration curve and any necessary dilutions which were made.

  10. Moisture Research - Optimizing Wall Assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arena, Lois [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB), Norwalk, CT (United States); Mantha, Pallavi [Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB), Norwalk, CT (United States)

    2013-05-01

    In this project, the Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) team evaluated several different configurations of wall assemblies to determine the accuracy of moisture modeling and make recommendations to ensure durable, efficient assemblies. WUFI and THERM were used to model the hygrothermal and heat transfer characteristics of these walls. Wall assemblies evaluated included code minimum walls using spray foam insulation and fiberglass batts, high R-value walls at least 12 in. thick (R-40 and R-60 assemblies), and brick walls with interior insulation.

  11. M-Area and Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facilities Groundwate Monitoring and Corrective-Action Report, First and Second Quarters 1998, Volumes I, II, & III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chase, J.

    1998-10-30

    This report describes the groundwater monitoring and corrective-action program at the M-Area Hazardous waste Management Facility (HWMF) and the Metallurgical Laboratory (Met Lab) HWMF at the Savannah river Site (SRS) during first and second quarters 1998. This program is required by South Carolina Hazardous Waste Permit SC1-890-008-989 and Section 264.100(g) of the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations. Report requirements are described in the 1995 RCRA Renewal Permit, effective October 5, 1995, Section IIIB.H.11.b for the M-Area HWMF and Section IIIG.H.11.b for the Met Lab HWMF.

  12. Draft Environmental Impact Statement. MX Deployment Area Selection and Land Withdrawal/Acquisition DEIS. Volume 4, Part III. Environmental Consequences to the Study Regions and Operating Base Vicinities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-12-01

    S BEACH 4c4S CL SUNRIE MONTAI NAUA 10 5**f 0 IO IE 4E 0 0 10 KIRECEATIOELAS 319 -C- Fiur 4...21. Rcetinlaesi h viint ofS th\\ooeSrngVleNvd / %OB...settlements, burial areas, historic event sites, cosmological event sites, ancestral trails, hot springs, rock art sites, ceremonial/ritual sites

  13. A comparison of human jaw muscle cross-sectional area and volume in long- and short-face subjects, using MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boom, H.P.W.; van Spronsen, P.H.; van Ginkel, F.C.; van Schijndel, R.A.; Castelijns, J.A.; Tuinzing, D.B.

    2008-01-01

    Objective In humans, the vertical craniofacial dimensions vary significantly with the size of the jaw muscles, which are regarded as important controlling factors of craniofacial growth. The functional relevance of the maximum cross-sectional area (CSA), indicating maximum muscle strength, is

  14. Environmental status of the Lake Michigan region. Volume II. Natural areas of the Lake Michigan drainage basin and endangered or threatened plant and animal species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stearns, F.; Lindsley, D.

    1977-09-01

    The accelerating encroachment of human activity on the natural landscape has made many citizens appreciate the need to save representative biotic communities before urbanization and technologically induced change eliminate such communities. Active programs in natural-area preservation are now in progress in the four basin states; these programs have strong public support and legislative mandate. Local, state, and federal agencies and private individuals have taken an active interest in protecting select areas as samples of the biotic communities and natural features of the Basin. Most natural areas described in this report have been dedicated or reserved in some fashion. Other areas are being added by the basin states each year. The maintenance of natural communities is closely linked to the preservation of endangered and threatened species of plants and animals which would cease to survive as isolated populations. Under federal regulations, certain plants and animals are listed as endangered or threatened in the Basin. As individual state lists are prepared and investigations proceed, it is probable that many more threatened species will be found.

  15. User Delay Cost Model and Facilities Maintenance Cost Model for a Terminal Control Area : Volume 2. User's Manual and Program Documentation for the User Delay Cost Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-05-01

    The User Delay Cost Model (UDCM) is a Monte Carlo simulation of certain classes of movement of air traffic in the Boston Terminal Control Area (TCA). It incorporates a weather module, an aircraft generation module, a facilities module, and an air con...

  16. A comparison of human jaw muscle cross-sectional area and volume in long- and short-face subjects, using MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Spronsena, P. H.; van Ginkel, F. C.; van Schijndel, R. A.; Castelijns, J. A.; Tuinzing, D. B.

    Objective: In humans, the vertical craniofacial dimensions vary significantly with the size of the jaw muscles, which are regarded as important controlling factors of craniofacial growth. The functional relevance of the maximum cross-sectional area (CSA), indicating maximum muscle strength, is

  17. A comparison of human jaw muscle cross-sectional area and volume in long- and short-face subjects, using MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boom, H.P.; van Spronsen, P.H.; van Ginkel, F.C.; van Schijndel, R.A.; Castelijns, J.A.; Tuinzing, D.B.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: In humans, the vertical craniofacial dimensions vary significantly with the size of the jaw muscles, which are regarded as important controlling factors of craniofacial growth. The functional relevance of the maximum cross-sectional area (CSA), indicating maximum muscle strength, is

  18. Environmental Status of the Lake Michigan Region Volume 11. Natural Areas of the Lake Michigan Drainage Basin and Endangered or Threatened Plant and Animal Species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stearns, Forest [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Lindsley, Diane [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    1977-09-01

    The accelerating encroachment of human activity on the natural landscape has made many citizens appreciate the need to save representative biotic communities before urbanization and technologically induced change eliminate such communities. Active programs in natural-area preservation a.re now in progress in the four basin states; these programs have strong public support and legislative mandate. Local, state, and federal agencies and private individuals have taken an active interest in protecting select areas as samples of the biotic communities and natural features of the Basin. Most natural areas described in this report have been dedicated or reserved in some fashion. Other areas are being added by the basin states each year. The maintenance of natural communities is closely linked to the preservation of endangered and threatened species of plants and animals which would cease to survive as isolated populations. Under federal regulations, certain plants and animals are listed as endange~ ed or threatened in the Basin. As individual state lists are prepared and investigations proceed, it is probable that many more threatened species will be found.

  19. High-R Walls for Remodeling: Wall Cavity Moisture Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiehagen, J.; Kochkin, V.

    2012-12-01

    The focus of the study is on the performance of wall systems, and in particular, the moisture characteristics inside the wall cavity and in the wood sheathing. Furthermore, while this research will initially address new home construction, the goal is to address potential moisture issues in wall cavities of existing homes when insulation and air sealing improvements are made.

  20. High-R Walls for Remodeling. Wall Cavity Moisture Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiehagen, J. [NAHB Research Center Industry Partnership, Upper Marlboro, MD (United States); Kochkin, V. [NAHB Research Center Industry Partnership, Upper Marlboro, MD (United States)

    2012-12-01

    The focus of the study is on the performance of wall systems, and in particular, the moisture characteristics inside the wall cavity and in the wood sheathing. Furthermore, while this research will initially address new home construction, the goal is to address potential moisture issues in wall cavities of existing homes when insulation and air sealing improvements are made.

  1. Novel titanium constructs for chest wall reconstruction in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Jacob T; Song, Kit; Avansino, Jeffrey R; Mesher, Andrew; Waldhausen, John H T

    2011-05-01

    We have previously reported the use of the vertical expandable prosthetic titanium rib (VEPTR) for treatment of thoracic dystrophy. This report describes our experience with this device and other novel titanium constructs for chest wall reconstruction. This is a retrospective chart review of all children and adolescents undergoing chest wall reconstruction with titanium constructs between December 2005 and May 2010. Six patients have undergone chest wall reconstruction with VEPTR or other titanium constructs. Four had chest wall resection for primary malignancy, 1 had metastatic chest wall tumor resection, and 1 had congenital chest wall deformity. There were no immediate complications, and all patients have exhibited excellent respiratory function with no scoliosis. Chest wall reconstruction after tumor resection or for primary chest wall deformities can be effectively accomplished with VEPTR and other customized titanium constructs. Goals should be durable protection of intrathoracic organs and preservation of thoracic volume and function throughout growth. Careful preoperative evaluation and patient-specific planning are important aspects of successful reconstruction. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Development of the ventral body wall in the human embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekonen, Hayelom K; Hikspoors, Jill P J M; Mommen, Greet; Köhler, S Eleonore; Lamers, Wouter H

    2015-11-01

    Migratory failure of somitic cells is the commonest explanation for ventral body wall defects. However, the embryo increases ~ 25-fold in volume in the period that the ventral body wall forms, so that differential growth may, instead, account for the observed changes in topography. Human embryos between 4 and 10 weeks of development were studied, using amira reconstruction and cinema 4D remodeling software for visualization. Initially, vertebrae and ribs had formed medially, and primordia of sternum and hypaxial flank muscle primordium laterally in the body wall at Carnegie Stage (CS)15 (5.5 weeks). The next week, ribs and muscle primordium expanded in ventrolateral direction only. At CS18 (6.5 weeks), separate intercostal and abdominal wall muscles differentiated, and ribs, sterna, and muscles began to expand ventromedially and caudally, with the bilateral sternal bars fusing in the midline after CS20 (7 weeks) and the rectus muscles reaching the umbilicus at CS23 (8 weeks). The near-constant absolute distance between both rectus muscles and approximately fivefold decline of this distance relative to body circumference between 6 and 10 weeks identified dorsoventral growth in the dorsal body wall as determinant of the 'closure' of the ventral body wall. Concomitant with the straightening of the embryonic body axis after the 6th week, the abdominal muscles expanded ventrally and caudally to form the infraumbilical body wall. Our data, therefore, show that the ventral body wall is formed by differential dorsoventral growth in the dorsal part of the body. © 2015 Anatomical Society.

  3. DIELECTRIC WALL ACCELERATOR TECHNOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sampayan, S; Caporaso, G; Chen, Y; Harris, J; Hawkins, S; Holmes, C; Nelson, S; Poole, B; Rhodes, M; Sanders, D; Sullivan, J; Wang, L; Watson, J

    2007-10-18

    The dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) is a compact pulsed power device where the pulse forming lines, switching, and vacuum wall are integrated into a single compact geometry. For this effort, we initiated a extensive compact pulsed power development program and have pursued the study of switching (gas, oil, laser induced surface flashover and photoconductive), dielectrics (ceramics and nanoparticle composites), pulse forming line topologies (asymmetric and symmetric Blumleins and zero integral pulse forming lines), and multilayered vacuum insulator (HGI) technology. Finally, we fabricated an accelerator cell for test on ETAII (a 5.5 MeV, 2 kA, 70 ns pulsewidth electron beam accelerator). We review our past results and report on the progress of accelerator cell testing.

  4. Partial domain wall partition functions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Foda, O; Wheeler, M

    2012-01-01

    We consider six-vertex model configurations on an (n × N) lattice, n ≤ N, that satisfy a variation on domain wall boundary conditions that we define and call partial domain wall boundary conditions...

  5. Scalable Resolution Display Walls

    KAUST Repository

    Leigh, Jason

    2013-01-01

    This article will describe the progress since 2000 on research and development in 2-D and 3-D scalable resolution display walls that are built from tiling individual lower resolution flat panel displays. The article will describe approaches and trends in display hardware construction, middleware architecture, and user-interaction design. The article will also highlight examples of use cases and the benefits the technology has brought to their respective disciplines. © 1963-2012 IEEE.

  6. Identification of Novel Cell Wall Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelle Momany

    2009-10-26

    Our DOE Biosciences-funded work focused on the fungal cell wall and morphogenesis. We are especially interested in how new cell wall material is targeted to appropriate areas for polar (asymmetric) growth. Polar growth is the only way that filamentous fungi explore the environment to find suitable substrates to degrade. Work funded by this grant has resulted in a total of twenty peer-reviewed publications. In work funded by this grant, we identified nine Aspergillus nidulans temperature-sensitive (ts) mutants that fail to send out a germ tube and show a swollen cell phenotype at restrictive temperature, the swo mutants. In other organisms, a swollen cell phenotype is often associated with misdirected growth or weakened cell walls. Our work shows that several of the A. nidulans swo mutants have defects in the establishment and maintenance of polarity. Cloning of several swo genes by complementation also showed that secondary modification of proteins seems is important in polarity. We also investigated cell wall biosynthesis and branching based on leads in literature from other organisms and found that branching and nuclear division are tied and that the cell wall reorganizes during development. In our most recent work we have focused on gene expression during the shift from isotropic to polar growth. Surprisingly we found that genes previously thought to be involved only in spore formation are important in early vegetative growth as well.

  7. Cultural Resources Reconnaissance in Dewey County, South Dakota from Below the Moreau River to the Forest City Recreation Area. Volume 2: Support Documentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-09-01

    community or family plots. 11 Euroamerican settlement of the area began largely after the Civil War in 1868, when military posts providing protection from... Mesoamerica . Peter Winham, assistant director, has extensive field and academic experience in Great Britain, Europe and the Great Plains. Research...Robinson, Will G. 1973 Dakota’s Own Civil War . In Dakota Panorama, edited by J. Leonard Jennewein and Jane Boorman, pp. 277-323. Pine Hill Press

  8. 3Q/4Q99 F-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility Corrective Action Report - Third and Fourth Quarter 1999, Volumes I and II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chase, J.

    2000-05-12

    Savannah River Site (SRS) monitors groundwater quality at the F-Area Hazardous Waste management Facility (HWMF) and provides results of this monitoring to the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) semiannually as required by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permit. SRS also performs monthly sampling of the Wastewater Treatment Unit (WTU) effluent in accordance with Section C of the Underground Injection Control (UIC) application.

  9. Draft Environmental Impact Statement. MX Deployment Area Selection and Land Withdrawal/Acquisition DEIS. Volume IV. Part II. Environmental Consequences to the Study Regions and Operating Base Vicinities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-12-01

    economic hub of Utah and have led earnings growth in the state. Salt Lake/Utah counties would likely be the only areas which could accommodate M-X without...CO;a C CC PVb’ -t a -PW r V s af- CL (L v 9 0 0,a T LC 10 L T w 0 ILit s P 0 *i a C OC -- -- 55C POrN n drC CO a - - E-4

  10. Remedial investigation report on Waste Area Grouping 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 3 -- Appendix B: Technical findings and conclusions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    This document provides the Environmental Restoration Program with information about the results of investigations performed at Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 5. It includes information on risk assessments that have evaluated long-term impacts to human health and the environment. Information provided in this document forms the basis for decisions regarding the need for subsequent remediation work at WAG 5. Sections B1.1 through B1.4 present an overview of the environmental setting of WAG 5, including location, population, land uses, ecology, and climate, and Sects. B1.5 through B1.7 give site-specific details (e.g., topography, soils, geology, and hydrology). The remediation investigation (RI) of WAG 5 did not entail en exhaustive characterization of all physical attributes of the site; the information presented here focuses on those most relevant to the development and verification of the WAG 5 conceptual model. Most of the information presented in this appendix was derived from the RI field investigation, which was designed to complement the existing data base from earlier, site-specific studies of Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 5 and related areas.

  11. Light shining through walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redondo, Javier [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Ringwald, Andreas [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2010-11-15

    Shining light through walls? At first glance this sounds crazy. However, very feeble gravitational and electroweak effects allow for this exotic possibility. Unfortunately, with present and near future technologies the opportunity to observe light shining through walls via these effects is completely out of question. Nevertheless there are quite a number of experimental collaborations around the globe involved in this quest. Why are they doing it? Are there additional ways of sending photons through opaque matter? Indeed, various extensions of the standard model of particle physics predict the existence of new particles called WISPs - extremely weakly interacting slim particles. Photons can convert into these hypothetical particles, which have no problems to penetrate very dense materials, and these can reconvert into photons after their passage - as if light was effectively traversing walls. We review this exciting field of research, describing the most important WISPs, the present and future experiments, the indirect hints from astrophysics and cosmology pointing to the existence of WISPs, and finally outlining the consequences that the discovery of WISPs would have. (orig.)

  12. Microfluidics with fluid walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Edmond J; Feuerborn, Alexander; Wheeler, James H R; Tan, Ann Na; Durham, William M; Foster, Kevin R; Cook, Peter R

    2017-10-10

    Microfluidics has great potential, but the complexity of fabricating and operating devices has limited its use. Here we describe a method - Freestyle Fluidics - that overcomes many key limitations. In this method, liquids are confined by fluid (not solid) walls. Aqueous circuits with any 2D shape are printed in seconds on plastic or glass Petri dishes; then, interfacial forces pin liquids to substrates, and overlaying an immiscible liquid prevents evaporation. Confining fluid walls are pliant and resilient; they self-heal when liquids are pipetted through them. We drive flow through a wide range of circuits passively by manipulating surface tension and hydrostatic pressure, and actively using external pumps. Finally, we validate the technology with two challenging applications - triggering an inflammatory response in human cells and chemotaxis in bacterial biofilms. This approach provides a powerful and versatile alternative to traditional microfluidics.The complexity of fabricating and operating microfluidic devices limits their use. Walsh et al. describe a method in which circuits are printed as quickly and simply as writing with a pen, and liquids in them are confined by fluid instead of solid walls.

  13. Wall Street som kreationistisk forkynder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekman, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Artiklen gennemgår Karen Hos etnografi om Wall Street: "Liquidated: An ethnography of Wall Street" set i lyset af den offentlige debat vedrørende Goldman Sachs opkøb af Dong......Artiklen gennemgår Karen Hos etnografi om Wall Street: "Liquidated: An ethnography of Wall Street" set i lyset af den offentlige debat vedrørende Goldman Sachs opkøb af Dong...

  14. Human uterine wall tension trajectories and the onset of parturition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Sokolowski

    Full Text Available Uterine wall tension is thought to be an important determinant of the onset of labor in pregnant women. We characterize human uterine wall tension using ultrasound from the second trimester of pregnancy until parturition and compare preterm, term and twin pregnancies. A total of 320 pregnant women were followed from first antenatal visit to delivery during the period 2000-2004 at the John Hunter Hospital, NSW, Australia. The uterine wall thickness, length, anterior-posterior diameter and transverse diameter were determined by serial ultrasounds. Subjects were divided into three groups: women with singleton pregnancies and spontaneous labor onset, either preterm or term and women with twin pregnancies. Intrauterine pressure results from the literature were combined with our data to form trajectories for uterine wall thickness, volume and tension for each woman using the prolate ellipsoid method and the groups were compared at 20, 25 and 30 weeks gestation. Uterine wall tension followed an exponential curve, with results increasing throughout pregnancy with the site of maximum tension on the anterior wall. For those delivering preterm, uterine wall thickness was increased P < 0.05 compared with term. For twin pregnancies intrauterine volume was increased compared to singletons (P < 0.001, but wall thickness was not. There was no evidence for increased tension in those delivering preterm or those with twin gestations. These data are not consistent with a role for high uterine wall tension as a causal factor in preterm spontaneous labor in singleton or twin gestations. It seems likely that hormonal differences in multiple gestations are responsible for increased rates of preterm birth in this group rather than increased tension.

  15. Unilateral NMR study of a XVI century wall painted

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proietti, N.; Capitani, D.; Rossi, E.; Cozzolino, S.; Segre, A. L.

    2007-06-01

    Wall paintings in the XVI century Serra Chapel in the "Chiesa di Nostra Signora del Sacro Cuore" Rome, have been studied using unilateral NMR. In order to map the distribution of moisture content in the wall painted, a large number of Hahn echo measurements, covering large areas of the wall painting were performed. Because the intensity of the Hahn echo is proportional to the amount of moisture in the area under study, the experimental data were transformed into 2D gradient colour maps which allowed an easy visualization of the moisture content of the wall. The state of conservation of the wall painting was monitored using T2 measurements specially with regards to outcropping salt.

  16. Association between impaired brain activity and volume at the sub-region of Broca's area in ultra-high risk and first-episode schizophrenia: A multi-modal neuroimaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwashiro, Norichika; Koike, Shinsuke; Satomura, Yoshihiro; Suga, Motomu; Nagai, Tatsuya; Natsubori, Tatsunobu; Tada, Mariko; Gonoi, Wataru; Takizawa, Ryu; Kunimatsu, Akira; Yamasue, Hidenori; Kasai, Kiyoto

    2016-04-01

    Recent studies have suggested that functional abnormalities in Broca's area, which is important in language production (speech and thoughts before speech), play an important role in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. While multi-modal approaches have proved useful in revealing the specific pathophysiology of psychosis, the association of functional abnormalities with gray matter volume (GMV) here in subjects with an ultra-high risk (UHR) of schizophrenia, those with first-episode schizophrenia (FES), and healthy controls has yet to be clarified. Therefore, the relationship between cortical activity measured using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) during a verbal fluency task, and GMV in the Broca's area assessed using a manual tracing in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which considers individual structural variation, was examined for 57 subjects (23 UHR/18 FES/16 controls). The UHR and FES group showed significantly reduced brain activity compared to control group in the left pars triangularis (PT) (P=.036, .003, respectively). Furthermore in the FES group, the reduced brain activity significantly positively correlated with the volume in the left PT (B=0.29, P=.027), while significant negative association was evident for all subjects (B=-0.18, P=.010). This correlation remained significant after adjusting for antipsychotics dosage, and voxel-wise analysis could not detect any significant correlation between impaired cortical activity and volume. The significant relationship between neural activity and GMV in the left PT may reflect a specific pathophysiology related to the onset of schizophrenia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Domain walls on the brane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergshoeff, E; van der Schaar, JP; Papadopoulos, G

    1998-01-01

    We show that all branes admit worldvolume domain wall solutions. We find one class of solutions for which the tension of the brane changes discontinuously along the domain wall. These solutions are not supersymmetric. We argue that there is another class of domain wall solutions which is

  18. Build an Interactive Word Wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Julie

    2018-01-01

    Word walls visually display important vocabulary covered during class. Although teachers have often been encouraged to post word walls in their classrooms, little information is available to guide them. This article describes steps science teachers can follow to transform traditional word walls into interactive teaching tools. It also describes a…

  19. Molded Concrete Center Mine Wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, E. V.

    1987-01-01

    Proposed semiautomatic system forms concrete-foam wall along middle of coal-mine passage. Wall helps support roof and divides passage into two conduits needed for ventilation of coal face. Mobile mold and concrete-foam generator form sections of wall in place.

  20. Indoor climbing walls in Prague

    OpenAIRE

    Schwarzová, Veronika

    2012-01-01

    This work presents the indoor climbing walls in climbing centers for the public in Prague. It creates an overview of qualitative and quantitative characteristics of indoor climbing walls in Prague. Thesis allowing ordinary users and the general public interested in climbing easier selection of the appropriate climbing wall according on their level, the safety requirements, background, but also the place of residence.

  1. Al Sahawa - The Awakening. Volume III-A: Al Anbar Province, Western Euphrates River Valley, Area of Operations Denver - Al Qaim

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    preceded by a breaching vehicle and fol- lowed by a film crew/media van penetrated Gannon’s de- fensive barriers and targeted its inner sanctum—the command...who doesn’t. The problem is we [the average Coalition Soldier or Marine] wanted to shoot at all of them. Hell , we were making insurgents!”63 Alford...you know, HESCO barriers , so you couldn’t get to it other than from in- side Camp Gannon to move out to that area. They had a Platoon Forward out

  2. Love Canal Emergency Declaration Area habitability study. Volume 4. Soil assessment: 2,3,7,8-TCDD (tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin). Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-03-01

    Environmental studies were conducted to provide data that could be used by the Commissioner of Health for the State of New York in determining whether the Emergency Declaration Area (EDA) surrounding the Love Canal hazardous-waste site is habitable. A soil assessment for 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) was conducted to determine whether the soil in the EDA contains 2,3,7,8-TCDD at levels above the level of concern set by the Centers for Disease Control: 1.0 ppb. Samples of surface soil were collected at 2,274 locations throughout the EDA.

  3. Left ventricular wall stress compendium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, L; Ghista, D N; Tan, R S

    2012-01-01

    Left ventricular (LV) wall stress has intrigued scientists and cardiologists since the time of Lame and Laplace in 1800s. The left ventricle is an intriguing organ structure, whose intrinsic design enables it to fill and contract. The development of wall stress is intriguing to cardiologists and biomedical engineers. The role of left ventricle wall stress in cardiac perfusion and pumping as well as in cardiac pathophysiology is a relatively unexplored phenomenon. But even for us to assess this role, we first need accurate determination of in vivo wall stress. However, at this point, 150 years after Lame estimated left ventricle wall stress using the elasticity theory, we are still in the exploratory stage of (i) developing left ventricle models that properly represent left ventricle anatomy and physiology and (ii) obtaining data on left ventricle dynamics. In this paper, we are responding to the need for a comprehensive survey of left ventricle wall stress models, their mechanics, stress computation and results. We have provided herein a compendium of major type of wall stress models: thin-wall models based on the Laplace law, thick-wall shell models, elasticity theory model, thick-wall large deformation models and finite element models. We have compared the mean stress values of these models as well as the variation of stress across the wall. All of the thin-wall and thick-wall shell models are based on idealised ellipsoidal and spherical geometries. However, the elasticity model's shape can vary through the cycle, to simulate the more ellipsoidal shape of the left ventricle in the systolic phase. The finite element models have more representative geometries, but are generally based on animal data, which limits their medical relevance. This paper can enable readers to obtain a comprehensive perspective of left ventricle wall stress models, of how to employ them to determine wall stresses, and be cognizant of the assumptions involved in the use of specific models.

  4. Environmental impact statement for the Encana shallow gas infill development in the CFB Suffield national wildlife area : volume 1 : project description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-05-15

    EnCana Corporation (EnCana) proposed to carry out an infill development project within the boundaries of its existing developed shallow gas field in the Canadian Forces Base (CFB) Suffield National Wildlife Area (NWA) in southeast Alberta. EnCana proposed to drill 1275 infill wells over three drilling seasons, beginning in fall 2008. An environmental assessment was needed in order to extract remaining shallow tight sweet gas from the wildlife area. This paper presented the environmental impact statement (EIS) that was prepared by EnCana to meet this requirement. The paper provided a description of the project and discussed additional environmental protection measures as well as the regulatory and environmental settings. The scope of the environmental impact statement was identified. The findings of the assessment for each environmental component were also summarized with particular reference to vegetation, wetlands, wildlife, biodiversity, groundwater, surface water, aquatic ecology, soil, historical resources, palaeontology, socio-economics, air quality, noise, and human health. Mitigation strategies were also proposed. The paper also described a cumulative effects assessment and various potential malfunctions and accidental events that could occur during the project and result in potential environmental effects. In developing the project, EnCana concluded that it had taken an expansive approach to considering potential effects to ensure that the cumulative effects of the Project were known, understood and mitigated. 26 refs., 22 tabs., 9 figs.

  5. Remedial investigation report on Waste Area Grouping 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 2 -- Appendix A: Characterization methods and data summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    This document provides the Environmental Restoration Program with information about the results of investigations performed at Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 5. It includes information on risk assessments that have evaluated long-term impacts to human health and the environment. Information provided in this document forms the basis for decisions regarding the need for subsequent remediation work at WAG 5. This appendix presents background regulatory and technical information regarding the solid waste management units (SWMUs) at WAG 5 to address requirements established by the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) for the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The US Department of Energy (DOE) agreed to conduct remedial investigations (RIs) under the FFA at various sites at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), including SWMUs and other areas of concern on WAG 5. The appendix gives an overview of the regulatory background to provide the context in which the WAG 5 RI was planned and implemented and documents how historical sources of data, many of which are SWMU-specific, were evaluated and used.

  6. White Oak Creek Watershed: Melton Valley Area Remedial Investigation Report, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee: Volume 1 Main Text

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-11-01

    The purpose of this Remedial Investigation (RI) report is to present an analysis of the Melton Valley portion of the White Oak Creek (WOC) watershed, which will enable the US Department of Energy (DOE) to pursue a series of cost-effective remedial actions resulting in site cleanup and stabilization. In this RI existing levels of contamination and radiological exposure are compared to levels acceptable for future industrial and potential recreational use levels at the site. This comparison provides a perspective for the magnitude of remedial actions required to achieve a site condition compatible with relaxed access restrictions over existing conditions. Ecological risk will be assessed to evaluate measures required for ecological receptor protection. For each subbasin, this report will provide site-specific analyses of the physical setting including identification of contaminant source areas, description of contaminant transport pathways, identification of release mechanisms, analysis of contaminant source interactions with groundwater, identification of secondary contaminated media associated with the source and seepage pathways, assessment of potential human health and ecological risks from exposure to contaminants, ranking of each source area within the subwatershed, and outline the conditions that remedial technologies must address to stop present and future contaminant releases, prevent the spread of contamination and achieve the goal of limiting environmental contamination to be consistent with a potential recreational use of the site.

  7. Lattice Boltzmann simulations for wall-flow dynamics in porous ceramic diesel particulate filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Da Young; Lee, Gi Wook; Yoon, Kyu; Chun, Byoungjin; Jung, Hyun Wook

    2018-01-01

    Flows through porous filter walls of wall-flow diesel particulate filter are investigated using the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). The microscopic model of the realistic filter wall is represented by randomly overlapped arrays of solid spheres. The LB simulation results are first validated by comparison to those from previous hydrodynamic theories and constitutive models for flows in porous media with simple regular and random solid-wall configurations. We demonstrate that the newly designed randomly overlapped array structures of porous walls allow reliable and accurate simulations for the porous wall-flow dynamics in a wide range of solid volume fractions from 0.01 to about 0.8, which is beyond the maximum random packing limit of 0.625. The permeable performance of porous media is scrutinized by changing the solid volume fraction and particle Reynolds number using Darcy's law and Forchheimer's extension in the laminar flow region.

  8. Radiation damage to multi-walled carbon nanotubes and their ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 38; Issue 7. Radiation damage to multi-walled carbon ... In this work, the Raman spectroscopy investigation of nanotube defects created by irradiation of Ar+ ions with various energies and doses was presented. In order to obtain more informative data, scanning electron ...

  9. Remedial Investigation Report on Bear Creek Valley Operable Unit 2 (Rust Spoil Area, Spoil Area 1, and SY-200 Yard) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1, Main text

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-01-01

    This report on the BCV OU 2 at the Y-12 Plant, was prepared in accordance with requirements under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) for reporting the results of a site characterization for public review. It provides the Environmental Restoration Program with information about the results of the 1993 investigation. It includes information on risk assessments that have evaluated impacts to human health and the environment. Field activities included collection of subsurface soil samples, groundwater and surface water samples, and sediments and seep at the Rust Spoil Area (RSA), SY-200 Yard, and SA-1.

  10. Bronchoscopic lung volume reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Polkey

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Surgical lung volume reduction can improve exercise performance and forced expiratory volume in one second in patients with emphysema. However, the procedure is associated with a 5% mortality rate and a nonresponse rate of 25%. Accordingly, interest has focused on alternative ways of reducing lung volume. Two principle approaches are used: collapse of the diseased area using blockers placed endobronchially and the creation of extrapulmonary pathways. Preliminary data from the former approach suggest that it can be successful and that the magnitude of success is related to reduction in dynamic hyperinflation.

  11. Remedial investigation report on Waste Area Grouping 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 3, Appendix B, Technical findings and conclusions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-03-01

    This Remedial Investigation Report on Waste Area Grouping, (NVAG) 5 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory was prepared in accordance with requirements under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) for reporting, the results of a site chacterization for public review. This work was performed under Work Breakdown Structure 1.4.12.6.1.05.40.02 (Activity Data Sheet 3305, ``WAG 5``). Publication of this document meets a Federal Facility Agreement milestone of March 31, 1995. This document provides the Environmental Restoration Program with information about the results of investigations performed at WAG 5. It includes information on risk assessments that have evaluated long-term impacts to human health and the environment. Information provided in this document forms the basis for decisions regarding, the need for subsequent remediation work at WAG 5.

  12. Design criteria -- Reactor plant modifications for increased production and 100-C Area Alterations (Sections A and B) CG-558. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russ, M.H.

    1954-08-10

    This document defines the basic criteria to be used in the preparation of detailed design for Project CG-558, Reactor Plant Modification for Increased Production and for Project CG-600, 100-C Area Alterations. It has been determined that the most economical method of increasing plutonium production within the next five years is by the modernization and improvement of the 100-B, 100-C, 100-D, 100-DR, 100-F, and 100-H reactor plants. These reactors are currently incapable of operating at their maximum potential power levels because of a limited availability of process cooling water. As a result of this programs, it is estimated that 1650-2350 megawatts of total additional production will be achieved. The purpose of this document is to set forth the design for certain modifications and additions to Hanford reactors and their supporting facilities as required to obtain higher power levels and improve the safety of reactor operation.

  13. Persistence and distribution of 4-nonylphenol in water, sediment, macrophytes, and wall material of littoral enclosures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinis, L.J.; Tunell, R.; Liber, K. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Superior, WI (United States). Lake Superior Research Inst.; Knuth, M.L. [Environmental Protection Agency, Duluth, MN (United States). Environmental Research Lab.

    1994-12-31

    Eighteen enclosures (5 m x 10 m) were constructed in the littoral zone of a 2-ha pond near Duluth, MN. Each enclosure consisted of 5 m of natural shoreline and three walls of an inert plastic. The enclosures had an average surface area of 31.9 m{sup 2} , an average depth of 0.6 m and an average water volume of 33.1 m{sup 3}. The enclosure waters were treated with the alkyl phenol ethoxylate precursor and degradation product 4-nonylphenol. Application was accomplished by sub-surface injection over a 20-day period with a 2 day frequency. Nominal aqueous concentrations were 0, 3, 30, 100 and 300 {mu}g/L. Concentrations of 4-nonylphenol were monitored during and after application in the water, sediment, macrophytes, and enclosure wall material. Average maximum water concentrations ranged from 96.5% of nominal to 62.0% of nominal and average minimum water concentrations ranged from 33.3% of nominal to 29.5% of nominal during the application period. Water concentrations decreased exponentially after application ended. Sediment concentrations during the application period were constant from 8 to 20 d and peak concentrations occurred 48 d after application began. Macrophyte concentrations peaked 21 d after initial application with a steady decline through 76 d. Enclosure wall material concentrations reached a peak 3 h before the final application. A gradual decline occurred until 34 d after initial application followed by a more rapid dissipation.

  14. Sensitivity to fuel diesel oil and cell wall structure of some Scenedesmus (Chlorococcales strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbigniew Tukaj

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sensitivity of three Scenedesmus strains exposed to aqueous fuel-oil extract (AFOE is strongly strain-dependent S. quadricauda is the most resistant, S. armatus moderately tolerant whereas the most sensitive appears to be S. microspina. The sensitivity of tested species increases parallel with decreasing of cell size and cell number in coenobium. The values of the cell surface/cell volumes ratios only partly explain the above relationships. Electron microscope investigations reveal that the sensitivity may depend on cell wall structure of the strains. Cell wall of all here investigated strains is built of two layers: the inner so-called cellulosic layer and the outer one showing a three-laminar structure (TLS. The latter contains an acetolysis-resistant biopolymer (ARB. These two layers are similar in thickness in the three strains tested, but the surface of Scenedesmus is covered with various epistructures that are characteristic of strains. Some of them as the tightly fitting warty layer of S. armatus and especially the loosely fitting reticulate layer of S. quadricauda may contribute to lower permeability of cell wall. The structure of the rosettes also appears to be correlated with the sensitivity of strains. Presence of invaginations of plasmalemma in areas under rosettes indicates their role in transport processes inside/outside the cells.

  15. Moisture Management for High R-Value Walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepage, R.; Schumacher, C.; Lukachko, A.

    2013-11-01

    The following report explains the moisture-related concerns for High R-value wall assemblies and discusses past Building America research work that informs this study. Hygrothermal simulations were prepared for several common approaches to High R-value wall construction in six cities (Houston, Atlanta, Seattle, St. Louis, Chicago, and International Falls) representing a range of climate zones (2, 3, 4C, 4, 5A, and 7, respectively). The simulations are informed by experience gained from past research in this area and validated by field measurement and forensic experience. The modeling program was developed to assess the moisture durability of the wall assemblies based on three primary sources of moisture: construction moisture, air leakage condensation, and bulk water leakage. The peak annual moisture content of the wood based exterior sheathing was used to comparatively analyze the response to the moisture loads for each of the walls in each given city. Walls which experienced sheathing moisture contents between 20% and 28% were identified as risky, whereas those exceeding 28% were identified as very high risk. All of the wall assemblies perform well under idealized conditions. However, only the walls with exterior insulation, or cavity insulation which provides a hygrothermal function similar to exterior insulation, perform adequately when exposed to moisture loads. Walls with only cavity insulation are particularly susceptible to air leakage condensation. None of the walls performed well when a precipitation based bulk water leak was introduced to the backside of the sheathing, emphasizing the importance of proper flashing details.

  16. Extrapleural Inner Thoracic Wall Lesions: Multidetector CT Findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seung Soo; Kim, Young Tong; Jou, Sung Shik [Soonchunhyang University, Cheonan Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    The extrapleural space is external to the parietal pleura in the thorax. The structures within and adjacent to this region include the fat pad, endothoracic fascia, intercostal muscles, connective tissue, nerves, vessels, and ribs. Further, the space is divided into the inner and outer thoracic wall by the innermost intercostal muscle. Extrapleural lesions in the inner thoracic wall are classified as air-containing lesions, fat-containing lesions, and soft tissue-containing lesions according on their main component. Air-containing lesions include extrapleural air from direct chest trauma and extrapleural extension from pneumomediastinum. Prominent extrapleural fat is seen in decreased lung volume conditions, and can also be seen in normal individuals. Soft tissue-containing lesions include extrapleural extensions from a pleural or chest wall infection as well as tumors and extrapleural hematoma. We classify extrapleural lesions in the inner thoracic wall and illustrate their imaging findings

  17. In situ vitrification demonstration at Pit 1, Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Volume 2: Site characterization report of the Pit 1 area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spalding, B.P.; Bogle, M.A.; Cline, S.R.; Naney, M.T.; Gu, B.

    1997-12-01

    A treatability study was initiated in October 1993, initially encompassing the application of in situ vitrification (ISV) to at least two segments of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) seepage Pit 1 by the end of fiscal year (FY) 1995. This treatability study was to have supported a possible Interim Record of Decision (IROD) or removal action for closure of one or more of the seepage pits and trenches as early as FY 1997. The Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 7, which contains these seven seepage pits and trenches, will probably not begin until after the year 2000. This treatability study will establish the field-scale technical performance of ISV for (1) attaining the required depth, nominally 15 ft, to incorporate source contamination within and beneath the pits; (2) demonstrating field capability to overlap melt settings that are necessary to achieve fused, melted segments of the source contamination; (3) demonstrating off-gas handling technology for accommodating and minimizing the volatilization of {sup 137}Cs; (4) demonstrating adequate site characterization techniques to predict ISV melting kinetics, processing temperatures, and product durability; and (5) promoting public acceptance of ISV technology by demonstrating its safety, implementability, site impacts, and air emissions and by coordinating the treatability study within the regulatory closure process. This report summarizes the site characterization information gathered through the end of September 1996 which supports the planning and assessment of ISV for Pit 1 (objective 4 above).

  18. Status report on the geology of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory site and adjacent areas. Volume I. Text and appendices A-E

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpenter, D.W.; Puchlik, K.P.; Ramirez, A.L.; Wagoner, J.L.; Knauss, K.G.; Kasameyer, P.W.

    1980-10-01

    In April, 1979, geoscience personnel at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) initiated comprehensive geologic, seismologic, and hydrologic investigations of the LLNL site and nearby areas. These investigations have two objectives: 1. to obtain data for use in preparing a Final Environmental Impact Report for LLNL, pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act; 2. to obtain data for use in improving the determination of a design basis earthquake for structural analysis of LLNL facilities. The first phases of these investigations have been completed. Work completed to date includes a comprehensive literature review, analyses of three sets of aerial photographs, reconnaissance geophysical surveys, examination of existing LLNL site borehole data, and the logging of seven exploratory trenches, segments of two sewer trenches, a deep building foundation excavation, a road cut, and an enlarged creek bank exposure. One absolute age date has been obtained by the /sup 14/C method and several dates of pedogenic carbonate formation have been obtained by the /sup 230/Th//sup 234/U method. A seismic monitoring network has been established, and planning for a site hydrologic monitoring program and strong motion instrument network has been completed. The seismologic and hydrologic investigations are beyond the scope of this report and will be discussed separately in future documents.

  19. Effects of opening in shear walls of 30- storey building

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchi Sharma

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Tall towers and multi-storey buildings have fascinated mankind from the beginning of civilization, their construction being initially for defense and subsequently for ecclesiastical purposes. These tall buildings because of its height, is affected by lateral forces due to wind or earthquake actions tends to snap the building in shear and push it over in bending. In general, the rigidity (i.e. Resistance to lateral deflection and stability (i.e. Resistance to overturning moments requirement become more important. Shear walls (Structural walls contribute significant lateral stiffness, strength, and overall ductility and energy dissipation capacity. In many structural walls a regular pattern of openings has to be provided due to various functional requirements such as to accommodate doors, windows and service ducts. Such type of openings reduces the stiffness of the shear wall to some extent depending on the shape and size of the opening. In the present parametric study, efforts are made to investigate and critically assess the effects of various size of openings in shear walls on the responses and behaviors of multi-storey buildings. The 30 storey Prototype buildings with different types of openings in shear wall with and without incorporating the volume of shear wall reduced in the boundary elements are analyzed using software E-TABS using Response spectrum method (1893(Part-1-2002 and Time history method.

  20. 3D cardiac wall thickening assessment for acute myocardial infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalid, A.; Chan, B. T.; Lim, E.; Liew, Y. M.

    2017-06-01

    Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is the most severe form of coronary artery disease leading to localized myocardial injury and therefore irregularities in the cardiac wall contractility. Studies have found very limited differences in global indices (such as ejection fraction, myocardial mass and volume) between healthy subjects and AMI patients, and therefore suggested regional assessment. Regional index, specifically cardiac wall thickness (WT) and thickening is closely related to cardiac function and could reveal regional abnormality due to AMI. In this study, we developed a 3D wall thickening assessment method to identify regional wall contractility dysfunction due to localized myocardial injury from infarction. Wall thickness and thickening were assessed from 3D personalized cardiac models reconstructed from cine MRI images by fitting inscribed sphere between endocardial and epicardial wall. The thickening analysis was performed in 5 patients and 3 healthy subjects and the results were compared against the gold standard 2D late-gadolinium-enhanced (LGE) images for infarct localization. The notable finding of this study is the highly accurate estimation and visual representation of the infarct size and location in 3D. This study provides clinicians with an intuitive way to visually and qualitatively assess regional cardiac wall dysfunction due to infarction in AMI patients.

  1. Laboratory Evaluation of In Situ Chemical Oxidation for Groundwater Remediation, Test Area North, Operable Unit 1-07B, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Volume Two, Appendices C, D, and E

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cline, S.R.; Denton, D.L.; Giaquinto, J.M.; McCracken, M.K.; Starr, R.C.

    1999-04-01

    These appendices support the results and discussion of the laboratory work performed to evaluate the feasibility of in situ chemical oxidation for Idaho National Environmental and Engineering Laboratory's (INEEL) Test Area North (TAN) which is contained in ORNL/TM-1371 l/Vol. This volume contains Appendices C-E. Appendix C is a compilation of all recorded data and mathematical calculations made to interpret the data. For the Task 3 and Task 4 work, the spreadsheet column definitions are included immediately before the actual spreadsheet pages and are listed as ''Sample Calculations/Column Definitions'' in the table of contents. Appendix D includes the chronological order in which the experiments were conducted and the final project costs through October 1998. Appendix E is a compilation of the monthly progress reports submitted to INEEL during the course of the project.

  2. Manipulating flow separation: sensitivity of stagnation points, separatrix angles and recirculation area to steady actuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boujo, E; Gallaire, F

    2014-10-08

    A variational technique is used to derive analytical expressions for the sensitivity of several geometric indicators of flow separation to steady actuation. Considering the boundary layer flow above a wall-mounted bump, the six following representative quantities are considered: the locations of the separation point and reattachment point connected by the separatrix, the separation angles at these stagnation points, the backflow area and the recirculation area. For each geometric quantity, linear sensitivity analysis allows us to identify regions which are the most sensitive to volume forcing and wall blowing/suction. Validations against full nonlinear Navier-Stokes calculations show excellent agreement for small-amplitude control for all considered indicators. With very resemblant sensitivity maps, the reattachment point, the backflow and recirculation areas are seen to be easily manipulated. By contrast, the upstream separation point and the separatrix angles are seen to remain extremely robust with respect to external steady actuation.

  3. Strengthening of Shear Walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Christian Skodborg

    The theory for concrete structures strengthened with fiber reinforced polymer materials has been developing for approximately two decades, and there are at the present time numerous guidelines covering strengthening of many commonly encountered structural building elements. Strengthening of in......-plane loaded walls and disks is however not included in any guidelines, and only a small fraction of scientists have initiated research within this topic. Furthermore, studies of the principal behavior and response of a strengthened disk has not yet been investigated satisfactorily, and this is the principal...... that describes a unit width strip of a strengthened disk. The unit width strip is named a strengthened concrete tension member and contains a single tensile crack and four debonding cracks. Analysis of the member results in closed form expressions for the load-crack opening relationship. Further analysis...

  4. Improving Station Performance by Building Isolation Walls in the Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yan; Horn, Nikolaus; Leohardt, Roman

    2014-05-01

    Conrad Observatory is situated far away from roads and industrial areas on the Trafelberg in Lower Austria. At the end of the seismic tunnel, the main seismic instrument of the Observatory with a station code CONA is located. This station is one of the most important seismic stations in the Austrian Seismic Network (network code OE). The seismic observatory consists of a 145m long gallery and an underground laboratory building with several working areas. About 25 meters away from the station CONA, six temporary seismic stations were implemented for research purposes. Two of them were installed with the same equipment as CONA, while the remaining four stations were set up with digitizers having lower noise and higher resolution (Q330HR) and sensors with the same type (STS-2). In order to prevent possible disturbances by air pressure and temperature fluctuation, three walls were built inside of the tunnel. The first wall is located ca 63 meters from the tunnel entrance, while a set of double walls with a distance of 1.5 meters is placed about 53 meters from the first isolation wall but between the station CONA and the six temporary stations. To assess impact of the isolation walls on noise reduction and detection performance, investigations are conducted in two steps. The first study is carried out by comparing the noise level and detection performance between the station CONA behind the double walls and the stations in front of the double walls for verifying the noise isolation by the double walls. To evaluate the effect of the single wall, station noise level and detection performance were studied by comparing the results before and after the installation of the wall. Results and discussions will be presented. Additional experiment is conducted by filling insulation material inside of the aluminium boxes of the sensors (above and around the sensors). This should help us to determine an optimal insulation of the sensors with respect to pressure and temperature

  5. Cell wall evolution and diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonatan Ulrik Fangel

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Plant cell walls display a considerable degree of diversity in their compositions and molecular architectures. In some cases the functional significance of a particular cell wall type appears to be easy to discern: secondary cells walls are often heavy reinforced with lignin that provides the required durability; the thin cell walls of pollen tubes have particular compositions that enable their tip growth; lupin seed cell walls are characteristically thickened with galactan used as a storage polysaccharide. However, more frequently the evolutionary mechanisms and selection pressures that underpin cell wall diversity and evolution are unclear. The rapidly increasing availability of transcriptome and genome data sets, development of high-throughput methods for cell wall analyses, and expansion of molecular probe sets, are providing new insights into the diversity and occurrence of cell wall polysaccharides and associated biosynthetic genes. Such research is important for refining our understanding of some of the fundamental processes that enabled plants to colonise land and subsequently radiate so comprehensively. The study of cell wall structural diversity is also an important aspect of the industrial utilization of global polysaccharide bio-resources.

  6. Rapid estimate of solid volume in large tuff cores using a gas pycnometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thies, C. [ed.; Geddis, A.M.; Guzman, A.G. [and others

    1996-09-01

    A thermally insulated, rigid-volume gas pycnometer system has been developed. The pycnometer chambers have been machined from solid PVC cylinders. Two chambers confine dry high-purity helium at different pressures. A thick-walled design ensures minimal heat exchange with the surrounding environment and a constant volume system, while expansion takes place between the chambers. The internal energy of the gas is assumed constant over the expansion. The ideal gas law is used to estimate the volume of solid material sealed in one of the chambers. Temperature is monitored continuously and incorporated into the calculation of solid volume. Temperature variation between measurements is less than 0.1{degrees}C. The data are used to compute grain density for oven-dried Apache Leap tuff core samples. The measured volume of solid and the sample bulk volume are used to estimate porosity and bulk density. Intrinsic permeability was estimated from the porosity and measured pore surface area and is compared to in-situ measurements by the air permeability method. The gas pycnometer accommodates large core samples (0.25 m length x 0.11 m diameter) and can measure solid volume greater than 2.20 cm{sup 3} with less than 1% error.

  7. Water-Walled Microfluidics Makes an Ultimate Optical Finesse

    CERN Document Server

    Maayani, Shai; Carmon, Tal

    2015-01-01

    Liquids serve microcavity research ever since Ashkins studies on optical resonances in levitating droplets to recent optofluidic resonators. Droplets can provide optical quality factor (Q) in proximity to the limit restricted by water absorption and radiation loss. However, water micro-drops vaporize quickly due to their large area to volume ratio. Here we fabricate a water-air interface that almost entirely surrounds our device, allowing for more than 1,000,000 recirculations of light (finesse). We sustain the droplets for longer than 16 hours using a nano-water-bridge that extends from the droplet to a practically-unlimited distant-reservoir that compensates for evaporation. Our device exhibits surface tension 8000-times stronger than gravity that self-stabilizes its shape to a degree sufficient to maintain critical coupling as well as to resolve split modes. Our device has 98 percents of their surrounding walls made strictly of water-air interfaces with concave, convex or saddle geometries, suggesting an a...

  8. A silica aerogel Cerenkov counter with diffusing walls

    CERN Document Server

    Carlson, P J

    1979-01-01

    A Cerenkov counter with an active area of 28*80 cm/sup 2/, using silica aerogel with a refractive index 1.03 is described. The light is collected by diffuse reflecting walls. With 9 cm of aerogel 9 photoelectrons are obtained for beta =1 particles. Scintillations in the walls of the detector amount to a maximum of 0.07 photoelectrons. (3 refs).

  9. Occupy Wall Street

    OpenAIRE

    Benítez,Francisca

    2011-01-01

    В статье рассматривается организованная антипотребительскими сообществами и направленная против негативных форм глобализации акция «Occupy Wall Street». Движение возникло осенью 2011 г. в США и стремительно распространилось по всему миру. Акции в поддержку движения были проведены еще в 82 странах. Автор, исследуя причины возникновения движения и источники его финансирования, приходит к выводу, что проект «Occupy Wall Street» может быть очередной уловкой глобалистов, цель которой «обезвредить»...

  10. Reliability Analysis of Geotechnical Failure Modes for Vertical Wall Breakwaters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Burcharth, H. F.

    2000-01-01

    Vertical wall breakwaters are usually designed as concrete caissons placed on the top of a rubble mound foundation or a rubble bedding layer. The purpose of the breakwater is usually to protect the area behind the breakwater from being flooded by large waves. The area protected can for example...... be a harbour of small or large importance, an important industrial area or a heavily populated coast line. This implies that vertical wall breakwaters are used under quite different conditions and therefore the consequences of a complete or partial failure also are very different. This implies...

  11. Control of Wall Mounting Robot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sloth, Christoffer; Pedersen, Rasmus

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a method for designing controllers for trajectory tracking with actuator constraints. In particular, we consider a joystick-controlled wall mounting robot called WallMo. In contrast to previous works, a model-free approach is taken to the control problem, where the path...

  12. Moisture Research - Optimizing Wall Assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arena, L.; Mantha, P.

    2013-05-01

    The Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) evaluated several different configurations of wall assemblies to determine the accuracy of moisture modeling and make recommendations to ensure durable, efficient assemblies. WUFI and THERM were used to model the hygrothermal and heat transfer characteristics of these walls.

  13. Bacterial cell-wall recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jarrod W.; Fisher, Jed F.; Mobashery, Shahriar

    2012-01-01

    Many Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria recycle a significant proportion of the peptidoglycan components of their cell walls during their growth and septation. In many—and quite possibly all—bacteria, the peptidoglycan fragments are recovered and recycled. While cell-wall recycling is beneficial for the recovery of resources, it also serves as a mechanism to detect cell-wall–targeting antibiotics and to regulate resistance mechanisms. In several Gram-negative pathogens, anhydro-MurNAc-peptide cell-wall fragments regulate AmpC β-lactamase induction. In some Gram-positive organisms, short peptides derived from the cell wall regulate the induction of both β-lactamase and β-lactam-resistant penicillin-binding proteins. The involvement of peptidoglycan recycling with resistance regulation suggests that inhibitors of the enzymes involved in the recycling might synergize with cell-wall-targeted antibiotics. Indeed, such inhibitors improve the potency of β-lactams in vitro against inducible AmpC β-lactamase-producing bacteria. We describe the key steps of cell-wall remodeling and recycling, the regulation of resistance mechanisms by cell-wall recycling, and recent advances toward the discovery of cell-wall recycling inhibitors. PMID:23163477

  14. External bulb variable volume maser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhardt, V. S.; Cervenka, P. O. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A maser functioning as a frequency standard stable to one part in 10 to the 14th power includes a variable volume, constant surface area storage bulb having a fixed volume portion located in a resonant cavity from which the frequency standard is derived. A variable volume portion of the bulb, exterior to the resonant cavity, has a maximum volume on the same order of magnitude as the fixed volume bulb portion. The cavity has a length to radius ratio of at least 3:1 so that the operation is attained without the need for a feedback loop. A baffle plate, between the fixed and variable volume bulb portions, includes apertures for enabling hydrogen atoms to pass between the two bulb portions and is an electromagnetic shield that prevents coupling of the electromagnetic field of the cavity into the variable volume bulb portion.

  15. Ultrasonography of chest wall lesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Cheol Min; Kim, C. H.; Cha, I. H.; Chung, K. B.; Ser, W. H.; Choi, Y. H. [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1989-12-15

    Thirty-one patients with chest wall diseases were studied with ultrasound to evaluate its role in chest wall lesions. There were eight infectious conditions, 9 benign tumors, 11 malignant lesions and 3 miscellaneous cases. Diffuse chest wall thickening with heterogeneous echogenicity and obliteration of subcutaneous fat layer are findings of acute infection. In cases of tuberculous smpyema necessitates, pleural abnormality extended to the chest wall through intercostal space. Benign tumors were well demarcated, except in 4 cases of lipoma/lipomatosis. Malignant lesions showed irregular soft tissue masses, bone destruction, pleural effusion and subcutaneous invasion. Multiple enlarged lymph nodes were also shown. Ultrasound can demonstrate te internal structure, extent, depth and associated findings such as pleural effusion, bone destruction and peripheral lung involvement. Ultrasound is not only safe, non-invasive and an effective diagnostic imaging modality for chest wall disease, but can also guide aspiration or biopsy for pathologic diagnosis

  16. Adding crumb rubber into exterior wall materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Han; Thong-On, Norasit; Zhang, Xiong

    2002-10-01

    In Arizona US, most houses are built with walls covered by stuccos/coatings/mortars. This paper presents an explorative investigation of adding crumb rubber into stuccos/coatings/mortars. A series of experiments are conducted to examine the thermal and mechanical performance of the crumb rubber mixes. The results show that, the mixes with crumb rubber do exhibit more desirable performances like being high in crack-resistance and thermal insulation, and low in thermal expansion/contraction. The drawback for the crumb rubber mixes is the reduction in compressive strength, but which can be compensated by other means. As a site experiment, an area of 100 square-feet of crumb rubber coatings for two mix designs is sprayed on a tire-adobe wall. After being sprayed more than 14 months, the coatings apparently are in good condition. Significance of this study is that this practice, if accepted, will yield improved products that consume large quantities of crumb rubber.

  17. Dry wall Kras 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domen Zupančič

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the modesty of hiska, they show a simple understanding of corbelling technique. One could say they are all examples of human landscape cultivation. Although there is no evident common line when comparing all types of hiska, the cunning eye may observe one shared feature: the positioning of the entrance. More or less all the documented shelters have south or south-western facing entrances. The burja is a cold northerly wind; from the south (Adriatic Sea the winds are warmer. When resting, the setting sun is taken as a sign of the ending of the working day and a reward for the whole day’s efforts. Entrances are the only openings to these structures, and they should serve as well as possible - to watch over the crops, to wait when hunting, to enjoy the calm of evening light, to breathe the sea wind.The syntax of the architectural language of layering stone and shaping the pattern of the landscape remain an inventive realisation of spatial ideas from the past until today. Not only ideas of shaping space - these ideas are basic interventions in the natural habitat which contribute to survival. Culture and an awareness of its values are the origins of local development and reasonable heritage preservation. The next step are tutorial days with workshops on how to build dry stone structures, walls and other stone architecture, as the DSWA organisation in the UK is doing.

  18. Analytical 1D models of the wall thermal resistance of rectangular minichannels applied in heat exchangers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rybiński Witold

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents four 1-dimensional models of thermal resistance of walls in a heat exchanger with rectangular minichannels. The first model is the simplest one, with a single wall separating two fluids. The second model of the so called equivalent wall takes into account total volume of intermediate walls between layers of minichannels and of side walls of minichannels. The next two more complicated models take separately into account thermal resistance of these walls. In these two models side walls are treated as fins. The results of models comparison are presented. It is shown that thermal resistance may be neglected for metal walls but it should be taken into account for the walls made of plastics. For the case of non-neglected wall thermal resistance the optimum wall thickness was derived. Minichannel heat exchangers made of plastic are larger than those built of metal, but are significantly cheaper. It makes possible to use of such exchangers in inexpensive microscale ORC installations.

  19. Growth Description for Vessel Wall Adaptation: A Thick-Walled Mixture Model of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grytsan, Andrii; Eriksson, Thomas S E; Watton, Paul N; Gasser, T Christian

    2017-08-25

    (1) Background: Vascular tissue seems to adapt towards stable homeostatic mechanical conditions, however, failure of reaching homeostasis may result in pathologies. Current vascular tissue adaptation models use many ad hoc assumptions, the implications of which are far from being fully understood; (2) Methods: The present study investigates the plausibility of different growth kinematics in modeling Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm (AAA) evolution in time. A structurally motivated constitutive description for the vessel wall is coupled to multi-constituent tissue growth descriptions; Constituent deposition preserved either the constituent's density or its volume, and Isotropic Volume Growth (IVG), in-Plane Volume Growth (PVG), in-Thickness Volume Growth (TVG) and No Volume Growth (NVG) describe the kinematics of the growing vessel wall. The sensitivity of key modeling parameters is explored, and predictions are assessed for their plausibility; (3) Results: AAA development based on TVG and NVG kinematics provided not only quantitatively, but also qualitatively different results compared to IVG and PVG kinematics. Specifically, for IVG and PVG kinematics, increasing collagen mass production accelerated AAA expansion which seems counterintuitive. In addition, TVG and NVG kinematics showed less sensitivity to the initial constituent volume fractions, than predictions based on IVG and PVG; (4) Conclusions: The choice of tissue growth kinematics is of crucial importance when modeling AAA growth. Much more interdisciplinary experimental work is required to develop and validate vascular tissue adaption models, before such models can be of any practical use.

  20. Solar walls in tsbi3 user's guide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wittchen, K.B.

    tsbi3 is a user-friendly and flexible computer program, which provides support to the design team in the analysis of the indoor climate and the energy performance of buildings. The solar wall module gives tsbi3 the capability of simulating solar walls and their interaction with the building....... This version, C, of tsbi3 is capable of simulating five types of solar walls say: mass-walls, Trombe-walls, double Trombe-walls, internally ventilated walls and solar walls for preheating ventilation air. The user's guide gives a description of the capabilities and how to simulate solar walls in tsbi3....

  1. Eficácia de diferentes inseticidas e de volumes de calda no controle de Spodoptera frugiperda nas culturas do milho e sorgo cultivados em várzea Efficacy of different insecticides and suspension volumes to control Spodoptera frugiperda in corn and sorghum in low land areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Antônio Gonçalves Costa

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available A lagarta-do-cartucho Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith, 1797 tem causado prejuízos significativos à produtividade nas culturas do milho e sorgo, principalmente em áreas de várzeas. Com o objetivo de determinar-se a eficiência de controle de S. frugiperda em milho e sorgo no agroecossistema de várzea e avaliar a resposta das culturas sobre o rendimento de grãos, foi realizado um experimento na Embrapa Clima Temperado de Pelotas, Estação Experimental de Terras Baixas, Capão do Leão, RS no ano agrícola 2001/2002. Semeou-se milho da cultivar Pioneer 30F33 e sorgo da cultivar Aventis BRS 305 em blocos ao acaso com parcelas sub-subdivididas. Os inseticidas utilizados e respectivas dosagens (mL p.c. ha-1 foram o Match CE (lufenurom, 300; Rimom 100 CE (novalurom, 150; Tracer SC (espinosade, 50; Lorsbam 480 BR (clorpirifós, 500 e Karate 50 Zeon (lambdacialotrina, 150. As avaliações foram aos 5, 10, 15, 20, e 25 dias após a aplicação. Os volumes de calda (L ha-1 utilizados para cada tratamento foram 0, 150, 200, 250 e 300. A eficiência de controle de S. frugiperda com os inseticidas lufenurom, novalurom, espinosade, clorpirifós e lambdacialotrina aplicados em volumes de calda de 0, 150, 200, 250 e 300L ha-1 que variou em função do estádio da cultura do milho e sorgo e época de aplicação. O rendimento de grãos foi independente do volume de calda aplicado tanto para as culturas de milho e sorgo.The fall armyworm Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith, 1797 has caused significant damage, mainly, in corn and sorghum growing in low land areas. A trial was carried out at Embrapa Clima Temperado de Pelotas, Estação Experimental de Terras Baixas, Capão do Leão, RS. The objective was to study the efficacy of S. frugiperda control based upon yield response of the corn cv Pioneer 30F33 and sorghum cv Aventis BRS 305. The experimental design was a random block with split plot. The insecticides and rate were Match CE (lufenurom, 300mL p

  2. The Shrinkage Cracking Behavior in Reinforced Reactive Powder Concrete Walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir A. Al-Mashhadi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the reduced scale wall models were used (they are believed to resemble as much as possible the field conditions to study the shrinkage behavior of reactive powder concrete (RPC base restrained walls. Six base restrained RPC walls were casted in different length/height ratios of two ratios of steel fiber by volume in Summer. These walls were restrained by reinforced concrete bases to provide the continuous base restraint to the walls. The mechanical properties of reactive powder concrete investigated were; compressive strength between (75.3 – 140.1 MPa, splitting tensile strength between (5.7 – 13.9 MPa, flexural tensile strength (7.7 – 24.5 MPa, and static modulus of elasticity (32.7 – 47.1GPa. Based on the observations of this work, it was found that the cracks did not develop in the reduced scale of the reactive powder concrete (RPC walls restrained from movement at their bases for different L/H ratios (2, 5, and 10 and for two ratio of steel fiber (1% & 2% during 90 days period of drying conditions. Moreover, the shrinkage values increase toward the edges. Based on the results of this work, the increase in the maximum shrinkage values of walls with 1% steel fiber were (29%, 28%, 28% of the maximum shrinkage values of walls with 2% steel fiber of length/height ratios of (2, 5, and 10 respectively. The experimental observation in beam specimens showed that the free shrinkage, tensile strain capacity and elastic tensile strain capacity (at date of cracking of beams with 1% steel fiber were higher than the beams with 2% steel fiber by about (24%, (45% and (42% respectively

  3. Development of the ventral body wall in the human embryo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekonen, Hayelom K; Hikspoors, Jill P J M; Mommen, Greet; Köhler, S Eleonore; Lamers, Wouter H

    2015-01-01

    Migratory failure of somitic cells is the commonest explanation for ventral body wall defects. However, the embryo increases ∼ 25-fold in volume in the period that the ventral body wall forms, so that differential growth may, instead, account for the observed changes in topography. Human embryos between 4 and 10 weeks of development were studied, using amira® reconstruction and cinema 4D® remodeling software for visualization. Initially, vertebrae and ribs had formed medially, and primordia of sternum and hypaxial flank muscle primordium laterally in the body wall at Carnegie Stage (CS)15 (5.5 weeks). The next week, ribs and muscle primordium expanded in ventrolateral direction only. At CS18 (6.5 weeks), separate intercostal and abdominal wall muscles differentiated, and ribs, sterna, and muscles began to expand ventromedially and caudally, with the bilateral sternal bars fusing in the midline after CS20 (7 weeks) and the rectus muscles reaching the umbilicus at CS23 (8 weeks). The near-constant absolute distance between both rectus muscles and approximately fivefold decline of this distance relative to body circumference between 6 and 10 weeks identified dorsoventral growth in the dorsal body wall as determinant of the ‘closure’ of the ventral body wall. Concomitant with the straightening of the embryonic body axis after the 6th week, the abdominal muscles expanded ventrally and caudally to form the infraumbilical body wall. Our data, therefore, show that the ventral body wall is formed by differential dorsoventral growth in the dorsal part of the body. PMID:26467243

  4. Anadromous fish inventory: Summary volume

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Summary volume, with discussion, on anadromous fish inventories, species lists, histories of fisheries, habitat, key spawning and rearing areas, runs/escapements,...

  5. Cell wall proteomics of crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setsuko eKomatsu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Cell wall proteins play key roles in cell structure and metabolism, cell enlargement, signal transduction, responses to environmental stress, and many other physiological events. Agricultural crops are often used for investigating stress tolerance because cultivars with differing degrees of tolerance are available. Abiotic and biotic stress factors markedly influence the geographical distribution and yields of many crop species. Crop cell wall proteomics is of particular importance for improving crop productivity, particularly under unfavorable environmental conditions. To better understand the mechanisms underlying stress response in crops, cell wall proteomic analyses are being increasingly utilized. In this review, the methods of purification and purity assays of cell wall protein fractions from crops are described, and the results of protein identification using gel-based and gel-free proteomic techniques are presented. Furthermore, protein composition of the cell walls of rice, wheat, maize and soybean are compared, and the role of cell wall proteins in crops under flooding and drought stress is discussed. This review will be useful for clarifying the role of the cell wall of crops in response to environmental stresses.

  6. Temperature measurements in a wall stabilized steady flame using CARS

    KAUST Repository

    Sesha Giri, Krishna

    2017-01-05

    Flame quenching by heat loss to a surface continues to be an active area of combustion research. Close wall temperature measurements in an isothermal wall-stabilized flame are reported in this work. Conventional N-vibrational Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) thermometry as close as 275 μm to a convex wall cooled with water has been carried out. The standard deviation of mean temperatures is observed to be ~6.5% for high temperatures (>2000K) and ~14% in the lower range (<500K). Methane/air and ethylene/air stoichiometric flames for various global strain rates based on exit bulk velocities are plotted and compared. CH* chemiluminescence is employed to determine the flame location relative to the wall. Flame locations are shown to move closer to the wall with increasing strain rates in addition to higher near-wall temperatures. Peak temperatures for ethylene are considerably higher (~250-300K) than peak temperatures for methane. Preheat zone profiles are similar for different strain rates across fuels. This work demonstrates close wall precise temperature measurments using CARS.

  7. The plant cell wall: A dynamic barrier against pathogen invasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William eUnderwood

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Prospective plant pathogens must overcome the physical barrier presented by the plant cell wall. In addition to being a preformed, passive barrier limiting access of pathogens to plant cells, the cell wall is actively remodeled and reinforced specifically at discrete sites of interaction with potentially pathogenic microbes. Active reinforcement of the cell wall through the deposition of call wall appositions, referred to as papillae, is an early response to perception of numerous categories of pathogens including fungi and bacteria. Rapid deposition of papillae is generally correlated with resistance to fungal pathogens that attempt to penetrate plant cell walls for the establishment of feeding structures. Despite the ubiquity and apparent importance of this early defense response, relatively little is known about the underlying molecular mechanisms and cellular processes involved in the targeting and assembly of papillae. This review summarizes recent advances in our understanding of call wall-associated defenses induced by pathogen perception as well as the impact of changes in cell wall polymers on interactions with pathogens and highlights significant unanswered questions driving future research in the area.

  8. Wall Insulation; BTS Technology Fact Sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Southface Energy Institute; Tromly, K.

    2000-11-07

    Properly sealed, moisture-protected, and insulated walls help increase comfort, reduce noise, and save on energy costs. This fact sheet addresses these topics plus advanced framing techniques, insulation types, wall sheathings, and steps for effective wall construction and insulation.

  9. The digital evolution of occupy wall street.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conover, Michael D; Ferrara, Emilio; Menczer, Filippo; Flammini, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    We examine the temporal evolution of digital communication activity relating to the American anti-capitalist movement Occupy Wall Street. Using a high-volume sample from the microblogging site Twitter, we investigate changes in Occupy participant engagement, interests, and social connectivity over a fifteen month period starting three months prior to the movement's first protest action. The results of this analysis indicate that, on Twitter, the Occupy movement tended to elicit participation from a set of highly interconnected users with pre-existing interests in domestic politics and foreign social movements. These users, while highly vocal in the months immediately following the birth of the movement, appear to have lost interest in Occupy related communication over the remainder of the study period.

  10. The digital evolution of occupy wall street.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D Conover

    Full Text Available We examine the temporal evolution of digital communication activity relating to the American anti-capitalist movement Occupy Wall Street. Using a high-volume sample from the microblogging site Twitter, we investigate changes in Occupy participant engagement, interests, and social connectivity over a fifteen month period starting three months prior to the movement's first protest action. The results of this analysis indicate that, on Twitter, the Occupy movement tended to elicit participation from a set of highly interconnected users with pre-existing interests in domestic politics and foreign social movements. These users, while highly vocal in the months immediately following the birth of the movement, appear to have lost interest in Occupy related communication over the remainder of the study period.

  11. Co-seismic changes of well water level and volume strain meter in capital area and its vicinity, due to the Nov.14, 2001 Ms8.1 Kunlun Mountain earthquake, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuqiong Huang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The Kunlunshan Mountain Ms8.1 earthquake, occurred in Nov.14, 2001, is the first event with magnitude more than 8 in the China earthquake monitoring history, specifically at the beginning of digital techniques in precursor monitoring networks. Any investigation of recorded data on this earthquake is very important for testing the operation of the digital monitoring networks and understanding the preparation, occurrence, and adjustment of stress/strain of strong continental earthquakes. In this paper we investigated the co-seismic response changes of well water level of groundwater and volume strain meter of bore hole in digital earthquake monitoring network of Capital area and its vicinity, due to the Nov.14, 2001 Ms8.1 Kunlun Mountain earthquake. The responding time, shapes or manners, amplitudes, and lasting time of well water level and strain-meters to seismic wave are studied in comparison. Then we discussed the possibility that the response changes of groundwater to strong distant earthquakes can be understood as one kind of observing evidence of stress/strain changes induced by distant earthquake.

  12. Circulatory Shock. Volume 27, Number 4, 1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-02-01

    confined to the lung or occurs throughout the interstitium. EVLW and total body extracelular fluid volume (ECFV) were measured in 6 dogs receiving 1.5 X...parallel isolation of SL vesicles from both the left and right ventricular free walls. Control hemodynamics remained constant Abstracts 353 during the 2 hr

  13. Blanket comparison and selection study. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-10-01

    This volume contains extensive data for the following chapters: (1) solid breeder tritium recovery, (2) solid breeder blanket designs, (3) alternate blanket concept screening, and (4) safety analysis. The following appendices are also included: (1) blanket design guidelines, (2) power conversion systems, (3) helium-cooled, vanadium alloy structure blanket design, (4) high wall loading study, and (5) molten salt safety studies. (MOW)

  14. Thermal Performance Evaluation of Walls with Gas Filled Panel Insulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shrestha, Som S. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Desjarlais, Andre Omer [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Atchley, Jerald Allen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Gas filled insulation panels (GFP) are very light weight and compact (when uninflated) advanced insulation products. GFPs consist of multiple layers of thin, low emittance (low-e) metalized aluminum. When expanded, the internal, low-e aluminum layers form a honeycomb structure. These baffled polymer chambers are enveloped by a sealed barrier and filled with either air or a low-conductivity gas. The sealed exterior aluminum foil barrier films provide thermal resistance, flammability protection, and properties to contain air or a low conductivity inert gas. This product was initially developed with a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy. The unexpanded product is nearly flat for easy storage and transport. Therefore, transportation volume and weight of the GFP to fill unit volume of wall cavity is much smaller compared to that of other conventional insulation products. This feature makes this product appealing to use at Army Contingency Basing, when transportation cost is significant compared to the cost of materials. The objective of this study is to evaluate thermal performance of walls, similar to those used at typical Barracks Hut (B-Hut) hard shelters, when GFPs are used in the wall cavities. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) tested performance of the wall in the rotatable guarded hotbox (RGHB) according to the ASTM C 1363 standard test method.

  15. PREFACE: Domain wall dynamics in nanostructures Domain wall dynamics in nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrows, C. H.; Meier, G.

    2012-01-01

    Domain structures in magnetic materials are ubiquitous and have been studied for decades. The walls that separate them are topological defects in the magnetic order parameter and have a wide variety of complex forms. In general, their investigation is difficult in bulk materials since only the domain structure on the surface of a specimen is visible. Cutting the sample to reveal the interior causes a rearrangement of the domains into a new form. As with many other areas of magnetism, the study of domain wall physics has been revitalised by the advent of nanotechnology. The ability to fabricate nanoscale structures has permitted the formation of simplified and controlled domain patterns; the development of advanced microscopy methods has permitted them to be imaged and then modelled; subjecting them to ultrashort field and current pulses has permitted their dynamics to be explored. The latest results from all of these advances are described in this special issue. Not only has this led to results of great scientific beauty, but also to concepts of great applicability to future information technologies. In this issue the reader will find the latest results for these domain wall dynamics and the high-speed processes of topological structures such as domain walls and magnetic vortices. These dynamics can be driven by the application of magnetic fields, or by flowing currents through spintronic devices using the novel physics of spin-transfer torque. This complexity has been studied using a wide variety of experimental techniques at the edge of the spatial and temporal resolution currently available, and can be described using sophisticated analytical theory and computational modelling. As a result, the dynamics can be engineered to give rise to finely controlled memory and logic devices with new functionality. Moreover, the field is moving to study not only the conventional transition metal ferromagnets, but also complex heterostructures, novel magnets and even other

  16. Super Wall Graphics for Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Anne; Vlastos, George

    1985-01-01

    Steps for organizing and implementing a program that involves elementary students in beautifying their school with large-scale wall graphics are outlined. Sources of design, drawing hints, painting methods, application techniques, and follow-up activities are discussed. (RM)

  17. Restrained shrinkage of masonry walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijl, G.P.A.G. van; Rots, J.G.

    1998-01-01

    State of the art computational rnechanics, in combination with experimental programmes have a lot to offer in providing insight, characterization of total behaviour and predictive ability of structural masonry. Here numerical research towards rationalizing masonry wall movement joint positioning and

  18. Quenched scalar-meson correlator with domain wall fermions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prelovsek, S.; Orginos, K

    2003-05-01

    We study the q-barq singlet and non-singlet scalar-meson masses using domain wall fermions and the quenched approximation. The singlet mass is found to be smaller than the non-singlet mass and indicates that the lowest singlet meson state could be lighter than 1 GeV. The two-point functions for very small quark masses are compared with expectations from the small-volume chiral perturbation theory and the presence of fermionic zero modes.

  19. Modeling of Two-Phase Flow in Rough-Walled Fracture Using Level Set Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunfeng Dai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To describe accurately the flow characteristic of fracture scale displacements of immiscible fluids, an incompressible two-phase (crude oil and water flow model incorporating interfacial forces and nonzero contact angles is developed. The roughness of the two-dimensional synthetic rough-walled fractures is controlled with different fractal dimension parameters. Described by the Navier–Stokes equations, the moving interface between crude oil and water is tracked using level set method. The method accounts for differences in densities and viscosities of crude oil and water and includes the effect of interfacial force. The wettability of the rough fracture wall is taken into account by defining the contact angle and slip length. The curve of the invasion pressure-water volume fraction is generated by modeling two-phase flow during a sudden drainage. The volume fraction of water restricted in the rough-walled fracture is calculated by integrating the water volume and dividing by the total cavity volume of the fracture while the two-phase flow is quasistatic. The effect of invasion pressure of crude oil, roughness of fracture wall, and wettability of the wall on two-phase flow in rough-walled fracture is evaluated.

  20. Acute traumatic abdominal wall hernia

    OpenAIRE

    Hartog, Dennis; Tuinebreijer, Wim; Oprel, Pim; Patka, Peter

    2011-01-01

    textabstractAlthough blunt abdominal trauma is frequent, traumatic abdominal wall hernias (TAWH) are rare. We describe a large TAWH with associated intra-abdominal lesions that were caused by high-energy trauma. The diagnosis was missed by clinical examination but was subsequently revealed by a computed tomography (CT) scan. Repair consisted of an open anatomical reconstruction of the abdominal wall layers with reinforcement by an intraperitoneal composite mesh. The patient recovered well and...

  1. WASTE HANDLING BUILDING SHIELD WALL ANALYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Padula

    2000-01-13

    The scope of this analysis is to estimate the shielding wall, ceiling or equivalent door thicknesses that will be required in the Waste Handling Building to maintain the radiation doses to personnel within acceptable limits. The shielding thickness calculated is the minimum required to meet administrative limits, and not necessarily what will be recommended for the final design. The preliminary evaluations will identify the areas which have the greatest impact on mechanical and facility design concepts. The objective is to provide the design teams with the necessary information to assure an efficient and effective design.

  2. Renormalized Volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gover, A. Rod; Waldron, Andrew

    2017-09-01

    We develop a universal distributional calculus for regulated volumes of metrics that are suitably singular along hypersurfaces. When the hypersurface is a conformal infinity we give simple integrated distribution expressions for the divergences and anomaly of the regulated volume functional valid for any choice of regulator. For closed hypersurfaces or conformally compact geometries, methods from a previously developed boundary calculus for conformally compact manifolds can be applied to give explicit holographic formulæ for the divergences and anomaly expressed as hypersurface integrals over local quantities (the method also extends to non-closed hypersurfaces). The resulting anomaly does not depend on any particular choice of regulator, while the regulator dependence of the divergences is precisely captured by these formulæ. Conformal hypersurface invariants can be studied by demanding that the singular metric obey, smoothly and formally to a suitable order, a Yamabe type problem with boundary data along the conformal infinity. We prove that the volume anomaly for these singular Yamabe solutions is a conformally invariant integral of a local Q-curvature that generalizes the Branson Q-curvature by including data of the embedding. In each dimension this canonically defines a higher dimensional generalization of the Willmore energy/rigid string action. Recently, Graham proved that the first variation of the volume anomaly recovers the density obstructing smooth solutions to this singular Yamabe problem; we give a new proof of this result employing our boundary calculus. Physical applications of our results include studies of quantum corrections to entanglement entropies.

  3. Asymmetric evolution of anterior chest wall blood supply in female adolescents with progressive right-convex thoracic idiopathic scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliopoulos, Panagiotis; Korovessis, Panagiotis; Koureas, Georgios; Zacharatos, Spyridon; Stergiou, Panagiotis

    2007-09-01

    Breast asymmetry was believed to be related to asymmetry of anterior chest wall blood supply and subsequently to aetiology of idiopathic thoracic scoliosis in female adolescents. Recent investigations on the anterior chest wall blood supply with Colour Doppler Ultrasonography (CDU) in such individuals did not show anatomical and hemodynamic abnormalities. The present study investigated the evolution of anterior chest wall blood supply in these individuals over a 2-year period. Twenty female adolescents with progressive right-convex idiopathic thoracic scoliosis (scoliotics), who were during the study in therapy with horacolumbosacral orthosis (TLSO) and 20 age-matched girls, without spine deformity (controls) were studied with CDU [internal mammary artery (IMA)] twice within the 2-year period. IMA-anatomical parameters [lumen diameter (D) and cross sectional area (AR)] as well as hemodynamic flow parameters [time average mean flow velocity and flow volume per minute (FV)] were measured. In the 2-year-period of observation, TLSO prevented scoliosis progression (P = 0.004), while IMA-AR decreased bilaterally in the individuals of both groups (P < 0.03). In the last evaluation: in scoliotics right IMA FV decreased (P < 0.04), while in controls IMA FV decreased bilaterally (P < 0.03); left IMA FV was significantly higher (P < 0.05) in scoliotics than in controls. The significant, within the 2-year period, decrease of IMA-diameter, cross-sectional area, and flow volume seems to be a physiological ageing process because it was observed in all individuals (scoliotics and controls), and thus these anatomic and hemodynamic changes seem not to have been affected by bracing. The maintenance of left flow volume of IMA in the pre-brace levels in scoliotics was the most significant finding of this investigation. In conclusion, this study provided evidence for abnormalities in the evolution of anterior chest wall blood supply in female adolescents with progressive right

  4. Four-wall turbine airfoil with thermal strain control for reduced cycle fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambell, Christian X

    2013-09-17

    A turbine airfoil (20B) with a thermal expansion control mechanism that increases the airfoil camber (60, 61) under operational heating. The airfoil has four-wall geometry, including pressure side outer and inner walls (26, 28B), and suction side outer and inner walls (32, 34B). It has near-wall cooling channels (31F, 31A, 33F, 33A) between the outer and inner walls. A cooling fluid flow pattern (50C, 50W, 50H) in the airfoil causes the pressure side inner wall (28B) to increase in curvature under operational heating. The pressure side inner wall (28B) is thicker than walls (26, 34B) that oppose it in camber deformation, so it dominates them in collaboration with the suction side outer wall (32), and the airfoil camber increases. This reduces and relocates a maximum stress area (47) from the suction side outer wall (32) to the suction side inner wall (34B, 72) and the pressure side outer wall (26).

  5. Peri-diaphragmatic lung volume assessed by computed tomography correlates with quality of life in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Naoya; Muro, Shigeo; Fuseya, Yoshinori; Sato, Susumu; Oguma, Tsuyoshi; Kiyokawa, Hirofumi; Takahashi, Tamaki; Kinose, Daisuke; Hoshino, Yuma; Kubo, Takeshi; Hirai, Toyohiro; Mishima, Michiaki

    2012-10-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is important in the management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In patients with emphysema, lung hyperinflation identified radiologically as shortening and flattening of the diaphragm is associated with impaired HRQoL. It remains unclear whether shortening of the diaphragm and/or alteration in chest wall shape are associated with reduced pulmonary function and HRQoL. Pulmonary function testing and chest computed tomography (CT) were performed, and the St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) was administered to 123 patients with COPD. Using CT images, the ratio of volume of lung region adjacent to the diaphragm dome to total lung volume (DLV%) was evaluated as a novel CT index, and conventional indices, including percent low attenuation volume (LAV%), wall area percent (WA%), total lung volume and diaphragm length (Ldi) were calculated. DLV% was significantly correlated with Ldi. DLV% and Ldi were inversely correlated with lung hyperinflation, assessed as the ratio of residual volume to total lung capacity, independent of LAV% and WA%. Unlike Ldi, DLV% was inversely associated with all components and total scores for the SGRQ, independent of the severity of emphysema and airflow limitation. Reduced lung volume around the diaphragm correlated with lung hyperinflation and HRQoL, independent of emphysema severity. This needs to be verified in additional studies. © 2012 The Authors. Respirology © 2012 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  6. Velocity distribution in a turbulent flow near a rough wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korsun, A. S.; Pisarevsky, M. I.; Fedoseev, V. N.; Kreps, M. V.

    2017-11-01

    Velocity distribution in the zone of developed wall turbulence, regardless of the conditions on the wall, is described by the well-known Prandtl logarithmic profile. In this distribution, the constant, that determines the value of the velocity, is determined by the nature of the interaction of the flow with the wall and depends on the viscosity of the fluid, the dynamic velocity, and the parameters of the wall roughness.In extreme cases depending on the ratio between the thickness of the viscous sublayer and the size of the roughness the constant takes on a value that does not depend on viscosity, or leads to a ratio for a smooth wall.It is essential that this logarithmic profile is the result not only of the Prandtl theory, but can be derived from general considerations of the theory of dimensions, and also follows from the condition of local equilibrium of generation and dissipation of turbulent energy in the wall area. This allows us to consider the profile as a universal law of velocity distribution in the wall area of a turbulent flow.The profile approximation up to the maximum speed line with subsequent integration makes possible to obtain the resistance law for channels of simple shape. For channels of complex shape with rough walls, the universal profile can be used to formulate the boundary condition when applied to the calculation of turbulence models.This paper presents an empirical model for determining the constant of the universal logarithmic profile. The zone of roughness is described by a set of parameters and is considered as a porous structure with variable porosity.

  7. Effective thermal conductivity and diffusivity of containment wall for nuclear power plant OPR1000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, Hyung Gyun; Park, Hyun Sun [Div. of Advanced Nuclear Engineering (DANE), Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong Hwi; Kang, Hie Chan [Mechanical Engineering Div., Kunsan National University (KNU), Gunsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    The goal of this study is to evaluate the effective thermal conductivity and diffusivity of containment walls as heat sinks or passive cooling systems during nuclear power plant (NPP) accidents. Containment walls consist of steel reinforced concrete, steel liners, and tendons, and provide the main thermal resistance of the heat sinks, which varies with the volume fraction and geometric alignment of the rebar and tendons, as well as the temperature and chemical composition. The target geometry for the containment walls of this work is the standard Korean NPP OPR1000. Sample tests and numerical simulations are conducted to verify the correlations for models with different densities of concrete, volume fractions, and alignments of steel. Estimation of the effective thermal conductivity and diffusivity of the containment wall models is proposed. The Maxwell model and modified Rayleigh volume fraction model employed in the present work predict the experiment and finite volume method (FVM) results well. The effective thermal conductivity and diffusivity of the containment walls are summarized as functions of density, temperature, and the volume fraction of steel for the analysis of the NPP accidents.

  8. A note on stereological estimation of the volume-weighted second moment of particle volume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, E B; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt

    1991-01-01

    It is shown that for a variety of biological particle shapes, the volume-weighted second moment of particle volume can be estimated stereologically using only the areas of particle transects, which can be estimated manually by point-counting....

  9. Innovative Composite Wall System for Sheathing Masonry Walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendt, Robert L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Cavallo, James [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1997-09-25

    Existing Housing - Much of the older multifamily housing stock in the United States includes units in structures with uninsulated masonry walls. Included in this stock are two- and three-story walk-up apartments, larger apartment complexes, and public housing (both high- rise and townhouse). This older multifamily housing has seen years of heavy use that may have left the plaster wall marred or damaged. Long- term building settlement or movement may have cracked the plaster, sometimes severely. Moisture from invented kitchens and baths may have caused condensation on uninsulated exterior walls. At best this condensation has left stains on the paint or wallpaper. At worst it has supported mold and mildew growth, fouling the air and creating unhealthy living conditions. Deteriorating plaster and flaking paint also result from wet walls. The presence of flaking, lead-based paint in older (pre-1978) housing is a major public health concern. Children can suffer permanent mental handicaps and psychological disorders if they are subjected to elevated levels of lead, while adults can suffer hypertension and other maladies. Studies have found that, in some urban communities with older housing stocks, over 35% of children tested have elevated blood lead levels (Hastings, et al.: 1997). Nationally, nearly 22% of black, non-hispanic children living in pre-1946 housing were found to have elevated levels of lead in their blood (MWWR Article: February 21,1997). The deterioration of many of these walls is to the point that lead can freely enter the living space.

  10. Determination of wall tension in cerebral artery aneurysms by numerical simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isaksen, J.G.; Bazilevs, Y.; Kvamsdal, T.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Cerebral artery aneurysms rupture when wall tension exceeds the strength of the wall tissue. At present, risk-assessment of unruptured aneurysms does not include evaluation of the lesions shape, yet clinical experience suggests that this is of importance. We aimed to develop...... a computational model for simulation of fluid-structure interaction in cerebral aneurysms based on patient specific lesion geometry, with special emphasis on wall tension. METHODS: An advanced isogeometric fluid-structure analysis model incorporating flexible aneurysm wall based on patient specific computed...... tomography angiogram images was developed. Variables used in the simulation model were retrieved from a literature review. RESULTS: The simulation results exposed areas of high wall tension and wall displacement located where aneurysms usually rupture. CONCLUSIONS: We suggest that analyzing wall tension...

  11. Segmentation of inner and outer bladder wall using deep-learning convolutional neural network in CT urography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Marshall; Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Cha, Kenny; Chan, Heang-Ping; Samala, Ravi; Cohan, Richard H.; Caoili, Elaine M.

    2017-03-01

    We are developing a computerized system for detection of bladder cancer in CT urography. In this study, we used a deep-learning convolutional neural network (DL-CNN) to segment the bladder wall. This task is challenging due to differences in the wall between the contrast and non-contrast-filled regions, significant variations in appearance, size, and shape of the bladder among cases, overlap of the prostate with the bladder wall, and the wall being extremely thin compared to the overall size of the bladder. We trained a DL-CNN to estimate the likelihood that a given pixel would be inside the wall of the bladder using neighborhood information. A segmented bladder wall was then obtained using level sets with this likelihood map as a term in the level set energy formulation to obtain contours of the inner and outer bladder walls. The accuracy of the segmentation was evaluated by comparing the segmented wall outlines to hand outlines for a set of 79 training cases and 15 test cases using the average volume intersection % as the metric. For the training set, the inner wall achieved an average volume intersection of 90.0+/-8.7% and the outer wall achieved 93.7+/-3.9%. For the test set, the inner wall achieved an average volume intersection of 87.6+/-7.6% and the outer wall achieved 87.2+/-9.3%. The results show that the DL-CNN with level sets was effective in segmenting the inner and outer bladder walls.

  12. A note on stereological estimation of the volume-weighted second moment of particle volume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, E B; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt

    1991-01-01

    It is shown that for a variety of biological particle shapes, the volume-weighted second moment of particle volume can be estimated stereologically using only the areas of particle transects, which can be estimated manually by point-counting.......It is shown that for a variety of biological particle shapes, the volume-weighted second moment of particle volume can be estimated stereologically using only the areas of particle transects, which can be estimated manually by point-counting....

  13. Domain wall QCD with physical quark masses

    CERN Document Server

    Blum, T.; Christ, N.H.; Frison, J.; Garron, N.; Hudspith, R.J.; Izubuchi, T.; Janowski, T.; Jung, C.; Jüttner, A.; Kelly, C.; Kenway, R.D.; Lehner, C.; Marinkovic, M.; Mawhinney, R.D.; McGlynn, G.; Murphy, D.J.; Ohta, S.; Portelli, A.; Sachrajda, C.T.; Soni, A.

    2016-01-01

    We present results for several light hadronic quantities ($f_\\pi$, $f_K$, $B_K$, $m_{ud}$, $m_s$, $t_0^{1/2}$, $w_0$) obtained from simulations of 2+1 flavor domain wall lattice QCD with large physical volumes and nearly-physical pion masses at two lattice spacings. We perform a short, O(3)%, extrapolation in pion mass to the physical values by combining our new data in a simultaneous chiral/continuum `global fit' with a number of other ensembles with heavier pion masses. We use the physical values of $m_\\pi$, $m_K$ and $m_\\Omega$ to determine the two quark masses and the scale - all other quantities are outputs from our simulations. We obtain results with sub-percent statistical errors and negligible chiral and finite-volume systematics for these light hadronic quantities, including: $f_\\pi$ = 130.2(9) MeV; $f_K$ = 155.5(8) MeV; the average up/down quark mass and strange quark mass in the $\\bar {\\rm MS}$ scheme at 3 GeV, 2.997(49) and 81.64(1.17) MeV respectively; and the neutral kaon mixing parameter, $B_K$...

  14. Furnace and Heat Recovery Area Design and Analysis for Conceptual Design of Oxygen-Based PC Boiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrew Seltzer

    2005-01-01

    The objective of the furnace and heat recovery area design and analysis task of the Conceptual Design of Oxygen-Based PC Boiler study is to optimize the location and design of the furnace, burners, over-fire gas ports, and internal radiant surfaces. The furnace and heat recovery area were designed and analyzed using the FW-FIRE and HEATEX computer programs. The furnace is designed with opposed wall-firing burners and over-fire air ports. Water is circulated in the furnace by natural circulation to the waterwalls and divisional wall panels. Compared to the air-fired furnace, the oxygen-fired furnace requires only 65% of the surface area and 45% of the volume. Two oxygen-fired designs were simulated: (1) without over-fire air and (2) with 20% over-fire air. The maximum wall heat flux in the oxygen-fired furnace is more than double that of the air-fired furnace due to the higher flame temperature and higher H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2} concentrations. The coal burnout for the oxygen-fired case is 100% due to a 500 F higher furnace temperature and higher concentration of O{sub 2}. Because of the higher furnace wall temperature of the oxygen-fired case compared to the air-fired case, furnace water wall material was upgraded from carbon steel to T91. The total heat transfer surface required in the oxygen-fired heat recovery area (HRA) is 25% less than the air-fired HRA due to more heat being absorbed in the oxygen-fired furnace and the greater molecular weight of the oxygen-fired flue gas. The HRA tube materials and wall thickness are practically the same for the air-fired and oxygen-fired design since the flue gas and water/steam temperature profiles encountered by the heat transfer banks are very similar.

  15. Sex-specific mediation effect of the right fusiform face area volume on the association between variants in repeat length of AVPR1A RS3 and altruistic behavior in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junping; Qin, Wen; Liu, Feng; Liu, Bing; Zhou, Yuan; Jiang, Tianzi; Yu, Chunshui

    2016-07-01

    Microsatellite variants in the arginine vasopressin receptor 1A gene (AVPR1A) RS3 have been associated with normal social behaviors variation and autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) in a sex-specific manner. However, neural mechanisms underlying these associations remain largely unknown. We hypothesized that AVPR1A RS3 variants affect altruistic behavior by modulating the gray matter volume (GMV) of specific brain regions in a sex-specific manner. We investigated 278 young healthy adults using the Dictator Game to assess altruistic behavior. All subjects were genotyped and main effect of AVPR1A RS3 repeat polymorphisms and interaction of genotype-by-sex on the GMV were assessed in a voxel-wise manner. We observed that male subjects with relatively short repeats allocated less money to others and exhibited a significantly smaller GMV in the right fusiform face area (FFA) compared with male long homozygotes. In male subjects, the GMV of the right FFA exhibited a significant positive correlation with altruistic behavior. A mixed mediation and moderation analysis further revealed both a significant mediation effect of the GMV of the right FFA on the association between AVPR1A RS3 repeat polymorphisms and allocation sums and a significant moderation effect of sex (only in males) on the mediation effect. Post hoc analysis showed that the GMV of the right FFA was significantly smaller in male subjects carrying allele 426 than in non-426 carriers. These results suggest that the GMV of the right FFA may be a potential mediator whereby the genetic variants in AVPR1A RS3 affect altruistic behavior in healthy male subjects. Hum Brain Mapp 37:2700-2709, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. THE STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS OF STEEL SILOS WITH CYLINDRICAL-WALL BEARING AND PROFILE-STEEL BEARING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengjun Tang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The silos are widely used in bulk material in many fields such as agriculture, mining, chemical, electric power storage, etc. Thin metal cylindrical silo shells are vulnerable to buckling failure caused by the compressive wall friction force. In this paper, the structural analysis of two types of steel silo with cylindrical-wall bearing and profile-steel bearing is implemented by Abaqus finite element analysis. The results indicate that under the same loading conditions, steel silos with profile-steel bearing and cylindrical-Wall bearing have similar values in Mises stress, but the steel silo with profile-steel bearing has a smaller radial displacement and a better capability of buckling resistance. Meanwhile, the total steel volumes reduced 8.0% comparing to the steel silo with cylindrical-wall bearing. Therefore, steel soil with profile-steel bearing not only has a less steel volumes but also a good stability.

  17. Effect of axial wall modification on the retention of cement-retained, implant-supported crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Kian M; Masri, Radi; Driscoll, Carl F; Limkangwalmongkol, Penwadee; Romberg, Elaine

    2012-02-01

    Compromised angulation of implants may result in abutment preparation that is less than ideal. Compromised abutment preparation may affect the retention of implant-retained crowns. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of 5 implant abutment designs on the retention of cement-retained crowns by varying the number and position of the axial walls. Five prefabricated abutments were attached to an implant analog and embedded in an acrylic resin block. The first abutment was left intact without modification. Axial walls were partially removed from the remaining abutments to produce abutments with 3 walls, 2 adjacent walls, 2 opposing walls, and 1 wall. Five crowns were made for each group. The screw access channel for the first abutment was completely filled with composite resin and the rest were partially filled. The retentive surface area of each abutment was calculated. Crowns were cemented with zinc phosphate cement. Tensile force was applied to separate the castings from the abutments. Peak load to dislodgment was recorded. A 1-way ANOVA was used to test for a significant difference followed by the Tukey Honestly Significant Difference test (α=.05). The abutment with 2 opposing axial walls had significantly higher retention than that of all other groups (F=149.9, df =24, P<.001). The abutment with 3 walls exhibited the second highest retention and was significantly greater than abutments with 2 adjacent walls, 1, and 4 walls. Abutments with 2 adjacent walls and 1 wall were not significantly different from each other. The unmodified abutment with 4 walls exhibited the lowest retention despite having a large retentive surface area. The retention of cemented crowns on implant abutments is influenced by the number and position of axial walls. Copyright © 2012 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Geologyy of the Yucca Mountain Site Area, Southwestern Nevada, Chapter in Stuckless, J.S., ED., Yucca Mountain, Nevada - A Proposed Geologic Repository for High-Level Radioactive Waste (Volume 1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W.R. Keefer; J.W. Whitney; D.C. Buesch

    2006-09-25

    Yucca Mountain in southwestern Nevada is a prominent, irregularly shaped upland formed by a thick apron of Miocene pyroclastic-flow and fallout tephra deposits, with minor lava flows, that was segmented by through-going, large-displacement normal faults into a series of north-trending, eastwardly tilted structural blocks. The principal volcanic-rock units are the Tiva Canyon and Topopah Spring Tuffs of the Paintbrush Group, which consist of volumetrically large eruptive sequences derived from compositionally distinct magma bodies in the nearby southwestern Nevada volcanic field, and are classic examples of a magmatic zonation characterized by an upper crystal-rich (> 10% crystal fragments) member, a more voluminous lower crystal-poor (< 5% crystal fragments) member, and an intervening thin transition zone. Rocks within the crystal-poor member of the Topopah Spring Tuff, lying some 280 m below the crest of Yucca Mountain, constitute the proposed host rock to be excavated for the storage of high-level radioactive wastes. Separation of the tuffaceous rock formations into subunits that allow for detailed mapping and structural interpretations is based on macroscopic features, most importantly the relative abundance of lithophysae and the degree of welding. The latter feature, varying from nonwelded through partly and moderately welded to densely welded, exerts a strong control on matrix porosities and other rock properties that provide essential criteria for distinguishing hydrogeologic and thermal-mechanical units, which are of major interest in evaluating the suitability of Yucca Mountain to host a safe and permanent geologic repository for waste storage. A thick and varied sequence of surficial deposits mantle large parts of the Yucca Mountain site area. Mapping of these deposits and associated soils in exposures and in the walls of trenches excavated across buried faults provides evidence for multiple surface-rupturing events along all of the major faults during

  19. MHD Electrode and wall constructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Way, Stewart; Lempert, Joseph

    1984-01-01

    Electrode and wall constructions for the walls of a channel transmitting the hot plasma in a magnetohydrodynamic generator. The electrodes and walls are made of a plurality of similar modules which are spaced from one another along the channel. The electrodes can be metallic or ceramic, and each module includes one or more electrodes which are exposed to the plasma and a metallic cooling bar which is spaced from the plasma and which has passages through which a cooling fluid flows to remove heat transmitted from the electrode to the cooling bar. Each electrode module is spaced from and electrically insulated from each adjacent module while interconnected by the cooling fluid which serially flows among selected modules. A wall module includes an electrically insulating ceramic body exposed to the plasma and affixed, preferably by mechanical clips or by brazing, to a metallic cooling bar spaced from the plasma and having cooling fluid passages. Each wall module is, similar to the electrode modules, electrically insulated from the adjacent modules and serially interconnected to other modules by the cooling fluid.

  20. Functional domain walls in multiferroics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Dennis

    2015-11-25

    During the last decade a wide variety of novel and fascinating correlation phenomena has been discovered at domain walls in multiferroic bulk systems, ranging from unusual electronic conductance to inseparably entangled spin and charge degrees of freedom. The domain walls represent quasi-2D functional objects that can be induced, positioned, and erased on demand, bearing considerable technological potential for future nanoelectronics. Most of the challenges that remain to be solved before turning related device paradigms into reality, however, still fall in the field of fundamental condensed matter physics and materials science. In this topical review seminal experimental findings gained on electric and magnetic domain walls in multiferroic bulk materials are addressed. A special focus is put on the physical properties that emerge at so-called charged domain walls and the added functionality that arises from coexisting magnetic order. The research presented in this review highlights that we are just entering a whole new world of intriguing nanoscale physics that is yet to be explored in all its details. The goal is to draw attention to the persistent challenges and identify future key directions for the research on functional domain walls in multiferroics.

  1. The feasibility of removable prefab diaphragm walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amaarouk, R.; De Gijt, J.G.; Braam, C.R.

    2013-01-01

    A diaphragm wall is a cast in-situ reinforced concrete retaining wall applied in, among others, quay walls. The main advantages of this type of retaining wall are that it can be made in almost every preferred length and that it can resist high structural loads. However, there are several

  2. Turbine airfoil with outer wall thickness indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, John J; James, Allister W; Merrill, Gary B

    2013-08-06

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine and including a depth indicator for determining outer wall blade thickness. The airfoil may include an outer wall having a plurality of grooves in the outer surface of the outer wall. The grooves may have a depth that represents a desired outer surface and wall thickness of the outer wall. The material forming an outer surface of the outer wall may be removed to be flush with an innermost point in each groove, thereby reducing the wall thickness and increasing efficiency. The plurality of grooves may be positioned in a radially outer region of the airfoil proximate to the tip.

  3. Nanoparticles for cultural heritage conservation: calcium and barium hydroxide nanoparticles for wall painting consolidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgi, Rodorico; Ambrosi, Moira; Toccafondi, Nicola; Baglioni, Piero

    2010-08-16

    Nanotechnology provides new concepts and materials for the consolidation and protection of wall paintings. In particular, humble calcium and barium hydroxide nanoparticles offer a versatile and highly efficient tool to combat the main degradation processes altering wall paintings. Clear example of the efficacy and potentiality of nanotechnology is represented by the conservation in situ of Maya wall paintings in the archaeological area in Calakmul (Mexico).

  4. Mapping hidden wall structures by quantitative IR thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosina, Elisabetta; Grinzato, Ermanno G.; Robison, Elwin C.

    2002-03-01

    Knowledge of an historic monument can be substantially improved by locating hidden structures, openings and the wall bonding beneath the plaster. When restoring buildings, the physical connection between the walls must be known in order to predict the risk areas for structural weakness. IR Thermography produces remarkable results, especially by means of the quantitative approach. The temperature pattern detected by thermography and analyzed in space and time maps the hidden structure of the wall. Thick walls exposed to the weather represent a challenge in detecting hidden structures by means of thermography. Frequently output is very poor because testing conditions are not optimized. Hence, appropriate testing requires careful analysis of the wall system before and after taking the thermograms. Otherwise, false alarms render the images useless. This paper describes a general procedure applied to see the hidden wall structure. It works in three steps: a) a mathematical simulation of the real test by a dedicated software, implementing the 3D thermal problem; b) a transient thermographic test, delivering a suitable heating flux on the surface for the proper time; c) processing test data, including a thermogram sequence and air temperature analysis. Here, are reported tests achieved on a XV-XVIIth century Palace at Cremona (Italy; in the Westcott House in Springfield (OH).

  5. Abdominal wall hernia and pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, K K; Henriksen, N A; Jorgensen, L N

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: There is no consensus as to the treatment strategy for abdominal wall hernias in fertile women. This study was undertaken to review the current literature on treatment of abdominal wall hernias in fertile women before or during pregnancy. METHODS: A literature search was undertaken in Pub......Med and Embase in combination with a cross-reference search of eligible papers. RESULTS: We included 31 papers of which 23 were case reports. In fertile women undergoing sutured or mesh repair, pain was described in a few patients during the last trimester of a subsequent pregnancy. Emergency surgery...... of incarcerated hernias in pregnant women, as well as combined hernia repair and cesarean section appears as safe procedures. No major complications were reported following hernia repair before or during pregnancy. The combined procedure of elective cesarean section and abdominal wall hernia repair was reported...

  6. Acalculous Diffuse Gallbladder Wall Thickening in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Ji Haeng; No, Young Eun; Lee, Yeoun Joo; Hwang, Jae Yeon; Lee, Joon Woo; Park, Jae Hong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Gallbladder (GB) wall thickening can be found in various conditions unrelated to intrinsic GB disease. We investigated the predisposing etiologies and the outcome of acalculous GB wall thickening in children. Methods We retrospectively analyzed 67 children with acalculous GB wall thickening who had visited our institute from June 2010 to June 2013. GB wall thickening was defined as a GB wall diameter >3.5 mm on abdominal ultrasound examination or computed tomography. Underlying diseas...

  7. Image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy for refractory bilateral breast cancer in a patient with extensive cutaneous metastasis in the chest and abdominal walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu YF

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Yueh-Feng Lu,1 Yu-Chin Lin,2 Kuo-Hsin Chen,3,4 Pei-Wei Shueng,1 Hsin-Pei Yeh,1 Chen-Hsi Hsieh1,5,6 1Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Radiology, 2Division of Oncology and Hematology, Department of Medicine, 3Department of Surgery, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, New Taipei City, 4Department of Electrical Engineering, Yuan-Ze University, Taoyuan, 5Department of Medicine, 6Institute of Traditional Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan Abstract: Treatment for bilateral breast cancer with chest wall and abdominal skin invasion normally involves conventional radiotherapy (RT; however, conventional RT provides inadequate target volume coverage and excessive treatment of large volumes of normal tissue. Helical tomotherapy (HT has the ability to deliver continuous craniocaudal irradiation that suppresses junction problems and provides good conformity of dose distribution. A 47-year-old female with stage IV bilateral breast cancer with chest wall and pectoralis major muscle invasion, lymphadenopathy, bilateral pleural effusion, and multiple bone metastases received chemotherapy and target therapy beginning in January 2014; 4 months after the initiation of chemotherapy, computed tomography revealed progression of chest and abdominal wall invasion. A total dose of 70.2 Gy was delivered to both breasts, the chest wall, the abdominal wall, and the bilateral supraclavicular nodal areas in 39 fractions via HT. The total planning target volume was 4,533.29 cm3. The percent of lung volume receiving at least 20 Gy (V20 was 28%, 22%, and 25% for the right lung, left lung, and whole lung, respectively. The mean dose to the heart was 8.6 Gy. Follow-up computed tomography revealed complete response after the RT course. Grade 1 dysphagia, weight loss, grade 2 neutropenia, and grade 3 dermatitis were noted during the RT course. Pain score decreased from 6 to 1. No cardiac, pulmonary, liver, or intestinal toxicity

  8. Solar Walls for concrete renovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gramkow, Lotte; Vejen, Niels Kristian; Olsen, Lars

    1996-01-01

    This repport gives a short presentation of three full-scale testing solar walls, the construction including the architectural design, materials and components, transportation and storage of solar enegy, the effect on the construction behind, statics and practical experience.The results of the mea......This repport gives a short presentation of three full-scale testing solar walls, the construction including the architectural design, materials and components, transportation and storage of solar enegy, the effect on the construction behind, statics and practical experience.The results...

  9. Wave Forces on Crown Walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jan; Burcharth, H. F.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents some of the results from a large parametric laboratory study including more than 200 long-duration model tests. The study addresses both the wave forces imposed on the breakwater crown wall as well as the performance of the structure in reducing the wave overtopping. The testing...... programme includes variations of the sea state parameters and of the geometrical configuration of the breakwater and crown wall. Basic relations between forces/overtopping and the varied parameters are examined and preliminary design guidelines for structures within the tested range of variations...

  10. Glass Walls in North America. Technical Paper No. 179.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutcheon, N. B.

    Solar heat gains (radiation) and its effects on the building environment are discussed, in conjunction with the proper and improper use of large glass areas in the exterior walls of buildings in North America. The difficulties of solar heat gain and of controlling natural light and glare are outlined and said to influence building comfort and air…

  11. Prediction of Chest Wall Toxicity From Lung Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephans, Kevin L., E-mail: stephak@ccf.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Center, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Djemil, Toufik; Tendulkar, Rahul D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Center, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Robinson, Cliff G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University, St Louis, MO (United States); Reddy, Chandana A.; Videtic, Gregory M.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Center, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To determine patient, tumor, and treatment factors related to the development of late chest wall toxicity after lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: We reviewed a registry of 134 patients treated with lung SBRT to 60 Gy in 3 fractions who had greater than 1 year of clinical follow-up and no history of multiple treatments to the same lobe (n = 48). Patients were treated as per Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Protocol 0236 without specific chest wall avoidance criteria. The chest wall was retrospectively contoured. Thirty-two lesions measured less than 3 cm, and sixteen measured 3 to 5 cm. The median planning target volume was 29 cm{sup 3}. Results: With a median follow-up of 18.8 months, 10 patients had late symptomatic chest wall toxicity (4 Grade 1 and 6 Grade 2) at a median of 8.8 months after SBRT. No patient characteristics (age, diabetes, hypertension, peripheral vascular disease, or body mass index) were predictive for toxicity, whereas there was a trend for continued smoking (p = 0.066; odds ratio [OR], 4.4). Greatest single tumor dimension (p = 0.047; OR, 2.63) and planning target volume (p = 0.040; OR, 1.04) were correlated with toxicity, whereas distance from tumor edge to chest wall and gross tumor volume did not reach statistical significance. Volumes of chest wall receiving 30 Gy (V30) through 70 Gy (V70) were all highly significant, although this correlation weakened for V65 and V70 and maximum chest wall point dose only trended to significance (p = 0.06). On multivariate analysis, tumor volume was no longer correlated with toxicity and only V30 through V60 remained statistically significant. Conclusions: Tumor size and chest wall dosimetry are correlated to late chest wall toxicity. Only chest wall V30 through V60 remained significant on multivariate analysis. Restricting V30 to 30 cm{sup 3} or less and V60 to 3 cm{sup 3} or less should result in a 10% to 15% risk of late chest wall toxicity or lower.

  12. Ancient Roman wall paintings mapped nondestructively by portable NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haber, Agnes; Blümich, Bernhard; Souvorova, Daria; Del Federico, Eleonora

    2011-09-01

    The stratigraphies of decorated walls in ancient Herculaneum, Italy, were analyzed by single-sided (1)H NMR. A large version of the NMR-MOUSE® with a maximum penetration depth of 25 mm was used to map proton density profiles at different positions of the Mosaic of Neptune and Amphitrite showing considerable differences between different tesserae and the mortar bed at different times of the year. In the House of the Black Room, different mortar layers were observed on painted walls as well as different proton content in different areas due to different moisture levels and different conservation treatments. The proton density profiles of the differently treated areas indicated that one method leads to higher moisture content than the other. Untreated wall paintings from different times were profiled in a recently excavated room at the Villa of the Papyri showing two different types of mortar layer structures which identify two different techniques of preparing the walls for painting. Reflectance Fourier mid-infrared spectroscopy and in situ X-ray fluorescence measurements complemented the NMR measurements and provided additional insight into the identification of organic coatings as well as the nature of the pigments used, respectively. The information acquired nondestructively by NMR is valued for elaborating conservation strategies and for identifying different schools of craftsmen who prepared the mortar supports of the wall paintings.

  13. Retrofitted green roofs and walls and improvements in thermal comfort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feitosa, Renato Castiglia; Wilkinson, Sara

    2017-06-01

    Increased urbanization has led to a worsening in the quality of life for many people living in large cities in respect of the urban heat island effect and increases of indoor temperatures in housing and other buildings. A solution may be to retrofit existing environments to their former conditions, with a combination of green infrastructures applied to existing walls and rooftops. Retrofitted green roofs may attenuate housing temperature. However, with tall buildings, facade areas are much larger compared to rooftop areas, the role of green walls in mitigating extreme temperatures is more pronounced. Thus, the combination of green roofs and green walls is expected to promote a better thermal performance in the building envelope. For this purpose, a modular vegetated system is adopted for covering both walls and rooftops. Rather than temperature itself, the heat index, which comprises the combined effect of temperature and relative humidity is used in the evaluation of thermal comfort in small scale experiments performed in Sydney - Australia, where identical timber framed structures prototypes (vegetated and non-vegetated) are compared. The results have shown a different understanding of thermal comfort improvement regarding heat index rather than temperature itself. The combination of green roof and walls has a valid role to play in heat index attenuation.

  14. Static and dynamic thermal characterisation of a hollow brick wall: Tests and numerical analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sala, J.M.; Urresti, A. [Thermal Engineering Department, Universidad del Pais Vasco (UPV/EHU), Alda. Urquijo s/n, 48013 Bilbao (Spain); Martin, K.; Flores, I.; Apaolaza, A. [Construction Quality Control Laboratory of the Basque Government, C/Aguirrelanda n 10, 01013 Vitoria-Gasteiz (Spain)

    2008-07-01

    This article explains the adjustment procedure of a calibrated hot-box unit and the execution of the corresponding tests to measure the dynamic thermal properties of walls needed to calculate the thermal load of buildings. The results of a test for a heterogeneous wall are also presented, in a dynamic temperature rating. These results are compared with those obtained from a simulation carried out on the performance of the same wall through the application of a finite volume software. Subsequently, the error introduced by assuming one-dimensional heat flow through a nonhomogeneous wall is discussed. This is equivalent to considering the heterogeneous layer of the wall as an equivalent homogeneous layer, which is done in several whole building simulation programs. It is concluded that the error committed may be appreciable, even when the heterogeneities are not excessive. (author)

  15. Dynamic conductivity of ferroelectric domain walls in BiFeO₃.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksymovych, Peter; Seidel, Jan; Chu, Ying Hao; Wu, Pingping; Baddorf, Arthur P; Chen, Long-Qing; Kalinin, Sergei V; Ramesh, Ramamoorthy

    2011-05-11

    Topological walls separating domains of continuous polarization, magnetization, and strain in ferroic materials hold promise of novel electronic properties, that are intrinsically localized on the nanoscale and that can be patterned on demand without change of material volume or elemental composition. We have revealed that ferroelectric domain walls in multiferroic BiFeO(3) are inherently dynamic electronic conductors, closely mimicking memristive behavior and contrary to the usual assumption of rigid conductivity. Applied electric field can cause a localized transition between insulating and conducting domain walls, tune domain wall conductance by over an order of magnitude, and create a quasicontinuous spectrum of metastable conductance states. Our measurements identified that subtle and microscopically reversible distortion of the polarization structure at the domain wall is at the origin of the dynamic conductivity. The latter is therefore likely to be a universal property of topological defects in ferroelectric semiconductors.

  16. Nonseparating High-Area-Ratio Supersonic Nozzles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, W. R.; Kassner, R. R.

    1984-01-01

    Procedure determines supersonic-nozzle contours that allow higher nozzle-exit wall pressures, reducing chamber pressure without causing wall-flow separation as encountered in optimum large-area-ratio nozzle designs. Procedure applies to chemical-laser nozzles, jet-engine and gas turbines, wind tunnels and rocket nozzles.

  17. Suitability of pharmacokinetic models for dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI of abdominal aortic aneurysm vessel wall: a comparison.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Lai Nguyen

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Increased microvascularization of the abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA vessel wall has been related to AAA progression and rupture. The aim of this study was to compare the suitability of three pharmacokinetic models to describe AAA vessel wall enhancement using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients with AAA underwent DCE-MRI at 1.5 Tesla. The volume transfer constant (K(trans , which reflects microvascular flow, permeability and surface area, was calculated by fitting the blood and aneurysm vessel wall gadolinium concentration curves. The relative fit errors, parameter uncertainties and parameter reproducibilities for the Patlak, Tofts and Extended Tofts model were compared to find the most suitable model. Scan-rescan reproducibility was assessed using the interclass correlation coefficient and coefficient of variation (CV. Further, the relationship between K(trans and AAA size was investigated. RESULTS: DCE-MRI examinations from thirty-nine patients (mean age±SD: 72±6 years; M/F: 35/4 with an mean AAA maximal diameter of 49±6 mm could be included for pharmacokinetic analysis. Relative fit uncertainties for K(trans based on the Patlak model (17% were significantly lower compared to the Tofts (37% and Extended Tofts model (42% (p<0.001. K(trans scan-rescan reproducibility for the Patlak model (ICC = 0.61 and CV = 22% was comparable with the Tofts (ICC = 0.61, CV = 23% and Extended Tofts model (ICC = 0.76, CV = 22%. K(trans was positively correlated with maximal AAA diameter (Spearman's ρ = 0.38, p = 0.02 using the Patlak model. CONCLUSION: Using the presented imaging protocol, the Patlak model is most suited to describe DCE-MRI data of the AAA vessel wall with good K(trans scan-rescan reproducibility.

  18. Vibroacoustic Response of a Double-Walled Cylindrical FGM Shell with a Porous Sandwiched Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramezani, H.; Talebitooti, R.

    2015-11-01

    The transmission loss of sound through a cylindrical structure whose walls sandwich a layer of porous material is predicted on the basis of the classical shell theory for shells made of functionally graded materials (FGMs). FGM shells composed of metal and ceramic, with three different distributions (power-law, sigmoid, or exponential) of their volume fractions across the wall thickness, are considered. The porous layer is modeled as a fluid with equivalent properties. The transmission loss through the multilayered structure is obtained analytically in a broad frequency band. To validate the results found, they are compared with some known ones. The effects of variation in the volume fractions of materials are also studied.

  19. Overlap/Domain-wall reweighting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukaya, H.; Aoki, S.; Cossu, G.; Hashimoto, S.; Kaneko, T.; Noaki, J.

    We investigate the eigenvalues of nearly chiral lattice Dirac operators constructed with five-dimensional implementations. Allowing small violation of the Ginsparg-Wilson relation, the HMC simulation is made much faster while the eigenvalues are not significantly affected. We discuss the possibility of reweighting the gauge configurations generated with domain-wall fermions to those of exactly chiral lattice fermions.

  20. The Influence of Wall Binders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Jørgen

    1997-01-01

    This report is an analysis of the thermal bridge effects that occur in wall binders in masonry buildings. The effects are analyzed using a numerical calculation programme.The results are compared to the values given in the danish standard, DS418....

  1. Retrofitting Systems for External Walls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Jørgen

    1997-01-01

    In this report, 9 different external and internal retrofitting systems are analyzed using numerical calculations. The analysis focuses on the thermal bridge effects in the different systems, and on this basis it is discussed whether internal or external retrofitting has the most advantages....... The different systems are evaluated using 5 different types of existing walls....

  2. Acute traumatic abdominal wall hernia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. den Hartog (Dennis); W.E. Tuinebreijer (Wim); P.P. Oprel (Pim); P. Patka (Peter)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractAlthough blunt abdominal trauma is frequent, traumatic abdominal wall hernias (TAWH) are rare. We describe a large TAWH with associated intra-abdominal lesions that were caused by high-energy trauma. The diagnosis was missed by clinical examination but was subsequently revealed by a

  3. Fandom and the fourth wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenna Kathryn Ballinger

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available I use the Teen Wolf fandom as an example to examine the ways social media has created a more complicated, nuanced relationship with fans. The collapse of the fourth wall between fans and The Powers That Be can have both positive and negative impacts, depending on the willingness of participants to maintain mutual respect and engage in meaningful dialogue.

  4. Abdominal wall blocks in adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neimann, Jens Dupont Børglum; Gögenür, Ismail; Bendtsen, Thomas F.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Abdominal wall blocks in adults have evolved much during the last decade; that is, particularly with the introduction of ultrasound-guided (USG) blocks. This review highlights recent advances of block techniques within this field and proposes directions for future research...

  5. Chapter 3 Cell Wall Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger M. Rowell; Roger Pettersen; Mandla A. Tshabalala

    2012-01-01

    Wood is best defined as a three-dimensional biopolymer composite composed of an interconnected network of cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin with minor amounts of extractives, and inorganics. The major chemical component of a living tree is water, but on a dry weight basis, all wood cell walls consist mainly of sugar-based polymers (carbohydrates, 65-75%) that are...

  6. Designing a Sound Reducing Wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erk, Kendra; Lumkes, John; Shambach, Jill; Braile, Larry; Brickler, Anne; Matthys, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Acoustical engineers use their knowledge of sound to design quiet environments (e.g., classrooms and libraries) as well as to design environments that are supposed to be loud (e.g., concert halls and football stadiums). They also design sound barriers, such as the walls along busy roadways that decrease the traffic noise heard by people in…

  7. Shear wall ultimate drift limits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duffey, T.A. [Duffy, (T.A.) Tijeras, NM (United States); Goldman, A. [Goldman, (A.), Sandia, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Farrar, C.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1994-04-01

    Drift limits for reinforced-concrete shear walls are investigated by reviewing the open literature for appropriate experimental data. Drift values at ultimate are determined for walls with aspect ratios ranging up to a maximum of 3.53 and undergoing different types of lateral loading (cyclic static, monotonic static, and dynamic). Based on the geometry of actual nuclear power plant structures exclusive of containments and concerns regarding their response during seismic (i.e.,cyclic) loading, data are obtained from pertinent references for which the wall aspect ratio is less than or equal to approximately 1, and for which testing is cyclic in nature (typically displacement controlled). In particular, lateral deflections at ultimate load, and at points in the softening region beyond ultimate for which the load has dropped to 90, 80, 70, 60, and 50 percent of its ultimate value, are obtained and converted to drift information. The statistical nature of the data is also investigated. These data are shown to be lognormally distributed, and an analysis of variance is performed. The use of statistics to estimate Probability of Failure for a shear wall structure is illustrated.

  8. Explosion induced dynamic responses of blast wall on FPSO topside: Blast loading application methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki-Yeob Kang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Topside areas on an offshore oil and gas platform are highly susceptible to explosion. A blast wall on these areas plays an important role in preventing explosion damage and must withstand the expected explosion loads. The uniformly distributed loading condition, predicted by Explosion Risk Analyses (ERAs, has been applied in most of the previous analysis methods. However, analysis methods related to load conditions are inaccurate because the blast overpressure around the wall tends to be of low-level in the open area and high-level in the enclosed area. The main objectives of this paper are to study the effects of applying different load applications and compare the dynamic responses of the blast wall. To do so, various kinds of blast pressures were measured by Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD simulations on the target area. Nonlinear finite element analyses of the blast wall under two types of identified dynamic loadings were also conducted.

  9. Synthesis and CO2 adsorption study of modified MOF-5 with multi-wall carbon nanotubes and expandable graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Sami; Bustam, M. A.; Shariff, A. M.; Elkhalifah, Ali E. I.; Murshid, G.; Riaz, Nadia

    2014-10-01

    MOF-5 was synthesized by solvothermal method and its reactivation under anhydrous conditions. This research is conducted to investigate the effect of MOF-5 and MOF-5 modified with multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and expandable graphite (EG) on the performance of CO2 adsorption. The synthesized MOFs were characterized using Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) for surface morphology, Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) for thermal stability, X-ray diffraction (XRD) for crystals plane, Brunauer-Emmet-Teller (BET) for surface area and CO2 adsorption. The result had showed that the modified MOF-5 enhanced the CO2 adsorption compared to the pure MOF-5. The increment in the CO2 uptake capacities of MOF materials was attributed to the decrease in the pore size and enhancement of micropore volume of MOF-5 by multi-walled carbon nanotube and EG incorporation. The BET surface area of the synthesized MOF-5@MWCNTs is more than MOF-5. The CO2 sorption capacities of MOF-5 and MOF-5@MWCNTs were observed to increase from 0.00008 to 0.00048 mol g-1 at 298 K and 1 bar. The modified MOF-5@MWCNTs resulted in the highest CO2 adsorption followed by the modified MOF-5@ EG and lastly, MOF-5.

  10. The Volume of Earth's Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cael, B. B.

    How much water do lakes on Earth hold? Global lake volume estimates are scarce, highly variable, and poorly documented. We develop a mechanistic null model for estimating global lake mean depth and volume based on a statistical topographic approach to Earth's surface. The volume-area scaling prediction is accurate and consistent within and across lake datasets spanning diverse regions. We applied these relationships to a global lake area census to estimate global lake volume and depth. The volume of Earth's lakes is 199,000 km3 (95% confidence interval 196,000-202,000 km3) . This volume is in the range of historical estimates (166,000-280,000 km3) , but the overall mean depth of 41.8 m (95% CI 41.2-42.4 m) is significantly lower than previous estimates (62 - 151 m). These results highlight and constrain the relative scarcity of lake waters in the hydrosphere and have implications for the role of lakes in global biogeochemical cycles. We also evaluate the size (area) distribution of lakes on Earth compared to expectations from percolation theory. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship Program under Grant No. 2388357.

  11. Giant Chest Wall Hematoma Mimicking Elastofibroma Dorsi: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yeon Soo; Park, Kuhn; Kim, Jong Ok; Choi, Eun Seok; Kang, Si Won [Daejeon St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-02-15

    Hematoma on the thoracic wall is very rare. We describe here a 63-year-old man with a huge chest wall hematoma and the man had no history of trauma. The patient was found to have a large mass located subjacent to the inferior angle of the right scapula area and the CT and MRI findings were similar to those of an elastofibroma dorsi. We describe the CT and MRI findings of this hematoma and how to make the differential diagnosis from elastofibroma dorsi

  12. Effect of internal wall covers on radon emanation inside houses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abu-Jarad, F.; Fremlin, J.H.

    1983-03-01

    Most types of paint for the internal walls of houses will reduce radon emanation from building materials. At the same time, the effect of paint will increase the concentration of radon inside the material itself and will increase the radon emanation from unpainted areas. One type of wall paper contains 6 and 0.3 ppm of uranium in its decorated and undecorated surfaces, respectively, the colouring being the main source of uranium. Other wallpapers appear to be free from uranium. Wallpaper, gypsum and plaster may increase the radon activity inside houses depending on their radium contents.

  13. An assessment for the erosion rate of DEMO first wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokar, M. Z.

    2018-01-01

    In a fusion reactor a significant fraction of plasma particles lost from the confined volume will reach the vessel wall. The recombination of these charged species, electrons and ions of hydrogen isotopes, is a source of neutral molecules and atoms, recycling back into the plasma. Here they participate, in particular, in charge-exchange (c-x) collisions with the plasma ions and, as a result, atoms of high energies with chaotically oriented velocities are generated. A significant fraction of these hot neutrals will hit the wall, leading, as well as the outflowing fuel and impurity ions, to its erosion, limiting the reactor operation time. The rate of the wall erosion in DEMO is assessed by applying a one-dimensional model which takes into account the transport of charged and neutral species across the flux surfaces in the main part of the scrape-off layer, beyond the X-point vicinity and divertor, and by considering the shift of the centers of flux surfaces, their elongation and triangularity. Atoms generated by c-x of recycling neutrals are modeled kinetically to define firmly their energy spectrum, being of particular importance for the erosion assessment. It is demonstrated the erosion rate of the DEMO wall armor of tungsten will have a pronounced ballooning character with a significant maximum of 0.3 mm per full power year at the low field side, decreasing with an increase in the anomalous perpendicular transport in the ‘far’ SOL or the plasma density at the separatrix.

  14. Through-the-wall radar imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Amin, Moeness G

    2011-01-01

    Wall Attenuation and Dispersion, A. Hussein Muqaibel, M.A. Alsunaidi, Nuruddeen M. Iya, and A. Safaai-JaziAntenna Elements, Arrays, and Systems for Through-the-Wall Radar Imaging, A. Hoorfar and A. FathyBeamforming for Through-the-Wall Radar Imaging, G. Alli and D. DiFilippoImage and Localization of Behind-the-Wall Targets Using Collocated and Distributed Apertures, Y.D. Zhang and A. HuntConventional and Emerging Waveforms for Detection and Imaging of Targets behind Walls, F. Ahmad and R.M. NarayananInverse Scattering Approaches in Through-the-Wall Imaging, K. Sarabandi, M. Thiel, M. Dehmollai

  15. Long-term Observation of Regenerated Periodontium Induced by FGF-2 in the Beagle Dog 2-Wall Periodontal Defect Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzai, Jun; Nagayasu-Tanaka, Toshie; Terashima, Akio; Asano, Taiji; Yamada, Satoru; Nozaki, Takenori; Kitamura, Masahiro; Murakami, Shinya

    2016-01-01

    The long-term stability and qualitative characteristics of periodontium regenerated by FGF-2 treatment were compared with normal physiological healing tissue controls in a Beagle dog 2-wall periodontal defect model 13 months after treatment by assessing tissue histology and three-dimensional microstructure using micro-computed tomography (μCT). After FGF-2 (0.3%) or vehicle treatment at the defect sites, serial changes in the bone mineral content (BMC) were observed using periodic X-ray imaging. Tissues were harvested at 13 months, evaluated histomorphometrically, and the cortical bone volume and trabecular bone structure of the newly formed bone were analyzed using μCT. FGF-2 significantly increased the BMC of the defect area at 2 months compared with that of the control group, and this difference was unchanged through 13 months. The cortical bone volume was significantly increased by FGF-2, but there was no difference between the groups in trabecular bone structure. Bone maturation was occurring in both groups because of the lower cortical volume and denser trabecular bone than what is found in intact bone. FGF-2 also increased the area of newly formed bone as assessed histomorphometrically, but the ratios of trabecular bone in the defect area were similar between the control and FGF-2 groups. These results suggest that FGF-2 stimulates neogenesis of alveolar bone that is of similar quality to that of the control group. The lengths of the regenerated periodontal ligament and cementum, measured as the distance from the defect bottom to the apical end of the gingival epithelium, and height and area of the newly formed bone in the FGF-2 group were larger than those in the control group. The present study demonstrated that, within the limitation of artificial periodontal defect model, the periodontal tissue regenerated by FGF-2 was maintained for 13 months after treatment and was qualitatively equivalent to that generated through the physiological healing process.

  16. Long-term Observation of Regenerated Periodontium Induced by FGF-2 in the Beagle Dog 2-Wall Periodontal Defect Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Anzai

    Full Text Available The long-term stability and qualitative characteristics of periodontium regenerated by FGF-2 treatment were compared with normal physiological healing tissue controls in a Beagle dog 2-wall periodontal defect model 13 months after treatment by assessing tissue histology and three-dimensional microstructure using micro-computed tomography (μCT. After FGF-2 (0.3% or vehicle treatment at the defect sites, serial changes in the bone mineral content (BMC were observed using periodic X-ray imaging. Tissues were harvested at 13 months, evaluated histomorphometrically, and the cortical bone volume and trabecular bone structure of the newly formed bone were analyzed using μCT. FGF-2 significantly increased the BMC of the defect area at 2 months compared with that of the control group, and this difference was unchanged through 13 months. The cortical bone volume was significantly increased by FGF-2, but there was no difference between the groups in trabecular bone structure. Bone maturation was occurring in both groups because of the lower cortical volume and denser trabecular bone than what is found in intact bone. FGF-2 also increased the area of newly formed bone as assessed histomorphometrically, but the ratios of trabecular bone in the defect area were similar between the control and FGF-2 groups. These results suggest that FGF-2 stimulates neogenesis of alveolar bone that is of similar quality to that of the control group. The lengths of the regenerated periodontal ligament and cementum, measured as the distance from the defect bottom to the apical end of the gingival epithelium, and height and area of the newly formed bone in the FGF-2 group were larger than those in the control group. The present study demonstrated that, within the limitation of artificial periodontal defect model, the periodontal tissue regenerated by FGF-2 was maintained for 13 months after treatment and was qualitatively equivalent to that generated through the physiological

  17. Dissecting the regulation of pollen tube growth by modelling the interplay of hydrodynamics, cell wall and ion dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junli eLiu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Hydrodynamics, cell wall and ion dynamics are all important properties that regulate pollen tube growth. Currently, the two main pollen tube growth models, the cell wall model and the hydrodynamic model do not appear to be reconcilable. Here we develop an integrative model for pollen tube growth and show that our model reproduces key experimental observations: 1 that the hypertonic condition leads to a much longer oscillatory period and that the hypotonic condition halves the oscillatory period; 2 that oscillations in turgor are experimentally undetectable; 3 that increasing the extracellular calcium concentration or decreasing the pH decreases the growth oscillatory amplitude; 4 that knockout of Raba4d, a member of the Rab family of small GTPase proteins, decreases pollen tube length after germination for 24 hours. Using the model generated here, we reveal that 1 when cell wall extensibility is large, pollen tube may sustain growth at different volume changes and maintain relatively stable turgor; 2 turgor increases if cell wall extensibility decreases; 3 increasing turgor due to decrease in osmolarity in the media, although very small, increases volume change . However, increasing turgor due to decrease in cell wall extensibility decreases volume change. In this way regulation of pollen tube growth by turgor is context dependent. By changing the osmolarity in the media, the main regulatory points are extracellular osmolarity for water flow and turgor for the volume encompassed by the cell wall. However, if the viscosity of cell wall changes, the main regulatory points are turgor for water flow and wall extensibility for the volume encompassed by the cell wall. The novel methodology developed here reveals the underlying context-dependent regulatory principle of pollen tube growth.

  18. Monitoring and modelling for dry-stone walls terracement maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preti, Federico; Errico, Alessandro; Giambastiani, Yamuna; Guastini, Enrico; Penna, Daniele

    2017-04-01

    An analysis of dry-stone walls stability in agricultural areas based on innovative monitoring and modeling is here presented The field test took place in Lamole, a terraced rural area located in the province of Florence, Tuscany, central Italy, where wine production is the most important agricultural activity business. Results show a good capability of the model to predict the time-space distribution and the intensity of stresses on the instrumented dry-stone wall and to describe the bulging of the ancient ones. We obtained significant information on how the terrace failure in Lamole resulted mainly related to the water concentration pathways at specific portions of the walls. An accurate drainage of the terraced slopes, even by means of simple ditches, could reduce the concentration factor at the critical parts of terraces strongly reducing the water pressures on the walls. The analysis of the effects caused by high return time events has been carried out by means of artificially reproduced severe rainfalls on the presented experimental area.

  19. Validation of cardiovascular magnetic resonance assessment of pericardial adipose tissue volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanders Prashanthan

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pericardial adipose tissue (PAT has been shown to be an independent predictor of coronary artery disease. To date its assessment has been restricted to the use of surrogate echocardiographic indices such as measurement of epicardial fat thickness over the right ventricular free wall, which have limitations. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR offers the potential to non-invasively assess total PAT, however like other imaging modalities, CMR has not yet been validated for this purpose. Thus, we sought to describe a novel technique for assessing total PAT with validation in an ovine model. Methods 11 merino sheep were studied. A standard clinical series of ventricular short axis CMR images (1.5T Siemens Sonata were obtained during mechanical ventilation breath-holds. Beginning at the mitral annulus, consecutive end-diastolic ventricular images were used to determine the area and volume of epicardial, paracardial and pericardial adipose tissue. In addition adipose thickness was measured at the right ventricular free wall. Following euthanasia, the paracardial adipose tissue was removed from the ventricle and weighed to allow comparison with corresponding CMR measurements. Results There was a strong correlation between CMR-derived paracardial adipose tissue volume and ex vivo paracardial mass (R2 = 0.89, p ex vivo paracardial mass (R2 = 0.003, p = 0.878. Conclusion In this ovine model, CMR-derived paracardial adipose tissue volume, but not the corresponding and conventional measure of paracardial adipose thickness over the RV free wall, accurately reflected paracardial adipose tissue mass. This study validates for the first time, the use of clinically utilised CMR sequences for the accurate and reproducible assessment of pericardial adiposity. Furthermore this non-invasive modality does not use ionising radiation and therefore is ideally suited for future studies of PAT and its role in cardiovascular risk prediction and

  20. Recovery after abdominal wall reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Kristian Kiim

    2017-03-01

    Incisional hernia is a common long-term complication to abdominal surgery, occurring in more than 20% of all patients. Some of these hernias become giant and affect patients in several ways. This patient group often experiences pain, decreased perceived body image, and loss of physical function, which results in a need for surgical repair of the giant hernia, known as abdominal wall reconstruction. In the current thesis, patients with a giant hernia were examined to achieve a better understanding of their physical and psychological function before and after abdominal wall reconstruction. Study I was a systematic review of the existing standardized methods for assessing quality of life after incisional hernia repair. After a systematic search in the electronic databases Embase and PubMed, a total of 26 studies using standardized measures for assessment of quality of life after incisional hernia repair were found. The most commonly used questionnaire was the generic Short-Form 36, which assesses overall health-related quality of life, addressing both physical and mental health. The second-most common questionnaire was the Carolinas Comfort Scale, which is a disease specific questionnaire addressing pain, movement limitation and mesh sensation in relation to a current or previous hernia. In total, eight different questionnaires were used at varying time points in the 26 studies. In conclusion, standardization of timing and method of quality of life assessment after incisional hernia repair was lacking. Study II was a case-control study of the effects of an enhanced recovery after surgery pathway for patients undergoing abdominal wall reconstruction for a giant hernia. Sixteen consecutive patients were included prospectively after the implementation of a new enhanced recovery after surgery pathway at the Digestive Disease Center, Bispebjerg Hospital, and compared to a control group of 16 patients included retrospectively in the period immediately prior to the

  1. Height-related scaling of phloem anatomy and the evolution of sieve element end wall types in woody plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liesche, Johannes; Pace, Marcelo R; Xu, Qiyu; Li, Yongqing; Chen, Shaolin

    2017-04-01

    In the sieve elements (SEs) of the phloem, carbohydrates are transported throughout the whole plant from their site of production to sites of consumption or storage. SE structure, especially of the pore-rich end walls, has a direct effect on translocation efficiency. Differences in pore size and other features were interpreted as an evolutionary trend towards reduced hydraulic resistance. However, this has never been confirmed. Anatomical data of 447 species of woody angiosperms and gymnosperms were used for a phylogenetic analysis of end wall types, calculation of hydraulic resistance and correlation analysis with morphological and physiological variables. end wall types were defined according to pore arrangement: either grouped into a single area (simple) or into multiple areas along the end wall (compound). Convergent evolution of end wall types was demonstrated in woody angiosperms. In addition, an optimization of end wall resistance with plant height was discovered, but found to be independent of end wall type. While physiological factors also showed no correlation with end wall types, the number of sieve areas per end wall was found to scale with SE length. The results exclude the minimization of hydraulic resistance as evolutionary driver of different end wall types, contradicting this long-standing assumption. Instead, end wall type might depend on SE length. © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  2. A study of sensing heat flow through thermal walls by using thermoelectric module

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sippawit Noppawit

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Demands on heat flow detection at a plane wall via a thermoelectric module have drawn researchers’ attention to quantitative understanding in order to properly implement the thermoelectric module in thermal engineering practices. Basic mathematical models of both heat transfer through a plane wall and thermoelectric effects are numerically solved to represent genuine behaviors of heat flow detection by mounting a thermoelectric module at a plane wall. The heat transfer through the plane wall is expected to be detected. It is intriguing from simulation results that the heat rejected at the plane wall is identical to the heat absorbed by the thermoelectric module when the area of the plane wall is the same as that of the thermoelectric module. Furthermore, both the area sizes of the plane walls and the convective heat transfer coefficients at the wall influence amount of the heat absorbed by the thermoelectric module. Those observational data are modeled for development of sensing heat flow through a plane wall by a thermoelectric module in practical uses.

  3. Assessing the pulmonary toxicity of single-walled carbon nanohorns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynch, Rachel M [ORNL; Voy, Brynn H [ORNL; Glass-Mattie, Dana F [ORNL; Mahurin, Shannon Mark [ORNL; Saxton, Arnold [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Donnel, Robert L. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Cheng, Mengdawn [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) may pose a pulmonary hazard. We investigated the pulmonary toxicity of single-walled carbon nanohorns (SWCNHs), a relatively new carbon-based nanomaterial that is structurally similar to SWCNTs. Mice were exposed to 30 {micro}g of surfactant-suspended SWCNHs or an equal volume of vehicle control by pharyngeal aspiration and sacrificed 24 hours or 7 days post-exposure. Total and differential cell counts and cytokine analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid demonstrated a mild inflammatory response which was mitigated by day 7 post-exposure. Whole lung microarray analysis demonstrated that SWCNH-exposure did not lead to robust changes in gene expression. Finally, histological analysis showed no evidence of granuloma formation or fibrosis following SWCNH aspiration. These combined results suggest that SWCNH is a relatively innocuous nanomaterial when delivered to mice in vivo using aspiration as a delivery mechanism.

  4. Force fluctuations on a wall in interaction with a granular lid-driven cavity flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneib, François; Faug, Thierry; Nicolet, Gilles; Eckert, Nicolas; Naaim, Mohamed; Dufour, Frédéric

    2017-10-01

    The force fluctuations experienced by a boundary wall subjected to a lid-driven cavity flow are investigated by means of numerical simulations based on the discrete-element method. The time-averaged dynamics inside the cavity volume and the resulting steady force on the wall are governed by the boundary macroscopic inertial number, the latter being derived from the shearing velocity and the confinement pressure imposed at the top. The force fluctuations are quantified through measuring both the autocorrelation of force time series and the distributions of grain-wall forces, at distinct spatial scales from particle scale to wall scale. A key result is that the grain-wall force distributions are entirely driven by the boundary macroscopic inertial number, whatever the spatial scale considered. In particular, when the wall scale is considered, the distributions are found to evolve from nearly exponential to nearly Gaussian distributions by decreasing the macroscopic inertial number. The transition from quasistatic to dense inertial flow is well identified through remarkable changes in the shapes of the distributions of grain-wall forces, accompanied by a loss of system memory in terms of the mesoscale force transmitted toward the wall.

  5. Precast/Prestressed Concrete Experiments - Series 1 (Volume 1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-11-01

    AFRL-RX-TY-TR-2008-4616 PRECAST/ PRESTRESSED CONCRETE EXPERIMENTS – SERIES 1 (VOLUME I) Clay J. Naito Associate Professor Department of...specific retrofit. To illustrate this concept, the blast resistances of non-load bearing precast, prestressed concrete sandwich wall panels (WP) are...resistances of non-load bearing precast, prestressed concrete sandwich wall panels (WP) are examined. These components are used extensively in

  6. Computed tomography assessment of pharmacological lung volume reduction induced by bronchodilators in COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Naoya; Muro, Shigeo; Oguma, Tsuyoshi; Sato, Susumu; Kiyokawa, Hirofumi; Takahashi, Tamaki; Kudo, Megumi; Kinose, Daisuke; Kubo, Takeshi; Hoshino, Yuma; Ogawa, Emiko; Hirai, Toyohiro; Mishima, Michiaki

    2012-08-01

    Pharmacological lung volume reduction in COPD is an important goal in treatment with long-acting bronchodilators because in addition to airflow limitation, lung hyperinflation considerably affects COPD symptoms. Quantitative computed tomography (CT) simultaneously provides structural information about airway dimensions, emphysematous changes, and lung volumes, some of which are difficult to be evaluated by pulmonary function. Here, we evaluated changes in CT parameters and pulmonary function in 30 patients with COPD who underwent CT scans before and one year after starting tiotropium treatment and in 12 patients with COPD who were not treated with long-acting bronchodilators. Baseline pulmonary function and CT parameters did not differ between the two groups. One-year tiotropium therapy improved physiological-indices including residual volume (RV) and ratio of RV to total lung capacity (RV/TLC) (-235 mL, p = 0.005, and -2.9%, p = 0.0001, respectively), and CT-indices including wall area percent (WA%) and inner luminal area in right upper lobe apical and lower lobe basal segmental bronchi (-1.59%, p = 0.01, 2.27 mm(2), p = 0.0005; and -1.33%, p = 0.0008, 3.42 mm(2), p volume (LAV) and total lung volume (CT-TLV) (-92 mL, p = 0.0003, and -211 mL, p = 0.002, respectively). Changes in LAV, CT-TLV, RV, and RV/TLC were significantly greater in the tiotropium, than the non-bronchodilator group. The tiotropium-induced reduction in LAV correlated with the decrease in RV (ρ = 0.45, p = 0.01). Our findings not only indicate the value of the comprehensive CT measurements in assessing the effects of bronchodilators, including pharmacological lung volume reduction, but also further understanding of the structural changes underlying physiological improvements induced by bronchodilators.

  7. Creating universes with thick walls

    CERN Document Server

    Ulvestad, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    We study the dynamics of a spherically symmetric false vacuum bubble embedded in a true vacuum region separated by a "thick wall", which is generated by a scalar field in a quartic potential. We study the "Farhi-Guth-Guven" (FGG) quantum tunneling process by constructing numerical solutions relevant to this process. The ADM mass of the spacetime is calculated, and we show that there is a lower bound that is a significant fraction of the scalar field mass. We argue that the zero mass solutions used to by some to argue against the physicality of the FGG process are artifacts of the thin wall approximation used in earlier work. We argue that the zero mass solutions should not be used to question the viability of the FGG process.

  8. Primary chest wall lymphoma: A rare entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binay Kumar Shah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary chest wall lymphoma is a rare but curable condition. This paper reports a case of a 52-year-old female patient who presented with a primary chest wall diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

  9. Flow over convergent and divergent wall riblets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koeltzsch, K.; Dinkelacker, A.; Grundmann, R. [Institut fuer Luft- und Raumfahrttechnik, Technische Universitaet Dresden, 36460 Merkers (Germany)

    2002-08-01

    Fast swimming sharks have small riblets on their skin, which are assumed to improve the swimming performance of the fish. Fluid dynamic experiments in water as well as in air confirm this assumption. With riblet surfaces as compared to smooth surfaces, drag reductions up to about 10% were measured. The overall riblet pattern on sharks shows parallel riblets directed from head to tail, but besides this overall pattern fast swimming sharks have also small areas with converging riblets and others with diverging riblets. In the present study the velocity field over convergent and divergent riblet patterns is investigated by hot-wire measurements in turbulent pipe flow. Significant changes in the near wall velocity field were found. (orig.)

  10. Breaching Walls in Urban Warfare

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-06-06

    Jewish forces, each struggling for dominance "■" - ■ ■ wmmtti**, : A3 as the British relinquished control of Palestine. Jewish forces bottled ...rebel forces held much of the city and threatened to topple the government. The stated mission of the initial elements deployed, the U.S. Army’s...8217 When five round« were fired at angles to the target wall rather than at zero degrees obliquity, a larger hole was obtained, but

  11. Experimental and numerical studies of two arterial wall delamination modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Xiaochang; Zhou, Boran; Deng, Xiaomin; Davis, Lindsey; Lessner, Susan M; Sutton, Michael A; Shazly, Tarek

    2017-09-19

    Arterial wall dissection, which results from various pathophysiological processes, can lead to the occurrence of large area delamination in the aortic wall that can potentially block blood flow and lead to deleterious clinical conditions. Despite its critical clinical relevance, few studies have focused on investigating the failure mode of delamination in the arterial wall. In this study, we quantify the energy release rate of the medial layer of a porcine abdominal aorta via two delamination experiments: the mixed-mode delamination experiment and the "T"-shaped delamination experiment. A cohesive zone model (CZM) is applied to simulate the arterial wall delamination and Holzapfel-Gasser-Ogden (HGO) material model is used to capture the bulk arterial material behavior. A set of parameter values for the HGO and CZM models are identified through matching simulation predictions of the load vs. load-point displacement curve with experimental measurements. Then the parameter values and critical energy release rates obtained from experiments are used as input data for simulation predictions for two arterial wall delamination experiments. The simulation predictions show that the delamination front matches well with experimental measurements. Moreover, the mixed-mode delamination experiment reveals a shear mode-dominated failure event, whereas the "T"-shaped delamination experiment is an opening failure process. The integration of experimental data and numerical predictions of arterial delamination events provides a comprehensive description of distinct failure modes and aids in the prediction of aortic dissection. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. ESTIMATION OF SOLAR ENERGY ON VERTICAL 3D BUILDING WALLS ON CITY QUARTER SCALE

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    F Jaugsch; M-O Löwner

    2016-01-01

    ... parliament’s goal of reducing CO2 emissions by 20 % compared to 1990. Although annual radiation on vertical walls is lower than that on roof surfaces, they are larger in area and, therefore may contribute to energy production...

  13. Thermal insulation properties of walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhukov Aleksey Dmitrievich

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Heat-protective qualities of building structures are determined by the qualities of the used materials, adequate design solutions and construction and installation work of high quality. This rule refers both to the structures made of materials similar in their structure and nature and mixed, combined by a construction system. The necessity to ecaluate thermal conductivity is important for a product and for a construction. Methods for evaluating the thermal protection of walls are based on the methods of calculation, on full-scale tests in a laboratory or on objects. At the same time there is a reason to believe that even deep and detailed calculation may cause deviation of the values from real data. Using finite difference method can improve accuracy of the results, but it doesn’t solve all problems. The article discusses new approaches to evaluating thermal insulation properties of walls. The authors propose technique of accurate measurement of thermal insulation properties in single blocks and fragments of walls and structures.

  14. Flooding Effect on Earth Walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meysam Banimahd

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Earth building is a sustainable, environmentally friendly and economical method of construction that has been used worldwide for many centuries. For the past three decades, earth has seen a revival as a building material for a modern construction method due to its benefits in terms of low carbon content, low cost and energy involved during construction, as well as the fact that it is a sustainable technology of building. Climate change is influencing precipitation levels and patterns around the world, and as a consequence, flood risk is increasing rapidly. When flooding occurs, earth buildings are exposed to water by submersion, causing an increase in the degree of saturation of the earth structures and therefore a decrease of the suction between particles. This study investigated the effect of cycles of flooding (consecutive events of flooding followed by dry periods on earth walls. A series of characterization tests were carried out to obtain the physical and mechanical properties of the studied earth material. In a second stage, Flooding Simulation Tests (FST were performed to explore the earth walls’ response to repeated flooding events. The results obtained for the tested earth wall/samples with reinforced material (straw reveal hydraulic hysteresis when wall/samples are subject to cycles of wetting and drying.

  15. Cells, walls, and endless forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monniaux, Marie; Hay, Angela

    2016-12-01

    A key question in biology is how the endless diversity of forms found in nature evolved. Understanding the cellular basis of this diversity has been aided by advances in non-model experimental systems, quantitative image analysis tools, and modeling approaches. Recent work in plants highlights the importance of cell wall and cuticle modifications for the emergence of diverse forms and functions. For example, explosive seed dispersal in Cardamine hirsuta depends on the asymmetric localization of lignified cell wall thickenings in the fruit valve. Similarly, the iridescence of Hibiscus trionum petals relies on regular striations formed by cuticular folds. Moreover, NAC transcription factors regulate the differentiation of lignified xylem vessels but also the water-conducting cells of moss that lack a lignified secondary cell wall, pointing to the origin of vascular systems. Other novel forms are associated with modified cell growth patterns, including oriented cell expansion or division, found in the long petal spurs of Aquilegia flowers, and the Sarracenia purpurea pitcher leaf, respectively. Another good example is the regulation of dissected leaf shape in C. hirsuta via local growth repression, controlled by the REDUCED COMPLEXITY HD-ZIP class I transcription factor. These studies in non-model species often reveal as much about fundamental processes of development as they do about the evolution of form. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Thermal Load Calculations of Multilayered Walls

    OpenAIRE

    Bashir M. Suleiman

    2012-01-01

    Thermal load calculations have been performed for multi-layered walls that are composed of three different parts; a common (sand and cement) plaster, and two types of locally produced soft and hard bricks. The masonry construction of these layered walls was based on concrete-backed stone masonry made of limestone bricks joined by mortar. These multilayered walls are forming the outer walls of the building envelope of a typical Libyan house. Based on the periodic seasonal ...

  17. Thermal control wall prototype and test results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakao, M.; Ohshima, K.; Jitsukawa, H.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes a heat exchanger prototype and test results. The heat exchanger, called a thermal control wall, functions as a skin wall and as a means to vary the exterior wall thermal resistance of a building. Test results confirm that the capacity of the TCW is influenced by solar radiation. Furthermore, this TCW capacity can be evaluated by an overall heat transmission coefficient defined using the same sol air temperature difference as for a conventional wall.

  18. Correlations of coronary plaque wall thickness with wall pressure and wall pressure gradient: a representative case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Biyue

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are two major hemodynamic stresses imposed at the blood arterial wall interface by flowing blood: the wall shear stress (WSS acting tangentially to the wall, and the wall pressure (WP acting normally to the wall. The role of flow wall shear stress in atherosclerosis progression has been under intensive investigation, while the impact of blood pressure on plaque progression has been under-studied. Method The correlations of wall thickness (WT with wall pressure (WP, blood pressure on the lumen wall and spatial wall pressure gradient (WPG in a human atherosclerotic right coronary artery were studied. The pulsatile blood flow was simulated using a three dimensional mathematical model. The blood was treated as an incompressible viscous non-Newtonian fluid. The geometry of the artery was re-constructed using an in vivo intravascular ultrasound (IVUS 44-slice dataset obtained from a patient with consent obtained. The WT, the WP and the WPG were averaged on each slice, respectively, and Pearson correlation analysis was performed on slice averaged base. Each slice was then divided into 8 segments and averaged vessel WT, WP and WPG were collected from all 352 segments for correlation analysis. Each slice was also divided into 2 segments (inner semi-wall of bend and outer semi-wall of bend and the correlation analysis was performed on the 88 segments. Results Under mean pressure, the Pearson coefficient for correlation between WT and WP was r = − 0.52 (p  Conclusions Results from this representative case report indicated that plaque wall thickness correlated negatively with wall pressure (r = −0.81 by slice and positively with wall pressure gradient (r = 0.45. The slice averaged WT has a strong linear relationship with the slice averaged WP. Large-scale patient studies are needed to further confirm our findings.

  19. Identification of the heart wall and chamber based on temporal change of ultrasonic scatterer distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kohei; Taki, Hirofumi; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2017-07-01

    In most current methods for evaluating the cardiac function by ultrasound, the heart wall area is identified manually by an examiner. To eliminate examiner dependence and to improve usability, an automatic heart wall identification method is desirable. Identification based on only echogenicity often fails because of low echogenicity of some areas of the heart wall. In the present study, to determine more essential features, we focused on the relative temporal change of ultrasonic scatterer distribution and proposed three features for identification of the heart wall and the chamber: cross-correlation of RF signals, that of envelopes, and spatial dispersion of movement vectors in small regions. In an in vivo experiment, using echogenicity and the three features, we identified the heart wall and the chamber in the left ventricular long-axis view, resulting in criteria of separability J of 1.69, 1.40, and 3.02 using these features compared with the result of 0.979 using echogenicity.

  20. Area Handbook for Syria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyrop, Richard; And Others

    This volume on Syria is one of a series of handbooks prepared by the Foreign Area Studies (FAS) of the American University, designed to be useful to military and other personnel who need a convenient compilation of basic facts about the social, economic, political, and military institutions and practices of various countries. The emphasis is on…