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Sample records for waldenstrom macroglobulinemia

  1. Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia; Macroglobulinemia - primary; Lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma; Monoclonal macroglobulinemia ... 2016:chap 187. Treon SP, Merlini G. Waldenström macroglobulinemia and lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma. In: Hoffman R, Benz EJ, ...

  2. Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia: prognosis and management.

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    Oza, A; Rajkumar, S V

    2015-03-27

    Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia (WM) is a B-cell lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma characterized by monoclonal immunoglobulin M protein in the serum and infiltration of bone marrow with lymphoplasmacytic cells. Asymptomatic patients can be observed without therapy. First-line therapy should consist of the monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody, rituximab, given typically in combination with other agents. We prefer dexamethasone, rituximab, cyclophosphamide (DRC) as initial therapy for most patients with symptomatic WM. Other reasonable options are bortezomib, rituximab, dexamethasone (BoRD) or bendamustine plus rituximab (BR). All of these regimens are associated with excellent response and tolerability. Initial therapy is usually administered for 6 months, followed by observation. Response to therapy is assessed using the standard response criteria developed by the International Working Group on Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia. Relapse is almost inevitable in WM but may occur years after initial therapy. In symptomatic patients relapsing more than 1-2 years after initial therapy, the original treatment can be repeated. For relapse occurring sooner, an alternative regimen is used. In select patients, high-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation may be an option at relapse. Options for therapy of relapsed WM besides regimens used in the front-line setting include ibrutinib, purine nucleoside analogs (cladribine, fludarabine), carfilzomib and immunomodulatory agents (thalidomide, lenalidomide).

  3. Epigenetic modifications as key regulators of Waldenstrom's Macroglobulinemia biology

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    Maiso Patricia

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Waldenstrom's Macroglobulinemia is a low-grade B-cell lymphoma characterized by the presence of lymphoplasmacytic cells in the bone marrow and a monoclonal immunoglobulin M in the circulation. Recent evidences support the hypothesis that epigenetic modifications lead to Waldesntrom cell proliferation and therefore play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of this disease. Indeed, while cytogenetic and gene expression analysis have demonstrated minimal changes; microRNA aberrations and modification in the histone acetylation status of primary Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia tumor cells have been described. These findings provide a better understanding of the underlying molecular changes that lead to the initiation and progression of this disease.

  4. IMMUNOCHEMICAL STUDIES IN A PATIENT WITH WALDEN-STROM'S MACROGLOBULINEMIA

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    M. Mir-Ahmadian

    1978-06-01

    Full Text Available Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia was studied in a 46 year old Iranian male with anemia, bleeding, ecchymose and splenomegaly. The diagnosis of Macroglobulinemia was established by the presence of veryhigh level of IgM paraprotein in sera which was detectable by imrnunoelectrophoresis and rocket immunoelectrophoresis, and by the presence of bone marrow infiltration of plasmoc ytes. Family studies revealed a high IgM level in one of the patient's daughters.

  5. Spontaneous splenic rupture in Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia: a case report

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    Charakidis Michail

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction We report the case of a patient with Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia complicated by spontaneous splenic rupture. Case presentation A 49-year-old Caucasian woman was referred to our emergency department by her general practitioner following a three-week history of malaise, night sweats, six kilograms of weight loss, intermittent nausea and vomiting, progressive upper abdominal pain and easy bruising. On the fourth day following her admission, she had a rapid clinical deterioration, with subsequent radiological investigations revealing a splenic rupture. Her morphology, biochemistry, flow cytometry and histology were strongly suggestive of Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia. Conclusions Spontaneous splenic rupture is not an expected complication of low-grade lymphoplasmacytic lymphomas, such as Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia. To the best of our knowledge, this is the only reported case of early spontaneous splenic rupture due to Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia. Our case highlights that despite the typical disease course of low-grade hematological malignancies, signs and symptoms of imminent splenic rupture should be considered when formulating a clinical assessment.

  6. Cytogenetic findings in mouse multiple myeloma and Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia

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    vandenAkker, TW; Radl, J; FrankenPostma, E; Hagemeijer, A

    1996-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) and Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia-like lymphoma (MW) appear spontaneously in C57BL/KaLwRij mice at a frequency of 0.5% and 0.2%, respectively, They can readily be propagated by intravenous transfer of mainly bone marrow or spleen cells into syngeneic recipients. Previous stud

  7. Bilateral Sudden Hearing Loss in Waldenstrom's Macroglobulinemia: MR Appearance.

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    Shibata, Dean K; Johnston, S Claiborne

    2006-01-01

    A 46 year-old man with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome presented with sudden development of vertigo and tinnitus and then simultaneous, bilateral, profound, sudden hearing loss. Magnetic resonance imaging showed bilateral high signal within the cochlea, vestibule, and portions of the semicircular canals on the non-enhanced T1-weighted images, most consistent with recent hemorrhage into the otic labyrinth. Serum analysis and bone-marrow biopsy led to diagnosis of Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia - a likely cause of the presumed hemorrhage.

  8. Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia Presenting with Pancreatic Mass: A Case Report and Review of Literature

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    Hemanta Kumar Nayak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia is a rare lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma characterized by a wide range of clinicalpresentations related to direct tumor infiltration and the production of IgM. Most commonly it presents with cytopenia,hepatosplenomegaly, lymphadenopathy, constitutional symptoms, and hyperviscosity syndrome. Case report We report a case of Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia in an 60-year-old female who initially presented with intermittent abdominal pain. The patient had no peripheral lymphadenopathy. On extensive investigation she was found to have pancreatic mass. The diagnosis of Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia was established after cytomorphology and immunohistochemical analysis of the patient’s bone marrow revealed the presence of a lymphoid/lymphoplasmacytoid-like bone marrow infiltrate along with an elevated serum IgM level. The patient responded both clinically and serologically to chemotherapy. This case is unusual because the patient lacked all common clinical features of Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia with exception of anemia. Conclusion To our knowledge this is the first report of a patient with Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia presenting with a pancreatic mass adding to the spectrum of clinical presentations seen in this disease. This adds to the wide variety of gastrointestinal related clinical presentations of Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia and points to the need for considering Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia along with other lymphoid neoplasms in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic lesions.

  9. A Case of Nephrotic Syndrome With Minimal-Change Disease and Waldenstrom's Macroglobulinemia.

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    Grabe, Darren W; Li, Bo; Haqqie, Syed S

    2013-12-01

    Kidney disease is a rare complication of Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia. We report a case of nephrotic syndrome and minimal change disease in a patient with biopsy proven Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia. The patient presented with over 12 grams of proteinuria and was successfully treated with oral prednisone over the course of 4 weeks. Repeat serum protein electrophoresis as well as serum immunoelectrophoresis revealed no paraproteins, urine analysis was negative for protein or blood by dipstick and spot urine protein was 9 mg/dL with creatinine of 101 mg/dL at time of last office visit. This case illustrates the successful treatment with corticosteroids alone with prolonged complete remission.

  10. A 44-Year-Old Man with Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia and Bilateral Maxillary Sinusitis

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    Shinta Oktya Wardhani

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia is a chronic, indolent, lymphoproliferative disorder, which is characterized by the presence of a high macroglobulin (IgM level, elevated serum viscosity, and the presence of a lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate in the bone marrow. Clinical manifestations may be found due to the presence of IgM paraprotein and malignant lymphoplasmacytic cell infiltration of the bone marrow and other tissues. We reported a case of male patient with Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia and bilateral maxillary sinusitis. He had received symptomatic and antibiotic treatment for his sinusitis, FFP and PRC transfusion to improve his general condition and chemotherapy with CHOP regimen as definitive treatment.

  11. MYD88 L265P mutation in Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia.

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    Poulain, Stéphanie; Roumier, Christophe; Decambron, Audrey; Renneville, Aline; Herbaux, Charles; Bertrand, Elisabeth; Tricot, Sabine; Daudignon, Agnès; Galiègue-Zouitina, Sylvie; Soenen, Valerie; Theisen, Olivier; Grardel, Nathalie; Nibourel, Olivier; Roche-Lestienne, Catherine; Quesnel, Bruno; Duthilleul, Patrick; Preudhomme, Claude; Leleu, Xavier

    2013-05-30

    Mutation of the MYD88 gene has recently been identified in activated B-cell-like diffuse cell lymphoma and enhanced Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK-STAT) and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) signaling pathways. A whole exome-sequencing study of Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia (WM) suggested a high frequency of MYD88 L265P mutation in WM. The genetic background is not fully deciphered in WM, although the role of NF-κB and JAK-STAT has been demonstrated. We analyzed MYD88 mutation in exon 5 and characterized the clinical significance of this genetic alteration in 67 WM patients. Clinical features; immunophenotypic markers; and conventional cytogenetic, fluorescence in situ hybridization, and single nucleotide polymorphism array data were analyzed. MYD88 L265P mutation was acquired in 79% of patients. Overall, we have identified alteration of the MYD88 locus in 91% of WM patients, including 12% with gain on chromosome 3 at the 3p22 locus that included the MYD88 gene. Patients with absence of MYD88 mutation were WM characterized with a female predominance, a splenomegaly, gain of chromosome 3, and CD27 expression. Importantly, inhibition of MYD88 signaling induced cytotoxicity and inhibited cell growth of cell lines issued from patients with WM. In conclusion, these results confirm a high frequency of MYD88 L265P mutation in WM. The discovery of MYD88 L265P mutation may contribute to a better understanding of the physiopathogeny of WM.

  12. Acquired mutations associated with ibrutinib resistance in Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia.

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    Xu, Lian; Tsakmaklis, Nicholas; Yang, Guang; Chen, Jiaji G; Liu, Xia; Demos, Maria; Kofides, Amanda; Patterson, Christopher J; Meid, Kirsten; Gustine, Joshua; Dubeau, Toni; Palomba, M Lia; Advani, Ranjana; Castillo, Jorge J; Furman, Richard R; Hunter, Zachary R; Treon, Steven P

    2017-02-24

    Ibrutinib produces high response rates and durable remissions in Waldenstrom's Macroglobulinemia (WM) that are impacted by MYD88 and CXCR4(WHIM) mutations. Disease progression can develop on ibrutinib, though the molecular basis remains to be clarified. We sequenced sorted CD19(+) lymphoplasmacytic cells from 6 WM patients who progressed after achieving major responses on ibrutinib using Sanger, TA cloning and sequencing, and highly sensitive and specific AS-PCR assays that we developed for BTK mutations. AS-PCR assays were used to screen patients with and without progressive disease on ibrutinib, and ibrutinib-naïve disease. Targeted next generation sequencing was used to validate AS-PCR findings, assess for other BTK mutations, and other targets in BCR and MYD88 signaling. Among the 6 progressing patients, 3 had BTK(Cys481) variants that included BTK(Cys481Ser(c.1635G>C and c.1634T>A)) and BTK(Cys481Arg(c.1634T>C)) Two of these patients had multiple BTK mutations. Screening of 38 additional patients on ibrutinib without clinical progression identified BTK(Cys481) mutations in 2 (5.1%) individuals, both of whom subsequently progressed. BTK(Cys481) mutations were not detected in baseline samples or in 100 ibrutinib-naive WM patients. Using mutated MYD88 as a tumor marker, BTK(Cys481) mutations were subclonal, with a highly variable clonal distribution. Targeted deep sequencing confirmed AS-PCR findings, and identified an additional BTK(Cys481Tyr(c.1634G>A)) mutation in the two patients with multiple other BTK(Cys481) mutations, as well as CARD11(Leu878Phe(c.2632C>T)) and PLCγ2(Tyr495His(c.1483T>C)) mutations. Four of the five patients with BTK(C481) variants were CXCR4 mutated. BTK(Cys481) mutations are common in WM patients with clinical progression on ibrutinib, and are associated with mutated CXCR4.

  13. Progression in smoldering Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia: long-term results.

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    Kyle, Robert A; Benson, Joanne T; Larson, Dirk R; Therneau, Terry M; Dispenzieri, Angela; Kumar, Shaji; Melton, L Joseph; Rajkumar, S Vincent

    2012-05-10

    The purpose of this study was to define the risk of progression and survival of patients with smoldering Waldenström macroglobulinemia (SWM). SWM is defined clinically as having a serum monoclonal IgM protein≥3 g/dL and/or≥10% bone marrow lymphoplasmacytic infiltration but no evidence of end-organ damage (anemia, constitutional symptoms, hyperviscosity, lymphadenopathy, or hepatosplenomegaly). We searched a computerized database and reviewed the medical records of all patients at Mayo Clinic who fulfilled the criteria of SWM between 1974 and 1995. During 285 cumulative person-years of follow-up of the 48 patients with SWM (median, 15.4 years), 34 (71%) progressed to symptomatic Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM) requiring treatment, one to primary amyloidosis, and one to lymphoma (total, 75%). The cumulative probability of progression to symptomatic WM, amyloidosis, or lymphoma was 6% at 1 year, 39% at 3 years, 59% at 5 years, and 68% at 10 years. The major risk factors for progression were percentage of lymphoplasmacytic cells in the bone marrow, size of the serum M-spike, and the hemoglobin value. Patients with SWM should be followed and not treated until symptomatic WM develops. Treatment on a clinical trial for those at greatest risk of progression should be considered.

  14. Study of Safety,Efficacy and Pharmacokinetics of CT-1530 in Patients With Relapsed or Refractory B Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, and Waldenstrom's Macroglobulinemia

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    2016-12-01

    Relapsed or Refractory B Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Waldenstrom's Macroglobulinemia; Mantle Zone Lymphoma Refractory/Recurrent; Follicle Centre Lymphoma Diffuse; Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma

  15. Natural History Study of Monoclonal B Cell Lymphocytosis (MBL), Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia/Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma (CLL/SLL), Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma (LPL)/Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia (WM), and Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma (SMZL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-05

    B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Monoclonal B-Cell Lymphocytosis; Lymhoma, Small Lymphocytic; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma

  16. Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia with CD5+ expression presented as cryoglobulinemic glomerulonephropathy: a case report.

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    Kim, You Lim; Gong, Soo Jung; Hwang, Young Hwan; Joo, Jong Eun; Cho, Young Uk; Lee, Jung Ae; Sung, Su Ah; Lee, So Young; Kim, Nae Yoo

    2011-06-01

    Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia (WM) is a B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder associated with bone marrow involvement of lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma (LPL) and an IgM monoclonal gammopathy. Generally B-lymphocytes in LPL do not express CD5 that is important for differential diagnosis of B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders. In WM, various renal diseases and type I cryoglobulinemia are well described separately, but cryoglobulinemic glomerulonephropathy is very rarely reported. A 61-yr-old woman complained of generalized edema, cyanosis of the extremities in cold weather, visual disturbance, and pancytopenia. Bone marrow and renal biopsy showed CD5+ expressing B-cells and cryoglobulinemic glomerulonephropathy. With the diagnosis of WM, she received cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisolone chemotherapy and got complete remission. Here, we report a rare case of WM associated with unusual expression of CD5+ B-lymphocytes and cryoglobulinemic glomerulonephropathy, and emphasize the importance of the clinical features in differentiating CD5+ B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders.

  17. Distinct characteristics and new prognostic scoring system for Chinese patients with Waldenstr(o)m macroglobulinemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Shuhua; Cui Rui; Li Zengjun; An Gang; Qi Junyuan; Zou Dehui; Zhang Peihong

    2014-01-01

    Background Waldenstr(o)m macroglobulinemia (WM) is an uncommon lymphoid malignancy.The characteristics and prognosis of WM have never been systematically studied in the East.Methods We analyzed the clinical characteristics and the prognostic factors of 90 Chinese WM patients,and compared them with the Western reports.Results The median age was 62 years old with a male-to-female ratio of 3.74.The most common symptoms at diagnosis were fatigue (77.8%) and bleeding (20%),while only 6 patients (6.7%) were asymptomatic.In the univariate analysis,age >62 years,thrombocytopenia,leucopenia,cytopenias ≥2,and high risk on the international prognostic scoring system for WM were the adverse risk factors,but only age >62 years and ≥2 cytopenias were the independent prognostic factors in the multivariate analysis.Using age <62 years and ≥2 cytopenias,three significantly different prognostic groups could been distinguished,with 5-year overall survival of 71.6%,48.6%,and 17.0% (P <0.001).Conclusion Distinct characteristics exist in WM in China compared to the West and we describe a new simple prognostic model for newly diagnosed WM patients.

  18. Immunoglobulin M 'Flare' Seen in a Case of Waldenstrom's Macroglobulinemia: Successfully Managed by Therapeutic Plasma Exchange.

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    Datta, Suvro Sankha; Mukherjee, Somnath; Talukder, Biplabendu; Bhattacharya, Prasun

    2016-06-01

    Therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE) is a conjunctive modality of treatment along with rituximab to decrease paraproteinemia associated with hyperviscosity. Here we narrate our experience in treating a diagnosed case of Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia in 70 years old male patient with moderate anemia and severe features of hyperviscosity syndrome by serial TPE and rituximab combined with bortezomib. The patient was relieved of his symptoms after initial two TPE procedures performed on alternative day. However he again developed signs and symptoms of the disease within 6 weeks following second TPE and starting of rituximab (375 mg/m(2) weekly for 4 weeks) therapy with bortezomib. His serum IgM level became as high as 9.901 g/dl suggesting immunoglobulin M 'Flare' due to rituximab therapy. At the end of third TPE he was relieved symptomatically with low IgM level (3.13 g/dl) and discharged in hemodynamically stable condition. Therefore we concluded that careful monitoring of serum viscosity and IgM level are necessary during treatment with rituximab based chemotherapy and TPE should be promptly initiated to control the treatment related hyperviscosity syndrome.

  19. Sequential technetium-99m sulfur colloid/indium-111 white blood cell imaging in macroglobulinemia of Waldenstrom

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    Fink-Bennett, D.; Balon, H.R.; Irwin, R. (William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (USA))

    1990-06-01

    Technetium-99m sulfur colloid (SC) and indium-111 labeled leukocyte (In-111 WBC) scintigraphy was performed on a 77-year-old female patient to rule out a left periprosthetic infection. Anterior Tc-99m SC and In-111 WBC images of the pelvis and femurs revealed no abnormal deposition of radiotracer about the Austin-Moore prosthesis. Absent radiotracer uptake, however, was demonstrated within the left hemipelvis. A left iliac bone marrow aspirate and biopsy revealed a lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate consistent with Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia.

  20. Rituximab, Cyclophosphamide, Bortezomib, and Dexamethasone in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Low-Grade Follicular Lymphoma, Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia, or Mantle Cell Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-13

    Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  1. Allogeneic stem-cell transplantation in patients with Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia: report from the Lymphoma Working Party of the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kyriakou, C.; Canals, C.; Cornelissen, J.J.; Socie, G.; Willemze, R.; Ifrah, N.; Greinix, H.T.; Blaise, D.; Deconinck, E.; Ferrant, A.; Schattenberg, A.V.M.B.; Harousseau, J.L.; Sureda, A.; Schmitz, N.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: Allogeneic stem-cell transplantation (alloSCT) is a curative therapeutic option for patients with low-grade lymphoid malignancies. Information regarding alloSCT in Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia (WM) is limited. This study presents the long-term outcome of a large series of patients with WM

  2. Bortezomib, Rituximab, and Dexamethasone With or Without Temsirolimus in Treating Patients With Untreated or Relapsed Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia or Relapsed or Refractory Mantle Cell or Follicular Lymphoma

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    2017-01-31

    Cognitive Side Effects of Cancer Therapy; Fatigue; Neurotoxicity Syndrome; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Therapy-Related Toxicity; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  3. Concomitant Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia and IgA plasmablastic myeloma in a patient with untreated IgM paraproteinemia: sequential development of biclonal B-cell neoplasms over a 10-year period in a single individual.

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    Wang, Endi; Kulbacki, Evan; Stoecker, Maggie

    2012-07-01

    Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia and plasma cell myeloma are both mature B-cell neoplasms primarily involving bone marrow and frequently demonstrating paraproteinemia. Plasma cell myeloma has been described in association with other indolent B-cell lymphomas, particularly chronic lymphocytic leukemia, but concomitant Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia and plasma cell myeloma has not been previously described. We report the first case of sequential development of Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia and plasma cell myeloma over a 10-year period in a 73-year-old man with untreated IgM paraproteinemia. The bone marrow biopsy demonstrated dual populations of lymphoid cells: small mature lymphocytes and immature plasma cells. Although both Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia and plasma cell myeloma were restricted to κ light chain, plasma cell myeloma expressed IgA, whereas the plasmacytic component in Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia produced IgM. The biclonal nature of these 2 B-cell neoplasms was further supported by immunofixation electrophoresis and cytogenetic studies. Although the clinical outcome of plasma cell myeloma when concomitant with other indolent B-cell neoplasms is unfavorable, our patient seemed to respond to high-dose bortezomib plus lenalidomide.

  4. Phase I/II trial of everolimus in combination with bortezomib and rituximab (RVR) in relapsed/refractory Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia.

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    Ghobrial, I M; Redd, R; Armand, P; Banwait, R; Boswell, E; Chuma, S; Huynh, D; Sacco, A; Roccaro, A M; Perilla-Glen, A; Noonan, K; MacNabb, M; Leblebjian, H; Warren, D; Henrick, P; Castillo, J J; Richardson, P G; Matous, J; Weller, E; Treon, S P

    2015-12-01

    We examined the combination of the mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor everolimus with bortezomib and rituximab in patients with relapsed/refractory Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia (WM) in a phase I/II study. All patients received six cycles of the combination of everolimus/rituximab or everolimus/bortezomib/rituximab followed by maintenance with everolimus until progression. Forty-six patients were treated; 98% received prior rituximab and 57% received prior bortezomib. No dose-limiting toxicities were observed in the phase I. The most common treatment-related toxicities of all grades were fatigue (63%), anemia (54%), leucopenia (52%), neutropenia (48%) and diarrhea (43%). Thirty-six (78%) of the 46 patients received full dose therapy (FDT) of the three drugs. Of these 36, 2 (6%) had complete response (90% confidence interval (CI): 1-16). In all, 32/36 (89%) of patients experienced at least a minimal response (90% CI: 76-96%). The observed partial response or better response rate was 19/36 (53, 90 CI: 38-67%). For the 36 FDT patients, the median progression-free survival was 21 months (95% CI: 12-not estimable). In summary, this study demonstrates that the combination of everolimus, bortezomib and rituximab is well tolerated and achieved 89% response rate even in patients previously treated, making it a possible model of non-chemotherapeutic-based combination therapy in WM.

  5. Characterization of subpopulation lacking both B-cell and plasma cell markers in Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia cell line.

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    Wada, Naoki; Zhan, Maosheng; Hori, Yumiko; Honma, Keiichiro; Ikeda, Jun-ichiro; Morii, Eiichi

    2014-01-01

    Cancer cells with tumorigenic potential are limited to a small population known as cancer-initiating cells (CICs). To date, CICs have not been identified in non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. Here, we investigated a candidate of CICs of an indolent non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia (WM), using WM cell line MWCL-1. WM tumor expresses both B-cell and plasma cell markers, CD20 and CD138. When stained with anti-CD20 and anti-CD138 antibodies, MWCL-1 cells were classified into three subpopulations: CD20⁻ CD138⁻, CD20⁺ CD138⁻, and CD20⁺ CD138⁺. When cultured, CD20⁻ CD138⁻ cells yielded all three subpopulations, but CD20⁺ cells did not yield CD20⁻ CD138⁻ cells. Higher reactive oxygen species (ROS) expelling and in vitro colony formation activities were detected in CD20⁻ CD138⁻ cells than in CD20⁺ CD138⁻ and CD20⁺ CD138⁺ cells. When cultured in the absence of serum or with anti-cancer drug, CD20⁻ CD138⁻ cells were resistant to apoptosis. In contrast, CD20⁺ CD138⁺ cells were vulnerable to apoptosis in the same condition. In fact, the immunohistochemical analysis with clinical samples revealed that tumor cells in apoptosis were CD138-positive. The production of all three subpopulations, the efficient ROS expelling and in vitro colony-forming activities, and the resistance to apoptosis suggested that the CD20⁻ CD138⁻ cell might be a candidate of CICs in WM.

  6. Impaired class switch recombination (CSR) in Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia (WM) despite apparently normal CSR machinery.

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    Kriangkum, Jitra; Taylor, Brian J; Strachan, Erin; Mant, Michael J; Reiman, Tony; Belch, Andrew R; Pilarski, Linda M

    2006-04-01

    Analysis of clonotypic isotype class switching (CSR) in Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM) and IgM monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) reveals a normal initial phase of B-cell activation as determined by constitutive and inducible expression of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID). Switch mu (Smu) analysis shows that large deletions are not common in WM or IgM MGUS. In CD40L/IL-4-stimulated WM cultures from 2 patients, we observed clonotypic IgG exhibiting intraclonal homogeneity associated with multiple hybrid Smu/Sgamma junctions. This suggests CSR had occurred within WM cells. Nevertheless, the estimated IgG/IgM-cell frequency was relatively low (1/1600 cells). Thus, for the majority of WM B cells, CSR does not occur even when stimulated in vitro, suggesting that the WM cell is constitutively unable to or being prevented from carrying out CSR. In contrast to WM, the majority of IgM MGUS clones exhibit intraclonal heterogeneity of IgH VDJ. Furthermore, most IgM MGUS accumulate more mutations in the upstream Smu region than do WM, making them unlikely WM progenitors. These observations suggest that switch sequence analysis may identify the subset of patients with IgM MGUS who are at risk of progression to WM.

  7. Detection of erythrocytes in patients with Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia using atomic force microscopy.

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    Liu, Junru; Li, Juan

    2014-05-01

    The pathological changes of erythrocytes are detected at the nanometer scale, which is important for revealing the onset of diseases and diagnosis. The aim of this study is to examine the ultrastructural changes of erythrocytes in Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM) at a nanometer scale. Blood samples were collected from two healthy volunteers, two WM patients, and three multiple myeloma (MM) patients when they were first diagnosed. The changes of morphology in the erythrocytes were studied at the nanometer level by high-resolution atomic force microscopy imaging (AFM). Compared with the healthy controls and the MM patients, there were dramatic deformations in the overall shape and surface membrane of the erythrocytes in WM patients. Healthy, pathological WM, and MM erythrocytes could be distinguished by several morphological parameters, including the width, length, length-to-width ratio, valley, peak, peak-to-valley, and Ra. AFM is able to detect the morphological differences in the red blood cells from WM patients, healthy controls, and MM patients. Therefore, the erythrocyte morphology is an important parameter for the diagnosis of WM, which can be used to distinguish WM from MM. The changes of ultrastructure in red blood cells may provide a clue to reveal the mechanism of WM.

  8. L265P mutation of the MYD88 gene is frequent in Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia and its absence in myeloma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Mori

    Full Text Available L265P mutation in the MYD88 gene has recently been reported in Waldenström's macroglobulinemia; however the incidence has been different according to the methods used. To determine the relevance and compare the incidence by different methods, we analyzed the L265P mutation in bone marrow mononuclear cells from lymphoid neoplasms. We first performed cloning and sequencing in 10 patients: 8 Waldenström's macroglobulinemia; 1 non-IgM-secreting lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma; and 1 low grade B-cell lymphoma with monoclonal IgG protein. The L265P mutation was detected in only 1/8 Waldenström's macroglobulinemia patients (2 of 9 clones. To confirm these results, direct sequencing was performed in the 10 patients and an additional 17 Waldenström's macroglobulinemia patients and 1 lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma patient. Nine of 28 patients (7/25 Waldenström's macroglobulinemia, 1/2 lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma, and B-cell lymphoma harbored the mutation. We next tested for the mutation with BSiE1 digestion and allele-specific polymerase chain reaction in the 28 patients and 38 patients with myeloma. Aberrant bands corresponding to the mutation were detected by BSiE1 digestion in 19/25 patients with Waldenström's macroglobulinemia (76%, 1/2 lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma and B-cell lymphoma, but not in the 38 myeloma patients. The L265P mutation was more frequent in patients with Waldenström's macroglobulinemia than in those with myeloma (p=1.3x10(-10. The mutation was detected by allele-specific polymerase chain reaction in 18/25 Waldenström's macroglobulinemia patients (72%. In the 25 Waldenström's macroglobulinemia patients, the L265P was more frequently detected by BSiE1 digestion than by direct sequencing (p=5.3x10(-4, and in males (15/16, 94% than in females (4/9, 44% (p=1.2x10(-2. No siginificant difference was observed in the incidence of the L265P mutation between BSiE1 digestion and allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (p=0.32. These results

  9. IL-21 in the bone marrow microenvironment contributes to IgM secretion and proliferation of malignant cells in Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, Lucy S; Ziesmer, Steve C; Yang, Zhi Zhang; Secreto, Frank J; Gertz, Morie A; Novak, Anne J; Ansell, Stephen M

    2012-11-01

    Cytokines within the tumor microenvironment play an important role in supporting the growth and survival of B-cell malignancies. One such cytokine, IL-21, promotes the growth of myeloma and Hodgkin lymphoma cells while inducing apoptosis in chronic lymphocytic leukemia. However, the biologic significance of IL-21 has not been examined in Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia (WM), a B-cell lymphoma characterized by elevated serum IgM and a lymphoplasmacytic bone marrow infiltrate. We report here on the presence of IL-21 in the bone marrow of patients with WM and have identified activated T cells as the source of this cytokine. We readily detected the IL-21 receptor on malignant WM B cells and show that IL-21 significantly increases both IgM secretion and cellular proliferation of these cells with no effect on viability. IL-21 rapidly induces phosphorylation of STAT3 in WM cells, and treatment of the WM cell line MWCL-1 with a STAT3 inhibitor abolished the IL-21-mediated increases in cellular proliferation and IgM secretion. IL-21 also increased the expression of known STAT3 targets involved in B-cell differentiation, including BLIMP-1, XBP-1, IL-6, and IL-10. Overall, our data indicate that IL-21 in the bone marrow microenvironment significantly affects the biology of WM tumor cells through a STAT3-dependent mechanism.

  10. In a patient with biclonal Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia only one clone expands in three-dimensional culture and includes putative cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirshner, Julia; Thulien, Kyle J; Kriangkum, Jitra; Motz, Sarah; Belch, Andrew R; Pilarski, Linda M

    2011-02-01

    A small percentage of cases of Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia (WM) present with biclonality, defined here as the rearrangement of two distinct VDJ gene segments. Here we investigated the expansion of two clones from a patient with WM expressing molecularly detectable clonotypic gene rearrangements, one V(H)3 and one V(H)4. Biclonality was determined in blood and bone marrow mononuclear cells using real-time quantitative PCR (RQ-PCR). V(H)4 expressing cells but not V(H)3 expressing cells underwent clonal expansion in 3-D culture of reconstructed WM bone marrow. After 3-D culture, secondary culture in a colony forming unit assay, and RQ-PCR, only the V(H)4 clone was shown to harbor a subpopulation with characteristics of cancer stem cells, including proliferative quiescence, self-regeneration, and the ability to generate clonotypic progeny, suggesting that the V(H)4, but not the V(H)3, clone is clinically significant. Enrichment of potential WM stem cells in 3-D cultures holds promise for monitoring their response to treatment and for testing new therapies.

  11. Rituximab, Cyclophosphamide, Dexamethasone (RCD) regimen induces cure in WSU-WM xenograft model and a partial remission in previously treated Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Ramzi M; Aboukameel, Amro; Nabha, Sanaa; Ibrahim, Dina; Al-Katib, Ayad

    2002-08-01

    Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia (WM) is an uncommon lymphoproliferative disease which remains incurable with current treatment protocols. We have previously established a permanent WM cell line, WSU-WM, which grows as a xenograft in severe combined immune deficient (SCID) mice. In this study, we investigated the antitumor effects of Rituximab (RTX), Cyclophosphamide (CTX), Dexamethasone (DEX) [RCD]-Regimen in vivo WSU-WM SCID xenograft and in a patient with WM. For the pre-clinical efficacy study, WSU-WM-bearing SCID mice were randomly assigned to receive RTX (150 mg/kg/inj, i.v., QDX5), CTX (90 mg/kg/inj, s.c. QDX5) as single agents or diluent. The combination group received RTX at 150 mg/kg/inj, QDX5; CTX at 150 mg/kg/inj, QODX3 and DEX at 1.0 mg/kg/inj, i.v., QDX5. Tumor growth inhibition (T/C), tumor growth delay (T - C), and log10 kill (net) for RTX and CTX were 24.5%, 37 days, 5.52 and 88%, 0.0 days, 0.0log10 kill, respectively. No cures were observed with either agent; however, all mice (6/6, with bilateral tumors) were cured when treated with RCD-regimen. A 57-year-old patient with relapsed WM was treated with the RCD-regimen and showed an excellent partial remission for seven months. The patient tolerated the treatment very well, the hemoglobin improved dramatically, platelets remained stable, the IgM level normalized and there was only minimal involvement of bone marrow. Based on these results, the RCD regimen is effective against WM and its activity should be further evaluated in clinical trials.

  12. Coinhibition of the deubiquitinating enzymes, USP14 and UCHL5, with VLX1570 is lethal to ibrutinib- or bortezomib-resistant Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia tumor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulus, A; Akhtar, S; Caulfield, T R; Samuel, K; Yousaf, H; Bashir, Y; Paulus, S M; Tran, D; Hudec, R; Cogen, D; Jiang, J; Edenfield, B; Novak, A; Ansell, S M; Witzig, T; Martin, P; Coleman, M; Roy, V; Ailawadhi, S; Chitta, K; Linder, S; Chanan-Khan, A

    2016-01-01

    The survival of Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia (WM) tumor cells hinges on aberrant B-cell receptor (BCR) and MYD88 signaling. WM cells upregulate the proteasome function to sustain the BCR-driven growth while maintaining homeostasis. Clinically, two treatment strategies are used to disrupt these complementary yet mutually exclusive WM survival pathways via ibrutinib (targets BTK/MYD88 node) and bortezomib (targets 20 S proteasome). Despite the success of both agents, WM patients eventually become refractory to treatment, highlighting the adaptive plasticity of WM cells and underscoring the need for development of new therapeutics. Here we provide a comprehensive preclinical report on the anti-WM activity of VLX1570, a novel small-molecule inhibitor of the deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs), ubiquitin-specific protease 14 (USP14) and ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase isozyme L5 (UCHL5). Both DUBs reside in the 19 S proteasome cap and their inhibition by VLX1570 results in rapid and tumor-specific apoptosis in bortezomib- or ibrutinib-resistant WM cells. Notably, treatment of WM cells with VLX1570 downregulated BCR-associated elements BTK, MYD88, NFATC, NF-κB and CXCR4, the latter whose dysregulated function is linked to ibrutinib resistance. VLX1570 administered to WM-xenografted mice resulted in decreased tumor burden and prolonged survival (P=0.0008) compared with vehicle-treated mice. Overall, our report demonstrates significant value in targeting USP14/UCHL5 with VLX1570 in drug-resistant WM and carries a high potential for clinical translation. PMID:27813535

  13. Somatic mutations in MYD88 and CXCR4 are determinants of clinical presentation and overall survival in Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treon, Steven P; Cao, Yang; Xu, Lian; Yang, Guang; Liu, Xia; Hunter, Zachary R

    2014-05-01

    Whole genome sequencing has revealed activating somatic mutations in MYD88 (L265P) and CXCR4 in Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM). CXCR4 somatic mutations in WM are the first ever reported in human cancer and are similar to nonsense (NS) and frameshift (FS) germline mutations found in warts, hypogammaglobulinemia, infections and myelokathexis (WHIM) syndrome. We genotyped lymphoplasmacytic cells from 175 WM patients and observed significantly higher bone marrow (BM) disease involvement, serum immunoglobulin-M levels, and symptomatic disease requiring therapy, including hyperviscosity syndrome in those patients with MYD88(L265P)CXCR4(WHIM/NS) mutations (P < .03). Patients with MYD88(L265P)CXCR4(WHIM/FS) or MYD88(L265P)CXCR4(WILDTYPE (WT)) had intermediate BM and serum immunoglobulin-M levels; those with MYD88(WT)CXCR4(WT) showed lowest BM disease burden. Fewer patients with MYD88(L265P) and CXCR4(WHIM/FS or NS) vs MYD88(L265P)CXCR4(WT) presented with adenopathy (P < .01), further delineating differences in disease tropism based on CXCR4 status. Neither MYD88 nor CXCR4 mutations correlated with SDF-1a (RS1801157) polymorphisms in 54 patients who were genotyped for these variants. Unexpectedly, risk of death was not impacted by CXCR4 mutation status, but by MYD88(WT) status (hazard ratio 10.54; 95% confidence interval 2.4-46.2, P = .0018). Somatic mutations in MYD88 and CXCR4 are important determinants of clinical presentation and impact overall survival in WM. Targeted therapies directed against MYD88 and/or CXCR4 signaling may provide a personalized treatment approach to WM.

  14. Immunophenotyping of Waldenstroms macroglobulinemia cell lines reveals distinct patterns of surface antigen expression: potential biological and therapeutic implications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneel Paulus

    Full Text Available Waldenströms macroglobulinemia (WM is a subtype of Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in which the tumor cell population is markedly heterogeneous, consisting of immunoglobulin-M secreting B-lymphocytes, plasmacytoid lymphocytes and plasma cells. Due to rarity of disease and scarcity of reliable preclinical models, many facets of WM molecular and phenotypic architecture remain incompletely understood. Currently, there are 3 human WM cell lines that are routinely used in experimental studies, namely, BCWM.1, MWCL-1 and RPCI-WM1. During establishment of RPCI-WM1, we observed loss of the CD19 and CD20 antigens, which are typically present on WM cells. Intrigued by this observation and in an effort to better define the immunophenotypic makeup of this cell line, we conducted a more comprehensive analysis for the presence or absence of other cell surface antigens that are present on the RPCI-WM1 model, as well as those on the two other WM cell lines, BCWM.1 and MWCL-1. We examined expression of 65 extracellular and 4 intracellular antigens, comprising B-cell, plasma cell, T-cell, NK-cell, myeloid and hematopoietic stem cell surface markers by flow cytometry analysis. RPCI-WM1 cells demonstrated decreased expression of CD19, CD20, and CD23 with enhanced expression of CD28, CD38 and CD184, antigens that were differentially expressed on BCWM.1 and MWCL-1 cells. Due to increased expression of CD184/CXCR4 and CD38, RPCI-WM1 represents a valuable model in which to study the effects anti-CXCR4 or anti-CD38 targeted therapies that are actively being developed for treatment of hematologic cancers. Overall, differences in surface antigen expression across the 3 cell lines may reflect the tumor clone population predominant in the index patients, from whom the cell lines were developed. Our analysis defines the utility of the most commonly employed WM cell lines as based on their immunophenotype profiles, highlighting unique differences that can be further studied for

  15. How Is Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... t cause any problems, but it’s a useful indicator of a patient’s prognosis (outlook). High levels of ... Life Events College Relay For Life Donate a Car Ways to Give Memorial Giving Planned Giving Leadership ...

  16. Rare Circulating Cells in Familial Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia Displaying the MYD88 L265P Mutation Are Enriched by Epstein-Barr Virus Immortalization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maroulio Pertesi

    Full Text Available The MYD88 L265P is a recurrent somatic mutation in neoplastic cells from patients with Waldenström Macroglobulinemia (WM. We identified the MYD88 L265P mutation in three individuals from unrelated families, but its presence did not explain the disease segregation within these WM pedigrees. We observed the mutation in these three individuals at high allele fractions in DNA extracted from EBV-immortalized Lymphoblastoid cell lines established from peripheral blood (LCL, but at much lower allele fractions in DNA extracted directly from peripheral blood, suggesting that this mutation is present in a clonal cell subpopulation rather than of germ-line origin. Furthermore, we observed that the MYD88 L265P mutation is enriched in WM families, detected in 40.5% of patients with familial WM or MGUS (10/22 WM, 5/15 MGUS, compared to 3.5% of patients with familial MM or MGUS (0/72 MM, 4/41 MGUS (p = 10-7. The mutant allele frequency increased with passages in vitro after immortalization with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV consistent with the MYD88 L265P described gain-of-function proposed for this mutation. The MYD88 L265P mutation appears to be frequently present in circulating cells in patients with WM, and MGUS, and these cells are amenable to immortalization by EBV.

  17. Guideline for diagnosis and treatment of Waldenstrom's macroglobulinaemia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, J.M.; Minnema, M.C.; Wijermans, P.W.; Croockewit, S.; Chamuleau, M.E.; Pals, S.T.; Klein, S.K.; Delforge, M.; Imhoff, G.W. van; Kersten, M.J.

    2013-01-01

    On behalf of the lymphoma and multiple myeloma working parties of the Dutch/Belgian Haemato-Oncology Foundation for Adults in The Netherlands (HOVON), we present a guideline for diagnosis and management of Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia (WM). Considering the indolent behaviour and heterogeneous cli

  18. Guideline for diagnosis and treatment of Waldenstrom's macroglobulinaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, J. M. I.; Minnema, M. C.; Wijermans, P. W.; Croockewit, S.; Chamuleau, M. E. D.; Pals, S. T.; Klein, S. K.; Delforge, M.; van Imhoff, G. W.; Kersten, M. J.

    2013-01-01

    On behalf of the lymphoma and multiple myeloma working parties of the Dutch/Belgian Haemato-Oncology Foundation for Adults in the Netherlands (HOVON), we present a guideline for diagnosis and management of Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia (WM). Considering the indolent behaviour and heterogeneous cli

  19. Primary therapy of Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia (WM) with weekly bortezomib, low-dose dexamethasone, and rituximab (BDR): long-term results of a phase 2 study of the European Myeloma Network (EMN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimopoulos, Meletios A; García-Sanz, Ramón; Gavriatopoulou, Maria; Morel, Pierre; Kyrtsonis, Marie-Christine; Michalis, Eurydiki; Kartasis, Zafiris; Leleu, Xavier; Palladini, Giovanni; Tedeschi, Alessandra; Gika, Dimitra; Merlini, Giampaolo; Kastritis, Efstathios; Sonneveld, Pieter

    2013-11-07

    In this phase 2 multicenter trial, we evaluated the activity of bortezomib, dexamethasone, and rituximab (BDR) combination in previously untreated symptomatic patients with Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM). To prevent immunoglobulin M (IgM) "flare," single agent bortezomib (1.3 mg/m(2) IV days 1, 4, 8, and 11; 21-day cycle), was followed by weekly IV bortezomib (1.6 mg/m(2) days 1, 8, 15, and 22) every 35 days for 4 additional cycles, followed by IV dexamethasone (40 mg) and IV rituximab (375 mg/m(2)) in cycles 2 and 5. Fifty-nine patients were treated; 45.5% and 40% were high and intermediate risk per the International Prognostic Scoring System for WM. On intent to treat, 85% responded (3% complete response, 7% very good partial response, 58% partial response [PR]). In 11% of patients, an increase of IgM ≥25% was observed after rituximab; no patient required plasmapheresis. After a minimum follow-up of 32 months, median progression-free survival was 42 months, 3-year duration of response for patients with ≥PR was 70%, and 3-year survival was 81%. Peripheral neuropathy occurred in 46% (grade ≥3 in 7%); only 8% discontinued bortezomib due to neuropathy. BDR is rapidly acting, well tolerated, and nonmyelotoxic, inducing durable responses in previously untreated WM.

  20. The genomic landscape of Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia is characterized by highly recurring MYD88 and WHIM-like CXCR4 mutations, and small somatic deletions associated with B-cell lymphomagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Zachary R; Xu, Lian; Yang, Guang; Zhou, Yangsheng; Liu, Xia; Cao, Yang; Manning, Robert J; Tripsas, Christina; Patterson, Christopher J; Sheehy, Patricia; Treon, Steven P

    2014-03-13

    The genetic basis for Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM) remains to be clarified. Although 6q losses are commonly present, recurring gene losses in this region remain to be defined. We therefore performed whole genome sequencing (WGS) in 30 WM patients, which included germline/tumor sequencing for 10 patients. Validated somatic mutations occurring in >10% of patients included MYD88, CXCR4, and ARID1A that were present in 90%, 27%, and 17% of patients, respectively, and included the activating mutation L265P in MYD88 and warts, hypogammaglobulinemia, infection, and myelokathexis-syndrome-like mutations in CXCR4 that previously have only been described in the germline. WGS also delineated copy number alterations (CNAs) and structural variants in the 10 paired patients. The CXCR4 and CNA findings were validated in independent expansion cohorts of 147 and 30 WM patients, respectively. Validated gene losses due to CNAs involved PRDM2 (93%), BTG1 (87%), HIVEP2 (77%), MKLN1 (77%), PLEKHG1 (70%), LYN (60%), ARID1B (50%), and FOXP1 (37%). Losses in PLEKHG1, HIVEP2, ARID1B, and BCLAF1 constituted the most common deletions within chromosome 6. Although no recurrent translocations were observed, in 2 patients deletions in 6q corresponded with translocation events. These studies evidence highly recurring somatic events, and provide a genomic basis for understanding the pathogenesis of WM.

  1. IMMUNOCHEMICAL STUDIES IN A PATIENT WITH WALDEN-STROM'S MACROGLOBULINEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mir-Ahmadian

    1978-01-01

    Full Text Available Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia was studied in a 46 year old Iranian male with anemia, bleeding, ecchymose and splenomegaly. The diagnosis of Macroglobulinemia was established by the presence of veryhigh level of IgM paraprotein in sera which was detectable by imrnunoelectrophoresis and rocket immunoelectrophoresis, and by the presence of bone marrow infiltration of plasmoc ytes. Family studies revealed a high IgM level in one of the patient's daughters.

  2. What Are the Risk Factors for Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia?

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    ... The reasons for these differences are not known. Sex Men are more likely than women to develop ... Treatments & Side Effects Cancer Facts & Statistics News and Stories Glossary For Health Care Professionals Programs & Services Breast ...

  3. Extramedullary Waldenström macroglobulinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banwait, Ranjit; Aljawai, Yosra; Cappuccio, Joseph; McDiarmid, Serena; Morgan, Elizabeth A; Leblebjian, Houry; Roccaro, Aldo M; Laubach, Jacob; Castillo, Jorge J; Paba-Prada, Claudia; Treon, Steven; Redd, Robert; Weller, Edie; Ghobrial, Irene M

    2015-02-01

    Disease assessment in Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia (WM) is dependent on the percent involvement of B-cell neoplasm in the bone marrow and IgM paraprotein in the serum. A subset of patients also demonstrates extramedullary involvement, which is infrequently examined. The role of extramedullary involvement in the diagnosis and prognosis of WM is poorly understood. The purpose of this study is to report the characteristics of WM patients with extramedullary disease (EMD). Nine hundred and eight-five patients with WM were evaluated at one academic center and the presence of EMD was assessed in these patients. Forty-three (4.4%) patients were identified to have EMD. Nine (21%) patients presented with involvement at WM diagnosis, while 34 (79%) developed EMD post-therapy for WM. Most frequent EMD sites involved were pulmonary (30%), soft tissue (21%), cerebrospinal fluid (23%), renal (8%), and bone (9%). The median overall survival at 10 years was 79% (95% CI: 57-90%). This is the first study to describe the clinical characteristics, response and overall survival in patients with extramedullary WM. Further studies to define the molecular characteristics of this entity and mechanisms of its development are warranted.

  4. Waldenstrom’s Macroglobulinemia and Peripheral Neuropathy, Organomegaly, Endocrinopathy, Monoclonal Gammopathy, and Skin Changes with a Bleeding Diathesis and Rash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Haider

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a 29-year-old male who presented with paraesthesia and skin lesions with excessive bleeding after skin biopsy leading to hematology consultation. He was found to have prolonged partial thromboplastin time (PTT and monoclonal gammopathy on serum protein electrophoresis (SPEP. He experienced excessive bleeding leading to hospitalization after bone marrow biopsy and required blood transfusion. He was diagnosed with Waldenstrom's Macroglobulinemia (WM, based on the presence of IgM-κ type monoclonal (M protein and infiltration of lymphoplasmacytic cells identified in bone marrow aspirates. He was noticed to have features of peripheral neuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, monoclonal gammopathy, and skin changes (POEMS syndrome. This is a very rare case of WM with POEMS syndrome which responded to chemotherapy using bortezomib, steroids, and rituximab.

  5. Waldenström macroglobulinemia: my way.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gertz, Morie

    2013-03-01

    Waldenström macroglobulinemia is a lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma. A serum monoclonal IgM protein is required to establish this diagnosis. The clinical features patients develop include normochromic normocytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, hepatosplenomegaly, lymphadenopathy and signs of hyperviscosity. The International Staging System for Waldenström macroglobulinemia divides patients prognostically based on age, hemoglobin, platelet count, IgM level, and β(2) microglobulin. Some patients with Waldenström macroglobulinemia have a smoldering form and can be observed without intervention. Active agents in the treatment of Waldenström macroglobulinemia include rituximab, chlorambucil, cyclophosphamide, fludarabine, bortezomib, lenalidomide, bendamustine, everolimus, and alemtuzumab. The current preferred Mayo Clinic non-study treatment is rituximab, cyclophosphamide, and dexamethasone. The median survival associated with this disease is now over 10 years.

  6. Waldenström macroglobulinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treon, Steven P; Hunter, Zachary R; Castillo, Jorge J; Merlini, Giampaolo

    2014-10-01

    Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM) is an IgM-secreting B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder, with strong familial predisposition. MYD88 L265P and CXCR4 WHIM mutations are common in WM and support the growth and survival of WM cells. Clinical manifestations of disease are related to both tumor cell infiltration and paraprotein production. Current treatment includes monoclonal antibodies, alkylating agents, nucleoside analogs, proteasome inhibitors, immunomodulatory drugs, and signal inhibitors. Short- and long-term toxicities should be weighed in treatment decisions with use of these agents. Elucidation of the signaling pathways involved in WM is helping to advance targeted therapeutics for WM and includes efforts directed at MYD88 and CXCR4 signaling.

  7. [Waldenström macroglobulinemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telek, Béla; Batár, Péter; Váróczy, László; Gergely, Lajos; Rejtő, László; Szász, Róbert; Miltényi, Zsófia; Simon, Zsófia; Udvardy, Miklós; Illés, Arpád

    2013-12-01

    Waldenström macroglobulinemia is a rare lymphoproliferative disease of B-cell origin.These tumorous B-cells produce monoclonal IgM type protein. Diagnosis is based on the detection of lymphoplasmacytic invasion of the bone marrow and serum electrophoresis. Clinical symptoms such as anemia, hyperviscosity and neuropathy are the commom consequences of bone marrow infiltration and serum monoclonal IgM protein. Former use of alkylating agents are replaced by purine analogues, rituximab and bortezomib. Additional clinical data have also accumulated regarding autologous and allogenous stem-cell transplantation. The authors present their own clinical experience and give a detailed review of current therapeutic approaches. Orv. Hetil., 154(50), 1970-1974.

  8. Novel M-component based biomarkers in Waldenström's macroglobulinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leleu, Xavier; Koulieris, Efstathios; Maltezas, Dimitrios; Itzykson, Raphael; Xie, Wanling; Manier, Salomon; Dulery, Remy; Boyle, Eilleen; Gauthier, Jordan; Poulain, Stéphanie; Tatiana, Tzenou; Panayiotidis, Panayiotis; Bradwell, Arthur R; Harding, Stephen; Leblond, Veronique; Kyrtsonis, Marie-Christine; Ghobrial, Irene M

    2011-02-01

    Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia (WM) is an indolent B-cell lymphoma of the lymphoplasmacytic type accompanied by a serum IgM component. However, conventional IgM quantification lacks sensitivity, does not precisely reflect tumor burden of WM, and, although being the main marker for monitoring response to treatment, may not be accurate. New serum M-component based biomarkers were developed for routine practice in recent years, such as the Freelite® test and more recently the Hevylite test®. Studies have shown that Freelite was a prognostic marker for time to treatment in WM that helps monitoring disease response or progression. Hevylite measures IgMkappa and IgMlambda, separately, and might provide true quantitative measurement of the IgM M-spike. Although current data are preliminary, Hevylite® might replace the current technique to measure IgM M-spike in the years to come. We summarize herein studies conducted to delineate the role of these tests in WM.

  9. Pseudovitelliform Subfoveal Deposit in Waldenström's Macroglobulinemia

    OpenAIRE

    Aurélie Brolly; Claire Janon; Flavien Precausta; Jean-Marie Baudet; Salomon Yves Cohen

    2012-01-01

    Background: Waldenström’s macroglobulinemia may be complicated by retinal hemorrhages, retinal vein occlusion, serous macular detachment or macular edema. We report a patient with pseudovitelliform subfoveal deposit complicating Waldenström’s macroglobulinemia. Case Report: A 56-year-old man presented with hyperviscosity syndrome due to Waldenström’s macroglobulinemia. After systemic therapy, a large serous retinal detachment persisted in the left eye. A pseudovitelliform subfoveal deposit wa...

  10. Pseudovitelliform Subfoveal Deposit in Waldenström’s Macroglobulinemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurélie Brolly

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Waldenström’s macroglobulinemia may be complicated by retinal hemorrhages, retinal vein occlusion, serous macular detachment or macular edema. We report a patient with pseudovitelliform subfoveal deposit complicating Waldenström’s macroglobulinemia. Case Report: A 56-year-old man presented with hyperviscosity syndrome due to Waldenström’s macroglobulinemia. After systemic therapy, a large serous retinal detachment persisted in the left eye. A pseudovitelliform subfoveal deposit was observed in the right eye. Conclusion: Pseudovitelliform subfoveal deposits may be part of the spectrum of ocular complications in Waldenström’s macroglobulinemia. They could be due to accumulation of macroglobulins.

  11. Pseudovitelliform Subfoveal Deposit in Waldenström's Macroglobulinemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brolly, Aurélie; Janon, Claire; Precausta, Flavien; Baudet, Jean-Marie; Cohen, Salomon Yves

    2012-01-01

    Background Waldenström's macroglobulinemia may be complicated by retinal hemorrhages, retinal vein occlusion, serous macular detachment or macular edema. We report a patient with pseudovitelliform subfoveal deposit complicating Waldenström's macroglobulinemia. Case Report A 56-year-old man presented with hyperviscosity syndrome due to Waldenström's macroglobulinemia. After systemic therapy, a large serous retinal detachment persisted in the left eye. A pseudovitelliform subfoveal deposit was observed in the right eye. Conclusion Pseudovitelliform subfoveal deposits may be part of the spectrum of ocular complications in Waldenström's macroglobulinemia. They could be due to accumulation of macroglobulins. PMID:22949912

  12. Case report: Macroglobulinemia in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejia, E B; Carman, S; Lumsden, J H

    1979-01-01

    This report describes a case of macroglobulinemia in a six year old castrate male Collie cross dog with clinical signs of epistaxis, anemia, retinopathy and high serum viscosity. The highest total serum protein was 12 g/dl with approximately 60% monoclonal beta globulin. Proteinuria, Bence Jones protein and osteolytic lesions were not detected.Chemotherapy and partial removal of the plasma protein by withdrawal of whole blood and transfusion with packed red cells from a DEA negative donor resulted in transient clinical remission.

  13. TCL1 expression patterns in Waldenström macroglobulinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemal, Richard; Bard-Sorel, Sandrine; Montrieul, Laura; Bay, Jacques-Olivier; Ravinet, Aurélie; Ledoux-Pilon, Albane; Cagnard, Nicolas; Bailly, Sébastien; Morel, Pierre; Charlotte, Frédéric; Leleu, Xavier; Poulain, Stéphanie; Déchelotte, Pierre J; Hermine, Olivier; Leblond, Véronique; Tournilhac, Olivier; Guièze, Romain

    2016-01-01

    The oncogenic role of TCL1 in chronic lymphocytic leukemia is well established in transgenic mice. TCL1 expression in other B-cell malignancies has been also described: post-germinal center-derived malignancies, such as multiple myeloma, classically do not express TCL1. Waldenström macroglobulinemia is a post-germinal center malignancy that is known to be similar to chronic lymphocytic leukemia in terms of its gene expression profile. TCL1 expression has not been so far assessed in Waldenström macroglobulinemia. Transcriptomic explorations show that TCL1A expression is linked to signaling pathways and biological functions that are known to be involved in Waldenström macroglobulinemia as well as to gene signatures of interest in B-cell malignancies. We investigated TCL1 expression at the protein level in the bone marrow of a series of 59 patients with Waldenström macroglobulinemia: 76% of patients expressed TCL1, which appeared to be associated with a pejorative prognostic impact. TCL1 could have an oncogenic role in Waldenström macroglobulinemia, and deserves further exploration.

  14. Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis complicating Waldenström’s macroglobulinemia

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    Kratochvil David

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lymphoproliferative disorders causing paraproteinemia can be associated with various kidney injuries including the deposition of monoclonal immunoglobulins (Ig. A known glomerular manifestation of Waldenström’s macroglobulinemia is characterized by prominent intracapillary hyaline thrombi and lack of conspicuous glomerular proliferation. The present case was special in 2 aspects: 1. the diagnosis of glomerulonephritis was unexpected before renal biopsy, 2. the prominent glomerular proliferation paired with large intracapillary hyaline thrombi is uncommon in Waldenström’s macroglobulinemia-associated glomerulonephritis. Case presentation A 73-year-old Caucasian woman with a long-standing history of rheumatoid arthritis and Waldenström’s macroglobulinemia was admitted for acute renal failure (ARF, which initially was presumed to be the consequence of extrarenal causes. Proteinuria and hematuria were only mild. In renal core biopsy, a membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN and prominent intracapillary hyaline monoclonal IgM thrombi were found in addition to acute tubular necrosis. Of note, the patient’s history was positive for purpuric skin changes, suspicious for cryoglobulinemia. However, serological tests for cryoglobulins were repeatedly negative. The ARF resolved before the start of immunomodulatory therapy for Waldenström’s macroglobulinemia. Conclusion The presence of MPGN with prominent hyaline thrombi in the context of Waldenström’s macroglobulinemia is uncommon and can be oligosymptomatic. We discuss this case in the context of previous literature and classifications suggested for monoclonal Ig-related renal pathologies.

  15. Waldenström's macroglobulinemia - a review

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    Susana Coimbra

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Waldenström's macroglobulinemia (WM is a lymphoproliferative disease of B lymphocytes, characterized by a lymphoplasmocytic lymphoma in the bone marrow and by IgM monoclonal hypergammaglobulinemia. It was first described in 1944 by Jan Gösta Waldenström, reporting two patients with oronasal bleeding, lymphadenopathy, anemia, thrombocytopenia, high erythrocyte sedimentation rate and serum viscosity, normal radiography and bone marrow infiltrated by lymphoid cells. The WM is a rare disease with a typically indolent clinical course, affecting mainly individuals aged between 63 and 68 years. Most patients have clinical signs and symptoms related to hyperviscosity resulting from IgM monoclonal gammopathy, and/or cytopenias resulting from bone marrow infiltration by lymphoma. The differential diagnosis with other lymphomas is essential for the assessment of prognosis and therapeutic approach. Treatment of patients with asymptomatic WM does not improve the quality of life of patients, or increase their survival, being recommended, therefore, their follow-up. For the treatment of symptomatic patients, alkylating agents, purine analogs and anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies are used. However, the disease is incurable and the response to therapy is not always favorable. Recent studies have shown promising results with bortezomib, an inhibitor of proteasomes, and some patients respond to thalidomide. In patients with relapse or refractory to therapy, autologous transplantation may be indicated. The aim of this paper is to describe in detail the current knowledge on the pathophysiology of WM, main clinical manifestations, diagnosis, prognosis and treatment.

  16. Autoimmune manifestations in patients with Waldenström macroglobulinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockorny, Bruno; Atienza, Jonessa A; Dasanu, Constantin A

    2014-12-01

    Waldenström macroglobulinemia represents a lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma with an indolent clinical course. The existing literature associates this hematologic malignancy with various autoimmune disorders. Notwithstanding, these autoimmune conditions have not been comprehensively characterized or systematized to date. As a result, their clinical implications remain largely unknown. The authors offer a comprehensive review of the existing literature on various hematologic and nonhematologic autoimmune disorders documented in the course of Waldenström macroglobulinemia. Whereas some of them are thought to be secondary to a dysfunctional immune response associated with an underlying malignant process, others might be primary and might even play a role in its pathogenesis. Moreover, the observations that personal history and family history of certain autoimmune diseases were associated with an increased risk of subsequent Waldenström macroglobulinemia strengthen further the hypothesis that shared susceptibility genes and chronic antigenic stimulation might predispose individuals to both conditions.

  17. Clinostatic syndrome in Waldenström macroglobulinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malick, Christine; de la Roque, Philippe Montané; About, Isabelle; Campistron, Evelyne; Delhomme, Olivier; Denat, Serge; Giauffret, Frédéric; Rochet, Nicole; Sicre, Chantal; Clarac, Annie

    2003-08-01

    We report a case of Waldenström macroglobulinemia revealed by clinostatic syndrome in an 81-year-old woman. A lytic lesion was found in the ilium and acetabulum. There was no evidence of transformation to high-grade lymphoma. Radiation therapy ensured complete resolution of the clinostatic syndrome within 1 month of treatment completion.

  18. Treatment recommendations from the Eighth International Workshop on Waldenström's Macroglobulinemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leblond, Véronique; Kastritis, Efstathios; Advani, Ranjana; Ansell, Stephen M; Buske, Christian; Castillo, Jorge J; García-Sanz, Ramón; Gertz, Morie; Kimby, Eva; Kyriakou, Charalampia; Merlini, Giampaolo; Minnema, Monique C; Morel, Pierre; Morra, Enrica; Rummel, Mathias; Wechalekar, Ashutosh; Patterson, Christopher J; Treon, Steven P; Dimopoulos, Meletios A

    2016-01-01

    Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM) is a distinct B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder for which clearly defined criteria for the diagnosis, initiation of therapy, and treatment strategy have been proposed as part of the consensus panels of the International Workshop on Waldenström's Macroglobulinemia

  19. CNS Vasculitis Associated with Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riangwiwat, Tanawan; Wu, Chris Y.; Santos-Ocampo, Alberto S.; Liu, Randal J.

    2016-01-01

    Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM) is an indolent B cell lymphoproliferative disorder with monoclonal IgM secretion. We present a patient with WM who presented with multifocal acute cortical ischemic strokes and was found to have central nervous system (CNS) vasculitis. Workup was negative for cryoglobulins and hyperviscosity syndrome. Immunosuppression with intravenous steroids and cyclophosphamide stabilized the patient's mental status and neurologic deficits. On followup over 7 years, patient gained independence from walking aids and experienced no recurrences of CNS vasculitis. To our knowledge, CNS vasculitis in a WM patient, in the absence of cryoglobulins, has not been reported. Immunosuppression is the preferred treatment. PMID:27818812

  20. CNS Vasculitis Associated with Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanawan Riangwiwat

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM is an indolent B cell lymphoproliferative disorder with monoclonal IgM secretion. We present a patient with WM who presented with multifocal acute cortical ischemic strokes and was found to have central nervous system (CNS vasculitis. Workup was negative for cryoglobulins and hyperviscosity syndrome. Immunosuppression with intravenous steroids and cyclophosphamide stabilized the patient’s mental status and neurologic deficits. On followup over 7 years, patient gained independence from walking aids and experienced no recurrences of CNS vasculitis. To our knowledge, CNS vasculitis in a WM patient, in the absence of cryoglobulins, has not been reported. Immunosuppression is the preferred treatment.

  1. Renal MALT lymphoma associated with Waldenström macroglobulinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Po-Jui; Pei, Sung-Nan; Huang, Tung-Liang; Huang, Shun-Chen; Ng, Hwee Yeong; Lee, Chien-Te

    2014-04-01

    Mucosa associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma (MALT lymphoma) is mostly seen in the gastrointestinal tract; origin from the kidney is extremely rare. Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM) is a clinicopathologic syndrome denoted by the presence of monoclonal gammopathy in the serum, typically caused by lymphoproliferative disorder. Literature review did not find any report of renal MALT lymphoma accompanied by WM. Herein, for the first time, we report a 72 year-old female patient with a history of chronic kidney disease, presenting with solitary renal mass; MALT lymphoma was confirmed by pathological examination. A serology study identified the presence of WM. No manifestation of hyperviscosity syndrome was noted. Bone marrow biopsy disclosed the concurrent systemic involvement. Her treatment response was uneventful and the renal mass responded with regressive change in size after chemotherapy. The renal function remained stable during follow-up. MALT lymphoma should be considered as an underlying pathology of isolated renal mass. Furthermore, patients with MALT lymphoma should be screened for Waldenström macroglobulinemia and hyperviscosity syndrome.

  2. Emerging therapeutic options for Waldenström macroglobulinemia/lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Rajshekhar; Kapoor, Prashant; Ansell, Stephen M; Gertz, Morie A

    2015-01-01

    Lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma is an indolent B-cell, non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), the majority of which are characterized by production of a monoclonal immunoglobulin M (IgM) protein and are known as Waldenström macroglobulinemia. Identification of highly recurrent activating somatic mutation in MYD88 has improved our understanding of the pathogenesis of Waldenström macroglobulinemia and has therapeutic implications. Here, we review novel therapeutic agents in Waldenström macroglobulinemia/lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma, which have emerged in the past decade and discuss their comparative efficacy and safety, with emphasis on a Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) inhibitor, which has been recently approved by the US FDA, specifically for Waldenström macroglobulinemia/lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma. Future research should focus on identifying targeted agents against activating mutations and long-term data for currently available novel agents should be critically evaluated, both in treatment-naïve and in relapsed/refractory settings.

  3. Risk stratification in Waldenström macroglobulinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morel, Pierre; Merlini, Giampaolo

    2012-04-01

    Waldenström macroglobulinemia is characterized by the production of serum monoclonal IgM and lymphoplasmacytic bone marrow infiltration. At least 25% of patients are asymptomatic at diagnosis and treatment is only mandatory in cases of symptomatic disease. Beside reports on treatment results, reviewing risk assessment is another way to describe the clinical course of the disease. This information may be particularly useful when numerous treatment options are available. While the introduction of new treatment approaches reinforces the need for careful risk assessment, the identification of useful prognostic information requires prolonged follow-up in patients who have not been treated with current therapeutic options. This limitation should be taken into account when using and interpreting available prognostic information, especially survival estimates.

  4. Biology, prognosis, and therapy of Waldenström Macroglobulinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Jorge J; Ghobrial, Irene M; Treon, Steven P

    2015-01-01

    Waldenström Macroglobulinemia (WM) is a rare B-cell lymphoma characterized by the uncontrolled accumulation of malignant lymphoplasmacytic cells, mainly in the bone marrow, and monoclonal IgM production. Despite its rarity, our understanding of the biology of this disease has improved significantly in recent years with the identification of recurrent mutations in the MYD88 and CXCR4 genes. Based on the diversity of clinical features observed in WM patients, therapy should be highly personalized having into account several factors such as age, co-morbidities, IgM levels, and presence of hyperviscosity, coagulopathy, cryoglobulinemia, or cold agglutinin disease. In this chapter, we review the recent advances in the biology of WM and the current therapeutic options for untreated and relapsed WM patients. Finally, we discuss the role of prognostic factors and current evidence supporting an improvement in the survival of WM patients in the last decade.

  5. Waldenström macroglobulinemia: from biology to treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Ilyas; Leblebjian, Houry; Treon, Steven P; Ghobrial, Irene M

    2014-02-01

    Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM) is distinct B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder primarily characterized by bone marrow infiltration of lymphoplasmacytic cells along with production of a serum monoclonal (IgM). In this review, we describe the biology of WM, the diagnostic evaluation for WM with a discussion of other conditions that are in the differential diagnosis and clinical manifestations of the disease as well as current treatment options. Within the novel agents discussed are everolimus, perifosine, enzastaurin, panobinostat, bortezomib and carfilzomib, pomalidomide and ibrutinib. Many of the novel agents have shown good responses and have a better toxicity profile compared to traditional chemotherapeutic agents, which makes them good candidates to be used as primary therapies for WM in the future.

  6. Waldenström macroglobulinemia: biology, genetics, and therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paludo J

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Jonas Paludo,1,2 Stephen M Ansell,1 1Division of Hematology, 2Division of Medical Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA Abstract: Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM is a distinct clinicopathologic entity characterized by the presence of a lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma, a non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and IgM monoclonal gammopathy. WM is an indolent, uncommon malignancy mostly affecting the elderly. Patient outcomes have modestly improved since the introduction of rituximab to conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy more than 20 years ago. However, the pivotal discovery of the somatic MYD88 L265P mutation, harbored by most patients with WM, and the somatic CXCR4 WHIM mutations, similar to germline CXCR4 mutations seen in the warts, hypogammaglobulinemia, immunodeficiency, and myelokathexis (WHIM syndrome, present in approximately one-third of patients with WM, has fundamentally changed our understanding of this disease and expanded the potential therapeutic targets. Within this new paradigm, ibrutinib emerged as a promising new drug. Ibrutinib targets Bruton’s tyrosine kinase, a downstream protein in the B-cell receptor pathway that is overactivated by the MYD88 L265P mutation. A seminal Phase II trial of ibrutinib in previously treated WM patients showed impressive response rates and confirmed the effects of MYD88 L265P and CXCR4 WHIM mutations in response to therapy. Ibrutinib is the first and only US Food and Drug Administration–approved drug specifically for the treatment of WM. However, before ibrutinib can be established as the standard of care for WM, long-term data regarding efficacy and safety are required. Further research to address ibrutinib resistance and cost-effectiveness is also imperative before ibrutinib can gain widespread acceptance. This review will cover the present pathophysiologic understanding of WM in light of the recent MYD88 and CXCR4 discovery, as well as current and emergent treatment regimens with focus on ibrutinib

  7. THERAPY-RELATED MYELOID NEOPLASMS IN CHRONIC LYMPHOCYTIC LEUKEMIA AND WALDENSTROM MICROGLOBULINEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Ricci

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Secondary myelodisplasia (MDS and acute myeloide leukaemia (AML are frequent long term complications in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL and Waldesntrom Macroglobulinemia (WM patients. Although disease-related immune-suppression plays a crucial role in leukemogenesis there is great concern that therapy may further increase the risk of developing these devastating complications. Nucleoside analogs (NA and alkilator agents are considered appropriate agents in the treatment of both CLL and WM patients. Prolonged immunosuppression related to nucleoside analogs therapy and the incorporation of these agents or their metabolites into DNA, with potentially mutagenic action, leads to speculation that their therapeutic use might be responsible for an increased incidence of second cancer especially when combined with other DNA damaging agents like alkylators. In this review the published studies considering the occurrence of secondary MDS and AML in CLL and WM patients are reported and the potential role of chemotherapeutic agents in leukemogenesis is discussed.

  8. Novel treatment options for Waldenström macroglobulinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblebjian, Houry; Agarwal, Amit; Ghobrial, Irene

    2013-09-01

    Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM), first described by Jan Waldenström in 1944, is a lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma characterized by the presence of an immunoglobulin M monoclonal gammopathy in the blood and monoclonal small lymphocytes and lymphoplasmacytoid cells in the bone marrow. WM is a rare and indolent disease but remains incurable. In this review we discuss the pathogenesis of WM and focus on novel treatment options that target pathways deregulated in this disease. Recent studies have helped us identify specific genetic mutations that are commonly seen in WM and might prove to be important therapeutic targets in the future. We discuss the role of epigenetics and the changes in the bone marrow microenvironment that are important in the pathogenesis of WM. The commonly used drugs are discussed with a focus on novel agents that are currently being used as single agents or in combination to treat WM. We finally focus on some agents that have shown preclinical efficacy and might be available in the near future.

  9. Lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma and Waldenström macroglobulinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naderi, Nadia; Yang, David T

    2013-04-01

    Lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma (LPL) is a low-grade, B-cell neoplasm composed of small lymphocytes, plasmacytoid lymphocytes, and plasma cells that typically involve the bone marrow, and it is associated with an immunoglobulin M (IgM) gammopathy. The definition of Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM) and its relationship to LPL has been confusing in the past. In addition, the diagnosis of LPL itself can be challenging because LPL lacks disease-specific morphologic, immunophenotypic, and genetic features to differentiate it from other mature B-cell neoplasms. Accurate diagnosis of LPL/WM rests on recognition of the differential diagnostic features between LPL and other diagnostic possibilities and the use of the recently refined definition of WM and its relationship with LPL: The presence of an IgM monoclonal gammopathy of any level in the setting of bone marrow involvement by LPL. This review summarizes the clinical, laboratory, and histologic features of LPL/WM, with particular emphasis on unique aspects of LPL/WM that may aid in accurate diagnosis.

  10. How I treat Waldenström macroglobulinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treon, Steven P

    2015-08-06

    Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM) is a B-cell neoplasm manifested by the accumulation of clonal immunoglobulin (Ig)M-secreting lymphoplasmacytic cells. MYD88 and CXCR4 warts, hypogammaglobulinemia, infections, myelokathexis syndrome-like somatic mutations are present in >90% and 30% to 35% of WM patients, respectively, and impact disease presentation, treatment outcome, and overall survival. Familial predisposition is common in WM. Asymptomatic patients should be observed. Patients with disease-related hemoglobin <10 g/L, platelets <100 × 10(9)/L, bulky adenopathy and/or organomegaly, symptomatic hyperviscosity, peripheral neuropathy, amyloidosis, cryoglobulinemia, cold-agglutinin disease, or transformed disease should be considered for therapy. Plasmapheresis should be used for patients with symptomatic hyperviscosity and before rituximab for those with high serum IgM levels to preempt a symptomatic IgM flare. Treatment choice should take into account specific goals of therapy, necessity for rapid disease control, risk of treatment-related neuropathy, immunosuppression and secondary malignancies, and planning for future autologous stem cell transplantation. Frontline treatments include rituximab alone or rituximab combined with alkylators (bendamustine and cyclophosphamide), proteasome inhibitors (bortezomib and carfilzomib), nucleoside analogs (fludarabine and cladribine), and ibrutinib. In the salvage setting, an alternative frontline regimen, ibrutinib, everolimus, or stem cell transplantation can be considered. Investigational therapies under development for WM include agents that target MYD88, CXCR4, BCL2, and CD27/CD70 signaling, novel proteasome inhibitors, and chimeric antigen receptor-modified T-cell therapy.

  11. [Waldenström macroglobulinemia complicated with chylothorax].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misaki, Sayaka; Sakoda, Hiroto; Hakata, Saya; Shigematsu, Michio; Hoshida, Yoshihiko

    2012-11-01

    An 81-year-old male had been diagnosed with Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM) eight years previously and had thus been administered appropriate treatment. Left chylothorax later developed at 3 years and 8 months after the initial diagnosis. He was hospitalized with severe anemia, general fatigue, and appetite loss one year prior to this presentation and died due to a severe fungal infection. Autopsy revealed the presence of 1,300 ml chylothorax and infiltration of lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma (LPL) cells throughout his entire body. LPL cells were found to have invaded the excitation conducting system in the heart. In an evaluation of a resected lung tissue specimen of pneumothorax, subpleural infiltrated lymphoid cells were observed to show immunohistochemical positivity for IgM and bcl-2. Although these lymphoid cells were initially considered to be non-neoplastic lymphocytes, they were later determined to be LPL cells, which thus induced dilatation and proliferation of the lymph vessels. Chylothorax complications in patients with WM are rare events and only six such cases have so far been reported. The present case is considered to be an instructive one in which autopsy suggested the invasion of LPL cells to be involved in the development of arrhythmia, pneumothorax, and chylothorax before death.

  12. Ibrutinib for the treatment of Waldenström macroglobulinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Rajshekhar; Kapoor, Prashant; Ansell, Stephen M; Gertz, Morie A

    2015-10-01

    Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM) is a B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) characterized by IgM monoclonal gammopathy and bone marrow infiltration by lymphoplasmacytic cells. Until recently, there was no drug specifically approved for WM by the US FDA, leading to wide variations in therapeutic strategies across the globe. Ibrutinib, an oral Bruton tyrosine kinase (BTK) inhibitor, is the first drug approved specifically for WM by the FDA after a clinical trial showed impressive response in previously treated WM. Ibrutinib is a non-stem cell toxic and non-neurotoxic option and suitable for long-term oral maintenance therapy, with the potential of improving survival in WM. With identification of novel genetic mutations impacting response to ibrutinib, it would be possible to individualize therapy based on MYD88 and CXCR4 genotypes. However, long-term safety and efficacy data are required, and cost-effectiveness needs to be addressed before ibrutinib can gain widespread acceptance for front-line therapy of WM.

  13. Unique association of Waldenström macroglobulinemia with optic neuritis and monoclonal T cell expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Ken; Yoshimi, Akihide; Masuda, Akiko; Ichikawa, Motoshi; Yatomi, Yutaka; Kurokawa, Mineo

    2013-08-01

    Waldenström macroglobulinemia is a lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma characterized by production of the immunoglobulin M (IgM) monoclonal protein. Commonly involved sites are the bone marrow, lymph nodes, and spleen. Lymphoplasmacytic infiltration of the central nervous system (CNS), in contrast, is referred to as Bing-Neel syndrome, and is an extremely rare phenomenon. Here, we present a unique case of Waldenström macroglobulinemia with optic neuritis accompanied by monoclonal expansion of T cells, which recovered after administration of CNS-targeting chemotherapy. Although the underlying causal relationships in this case remain obscure, aberrantly expanded T cells may have contributed to the development of optic neuritis, and we should be reminded that some types of cranial neuropathy in Waldenström macroglobulinemia may be reversible.

  14. Cast nephropathy and light-chain deposition disease in Waldenström macroglobulinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnemmi, Viviane; Leleu, Xavier; Provot, François; Moulonguet, Florence; Buob, David

    2012-09-01

    Waldenström macroglobulinemia is a rare low-grade hematologic malignancy due to clonal proliferation of B lymphocytes responsible for immunoglobulin M (IgM) monoclonal gammopathy secreted in serum. This disease is characterized by lymphoplasmacytic tumoral infiltration of bone marrow and various organs, especially the liver and spleen. Kidney involvement in Waldenström macroglobulinemia has been described previously with reports of various forms of glomerular injury: large intracapillary IgM pseudothrombi, cryoglobulinemia-associated membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, or amyloidosis. Interstitial infiltration by tumoral B lymphocytes is another classic pattern. Conversely, tubular involvement in the form of myeloma-like casts or basement membrane deposition of monoclonal light chain (light-chain deposition disease) is unusual. We report the occurrence of cast nephropathy associated with light-chain deposition disease in 2 patients with Waldenström macroglobulinemia, which resulted in severe and prolonged kidney failure.

  15. Etiology of Waldenström macroglobulinemia: genetic factors and immune-related conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manasanch, Elisabet E; Kristinsson, Sigurdur Y; Landgren, Ola

    2013-04-01

    Epidemiologic studies provide an insight into the etiology of lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma/Waldenström macroglobulinemia, which indicates that repetitive immune stimulation and genetic factors play an important role. Here, the current understanding on the causes of lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma/Waldenström macroglobulinemia are reviewed. Recent studies of the literature are discussed, and future population-based studies are proposed to further elucidate the molecular mechanisms that underlie these associations. Finally, the clinical implications of these data are outlined, and perspectives on clinical follow-up and counseling are provided.

  16. Cytogenetic findings in mouse multiple myeloma and Waldenström's macroglobulinemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akker, Th.W. van den; Radl, J.; Franken-Postma, E.; Hagemeijer, A.

    1996-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) and Waldenström's macroglobulinemia-like lymphoma (MW) appear spontaneously in C57BL/KaLwRij mice at a frequency of 0.5% and 0.2%, respectively. They can readily be propagated by intravenous transfer of mainly bone marrow or spleen cells into syngeneic recipients. Previous stud

  17. Primary pulmonary manifestation of Waldenstroem's macroglobulinemia. Primaer pulmonale Manifestation der Makroglobulinaemie Waldenstroem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaa, J.; Deininger, H.K. (Staedtische Kliniken Darmstadt (Germany, F.R.). Strahleninstitut)

    1989-10-01

    A case of Waldenstroem's macroglobulinemia (MGW) is presented with a rare primary pulmonary manifestation. The disease was discovered from abnormal reticulonodular opacities in chest X-ray films, which at first did not have the classic features of MGW. The radiological findings and therapeutic possibilities are discussed with reference to the literature. (orig.).

  18. Waldenström Macroglobulinemia in Hepatitis C: Case Report and Review of the Current Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Nipp

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Recent literature has associated hepatitis C virus with the development of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Hepatitis C virus infection appears to promote lymphoproliferation, providing a plausible mechanism for a causative association; however, despite prior reports of patients with comorbid hepatitis C infection and Waldenström macroglobulinemia, the literature is in disagreement regarding whether there exists an association between these two conditions. Case Presentation. This case report describes a 57-year-old African-American male with chronic hepatitis C infection and cryoglobulinemia who presented with several episodes of transient confusion and paralysis and was found to have symptomatic hyperviscosity. The recognition of his condition was facilitated by characteristic findings on ophthalmologic examination. He was subsequently diagnosed with Waldenström macroglobulinemia on bone marrow biopsy. Conclusions. An up to date, comprehensive review of the literature suggests an association between hepatitis C and Waldenström macroglobulinemia. Data on optimal treatment of patients with comorbid hepatitis C infection and Waldenström macroglobulinemia is limited. We have provided a comprehensive review of previously explored treatment options to guide management of other similar patients. Our patient has since been treated with repeated plasmapheresis with a plan to pursue antiviral therapy.

  19. B-Cell Hematologic Malignancy Vaccination Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-28

    Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance; Multiple Myeloma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia; Lymphocytosis; Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin; B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Hematological Malignancies

  20. THERAPY-RELATED MYELOID NEOPLASMS IN CHRONIC LYMPHOCYTIC LEUKEMIA AND WALDENSTROM MICROGLOBULINEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Tedeschi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available

    Secondary myelodisplasia (MDS and acute myeloide leukaemia (AML are frequent long term complications in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL and Waldesntrom Macroglobulinemia (WM patients. Although disease-related immune-suppression plays a crucial role in leukemogenesis there is great concern that therapy may further increase the risk of developing these devastating complications.

    Nucleoside analogs (NA and alkilator agents are considered appropriate agents in the treatment of both CLL and WM patients. Prolonged immunosuppression related to nucleoside analogs therapy and the incorporation of these agents or their metabolites into DNA, with potentially mutagenic action, leads to speculation that their therapeutic use might be responsible for an increased incidence of second cancer especially when combined with other DNA damaging agents like alkylators. In this review the published studies considering the occurrence of secondary MDS and AML in CLL and WM patients are reported and the potential role of chemotherapeutic agents in leukemogenesis is discussed.

  1. [Recurrence of Waldenström macroglobulinemia accompanied by factor X deficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohara, Shin; Hagihara, Masao; Hua, Jian; Inoue, Morihiro; Uchida, Tomoyuki; Yoshinaga, Tsuneaki; Yazaki, Masahide; Sekijima, Yoshiki; Kametani, Fuyuki

    2016-03-01

    A medical check-up revealed severe anemia in an 85-year-old man who had been diagnosed with Waldenström macroglobulinemia 11 years previously. On the other hand, prolonged PT and aPTT were demonstrated on admission, and were attributed to a significant decrease in factor X activity. These abnormalities were all considered to be have been caused by an exacerbation of the underlying disease and, thus, chemotherapy with the RCD regimen (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, dexamethasone) was started. No significant improvement was obtained and the patient died suddenly on day 154. AL amyloidosis was diagnosed by histopathological examinations and also confirmed by a sequence analysis of amyloid protein. This case with Waldenström macroglobulinemia complicated by AL amyloidosis and recurrent factor X deficiency is quite rare.

  2. Penile ulcer as a specific clinical manifestation of Waldenstrom’s macroglobulinemia*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Cláudia Cardoso de Macedo; Bressa, José Antônio Nascimento; Mendes, Fernanda; Roncada, Eduardo Vinicius Mendes; Monteiro, Rodrigo; Abreu, Marilda Aparecida Milanez Morgado

    2016-01-01

    Waldenstrom’s macroglobulinemia is considered a lymphoma by the World Health Organization. Cutaneous lesions, particularly of a specific type, are rare occurring in 5% of patients. What draws attention in this case is the unusual cutaneous clinical manifestation and its location on the genitals, which has not been described in researched literature, therefore imposing differential diagnosis with other etiologies of genital ulcers. PMID:27192528

  3. Immunoglobulin m monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance and smoldering Waldenström macroglobulinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyle, Robert A; Therneau, Terry M; Dispenzieri, Angela; Kumar, Shaji; Benson, Joanne T; Larson, Dirk R; Melton, L Joseph; Rajkumar, S Vincent

    2013-04-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance of the immunoglobulin M class was diagnosed in 213 patients at the Mayo Clinic, 29 (14%) of whom developed lymphoma, Waldenström macroglobulinemia, or a related disorder over 1567 person-years of follow-up. The cumulative probability of progression was 10% at 5 years, 18% at 10 years, and 24% at 15 years, or approximately 1.5% per year. The concentration of serum monoclonal protein at diagnosis and the initial serum albumin value were the only independent predictors of progression with multivariate analysis. By contrast, during 285 person-years of follow-up, 34 (71%) of 48 patients with smoldering Waldenström macroglobulinemia (SWM) progressed to Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM), which required therapy, along with amyloid light chain (AL) amyloidosis (1) and lymphoma (1). The cumulative probability of progression was 6% at 1 year, 39% at 3 years, 59% at 5 years, and 65% at 10 years. The percentage of lymphoplasmacytic cells in the bone marrow, size of the serum monoclonal (M) spike, and hemoglobin value were significant independent risk factors for progression.

  4. Peripheral capillary non-perfusion in asymptomatic Waldenström's macroglobulinemia

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    Papaconstantinou Dimitris

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To report the rare association of peripheral retinal ischemia in a patient with Waldenström's macroglobulinemia. Case Presentation A 39-year old man with a recent diagnosis of asymptomatic Waldenström's macroglobulinemia (WM was referred from his physician for ocular evaluation. The fundus examination in his right eye (RE revealed very mild central vein dilation, while retinal hemorrhages associated with microaneurismal alterations of the vascular plexus were detected at the temporal periphery. Fluoroscein angiography of his RE revealed an extended area of capillary dropout distal to the microaneurismal lesions. In our patient with WM an extensive area of capillary non-perfusion, in the absence of severe involvement of the posterior pole was documented; this association to the best of our knowledge has never been reported before. Conclusion Although the incidence of the disease is rare, meticulous examination of the retinal periphery should be performed in all patients with WM and vice versa the differential diagnosis of peripheral retinal ischemia of unknown origin should include an investigation to rule out asymptomatic Waldenström's macroglobulinemia.

  5. Diagnosis and management of Waldenström macroglobulinemia: Mayo stratification of macroglobulinemia and risk-adapted therapy (mSMART) guidelines.

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    Ansell, Stephen M; Kyle, Robert A; Reeder, Craig B; Fonseca, Rafael; Mikhael, Joseph R; Morice, William G; Bergsagel, P Leif; Buadi, Francis K; Colgan, Joseph P; Dingli, David; Dispenzieri, Angela; Greipp, Philip R; Habermann, Thomas M; Hayman, Suzanne R; Inwards, David J; Johnston, Patrick B; Kumar, Shaji K; Lacy, Martha Q; Lust, John A; Markovic, Svetomir N; Micallef, Ivana N M; Nowakowski, Grzegorz S; Porrata, Luis F; Roy, Vivek; Russell, Stephen J; Short, Kristen E Detweiler; Stewart, A Keith; Thompson, Carrie A; Witzig, Thomas E; Zeldenrust, Steven R; Dalton, Robert J; Rajkumar, S Vincent; Gertz, Morie A

    2010-09-01

    Waldenström macroglobulinemia is a B-cell malignancy with lymphoplasmacytic infiltration in the bone marrow or lymphatic tissue and a monoclonal immunoglobulin M protein (IgM) in the serum. It is incurable with current therapy, and the decision to treat patients as well as the choice of treatment can be complex. Using a risk-adapted approach, we provide recommendations on timing and choice of therapy. Patients with smoldering or asymptomatic Waldenström macroglobulinemia and preserved hematologic function should be observed without therapy. Symptomatic patients with modest hematologic compromise, IgM-related neuropathy that requires therapy, or hemolytic anemia unresponsive to corticosteroids should receive standard doses of rituximab alone without maintenance therapy. Patients who have severe constitutional symptoms, profound hematologic compromise, symptomatic bulky disease, or hyperviscosity should be treated with the DRC (dexamethasone, rituximab, cyclophosphamide) regimen. Any patient with symptoms of hyperviscosity should first be treated with plasmapheresis. For patients who experience relapse after a response to initial therapy of more than 2 years' duration, the original therapy should be repeated. For patients who had an inadequate response to initial therapy or a response of less than 2 years' duration, an alternative agent or combination should be used. Autologous stem cell transplant should be considered in all eligible patients with relapsed disease.

  6. Development and characterization of a novel human Waldenström macroglobulinemia cell line: RPCI-WM1, Roswell Park Cancer Institute - Waldenström Macroglobulinemia 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitta, Kasyapa S; Paulus, Aneel; Ailawadhi, Sikander; Foster, Barbara A; Moser, Michael T; Starostik, Petr; Masood, Aisha; Sher, Taimur; Miller, Kena C; Iancu, Dan M; Conroy, Jeffrey; Nowak, Norma J; Sait, Sheila N; Personett, David A; Coleman, Morton; Furman, Richard R; Martin, Peter; Ansell, Stephen M; Lee, Kelvin; Chanan-Khan, Asher A

    2013-02-01

    Understanding the biology of Waldenström macroglobulinemia is hindered by a lack of preclinical models. We report a novel cell line, RPCI-WM1, from a patient treated for WM. The cell line secretes human immunoglobulin M (h-IgM) with κ-light chain restriction identical to the primary tumor. The cell line has a modal chromosomal number of 46 and harbors chromosomal changes such as deletion of 6q21, monoallelic deletion of 9p21 (CDKN2A), 13q14 (RB1) and 18q21 (BCL-2), with a consistent amplification of 14q32 (immunoglobulin heavy chain; IgH) identical to its founding tumor sample. The clonal relationship is confirmed by identical CDR3 length and single nucleotide polymorphisms as well as a matching IgH sequence of the cell line and founding tumor. Both also harbor a heterozygous, non-synonymous mutation at amino acid 265 in the MYD88 gene (L265P). The cell line expresses most of the cell surface markers present on the parent cells. Overall, RPCI-WM1 represents a valuable model to study Waldenström macroglobulinemia.

  7. Retinal detachment as the inaugural manifestation in Waldenstrom′s macroglobulinemia

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    Hanumanthappa Vijaya Raghavendra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Waldenstrom′s macroglobulinemia (WM is a rare disorder and forms 1-2% of hematological malignancies. Rarely retinal detachment precedes the diagnosis of WM. In this case report, we present 65-year-old man with retinal detachment as the inaugural manifestation in WM. Clinical manifestations in WM are related to direct tumor infiltration, circulating immunoglobulin M (IgM and deposition into tissues, amyloidogenic properties and autoantibody activity of IgM. Diagnosis is difficult, when a rare disease manifests differently, as in our case. Delay in diagnosis can be prevented by heightened awareness of this rare disease.

  8. Ibrutinib in Waldenström macroglobulinemia: latest evidence and clinical experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Jorge J.; Palomba, M. Lia; Advani, Ranjana; Treon, Steven P.

    2016-01-01

    Ibrutinib is an oral Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (BTK) inhibitor, which has recently gained approval by the United States (US) Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Medicines Agency (EMA) for the treatment of patients with symptomatic Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM). Herein, we review the role of BTK in the pathophysiology of WM, and present the results of the preclinical and clinical studies that led to the initial investigation and later approval of ibrutinib in WM. We also discuss aspects associated with ibrutinib therapy in WM patients, especially focusing on genomic profiling and the impact on response to ibrutinib, and the management of adverse events. PMID:27493708

  9. A Diagnostic Dilemma: Waldenström's Macroglobulinemia/Plasma Cell Leukemia

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    Bhawna Sethi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Waldenström's macroglobulinemia is a B-cell neoplasm characterized by infiltration of the bone marrow by a lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate and an IgM monoclonal gammopathy. It is an uncommon disease with overall incidence of approximately 3 per million persons per year, accounting for approximately 1% to 2% of all hematologic cancers. It has only one-sixth the estimated prevalence of plasma cell myeloma. Disease symptoms can be due to infiltration of bone marrow and other tissue sites by malignant lymphoplasmacytic cells or due to the effects of elevated serum IgM levels. However, patients may present with constitutional symptoms only or may be asymptomatic. In our case, patient presented with chief complaints of fatigability and dyspnoea and was misdiagnosed as plasma cell leukemia on peripheral blood film and bone marrow morphology, but turned out to be a case of Waldenström's macroglobulinemia on cytoflorometry. The patient was referred for chemotherapy but expired on 10th day of admission. The suspected cause of death was cardiorespiratory failure.

  10. Primary therapy of Waldenström macroglobulinemia with nucleoside analogue-based therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souchet-Compain, Laetitia; Nguyen, Stéphanie; Choquet, Sylvain; Leblond, Véronique

    2013-04-01

    Waldenström macroglobulinemia is a rare chronic lymphoproliferative disorder. Treatments are currently reserved for symptomatic patients and usually consist of nucleoside analogues (NAs), alkylating agents, bortezomib, and monoclonal antibodies, alone or in combination. Fludarabine and 2-chlorodeoxyadenosine (2-CdA) have been studied in first-line treatment of Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM) since the end of the 1990s. In monotherapy, response rates vary between 36% and 94%. In a phase III trial, fludarabine in monotherapy was more efficient than chlorambucil for progression-free survival (PFS) (37.8 vs. 27.1 months), duration of response (DOR) (38.5 vs. 21.3 months) and overall survival (OS) (median not reached vs. 69.8 months), but the overall response rate (ORR) was similar (45.6% and 35.9%). NAs have been studied in combination with rituximab and/or alkylating agents for increasing the quality and duration of the response. Hematologic toxicities are a major concern, limiting the indication for NAs in first-line treatment to patients who are not candidates for autologous stem cell transplantation, those in need of rapid control of the disease, or those with poor prognostic factors.

  11. Simultaneous presentation of Waldenström macroglobulinemia and multiple myeloma: multidisciplinary diagnosis, treatment and 30-month follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carulli, Giovanni; Ciancia, Eugenio M; Azzarà, Antonio; Ottaviano, Virginia; Grassi, Susanna; Ciabatti, Elena; Ferreri, Maria I; Rocco, Melania; Marini, Alessandra; Petrini, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Waldenström macroglobulinemia and multiple myeloma are mature B-cell neoplasms deriving from post-germinal cells at different stages of differentiation. The simultaneous presentation of Waldenström macroglobulinemia and multiple myeloma in the same patient is a very rare phenomenon and, so far, only two cases have been described. We report the case of a 75-year Caucasian female patient, with a silent clinical history, who presented with anemia and two different monoclonal proteins (IgMκ and IgGκ). The trephine biopsy showed the presence of a dual population, represented by small lymphoplasmacytoid cells and by plasma cells, which infiltrated the bone marrow with a clearly different pattern. Both immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry demonstrated the biclonal origin such neoplastic cells, since lymphoplasmacytoid cells resulted IgMκ while plasma cells were IgGκ. This biclonal pattern was further confirmed by the demonstration of a different IgH gene rearrangement of the two neoplasms. The patient was treated with bortezomib, dexamethasone and rituximab, achieving partial remission of both Waldenström macroglobulinemia and multiple myeloma. After a 30-month follow-up, she is in stable disease. Multiple myeloma has been described in association with other indolent B-cell neoplasms, mostly chronic lymphocytic leukemia, while Waldenström macroglobulinemia can be followed by diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in some instances, after chemotherapy. The association of Waldenström macroglobulinemia and multiple myeloma seems to be very rare. Our study shows that an integrated diagnostic work-up is very useful in such cases, with an interesting role for flow cytometry. [J Clin Exp Hematop 53(1): 29-36, 2013].

  12. [Cytokine profiles of multiple myeloma and Waldenström macroglobulinemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlaříková, L; Sadílková, K; Kubiczková, L; Hájek, R; Sevčíková, S

    2014-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) and Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM) are malignant disorders of B lymphocytes. These diseases are characterized by monoclonal immunoglobulin production and bone marrow infiltration, which further lead to disease manifestation mainly via osteolytic lesions and disruption of hematopoiesis. The bone marrow microenvironment plays a crucial role in pathogenesis of both of these diseases, as it is well known that interaction between malignant cells and bone marrow cells facilitates both survival and growth of these tumor cells. The interactions are mediated by several different factors, including cytokines. Their production leads to tumor cell growth, proliferation and survival contributing to pathogenesis of MM and WM. In this review, we focus on function of the most important cytokines in both these diseases.

  13. Familial aggregation of lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma/Waldenström macroglobulinemia with solid tumors and myeloid malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristinsson, Sigurdur Y; Goldin, Lynn R; Turesson, Ingemar; Björkholm, Magnus; Landgren, Ola

    2012-01-01

    Lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma (LPL)/Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM) is a B-cell disorder resulting from the accumulation, predominantly in the bone marrow, of clonally related lymphoplasmacytic cells. LPL/WM is a very rare disease, with an incidence rate of 3-4 cases per million people per year.Currently, the causes of LPL/WM are poorly understood; however, there are emerging data to support a role for immune-related factors in the pathogenesis of LPL/WM. In addition, data show that genetic factors are of importance in the etiology of LPL/WM. In this paper, we will review the current knowledge about familiality of LPL/WM and provide novel data on solid tumors and myeloid malignancies in first-degree relatives of LPL/WM patients.

  14. Splenic re-irradiation for waldenstrőm’s macroglobulinemia

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    Wei Zhou

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report on a case of Waldenström’s macroglobulinemia (WM treated with splenic re-irradiation. To the best of our knowledge this has not been reported before. A 69-year-old Asian female patient with WM received a three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, with 24 Gy in 12 treatment fractions in the first stage. She tolerated the treatment well, with a 37% reduction of the monoclonal immunoglobulin, an impalpable spleen, and improved hematological laboratory tests for 4 months. She was then treated with splenic re-irradiation up to 24 Gy for tumor progression. She showed no evidence of progression one year after re-irradiation, with a 55% reduction of the monoclonal immunoglobulin. Our experience demonstrates that splenic irradiation is an effective treatment to control the progression of WM.

  15. Abdominal computed tomography in macroglobulinemia (Waldenstroem's disease). Report of a case

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    Aspelin, P.; Adielsson, G.; Dimitrov, N.; Nyman, U.; Waldenstroem, J.

    The findings at abdominal computed tomography (CT) in a patient with primary macroglobulinemia (Waldenstroem's disease) are reported. CT was of special value in monitoring the extent of the disease in the abdomen and the response to treatment. At the first examination the patient had changes in both the reticuloendothelial system and the small bowel changes. The prompt disappearance on treatment of the small bowel changes proves that these changes were due to a high plasma viscosity syndrome. The slow response on the liver, spleen and lymph nodes suggests lymphomatous engagement. Although the primary method to diagnose Waldenstroem's disease is through laboratory tests, CT is of use in monitoring the abdominal involvement, especially the response to treatment.

  16. Immunoglobulin M concentration in Waldenström macroglobulinemia: correlation with bone marrow B cells and plasma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Tute, Ruth M; Rawstron, Andy C; Owen, Roger G

    2013-04-01

    Serum immunoglobulin (Ig) M levels vary considerably among patients with Waldenström macroglobulinemia, and previous studies have failed to demonstrate a correlation with overall bone marrow disease burden. In this study, bone marrow B cells and plasma cells were enumerated by flow cytometry and correlated with serum IgM concentrations. Monotypic B cells comprised a median of 6% of bone marrow leukocytes but did not correlate with IgM levels (r = 0.071, P = .5). Plasma cells, although typically present in lower numbers (median, 0.52%) did show a correlation with IgM (r = 0.452, P = .01). IgM levels in Waldenström macroglobulinemia, at least in part, correlate with the degree of plasma cell differentiation seen within the tumor.

  17. Fludarabine, cyclophosphamide, and rituximab in salvage therapy of Waldenström's macroglobulinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedeschi, Alessandra; Ricci, Francesca; Goldaniga, Maria Cecilia; Benevolo, Giulia; Varettoni, Marzia; Motta, Marina; Pioltelli, Pietro; Gini, Guido; Barate', Claudia; Luraschi, Annamaria; Vismara, Eleonora; Frustaci, Anna Maria; Nichelatti, Michele; Vitolo, Umberto; Baldini, Luca; Morra, Enrica

    2013-04-01

    The combination FCR (fludarabine, cyclophosphamide, and rituximab) proved to be active in Waldenström's macroglobulinemia in a mixed population of untreated and previously treated patients. Prolonged myelosuppression and concerns about purine analogue treatment led to the conclusion that this regimen should be avoided in younger patients in first-line treatment. In this retrospective study on 40 patients we observed a response rate of 80% (32) after FCR salvage treatment with 32.5% (13) of patients reaching at least a very good partial remission. None of the prognostic variables had a significant effect on response or good quality of response achievement. Median event-free survival was reached at 77 months; median progression-free survival was not reached after a median follow-up of 51 months with any difference when categorizing patients according to quality of response. The results of this study suggest that the FCR regimen might overcome poor prognostic features and should be taken into account as salvage treatment. Tardive immunosuppression and myelosuppression warrant accurate patient follow-up.

  18. Waldenström macroglobulinemia. Development of diagnostic criteria and identification of prognostic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, R G; Barrans, S L; Richards, S J; O'Connor, S J; Child, J A; Parapia, L A; Morgan, G J; Jack, A S

    2001-09-01

    To establish whether a combination of morphologic and immunophenotypic criteria could be developed to more precisely define Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM) and prognostic factors, we retrospectively assessed the clinical and laboratory features of 111 cases of WM. Bone marrow infiltration by small lymphocytes was documented in each case; and diffuse, interstitial, nodular, and paratrabecular patterns of infiltration were documented in 58%, 32%, 6%, and 4% of cases, respectively. Ninety percent were characterized by a surface immunoglobulin-positive, CD19+CD20+CD5-CD10-CD23- immunophenotype. The median overall survival from diagnosis was 60 months; univariate analysis revealed the following adverse prognostic factors: older than 60 years, performance status more than 1, platelet count less than 100 x 10(3)/microL (< 100 x 10(9)/L), pancytopenia, and diffuse bone marrow infiltration. Associated median survival was 40, 38, 46, 28, and 59 months, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed age, performance status, and platelet count as prognostically significant, but stratification of patients according to the International Prognostic Index had limited value. We suggest defining WM by the following criteria: IgM monoclonal gammopathy; bone marrow infiltration by small lymphocytes, plasmacytoid cells, and plasma cells in a diffuse, interstitial, or nodular pattern; and a surface immunoglobulin-positive, CD19+CD20+CD5-CD10-CD23- immunophenotype.

  19. Systemic Amyloidosis and Cardiac Autonomic Neuropathy Associated with Waldenstrom’s Macroglobulinemia

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    Aasems Jacob

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A 73-year-old male with long-standing Waldenstrom’s macroglobulinemia complicated with systemic amyloidosis presented with a witnessed syncopal episode. He had complaints of orthostatic dizziness and palpitations for few months. Orthostatic hypotension and peripheral neuropathy were demonstrated on physical examination. EKG, 24-hour Holter monitoring, and 2D echocardiogram were unremarkable. MRI of the brain ruled out stroke. Patients with amyloidosis can develop cardiovascular disease through amyloid cardiomyopathy, small vessel disease, conduction defects, pericardial effusion, or autonomic denervation. After ruling out other life-threatening causes, Ewing’s battery of tests was done to rule out cardiac autonomic neuropathy. Two heart rate tests and one blood pressure test were abnormal which indicated severe cardiac autonomic neuropathy. Cardiac autonomic neuropathy can mask symptoms of acute coronary syndrome and hence early diagnosis using the simple bedside maneuver is beneficial. The test is also important for prognostication. Absence of augmentation of cardiac output from inadequate autonomic stimulation will lead to postural hypotension, exercise intolerance, and tachycardia. There may be no change in heart rate with Valsalva or deep breathing both of which increase parasympathetic tone. As the condition progresses, it may result in cardiac denervation which can result in silent myocardial infarction, syncope, and sudden death.

  20. Transgenic mouse model of IgM+ lymphoproliferative disease mimicking Waldenström macroglobulinemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tompkins, V S; Sompallae, R; Rosean, T R; Walsh, S; Acevedo, M; Kovalchuk, A L; Han, S-S; Jing, X; Holman, C; Rehg, J E; Herms, S; Sunderland, J S; Morse, H C; Janz, S

    2016-01-01

    Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM) is a low-grade incurable immunoglobulin M+ (IgM+) lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma for which a genetically engineered mouse model of de novo tumor development is lacking. On the basis of evidence that the pro-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin 6 (IL6), and the survival-enhancing oncoprotein, B cell leukemia 2 (BCL2), have critical roles in the natural history of WM, we hypothesized that the enforced expression of IL6 and BCL2 in mice unable to perform immunoglobulin class switch recombination may result in a lymphoproliferative disease that mimics WM. To evaluate this possibility, we generated compound transgenic BALB/c mice that harbored the human BCL2 and IL6 transgenes, EμSV-BCL2-22 and H2-Ld-hIL6, on the genetic background of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) deficiency. We designated these mice BCL2+IL6+AID− and found that they developed—with full genetic penetrance (100% incidence) and suitably short latency (93 days median survival)—a severe IgM+ lymphoproliferative disorder that recapitulated important features of human WM. However, the BCL2+IL6+AID− model also exhibited shortcomings, such as low serum IgM levels and histopathological changes not seen in patients with WM, collectively indicating that further refinements of the model are required to achieve better correlations with disease characteristics of WM. PMID:27813533

  1. Clinicopathologic spectrum of Waldenström′s macroglobulinemia: A single center experience

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    Sajid Raihan

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Waldenström′s Macroglobulinemia (WM is a B cell neoplasm characterized by infiltration of the bone marrow by a lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate and an IgM monoclonal gammopathy. We report a 15-year review of patients diagnosed with WM at our center. A total of 18 patients were diagnosed and treated at our center during the study period. Neurological symptoms were seen in almost 95% while B symptoms were present in almost 80% of patients. More than two-thirds of patients were anemic at the time of presentation and more than 90% showed bone marrow infiltration with lymphoplasmacytoid cells. Anemia, B symptoms, splenomegaly and neurological symptoms were the primary reasons in the majority of patients to initiate treatment. Chlorambucil was the primary treatment in more than half the patients followed by CVP. The median overall survival in all patients was 29 months (range 22-81 months. WM is a rare disorder and novel therapeutic modalities need to be identified to improve survival in these patients.

  2. Lenalidomide is safe and active in Waldenström macroglobulinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouquet, Guillemette; Guidez, Stéphanie; Petillon, Marie-Odile; Louni, Chanaz; Ohyba, Bella; Dib, Malek; Poulain, Stéphanie; Herbaux, Charles; Martin, Audrey; Thielemans, Béatrice; Brice, Pauline; Choquet, Sylvain; Bakala, Jana; Bories, Claire; Demarquette, Hélène; Nudel, Morgane; Tournilhac, Olivier; Arnulf, Bertrand; LeGouill, Steven; Morel, Pierre; Banos, Anne; Karlin, Lionel; Salles, Gilles; Leblond, Véronique; Leleu, Xavier

    2015-11-01

    Lenalidomide is manageable and effective in multiple myeloma, particularly in elderly patients. Surprisingly, the combination of lenalidomide with rituximab produced clinically significant anemia at 25 mg/day for 21/28 days, the highest possible dose, in Waldenström's Macroglobulinemia (WM). We aimed to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of single agent lenalidomide and determine its impact on WM. RV-WM-0426 is a multicenter dose escalation open label phase 1/2 study of lenalidomide in relapsed/refractory WM (RRWM). Lenalidomide was given orally 21/28 days per cycle for 1 year, at escalated dose of 15 to 20 mg during phase 1 to determine the MTD; the phase 2 part was conducted at the MTD. Seventeen RRWM patients were included. The MTD was established at 15 mg/day 21/28. By ITT analysis, the overall response rate was 29%. With a median follow-up of 36 months, median TTP was 16 months (95% CI 5.5-26), the 5-year OS was 91%. The most frequent adverse events ≥ grade 3 at 15 mg were 14% anemia and 43% neutropenia. The MTD of lenalidomide is 15 mg/day 21/28 days in RRWM. Lenalidomide is active in the treatment of RRWM and the safety profile appears manageable. Future studies may look into combinations of lenalidomide and continuous dosing.

  3. What Is Waldenstrom Macroglobulinema?

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  4. The cellular origin and malignant transformation of Waldenström macroglobulinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva, Bruno; Corchete, Luis A; Vidriales, Maria-Belen; García-Sanz, Ramón; Perez, Jose J; Aires-Mejia, Irene; Sanchez, Maria-Luz; Barcena, Paloma; Alignani, Diego; Jimenez, Cristina; Sarasquete, Maria-Eugenia; Mateos, María-Victoria; Ocio, Enrique M; Puig, Noemi; Escalante, Fernando; Hernández, José; Cuello, Rebeca; García de Coca, Alfonso; Sierra, Magdalena; Montes, Maria-Carmen; González-López, Tomás J; Galende, Josefina; Bárez, Abelardo; Alonso, José; Pardal, Emilia; Orfao, Alberto; Gutierrez, Norma C; San Miguel, Jesús F

    2015-04-09

    Although information about the molecular pathogenesis of Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM) has significantly advanced, the precise cell of origin and the mechanisms behind WM transformation from immunoglobulin-M (IgM) monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) remain undetermined. Here, we undertook an integrative phenotypic, molecular, and genomic approach to study clonal B cells from newly diagnosed patients with IgM MGUS (n = 22), smoldering (n = 16), and symptomatic WM (n = 11). Through principal component analysis of multidimensional flow cytometry data, we demonstrated highly overlapping phenotypic profiles for clonal B cells from IgM MGUS, smoldering, and symptomatic WM patients. Similarly, virtually no genes were significantly deregulated between fluorescence-activated cell sorter-sorted clonal B cells from the 3 disease groups. Interestingly, the transcriptome of the Waldenström B-cell clone was highly different than that of normal CD25(-)CD22(+) B cells, whereas significantly less genes were differentially expressed and specific WM pathways normalized once the transcriptome of the Waldenström B-cell clone was compared with its normal phenotypic (CD25(+)CD22(+low)) B-cell counterpart. The frequency of specific copy number abnormalities [+4, del(6q23.3-6q25.3), +12, and +18q11-18q23] progressively increased from IgM MGUS and smoldering WM vs symptomatic WM (18% vs 20% and 73%, respectively; P = .008), suggesting a multistep transformation of clonal B cells that, albeit benign (ie, IgM MGUS and smoldering WM), already harbor the phenotypic and molecular signatures of the malignant Waldenström clone.

  5. Candidate genes of Waldenström’s macroglobulinemia: current evidence and research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianchi G

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Giada Bianchi,1 Antonio Sacco,1 Shaji Kumar,2 Giuseppe Rossi,3 Irene Ghobrial,1 Aldo Roccaro11Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, 2Division of Hematology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; 3Department of Hematology, Spedali Civili di Brescia, Brescia, ItalyAbstract: Waldenström’s macroglobulinemia (WM is a relatively uncommon, indolent malignancy of immunoglobulin M-producing B cells. The World Health Organization classifies it as a lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma and patients typically present with anemia, hepatosplenomegaly and diffuse lymphadenopathies. Historically, the genetic characterization of the disease has been hampered by the relatively low proliferative rate of WM cells, thus making karyotyping challenging. The use of novel technologies such as fluorescence in situ hybridization, gene array, and whole genome sequencing has contributed greatly to establishing candidate genes in the pathophysiology of WM and to identifying potential treatment targets, such as L265P MYD88. The discovery of microRNAs and the recognition of epigenetics as a major modulatory mechanism of oncogene expression and/or oncosuppressor silencing have aided in further understanding the pathogenesis of WM. Once thought to closely resemble multiple myeloma, a cancer of terminally differentiated, immunoglobulin-secreting plasma cells, WM appears to genetically cluster with other indolent B-cell lymphomas such as chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small cell lymphoma. The relative high incidence of familial cases of WM and other B-cell malignancies has been helpful in identifying high-risk gene candidates. In this review, we focus on the established genes involved in the pathogenesis of WM, with special emphasis on the key role of derangement of the nuclear factor kappa B signaling pathway and epigenetic mechanisms.Keywords: genetics, familial cases, NF-κB, whole genome sequencing, MYD88

  6. Macroglobulinemia de Waldenström - remissão completa após tratamento com rituximabe Successful outcome in Waldenström's macroglobulinemia treated with rituximab

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    Flavia C. F. Pimenta

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available A macroglobulinemia de Waldenström (MW é uma patologia rara dos linfócitos B caracterizada pela produção monoclonal de IgM, e que pode manifestar-se clinicamente com fadiga, astenia, perda de peso, sangramento de mucosas e do trato gastrintestinal, lifonodonomegalias, hepatoesplenomegalia e alterações neurológicas. A doença é mais comum em pacientes idosos, e seus sintomas são decorrentes da hiperviscosidade sangüínea. Na MW observa-se hipergamaglobulinemia com pico monoclonal na eletroforese de proteínas séricas, níveis elevados de IgM e demais imunoglobulinas normais ou diminuídas, imunofenotipagem com linfócitos B CD19+, CD20+ e CD24+, aspirado de medula óssea hipercelular, e biópsia de medula óssea hipercelular com infiltração difusa de linfócitos, linfócitos plasmocitóides e plasmócitos. Atualmente, anticorpos monoclonais estão sendo usados na terapêutica da MW com grande sucesso. O rituximabe, anticorpo monoclonal anti -CD20, tem mostrado excelentes resultados no tratamento da MW, inclusive naqueles indivíduos que não obtiveram resposta adequada ao tratamento convencional. Nós reportamos o caso de uma mulher de 78 anos de idade com história de fadiga, astenia, anorexia, sonolência, inquietação, urticária, dificuldade para deambular e perda excessiva de peso, aproximadamente 22 kg em um período de cinco meses, cujo tratamento foi realizado com rituximabe. O objetivo deste relato é apresentar uma paciente com diagnóstico de MW e revisar aspectos clínicos e terapêutico atual da doença.Waldenström's macroglobulinemia is a rare pathology of B lymphocytes characterized by the production of monoclonal IgM, causing clinical manifestations which may include fatigue, asthenia, weight loss, bleeding of the mucosa and intestinal tract, lymphadenomegaly, hepatosplenomegaly and neurological alterations. The disease is more frequent among elderly patients and its symptoms are a result of the hyperviscosity of

  7. Safety and Tolerability Study of PCI-32765 in B Cell Lymphoma and Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-09

    B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Diffuse Well-differentiated Lymphocytic Lymphoma; B Cell Lymphoma; Follicular Lymphoma; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia; Burkitt Lymphoma; B-Cell Diffuse Lymphoma

  8. A Phase II Study of Doxycycline in Relapsed NHL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-27

    Adult Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Mantle Cell Lymphoma Recurrent; Lymphoma, Follicular; Marginal Zone B-Cell Lymphoma; Malignant Lymphoma - Lymphoplasmacytic; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL); T-Cell Lymphoma

  9. An autopsy case of macroglobulinemia complicated with syndrome of inappropriate secretion of ADH (SIADH) like hyponatremia, hypopituitarism and AL amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Chika; Yoneda, Chihiro; Ogino, Jun; Fukushima, Sayaka; Kodama, Shoko; Asano, Chihiro; Masuda, Michihiko; Horie-Tajima, Kanako; Toyonaga, Aiko; Hiroshima, Kenzo; Kawamura, Shunji; Hashimoto, Naotake

    2014-01-01

    An 88-year-old male patient with macroglobulinemia was admitted to our hospital because of severe hyponatremia and unconsciousness. Laboratory findings showed decreased inhibition of antidiuretic hormone (ADH) and he was diagnosed with syndrome of inappropriate secretion of ADH (SIADH). Hyponatremia improved with only limitation of water intake and the patient was followed up on a continuing outpatient basis. However, soon after discharge from hospital, his legs started swelling with edema and hyponatremia worsened. He was re-admitted due to a fall at home. Hyponatremia was observed at re-admission. A CRH challenge test showed partial dysfunction of ACTH secretion. Corticosteroid therapy was performed, but the patient subsequently died from pneumonia. Pathological findings at autopsy revealed invasion of plasma cells and amyloid depositions in multiple organs, including the pituitary, adrenal cortex, heart, liver, kidney, lymph nodes and bone marrow. Consistent with these results, fibrosis was observed in the anterior lobe of the pituitary, suggesting that the autopsy findings were related to the clinical observations and diagnosis. This is the first reported case of macroglobulinemia complicated with multiple hormone dysfunction.

  10. Macroglobulinemia de Waldenström com hemorragia intra-ocular Waldenström's macroglobulinaemia with intraocular hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João J. Nassaralla Júnior

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho é relatar um caso de macroglobulinemia de Waldenström com envolvimento retiniano e da circulação coroidiana, com boa resposta ao tratamento. O desenho é um caso controle intervencional. Um homem de 47 anos foi encaminhado para o serviço de hematologia para avaliação de anemia e linfadenopatia inguinal. O diagnóstico de macroglobulinemia de Waldenström foi feito com base nos achados clínicos e laboratoriais. O paciente desenvolveu hemorragia intra-ocular sem associação com hipertensão e com fatores de coagulação normais. Exame fundoscópico revelou retardamento na circulação coriorretiniana, microaneurismas, e telangiectasias no pólo posterior. Angiografia fluorescente demonstrou o prolongamento do tempo da circulação coroidiana, tempo de trânsito arteriovenoso também prolongado, e áreas de não perfusão capilar. Estes resultados foram acompanhados por uma elevação acentuada da IgM. A maioria dos achados oculares foi revertida com a plasmaférese. A macroglobulinemia de Waldenström pode envolver a retina e a circulação coroidiana, porém pode ser reversível com o tratamento apropriado.The aim of this work is to report a case of Waldenström's Macroglobulinaemia involving both retinal and choroidal circulation that resolved after treatment. The design is an interventional case report. A 47-year old male was admitted for evaluation of anaemia, and groin lymphadenopathy. A diagnosis of Waldenström's macroglobulinaemia was made based on clinical and laboratory findings. The patient developed intraocular hemorrhage without associated hypertension and with normal coagulation profile. A funduscopic examination revealed marked dilation and beading of the venous system, microaneurysms, and telangiectatic capillary beds in the posterior pole. A fluorescein angiography showed delayed choroidal filling, prolonged arteriovenous transit time and areas of capillary non-perfusion. These findings were

  11. Recommendations for the diagnosis and initial evaluation of patients with Waldenström Macroglobulinemia: A Task Force from the 8th International Workshop on Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Jorge J.; Garcia-Sanz, Ramon; Hatjiharissi, Evdoxia; Kyle, Robert; Leleu, Xavier; McMaster, Mary L.; Merlini, Giampaolo; Minnema, Monique C.; Morra, Enrica; Owen, Roger; Poulain, Stephanie; Stone, Marvin; Tam, Constantine; Varettoni, Marzia; Dimopoulos, Meletios; Treon, Steven P.; Kastritis, Efstathios

    2016-01-01

    The diagnosis of Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM) can be challenging given the variety of signs and symptoms patients can present. Furthermore, once the diagnosis of WM is established, the initial evaluation should be thorough as well as appropriately directed. During the 8th International Workshop for WM in London, United Kingdom, a multi-institutional task force was formed to develop consensus recommendations for the diagnosis and initial evaluation of patients with WM. In this document, we present the results of the deliberations taken place to address these issues. We provide recommendations for history taking and physical examination, laboratory studies, bone marrow aspiration and biopsy analysis and imaging studies. We also provide guidance on the initial evaluation of special situations such as anemia, hyperviscosity, neuropathy, Bing-Neel syndrome and amyloidosis. We hope these recommendations serve as a practical guidance to clinicians taking care of patients with a suspected or an established diagnosis of WM. PMID:27378193

  12. Waldenström's macroglobulinemia is infrequent in Mexican Mestizos: experience of a hematological diseases referral center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Argüelles, G J; Ramírez-Cisneros, F J; Flores-Martínez, J; Cernuda-Graham, M C

    2000-01-01

    Along a 17-year period 7,373 patients were prospectively studied in a private practice Health facility; of these 11 were patients with Waldenström's macroglobulinemia; calculations from these data and previous publications show that this lymphoid malignancy represents in Mexico 0.18% of all hematologic malignancies, a figure 11 times lower than that described from caucasians. The median age was 65 years (range 31 to 84); there were 6 males and 5 females. Ten individuals were mexican mestizos, whereas one had a caucasian phenotype. The clinical features of the patients afflicted by the disease in Mexico were similar to those reported from caucasian populations. The median survival (SV) of the group of patients was 40 months, whereas the 42-month survival was 49%; the prognosis of the disease was relatively good despite the fact that complete remissions were unfrequent as a result of the treatment.

  13. Waldenström macroglobulinemia: Progress in evidence-based medicine and updates of consensus panel recommendation

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    Jian HOU

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM is a distinct B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder primarily characterized by infiltration of lymphoplasmacytic cells into the bone marrow, along with demonstration of monoclonal immunoglobulinemia M(IgM. Recent studies have demonstrated the MYD88 L265P somatic mutation contributes to the pathogenesis of WM. Mutated MYD88 activates NF-κB through a series of signals, which results in abnormal propagation of B cells. Clinical manifestation mainly consisted of tissue injuries attributable to tissue infiltration and monoclonal IgM. WM should be differentiated from lymphomas producing monoclonal IgM, and detection of MYD88 L265P mutation provides a new way to differentiate WM from other similar diseases. At present recommended treatments for WM include alkylating agents, nucleoside analogues, bortezomib, rituximab etc.

  14. Bendamustine and rituximab combination is safe and effective as salvage regimen in Waldenström macroglobulinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedeschi, Alessandra; Picardi, Paola; Ferrero, Simone; Benevolo, Giulia; Margiotta Casaluci, Gloria; Varettoni, Marzia; Baratè, Claudia; Motta, Marina; Gini, Guido; Goldaniga, Maria Cecilia; Visco, Carlo; Zaja, Francesco; Belsito Petrizi, Valeria; Ravelli, Erika; Gentile, Massimo; Urbano, Marina Aurora; Franceschetti, Silvia; Ghione, Paola; Orsucci, Lorella; Frustaci, Anna Maria; Gaidano, Gianluca; Vitolo, Umberto; Morra, Enrica

    2015-01-01

    According to the European Society for Medical Oncology and National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines on Waldenström macroglobulinemia, bendamustine (B) may be considered a suitable therapeutic option. To address the role of B in combination with rituximab (BR), we analyzed the outcome of 71 patients with relapsed/refractory disease, median age 72 years, treated with R 375 mg/m(2) day 1 and B days 1 and 2 (dosage ranging from 50 to 90 mg/m(2)). Patients had previously received a median number of 2 lines of treatment (range 1-5). Overall and major response rates were 80.2% and 74.6%. Major toxicity was grade 3/4 neutropenia occurring in 13% of courses. There was no significant association between baseline features or patients' characteristics and response achievement. Median progression-free survival was not reached after a median follow-up of 19 months (range 3-54). None of the patients developed aggressive lymphoma or secondary myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myeloid leukemia. BR was found to be an active and well-tolerated salvage regimen leading to rapid disease control.

  15. Clinical Factors Associated with Response or Survival after Chemotherapy in Patients with Waldenström Macroglobulinemia in Korea

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    Ho Sup Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Waldenström’s macroglobulinemia (WM is a B-cell proliferative malignancy characterized by immunoglobulin M monoclonal gammopathy and bone marrow infiltration by lymphoplasmacytic cells. Clinical features and cytogenetics of WM in Asia including Republic of Korea remain unclear. Moreover, no study has reported treatment outcomes in patients with WM treated with novel agent combined with conventional chemotherapy. This study investigated clinical features and assessed treatment outcomes with novel agent and conventional chemotherapy in Republic of Korea. Data from all (n=71 patients with newly diagnosed WM at 17 hospitals who received chemotherapy between January 2005 and December 2012 were collected retrospectively. The median age of patients was 66 years (range: 37–92 years and male to female ratio was 5 : 1. Patients treated with novel agent combined chemotherapy displayed higher overall response rate (ORR compared to conventional chemotherapy alone (92.9% versus 52.6%, P=0.006. The 5-year overall survival rate was 62.6% (95% confidence interval: 34.73–111.07. Use of novel agents produced higher ORR but survival benefit was not apparent due to the small number of patients and short follow-up duration. Further studies are needed to confirm the efficacy of novel agents in patients with WM.

  16. [Lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma/Waldenström macroglobulinemia with P53 deletion and TCR-delta rearrangement in a case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaofeng; Yang, Wei; Zhang, Xuejin

    2015-10-01

    OBJECTIVE To study the morphology, immunology, cyto- and molecular genetics of a patient with lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma/Waldenström macroglobulinemia (LPL/WM), deletion of P53 gene and rearrangement of clonal T cell receptors-delta (TCR-delta) gene. METHODS The cell morphology and immunocytochemistry were analyzed by bone marrow testing and biopsy. Cellular immunology was analyzed by flow cytometry. Genetic analysis was carried out by chromosome karyotyping, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Immunoglobulin M (IgM) in serum and urine was assayed by immunofixation electrophoresis. And the effect of chlorambucil therapy was evaluated. RESULTS Bone marrow biopsy suggested that the patient was of B lymphocyte type and had abnormal increase of lymphocytoid plasma cells, which were CD38 and CD138 positive. The patient had a normal male karyotype. FISH and PCR analysis of peripheral blood samples suggested deletion of P53 gene and rearrangement of TCR-delta gene. Immunofixation electrophoresis has detected IgM-kappa in both serum and urine. The patient showed partial response to chlorambucil. CONCLUSION In addition to typical clinical features, bone marrow examination, flow cytometry, histochemistry and immunophenotyping, testing for P53 gene deletion and lymphocyte gene rearrangement can facilitate the diagnosis and treatment of LPL/WM.

  17. Clinical factors associated with response or survival after chemotherapy in patients with Waldenström macroglobulinemia in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ho Sup; Kim, Kihyun; Yoon, Dok Hyun; Kim, Jin Seok; Bang, Soo-Mee; Lee, Jeong-Ok; Eom, Hyeon Seok; Lee, Hyewon; Kim, Inho; Lee, Won Sik; Bae, Sung Hwa; Kim, Se Hyung; Lee, Mark Hong; Do, Young Rok; Lee, Jae Hoon; Hong, Junshik; Shin, Ho-Jin; Lee, Ji Hyun; Mun, Yeung-Chul; Min, Chang-Ki

    2014-01-01

    Waldenström's macroglobulinemia (WM) is a B-cell proliferative malignancy characterized by immunoglobulin M monoclonal gammopathy and bone marrow infiltration by lymphoplasmacytic cells. Clinical features and cytogenetics of WM in Asia including Republic of Korea remain unclear. Moreover, no study has reported treatment outcomes in patients with WM treated with novel agent combined with conventional chemotherapy. This study investigated clinical features and assessed treatment outcomes with novel agent and conventional chemotherapy in Republic of Korea. Data from all (n = 71) patients with newly diagnosed WM at 17 hospitals who received chemotherapy between January 2005 and December 2012 were collected retrospectively. The median age of patients was 66 years (range: 37-92 years) and male to female ratio was 5 : 1. Patients treated with novel agent combined chemotherapy displayed higher overall response rate (ORR) compared to conventional chemotherapy alone (92.9% versus 52.6%, P = 0.006). The 5-year overall survival rate was 62.6% (95% confidence interval: 34.73-111.07). Use of novel agents produced higher ORR but survival benefit was not apparent due to the small number of patients and short follow-up duration. Further studies are needed to confirm the efficacy of novel agents in patients with WM.

  18. Low expression of pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins sets the apoptotic threshold in Waldenström macroglobulinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudette, B T; Dwivedi, B; Chitta, K S; Poulain, S; Powell, D; Vertino, P; Leleu, X; Lonial, S; Chanan-Khan, A A; Kowalski, J; Boise, L H

    2016-01-28

    Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM) is a proliferative disorder of IgM-secreting, lymphoplasmacytoid cells that inhabit the lymph nodes and bone marrow. The disease carries a high prevalence of activating mutations in MyD88 (91%) and CXCR4 (28%). Because signaling through these pathways leads to Bcl-xL induction, we examined Bcl-2 family expression in WM patients and cell lines. Unlike other B-lymphocyte-derived malignancies, which become dependent on expression of anti-apoptotic proteins to counter expression of pro-apoptotic proteins, WM samples expressed both pro- and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 proteins at low levels similar to their normal B-cell and plasma cell counterparts. Three WM cell lines expressed pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members Bim or Bax and Bak at low levels, which determined their sensitivity to inducers of intrinsic apoptosis. In two cell lines, miR-155 upregulation, which is common in WM, was responsible for the inhibition of FOXO3a and Bim expression. Both antagonizing miR-155 to induce Bim and proteasome inhibition increased the sensitivity to ABT-737 in these lines indicating a lowering of the apoptotic threshold. In this manner, treatments that increase pro-apoptotic protein expression increase the efficacy of agents treated in combination in addition to direct killing.

  19. Waldenström's macroglobulinemia: clinical course and prognostic factors in 60 patients. Experience from a single hematology unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyrtsonis, M C; Vassilakopoulos, T P; Angelopoulou, M K; Siakantaris, P; Kontopidou, F N; Dimopoulou, M N; Boussiotis, V; Gribabis, A; Konstantopoulos, K; Vaiopoulos, G A; Fessas, P; Kittas, C; Pangalis, G A

    2001-12-01

    Waldenström's macroglobulinemia (WM) is a lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma characterized by the presence in patients' serum of an IgM monoclonal component. We report on our experience with 60 WM patients, focusing on their clinical findings, response to treatment, and the possible identification of prognostic factors. Of these patients, 70% presented with fatigue, and lymphadenopathy was observed in 22%, splenomegaly in 18%, hepatomegaly in 13%, and extranodal site of involvement in 6%. Bleeding tendency was seen in 17%, infections in 17%, hyperviscosity syndrome in 12%, and cardiac failure in 25% of the patients. The median of IgM levels was 30 g/l with hypoalbuminemia in 20% of cases, hypogammaglobulinemia in 27%, polyclonal hypergammaglobulinemia in 15%, kappa light-chain restriction in 78%, and Bence-Jones proteinuria in 54%. Anemia was frequent (85%), followed by leukocytosis (18%), lymphocytosis (12%), leukopenia (10%), and thrombocytopenia (10%). Cryoglobulinemia and autoimmune hemolytic anemia were encountered in 5%. In all cases but two, bone marrow was involved. Of 50 patients initially treated with intermittent oral chlorambucil, 46 (92%) responded. Median overall survival was 108 months. Factors associated with adverse prognosis were age > or =65 years (p=0.06), presence of lymphadenopathy (p=0.06), bone marrow infiltration > or =50% (p=0.007), international prognostic index (IPI) > or =3 (p=0.0001), and Morel's scoring system (p=0.04). Concluding, we found in this series of WM patients that chlorambucil is an effective treatment and that the parameters of age, lymphadenopathy, percentage of bone marrow infiltration, IPI, and Morel's scoring system carry prognostic significance.

  20. Primary Therapy of Waldenström Macroglobulinemia With Bortezomib, Dexamethasone, and Rituximab: WMCTG Clinical Trial 05-180

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treon, Steven P.; Ioakimidis, Leukothea; Soumerai, Jacob D.; Patterson, Christopher J.; Sheehy, Patricia; Nelson, Marybeth; Willen, Michael; Matous, Jeffrey; Mattern, John; Diener, Jakow G.; Keogh, George P.; Myers, Thomas J.; Boral, Andy; Birner, Ann; Esseltine, Dixie L.; Ghobrial, Irene M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose We examined the activity of bortezomib, dexamethasone, and rituximab (BDR) in patients with symptomatic, untreated Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM). Patients and Methods A cycle of therapy consisted of bortezomib 1.3 mg/m2 intravenously; dexamethasone 40 mg on days 1, 4, 8, and 11; and rituximab 375 mg/m2 on day 11. Patients received four consecutive cycles for induction therapy and then four more cycles, each given 3 months apart, for maintenance therapy. Twenty-three patients received a median of seven cycles of treatment. Results Median bone marrow disease involvement declined from 55% to 10% (P = .0004), serum immunoglobulin M levels declined from 4,830 to 1,115 mg/dL (P < .0001), and hematocrit increased from 29.8% to 38.2% (P = .0002) at best response. The overall response rates and major response rates were 96% and 83% with three complete responses, two near complete responses, three very good partial responses, 11 partial responses, and three minor responses. Responses occurred at a median of 1.4 months. With a median follow-up of 22.8 months, 18 of 23 patients remained free of disease progression. Peripheral neuropathy was the most common toxicity, and it resolved to grade ≤ 1 in 13 of 16 patients at a median of 6.0 months. Four of the first seven treated patients developed herpes zoster, resulting in the institution of prophylactic antiviral therapy. Conclusion The results demonstrate that BDR produces rapid and durable responses, along with high rates of response and complete remissions in WM. Herpes zoster prophylaxis is necessary with BDR, and reversible peripheral neuropathy was the most common toxicity leading to premature discontinuation of bortezomib in 61% of patients. Exploration of alternative schedules for bortezomib administration that includes weekly dosing should be pursued. PMID:19506160

  1. Primary therapy of Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM) with weekly bortezomib, low-dose dexamethasone, and rituximab (BDR): Long-term results of a phase 2 study of the European Myeloma Network (EMN)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. Dimopoulos (Meletios); R. Garcia-Sanz (Ramon); M. Gavriatopoulou (Maria); P. Morel; M.-C. Kyrtsonis (Marie-Christine); L.K. Michalis (Lampros); Z. Kartasis (Zafiris); X. Leleu; G. Palladini (Giovanni); A. Tedeschi (Alessandra); D. Gika (Dimitra); G. Merlini; E. Kastritis (Efstathios); P. Sonneveld (Pieter)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractIn this phase 2 multicenter trial, we evaluated the activity of bortezomib, dexamethasone, and rituximab (BDR) combination in previously untreated symptomatic patients with Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM). To prevent immunoglobulin M (IgM) "flare," single agent bortezomib (1.3 mg/m 2

  2. Primary structure of the major glycans of the N-acetyllactosamine type derived from the human immunoglobulins M from two patients with Waldenström’s macroglobulinemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliegenthart, J.F.G.; Cahour, A.; Debeire, P.; Hartmann, L.; Montreuil, J.; Halbeek, H. van

    1984-01-01

    The carbohydrate chains of the pathological human immunoglobulins M from two patients with Waldenström's macroglobulinemia were released by hydrazinolysis. The N-acetyllactosamine-type glycans were obtained by affinity chromatography on concanavalin A and fractionated by high-voltage paper electroph

  3. Rituximab Improves Subclinical Temporal Dispersion of Distal Compound Muscle Action Potential in Anti-MAG/SGPG Neuropathy Associated with Waldenström Macroglobulinemia: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanji Yamamoto

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Patients with anti-myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG/sulfated glucuronyl paragloboside (SGPG neuropathy associated with Waldenström macroglobulinemia show demyelinating neuropathy, but the temporal dispersion of distal compound muscle action potential (CMAP in motor nerve conduction studies (NCS, which represents heterogeneous demyelination at the motor nerve terminal, is rare. We report on a 70-year-old man with anti-MAG/SGPG neuropathy associated with Waldenström macroglobulinemia; he had a 2-year history of mild dysesthesia of the foot sole without any motor symptoms. He showed marked temporal dispersion of distal CMAP in the tibial nerve with other demyelinating findings in the NCS. The temporal dispersion of distal CMAP in the tibial nerve improved significantly, and motor function was again normal 1 year after rituximab monotherapy. The temporal dispersion of distal CMAP in anti-MAG/SGPG neuropathy is rare, but it could occur from an early stage when the patients show mild or no motor symptoms. Rituximab therapy before secondary axonal degeneration has great potential to reverse the effects of the demyelination including the temporal dispersion of distal CMAP, and to prevent the deterioration of neuropathy in anti-MAG/SGPG neuropathy.

  4. Bing-Neel syndrome, a rare complication of Waldenström macroglobulinemia: analysis of 44 cases and review of the literature. A study on behalf of the French Innovative Leukemia Organization (FILO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Laurence; Fitsiori, Aikaterini; Lemal, Richard; Dupuis, Jehan; Carpentier, Benjamin; Boudin, Laurys; Corby, Anne; Aurran-Schleinitz, Thérèse; Gastaud, Lauris; Talbot, Alexis; Leprêtre, Stéphane; Mahe, Béatrice; Payet, Camille; Soussain, Carole; Bonnet, Charlotte; Vincent, Laure; Lissandre, Séverine; Herbrecht, Raoul; Kremer, Stéphane; Leblond, Véronique; Fornecker, Luc-Matthieu

    2015-01-01

    Central nervous system involvement by malignant cells is a rare complication of Waldenström macroglobulinemia, and this clinicopathological entity is referred to as the Bing-Neel syndrome. There is currently no consensus on the diagnostic criteria, therapeutic approaches and response evaluation for this syndrome. In this series, we retrospectively analyzed 44 French patients with Bing-Neel syndrome. Bing-Neel syndrome was the first manifestation of Waldenström macroglobulinemia in 36% of patients. When Waldenström macroglobulinemia was diagnosed prior to Bing-Neel syndrome, the median time interval between this diagnosis and the onset of Bing-Neel syndrome was 8.9 years. This study highlights the possibility of the occurrence of Bing-Neel syndrome without any other evidence of progression of Waldenström macroglobulinemia. The clinical presentation was heterogeneous without any specific signs or symptoms. Biologically, the median lymphocyte count in the cerebrospinal fluid was 31/mm3. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed abnormalities in 78% of the cases. The overall response rate after first-line treatment was 70%, and the overall survival rate after the diagnosis of Bing-Neel syndrome was 71% at 5 years. Altogether, these results suggest that Bing-Neel syndrome should be considered in the context of any unexplained neurological symptoms associated with Waldenström macroglobulinemia. The diagnostic approach should be based on cerebrospinal fluid analysis and magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and spinal axis. It still remains difficult to establish treatment recommendations or prognostic factors in the absence of large-scale, prospective, observational studies. PMID:26385211

  5. Bing-Neel syndrome, a rare complication of Waldenström macroglobulinemia: analysis of 44 cases and review of the literature. A study on behalf of the French Innovative Leukemia Organization (FILO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Laurence; Fitsiori, Aikaterini; Lemal, Richard; Dupuis, Jehan; Carpentier, Benjamin; Boudin, Laurys; Corby, Anne; Aurran-Schleinitz, Thérèse; Gastaud, Lauris; Talbot, Alexis; Leprêtre, Stéphane; Mahe, Béatrice; Payet, Camille; Soussain, Carole; Bonnet, Charlotte; Vincent, Laure; Lissandre, Séverine; Herbrecht, Raoul; Kremer, Stéphane; Leblond, Véronique; Fornecker, Luc-Matthieu

    2015-12-01

    Central nervous system involvement by malignant cells is a rare complication of Waldenström macroglobulinemia, and this clinicopathological entity is referred to as the Bing-Neel syndrome. There is currently no consensus on the diagnostic criteria, therapeutic approaches and response evaluation for this syndrome. In this series, we retrospectively analyzed 44 French patients with Bing-Neel syndrome. Bing-Neel syndrome was the first manifestation of Waldenström macroglobulinemia in 36% of patients. When Waldenström macroglobulinemia was diagnosed prior to Bing-Neel syndrome, the median time interval between this diagnosis and the onset of Bing-Neel syndrome was 8.9 years. This study highlights the possibility of the occurrence of Bing-Neel syndrome without any other evidence of progression of Waldenström macroglobulinemia. The clinical presentation was heterogeneous without any specific signs or symptoms. Biologically, the median lymphocyte count in the cerebrospinal fluid was 31/mm(3). Magnetic resonance imaging revealed abnormalities in 78% of the cases. The overall response rate after first-line treatment was 70%, and the overall survival rate after the diagnosis of Bing-Neel syndrome was 71% at 5 years. Altogether, these results suggest that Bing-Neel syndrome should be considered in the context of any unexplained neurological symptoms associated with Waldenström macroglobulinemia. The diagnostic approach should be based on cerebrospinal fluid analysis and magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and spinal axis. It still remains difficult to establish treatment recommendations or prognostic factors in the absence of large-scale, prospective, observational studies.

  6. Development of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in a patient with Waldenström’s macroglobulinemia/ lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma: clonal identity between two B-cell neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masayuki Shiseki

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Waldenström’s macroglobulinemia (WM/ lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma (LPL is an indolent mature B-cell neoplasm. In rare cases of WM/LPL, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL develops as a result of histologic transformation. In this report, we present a case of DLBCL developing in a patient with WM/LPL. Combination chemotherapy for DLBCL was effective and complete remission was eventually achieved. We attempted to determine the clonal relatedness between WM/LPL and DLBCL in the patient by analyzing complementarity-determining region 3 (CDR3 in the immunoglobulin heavy chain gene. A common CDR3 sequence was found in tumor cells of DLBCL and those of WM/LPL, indicating that tumor cells of DLBCL are clonally identical to those of WM/LPL. Therefore, in the present case, DLBCL is developed from WM/LPL cells by clonal evolution.

  7. A Rare Case of Waldenström Macroglobulinemia/Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma with Light Chain Discrepancy between B Lymphocyte Population and Serum Paraprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Jeong; Hur, Mina; Kim, Hanah; Moon, Hee-Won; Yun, Yeo-Min; Kim, Sung Yong; Lee, Mark Hong

    2015-01-01

    Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM) is a subset of lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma with bone marrow involvement, monotypic immunoglobulin (Ig) M and a light chain of neoplastic cells. A 68-year-old woman presented with fever, nausea, vomiting, and pancytopenia. Her serum albumin/globulin ratio was reversed, and monoclonal gammopathy of IgM, lambda type (23.20%, 1.58 g/dL) was detected. In her bone marrow, increased small lymphocytes were admixed with plasmacytoid lymphocytes and plasma cells. She was diagnosed as having lymphoplasmacytic variant of WM. Immunohistochemical stains and flow cytometic analysis revealed two distinct populations; monoclonal B cells (kappa+) and abnormal plasma cells (CD19-/CD56+/lambda+). She expired 19 days after admission due to septic shock. This is a rare case of WM exhibiting a light chain discrepancy between monoclonal B lymphocytes and paraprotein-secreting plasma cells. Light chain restriction may occur distinctly between lymphocyte and plasma cell populations in WM.

  8. Results of a randomized trial of chlorambucil versus fludarabine for patients with untreated Waldenström macroglobulinemia, marginal zone lymphoma, or lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblond, Véronique; Johnson, Steve; Chevret, Sylvie; Copplestone, Adrian; Rule, Simon; Tournilhac, Olivier; Seymour, John Francis; Patmore, Russell D; Wright, David; Morel, Pierre; Dilhuydy, Marie-Sarah; Willoughby, Sara; Dartigeas, Caroline; Malphettes, Marion; Royer, Bruno; Ewings, Maeve; Pratt, Guy; Lejeune, Julie; Nguyen-Khac, Florence; Choquet, Sylvain; Owen, Roger G

    2013-01-20

    Treatment options for patients with Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM) and closely related disorders include alkylating agents, purine analogs, and monoclonal antibodies. No large randomized studies have yet been reported comparing any of these approaches. The randomized WM1 study (Trial Comparing Chlorambucil to Fludarabine in Patients With Advanced Waldenström Macroglobulinemia) was undertaken in 101 centers in five countries enrolling 414 eligible patients (339 with WM, 37 with non-mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue marginal zone lymphoma, and 38 with lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma) who were randomly assigned to receive chlorambucil or fludarabine. The primary end point was the overall response rate (ORR). On the basis of intent-to-treat analysis, the ORR was 47.8% (95% CI, 40.9% to 54.8%) in the fludarabine arm versus 38.6% (95% CI, 32.0% to 45.7%) in the chlorambucil arm (P = .07). With a median follow-up of 36 months (interquartile range, 18 to 58 months), median progression-free survival (PFS), and duration of response (DR) were significantly improved in the fludarabine arm compared with the chlorambucil arm: PFS, 36.3 versus 27.1 months (P = .012) and DR, 38.3 versus 19.9 months (P chlorambucil arm (95% CI, 61.6 to 79.8 months; P = .014). Grade 3 to 4 neutropenia was significantly higher among patients treated with fludarabine (36%) compared with patients treated with chlorambucil (17.8%; P chlorambucil arm with 6-year cumulative incidence rate of 20.6% versus 3.7% in the fludarabine arm (P = .001). In the complete intent-to-treat study population, fludarabine significantly improved PFS compared with chlorambucil, and in patients with WM, it improved OS.

  9. Results of a phase 2 trial of the single-agent histone deacetylase inhibitor panobinostat in patients with relapsed/refractory Waldenström macroglobulinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghobrial, Irene M; Campigotto, Federico; Murphy, Timothy J; Boswell, Erica N; Banwait, Ranjit; Azab, Feda; Chuma, Stacey; Kunsman, Janet; Donovan, Amanda; Masood, Farzana; Warren, Diane; Rodig, Scott; Anderson, Kenneth C; Richardson, Paul G; Weller, Edie; Matous, Jeffrey

    2013-02-21

    The present study aimed to determine the safety and activity of the histone deacetylase inhibitor panobinostat in patients with relapsed/refractory Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM). Eligibility criteria included patients with relapsed/refractory WM with any number of prior therapies. Patients received panobinostat at 30 mg 3 times a week; 12 of 36 (33%) patients were enrolled at 25 mg dose. A total of 36 patients received therapy. The median age was 62 years (range, 47-80) and the median number of prior therapies was 3 (range, 1-8). All of the patients had received prior rituximab. Minimal response (MR) or better was achieved in 47% of patients (90% confidence interval [CI], 33-62), with 22% partial remissions and 25% MR. In addition, 18 (50%) patients achieved stable disease and none showed progression while on therapy. The median time to first response was 1.8 months (range, 1.7-3.2). The median progression-free survival was 6.6 months(90% CI, 5.5-14.8). Grade 3 and 4 toxicities included thrombocytopenia (67%), neutropenia (36%), anemia (28%), leukopenia (22%), and fatigue (11%). We conclude that panobinostat is an active therapeutic agent in patients with relapsed/ refractory WM. This study (www.clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT00936611) establishes a role for histone deacetylase inhibitors as an active class of therapeutic agents in WM.

  10. Correlation between survival and number of mobilized CD34+ cells in patients with multiple myeloma or Waldenström macroglobulinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakihana, Kazuhiko; Ohashi, Kazuteru; Akiyama, Hideki; Sakamaki, Hisashi

    2010-12-01

    High-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous stem cell transplantation is the established treatment for symptomatic multiple myeloma (MM) or Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM). We retrospectively analyzed the impact of mobilized CD34+ cell number on clinical outcomes in patients with MM or WM who underwent autologous stem cell transplantation in our hospital from 1997 to 2007. A total of 39 patients were identified. All patients received peripheral stem cell support after a conditioning regimen. We defined patients with collection of a large number (≥ 8 × 10(6)/kg) of CD34+ cells as super mobilizers (SM), and all others as normal mobilizers (NM). Although hematological engraftment was earlier in the SM group, overall survival did not differ significantly between groups (P = 0.392). Likewise, no significant differences were seen in progression-free survival (P = 0.201) or survival after relapse (P = 0.330). In conclusion, our retrospective study could not find any correlation between survival and number of mobilized CD34+ cells, in contrast to previously reported results.

  11. Rare Circulating Cells in Familial Waldenström Macroglobulinemia Displaying the MYD88 L265P Mutation Are Enriched by Epstein-Barr Virus Immortalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pertesi, Maroulio; Galia, Perrine; Nazaret, Nicolas; Vallée, Maxime; Garderet, Laurent; Leleu, Xavier; Avet-Loiseau, Hervé; Foll, Matthieu; Byrnes, Graham; Lachuer, Joel; McKay, James D; Dumontet, Charles

    2015-01-01

    The MYD88 L265P is a recurrent somatic mutation in neoplastic cells from patients with Waldenström Macroglobulinemia (WM). We identified the MYD88 L265P mutation in three individuals from unrelated families, but its presence did not explain the disease segregation within these WM pedigrees. We observed the mutation in these three individuals at high allele fractions in DNA extracted from EBV-immortalized Lymphoblastoid cell lines established from peripheral blood (LCL), but at much lower allele fractions in DNA extracted directly from peripheral blood, suggesting that this mutation is present in a clonal cell subpopulation rather than of germ-line origin. Furthermore, we observed that the MYD88 L265P mutation is enriched in WM families, detected in 40.5% of patients with familial WM or MGUS (10/22 WM, 5/15 MGUS), compared to 3.5% of patients with familial MM or MGUS (0/72 MM, 4/41 MGUS) (p = 10-7). The mutant allele frequency increased with passages in vitro after immortalization with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) consistent with the MYD88 L265P described gain-of-function proposed for this mutation. The MYD88 L265P mutation appears to be frequently present in circulating cells in patients with WM, and MGUS, and these cells are amenable to immortalization by EBV.

  12. MYD88 mutant lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma/Waldenström macroglobulinemia has distinct clinical and pathological features as compared to its mutation negative counterpart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patkar, Nikhil; Subramanian, P G; Deshpande, Prashant; Ghodke, Kiran; Tembhare, Prashant; Mascarenhas, Russel; Muranjan, Aditi; Chaudhary, Shruti; Bagal, Bhausaheb; Gujral, Sumeet; Sengar, Manju; Menon, Hari

    2015-02-01

    In a first series from India, we report 32 cases of lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma/Waldenström macroglobulinemia (LPL/WM) over 7 years. Here, we analyzed 32 patients with LPL/WM for MYD88 L265P mutation and correlated mutation staus with hematological and biochemical parameters and also with the International Prognostic Scoring System (ISSWM) and treatment response. Twenty-seven out of 32 cases of LPL/WM (84.3%) harbored the MYD88 L265P mutation. MYD88 wild-type WM was associated with a lower number of tumor cells (p<0.01) and older age (p=0.02) and a lower ISSWM score at presentation (p=0.03) as compared to mutated LPL/WM. On evaluation of response (n=23), 44.4% of patients with MYD88 mutated LPL/WM had progressive disease, whereas no patient in the MYD88 unmutated group changed their baseline status. We confirm the high frequency of MYD88 mutations in LPL/WM. Although the number of MYD88 wild-type cases was limited, our data indicate that MYD88 may represent an adverse prognostic marker for LPL/WM.

  13. MYD88 L265P mutations are correlated with 6q deletion in Korean patients with Waldenström macroglobulinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung-Ah; Im, Kyongok; Park, Si Nae; Kwon, Jiseok; Choi, Qute; Hwang, Sang Mee; Sekiguchi, Naohiro; Yoon, Sung-Soo; Lee, Dong Soon; Kim, Seon Young

    2014-01-01

    Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM) is a malignant lymphoplasma-proliferative disorder with IgM monoclonal gammopathy. A recent whole-genome study identified MYD88 L265P as the key mutation in WM. We investigated MYD88 mutations in conjunction with cytogenetic study in 22 consecutive Korean WM patients. Conventional G-banding and interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) were performed at regions including 6q21 using bone marrow (BM) aspirates. Sixteen patients were subjected to Sanger sequencing-based MYD88 mutation study. Five patients (28%) showed cytogenetic aberrations in G-banding. The incidence of 6q21 deletion was 17% by conventional G-banding and 37% by FISH. Ten patients (45%) showed cytogenetic aberrations using FISH: 6q deletion in eight (37%) and IGH rearrangement in four (18%). Two patients had both the 6q deletion and IGH rearrangement, and two had only the IGH rearrangement. Eleven patients (69%) presented with the MYD88 L265P mutation. MYD88 mutations were significantly associated with the presence of 6q deletions (P = 0.037). Six patients with the 6q deletion for whom sequencing was possible were found to harbor MYD88 mutations. The MYD88 L265P mutation was also associated with increased lymphocyte burden in BM biopsy. This is the first report of high frequency MYD88 L265P mutations in Korean WM patients.

  14. MYD88 L265P Mutations Are Correlated with 6q Deletion in Korean Patients with Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Ah Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM is a malignant lymphoplasma-proliferative disorder with IgM monoclonal gammopathy. A recent whole-genome study identified MYD88 L265P as the key mutation in WM. We investigated MYD88 mutations in conjunction with cytogenetic study in 22 consecutive Korean WM patients. Conventional G-banding and interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH were performed at regions including 6q21 using bone marrow (BM aspirates. Sixteen patients were subjected to Sanger sequencing-based MYD88 mutation study. Five patients (28% showed cytogenetic aberrations in G-banding. The incidence of 6q21 deletion was 17% by conventional G-banding and 37% by FISH. Ten patients (45% showed cytogenetic aberrations using FISH: 6q deletion in eight (37% and IGH rearrangement in four (18%. Two patients had both the 6q deletion and IGH rearrangement, and two had only the IGH rearrangement. Eleven patients (69% presented with the MYD88 L265P mutation. MYD88 mutations were significantly associated with the presence of 6q deletions (P=0.037. Six patients with the 6q deletion for whom sequencing was possible were found to harbor MYD88 mutations. The MYD88 L265P mutation was also associated with increased lymphocyte burden in BM biopsy. This is the first report of high frequency MYD88 L265P mutations in Korean WM patients.

  15. Total-Body Irradiation With or Without Fludarabine Phosphate Followed By Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Hematologic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-02

    Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Aggressive Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Hematopoietic and Lymphoid Cell Neoplasm; Indolent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm; Plasma Cell Myeloma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  16. Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) and smoldering (asymptomatic) multiple myeloma: IMWG consensus perspectives risk factors for progression and guidelines for monitoring and management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Kyle (Robert); B.G.M. Durie (Brian); S.V. Rajkumar (Vincent); O. Landgren; J. Bladé (Joan); G. Merlini; N. Kröger; H. Einsele (Hermann); D. Vesole (David); M.A. Dimopoulos (Meletios); J.F. San Miguel (Jesús Fernando); H. Avet-Loiseau; R. Hajek (Roman); W. Chen (Wei); K.C. Anderson (Kenneth Carl); H. Ludwig (Heinz); P. Sonneveld (Pieter); S. Pavlovsky; A. Palumbo (Antonio); P.G. Richardson; B. Barlogie (Bart); P. Greipp (Philip); R. Vescio (Robert); I. Turesson; J. Westin (Johan); M. Boccadoro (Mario)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractMonoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) was identified in 3.2% of 21 463 residents of Olmsted County, Minnesota, 50 years of age or older. The risk of progression to multiple myeloma, Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia, AL amyloidosis or a lymphoproliferative disorder is a

  17. Agatolimod Sodium, Rituximab, and Yttrium Y 90 Ibritumomab Tiuxetan in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-04

    Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  18. Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) and smoldering (asymptomatic) multiple myeloma: IMWG consensus perspectives risk factors for progression and guidelines for monitoring and management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Kyle (Robert); B.G.M. Durie (Brian); S.V. Rajkumar (Vincent); O. Landgren; J. Bladé (Joan); G. Merlini; N. Kröger; H. Einsele (Hermann); D. Vesole (David); M.A. Dimopoulos (Meletios); J.F. San Miguel (Jesús Fernando); H. Avet-Loiseau; R. Hajek (Roman); W. Chen (Wei); K.C. Anderson (Kenneth Carl); H. Ludwig (Heinz); P. Sonneveld (Pieter); S. Pavlovsky; A. Palumbo (Antonio); P.G. Richardson; B. Barlogie (Bart); P. Greipp (Philip); R. Vescio (Robert); I. Turesson; J. Westin (Johan); M. Boccadoro (Mario)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractMonoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) was identified in 3.2% of 21 463 residents of Olmsted County, Minnesota, 50 years of age or older. The risk of progression to multiple myeloma, Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia, AL amyloidosis or a lymphoproliferative disorder is a

  19. Guideline for the diagnosis, treatment and response criteria for Bing Neel syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minnema, Monique C; Kimby, Eva; D'Sa, Shirley; Fornecker, Luc-Matthieu; Poulain, Stéphanie; Snijders, Tom J; Kastritis, Efstathios; Kremer, Stéphane; Fitsiori, Aikaterini; Simon, Laurence; Davi, Frédéric; Lunn, Michael; Castillo, Jorge J; Patterson, Christopher J; Le Garff-Tavernier, Magali; Costopoulos, Myrto; Leblond, Véronique; Kersten, Marie-José; Dimopoulos, Meletios A; Treon, Steven P

    2017-01-01

    Bing Neel syndrome is a rare disease manifestation of Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia that results from infiltration of the central nervous system by malignant lymphoplasmacytic cells. In this guideline, we describe the clinical symptoms, as well as the appropriate laboratory and radiological studies

  20. Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) and smoldering (asymptomatic) multiple myeloma: IMWG consensus perspectives risk factors for progression and guidelines for monitoring and management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Kyle (Robert); B.G.M. Durie (Brian); S.V. Rajkumar (Vincent); O. Landgren; J. Bladé (Joan); G. Merlini; N. Kröger; H. Einsele (Hermann); D. Vesole (David); M.A. Dimopoulos (Meletios); J.F. San Miguel (Jesús Fernando); H. Avet-Loiseau; R. Hajek (Roman); W. Chen (Wei); K.C. Anderson (Kenneth Carl); H. Ludwig (Heinz); P. Sonneveld (Pieter); S. Pavlovsky; A. Palumbo (Antonio); P.G. Richardson; B. Barlogie (Bart); P. Greipp (Philip); R. Vescio (Robert); I. Turesson; J. Westin (Johan); M. Boccadoro (Mario)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractMonoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) was identified in 3.2% of 21 463 residents of Olmsted County, Minnesota, 50 years of age or older. The risk of progression to multiple myeloma, Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia, AL amyloidosis or a lymphoproliferative disorder is

  1. Modulation of the IL-6 Receptor α Underlies GLI2-Mediated Regulation of Ig Secretion in Waldenström Macroglobulinemia Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, David A; Smith, Timothy D; Amarsaikhan, Nansalmaa; Han, Weiguo; Neil, Matthew S; Boi, Shannon K; Vrabel, Anne M; Tolosa, Ezequiel J; Almada, Luciana L; Fernandez-Zapico, Martin E; Elsawa, Sherine F

    2015-09-15

    Ig secretion by terminally differentiated B cells is an important component of the immune response to foreign pathogens. Its overproduction is a defining characteristic of several B cell malignancies, including Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM), where elevated IgM is associated with significant morbidity and poor prognosis. Therefore, the identification and characterization of the mechanisms controlling Ig secretion are of great importance for the development of future therapeutic approaches for this disease. In this study, we define a novel pathway involving the oncogenic transcription factor GLI2 modulating IgM secretion by WM malignant cells. Pharmacological and genetic inhibition of GLI2 in WM malignant cells resulted in a reduction in IgM secretion. Screening for a mechanism identified the IL-6Rα (gp80) subunit as a downstream target of GLI2 mediating the regulation of IgM secretion. Using a combination of expression, luciferase, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays we demonstrate that GLI2 binds to the IL-6Rα promoter and regulates its activity as well as the expression of this receptor. Additionally, we were able to rescue the reduction in IgM secretion in the GLI2 knockdown group by overexpressing IL-6Rα, thus defining the functional significance of this receptor in GLI2-mediated regulation of IgM secretion. Interestingly, this occurred independent of Hedgehog signaling, a known regulator of GLI2, as manipulation of Hedgehog had no effect on IgM secretion. Given the poor prognosis associated with elevated IgM in WM patients, components of this new signaling axis could be important therapeutic targets.

  2. A mutation in MYD88 (L265P) supports the survival of lymphoplasmacytic cells by activation of Bruton tyrosine kinase in Waldenström macroglobulinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guang; Zhou, Yangsheng; Liu, Xia; Xu, Lian; Cao, Yang; Manning, Robert J; Patterson, Christopher J; Buhrlage, Sara J; Gray, Nathanael; Tai, Yu-Tzu; Anderson, Kenneth C; Hunter, Zachary R; Treon, Steven P

    2013-08-15

    Myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MYD88) L265P somatic mutation is highly prevalent in Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM) and supports malignant growth through nuclear factor κB (NF-κB). The signaling cascade(s) by which MYD88 L265P promotes NF-κB activation in WM remain unclear. By lentiviral knockdown or use of a MYD88 inhibitor, decreased phosphorylation of the NF-κB gatekeeper IκBα and survival occurred in MYD88 L265P-expressing WM cells. Conversely, WM cells engineered to overexpress MYD88 L265P showed enhanced survival. Coimmunoprecipitation studies identified Bruton tyrosine kinase (BTK) complexed to MYD88 in L265P-expressing WM cells, with preferential binding of MYD88 to phosphorylated BTK (pBTK). Increased pBTK was also observed in WM cells transduced to overexpress L265P vs wild-type MYD88. Importantly, MYD88 binding to BTK was abrogated following treatment of MYD88 L265P-expressing cells with a BTK kinase inhibitor. Inhibition of BTK or interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinase 1 and 4 (IRAK-1 and -4) kinase activity induced apoptosis of WM cells, and their combination resulted in more robust inhibition of NF-κB signaling and synergistic WM cell killing. The results establish BTK as a downstream target of MYD88 L265P signaling, and provide a framework for the study of BTK inhibitors alone, and in combination with IRAK inhibitors for the treatment of WM.

  3. Patterns of survival in lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma/Waldenström macroglobulinemia: a population-based study of 1,555 patients diagnosed in Sweden from 1980 to 2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristinsson, Sigurdur Y; Eloranta, Sandra; Dickman, Paul W; Andersson, Therese M-L; Turesson, Ingemar; Landgren, Ola; Björkholm, Magnus

    2013-01-01

    Clinical management of lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma (LPL)/Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM) has changed considerably over recent years, reflected in the use of new therapeutic agents (purine analogs, monoclonal antibodies, thalidomide- and bortezomib-based therapies). No population-based studies and few randomized trials have been performed to assess survival in newly diagnosed LPL/WM. We performed a large population-based study in Sweden including 1,555 LPL/WM patients diagnosed from 1980 to 2005. Relative survival ratios (RSRs) and excess mortality rate ratios (EMRR) were computed as measures of survival. Survival of LPL/WM patients has improved significantly (P = 0.007) over time with 5-year RSR = 0.57 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.46-0.68), 0.65 (0.57-0.73), 0.74 (0.68-0.80), 0.72 (0.66-0.77), and 0.78 (0.71-0.85) for patients diagnosed during the calendar periods 1980-1985, 1986-1990, 1991-1995, 1996-2000, and 2001-2005, respectively. Improvement in 1- and 5-year relative survival was found in all age groups and for LPL and WM separately. Patients with WM had lower excess mortality compared to LPL (EMRR = 0.38; 95% CI 0.30-0.48). Older age at diagnosis was associated with a poorer survival (P < 0.001). Taken together, we found a significant improvement in survival in LPL/WM over time. Despite this progress, new effective agents with a more favourable toxicity profile are needed to further improve survival in LPL/WM, especially in the elderly.

  4. Autologous Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant Followed by Donor Bone Marrow Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Hodgkin Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, Multiple Myeloma, or Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-17

    B-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Plasma Cell Leukemia; Progression of Multiple Myeloma or Plasma Cell Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Plasma Cell Myeloma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Plasma Cell Myeloma; Refractory Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; T-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  5. Graft-Versus-Host Disease Prophylaxis in Treating Patients With Hematologic Malignancies Undergoing Unrelated Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-18

    Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Aggressive Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Hematopoietic and Lymphoid Cell Neoplasm; Indolent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Myeloproliferative Neoplasm; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Plasma Cell Myeloma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; T-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  6. Fludarabine Phosphate, Cyclophosphamide, Total-Body Irradiation, and Donor Bone Marrow Transplant Followed by Donor Natural Killer Cell Therapy, Mycophenolate Mofetil, and Tacrolimus in Treating Patients With Hematologic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-06

    Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Aggressive Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Recurrent Indolent Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Plasma Cell Myeloma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Plasma Cell Myeloma; Refractory Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  7. Clues to pathogenesis of Waldenström macroglobulinemia and immunoglobulin M monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance provided by analysis of immunoglobulin heavy chain gene rearrangement and clustering of B-cell receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varettoni, Marzia; Zibellini, Silvia; Capello, Daniela; Arcaini, Luca; Rossi, Davide; Pascutto, Cristiana; Rattotti, Sara; Mangiacavalli, Silvia; Pochintesta, Lara; Gotti, Manuel; Gaidano, Gianluca; Cazzola, Mario

    2013-11-01

    We characterized immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH) gene rearrangements and searched for clusters of stereotyped B-cell receptors in 123 patients with Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM; n = 59) or immunoglobulin M monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (IgM-MGUS) (n = 64). A productive monoclonal IGHV-D-J rearrangement was obtained in 99/123 patients (80%). Immunoglobulin heavy chain variable (IGHV) genes were mutated in 94/99 patients (95%) with a median somatic hypermutation rate of 6.7% (2.1-14.5). Compared with the normal B-cell repertoire, patients with WM/IgM-MGUS showed an over-representation of the IGHV3 subgroup (83% vs. 55%, p < 0.0001) and an under-representation of IGHV1 (7% vs. 14%, p = 0.04) and IGHV4 (7% vs. 23%, p = 0.0001) subgroups. At the gene level, in WM/IgM-MGUS there was an over-representation of IGHV3-23 (24% vs. 12%, p = 0.0003), IGHV3-64 (3% vs. < 1%, p = 0.003), IGHV3-7 (12% vs. 4%, p = 0.0001) and IGHV3-74 (9% vs. 2%, p < 0.0001), while IGHV4-39 was never used (0 vs. 5%, p = 0.03). Intra-WM/IgM-MGUS search for HCDR3 similarity showed no association fulfilling criteria for stereotyped receptors. WM/IgM-MGUS sequences were unrelated to known chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), splenic marginal zone lymphoma (SMZL) or mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) subsets. In conclusion, the IGHV gene usage in WM and IgM-MGUS is remarkably biased as compared to the normal B-cell repertoire. WM and IgM-MGUS-specific HCDR3 clusters do not occur with a frequency detectable with currently available databases, not supporting a B-cell receptor-driven pathogenesis in WM and IgM-MGUS.

  8. Sirolimus, Cyclosporine, and Mycophenolate Mofetil in Preventing Graft-versus-Host Disease in Treating Patients With Hematologic Malignancies Undergoing Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-06

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Adult Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Adult Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Aggressive Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large B -Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Hematopoietic and Lymphoid Cell Neoplasm; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Plasma Cell Myeloma; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; T-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; T-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  9. Pembrolizumab Alone or With Idelalisib or Ibrutinib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Other Low-Grade B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-02

    Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Refractory Follicular Lymphoma; Refractory Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma; Refractory Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Refractory Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Richter Syndrome; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  10. Everolimus and Lenalidomide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin or Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-18

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  11. Hepatitis B Associated Monoclonal Gammopathy That Resolved after Successful Liver Transplant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Sreenivasan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS has been most commonly associated with diseases like multiple myeloma, Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia, primary systemic amyloidosis, HIV, and other lymphoproliferative disorders. There has been an isolated report of MGUS in patients coinfected with HIV and Hepatitis B, as the work by Amara et al. in 2006. Here, we report a case of IgA-kappa light chain gammopathy secondary to Hepatitis B infection, which resolved after liver transplantation. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of M protein spike seen in the context of Hepatitis B infection only.

  12. Tei index might be the unique echocardiographic parameter that detects hyperviscosity syndrome: A case report

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    Boban Marko

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Hyperviscosity syndromes are disorders of infrequent prevalence in which changes of rheological characteristics cause increased resistance to blood flow, endothelial dysfunction, tissue ischemia and bleeding. Signs of hyperviscosity syndrome become clinically overt at the point of 4 centipoise units. We present a case of patient with hyperviscosity syndrome due to Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia with negative records on earlier cardiovascular illnesses. Laboratory diagnostic and standard echocardiography did not show any deviation towards increased cardiovascular risk, heart failure or ischemic heart disease. However, unique clinically significant change that could be indirectly related to hyperviscosity syndrome was found with the myocardium performance index (MPI. Tei-index showed median value of 0.75 corresponding to severe grades of myocardial dysfunction earlier described in the literature for other entities. Comprehensive roles of rheological changes in relation to echocardiography, pathophysiology of myocardial performance and cardiovascular continuum might be interesting point for further investigations.

  13. Leukocytoclastic Vasculitis in a Patient with Type 1 Cryoglobulinemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Y. Liu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous manifestations of type 1 cryoglobulinemia are usually related to vascular occlusion by noninflammatory thrombosis; rarely is leukocytoclastic vasculitis seen in type 1 cryoglobulinemia. We report the case of a 64-year-old male who presented with isolated cutaneous leukocytoclastic vasculitis that was initially attributed to essential mixed cryoglobulinemia after thorough diagnostic evaluation. A lack of adequate clinical response to therapy prompted further investigation, including cryoprecipitate electrophoresis and immunofixation, which revealed an IgM kappa monoclonal gammopathy consistent with type 1 cryoglobulinemia. A renewed search for an underlying malignancy led to the discovery of early Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia. Although leukocytoclastic vasculitis is more characteristic of mixed cryoglobulinemia, it can be a presenting manifestation of type 1 cryoglobulinemia.

  14. Discovering the meaning of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance: current knowledge, future challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palladino, C; Bruno, B; Boccadoro, M

    2014-01-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) is a non malignant plasma cell disorder with a relatively low risk of progression to Multiple Myeloma (MM) and to related Plasma cells disordes (lymphoplasmacellular neoplasms, Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia or light chain amyloidosis). It is a quite common finding, especially in the population above the age of 50 and it can also present in association with many non malignant conditions. Differential diagnosis of symptomatic and asymptomatic forms is the determinant for starting therapy. Over the last few years many advances in the understanding of the biology of MGUS, together with large epidemiological studies, allowed to define risk models to estimate the risk of progression to MM according to MGUS isotype and, more recently, to peculiar flow cytometry findings. The goal of many recent studies aims at evaluating individual patients and their overall risk of progression, the detection of early signs of progression and the development of timely treatment strategies.

  15. Inherited polymorphisms in hyaluronan synthase 1 predict risk of systemic B-cell malignancies but not of breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemalatha Kuppusamy

    Full Text Available Genetic variations in the hyaluronan synthase 1 gene (HAS1 influence HAS1 aberrant splicing. HAS1 is aberrantly spliced in malignant cells from multiple myeloma (MM and Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia (WM, but not in their counterparts from healthy donors. The presence of aberrant HAS1 splice variants predicts for poor survival in multiple myeloma (MM. We evaluated the influence of inherited HAS1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP on the risk of having a systemic B cell malignancy in 1414 individuals compromising 832 patients and 582 healthy controls, including familial analysis of an Icelandic kindred. We sequenced HAS1 gene segments from 181 patients with MM, 98 with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS, 72 with Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia (WM, 169 with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL, as well as 34 members of a monoclonal gammopathy-prone Icelandic family, 212 age-matched healthy donors and a case-control cohort of 295 breast cancer patients with 353 healthy controls. Three linked single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP in HAS1 intron3 are significantly associated with B-cell malignancies (range p = 0.007 to p = 10(-5, but not MGUS or breast cancer, and predict risk in a 34 member Icelandic family (p = 0.005, Odds Ratio = 5.8 (OR, a relatively homogeneous cohort. In contrast, exon3 SNPs were not significantly different among the study groups. Pooled analyses showed a strong association between the linked HAS1 intron3 SNPs and B-cell malignancies (OR = 1.78, but not for sporadic MGUS or for breast cancer (OR<1.0. The minor allele genotypes of HAS1 SNPs are significantly more frequent in MM, WM, CLL and in affected members of a monoclonal gammopathy-prone family than they are in breast cancer, sporadic MGUS or healthy donors. These inherited changes may increase the risk for systemic B-cell malignancies but not for solid tumors.

  16. Infiltración orbitaria en la macroglobulinemia de Waldenström

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    Felipe Costales-Mier

    2016-03-01

    Conclusiones: Es importante tener en cuenta esta complicación en la MW. Las pruebas de imagen son de utilidad, aunque el diagnóstico definitivo es anatomo-patológico e inmunohistoquímico, acompañado de afectación sistémica y niveles elevados de IgM.

  17. Immunophenotypic features by multiparameter flow cytometry can help distinguish low grade B-cell lymphomas with plasmacytic differentiation from plasma cell proliferative disorders with an unrelated clonal B-cell process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosado, Flavia G; Morice, William G; He, Rong; Howard, Matthew T; Timm, Michael; McPhail, Ellen D

    2015-05-01

    Highly sensitive flow cytometry studies may incidentally identify B cell clones when used to assess plasma cell clonality in bone marrows. Clinical history, which can help differentiate related clones (low grade B cell lymphoma with plasmacytic differentiation/LBCL-PD) from unrelated ones (plasma cell proliferative disorder (PCPD) with an unrelated B cell clone), is often unavailable in referred specimens. We sought to identify morphologic or phenotypic features that would help predict the significance of these clones in the absence of history. We included only cases with identical light chain B and plasma cell clones, as determined by 6-color flow cytometry with additional DNA ploidy analysis, in which the relationship between clones could be established by review of medical records. There were 26 cases; 18 were related (14 were Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia) and eight were unrelated (seven multiple myeloma). Features seen exclusively in LBCL-PD include CD19+/CD45+ clonal plasma cell phenotype (66·7%, P = 0·0022) and morphologic features such as paratrabecular bone marrow involvement, increased mast cells, and plasma cells surrounding B-cell nodules. Aneuploidy was identified exclusively in PCPD cases (75%, P = 0·000028). We conclude that CD19+/CD45+ clonal plasma cell phenotype and aneuploidy are useful in distinguishing related clones (LBCL-PD) from unrelated clones (PCPD).

  18. Hemorrhagic cystitis; an old story with new advancements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Yildirim

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Cyclophosphamide (CP, an oxazaphosphorine alkylating agent introduced in 1958, is widely used in the treatment of solid tumors and B-cell malignant disease, such as lymphoma, myeloma, chronic lymphocytic leukemia and Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia. Furthermore, CP and ifosfamide, a synthetic analogue of CP, have had an increasing role in the treatment of nonneoplastic diseases, such as thrombocytopenic purpura, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosis, nephritic syndrome, and Wegener granulomatosis, and as a conditioner before bone marrow transplantation. Soon after their discovery, as early as 1960, the first side-effects of CP were reported by Coggins and co-workers. These side-effects have been reported as transient irritative voiding symptoms, including urinary frequency, dysuria, urgency, suprapubic discomfort and strangury with microhematuria as well as life-threatening hemorrhagic cystitis. Bladder fibrosis, necrosis, contracture, and vesicoureteral reflux also have been reported. Hemorrhage usually occurs during or immediately after treatment, whether with short-term high or long-term low dosages. In 1981, Brock et al have documented that... [J Exp Integr Med 2012; 2(2.000: 93-94

  19. High serum levels of extracellular vesicles expressing malignancy-related markers are released in patients with various types of hematological neoplastic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caivano, Antonella; Laurenzana, Ilaria; De Luca, Luciana; La Rocca, Francesco; Simeon, Vittorio; Trino, Stefania; D'Auria, Fiorella; Traficante, Antonio; Maietti, Maddalena; Izzo, Tiziana; D'Arena, Giovanni; Mansueto, Giovanna; Pietrantuono, Giuseppe; Laurenti, Luca; Musto, Pellegrino; Del Vecchio, Luigi

    2015-12-01

    Many cell types release extracellular vesicles (EVs), including exosomes, microvesicles (MVs), and apoptotic bodies, which play a role in physiology and diseases. Presence and phenotype of circulating EVs in hematological malignancies (HMs) remain largely unexplored.The aim of this study was to characterize EVs in peripheral blood of HM patients compared to healthy subjects (controls). We isolated serum EVs from patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia (WM), Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL), multiple myeloma (MM), acute myeloid leukemia (AML), myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs), myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), and controls. EVs were isolated from serum of peripheral blood by ultracentrifuge steps and analyzed by flow cytometry to define count, size, and immunophenotype. MV levels were significantly elevated in WM, HL, MM, AML, and some MPNs and, though at a lesser degree, in CLL and NHL as compared to healthy controls. HL, MM, and MPNs generated a population of MVs characterized by lower size (below 0.3 μm) when compared to controls. MVs from patients specifically expressed tumor-related antigens, such as CD19 in B cell neoplasms, CD38 in MM, CD13 in myeloid tumors, and CD30 in HL. Both total and antigen-specific count of MVs significantly correlated with different HM clinical features such as Rai stage in CLL, International Prognostic Scoring System in WM, International Staging System in MM, and clinical stage in HL. MVs may represent a novel biomarker in HMs.

  20. Are neurological complications of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance underestimated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Normann; Schwärzler, Angelika; Göbel, Georg; Löscher, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) is a premalignancy preceding multiple myeloma (MM) or related disorders. Neurological symptoms caused by the monoclonal immunoglobulins or free light-chains are often associated with a high morbidity. We analyzed the prevalence of neuropathy, clinical features and the long-term outcome in 223 patients (pts.) with MGUS. Patients and Methods Between 1/2005 and 3/2015, 223 adult pts. with MGUS were identified in our database. Results In36/223 pts. (16%) a neuropathy was diagnosed (MGUS associated neuropathy, MGUS-N). 20 pts. (55%) had a distal symmetric axonal neuropathy, 10 pts. (28%) had a chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy and 6 pts (17%) a distal acquired demyelinating symmetric polyneuropathy. In MGUS-NN (without neuropathy) and in MGUS-N, progression to smoldering MM, MM or Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia (WM) occurred in 17% of the pts. The Immunoglobulin subtype was predominantly IgG in MGUS-NN and IgM in MGUS-N and ≥5.5% plasma cells in the bone-marrow predicted progression to MM and AL-amyloidosis in MGUS-NN and to WM in MGUS-N (p<0.05). Conclusion Due to the substantial prevalence of neuropathies, MGUS pts. should be monitored carefully and referred to a specialized center if neurological symptoms occur. PMID:27974705

  1. Alisertib in Combination With Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Recurrent Hodgkin Lymphoma, B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, or Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-12

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Cutaneous B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-Cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Lymphomatous Involvement of Non-Cutaneous Extranodal Site; Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides and Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestinal Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-Cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  2. APRIL is overexpressed in cancer: link with tumor progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veyrune Jean-Luc

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background BAFF and APRIL share two receptors – TACI and BCMA – and BAFF binds to a third receptor, BAFF-R. Increased expression of BAFF and APRIL is noted in hematological malignancies. BAFF and APRIL are essential for the survival of normal and malignant B lymphocytes, and altered expression of BAFF or APRIL or of their receptors (BCMA, TACI, or BAFF-R have been reported in various B-cell malignancies including B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, Hodgkin's lymphoma, multiple myeloma, and Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia. Methods We compared the expression of BAFF, APRIL, TACI and BAFF-R gene expression in 40 human tumor types – brain, epithelial, lymphoid, germ cells – to that of their normal tissue counterparts using publicly available gene expression data, including the Oncomine Cancer Microarray database. Results We found significant overexpression of TACI in multiple myeloma and thyroid carcinoma and an association between TACI expression and prognosis in lymphoma. Furthermore, BAFF and APRIL are overexpressed in many cancers and we show that APRIL expression is associated with tumor progression. We also found overexpression of at least one proteoglycan with heparan sulfate chains (HS, which are coreceptors for APRIL and TACI, in tumors where APRIL is either overexpressed or is a prognostic factor. APRIL could induce survival or proliferation directly through HS proteoglycans. Conclusion Taken together, these data suggest that APRIL is a potential prognostic factor for a large array of malignancies.

  3. Impact of pomalidomide therapy in multiple myeloma: a recent survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Arvind; Porwal, Mayur; Verma, Ankita; Mishra, Arun K

    2014-12-01

    Pomalidomide (Pomalyst(®)) is a synthetic compound derived by modifying the chemical structure of thalidomide to improve its potency and reduce its side effects and third drug in the class of immunomodulatory drugs. Pomalidomide is under global development with Celgene Corporation, was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration on February 8, 2013 to treat patients with relapsed and refractory multiple myeloma (MM) who have received at least two prior therapies including bortezomib and lenalidomide. In October 2009, it has found orphan designation for the treatment of relapsed and refractory MM by the EMA, and on August 2013, marketing authorization has issued in Europe by gaining a positive response. It inhibits myeloma cell growth and angiogenesis directly. Pomalidomide is the latest myeloma cell growth inhibitor to be approved in both USA and EU. The predominant side effects are thrombocytopenia, neuropathy, and deep vein thrombosis. Pomalidomide is also being investigated in patients with amyloidosis, prostate cancer, small cell lung cancer, pancreatic cancer, graft-versus-host disease, and Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia. This article reviews the available information on pomalidomide with respect to its clinical pharmacology, mechanism of action, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, metabolism, pre-clinical studies, and clinical trials.

  4. 重视浆细胞疾病的临床研究%Pay attention to the clinical study of plasma cell disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈世伦

    2009-01-01

    浆细胞病(包括多发性骨髓瘤、意义未明的单克隆免疫球蛋白血症、华氏巨球蛋白血症、淀粉样变性、POEMS综合征等)是血液系统常见的恶性疾病,发病率逐年增高.深入地研究该病的临床过程,制订合理的治疗方法 是延长患者生存期,改善预后的重要途径.%Plasma cell dyscrasia including multiple myeloma, monoelonal gammopathy of undetermined significance(MGUS), Waldenstrom s macroglobulinemia, amyloidosis and POEMS syndrome is a common malignant disease of hematological system and its incidence is increased by year. Deeply study the clinical process of this kind of disease and make reasonable therapies is an important approach for extending the life span and improving the prognosis of patients.

  5. An Autopsy Case of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis with Waldenström Macroglobulinemia and Anti-MAG Gammopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snejana Jurici

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 71-year-old woman with typical signs of bulbar amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS associated with immunoglobulin M (IgM monoclonal gammopathy and anti-MAG (myelin-associated glycoprotein antibodies. This unusual association between ALS and anti-MAG antibodies has previously been reported in a single case. Our present case, at neuropathological examination, demonstrated no causative link between anti-MAG antibodies and ALS.

  6. Angioedema with normal C1q and C1 inhibitor: an atypical presentation of Waldenström macroglobulinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanfar, Anas; Trikha, Anita; Bonds, Rana; Jana, Bagi

    2013-05-01

    Angioedema is a recurrent, non-pitting, non-pruritic, transitory swelling due to transient increase of endothelial permeability in the capillaries of the deep cutaneous and mucosal layers. Angioedema is generally categorized based on etiology, and characteristic lab findings are associated with each category. Cases of acquired angioedema associated with myeloproliferative disorders have been described in the literature, but these have been associated with a characteristic low C1q, a defining laboratory finding in acquired angioedema. Here we present a case of 68-year-old female with acquired angioedema that was not associated with low C1q, but was found to have Waldenström disease. Her angioedema responded dramatically to combination therapy consisting of bortezomib, rituximab, and dexamethasone.

  7. Survival outcomes of secondary cancers in patients with Waldenström macroglobulinemia: An analysis of the SEER database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Jorge J; Olszewski, Adam J; Kanan, Sandra; Meid, Kirsten; Hunter, Zachary R; Treon, Steven P

    2015-08-01

    We hypothesized that survival outcomes of WM patients who develop SM is distinct from the general population of individuals who develop those same malignancies. Using the SEER-18 data (2000-2011), we identified patients with cancers of the breast, prostate, lung, colorectum, bladder, melanoma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), and acute leukemia, and compared their outcomes according to having antecedent WM or not. The outcome of interest was overall survival (OS), which was analyzed in proportional-hazard models adjusted for age, sex, race, and stage. We found that patients with WM who developed SM were older than population controls with those same cancers. In the multivariate analysis, WM cases with colorectal cancer (HR 1.97; P < 0.001), melanoma (HR 2.63; P < 0.001) and NHL (HR = 1.35; P = 0.02) had worse OS than controls with those respective cancers. WM patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma also had worse OS (HR = 1.86; P = 0.008). The utilization of surgery and radiation was similar between WM cases and controls, except lower rates of prostatectomy and melanoma surgery among WM patients. The survival of WM patients with colorectal cancer, melanoma, and NHL is worse than among general population controls, arguing in favor of age-appropriate cancer screening.

  8. Therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia following fludarabine combination chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, D A; Westerman, D A; Tam, C S; Milner, A; Prince, H M; Kenealy, M; Wolf, M; Januszewicz, E H; Ritchie, D; Came, N; Seymour, J F

    2010-12-01

    Fludarabine combination chemotherapy achieves high response rates in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and indolent lymphoma. The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence and characteristics of treatment-related myelodysplasia and acute myeloid leukemia (t-MDS/AML) after treatment with fludarabine in combination for lymphoproliferative disorders and identify risk factors for its development. In all, 176 patients treated with fludarabine combination were followed for a median of 41 months (range 6-125 months). In all, 19 cases of t-MDS/AML have been identified for an overall rate of 10.8%. Median overall survival post-t-MDS/AML diagnosis was 11 months. Patients developing t-MDS/AML included 11/54 with follicular lymphoma (FL) (crude rate 20.4%), 5/82 with CLL (6.1%) and 3/24 with Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia or marginal zone lymphoma (12.5%). Most patients had other cytotoxic treatments (median 4, range 0-7) but three with FL had fludarabine combination as their only line of treatment. Of the eleven patients (6.3%) who received mitoxantrone with their first fludarabine combination, four (36.4%) developed t-MDS/AML (P=0.007). There was a trend toward prior cytotoxic therapy increasing the risk for t-MDS/AML (P=0.067). Fludarabine combination chemotherapy is associated with a moderate risk of t-MDS/AML particularly when combined with mitoxantrone. This complication should be considered when evaluating the potential benefit of this treatment in lymphoproliferative disorders.

  9. Phase I Trial of Bortezomib (PS-341; NSC 681239) and “Non-Hybrid “(Bolus) Infusion Schedule of Alvocidib (Flavopiridol; NSC 649890) in Patients with Recurrent or Refractory Indolent B-cell Neoplasms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holkova, Beata; Kmieciak, Maciej; Perkins, E. Brent; Bose, Prithviraj; Baz, Rachid C.; Roodman, G. David; Stuart, Robert K.; Ramakrishnan, Viswanathan; Wan, Wen; Peer, Cody J; Dawson, Jana; Kang, Loveleen; Honeycutt, Connie; Tombes, Mary Beth; Shrader, Ellen; Weir-Wiggins, Caryn; Wellons, Martha; Sankala, Heidi; Hogan, Kevin T.; Colevas, A. Dimitrios; Doyle, L. Austin; Figg, William D.; Coppola, Domenico; Roberts, John D.; Sullivan, Daniel; Grant, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This phase I study was conducted to determine the dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) and maximum tolerated dose (MTD) for the combination of bortezomib and alvocidib in patients with B-cell malignancies (multiple myeloma [MM], indolent lymphoma, Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia, and mantle cell lymphoma). Experimental Design Patients received bortezomib (intravenous push), followed by alvocidib (1-hour infusion), on days 1, 4, 8, and 11 of a 21-day treatment cycle. Patients experiencing responses or stable disease continued on treatment at the investigator's discretion. A standard 3+3 dose-escalation design was used to identify the MTD based on DLTs, and pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies were conducted. Results A total of 44 patients were enrolled, with 39 patients assessed for response. The MTD was established as 1.3 mg/m2 for bortezomib and 40 mg/m2 for alvocidib. The most common hematologic toxicities included leukopenia, lymphopenia, neutropenia, and thrombocytopenia. The most common non-hematologic toxicities included diarrhea, fatigue, and sensory neuropathy. Three complete remissions (8%) and 10 partial remissions (26%) were observed for a total response rate of 33%. Pharmacokinetic findings with the current dosing regimen were consistent with the comparable literature and the hybrid dosing regimen. Pharmacodynamic study results did not correlate with clinical responses. Conclusions The combination of bortezomib and alvocidib is tolerable and an MTD has been established for this schedule. The regimen appears to be efficacious in patients with relapsed/refractory MM or indolent non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. As the non-hybrid regimen is less cumbersome than the previous hybrid dosing schedule regimen, the current schedule is recommended for successor studies. PMID:25248382

  10. Treatment of immune-mediated, dysimmune neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finsterer, J

    2005-08-01

    This review focuses on the actual status and recent advances in the treatment of immune-mediated neuropathies, including: Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS) with its subtypes acute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, acute motor axonal neuropathy, acute motor and sensory axonal neuropathy, Miller Fisher syndrome, and acute pandysautonomia; chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) with its subtypes classical CIDP, CIDP with diabetes, CIDP/monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), sensory CIDP, multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN), multifocal acquired demyelinating sensory and motor neuropathy or Lewis-Sumner syndrome, multifocal acquired sensory and motor neuropathy, and distal acquired demyelinating sensory neuropathy; IgM monoclonal gammopathies with its subtypes Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia, myelin-associated glycoprotein-associated gammopathy, polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, M-protein, skin changes syndrome, mixed cryoglobulinemia, gait ataxia, late-onset polyneuropathy syndrome, and MGUS. Concerning the treatment of GBS, there is no significant difference between intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG), plasma exchange or plasma exchange followed by IVIG. Because of convenience and absent invasiveness, IVIG are usually preferred. In treating CIDP corticosteroids, IVIG, or plasma exchange are equally effective. Despite the high costs and relative lack of availability, IVIG are preferentially used. For the one-third of patients, who does not respond, other immunosuppressive options are available. In MMN IVIG are the treatment of choice. Inadequate response in 20% of the patients requires adjunctive immunosuppressive therapies. Neuropathies with IgM monoclonal gammopathy may respond to various chemotherapeutic agents, although the long-term effects are unknown. In addition, such treatment may be associated with serious side effects. Recent data support the use of rituximab, a monoclonal antibody against the B

  11. Immunophenotypic analysis of abnormal plasma cell clones in bone marrow of primary systemic light chain amyloidosis patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Yang; Wang Mangju; Chen Yan; Chen Xue; Fang Fang; Liu Shiqin; Zhang Ying

    2014-01-01

    Background Primary systemic light chain amyloidosis (AL) is a rare plasma cell disease,our purpose was to analyze the immunophenotypic characteristics of the plasma cells in bone marrow in AL patients,and explore whether the detection of abnormal plasma cell clones in bone marrow by flow cytometry (FCM) could be used as an important indicator of AL diagnosis.Methods Fresh bone marrow samples were collected from 51 AL,21 multiple myeloma (MM),and 5 Waldenstr(o)m's macroglobulinemia (WM) patients.The immunophenotype of bone marrow cells were analyzed and compared by FCM using a panel of antibodies including CD45,CD38,CD138,CD117,CD56,and CD19.Results In AL,light chain restriction could be identified in 31 cases (60.9%),in which the λ light chain restriction was found in 24 cases (77.4%).In MM,κ light chain restriction was found in 13 cases (61.9%),and λ light chain restriction in eight cases.CD45 on abnormal plasma cells was negative to weakly positive in both AL and MM,but was positive to strongly positive in WM.In the bone marrow plasma cells of the 51 AL,78.4% were CD56+,68.6% were CD117+,and 88.2% were CD19-.While in the 21 MM cases,66.7% were CD56+,38.1% were CD117+,and 90.4% were CD19-.The plasmacytoid lymphocytes in the five WM patients were CD19+ and CD56-,CD117-.Conclusion Detection of abnormal plasma cell clones in bone marrow by FCM is valuable for the diagnosis of AL.

  12. Single-Cell Analysis and Next-Generation Immuno-Sequencing Show That Multiple Clones Persist in Patients with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitra Kriangkum

    Full Text Available The immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH gene rearrangement in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL provides a unique molecular signature; however, we demonstrate that 26/198 CLL patients (13% had more than one IGH rearrangement, indicating the power of molecular technology over phenotypic analysis. Single-cell PCR analysis and next-generation immuno-sequencing identified IGH-defined clones. In 23% (18/79 of cases whose clones carried unmutated immunoglobulin heavy chain variable (IGHV genes (U-CLL, IGH rearrangements were bialleic with one productive (P and one non-productive (NP allele. Two U-CLL were biclonal, each clone being monoallelic (P. In 119 IGHV-mutated (M-CLL cases, one had biallelic rearrangements in their CLL (P/NP and five had 2-4 distinct clones. Allelic exclusion was maintained in all B-clones analyzed. Based on single-cell PCR analysis, 5/11 partner clones (45% reached levels of >5x10(9 cells/L, suggesting second CLL clones. Partner clones persisted over years. Conventional IGH characterization and next-generation sequencing of 13 CLL, 3 multiple myeloma, 2 Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia and 3 age-matched healthy donors consistently identified the same rearranged IGH sequences. Most multiple clones occurred in M-CLL, perhaps indicative of weak clonal dominance, thereby associating with a good prognosis. In contrast, biallelic CLL occurred primarily in U-CLL thus being associated with poor prognosis. Extending beyond intra-clonal diversity, molecular analysis of clonal evolution and apparent subclones in CLL may also reflect inter-clonal diversity.

  13. Lenalidomide After Donor Bone Marrow Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Hematologic Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-26

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21); (q22; q22.1); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22.3;q23.3); MLLT3-KMT2A; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With PML-RARA; Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-Cell Lymphoma; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-Cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Lymphomatous Involvement of Non-Cutaneous Extranodal Site; Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides and Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Richter Syndrome; Small Intestinal Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-Cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  14. Nursing care of a case with macroglobulinemia%1例原发性巨球蛋白血症病人护理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    季红; 赵庆英

    2008-01-01

    @@ 原发性巨球蛋白血症 (walden-strommacroglobinemia,WM)是指血中出现异常增多的免疫球蛋白M[1].系单克隆的B淋巴细胞恶性增殖,以具有合成和分泌免疫球蛋白M(IgM)能力的淋巴细胞样浆细胞骨髓浸润为特征.本病发病率低,但误诊率高.我院收治1例以右食指动脉栓塞为首诊的WM病人, 经过积极治疗,好转出院.现将护理体会介绍如下. 1 病例介绍

  15. Anti-interleukin-1 alpha autoantibodies in humans: Characterization, isotype distribution, and receptor-binding inhibition--higher frequency in Schnitzler's syndrome (urticaria and macroglobulinemia)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saurat, J.H.; Schifferli, J.; Steiger, G.; Dayer, J.M.; Didierjean, L. (Department of Dermatology, University Hospital, Geneva (Switzerland))

    1991-08-01

    Since autoantibodies (Abs) to cytokines may modify their biologic activities, high-affinity binding factors for interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1 alpha BF) were characterized in human sera. IL-1 alpha BF was identified as IgG (1) by sucrose density-gradient centrifugation followed by immunodiffusion autoradiography, (2) by ligand-blotting method, (3) by ligand binding to affinity-immobilized serum IgG, and (4) by IgG affinity purification followed by sucrose density-gradient centrifugation. IL-1 alpha binding activity resided in the F(ab)2 fragment. The apparent equilibrium constant was in the range of IgG found after immunization with conventional antigens (i.e., 10(-9) to 10(-10) mol/L). Anti-IL-1 alpha IgG auto-Abs represented only an extremely small fraction of total IgG (less than 1/10(-5)). Some sera with IL-1 alpha BF and purified IgG thereof were able to inhibit by 96% to 98% the binding of human recombinant IL-1 alpha to its receptor on murine thymoma EL4-6.1 cells, whereas other sera did not. When 125I-labeled anti-IL-1 alpha IgG complexes were injected into rats, they prolonged the plasma half-life of 125I-labeled IL-1 alpha several fold and altered its tissue distribution. The predominant class was IgG (12/19), mainly IgG4 (9/19), but in five of the sera, anti-IL-1 alpha IgA was also detected. In a screening of 271 sera, IL-1 alpha BF was detected in 17/98 normal subjects and was not more frequent in several control groups of patients, except in patients with Schnitzler's syndrome (fever, chronic urticaria, bone pain, and monoclonal IgM paraprotein) (6/9; p less than 0.005). The pathologic significance of these auto-Abs remains to be determined.

  16. If it is in the marrow, is it also in the blood? An analysis of 1,000 paired samples from patients with B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pruneri Giancarlo

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Staging of B-cell non Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL routinely involves bone marrow (BM examination by trephine biopsy (BM-TB. The evidence of disease in the BM-TB results in a clinical stage IV classification affecting therapeutic strategies for NHL patients. BM immunophenotyping by flow cytometry (FC is also used, although its clinical value is still under debate. Methods Using FC we analyzed 1,000 paired BM aspirates and peripheral blood (PB samples from 591 NHL patients to investigate the concordance between BM and PB. B-lymphocytes were defined monoclonal when a ratio of 0.3 3 was observed. Aberrant immunophenotypes present in the B-cell subpopulation were also investigated. BM-TB was also performed in 84.1% of samples (841/1000, and concordance between BM-TB and BM-FC was evaluated. Concordance was defined as the presence of a positive (in terms of disease detection or negative result in both BM-FC and PB-FC or BM-TB and BM-FC. Results Using FC, the overall concordance between BM and PB was 95%. Among the discordant cases (ie presence of neoplastic B-lymphocyte in the BM but under the sensibility of the technique in the PB the most frequent diagnosis was Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia (WM, accounting for 20.8% of all discordant cases. The expression of CXCR4, a receptor involved in B-cell trafficking and homing, was found to be down regulated in WM compared to other NHL types, thus suggesting a possible role of CXCR4 in WM cell homing in the BM. WM excluded, FC investigation of BM and PB in NHL patients gives overlapping information. BM involvement was observed by FC in 38% of samples, and concordance between BM-FC and BM-TB was 85%. Conclusions The finding that FC data from BM and PB samples overlap in NHL might have major implications for the design of future clinical studies and for patients' follow-up.

  17. High-Dose Busulfan and High-Dose Cyclophosphamide Followed By Donor Bone Marrow Transplant in Treating Patients With Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Multiple Myeloma, or Recurrent Hodgkin or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-05

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  18. Clinical, laboratory, and morphological characteristics of kidney damage in lymphoproliferative disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. T. Dzhumabaeva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Kidney involvement in the onset of lymphoproliferative diseases (LPD detected rarely, observed mainly at tumor progression or relapse.Objective: to determine the clinical and morphological features of kidney damage in the initial manifestation of LPD.Materials and methods: 19 patients with LPD and kidney damage were included in the study. The diagnosis of non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas was established according to 2008 WHO classification. Histological and immunohistochemical, immunofluorescent and electron microscopic studies of nephrobiopsy have been performed.Results. Patients were aged 46-83 years (median 63 years, of which 13 were men and 6 women. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia / small cell lymphocytic lymphoma was established in 12 patients, marginal zone lymphoma – in 4 pts, follicular lymphoma – in 1 patient, Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia – in 1 patient and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL in 1 patient. Proteinuria was observed in 18 patients, microhematuria – in 6 pts, arterial hypertension – in 8 pts, nephrotic syndrome – in 3 pts and renal failure in 18 patients. The mean creatinine level was 330.9 ± 52.3 µmol/L, the average glomerular filtration rate was 25.7 ± 12.9 ml/min. Monoclonal IgMκ secretion was detected in 6 patients, BJκ protein – in 9 pts, increased free light chain level – in 4 pts, cryoglobulin – in 4 pts (type II cryoglobulin in 3 of them, type I – in 1 patient.Morphological study of nephrobiopsy revealed tumor lymphoid infiltration of kidney interstitium in 10 (52.6 % cases. Diffuse small cell lymphoid proliferation was detected in 1 patient, local infiltration – in 9 pts, in 3 of them in combination with glomerulonephritis, and in 4 cases with kidney carcinoma. Local large cell lymphoid proliferation was found in 1 patient with DLBCL. Amyloidosis was detected in 2 pts and thrombotic microangiopathy – in 2 patients. Glomerulopathy was revealed in 10 patients (52.6 %: mesangioproliferative

  19. Fludarabine Phosphate, Melphalan, and Low-Dose Total-Body Irradiation Followed by Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Hematologic Malignancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-26

    Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Myelofibrosis; Severe Combined Immunodeficiency; Severe Congenital Neutropenia; Shwachman-Diamond Syndrome; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia; Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome

  20. Clonotypic Analysis of Immunoglobulin Heavy Chain Sequences in Patients with Waldenström’s Macroglobulinemia: Correlation with MYD88 L265P Somatic Mutation Status, Clinical Features, and Outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loizos Petrikkos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We performed IGH clonotypic sequence analysis in WM in order to determine whether a preferential IGH gene rearrangement was observed and to assess IGHV mutational status in blood and/or bone marrow samples from 36 WM patients. In addition we investigated the presence of MYD88 L265P somatic mutation. After IGH VDJ locus amplification, monoclonal VDJ rearranged fragments were sequenced and analyzed. MYD88 L265P mutation was detected by AS-PCR. The most frequent family usage was IGHV3 (74%; IGHV3-23 and IGHV3-74 segments were used in 26% and 17%, respectively. Somatic hypermutation was seen in 91% of cases. MYD88 L265P mutation was found in 65,5% of patients and absent in the 3 unmutated. These findings did not correlate with clinical findings and outcome. Conclusion. IGH genes’ repertoire differed in WM from those observed in other B-cell disorders with a recurrent IGHV3-23 and IGHV3-74 usage; monoclonal IGHV was mutated in most cases, and a high but not omnipresent prevalence of MYD88 L265P mutation was observed. In addition, the identification of 3 patients with unmutated IGHV gene segments, negative for the MYD88 L265P mutation, could support the hypothesis that an extra-germinal B-cell may represent the originating malignant cell in this minority of WM patients.

  1. [Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance and asymptomatic multiple myelom in the year 2014 ].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Zdeněk; Krejčí, Marta; Pour, Luděk; Sevčíková, Eva; Křivanová, Andrea; Rehák, Zdeněk; Koukalová, Renata; Cermáková, Zdeňka; Vaníček, Jíří; Sevčíková, Sabina

    2014-10-01

    Presence of monoclonal immunoglobulin in serum or urine is a relatively common event affecting about 3.2 % of people over 50. Isolated increase of only one type of free light chain, either κ or λ, is detected in 0.7-0.8 % of people over 50. Most people with monoclonal immunoglobulin meet the criteria of the so-called "mono-clonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS)". MGUS is defined by concentration of monoclonal immunoglobulin in serum < 30 g/l, number of plasma cells in the bone marrow < 10 % and the absence of symptoms of multiple myeloma and other lymphoproliferative diseases. A proportion of people with MGUS gradually progresses from asymptomatic into symptomatic myeloma or other malignant lymphoproliferative disease requiring treatment. Therefore, MGUS is considered to be one of the most common premalignant conditions with an average risk of transformation into malignant disease of 1 % per year. Monoclonal gammopathy of IgG and IgA subtype can develop into multiple myeloma. Light chain monoclonal gammopathy can develop not only into light chain multiple myeloma but also into AL-amyloidosis and light chain deposition disease (amorphous deposits of light chains damaging organs). IgM monoclonal gammopathy may develop into Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia or other lymphoproliferative disorder, or into rare IgM subtype of multiple myeloma. Unfortunately, people with MGUS are threatened by more than an increased risk of transformation into multiple myeloma or other severe hematologic disease. Pre-malignant clone of plasma cells in the bone marrow causes changes in the bone marrow that directly affect the person. For people with MGUS, there is an increased incidence of osteoporosis and increased fracture risk when compared to the general population. People with MGUS also have an increased risk of bacterial infections and thromboembolic complications compared with the same age population without MGUS. Clonal plasma cells, which are the basis of MGUS, may in

  2. Urine protein electrophoresis test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urine protein electrophoresis; UPEP; Multiple myeloma - UPEP; Waldenström macroglobulinemia - UPEP; Amyloidosis - UPEP ... special paper and apply an electric current. The proteins move and form visible bands. These reveal the ...

  3. Universal Detection and Identification of Avian Influenza Virus by Use of Resequencing Microarrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    antibodies to tetanus, diphtheria , and Haemophilus influenzae type b. Clin. Diagn. Lab. Immunol. 9:872–876. 28. Pourmand, N., L. Diamond, R. Garten, J...influenza virus by reverse transcription-PCR and PCR- ELISA . Arch. Virol. 146:87–97. 24. Munster, V. J., C. Baas, P. Lexmond, J. Waldenstrom, A

  4. Deferasirox in Treating Iron Overload Caused By Blood Transfusions in Patients With Hematologic Malignancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-09

    ; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage II Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Multiple Myeloma; Stage II Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  5. Obituary: Norman Hodgson Baker, Jr., 1931-2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfand, David J.

    2005-12-01

    Norman H. Baker, a key contributor to the foundation of modern stellar pulsation theory and former editor of the "Astronomical Journal", died on 11 October 2005 in Watertown, New York near his beloved summer home in Natural Bridge. He succumbed to complications of Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia, a bone marrow lymphoma that he had successfully surmounted for twenty-two years. Norm, as he was known to all, was born 23 October 1931 in Fergus Falls, Minnesota to Norman Hodgson and Jeannette (née Lieber) Baker. He attended the University of Minnesota where he met the first of many lifelong astronomical friends, Bill Erickson. He received his BA in 1952. He went on to do his PhD, "Radiation from Particle Interactions which Create Current," at Cornell University under Phil Morrison. He then moved to a postdoctoral position at the Max Planck Institut für Physik und Astrophysik in München with the intent of pursuing his work in plasma physics with Ludwig Biermann and Arnulf Schlüter. However, Rudolf (Rudi) Kippenhan snatched him away to pursue what became his lifelong interest, stellar physics. This was the dawn of the era in which electronic computers were becoming practical for scientific calculations, and Norm immediately adopted this new tool. Indeed, he remained at the forefront of computing technology throughout his life: He was certainly the first member of the Astronomy Department at Columbia to buy a Mac, and was undoubtedly one of the few emeritus professors in the world known by all the administrative staff as the first person to turn to when stumped by a computer problem. Following his first paper with Kippenhan on stellar rotation, Norm turned his attention to stellar pulsations, a topic he would pursue throughout his career. His 1962 paper in "Zeitschrift für Astrophysik" on pulsational models of Cepheids (Baker and Kippenhan 1962, 54, 155) is a classic in the field. The first figure displays the three dimensional model of the atmospheric absorption

  6. Spontaneous Iliopsoas Muscle Hemorrhage Secondary to Ibrutinib (Imbruvica; Pharmacyclics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Sarcon MD

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Ibrutinib (Imbruvica; Pharmacyclics is the first Food and Drug Administration–approved inhibitor of Burton’s tyrosine kinase (BTK. Attenuation of BTK signaling ultimately leads to inhibition of B-cell proliferation and apoptosis. After a series of clinical trials, the Food and Drug Administration approved ibrutinib in patients with relapsed chronic lymphocytic leukemia in 2014 and Waldenström’s macroglobulinemia in 2015. Those trials included rare grade 3+ hemorrhagic events associated with ibrutinib. Herein, we report a unique presentation of back pain due to iliopsoas muscle hemorrhage in a patient with Waldenström’s macroglobulinemia after initiation of ibrutinib.

  7. Yttrium Y 90 Ibritumomab Tiuxetan and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-24

    Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  8. Genetically Engineered Lymphocytes, Cyclophosphamide, and Aldesleukin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Mantle Cell Lymphoma or Indolent B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-04

    B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  9. 506U78 in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma or T-cell Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-22

    Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  10. Arsenic Trioxide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Lymphoma or Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-31

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  11. con transformación a Linfoma del manto

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Martínez Gabarrón

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available La Macroglobulinemia de Waldenström (MW es una enfermedad infrecuente con una incidencia de tres casos por millón de habitantes al año aproximadamente1 y cuyo diagnóstico siempre plantea importantes dudas. La edad media de diagnóstico es de 64 años siendo más frecuente en varones (60% y en la raza caucasiana2. Se considera una patología progresiva, crónica y en general de curso lento. La causa más frecuente de muerte son las segundas neoplasias y de todas ellas la trasformación a linfoma inmunoblástico causa un pequeño porcentaje de ellas. Exponemos el caso de una mujer diagnosticada de Macroglobulinemia de Waldenström que presentó precozmente una trasformación a linfoma del manto con rápida y nefasta progresión. Waldenström's Macroglobulinemia (MW is an uncommon disease with an incidence of three cases per million population per year approximately and whose diagnosis presents important questions always. The average age of diagnosis is 64 years being more frequent in males (60% and Caucasian race. It is considered a progressive, chronic disease and slow course generally. The second malignancies are the most frequent cause of death and a small percentage of them transformation to Immunoblastic Lymphoma. We present the case of a diagnosed woman of Waldenström's Macroglobulinemia who presented a transformation to mantle cell lymphoma precociously with quick and grim progression.

  12. Rearreglos de genes de cadenas pesadas de las inmunoglobulinas en las gammapatías monoclonales Immunoglobulin heavy chain gene rearrangements in the monoclonal gammopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Bosaleh

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Las neoplasias de células plasmáticas resultan de la expansión de un clon de células B que secreta inmunoglobulinas, conocido como componente monoclonal o componente M. Las neoplasias malignas incluyen al mieloma múltiple y la macroglobulinemia de Waldenström, y la condición premaligna comprende las gammapatías monoclonales de significado incierto (MGUS. El MGUS presenta un componente monoclonal sin evidencia de mieloma múltiple, macroglobulinemia de Waldenström, amiloidosis primaria u otros desórdenes. El diagnóstico se basa en la combinación de características patológicas, radiológicas y clínicas. Aproximadamente el 25% de las gammapatías monoclonales de significado incierto desarrollarán mieloma múltiple, amiloidosis sistémica, macroglobulinemia o enfermedades linfoproliferativas malignas, indicando que sería una condición premielomatosa. El objetivo del presente trabajo es establecer la utilidad clínica de la inmunofenotipificación por citometría de flujo (CF y la detección de clonalidad por biología molecular. Se estudiaron 32 pacientes, siete con diagnóstico de mieloma múltiple y veinticinco con gammapatía monoclonal en estudio, los cuales fueron divididos en cuatro grupos basados en los datos clínicos y los resultados de CF. En el grupo de pacientes con CF no diagnóstica, se realizó la detección de los rearreglos de los genes de las cadenas pesadas de las inmunoglobulinas mediante reacción en cadena de la polimerasa (PCR, detectándose monoclonalidad en el 59% de los casos. El estudio de los rearreglos de los genes de las cadenas pesadas de las IgH mediante PCR incrementa la sensibilidad de detección de monoclonalidad.Plasma cell neoplasia occurs as a result of the expansion of an immunoglobulin-secreting B-cells clones, known as monoclonal component or M component. Malignant neoplasias include multiple myeloma and Waldenström macroglobulinemia, while premalignant conditions comprise monoclonal

  13. Pomalidomide: first global approval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkinson, Shelley; McCormack, Paul L

    2013-05-01

    Pomalidomide (Pomalyst(®)) is a small molecule analogue of thalidomide under development with Celgene Corporation for the oral treatment of haematological and connective tissue diseases. Pomalidomide has been approved in the USA and is awaiting approval in the EU for use with low-dose dexamethasone for the treatment of relapsed and refractory multiple myeloma that has progressed following at least two prior therapies, including lenalidomide and bortezomib. The efficacy and safety of pomalidomide as monotherapy in patients with relapsed and refractory multiple myeloma has also been evaluated in a phase III trial. The agent is in phase III clinical development for the treatment of myelofibrosis and in phase II development for systemic sclerosis. Pomalidomide is also being investigated in patients with amyloidosis, prostate cancer, small cell lung cancer, pancreatic cancer, graft-versus-host disease, and Waldenstrom's macroglobulinaemia. This article summarizes the milestones in the development of pomalidomide leading to this first global approval for relapsed and refractory multiple myeloma.

  14. Interleukin-12 in Treating Patients With Previously Treated Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma or Hodgkin's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-14

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  15. Yttrium Y 90 Ibritumomab Tiuxetan, Fludarabine, Radiation Therapy, and Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-21

    B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  16. Advances in cancer research. Volume 41

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, G.; Weinhouse, S.

    1984-01-01

    This book contains seven chapters. They are: The Epidemiology of Diet and Cancer; Molecular Aspects of Immunoglobin Expression by Human B Cell Leukemias and Lymphomas; Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus: Transcriptional Control and Involvement in Tumorigenesis; Dominant Susceptibility to Cancer in Man; Multiple Myeloma; Waldenstreom's Macroglobulinemia, and Benign Monoclonal Gammopathy: Characteristics of the B Cell Clone, Immunoregulatory Cell Populations and Clinical Implications; Idiotype Network Interactions in Tumor Immunity; and Chromosomal Location of Immunoglobulin Genes: Partial Mapping of these Genes in the Rabbit and Comparison with Ig Genes Carrying Chromosomes of Man and Mouse.

  17. Acalabrutinib (ACP-196: a selective second-generation BTK inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Wu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract More and more targeted agents become available for B cell malignancies with increasing precision and potency. The first-in-class Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (BTK inhibitor, ibrutinib, has been in clinical use for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia, mantle cell lymphoma, and Waldenstrom’s macroglobulinemia. More selective BTK inhibitors (ACP-196, ONO/GS-4059, BGB-3111, CC-292 are being explored. Acalabrutinib (ACP-196 is a novel irreversible second-generation BTK inhibitor that was shown to be more potent and selective than ibrutinib. This review summarized the preclinical research and clinical data of acalabrutinib.

  18. Diagnosis and treatment of acute and chronic leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-01-01

    The Cancergram covers both acute and chronic leukemia in all of its forms (acute lymphocytic, acute monocytic, acute or sub-acute granulocytic, chronic granulocytic, chronic lymphocytic, chronic monocytic, plasma cell, stem cell, and hairy cell). Other neoplastic conditions of the reticuloendothelial system, lymphatic system, spleen, multiple myeloma, macroglobulinemia and other monoclonal gammopathies are excluded, and will be coveted by other Cancergrams now under development. This Cancergram includes abstracts concerning all clinical aspects of the disease, such as diagnosis and staging, supportive care, evaluation, and therapy. Animal models, tissue culture experiments, carcinogenesis and other pre-clinical studies are generally excluded, except for those considered to have direct clinical relevance.

  19. Direct and two-step bioorthogonal probes for Bruton's tyrosine kinase based on ibrutinib: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Nora; Hoogendoorn, Sascha; van de Kar, Bas; Kaptein, Allard; Barf, Tjeerd; Driessen, Christoph; Filippov, Dmitri V; van der Marel, Gijsbert A; van der Stelt, Mario; Overkleeft, Herman S

    2015-05-14

    Ibrutinib is a covalent and irreversible inhibitor of Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) and has been approved for the treatment of haematological malignancies, such as chronic lymphocytic leukaemia, mantle cell lymphoma and Waldenström's macroglobulinemia. The covalent and irreversible nature of its molecular mode of action allows identification and monitoring of its target in an activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) setting. Fluorescent and biotinylated ibrutinib derivatives have appeared in the literature in recent years to monitor BTK in vitro and in situ. The work described here complements this existing methodology and pertains a comparative study on the efficacy of direct and two-step bioorthogonal ABPP of BTK.

  20. Iodine I 131 Tositumomab and Fludarabine Phosphate in Treating Older Patients Who Are Undergoing an Autologous or Syngeneic Stem Cell Transplant for Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-04

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  1. Comparison of the results from simple radiography, from before to after Salter osteotomy, in patients with Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Futoshi Toma

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives:To determine whether the clinical variables and preoperative classification of patients with Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease (LCPD who undergo Salter osteotomy correlate with the radiographic result at the time of skeletal maturity.Methods:In this retrospective cohort study, 47 individuals with LCPD who were treated using Salter osteotomy (1984-2004 were evaluated. The patients were evaluated according to sex, skin color, side affected and age at which osteotomy was performed. The preoperative radiographs were analyzed in accordance with the classifications of Waldenstrom, Catter-all, Laredo and Herring. The radiographs obtained at the time of skeletal maturity were classified using the Stulberg method.Results:The mean age at the time of surgical treatment was 82.87 months (6.9 years. The age presented a statistically significant correlation with the Stulberg grades at skeletal maturity (p < 0.001. Patients over the age of 6.12 years tended to present less favorable results. The variables of sex, skin color and side affected did not present any statistically significant correlation with the prognosis (p= 0.425; p = 0.467; p = 0.551, respectively. Only the Laredo classification presented a statistically significant correlation with the final result given by the Stulberg classification (p = 0.001. The other classifications used (Waldenstrom, Catterall and Herring did not present any correlation between the time at which surgery was indicated and the postoperative result.Conclusions:The age at which the patients underwent surgical treatment and the Laredo classification groups were the only variables that presented significant correlations with the Stulberg classification.

  2. Detection of the MYD88 mutation by the combination of the allele-specific PCR and quenching probe methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogami, S; Kawaguchi-Ihara, N; Shiratori, E; Ohtaka, M; Itoh, M; Tohda, S

    2017-04-01

    The MYD88 missense mutation c.794T>C, p.Leu265Pro, is found in patients with Waldenstörm's macroglobulinemia and lymphoma. Direct sequencing, allele-specific PCR (AS-PCR), PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP), and high-resolution melting analysis (HRM) are currently used to detect the mutation; however, they are either time-consuming or have low detection sensitivity. Here, we developed a novel highly sensitive and rapid detection method based on the quenching probe (QP) technique and AS-PCR. A lymphoma cell line heterozygous for the MYD88 mutation, two wild-type cell lines, and two samples from Waldenstörm's macroglobulinemia patients were analyzed by AS-PCR, PCR-RFLP, HRM, and QP, and their detection sensitivity was examined using the mixtures of the mutant and wild-type DNA. For mutation-carrying heterozygous samples, the QP method produced W-shaped melting profiles presenting curves derived from the wild-type and mutant alleles. The QP analysis was performed in 2 h and demonstrated the detection limit of 5%, which was similar to that of the other methods. However, the combination of AS-PCR and QP (AS-QP) improved the sensitivity to 0.62% of the mutant allele. The AS-QP analysis is rapid and minimally improves detection sensitivity compared to the AS-PCR. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Calorimetric features of IgM gammopathies. Implication for patient’s diagnosis and monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krumova, Sashka; Todinova, Svetla; Danailova, Avgustina [Institute of Biophysics and Biomedical Engineering, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bonchev Str., bl. 21, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Petkova, Violeta; Dimitrova, Keranka; Gartcheva, Lidia [National Specialized Hospital for Active Treating of Haematological Diseases, Sofia 1756 (Bulgaria); Taneva, Stefka G., E-mail: stefka.germanova@ehu.es [Institute of Biophysics and Biomedical Engineering, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bonchev Str., bl. 21, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Unidad de Biofísica (CSIC-UPV/EHU) and Departamento de Bioquímica y Biología Molecular, Universidad del País Vasco, 48080 Bilbao (Spain)

    2015-09-10

    Highlights: • DSC reveals distinct calorimetric features for IgM gammopaties. • Calorimetry sets of IgM multiple myeloma and Waldenström’s macroglobulinemia patients. • DSC features correlate with the level of involved IgM heavy/light chains. • DSC and “Heavylite” are complementary methods for patients diagnostics/monitoring. - Abstract: The serum proteome of patients featuring immunoglobulin M (IgM) gammopathy and diagnosed as having IgM multiple myeloma or Waldenström’s macroglobulinemia was characterized by differential scanning calorimetry and HevyLite™ (HLC) assay. The thermodynamic properties of the thermograms and their deviation from the typical healthy thermogram were found to correlate with the monoclonal protein concentration and the level of the involved (monoclonal) IgM heavy/light chains. Patients monitoring during treatment showed that the variations in the shape of the DSC profiles corresponded to fluctuations of the IgM heavy/light chain levels verifying the two parameters as non-invasive markers for disease progression.

  4. Interleukin 6 dependence of spontaneous in vitro differentiation of B cells from patients with IgM gammapathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, Y.; Fermand, J.P.; Schmitt, C.; Seligmann, M.; Brouet, J.C. (Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale, Paris (France)); Navarro, S.; Vainchenker, W. (Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale, Cretail (France))

    1990-05-01

    Blood B cells from eight patients with clonal lymphoid disorders characterized by monoclonal IgM secretion (four with malignant plasmacytic proliferation typical of Waldenstroem macroglobulinemia and four without overt lymphoid neoplasia) were found to spontaneously differentiate in vitro into plasma cells. In all instances, monoclonal plasma cells were generated from extensively purified B cells or T-cell-depleted peripheral blood mononuclear cells after a 7-day culture period, with a corresponding high rate of IgM secretion into the culture medium. This differentiation occurred in the absence of any cell proliferation process as measured by ({sup 3}H)thymidine uptake at day 2 or 4. Normal B cells did not differentiate under the same experimental conditions. Detection of interleukin 6 (IL-6) bioactivity in all patients' B-cell culture supernatants as well as of IL-6 mRNA in freshly prepared, uncultured B cells in the two cases studied by in situ hybridization suggested that IL-6 secretion by B cells may play a role in this process. Moreover, in the four patients without overt lymphoid proliferation, B-cell differentiation was significantly inhibited in the presence of anti-IL-6 antibodies. In contrast, anti-IL-6 antibodies did not preclude the differentiation into plasma cells of B cells from the four patients with bona fide Waldenstroem macroglobulinemia. These results suggest a two-step pathogenesis for such human lymphoplasmacytic clonal proliferations, the initial stage being characterized by an IL-6-dependent autocrine differentiation pathway.

  5. Genetically Modified T-cell Infusion Following Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Recurrent or High-Risk Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-27

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  6. Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance and risk of infections: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristinsson, Sigurdur Y; Tang, Min; Pfeiffer, Ruth M; Björkholm, Magnus; Goldin, Lynn R; Blimark, Cecilie; Mellqvist, Ulf-Henrik; Wahlin, Anders; Turesson, Ingemar; Landgren, Ola

    2012-06-01

    No comprehensive evaluation has been made to assess the risk of viral and bacterial infections among patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance. Using population-based data from Sweden, we estimated risk of infections among 5,326 monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance patients compared to 20,161 matched controls. Patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance had a 2-fold increased risk (Pundetermined significance had an increased risk (Pundetermined significance with M-protein concentrations over 2.5 g/dL at diagnosis had highest risks of infections. However, the risk was also increased (Pundetermined significance who developed infections had no excess risk of developing multiple myeloma, Waldenström macroglobulinemia or related malignancy. Our findings provide novel insights into the mechanisms behind infections in patients with plasma cell dyscrasias, and may have clinical implications.

  7. The clinical relevance and management of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance and related disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van de Donk, Niels W C J; Palumbo, Antonio; Johnsen, Hans Erik

    2014-01-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance is one of the most common pre-malignant disorders. IgG and IgA monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance are precursor conditions of multiple myeloma; light-chain monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance of light-chain multiple...... myeloma; and IgM monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance of Waldenström's macroglobulinemia and other lymphoproliferative disorders. Clonal burden, as determined by bone marrow plasma cell percentage or M-protein level, as well as biological characteristics, including heavy chain isotype...... and light chain production, are helpful in predicting risk of progression of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance to symptomatic disease. Furthermore, alterations in the bone marrow microenvironment of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance patients result in an increased risk...

  8. Flavopiridol in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Lymphoma or Multiple Myeloma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-27

    Adult Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Multiple Myeloma; Stage II Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Multiple Myeloma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  9. Refractory IgG Warm Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia Treated with Eculizumab: A Novel Application of Anticomplement Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Ma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia (wAIHA is the most common form of AIHA, with corticosteroids in first-line treatment resulting in a 60–80% response rate. Atypical wAIHA and IgG plus complement mediated disease have a higher treatment failure rate and higher recurrence rate. We report a case of severe wAIHA secondary to Waldenström macroglobulinemia with life threatening intravascular hemolysis refractory to prednisone, rituximab, splenectomy, and plasmapheresis. A four-week treatment of eculizumab in this heavily pretreated patient resulted in a sustained increase in hemoglobin and transfusion independence, suggesting a role for complement inhibition in refractory wAIHA.

  10. Soluble CD23 in multiple myelomas and related diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoaki Matsumoto

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The serum levels of soluble CD23 (sCD23 were examined in patients with multiple myelomas and related diseases and were compared with levels of sCD23 in healthy, age- and sex-matched controls. The mean levels (95% confidence intervals of sCD23 in the sera of 40 patients with multiple myelomas, nine patients with myeloma-related diseases (seven primary macroglobulinemia and two chronic lymphatic leukemia and 30 matched controls were 2.7 (1.9-3.8, 9.9 (5.1-19.2 and 1.5 (1.3-1.7 ng/mL, respectively, showing a significant increase in sCD23 in the circulation of patients with myelomas (P<0.01 and myeloma-related diseases (P< 0.001. The potential biologic importance of sCD23 in myelomas and related diseases is discussed.

  11. A double antibody radioimmunoassay for measurement of IgG, IgA and IgM synthesized by human lymphocytes in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asano,Taro

    1981-11-01

    Full Text Available To investigate cellular interactions between human T and B lymphocytes in various diseases, we established a technique to prove terminal differentiation of B lymphocytes into immunoglobulin synthesizing and secreting cells. We also established a double antibody radioimmunoassay to measure the amount of IgG, IgA and IgM synthesized and secreted in culture supernatants. Purified immunoglobulins were obtained from sera of patients with myeloma or macroglobulinemia. The peripheral blood lymphocytes from 25 normal individuals had the geometric mean synthetic rates of 1886 ng for IgG, 1607 ng for IgA and 1173 ng for IgM per 1 X 10(6 cells when cultured for nine days in the presence of pokeweed mitogen. The method is simple and sensitive, and is thought to be useful for examining human lymphocyte function in vitro.

  12. Oncological emergencies for the internist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umesh Das

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An oncologic emergency is defined as any acute, potentially life-threatening event, either directly or indirectly related to a patient′s cancer (ca or its treatment. It requires rapid intervention to avoid death or severe permanent damage. Most oncologic emergencies can be classified as metabolic, hematologic, structural, or side effects from chemotherapy agents. Tumor lysis syndrome is a metabolic emergency that presents as severe electrolyte abnormalities. The condition is treated with aggressive hydration, allopurinol or urate oxidase to lower uric acid levels. Hypercalcemia of malignancy is treated with aggressive rehydration, furosemide, and intravenous (IV bisphosphonates. Syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone should be suspected if a patient with ca presents with normovolemic hyponatremia. This metabolic condition usually is treated with fluid restriction and furosemide. Febrile neutropenia is a hematologic emergency that usually requires inpatient therapy with broad-spectrum antibiotics, although outpatient therapy may be appropriate for low-risk patients. Hyperviscosity syndrome usually is associated with Waldenstrφm′s macroglobulinemia, which is treated with plasmapheresis and chemotherapy. Structural oncologic emergencies are caused by direct compression of surrounding structures or by metastatic disease. Superior vena cava syndrome is the most common structural oncological emergency. Treatment options include chemotherapy, radiation, and IV stenting. Epidural spinal cord compression can be treated with dexamethasone, radiation, or surgery. Malignant pericardial effusion, which often is undiagnosed in ca patients, can be treated with pericardiocentesis or a pericardial window procedure.

  13. Low-Dose Total Body Irradiation and Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant Followed by Donor Lymphocyte Infusion in Treating Patients With Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, or Multiple Myeloma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-30

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage II Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Multiple Myeloma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  14. Bing and Neel Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Jennane

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. We report the case of a Bing and Neel syndrome revealed by an isolated left ptosis. Case Report. a 57-year-old man was followed up since October 2003 for a typical Waldenström’s macroglobulinemia. A first complete remission was obtained with chlorambucil. In August 2004, he relapsed. A second complete remission was obtained with RFC chemotherapy regimen (rituximab, fludarabine, and cyclophosphamide. In October 2009, the patient presented with an isolated left ptosis revealing a Bing and Neel syndrome. The diagnosis was suspected on MRI and confirmed by the detection in the CSF of a monoclonal IgM similar to the one found in the plasma. A quite good partial remission has been obtained after one course of RDHAP (rituximab, dexamethasone, cytarabine, and cisplatin and 3 courses of RDHOx (rituximab, dexamethasone, cytarabine, and oxaliplatin, in addition to ten intrahectal chemotherapy injections. The treatment was followed by intensification and autologous stem cell transplantation. At D58, the patient died due to a septic shock. Conclusion. BNS is a rare and potentially treatable complication of WM. It should be considered in patients with neurologic symptoms and a history of WM.

  15. Lenalidomide With or Without Rituximab in Treating Patients With Progressive or Relapsed Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma, Prolymphocytic Leukemia, or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Previously Treated With Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-24

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  16. Detection of MYD88 L265P mutations in formalin-fixed and decalcified BM biopsies from patients with lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capaldi, Ianina Belén; May, Annette M; Schmitt-Graeff, Annette; Follo, Marie; Aumann, Konrad; Kayser, Gian; Perazzo, Juan Carlos; Werner, Martin; Fisch, Paul

    2014-08-01

    The diagnosis of bone marrow (BM) infiltration by Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM)/lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma (LPL) poses a diagnostic challenge in hematopathology. No definitive morphology or immunophenotype is able to distinguish between infiltration of paraffin-embedded BM sections by WM/LPL and other indolent lymphomas, in particular those of the splenic marginal zone (SMZL) which may also show plasmacytic maturation. An oncogenic gain-of-function mutation (L265P) in the human MYD88 gene has been found to be present in most cases of WM/LPL, yet is absent in most other cases of B-cell chronic lymphoproliferative disorders (LPD), including SMZL. Here, we compare two newly developed diagnostic protocols for detection of this mutation in paraffin-embedded archival tissues which are particularly applicable to decalcified BM biopsies. Sanger sequencing can easily detect levels of BM infiltration above 15% by WM lymphoplasmacytic cells, while the allele-specific PCR can detect the L265P mutation in BM infiltrations below 1% of lymphoma cells. We show that these methods are easily applicable to archival BM specimens and markedly improve diagnostic accuracy of BM infiltrations by indolent B-cell lymphomas.

  17. Rituximab in Treating Patients Undergoing Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant for Relapsed or Refractory B-cell Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-23

    B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  18. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy Before Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Lymphoid Malignancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-07

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  19. Systematic review of the recent evidence for the efficacy and safety of chlorambucil in the treatment of B-cell malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepretre, Stéphane; Dartigeas, C; Feugier, P; Marty, M; Salles, G

    2016-01-01

    Emergence of new agents has deeply modified treatment options and the role of chlorambucil (CLB) in B-cell malignancies. We conducted a systematic review of prospective, randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) investigating the benefits and harms of CLB used alone or in combination with other treatment in patients suffering from chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), low-grade non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) or Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM). For CLL, review of the nine RCTs showed that the main advantage of CLB is its low toxicity in comparison with purine nucleoside analogs like fludarabine in either CLL or NHL. In CLL, the major disadvantage is the very low rate of complete response, except when combining an anti-CD20 antibody. For B-cell lymphoma and WM, six RCTs were summarized. Results according to the usual criteria are presented and the role of CLB, used mostly in combination with an anti-CD20 antibody, is discussed for each indication, in particular for unfit patients.

  20. Siltuximab and hematologic malignancies. A focus in non Hodgkin lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrario, Andrea; Merli, Michele; Basilico, Claudia; Maffioli, Margherita; Passamonti, Francesco

    2017-03-01

    The role of interleukin-6 (IL-6) in tumorigenesis and in particular in haematological malignancies is crucial. On the basis of the favourable results obtained in the subset of multicentric Castleman disease (MCD), Siltuximab, a chimeric, human-murine, immunoglobulin (Ig) Gk monoclonal antibody directed against human IL-6 has been evaluated in haematological malignancies such as multiple myeloma, myelodisplastic syndromes and non Hodgkin lymphomas. Areas covered: This review discusses available data related to the role of IL-6 as a therapeutic target, the characteristics of Siltuximab in term pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics properties and a detailed analysis of the studies involving haematological malignancies with a peculiar focus on non Hodgkin lymphoma. Expert opinion: The results obtained with Siltuximab in haematological malignancies and in particular with non Hodgkin lymphoma are inferior to those obtained in MCD. The complex interaction between malignant clones, inflammatory background and host response could justify this difference. New interesting areas of study are the role of Siltuximab in early phase of multiple myeloma (smoldering multiple myeloma) and if there may be a possible future application in the treatment of Waldenström macroglobulinemia.

  1. Management of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) and smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyle, Robert A; Buadi, Francis; Rajkumar, S Vincent

    2011-06-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) is defined as a serum M protein level of less than 3 g/dL, less than 10% clonal plasma cells in the bone marrow, and the absence of end-organ damage. The prevalence of MGUS is 3.2% in the white population but is approximately twice that high in the black population. MGUS may progress to multiple myeloma, AL amyloidosis, Waldenström macroglobulinemia, or lymphoma. The risk of progression is approximately 1% per year, but the risk continues even after more than 25 years of observation. Risk factors for progression include the size of the serum M protein, the type of serum M protein, the number of plasma cells in the bone marrow, and the serum free light chain ratio. Smoldering (asymptomatic) multiple myeloma (SMM) is characterized by the presence of an M protein level of 3 g/dL or higher and/or 10% or more monoclonal plasma cells in the bone marrow but no evidence of end-organ damage. The overall risk of progression to a malignant condition is 10% per year for the first 5 years, approximately 3% per year for the next 5 years, and 1% to 2% per year for the following 10 years. Patients with both MGUS and SMM must be followed up for their lifetime.

  2. Toll-like receptors and cancer: MYD88 mutation and inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Q Wang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Pattern recognition receptors (PRRs expressed on immune cells are crucial for the early detection of invading pathogens, in initiating early innate immune response and in orchestrating the adaptive immune response. PRRs are activated by specific pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs that are present in pathogenic microbes or nucleic acids of viruses or bacteria. However, inappropriate activation of these PRRs, such as the Toll-like receptors (TLRs, due to genetic lesions or chronic inflammation has been demonstrated to be a major cause of many haematological malignancies. Gain-of-function mutations in the TLR adaptor protein MYD88 found in 39% of the activated B cell type of diffuse large B cell lymphomas (ABC-DLBCL and almost 100% of Waldenström’s macroglobulinemia (WM further highlight the involvement of TLRs in these malignancies. MYD88 mutations result in the chronic activation of TLR signalling pathways, thus the constitutive activation of the transcription factor NFκB to promote cell survival and proliferation. These recent insights into TLR pathway driven malignancies warrant the need for a better understanding of TLRs in cancers and the development of novel anti-cancer therapies targeting TLRs. This review focuses on Toll-like receptors function and signalling in normal or inflammatory conditions, and how mutations can also hijack the TLR signalling pathways to give rise to cancer. Lastly, we discuss how potential therapeutic agents could be used to restore normal responses to TLRs and have long lasting anti-tumour effects.

  3. The therapeutic role of targeting protein kinase C in solid and hematologic malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podar, Klaus; Raab, Marc S; Chauhan, Dharminder; Anderson, Kenneth C

    2007-10-01

    The protein kinase C (PKC) family, the most prominent target of tumor-promoting phorbol esters, is functionally linked to cell differentiation, growth, survival, migration and tumorigenesis and so mediates tumor cell proliferation, survival, multidrug resistance, invasion, metastasis and tumor angiogenesis. Therefore, targeting PKC isozymes may represent an attractive target for novel anticancer therapies. Recent preclinical and clinical studies using the macrocyclic bisindolylmaleimide enzastaurin or the N-benzylstaurosporine midostaurin demonstrate promising activity of PKC inhibitors in a variety of tumors, including diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, multiple myeloma and Waldenstroem's macroglobulinemia. However, our knowledge of PKCs in tumorigenesis is still only partial and each PKC isoform may contribute to tumorigenesis in a distinct way. Specifically, PKC isoforms have vastly different roles, which vary depending on expression levels of organ and tissue distribution, cell type, intracellular localization, protein-protein and lipid-protein interactions and the biologic environment. Although PKC activation generally positively affects tumor cell growth, motility, invasion and metastasis, recent reports show that many PKCs can also have negative effects. Therefore, it is necessary to further dissect the relative contribution of PKC isozymes in the development and progression of specific tumors in order to identify therapeutic opportunities, using either PKC inhibitors or PKC activators.

  4. Computer-supported detection of M-components and evaluation of immunoglobulins after capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsson, M; Carlson, J; Jeppsson, J O; Simonsson, P

    2001-01-01

    Electrophoresis of serum samples allows detection of monoclonal gammopathies indicative of multiple myeloma, Waldenström macroglobulinemia, monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance, and amyloidosis. Present methods of high-resolution agarose gel electrophoresis (HRAGE) and immunofixation electrophoresis (IFE) are manual and labor-intensive. Capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) allows rapid automated protein separation and produces digital absorbance data, appropriate as input for a computerized decision support system. Using the Beckman Paragon CZE 2000 instrument, we analyzed 711 routine clinical samples, including 95 monoclonal components (MCs) and 9 cases of Bence Jones myeloma, in both the CZE and HRAGE systems. Mathematical algorithms developed for the detection of monoclonal immunoglobulins (MCs) in the gamma- and ss-regions of the electropherogram were tested on the entire material. Additional algorithms evaluating oligoclonality and polyclonal concentrations of immunoglobulins were also tested. CZE electropherograms corresponded well with HRAGE. Only one IgG MC of 1 g/L, visible on HRAGE, was not visible after CZE. Algorithms detected 94 of 95 MCs (98.9%) and 100% of those visible after CZE. Of 607 samples lacking an MC on HRAGE, only 3 were identified by the algorithms (specificity, 99%). Algorithms evaluating total gammaglobulinemia and oligoclonality also identified several cases of Bence Jones myeloma. The use of capillary electrophoresis provides a modern, rapid, and cost-effective method of analyzing serum proteins. The additional option of computerized decision support, which provides rapid and standardized interpretations, should increase the clinical availability and usefulness of protein analyses in the future.

  5. Cold-induced precipitation of a monoclonal IgM: a negative activation enthalpy reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meliga, Stefano C; Farrugia, William; Ramsland, Paul A; Falconer, Robert J

    2013-01-17

    Cold-induced precipitation of a monoclonal IgM cryoglobulin isolated from a patient with Waldenström's macroglobulinemia was observed to have a negative activation enthalpy. The rate of the reaction increased, as the temperature decreased. Differential scanning calorimetry of the monoclonal IgM showed precipitation as an inverted peak during a downward temperature scan. The transition temperature was between 14 and 15 °C and was possibly concentration dependent. At temperatures below the transition the precipitation was best described by second-order kinetics. The difference in change in enthalpy between precipitation and disassociation suggests that cold-induced precipitation had a fast precipitation stage followed by a slower consolidation reaction. Negligible curvature of the Eyring plot suggested the precipitation reaction was dominated by van der Waal forces and hydrogen bonding. Conversely, during an upward temperature scan, disassociation was observed as a positive enthalpy peak. This reaction had two stages, a reaction undoing consolidation followed by heat-induced disassociation that had first-order kinetics.

  6. Failure of mefloquine therapy in progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy: report of two Japanese patients without human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Zen; Akaza, Miho; Numasawa, Yoshiyuki; Ishihara, Shoichiro; Tomimitsu, Hiroyuki; Nakamichi, Kazuo; Saijo, Masayuki; Morio, Tomohiro; Shimizu, Norio; Sanjo, Nobuo; Shintani, Shuzo; Mizusawa, Hidehiro

    2013-01-15

    Although progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) cases showing responses to mefloquine therapy have been reported, the efficacy of mefloquine for PML remains unclear. We report on the failure of mefloquine therapy in two Japanese patients with PML unrelated to human immunodeficiency virus. One of the patients was a 47-year-old male who had been treated with chemotherapy for Waldenström macroglobulinemia, and the other was an 81-year-old male with idiopathic CD4(+) lymphocytopenia. Diagnosis of PML was established based on MRI findings and increased JC virus DNA in the cerebrospinal fluid in both patients. Mefloquine was initiated about 5 months and 2 months after the onset of PML, respectively. During mefloquine therapy, clinical and radiological progression was observed, and JC virus DNA in the cerebrospinal fluid was increased in both patients. Both patients died about 4 months and 2 months after initiation of mefloquine, respectively. Further studies are necessary to clarify the differences between mefloquine responders and non-responders in PML.

  7. The clinical relevance and management of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance and related disorders: recommendations from the European Myeloma Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Donk, Niels W C J; Palumbo, Antonio; Johnsen, Hans Erik; Engelhardt, Monika; Gay, Francesca; Gregersen, Henrik; Hajek, Roman; Kleber, Martina; Ludwig, Heinz; Morgan, Gareth; Musto, Pellegrino; Plesner, Torben; Sezer, Orhan; Terpos, Evangelos; Waage, Anders; Zweegman, Sonja; Einsele, Hermann; Sonneveld, Pieter; Lokhorst, Henk M

    2014-06-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance is one of the most common pre-malignant disorders. IgG and IgA monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance are precursor conditions of multiple myeloma; light-chain monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance of light-chain multiple myeloma; and IgM monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance of Waldenström's macroglobulinemia and other lymphoproliferative disorders. Clonal burden, as determined by bone marrow plasma cell percentage or M-protein level, as well as biological characteristics, including heavy chain isotype and light chain production, are helpful in predicting risk of progression of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance to symptomatic disease. Furthermore, alterations in the bone marrow microenvironment of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance patients result in an increased risk of venous and arterial thrombosis, infections, osteoporosis, and bone fractures. In addition, the small clone may occasionally be responsible for severe organ damage through the production of a monoclonal protein that has autoantibody activity or deposits in tissues. These disorders are rare and often require therapy directed at eradication of the underlying plasma cell or lymphoplasmacytic clone. In this review, we provide an overview of the clinical relevance of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance. We also give general recommendations of how to diagnose and manage patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  8. Management of Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance (MGUS) and Smoldering Multiple Myeloma (SMM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    KYLE, ROBERT A.; BUADI, FRANC IS; RAJKUMAR, S. VINC ENT

    2014-01-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) is defined as a serum M protein level of less than 3 g/dL, less than 10% clonal plasma cells in the bone marrow, and the absence of end-organ damage. The prevalence of MGUS is 3.2% in the white population but is approximately twice that high in the black population. MGUS may progress to multiple myeloma, AL amyloidosis, Waldenström macroglobulinemia, or lymphoma. The risk of progression is approximately 1% per year, but the risk continues even after more than 25 years of observation. Risk factors for progression include the size of the serum M protein, the type of serum M protein, the number of plasma cells in the bone marrow, and the serum free light chain ratio. Smoldering (asymptomatic) multiple myeloma (SMM) is characterized by the presence of an M protein level of 3 g/dL or higher and/or 10% or more monoclonal plasma cells in the bone marrow but no evidence of end-organ damage. The overall risk of progression to a malignant condition is 10% per year for the first 5 years, approximately 3% per year for the next 5 years, and 1% to 2% per year for the following 10 years. Patients with both MGUS and SMM must be followed up for their lifetime. PMID:21888255

  9. Rheumatic masks of plasma cell dyscrasias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Ivanovich Vasilyev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to consider clinical practice problems in the differential diagnosis of different types of plasma cell dyscrasias (PCD. Subjects and methods. Fourteen patients (8 men and 6 women aged 52±12 years, in whom rheumatic diseases (RD were ruled out and who were diagnosed as having primary PCD: different types of myeloma in 7 patients, myeloma + AL-amyloidosis in 2, AL-amyloidosis in 3, and Waldenstrom’s macroglobulinemia in 2, were examined. Results and discussion. The most common maldiagnosed RDs in patients with PCD were seronegative rheumatoid arthritis (RA, systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjogren’s disease, and different forms of vasculitis. The most frequent masks of RD were kidney (78% and osteoarticular system (64% lesions, vascular disorders (36%, peripheral polyneuropathies (36%, and enlarged salivary glands with xerostomia (28.5%. Serum and urine immunochemical study should be performed in all patients who have clinical manifestations of seropositive RA, spondyloarthritis, intensive bone pain syndrome, ulceronecrotic vasculitis, enlarged submandibular salivary glands with macroglossia in the absence of markers of autoimmune disease for the timely diagnosis of PCD and the exclusion of RD. The paper estimates the sensitivity and specificity of main methods used to diagnose different types of PCD.

  10. Etoposide, Filgrastim, and Plerixafor in Improving Stem Cell Mobilization in Treating Patients With Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-15

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  11. CLINICAL MANIFESTATIONS OF VASCULITIS AT THE ONSET OF MULTIPLE MYELOMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V I Vasil'ev

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes two patients (a 50-year woman and a 72-year man in whom the clinical manifestations of ulceronecrotic vasculitis had long preceded before the diagnosis of multiple myeloma was made. In the former, monoclonal cryoglobulinemia type I induced ulcerative lesions with the development of dry toe gangrene and paraproteinemic renal lesion. In the latter, ulceronecrotic vasculitis with the development of dry toe gangrene was a manifestation of monoclonal paraproteinemia without signs of cryoglobulinemia. Both patients were found to have monoclonal blood secretion (РIgGλ и РIgGκ and urine Bence Jones protein (BJλ+BJκ, BJκ in the absence of immunological markers of vasculitis developing in patients with rheumatic diseases. Immunochemical study of serum/urine and, when monoclonal secretion of PIg+BJ is detected, further examination for plasma cell dyscrasia should be performed in all cases of vascular disorders (cold allergy, Raynaud's syndrome, purpura, ulcers of cruses, and gangrene of distal phalanxes of the hands/feet in patients with atypical vasculitis. The timely immunochemical study of blood and urine will make it possible to diagnose plasma cell dyscrasia (different types of myelomic disease, Waldenstrцm macroglobulinemia, primary amyloidosis at the early stage of the disease and to rule out unjustifiably diagnosed vasculitis in patients with atypical vascular lesions.

  12. Evidence for shared idiotypy expressed by the IgM, IgG, and IgA serum proteins of a patient with a complex multiple paraprotein disorder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopper, J.E.; Haren, J.M.; Kmiecik, T.E.

    1979-05-01

    The results of a comparative idiotypic analysis of multiple Ig paraproteins isolated from the serum of an individual patient, Ca, with Sjoegren's syndrome and Waldenstroem's macroglobulinemia are reported. At initial presentation, Ca serum was found to contain two major paraproteins, an IgMk and an IgGk, together with a small elevation in the level of IgA protein. The patient's clinical course was characterized by dramatic and opposing changes in the respective serum levels of the IgMk and IgGk paraproteins over an extended time period that coincided in part with received chemotherapy. Idiotypic antigenic analysis of the IgMk and IgGk paraproteins revealed that the two monotypic proteins shared identical idiotypic determinants. The Ca IgA serum fraction, specifically isolated by an immunoabsorbent and free of any IgG and IgM, was shown to possess idiotypic determinants identical to the IgG and IgM proteins. In extensive tests of specificity, the idiotypic determinants shared by Ca IgM, IgG, and IgA proteins were not present in large excesses of heterologous IgM and IgG, nor on Ig molecules contained in a large number of normal and myeloma sera.

  13. Emerging targets in human lymphoma: targeting the MYD88 mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang JQ

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available James Q Wang,* Yogesh S Jeelall,* Keisuke Horikawa* Department of Immunology, The John Curtin School of Medical Research, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT, Australia *All authors contributed equally to this manuscript Abstract: B cell neoplasms co-opt the molecular machinery of normal B cells for their survival. Technological advances in cancer genomics has significantly contributed to uncovering the root cause of aggressive lymphomas, revealing a previously unknown link between TLR signaling and B cell neoplasm. Recurrent oncogenic mutations in MYD88 have been found in 39% of the activated B cell-like subtype of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (ABC DLBCL. Interestingly, 29% of ABC DLBCL have a single amino acid substitution of proline for the leucine at position 265 (L265P, and the exact same variant has also been identified in a number of lymphoid malignancies. The MYD88 L265P variant was recently identified in 90% of Wadenstrom's macroglobulinemia patients. These recent developments warrant the need for novel diagnostic tools as well as targeted therapeutics. In this review, we discuss the physiological functions of MYD88 and focus on its role in B cell lymphomas, evaluating the potential for targeting oncogenic MYD88 in lymphoma. Keywords: MYD88, L265P mutation, lymphoma, targeted therapy

  14. A-bomb radiation and diseases; M proteinemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujimura, Kingo (Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). Research Inst. for Nuclear Medicine and Biology); Ito, Chikako

    1994-03-01

    Mass health screening was conducted in 65,483 A-bomb survivors (23,153 men and 42,336 women). Among them, 553 (0.84%) was found to have M proteinemia. The incidence of M proteinemia was higher in men (1.1%) than women (0.72%). M proteinemia was simply classified as benign monoclonal gammopathy (BMG) in 372 A-bomb survivors (67.3%), pre-myeloma (PreMM) in 81 (14.6%), myeloma (MM) in 77 (13.9%), and macroglobulinemia in 23 (4.2%). A higher incidence of M proteinemia was associated with aging; it was rapidly increased in the age-group of 70. Death was seen in 45 (8%) of all cases, frequently due to vascular disorder and cancer. Some of the BMG cases had a long process or developed either PreMM or MM. The incidence of BMG was significantly higher in the group of A-bomb survivors exposed to 100 rad or more than the control group. (N.K.).

  15. Increased risk of lymphoma in sicca syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassan, S.S.; Thomas, T.L.; Moutsopoulos, H.M.; Hoover, R.; Kimberly, R.P.; Budman, D.R.; Costa, J.; Decker, J.L.; Chused, T.M.

    1978-12-01

    The risk of cancer was ascertained in 136 women with sicca syndrome followed at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Seven patients developed non-Hodgkin's lymphoma from 6 months to 13 years after their first admission to NIH. This was 43.8 times (P less than 0.01) the incidence expected from the rates of cancer prevailing among women of the same age range in the general population during this time. In addition, three cases of Waldenstroem's macroglobulinemia occurred in this study group. Eight patients developed cancers other than lymphoma, similar to the number expected based on the rates prevailing in the general population. Patients with a history of parotid enlargement, splenomegaly, and lymphadenopathy had an increased risk of lymphoma. These clinical conditions did not appear to be early manifestations of undiagnosed lymphoma but rather seemed to identify a subgroup of patients with sicca syndrome with marked lymphoid reactivity, who had a particularly high risk of subsequently developing lymphoma.

  16. Disseminated Cryptococcal Disease in a Patient with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia on Ibrutinib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koh Okamoto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cryptococcus is a unique environmental fungus that can cause disease most often in immunocompromised individuals with defective cell-mediated immunity. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL is not known to be a risk factor for cryptococcal disease although cases have been described mainly in patients treated with agents that suppress cell-mediated immunity. Ibrutinib is a new biologic agent used for treatment of CLL, mantle cell lymphoma, and Waldenstrom’s macroglobulinemia. It acts by inhibiting Bruton’s tyrosine kinase, a kinase downstream of the B-cell receptor critical for B-cell survival and proliferation. Ibrutinib use has not been associated previously with cryptococcal disease. However, recent evidence suggested that treatments aimed at blocking the function of Bruton’s tyrosine kinase could pose a higher risk for cryptococcal infection in a mice model. Here, we report the first case of disseminated cryptococcal disease in a patient with CLL treated with ibrutinib. When evaluating possible infection in CLL patients receiving ibrutinib, cryptococcal disease, which could be life threatening if overlooked, could be considered.

  17. Intravitreal Injection of Dexamethasone Implant in Serous Macular Detachment Associated with Waldenström's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vito Fenicia

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of one intravitreal injection of dexamethasone (Ozurdex®; Allergan, Inc., Irvine, Calif., USA in serous macular detachment (SMD of one eye, associated with bilateral central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO in a patient affected by Waldenström's macroglobulinemia (WM. Patients and Methods: A female patient, affected by WM, complained of a progressive decrease in visual acuity, mainly in the left eye (LE. SMD in the LE associated with bilateral CRVO was diagnosed. One intravitreal injection of dexamethasone was administered in the LE and the patient was tested 1, 2, and 6 months after the injection. Results: 1, 2, and 6 months after the injection, the spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT showed a progressive slight reduction of foveal thickness that was not related to any improvement of visual function. Conclusions: Treatment with dexamethasone (Ozurdex induced a progressive slight reduction of SMD but no improvement of visual acuity, and it is possible that this is related to the condition of hematic hyperviscosity that is present in WM.

  18. Targeting Bruton's tyrosine kinase with ibrutinib in B-cell malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y; Zhang, L L; Champlin, R E; Wang, M L

    2015-05-01

    The B-cell receptor signaling pathway, which is critical to the development and maturation of normal B-cells, is emerging as an attractive therapeutic target in B-cell malignancies. Ibrutinib is a potent irreversible inhibitor of Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk), a key kinase important for signal transduction in the B-cell receptor (BCR) pathway. In preclinical studies, ibrutinib potently bound to Btk, inhibited BCR signaling, and decreased tumor cell proliferation and survival in many B-cell malignancy models. Excellent safety and efficacy data in clinical trials have led to US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of ibrutinib for previously treated mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), as well as CLL with 17p deletion. Ongoing clinical studies have also demonstrated great potency of ibrutinib in treating other types of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), including diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), follicular lymphoma (FL), and Waldenström's macroglobulinemia (WM). Combination of ibrutinib with chemoimmunotherapy and other promising novel agents in B-cell malignancy therapy has also been under clinical investigation. © 2015 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  19. Development of the Bruton's tyrosine kinase inhibitor ibrutinib for B cell malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayko, Urte; Fung, Mann; Clow, Fong; Sun, Steven; Faust, Elizabeth; Price, Samiyeh; James, Danelle; Doyle, Margaret; Bari, Samina; Zhuang, Sen Hong

    2015-11-01

    Ibrutinib is a first-in-class oral covalent inhibitor of Bruton's tyrosine kinase that has demonstrated clinical benefit for many patients with B cell malignancies. Positive results in initial trials led the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to grant ibrutinib three breakthrough therapy designations for mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), del17p chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), and Waldenström's macroglobulinemia (WM). Ibrutinib was approved for these three cancers within 14 months of the original U.S. approval. Additionally, ibrutinib is approved for patient subsets with MCL and/or CLL in >45 other countries. Via a unique mechanism of action, ibrutinib inhibits B cell signaling pathways that regulate the survival, proliferation, adhesion, and homing of cancerous cells. This marks a paradigm shift from the conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy approach to treating B cell malignancies. Ibrutinib continues to be evaluated across a range of B cell malignancies, either as single-agent therapy or in combination with other therapies, and continues to transform the lives of these patients. © 2015 The Authors. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences published by Wiley Periodicals Inc. on behalf of The New York Academy of Sciences.

  20. Bruton's tyrosine kinase inhibitors in chronic lymphocytic leukemia and lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varma, Gaurav; Johnson, Tyler P; Advani, Ranjana H

    2016-07-01

    The development of Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) inhibitors and their introduction into clinical practice represent a major advance in the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and other B-cell lymphomas. Although ibrutinib is the only BTK inhibitor that has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration, several others are under investigation. Ibrutinib is currently approved for use in relapsed/refractory CLL, CLL with 17p deletion (del[17p]), relapsed or refractory mantle cell lymphoma, and Waldenström macroglobulinemia. Although it is clear that ibrutinib has altered treatment paradigms and outcomes in these diseases, several questions remain regarding (1) its role in frontline vs salvage therapy; (2) its use as a single agent vs in combination with biologic agents, other small molecules, or traditional chemoimmunotherapy; (3) the optimal duration of treatment; and (4) the treatment of patients who cannot tolerate or have disease resistant to ibrutinib. Because sparse clinical data are available on other BTK inhibitors, it is unclear at present whether their clinical efficacy and toxicity will differ from those of ibrutinib.

  1. Genetically Modified Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With HIV-Associated Non-Hodgkin or Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-06

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; HIV-associated Hodgkin Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I AIDS-related Lymphoma; Stage II AIDS-related Lymphoma; Stage III AIDS-related Lymphoma; Stage IV AIDS-related Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  2. Cold antibody autoimmune hemolytic anemia and lymphoproliferative disorders: a retrospective study of 20 patients including clinical, hematological, and molecular findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthold, Cathrin; Skrabs, Cathrin; Mitterbauer-Hohendanner, Gerlinde; Thalhammer, Renate; Simonitsch-Klupp, Ingrid; Panzer, Simon; Valent, Peter; Lechner, Klaus; Jäger, Ulrich; Sillaber, Christian

    2014-06-01

    A total of 20 patients with cold antibody hemolytic anemia were evaluated in a retrospective study of them, 15 had a monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance (MGUS): 14 with MGUS of immunoglobulin M (IgM) subtype and 1 with immunoglobulin G subtype. One patient had smoldering Waldenström's macroglobulinemia, but four patients had no monoclonal protein and no evidence of lymphoma. However, in three of these patients, we were able to demonstrate a (mono-)clonal rearrangement of their immunoglobulin heavy and/or light chains. Of the 20 patients, 5 had IgHV34 nucleotide sequence indicating that the antibody was directed against the "I" antigen. Two patients exhibited a progressive increase of IgM over time, however without increasing hemolytic activity. Moreover, in two patients with long-term follow-up, we were able to correlate recurrent hemolytic activity with low environmental temperatures. Among four patients treated with rituximab, all four responded to treatment. However, treatment effect was only transient in all of them.

  3. [The role of the assessment of heavy/light chain pairs of immunoglobulin in monoclonal gammopathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ščudla, Vlastimil; Pika, Tomáš; Minařík, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to inform about the contribution of novel, highly sensitive analytic technique for the assessment of serum immunoglobulins (Hevylite), enabling separate quantitative assessment of heavy/light chain pairs of immunoglobulin (HLC), i. e. the monoclonal ("involved") and polyclonal ("noninvolved") isotype including their ratio (HLC-r) in monoclonal gammopathies. We particularly target the characteristics of this technique, the compari-son of its clinical contribution with standard methods used in the diagnostics, course and the detection of relapse and progression of the disease, as well as the stratification, assessment of therapeutic outcome and prognosis in monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance, multiple myeloma, Waldenström´s macroglobulinemia, systemic AL-amyloidosis and some non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Present results show that in comparison with existing routinely used techniques the Hevylite method enriches clinical practice with the assessment of serum levels of "uninvolved" Ig. It enables the evaluation of the depth of "immunoparesis", and the determination of HLC-r index that is needful for the stratification of MM into "risk cohorts". It also contributes to prognostic assessment and improvement of the evaluation of the depth of therapeutic response. In MGUS individuals the HLC-r index provides information about the risk of malignant transformation. We await the results of ongoing validation studies that are expected to provide specific indications for Hevylite technique for MG in routine practice.

  4. Alemtuzumab, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Total-Body Irradiation Followed by Cyclosporine and Mycophenolate Mofetil in Treating Patients Who Are Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant for Hematologic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-13

    -cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  5. Fludarabine Phosphate, Low-Dose Total-Body Irradiation, and Donor Stem Cell Transplant Followed by Cyclosporine, Mycophenolate Mofetil, Donor Lymphocyte Infusion in Treating Patients With Hematopoietic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    ; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage II Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Multiple Myeloma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  6. Laboratory Characterizations on 2007 Cases of Monoclonal Gammopathies in East China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao Wang; Chunfang Gao; Lingling Xu; Zaixing Yang; Wenjing Zhao

    2008-01-01

    Monoclonal gammopathies are characterized by the presence of monoclonal immunoglobulin in patients with or without evidence of multiple myeloma (MM), macroglobulinemia, amyloidosis (AL), or a related plasma cell proliferative disorder. This study aims to evaluate laboratory diagnostic characters of monoclonal gammopathies and investigates the correlation between monoclonal gammopathies and transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1). Immunofixation electrophoresis (IFE), serum protein electrophoresis (SPE), nephelometry and urine light chain ELISA were used for laboratory identification of monoclonal immunoglobulins. Plasma TGFβ1 was detected with double-antibodies ELISA. Lightcycler was used for single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis. Totally 2,007 cases of monoclonai immunogiobulin (M protein) were identified in 10,682 samples. The isotypes of M protein were IgG type 47.1%, IgA 23.0%, IgM 8.7%, IgD 5.3%, free light chain κ 6.1%, λ 9.8%. In reference to IFE, the coherency of diagnosis was serum light chain ratio (κ/λ) 94.4%, quantitation of lgs 83%, light chain quantitation 80.9%, and urine light chain ratio (κ/λ) 58.0%. Plasma TGFβ1 was elevated significantly compared to normal control. The allelic frequency of codon 10 (C > T) was neither associated with the existence of the M protein nor with the M protein isotype. Monoclonal gammopathies can be identified with the combination of IFE, SPE, Igs quantitaion and urine light chain determination. Although TGFβ1, an important cytokine in immune regulation, was elevated in monoclonal gammopathies, the SNPs in coding region of TGFβ1 gene did not confer susceptibility to the development of monoclonal gammopathies in this study. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2008;5(4): 293-298.

  7. Waldenström makroglobulinemili hastada rituksimab tedavisi sonrası gelişen gizli hepatit B reaktivasyonu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vedat Aslan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab has beenused extensively in the treatment of B-cell lymphoma.Several studies reported hepatitis B virus (HBV reactivationafter rituximab. The majority of these cases havebeen described in chronic carriers of HBV, whereas reactivationin occult hepatitis B virus (OHBV carriers mayoccur.The presented case with the diagnosis of Waldenström’smacroglobulinemia was HBsAg negative and anti HBcIgGpositive before chemotherapy. The patient was started onCVP (cyclophosphamide, vincristine, prednisolone chemotherapy.However, no clinical or laboratory responsewas obtained and the patient was considered unresponsiveto three cycles of CVP therapy. Therefore R-CHOP(rituximab, cyclophosphamide, adriamycin, vincristineand prednisolone was planned as the second therapy.Laboratory work-up after the first cycle of R-CHOP therapyrevealed an aspartate aminotransferase (AST levelof 267 U/L and alanine aminotransferase (ALT level of318 U/L. HBsAg and anti HBcIgG were positive and HBVDNA was 56400 IU/ml. Lamivudin 100 mg/day was started.Four weeks after the initiation of lamivudin therapy,ALT and AST levels returned to normal. Currently, the patienthas received the fourth cycle of R-CHOP therapy.ALT and AST levels continue to be in normal range. Thiscondition was considered to be the reactivation of OHBVfollowing rituximab.The aim of this case presentation is to call attention toHBV reactivation possibility in cases taking immunosupressivemedications like Rituximab. J Clin Exp Invest2012; 3(4: 541-544Key words: Waldenström’s macroglobulinemia, rituximab,occult HBV infection

  8. [Monoclonal gammopathies of undetermined significance do not systematically require a specialized consultation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouquet, G; Amouzou, K; Renaud, L; Carpentier, B; Simonnet, A; Van de Wyngaert, Z; Guidez, S; Demarquette, H; Seynave, M; Deleplanque, D; Yakoub-Agha, I; Facon, T; Leleu, X

    2015-07-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) is a frequent entity in the general population. The incidence rate of fortuitous discovery of a monoclonal component in asymptomatic patients is increasing nowadays. The majority of MGUS is being addressed to a hematologist for diagnosis or follow-up by their generalist practitioners. The management of MGUS consists of a clinical and biological surveillance as per published and validated international guidelines available for MGUS diagnosis and follow-up. MGUS thus may not necessarily need a specialized consultation and follow-up in a hematology ward, as we believe it could be performed by generalist practitioners. We studied 190 patients addressed to our hematology department of Lille for diagnosis or follow-up of MGUS. Among the patients, 9.5% developed a malignant hemopathy (multiple myeloma or Waldenström macroglobulinemia). Among patients diagnosed with MGUS of IgG isotype and a monoclonal component <15 g/L, 96.2% showed no pejorative outcome: these represent simple and routine prognostic factors that can be assessed at diagnosis in order to predict the risk of progression. Those patients could have easily been followed by their generalist practitioner from the diagnosis of MGUS. A specialist's consultation would still be recommended for patients with pejorative factors at diagnosis, or if a clinical or biological event that could suggest progression occurs during follow-up, or in case of MGUS with complication, in which cases patients would need a specialized management in a hematology department. Copyright © 2014 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Determining the clinical significance of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance: a SEER-Medicare population analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Go, Ronald S; Gundrum, Jacob D; Neuner, Joan M

    2015-03-01

    Clinical guidelines have recommended annual follow-up examinations of most patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS); however, evidence supporting this practice is lacking. We performed a population-based study to examine the patterns of disease presentation and outcomes of patients with multiple myeloma, Waldenström macroglobulinemia, and lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma (monoclonal gammopathy-associated malignancies) comparing those with or without a previous MGUS follow-up examination. Patients with monoclonal gammopathy-associated malignancy from 1994 through 2007 were identified using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare linked database and divided into 2 cohorts: those with follow-up (MGUS follow-up examination preceding the diagnosis) and those with no follow-up (no such follow-up examination). We compared the outcomes, including the rates of major complications at cancer diagnosis (acute kidney injury, cord compression, dialysis use, fracture, and hypercalcemia) and survival using propensity score adjustment and Cox proportional hazard models. All statistical tests were 2-sided. Of the 17,457 study patients, 6% had undergone MGUS follow-up. After multivariable modeling, the follow-up group had significantly fewer major complications at diagnosis (odds ratio 0.68; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.57-0.80) and better disease-specific (median, 38 vs. 29 months, P < .001; hazard ratio [HR] 0.85; 95% CI, 0.76-0.94) and overall (median, 23 vs. 19 months, P < .001; HR 0.87; 95% CI, 0.80-0.95) survival. Patients with MGUS follow-up preceding the diagnosis of a monoclonal gammopathy-associated malignancy can experience fewer major complications and have longer survival than those without such follow-up examinations. Future studies replicating our findings in the non-Medicare population and determining the optimal schedule and cost-effectiveness of MGUS follow-up are warranted. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  10. Advances in the treatment of monoclonal gammopaties: The emerging role of targeted therapy in plasma cell dyscrasias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldo M Roccaro

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Aldo M Roccaro1, Irene M Ghobrial1, Simona Blotta1, Steven P Treon1, Michele Malagola2, Kenneth C Anderson1, Paul G Richardson1, Domenico Russo21Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; 2Unit of Blood Diseases and Cell Therapies, University of Brescia Medical School, Brescia, ItalyAbstract: The paradigm for the treatment of monoclonal gammopaties has dramatically changed: therapeutic options in multiple myeloma (MM have evolved from the introduction of melphalan and prednisone in the 1960s, high-dose chemotherapy and stem cell transplantation in the late 1980s and 1990s, to the rapid introduction of small novel molecules within the last seven years. Based on the understanding of the complex interaction of the MM cells with the bone marrow microenvironment and the signaling pathways that are dysregulated in this process, a number of novel therapeutic agents are now available. Specifically, three novel agents with a specific-targeted anti-MM activity, have been FDA-approved for the treatment of this disease, namely Bortezomib, thalidomide, and lenalidomide which are now all playing a key role in the treatment of MM. The success of targeted therapy in MM has since led to the development and investigation of more than 30 new compounds in this disease and in other plasma cell dyscrasias such as Waldenström’s macroglobulinemia and primary amyloidosis, both in the preclinical settings and as part of clinical trials.Keywords: monoclonal gammopaties, targeted therapies

  11. Comparative studies on monotypic IgMlambda and IgGkappa from an inividual patient. IV. Immunofluorescent evidence for a common clonal synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopper, J.E.

    1977-08-01

    Previous studies have presented evidence of shared idiotypic antigenic determinants located within the variable (V/sub H/) region of the heavy chains of monotypic IgMlambda and IgGkappa isolated from the serum of an individual patient, Bro, with Waldenstroem macroglobulinemia. Comparative N-terminal V/sub H/ sequence analyses have demonstrated that the respective ..mu.. and ..gamma.. chains belong to separate V/sub H/ subgroups. The entire V/sub H/ sequence of the Bro ..mu.. chain has been reported, but the V/sub H/ sequence of the Bro ..gamma.. chain still awaits completion. Reported are the results of an immunofluorescent analysis of cytoplasmic lg of lymphoid cells isolated from the patient's peripheral blood and bone marrow. Between 6% and 9% of the cytoplasmic Ig-positive lymphoid cells exhibited fluorescent evidence for the dual presence of kappa and lambda chains as well as ..mu.. and ..gamma.. chains. These results strongly suggest that the idiotypically related Bro IgMlambda and IgGkappa paraproteins are derived from a common clonal origin. Moreover, these findings extend the results of a previous study that has demonstrated the dual presence of IgGkappa and IgGlambda paraproteins within individual myeloma plasma cells. Collectively, these studies suggest that a single neoplastic lymphoid clone may not necessarily be restricted to the synthesis of lg proteins of the identical light chain class. These findings may have a broad implication for the understanding of surface and cytoplasmic lg markers of neoplastic lymphoid cells in certain other lymphoproliferative disorders.

  12. Karyotypic abnormalities and clinical aspects of patients with multiple myeloma and related paraproteinemic disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, W.; Hopper, J.E.; Rowley, J.D.

    1979-08-01

    Karyotypic abnormalities were detected in the malignant cells of 6 of 18 patients with multiple myeloma (MM). Six patients with benign monoclonal gammopathy, one with amyloidosis of immunoglobulin origin, and two with Waldenstroem's macroglobulinemia had normal karyotypes. All six MM patients with aneuploidy were in a group of 10 patients in an accelerated or relapse phase of their disease and four had high serum paraprotein levels when their abnormal karyotypes were detected. Five of the 6 MM patients with aneuploidy had received prior chemotherapy. Aneuploidy was not observed in 8 stable MM patients. Abnormalities of chromosome 14 were present in all 6 patients. A translocation between Nos. 11 and 14 was found in aneuploid cells of 2 patients who had plasma cell leukemia (PCL). A deletion of chromosome 6 was detected in 2 MM patients and a pericentric inversion of No. 6 was seen in the patient with PCL. Three of 4 MM patients had a nonrandom loss of one chromosome 8. Two other MM patients developed acute nonlymphocytic leukemia (ANLL) after the diagnosis of MM. Marrow cells of one patient showed a 5q- chromosome and a constitutional translocation involving Nos. 13 and 14 during the preleukemic stage; during the leukemic phase, the karyotype evolved to 50 chromosomes including extra chromosomes 1, 6, 8, 10, and 21 and a missing 7, in addition to the originally detected 5q- and the 13/14 translocation.The peripheral blood from the other patient was hypodiploid, with a missing chromosome 7 and a translocation between 3q and 9p. These patterns of chromosome change resemble those of ANLL rather than MM and are similar to the changes seen in ANLL after treated malignant lymphoma.

  13. Current Status of Bruton's Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Development and Use in B-Cell Malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aw, Andrew; Brown, Jennifer R

    2017-07-01

    The B-cell receptor (BCR) pathway plays an important role in the survival, proliferation and trafficking of cancer cells in a variety of B-cell malignancies. Recently, a number of agents have been developed to target various components of the BCR pathway. One such target is Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK), a Tec family kinase member found near the cell membrane that is involved in upstream BCR signaling. The biological function of BTK in several B-cell lymphoid malignancies has led to the development of the oral BTK inhibitor ibrutinib. In chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), ibrutinib has demonstrated durable clinical responses in relapsed/refractory (R/R) patients, including those with the high-risk del(17p) cytogenetic abnormality. These findings have paved the way for trials evaluating ibrutinib in previously untreated CLL patients, and also in combination with chemoimmunotherapy or other novel agents. Durable clinical responses have also been demonstrated in mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) and Waldenström's macroglobulinemia (WM) patients treated with ibrutinib. Ibrutinib is generally well tolerated, although current follow-up remains short and patients of advanced age are more likely to discontinue treatment for toxicity. Treatment-specific side effects such as bleeding and atrial fibrillation may, at least partly, be related to off-target inhibition of non-BTK kinases. Studies evaluating other potential indications for BTK inhibition are ongoing, including in post-allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients for whom ibrutinib may be effective in modulating graft-versus-host disease. Combination trials of ibrutinib with venetoclax, a Bcl-2 inhibitor, are underway and are supported by sound preclinical rationale. Several next-generation BTK inhibitors are under development with the goal of decreasing treatment-related toxicity and resistance.

  14. Diagnosis and management of neuropathies associated with plasma cell dyscrasias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, Evan; Marks, Douglas; Raza, Shahzad

    2017-04-10

    Neuropathies associated with plasma cell dyscrasias are a major cause of morbidity for patients managed by medical oncologists. Because of similarities in clinical presentation and on nerve conduction studies, identifying the underlying disease leading to a paraproteinemic neuropathy can often be difficult. In addition, the degree of neurologic deficit does not strictly correlate with the extent of abnormalities on common clinical laboratory testing. Fortunately, with increasing understanding into the biologic mechanisms of underlying hematologic diseases, additional biomarkers have recently been developed, thus improving our diagnostic capacity. Neuropathies associated with plasma cells dyscrasias are seen with Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) particularly IgM subtype, followed by IgG and IgA MGUS, multiple myeloma, Waldenström's macroglobulinemia, amyloid, Castleman's disease, and POEMS syndrome. The mechanisms of neuronal injury associated with plasma cell dyscrasia vary based on underlying diagnosis and include malignant infiltration, immune-mediated antibody deposition, or local compression of nerve roots. The polyneuropathies are frequently demyelinating, although axonal and mixed neuropathies can also be seen. As demonstrated by the cases included in this review, patients frequently present with symmetric sensory disturbance, followed by progressive motor weakness. Unfortunately, because of the complexity of diagnostic testing, patients are frequently examined late, often after receiving several ineffective therapies. The aim of this case-based review is to provide clinicians with insight on how to properly recognize these atypical neuropathies and send the appropriate diagnostic work, increasing the likelihood of accurately classify the patient's underlying hematologic disorder. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Caracterización del mieloma múltiple y de su componente monoclonal durante 14 años en Las Tunas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Lina Pupo Rodríguez

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available El mieloma múltiple es una neoplasia de células plasmáticas que representa el 10% de las enfermedades hematológicas malignas. La mayoría de los pacientes presentan síntomas, signos y trastornos de laboratorio sugestivos de enfermedad activa, incluyendo lesiones osteolíticas activas, hipercalcemia, anemia y fallo renal. Para el diagnóstico de esta enfermedad hay que tener en cuenta las manifestaciones clínicas, los estudios radiológicos, pruebas especiales como citología celular y exámenes de laboratorio como la electroforesis de proteína en suero y orina, inmunoelectroforesis, cuantificación de inmunoglobulinas y proteína de Bence-Jones. Se realizó un estudio con el objetivo de evaluar las características de las variables inmunológicas mediante la determinación de inmunoglobulinas (inmunodifusión radial simple o inmunoturbidimetría en un analizador automático HITACHI, proteínas totales (método de Biuret o en el analizador HITACHI y electroforesis de proteínas en suero y orina en pacientes remitidos de la consulta de Hematología del Hospital “Ernesto Guevara de la Serna” de Las Tunas, con el diagnóstico de mieloma múltiple. La clase IgG fue la predominante en los 127 casos estudiados (73,3%, seguido de la IgA (16,5% y de cadenas ligeras (9,5%. Se han registrado dos casos de macroglobulinemia de Waldeström. En correspondencia con lo reportado en la literatura, en la provincia de Las Tunas el isotipo más frecuente en pacientes afectados por mieloma múltiple es de clase IgG.

  16. High-Dose Chemotherapy With or Without Total-Body Irradiation Followed by Autologous Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Hematologic Cancer or Solid Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-07

    Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Neuroblastoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Regional Neuroblastoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  17. Patterns of survival and causes of death following a diagnosis of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristinsson, Sigurdur Y; Björkholm, Magnus; Andersson, Therese M-L; Eloranta, Sandra; Dickman, Paul W; Goldin, Lynn R; Blimark, Cecilie; Mellqvist, Ulf-Henrik; Wahlin, Anders; Turesson, Ingemar; Landgren, Ola

    2009-12-01

    There are limited data on survival patterns among patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance. We compared the survival of 4,259 patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance, collected from hematology outpatient units in Sweden, with the survival of the general population by computing relative survival ratios. We also compared causes of death in these patients with those in 16,151 matched controls. One-, 5-, 10-, and 15-year relative survival ratios were 0.98 (95% CI 0.97-0.99), 0.93 (0.91-0.95), 0.82 (0.79-0.84), and 0.70 (0.64-0.76), respectively. Younger age at diagnosis of the gammopathy was associated with a significantly lower excess mortality compared to that in older patients (pundetermined significance had an increased risk of dying from multiple myeloma (hazards ratio (HR)=553; 95% CI 77-3946), Waldenström's macroglobulinemia (HR=infinity), other lymphoproliferative malignancies (6.5; 2.8-15.1), other hematologic malignancies (22.9; 8.9-58.7), amyloidosis (HR=infinity), bacterial infections (3.4; 1.7-6.7), ischemic heart disease (1.3; 1.1-1.4), other heart disorders (1.5; 1.2-1.8), other hematologic conditions (6.9; 2.7-18), liver (2.1; 1.1-4.2), and renal diseases (3.2; 2.0-4.9). Our finding of decreased life expectancy in patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance, which was most pronounced in the elderly and explained by both malignant transformation and non-malignant causes, is of importance in the understanding and clinical management of this disease. The underlying mechanisms may be causally related to the gammopathy, but may also be explained by underlying disease that led to the detection of the hematologic disease. Our results are of importance since they give a true estimation of survival in patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance diagnosed in clinical practice.

  18. Gain-of-function mutations in the Toll-like Receptor pathway: TPL2-mediated ERK1/ERK2 MAPK activation, a path to tumorigenesis in lymphoid neoplasms?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon eRousseau

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Lymphoid neoplasms form a family of cancers affecting B-cells, T-cells and NK cells. The Toll-Like Receptor (TLR signalling adapter molecule MYD88 is the most frequently mutated gene in these neoplasms. This signalling adaptor relays signals from TLRs to downstream effector pathways such as the Nuclear Factor kappa B (NFB and Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK pathways to regulate innate immune responses (Kawai and Akira, 2010. Gain-of-function mutations such as MYD88[L265P] activate downstream signalling pathways in absence of cognate ligands for TLRs, resulting in increased cellular proliferation and survival. This article reports an analysis of non-synonymous somatic mutations found in the TLR signaling network in lymphoid neoplasms. In accordance with previous reports, mutations map to MYD88 pro-inflammatory signaling and not TRIF-mediated Type I IFN production. Interestingly, the analysis of somatic mutations found downstream of the core TLR-signaling network uncovered a strong association with the ERK1/2 MAPK cascade. In support of this analysis, heterologous expression of MYD88[L265P] in HEK 293 cells led to ERK1/2 MAPK phosphorylation in addition to NFB activation. Moreover, this activation is dependent on the protein kinase Tumour Promoting Locus-2 (TPL-2, activated downstream of the IKK complex. Activation of ERK1/2 would then lead to activation, amongst others, of MYC and hnRNP A1, two proteins previously shown to contribute to tumour formation in lymphoid neoplasms. Taken together, this analysis suggests that TLR-mediated tumorigenesis occurs via the TPL2-mediated ERK1/2 activation. Therefore, the hypothesis proposed is that inhibition of ERK1/2 MAPK activation would prevent tumour growth downstream of MYD88[L265]. It will be interesting to test whether pharmacological inhibitors of this pathway show efficacy in primary tumour cells derived from hematologic malignancies such as Waldenstrom’s Macroglobulinemia, where the

  19. Anti-CD22/CD20 Bispecific antibody with enhanced trogocytosis for treatment of Lupus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edmund A Rossi

    Full Text Available The humanized anti-CD22 antibody, epratuzumab, has demonstrated therapeutic activity in clinical trials of lymphoma, leukemia and autoimmune diseases, treating currently over 1500 cases of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, acute lymphoblastic leukemias, Waldenström's macroglobulinemia, Sjögren's syndrome, and systemic lupus erythematosus. Because epratuzumab reduces on average only 35% of circulating B cells in patients, and has minimal antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and negligible complement-dependent cytotoxicity when evaluated in vitro, its therapeutic activity may not result completely from B-cell depletion. We reported recently that epratuzumab mediates Fc/FcR-dependent membrane transfer from B cells to effector cells via trogocytosis, resulting in a substantial reduction of multiple BCR modulators, including CD22, CD19, CD21, and CD79b, as well as key cell adhesion molecules, including CD44, CD62L, and β7 integrin, on the surface of B cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained from normal donors or SLE patients. Rituximab has clinical activity in lupus, but failed to achieve primary endpoints in a Phase III trial. This is the first study of trogocytosis mediated by bispecific antibodies targeting neighboring cell-surface proteins, CD22, CD20, and CD19, as demonstrated by flow cytometry and immunofluorescence microscopy. We show that, compared to epratuzumab, a bispecific hexavalent antibody comprising epratuzumab and veltuzumab (humanized anti-CD20 mAb exhibits enhanced trogocytosis resulting in major reductions in B-cell surface levels of CD19, CD20, CD21, CD22, CD79b, CD44, CD62L and β7-integrin, and with considerably less immunocompromising B-cell depletion that would result with anti-CD20 mAbs such as veltuzumab or rituximab, given either alone or in combination with epratuzumab. A CD22/CD19 bispecific hexavalent antibody, which exhibited enhanced trogocytosis of some antigens and minimal B-cell depletion, may also be

  20. FAU in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-06

    Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  1. Lenalidomide and Combination Chemotherapy (DA-EPOCH-R) in Treating Patients With MYC-Associated B-Cell Lymphomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-24

    Leukemia; Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Untreated Hairy Cell Leukemia; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  2. Fludarabine Phosphate, Melphalan, Total-Body Irradiation, Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Hematologic Cancer or Bone Marrow Failure Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-05

    IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  3. Fludarabine Phosphate, Cyclophosphamide, Tacrolimus, Mycophenolate Mofetil, Total-Body Irradiation, and Donor Bone Marrow Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Hematologic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-27

    ; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage II Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  4. Bortezomib and Filgrastim in Promoting Stem Cell Mobilization in Patients With Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or Multiple Myeloma Undergoing Stem Cell Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-19

    Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Multiple Myeloma; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Untreated Hairy Cell Leukemia; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  5. Sunitinib Malate in Treating HIV-Positive Patients With Cancer Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-14

    -transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Myelofibrosis; Primary Systemic Amyloidosis; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia, Initial Treatment; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  6. 惰性淋巴瘤非化疗药物的治疗现状及进展%Advances and the current status in chemotherapy-free management for indolent lym-phomas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋腾(综述); 王华庆(审校)

    2016-01-01

    Indolent B-cell lymphomas constitute a slow growing cancer of the lymphatic system. These lymphomas mainly include fol-licular lymphoma, chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma, Waldenstom macroglobulinemia, marginal zone lym-phoma, and low malignant mantle cell lymphoma. These lymphomas are sensitive to chemotherapy and/or immunochemotherapy, but they cannot be cured. Furthermore, patient age at diagnosis, patient age at time of first onset or subsequent relapses, and compli-cations often influence the chemotherapy curative effect. At present, recent progress has been achieved in our understanding of dys-regulated pathways and immunologic anti-tumor responses in indolent lymphoma. In particular, the breakthrough of non-cytotoxic drugs renders"chemo-free"treatment a near-future reality. In this review, we highlight these promising approaches, such as the com-bination of anti-CD20 antibodies with immunomodulatory drugs, mAbs directed against other surface antigens, and programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) receptor inhibitor or B-cell receptor signaling pathway inhibitors. Future phase III studies will evaluate the efficacy of these drugs in the context of non-chemotherapy and further clarify treatment status.%惰性B细胞淋巴瘤是一类生长缓慢的淋巴系统肿瘤,主要包括滤泡性淋巴瘤(follicular lymphoma,FL)、慢性淋巴细胞白血病(chronic lymphocytic leukemia,CLL)/小淋巴细胞淋巴瘤(small lymphocytic lymphoma,SLL)、华氏巨球蛋白血症(waldenstom mac⁃roglobulinemia,WM)、边缘区淋巴瘤(marginal zone lymphoma,MZL)以及低度恶性的套细胞淋巴瘤(low malignant mantle cell lym⁃phoma,MCL)等,对化疗及免疫治疗敏感,但无法治愈。患者发病年龄、首次发病及再次复发时间、并发症等均可影响化疗疗效。当前,在惰性淋巴瘤信号转导通路及抗肿瘤免疫反应等方面,尤其是非细胞毒药物研究的突破,支持了

  7. Vaccine Therapy in Preventing Cytomegalovirus Infection in Patients With Hematological Malignancies Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-17

    ; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IIIA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IIIB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IVA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IVB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Hairy Cell Leukemia; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  8. Mycophenolate Mofetil and Cyclosporine in Reducing Graft-Versus-Host Disease in Patients With Hematologic Malignancies or Metastatic Kidney Cancer Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-27

    /Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Type 1 Papillary Renal Cell Carcinoma; Type 2 Papillary Renal Cell Carcinoma; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  9. Fludarabine and Total-Body Irradiation Followed By Donor Stem Cell Transplant and Cyclosporine and Mycophenolate Mofetil in Treating HIV-Positive Patients With or Without Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-28

    Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IIIA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IIIB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IVA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IVB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia