WorldWideScience

Sample records for walking speeds flows

  1. Modulation of walking speed by changing optic flow in persons with stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamontagne Anouk

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Walking speed, which is often reduced after stroke, can be influenced by the perception of optic flow (OF speed. The present study aims to: 1 compare the modulation of walking speed in response to OF speed changes between persons with stroke and healthy controls and 2 investigate whether virtual environments (VE manipulating OF speed can be used to promote volitional changes in walking speed post stroke. Methods Twelve persons with stroke and 12 healthy individuals walked on a self-paced treadmill while viewing a virtual corridor in a helmet-mounted display. Two experiments were carried out on the same day. In experiment 1, the speed of an expanding OF was varied sinusoidally at 0.017 Hz (sine duration = 60 s, from 0 to 2 times the subject's comfortable walking speed, for a total duration of 5 minutes. In experiment 2, subjects were exposed to expanding OFs at discrete speeds that ranged from 0.25 to 2 times their comfortable speed. Each test trial was paired with a control trial performed at comfortable speed with matching OF. For each of the test trials, subjects were instructed to walk the distance within the same time as during the immediately preceding control trial. VEs were controlled by the CAREN-2 system (Motek. Instantaneous changes in gait speed (experiment 1 and the ratio of speed changes in the test trial over the control trial (experiment 2 were contrasted between the two groups of subjects. Results When OF speed was changing continuously (experiment 1, an out-of-phase modulation was observed in the gait speed of healthy subjects, such that slower OFs induced faster walking speeds, and vice versa. Persons with stroke displayed weaker (p 0.05, T-test. Conclusion Stroke affects the modulation of gait speed in response to changes in the perception of movement through different OF speeds. Nevertheless, the preservation of even a modest modulation enabled the persons with stroke to increase walking speed when

  2. Does manipulating the speed of visual flow in virtual reality change distance estimation while walking in Parkinson's disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehgoetz Martens, Kaylena A; Ellard, Colin G; Almeida, Quincy J

    2015-03-01

    Although dopaminergic replacement therapy is believed to improve sensory processing in PD, while delayed perceptual speed is thought to be caused by a predominantly cholinergic deficit, it is unclear whether sensory-perceptual deficits are a result of corrupt sensory processing, or a delay in updating perceived feedback during movement. The current study aimed to examine these two hypotheses by manipulating visual flow speed and dopaminergic medication to examine which influenced distance estimation in PD. Fourteen PD and sixteen HC participants were instructed to estimate the distance of a remembered target by walking to the position the target formerly occupied. This task was completed in virtual reality in order to manipulate the visual flow (VF) speed in real time. Three conditions were carried out: (1) BASELINE: VF speed was equal to participants' real-time movement speed; (2) SLOW: VF speed was reduced by 50 %; (2) FAST: VF speed was increased by 30 %. Individuals with PD performed the experiment in their ON and OFF state. PD demonstrated significantly greater judgement error during BASELINE and FAST conditions compared to HC, although PD did not improve their judgement error during the SLOW condition. Additionally, PD had greater variable error during baseline compared to HC; however, during the SLOW conditions, PD had significantly less variable error compared to baseline and similar variable error to HC participants. Overall, dopaminergic medication did not significantly influence judgement error. Therefore, these results suggest that corrupt processing of sensory information is the main contributor to sensory-perceptual deficits during movement in PD rather than delayed updating of sensory feedback.

  3. Establishing the Range of Perceptually Natural Visual Walking Speeds for Virtual Walking-In-Place Locomotion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Niels Christian; Serafin, Stefania; Nordahl, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    to virtual motion. This paper describes two within-subjects studies performed with the intention of establishing the range of perceptually natural walking speeds for WIP locomotion. In both studies, subjects performed a series of virtual walks while exposed to visual gains (optic flow multipliers) ranging...... from 1.0 to 3.0. Thus, the slowest speed was equal to an estimate of the subjects normal walking speed, while the highest speed was three times greater. The perceived naturalness of the visual speed was assessed using self-reports. The first study compared four different types of movement, namely...... proportional to the degree of underestimation of the virtual speeds for both treadmill-mediated virtual walking and WIP locomotion. Combined, the results constitute a first attempt at establishing a set of guidelines specifying what virtual walking speeds WIP gestures should produce in order to facilitate...

  4. Fast visual prediction and slow optimization of preferred walking speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Shawn M; Donelan, J Maxwell

    2012-05-01

    People prefer walking speeds that minimize energetic cost. This may be accomplished by directly sensing metabolic rate and adapting gait to minimize it, but only slowly due to the compounded effects of sensing delays and iterative convergence. Visual and other sensory information is available more rapidly and could help predict which gait changes reduce energetic cost, but only approximately because it relies on prior experience and an indirect means to achieve economy. We used virtual reality to manipulate visually presented speed while 10 healthy subjects freely walked on a self-paced treadmill to test whether the nervous system beneficially combines these two mechanisms. Rather than manipulating the speed of visual flow directly, we coupled it to the walking speed selected by the subject and then manipulated the ratio between these two speeds. We then quantified the dynamics of walking speed adjustments in response to perturbations of the visual speed. For step changes in visual speed, subjects responded with rapid speed adjustments (lasting 300 s). The timing and direction of these responses strongly indicate that a rapid predictive process informed by visual feedback helps select preferred speed, perhaps to complement a slower optimization process that seeks to minimize energetic cost.

  5. Biomechanical parameters in lower limbs during natural walking and Nordic walking at different speeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziuba, Alicja K; Żurek, Grzegorz; Garrard, Ian; Wierzbicka-Damska, Iwona

    2015-01-01

    Nordic Walking (NW) is a sport that has a number of benefits as a rehabilitation method. It is performed with specially designed poles and has been often recommended as a physical activity that helps reduce the load to limbs. However, some studies have suggested that these findings might be erroneous. The aim of this paper was to compare the kinematic, kinetic and dynamic parameters of lower limbs between Natural Walking (W) and Nordic Walking (NW) at both low and high walking speeds. The study used a registration system, BTS Smart software and Kistler platform. Eleven subjects walked along a 15-metre path at low (below 2 m⋅s-1) and high (over 2 m⋅s-1) walking speeds. The Davis model was employed for calculations of kinematic, kinetic and dynamic parameters of lower limbs. With constant speed, the support given by Nordic Walking poles does not make the stroke longer and there is no change in pelvic rotation either. The only change observed was much bigger pelvic anteversion in the sagittal plane during fast NW. There were no changes in forces, power and muscle torques in lower limbs. The study found no differences in kinematic, kinetic and dynamic parameters between Natural Walking (W) and Nordic Walking (NW). Higher speeds generate greater ground reaction forces and muscle torques in lower limbs. Gait parameters depend on walking speed rather than on walking style.

  6. Tempo and walking speed with music in the urban context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franěk, Marek; van Noorden, Leon; Režný, Lukáš

    2014-01-01

    The study explored the effect of music on the temporal aspects of walking behavior in a real outdoor urban setting. First, spontaneous synchronization between the beat of the music and step tempo was explored. The effect of motivational and non-motivational music (Karageorghis et al., 1999) on the walking speed was also studied. Finally, we investigated whether music can mask the effects of visual aspects of the walking route environment, which involve fluctuation of walking speed as a response to particular environmental settings. In two experiments, we asked participants to walk around an urban route that was 1.8 km in length through various environments in the downtown area of Hradec Králové. In Experiment 1, the participants listened to a musical track consisting of world pop music with a clear beat. In Experiment 2, participants were walking either with motivational music, which had a fast tempo and a strong rhythm, or with non-motivational music, which was slower, nice music, but with no strong implication to movement. Musical beat, as well as the sonic character of the music listened to while walking, influenced walking speed but did not lead to precise synchronization. It was found that many subjects did not spontaneously synchronize with the beat of the music at all, and some subjects synchronized only part of the time. The fast, energetic music increases the speed of the walking tempo, while slower, relaxing music makes the walking tempo slower. Further, it was found that listening to music with headphones while walking can mask the influence of the surrounding environment to some extent. Both motivational music and non-motivational music had a larger effect than the world pop music from Experiment 1. Individual differences in responses to the music listened to while walking that were linked to extraversion and neuroticism were also observed. The findings described here could be useful in rhythmic stimulation for enhancing or recovering the features of

  7. Tempo and walking speed with music in the urban context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franěk, Marek; van Noorden, Leon; Režný, Lukáš

    2014-01-01

    The study explored the effect of music on the temporal aspects of walking behavior in a real outdoor urban setting. First, spontaneous synchronization between the beat of the music and step tempo was explored. The effect of motivational and non-motivational music (Karageorghis et al., 1999) on the walking speed was also studied. Finally, we investigated whether music can mask the effects of visual aspects of the walking route environment, which involve fluctuation of walking speed as a response to particular environmental settings. In two experiments, we asked participants to walk around an urban route that was 1.8 km in length through various environments in the downtown area of Hradec Králové. In Experiment 1, the participants listened to a musical track consisting of world pop music with a clear beat. In Experiment 2, participants were walking either with motivational music, which had a fast tempo and a strong rhythm, or with non-motivational music, which was slower, nice music, but with no strong implication to movement. Musical beat, as well as the sonic character of the music listened to while walking, influenced walking speed but did not lead to precise synchronization. It was found that many subjects did not spontaneously synchronize with the beat of the music at all, and some subjects synchronized only part of the time. The fast, energetic music increases the speed of the walking tempo, while slower, relaxing music makes the walking tempo slower. Further, it was found that listening to music with headphones while walking can mask the influence of the surrounding environment to some extent. Both motivational music and non-motivational music had a larger effect than the world pop music from Experiment 1. Individual differences in responses to the music listened to while walking that were linked to extraversion and neuroticism were also observed. The findings described here could be useful in rhythmic stimulation for enhancing or recovering the features of

  8. Tempo and walking speed with music in the urban context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek eFranek

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The study explored the effect of music on the temporal aspects of walking behavior in a real outdoor urban setting. First, spontaneous synchronization between the beat of the music and step tempo was explored. The effect of motivational and non-motivational music (Karageorghis et al. 1999 on the walking speed was also studied. Finally, we investigated whether music can mask the effects of visual aspects of the walking route environment, which involve fluctuation of walking speed as a response to particular environmental settings. In two experiments, we asked participants to walk around an urban route through various environments in the downtown area of Hradec Králové. In Experiment 1, the participants listened to a musical track consisting of world pop music with a clear beat. In Experiment 2, participants were walking either with motivational music, which had a fast tempo and a strong rhythm, or with non-motivational music, which was slower, nice music, but with no strong implication to movement. Musical beat, as well as the sonic character of the music listened to while walking, influenced walking speed but did not lead to precise synchronization. It was found that many subjects did not spontaneously synchronize with the beat of the music at all, and some subjects synchronized only part of the time. The fast, energetic music increases the speed of the walking tempo, while slower, relaxing music makes the walking tempo slower. Further, it was found that listening to music with headphones while walking can mask the influence of the surrounding environment to some extent. Both motivational music and non-motivational music had a larger effect than the music from Experiment 1. Individual differences in responses to the music listened to while walking that were linked to extraversion and neuroticism were also observed. The findings described here could be useful in rhythmic stimulation for enhancing or recovering the features of movement

  9. Predicting the walking speed of pedestrians on stairs

    OpenAIRE

    Fujiyama, T.; Tyler, N.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a framework in which the behaviour of a pedestrian is predicted based on the characteristics of both the pedestrian and the facility the pedestrian uses. As an example of its application, we develop a model to predict the walking speed of a pedestrian on stairs. We examine the physiology and biomechanics of walking on stairs, and then develop a model that predicts walking speed based on the weight and leg extensor power of the pedestrian, and the gradient of the stai...

  10. Walking speed-related changes in stride time variability: effects of decreased speed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dubost Veronique

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Conflicting results have been reported regarding the relationship between stride time variability (STV and walking speed. While some studies failed to establish any relationship, others reported either a linear or a non-linear relationship. We therefore sought to determine the extent to which decrease in self-selected walking speed influenced STV among healthy young adults. Methods The mean value, the standard deviation and the coefficient of variation of stride time, as well as the mean value of stride velocity were recorded while steady-state walking using the GAITRite® system in 29 healthy young adults who walked consecutively at 88%, 79%, 71%, 64%, 58%, 53%, 46% and 39% of their preferred walking speed. Results The decrease in stride velocity increased significantly mean values, SD and CoV of stride time (p Conclusion The results support the assumption that gait variability increases while walking speed decreases and, thus, gait might be more unstable when healthy subjects walk slower compared with their preferred walking speed. Furthermore, these results highlight that a decrease in walking speed can be a potential confounder while evaluating STV.

  11. Optimal speeds for walking and running, and walking on a moving walkway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Manoj

    2009-06-01

    Many aspects of steady human locomotion are thought to be constrained by a tendency to minimize the expenditure of metabolic cost. This paper has three parts related to the theme of energetic optimality: (1) a brief review of energetic optimality in legged locomotion, (2) an examination of the notion of optimal locomotion speed, and (3) an analysis of walking on moving walkways, such as those found in some airports. First, I describe two possible connotations of the term "optimal locomotion speed:" that which minimizes the total metabolic cost per unit distance and that which minimizes the net cost per unit distance (total minus resting cost). Minimizing the total cost per distance gives the maximum range speed and is a much better predictor of the speeds at which people and horses prefer to walk naturally. Minimizing the net cost per distance is equivalent to minimizing the total daily energy intake given an idealized modern lifestyle that requires one to walk a given distance every day--but it is not a good predictor of animals' walking speeds. Next, I critique the notion that there is no energy-optimal speed for running, making use of some recent experiments and a review of past literature. Finally, I consider the problem of predicting the speeds at which people walk on moving walkways--such as those found in some airports. I present two substantially different theories to make predictions. The first theory, minimizing total energy per distance, predicts that for a range of low walkway speeds, the optimal absolute speed of travel will be greater--but the speed relative to the walkway smaller--than the optimal walking speed on stationary ground. At higher walkway speeds, this theory predicts that the person will stand still. The second theory is based on the assumption that the human optimally reconciles the sensory conflict between the forward speed that the eye sees and the walking speed that the legs feel and tries to equate the best estimate of the forward

  12. The Perceived Naturalness of Virtual Walking Speeds during WIP Locomotion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Niels Chr.; Serafin, Stefania; Nordahl, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that individuals tend to underestimate visually presented walking speeds when relying on treadmills for virtual walking. However, prior to the present studies this perceptual distortion had not been observed in relation to Walking-in-Place (WIP) locomotion, and a number...... to how gait cycle characteristics, visual display properties, and methodological differences affect speed underestimation during treadmill and WIP locomotion. The studies suggested the following: A significant main effect was found for step frequency; both display and geometric field of view were...... inversely proportional to the degree of underestimation; varying degrees of peripheral occlusion and increased HMD weight did not yield significant main effects; and the choice of method (i.e., how the speeds were presented) had a significant effect on the upper and lower bounds of what speeds were...

  13. Treadmill Adaptation and Verification of Self-Selected Walking Speed: A Protocol for Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorim, Paulo Roberto S.; Hills, Andrew; Byrne, Nuala

    2009-01-01

    Walking is a common activity of daily life and researchers have used the range 3-6 km.h[superscript -1] as reference for walking speeds habitually used for transportation. The term self-selected (i.e., individual or comfortable walking pace or speed) is commonly used in the literature and is identified as the most efficient walking speed, with…

  14. Influence of Neuromuscular Noise and Walking Speed on Fall Risk and Dynamic Stability in a 3D Dynamic Walking Model

    OpenAIRE

    Roos, Paulien E.; Dingwell, Jonathan B.

    2013-01-01

    Older adults and those with increased fall risk tend to walk slower. They may do this voluntarily to reduce their fall risk. However, both slower and faster walking speeds can predict increased risk of different types of falls. The mechanisms that contribute to fall risk across speeds are not well known. Faster walking requires greater forward propulsion, generated by larger muscle forces. However, greater muscle activation induces increased signal-dependent neuromuscular noise. These speed-r...

  15. Walking training with cueing of cadence improves walking speed and stride length after stroke more than walking training alone: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Lucas R; de Oliveira, Camila Quel; Ada, Louise; Michaelsen, Stella M; Teixeira-Salmela, Luci F

    2015-01-01

    After stroke, is walking training with cueing of cadence superior to walking training alone in improving walking speed, stride length, cadence and symmetry? Systematic review with meta-analysis of randomised or controlled trials. Adults who have had a stroke. Walking training with cueing of cadence. Four walking outcomes were of interest: walking speed, stride length, cadence and symmetry. This review included seven trials involving 211 participants. Because one trial caused substantial statistical heterogeneity, meta-analyses were conducted with and without this trial. Walking training with cueing of cadence improved walking speed by 0.23 m/s (95% CI 0.18 to 0.27, I(2)=0%), stride length by 0.21 m (95% CI 0.14 to 0.28, I(2)=18%), cadence by 19 steps/minute (95% CI 14 to 23, I(2)=40%), and symmetry by 15% (95% CI 3 to 26, random effects) more than walking training alone. This review provides evidence that walking training with cueing of cadence improves walking speed and stride length more than walking training alone. It may also produce benefits in terms of cadence and symmetry of walking. The evidence appears strong enough to recommend the addition of 30 minutes of cueing of cadence to walking training, four times a week for 4 weeks, in order to improve walking in moderately disabled individuals with stroke. PROSPERO (CRD42013005873). Copyright © 2014 Australian Physiotherapy Association. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Treadmill walking of the pneumatic biped Lucy: Walking at different speeds and step-lengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderborght, B.; Verrelst, B.; Van Ham, R.; Van Damme, M.; Versluys, R.; Lefeber, D.

    2008-07-01

    Actuators with adaptable compliance are gaining interest in the field of legged robotics due to their capability to store motion energy and to exploit the natural dynamics of the system to reduce energy consumption while walking and running. To perform research on compliant actuators we have built the planar biped Lucy. The robot has six actuated joints, the ankle, knee and hip of both legs with each joint powered by two pleated pneumatic artificial muscles in an antagonistic setup. This makes it possible to control both the torque and the stiffness of the joint. Such compliant actuators are used in passive walkers to overcome friction when walking over level ground and to improve stability. Typically, this kind of robots is only designed to walk with a constant walking speed and step-length, determined by the mechanical design of the mechanism and the properties of the ground. In this paper, we show that by an appropriate control, the robot Lucy is able to walk at different speeds and step-lengths and that adding and releasing weights does not affect the stability of the robot. To perform these experiments, an automated treadmill was built

  17. How humans use visual optic flow to regulate stepping during walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, Mandy M; Wilken, Jason M; Dingwell, Jonathan B

    2017-09-01

    Humans use visual optic flow to regulate average walking speed. Among many possible strategies available, healthy humans walking on motorized treadmills allow fluctuations in stride length (L n ) and stride time (T n ) to persist across multiple consecutive strides, but rapidly correct deviations in stride speed (S n =L n /T n ) at each successive stride, n. Several experiments verified this stepping strategy when participants walked with no optic flow. This study determined how removing or systematically altering optic flow influenced peoples' stride-to-stride stepping control strategies. Participants walked on a treadmill with a virtual reality (VR) scene projected onto a 3m tall, 180° semi-cylindrical screen in front of the treadmill. Five conditions were tested: blank screen ("BLANK"), static scene ("STATIC"), or moving scene with optic flow speed slower than ("SLOW"), matched to ("MATCH"), or faster than ("FAST") walking speed. Participants took shorter and faster strides and demonstrated increased stepping variability during the BLANK condition compared to the other conditions. Thus, when visual information was removed, individuals appeared to walk more cautiously. Optic flow influenced both how quickly humans corrected stride speed deviations and how successful they were at enacting this strategy to try to maintain approximately constant speed at each stride. These results were consistent with Weber's law: healthy adults more-rapidly corrected stride speed deviations in a no optic flow condition (the lower intensity stimuli) compared to contexts with non-zero optic flow. These results demonstrate how the temporal characteristics of optic flow influence ability to correct speed fluctuations during walking. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Influence of neuromuscular noise and walking speed on fall risk and dynamic stability in a 3D dynamic walking model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos, Paulien E; Dingwell, Jonathan B

    2013-06-21

    Older adults and those with increased fall risk tend to walk slower. They may do this voluntarily to reduce their fall risk. However, both slower and faster walking speeds can predict increased risk of different types of falls. The mechanisms that contribute to fall risk across speeds are not well known. Faster walking requires greater forward propulsion, generated by larger muscle forces. However, greater muscle activation induces increased signal-dependent neuromuscular noise. These speed-related increases in neuromuscular noise may contribute to the increased fall risk observed at faster walking speeds. Using a 3D dynamic walking model, we systematically varied walking speed without and with physiologically-appropriate neuromuscular noise. We quantified how actual fall risk changed with gait speed, how neuromuscular noise affected speed-related changes in fall risk, and how well orbital and local dynamic stability measures predicted changes in fall risk across speeds. When we included physiologically-appropriate noise to the 'push-off' force in our model, fall risk increased with increasing walking speed. Changes in kinematic variability, orbital, and local dynamic stability did not predict these speed-related changes in fall risk. Thus, the increased neuromuscular variability that results from increased signal-dependent noise that is necessitated by the greater muscular force requirements of faster walking may contribute to the increased fall risk observed at faster walking speeds. The lower fall risk observed at slower speeds supports experimental evidence that slowing down can be an effective strategy to reduce fall risk. This may help explain the slower walking speeds observed in older adults and others. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Is perception of self-motion speed a necessary condition for intercepting a moving target while walking?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morice, Antoine H P; Wallet, Grégory; Montagne, Gilles

    2014-04-30

    While it has been shown that the Global Optic Flow Rate (GOFR) is used in the control of self-motion speed, this study examined its relevance in the control of interceptive actions while walking. We asked participants to intercept approaching targets by adjusting their walking speed in a virtual environment, and predicted that the influence of the GOFR depended on their interception strategy. Indeed, unlike the Constant Bearing Angle (CBA), the Modified Required Velocity (MRV) strategy relies on the perception of self-displacement speed. On the other hand, the CBA strategy involves specific speed adjustments depending on the curvature of the target's trajectory, whereas the MRV does not. We hypothesized that one strategy is selected among the two depending on the informational content of the environment. We thus manipulated the curvature and display of the target's trajectory, and the relationship between physical walking speed and the GOFR (through eye height manipulations). Our results showed that when the target trajectory was not displayed, walking speed profiles were affected by curvature manipulations. Otherwise, walking speed profiles were less affected by curvature manipulations and were affected by the GOFR manipulations. Taken together, these results show that the use of the GOFR for intercepting a moving target while walking depends on the informational content of the environment. Finally we discuss the complementary roles of these two perceptual-motor strategies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Changes in resting and walking energy expenditure and walking speed during pregnancy in obese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Nuala M; Groves, Ainsley M; McIntyre, H David; Callaway, Leonie K

    2011-09-01

    Energy-conserving processes reported in undernourished women during pregnancy are a recognized strategy for providing the energy required to support fetal development. Women who are obese before conceiving arguably have sufficient fat stores to support the energy demands of pregnancy without the need to provoke energy-conserving mechanisms. We tested the hypothesis that obese women would show behavioral adaptation [ie, a decrease in self-selected walking (SSW) speed] but not metabolic compensation [ie, a decrease in resting metabolic rate (RMR) or the metabolic cost of walking] during gestation. RMR, SSW speed, metabolic cost of walking, and anthropometric variables were measured in 23 women aged 31 ± 4 y with a BMI (in kg/m(2)) of 33.6 ± 2.5 (mean ± SD) at ≈15 and 30 wk of gestation. RMR was also measured in 2 cohorts of nonpregnant control subjects matched for the age, weight, and height of the pregnant cohort at 15 (n = 23) and 30 (n = 23) wk. Gestational weight gain varied widely (11.3 ± 5.4 kg), and 52% of the women gained more weight than is recommended. RMR increased significantly by an average of 177 ± 176 kcal/d (11 ± 12%; P 80% of the cohort, the net oxygen cost of walking decreased in the same proportion of women. Although the increase in RMR was greater than that explained by weight gain, evidence of both behavioral and biological compensation in the metabolic cost of walking was observed in obese women during gestation. The trial is registered with the Australian Clinical Trials Registry as ACTRN012606000271505.

  1. Rat muscle blood flows during high-speed locomotion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, R.B.; Laughlin, M.H.

    1985-01-01

    We previously studied blood flow distribution within and among rat muscles as a function of speed from walking (15 m/min) through galloping (75 m/min) on a motor-driven treadmill. The results showed that muscle blood flows continued to increase as a function of speed through 75 m/min. The purpose of the present study was to have rats run up to maximal treadmill speeds to determine if blood flows in the muscles reach a plateau as a function of running speed over the animals normal range of locomotory speeds. Muscle blood flows were measured with radiolabeled microspheres at 1 min of running at 75, 90, and 105 m/min in male Sprague-Dawley rats. The data indicate that even at these relatively high treadmill speeds there was still no clear evidence of a plateau in blood flow in most of the hindlimb muscles. Flows in most muscles continued to increase as a function of speed. These observed patterns of blood flow vs. running speed may have resulted from the rigorous selection of rats that were capable of performing the high-intensity exercise and thus only be representative of a highly specific population of animals. On the other hand, the data could be interpreted to indicate that the cardiovascular potential during exercise is considerably higher in laboratory rats than has normally been assumed and that inadequate blood flow delivery to the muscles does not serve as a major limitation to their locomotory performance

  2. Tracking Steps on Apple Watch at Different Walking Speeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veerabhadrappa, Praveen; Moran, Matthew Duffy; Renninger, Mitchell D; Rhudy, Matthew B; Dreisbach, Scott B; Gift, Kristin M

    2018-04-09

    QUESTION: How accurate are the step counts obtained from Apple Watch? In this validation study, video steps vs. Apple Watch steps (mean ± SD) were 2965 ± 144 vs. 2964 ± 145 steps; P Apple Watch steps when compared with the manual counts obtained from video recordings. Our study is one of the initial studies to objectively validate the accuracy of the step counts obtained from Apple watch at different walking speeds. Apple Watch tested to be an extremely accurate device for measuring daily step counts for adults.

  3. Effects of changing speed on knee and ankle joint load during walking and running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de David, Ana Cristina; Carpes, Felipe Pivetta; Stefanyshyn, Darren

    2015-01-01

    Joint moments can be used as an indicator of joint loading and have potential application for sports performance and injury prevention. The effects of changing walking and running speeds on joint moments for the different planes of motion still are debatable. Here, we compared knee and ankle moments during walking and running at different speeds. Data were collected from 11 recreational male runners to determine knee and ankle joint moments during different conditions. Conditions include walking at a comfortable speed (self-selected pacing), fast walking (fastest speed possible), slow running (speed corresponding to 30% slower than running) and running (at 4 m · s(-1) ± 10%). A different joint moment pattern was observed between walking and running. We observed a general increase in joint load for sagittal and frontal planes as speed increased, while the effects of speed were not clear in the transverse plane moments. Although differences tend to be more pronounced when gait changed from walking to running, the peak moments, in general, increased when speed increased from comfortable walking to fast walking and from slow running to running mainly in the sagittal and frontal planes. Knee flexion moment was higher in walking than in running due to larger knee extension. Results suggest caution when recommending walking over running in an attempt to reduce knee joint loading. The different effects of speed increments during walking and running should be considered with regard to the prevention of injuries and for rehabilitation purposes.

  4. Walking speed and subclinical atherosclerosis in healthy older adults: the Whitehall II study

    OpenAIRE

    Hamer, M.; Kivimaki, M.; Lahiri, A.; Yerramasu, A.; Deanfield, J. E.; Marmot, M. G.; Steptoe, A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Extended walking speed is a predictor of incident cardiovascular disease (CVD) in older individuals, but the ability of an objective short-distance walking speed test to stratify the severity of preclinical conditions remains unclear. This study examined whether performance in an 8-ft walking speed test is associated with metabolic risk factors and subclinical atherosclerosis.Design Cross-sectional.Setting Epidemiological cohort.Participants 530 adults (aged 63 +/- 6 years, 50.3% ma...

  5. Walking speed and subclinical atherosclerosis in healthy older adults: the Whitehall II study

    OpenAIRE

    Hamer, Mark; Kivimaki, Mika; Lahiri, Avijit; Yerramasu, Ajay; Deanfield, John E; Marmot, Michael G; Steptoe, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Objective Extended walking speed is a predictor of incident cardiovascular disease (CVD) in older individuals, but the ability of an objective short-distance walking speed test to stratify the severity of preclinical conditions remains unclear. This study examined whether performance in an 8-ft walking speed test is associated with metabolic risk factors and subclinical atherosclerosis. Design Cross-sectional. Setting Epidemiological cohort. Participants 530 adults (aged 63?6?years, 50.3% mal...

  6. Walking, running, and resting under time, distance, and average speed constraints: optimality of walk-run-rest mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Leroy L; Srinivasan, Manoj

    2013-04-06

    On a treadmill, humans switch from walking to running beyond a characteristic transition speed. Here, we study human choice between walking and running in a more ecological (non-treadmill) setting. We asked subjects to travel a given distance overground in a given allowed time duration. During this task, the subjects carried, and could look at, a stopwatch that counted down to zero. As expected, if the total time available were large, humans walk the whole distance. If the time available were small, humans mostly run. For an intermediate total time, humans often use a mixture of walking at a slow speed and running at a higher speed. With analytical and computational optimization, we show that using a walk-run mixture at intermediate speeds and a walk-rest mixture at the lowest average speeds is predicted by metabolic energy minimization, even with costs for transients-a consequence of non-convex energy curves. Thus, sometimes, steady locomotion may not be energy optimal, and not preferred, even in the absence of fatigue. Assuming similar non-convex energy curves, we conjecture that similar walk-run mixtures may be energetically beneficial to children following a parent and animals on long leashes. Humans and other animals might also benefit energetically from alternating between moving forward and standing still on a slow and sufficiently long treadmill.

  7. A Case Study on the Walking Speed of Pedestrian at the Bus Terminal Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Ali Mohd Firdaus

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Walking speed is one of the factors in understanding the pedestrian walking behaviours. Every pedestrian has different level of walking speed that are regulated by some factors such as gender and age. This study was conducted at a bus terminal area with two objectives in which the first one was to determine the average walking speed of pedestrian by considering the factors of age, gender, people with and without carrying baggage; and the second one was to make a comparison of the average walking speed that considered age as the factor of comparison between pedestrian at the bus terminal area and crosswalk. Demographic factor of pedestrian walking speed in this study are gender and age consist of male, female, and 7 groups of age categories that are children, adult men and women, senior adult men and women, over 70 and disabled person. Data of experiment was obtained by making a video recording of the movement of people that were walking and roaming around at the main lobby for 45 minutes by using a camcorder. Hence, data analysis was done by using software named Human Behaviour Simulator (HBS for analysing the data extracted from the video. The result of this study was male pedestrian walked faster than female with the average of walking speed 1.13m/s and 1.07m/s respectively. Averagely, pedestrian that walked without carrying baggage had higher walking speed compared to pedestrian that were carrying baggage with the speed of 1.02m/s and 0.70m/s respectively. Male pedestrian walks faster than female because they have higher level of stamina and they are mostly taller than female pedestrian. Furthermore, pedestrian with baggage walks slower because baggage will cause distractions such as pedestrian will have more weight to carry and people tend to walk slower.

  8. A Case Study on the Walking Speed of Pedestrian at the Bus Terminal Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firdaus Mohamad Ali, Mohd; Salleh Abustan, Muhamad; Hidayah Abu Talib, Siti; Abustan, Ismail; Rahman, Noorhazlinda Abd; Gotoh, Hitoshi

    2018-03-01

    Walking speed is one of the factors in understanding the pedestrian walking behaviours. Every pedestrian has different level of walking speed that are regulated by some factors such as gender and age. This study was conducted at a bus terminal area with two objectives in which the first one was to determine the average walking speed of pedestrian by considering the factors of age, gender, people with and without carrying baggage; and the second one was to make a comparison of the average walking speed that considered age as the factor of comparison between pedestrian at the bus terminal area and crosswalk. Demographic factor of pedestrian walking speed in this study are gender and age consist of male, female, and 7 groups of age categories that are children, adult men and women, senior adult men and women, over 70 and disabled person. Data of experiment was obtained by making a video recording of the movement of people that were walking and roaming around at the main lobby for 45 minutes by using a camcorder. Hence, data analysis was done by using software named Human Behaviour Simulator (HBS) for analysing the data extracted from the video. The result of this study was male pedestrian walked faster than female with the average of walking speed 1.13m/s and 1.07m/s respectively. Averagely, pedestrian that walked without carrying baggage had higher walking speed compared to pedestrian that were carrying baggage with the speed of 1.02m/s and 0.70m/s respectively. Male pedestrian walks faster than female because they have higher level of stamina and they are mostly taller than female pedestrian. Furthermore, pedestrian with baggage walks slower because baggage will cause distractions such as pedestrian will have more weight to carry and people tend to walk slower.

  9. The influence of gait speed on the stability of walking among the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yifang; Li, Zhiyu; Han, Shuyan; Lv, Changsheng; Zhang, Bo

    2016-06-01

    Walking speed is a basic factor to consider when walking exercises are prescribed as part of a training programme. Although associations between walking speed, step length and falling risk have been identified, the relationship between spontaneous walking pattern and falling risk remains unclear. The present study, therefore, examined the stability of spontaneous walking at normal, fast and slow speed among elderly (67.5±3.23) and young (21.4±1.31) individuals. In all, 55 participants undertook a test that involved walking on a plantar pressure platform. Foot-ground contact data were used to calculate walking speed, step length, pressure impulse along the plantar-impulse principal axis and pressure record of time series along the plantar-impulse principal axis. A forward dynamics method was used to calculate acceleration, velocity and displacement of the centre of mass in the vertical direction. The results showed that when the elderly walked at different speeds, their average step length was smaller than that observed among the young (p=0.000), whereas their anterior/posterior variability and lateral variability had no significant difference. When walking was performed at normal or slow speed, no significant between-group difference in cadence was found. When walking at a fast speed, the elderly increased their stride length moderately and their cadence greatly (p=0.012). In summary, the present study found no correlation between fast walking speed and instability among the elderly, which indicates that healthy elderly individuals might safely perform fast-speed walking exercises. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Energy cost of walking: solving the paradox of steady state in the presence of variable walking speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plasschaert, Frank; Jones, Kim; Forward, Malcolm

    2009-02-01

    Measurement of the energy cost of walking in children with cerebral palsy is used for baseline and outcome assessment. However, such testing relies on the establishment of steady state that is deemed present when oxygen consumption is stable. This is often assumed when walking speed is constant but in practice, speed can and does vary naturally. Whilst constant speed is achievable on a treadmill, this is often impractical clinically, thus rendering an energy cost test to an element of subjectivity. This paper attempts to address this issue by presenting a new method for calculating energy cost of walking that automatically applies a mathematically defined threshold for steady state within a (non-treadmill) walking trial and then strips out all of the non-steady state events within that trial. The method is compared with a generic approach that does not remove non-steady state data but rather uses an average value over a complete walking trial as is often used in the clinical environment. Both methods were applied to the calculation of several energy cost of walking parameters of self-selected walking speed in a cohort of unimpaired subjects and children with cerebral palsy. The results revealed that both methods were strongly correlated for each parameter but showed systematic significant differences. It is suggested that these differences are introduced by the rejection of non-steady state data that would otherwise have incorrectly been incorporated into the calculation of the energy cost of walking indices during self-selected walking with its inherent speed variation.

  11. Walking training associated with virtual reality-based training increases walking speed of individuals with chronic stroke: systematic review with meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Juliana M. Rodrigues-Baroni; Lucas R. Nascimento; Louise Ada; Luci F. Teixeira-Salmela

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To systematically review the available evidence on the efficacy of walking training associated with virtual reality-based training in patients with stroke. The specific questions were: Is walking training associated with virtual reality-based training effective in increasing walking speed after stroke? Is this type of intervention more effective in increasing walking speed, than non-virtual reality-based walking interventions? METHOD: A systematic review with meta-analysis of rando...

  12. Walking during body-weight-supported treadmill training and acute responses to varying walking speed and body-weight support in ambulatory patients post-stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaslund, Mona Kristin; Helbostad, Jorunn Lægdheim; Moe-Nilssen, Rolf

    2013-05-01

    Rehabilitating walking in ambulatory patients post-stroke, with training that is safe, task-specific, intensive, and of sufficient duration, can be challenging. Some challenges can be met by using body-weight-supported treadmill training (BWSTT). However, it is not known to what degree walking characteristics are similar during BWSTT and overground walking. In addition, important questions regarding the training protocol of BWSTT remain unanswered, such as how proportion of body-weight support (BWS) and walking speed affect walking characteristics during training. The objective was therefore to investigate if and how kinematic walking characteristics are different between overground walking and treadmill walking with BWS in ambulatory patients post-stroke, and the acute response of altering walking speed and percent BWS during treadmill walking with BWS. A cross-sectional repeated-measures design was used. Ambulating patients post-stroke walked in slow, preferred, and fast walking speed overground and at comparable speeds on the treadmill with 20% and 40% BWS. Kinematic walking characteristics were obtained using a kinematic sensor attached over the lower back. Forty-four patients completed the protocol. Kinematic walking characteristics were similar during treadmill walking with BWS, compared to walking overground. During treadmill walking, choice of walking speed had greater impact on kinematic walking characteristics than proportion of BWS. Faster walking speeds tended to affect the kinematic walking characteristics positively. This implies that in order to train safely and with sufficient intensity and duration, therapists may choose to include BWSTT in walking rehabilitation also for ambulatory patients post-stroke without aggravating gait pattern during training.

  13. Reliability and Validity of Ten Consumer Activity Trackers Depend on Walking Speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fokkema, Tryntsje; Kooiman, Thea J M; Krijnen, Wim P; VAN DER Schans, Cees P; DE Groot, Martijn

    2017-04-01

    To examine the test-retest reliability and validity of ten activity trackers for step counting at three different walking speeds. Thirty-one healthy participants walked twice on a treadmill for 30 min while wearing 10 activity trackers (Polar Loop, Garmin Vivosmart, Fitbit Charge HR, Apple Watch Sport, Pebble Smartwatch, Samsung Gear S, Misfit Flash, Jawbone Up Move, Flyfit, and Moves). Participants walked three walking speeds for 10 min each; slow (3.2 km·h), average (4.8 km·h), and vigorous (6.4 km·h). To measure test-retest reliability, intraclass correlations (ICC) were determined between the first and second treadmill test. Validity was determined by comparing the trackers with the gold standard (hand counting), using mean differences, mean absolute percentage errors, and ICC. Statistical differences were calculated by paired-sample t tests, Wilcoxon signed-rank tests, and by constructing Bland-Altman plots. Test-retest reliability varied with ICC ranging from -0.02 to 0.97. Validity varied between trackers and different walking speeds with mean differences between the gold standard and activity trackers ranging from 0.0 to 26.4%. Most trackers showed relatively low ICC and broad limits of agreement of the Bland-Altman plots at the different speeds. For the slow walking speed, the Garmin Vivosmart and Fitbit Charge HR showed the most accurate results. The Garmin Vivosmart and Apple Watch Sport demonstrated the best accuracy at an average walking speed. For vigorous walking, the Apple Watch Sport, Pebble Smartwatch, and Samsung Gear S exhibited the most accurate results. Test-retest reliability and validity of activity trackers depends on walking speed. In general, consumer activity trackers perform better at an average and vigorous walking speed than at a slower walking speed.

  14. Energetic consequences of human sociality: walking speed choices among friendly dyads.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janelle Wagnild

    Full Text Available Research has shown that individuals have an optimal walking speed-a speed which minimizes energy expenditure for a given distance. Because the optimal walking speed varies with mass and lower limb length, it also varies with sex, with males in any given population tending to have faster optimal walking speeds. This potentially creates an energetic dilemma for mixed-sex walking groups. Here we examine speed choices made by individuals of varying stature, mass, and sex walking together. Individuals (N = 22 walked around a track alone, with a significant other (with and without holding hands, and with friends of the same and opposite sex while their speeds were recorded every 100 m. Our findings show that males walk at a significantly slower pace to match the females' paces (p = 0.009, when the female is their romantic partner. The paces of friends of either same or mixed sex walking together did not significantly change (p>0.05. Thus significant pace adjustment appears to be limited to romantic partners. These findings have implications for both mobility and reproductive strategies of groups. Because the male carries the energetic burden by adjusting his pace (slowing down 7%, the female is spared the potentially increased caloric cost required to walk together. In energetically demanding environments, we will expect to find gender segregation in group composition, particularly when travelling longer distances.

  15. Effects of walking speed on the step-by-step control of step width.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stimpson, Katy H; Heitkamp, Lauren N; Horne, Joscelyn S; Dean, Jesse C

    2018-02-08

    Young, healthy adults walking at typical preferred speeds use step-by-step adjustments of step width to appropriately redirect their center of mass motion and ensure mediolateral stability. However, it is presently unclear whether this control strategy is retained when walking at the slower speeds preferred by many clinical populations. We investigated whether the typical stabilization strategy is influenced by walking speed. Twelve young, neurologically intact participants walked on a treadmill at a range of prescribed speeds (0.2-1.2 m/s). The mediolateral stabilization strategy was quantified as the proportion of step width variance predicted by the mechanical state of the pelvis throughout a step (calculated as R 2 magnitude from a multiple linear regression). Our ability to accurately predict the upcoming step width increased over the course of a step. The strength of the relationship between step width and pelvis mechanics at the start of a step was reduced at slower speeds. However, these speed-dependent differences largely disappeared by the end of a step, other than at the slowest walking speed (0.2 m/s). These results suggest that mechanics-dependent adjustments in step width are a consistent component of healthy gait across speeds and contexts. However, slower walking speeds may ease this control by allowing mediolateral repositioning of the swing leg to occur later in a step, thus encouraging slower walking among clinical populations with limited sensorimotor control. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Economy, Movement Dynamics, and Muscle Activity of Human Walking at Different Speeds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raffalt, Peter Christian; Guul, Martin Kjær; Nielsen, A. N.

    2017-01-01

    The complex behaviour of human walking with respect to movement variability, economy and muscle activity is speed dependent. It is well known that a U-shaped relationship between walking speed and economy exists. However, it is an open question if the movement dynamics of joint angles and centre...... of mass and muscle activation strategy also exhibit a U-shaped relationship with walking speed. We investigated the dynamics of joint angle trajectories and the centre of mass accelerations at five different speeds ranging from 20 to 180% of the predicted preferred speed (based on Froude speed) in twelve...... healthy males. The muscle activation strategy and walking economy were also assessed. The movement dynamics was investigated using a combination of the largest Lyapunov exponent and correlation dimension. We observed an intermediate stage of the movement dynamics of the knee joint angle and the anterior...

  17. Wake flow characteristics at high wind speed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard Madsen, Helge; Larsen, Torben J.; Larsen, Gunner Chr.

    2016-01-01

    Wake flow characteristic at high wind speeds is the main subject of this paper. Although the wake losses decrease at high wind speeds it has been found in a recent study that for multiple wake inflow the increase in loading due to wake effects are substantial even at wind speeds well above rated ...

  18. Activating and relaxing music entrains the speed of beat synchronized walking

    OpenAIRE

    Leman, Marc; Moelants, Dirk; Varewyck, Matthias; Styns, Frederik; van Noorden, Leon; Martens, Jean-Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Inspired by a theory of embodied music cognition, we investigate whether music can entrain the speed of beat synchronized walking. If human walking is in synchrony with the beat and all musical stimuli have the same duration and the same tempo, then differences in walking speed can only be the result of music-induced differences in stride length, thus reflecting the vigor or physical strength of the movement. Participants walked in an open field in synchrony with the beat of 52 different musi...

  19. Effect of Traffic Noise and Relaxations Sounds on Pedestrian Walking Speed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Franěk

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to noise in everyday urban life is considered to be an environmental stressor. A specific outcome of reactions to environmental stress is a fast pace of life that also includes a faster pedestrian walking speed. The present study examined the effect of listening to annoying acoustical stimuli (traffic noise compared with relaxation sounds (forest birdsong on walking speed in a real outdoor urban environment. The participants (N = 83 walked along an urban route of 1.8 km. They listened to either traffic noise or forest birdsong, or they walked without listening to any acoustical stimuli in the control condition. The results showed that participants listening to traffic noise walked significantly faster on the route than both the participants listening to forest birdsong sounds and the participants in the control condition. Participants who listened to forest birdsong walked slightly slower than those under control conditions; however, this difference was not significant. Analysis of the walk experience showed that participants who listened to forest birdsong during the walk liked the route more than those who listened to traffic sounds. The study demonstrated that exposure to traffic noise led to an immediate increase in walking speed. It was also shown that exposure to noise may influence participants’ perception of an environment. The same environment may be more liked in the absence of noise or in the presence of relaxation sounds. The study also documented the positive effect of listening to various kinds of relaxation sounds while walking in an outdoor environment with traffic noise.

  20. Compressibility, turbulence and high speed flow

    CERN Document Server

    Gatski, Thomas B

    2013-01-01

    Compressibility, Turbulence and High Speed Flow introduces the reader to the field of compressible turbulence and compressible turbulent flows across a broad speed range, through a unique complimentary treatment of both the theoretical foundations and the measurement and analysis tools currently used. The book provides the reader with the necessary background and current trends in the theoretical and experimental aspects of compressible turbulent flows and compressible turbulence. Detailed derivations of the pertinent equations describing the motion of such turbulent flows is provided and an extensive discussion of the various approaches used in predicting both free shear and wall bounded flows is presented. Experimental measurement techniques common to the compressible flow regime are introduced with particular emphasis on the unique challenges presented by high speed flows. Both experimental and numerical simulation work is supplied throughout to provide the reader with an overall perspective of current tre...

  1. Reliability and Validity of Ten Consumer Activity Trackers Depend on Walking Speed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fokkema, Tryntsje; Kooiman, Thea J. M.; Krijnen, Wim P.; Van der Schans, Cees P.; De Groot, Martijn

    Purpose: To examine the test-retest reliability and validity of ten activity trackers for step counting at three different walking speeds. Methods: Thirty-one healthy participants walked twice on a treadmill for 30 min while wearing 10 activity trackers (Polar Loop, Garmin Vivosmart, Fitbit Charge

  2. Reliability and validity of ten consumer activity trackers depend on walking speed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fokkema, Tryntsje; Kooiman, Thea; Krijnen, Wim; van der Schans, Cees; de Groot, Martijn

    Purpose: To examine the test–retest reliability and validity of ten activity trackers for step counting at three different walking speeds. Methods: Thirty-one healthy participants walked twice on a treadmill for 30 min while wearing 10 activity trackers (Polar Loop, Garmin Vivosmart, Fitbit Charge

  3. Inertial sensor-based methods in walking speed estimation: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shuozhi; Li, Qingguo

    2012-01-01

    Self-selected walking speed is an important measure of ambulation ability used in various clinical gait experiments. Inertial sensors, i.e., accelerometers and gyroscopes, have been gradually introduced to estimate walking speed. This research area has attracted a lot of attention for the past two decades, and the trend is continuing due to the improvement of performance and decrease in cost of the miniature inertial sensors. With the intention of understanding the state of the art of current development in this area, a systematic review on the exiting methods was done in the following electronic engines/databases: PubMed, ISI Web of Knowledge, SportDiscus and IEEE Xplore. Sixteen journal articles and papers in proceedings focusing on inertial sensor based walking speed estimation were fully reviewed. The existing methods were categorized by sensor specification, sensor attachment location, experimental design, and walking speed estimation algorithm.

  4. Inertial Sensor-Based Methods in Walking Speed Estimation: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingguo Li

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Self-selected walking speed is an important measure of ambulation ability used in various clinical gait experiments. Inertial sensors, i.e., accelerometers and gyroscopes, have been gradually introduced to estimate walking speed. This research area has attracted a lot of attention for the past two decades, and the trend is continuing due to the improvement of performance and decrease in cost of the miniature inertial sensors. With the intention of understanding the state of the art of current development in this area, a systematic review on the exiting methods was done in the following electronic engines/databases: PubMed, ISI Web of Knowledge, SportDiscus and IEEE Xplore. Sixteen journal articles and papers in proceedings focusing on inertial sensor based walking speed estimation were fully reviewed. The existing methods were categorized by sensor specification, sensor attachment location, experimental design, and walking speed estimation algorithm.

  5. The effect of walking speed on local dynamic stability is sensitive to calculation methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenum, Jan; Bruijn, Sjoerd M; Jensen, Bente Rona

    2014-01-01

    Local dynamic stability has been assessed by the short-term local divergence exponent (λS), which quantifies the average rate of logarithmic divergence of infinitesimally close trajectories in state space. Both increased and decreased local dynamic stability at faster walking speeds have been...... reported. This might pertain to methodological differences in calculating λS. Therefore, the aim was to test if different calculation methods would induce different effects of walking speed on local dynamic stability. Ten young healthy participants walked on a treadmill at five speeds (60%, 80%, 100%, 120......% and 140% of preferred walking speed) for 3min each, while upper body accelerations in three directions were sampled. From these time-series, λS was calculated by three different methods using: (a) a fixed time interval and expressed as logarithmic divergence per stride-time (λS-a), (b) a fixed number...

  6. The independent effects of speed and propulsive force on joint power generation in walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Michael G; Franz, Jason R

    2017-04-11

    Walking speed is modulated using propulsive forces (F P ) during push-off and both preferred speed and F P decrease with aging. However, even prior to walking slower, reduced F P may be accompanied by potentially unfavorable changes in joint power generation. For example, compared to young adults, older adults exhibit a redistribution of mechanical power generation from the propulsive plantarflexor muscles to more proximal muscles acting across the knee and hip. Here, we used visual biofeedback based on real-time F P measurements to decouple and investigate the interaction between joint-level coordination, whole-body F P , and walking speed. 12 healthy young subjects walked on a dual-belt instrumented treadmill at a range of speeds (0.9-1.3m/s). We immediately calculated the average F P from each speed. Subjects then walked at 1.3m/s while completing a series of biofeedback trials with instructions to match their instantaneous F P to their averaged F P from slower speeds. Walking slower decreased F P and total positive joint work with little effect on relative joint-level contributions. Conversely, subjects walked at a constant speed with reduced F P , not by reducing total positive joint work, but by redistributing the mechanical demands of each step from the plantarflexor muscles during push-off to more proximal leg muscles during single support. Interestingly, these naturally emergent joint- and limb-level biomechanical changes, in the absence of neuromuscular constraints, resemble those due to aging. Our findings provide important reference data to understand the presumably complex interactions between joint power generation, whole-body F P , and walking speed in our aging population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. [Factors associated with slow walking speed in older adults of a district in Lima, Peru].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Gabriela; Burga-Cisneros, Daniella; Cipriano, Gabriela; Ortiz, Pedro J; Tello, Tania; Casas, Paola; Aliaga, Elizabeth; Varela, Luis F

    2017-01-01

    To determine the factors associated with slow walking speed in older adults living in a district of Lima, Peru. Analysis of secondary data. Adults older than 60 years were included in the study, while adults with physical conditions who did not allow the evaluation of the walking speed were excluded. The dependent variable was slow walking speed (less than 1 m/s), and the independent variables were sociodemographic, clinical, and geriatric data. Raw and adjusted prevalence ratios (PR) were calculated with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). The study sample included 416 older adults aged 60 to 99 years, and 41% of the participants met the slow walking speed criterion. The factors associated with slow walking speed in this sample were female gender (PR, 1.45; 95% CI, 1.13-1.88), age > 70 years (PR, 1.73; 95% CI, 1.30- 2.30), lower level of education (PR, 2.07, 95% CI, 1.20-3.55), social-familial problems (PR, 1.66; 95% CI, 1.08-2.54), diabetes mellitus (PR, 1.35; 95% CI, 1.01-1.80), and depression (PR, 1.41; 95% CI, 1.02-1.95). The modifiable factors associated with slow walking speed in older adults included clinical and social-familial problems, and these factors are susceptible to interventions from the early stages of life.

  8. Insect-computer hybrid legged robot with user-adjustable speed, step length and walking gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Feng; Zhang, Chao; Choo, Hao Yu; Sato, Hirotaka

    2016-03-01

    We have constructed an insect-computer hybrid legged robot using a living beetle (Mecynorrhina torquata; Coleoptera). The protraction/retraction and levation/depression motions in both forelegs of the beetle were elicited by electrically stimulating eight corresponding leg muscles via eight pairs of implanted electrodes. To perform a defined walking gait (e.g., gallop), different muscles were individually stimulated in a predefined sequence using a microcontroller. Different walking gaits were performed by reordering the applied stimulation signals (i.e., applying different sequences). By varying the duration of the stimulation sequences, we successfully controlled the step frequency and hence the beetle's walking speed. To the best of our knowledge, this paper presents the first demonstration of living insect locomotion control with a user-adjustable walking gait, step length and walking speed. © 2016 The Author(s).

  9. In vivo fascicle behavior of the flexor hallucis longus muscle at different walking speeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Péter, A; Hegyi, A; Finni, T; Cronin, N J

    2017-12-01

    Ankle plantar flexor muscles support and propel the body in the stance phase of locomotion. Besides the triceps surae, flexor hallucis longus muscle (FHL) may also contribute to this role, but very few in vivo studies have examined FHL function during walking. Here, we investigated FHL fascicle behavior at different walking speeds. Ten healthy males walked overground at three different speeds while FHL fascicle length changes were recorded with ultrasound and muscle activity was recorded with surface electromyography (EMG). Fascicle length at heel strike at toe off and at peak EMG activity did not change with speed. Range of FHL fascicle length change (3.5-4.5 and 1.9-2.9 mm on average in stance and push-off phase, respectively), as well as minimum (53.5-54.9 and 53.8-55.7 mm) and maximum (58-58.4 and 56.8-57.7 mm) fascicle length did not change with speed in the stance or push-off phase. Mean fascicle velocity did not change in the stance phase, but increased significantly in the push-off phase between slow and fast walking speeds (P=.021). EMG activity increased significantly in both phases from slow to preferred and preferred to fast speed (P<.02 in all cases). FHL muscle fascicles worked near-isometrically during the whole stance phase (at least during slow walking) and operated at approximately the same length at different walking speeds. FHL and medial gastrocnemius (MG) have similar fiber length to muscle belly length ratios and, according to our results, also exhibit similar fascicle behavior at different walking speeds. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. An observation of the walking speed of evacuees during a simulated tsunami evacuation in Padang, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yosritzal; Kemal, B. M.; Purnawan; Putra, H.

    2018-04-01

    This paper presents a simulation study to observe the walking speed of evacuee in the case of tsunami evacuation in Padang, West Sumatera, Indonesia. A number of 9 volunteers, 6 observers, 1 route with 5 segments were involved in the simulation. The chosen route is the easiest path and the volunteers were ordered to walk in hurry to a particular place which was assumed as a shelter. The observers were placed at some particular places to record the time when an evacuee passes their place. The distance between the observers were measured using a manual distance meter. The study found that the average walking speed during the evacuation was 1.419 m/s. Walking speed is varied by age and gender of the evacuee.

  11. Speed-related spinal excitation from ankle dorsiflexors to knee extensors during human walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iglesias, Caroline; Nielsen, Jens Bo; Marchand-Pauvert, Véronique

    2008-01-01

    Automatic adjustments of muscle activity throughout the body are required for the maintenance of balance during human walking. One mechanism that is likely to contribute to this control is the heteronymous spinal excitation between human ankle dorsiflexors and knee extensors (CPQ-reflex). Here, we...... investigated the CPQ-reflex at different walking speeds (1-6 km/h) and stride frequencies (0.6-1.3 Hz) in healthy human subjects to provide further evidence of its modulation, and its role in ensuring postural stability during walking. The CPQ-reflex was small or absent at walking speeds below 2-3 km....../h, then increased with walking speeds about 3-4 km/h, and reached a plateau without any further change at walking speeds from 4 to 6 km/h. The reflex showed no modulation when the stride cycle was varied at constant speed (4 km/h; short steps versus long steps). These changes were unlikely to be only caused...

  12. Walking speed and subclinical atherosclerosis in healthy older adults: the Whitehall II study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamer, Mark; Kivimaki, Mika; Lahiri, Avijit; Yerramasu, Ajay; Deanfield, John E; Marmot, Michael G; Steptoe, Andrew

    2010-03-01

    Extended walking speed is a predictor of incident cardiovascular disease (CVD) in older individuals, but the ability of an objective short-distance walking speed test to stratify the severity of preclinical conditions remains unclear. This study examined whether performance in an 8-ft walking speed test is associated with metabolic risk factors and subclinical atherosclerosis. Cross-sectional. Setting Epidemiological cohort. 530 adults (aged 63 + or - 6 years, 50.3% male) from the Whitehall II cohort study with no known history or objective signs of CVD. Electron beam computed tomography and ultrasound was used to assess the presence and extent of coronary artery calcification (CAC) and carotid intima-media thickness (IMT), respectively. High levels of CAC (Agatston score >100) were detected in 24% of the sample; the mean IMT was 0.75 mm (SD 0.15). Participants with no detectable CAC completed the walking course 0.16 s (95% CI 0.04 to 0.28) faster than those with CAC > or = 400. Objectively assessed, but not self-reported, faster walking speed was associated with a lower risk of high CAC (odds ratio 0.62, 95% CI 0.40 to 0.96) and lower IMT (beta=-0.04, 95% CI -0.01 to -0.07 mm) in comparison with the slowest walkers (bottom third), after adjusting for conventional risk factors. Faster walking speed was also associated with lower adiposity, C-reactive protein and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Short-distance walking speed is associated with metabolic risk and subclinical atherosclerosis in older adults without overt CVD. These data suggest that a non-aerobically challenging walking test reflects the presence of underlying vascular disease.

  13. EFFECTS OF UNSTABLE SHOES ON ENERGY COST DURING TREADMILL WALKING AT VARIOUS SPEEDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiji Koyama

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, shoes having rounded soles in the anterior- posterior direction have been commercially introduced, which are commonly known as unstable shoes (US. However, physiological responses during walking in US, particularly at various speeds, have not been extensively studied to date. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of wearing unstable shoes while walking at low to high speeds on the rate of perceived exertion (RPE, muscle activation, oxygen consumption (VO2, and optimum speed. Healthy male adults wore US or normal walking shoes (WS, and walked at various speeds on a treadmill with no inclination. In experiment 1, subjects walked at 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7 km·h-1 (duration, 3 min for all speeds and were recorded on video from the right sagittal plane to calculate the step length and cadence. Simultaneously, electromyogram (EMG was recorded from six different thigh and calf muscles, and the integrated EMG (iEMG was calculated. In experiment 2, RPE, heart rate and VO2 were measured with the walking speed being increased from 3.6 to 7.2 km·h-1 incrementally by 0.9 km·h-1 every 6 min. The optimum speed, defined by the least oxygen cost, was calculated from the fitted quadratic relationship between walking speed and oxygen cost. Wearing US resulted in significantly longer step length and lower cadence compared with WS condition at any given speed. For all speeds, iEMG in the medial gastrocnemius and soleus muscles, heart rate, and VO2 were significantly higher in US than WS. However, RPE and optimum speed (US, 4.75 ± 0.32 km·h-1; WS, 4. 79 ± 0.18 km·h-1 did not differ significantly between the two conditions. These results suggest that unstable shoes can increase muscle activity of lower legs and energy cost without influencing RPE and optimum speed during walking at various speeds

  14. A case study of energy expenditure based on walking speed reduction during walking upstairs situation at a staircase in FKAAS, UTHM, Johor building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abustan, M. S.; Ali, M. F. M.; Talib, S. H. A.

    2018-04-01

    Walking velocity is a vector quantity that can be determined by calculating the time taken and displacement of a moving objects. In Malaysia, there are very few researches that were done to determine the walking velocity of citizens to be compared with other countries such as the study about walking upstairs during evacuation process is important when emergency case happen, if there are people in underground garages, they have to walk upstairs for exits and look for shelter and the walking velocity of pedestrian in such cases are necessary to be analysed. Therefore, the objective of this study is to determine the walking speed of pedestrian during walking upstairs situation, finding the relationship between pedestrian walking speed and the characteristics of the pedestrian as well as analysing the energy reduction by comparing the walking speed of pedestrian at the beginning and at the end of staircase. In this case study, an experiment was done to determine the average walking speed of pedestrian. The pedestrian has been selected from different gender, physical character, and age. Based on the data collected, the average normal walking speed of male pedestrian was 1.03 m/s while female was 1.08 m/s. During walking upstairs, the walking speed of pedestrian decreased as the number of floor increased. The average speed for the first stairwell was 0.90 m/s and the number decreased to 0.73 m/s for the second stairwell. From the reduction of speed, the energy used has been calculated and the average kinetic energy used was 1.69 J. Hence, the data collected can be used for further research of staircase design and plan of evacuation process.

  15. Do kinematic metrics of walking balance adapt to perturbed optical flow?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Jessica D; Franz, Jason R

    2017-08-01

    Visual (i.e., optical flow) perturbations can be used to study balance control and balance deficits. However, it remains unclear whether walking balance control adapts to such perturbations over time. Our purpose was to investigate the propensity for visuomotor adaptation in walking balance control using prolonged exposure to optical flow perturbations. Ten subjects (age: 25.4±3.8years) walked on a treadmill while watching a speed-matched virtual hallway with and without continuous mediolateral optical flow perturbations of three different amplitudes. Each of three perturbation trials consisted of 8min of prolonged exposure followed by 1min of unperturbed walking. Using 3D motion capture, we analyzed changes in foot placement kinematics and mediolateral sacrum motion. At their onset, perturbations elicited wider and shorter steps, alluding to a more cautious, general anticipatory balance control strategy. As perturbations continued, foot placement tended toward values seen during unperturbed walking while step width variability and mediolateral sacrum motion concurrently increased. Our findings suggest that subjects progressively shifted from a general anticipatory balance control strategy to a reactive, task-specific strategy using step-to-step adjustments. Prolonged exposure to optical flow perturbations may have clinical utility to reinforce reactive, task-specific balance control through training. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Walking at speeds close to the preferred transition speed as an approach to obesity treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilić Duško

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Increasing energy expenditure through certain exercise is an important component of effective interventions to enhance initial weight loss and prevent weight regain. Objective. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of a 16-week weight loss exercise programme on morpho-functional changes in female adults and to examine the programme effects on two subpopulations with different levels of obesity. Methods. Fifty-six middle-aged women were divided into 2 groups according to their body mass index (BMI: 25-29.9 kg/m2 - overweight (OW and ≥30 kg/m2 - obese (OB. The exercise protocol included a walking technique based on hip rotation at horizontal plane at speeds close to the preferred transition speed (PTS. At the initiation of the study and after 16 weeks of the programme, anthropometric, morphological and cardiovascular parameters of all subjects were assessed. The main effects of Group (OW and OB and Time and the interaction effect of Group by Time were tested by time repeated measures General Linear Model (mixed between-within subjects ANOVA. Results. Mean weight loss during the programme was 10.3 kg and 20.1 kg in OW and OB, respectively. The average fat mass (FM loss was 9.4 kg in OW and 16.9 kg in OB. The Mixed ANOVA revealed a significant Group by Time interaction effects for waist circumference, body weight, body water, fat free mass, FM, %FM and BMI (p<0.05. Conclusion. The applied exercise protocol has proved as beneficial in the treatment of obesity, since it resulted in a significant weight loss and body composition changes. The reduction in body weight was achieved mainly on account of the loss of fat mass.

  17. Investigations on high speed MHD liquid flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamasaki, Takasuke; Kamiyama, Shin-ichi.

    1982-01-01

    Lately, the pressure drop problem of MHD two-phase flow in a duct has been investigated theoretically and experimentally in conjunction with the problems of liquid metal MHD two-phase flow power-generating cycle or of liquid metal boiling two-phase flow in the blanket of a nuclear fusion reactor. Though many research results have been reported so far for MHD single-phase flow, the hydrodynamic studies on high speed two-phase flow are reported only rarely, specifically the study dealing with the generation of cavitation is not found. In the present investigation, the basic equation was derived, analyzing the high speed MHD liquid flow in a diverging duct as the one-dimensional flow of homogeneous two-phase fluid of small void ratio. Furthermore, the theoretical solution for the effect of magnetic field on cavitation-generating conditions was tried. The pressure distribution in MHD flow in a duct largely varies with load factor, and even if the void ratio is small, the pressure distribution in two-phase flow is considerably different from that in single-phase flow. Even if the MHD two-phase flow in a duct is subsonic flow at the throat, the critical conditions may be achieved sometimes in a diverging duct. It was shown that cavitation is more likely to occur as magnetic field becomes more intense if it is generated downstream of the throat. This explains the experimental results qualitatively. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  18. Required coefficient of friction in the anteroposterior and mediolateral direction during turning at different walking speeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Takeshi; Suzuki, Akito; Hokkirigawa, Kazuo

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the required coefficient of friction (RCOF) and the tangent of center of mass (COM)-center of pressure (COP) angle in the mediolateral (ML) and anteroposterior (AP) directions during turning at different walking speeds. Sixteen healthy young adults (8 males and 8 females) participated in this study. The participants were instructed to conduct trials of straight walking and 90° step and spin turns to the right at each of three self-selected speeds (slow, normal, and fast). The ML and AP directions during turning gait were defined using the orientation of the pelvis to construct a body-fixed reference frame. The RCOF values and COM-COP angle tangent in the ML direction during turning at weight acceptance phase were higher than those during straight walking, and those values increased with increasing walking speed. The ML component of the RCOF and COM-COP tangent values during weight acceptance for step turns were higher than those for spin turns. The mean centripetal force during turning tended to increase with an increase in walking speed and had a strong positive correlation with the RCOF values in the ML direction (R = 0.97 during the weight acceptance phase; R = 0.95 during the push-off phase). Therefore, turning, particularly step turn, is likely to cause lateral slip at weight acceptance because of the increased centripetal force compared with straight walking. Future work should test at-risk population and compare with the present results.

  19. Measuring In-Home Walking Speed using Wall-Mounted RF Transceiver Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Peter G.; Wan, Eric A.; Schafermeer, Erich; Adenwala, Fatema; Paul, Anindya S.; Preiser, Nick; Kaye, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present a new method for passively measuring walking speed using a small array of radio transceivers positioned on the walls of a hallway within a home. As a person walks between a radio transmitter and a receiver, the received signal strength (RSS) detected by the receiver changes in a repeatable pattern that may be used to estimate walking speed without the need for the person to wear any monitoring device. The transceivers are arranged as an array of 4 with a known distance between the array elements. Walking past the first pair of transceivers will cause a peak followed by a second peak when the person passes the second pair of transceivers. The time difference between these peaks is used to estimate walking speed directly. We further show that it is possible to estimate the walking speed by correlating the shape of the signal using a single pair of transceivers positioned across from each other in a hallway or doorframe. RMSE performance was less than 15 cm/s using a 2-element array, and less than 8 cm/s using a 4-element array relative to a gait mat used for ground truth. PMID:25570108

  20. Required coefficient of friction in the anteroposterior and mediolateral direction during turning at different walking speeds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Yamaguchi

    Full Text Available This study investigated the required coefficient of friction (RCOF and the tangent of center of mass (COM-center of pressure (COP angle in the mediolateral (ML and anteroposterior (AP directions during turning at different walking speeds. Sixteen healthy young adults (8 males and 8 females participated in this study. The participants were instructed to conduct trials of straight walking and 90° step and spin turns to the right at each of three self-selected speeds (slow, normal, and fast. The ML and AP directions during turning gait were defined using the orientation of the pelvis to construct a body-fixed reference frame. The RCOF values and COM-COP angle tangent in the ML direction during turning at weight acceptance phase were higher than those during straight walking, and those values increased with increasing walking speed. The ML component of the RCOF and COM-COP tangent values during weight acceptance for step turns were higher than those for spin turns. The mean centripetal force during turning tended to increase with an increase in walking speed and had a strong positive correlation with the RCOF values in the ML direction (R = 0.97 during the weight acceptance phase; R = 0.95 during the push-off phase. Therefore, turning, particularly step turn, is likely to cause lateral slip at weight acceptance because of the increased centripetal force compared with straight walking. Future work should test at-risk population and compare with the present results.

  1. Vitamin D and walking speed in older adults: Systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annweiler, Cedric; Henni, Samir; Walrand, Stéphane; Montero-Odasso, Manuel; Duque, Gustavo; Duval, Guillaume T

    2017-12-01

    Vitamin D is involved in musculoskeletal health. There is no consensus on a possible association between circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) concentrations and walking speed, a 'vital sign' in older adults. Our objective was to systematically review and quantitatively assess the association of 25OHD concentration with walking speed. A Medline search was conducted on June 2017, with no limit of date, using the MeSH terms "Vitamin D" OR "Vitamin D Deficiency" combined with "Gait" OR "Gait disorders, Neurologic" OR "Walking speed" OR "Gait velocity". Fixed-effect meta-analyses were performed to compute: i) mean differences in usual and fast walking speeds and Timed Up and Go test (TUG) between participants with severe vitamin D deficiency (≤25nmol/L) (SVDD), vitamin D deficiency (≤50nmol/L) (VDD), vitamin D insufficiency (≤75nmol/L) (VDI) and normal vitamin D (>75nmol/L) (NVD); ii) risk of slow walking speed according to vitamin D status. Of the 243 retrieved studies, 22 observational studies (17 cross-sectional, 5 longitudinal) met the selection criteria. The number of participants ranged between 54 and 4100 (0-100% female). Usual walking speed was slower among participants with hypovitaminosis D, with a clinically relevant difference compared with NVD of -0.18m/s for SVDD, -0.08m/s for VDD and -0.12m/s for VDI. We found similar results regarding the fast walking speed (mean differences -0.04m/s for VDD and VDI compared with NVD) and TUG (mean difference 0.48s for SVDD compared with NVD). A slow usual walking speed was positively associated with SVDD (summary OR=2.17[95%CI:1.52-3.10]), VDD (OR=1.38[95%CI:1.01-1.89]) and VDI (OR=1.38[95%CI:1.04-1.83]), using NVD as the reference. In conclusion, this meta-analysis provides robust evidence that 25OHD concentrations are positively associated with walking speed among adults. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Activating and relaxing music entrains the speed of beat synchronized walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leman, Marc; Moelants, Dirk; Varewyck, Matthias; Styns, Frederik; van Noorden, Leon; Martens, Jean-Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Inspired by a theory of embodied music cognition, we investigate whether music can entrain the speed of beat synchronized walking. If human walking is in synchrony with the beat and all musical stimuli have the same duration and the same tempo, then differences in walking speed can only be the result of music-induced differences in stride length, thus reflecting the vigor or physical strength of the movement. Participants walked in an open field in synchrony with the beat of 52 different musical stimuli all having a tempo of 130 beats per minute and a meter of 4 beats. The walking speed was measured as the walked distance during a time interval of 30 seconds. The results reveal that some music is 'activating' in the sense that it increases the speed, and some music is 'relaxing' in the sense that it decreases the speed, compared to the spontaneous walked speed in response to metronome stimuli. Participants are consistent in their observation of qualitative differences between the relaxing and activating musical stimuli. Using regression analysis, it was possible to set up a predictive model using only four sonic features that explain 60% of the variance. The sonic features capture variation in loudness and pitch patterns at periods of three, four and six beats, suggesting that expressive patterns in music are responsible for the effect. The mechanism may be attributed to an attentional shift, a subliminal audio-motor entrainment mechanism, or an arousal effect, but further study is needed to figure this out. Overall, the study supports the hypothesis that recurrent patterns of fluctuation affecting the binary meter strength of the music may entrain the vigor of the movement. The study opens up new perspectives for understanding the relationship between entrainment and expressiveness, with the possibility to develop applications that can be used in domains such as sports and physical rehabilitation.

  3. Activating and relaxing music entrains the speed of beat synchronized walking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Leman

    Full Text Available Inspired by a theory of embodied music cognition, we investigate whether music can entrain the speed of beat synchronized walking. If human walking is in synchrony with the beat and all musical stimuli have the same duration and the same tempo, then differences in walking speed can only be the result of music-induced differences in stride length, thus reflecting the vigor or physical strength of the movement. Participants walked in an open field in synchrony with the beat of 52 different musical stimuli all having a tempo of 130 beats per minute and a meter of 4 beats. The walking speed was measured as the walked distance during a time interval of 30 seconds. The results reveal that some music is 'activating' in the sense that it increases the speed, and some music is 'relaxing' in the sense that it decreases the speed, compared to the spontaneous walked speed in response to metronome stimuli. Participants are consistent in their observation of qualitative differences between the relaxing and activating musical stimuli. Using regression analysis, it was possible to set up a predictive model using only four sonic features that explain 60% of the variance. The sonic features capture variation in loudness and pitch patterns at periods of three, four and six beats, suggesting that expressive patterns in music are responsible for the effect. The mechanism may be attributed to an attentional shift, a subliminal audio-motor entrainment mechanism, or an arousal effect, but further study is needed to figure this out. Overall, the study supports the hypothesis that recurrent patterns of fluctuation affecting the binary meter strength of the music may entrain the vigor of the movement. The study opens up new perspectives for understanding the relationship between entrainment and expressiveness, with the possibility to develop applications that can be used in domains such as sports and physical rehabilitation.

  4. Activating and Relaxing Music Entrains the Speed of Beat Synchronized Walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leman, Marc; Moelants, Dirk; Varewyck, Matthias; Styns, Frederik; van Noorden, Leon; Martens, Jean-Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Inspired by a theory of embodied music cognition, we investigate whether music can entrain the speed of beat synchronized walking. If human walking is in synchrony with the beat and all musical stimuli have the same duration and the same tempo, then differences in walking speed can only be the result of music-induced differences in stride length, thus reflecting the vigor or physical strength of the movement. Participants walked in an open field in synchrony with the beat of 52 different musical stimuli all having a tempo of 130 beats per minute and a meter of 4 beats. The walking speed was measured as the walked distance during a time interval of 30 seconds. The results reveal that some music is ‘activating’ in the sense that it increases the speed, and some music is ‘relaxing’ in the sense that it decreases the speed, compared to the spontaneous walked speed in response to metronome stimuli. Participants are consistent in their observation of qualitative differences between the relaxing and activating musical stimuli. Using regression analysis, it was possible to set up a predictive model using only four sonic features that explain 60% of the variance. The sonic features capture variation in loudness and pitch patterns at periods of three, four and six beats, suggesting that expressive patterns in music are responsible for the effect. The mechanism may be attributed to an attentional shift, a subliminal audio-motor entrainment mechanism, or an arousal effect, but further study is needed to figure this out. Overall, the study supports the hypothesis that recurrent patterns of fluctuation affecting the binary meter strength of the music may entrain the vigor of the movement. The study opens up new perspectives for understanding the relationship between entrainment and expressiveness, with the possibility to develop applications that can be used in domains such as sports and physical rehabilitation. PMID:23874469

  5. Effects of Door Width and Human Body Size on Walking Speed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jetthumrong Siwalee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Door width is one of the important factors to concern in layout or facilities design because it affects directly to traffic speed and overall traffic time simultaneously. Nowadays, common assessment method is computer simulation which is still not realistic due to the unchanged speed of model while walking through a door. This research aims to study an effect of door width to individual walking speed. Sixty subjects participated in the experiment and performed task by walking through the door that is set the width as 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90 and 100 centimetres. The optical motion capture system was used to determine walking speed. The results showed that Fitts’ law was applied to the participants with high weight. Door width below 70 centimetres significantly affected to changing speed at 0-0.5 m. before the door. Additionally, human size also affected changing speed. The factors include shoulder breadth, weight and interaction between shoulder breadth and weight were found to be significant. These factors explained 54.2% of changing speed.

  6. Walking smoothness is associated with self-reported function after accounting for gait speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowry, Kristin A; Vanswearingen, Jessie M; Perera, Subashan; Studenski, Stephanie A; Brach, Jennifer S

    2013-10-01

    Gait speed has shown to be an indicator of functional status in older adults; however, there may be aspects of physical function not represented by speed but by the quality of movement. The purpose of this study was to determine the relations between walking smoothness, an indicator of the quality of movement based on trunk accelerations, and physical function. Thirty older adults (mean age, 77.7±5.1 years) participated. Usual gait speed was measured using an instrumented walkway. Walking smoothness was quantified by harmonic ratios derived from anteroposterior, vertical, and mediolateral trunk accelerations recorded during overground walking. Self-reported physical function was recorded using the function subscales of the Late-Life Function and Disability Instrument. Anteroposterior smoothness was positively associated with all function components of the Late-Life Function and Disability Instrument, whereas mediolateral smoothness exhibited negative associations. Adjusting for gait speed, anteroposterior smoothness remained associated with the overall and lower extremity function subscales, whereas mediolateral smoothness remained associated with only the advanced lower extremity subscale. These findings indicate that walking smoothness, particularly the smoothness of forward progression, represents aspects of the motor control of walking important for physical function not represented by gait speed alone.

  7. Loading of Hip Measured by Hip Contact Forces at Different Speeds of Walking and Running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giarmatzis, Georgios; Jonkers, Ilse; Wesseling, Mariska; Van Rossom, Sam; Verschueren, Sabine

    2015-08-01

    Exercise plays a pivotal role in maximizing peak bone mass in adulthood and maintaining it through aging, by imposing mechanical loading on the bone that can trigger bone mineralization and growth. The optimal type and intensity of exercise that best enhances bone strength remains, however, poorly characterized, partly because the exact peak loading of the bone produced by the diverse types of exercises is not known. By means of integrated motion capture as an input to dynamic simulations, contact forces acting on the hip of 20 young healthy adults were calculated during walking and running at different speeds. During walking, hip contact forces (HCFs) have a two-peak profile whereby the first peak increases from 4.22 body weight (BW) to 5.41 BW and the second from 4.37 BW to 5.74 BW, by increasing speed from 3 to 6 km/h. During running, there is only one peak HCF that increases from 7.49 BW to 10.01 BW, by increasing speed from 6 to 12 km/h. Speed related profiles of peak HCFs and ground reaction forces (GRFs) reveal a different progression of the two peaks during walking. Speed has a stronger impact on peak HCFs rather than on peak GRFs during walking and running, suggesting an increasing influence of muscle activity on peak HCF with increased speed. Moreover, results show that the first peak of HCF during walking can be predicted best by hip adduction moment, and the second peak of HCF by hip extension moment. During running, peak HCF can be best predicted by hip adduction moment. The present study contributes hereby to a better understanding of musculoskeletal loading during walking and running in a wide range of speeds, offering valuable information to clinicians and scientists exploring bone loading as a possible nonpharmacological osteogenic stimulus. © 2015 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. © 2015 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  8. Effects of walking speed on asymmetry and bilateral coordination of gait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnik, Meir; Bartsch, Ronny P.; Zeev, Aviva; Giladi, Nir; Hausdorff, Jeffery M.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms regulating the bilateral coordination of gait in humans are largely unknown. Our objective was to study how bilateral coordination changes as a result of gait speed modifications during over ground walking. 15 young adults wore force sensitive insoles that measured vertical forces used to determine the timing of the gait cycle events under three walking conditions (i.e., usual-walking, fast and slow). Ground reaction force impact (GRFI) associated with heel-strikes was also quantified, representing the potential contribution of sensory feedback to the regulation of gait. Gait asymmetry (GA) was quantified based on the differences between right and left swing times and the bilateral coordination of gait was assessed using the phase coordination index (PCI), a metric that quantifies the consistency and accuracy of the anti-phase stepping pattern. GA was preserved in the three different gait speeds. PCI was higher (reduced coordination) in the slow gait condition, compared to usual-walking (3.51% vs. 2.47%, respectively, p=0.002), but was not significantly affected in the fast condition. GRFI values were lower in the slow walking as compared to usual-walking and higher in the fast walking condition (pgait related changes in PCI were not associated with the slowed gait related changes in GRFI. The present findings suggest that left-right anti-phase stepping is similar in normal and fast walking, but altered during slowed walking. This behavior might reflect a relative increase in attention resources required to regulate a slow gait speed, consistent with the possibility that cortical function and supraspinal input influences the bilateral coordination of gait. PMID:23680424

  9. Motor fatigue measurement by distance-induced slow down of walking speed in multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rémy Phan-Ba

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND RATIONALE: Motor fatigue and ambulation impairment are prominent clinical features of people with multiple sclerosis (pMS. We hypothesized that a multimodal and comparative assessment of walking speed on short and long distance would allow a better delineation and quantification of gait fatigability in pMS. Our objectives were to compare 4 walking paradigms: the timed 25-foot walk (T25FW, a corrected version of the T25FW with dynamic start (T25FW(+, the timed 100-meter walk (T100MW and the timed 500-meter walk (T500MW. METHODS: Thirty controls and 81 pMS performed the 4 walking tests in a single study visit. RESULTS: The 4 walking tests were performed with a slower WS in pMS compared to controls even in subgroups with minimal disability. The finishing speed of the last 100-meter of the T500MW was the slowest measurable WS whereas the T25FW(+ provided the fastest measurable WS. The ratio between such slowest and fastest WS (Deceleration Index, DI was significantly lower only in pMS with EDSS 4.0-6.0, a pyramidal or cerebellar functional system score reaching 3 or a maximum reported walking distance ≤ 4000 m. CONCLUSION: The motor fatigue which triggers gait deceleration over a sustained effort in pMS can be measured by the WS ratio between performances on a very short distance and the finishing pace on a longer more demanding task. The absolute walking speed is abnormal early in MS whatever the distance of effort when patients are unaware of ambulation impairment. In contrast, the DI-measured ambulation fatigability appears to take place later in the disease course.

  10. A novel walking speed estimation scheme and its application to treadmill control for gait rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jungwon; Park, Hyung-Soon; Damiano, Diane Louise

    2012-08-28

    Virtual reality (VR) technology along with treadmill training (TT) can effectively provide goal-oriented practice and promote improved motor learning in patients with neurological disorders. Moreover, the VR + TT scheme may enhance cognitive engagement for more effective gait rehabilitation and greater transfer to over ground walking. For this purpose, we developed an individualized treadmill controller with a novel speed estimation scheme using swing foot velocity, which can enable user-driven treadmill walking (UDW) to more closely simulate over ground walking (OGW) during treadmill training. OGW involves a cyclic acceleration-deceleration profile of pelvic velocity that contrasts with typical treadmill-driven walking (TDW), which constrains a person to walk at a preset constant speed. In this study, we investigated the effects of the proposed speed adaptation controller by analyzing the gait kinematics of UDW and TDW, which were compared to those of OGW at three pre-determined velocities. Ten healthy subjects were asked to walk in each mode (TDW, UDW, and OGW) at three pre-determined speeds (0.5 m/s, 1.0 m/s, and 1.5 m/s) with real time feedback provided through visual displays. Temporal-spatial gait data and 3D pelvic kinematics were analyzed and comparisons were made between UDW on a treadmill, TDW, and OGW. The observed step length, cadence, and walk ratio defined as the ratio of stride length to cadence were not significantly different between UDW and TDW. Additionally, the average magnitude of pelvic acceleration peak values along the anterior-posterior direction for each step and the associated standard deviations (variability) were not significantly different between the two modalities. The differences between OGW and UDW and TDW were mainly in swing time and cadence, as have been reported previously. Also, step lengths between OGW and TDW were different for 0.5 m/s and 1.5 m/s gait velocities, and walk ratio between OGS and UDW was

  11. A novel walking speed estimation scheme and its application to treadmill control for gait rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon Jungwon

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Virtual reality (VR technology along with treadmill training (TT can effectively provide goal-oriented practice and promote improved motor learning in patients with neurological disorders. Moreover, the VR + TT scheme may enhance cognitive engagement for more effective gait rehabilitation and greater transfer to over ground walking. For this purpose, we developed an individualized treadmill controller with a novel speed estimation scheme using swing foot velocity, which can enable user-driven treadmill walking (UDW to more closely simulate over ground walking (OGW during treadmill training. OGW involves a cyclic acceleration-deceleration profile of pelvic velocity that contrasts with typical treadmill-driven walking (TDW, which constrains a person to walk at a preset constant speed. In this study, we investigated the effects of the proposed speed adaptation controller by analyzing the gait kinematics of UDW and TDW, which were compared to those of OGW at three pre-determined velocities. Methods Ten healthy subjects were asked to walk in each mode (TDW, UDW, and OGW at three pre-determined speeds (0.5 m/s, 1.0 m/s, and 1.5 m/s with real time feedback provided through visual displays. Temporal-spatial gait data and 3D pelvic kinematics were analyzed and comparisons were made between UDW on a treadmill, TDW, and OGW. Results The observed step length, cadence, and walk ratio defined as the ratio of stride length to cadence were not significantly different between UDW and TDW. Additionally, the average magnitude of pelvic acceleration peak values along the anterior-posterior direction for each step and the associated standard deviations (variability were not significantly different between the two modalities. The differences between OGW and UDW and TDW were mainly in swing time and cadence, as have been reported previously. Also, step lengths between OGW and TDW were different for 0.5 m/s and 1.5 m/s gait velocities

  12. Factors associated with maximal walking speed among older community-living adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sallinen, Janne; Mänty, Minna; Leinonen, Raija

    2011-01-01

    explained to 38%. Further adjusting for physical activity, smoking status and use of alcohol increased the variation explained by additional 7%. A minor further increase in variability explained was gained by adding chronic diseases and depressive symptoms in the model. In the final model, the single most...... 07330512) involving 605 community-living ambulatory adults aged 75-81 years. Maximal walking speed, leg extensor power, standing balance and body mass index were measured at the research center. Physical activity, smoking, use of alcohol, chronic diseases and depressive symptoms were self-reported using...... standard questionnaires. Results: The mean maximal walking speed was 1.4 m/s (range 0.3-2.9). In linear regression analysis, age, gender and body mass index explained 11% of the variation in maximal walking speed. Adding leg extensor power and standing balance into the model increased the variation...

  13. Effect of walking speed and placement position interactions in determining the accuracy of various newer pedometers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wonil Park

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Older types of pedometers had varied levels of accuracy, which ranged from 0% to 45%. In addition, to obtain accurate results, it was also necessary to position them in a certain way. By contrast, newer models can be placed anywhere on the body; however, their accuracy is unknown when they are placed at different body sites. We determined the accuracy of various newer pedometers under controlled laboratory and free walking conditions. A total of 40 participants, who varied widely in age and body mass index, were recruited for the study. The numbers of steps recorded using five different pedometers placed at the waist, the chest, in a pocket, and on an armband were compared against those counted with a hand tally counter. With the exception of one, all the pedometers were accurate at moderate walking speeds, irrespective of their placement on the body. However, the accuracy tended to decrease at slower and faster walking speeds, especially when the pedometers were worn in the pockets or kept in the purse (p < 0.05. In conclusion, most pedometers examined were accurate when they were placed at the waist, chest, and armband irrespective of the walking speed or terrain. However, some pedometers had reduced accuracy when they were kept in a pocket or placed in a purse, especially at a slower and faster walking speeds.

  14. Age-Related Imbalance Is Associated With Slower Walking Speed: An Analysis From the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yanjun J; Liu, Elizabeth Y; Anson, Eric R; Agrawal, Yuri

    Walking speed is an important dimension of gait function and is known to decline with age. Gait function is a process of dynamic balance and motor control that relies on multiple sensory inputs (eg, visual, proprioceptive, and vestibular) and motor outputs. These sensory and motor physiologic systems also play a role in static postural control, which has been shown to decline with age. In this study, we evaluated whether imbalance that occurs as part of healthy aging is associated with slower walking speed in a nationally representative sample of older adults. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of the previously collected 1999 to 2002 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) data to evaluate whether age-related imbalance is associated with slower walking speed in older adults aged 50 to 85 years (n = 2116). Balance was assessed on a pass/fail basis during a challenging postural task-condition 4 of the modified Romberg Test-and walking speed was determined using a 20-ft (6.10 m) timed walk. Multivariable linear regression was used to evaluate the association between imbalance and walking speed, adjusting for demographic and health-related covariates. A structural equation model was developed to estimate the extent to which imbalance mediates the association between age and slower walking speed. In the unadjusted regression model, inability to perform the NHANES balance task was significantly associated with 0.10 m/s slower walking speed (95% confidence interval: -0.13 to -0.07; P imbalance mediates 12.2% of the association between age and slower walking speed in older adults. In a nationally representative sample, age-related balance limitation was associated with slower walking speed. Balance impairment may lead to walking speed declines. In addition, reduced static postural control and dynamic walking speed that occur with aging may share common etiologic origins, including the decline in visual, proprioceptive, and vestibular sensory and

  15. Obesity does not impair walking economy across a range of speeds and grades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, Raymond C; Reynolds, Michelle M; Board, Wayne J; Walters, Kellie A; Reiser, Raoul F

    2013-05-01

    Despite the popularity of walking as a form of physical activity for obese individuals, relatively little is known about how obesity affects the metabolic rate, economy, and underlying mechanical energetics of walking across a range of speeds and grades. The purpose of this study was to quantify metabolic rate, stride kinematics, and external mechanical work during level and gradient walking in obese and nonobese adults. Thirty-two obese [18 women, mass = 102.1 (15.6) kg, BMI = 33.9 (3.6) kg/m(2); mean (SD)] and 19 nonobese [10 women, mass = 64.4 (10.6) kg, BMI = 21.6 (2.0) kg/m(2)] volunteers participated in this study. We measured oxygen consumption, ground reaction forces, and lower extremity kinematics while subjects walked on a dual-belt force-measuring treadmill at 11 speeds/grades (0.50-1.75 m/s, -3° to +9°). We calculated metabolic rate, stride kinematics, and external work. Net metabolic rate (Ė net/kg, W/kg) increased with speed or grade across all individuals. Surprisingly and in contrast with previous studies, Ė net/kg was 0-6% less in obese compared with nonobese adults (P = 0.013). External work, although a primary determinant of Ė net/kg, was not affected by obesity across the range of speeds/grades used in this study. We also developed new prediction equations to estimate oxygen consumption and Ė net/kg and found that Ė net/kg was positively related to relative leg mass and step width and negatively related to double support duration. These results suggest that obesity does not impair walking economy across a range of walking speeds and grades.

  16. Compressibility, turbulence and high speed flow

    CERN Document Server

    Gatski, Thomas B

    2009-01-01

    This book introduces the reader to the field of compressible turbulence and compressible turbulent flows across a broad speed range through a unique complimentary treatment of both the theoretical foundations and the measurement and analysis tools currently used. For the computation of turbulent compressible flows, current methods of averaging and filtering are presented so that the reader is exposed to a consistent development of applicable equation sets for both the mean or resolved fields as well as the transport equations for the turbulent stress field. For the measurement of turbulent compressible flows, current techniques ranging from hot-wire anemometry to PIV are evaluated and limitations assessed. Characterizing dynamic features of free shear flows, including jets, mixing layers and wakes, and wall-bounded flows, including shock-turbulence and shock boundary-layer interactions, obtained from computations, experiments and simulations are discussed. Key features: * Describes prediction methodologies in...

  17. Genetic Analysis of Daily Maximum Milking Speed by a Random Walk Model in Dairy Cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karacaören, Burak; Janss, Luc; Kadarmideen, Haja

    Data were obtained from dairy cows stationed at research farm ETH Zurich for maximum milking speed. The main aims of this paper are a) to evaluate if the Wood curve is suitable to model mean lactation curve b) to predict longitudinal breeding values by random regression and random walk models of ...... filter applications: random walk model could give online prediction of breeding values. Hence without waiting for whole lactation records, genetic evaluation could be made when the daily or monthly data is available......Data were obtained from dairy cows stationed at research farm ETH Zurich for maximum milking speed. The main aims of this paper are a) to evaluate if the Wood curve is suitable to model mean lactation curve b) to predict longitudinal breeding values by random regression and random walk models...... of maximum milking speed. Wood curve did not provide a good fit to the data set. Quadratic random regressions gave better predictions compared with the random walk model. However random walk model does not need to be evaluated for different orders of regression coefficients. In addition with the Kalman...

  18. The Effect of Head Mounted Display Weight and Locomotion Method on the Perceived Naturalness of Virtual Walking Speeds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Niels Chr.; Serafin, Stefania; Nordahl, Rolf

    This poster details a study investigating the effect of Head Mounted Display (HMD) weight and locomotion method (Walking-In-Place and treadmill walking) on the perceived naturalness of virtual walking speeds. The results revealed significant main effects of movement type, but no significant effec...

  19. Regularity of the Speed of Biased Random Walk in a One-Dimensional Percolation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantert, Nina; Meiners, Matthias; Müller, Sebastian

    2018-03-01

    We consider biased random walks on the infinite cluster of a conditional bond percolation model on the infinite ladder graph. Axelson-Fisk and Häggström established for this model a phase transition for the asymptotic linear speed \\overline{v} of the walk. Namely, there exists some critical value λ c>0 such that \\overline{v}>0 if λ \\in (0,λ c) and \\overline{v}=0 if λ ≥ λ c. We show that the speed \\overline{v} is continuous in λ on (0,∞) and differentiable on (0,λ c/2). Moreover, we characterize the derivative as a covariance. For the proof of the differentiability of \\overline{v} on (0,λ c/2), we require and prove a central limit theorem for the biased random walk. Additionally, we prove that the central limit theorem fails to hold for λ ≥ λ c/2.

  20. Electromagnetic application device for flow rate/flow speed control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshioka, Senji.

    1994-01-01

    Electric current and magnetic field are at first generated in a direction perpendicular to a flow channel of a fluid, and forces generated by electromagnetic interaction of the current and the magnetic field are combined and exerted on the fluid, to control the flow rate and the flow speed thereby decreasing flowing pressure loss. In addition, an electric current generation means and a magnetic field generation means integrated together are disposed to a structural component constituting the flow channel, and they are combined to attain the aimed effect. The current generating means forms a potential difference by supplying electric power to a pair of electrodes as a cathode and an anode by using structures disposed along the channel, to generate an electric field or electric current in a direction perpendicular to the flow channel. The magnetic field generating means forms a counter current (reciprocal current) by using structures disposed along the flow channel, to generate synthesized or emphasized magnetic field. The fluid can be applied with a force in the direction of the flowing direction by the electromagnetic interaction of the electric current and the magnetic field, thereby capable of propelling the fluid. Accordingly, the flowrate/flowing speed can be controlled inside of the flow channel and flowing pressure loss can be decreased. (N.H.)

  1. Changes in Energy Cost and Total External Work of Muscles in Elite Race Walkers Walking at Different Speeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chwała Wiesław

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to assess energy cost and total external work (total energy depending on the speed of race walking. Another objective was to determine the contribution of external work to total energy cost of walking at technical, threshold and racing speed in elite competitive race walkers.

  2. Correlation between balance, speed, and walking ability in individuals with chronic hemiparesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heloisa Maria Jácome de Sousa Britto

    Full Text Available Abstract Alterations in balance and gait are frequently present in patients with hemiparesis. This study aimed at determining whether there is a correlation between static and functional balance, gait speed and walking capacity. To that end, 17 individuals with chronic hemiparesis of both sexes (58.8% men and 42.25 women, mean age of 56.3 ± 9.73 years, took part in the study. Static balance was assessed by computerized baropodometry, under two different sensory conditions: eyes open (EO and eyes closed (EC. Functional balance was evaluated by Berg Balance Scale and walking ability by the Functional Ambulation Classification. Gait speed was assessed by kinemetry. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test was used to verify data distribution normality. Parametric variables were correlated by Pearson's test and their non-parametric parameters by Spearman's test. Functional balance showed a positive correlation with gait speed (p=0.005; r=0.64 and walking ability (p = 0.019; r = 0.56. Anteroposterior (AP and mediolateral (ML alterations with EO and EC exhibited negative correlations with gait speed (EO: AP amplitude (p = 0.0049 and r = -0.48; mean ML deviation (p = 0.019 and r =-0.56/ EC: mean AP deviation (p = 0.018 and r = -0.56 and mean ML deviation (p = 0.032 and r = -0.52; AP amplitude (p = 0.014 and r = -0.57 and ML amplitude (p = 0.032 and r = -0.52; postural instability (p = 0.019 and r = -0.55 and walking ability (EO: mean AP deviation (p = 0.05 and r = -0.47 and AP amplitude (p = 0.024 and r = -0.54. The results suggest correlations between static and functional balance and gait speed and walking ability, and that balance training can be an important component of gait recovery protocols.

  3. Flow Studies of Decelerators at Supersonic Speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    1959-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests recorded the effect of decelerators on flow at various supersonic speeds. Rigid parachute models were tested for the effects of porosity, shroud length, and number of shrouds. Flexible model parachutes were tested for effects of porosity and conical-shaped canopy. Ribbon dive brakes on a missile-shaped body were tested for effect of tension cable type and ribbon flare type. The final test involved a plastic sphere on riser lines.

  4. The Combined Effects of Body Weight Support and Gait Speed on Gait Related Muscle Activity: A Comparison between Walking in the Lokomat Exoskeleton and Regular Treadmill Walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Kammen, Klaske; Boonstra, Annemarijke; Reinders-Messelink, Heleen; den Otter, Rob

    2014-01-01

    Background For the development of specialized training protocols for robot assisted gait training, it is important to understand how the use of exoskeletons alters locomotor task demands, and how the nature and magnitude of these changes depend on training parameters. Therefore, the present study assessed the combined effects of gait speed and body weight support (BWS) on muscle activity, and compared these between treadmill walking and walking in the Lokomat exoskeleton. Methods Ten healthy participants walked on a treadmill and in the Lokomat, with varying levels of BWS (0% and 50% of the participants’ body weight) and gait speed (0.8, 1.8, and 2.8 km/h), while temporal step characteristics and muscle activity from Erector Spinae, Gluteus Medius, Vastus Lateralis, Biceps Femoris, Gastrocnemius Medialis, and Tibialis Anterior muscles were recorded. Results The temporal structure of the stepping pattern was altered when participants walked in the Lokomat or when BWS was provided (i.e. the relative duration of the double support phase was reduced, and the single support phase prolonged), but these differences normalized as gait speed increased. Alternations in muscle activity were characterized by complex interactions between walking conditions and training parameters: Differences between treadmill walking and walking in the exoskeleton were most prominent at low gait speeds, and speed effects were attenuated when BWS was provided. Conclusion Walking in the Lokomat exoskeleton without movement guidance alters the temporal step regulation and the neuromuscular control of walking, although the nature and magnitude of these effects depend on complex interactions with gait speed and BWS. If normative neuromuscular control of gait is targeted during training, it is recommended that very low speeds and high levels of BWS should be avoided when possible. PMID:25226302

  5. Restricted Arm Swing Affects Gait Stability and Increased Walking Speed Alters Trunk Movements in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delabastita, Tijs; Desloovere, Kaat; Meyns, Pieter

    2016-01-01

    Observational research suggests that in children with cerebral palsy, the altered arm swing is linked to instability during walking. Therefore, the current study investigates whether children with cerebral palsy use their arms more than typically developing children, to enhance gait stability. Evidence also suggests an influence of walking speed on gait stability. Moreover, previous research highlighted a link between walking speed and arm swing. Hence, the experiment aimed to explore differences between typically developing children and children with cerebral palsy taking into account the combined influence of restricting arm swing and increasing walking speed on gait stability. Spatiotemporal gait characteristics, trunk movement parameters and margins of stability were obtained using three dimensional gait analysis to assess gait stability of 26 children with cerebral palsy and 24 typically developing children. Four walking conditions were evaluated: (i) free arm swing and preferred walking speed; (ii) restricted arm swing and preferred walking speed; (iii) free arm swing and high walking speed; and (iv) restricted arm swing and high walking speed. Double support time and trunk acceleration variability increased more when arm swing was restricted in children with bilateral cerebral palsy compared to typically developing children and children with unilateral cerebral palsy. Trunk sway velocity increased more when walking speed was increased in children with unilateral cerebral palsy compared to children with bilateral cerebral palsy and typically developing children and in children with bilateral cerebral palsy compared to typically developing children. Trunk sway velocity increased more when both arm swing was restricted and walking speed was increased in children with bilateral cerebral palsy compared to typically developing children. It is proposed that facilitating arm swing during gait rehabilitation can improve gait stability and decrease trunk movements in

  6. Required coefficient of friction during turning at self-selected slow, normal, and fast walking speeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fino, Peter; Lockhart, Thurmon E

    2014-04-11

    This study investigated the relationship of required coefficient of friction to gait speed, obstacle height, and turning strategy as participants walked around obstacles of various heights. Ten healthy, young adults performed 90° turns around corner pylons of four different heights at their self selected normal, slow, and fast walking speeds using both step and spin turning strategies. Kinetic data was captured using force plates. Results showed peak required coefficient of friction (RCOF) at push off increased with increased speed (slow μ=0.38, normal μ=0.45, and fast μ=0.54). Obstacle height had no effect on RCOF values. The average peak RCOF for fast turning exceeded the OSHA safety guideline for static COF of μ>0.50, suggesting further research is needed into the minimum static COF to prevent slips and falls, especially around corners. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. IMPACT OF BODY WEIGHT SUPPORTED BACKWARD TREADMILL TRAINING ON WALKING SPEED IN CHILDREN WITH SPASTIC DIPLEGIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamada El Sayed Abd Allah Ayoub

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: A lot of the ambulating children with spastic diplegia were able to walk with flexed hips, knees and ankles this gait pattern is known as crouch gait. The most needed functional achievement of diplegic children habilitation is to be able to walk appropriately. The development of an independent and efficient walking is one of the main objectives for children with cerebral palsy especially those with spastic diplegia. Method: Twenty children with spastic diplegia enrolled in this study, they were classified into two groups of equal number, eligibility to our study were ages ranged from seven to ten years, were able to ambulate, They had gait problems and abnormal gait kinematics. The control group (A received selected physical therapy program based on neurodevelopmental approach for such cases, while the study group (B received partial body weight supported backward treadmill training in addition to regular exercise program. Gait pattern was assessed using the Biodex Gait Trainer II for each group pre and post three months of the treatment program. Results: There was statistically significant improvement in walking speed in the study group (P<0.05 with significant difference when comparing post treatment results between groups (p<0.05. Conclusion: These findings suggested that partial body weight supported backward treadmill training can be included as a supplementary therapeutic modality to improve walking speed and functional abilities of children with diplegic cerebral palsy.

  8. Investigating the relationship between energy expenditure, walking speed and angle of turning in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M A McNarry

    Full Text Available Recent studies have suggested that changing direction is associated with significant additional energy expenditure. A failure to account for this additional energy expenditure of turning has significant implications in the design and interpretation of health interventions. The purpose of this study was therefore to investigate the influence of walking speed and angle, and their interaction, on energy expenditure in 20 healthy adults (7 female; 28±7 yrs. On two separate days, participants completed a turning protocol at one of 16 speed- (2.5, 3.5, 4.5, 5.5 km∙h-1 and angle (0, 45, 90, 180° combinations, involving three minute bouts of walking, interspersed by three minutes seated rest. Each condition involved 5 m of straight walking before turning through the pre-determined angle with the speed dictated by a digital, auditory metronome. Tri-axial accelerometry and magnetometry were measured at 60 Hz, in addition to gas exchange on a breath-by-breath basis. Mixed models revealed a significant main effect for speed (F = 121.609, P < 0.001 and angle (F = 19.186, P < 0.001 on oxygen uptake ([Formula: see text] and a significant interaction between these parameters (F = 4.433, P < 0.001. Specifically, as speed increased, [Formula: see text] increased but significant increases in [Formula: see text] relative to straight line walking were only observed for 90° and 180° turns at the two highest speeds (4.5 and 5.5 km∙hr-1. These findings therefore highlight the importance of accounting for the quantity and magnitude of turns completed when estimating energy expenditure and have significant implications within both sport and health contexts.

  9. Assessment of intersegmental coordination of rats during walking at different speeds - Application of continuous relative phase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raffalt, Peter Christian; Nielsen, Louise R; Madsen, Stefan

    2018-01-01

    of the CRP (ACRP) and DP and on the mean ACRP and mean DP was established by statistical parametric mapping (SPM) and a one-way ANOVA for repeated measures. Absolute and relative reliability were assessed by measurement error and intra-class correlation coefficient. The SPM analysis revealed time dependent......The present study investigated the feasibility and reliability of continuous relative phase (CRP) and deviation phase (DP) to assess intersegmental hind limb coordination pattern and coordination variability in rats during walking. Twenty-six adult rats walked at 8 m/min, 12 m/min and 16 m....../min while two-dimensional kinematics were recorded. Segment angles and segment angular velocities of the paw, shank and thigh on the left hind-limb were extracted from 15 strides and CRP was calculated for the paw-shank and shank-thigh coupling. The effect of walking speed on the time point average curve...

  10. Mobility-Related Fatigue, Walking Speed, and Muscle Strength in Older People

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mänty, Minna; Mendes de Leon, Carlos F.; Rantanen, Taina

    2012-01-01

    history, as well as performance-based assessment of walking speed and maximal isometric strength of knee extension, body extension, and handgrip. Results. In the cross-sectional baseline analysis, one unit increase in fatigue score was associated with 0.03 m/s (b = −.03, p ... the degree to which muscle strength accounts for this association. Methods. The study is based on baseline (n = 523) and 5-year follow-up data (n = 292) from a cohort of 75-year-old persons. Standardized assessments include self-report measures of mobility-related fatigue (score range 0–6) and medical......, p strength accounted up to 21% and among men up to 24% for the association. In the prospective analysis, fatigue at baseline was predictive of change in walking speed...

  11. Mildly disabled persons with multiple sclerosis use similar net joint power strategies as healthy controls when walking speed increases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brincks, John; Sørensen, Henrik; Dalgas, Ulrik

    2018-01-01

    flexors in mildly disabled persons with MS and healthy controls at different walking speeds. METHODS:Thirteen persons with MS and thirteen healthy controls participated and peak net joint power was calculated using 3D motion analysis. RESULTS:In general, no differences were found between speed......-matched healthy controls and persons with MS, but the fastest walking speed was significantly higher in healthy controls (2.42 m/s vs. 1.70 m/s). The net joint power increased in hip flexors, hip extensors, hip abductors, knee extensors and plantar flexors in both groups, when walking speed increased. Significant...... correlations between changes in walking speed and changes in net joint power of plantar flexors, hip extensors and hip flexors existed in healthy controls and persons with MS, and in net knee extensor absorption power of persons with MS only. CONCLUSION:In contrast to previous studies, these findings suggest...

  12. The effect of waist twisting on walking speed of an amphibious salamander like robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xin-Yan; Jia, Li-Chao; Wang, Chen; Xie, Guang-Ming

    2016-06-01

    Amphibious salamanders often swing their waist to coordinate quadruped walking in order to improve their crawling speed. A robot with a swing waist joint, like an amphibious salamander, is used to mimic this locomotion. A control method is designed to allow the robot to maintain the rotational speed of its legs continuous and avoid impact between its legs and the ground. An analytical expression is established between the amplitude of the waist joint and the step length. Further, an optimization amplitude is obtained corresponding to the maximum stride. The simulation results based on automatic dynamic analysis of mechanical systems (ADAMS) and physical experiments verify the rationality and validity of this expression.

  13. Linear and Nonlinear Gait Features in Older Adults Walking on Inclined Surfaces at Different Speeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Marcus Fraga; Rodrigues, Fábio Barbosa; de Sá E Souza, Gustavo Souto; Magnani, Rina Márcia; Lehnen, Georgia Cristina; Andrade, Adriano O

    2017-06-01

    This study evaluated linear and nonlinear gait features in healthy older adults walking on inclined surfaces at different speeds. Thirty-seven active older adults (experimental group) and fifty young adults (control group) walked on a treadmill at 100% and ±20% of their preferred walking speed for 4 min under horizontal (0%), upward (UP) (+8%), and downward (DOWN) (-8%) conditions. Linear gait variability was assessed using the average standard deviation of trunk acceleration between strides (VAR). Gait stability was assessed using the margin of stability (MoS). Nonlinear gait features were assessed by using the maximum Lyapunov exponent, as a measure of local dynamic stability (LDS), and sample entropy (SEn), as a measure of regularity. VAR increased for all conditions, but the interaction effects between treadmill inclination and age, and speed and age were higher for young adults. DOWN conditions showed the lowest stability in the medial-lateral MoS, but not in LDS. LDS was smaller in UP conditions. However, there were no effects of age for either MoS or LDS. The values of SEn decreased almost linearly from the DOWN to the UP conditions, with significant interaction effects of age for anterior-posterior SEn. The overall results supported the hypothesis that inclined surfaces modulate nonlinear gait features and alter linear gait variability, particularly in UP conditions, but there were no significant effects of age for active older adults.

  14. Walking economy is predictably determined by speed, grade, and gravitational load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludlow, Lindsay W; Weyand, Peter G

    2017-11-01

    The metabolic energy that human walking requires can vary by more than 10-fold, depending on the speed, surface gradient, and load carried. Although the mechanical factors determining economy are generally considered to be numerous and complex, we tested a minimum mechanics hypothesis that only three variables are needed for broad, accurate prediction: speed, surface grade, and total gravitational load. We first measured steady-state rates of oxygen uptake in 20 healthy adult subjects during unloaded treadmill trials from 0.4 to 1.6 m/s on six gradients: -6, -3, 0, 3, 6, and 9°. Next, we tested a second set of 20 subjects under three torso-loading conditions (no-load, +18, and +31% body weight) at speeds from 0.6 to 1.4 m/s on the same six gradients. Metabolic rates spanned a 14-fold range from supine rest to the greatest single-trial walking mean (3.1 ± 0.1 to 43.3 ± 0.5 ml O 2 ·kg -body -1 ·min -1 , respectively). As theorized, the walking portion (V̇o 2-walk  =  V̇o 2-gross - V̇o 2-supine-rest ) of the body's gross metabolic rate increased in direct proportion to load and largely in accordance with support force requirements across both speed and grade. Consequently, a single minimum-mechanics equation was derived from the data of 10 unloaded-condition subjects to predict the pooled mass-specific economy (V̇o 2-gross , ml O 2 ·kg -body + load -1 ·min -1 ) of all the remaining loaded and unloaded trials combined ( n = 1,412 trials from 90 speed/grade/load conditions). The accuracy of prediction achieved ( r 2  = 0.99, SEE = 1.06 ml O 2 ·kg -1 ·min -1 ) leads us to conclude that human walking economy is predictably determined by the minimum mechanical requirements present across a broad range of conditions. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Introduced is a "minimum mechanics" model that predicts human walking economy across a broad range of conditions from only three variables: speed, surface grade, and body-plus-load mass. The derivation

  15. Mildly disabled persons with multiple sclerosis use similar net joint power strategies as healthy controls when walking speed increases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brincks, John; Christensen, Lars Ejsing; Rehnquist, Mette Voigt; Petersen, Jesper; Sørensen, Henrik; Dalgas, Ulrik

    2018-01-01

    To improve walking in persons with multiple sclerosis (MS), it is essential to understand the underlying mechanisms of walking. This study examined strategies in net joint power generated or absorbed by hip flexors, hip extensors, hip abductors, knee extensors, and plantar flexors in mildly disabled persons with MS and healthy controls at different walking speeds. Thirteen persons with MS and thirteen healthy controls participated and peak net joint power was calculated using 3D motion analysis. In general, no differences were found between speed-matched healthy controls and persons with MS, but the fastest walking speed was significantly higher in healthy controls (2.42 m/s vs. 1.70 m/s). The net joint power increased in hip flexors, hip extensors, hip abductors, knee extensors and plantar flexors in both groups, when walking speed increased. Significant correlations between changes in walking speed and changes in net joint power of plantar flexors, hip extensors and hip flexors existed in healthy controls and persons with MS, and in net knee extensor absorption power of persons with MS only. In contrast to previous studies, these findings suggest that mildly disabled persons with MS used similar kinetic strategies as healthy controls to increase walking speed.

  16. Effect of walking speed on the gait of king penguins: An accelerometric approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willener, Astrid S T; Handrich, Yves; Halsey, Lewis G; Strike, Siobhán

    2015-12-21

    Little is known about non-human bipedal gaits. This is probably due to the fact that most large animals are quadrupedal and that non-human bipedal animals are mostly birds, whose primary form of locomotion is flight. Very little research has been conducted on penguin pedestrian locomotion with the focus instead on their associated high energy expenditure. In animals, tri-axial accelerometers are frequently used to estimate physiological energy cost, as well as to define the behaviour pattern of a species, or the kinematics of swimming. In this study, we showed how an accelerometer-based technique could be used to determine the biomechanical characteristics of pedestrian locomotion. Eight king penguins, which represent the only family of birds to have an upright bipedal gait, were trained to walk on a treadmill. The trunk tri-axial accelerations were recorded while the bird was walking at four different speeds (1.0, 1.2, 1.4 and 1.6km/h), enabling the amplitude of dynamic body acceleration along the three axes (amplitude of DBAx, DBAy and DBAz), stride frequency, waddling and leaning amplitude, as well as the leaning angle to be defined. The magnitude of the measured variables showed a significant increase with increasing speed, apart from the backwards angle of lean, which decreased with increasing speed. The variability of the measured variables also showed a significant increase with speed apart from the DBAz amplitude, the waddling amplitude, and the leaning angle, where no significant effect of the walking speed was found. This paper is the first approach to describe 3D biomechanics with an accelerometer on wild animals, demonstrating the potential of this technique. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Prefrontal, posterior parietal and sensorimotor network activity underlying speed control during walking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas C Bulea

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence suggests cortical circuits may contribute to control of human locomotion. Here, noninvasive electroencephalography (EEG recorded from able-bodied volunteers during a novel treadmill walking paradigm was used to assess neural correlates of walking. A systematic processing method, including a recently developed subspace reconstruction algorithm, reduced movement-related EEG artifact prior to independent component analysis and dipole source localization. We quantified cortical activity while participants tracked slow and fast target speeds across two treadmill conditions: an active mode that adjusted belt speed based on user movements and a passive mode reflecting a typical treadmill. Our results reveal frequency specific, multi-focal task related changes in cortical oscillations elicited by active walking. Low γ band power, localized to the prefrontal and posterior parietal cortices, was significantly increased during double support and early swing phases, critical points in the gait cycle since the active controller adjusted speed based on pelvis position and swing foot velocity. These phasic γ band synchronizations provide evidence that prefrontal and posterior parietal networks, previously implicated in visuo-spatial and somotosensory integration, are engaged to enhance lower limb control during gait. Sustained μ and β band desynchronization within sensorimotor cortex, a neural correlate for movement, was observed during walking thereby validating our methods for isolating cortical activity. Our results also demonstrate the utility of EEG recorded during locomotion for probing the multi-regional cortical networks which underpin its execution. For example, the cortical network engagement elicited by the active treadmill suggests that it may enhance neuroplasticity for more effective motor training.

  18. Effect of the walking speed to the lower limb joint angular displacements, joint moments and ground reaction forces during walking in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Tasuku; Shirota, Takashi; Yamamoto, Shin-ichiro; Nakazawa, Kimitaka; Akai, Masami

    2004-06-17

    The purpose of this study was to compare the changes in ground reaction forces (GRF), joint angular displacements (JAD), joint moments (JM) and electromyographic (EMG) activities that occur during walking at various speeds in water and on land. Fifteen healthy adults participated in this study. In the water experiments, the water depth was adjusted so that body weight was reduced by 80%. A video-motion analysis system and waterproof force platform was used to obtain kinematics and kinetics data and to calculate the JMs. Results revealed that (1) the anterior-posterior GRF patterns differed between walking in water and walking on land, whereas the medio-lateral GRF patterns were similar, (2) the JAD patterns of the hip and ankle were similar between water- and land-walking, whereas the range of motion at the knee joint was lower in water than on land, (3) the JMs in all three joints were lower in water than on land throughout the stance phase, and (4) the hip joint extension moment and hip extensor muscle EMG activity were increased as walking speed increase during walking in water. Rehabilitative water-walking exercise could be designed to incorporate large-muscle activities, especially of the lower-limb extensor muscles, through full joint range of motion and minimization of joint moments.

  19. Human Skeleton Model Based Dynamic Features for Walking Speed Invariant Gait Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jure Kovač

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Humans are able to recognize small number of people they know well by the way they walk. This ability represents basic motivation for using human gait as the means for biometric identification. Such biometrics can be captured at public places from a distance without subject's collaboration, awareness, and even consent. Although current approaches give encouraging results, we are still far from effective use in real-life applications. In general, methods set various constraints to circumvent the influence of covariate factors like changes of walking speed, view, clothing, footwear, and object carrying, that have negative impact on recognition performance. In this paper we propose a skeleton model based gait recognition system focusing on modelling gait dynamics and eliminating the influence of subjects appearance on recognition. Furthermore, we tackle the problem of walking speed variation and propose space transformation and feature fusion that mitigates its influence on recognition performance. With the evaluation on OU-ISIR gait dataset, we demonstrate state of the art performance of proposed methods.

  20. Impact of a Pilot Videogame-Based Physical Activity Program on Walking Speed in Adults with Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leutwyler, H; Hubbard, E; Cooper, B A; Dowling, G

    2017-11-10

    The purpose of this report is to describe the impact of a videogame-based physical activity program using the Kinect for Xbox 360 game system (Microsoft, Redmond, WA) on walking speed in adults with schizophrenia. In this randomized controlled trial, 28 participants played either an active videogame for 30 min (intervention group) or played a sedentary videogame for 30 min (control group), once a week for 6 weeks. Walking speed was measured objectively with the Short Physical Performance Battery at enrollment and at the end of the 6-week program. The intervention group (n = 13) showed an average improvement in walking speed of 0.08 m/s and the control group (n = 15) showed an average improvement in walking speed of 0.03 m/s. Although the change in walking speed was not statistically significant, the intervention group had between a small and substantial clinically meaningful change. The results suggest a videogame based physical activity program provides clinically meaningful improvement in walking speed, an important indicator of health status.

  1. Self-paced versus fixed speed walking and the effect of virtual reality in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloot, Lizeth H; Harlaar, Jaap; van der Krogt, Marjolein M

    2015-10-01

    While feedback-controlled treadmills with a virtual reality could potentially offer advantages for clinical gait analysis and training, the effect of self-paced walking and the virtual environment on the gait pattern of children and different patient groups remains unknown. This study examined the effect of self-paced (SP) versus fixed speed (FS) walking and of walking with and without a virtual reality (VR) in 11 typically developing (TD) children and nine children with cerebral palsy (CP). We found that subjects walked in SP mode with twice as much between-stride walking speed variability (pinteraction effects between SP and group (TD versus CP) were found for five out of 33 parameters. This suggests that children with CP might need more time to familiarize to SP walking, however, these differences were generally too small to be clinically relevant. The VR environment did not affect the kinematic or kinetic parameters, but walking with VR was rated as more similar to overground walking by both groups (p=0.02). The results of this study indicate that both SP and FS walking, with and without VR, can be used interchangeably for treadmill-based clinical gait analysis in children with and without CP. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Assessment of Human Ambulatory Speed by Measuring Near-Body Air Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Salati

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Accurate measurements of physical activity are important for the diagnosis of the exacerbation of chronic diseases. Accelerometers have been widely employed in clinical research for measuring activity intensity and investigating the association between physical activity and adverse health conditions. However, the ability of accelerometers in assessing physical activity intensity such as walking speed has been constrained by the inter-individual variability in sensor output and by the necessity of developing unobtrusive low-power monitoring systems. This paper will present a study aimed at investigating the accuracy of a wearable measuring system of near-body air flow to determine ambulatory speed in the field.

  3. Differences in physical aging measured by walking speed: evidence from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Daniela

    2016-01-28

    Physical functioning and mobility of older populations are of increasing interest when populations are aging. Lower body functioning such as walking is a fundamental part of many actions in daily life. Limitations in mobility threaten independent living as well as quality of life in old age. In this study we examine differences in physical aging and convert those differences into the everyday measure of single years of age. We use the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing, which was collected biennially between 2002 and 2012. Data on physical performance, health as well as information on economics and demographics of participants were collected. Lower body performance was assessed with two timed walks at normal pace each of 8 ft (2.4 m) of survey participants aged at least 60 years. We employed growth curve models to study differences in physical aging and followed the characteristic-based age approach to illustrate those differences in single years of age. First, we examined walking speed of about 11,700 English individuals, and identified differences in aging trajectories by sex and other characteristics (e.g. education, occupation, regional wealth). Interestingly, higher educated and non-manual workers outperformed their counterparts for both men and women. Moreover, we transformed the differences between subpopulations into single years of age to demonstrate the magnitude of those gaps, which appear particularly high at early older ages. This paper expands research on aging and physical performance. In conclusion, higher education provides an advantage in walking of up to 15 years for men and 10 years for women. Thus, enhancements in higher education have the potential to ensure better mobility and independent living in old age for a longer period.

  4. Speed scaling for weighted flow time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bansal, N.; Pruhs, K.R.; Stein, C.

    2007-01-01

    In addition to the traditional goal of efficiently managing time and space, many computers now need to efficiently manage power usage. For example, Intel's SpeedStep and AMD's PowerNOW technologies allow the Windows XP operating system to dynamically change the speed of the processor to prolong

  5. Television Viewing, Walking Speed, and Grip Strength in a Prospective Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    KEEVIL, VICTORIA L.; WIJNDAELE, KATRIEN; LUBEN, ROBERT; SAYER, AVAN A.; WAREHAM, NICHOLAS J.; KHAW, KAY-TEE

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose Television (TV) watching is the most prevalent sedentary leisure time activity in the United Kingdom. We examined associations between TV viewing time, measured over 10 yr, and two objective measures of physical capability, usual walking speed (UWS) and grip strength. Methods Community-based participants (n = 8623; 48–92 yr old) enrolled in the European Prospective Investigation of Cancer—Norfolk study attended a third health examination (3HC, 2006–2011) for measurement of maximum grip strength (Smedley dynamometer) and UWS. TV viewing time was estimated using a validated questionnaire (n = 6086) administered during two periods (3HC, 2006–2007; 2HC, 1998–2000). Associations between physical capability and TV viewing time category (<2, 2 < 3, 3 < 4, and ≥4 h·d−1) at the 3HC, 2HC, and using an average of the two measures were explored. Sex-stratified analyses were adjusted for age, physical activity, anthropometry, wealth, comorbidity, smoking, and alcohol intake and combined if no sex–TV viewing time interactions were identified. Results Men and women who watched the least TV at the 2HC or 3HC walked at a faster usual pace than those who watched the most TV. There was no evidence of effect modification by sex (Pinteraction = 0.09), and in combined analyses, participants who watched for <2 h·d−1 on average walked 4.29 cm·s−1 (95% confidence interval, 2.56–6.03) faster than those who watched for ≥4 h·d−1, with evidence of a dose–response association (Ptrend < 0.001). However, no strong associations with grip strength were found. Conclusions TV viewing time predicted UWS in older adults. More research is needed to inform public health policy and prospective associations between other measures of sedentariness, such as total sitting time or objectively measured sedentary time, and physical capability should be explored. PMID:25785826

  6. Aeroacoustic modelling of low-speed flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen Zhong Shen; Noerkaer Soerensen, Jens

    1998-08-01

    A new numerical algorithm for acoustic noise generation is developed. The approach involves two steps comprising an incompressible flow part and inviscid acoustic part. The acoustic part can be started at any time of the incompressible computation. The formulation can be applied both for isentropic flows and non-isentropic flows. The model is validated for the cases of an isentropic pulsating sphere and non-isentropic flows past a circular cylinder and a NACA 0015 airfoil. The computations show that the generated acoustic frequencies have the form 1/m of the basic frequency of incompressible flow. (au) 15 refs.

  7. Walking, running, and resting under time, distance, and average speed constraints: optimality of walk–run–rest mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Leroy L.; Srinivasan, Manoj

    2013-01-01

    On a treadmill, humans switch from walking to running beyond a characteristic transition speed. Here, we study human choice between walking and running in a more ecological (non-treadmill) setting. We asked subjects to travel a given distance overground in a given allowed time duration. During this task, the subjects carried, and could look at, a stopwatch that counted down to zero. As expected, if the total time available were large, humans walk the whole distance. If the time available were small, humans mostly run. For an intermediate total time, humans often use a mixture of walking at a slow speed and running at a higher speed. With analytical and computational optimization, we show that using a walk–run mixture at intermediate speeds and a walk–rest mixture at the lowest average speeds is predicted by metabolic energy minimization, even with costs for transients—a consequence of non-convex energy curves. Thus, sometimes, steady locomotion may not be energy optimal, and not preferred, even in the absence of fatigue. Assuming similar non-convex energy curves, we conjecture that similar walk–run mixtures may be energetically beneficial to children following a parent and animals on long leashes. Humans and other animals might also benefit energetically from alternating between moving forward and standing still on a slow and sufficiently long treadmill. PMID:23365192

  8. Carotid flow pulsatility is higher in women with greater decrement in gait speed during multi-tasking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Joaquin U; James, C Roger; Yang, Hyung Suk; Jensen, Daniel; Atkins, Lee; Al-Khalil, Kareem; O'Boyle, Michael

    2017-05-01

    Central arterial hemodynamics is associated with cognitive impairment. Reductions in gait speed during walking while performing concurrent tasks known as dual-tasking (DT) or multi-tasking (MT) is thought to reflect the cognitive cost that exceeds neural capacity to share resources. We hypothesized that central vascular function would associate with decrements in gait speed during DT or MT. Gait speed was measured using a motion capture system in 56 women (30-80y) without mild-cognitive impairment. Dual-tasking was considered walking at a fast-pace while balancing a tray. Multi-tasking was the DT condition plus subtracting by serial 7's. Applanation tonometry was used for measurement of aortic stiffness and central pulse pressure. Doppler-ultrasound was used to measure blood flow velocity and β-stiffness index in the common carotid artery. The percent change in gait speed was larger for MT than DT (14.1±11.2 vs. 8.7±9.6%, p decrement (third tertile) as compared to women with less decrement (first tertile) in gait speed during MT after adjusting for age, gait speed, and task error. Carotid pulse pressure and β-stiffness did not contribute to these tertile differences. Elevated carotid flow pulsatility and resistance are characteristics found in healthy women that show lower cognitive capacity to walk and perform multiple concurrent tasks. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. 30 min of treadmill walking at self-selected speed does not increase gait variability in independent elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Rocha, Emmanuel S; Kunzler, Marcos R; Bobbert, Maarten F; Duysens, Jacques; Carpes, Felipe P

    2018-06-01

    Walking is one of the preferred exercises among elderly, but could a prolonged walking increase gait variability, a risk factor for a fall in the elderly? Here we determine whether 30 min of treadmill walking increases coefficient of variation of gait in elderly. Because gait responses to exercise depend on fitness level, we included 15 sedentary and 15 active elderly. Sedentary participants preferred a lower gait speed and made smaller steps than the actives. Step length coefficient of variation decreased ~16.9% by the end of the exercise in both the groups. Stride length coefficient of variation decreased ~9% after 10 minutes of walking, and sedentary elderly showed a slightly larger step width coefficient of variation (~2%) at 10 min than active elderly. Active elderly showed higher walk ratio (step length/cadence) than sedentary in all times of walking, but the times did not differ in both the groups. In conclusion, treadmill gait kinematics differ between sedentary and active elderly, but changes over time are similar in sedentary and active elderly. As a practical implication, 30 min of walking might be a good strategy of exercise for elderly, independently of the fitness level, because it did not increase variability in step and stride kinematics, which is considered a risk of fall in this population.

  10. The effect of walking speed on hamstrings length and lengthening velocity in children with spastic cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krogt, van der M.M.; Doorenbosch, C.A.M.; Harlaar, J.

    2009-01-01

    0.001). These data are important as a reference for valid interpretation of hamstrings length and velocity data in gait analyses at different walking speeds. The results indicate that the presence of spasticity is associated with reduced hamstrings length and lengthening velocity during gait, even

  11. Reference values of maximum walking speed among independent community-dwelling Danish adults aged 60 to 79 years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tibaek, S; Holmestad-Bechmann, N; Pedersen, Trine B

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To establish reference values for maximum walking speed over 10m for independent community-dwelling Danish adults, aged 60 to 79 years, and to evaluate the effects of gender and age. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING: Danish companies and senior citizens clubs. PARTICIPANTS: Two ...

  12. Unstable footwear as a speed-dependent noise-based training gear to exercise inverted pendulum motion during walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dierick, Frédéric; Bouché, Anne-France; Scohier, Mikaël; Guille, Clément; Buisseret, Fabien

    2018-05-15

    Previous research on unstable footwear has suggested that it may induce mechanical noise during walking. The purpose of this study was to explore whether unstable footwear could be considered as a noise-based training gear to exercise body center of mass (CoM) motion during walking. Ground reaction forces were collected among 24 healthy young women walking at speeds between 3 and 6 km h -1 with control running shoes and unstable rocker-bottom shoes. The external mechanical work, the recovery of mechanical energy of the CoM during and within the step cycles, and the phase shift between potential and kinetic energy curves of the CoM were computed. Our findings support the idea that unstable rocker-bottom footwear could serve as a speed-dependent noise-based training gear to exercise CoM motion during walking. At slow speed, it acts as a stochastic resonance or facilitator that reduces external mechanical work; whereas at brisk speed it acts as a constraint that increases external mechanical work and could mimic a downhill slope.

  13. Combined application of FBG and PZT sensors for plantar pressure monitoring at low and high speed walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, R; Bhalla, S; Singh, C; Kaur, N; Hao, J; Anand, S

    2015-01-01

    Clinical monitoring of planar pressure is vital in several pathological conditions, such as diabetes, where excess pressure might have serious repercussions on health of the patient, even to the extent of amputation. The main objective of this paper is to experimentally evaluate the combined application of the Fibre Bragg Grating (FBG) and the lead zirconate titanate (PZT) piezoceramic sensors for plantar pressure monitoring during walk at low and high speeds. For fabrication of the pressure sensors, the FBGs are embedded within layers of carbon composite material and stacked in an arc shape. From this embedding technique, average pressure sensitivity of 1.3 pm/kPa and resolution of nearly 0.8 kPa is obtained. These sensors are found to be suitable for measuring the static and the low-speed walk generated foot pressure. Simultaneously, PZT patches of size 10 × 10 × 0.3 mm were used as sensors, utilizing the d_{33} (thickness) coupling mode. A sensitivity of 7.06 mV/kPa and a pressure resolution of 0.14 kPa is obtained from these sensors, which are found to be suitable for foot pressure measurement during high speed walking and running. Both types of sensors are attached to the underside of the sole of commercially available shoes. In the experiments, a healthy male subject walks/runs over the treadmill wearing the fabricated shoes at various speeds and the peak pressure is measured using both the sensors. Commercially available low-cost hardware is used for interrogation of the two sensor types. The test results clearly show the feasibility of the FBG and the PZT sensors for measurement of plantar pressure. The PZT sensors are more accurate for measurement of pressure during walking at high speeds. The FBG sensors, on the other hand, are found to be suitable for static and quasi-dynamic (slow walking) conditions. Typically, the measured pressure varied from 400 to 600 kPa below the forefoot and 100 to 1000 kPa below the heel as the walking speed varied from 1

  14. Reducing the impact of speed dispersion on subway corridor flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Jing; Sun, Lishan; Liu, Xiaoming; Rong, Jian

    2017-11-01

    The rapid increase in the volume of subway passengers in Beijing has necessitated higher requirements for the safety and efficiency of subway corridors. Speed dispersion is an important factor that affects safety and efficiency. This paper aims to analyze the management control methods for reducing pedestrian speed dispersion in subways. The characteristics of the speed dispersion of pedestrian flow were analyzed according to field videos. The control measurements which were conducted by placing traffic signs, yellow marking, and guardrail were proposed to alleviate speed dispersion. The results showed that the methods of placing traffic signs, yellow marking, and a guardrail improved safety and efficiency for all four volumes of pedestrian traffic flow, and the best-performing control measurement was guardrails. Furthermore, guardrails' optimal position and design measurements were explored. The research findings provide a rationale for subway managers in optimizing pedestrian traffic flow in subway corridors. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Modeling of high speed micro rotors in moderate flow confinement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dikmen, E.; van der Hoogt, Peter; Aarts, Ronald G.K.M.; Sas, P.; Bergen, B.

    2008-01-01

    The recent developments in high speed micro rotating machinery lead to the need for multiphysical modeling of the rotor and the surrounding medium. In this study, thermal and flow induced effects on rotor dynamics of geometries with moderate flow confinement are studied. The structure is modeled via

  16. High speed digital holographic interferometry for hypersonic flow visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, G. M.; Jagdeesh, G.; Reddy, K. P. J.

    2013-06-01

    Optical imaging techniques have played a major role in understanding the flow dynamics of varieties of fluid flows, particularly in the study of hypersonic flows. Schlieren and shadowgraph techniques have been the flow diagnostic tools for the investigation of compressible flows since more than a century. However these techniques provide only the qualitative information about the flow field. Other optical techniques such as holographic interferometry and laser induced fluorescence (LIF) have been used extensively for extracting quantitative information about the high speed flows. In this paper we present the application of digital holographic interferometry (DHI) technique integrated with short duration hypersonic shock tunnel facility having 1 ms test time, for quantitative flow visualization. Dynamics of the flow fields in hypersonic/supersonic speeds around different test models is visualized with DHI using a high-speed digital camera (0.2 million fps). These visualization results are compared with schlieren visualization and CFD simulation results. Fringe analysis is carried out to estimate the density of the flow field.

  17. Exploring the Metabolic and Perceptual Correlates of Self-Selected Walking Speed under Constrained and Un-Constrained Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David T Godsiff, Shelly Coe, Charlotte Elsworth-Edelsten, Johnny Collett, Ken Howells, Martyn Morris, Helen Dawes

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Mechanisms underpinning self-selected walking speed (SSWS are poorly understood. The present study investigated the extent to which SSWS is related to metabolism, energy cost, and/or perceptual parameters during both normal and artificially constrained walking. Fourteen participants with no pathology affecting gait were tested under standard conditions. Subjects walked on a motorized treadmill at speeds derived from their SSWS as a continuous protocol. RPE scores (CR10 and expired air to calculate energy cost (J.kg-1.m-1 and carbohydrate (CHO oxidation rate (J.kg-1.min-1 were collected during minutes 3-4 at each speed. Eight individuals were re-tested under the same conditions within one week with a hip and knee-brace to immobilize their right leg. Deflection in RPE scores (CR10 and CHO oxidation rate (J.kg-1.min-1 were not related to SSWS (five and three people had deflections in the defined range of SSWS in constrained and unconstrained conditions, respectively (p > 0.05. Constrained walking elicited a higher energy cost (J.kg-1.m-1 and slower SSWS (p 0.05. SSWS did not occur at a minimum energy cost (J.kg-1.m-1 in either condition, however, the size of the minimum energy cost to SSWS disparity was the same (Froude {Fr} = 0.09 in both conditions (p = 0.36. Perceptions of exertion can modify walking patterns and therefore SSWS and metabolism/ energy cost are not directly related. Strategies which minimize perceived exertion may enable faster walking in people with altered gait as our findings indicate they should self-optimize to the same extent under different conditions.

  18. Development and validation of a new method to measure walking speed in free-living environments using the actibelt® platform.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela Schimpl

    Full Text Available Walking speed is a fundamental indicator for human well-being. In a clinical setting, walking speed is typically measured by means of walking tests using different protocols. However, walking speed obtained in this way is unlikely to be representative of the conditions in a free-living environment. Recently, mobile accelerometry has opened up the possibility to extract walking speed from long-time observations in free-living individuals, but the validity of these measurements needs to be determined. In this investigation, we have developed algorithms for walking speed prediction based on 3D accelerometry data (actibelt® and created a framework using a standardized data set with gold standard annotations to facilitate the validation and comparison of these algorithms. For this purpose 17 healthy subjects operated a newly developed mobile gold standard while walking/running on an indoor track. Subsequently, the validity of 12 candidate algorithms for walking speed prediction ranging from well-known simple approaches like combining step length with frequency to more sophisticated algorithms such as linear and non-linear models was assessed using statistical measures. As a result, a novel algorithm employing support vector regression was found to perform best with a concordance correlation coefficient of 0.93 (95%CI 0.92-0.94 and a coverage probability CP1 of 0.46 (95%CI 0.12-0.70 for a deviation of 0.1 m/s (CP2 0.78, CP3 0.94 when compared to the mobile gold standard while walking indoors. A smaller outdoor experiment confirmed those results with even better coverage probability. We conclude that walking speed thus obtained has the potential to help establish walking speed in free-living environments as a patient-oriented outcome measure.

  19. The preferred walk to run transition speed in actual lunar gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Witt, John K; Edwards, W Brent; Scott-Pandorf, Melissa M; Norcross, Jason R; Gernhardt, Michael L

    2014-09-15

    Quantifying the preferred transition speed (PTS) from walking to running has provided insight into the underlying mechanics of locomotion. The dynamic similarity hypothesis suggests that the PTS should occur at the same Froude number across gravitational environments. In normal Earth gravity, the PTS occurs at a Froude number of 0.5 in adult humans, but previous reports found the PTS occurred at Froude numbers greater than 0.5 in simulated lunar gravity. Our purpose was to (1) determine the Froude number at the PTS in actual lunar gravity during parabolic flight and (2) compare it with the Froude number at the PTS in simulated lunar gravity during overhead suspension. We observed that Froude numbers at the PTS in actual lunar gravity (1.39±0.45) and simulated lunar gravity (1.11±0.26) were much greater than 0.5. Froude numbers at the PTS above 1.0 suggest that the use of the inverted pendulum model may not necessarily be valid in actual lunar gravity and that earlier findings in simulated reduced gravity are more accurate than previously thought. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  20. High-speed solar wind flow parameters at 1 AU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldman, W.C.; Asbridge, J.R.; Bame, S.J.; Gosling, J.T.

    1976-01-01

    To develop a set of constraints for theories of solar wind high-speed streams, a detailed study was made of the fastest streams observed at 1 AU during the time period spanning March 1971 through July 1974. Streams were accepted for study only if (1) the maximum speed exceeded 650 km s -1 ; (2) effects of stream-stream dynamical interaction on the flow parameters could be safely separated from the intrinsic characteristics of the high-speed regions; (3) the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the stream when mapped back to 20 solar radii by using a constant speed approximation was greater than 45degree in Carrington longitude; and (4) there were no obvious solar-activity-induced contaminating effects. Nineteen streams during this time interval satisfied these criteria. Average parameters at 1 AU for those portions of these streams above V=650 km s -1 are given.Not only is it not presently known why electrons are significantly cooler than the protons within high-speed regions, but also observed particle fluxes and convected energy fluxes for speed greater than 650 km s -1 are substantially larger than those values predicted by any of the existing theories of solar wind high-speed streams. More work is therefore needed in refining present solar wind models to see whether suitable modifications and/or combinations of existing theories based on reasonable coronal conditions can accommodate the above high-speed flow parameters

  1. Speed and Duration of Walking and Other Leisure Time Physical Activity and the Risk of Heart Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sævereid, Hans Askelund; Schnohr, Peter; Prescott, Eva

    2014-01-01

    in 1976-2003, we studied the association between updated self-assessed leisure-time PA, speed and duration of walking and subsequent hospitalization or death from HF. Light and moderate/high level of leisure-time PA and brisk walking were associated with reduced risk of HF in both genders whereas...... no consistent association with duration of walking was seen. In 18,209 subjects age 20-80 with 1580 cases of HF, using the lowest activity level as reference, the confounder-adjusted hazard ratios (HR) for light and moderate/high leisure-time physical activity were 0.75 (0.66-0.86) and 0.80 (0......-spread PA and public health measures to curb the increase in HF may benefit from this information....

  2. A clinically meaningful training effect in walking speed using functional electrical stimulation for motor-incomplete spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Tamsyn; Singleton, Christine

    2018-05-01

    The study aimed to investigate the presence of a training effect for rehabilitation of walking function in motor-incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI) through daily use of functional electrical stimulation (FES). A specialist FES outpatient centre. Thirty-five participants (mean age 53, SD 15, range 18-80; mean years since diagnosis 9, range 5 months - 39 years) with drop foot and motor-incomplete SCI (T12 or higher, ASIA Impairment Scale C and D) able to ambulate 10 metres with the use of a walking stick or frame. FES of the peroneal nerve, glutei and hamstrings as clinically indicated over six months in the community. The data was analysed for a training effect (difference between unassisted ten metre walking speed at baseline and after six months) and orthotic effects (difference between walking speed with and without FES) initially on day one and after six months. The data was further analysed for a minimum clinically important difference (MCID) (>0.06 m/s). A clinically meaningful, significant change was observed for initial orthotic effect (0.13m/s, CI: 0.04-0.17, P = 0.013), total orthotic effect (0.11m/s, CI: 0.04-0.18, P = 0.017) and training effect (0.09m/s, CI: 0.02-0.16, P = 0.025). The results suggest that daily independent use of FES may produce clinically meaningful changes in walking speed which are significant for motor-incomplete SCI. Further research exploring the mechanism for the presence of a training effect may be beneficial in targeting therapies for future rehabilitation.

  3. Plasma-Assisted Chemistry in High-Speed Flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonov, Sergey B.; Yarantsev, Dmitry A.; Napartovich, Anatoly P.; Kochetov, Igor V.

    2007-01-01

    Fundamental problems related to the high-speed combustion are analyzed. The result of plasma-chemical modeling is presented as a motivation of experimental activity. Numerical simulations of the effect of uniform non-equilibrium discharge on the premixed hydrogen and ethylene-air mixture in supersonic flow demonstrate an advantage of such a technique over a heating. Experimental results on multi-electrode non-uniform discharge maintenance behind wallstep and in cavity of supersonic flow are presented. The model test on hydrogen and ethylene ignition is demonstrated at direct fuel injection to low-temperature high-speed airflow

  4. Does walking speed mediate the association between visual impairment and self-report of mobility disability? The Salisbury Eye Evaluation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenor, Bonnielin K; Bandeen-Roche, Karen; Muñoz, Beatriz; West, Sheila K

    2014-08-01

    To determine whether performance speeds mediate the association between visual impairment and self-reported mobility disability over an 8-year period. Longitudinal analysis. Salisbury, Maryland. Salisbury Eye Evaluation Study participants aged 65 and older (N=2,520). Visual impairment was defined as best-corrected visual acuity worse than 20/40 in the better-seeing eye or visual field less than 20°. Self-reported mobility disability on three tasks was assessed: walking up stairs, walking down stairs, and walking 150 feet. Performance speed on three similar tasks was measured: walking up steps (steps/s), walking down steps (steps/s), and walking 4 m (m/s). For each year of observation, the odds of reporting mobility disability was significantly greater for participants who were visually impaired (VI) than for those who were not (NVI) (odds ratio (OR) difficulty walking up steps=1.58, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.32-1.89; OR difficulty walking down steps=1.90, 95% CI=1.59-2.28; OR difficulty walking 150 feet=2.11, 95% CI=1.77-2.51). Once performance speed on a similar mobility task was included in the models, VI participants were no longer more likely to report mobility disability than those who were NVI (OR difficulty walking up steps=0.84, 95% CI=0.65-1.11; OR difficulty walking down steps=0.96, 95% CI=0.74-1.24; OR difficulty walking 150 feet=1.22, 95% CI=0.98-1.50). Slower performance speed in VI individuals largely accounted for the difference in the odds of reporting mobility disability, suggesting that VI older adults walk slower and are therefore more likely to report mobility disability than those who are NVI. Improving mobility performance in older adults with visual impairment may minimize the perception of mobility disability. © 2014, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2014, The American Geriatrics Society.

  5. Load flow analysis for variable speed offshore wind farms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Zhe; Zhao, Menghua; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2009-01-01

    factors such as the different wind farm configurations, the control of wind turbines and the power losses of pulse width modulation converters are considered. The DC/DC converter model is proposed and integrated into load flow algorithm by modifying the Jacobian matrix. Two iterative methods are proposed...... and integrated into the load flow algorithm: one takes into account the control strategy of converters and the other considers the power losses of converters. In addition, different types of variable speed wind turbine systems with different control methods are investigated. Finally, the method is demonstrated......A serial AC-DC integrated load flow algorithm for variable speed offshore wind farms is proposed. It divides the electrical system of a wind farm into several local networks, and different load flow methods are used for these local networks sequentially. This method is fast, more accurate, and many...

  6. Mechanical and neural stretch responses of the human soleus muscle at different walking speeds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cronin, Neil J; Ishikawa, Masaki; Grey, Michael J

    2009-01-01

    responses. Twelve healthy subjects walked on a treadmill with the left leg attached to an actuator capable of rapidly dorsiflexing the ankle joint. Ultrasound was used to measure fascicle lengths in SOL during walking, and surface electromyography (EMG) was used to record muscle activation. Dorsiflexion...

  7. Unsteady flow simulations of Pelton turbine at different rotational speeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minsuk Choi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This article presents numerical simulations of a small Pelton turbine suitable for desalination system. A commercial flow solver was adopted to resolve difficulties in the numerical simulation for Pelton turbine such as the relative motion of the turbine runner to the injector and two-phase flow of water and air. To decrease the numerical diffusion of the water jet, a new topology with only hexagonal mesh was suggested for the computational mesh around the complex geometry of a bucket. The predicted flow coefficient, net head coefficient, and overall efficiency showed a good agreement with the experimental data. Based on the validation of the numerical results, the pattern of wet area on the bucket inner surface has been analyzed at different rotational speeds, and an attempt to find the connection between rotational speeds, torque, and efficiency has been made.

  8. Insights from field observations into controls on flow front speed in submarine sediment flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heerema, C.; Talling, P.; Cartigny, M.; Paull, C. K.; Gwiazda, R.; Clare, M. A.; Parsons, D. R.; Xu, J.; Simmons, S.; Maier, K. L.; Chapplow, N.; Gales, J. A.; McGann, M.; Barry, J.; Lundsten, E. M.; Anderson, K.; O'Reilly, T. C.; Rosenberger, K. J.; Sumner, E. J.; Stacey, C.

    2017-12-01

    Seafloor avalanches of sediment called turbidity currents are one of the most important processes for moving sediment across our planet. Only rivers carry comparable amounts of sediment across such large areas. Here we present some of the first detailed monitoring of these underwater flows that is being undertaken at a series of test sites. We seek to understand the factors that determine flow front speed, and how that speed varies with distance. This frontal speed is particularly important for predicting flow runout, and how the power of these hazardous flows varies with distance. First, we consider unusually detailed measurements of flow front speed defined by transit times between moorings and other tracked objects placed on the floor of Monterey Canyon offshore California in 2016-17. These measurements are then compared to flow front speeds measured using multiple moorings in Bute Inlet, British Columbia in 2016; and by cable breaks in Gaoping Canyon offshore Taiwan in 2006 and 2009. We seek to understand how flow front velocity is related to seafloor gradient, flow front thickness and density. It appears that the spatial evolution of frontal speed is similar in multiple flows, although their peak frontal velocities vary. Flow front velocity tends to increase rapidly initially before declining rather gradually over tens or even hundreds of kilometres. It has been proposed that submarine flows will exist in one of two states; either eroding and accelerating, or depositing sediment and dissipating. We conclude by discussing the implications of this global compilation of flow front velocities for understanding submarine flow behaviour.

  9. Locomotion Mode Affects the Physiological Strain during Exercise at Walk-Run Transition Speed inElderly Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, Raul; Farinatti, Paulo; Cunha, Felipe; Silva, Brenno; Monteiro, Walace

    2017-07-01

    This study investigated cardiorespiratory responses and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) during prolonged walking and running exercise performed at the walk-run transition speed (WRTS) in untrained healthy elderly men. 20 volunteers (mean±SE, age: 68.4±1.2 yrs; height: 170.0±0.02 cm; body mass: 74.7±2.3 kg) performed the following bouts of exercise: a) maximal cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET); b) specific protocol to detect WRTS; and c) two 30-min walking and running bouts at WRTS. Expired gases were collected during exercise bouts via the Ultima CardiO 2 metabolic analyzer. Compared to walking, running at the WRTS resulted in higher oxygen uptake (>0.27 L·min -1 ), pulmonary ventilation (>7.7 L·min -1 ), carbon dioxide output (>0.23 L·min -1 ), heart rate (>15 beats·min -1 ), oxygen pulse (>0.88 15 mL·beats -1 ), energy expenditure (>27 kcal) and cost of oxygen transport (>43 mL·kg -1 ·km -1 ·bout -1 ). The increase of overall and local RPEs with exercise duration was similar across locomotion modes (Pexercise tolerance. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Race Differences: Use of Walking Speed to Identify Community-Dwelling Women at Risk for Poor Health Outcomes--Osteoarthritis Initiative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkness, Carmen S; Ren, Jinma

    2015-07-01

    Onset of disability, risk for future falls, frailty, functional decline, and mortality are strongly associated with a walking speed of less than 1.0 m/s. The study objective was to determine whether there were differences in slow walking speed (differences in walking speed can be attributed to age, obesity, socioeconomic factors, disease severity, or comorbidities. A cross-sectional design was used. Community-dwelling adults were recruited from Baltimore, Maryland; Columbus, Ohio; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; and Pawtucket, Rhode Island. Participants were 2,648 women (23% African American) who were 45 to 79 years of age and had a self-selected baseline walking speed of 20 m/s in the Osteoarthritis Initiative Study. Mixed-effects logistic regression models were used to examine racial differences in walking speed (<1.0 m/s versus ≥1.0 m/s), with adjustments for demographic factors, socioeconomic factors, disease severity, and comorbidities. Walking speed was significantly slower for African American women than for white American women (mean walking speed=1.19 and 1.33 m/s, respectively). The prevalence of a walking speed of less than 1.0 m/s in this cohort of middle-aged women was 9%; about 50% of the women with a walking speed of less than 1.0 m/s were younger than 65 years. Women with a walking speed of less than 1.0 m/s had lower values for socioeconomic factors, higher values for disease severity, and higher prevalences of obesity and comorbidities than those with a walking speed of ≥1.0 m/s. After controlling for these covariates, it was found that African American women were 3 times (odds ratio=2.9; 95% confidence interval=2.0, 4.1) more likely to have a walking speed of less than 1.0 m/s than white American women. The study design made it impossible to know whether a walking speed of less than 1.0 m/s in women who were 45 years of age or older was a predictor of future poor health outcomes. In this study, race was independently associated with a walking speed

  11. High speed motion neutron radiography of two-phase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, A.H.; Wang, S.L.

    1983-01-01

    Current research in the area of two-phase flow utilizes a wide variety of sensing devices, but some limitations exist on the information which can be obtained. Neutron radiography is a feasible alternative to ''see'' the two-phase flow. A system to perform neutron radiographic analysis of dynamic events which occur on the order of several milliseconds has been developed at Oregon State University. Two different methods have been used to radiograph the simulated two-phase flow. These are pulsed, or ''flash'' radiography, and high speed movie neutron radiography. The pulsed method serves as a ''snap-shot'' with an exposure time ranging from 10 to 20 milliseconds. In high speed movie radiography, a scintillator is used to convert neutrons into light which is enhanced by an optical intensifier and then photographed by a high speed camera. Both types of radiography utilize the pulsing capability of the OSU TRIGA reactor. The principle difficulty with this type of neutron radiography is the fogging of the image due to the large amount of scattering in the water. This difficulty can be overcome by using thin regions for the two-phase flow or using heavy water instead of light water. The results obtained in this paper demonstrate the feasibility of using neutron radiography to obtain data in two-phase flow situations. Both movies and flash radiographs have been obtained of air bubbles in water and boiling from a heater element. The neutron radiographs of the boiling element show both nucleate boiling and film boiling. (Auth.)

  12. Step-by-step variability of swing phase trajectory area during steady state walking at a range of speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurt, Christopher P.; Brown, David A.

    2018-01-01

    Background Step kinematic variability has been characterized during gait using spatial and temporal kinematic characteristics. However, people can adopt different trajectory paths both between individuals and even within individuals at different speeds. Single point measures such as minimum toe clearance (MTC) and step length (SL) do not necessarily account for the multiple paths that the foot may take during the swing phase to reach the same foot fall endpoint. The purpose of this study was to test a step-by-step foot trajectory area (SBS-FTA) variability measure that is able to characterize sagittal plane foot trajectories of varying areas, and compare this measure against MTC and SL variability at different speeds. We hypothesize that the SBS-FTA variability would demonstrate increased variability with speed. Second, we hypothesize that SBS-FTA would have a stronger curvilinear fit compared with the CV and SD of SL and MTC. Third, we hypothesize SBS-FTA would be more responsive to change in the foot trajectory at a given speed compared to SL and MTC. Fourth, SBS-FTA variability would not strongly co-vary with SL and MTC variability measures since it represents a different construct related to foot trajectory area variability. Methods We studied 15 nonimpaired individuals during walking at progressively faster speeds. We calculated SL, MTC, and SBS-FTA area. Results SBS-FTA variability increased with speed, had a stronger curvilinear fit compared with the CV and SD of SL and MTC, was more responsive at a given speed, and did not strongly co-vary with SL and MTC variability measures. Conclusion SBS foot trajectory area variability was sensitive to change with faster speeds, captured a relationship that the majority of the other measures did not demonstrate, and did not co-vary strongly with other measures that are also components of the trajectory. PMID:29370202

  13. The adaptation of limb kinematics to increasing walking speeds in freely moving mice 129/Sv and C57BL/6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serradj, Nadjet; Jamon, Marc

    2009-07-19

    The kinematics of locomotion was analyzed in two strains of great importance for the creation of mutated mice (C56BL/6 and 129/Sv). Different behavioral situations were used to trigger sequences of movement covering the whole range of velocities in the mice, and the variations of kinematic parameters were analyzed in relation with velocity. Both stride frequency and stride length contributed to the moving speed, but stride frequency was found to be the main contributor to the speed increase. A trot-gallop transition was detected at speed about 70 cm/s, in relation with a sharp shift in limb coordination. The results of this study were consistent with pieces of information previously published concerning the gait analyses of other strains, and provided an integrative view of the basic motor pattern of mice. On the other hand some qualitative differences were found in the movement characteristics of the two strains. The stride frequency showed a higher contribution to speed in 129/Sv than in C57BL/6. In addition, 129/Sv showed a phase shift in the forelimb and hindlimb, and a different position of the foot during the stance time that revealed a different gait and body position during walking. Overall, 129/Sv moved at a slower speed than C57BL/6 in any behavioral situation. This difference was related to a basal lower level of motor activity. The possibility that an alteration in the dopamine circuit was responsible for the different movement pattern in 129/Sv is discussed.

  14. Control entropy identifies differential changes in complexity of walking and running gait patterns with increasing speed in highly trained runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, Stephen J; Busa, Michael A; Skufca, Joseph; Yaggie, James A; Bollt, Erik M

    2009-06-01

    Regularity statistics have been previously applied to walking gait measures in the hope of gaining insight into the complexity of gait under different conditions and in different populations. Traditional regularity statistics are subject to the requirement of stationarity, a limitation for examining changes in complexity under dynamic conditions such as exhaustive exercise. Using a novel measure, control entropy (CE), applied to triaxial continuous accelerometry, we report changes in complexity of walking and running during increasing speeds up to exhaustion in highly trained runners. We further apply Karhunen-Loeve analysis in a new and novel way to the patterns of CE responses in each of the three axes to identify dominant modes of CE responses in the vertical, mediolateral, and anterior/posterior planes. The differential CE responses observed between the different axes in this select population provide insight into the constraints of walking and running in those who may have optimized locomotion. Future comparisons between athletes, healthy untrained, and clinical populations using this approach may help elucidate differences between optimized and diseased locomotor control.

  15. The Hidden Flow Structure and Metric Space of Network Embedding Algorithms Based on Random Walks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Weiwei; Gong, Li; Lou, Xiaodan; Zhang, Jiang

    2017-10-13

    Network embedding which encodes all vertices in a network as a set of numerical vectors in accordance with it's local and global structures, has drawn widespread attention. Network embedding not only learns significant features of a network, such as the clustering and linking prediction but also learns the latent vector representation of the nodes which provides theoretical support for a variety of applications, such as visualization, link prediction, node classification, and recommendation. As the latest progress of the research, several algorithms based on random walks have been devised. Although those algorithms have drawn much attention for their high scores in learning efficiency and accuracy, there is still a lack of theoretical explanation, and the transparency of those algorithms has been doubted. Here, we propose an approach based on the open-flow network model to reveal the underlying flow structure and its hidden metric space of different random walk strategies on networks. We show that the essence of embedding based on random walks is the latent metric structure defined on the open-flow network. This not only deepens our understanding of random- walk-based embedding algorithms but also helps in finding new potential applications in network embedding.

  16. Measurements of granular flow dynamics with high speed digital images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jingeol [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    1994-01-01

    The flow of granular materials is common to many industrial processes. This dissertation suggests and validates image processing algorithms applied to high speed digital images to measure the dynamics (velocity, temperature and volume fraction) of dry granular solids flowing down an inclined chute under the action of gravity. Glass and acrylic particles have been used as granular solids in the experiment. One technique utilizes block matching for spatially averaged velocity measurements of the glass particles. This technique is compared with the velocity measurement using an optic probe which is a conventional granular flow velocity measurement device. The other technique for measuring the velocities of individual acrylic particles is developed with correspondence using a Hopfield network. This technique first locates the positions of particles with pattern recognition techniques, followed by a clustering technique, which produces point patterns. Also, several techniques are compared for particle recognition: synthetic discriminant function (SDF), minimum average correlation energy (MACE) filter, modified minimum average correlation energy (MMACE) filter and variance normalized correlation. The author proposes an MMACE filter which improves generalization of the MACE filter by adjusting the amount of averaged spectrum of training images in the spectrum whitening stages of the MACE filter. Variance normalized correlation is applied to measure the velocity and temperature of flowing glass particles down the inclined chute. The measurements are taken for the steady and wavy flow and qualitatively compared with a theoretical model of granular flow.

  17. Age differences in the required coefficient of friction during level walking do not exist when experimentally-controlling speed and step length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Dennis E; Franck, Christopher T; Madigan, Michael L

    2014-08-01

    The effects of gait speed and step length on the required coefficient of friction (COF) confound the investigation of age-related differences in required COF. The goals of this study were to investigate whether age differences in required COF during self-selected gait persist when experimentally-controlling speed and step length, and to determine the independent effects of speed and step length on required COF. Ten young and 10 older healthy adults performed gait trials under five gait conditions: self-selected, slow and fast speeds without controlling step length, and slow and fast speeds while controlling step length. During self-selected gait, older adults walked with shorter step lengths and exhibited a lower required COF. Older adults also exhibited a lower required COF when walking at a controlled speed without controlling step length. When both age groups walked with the same speed and step length, no age difference in required COF was found. Thus, speed and step length can have a large influence on studies investigating age-related differences in required COF. It was also found that speed and step length have independent and opposite effects on required COF, with step length having a strong positive effect on required COF, and speed having a weaker negative effect.

  18. A community-based Falls Management Exercise Programme (FaME) improves balance, walking speed and reduced fear of falling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Pui Yee; Chan, Wayne; Woo, Jean

    2015-04-01

    Although effective community falls prevention programmes for the older persons have been described, challenges remain in translating proven interventions into daily practice. To evaluate the efficacy, feasibility and acceptability of a falls prevention programme that can be integrated into daily activities in a group of community-dwelling older adults with risk of falling. A cohort study with intervention and comparison groups was designed to evaluate a 36-week group-based falls prevention exercise programme (FaME) in the community setting. Participants were aged 60 years or older, had fallen in the past 12 months, had fear of falling with avoidance of activities or had deficits in balance control. Primary outcome measures included assessment of balance control and mobility; secondary outcome measures included level of physical activity, assessment of fear of falling and health-related quality of life. There were 48 and 51 participants in the intervention and comparison groups, respectively. There were improvements in measurements of balance, walking speed and self-efficacy. The drop out rate was low (14.6% and 3.9% from the intervention and comparison groups, respectively). Overall compliance in the intervention group was 79%. Factors that motivated continued participation include the regular and long-term nature of the programme helping to reinforce their exercise habits, the simplicity of movements and friendliness of the group. The FaME programme improves balance, walking speed and reduces fear of falling. It could be widely promoted and integrated into regular health and social activities in community settings.

  19. Flow in a Low Specific Speed Centrifugal Pump Using PIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui Dai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The interflow plays important roles in centrifugal pump design. In order to study the effect of rotation and z-axis on internal flow, two-dimensional particle image velocimetry (PIV measurements have been performed to measure the steady velocity field on three planes in all impeller passages of a low specific-speed centrifugal pump. The results show that the relative velocity flows in blade passages are obviously different in terms of the positions of the blade relative to the tongue. The interaction between the impeller and tongue changes the occurrence and development of low velocity region with time. From shroud to hub, the relative velocity gradually increases, and the minimum value moves toward the suction surface. On the midplane, the magnitude increases with increased flow rate from pressure surface to suction surface, while at the shroud and hub, the measured velocity first increases with decreased flow rate from the blade pressure surface to nearly ζ = 0.5 to 0.6.

  20. Preconditioned Conjugate Gradient methods for low speed flow calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajmani, Kumud; Ng, Wing-Fai; Liou, Meng-Sing

    1993-01-01

    An investigation is conducted into the viability of using a generalized Conjugate Gradient-like method as an iterative solver to obtain steady-state solutions of very low-speed fluid flow problems. Low-speed flow at Mach 0.1 over a backward-facing step is chosen as a representative test problem. The unsteady form of the two dimensional, compressible Navier-Stokes equations are integrated in time using discrete time-steps. The Navier-Stokes equations are cast in an implicit, upwind finite-volume, flux split formulation. The new iterative solver is used to solve a linear system of equations at each step of the time-integration. Preconditioning techniques are used with the new solver to enhance the stability and the convergence rate of the solver and are found to be critical to the overall success of the solver. A study of various preconditioners reveals that a preconditioner based on the lower-upper (L-U)-successive symmetric over-relaxation iterative scheme is more efficient than a preconditioner based on incomplete L-U factorizations of the iteration matrix. The performance of the new preconditioned solver is compared with a conventional line Gauss-Seidel relaxation (LGSR) solver. Overall speed-up factors of 28 (in terms of global time-steps required to converge to a steady-state solution) and 20 (in terms of total CPU time on one processor of a CRAY-YMP) are found in favor of the new preconditioned solver, when compared with the LGSR solver.

  1. Interpolating between random walks and optimal transportation routes: Flow with multiple sources and targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guex, Guillaume

    2016-05-01

    In recent articles about graphs, different models proposed a formalism to find a type of path between two nodes, the source and the target, at crossroads between the shortest-path and the random-walk path. These models include a freely adjustable parameter, allowing to tune the behavior of the path toward randomized movements or direct routes. This article presents a natural generalization of these models, namely a model with multiple sources and targets. In this context, source nodes can be viewed as locations with a supply of a certain good (e.g. people, money, information) and target nodes as locations with a demand of the same good. An algorithm is constructed to display the flow of goods in the network between sources and targets. With again a freely adjustable parameter, this flow can be tuned to follow routes of minimum cost, thus displaying the flow in the context of the optimal transportation problem or, by contrast, a random flow, known to be similar to the electrical current flow if the random-walk is reversible. Moreover, a source-targetcoupling can be retrieved from this flow, offering an optimal assignment to the transportation problem. This algorithm is described in the first part of this article and then illustrated with case studies.

  2. Predicting Free Flow Speed and Crash Risk of Bicycle Traffic Flow Using Artificial Neural Network Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Xu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Free flow speed is a fundamental measure of traffic performance and has been found to affect the severity of crash risk. However, the previous studies lack analysis and modelling of impact factors on bicycles’ free flow speed. The main focus of this study is to develop multilayer back propagation artificial neural network (BPANN models for the prediction of free flow speed and crash risk on the separated bicycle path. Four different models with considering different combinations of input variables (e.g., path width, traffic condition, bicycle type, and cyclists’ characteristics were developed. 459 field data samples were collected from eleven bicycle paths in Hangzhou, China, and 70% of total samples were used for training, 15% for validation, and 15% for testing. The results show that considering the input variables of bicycle types and characteristics of cyclists will effectively improve the accuracy of the prediction models. Meanwhile, the parameters of bicycle types have more significant effect on predicting free flow speed of bicycle compared to those of cyclists’ characteristics. The findings could contribute for evaluation, planning, and management of bicycle safety.

  3. Speed and duration of walking and other leisure time physical activity and the risk of heart failure: a prospective cohort study from the Copenhagen City Heart Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Askelund Saevereid

    Full Text Available AIM: Physical activity (PA confers some protection against development of heart failure (HF but little is known of the role of intensity and duration of exercise. METHODS AND RESULTS: In a prospective cohort study of men and women free of previous MI, stroke or HF with one or more examinations in 1976-2003, we studied the association between updated self-assessed leisure-time PA, speed and duration of walking and subsequent hospitalization or death from HF. Light and moderate/high level of leisure-time PA and brisk walking were associated with reduced risk of HF in both genders whereas no consistent association with duration of walking was seen. In 18,209 subjects age 20-80 with 1580 cases of HF, using the lowest activity level as reference, the confounder-adjusted hazard ratios (HR for light and moderate/high leisure-time physical activity were 0.75 (0.66-0.86 and 0.80 (0.69-0.93, respectively. In 9,937 subjects with information on walking available and 542 cases of HF, moderate and high walking speed were associated with adjusted HRs of 0.53 (0.43-0.66 and 0.30 (0.21-0.44, respectively, and daily walking of ½-1 hrs, 1-2 and >2 hrs with HR of 0.80 (0.61-1.06, 0.82 (0.62-1.06, and 0.96 (0.73-1.27, respectively. Results were similar for both genders and remained robust after exclusion of HF related to coronary heart disease and after a series of sensitivity analyses. CONCLUSIONS: Speed rather than duration of walking was associated with reduced risk of HF. Walking is the most wide-spread PA and public health measures to curb the increase in HF may benefit from this information.

  4. Transient flow characteristics of a high speed rotary valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, Patrick H.

    were experimentally mapped as a function of valve speed, inter-cylinder pressure ratios and volume ratios and the results were compared to compressible flow theoretical models. Specifically, the transient behavior suggested a short-lived loss-mode initiation closely resembled by shock tube theory followed by a quasi-steady flow regime resembling choked flow behavior. An empirical model was then employed to determine the useful range of the CCV design as applied to a four-stroke CIBAI engine cycle modeled using a 1-D quasi-steady numerical method, with particular emphasis on the cyclic timing of the CCV opening. Finally, a brief discussion of a high-temperature version of the CCV design is presented.

  5. Internal Flow of a High Specific-Speed Diagonal-Flow Fan (Rotor Outlet Flow Fields with Rotating Stall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norimasa Shiomi

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available We carried out investigations for the purpose of clarifying the rotor outlet flow fields with rotating stall cell in a diagonal-flow fan. The test fan was a high–specific-speed (ns=1620 type of diagonal-flow fan that had 6 rotor blades and 11 stator blades. It has been shown that the number of the stall cell is 1, and its propagating speed is approximately 80% of its rotor speed, although little has been known about the behavior of the stall cell because a flow field with a rotating stall cell is essentially unsteady. In order to capture the behavior of the stall cell at the rotor outlet flow fields, hot-wire surveys were performed using a single-slant hotwire probe. The data obtained by these surveys were processed by means of a double phase-locked averaging technique, which enabled us to capture the flow field with the rotating stall cell in the reference coordinate system fixed to the rotor. As a result, time-dependent ensemble averages of the three-dimensional velocity components at the rotor outlet flow fields were obtained. The behavior of the stall cell was shown for each velocity component, and the flow patterns on the meridional planes were illustrated.

  6. The influence of step frequency on the range of perceptually natural visual walking speeds during walking-in-place and treadmill locomotion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Niels Christian; Serafin, Stefania; Nordahl, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    Walking-In-Place (WIP) techniques make relatively natural walking experiences within immersive virtual environments possible when the physical interaction space is limited in size. In order to facilitate such experiences it is necessary to establish a natural connection between steps in place and...

  7. Direct numerical simulation of laminar-turbulent flow over a flat plate at hypersonic flow speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egorov, I. V.; Novikov, A. V.

    2016-06-01

    A method for direct numerical simulation of a laminar-turbulent flow around bodies at hypersonic flow speeds is proposed. The simulation is performed by solving the full three-dimensional unsteady Navier-Stokes equations. The method of calculation is oriented to application of supercomputers and is based on implicit monotonic approximation schemes and a modified Newton-Raphson method for solving nonlinear difference equations. By this method, the development of three-dimensional perturbations in the boundary layer over a flat plate and in a near-wall flow in a compression corner is studied at the Mach numbers of the free-stream of M = 5.37. In addition to pulsation characteristic, distributions of the mean coefficients of the viscous flow in the transient section of the streamlined surface are obtained, which enables one to determine the beginning of the laminar-turbulent transition and estimate the characteristics of the turbulent flow in the boundary layer.

  8. Flow speed measurement using two-point collective light scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinemeier, N.P.

    1998-09-01

    Measurements of turbulence in plasmas and fluids using the technique of collective light scattering have always been plagued by very poor spatial resolution. In 1994, a novel two-point collective light scattering system for the measurement of transport in a fusion plasma was proposed. This diagnostic method was design for a great improvement of the spatial resolution, without sacrificing accuracy in the velocity measurement. The system was installed at the W7-AS steallartor in Garching, Germany, in 1996, and has been operating since. This master thesis is an investigation of the possible application of this new method to the measurement of flow speeds in normal fluids, in particular air, although the results presented in this work have significance for the plasma measurements as well. The main goal of the project was the experimental verification of previous theoretical predictions. However, the theoretical considerations presented in the thesis show that the method can only be hoped to work for flows that are almost laminar and shearless, which makes it of very small practical interest. Furthermore, this result also implies that the diagnostic at W7-AS cannot be expected to give the results originally hoped for. (au)

  9. Flow speed measurement using two-point collective light scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinemeier, N.P

    1998-09-01

    Measurements of turbulence in plasmas and fluids using the technique of collective light scattering have always been plagued by very poor spatial resolution. In 1994, a novel two-point collective light scattering system for the measurement of transport in a fusion plasma was proposed. This diagnostic method was design for a great improvement of the spatial resolution, without sacrificing accuracy in the velocity measurement. The system was installed at the W7-AS steallartor in Garching, Germany, in 1996, and has been operating since. This master thesis is an investigation of the possible application of this new method to the measurement of flow speeds in normal fluids, in particular air, although the results presented in this work have significance for the plasma measurements as well. The main goal of the project was the experimental verification of previous theoretical predictions. However, the theoretical considerations presented in the thesis show that the method can only be hoped to work for flows that are almost laminar and shearless, which makes it of very small practical interest. Furthermore, this result also implies that the diagnostic at W7-AS cannot be expected to give the results originally hoped for. (au) 1 tab., 51 ills., 29 refs.

  10. the factors that affect the free flow speed on an arterial in ilorin, nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    lower average free flow speed of commercial saloon cars on wet pavement than on dry pavement, with 12% percentage ... average space mean speed in a low volume traffic stream when ..... travel way width and number of traffic control units.

  11. Inductive flow meter for measuring the speed of flow and gas volume contained in a flow of liquid metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, S.

    1980-01-01

    The speed of flow of the sodium is measured in two closely adjacent flow crossections using pairs of electrodes in the field of two disc-shaped permanent magnets made of AlNiCo 450, by means of measurements of running time of speed fluctuations. The result of the measurement is independent of the temperature of the sensor and the temperature of the sodium. The same arrangement makes it possible to determine the proportion by volume of the fission gas in sodium with a limiting freequency of several kHz. (DG) [de

  12. AC-DC integrated load flow calculation for variable speed offshore wind farms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Menghua; Chen, Zhe; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2005-01-01

    This paper proposes a sequential AC-DC integrated load flow algorithm for variable speed offshore wind farms. In this algorithm, the variable frequency and the control strategy of variable speed wind turbine systems are considered. In addition, the losses of wind turbine systems and the losses...... of converters are also integrated into the load flow algorithm. As a general algorithm, it can be applied to different types of wind farm configurations, and the load flow is related to the wind speed....

  13. Socioeconomic status, non-communicable disease risk factors, and walking speed in older adults: multi-cohort population based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringhini, Silvia; Carmeli, Cristian; Jokela, Markus; Avendaño, Mauricio; McCrory, Cathal; d'Errico, Angelo; Bochud, Murielle; Barros, Henrique; Costa, Giuseppe; Chadeau-Hyam, Marc; Delpierre, Cyrille; Gandini, Martina; Fraga, Silvia; Goldberg, Marcel; Giles, Graham G; Lassale, Camille; Kenny, Rose Anne; Kelly-Irving, Michelle; Paccaud, Fred; Layte, Richard; Muennig, Peter; Marmot, Michael G; Ribeiro, Ana Isabel; Severi, Gianluca; Steptoe, Andrew; Shipley, Martin J; Zins, Marie; Mackenbach, Johan P; Vineis, Paolo; Kivimäki, Mika

    2018-03-23

    To assess the association of low socioeconomic status and risk factors for non-communicable diseases (diabetes, high alcohol intake, high blood pressure, obesity, physical inactivity, smoking) with loss of physical functioning at older ages. Multi-cohort population based study. 37 cohort studies from 24 countries in Europe, the United States, Latin America, Africa, and Asia, 1990-2017. 109 107 men and women aged 45-90 years. Physical functioning assessed using the walking speed test, a valid index of overall functional capacity. Years of functioning lost was computed as a metric to quantify the difference in walking speed between those exposed and unexposed to low socioeconomic status and risk factors. According to mixed model estimations, men aged 60 and of low socioeconomic status had the same walking speed as men aged 66.6 of high socioeconomic status (years of functioning lost 6.6 years, 95% confidence interval 5.0 to 9.4). The years of functioning lost for women were 4.6 (3.6 to 6.2). In men and women, respectively, 5.7 (4.4 to 8.1) and 5.4 (4.3 to 7.3) years of functioning were lost by age 60 due to insufficient physical activity, 5.1 (3.9 to 7.0) and 7.5 (6.1 to 9.5) due to obesity, 2.3 (1.6 to 3.4) and 3.0 (2.3 to 4.0) due to hypertension, 5.6 (4.2 to 8.0) and 6.3 (4.9 to 8.4) due to diabetes, and 3.0 (2.2 to 4.3) and 0.7 (0.1 to 1.5) due to tobacco use. In analyses restricted to high income countries, the number of years of functioning lost attributable to low socioeconomic status by age 60 was 8.0 (5.7 to 13.1) for men and 5.4 (4.0 to 8.0) for women, whereas in low and middle income countries it was 2.6 (0.2 to 6.8) for men and 2.7 (1.0 to 5.5) for women. Within high income countries, the number of years of functioning lost attributable to low socioeconomic status by age 60 was greater in the United States than in Europe. Physical functioning continued to decline as a function of unfavourable risk factors between ages 60 and 85. Years of functioning

  14. From medium heterogeneity to flow and transport: A time-domain random walk approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakoun, V.; Comolli, A.; Dentz, M.

    2017-12-01

    The prediction of flow and transport processes in heterogeneous porous media is based on the qualitative and quantitative understanding of the interplay between 1) spatial variability of hydraulic conductivity, 2) groundwater flow and 3) solute transport. Using a stochastic modeling approach, we study this interplay through direct numerical simulations of Darcy flow and advective transport in heterogeneous media. First, we study flow in correlated hydraulic permeability fields and shed light on the relationship between the statistics of log-hydraulic conductivity, a medium attribute, and the flow statistics. Second, we determine relationships between Eulerian and Lagrangian velocity statistics, this means, between flow and transport attributes. We show how Lagrangian statistics and thus transport behaviors such as late particle arrival times are influenced by the medium heterogeneity on one hand and the initial particle velocities on the other. We find that equidistantly sampled Lagrangian velocities can be described by a Markov process that evolves on the characteristic heterogeneity length scale. We employ a stochastic relaxation model for the equidistantly sampled particle velocities, which is parametrized by the velocity correlation length. This description results in a time-domain random walk model for the particle motion, whose spatial transitions are characterized by the velocity correlation length and temporal transitions by the particle velocities. This approach relates the statistical medium and flow properties to large scale transport, and allows for conditioning on the initial particle velocities and thus to the medium properties in the injection region. The approach is tested against direct numerical simulations.

  15. Modelling Free Flow Speed on Two-Lane Rural Highways in Bosnia and Herzegovina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Lovrić

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Free flow speed is used as a parameter in transportation planning and capacity analysis models, as well as speed-flow diagrams. Many of these models suggest estimating free flow speed according to measurements from similar highways, which is not a practical method for use in B&H. This paper first discusses problems with using these methodologies in conditions prevailing in B&H and then presents a free flow speed evaluation model developed from a comprehensive field survey conducted on nine homogeneous sections of state and regional roads.

  16. Free-flow speeds for representative road and terrain types

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Schutte, IC

    2009-06-02

    Full Text Available Speed plays an important role in the justification of road infrstructure projects. It affects both vehicle operating cost and travel time cost. If incorrecr values for speed are used in the economic analyses of transport projects, incorrect...

  17. Dust mobilization by high-speed vapor flow under LOVA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuki, K.; Suzuki, S.; Ebara, S.; Yokomine, T.; Shimizu, A.

    2006-01-01

    In the safety analysis on the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), the ingress of coolant (ICE) event and the loss of vacuum (LOVA) event are considered as one of the most serious accident. On the assumption of LOVA occurring after ICE, it is inferable that activated dusts are under the wet condition. Transport behavior of in-vessel activated dusts under the wet condition is not well understood in comparison with the dry case. In this study, we experimentally investigated the entrainment behavior of dust under LOVA after ICE. We measured dust entrainment by high-speed humid airflow with phase change. Graphite dusts and glass beads are used as substitutions for mobile inventory. The relations among the relative humidity, the entrainment of particles in the exhaust gas flow and the adhesion rate of dust particles on the pipe wall have been made clear, as has the distribution profile of dust deposition on the pipe wall. The entrainment ratio decreased as the relative humidity increased and increased as the initial pressure difference increased

  18. Experimental Comparison of Speed : Fuel-flow and Speed-area Controls on a Turbojet Engine for Small Step Disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzel, L M; Hart, C E; Craig, R T

    1957-01-01

    Optimum proportional-plus-integral control settings for speed - fuel-flow control, determined by minimization of integral criteria, correlated well with analytically predicted optimum settings. Engine response data are given for a range of control settings around the optimum. An inherent nonlinearity in the speed-area loop necessitated the use of nonlinear controls. Response data for two such nonlinear control schemes are presented.

  19. Empirical analysis of gross vehicle weight and free flow speed and consideration on its relation with differential speed limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saifizul, Ahmad Abdullah; Yamanaka, Hideo; Karim, Mohamed Rehan

    2011-05-01

    Most highly motorized countries in the world have implemented different speed limits for light weight and heavy weight vehicles. The heavy vehicle speed limit is usually chosen to be lower than that of passenger cars due to the difficulty for the drivers to safely maneuver the heavy vehicle at high speed and greater impact during a crash. However, in many cases, the speed limit for heavy vehicle is set by only considering the vehicle size or category, mostly due to simplicity in enforcement. In this study, traffic and vehicular data for all vehicle types were collected using a weigh-in-motion system installed at Federal Route 54 in Malaysia. The first finding from the data showed that the weight variation for each vehicle category is considerable. Therefore, the effect of gross vehicle weight (GVW) and category of heavy vehicle on free flow speed and their interaction were analyzed using statistical techniques. Empirical analysis results showed that statistically for each type of heavy vehicle, there was a significant relationship between free flow speed of a heavy vehicle and GVW. Specifically, the results suggest that the mean and variance of free flow speed decrease with an increase GVW by the amount unrelated to size and shape for all GVW range. Then, based on the 85th percentile principle, the study proposed a new concept for setting the speed limit for heavy vehicle by incorporating GVW where a different speed limit is imposed to the heavy vehicle, not only based on vehicle classification, but also according to its GVW. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Counting the corners of a random walk and its application to traffic flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knorr, Florian; Schreckenberg, Michael

    2012-01-01

    We study a system with two types of interacting particles on a one-dimensional lattice. Particles of the first type, which we call ‘active’, are able to detect particles of the second type (called ‘passive’). By relating the problem to a discrete random walk in one dimension with a fixed number of steps we determine the fraction of active and detected particles for both open and periodic boundary conditions as well as for the case where passive particles interact with both or only one neighbors. In the random walk picture, where the two particles types stand for steps in opposite directions, passive particles are detected whenever the resulting path has a corner. For open boundary conditions, it turns out that a simple mean field approximation reproduces the exact result if the particles interact with one neighbor only. A practical application of this problem is heterogeneous traffic flow with communicating and non-communicating vehicles. In this context communicating vehicles can be thought of as active particles which can by front (and rear) sensors detect the vehicle ahead (and behind) although these vehicles do not actively share information. Therefore, we also present simulation results which show the validity of our analysis for real traffic flow. (paper)

  1. Rehabilitation that incorporates virtual reality is more effective than standard rehabilitation for improving walking speed, balance and mobility after stroke: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Corbetta

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Question: In people after stroke, does virtual reality based rehabilitation (VRBR improve walking speed, balance and mobility more than the same duration of standard rehabilitation? In people after stroke, does adding extra VRBR to standard rehabilitation improve the effects on gait, balance and mobility? Design: Systematic review with meta-analysis of randomised trials. Participants: Adults with a clinical diagnosis of stroke. Intervention: Eligible trials had to include one these comparisons: VRBR replacing some or all of standard rehabilitation or VRBR used as extra rehabilitation time added to a standard rehabilitation regimen. Outcome measures: Walking speed, balance, mobility and adverse events. Results: In total, 15 trials involving 341 participants were included. When VRBR replaced some or all of the standard rehabilitation, there were statistically significant benefits in walking speed (MD 0.15 m/s, 95% CI 0.10 to 0.19, balance (MD 2.1 points on the Berg Balance Scale, 95% CI 1.8 to 2.5 and mobility (MD 2.3 seconds on the Timed Up and Go test, 95% CI 1.2 to 3.4. When VRBR was added to standard rehabilitation, mobility showed a significant benefit (0.7 seconds on the Timed Up and Go test, 95% CI 0.4 to 1.1, but insufficient evidence was found to comment about walking speed (one trial and balance (high heterogeneity. Conclusion: Substituting some or all of a standard rehabilitation regimen with VRBR elicits greater benefits in walking speed, balance and mobility in people with stroke. Although the benefits are small, the extra cost of applying virtual reality to standard rehabilitation is also small, especially when spread over many patients in a clinic. Adding extra VRBR time to standard rehabilitation also has some benefits; further research is needed to determine if these benefits are clinically worthwhile. [Corbetta D, Imeri F, Gatti R (2015 Rehabilitation that incorporates virtual reality is more effective than standard

  2. Modeling of speed distribution for mixed bicycle traffic flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Xu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Speed is a fundamental measure of traffic performance for highway systems. There were lots of results for the speed characteristics of motorized vehicles. In this article, we studied the speed distribution for mixed bicycle traffic which was ignored in the past. Field speed data were collected from Hangzhou, China, under different survey sites, traffic conditions, and percentages of electric bicycle. The statistics results of field data show that the total mean speed of electric bicycles is 17.09 km/h, 3.63 km/h faster and 27.0% higher than that of regular bicycles. Normal, log-normal, gamma, and Weibull distribution models were used for testing speed data. The results of goodness-of-fit hypothesis tests imply that the log-normal and Weibull model can fit the field data very well. Then, the relationships between mean speed and electric bicycle proportions were proposed using linear regression models, and the mean speed for purely electric bicycles or regular bicycles can be obtained. The findings of this article will provide effective help for the safety and traffic management of mixed bicycle traffic.

  3. Cellular automaton simulation of pedestrian counter flow with different walk velocities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weng, W. G.; Chen, T.; Yuan, H. Y.; Fan, W. C.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a cellular automaton model without step back for pedestrian dynamics considering the human behaviors which can make judgments in some complex situations. This model can simulate pedestrian movement with different walk velocities through update at different time-step intervals. Two kinds of boundary conditions including periodic and open boundary for pedestrian counter flow are considered, and their dynamical characteristics are discussed. Simulation results show that for periodic boundary condition there are three phases of pedestrian patterns, i.e., freely moving phase, lane formation phase, and perfectly stopped phase at some certain total density ranges. In the stage of lane formation, the phenomenon that pedestrians exceed those with lower walk velocity through a narrow walkway can be found. For open boundary condition, at some certain entrance densities, there are two steady states of pedestrian patterns; but the first is metastable. Spontaneous fluctuations can break the first steady state, i.e., freely moving phase, and run into the second steady state, i.e., perfectly stopped phase

  4. Speed

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Speed. The rate of information transferred per second is the speed of the information. Measured in bits per second. Need for speed on the net: You-Tube phenomenon; IPTV; 3D Video telephony. Online gaming; HDTV.

  5. Too much or too little step width variability is associated with a fall history in older persons who walk at or near normal gait speed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Newman Anne B

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Decreased gait speed and increased stride time, stride length, double support time, and stance time variability have consistently been associated with falling whereas step width variability has not been strongly related to falls. The purpose was to examine the linear and nonlinear associations between gait variability and fall history in older persons and to examine the influence of gait speed. Methods Gait characteristics and fall history were obtained in 503 older adults (mean age = 79; 61% female participating in the Cardiovascular Health Study who could ambulate independently. Gait characteristics were recorded from two trials on a 4 meter computerized walkway at the subject's self-selected walking speed. Gait variability was calculated as the coefficient of variation. The presence of a fall in the past 12 months was determined by interview. The nonlinear association between gait variability and fall history was examined using a simple three level classification derived from the distribution of the data and from literature based cut-points. Multivariate logistic regression was used to examine the association between step width variability (extreme or moderate and fall history stratifying by gait speed (1.0 m/s and controlling for age and gender. Results Step length, stance time, and step time variability did not differ with respect to fall history (p > .33. Individuals with extreme step width variability (either low or high step width variability were more likely to report a fall in the past year than individuals with moderate step width variability. In individuals who walked ≥ 1.0 m/s (n = 281, after controlling for age, gender, and gait speed, compared to individuals with moderate step width variability individuals with either low or high step width variability were more likely to have fallen in the past year (OR and 95% CI 4.38 [1.79–10.72]. The association between step width variability and fall history was not

  6. Multicomponent Exercise Improves Hemodynamic Parameters and Mobility, but Not Maximal Walking Speed, Transfer Capacity, and Executive Function of Older Type II Diabetic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélio José Coelho Junior

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to investigate the effects of a 6-month multicomponent exercise program (MCEP on functional, cognitive, and hemodynamic parameters of older Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM patients. Moreover, additional analyses were performed to evaluate if T2DM patients present impaired adaptability in response to physical exercise when compared to nondiabetic volunteers. A total of 72 T2DM patients and 72 age-matched healthy volunteers (CG were recruited and submitted to functional, cognitive, and hemodynamic evaluations before and after six months of a MCEP. The program of exercise was performed twice a week at moderate intensity. Results indicate T2DM and nondiabetic patients present an increase in mobility (i.e., usual walking speed after the MCEP. However, improvements in maximal walking speed, transfer capacity, and executive function were only observed in the CG. On the other hand, only T2DM group reveals a marked decline in blood pressure. In conclusion, data of the current study indicate that a 6-month MCEP improves mobility and reduce blood pressure in T2DM patients. However, maximal walking speed, transfer capacity, and executive function were only improved in CG, indicating that T2DM may present impaired adaptability in response to physical stimulus.

  7. High-Speed Thermal Characterization of Cryogenic Flows, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Luna proposes to continue development on a high-speed fiber optic sensor and readout system for cryogenic temperature measurements in liquid oxygen (LOX) and liquid...

  8. PDF methods for combustion in high-speed turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Stephen B.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes the research performed during the second year of this three-year project. The ultimate objective of the project is extend the applicability of probability density function (pdf) methods from incompressible to compressible turbulent reactive flows. As described in subsequent sections, progress has been made on: (1) formulation and modelling of pdf equations for compressible turbulence, in both homogeneous and inhomogeneous inert flows; and (2) implementation of the compressible model in various flow configurations, namely decaying isotropic turbulence, homogeneous shear flow and plane mixing layer.

  9. Turbulent Scalar Transport Model Validation for High Speed Propulsive Flows, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This effort entails the validation of a RANS turbulent scalar transport model (SFM) for high speed propulsive flows, using new experimental data sets and...

  10. Technical report on prototype intelligent network flow optimization (INFLO) dynamic speed harmonization and queue warning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    This Technical Report on Prototype Intelligent Network Flow Optimization (INFLO) Dynamic Speed Harmonization and : Queue Warning is the final report for the project. It describes the prototyping, acceptance testing and small-scale : demonstration of ...

  11. Online Speed Scaling Based on Active Job Count to Minimize Flow Plus Energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lam, Tak-Wah; Lee, Lap Kei; To, Isaac K. K.

    2013-01-01

    This paper is concerned with online scheduling algorithms that aim at minimizing the total flow time plus energy usage. The results are divided into two parts. First, we consider the well-studied “simple” speed scaling model and show how to analyze a speed scaling algorithm (called AJC) that chan...

  12. assessment of traffic flow on enugu highways using speed density

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HOD

    Corresponding author, tel: +234 – 806 – 435 – 0200 ... construction, maintenance and optimization of the highways using the ...... Research Part A: Policy and Practice 29(4), 273-281. 1995. ... relationships: Quality and Theory of Traffic Flow.

  13. Perceived enjoyment, concentration, intention, and speed violation behavior: Using flow theory and theory of planned behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atombo, Charles; Wu, Chaozhong; Zhang, Hui; Wemegah, Tina D

    2017-10-03

    Road accidents are an important public health concern, and speeding is a major contributor. Although flow theory (FLT) is a valid model for understanding behavior, currently the nature of the roles and interplay of FLT constructs within the theory of planned behavior (TPB) framework when attempting to explain the determinants of motivations for intention to speed and speeding behavior of car drivers is not yet known. The study aims to synthesize TPB and FLT in explaining drivers of advanced vehicles intentions to speed and speed violation behaviors and evaluate factors that are critical for explaining intention and behavior. The hypothesized model was validated using a sample collected from 354 fully licensed drivers of advanced vehicles, involving 278 males and 76 females on 2 occasions separated by a 3-month interval. During the first of the 2 occasions, participants completed questionnaire measures of TPB and FLT variables. Three months later, participants' speed violation behaviors were assessed. The study observed a significant positive relationship between the constructs. The proposed model accounted for 51 and 45% of the variance in intention to speed and speed violation behavior, respectively. The independent predictors of intention were enjoyment, attitude, and subjective norm. The independent predictors of speed violation behavior were enjoyment, concentration, intention, and perceived behavioral control. The findings suggest that safety interventions for preventing speed violation behaviors should be aimed at underlying beliefs influencing the speeding behaviors of drivers of advanced vehicles. Furthermore, perceived enjoyment is of equal importance to driver's intention, influencing speed violation behavior.

  14. Children's Brain Responses to Optic Flow Vary by Pattern Type and Motion Speed.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rick O Gilmore

    Full Text Available Structured patterns of global visual motion called optic flow provide crucial information about an observer's speed and direction of self-motion and about the geometry of the environment. Brain and behavioral responses to optic flow undergo considerable postnatal maturation, but relatively little brain imaging evidence describes the time course of development in motion processing systems in early to middle childhood, a time when psychophysical data suggest that there are changes in sensitivity. To fill this gap, electroencephalographic (EEG responses were recorded in 4- to 8-year-old children who viewed three time-varying optic flow patterns (translation, rotation, and radial expansion/contraction at three different speeds (2, 4, and 8 deg/s. Modulations of global motion coherence evoked coherent EEG responses at the first harmonic that differed by flow pattern and responses at the third harmonic and dot update rate that varied by speed. Pattern-related responses clustered over right lateral channels while speed-related responses clustered over midline channels. Both children and adults show widespread responses to modulations of motion coherence at the second harmonic that are not selective for pattern or speed. The results suggest that the developing brain segregates the processing of optic flow pattern from speed and that an adult-like pattern of neural responses to optic flow has begun to emerge by early to middle childhood.

  15. Anticipatory changes in control of swing foot and lower limb joints when walking onto a moving surface traveling at constant speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Wei-Chun; Wang, Ting-Ming; Lu, Hsuan-Lun; Lu, Tung-Wu

    2015-01-01

    Adapting to a predictable moving surface such as an escalator is a crucial part of daily locomotor tasks in modern cities. However, the associated biomechanics have remained unexplored. In a gait laboratory, fifteen young adults walked from the ground onto a moving or a static surface while their kinematic and kinetic data were obtained for calculating foot and pelvis motions, as well as the angles and moments of the lower limb joints. Between-surface-condition comparisons were performed using a paired t-test (α = 0.05). The results showed that anticipatory locomotor adjustments occurred at least a stride before successfully walking onto the moving surface, including increasing step length and speed in the trailing step (p moving surface (p > 0.05), mainly through reduced extension of the trailing hip but increased pelvic anterior tilt and leading swing ankle plantarflexion (p moving surfaces such as escalators. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Flow visualization in models of high speed centrifugal separators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagerstedt, T.; Nabo, O.

    1987-01-01

    The modern centrifugal separator is a fluid machine where the high ''G'' forces set up by rotation are utilized to separate phases of different densities. The fluid dynamics of the separator is complex and poorly known. Hundred years of (practical) experience has, however, turned the separator into an efficient machine. The present report shows how straight forward visualization experiments in model rigs provide valuable information on the flow inside the separator. The report concentrates on describing the flow between the closely spaced discs in a separator disc stack

  17. Particle deposition in low-speed, high-turbulence flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reck, Mads; Larsen, Poul Scheel; Ullum, U.

    2002-01-01

    The experimental and numerical study considers the concentration of airborne particulate contaminants, such as spores of spoilage fungi, and their deposition on a surface, in a petri dish, and on a warm box-shaped product placed in a food-processing environment. Field measurements by standard...... field measurements. Particle deposition is shown to be associated with near-wall coherent structures. Flow reversal, simulated by impulsive start, is shown to give higher deposition rates than steady mean flows. Key word index: Spoilage fungi; spores; food processing plant; deposition flux; large eddy...

  18. Experimental analysis of flow structure in contra-rotating axial flow pump designed with different rotational speed concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Linlin; Watanabe, Satoshi; Imanishi, Toshiki; Yoshimura, Hiroaki; Furukawa, Akinori

    2013-08-01

    As a high specific speed pump, the contra-rotating axial flow pump distinguishes itself in a rear rotor rotating in the opposite direction of the front rotor, which remarkably contributes to the energy conversion, the reduction of the pump size, better hydraulic and cavitation performances. However, with two rotors rotating reversely, the significant interaction between blade rows was observed in our prototype contra-rotating rotors, which highly affected the pump performance compared with the conventional axial flow pumps. Consequently, a new type of rear rotor was designed by the rotational speed optimization methodology with some additional considerations, aiming at better cavitation performance, the reduction of blade rows interaction and the secondary flow suppression. The new rear rotor showed a satisfactory performance at the design flow rate but an unfavorable positive slope of the head — flow rate curve in the partial flow rate range less than 40% of the design flow rate, which should be avoided for the reliability of pump-pipe systems. In the present research, to understand the internal flow field of new rear rotor and its relation to the performances at the partial flow rates, the velocity distributions at the inlets and outlets of the rotors are firstly investigated. Then, the boundary layer flows on rotor surfaces, which clearly reflect the secondary flow inside the rotors, are analyzed through the limiting streamline observations using the multi-color oil-film method. Finally, the unsteady numerical simulations are carried out to understand the complicated internal flow structures in the rotors.

  19. Effect of variations in air speed on cross-flow cylinder frosting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monaghan, P.F.; Cassidy, S.F.; Oosthuizen, P.H.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper the effect of fluctuating air speed on frost growth and heat transfer to a cylinder in cross-flow is discussed. Frost-growth of up to 20 hours is simulated using an experimentally validated finite difference computer model. Graphical results are presented for frost mass, frost depth, frost surface temperature and heat transfer versus time under both steady and fluctuating air speed conditions. In general, it is found that a thinner, more dense frost layer develops under fluctuating air speed conditions giving improved heat transfer. This phenomenon may be explained by the increased frequency of frost surface thaw/freeze cycles when fluctuating air speed conditions prevail

  20. Comparison of the Mini-Balance Evaluations Systems Test with the Berg Balance Scale in relationship to walking speed and motor recovery post stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhavan, Sangeetha; Bishnoi, Alka

    2017-12-01

    The Mini-BESTest is a recently developed balance assessment tool that incorporates challenging dynamic balance tasks. Few studies have compared the psychometric properties of the Mini-BESTest to the commonly used Berg Balance Scale (BBS). However, the utility of these scales in relationship to post stroke walking speeds has not been explored. The purpose of this study was to compare the sensitivity and specificity of the Mini-BESTest and BBS to evaluate walking speeds in individuals with stroke. A retrospective exploratory design. Forty-one individuals with chronic stroke were evaluated with the Mini-BESTest, BBS, and 10-meter self-selected walk test (10MWT). Based on their self-selected gait speeds (below or above 0.8 m/s), participants were classified as slow and fast walkers. Significant linear correlations were observed between the Mini-BESTest vs. BBS (r = 0.72, p ≤ 0.001), Mini-BESTest vs. 10MWT (r = 0.58, p ≤ 0.001), and BBS vs. 10MWT (r = 0.30, p = 0.05). Independent t-tests comparing the balance scores for the slow and fast walkers revealed significant group differences for the Mini-BESTest (p = 0.003), but not for the BBS (p = 0.09). The Mini-BESTest demonstrated higher sensitivity (93%) and specificity (64%) compared to the BBS (sensitivity 81%, specificity 56%) for discriminating participants into slow and fast walkers. The Mini-BESTest has a greater discriminative ability than the BBS to categorize individuals with stroke into slow and fast walkers.

  1. Associations of Walking Speed, Grip Strength, and Standing Balance With Total and Cause-Specific Mortality in a General Population of Japanese Elders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nofuji, Yu; Shinkai, Shoji; Taniguchi, Yu; Amano, Hidenori; Nishi, Mariko; Murayama, Hiroshi; Fujiwara, Yoshinori; Suzuki, Takao

    2016-02-01

    Walking speed, grip strength, and standing balance are key components of physical performance in older people. The present study aimed to evaluate (1) associations of these physical performance measures with cause-specific mortality, (2) independent associations of individual physical performance measures with mortality, and (3) the added value of combined use of the 3 physical performance measures in predicting all-cause and cause-specific mortality. Prospective cohort study with a follow-up of 10.5 years. Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology Longitudinal Interdisciplinary Study on Aging (TMIG-LISA), Japan. A total of 1085 initially nondisabled older Japanese aged 65 to 89 years. Usual walking speed, grip strength, and standing balance were measured at baseline survey. During follow-up, 324 deaths occurred (122 of cardiovascular disease, 75 of cancer, 115 of other causes, and 12 of unknown causes). All 3 physical performance measures were significantly associated with all-cause, cardiovascular, and other-cause mortality, but not with cancer mortality, independent of potential confounders. When all 3 physical performance measures were simultaneously entered into the model, each was significantly independently associated with all-cause and cardiovascular mortality. The C statistics for all-cause and cardiovascular mortality were significantly increased by adding grip strength and standing balance to walking speed (P balance predicted all-cause, cardiovascular, and other-cause mortality, but not cancer mortality, independent of covariates. Moreover, these 3 components of physical performance were independently associated with all-cause and cardiovascular mortality and their combined use increased prognostic power. Copyright © 2016 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Characteristics of the gait adaptation process due to split-belt treadmill walking under a wide range of right-left speed ratios in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Hikaru; Sato, Koji; Ogawa, Tetsuya; Yamamoto, Shin-Ichiro; Nakazawa, Kimitaka; Kawashima, Noritaka

    2018-01-01

    The adaptability of human bipedal locomotion has been studied using split-belt treadmill walking. Most of previous studies utilized experimental protocol under remarkably different split ratios (e.g. 1:2, 1:3, or 1:4). While, there is limited research with regard to adaptive process under the small speed ratios. It is important to know the nature of adaptive process under ratio smaller than 1:2, because systematic evaluation of the gait adaptation under small to moderate split ratios would enable us to examine relative contribution of two forms of adaptation (reactive feedback and predictive feedforward control) on gait adaptation. We therefore examined a gait behavior due to on split-belt treadmill adaptation under five belt speed difference conditions (from 1:1.2 to 1:2). Gait parameters related to reactive control (stance time) showed quick adjustments immediately after imposing the split-belt walking in all five speed ratios. Meanwhile, parameters related to predictive control (step length and anterior force) showed a clear pattern of adaptation and subsequent aftereffects except for the 1:1.2 adaptation. Additionally, the 1:1.2 ratio was distinguished from other ratios by cluster analysis based on the relationship between the size of adaptation and the aftereffect. Our findings indicate that the reactive feedback control was involved in all the speed ratios tested and that the extent of reaction was proportionally dependent on the speed ratio of the split-belt. On the contrary, predictive feedforward control was necessary when the ratio of the split-belt was greater. These results enable us to consider how a given split-belt training condition would affect the relative contribution of the two strategies on gait adaptation, which must be considered when developing rehabilitation interventions for stroke patients.

  3. Advancement and Application of Multi-Phase CFD Modeling to High Speed Supercavitating Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-13

    October 2008 - December 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Advancement and Application of Multi-Phase CFD Modeling to High Speed Supercavitating Flows...influence cavity hysteresis behavior. These observations are used to guide improved supercavitating -vehicle analyses including numerical predictions...experiments, and modeling 15. SUBJECT TERMS supercavitation , computational fluid dynamics, multiphase flow 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: a

  4. Cavitation performance improvement of high specific speed mixed-flow pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, T; Sun, Y B; Wu, D Z; Wang, L Q

    2012-01-01

    Cavitation performance improvement of large hydraulic machinery such as pump and turbine has been a hot topic for decades. During the design process of the pumps, in order to minimize size, weight and cost centrifugal and mixed-flow pump impellers are required to operate at the highest possible rotational speed. The rotational speed is limited by the phenomenon of cavitation. The hydraulic model of high-speed mixed-flow pump with large flow rate and high pumping head, which was designed based on the traditional method, always involves poor cavitation performance. In this paper, on the basis of the same hydraulic design parameters, two hydraulic models of high-speed mixed-flow pump were designed by using different methods, in order to investigate the cavitation and hydraulic performance of the two models, the method of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was adopted for internal flow simulation of the high specific speed mixed-flow pump. Based on the results of numerical simulation, the influences of impeller parameters and three-dimensional configuration on pressure distribution of the blades' suction surfaces were analyzed. The numerical simulation results shows a better pressure distribution and lower pressure drop around the leading edge of the improved model. The research results could provide references to the design and optimization of the anti-cavitation blade.

  5. Walking speed, rather than Expanded Disability Status Scale, relates to long-term patient-reported impact in progressive MS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosma, L.V.A.E.; Kragt, J.J.; Polman, C.H.; Uitdehaag, B.M.J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To study the relationships between 1-2 year changes in well-known physician-rated measurements (Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS), Timed 25-Foot Walk (T25FW), 9-Hole Peg Test (9HPT)) and the long-term (= 5 years) outcome in patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures (Multiple Sclerosis

  6. Self-paced versus fixed speed walking and the effect of virtual reality in children with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sloot, L.H.; Harlaar, J.; van der Krogt, M.M.

    2015-01-01

    While feedback-controlled treadmills with a virtual reality could potentially offer advantages for clinical gait analysis and training, the effect of self-paced walking and the virtual environment on the gait pattern of children and different patient groups remains unknown. This study examined the

  7. Study on transient hydrodynamic performance and cavitation characteristic of high-speed mixed-flow pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, T; Liu, Y L; Sun, Y B; Wang, L Q; Wu, D Z

    2013-01-01

    In order to analyse the hydrodynamic performance and cavitation characteristic of a high-speed mixed-flow pump during transient operations, experimental studies were carried out. The transient hydrodynamic performance and cavitation characteristics of the mixed-flow pump with guide vane during start-up operation processes were tested on the pump performance test-bed. Performance tests of the pump were carried out under various inlet pressures and speed-changing operations. The real-time instantaneous external characteristics such as rotational speed, hydraulic head, flow rate, suction pressure and discharge pressure of the pump were measured. Based on the experimental results, the effect of fluid acceleration on the hydrodynamic performances and cavitation characteristics of the mixed-flow pump were analysed and evaluated

  8. Local scattering property scales flow speed estimation in laser speckle contrast imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miao, Peng; Chao, Zhen; Feng, Shihan; Ji, Yuanyuan; Yu, Hang; Thakor, Nitish V; Li, Nan

    2015-01-01

    Laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) has been widely used in in vivo blood flow imaging. However, the effect of local scattering property (scattering coefficient µ s ) on blood flow speed estimation has not been well investigated. In this study, such an effect was quantified and involved in relation between speckle autocorrelation time τ c and flow speed v based on simulation flow experiments. For in vivo blood flow imaging, an improved estimation strategy was developed to eliminate the estimation bias due to the inhomogeneous distribution of the scattering property. Compared to traditional LSCI, a new estimation method significantly suppressed the imaging noise and improves the imaging contrast of vasculatures. Furthermore, the new method successfully captured the blood flow changes and vascular constriction patterns in rats’ cerebral cortex from normothermia to mild and moderate hypothermia. (letter)

  9. Honeybees' speed depends on dorsal as well as lateral, ventral and frontal optic flows.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey Portelli

    Full Text Available Flying insects use the optic flow to navigate safely in unfamiliar environments, especially by adjusting their speed and their clearance from surrounding objects. It has not yet been established, however, which specific parts of the optical flow field insects use to control their speed. With a view to answering this question, freely flying honeybees were trained to fly along a specially designed tunnel including two successive tapering parts: the first part was tapered in the vertical plane and the second one, in the horizontal plane. The honeybees were found to adjust their speed on the basis of the optic flow they perceived not only in the lateral and ventral parts of their visual field, but also in the dorsal part. More specifically, the honeybees' speed varied monotonically, depending on the minimum cross-section of the tunnel, regardless of whether the narrowing occurred in the horizontal or vertical plane. The honeybees' speed decreased or increased whenever the minimum cross-section decreased or increased. In other words, the larger sum of the two opposite optic flows in the horizontal and vertical planes was kept practically constant thanks to the speed control performed by the honeybees upon encountering a narrowing of the tunnel. The previously described ALIS ("AutopiLot using an Insect-based vision System" model nicely matches the present behavioral findings. The ALIS model is based on a feedback control scheme that explains how honeybees may keep their speed proportional to the minimum local cross-section of a tunnel, based solely on optic flow processing, without any need for speedometers or rangefinders. The present behavioral findings suggest how flying insects may succeed in adjusting their speed in their complex foraging environments, while at the same time adjusting their distance not only from lateral and ventral objects but also from those located in their dorsal visual field.

  10. High-speed cell recognition algorithm for ultrafast flow cytometer imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wanyue; Wang, Chao; Chen, Hongwei; Chen, Minghua; Yang, Sigang

    2018-04-01

    An optical time-stretch flow imaging system enables high-throughput examination of cells/particles with unprecedented high speed and resolution. A significant amount of raw image data is produced. A high-speed cell recognition algorithm is, therefore, highly demanded to analyze large amounts of data efficiently. A high-speed cell recognition algorithm consisting of two-stage cascaded detection and Gaussian mixture model (GMM) classification is proposed. The first stage of detection extracts cell regions. The second stage integrates distance transform and the watershed algorithm to separate clustered cells. Finally, the cells detected are classified by GMM. We compared the performance of our algorithm with support vector machine. Results show that our algorithm increases the running speed by over 150% without sacrificing the recognition accuracy. This algorithm provides a promising solution for high-throughput and automated cell imaging and classification in the ultrafast flow cytometer imaging platform.

  11. Distributed flow sensing for closed-loop speed control of a flexible fish robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feitian; Lagor, Francis D; Yeo, Derrick; Washington, Patrick; Paley, Derek A

    2015-10-23

    Flexibility plays an important role in fish behavior by enabling high maneuverability for predator avoidance and swimming in turbulent flow. This paper presents a novel flexible fish robot equipped with distributed pressure sensors for flow sensing. The body of the robot is molded from soft, hyperelastic material, which provides flexibility. Its Joukowski-foil shape is conducive to modeling the fluid analytically. A quasi-steady potential-flow model is adopted for real-time flow estimation, whereas a discrete-time vortex-shedding flow model is used for higher-fidelity simulation. The dynamics for the flexible fish robot yield a reduced model for one-dimensional swimming. A recursive Bayesian filter assimilates pressure measurements to estimate flow speed, angle of attack, and foil camber. The closed-loop speed-control strategy combines an inverse-mapping feedforward controller based on an average model derived for periodic actuation of angle-of-attack and a proportional-integral feedback controller utilizing the estimated flow information. Simulation and experimental results are presented to show the effectiveness of the estimation and control strategy. The paper provides a systematic approach to distributed flow sensing for closed-loop speed control of a flexible fish robot by regulating the flapping amplitude.

  12. Virtual Refrigerant Mass Flow and Power Sensors for Variable-Speed Compressors

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Woohyun; Braun, James E.

    2012-01-01

    The use of variable-speed compressors in heat pumps and air conditioners has increased in recent years in order to improve comfort and energy efficiency. At the same time, there is a trend towards embedding more sensors in this type of equipment to facilitate real-time energy monitoring and diagnostics. Although compressor mass flow rate and power consumption are useful indices for performance monitoring and diagnostics, they are expensive to measure. The virtual variable-speed compressor sen...

  13. High-speed flow visualization in a pump-turbine under off-design operating conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasmatuchi, V; Roth, S; Botero, F; Avellan, F; Farhat, M

    2010-01-01

    The flow hydrodynamics in a low specific speed radial pump-turbine reduced scale model is experimentally investigated under off-design operating conditions in generating mode. Wall pressure measurements, in the stator, synchronized with high-speed flow visualizations in the vaneless space between the impeller and the guide vanes using air bubbles injection are performed. When starting from the best efficiency point and increasing the runner speed, a significant increase of the pressure fluctuations is observed mainly in channels between wicket gates. The spectral analysis shows a rise of one stall cell, rotating with about 70% of the impeller frequency, at runaway, which further increases as the zero discharge condition is approached. Then a specific image processing technique is detailed and applied to create a synthetic instantaneous view of the flow pattern on the entire guide vanes circumference for an operating point in turbine-brake mode, where backflow and vortices accompany the stall passage.

  14. Loss reduction in axial-flow compressors through low-speed model testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisler, D. C.

    1984-01-01

    A systematic procedure for reducing losses in axial-flow compressors is presented. In this procedure, a large, low-speed, aerodynamic model of a high-speed core compressor is designed and fabricated based on aerodynamic similarity principles. This model is then tested at low speed where high-loss regions associated with three-dimensional endwall boundary layers flow separation, leakage, and secondary flows can be located, detailed measurements made, and loss mechanisms determined with much greater accuracy and much lower cost and risk than is possible in small, high-speed compressors. Design modifications are made by using custom-tailored airfoils and vector diagrams, airfoil endbends, and modified wall geometries in the high-loss regions. The design improvements resulting in reduced loss or increased stall margin are then scaled to high speed. This paper describes the procedure and presents experimental results to show that in some cases endwall loss has been reduced by as much as 10 percent, flow separation has been reduced or eliminated, and stall margin has been substantially improved by using these techniques.

  15. Generating pulsatility by pump speed modulation with continuous-flow total artificial heart in awake calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukamachi, Kiyotaka; Karimov, Jamshid H; Sunagawa, Gengo; Horvath, David J; Byram, Nicole; Kuban, Barry D; Dessoffy, Raymond; Sale, Shiva; Golding, Leonard A R; Moazami, Nader

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of sinusoidal pump speed modulation of the Cleveland Clinic continuous-flow total artificial heart (CFTAH) on hemodynamics and pump flow in an awake chronic calf model. The sinusoidal pump speed modulations, performed on the day of elective sacrifice, were set at ±15 and ± 25% of mean pump speed at 80 bpm in four awake calves with a CFTAH. The systemic and pulmonary arterial pulse pressures increased to 12.0 and 12.3 mmHg (±15% modulation) and to 15.9 and 15.7 mmHg (±25% modulation), respectively. The pulsatility index and surplus hemodynamic energy significantly increased, respectively, to 1.05 and 1346 ergs/cm at ±15% speed modulation and to 1.51 and 3381 ergs/cm at ±25% speed modulation. This study showed that it is feasible to generate pressure pulsatility with pump speed modulation; the platform is suitable for evaluating the physiologic impact of pulsatility and allows determination of the best speed modulations in terms of magnitude, frequency, and profiles.

  16. Flow visualization of bubble behavior under two-phase natural circulation flow conditions using high speed digital camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemos, Wanderley F.; Su, Jian, E-mail: wlemos@con.ufrj.br, E-mail: sujian@lasme.coppe.ufrj.br [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear; Faccini, Jose L.H., E-mail: faccini@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Termo-Hidraulica Experimental

    2013-07-01

    The The present work aims at identifying flow patterns and measuring interfacial parameters in two-phase natural circulation by using visualization technique with high-speed digital camera. The experiments were conducted in the Natural Circulation Circuit (CCN), installed at Nuclear Engineering Institute/CNEN. The thermo-hydraulic circuit comprises heater, heat exchanger, expansion tank, the pressure relief valve and pipes to interconnect the components. A glass tube is installed at the midpoint of the riser connected to the heater outlet. The natural circulation circuit is complemented by acquisition system of values of temperatures, flow and graphic interface. The instrumentation has thermocouples, volumetric flow meter, rotameter and high-speed digital camera. The experimental study is performed through analysis of information from measurements of temperatures at strategic points along the hydraulic circuit, besides natural circulation flow rates. The comparisons between analytical and experimental values are validated by viewing, recording and processing of the images for the flows patterns. Variables involved in the process of identification of flow regimes, dimensionless parameters, the phase velocity of the flow, initial boiling point, the phenomenon of 'flashing' pre-slug flow type were obtained experimentally. (author)

  17. Flow visualization of bubble behavior under two-phase natural circulation flow conditions using high speed digital camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemos, Wanderley F.; Su, Jian; Faccini, Jose L.H.

    2013-01-01

    The The present work aims at identifying flow patterns and measuring interfacial parameters in two-phase natural circulation by using visualization technique with high-speed digital camera. The experiments were conducted in the Natural Circulation Circuit (CCN), installed at Nuclear Engineering Institute/CNEN. The thermo-hydraulic circuit comprises heater, heat exchanger, expansion tank, the pressure relief valve and pipes to interconnect the components. A glass tube is installed at the midpoint of the riser connected to the heater outlet. The natural circulation circuit is complemented by acquisition system of values of temperatures, flow and graphic interface. The instrumentation has thermocouples, volumetric flow meter, rotameter and high-speed digital camera. The experimental study is performed through analysis of information from measurements of temperatures at strategic points along the hydraulic circuit, besides natural circulation flow rates. The comparisons between analytical and experimental values are validated by viewing, recording and processing of the images for the flows patterns. Variables involved in the process of identification of flow regimes, dimensionless parameters, the phase velocity of the flow, initial boiling point, the phenomenon of 'flashing' pre-slug flow type were obtained experimentally. (author)

  18. Positivity-preserving space-time CE/SE scheme for high speed flows

    KAUST Repository

    Shen, Hua

    2017-03-02

    We develop a space-time conservation element and solution element (CE/SE) scheme using a simple slope limiter to preserve the positivity of the density and pressure in computations of inviscid and viscous high-speed flows. In general, the limiter works with all existing CE/SE schemes. Here, we test the limiter on a central Courant number insensitive (CNI) CE/SE scheme implemented on hybrid unstructured meshes. Numerical examples show that the proposed limiter preserves the positivity of the density and pressure without disrupting the conservation law; it also improves robustness without losing accuracy in solving high-speed flows.

  19. Positivity-preserving space-time CE/SE scheme for high speed flows

    KAUST Repository

    Shen, Hua; Parsani, Matteo

    2017-01-01

    We develop a space-time conservation element and solution element (CE/SE) scheme using a simple slope limiter to preserve the positivity of the density and pressure in computations of inviscid and viscous high-speed flows. In general, the limiter works with all existing CE/SE schemes. Here, we test the limiter on a central Courant number insensitive (CNI) CE/SE scheme implemented on hybrid unstructured meshes. Numerical examples show that the proposed limiter preserves the positivity of the density and pressure without disrupting the conservation law; it also improves robustness without losing accuracy in solving high-speed flows.

  20. Reliability and validity of a smartphone-based assessment of gait parameters across walking speed and smartphone locations: Body, bag, belt, hand, and pocket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silsupadol, Patima; Teja, Kunlanan; Lugade, Vipul

    2017-10-01

    The assessment of spatiotemporal gait parameters is a useful clinical indicator of health status. Unfortunately, most assessment tools require controlled laboratory environments which can be expensive and time consuming. As smartphones with embedded sensors are becoming ubiquitous, this technology can provide a cost-effective, easily deployable method for assessing gait. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to assess the reliability and validity of a smartphone-based accelerometer in quantifying spatiotemporal gait parameters when attached to the body or in a bag, belt, hand, and pocket. Thirty-four healthy adults were asked to walk at self-selected comfortable, slow, and fast speeds over a 10-m walkway while carrying a smartphone. Step length, step time, gait velocity, and cadence were computed from smartphone-based accelerometers and validated with GAITRite. Across all walking speeds, smartphone data had excellent reliability (ICC 2,1 ≥0.90) for the body and belt locations, with bag, hand, and pocket locations having good to excellent reliability (ICC 2,1 ≥0.69). Correlations between the smartphone-based and GAITRite-based systems were very high for the body (r=0.89, 0.98, 0.96, and 0.87 for step length, step time, gait velocity, and cadence, respectively). Similarly, Bland-Altman analysis demonstrated that the bias approached zero, particularly in the body, bag, and belt conditions under comfortable and fast speeds. Thus, smartphone-based assessments of gait are most valid when placed on the body, in a bag, or on a belt. The use of a smartphone to assess gait can provide relevant data to clinicians without encumbering the user and allow for data collection in the free-living environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. The influence of air flow speed on fire propagation in object

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jevtić Radoje

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fire presents the process of the uncontrolled combustion that makes material damage and endangers human lives. It is important to know the factors that fire depends on for success projecting and realization of fire protection systems. One of such factors is different air flow that could be presented as wind, draft and the like. The simulation of different air flow speeds and its influences on fire propagation in object were analyzed in this paper.

  2. Application of PIV to the Measurement of High Speed Jet Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenco, L.

    1999-01-01

    The Particle Image Velocimetry, PIV, has been implemented for the investigation of high-speed jet flows at the NASA Langley Research Center. In this approach the velocity (displacement) is found as the location of a peak in the correlation map of particle images acquired in quick succession. In the study, the technique for the correct seeding of the flow field were developed and implemented and the operational parameters influencing the accuracy of the measurement have been optimized.

  3. Flipping the analytical coin : closing the information flow loop in high speed (real time) analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.E. Shahroudi

    1997-01-01

    textabstractAnalysis modules tend to be set up as one way flow of information, i.e a clear distinction between cause and effect or input and output. However, as the speed of analysis approaches real time (or faster than movie rate), it becomes increasingly difficult for an external user to

  4. Characterization of Diamond Nanoparticles by High-Speed Micro-Thermal Field-Flow Fractionation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Janča, Josef

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 8 (2015), s. 671-680 ISSN 1023-666X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : diamond nanoparticles * high-speed microfluidic separation * micro-thermal field-flow fractionation, * article size distribution Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.515, year: 2015

  5. Mixed Platoon Flow Dispersion Model Based on Speed-Truncated Gaussian Mixture Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weitiao Wu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A mixed traffic flow feature is presented on urban arterials in China due to a large amount of buses. Based on field data, a macroscopic mixed platoon flow dispersion model (MPFDM was proposed to simulate the platoon dispersion process along the road section between two adjacent intersections from the flow view. More close to field observation, truncated Gaussian mixture distribution was adopted as the speed density distribution for mixed platoon. Expectation maximum (EM algorithm was used for parameters estimation. The relationship between the arriving flow distribution at downstream intersection and the departing flow distribution at upstream intersection was investigated using the proposed model. Comparison analysis using virtual flow data was performed between the Robertson model and the MPFDM. The results confirmed the validity of the proposed model.

  6. Numerical Simulation of 3D Solid-Liquid Turbulent Flow in a Low Specific Speed Centrifugal Pump: Flow Field Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baocheng Shi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available For numerically simulating 3D solid-liquid turbulent flow in low specific speed centrifugal pumps, the iteration convergence problem caused by complex internal structure and high rotational speed of pump is always a problem for numeral simulation researchers. To solve this problem, the combination of three measures of dynamic underrelaxation factor adjustment, step method, and rotational velocity control means according to residual curves trends of operating parameters was used to improve the numerical convergence. Numeral simulation of 3D turbulent flow in a low specific speed solid-liquid centrifugal pump was performed, and the results showed that the improved solution strategy is greatly helpful to the numerical convergence. Moreover, the 3D turbulent flow fields in pumps have been simulated for the bottom ash-particles with the volume fraction of 10%, 20%, and 30% at the same particle diameter of 0.1 mm. The two-phase calculation results are compared with those of single-phase clean water flow. The calculated results gave the main region of the abrasion of the impeller and volute casing and improve the hydraulic design of the impeller in order to decrease the abrasion and increase the service life of the pump.

  7. The Effect of Visual Display Properties and Gain Presentation Mode on the Perceived Naturalness of Virtual Walking Speeds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Niels Chr.; Serafin, Stefania; Nordahl, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    of the visual speed. The third study found a significant main effect of gain presentation mode. Allowing participants to interactively adjust the gain led to a smaller range of perceptually natural gains and this approach was significantly faster. However, the efficiency may come at the expense of confidence...

  8. Discussion of various flow calculation methods in high-speed centrifuges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louvet, P.; Cortet, C.

    1979-01-01

    The flow in high-speed centrifuges for the separation of uranium isotopes has been studied in the frame of linearized theory for long years. Three different methods have been derived for viscous compressible flow with small Ekman numbers and high Mach numbers: - numerical solution of flow equation by finite element method and Gaussian elimination (Centaure Code), - boundary layer theory using matched asymptotic expansions, - the so called eigenfunction method slightly modified. The mathematical assumptions, the easiness and the accuracy of the computations are compared. Numerical applications are performed successively for thermal countercurrent centrifuges with or without injections

  9. Nearly Interactive Parabolized Navier-Stokes Solver for High Speed Forebody and Inlet Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Thomas J.; Liou, May-Fun; Jones, William H.; Trefny, Charles J.

    2009-01-01

    A system of computer programs is being developed for the preliminary design of high speed inlets and forebodies. The system comprises four functions: geometry definition, flow grid generation, flow solver, and graphics post-processor. The system runs on a dedicated personal computer using the Windows operating system and is controlled by graphical user interfaces written in MATLAB (The Mathworks, Inc.). The flow solver uses the Parabolized Navier-Stokes equations to compute millions of mesh points in several minutes. Sample two-dimensional and three-dimensional calculations are demonstrated in the paper.

  10. Investigation on Flow-Induced Noise due to Backflow in Low Specific Speed Centrifugal Pumps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiaorui Si

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Flow-induced noise causes disturbances during the operation of centrifugal pumps and also affects their performance. The pumps often work at off-design conditions, mainly at part-load conditions, because of frequent changes in the pump device system. Consequently numerous unstable phenomena occur. In low specific speed centrifugal pumps the main disturbance is the inlet backflow, which is considered as one of the most important factors of flow-induced noise and vibration. In this study, a test rig of the flow-induced noise and vibration of the centrifugal pump was built to collect signals under various operating conditions. The three-dimensional unsteady flow of centrifugal pumps was calculated based on the Reynolds-averaged equations that resemble the shear stress transport (SST k-ω turbulence model. The results show that the blade passing frequency and shaft frequency are dominant in the spectrum of flow-induced noise, whereas the shaft component, amplitude value at shaft frequency, and peak frequencies around the shaft increase with decreasing flow. Through flow field analysis, the inlet backflow of the impeller occurs under 0.7 times the design flow. The pressure pulsation spectrum with backflow conditions validates the flow-induced noise findings. The velocity characteristics of the backflow zone at the inlet pipe were analyzed, and the dynamic characteristics of the backflow eddy during one impeller rotating period were simultaneously obtained by employing the backflow conditions. A flow visualization experiment was performed to confirm the numerical calculations.

  11. On-Chip Enucleation of Bovine Oocytes using Microrobot-Assisted Flow-Speed Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihiko Ichikawa

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we developed a microfluidic chip with a magnetically driven microrobot for oocyte enucleation. A microfluidic system was specially designed for enucleation, and the microrobot actively controls the local flow-speed distribution in the microfluidic chip. The microrobot can adjust fluid resistances in a channel and can open or close the channel to control the flow distribution. Analytical modeling was conducted to control the fluid speed distribution using the microrobot, and the model was experimentally validated. The novelties of the developed microfluidic system are as follows: (1 the cutting speed improved significantly owing to the local fluid flow control; (2 the cutting volume of the oocyte can be adjusted so that the oocyte undergoes less damage; and (3 the nucleus can be removed properly using the combination of a microrobot and hydrodynamic forces. Using this device, we achieved a minimally invasive enucleation process. The average enucleation time was 2.5 s and the average removal volume ratio was 20%. The proposed new system has the advantages of better operation speed, greater cutting precision, and potential for repeatable enucleation.

  12. Flow and free running speed characterization of dental air turbine handpieces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, J E; Darvell, B W

    1999-09-01

    Dental air turbine handpieces have been widely used in clinical dentistry for over 30 years, yet little work has been reported on their performance. A few studies have been concerned with measurement of speed (i.e. rotation rate), torque and power performance of these devices, but neither investigations of functional relationships between controlling variables nor theory dealing specifically with this class of turbine have been reported. This has hindered the development of satisfactory methods of handpiece specification and of testing dental rotary cutting tools. It was the intention of the present work to remedy that deficiency. Measurements of pressure, temperature, gas flow rate and rotation rate were made with improved accuracy and precision for 14 ball bearing turbine handpieces on several gases. Functional relationships between gas properties, supply pressure, flow rate, turbine design factors and free running speed were identified and equations describing these aspects of behaviour of this class of turbine developed. The rotor radius, through peripheral Mach number, was found to be a major determinant of speed performance. In addition, gas flow was found to be an important limiting factor through the effect of choke. Each dental handpiece can be treated as a simple orifice of a characteristic cross-sectional area. Free running speed can be explained in terms of gas properties and pressure, with allowance for a design-specific performance coefficient.

  13. Development and numerical analysis of low specific speed mixed-flow pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, H F; Huo, Y W; Pan, Z B; Zhou, W C; He, M H

    2012-01-01

    With the development of the city, the market of the mixed flow pump with large flux and high head is prospect. The KSB Shanghai Pump Co., LTD decided to develop low speed specific speed mixed flow pump to meet the market requirements. Based on the centrifugal pump and axial flow pump model, aiming at the characteristics of large flux and high head, a new type of guide vane mixed flow pump was designed. The computational fluid dynamics method was adopted to analyze the internal flow of the new type model and predict its performances. The time-averaged Navier-Stokes equations were closed by SST k-ω turbulent model to adapt internal flow of guide vane with larger curvatures. The multi-reference frame(MRF) method was used to deal with the coupling of rotating impeller and static guide vane, and the SIMPLEC method was adopted to achieve the coupling solution of velocity and pressure. The computational results shows that there is great flow impact on the head of vanes at different working conditions, and there is great flow separation at the tailing of the guide vanes at different working conditions, and all will affect the performance of pump. Based on the computational results, optimizations were carried out to decrease the impact on the head of vanes and flow separation at the tailing of the guide vanes. The optimized model was simulated and its performance was predicted. The computational results show that the impact on the head of vanes and the separation at the tailing of the guide vanes disappeared. The high efficiency of the optimized pump is wide, and it fit the original design destination. The newly designed mixed flow pump is now in modeling and its experimental performance will be getting soon.

  14. Development and numerical analysis of low specific speed mixed-flow pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H. F.; Huo, Y. W.; Pan, Z. B.; Zhou, W. C.; He, M. H.

    2012-11-01

    With the development of the city, the market of the mixed flow pump with large flux and high head is prospect. The KSB Shanghai Pump Co., LTD decided to develop low speed specific speed mixed flow pump to meet the market requirements. Based on the centrifugal pump and axial flow pump model, aiming at the characteristics of large flux and high head, a new type of guide vane mixed flow pump was designed. The computational fluid dynamics method was adopted to analyze the internal flow of the new type model and predict its performances. The time-averaged Navier-Stokes equations were closed by SST k-ω turbulent model to adapt internal flow of guide vane with larger curvatures. The multi-reference frame(MRF) method was used to deal with the coupling of rotating impeller and static guide vane, and the SIMPLEC method was adopted to achieve the coupling solution of velocity and pressure. The computational results shows that there is great flow impact on the head of vanes at different working conditions, and there is great flow separation at the tailing of the guide vanes at different working conditions, and all will affect the performance of pump. Based on the computational results, optimizations were carried out to decrease the impact on the head of vanes and flow separation at the tailing of the guide vanes. The optimized model was simulated and its performance was predicted. The computational results show that the impact on the head of vanes and the separation at the tailing of the guide vanes disappeared. The high efficiency of the optimized pump is wide, and it fit the original design destination. The newly designed mixed flow pump is now in modeling and its experimental performance will be getting soon.

  15. Using wind speed from a blade-mounted flow sensor for power and load assessment on modern wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mads M.; Larsen, Torben J.; Madsen, Helge Aa

    2017-01-01

    In this paper an alternative method to evaluate power performance and loads on wind turbines using a blade-mounted flow sensor is investigated. The hypothesis is that the wind speed measured at the blades has a high correlation with the power and loads such that a power or load assessment can...... be performed from a few hours or days of measurements. In the present study a blade-mounted five-hole pitot tube is used as the flow sensor as an alternative to the conventional approach, where the reference wind speed is either measured at a nearby met mast or on the nacelle using lidar technology or cup...... anemometers. From the flow sensor measurements, an accurate estimate of the wind speed at the rotor plane can be obtained. This wind speed is disturbed by the presence of the wind turbine, and it is therefore different from the free-flow wind speed. However, the recorded wind speed has a high correlation...

  16. Random walk, diffusion and mixing in simulations of scalar transport in fluid flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klimenko, A Y

    2008-01-01

    Physical similarity and mathematical equivalence of continuous diffusion and particle random walk form one of the cornerstones of modern physics and the theory of stochastic processes. In many applied models used in simulation of turbulent transport and turbulent combustion, mixing between particles is used to reflect the influence of the continuous diffusion terms in the transport equations. We show that the continuous scalar transport and diffusion can be accurately specified by means of mixing between randomly walking Lagrangian particles with scalar properties and assess errors associated with this scheme. This gives an alternative formulation for the stochastic process which is selected to represent the continuous diffusion. This paper focuses on statistical errors and deals with relatively simple cases, where one-particle distributions are sufficient for a complete description of the problem.

  17. MOSS spectroscopic camera for imaging time resolved plasma species temperature and flow speed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michael, Clive; Howard, John

    2000-01-01

    A MOSS (Modulated Optical Solid-State) spectroscopic camera has been devised to monitor the spatial and temporal variations of temperatures and flow speeds of plasma ion species, the Doppler broadening measurement being made of spectroscopic lines specified. As opposed to a single channel MOSS spectrometer, the camera images light from plasma onto an array of light detectors, being mentioned 2D imaging of plasma ion temperatures and flow speeds. In addition, compared to a conventional grating spectrometer, the MOSS camera shows an excellent light collecting performance which leads to the improvement of signal to noise ratio and of time resolution. The present paper first describes basic items of MOSS spectroscopy, then follows MOSS camera with an emphasis on the optical system of 2D imaging. (author)

  18. MOSS spectroscopic camera for imaging time resolved plasma species temperature and flow speed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael, Clive; Howard, John [Australian National Univ., Plasma Research Laboratory, Canberra (Australia)

    2000-03-01

    A MOSS (Modulated Optical Solid-State) spectroscopic camera has been devised to monitor the spatial and temporal variations of temperatures and flow speeds of plasma ion species, the Doppler broadening measurement being made of spectroscopic lines specified. As opposed to a single channel MOSS spectrometer, the camera images light from plasma onto an array of light detectors, being mentioned 2D imaging of plasma ion temperatures and flow speeds. In addition, compared to a conventional grating spectrometer, the MOSS camera shows an excellent light collecting performance which leads to the improvement of signal to noise ratio and of time resolution. The present paper first describes basic items of MOSS spectroscopy, then follows MOSS camera with an emphasis on the optical system of 2D imaging. (author)

  19. Effects of high intensity resistance aquatic training on body composition and walking speed in women with mild knee osteoarthritis: a 4-month RCT with 12-month follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, B; Munukka, M; Rantalainen, T; Lammentausta, E; Nieminen, M T; Kiviranta, I; Kautiainen, H; Häkkinen, A; Kujala, U M; Heinonen, A

    2017-08-01

    To investigate the effects of 4-months intensive aquatic resistance training on body composition and walking speed in post-menopausal women with mild knee osteoarthritis (OA), immediately after intervention and after 12-months follow-up. Additionally, influence of leisure time physical activity (LTPA) will be investigated. This randomised clinical trial assigned eighty-seven volunteer postmenopausal women into two study arms. The intervention group (n = 43) participated in 48 supervised intensive aquatic resistance training sessions over 4-months while the control group (n = 44) maintained normal physical activity. Eighty four participants continued into the 12-months' follow-up period. Body composition was measured with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Walking speed over 2 km and the knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS) were measured. LTPA was recorded with self-reported diaries. After the 4-month intervention there was a significant decrease (P = 0.002) in fat mass (mean change: -1.17 kg; 95% CI: -2.00 to -0.43) and increase (P = 0.002) in walking speed (0.052 m/s; 95% CI: 0.018 to 0.086) in favour of the intervention group. Body composition returned to baseline after 12-months. In contrast, increased walking speed was maintained (0.046 m/s; 95% CI 0.006 to 0.086, P = 0.032). No change was seen in lean mass or KOOS. Daily LTPA over the 16-months had a significant effect (P = 0.007) on fat mass loss (f 2  = 0.05) but no effect on walking speed. Our findings show that high intensity aquatic resistance training decreases fat mass and improves walking speed in post-menopausal women with mild knee OA. Only improvements in walking speed were maintained at 12-months follow-up. Higher levels of LTPA were associated with fat mass loss. ISRCTN65346593. Copyright © 2017 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Thermoconvective flow velocity in a high-speed magnetofluid seal after it has stopped

    OpenAIRE

    Krakov, M. S.; Nikiforov, I. V.

    2012-01-01

    Convective flow is investigated in the high-speed (linear velocity of the shaft seal is more than 1 m/s) magnetofluid shaft seal after it has been stopped. Magnetic fluid is preliminarily heated due to viscous friction in the moving seal. After the shaft has been stopped, nonuniform heated fluid remains under the action of a high-gradient magnetic field. Numerical analysis has revealed that in this situation, intense thermomagnetic convection is initiated. The velocity of magnetic fluid depen...

  1. High speed photography for investigating kiloampere discharges in supersonic air flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, G.R.; Strachan, D.

    1975-01-01

    Examples of the use of conventional high speed photographic techniques are given for obtaining information about the behaviour of high current arc discharges in different gas flow fields. The photographic records yield information about the extent of both the luminous arc core and the surrounding heated volume of gas. A knowledge of these parameters leads to a better understanding of arc discharges which occur in gas blast circuit breakers. (author)

  2. Energy transformation, transfer, and release dynamics in high speed turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Secondly, a new high -order (4 th -order) convective flux formulation was developed that uses the tabulated information, yet produces a fully consistent...Klippenstein 2012 Comprehensive H2/O2 Kinetic Model for High - Pressure Combustion. Int. J. Chem. Kinetics 44:444-474. Cabot, W.H., A.W. Cook, P.L. Miller, D.E...AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2017-0054 Energy Transformation, Transfer, and Release Dynamics in High -Speed Turbulent Flows Paul Dimotakis CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE

  3. Estimation of Engine Intake Air Mass Flow using a generic Speed-Density method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojtíšek Michal

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Measurement of real driving emissions (RDE from internal combustion engines under real-world operation using portable, onboard monitoring systems (PEMS is becoming an increasingly important tool aiding the assessment of the effects of new fuels and technologies on environment and human health. The knowledge of exhaust flow is one of the prerequisites for successful RDE measurement with PEMS. One of the simplest approaches for estimating the exhaust flow from virtually any engine is its computation from the intake air flow, which is calculated from measured engine rpm and intake manifold charge pressure and temperature using a generic speed-density algorithm, applicable to most contemporary four-cycle engines. In this work, a generic speed-density algorithm was compared against several reference methods on representative European production engines - a gasoline port-injected automobile engine, two turbocharged diesel automobile engines, and a heavy-duty turbocharged diesel engine. The overall results suggest that the uncertainty of the generic speed-density method is on the order of 10% throughout most of the engine operating range, but increasing to tens of percent where high-volume exhaust gas recirculation is used. For non-EGR engines, such uncertainty is acceptable for many simpler and screening measurements, and may be, where desired, reduced by engine-specific calibration.

  4. Influence of speed and frequency towards the automotive turbocharger turbine performance under pulsating flow conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padzillah, M.H.; Rajoo, S.; Martinez-Botas, R.F.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • 3D CFD modeling of a turbocharger turbine with pulsating flow. • Characterization based on turbine speed and frequency. • Speed has higher influence on turbine performance compared to frequency. • Detailed localized flow behavior are shown for better understanding. - Abstract: The ever-increasing demand for low carbon applications in automotive industry has intensified the development of highly efficient engines and energy recovery devices. Even though there are significant developments in the alternative powertrains such as full electric, their full deployment is hindered by high costing and unattractive life-cycle energy and emission balance. Thus powertrain based on highly efficient internal combustion engines are still considered to be the mainstream for years to come. Traditionally, turbocharger has been an essential tool to boost the engine power, however in recent years it is seen as an enabling technology for engine downsizing. It is a well-known fact that a turbocharger turbine in an internal combustion engine operates in a highly pulsating exhaust flow. There are numerous studies looking into the complex interaction of the pulsating exhaust gas within the turbocharger turbine, however the phenomena is still not fully integrated into the design stage. Industry practice is still to design and match the turbine to an engine based on steady performance maps. The current work is undertaken with the mind to move one step closer towards fully integrating the pulsating flow performance into the turbocharger turbine design. This paper presents the development efforts and results from a full 3-D CFD model of a turbocharger turbine stage. The simulations were conducted at 30,000 rpm and 48,000 rpm (50% and 80% design speed respectively) for both 20 Hz and 80 Hz pulsating flow inlet conditions. Complete validation procedure using cold-flow experimental data is also described. The temporal and spatial resolutions of the incidence angle at the

  5. Free flow wind speed from a blade-mounted flow sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mads Mølgaard; Larsen, Torben Juul; Aagaard Madsen, Helge

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents a method for obtaining the free-inflow velocities from a 3-D flow sensor mounted on the blade of a wind turbine. From its position on the rotating blade, e.g. one-third from the tip, a blade-mounted flow sensor (BMFS) is able to provide valuable information about the turbulent...... sheared inflow in different regions of the rotor. At the rotor, however, the inflow is affected by the wind turbine, and in most cases the wind of interest is the inflow that the wind turbine is exposed to, i.e. the free-inflow velocities. The current method applies a combination of aerodynamic models...... and procedures to estimate the induced velocities, i.e. the disturbance of the flow field caused by the wind turbine. These velocities are subtracted from the flow velocities measured by the BMFS to obtain the free-inflow velocities. Aeroelastic codes, like HAWC2, typically use a similar approach to calculate...

  6. A matrix-free implicit treatment for all speed flows on unstructured grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kloczko, Th.

    2006-03-01

    The aim of this research work is the development of an efficient implicit scheme for computing compressible and low-speed flows on unstructured meshes. The first part is devoted to the review and analysis of some standard block-implicit treatments for the two-dimensional Euler and Navier-Stokes equations with a view to identify the best candidate for a fair comparison with the matrix-free treatment. The second part forms the main original contribution of this research work. It describes and analyses a matrix-free treatment that can be applied to any type of flow (inviscid/viscous, low Mach/highly compressible, steady/unsteady). The third part deals with the implementation of this treatment within the CAST3M code, and the demonstration of its advantages over existing techniques for computing applications of interest for the CEA: low-Mach number steady and unsteady flows in a Tee junction for example

  7. Muscle function-dependent sarcopenia and cut-off values of possible predictors in community-dwelling Turkish elderly: calf circumference, midarm muscle circumference and walking speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akın, S; Mucuk, S; Öztürk, A; Mazıcıoğlu, M; Göçer, Ş; Arguvanlı, S; Şafak, E D

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of muscle strength-based sarcopenia and to determine possible predictors. This is a cross-sectional population-based study in the community-dwelling Turkish elderly. Anthropometric measurements, namely body height, weight, triceps skin fold (TSF), mid upper arm circumference (MUAC), waist circumference (WC) and calf circumference (CC), were noted. The midarm muscle circumference (MAMC) was calculated by using MUAC and TSF measurement. Sarcopenia was assessed, adjusted for body mass index (BMI) and gender, according to muscle strength. Physical performance was determined by 4 m walking speed (WS; m/s). The receiver operating curve analysis was performed to determine cut-offs of CC, MAMC and 4 m WS. A total of 879 elderly subjects, 50.1% of whom were female, were recruited. The mean handgrip strength (HGS) and s.d. was 24.2 (8.8) kg [17.9 (4.8) female, 30.6 (7.1) male]. The muscle function-dependent sarcopenia was 63.4% (female 73.5%, male 53.2%). The muscle mass-dependent sarcopenia for CC (sarcopenia. An adequate muscle mass may not mean a reliable muscle function. Muscle function may describe sarcopenia better compared with muscle mass. The CC, MAMC and 4 m WS cut-offs may be used to assess sarcopenia in certain age groups.

  8. Numerical analysis of high-speed liquid lithium free-surface flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordeev, Sergej; Heinzel, Volker; Stieglitz, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The free surface behavior of a high speed lithium jet is investigated by means of a CFD LES analysis. ► The study is aiming to validate adequate LES technique. ► The Osaka University experiments with liquid lithium jet have been simulated. ► Four cases with jet flow velocities of 4, 9, 13 and 15 m/s are analyzed. ► Calculation results show a good qualitative and a quantitative agreement with the experimental data. - Abstract: The free-surface stability of the target of the International Fusion Material Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) is one of the crucial issues, since the spatio-temporal behavior of the free-surface determines the neutron flux to be generated. This article investigates the relation between the evolution of a wall boundary layer in a convergent nozzle and the free surface shape of a high speed lithium jet by means of a CFD LES analysis using the Osaka University experiments. The study is aiming to validate adequate LES technique to analyze the individual flow phenomena observed. Four cases with jet flow velocities of 4, 9, 13 and 15 m/s are analyzed. First analyses of calculation results show that the simulation exhibits a good qualitative and a quantitative agreement with the experimental data, which allows in the future a more realistic prediction of the IFMIF target behavior.

  9. Flow Rate In Microfluidic Pumps As A Function Of Tension and Pump Motor Head Speed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Anthony; McBride, Krista

    2015-03-01

    As the use of microfluidic devices has become more common in recent years the need for standardization within the pump systems has grown. The pumps are ball bearing rotor microfluidic pumps and work off the idea of peristalsis. The rapid contraction and relaxation propagating down a tube or a microfluidic channel. The ball bearings compress the tube (occlusion) and move along part of the tube length forcing fluid to move inside of the tube in the same direction of the ball bearings. When the ball bearing rolls off the area occupied by the microfluidic channel, its walls and ceiling undergo restitution and a pocket of low pressure is briefly formed pulling more of the liquid into the pump system. Before looking to standardize the pump systems it must be known how the tension placed by the pumps bearing heads onto the PDMS inserts channels affect the pumps performance (mainly the flow rate produced). The relationship of the speed at which the bearings on the motor head spin and the flow rate must also be established. This research produced calibration curves for flow rate vs. tension and rpm. These calibration curves allow the devices to be set to optimal user settings by simply varying either the motor head tension or the motor head speed. I would like to acknowledge the help and support of Vanderbilt University SyBBURE program, Christina Marasco, Stacy Sherod, Franck Block and Krista McBride.

  10. Supercavitating flow around high-speed underwater projectile near free surface induced by air entrainment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Xu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Cavitating flow near free surface is a complicated issue and may provide new inspiration on high-speed surface cruising. This study observes stable supercavitating flow as a new phenomenon in a launch experiment of axisymmetric projectile when the upper side of the projectile coincides with the free surface. A numerical approach is established using large eddy-simulation and volume-of-fluid methods, and good agreements are achieved between numerical and experimental results. Supercavity formation mechanism is revealed by analyzing the experiment photographs and the iso-surface of 90% water volume fraction in numerical results. The entrainment of a large amount of air into the cavity can cause the pressure inside the cavity to similarly increase with the pressure outside the cavity, which makes the actual cavitation number close to zero and is similar to supercavitation. Cases with various headforms of the projectile and cavitation numbers on the cavitating flow, as well as the drag reduction effects are further examined. Results indicate that the present strategy near the free surface could possibly be a new effective approach for high-speed cruising after vigorous design optimization in the future.

  11. Study on numerical methods for transient flow induced by speed-changing impeller of fluid machinery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Dazhuan; Chen, Tao; Wang, Leqin; Cheng, Wentao; Sun, Youbo

    2013-01-01

    In order to establish a reliable numerical method for solving the transient rotating flow induced by a speed-changing impeller, two numerical methods based on finite volume method (FVM) were presented and analyzed in this study. Two-dimensional numerical simulations of incompressible transient unsteady flow induced by an impeller during starting process were carried out respectively by using DM and DSR methods. The accuracy and adaptability of the two methods were evaluated by comprehensively comparing the calculation results. Moreover, an intensive study on the application of DSR method was conducted subsequently. The results showed that transient flow structure evolution and transient characteristics of the starting impeller are obviously affected by the starting process. The transient flow can be captured by both two methods, and the DSR method shows a higher computational efficiency. As an application example, the starting process of a mixed-flow pump was simulated by using DSR method. The calculation results were analyzed by comparing with the experiment data.

  12. Numerical analysis of flow induced noise propagation in supercavitating vehicles at subsonic speeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, Sai Sudha; Lim, Kian Meng; Zheng, Jianguo; Khoo, Boo Cheong

    2014-04-01

    Flow supercavitation begins when fluid is accelerated over a sharp edge, usually at the nose of an underwater vehicle, where phase change occurs and causes low density gaseous cavity to gradually envelop the whole object (supercavity) and thereby enabling higher speeds of underwater vehicles. The process of supercavity inception/development by means of "natural cavitation" and its sustainment through ventilated cavitation result in turbulence and fluctuations at the water-vapor interface that manifest themselves as major sources of hydrodynamic noise. Therefore in the present context, three main sources are investigated, namely, (1) flow generated noise due to turbulent pressure fluctuations around the supercavity, (2) small scale pressure fluctuations at the vapor-water interface, and (3) pressure fluctuations due to direct impingement of ventilated gas-jets on the supercavity wall. An understanding of their relative contributions toward self-noise is very crucial for the efficient operation of high frequency acoustic sensors that facilitate the vehicle's guidance system. Qualitative comparisons of acoustic pressure distribution resulting from aforementioned sound sources are presented by employing a recently developed boundary integral method. By using flow data from a specially developed unsteady computational fluid dynamics solver for simulating supercavitating flows, the boundary-element method based acoustic solver was developed for computing flow generated sound.

  13. A new phase coding method using a slice selection gradient for high speed flow velocity meaurements in NMR tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, C.H.; Cho, Z.H.; California Univ., Irvine

    1986-01-01

    A new phase coding method using a selection gradient for high speed NMR flow velocity measurements is introduced and discussed. To establish a phase-velocity relationship of flow under the slice selection gradient and spin-echo RF pulse, the Bloch equation was numerically solved under the assumption that only one directional flow exists, i.e. in the direction of slice selection. Details of the numerical solution of the Bloch equation and techniques related to the numerical computations are also given. Finally, using the numerical calculation, high speed flow velocity measurement was attempted and found to be in good agreement with other complementary controlled measurements. (author)

  14. Variable speed limit strategies analysis with mesoscopic traffic flow model based on complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shu-Bin; Cao, Dan-Ni; Dang, Wen-Xiu; Zhang, Lin

    As a new cross-discipline, the complexity science has penetrated into every field of economy and society. With the arrival of big data, the research of the complexity science has reached its summit again. In recent years, it offers a new perspective for traffic control by using complex networks theory. The interaction course of various kinds of information in traffic system forms a huge complex system. A new mesoscopic traffic flow model is improved with variable speed limit (VSL), and the simulation process is designed, which is based on the complex networks theory combined with the proposed model. This paper studies effect of VSL on the dynamic traffic flow, and then analyzes the optimal control strategy of VSL in different network topologies. The conclusion of this research is meaningful to put forward some reasonable transportation plan and develop effective traffic management and control measures to help the department of traffic management.

  15. Thermoconvective flow velocity in a high-speed magnetofluid seal after it has stopped

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krakov, M. S.; Nikiforov, I. V.

    2012-09-01

    Convective flow is investigated in the high-speed (linear velocity of the shaft seal is more than 1 m/s) magnetofluid shaft seal after it has been stopped. Magnetic fluid is preliminarily heated due to viscous friction in the moving seal. After the shaft has been stopped, nonuniform heated fluid remains under the action of a high-gradient magnetic field. Numerical analysis has revealed that in this situation, intense thermomagnetic convection is initiated. The velocity of magnetic fluid depends on its viscosity. For the fluid with viscosity of 2 × 10-4 m2/s the maximum flow velocity within the volume of magnetic fluid with a characteristic size of 1 mm can attain a value of 10 m/s.

  16. Energy flow analysis of amputee walking shows a proximally-directed transfer of energy in intact limbs, compared to a distally-directed transfer in prosthetic limbs at push-off.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinert-Aplin, R A; Howard, D; Twiste, M; Jarvis, H L; Bennett, A N; Baker, R J

    2017-01-01

    Reduced capacity and increased metabolic cost of walking occurs in amputees, despite advances in prosthetic componentry. Joint powers can quantify deficiencies in prosthetic gait, but do not reveal how energy is exchanged between limb segments. This study aimed to quantify these energy exchanges during amputee walking. Optical motion and forceplate data collected during walking at a self-selected speed for cohorts of 10 controls, 10 unilateral trans-tibial, 10 unilateral trans-femoral and 10 bilateral trans-femoral amputees were used to determine the energy exchanges between lower limb segments. At push-off, consistent thigh and shank segment powers were observed between amputee groups (1.12W/kg vs. 1.05W/kg for intact limbs and 0.97W/kg vs. 0.99W/kg for prosthetic limbs), and reduced prosthetic ankle power, particularly in trans-femoral amputees (3.12W/kg vs. 0.87W/kg). Proximally-directed energy exchange was observed in the intact limbs of amputees and controls, while prosthetic limbs displayed distally-directed energy exchanges at the knee and hip. This study used energy flow analysis to show a reversal in the direction in which energy is exchanged between prosthetic limb segments at push-off. This reversal was required to provide sufficient energy to propel the limb segments and is likely a direct result of the lack of push-off power at the prosthetic ankle, particularly in trans-femoral amputees, and leads to their increased metabolic cost of walking. Copyright © 2016 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Inversion of Flow Depth and Speed from Tsunami Deposits using TsuSedMod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiske, M.; Weiss, R.; Roskosch, J.; Bahlburg, H.

    2008-12-01

    The global evolution of a tsunami wave train can be expressed by the sum of local effects along a tsunami- wave beam. The near-shore evolution of tsunami is very complex as the waves interact with the sea-bottom sediments. Filtered through offshore and onshore erosion and deposition, this evolution is recorded in the coastal area by topographical changes, local erosion and tsunami deposits. Recordable sedimentary on-site features include grain-size distributions and horizontal thickness trends. Immediately after an event, indicators of flow depth and run up extent, such as water marks on buildings and vegetation, debris and plastic bags caught in trees and swash lines, can be measured in the field. A direct measurement of the overland flow velocity is usually not possible. However, regarding recent tsunami events, videos of surveillance cameras or witness accounts helped to estimate the characteristics of overland flow. For historical and paleotsunami events such information is not directly available. Jaffe & Gelfenbaum (2007) developed an inversion model (TsuSedMod) to estimate flow depth and speed based upon the grain-size distribution and the thickness of onshore tsunami sediments. This model assumes a steady distribution of sediment in the water column, for which the appication of the Rouse equation is possible. Further simplifications, especially concerning the turbulence structure, are based on the mixing- length theory by Prandtl, the standard approximation in physical sedimentology. We calculated flow depths for sediments left behind by the 2004 Sumatra-Tsunami in India and Kenya (Weiss & Bahlburg, 2006; Bahlburg & Weiss, 2007) and by the 2006 Java-Tsunami on Java (Piepenbreier et al., 2007), using the model of Jaffe and Gelfenbaum (2007). Estimated flow depth were compared with measured data to extend the validation procedure. This extension is needed to gain confidence and understanding before the next step is taken to compute the near

  18. High speed ultrasonic system to measure bubbles velocities in a horizontal two-phase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunha Filho, Jurandyr S.; Jian Su; Farias, Marcos S.; Faccini, Jose L.H.; Lamy, Carlos A.

    2009-01-01

    In this work, a non invasive technique consisting of a high speed ultrasonic multitransducer pulse-echo system was developed to characterize gas-liquid two-phase flow parameters that are important in the study of the primary refrigeration circuit of nuclear reactors. The high speed ultrasonic system consists of two transducers (10 MHz/φ 6.35 mm), a generator/multiplexer board, and software that selects and has a data acquisition system of the ultrasonic signals. The resolutions of the system and the pulse time generated from each transducer are, respectively, 10 ns and 1.06 ms. The system initially was used in the local instantaneous measurement of gas-liquid interface in a circular horizontal pipe test section made of a 5 m long stainless steel pipe of 51.2 mm inner diameter, where the elongated bubbles velocity was measured (Taylor bubbles). The results show that the high speed ultrasonic pulse-echo system provides good results for the determination of elongated bubbles velocities. (author)

  19. Analysis of Low Speed Stall Aerodynamics of a Swept Wing with Laminar Flow Glove

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Trong T.

    2014-01-01

    Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis was conducted to study the low-speed stall aerodynamics of a GIII aircraft's swept wing modified with a laminar-flow wing glove. The stall aerodynamics of the gloved wing were analyzed and compared with the unmodified wing for the flight speed of 120 knots and altitude of 2300 ft above mean sea level (MSL). The Star-CCM+ polyhedral unstructured CFD code was first validated for wing stall predictions using the wing-body geometry from the First American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) CFD High-Lift Prediction Workshop. It was found that the Star-CCM+ CFD code can produce results that are within the scattering of other CFD codes considered at the workshop. In particular, the Star-CCM+ CFD code was able to predict wing stall for the AIAA wing-body geometry to within 1 degree of angle of attack as compared to benchmark wind-tunnel test data. Current results show that the addition of the laminar-flow wing glove causes the gloved wing to stall much earlier than the unmodified wing. Furthermore, the gloved wing has a different stall characteristic than the clean wing, with no sharp lift drop-off at stall for the gloved wing.

  20. Analysis of Low-Speed Stall Aerodynamics of a Swept Wing with Laminar-Flow Glove

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Trong T.

    2014-01-01

    Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis was conducted to study the low-speed stall aerodynamics of a GIII aircraft's swept wing modified with a laminar-flow wing glove. The stall aerodynamics of the gloved wing were analyzed and compared with the unmodified wing for the flight speed of 120 knots and altitude of 2300 ft above mean sea level (MSL). The Star-CCM+ polyhedral unstructured CFD code was first validated for wing stall predictions using the wing-body geometry from the First American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) CFD High-Lift Prediction Workshop. It was found that the Star-CCM+ CFD code can produce results that are within the scattering of other CFD codes considered at the workshop. In particular, the Star-CCM+ CFD code was able to predict wing stall for the AIAA wing-body geometry to within 1 degree of angle of attack as compared to benchmark wind-tunnel test data. Current results show that the addition of the laminar-flow wing glove causes the gloved wing to stall much earlier than the unmodified wing. Furthermore, the gloved wing has a different stall characteristic than the clean wing, with no sharp lift drop-off at stall for the gloved wing.

  1. Calibration of a γ- Re θ transition model and its application in low-speed flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, YunTao; Zhang, YuLun; Meng, DeHong; Wang, GunXue; Li, Song

    2014-12-01

    The prediction of laminar-turbulent transition in boundary layer is very important for obtaining accurate aerodynamic characteristics with computational fluid dynamic (CFD) tools, because laminar-turbulent transition is directly related to complex flow phenomena in boundary layer and separated flow in space. Unfortunately, the transition effect isn't included in today's major CFD tools because of non-local calculations in transition modeling. In this paper, Menter's γ- Re θ transition model is calibrated and incorporated into a Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) code — Trisonic Platform (TRIP) developed in China Aerodynamic Research and Development Center (CARDC). Based on the experimental data of flat plate from the literature, the empirical correlations involved in the transition model are modified and calibrated numerically. Numerical simulation for low-speed flow of Trapezoidal Wing (Trap Wing) is performed and compared with the corresponding experimental data. It is indicated that the γ- Re θ transition model can accurately predict the location of separation-induced transition and natural transition in the flow region with moderate pressure gradient. The transition model effectively imporves the simulation accuracy of the boundary layer and aerodynamic characteristics.

  2. Flow establishment behind blunt bodies at hypersonic speeds in a shock tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, G.; Hruschka, R.; Gai, S. L.; Neely, A. J.

    2008-11-01

    An investigation of flow establishment behind two blunt bodies, a circular cylinder and a 45° half-angle blunted-cone was conducted. Unlike previous studies which relied solely on surface measurements, the present study combines these with unique high-speed visualisation to image the establishment of the flow structure in the base region. Test flows were generated using a free-piston shock tunnel at a nominal Mach number of 10. The freestream unit Reynolds numbers considered were 3.02x105/m and 1.17x106/m at total enthalpies of 13.35MJ/kg and 3.94MJ/kg, respectively. In general, the experiments showed that it takes longer to establish steady heat flux than pressure. The circular cylinder data showed that the near wake had a slight Reynolds number effect, where the size of the near wake was smaller for the high enthalpy flow condition. The blunted-cone data showed that the heat flux and pressures reached steady states in the near wake at similar times for both high and low enthalpy conditions.

  3. Experimental and computational investigation of the NASA low-speed centrifugal compressor flow field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathaway, Michael D.; Chriss, Randall M.; Wood, Jerry R.; Strazisar, Anthony J.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental and computational investigation of the NASA Lewis Research Center's low-speed centrifugal compressor (LSCC) flow field was conducted using laser anemometry and Dawes' three-dimensional viscous code. The experimental configuration consisted of a backswept impeller followed by a vaneless diffuser. Measurements of the three-dimensional velocity field were acquired at several measurement planes through the compressor. The measurements describe both the throughflow and secondary velocity field along each measurement plane. In several cases the measurements provide details of the flow within the blade boundary layers. Insight into the complex flow physics within centrifugal compressors is provided by the computational fluid dynamics analysis (CFD), and assessment of the CFD predictions is provided by comparison with the measurements. Five-hole probe and hot-wire surveys at the inlet and exit to the impeller as well as surface flow visualization along the impeller blade surfaces provided independent confirmation of the laser measurement technique. The results clearly document the development of the throughflow velocity wake that is characteristic of unshrouded centrifugal compressors.

  4. Optical Flow-Field Techniques Used for Measurements in High-Speed Centrifugal Compressors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoch, Gary J.

    1999-01-01

    The overall performance of a centrifugal compressor depends on the performance of the impeller and diffuser as well as on the interactions occurring between these components. Accurate measurements of the flow fields in each component are needed to develop computational models that can be used in compressor design codes. These measurements must be made simultaneously over an area that covers both components so that researchers can understand the interactions occurring between the two components. Optical measurement techniques are being used at the NASA Lewis Research Center to measure the velocity fields present in both the impeller and diffuser of a 4:1 pressure ratio centrifugal compressor operating at several conditions ranging from design flow to surge. Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) was used to measure the intrablade flows present in the impeller, and the results were compared with analyses obtained from two three-dimensional viscous codes. The development of a region of low throughflow velocity fluid within this high-speed impeller was examined and compared with a similar region first observed in a large low-speed centrifugal impeller at Lewis. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) is a relatively new technique that has been applied to measuring the diffuser flow fields. PIV can collect data rapidly in the diffuser while avoiding the light-reflection problems that are often encountered when LDV is used. The Particle Image Velocimeter employs a sheet of pulsed laser light that is introduced into the diffuser in a quasi-radial direction through an optical probe inserted near the diffuser discharge. The light sheet is positioned such that its centerline is parallel to the hub and shroud surfaces and such that it is parallel to the diffuser vane, thereby avoiding reflections from the solid surfaces. Seed particles small enough to follow the diffuser flow are introduced into the compressor at an upstream location. A high-speed charge-coupled discharge (CCD) camera is

  5. Preconditioned conjugate-gradient methods for low-speed flow calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajmani, Kumud; Ng, Wing-Fai; Liou, Meng-Sing

    1993-01-01

    An investigation is conducted into the viability of using a generalized Conjugate Gradient-like method as an iterative solver to obtain steady-state solutions of very low-speed fluid flow problems. Low-speed flow at Mach 0.1 over a backward-facing step is chosen as a representative test problem. The unsteady form of the two dimensional, compressible Navier-Stokes equations is integrated in time using discrete time-steps. The Navier-Stokes equations are cast in an implicit, upwind finite-volume, flux split formulation. The new iterative solver is used to solve a linear system of equations at each step of the time-integration. Preconditioning techniques are used with the new solver to enhance the stability and convergence rate of the solver and are found to be critical to the overall success of the solver. A study of various preconditioners reveals that a preconditioner based on the Lower-Upper Successive Symmetric Over-Relaxation iterative scheme is more efficient than a preconditioner based on Incomplete L-U factorizations of the iteration matrix. The performance of the new preconditioned solver is compared with a conventional Line Gauss-Seidel Relaxation (LGSR) solver. Overall speed-up factors of 28 (in terms of global time-steps required to converge to a steady-state solution) and 20 (in terms of total CPU time on one processor of a CRAY-YMP) are found in favor of the new preconditioned solver, when compared with the LGSR solver.

  6. Concurrent Flame Growth, Spread and Extinction over Composite Fabric Samples in Low Speed Purely Forced Flow in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaoyang; T'ien, James S.; Ferkul, Paul V.; Olson, Sandra L.

    2015-01-01

    As a part of the NASA BASS and BASS-II experimental projects aboard the International Space Station, flame growth, spread and extinction over a composite cotton-fiberglass fabric blend (referred to as the SIBAL fabric) were studied in low-speed concurrent forced flows. The tests were conducted in a small flow duct within the Microgravity Science Glovebox. The fuel samples measured 1.2 and 2.2 cm wide and 10 cm long. Ambient oxygen was varied from 21% down to 16% and flow speed from 40 cm/s down to 1 cm/s. A small flame resulted at low flow, enabling us to observe the entire history of flame development including ignition, flame growth, steady spread (in some cases) and decay at the end of the sample. In addition, by decreasing flow velocity during some of the tests, low-speed flame quenching extinction limits were found as a function of oxygen percentage. The quenching speeds were found to be between 1 and 5 cm/s with higher speed in lower oxygen atmosphere. The shape of the quenching boundary supports the prediction by earlier theoretical models. These long duration microgravity experiments provide a rare opportunity for solid fuel combustion since microgravity time in ground-based facilities is generally not sufficient. This is the first time that a low-speed quenching boundary in concurrent spread is determined in a clean and unambiguous manner.

  7. Electric field measurements in a kHz-driven He jet - The influence of the gas flow speed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sobota, A.; Guaitella, O.; Sretenović, G.B.; Krstić, I.B.; Kovačević, V.V.; Obrusník, A.; Nguyen, Y.N.; Zajíčková, L.; Obradović, B.M.; Kuraica, M.M.

    2016-01-01

    This report focuses on the dependence of electric field strength in the effluent of a vertically downwards-operated plasma jet freely expanding into room air as a function of the gas flow speed. A 30 kHz AC-driven He jet was used in a coaxial geometry, with an amplitude of 2 kV and gas flow between

  8. Effects of Injection Timing on Fluid Flow Characteristics of Partially Premixed Combustion Based on High-Speed Particle Image Velocimetry

    KAUST Repository

    Izadi Najafabadi, Mohammad; Tanov, Slavey; Wang, Hua; Somers, Bart; Johansson, Bengt; Dam, Nico

    2017-01-01

    behavior. The scope of the present study is to investigate the fluid flow characteristics of PPC at different injection timings. To this end, high-speed Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) is implemented in a light-duty optical engine to measure fluid flow

  9. Burst Speed of Wild Fishes under High-Velocity Flow Conditions Using Stamina Tunnel with Natural Guidance System in River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Mattashi; Yamamoto, Yasuyuki; Yataya, Kenichi; Kamiyama, Kohhei

    Swimming experiments were conducted on wild fishes in a natural guidance system stamina tunnel (cylindrical pipe) installed in a fishway of a local river under high-velocity flow conditions (tunnel flow velocity : 211 to 279 cm·s-1). In this study, the swimming characteristics of fishes were observed. The results show that (1) the swimming speeds of Tribolodon hakonensis (Japanese dace), Phoxinus lagowshi steindachneri (Japanese fat-minnow), Plecoglossus altivelis (Ayu), and Zacco platypus (Pale chub) were in proportion to their body length under identical water flow velocity conditions; (2) the maximum burst speed of Japanese dace and Japanese fat-minnow (measuring 4 to 6 cm in length) was 262 to 319 cm·s-1 under high flow velocity conditions (225 to 230 cm·s-1), while the maximum burst speed of Ayu and Pale chub (measuring 5 cm to 12 cm in length) was 308 to 355 cm·s-1 under high flow velocity conditions (264 to 273 cm·s-1) ; (3) the 50cm-maximum swimming speed of swimming fishes was 1.07 times faster than the pipe-swimming speed; (4) the faster the flow velocity, the shorter the swimming distance became.

  10. Development of a Dual-PIV system for high-speed flow applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreyer, Anne-Marie; Lasserre, Jean J.; Dupont, Pierre

    2015-10-01

    A new Dual-particle image velocimetry (Dual-PIV) system for application in supersonic flows was developed. The system was designed for shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interactions with separation. This type of flow places demanding requirements on the system, from the large range of characteristic frequencies O(100 Hz-100 kHz) to spatial and temporal resolutions necessary for the measurement of turbulent quantities (Dolling in AIAA J 39(8):1517-1531, 2001; Dupont et al. in J Fluid Mech 559:255-277, 2006; Smits and Dussauge in Turbulent shear layers in supersonic flow, 2nd edn. Springer, New York, 2006). While classic PIV systems using high-resolution CCD sensors allow high spatial resolution, these systems cannot provide the required temporal resolution. Existing high-speed PIV systems provide temporal and CMOS sensor resolutions, and even laser pulse energies, that are not adapted to our needs. The only obvious solution allowing sufficiently high spatial resolution, access to high frequencies, and a high laser pulse energy is a multi-frame system: a Dual-PIV system, consisting of two synchronized PIV systems observing the same field of view, will give access to temporal characteristics of the flow. The key technology of our system is frequency-based image separation: two lasers of different wavelengths illuminate the field of view. The cross-pollution with laser light from the respective other branches was quantified during system validation. The overall system noise was quantified, and the prevailing error of only 2 % reflects the good spatial and temporal alignment. The quality of the measurement system is demonstrated with some results on a subsonic jet flow including the spatio-temporal inter-correlation functions between the systems. First measurements in a turbulent flat-plate boundary layer at Mach 2 show the same satisfactory data quality and are also presented and discussed.

  11. ULTRA-SHARP nonoscillatory convection schemes for high-speed steady multidimensional flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, B. P.; Mokhtari, Simin

    1990-01-01

    For convection-dominated flows, classical second-order methods are notoriously oscillatory and often unstable. For this reason, many computational fluid dynamicists have adopted various forms of (inherently stable) first-order upwinding over the past few decades. Although it is now well known that first-order convection schemes suffer from serious inaccuracies attributable to artificial viscosity or numerical diffusion under high convection conditions, these methods continue to enjoy widespread popularity for numerical heat transfer calculations, apparently due to a perceived lack of viable high accuracy alternatives. But alternatives are available. For example, nonoscillatory methods used in gasdynamics, including currently popular TVD schemes, can be easily adapted to multidimensional incompressible flow and convective transport. This, in itself, would be a major advance for numerical convective heat transfer, for example. But, as is shown, second-order TVD schemes form only a small, overly restrictive, subclass of a much more universal, and extremely simple, nonoscillatory flux-limiting strategy which can be applied to convection schemes of arbitrarily high order accuracy, while requiring only a simple tridiagonal ADI line-solver, as used in the majority of general purpose iterative codes for incompressible flow and numerical heat transfer. The new universal limiter and associated solution procedures form the so-called ULTRA-SHARP alternative for high resolution nonoscillatory multidimensional steady state high speed convective modelling.

  12. Development and application of a particle image velocimeter for high-speed flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molezzi, M. J.; Dutton, J. C.

    1992-01-01

    A particle image velocimetry (PIV) system has been developed for use in high-speed separated air flows. The image acquisition system uses two 550 mJ/pulse Nd:YAG lasers and is fully controlled by a host Macintosh computer. The interrogation system is also Macintosh-based and performs interrogations at approximately 2.3 sec/spot and 4.0 sec/spot when using the Young's fringe and autocorrelation methods, respectively. The system has been proven in preliminary experiments using known-displacement simulated PIV photographs and a simple axisymmetric jet flow. Further results have been obtained in a transonic wind tunnel operating at Mach 0.4 to 0.5 (135 m/s to 170 m/s). PIV experiments were done with an empty test section to provide uniform flow data for comparison with pressure and LDV data, then with a two-dimensional base model, revealing features of the von Karman vortex street wake and underlying small scale turbulence.

  13. IN VITRO FLOW ANALYSIS OF NOVEL DOUBLE-CUTTING, OPEN-PORT, ULTRAHIGH-SPEED VITRECTOMY SYSTEMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehetner, Claus; Moelgg, Marion; Bechrakis, Emmanouil; Linhart, Caroline; Bechrakis, Nikolaos E

    2017-10-09

    To analyze the performance and flow characteristics of novel double-cutting, open-port, 23-, 25-, and 27-gauge ultrahigh-speed vitrectomy systems. In vitro fluidic measurements were performed to assess the volumetric aspiration profiles of several vitrectomy systems in basic salt solution and egg white. Double-cutting open-port vitrectomy probes delivered stable aspiration flow rates that were less prone to flow variation affected by the cutting speed. Increase in cutting frequency to the maximum level resulted in flow reduction of less than 10% (0.0%-9.5%). Commercially available 23-, 25-, and 27-G double-cutting probes exhibited higher egg-white and basic salt solution flow rates at all evaluated cut rates, with aspirational efficiencies being 1.1 to 2.9 times the flow rates of standard single-blade vitrectomy probes of the same caliber at the maximum preset vacuum. The highest relative differences were observed at faster cut rates. The newly introduced double-cutting open-port vitrectomy probes delivered stable aspiration flow rates that were less prone to flow variation affected by the cutting speed. The fluidic principle of constant flow even at the highest cut rates and low vacuum levels might impact surgical strategies, especially when performing manipulations close to the retina.

  14. RICE: a computer program for multicomponent chemically reactive flows at all speeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivard, W.C.; Farmer, O.A.; Butler, T.D.

    1974-11-01

    The fluid dynamics of chemically reactive mixtures are calculated at arbitrary flow speeds with the RICE program. The dynamics are governed by the two-dimensional, time-dependent Navier-Stokes equations together with the species transport equations and the mass-action rate equations for the chemical reactions. The mass and momentum equations for the mixture are solved implicitly by the ICE technique. The equations for total energy and species transport are solved explicitly while the chemical rate equations are solved implicitly with a time step that may be a submultiple of the hydrodynamic time step. Application is made to continuous wave HF chemical lasers to compute the supersonic mixing and chemical reactions that take place in the lasing cavity. (U.S.)

  15. Progress on a Taylor weak statement finite element algorithm for high-speed aerodynamic flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, A. J.; Freels, J. D.

    1989-01-01

    A new finite element numerical Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) algorithm has matured to the point of efficiently solving two-dimensional high speed real-gas compressible flow problems in generalized coordinates on modern vector computer systems. The algorithm employs a Taylor Weak Statement classical Galerkin formulation, a variably implicit Newton iteration, and a tensor matrix product factorization of the linear algebra Jacobian under a generalized coordinate transformation. Allowing for a general two-dimensional conservation law system, the algorithm has been exercised on the Euler and laminar forms of the Navier-Stokes equations. Real-gas fluid properties are admitted, and numerical results verify solution accuracy, efficiency, and stability over a range of test problem parameters.

  16. Calculation of large Reynolds number two-dimensional flow using discrete vortices with random walk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milinazzo, F.; Saffman, P.G.

    1977-01-01

    The numerical calculation of two-dimensional rotational flow at large Reynolds number is considered. The method of replacing a continuous distribution of vorticity by a finite number, N, of discrete vortices is examined, where the vortices move under their mutually induced velocities plus a random component to simulate effects of viscosity. The accuracy of the method is studied by comparison with the exact solution for the decay of a circular vortex. It is found, and analytical arguments are produced in support, that the quantitative error is significant unless N is large compared with a characteristic Reynolds number. The mutually induced velocities are calculated by both direct summation and by the ''cloud in cell'' technique. The latter method is found to produce comparable error and to be much faster

  17. Tribological properties of high-speed steel treated by compression plasma flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherenda, K.K.; Uglov, V.V.; Anishchik, V.M.; Stalmashonak, A.K.; Astashinski, V.M.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The investigation of tribological properties of two high-speed steels AISI M2 and AISI Tl treated by the nitrogen compression plasma flow was the main aim of this work. Two types of samples were investigated before and after quenching. The plasma flow was received in a magneto-plasma compressor. The impulse duration was ∼100 μs, the number of impulses varied in the range of 1-5, the nitrogen pressure in the chamber was 400-4000 Pa, the energy absorbed by the sample was 2-10 J/cm 2 per impulse. Tribological properties were examined by means of a tribometer TAYl under conditions of dry friction. The Vickers's microhardness was measured by a hard meter PMT3. X-ray diffraction analysis, Auger electron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersion microanalysis were used for samples characterization. The earlier conducted investigations showed that the compression plasma flow suited well for the improvement of tribological properties of iron and low-alloyed steels due to the formation of hardening nitrides in the near surface layer. It was found that in the case of high-speed steels only not quenched samples had increased hardness after treatment. The latter can be explained by the formation of hardening nitrides though the phase analysis did not clearly reveal their presence. The element composition confirmed the presence of nitrogen in the surface layer with the concentration up to 30 at. %. The treatment of quenched samples almost always resulted in the hardness decrease due to the dissolution or partial dissolution of alloying elements carbides: M 6 C, MC, M 23 C 6 . The rate of carbides dissolution increased with the growth of the energy absorbed by the sample. The treated samples showed a lower value of the friction coefficient than the untreated one. It could be explained by the formation of nitrogenous austenite which was found out by the phase analysis. At the same time the compression plasma flow strongly influenced surface

  18. Development of Modal Analysis for the Study of Global Modes in High Speed Boundary Layer Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Joseph Michael

    Boundary layer transition for compressible flows remains a challenging and unsolved problem. In the context of high-speed compressible flow, transitional and turbulent boundary-layers produce significantly higher surface heating caused by an increase in skin-friction. The higher heating associated with transitional and turbulent boundary layers drives thermal protection systems (TPS) and mission trajectory bounds. Proper understanding of the mechanisms that drive transition is crucial to the successful design and operation of the next generation spacecraft. Currently, prediction of boundary-layer transition is based on experimental efforts and computational stability analysis. Computational analysis, anchored by experimental correlations, offers an avenue to assess/predict stability at a reduced cost. Classical methods of Linearized Stability Theory (LST) and Parabolized Stability Equations (PSE) have proven to be very useful for simple geometries/base flows. Under certain conditions the assumptions that are inherent to classical methods become invalid and the use of LST/PSE is inaccurate. In these situations, a global approach must be considered. A TriGlobal stability analysis code, Global Mode Analysis in US3D (GMAUS3D), has been developed and implemented into the unstructured solver US3D. A discussion of the methodology and implementation will be presented. Two flow configurations are presented in an effort to validate/verify the approach. First, stability analysis for a subsonic cylinder wake is performed and results compared to literature. Second, a supersonic blunt cone is considered to directly compare LST/PSE analysis and results generated by GMAUS3D.

  19. Model Reduction of Computational Aerothermodynamics for Multi-Discipline Analysis in High Speed Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowell, Andrew Rippetoe

    This dissertation describes model reduction techniques for the computation of aerodynamic heat flux and pressure loads for multi-disciplinary analysis of hypersonic vehicles. NASA and the Department of Defense have expressed renewed interest in the development of responsive, reusable hypersonic cruise vehicles capable of sustained high-speed flight and access to space. However, an extensive set of technical challenges have obstructed the development of such vehicles. These technical challenges are partially due to both the inability to accurately test scaled vehicles in wind tunnels and to the time intensive nature of high-fidelity computational modeling, particularly for the fluid using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). The aim of this dissertation is to develop efficient and accurate models for the aerodynamic heat flux and pressure loads to replace the need for computationally expensive, high-fidelity CFD during coupled analysis. Furthermore, aerodynamic heating and pressure loads are systematically evaluated for a number of different operating conditions, including: simple two-dimensional flow over flat surfaces up to three-dimensional flows over deformed surfaces with shock-shock interaction and shock-boundary layer interaction. An additional focus of this dissertation is on the implementation and computation of results using the developed aerodynamic heating and pressure models in complex fluid-thermal-structural simulations. Model reduction is achieved using a two-pronged approach. One prong focuses on developing analytical corrections to isothermal, steady-state CFD flow solutions in order to capture flow effects associated with transient spatially-varying surface temperatures and surface pressures (e.g., surface deformation, surface vibration, shock impingements, etc.). The second prong is focused on minimizing the computational expense of computing the steady-state CFD solutions by developing an efficient surrogate CFD model. The developed two

  20. Large-eddy simulation/Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes hybrid schemes for high speed flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xudong

    Three LES/RANS hybrid schemes have been proposed for the prediction of high speed separated flows. Each method couples the k-zeta (Enstrophy) BANS model with an LES subgrid scale one-equation model by using a blending function that is coordinate system independent. Two of these functions are based on turbulence dissipation length scale and grid size, while the third one has no explicit dependence on the grid. To implement the LES/RANS hybrid schemes, a new rescaling-reintroducing method is used to generate time-dependent turbulent inflow conditions. The hybrid schemes have been tested on a Mach 2.88 flow over 25 degree compression-expansion ramp and a Mach 2.79 flow over 20 degree compression ramp. A special computation procedure has been designed to prevent the separation zone from expanding upstream to the recycle-plane. The code is parallelized using Message Passing Interface (MPI) and is optimized for running on IBM-SP3 parallel machine. The scheme was validated first for a flat plate. It was shown that the blending function has to be monotonic to prevent the RANS region from appearing in the LES region. In the 25 deg ramp case, the hybrid schemes provided better agreement with experiment in the recovery region. Grid refinement studies demonstrated the importance of using a grid independent blend function and further improvement with experiment in the recovery region. In the 20 deg ramp case, with a relatively finer grid, the hybrid scheme characterized by grid independent blending function well predicted the flow field in both the separation region and the recovery region. Therefore, with "appropriately" fine grid, current hybrid schemes are promising for the simulation of shock wave/boundary layer interaction problems.

  1. A Real-Time Method to Estimate Speed of Object Based on Object Detection and Optical Flow Calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kaizhan; Ye, Yunming; Li, Xutao; Li, Yan

    2018-04-01

    In recent years Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) has been widely used in computer vision field and makes great progress in lots of contents like object detection and classification. Even so, combining Convolutional Neural Network, which means making multiple CNN frameworks working synchronously and sharing their output information, could figure out useful message that each of them cannot provide singly. Here we introduce a method to real-time estimate speed of object by combining two CNN: YOLOv2 and FlowNet. In every frame, YOLOv2 provides object size; object location and object type while FlowNet providing the optical flow of whole image. On one hand, object size and object location help to select out the object part of optical flow image thus calculating out the average optical flow of every object. On the other hand, object type and object size help to figure out the relationship between optical flow and true speed by means of optics theory and priori knowledge. Therefore, with these two key information, speed of object can be estimated. This method manages to estimate multiple objects at real-time speed by only using a normal camera even in moving status, whose error is acceptable in most application fields like manless driving or robot vision.

  2. Numerical study on the impact of ground heating and ambient wind speed on flow fields in street canyons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei; Yang, Lin; Zhang, Li-Jie; Jiang, Yin

    2012-11-01

    The impact of ground heating on flow fields in street canyons under different ambient wind speed conditions was studied based on numerical methods. A series of numerical tests were performed, and three factors including height-to-width (H/W) ratio, ambient wind speed and ground heating intensity were taken into account. Three types of street canyon with H/W ratios of 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0, respectively, were used in the simulation and seven speed values ranging from 0.0 to 3.0 m s-1 were set for the ambient wind speed. The ground heating intensity, which was defined as the difference between the ground temperature and air temperature, ranged from 10 to 40 K with an increase of 10 K in the tests. The results showed that under calm conditions, ground heating could induce circulation with a wind speed of around 1.0 m s-1, which is enough to disperse pollutants in a street canyon. It was also found that an ambient wind speed threshold may exist for street canyons with a fixed H/W ratio. When ambient wind speed was lower than the threshold identified in this study, the impact of the thermal effect on the flow field was obvious, and there existed a multi-vortex flow pattern in the street canyon. When the ambient wind speed was higher than the threshold, the circulation pattern was basically determined by dynamic effects. The tests on the impact of heating intensity showed that a higher ground heating intensity could strengthen the vortical flow within the street canyon, which would help improve pollutant diffusion capability in street canyons.

  3. Cluster Risk of Walking Scenarios Based on Macroscopic Flow Model and Crowding Force Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohong Li

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, accidents always happen in confined space such as metro stations because of congestion. Various researchers investigated the patterns of dense crowd behaviors in different scenarios via simulations or experiments and proposed methods for avoiding accidents. In this study, a classic continuum macroscopic model was applied to simulate the crowded pedestrian flow in typical scenarios such as at bottlenecks or with an obstacle. The Lax–Wendroff finite difference scheme and artificial viscosity filtering method were used to discretize the model to identify high-density risk areas. Furthermore, we introduced a contact crowding force test of the interactions among pedestrians at bottlenecks. Results revealed that in the most dangerous area, the individual on the corner position bears the maximum pressure in such scenarios is 90.2 N, and there is an approximate exponential relationship between crowding force and density indicated by our data. The results and findings presented in this paper can facilitate more reasonable and precise simulation models by utilizing crowding force and crowd density and ensure the safety of pedestrians in high-density scenarios.

  4. Effects of Bell Speed and Flow Rate on Evaporation of Water Spray from a Rotary Bell Atomizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajan Ray

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A phase doppler anemometer (PDA was used to determine the effects of evaporation on water spray for three rotary bell atomizer operational variable parameters: shaping air, bell speed and liquid flow. Shaping air was set at either 200 standard liters per minute (L/min or 300 L/min, bell speed was set to 30, 40 or 50 thousand rotations per minute (krpm and water flow rate was varied between 100, 200 or 300 cubic centimeters per minute (cm3/min. The total evaporation between 22.5 and 37.5 cm from the atomizer (cm3/s was calculated for all the combinations of those variables. Evaporation rate increased with higher flow rate and bell speed but no statistically significant effects were obtained for variable shaping air on interactions between parameters.

  5. Effect of Sweep on Cavity Flow Fields at Subsonic and Transonic Speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracy, Maureen B.; Plentovich, Elizabeth B.; Hemsch, Michael J.; Wilcox, Floyd J.

    2012-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted in the NASA Langley 7 x 10-Foot High Speed Tunnel (HST) to study the effect of leading- and trailing-edge sweep on cavity flow fields for a range of cavity length-to-height (l/h) ratios. The free-stream Mach number was varied from 0.2 to 0.8. The cavity had a depth of 0.5 inches, a width of 2.5 inches, and a maximum length of 12.0 inches. The leading- and trailing-edge sweep was adjusted using block inserts to achieve leading edge sweep angles of 65 deg, 55 deg, 45 deg, 35 deg, and 0 deg. The fore and aft cavity walls were always parallel. The aft wall of the cavity was remotely positioned to achieve a range of length-to-depth ratios. Fluctuating- and static-pressure data were obtained on the floor of the cavity. The fluctuating pressure data were used to determine whether or not resonance occurred in the cavity rather than to provide a characterization of the fluctuating pressure field. Qualitative surface flow visualization was obtained using a technique in which colored water was introduced into the model through static-pressure orifices. A complete tabulation of the mean static-pressure data for the swept leading edge cavities is included.

  6. Two-dimensional computational modeling of high-speed transient flow in gun tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohsen, A. M.; Yusoff, M. Z.; Hasini, H.; Al-Falahi, A.

    2018-03-01

    In this work, an axisymmetric numerical model was developed to investigate the transient flow inside a 7-meter-long free piston gun tunnel. The numerical solution of the gun tunnel was carried out using the commercial solver Fluent. The governing equations of mass, momentum, and energy were discretized using the finite volume method. The dynamic zone of the piston was modeled as a rigid body, and its motion was coupled with the hydrodynamic forces from the flow solution based on the six-degree-of-freedom solver. A comparison of the numerical data with the theoretical calculations and experimental measurements of a ground-based gun tunnel facility showed good agreement. The effects of parameters such as working gases and initial pressure ratio on the test conditions in the facility were examined. The pressure ratio ranged from 10 to 50, and gas combinations of air-air, helium-air, air-nitrogen, and air-CO2 were used. The results showed that steady nozzle reservoir conditions can be maintained for a longer duration when the initial conditions across the diaphragm are adjusted. It was also found that the gas combination of helium-air yielded the highest shock wave strength and speed, but a longer test time was achieved in the test section when using the CO2 test gas.

  7. CUFID-query: accurate network querying through random walk based network flow estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Hyundoo; Qian, Xiaoning; Yoon, Byung-Jun

    2017-12-28

    Functional modules in biological networks consist of numerous biomolecules and their complicated interactions. Recent studies have shown that biomolecules in a functional module tend to have similar interaction patterns and that such modules are often conserved across biological networks of different species. As a result, such conserved functional modules can be identified through comparative analysis of biological networks. In this work, we propose a novel network querying algorithm based on the CUFID (Comparative network analysis Using the steady-state network Flow to IDentify orthologous proteins) framework combined with an efficient seed-and-extension approach. The proposed algorithm, CUFID-query, can accurately detect conserved functional modules as small subnetworks in the target network that are expected to perform similar functions to the given query functional module. The CUFID framework was recently developed for probabilistic pairwise global comparison of biological networks, and it has been applied to pairwise global network alignment, where the framework was shown to yield accurate network alignment results. In the proposed CUFID-query algorithm, we adopt the CUFID framework and extend it for local network alignment, specifically to solve network querying problems. First, in the seed selection phase, the proposed method utilizes the CUFID framework to compare the query and the target networks and to predict the probabilistic node-to-node correspondence between the networks. Next, the algorithm selects and greedily extends the seed in the target network by iteratively adding nodes that have frequent interactions with other nodes in the seed network, in a way that the conductance of the extended network is maximally reduced. Finally, CUFID-query removes irrelevant nodes from the querying results based on the personalized PageRank vector for the induced network that includes the fully extended network and its neighboring nodes. Through extensive

  8. Ultra-high-speed digital in-line holography system applied to particle-laden supersonic underexpanded jet flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingvorsen, Kristian Mark; Buchmann, Nicolas A.; Soria, Julio

    2012-01-01

    -fluid interactions in these high-speed flows special high performance techniques are required. The present work is an investigation into the applicability of magnified digital in-line holography with ultra-high-speed recording for the study of three-dimensional supersonic particle-laden flows. An optical setup...... × 10mm calibration grid and 120 μm particles on a glass plate. In the case with the calibration grid it is found that accurate determination of the depthwise position is possible. However, when applying the same technique to the particle target, significant problems are encountered. © 2012...

  9. Matching optical flow to motor speed in virtual reality while running on a treadmill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafortuna, Claudio L.; Mugellini, Elena; Abou Khaled, Omar

    2018-01-01

    We investigated how visual and kinaesthetic/efferent information is integrated for speed perception in running. Twelve moderately trained to trained subjects ran on a treadmill at three different speeds (8, 10, 12 km/h) in front of a moving virtual scene. They were asked to match the visual speed of the scene to their running speed–i.e., treadmill’s speed. For each trial, participants indicated whether the scene was moving slower or faster than they were running. Visual speed was adjusted according to their response using a staircase until the Point of Subjective Equality (PSE) was reached, i.e., until visual and running speed were perceived as equivalent. For all three running speeds, participants systematically underestimated the visual speed relative to their actual running speed. Indeed, the speed of the visual scene had to exceed the actual running speed in order to be perceived as equivalent to the treadmill speed. The underestimation of visual speed was speed-dependent, and percentage of underestimation relative to running speed ranged from 15% at 8km/h to 31% at 12km/h. We suggest that this fact should be taken into consideration to improve the design of attractive treadmill-mediated virtual environments enhancing engagement into physical activity for healthier lifestyles and disease prevention and care. PMID:29641564

  10. Irrigant flow in the root canal: experimental validation of an unsteady Computational Fluid Dynamics model using high-speed imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutsioukis, C; Verhaagen, B; Versluis, M; Kastrinakis, E; van der Sluis, L W M

    2010-05-01

    To compare the results of a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation of the irrigant flow within a prepared root canal, during final irrigation with a syringe and a needle, with experimental high-speed visualizations and theoretical calculations of an identical geometry and to evaluate the effect of off-centre positioning of the needle inside the root canal. A CFD model was created to simulate irrigant flow from a side-vented needle inside a prepared root canal. Calculations were carried out for four different positions of the needle inside a prepared root canal. An identical root canal model was made from poly-dimethyl-siloxane (PDMS). High-speed imaging of the flow seeded with particles and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) were combined to obtain the velocity field inside the root canal experimentally. Computational, theoretical and experimental results were compared to assess the validity of the computational model. Comparison between CFD computations and experiments revealed good agreement in the velocity magnitude and vortex location and size. Small lateral displacements of the needle inside the canal had a limited effect on the flow field. High-speed imaging experiments together with PIV of the flow inside a simulated root canal showed a good agreement with the CFD model, even though the flow was unsteady. Therefore, the CFD model is able to predict reliably the flow in similar domains.

  11. A prediction of 3-D viscous flow and performance of the NASA Low-Speed Centrifugal Compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, John; Moore, Joan G.

    1990-01-01

    A prediction of the three-dimensional turbulent flow in the NASA Low-Speed Centrifugal Compressor Impeller has been made. The calculation was made for the compressor design conditions with the specified uniform tip clearance gap. The predicted performance is significantly worse than that predicted in the NASA design study. This is explained by the high tip leakage flow in the present calculation and by the different model adopted for tip leakage flow mixing. The calculation gives an accumulation of high losses in the shroud/pressure-side quadrant near the exit of the impeller. It also predicts a region of meridional backflow near the shroud wall. Both of these flow features should be extensive enough in the NASA impeller to allow detailed flow measurements, leading to improved flow modeling. Recommendations are made for future flow studies in the NASA impeller.

  12. Nine Walks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    Based on studies of, among others, the Situationists and their theories regarding walks as an artistic method and expression nine master students from “Studio Constructing an Archive”, Aarhus School of Architecture, Denmark performed nine walks as part of the exhibition. These walks relate...... to the students’ individual mappings of Behind the Green Door, its structure and content. They highlight a number of motifs found in the exhibition which are of particular interest to the students. The walks represented reflections on the walk as an artistic method and expression. Each walk is an individual...

  13. InfAcrOnt: calculating cross-ontology term similarities using information flow by a random walk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Liang; Jiang, Yue; Ju, Hong; Sun, Jie; Peng, Jiajie; Zhou, Meng; Hu, Yang

    2018-01-19

    Since the establishment of the first biomedical ontology Gene Ontology (GO), the number of biomedical ontology has increased dramatically. Nowadays over 300 ontologies have been built including extensively used Disease Ontology (DO) and Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO). Because of the advantage of identifying novel relationships between terms, calculating similarity between ontology terms is one of the major tasks in this research area. Though similarities between terms within each ontology have been studied with in silico methods, term similarities across different ontologies were not investigated as deeply. The latest method took advantage of gene functional interaction network (GFIN) to explore such inter-ontology similarities of terms. However, it only used gene interactions and failed to make full use of the connectivity among gene nodes of the network. In addition, all existent methods are particularly designed for GO and their performances on the extended ontology community remain unknown. We proposed a method InfAcrOnt to infer similarities between terms across ontologies utilizing the entire GFIN. InfAcrOnt builds a term-gene-gene network which comprised ontology annotations and GFIN, and acquires similarities between terms across ontologies through modeling the information flow within the network by random walk. In our benchmark experiments on sub-ontologies of GO, InfAcrOnt achieves a high average area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) (0.9322 and 0.9309) and low standard deviations (1.8746e-6 and 3.0977e-6) in both human and yeast benchmark datasets exhibiting superior performance. Meanwhile, comparisons of InfAcrOnt results and prior knowledge on pair-wise DO-HPO terms and pair-wise DO-GO terms show high correlations. The experiment results show that InfAcrOnt significantly improves the performance of inferring similarities between terms across ontologies in benchmark set.

  14. Large eddy simulation and direct numerical simulation of high speed turbulent reacting flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adumitroaie, V.; Frankel, S. H.; Madnia, C. K.; Givi, P.

    The objective of this research is to make use of Large Eddy Simulation (LES) and Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) for the computational analyses of high speed reacting flows. Our efforts in the first phase of this research conducted within the past three years have been directed in several issues pertaining to intricate physics of turbulent reacting flows. In our previous 5 semi-annual reports submitted to NASA LaRC, as well as several technical papers in archival journals, the results of our investigations have been fully described. In this progress report which is different in format as compared to our previous documents, we focus only on the issue of LES. The reason for doing so is that LES is the primary issue of interest to our Technical Monitor and that our other findings were needed to support the activities conducted under this prime issue. The outcomes of our related investigations, nevertheless, are included in the appendices accompanying this report. The relevance of the materials in these appendices are, therefore, discussed only briefly within the body of the report. Here, results are presented of a priori and a posterior analyses for validity assessments of assumed Probability Density Function (PDF) methods as potential subgrid scale (SGS) closures for LES of turbulent reacting flows. Simple non-premixed reacting systems involving an isothermal reaction of the type A + B yields Products under both chemical equilibrium and non-equilibrium conditions are considered. A priori analyses are conducted of a homogeneous box flow, and a spatially developing planar mixing layer to investigate the performance of the Pearson Family of PDF's as SGS models. A posteriori analyses are conducted of the mixing layer using a hybrid one-equation Smagorinsky/PDF SGS closure. The Smagorinsky closure augmented by the solution of the subgrid turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) equation is employed to account for hydrodynamic fluctuations, and the PDF is employed for modeling the

  15. The use of relative coupling intervals in horses during walk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Emil; Pfau, Thilo

    Walking speed varies between over-ground trials and a speed-independent gait-parameter does not exist for use in horses. We introduce relative (R) lateral (L) and diagonal (D) coupling intervals (CI) and hypothesize that both are independent of walking speed. Four horses were walked over 8 Kistler...

  16. Random walk-percolation-based modeling of two-phase flow in porous media: Breakthrough time and net to gross ratio estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganjeh-Ghazvini, Mostafa; Masihi, Mohsen; Ghaedi, Mojtaba

    2014-07-01

    Fluid flow modeling in porous media has many applications in waste treatment, hydrology and petroleum engineering. In any geological model, flow behavior is controlled by multiple properties. These properties must be known in advance of common flow simulations. When uncertainties are present, deterministic modeling often produces poor results. Percolation and Random Walk (RW) methods have recently been used in flow modeling. Their stochastic basis is useful in dealing with uncertainty problems. They are also useful in finding the relationship between porous media descriptions and flow behavior. This paper employs a simple methodology based on random walk and percolation techniques. The method is applied to a well-defined model reservoir in which the breakthrough time distributions are estimated. The results of this method and the conventional simulation are then compared. The effect of the net to gross ratio on the breakthrough time distribution is studied in terms of Shannon entropy. Use of the entropy plot allows one to assign the appropriate net to gross ratio to any porous medium.

  17. Walking economy during cued versus non-cued self-selected treadmill walking in persons with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Paul M; McIsaac, Tara L; Garber, Carol Ewing

    2014-01-01

    Gait impairments related to Parkinson's disease (PD) include variable step length and decreased walking velocity, which may result in poorer walking economy. Auditory cueing is a common method used to improve gait mechanics in PD that has been shown to worsen walking economy at set treadmill walking speeds. It is unknown if auditory cueing has the same effects on walking economy at self-selected treadmill walking speeds. To determine if auditory cueing will affect walking economy at self-selected treadmill walking speeds and at speeds slightly faster and slower than self-selected. Twenty-two participants with moderate PD performed three, 6-minute bouts of treadmill walking at three speeds (self-selected and ± 0.22 m·sec-1). One session used cueing and the other without cueing. Energy expenditure was measured and walking economy was calculated (energy expenditure/power). Poorer walking economy and higher energy expenditure occurred during cued walking at a self-selected and a slightly faster walking speed, but there was no apparent difference at the slightly slower speed. These results suggest that potential gait benefits of auditory cueing may come at an energy cost and poorer walking economy for persons with PD at least at some treadmill walking speeds.

  18. The influence of current speed and vegetation density on flow structure in two macrotidal eelgrass canopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacy, Jessica R.; Wyllie-Echeverria, Sandy

    2011-01-01

    The influence of eelgrass (Zostera marina) on near-bed currents, turbulence, and drag was investigated at three sites in two eelgrass canopies of differing density and at one unvegetated site in the San Juan archipelago of Puget Sound, Washington, USA. Eelgrass blade length exceeded 1 m. Velocity profiles up to 1.5 m above the sea floor were collected over a spring-neap tidal cycle with a downward-looking pulse-coherent acoustic Doppler profiler above the canopies and two acoustic Doppler velocimeters within the canopies. The eelgrass attenuated currents by a minimum of 40%, and by more than 70% at the most densely vegetated site. Attenuation decreased with increasing current speed. The data were compared to the shear-layer model of vegetated flows and the displaced logarithmic model. Velocity profiles outside the meadows were logarithmic. Within the canopies, most profiles were consistent with the shear-layer model, with a logarithmic layer above the canopy. However, at the less-dense sites, when currents were strong, shear at the sea floor and above the canopy was significant relative to shear at the top of the canopy, and the velocity profiles more closely resembled those in a rough-wall boundary layer. Turbulence was strong at the canopy top and decreased with height. Friction velocity at the canopy top was 1.5–2 times greater than at the unvegetated, sandy site. The coefficient of drag CD on the overlying flow derived from the logarithmic velocity profile above the canopy, was 3–8 times greater than at the unvegetated site (0.01–0.023 vs. 2.9 × 10−3).

  19. Automated high-speed video analysis of the bubble dynamics in subcooled flow boiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurus, Reinhold; Ilchenko, Volodymyr; Sattelmayer, Thomas [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Lehrstuhl fuer Thermodynamik, Garching (Germany)

    2004-04-01

    Subcooled flow boiling is a commonly applied technique for achieving efficient heat transfer. In the study, an experimental investigation in the nucleate boiling regime was performed for water circulating in a closed loop at atmospheric pressure. The test-section consists of a rectangular channel with a one side heated copper strip and a very good optical access. For the optical observation of the bubble behaviour the high-speed cinematography is used. Automated image processing and analysis algorithms developed by the authors were applied for a wide range of mass flow rates and heat fluxes in order to extract characteristic length and time scales of the bubbly layer during the boiling process. Using this methodology, a huge number of bubble cycles could be analysed. The structure of the developed algorithms for the detection of the bubble diameter, the bubble lifetime, the lifetime after the detachment process and the waiting time between two bubble cycles is described. Subsequently, the results from using these automated procedures are presented. A remarkable novelty is the presentation of all results as distribution functions. This is of physical importance because the commonly applied spatial and temporal averaging leads to a loss of information and, moreover, to an unjustified deterministic view of the boiling process, which exhibits in reality a very wide spread of bubble sizes and characteristic times. The results show that the mass flux dominates the temporal bubble behaviour. An increase of the liquid mass flux reveals a strong decrease of the bubble life - and waiting time. In contrast, the variation of the heat flux has a much smaller impact. It is shown in addition that the investigation of the bubble history using automated algorithms delivers novel information with respect to the bubble lift-off probability. (Author)

  20. Automated high-speed video analysis of the bubble dynamics in subcooled flow boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurus, Reinhold; Ilchenko, Volodymyr; Sattelmayer, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    Subcooled flow boiling is a commonly applied technique for achieving efficient heat transfer. In the study, an experimental investigation in the nucleate boiling regime was performed for water circulating in a closed loop at atmospheric pressure. The test-section consists of a rectangular channel with a one side heated copper strip and a very good optical access. For the optical observation of the bubble behaviour the high-speed cinematography is used. Automated image processing and analysis algorithms developed by the authors were applied for a wide range of mass flow rates and heat fluxes in order to extract characteristic length and time scales of the bubbly layer during the boiling process. Using this methodology, a huge number of bubble cycles could be analysed. The structure of the developed algorithms for the detection of the bubble diameter, the bubble lifetime, the lifetime after the detachment process and the waiting time between two bubble cycles is described. Subsequently, the results from using these automated procedures are presented. A remarkable novelty is the presentation of all results as distribution functions. This is of physical importance because the commonly applied spatial and temporal averaging leads to a loss of information and, moreover, to an unjustified deterministic view of the boiling process, which exhibits in reality a very wide spread of bubble sizes and characteristic times. The results show that the mass flux dominates the temporal bubble behaviour. An increase of the liquid mass flux reveals a strong decrease of the bubble life- and waiting time. In contrast, the variation of the heat flux has a much smaller impact. It is shown in addition that the investigation of the bubble history using automated algorithms delivers novel information with respect to the bubble lift-off probability

  1. Using wind speed from a blade-mounted flow sensor for power and load assessment on modern wind turbines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Pedersen

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper an alternative method to evaluate power performance and loads on wind turbines using a blade-mounted flow sensor is investigated. The hypothesis is that the wind speed measured at the blades has a high correlation with the power and loads such that a power or load assessment can be performed from a few hours or days of measurements.In the present study a blade-mounted five-hole pitot tube is used as the flow sensor as an alternative to the conventional approach, where the reference wind speed is either measured at a nearby met mast or on the nacelle using lidar technology or cup anemometers. From the flow sensor measurements, an accurate estimate of the wind speed at the rotor plane can be obtained. This wind speed is disturbed by the presence of the wind turbine, and it is therefore different from the free-flow wind speed. However, the recorded wind speed has a high correlation with the actual power production as well as the flap-wise loads as it is measured close to the blade where the aerodynamic forces are acting.Conventional power curves are based on at least 180 h of 10 min mean values, but using the blade-mounted flow sensor both the observation average time and the overall assessment time can potentially be shortened. The basis for this hypothesis is that the sensor is able to provide more observations with higher accuracy, as the sensor follows the rotation of the rotor and because of the high correlation between the flow at the blades and the power production. This is the research question addressed in this paper.The method is first tested using aeroelastic simulations where the dependence of the radial position and effect of multiple blade-mounted flow sensors are also investigated. Next the method is evaluated on the basis of full-scale measurements on a pitch-regulated, variable-speed 3.6 MW wind turbine.It is concluded that the wind speed derived from the blade-mounted flow sensor is highly correlated with the

  2. Numerical research on rotating speed influence and flow state distribution of water-lubricated thrust bearing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Xiao; Deng Liping; Huang Wei

    2015-01-01

    Water-lubricated thrust bearing is one of the key parts in canned motor pump, for example, the RCP in AP1000, and it functions to balance axial loads. A calculation model which can handle all flow state lubrication performance for water-lubricated thrust bearing has been presented. The model first includes laminar and turbulent Reynolds' equation. Then to get continuous viscosity coefficients cross critical Reynolds number, a transition zone which ranges based on engineering experience is put up, through which Hermite interpolation is employed. The model is numerically solved in finite difference method with uniform grids. To accelerate the calculation process, multigrid method and line relaxation is adopted within the iteration procedure. A medium sized water-lubricated tilting pad thrust bearing is exampled to verify the calculation model. Results suggest that as rotating speed enlarges, lubrication state distribution of the thrust bearing gradually tends to turbulent lubrication from the intersection corner of pad outer diameter and pad inlet to the opposite, minimum water film thickness increases approximately linearly, maximum water film pressure has little change, meanwhile the friction power grows nearly in exponential law which could result in bad effect by yielding much more heat. (author)

  3. Comparison between Mother, ActiGraph wGT3X-BT, and a hand tally for measuring steps at various walking speeds under controlled conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riel, Henrik; Rathleff, Camilla Rams; Kalstrup, Pernille Møller

    2016-01-01

    Walking is endorsed as health enhancing and is the most common type of physical activity among older adults. Accelerometers are superior to self-reports when measuring steps, however, if they are to be used by clinicians the validity is of great importance. The aim of this study was to investigat...

  4. An Analysis of Flow in Rotating Passage of Large Radial-Inlet Centrifugal Compressor at Tip Speed of 700 Feet Per Second

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Prian, Vasily

    1951-01-01

    An analysis was made of the flow in the rotating passages of a 48-inch diameter radial-inlet centrifugal impeller at a tip speed of 700 feet per second in order to provide more knowledge on the flow...

  5. A study on the performance and internal flow characteristics of a very low specific speed centrifugal pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Young Do; Kurokawa, Junichi; Lee, Young Ho

    2005-01-01

    In the very low specific speed range (n s < 0.25, non-dimensional), the efficiency of centrifugal pump designed by a conventional method is very low in common. Therefore, positive-displacement pumps have long been used widely. Recently, since the centrifugal pumps are becoming higher in rotational speed and smaller in size, there experts to develop a new centrifugal pump with a high performance to replace the positive-displacement pumps. The purpose of this study is to investigate the internal flow characteristics of a very low specific speed centrifugal pump and to examine the effect of internal flow pattern on pump performance. The results show that the theoretical head definition of semi-open impeller should be revised by the consideration of high slip factor in the semi-open impeller, and the leakage flow through the tip clearance results in a large effect on the impeller internal flow. Strong reverse flow at the outlet of semi-open impeller reduces the absolute tangential velocity considerably, and the decreased absolute tangential velocity increases the slip factor with the reduction of theoretical head

  6. Active control of massively separated high-speed/base flows with electric arc plasma actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBlauw, Bradley G.

    The current project was undertaken to evaluate the effects of electric arc plasma actuators on high-speed separated flows. Two underlying goals motivated these experiments. The first goal was to provide a flow control technique that will result in enhanced flight performance for supersonic vehicles by altering the near-wake characteristics. The second goal was to gain a broader and more sophisticated understanding of these complex, supersonic, massively-separated, compressible, and turbulent flow fields. The attainment of the proposed objectives was facilitated through energy deposition from multiple electric-arc plasma discharges near the base corner separation point. The control authority of electric arc plasma actuators on a supersonic axisymmetric base flow was evaluated for several actuator geometries, frequencies, forcing modes, duty cycles/on-times, and currents. Initially, an electric arc plasma actuator power supply and control system were constructed to generate the arcs. Experiments were performed to evaluate the operational characteristics, electromagnetic emission, and fluidic effect of the actuators in quiescent ambient air. The maximum velocity induced by the arc when formed in a 5 mm x 1.6 mm x 2 mm deep cavity was about 40 m/s. During breakdown, the electromagnetic emission exhibited a rise and fall in intensity over a period of about 340 ns. After breakdown, the emission stabilized to a near-constant distribution. It was also observed that the plasma formed into two different modes: "high-voltage" and "low-voltage". It is believed that the plasma may be switching between an arc discharge and a glow discharge for these different modes. The two types of plasma do not appear to cause substantial differences on the induced fluidic effects of the actuator. In general, the characterization study provided a greater fundamental understanding of the operation of the actuators, as well as data for computational model comparison. Preliminary investigations

  7. Random walk on random walks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilário, M.; Hollander, den W.Th.F.; Sidoravicius, V.; Soares dos Santos, R.; Teixeira, A.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we study a random walk in a one-dimensional dynamic random environment consisting of a collection of independent particles performing simple symmetric random walks in a Poisson equilibrium with density ¿¿(0,8). At each step the random walk performs a nearest-neighbour jump, moving to

  8. A study of energy dissipation and critical speed of granular flow in a rotating cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragomir, Sergiu C.; Sinnott, Mathew D.; Semercigil, S. Eren; Turan, Özden F.

    2014-12-01

    Tuned vibration absorbers may improve the safety of flexible structures which are prone to excessive oscillation magnitudes under dynamic loads. A novel absorber design proposes sloshing of granular material in a rotating cylinder where the granular material is the energy dissipating agent. As the conventional dissipative elements require maintenance due to the nature of their function, the new design may represent a virtually maintenance free alternative. The angular speed of the cylinder containing particles has a critical centrifuging speed, after which particles remain permanently in contact with the walls and there can be no further dissipation. Until the critical speed, however, dissipation increases proportionally with the angular speed. It is then vital to know the value of the critical speed as the limit of dissipation. The focus of the present study is on determination of the critical centrifuge speed. This critical speed is also of practical importance in bulk-material handling rotary mills, such as dryers and crushers. Experiments and numerical simulations, using Discrete Element Method, are used to determine the critical centrifuging speed. In addition, predictions are given and guidelines are offered for the choice of material properties to maximize the energy dissipation. As a result of a parametric study, the coefficient of friction is found to have the greatest significance on the centrifuging speed.

  9. Supercomputer implementation of finite element algorithms for high speed compressible flows. Progress report, period ending 30 June 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thornton, E.A.; Ramakrishnan, R.

    1986-06-01

    Prediction of compressible flow phenomena using the finite element method is of recent origin and considerable interest. Two shock capturing finite element formulations for high speed compressible flows are described. A Taylor-Galerkin formulation uses a Taylor series expansion in time coupled with a Galerkin weighted residual statement. The Taylor-Galerkin algorithms use explicit artificial dissipation, and the performance of three dissipation models are compared. A Petrov-Galerkin algorithm has as its basis the concepts of streamline upwinding. Vectorization strategies are developed to implement the finite element formulations on the NASA Langley VPS-32. The vectorization scheme results in finite element programs that use vectors of length of the order of the number of nodes or elements. The use of the vectorization procedure speeds up processing rates by over two orders of magnitude. The Taylor-Galerkin and Petrov-Galerkin algorithms are evaluated for 2D inviscid flows on criteria such as solution accuracy, shock resolution, computational speed and storage requirements. The convergence rates for both algorithms are enhanced by local time-stepping schemes. Extension of the vectorization procedure for predicting 2D viscous and 3D inviscid flows are demonstrated. Conclusions are drawn regarding the applicability of the finite element procedures for realistic problems that require hundreds of thousands of nodes

  10. NASA low-speed centrifugal compressor for 3-D viscous code assessment and fundamental flow physics research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathaway, M. D.; Wood, J. R.; Wasserbauer, C. A.

    1991-01-01

    A low speed centrifugal compressor facility recently built by the NASA Lewis Research Center is described. The purpose of this facility is to obtain detailed flow field measurements for computational fluid dynamic code assessment and flow physics modeling in support of Army and NASA efforts to advance small gas turbine engine technology. The facility is heavily instrumented with pressure and temperature probes, both in the stationary and rotating frames of reference, and has provisions for flow visualization and laser velocimetry. The facility will accommodate rotational speeds to 2400 rpm and is rated at pressures to 1.25 atm. The initial compressor stage being tested is geometrically and dynamically representative of modern high-performance centrifugal compressor stages with the exception of Mach number levels. Preliminary experimental investigations of inlet and exit flow uniformly and measurement repeatability are presented. These results demonstrate the high quality of the data which may be expected from this facility. The significance of synergism between computational fluid dynamic analysis and experimentation throughout the development of the low speed centrifugal compressor facility is demonstrated.

  11. Step-wise changes in glacier flow speed coincide with calving and glacial earthquakes at Helheim Glacier, Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nettles, M.; Larsen, T. B.; Elósegui, P.

    2008-01-01

    Geodetic observations show several large, sudden increases in flow speed at Helheim Glacier, one of Greenland's largest outlet glaciers, during summer, 2007. These step-like accelerations, detected along the length of the glacier, coincide with teleseismically detected glacial earthquakes and major...... iceberg calving events. No coseismic offset in the position of the glacier surface is observed; instead, modest tsunamis associated with the glacial earthquakes implicate glacier calving in the seismogenic process. Our results link changes in glacier velocity directly to calving-front behavior...... at Greenland's largest outlet glaciers, on timescales as short as minutes to hours, and clarify the mechanism by which glacial earthquakes occur. Citation: Nettles, M., et al. (2008), Step-wise changes in glacier flow speed coincide with calving and glacial earthquakes at Helheim Glacier, Greenland....

  12. Geometrically Flexible and Efficient Flow Analysis of High Speed Vehicles Via Domain Decomposition, Part 1: Unstructured-Grid Solver for High Speed Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Jeffery A.; Baurle, Robert A.; Passe, Bradley J.; Spiegel, Seth C.; Nishikawa, Hiroaki

    2017-01-01

    The ability to solve the equations governing the hypersonic turbulent flow of a real gas on unstructured grids using a spatially-elliptic, 2nd-order accurate, cell-centered, finite-volume method has been recently implemented in the VULCAN-CFD code. This paper describes the key numerical methods and techniques that were found to be required to robustly obtain accurate solutions to hypersonic flows on non-hex-dominant unstructured grids. The methods and techniques described include: an augmented stencil, weighted linear least squares, cell-average gradient method, a robust multidimensional cell-average gradient-limiter process that is consistent with the augmented stencil of the cell-average gradient method and a cell-face gradient method that contains a cell skewness sensitive damping term derived using hyperbolic diffusion based concepts. A data-parallel matrix-based symmetric Gauss-Seidel point-implicit scheme, used to solve the governing equations, is described and shown to be more robust and efficient than a matrix-free alternative. In addition, a y+ adaptive turbulent wall boundary condition methodology is presented. This boundary condition methodology is deigned to automatically switch between a solve-to-the-wall and a wall-matching-function boundary condition based on the local y+ of the 1st cell center off the wall. The aforementioned methods and techniques are then applied to a series of hypersonic and supersonic turbulent flat plate unit tests to examine the efficiency, robustness and convergence behavior of the implicit scheme and to determine the ability of the solve-to-the-wall and y+ adaptive turbulent wall boundary conditions to reproduce the turbulent law-of-the-wall. Finally, the thermally perfect, chemically frozen, Mach 7.8 turbulent flow of air through a scramjet flow-path is computed and compared with experimental data to demonstrate the robustness, accuracy and convergence behavior of the unstructured-grid solver for a realistic 3-D geometry on

  13. Measurement of liquid film flow on nuclear rod bundle in micro-scale by using very high speed camera system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Son; Kawara, Zensaku; Yokomine, Takehiko; Kunugi, Tomoaki

    2012-11-01

    Playing important roles in the mass and heat transfer as well as the safety of boiling water reactor, the liquid film flow on nuclear fuel rods has been studied by different measurement techniques such as ultrasonic transmission, conductivity probe, etc. Obtained experimental data of this annular two-phase flow, however, are still not enough to construct the physical model for critical heat flux analysis especially at the micro-scale. Remain problems are mainly caused by complicated geometry of fuel rod bundles, high velocity and very unstable interface behavior of liquid and gas flow. To get over these difficulties, a new approach using a very high speed digital camera system has been introduced in this work. The test section simulating a 3×3 rectangular rod bundle was made of acrylic to allow a full optical observation of the camera. Image data were taken through Cassegrain optical system to maintain the spatiotemporal resolution up to 7 μm and 20 μs. The results included not only the real-time visual information of flow patterns, but also the quantitative data such as liquid film thickness, the droplets' size and speed distributions, and the tilt angle of wavy surfaces. These databases could contribute to the development of a new model for the annular two-phase flow. Partly supported by the Global Center of Excellence (G-COE) program (J-051) of MEXT, Japan.

  14. Development of Localized Arc Filament RF Plasma Actuators for High-Speed and High Reynolds Number Flow Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    high-speed flows is problematic due to their low forcing frequency (for mechanical actuators) and low forcing amplitude (for piezo actuators...very low fraction of DC power is coupled to the actuators (5-10%), with the rest of the power dissipated in massive ballast resistors acting as heat... resistors . The use of high-power resistors also significantly increases the weight and size of the plasma generator and makes scaling to a large number of

  15. Investigation of the Shear Flow Effect and Tip Clearance on a Low Speed Axial Flow Compressor Cascade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahesh Varpe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the effect of inlet shear flow on the tip leakage flow in an axial flow compressor cascade. A flow with a high shear rate is generated in the test section of an open circuit cascade wind tunnel by using a combination of screens with a prescribed solidity. It is observed that a stable shear flow of shear rate 1.33 is possible and has a gradual decay rate until 15 times the height of the shear flow generator downstream. The computational results obtained agree well with the available experimental data on the baseline configuration. The detailed numerical analysis shows that the tip clearance improves the blade loading near the tip through the promotion of favorable incidence by the tip leakage flow. The tip clearance shifts the centre of pressure on the blade surface towards the tip. It, however, has no effect on the distribution of end wall loss and deviation angle along the span up to 60% from the hub. In the presence of a shear inflow, the end wall effects are considerable. On the other hand, with a shear inflow, the effects of tip leakage flow are observed to be partly suppressed. The shear flow reduces the tip leakage losses substantially in terms of kinetic energy associated with it.

  16. Effect of Nordic Walking and Water Aerobics Training on Body Composition and the Blood Flow in Lower Extremities in Elderly Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasiński Ryszard

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Nordic walking and water aerobics are very popular forms of physical activity in the elderly population. The aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of regular health training on the venous blood flow in lower extremities and body composition in women over 50 years old. Twenty-four women of mean age 57.9 (± 3.43 years, randomly divided into three groups (Nordic walking, water aerobics, and non-training, participated in the study. The training lasted 8 weeks, with one-hour sessions twice a week. Dietary habits were not changed. Before and after training vein refilling time and the function of the venous pump of the lower extremities were measured by photoplethysmography. Body composition was determined by bioelectrical impedance. Eight weeks of Nordic walking training improved the venous blood flow in lower extremities and normalized body composition in the direction of reducing chronic venous disorder risk factors. The average values of the refilling time variable (p = 0.04, p = 0.02, respectively decreased in both the right and the left leg. After training a statistically significant increase in the venous pump function index was found only in the right leg (p = 0.04. A significant increase in fat-free mass, body cell mass and total body water was observed (p = 0.01, whereas body mass, the body mass index, and body fat decreased (p < 0.03. With regard to water aerobic training, no similar changes in the functions of the venous system or body composition were observed.

  17. Nordic Walking Practice Might Improve Plantar Pressure Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Soriano, Pedro; Llana-Belloch, Salvador; Martinez-Nova, Alfonso; Morey-Klapsing, G.; Encarnacion-Martinez, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Nordic walking (NW), characterized by the use of two walking poles, is becoming increasingly popular (Morgulec-Adamowicz, Marszalek, & Jagustyn, 2011). We studied walking pressure patterns of 20 experienced and 30 beginner Nordic walkers. Plantar pressures from nine foot zones were measured during trials performed at two walking speeds (preferred…

  18. Cadence® High-Speed PCB Layout Flow Workshop

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    Last release of Cadence High-Speed PCB Design methodology (PE142) based on Concept-HDL schematic editor, Constraint Manager, SPECCTRAQuest signal integrity analysis tool and ALLEGRO layout associated with SPECCTRA auto router tools, is now enough developed and stable to be taken into account for high-speed board designs at CERN. The implementation of this methodology, build around the new Constraint Manager program, is essential when you have to develop a board having a lot of high-speed design rules such as terminated lines, large bus structures, maximum length, timing, crosstalk etc.. that could not be under control by traditional method. On more conventional designs, formal aspect of the methodology could avoid misunderstanding between hardware and ALLEGRO layout designers, minimizing prototype iteration, development time and price. The capability to keep trace of the original digital designer intents in schematic or board layout, loading formal constraints in EDMS, could also be considered for LHC electro...

  19. Cadence® High High-Speed PCB Design Flow Workshop

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    Last release of Cadence High-Speed PCB Design methodology (PE142) based on Concept-HDL schematic editor, Constraint Manager, SPECCTRAQuest signal integrity analysis tool and ALLEGRO layout associated with SPECCTRA auto router tools, is now enough developed and stable to be taken into account for high-speed board designs at CERN. The implementation of this methodology, build around the new Constraint Manager program, is essential when you have to develop a board having a lot of high-speed design rules such as terminated lines, large bus structures, maximum length, timing, crosstalk etc.. that could not be under control by traditional method. On more conventional designs, formal aspect of the methodology could avoid misunderstanding between hardware and ALLEGRO layout designers, minimizing prototype iteration, development time and price. The capability to keep trace of the original digital designer intents in schematic or board layout, loading formal constraints in EDMS, could also be considered for LHC electro...

  20. A coupled implicit method for chemical non-equilibrium flows at all speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuen, Jian-Shun; Chen, Kuo-Huey; Choi, Yunho

    1993-01-01

    The present time-accurate coupled-solution procedure addresses the chemical nonequilibrium Navier-Stokes equations over a wide Mach-number range uses, in conjunction with the strong conservation form of the governing equations, five unknown primitive variables. The numerical tests undertaken address steady convergent-divergent nozzle flows with air dissociation/recombination, dump combustor flows with n-pentane/air chemistry, and unsteady nonreacting cavity flows.

  1. Modified Motor Vehicles Travel Speed Models on the Basis of Curb Parking Setting under Mixed Traffic Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenyu Mei

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The ongoing controversy about in what condition should we set the curb parking has few definitive answers because comprehensive research in this area has been lacking. Our goal is to present a set of heuristic urban street speed functions under mixed traffic flow by taking into account impacts of curb parking. Two impacts have been defined to classify and quantify the phenomena of motor vehicles' speed dynamics in terms of curb parking. The first impact is called Space impact, which is caused by the curb parking types. The other one is the Time impact, which results from the driver maneuvering in or out of parking space. In this paper, based on the empirical data collected from six typical urban streets in Nanjing, China, two models have been proposed to describe these phenomena for one-way traffic and two-way traffic, respectively. An intensive experiment has been conducted in order to calibrate and validate these proposed models, by taking into account the complexity of the model parameters. We also provide guidelines in terms of how to cluster and calculate those models' parameters. Results from these models demonstrated promising performance of modeling motor vehicles' speed for mixed traffic flow under the influence of curb parking.

  2. Does gene flow constrain adaptive divergence or vice versa? A test using ecomorphology and sexual isolation in Timema cristinae walking-sticks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosil, P; Crespi, B J

    2004-01-01

    Population differentiation often reflects a balance between divergent natural selection and the opportunity for homogenizing gene flow to erode the effects of selection. However, during ecological speciation, trait divergence results in reproductive isolation and becomes a cause, rather than a consequence, of reductions in gene flow. To assess both the causes and the reproductive consequences of morphological differentiation, we examined morphological divergence and sexual isolation among 17 populations of Timema cristinae walking-sticks. Individuals from populations adapted to using Adenostoma as a host plant tended to exhibit smaller overall body size, wide heads, and short legs relative to individuals using Ceonothus as a host. However, there was also significant variation in morphology among populations within host-plant species. Mean trait values for each single population could be reliably predicted based upon host-plant used and the potential for homogenizing gene flow, inferred from the size of the neighboring population using the alternate host and mitochondrial DNA estimates of gene flow. Morphology did not influence the probability of copulation in between-population mating trials. Thus, morphological divergence is facilitated by reductions in gene flow, but does not cause reductions in gene flow via the evolution of sexual isolation. Combined with rearing data indicating that size and shape have a partial genetic basis, evidence for parallel origins of the host-associated forms, and inferences from functional morphology, these results indicate that morphological divergence in T. cristinae reflects a balance between the effects of host-specific natural selection and gene flow. Our findings illustrate how data on mating preferences can help determine the causal associations between trait divergence and levels of gene flow.

  3. Deriving the pattern speed using dynamical modelling of gas flows in barred galaxies .

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pérez, I.; Freeman, K. C.; Fux, R.; Zurita, A.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we analyse the methodology to derive the bar pattern speed from dynamical simulations. The results are robust to the changes in the vertical-scale height and in the mass-to-light (M/L) ratios. There is a small range of parameters for which the kinematics can be fitted. We have also

  4. Study on flow fields in high specific speed centrifugal compressor with unpinched vaneless diffuser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamaki, Hideaki

    2013-01-01

    Performance of centrifugal compressors strongly depends on their internal flow fields. CFD has become indispensable tool for getting the information about flow fields in centrifugal compressors. CFD codes are usually validated by some representative data or compared with calculated results by other CFD codes, in order to ensure their accuracies. However, learning their accuracies for all types of centrifugal compressor's specifications requires continuous works that compare experimental data obtained in developmental processes of various types of centrifugal compressors with CFD results. A prediction of a performance and a flow field of a centrifugal compressor by CFD is relatively accurate when the impact of separation and secondary flow on that flow field is weak, i.e. near design condition. Centrifugal compressors are deemed to have a wide operating range alongside high efficiencies at design points. Hence the prediction accuracy of CFD at off design conditions, where the impacts of separation and secondary flow on the flow field are strong, is critical for the design of the centrifugal compressors. This study therefore investigated the prediction accuracy of CFD using a centrifugal compressor whose geometry was intentionally changed to have a distorted flow field over a whole operating range, i.e. from choke to surge.

  5. Study on flow fields in high specific speed centrifugal compressor with unpinched vaneless diffuser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamaki, Hideaki [IHI Corporation, Yokoham (Japan)

    2013-06-15

    Performance of centrifugal compressors strongly depends on their internal flow fields. CFD has become indispensable tool for getting the information about flow fields in centrifugal compressors. CFD codes are usually validated by some representative data or compared with calculated results by other CFD codes, in order to ensure their accuracies. However, learning their accuracies for all types of centrifugal compressor's specifications requires continuous works that compare experimental data obtained in developmental processes of various types of centrifugal compressors with CFD results. A prediction of a performance and a flow field of a centrifugal compressor by CFD is relatively accurate when the impact of separation and secondary flow on that flow field is weak, i.e. near design condition. Centrifugal compressors are deemed to have a wide operating range alongside high efficiencies at design points. Hence the prediction accuracy of CFD at off design conditions, where the impacts of separation and secondary flow on the flow field are strong, is critical for the design of the centrifugal compressors. This study therefore investigated the prediction accuracy of CFD using a centrifugal compressor whose geometry was intentionally changed to have a distorted flow field over a whole operating range, i.e. from choke to surge.

  6. The Effect of 12 Weeks Individualized Combined Exercise Rehabilitation Training on Physiological Cost Index (PCI and Walking Speed in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis at all Levels of Physical Disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Narimani

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Most research on the effects of exercise on people with MS rehabilitation exercises sclerosis (MS  have been carried out on patients with low to moderate disability, but research on patients with different severity of disability (physical disability scale of zero to 10 still has to be carefully considered. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of twelve weeks of rehabilitation exercises personalized compound exercise on physiological cost index (PCI and average speed walking in patients with MS at various levels of disability. Methods: The present research was a semi-experimental practical study. Thus among female patients admitted to the MS Association of Shahrekord city, 96 people were chosen on the basis of physical disability scores and divided into three groups. The first group consisted of less than 5/4 a total of 44 people, the second group between 5/65 and 5/6 up third of each 26 patients were then randomly assigned to an experimental group and a control group. Afterwards each group was divided randomly into an experimental group and a control group. The first group (the scale of disability less than 4.5, N= 44. The second group (the scale of disability 5 - 6.5, N=26. Also 26 patients were in the third group (the scale of disability 6.5 and above. In addition, they were divided into 6 experimental and control groups. Training programs for experimental groups were 12 weeks, three sessions per week and one hour for each session. Factors such as physiological cost index and walking speed were measured with the appropriate tools before and after training. The experimental groups of 1, 2 and 3 each did their own intervention, while the control groups received only stretching exercises. Analysis of data obtained from 96 patients studied was done using descriptive statistics and the analysis of covariance and paired comparing of the adjusted means (P<0.05. ‌‌‌ Results: A significant difference in walking

  7. Simultaneous two-phase flow measurement of spray mixing process by means of high-speed two-color PIV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Ming; Xu, Min; Hung, David L S

    2014-01-01

    In this article, a novel high-speed two-color PIV optical diagnostic technique has been developed and applied to simultaneously measure the velocity flow-fields of a multi-hole spark-ignition direct injection (SIDI) fuel injector spray and its ambient gas in a high-pressure constant volume chamber. To allow for the phase discrimination between the fuel droplets and ambient gas, a special tracer-filter system was designed. Fluorescent seeding particles with Sauter mean diameter (SMD) of 4.8 µm were used to trace the gas inside the chamber. With a single high-speed Nd:YLF laser sheet (527 nm) as the incident light source, the Mie-scattering signal marked the phase of the fuel spray, while the fluorescent signal generated from the seeding particles tracked the phase of ambient gas. A high-speed camera, with an image-doubler (mounted in front of the camera lens) that divided the camera pixels into two parts focusing on the same field of view, was used to collect the Mie-scattering signal and LIF (laser induced fluorescence) signal simultaneously with two carefully selected optical filters. To accommodate the large dynamic range of velocities in the two phases (1–2 orders of magnitude difference), two separation times (dt) were introduced. This technique was successfully applied to the liquid spray and ambient gas two-phase flow measurement. The measurement accuracy was compared with those from LDV (laser Doppler velocimetry) measurement and good agreement was obtained. Ambient gas motion surrounding the fuel spray was investigated and characterized into three zones. The momentum transfer process between the fuel spray and ambient gas in each zone was analyzed. The two-phase flow interaction under various superheated conditions was investigated. A strengthened momentum transfer from the liquid spray to the ambient was observed with increased superheat degree. (paper)

  8. Phase-measuring laser holographic interferometer for use in high speed flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanta, William J.; Spring, W. Charles, III; Gross, Kimberly Uhrich; McArthur, J. Craig

    Phase-measurement techniques have been applied to a dual-plate laser holographic interferometer (LHI). This interferometer has been used to determine the flowfield densities in a variety of two-dimensional and axisymmetric flows. In particular, LHI has been applied in three different experiments: flowfield measurements inside a two-dimensional scramjet inlet, flow over a blunt cone, and flow over an indented nose shape. Comparisons of experimentally determined densities with computational results indicate that, when phase-measurement techniques are used in conjunction with state-of-the-art image-processing instrumentation, holographic interferometry can be a diagnostic tool with high resolution, high accuracy, and rapid data retrieval.

  9. Coupling Analysis of Low-Speed Multiphase Flow and High-Frequency Electromagnetic Field in a Complex Pipeline Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaokai Huo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate estimation of water content in an oil-water mixture is a key technology in oil exploration and production. Based on the principles of the microwave transmission line (MTL, the logging probe is an important water content measuring apparatus. However, the effects of mixed fluid flow on the measurement of electromagnetic field parameters are rarely considered. This study presents the coupling model for low-speed multiphase flow and high-frequency electromagnetic field in a complex pipeline structure. We derived the S-parameter equations for the stratified oil/water flow model. The corresponding relationship between the S-parameters and water holdup is established. Evident coupling effects of the fluid flow and the electromagnetic field are confirmed by comparing the calculated S-parameters for both stratified and homogeneous flow patterns. In addition, a multiple-solution problem is analyzed for the inversion of dielectric constant from the S-parameters. The most sensitive phase angle range is determined to improve the detection of variation in the dielectric constant. Suggestions are proposed based on the influence of the oil/water layer on measurement sensitivity to optimize the geometric parameters of a device structure. The method proposed elucidates how accuracy and sensitivity can be improved in water holdup measurements under high water content conditions.

  10. Experimental and analytical studies on high-speed plane jet along concave wall simulating IFMIF Li target flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, H.; Ida, M.; Kato, Y.; Maekawa, H.; Katsuta, H.; Itoh, K.; Kukita, Y.

    1998-01-01

    As part of the conceptual design activity (CDA) of the international fusion materials irradiation facility (IFMIF), the characteristics of the high-speed liquid lithium (Li) plane jet target flow have been studied by water experiments and numerical analyses for both heating and non-heating conditions. The simulated prototypal-size water flows were stable over the entire length of ∝130 mm at the average velocity up to 17 m/s. The jet flow had a specific radial velocity profile, close to that of free-vortex flow, because of a static pressure distribution in the jet thickness due to centrifugal force. Detailed velocity measurement revealed that this flow condition is penetrating into the upstream reducer nozzle up to a distance ∼ the jet thickness. The numerical analyses using a two-dimensional Cartesian-coordinate model were successful to predict the velocity profile transient around the nozzle exit, though underestimated the development of the velocity profile and the jet thickness. (orig.)

  11. High-temperature epoxidation of soybean oil in flow : speeding up elemental reactions wanted and unwanted

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cortese, B.; Croon, de M.H.J.M.; Hessel, V.

    2012-01-01

    The soybean oil epoxidation reaction is investigated theoretically through kinetic modeling of temperature effects enabled through flow processing under superheated conditions. Different from previous studies on such processing, here a complex reaction network superimposed by multiphase transport is

  12. Stability Analysis of High-Speed Boundary-Layer Flow with Gas Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    laminar-turbulent transition on slender bodies in a hypersonic flow at small angles of attack is caused by amplification of acoustic waves trapped in...x decreases and slowly approaches the no-blow distribution. These CFD data demonstrate that the injection strongly affects the near-wall flow...conclusion. Figure 10 shows that the spatial growth rates ( )  are maximal for mode 0 corresponding to the Mack second mode – typical for hypersonic

  13. Estimation of Engine Intake Air Mass Flow using a generic Speed-Density method

    OpenAIRE

    Vojtíšek Michal; Kotek Martin

    2014-01-01

    Measurement of real driving emissions (RDE) from internal combustion engines under real-world operation using portable, onboard monitoring systems (PEMS) is becoming an increasingly important tool aiding the assessment of the effects of new fuels and technologies on environment and human health. The knowledge of exhaust flow is one of the prerequisites for successful RDE measurement with PEMS. One of the simplest approaches for estimating the exhaust flow from virtually any engine is its comp...

  14. Numerical study of the influence of flow blockage on the aerodynamic coefficients of models in low-speed wind tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, V. T.; Kalugin, V. T.; Lapygin, V. I.; Khlupnov, A. I.

    2017-11-01

    With the use of ANSYS Fluent software and ANSYS ICEM CFD calculation grid generator, the flows past a wing airfoil, an infinite cylinder, and 3D blunted bodies located in the open and closed test sections of low-speed wind tunnels were calculated. The mathematical model of the flows included the Reynolds equations and the SST model of turbulence. It was found that the ratios between the aerodynamic coefficients in the test section and in the free (unbounded) stream could be fairly well approximated with a piecewise-linear function of the blockage factor, whose value weakly depended on the angle of attack. The calculated data and data gained in the analysis of previously reported experimental studies proved to be in a good agreement. The impact of the extension of the closed test section on the airfoil lift force is analyzed.

  15. Laser Anemometer Measurements of the Three-Dimensional Rotor Flow Field in the NASA Low-Speed Centrifugal Compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathaway, Michael D.; Chriss, Randall M.; Strazisar, Anthony J.; Wood, Jerry R.

    1995-01-01

    A laser anemometer system was used to provide detailed surveys of the three-dimensional velocity field within the NASA low-speed centrifugal impeller operating with a vaneless diffuser. Both laser anemometer and aerodynamic performance data were acquired at the design flow rate and at a lower flow rate. Floor path coordinates, detailed blade geometry, and pneumatic probe survey results are presented in tabular form. The laser anemometer data are presented in the form of pitchwise distributions of axial, radial, and relative tangential velocity on blade-to-blade stream surfaces at 5-percent-of-span increments, starting at 95-percent-of-span from the hub. The laser anemometer data are also presented as contour and wire-frame plots of throughflow velocity and vector plots of secondary velocities at all measurement stations through the impeller.

  16. Development of the Seeding System Used for Laser Velocimeter Surveys of the NASA Low-Speed Centrifugal Compressor Flow Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserbauer, C. A.; Hathaway, M. D.

    1994-01-01

    Consideration is given to an atomizer-based system for distributing high-volume rates of polystyrene latex (PSL) seed material developed to support laser velocimeter investigations of the NASA Low-Speed Compressor flow field. Complete evaporation of the liquid carrier before the flow entering the compressor was of primary concern for the seeder system design. It is argued that the seed nozzle should incorporate a needle valve that can mechanically dislodge accumulated PSL seed material when the nozzle is turned off. Water is less expensive as the liquid carrier and should be used whenever adequate residence times are available to ensure complete evaporation. PSL agglomerates over time and needs to be mixed or blended before use. Arrangement of the spray nozzles needs to be adjustable to provide maximum seeding at the laser probe volume.

  17. Assertion based verification methodology for HDL designs of primary sodium pump speed and eddy current flow measurement systems of PFBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misra, M.K.; Menon, Saritha P.; Thirugnana Murthy, D.

    2013-01-01

    With the growing complexity and size of digital designs, functional verification has become a huge challenge. The validation and testing process accounts for a significant percentage of the overall development effort and cost for electronic systems. Many studies have shown that up to 70% of the design development time and resources are spent on functional verification. Functional errors manifest themselves very early in the design flow, and unless they are detected upfront, they can result in severe consequences - both financially and from a safety viewpoint. This paper covers the various types of verification methodologies and focuses on Assertion Based Verification Methodology for HDL designs, taking as case studies, the Primary Sodium Pump Speed and Eddy Current Flow Measurement Systems of PFBR. (author)

  18. Speeding up the flash calculations in two-phase compositional flow simulations - The application of sparse grids

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Yuanqing

    2015-03-01

    Flash calculations have become a performance bottleneck in the simulation of compositional flow in subsurface reservoirs. We apply a sparse grid surrogate model to substitute the flash calculation and thus try to remove the bottleneck from the reservoir simulation. So instead of doing a flash calculation in each time step of the simulation, we just generate a sparse grid approximation of all possible results of the flash calculation before the reservoir simulation. Then we evaluate the constructed surrogate model to approximate the values of the flash calculation results from this surrogate during the simulations. The execution of the true flash calculation has been shifted from the online phase during the simulation to the offline phase before the simulation. Sparse grids are known to require only few unknowns in order to obtain good approximation qualities. In conjunction with local adaptivity, sparse grids ensure that the accuracy of the surrogate is acceptable while keeping the memory usage small by only storing a minimal amount of values for the surrogate. The accuracy of the sparse grid surrogate during the reservoir simulation is compared to the accuracy of using a surrogate based on regular Cartesian grids and the original flash calculation. The surrogate model improves the speed of the flash calculations and the simulation of the whole reservoir. In an experiment, it is shown that the speed of the online flash calculations is increased by about 2000 times and as a result the speed of the reservoir simulations has been enhanced by 21 times in the best conditions.

  19. Numerical analysis of high-speed Lithium jet flow under vacuum conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordeev, Sergej; Groeschel, Friedrich; Stieglitz, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The EVEDA Li test loop (ELTL) [1] is aimed at validating the hydraulic stability of the Lithium (Li) target at a velocity up to 20 m/s at vacuum (≈10 −3 Pa). The ELTL has been designed to demonstrate the feasibility of the major components providing a neutron production liquid Li target for IFMIF. The rectangular shaped Li jet (cross-section 25 mm × 100 mm) necessitates for heat removal flow velocities of 15–20 m/s along a concave shaped back wall (curvature radius 250 mm) towards the outlet pipe, where the Li jet is subjected to vacuum before it finally enters the collecting quench tank. During the validation experiments within the ELTL acoustic waves within the target outlet pipe have been recorded, indicating potential cavitation processes in the jet impinging region, which may cause premature failures. In order to identify potential cavitation phenomena in correlation with the free jet flow in the outlet pipe a numerical study has been performed. The comparison measured and simulated acoustic emissions exhibits that experimentally deduced cavitation area coincides with the location of the jet wall impingement. The simulations further reveal that a part of the fluid after striking the wall even flows opposite to the gravity vector. This reversed flow is inherently unstable and characterized by waves at first growing and then bursting into droplets. The intense generation of small droplets increases significantly the Li free surface area and lead to a production of Li vapour, which is captured by the jet flow and reintroduced in the main flow. As the static pressure is recovered downstream due to jet impact, the vapour bubbles collapse and hence cavitation likely occurs.

  20. Numerical analysis of high-speed Lithium jet flow under vacuum conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordeev, Sergej, E-mail: sergej.gordeev@kit.edu; Groeschel, Friedrich; Stieglitz, Robert

    2016-11-01

    The EVEDA Li test loop (ELTL) [1] is aimed at validating the hydraulic stability of the Lithium (Li) target at a velocity up to 20 m/s at vacuum (≈10{sup −3} Pa). The ELTL has been designed to demonstrate the feasibility of the major components providing a neutron production liquid Li target for IFMIF. The rectangular shaped Li jet (cross-section 25 mm × 100 mm) necessitates for heat removal flow velocities of 15–20 m/s along a concave shaped back wall (curvature radius 250 mm) towards the outlet pipe, where the Li jet is subjected to vacuum before it finally enters the collecting quench tank. During the validation experiments within the ELTL acoustic waves within the target outlet pipe have been recorded, indicating potential cavitation processes in the jet impinging region, which may cause premature failures. In order to identify potential cavitation phenomena in correlation with the free jet flow in the outlet pipe a numerical study has been performed. The comparison measured and simulated acoustic emissions exhibits that experimentally deduced cavitation area coincides with the location of the jet wall impingement. The simulations further reveal that a part of the fluid after striking the wall even flows opposite to the gravity vector. This reversed flow is inherently unstable and characterized by waves at first growing and then bursting into droplets. The intense generation of small droplets increases significantly the Li free surface area and lead to a production of Li vapour, which is captured by the jet flow and reintroduced in the main flow. As the static pressure is recovered downstream due to jet impact, the vapour bubbles collapse and hence cavitation likely occurs.

  1. Quantum random walks and their convergence to Evans–Hudson ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Quantum dynamical semigroup; Evans–Hudson flow; quantum random walk. 1. Introduction. The aim of this article is to investigate convergence of random walks on von Neumann algebra to Evans–Hudson flows. Here the random walks and Evans–Hudson flows are gene- ralizations of classical Markov chains and Markov ...

  2. Advanced high speed X-ray CT scanner for measurement and visualization of multi-phase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hori, Keiichi; Fujimoto, Tetsuro; Kawanishi, Kohei; Nishikawa, Hideo

    1998-01-01

    The development of an ultra-fast X-ray computed tomography (CT) scanner has been performed. The object of interest is in a transient or unsettled state, which makes the conventional CT scanner inappropriate. A concept of electrical switching of electron beam of X-ray generation unit is adopted to reduce the scanning time instead of a mechanical motion adopted by a conventional CT scanner. The mechanical motion is a major obstacle to improve the scanning speed. A prototype system with a scanning time of 3.6 milliseconds was developed at first. And, the feasibility was confirmed to measure the dynamic events of two-phase flow. However, faster scanning speed is generally required for the practical use in the thermalhydraulics research field. Therefore, the development of advanced type has been performed. This advanced type can operate under the scanning time of 0.5 milliseconds and is applicable for the measurement of the multi-phase flow with velocity up to 4-5 m/s. (author)

  3. Application of X-ray micro-computed tomography on high-speed cavitating diesel fuel flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitroglou, N.; Lorenzi, M.; Gavaises, M. [City University London, School of Mathematics Computer Science and Engineering, London (United Kingdom); Santini, M. [University of Bergamo, Department of Engineering, Bergamo (Italy)

    2016-11-15

    The flow inside a purpose built enlarged single-orifice nozzle replica is quantified using time-averaged X-ray micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and high-speed shadowgraphy. Results have been obtained at Reynolds and cavitation numbers similar to those of real-size injectors. Good agreement for the cavitation extent inside the orifice is found between the micro-CT and the corresponding temporal mean 2D cavitation image, as captured by the high-speed camera. However, the internal 3D structure of the developing cavitation cloud reveals a hollow vapour cloud ring formed at the hole entrance and extending only at the lower part of the hole due to the asymmetric flow entry. Moreover, the cavitation volume fraction exhibits a significant gradient along the orifice volume. The cavitation number and the needle valve lift seem to be the most influential operating parameters, while the Reynolds number seems to have only small effect for the range of values tested. Overall, the study demonstrates that use of micro-CT can be a reliable tool for cavitation in nozzle orifices operating under nominal steady-state conditions. (orig.)

  4. Application of X-ray micro-computed tomography on high-speed cavitating diesel fuel flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitroglou, N.; Lorenzi, M.; Santini, M.; Gavaises, M.

    2016-11-01

    The flow inside a purpose built enlarged single-orifice nozzle replica is quantified using time-averaged X-ray micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and high-speed shadowgraphy. Results have been obtained at Reynolds and cavitation numbers similar to those of real-size injectors. Good agreement for the cavitation extent inside the orifice is found between the micro-CT and the corresponding temporal mean 2D cavitation image, as captured by the high-speed camera. However, the internal 3D structure of the developing cavitation cloud reveals a hollow vapour cloud ring formed at the hole entrance and extending only at the lower part of the hole due to the asymmetric flow entry. Moreover, the cavitation volume fraction exhibits a significant gradient along the orifice volume. The cavitation number and the needle valve lift seem to be the most influential operating parameters, while the Reynolds number seems to have only small effect for the range of values tested. Overall, the study demonstrates that use of micro-CT can be a reliable tool for cavitation in nozzle orifices operating under nominal steady-state conditions.

  5. Application of X-ray micro-computed tomography on high-speed cavitating diesel fuel flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitroglou, N.; Lorenzi, M.; Gavaises, M.; Santini, M.

    2016-01-01

    The flow inside a purpose built enlarged single-orifice nozzle replica is quantified using time-averaged X-ray micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and high-speed shadowgraphy. Results have been obtained at Reynolds and cavitation numbers similar to those of real-size injectors. Good agreement for the cavitation extent inside the orifice is found between the micro-CT and the corresponding temporal mean 2D cavitation image, as captured by the high-speed camera. However, the internal 3D structure of the developing cavitation cloud reveals a hollow vapour cloud ring formed at the hole entrance and extending only at the lower part of the hole due to the asymmetric flow entry. Moreover, the cavitation volume fraction exhibits a significant gradient along the orifice volume. The cavitation number and the needle valve lift seem to be the most influential operating parameters, while the Reynolds number seems to have only small effect for the range of values tested. Overall, the study demonstrates that use of micro-CT can be a reliable tool for cavitation in nozzle orifices operating under nominal steady-state conditions. (orig.)

  6. Assessment of Power Potential of Tidal Currents and Impacts of Power Extraction on Flow Speeds in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orhan, K.; Mayerle, R.

    2016-12-01

    A methodology comprising of the estimates of power yield, evaluation of the effects of power extraction on flow conditions, and near-field investigations to deliver wake characteritics, recovery and interactions is described and applied to several straits in Indonesia. Site selection is done with high-resolution, three-dimensional flow models providing sufficient spatiotemporal coverage. Much attention has been given to the meteorological forcing, and conditions at the open sea boundaries to adequately capture the density gradients and flow fields. Model verification using tidal records shows excellent agreement. Sites with adequate depth for the energy conversion using horizontal axis tidal turbines, average kinetic power density greater than 0.5 kW/m2, and surface area larger than 0.5km2 are defined as energy hotspots. Spatial variation of the average extractable electric power is determined, and annual tidal energy resource is estimated for the straits in question. The results showed that the potential for tidal power generation in Indonesia is likely to exceed previous predictions reaching around 4,800MW. To assess the impact of the devices, flexible mesh models with higher resolutions have been developed. Effects on flow conditions, and near-field turbine wakes are resolved in greater detail with triangular horizontal grids. The energy is assumed to be removed uniformly by sub-grid scale arrays of turbines, and calculations are made based on velocities at the hub heights of the devices. An additional drag force resulting in dissipation of the pre-existing kinetic power from %10 to %60 within a flow cross-section is introduced to capture the impacts. It was found that the effect of power extraction on water levels and flow speeds in adjacent areas is not significant. Results show the effectivess of the method to capture wake characteritics and recovery reasonably well with low computational cost.

  7. Influence of Wind Speed on Heat Flow through Polypropylene Insulating Material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Yu-chai; CHENG Zhong-hao; FENG Xun-wei

    2006-01-01

    The heat transfer properties of polypropylene insulation at different ambient temperature against wind were analysed.A theoretical model of the combined conductive, convective and radiative heat flow through fibrous insulating material was presented. Detail study was carried out by using the finite element method. The theoretical results are in accordance to the experimental results which were accomplished in an artificial climate chamber.

  8. Development of a Three-Dimensional Unstructured Euler Solver for High-Speed Flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tudorel Petronel AFILIPOAE

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the solution of the compressible Euler equations on hexahedral meshes for supersonic and hypersonic flows. Spatial discretization is accomplished by a cell-centered finite-volume formulation which employs two different upwind schemes for the computation of convective fluxes. Second-order solutions are attained through a linear state reconstruction technique that yields highly resolved flows in smooth regions while providing a sharp and clean resolution of shocks. The solution gradients required for the higher-order spatial discretization are estimated by a least-square method while Venkatakrishnan limiter is employed to preserve monotonicity and avoid oscillations in the presence of shocks. Furthermore, solutions are advanced in time by an explicit third-order Runge-Kutta scheme and convergence to steady state is accelerated using implicit residual smoothing. Flow around a circular arc in a channel and flow past a circular cylinder are studied and results are presented for various Mach numbers together with comparisons to theoretical and experimental data where possible.

  9. High-efficiency particulate air filter behavior at high-speed flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, P.K.; Gregory, W.S.; Ricketts, C.I.; Smith, P.R.

    1984-04-01

    This paper presents a filter model based on the principle of fluid flow through porous media. The model includes both laminar and turbulent effects. The coefficients used in the model are determined empirically based on existing data. Deviation from the model is discussed

  10. Numerical modeling of the flow conditions in a closed-circuit low-speed wind tunnel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moonen, P.; Blocken, B.J.E.; Roels, S.; Carmeliet, J.E.

    2006-01-01

    A methodology for numerically simulating the flow conditions in closed-circuit wind tunnels is developed as a contribution to the general philosophy of incorporating Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) in wind tunnel design and testing and to CFD validation studies. The methodology is applied to the

  11. Aerothermal and aeroelastic response prediction of aerospace structures in high-speed flows using direct numerical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostoich, Christopher Mark

    Future high-speed air vehicles will be lightweight, flexible, and reusable. Ve- hicles fitting this description are subject to severe thermal and fluid dynamic loading from multiple sources such as aerothermal heating, propulsion sys- tem exhaust, and high dynamic pressures. The combination of low-margin design requirements and extreme environmental conditions emphasizes the occurrence of fluid-thermal-structural coupling. Numerous attempts to field such vehicles have been unsuccessful over the past half-century due par- tially to the inability of traditional design and analysis practices to predict the structural response in this flight regime. In this thesis, a high-fidelity computational approach is used to examine the fluid-structural response of aerospace structures in high-speed flows. The method is applied to two cases: one involving a fluid-thermal interaction problem in a hypersonic flow and the other a fluid-structure interaction study involving a turbulent boundary layer and a compliant panel. The coupled fluid-thermal investigation features a nominally rigid alu- minum spherical dome fixed to a ceramic panel holder placed in a Mach 6.59 laminar boundary layer. The problem was originally studied by Glass and Hunt in a 1988 wind tunnel experiment in the NASA Langley 8-Foot High Temperature Tunnel and is motivated by thermally bowed body panels designed for the National Aerospace Plane. In this work, the compressible Navier-Stokes equations for a thermally perfect gas and the transient heat equation in the structure are solved simultaneously using two high-fidelity solvers coupled at the solid-fluid interface. Predicted surface heat fluxes are within 10% of the measured values in the dome interior with greater differ- ences found near the dome edges where uncertainties concerning the exper- imental model's construction likely influence the thermal dynamics. On the flat panel holder, the local surface heat fluxes approach those on the wind- ward dome face

  12. Ventilation of high-speed flows, an alternating methodology for the ventilator design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saldarriaga V, Juan G.; Navarrete, J.; Galeano B, Luis A.

    1996-01-01

    This article is about a research developed at Universidad de los Andes on the ventilation of high velocity flows as prevention against cavitations erosion. The research was a consequence of the results found in the physical model of the Guavio River Hydroelectric Project near Bogota and was based in a general model study of a spillway with ventilation system, which did not represent a particular prototype. In the Guavio study one conclusion was obtained:in every ventilation system there are three unknowns which are the air discharge injected to the water flow (design object variable), the sub pressure under the water jet and the jump length of that jet. In the research those three variables were studied using dimensional analysis and multivariable regressions in order to find a set of three equations that allow the design of this type of structures. The new equations are more general than those reported in technical literature

  13. The flow over a 'high' aspect ratio gothic wing at supersonic speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, K. Y.

    1975-01-01

    Results are presented of an experimental investigation on a nonconical wing which supports an attached shock wave over a region of the leading edge near the vertex and a detached shock elsewhere. The shock detachment point is determined from planform schlieren photographs of the flow field and discrepancies are shown to exist between this and the one calculated by applying the oblique shock equations normal to the leading edge. On a physical basis, it is argued that the shock detachment has to obey the two-dimensional law normal to the leading edges. From this, and from other measurements on conical wings, it is thought that the planform schlieren technique may not be particularly satisfactory for detecting shock detachment. Surface pressure distributions are presented and are explained in terms of the flow over related delta wings which are identified as a vertex delta wing and a local delta wing.

  14. Relaxation with high-speed plasma flows and singularity analysis in MHD equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiraishi, Junya; Ohsaki, Shuichi; Yoshida, Zensho

    2004-01-01

    Relaxation model that leads to plasma confinement with rigid-rotation is presented. This model applies to Jupiter's magnetosphere. It is shown that the invariance of canonical angular momentum of electron fluid, which is realized by axisymmetry through self-organization process, yields plasma confinement. including poloidal flows in equilibrium equation makes the problem rather complicated. Singularity due to the poloidal flow is focused on. It is shown that the singular equation for equilibrium has the same structure as the equation for linear Alfven wave. Since the singular solution for equilibrium equation is physically inadequate, the singularity may be removed by another physical effect. The Hall-effect is taken into account as a singular perturbation that removes the singularity of equilibrium equation for ideal magnetohydrodynamics. (author)

  15. Analysis of high-speed rotating flow inside gas centrifuge casing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Sahadev

    2017-11-01

    The generalized analytical model for the radial boundary layer inside the gas centrifuge casing in which the inner cylinder is rotating at a constant angular velocity Ωi while the outer one is stationary, is formulated for studying the secondary gas flow field due to wall thermal forcing, inflow/outflow of light gas along the boundaries, as well as due to the combination of the above two external forcing. The analytical model includes the sixth order differential equation for the radial boundary layer at the cylindrical curved surface in terms of master potential (χ) , which is derived from the equations of motion in an axisymmetric (r - z) plane. The linearization approximation is used, where the equations of motion are truncated at linear order in the velocity and pressure disturbances to the base flow, which is a solid-body rotation. Additional approximations in the analytical model include constant temperature in the base state (isothermal compressible Couette flow), high aspect ratio (length is large compared to the annular gap), high Reynolds number, but there is no limitation on the Mach number. The discrete eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the linear operators (sixth-order in the radial direction for the generalized analytical equation) are obtained. The solutions for the secondary flow is determined in terms of these eigenvalues and eigenfunctions. These solutions are compared with direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) simulations and found excellent agreement (with a difference of less than 15%) between the predictions of the analytical model and the DSMC simulations, provided the boundary conditions in the analytical model are accurately specified.

  16. The characterisation of diesel nozzle flow using high speed imaging of elastic light scattering

    OpenAIRE

    Lockett, R. D.; Liverani, L.; Thaker, D.; Jeshani, M.; Tait, N. P.

    2013-01-01

    Two identical, conventional six-hole, valve-covered orifice (VCO) diesel injectors have been modified in order to provide optical access to the region below the needle, and the nozzle-flow passages. This has been achieved through the removal of the metal tips, and their replacement with transparent acrylic tips of identical geometry. \\ud \\ud These two identical injectors were employed in order to offer comparability between the measurements. One of them had a dark, anodised inner surface at t...

  17. Longitudinal Plasmoid in High-Speed Vortex Gas Flow Created by Capacity HF Discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-28

    interferometer with high space resolution, PIV method, FTIR spectrometer, optical spectrometer, pressure sensors with high time resolution, IR pyrometer and...of strong LP-vortex interaction. Intensive acoustic waves are created by CHFD in swirl flow in this regime. 38. Study of control of a longitudinal...quartz tube, 4- HF ball electrode, 5- Tesla’s transformer, 6- microwave interferometer, 7- video camera, 8-optical pyrometer , 9-pressure sensor, 10

  18. Local Limit Phenomena, Flow Compression, and Fuel Cracking Effects in High-Speed Turbulent Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    e.g. local extinction and re- ignition , interactions between flow compression and fast-reaction induced dilatation (reaction compression ), and to...time as a function of initial temperature in constant-pressure auto - ignition , and (b) the S-curves of perfectly stirred reactors (PSRs), for n...mechanism. The reduction covered auto - ignition and perfectly stirred reactors for equivalence ratio range of 0.5~1.5, initial temperature higher than

  19. Experimental and Computational Study of Trapped Vortex Combustor Sector Rig with High-Speed Diffuser Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. Hendricks

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The Trapped Vortex Combustor (TVC potentially offers numerous operational advantages over current production gas turbine engine combustors. These include lower weight, lower pollutant emissions, effective flame stabilization, high combustion efficiency, excellent high altitude relight capability, and operation in the lean burn or RQL modes of combustion. The present work describes the operational principles of the TVC, and extends diffuser velocities toward choked flow and provides system performance data. Performance data include EINOx results for various fuel-air ratios and combustor residence times, combustion efficiency as a function of combustor residence time, and combustor lean blow-out (LBO performance. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD simulations using liquid spray droplet evaporation and combustion modeling are performed and related to flow structures observed in photographs of the combustor. The CFD results are used to understand the aerodynamics and combustion features under different fueling conditions. Performance data acquired to date are favorable compared to conventional gas turbine combustors. Further testing over a wider range of fuel-air ratios, fuel flow splits, and pressure ratios is in progress to explore the TVC performance. In addition, alternate configurations for the upstream pressure feed, including bi-pass diffusion schemes, as well as variations on the fuel injection patterns, are currently in test and evaluation phases.

  20. Supercritical droplet dynamics and emission in low speed cross-flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chae, J. W.; Yang, H. S.; Yoon, W. S.

    2008-01-01

    Droplet dynamics and emission of a supercritical droplet in crossing gas stream are numerically investigated. Effects of ambient pressure and velocity of nitrogen gas on the dynamics of the supercritical oxygen droplet are parametrically examined. Unsteady conservative axisymmetric Navier-Stokes equations in curvilinear coordinates are preconditioned and solved by dual-time stepping method. A unified property evaluation scheme based on a fundamental equation of state and extended corresponding-state principle is established to deal with thermodynamic non-idealities and transport anomalies. At lower pressures and velocities of nitrogen cross flows, both the diffusion and the convection are important in determining the droplet dynamics. Relative flow motion causes a secondary breakup and cascading vortices, and the droplet lifetime is reduced with increasing in ambient pressure. At higher ambient pressures and velocities, however, the droplet dynamics become convection-controlled while the secondary breakup is hindered by reduced diffusivity of the oxygen. Gas-phase mixing depends on the convection and diffusion velocities in conjunction with corresponding droplet deformation and flow interaction. Supercritical droplet dynamics and emission is not similar with respect to the pressure and velocity of the ambient gas and thus provides no scale

  1. Experimental Studies of Flow Separation of the NACA 2412 Airfoil at Low Speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seetharam, H. C.; Rodgers, E. J.; Wentz, W. H., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests have been conducted on an NACA 2412 airfoil section at Reynolds number of 2.2 x 10(exp 6) and Mach number of 0.13. Detailed measurements of flow fields associated with turbulent boundary layers have been obtained at angles of attack of 12.4 degrees, 14.4 degrees, and 16.4 degrees. Pre- and post-separated velocity and pressure survey results over the airfoil and in the associated wake are presented. Extensive force, pressure, tuft survey, hot-film survey, local skin friction, and boundary layer data are also included. Pressure distributions and separation point locations show good agreement with theory for the two layer angles of attack. Boundary layer displacement thickness, momentum thickness, and shape factor agree well with theory up to the point of separation. There is considerable disparity between extent of flow reversal in the wake as measured by pressure and hot-film probes. The difference is attributed to the intermittent nature of the flow reversal.

  2. High-Speed Synchrotron X-ray Imaging Studies of the Ultrasound Shockwave and Enhanced Flow during Metal Solidification Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Dongyue; Lee, Tung Lik; Khong, Jia Chuan; Connolley, Thomas; Fezzaa, Kamel; Mi, Jiawei

    2015-07-01

    The highly dynamic behavior of ultrasonic bubble implosion in liquid metal, the multiphase liquid metal flow containing bubbles and particles, and the interaction between ultrasonic waves and semisolid phases during solidification of metal were studied in situ using the complementary ultrafast and high-speed synchrotron X-ray imaging facilities housed, respectively, at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, US, and Diamond Light Source, UK. Real-time ultrafast X-ray imaging of 135,780 frames per second revealed that ultrasonic bubble implosion in a liquid Bi-8 wt pctZn alloy can occur in a single wave period (30 kHz), and the effective region affected by the shockwave at implosion was 3.5 times the original bubble diameter. Furthermore, ultrasound bubbles in liquid metal move faster than the primary particles, and the velocity of bubbles is 70 ~ 100 pct higher than that of the primary particles present in the same locations close to the sonotrode. Ultrasound waves can very effectively create a strong swirling flow in a semisolid melt in less than one second. The energetic flow can detach solid particles from the liquid-solid interface and redistribute them back into the bulk liquid very effectively.

  3. Effect of Body Composition on Walking Economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciejczyk Marcin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The aim of the study was to evaluate walking economy and physiological responses at two walking speeds in males with similar absolute body mass but different body composition. Methods. The study involved 22 young men with similar absolute body mass, BMI, aerobic performance, calf and thigh circumference. The participants differed in body composition: body fat (HBF group and lean body mass (HLBM group. In the graded test, maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max and maximal heart rate were measured. Walking economy was evaluated during two walks performed at two different speeds (4.8 and 6.0 km ‧ h-1. Results. The VO2max was similar in both groups, as were the physiological responses during slow walking. The absolute oxygen uptake or oxygen uptake relative to body mass did not significantly differentiate the studied groups. The only indicator significantly differentiating the two groups was oxygen uptake relative to LBM. Conclusions. Body composition does not significantly affect walking economy at low speed, while during brisk walking, the economy is better in the HLBM vs. HBF group, provided that walking economy is presented as oxygen uptake relative to LBM. For this reason, we recommend this manner of oxygen uptake normalization in the evaluation of walking economy.

  4. Pedestrian Walking Behavior Revealed through a Random Walk Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Xiong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper applies method of continuous-time random walks for pedestrian flow simulation. In the model, pedestrians can walk forward or backward and turn left or right if there is no block. Velocities of pedestrian flow moving forward or diffusing are dominated by coefficients. The waiting time preceding each jump is assumed to follow an exponential distribution. To solve the model, a second-order two-dimensional partial differential equation, a high-order compact scheme with the alternating direction implicit method, is employed. In the numerical experiments, the walking domain of the first one is two-dimensional with two entrances and one exit, and that of the second one is two-dimensional with one entrance and one exit. The flows in both scenarios are one way. Numerical results show that the model can be used for pedestrian flow simulation.

  5. The Effects of Uncertainty in Speed-Flow Curve Parameters on a Large-Scale Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manzo, Stefano; Nielsen, Otto Anker; Prato, Carlo Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    -delay functions express travel time as a function of traffic flows and the theoretical capacity of the modeled facility. The U.S. Bureau of Public Roads (BPR) formula is one of the most extensively applied volume delay functions in practice. This study investigated uncertainty in the BPR parameters. Initially......-stage Danish national transport model. The results clearly highlight the importance to modeling purposes of taking into account BPR formula parameter uncertainty, expressed as a distribution of values rather than assumed point values. Indeed, the model output demonstrates a noticeable sensitivity to parameter...

  6. A new particle-like method for high-speed flows with chemical non-equilibrium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Rodrigues Guzzo

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The present work is concerned with the numerical simulation of hypersonic blunt body flows with chemical non-equilibrium. New theoretical and numerical formulations for coupling the chemical reaction to the fluid dynamics are presented and validated. The fluid dynamics is defined for a stationary unstructured mesh and the chemical reaction process is defined for “finite quantities” moving through the stationary mesh. The fluid dynamics is modeled by the Euler equations and the chemical reaction rates by the Arrhenius law. Ideal gases are considered. The thermodynamical data are based on JANNAF tables and Burcat’s database. The algorithm proposed by Liou, known as AUSM+, is implemented in a cell-centered based finite volume method and in an unstructured mesh context. Multidimensional limited MUSCL interpolation method is used to perform property reconstructions and to achieve second-order accuracy in space. The minmod limiter is used. The second order accuracy, five stage, Runge-Kutta time-stepping scheme is employed to perform the time march for the fluid dynamics. The numerical code VODE, which is part of the CHEMKIN-II package, is adopted to perform the time integration for the chemical reaction equations. The freestream reacting fluid is composed of H2 and air at the stoichiometric ratio. The emphasis of the present paper is on the description of the new methodology for handling the coupling of chemical and fluid mechanic processes, and its validation by comparison with the standard time-splitting procedure. The configurations considered are the hypersonic flow over a wedge, in which the oblique detonation wave is induced by an oblique shock wave, and the hypersonic flow over a blunt body. Differences between the solutions obtained with each formulation are presented and discussed, including the effects of grid refinement in each case. The primary objective of such comparisons is the validation of the proposed methodology. Moreover, for

  7. Multi-Scale Visualization Analysis of Bus Flow Average Travel Speed in Qingdao

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, HAN; Man, GAO; Xiao-Lei, ZHANG; Jie, LI; Ge, CHEN

    2016-11-01

    Public transportation is a kind of complex spatiotemporal behaviour. The traffic congestion and environmental pollution caused by the increase in private cars is becoming more and more serious in our city. Spatiotemporal data visualization is an effective tool for studying traffic, transforming non-visual data into recognizable images, which can reveal where/when congestion is formed, developed and disappeared in space and time simultaneously. This paper develops a multi-scale visualization of average travel speed derived from floating bus data, to enable congestion on urban bus networks to be shown and analyzed. The techniques of R language, Echarts, WebGL are used to draw statistical pictures and 3D wall map, which show the congestion in Qingdao from the view of space and time. The results are as follows:(1) There is a more severely delay in Shibei and Shinan areas than Licun and Laoshan areas; (2) The high congestion usually occurs on Hong Kong Middle Road, Shandong Road, Nanjing Road, Liaoyang West Road and Taiping Road;(3) There is a similar law from Monday to Sunday that the congestion is severer in the morning and evening rush hours than other hours; (4) On Monday morning the severity of congestion is higher than on Friday morning, and on Friday evening the severity is higher than on Monday evening. The research results will help to improve the public transportation of Qingdao.

  8. A comparison of at-home walking and 10-meter walking test parameters of individuals with post-stroke hemiparesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagano, Katsuhito; Hori, Hideaki; Muramatsu, Ken

    2015-02-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to clarify the difference in gait parameters of at-home walking and the 10-meter walking test results of individuals with hemiparesis. [Subjects] A total of 14 hemiparetic stroke recovery patients participated in this study. Inclusion criteria were: living at home, the ability to walk independently, and demonstrated low extremity on recovery stages III-V on the Brunnstrom Approach. The average age of the subjects was 66 years. [Methods] We used video surveillance and the inked footprint technique to record usual walking speed and maximum speed patterns both in subjects' homes and during the 10-meter walking test. From these methods, walking speed, stride length, and step rate were calculated. [Results] While both usual and maximum walking speeds of the 10-meter walking test correlated with stride length and step rate, at-home walking speeds only significantly correlated with stride length. [Conclusion] Walking patterns of the 10-meter walking test are quantifiably distinct from those demonstrated in patients' homes, and this difference is mainly characterized by stride length. In order to enhance in-home walking ability, exercises that improve length of stride rather than step rate should be recommended.

  9. Bed Evolution under Rapidly Varying Flows by a New Method for Wave Speed Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khawar Rehman

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a sediment-transport model based on coupled Saint-Venant and Exner equations. A finite volume method of Godunov type with predictor-corrector steps is used to solve a set of coupled equations. An efficient combination of approximate Riemann solvers is proposed to compute fluxes associated with sediment-laden flow. In addition, a new method is proposed for computing the water depth and velocity values along the shear wave. This method ensures smooth solutions, even for flows with high discontinuities, and on domains with highly distorted grids. The numerical model is tested for channel aggradation on a sloping bottom, dam-break cases at flume-scale and reach-scale with flat bottom configurations and varying downstream water depths. The proposed model is tested for predicting the position of hydraulic jump, wave front propagation, and for predicting magnitude of bed erosion. The comparison between results based on the proposed scheme and analytical, experimental, and published numerical results shows good agreement. Sensitivity analysis shows that the model is computationally efficient and virtually independent of mesh refinement.

  10. Numerical Simulation of a Nanosecond-Pulse Discharge for High-Speed Flow Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poggie, Jonathan; Adamovich, Igor

    2012-10-01

    Numerical calculations were carried out to examine the physics of the operation of a nanosecond-pulse, single dielectric barrier discharge in a configuration with planar symmetry. This simplified configuration was chosen as a vehicle to develop a physics based nanosecond discharge model, including realistic air plasma chemistry and compressible bulk gas flow. First, a reduced plasma kinetic model was developed by carrying out a sensitivity analysis of zero-dimensional plasma computations with an extended chemical kinetic model. Transient, one- dimensional discharge computations were then carried out using the reduced kinetic model, incorporating a drift-diffusion formulation for each species, a self-consistent computation of the electric potential using the Poisson equation, and a mass-averaged gas dynamic formulation for the bulk gas motion. Discharge parameters (temperature, pressure, and input waveform) were selected to be representative of recent experiments on bow shock control with a nanosecond discharge in a Mach 5 cylinder flow. The computational results qualitatively reproduce many of the features observed in the experiments, including the rapid thermalization of the input electrical energy and the consequent formation of a weak shock wave. At breakdown, input electrical energy is rapidly transformed (over roughly 1 ns) into ionization products, dissociation products, and electronically excited particles, with subsequent thermalization over a relatively longer time-scale (roughly 10 μs).

  11. On equivalency of various expressions for speed of wave propagation for compressible liquid flows with heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chawla, T.C.

    1978-01-01

    It is demonstrated that for a compressible flow model with heat transfer, the introduction of a specific state equation to supplement the continuity, momentum an enthalpy equations, leads to a very specific form of an expression for a speed of wave propagation. Consequently, the numerous expressions obtained for various choices of state equations are not easily identifiable and, therefore, can not be evaluated directly in terms of measurable properties. By use of the various thermodynamic relationships, it has been shown that these expressions are all equivalent and are identifiable as isentropic sonic velocity. As a corollary to this demonstration, expressions have also been obtained in terms of measurable properties for various thermodynamic-state variables occurring in the coefficients of the governing equations. These expressions are required if loss in accuracy owing to noise introduced in the direct numerical differentiation of the derivatives that these state-variables represent is to be avoided. (author)

  12. "V-junction": a novel structure for high-speed generation of bespoke droplet flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yun; Casadevall i Solvas, Xavier; deMello, Andrew

    2015-01-21

    We present the use of microfluidic "V-junctions" as a droplet generation strategy that incorporates enhanced performance characteristics when compared to more traditional "T-junction" formats. This includes the ability to generate target-sized droplets from the very first one, efficient switching between multiple input samples, the production of a wide range of droplet sizes (and size gradients) and the facile generation of droplets with residence time gradients. Additionally, the use of V-junction droplet generators enables the suspension and subsequent resumption of droplet flows at times defined by the user. The high degree of operational flexibility allows a wide range of droplet sizes, payloads, spacings and generation frequencies to be obtained, which in turn provides for an enhanced design space for droplet-based experimentation. We show that the V-junction retains the simplicity of operation associated with T-junction formats, whilst offering functionalities normally associated with droplet-on-demand technologies.

  13. Femtosecond two-photon laser-induced fluorescence of krypton for high-speed flow imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yejun; Capps, Cade; Kulatilaka, Waruna D

    2017-02-15

    Ultrashort-pulse (femtosecond-duration) two-photon laser-induced fluorescence (fs-TPLIF) of an inert gas tracer krypton (Kr) is investigated. A detailed spectroscopic study of fluorescence channels followed by the 5p'←←4p excitation of Kr at 204.1 nm is reported. The experimental line positions in the 750-840 nm emission region agree well with the NIST Atomic Spectra Database. The present work provides an accurate listing of relative line strengths in this spectral region. In the range of laser pulse energies investigated, a quadratic dependence was observed between the Kr-TPLIF signal and the laser pulse energy. The single-laser-shot 2D TPLIF images recorded in an unsteady jet demonstrate the potential of using fs excitation at 204.1 nm for mixing and flow diagnostic studies using Kr as an inert gas tracer.

  14. Stability management of high speed axial flow compressor stage through axial extensions of bend skewed casing treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DilipkumarBhanudasji Alone

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the experimental results to understand the performance of moderately loaded high speed single stage transonic axial flow compressor subjected to various configurations of axial extensions of bend skewed casing treatment with moderate porosity. The bend skewed casing treatment of 33% porosity was coupled with rectangular plenum chamber of depth equal to the slots depth. The five axial extensions of 20%, 40%, 60%, 80% and 100% were used for the experimental evaluations of compressor performance. The main objective was to identify the optimum extension of the casing treatment with reference to rotor leading edge which results in maximum stall margin improvements with minimum loss in the stage efficiency. At each axial extension the compressor performance is distinctive. The improvement in the stall margin was very significant at some axial extensions with 4%–5% penalty in the stage efficiency. The compressors stage shows recovery in terms of efficiency at lower axial extensions of 20% and 40% with increase in the peak stage efficiency. Measurements of flow parameters showed the typical behaviors at near stall flow conditions. Hot wire sensor was placed at the rotor upstream in the tip region to capture the oscillations in the inlet axial and tangential velocities at stall conditions. In the absence of casing treatment the compressor exhibit abrupt stall with very high oscillations in the inlet axial and tangential velocity of the flow. The extents of oscillations reduce with bend skewed casing treatment. Few measurements were also performed in the plenum chamber and salient results are presented in this paper.

  15. Effects of Injection Timing on Fluid Flow Characteristics of Partially Premixed Combustion Based on High-Speed Particle Image Velocimetry

    KAUST Repository

    Izadi Najafabadi, Mohammad

    2017-03-28

    Partially Premixed Combustion (PPC) is a promising combustion concept ,based on judicious tuning of the charge stratification, to meet the increasing demands of emission legislation and to improve fuel efficiency. Longer ignition delays of PPC in comparison with conventional diesel combustion provide better fuel/air mixture which decreases soot and NO emissions. Moreover, a proper injection timing and strategy for PPC can improve the combustion stability as a result of a higher level of fuel stratification in comparison with the Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) concept. Injection timing is the major parameter with which to affect the level of fuel and combustion stratification and to control the combustion phasing and the heat release behavior. The scope of the present study is to investigate the fluid flow characteristics of PPC at different injection timings. To this end, high-speed Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) is implemented in a light-duty optical engine to measure fluid flow characteristics, including the flow fields, mean velocity and cycle-resolved turbulence, inside the piston bowl as well as the squish region with a temporal resolution of 1 crank angle degree at 800 rpm. Two injectors, having 5 and 7 holes, were compared to see their effects on fluid flow and heat release behavior for different injection timings. Reactive and non-reactive measurements were performed to distinguish injection-driven and combustion-driven turbulence. Formation of vortices and higher turbulence levels enhance the air/fuel interaction, changing the level of fuel stratification and combustion duration. Results demonstrate clearly how turbulence level correlates with heat release behavior, and provide a quantitative dataset for validation of numerical simulations.

  16. Does dynamic stability govern propulsive force generation in human walking?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Michael G; Franz, Jason R

    2017-11-01

    Before succumbing to slower speeds, older adults may walk with a diminished push-off to prioritize stability over mobility. However, direct evidence for trade-offs between push-off intensity and balance control in human walking, independent of changes in speed, has remained elusive. As a critical first step, we conducted two experiments to investigate: (i) the independent effects of walking speed and propulsive force ( F P ) generation on dynamic stability in young adults, and (ii) the extent to which young adults prioritize dynamic stability in selecting their preferred combination of walking speed and F P generation. Subjects walked on a force-measuring treadmill across a range of speeds as well as at constant speeds while modulating their F P according to a visual biofeedback paradigm based on real-time force measurements. In contrast to improvements when walking slower, walking with a diminished push-off worsened dynamic stability by up to 32%. Rather, we find that young adults adopt an F P at their preferred walking speed that maximizes dynamic stability. One implication of these findings is that the onset of a diminished push-off in old age may independently contribute to poorer balance control and precipitate slower walking speeds.

  17. Comparison of walking overground and in a Computer Assisted Rehabilitation Environment (CAREN in individuals with and without transtibial amputation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gates Deanna H

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Due to increased interest in treadmill gait training, recent research has focused on the similarities and differences between treadmill and overground walking. Most of these studies have tested healthy, young subjects rather than impaired populations that might benefit from such training. These studies also do not include optic flow, which may change how the individuals integrate sensory information when walking on a treadmill. This study compared overground walking to treadmill walking in a computer assisted virtual reality environment (CAREN in individuals with and without transtibial amputations (TTA. Methods Seven individuals with traumatic TTA and 27 unimpaired controls participated. Subjects walked overground and on a treadmill in a CAREN at a normalized speed. The CAREN applied optic flow at the same speed that the subject walked. Temporal-spatial parameters, full body kinematics, and kinematic variability were collected during all trials. Results Both subject groups decreased step time and control subjects decreased step length when walking in the CAREN. Differences in lower extremity kinematics were small (○ and did not exceed the minimal detectable change values for these measures. Control subjects exhibited decreased transverse and frontal plane range of motion of the pelvis and trunk when walking in the CAREN, while patients with TTA did not. Both groups exhibited increased step width variability during treadmill walking in the CAREN, but only minor changes in kinematic variability. Conclusions The results of this study suggest that treadmill training in a virtual environment should be similar enough to overground that changes should carry over. Caution should be made when comparing step width variability and step time results from studies utilizing a treadmill to those overground.

  18. Estimating the energy-saving benefit of reduced-flow and/or multi-speed commercial kitchen ventilation systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, D.; Schmid, F.; Spata, A.J.

    1999-07-01

    Kitchen exhaust ventilation systems are recognized as a major energy user within commercial food service facilities and restaurants. Minimizing the design ventilation rate of an appliance/hood system by optimizing hood performance in the laboratory is a viable strategy for reducing the makeup air heating and cooling loads as well as the exhaust and supply fan energy. Cutting back the exhaust flow under conditions of noncooking (appliance idle) can further reduce the energy load associated with a kitchen ventilation system. An optimized, two-speed exhaust system was installed within the scope of an energy-efficient, quick service restaurant (QSR) design and demonstration project. This paper evaluates the energy benefit of this variable-flow strategy as well as the savings associated with reducing the design ventilation rate (compared to an off-the-shelf exhaust hood). The paper describes a new public-domain software tool for estimating heating and cooling loads associated with the makeup air requirements of commercial kitchens. This bin-based software provides ASHRAE engineers with an alternative to hand calculations or more sophisticated hour-by-hour simulation. The dramatic impact that both makeup air set point and geographic location have on the outdoor air load is illustrated. The paper concludes with an industry-wide projection of energy savings associated with optimizing the design and operation of commercial kitchen ventilation (CKV) systems.

  19. Effects of adding a virtual reality environment to different modes of treadmill walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloot, L H; van der Krogt, M M; Harlaar, J

    2014-03-01

    Differences in gait between overground and treadmill walking are suggested to result from imposed treadmill speed and lack of visual flow. To counteract this effect, feedback-controlled treadmills that allow the subject to control the belt speed along with an immersive virtual reality (VR) have recently been developed. We studied the effect of adding a VR during both fixed speed (FS) and self-paced (SP) treadmill walking. Nineteen subjects walked on a dual-belt instrumented treadmill with a simple endless road projected on a 180° circular screen. A main effect of VR was found for hip flexion offset, peak hip extension, peak knee extension moment, knee flexion moment gain and ankle power during push off. A consistent interaction effect between VR and treadmill mode was found for 12 out of 30 parameters, although the differences were small and did not exceed 50% of the within subject stride variance. At FS, the VR seemed to slightly improve the walking pattern towards overground walking, with for example a 6.5mm increase in stride length. At SP, gait became slightly more cautious by adding a VR, with a 9.1mm decrease in stride length. Irrespective of treadmill mode, subjects rated walking with the VR as more similar to overground walking. In the context of clinical gait analysis, the effects of VR are too small to be relevant and are outweighed by the gains of adding a VR, such as a more stimulating experience and possibility of augmenting it by real-time feedback. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. NASA Langley Low Speed Aeroacoustic Wind Tunnel: Background Noise and Flow Survey Results Prior to FY05 Construction of Facilities Modifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Earl R., Jr.; Henderson, Brenda S.

    2005-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center Low Speed Aeroacoustic Wind Tunnel is a premier facility for model-scale testing of jet noise reduction concepts at realistic flow conditions. However, flow inside the open jet test section is less than optimum. A Construction of Facilities project, scheduled for FY 05, will replace the flow collector with a new design intended to reduce recirculation in the open jet test section. The reduction of recirculation will reduce background noise levels measured by a microphone array impinged by the recirculation flow and will improve flow characteristics in the open jet tunnel flow. In order to assess the degree to which this modification is successful, background noise levels and tunnel flow are documented, in order to establish a baseline, in this report.

  1. Motor modules in robot-aided walking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gizzi Leonardo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is hypothesized that locomotion is achieved by means of rhythm generating networks (central pattern generators and muscle activation generating networks. This modular organization can be partly identified from the analysis of the muscular activity by means of factorization algorithms. The activity of rhythm generating networks is described by activation signals whilst the muscle intervention generating network is represented by motor modules (muscle synergies. In this study, we extend the analysis of modular organization of walking to the case of robot-aided locomotion, at varying speed and body weight support level. Methods Non Negative Matrix Factorization was applied on surface electromyographic signals of 8 lower limb muscles of healthy subjects walking in gait robotic trainer at different walking velocities (1 to 3km/h and levels of body weight support (0 to 30%. Results The muscular activity of volunteers could be described by low dimensionality (4 modules, as for overground walking. Moreover, the activation signals during robot-aided walking were bursts of activation timed at specific phases of the gait cycle, underlying an impulsive controller, as also observed in overground walking. This modular organization was consistent across the investigated speeds, body weight support level, and subjects. Conclusions These results indicate that walking in a Lokomat robotic trainer is achieved by similar motor modules and activation signals as overground walking and thus supports the use of robotic training for re-establishing natural walking patterns.

  2. Validity of the Nike+ device during walking and running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, N A; Simmons, M C; John, D; Thompson, D L; Bassett, D R; Basset, D R

    2010-02-01

    We determined the validity of the Nike+ device for estimating speed, distance, and energy expenditure (EE) during walking and running. Twenty trained individuals performed a maximal oxygen uptake test and underwent anthropometric and body composition testing. Each participant was outfitted with a Nike+ sensor inserted into the shoe and an Apple iPod nano. They performed eight 6-min stages on the treadmill, including level walking at 55, 82, and 107 m x min(-1), inclined walking (82 m x min(-1)) at 5 and 10% grades, and level running at 134, 161, and 188 m x min(-1). Speed was measured using a tachometer and EE was measured by indirect calorimetry. Results showed that the Nike+ device overestimated the speed of level walking at 55 m x min(-1) by 20%, underestimated the speed of level walking at 107 m x min(-1) by 12%, but closely estimated the speed of level walking at 82 m x min(-1), and level running at all speeds (pNike+ device overestimated the EE of level walking by 18-37%, but closely estimated the EE of level running (pNike+ in-shoe device provided reasonable estimates of speed and distance during level running at the three speeds tested in this study. However, it overestimated EE during level walking and it did not detect the increased cost of inclined locomotion.

  3. Accurate prediction of complex free surface flow around a high speed craft using a single-phase level set method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broglia, Riccardo; Durante, Danilo

    2017-11-01

    This paper focuses on the analysis of a challenging free surface flow problem involving a surface vessel moving at high speeds, or planing. The investigation is performed using a general purpose high Reynolds free surface solver developed at CNR-INSEAN. The methodology is based on a second order finite volume discretization of the unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations (Di Mascio et al. in A second order Godunov—type scheme for naval hydrodynamics, Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers, Dordrecht, pp 253-261, 2001; Proceedings of 16th international offshore and polar engineering conference, San Francisco, CA, USA, 2006; J Mar Sci Technol 14:19-29, 2009); air/water interface dynamics is accurately modeled by a non standard level set approach (Di Mascio et al. in Comput Fluids 36(5):868-886, 2007a), known as the single-phase level set method. In this algorithm the governing equations are solved only in the water phase, whereas the numerical domain in the air phase is used for a suitable extension of the fluid dynamic variables. The level set function is used to track the free surface evolution; dynamic boundary conditions are enforced directly on the interface. This approach allows to accurately predict the evolution of the free surface even in the presence of violent breaking waves phenomena, maintaining the interface sharp, without any need to smear out the fluid properties across the two phases. This paper is aimed at the prediction of the complex free-surface flow field generated by a deep-V planing boat at medium and high Froude numbers (from 0.6 up to 1.2). In the present work, the planing hull is treated as a two-degree-of-freedom rigid object. Flow field is characterized by the presence of thin water sheets, several energetic breaking waves and plungings. The computational results include convergence of the trim angle, sinkage and resistance under grid refinement; high-quality experimental data are used for the purposes of validation, allowing to

  4. Development of localized arc filament RF plasma actuators for high-speed and high Reynolds number flow control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.-H.; Nishihara, M.; Adamovich, I.V.; Samimy, M.; Gorbatov, S.V.; Pliavaka, F.V.

    2010-01-01

    Recently developed localized arc filament plasma actuators (LAFPAs) have shown tremendous control authority in high-speed and high Reynolds number flow for mixing enhancement and noise mitigation. Previously, these actuators were powered by a high-voltage pulsed DC plasma generator with low energy coupling efficiency of 5-10%. In the present work, a new custom-designed 8-channel pulsed radio frequency (RF) plasma generator has been developed to power up to 8 plasma actuators operated over a wide range of forcing frequencies (up to 50 kHz) and duty cycles (1-50%), and at high energy coupling efficiency (up to 80-85%). This reduces input electrical power requirements by approximately an order of magnitude, down to 12 W per actuator operating at 10% duty cycle. The new pulsed RF plasma generator is scalable to a system with a large number of channels. Performance of pulsed RF plasma actuators used for flow control was studied in a Mach 0.9 circular jet with a Reynolds number of about 623,000 and compared with that of pulsed DC actuators. Eight actuators were distributed uniformly on the perimeter of a 2.54-cm diameter circular nozzle extension. Both types of actuators coupled approximately the same amount of power to the flow, but with drastically different electrical inputs to the power supplies. Particle image velocimetry measurements showed that jet centerline Mach number decay produced by DC and RF actuators operating at the same forcing frequencies and duty cycles is very similar. At a forcing Strouhal number near 0.3, close to the jet column instability frequency, well-organized periodic structures, with similar patterns and dimensions, were generated in the jets forced by both DC and RF actuators. Far-field acoustic measurements demonstrated similar trends in the overall sound pressure level (OASPL) change produced by both types of actuators, resulting in OASPL reduction up to 1.2-1.5 dB in both cases. We conclude that pulsed RF actuators demonstrate flow

  5. Walking on high heels changes muscle activity and the dynamics of human walking significantly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Erik B; Svendsen, Morten Bo Søndergaard; Nørreslet, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the distribution of net joint moments in the lower extremities during walking on high-heeled shoes compared with barefooted walking at identical speed. Fourteen female subjects walked at 4 km/h across three force platforms while they were filmed by five...... digital video cameras operating at 50 frames/second. Both barefooted walking and walking on high-heeled shoes (heel height: 9 cm) were recorded. Net joint moments were calculated by 3D inverse dynamics. EMG was recorded from eight leg muscles. The knee extensor moment peak in the first half of the stance...... phase was doubled when walking on high heels. The knee joint angle showed that high-heeled walking caused the subjects to flex the knee joint significantly more in the first half of the stance phase. In the frontal plane a significant increase was observed in the knee joint abductor moment and the hip...

  6. Hydrodynamics of a robotic fish tail: effects of the caudal peduncle, fin ray motions and the flow speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Ziyu; Yang, Xingbang; Wang, Tianmiao; Wen, Li

    2016-02-08

    Recent advances in understanding fish locomotion with robotic devices have included the use of biomimetic flapping based and fin undulatory locomotion based robots, treating two locomotions separately from each other. However, in most fish species, patterns of active movements of fins occur in concert with the body undulatory deformation during swimming. In this paper, we describe a biomimetic robotic caudal fin programmed with individually actuated fin rays to mimic the fin motion of the Bluegill Sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus) and coupled with heave and pitch oscillatory motions adding to the robot to mimic the peduncle motion which is derived from the undulatory fish body. Multiple-axis force and digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) experiments from both the vertical and horizontal planes behind the robotic model were conducted under different motion programs and flow speeds. We found that both mean thrust and lift could be altered by changing the phase difference (φ) from 0° to 360° between the robotic caudal peduncle and the fin ray motion (spanning from 3 mN to 124 mN). Notably, DPIV results demonstrated that the caudal fin generated multiple wake flow patterns in both the vertical and horizontal planes by varying φ. Vortex jet angle and thrust impulse also varied significantly both in these two planes. In addition, the vortex shedding position along the spanwise tail direction could be shifted around the mid-sagittal position between the upper and lower lobes by changing the phase difference. We hypothesize that the fish caudal fin may serve as a flexible vectoring propeller during swimming and may be critical for the high maneuverability of fish.

  7. Reducing travel delay by in-car advice on speed, headway and lane use based on downstream traffic flow conditions - a simulation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schakel, W.J.; Klunder, G.; van Arem, B.; Harmsen, E.; Hagenzieker, M.P.

    2012-01-01

    A new advisory ADAS system is implemented in micro simulation to asses the effects on traffic flow as well as on safety. The system uses loop detector data from which situations may be recognized where advices are given to drivers in-car. Advice is given on speed, headway and lane use. Effectively

  8. Hydraulic performance numerical simulation of high specific speed mixed-flow pump based on quasi three-dimensional hydraulic design method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Y X; Su, M; Hou, H C; Song, P F

    2013-01-01

    This research adopts the quasi three-dimensional hydraulic design method for the impeller of high specific speed mixed-flow pump to achieve the purpose of verifying the hydraulic design method and improving hydraulic performance. Based on the two families of stream surface theory, the direct problem is completed when the meridional flow field of impeller is obtained by employing iterative calculation to settle the continuity and momentum equation of fluid. The inverse problem is completed by using the meridional flow field calculated in the direct problem. After several iterations of the direct and inverse problem, the shape of impeller and flow field information can be obtained finally when the result of iteration satisfies the convergent criteria. Subsequently the internal flow field of the designed pump are simulated by using RANS equations with RNG k-ε two-equation turbulence model. The static pressure and streamline distributions at the symmetrical cross-section, the vector velocity distribution around blades and the reflux phenomenon are analyzed. The numerical results show that the quasi three-dimensional hydraulic design method for high specific speed mixed-flow pump improves the hydraulic performance and reveal main characteristics of the internal flow of mixed-flow pump as well as provide basis for judging the rationality of the hydraulic design, improvement and optimization of hydraulic model

  9. Analysis of Metal Flow Behavior and Residual Stress Formation of Complex Functional Profiles under High-Speed Cold Roll-Beating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengkui Cui

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available To obtain a good surface layer performance of the complex functional profile during the high-speed cold roll-beating forming process, this paper analyzed the metal plastic flow and residual stress-formed mechanism by using a theoretical model of the metal flow and residual stress generation. By using simulation software, the cold roll-beating forming process of a spline shaft was simulated and analyzed. The metal flow and residual stress formation law in the motion were researched. In a practical experiment, the changes in the grains in the spline tooth profile section and the residual stress distribution on the tooth profile were studied. A microcorrespondence relationship was established between the metal plastic flow and the residual stress generation. The conclusions indicate that the rate at which the metal flow decreases changes gradually at different metal layers. The residual stress value is directly related to the plastic flow difference. As the roll-beating speed increases, the uneven degree of plastic deformation at the workpiece surface increases, and the residual stress in the tooth profile is generally greater. At the same roll-beating speed, the rate change trend of the metal flow decreases gradually from the surface to the inner layer and from the dedendum to the addendum. The residual stress distribution on the surface of the tooth profile decreases from the dedendum to the addendum. These findings provide a basis and guidance for the controlled use of residual stress, obtaining better surface layer quality in the high-speed cold roll-beating process of the complex functional profile.

  10. Wire-mesh sensor, ultrasound and high-speed videometry applied for the characterization of horizontal gas-liquid slug flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofuchi, C. Y.; Morales, R. E. M.; Arruda, L. V. R.; Neves, F., Jr.; Dorini, L.; do Amaral, C. E. F.; da Silva, M. J.

    2012-03-01

    Gas-liquid flows occur in a broad range of industrial applications, for instance in chemical, petrochemical and nuclear industries. Correct understating of flow behavior is crucial for safe and optimized operation of equipments and processes. Thus, measurement of gas-liquid flow plays an important role. Many techniques have been proposed and applied to analyze two-phase flows so far. In this experimental research, data from a wire-mesh sensor, an ultrasound technique and high-speed camera are used to study two-phase slug flows in horizontal pipes. The experiments were performed in an experimental two-phase flow loop which comprises a horizontal acrylic pipe of 26 mm internal diameter and 9 m length. Water and air were used to produce the two-phase flow and their flow rates are separately controlled to produce different flow conditions. As a parameter of choice, translational velocity of air bubbles was determined by each of the techniques and comparatively evaluated along with a mechanistic flow model. Results obtained show good agreement among all techniques. The visualization of flow obtained by the different techniques is also presented.

  11. Applicability of linearized-theory attached-flow methods to design and analysis of flap systems at low speeds for thin swept wings with sharp leading edges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Harry W.; Darden, Christine M.

    1987-01-01

    Low-speed experimental force and data on a series of thin swept wings with sharp leading edges and leading and trailing-edge flaps are compared with predictions made using a linearized-theory method which includes estimates of vortex forces. These comparisons were made to assess the effectiveness of linearized-theory methods for use in the design and analysis of flap systems in subsonic flow. Results demonstrate that linearized-theory, attached-flow methods (with approximate representation of vortex forces) can form the basis of a rational system for flap design and analysis. Even attached-flow methods that do not take vortex forces into account can be used for the selection of optimized flap-system geometry, but design-point performance levels tend to be underestimated unless vortex forces are included. Illustrative examples of the use of these methods in the design of efficient low-speed flap systems are included.

  12. Functional electrical stimulation-assisted walking for persons with incomplete spinal injuries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladouceur, M.; Barbeau, H.

    2000-01-01

    This study investigated the changes in maximal overground walking speed (MOWS) that occurred during; walking training with a functional electrical stimulation (FES) orthosis by chronic spinal cord injured persons with incomplete motor function loss. The average walking: speed over a distance of 10...

  13. Allegheny County Walk Scores

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Walk Score measures the walkability of any address using a patented system developed by the Walk Score company. For each 2010 Census Tract centroid, Walk Score...

  14. Toe Walking in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... prone to damage and weaken over time. This diagnosis might be more likely if your child initially walked normally before starting to toe walk. Autism. Toe walking has been linked to autism spectrum ...

  15. Stride rate and walking intensity in healthy older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, Leslie; Hewitt, Allan; Rowe, David A; Sutherland, Rona

    2014-04-01

    The study investigated (a) walking intensity (stride rate and energy expenditure) under three speed instructions; (b) associations between stride rate, age, height, and walking intensity; and (c) synchronization between stride rate and music tempo during overground walking in a population of healthy older adults. Twenty-nine participants completed 3 treadmill-walking trials and 3 overground-walking trials at 3 self-selected speeds. Treadmill VO2 was measured using indirect calorimetry. Stride rate and music tempo were recorded during overground-walking trials. Mean stride rate exceeded minimum thresholds for moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) under slow (111.41 ± 11.93), medium (118.17 ± 11.43), and fast (123.79 ± 11.61) instructions. A multilevel model showed that stride rate, age, and height have a significant effect (p Music can be a useful way to guide walking cadence.

  16. Kinematic control of walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacquaniti, F; Ivanenko, Y P; Zago, M

    2002-10-01

    The planar law of inter-segmental co-ordination we described may emerge from the coupling of neural oscillators between each other and with limb mechanical oscillators. Muscle contraction intervenes at variable times to re-excite the intrinsic oscillations of the system when energy is lost. The hypothesis that a law of coordinative control results from a minimal active tuning of the passive inertial and viscoelastic coupling among limb segments is congruent with the idea that movement has evolved according to minimum energy criteria (1, 8). It is known that multi-segment motion of mammals locomotion is controlled by a network of coupled oscillators (CPGs, see 18, 33, 37). Flexible combination of unit oscillators gives rise to different forms of locomotion. Inter-oscillator coupling can be modified by changing the synaptic strength (or polarity) of the relative spinal connections. As a result, unit oscillators can be coupled in phase, out of phase, or with a variable phase, giving rise to different behaviors, such as speed increments or reversal of gait direction (from forward to backward). Supra-spinal centers may drive or modulate functional sets of coordinating interneurons to generate different walking modes (or gaits). Although it is often assumed that CPGs control patterns of muscle activity, an equally plausible hypothesis is that they control patterns of limb segment motion instead (22). According to this kinematic view, each unit oscillator would directly control a limb segment, alternately generating forward and backward oscillations of the segment. Inter-segmental coordination would be achieved by coupling unit oscillators with a variable phase. Inter-segmental kinematic phase plays the role of global control variable previously postulated for the network of central oscillators. In fact, inter-segmental phase shifts systematically with increasing speed both in man (4) and cat (38). Because this phase-shift is correlated with the net mechanical power

  17. Two-dimensional magnetic field evolution measurements and plasma flow speed estimates from the coaxial thruster experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, D.C.; Mayo, R.M.; Gerwin, R.A.; Schoenberg, K.F.; Scheuer, J.T.; Hoyt, R.P.; Henins, I.

    1994-01-01

    Local, time-dependent magnetic field measurements have been made in the Los Alamos coaxial thruster experiment (CTX) [C. W. Barnes et al., Phys. Fluids B 2, 1871 (1990); J. C. Fernandez et al., Nucl. Fusion 28, 1555 (1988)] using a 24 coil magnetic probe array (eight spatial positions, three axis probes). The CTX is a magnetized, coaxial plasma gun presently being used to investigate the viability of high pulsed power plasma thrusters for advanced electric propulsion. Previous efforts on this device have indicated that high pulsed power plasma guns are attractive candidates for advanced propulsion that employ ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) plasma stream flow through self-formed magnetic nozzles. Indirect evidence of magnetic nozzle formation was obtained from plasma gun performance and measurements of directed axial velocities up to v z ∼10 7 cm/s. The purpose of this work is to make direct measurement of the time evolving magnetic field topology. The intent is to both identify that applied magnetic field distortion by the highly conductive plasma is occurring, and to provide insight into the details of discharge evolution. Data from a magnetic fluctuation probe array have been used to investigate the details of applied magnetic field deformation through the reconstruction of time-dependent flux profiles. Experimentally observed magnetic field line distortion has been compared to that predicted by a simple one-dimensional (1-D) model of the discharge channel. Such a comparison is utilized to estimate the axial plasma velocity in the thruster. Velocities determined in this manner are in approximate agreement with the predicted self-field magnetosonic speed and those measured by a time-of-flight spectrometer

  18. Walking for art's sake

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    The man who compared himself to a proton ! On 20 May, Gianni Motti went down into the LHC tunnel and walked around the 27 kilometres of the underground ring at an average, unaccelerated pace of 5 kph. This was an artistic rather than an athletic performance, aimed at drawing a parallel between the fantastic speed of the beams produced by the future accelerator and the leisurely stroll of a human. The artist, who hails from Lombardy, was accompanied by cameraman Ivo Zanetti, who filmed the event from start to finish, and physicist Jean-Pierre Merlo. The first part of the film can be seen at the Villa Bernasconi, 8 route du Grand-Lancy, Grand Lancy, until 26 June.

  19. Walking for art's sake

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

      The man who compared himself to a proton ! On 20 May, Gianni Motti went down into the LHC tunnel and walked around the 27 kilometres of the underground ring at an average, unaccelerated pace of 5 kph. This was an artistic rather than an athletic performance, aimed at drawing a parallel between the fantastic speed of the beams produced by the future accelerator and the leisurely stroll of a human. The artist, who hails from Lombardy, was accompanied by cameraman Ivo Zanetti, who filmed the event from start to finish, and physicist Jean-Pierre Merlo. The first part of the film can be seen at the Villa Bernasconi, 8 route du Grand-Lancy, Grand Lancy, until 26 June.

  20. Outflow of traffic from the national capital Kuala Lumpur to the north, south and east coast highways using flow, speed and density relationships

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nik Hashim Nik Mustapha; Nik Nur Wahidah Nik Hashim

    2016-01-01

    The functional relationships between flow (veh/km), density (veh/h) and speed (km/h) in traffic congestion have a long history of research. However, their findings and techniques persist to be relevant to this day. The analysis is pertinent, particularly in finding the best fit for the three major highways in Malaysia, namely the KL-Karak Highway, KL-Seremban Highway and KL-Ipoh Highway. The trans-logarithm function of density—speed model was compared to the classical models of Greenshields, Greenberg, Underwood and Drake et al. using data provided by the Transport Statistics Malaysia 2014. The results of regression analysis revealed that the Greenshields and Greenberg models were statistically signifi-cant. The trans-logarithm function was also tested and the results were nonetheless without exception. Its usefulness in addition to statistical significance related to the derived economic concepts of maximum speed and the related number of vehicles, flow and density and the limits of free speed were relevant in comparing the individual levels of traffic congestion between highways. For instance, KL-Karak Highway was least congested compared to KL-Seremban Highway and KL-Ipoh Highway. Their maximum speeds, based on three lanes carriage capacity of one direction, were 33.4 km/h for KL-Karak, 15.9 km/h for KL-Seremban, and 21.1 km/h for KL-Ipoh. Their corresponding flows were approxi-mated at 1080.9 veh/h, 1555.4 veh/h, and 1436.6 veh/h.

  1. Outflow of traffic from the national capital Kuala Lumpur to the north, south and east coast highways using flow, speed and density relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nik Hashim Nik Mustapha

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The functional relationships between flow (veh/km, density (veh/h and speed (km/h in traffic congestion have a long history of research. However, their findings and techniques persist to be relevant to this day. The analysis is pertinent, particularly in finding the best fit for the three major highways in Malaysia, namely the KL-Karak Highway, KL-Seremban Highway and KL-Ipoh Highway. The trans-logarithm function of density–speed model was compared to the classical models of Greenshields, Greenberg, Underwood and Drake et al. using data provided by the Transport Statistics Malaysia 2014. The results of regression analysis revealed that the Greenshields and Greenberg models were statistically significant. The trans-logarithm function was also tested and the results were nonetheless without exception. Its usefulness in addition to statistical significance related to the derived economic concepts of maximum speed and the related number of vehicles, flow and density and the limits of free speed were relevant in comparing the individual levels of traffic congestion between highways. For instance, KL-Karak Highway was least congested compared to KL-Seremban Highway and KL-Ipoh Highway. Their maximum speeds, based on three lanes carriage capacity of one direction, were 33.4 km/h for KL-Karak, 15.9 km/h for KL-Seremban, and 21.1 km/h for KL-Ipoh. Their corresponding flows were approximated at 1080.9 veh/h, 1555.4 veh/h, and 1436.6 veh/h.

  2. Influence of air flow, temperature and agitation speed in the batch acetification process to obtain orange vinegar (Citrus sinensis var.W. Navel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Ferreyra

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the influence of process variables to produce orange vinegar. Orange juice was fermented with Saccharomyces cerevisiae until reach 14% v/v. The biooxidation was carried out with Acetobacter sp., in submerge culture using a laboratory scale fermentor. In order to avoid the inhibitory effect of ethanol on acetic acid bacteria, the orange wine was diluted to 6% v/v with a mineral solution. It was performed a factorial design 2k to study the influence of variables. It was studied air flow rate/agitation at levels of 0.3-0.6 vvm and 200-400 rpm and the effect of air flow rate/temperature at 0.4-0.6 vvm and 25- 30°C, respectively. Duplicate treatments were carried out and the results were evaluated in terms of productivity and fermentation yield. Statistical design (p-value<0.05 was analyzed using Statgraphics Centurion XV Corporate software. Treatments performed at 200 rpm and different air flow levels, did not show significant differences on acetification rate. At higher agitation speed and air flow rates, the productivity was high. The best yields were obtained at lower air flows levels and higher agitation speed. Temperature did not present statistically differences on studied variables. The best yield was obtained at 400 rpm and 0.3 vvm at 25°C. It can be concluded that agitation speed plays an important role for a better acetification rate however higher air flow rates causes less yields.

  3. Numerical Investigation on the Effects of Self-Excited Tip Flow Unsteadiness and Blade Row Interactions on the Performance Predictions of Low Speed and Transonic Compressor Rotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Daniel H.

    The impact blade row interactions can have on the performance of compressor rotors has been well documented. It is also well known that rotor tip clearance flows can have a large effect on compressor performance and stall margin and recent research has shown that tip leakage flows can exhibit self-excited unsteadiness at near stall conditions. However, the impact of tip leakage flow on the performance and operating range of a compressor rotor, relative to other important flow features such as upstream stator wakes or downstream potential effects, has not been explored. To this end, a numerical investigation has been conducted to determine the effects of self-excited tip flow unsteadiness, upstream stator wakes, and downstream blade row interactions on the performance prediction of low speed and transonic compressor rotors. Calculations included a single blade-row rotor configuration as well as two multi-blade row configurations: one where the rotor was modeled with an upstream stator and a second where the rotor was modeled with a downstream stator. Steady-state and time accurate calculations were performed using a RANS solver and the results were compared with detailed experimental data obtained in the GE Low Speed Research Compressor and the Notre Dame Transonic Rig at several operating conditions including near stall. Differences in the performance predictions between the three configurations were then used to determine the effect of the upstream stator wakes and the downstream blade row interactions. Results obtained show that for both the low speed and transonic research compressors used in this investigation time-accurate RANS analysis is necessary to accurately predict the stalling character of the rotor. Additionally, for the first time it is demonstrated that capturing the unsteady tip flow can have a larger impact on rotor performance predictions than adjacent blade row interactions.

  4. TOMOGRAPHY OF PLASMA FLOWS IN THE UPPER SOLAR CONVECTION ZONE USING TIME-DISTANCE INVERSION COMBINING RIDGE AND PHASE-SPEED FILTERING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Švanda, Michal

    2013-01-01

    The consistency of time-distance inversions for horizontal components of the plasma flow on supergranular scales in the upper solar convection zone is checked by comparing the results derived using two k-ω filtering procedures—ridge filtering and phase-speed filtering—commonly used in time-distance helioseismology. I show that both approaches result in similar flow estimates when finite-frequency sensitivity kernels are used. I further demonstrate that the performance of the inversion improves (in terms of a simultaneously better averaging kernel and a lower noise level) when the two approaches are combined together in one inversion. Using the combined inversion, I invert for horizontal flows in the upper 10 Mm of the solar convection zone. The flows connected with supergranulation seem to be coherent only for the top ∼5 Mm; deeper down there is a hint of change of the convection scales toward structures larger than supergranules

  5. Effect of uphill and downhill walking on walking performance in geriatric patients using a wheeled walker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindemann, Ulrich; Schwenk, Michael; Schmitt, Syn; Weyrich, Michael; Schlicht, Wolfgang; Becker, Clemens

    2017-08-01

    Wheeled walkers are recommended to improve walking performance in older persons and to encourage and assist participation in daily life. Nevertheless, using a wheeled walker can cause serious problems in the natural environment. This study aimed to compare uphill and downhill walking with walking level in geriatric patients using a wheeled walker. Furthermore, we investigated the effect of using a wheeled walker with respect to dual tasking when walking level. A total of 20 geriatric patients (median age 84.5 years) walked 10 m at their habitual pace along a level surface, uphill and downhill, with and without a standard wheeled walker. Gait speed, stride length and cadence were assessed by wearable sensors and the walk ratio was calculated. When using a wheeled walker while walking level the walk ratio improved (0.58 m/[steps/min] versus 0.57 m/[steps/min], p = 0.023) but gait speed decreased (1.07 m/s versus 1.12 m/s, p = 0.020) when compared to not using a wheeled walker. With respect to the walk ratio, uphill and downhill walking with a wheeled walker decreased walking performance when compared to level walking (0.54 m/[steps/min] versus 0.58 m/[steps/min], p = 0.023 and 0.55 m/[steps/min] versus 0.58 m/[steps/min], p = 0.001, respectively). At the same time, gait speed decreased (0.079 m/s versus 1.07 m/s, p walker improved the quality of level walking but the performance of uphill and downhill walking was worse compared to walking level when using a wheeled walker.

  6. Complementarity and quantum walks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kendon, Viv; Sanders, Barry C.

    2005-01-01

    We show that quantum walks interpolate between a coherent 'wave walk' and a random walk depending on how strongly the walker's coin state is measured; i.e., the quantum walk exhibits the quintessentially quantum property of complementarity, which is manifested as a tradeoff between knowledge of which path the walker takes vs the sharpness of the interference pattern. A physical implementation of a quantum walk (the quantum quincunx) should thus have an identifiable walker and the capacity to demonstrate the interpolation between wave walk and random walk depending on the strength of measurement

  7. Development and Application of Plasma Actuators for Active Control of High-Speed and High Reynolds Number Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammy, Mo

    2010-01-01

    Active flow control is often used to manipulate flow instabilities to achieve a desired goal (e.g. prevent separation, enhance mixing, reduce noise, etc.). Instability frequencies normally scale with flow velocity scale and inversely with flow length scale (U/l). In a laboratory setting for such flow experiments, U is high, but l is low, resulting in high instability frequency. In addition, high momentum and high background noise & turbulence in the flow necessitate high amplitude actuation. Developing a high amplitude and high frequency actuator is a major challenge. Ironically, these requirements ease up in application (but other issues arise).

  8. Fire-Walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willey, David

    2010-01-01

    This article gives a brief history of fire-walking and then deals with the physics behind fire-walking. The author has performed approximately 50 fire-walks, took the data for the world's hottest fire-walk and was, at one time, a world record holder for the longest fire-walk (www.dwilley.com/HDATLTW/Record_Making_Firewalks.html). He currently…

  9. Relationship between quantum walks and relativistic quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandrashekar, C. M.; Banerjee, Subhashish; Srikanth, R.

    2010-01-01

    Quantum walk models have been used as an algorithmic tool for quantum computation and to describe various physical processes. This article revisits the relationship between relativistic quantum mechanics and the quantum walks. We show the similarities of the mathematical structure of the decoupled and coupled forms of the discrete-time quantum walk to that of the Klein-Gordon and Dirac equations, respectively. In the latter case, the coin emerges as an analog of the spinor degree of freedom. Discrete-time quantum walk as a coupled form of the continuous-time quantum walk is also shown by transforming the decoupled form of the discrete-time quantum walk to the Schroedinger form. By showing the coin to be a means to make the walk reversible and that the Dirac-like structure is a consequence of the coin use, our work suggests that the relativistic causal structure is a consequence of conservation of information. However, decoherence (modeled by projective measurements on position space) generates entropy that increases with time, making the walk irreversible and thereby producing an arrow of time. The Lieb-Robinson bound is used to highlight the causal structure of the quantum walk to put in perspective the relativistic structure of the quantum walk, the maximum speed of walk propagation, and earlier findings related to the finite spread of the walk probability distribution. We also present a two-dimensional quantum walk model on a two-state system to which the study can be extended.

  10. Race walking gait and its influence on race walking economy in world-class race walkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Ezeiza, Josu; Torres-Unda, Jon; Tam, Nicholas; Irazusta, Jon; Granados, Cristina; Santos-Concejero, Jordan

    2018-03-06

    The aim of this study was to determine the relationships between biomechanical parameters of the gait cycle and race walking economy in world-class Olympic race walkers. Twenty-One world-class race walkers possessing the Olympic qualifying standard participated in this study. Participants completed an incremental race walking test starting at 10 km·h -1 , where race walking economy (ml·kg -1 ·km -1 ) and spatiotemporal gait variables were analysed at different speeds. 20-km race walking performance was related to race walking economy, being the fastest race walkers those displaying reduced oxygen cost at a given speed (R = 0.760, p < 0.001). Longer ground contact times, shorter flight times, longer midstance sub-phase and shorter propulsive sub-phase during stance were related to a better race walking economy (moderate effect, p < 0.05). According to the results of this study, the fastest race walkers were more economi cal than the lesser performers. Similarly, shorter flight times are associated with a more efficient race walking economy. Coaches and race walkers should avoid modifying their race walking style by increasing flight times, as it may not only impair economy, but also lead to disqualification.

  11. Application of the ultrasonic technique and high-speed filming for the study of the structure of air-water bubbly flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, R.D.M.; Venturini, O.J.; Tanahashi, E.I. [Universidade Federal de Itajuba (UNIFEI), Itajuba (Brazil); Neves, F. Jr. [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba (Brazil); Franca, F.A. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Campinas (Brazil)

    2009-10-15

    Multiphase flows are very common in industry, oftentimes involving very harsh environments and fluids. Accordingly, there is a need to determine the dispersed phase holdup using noninvasive fast responding techniques; besides, knowledge of the flow structure is essential for the assessment of the transport processes involved. The ultrasonic technique fulfills these requirements and could have the capability to provide the information required. In this paper, the potential of the ultrasonic technique for application to two-phase flows was investigated by checking acoustic attenuation data against experimental data on the void fraction and flow topology of vertical, upward, air-water bubbly flows in the zero to 15% void fraction range. The ultrasonic apparatus consisted of one emitter/receiver transducer and three other receivers at different positions along the pipe circumference; simultaneous high-speed motion pictures of the flow patterns were made at 250 and 1000 fps. The attenuation data for all sensors exhibited a systematic interrelated behavior with void fraction, thereby testifying to the capability of the ultrasonic technique to measure the dispersed phase holdup. From the motion pictures, basic gas phase structures and different flows patterns were identified that corroborated several features of the acoustic attenuation data. Finally, the acoustic wave transit time was also investigated as a function of void fraction. (author)

  12. Randomized random walk on a random walk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, P.A.

    1983-06-01

    This paper discusses generalizations of the model introduced by Kehr and Kunter of the random walk of a particle on a one-dimensional chain which in turn has been constructed by a random walk procedure. The superimposed random walk is randomised in time according to the occurrences of a stochastic point process. The probability of finding the particle in a particular position at a certain instant is obtained explicitly in the transform domain. It is found that the asymptotic behaviour for large time of the mean-square displacement of the particle depends critically on the assumed structure of the basic random walk, giving a diffusion-like term for an asymmetric walk or a square root law if the walk is symmetric. Many results are obtained in closed form for the Poisson process case, and these agree with those given previously by Kehr and Kunter. (author)

  13. Relation between random walks and quantum walks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boettcher, Stefan; Falkner, Stefan; Portugal, Renato

    2015-05-01

    Based on studies of four specific networks, we conjecture a general relation between the walk dimensions dw of discrete-time random walks and quantum walks with the (self-inverse) Grover coin. In each case, we find that dw of the quantum walk takes on exactly half the value found for the classical random walk on the same geometry. Since walks on homogeneous lattices satisfy this relation trivially, our results for heterogeneous networks suggest that such a relation holds irrespective of whether translational invariance is maintained or not. To develop our results, we extend the renormalization-group analysis (RG) of the stochastic master equation to one with a unitary propagator. As in the classical case, the solution ρ (x ,t ) in space and time of this quantum-walk equation exhibits a scaling collapse for a variable xdw/t in the weak limit, which defines dw and illuminates fundamental aspects of the walk dynamics, e.g., its mean-square displacement. We confirm the collapse for ρ (x ,t ) in each case with extensive numerical simulation. The exact values for dw themselves demonstrate that RG is a powerful complementary approach to study the asymptotics of quantum walks that weak-limit theorems have not been able to access, such as for systems lacking translational symmetries beyond simple trees.

  14. Speed-Dependent Modulation of the Locomotor Behavior in Adult Mice Reveals Attractor and Transitional Gaits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemieux, Maxime; Josset, Nicolas; Roussel, Marie; Couraud, Sébastien; Bretzner, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Locomotion results from an interplay between biomechanical constraints of the muscles attached to the skeleton and the neuronal circuits controlling and coordinating muscle activities. Quadrupeds exhibit a wide range of locomotor gaits. Given our advances in the genetic identification of spinal and supraspinal circuits important to locomotion in the mouse, it is now important to get a better understanding of the full repertoire of gaits in the freely walking mouse. To assess this range, young adult C57BL/6J mice were trained to walk and run on a treadmill at different locomotor speeds. Instead of using the classical paradigm defining gaits according to their footfall pattern, we combined the inter-limb coupling and the duty cycle of the stance phase, thus identifying several types of gaits: lateral walk, trot, out-of-phase walk, rotary gallop, transverse gallop, hop, half-bound, and full-bound. Out-of-phase walk, trot, and full-bound were robust and appeared to function as attractor gaits (i.e., a state to which the network flows and stabilizes) at low, intermediate, and high speeds respectively. In contrast, lateral walk, hop, transverse gallop, rotary gallop, and half-bound were more transient and therefore considered transitional gaits (i.e., a labile state of the network from which it flows to the attractor state). Surprisingly, lateral walk was less frequently observed. Using graph analysis, we demonstrated that transitions between gaits were predictable, not random. In summary, the wild-type mouse exhibits a wider repertoire of locomotor gaits than expected. Future locomotor studies should benefit from this paradigm in assessing transgenic mice or wild-type mice with neurotraumatic injury or neurodegenerative disease affecting gait.

  15. Desflurane usage during anesthesia with and without N2O using FLOW-i Automatic Gas Control with three different wash-in speeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Medts, Robrecht; Carette, Rik; De Wolf, Andre M; Hendrickx, Jan F A

    2017-06-09

    AGC ® (Automatic Gas Control) is the FLOW-i's automated low flow tool (Maquet, Solna, Sweden) that target controls the inspired O 2 (F I O 2 ) and end-expired desflurane concentration (F A des) while (by design) exponentially decreasing fresh gas flow (FGF) during wash-in to a maintenance default FGF of 300 mL min -1 . It also offers a choice of wash-in speeds for the inhaled agents. We examined AGC performance and hypothesized that the use of lower wash-in speeds and N 2 O both reduce desflurane usage (Vdes). After obtaining IRB approval and patient consent, 78 ASA I-II patients undergoing abdominal surgery were randomly assigned to 1 of 6 groups (n = 13 each), depending on carrier gas (O 2 /air or O 2 /N 2 O) and wash-in speed (AGC speed 2, 4, or 6) of desflurane, resulting in groups air/2, air/4, air/6, N 2 O/2, N 2 O/4, and N 2 O/6. The target for F I O 2 was set at 35%, while the F A des target was selected so that the AGC displayed 1.3 MAC (corrected for the additive affect of N 2 O if used). AGC was activated upon starting mechanical ventilation. Varvel's criteria were used to describe performance of achieving the targets. Patient demographics, end-expired N 2 O concentration, MAC, FGF, and Vdes were compared using ANOVA. Data are presented as mean ± standard deviation, except for Varvel's criteria (median ± quartiles). Patient demographics did not differ among the groups. Median performance error was -2-0% for F I O 2 and -3-1% for F A des; median absolute performance error was 1-2% for F I O 2 and 0-3% for F A des. MAC increased faster in N 2 O groups, but total MAC decreased 0.1-0.25 MAC below that in the O 2 /air groups after 60 min. The effect of wash-in speed on Vdes faded over time. N 2 O decreased Vdes by 62%. AGC performance for O 2 and desflurane targeting is excellent. After 1 h, the wash-in speeds tested are unlikely to affect desflurane usage. N 2 O usage decreases Vdes proportionally with its reduction in F A tdes.

  16. Daily intermittent hypoxia enhances walking after chronic spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Heather B.; Jayaraman, Arun; Herrmann, Megan; Mitchell, Gordon S.; Rymer, William Z.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To test the hypothesis that daily acute intermittent hypoxia (dAIH) and dAIH combined with overground walking improve walking speed and endurance in persons with chronic incomplete spinal cord injury (iSCI). Methods: Nineteen subjects completed the randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study. Participants received 15, 90-second hypoxic exposures (dAIH, fraction of inspired oxygen [Fio2] = 0.09) or daily normoxia (dSHAM, Fio2 = 0.21) at 60-second normoxic intervals on 5 consecutive days; dAIH was given alone or combined with 30 minutes of overground walking 1 hour later. Walking speed and endurance were quantified using 10-Meter and 6-Minute Walk Tests. The trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01272349). Results: dAIH improved walking speed and endurance. Ten-Meter Walk time improved with dAIH vs dSHAM after 1 day (mean difference [MD] 3.8 seconds, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1–6.5 seconds, p = 0.006) and 2 weeks (MD 3.8 seconds, 95% CI 0.9–6.7 seconds, p = 0.010). Six-Minute Walk distance increased with combined dAIH + walking vs dSHAM + walking after 5 days (MD 94.4 m, 95% CI 17.5–171.3 m, p = 0.017) and 1-week follow-up (MD 97.0 m, 95% CI 20.1–173.9 m, p = 0.014). dAIH + walking increased walking distance more than dAIH after 1 day (MD 67.7 m, 95% CI 1.3–134.1 m, p = 0.046), 5 days (MD 107.0 m, 95% CI 40.6–173.4 m, p = 0.002), and 1-week follow-up (MD 136.0 m, 95% CI 65.3–206.6 m, p walking improved walking speed and distance in persons with chronic iSCI. The impact of dAIH is enhanced by combination with walking, demonstrating that combinatorial therapies may promote greater functional benefits in persons with iSCI. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class I evidence that transient hypoxia (through measured breathing treatments), along with overground walking training, improves walking speed and endurance after iSCI. PMID:24285617

  17. Investigation of Unsteady Tip Clearance Flow in a Low-Speed One and Half Stage Axial Compressor with LES And PIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hah, Chunill; Hathaway, Michael; Katz, Joseph; Tan, David

    2015-01-01

    The primary focus of this paper is to investigate how a rotor's unsteady tip clearance flow structure changes in a low speed one and half stage axial compressor when the rotor tip gap size is increased from 0.5 mm (0.49% of rotor tip blade chord, 2% of blade span) to 2.4 mm (2.34% chord, 4% span) at the design condition are investigated. The changes in unsteady tip clearance flow with the 0.62 % tip gap as the flow rate is reduced to near stall condition are also investigated. A Large Eddy Simulation (LES) is applied to calculate the unsteady flow field at these three flow conditions. Detailed Stereoscopic PIV (SPIV) measurements of the current flow fields were also performed at the Johns Hopkins University in a refractive index-matched test facility which renders the compressor blades and casing optically transparent. With this setup, the unsteady velocity field in the entire flow domain, including the flow inside the tip gap, can be measured. Unsteady tip clearance flow fields from LES are compared with the PIV measurements and both LES and PIV results are used to study changes in tip clearance flow structures. The current study shows that the tip clearance vortex is not a single structure as traditionally perceived. The tip clearance vortex is formed by multiple interlaced vorticities. Therefore, the tip clearance vortex is inherently unsteady. The multiple interlaced vortices never roll up to form a single structure. When phased-averaged, the tip clearance vortex appears as a single structure. When flow rate is reduced with the same tip gap, the tip clearance vortex rolls further upstream and the tip clearance vortex moves further radially inward and away from the suction side of the blade. When the tip gap size is increased at the design flow condition, the overall tip clearance vortex becomes stronger and it stays closer to the blade suction side and the vortex core extends all the way to the exit of the blade passage. Measured and calculated unsteady flow

  18. Effectiveness of Motorcycle speed controlled by speed hump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pornsiri Urapa

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Speed humps are one of the traffic calming measures widely accepted to control vehicle speed in the local road. Humps standards from the western countries are designed mainly for the passenger car. This study, therefore, aims to reveal the effectiveness of speed hump to control the motorcycle speed. This study observes the free-flow speed of the riders at the total of 20 speed bumps and humps. They are 0.3-14.8 meter in width and 5-18 centimeter in height. The results reveal that the 85th percentile speeds reduce 15-65 percent when crossing the speed bumps and speed humps. Besides, this study develops the speed model to predict the motorcycle mean speed and 85th percentile speed. It is found that speed humps follow the ITE standard can control motorcycle crossing speeds to be 25-30 Kph which are suitable to travel on the local road.

  19. Kinetic analysis of the function of the upper body for elite race walkers during official men 20 km walking race.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoga-Miura, Koji; Ae, Michiyoshi; Fujii, Norihisa; Yokozawa, Toshiharu

    2016-10-01

    This study investigated the function of the upper extremities of elite race walkers during official 20 km races, focusing on the angular momentum about the vertical axis and other parameters of the upper extremities. Sixteen walkers were analysed using the three-dimensional direct linear transformation method during three official men's 20 km walking races. The subjects, included participants at the Olympics and World Championships, who finished without disqualification and had not been disqualified during the two years prior to or following the races analysed in the present study. The angular momenta of the upper and lower body were counterbalanced as in running and normal walking. The momentum of the upper body was mainly generated by the upper extremities. The joint force moment of the right shoulder and the joint torque at the left shoulder just before right toe-off were significantly correlated with the walking speed. These were counterbalanced by other moments and torques to the torso torque, which worked to obtain a large mechanical energy flow from the recovery leg to the support leg in the final phase of the support phase. Therefore, a function of the shoulder torque was to counterbalance the torso torque to gain a fast walking speed with substantial mechanical energy flow.

  20. High Speed Schlieren Studies of Flow Over Mercury Atlas Vehicle in the Langley 2-Foot Transonic Aeroplasticity Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    1960-01-01

    Test conditions for the studies are: Mach number varying continuously from approximately 0.8 to 1.1 and Reynolds number (based on maximum diameter of Atlas) approximately 0.451 x 10(exp 6). Camera speed is 2000 frames per second.

  1. Steady and transient coordination structures of walking and running

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamoth, C.J.C.; Daffertshofer, A.; Huys, R.; Beek, P.J.

    2009-01-01

    We studied multisegmental coordination and stride characteristics in nine participants while walking and running on a treadmill. The study's main aim was to evaluate the coordination patterns of walking and running and their variance as a function of locomotion speed, with a specific focus on gait

  2. Steady and transient coordination structures of walking and running

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamoth, C. J. C.; Daffertshofer, A.; Huys, R.; Beek, P. J.

    We studied multisegmental coordination and stride characteristics in nine participants while walking and running on a treadmill. The study's main aim was to evaluate the coordination patterns of walking and running and their variance as a function of locomotion speed, with a specific focus on gait

  3. Elastic coupling of limb joints enables faster bipedal walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, J.C.; Kuo, A.D.

    2008-01-01

    The passive dynamics of bipedal limbs alone are sufficient to produce a walking motion, without need for control. Humans augment these dynamics with muscles, actively coordinated to produce stable and economical walking. Present robots using passive dynamics walk much slower, perhaps because they lack elastic muscles that couple the joints. Elastic properties are well known to enhance running gaits, but their effect on walking has yet to be explored. Here we use a computational model of dynamic walking to show that elastic joint coupling can help to coordinate faster walking. In walking powered by trailing leg push-off, the model's speed is normally limited by a swing leg that moves too slowly to avoid stumbling. A uni-articular spring about the knee allows faster but uneconomical walking. A combination of uni-articular hip and knee springs can speed the legs for improved speed and economy, but not without the swing foot scuffing the ground. Bi-articular springs coupling the hips and knees can yield high economy and good ground clearance similar to humans. An important parameter is the knee-to-hip moment arm that greatly affects the existence and stability of gaits, and when selected appropriately can allow for a wide range of speeds. Elastic joint coupling may contribute to the economy and stability of human gait. PMID:18957360

  4. Implementing quantum walks using orbital angular momentum of classical light

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Goyal, SK

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available –5]. This speed up gained in quantum walks promises ad- vantages when applied in quantum computation for cer- tain classes of quantum algorithms [6], for example, quan- tum search algorithms [7, 8]. Quantum walks have also been used to analyze energy transport...

  5. Effect of the submergence, the bed form geometry, and the speed of the surface water flow on the mitigation of pesticides in agricultural ditches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutron, Olivier; Margoum, Christelle; Chovelon, Jean-Marc; Guillemain, CéLine; Gouy, VéRonique

    2011-08-01

    Pesticides, which have been extensively used in agriculture, have become a major environmental issue, especially regarding surface and groundwater contamination. Of particular importance are vegetated farm drainage ditches, which can play an important role in the mitigation of pesticide contamination by adsorption onto ditch bed substrates. This role is, however, poorly understood, especially regarding the influence of hydrodynamic parameters, which make it difficult to promote best management practice of these systems. We have assessed the influence of three of these parameters (speed of the surface water flow, submergence, and geometrical characteristics of the bed forms) on the transfer and adsorption of selected pesticides (isoproturon, diuron, tebuconazole, and azoxystrobin) into the bed substrate by performing experiments with a tilted experimental flume, using hemp fibers as a standard of natural organic substrates that are found at the bottom of agricultural ditches. Results show the transfer of pesticides from surface water flow into bed substrate is favored, both regarding the amounts transferred into the bed substrate and the kinetics of the transfer, when the surface water speed and the submergence increase and when the bed forms are made of rectangular shapes. Extrapolation of flume data over a distance of several hundred meters suggests that an interesting possibility for improving the mitigation of pesticides in ditches would be to increase the submergence and to favor bed forms that tend to enhance perturbations and subsequent infiltration of the surface water flow.

  6. Relativistically speaking: Let's walk or run through the rain?

    OpenAIRE

    Assis, Armando V. D. B.

    2010-01-01

    We analyse under a simple approach the problem one must decide the best strategy to minimize the contact with rain when moving between two points through the rain. The available strategies: walk (low speed boost $

  7. Central and peripheral blood flow during exercise with a continuous-flow left ventricular assist device: constant versus increasing pump speed: a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brassard, Patrice; Jensen, Annette S; Nordsborg, Nikolai

    2011-01-01

    with work rate would increase organ blood flow. Methods and Results- Invasively determined CO and leg blood flow and Doppler-determined cerebral perfusion were measured during 2 incremental cycle exercise tests on the same day in 8 patients provided with a HeartMate II LVAD. In random order, patients...

  8. More Adults Are Walking

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This podcast is based on the August 2012 CDC Vital Signs report. While more adults are walking, only half get the recommended amount of physical activity. Listen to learn how communities, employers, and individuals may help increase walking.

  9. Influence of the swing ankle angle on walking stability for a passive dynamic walking robot with flat feet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xizhe Zang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available To achieve high walking stability for a passive dynamic walking robot is not easy. In this article, we aim to investigate whether the walking performance for a passive dynamic walking robot can be improved by just simply changing the swing ankle angle before impact. To validate this idea, a passive bipedal walking model with two straight legs, two flat feet, a hip joint, and two ankle joints was built in this study. The walking dynamics that contains double stance phase was derived. By numerical simulation of the walking in MATLAB, we found that the walking performance can be adjusted effectively by only simply changing the swing ankle angle before impact. A bigger swing ankle angle in a reasonable range will lead to a higher walking stability and a lower initial walking speed of the next step. A bigger swing ankle angle before impact leads to a bigger amount of energy lost during impact for the quasi-passive dynamic walking robot which will influence the walking stability of the next step.

  10. Development and Implementation of 3-D, High Speed Capacitance Tomography for Imaging Large-Scale, Cold-Flow Circulating Fluidized Bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marashdeh, Qussai [Tech4imaging LLC, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2013-02-01

    A detailed understanding of multiphase flow behavior inside a Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB) requires a 3-D technique capable of visualizing the flow field in real-time. Electrical Capacitance Volume Tomography (ECVT) is a newly developed technique that can provide such measurements. The attractiveness of the technique is in its low profile sensors, fast imaging speed and scalability to different section sizes, low operating cost, and safety. Moreover, the flexibility of ECVT sensors enable them to be designed around virtually any geometry, rendering them suitable to be used for measurement of solid flows in exit regions of the CFB. Tech4Imaging LLC has worked under contract with the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL) to develop an ECVT system for cold flow visualization and install it on a 12 inch ID circulating fluidized bed. The objective of this project was to help advance multi-phase flow science through implementation of an ECVT system on a cold flow model at DOE NETL. This project has responded to multi-phase community and industry needs of developing a tool that can be used to develop flow models, validate computational fluid dynamics simulations, provide detailed real-time feedback of process variables, and provide a comprehensive understating of multi-phase flow behavior. In this project, a complete ECVT system was successfully developed after considering different potential electronics and sensor designs. The system was tested at various flow conditions and with different materials, yielding real-time images of flow interaction in a gas-solid flow system. The system was installed on a 12 inch ID CFB of the US Department of Energy, Morgantown Labs. Technical and economic assessment of Scale-up and Commercialization of ECVT was also conducted. Experiments conducted with larger sensors in conditions similar to industrial settings are very promising. ECVT has also the potential to be developed for imaging multi

  11. Heat-flux gage measurements on a flat plate at a Mach number of 4.6 in the VSD high speed wind tunnel, a feasibility test (LA28). [wind tunnel tests of measuring instruments for boundary layer flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility of employing thin-film heat-flux gages was studied as a method of defining boundary layer characteristics at supersonic speeds in a high speed blowdown wind tunnel. Flow visualization techniques (using oil) were employed. Tabulated data (computer printouts), a test facility description, and photographs of test equipment are given.

  12. Quantum walk computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kendon, Viv

    2014-01-01

    Quantum versions of random walks have diverse applications that are motivating experimental implementations as well as theoretical studies. Recent results showing quantum walks are “universal for quantum computation” relate to algorithms, to be run on quantum computers. We consider whether an experimental implementation of a quantum walk could provide useful computation before we have a universal quantum computer

  13. A comparative pressure analysis of air flow between horizontal and V-Tail of UAV MALE of NACA0012H with speed variation

    OpenAIRE

    Riza Rahmat; Kurniawan Dicky; Wicaksono Arif Budi

    2018-01-01

    NACA0012H is an airfoil type that could be used for Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Medium Altitude Long Endurance. This experiment was used to analyze stress in the surface of Tail of UAV MALE that was caused by air flow. The experiment was conducted using Computational Fluid Dynamics Software. Two designs of tail, horizontal and V-tail, were considered to simulate pressure occurred on the surface of leading edge, chamber and trailing edge. The simulation was developed varying the speed of the UAV M...

  14. A comparative pressure analysis of air flow between horizontal and V-Tail of UAV MALE of NACA0012H with speed variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riza Rahmat

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available NACA0012H is an airfoil type that could be used for Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Medium Altitude Long Endurance. This experiment was used to analyze stress in the surface of Tail of UAV MALE that was caused by air flow. The experiment was conducted using Computational Fluid Dynamics Software. Two designs of tail, horizontal and V-tail, were considered to simulate pressure occurred on the surface of leading edge, chamber and trailing edge. The simulation was developed varying the speed of the UAV MALE. The results showed that pressure occurred on the surface of horizontal tail higher than pressure on the V-tail.

  15. Walk-Startup of a Two-Legged Walking Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babković, Kalman; Nagy, László; Krklješ, Damir; Borovac, Branislav

    There is a growing interest towards humanoid robots. One of their most important characteristic is the two-legged motion - walk. Starting and stopping of humanoid robots introduce substantial delays. In this paper, the goal is to explore the possibility of using a short unbalanced state of the biped robot to quickly gain speed and achieve the steady state velocity during a period shorter than half of the single support phase. The proposed method is verified by simulation. Maintainig a steady state, balanced gait is not considered in this paper.

  16. Speeding up the flash calculations in two-phase compositional flow simulations - The application of sparse grids

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Yuanqing; Kowitz, Christoph; Sun, Shuyu; Salama, Amgad

    2015-01-01

    Flash calculations have become a performance bottleneck in the simulation of compositional flow in subsurface reservoirs. We apply a sparse grid surrogate model to substitute the flash calculation and thus try to remove the bottleneck from

  17. Small Sub-micron-Particle Position-Resolving Laser-Doppler Velocimeter for High-Speed Flows, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The technical objectives of this proposed work are to develop and prove the use of LDV and CompLDV for particle-position-resolving and flow velocity profile...

  18. Development and Application of Advanced Optical Diagnostics for the Study of High Speed Flows in Micro Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lempert, Walter

    2000-01-01

    .... In particular, Molecular Tagging Velocimetry (MTV) measurements have been performed, using acetone vapor as a molecular tracer, in the flow produced by a 1 mm diameter, pressure matched, sonic nozzle...

  19. Walking-Beam Solar-Cell Conveyor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feder, H.; Frasch, W.

    1982-01-01

    Microprocessor-controlled walking-beam conveyor moves cells between work stations in automated assembly line. Conveyor has arm at each work station. In unison arms pick up all solar cells and advance them one station; then beam retracks to be in position for next step. Microprocessor sets beam stroke, speed, and position.

  20. Direct numerical simulation of a compressible boundary-layer flow past an isolated three-dimensional hump in a high-speed subsonic regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Grazia, D.; Moxey, D.; Sherwin, S. J.; Kravtsova, M. A.; Ruban, A. I.

    2018-02-01

    In this paper we study the boundary-layer separation produced in a high-speed subsonic boundary layer by a small wall roughness. Specifically, we present a direct numerical simulation (DNS) of a two-dimensional boundary-layer flow over a flat plate encountering a three-dimensional Gaussian-shaped hump. This work was motivated by the lack of DNS data of boundary-layer flows past roughness elements in a similar regime which is typical of civil aviation. The Mach and Reynolds numbers are chosen to be relevant for aeronautical applications when considering small imperfections at the leading edge of wings. We analyze different heights of the hump: The smaller heights result in a weakly nonlinear regime, while the larger result in a fully nonlinear regime with an increasing laminar separation bubble arising downstream of the roughness element and the formation of a pair of streamwise counterrotating vortices which appear to support themselves.

  1. Different instructions during the ten-meter walking test determined significant increases in maximum gait speed in individuals with chronic hemiparesis Diferentes instruções durante teste de velocidade de marcha determinam aumento significativo na velocidade máxima de indivíduos com hemiparesia crônica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas R. Nascimento

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of different instructions for the assessment of maximum walking speed during the ten-meter walking test with chronic stroke subjects. METHODS: Participants were instructed to walk under four experimental conditions: (1 comfortable speed, (2 maximum speed (simple verbal command, (3 maximum speed (modified verbal command-"catch a bus" and (4 maximum speed (verbal command + demonstration. Participants walked three times in each condition and the mean time to cover the intermediate 10 meters of a 14-meter corridor was registered to calculate the gait speed (m/s. Repeated-measures ANOVAs, followed by planned contrasts, were employed to investigate differences between the conditions (α=5%. Means, standard deviations and 95% confidence intervals (CI were calculated. RESULTS: The mean values for the four conditions were: (1 0.74m/s; (2 0.85 m/s; (3 0.93 m/s; (4 0.92 m/s, respectively, with significant differences between the conditions (F=40.9; pOBJETIVO: Avaliar os efeitos de diferentes instruções para avaliação da velocidade de marcha máxima de indivíduos hemiparéticos durante o teste de caminhada de 10 metros. MÉTODOS: Os indivíduos deambularam em quatro condições experimentais: (1 velocidade habitual, (2 velocidade máxima (comando verbal simples, (3 velocidade máxima (comando verbal modificado: pegar ônibus, (4 velocidade máxima (comando verbal + demonstração. Solicitou-se a cada participante que deambulasse três vezes em cada condição, e a média do tempo necessário para percorrer os 10 metros intermediários de um corredor de 14 metros foi utilizada para cálculo da velocidade (m/s. A ANOVA de medidas repetidas, com contrastes pré-planejados, foi utilizada para comparação dos dados (α=5%, sendo apresentados valores de média, desvio-padrão e intervalos de confiança (IC de 95%. RESULTADOS: As médias de velocidade para as quatro condições foram: (1 0,74m/s; (2 0,85m/s; (3 0,93m/s; (4

  2. Human H-reflexes are smaller in difficult beam walking than in normal treadmill walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llewellyn, M; Yang, J F; Prochazka, A

    1990-01-01

    Hoffman (H) reflexes were elicited from the soleus (SOL) muscle while subjects walked on a treadmill and on a narrow beam (3.5 cm wide, raised 34 cm from the floor). The speed of walking on the treadmill was selected for each subject to match the background activation level of their SOL muscle during beam walking. The normal reciprocal activation pattern of the tibialis anterior and SOL muscles in treadmill walking was replaced by a pattern dominated by co-contraction on the beam. In addition, the step cycle duration was more variable and the time spent in the swing phase was reduced on the beam. The H-reflexes were highly modulated in both tasks, the amplitude being high in the stance phase and low in the swing phase. The H-reflex amplitude was on average 40% lower during beam walking than treadmill walking. The relationship between the H-reflex amplitude and the SOL EMG level was quantified by a regression line relating the two variables. The slope of this line was on average 41% lower in beam walking than treadmill walking. The lower H-reflex gain observed in this study and the high level of fusimotor drive observed in cats performing similar tasks suggest that the two mechanisms which control the excitability of this reflex pathway (i.e. fusimotor action and control of transmission at the muscle spindle to moto-neuron synapse) may be controlled independently.

  3. A novel five-wire micro anemometer with 3D directionality for low speed air flow detection and acoustic particle velocity detecting capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhe; Chang, Wenhan; Gao, Chengchen; Hao, Yilong

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, a novel five-wire micro-fabricated anemometer with 3D directionality based on calorimetric principle is proposed, which is capable of measuring low speed airflow. This structure is realized by vertically bonding two different dies, which can be fabricated on the same wafer resulting in a simple fabrication process. Experiments on speed lower than 200 mm s-1 are conducted, showing good repeatability and directionality. The speed of airflow is controlled by the volumetric flow rate. The measured velocity sensitivity is 9.4 mV · s m-1, with relative direction sensitivity of 37.1 dB. The deviation between the expected and the measured directivity is analyzed by both theories and simulations. A correction procedure is proposed and turns out to be useful to eliminate this deviation. To further explore the potential of our device, we expose it to acoustic plane waves in a standing wave tube, showing consistent planar directivity of figure of eight. The measured velocity sensitivity at 1 kHz and 120 dBC is 4.4 mV · s m-1, with relative direction sensitivity of 27.0 dB. By using the correction method proposed above, the maximum angle error is about  ±2°, showing its good directionality accuracy.

  4. High speed capillary zone electrophoresis-mass spectrometry via an electrokinetically pumped sheath flow interface for rapid analysis of amino acids and a protein digest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiavone, Nicole M; Sarver, Scott A; Sun, Liangliang; Wojcik, Roza; Dovichi, Norman J

    2015-06-01

    While capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) has been used to produce very rapid and efficient separations, coupling these high-speed separations with mass spectrometry (MS) has been challenging. Now, with much faster and sensitive mass spectrometers, it is possible to take full advantage of the CZE speed and reconstruct the fast migrating peaks. Here are three high-speed CZE-MS analyses via an electrokinetically pumped sheath-flow interface. The first separation demonstrates CZE-ESI-MS of an amino acid mixture with a 2-min separation, >50,000 theoretical plates, low micromolar concentration detection limits, and subfemtomole mass detection limits (LTQ XL mass spectrometer). The second separation with our recently improved third-generation CE-MS interface illustrates a 20 amino acid separation in ∼7min with an average over 200,000 plate counts, and results in almost-baseline resolution of structural isomers, leucine and isoleucine. The third separation is of a BSA digest with a reproducible CZE separation and mass spectrometry detection in 2min. CZE-MS/MS analysis of the BSA digest identified 31 peptides, produced 52% sequence coverage, and generated a peak capacity of ∼40 across the 1-min separation window (Q-Exactive mass spectrometer). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Aerobic treadmill plus Bobath walking training improves walking in subacute stroke: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eich, H-J; Mach, H; Werner, C; Hesse, S

    2004-09-01

    To evaluate the immediate and long-term effects of aerobic treadmill plus Bobath walking training in subacute stroke survivors compared with Bobath walking training alone. Randomized controlled trial. Rehabilitation unit. Fifty patients, first-time supratentorial stroke, stroke interval less than six weeks, Barthel Index (0-100) from 50 to 80, able to walk a minimum distance of 12 m with either intermittent help or stand-by while walking, cardiovascular stable, minimum 50 W in the bicycle ergometry, randomly allocated to two groups, A and B. Group A 30 min of treadmill training, harness secured and minimally supported according to patients' needs, and 30 min of physiotherapy, every workday for six weeks, speed and inclination of the treadmill were adjusted to achieve a heart rate of HR: (Hrmax-HRrest)*0.6+HRrest; in group B 60 min of daily physiotherapy for six weeks. Primary outcome variables were the absolute improvement of walking velocity (m/s) and capacity (m), secondary were gross motor function including walking ability (score out of 13) and walking quality (score out of 41), blindly assessed before and after the intervention, and at follow-up three months later. Patients tolerated the aerobic training well with no side-effects, significantly greater improvement of walking velocity and capacity both at study end (p =0.001 versus p =0.002) and at follow-up (p Bobath walking training in moderately affected stroke patients was better than Bobath walking training alone with respect to the improvement of walking velocity and capacity. The treatment approach is recommended in patients meeting the inclusion criteria. A multicentre trial should follow to strengthen the evidence.

  6. Detection of Abnormal Muscle Activations during Walking Following Spinal Cord Injury (SCI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ping; Low, K. H.; McGregor, Alison H.; Tow, Adela

    2013-01-01

    In order to identify optimal rehabilitation strategies for spinal cord injury (SCI) participants, assessment of impaired walking is required to detect, monitor and quantify movement disorders. In the proposed assessment, ten healthy and seven SCI participants were recruited to perform an over-ground walking test at slow walking speeds. SCI…

  7. Lower limb joint moment during walking in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Tasuku; Shirota, Takashi; Yamamoto, Shin-Ichiro; Nakazawa, Kimitaka; Akai, Masami

    2003-11-04

    Walking in water is a widely used rehabilitation method for patients with orthopedic disorders or arthritis, based on the belief that the reduction of weight in water makes it a safer medium and prevents secondary injuries of the lower-limb joints. To our knowledge, however, no experimental data on lower-limb joint moment during walking in water is available. The aim of this study was to quantify the joint moments of the ankle, knee, and hip during walking in water in comparison with those on land. Eight healthy volunteers walked on land and in water at a speed comfortable for them. A video-motion analysis system and waterproof force platform were used to obtain kinematic data and to calculate the joint moments. The hip joint moment was shown to be an extension moment almost throughout the stance phase during walking in water, while it changed from an extension- to flexion-direction during walking on land. The knee joint moment had two extension peaks during walking on land, whereas it had only one extension peak, a late one, during walking in water. The ankle joint moment during walking in water was considerably reduced but in the same direction, plantarflexion, as that during walking on land. The joint moments of the hip, knee, and ankle were not merely reduced during walking in water; rather, inter-joint coordination was totally changed.

  8. Cardiovascular Responses Associated with Daily Walking in Subacute Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay K. Prajapati

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the importance of regaining independent ambulation after stroke, the amount of daily walking completed during in-patient rehabilitation is low. The purpose of this study is to determine if (1 walking-related heart rate responses reached the minimum intensity necessary for therapeutic aerobic exercise (40%–60% heart rate reserve or (2 heart rate responses during bouts of walking revealed excessive workload that may limit walking (>80% heart rate reserve. Eight individuals with subacute stroke attending in-patient rehabilitation were recruited. Participants wore heart rate monitors and accelerometers during a typical rehabilitation day. Walking-related changes in heart rate and walking bout duration were determined. Patients did not meet the minimum cumulative requirements of walking intensity (>40% heart rate reserve and duration (>10 minutes continuously necessary for cardiorespiratory benefit. Only one patient exceeded 80% heart rate reserve. The absence of significant increases in heart rate associated with walking reveals that patients chose to walk at speeds well below a level that has meaningful cardiorespiratory health benefits. Additionally, cardiorespiratory workload is unlikely to limit participation in walking. Measurement of heart rate and walking during in-patient rehabilitation may be a useful approach to encourage patients to increase the overall physical activity and to help facilitate recovery.

  9. Turbulence modification in bubbly upward pipe flow. Extraction of time resolved turbulent microscopic structure by high speed PIV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimura, Koki; Minato, Daiju; Sato, Yohei; Hishida, Koichi

    2004-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to obtain detailed information on the effects of bubbles on modification of turbulent structure by time-series measurements using a high speed time-resolved PIV. The experiments were carried out in a fully-developed vertical pipe with upflow of water at the Reynolds number of 9700 and the void fraction of 0.5%. It is observed that turbulence production was decreased and the dissipation rate was enhanced in the whole domain. We analyzed the effects of bubbles on modification of the energy cascade process from power spectra of velocity fluctuation of the continuous phase. (author)

  10. Effects of Initial Stance of Quadruped Trotting on Walking Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peisun Ma

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available It is very important for quadruped walking machine to keep its stability in high speed walking. It has been indicated that moment around the supporting diagonal line of quadruped in trotting gait largely influences walking stability. In this paper, moment around the supporting diagonal line of quadruped in trotting gait is modeled and its effects on body attitude are analyzed. The degree of influence varies with different initial stances of quadruped and we get the optimal initial stance of quadruped in trotting gait with maximal walking stability. Simulation results are presented.

  11. Low speed/low rarefaction flow simulation in micro/nano cavity using DSMC method with small number of particles per cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amiri-Jaghargh, Ali; Roohi, Ehsan; Niazmand, Hamid; Stefanov, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to extend the validity of the simplified Bernoulli-trials (SBT)/dual grid algorithm, newly proposed by Stefanov, as a suitable alternative of the standard collision scheme in the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method, for solving low speed/low Knudsen number rarefied micro/nano flows. The main advantage of the SBT algorithm is to provide accurate calculations using much smaller number of particles per cell, i.e., ≈ 1. Compared to the original development of SBT [1], we extend the application of the SBT scheme to the near continuum rarefied flows, i.e., Kn = 0.005, where NTC scheme requires a relatively large sample size. Comparing the results of the SBT/dual grid scheme with NTC, it is shown that the SBT/dual grid scheme could successfully predict the thermal pattern and hydrodynamics field as well as surface parameters such as velocity slip and temperature jump. Nonlinear flux-corrected transport algorithm (FCT) is also employed as a filter to extract the smooth solution from the noisy DSMC calculation for low-speed/low-Knudsen number DSMC calculations. The results indicate that combination of SBT/dual grid and FTC filtering can decrease the total sample size needed to reach smooth solution without losing significant accuracy.

  12. COMPUTER MODELING IN DEFORM-3D FOR ANALYSIS OF PLASTIC FLOW IN HIGH-SPEED HOT EXTRUSION OF BIMETALLIC FORMATIVE PARTS OF DIE TOOLING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Kachanov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The modern development of industrial production is closely connected with the use of science-based and high technologies to ensure competitiveness of the manufactured products on the world market. There is also much tension around an energy- and resource saving problem which can be solved while introducing new technological processes and  creation of new materials that provide productivity increase through automation and improvement of tool life. Development and implementation of such technologies are rather often considered as time-consuming processes  which are connected with complex calculations and experimental investigations. Implementation of a simulation modelling for materials processing using modern software products serves an alternative to experimental and theoretical methods of research.The aim of this paper is to compare experimental results while obtaining bimetallic samples of a forming tool through the method of speed hot extrusion and the results obtained with the help of computer simulation using DEFORM-3D package and a finite element method. Comparative analysis of plastic flow of real and model samples has shown that the obtained models provide high-quality and reliable picture of plastic flow during high-speed hot extrusion. Modeling in DEFORM-3D make it possible to eliminate complex calculations and significantly reduce a number of experimental studies while developing new technological processes.

  13. Predation by the Dwarf Seahorse on Copepods: Quantifying Motion and Flows Using 3D High Speed Digital Holographic Cinematography - When Seahorses Attack!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemmell, Brad; Sheng, Jian; Buskey, Ed

    2008-11-01

    Copepods are an important planktonic food source for most of the world's fish species. This high predation pressure has led copepods to evolve an extremely effective escape response, with reaction times to hydrodynamic disturbances of less than 4 ms and escape speeds of over 500 body lengths per second. Using 3D high speed digital holographic cinematography (up to 2000 frames per second) we elucidate the role of entrainment flow fields generated by a natural visual predator, the dwarf seahorse (Hippocampus zosterae) during attacks on its prey, Acartia tonsa. Using phytoplankton as a tracer, we recorded and reconstructed 3D flow fields around the head of the seahorse and its prey during both successful and unsuccessful attacks to better understand how some attacks lead to capture with little or no detection from the copepod while others result in failed attacks. Attacks start with a slow approach to minimize the hydro-mechanical disturbance which is used by copepods to detect the approach of a potential predator. Successful attacks result in the seahorse using its pipette-like mouth to create suction faster than the copepod's response latency. As these characteristic scales of entrainment increase, a successful escape becomes more likely.

  14. PARTICLE-IN-CELL SIMULATION OF A STRONG DOUBLE LAYER IN A NONRELATIVISTIC PLASMA FLOW: ELECTRON ACCELERATION TO ULTRARELATIVISTIC SPEEDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dieckmann, Mark E.; Bret, Antoine

    2009-01-01

    Two charge- and current-neutral plasma beams are modeled with a one-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation. The beams are uniform and unbounded. The relative speed between both beams is 0.4c. One beam is composed of electrons and protons, and the other of protons and negatively charged oxygen (dust). All species have the temperature 9.1 keV. A Buneman instability develops between the electrons of the first beam and the protons of the second beam. The wave traps the electrons, which form plasmons. The plasmons couple energy into the ion acoustic waves, which trap the protons of the second beam. A structure similar to a proton phase-space hole develops, which grows through its interaction with the oxygen and the heated electrons into a rarefaction pulse. This pulse drives a double layer, which accelerates a beam of electrons to about 50 MeV, which is comparable to the proton kinetic energy. The proton distribution eventually evolves into an electrostatic shock. Beams of charged particles moving at such speeds may occur in the foreshock of supernova remnant (SNR) shocks. This double layer is thus potentially relevant for the electron acceleration (injection) into the diffusive shock acceleration by SNR shocks.

  15. Consistent lattice Boltzmann modeling of low-speed isothermal flows at finite Knudsen numbers in slip-flow regime: Application to plane boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Goncalo; Semiao, Viriato

    2017-07-01

    The first nonequilibrium effect experienced by gaseous flows in contact with solid surfaces is the slip-flow regime. While the classical hydrodynamic description holds valid in bulk, at boundaries the fluid-wall interactions must consider slip. In comparison to the standard no-slip Dirichlet condition, the case of slip formulates as a Robin-type condition for the fluid tangential velocity. This makes its numerical modeling a challenging task, particularly in complex geometries. In this work, this issue is handled with the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM), motivated by the similarities between the closure relations of the reflection-type boundary schemes equipping the LBM equation and the slip velocity condition established by slip-flow theory. Based on this analogy, we derive, as central result, the structure of the LBM boundary closure relation that is consistent with the second-order slip velocity condition, applicable to planar walls. Subsequently, three tasks are performed. First, we clarify the limitations of existing slip velocity LBM schemes, based on discrete analogs of kinetic theory fluid-wall interaction models. Second, we present improved slip velocity LBM boundary schemes, constructed directly at discrete level, by extending the multireflection framework to the slip-flow regime. Here, two classes of slip velocity LBM boundary schemes are considered: (i) linear slip schemes, which are local but retain some calibration requirements and/or operation limitations, (ii) parabolic slip schemes, which use a two-point implementation but guarantee the consistent prescription of the intended slip velocity condition, at arbitrary plane wall discretizations, further dispensing any numerical calibration procedure. Third and final, we verify the improvements of our proposed slip velocity LBM boundary schemes against existing ones. The numerical tests evaluate the ability of the slip schemes to exactly accommodate the steady Poiseuille channel flow solution, over

  16. Consistent lattice Boltzmann modeling of low-speed isothermal flows at finite Knudsen numbers in slip-flow regime: Application to plane boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Goncalo; Semiao, Viriato

    2017-07-01

    The first nonequilibrium effect experienced by gaseous flows in contact with solid surfaces is the slip-flow regime. While the classical hydrodynamic description holds valid in bulk, at boundaries the fluid-wall interactions must consider slip. In comparison to the standard no-slip Dirichlet condition, the case of slip formulates as a Robin-type condition for the fluid tangential velocity. This makes its numerical modeling a challenging task, particularly in complex geometries. In this work, this issue is handled with the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM), motivated by the similarities between the closure relations of the reflection-type boundary schemes equipping the LBM equation and the slip velocity condition established by slip-flow theory. Based on this analogy, we derive, as central result, the structure of the LBM boundary closure relation that is consistent with the second-order slip velocity condition, applicable to planar walls. Subsequently, three tasks are performed. First, we clarify the limitations of existing slip velocity LBM schemes, based on discrete analogs of kinetic theory fluid-wall interaction models. Second, we present improved slip velocity LBM boundary schemes, constructed directly at discrete level, by extending the multireflection framework to the slip-flow regime. Here, two classes of slip velocity LBM boundary schemes are considered: (i) linear slip schemes, which are local but retain some calibration requirements and/or operation limitations, (ii) parabolic slip schemes, which use a two-point implementation but guarantee the consistent prescription of the intended slip velocity condition, at arbitrary plane wall discretizations, further dispensing any numerical calibration procedure. Third and final, we verify the improvements of our proposed slip velocity LBM boundary schemes against existing ones. The numerical tests evaluate the ability of the slip schemes to exactly accommodate the steady Poiseuille channel flow solution, over

  17. Simulation of effects of direction and air flow speed on temperature distribution in the room covered by various roof materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sukanto, H., E-mail: masheher@uns.ac.id; Budiana, E. P., E-mail: budiana.e@gmail.com; Putra, B. H. H., E-mail: benedictus.hendy@gmail.com [Mechanical Engineering Department, Sebelas Maret University, Surakarta, Indonesia 57126 (Indonesia)

    2016-03-29

    The objective of this research is to get a comparison of the distribution of the room temperature by using three materials, namely plastic-rubber composite, clay, and asbestos. The simulation used Ansys Fluent to get the temperature distribution. There were two conditions in this simulations, first the air passing beside the room and second the air passing in front of the room. Each condition will be varied with the air speed of 1 m/s, 2 m/s, 3 m/s, 4 m/s, 5 m/s for each material used. There are three heat transfers in this simulation, namely radiation, convection, and conduction. Based on the ANSI/ ASHRAE Standard 55-2004, the results of the simulation showed that the best temperature distribution was the roof of plastic-rubber composites.

  18. Treadmill training improves overground walking economy in Parkinson’s disease: A randomized, controlled pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel eFERNANDEZ-DEL-OLMO

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Gait disturbances are one of the principal and most incapacitating symptoms of Parkinson’s disease (PD. In addition, walking economy is impaired in PD patients and could contribute to excess fatigue in this population. An important number of studies have shown that treadmill training can improve kinematic parameters in PD patients. However, the effects of treadmill and overground walking on the walking economy remain unknown. The goal of this study was to explore the walking economy changes in response to a treadmill and an overground training program, as well as the differences in the walking economy during treadmill and overground walking. 22 mild PD patients were randomly assigned to a treadmill or overground training group. The training program consisted of 5 weeks (3 sessions/week. We evaluated the energy expenditure of overground walking, before and after each of the training programs. The energy expenditure of treadmill walking (before the program was also evaluated. The treadmill, but not the overground training program, lead to an improvement in the walking economy (the rate of oxygen consumed per distance, during overground walking at a preferred speed in PD patients. In addition, walking on a treadmill required more energy expenditure compared with overground walking at the same speed. This study provides evidence that in mild PD patients, treadmill training is more beneficial compared with that of walking overground, leading to a greater improvement in the walking economy. This finding is of clinical importance for the therapeutic administration of exercise in Parkinson’s disease.

  19. Experimental investigation of the effects of heat release on mixing processes and flow structure in a high-speed subsonic turbulent H{sub 2} jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theron, M.; Bellenoue, M. [Laboratoire de Combustion et de Detonique, CNRS UPR 9028, Poitiers (France)

    2006-06-15

    In this paper, we explore the effects of heat release on mixing and flow structure in a high-speed subsonic turbulent H{sub 2} jet in an air coflow. Heat release effects are determined from the comparison of nonreacting and reacting jet behavior, boundary conditions being identical in both cases. Experiments are performed in a wind tunnel specifically designed for this purpose. Planar laser induced fluorescence on OH radicals and on acetone (seeded in the hydrogen jet) are used to characterize the cartography of scalars, and laser Doppler velocimetry is used to characterize velocity profiles in the far field of the H{sub 2} jet. Results show significant effects of heat release on mixing and flow structure, indicating an overall reduction of mixing and entrainment in the reacting jet compared to the nonreacting jet. First, a change is observed in the orientation of coherent structures originating from Kelvin-Helmholtz type instabilities, and responsible for air entrainment within the jet, which appear 'flatter' in the jet flame. Then, the flame length is increased over what would be predicted from the intersection of the mean stoichiometric contour with the centerline of the nonreacting jet. And finally, the longitudinal average velocity decrease along the jet axis is quicker in the nonreacting jet, and nondimensional transverse velocity fluctuations are about half as high in the reacting jet as in the nonreacting jet, indicating a reduction of the turbulence intensity of the flow in this direction in the jet flame. (author)

  20. Cross-sectional void fraction distribution measurements in a vertical annulus two-phase flow by high speed X-ray computed tomography and real-time neutron radiography techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvel, G.D.; Hori, K.; Kawanishi, K.

    1995-01-01

    A Real-Time Neutron Radiography (RTNR) system and a high speed X-ray Computed tomography (X-CT) system are compared for measurement of two-phase flow. Each system is used to determine the flow regime, and the void fraction distribution in a vertical annulus flow channel. A standard optical video system is also used to observe the flow regime. The annulus flow channel is operated as a bubble column and measurements obtained for gas flow rates from 0.0 to 30.01/min. The flow regimes observed by all three measurement systems through image analysis shows that the two-dimensional void fraction distribution can be obtained. The X-CT system is shown to have a superior temporal resolution capable of resolving the void fraction distribution in an (r,θ) plane in 33.0 ms. Void fraction distribution for bubbly flow and slug flow is determined

  1. Cross-sectional void fraction distribution measurements in a vertical annulus two-phase flow by high speed X-ray computed tomography and real-time neutron radiography techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harvel, G.D. [McMaster Univ., Ontario (Canada)]|[Combustion and Heat Transfer Lab., Takasago (Japan); Hori, K.; Kawanishi, K. [Combustion and Heat Transfer Lab., Takasago (Japan)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    A Real-Time Neutron Radiography (RTNR) system and a high speed X-ray Computed tomography (X-CT) system are compared for measurement of two-phase flow. Each system is used to determine the flow regime, and the void fraction distribution in a vertical annulus flow channel. A standard optical video system is also used to observe the flow regime. The annulus flow channel is operated as a bubble column and measurements obtained for gas flow rates from 0.0 to 30.01/min. The flow regimes observed by all three measurement systems through image analysis shows that the two-dimensional void fraction distribution can be obtained. The X-CT system is shown to have a superior temporal resolution capable of resolving the void fraction distribution in an (r,{theta}) plane in 33.0 ms. Void fraction distribution for bubbly flow and slug flow is determined.

  2. High speed photography of the plasma flow and the projectiles in the T.U.M. hypervelocity accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igenbergs, E.; Kuczera, H.; Schroeder, B.

    1979-01-01

    The hypervelocity accelerator at the Technische Universitaet Muenchen, FRG, accelerates small projectiles (0.1 to 1.0 mm diameter) to velocities around 20 km/s. The photographic equipment consists of two Cordin single-frame image converter cameras and one TRW image converter camera with streak units and multiple-frame units. They are used for plasma flow diagnostics and the measurement of the position and the velocity of the projectiles. The single-frame cameras are triggered with a Laser light bar and the photographic measurement of the projectile velocity will be compared with Doppler-Radar. (author)

  3. Running for exercise mitigates age-related deterioration of walking economy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justus D Ortega

    Full Text Available Impaired walking performance is a key predictor of morbidity among older adults. A distinctive characteristic of impaired walking performance among older adults is a greater metabolic cost (worse economy compared to young adults. However, older adults who consistently run have been shown to retain a similar running economy as young runners. Unfortunately, those running studies did not measure the metabolic cost of walking. Thus, it is unclear if running exercise can prevent the deterioration of walking economy.To determine if and how regular walking vs. running exercise affects the economy of locomotion in older adults.15 older adults (69 ± 3 years who walk ≥ 30 min, 3x/week for exercise, "walkers" and 15 older adults (69 ± 5 years who run ≥ 30 min, 3x/week, "runners" walked on a force-instrumented treadmill at three speeds (0.75, 1.25, and 1.75 m/s. We determined walking economy using expired gas analysis and walking mechanics via ground reaction forces during the last 2 minutes of each 5 minute trial. We compared walking economy between the two groups and to non-aerobically trained young and older adults from a prior study.Older runners had a 7-10% better walking economy than older walkers over the range of speeds tested (p = .016 and had walking economy similar to young sedentary adults over a similar range of speeds (p =  .237. We found no substantial biomechanical differences between older walkers and runners. In contrast to older runners, older walkers had similar walking economy as older sedentary adults (p =  .461 and ∼ 26% worse walking economy than young adults (p<.0001.Running mitigates the age-related deterioration of walking economy whereas walking for exercise appears to have minimal effect on the age-related deterioration in walking economy.

  4. Biomechanical implications of walking with indigenous footwear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willems, Catherine; Stassijns, Gaetane; Cornelis, Wim; D'Août, Kristiaan

    2017-04-01

    This study investigates biomechanical implications of walking with indigenous "Kolhapuri" footwear compared to barefoot walking among a population of South Indians. Ten healthy adults from South India walked barefoot and indigenously shod at voluntary speed on an artificial substrate. The experiment was repeated outside, on a natural substrate. Data were collected from (1) a heel-mounted 3D-accelerometer recording peak impact at heel contact, (2) an ankle-mounted 3D-goniometer (plantar/dorsiflexion and inversion/eversion), and (3) sEMG electrodes at the m. tibialis anterior and the m. gastrocnemius medialis. Data show that the effect of indigenous footwear on the measured variables, compared to barefoot walking, is relatively small and consistent between substrates (even though subjects walked faster on the natural substrate). Walking barefoot, compared to shod walking yields higher impact accelerations, but the differences are small and only significant for the artificial substrate. The main rotations of the ankle joint are mostly similar between conditions. Only the shod condition shows a faster ankle rotation over the rapid eversion motion on the natural substrate. Maximal dorsiflexion in late stance differs between the footwear conditions on an artificial substrate, with the shod condition involving a less dorsiflexed ankle, and the plantar flexion at toe-off is more extreme when shod. Overall the activity pattern of the external foot muscles is similar. The indigenous footwear studied (Kolhapuri) seems to alter foot biomechanics only in a subtle way. While offering some degree of protection, walking in this type of footwear resembles barefoot gait and this type of indigenous footwear might be considered "minimal". © 2017 The Authors American Journal of Physical Anthropology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Experimental Studies of the Aerothermal Characteristics of the Project Orion CEV heat Shield in High Speed Transitional and Turbulent Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadhams, T.P.; MacLean, M.; Holden, M.S.; Cassady, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    An experimental program has been completed by CUBRC exploring laminar, transitional, and turbulent flows over a 7.0% scale model of the Project ORION CEV geometry. This program was executed primarily to answer questions concerning the increase in heat transfer on the windward, or "hot shoulder" of the CEV heat shield from laminar to turbulent flow. To answer these questions CUBRC constructed and instrumented a 14.0 inch diameter Project ORION CEV model and ran a range of Reynolds numbers based on diameter from 1.0 to over 40 million at a Mach number of 8.0. These Reynolds numbers were selected to cover laminar to turbulent heating data on the "hot shoulder". Data obtained during these runs will be used to guide design decisions as they apply to heat shield thickness and extent. Several experiments at higher enthalpies were achieved to obtain data for code validation with real gas effects and transition. CUBRC also performed computation studies of these experiments to aid in the data reduction process and study turbulence modeling.

  6. Simulation of bubbly flow in vertical pipes by coupling Lagrangian and Eulerian models with 3D random walks models: Validation with experimental data using multi-sensor conductivity probes and Laser Doppler Anemometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz-Cobo, Jose L., E-mail: jlcobos@iqn.upv.es [Instituto de Ingenieria Energetica, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Chiva, Sergio [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Construction, Universitat Jaume I, Castellon (Spain); Essa, Mohamed Ali Abd El Aziz [Instituto de Ingenieria Energetica, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Mendes, Santos [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon (Mexico)

    2012-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We have simulated bubbly flow in vertical pipes by coupling a Lagrangian model to an Eulerian one, and to a 3D random walk model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A set of experiments in a vertical column with isothermal co-current two phase flow have been performed and used to validate the previous model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We have investigated the influence of the turbulence induced by the bubbles on the results. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Comparison of experimental and computed results has been performed for different boundary conditions. - Abstract: A set of two phase flow experiments for different conditions ranging from bubbly flow to cap/slug flow have been performed under isothermal concurrent upward air-water flow conditions in a vertical column of 3 m height. Special attention in these experiments was devoted to the transition from bubbly to cap/slug flow. The interfacial velocity of the bubbles and the void fraction distribution was obtained using 2 and 4 sensors conductivity probes. Numerical simulations of these experiments for bubbly flow conditions were performed by coupling a Lagrangian code with an Eulerian one. The first one tracks the 3D motion of the individual bubbles in cylindrical coordinates (r, {phi}, z) inside the fluid field under the action of the following forces: buoyancy, drag, lift, wall lubrication. Also we have incorporated a 3D stochastic differential equation model to account for the random motion of the individual bubbles in the turbulent velocity field of the carrier liquid. Also we have considered the deformations undergone by the bubbles when they touch the walls of the pipe and are compressed until they rebound. The velocity and turbulence fields of the liquid phase were computed by solving the time dependent conservation equations in its Reynolds Averaged Transport Equation form (RANS). The turbulent kinetic energy k, and the dissipation rate {epsilon} transport equations

  7. Simulation of bubbly flow in vertical pipes by coupling Lagrangian and Eulerian models with 3D random walks models: Validation with experimental data using multi-sensor conductivity probes and Laser Doppler Anemometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muñoz-Cobo, José L.; Chiva, Sergio; Essa, Mohamed Ali Abd El Aziz; Mendes, Santos

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We have simulated bubbly flow in vertical pipes by coupling a Lagrangian model to an Eulerian one, and to a 3D random walk model. ► A set of experiments in a vertical column with isothermal co-current two phase flow have been performed and used to validate the previous model. ► We have investigated the influence of the turbulence induced by the bubbles on the results. ► Comparison of experimental and computed results has been performed for different boundary conditions. - Abstract: A set of two phase flow experiments for different conditions ranging from bubbly flow to cap/slug flow have been performed under isothermal concurrent upward air–water flow conditions in a vertical column of 3 m height. Special attention in these experiments was devoted to the transition from bubbly to cap/slug flow. The interfacial velocity of the bubbles and the void fraction distribution was obtained using 2 and 4 sensors conductivity probes. Numerical simulations of these experiments for bubbly flow conditions were performed by coupling a Lagrangian code with an Eulerian one. The first one tracks the 3D motion of the individual bubbles in cylindrical coordinates (r, φ, z) inside the fluid field under the action of the following forces: buoyancy, drag, lift, wall lubrication. Also we have incorporated a 3D stochastic differential equation model to account for the random motion of the individual bubbles in the turbulent velocity field of the carrier liquid. Also we have considered the deformations undergone by the bubbles when they touch the walls of the pipe and are compressed until they rebound. The velocity and turbulence fields of the liquid phase were computed by solving the time dependent conservation equations in its Reynolds Averaged Transport Equation form (RANS). The turbulent kinetic energy k, and the dissipation rate ε transport equations were simultaneously solved using the k, epsilon model in a (r, z) grid by the finite volume method and the

  8. Women with fibromyalgia walk with an altered muscle synergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierrynowski, Michael R; Tiidus, Peter M; Galea, Victoria

    2005-11-01

    Most individuals can use different movement and muscle recruitment patterns to perform a stated task but often only one pattern is selected which optimizes an unknown global objective given the individual's neuromusculoskeletal characteristics. Patients with fibromyalgia syndrome (FS), characterized by their chronic pain, reduced physical work capacity and muscular fatigue, could exhibit a different control signature compared to asymptomatic control volunteers (CV). To test this proposal, 22 women with FS, and 11 CV, were assessed in a gait analysis laboratory. Each subject walked repeatedly at self-selected slow, comfortable, and fast walking speeds. The gait analysis provided, for each walk, each subject's stride time, length, and velocity, and ground reaction force, and lower extremity joint kinematics, moments and powers. The data were then anthropometrically scaled and velocity normalized to reduce the influence of subject mass, leg length, and walking speed on the measured gait outcomes. Similarities and differences in the two groups' scaled and normalized gait patterns were then determined. Results show that FS and CV walk with externally similar stride lengths, times, and velocities, and joint angles and ground reaction forces but they use internally different muscle recruitment patterns. Specifically, FS preferentially power gait using their hip flexors instead of their ankle plantarflexors. Interestingly, CV use a similar muscle fatiguing recruitment pattern to walk fast which parallels the common complaint of fatigue reported by FS walking at comfortable speed.

  9. Predictive neuromechanical simulations indicate why walking performance declines with ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Seungmoon; Geyer, Hartmut

    2018-04-01

    Although the natural decline in walking performance with ageing affects the quality of life of a growing elderly population, its physiological origins remain unknown. By using predictive neuromechanical simulations of human walking with age-related neuro-musculo-skeletal changes, we find evidence that the loss of muscle strength and muscle contraction speed dominantly contribute to the reduced walking economy and speed. The findings imply that focusing on recovering these muscular changes may be the only effective way to improve performance in elderly walking. More generally, the work is of interest for investigating the physiological causes of altered gait due to age, injury and disorders. Healthy elderly people walk slower and energetically less efficiently than young adults. This decline in walking performance lowers the quality of life for a growing ageing population, and understanding its physiological origin is critical for devising interventions that can delay or revert it. However, the origin of the decline in walking performance remains unknown, as ageing produces a range of physiological changes whose individual effects on gait are difficult to separate in experiments with human subjects. Here we use a predictive neuromechanical model to separately address the effects of common age-related changes to the skeletal, muscular and nervous systems. We find in computer simulations of this model that the combined changes produce gait consistent with elderly walking and that mainly the loss of muscle strength and mass reduces energy efficiency. In addition, we find that the slower preferred walking speed of elderly people emerges in the simulations when adapting to muscle fatigue, again mainly caused by muscle-related changes. The results suggest that a focus on recovering these muscular changes may be the only effective way to improve performance in elderly walking. © 2018 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2018 The Physiological Society.

  10. High on walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woythal, Bente Martinsen; Haahr, Anita; Dreyer, Pia

    2018-01-01

    a leg, and people who live with Parkinson’s disease. The analysis of the data is inspired by Paul Ricoeur’s philosophy of interpretation. Four themes were identified: (a) I feel high in two ways; (b) Walking has to be automatic; (c) Every Monday, I walk with the girls in the park; and (d) I dream...

  11. James Watt's Leicester Walk

    OpenAIRE

    Bell, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    a poem in which James Watt, inventor of the separate condenser, walks through contemporary Leicester (his route is from Bonners Lane and alongside the canal, taking in the Statue of Liberty on its traffic island near Sage Road). It is derived from the exercise of taking a character for a walk,

  12. More Adults Are Walking

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-07-31

    This podcast is based on the August 2012 CDC Vital Signs report. While more adults are walking, only half get the recommended amount of physical activity. Listen to learn how communities, employers, and individuals may help increase walking.  Created: 7/31/2012 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 8/7/2012.

  13. Lévy walks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaburdaev, V.; Denisov, S.; Klafter, J.

    2015-04-01

    Random walk is a fundamental concept with applications ranging from quantum physics to econometrics. Remarkably, one specific model of random walks appears to be ubiquitous across many fields as a tool to analyze transport phenomena in which the dispersal process is faster than dictated by Brownian diffusion. The Lévy-walk model combines two key features, the ability to generate anomalously fast diffusion and a finite velocity of a random walker. Recent results in optics, Hamiltonian chaos, cold atom dynamics, biophysics, and behavioral science demonstrate that this particular type of random walk provides significant insight into complex transport phenomena. This review gives a self-consistent introduction to Lévy walks, surveys their existing applications, including latest advances, and outlines further perspectives.

  14. Neuromorphic walking gait control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Still, Susanne; Hepp, Klaus; Douglas, Rodney J

    2006-03-01

    We present a neuromorphic pattern generator for controlling the walking gaits of four-legged robots which is inspired by central pattern generators found in the nervous system and which is implemented as a very large scale integrated (VLSI) chip. The chip contains oscillator circuits that mimic the output of motor neurons in a strongly simplified way. We show that four coupled oscillators can produce rhythmic patterns with phase relationships that are appropriate to generate all four-legged animal walking gaits. These phase relationships together with frequency and duty cycle of the oscillators determine the walking behavior of a robot driven by the chip, and they depend on a small set of stationary bias voltages. We give analytic expressions for these dependencies. This chip reduces the complex, dynamic inter-leg control problem associated with walking gait generation to the problem of setting a few stationary parameters. It provides a compact and low power solution for walking gait control in robots.

  15. Cross-B convection of artificially created, negative-ion clouds and plasma depressions: Low-speed flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernhardt, P.A.

    1988-01-01

    A negative-ion, positive-ion plasma produced by the release of an electron attachment chemical into the F region becomes electrically polarized by the collisions with neutrals moving across magnetic field lines. The resulting electric field causes E x B drift of the two ion species and the residual electrons. The cross-field flow of the modified ionosphere is computed using a two-dimensional numerical simulation which includes electron attachment and mutual neutralization chemistry, self-consistent electric fields, and three-species plasma transport. The velocity of the plasma is initially in the direction of the neutral wind because the negative-ion cloud is a Pedersen conductivity enhancement. As the positive and negative ions react, the Pedersen conductivity becomes depressed below the ambient value and the velocity of the plasma reverses direction. A plasma hole remains after the positive and negative ions have mutually neutralized. The E x B gradient drift instability produces irregularities on the upwind edge of the hole. These processes may be observed experimentally with optical and backscatter-radar diagnostics

  16. Running for exercise mitigates age-related deterioration of walking economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Justus D; Beck, Owen N; Roby, Jaclyn M; Turney, Aria L; Kram, Rodger

    2014-01-01

    Impaired walking performance is a key predictor of morbidity among older adults. A distinctive characteristic of impaired walking performance among older adults is a greater metabolic cost (worse economy) compared to young adults. However, older adults who consistently run have been shown to retain a similar running economy as young runners. Unfortunately, those running studies did not measure the metabolic cost of walking. Thus, it is unclear if running exercise can prevent the deterioration of walking economy. To determine if and how regular walking vs. running exercise affects the economy of locomotion in older adults. 15 older adults (69 ± 3 years) who walk ≥ 30 min, 3x/week for exercise, "walkers" and 15 older adults (69 ± 5 years) who run ≥ 30 min, 3x/week, "runners" walked on a force-instrumented treadmill at three speeds (0.75, 1.25, and 1.75 m/s). We determined walking economy using expired gas analysis and walking mechanics via ground reaction forces during the last 2 minutes of each 5 minute trial. We compared walking economy between the two groups and to non-aerobically trained young and older adults from a prior study. Older runners had a 7-10% better walking economy than older walkers over the range of speeds tested (p = .016) and had walking economy similar to young sedentary adults over a similar range of speeds (p =  .237). We found no substantial biomechanical differences between older walkers and runners. In contrast to older runners, older walkers had similar walking economy as older sedentary adults (p =  .461) and ∼ 26% worse walking economy than young adults (peconomy whereas walking for exercise appears to have minimal effect on the age-related deterioration in walking economy.

  17. Biomechanical analysis of rollator walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkjaer, T; Larsen, Peter K; Pedersen, Gitte

    2006-01-01

    The rollator is a very popular walking aid. However, knowledge about how a rollator affects the walking patterns is limited. Thus, the purpose of the study was to investigate the biomechanical effects of walking with and without a rollator on the walking pattern in healthy subjects.......The rollator is a very popular walking aid. However, knowledge about how a rollator affects the walking patterns is limited. Thus, the purpose of the study was to investigate the biomechanical effects of walking with and without a rollator on the walking pattern in healthy subjects....

  18. Development of N_2O-MTV for low-speed flow and in-situ deployment to an integral effect test facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, Matthieu A.; Burns, Ross A.; Danehy, Paul M.; Cadell, Seth R.; Woods, Brian G.; Bardet, Philippe M.

    2018-01-01

    A molecular tagging velocity (MTV) technique is developed to non-intrusively measure velocity in an integral effect test (IET) facility simulating a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear reactor in accident scenarios. In these scenarios, the velocities are expected to be low, on the order of 1 m/s or less, which forces special requirements on the MTV tracer selection. Nitrous oxide (N_2O) is identified as a suitable seed gas to generate NO tracers capable of probing the flow over a large range of pressure, temperature, and flow velocity. The performance of N_2O-MTV is assessed in the laboratory at temperature and pressure ranging from 295 to 781 K and 1 to 3 atm. MTV signal improves with a temperature increase, but decreases with a pressure increase. Velocity precision down to 0.004 m/s is achieved with a probe time of 40 ms at ambient pressure and temperature. Measurement precision is limited by tracer diffusion, and absorption of the tag laser beam by the seed gas. Processing by cross-correlation of single-shot images with high signal-to-noise ratio reference images improves the precision by about 10% compared to traditional single-shot image correlations. The instrument is then deployed to the IET facility. Challenges associated with heat, vibrations, safety, beam delivery, and imaging are addressed in order to successfully operate this sensitive instrument in-situ. Data are presented for an isothermal depressurized conduction cooldown. Velocity profiles from MTV reveal a complex flow transient driven by buoyancy, diffusion, and instability taking place over short (30 min) time scales at sub-meter per second speed. The precision of the in-situ results is estimated at 0.027, 0.0095, and 0.006 m/s for a probe time of 5, 15, and 35 ms, respectively.

  19. Dynamic optimization of a biped model: Energetic walking gaits with different mechanical and gait parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang An

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Energy consumption is one of the problems for bipedal robots walking. For the purpose of studying the parameter effects on the design of energetic walking bipeds with strong adaptability, we use a dynamic optimization method on our new walking model to first investigate the effects of the mechanical parameters, including mass and length distribution, on the walking efficiency. Then, we study the energetic walking gait features with the combinations of walking speed and step length. Our walking model is designed upon Srinivasan’s model. Dynamic optimization is used for a free search with minimal constraints. The results show that the cost of transport of a certain gait increases with the increase in the mass and length distribution parameters, except for that the cost of transport decreases with big length distribution parameter and long step length. We can also find a corresponding range of walking speed and step length, in which the variation in one of the two parameters has no obvious effect on the cost of transport. With fixed mechanical parameters, the cost of transport increases with the increase in the walking speed. There is a speed–step length relationship for walking with minimal cost of transport. The hip torque output strategy is adjusted in two situations to meet the walking requirements.

  20. Analysis of coined quantum walks with renormalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boettcher, Stefan; Li, Shanshan

    2018-01-01

    We introduce a framework to analyze quantum algorithms with the renormalization group (RG). To this end, we present a detailed analysis of the real-space RG for discrete-time quantum walks on fractal networks and show how deep insights into the analytic structure as well as generic results about the long-time behavior can be extracted. The RG flow for such a walk on a dual Sierpinski gasket and a Migdal-Kadanoff hierarchical network is obtained explicitly from elementary algebraic manipulations, after transforming the unitary evolution equation into Laplace space. Unlike for classical random walks, we find that the long-time asymptotics for the quantum walk requires consideration of a diverging number of Laplace poles, which we demonstrate exactly for the closed-form solution available for the walk on a one-dimensional loop. In particular, we calculate the probability of the walk to overlap with its starting position, which oscillates with a period that scales as NdwQ/df with system size N . While the largest Jacobian eigenvalue λ1 of the RG flow merely reproduces the fractal dimension, df=log2λ1 , the asymptotic analysis shows that the second Jacobian eigenvalue λ2 becomes essential to determine the dimension of the quantum walk via dwQ=log2√{λ1λ2 } . We trace this fact to delicate cancellations caused by unitarity. We obtain identical relations for other networks, although the details of the RG analysis may exhibit surprisingly distinct features. Thus, our conclusions—which trivially reproduce those for regular lattices with translational invariance with df=d and dwQ=1 —appear to be quite general and likely apply to networks beyond those studied here.

  1. NASA low speed centrifugal compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathaway, Michael D.

    1990-01-01

    The flow characteristics of a low speed centrifugal compressor were examined at NASA Lewis Research Center to improve understanding of the flow in centrifugal compressors, to provide models of various flow phenomena, and to acquire benchmark data for three dimensional viscous flow code validation. The paper describes the objectives, test facilities' instrumentation, and experiment preliminary comparisons.

  2. Alzheimer random walk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odagaki, Takashi; Kasuya, Keisuke

    2017-09-01

    Using the Monte Carlo simulation, we investigate a memory-impaired self-avoiding walk on a square lattice in which a random walker marks each of sites visited with a given probability p and makes a random walk avoiding the marked sites. Namely, p = 0 and p = 1 correspond to the simple random walk and the self-avoiding walk, respectively. When p> 0, there is a finite probability that the walker is trapped. We show that the trap time distribution can well be fitted by Stacy's Weibull distribution b(a/b){a+1}/{b}[Γ({a+1}/{b})]-1x^a\\exp(-a/bx^b)} where a and b are fitting parameters depending on p. We also find that the mean trap time diverges at p = 0 as p- α with α = 1.89. In order to produce sufficient number of long walks, we exploit the pivot algorithm and obtain the mean square displacement and its Flory exponent ν(p) as functions of p. We find that the exponent determined for 1000 step walks interpolates both limits ν(0) for the simple random walk and ν(1) for the self-avoiding walk as [ ν(p) - ν(0) ] / [ ν(1) - ν(0) ] = pβ with β = 0.388 when p ≪ 0.1 and β = 0.0822 when p ≫ 0.1. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Continuous Time Random Walk Still Trendy: Fifty-year History, Current State and Outlook", edited by Ryszard Kutner and Jaume Masoliver.

  3. Variability in energy cost and walking gait during race walking in competitive race walkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisswalter, J; Fougeron, B; Legros, P

    1998-09-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the variability of energy cost (Cw) and race walking gait after a 3-h walk at the competition pace in race walkers of the same performance level. Nine competitive race walkers were studied. In the same week, after a first test of VO2max determination, each subject completed two submaximal treadmill walks (6 min length, 0% grade, 12 km X h(-1) speed) before and after a 3-h overground test completed at the individual competition speed of the race walker. During the two submaximal tests, subjects were filmed between the 2nd and the 4th min, and physiological parameters were recorded between the 4th and the 6th min. Results showed two trends. On the one hand, we observed a significant and systematic increase in energy cost of walking (mean deltaCw = 8.4%), whereas no variation in the gait kinematics prescribed by the rules of race walking was recorded. On the other hand, this increase in metabolic energy demand was accompanied by variations of different magnitude and direction of stride length, of the excursion of the heel and of the maximal ankle flexion at toe-off among the race walkers. These results indicated that competitive race walkers are able to maintain their walking gait with exercise duration apart from a systematic increase in energy cost. Moreover, in this form of locomotion the effect of fatigue on the gait variability seems to be an individual function of the race walk constraints and the constraints of the performer.

  4. Walking to health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, J N; Hardman, A E

    1997-05-01

    Walking is a rhythmic, dynamic, aerobic activity of large skeletal muscles that confers the multifarious benefits of this with minimal adverse effects. Walking, faster than customary, and regularly in sufficient quantity into the 'training zone' of over 70% of maximal heart rate, develops and sustains physical fitness: the cardiovascular capacity and endurance (stamina) for bodily work and movement in everyday life that also provides reserves for meeting exceptional demands. Muscles of the legs, limb girdle and lower trunk are strengthened and the flexibility of their cardinal joints preserved; posture and carriage may improve. Any amount of walking, and at any pace, expends energy. Hence the potential, long term, of walking for weight control. Dynamic aerobic exercise, as in walking, enhances a multitude of bodily processes that are inherent in skeletal muscle activity, including the metabolism of high density lipoproteins and insulin/glucose dynamics. Walking is also the most common weight-bearing activity, and there are indications at all ages of an increase in related bone strength. The pleasurable and therapeutic, psychological and social dimensions of walking, whilst evident, have been surprisingly little studied. Nor has an economic assessment of the benefits and costs of walking been attempted. Walking is beneficial through engendering improved fitness and/or greater physiological activity and energy turnover. Two main modes of such action are distinguished as: (i) acute, short term effects of the exercise; and (ii) chronic, cumulative adaptations depending on habitual activity over weeks and months. Walking is often included in studies of exercise in relation to disease but it has seldom been specifically tested. There is, nevertheless, growing evidence of gains in the prevention of heart attack and reduction of total death rates, in the treatment of hypertension, intermittent claudication and musculoskeletal disorders, and in rehabilitation after heart

  5. Cardiorespiratory Responses to Pool Floor Walking in People Poststroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeng, Brenda; Fujii, Takuto; Lim, Hyosok; Vrongistinos, Konstantinos; Jung, Taeyou

    2018-03-01

    To compare cardiorespiratory responses between pool floor walking and overground walking (OW) in people poststroke. Cross-sectional study. University-based therapeutic exercise facility. Participants (N=28) were comprised of 14 community-dwelling individuals poststroke (5.57±3.57y poststroke) and 14 age- and sex-matched healthy adults (mean age, 58.00±15.51y; male/female ratio, 9:5). Not applicable. A telemetric metabolic system was used to collect cardiorespiratory variables, including oxygen consumption (V˙o 2 ), energy expenditure (EE), and expired volume per unit time (V˙e), during 6-minute walking sessions in chest-depth water and on land at a matched speed, determined by average of maximum walking speed in water. Individuals poststroke elicited no significant differences in cardiorespiratory responses between pool floor walking and OW. However, healthy controls showed significant increases in mean V˙o 2 values by 94%, EE values by 109%, and V˙e values by 94% (all Pstroke group did not. Our results indicate that people poststroke, unlike healthy adults, do not increase EE while walking in water compared with on land. Unlike stationary walking on an aquatic treadmill, forward locomotion during pool floor walking at faster speeds may have increased drag force, which requires greater EE from healthy adults. Without demanding excessive EE, walking in water may offer a naturally supportive environment for gait training in the early stages of rehabilitation. Copyright © 2017 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. All rights reserved.

  6. Spatial search by quantum walk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Childs, Andrew M.; Goldstone, Jeffrey

    2004-01-01

    Grover's quantum search algorithm provides a way to speed up combinatorial search, but is not directly applicable to searching a physical database. Nevertheless, Aaronson and Ambainis showed that a database of N items laid out in d spatial dimensions can be searched in time of order √(N) for d>2, and in time of order √(N) poly(log N) for d=2. We consider an alternative search algorithm based on a continuous-time quantum walk on a graph. The case of the complete graph gives the continuous-time search algorithm of Farhi and Gutmann, and other previously known results can be used to show that √(N) speedup can also be achieved on the hypercube. We show that full √(N) speedup can be achieved on a d-dimensional periodic lattice for d>4. In d=4, the quantum walk search algorithm takes time of order √(N) poly(log N), and in d<4, the algorithm does not provide substantial speedup

  7. Which walking capacity tests to use in multiple sclerosis? A multicentre study providing the basis for a core set

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijbels, D.; Dalgas, U.; Romberg, A.; de Groot, V.; Bethoux, F.; Vaney, C.; Gebara, B.; Santoyo, C.; Maamagi, H.; Rasova, K.; de Maertens, N.B.; Knuts, K.; Feys, P.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Many different walking capacity test formats are being used. It is unclear whether walking speed, obtained from short tests, and walking distance, obtained from long tests, provide different clinical information. Objectives: To determine the differential effect of various short and long

  8. The Act of Walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Maria Quvang Harck; Olesen, Mette; Helmer, Pernille Falborg

    2014-01-01

    ’ of mobility (Jensen 2013:111) such as the urban environment, and the infrastructures. Walking has indeed also a ‘software dimension’ as an embodied performance that trigger the human senses (Jensen 2013) and which is closely related to the habitus and identity of the individual (Halprin 1963). The individual......The ability to walk in an area is, in the existing literature, often explained by the physical structures like building density and the presence of facilities in an area, and it is often termed ‘walkability’ (Patton 2007; Forsyth and Southworth 2008; Krizek, Handy and Forsyth 2009; Johnson 2003......; Frumkin 2002). The term ‘walkability’ focuses on how the physical structures in the urban environment can promote walking, and how this potentially eases issues of public health and liveability in our cities (Krizek et al. 2009). However, the study of walking should not be reduced merely to the ‘hardware...

  9. Minimal Walking Technicolor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foadi, Roshan; Frandsen, Mads Toudal; A. Ryttov, T.

    2007-01-01

    Different theoretical and phenomenological aspects of the Minimal and Nonminimal Walking Technicolor theories have recently been studied. The goal here is to make the models ready for collider phenomenology. We do this by constructing the low energy effective theory containing scalars......, pseudoscalars, vector mesons and other fields predicted by the minimal walking theory. We construct their self-interactions and interactions with standard model fields. Using the Weinberg sum rules, opportunely modified to take into account the walking behavior of the underlying gauge theory, we find...... interesting relations for the spin-one spectrum. We derive the electroweak parameters using the newly constructed effective theory and compare the results with the underlying gauge theory. Our analysis is sufficiently general such that the resulting model can be used to represent a generic walking technicolor...

  10. Walking - Sensing - Participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Mads; Meinhardt, Nina Dam; Browning, David

    2014-01-01

    Building on ethnographic research and social theory in the field of ‘mobilities’, this workshop paper suggests that field work based on simply walking with people entails a form of embodied participation that informs technological interventions by creating a space within which to address a wider ...... set of experiential or ‘felt’ qualities of living with mobile technologies. Moving from reflections on the value of walking with people, the paper outlines some affordances of a smartphone application built to capture place experiences through walking.......Building on ethnographic research and social theory in the field of ‘mobilities’, this workshop paper suggests that field work based on simply walking with people entails a form of embodied participation that informs technological interventions by creating a space within which to address a wider...

  11. What Is Walking Pneumonia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... different from regular pneumonia? Answers from Eric J. Olson, M.D. Walking pneumonia is an informal term ... be treated with an antibiotic. With Eric J. Olson, M.D. Goldman L, et al., eds. Mycoplasma ...

  12. walk over ℤ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Leroux

    2005-01-01

    walk over ℤ can be described from a coassociative coalgebra. Relationships between this coalgebra and the set of periodic orbits of the classical chaotic system x↦2x mod⁡1, x∈[0,1], are also given.

  13. Two Legged Walking Robot

    OpenAIRE

    Kraus, V.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work is to construct a two-legged wirelessly controlled walking robot. This paper describes the construction of the robot, its control electronics, and the solution of the wireless control. The article also includes a description of the application to control the robot. The control electronics of the walking robot are built using the development kit Arduino Mega, which is enhanced with WiFi module allowing the wireless control, a set of ultrasonic sensors for detecting obstacl...

  14. Foot trajectory approximation using the pendulum model of walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Juan; Vuckovic, Aleksandra; Galen, Sujay; Conway, Bernard A; Hunt, Kenneth J

    2014-01-01

    Generating a natural foot trajectory is an important objective in robotic systems for rehabilitation of walking. Human walking has pendular properties, so the pendulum model of walking has been used in bipedal robots which produce rhythmic gait patterns. Whether natural foot trajectories can be produced by the pendulum model needs to be addressed as a first step towards applying the pendulum concept in gait orthosis design. This study investigated circle approximation of the foot trajectories, with focus on the geometry of the pendulum model of walking. Three able-bodied subjects walked overground at various speeds, and foot trajectories relative to the hip were analysed. Four circle approximation approaches were developed, and best-fit circle algorithms were derived to fit the trajectories of the ankle, heel and toe. The study confirmed that the ankle and heel trajectories during stance and the toe trajectory in both the stance and the swing phases during walking at various speeds could be well modelled by a rigid pendulum. All the pendulum models were centred around the hip with pendular lengths approximately equal to the segment distances from the hip. This observation provides a new approach for using the pendulum model of walking in gait orthosis design.

  15. Design of wheel-type walking-assist device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Seung Ho; Kim, Seung Ho; Kim, Chang Hoi; Seo, Yong Chil; Jung, Kyung Min; Lee, Sung Uk

    2006-03-01

    In this research, a outdoor wheel-type walking-assist device is developed to help an elder having a poor muscular strength at legs for walking, sitting and standing up easily at outdoors, and also for going and downing stairs. In conceptually designing, the environments of an elder's activity, the size of an elder's body and a necessary function of helping an elder are considered. This device has 4 wheels for stability. When an elder walks in incline plane with the proposed device, a rear-wing is rotated to keep the supporting device horizontal, regardless of an angle of inclination. A height-controlling device, which can control the height of the supporting device for adjusting an elder's height, is varied vertically to help an elder to sit and stand-up easily. Moreover, a outdoor wheel-type walking-assist device is conceptually designed and is made. In order to design it, the preview research is investigated firstly. On the basis of the proposed walking-assist device, the outdoor walking-assist device is designed and made. The outdoor wheel-type walking-assist device can go and down stairs automatically. This device go up and down the stair of having maximum 20cm height and an angle of 25 degrees with maximum 4 sec/stairs speed, and move at flatland with 60cm/sec speed

  16. The walk is never random: subtle landscape effects shape gene flow in a continuous white-tailed deer population in the Midwestern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Stacie J.; Samuel, Michael D.; Lopez, Davin L.; Shelton, Paul

    2012-01-01

    One of the pervasive challenges in landscape genetics is detecting gene flow patterns within continuous populations of highly mobile wildlife. Understanding population genetic structure within a continuous population can give insights into social structure, movement across the landscape and contact between populations, which influence ecological interactions, reproductive dynamics or pathogen transmission. We investigated the genetic structure of a large population of deer spanning the area of Wisconsin and Illinois, USA, affected by chronic wasting disease. We combined multiscale investigation, landscape genetic techniques and spatial statistical modelling to address the complex questions of landscape factors influencing population structure. We sampled over 2000 deer and used spatial autocorrelation and a spatial principal components analysis to describe the population genetic structure. We evaluated landscape effects on this pattern using a spatial autoregressive model within a model selection framework to test alternative hypotheses about gene flow. We found high levels of genetic connectivity, with gradients of variation across the large continuous population of white-tailed deer. At the fine scale, spatial clustering of related animals was correlated with the amount and arrangement of forested habitat. At the broader scale, impediments to dispersal were important to shaping genetic connectivity within the population. We found significant barrier effects of individual state and interstate highways and rivers. Our results offer an important understanding of deer biology and movement that will help inform the management of this species in an area where overabundance and disease spread are primary concerns.

  17. Walking the Everyday

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Bissen

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Since 2010, @matthewalking (Bissen, 2013 has published real-time public texts of walks in the city. This text-based Twitter feed has developed a narrative of a particular everyday life and developed a space of interface with others that represents a centering of perspective within an urban landscape. Walking the city provides a spatial, tactile, social, and embodied knowledge of the environment as each of us emerges into a space, orients ourselves, and determines a path that is highly localized, but is in connection with distant spaces and cultures. According to Ben Jacks in “Walking the City: Manhattan Projects,” “for urban dwellers and designers, walking is a fundamental tool for laying claim to, understanding, and shaping a livable city. Walking yields bodily knowing, recovers place memory, creates narrative, prioritizes human scale, and reconnects people to places” (75. @matthewalking’s walks, at times for as long as 5 hours, attempt to center an experience of an urban existence in a spatial narrative of the city that at once prioritizes a connection to place, but also is projected outward into a mediated relationship with others. The project is a series of unbounded walks, or dérives (drift, through the city that are logged on Twitter and traced to create an archive map of a set of particular urban experiences. The dérive concept as outlined in “The Theory of the Dérive,” by Guy Debord is when “one or more persons during a certain period drop their relations, their work and leisure activities, and all their other usual motives for movement and action, and let themselves be drawn by the attractions of the terrain and the encounters they find there” (62.

  18. Patient Satisfaction of Using the ActiGait® Drop Foot Stimulator System and Effect of Treatment on Walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Severinsen, Kåre Eg; Grey, Kurt; Juhl, Anne

    2014-01-01

    In this case-control study of ten chronic stroke patients with drop foot we report preliminary data on patient satisfaction, self- assessed changes in walking performance, effect on walking speed as well as adverse effects after surgical implantation of the ActiGait® drop foot stimulator in a cli...... with great care due to the small population size, the case control design and the limitations of the ten meter walk test in describing walking quality and safety....

  19. Physiotherapy Effects in Gait Speed in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klejda Tani

    2018-03-01

    CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicated that there was a significant decrease in pain and increase of gait speed while walking for 10 meters. Kinesio Tape can be used in patients with knee osteoarthritis, especially when changing walking stereotypes is a long-term goal of the treatment.

  20. Walks on SPR neighborhoods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caceres, Alan Joseph J; Castillo, Juan; Lee, Jinnie; St John, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    A nearest-neighbor-interchange (NNI)-walk is a sequence of unrooted phylogenetic trees, T1, T2, . . . , T(k) where each consecutive pair of trees differs by a single NNI move. We give tight bounds on the length of the shortest NNI-walks that visit all trees in a subtree-prune-and-regraft (SPR) neighborhood of a given tree. For any unrooted, binary tree, T, on n leaves, the shortest walk takes Θ(n²) additional steps more than the number of trees in the SPR neighborhood. This answers Bryant’s Second Combinatorial Challenge from the Phylogenetics Challenges List, the Isaac Newton Institute, 2011, and the Penny Ante Problem List, 2009.

  1. Performance of a six-legged planetary rover - Power, positioning, and autonomous walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krotkov, Eric; Simmons, Reid

    The authors quantify several performance metrics for the Ambler, a six-legged robot configured for autonomous traversal of Mars-like terrain. They present power consumption measures for walking on sandy terrain and for vertical lifts at different velocities. They document the accuracy of a novel dead reckoning approach, and analyze the accuracy. They describe the results of autonomous walking experiments in terms of terrain traversed, walking speed, number of instructions executed and endurance.

  2. Fitness Club / Nordic Walking

    CERN Multimedia

    Fitness Club

    2011-01-01

    Nordic Walking at CERN Enrollments are open for Nordic Walking courses and outings at CERN. Classes will be on Tuesdays as of 20 September, and outings for the more experienced will be on Thursdays as of 15 September. We meet at the CERN Club barracks car park (near entrance A). • 18:00 to 19:00 on 20 & 27 September, as well as 4 & 11 October. Check out our schedule and rates and enroll at: http://cern.ch/club-fitness Hope to see you among us! CERN Fitness Club fitness.club@cern.ch  

  3. Impact of left ventricular assist device speed adjustment on exercise tolerance and markers of wall stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, Christopher S; Salamonsen, Robert; Keogh, Anne M; Woodard, John; Ayre, Peter; Prichard, Roslyn; Kotlyar, Eugene; Macdonald, Peter S; Jansz, Paul; Spratt, Phillip

    2015-09-01

    Left ventricular assist devices are crucial in rehabilitation of patients with end-stage heart failure. Whether cardiopulmonary function is enhanced with higher pump output is unknown. 10 patients (aged 39±16 years, mean±SD) underwent monitored adjustment of pump speed to determine minimum safe low speed and maximum safe high speed at rest. Patients were then randomized to these speed settings and underwent three 6-minute walk tests (6MWT) and symptom-limited cardiopulmonary stress tests (CPX) on separate days. Pump speed settings (low, normal and high) resulted in significantly different resting pump flows of 4.43±0.6, 5.03±0.94, and 5.72±1.2 l/min (Pexercise (Pexercise time (p=.27). Maximum workload achieved and peak oxygen consumption were significantly different comparing low to high pump speed settings only (Prelease was significantly reduced at higher pump speed with exercise (Prelease consistent with lower myocardial wall stress. This did not, however, improve exercise tolerance.

  4. Physiological aspect walking and Nordic walking as adequate kinetic activities.

    OpenAIRE

    BENEŠ, Václav

    2010-01-01

    This bachelor thesis on the topic of The Physiological Aspect of Walking and Nordic Walking as an adequate physical activity focuses on chosen physiological changes of an organism during a five-month training cycle. In the theoretical part I describe the physiological changes of organism during a regularly repeated strain, and also the technique of walking, Nordic walking and health benefits of these activities are defined here. The research part of the thesis describes the measurement method...

  5. Walking adaptability therapy after stroke: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermans, Celine; Roerdink, Melvyn; van Ooijen, Marielle W; Meskers, Carel G; Janssen, Thomas W; Beek, Peter J

    2016-08-26

    Walking in everyday life requires the ability to adapt walking to the environment. This adaptability is often impaired after stroke, and this might contribute to the increased fall risk after stroke. To improve safe community ambulation, walking adaptability training might be beneficial after stroke. This study is designed to compare the effects of two interventions for improving walking speed and walking adaptability: treadmill-based C-Mill therapy (therapy with augmented reality) and the overground FALLS program (a conventional therapy program). We hypothesize that C-Mill therapy will result in better outcomes than the FALLS program, owing to its expected greater amount of walking practice. This is a single-center parallel group randomized controlled trial with pre-intervention, post-intervention, retention, and follow-up tests. Forty persons after stroke (≥3 months) with deficits in walking or balance will be included. Participants will be randomly allocated to either C-Mill therapy or the overground FALLS program for 5 weeks. Both interventions will incorporate practice of walking adaptability and will be matched in terms of frequency, duration, and therapist attention. Walking speed, as determined by the 10 Meter Walking Test, will be the primary outcome measure. Secondary outcome measures will pertain to walking adaptability (10 Meter Walking Test with context or cognitive dual-task and Interactive Walkway assessments). Furthermore, commonly used clinical measures to determine walking ability (Timed Up-and-Go test), walking independence (Functional Ambulation Category), balance (Berg Balance Scale), and balance confidence (Activities-specific Balance Confidence scale) will be used, as well as a complementary set of walking-related assessments. The amount of walking practice (the number of steps taken per session) will be registered using the treadmill's inbuilt step counter (C-Mill therapy) and video recordings (FALLS program). This process measure will

  6. Displacement of the pelvis during human walking : experimental data and model predictions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlstra, W; Hof, AL

    1997-01-01

    Displacements of the pelvis during treadmill walking were studied in dependence of walking speed, stride frequency and stride length. Displacement curves per stride cycle were described by means of harmonic analysis. Simple mechanical, or geometrical models of the body's center of mass (COM)

  7. Within-day variability on short and long walking tests in persons with multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feys, P.; Bibby, B.; Romberg, A.; Santoyo, C.; Gebara, B.; de Noordhout, B.M.; Knuts, K.; Bethoux, F.; Skjerbaek, A.; Jensen, E.; Baert, I.; Vaney, C.; de Groot, V.; Dalgas, U.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare within-day variability of short (10 m walking test at usual and fastest speed; 10MWT) and long (2 and 6-minute walking test; 2MWT/6MWT) tests in persons with multiple sclerosis. Design Observational study. Setting MS rehabilitation and research centers in Europe and US within

  8. Locomotor sequence learning in visually guided walking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choi, Julia T; Jensen, Peter; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2016-01-01

    walking. In addition, we determined how age (i.e., healthy young adults vs. children) and biomechanical factors (i.e., walking speed) affected the rate and magnitude of locomotor sequence learning. The results showed that healthy young adults (age 24 ± 5 years, N = 20) could learn a specific sequence...... of step lengths over 300 training steps. Younger children (age 6-10 years, N = 8) have lower baseline performance, but their magnitude and rate of sequence learning was the same compared to older children (11-16 years, N = 10) and healthy adults. In addition, learning capacity may be more limited...... to modify step length from one trial to the next. Our sequence learning paradigm is derived from the serial reaction-time (SRT) task that has been used in upper limb studies. Both random and ordered sequences of step lengths were used to measure sequence-specific and sequence non-specific learning during...

  9. Speeding up or slowing down?: Gait adaptations to preserve gait stability in response to balance perturbations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hak, L.; Houdijk, J.H.P.; Steenbrink, F.; van der Wurff, P.; Beek, P.J.; van Dieen, J.H.

    2012-01-01

    It has frequently been proposed that lowering walking speed is a strategy to enhance gait stability and to decrease the probability of falling. However, previous studies have not been able to establish a clear relation between walking speed and gait stability. We investigated whether people do

  10. Treadmill training and body weight support for walking after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrholz, Jan; Thomas, Simone; Elsner, Bernhard

    2017-08-17

    Treadmill training, with or without body weight support using a harness, is used in rehabilitation and might help to improve walking after stroke. This is an update of the Cochrane review first published in 2003 and updated in 2005 and 2014. To determine if treadmill training and body weight support, individually or in combination, improve walking ability, quality of life, activities of daily living, dependency or death, and institutionalisation or death, compared with other physiotherapy gait-training interventions after stroke. The secondary objective was to determine the safety and acceptability of this method of gait training. We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (last searched 14 February 2017), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) and the Database of Reviews of Effects (DARE) (the Cochrane Library 2017, Issue 2), MEDLINE (1966 to 14 February 2017), Embase (1980 to 14 February 2017), CINAHL (1982 to 14 February 2017), AMED (1985 to 14 February 2017) and SPORTDiscus (1949 to 14 February 2017). We also handsearched relevant conference proceedings and ongoing trials and research registers, screened reference lists, and contacted trialists to identify further trials. Randomised or quasi-randomised controlled and cross-over trials of treadmill training and body weight support, individually or in combination, for the treatment of walking after stroke. Two review authors independently selected trials, extracted data, and assessed risk of bias and methodological quality. The primary outcomes investigated were walking speed, endurance, and dependency. We included 56 trials with 3105 participants in this updated review. The average age of the participants was 60 years, and the studies were carried out in both inpatient and outpatient settings. All participants had at least some walking difficulties and many could not walk without assistance. Overall, the use of treadmill training did not increase the chances of walking

  11. Walking to transit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    Using a real-life setting, WalkBostons project focused on developing and testing techniques to broaden the scope and range of public participation in transportation planning in a large neighborhood in Boston. The team explored methods of seeking o...

  12. Walking along water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Mattias Borg

    2014-01-01

    Steep slopes, white peaks and deep valleys make up the Andes. As phenomenologists of landscape have told us, different people have different landscapes. By moving across the terrain, walking along, we might get a sense of how this has been carved out by the movement of wind and water, tectonics...

  13. Functional roles of lower-limb joint moments while walking in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Tasuku; Shirota, Takashi; Yamamoto, Shin-Ichiro; Nakazawa, Kimitaka; Akai, Masami

    2005-02-01

    To clarify the functional roles of lower-limb joint moments and their contribution to support and propulsion tasks while walking in water compared with that on land. Sixteen healthy, young subjects walked on land and in water at several different speeds with and without additional loads. Walking in water is a major rehabilitation therapy for patients with orthopedic disorders. However, the functional role of lower-limb joint moments while walking in water is still unclear. Kinematics, electromyographic activities in biceps femoris and gluteus maximums, and ground reaction forces were measured under the following conditions: walking on land and in water at a self-determined pace, slow walking on land, and fast walking in water with or without additional loads (8 kg). The hip, knee, and ankle joint moments were calculated by inverse dynamics. The contribution of the walking speed increased the hip extension moment, and the additional weight increased the ankle plantar flexion and knee extension moment. The major functional role was different in each lower-limb joint musc