WorldWideScience

Sample records for wakefulness test regimen

  1. Detailed field test of yaw-based wake steering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fleming, P.; Churchfield, M.; Scholbrock, A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a detailed field-test campaign to investigate yaw-based wake steering. In yaw-based wake steering, an upstream turbine intentionally misaligns its yaw with respect to the inflow to deflect its wake away from a downstream turbine, with the goal of increasing total power...... production. In the first phase, a nacelle-mounted scanning lidar was used to verify wake deflection of a misaligned turbine and calibrate wake deflection models. In the second phase, these models were used within a yaw controller to achieve a desired wake deflection. This paper details the experimental...

  2. Full-Scale Field Test of Wake Steering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Paul; Annoni, Jennifer; Scholbrock, Andrew; Quon, Eliot; Dana, Scott; Schreck, Scott; Raach, Steffen; Haizmann, Florian; Schlipf, David

    2017-05-01

    Wind farm control, in which turbine controllers are coordinated to improve farmwide performance, is an active field of research. One form of wind farm control is wake steering, in which a turbine is yawed to the inflow to redirect its wake away from downstream turbines. Wake steering has been studied in depth in simulations as well as in wind tunnels and scaled test facilities. This work performs a field test of wake steering on a full-scale turbine. In the campaign, the yaw controller of the turbine has been set to track different yaw misalignment set points while a nacelle-mounted lidar scans the wake at several ranges downwind. The lidar measurements are combined with turbine data, as well as measurements of the inflow made by a highly instrumented meteorological mast. These measurements are then compared to the predictions of a wind farm control-oriented model of wakes.

  3. Test Vehicle Forebody Wake Effects on CPAS Parachutes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Eric S.

    2017-01-01

    Parachute drag performance has been reconstructed for a large number of Capsule Parachute Assembly System (CPAS) flight tests. This allows for determining forebody wake effects indirectly through statistical means. When data are available in a "clean" wake, such as behind a slender test vehicle, the relative degradation in performance for other test vehicles can be computed as a Pressure Recovery Fraction (PRF). All four CPAS parachute types were evaluated: Forward Bay Cover Parachutes (FBCPs), Drogues, Pilots, and Mains. Many tests used the missile-shaped Parachute Compartment Drop Test Vehicle (PCDTV) to obtain data at high airspeeds. Other tests used the Orion "boilerplate" Parachute Test Vehicle (PTV) to evaluate parachute performance in a representative heatshield wake. Drag data from both vehicles are normalized to a "capsule" forebody equivalent for Orion simulations. A separate database of PCDTV-specific performance is maintained to accurately predict flight tests. Data are shared among analogous parachutes whenever possible to maximize statistical significance.

  4. [Multiple sleep latency test, maintenance of wakefulness test and suggestive immobilization test].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Haruhito

    2015-06-01

    In clinical practice, assessment usually involves self-report; however, objective measures are available. The multiple sleep latency test(MSLT) is performed during the main period of wakefulness and is designed to determine a patient's propensity to fall asleep. To be valid, the MSLT should be performed the day after nocturnal polysomnography (PSG). It is the standard test for the assessment of objective sleepiness and diagnosis of narcolepsy, that is a mean sleep latency equal to or under 8 minutes and equal to or greater than two sleep onset REM periods (SOREMPs). As opposed to the MSLT, the maintenance of wakefulness test (MWT) is designed to test the patient's ability to stay awake. The MWT is a 40-minutes protocol consisting of four trials separated by 2-hour intervals and is performed in much the same way as the MSLT. The MWT may be indicated in assessment of individuals in whom the inability to remain awake constitutes a safety issue, or in patients with narcolepsy or idiopathic hypersomnia to assess response to treatment with medications. There is little evidence linking mean sleep latency on the MWT with risk of accidents in real world circumstances. The suggestive immobilization test(SIT) was designed during which sensor and motor symptoms of restless legs syndrome are quantified during a period of immobility taking place in the evening before PSG. The patient is instructed to avoid moving voluntary for the entire duration of the test, which is designed to last 1 hour. The subjective leg discomfort evaluation and periodic leg movement by surface electromyograms from right and left anterior tibialis support diagnosis for restless legs syndrome. Many factors, such as clinical setting, pretest condition or aging effects etc. can alter the findings of the test and considerable clinical judgment is needed to avoid an error in interpretation. Above those three sleep-wake related tests provide us useful information.

  5. International Organization of Standardization (ISO) and Cambridge Filter Test (CFT) Smoking Regimen Data Comparisons in Tobacco Product Marketing Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Changyu; Walters, Matthew J; Holman, Matthew R

    2017-07-01

    We investigated the differences in TNCO (tar, nicotine, and carbon monoxide) smoke yields generated under the International Organization of Standardization (ISO) and Federal Trade Commission (FTC) Cambridge Filter Test (CFT) smoking regimens. Twenty-nine commercial cigarette products from the US marketplace were acquired in 2015 and tested by measuring the TNCO smoke yields generated under these 2 nonintense smoking regimens. Data obtained demonstrated a linear relationship between the TNCO yields produced under the 2 smoking regimens (R 2 > 0.99). TNCO yields produced by each product were higher under the CFT smoking regimen than the ISO smoking regimen. We found that tar, nicotine, and carbon monoxide yields were consistently 10% to 13% higher under the CFT smoking regimen than under the ISO smoking regimen. This strong correlation indicates that the 2 smoking regimens can be used to apply a correlation correction to CFT TNCO data and allow its comparison to ISO TNCO data in tobacco product marketing applications.

  6. Test results for an SMA-actuated vortex wake control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quackenbush, Todd R.; Bilanin, Alan J.; Carpenter, Bernie F.

    1999-07-01

    This paper describes recent test result obtained on a prototype SMA-actuated foil that serves as a key element in a vortex wake control scheme for lifting surfaces. Previous papers have described the theoretical basis and feasibility studies for this scheme - which is based on a novel wake control known as vortex leveraging - as well as prior work on device design, test planning, and fabrication. The critical item in the realization of this scheme is a Smart Vortex Leveraging Tab (SVLT), a device designed to provide perturbations in the vortex system downstream of lifting surfaces at frequencies and amplitudes carefully selected to accelerate overall wake breakup. The paper summarizes the background of the effort, but focuses on the detail design and fabrication techniques used in the construction of a prototype SVLT and the results of water tunnel tests of a near full-scale prototype device.

  7. Wake fields in HCS accelerator and CTS power line of the CLIC Test Facility (CTF II) simulation with program wake

    CERN Document Server

    Riche, A

    2000-01-01

    One of the two parallel beam lines of the CTF II, (the 'Drive Beam') is providing the other (the accelerator) with 30 GHz power. Experimentation was performed in 98 and later with a CTF layout to study acceleration of a train of bunches with beam loading compensation, bunch length compression and 30 GHz conversion of the Drive Beam power [1]. This conversion is limited by the difficulty of transmitting the beam through the structures extracting the beam power (CTS). A large transverse wake loss factor is associated with the necessary high longitudinal wake loss factor in CTS. Therefore the limitation of transmission should come mainly from transverse wakes in CTS. Dynamics in HCS and in the bunch compression device was studied with codes GPT [2] and PARMELA [3], [4] using beam parameters input derived from calculations of the beam in the RF gun with code MAFIA. Code WAKE is used to verify that the influence of the wake-fields in HCS is small, to follow the beam along the 4 CTS of the drive linac, and to give ...

  8. Design, fabrication, and test planning for an SMA-actuated vortex wake control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quackenbush, Todd R.; Batcho, P. F.; Bilanin, Alan J.; Carpenter, Bernie F.

    1998-06-01

    This paper describes ongoing design and fabrication work on a vortex wake control system for submarines that employs SMA-actuated devices. Previous work has described the theoretical basis and feasibility studies for this system, which is based on a novel wake control scheme known as vortex leveraging. The critical item in the realization of this system is a Smart Vortex Leveraging Tab (SVLT), whose design and fabrication is the principal focus of this work. This paper outlines the background of the effort and the design principles involved, but will chiefly deal with three closely interrelated topics; the hydrodynamic design requirements and control surface layout for the vortex leveraging system; the detail design and fabrication techniques being used in the construction of a prototype SVLT; and the test planning and experiment design process currently underway for test of both the overall vortex leveraging concept and SVLT device itself.

  9. Fast wake measurements with LiDAR at Risø test field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bingöl, Ferhat; Trujillo, J.J.; Mann, Jakob

    2008-01-01

    The vast majority of wind turbines are today erected in wind farms. As a consequence, wake generated loads are becoming more and more important. We present a new and successful experimental technique, based on remote sensing, to measure instantaneously the flow in the wake of wind turbines. Downs...

  10. Exploring the wake of a dust particle by a continuously approaching test grain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Hendrik, E-mail: hjung@physik.uni-kiel.de; Greiner, Franko; Asnaz, Oguz Han; Piel, Alexander [IEAP, Christian-Albrechts-Universität, D-24098 Kiel (Germany); Carstensen, Jan [ABB Switzerland Ltd., CH-5405 Baden-Daettwil (Switzerland)

    2015-05-15

    The structure of the ion wake behind a dust particle in the plasma sheath of an rf discharge is studied in a two-particle system. The wake formation leads to attractive forces between the negatively charged dust and can cause a reduction of the charge of a particle. By evaluating the dynamic response of the particle system to small external perturbations, these quantities can be measured. Plasma inherent etching processes are used to achieve a continuous mass loss and hence an increasing levitation height of the lower particle, so that the structure of the wake of the upper particle, which is nearly unaffected by etching, can be probed. The results show a significant modification of the wake structure in the plasma sheath to one long potential tail.

  11. Experimental testing of axial induction based control strategies for wake control and wind farm optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartl, J.; Sætran, L.

    2016-09-01

    In state-of-the-art wind farms each turbine is controlled individually aiming for optimum turbine power not considering wake effects on downstream turbines. Wind farm control concepts aim for optimizing the overall power output of the farm taking wake interactions between the individual turbines into account. This experimental wind tunnel study investigates axial induction based control concepts. It is examined how the total array efficiency of two in-line model turbines is affected when the upstream turbine's tip speed ratio (λcontrol) or blade pitch angle (β-control) is modified. The focus is particularly directed on how the wake flow behind the upstream rotor is affected when its axial induction is reduced in order to leave more kinetic energy in the wake to be recovered by a downstream turbine. It is shown that the radial distribution of kinetic energy in the wake area can be controlled by modifying the upstream turbine's tip speed ratio. By pitching out the upstream turbine's blades, however, the available kinetic energy in the wake is increased at an equal rate over the entire blade span. Furthermore, the total array efficiency of the two turbine setup is mapped depending on the upstream turbines tip speed ratio and pitch angle. For a small turbine separation distance of x/D=3 the downstream turbine is able to recover the major part of the power lost on the upstream turbine. However, no significant increase in the two-turbine array efficiency is achieved by altering the upstream turbine's operation point away from its optimum.

  12. Impact of Complex Orography on Wake Development: Simulation Results for the Planned WindForS Test Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Thorsten; Schulz, Christoph; Letzgus, Patrick; Rettenmeier, Andreas

    2017-05-01

    In Southern Germany a test site will be erected in complex terrain. The purpose is to enable detailed scientific studies of terrain impact on the characteristics of two research wind turbines and to demonstrate new technologies. Within preparatory studies an appropriate site was identified and examined by field tests and numerical studies in more detail. The present paper summarizes CFD analyses on the impact of the local test site orography on the wake development of a virtual wind turbine. The effects of the orography are identified by comparative simulations for the same turbine using comparative wind situation in flat terrain.

  13. Ahemeral light regimens test the photoperiodic threshold of the european starling (Sturnus vulgaris)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, R. G.

    1980-03-01

    Male European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) were held for three consecutive photoperiod oscillations (ahemeral years) composed of 30-h day lengths, i.e., the “daily” light and dark each lasted three hours longer than under the natural daily photoperiod at latitude 38°N. These starlings had no gonad metamorphosis during the 45 actual months necessary to complete the three ahemeral photoperiod oscillations; nor did subsequent exposure to continuous illumination elicit gonad response. It is concluded that the daily duration of light and darkness (although certainly operant in controlling starling sexual cycles under temperate-zone photoperiod oscillations) is not the critical factor establishing a sexual cycle under the ahemeral regimen. Rather, it appears that this species must experience a daily duration of light of 12 hours or less (a definitive photoperiodic threshold) before photo-induction of a sexual cycle is possible.

  14. Assessment of a new dynamic light regimen in a nuclear power control room without windows on quickly rotating shiftworkers--effects on health, wakefulness, and circadian alignment: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowden, Arne; Åkerstedt, Torbjörn

    2012-06-01

    The aim of the study was to test whether a new dynamic light regime would improve alertness, sleep, and adaptation to rotating shiftwork. The illumination level in a control room without windows at a nuclear power station was ~200 lux (straight-forward horizontal gaze) using a weak yellow light of 200 lux, 3000 K (Philips Master TLD 36 W 830). New lighting equipment was installed in one area of the control room above the positions of the reactor operators. The new lights were shielded from the control group by a distance of >6 m, and the other operators worked at desks turned away from the new light. The new lights were designed to give three different light exposures: (i) white/blue strong light of 745 lux, 6000 K; (ii) weak yellow light of 650 lux, 4000 K; and (iii) yellow moderate light of 700 lux, 4000 K. In a crossover design, the normal and new light exposures were given during a sequence of three night shifts, two free days, two morning shifts, and one afternoon shift (NNN + MMA), with 7 wks between sessions. The operators consisted of two groups; seven reactor operators from seven work teams were at one time exposed to the new equipment and 16 other operators were used as controls. The study was conducted during winter with reduced opportunities of daylight exposure during work, after night work, or before morning work. Operators wore actigraphs, filled in a sleep/wake diary, including ratings of sleepiness on the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale (KSS) every 2 h, and provided saliva samples for analysis of melatonin at work (every 2nd h during one night shift and first 3 h during one morning shift). Results from the wake/sleep diary showed the new light treatment increased alertness during the 2nd night shift (interaction group × light × time, p light condition after the 3rd night shift (group × light, p sleep span increased after the 2nd night shift (p sleep efficiency (p light in rooms without windows during the dark Nordic season may promote alertness

  15. Test Plan for the Wake Steering Experiment at the Scaled Wind Farm Technology (SWiFT) Facility.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naughton, Brian Thomas [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-02-01

    This document is a test plan describing the objectives, configuration, procedures, reporting, roles, and responsibilities for conducting the joint Sandia National Laboratories and National Renewable Energy Laboratory Wake Steering Experiment at the Sandia Scaled Wind Farm Technology (SWiFT) facility near Lubbock, Texas in 2016 and 2017 . The purpose of this document is to ensure the test objectives and procedures are sufficiently detailed such that al l involved personnel are able to contribute to the technical success of the test. This document is not intended to address safety explicitly which is addressed in a separate document listed in the references titled Sandia SWiFT Facility Site Operations Manual . Both documents should be reviewed by all test personnel.

  16. Effects of a Month-Long Napping Regimen in Older Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Scott S.; Stanchina, Michele D.; Schlang, Joelle R.; Murphy, Patricia J.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES 1) To examine the effects of a month-long nap regimen using one of two durations (45 min, or 2 hr) on nighttime sleep and waking function in a group of healthy older subjects. 2) To assess the degree to which healthy older individuals are willing/able to adhere to such napping regimens. DESIGN Three laboratory sessions, with 2-week at-home recording interspersed, using a between-subjects approach. SETTING The study was conducted in the Laboratory of Human Chronobiology at Weill Cornell Medical College and in subjects’ homes. PARTICIPANTS Twenty-two healthy men and women aged 50–88 years (mean = 70y). MEASUREMENTS Polysomnography (sleep EEG), actigraphy, sleep diaries, neurobehavioral performance, sleep latency tests. RESULTS With the exception of compliance to the protocol, there were few differences between Short and Long nap conditions. Napping had no negative impact on subsequent nighttime sleep quality or duration, resulting in a significant increase in 24-hour sleep amounts. Such increased sleep was associated with enhanced cognitive performance, but had no impact on simple reaction time. Subjects were generally able to comply better with the 45-minute than the 2-hour nap regimen. CONCLUSION A month-long, daily nap regimen may enhance waking function without negatively impacting nighttime sleep. Using 2-hour naps in such a regimen is unlikely to meet with acceptable compliance; a regimen of daily 1-hour naps may be more desireable for both effectiveness and compliance. PMID:21314644

  17. Effects of a month-long napping regimen in older individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Scott S; Stanchina, Michele D; Schlang, Joelle R; Murphy, Patricia J

    2011-02-01

    To examine the effects of a month-long nap regimen using one of two durations (45 minutes or 2 hours) on nighttime sleep and waking function in a group of healthy older participants and to assess the degree to which healthy older individuals are willing and able to adhere to such napping regimens. Three laboratory sessions, with 2-week at-home recording interspersed, using a between-participants approach. Laboratory of Human Chronobiology at Weill Cornell Medical College and participants' homes. Twenty-two healthy men and women aged 50 to 88 (mean 70). Polysomnography (sleep electroencephalography), actigraphy, sleep diaries, neurobehavioral performance, sleep latency tests. With the exception of adherence to the protocol, there were few differences between short and long nap conditions. Napping had no negative effect on subsequent nighttime sleep quality or duration, resulting in a significant increase in 24-hour sleep amounts. Such increased sleep was associated with enhanced cognitive performance but had no effect on simple reaction time. Participants were generally able to adhere better to the 45-minute than the 2-hour nap regimen. A month-long, daily nap regimen may enhance waking function without negatively affecting nighttime sleep. Using 2-hour naps in such a regimen is unlikely to meet with acceptable adherence; a regimen of daily 1-hour naps may be more desirable for effectiveness and adherence. © 2011, Copyright the Authors. Journal compilation © 2011, The American Geriatrics Society.

  18. Wake Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-07-06

    THIS IS A SAFETY NOTICE. The guidance contained herein supersedes : the guidance provided in the current edition of Order 7110.65, Air Traffic Control, relating to selected wake turbulence separations and aircraft weight classifications. This Notice ...

  19. New insights into the mechanism of action of pyrazinamide, implications for susceptibility testing, and future regimens*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard M Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Although the exact mechanism of action of PZA is not known yet, it is widely accepted that PZA is a prodrug requiring transformation to pyrazinoic acid, the active form, by the mycobacterial enzyme encoded by the pncA gene. Most clinical resistance indeed appears to be a result of a diverse range of mutations in this gene and sequencing of the pncA gene has been shown to have excellent predictive power for PZA resistance. The wider availably of pncA sequencing in combination with databases of the phenotypic implications of these mutations has helped make genetic testing for PZA resistance a practical proposition. For the past decades, it has been generally accepted that an extracellular low pH is required for PZA activity but work in our laboratory [1] and others [2] has recently challenged this assumption. Alternative bacterial stresses, apart from a reduced pH of the growth media (such as reduced temperature, can also induce a PZA-susceptible phenotype. The characterization of spontaneous in vitro-resistant pyrazinoic acid mutants selected under neutral pH conditions suggests a key role for the pantothenate/coenzyme A biosynthetic pathway. This has profound implications for the mechanism of action of PZA as well as potentially the bacterial population against which PZA is active in the host. These findings will be discussed as well as their implications for further research and the future of PZA susceptibility testing.

  20. Desmopressin in haemophilia: The need for a standardised clinical response and individualised test regimen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoof, S C M; Schütte, L M; Leebeek, F W G; Cnossen, M H; Kruip, M J H A

    2017-06-21

    Due to interindividual variation in desmopressin response, non-severe haemophilia A patients require desmopressin testing prior to therapeutic treatment. However, adequate response or frequency of blood sampling is not standardised in international guidelines. Consequently, various definitions and blood sampling protocols are currently applied. Interestingly, sustainability of desmopressin response is not incorporated into these definitions. To study desmopressin response rates in a cohort of non-severe haemophilia A patients using currently accepted desmopressin response definitions. This, in order to formulate a standardised, uniform response which includes information on sustainability and to design a standardised blood sampling protocol. Currently used desmopressin responses in non-severe haemophilia A patients were derived from a literature search. Actual desmopressin response rates were individualised in 105 non-severe HA patients from the Erasmus University Medical Centre and classified according to current varying definitions. Five response definitions were evaluated, three of which included only factor VIII (FVIII):C cut-off levels and two also incorporated FVIII:C-fold increase over baseline. C-fold increase showed no association with desmopressin response sustainability. C 1 hour after infusion (standardised desmopressin response based on clinically relevant FVIII:C levels, e.g. 0.30 and 0.50 IU/mL. In addition, patients with <0.30 IU/mL FVIII:C after 1 hour (non-responder) or ≥0.80 IU/mL (sustained responder) do not require subsequent blood sampling. However, patients with ≥0.30-0.79 IU/mL FVIII:C after 1 hour should undergo blood sampling after 6 hours to additionally determine response sustainability. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Adapting test timing to the sleep-wake schedule: effects on diurnal neurobehavioral performance changes in young evening and older morning chronotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Christina; Peigneux, Philippe; Cajochen, Christian; Collette, Fabienne

    2012-05-01

    The synchrony effect refers to the beneficial impact of temporal matching between the timing of cognitive task administration and preferred time-of-day for diurnal activity. Aging is often associated with an advance in sleep-wake timing and concomitant optimal performance levels in the morning. In contrast, young adults often perform better in the evening hours. So far, the synchrony effect has been tested at fixed clock times, neglecting the individual's sleep-wake schedule and thus introducing confounds, such as differences in accumulated sleep pressure or circadian phase, which may exacerbate synchrony effects. To probe this hypothesis, the authors tested older morning and young evening chronotypes with a psychomotor vigilance and a Stroop paradigm once at fixed morning and evening hours and once adapting testing time to their preferred sleep-wake schedule in a within-subject design. The authors observe a persistence of synchrony effects for overall median reaction times during a psychomotor vigilance task, even when testing time is adapted to the specific individual's sleep-wake schedule. However, data analysis also indicates that time-of-day modulations are weakened under those conditions for incongruent trials on Stroop performance and the slowest reaction times on the psychomotor vigilance task. The latter result suggests that the classically observed synchrony effect may be partially mediated by a series of parameters, such as differences in socio-professional timing constraints, the amount of accumulated sleep need, or circadian phase, all leading to differential arousal levels at testing.

  2. Comparing Treatment Effect Measurements in Narcolepsy: The Sustained Attention to Response Task, Epworth Sleepiness Scale and Maintenance of Wakefulness Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Heide, Astrid; van Schie, Mojca K M; Lammers, Gert Jan; Dauvilliers, Yves; Arnulf, Isabelle; Mayer, Geert; Bassetti, Claudio L; Ding, Claire-Li; Lehert, Philippe; van Dijk, J Gert

    2015-07-01

    To validate the Sustained Attention to Response Task (SART) as a treatment effect measure in narcolepsy, and to compare the SART with the Maintenance of Wakefulness Test (MWT) and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS). Validation of treatment effect measurements within a randomized controlled trial (RCT). Ninety-five patients with narcolepsy with or without cataplexy. The RCT comprised a double-blind, parallel-group, multicenter trial comparing the effects of 8-w treatments with pitolisant (BF2.649), modafinil, or placebo (NCT01067222). MWT, ESS, and SART were administered at baseline and after an 8-w treatment period. The severity of excessive daytime sleepiness and cataplexy was also assessed using the Clinical Global Impression scale (CGI-C). The SART, MWT, and ESS all had good reliability, obtained for the SART and MWT using two to three sessions in 1 day. The ability to distinguish responders from nonresponders, classified using the CGI-C score, was high for all measures, with a high performance for the SART (r = 0.61) and the ESS (r = 0.54). The Sustained Attention to Response Task is a valid and easy-to-administer measure to assess treatment effects in narcolepsy, enhanced by combining it with the Epworth Sleepiness Scale. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  3. Improvements in ECN Wake Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Versteeg, M.C. [University of Twente, Enschede (Netherlands); Ozdemir, H.; Brand, A.J. [ECN Wind Energy, Petten (Netherlands)

    2013-08-15

    Wind turbines extract energy from the flow field so that the flow in the wake of a wind turbine contains less energy and more turbulence than the undisturbed flow, leading to less energy extraction for the downstream turbines. In large wind farms, most turbines are located in the wake of one or more turbines causing the flow characteristics felt by these turbines differ considerably from the free stream flow conditions. The most important wake effect is generally considered to be the lower wind speed behind the turbine(s) since this decreases the energy production and as such the economical performance of a wind farm. The overall loss of a wind farm is very much dependent on the conditions and the lay-out of the farm but it can be in the order of 5-10%. Apart from the loss in energy production an additional wake effect is formed by the increase in turbulence intensity, which leads to higher fatigue loads. In this sense it becomes important to understand the details of wake behavior to improve and/or optimize a wind farm layout. Within this study improvements are presented for the existing ECN wake model which constructs the fundamental basis of ECN's FarmFlow wind farm wake simulation tool. The outline of this paper is as follows: first, the governing equations of the ECN wake farm model are presented. Then the near wake modeling is discussed and the results compared with the original near wake modeling and EWTW (ECN Wind Turbine Test Site Wieringermeer) data as well as the results obtained for various near wake implementation cases are shown. The details of the atmospheric stability model are given and the comparison with the solution obtained for the original surface layer model and with the available data obtained by EWTW measurements are presented. Finally the conclusions are summarized.

  4. Wake potentials and impedances for the ATA (Advanced Test Accelerator) induction cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craig, G.D.

    1990-09-04

    The AMOS Wakefield Code is used to calculate the impedances of the induction cell used in the Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) at Livermore. We present the wakefields and impedances for multipoles m = 0, 1 and 2. The ATA cell is calculated to have a maximum transverse impedance of approximately 1000 {Omega}/m at 875 MHz with a quality factor Q = 5. The sensitivity of the impedance spectra to modeling variations is discussed.

  5. Wind farm array wake losses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, R.W. [Impact Weather, Washougal, WA (United States); McCarthy, E.F. [Wind Economics & Technology, Inc., Martinez, CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    A wind turbine wake study was conducted in the summer of 1987 at an Altamont Pass wind electric generating facility. The wind speed deficits, turbulence, and power deficits from an array consisting of several rows of wind turbines is discussed. A total of nine different test configurations were evaluated for a downwind spacing ranging from 7 rotor diameters (RD) to 34 RD and a cross wind spacing of 1.3 RD and 2.7 RD. Wake power deficits of 15% were measured at 16 RD and power losses of a few percent were even measurable at 27 RD for the closer cross wind spacing. For several rows of turbines separated by 7-9 RD the wake zones overlapped and formed compound wakes with higher velocity deficits. The wind speed and direction turbulence in the wake was much higher than the ambient turbulence. The results from this study are compared to the findings from other similar field measurements.

  6. The Neurological Wake-up Test-A Role in Neurocritical Care Monitoring of Traumatic Brain Injury Patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marklund, Niklas

    2017-01-01

    The most fundamental clinical monitoring tool in traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients is the repeated clinical examination. In the severe TBI patient treated by continuous sedation in a neurocritical care (NCC) unit, sedation interruption is required to enable a clinical evaluation (named the neurological wake-up test; NWT) assessing the level of consciousness, pupillary diameter and reactivity to light, and presence of focal neurological deficits. There is a basic conflict regarding the NWT in the NCC setting; can the clinical information obtained by the NWT justify the risk of inducing a stress response in a severe TBI patient? Furthermore, in the presence of advanced multimodal monitoring and neuroimaging, is the NWT necessary to identify important clinical alterations? In studies of severe TBI patients, the NWT was consistently shown to induce a stress reaction including brief increases in intracranial pressure (ICP) and changes in cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP). However, it has not been established whether these short-lived ICP and CPP changes are detrimental to the injured brain. Daily interruption of sedation is associated with a reduced ventilator time, shorter hospital stay and reduced mortality in many studies of general intensive care unit patients, although such clinical benefits have not been firmly established in TBI. To date, there is no consensus on the use of the NWT among NCC units and systematic studies are scarce. Thus, additional studies evaluating the role of the NWT in clinical decision-making are needed. Multimodal NCC monitoring may be an adjunct in assessing in which TBI patients the NWT can be safely performed. At present, the NWT remains the golden standard for clinical monitoring and detection of neurological changes in NCC and could be considered in TBI patients with stable baseline ICP and CPP readings. The focus of the present review is an overview of the existing literature on the role of the NWT as a clinical monitoring tool

  7. Sandia Wake Imaging System Field Test Report: 2015 Deployment at the Scaled Wind Farm Technology (SWiFT) Facility.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naughton, Brian Thomas [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Herges, Thomas [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-10-01

    This report presents the objectives, configuration, procedures, reporting , roles , and responsibilities and subsequent results for the field demonstration of the Sandia Wake Imaging System (SWIS) at the Sandia Scaled Wind Farm Technology (SWiFT) facility near Lubbock, Texas in June and July 2015.

  8. Wake characteristics of a model ornithopter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juarez, Alfredo; Harlow, Jacob; Allen, James; Ferreira de Sousa, Paulo

    2006-03-01

    This paper details unsteady wake measurements from a model Ornithopther flying in a wind tunnel at representative flight conditions. Testing over a range of Strouhal number, 0.1-0.3, shows that the unsteady wake is composed of coherent vortical structures that resemble vortex rings. A single ring is formed in the wake of each wing during one wing beat. Momentum balance from velocity field measurements are reconciled with unsteady lift and drag measurements from a drag balance.

  9. Do later wake times and increased sleep duration of 12th graders result in more studying, higher grades, and improved SAT/ACT test scores?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, James S

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between sleep duration, wake time, and hours studying on high school grades and performance on the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT)/ American College Testing (ACT) college entrance exams. Data were collected from 13,071 recently graduated high school seniors who were entering college in the fall of 2014. A column proportions z test with a Bonferroni adjustment was used to analyze proportional differences. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was used to examine mean group differences. Students who woke up prior to 6 a.m. and got less than 8 h of sleep (27 %) were significantly more likely to report studying 11 or more hours per week (30 %), almost double the rate compared to students who got more than 8 h of sleep and woke up the latest (16 %). Post hoc results revealed students who woke up at 7 a.m. or later reported significantly higher high school grades than all other groups (p SAT/ACT scores were from the group that woke up after 7 a.m. but got less than 8 h sleep (M = 1099.5). Their scores were significantly higher than all other groups. This study provides additional evidence that increased sleep and later wake time are associated with increased high school grades. However, this study also found that students who sleep the longest also reported less studying and lower SAT/ACT scores.

  10. Wake up and Die

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schubart, Rikke

    2013-01-01

    Anmeldelse af den colombianske gyserfilm Volver a morir (eng. titel Wake Up and Die) af Miguel Urrutia......Anmeldelse af den colombianske gyserfilm Volver a morir (eng. titel Wake Up and Die) af Miguel Urrutia...

  11. Wind Turbines Wake Aerodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vermeer, L.; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Crespo, A.

    2003-01-01

    The aerodynamics of horizontal axis wind turbine wakes is studied. The contents is directed towards the physics of power extraction by wind turbines and reviews both the near and the far wake region. For the near wake, the survey is restricted to uniform, steady and parallel flow conditions...

  12. Magnesium sulphate for the management of preeclampsia and eclampsia in low and middle income countries: a systematic review of tested dosing regimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Rebecca; Magee, Laura A; Payne, Beth; Firoz, Tabassum; Sawchuck, Diane; Tu, Domena; Vidler, Marianne; de Silva, Dane; von Dadelszen, Peter

    2014-02-01

    To review systematically the magnesium sulphate (MgSO4) dosing regimens tested in low and middle income countries (LMICs) for women with preeclampsia (prevention) and/or eclampsia (treatment). We searched Medline, EMBASE, IPA, CINAHL, CDSR, and CENTRAL databases for relevant English language publications. Our search yielded 753 publications, of which 26 (10 randomized controlled trials and 16 observational studies) evaluated MgSO4 for preeclampsia and/or eclampsia in World Bank-classified LMICs. Independent, by two authors. Twenty-five studies were conducted in hospital settings and one in the community. Rates of eclampsia were usually management of preeclampsia and eclampsia and whether MgSO4 loading can be safely administered in the community.

  13. Coupled wake boundary layer model of wind-farms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stevens, Richard Johannes Antonius Maria; Gayme, Dennice F.; Meneveau, Charles

    2015-01-01

    We present and test a coupled wake boundary layer (CWBL) model that describes the distribution of the power output in a wind-farm. This model couples the traditional, industry-standard wake model approach with a “top-down” model for the overall wind-farm boundary layer structure. The wake model

  14. Controlled progressive innate immune stimulation regimen prevents the induction of sickness behavior in the open field test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Q

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Qun Chen, Andrew J Tarr, Xiaoyu Liu, Yufen Wang, Nathaniel S Reed, Cameron P DeMarsh, John F Sheridan, Ning QuanDivision of Oral Biology, Institute for Behavioral Medicine Research, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USAAbstract: Peripheral immune activation by bacterial mimics or live replicating pathogens is well known to induce central nervous system activation. Sickness behavior alterations are often associated with inflammation-induced increases in peripheral proinflammatory cytokines (eg, interleukin [IL]-1β and IL-6. However, most researchers have used acute high dose endotoxin/bacterial challenges to observe these outcomes. Using this methodology may pose inherent risks in the translational interpretation of the experimental data in these studies. Studies using Escherichia coli have yet to establish the full kinetics of repeated E. coli peripheral injections. Therefore, we sought to examine the effects of repeated low dose E. coli on sickness behavior and local peripheral inflammation in the open field test. Results from the current experiments showed a behavioral dose response, where increased amounts of E. coli resulted in correspondingly increased sickness behavior. Furthermore, animals that received a subthreshold dose (ie, one that did not cause sickness behavior of E. coli 24 hours prior were able to withstand a larger dose of E. coli on the second day (a dose that would normally cause sickness behavior in mice without prior exposure without inducing sickness behavior. In addition, animals that received escalating subthreshold doses of E. coli on days 1 and 2 behaviorally tolerated a dose of E. coli 25 times higher than what would normally cause sickness behavior if given acutely. Lastly, increased levels of E. coli caused increased IL-6 and IL-1β protein expression in the peritoneal cavity, and this increase was blocked by administering a subthreshold dose of E. coli 24 hours prior. These data show that progressive

  15. Detecting wind turbine wakes with nacelle lidars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Held, D. P.; Larvol, A.; Mann, J.

    2017-05-01

    Because the horizontal homogeneity assumption is violated in wakes flows, lidars face difficulties when reconstructing wind fields. Further, small-scale turbulence which is prevalent in wake flows causes Doppler spectrum widths to be broader than in the free stream. In this study the Doppler peak variance is used as a detection parameter for wakes. A one month long measurement campaign, where a continuous-wave lidar on a turbine has been exposed to multiple wake situations, is used to test the detection capabilities. The results show that it is possible to identify situation where a downstream turbine is in wake by comparing the peak widths. The used lidar is inexpensive and brings instalments on every turbine within economical reach. Thus, the information gathered by the lidars can be used for improved control at wind farm level.

  16. Multiple Turbine Wakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machefaux, Ewan; Mann, Jakob

    lateral velocities, and thus inspired by the basic assumption behind the Dynamic Wake Meandering model.Secondly, the impact of the atmospheric stability on wind turbine wake deficit is studied experimentally and numerically. The measurements collected from the previous pulsed lidar campaign was reused...... wind are adapted to the thermal stratification using a newly developed spectral tensor, which includes buoyancy effects. Discrepancies are discussed as basis for future model development and improvement. Moreover, the impact of atmospheric stability and terrain on large/small scale wake flow...... and wake advection velocity, is derived and linked to the characteristics of a spherical vortex structure. Additionally, a new empirical model for single wake expansion is proposed based on an initial wake expansion in the pressure driven flow regime and a spatial gradient computed from the large scale...

  17. Wake modeling and simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Gunner Chr.; Madsen Aagaard, Helge; Larsen, Torben J.

    We present a consistent, physically based theory for the wake meandering phenomenon, which we consider of crucial importance for the overall description of wind turbine loadings in wind farms. In its present version the model is confined to single wake situations. The model philosophy does, howev...... methodology has been implemented in the aeroelastic code HAWC2, and example simulations of wake situations, from the small Tjæreborg wind farm, have been performed showing satisfactory agreement between predictions and measurements...

  18. Wake Expansion Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Branlard, Emmanuel Simon Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Different models of wake expansion are presented in this chapter: the 1D momentum theory model, the cylinder analog model and Theodorsen’s model. Far wake models such as the ones from Frandsen or Rathmann or only briefly mentioned. The different models are compared to each other. Results from thi...... this chapter are used in Chap. 16 to link near-wake and far-wake parameters and in Chap. 20 to study the influence of expansion on tip-losses....

  19. Classifying insulin regimens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neu, A; Lange, K; Barrett, T

    2015-01-01

    defined. The proposed new classification for insulin management will be comprehensive, simple, and catchy. Currently available terms were included. This classification may offer the opportunity to compare therapeutic strategies without the currently existing confusion on the insulin regimen....

  20. To choose the proper antibiotic regimen between the old and new antimicrobial agents and to determine the optimum dosage with Bi-Digital O-Ring Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Dominic P; Wu, Ping-Shi; Panik, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Bi-Digital O-Ring Test (BDORT) can be used for various purposes for medical and dental diagnosis as well as for treatment purposes by determining the type of medication and the dosage for a patient. In case of infection, BDORT is a fast and non-invasive way to decide what kind of antibiotic and the dosage to be given to patient. If a patient already has been on a certain antibiotic for days, the clinician could use BDORT with diode (with arrow signs of the diode pointing to the patient) to test the same drug. Otherwise without diode, if BDORT result is negative, it could either mean the negative result might be due to resonance phenomenon or it may be because the antibiotic is ineffective. Either way, if O-Ring would be open during testing, the clinician should gradually increase or decrease the dosage of antibiotic to find out if BDORT result begins to become positive. In great majority of cases involving less effective old generation antibiotics, it is usually due to resistant microbia that require increasing dosage of antibiotic to make it become more effective. If increasing dosage would make O-Ring close, then the increased dosage would be effective to the patient. If the result is negative, the clinician should consider switching to another antibiotic regimen that may be tested positive with BDORT. Old generation antibiotics have not necessarily lost usefulness or lack efficacy on those new emerging resistant bacteria. Clinicians may just need to increase the dosage of those older generation antibiotics to make them more effective. In fact, with so many antibiotic-resisting strains of bacteria, clinician often face dilemma whether to switch to newer generation of antibiotics or just to increase the dosage of the older generation of antibiotics that a patient has been taking. When testing antibiotic of penicillin-related medication including amoxicillin, the thymus tablet (bovine source) should also be used for the testing after initially testing without it

  1. Dynamic wake meandering modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, Gunner C.; Aagaard Madsen, H.; Bingoel, F. (and others)

    2007-06-15

    We present a consistent, physically based theory for the wake meandering phenomenon, which we consider of crucial importance for the overall description of wind turbine loadings in wind farms. In its present version the model is confined to single wake situations. The model philosophy does, however, have the potential to include also mutual wake interaction phenomenons. The basic conjecture behind the dynamic wake meandering model is that wake transportation in the atmospheric boundary layer is driven by the large scale lateral- and vertical turbulence components. Based on this conjecture a stochastic model of the downstream wake meandering is formulated. In addition to the kinematic formulation of the dynamics of the 'meandering frame of reference', models characterizing the mean wake deficit as well as the added wake turbulence, described in the meandering frame of reference, are an integrated part the model complex. For design applications, the computational efficiency of wake deficit prediction is a key issue. Two computationally low cost models are developed for this purpose. The character of the added wake turbulence, generated by the up-stream turbine in the form of shed and trailed vorticity, has been approached by analytical as well as by numerical studies. The dynamic wake meandering philosophy has been verified by comparing model predictions with extensive full-scale measurements. These comparisons have demonstrated good agreement, both qualitatively and quantitatively, concerning both flow characteristics and turbine load characteristics. Contrary to previous attempts to model wake loading, the dynamic wake meandering approach opens for a unifying description in the sense that turbine power and load aspects can be treated simultaneously. This capability is a direct and attractive consequence of the model being based on the underlying physical process, and it potentially opens for optimization of wind farm topology, of wind farm operation as

  2. The Epworth Sleepiness Scale for screening of the drowsy driving: comparison with the maintenance of wakefulness test in an Iranian sample of commercial drivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghniiat-Haghighi, Khosro; Moller, Henry J; Saraei, Maryam; Aminian, Omid; Khajeh-Mehrizi, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    Traffic fatalities are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in Iran. Occupational sleep medicine field needs more cost-effective and applicable tests for screening purposes. This study reports on a pilot screening study for drowsy drivers in an urban Iranian sample of commercial drivers. The Maintenance of Wakefulness Test (MWT) measures the ability to remain awake objectively. Sleep latency in MWT is a reasonable predictor of driving simulator performance in drivers. In this study, we evaluate whether the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) and MWT are equally useful in drivers with possible Excessive Daytime Sleepiness (EDS). 46 consecutive road truck drivers in a transportation terminal entered into this study. The ESS score of patients with normal and abnormal MWT was 3.24±2.4 and 4.08±3 respectively which was not significantly differenced (P value = 0.34). No significant correlation was found between the ESS and sleep latency in MWT (r=-0.28, 95%CI= -0.58 to 0.02). By using the receiver operating characteristic analysis, the area under the curve was found to be 0.57 (95% confidence interval = 0.37- 0.77) which is not statistically acceptable (P value=0.46). Our finding showed that the MWT and ESS do not measure the same parameter.

  3. The Epworth Sleepiness Scale for screening of the drowsy driving: comparison with the maintenance of wakefulness test in an Iranian sample of commercial drivers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khosro Sadeghniiat-Haghighi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Traffic fatalities are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in Iran. Occupational sleep medicine field needs more cost-effective and applicable tests for screening purposes. This study reports on a pilot screening study for drowsy drivers in an urban Iranian sample of commercial drivers. The Maintenance of Wakefulness Test (MWT measures the ability to remain awake objectively. Sleep latency in MWT is a reasonable predictor of driving simulator performance in drivers. In this study, we evaluate whether the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS and MWT are equally useful in drivers with possible Excessive Daytime Sleepiness (EDS. 46 consecutive road truck drivers in a transportation terminal entered into this study. The ESS score of patients with normal and abnormal MWT was 3.24±2.4 and 4.08±3 respectively which was not significantly differenced (P value = 0.34. No significant correlation was found between the ESS and sleep latency in MWT (r=-0.28, 95%CI= -0.58 to 0.02. By using the receiver operating characteristic analysis, the area under the curve was found to be 0.57 (95% confidence interval = 0.37- 0.77 which is not statistically acceptable (P value=0.46. Our finding showed that the MWT and ESS do not measure the same parameter.

  4. Status of wake and array loss research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, D.L.

    1991-09-01

    In recent years, many projects have evaluated wind turbine wake effects and resultant array losses in both Europe and the United States. This paper examines the status of current knowledge about wake effects and array losses and suggests future research. Single-turbine wake characteristics have been studied extensively and are generally described well by existing theoretical models. Field measurements of wake effects in wind turbine arrays are largely limited to small arrays, with 2 to 4 rows of turbines. Few data have been published on wake effects within large arrays. Measurements of wake deficits downwind of large arrays that deficits are substantially larger and extend farther downwind than expected. Although array design models have been developed, these models have been tested and verified using only limited data from a few rows of wind turbines in complex terrain, whereas some of the largest arrays have more than 40 rows of wind turbines. Planned cooperative efforts with the wind industry will obtain existing data relevant to analyzing energy deficits within large arrays and identifying data sets for potential use in array model verification efforts. Future research being considered include a cooperative research experiment to obtain more definitive data on wake deficits and turbulence within and downwind of large arrays. 16 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) Capsule Parachute Assembly System (CPAS) Wake Deficit Wind Tunnel Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, James C.; Schuster, David M.

    2014-01-01

    During descent after re-entry into the Earth's atmosphere, the Orion CM deploys its drogue parachutes at approximately Mach 0.7. Accurately predicting the dynamic pressure experienced by the drogue parachutes at deployment is critical to properly designing the parachutes. This NASA Engineering and Safety Center assessment was designed to provide a complete set of flowfield measurements on and around an idealized Orion Crew Module shape with the most appropriate wind tunnel simulation of the Orion flight conditions prior to parachute deployment. This document contains the details of testing and the outcome of the assessment.

  6. Experiments in the wind turbine far wake for the evaluation of an analytical wake model

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Luis; Vatn, Mari; Mühle, Franz; Sætran, Lars

    2017-05-01

    Nowadays, not only the size of single wind turbines but also the size of wind farms is increasing. Understanding the interaction between the turbines and especially the wakes formed behind them are getting more important to further improve such wind turbine arrays. Consequently, new issues in wind energy research arise. An experimental wind tunnel study was conducted, in order to analyze and understand the far wake of a wind turbine. The experimental results were used to test if an analytical wake model derived by H. Schilichting for blunt bodies can be used to describe the velocity and width development in the far wake of wind turbines. The results of the evaluation show that the wake of a wind turbine agrees fairly well with the model according to Schlichting. The velocity deficit as well as the width in the wake behind the turbine, are found to deviate with around only 2% from the results obtained applying the analytical model. Thus, it can be concluded that the analytical wake model by Schlichting is well suited to estimate the velocity deficit and the width in the far wake of a wind turbine.

  7. Rethinking the laryngopharyngeal reflux treatment algorithm: Evaluating an alternate empiric dosing regimen and considering up-front, pH-impedance, and manometry testing to minimize cost in treating suspect laryngopharyngeal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Thomas L; Werner, Astrid; Nahikian, Kael; Dezube, Aaron; Roth, Douglas F

    2017-10-01

    Empiric proton pump inhibitor (PPI) trials for laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) are common. A majority of the patients respond to acid suppression. This work intends to evaluate once-daily, 40 mg omeprazole and once-nightly, 300 mg ranitidine (QD/QHS) dosing as an alternative regimen, and use this study's cohort to evaluate empiric regimens prescribed for LPR as compared to up-front testing with pH impedance multichannel intraluminal impedance (MII) with dual pH probes and high-resolution manometry (HRM) for potential cost minimization. Retrospective cohort review and cost minimization study. A chart review identified patients diagnosed with LPR. All subjects were treated sequentially and outcomes recorded. Initial QD/QHS dosing increased after 3 months to BID if no improvement and ultimately prescribed MII and HRM if they failed BID dosing. Decision tree diagrams were constructed to determine costs of two empiric regimens and up-front MII and HRM. Ninety-seven subjects met the criteria. Responders and nonresponders to empiric therapy were identified. Seventy-two subjects (74%) responded. Forty-eight (67% of responders and 49% of all) improved with QD/QHS dosing. Forty-nine (51%) subjects escalated to BID dosing. Twenty-four subjects (33% of responders and 25% of all) improved on BID therapy. Twenty-five subjects (26%) did not respond to acid suppression. Average weighted cost was $1,897.00 per patient for up-front testing, $3,033.00 for initial BID, and $3,366.00 for initial QD/QHS. An alternate QD/QHS regimen improved the majority who presented with presumed LPR. Cost estimates demonstrate that the QD/QHS regimen was more expensive than the initial BID high-dose PPI for 6 months. Overall per-patient cost appears less with up-front MII and HRM. 4. Laryngoscope, 127:S1-S13, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  8. HARP PRIA- Wake

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This HARP was first deployed off of Wake Atoll in 2010. It has been recovered and redeployed multiple times (see time frames for information).

  9. Recreating the shading effects of ship wake induced turbidity to test acclimation responses in the seagrass Thalassia hemprichii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Nicola K.; Yaakub, Siti Maryam; Tay, Jason K. L.; Todd, Peter A.

    2017-12-01

    Elevated sediment delivery and resuspension in coastal waters from human activities such as shipping can have detrimental effects on seagrass health by limiting light penetration. Managing seagrasses requires knowledge of their light acclamatory abilities so guidelines for coastal activities (e.g. ship movements) that influence sediment dynamics can be created. Guidelines typically focus on ensuring that seagrasses are able to meet their minimal light requirements (MLR). MLRs can be achieved by different light regimes, but it remains unknown whether a chronically low yet stable light regime is less or more detrimental than a highly variable regime with periods of extreme low to no light. To test this, we compared the physiological and morphological responses of Thalassia hemprichii among three light regimes: an open control (30-40% ambient light), a shaded control with (11-15% ambient light), and a fluctuating shade (4-30% ambient light). The MLR for the T. hemprichii we studied was lower (4-10% ambient light) than previous reports (mean = 18%) illustrating enhanced light acclimation in Singapore's chronically turbid waters. Seagrass shoots in the shaded control, however, exhibited significantly more morphological stress symptoms, with reduced shoot growth and lower below ground biomass. These data suggest that for seagrass exposed to periods of acute light stress, energetic costs associated with photo-acclimation to more variable light regimes can be offset if the plant can meet its daily light requirements during periods of high light. Management of seagrass beds should incorporate regular light monitoring and move towards an adaptive feedback-based approach to ensure the long-term viability of these vulnerable ecosystems.

  10. PREFACE: Wake Conference 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barney, Andrew; Nørkær Sørensen, Jens; Ivanell, Stefan

    2015-06-01

    The 44 papers in this volume constitute the proceedings of the 2015 Wake Conference, held in Visby on the island of Gotland in Sweden. It is the fourth time this conference has been held. The Wake Conference series started in Visby, where it was held in 2009 and 2011. In 2013 it took place in Copenhagen where it was combined with the International Conference on Offshore Wind Energy and Ocean Energy. In 2015 it is back where it started in Visby, where it takes place at Uppsala University Campus Gotland, June 9th-11th. The global yearly production of electrical energy by wind turbines has grown tremendously in the past decade and it now comprises more than 3% of the global electrical power consumption. Today the wind power industry has a global annual turnover of more than 50 billion USD and an annual average growth rate of more than 20%. State-of-the-art wind turbines have rotor diameters of up to 150 m and 8 MW installed capacity. These turbines are often placed in large wind farms that have a total production capacity corresponding to that of a nuclear power plant. In order to make a substantial impact on one of the most significant challenges of our time, global warming, the industry's growth has to continue for a decade or two yet. This in turn requires research into the physics of wind turbine wakes and wind farms. Modern wind turbines are today clustered in wind farms in which the turbines are fully or partially influenced by the wake of upstream turbines. As a consequence, the wake behind the wind turbines has a lower mean wind speed and an increased turbulence level, as compared to the undisturbed flow outside the farm. Hence, wake interaction results in decreased total production of power, caused by lower kinetic energy in the wind, and an increase in the turbulence intensity. Therefore, understanding the physical nature of the vortices and their dynamics in the wake of a turbine is important for the optimal design of a wind farm. This conference is aimed

  11. Optimization Under Uncertainty for Wake Steering Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quick, Julian; Annoni, Jennifer; King, Ryan; Dykes, Katherine; Fleming, Paul; Ning, Andrew

    2017-05-01

    Wind turbines in a wind power plant experience significant power losses because of aerodynamic interactions between turbines. One control strategy to reduce these losses is known as “wake steering,” in which upstream turbines are yawed to direct wakes away from downstream turbines. Previous wake steering research has assumed perfect information, however, there can be significant uncertainty in many aspects of the problem, including wind inflow and various turbine measurements. Uncertainty has significant implications for performance of wake steering strategies. Consequently, the authors formulate and solve an optimization under uncertainty (OUU) problem for finding optimal wake steering strategies in the presence of yaw angle uncertainty. The OUU wake steering strategy is demonstrated on a two-turbine test case and on the utility-scale, offshore Princess Amalia Wind Farm. When we accounted for yaw angle uncertainty in the Princess Amalia Wind Farm case, inflow-direction-specific OUU solutions produced between 0% and 1.4% more power than the deterministically optimized steering strategies, resulting in an overall annual average improvement of 0.2%. More importantly, the deterministic optimization is expected to perform worse and with more downside risk than the OUU result when realistic uncertainty is taken into account. Additionally, the OUU solution produces fewer extreme yaw situations than the deterministic solution.

  12. Recent developments in rotor wake modeling for helicopter noise prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poling, D.; Dadone, L.; Althoff, S.

    1991-01-01

    A preliminary test/theory correlation evaluation is conducted for wake measurement test results obtained by LDV for a B360 helicopter rotor, at conditions critical to the understanding of wake-rollup and blade-vortex interaction phenomena. The LDV data were complemented by acoustic, blade pressure, rotor performance, and blade/control load measurements.

  13. Dynamic wake meandering modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Gunner Chr.; Madsen Aagaard, Helge; Bingöl, Ferhat

    , concerning both flow characteristics and turbine load characteristics. Contrary to previous attempts to model wake loading, the dynamic wake meandering approach opens for a unifying description in the sense that turbine power– and load aspects can be treated simultaneously. This capability is a direct...... and attractive consequence of the model being based on the underlying physical process, and it potentially opens for optimization of wind farm topology, of wind farm operation as well as of control strategies for the individual turbine. Implementation of the methodology with aeroelastic codes is straight forward...

  14. Wake Studies of Ornithopters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juarez, Alfredo; Harlow, Jacob; Allen, James; Ferreira de Sousa, Paulo

    2006-11-01

    This paper details experiments using a mechanical ornithopter flying in a low speed wind tunnel. Experiments were conducted for a Strouhal number of 0.3 and Reynolds number of 2300, Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and flow visualization was used to develop quantitative and qualitative information about the nature of the wake. The data shows that the wake is made of a series of discrete vortex rings. The impulse of these rings has been estimated with PIV data and the results correlate well with the lift required to sustain the ornithopter in flight.

  15. Wake measurements for code validations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kurt Schaldemose

    2009-01-01

    As part of the EU-TOPFARM project a large number of datasets have been identified for verification of wind farm climate models, aeroelastic load and production models of turbines subjected to three dimensional dynamic wake wind field and the aeroelastic production modeling of a whole wind farm de...... developed in the project. This report identifies a number of measurement datasets which is available for model validations in the EU-TOPFARM project. The datasets are presented with a very short summary of the test setup and a principle site layout illustration....

  16. Spectral coherence in windturbine wakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hojstrup, J. [Riso National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark)

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes an experiment at a Danish wind farm to investigate the lateral and vertical coherences in the nonequilibrium turbulence of a wind turbine wake. Two meteorological masts were instrumented for measuring profiles of mean speed, turbulence, and temperature. Results are provided graphically for turbulence intensities, velocity spectra, lateral coherence, and vertical coherence. The turbulence was somewhat influenced by the wake, or possibly from aggregated wakes further upstream, even at 14.5 diameters. Lateral coherence (separation 5m) seemed to be unaffected by the wake at 7.5 diameters, but the flow was less coherent in the near wake. The wake appeared to have little influence on vertical coherence (separation 13m). Simple, conventional models for coherence appeared to be adequate descriptions for wake turbulence except for the near wake situation. 3 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Wake modelling combining mesoscale and microscale models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Badger, Jake; Volker, Patrick; Prospathospoulos, J.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper the basis for introducing thrust information from microscale wake models into mesocale model wake parameterizations will be described. A classification system for the different types of mesoscale wake parameterizations is suggested and outlined. Four different mesoscale wake...

  18. Wind Farm Wake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasager, Charlotte Bay; Karagali, Ioanna; Volker, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    On 25 January 2016 at 12:45 UTC several photographs of the offshore wind farm Horns Rev 2 were taken by helicopter pilot Gitte Lundorff with an iPhone. A very shallow layer of fog covered the sea. The photos of the fog over the sea dramatically pictured the offshore wind farm wake. Researchers got...

  19. Wake structure and similar behavior of wake profiles downstream of a plunging airfoil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali R. DAVARI

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Very limited attention has already been paid to the velocity behavior in the wake region in unsteady aerodynamic problems. A series of tests has been performed on a flapping airfoil in a subsonic wind tunnel to study the wake structure for different sets of mean angle of attack, plunging amplitude and reduced frequency. In this study, the velocity profiles in the wake for various oscillation parameters have been measured using a wide shoulder rake, especially designed for the present experiments. The airfoil under consideration was a critical section of a 660 kW wind turbine. The results show that for a flapping airfoil the wake structure can be of drag producing type, thrust producing or neutral, depending on the mean angle of attack, oscillation amplitude and reduced frequency. In a thrust producing wake, a high-momentum high-velocity jet flow is formed in the core region of the wake instead of the conventional low-momentum flow. As a result, the drag force normally experienced by the body due to the momentum deficit would be replaced by a thrust force. According to the results, the momentum loss in the wake decreases as the reduced frequency increases. The thrust producing wake pattern for the flapping airfoil has been observed for sufficiently low angles of attack in the absence of the viscous effects. This phenomenon has also been observed for either high oscillation amplitudes or high reduced frequencies. According to the results, for different reduced frequencies and plunging amplitudes, such that the product of them be a constant, the velocity profiles exhibit similar behavior and coalesce on each other. This similarity parameter works excellently at small angles of attack. However, at near stall boundaries, the similarity is not as evident as before.

  20. Using High-Fidelity Computational Fluid Dynamics to Help Design a Wind Turbine Wake Measurement Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churchfield, M.; Wang, Q.; Scholbrock, A.; Herges, T.; Mikkelsen, T.; Sjöholm, M.

    2016-09-01

    We describe the process of using large-eddy simulations of wind turbine wake flow to help design a wake measurement campaign. The main goal of the experiment is to measure wakes and wake deflection that result from intentional yaw misalignment under a variety of atmospheric conditions at the Scaled Wind Farm Technology facility operated by Sandia National Laboratories in Lubbock, Texas. Prior simulation studies have shown that wake deflection may be used for wind-plant control that maximizes plant power output. In this study, simulations are performed to characterize wake deflection and general behavior before the experiment is performed to ensure better upfront planning. Beyond characterizing the expected wake behavior, we also use the large-eddy simulation to test a virtual version of the lidar we plan to use to measure the wake and better understand our lidar scan strategy options. This work is an excellent example of a “simulation-in-the-loop” measurement campaign.

  1. Light detection and ranging measurements of wake dynamics Part I: One-dimensional Scanning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bingöl, Ferhat; Mann, Jakob; Larsen, Gunner Chr.

    2010-01-01

    of the wake meandering, as well as the instantaneous wake expansion expressed in a meandering frame of reference. The experiment was conducted primarily to test the simple hypothesis that the wake deficit is advected passively by the larger-than-rotor-size eddies in the atmospheric flow, and that the wake...... at the same time widens gradually, primarily because of mixing caused by small-scale atmospheric eddies. In this first paper, we focus on our new measurement technique, and test if the wake meandering follows the wind direction fluctuations, i.e. if it is advected passively in the lateral direction...

  2. Severe Bloodstream Infection due to KPC-Producer E coli in a Renal Transplant Recipient Treated With the Double-Carbapenem Regimen and Analysis of In Vitro Synergy Testing: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva, Alessandra; Cipolla, Alessia; Gizzi, Francesca; D'Abramo, Alessandra; Favaro, Marco; De Angelis, Massimiliano; Ferretti, Giancarlo; Russo, Gianluca; Iannetta, Marco; Mastroianni, Claudio M; Mascellino, Maria T; Vullo, Vincenzo

    2016-02-01

    Transplant recipients are at high risk of infections caused by multidrug resistant microorganisms. Due to the limited therapeutic options, innovative antimicrobial combinations against carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae causing severe infections are necessary.A 61-year-old woman with a history of congenital solitary kidney underwent renal transplantation. The postoperative course was complicated by nosocomial pneumonia due to Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and pan-sensitive Escherichia coli, successfully treated with antimicrobial therapy. On postoperative day 22, diagnosis of surgical site infection and nosocomial pneumonia with concomitant bacteremia due to a Klebisella pneumoniae carbapenemase-producer E coli was made. The patient was treated with the double-carbapenem regimen (high dose of meropenem plus ertapenem) and a potent synergistic and bactericidal activity of this un-conventional therapeutic strategy was observed in vitro. Despite a microbiological response with prompt negativity of blood cultures, the patient faced a worse outcome because of severe hemorrhagic shock.The double-carbapenem regimen might be considered as a rescue therapy in those subjects, including transplant recipients, in whom previous antimicrobial combinations failed or when colistin use might be discouraged. Performing in vitro synergy testing should be strongly encouraged in cases of infections caused by pan-drug resistant strains, especially in high-risk patients.

  3. Rotating Wheel Wake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombard, Jean-Eloi; Xu, Hui; Moxey, Dave; Sherwin, Spencer

    2016-11-01

    For open wheel race-cars, such as Formula One, or IndyCar, the wheels are responsible for 40 % of the total drag. For road cars, drag associated to the wheels and under-carriage can represent 20 - 60 % of total drag at highway cruise speeds. Experimental observations have reported two, three or more pairs of counter rotating vortices, the relative strength of which still remains an open question. The near wake of an unsteady rotating wheel. The numerical investigation by means of direct numerical simulation at ReD =400-1000 is presented here to further the understanding of bifurcations the flow undergoes as the Reynolds number is increased. Direct numerical simulation is performed using Nektar++, the results of which are compared to those of Pirozzoli et al. (2012). Both proper orthogonal decomposition and dynamic mode decomposition, as well as spectral analysis are leveraged to gain unprecedented insight into the bifurcations and subsequent topological differences of the wake as the Reynolds number is increased.

  4. Statistical Study of the Lunar Plasma Wake Outer Boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ames, W. F.; Brain, D. A.; Poppe, A.; Halekas, J. S.; McFadden, J. P.; Glassmeier, K.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2012-12-01

    The Moon does not have an intrinsic magnetic field and lacks the conductivity necessary to develop an induced magnetosphere. Therefore, the interaction of the Moon with the solar wind is dominated by impact absorption of solar wind particles on the day side and the generation of a plasma wake on the night side. A plasma density gradient forms between the flowing solar wind and the plasma wake, causing solar wind plasma to gradually refill the wake region. Electrons fill the wake first, pulling ions in after them via ambi-polar diffusion. Despite the existence of comprehensive new plasma measurements of the lunar wake region, relatively little attention has been devoted to the shape and variability in location of its outer boundary. Improved knowledge of this boundary condition for the physical processes associated with wake refilling would provide useful tests for simulations and theoretical models of the lunar plasma interaction. The ARTEMIS (Acceleration, Reconnection, Turbulence, and Electrodynamics of the Moon's Interaction with the Sun) spacecraft mission is a two-probe lunar mission derived from the THEMIS (Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions During Substorms) mission, repurposed to study the lunar space and planetary environment. Over the course of the mission there have been numerous passes of the ARTEMIS spacecraft through the lunar wake, at distances of up to seven lunar radii from the Moon. They have occurred for a variety of external conditions. We present a statistical study of tens of selected wake-crossing events of the ARTEMIS probes in 2011, using data primarily from the ARTEMIS fluxgate magnetometers (FGMs) and electrostatic analyzers (ESAs) to identify when the spacecraft entered and exited the wake. We study the shape of the outer wake boundary and its response to external conditions using two different techniques: one defines the wake boundary by a sharp decrease in ion density, the other by a decrease in magnetic field magnitude

  5. Assessment of adherence to tuberculosis drug regimen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalili H.

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and the purpose of the study: Tuberculosis is curable if patients take sufficient uninterrupted therapy. Most experts acknowledge importance of patient adherence in efforts to control of the disease. This cross-sectional study was designed to evaluate the rate of compliance to anti-tuberculosis regimens by means of urine tests in newly diagnosed tuberculosis patients.Method: Investigation was carried out in Tehran University of Medical Sciences Teaching Hospitals, Tehran, IRAN. Fifty patients completed the study. The patients' urine samples were obtained at 0, 1, 2, 4 and 6 months of the study. Simple chemical methods were used to detect Isoniazid, Rifampin, and pyrazinamide, the three main drugs in tuberculosis treatment regimens. Urine tests at months of 0 and l of the study were considered as control tests.Results: After the first month, the patients' compliance was about 96%. At months of second, fourth and sixth, the whole adherence rates were 56 %, 76% and 81% respectively. Conclusion: About 30% of patients were non-compliant with treatment regimen which was more frequent than presumed; therefore detection of non-adherent patients is an essential subject in developing countries.

  6. Metronomic chemotherapy regimens in oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Yu. Fedyanin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Metronomic chemotherapy implies the regular use of cytotoxic agents in doses much smaller than the maximum tolerable doses for a long time. Preclinical experiments show that this treatment option has a many-sided (antiangiogenic, immunostimulating, and direct cytotoxic effect on tumor. Moreover, this approach has gained the widest acceptance in treating patients with metastatic breast cancer in clinical practice. By taking into account the high activity of angiogenesis in colon cancer progression, it is interesting to study the impact of metronomic chemotherapy regimens for this nosological entity as well. This literature review considers not only the history of metronomic chemotherapy, the mechanisms of action, and a range of drugs having an antitumor effect in the metronomic regimens, but also analyzes clinical trials of metronomic chemotherapy regimens in patients with metastatic colon cancer.

  7. A randomized controlled trial testing an adherence-optimized Vitamin D regimen to mitigate bone change in adolescents being treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orgel, Etan; Mueske, Nicole M; Sposto, Richard; Gilsanz, Vicente; Wren, Tishya A L; Freyer, David R; Butturini, Anna M; Mittelman, Steven D

    2017-10-01

    Adolescents with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) develop osteopenia early in therapy, potentially exacerbated by high rates of concurrent Vitamin D deficiency. We conducted a randomized clinical trial testing a Vitamin D-based intervention to improve Vitamin D status and reduce bone density decline. Poor adherence to home supplementation necessitated a change to directly observed therapy (DOT) with intermittent, high-dose Vitamin D3 randomized versus standard of care (SOC). Compared to SOC, DOT Vitamin D3 successfully increased trough Vitamin 25(OH)D levels (p = .026) with no residual Vitamin D deficiency, 100% adherence to DOT Vitamin D3, and without associated toxicity. However, neither Vitamin D status nor supplementation impacted bone density. Thus, this adherence-optimized intervention is feasible and effective to correct Vitamin D deficiency in adolescents during ALL therapy. Repletion of Vitamin D and calcium alone did not mitigate osteopenia, however, and new, comprehensive approaches are needed to address treatment-associated osteopenia during ALL therapy.

  8. Wake flow characteristics at high wind speed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard Madsen, Helge; Larsen, Torben J.; Larsen, Gunner Chr.

    2016-01-01

    Wake flow characteristic at high wind speeds is the main subject of this paper. Although the wake losses decrease at high wind speeds it has been found in a recent study that for multiple wake inflow the increase in loading due to wake effects are substantial even at wind speeds well above rated ...

  9. Wake Island Supplemental Environmental Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-02-01

    and recreational purposes include groupers (Cephalapholis argus), porgy (Monotaxis grandoculis), and jacks (Carangidae). Sharks are abundant...Possibly Extinct on Wake Island Swiftlet, Guam; Yayaguak (Collecalia bartschi) Endangered Crow, Mariana; Aga (Corvus kubaryi) Endangered

  10. Irregular sleep-wake syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... total sleep time is normal, but the body clock loses its normal circadian cycle. People with changing ... least 3 abnormal sleep-wake episodes during a 24-hour period to be diagnosed with this problem. The ...

  11. Mast Wake Reduction by Shaping

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Beauchamp, Charles H

    2005-01-01

    The present invention relates to various mast shapes, in which the mast shapes minimize the production of visible, electro-optic, infrared and radar cross section wake signatures produced by water surface piercing masts...

  12. NASA AVOSS Fast-Time Wake Prediction Models: User's Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Nash'at N.; VanValkenburg, Randal L.; Pruis, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is developing and testing fast-time wake transport and decay models to safely enhance the capacity of the National Airspace System (NAS). The fast-time wake models are empirical algorithms used for real-time predictions of wake transport and decay based on aircraft parameters and ambient weather conditions. The aircraft dependent parameters include the initial vortex descent velocity and the vortex pair separation distance. The atmospheric initial conditions include vertical profiles of temperature or potential temperature, eddy dissipation rate, and crosswind. The current distribution includes the latest versions of the APA (3.4) and the TDP (2.1) models. This User's Guide provides detailed information on the model inputs, file formats, and the model output. An example of a model run and a brief description of the Memphis 1995 Wake Vortex Dataset is also provided.

  13. Analysis of Hypersonic Vehicle Wakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-17

    research . The data is being included for the sake of completion. Figure 93 and Figure 94 depict the concentration of Diatomic Oxygen on the surface...reactions occurring in the wake region will enable an advancement of tracking hypersonic bodies. This research examined the wake region behind a...Acknowledgments I would like to express my sincere appreciation to my research advisor, Dr. Robert Greendyke, for his guidance and support throughout

  14. Wake flow control using a dynamically controlled wind turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Ricardo; Wang, Yeqin; Pol, Suhas; Swift, Andy; Hussain, Fazle; Westergaard, Carsten; Texas Tech University Team

    2016-11-01

    A wind tunnel based "Hyper Accelerated Wind Farm Kinematic-Control Simulator" (HAWKS) is being built at Texas Tech University to emulate controlled wind turbine flow physics. The HAWKS model turbine has pitch, yaw and speed control which is operated in real model time, similar to that of an equivalent full scale turbine. Also, similar to that of a full scale wind turbine, the controls are developed in a Matlab Simulink environment. The current diagnostic system consists of power, rotor position, rotor speed measurements and PIV wake characterization with four cameras. The setup allows up to 7D downstream of the rotor to be mapped. The purpose of HAWKS is to simulate control strategies at turnaround times much faster than CFD and full scale testing. The fundamental building blocks of the simulator have been tested, and demonstrate wake steering for both static and dynamic turbine actuation. Parameters which have been studied are yaw, rotor speed and combinations hereof. The measured wake deflections for static yaw cases are in agreement with previously reported research implying general applicability of the HAWKS platform for the purpose of manipulating the wake. In this presentation the general results will be introduced followed by an analysis of the wake turbulence and coherent structures when comparing static and dynamic flow cases. The outcome of such studies could ultimately support effective wind farm wake flow control strategies. Texas Emerging Technology Fund (ETF).

  15. Accurate wind farm development and operation. Advanced wake modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brand, A.; Bot, E.; Ozdemir, H. [ECN Unit Wind Energy, P.O. Box 1, NL 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Steinfeld, G.; Drueke, S.; Schmidt, M. [ForWind, Center for Wind Energy Research, Carl von Ossietzky Universitaet Oldenburg, D-26129 Oldenburg (Germany); Mittelmeier, N. REpower Systems SE, D-22297 Hamburg (Germany))

    2013-11-15

    The ability is demonstrated to calculate wind farm wakes on the basis of ambient conditions that were calculated with an atmospheric model. Specifically, comparisons are described between predicted and observed ambient conditions, and between power predictions from three wind farm wake models and power measurements, for a single and a double wake situation. The comparisons are based on performance indicators and test criteria, with the objective to determine the percentage of predictions that fall within a given range about the observed value. The Alpha Ventus site is considered, which consists of a wind farm with the same name and the met mast FINO1. Data from the 6 REpower wind turbines and the FINO1 met mast were employed. The atmospheric model WRF predicted the ambient conditions at the location and the measurement heights of the FINO1 mast. May the predictability of the wind speed and the wind direction be reasonable if sufficiently sized tolerances are employed, it is fairly impossible to predict the ambient turbulence intensity and vertical shear. Three wind farm wake models predicted the individual turbine powers: FLaP-Jensen and FLaP-Ainslie from ForWind Oldenburg, and FarmFlow from ECN. The reliabilities of the FLaP-Ainslie and the FarmFlow wind farm wake models are of equal order, and higher than FLaP-Jensen. Any difference between the predictions from these models is most clear in the double wake situation. Here FarmFlow slightly outperforms FLaP-Ainslie.

  16. Optimization Under Uncertainty for Wake Steering Strategies: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quick, Julian [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Annoni, Jennifer [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); King, Ryan N [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Dykes, Katherine L [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Fleming, Paul A [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Ning, Andrew [Brigham Young University

    2017-05-01

    Wind turbines in a wind power plant experience significant power losses because of aerodynamic interactions between turbines. One control strategy to reduce these losses is known as 'wake steering,' in which upstream turbines are yawed to direct wakes away from downstream turbines. Previous wake steering research has assumed perfect information, however, there can be significant uncertainty in many aspects of the problem, including wind inflow and various turbine measurements. Uncertainty has significant implications for performance of wake steering strategies. Consequently, the authors formulate and solve an optimization under uncertainty (OUU) problem for finding optimal wake steering strategies in the presence of yaw angle uncertainty. The OUU wake steering strategy is demonstrated on a two-turbine test case and on the utility-scale, offshore Princess Amalia Wind Farm. When we accounted for yaw angle uncertainty in the Princess Amalia Wind Farm case, inflow-direction-specific OUU solutions produced between 0% and 1.4% more power than the deterministically optimized steering strategies, resulting in an overall annual average improvement of 0.2%. More importantly, the deterministic optimization is expected to perform worse and with more downside risk than the OUU result when realistic uncertainty is taken into account. Additionally, the OUU solution produces fewer extreme yaw situations than the deterministic solution.

  17. The HART-II Test: Rotor Wakes and Aeroacoustics with Higher-Harmonic Pitch Control (HHC) Inputs - The Joint German/French/Dutch/US Project

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yu, Yung H; Tung, Chee; van der Wall, Berend; Pausder, Heinz-Juergen; Burley, Casey; Brooks, Thomas; Beaumier, Philippe; Delrieux, Yves; Mercker, Edzard; Pengel, Kurt

    2002-01-01

    ...) conducted a comprehensive experimental program in October 2001 with a 40%-geometrically and aeroelastically scaled model of a BO-105 main rotor in the open-jet anechoic test section of the German-Dutch Windtunnel (DNW...

  18. Procalcitonin for selecting the antibiotic regimen in outpatients with low-risk community-acquired pneumonia using a rapid point-of-care testing: A single-arm clinical trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mar Masiá

    Full Text Available We aimed to assess the role of procalcitonin (PCT to guide the initial selection of the antibiotic regimen for low-risk community-acquired pneumonia (CAP.A single-arm clinical trial was conducted including outpatients with CAP and Pneumonia Severity Index risk classes I-II. Antimicrobial selection was based on the results of PCT measured with a rapid point-of-care testing. According to serum PCT levels, patients were assigned to two treatment strategies: oral azithromycin if PCT was <0.5 ng/ml, or levofloxacin if levels were ≥0.5 ng/ml. Primary outcome was clinical cure rate. Short-term and long-term outcomes were assessed. Results were compared with those of a historical standard-of-care control-group treated in our centre.Of 253 subjects included, 216 (85.4% were assigned to azithromycin. Pneumococcal infection was diagnosed in 26 (12% and 21 (56.8% patients allocated to azithromycin and levofloxacin groups, respectively. No patients in the azithromycin group developed bacteraemia. Atypical organisms were more common in patients given azithromycin (18.5% vs 8.1%, respectively. The majority (93% of patients with atypical pneumonia had low PCT levels. Clinical cure rates were 95.8% in the azithromycin group, 94.6% in the levofloxacin group, and 94.4% in the historical control group. No 30-day mortality or recurrences were observed, and the 3-year rates of recurrence and mortality were very low in both groups. Adverse events occurrence was also infrequent.A PCT-guided strategy with a rapid point-of-care testing safely allowed selecting empirical narrow-spectrum antibiotics in outpatients with CAP.The study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02600806.

  19. Procalcitonin for selecting the antibiotic regimen in outpatients with low-risk community-acquired pneumonia using a rapid point-of-care testing: A single-arm clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masiá, Mar; Padilla, Sergio; Ortiz de la Tabla, Victoria; González, Matilde; Bas, Cristina; Gutiérrez, Félix

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to assess the role of procalcitonin (PCT) to guide the initial selection of the antibiotic regimen for low-risk community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). A single-arm clinical trial was conducted including outpatients with CAP and Pneumonia Severity Index risk classes I-II. Antimicrobial selection was based on the results of PCT measured with a rapid point-of-care testing. According to serum PCT levels, patients were assigned to two treatment strategies: oral azithromycin if PCT was <0.5 ng/ml, or levofloxacin if levels were ≥0.5 ng/ml. Primary outcome was clinical cure rate. Short-term and long-term outcomes were assessed. Results were compared with those of a historical standard-of-care control-group treated in our centre. Of 253 subjects included, 216 (85.4%) were assigned to azithromycin. Pneumococcal infection was diagnosed in 26 (12%) and 21 (56.8%) patients allocated to azithromycin and levofloxacin groups, respectively. No patients in the azithromycin group developed bacteraemia. Atypical organisms were more common in patients given azithromycin (18.5% vs 8.1%, respectively). The majority (93%) of patients with atypical pneumonia had low PCT levels. Clinical cure rates were 95.8% in the azithromycin group, 94.6% in the levofloxacin group, and 94.4% in the historical control group. No 30-day mortality or recurrences were observed, and the 3-year rates of recurrence and mortality were very low in both groups. Adverse events occurrence was also infrequent. A PCT-guided strategy with a rapid point-of-care testing safely allowed selecting empirical narrow-spectrum antibiotics in outpatients with CAP. The study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02600806.

  20. Conformal FDTD modeling wake fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jurgens, T.; Harfoush, F.

    1991-05-01

    Many computer codes have been written to model wake fields. Here we describe the use of the Conformal Finite Difference Time Domain (CFDTD) method to model the wake fields generated by a rigid beam traveling through various accelerating structures. The non- cylindrical symmetry of some of the problems considered here requires the use of a three dimensional code. In traditional FDTD codes, curved surfaces are approximated by rectangular steps. The errors introduced in wake field calculations by such an approximation can be reduced by increasing the mesh size, therefore increasing the cost of computing. Another approach, validated here, deforms Ampere and Faraday contours near a media interface so as to conform to the interface. These improvements of the FDTD method result in better accuracy of the fields at asymptotically no computational cost. This method is also capable of modeling thin wires as found in beam profile monitors, and slots and cracks as found in resistive wall motions. 4 refs., 5 figs.

  1. Linearised CFD models for wakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ott, S.; Berg, J.; Nielsen, Morten

    2011-12-15

    This report describes the development of a fast and reasonably accurate model for the prediction of energy production in offshore wind farms taking wake effects into account. The model has been implemented as a windows application called Fuga which can run in batch mode or as a graphical user interface. Fuga is briefly described. The model is based on a linearization technique which is described in some detail, and linearized, governing equations are derived and written in a standard form based on a mixed-spectral formulation. A new solution method is used to solve the equations which involves intensive use of look-up tables for storage of intermediate results. Due to the linearity of the model, multiple wakes from many turbines can be constructed from the wake of a single, solitary turbine. These are in turn constructed from Fourier components by a fast Fourier integral transform of results derived from generic look-up tables. Three different models, based on three different closures, are examined: 1) the 'simple closure' using an unperturbed eddy viscosity kucentre dotz. 2) the mixing length closure. 3) the E-epsilon closure. Model results are evaluated against offshore wind farm production data from Horns Rev I and the Nysted wind farm, and a comparison with direct wake measurements in an onshore turbine (Nibe B) is also made. A very satisfactory agreement with data is found for the simple closure. The exception is the near wake, just behind the rotor, where all three linearized models fail. The mixing length closure underestimates wake effects in all cases. The E-epsilon closure overestimates wake losses in the offshore farms while it predicts a too shallow and too wide the wake in the onshore case. The simple closure performs distinctly better than the other two. Wind speed data from the the Horns rev met masts are used to further validate Fuga results with the 'simple' closure. Finally, Roedsand 1 and 2 are used as an example to illustrate

  2. Antibiotic regimens for postpartum endometritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackeen, A Dhanya; Packard, Roger E; Ota, Erika; Speer, Linda

    2015-02-02

    Postpartum endometritis occurs when vaginal organisms invade the endometrial cavity during the labor process and cause infection. This is more common following cesarean birth. The condition warrants antibiotic treatment. Systematically, to review treatment failure and other complications of different antibiotic regimens for postpartum endometritis. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (30 November 2014) and reference lists of retrieved studies. We included randomized trials of different antibiotic regimens after cesarean birth or vaginal birth; no quasi-randomized trials were included. Two review authors independently assessed trials for inclusion and risk of bias, extracted data and checked them for accuracy. The review includes a total of 42 trials, and 40 of these trials contributed data on 4240 participants.Regarding the primary outcomes, seven studies compared clindamycin plus an aminoglycoside versus penicillins and showed fewer treatment failures (risk ratio (RR) 0.65, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.46 to 0.90). There were more treatment failures in those treated with an aminoglycoside plus penicillin when compared to those treated with gentamycin/clindamycin (RR 2.57, 95% CI 1.48 to 4.46). There were more treatment failures (RR 1.66, 95% CI 1.01 to 2.74) and wound infections (RR 1.88, 95% CI 1.08 to 3.28) in those treated with second or third generation cephalosporins (excluding cephamycins) versus those treated with clindamycin plus gentamycin. In four studies comparing once-daily with thrice-daily dosing of gentamicin, there were fewer failures with once-daily dosing. There were more treatment failures (RR 1.94, 95% CI 1.38 to 2.72) and wound infections (RR 1.88, 95% CI 1.17 to 3.02) in those treated with a regimen with poor activity against penicillin-resistant anaerobic bacteria as compared to those treated with a regimen with good activity against penicillin-resistant anaerobic bacteria. There were no differences

  3. Anesthesia Awareness (Waking Up) During Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources About Policymakers Media ASA Member Toolkit Risks Anesthesia Awareness (Waking Up) During Surgery Explore this page: ... do you reduce the risk of anesthesia awareness? Anesthesia Awareness (Waking Up) During Surgery If you’re ...

  4. Wake Management Strategies for Reduction of Turbomachinery Fan Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waitz, Ian A.

    1998-01-01

    The primary objective of our work was to evaluate and test several wake management schemes for the reduction of turbomachinery fan noise. Throughout the course of this work we relied on several tools. These include 1) Two-dimensional steady boundary-layer and wake analyses using MISES (a thin-shear layer Navier-Stokes code), 2) Two-dimensional unsteady wake-stator interaction simulations using UNSFLO, 3) Three-dimensional, steady Navier-Stokes rotor simulations using NEWT, 4) Internal blade passage design using quasi-one-dimensional passage flow models developed at MIT, 5) Acoustic modeling using LINSUB, 6) Acoustic modeling using VO72, 7) Experiments in a low-speed cascade wind-tunnel, and 8) ADP fan rig tests in the MIT Blowdown Compressor.

  5. Wall modeled LES of wind turbine wakes with geometrical effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bricteux, Laurent; Benard, Pierre; Zeoli, Stephanie; Moureau, Vincent; Lartigue, Ghislain; Vire, Axelle

    2017-11-01

    This study focuses on prediction of wind turbine wakes when geometrical effects such as nacelle, tower, and built environment, are taken into account. The aim is to demonstrate the ability of a high order unstructured solver called YALES2 to perform wall modeled LES of wind turbine wake turbulence. The wind turbine rotor is modeled using an Actuator Line Model (ALM) while the geometrical details are explicitly meshed thanks to the use of an unstructured grid. As high Reynolds number flows are considered, sub-grid scale models as well as wall modeling are required. The first test case investigated concerns a wind turbine flow located in a wind tunnel that allows to validate the proposed methodology using experimental data. The second test case concerns the simulation of a wind turbine wake in a complex environment (e.g. a Building) using realistic turbulent inflow conditions.

  6. Control of sleep and wakefulness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Ritchie E; Basheer, Radhika; McKenna, James T; Strecker, Robert E; McCarley, Robert W

    2012-07-01

    This review summarizes the brain mechanisms controlling sleep and wakefulness. Wakefulness promoting systems cause low-voltage, fast activity in the electroencephalogram (EEG). Multiple interacting neurotransmitter systems in the brain stem, hypothalamus, and basal forebrain converge onto common effector systems in the thalamus and cortex. Sleep results from the inhibition of wake-promoting systems by homeostatic sleep factors such as adenosine and nitric oxide and GABAergic neurons in the preoptic area of the hypothalamus, resulting in large-amplitude, slow EEG oscillations. Local, activity-dependent factors modulate the amplitude and frequency of cortical slow oscillations. Non-rapid-eye-movement (NREM) sleep results in conservation of brain energy and facilitates memory consolidation through the modulation of synaptic weights. Rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep results from the interaction of brain stem cholinergic, aminergic, and GABAergic neurons which control the activity of glutamatergic reticular formation neurons leading to REM sleep phenomena such as muscle atonia, REMs, dreaming, and cortical activation. Strong activation of limbic regions during REM sleep suggests a role in regulation of emotion. Genetic studies suggest that brain mechanisms controlling waking and NREM sleep are strongly conserved throughout evolution, underscoring their enormous importance for brain function. Sleep disruption interferes with the normal restorative functions of NREM and REM sleep, resulting in disruptions of breathing and cardiovascular function, changes in emotional reactivity, and cognitive impairments in attention, memory, and decision making.

  7. Linearised CFD Models for Wakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ott, Søren; Berg, Jacob; Nielsen, Morten

    This report describes the development of a fast and reasonably accurate model for the prediction of energy production in oshore wind farms taking wake eects into account. The model has been implemented as a windows application called Fuga which can run in batch mode or as a graphical user interfa...

  8. Computation of Rotorcraft Wake Geometry using NURBS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Hoydonck, W.R.M.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis contains the results of research in the area of rotorcraft aerodynamics with a focus on method development related to the vortical wake generated by rotor blades. It is applied to a vortex tube representation of the wake (using a single NURBS surface) and a simplified filament wake model

  9. Maternal Depressive Symptoms, Dysfunctional Cognitions, and Infant Night Waking: The Role of Maternal Nighttime Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teti, Douglas M.; Crosby, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Mechanisms were examined to clarify relations between maternal depressive symptoms, dysfunctional cognitions, and infant night waking among 45 infants (1-24 months) and their mothers. A mother-driven mediational model was tested in which maternal depressive symptoms and dysfunctional cognitions about infant sleep predicted infant night waking via…

  10. Memory for Semantically Related and Unrelated Declarative Information: The Benefit of Sleep, the Cost of Wake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellenbogen, Jeffrey M.; Wamsley, Erin J.; Walker, Matthew P.; Schacter, Daniel L.; Stickgold, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Numerous studies have examined sleep's influence on a range of hippocampus-dependent declarative memory tasks, from text learning to spatial navigation. In this study, we examined the impact of sleep, wake, and time-of-day influences on the processing of declarative information with strong semantic links (semantically related word pairs) and information requiring the formation of novel associations (unrelated word pairs). Participants encoded a set of related or unrelated word pairs at either 9am or 9pm, and were then tested after an interval of 30 min, 12 hr, or 24 hr. The time of day at which subjects were trained had no effect on training performance or initial memory of either word pair type. At 12 hr retest, memory overall was superior following a night of sleep compared to a day of wakefulness. However, this performance difference was a result of a pronounced deterioration in memory for unrelated word pairs across wake; there was no sleep-wake difference for related word pairs. At 24 hr retest, with all subjects having received both a full night of sleep and a full day of wakefulness, we found that memory was superior when sleep occurred shortly after learning rather than following a full day of wakefulness. Lastly, we present evidence that the rate of deterioration across wakefulness was significantly diminished when a night of sleep preceded the wake period compared to when no sleep preceded wake, suggesting that sleep served to stabilize the memories against the deleterious effects of subsequent wakefulness. Overall, our results demonstrate that 1) the impact of 12 hr of waking interference on memory retention is strongly determined by word-pair type, 2) sleep is most beneficial to memory 24 hr later if it occurs shortly after learning, and 3) sleep does in fact stabilize declarative memories, diminishing the negative impact of subsequent wakefulness. PMID:22457736

  11. A new approach for evaluating measured wake data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnusson, Mikael [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Meteorology

    1996-12-01

    Wind turbine wakes have been studied by analysing a large set of atmospheric data, from a wind farm with four turbines sited on a flat coastal area. The results obtained have ben generalized to allow tests against data from other full scale wind turbines as well as wind tunnel simulations. These comparisons are found to give very satisfactory results. The thrust coefficient is found to be a better parameter for description than wind speed, of wake characteristics because it implicitly includes the effect of regulation. It is also found that down-wind travel time is more convenient to use than down-wind distance in this context. The travel time to the end of the near wake region, i.e. to the point where a single velocity deficit peak first appears, is found to be inversely proportional to the rotational frequency of the turbine and to the turbulence intensity of the ambient air flow and proportional to the ratio of the wake radius and the hub height. For larger travel times, i.e. for the far wake region, it is found that the centre line relative velocity deficit decreases with the logarithm of the time traveled and is parametrically dependent on the time constant and the thrust coefficient. 3 refs, 5 figs

  12. Implementation of vortex wake control using SMA-actuated devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quackenbush, Todd R.; Bilanin, Alan J.; Batcho, P. F.; McKillip, Robert M., Jr.; Carpenter, Bernie F.

    1997-05-01

    Mitigation of the undesirable effects of trailing vortex wakes has been a long-standing priority for both reduction of submarine wake signature and alleviation of aircraft vortex wake hazard. A recent study established the feasibility of using relatively weak, secondary vortices with carefully selected unsteady amplitude and phasing to accelerate the breakup of the primary vortex system of a lifting surface, a technique denoted `vortex leveraging'. This paper will summarize progress on the development of SMA-actuated devices for implementing vortex leveraging for hydrodynamic applications. The methods being applied to the hydrodynamic design of these deformable Smart Vortex Leveraging Tabs (SVLTs) will be described, and the results of a preliminary assessment of SVLT performance in achieving wake breakup will be presented. Also, previous work on the design and testing of deformable control surfaces actuated via embedded SMA agonist wires will be reviewed and the design process being employed in the present applications will be discussed. Finally, the plans for near-term computational and experimental work to validate the use of SMA-driven devices for the wake mitigation task will be briefly outlined.

  13. ASRS Reports on Wake Vortex Encounters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, Linda J.; Taube, Elisa Ann; Drew, Charles Robert; Barclay, Tommy Earl

    2010-01-01

    ASRS is conducting a structured callback research project of wake vortex incidents reported to the ASRS at all US airports, as well as wake encounters in the enroute environment. This study has three objectives: (1) Utilize the established ASRS supplemental data collection methodology and provide ongoing analysis of wake vortex encounter reports; (2) Document event dynamics and contributing factors underlying wake vortex encounter events; and (3) Support ongoing FAA efforts to address pre-emptive wake vortex risk reduction by utilizing ASRS reporting contributions.

  14. Improvement of a near wake model for trailing vorticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pirrung, Georg; Hansen, Morten Hartvig; Aagaard Madsen, Helge

    2014-01-01

    A near wake model, originally proposed by Beddoes, is further developed. The purpose of the model is to account for the radially dependent time constants of the fast aerodynamic response and to provide a tip loss correction. It is based on lifting line theory and models the downwash due to roughl...... of both lift and circulation in the attached flow region. The near wake model is validated against the test case of a finite wing with constant elliptical bound circulation. An unsteady simulation of the NREL 5 MW rotor shows the functionality of the coupled model....

  15. A stochastic wind turbine wake model based on new metrics for wake characterization: A stochastic wind turbine wake model based on new metrics for wake characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doubrawa, Paula [Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Cornell University, Upson Hall Ithaca 14850 New York USA; Barthelmie, Rebecca J. [Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Cornell University, Upson Hall Ithaca 14850 New York USA; Wang, Hui [Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Cornell University, Upson Hall Ithaca 14850 New York USA; Churchfield, Matthew J. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden 80401 Colorado USA

    2016-08-04

    Understanding the detailed dynamics of wind turbine wakes is critical to predicting the performance and maximizing the efficiency of wind farms. This knowledge requires atmospheric data at a high spatial and temporal resolution, which are not easily obtained from direct measurements. Therefore, research is often based on numerical models, which vary in fidelity and computational cost. The simplest models produce axisymmetric wakes and are only valid beyond the near wake. Higher-fidelity results can be obtained by solving the filtered Navier-Stokes equations at a resolution that is sufficient to resolve the relevant turbulence scales. This work addresses the gap between these two extremes by proposing a stochastic model that produces an unsteady asymmetric wake. The model is developed based on a large-eddy simulation (LES) of an offshore wind farm. Because there are several ways of characterizing wakes, the first part of this work explores different approaches to defining global wake characteristics. From these, a model is developed that captures essential features of a LES-generated wake at a small fraction of the cost. The synthetic wake successfully reproduces the mean characteristics of the original LES wake, including its area and stretching patterns, and statistics of the mean azimuthal radius. The mean and standard deviation of the wake width and height are also reproduced. This preliminary study focuses on reproducing the wake shape, while future work will incorporate velocity deficit and meandering, as well as different stability scenarios.

  16. Slow Activity in Focal Epilepsy During Sleep and Wakefulness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pellegrino, Giovanni; Tombini, Mario; Curcio, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    Introduction We aimed to test differences between healthy subjects and patients with respect to slow wave activity during wakefulness and sleep. Methods Fifteen patients affected by nonlesional focal epilepsy originating within temporal areas and fourteen matched controls underwent a 24-hour EEG...... recording. We studied the EEG power spectral density during wakefulness and sleep in delta (1-4 Hz), theta (5-7 Hz), alpha (8-11 Hz), sigma (12-15 Hz), and beta (16-20 Hz) bands. Results During sleep, patients with focal epilepsy showed higher power from delta to beta frequency bands compared with controls...... was the delta band during the first 2 sleep cycles (sleep cycle 1, P = .014; sleep cycle 2, P = .002). During wakefulness, patients showed higher delta/theta activity over the affected regions compared with controls. Conclusions Patients with focal epilepsy showed a pattern of power increases characterized...

  17. Tip Vortex and Wake Characteristics of a Counterrotating Open Rotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanZante, Dale E.; Wernet, Mark P.

    2012-01-01

    One of the primary noise sources for Open Rotor systems is the interaction of the forward rotor tip vortex and blade wake with the aft rotor. NASA has collaborated with General Electric on the testing of a new generation of low noise, counterrotating Open Rotor systems. Three-dimensional particle image velocimetry measurements were acquired in the intra-rotor gap of the Historical Baseline blade set. The velocity measurements are of sufficient resolution to characterize the tip vortex size and trajectory as well as the rotor wake decay and turbulence character. The tip clearance vortex trajectory is compared to results from previously developed models. Forward rotor wake velocity profiles are shown. Results are presented in a form as to assist numerical modeling of Open Rotor system aerodynamics and acoustics.

  18. Three-dimensional wake potential in a streaming dusty plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Department of Physics, Jahangirnagar University, Savar, Dhaka 1342, Bangladesh. £School of Studies in Physics, Vikram University, Ujjain 456 010, India. MS received 27 December 2001; accepted 5 March 2003. Abstract. The oscillatory wake potential for a slowly moving or static test dust particulate in a finite temperature ...

  19. Tuberculosis treatment and drug regimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotgiu, Giovanni; Centis, Rosella; D'ambrosio, Lia; Migliori, Giovanni Battista

    2015-01-08

    Tuberculosis is an airborne infectious disease treated with combination therapeutic regimens. Adherence to long-term antituberculosis therapy is crucial for maintaining adequate blood drug level. The emergence and spread of drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains are mainly favored by the inadequate medical management of the patients. The therapeutic approach for drug-resistant tuberculosis is cumbersome, because of the poor, expensive, less-effective, and toxic alternatives to the first-line drugs. New antituberculosis drugs (bedaquiline and delamanid) have been recently approved by the health authorities, but they cannot represent the definitive solution to the clinical management of drug-resistant tuberculosis forms, particularly in intermediate economy settings where the prevalence of drug resistance is high (China, India, and former Soviet Union countries). New research and development activities are urgently needed. Public health policies are required to preserve the new and old therapeutic options. Copyright © 2015 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  20. Characterization of wind velocities in the wake of a full scale wind turbine using three ground-based synchronized WindScanners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yazicioglu, Hasan; Angelou, Nikolas; Mikkelsen, Torben Krogh

    2016-01-01

    The wind energy community is in need of detailed full-field measurements in the wake of wind turbines. Here, three dimensional(3D) wind vector field measurements obtained in the near-wake region behind a full-scale test turbine are presented. Specifically, the wake of a NEG Nordtank turbine, inst...

  1. Effect of Upstream Wake on Shower-Head Film Cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping-Hei Chen

    1996-01-01

    transfer distributions on both suction and pressure surfaces of the test blade. All mass transfer runs were conducted on a blowing-type wind tunnel with a six-blade linear cascade. The leading edge of the test blade was drilled with three rows of equally spaced injection holes. The upstream wake was simulated by a circular bar with the same diameter as that of the trailing edge of the test blade.

  2. High-Order Numerical Simulations of Wind Turbine Wakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleusberg, E.; Mikkelsen, R. F.; Schlatter, P.; Ivanell, S.; Henningson, D. S.

    2017-05-01

    Previous attempts to describe the structure of wind turbine wakes and their mutual interaction were mostly limited to large-eddy and Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes simulations using finite-volume solvers. We employ the higher-order spectral-element code Nek5000 to study the influence of numerical aspects on the prediction of the wind turbine wake structure and the wake interaction between two turbines. The spectral-element method enables an accurate representation of the vortical structures, with lower numerical dissipation than the more commonly used finite-volume codes. The wind-turbine blades are modeled as body forces using the actuator-line method (ACL) in the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. Both tower and nacelle are represented with appropriate body forces. An inflow boundary condition is used which emulates homogeneous isotropic turbulence of wind-tunnel flows. We validate the implementation with results from experimental campaigns undertaken at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU Blind Tests), investigate parametric influences and compare computational aspects with existing numerical simulations. In general the results show good agreement between the experiments and the numerical simulations both for a single-turbine setup as well as a two-turbine setup where the turbines are offset in the spanwise direction. A shift in the wake center caused by the tower wake is detected similar to experiments. The additional velocity deficit caused by the tower agrees well with the experimental data. The wake is captured well by Nek5000 in comparison with experiments both for the single wind turbine and in the two-turbine setup. The blade loading however shows large discrepancies for the high-turbulence, two-turbine case. While the experiments predicted higher thrust for the downstream turbine than for the upstream turbine, the opposite case was observed in Nek5000.

  3. CFD Study on Effective Wake of Conventional and Tip-modified Propellers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shin, K. W.; Andersen, Poul

    2016-01-01

    -propulsion tests. The effects of different Reynolds number on higher effective wake fraction of tip-modified propellers are investigated by open-water simulations with varying the propeller speed and evaluations of effective wake extracted from self-propulsion simulations on tip-modified and conventional...... propellers. Open-water simulations show that the advance ratio at the design thrust is higher at a higher Reynolds number for both propellers and the advance ratio increase is smaller for the tip-modified propeller, which results in a higher effective wake fraction. Effective wake fractions are evaluated...... by integrating velocity fields at a section 40% of the propeller radius upstream from the propeller plane in self-propulsion simulations. The difference of effective wake fraction from integrating velocity fields between tip-modified and conventional propellers is less than 1%. Based on the open-water simulation...

  4. Investigating fundamental properties of wind turbine wake structure using particle image velocimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whale, J. [Univ. of Edinburgh, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

    1997-08-01

    Low Reynolds number flow visualization tests are often used for showing the flow pattern changes associated with changes in lift-coefficients at a higher Reynolds number. In wind turbine studies, analysis of measured wake structures at small scale may reveal fundamental properties of the wake which will offer wake modellers a more complete understanding of rotor flows. Measurements are presented from experiments on a model wind turbine rig conducted in a water channel. The laser-optics technique of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) is used to make simultaneous multi-point measurements of the wake flow behind small-scale rotors. Analysis of the PIV data shows trends in velocity and vorticity structure in the wake. Study of the flow close to the rotor plane reveals information on stalled flow and blade performance. (au)

  5. A comparison between 2-and 3-bladed wind turbine rotors with focus on wake characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mühle, Franz; Adaramola, Muyiwa Samuel; Sætran, Lars

    2016-11-01

    Due to cost benefit and weight reduction, 2-bladed wind turbines have the potential to become more important for offshore wind applications. In order to optimize the arrangement of wind turbines in wind farms and for accurate forecasts of the power production, a detailed knowledge of the wake flow is needed. In the presented study, three different rotors with varying number of blades and similar performance behavior have been designed and manufactured using the 3-dimensional (3D) printing technology. The performance characteristics of these rotors as well as their wake features are measured experimentally in wind tunnel tests and compared. The velocity deficit is seen to vary only insignificantly for the wakes in distances of 3D (where D is the rotor diameter), 5D and 7D behind the turbine. However, higher turbulence intensity levels are recorded in the wake of the 2-bladed rotors. This could have potential for a faster wake recovery and thus a narrower turbine spacing.

  6. Evolution of Rotor Wake in Swirling Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Haldidi, Basman; Atassi, Hafiz; Envia, Edmane; Podboy, Gary

    2000-01-01

    A theory is presented for modeling the evolution of rotor wakes as a function of axial distance in swirling mean flows. The theory, which extends an earlier work to include arbitrary radial distributions of mean swirl, indicates that swirl can significantly alter the wake structure of the rotor especially at large downstream distances (i.e., for moderate to large rotor-stator spacings). Using measured wakes of a representative scale model fan stage to define the mean swirl and initial wake perturbations, the theory is used to predict the subsequent evolution of the wakes. The results indicate the sensitivity of the wake evolution to the initial profile and the need to have complete and consistent initial definition of both velocity and pressure perturbations.

  7. Ship heading and velocity analysis by wake detection in SAR images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziano, Maria Daniela; D'Errico, Marco; Rufino, Giancarlo

    2016-11-01

    With the aim of ship-route estimation, a wake detection method is developed and applied to COSMO/SkyMed and TerraSAR-X Stripmap SAR images over the Gulf of Naples, Italy. In order to mitigate the intrinsic limitations of the threshold logic, the algorithm identifies the wake features according to the hydrodynamic theory. A post-detection validation phase is performed to classify the features as real wake structures by means of merit indexes defined in the intensity domain. After wake reconstruction, ship heading is evaluated on the basis of turbulent wake direction and ship velocity is estimated by both techniques of azimuth shift and Kelvin pattern wavelength. The method is tested over 34 ship wakes identified by visual inspection in both HH and VV images at different incidence angles. For all wakes, no missed detections are reported and at least the turbulent and one narrow-V wakes are correctly identified, with ship heading successfully estimated. Also, the azimuth shift method is applied to estimate velocity for the 10 ships having route with sufficient angular separation from the satellite ground track. In one case ship velocity is successfully estimated with both methods, showing agreement within 14%.

  8. Impact of Neutral Boundary-Layer Turbulence on Wind-Turbine Wakes: A Numerical Modelling Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englberger, Antonia; Dörnbrack, Andreas

    2017-03-01

    The wake characteristics of a wind turbine in a turbulent boundary layer under neutral stratification are investigated systematically by means of large-eddy simulations. A methodology to maintain the turbulence of the background flow for simulations with open horizontal boundaries, without the necessity of the permanent import of turbulence data from a precursor simulation, was implemented in the geophysical flow solver EULAG. These requirements are fulfilled by applying the spectral energy distribution of a neutral boundary layer in the wind-turbine simulations. A detailed analysis of the wake response towards different turbulence levels of the background flow results in a more rapid recovery of the wake for a higher level of turbulence. A modified version of the Rankine-Froude actuator disc model and the blade element momentum method are tested as wind-turbine parametrizations resulting in a strong dependence of the near-wake wind field on the parametrization, whereas the far-wake flow is fairly insensitive to it. The wake characteristics are influenced by the two considered airfoils in the blade element momentum method up to a streamwise distance of 14 D ( D = rotor diameter). In addition, the swirl induced by the rotation has an impact on the velocity field of the wind turbine even in the far wake. Further, a wake response study reveals a considerable effect of different subgrid-scale closure models on the streamwise turbulent intensity.

  9. Study on the Wake of a Miniature Wind Turbine Using the Reynolds Stress Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianxiao Hu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The Reynolds Stress Model (RSM is adopted to simulate the wind turbine wake and the simulation results are compared with the wind tunnel test data, simulation results from the standard k-ε model and a modified k-ε model. RSM shows good performance in predicting the turbine wakes velocity, turbulence intensity and the kinetic shear stress, while the k-ε based models fail to predict either wakes velocity or turbulence intensity. Simulation results show that the wake velocity will be recovered up to 90% at around 10 D downstream of the turbine (D denotes turbine rotor diameter and it stops at 91% at around 16 D downstream. The wake turbulence intensity reaches a maximum at around 5 D downstream of turbine. Further investigation shows that the horizontal profile of the wakes velocity can be approximated by a Gaussian distribution, and the turbulence intensity can be approximated by a bimodal distribution. The influence of the wakes effect is limited to within ±D in the across-wind direction. The turbine wakes show clear anisotropy, which could explain the incorrect estimation on the turbulence intensity with the extended k-ε model.

  10. Wake Vortex Detection: Phased Microphone vs. Linear Infrasonic Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams, Qamar A.; Zuckerwar, Allan J.; Sullivan, Nicholas T.; Knight, Howard K.

    2014-01-01

    Sensor technologies can make a significant impact on the detection of aircraft-generated vortices in an air space of interest, typically in the approach or departure corridor. Current state-of-the art sensor technologies do not provide three-dimensional measurements needed for an operational system or even for wake vortex modeling to advance the understanding of vortex behavior. Most wake vortex sensor systems used today have been developed only for research applications and lack the reliability needed for continuous operation. The main challenges for the development of an operational sensor system are reliability, all-weather operation, and spatial coverage. Such a sensor has been sought for a period of last forty years. Acoustic sensors were first proposed and tested by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) early in 1970s for tracking wake vortices but these acoustic sensors suffered from high levels of ambient noise. Over a period of the last fifteen years, there has been renewed interest in studying noise generated by aircraft wake vortices, both numerically and experimentally. The German Aerospace Center (DLR) was the first to propose the application of a phased microphone array for the investigation of the noise sources of wake vortices. The concept was first demonstrated at Berlins Airport Schoenefeld in 2000. A second test was conducted in Tarbes, France, in 2002, where phased microphone arrays were applied to study the wake vortex noise of an Airbus 340. Similarly, microphone phased arrays and other opto-acoustic microphones were evaluated in a field test at the Denver International Airport in 2003. For the Tarbes and Denver tests, the wake trajectories of phased microphone arrays and lidar were compared as these were installed side by side. Due to a built-in pressure equalization vent these microphones were not suitable for capturing acoustic noise below 20 Hz. Our group at NASA Langley Research Center developed and installed an

  11. Wake Survey of a Marine Current Turbine Under Steady Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lust, Ethan; Luznik, Luksa; Flack, Karen

    2016-11-01

    A submersible particle image velocimetry (PIV) system was used to study the wake of a horizontal axis marine current turbine. The turbine was tested in a large tow tank facility at the United States Naval Academy. The turbine is a 1/25th scale model of the U.S. National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Reference Model 1 (RM1) tidal turbine. It is a two-bladed turbine measuring 0.8 m in diameter and featuring a NACA 63-618 airfoil cross section. Separate wind tunnel testing has shown the foil section used on the turbine to be Reynolds number independent with respect to lift at the experimental parameters of tow carriage speed (Utow = 1 . 68 m/s) and tip speed ratio (TSR = 7). The wake survey was conducted over an area extending 0.25D forward of the turbine tip path to 2.0D aft, and to a depth of 1.0D beneath the turbine output shaft in the streamwise plane. Each field of view was approximately 30 cm by 30 cm, and each overlapped the adjacent fields of view by 5 cm. The entire flow field was then reconstructed into a single field of investigation. Results include streamwise and vertical ensemble average velocity fields averaged over approximately 1,000 realizations, as well as higher-order statistics. Turbine tip vortex centers were identified and plotted showing increasing aperiodicity with wake age. keywords: horizontal axis marine current turbine, particle image velocimetry, towing tank, wake survey

  12. Intravenous and intramuscular magnesium sulphate regimens in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1993-09-03

    Sep 3, 1993 ... management of severe pre-eclampsia. It is given parenterally, usually according to one of two popular regimens: the intramuscular (IM) regimen introduced by. Pritchard' and a continuous intravenous (IV) infusion described by Zuspan! Sibai et a/.3 have reported that lower serum magnesium values are ...

  13. Multi-Model Ensemble Wake Vortex Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koerner, Stephan; Holzaepfel, Frank; Ahmad, Nash'at N.

    2015-01-01

    Several multi-model ensemble methods are investigated for predicting wake vortex transport and decay. This study is a joint effort between National Aeronautics and Space Administration and Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt to develop a multi-model ensemble capability using their wake models. An overview of different multi-model ensemble methods and their feasibility for wake applications is presented. The methods include Reliability Ensemble Averaging, Bayesian Model Averaging, and Monte Carlo Simulations. The methodologies are evaluated using data from wake vortex field experiments.

  14. Sleep Pharmacogenetics: Personalized Sleep-Wake Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holst, Sebastian C; Valomon, Amandine; Landolt, Hans-Peter

    2016-01-01

    Research spanning (genetically engineered) animal models, healthy volunteers, and sleep-disordered patients has identified the neurotransmitters and neuromodulators dopamine, serotonin, norepinephrine, histamine, hypocretin, melatonin, glutamate, acetylcholine, γ-amino-butyric acid, and adenosine as important players in the regulation and maintenance of sleep-wake-dependent changes in neuronal activity and the sleep-wake continuum. Dysregulation of these neurochemical systems leads to sleep-wake disorders. Most currently available pharmacological treatments are symptomatic rather than causal, and their beneficial and adverse effects are often variable and in part genetically determined. To evaluate opportunities for evidence-based personalized medicine with present and future sleep-wake therapeutics, we review here the impact of known genetic variants affecting exposure of and sensitivity to drugs targeting the neurochemistry of sleep-wake regulation and the pathophysiology of sleep-wake disturbances. Many functional polymorphisms modify drug response phenotypes relevant for sleep. To corroborate the importance of these and newly identified variants for personalized sleep-wake therapy, human sleep pharmacogenetics should be complemented with pharmacogenomic investigations, research about sleep-wake-dependent pharmacological actions, and studies in mice lacking specific genes. These strategies, together with future knowledge about epigenetic mechanisms affecting sleep-wake physiology and treatment outcomes, may lead to potent and safe novel therapies for the increasing number of sleep-disordered patients (e.g., in aged populations).

  15. Revolutionary Wake Hazard Assessment Tool Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Continuum Dynamics, Inc. (CDI) has developed a Multiple Aircraft Simulation Tool (MAST) that revolutionizes the ability to predict and assess wake interactions...

  16. Coupled wake boundary layer model of windfarms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Richard; Gayme, Dennice; Meneveau, Charles

    2014-11-01

    We present a coupled wake boundary layer (CWBL) model that describes the distribution of the power output in a windfarm. The model couples the traditional, industry-standard wake expansion/superposition approach with a top-down model for the overall windfarm boundary layer structure. Wake models capture the effect of turbine positioning, while the top-down approach represents the interaction between the windturbine wakes and the atmospheric boundary layer. Each portion of the CWBL model requires specification of a parameter that is unknown a-priori. The wake model requires the wake expansion rate, whereas the top-down model requires the effective spanwise turbine spacing within which the model's momentum balance is relevant. The wake expansion rate is obtained by matching the mean velocity at the turbine from both approaches, while the effective spanwise turbine spacing is determined from the wake model. Coupling of the constitutive components of the CWBL model is achieved by iterating these parameters until convergence is reached. We show that the CWBL model predictions compare more favorably with large eddy simulation results than those made with either the wake or top-down model in isolation and that the model can be applied successfully to the Horns Rev and Nysted windfarms. The `Fellowships for Young Energy Scientists' (YES!) of the Foundation for Fundamental Research on Matter supported by NWO, and NSF Grant #1243482.

  17. Anisotropy in turbulence profiles of stratified wakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spedding, G. R.

    2001-08-01

    At sufficiently high values of the Reynolds number (Re⩾4.5×103) and internal Froude number (F⩾4), initially turbulent bluff body wakes evolve in the presence of a stable background density gradient with wake-averaged mean and turbulence length and velocity scales that are independent of Re and F for at least two orders of magnitude extension in both parameters. The way in which the initially three-dimensional motions transition to the characteristic (and Re- and F-independent) late wakes (where vertical velocities, w≪u,v) is both of great practical interest, and complex, hence somewhat unclear. Here, digital particle imaging velocimetry type measurements on towed-sphere wakes are described, so that the development of anisotropy can be measured by the time development of turbulence profiles in horizontal and vertical centerplanes. The observed anisotropies can be associated with energy transfer to internal wave modes, and suppression of other vertical displacements, that contrasts with sphere wakes at similar Re in a homogeneous fluid. Maximum Reynolds stresses occur at the boundary of a sinuous undulation of the wake, which increases in amplitude up to Nt≈60 (N is the buoyancy frequency that characterizes the strength of the stratification). Although an intrinsic wake profile instability cannot be excluded, the observed wake element spacings can be accounted for by known spiral and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities in the near wake.

  18. Wind turbine wake measurement in complex terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kurt Schaldemose; Larsen, Gunner Chr.; Menke, Robert

    2016-01-01

    SCADA data from a wind farm and high frequency time series measurements obtained with remote scanning systems have been analysed with focus on identification of wind turbine wake properties in complex terrain. The analysis indicates that within the flow regime characterized by medium to large...... downstream distances (more than 5 diameters) from the wake generating turbine, the wake changes according to local atmospheric conditions e.g. vertical wind speed. In very complex terrain the wake effects are often “overruled” by distortion effects due to the terrain complexity or topology....

  19. Multiple-LiDAR measurements of wind turbine wakes: effect of the atmospheric stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valerio Iungo, Giacomo; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2013-04-01

    Aerodynamic design and optimization of a wind farm layout are mainly based on the evaluation of wind turbine wake recovery by moving downstream, and on the characterization of wake interactions within a wind farm. Indeed, the power production of downstream wind turbine rows is strictly affected by the cumulative wake produced by the turbines deployed upstream. Wind turbine wakes are dependent on their aerodynamic features, and being immersed in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL), they are also affected by surface heterogeneity, e.g. site topography and surface coverage, and atmospheric stability. The ABL stability is typically classified as neutral, convective or stable. In a neutral ABL the mechanical turbulent production is the dominating phenomenon. Conversely, for a convective ABL the turbulent kinetic energy and vertical transport phenomena are enhanced by positive buoyancy. Finally, for a stable ABL, a lower turbulence level is typically observed with an increased wind shear. For the present campaign convective ABL was typically observed during day-time, and neutral ABL for early morning and sunset periods. The aim of the present work is the evaluation of the influence of the ABL stability on downstream evolution of wind turbine wakes, which is mainly controlled by different ABL turbulence characteristics. Field measurements of the wake produced from a 2 MW Enercon E-70 wind turbine were performed with three scanning Doppler wind LiDARs. The wind and atmospheric conditions were characterized through a sonic anemometer deployed in proximity of the wind turbine. One LiDAR was placed at a distance about 12 rotor diameters upstream of the turbine in order to characterize the incoming wind. Two additional LiDARs were typically used to perform wake measurements. Tests were performed over the wake vertical symmetry plane in order to characterize wake recovery. Measurements were also carried out over conical surfaces in order to investigate the wind turbine wake

  20. Comparison of the effects on pupil size and accommodation of three regimens of topical dapiprazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, C S; Heiser, J F; Crowder, A M; Wassom, N J; Katz, B B; Dale, J L

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Patients who have their pupils dilated for an eye examination traditionally have to wait several hours before their pupils return to normal size and their blurred vision (caused by paralysis of accommodation) resolves. Earlier studies with dapiprazole have demonstrated an accelerated reversal of dilatation. METHODS--Three regimens of dapiprazole were studied to determine the effects on pupil diameter and accommodation after mydriasis produced by 2.5% phenylephrine and 0.5% tropicamide. Test regimens included one drop and 1 + 1 drop regimens, compared with a 2 + 2 drop reference regimen. Dapiprazole was administered in one eye and placebo in the other. Mean change from baseline was analysed for pupil diameter and accommodation at various time points after drug administration. Also, for the same variables, 90% confidence intervals for the areas under the curve (AUC) were computed. RESULTS--Both test regimens were equivalent to the reference regimen on the basis of mean change from baseline for pupil diameter and accommodation at individual time points, and for the mean AUC. Most signs and symptoms (injection, stinging, burning, lid oedema, and ptosis) were less frequent in the test regimen treated eyes. There was no significant interaction between regimen and eye colour. CONCLUSION--This study indicates that a lower dosage (for example, one drop) is also efficacious and has the added benefit of fewer side effects. PMID:7626570

  1. Comparison of two LES codes for wind turbine wake studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chivaee, Hamid Sarlak; Pierella, F.; Mikkelsen, Robert Flemming

    2014-01-01

    For the third time a blind test comparison in Norway 2013, was conducted comparing numerical simulations for the rotor Cp and Ct and wake profiles with the experimental results. As the only large eddy simulation study among participants, results of the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) using...... their in-house CFD solver, EllipSys3D, proved to be more reliable among the other models for capturing the wake profiles and the turbulence intensities downstream the turbine. It was therefore remarked in the workshop to investigate other LES codes to compare their performance with EllipSys3D. The aim...... of this paper is to investigate on two CFD solvers, the DTU's in-house code, EllipSys3D and the open-sourse toolbox, OpenFoam, for a set of actuator line based LES computations. Two types of simulations are performed: the wake behind a signle rotor and the wake behind a cluster of three inline rotors. Results...

  2. Flow Structures within a Helicopter Rotor Hub Wake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbing, Brian; Reich, David; Schmitz, Sven

    2015-11-01

    A scaled model of a notional helicopter rotor hub was tested in the 48'' Garfield Thomas Water Tunnel at the Applied Research Laboratory Penn State. The measurement suite included total hub drag and wake velocity measurements (LDV, PIV, stereo-PIV) at three downstream locations. The main objective was to understand the spatiotemporal evolution of the unsteady wake between the rotor hub and the nominal location of the empennage (tail). Initial analysis of the data revealed prominent two- and four-per-revolution fluid structures linked to geometric hub features persisting into the wake far-field. In addition, a six-per-revolution fluid structure was observed in the far-field, which is unexpected due to the lack of any hub feature with the corresponding symmetry. This suggests a nonlinear interaction is occurring within the wake to generate these structures. This presentation will provide an overview of the experimental data and analysis with particular emphasis on these six-per-revolution structures.

  3. Wake-Induced Aerodynamics on a Trailing Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendenhall, Michael R.; Lesieutre, Daniel J.; Kelly, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    NASA conducted flight tests to measure the exhaust products from alternative fuels using a DC-8 transport aircraft and a Falcon business jet. An independent analysis of the maximum vortex-induced loads on the Falcon in the DC-8 wake was conducted for pre-flight safety analysis and to define safe trail distances for the flight tests. Static and dynamic vortex-induced aerodynamic loads on the Falcon were predicted at a matrix of locations aft of the DC-8 under flight-test conditions, and the maximum loads were compared with design limit loads to assess aircraft safety. Trajectory simulations for the Falcon during close encounters with the DC-8 wake were made to study the vortex-induced loads during traverses of the DC-8 primary trailing vortex. A parametric study of flight traverses through the trailing vortex was conducted to assess Falcon flight behavior and motion characteristics.

  4. Strongly Stratified Turbulence Wakes and Mixing Produced by Fractal Wakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrieva, Natalia; Redondo, Jose Manuel; Chashechkin, Yuli; Fraunie, Philippe; Velascos, David

    2017-04-01

    This paper describes Shliering and Shadowgraph experiments of the wake induced mixing produced by tranversing a vertical or horizontal fractal grid through the interfase between two miscible fluids at low Atwood and Reynolds numbers. This is a configuration design to models the mixing across isopycnals in stably-stratified flows in many environmental relevant situations (either in the atmosphere or in the ocean. The initial unstable stratification is characterized by a reduced gravity: g' = gΔρ ρ where g is gravity, Δρ being the initial density step and ρ the reference density. Here the Atwood number is A = g' _ 2 g . The topology of the fractal wake within the strong stratification, and the internal wave field produces both a turbulent cascade and a wave cascade, with frecuen parametric resonances, the envelope of the mixing front is found to follow a complex non steady 3rd order polinomial function with a maximum at about 4-5 Brunt-Vaisalla non-dimensional time scales: t/N δ = c1(t/N) + c2g Δρ ρ (t/N)2 -c3(t/N)3. Conductivity probes and Shliering and Shadowgraph visual techniques, including CIV with (Laser induced fluorescence and digitization of the light attenuation across the tank) are used in order to investigate the density gradients and the three-dimensionality of the expanding and contracting wake. Fractal analysis is also used in order to estimate the fastest and slowest growing wavelengths. The large scale structures are observed to increase in wave-length as the mixing progresses, and the processes involved in this increase in scale are also examined.Measurements of the pointwise and horizontally averaged concentrations confirm the picture obtained from past flow visualization studies. They show that the fluid passes through the mixing region with relatively small amounts of molecular mixing,and the molecular effects only dominate on longer time scales when the small scales have penetrated through the large scale structures. The Non

  5. Wake Vortex Avoidance System and Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams, Qamar A. (Inventor); Zuckerwar, Allan J. (Inventor); Knight, Howard K. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A wake vortex avoidance system includes a microphone array configured to detect low frequency sounds. A signal processor determines a geometric mean coherence based on the detected low frequency sounds. A display displays wake vortices based on the determined geometric mean coherence.

  6. Wake-vortex decay in external turbulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuczaj, Arkadiusz K.; Armenio, V.; Fröhlich, J.; Geurts, Bernardus J.

    2010-01-01

    Wake vortices that form behind a moving aircraft represent 11 safety COil cern for other aircraft.s that follow. These tornado-like wake structures may persist for several minutes, extending for many kilometers across the sky. This safety issue is particularly important close to major airports where

  7. Simulation and Analysis of Wind Turbine Wakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2017-01-01

    Modern wind turbines are often clustered in wind farms in which the turbines are fully or partially influenced by the wake of upstream located turbines. As a consequence, the wake behind the wind turbines has a lower mean wind speed and an increased turbulence level, as compared to the undisturbed...... flow outside the farm. Hence, wake interaction leads to a decreased total production of power, caused by lower kinetic energy in the wind, and an increase in the turbulence intensity. The turbulence created from wind turbine wakes is mainly due to the presence of the distinct tip and root vortices......, which eventually break down and forms small-scale turbulent structures. If a wind turbine is located in a wake consisting of tip and root vortices, the fatigue loading is more severe than in the case where the tip vortices have already broken down by instability mechanisms. Therefore, understanding...

  8. Why Does REM Sleep Occur? A Wake-up Hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. W. R. eKlemm

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Brain activity differs in the various sleep stages and in conscious wakefulness. Awakening from sleep requires restoration of the complex nerve impulse patterns in neuronal network assemblies necessary to re-create and sustain conscious wakefulness. Herein I propose that the brain uses REM to help wake itself up after it has had a sufficient amount of sleep. Evidence suggesting this hypothesis includes the facts that, 1 when first going to sleep, the brain plunges into Stage N3 (formerly called Stage IV, a deep abyss of sleep, and, as the night progresses, the sleep is punctuated by episodes of REM that become longer and more frequent toward morning, 2 conscious-like dreams are a reliable component of the REM state in which the dreamer is an active mental observer or agent in the dream, 3 the last awakening during a night’s sleep usually occurs in a REM episode during or at the end of a dream, 4 both REM and awake consciousness seem to arise out of a similar brainstem ascending arousal system 5 N3 is a functionally perturbed state that eventually must be corrected so that embodied brain can direct adaptive behavior, and 6 corticofugal projections to brainstem arousal areas provide a way to trigger increased cortical activity in REM to progressively raise the sleeping brain to the threshold required for wakefulness. This paper shows how the hypothesis conforms to common experience and has substantial predictive and explanatory power regarding the phenomenology of sleep in terms of ontogeny, aging, phylogeny, abnormal/disease states, cognition, and behavioral physiology. That broad range of consistency is not matched by competing theories, which are summarized herein. Specific ways to test this wake-up hypothesis are suggested. Such research could lead to a better understanding of awake consciousness.

  9. Boosting Long-Term Memory via Wakeful Rest: Intentional Rehearsal Is Not Necessary, Consolidation Is Sufficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewar, Michaela; Alber, Jessica; Cowan, Nelson; Della Sala, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    People perform better on tests of delayed free recall if learning is followed immediately by a short wakeful rest than by a short period of sensory stimulation. Animal and human work suggests that wakeful resting provides optimal conditions for the consolidation of recently acquired memories. However, an alternative account cannot be ruled out, namely that wakeful resting provides optimal conditions for intentional rehearsal of recently acquired memories, thus driving superior memory. Here we utilised non-recallable words to examine whether wakeful rest boosts long-term memory, even when new memories could not be rehearsed intentionally during the wakeful rest delay. The probing of non-recallable words requires a recognition paradigm. Therefore, we first established, via Experiment 1, that the rest-induced boost in memory observed via free recall can be replicated in a recognition paradigm, using concrete nouns. In Experiment 2, participants heard 30 non-recallable non-words, presented as ‘foreign names in a bridge club abroad’ and then either rested wakefully or played a visual spot-the-difference game for 10 minutes. Retention was probed via recognition at two time points, 15 minutes and 7 days after presentation. As in Experiment 1, wakeful rest boosted recognition significantly, and this boost was maintained for at least 7 days. Our results indicate that the enhancement of memory via wakeful rest is not dependent upon intentional rehearsal of learned material during the rest period. We thus conclude that consolidation is sufficient for this rest-induced memory boost to emerge. We propose that wakeful resting allows for superior memory consolidation, resulting in stronger and/or more veridical representations of experienced events which can be detected via tests of free recall and recognition. PMID:25333957

  10. Boosting long-term memory via wakeful rest: intentional rehearsal is not necessary, consolidation is sufficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewar, Michaela; Alber, Jessica; Cowan, Nelson; Della Sala, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    People perform better on tests of delayed free recall if learning is followed immediately by a short wakeful rest than by a short period of sensory stimulation. Animal and human work suggests that wakeful resting provides optimal conditions for the consolidation of recently acquired memories. However, an alternative account cannot be ruled out, namely that wakeful resting provides optimal conditions for intentional rehearsal of recently acquired memories, thus driving superior memory. Here we utilised non-recallable words to examine whether wakeful rest boosts long-term memory, even when new memories could not be rehearsed intentionally during the wakeful rest delay. The probing of non-recallable words requires a recognition paradigm. Therefore, we first established, via Experiment 1, that the rest-induced boost in memory observed via free recall can be replicated in a recognition paradigm, using concrete nouns. In Experiment 2, participants heard 30 non-recallable non-words, presented as 'foreign names in a bridge club abroad' and then either rested wakefully or played a visual spot-the-difference game for 10 minutes. Retention was probed via recognition at two time points, 15 minutes and 7 days after presentation. As in Experiment 1, wakeful rest boosted recognition significantly, and this boost was maintained for at least 7 days. Our results indicate that the enhancement of memory via wakeful rest is not dependent upon intentional rehearsal of learned material during the rest period. We thus conclude that consolidation is sufficient for this rest-induced memory boost to emerge. We propose that wakeful resting allows for superior memory consolidation, resulting in stronger and/or more veridical representations of experienced events which can be detected via tests of free recall and recognition.

  11. Boosting long-term memory via wakeful rest: intentional rehearsal is not necessary, consolidation is sufficient.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela Dewar

    Full Text Available People perform better on tests of delayed free recall if learning is followed immediately by a short wakeful rest than by a short period of sensory stimulation. Animal and human work suggests that wakeful resting provides optimal conditions for the consolidation of recently acquired memories. However, an alternative account cannot be ruled out, namely that wakeful resting provides optimal conditions for intentional rehearsal of recently acquired memories, thus driving superior memory. Here we utilised non-recallable words to examine whether wakeful rest boosts long-term memory, even when new memories could not be rehearsed intentionally during the wakeful rest delay. The probing of non-recallable words requires a recognition paradigm. Therefore, we first established, via Experiment 1, that the rest-induced boost in memory observed via free recall can be replicated in a recognition paradigm, using concrete nouns. In Experiment 2, participants heard 30 non-recallable non-words, presented as 'foreign names in a bridge club abroad' and then either rested wakefully or played a visual spot-the-difference game for 10 minutes. Retention was probed via recognition at two time points, 15 minutes and 7 days after presentation. As in Experiment 1, wakeful rest boosted recognition significantly, and this boost was maintained for at least 7 days. Our results indicate that the enhancement of memory via wakeful rest is not dependent upon intentional rehearsal of learned material during the rest period. We thus conclude that consolidation is sufficient for this rest-induced memory boost to emerge. We propose that wakeful resting allows for superior memory consolidation, resulting in stronger and/or more veridical representations of experienced events which can be detected via tests of free recall and recognition.

  12. Dynamics of sleep-wake cyclicity at night across the human lifespan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hrönn Arnardóttir

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Studies in adult mammals (rats, cats, mice, and humans have revealed a surprising regularity in the duration of sleep and wake bouts. In particular, wake bout durations exhibit a power-law distribution whereas sleep bout durations exhibit an exponential distribution. Moreover, in rodents, sleep bouts exhibit an exponential distribution at all ages examined, whereas wake bout durations exhibit exponential distributions early in ontogeny with a clear power-law emerging only at the older ages. Thus, the data examined thus far suggests a similar developmental trajectory for a wide range of mammals which in turn may offer a novel metric to directly compare human and animal sleep-wake data. Therefore, we tested the generalizability of these findings by examining the distributions of sleep and wake bouts during the night in a healthy human sample – from premature infants to 70-year-olds. We find that sleep bouts elongate over the first years. At the same time wake bouts shorten but elongate again with increasing age. Moreover, sleep bout durations exhibit exponential distributions at all ages tested, except for the youngest (premature infants. Wake bouts exhibit a power-law distribution - but only during a restricted time window during adulthood. We conclude that the developmental trajectory of human sleep-wake cycles does not map well onto those of rodents; however, the method of characterizing sleep-wake cycles, using bout distribution, holds great promise for classifying sleep, its disorders, and tracking its developmental milestones across the life-span in humans.

  13. Nicaragua: la consolidacion de un regimen hibrido

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Puig Marti, Salvador

    2013-01-01

    El texto tiene como objetivo exponer el proceso de conversion y consolidacion del sistema politico nicaraguense en un regimen hibrido, senalando como episodio "clave" las elecciones municipales del 4...

  14. Impaired wake-promoting mechanisms in ghrelin receptor-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Matthew; Pellinen, Jacob; Kapás, Levente; Szentirmai, Éva

    2012-01-01

    Ghrelin receptors are expressed by key components of the arousal system. Exogenous ghrelin induces behavioral activation, promotes wakefulness and stimulates eating. We hypothesized that ghrelin-sensitive mechanisms play a role in the arousal system. To test this, we investigated the responsiveness of ghrelin receptor knockout (KO) mice to two natural wake-promoting stimuli. Additionally, we assessed the integrity of their homeostatic sleep-promoting system using sleep deprivation. There was no significant difference in the spontaneous sleep-wake activity between ghrelin receptor KO and wild-type (WT) mice. WT mice mounted robust arousal responses to a novel environment and food deprivation. Wakefulness increased for 6 h after cage change accompanied by increases in body temperature and locomotor activity. Ghrelin receptor KO mice completely lacked the wake and body temperature responses to new environment. When subjected to 48 h food deprivation, WT mice showed marked increases in their waking time during the dark periods of both days. Ghrelin receptor KO mice failed to mount an arousal response on the first night and wake increases were attenuated on the second day. The responsiveness to sleep deprivation did not differ between the two genotypes. These results indicate that the ghrelin-receptive mechanisms play an essential role in the function of the arousal system but not in homeostatic sleep-promoting mechanisms. © 2011 The Authors. European Journal of Neuroscience © 2011 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Effect of Severity of Esophageal Acidification on Sleep vs Wake Periods in Infants Presenting with Brief Resolved Unexplained Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaran, Janani; Qureshi, Aslam H; Woodley, Frederick; Splaingard, Mark; Jadcherla, Sudarshan R

    2016-12-01

    To describe the pattern of gastroesophageal reflux (GER) events in wake and sleep states with increasing acid reflux index (ARI) in neonates and to test the hypothesis that GER-related symptoms are frequent in ARI >7% in wake state. Infants underwent 24-hour pH-impedance studies with 6-hour concurrent video-polysomnography studies. Data were stratified based on the 24-hour ARI (% duration that esophageal pH is 7% (abnormal). GER frequency, clearance mechanisms, and symptoms were distinguished during wake state and sleep state. Total wake and sleep duration was similar (P ≥ .2) in all ARI groups. Acidic events were frequent with increasing ARI in wake state vs sleep state (P ≤ .03). The symptom index increased with increasing ARI (P ≤ .02) in both wake state and sleep state. Acid clearance time increased with increasing ARI in wake state (P ≤ .02). In ARI > 7% vs ARI ≤ 7%, frequency of acidic GER events was higher (P ≤ .02) in wake state and sleep state; proximal migration of acid (P = .03) and acid clearance time were higher in wake state (P = .0005) only. Symptom index was higher in ARI >7% vs ARI ≤ 7% in wake state (P 7%) is associated with increased reflux-associated symptoms in wake state. Sleep state appears to be protective regardless of ARI, likely because of greater chemosensory thresholds. Attention to posture and movements during wake state can be helpful. Scrutiny for non-GER etiologies should occur for infants presenting with life-threatening symptoms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Wake fields and instabilities in linear accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrario, M; Palumbo, L

    2006-01-01

    A charged particle beam travelling across perfectly conducting structures whose boundaries do not have constant cross section, such as an RF cavity or bellows, generates longitudinal and transverse wake fields. We discuss in this lecture the general features of wake fields, and show a few simple examples in cylindrical geometry: perfectly conducting pipe and the resonant modes of an RF cavity. We then study the effect of wake fields on the dynamics of a beam in a linac, such as beam break-up instabilities and how to cure them.

  17. Aircraft control in wake vortex wind shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wold, Gregory R.

    1995-01-01

    In the past, there have been a number of fatal incidents attributable to wake vortex encounters, involving both general aviation and commercial aircraft. In fact, the wake vortex hazard is considered to be the single dominant safety issue determining the aircraft spacing requirements at airports. As the amount of air traffic increases, the number of dangerous encounters is likely only to increase. It is therefore imperative that a means be found to reduce the danger. That is the purpose of this research: to use nonlinear inverse dynamic (NID) control methods in the design of an aircraft control system which can improve the safety margin in a wake vortex encounter.

  18. Detecting wind turbine wakes with nacelle lidars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Held, D. P.; Larvol, A.; Mann, Jakob

    2017-01-01

    Because the horizontal homogeneity assumption is violated in wakes flows, lidars face difficulties when reconstructing wind fields. Further, small-scale turbulence which is prevalent in wake flows causes Doppler spectrum widths to be broader than in the free stream. In this study the Doppler peak...... turbine is in wake by comparing the peak widths. The used lidar is inexpensive and brings instalments on every turbine within economical reach. Thus, the information gathered by the lidars can be used for improved control at wind farm level....

  19. Wake bursting: A computational and experimental investigation for application to high-lift multielement airfoil design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomeroy, Brent William

    High-lift aerodynamic flowfields are complex, and the potentially-adverse wake development associated with these high-lift systems is not fully understood. Thus, an exhaustive investigation including both experimental and computational efforts is needed to gain an increased understanding of the flowfield. Previous work indicates the strong off-the-surface adverse pressure gradients created by flaps may cause the main-element wake to "separate" in an aerodynamic phenomena known as wake bursting. Previous experimental research efforts to study wake bursting over a multielement airfoil are lacking a detailed study of the burst wakes in a wide range of spatial coordinates. In addition, no thorough comparison between the experimentally-captured data and computational simulations of a high-lift multielement airfoil has been performed. A variety of different experimental and computational tools can be used to study the burst-wake flowfield. These experimental techniques include the standard aerodynamic-performance and flow-visualization techniques in addition to complex wake survey methods. These wake surveys can be executed with one of a variety of probes to capture unsteady or steady data such as pressures or velocities. Because all desired flowfield parameters cannot be captured by one probe, results from different probes must be carefully analyzed and compared to other data such that a full understanding of the flowfield can be gained. Computational methods to study the burst-wake flowfield must adequately solve both the inviscid and viscous regions of the flowfield. Computations can be performed with low-order coupled viscous/inviscid program in addition to more-robust Navier-Stokes solvers, such as Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) programs. It is necessary to carefully compare the experimental and computational results such that the flowfield can be understood in greater detail. These comparisons will also yield insight into the effects of experimental testing

  20. Comparison of a Coupled Near and Far Wake Model With a Free Wake Vortex Code

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pirrung, Georg; Riziotis, Vasilis; Aagaard Madsen, Helge

    2016-01-01

    model can be improved by adding near wake trailed vorticity computation. For all prescribed vibration cases with high aerodynamic damping, results similar to those obtained by 15 the free wake model can be achieved in a small fraction of computation time with the proposed model. In the cases with low...... computations performed using a free wake panel code. The focus of the description of the aerodynamics model is on the numerical stability, the computation speed and the accuracy of 5 unsteady simulations. To stabilize the near wake model, it has to be iterated to convergence, using a relaxation factor that has...... induction modeling at slow time scales. Finally, the unsteady airfoil aerodynamics model is extended to provide the unsteady bound circulation for the near wake model and to improve 10 the modeling of the unsteady behavior of cambered airfoils. The model comparison with results from a free wake panel code...

  1. Simulation and Prediction of Wakes and Wake Interaction in Wind Farms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Søren Juhl

    coupled with the flow solver. The numerical simulations include the study of the far wake behind a single turbine, three idealised cases of infinitely long rows of turbines and finally three infinite wind farm scenarios with different spacings. The flow characteristics between the turbines, turbine...... the basis for two proposed dynamic wake models of the turbulent wake deep inside large wind farms. The first model is based on a direct reconstruction using POD, while the other model (REDOMO) is based on an additional reduction by only including the most dominant frequencies. The flow fields derived from......The highly turbulent wake and the wake interaction of merging wakes between multiple wind turbines are modelled using Large Eddy Simulation (LES) in a general Navier-Stokes solver. The Actuator Line (AL) technique is employed to model the wind turbines, and the aeroelastic computations are fully...

  2. Collision of counterpropagating laser-excited wake bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Z. G.; Yang, L.; Zhou, C. T.; Yu, M. Y.; Ying, H. P.; Wang, X. G.

    2014-06-01

    The collision of wake bubbles behind two counterpropagating laser pulses in rarefied plasma is investigated using particle-in-cell simulation. Special attention is paid to the highly nonlinear dynamics of the electrons in the interaction region. It is found that, as the two bubbles approach each other and collide, the electrons in the interaction region first oscillate in a periodic fashion, forming a quasistationary dense electron density ripple with fairly regular spatial structure. At longer times, the electron motion becomes chaotic, and the density grating is gradually smeared. The electrons escape in the transverse direction, and eventually the two bubbles merge to form a single one. The transition of the electron motion from regular to chaotic is confirmed by analytical modeling using test electrons moving in counterpropagating planar electromagnetic waves. The findings shed light on the dynamics of wake-bubble collisions and the complex behavior induced by multiple laser pulses in plasmas.

  3. 2014 CERN Accelerator Schools: Plasma Wake Acceleration

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    A specialised school on Plasma Wake Acceleration will be held at CERN, Switzerland from 23-29 November, 2014.   This course will be of interest to staff and students in accelerator laboratories, university departments and companies working in or having an interest in the field of new acceleration techniques. Following introductory lectures on plasma and laser physics, the course will cover the different components of a plasma wake accelerator and plasma beam systems. An overview of the experimental studies, diagnostic tools and state of the art wake acceleration facilities, both present and planned, will complement the theoretical part. Topical seminars and a visit of CERN will complete the programme. Further information can be found at: http://cas.web.cern.ch/cas/PlasmaWake2014/CERN-advert.html http://indico.cern.ch/event/285444/

  4. Three-Phased Wake Vortex Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Fred H.; Ahmad, Nashat N.; Switzer, George S.; LimonDuparcmeur, Fanny M.

    2010-01-01

    A detailed parametric study is conducted that examines vortex decay within turbulent and stratified atmospheres. The study uses a large eddy simulation model to simulate the out-of-ground effect behavior of wake vortices due to their interaction with atmospheric turbulence and thermal stratification. This paper presents results from a parametric investigation and suggests improvements for existing fast-time wake prediction models. This paper also describes a three-phased decay for wake vortices. The third phase is characterized by a relatively slow rate of circulation decay, and is associated with the ringvortex stage that occurs following vortex linking. The three-phased decay is most prevalent for wakes imbedded within environments having low-turbulence and near-neutral stratification.

  5. Bifurcation and instability problems in vortex wakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aref, Hassan; Brøns, Morten; Stremler, Mark A.

    2007-01-01

    A number of instability and bifurcation problems related to the dynamics of vortex wake flows are addressed using various analytical tools and approaches. We discuss the bifurcations of the streamline pattern behind a bluff body as a vortex wake is produced, a theory of the universal Strouhal......-Reynolds number relation for vortex wakes, the bifurcation diagram for "exotic" wake patterns behind an oscillating cylinder first determined experimentally by Williamson & Roshko, and the bifurcations in topology of the streamlines pattern in point vortex streets. The Hamiltonian dynamics of point vortices...... in a periodic strip is considered. The classical results of von Kármán concerning the structure of the vortex street follow from the two-vortices-in-a-strip problem, while the stability results follow largely from a four-vortices-in-a-strip analysis. The three-vortices-in-a-strip problem is argued...

  6. Wind Turbine Wake in Atmospheric Turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rethore, Pierre-Elouan

    This thesis describes the different steps needed to design a steady-state computational fluid dynamics (CFD) wind farm wake model. The ultimate goal of the project was to design a tool that could analyze and extrapolate systematically wind farm measurements to generate wind maps in order...... to calibrate faster and simpler engineering wind farm wake models. The most attractive solution was the actuator disc method with the steady state k-ε turbulence model. The first step to design such a tool is the treatment of the forces. This thesis presents a computationally inexpensive method to apply......) shows that the problem mainly comes from the assumptions of the eddy-viscosity concept, which are deeply invalidated in the wind turbine wake region. Different models that intent to correct the k-ε model's issues are investigated, of which none of them is found to be adequate. The mixing of the wake...

  7. Review of Idealized Aircraft Wake Vortex Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Nashat N.; Proctor, Fred H.; Duparcmeur, Fanny M. Limon; Jacob, Don

    2014-01-01

    Properties of three aircraft wake vortex models, Lamb-Oseen, Burnham-Hallock, and Proctor are reviewed. These idealized models are often used to initialize the aircraft wake vortex pair in large eddy simulations and in wake encounter hazard models, as well as to define matched filters for processing lidar observations of aircraft wake vortices. Basic parameters for each vortex model, such as peak tangential velocity and circulation strength as a function of vortex core radius size, are examined. The models are also compared using different vortex characterizations, such as the vorticity magnitude. Results of Euler and large eddy simulations are presented. The application of vortex models in the postprocessing of lidar observations is discussed.

  8. Efficient Turbulence Modeling for CFD Wake Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Laan, Paul

    Wind turbine wakes can cause 10-20% annual energy losses in wind farms, and wake turbulence can decrease the lifetime of wind turbine blades. One way of estimating these effects is the use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to simulate wind turbines wakes in the atmospheric boundary layer. Since...... wind farm, the simulated results cannot be compared directly with wind farm measurements that have a high uncertainty in the measured reference wind direction. When this uncertainty is used to post-process the CFD results, a fairer comparison with measurements is achieved....... this flow is in the high Reynolds number regime, it is mainly dictated by turbulence. As a result, the turbulence modeling in CFD dominates the wake characteristics, especially in Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS). The present work is dedicated to study and develop RANS-based turbulence models...

  9. Wake dynamics in offshore wind farms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Mare, Martin Tobias

    Wind turbines within offshore wind farms spend considerable time operating in the wake of neighboring wind turbines. An important contribution to the loads on a wake-affected wind turbine is the slow movement of the wake from the upstream wind turbine across the rotor of the wake-affected wind...... to be uniquely determined by the friction velocity, the shear and the dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy, all of them physical properties of the flow. If local equilibrium between the turbulent kinetic energy produced by shear and the turbulent kinetic energy dissipated as heat is assumed, then, for neutral...... components of the cross-spectra at known shear, is proposed. Future work could also include investigating if a Rapid Distortion formulation that also includes a term for buoyancy effects is needed in order to make accurate predictions for non-neutral atmospheric stratification....

  10. CRED REA Algal Assessments Wake Atoll, 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Twelve quadrats were sampled along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 12 sites at Wake Atoll in April...

  11. CRED REA Algal Assessments Wake Atoll, 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Twelve quadrats were sampled along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 14 sites at Wake Atoll in October...

  12. Secure Wake-Up Scheme for WBANs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing-Wei; Ameen, Moshaddique Al; Kwak, Kyung-Sup

    Network life time and hence device life time is one of the fundamental metrics in wireless body area networks (WBAN). To prolong it, especially those of implanted sensors, each node must conserve its energy as much as possible. While a variety of wake-up/sleep mechanisms have been proposed, the wake-up radio potentially serves as a vehicle to introduce vulnerabilities and attacks to WBAN, eventually resulting in its malfunctions. In this paper, we propose a novel secure wake-up scheme, in which a wake-up authentication code (WAC) is employed to ensure that a BAN Node (BN) is woken up by the correct BAN Network Controller (BNC) rather than unintended users or malicious attackers. The scheme is thus particularly implemented by a two-radio architecture. We show that our scheme provides higher security while consuming less energy than the existing schemes.

  13. Cockpit-based Wake Vortex Visualization Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To prevent aircraft accidents due to wake vortex hazards, FAA procedures specify the minimum separation required between different categories of aircraft. However, a...

  14. On the wake of a Darrieus turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Base, T. E.; Phillips, P.; Robertson, G.; Nowak, E. S.

    1981-01-01

    The theory and experimental measurements on the aerodynamic decay of a wake from high performance vertical axis wind turbine are discussed. In the initial experimental study, the wake downstream of a model Darrieus rotor, 28 cm diameter and a height of 45.5 cm, was measured in a Boundary Layer Wind Tunnel. The wind turbine was run at the design tip speed ratio of 5.5. It was found that the wake decayed at a slower rate with distance downstream of the turbine, than a wake from a screen with similar troposkein shape and drag force characteristics as the Darrieus rotor. The initial wind tunnel results indicated that the vertical axis wind turbines should be spaced at least forty diameters apart to avoid mutual power depreciation greater than ten per cent.

  15. Free wake models for vortex methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaiser, K. [Technical Univ. Berlin, Aerospace Inst. (Germany)

    1997-08-01

    The blade element method works fast and good. For some problems (rotor shapes or flow conditions) it could be better to use vortex methods. Different methods for calculating a wake geometry will be presented. (au)

  16. Stereo particle image velocimetry set up for measurements in the wake of scaled wind turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanardi, Gabriele; Grassi, Donato; Zanotti, Alex; Nanos, Emmanouil M.; Campagnolo, Filippo; Croce, Alessandro; Bottasso, Carlo L.

    2017-08-01

    Stereo particle image velocimetry measurements were carried out in the boundary layer test section of Politecnico di Milano large wind tunnel to survey the wake of a scaled wind turbine model designed and developed by Technische Universität München. The stereo PIV instrumentation was set up to survey the three velocity components on cross-flow planes at different longitudinal locations. The area of investigation covered the entire extent of the wind turbines wake that was scanned by the use of two separate traversing systems for both the laser and the cameras. Such instrumentation set up enabled to gain rapidly high quality results suitable to characterise the behaviour of the flow field in the wake of the scaled wind turbine. This would be very useful for the evaluation of the performance of wind farm control methodologies based on wake redirection and for the validation of CFD tools.

  17. Aircraft Wake Vortex Deformation in Turbulent Atmosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Hennemann, Ingo; Holzaepfel, Frank

    2007-01-01

    Large-scale distortion of aircraft wake vortices appears to play a crucial role for aircraft safety during approach and landing. Vortex distortion is investigated based on large eddy simulations of wake vortex evolution in a turbulent atmosphere. A vortex identification method is developed that can be adapted to the vortex scales of interest. Based on the identified vortex center tracks, a statistics of vortex curvature radii is established. This statistics constitutes the basis for understan...

  18. Flow visualization of the wake of a transport aircraft model with lateral-control oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, F. L., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    An exploratory flow visualization study conducted in the Langley Vortex Research Facility to investigate the effectiveness of lateral control surface oscillations as a potential method for wake vortex attenuation on a 0.03 scale model of a wide body jet transport aircraft is described. Effects of both asymmetric surface oscillation (control surfaces move as with normal lateral control inputs) and symmetric surface oscillation (control surfaces move in phase) are presented. The asymmetric case simulated a flight maneuver which was previously investigated on the transport aircraft during NASA/FAA flight tests and which resulted in substantial wake vortex attenuation. Effects on the model wake vortex systems were observed by propelling the model through a two dimensional smoke screen perpendicular to the model flight path. Results are presented as photographic time histories of the wake characteristics recorded with high speed still cameras. Effects of oscillation on the wake roll up are described in some detail, and the amount of vortex attenuation observed is discussed in comparative terms. Findings were consistent with flight test results in that only a small amount of rotation was observed in the wake for the asymmetric case. A possible aerodynamic mechanism contributing to this attenuation is suggested.

  19. Wake losses from averaged and time-resolved power measurements at full scale wind turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellani, Francesco; Astolfi, Davide; Mana, Matteo; Becchetti, Matteo; Segalini, Antonio

    2017-05-01

    This work deals with the experimental analysis of wake losses fluctuations at full-scale wind turbines. The test case is a wind farm sited on a moderately complex terrain: 4 turbines are installed, having 2 MW of rated power each. The sources of information are the time-resolved data, as collected from the OPC server, and the 10-minutes averaged SCADA data. The objective is to compare the statistical distributions of wake losses for far and middle wakes, as can be observed through the “fast” lens of time-resolved data, for certain selected test-case time series, and through the “slow” lens of SCADA data, on a much longer time basis that allow to set the standards of the mean wake losses along the wind farm. Further, time-resolved data are used for an insight into the spectral properties of wake fluctuations, highlighting the role of the wind turbine as low-pass filter. Summarizing, the wind rose, the layout of the site and the structure of the data sets at disposal allow to study middle and far wake behavior, with a “slow” and “fast” perspective.

  20. Probes, Moons, and Kinetic Plasma Wakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, I. H.; Malaspina, D.; Zhou, C.

    2017-10-01

    Nonmagnetic objects as varied as probes in tokamaks or moons in space give rise to flowing plasma wakes in which strong distortions of the ion and electron velocity distributions cause electrostatic instabilities. Non-linear phenomena such as electron holes are then produced. Historic probe theory largely ignores the resulting unstable character of the wake, but since we can now simulate computationally the non-linear wake phenomena, a timely challenge is to reassess the influence of these instabilities both on probe measurements and on the wakes themselves. Because the electron instability wavelengths are very short (typically a few Debye-lengths), controlled laboratory experiments face serious challenges in diagnosing them. That is one reason why they have long been neglected as an influence in probe interpretation. Space-craft plasma observations, by contrast, easily obtain sub-Debye-length resolution, but have difficulty with larger-scale reconstruction of the plasma spatial variation. In addition to surveying our developing understanding of wakes in magnetized plasmas, ongoing analysis of Artemis data concerning electron holes observed in the solar-wind lunar wake will be featured. Work partially supported by NASA Grant NNX16AG82G.

  1. Suppression of wake's instabilities by optimal streaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Guercio, Gerardo; Cossu, Carlo; Pujals, Gregory

    2014-11-01

    Wakes can sustain large transient energy growth. Optimal perturbations are computed for the cases of parallel, weakly non-parallel and the circular cylinder wakes. Streaks are found to be the optimal amplified structures produced by the non normal energy amplification. The level of energy increases with the spanwise wavelength of the perturbations except in the circular cylinder wake where the optimal is reached for λz ~ 6 D . In parallel wakes these streaks are shown to suppress the absolute instability. Furthermore the global instability of the weakly non-parallel and the circular cylinder wakes can be completely annihilate with moderate streaks amplitudes. The comparison of these spanwise periodic (3D) optimal perturbations with the spanwise uniform (2D) control showed that the energy required to stabilize the wake is always smaller for the 3D control. Moreover the sensitivity of the global mode growth rate is discovered to be quadratic for 3D perturbations while being linear for 2D ones meaning that usual first order sensitivity analysis is unable to predict their larger efficiency.

  2. VIRTUAL REALITY IN WAKING AND DREAMING CONSCIOUSNESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan eHobson

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the notion that the brain is genetically endowed with an innate virtual reality generator that – through experience-dependent plasticity –becomes a generative or predictive model of the world. This model, which is most clearly revealed in rapid eye movement (REM sleep dreaming, may provide the theatre for conscious experience. Functional neuroimaging evidence for brain activations that are time-locked to rapid eye movements endorses the view that waking consciousness emerges from REM sleep – and dreaming lays the foundations for waking perception. In this view, the brain is equipped with a virtual model of the world that generates predictions of its sensations. This model is continually updated and entrained by sensory prediction errors in wakefulness to ensure veridical perception, but not in dreaming. In contrast, dreaming plays an essential role in maintaining and enhancing the capacity to model the world by minimizing model complexity and thereby maximizing both statistical and thermodynamic efficiency. This perspective suggests that consciousness corresponds to the embodied process of inference, realized through the generation of virtual realities (in both sleep and wakefulness. In short, our premise or hypothesis is that the waking brain engages with the sensorium to predict the causes of sensations, while in sleep the brain's generative model is actively refined so that it generates more efficient predictions during waking. We review the evidence in support of this hypothesis – evidence that grounds consciousness in biophysical computations whose neuronal and neurochemical infrastructure has been disclosed by sleep research.

  3. Prophylactic antibiotic regimens in tumour surgery (PARITY)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Michael Mørk; Hettwer, Werner H; Grum-Schwensen, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    -day regimen of post-operative antibiotics, in comparison to a 24-hour regimen, decreases surgical site infections in patients undergoing endoprosthetic reconstruction for lower extremity primary bone tumours. METHODS: We performed a pilot international multi-centre RCT. We used central randomisation...... to conceal treatment allocation and sham antibiotics to blind participants, surgeons, and data collectors. We determined feasibility by measuring patient enrolment, completeness of follow-up, and protocol deviations for the antibiotic regimens. RESULTS: We screened 96 patients and enrolled 60 participants......% at one year (the remainder with partial data or pending queries). In total, 18 participants missed at least one dose of antibiotics or placebo post-operatively, but 93% of all post-operative doses were administered per protocol. CONCLUSIONS: It is feasible to conduct a definitive multi-centre RCT of post...

  4. Direct numerical simulations and modeling of a spatially-evolving turbulent wake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimbala, John M.

    1994-12-01

    Understanding of turbulent free shear flows (wakes, jets, and mixing layers) is important, not only for scientific interest, but also because of their appearance in numerous practical applications. Turbulent wakes, in particular, have recently received increased attention by researchers at NASA Langley. The turbulent wake generated by a two-dimensional airfoil has been selected as the test-case for detailed high-resolution particle image velocimetry (PIV) experiments. This same wake has also been chosen to enhance NASA's turbulence modeling efforts. Over the past year, the author has completed several wake computations, while visiting NASA through the 1993 and 1994 ASEE summer programs, and also while on sabbatical leave during the 1993-94 academic year. These calculations have included two-equation (K-omega and K-epsilon) models, algebraic stress models (ASM), full Reynolds stress closure models, and direct numerical simulations (DNS). Recently, there has been mutually beneficial collaboration of the experimental and computational efforts. In fact, these projects have been chosen for joint presentation at the NASA Turbulence Peer Review, scheduled for September 1994. DNS calculations are presently underway for a turbulent wake at Re(sub theta) = 1000 and at a Mach number of 0.20. (Theta is the momentum thickness, which remains constant in the wake of a two dimensional body.) These calculations utilize a compressible DNS code written by M. M. Rai of NASA Ames, and modified for the wake by J. Cimbala. The code employs fifth-order accurate upwind-biased finite differencing for the convective terms, fourth-order accurate central differencing for the viscous terms, and an iterative-implicit time-integration scheme. The computational domain for these calculations starts at x/theta = 10, and extends to x/theta = 610. Fully developed turbulent wake profiles, obtained from experimental data from several wake generators, are supplied at the computational inlet, along with

  5. Slow Activity in Focal Epilepsy During Sleep and Wakefulness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrino, Giovanni; Tombini, Mario; Curcio, Giuseppe; Campana, Chiara; Di Pino, Giovanni; Assenza, Giovanni; Tomasevic, Leo; Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo

    2017-05-01

    We aimed to test differences between healthy subjects and patients with respect to slow wave activity during wakefulness and sleep. Fifteen patients affected by nonlesional focal epilepsy originating within temporal areas and fourteen matched controls underwent a 24-hour EEG recording. We studied the EEG power spectral density during wakefulness and sleep in delta (1-4 Hz), theta (5-7 Hz), alpha (8-11 Hz), sigma (12-15 Hz), and beta (16-20 Hz) bands. During sleep, patients with focal epilepsy showed higher power from delta to beta frequency bands compared with controls. The effect was widespread for alpha band and above, while localized over the affected hemisphere for delta (sleep cycle 1, P = .006; sleep cycle 2, P = .008; sleep cycle 3, P = .017). The analysis of interhemispheric differences showed that the only frequency band stronger over the affected regions was the delta band during the first 2 sleep cycles (sleep cycle 1, P = .014; sleep cycle 2, P = .002). During wakefulness, patients showed higher delta/theta activity over the affected regions compared with controls. Patients with focal epilepsy showed a pattern of power increases characterized by a selective slow wave activity enhancement over the epileptic regions during daytime and sleep. This phenomenon was stronger and asymmetric during the first sleep cycles.

  6. The effect of the number of blades on wind turbine wake - a comparison between 2-and 3-bladed rotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mühle, Franz; Adaramola, Muyiwa S.; Sretran, Lars

    2016-09-01

    Due to cost benefit and weight reduction, 2-bladed wind turbines have the potential to become more important for offshore wind applications. In order to optimize the arrangement of wind turbines in wind farms and for accurate forecasts of the power production, a detailed knowledge of the wake flow is needed. In this study, three different rotors with varying number of blades and similar performance behaviour have been designed and manufactured using the 3dimensional (3D) printing technology. The performance characteristics of these rotors as well as their wake features are measured experimentally in wind tunnel tests and compared. The velocity deficit is seen to vary only insignificantly for the wakes in distances of 3D (where D is the rotor diameter), 5D and 7D behind the turbine. However, higher turbulence intensity levels are recorded in the wake of the 2-bladed rotors. This could have potential for a faster wake recovery and thus a narrower turbine spacing.

  7. Eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection: which regimen first?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federico, Alessandro; Gravina, Antonietta Gerarda; Miranda, Agnese; Loguercio, Carmela; Romano, Marco

    2014-01-21

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a well-known human pathogen that plays an essential role in the pathogenesis of chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, and gastric malignancies. Although H. pylori is susceptible to several antimicrobials, this infection has proven challenging to cure because of the increasing prevalence of bacterial strains that are resistant to the most commonly used antimicrobials, particularly clarithromycin. An effective (i.e., > 90%) first-line therapy is mandatory for avoiding supplementary treatments and testing, and more importantly for preventing the development of secondary resistance. This study reviews the recent literature on first-line therapies for H. pylori. The eradication rates following standard triple therapy (a proton pump inhibitor plus amoxicillin and clarithromycin) for H. pylori infection are declining worldwide. Several first-line strategies have been proposed to increase the eradication rate, including extending the treatment duration to 14 d, the use of a four-drug regimen (bismuth-containing quadruple, sequential, and concomitant treatments), and the use of novel antibiotics, such as fluoroquinolones. However, the efficacy of these regimens is controversial. A first-line eradication regimen should be based on what works best in a defined geographical area and must take into account the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance in that region.

  8. Sensitivity Analysis to Control the Far-Wake Unsteadiness Behind Turbines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esteban Ferrer

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We explore the stability of wakes arising from 2D flow actuators based on linear momentum actuator disc theory. We use stability and sensitivity analysis (using adjoints to show that the wake stability is controlled by the Reynolds number and the thrust force (or flow resistance applied through the turbine. First, we report that decreasing the thrust force has a comparable stabilising effect to a decrease in Reynolds numbers (based on the turbine diameter. Second, a discrete sensitivity analysis identifies two regions for suitable placement of flow control forcing, one close to the turbines and one far downstream. Third, we show that adding a localised control force, in the regions identified by the sensitivity analysis, stabilises the wake. Particularly, locating the control forcing close to the turbines results in an enhanced stabilisation such that the wake remains steady for significantly higher Reynolds numbers or turbine thrusts. The analysis of the controlled flow fields confirms that modifying the velocity gradient close to the turbine is more efficient to stabilise the wake than controlling the wake far downstream. The analysis is performed for the first flow bifurcation (at low Reynolds numbers which serves as a foundation of the stabilization technique but the control strategy is tested at higher Reynolds numbers in the final section of the paper, showing enhanced stability for a turbulent flow case.

  9. Effects of dawn simulation on markers of sleep inertia and post-waking performance in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Andrew; Jones, Helen; Gregson, Warren; Atkinson, Greg

    2014-05-01

    To examine the effects of a simulated dawn during the last 30 min of sleep on the subsequent dissipation of sleep inertia and changes in simulated work and physical performance. Eight participants, who reported difficulty with morning waking, were administered in a random order to a control (C) and a dawn simulation (DS) trial (starting 30 min prior to waking). Subjective ratings of sleep quality and alertness were obtained alongside measures of cognitive performance (addition and reaction time tasks measured at 5, 30 and 75 min after waking at habitual workday times). Physical performance was also measured 35 min after waking using a self-paced cycling protocol. After waking in DS, perceived sleep quality was 1.16 ± 0.89 (p = 0.01) points higher compared with C. Ratings of alertness were significantly higher in DS than C throughout the testing period (p = 0.04). Cognitive performance improved in both trials as time awake increased (p sleep can increase subjective alertness and improve both cognitive and physical performance after waking.

  10. Simulation of wind turbine wakes using the actuator line technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Jens N.; Mikkelsen, Robert F.; Henningson, Dan S.; Ivanell, Stefan; Sarmast, Sasan; Andersen, Søren J.

    2015-01-01

    The actuator line technique was introduced as a numerical tool to be employed in combination with large eddy simulations to enable the study of wakes and wake interaction in wind farms. The technique is today largely used for studying basic features of wakes as well as for making performance predictions of wind farms. In this paper, we give a short introduction to the wake problem and the actuator line methodology and present a study in which the technique is employed to determine the near-wake properties of wind turbines. The presented results include a comparison of experimental results of the wake characteristics of the flow around a three-bladed model wind turbine, the development of a simple analytical formula for determining the near-wake length behind a wind turbine and a detailed investigation of wake structures based on proper orthogonal decomposition analysis of numerically generated snapshots of the wake. PMID:25583862

  11. Numerical computations of wind turbine wakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanell, Stefan S.A.

    2009-01-15

    Numerical simulations of the Navier-Stokes equations are performed to achieve a better understanding of the behaviour of wakes generated by wind turbines. The simulations are performed by combining the in-house developed computer code EllipSys3D with the actuator line and disc methodologies. In the actuator line and disc methods the blades are represented by a line or a disc on which body forces representing the loading are introduced. The body forces are determined by computing local angles of attack and using tabulated aerofoil coefficients. The advantage of using the actuator disc technique is that it is not necessary to resolve blade boundary layers. Instead the computational resources are devoted to simulating the dynamics of the flow structures. In the present study both the actuator line and disc methods are used. Between approximately six to fourteen million mesh points are used to resolve the wake structure in a range from a single turbine wake to wake interaction in a farm containing 80 turbines. These 80 turbines are however represented by 20 actuator discs due to periodicity because of numerical limitations. In step one of this project the objective was to find a numerical method suitable to study both the flow structures in the wake behind a single wind turbine and to simulate complicated interaction between a number of turbines. The study resulted in an increased comprehension of basic flow features in the wake, but more importantly in the use of a numerical method very suitable for the upcoming purpose. The second objective of the project was to study the basic mechanisms controlling the length of the wake to obtain better understanding of the stability properties of wakes generated by wind turbine rotors. The numerical model was based on large eddy simulations of the Navier-Stokes equations using the actuator line method to generate the wake and the tip vortices. To determine critical frequencies the flow is disturbed by inserting a harmonic

  12. DIELECTRIC WAKE FIELD RESONATOR ACCELERATOR MODULE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirshfield, Jay L.

    2013-11-06

    Results are presented from experiments, and numerical analysis of wake fields set up by electron bunches passing through a cylindrical or rectangular dielectric-lined structure. These bunches excite many TM-modes, with Ez components of the wake fields sharply localized on the axis of the structure periodically behind the bunches. The experiment with the cylindrical structure, carried out at ATF Brookhaven National Laboratory, used up to three 50 MeV bunches spaced by one wake field period (21 cm) to study the superposition of wake fields by measuring the energy loss of each bunch after it passed through the 53-cm long dielectric element. The millimeter-wave spectrum of radiation excited by the passage of bunches is also studied. Numerical analysis was aimed not only to simulate the behavior of our device, but in general to predict dielectric wake field accelerator performance. It is shown that one needs to match the radius of the cylindrical dielectric channel with the bunch longitudinal rms-length to achieve optimal performance.

  13. Evolution of drug resistance in HIV infected patients remaining on a virologically failing cART regimen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cozzi-Lepri, A; Phillips, AN; Ruiz, L

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the extent of drug resistance accumulation in patients kept on a virologically failing regimen and its determinants in the clinical setting. DESIGN: The study focused on 110 patients of EuroSIDA on an unchanged regimen who had two genotypic tests performed at two time points...

  14. Evolution of drug resistance in HIV-infected patients remaining on a virologically failing combination antiretroviral therapy regimen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cozzi-Lepri, Alessandro; Phillips, Andrew N; Ruiz, Lidia

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the extent of drug resistance accumulation in patients kept on a virologically failing regimen and its determinants in the clinical setting. DESIGN: The study focused on 110 patients of EuroSIDA on an unchanged regimen who had two genotypic tests performed at two time point...

  15. Joyce the Deconstructionist: Finnegans Wake in Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zangouei J.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Had Finnegans Wake not been written, some seminal post-1950s innovations in the field of modern literary theory and criticism would have been impossible. James Joyce, who seems to have inspiringly influenced the entire sphere of modern literary theory and criticism greatly, is a pioneer of deconstruction too. His last novel, which reflects his deconstructive tendencies, has played a seminal role in the formation of 20th century deconstruction, and comprises an inchoate mass of implicit ideas on the subject. It was perhaps not until Jacques Derrida and his deconstruction techniques that the theory implied by Finnegans Wake really came into focus. This article seeks to delineate Derrida’s theory of deconstruction as well as Joyce's deconstructive aesthetics; and taking a diachronic approach to literary theory and criticism it glances at Finnegans Wake in the light of deconstruction.

  16. Fast particle tracking with wake fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dohlus, M.; Floettmann, K.; Henning, C.

    2012-01-15

    Tracking calculations of charged particles in electromagnetic fields require in principle the simultaneous solution of the equation of motion and of Maxwell's equations. In many tracking codes a simpler and more efficient approach is used: external fields like that of the accelerating structures are provided as field maps, generated in separate computations and for the calculation of self fields the model of a particle bunch in uniform motion is used. We describe how an externally computed wake function can be approximated by a table of Taylor coefficients and how the wake field kick can be calculated for the particle distribution in a tracking calculation. The integrated kick, representing the effect of a distributed structure, is applied at a discrete time. As an example, we use our approach to calculate the emittance growth of a bunch in an undulator beam pipe due to resistive wall wake field effects. (orig.)

  17. Vortex structure in the Venus plasma wake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-de-Tejada, H.; Lundin, R. N. A.

    2016-12-01

    Measurements conducted with the ASPERA-4 instrument of the Venus Express spacecraft in orbit around Venus show velocity distributions of the H+ ions that describe a large scale vortex flow structure in the Venus wake (Lundin et al., GRL, 40, 1273, 2013). Such structure is in agreement with that reported from the early Pioneer Venus Orbiter plasma data (Pérez-de-Tejada et al., INTECH, ISBN 978-953-51-0880-1, p. 317, 2012) and suggests that the solar wind around the Venus ionosphere is forced back into the planet from the wake. Measurements also show that a vortex circulation flow rather than local magnetic forces is responsible for the deviated direction of motion of the solar wind in the Venus wake.

  18. Meteorological Controls on Wind Turbine Wakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barthelmie, Rebecca J.; Hansen, Kurt Schaldemose; Pryor, S.C.

    2013-01-01

    is high, wake losses are proportionally larger and decrease to be virtually undetectable at wind speeds above rated wind speeds. Wind direction is also critical. Not only does it determine the effective spacing between turbines but also the wind speed distribution is primarily determined by synoptic......The primary control on the magnitude of the power losses induced by wind turbine wakes in large wind farms is the hub-height wind speed via its link to the turbine thrust coefficient. Hence, at low to moderate wind speeds (between cut-in and rated turbine wind speeds) when the thrust coefficient...... forcing and typically has a predominant direction from which wind speeds tend to be higher (from southwest for much of the central United States and northern Europe). Two other interlinked variables, turbulence intensity (TI), and atmospheric stability also dictate wake losses. Quantifying, understanding...

  19. Actuator Line Modeling of Wind Turbine Wakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troldborg, Niels

    2009-01-01

    This thesis contains a comprehensive 3D Navier-Stokes computational study of the characteristics of wakes of wind turbines operating in various flow conditions including interacting wakes between a row of turbines. The computations were carried out using the actuator line technique combined...... and it is shown that the turbines are subject to rather severe yaw moments, even in situations where the mean wind is oriented along the row. This observation is indicative of large scale dynamics of the wakes....... with the 3D Navier Stokes solver EllipSys3D and a LES turbulence model. Simple models, based on applying body forces in the computational domain, are developed for imposing sheared and turbulent infow and their validity is discussed. A few computations on stand alone turbines are compared to measurements...

  20. Wakes in large offshore wind farms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berthelmie, Rebecca J.; Frandsen, Sten Tronæs; Rathmann, Ole

    2008-01-01

    Power losses due to wind turbine wakes are of the order of 10 and 20% of total power output in large wind farms. The focus of this research carried out within the EC funded UPWIND project is wind speed and turbulence modelling for large wind farms/wind turbines in complex terrain and offshore...... is for five turbines in flat terrain. Finally a complex terrain wind farm will be modelled and compared with observations. For offshore wind farms, the focus is on cases at the Horns Rev wind farm which indicate wind farm models require modification to reduce under-prediction of wake losses while CFD models...... in order to optimise wind farm layouts to reduce wake losses and loads. For complex terrain, a set of three evaluations is underway. The first is a model comparison for a Gaussian Hill where CFD models and wind farm models are being compared for the case of one hilltop wind turbine. The next case...

  1. Wind turbine wake in atmospheric turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rethore, P.-E.

    2009-10-15

    This thesis describes the different steps needed to design a steady-state computational fluid dynamics (CFD) wind farm wake model. The ultimate goal of the project was to design a tool that could analyze and extrapolate systematically wind farm measurements to generate wind maps in order to calibrate faster and simpler engineering wind farm wake models. The most attractive solution was the actuator disc method with the steady state k-epsilon turbulence model. The first step to design such a tool is the treatment of the forces. This thesis presents a computationally inexpensive method to apply discrete body forces into the finite-volume flow solver with collocated variable treatment (EllipSys), which avoids the pressure-velocity decoupling issue. The second step is to distribute the body forces in the computational domain accordingly to rotor loading. This thesis presents a generic flexible method that associates any kind of shapes with the computational domain discretization. The special case of the actuator disc performs remarkably well in comparison with Conway's heavily loaded actuator disc analytical solution and a CFD full rotor computation, even with a coarse discretization. The third step is to model the atmospheric turbulence. The standard k-epsilon model is found to be unable to model at the same time the atmospheric turbulence and the actuator disc wake and performs badly in comparison with single wind turbine wake measurements. A comparison with a Large Eddy Simulation (LES) shows that the problem mainly comes from the assumptions of the eddy-viscosity concept, which are deeply invalidated in the wind turbine wake region. Different models that intent to correct the k-epsilon model's issues are investigated, of which none of them is found to be adequate. The mixing of the wake in the atmosphere is a deeply non-local phenomenon that is not handled correctly by an eddy-viscosity model such as k-epsilon. (author)

  2. Aircraft wake vortices in the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerz, Thomas; Holzäpfel, Frank; Hofbauer, Thomas; Dörnbrack, Andreas; Frech, Michael

    The studies summarized here were motivated by the need to gain information (i) about the impact of aircraft emissions upon the atmosphere and the climate and (ii) about optimized separation distances between aircraft landing at an airport for possibly increasing its capacity. To this end, large-eddy simulations have been performed to learn about the behaviour of vortex wakes shed by cruising aircraft in the free atmosphere and in the atmospheric boundary layer close to the ground. Some results are best illustrated in animated form and may be found under http://www.pa.op.dlr.de/wirbelschleppe/WakeVortex.html.

  3. Anisotropy of turbulence in wind turbine wakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Elvira, Rafael [Comision Nacional de Energia (Spain); Crespo, Antonio; Migoya, Emilio; Manuel, Fernando [Departamento de Ingenieria Energetica y Fluidomecanica, Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieros Industriales, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Jose Gutierrez Abascal, 2. 28006 Madrid (Spain); Hernandez, Julio [Departamento de Mecanica, ETSII, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, Ciudad Universitaria, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2005-10-01

    This work is mainly dedicated to the study of non-isotropic characteristics of turbulence in wind turbine wakes, specifically the shear layer of the near wake. A calculation method based on an explicit algebraic model for the components of the turbulent stress tensor is proposed, and the results are found to be in acceptable agreement with experimental results. Analytical expressions for the estimation of an upper limit of the global turbulence kinetic energy, k, and the individual contributions of each diagonal term in the turbulent stress tensor are proposed. Their predictions are compared with experimental results.

  4. Cylinder wakes in flowing soap films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorobieff, P; Ecke, R E

    1999-09-01

    We present an experimental characterization of cylinder wakes in flowing soap films. From instantaneous velocity and thickness fields, we find the vortex-shedding frequency, mean-flow velocity, and mean-film thickness. Using the empirical relationship between the Reynolds and Strouhal numbers obtained for cylinder wakes in three dimensions, we estimate the effective soap-film viscosity and its dependence on film thickness. We also compare the decay of vorticity with that in a simple Rankine vortex model with a dissipative term to account for air drag.

  5. Local experience-dependent changes in the wake EEG after prolonged wakefulness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ching-Sui; Sarasso, Simone; Ferrarelli, Fabio; Riedner, Brady; Ghilardi, M Felice; Cirelli, Chiara; Tononi, Giulio

    2013-01-01

    Prolonged wakefulness leads to a progressive increase in sleep pressure, reflected in a global increase in slow wave activity (SWA, 0.5-4.5 Hz) in the sleep electroencephalogram (EEG). A global increase in wake theta activity (5-9 Hz) also occurs. Recently, it was shown that prolonged wakefulness in rodents leads to signs of "local sleep" in an otherwise awake brain, accompanied by a slow/theta wave (2-6 Hz) in the local EEG that occurs at different times in different cortical areas. Compelling evidence in animals and humans also indicates that sleep is locally regulated by the amount of experience-dependent plasticity. Here, we asked whether the extended practice of tasks that involve specific brain circuits results in increased occurrence of local intermittent theta waves in the human EEG, above and beyond the global EEG changes previously described. Participants recorded with high-density EEG completed 2 experiments during which they stayed awake ≥ 24 h practicing a language task (audiobook listening [AB]) or a visuomotor task (driving simulator [DS]). Sleep laboratory. 16 healthy participants (7 females). Two extended wake periods. Both conditions resulted in global increases in resting wake EEG theta power at the end of 24 h of wake, accompanied by increased sleepiness. Moreover, wake theta power as well as the occurrence and amplitude of theta waves showed regional, task-dependent changes, increasing more over left frontal derivations in AB, and over posterior parietal regions in DS. These local changes in wake theta power correlated with similar local changes in sleep low frequencies including SWA. Extended experience-dependent plasticity of specific circuits results in a local increase of the wake theta EEG power in those regions, followed by more intense sleep, as reflected by SWA, over the same areas.

  6. To wake-up, or not to wake-up: that is the Hamletic neurocritical care question!

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    The need for a reliable neurological evaluation in severely brain-injured patients conflicts with sedation, which is routinely administered. Helbok and colleagues prospectively evaluated in a small cohort of 20 sedated severely brain-injured patients the effects of a wakeup test on intracranial pressure (ICP), brain tissue oxygen tension and brain metabolism. The test has been considered potentially risky on 34% of the study days. When the test is performed, ICP and cerebral perfusion pressure increase, usually slightly, except in a subgroup of patients with lower cerebral compliance where marked ICP and cerebral perfusion pressure changes were recorded. In this cohort, the information gained with the wake-up test has been negligible. Given the current little knowledge about the benefits of interruption of continuous sedation in brain-injured patients, it is extremely important to adopt multiple monitoring modalities in neurocritical care in order to escape wake-up tests in those patients who will potentially be harmed by this procedure. Once the clinical condition will improve, sedation needs to be tapered and suspended as soon as possible. PMID:23273166

  7. On the application of the Jensen wake model using a turbulence-dependent wake decay coefficient: the Sexbierum case

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pena Diaz, Alfredo; Réthoré, Pierre-Elouan; van der Laan, Paul

    2016-01-01

    and partly accounts for the uncertainty in the wind direction assuming that the same follows a Gaussian distribution. Simulations of the single and double wake measurements at the Sexbierum onshore wind farm are performed using a fast engineering wind farm wake model based on the Jensen wake model...... with the suggested post-processing. We show that the wake decay coefficient of the Jensen wake model must be decreased from the commonly used onshore value of 0.075 to 0.038, when applied to the Sexbierum cases, as wake decay is related to the height, roughness and atmospheric stability and, thus, to turbulence...

  8. Prediction of multi-wake problems using an improved Jensen wake model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tian, Linlin; Zhu, Wei Jun; Shen, Wen Zhong

    2017-01-01

    model uses a cosine shape instead of the top-hat shape for the velocity deficit in the wake, and the wake decay rate as a variable that is related to the ambient turbulence as well as the rotor generated turbulence. Coupled with four different multi-wake combination models, the 2D_k Jensen model...... Simulations (LES) as well as results from other commercial codes, it is found that the predictions obtained with the 2D_k Jensen model exhibit good to excellent agreements with experimental and LES data....

  9. La gestion del regimen cambiario en Brasil

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Prates, Daniela M; Cunha, Andre M; Lelis, Marcos T.C

    2009-01-01

    ...) en esta singular experiencia se combina un contexto de amplia movilidad de capitales con la existencia de mercados de derivados financieros amplios y liquidos y el elevado costo fiscal de la politica de acumulacion de reservas; iv) hasta abril de 2006, el patron de acumulacion de reservas en el sistema cambiarlo fluctuante fue similar al del regimen de bandas cambiarias; desde entonces se observaron cambios debido al crecimiento acelerado de las reservas. PALABRAS CLAVE Politica monetaria Tipos de cambio flota...

  10. New Treatment Regimen for Latent Tuberculosis Infection

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-03-15

    In this podcast, Dr. Kenneth Castro, Director of the Division of Tuberculosis Elimination, discusses the December 9, 2011 CDC guidelines for the use of a new regimen for the treatment of persons with latent tuberculosis infection.  Created: 3/15/2012 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 3/15/2012.

  11. Investigation of Murine Models for Sleep, Wakefulness and Target Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-10-01

    subjective day, 7pm-7am w R NR 0 50 100 150 200 250 state c o u n t s F2 Females F2 Males Different from humans, mice exhibit polyphasic sleep with many...early trends, e.g., in the 1p.m. (6 hrs of subjective night) group, became non-significant with additional mice tested • The polyphasic sleep ...REPORT Final report - Investigation of Murine Models for Sleep , Wakefulness and Target Discovery 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF

  12. COAXIAL TWO-CHANNEL DIELECTRIC WAKE FIELD ACCELERATOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirshfield, Jay L. [Omega-P, Inc.

    2013-04-30

    Theory, computations, and experimental apparatus are presented that describe and are intended to confirm novel properties of a coaxial two-channel dielectric wake field accelerator. In this configuration, an annular drive beam in the outer coaxial channel excites multimode wakefields which, in the inner channel, can accelerate a test beam to an energy much higher than the energy of the drive beam. This high transformer ratio is the result of judicious choice of the dielectric structure parameters, and of the phase separation between drive bunches and test bunches. A structure with cm-scale wakefields has been build for tests at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator Laboratory, and a structure with mm-scale wakefields has been built for tests at the SLAC FACET facility. Both tests await scheduling by the respective facilities.

  13. Engineering models for merging wakes in wind farm optimization applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machefaux, Ewan; Larsen, Gunner Chr.; Murcia Leon, Juan Pablo

    2015-01-01

    The present paper deals with validation of 4 different engineering wake superposition approaches against detailed CFD simulations and covering different turbine interspacing, ambient turbulence intensities and mean wind speeds. The first engineering model is a simple linear superposition of wake ...

  14. Qualitative analysis of wind-turbine wakes over hilly terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyvärinen, A.; Segalini, A.

    2017-05-01

    In this work, wind-turbine wakes are studied over flat and hilly terrains. Measurements made by using stereoscopic PIV are compared to data obtained from numerical simulations using RANS equations and an actuator-disc method. The numerical and experimental data show similar qualitative trends, indicating that the wind-turbine wake is perturbed by the presence of the hills. Additionally, a faster flow recovery at hub height is seen with the hilly terrain, indicating that the hills presence is beneficial for downstream turbines exposed to wake-interaction effects. The Jensen wake model is implemented over the hilly terrain and it is shown that this model cannot accurately capture the wake modulations induced by the hills. However, by superimposing a wind-turbine wake simulated over flat terrain on the hilly-terrain flow field, it is illustrated that the commonly-used wake-superposition technique can yield reasonable results if the used wake model has sufficient accuracy.

  15. Optimizing the immunosuppressive regimen in heart transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisen, Howard; Ross, Heather

    2004-05-01

    The use of immunosuppression regimens containing a calcineurin inhibitor (CNI), an adjunct immunosuppressant (e.g., azathioprine, everolimus or mycophenolate mofetil) and corticosteroids has effectively reduced the risk of early graft loss due to acute rejection in heart transplant recipients. At present, late graft loss due to cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) remains a major challenge for transplant teams. CAV is characterized by intimal hyperplasia as a result of endothelial cell injury. Factors relating to the transplant procedure itself (e.g., ischemic time and reperfusion injury), cardiovascular risks (e.g., donor age, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, pre-existing diabetes and new-onset diabetes after transplantation), immunologic risks (e.g., acute rejection episodes, anti-HLA antibodies) and the side effects of immunosuppression with CNIs or corticosteroids (e.g., cytomegalovirus infection, nephrotoxicity) have all been implicated in the development of CAV. The 2 main approaches to the prevention of CAV are modification of underlying risk factors (e.g., treatment with anti-hypertensive agents and lipid-lowering drugs, and optimizing the immunosuppressive regimen) and improvement in immunosuppression. CNIs remain the cornerstone of immunosuppressive regimens in heart transplantation, but new parameters for monitoring CNI exposure and new immunosuppressive regimens hold the promise of reduced overall CNI exposure with consequent reductions in vascular toxicity and improved clinical outcomes. Traditionally, trough levels of cyclosporine (C(0)) have been used to monitor exposure to cyclosporine and to assess the need for dose adjustment. However, optimal cyclosporine exposure can now be achieved through monitoring of cyclosporine levels 2 hours after dosing (C(2) monitoring). Furthermore, in a pivotal trial in heart transplantation, the new proliferation signal inhibitor, everolimus, plus full-dose cyclosporine and corticosteroids, has been shown to have

  16. SIMULATION OF AIRCRAFT CONDENSATION TRAILS AND WAKE VORTICES INTERACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. O. Aubakirov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A technique of calculation of aircraft condensation trails (contrails and wake vortices interaction is described. The technique is based on a suitable for real-time applications mathematical model of far wake utilizes the method of discrete vortices. The technique is supplemented by account of the influence of axial velocities in the vortex nucleus on contrail and wake vortex location. Results of calculations of contrails and wake vortices interaction for Il-76 and B-747 aircraft are presented.

  17. Vortex wakes of a flapping foil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schnipper, Teis; Andersen, Anders Peter; Bohr, Tomas

    2009-01-01

    We present an experimental study of a symmetric foil performing pitching oscillations in a vertically flowing soap film. By varying the frequency and amplitude of the oscillation we visualize a variety of wakes with up to 46 vortices per oscillation period, including von Karman vortex street...

  18. Performance and wake conditions of a rotor located in the wake of an obstacle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naumov, I. V.; Kabardin, I. K.; Mikkelsen, Robert Flemming

    2016-01-01

    Obstacles like forests, ridges and hills can strongly affect the velocity profile in front of a wind turbine rotor. The present work aims at quantifying the influence of nearby located obstacles on the performance and wake characteristics of a downstream located wind turbine. Here the influence......, PIV measurements were carried out to study the development of the mean velocity deficit profiles of the wake behind the wind turbine model under the influence of the wake generated by the obstacle. By use of regression techniques to fit the velocity profiles it was possible to determine velocity...... of an obstacle in the form of a cylindrical disk was investigated experimentally in a water flume. A model of a three-bladed rotor, designed using Glauert's optimum theory at a tip speed ratio λ = 5, was placed in the wake of a disk with a diameter close to the one of the rotor. The distance from the disk...

  19. Diurnal sex differences in the sleep-wake cycle of mice are dependent on gonadal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Ketema N; Dugovic, Christine; Turek, Fred W; Laposky, Aaron D

    2006-09-01

    Sex is an important determinant of the pathophysiology of several disorders that influence and/or impair sleep-wake regulation. To date, few studies have examined either the role of sex or the gonadal hormones on sleep and wakefulness. The difficulty in performing well-controlled clinical experiments on sex and sleep underscores the need for effective animal models to investigate the influence of the gonadal hormones on sleep-wake states. This study describes the influence of sex on sleep and wakefulness in mice, the primary mammalian genetic model for sleep analysis, and tests the hypothesis that gonadal function drives sex differences in sleep-wake states. Electroencephalogram/electromyogram sleep-wake patterns were recorded in intact and gonadectomized male and female C57BL/6J mice maintained on a 14-hour light:10-hour dark schedule. Following a 24-hour baseline recording, mice were sleep deprived during the light phase by gentle handling and given a 10-hour recovery opportunity during the immediate dark phase. Intact female mice spent more time awake than intact males during 24 hours of baseline recording at the expense of non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. Though the recovery response of NREM sleep was similar between males and females, when examined in reference to baseline levels, females exhibited a more robust recovery response. Gonadectomy in males and females reduced or eliminated the majority of sex differences in sleep architecture and homeostasis. These data demonstrate that the gonadal hormones influence the amount, distribution, and intensity of sleep but do not account for all sex differences in the sleep-wake cycle.

  20. Comparison Between 10- and 14-Day Hybrid Regimens for Helicobacter pylori Eradication: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metanat, Hassan Ali; Valizadeh, Seyed Mohammad; Fakheri, Hafez; Maleki, Iradj; Taghvaei, Tarang; Hosseini, Vahid; Bari, Zohreh

    2015-08-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) eradication has always been a concern. In our previous study, 14-day hybrid regimen showed ideal results. Based on these findings, we decided to compare the efficacy of 10- and 14-day hybrid regimens for H. pylori eradication. Two hundred and seventy patients with peptic ulcer disease and H. pylori infection were enrolled in the study. One hundred and thirty-four patients received 10-day hybrid regimen (PACT-10): pantoprazole, 40 mg, and amoxicillin, 1 g, both twice daily for 10 days; plus clarithromycin, 500 mg, and tinidazole, 500 mg, both twice daily just during the last 5 days. One hundred and thirty-six patients received 14-day hybrid regimen (PACT-14): pantoprazole, 40 mg, and amoxicillin, 1 g, both twice a day for 14 days; plus clarithromycin, 500 mg, and tinidazole, 500 mg, both twice daily just for the last 7 days. Eight weeks after treatment, (14) C-urea breath test was performed to evaluate H. pylori eradication. Two hundred and fifty patients (124 patients in PACT-10 and 126 patients in PACT-14 regimens) completed the study. The intention-to-treat eradication rates were 77.6% (95% confidence interval (CI): 70.6-84.6%) and 86% (95% CI: 80-92%) for the two regimens, respectively (p = .17). Per-protocol eradication rates were 83.8% (95% CI: 80-86%) and 92.8% (95% CI: 88-96%), respectively (p pylori eradication in Iran. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Local Experience-Dependent Changes in the Wake EEG after Prolonged Wakefulness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ching-Sui; Sarasso, Simone; Ferrarelli, Fabio; Riedner, Brady; Ghilardi, M. Felice; Cirelli, Chiara; Tononi, Giulio

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Prolonged wakefulness leads to a progressive increase in sleep pressure, reflected in a global increase in slow wave activity (SWA, 0.5-4.5 Hz) in the sleep electroencephalogram (EEG). A global increase in wake theta activity (5-9 Hz) also occurs. Recently, it was shown that prolonged wakefulness in rodents leads to signs of “local sleep” in an otherwise awake brain, accompanied by a slow/theta wave (2-6 Hz) in the local EEG that occurs at different times in different cortical areas. Compelling evidence in animals and humans also indicates that sleep is locally regulated by the amount of experience-dependent plasticity. Here, we asked whether the extended practice of tasks that involve specific brain circuits results in increased occurrence of local intermittent theta waves in the human EEG, above and beyond the global EEG changes previously described. Design: Participants recorded with high-density EEG completed 2 experiments during which they stayed awake ≥ 24 h practicing a language task (audiobook listening [AB]) or a visuomotor task (driving simulator [DS]). Setting: Sleep laboratory. Patients or Participants: 16 healthy participants (7 females). Interventions: Two extended wake periods. Measurements and Results: Both conditions resulted in global increases in resting wake EEG theta power at the end of 24 h of wake, accompanied by increased sleepiness. Moreover, wake theta power as well as the occurrence and amplitude of theta waves showed regional, task-dependent changes, increasing more over left frontal derivations in AB, and over posterior parietal regions in DS. These local changes in wake theta power correlated with similar local changes in sleep low frequencies including SWA. Conclusions: Extended experience-dependent plasticity of specific circuits results in a local increase of the wake theta EEG power in those regions, followed by more intense sleep, as reflected by SWA, over the same areas. Citation: Hung CS; Sarasso S

  2. Benchmarking of Wind Turbine Wake Models in Large Offshore Windfarms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaumond, M.; Réthoré, Pierre-Elouan; Bechmann, Andreas

    Quantifying accurately wind turbine wakes is a key aspect of wind farm economics in large wind farms. This research compares three engineering wake models with power production data from the Horns Rev and Lillgrund offshore wind farms. Single and multiple wake cases are investigated to verify...

  3. Simulation of wind turbine wakes using the actuator line technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Mikkelsen, Robert Flemming; Henningson, Dan S.

    2015-01-01

    The actuator line technique was introduced as a numerical tool to be employed in combination with large eddy simulations to enable the study of wakes and wake interaction in wind farms. The technique is today largely used for studying basic features of wakes as well as for making performance...

  4. Comparing satellite SAR and wind farm wake models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasager, Charlotte Bay; Vincent, P.; Husson, R.

    2015-01-01

    . These extend several tens of kilometres downwind e.g. 70 km. Other SAR wind maps show near-field fine scale details of wake behind rows of turbines. The satellite SAR wind farm wake cases are modelled by different wind farm wake models including the PARK microscale model, the Weather Research and Forecasting...

  5. Wake simulation for wind turbines with a free, prescribed- and hybrid-wake method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bareiss, R.; Guidati, G.; Wagner, S. [Univ. Stuttgart, Inst. fuer Aerodynamik und Gasdynamik, Stuttgart (Germany)

    1997-08-01

    Calculations of the radial distribution and the time history of the induction factors have been performed with a number of different wake models implemented in a vortex-lattice method for tip-speed ratios in the range 1-13. The new models lead to a significant reduction of the computational effort down to 3-27% compared to a free-wake model with errors less than 5%. (au)

  6. Assessment of non-standard HIV antiretroviral therapy regimens at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-03-06

    Mar 6, 2016 ... Lighthouse Trust in Lilongwe, Malawi serves approximately 25,000 patients with HIV antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens standardized according to national treatment .... Table 2: Most common non-standard antiretroviral therapy regimens. The most .... patients, three-NRTI regimens can maintain HIV-RNA.

  7. mtct regimen choice, drug resistance and the treatment of hiv

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    considered in order for the clinician to assist in the choice of the initial ARV regimen. It is not known whether ARV choices for infants who have been exposed to non- suppressive ARV regimens used to prevent MTCT should be modified. The efficacy of first-line highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) treatment regimens.

  8. The vortex wake of blackcaps (Sylvia atricapilla L.) measured using high-speed digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, L C; Hedenström, A

    2009-10-01

    Reconstructing the vortex wake of freely flying birds is challenging, but in the past few years, direct measurements of the wake circulation have become available for a number of species. Streamwise circulation has been measured at different positions along the span of the birds, but no measurements have been performed in the transverse plane. Recent findings from studies of bat wakes have pointed to the importance of transverse plane data for reconstructing the wake topology because important structures may be missed otherwise. We present results of high-speed DPIV measurements in the transverse plane behind freely flying blackcaps. We found novel wake structures previously not shown in birds, including wing root vortices of opposite as well as the same sign as the wing tip vortices. This suggests a more complex wake structure in birds than previously assumed and calls for more detailed studies of the flow over the wings and body, respectively. Based on measurements on birds with and without a tail we also tested hypotheses regarding the function of the tail during steady flight. We were unable to detect any differences in the wake pattern between birds with and without a tail. We conclude that the birds do not use their tail to exploit vortices shed at the wing root during the downstroke. Neither did we find support for the hypothesis that the tail should reduce the drag of the bird. The function of the tail during steady flight thus remains unclear and calls for further investigation in future studies.

  9. Increasing length of wakefulness and modulation of hypocretin-1 in the wake-consolidated squirrel monkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeitzer, Jamie M; Buckmaster, Christine L; Lyons, David M; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2007-10-01

    The neuropeptides hypocretins (orexins), the loss of which results in the sleep disorder narcolepsy, are hypothesized to be involved in the consolidation of wakefulness and have been proposed to be part of the circadian-driven alertness signal. To elucidate the role of hypocretins in the consolidation of human wakefulness we examined the effect of wake extension on hypocretin-1 in squirrel monkeys, primates that consolidate wakefulness during the daytime as do humans. Wake was extended up to 7 h with hypocretin-1, cortisol, ghrelin, leptin, locomotion, and feeding, all being assayed. Hypocretin-1 (P sleep deprivation, while ghrelin (P = 0.79) and leptin (P = 1.00) did not change with sleep deprivation. Using cross-correlation and multivariate modeling of these potential covariates along with homeostatic pressure (a measure of time awake/asleep), we found that time of day and homeostatic pressure together explained 44% of the variance in the hypocretin-1 data (P sleep pressure. Concomitants of wakefulness that affect hypocretin-1 in polyphasic species, such as locomotion, food intake, and food deprivation, likely have a more minor role in monophasic species, such as humans.

  10. Brain reactivity differentiates subjects with high and low dream recall frequencies during both sleep and wakefulness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichenlaub, Jean-Baptiste; Bertrand, Olivier; Morlet, Dominique; Ruby, Perrine

    2014-05-01

    The neurophysiological correlates of dreaming remain unclear. According to the "arousal-retrieval" model, dream encoding depends on intrasleep wakefulness. Consistent with this model, subjects with high and low dream recall frequency (DRF) report differences in intrasleep awakenings. This suggests a possible neurophysiological trait difference between the 2 groups. To test this hypothesis, we compared the brain reactivity (evoked potentials) of subjects with high (HR, N = 18) and low (LR, N = 18) DRF during wakefulness and sleep. During data acquisition, the subjects were presented with sounds to be ignored (first names randomly presented among pure tones) while they were watching a silent movie or sleeping. Brain responses to first names dramatically differed between the 2 groups during both sleep and wakefulness. During wakefulness, the attention-orienting brain response (P3a) and a late parietal response were larger in HR than in LR. During sleep, we also observed between-group differences at the latency of the P3a during N2 and at later latencies during all sleep stages. Our results demonstrate differences in the brain reactivity of HR and LR during both sleep and wakefulness. These results suggest that the ability to recall dreaming is associated with a particular cerebral functional organization, regardless of the state of vigilance.

  11. A quantitative comparison of bird and bat wakes

    OpenAIRE

    Johansson, L. Christoffer; Wolf, Marta; Hedenström, Anders

    2009-01-01

    Qualitative comparison of bird and bat wakes has demonstrated significant differences in the structure of the far wake. Birds have been found to have a unified vortex wake of the two wings, while bats have a more complex wake with gradients in the circulation along the wingspan, and with each wing generating its own vortex structure. Here, we compare quantitative measures of the circulation in the far wake of three bird and one bat species. We find that bats have a significantly stronger norm...

  12. Fish oil provides robust and sustained memory recovery after cerebral ischemia: influence of treatment regimen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia Bacarin, Cristiano; Mori, Marco Aurélio; Dias Fiuza Ferreira, Emilene; Valério Romanini, Cássia; Weffort de Oliveira, Rúbia Maria; Milani, Humberto

    2013-07-02

    We previously reported that long-term treatment with fish oil (FO) facilitates memory recovery after transient, global cerebral ischemia (TGCI), despite the presence of severe hippocampal damage. The present study tested whether this antiamnesic effect resulted from an action of FO on behavioral performance itself, or whether it resulted from an anti-ischemic action. Different treatment regimens were used that were distinguished from each other by their initiation or duration with regard to the onset of TGCI and memory assessment. Naive rats were trained in an eight-arm radial maze, subjected to TGCI (4-VO model, 15 min), and tested for memory performance up to 6 weeks after TGCI. Fish oil (docosahexaenoic acid, 300 mg/kg/day) was given orally according to one of the following regimens: regimen 1 (from 3 days prior to ischemia until 4 weeks post-ischemia), regimen 2 (from 3 days prior to ischemia until 1 week post-ischemia), and regimen 3 (from week 2 to week 5 post-ischemia). When administered according to regimens 1 and 2, FO abolished amnesia completely. This effect persisted for at least 5 weeks after discontinuing the treatment. Such an effect did not occur, however, in the group treated according to regimen 3. Hippocampal and cortical damage was not alleviated by FO. The present results demonstrate that FO-mediated memory recovery (or preservation) following TGCI is a reproducible, robust, and long-lasting effect. Moreover, such an effect was found with a relatively short period of treatment, provided it covered the first days prior to and after ischemia. This suggests that FO prevented amnesia by changing some acute, ischemia/reperfusion-triggered process and not by stimulating memory performance on its own. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Non-24-hour sleep-wake disorder revisited – A case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corrado eGarbazza

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The human sleep-wake cycle is governed by two major factors: a homeostatic hourglass process (process S, which rises linearly during the day, and a circadian process C, which determines the timing of sleep in an approximately 24h rhythm in accordance to the external light-dark (LD cycle. While both individual processes are fairly well characterized, the exact nature of their interaction remains unclear. The circadian rhythm is generated by the subthalamic nucleus (SCN, master clock of the anterior hypothalamus, through cell-autonomous feedback loops of DNA transcription and translation. While the phase length (tau of the cycle is relatively stable and genetically determined, the phase of the clock is reset by external stimuli (zeitgebers, the most important being the LD-cycle. Misalignments of the internal rhythm with the LD-cycle can lead to various somatic complaints and ultimately to the development of circadian rhythm sleep disorders (CRSD. Non-24-h sleep-wake disorders (N24HSWD is a CRSD affecting up to 50% of totally blind patients and characterized by the inability to maintain a stable entrainment of the typically long circadian rhythm (tau >24.5h to the LD- cycle. The disease is rare (<1:1 Mio in sighted individuals and the pathophysiology less well understood.Here we present the case of a 40 year old sighted male, who developed a misalignment of the internal clock with the external light-dark cycle following the treatment for Hodgkin’s lymphoma (ABVD regimen, 4 cycles and AVD regimen, 4 cycles. A thorough clinical assessment including actigraphy, melatonin profiles, polysomnography and wake-EEG lead to the diagnosis of a non-24-h sleep-wake disorders (N24HSWD with a free-running rhythm of tau=25.5h. A therapeutic intervention with bright-light therapy (BLT, 30 min 10.000lux in the morning and melatonin administration (0.5-0.75 mg in the evening failed to entrain the free-running rhythm, although a longer treatment duration and more

  14. Wake-vortex structure from lift and torque induced on a following wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossow, Vernon J.

    1993-01-01

    A procedure based on vortex lattice theory to interpret the lift and torque measured on a following model in a wind tunnel is developed to retrieve the velocity distribution in the vortex wake that caused the induced forces. It is concluded that the retrieval procedure has a potential for reliably determining the structure of vortex wakes that trail from the wings of subsonic transport aircraft. Tests using idealized theoretical models show that the procedure is highly reliable and accurate. However, certain difficulties are found in the retrieval procedure when applied to actual data measured with following wings of various sizes in a wind tunnel.

  15. Numerical investigation of the wake interaction between two model wind turbines with span-wise offset

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarmast, Sasan; Chivaee, Hamid Sarlak; Ivanell, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Wake interaction between two model scale wind turbines with span-wise offset is investigated numerically using Large Eddy Simulation (LES) and the results are validated against the experimental data. An actuator line technique is used for modeling the rotor. The investigated setup refers to a ser......Wake interaction between two model scale wind turbines with span-wise offset is investigated numerically using Large Eddy Simulation (LES) and the results are validated against the experimental data. An actuator line technique is used for modeling the rotor. The investigated setup refers...... to a series of experimental measurements of two model scale turbines conducted by NTNU in low speed wind tunnel in which the two wind turbines are aligned with a span-wise offset resulting in half wake interaction. Two levels of free-stream turbulence are tested, the minimum undisturbed level of about Ti ≈ 0...

  16. Fractal analysis of EEG upon auditory stimulation during waking and hypnosis in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jun-Seok; Koo, Bon-Hoon

    2012-01-01

    The authors tested fluctuation analyses (DFA) of EEGs upon auditory stimulation in waking and hypnotic states as related to topography and hypnotizability. They administered the Hypnotic Induction Profile (HIP), Dissociation Experience Scale, and Tellegen Absorption Scale to 10 healthy volunteers and measured subjects' EEGs while the subjects listened to sounds, either selecting or ignoring tones of different decibels, in waking and hypnotic states. DFA scaling exponents were closest to 0.5 when subjects reported the tones in the hypnotic state. Different DFA values at C3 showed significant positive correlations with the HIP eye-roll sign. Adding to the literature supporting the state theory of hypnosis, the DFA values at F3 and C3 showed significant differences between waking and hypnotic states. Application of auditory stimuli is useful for understanding neurophysiological characteristics of hypnosis using DFA.

  17. A simple stationary semi-analytical wake model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Gunner Chr.

    -uniform mean wind field, although the modelling of the individual stationary wake flow fields includes non-linear terms. The simulation of the individual wake contributions are based on an analytical solution of the thin shear layer approximation of the NS equations. The wake flow fields are assumed...... rotationally symmetric, and the rotor inflow fields are consistently assumed uniform. Expansion of stationary wake fields is believed to be significantly affected by meandering of wake deficits as e.g. described by the Dynamic Wake Meandering model. In the present context, this effect is approximately...... approximately linearly with the downstream distance. The link from a non-uniform wind farm wind field, consisting of linear perturbations on the ambient non-uniform mean wind field, to a fictitious uniform wake generating inflow field is established using two different averaging approaches – a linear and a non-linear...

  18. The near wake of a freely flying European starling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchhefer, Adam J.; Kopp, Gregory A.; Gurka, Roi

    2013-05-01

    The wake of a freely flying European starling (Sturnus vulgaris) has been measured using high speed, time-resolved, particle image velocimetry, simultaneously with high speed cameras which imaged the bird. These have been used to generate vector maps that can be associated with the bird's location and wing configuration in the wind tunnel. Time series of measurements have been expressed as composite wake plots which depict segments of the wing beat cycle for various spanwise locations in the wake. Measurements indicate that downwash is not produced during the upstroke, suggesting that the upstroke does not generate lift. As well, the wake velocities imply the presence of streamwise vortical structures, in addition to tip vortices. These two characteristics indicate similarities between the wake of a bird and the wake of a bat, which may be general features of the wakes of flapping wings.

  19. CAS course on Plasma Wake Acceleration

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Accelerator School

    2015-01-01

    The CERN Accelerator School (CAS) recently organised a specialised course on Plasma Wake Acceleration, held at CERN, Geneva, Switzerland, from 23 to 29 November 2014.    Following a number of introductory lectures on laser and plasma physics, as well as an overview of conventional accelerators and their limitations, the course covered a large number of aspects of plasma wake acceleration schemes: the creation of plasma by high power lasers or particle beams, a description of the plasma creation process through simulations and the characteristics of the accelerated particle beams, including results of the latest achievements. Lectures on beam diagnostics, the applications of plasma accelerated beams, and topical seminars completed the programme.  The course was very successful, with 109 students of 26 nationalities attending; most participants coming from European counties, but also from the US, Israel, India, South Korea, Russia and Ukraine. Feedback from the participants was...

  20. Optical Injection into Laser Wake Field Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Cary, John R; Esarey, Eric; Geddes, Cameron G R; Giacone, Rodolfo; Leemans, Wim; Nieter, Chet

    2005-01-01

    The accelerating gradient of laser-generated wake fields in plasmas can be orders of magnitude greater than the gradients obtainable in traditional, rf structures. One of the hurdles to overcome on the road to practical utilization of said plasma wake fields for production of high energy particles is the creation of quality beams having significant charge, low emittance, and narrow energy spread. To generate appropriate beams, various injection methods have been proposed. Injection by conventional means of beam prepartion using conventional technology is very difficult, as the accelerating buckets are only tens of microns long. Therefore, the field has turned to all-optical injection schemes, which include injection by colliding pulses, plasma ramps, wave breaking, and self-trapping through pulse evolution. This talk will review the various concepts proposed for injection, including plasma ramps, colliding pulses, and self trapping. The results of simulations and experiments will be discussed along with propo...

  1. Inviscid double wake model for stalled airfoils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marion, Lucas; Ramos García, Néstor; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2014-01-01

    An inviscid double wake model based on a steady two-dimensional panel method has been developed to predict aerodynamic loads of wind turbine airfoils in the deep stall region. The separated flow is modelled using two constant vorticity sheets which are released at the trailing edge and at the sep......An inviscid double wake model based on a steady two-dimensional panel method has been developed to predict aerodynamic loads of wind turbine airfoils in the deep stall region. The separated flow is modelled using two constant vorticity sheets which are released at the trailing edge...... and at the separation point. A calibration of the code through comparison with experiments has been performed using one set of airfoils. A second set of airfoils has been used for the validation of the calibrated model. Predicted aerodynamic forces for a wide range of angles of attack (0 to 90 deg) are in overall good...

  2. Wake up to fatigue risk management

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Schutte, PC

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available of Occupational Hygiene II Wake up 0 t tgue rl k man P.C. SCHUTTE OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH & ERGONOMICS RESEARCH GROUP, CSIR NRE (MINING). PAPER PRESENTED AT SAFECONEX 2009, 12 -13 MARCH 2009, INDABA HOTEL & CONFERENCE CENTRE Abstract There have been several high... on pregnont women. Negative effects include an increased risk of Southern African Institute of Occupational Hygiene Ii miscarriage, low birth weight and a higher occurrence of premature births. 5. Fatigue management The management of fatigue...

  3. A three states sleep-waking model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comte, J.C. [Laboratoire de Physiopathologie des Reseaux Neuronaux du Cycle Veille-Sommeil, UMR 5167, CNRS/Universite Claude Bernard Lyon1, Faculte de Medecine RTH Laennec 7, Rue Guillaume Paradin 69372 Lyon Cedex 08 (France)]. E-mail: comtejc@gmail.com; Schatzman, M. [MAPLY, Laboratoire de Mathematiques appliquees de Lyon, UMR5585, CNRS/Universite Claude Bernard Lyon1, 21, Avenue Claude Bernard, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Ravassard, P. [Laboratoire de Physiopathologie des Reseaux Neuronaux du Cycle Veille-Sommeil, UMR 5167, CNRS/Universite Claude Bernard Lyon1, Faculte de Medecine RTH Laennec 7, Rue Guillaume Paradin 69372 Lyon Cedex 08 (France); Luppi, P.H. [Laboratoire de Physiopathologie des Reseaux Neuronaux du Cycle Veille-Sommeil, UMR 5167, CNRS/Universite Claude Bernard Lyon1, Faculte de Medecine RTH Laennec 7, Rue Guillaume Paradin 69372 Lyon Cedex 08 (France); Salin, P.A. [Laboratoire de Physiopathologie des Reseaux Neuronaux du Cycle Veille-Sommeil, UMR 5167, CNRS/Universite Claude Bernard Lyon1, Faculte de Medecine RTH Laennec 7, Rue Guillaume Paradin 69372 Lyon Cedex 08 (France)

    2006-08-15

    The mechanisms underlying the sleep-states periodicity in animals are a mystery of biology. Recent studies identified a new neuronal population activated during the slow wave sleep (SWS) in the ventral lateral preoptic area of the hypothalamus. Interactions between this neuronal population and the others populations implicated in the vigilance states (paradoxical sleep (PS) and wake (W)) dynamics are not determined. Thus, we propose here a sleep-waking theoretical model that depicts the potential interactions between the neuronal populations responsible for the three vigilance states. First, we pooled data from previous papers regarding the neuronal populations firing rate time course and characterized statistically the experimental hypnograms. Then, we constructed a nonlinear differential equations system describing the neuronal populations activity time course. A simple rule playing the firing threshold role applied to the model allows to construct a theoretical hypnogram. A random modulation of the neuronal activity, shows that theoretical hypnograms present a dynamics close to the experimental observations. Furthermore, we show that the wake promoting neurons activity can predict the next SWS episode duration.

  4. Determination of wind-turbine-wake centerline for the analysis of the wake-meandering phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coudou, Nicolas; Chatelain, Philippe; van Beeck, Jeroen; Bricteux, Laurent

    2017-11-01

    The oscillatory motion of wind turbine wakes, also known as wake meandering, is crucial in wind farms as it increases unsteady loading, in particular yawing moments, on downstream turbines. The study of this phenomenon requires, as a first step, the determination of the position of the wake. Therefore, the aim of this work is to compare different techniques to detect the wake centerline based on the velocity/momentum deficit inside the wake or on the estimation of azimuthal vorticity centroids. These techniques are applied to the data obtained from Large-Eddy simulations of the NREL 5-MW wind turbine. The computations were performed with a vortex-particle mesh code with the wind turbine rotor modeled by means of immersed lifting lines. This study constitutes a first step towards the understanding of meandering mechanisms and its accurate operational modeling. Nicolas Coudou is funded by the ``Fonds pour la Formation - la Recherche dans l'Industrie et dans l'Agriculture'' (FRIA), Belgium.

  5. Analytical and experimental studies of wakes behind circularly capped bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessler, W. F.

    The wakes behind circularly capped bubbles are examined by means of an experimental and analytical study. A single two-inch diameter bubble is injected into a six by three foot fluid column, one half inch thick, producing an essentially two-dimensional flow. Aspirin powder placed in the fluid column just prior to bubble release highlights the structure of the flow field before dissolving. High speed film and sequenced photographs are taken to document the observed results. Pressure-time measurements are made with sensitive capacitive transducers mounted in the rear column wall and are synchronized with photographs using a high speed clock. Experimental fluids, prepared by mixing water and glycerine in varying proportions, are used to study the effects of viscosity on bubble shape and wake structure. Testing is performed over a range of Reynolds numbers from 14 to 29,655 which includes the transition from circularly capped to ellipsoidal bubble shape. Experimental data is reduced and summarized in convenient dimensionless form to permit comparison with analytical predictions.

  6. A Simplified 4-Site Economical Intradermal Post-Exposure Rabies Vaccine Regimen: A Randomised Controlled Comparison with Standard Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrell, Mary J.; Riddell, Anna; Yu, Ly-Mee; Phipps, Judith; Diggle, Linda; Bourhy, Hervé; Deeks, Jonathan J.; Fooks, Anthony R.; Audry, Laurent; Brookes, Sharon M.; Meslin, François-Xavier; Moxon, Richard; Pollard, Andrew J.; Warrell, David A.

    2008-01-01

    Background The need for economical rabies post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) is increasing in developing countries. Implementation of the two currently approved economical intradermal (ID) vaccine regimens is restricted due to confusion over different vaccines, regimens and dosages, lack of confidence in intradermal technique, and pharmaceutical regulations. We therefore compared a simplified 4-site economical PEP regimen with standard methods. Methods Two hundred and fifty-four volunteers were randomly allocated to a single blind controlled trial. Each received purified vero cell rabies vaccine by one of four PEP regimens: the currently accepted 2-site ID; the 8-site regimen using 0.05 ml per ID site; a new 4-site ID regimen (on day 0, approximately 0.1 ml at 4 ID sites, using the whole 0.5 ml ampoule of vaccine; on day 7, 0.1 ml ID at 2 sites and at one site on days 28 and 90); or the standard 5-dose intramuscular regimen. All ID regimens required the same total amount of vaccine, 60% less than the intramuscular method. Neutralising antibody responses were measured five times over a year in 229 people, for whom complete data were available. Findings All ID regimens showed similar immunogenicity. The intramuscular regimen gave the lowest geometric mean antibody titres. Using the rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test, some sera had unexpectedly high antibody levels that were not attributable to previous vaccination. The results were confirmed using the fluorescent antibody virus neutralisation method. Conclusions This 4-site PEP regimen proved as immunogenic as current regimens, and has the advantages of requiring fewer clinic visits, being more practicable, and having a wider margin of safety, especially in inexperienced hands, than the 2-site regimen. It is more convenient than the 8-site method, and can be used economically with vaccines formulated in 1.0 or 0.5 ml ampoules. The 4-site regimen now meets all requirements of immunogenicity for PEP and can be

  7. A simplified 4-site economical intradermal post-exposure rabies vaccine regimen: a randomised controlled comparison with standard methods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary J Warrell

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The need for economical rabies post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP is increasing in developing countries. Implementation of the two currently approved economical intradermal (ID vaccine regimens is restricted due to confusion over different vaccines, regimens and dosages, lack of confidence in intradermal technique, and pharmaceutical regulations. We therefore compared a simplified 4-site economical PEP regimen with standard methods.Two hundred and fifty-four volunteers were randomly allocated to a single blind controlled trial. Each received purified vero cell rabies vaccine by one of four PEP regimens: the currently accepted 2-site ID; the 8-site regimen using 0.05 ml per ID site; a new 4-site ID regimen (on day 0, approximately 0.1 ml at 4 ID sites, using the whole 0.5 ml ampoule of vaccine; on day 7, 0.1 ml ID at 2 sites and at one site on days 28 and 90; or the standard 5-dose intramuscular regimen. All ID regimens required the same total amount of vaccine, 60% less than the intramuscular method. Neutralising antibody responses were measured five times over a year in 229 people, for whom complete data were available.All ID regimens showed similar immunogenicity. The intramuscular regimen gave the lowest geometric mean antibody titres. Using the rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test, some sera had unexpectedly high antibody levels that were not attributable to previous vaccination. The results were confirmed using the fluorescent antibody virus neutralisation method.This 4-site PEP regimen proved as immunogenic as current regimens, and has the advantages of requiring fewer clinic visits, being more practicable, and having a wider margin of safety, especially in inexperienced hands, than the 2-site regimen. It is more convenient than the 8-site method, and can be used economically with vaccines formulated in 1.0 or 0.5 ml ampoules. The 4-site regimen now meets all requirements of immunogenicity for PEP and can be introduced without further

  8. Automating the medication regimen complexity index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Margaret V; Peng, Timothy R; Sridharan, Sridevi; Foust, Janice B; Kogan, Polina; Pezzin, Liliana E; Feldman, Penny H

    2013-05-01

    To adapt and automate the medication regimen complexity index (MRCI) within the structure of a commercial medication database in the post-acute home care setting. In phase 1, medication data from 89 645 electronic health records were abstracted to line up with the components of the MRCI: dosage form, dosing frequency, and additional administrative directions. A committee reviewed output to assign index weights and determine necessary adaptations. In phase 2 we examined the face validity of the modified MRCI through analysis of automatic tabulations and descriptive statistics. The mean number of medications per patient record was 7.6 (SD 3.8); mean MRCI score was 16.1 (SD 9.0). The number of medications and MRCI were highly associated, but there was a wide range of MRCI scores for each number of medications. Most patients (55%) were taking only oral medications in tablet/capsule form, although 16% had regimens with three or more medications with different routes/forms. The biggest contributor to the MRCI score was dosing frequency (mean 11.9). Over 36% of patients needed to remember two or more special instructions (eg, take on alternate days, dissolve). Medication complexity can be tabulated through an automated process with some adaptation for local organizational systems. The MRCI provides a more nuanced way of measuring and assessing complexity than a simple medication count. An automated MRCI may help to identify patients who are at higher risk of adverse events, and could potentially be used in research and clinical decision support to improve medication management and patient outcomes.

  9. Widespread changes in white matter microstructure after a day of waking and sleep deprivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torbjørn Elvsåshagen

    Full Text Available Elucidating the neurobiological effects of sleep and waking remains an important goal of the neurosciences. Recently, animal studies indicated that sleep is important for cell membrane and myelin maintenance in the brain and that these structures are particularly susceptible to insufficient sleep. Here, we tested the hypothesis that a day of waking and sleep deprivation would be associated with changes in diffusion tensor imaging (DTI indices of white matter microstructure sensitive to axonal membrane and myelin alterations.Twenty-one healthy adult males underwent DTI in the morning [7:30AM; time point (TP1], after 14 hours of waking (TP2, and then after another 9 hours of waking (TP3. Whole brain voxel-wise analysis was performed with tract based spatial statistics.A day of waking was associated with widespread increases in white matter fractional anisotropy, which were mainly driven by radial diffusivity reductions, and sleep deprivation was associated with widespread fractional anisotropy decreases, which were mainly explained by reductions in axial diffusivity. In addition, larger decreases in axial diffusivity after sleep deprivation were associated with greater sleepiness. All DTI changes remained significant after adjusting for hydration measures.This is the first DTI study of sleep deprivation in humans. Although previous studies have observed localized changes in DTI indices of cerebral microstructure over the course of a few hours, further studies are needed to confirm widespread DTI changes within hours of waking and to clarify whether such changes in white matter microstructure serve as neurobiological substrates of sleepiness.

  10. Promotion of Wakefulness and Energy Expenditure by Orexin-A in the Ventrolateral Preoptic Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavanji, Vijayakumar; Perez-Leighton, Claudio E; Kotz, Catherine M; Billington, Charles J; Parthasarathy, Sairam; Sinton, Christopher M; Teske, Jennifer A

    2015-09-01

    The ventrolateral preoptic area (VLPO) and the orexin/hypocretin neuronal system are key regulators of sleep onset, transitions between vigilance states, and energy homeostasis. Reciprocal projections exist between the VLPO and orexin/hypocretin neurons. Although the importance of the VLPO to sleep regulation is clear, it is unknown whether VLPO neurons are involved in energy balance. The purpose of these studies was to determine if the VLPO is a site of action for orexin-A, and which orexin receptor subtype(s) would mediate these effects of orexin-A. We hypothesized that orexin-A in the VLPO modulates behaviors (sleep and wakefulness, feeding, spontaneous physical activity [SPA]) to increase energy expenditure. Sleep, wakefulness, SPA, feeding, and energy expenditure were determined after orexin-A microinjection in the VLPO of male Sprague-Dawley rats with unilateral cannulae targeting the VLPO. We also tested whether pretreatment with a dual orexin receptor antagonist (DORA, TCS-1102) or an OX2R antagonist (JNJ-10397049) blocked the effects of orexin-A on the sleep/wake cycle or SPA, respectively. Orexin-A injected into the VLPO significantly increased wakefulness, SPA, and energy expenditure (SPA-induced and total) and reduced NREM sleep and REM sleep with no effect on food intake. Pretreatment with DORA blocked the increase in wakefulness and the reduction in NREM sleep elicited by orexin-A, and the OX2R antagonist reduced SPA stimulated by orexin-A. These data show the ventrolateral preoptic area is a site of action for orexin-A, which may promote negative energy balance by modulating sleep/wakefulness and stimulating spontaneous physical activity and energy expenditure. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  11. Performance and wake conditions of a rotor located in the wake of an obstacle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumov, I. V.; Kabardin, I. K.; Mikkelsen, R. F.; Okulov, V. L.; Sørensen, J. N.

    2016-09-01

    Obstacles like forests, ridges and hills can strongly affect the velocity profile in front of a wind turbine rotor. The present work aims at quantifying the influence of nearby located obstacles on the performance and wake characteristics of a downstream located wind turbine. Here the influence of an obstacle in the form of a cylindrical disk was investigated experimentally in a water flume. A model of a three-bladed rotor, designed using Glauert's optimum theory at a tip speed ratio λ = 5, was placed in the wake of a disk with a diameter close to the one of the rotor. The distance from the disk to the rotor was changed from 4 to 8 rotor diameters, with the vertical distance from the rotor axis varied 0.5 and 1 rotor diameters. The associated turbulent intensity of the incoming flow to the rotor changed 3 to '6% due to the influence of the disk wake. In the experiment, thrust characteristics and associated pulsations as a function of the incoming flow structures were measured by strain gauges. The flow condition in front of the rotor was measured with high temporal accuracy using LDA and power coefficients were determine as function of tip speed ratio for different obstacle positions. Furthermore, PIV measurements were carried out to study the development of the mean velocity deficit profiles of the wake behind the wind turbine model under the influence of the wake generated by the obstacle. By use of regression techniques to fit the velocity profiles it was possible to determine velocity deficits and estimate length scales of the wake attenuation.

  12. Efavirenz Conceptions and Regimen Management in a Prospective Cohort of Women on Antiretroviral Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheree Schwartz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Use of the antiretroviral drug efavirenz (EFV is not recommended by the WHO or South African HIV treatment guidelines during the first trimester of pregnancy due to potential fetal teratogenicity; there is little evidence of how clinicians manage EFV-related fertility concerns. Women on antiretroviral therapy (ART were enrolled into a prospective cohort in four public clinics in Johannesburg, South Africa. Fertility intentions, ART regimens, and pregnancy testing were routinely assessed during visits. Women reporting that they were trying to conceive while on EFV were referred for regimen changes. Kaplan-Meier estimators were used to assess incidence across ART regimens. From the 822 women with followup visits between August 2009–March 2011, 170 pregnancies were detected during study followup, including 56 EFV conceptions. Pregnancy incidence rates were comparable across EFV, nevirapine, and lopinavir/ritonavir person-years (95% 100/users (P=0.25; incidence rates on EFV were 18.6 Confidence Interval: 14.2–24.2. Treatment substitution from EFV was made for 57 women, due to pregnancy intentions or actual pregnancy; however, regimen changes were not systematically applied across women. High rates of pregnancy on EFV and inconsistencies in treatment management suggest that clearer guidelines are needed regarding how to manage fertility-related issues in. women on EFV-based regimens.

  13. Outcome of treatment of MDR-TB patients with standardised regimens, Iran, 2002-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masjedi, M R; Tabarsi, P; Chitsaz, E; Baghaei, P; Mirsaeidi, M; Amiri, M V; Farnia, P; Javanmard, P; Mansouri, D; Velayati, A A

    2008-07-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) imposes a formidable burden on national health systems. There is still no consensus on the subject, with controversies regarding treatment protocols, treatment outcomes and the various treatment regimens. The present study describes Iran's second national cohort for treatment of MDR-TB. The study comprised all documented MDR-TB cases in Iran referred to our centre during the period 2002-2006. All patients received a standardised second-line regimen consisting of ofloxacin, cycloserine, prothionamide and amikacin. Based on drug susceptibility testing results, ethambutol and pyrazinamide were added to the regimen. Forty-three patients diagnosed with MDR-TB, with a mean age of 44.38 +/- 19.05 years, received treatment; of these, 27 (62.8%) were male. Twenty-three were (53.5%) Iranians and the remainder were Afghans. All patients were acquired MDR-TB cases. Of the 43 cases, 25 (58.1%) experienced severe clinically significant adverse effects; 29 (67.5%) had a successful outcome and 14 (32.5%) had a poor outcome (treatment failure in six [14%] and death in eight [18.6%]). Mortality was higher in Iranians (P = 0.039) and in patients whose initial regimen was changed due to adverse drug reactions (P = 0.01). Compared with previous studies, our study was able to obtain more favourable outcomes of MDR-TB treatment using a standardised regimen.

  14. An in silico evaluation of treatment regimens for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Natalia; Foxman, Betsy; Malani, Anurag N.; Zhang, Min; Walk, Seth; Rickard, Alexander H.

    2017-01-01

    Background Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a significant nosocomial infection worldwide, that recurs in as many as 35% of infections. Risk of CDI recurrence varies by ribotype, which also vary in sporulation and germination rates. Whether sporulation/germination mediate risk of recurrence and effectiveness of treatment of recurring CDI remains unclear. We aim to assess the role of sporulation/germination patterns on risk of recurrence, and the relative effectiveness of the recommended tapered/pulsing regimens using an in silico model. Methods We created a compartmental in-host mathematical model of CDI, composed of vegetative cells, toxins, and spores, to explore whether sporulation and germination have an impact on recurrence rates. We also simulated the effectiveness of three tapered/pulsed vancomycin regimens by ribotype. Results Simulations underscored the importance of sporulation/germination patterns in determining pathogenicity and transmission. All recommended regimens for recurring CDI tested were effective in reducing risk of an additional recurrence. Most modified regimens were still effective even after reducing the duration or dosage of vancomycin. However, the effectiveness of treatment varied by ribotype. Conclusion Current CDI vancomycin regimen for treating recurrent cases should be studied further to better balance associated risks and benefits. PMID:28800598

  15. Effects of an Aerobic Rowing Training Regimen in Young Adults with Down Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, Ana Maria; Sardinha, Luis Bettencount; Pitetti, Kenneth H.

    2001-01-01

    Eight young adult males with Down syndrome received a 16-week rowing ergometry training regimen. Following training, no changes in cardiovascular fitness were found but participants did achieve significantly higher levels of work performance on both treadmill and rowing ergometer tests than did a control group. (Contains references.) (Author/DB)

  16. Single unit activity of the suprachiasmatic nucleus and surrounding neurons during the wake-sleep cycle in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, K

    2014-02-28

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the mammalian hypothalamus contains a circadian clock for timing of diverse neuronal, endocrine, and behavioral rhythms, such as the cycle of sleep and wakefulness. Using extracellular single unit recordings, we have determined, for the first time, the discharge activity of individual SCN neurons during the complete wake-sleep cycle in non-anesthetized, head restrained mice. SCN neurons (n=79) were divided into three types according to their regular (type I; n=38) or irregular (type II; n=19) discharge activity throughout the wake-sleep cycle or their quiescent activity during waking and irregular discharge activity during sleep (type III; n=22). The type I and II neurons displayed a long-duration action potential, while the type III neurons displayed either a short-duration or long-duration action potential. The type I neurons discharged exclusively as single isolated spikes, whereas the type II and III neurons fired as single isolated spikes, clusters, or bursts. The type I and II neurons showed wake-active, wake/paradoxical (or rapid eye movement) sleep-active, or state-unrelated activity profiles and were, respectively, mainly located in the ventral or dorsal region of the SCN. In contrast, the type III neurons displayed sleep-active discharge profiles and were mainly located in the lateral region of the SCN. The majority of type I and II neurons tested showed an increase in discharge rate following application of light to the animal's eyes. Of the 289 extra-SCN neurons recorded, those displaying sleep-active discharge profiles were mainly located dorsal to the SCN, whereas those displaying wake-active discharge profiles were mainly located lateral or dorsolateral to the SCN. This study shows heterogeneity of mouse SCN and surrounding anterior hypothalamic neurons and suggests differences in their topographic organization and roles in mammalian circadian rhythms and the regulation of sleep and wakefulness. Copyright © 2013

  17. Pharmacological Targeting the REV-ERBs in Sleep/Wake Regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariadna Amador

    Full Text Available The circadian clock maintains appropriate timing for a wide range of behaviors and physiological processes. Circadian behaviors such as sleep and wakefulness are intrinsically dependent on the precise oscillation of the endogenous molecular machinery that regulates the circadian clock. The identical core clock machinery regulates myriad endocrine and metabolic functions providing a link between sleep and metabolic health. The REV-ERBs (REV-ERBα and REV-ERBβ are nuclear receptors that are key regulators of the molecular clock and have been successfully targeted using small molecule ligands. Recent studies in mice suggest that REV-ERB-specific synthetic agonists modulate metabolic activity as well as alter sleep architecture, inducing wakefulness during the light period. Therefore, these small molecules represent unique tools to extensively study REV-ERB regulation of sleep and wakefulness. In these studies, our aim was to further investigate the therapeutic potential of targeting the REV-ERBs for regulation of sleep by characterizing efficacy, and optimal dosing time of the REV-ERB agonist SR9009 using electroencephalographic (EEG recordings. Applying different experimental paradigms in mice, our studies establish that SR9009 does not lose efficacy when administered more than once a day, nor does tolerance develop when administered once a day over a three-day dosing regimen. Moreover, through use of a time response paradigm, we determined that although there is an optimal time for administration of SR9009 in terms of maximal efficacy, there is a 12-hour window in which SR9009 elicited a response. Our studies indicate that the REV-ERBs are potential therapeutic targets for treating sleep problems as those encountered as a consequence of shift work or jet lag.

  18. 'Unfallable encyclicing': Finnegans Wake and the Encyclopedia Britannica

    OpenAIRE

    Platt, Len

    2009-01-01

    This essay aims to develop our knowledge about why the 'Encyclopedia Britannica' ('EB') is of such importance to 'Finnegans Wake' and to establish the general nature of what is an extraordinary example of literary intertextuality. While it incorporates 'EB' articles in various ways, the 'Wake' also sets up a specific riposte to the encyclopedic idea. Engaging at a fundamental level with the principles that underline the 'EB', the 'Wake' swallows or 'digests' vast amounts of conventional reaso...

  19. Detection and Behavior of Pan Wakes in Saturn's A Ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, L. J.; Showalter, M. R.; Russell, C. T.

    1996-01-01

    Six previously unseen Pan wakes are found interior and exterior to the Encke gap in Saturn's A ring, one in the Voyager 2 photopolarimeter (PPS) stellar occultation data and five in the Voyager 1 radio science (RSS) Earth occultation data. Pan orbits at the center of the Encke gap and maintains it...The detection of Pan wakes at longitudes greater than 360(deg) demonstrates that wakes persist for much longer than originally hypothesized and may interact with one another.

  20. Large-Eddy Simulation of turbine wake in complex terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, J.; Troldborg, N.; Sørensen, N. N.; Patton, E. G.; Sullivan, P. P.

    2017-05-01

    We present Large-Eddy Simulation results of a turbine wake in realistic complex terrain with slopes above 0.5. By comparing simulations including and without the wind turbine we can estimate the induction factor, a, and we show how the presence of a strong recirculation zone in the terrain dictates the positioning of the wake. This last finding is in contrast to what would happen in gentle terrain with no substantial increase of turbulent kinetic energy in the terrain induced wakes.

  1. Time to wake up: reactive countermeasures to sleep inertia

    OpenAIRE

    HILDITCH, Cassie J.; DORRIAN, Jillian; BANKS, Siobhan

    2016-01-01

    Sleep inertia is the period of impaired performance and grogginess experienced after waking. This period of impairment is of concern to workers who are on-call, or nap during work hours, and need to perform safety-critical tasks soon after waking. While several studies have investigated the best sleep timing and length to minimise sleep inertia effects, few have focused on countermeasures -especially those that can be implemented after waking (i.e. reactive countermeasures). This structured r...

  2. Sleep deprivation impairs inhibitory control during wakefulness in adult sleepwalkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labelle, Marc-Antoine; Dang-Vu, Thien Thanh; Petit, Dominique; Desautels, Alex; Montplaisir, Jacques; Zadra, Antonio

    2015-12-01

    Sleepwalkers often complain of excessive daytime somnolence. Although excessive daytime somnolence has been associated with cognitive impairment in several sleep disorders, very few data exist concerning sleepwalking. This study aimed to investigate daytime cognitive functioning in adults diagnosed with idiopathic sleepwalking. Fifteen sleepwalkers and 15 matched controls were administered the Continuous Performance Test and Stroop Colour-Word Test in the morning after an overnight polysomnographic assessment. Participants were tested a week later on the same neuropsychological battery, but after 25 h of sleep deprivation, a procedure known to precipitate sleepwalking episodes during subsequent recovery sleep. There were no significant differences between sleepwalkers and controls on any of the cognitive tests administered under normal waking conditions. Testing following sleep deprivation revealed significant impairment in sleepwalkers' executive functions related to inhibitory control, as they made more errors than controls on the Stroop Colour-Word Test and more commission errors on the Continuous Performance Test. Sleepwalkers' scores on measures of executive functions were not associated with self-reported sleepiness or indices of sleep fragmentation from baseline polysomnographic recordings. The results support the idea that sleepwalking involves daytime consequences and suggest that these may also include cognitive impairments in the form of disrupted inhibitory control following sleep deprivation. These disruptions may represent a daytime expression of sleepwalking's pathophysiological mechanisms. © 2015 European Sleep Research Society.

  3. Wind Farm Wake: The 2016 Horns Rev Photo Case

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasager, Charlotte Bay; Nygaard, Nicolai Gayle; Volker, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Offshore wind farm wakes were observed and photographed in foggy conditions at Horns Rev 2 on 25 January 2016 at 12:45 UTC. These new images show highly contrasting conditions regarding the wind speed, turbulence intensity, atmospheric stability, weather conditions and wind farm wake development...... rated power. The wind direction was southwesterly and long, narrow wakes persisted several rotor diameters downwind of the wind turbines. Eventually mixing of warm air from aloft dispersed the fog in the far wake region of the wind farm....

  4. Comparison of Engineering Wake Models with CFD Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Søren Juhl; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Ivanell, S.

    2014-01-01

    The engineering wake models by Jensen [1] and Frandsen et al. [2] are assessed for different scenarios simulated using Large Eddy Simulation and the Actuator Line method implemented in the Navier-Stokes equations. The scenarios include the far wake behind a single wind turbine, a long row...... of turbines in an atmospheric boundary layer, idealised cases of an infinitely long row of wind turbines and infinite wind farms with three different spacings. Both models include a wake expansion factor, which is calibrated to fit the simulated wake velocities. The analysis highlights physical deficiencies...

  5. Simulation of wind turbine wakes using the actuator line technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Jens N; Mikkelsen, Robert F; Henningson, Dan S; Ivanell, Stefan; Sarmast, Sasan; Andersen, Søren J

    2015-02-28

    The actuator line technique was introduced as a numerical tool to be employed in combination with large eddy simulations to enable the study of wakes and wake interaction in wind farms. The technique is today largely used for studying basic features of wakes as well as for making performance predictions of wind farms. In this paper, we give a short introduction to the wake problem and the actuator line methodology and present a study in which the technique is employed to determine the near-wake properties of wind turbines. The presented results include a comparison of experimental results of the wake characteristics of the flow around a three-bladed model wind turbine, the development of a simple analytical formula for determining the near-wake length behind a wind turbine and a detailed investigation of wake structures based on proper orthogonal decomposition analysis of numerically generated snapshots of the wake. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  6. Study of Passive Flow Control for Ship Air Wakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-10

    electronically scanned pressure NAVAIR……………Naval Air Systems Command USNA………………. United States Naval Academy WISP ………………..wake interactive survey probe...Figure 8. YP coordinate system 2.3.2 Instrumentation This experiment used the Wake Interactive Survey Probe ( WISP ) system to survey the ship...air wake. The WISP system allows a flow probe to be moved through the air wake according to a pre-determined grid pattern. For this investigation

  7. Near wake features of a flying European Starling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchhefer, Adam; Kopp, Gregory; Gurka, Roi

    2013-11-01

    A great deal of research focusing on flapping wings has been motivated by their high performance capabilities, especially in low Reynolds number configurations where static wing performance typically suffers. The approaches to studying flapping wings have taken different forms. One form has been the systematic investigation of the parameters that influence the relationship between flapping wings and their wake. The other form, and the approach used in the present work, is the investigation of flapping wings in nature. While the earliest work on the flapping wings of animals consists of observations of bird flight by Leonardo DaVinci, advances in technology have allowed for quantitative measurements of the wake. The near wake of a freely flying European starling has been measured using high speed, time-resolved, particle image velocimetry, simultaneously with high speed cameras which imaged the bird. These have been used to measure the near wake two-dimensional velocity field that can be associated with the bird's location and wing configuration in an avian wind tunnel. Time series of the velocities have been expressed as composite wake plots, which depict segments of the wing beat cycle for various spanwise locations in the wake. Measurements indicate that downwash is not produced during the upstroke, suggesting that the upstroke does not generate lift. As well, the wake velocities imply the presence of streamwise vortical structures, in addition to tip vortices. These two characteristics indicate similarities between the wake of a bird and the wake of a bat.

  8. Interaction of a swept shock wave and a supersonic wake

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, G.; Zhao, Y. X.; Zhou, J.

    2017-09-01

    The interaction of a swept shock wave and a supersonic wake has been studied. The swept shock wave is generated by a swept compression sidewall, and the supersonic wake is generated by a wake generator. The flow field is visualized with the nanoparticle-based planar laser scattering method, and a supplementary numerical simulation is conducted by solving the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. The results show that the pressure rise induced by the swept shock wave can propagate upstream in the wake, which makes the location where vortices are generated move upstream, thickens the laminar section of the wake, and enlarges the generated vortices. The wake is swept away from the swept compression sidewall by the pressure gradient of the swept shock wave. This pressure gradient is not aligned with the density gradient of the supersonic wake, so the baroclinic torque generates streamwise vorticity and changes the distribution of the spanwise vorticity. The wake shock is curved, so the flow downstream of it is non-uniform, leaving the swept shock wave being distorted. A three-dimensional Mach disk structure is generated when the wake shock interacts with the swept shock wave.

  9. The Structure of Cosmic String Wakes

    OpenAIRE

    Sornborger, A.; Brandenberger, R.; Fryxell, B.; Olson, K.

    1996-01-01

    The clustering of baryons and cold dark matter induced by a single moving string is analyzed numerically making use of a new three-dimensional Eulerian cosmological hydro code$^{1)}$ which is based on the PPM method to track the baryons and the PIC method to evolve the dark matter particles. A long straight string moving with a speed comparable to $c$ induces a planar overdensity (a``wake"). Since the initial perturbation is a velocity kick towards the plane behind the string and there is no ...

  10. Similarity and Decay Laws of Momentumless Wakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-05-26

    Naval Sea Systems Command , Code NSEA—03133. -‘ F 9 —2— 26 May 1977 SN : j ep SIMILARITY AND DECAY LAWS OF MOMENTUI’ILESS WAKE S by Samuel Ilassid...and this neg lect will have to be justified a posteriori. Now, one seeks self-similar solutions of the type: k = Xh(ri) c = Ee(n) Ud = UDf (n) ~ = where...0 9x r 3r L6 c Again, seeking self-similar solutions of the type: k = Kh(ti) c = Ee(ri) Ud = UDf (n) r~ = (6.4) and letting 2 2 = 1 (6.5)E L one

  11. Vortex wakes of a flapping foil in a flowing soap film

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    We present an experimental study of an oscillating, symmetric foil in a vertically flowing soap film. By varying frequency and amplitude of the oscillation we explore and visualize a variety of wake structures, including von K´arm´an wake, reverse von K´arm´an wake, 2P wake, and 2P+2S wake. We...

  12. A CFD model of the wake of an offshore wind farm: Using a prescribed wake inflow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Réthoré, P.-E.; Bechmann, Andreas; Sørensen, Niels N.

    2007-01-01

      An CFD model of the wake of an offshore wind farm, expanding existing measurements is proposed. The method is based on solving the Navier Stokes equation in a large domain downstream an offshore wind farm. The inflow of the domain is estimated using existing met mast measurements from both free...

  13. Wake Sensor Evaluation Program and Results of JFK-1 Wake Vortex Sensor Intercomparisons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Ben C., Jr.; Burnham, David C.; Rudis, Robert P.

    1997-01-01

    The overall approach should be to: (1) Seek simplest, sufficiently robust, integrated ground based sensor systems (wakes and weather) for AVOSS; (2) Expand all sensor performance cross-comparisons and data mergings in on-going field deployments; and (3) Achieve maximal cost effectiveness through hardware/info sharing. An effective team is in place to accomplish the above tasks.

  14. A CFD code comparison of wind turbine wakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laan, van der, Paul Maarten; Storey, R. C.; Sørensen, Niels N.

    2014-01-01

    A comparison is made between the EllipSys3D and SnS CFD codes. Both codes are used to perform Large-Eddy Simulations (LES) of single wind turbine wakes, using the actuator disk method. The comparison shows that both LES models predict similar velocity deficits and stream-wise Reynolds...... simulations using EllipSys3D for a test case that is based on field measurements. In these simulations, two eddy viscosity turbulence models are employed: the k- (ε) model and the k- (ε)-fp model. Where the k- (ε) model fails to predict the velocity deficit, the results of the k- (ε)-fP model show good...

  15. [Potential role of rilpivirine in simplification regimens].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casado, José L; Moreno, Santiago

    2013-06-01

    Antiretroviral simplification is a useful strategy to improve adherence and quality of life and prevent or reverse adverse effects in patients with HIV infection. The availability of new drugs with high efficacy and better tolerability in once-daily formulations or in fixed-dose combinations may be a better option for prolonged treatment. Rilpivirine, a new nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI), has shown high antiviral efficacy in clinical trials with treatment-naïve patients, with a lower incidence of adverse effects and good tolerability. Its use in simplification regimens has been evaluated after the switch from efavirenz, demonstrating that dose adjustment is not required. In a large randomized study in patients who were receiving protease inhibitors, virological efficacy was maintained, with a lower incidence of adverse effects and improved lipid parameters and cardiovascular risk score. Given the ease of administration and good tolerability of this drug, recent communications at congresses have shown the rapid applicability of the results of studies in daily clinical practice in this scenario. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  16. Validation of the Eddy Viscosity and Lange Wake Models using Measured Wake Flow Characteristics Behind a Large Wind Turbine Rotor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Sang Hyeon; Kim, Bum Suk; Huh, Jong Chul [Jeju National Univ., Jeju (Korea, Republic of); Go, Young Jun [Hanjin Ind, Co., Ltd., Yangsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    The wake effects behind wind turbines were investigated by using data from a Met Mast tower and the SCADA (Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition) system for a wind turbine. The results of the wake investigations and predicted values for the velocity deficit based on the eddy viscosity model were compared with the turbulence intensity from the Lange model. As a result, the velocity deficit and turbulence intensity of the wake increased as the free stream wind speed decreased. In addition, the magnitude of the velocity deficit for the center of the wake using the eddy viscosity model was overestimated while the turbulence intensity from the Lange model showed similarities with measured values.

  17. Non-24-Hour Sleep-Wake Disorder Revisited - A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbazza, Corrado; Bromundt, Vivien; Eckert, Anne; Brunner, Daniel P; Meier, Fides; Hackethal, Sandra; Cajochen, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The human sleep-wake cycle is governed by two major factors: a homeostatic hourglass process (process S), which rises linearly during the day, and a circadian process C, which determines the timing of sleep in a ~24-h rhythm in accordance to the external light-dark (LD) cycle. While both individual processes are fairly well characterized, the exact nature of their interaction remains unclear. The circadian rhythm is generated by the suprachiasmatic nucleus ("master clock") of the anterior hypothalamus, through cell-autonomous feedback loops of DNA transcription and translation. While the phase length (tau) of the cycle is relatively stable and genetically determined, the phase of the clock is reset by external stimuli ("zeitgebers"), the most important being the LD cycle. Misalignments of the internal rhythm with the LD cycle can lead to various somatic complaints and to the development of circadian rhythm sleep disorders (CRSD). Non-24-hour sleep-wake disorders (N24HSWD) is a CRSD affecting up to 50% of totally blind patients and characterized by the inability to maintain a stable entrainment of the typically long circadian rhythm (tau > 24.5 h) to the LD cycle. The disease is rare in sighted individuals and the pathophysiology less well understood. Here, we present the case of a 40-year-old sighted male, who developed a misalignment of the internal clock with the external LD cycle following the treatment for Hodgkin's lymphoma (ABVD regimen, four cycles and AVD regimen, four cycles). A thorough clinical assessment, including actigraphy, melatonin profiles and polysomnography led to the diagnosis of non-24-hour sleep-wake disorders (N24HSWD) with a free-running rhythm of tau = 25.27 h. A therapeutic intervention with bright light therapy (30 min, 10,000 lux) in the morning and melatonin administration (0.5-0.75 mg) in the evening failed to entrain the free-running rhythm, although a longer treatment duration and more intense therapy might have

  18. Assessment of two emergency contraceptive regimens in Iran ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    allocated in levonorgestrol group (n=62) andYuzpe (n=60).The levonorgestrel regimen consisted of two pills: 0.75 mg levonorgestrel, taken twice in the 12-h interval within 72h after unprotected intercourse. The Yuzpe method included twoHDcontraceptive pills taken as another regimen.Datawere collected by questionnaire ...

  19. The Sex Res Non Naturales and the Regimen of Health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerholm, Frank Juul

    The paper discusses the ethical and social soundness of the classical idea of diaita/regimen vis-à-vis the contemporary focus on healthy lifestyle......The paper discusses the ethical and social soundness of the classical idea of diaita/regimen vis-à-vis the contemporary focus on healthy lifestyle...

  20. Unsteady wake of a rotating tire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombard, Jean-Eloi; Moxey, Dave; Xu, Hui; Sherwin, Spencer; Sherwin Lab Team

    2015-11-01

    For open wheel race-cars, such as IndyCar and Formula One, the wheels are responsible for 40% of the total drag. For road cars drag associated to the wheels and under-carriage can represent 60% of total drag at highway cruise speeds. Experimental observations have reported two or three pairs of counter rotating vortices, the relative importance of which still remains an open question, that interact to form a complex wake. Traditional RANS based methods are typically not well equipped to deal with such highly unsteady flows which motivates research into more physical, unsteady models. Leveraging a high-fidelity spectral/hp element based method a Large Eddy Simulation is performed to give further insight into unsteady characteristics of the wake. In particular the unsteady nature of both the jetting and top vortex pair is reported as well as the time and length scales associated with the vortex core trajectories. Correlation with experimentally obtained particle image velocimetry is presented. The authors acknowledge support from the United Kingdom Turbulence Consortium (UKTC) as well as from the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) for access to ARCHER UK National Supercomputing Service.

  1. Wake potentials of the ILC Interaction Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novokhatski, A.; /SLAC

    2011-08-16

    The vacuum chamber of the ILC Interaction Region (IR) is optimized for best detector performance. It has special shaping to minimize additional backgrounds due to the metal part of the chamber. Also, for the same reason this thin vacuum chamber does not have water cooling. Therefore, small amounts of power, which may be deposited in the chamber, can be enough to raise the chamber to a high temperature. One of the sources of 'heating' power is the electromagnetic field of the beam. This field diffracts by non-regularities of the beam pipe and excites free-propagating fields, which are then absorbed by the pipe wall. In addition we have a heating power of the image currents due to finite conductivity of the metallic wall. We will discuss these effects as updating the previous results. The conclusions of this report are: (1) The amount of the beam energy loss in IR is almost equal to the energy loss in one ILC (TESLA) accelerating cryo-module; (2) Addition energy spread at IR is very small; (3) Spectrum of the wake fields is limited 300 GHz; (4) Average power of the wake fields excited in IR is 30 W for nominal ILC parameters; and (5) Pulse power in this case is 6 kilowatts.

  2. Measuring bubbles in a bubbly wake flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Jae; Kawakami, Ellison; Arndt, Roger E. A.

    2012-11-01

    This paper presents measurements of the velocity and size distribution of bubbles in a bubbly wake. This was carried out by utilizing particle shadow velocimetry (PSV). This technique is a non-scattering approach that relies on direct in-line volume illumination by a pulsed source such as a light-emitting diode (LED). A narrow depth-of-field (DoF) is required for imaging a 2-dimensional plane within a flow volume. Shadows of the bubbles were collected by a high-speed camera. Once a reference image, taken when no bubbles were present in the flow, was subtracted from the images, the image was segmented using an edge detection technique. The Canny algorithm was determined to be best suited for this application. A curvature profile method was employed to distinguish individual bubbles within a cluster of highly overlapping bubbles. The utilized algorithm was made to detect partly overlapping bubbles and reconstruct the missing parts. The movement of recognized individual bubbles was tracked on a two dimensional plane within a flow volume. In order to obtain quantitative results, the wake of a ventilated hydrofoil was investigated by applying the shadowgraphy technique and the described bubble detection algorithm. These experiments were carried out in the high speed cavitation tunnel at Saint Anthony Falls Laboratory (SAFL) of the University of Minnesota. This research is jointly sponsored by the Office of Naval Re- search, Dr. Ron Joslin, program manager, and the Department of Energy, Golden Field Office.

  3. Optimization Under Uncertainty for Wake Steering Strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quick, Julian [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Annoni, Jennifer [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); King, Ryan N [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Dykes, Katherine L [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Fleming, Paul A [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Ning, Andrew [Brigham Young University

    2017-08-03

    Offsetting turbines' yaw orientations from incoming wind is a powerful tool that may be leveraged to reduce undesirable wake effects on downstream turbines. First, we examine a simple two-turbine case to gain intuition as to how inflow direction uncertainty affects the optimal solution. The turbines are modeled with unidirectional inflow such that one turbine directly wakes the other, using ten rotor diameter spacing. We perform optimization under uncertainty (OUU) via a parameter sweep of the front turbine. The OUU solution generally prefers less steering. We then do this optimization for a 60-turbine wind farm with unidirectional inflow, varying the degree of inflow uncertainty and approaching this OUU problem by nesting a polynomial chaos expansion uncertainty quantification routine within an outer optimization. We examined how different levels of uncertainty in the inflow direction effect the ratio of the expected values of deterministic and OUU solutions for steering strategies in the large wind farm, assuming the directional uncertainty used to reach said OUU solution (this ratio is defined as the value of the stochastic solution or VSS).

  4. Studies of Particle Wake Potentials in Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Ian; Graziani, Frank; Glosli, James; Strozzi, David; Surh, Michael; Richards, David; Decyk, Viktor; Mori, Warren

    2011-10-01

    Fast Ignition studies require a detailed understanding of electron scattering, stopping, and energy deposition in plasmas with variable values for the number of particles within a Debye sphere. Presently there is disagreement in the literature concerning the proper description of these processes. Developing and validating proper descriptions requires studying the processes using first-principle electrostatic simulations and possibly including magnetic fields. We are using the particle-particle particle-mesh (PPPM) code ddcMD and the particle-in-cell (PIC) code BEPS to perform these simulations. As a starting point in our study, we examine the wake of a particle passing through a plasma in 3D electrostatic simulations performed with ddcMD and with BEPS using various cell sizes. In this poster, we compare the wakes we observe in these simulations with each other and predictions from Vlasov theory. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and by UCLA under Grant DE-FG52-09NA29552.

  5. Characterizing cylinder and hydrofoil wake dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjeldsen, Morten; Seim, Bjarte G.; Arndt, Roger E. A.

    2009-11-01

    A number of high speed PIV measurements of wakes trailing a NACA 0015, c=0.081m, and a cylinder D= 0.0127m, in the speed range 2 through 9 m/s have been made in the high speed water tunnel at SAFL- UMN. The cylinder vortex shedding follows closely St=0.2, while that off the hydrofoil is more irregular. Although the hydrofoil shows a more irregular nature a measure for both shedding frequencies and vortex strength of is of great interest also for drag analysis. The direct approach mapping individual structures, e.g. vorticity based analysis, can be obscured by the quality of the measurements made, hence other methods to reveal frequency and strength are in demand. A study were the mapping of time variation of the main flow direction impulse flux integrated over the wake at, minimum two, downstream positions has been made. A cross-correlation analysis of the impulse flux can reveal structure transport speeds, the frequency spectrum will reflect the shedding frequency, while the temporal variation represents the strength. For the hydrofoil it's shown that a significant cross- correlation is present. In terms of spectra even the more structured shedding from cylinders are hard to capture, and finally the vortex strength found using the cited algorithm seems somewhat unreliable. A thorough comparison between the suggested measure and traditional measures is given.

  6. Brain mechanisms that control sleep and waking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Jerome

    This review paper presents a brief historical survey of the technological and early research that laid the groundwork for recent advances in sleep-waking research. A major advance in this field occurred shortly after the end of World War II with the discovery of the ascending reticular activating system (ARAS) as the neural source in the brain stem of the waking state. Subsequent research showed that the brain stem activating system produced cortical arousal via two pathways: a dorsal route through the thalamus and a ventral route through the hypothalamus and basal forebrain. The nuclei, pathways, and neurotransmitters that comprise the multiple components of these arousal systems are described. Sleep is now recognized as being composed of two very different states: rapid eye movements (REMs) sleep and non-REM sleep. The major findings on the neural mechanisms that control these two sleep states are presented. This review ends with a discussion of two current views on the function of sleep: to maintain the integrity of the immune system and to enhance memory consolidation.

  7. Rainfall-enhanced blooming in typhoon wakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Y.; Oey, L. Y.

    2016-12-01

    Strong phytoplankton blooming in tropical-cyclone (TC) wakes over the oligotrophic oceans potentially contributes to long-term changes in global biogeochemical cycles. Yet blooming has traditionally been discussed using anecdotal events and its biophysical mechanics remain poorly understood. Here we identify dominant blooming patterns using 16 years of ocean-color data in the wakes of 141 typhoons in western North Pacific. We observe right-side asymmetric blooming shortly after the storms, attributed previously to sub-mesoscale re-stratification, but thereafter a left-side asymmetry which coincides with the left-side preference in rainfall due to the large-scale wind shear. Biophysical model experiments and observations demonstrate that heavier rainfall freshens the near-surface water, leading to stronger stratification, decreased turbulence and enhanced blooming. Our results suggest that rainfall plays a previously unrecognized, critical role in TC-induced blooming, with potentially important implications for global biogeochemical cycles especially in view of the recent and projected increases in TC-intensity that harbingers stronger mixing and heavier rain under the storm.

  8. Helicobacter pylori-positive duodenal ulcer: three-day antibiotic eradication regimen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalano, F; Branciforte, G; Catanzaro, R; Cipolla, R; Bentivegna, C; Brogna, A

    2000-10-01

    The most widely used treatments for ulcer healing and Helicobacter pylori eradication consist of a 1-2 week regimen of a proton pump inhibitor plus two or three antimicrobials. To evaluate the efficacy, safety, cost, and tolerance of a three-day regimen with three antibiotics vs. a 10-day treatment with a proton pump inhibitor or vs. a ranitidine bismuth citrate triple therapy. Two hundred and twenty-one patients with endoscopically-proven H. pylori-positive duodenal ulcers were recruited to the study. Recruited patients were assigned to one of the following four regimens: (I) omeprazole 40 mg o.m. plus amoxycillin 1 g b.d. and clarithromycin 500 mg b.d. for 10 days (OAC: 55 patients); (ii) omeprazole 40 mg o.m. on days 1-5, plus amoxycillin 1 g b.d., clarithromycin 500 mg b.d. and metronidazole 500 mg b.d. on days 3-5 (OACM: 56 patients); (iii) ranitidine bismuth citrate 400 mg b.d. plus amoxycillin 1 g b.d. and clarithromycin 500 mg b.d. for 10 days (RAC: 54 patients); (iv) ranitidine bismuth citrate 400 mg b.d. on days 1-5, plus amoxycillin 1 g b.d., clarithromycin 500 mg b.d. and metronidazole 500 mg b.d. on days 3-5 (RACM: 56 patients). Fisher's exact test was used to compare data regarding healing and eradication in the four groups. The intention-to-treat eradication and ulcer healing rates for the RACM regimen were 95% and 98%, respectively. Statistically significant differences were observed, relating to the eradication and healing of ulcers, between RACM and either the RAC or OAC regimens. The three-day antibiotic therapy with amoxycillin, clarithromycin and metronidazole in addition to ranitidine bismuth citrate is a very effective anti-H. pylori regimen.

  9. Reconstruction of three-dimensional coherent structures in turbulent wakes using planar measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarusevych, Serhiy; Morton, Chris

    2014-11-01

    The present study is focused on reconstructing the dynamics of dominant three-dimensional coherent structures in turbulent wakes of complex cylindrical geometries using time-resolved, planar Particle-Image-Velocimetry data. As a test case, the turbulent wake of a low aspect ratio dual step cylinder model is considered. The model consists of a large diameter cylinder (D) of low aspect ratio (L / D) attached to the mid-span of a small diameter cylinder (d) . Experiments are performed in a water flume facility for ReD = 2100, D / d = 2, and L / D = 1. The investigated model produces cellular vortex shedding, with distinct variations in the average shedding frequency along the span of the model, and the associated complex vortex interactions. Time-resolved velocity measurements are acquired simultaneously in two mutually orthogonal planes at multiple planes along the span of the model. The technique involves conditional averaging of the planar results to produce three-dimensional reconstructions of wake topology for a given planar alignment of the dominant spanwise vortex filaments. This is achieved by identifying velocity fields matching a given flow-based template. The results demonstrate that the proposed technique can successfully reconstruct the dominant wake vortex interactions and can be extended to other flows where traditional phase-averaging approaches are not applicable. The authors gratefully acknowledge the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) for funding of this work.

  10. Histamine-HisCl1 Receptor Axis Regulates Wake-Promoting Signals in Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Yangkyun; Jang, Donghoon; Sonn, Jun Young; Choe, Joonho

    2013-01-01

    Histamine and its two receptors, histamine-gated chloride channel subunit 1 (HisCl1) and ora transientless (Ort), are known to control photoreception and temperature sensing in Drosophila. However, histamine signaling in the context of neural circuitry for sleep-wake behaviors has not yet been examined in detail. Here, we obtained mutant flies with compromised or enhanced histamine signaling and tested their baseline sleep. Hypomorphic mutations in histidine decarboxylase (HDC), an enzyme catalyzing the conversion from histidine to histamine, caused an increase in sleep duration. Interestingly, hisCl1 mutants but not ort mutants showed long-sleep phenotypes similar to those in hdc mutants. Increased sleep duration in hisCl1 mutants was rescued by overexpressing hisCl1 in circadian pacemaker neurons expressing a neuropeptide pigment dispersing factor (PDF). Consistently, RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated depletion of hisCl1 in PDF neurons was sufficient to mimic hisCl1 mutant phenotypes, suggesting that PDF neurons are crucial for sleep regulation by the histamine-HisCl1 signaling. Finally, either hisCl1 mutation or genetic ablation of PDF neurons dampened wake-promoting effects of elevated histamine signaling via direct histamine administration. Taken together, these data clearly demonstrate that the histamine-HisCl1 receptor axis can activate and maintain the wake state in Drosophila and that wake-activating signals may travel via the PDF neurons. PMID:23844178

  11. Relation between waking sport activities, reading, and dream content in sport students and psychology students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schredl, Michael; Erlacher, Daniel

    2008-05-01

    The continuity hypothesis in its general form states that dreams reflect waking life: concerns, thoughts, and experiences (G. W. Domhoff, 1996; M. Schredl, 1999; I. Strauch & B. Meier, 1996). For example, athletes and sport students dream about sports more often than do psychology students, presumably reflecting their engagement in sport activities and sport theory (D. Erlacher & M. Schredl, 2004). In the present study, the authors tested the previously unexamined hypothesis that differences in dream content would directly reflect individuals' differing amounts of waking sport activities. As expected, the amount of time that individuals spent engaged in an activity (sports or reading) was directly related to their percentage of corresponding dreams. Also, individuals reported reading dreams less frequently than they did sport dreams, although reading was more prominent in their waking lives than were sport activities. The findings also indicated that other factors such as emotional involvement and associated worries might be of importance in explaining the relation between waking activities and dream events. Future studies using longitudinal designs would shed more light on this relation and would help derive a more precise formulation of the continuity hypothesis.

  12. Decay time of the auditory sensory memory trace during wakefulness and REM sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atienza, M; Cantero, J L; Gómez, C M

    2000-07-01

    In a repetitive auditory stimulus sequence, deviant infrequent tones typically elicit a component of auditory event-related potentials termed mismatch negativity (MMN). The elicitation of MMN is assumed to reflect the existence of a memory trace of the standard stimulus that has a decay time of about 10 s and is strengthened by repetition of the standards. The main aim of the present study was to test the decay time of the sensory memory trace during rapid-eye movement (REM) sleep vs. wakefulness, as indexed by the MMN. Subjects were presented 10 tone trains, separated by 3, 6, or 9 s of silence, during waking and REM sleep. Each train consisted of 9 standards of 1000 Hz and 1 deviant of 2000 Hz that occurred at position 1, 2, 4, or 6. The waking deviants elicited a frontocentral negativity with a scalp topography equivalent to the MMN component. During REM sleep, the negative component showed the same scalp distribution only for the 3-s intertrain interval (ITI). In this brain state, the MMN amplitude was smaller and decreased with prolongation of the ITI. These results suggest a weaker sensory memory trace formation and a premature decay time of such a memory trace during REM sleep as compared with wakefulness.

  13. Effects of dietary resveratrol on the sleep-wake cycle in the non-human primate gray mouse lemur (Microcebus murinus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pifferi, F; Rahman, A; Languille, S; Auffret, A; Babiloni, C; Blin, O; Lamberty, Y; Richardson, J C; Aujard, F

    2012-04-01

    Converging evidence shows that the non-human primate gray mouse lemur (Microcebus murinus) is ideal for the study of the aging process and for testing the effects of new therapies and dietary interventions on age-associated pathologies. One such dietary supplement is resveratrol (RSV), a dietary polyphenolic compound with several positive effects on metabolic functions and longevity. However, little is known about the effect of RSV on the lemur sleep-wake cycle, which reflects mammalian brain function and health. In the present study, the authors investigated this effect by comparing sleep-wake cycles in adult lemurs based on electroencephalographic (EEG) rhythms. The effect of short-term RSV supplementation on the sleep-wake cycle of mouse lemurs was evaluated in entrained conditions (long-day photoperiods, light:dark 14:10). After 3 wks of RSV supplementation, the animals exhibited a significantly increased proportion of active-wake time, occurring mainly during the resting phase of the sleep-wake cycle (+163%). The increase in active-wake time with RSV supplementation was accompanied by a significant reduction of both paradoxical sleep (-95%) and slow-wave sleep (-38%). These changes mainly occurred during the resting phase of the sleep-wake cycle (RSV supplementation induced negligible changes in active-wake time during the active phase of the sleep-wake cycle). The present data suggest that RSV may be a potent regulator of sleep-wake rhythms and could be of major interest in the study of sleep perturbations associated with aging and neuropathology.

  14. Trastuzumab containing regimens for early breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moja, Lorenzo; Tagliabue, Ludovica; Balduzzi, Sara; Parmelli, Elena; Pistotti, Vanna; Guarneri, Valentina; D'Amico, Roberto

    2012-04-18

    Approximately one-fifth of women who develop early breast cancer have HER2-positive tumours, which if untreated, have a worse prognosis than HER2-negative tumours. Trastuzumab is a selective treatment targeting the HER2 pathway. Although the results on efficacy seem to support its use, there are potential cardiac toxicities which need to be considered, especially for women at lower risk of recurrence, or those at increased cardiovascular risk. To assess the evidence on the efficacy and safety of therapy with trastuzumab, overall and in relation to its duration, concurrent or sequential administration with the standard chemotherapy regimen in patients with HER2-positive early breast cancer. We searched the Cochrane Breast Cancer Group's (CBCGs) Specialised Trials Register, and used the search strategy developed by the CBCG to search for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, BIOSIS, TOXNET, and the WHO ICTRP search portal (up to February 2010). RCTs comparing the efficacy and safety of trastuzumab alone, or in combination with chemotherapy, or no treatment, or standard chemotherapy alone, in women with HER2-positive early breast cancer including women with locally advanced breast cancer. We collected data from published and unpublished trials. We used hazard ratios (HRs) for time-to-event outcomes and risk ratio (RRs) for binary outcomes. Subgroup analyses included duration (less or greater than six months) and concurrent or sequential trastuzumab administration. We included eight studies involving 11,991 patients. The combined HRs for overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) significantly favoured the trastuzumab-containing regimens (HR 0.66; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.57 to 0.77, P < 0.00001; and HR 0.60; 95% CI 0.50 to 0.71, P < 0.00001, respectively). Trastuzumab significantly increased the risk of congestive heart failure (CHF: RR 5.11; 90% CI 3.00 to 8.72, P < 0.00001); and left ventricular ejection fraction decline

  15. Thrust generation and wake structure for flow across a pitching ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this work, we present detailed particle image velocimetry (PIV) based investigation of wake structure of a pitching airfoil. PIV measurements have been carried out for NACA0015 airfoil at Re = 2900 with reduced frequency range of 1.82–10.92 and pitching angle of 5°. Two different wake structures (reverse Kármán ...

  16. On actuator disc force fields generating wake vorticity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Kuik, G.A.M.; Van Zuijlen, A.H.

    2009-01-01

    Actuator disc calculations can be divided in two categories: force models where, for a prescribed force field, the flow is calculated using a CFD method, and kinematic models, where the wake is calculated based on wake boundary conditions and the force field is known when the velocities are known.

  17. Nonlinear Eddy Viscosity Models applied to Wind Turbine Wakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laan, van der, Paul Maarten; Sørensen, Niels N.; Réthoré, Pierre-Elouan

    2013-01-01

    The linear k−ε eddy viscosity model and modified versions of two existing nonlinear eddy viscosity models are applied to single wind turbine wake simulations using a Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes code. Results are compared with field wake measurements. The nonlinear models give better results...

  18. Drone Based Experimental Investigation of Wind Turbine Wake Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Balaji, , Dr.; Chokani, Ndaona, , Dr.; Abhari, Reza, Prof. _., Dr.

    2016-11-01

    The characteristics of the wake downstream of a wind turbine has an important bearing on the optimized micrositing of wind turbines in a given land area, as well as on the loads seen by downstream turbines. We use a novel measurement system to measure the flow field upstream and in the wake of a full-scale wind turbine. The system consists of a fast response aerodynamic probe, mounted on an autonomous drone that is equipped with a suite of sensors. These measurements detail, for the first time at full-scale Reynolds number conditions, the evolution and breakdown of tip vortices that are characteristic of the near wake, as well as the turbulent mixing and entrainment of more energised flow, which are distinctive in the far wake. A short-time Fourier transform (STFT) analysis method is used to derive time-localized TKE along the drone's trajectory. Detailed upstream and wake measurements are needed to understand the flow behavior, as it helps in developing and validating simplified wake models that can approximate the wake qualities. Comparisons of these measurements to recently developed wake prediction models highlights how these measurements can support further model development.

  19. Bubble wake dynamics in liquids and liquid-solid suspensions

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Liang-Shih; Brenner, Howard

    1990-01-01

    This book is devoted to a fundamental understanding of the fluid dynamic nature of a bubble wake, more specifically the primary wake, in liquids and liquid-solid suspensions, an dto the role it plays in various important flow phenomena of multiphase systems. Examples of these phenomena are liquid/solids mixing, bubble coalescence and disintergration, particle entrainment to the freeboard, and bed contraction.

  20. Review of computational fluid dynamics for wind turbine wake aerodynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Sanderse (Benjamin); S.P. van der Pijl (Sander); B. Koren (Barry)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThis article reviews the state-of-the-art numerical calculation of wind turbine wake aerodynamics. Different computational fluid dynamics techniques for modeling the rotor and the wake are discussed. Regarding rotor modeling, recent advances in the generalized actuator approach and the

  1. Highly resolved Large-Eddy Simulation of wind turbine wakes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benard, P.; Bricteux, L; Moureau, V.; Lartigue, G.; Beaudet, L.; Laine, R.; Viré, A.C.

    2017-01-01

    An horizontal axis wind turbine placed in a free stream develops a wake behind its rotor. Inside this wake, complex vortical instabilities are developing and can lead to turbulent structures generation1 . In order to predict performances and loads of wind turbines in wind farms, it is essential to

  2. High-Order Numerical Simulations of Wind Turbine Wakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleusberg, E.; Mikkelsen, Robert Flemming; Schlatter, Philipp

    2017-01-01

    aspects on the prediction of the wind turbine wake structure and the wake interaction between two turbines. The spectral-element method enables an accurate representation of the vortical structures, with lower numerical dissipation than the more commonly used finite-volume codes. The wind-turbine blades...

  3. Variations of the wake height over the Bolund escarpment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Julia; Mann, Jakob; Angelou, Nikolas

    2015-01-01

    with distance from the escarpment, with the wake height depending strongly on the wind direction, such that the minimum height appears when the flow is perpendicular to the escarpment. The wake increases by 10% to 70% when the wind direction deviates ± 15 from perpendicular depending on the distance to the edge...

  4. Pharmacokinetics of cyclophosphamide and thiotepa in a conventional fractionated high-dose regimen compared with a novel simplified unfractionated regimen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ekhart, Corine; Rodenhuis, Sjoerd; Beijnen, Jos H.; Huitema, Alwin D. R.

    2009-01-01

    High-dose alkylating chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide (4000 or 6000 mg/m2) and thiotepa (320 or 480 mg/m2) has commonly been administered in a fractionated regimen over 4 days. A simplified unfractionated regimen would be preferable, especially because cyclophosphamide and thiotepa have been shown

  5. Sleep-wake transitions in premature neonates predict early development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisman, Omri; Magori-Cohen, Reuma; Louzoun, Yoram; Eidelman, Arthur I; Feldman, Ruth

    2011-10-01

    To identify patterns of sleep-wake transitions in the neonatal period that might differentiate premature infants who would show better or worse outcomes in multiple developmental domains across the first 5 years of life. Participants were 143 low birth weight premature infants (mean birth weight: 1482 g; mean gestational age [GA]: 31.82 weeks). Sleep states were observed at a GA of 37 weeks in 10-second epochs over 4 consecutive evening hours and were analyzed through mathematical clustering. Neurobehavioral maturation was evaluated with the Neonatal Behavior Assessment Scale at discharge, emotional regulation was assessed during infant-mother and infant-father interactions at 3 and 6 months, cognitive development was measured at 6, 12, and 24 months, and verbal IQ, executive functions, and symbolic competence were tested at 5 years. Three types of state-transition patterns were identified, and no differences in birth weight, GA, or medical risk between the 3 groups were found. Infants whose sleep-state transitions were mainly characterized by shifts between quiet sleep and wakefulness exhibited the best development, including greater neonatal neuromaturation, less negative emotionality, better cognitive development, and better verbal, symbolic, and executive competences at 5 years. In comparison, infants who cycled mainly between states of high arousal, such as active sleep and cry, or between short episodes of active and quiet sleep showed poorer outcomes. Defining sleep organization on the basis of transitions between states proved useful for identifying risk and resilience indicators in neonatal behavior to predict trajectories of neurobehavioral, emotional, and cognitive growth.

  6. Blindfolding during wakefulness causes decrease in sleep slow wave activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korf, Eva Magdalena; Mölle, Matthias; Born, Jan; Ngo, Hong-Viet V

    2017-04-01

    Slow wave activity (SWA, 0.5-4 Hz) represents the predominant EEG oscillatory activity during slow wave sleep (SWS). Its amplitude is considered in part a reflection of synaptic potentiation in cortical networks due to encoding of information during prior waking, with higher amplitude indicating stronger potentiation. Previous studies showed that increasing and diminishing specific motor behaviors produced corresponding changes in SWA in the respective motor cortical areas during subsequent SWS Here, we tested whether this relationship can be generalized to the visual system, that is, whether diminishing encoding of visual information likewise leads to a localized decrease in SWA over the visual cortex. Experiments were performed in healthy men whose eyes on two different days were or were not covered for 10.5 h before bedtime. The subject's EEG was recorded during sleep and, after sleep, visual evoked potentials (VEPs) were recorded. SWA during nonrapid eye movement sleep (NonREM sleep) was lower after blindfolding than after eyes open (P < 0.01). The decrease in SWA that was most consistent during the first 20 min of NonREM sleep, did not remain restricted to visual cortex regions, with changes over frontal and parietal cortical regions being even more pronounced. In the morning after sleep, the N75-P100 peak-to-peak-amplitude of the VEP was significantly diminished in the blindfolded condition. Our findings confirm a link between reduced wake encoding and diminished SWA during ensuing NonREM sleep, although this link appears not to be restricted to sensory cortical areas. © 2017 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  7. CFD simulation on Kappel propeller with a hull wake field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shin, Keun Woo; Andersen, Poul; Møller Bering, Rasmus

    2013-01-01

    for propeller designers and the computational effort can be reduced by excluding the hull. The CFD simulation of a propeller flow with a hull wake is verified in order to use CFD as a propeller design tool. A Kappel propeller, which is an innovative tip-modified propeller, is handled. Kappel propellers....... It is investigated how the accuracy is improved, as the wake field is modelled more precisely. The thrust variation and pressure distribution on the blade from the CFD simulation with the hull wake model are also analyzed.......Marine propellers are designed not for the open-water operation, but for the operation behind a hull due to the inhomogeneous hull wake and thrust deduction. The adaptation for the hull wake is important for the propulsive efficiency and cavitation risk especially on single-screw ships. CFD...

  8. [About evolution of sleep-wakefulness cycle in vertebrates].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oganesian, G A; Aristakesian, E A; Vataev, S I

    2012-10-01

    Data about behavioral, somato-vegetative and neurophysiological parameters of sleep and wakefulness in insects, cold- and warm-blooded vertebrates are provided. Hypotheses existing now about evolutionary formation of separate sleep phases and stages in vertebrates are considered. In the review are shown the data about correlations of quantitative characteristics of sleep and wake in some mammals with basic metabolic rate, lifestyle, environmental habits. The original experimental results at formation of neurophysiological characteristics of sleep and wake in vertebrates, phylogeny and in ontogeny of mature and immature mammals are provided in detail. On the basis of own concepts about evolutionary development of sleep-wakefulness cycle in vertebrates the interactions of telencephalic, diencephalic and rhombencepalic parts of brain in the processes of cycle wakefulness cycle integration are discussed.

  9. On AEP prediction and wake modelling at Anholt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pena Diaz, Alfredo; Hansen, Kurt Schaldemose; Volker, Patrick

    and direction. We show that the WRF model is able to reproduce such gradients relatively well by comparison to the wind farm’s SCADA. About 1.5 yr of such SCADA, further quality controlled and filtered, reveals an average wake loss of 3.87% only, whereas results from three wake models, Park, Larsen and FUGA......, show average wake losses of 3.46%, 3.69%, and 3.38%, respectively. We employ a bootstrap method to estimate the uncertainty of the wake models. As this is performed with reference to the SCADA, the results provide an idea of the uncertainty of the AEP prediction2. We find all wake models...

  10. Stability Impact on Wake Development in Moderately Complex Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infield, D.; Zorzi, G.

    2017-05-01

    This paper uses a year of SCADA data from Whitelee Wind Farm near Glasgow to investigate wind turbine wake development in moderately complex terrain. Atmospheric stability measurements in terms of Richardson number from a met mast at an adjoining site have been obtained and used to assess the impact of stability on wake development. Considerable filtering of these data has been undertaken to ensure that all turbines are working normally and are well aligned with the wind direction. A group of six wind turbines, more or less in a line, have been selected for analysis, and winds within a 2 degree direction sector about this line are used to ensure, as far as possible, that all the turbines investigated are fully immersed in the wake/s of the upstream turbine/s. Results show how the terrain effects combine with the wake effects, with both being of comparable importance for the site in question. Comparison has been made with results from two commercial CFD codes for neutral stability, and reasonable agreement is demonstrated. Richardson number has been plotted against wind shear and turbulence intensity at a met mast on the wind farm that for the selected wind direction is not in the wake of any turbines. Good correlations are found indicating that the Richardson numbers obtained are reliable. The filtered data used for wake analysis were split according to Richardson number into two groups representing slightly stable to neutral, and unstable conditions. Very little difference in wake development is apparent. A greater difference can be observed when the data are separated simply by turbulence intensity, suggesting that, although turbulence intensity is correlated with stability, of the two it is the parameter that most directly impacts on wake development through mixing of ambient and wake flows.

  11. Wakeful rest promotes the integration of spatial memories into accurate cognitive maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Michael; Dewar, Michaela; Harris, Mathew A; Della Sala, Sergio; Wolbers, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    Flexible spatial navigation, e.g. the ability to take novel shortcuts, is contingent upon accurate mental representations of environments-cognitive maps. These cognitive maps critically depend on hippocampal place cells. In rodents, place cells replay recently travelled routes, especially during periods of behavioural inactivity (sleep/wakeful rest). This neural replay is hypothesised to promote not only the consolidation of specific experiences, but also their wider integration, e.g. into accurate cognitive maps. In humans, rest promotes the consolidation of specific experiences, but the effect of rest on the wider integration of memories remained unknown. In the present study, we examined the hypothesis that cognitive map formation is supported by rest-related integration of new spatial memories. We predicted that if wakeful rest supports cognitive map formation, then rest should enhance knowledge of overarching spatial relations that were never experienced directly during recent navigation. Forty young participants learned a route through a virtual environment before either resting wakefully or engaging in an unrelated perceptual task for 10 min. Participants in the wakeful rest condition performed more accurately in a delayed cognitive map test, requiring the pointing to landmarks from a range of locations. Importantly, the benefit of rest could not be explained by active rehearsal, but can be attributed to the promotion of consolidation-related activity. These findings (i) resonate with the demonstration of hippocampal replay in rodents, and (ii) provide the first evidence that wakeful rest can improve the integration of new spatial memories in humans, a function that has, hitherto, been associated with sleep. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Evidence for cortical structural plasticity in humans after a day of waking and sleep deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elvsåshagen, Torbjørn; Zak, Nathalia; Norbom, Linn B; Pedersen, Per Ø; Quraishi, Sophia H; Bjørnerud, Atle; Alnæs, Dag; Doan, Nhat Trung; Malt, Ulrik F; Groote, Inge R; Westlye, Lars T

    2017-08-01

    Sleep is an evolutionarily conserved process required for human health and functioning. Insufficient sleep causes impairments across cognitive domains, and sleep deprivation can have rapid antidepressive effects in mood disorders. However, the neurobiological effects of waking and sleep are not well understood. Recently, animal studies indicated that waking and sleep are associated with substantial cortical structural plasticity. Here, we hypothesized that structural plasticity can be observed after a day of waking and sleep deprivation in the human cerebral cortex. To test this hypothesis, 61 healthy adult males underwent structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at three time points: in the morning after a regular night's sleep, the evening of the same day, and the next morning, either after total sleep deprivation (N=41) or a night of sleep (N=20). We found significantly increased right prefrontal cortical thickness from morning to evening across all participants. In addition, pairwise comparisons in the deprived group between the two morning scans showed significant thinning of mainly bilateral medial parietal cortices after 23h of sleep deprivation, including the precuneus and posterior cingulate cortex. However, there were no significant group (sleep vs. sleep deprived group) by time interactions and we can therefore not rule out that other mechanisms than sleep deprivation per se underlie the bilateral medial parietal cortical thinning observed in the deprived group. Nonetheless, these cortices are thought to subserve wakefulness, are among the brain regions with highest metabolic rate during wake, and are considered some of the most sensitive cortical regions to a variety of insults. Furthermore, greater thinning within the left medial parietal cluster was associated with increased sleepiness after sleep deprivation. Together, these findings add to a growing body of data showing rapid structural plasticity within the human cerebral cortex detectable with

  13. Why Does Rem Sleep Occur? A Wake-Up Hypothesis1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemm, W. R.

    2011-01-01

    Brain activity differs in the various sleep stages and in conscious wakefulness. Awakening from sleep requires restoration of the complex nerve impulse patterns in neuronal network assemblies necessary to re-create and sustain conscious wakefulness. Herein I propose that the brain uses rapid eye movement (REM) to help wake itself up after it has had a sufficient amount of sleep. Evidence suggesting this hypothesis includes the facts that, (1) when first going to sleep, the brain plunges into Stage N3 (formerly called Stage IV), a deep abyss of sleep, and, as the night progresses, the sleep is punctuated by episodes of REM that become longer and more frequent toward morning, (2) conscious-like dreams are a reliable component of the REM state in which the dreamer is an active mental observer or agent in the dream, (3) the last awakening during a night's sleep usually occurs in a REM episode during or at the end of a dream, (4) both REM and awake consciousness seem to arise out of a similar brainstem ascending arousal system (5) N3 is a functionally perturbed state that eventually must be corrected so that embodied brain can direct adaptive behavior, and (6) cortico-fugal projections to brainstem arousal areas provide a way to trigger increased cortical activity in REM to progressively raise the sleeping brain to the threshold required for wakefulness. This paper shows how the hypothesis conforms to common experience and has substantial predictive and explanatory power regarding the phenomenology of sleep in terms of ontogeny, aging, phylogeny, abnormal/disease states, cognition, and behavioral physiology. That broad range of consistency is not matched by competing theories, which are summarized herein. Specific ways to test this wake-up hypothesis are suggested. Such research could lead to a better understanding of awake consciousness. PMID:21922003

  14. Comparing offshore wind farm wake observed from satellite SAR and wake model results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bay Hasager, Charlotte

    2014-05-01

    Offshore winds can be observed from satellite synthetic aperture radar (SAR). In the FP7 EERA DTOC project, the European Energy Research Alliance project on Design Tools for Offshore Wind Farm Clusters, there is focus on mid- to far-field wind farm wakes. The more wind farms are constructed nearby other wind farms, the more is the potential loss in annual energy production in all neighboring wind farms due to wind farm cluster effects. It is of course dependent upon the prevailing wind directions and wind speed levels, the distance between the wind farms, the wind turbine sizes and spacing. Some knowledge is available within wind farm arrays and in the near-field from various investigations. There are 58 offshore wind farms in the Northern European seas grid connected and in operation. Several of those are spaced near each other. There are several twin wind farms in operation including Nysted-1 and Rødsand-2 in the Baltic Sea, and Horns Rev 1 and Horns Rev 2, Egmond aan Zee and Prinses Amalia, and Thompton 1 and Thompton 2 all in the North Sea. There are ambitious plans of constructing numerous wind farms - great clusters of offshore wind farms. Current investigation of offshore wind farms includes mapping from high-resolution satellite SAR of several of the offshore wind farms in operation in the North Sea. Around 20 images with wind farm wake cases have been retrieved and processed. The data are from the Canadian RADARSAT-1/-2 satellites. These observe in microwave C-band and have been used for ocean surface wind retrieval during several years. The satellite wind maps are valid at 10 m above sea level. The wakes are identified in the raw images as darker areas downwind of the wind farms. In the SAR-based wind maps the wake deficit is found as areas of lower winds downwind of the wind farms compared to parallel undisturbed flow in the flow direction. The wind direction is clearly visible from lee effects and wind streaks in the images. The wind farm wake cases

  15. In the wake of the economic crisis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Komp, Katrin; Starke, Peter; van Hooren, Franca

    The economic crisis of 2008 is a global phenomenon with far-ranging impact. Its effects reach beyond the economic sphere, impacting the lives of individuals. When confronted with job loss and financial hardship, people look for new income sources, change their world views and attitudes, and remodel...... their interaction with each other. As a result, societies change. Families grow closer together, and tensions between generations and between migrants and non-migrants increase. Governments have to consolidate their finances while reacting to the increasing need for welfare state intervention. In doing so......, they take different approaches that reflect the country-specific history and welfare state institutions. This working paper gives an overview of social change and welfare state reform in the wake of the economic crisis. For this purpose, it presents discussions and findings from two classes that were taught...

  16. Finnegans Wake & embodied cognition. A joycean reading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Rebora

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This contribution proposes an interpretation of the language theory in Finnegans Wake, identifying its potential matches with the embodied cognition thesis. First, are revised critical texts about the relations between joycean writings, the sciences of the mind and the evolution of technology and informatics. Then, through the close analysis of four excerpt, are outlined the traits of joycean poetics closer to the recent acquisitions in the cognitive sciences. In particular: the bodily roots of the formation of language and the inexhaustible process of interpretation. The first convergence is detected in neurosciences, with reference to the recent proposals of Vittorio Gallese, about “embodiment of language comprehension.” The second convergence is identified in the studies on Artificial Life, referring to the writings of Christopher Langton and the Research Group of Los Alamos.

  17. Sleep-wake functions and quality of life in patients with subthalamic deep brain stimulation for Parkinson’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eugster, Lukas; Oberholzer, Michael; Debove, Ines; Lachenmayer, M. Lenard; Mathis, Johannes; Pollo, Claudio; Schüpbach, W. M. Michael; Bassetti, Claudio L.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Sleep-wake disturbances (SWD) are frequent in Parkinson’s disease (PD). The effect of deep brain stimulation (DBS) on SWD is poorly known. In this study we examined the subjective and objective sleep-wake profile and the quality of life (QoL) of PD patients in the context of subthalamic DBS. Patients and methods We retrospectively analyzed data from PD patients and candidates for DBS in the nucleus suthalamicus (STN). Pre-DBS, sleep-wake assessments included subjective and objective (polysomnography, vigilance tests and actigraphy) measures. Post-DBS, subjective measures were collected. QoL was assessed using the Parkinson’s Disease Questionnaire (PDQ-39) and the RAND SF-36-item Health Survey (RAND SF-36). Results Data from 74 PD patients (62% male, mean age 62.2 years, SD = 8.9) with a mean UPDRS-III (OFF) of 34.2 (SD = 14.8) and 11.8 (SD = 4.5) years under PD treatment were analyzed. Pre-DBS, daytime sleepiness, apathy, fatigue and depressive symptoms were present in 49%, 34%, 38% and 25% of patients respectively but not always as co-occurring symptoms. Sleep-wake disturbances were significantly correlated with QoL scores. One year after STN DBS, motor signs, QoL and sleepiness improved but apathy worsened. Changes in QoL were associated with changes in sleepiness and apathy but baseline sleep-wake functions were not predictive of STN DBS outcome. Conclusion In PD patients presenting for STN DBS, subjective and objective sleep-wake disturbances are common and have a negative impact on QoL before and after neurosurgery. Given the current preliminary evidence, prospective observational studies assessing subjective and objective sleep-wake variables prior to and after DBS are needed. PMID:29253029

  18. Sleep-wake functions and quality of life in patients with subthalamic deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargiotas, Panagiotis; Eugster, Lukas; Oberholzer, Michael; Debove, Ines; Lachenmayer, M Lenard; Mathis, Johannes; Pollo, Claudio; Schüpbach, W M Michael; Bassetti, Claudio L

    2017-01-01

    Sleep-wake disturbances (SWD) are frequent in Parkinson's disease (PD). The effect of deep brain stimulation (DBS) on SWD is poorly known. In this study we examined the subjective and objective sleep-wake profile and the quality of life (QoL) of PD patients in the context of subthalamic DBS. We retrospectively analyzed data from PD patients and candidates for DBS in the nucleus suthalamicus (STN). Pre-DBS, sleep-wake assessments included subjective and objective (polysomnography, vigilance tests and actigraphy) measures. Post-DBS, subjective measures were collected. QoL was assessed using the Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire (PDQ-39) and the RAND SF-36-item Health Survey (RAND SF-36). Data from 74 PD patients (62% male, mean age 62.2 years, SD = 8.9) with a mean UPDRS-III (OFF) of 34.2 (SD = 14.8) and 11.8 (SD = 4.5) years under PD treatment were analyzed. Pre-DBS, daytime sleepiness, apathy, fatigue and depressive symptoms were present in 49%, 34%, 38% and 25% of patients respectively but not always as co-occurring symptoms. Sleep-wake disturbances were significantly correlated with QoL scores. One year after STN DBS, motor signs, QoL and sleepiness improved but apathy worsened. Changes in QoL were associated with changes in sleepiness and apathy but baseline sleep-wake functions were not predictive of STN DBS outcome. In PD patients presenting for STN DBS, subjective and objective sleep-wake disturbances are common and have a negative impact on QoL before and after neurosurgery. Given the current preliminary evidence, prospective observational studies assessing subjective and objective sleep-wake variables prior to and after DBS are needed.

  19. The Near Wake of Bluff Bodies in Stratified Fluids and the Emergence of Late Wake Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-29

    to as being "separated." These two particular cases of boundary layer behavior dependent on the Reynolds number provide an opportunity to discuss...turbulence in the near wake region." There is then an opportunity to explicitly account for the sphere within the computational domain and provide...The Physics of Fluids, 20:187-191, 1977. [39] L. Prandtl. Uber ttiissigkeitsbewegimg bei sehr kleiuer reibung. Int. Math. Kongr. Heidelberg, pages

  20. Theta waves in children's waking electroencephalogram resemble local aspects of sleep during wakefulness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattinger, Sara; Kurth, Salome; Ringli, Maya; Jenni, Oskar G; Huber, Reto

    2017-09-11

    Vyazovskiy and colleagues found in rats' multi-unit recordings brief periods of silence (off-states) in local populations of cortical neurons during wakefulness which closely resembled the characteristic off-states during sleep. These off-states became more global and frequent with increasing sleep pressure and were associated with the well-known increase of theta activity under sleep deprivation in the surface EEG. Moreover, the occurrence of such off-states was related to impaired performance. While these animal experiments were based on intracranial recordings, we aimed to explore whether the human surface EEG may also provide evidence for such a local sleep-like intrusion during wakefulness. Thus, we analysed high-density wake EEG recordings during an auditory attention task in the morning and evening in 12 children. We found that, theta waves became more widespread in the evening and the occurrence of widespread theta waves was associated with slower reaction times in the attention task. These results indicate that widespread theta events measured on the scalp might be markers of local sleep in humans. Moreover, such markers of local sleep, seem to be related to the well described performance decline under high sleep pressure.

  1. PROPOSAL OF ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS REGIMENS BASED ON SUSCEPTIBILITY TO ISONIAZID AND RIFAMPICIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Ticona, Alberto; Moore, David AJ; Alarcón, Valentina; Samalvides, Frine; Seas, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Objective To elaborate optimal anti-tuberculosis regimens following drug susceptibility testing (DST) to isoniazid (H) and rifampicin (R). Design 12 311 M. tuberculosis strains (National Health Institute of Peru 2007-2009) were classified in four groups according H and R resistance. In each group the sensitivity to ethambutol (E), pirazinamide (Z), streptomycin (S), kanamycin (Km), capreomycin (Cm), ciprofloxacin (Cfx), ethionamide (Eto), cicloserine (Cs) and p-amino salicilic acid (PAS) was determined. Based on resistance profiles, domestic costs, and following WHO guidelines, we elaborated and selected optimal putative regimens for each group. The potential efficacy (PE) variable was defined as the proportion of strains sensitive to at least three or four drugs for each regimen evaluated. Results Selected regimes with the lowest cost, and highest PE of containing 3 and 4 effective drugs for TB sensitive to H and R were: HRZ (99,5%) and HREZ (99,1%), respectively; RZECfx (PE=98,9%) and RZECfxKm (PE=97,7%) for TB resistant to H; HZECfx (96,8%) and HZECfxKm (95,4%) for TB resistant to R; and EZCfxKmEtoCs (82.9%) for MDR-TB. Conclusion Based on resistance to H and R it was possible to select anti-tuberculosis regimens with high probability of success. This proposal is a feasible alternative to tackle tuberculosis in Peru where the access to rapid DST to H and R is improving progressively. PMID:23949502

  2. The Burble Effect: Superstructure and Flight Deck Effects on Carrier Air Wake

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    velocity of 300 feet per second (fps). Wake-Interactive Survey Probe ( WISP ): The WISP is a custom-built automated data collection system that serves to...minimize vibration and interference with test section flow. The WISP allowed data to be continuously recorded as the wind tunnel ran without the need...using a nitrogen gas cylinder at 130 psia. The window of locations to survey by the probe and the measurement intervals were input into the WISP GUI

  3. A comparison of sedation-related events for two multiagent oral sedation regimens in pediatric dental patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, Laura; Chen, Jung-Wei; Trapp, Larry; Job, Allen

    2014-01-01

    This study compared the incidence of adverse sedation-related events occurring with two different multiagent oral sedation regimens in pediatric dental patients. Forty healthy patients (three to six years old), received either a sedation regimen of chloral hydrate, meperidine, and hydroxyzine with nitrous oxide (CH/M/H/N2O; N=19) or a regimen of midazolam, meperidine, and hydroxyzine with nitrous oxide (MZ/M/H/N2O; N=21). The two treating dentists answered a questionnaire regarding the perioperative period. Parents received two phone interviews at eight and 24 hours after sedation. Statistical analysis included chi-square, Pearson correlation coefficient, and t-test (Phours after discharge. Children sedated with CH/M/H/N2O showed a significant increase in frequency of sleeping, talking less than normal after arriving home, and an increased need for postoperative pain medication. Different oral sedation regimens produce different adverse sedation-related events. The provider of pediatric oral sedation should select a sedative regimen with an adverse sedation-related profile that he/she believes is optimal for the patient being treated. Parents should be counseled as to possible postsedation effects anticipated based on the sedative regimen administered.

  4. Observations of the trade wind wakes of Kauai and Oahu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Ma, Jian; Xie, Shang-Ping

    2008-02-01

    The Hawaiian islands of Kauai and Oahu stand in the path of the east-northeasterly trade winds, creating wakes in the lee. For the first time, the structure of the wakes and their diurnal cycle were observed on a cruise during 18-20 December 2006. The dynamic wakes, characterized by reduced trades, extend about 1 km in height with strong wind shear at the top. Thermal forcing of these small islands also affects the wake circulations. Sea breezes develop in the afternoon turning the winds into westerly near the shore in the wakes. At night, land breezes advect cool air from the islands, creating a shallow cool layer between the sea surface and a capping inversion. The warming in the wake in the afternoon extends much deeper (1.4 km) than the cool layer (0.5 km) at night. The effect of diurnal changes on cloud formation in the wakes is discussed, and the sharp variations in wind velocity lee of the islands may affect ocean currents, waves and mixing.

  5. Armodafinil-induced wakefulness in animals with ventrolateral preoptic lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vetrivelan R

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Ramalingam Vetrivelan, Clifford B Saper, Patrick M Fuller Department of Neurology, Harvard Medical School and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: Armodafinil is the pharmacologically active R-enantiomer of modafinil, a widely prescribed wake-promoting agent used to treat several sleep-related disorders including excessive daytime sleepiness associated with narcolepsy, shift work sleep disorder, and obstructive sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome. Remarkably, however, the neuronal circuitry through which modafinil exerts its wake-promoting effects remains unresolved. In the present study, we sought to determine if the wake-promoting effects of armodafinil are mediated, at least in part, by inhibiting the sleep-promoting neurons of the ventrolateral preoptic (VLPO nucleus. To do so, we measured changes in waking following intraperitoneal administration of armodafinil (200 mg/kg or the psychostimulant methamphetamine (1 mg/kg in rats with cell-body specific lesion of the VLPO. Rats with histologically confirmed lesions of the VLPO demonstrated a sustained increase in wakefulness at baseline, but the increase in wakefulness following administration of both armodafinil and methamphetamine was similar to that of intact animals. These data suggest that armodafinil increases wakefulness by mechanisms that extend beyond inhibition of VLPO neurons. Keywords: EEG, sleep, orexin-saporin, methamphetamine

  6. Chemotherapy Regimen Extends Survival in Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    A four-drug chemotherapy regimen has produced the longest improvement in survival ever seen in a phase III clinical trial of patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer, one of the deadliest types of cancer.

  7. Effects of one night of induced night-wakings versus sleep restriction on sustained attention and mood: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Michal; Fridenson, Shimrit; Lerer, Reut; Bar-Haim, Yair; Sadeh, Avi

    2014-07-01

    Despite their high prevalence in daily life, repeated night-wakings and their cognitive and emotional consequences have received less research attention compared to other types of sleep disturbances. Our aim was to experimentally compare the effects of one night of induced infrequent night-wakings (of ∼15 min, each requiring a purposeful response) and sleep restriction on sustained attention and mood in young adults. In a within-between subjects counterbalanced design, 61 healthy adults (40 females; aged 20-29 years) underwent home assessments of sustained attention and self-reported mood at two times: after a normal (control) sleep night, and after a night of either sleep restriction (4h in bed) or induced night-wakings (four prolonged awakenings across 8h in bed). Sleep was monitored using actigraphy and sleep diaries. Sustained attention was assessed using an online continuous performance test (OCPT), and mood was reported online using the Profile of Mood States (POMS). Actigraphic data revealed good compliance with experimental sleep requirements. Induced night-wakings and sleep restriction both resulted in more OCPT omission and commission errors, and in increased depression, fatigue and confusion levels and reduced vigor compared to the normal sleep night. Moreover, there were no significant differences between the consequences of induced awakenings and sleep restriction. Our pilot study indicates that, similar to sleep restriction, one night of life-like repeated night-wakings negatively affects mood and sustained attention. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Single-tablet regimens (STRs enhance patients’ acceptability of HAART

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Maggiolo

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Patients’ acceptability of HAART is a subjective variable that may deeply influence therapeutic outcome. The feeling of the patient may alter adherence and lead to virologic failure. Acceptability may depend on various variables often difficulty evaluated by the care-giver. In a clinical setting the evaluation of acceptability is difficult, too, as patients may feel a judgement and be less sincere. Aim of this study was to asses adherence and acceptability of HAART. To limit reporting biases, the study was performed in five different non-clinic settings covering North and Central Italy. A total of 230 patients on stable HAART were asked to complete a semi-structured, anonymous questionnaire reporting their attitude toward HAART, their adherence and the acceptability of their regimen. In these notes we focus on this last patient-oriented outcome. Most of the subjects were males (66% with a mean age of 46 years, with higher education level (72% and a long history of HIV infection (mean 13.6 years. Consequently only 17% of patients were on a first-line regimen. Patients reporting a high or very high acceptability of HAART were 60% compared to a 31% reporting a fair grade of satisfaction and a 9% indicating low or null acceptability. However the type of the regimen significantly influenced patients’ acceptability. Single-tablet regimens (STRs, OD regimens with more than one tablet/day or BID regimens were scored as highly acceptable in 84%; 61%; and 53% of cases, respectively (P < 0.0001 (Figure. Statistical significance was retained when the dosing schedule was entered in a multivariate logistic model. When the analysis was restricted to experienced patients 62% of them were currently on a regimen based on a reduced number of pills compared to the previous one. Patients scored the previous regimen as more difficult to comply with in 72% of cases; as difficult in 22% and less difficult in 6%. The eventuality of AEs (40%; respect of timing of

  9. Sleep-Wake Cycle Dysfunction in the TgCRND8 Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease: From Early to Advanced Pathological Stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colby-Milley, Jessica; Cavanagh, Chelsea; Jego, Sonia; Breitner, John C S; Quirion, Rémi; Adamantidis, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    In addition to cognitive decline, individuals affected by Alzheimer's disease (AD) can experience important neuropsychiatric symptoms including sleep disturbances. We characterized the sleep-wake cycle in the TgCRND8 mouse model of AD, which overexpresses a mutant human form of amyloid precursor protein resulting in high levels of β-amyloid and plaque formation by 3 months of age. Polysomnographic recordings in freely-moving mice were conducted to study sleep-wake cycle architecture at 3, 7 and 11 months of age and corresponding levels of β-amyloid in brain regions regulating sleep-wake states were measured. At all ages, TgCRND8 mice showed increased wakefulness and reduced non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep during the resting and active phases. Increased wakefulness in TgCRND8 mice was accompanied by a shift in the waking power spectrum towards fast frequency oscillations in the beta (14-20 Hz) and low gamma range (20-50 Hz). Given the phenotype of hyperarousal observed in TgCRND8 mice, the role of noradrenergic transmission in the promotion of arousal, and previous work reporting an early disruption of the noradrenergic system in TgCRND8, we tested the effects of the alpha-1-adrenoreceptor antagonist, prazosin, on sleep-wake patterns in TgCRND8 and non-transgenic (NTg) mice. We found that a lower dose (2 mg/kg) of prazosin increased NREM sleep in NTg but not in TgCRND8 mice, whereas a higher dose (5 mg/kg) increased NREM sleep in both genotypes, suggesting altered sensitivity to noradrenergic blockade in TgCRND8 mice. Collectively our results demonstrate that amyloidosis in TgCRND8 mice is associated with sleep-wake cycle dysfunction, characterized by hyperarousal, validating this model as a tool towards understanding the relationship between β-amyloid overproduction and disrupted sleep-wake patterns in AD.

  10. Sleep-Wake Cycle Dysfunction in the TgCRND8 Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease: From Early to Advanced Pathological Stages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Colby-Milley

    Full Text Available In addition to cognitive decline, individuals affected by Alzheimer's disease (AD can experience important neuropsychiatric symptoms including sleep disturbances. We characterized the sleep-wake cycle in the TgCRND8 mouse model of AD, which overexpresses a mutant human form of amyloid precursor protein resulting in high levels of β-amyloid and plaque formation by 3 months of age. Polysomnographic recordings in freely-moving mice were conducted to study sleep-wake cycle architecture at 3, 7 and 11 months of age and corresponding levels of β-amyloid in brain regions regulating sleep-wake states were measured. At all ages, TgCRND8 mice showed increased wakefulness and reduced non-rapid eye movement (NREM sleep during the resting and active phases. Increased wakefulness in TgCRND8 mice was accompanied by a shift in the waking power spectrum towards fast frequency oscillations in the beta (14-20 Hz and low gamma range (20-50 Hz. Given the phenotype of hyperarousal observed in TgCRND8 mice, the role of noradrenergic transmission in the promotion of arousal, and previous work reporting an early disruption of the noradrenergic system in TgCRND8, we tested the effects of the alpha-1-adrenoreceptor antagonist, prazosin, on sleep-wake patterns in TgCRND8 and non-transgenic (NTg mice. We found that a lower dose (2 mg/kg of prazosin increased NREM sleep in NTg but not in TgCRND8 mice, whereas a higher dose (5 mg/kg increased NREM sleep in both genotypes, suggesting altered sensitivity to noradrenergic blockade in TgCRND8 mice. Collectively our results demonstrate that amyloidosis in TgCRND8 mice is associated with sleep-wake cycle dysfunction, characterized by hyperarousal, validating this model as a tool towards understanding the relationship between β-amyloid overproduction and disrupted sleep-wake patterns in AD.

  11. Impacts of 12-dose regimen for latent tuberculosis infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yi-Wen; Yang, Shun-Fa; Yeh, Yen-Po; Tsao, Thomas Chang-Yao; Tsao, Shih-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Treatment of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) is essential for eradicating tuberculosis (TB). Moreover, the patient adherence is crucial in determining the effectiveness of TB control. Isoniazid given by DOTS daily for 9 months (9H) is the standard treatment for LTBI in Taiwan. However, the completion rate is low due to the long treatment period and its side effects. The combined regimen using a high dose of rifapentine/isoniazid once weekly for 12 weeks (3HP) has been used as an alternative treatment option for LTBI in the United States. This may result in a higher completion rate. In this pilot study, patient adherence and cost of these 2 treatment regimens were investigated. Thus, we aimed to assess the treatment completion rate and costs of 3HP and compare to those with 9H. Data from 691 cases of LTBI treatments including 590 cases using the conventional regimen and 101 cases with rifapentine/Isoniazid were collected. The cost was the sum of the cost of treatment with Isoniazid for 9 months or with rifapentin/Isoniazid for 3 months of all contacts. The effectiveness was the cost of cases of tuberculosis avoided. In this study, the treatment completion rate for patients prescribed with the 3 months rifapentine/isoniazid regimen (97.03%) was higher than those given the conventional 9-month isoniazid regimen (87.29%) (P rifapentine/isoniazid regimen due to undesirable side effects. This was the first study to compare the 2 treatment regimens in Taiwan, and it showed that a short-term high-dosage rifapentine/isoniazid treatment regimen reduced costs and resulted in higher treatment completion than the standard LTBI isoniazid treatment. PMID:27559940

  12. Proceedings of the ENDOW Workshop 'Offshore Wakes: measurements and Modelling'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2002-01-01

    presentations covered a range of relevant topics from analytical approaches to fatigue and extreme loads in wind turbine clusters, current wake modelling in WAsP,optimising power production at Arklow Bank, Particle Image Velocimetry study of a wind turbine wake in a yaw, offshore wind measurements...... in Massachusetts, accuracy of SODAR measurements for wind energy and tidal influence of offshore wind speeds andturbulence. The papers presented in these Proceedings are the result of a workshop held at Risø National Laboratory on March 7 and 8 2002 entitled 'Offshore Wakes: Measurements and Modelling'....

  13. Wind field re-construction of 3D Wake measurements from a turbine-installed scanning lidar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Torben Krogh; Herges, Tommy; Astrup, Poul

    fields in the scan planes consisting of all three wind components. The combination of a fast-scanning wind lidar and a corresponding fast wind field reconstruction model is shown to be able to provide detailed wind data useful for proactive steering of wakes in real time and also for advanced feed......High-resolution wake flow measurements obtained from a turbine-mounted scanning lidar have been obtained from 1D to 5D behind a V27 test turbine. The measured line-of-sight projected wind speeds have, in connection with a fast CFD wind field reconstruction model, been used to generate 3D wind...

  14. Impact of adverse events of antiretroviral treatment on regimen change and mortality in Ugandan children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ntambwe Malangu

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Outcomes of antiretroviral treatment have been documented in both developed and developing countries. It has been reported consistently that the treatment is associated with many adverse events. However, little is known about their impact on the quality of life, clinical management, and survival in children aged less than 6 years in Uganda.Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of the adverse events of antiretroviral treatment, their impact on mortality and the change in regimens prescribed to children treated at Mildway Centre in Uganda.Method: A retrospective chart review was performed for children younger than 6 years, treated since the Mildway Centre was opened in 1999. In order to achieve a larger sample, the records of children treated from January 2000 to July 2005 were included in the study. A pre-tested data collection form was used to collate socio-demographic and clinical data of the patients. These included the documented adverse events, causes of death, stage of infection, duration of treatment, regimen prescribed, year of enrolment into the treatment program, as well as whether or not they were still alive. Descriptive statistics were used in the analysis of data.Results: Of the 179 children, the majority were males and had a median age of 4 years. The majority (58.8% of children had suffered from severe immune depression since they met the WHO clinical stage III and IV, 73.8% had a baseline CD4T of less than 15%. Four regimens were prescribed to the children. The most common was a regimen containing zidovudine, lamivudine, and nevirapine (34.6%, followed by a regimen containing stavudine, lamivudine, and nevirapine (27.9%. Eleven children (6.1% had their regimen changed, of which six (54.5% were due to adverse events. The prevalence of adverse events was 8%; of the 14 documented adverse events, the most common were severe anaemia (3, vomiting (3, and skin rashes (3. After 12 months on

  15. Temozolomide chemoresistance heterogeneity in melanoma with different treatment regimens: DNA damage accumulation contribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeckmann, Lars; Nickel, Ann-Christin; Kuschal, Christiane; Schaefer, Annika; Thoms, Kai-Martin; Schön, Michael P; Thomale, Jürgen; Emmert, Steffen

    2011-06-01

    The efficacy of temozolomide in melanoma treatment is low (response rate DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) and mismatch repair. We identified melanoma cell lines with different sensitivities to single versus prolonged clinical dosing regimens of temozolomide treatment and assessed a variety of potential resistance mechanisms using this model. We measured mRNA expression and promoter methylation of MGMT and essential mismatch repair genes (MLH1, MSH2). Cell cycle distribution, apoptosis/necrosis induction, O-methylguanine-adduct formation, and ABCB1 gene expression were assessed. We found that three cell lines, MelA, MelB, and MelC, were more sensitive to a single dose regimen than to a prolonged regimen, which would be expected to exhibit higher cytotoxicity. KAII and LIBR cell sensitivity was higher with regard to the prolonged treatment regimen, as expected. Only MelC expressed MGMT. Gene expression correlated well with promoter methylation. Temozolomide exposure did not alter mRNA expression. Different sensitivities to temozolomide were caused neither by delayed apoptosis induction due to early cell cycle arrest nor by O-methylguanine-adduct formation or efflux transporter expression. MelC was the most resistant cell line with rapid elimination of O-methylguanine adducts. This was in good agreement with its MGMT expression. The sensitive cell lines KAII and LIBR accumulated O-methylguanine adducts after a second treatment cycle with temozolomide in contrast with the other three cell lines. We conclude that MGMT expression and DNA adduct accumulation are relevant factors in temozolomide chemosensitivity. Considering individualized temozolomide treatment regimens either by quantification of DNA adducts or by chemosensitivity testing seems worthwhile clinically.

  16. Oxygen regimen in the human peripheral tissue during space flights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haase, H.; Kovalenko, E. A.; Vacek, A.; Bobrovnickij, M. P.; Jarsumbeck, B.; Semencov, V. N.; Sarol, Z.; Hideg, J.; Zlatarev, K.

    A survey of the results of the experiment "Oxygen," carried out within the scope of the INTERKOSMOS program in members of the permanent crews and of international visiting expeditions to the Soviet orbital station Salyut-6, is given. During the 7-day space flights of the international visiting expeditions a significant decrease in pO 2 ic by 3.28 kPa was observed. Local oxygen utilization reduced significantly by 0.44 kPa. During hyperventilation testing after return to earth a statistically significant decrease in the peak value by 1.39 kPa was noted. In the long-term crews of the orbital station Salyut-6 the highest decrease in pO 2 ic of 3.8 kPa and the absolutely lowest value of 3.4 ± 0.5 kPa during space flight were observed. The decrease in local oxygen utilization during the flight of 0.8 kPa/min was greater than that of the visiting crews. The results indicate the importance of investigating the dynamics of the oxygen regimen for medical control of the crew members both during the space flight and during the readaptation phase after return to earth.

  17. Numerical Analysis of the Unsteady Propeller Performance in the Ship Wake Modified By Different Wake Improvement Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bugalski Tomasz

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the summary of results of the numerical analysis of the unsteady propeller performance in the non-uniform ship wake modified by the different wake improvement devices. This analysis is performed using the lifting surface program DUNCAN for unsteady propeller analysis. Te object of the analysis is a 7000 ton chemical tanker, for which four different types of the wake improvement devices have been designed: two vortex generators, a pre-swirl stator, and a boundary layer alignment device. These produced five different cases of the ship wake structure: the original hull and hull equipped alternatively with four wake improvement devices. Two different propellers were analyzed in these five wake fields, one being the original reference propeller P0 and the other - a specially designed, optimized propeller P3. Te analyzed parameters were the pictures of unsteady cavitation on propeller blades, harmonics of pressure pulses generated by the cavitating propellers in the selected points and the fluctuating bearing forces on the propeller shaft. Some of the calculated cavitation phenomena were confronted with the experimental. Te objective of the calculations was to demonstrate the differences in the calculated unsteady propeller performance resulting from the application of different wake improvement devices. Te analysis and discussion of the results, together with the appropriate conclusions, are included in the paper.

  18. Wake Vortex Inverse Model User's Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, David; Delisi, Donald

    2008-01-01

    NorthWest Research Associates (NWRA) has developed an inverse model for inverting landing aircraft vortex data. The data used for the inversion are the time evolution of the lateral transport position and vertical position of both the port and starboard vortices. The inverse model performs iterative forward model runs using various estimates of vortex parameters, vertical crosswind profiles, and vortex circulation as a function of wake age. Forward model predictions of lateral transport and altitude are then compared with the observed data. Differences between the data and model predictions guide the choice of vortex parameter values, crosswind profile and circulation evolution in the next iteration. Iterations are performed until a user-defined criterion is satisfied. Currently, the inverse model is set to stop when the improvement in the rms deviation between the data and model predictions is less than 1 percent for two consecutive iterations. The forward model used in this inverse model is a modified version of the Shear-APA model. A detailed description of this forward model, the inverse model, and its validation are presented in a different report (Lai, Mellman, Robins, and Delisi, 2007). This document is a User's Guide for the Wake Vortex Inverse Model. Section 2 presents an overview of the inverse model program. Execution of the inverse model is described in Section 3. When executing the inverse model, a user is requested to provide the name of an input file which contains the inverse model parameters, the various datasets, and directories needed for the inversion. A detailed description of the list of parameters in the inversion input file is presented in Section 4. A user has an option to save the inversion results of each lidar track in a mat-file (a condensed data file in Matlab format). These saved mat-files can be used for post-inversion analysis. A description of the contents of the saved files is given in Section 5. An example of an inversion input

  19. What I make up when I wake up: anti-experience views and narrative fabrication of dreams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Melanie G.

    2013-01-01

    I propose a narrative fabrication thesis of dream reports, according to which dream reports are often not accurate representations of experiences that occur during sleep. I begin with an overview of anti-experience theses of Norman Malcolm and Daniel Dennett who reject the received view of dreams, that dreams are experiences we have during sleep which are reported upon waking. Although rejection of the first claim of the received view, that dreams are experiences that occur during sleep, is implausible, I evaluate in more detail the second assumption of the received view, that dream reports are generally accurate. I then propose a “narrative fabrication” view of dreams as an alternative to the received view. Dream reports are often confabulated or fabricated because of poor memory, bizarre dream content, and cognitive deficits. It is well documented that narratives can be altered between initial rapid eye movement sleep awakenings and subsequent reports. I argue that we have reason to suspect that initial reports are prone to inaccuracy. Experiments demonstrate that subjects rationalize strange elements in narratives, leaving out supernatural or bizarre components when reporting waking memories of stories. Inaccuracies in dream reports are exacerbated by rapid memory loss and bizarre dream content. Waking memory is a process of reconstruction and blending of elements, but unlike waking memory, we cannot reality-test for dream memories. Dream experiences involve imaginative elements, and dream content cannot be verified with external evidence. Some dreams may involve wake-like higher cognitive functions, such as lucid dreams. Such dreams are more likely to elicit accurate reports than cognitively deficient dreams. However, dream reports are generally less accurate than waking reports. I then propose methods which could verify the narrative fabrication view, and argue that although the theory cannot be tested with current methods, new techniques and technologies

  20. What I make up when I wake up: anti-experience views and narrative fabrication of dreams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Melanie G

    2013-01-01

    I propose a narrative fabrication thesis of dream reports, according to which dream reports are often not accurate representations of experiences that occur during sleep. I begin with an overview of anti-experience theses of Norman Malcolm and Daniel Dennett who reject the received view of dreams, that dreams are experiences we have during sleep which are reported upon waking. Although rejection of the first claim of the received view, that dreams are experiences that occur during sleep, is implausible, I evaluate in more detail the second assumption of the received view, that dream reports are generally accurate. I then propose a "narrative fabrication" view of dreams as an alternative to the received view. Dream reports are often confabulated or fabricated because of poor memory, bizarre dream content, and cognitive deficits. It is well documented that narratives can be altered between initial rapid eye movement sleep awakenings and subsequent reports. I argue that we have reason to suspect that initial reports are prone to inaccuracy. Experiments demonstrate that subjects rationalize strange elements in narratives, leaving out supernatural or bizarre components when reporting waking memories of stories. Inaccuracies in dream reports are exacerbated by rapid memory loss and bizarre dream content. Waking memory is a process of reconstruction and blending of elements, but unlike waking memory, we cannot reality-test for dream memories. Dream experiences involve imaginative elements, and dream content cannot be verified with external evidence. Some dreams may involve wake-like higher cognitive functions, such as lucid dreams. Such dreams are more likely to elicit accurate reports than cognitively deficient dreams. However, dream reports are generally less accurate than waking reports. I then propose methods which could verify the narrative fabrication view, and argue that although the theory cannot be tested with current methods, new techniques and technologies may

  1. Wind Farm Layout Optimization through a Crossover-Elitist Evolutionary Algorithm performed over a High Performing Analytical Wake Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchner-Bossi, Nicolas; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2017-04-01

    Wind turbine wakes can significantly disrupt the performance of further downstream turbines in a wind farm, thus seriously limiting the overall wind farm power output. Such effect makes the layout design of a wind farm to play a crucial role on the whole performance of the project. An accurate definition of the wake interactions added to a computationally compromised layout optimization strategy can result in an efficient resource when addressing the problem. This work presents a novel soft-computing approach to optimize the wind farm layout by minimizing the overall wake effects that the installed turbines exert on one another. An evolutionary algorithm with an elitist sub-optimization crossover routine and an unconstrained (continuous) turbine positioning set up is developed and tested over an 80-turbine offshore wind farm over the North Sea off Denmark (Horns Rev I). Within every generation of the evolution, the wind power output (cost function) is computed through a recently developed and validated analytical wake model with a Gaussian profile velocity deficit [1], which has shown to outperform the traditionally employed wake models through different LES simulations and wind tunnel experiments. Two schemes with slightly different perimeter constraint conditions (full or partial) are tested. Results show, compared to the baseline, gridded layout, a wind power output increase between 5.5% and 7.7%. In addition, it is observed that the electric cable length at the facilities is reduced by up to 21%. [1] Bastankhah, Majid, and Fernando Porté-Agel. "A new analytical model for wind-turbine wakes." Renewable Energy 70 (2014): 116-123.

  2. What I make up when I wake up: anti-experience views and narrative fabrication of dreams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Gillespie Rosen

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available I propose a narrative fabrication thesis of dream reports, according to which dream reports are often not accurate representations of experiences that occur during sleep. I begin with an overview of anti-experience theses of Norman Malcolm and Daniel Dennett who reject the received view of dreams, that dreams are experiences we have during sleep which are reported upon waking. Although rejection of the first claim of the received view, that dreams are experiences that occur during sleep, is implausible, I evaluate in more detail the second assumption of the received view, that dream reports are generally accurate. I then propose a ‘narrative fabrication’ view of dreams as an alternative to the received view. Dream reports are often confabulated or fabricated because of poor memory, bizarre dream content and cognitive deficits. It is well documented that narratives can alter between initial REM sleep awakenings and subsequent reports. I argue that we have reason to suspect that initial reports are prone to inaccuracy. Experiments demonstrate that subjects rationalise strange elements in narratives, leaving out supernatural or bizarre components when reporting waking memories of stories. Inaccuracies in dream reports are exacerbated by rapid memory loss and bizarre dream content. Waking memory is a process of reconstruction and blending of elements, but unlike waking memory, we cannot reality-test for dream memories. Dream experiences involve imaginative elements, and dream content cannot be verified with external evidence. Some dreams may involve wake-like higher cognitive functions, such as lucid dreams. Such dreams more likely to elicit accurate reports than cognitively deficient dreams. However, dream reports are generally less accurate than waking reports. I then propose methods which could verify the narrative fabrication, and argue that although the theory cannot be tested with current methods, new techniques and technologies may be

  3. Modelling lidar volume-averaging and its significance to wind turbine wake measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer Forsting, A. R.; Troldborg, N.; Borraccino, A.

    2017-05-01

    Lidar velocity measurements need to be interpreted differently than conventional in-situ readings. A commonly ignored factor is “volume-averaging”, which refers to lidars not sampling in a single, distinct point but along its entire beam length. However, especially in regions with large velocity gradients, like the rotor wake, can it be detrimental. Hence, an efficient algorithm mimicking lidar flow sampling is presented, which considers both pulsed and continous-wave lidar weighting functions. The flow-field around a 2.3 MW turbine is simulated using Detached Eddy Simulation in combination with an actuator line to test the algorithm and investigate the potential impact of volume-averaging. Even with very few points discretising the lidar beam is volume-averaging captured accurately. The difference in a lidar compared to a point measurement is greatest at the wake edges and increases from 30% one rotor diameter (D) downstream of the rotor to 60% at 3D.

  4. Wind tunnel study of helical and straight-bladed vertical-axis wind turbine wakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Maryam; Araya, Daniel

    2017-11-01

    It is hypothesized that blade curvature can serve as a passive means to control fluid entrainment and wake recovery in vertical-axis wind turbine (VAWT) arrays. We test this experimentally in a wind tunnel using two different VAWT configurations, one with straight blades and another with helical blades, keeping all other experimental parameters fixed. A small-scale, commercially available VAWT (15W max power) is used as the baseline wind tunnel model in each case. The commercial VAWT blades are replaced with either straight or helical blades that are 3D-printed extrusions of the same airfoil cross-section. Results from smoke flow visualization, three-component wake velocity measurements, and turbine power data are presented. These results give insight into the potential use of VAWTs with curved blades in utility-scale wind farms.

  5. Double-blind, placebo-controlled psychometric studies on the effects of a combined estrogen-progestin regimen versus estrogen alone on performance, mood and personality of menopausal syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linzmayer, L; Semlitsch, H V; Saletu, B; Böck, G; Saletu-Zyhlarz, G; Zoghlami, A; Gruber, D; Metka, M; Huber, J; Oettel, M; Gräser, T; Grünberger, J

    2001-01-01

    The influence of a combined estrogen-progestin regimen (Climodien) on noopsyche, thymopsyche, personality and psychophysiological measures of menopausal syndrome patients was investigated in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, comparative, randomized 3-arm trial phase (Climodien 2/3 = estradiol valerate (CAS 979-32-8) 2 mg + the progestin dienogest (CAS 65928-58-7) 3 mg = regimen A, estradiol valerate 2 mg = regimen EV, and placebo = regimen P) followed by an open-label phase in which all patients received Climodien 2/2 (estradiol valerate 2 mg + dienogest 2 mg) = regimen A*. 49 women (16, 17, 16 valid patients per arm) aged between 46 and 67 years (mean 58, 58, 56 years, respectively) with the diagnoses of insomnia (G 47.0) related to postmenopausal syndrome (N 95.1) were included in the analysis of the double-blind phase. Both the double-blind and the open-label phase lasted 2 months. Noopsychic investigations demonstrated an improvement in associative verbal memory after 2 months of regimen A, which was significant as compared with both baseline and placebo. Regarding visual memory, regimen A* induced an improvement, which was significantly different from the decline in correct reproductions in the Benton Test observed under estradiol. Errors in the Benton Test decreased significantly after regimen A* as compared with regimen EV. These findings suggest that hormone replacement therapy with estradiol, and even more in combination with dienogest, improves verbal and visual memory, which is in line with the improvement in information processing speed and capacity objectified by event-related potentials (ERP). Thymopsychic investigations demonstrated a significant improvement in somatic complaints and trait anxiety after both regimen A and regimen EV as compared with baseline. State anxiety decreased significantly under regimen A* as compared with EV. The Freiburger Personality Inventory showed an improvement in aggressivity after regimen A* as compared with the

  6. Circadian Sleep-Wake Rhythm of Older Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maaskant, Marijke; van de Wouw, Ellen; van Wijck, Ruud; Evenhuis, Heleen M.; Echteld, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    The circadian sleep-wake rhythm changes with aging, resulting in a more fragmented sleep-wake pattern. In individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID), brain structures regulating the sleep-wake rhythm might be affected. The aims of this study were to compare the sleep-wake rhythm of older adults with ID to that of older adults in the general…

  7. Circadian sleep-wake rhythm of older adults with intellectual disabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maaskant, Marijke; van de Wouw, Ellen; van Wijck, Ruud; Evenhuis, Heleen M.; Echteld, Michael A.

    The circadian sleep-wake rhythm changes with aging, resulting in a more fragmented sleep-wake pattern. In individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID), brain structures regulating the sleep-wake rhythm might be affected. The aims of this study were to compare the sleep-wake rhythm of older adults

  8. Manipulating the sleep-wake cycle and circadian rhythms to improve clinical management of major depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Clinical psychiatry has always been limited by the lack of objective tests to substantiate diagnoses and a lack of specific treatments that target underlying pathophysiology. One area in which these twin failures has been most frustrating is major depression. Due to very considerable progress in the basic and clinical neurosciences of sleep-wake cycles and underlying circadian systems this situation is now rapidly changing. Discussion The development of specific behavioral or pharmacological strategies that target these basic regulatory systems is driving renewed clinical interest. Here, we explore the extent to which objective tests of sleep-wake cycles and circadian function - namely, those that measure timing or synchrony of circadian-dependent physiology as well as daytime activity and nighttime sleep patterns - can be used to identify a sub-class of patients with major depression who have disturbed circadian profiles. Summary Once this unique pathophysiology is characterized, a highly personalized treatment plan can be proposed and monitored. New treatments will now be designed and old treatments re-evaluated on the basis of their effects on objective measures of sleep-wake cycles, circadian rhythms and related metabolic systems. PMID:23521808

  9. Wake Vortex Lidar Monte Carlo Simulation and Visualization Tool Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) sensors have been successfully demonstrated and implemented capabilities to detect and measure wake vortices in and around the...

  10. In Situ Wake Vortex Encounter Detection and Reporting System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Wake vortices are a critical constraint to aircraft separation and therefore airportal throughput, which is already at or near capacity at many major airports in the...

  11. Wake Fields in the Super B Factory Interaction Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weathersby, Stephen; /SLAC; Novokhatski, Alexander; /SLAC

    2011-06-02

    The geometry of storage ring collider interaction regions present an impedance to beam fields resulting in the generation of additional electromagnetic fields (higher order modes or wake fields) which affect the beam energy and trajectory. These affects are computed for the Super B interaction region by evaluating longitudinal loss factors and averaged transverse kicks for short range wake fields. Results indicate at least a factor of 2 lower wake field power generation in comparison with the interaction region geometry of the PEP-II B-factory collider. Wake field reduction is a consderation in the Super B design. Transverse kicks are consistent with an attractive potential from the crotch nearest the beam trajectory. The longitudinal loss factor scales as the -2.5 power of the bunch length. A factor of 60 loss factor reduction is possible with crotch geometry based on an intersecting tubes model.

  12. Wake Island Tsunami Forecast Grids for MOST Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Wake Island Forecast Model Grids provides bathymetric data strictly for tsunami inundation modeling with the Method of Splitting Tsunami (MOST) model. MOST is a...

  13. Effects of viscoelasticity in the high Reynolds number cylinder wake

    KAUST Repository

    Richter, David

    2012-01-16

    At Re = 3900, Newtonian flow past a circular cylinder exhibits a wake and detached shear layers which have transitioned to turbulence. It is the goal of the present study to investigate the effects which viscoelasticity has on this state and to identify the mechanisms responsible for wake stabilization. It is found through numerical simulations (employing the FENE-P rheological model) that viscoelasticity greatly reduces the amount of turbulence in the wake, reverting it back to a state which qualitatively appears similar to the Newtonian mode B instability which occurs at lower Re. By focusing on the separated shear layers, it is found that viscoelasticity suppresses the formation of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability which dominates for Newtonian flows, consistent with previous studies of viscoelastic free shear layers. Through this shear layer stabilization, the viscoelastic far wake is then subject to the same instability mechanisms which dominate for Newtonian flows, but at far lower Reynolds numbers. © Copyright Cambridge University Press 2012.

  14. Investigation of Murine Models for Sleep, Wakefulness and Target Discovery

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ye, Gui-lan; Lanthorn, Thomas; Savelieva, Katerina

    2007-01-01

    Genetic inhibition of two genes, an orphan GPCR and a kinase, have been shown to produce changes in the behavior of mice that suggest the ability to promote sleep and to promote extended wakefulness...

  15. CRED REA Coral Population Parameters at Wake Atoll, 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Belt transects along 1 or 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines were surveyed as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 14 sites at Wake Atoll in...

  16. High resolution wind turbine wake measurements with a scanning lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herges, T. G.; Maniaci, D. C.; Naughton, B. T.; Mikkelsen, T.; Sjöholm, M.

    2017-05-01

    High-resolution lidar wake measurements are part of an ongoing field campaign being conducted at the Scaled Wind Farm Technology facility by Sandia National Laboratories and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory using a customized scanning lidar from the Technical University of Denmark. One of the primary objectives is to collect experimental data to improve the predictive capability of wind plant computational models to represent the response of the turbine wake to varying inflow conditions and turbine operating states. The present work summarizes the experimental setup and illustrates several wake measurement example cases. The cases focus on demonstrating the impact of the atmospheric conditions on the wake shape and position, and exhibit a sample of the data that has been made public through the Department of Energy Atmosphere to Electrons Data Archive and Portal.

  17. Sleep/wake dependent changes in cortical glucose concentrations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dash, Michael B; Bellesi, Michele; Tononi, Giulio; Cirelli, Chiara

    2013-01-01

    ... the question whether glucose levels reflect behavioral state and sleep/wake history. Here chronic (2–3 days) electroencephalographic recordings in the rat cerebral cortex were coupled with fixed...

  18. Wake high-density electroencephalographic spatiospectral signatures of Insomnia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Colombo, Michele A.; Ramautar, Jennifer R.; Wei, Yishul; Gomez-Herrero, Germán; Stoffers, Diederick; Wassing, Rick; Benjamins, Jeroen S.; Tagliazucchi, Enzo; van der Werf, Ysbrand; Cajochen, Christian; Van Someren, Eus J.W.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Although daytime complaints are a defining characteristic of insomnia, most EEG studies evaluated sleep only. We used high-density electroencephalography to investigate wake resting state oscillations characteristic of insomnia disorder (ID) at a fine-grained spatiospectral

  19. Uncovering the genetic landscape for multiple sleep-wake traits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Winrow

    Full Text Available Despite decades of research in defining sleep-wake properties in mammals, little is known about the nature or identity of genes that regulate sleep, a fundamental behaviour that in humans occupies about one-third of the entire lifespan. While genome-wide association studies in humans and quantitative trait loci (QTL analyses in mice have identified candidate genes for an increasing number of complex traits and genetic diseases, the resources and time-consuming process necessary for obtaining detailed quantitative data have made sleep seemingly intractable to similar large-scale genomic approaches. Here we describe analysis of 20 sleep-wake traits from 269 mice from a genetically segregating population that reveals 52 significant QTL representing a minimum of 20 genomic loci. While many (28 QTL affected a particular sleep-wake trait (e.g., amount of wake across the full 24-hr day, other loci only affected a trait in the light or dark period while some loci had opposite effects on the trait during the light vs. dark. Analysis of a dataset for multiple sleep-wake traits led to previously undetected interactions (including the differential genetic control of number and duration of REM bouts, as well as possible shared genetic regulatory mechanisms for seemingly different unrelated sleep-wake traits (e.g., number of arousals and REM latency. Construction of a Bayesian network for sleep-wake traits and loci led to the identification of sub-networks of linkage not detectable in smaller data sets or limited single-trait analyses. For example, the network analyses revealed a novel chain of causal relationships between the chromosome 17@29cM QTL, total amount of wake, and duration of wake bouts in both light and dark periods that implies a mechanism whereby overall sleep need, mediated by this locus, in turn determines the length of each wake bout. Taken together, the present results reveal a complex genetic landscape underlying multiple sleep-wake traits

  20. Waking dreams and other metachoric experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, C

    1990-06-01

    This paper summarizes the development of the concept of metachoric experiences from 1961 onwards. The name of metachoric experience was given to one in which the whole of the environment was replaced by a hallucinatory one, although this may provide a precise replica of the physical world and appear to be completely continuous with normal experience. Prior to 1968 three types of metachoric experiences had been recognized; lucid dreams, out-of-the-body experiences (OBEs) and false awakenings, all of which showed interrelationships. The Institute's 1968 appeal for apparitional experiences led to a recognition that many of these were probably metachoric. This was suggested among other things by certain cases in which the lighting of the whole field of view changes, thus indicating that the experience was completely hallucinatory. The study of apparitions led also to the concept of waking dreams, i.e. completely hallucinatory experiences which may be initiated and terminated without any awareness of discontinuity on the part of the subject. These experiences seem to be capable of considerable apparent extension in time, thus providing a possible explanation of some reports of UFO sightings and of some of the more anomalous experiences of psychical research. In this connection the paper discusses the well-known Versailles experience of Miss Moberly and Miss Jourdain, and a published case of C.G. Jung. In conclusion some of the most obvious similarities and differences between the different types of metachoric experiences are discussed.

  1. WAKES: Wavelet Adaptive Kinetic Evolution Solvers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardirian, Marine; Afeyan, Bedros; Larson, David

    2016-10-01

    We are developing a general capability to adaptively solve phase space evolution equations mixing particle and continuum techniques in an adaptive manner. The multi-scale approach is achieved using wavelet decompositions which allow phase space density estimation to occur with scale dependent increased accuracy and variable time stepping. Possible improvements on the SFK method of Larson are discussed, including the use of multiresolution analysis based Richardson-Lucy Iteration, adaptive step size control in explicit vs implicit approaches. Examples will be shown with KEEN waves and KEEPN (Kinetic Electrostatic Electron Positron Nonlinear) waves, which are the pair plasma generalization of the former, and have a much richer span of dynamical behavior. WAKES techniques are well suited for the study of driven and released nonlinear, non-stationary, self-organized structures in phase space which have no fluid, limit nor a linear limit, and yet remain undamped and coherent well past the drive period. The work reported here is based on the Vlasov-Poisson model of plasma dynamics. Work supported by a Grant from the AFOSR.

  2. Theoretical modelling of wakes from retractable flapping wings in forward flight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parslew, Ben; Crowther, William J

    2013-01-01

    A free-wake method is used to simulate the wake from retractable, jointed wings. The method serves to complement existing experimental studies that visualise flying animal wakes. Simulated wakes are shown to be numerically convergent for a case study of the Rock Pigeon in minimum power cruising flight. The free-wake model is robust in simulating wakes for a range of wing geometries and dynamics without requiring changes to the numerical method. The method is found to be useful for providing low order predictions of wake geometries. However, it is not well suited to reconstructing 3d flowfields as solutions are sensitive to the numerical mesh node locations.

  3. Theoretical modelling of wakes from retractable flapping wings in forward flight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Parslew

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A free-wake method is used to simulate the wake from retractable, jointed wings. The method serves to complement existing experimental studies that visualise flying animal wakes. Simulated wakes are shown to be numerically convergent for a case study of the Rock Pigeon in minimum power cruising flight. The free-wake model is robust in simulating wakes for a range of wing geometries and dynamics without requiring changes to the numerical method. The method is found to be useful for providing low order predictions of wake geometries. However, it is not well suited to reconstructing 3d flowfields as solutions are sensitive to the numerical mesh node locations.

  4. Wind Turbine Wake-Redirection Control at the Fishermen's Atlantic City Windfarm: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Churchfield, M.; Fleming, P.; Bulder, B.; White, S.

    2015-05-06

    In this paper, we will present our work towards designing a control strategy to mitigate wind turbine wake effects by redirecting the wakes, specifically applied to the Fishermen’s Atlantic City Windfarm (FACW), proposed for deployment off the shore of Atlantic City, New Jersey. As wind turbines extract energy from the air, they create low-speed wakes that extend behind them. Full wake recovery Full wake recovery to the undisturbed wind speed takes a significant distance. In a wind energy plant the wakes of upstream turbines may travel downstream to the next row of turbines, effectively subjecting them to lower wind speeds, meaning these waked turbines will produce less power.

  5. Energy-autonomous wake-up receiver using solar panel and visible light communication

    OpenAIRE

    Sariol Ramos, Joyce

    2016-01-01

    One of the most promising energy-efficient communication methods is the use of wake-up receivers. In this work, we will develop a novel wake-up communication system that uses Visual Light Communication (VLC) and an indoor solar panel as the receiver of the wake-up signal. After the reception of the wake-up signal, an interrupt generated by the wake-up receiver wakes up the wireless device attached. The use of wake-up communication systems is a potential energy-efficient and low-cost soluti...

  6. Wake Mitigation Strategies for Optimizing Wind Farm Power Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilip, Deepu; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    Although wind turbines are designed individually for optimum power production, they are often arranged into groups of closely spaced turbines in a wind farm rather than in isolation. Consequently, most turbines in a wind farm do not operate in unobstructed wind flows, but are affected by the wakes of turbines in front of them. Such wake interference significantly reduces the overall power generation from wind farms and hence, development of effective wake mitigation strategies is critical for improving wind farm efficiency. One approach towards this end is based on the notion that the operation of each turbine in a wind farm at its optimum efficiency might not lead to optimum power generation from the wind farm as a whole. This entails a down regulation of individual turbines from its optimum operating point, which can be achieved through different methods such as pitching the turbine blades, changing the turbine tip speed ratio or yawing of the turbine, to name a few. In this study, large-eddy simulations of a two-turbine arrangement with the second turbine fully in the wake of the first are performed. Different wake mitigation techniques are applied to the upstream turbine, and the effects of these on its wake characteristics are investigated. Results for the combined power from the two turbines for each of these methods are compared to a baseline scenario where no wake mitigation strategies are employed. Analysis of the results shows the potential for improved power production from such wake control methods. It should be noted, however, that the magnitude of the improvement is strongly affected by the level of turbulence in the incoming atmospheric flow.

  7. Sleep wake pattern analysis: Study of 131 medical students

    OpenAIRE

    Nita Ninama; Jaydeep Kangathara

    2012-01-01

    Objective:Sleep is part of the rhythm of life. Without a good sleep the mind is less adapts, mood is altered and the body loses the ability to refresh. The sleep wake cycle of the students is quite different and characterized by delayed onset, partial sleep deprivation, poor sleep quality, insufficient sleep duration and occurrence of napping episodes during the day The aim of the present study is to know sleep wake pattern in medical student, role of residence and individual characterization...

  8. Armodafinil in the treatment of sleep/wake disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan RL Schwartz

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Jonathan RL Schwartz1,Thomas Roth2, Chris Drake21INTEGRIS Sleep Disorders Center and University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK, USA; 2Sleep Disorders and Research Center, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI, USAAbstract: Excessive sleepiness (ES is a major but underestimated public health concern associated with significant impairments in alertness/wakefulness and significant morbidity. The term ES has been used in the sleep medicine literature for years, but due to its nonspecific symptoms (ie tiredness or fatigue, it frequently goes unrecognized or is misdiagnosed in primary care. In some cases ES arises due to poor sleep habits or self-imposed sleep deprivation; however, ES is also a key component of a number of sleep/wake disorders and multiple medical and psychiatric disorders. Identification and treatment of ES is critical to improve the quality of life and well-being of patients and for the safety of the wider community. The inability of patients to recognize the nature, extent, and symptomatic profile of sleep/wake disorders requires vigilance on the part of healthcare professionals. Interventions to address ES and its associated impairments, treatment of the underlying sleep/wake disorder, and follow-up are a priority given the potential for serious consequences if left untreated. Wakefulness-promoting agents are available that treat ES associated with sleep/wake disorders. This review examines current approaches for managing this debilitating and potentially life-threatening condition, focusing on the place of armodafinil as a wakefulness-promoting agent.Keywords: excessive sleepiness, wakefulness, armodafinil, obstructive sleep apnea, narcolepsy, shift-work disorder

  9. An Analytic Parameterization of Self-Gravity Wakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiscareno, Matthew S.; Perrine, R. P.; Richardson, D. C.; Hedman, M. M.; Burns, J. A.; Weiss, J. W.; Porco, C. C.

    2008-09-01

    Saturn's dense A and B rings are pervaded by a microstructure dubbed "self-gravity wakes," which arise due to a rough balance between the clumping together of particles under their mutual self-gravity and their shearing apart again due to tidal forces (Julian and Toomre 1966; Salo 1995). This effect causes azimuthal variations in the rings' brightness as seen in images (Franklin et al. 1987; Dones and Porco 1989; Salo et al. 2004; Porco et al. 2008) and in the optical depth as probed by occultations (Colwell et al. 2006; Hedman et al. 2007). The latter papers explain the occultation observations with models that assume widely separated elongated structures that have an optical-depth dichotomy, with nearly-opaque wakes (with optical depth κwake) and a low but relatively constant optical depth in the spaces between the wakes (κgap). However, it is not known whether simulated wakes (not to mention real ones) can be so characterized, nor, if they can, how κwake and κgap respond to environmental parameters such as optical depth and coefficient of restitution. What do observed values of κgap (Colwell et al. 2006; Hedman et al. 2007) tell us about the conditions under which wakes occur? To this end, we determine the distribution of densities in simulated wake cells. Our method uses an adaptive bin size to simultaneously accommodate low-density regions, where particles are sparse (large bins required), and the sharp boundaries between high- and low-density regions (small bins required). The result is a histogram of the local densities within simulated patches of the ring. We apply this method to a suite of simulated wake cells, and will present our results. We further plan to use our results to address the question of whether local disruption of self-gravity wakes can explain the observed brightness of "propeller" structures (Tiscareno et al. 2008, AJ).

  10. A New Analytical Model for Wind-Turbine Wakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastankhah, Majid; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2013-04-01

    The intention of this study is to propose and validate a simple and efficient analytical model for the prediction of the wake velocity downwind of a stand-alone wind-turbine. Extensive efforts have been carried out to model the wake region analytically. One of the most popular models, proposed by Jensen, assumes a top-hat distribution of the velocity deficit at any plane perpendicular to the wake. That model has been extensively used in the literature and commercial softwares, but it has two important limitations that should be pointed out: (a) Even though this model is supposed to satisfy momentum conservation, in reality mass conservation is only used to derive it; (b) the assumption of a top-hat distribution of the velocity deficit is expected to underestimate that deficit in the center of the wake, and overestimate it near the edge of the wake. In order to overcome the above-mentioned limitations, here we propose an alternative analytical model that satisfies both mass and momentum conservation, and assumes a Gaussian distribution of the velocity deficit. For this purpose, we apply momentum and mass conservation to two different control volumes which have been previously used in the context of analytical modeling of wakes. The velocity profiles obtained with our proposed model are in good agreement with large-eddy simulation data and experimental measurements. By contrast, the top hat models, as expected, clearly underestimate the velocity deficit at the center of the wake region and overestimate it near the edge of the wake.

  11. Instability Analysis of Vortex Systems in Lifting-Body Wakes

    OpenAIRE

    Tendero Ventanas, Juan Ángel

    2016-01-01

    The present work deals with vortical flow instabilities, in particular with those that appear in the wake left by aircraft, wind turbines or any other body surrounded by fluid, generating a force perpendicular to the flow, namely lift. The case of the aircraft wake destruction caused by the growth of vortex instabilities is of great importance, as the selection of safe distances between aircraft is in most of the cases very conservative due to the lack of knowledge of the phenomena involved i...

  12. Turbulent ship wakes: further evidence that the Earth is round.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, David K

    2005-09-20

    When viewed from the stern, a ship's turbulent wake appears as a narrow strip of bubble-whitened water converging toward the horizon. The wake does not reach a sharp point on the horizon but has a finite angular width, indicating that the Earth is not flat, but rather round. A simple analysis of the geometry of the observations shows that the radius of the Earth can be estimated using only simple instruments and observations.

  13. Enhancement of SAR Ship Wake Image Based on FABEMD and Goldstein Filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Wen-yi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Enhanced SAR ship wake images with blur Kelvin wakes and reserved turbulent wakes are very important to the inversions of ship and motion parameters. This paper applies the Fast and Adaptive Bidimensional Empirical Mode Decomposition (FABEMD to decompose the SAR ship wake image into Kelvin wakes, turbulent wakes and other multiscale features, which enhances the gray intensity and spectrum contrast of Kelvin wakes to other features. Based on the FABEMD, a modified Goldstein interferogram filter is developed to further enhance the Kelvin wakes. Moreover, the moment invariants are introduced to evaluate the enhancement. Therefore, the Kelvin wakes are dramatically enhanced and the turbulent wakes are reserved. Algorithm analysis, experiments, subjective and objective evaluations show the reasonable efficiency and capabilities.

  14. HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders: Antiretroviral regimen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    thought to invade the central nervous system (CNS) early in the course of infection. Infected individuals may develop cognitive impairment of varying severity, ranging from mild deficits evident only on formal cognitive testing to severe HIV-associated dementia (HIV-D). This spectrum of disease is known collectively as HIV- ...

  15. Sleep/wake dependent changes in cortical glucose concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Michael B; Bellesi, Michele; Tononi, Giulio; Cirelli, Chiara

    2013-01-01

    Most of the energy in the brain comes from glucose and supports glutamatergic activity. The firing rate of cortical glutamatergic neurons, as well as cortical extracellular glutamate levels, increase with time spent awake and decline throughout non rapid eye movement sleep, raising the question whether glucose levels reflect behavioral state and sleep/wake history. Here chronic (2-3 days) electroencephalographic recordings in the rat cerebral cortex were coupled with fixed-potential amperometry to monitor the extracellular concentration of glucose ([gluc]) on a second-by-second basis across the spontaneous sleep-wake cycle and in response to 3 h of sleep deprivation. [Gluc] progressively increased during non rapid eye movement sleep and declined during rapid eye movement sleep, while during wake an early decline in [gluc] was followed by an increase 8-15 min after awakening. There was a significant time of day effect during the dark phase, when rats are mostly awake, with [gluc] being significantly lower during the last 3-4 h of the night relative to the first 3-4 h. Moreover, the duration of the early phase of [gluc] decline during wake was longer after prolonged wake than after consolidated sleep. Thus, the sleep/wake history may affect the levels of glucose available to the brain upon awakening. © 2012 The Authors Journal of Neurochemistry © 2012 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  16. Wake potential of swift ion in amorphous carbon target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Bahnam, Nabil janan; Ahmad, Khalid A.; Aboo Al-Numan, Abdullah Ibrahim

    2017-02-01

    The wake potential and wake phenomena for swift proton in an amorphous carbon target were studied by utilising various dielectric function formalisms, including the Drude dielectric function, the Drude-Lorentz dielectric function and quantum dielectric function. The Drude model results exhibited a damped oscillatory behaviour in the longitudinal direction behind the projectile; the pattern of these oscillations decreases exponentially in the transverse direction. In addition, the wake potential extends slightly ahead of the projectile which also depends on the proton coordinate and velocity. The effect of electron binding on the wake potential, characterised by the ratio ωp2/ω02 = 10 to 0.1, has been studied alongside the Drude-Lorentz dielectric function and quantum dielectric function formalisms; the results evidently show that the wake potential dip depth decreases with more oscillations when the electron density ratio ωp2/ω02 decreases from 10 to 0.1. One of the primary objectives of the present work is to construct a reasonably realistic procedure for simulating the response of target to swift ions by combining an expression for the induced wake potential along with several important dielectric function models; the aim of this research is to reduce computational complexity without sacrificing accuracy. This is regarded as being an efficient strategy in that it creates suitable computer simulation procedures which are relevant to actual solids. After comparing this method with other models, the main differences and similarities have been noted while the end results have proved encouraging.

  17. Visualization of the wake behind a sliding bubble

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly Meehan, R.; Grennan, K.; Davis, I.; Nolan, K.; Murray, D. B.

    2017-10-01

    In this work, Schlieren measurements are presented for the wake of an air bubble sliding under a heated, inclined surface in quiescent water to provide new insights into the intricate sliding bubble wake structure and the associated convective cooling process. This is a two-phase flow configuration that is pertinent to thermal management solutions, where the fundamental flow physics have yet to be fully described. In this work, we present an experimental apparatus that enables high-quality Schlieren images for different bubble sizes and measurement planes. By combining these visualizations with an advanced bubble tracking technique, we can simultaneously quantify the symbiotic relationship that exists between the sliding bubble dynamics and its associated wake. An unstable, dynamic wake structure is revealed, consisting of multiple hairpin-shaped vortex structures interacting within the macroscopic area affected by the bubble. As vorticity is generated in the near wake, the bubble shape is observed to recoil and rebound. This also occurs normal to the surface and is particularly noticeable for larger bubble sizes, with a periodic ejection of material from the near wake corresponding to significant shape changes. These findings, along with their implications from a thermal management perspective, provide information on the rich dynamics of this natural flow that cannot be obtained using alternate experimental techniques.

  18. Comparison of wake models with data for offshore wind farms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rados, K. [Robert Gordon Univ., School of Engineering, Aberdeen (United Kingdom); Larsen, G.; Barthelmie, R. [Risoe National Lab., Wind Energy Dept., Roskilde (Denmark); Schelz, W. [Garrad Hassan and Partners Ltd., Bristol (United Kingdom); Lange, B. [Oldenburg Univ., Dept. of Energy and Semiconductor Research EHF, Oldenburg (Germany); Schepers, G.; Hegberg, T. [Netherlands Energy Research Foundation ECN, Solar and Wind Energy Dept., Petten (Netherlands); Magnisson, M. [Uppsala Univ., Dept. of Earth Sciences, Meteorology, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2001-07-01

    A major objective of the ENDOW project is to evaluate the performance of wake models in offshore wind farm environments in order to ascertain the improvements required to enhance the prediction of power output within large offshore wind farms. The strategy for achieving this is to compare the performance of the models in a wide range of conditions which are expected to be encountered during turbine operation offshore. Six models of varying complexity have been evaluated initially against the Vindeby single wake data where it was found that almost all of them overestimate the wake effects and also significant inconsistencies between the model predictions appeared in the near wake and turbulence intensity results. Based on the conclusions of that study, the ENDOW wake modeling groups have already implemented a number of modifications to their original models. In the present paper, new single wake results are presented against experimental data at Vindeby and Bockstigen wind farms. Clearly, some of the model discrepancies previously observed in Vindeby cases have been smoothed and overall the performance is improved. (Author)

  19. Simulation of Wake Vortex Radiometric Detection via Jet Exhaust Proxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Taumi S.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes an analysis of the potential of an airborne hyperspectral imaging IR instrument to infer wake vortices via turbine jet exhaust as a proxy. The goal was to determine the requirements for an imaging spectrometer or radiometer to effectively detect the exhaust plume, and by inference, the location of the wake vortices. The effort examines the gas spectroscopy of the various major constituents of turbine jet exhaust and their contributions to the modeled detectable radiance. Initially, a theoretical analysis of wake vortex proxy detection by thermal radiation was realized in a series of simulations. The first stage used the SLAB plume model to simulate turbine jet exhaust plume characteristics, including exhaust gas transport dynamics and concentrations. The second stage used these plume characteristics as input to the Line By Line Radiative Transfer Model (LBLRTM) to simulate responses from both an imaging IR hyperspectral spectrometer or radiometer. These numerical simulations generated thermal imagery that was compared with previously reported wake vortex temperature data. This research is a continuation of an effort to specify the requirements for an imaging IR spectrometer or radiometer to make wake vortex measurements. Results of the two-stage simulation will be reported, including instrument specifications for wake vortex thermal detection. These results will be compared with previously reported results for IR imaging spectrometer performance.

  20. A quantitative comparison of bird and bat wakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, L Christoffer; Wolf, Marta; Hedenström, Anders

    2010-01-06

    Qualitative comparison of bird and bat wakes has demonstrated significant differences in the structure of the far wake. Birds have been found to have a unified vortex wake of the two wings, while bats have a more complex wake with gradients in the circulation along the wingspan, and with each wing generating its own vortex structure. Here, we compare quantitative measures of the circulation in the far wake of three bird and one bat species. We find that bats have a significantly stronger normalized circulation of the start vortex than birds. We also find differences in how the circulation develops during the wingbeat as demonstrated by the ratio of the circulation of the dominant start vortex and the total circulation of the same sense. Birds show a more prominent change with changing flight speed and a relatively weaker start vortex at minimum power speed than bats. We also find that bats have a higher normalized wake loading based on the start vortex, indicating higher relative induced drag and therefore less efficient lift generation than birds. Our results thus indicate fundamental differences in the aerodynamics of bird and bat flight that will further our understanding of the evolution of vertebrate flight.

  1. Sleep and wake disturbances following traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duclos, C; Dumont, M; Wiseman-Hakes, C; Arbour, C; Mongrain, V; Gaudreault, P-O; Khoury, S; Lavigne, G; Desautels, A; Gosselin, N

    2014-10-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major health concern in industrialised countries. Sleep and wake disturbances are among the most persistent and disabling sequelae after TBI. Yet, despite the widespread complaints of post-TBI sleep and wake disturbances, studies on their etiology, pathophysiology, and treatments remain inconclusive. This narrative review aims to summarise the current state of knowledge regarding the nature of sleep and wake disturbances following TBI, both subjective and objective, spanning all levels of severity and phases post-injury. A second goal is to outline the various causes of post-TBI sleep-wake disturbances. Globally, although sleep-wake complaints are reported in all studies and across all levels of severity, consensus regarding the objective nature of these disturbances is not unanimous and varies widely across studies. In order to optimise recovery in TBI survivors, further studies are required to shed light on the complexity and heterogeneity of post-TBI sleep and wake disturbances, and to fully grasp the best timing and approach for intervention. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Towards a Wind Turbine Wake Reduced-Order Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Nicholas; Viggiano, Bianca; Calaf, Marc; Tutkun, Murat; Cal, Raúl Bayoán

    2017-11-01

    A reduced-order model for a wind turbine wake is sought for prediction and control. Basis functions from the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) represent the spatially coherent turbulence structures in the wake; eigenvalues delineate the turbulence kinetic energy associated with each mode. Back-projecting the POD modes onto the velocity snapshots produces coefficients that express the amplitude of each mode in time. A reduced-order model of the wind turbine wake (wakeROM) is defined through a series of polynomial parameters that quantify mode interaction and the evolution of each mode coefficient. Tikhonov regularization is employed to recalibrate the dynamical system, reducing error in the modeled mode coefficients and adding stability to the system. The wakeROM is periodically reinitialized by relating the incoming turbulent velocity to the POD mode coefficients. A high-level view of the wakeROM provides as a platform to discuss promising research direction, alternate processes that will enhance stability, and portability to control methods. NSF- ECCS-1032647, NSF-CBET-1034581, Research Council of Norway Project Number 231491.

  3. Sleep and wakefulness in the green iguanid lizard (Iguana iguana).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala-Guerrero, F; Mexicano, G

    2008-11-01

    The reptile Iguana iguana exhibits four states of vigilance: active wakefulness (AW), quiet wakefulness (QW), quiet sleep (QS) and active sleep (AS). Cerebral activity decreases in amplitude and frequency when passing from wakefulness to QS. Both parameters show a slight increase during AS. Heart rate is at a maximum during AW (43.8+/-7.9 beats/min), decreases to a minimum in QS (25.3+/-3.2 beats/min) and increases in AS (36.1+/-5.7 beats/min). Tonical and phasical muscular activity is present in wakefulness, decreases or disappears in QS and reappears in AS. Single or conjugate ocular movements are observed during wakefulness, then disappear in QS and abruptly reappear in AS. Although these reptiles are polyphasic, their sleep shows a tendency to concentrate between 20:00 and 8:00 h. Quiet sleep occupies the greater percentage of the total sleep time. Active sleep episodes are of very short duration, showing an average of 21.5+/-4.9 (mean+/-SD). Compensatory increment of sleep following its total deprivation was significant only for QS. Reaction to stimuli decreased significantly when passing from wakefulness to sleep. It is suggested that the lizard I. iguana displays two sleep phases behaviorally and somatovegetatively similar to slow wave sleep and paradoxical sleep in birds and mammals.

  4. Potential load reductions on megawatt turbines exposed to wakes using individual-pitch wake compensator and trailing-edge flaps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markou, Helen; Andersen, Peter Bjørn; Larsen, Gunner Chr.

    2011-01-01

    Wind turbines located in wind farms experience inflow wind conditions that are substantially modified compared with the ambient wind field that applies for stand-alone wind turbines because of upstream emitted wakes. This has implications not only for the power production of a wind farm, but also...... that typically focus on either load or power prediction. As a consequence, the wake affected inflow field generated by the DWM formulation opens for control strategies for the individual turbine. Two different control approaches for load reduction on the individual turbines are implemented in the multi-body aero......-servo-elastic tool HAWC2, developed at Risø-DTU in Denmark, and their potential load reduction capabilities compared: (1) full-blade ‘individual-pitch controllers’ acting as wake compensators and (2) controllers using trailing-edge flaps. Information on the wake inflow conditions, induced by upstream turbines...

  5. Efficacy and safety of weight-based insulin glargine dose titration regimen compared with glucose level- and current dose-based regimens in hospitalized patients with type 2 diabetes: a randomized, controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaowei; Du, Tao; Li, Wangen; Zhang, Tong; Liu, Haiyan; Xiong, Yifeng

    2014-09-01

    Insulin glargine is widely used as basal insulin. However, published dose titration regimens for insulin glargine are complex. This study aimed to compare the efficacy and safety profile of a user-friendly, weight-based insulin glargine dose titration regimen with 2 published regimens. A total of 160 hospitalized patients with hyperglycemia in 3 medical centers were screened. Our inclusion criteria included age 18 to 80 years and being conscious. Exclusion criteria included pregnancy or breast-feeding and hepatic or renal dysfunction. A total of 149 patients were randomly assigned to receive weight-based, glucose level-based, or dose-based insulin glargine dose titration regimen between January 2011 and February 2013. The initial dose of insulin glargine was 0.2 U/kg. In the weight-based regimen (n = 49), the dose was titrated by increments of 0.1 U/kg daily. In the glucose level-based regimen (n = 51), the dose was titrated by 2, 4, 6, or 8 U daily when fasting blood glucose (FBG) was, respectively, between 7.0 and 7.9, 8.0 and 8.9, 9.0 and 9.9, or ≥10 mmol/L. In the current dose-based regimen (n = 49), titration was by daily increments of 20% of the current dose. The target FBG in all groups was ≤7.0 mmol/L. The incidence of hypoglycemia was recorded. One-way ANOVA and χ(2) test were used to compare data between the 3 groups. All but 1 patient who required additional oral antidiabetic medication completed the study. The mean (SD) time to achieve target FBG was 3.2 (1.2) days with the weight-based regimen and 3.7 (1.5) days with the glucose level-based regimen (P = 0.266). These times were both shorter than that achieved with the current dose-based regimen (4.8 [2.8] days; P = 0.0001 and P = 0.005, respectively). The daily doses of insulin glargine at the study end point were 0.43 (0.13) U/kg with the weight-based regimen, 0.50 (0.20) U/kg with the glucose level-based regimen, and 0.47 (0.23) U/kg with the current dose-based regimen (P = 0.184). The incidence

  6. Defining the diversity of phenotypic respecification using multiple cell lines and reprogramming regimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alicea, Bradly; Murthy, Shashanka; Keaton, Sarah A; Cobbett, Peter; Cibelli, Jose B; Suhr, Steven T

    2013-10-01

    To better understand the basis of variation in cellular reprogramming, we performed experiments with two primary objectives: first, to determine the degree of difference, if any, in reprogramming efficiency among cells lines of a similar type after accounting for technical variables, and second, to compare the efficiency of conversion of multiple similar cell lines to two separate reprogramming regimens-induced neurons and induced skeletal muscle. Using two reprogramming regimens, it could be determined whether converted cells are likely derived from a distinct subpopulation that is generally susceptible to reprogramming or are derived from cells with an independent capacity for respecification to a given phenotype. Our results indicated that when technical components of the reprogramming regimen were accounted for, reprogramming efficiency was reproducible within a given primary fibroblast line but varied dramatically between lines. The disparity in reprogramming efficiency between lines was of sufficient magnitude to account for some discrepancies in published results. We also found that the efficiency of conversion to one phenotype was not predictive of reprogramming to the alternate phenotype, suggesting that the capacity for reprogramming does not arise from a specific subpopulation with a generally "weak grip" on cellular identity. Our findings suggest that parallel testing of multiple cell lines from several sources may be needed to accurately assess the efficiency of direct reprogramming procedures, and that testing a larger number of fibroblast lines--even lines with similar origins--is likely the most direct means of improving reprogramming efficiency.

  7. Reasons and Risk Factors for the Initial Regimen Modification in Chinese Treatment-Naive Patients with HIV Infection: A Retrospective Cohort Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianjun Sun

    Full Text Available To investigate the reasons and risk factors for modification of the first combined antiretroviral therapy (cART currently used for HIV infected patients who were treatment naïve in Shanghai China.Making a retrospective observational research on treatment naïve patients with HIV infection who initiated cART during the period of September 1st 2005---December 1st 2013. The demographic and clinical data were collected from the first visit to the time of the first regimen modification or the last visit in December 1st, 2014. The reasons of treatment modification were recorded. Survival analysis of modification was made by Kaplan-Meier curves analysis and log rank test, and a Cox multiple regression model was constructed to identify related factors of modification.A total number of the eligible participants were 3372 and 871(25.8% patients changed their first cART regimen. The median follow up was 22 months [interquartile range (IQR 14-39]. Among patients who modified the original regimen, drug toxicity occurred in 805(92.4% participants and 44(5.1% experienced treatment failure. In multiple regression analysis regimen modification was associated with patients' age more than 40 years old (aHR 1.224, 95%CI 1.051-1.426, P = 0.010, CD4 less than 200(aHR 1.218, 95%CI 1.044-1.421, P = 0.012 and the initial regimen they received. Compared with the regimen of TDF+3TC+EFV, patients with regimen of d4T+3TC+NVP, d4T+3TC+EFV, AZT+3TC+NVP or AZT+3TC+EFV were 10.4, 8.2, 6.4, 2.5 times more likely to modify their initial regimen, respectively.The main reason for the regimen switch was drug toxicity and main risk factors for regimen modification were age older than 40 years, CD4 cell counts less than 200 at baseline and regimen they received. Among the 2NRTI plus 1NNRTI regimens, the co-formulation of d4T+3TC+NVP had the highest risk for modification while the regimen of TDF+3TC+EFV was the most tolerable treatment regimen in first years' follow up.

  8. Aspects of the influence of an oscillating mini-flap upon the near wake of an airfoil NACA 4412

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delnero, J. S.; Marañón Di Leo, J.; Colman, J.; García Sainz, M.; Muñoz, F.; Hérouard, N.; Camocardi, M. E.

    2011-05-01

    A NACA 4412 airfoil was tested, in a boundary layer wind tunnel, with the aim to study the effect of a Gurney mini-flap, as an active and passive flow control device submitted to a turbulent flow field. The main objective was the experimental determination of flow pattern characteristics downstream the airfoil in the near wake. The untwisted wing model used for the experiments had 80cm wingspan and 50cm chord, with airfoil NACA 4412. The mini-flap was located on the lower surface at a distance, from the trailing edge, of 8%c (c airfoil chord). The Reynolds number, based upon the wing chord and the mean free stream velocity was 326,000 and 489,000. The turbulence intensity was 1.8%. The model was located into the wind tunnel between two panels, in order to assure a close approximation to two-dimensional flow over the model. As an active control device a rotating mini-flaps, geared by an electromechanical system (which rotate to a 30°) was constructed. The wake pattern and pressure values near the trailing edge were measured. The results obtained, for this mechanism, show us that the oscillating mini-flap change the wake flow pattern, alleviating the near wake turbulence and enhancing the vortex pair near the trailing edge at the mini-flap level and below that level, magnifying the effect described first by Liebeck [1]. That effect grows with the oscillating frequency. Additionally, the wake alleviation probably affects also the far wake. All of these facts suggest us to continue with the experiments, trying to measure the pressure distribution around the airfoil in all the cases, obtaining the lift and drag characteristics.

  9. Impact of anesthetic regimen on the respiratory pattern, EEG microstructure and sleep in the rat model of cholinergic Parkinson's disease neuropathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazic, K; Petrovic, J; Ciric, J; Kalauzi, A; Saponjic, J

    2015-09-24

    We hypothesized that the impact of distinct anesthetic regimens could be differently expressed during anesthesia and on post-anesthesia sleep in the neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, we followed the impact of ketamine/diazepam and pentobarbital anesthesia in a rat model of the severe Parkinson's disease cholinergic neuropathology on the electroencephalographic (EEG) microstructure and respiratory pattern during anesthesia, and on the post-anesthesia sleep. We performed the experiments on adult, male, spontaneously breathing Wistar rats chronically instrumented for sleep recording. The bilateral pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPT) lesion was done by ibotenic acid microinfusion. Following postoperative recovery, we recorded sleep for 6h, induced anesthesia 24h later using ketamine/diazepam or pentobarbital, and repeated sleep recordings sessions 48h and 6days later. During 20min of each anesthesia we recorded both the EEG and respiratory movements. For sleep and EEG analysis, Fourier analysis was applied on 6-h recordings, and each 10-s epoch was differentiated as a state of wakefulness (Wake), non-rapid eye movement (NREM) or rapid eye movement (REM). Additionally, the group probability density distributions of all EEG frequency band relative amplitudes were calculated for each state, with particular attention during anesthesia. For respiratory pattern analysis we used Monotone Signal Segments Analysis. The PPT lesion was identified through nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) diaphorase histochemistry. Our data show that the ketamine/diazepam anesthetic regimen in the PPT-lesioned rats induces more alterations in the EEG microstructure and respiratory pattern than does the pentobarbital anesthesia. In addition, the equal time required to establish an anesthetized state, and the long-term effect on post-anesthesia sleep in the PPT-lesioned vs. control rats suggest this anesthetic regimen as potentially more beneficial both for anesthesia

  10. Sleep and wakefulness in aircrew before and after transoceanic flights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dement, William C.; Seidel, Wesley F.; Cohen, Suzanne A.; Carskadon, Mary A.; Bliwise, Nancy G.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of rapid transmeridian flight on sleep and wakefulness were studied in aircrew members before and after flying one of two routes: San Francisco (SFO) to London (LHR) or SFO to Tokyo. After an adaptation night, sleep and daytime sleepiness were measured objectively in SFO and during the first layover (L/O) of the target trip, using the 'core measures' described by Graeber et al. (1986) and respiration parameters, and the Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT) described by Carscadon (1982); postsleep questionnaires provided subjective assessments. It was found that baseline sleep is not an ideal basis for subsequent comparison; nevertheless, there was an indication that L/O sleep periods tended to provide either less total sleep or less efficient sleep. During baseline, there was significant midday sleepiness tendency as measured by the MSLT; this tendency occurred at almost the same time on the second L/O day in LHR. Recommendations are offered for the adjustment of flight times and for scheduling times of permitted napping as accommodations for the periods of sleepiness tendency.

  11. Tower wake/blade interaction noise of a wind turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiwaki, Hideo; Takeda, Katsumi

    1987-10-01

    A scale model of a 1.5m dia. two-bladed windturbine was used in an anechoic chamber that provided a free-stream velocity of 8m/s. The blades used were a 1.5/8 scale model of a test machine for a local energy utilization project promoted by the Science and Technology Agency. The height of the tower from the ground level was 1.8m. The acoustic measurements were made in a circle of 1.6m downstream from the machine at the height of the windmill centerline. The noise level of the on-axis spectra was about 15dB larger than that of the off-axis. This is a result of the dipole nature of the acoustic impulse. The Wortmann airfoil (FX 77-W series) was employed for the blade profiles and the Reynolds number was 10(5), based on the tip chord length. The experiment revealed that the sound intensity at each harmonic was not proportional to the axial and radial extents of the wake. The elliptic slender configuration was the quietest, while the square configuration was the loudest. From a practical point of view, it is suggested that the circular section is most suitable for the tower leg.

  12. Accommodating adolescent sleep-wake patterns: the effects of shifting the timing of sleep on training effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Nita Lewis; Tvaryanas, Anthony P; Shattuck, Lawrence G

    2012-08-01

    This study evaluated the effect of accommodating adolescent sleep-wake patterns by altering the timing of the major sleep period of US Army recruits. The quasi-experimental study compared recruits assigned to one of two training companies: one with a customary sleep regimen (20:30 to 04:30) while the other employed a phase-delayed sleep regimen (23:00 to 07:00), the latter aligning better with biologically driven sleep-wake patterns of adolescents. The study was conducted during Basic Combat Training (BCT) at Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri. TRAINEES: The study included 392 trainees: 209 received the intervention, while 183 composed the Comparison group. Demographic and psychophysiological measures were collected on all trainees. Weekly assessments of subjective fatigue and mood, periodic physical fitness, marksmanship scores, and attrition rates from BCT were studied. Actigraphy was collected on approximately 24% of trainees. Based on actigraphy, trainees on the phase-delayed sleep schedule obtained 31 m more sleep/night than trainees on the customary sleep schedule. The Intervention group reported less total mood disturbance relative to baseline. Improvements in marksmanship correlated positively with average nightly sleep during the preceding week when basic marksmanship skills were taught. No differences were seen in physical fitness or attrition rates. In contrast to the Intervention group, the Comparison group was 2.3 times more likely to experience occupationally significant fatigue and 5.5 times more likely to report poor sleep quality. Accommodating adolescent sleep patterns significantly improves mental health and performance in the training environment.

  13. TMS-induced cortical potentiation during wakefulness locally increases slow wave activity during sleep.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reto Huber

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Sleep slow wave activity (SWA is thought to reflect sleep need, increasing in proportion to the length of prior wakefulness and decreasing during sleep. However, the process responsible for SWA regulation is not known. We showed recently that SWA increases locally after a learning task involving a circumscribed brain region, suggesting that SWA may reflect plastic changes triggered by learning.To test this hypothesis directly, we used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS in conjunction with high-density EEG in humans. We show that 5-Hz TMS applied to motor cortex induces a localized potentiation of TMS-evoked cortical EEG responses. We then show that, in the sleep episode following 5-Hz TMS, SWA increases markedly (+39.1+/-17.4%, p<0.01, n = 10. Electrode coregistration with magnetic resonance images localized the increase in SWA to the same premotor site as the maximum TMS-induced potentiation during wakefulness. Moreover, the magnitude of potentiation during wakefulness predicts the local increase in SWA during sleep.These results provide direct evidence for a link between plastic changes and the local regulation of sleep need.

  14. Effects of chronic sleep fragmentation on wake-active neurons and the hypercapnic arousal response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanpeng; Panossian, Lori A; Zhang, Jing; Zhu, Yan; Zhan, Guanxia; Chou, Yu-Ting; Fenik, Polina; Bhatnagar, Seema; Piel, David A; Beck, Sheryl G; Veasey, Sigrid

    2014-01-01

    Delayed hypercapnic arousals may occur in obstructive sleep apnea. The impaired arousal response is expected to promote more pronounced oxyhemoglobin desaturations. We hypothesized that long-term sleep fragmentation (SF) results in injury to or dysfunction of wake-active neurons that manifests, in part, as a delayed hypercapnic arousal response. Adult male mice were implanted for behavioral state recordings and randomly assigned to 4 weeks of either orbital platform SF (SF4wk, 30 events/h) or control conditions (Ct4wk) prior to behavioral, histological, and locus coeruleus (LC) whole cell electrophysiological evaluations. SF was successfully achieved across the 4 week study, as evidenced by a persistently increased arousal index, P sleep bouts, P sleep/wake times and plasma corticosterone levels were unaffected. A multiple sleep latency test performed at the onset of the dark period showed a reduced latency to sleep in SF4wk mice (P recovery (101 ± 4 sec, P sleep fragmentation (SF4wk) impairs arousal responses to hypercapnia, reduces wake neuron projections and locus coeruleus neuronal excitability, supporting the concepts that some effects of sleep fragmentation may contribute to impaired arousal responses in sleep apnea, which may not reverse immediately with therapy.

  15. Navier-Stokes Simulation of UH-60A Rotor/Wake Interaction Using Adaptive Mesh Refinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaderjian, Neal M.

    2017-01-01

    High-resolution simulations of rotor/vortex-wake interaction for a UH60-A rotor under BVI and dynamic stallconditions were carried out with the OVERFLOW Navier-Stokes code.a. The normal force and pitching moment variation with azimuth angle were in good overall agreementwith flight-test data, similar to other CFD results reported in the literature.b. The wake-grid resolution did not have a significant effect on the rotor-blade airloads. This surprisingresult indicates that a wake grid spacing of (Delta)S=10% ctip is sufficient for engineering airloads predictionfor hover and forward flight. This assumes high-resolution body grids, high-order spatial accuracy, anda hybrid RANS/DDES turbulence model.c. Three-dimensional dynamic stall was found to occur due the presence of blade-tip vortices passing overa rotor blade on the retreating side. This changed the local airfoil angle of attack, causing stall, unlikethe 2D perspective of pure pitch oscillation of the local airfoil section.

  16. A comparative analysis on the shed vortices from the wake of finned, foam-wrapped cylinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khashehchi, Morteza; Ashtiani Abdi, Iman; Hooman, Kamel

    2017-08-01

    The wake characteristics behind a finned and a foam-wrapped circular cylinder has been compared in a study (Khashehchi et al 2014 Exp. Therm. Fluid Sci. 52 328-38) done by the Authors. In this paper, the shed vortices from the wake of the same cylinders have been studied. Shedding in a bluff body has an important effect on increasing the pressure drop downstream of the object. Here, we have used particle image velocimetry to investigate the detached vortices from the wake behind a foam-wrapped and a finned cylinder. The standard case of cross-flow over a bare cylinder, i.e. no surface extension, has also been tested as a benchmark. The experiments have been performed for Reynolds numbers 2000 based on the mean air velocity and the cylinder’s outer diameter. To identify the features of each aforementioned case, linear stochastic estimation has been applied to the velocity fields. Results show that unlike the fin, adding foam to the cylinder surface increases the size of detached vortices and amplifies the core strength. Moreover, foam-wrapped cylinder in contrast to the finned one produces strong three-dimensionality. Interestingly, finned cylinder’s results show less three-dimensionality compared to the bare cylinder.

  17. Performance and wake measurements for a cross-flow axis lift-driven turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachant, Peter; Wosnik, Martin

    2012-11-01

    A 2.67 m wide, 3.67 m deep tow tank was used to measure performance and wake flow from a cross-flow axis (CFA) lift-driven turbine. A custom turbine test bed was designed that allows precise control of turbine tip speed ratio via servomotor, as well as measurements of power and overall drag on the turbine. Blade forces are measured with high spatio-temporal resolution via piezoelectric film sensors. The flow-field in the near wake is measured via high frame rate PIV and acoustic Doppler velocimetry. The size of the turbine model and a newly renovated tow tank mechanism allowed the blade chord Reynolds number to be roughly an order of magnitude higher than in previous studies. The overall goal of this study is to accurately measure fluid-blade interactions to observe effects of design parameter changes to performance and wake structure; also to help validate (or invalidate) numerical models. The higher Reynolds numbers of these results, especially those under dynamic stall conditions, make them more applicable to full scale commercial installations.

  18. Utilization and evaluation of noncore chemotherapy regimens within an academic medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jared, Jason R; Mably, Mary S; Makielski, Rory; Reed, Michael P; Fallon, Michael J; Liu, Glenn; Mulkerin, Daniel; Callander, Natalie S

    2017-10-01

    Uniformity of evidence-based chemotherapy prescribing using approved, standard, or "core" regimens provides systems-based safety. Noncore chemotherapy regimens are non-standard-of-care regimens requested by physicians on a patient-by-patient basis. Chemotherapy Council, a Pharmacy & Therapeutics subcommittee, assesses all requests and determines approval status based upon submitted evidence and patient-specific factors. This study's purpose is to describe noncore chemotherapy regimens utilization, efficacy, and clinical outcomes in patients receiving noncore chemotherapy regimens. This retrospective chart review includes a two-stage utilization and outcomes evaluation of patients receiving noncore chemotherapy regimens. Stage I, a demographics and utilization assessment of patients receiving noncore chemotherapy regimens, has data collection including patient age, sex, performance score, malignancy, and noncore chemotherapy regimen use justification. Stage II assesses noncore chemotherapy regimen-related, patient-specific outcomes of breast cancer noncore chemotherapy regimen patients. Breast cancer patients were evaluated on regimen and clinical outcomes including disease stage, regimen duration, discontinuation reason, subsequent chemotherapy, survival, and time from noncore chemotherapy regimen until death. Within stage I, 307 patient-specific noncore chemotherapy regimen requests were submitted. The most commonly submitted rationale was modification of a core regimen (33%), followed by patient-specific factors (29%) and salvage therapy (22%). For stage II, 29 breast cancer patients received a noncore chemotherapy regimen and most (54%) received a modified core regimen. The vast majority of noncore chemotherapy regimen discontinuation was due to either regimen completion (42%) or disease progression (42%). Nonelective hospitalizations (35%) and mortality (30%) were found during the median 13.3 months of follow up. Noncore chemotherapy regimen use provides

  19. One-week therapy for Helicobacter pylori. A randomized trial of two treatment regimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheiman, J M; Chey, W D; Behler, E M; Crause, I; Elta, G H

    1996-10-01

    In clinical practice, eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection may be difficult due to medication side effects and the need for 2 weeks of therapy. Because therapies of shorter duration may improve patient compliance and reduce treatment side effects, we compared the efficacy and tolerability of two anti-H. pylori treatments of 1 week's duration. Patients with H. pylori infection were randomized to treatment with either (a) short-course triple therapy, composed-of bismuth subsalicylate (Pepto-Bismol, Procter & Gamble, Cincinnati, OH, U.S.A.) two tablets four times daily, amoxicillin 1 g (two 500-mg tablets) twice daily, and metronidazole 500 mg four times daily on days 5-7 or (b) omeprazole 40 mg twice a day with amoxicillin 1 g twice a day for 1 week. At least 4 weeks posttreatment, efficacy was evaluated with either histological evaluation of antral biopsies for H. pylori or 14C urea breath testing. Patients who failed initial therapy were allowed to cross over to the alternative treatment regimen after a minimum "wash-out" period of 5 weeks. Patients completed a diary during therapy to monitor both compliance and side effects. Thirty-four patients completed the study, 10 receiving both treatment regimens. Treatment with the shortcourse triple therapy eradicated H. pylori in 78.3% of treatments compared with 38% with the high-dose omeprazole/ amoxicillin combination (p < 0.05). Patients were highly compliant with both treatments, and mild side effects, such as transient loose stools or abdominal pain, were common in both groups. This is the first report from North America confirming the success of the short-course triple therapy for the eradication of H. pylori. The high-dose omeprazole/ amoxicillin regimen's eradication rate was markedly inferior to that achieved by the short-course triple therapy regimen and should not be used. Comparative studies of the short-course triple therapy regimen with other 7-day anti-H. pylori treatment regimen therapies are

  20. Characteristics of HIV antiretroviral regimen and treatment adherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Lúcia da Silveira

    Full Text Available The relationship between characteristics of HIV antiretroviral regimens and treatment adherence was studied in adolescent and adult patients who underwent antiretroviral therapy from January 1998 to September 2000, at the Service for Specialized Assistance in Pelotas. The patients were interviewed on two occasions, and the use of antiretrovirals during the previous 48 hours was investigated by a self-report. Adherence was defined as use of 95% or more of the prescribed medication. Social-demographic variables were collected through direct questionnaires. The antiretroviral regimen and clinical data were copied from the patients' records. Associations between the independent variables and adherence were analyzed by means of logistic regression. The multivariate analysis included characteristics of the antiretroviral regimens, social-demographic variables, as well as perception of negative effects, negative physiological states, and adverse effects of the treatment. Among the 224 selected patients, 194 participated in our study. Their ages varied from 17 to 67 years; most patients were men, with few years of schooling and a low family income. Only 49% adhered to the treatment. Adherence to treatment regimens was reduced when more daily doses were indicated: three to four doses (odds ratio of adherence to treatment (OR=0.47, 95% confidence interval (CI 0.22-1.01 and five to six (OR=0.24, 95% CI 0.09-0.62; two or more doses taken in a fasting state (OR=0.59, 95% CI 0.11-0.68, and for patients who reported adverse effects to the treatment (OR=0.39, 95% CI 0.19-0.77. Most of the regimens with more than two daily doses of medication included at least one dose apart from mealtimes. The results suggest that, if possible, regimens with a reduced number of doses should be chosen, with no compulsory fasting, and with few adverse effects. Strategies to minimize these effects should be discussed with the patients.

  1. Wake field monitors in a multi purpose X Band accelerating structure

    CERN Document Server

    Dehler, M; Beutner, B; de Michele, G

    2013-01-01

    used to measure the alignment (offset and tilt) between structure and beam. One structure has recently been installed in the SwissFEL Injector Test facility (SITF) at PSI. The WFM front end electronics will be developed within the EuCard2 framework, so for the measurements described in this paper we used the raw WFM signals. We compare these measurements to the theoretical results obtained via an equivalent circuit model used in the design and numerical calculations. The beam tests show that by minimizing the WFM signals, the emittance dilution given by the transverse wakes, crucial because of the small aperture of the structure, is minimized as well.

  2. Sleep/wake estimation using only anterior tibialis electromyography data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwang SuHwan

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In sleep efficiency monitoring system, actigraphy is the simplest and most commonly used device. However, low specificity to wakefulness of actigraphy was revealed in previous studies. In this study, we assumed that sleep/wake estimation using actigraphy and electromyography (EMG signals would show different patterns. Furthermore, each EMG pattern in two states (sleep, wake during sleep was analysed. Finally, we proposed two types of method for the estimation of sleep/wake patterns using only EMG signals from anterior tibialis muscles and the results were compared with PSG data. Methods Seven healthy subjects and five patients (2 obstructive sleep apnea, 3 periodic limb movement disorder participated in this study. Night time polysomnography (PSG recordings were conducted, and electrooculogram, EMG, electroencephalogram, electrocardiogram, and respiration data were collected. Time domain analysis and frequency domain analysis were applied to estimate the sleep/wake patterns. Each method was based on changes in amplitude or spectrum (total power of anterior tibialis electromyography signals during the transition from the sleep state to the wake state. To obtain the results, leave-one-out-cross-validation technique was adopted. Results Total sleep time of the each group was about 8 hours. For healthy subjects, the mean epoch-by-epoch results between time domain analysis and PSG data were 99%, 71%, 80% and 0.64 (sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and kappa value, respectively. For frequency domain analysis, the corresponding values were 99%, 73%, 81% and 0.67, respectively. Absolute and relative differences between sleep efficiency index from PSG and our methods were 0.8 and 0.8% (for frequency domain analysis. In patients with sleep-related disorder, our proposed methods revealed the substantial agreement (kappa > 0.61 for OSA patients and moderate or fair agreement for PLMD patients. Conclusions The results of our proposed

  3. Treatment burden, clinical outcomes, and comorbidities in COPD: an examination of the utility of medication regimen complexity index in COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negewo, Netsanet A; Gibson, Peter G; Wark, Peter Ab; Simpson, Jodie L; McDonald, Vanessa M

    2017-01-01

    COPD patients are often prescribed multiple medications for their respiratory disease and comorbidities. This can lead to complex medication regimens resulting in poor adherence, medication errors, and drug-drug interactions. The relationship between clinical outcomes and medication burden beyond medication count in COPD is largely unknown. The aim of this study was to explore the relationships of medication burden in COPD with clinical outcomes, comorbidities, and multidimensional indices. In a cross-sectional study, COPD patients (n=222) were assessed for demographic information, comorbidities, medication use, and clinical outcomes. Complexity of medication regimens was quantified using the validated medication regimen complexity index (MRCI). Participants (58.6% males) had a mean (SD) age of 69.1 (8.3) years with a postbronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 second % predicted of 56.5 (20.4) and a median of five comorbidities. The median ( q 1, q 3) total MRCI score was 24 (18.5, 31). COPD-specific medication regimens were more complex than those of non-COPD medications (median MRCI: 14.5 versus 9, respectively; P Index and COPD-specific comorbidity test showed the highest degree of correlation with total MRCI score ( ρ =0.289 and ρ =0.326; P <0.0001, respectively). In COPD patients, complex medication regimens are associated with disease severity and specific class of comorbidities.

  4. COMPUTATIONAL STUDY OF AERODYNAMIC CHARACTERISTICS OF SINGLE-ROTOR HELICOPTER TAIL ROTOR UNDER THE INFLUENCE OF VORTICAL WAKE OF MAIN ROTOR AT THE HOVER WITH CROSSWIND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available For single-rotor helicopters there are special flight modes, when tail rotor (TR is under significant inductive influ- ence of vortical wake of main rotor (MR. Inductive influence of vortical wake of MR can provoke essential changes in flowing of TR and its aerodynamic characteristics comparing to isolated rotor. In this case increase of tail rotor pitch, nec- essary for helicopter controlling, is possible.The article contains computational modelling of TR work with vortical wake of MR at the example of MIL Mi-171 helicopter. The modelling has been made on the base of non-linear blade (free wake vortical model of rotor, pro- duced at Helicopter Design Department of MAI.Helicopter hovering modes with crosswind of various intensity Vz was considered. Thrust-time relationship forisolated TR and TR with vortical wake of MR for equal flight modes was obtained. Flow around the rotors was analyzed, its vortical wake was considered.The results make it possible to clarify the peculiarities of TR work on considered modes and MR influence on its work. It was found out that vortical wake of MR has a more significant impact on TR work with crosswind on the right, when TR falls into vortex ring state mode. Inductive influence of vortical wake of MR leads to vortexring state mode for TR on lower speeds (Vz :: 5 m/s than in case of isolated work of TR (Vz :: 12,5 m/s. In that case,the required tail rotor pitch has increased by 13% for Vz = 5 m/s. The results of modelling and flight tests led to good agreement.

  5. Clinical profile & complications of neurotoxic snake bite & comparison of two regimens of polyvalent anti-snake venom in its treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna Sarin

    2017-01-01

    Interpretation & conclusions: In this preliminary study, it was found that the national ASV protocol was as effective as the conventional regimen for neurotoxic snake bites. However, the findings need to be tested in a larger randomized controlled trial for definitive conclusions.

  6. Evolution of drug resistance in HIV infected patients remaining on a virologically failing cART regimen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cozzi-Lepri, A; Phillips, AN; Ruiz, L

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the extent of drug resistance accumulation in patients kept on a virologically failing regimen and its determinants in the clinical setting. DESIGN: The study focused on 110 patients of EuroSIDA on an unchanged regimen who had two genotypic tests performed at two time points.......08 [95% confidence interval (CI), -2.13 to -0.03; P = 0.04] in those with GSS_f-t0 of 0.5-1.5 and -1.24 (95% CI, -2.44 to -0.04; P = 0.04) in those with GSS_f-t0 >or= 2. CONCLUSIONS: In patients kept on the same virologically failing cART regimen for a median of 6 months, there was considerable...

  7. The efficacy of sublingual immunotherapy for respiratory allergy is not affected by different dosage regimens in the induction phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambugaro, R; Puccinelli, P; Burastero, S E; Di Rienzo, V

    2003-01-01

    Sublingual administration of allergens is a safe and effective alternative to subcutaneous immunotherapy in patients with respiratory allergies. A drawback to this therapeutic approach is the relatively long and complex management of the induction phase. To determine whether different induction regimens affect the outcome of sublingual immunotherapy. Adult and pediatric patients with allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and/or asthma were included in the study. Ten subjects served as controls and received symptomatic treatments. Forty-three subjects were allocated to sublingual immunotherapy, with three different induction protocols (8-, 15- and 20-day, respectively). Symptom and medication scores, skin test results and (in asthmatic patients) FEV1 values were monitored for two years. Adverse effects were recorded. All induction regimens produced a significant improvement in symptom and medication usage (p protocol is safe and effective. Our results encourage the usage of shorter induction regimens, which produce better compliance with this therapy.

  8. Wake investigations at onshore projects - a comparison of measured to modelled data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comstock, Kim; Spalding, Taurin; VanLuvanee, David [DNV Canada (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    In recent years, North American wind projects have shown very poor performance. It was observed that wake losses turned out to be higher than expected. The objective of this study is to improve industry understanding of wake effects in onshore wind farms. Wake loss is the reduction in power of a downwind turbine due to the presence of one or more turbines upwind. Some wake models are discussed, such as the single turbine wake model, and combinations of methods. The inputs for these models typically include elements such as turbine layout, intensity, power, and thrust curves. A project is studied using the Windfarm software package and the results are given. A bar chart represents the results in wake loss percentages for measured versus modeled wakes. Data from reduced land-based projects are useful for quantifying wake effects despite certain complexities introduced by topography. It can be concluded that wake models are subject to error and are not performing well.

  9. Longitudinal wake of a bunch of suddenly accelerated electrons within the radiation formation zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Bosch

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The longitudinal wake is considered for a bunch of electrons that are suddenly accelerated to an ultrarelativistic velocity. This wake describes the wake of forward transition radiation, and it approximates the edge-radiation wake of a bunch exiting a bending magnet. The wake is large within the radiation formation zone, where it provides resistive impedance. A comparison with the computed wake downstream of a bending magnet yields good agreement, indicating that our wake expressions may be used to approximate the wake without numerical computation. For schemes in which a bunch produced by laser-plasma acceleration exits the plasma and then drives a free electron laser (FEL, the transition-radiation wake causes energy losses of many MeV that may affect the FEL process.

  10. Doppler lidar investigation of wind turbine wake characteristics and atmospheric turbulence under different surface roughness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Xiaochun; Wu, Songhua; Liu, Bingyi

    2017-06-12

    Four field experiments based on Pulsed Coherent Doppler Lidar with different surface roughness have been carried out in 2013-2015 to study the turbulent wind field in the vicinity of operating wind turbine in the onshore and offshore wind parks. The turbulence characteristics in ambient atmosphere and wake area was analyzed using transverse structure function based on Plane Position Indicator scanning mode. An automatic wake processing procedure was developed to determine the wake velocity deficit by considering the effect of ambient velocity disturbance and wake meandering with the mean wind direction. It is found that the turbine wake obviously enhances the atmospheric turbulence mixing, and the difference in the correlation of turbulence parameters under different surface roughness is significant. The dependence of wake parameters including the wake velocity deficit and wake length on wind velocity and turbulence intensity are analyzed and compared with other studies, which validates the empirical model and simulation of a turbine wake for various atmosphere conditions.

  11. Optimization of decision support tool using medication regimens to assess rehospitalization risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, C H; Dierich, M; Adam, T; Westra, B L

    2014-01-01

    Unnecessary hospital readmissions are costly for the U.S. health care system. An automated algorithm was developed to target this problem and proven to predict elderly patients at greater risk of rehospitalization based on their medication regimens. Improve the algorithm for predicting elderly patients' risks for readmission by optimizing the sensitivity of its medication criteria. Outcome and Assessment Information Set (OASIS) and medication data were reused from a study that defined and tested an algorithm for assessing rehospitalization risks of 911 patients from 15 Medicare-certified home health care agencies. Odds Ratio analyses, literature reviews and clinical judgments were used to adjust the scoring of patients' High Risk Medication Regimens (HRMRs). Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analysis evaluated whether these adjustments improved the predictive strength of the algorithm's components. HRMR scores are composed of polypharmacy (number of drugs), potentially inappropriate medications (PIM) (drugs risky to the elderly), and Medication Regimen Complexity Index (MRCI) (complex dose forms, dose frequency, instructions or administration). Strongest ROC results for the HRMR components were Areas Under the Curve (AUC) of .68 for polypharmacy when excluding supplements; and .60 for PIM and .69 for MRCI using the original HRMR criteria. The "cut point" identifying MRCI scores as indicative of medication-related readmission risk was increased from 20 to 33. The automated algorithm can predict elderly patients at risk of hospital readmissions and its underlying criteria is improved by a modification to its polypharmacy definition and MRCI cut point.

  12. Helicobacter pylori: Effect of coexisting diseases and update on treatment regimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shen-Shong; Hu, Hsiao-Yun

    2015-11-06

    The presence of concomitant diseases is an independent predictive factor for non-Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) peptic ulcers. Patients contracting concomitant diseases have an increased risk of developing ulcer disease through pathogenic mechanisms distinct from those of H. pylori infections. Factors other than H. pylori seem critical in peptic ulcer recurrence in end stage renal disease (ESRD) and cirrhotic patients. However, early H. pylori eradication is associated with a reduced risk of recurrent complicated peptic ulcers in patients with ESRD and liver cirrhosis. Resistances to triple therapy are currently detected using culture-based and molecular methods. Culture susceptibility testing before first- or second-line therapy is unadvisable. Using highly effective empiric first-line and rescue regimens can yield acceptable results. Sequential therapy has been included in a recent consensus report as a valid first-line option for eradicating H. pylori in geographic regions with high clarithromycin resistance. Two novel eradication regimens, namely concomitant and hybrid therapy, have proven more effective in patients with dual- (clarithromycin- and metronidazole-) resistant H. pylori strains. We aim to review the prevalence of and eradication therapy for H. pylori infection in patients with ESRD and cirrhosis. Moreover, we summarized the updated H. pylori eradication regimens.

  13. Helicobacter pylori: Effect of coexisting diseases and update on treatment regimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shen-Shong; Hu, Hsiao-Yun

    2015-01-01

    The presence of concomitant diseases is an independent predictive factor for non-Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) peptic ulcers. Patients contracting concomitant diseases have an increased risk of developing ulcer disease through pathogenic mechanisms distinct from those of H. pylori infections. Factors other than H. pylori seem critical in peptic ulcer recurrence in end stage renal disease (ESRD) and cirrhotic patients. However, early H. pylori eradication is associated with a reduced risk of recurrent complicated peptic ulcers in patients with ESRD and liver cirrhosis. Resistances to triple therapy are currently detected using culture-based and molecular methods. Culture susceptibility testing before first- or second-line therapy is unadvisable. Using highly effective empiric first-line and rescue regimens can yield acceptable results. Sequential therapy has been included in a recent consensus report as a valid first-line option for eradicating H. pylori in geographic regions with high clarithromycin resistance. Two novel eradication regimens, namely concomitant and hybrid therapy, have proven more effective in patients with dual- (clarithromycin- and metronidazole-) resistant H. pylori strains. We aim to review the prevalence of and eradication therapy for H. pylori infection in patients with ESRD and cirrhosis. Moreover, we summarized the updated H. pylori eradication regimens. PMID:26558147

  14. [Effectiveness of short course intermittent regimen on different categories of retreated patients with pulmonary tuberculosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X; Dai, Y; Cao, J

    2001-08-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of short course intermittent regimen in the different categories of retreated patients with tuberculosis. 303 retreated patients with smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis were recruited for the study. They were divided into three groups based on the history of tuberculosis and anti-tuberculosis treatment. 87 were in relapse group, 21 in failure group (failure after the initial treatment) and 195 in other retreatment group. Sputum Mycobacterium tuberculosis culture and drug susceptibility test were conducted before treatment. The same retreatment regimen (2-3H3R3Z3E3S3/5-6H3R3E3) was employed for all three groups of patients. Drug resistance and the outcomes of three groups of retreatment tuberculosis were analysed. The drug resistance rates and efficacy of retreatment showed no statistical difference among three groups (P > 0.05). In other retreatment group, the drug resistant rate in patients who received anti-TB drugs for more than 12 months (79.5%) was significantly higher than those for less than 12 months (59.8%, 0.01 short course intermittent regimen.

  15. Exploration of Terminal Procedures Enabled by NASA Wake VAS Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunsford, Clark R.; Smith, Arthur P., III; Cooper, Wayne W., Jr.; Mundra, Anand D.; Gross, Amy E.; Audenaerd, Laurence F.; Killian, Bruce E.

    2004-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) tasked The MITRE Corporation's Center for Advanced Aviation System Development (CAASD) to investigate potential air traffic control (ATC) procedures that could benefit from technology used or developed in NASA's Wake Vortex Advisory System (WakeVAS). The task also required developing an estimate of the potential benefits of the candidate procedures. The main thrust of the investigation was to evaluate opportunities for improved capacity and efficiency in airport arrival and departure operations. Other procedures that would provide safety enhancements were also considered. The purpose of this investigation was to provide input to the WakeVAS program office regarding the most promising areas of development for the program. A two-fold perspective was desired: First, identification of benefits from possible procedures enabled by both incremental components and the mature state of WakeVAS technology; second identification of procedures that could be expected to evolve from the current Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) procedures. The evolution of procedures should provide meaningful increments of benefit and a low risk implementation of the WakeVAS technologies.

  16. CFD three dimensional wake analysis in complex terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellani, F.; Astolfi, D.; Terzi, L.

    2017-11-01

    Even if wind energy technology is nowadays fully developed, the use of wind energy in very complex terrain is still challenging. In particular, it is challenging to characterize the combination effects of wind ow over complex terrain and wake interactions between nearby turbines and this has a practical relevance too, for the perspective of mitigating anomalous vibrations and loads as well improving the farm efficiency. In this work, a very complex terrain site has been analyzed through a Reynolds-averaged CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) numerical wind field model; in the simulation the inuence of wakes has been included through the Actuator Disk (AD) approach. In particular, the upstream turbine of a cluster of 4 wind turbines having 2.3 MW of rated power is studied. The objective of this study is investigating the full three-dimensional wind field and the impact of three-dimensionality on the evolution of the waked area between nearby turbines. A post-processing method of the output of the CFD simulation is developed and this allows to estimate the wake lateral deviation and the wake width. The reliability of the numerical approach is inspired by and crosschecked through the analysis of the operational SCADA (Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition) data of the cluster of interest.

  17. Optogenetic deconstruction of sleep-wake circuitry in the brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine Adamantidis

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available How does the brain regulate the sleep-wake cycle? What are the temporal codes of sleep- and wake-promoting neural circuits? How do these circuits interact with each other across the light/dark cycle? Over the past few decades, many studies from a variety of disciplines have made substantial progress in answering these fundamental questions. For example, neurobiologists have identified multiple, redundant wake-promoting circuits in the brainstem, hypothalamus, and basal forebrain. Sleep-promoting circuits have been found in the preoptic area and hypothalamus. One of the greatest challenges in recent years has been to selectively record and manipulate these sleep-wake centers in vivo with high spatial and temporal resolution. Recent developments in microbial opsin-based neuromodulation tools, collectively referred to as “optogenetics,” have provided a novel method to demonstrate causal links between neural activity and specific behaviors. Here, we propose to use optogenetics as a fundamental tool to probe the necessity, sufficiency, and connectivity of defined neural circuits in the regulation of sleep and wakefulness.

  18. Wind Turbine Wake Characterization from Temporally Disjunct 3-D Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Doubrawa

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Scanning LiDARs can be used to obtain three-dimensional wind measurements in and beyond the atmospheric surface layer. In this work, metrics characterizing wind turbine wakes are derived from LiDAR observations and from large-eddy simulation (LES data, which are used to recreate the LiDAR scanning geometry. The metrics are calculated for two-dimensional planes in the vertical and cross-stream directions at discrete distances downstream of a turbine under single-wake conditions. The simulation data are used to estimate the uncertainty when mean wake characteristics are quantified from scanning LiDAR measurements, which are temporally disjunct due to the time that the instrument takes to probe a large volume of air. Based on LES output, we determine that wind speeds sampled with the synthetic LiDAR are within 10% of the actual mean values and that the disjunct nature of the scan does not compromise the spatial variation of wind speeds within the planes. We propose scanning geometry density and coverage indices, which quantify the spatial distribution of the sampled points in the area of interest and are valuable to design LiDAR measurement campaigns for wake characterization. We find that scanning geometry coverage is important for estimates of the wake center, orientation and length scales, while density is more important when seeking to characterize the velocity deficit distribution.

  19. Circadian and Wakefulness-Sleep Modulation of Cognition in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth P Wright

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive and affective processes vary over the course of the 24 hour day. Time of day dependent changes in human cognition are modulated by an internal circadian timekeeping system with a near-24-hour period. The human circadian timekeeping system interacts with sleep-wakefulness regulatory processes to modulate brain arousal, neurocognitive and affective function. Brain arousal is regulated by ascending brain stem, basal forebrain and hypothalamic arousal systems and inhibition or disruption of these systems reduces brain arousal, impairs cognition, and promotes sleep. The internal circadian timekeeping system modulates cognition and affective function by projections from the master circadian clock, located in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei, to arousal and sleep systems and via clock gene oscillations in brain tissues. Understanding the basic principles of circadian and wakefulness-sleep physiology can help to recognize how the circadian system modulates human cognition and influences learning, memory and emotion. Developmental changes in sleep and circadian processes and circadian misalignment in circadian rhythm sleep disorders have important implications for learning, memory and emotion. Overall, when wakefulness occurs at appropriate internal biological times, circadian clockwork benefits human cognitive and emotion function throughout the lifespan. Yet, when wakefulness occurs at inappropriate biological times because of environmental pressures (e.g., early school start times, long work hours that include work at night, shift work, jet lag or because of circadian rhythm sleep disorders, the resulting misalignment between circadian and wakefulness-sleep physiology leads to impaired cognitive performance, learning, emotion, and safety.

  20. Three-dimensional structure of wind turbine wakes as measured by scanning lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodini, Nicola; Zardi, Dino; Lundquist, Julie K.

    2017-08-01

    The lower wind speeds and increased turbulence that are characteristic of turbine wakes have considerable consequences on large wind farms: turbines located downwind generate less power and experience increased turbulent loads. The structures of wakes and their downwind impacts are sensitive to wind speed and atmospheric variability. Wake characterization can provide important insights for turbine layout optimization in view of decreasing the cost of wind energy. The CWEX-13 field campaign, which took place between June and September 2013 in a wind farm in Iowa, was designed to explore the interaction of multiple wakes in a range of atmospheric stability conditions. Based on lidar wind measurements, we extend, present, and apply a quantitative algorithm to assess wake parameters such as the velocity deficits, the size of the wake boundaries, and the location of the wake centerlines. We focus on wakes from a row of four turbines at the leading edge of the wind farm to explore variations between wakes from the edge of the row (outer wakes) and those from turbines in the center of the row (inner wakes). Using multiple horizontal scans at different elevations, a three-dimensional structure of wakes from the row of turbines can be created. Wakes erode very quickly during unstable conditions and can in fact be detected primarily in stable conditions in the conditions measured here. During stable conditions, important differences emerge between the wakes of inner turbines and the wakes of outer turbines. Further, the strong wind veer associated with stable conditions results in a stretching of the wake structures, and this stretching manifests differently for inner and outer wakes. These insights can be incorporated into low-order wake models for wind farm layout optimization or for wind power forecasting.

  1. The mortality and response rate after FLANG regimen in patients with refractory/relapsed acute leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vali A Mehrzad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oncologists today are greatly concerned about the treatment of relapsed/refractory acute leukemia. FLANG regimen, combination of novantron, cytarabine, fludarabine, and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor, has been used in treatment of refractory/relapsed acute leukemia since 1990s. The present study has evaluated mortality and response rate of this regimen. Materials and Methods: In this study, 25 patients with refractory/relapsed acute leukemia aged 15-55 years underwent FLANG regimen at Seyed-Al-Shohada Hospital, Isfahan, Iran during 2008-2009. One month later, bone marrow samples were taken to evaluate the responsiveness to treatment. Participants were followed for a year. The data was analyzed by student-t and chi-square tests, logistic, and Cox regression analysis, and Kaplan-Meier curves in SPSS 19. Results: Out of the 25 patients, 8 patients (32% had acute lymphoblastic leukemia (5 refractory and 3 relapsed cases and 17 subjects had acute myeloid leukemia (7 refractory and 10 relapsed cases. According to the bone marrow biopsies taken one month after FLANG regimen, 10 patients (40% had responded to treatment. Five patients of the 10 responders underwent successful bone marrow transplantation (BMT. On the other hand, 13 patients (52%, who had not entered the CR period, died during the follow-up. Logistic regression analysis did not reveal any significant associations between disease type and responsiveness to treatment. Conclusion: This study indicated higher rates of unresponsiveness to treatment while its mortality rate was comparable with other studies. Overall, according to limitations for BMT (as the only chance for cure in Iran, it seems that FLANG therapy is an acceptable choice for these patients.

  2. Once-daily dose regimen of ribavirin is interchangeable with a twice-daily dose regimen: randomized open clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balk JM

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Jiska M Balk,1 Guido RMM Haenen,1 Özgür M Koc,2 Ron Peters,3 Aalt Bast,1 Wim JF van der Vijgh,1 Ger H Koek,4 1Department of Toxicology, NUTRIM School for Nutrition, Toxicology and Metabolism, Maastricht University Medical Centre, 2Faculty of Health, Medicine and Life Sciences, Maastricht University, Maastricht, 3DSM Resolve, Geleen, 4Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht, the Netherlands Background: The combination of ribavirin (RBV and pegylated interferon (PEG-IFN is effective in the treatment of chronic hepatitis C infection. Reducing the frequency of RBV intake from twice to once a day will improve compliance and opens up the opportunity to combine RBV with new and more specific direct-acting agents in one pill. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetic profile of RBV in a once-daily to twice-daily regimen. The secondary aim was to determine tolerability as well as the severity and differences in side effects of both treatment regimens. Methods: In this randomized open-label crossover study, twelve patients with chronic type 1 hepatitis C infection and weighing more than 75 kg were treated with 180 µg of PEG-IFN weekly and 1,200 mg RBV daily for 24 weeks. The patients received RBV dosed as 1,200 mg once-daily for 12 weeks followed by RBV dosed as 600 mg twice-daily for 12 weeks, or vice versa. In addition to the pharmacokinetic profile, the hematological profile and side effects were recorded. The RBV concentrations in plasma were determined using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Results: Eight of twelve patients completed the study. Neither the time taken for RBV to reach peak plasma concentration nor the AUC0-last (adjusted for difference in dose was significantly different between the two groups (P>0.05. Furthermore, the once-daily regimen did not give more side effects than the twice-daily regimen (P>0

  3. Comparison of different insulin regimens in elderly patients with NIDDM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolffenbuttel, B H; Sels, J P; Rondas-Colbers, G J; Menheere, P P; Nieuwenhuijzen Kruseman, A C

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the metabolic effects of three different frequently used regimens of insulin administration on blood glucose control and serum lipids, and the costs associated with this treatment, in subjects with NIDDM, who were poorly controlled with oral antihyperglycemic agents. RESEARCH

  4. Causes for antiretroviral regimen change among HIV/AIDS patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-03-01

    This was a retrospective cross-sectional study conducted from January 1 to March 1, 2010 in two primary hospitals and one health centre in central Ethiopia. Information cards of HIV/AIDS patients who have had their antiretroviral regimen switched were reviewed. Data from patients below 18 years old and those who did not ...

  5. Gonzalez Regimen (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Gonzalez regimen is a specialized diet that uses enzymes, supplements, and other factors in cancer management based on a theory that involves the use of pancreatic enzymes to help the body get rid of toxins that lead to cancer. Read about existing clinical data in this expert-reviewed summary.

  6. Unnecessary complexity of home medication regimens among seniors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindquist, Lee A; Lindquist, Lucy M; Zickuhr, Lisa; Friesema, Elisha; Wolf, Michael S

    2014-07-01

    To determine whether seniors consolidate their home medications or if there is evidence of unnecessary regimen complexity. Face-to-face interviews were conducted with 200 community-dwelling seniors >70 years in their homes. Subjects demonstrated how they took their medications in a typical day and the number of times a day patients would take medications was calculated. A pharmacist and physician blinded to patient characteristics examined medication regimens and determined the fewest number of times a day they could be taken by subjects. Home medication regimens could be simplified for 85 (42.5%) subjects. Of those subjects not optimally consolidating their medications, 53 (26.5%) could have had the number of times a day medications were taken reduced by one time per day; 32 (16.0%) reduced by two times or more. The three most common causes of overcomplexity were (1) misunderstanding medication instructions, (2) concern over drug absorption (i.e. before meals), and (3) perceived drug-drug interactions. Almost half of seniors had medication regimens that were unnecessarily complicated and could be simplified. This lack of consolidation potentially impedes medication adherence. Health care providers should ask patients to explicitly detail when medication consumption occurs in the home. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The liberal peace security regimen: a gramscian critique of its ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Current security regimens are grounded in the advancement of liberal peace. All inter-governmental organizations, most states and most donor agencies more or less accept as common sense the self-evident virtuosity and truth of the liberal peace project. However, there is a profound contradiction within this project in ...

  8. Influence of different final irrigation regimens and various ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-04-28

    Apr 28, 2015 ... Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of different endodontic materials and final irrigation regimens on vertical root fracture ... [11] A recently introduced bioceramic‑based root canal sealer ..... Ari H, Yasar E, Belli S. Effects of NaOCl on bond strengths of resin cements to root canal dentin.

  9. Efficacy of Some Combination Regimens of Oral Hypoglycaemic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To examine the efficacy of selected oral hypoglycaemic agent (OHA) regimens in a small group of patients receiving such treatment. Methods: This was a retrospective, observational study that involved patients who had been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus and undergoing routine follow-up at a teaching ...

  10. Assessment of non-standard HIV antiretroviral therapy regimens at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-03-06

    Mar 6, 2016 ... Challenges in quantifying these regimens have resulted in medication stockouts in the past, .... their HIV management. The most common NS-ARTs used are listed in Table 2. Table 2: Most .... impact of uncertainty in Malawi's ART supply chain. Malawi has struggled with national medication stockouts in the ...

  11. eight month regimen recommended by the nigerian national ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The clinical outcome in terms of the time of sputum conversion, prognosis, radiological changes at the endof ... groups using the prognosis, side-effects profile, sputum conversion and radiological clearance at the end of chemotherapy. The regimen .... Isoniazid (H) 7.5 mg/kg (daily) 2 months Therapy. 4. Pyrazinamide (Z) ...

  12. Influence of different final irrigation regimens and various ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of different endodontic materials and final irrigation regimens on vertical root fracture (VRF) resistance. Materials and Methods: Eighty human teeth were prepared then assigned into two groups (n = 40) according to the final irrigations. G1: 5 mL, 5.25% sodium ...

  13. Using High-Fidelity Computational Fluid Dynamics to Help Design a Wind Turbine Wake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Churchfield, Matthew J.; Wang, Qi; Scholbrock, A.

    2016-01-01

    We describe the process of using large-eddy simulations of wind turbine wake flow to help design a wake measurement campaign. The main goal of the experiment is to measure wakes and wake deflection that result from intentional yaw misalignment under a variety of atmospheric conditions at the Scaled...... Wind Farm Technology facility operated by Sandia National Laboratories in Lubbock, Texas. Prior simulation studies have shown that wake deflection may be used for wind-plant control that maximizes plant power output. In this study, simulations are performed to characterize wake deflection and general...

  14. Volumetric LiDAR scanning of a wind turbine wake and comparison with a 3D analytical wake model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbajo Fuertes, Fernando; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    A correct estimation of the future power production is of capital importance whenever the feasibility of a future wind farm is being studied. This power estimation relies mostly on three aspects: (1) a reliable measurement of the wind resource in the area, (2) a well-established power curve of the future wind turbines and, (3) an accurate characterization of the wake effects; the latter being arguably the most challenging one due to the complexity of the phenomenon and the lack of extensive full-scale data sets that could be used to validate analytical or numerical models. The current project addresses the problem of obtaining a volumetric description of a full-scale wake of a 2MW wind turbine in terms of velocity deficit and turbulence intensity using three scanning wind LiDARs and two sonic anemometers. The characterization of the upstream flow conditions is done by one scanning LiDAR and two sonic anemometers, which have been used to calculate incoming vertical profiles of horizontal wind speed, wind direction and an approximation to turbulence intensity, as well as the thermal stability of the atmospheric boundary layer. The characterization of the wake is done by two scanning LiDARs working simultaneously and pointing downstream from the base of the wind turbine. The direct LiDAR measurements in terms of radial wind speed can be corrected using the upstream conditions in order to provide good estimations of the horizontal wind speed at any point downstream of the wind turbine. All this data combined allow for the volumetric reconstruction of the wake in terms of velocity deficit as well as turbulence intensity. Finally, the predictions of a 3D analytical model [1] are compared to the 3D LiDAR measurements of the wind turbine. The model is derived by applying the laws of conservation of mass and momentum and assuming a Gaussian distribution for the velocity deficit in the wake. This model has already been validated using high resolution wind-tunnel measurements

  15. A Neuron-Based Model of Sleep-Wake Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postnova, Svetlana; Peters, Achim; Braun, Hans

    2008-03-01

    In recent years it was discovered that a neuropeptide orexin/hypocretin plays a main role in sleep processes. This peptide is produced by the neurons in the lateral hypothalamus, which project to almost all brain areas. We present a computational model of sleep-wake cycles, which is based on the Hodgkin-Huxley type neurons and considers reciprocal glutaminergic projections between the lateral hypothalamus and the prefrontal cortex. Orexin is released as a neuromodulator and is required to keep the neurons firing, which corresponds to the wake state. When orexin is depleted the neurons are getting silent as observed in the sleep state. They can be reactivated by the circadian signal from the suprachiasmatic nucleus and/or external stimuli (alarm clock). Orexin projections to the thalamocortical neurons also can account for their transition from tonic firing activity during wakefulness to synchronized burst discharges during sleep.

  16. Biological rhythms, sleep, and wakefulness in prolonged confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siffre, Michael

    1988-01-01

    The dysynchronization of human circadian rhythms during 7 long-term (2 to 6 months) confinement experiments in temporal isolation in caves was studied. Five subjects abandon the circadian period of sleep and wakefulness (S-W) and spontaneously reach a circabidian S-W cycle (34 to 36 hr waking, 14 to 12 hr sleep) they maintain during weeks. Some subjects reach the 48 hr cycle very quickly (8 to 15 days), others after months. Polygraphic analyses of sleep show that rapid eye movement state (REMS) duration is directly proportional to the total duration of sleep and that the ultradian periodicity of REMS remains constant when S-W cycle is circadian or circabidian. When S-W cycle desynchronizes from circadian to circabidian, REMS and S-4 increase at the expense of stages I-2 and remain in constant relationship with the duration of previous wakefulness period.

  17. An Improved Wake Vortex Tracking Algorithm for Multiple Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Switzer, George F.; Proctor, Fred H.; Ahmad, Nashat N.; LimonDuparcmeur, Fanny M.

    2010-01-01

    The accurate tracking of vortex evolution from Large Eddy Simulation (LES) data is a complex and computationally intensive problem. The vortex tracking requires the analysis of very large three-dimensional and time-varying datasets. The complexity of the problem is further compounded by the fact that these vortices are embedded in a background turbulence field, and they may interact with the ground surface. Another level of complication can arise, if vortices from multiple aircrafts are simulated. This paper presents a new technique for post-processing LES data to obtain wake vortex tracks and wake intensities. The new approach isolates vortices by defining "regions of interest" (ROI) around each vortex and has the ability to identify vortex pairs from multiple aircraft. The paper describes the new methodology for tracking wake vortices and presents application of the technique for single and multiple aircraft.

  18. Analytical Formulas for Short Bunch Wakes in a Flat Dechirper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bane, Karl [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Stupakov, Gennady [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Zagorodnov, Igor [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-03-29

    We develop analytical models of the longitudinal and transverse wakes, on and off axis for realistic structures, and then compare them with numerical calculations, and generally find good agreement. These analytical "first order" formulas approximate the droop at the origin of the longitudinal wake and of the slope of the transverse wakes; they represent an improvement in accuracy over earlier, "zeroth order" formulas. In example calculations for the RadiaBeam/LCLS dechirper using typical parameters, we find a 16% droop in the energy chirp at the bunch tail compared to simpler calculations. With the beam moved to 200 m from one jaw in one dechiper section, one can achieve a 3 MV transverse kick differential over a 30 m length.

  19. Gas dynamics, optics and chemistry of an aircraft condensable wake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grinats, E.S.; Kashevarov, A.V.; Stasenko, A.L. [Central Aerohydrodynamic Inst., Zhukovsky (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    Prediction of the properties of a jet-and-vortex wake from an individual airplane is of great interest as the first step to assessment of the possible global changes in the atmosphere due to the world civil aviation. Several mathematical models of the different regions of an aircraft wake and corresponding numerical results are presented. The axisymmetric exhaust jet was simulated on the base of the well-known k-{epsilon} model of turbulence. Jet chemistry was investigated on the base of kinetic scheme of the gas phase reactions of enriched by including chemisorption by water droplets of several species and by taking into account of the photochemical processes. In the 3D far wake model, the numerical results for distribution of species exhausted by the engines and entrapped by the velocity field of two parallel vortices are shown. (R.P.) 7 refs.

  20. Effects of wind turbine wake on atmospheric sound propagation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barlas, Emre; Zhu, Wei Jun; Shen, Wen Zhong

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the sound propagation from a wind turbine considering the effects of wake-induced velocity deficit and turbulence. In order to address this issue, an advanced approach was developed in which both scalar and vector parabolic equations in two dimensions are solved. Flow...... source. Unsteady acoustic simulations were carried out with the AL/LES input for three cases with different incoming turbulence intensity, and a moving source approach to mimic the rotating turbine blades. The results show a non-negligible effect of the wake on far-field noise prediction. Particularly...... under stable atmospheric conditions, SPL amplification reaches up to 7.5dB at the wake centre. Furthermore, it was observed that when the turbulence intensity level of the incoming flow is higher, the SPL difference between the moving and the steady source is lower....

  1. High-voltage interactions in plasma wakes: Results from the charging hazards and wake studies (CHAWS) flight experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enloe, C. L.; Cooke, D. L.; Pakula, W. A.; Violet, M. D.; Hardy, D. A.; Chaplin, C. B.; Kirkwood, R. K.; Tautz, M. F.; Bonito, N.; Roth, C.; Courtney, G.; Davis, V. A.; Mandell, M. J.; Hastings, D. E.; Shaw, G. B.; Giffin, G.; Sega, R. M.

    1997-01-01

    Data from the charging hazards and wake studies (CHAWS) flight experiments on board space shuttle missions STS-60 and STS-69, during which a negatively biased, high-voltage (0-5 kV) probe was placed in a plasma wake in low Earth orbit, are presented. For these experiments the source of the wake was the 4-m-diameter Wake Shield Facility (WSF), which was operated both as a free-flying spacecraft and attached to the shuttle orbiter's robot arm. Current collection by the biased probe is investigated as a function of the density and temperature of the ambient plasma and the probe's location in the plasma wake. Current collection behavior is determined by the expansion of the high-voltage sheath into the ambient plasma stream. Consistent with preflight predictions, current collection on the probe is highly nonuniform, varying by more than 5 orders of magnitude across the surface of the probe. The onset of current collection, however, begins at voltages that are an order of magnitude lower than anticipated. This is likely due to the low-energy, turbulent plasma (typically 2-5% of the ambient density and up to 40% on occasion) observed in the ambient environment. This important minority constituent of the plasma was observed in the vicinity of the shuttle Orbiter and observed while the WSF was free-flying.

  2. Performance and Near-Wake Flow field of A Marine Hydrokinetic Turbine Operating in Free surface Proximity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Arindam; Kolekar, Nitin

    2015-11-01

    The current experimental investigation aims at understanding the effect of free surface proximity and associated blockage on near-wake flow-field and performance of a three bladed horizontal axis marine hydrokinetic turbine. Experiments were conducted on a 0.14m radius, three bladed constant chord turbine in a 0.61m ×0.61m test section water channel. The turbine was subjected to various rotational speeds, flow speeds and depths of immersion. Experimental data was acquired through a submerged in-line thrust-torque sensor that was corrected to an unblocked dataset with a blockage correction using measured thrust data. A detailed comparison is presented between blocked and unblocked datasets to identify influence of Reynolds number and free surface proximity on blockage effects. The percent change in Cp was found to be dependent on flow velocity, rotational speed and free surface to blade tip clearance. Further, flow visualization using a stereoscopic particle image velocimetry was carried out in the near-wake region of turbine to understand the mechanism responsible for variation of Cp with rotational speed and free surface proximity. Results revealed presence of slower wake at higher rotational velocities and increased asymmetry in the wake at high free surface proximity.

  3. Wind turbine wake visualization and characteristics analysis by Doppler lidar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Songhua; Liu, Bingyi; Liu, Jintao; Zhai, Xiaochun; Feng, Changzhong; Wang, Guining; Zhang, Hongwei; Yin, Jiaping; Wang, Xitao; Li, Rongzhong; Gallacher, Daniel

    2016-05-16

    Wind power generation is growing fast as one of the most promising renewable energy sources that can serve as an alternative to fossil fuel-generated electricity. When the wind turbine generator (WTG) extracts power from the wind, the wake evolves and leads to a considerable reduction in the efficiency of the actual power generation. Furthermore, the wake effect can lead to the increase of turbulence induced fatigue loads that reduce the life time of WTGs. In this work, a pulsed coherent Doppler lidar (PCDL) has been developed and deployed to visualize wind turbine wakes and to characterize the geometry and dynamics of wakes. As compared with the commercial off-the-shelf coherent lidars, the PCDL in this work has higher updating rate of 4 Hz and variable physical spatial resolution from 15 to 60 m, which improves its capability to observation the instantaneous turbulent wind field. The wind speed estimation method from the arc scan technique was evaluated in comparison with wind mast measurements. Field experiments were performed to study the turbulent wind field in the vicinity of operating WTGs in the onshore and offshore wind parks from 2013 to 2015. Techniques based on a single and a dual Doppler lidar were employed for elucidating main features of turbine wakes, including wind velocity deficit, wake dimension, velocity profile, 2D wind vector with resolution of 10 m, turbulence dissipation rate and turbulence intensity under different conditions of surface roughness. The paper shows that the PCDL is a practical tool for wind energy research and will provide a significant basis for wind farm site selection, design and optimization.

  4. Passive Wake Detection Using Seal Whisker-Inspired Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    21(11):113001, 2012. [128] A. Thesen, J.B. Steen, and K.B. Doving. Behaviour of dogs during olfactory tracking. Journal of Experimental Biology, 180(1...sensing in animals. A few are listed here to give a sense of the vast range of sensory capabilities in the animal kingdom. Bloodhounds and other dogs ...Y. Gao, Z. Sun, D.S. Tan, D. Yu, and S.K. Tan. Wake flow behaviour behind a smaller cylinder oscillating in the wake of an upstream stationary

  5. High resolution wind turbine wake measurements with a scanning lidar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herges, T. G.; Maniaci, D. C.; Naughton, B. T.

    2017-01-01

    High-resolution lidar wake measurements are part of an ongoing field campaign being conducted at the Scaled Wind Farm Technology facility by Sandia National Laboratories and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory using a customized scanning lidar from the Technical University of Denmark. One...... of the primary objectives is to collect experimental data to improve the predictive capability of wind plant computational models to represent the response of the turbine wake to varying inflow conditions and turbine operating states. The present work summarizes the experimental setup and illustrates several...

  6. The Films at the Wake. Per un catalogo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinaldo Rinaldi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Recently – particularly in the last few year – critics have highlighted the importance of cinema in James Joyce's works. We can think, for instance, of the evocative role of cinematographic techniques; in addition , being a cinephile, Joyce proves to know a wide variety of films. Finnegans Wake has not been much explored from this perspective. This article aims to highlight the presence of cinema and films (but also directors and actors in Joyce's last novel: this is a temporary and hypothetical catalogue, due to Finnegans Wake's multiple allusions and to its requiring an infinite patience and a qualified collaboration of all its readers.

  7. Sleep Inertia: Is There a Worst Time to Wake Up?

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-07-07

    deprivation without naps we almost never have had a subject withdraw. Perhaps, long-term training in taking many short naps or polyphasic sleep to replace...AD-A256 602 HhIllllM 111lUIIHflllhE’l’• II SLEEP INERTIA: IS THERE A WORST TIME TO WAKE UP? DTIC Aa ELECTE OCT 2 81992 T. Kelly --A 11. akoff 92...BETHESDA. MARYLAND SLEEP INERTIA: IS THERE A WORST TIME TO WAKE-UP? Paul Naitoh*, Tamsin Kelly* and Harvey Babkoff** *Naval Health Research Center P.O

  8. Numerical Survey of Self-gravity Wakes in Saturn's Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salo, H.

    Although the total mass of Saturn's rings is small compared to the central mass, the mutual gravity between ring particles has a crucial role in shaping the local ring structure. In essence, the rings are on the verge of gravitational instability, due to their low velocity dispersion resulting from the dissipative physical impacts between particles. In differentially rotating rings this near-instability manifests in the form of tilted shearing density enhancements, as demonstrated by various N-body simulations (e.g Salo 1992, Nature 359, 619). Autocorrelation analysis indicates that these structures are analogous to the transient wakes produced by an orbiting body in a self-gravitating stellar disk (Julian and Toomre 1966, ApJ 146, 810). The term 'gravity wakes' is thus very appropriate, emphasizing the fact that these structures are a superposition of numerous individual Julian-Toomre wakes excited around each and every ring particle. The crucial difference to stellar disks is that in planetary rings the collisional dissipation balances the strong gravitational heating induced by the wakes themselves. This enables a statistical steady-state with a constant average wake amplitude and pitch angle, characterized by a continuous dissolution and regeneration of individual wakes in time scales ˜ orbital period. I will report some results of an ongoing N-body survey of wake structures in systems of different geometrical optical depth and the strength of self-gravity (related to the distance and the internal density of particles). Also factors like particle elasticity and the role of size distribution are examined. An essential part of this survey is the combination of dynamical and photometric modeling (see Salo et al. 2004, Icarus 170, 70), connecting the N-body density structures to directly observable quantities, like the photometric optical depth and the brightness of rings in reflected and transmitted light, when viewed from different orientations with respect to

  9. Wind Farm Wake: The Horns Rev Photo Case

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasager, Charlotte Bay; Rasmussen, Leif; Peña, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to examine the nowadays well-known wind farm wake photographs taken on 12 February 2008 at the offshore Horns Rev 1 wind farm. The meteorological conditions are described from observations from several satellite sensors quantifying clouds, surface wind vectors and sea...... conditions where a layer of cold humid air above a warmer sea surface re-condensates to fog in the wake of the turbines. The process is fed by warm humid air up-drafted from below in the counter-rotating swirl generated by the clock-wise rotating rotors. The condensation appears to take place primarily...

  10. Potential Effects of Cannabidiol as a Wake-Promoting Agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murillo-Rodríguez, Eric; Sarro-Ramírez, Andrea; Sánchez, Daniel; Mijangos-Moreno, Stephanie; Tejeda-Padrón, Alma; Poot-Aké, Alwin; Guzmán, Khalil; Pacheco-Pantoja, Elda; Arias-Carrión, Oscar

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decades, the scientific interest in chemistry and pharmacology of cannabinoids has increased. Most attention has focused on ∆9-tetrahydrocannabinol (∆9-THC) as it is the psychoactive constituent of Cannabis sativa (C. sativa). However, in previous years, the focus of interest in the second plant constituent with non-psychotropic properties, cannabidiol (CBD) has been enhanced. Recently, several groups have investigated the pharmacological properties of CBD with significant findings; furthermore, this compound has raised promising pharmacological properties as a wake-inducing drug. In the current review, we will provide experimental evidence regarding the potential role of CBD as a wake-inducing drug. PMID:24851090

  11. Acute Kynurenine Challenge Disrupts Sleep-Wake Architecture and Impairs Contextual Memory in Adult Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pocivavsek, Ana; Baratta, Annalisa M; Mong, Jessica A; Viechweg, Shaun S

    2017-09-28

    Tryptophan metabolism via the kynurenine pathway may represent a key molecular link between sleep loss and cognitive dysfunction. Modest increases in the kynurenine pathway metabolite kynurenic acid (KYNA), which acts as an antagonist at N-methyl-d-aspartate and α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the brain, result in cognitive impairments. As glutamatergic and cholinergic neurotransmissions are critically involved in modulation of sleep, our current experiments tested the hypothesis that elevated KYNA adversely impacts sleep quality. Adult male Wistar rats were treated with vehicle (saline) and kynurenine (25, 50, 100, and 250 mg/kg), the direct bioprecursor of KYNA, intraperitoneally at zeitgeber time (ZT) 0 to rapidly increase brain KYNA. Levels of KYNA in the brainstem, cortex, and hippocampus were determined at ZT 0, ZT 2, and ZT 4, respectively. Analyses of vigilance state-related parameters categorized as wake, rapid eye movement (REM), and non-REM (NREM) as well as spectra power analysis during NREM and REM were assessed during the light phase. Separate animals were tested in the passive avoidance paradigm, testing contextual memory. When KYNA levels were elevated in the brain, total REM duration was reduced and total wake duration was increased. REM and wake architecture, assessed as number of vigilance state bouts and average duration of each bout, and theta power during REM were significantly impacted. Kynurenine challenge impaired performance in the hippocampal-dependent contextual memory task. Our results introduce kynurenine pathway metabolism and formation of KYNA as a novel molecular target contributing to sleep disruptions and cognitive impairments.

  12. Comparison of Effectiveness between Rifampicin Ofloxin-Minocycline Regimen and Multidrug Therapy-World Health Organization in Multibacillary Leprosy Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octawyana Moestopo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Multidrug therapy (MDT which is recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO for multibacillary (MB leprosy patients has some side effects; it is given in 12 doses over 12-18 months. Patients who refuse or are contraindicated in undertaking MDT-WHO can be given alternative rifampicin-ofloxacin-minocycline (ROM regimen for 24 months, whose side effects are less but more expensive. This study was conducted to compare the effectiveness between ROM and MDT-WHO regimen in the first 12 months based on the derivation in morphological index (MI of acid-fast bacilli (AFB in MB leprosy patient. Methods: This was an observational analytical study with retrospective cohort method. Data was collected from medical records of MB leprosy patients in the Medical Record Installation and Morbus Hansen Clinic, Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital Bandung. The overall derivation in MI in 12 months was assessed according to the type of therapy undertaken by the patient. Data was analyzed by Mann-Whitney U Test. Results: A total of 59 data were selected out of 800 data of new leprosy patients based on the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Among those, 20 patients were treated by ROM and 39 by MDT-WHO. Derivation of MI occurred among both groups, but ROM regimen had higher percentage (94.83% compared with MDT-WHO regimen (79.57% with p value=0.003 (p <0.05. Conclusions: ROM regimen has better effectiveness than MDT-WHO regimen in the first 12 months in MB leprosy patients.

  13. Validation of a vortex ring wake model suited for aeroelastic simulations of floating wind turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vaal, J. B.; Hansen, M. O. L.; Moan, T.

    2014-12-01

    In order to evaluate aerodynamic loads on floating offshore wind turbines, advanced dynamic analysis tools are required. As a unified model that can represent both dynamic inflow and skewed inflow effects in it basic formulation, a wake model based on a vortex ring formulation is discussed. Such a model presents a good intermediate solution between computationally efficient but simple momentum balance methods and computationally expensive but complete computational fluid dynamics models. The model introduced is shown to be capable of modelling typical steady and unsteady test cases with reasonable accuracy.

  14. Paclitaxel/oxaliplatin/fluorouracil (TOF) regimen versus S-1/oxaliplatin (SOX) regimen for metastatic gastric cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xichao; Zhang, Xizhi; Wang, Chaomin; Jiang, Jingting; Wu, Changping

    2017-05-02

    This study was designed to compare the efficacy and safety of paclitaxel/oxaliplatin/fluorouracil (TOF) regimen and S-1/oxaliplatin (SOX) regimen for metastatic gastric cancer (GC) patients. Sixty patients were divided into TOF group and SOX groups randomly. Patients in the TOF group received paclitaxel (135 mg/m2 iv) on day 1, oxaliplatin (100 mg/m2 iv) on day 1, fluorouracil (500 mg/m2 continuous iv) on day 1-5. The patients in the SOX group received oxaliplatin (130 mg/m2 iv) on day 1 and S-1 (40 mg~60mg orally twice/day based on body surface area) on days 1-14. All the treatments were repeated every 21d for 4-6 cycles. The ORR and DCR of TOF group was 43.3% and 60.0%, respectively while that of SOX group was 36.7% and 56.7%. There were no statistical differences between the ORRs (χ2 = 0.278) and the DCRs (χ2 = 0.069) of the 2 groups. The majority of adverse events of two groups were hematological and digestive ones. Most of them were grade I and II. The adverse event rate of TOF group was higher than SOX group. The PFS times of TOF and SOX groups were 6.5 and 5.8 months, respectively. There was no statistical difference between the PFSs of the 2 groups (P = 0.451). The efficacies of TOF and SOX regimens are similar but the safety of SOX regimen better than TOF regimen.

  15. A state-space free-vortex hybrid wake model for helicopter rotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasileski, Bryan J.

    This paper presents the development of a new hybrid wake model merging two distinctly different modeling approaches into a single, more comprehensive solution. The objective of the work was to leverage the strengths of each individual wake model creating a more flexible and extensible solution that could be used across the entire flight envelope of a helicopter. The results of the work indicate that the two wakes models can be successfully merged. The results also show that hybrid wake provides a mechanism by which finite-state wake imparts a level of stability on the free wake solution allowing the free wake to provide consistent, repeatable results from hover through high speed forward flight. While the new hybrid wake includes the geometric distortion needed for predicting the off-axis control response, the new model, as configured in this work, shows no sign of improvement in this area.

  16. A Simplified Regimen Compared with WHO Guidelines Decreases Antenatal Calcium Supplement Intake for Prevention of Preeclampsia in a Cluster-Randomized Noninferiority Trial in Rural Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omotayo, Moshood O; Dickin, Katherine L; Pelletier, David L; Mwanga, Erick O; Kung'u, Jacqueline K; Stoltzfus, Rebecca J

    2017-10-01

    Background: To prevent preeclampsia, the WHO recommends antenatal calcium supplementation in populations with inadequate habitual intake. The WHO recommends 1500-2000 mg Ca/d with iron-folic acid (IFA) taken separately, a complex pill-taking regimen. Objective: The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that simpler regimens with lower daily dosages would lead to higher adherence and similar supplement intake. Methods: In the Micronutrient Initiative Calcium Supplementation study, we compared the mean daily supplement intake associated with 2 dosing regimens with the use of a parallel, cluster-randomized noninferiority trial implemented in 16 primary health care facilities in rural Kenya. The standard regimen was 3 × 500 mg Ca/d in 3 pill-taking events, and the low-dose regimen was 2 × 500 mg Ca/d in 2 pill-taking events; both regimens included a 200 IU cholecalciferol and calcium pill and a separate IFA pill. We enrolled 990 pregnant women between 16 and 30 wk of gestation. The primary outcome was supplemental calcium intake measured by pill counts 4 and 8 wk after recruitment. We carried out intention-to-treat analyses with the use of mixed-effect models, with regimen as the fixed effect and health care facilities as a random effect, by using a noninferiority margin of 125 mg Ca/d. Results: Women in facilities assigned to the standard regimen consumed a mean of 1198 mg Ca/d, whereas those assigned to the low-dose regimen consumed 810 mg Ca/d. The difference in intake was 388 mg Ca/d (95% CI = 341, 434 mg Ca/d), exceeding the prespecified margin of 125 mg Ca/d. The overall adherence rate was 80% and did not differ between study arms. Conclusions: Contrary to our expectation, a simpler, lower-dose regimen led to significantly lower supplement intake than the regimen recommended by the WHO. Further studies are needed to precisely characterize the dose-response relation of calcium supplementation and preeclampsia risk and to examine cost effectiveness

  17. Evaluating the impact of treatment for sleep/wake disorders on recovery of cognition and communication in adults with chronic TBI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiseman-Hakes, Catherine; Murray, Brian; Moineddin, Rahim; Rochon, Elizabeth; Cullen, Nora; Gargaro, Judith; Colantonio, Angela

    2013-01-01

    To longitudinally examine objective and self-reported outcomes for recovery of cognition, communication, mood and participation in adults with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and co-morbid post-traumatic sleep/wake disorders. Prospective, longitudinal, single blind outcome study. Community-based. Ten adults with moderate-severe TBI and two adults with mild TBI and persistent symptoms aged 18-58 years. Six males and six females, who were 1-22 years post-injury and presented with self-reported sleep/wake disturbances with onset post-injury. Individualized treatments for sleep/wake disorders that included sleep hygiene recommendations, pharmacological interventions and/or treatments for sleep apnea with follow-up. Insomnia Severity Index, Beck Depression and Anxiety Inventories, Latrobe Communication Questionnaire, Speed and Capacity of Language Processing, Test of Everyday Attention, Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status, Daily Cognitive-Communication and Sleep Profile. Group analysis revealed positive trends in change for each measure and across sub-tests of all measures. Statistically significant changes were noted in insomnia severity, p = 0.0003; depression severity, p = 0.03; language, p = 0.01; speed of language processing, p = 0.007. These results add to a small but growing body of evidence that sleep/wake disorders associated with TBI exacerbate trauma-related cognitive, communication and mood impairments. Treatment for sleep/wake disorders may optimize recovery and outcomes.

  18. Comparison of Ciprofloxacin-Based Triple Therapy with Conventional Triple Regimen for Helicobacter pylori Eradication in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahmand, Fatemeh; Mohammadi, Tayebeh; Najafi, Mehri; Fallahi, Gholamhosein; Khodadad, Ahmad; Motamed, Farzaneh; Mahdi Marashi, Sayed; Shoaran, Maryam; Nabavizadeh Rafsanjani, Raheleh

    2016-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is a prevalent disease among Iranian children. The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of ciprofloxacin and furazolidone on eradicating helicobacter pylori in Iranian children in combination with amoxicillin and omeprazole. In this cohort study, helicobacter pylori infection was confirmed by gastroscopy, rapid urease test or pathologic assessments. A total of 66 children were randomly enrolled; based on the random number table, and were divided into two groups; first, a combination regimen consisting of ciprofloxacin, amoxicillin, and omeprazole; second, a three-medication regimen consisting of amoxicillin, furazolidone, and omeprazole. The effect of both medical regimens on the successful eradication of helicobacter pylori infection was assessed and compared. Chi-square test was used for evaluating the association between quantitative variables. All comparisons were made at the significance of P<0.05. Endoscopic tests prior to initiating treatments showed that 66.7% of the patients had a degree of nodularity while peptic ulcer was only observed in one patient. One month after the end of the treatments, eradication of the helicobacter pylori infection was reported 87.9% (29/33) in the first group (CAO) and 60.6% (20.33) in the second group (FAO) (P=0.011). It appears that a major advantage of our proposed regimen over others is a lack of wide use of fluoroquinolones for treating children's diseases. Given FDA's recommendation about the possibility of prescribing ciprofloxacin for infected patients with multidrug resistance, we can use the regimen proposed in this study in patients with resistance to standard treatments.

  19. Comparison of Ciprofloxacin-Based Triple Therapy with Conventional Triple Regimen for Helicobacter pylori Eradication in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Farahmand

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori infection is a prevalent disease among Iranian children. The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of ciprofloxacin and furazolidone on eradicating helicobacter pylori in Iranian children in combination with amoxicillin and omeprazole. In this cohort study, helicobacter pylori infection was confirmed by gastroscopy, rapid urease test or pathologic assessments. A total of 66 children were randomly enrolled; based on the random number table, and were divided into two groups; first, a combination regimen consisting of ciprofloxacin, amoxicillin, and omeprazole; second, a three-medication regimen consisting of amoxicillin, furazolidone, and omeprazole. The effect of both medical regimens on the successful eradication of helicobacter pylori infection was assessed and compared. Chi-square test was used for evaluating the association between quantitative variables. All comparisons were made at the significance of P<0.05. Endoscopic tests prior to initiating treatments showed that 66.7% of the patients had a degree of nodularity while peptic ulcer was only observed in one patient. One month after the end of the treatments, eradication of the helicobacter pylori infection was reported 87.9% (29/33 in the first group (CAO and 60.6% (20.33 in the second group (FAO (P=0.011. It appears that a major advantage of our proposed regimen over others is a lack of wide use of fluoroquinolones for treating children’s diseases. Given FDA’s recommendation about the possibility of prescribing ciprofloxacin for infected patients with multidrug resistance, we can use the regimen proposed in this study in patients with resistance to standard treatments.

  20. Dynamical states of a system due to localized wake forces in a BEPC storage ring

    CERN Document Server

    Nam, S K; Zhang, C; Kim, E S

    1999-01-01

    We examine the dynamical states of a system in the storage ring of the Beijing electron-positron collider (BEPC) by using an extended model with the combination of a constant wake and a delta wake function. The influences of parameters on the stable equilibrium states and the transitions of the states in the BEPC ring are also investigated by using a new extended model with a constant wake function and a delta wake function.

  1. Thrust generation and wake structure for flow across a pitching ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Two different wake structures (reverse Kármán shedding and deflected vortex shedding) are observed over this parameter range. The vorticity decreases substantially over a distance of two chord-lengths. The velocity profile indicates a jet-like flow downstream of the airfoil. It is shown that the jet-like flow downstream of the ...

  2. Electron holes observed in the Moon Plasma Wake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, I. H.; Malaspina, D.; Zhou, C.

    2017-10-01

    Electrostatic instabilities are predicted in the magnetized wake of plasma flowing past a non-magnetic absorbing object such as a probe or the moon. Analysis of the data from the Artemis satellites, now orbiting the moon at distances ten moon radii and less, shows very clear evidence of fast-moving isolated solitary potential structures causing bipolar electric field excursions as they pass the satellite's probes. These structures have all the hallmarks of electron holes: BGK solitons typically a few Debye-lengths in size, self-sustaining by a deficit of phase-space density on trapped orbits. Electron holes are now observed to be widespread in space plasmas. They have been observed in PIC simulations of the moon wake to be the non-linear consequence of the predicted electron instabilities. Simulations document hole prevalence, speed, length, and depth; and theory can explain many of these features from kinetic analysis. The solar wind wake is certainly the cause of the overwhelming majority of the holes observed by Artemis, because we observe almost all holes to be in or very near to the wake. We compare theory and simulation of the hole generation, lifetime, and transport mechanisms with observations. Work partially supported by NASA Grant NNX16AG82G.

  3. Sleep-waking states and the endogenous opioid system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O.E. Ukponmwan (Otas)

    1986-01-01

    textabstractIn the general introductory part of this thesis (Chapters and 2) a review of some pertinent literature related to sleep-waking states and opioid peptides is offered. A global view of the neurochemical mechanisms and theories of functions of sleep, as well as the physiological and

  4. Exploiting Concurrent Wake-Up Transmissions Using Beat Frequencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timo Kumberg

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Wake-up receivers are the natural choice for wireless sensor networks because of their ultra-low power consumption and their ability to provide communications on demand. A downside of ultra-low power wake-up receivers is their low sensitivity caused by the passive demodulation of the carrier signal. In this article, we present a novel communication scheme by exploiting purposefully-interfering out-of-tune signals of two or more wireless sensor nodes, which produce the wake-up signal as the beat frequency of superposed carriers. Additionally, we introduce a communication algorithm and a flooding protocol based on this approach. Our experiments show that our approach increases the received signal strength up to 3 dB, improving communication robustness and reliability. Furthermore, we demonstrate the feasibility of our newly-developed protocols by means of an outdoor experiment and an indoor setup consisting of several nodes. The flooding algorithm achieves almost a 100% wake-up rate in less than 20 ms.

  5. Integration of human sleep-wake regulation and circadian rhythmicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijk, Derk-Jan; Lockley, Steven W.

    2002-01-01

    The human sleep-wake cycle is generated by a circadian process, originating from the suprachiasmatic nuclei, in interaction with a separate oscillatory process: the sleep homeostat. The sleep-wake cycle is normally timed to occur at a specific phase relative to the external cycle of light-dark exposure. It is also timed at a specific phase relative to internal circadian rhythms, such as the pineal melatonin rhythm, the circadian sleep-wake propensity rhythm, and the rhythm of responsiveness of the circadian pacemaker to light. Variations in these internal and external phase relationships, such as those that occur in blindness, aging, morning and evening, and advanced and delayed sleep-phase syndrome, lead to sleep disruptions and complaints. Changes in ocular circadian photoreception, interindividual variation in the near-24-h intrinsic period of the circadian pacemaker, and sleep homeostasis can contribute to variations in external and internal phase. Recent findings on the physiological and molecular-genetic correlates of circadian sleep disorders suggest that the timing of the sleep-wake cycle and circadian rhythms is closely integrated but is, in part, regulated differentially.

  6. Non-linear Plasma Wake Growth of Electron Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Hutchinson, I H; Zhou, C

    2015-01-01

    An object's wake in a plasma with small Debye length that drifts \\emph{across} the magnetic field is subject to electrostatic electron instabilities. Such situations include, for example, the moon in the solar wind wake and probes in magnetized laboratory plasmas. The instability drive mechanism can equivalently be considered drift down the potential-energy gradient or drift up the density-gradient. The gradients arise because the plasma wake has a region of depressed density and electrostatic potential into which ions are attracted along the field. The non-linear consequences of the instability are analysed in this paper. At physical ratios of electron to ion mass, neither linear nor quasilinear treatment can explain the observation of large-amplitude perturbations that disrupt the ion streams well before they become ion-ion unstable. We show here, however, that electron holes, once formed, continue to grow, driven by the drift mechanism, and if they remain in the wake may reach a maximum non-linearly stable...

  7. Sleep-Wake Actigraphy and Light Exposure During Spaceflight - Short

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czeisler, Charles A.; Wright, Kenneth P., Jr.; Ronda, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    Sleep-Wake Actigraphy and Light Exposure During Spaceflight - Short (Sleep-Short) will examine the effects of spaceflight on the sleep of the astronauts during space shuttle missions. Advancing state-of-the-art technology for monitoring, diagnosing and assessing treatment of sleep patterns is vital to treating insomnia on Earth and in space.

  8. Large-Eddy Simulation of turbine wake in complex terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Jacob; Troldborg, Niels; Sørensen, Niels N.

    2017-01-01

    We present Large-Eddy Simulation results of a turbine wake in realistic complex terrain with slopes above 0.5. By comparing simulations including and without the wind turbine we can estimate the induction factor, a, and we show how the presence of a strong recirculation zone in the terrain dictates...

  9. Results of Sexbierum Wind Farm: single wake measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cleijne, J.W.

    1993-01-01

    In the framework of the JOULE-0064 'Full-scale Measurements in Wind Turbine Arrays' in the period between June-November 1992 measurements have been performed in the Sexbierum Wind Farm. The aim of the measurements is to provide data for the validation of wake and wind farm models, which are being

  10. Wind Farm Wake: The Horns Rev Photo Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre-Elouan Réthoré

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to examine the nowadays well-known wind farm wake photographs taken on 12 February 2008 at the offshore Horns Rev 1 wind farm. The meteorological conditions are described from observations from several satellite sensors quantifying clouds, surface wind vectors and sea surface temperature as well as ground-based information at and near the wind farm, including Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA data. The SCADA data reveal that the case of fog formation occurred 12 February 2008 on the 10:10 UTC. The fog formation is due to very special atmospheric conditions where a layer of cold humid air above a warmer sea surface re-condensates to fog in the wake of the turbines. The process is fed by warm humid air up-drafted from below in the counter-rotating swirl generated by the clock-wise rotating rotors. The condensation appears to take place primarily in the wake regions with relatively high axial velocities and high turbulent kinetic energy. The wind speed is near cut-in and most turbines produce very little power. The rotational pattern of spiraling bands produces the large-scale structure of the wake fog.

  11. Comparison study between wind turbine and power kite wakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, T.; Meyers, J.

    2017-05-01

    Airborne Wind Energy (AWE) is an emerging technology in the field of renewable energy that uses kites to harvest wind energy. However, unlike for conventional wind turbines, the wind environment in AWE systems has not yet been studied in much detail. We propose a simulation framework using Large Eddy Simulation to model the wakes of such kite systems and offer a comparison with turbine-like wakes. In order to model the kite effects on the flow, a lifting line technique is used. We investigate different wake configurations related to the operation modes of wind turbines and airborne systems in drag mode. In the turbine mode, the aerodynamic torque of the blades is directly added to the flow. In the kite drag mode, the aerodynamic torque of the wings is directly balanced by an opposite torque induced by on-board generators; this results in a total torque on the flow that is zero. We present the main differences in wake characteristics, especially flow induction and vorticity fields, for the depicted operation modes both with laminar and turbulent inflows.

  12. An Analytical Model of Wake Deflection Due to Shear Flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Micallef, D.; Simao Ferreira, C.J.; Sant, T.; Van Bussel, G.J.W.

    2010-01-01

    The main motivation behind this work is to create a purely analytical engineering model for wind turbine wake upward deflection due to shear flow, by developing a closed form solution of the velocity field due to an oblique vortex ring. The effectiveness of the model is evaluated by comparing the

  13. Gap Winds and Wakes: SAR Observations and Numerical Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Feifei; Smith, Ronald B.

    1999-04-01

    The nature of terrain-induced gap winds and wakes in the atmosphere is examined using surface wind data from synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and the shallow water equations. The shallow water model is used to predict the types of wake-jet wind patterns that might occur behind an idealized pair of bell-shaped hills with a gap between them. A regime diagram is constructed based on the width of the gap and the upstream Froude number. Specific predictions of the model are found to compare moderately well with SAR data from four examples of airflow near Unimak Island in the Aleutian Chain. The model predicts the observed wakes and jets, including jets that exceed the upstream speed. Theoretical analysis considers the relative importance of rising terrain and narrowing valley walls in the acceleration of gap winds. Wind speeds in the wake region are controlled by the Bernoulli function and regional pressure. Gap winds therefore are streams of air that have avoided Bernoulli loss over the terrain by passing through gaps. The speed of gap winds can exceed the upstream speed only in ridgelike situations when the regional leeside pressure is lower than the upstream pressure.

  14. Wind turbine and actuator disc wake : Two experimental campaigns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lignarolo, L.; Ragni, D.; Simao Ferreira, C.J.; van Bussel, G.J.W.

    2015-01-01

    The present paper is the summary of 3 years of research on the wake aerodynamics of horizontal axis wind turbine at Delft University of Technology, the Netherlands. In particular, the main results and the conclusions of two experimental campaigns are collected. The underlying research question is:

  15. PIV in a model wind turbine rotor wake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Knud Erik; Naumov, Igor; Karbadin, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Stereoscopic particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements of the flow in the wake of scale model of a horizontal axis wind turbine is presented Near the rotor, measurements are made in vertical planes intersecting the rotor axis These planes capture flow effect from the tip and root vortices...

  16. Wake Forest University: Building a Campus-Wide Mentoring Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWilliams, Allison E.

    2017-01-01

    This article describes recent efforts by Wake Forest University to develop a campus-wide mentoring culture to support holistic student development, to assist with the critical transition from high school to college to life after college, and to develop skills and practices that will be valued by employers and graduate schools. The article…

  17. Numerical investigation of wake structures of slow-flying bats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shizhao; Zhang, Xing; He, Guowei

    2010-11-01

    Recently, some unique features of wake structure in bat flight have been revealed by experiments. It is found that the flow structure of bat flight is more complex than that of bird. A conceptual wake model of bat flight has been "rebuilt" using 2D DPIV images, but there is some risk of missing the details regarding dynamics of 3D vortex structures. Detailed flow information is still needed to understand the unsteady flow in bat flying. In this work, we perform 3D simulation of bat flying at the Reynolds number of 1000 (based on upstream flow and mean chord length) using the immersed boundary method. The geometry and wing-beat kinematics of bat are taken from the work of Watts et al (2001). The topology and evolution of the wake structures are described. The variation of topology in wake structures with the flapping Strouhal number is investigated. Moreover, the link between the generation of high lift and leading edge vortex is also studied.

  18. Age differences in sleep-wake behavior under natural conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kramer, C.J.; Kerkhof, G.A.; Hofman, W.F.

    1999-01-01

    Differences in lifestyle may account for a considerable portion of the reported age-related changes in overt circadian rhythmicity. By instructing a group of healthy, noninstitutionalized, elderly males (aged 59-74 yrs) and a group of young male adults (aged 18-26 yrs) to keep a sleep-wake log for a

  19. Time to wake up: reactive countermeasures to sleep inertia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilditch, Cassie J; Dorrian, Jillian; Banks, Siobhan

    2016-12-07

    Sleep inertia is the period of impaired performance and grogginess experienced after waking. This period of impairment is of concern to workers who are on-call, or nap during work hours, and need to perform safety-critical tasks soon after waking. While several studies have investigated the best sleep timing and length to minimise sleep inertia effects, few have focused on countermeasures -especially those that can be implemented after waking (i.e. reactive countermeasures). This structured review summarises current literature on reactive countermeasures to sleep inertia such as caffeine, light, and temperature and discusses evidence for the effectiveness and operational viability of each approach. Current literature does not provide a convincing evidence-base for a reactive countermeasure. Caffeine is perhaps the best option, although it is most effective when administered prior to sleep and is therefore not strictly reactive. Investigations into light and temperature have found promising results for improving subjective alertness; further research is needed to determine whether these countermeasures can also attenuate performance impairment. Future research in this area would benefit from study design features highlighted in this review. In the meantime, it is recommended that proactive sleep inertia countermeasures are used, and that safety-critical tasks are avoided immediately after waking.

  20. Experimental Investigation of the Supersonic Wake of a Reentry Capsule

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrijer, F.F.J.; Walpot, L.M.G.F.M.

    2010-01-01

    The wake behind an Apollo shaped capsule is investigated in the framework of the ’afterbody heating’ topic in the RTO WG043 working group. Measurements are performed by means of schlieren, shadowgraphy and stereo particle image velocimetry (SPIV) and are used for CFD validation purposes. The model

  1. Modelling and measurements of wakes in large wind farms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barthelmie, Rebecca Jane; Rathmann, Ole; Frandsen, Sten Tronæs

    2007-01-01

    The paper presents research conducted in the Flow workpackage of the EU funded UPWIND project which focuses on improving models of flow within and downwind of large wind farms in complex terrain and offshore. The main activity is modelling the behaviour of wind turbine wakes in order to improve p...

  2. Flow and wakes in complex terrain and offshore

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barthelmie, Rebecca J.; Schepers, J.G.; Pihl, Sander van der

    2007-01-01

    The paper presents research conducted in the Flow workpackage of the EU funded UPWIND project which focuses on improving models for flow within and downwind of large wind farms in complex terrain and offshore. The main activity is modelling the behaviour of wind turbine wakes in order to improve ...

  3. Wind Farm Wake: The 2016 Horns Rev Photo Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Bay Hasager

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Offshore wind farm wakes were observed and photographed in foggy conditions at Horns Rev 2 on 25 January 2016 at 12:45 UTC. These new images show highly contrasting conditions regarding the wind speed, turbulence intensity, atmospheric stability, weather conditions and wind farm wake development as compared to the Horns Rev 1 photographs from 12 February 2008. The paper examines the atmospheric conditions from satellite images, radiosondes, lidar and wind turbine data and compares the observations to results from atmospheric meso-scale modelling and large eddy simulation. Key findings are that a humid and warm air mass was advected from the southwest over cold sea and the dew-point temperature was such that cold-water advection fog formed in a shallow layer. The flow was stably stratified and the freestream wind speed was 13 m/s at hub height, which means that most turbines produced at or near rated power. The wind direction was southwesterly and long, narrow wakes persisted several rotor diameters downwind of the wind turbines. Eventually mixing of warm air from aloft dispersed the fog in the far wake region of the wind farm.

  4. Noncompliance with Medical Regimen in Haemodialysis Treatment: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paraskevi Theofilou

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients undergoing haemodialysis treatment have a high burden of disease (particularly cardiovascular comorbidities affecting their quality of life and dramatically shortening life expectancy. Effective chronic kidney disease (CKD control requires regular preventive medication and a response to that medication. Poor receptiveness to CKD medication can be related to individual variability in the dose needed to achieve a response, as well as to low-adherent behaviour in relation to the CKD medication regimen. Some patients, though not many, according to studies' findings, abuse the medical regimen as a result of suicidal tendencies. The present case gave us the opportunity to consider the causes and clinical findings and review the specific psychological interventions for patients with CKD.

  5. Basis for selecting optimum antibiotic regimens for secondary peritonitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maseda, Emilio; Gimenez, Maria-Jose; Gilsanz, Fernando; Aguilar, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Adequate management of severely ill patients with secondary peritonitis requires supportive therapy of organ dysfunction, source control of infection and antimicrobial therapy. Since secondary peritonitis is polymicrobial, appropriate empiric therapy requires combination therapy in order to achieve the needed coverage for both common and more unusual organisms. This article reviews etiological agents, resistance mechanisms and their prevalence, how and when to cover them and guidelines for treatment in the literature. Local surveillances are the basis for the selection of compounds in antibiotic regimens, which should be further adapted to the increasing number of patients with risk factors for resistance (clinical setting, comorbidities, previous antibiotic treatments, previous colonization, severity…). Inadequate antimicrobial regimens are strongly associated with unfavorable outcomes. Awareness of resistance epidemiology and of clinical consequences of inadequate therapy against resistant bacteria is crucial for clinicians treating secondary peritonitis, with delicate balance between optimization of empirical therapy (improving outcomes) and antimicrobial overuse (increasing resistance emergence).

  6. Impacts of 12-dose regimen for latent tuberculosis infection

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Yi-Wen; Yang, Shun-Fa; Yeh, Yen-Po; Tsao, Thomas Chang-Yao; Tsao, Shih-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Treatment of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) is essential for eradicating tuberculosis (TB). Moreover, the patient adherence is crucial in determining the effectiveness of TB control. Isoniazid given by DOTS daily for 9 months (9H) is the standard treatment for LTBI in Taiwan. However, the completion rate is low due to the long treatment period and its side effects. The combined regimen using a high dose of rifapentine/isoniazid once weekly for 12 weeks (3HP) has been used as an...

  7. Numerical simulations of wake interaction between two wind turbines at various inflow conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troldborg, Niels; Larsen, Gunner Chr.; Aagaard Madsen, Helge

    2011-01-01

    The phenomenon of wake interaction between two wind turbines was analysed using the actuator line technique and full unsteady Navier–Stokes computations. Results are presented for varying mutual distances between the two turbines and both full wake and half wake situations were considered...

  8. Effect of nacelle on wake meandering in a laboratory scale wind turbine using LES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foti, Daniel; Yang, Xiaolei; Guala, Michele; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2015-11-01

    Wake meandering, large scale motion in the wind turbine wakes, has considerable effects on the velocity deficit and turbulence intensity in the turbine wake from the laboratory scale to utility scale wind turbines. In the dynamic wake meandering model, the wake meandering is assumed to be caused by large-scale atmospheric turbulence. On the other hand, Kang et al. (J. Fluid Mech., 2014) demonstrated that the nacelle geometry has a significant effect on the wake meandering of a hydrokinetic turbine, through the interaction of the inner wake of the nacelle vortex with the outer wake of the tip vortices. In this work, the significance of the nacelle on the wake meandering of a miniature wind turbine previously used in experiments (Howard et al., Phys. Fluid, 2015) is demonstrated with large eddy simulations (LES) using immersed boundary method with fine enough grids to resolve the turbine geometric characteristics. The three dimensionality of the wake meandering is analyzed in detail through turbulent spectra and meander reconstruction. The computed flow fields exhibit wake dynamics similar to those observed in the wind tunnel experiments and are analyzed to shed new light into the role of the energetic nacelle vortex on wake meandering. This work was supported by Department of Energy DOE (DE-EE0002980, DE-EE0005482 and DE-AC04-94AL85000), and Sandia National Laboratories. Computational resources were provided by Sandia National Laboratories and the University of Minnesota Supercomputing.

  9. Mathematical model of network dynamics governing mouse sleep-wake behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behn, Cecilia G Diniz; Brown, Emery N; Scammell, Thomas E; Kopell, Nancy J

    2007-06-01

    Recent work in experimental neurophysiology has identified distinct neuronal populations in the rodent brain stem and hypothalamus that selectively promote wake and sleep. Mutual inhibition between these cell groups has suggested the conceptual model of a sleep-wake switch that controls transitions between wake and sleep while minimizing time spent in intermediate states. By combining wake- and sleep-active populations with populations governing transitions between different stages of sleep, a "sleep-wake network" of neuronal populations may be defined. To better understand the dynamics inherent in this network, we created a model sleep-wake network composed of coupled relaxation oscillation equations. Mathematical analysis of the deterministic model provides insight into the dynamics underlying state transitions and predicts mechanisms for each transition type. With the addition of noise, the simulated sleep-wake behavior generated by the model reproduces many qualitative and quantitative features of mouse sleep-wake behavior. In particular, the existence of simulated brief awakenings is a unique feature of the model. In addition to capturing the experimentally observed qualitative difference between brief and sustained wake bouts, the model suggests distinct network mechanisms for the two types of wakefulness. Because circadian and other factors alter the fine architecture of sleep-wake behavior, this model provides a novel framework to explore dynamical principles that may underlie normal and pathologic sleep-wake physiology.

  10. A comparative study of eyelid cleaning regimens in chronic blepharitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Key, J E

    1996-07-01

    Blepharitis, an intrinsic eyelid inflammation with crusting and irritation, presents a great problem for patients wearing contact lenses. An important part of blepharitis therapy is eyelid hygiene, including the use of either soap, dilute baby shampoo, or commercial lid scrubs. In this study, a comparison was made between these three cleaning regimens in a group of 25 patients, 80% of whom (20/25) wore contact lenses. Patients used commercial eyelid scrub on right eyelids and a hypo-allergenic bar soap on left eyelids. Patient symptoms, slit lamp findings, and overall preferences were determined at the end of 4 months. A subgroup of 10 patients using lid scrub on right eyelids and dilute baby shampoo on left eyelids was followed for an additional 3 months. At the end of 4 months, 24% (6/25) of the patients noted no difference between soap and lid scrub, but 89% (17/19) of the others preferred the lid scrub. In the group using baby shampoo, 50% (5/10) noted no difference in 3 months, but 80% (4/5) of the remaining patients preferred the lid scrub. All patients improved in slit lamp findings with all three regimens, and patient preference was overwhelmingly in favor of the lid scrub regimen for convenience and ease of use.

  11. Acoustic Wake-Up Receivers for Home Automation Control Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Bannoura

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Automated home applications are to ease the use of technology and devices around the house. Most of the electronic devices, like shutters or entertainment products (Hifi, TV and even WiFi, are constantly in a standby mode, where they consume a considerable amount of energy. The standby mode is necessary to react to commands triggered by the user, but the time the device spends in a standby mode is considered long. In our work, we present a receiver that is attached to home appliances that allows the devices to be activated while they are completely turned off in order to reduce the energy consumed in the standby mode. The receiver contains a low power wake-up module that reacts to an addressable acoustic 20-kHz sound signal that controls home devices that are connected to it. The acoustic wake-up signal can be sent by any kind of speaker that is available in commercial smartphones. The smartphones will operate as transmitters to the signals. Our wake-up receiver consists of two parts: a low power passive circuit connected to a wake-up chip microcontroller and an active micro-electromechanical system (MEMS microphone that receives the acoustic signal. A duty cycle is required to reduce the power consumption of the receiver, because the signal reception occurs when the microphone is active. The current consumption was measured to be 15 μA in sleep mode and 140 μA in active mode. An average wake-up range of 10 m using a smartphone as a sender was achieved.

  12. Large Eddy Simulation of Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Wakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sina Shamsoddin

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, large eddy simulation (LES is combined with a turbine model to investigate the wake behind a vertical-axis wind turbine (VAWT in a three-dimensional turbulent flow. Two methods are used to model the subgrid-scale (SGS stresses: (a the Smagorinsky model; and (b the modulated gradient model. To parameterize the effects of the VAWT on the flow, two VAWT models are developed: (a the actuator swept-surface model (ASSM, in which the time-averaged turbine-induced forces are distributed on a surface swept by the turbine blades, i.e., the actuator swept surface; and (b the actuator line model (ALM, in which the instantaneous blade forces are only spatially distributed on lines representing the blades, i.e., the actuator lines. This is the first time that LES has been applied and validated for the simulation of VAWT wakes by using either the ASSM or the ALM techniques. In both models, blade-element theory is used to calculate the lift and drag forces on the blades. The results are compared with flow measurements in the wake of a model straight-bladed VAWT, carried out in the Institute de Méchanique et Statistique de la Turbulence (IMST water channel. Different combinations of SGS models with VAWT models are studied, and a fairly good overall agreement between simulation results and measurement data is observed. In general, the ALM is found to better capture the unsteady-periodic nature of the wake and shows a better agreement with the experimental data compared with the ASSM. The modulated gradient model is also found to be a more reliable SGS stress modeling technique, compared with the Smagorinsky model, and it yields reasonable predictions of the mean flow and turbulence characteristics of a VAWT wake using its theoretically-determined model coefficient.

  13. Using airborne and satellite SAR for wake mapping offshore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Merete B.; Hasager, Charlotte B.

    2006-09-01

    Offshore wind energy is progressing rapidly around Europe. One of the latest initiatives is the installation of multiple wind farms in clusters to share cables and maintenance costs and to fully exploit premium wind resource sites. For siting of multiple nearby wind farms, the wind turbine wake effect must be considered. Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) is an imaging remote sensing technique which offers a unique opportunity to describe spatial variations of wind speed offshore. For the first time an airborne SAR instrument was used for data acquisition over a large offshore wind farm. The aim was to identify the turbine wake effect from SAR-derived wind speed maps as a downstream region of reduced wind speed. The aircraft SAR campaign was conducted on 12 October 2003 over the wind farm at Horns Rev in the North Sea. Nearly simultaneous measurements were acquired over the area by the SAR on board the ERS-2 satellite. In addition, meteorological data were collected. Both aircraft and satellite SAR-derived wind speed maps showed significant velocity deficits downstream of the wind farm. Wind speed maps retrieved from aircraft SAR suggested deficits of up to 20% downstream of the last turbine, whereas satellite SAR-derived maps showed deficits of the order of 10%. The difference originated partly from the two different reference methods used for normalization of measured wind speeds. The detected region of reduced wind speed had the same width as the wind turbine array, indicating a low degree of horizontal wake dispersion. The downstream wake extent was approximately 10 km, which corresponds well with results from previous studies and with wake model predictions. Copyright

  14. Daily rhythms of the sleep-wake cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterhouse, Jim; Fukuda, Yumi; Morita, Takeshi

    2012-03-13

    The amount and timing of sleep and sleep architecture (sleep stages) are determined by several factors, important among which are the environment, circadian rhythms and time awake. Separating the roles played by these factors requires specific protocols, including the constant routine and altered sleep-wake schedules. Results from such protocols have led to the discovery of the factors that determine the amounts and distribution of slow wave and rapid eye movement sleep as well as to the development of models to determine the amount and timing of sleep. One successful model postulates two processes. The first is process S, which is due to sleep pressure (and increases with time awake) and is attributed to a 'sleep homeostat'. Process S reverses during slow wave sleep (when it is called process S'). The second is process C, which shows a daily rhythm that is parallel to the rhythm of core temperature. Processes S and C combine approximately additively to determine the times of sleep onset and waking. The model has proved useful in describing normal sleep in adults. Current work aims to identify the detailed nature of processes S and C. The model can also be applied to circumstances when the sleep-wake cycle is different from the norm in some way. These circumstances include: those who are poor sleepers or short sleepers; the role an individual's chronotype (a measure of how the timing of the individual's preferred sleep-wake cycle compares with the average for a population); and changes in the sleep-wake cycle with age, particularly in adolescence and aging, since individuals tend to prefer to go to sleep later during adolescence and earlier in old age. In all circumstances, the evidence that sleep times and architecture are altered and the possible causes of these changes (including altered S, S' and C processes) are examined.

  15. Sleep inertia: performance changes after sleep, rest and active waking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer-Tinguely, Gilberte; Achermann, Peter; Landolt, Hans-Peter; Regel, Sabine J; Rétey, Julia V; Dürr, Roland; Borbély, Alexander A; Gottselig, Julie M

    2005-03-01

    Napping benefits and sustains subsequent performance. Prophylactic naps have been recommended as a means to maintain performance during extended wakefulness, as required during shiftwork. However, napping may cause short-term performance impairments, because awakening from sleep is followed by sleep inertia, a period of hypovigilance and impaired cognitive and behavioral performance. We investigated sleep inertia after an afternoon nap. Healthy 18-28 year-olds (n=50, not sleep deprived) were assigned to sleep, active wake or rest groups for a 2-h experimental phase with polysomnography starting either at 14:00 or 16:00 for half of each group. Before (baseline, 12:30 or 14:30) and in five sessions during the hour after the experimental phase (16:00-17:00 or 18:00-19:00), subjects completed an addition task, an auditory reaction time task, and the Stanford Sleepiness Scale. In session one, addition speed in the sleep group was reduced compared with baseline and with active wake controls, whereas calculation accuracy did not change. Addition speed in the sleep and rest groups increased substantially from session one to session two and reached a level similar to that of the active wake group by the fifth session. In the first session, auditory reaction speed of the sleep group was reduced compared with baseline and with rest controls but did not differ from the active wake group. The slowest reaction times showed significant recovery after 20 min. The groups reported similar increases in subjective sleepiness after the experimental period. These findings provide evidence for performance slowing and recovery during the hour following a 2-h nap opportunity. They highlight the importance of employing multiple control groups and various objective and subjective measures to assess sleep inertia.

  16. Daily rhythms of the sleep-wake cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waterhouse Jim

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The amount and timing of sleep and sleep architecture (sleep stages are determined by several factors, important among which are the environment, circadian rhythms and time awake. Separating the roles played by these factors requires specific protocols, including the constant routine and altered sleep-wake schedules. Results from such protocols have led to the discovery of the factors that determine the amounts and distribution of slow wave and rapid eye movement sleep as well as to the development of models to determine the amount and timing of sleep. One successful model postulates two processes. The first is process S, which is due to sleep pressure (and increases with time awake and is attributed to a 'sleep homeostat'. Process S reverses during slow wave sleep (when it is called process S'. The second is process C, which shows a daily rhythm that is parallel to the rhythm of core temperature. Processes S and C combine approximately additively to determine the times of sleep onset and waking. The model has proved useful in describing normal sleep in adults. Current work aims to identify the detailed nature of processes S and C. The model can also be applied to circumstances when the sleep-wake cycle is different from the norm in some way. These circumstances include: those who are poor sleepers or short sleepers; the role an individual's chronotype (a measure of how the timing of the individual's preferred sleep-wake cycle compares with the average for a population; and changes in the sleep-wake cycle with age, particularly in adolescence and aging, since individuals tend to prefer to go to sleep later during adolescence and earlier in old age. In all circumstances, the evidence that sleep times and architecture are altered and the possible causes of these changes (including altered S, S' and C processes are examined.

  17. Separation of Lift-Generated Vortex Wakes Into Two Diverging Parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossow, Vernon J.; Brown, Anthony P.

    2010-01-01

    As part of an ongoing study of the spreading rate of lift-generated vortex wakes, the present investigation considers possible reasons as to why segments of lift-generated wakes sometimes depart from the main part of the wake to move rapidly in either an upward or downward direction. It is assumed that deficiencies or enhancements of the lift carry over across the fuselage-shrouded wing are the driving mechanism for departures of wake-segments. The computations presented first indicate that upwardly departing wake segments that were observed and photographed could have been produced by a deficiency in lift carryover across the fuselage-shrouded part of the wing. Computations made of idealized vortex wakes indicate that upward departure of a wake segment requires a centerline reduction in the span loading of 70% or more, whether the engines are at idle or robust thrust. Similarly, it was found that downward departure of wake segments is produced when the lift over the center part of the wing is enhanced. However, it was also found that downward departures do not occur without the presence of robust engine-exhaust streams (i.e., engines must NOT be at idle). In those cases, downward departures of a wake segment occurs when the centerline value of the loading is enhanced by any amount between about 10% to 100%. Observations of condensation trails indicate that downward departure of wake segments is rare. Upward departures of wake segments appears to be more common but still rare. A study to determine the part of the aircraft that causes wake departures has not been carried out. However, even though departures of wake segments rarely occur, some aircraft do regularly shed these wake structures. If aircraft safety is to be assured to a high degree of reliability, and a solution for eliminating them is not implemented, existing guidelines for the avoidance of vortex wakes [1,3] may need to be broadened to include possible increases in wake sizes caused by vertical

  18. Standardised nomenclature for glucocorticoid dosages and glucocorticoid treatment regimens : current questions and tentative answers in rheumatology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buttgereit, F; da Silva, JAP; Burmester, GR; Cutolo, M; Jacobs, J; Kirwan, J; Kohler, L; van Riel, P; Vischer, T; Bijlsma, JWJ

    In rheumatology and other medical specialties there is a discrepancy between the widespread use and the imprecise designation of glucocorticoid treatment regimens. Verbal descriptions of glucocorticoid treatment regimens used in various phases of diseases vary between countries and institutions.

  19. Chemotherapy for pulmonary large cell neuroendocrine carcinomas : Does the regimen matter?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derks, Jules L.; van Suylen, Robert Jan; Thunnissen, Erik; den Bakker, Michael A.; Groen, Harry J.; Smit, Egbert F.; Damhuis, Ronald A.; van den Broek, Esther C.; Speel, Ernst-Jan M.; Dingemans, Anne-Marie C.

    Pulmonary large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma (LCNEC) is rare. Chemotherapy for metastatic LCNEC ranges from small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) regimens to nonsmall cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) chemotherapy regimens. We analysed outcomes of chemotherapy treatments for LCNEC. The Netherlands Cancer

  20. Once-weekly dalbavancin versus standard-of-care antimicrobial regimens for treatment of skin and soft-tissue infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seltzer, Elyse; Dorr, Mary Beth; Goldstein, Beth P; Perry, Marc; Dowell, James A; Henkel, Tim

    2003-11-15

    Dalbavancin, a novel glycopeptide with a long elimination half-life ( approximately 9-12 days), was compared to standard antimicrobial therapy for skin and soft-tissue infections (SSTIs). In a randomized, controlled, open-label, phase 2 proof-of-concept trial, adults received 1100 mg of dalbavancin (as a single intravenous infusion), 1000 mg of dalbavancin intravenously and then 500 mg intravenously 1 week later, or a prospectively defined standard-of-care regimen. A gram-positive pathogen was isolated from samples obtained from 41 (66%) of 62 patients at baseline; Staphylococcus aureus was the most prevalent species (83% of pathogens). Clinical success rates at a follow-up visit (test of cure) were 94.1% among patients treated with 2 doses of dalbavancin, 61.5% among patients treated with 1 dose of dalbavancin, and 76.2% among patients treated with a standard-of-care regimen. All treatment regimens were well tolerated; drug-related adverse reaction rates were similar across the 3 groups. These findings suggest that a regimen of 2 doses of dalbavancin administered 1 week apart is effective in the treatment of complicated, gram-positive bacterial SSTIs and warrants further study.

  1. Tetracycline- and furazolidone-containing quadruple regimen as rescue treatment for Helicobacter pylori infection: a single center retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuemiao; Gao, Wen; Cheng, Hong; Zhang, Xuezhi; Hu, Fulian

    2014-10-01

    Eradication rate of Helicobacter pylori decreases worldwide, while antibiotics resistance rates of H. pylori increase rapidly in recent years. In most cases, H. pylori would be resistant to clarithromycin, metronidazole, and quinolone if these antibiotics had been used as component of eradication regimen. H. pylori strains resistant to both tetracycline and furazolidone are rare. The aim of our study was to evaluate efficacy and side effects of tetracycline- and furazolidone-containing quadruple regimen as rescue treatment. Patients with H. pylori infection given RTFB (rabeprazole 20 mg b.i.d. + tetracycline 750 mg b.i.d. +furazolidone 100 mg b.i.d. + colloidal bismuth subcitrate 200 mg b.i.d.) regimen for 14 days as rescue treatment were enrolled in this retrospective study. Eradication status was evaluated by (13) C-urea breath test, and side effects were collected. One hundred and nine patients were enrolled. The intention-to-treat eradication rate was 91.74% (100 of 109) and 95.24% (100 of 105) per protocol analysis. Side effects including fever, palpitation, and skin rash occurred in 35 patients. The 14-day tetracycline- and furazolidone-containing quadruple regimen can achieve a relatively high eradication rate as rescue treatment. Some side effects including fever may occur during the treatment. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. TWO-CHANNEL DIELECTRIC WAKE FIELD ACCELERATOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2012-05-30

    Experimental results are reported for test beam acceleration and deflection in a two-channel, cm-scale, rectangular dielectric-lined wakefield accelerator structure energized by a 14-MeV drive beam. The dominant waveguide mode of the structure is at {approx}30 GHz, and the structure is configured to exhibit a high transformer ratio ({approx}12:1). Accelerated bunches in the narrow secondary channel of the structure are continuously energized via Cherenkov radiation that is emitted by a drive bunch moving in the wider primary channel. Observed energy gains and losses, transverse deflections, and changes in the test bunch charge distribution compare favorably with predictions of theory.

  3. Cost/efficacy analysis of preferred Spanish AIDS study group regimens and the dual therapy with lopinavir/ritonavir plus lamivudine for initial ART in HIV infected adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatell Artigas, Josep María; Arribas López, José Ramón; Lázaro Y de Mercado, Pablo; Blasco Bravo, Antonio Javier

    2016-01-01

    The National AIDS Plan and the Spanish AIDS study group (GESIDA) proposes "preferred regimens" (PR) of antiretroviral treatment (ART) as initial therapy in HIV-infected patients. In 2013, the recommended regimens were all triple therapy regimens. The Gardel Study assessed the efficacy of a dual therapy (DT) combination of lopinavir/ritonavir (LPV/r) plus lamivudine (3TC). Our objective is to evaluate the GESIDA PR and the DT regimen LPV/r+3TC cost/efficacy ratios. Decision tree models were built. probability of having viral load <50 copies/mL at week 48. ART regime cost: costs of ART, adverse effects, and drug resistance tests during the first 48 weeks. Cost/efficacy ratios varied between 5,817 and 13,930 euros per responder at 48 weeks, for the DT of LPV/r+3TC and tenofovir DF/emtricitabine+raltegravir, respectively. Taking into account the official Spanish prices of ART, the most efficient regimen was DT of LPV/r+3TC, followed by the triple therapy with non-nucleoside containing regimens. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  4. Design and implementation of low complexity wake-up receiver for underwater acoustic sensor networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Ming

    This thesis designs a low-complexity dual Pseudorandom Noise (PN) scheme for identity (ID) detection and coarse frame synchronization. The two PN sequences for a node are identical and are separated by a specified length of gap which serves as the ID of different sensor nodes. The dual PN sequences are short in length but are capable of combating severe underwater acoustic (UWA) multipath fading channels that exhibit time varying impulse responses up to 100 taps. The receiver ID detection is implemented on a microcontroller MSP430F5529 by calculating the correlation between the two segments of the PN sequence with the specified separation gap. When the gap length is matched, the correlator outputs a peak which triggers the wake-up enable. The time index of the correlator peak is used as the coarse synchronization of the data frame. The correlator is implemented by an iterative algorithm that uses only one multiplication and two additions for each sample input regardless of the length of the PN sequence, thus achieving low computational complexity. The real-time processing requirement is also met via direct memory access (DMA) and two circular buffers to accelerate data transfer between the peripherals and the memory. The proposed dual PN detection scheme has been successfully tested by simulated fading channels and real-world measured channels. The results show that, in long multipath channels with more than 60 taps, the proposed scheme achieves high detection rate and low false alarm rate using maximal-length sequences as short as 31 bits to 127 bits, therefore it is suitable as a low-power wake-up receiver. The future research will integrate the wake-up receiver with Digital Signal Processors (DSP) for payload detection.

  5. Sleep tendency during extended wakefulness: insights into adolescent sleep regulation and behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Daniel J; Jenni, Oskar G; Acebo, Christine; Carskadon, Mary A

    2005-09-01

    Sleep tendency (latency to sleep onset) was examined during extended waking in prepubertal and mature adolescents to determine whether sleep pressure is lower near bedtime in the latter group. Participants were nine prepubertal (pubertal stage Tanner 1, mean age 11.1 years, SD+/-1.3 years, five males) and 11 pubertally mature adolescents (Tanner 5, 13.9+/-1.2 years, three males). They spent 10 nights at home on an identical fixed 10-h sleep schedule followed by a 36-h constant routine with sleep latency tests at 2-h intervals using standard polysomnography. Saliva was collected to assess dim-light melatonin onset (DLMO) phase. DLMO was earlier in the Tanner 1 (mean clock time=20:33 hours, SD=49 min) than Tanner 5 group (21:29 hours+/-42 min). Sleep latency compared at a 'critical period' spanning 12.5 (20:30 hours clock time) to 18.5 h (02:30 hours) after waking did not differ at 20:30 hours, but was shorter for the Tanner 1 group at 22:30 hours (Tanner 1=9.2+/-6.3 min; Tanner 5=15.7+/-5.8 min), 00:30 hours (Tanner 1=3.6+/-1.7 min; Tanner 5=9.0+/-6.4 min), and 02:30 hours (Tanner 1=2.0+/-1.7 min; Tanner 5=4.3+/-3.2 min; trend). These differences were apparent controlling for circadian phase by partial correlation. Sleep tendency after 14.5, 16.5, and 18.5 h awake was lower in mature versus prepubertal adolescents, supporting our hypothesis that a developmental change of intrinsic sleep-wake regulation may provide physiologically mediated 'permission' for later bedtimes in older adolescents.

  6. An All-Fiber, Modular, Compact Wind Lidar for Wind Sensing and Wake Vortex Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Narasimha S.; Sibell, Russ; Vetorino, Steve; Higgins, Richard; Tracy, Allen

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses an innovative, compact and eyesafe coherent lidar system developed for wind and wake vortex sensing applications. With an innovative all-fiber and modular transceiver architecture, the wind lidar system has reduced size, weight and power requirements, and provides enhanced performance along with operational elegance. This all-fiber architecture is developed around fiber seed laser coupled to uniquely configured fiber amplifier modules. The innovative features of this lidar system, besides its all fiber architecture, include pulsewidth agility and user programmable 3D hemispherical scanner unit. Operating at a wavelength of 1.5457 microns and with a PRF of up to 20 KHz, the lidar transmitter system is designed as a Class 1 system with dimensions of 30"(W) x 46"(L) x 60"(H). With an operational range exceeding 10 km, the wind lidar is configured to measure wind velocities of greater than 120 m/s with an accuracy of +/- 0.2 m/s and allow range resolution of less than 15 m. The dynamical configuration capability of transmitted pulsewidths from 50 ns to 400 ns allows high resolution wake vortex measurements. The scanner uses innovative liquid metal slip ring and is built using 3D printer technology with light weight nylon. As such, it provides continuous 360 degree azimuth and 180 degree elevation scan angles with an incremental motion of 0.001 degree. The lidar system is air cooled and requires 110 V for its operation. This compact and modular lidar system is anticipated to provide mobility, reliability, and ease of field deployment for wind and wake vortex measurements. Currently, this wind lidar is undergoing validation tests under various atmospheric conditions. Preliminary results of these field measurements of wind characteristics that were recently carried out in Colorado are discussed.

  7. Altered Sleep Mechanisms following Traumatic Brain Injury and Relation to Waking Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly A Cote

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Sleep difficulties are commonly reported following traumatic brain injury (TBI, but few studies have systematically examined the neurophysiological characteristics of sleep. Sleep EEG was quantified over multiple nights to examine mechanisms underlying sleep disruption in individuals who had sustained a TBI and to explore the relationship between sleep disruption and waking function. Sleep was recorded from 20 individuals with a TBI (18-64 years and 20 age-matched controls over two uninterrupted nights, as well as during a night where auditory stimuli were delivered. All participants underwent neuropsychological testing and waking performance assessment. Compared to controls, the TBI group had subjective complaints of falling asleep, delayed sleep onset on polysomnography (PSG, less Slow Wave (< 1 Hz and delta (1-4 Hz EEG power in non-REM sleep, fewer spontaneous and evoked k-complexes, reduced periodicity of spontaneous k-complexes, and lower amplitude of evoked k-complexes. While for controls, the density, duration and periodicity of sleep spindles diminished with deepening of non-REM as typically observed, this pattern was disrupted in the TBI group with peak spindle presentation occurring in Stage 3 sleep. Night-to-night-stability of Stage 2 spindles was high for controls but absent for the TBI group. Greater injury severity was related to fewer evoked k-complexes and lower spindle density. Greater spindle production predicted better waking function in the TBI group. Taken together, these data demonstrate impairment in sleep regulatory and inhibitory mechanisms as factors underlying sleep complaints following a TBI. Spindle generation may be adaptive or a marker of resiliency following TBI.

  8. Comparison of different regimens of proton pump inhibitors for acute peptic ulcer bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Ignacio; Letelier, Luz M; Rada, Gabriel; Claro, Juan Carlos; Martin, Janet; Howden, Colin W; Yuan, Yuhong; Leontiadis, Grigorios I

    2013-06-12

    Treatment with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) improves clinical outcomes in patients with peptic ulcer bleeding. However, the optimal dose and route of administration of PPIs remains controversial. To evaluate the efficacy of different regimens of PPIs in the management of acute peptic ulcer bleeding using evidence from direct comparison randomized controlled trials (RCTs).We specifically intended to assess the differential effect of the dose and route of administration of PPI on mortality, rebleeding, surgical intervention, further endoscopic haemostatic treatment (EHT), length of hospital stay, transfusion requirements and adverse events. We searched CENTRAL (in The Cochrane Library 2010, Issue 3), MEDLINE and EMBASE (from inception to September 2010) and proceedings of major gastroenterology meetings (January 2000 to September 2010), without language restrictions. Original investigators were contacted to request missing data. RCTs that compared at least two different regimens of the same or a different PPI in patients with acute peptic ulcer bleeding, diagnosed endoscopically. Two reviewers independently selected studies, extracted data and assessed risk of bias. We synthesized data using the Mantel-Haenszel random-effects method and performed multivariate meta-regression with random permutations based on Monte Carlo simulation. We measured heterogeneity with the I² statistic and Cochrane Q test and assessed publication bias with funnel plots and Egger's test. We graded the overall quality of evidence using the GRADE approach. Twenty two RCTs were included; risk of bias was high in 17 and unclear in 5. The main analysis included 13 studies (1716 patients) comparing "high" dose regimens (72-hour cumulative dose > 600 mg of intravenous PPI) to other doses; there was no significant heterogeneity for any clinical outcome. We found low quality evidence that did not exclude a potential reduction or increase in mortality, rebleeding, surgical interventions or

  9. Comparative study on the wake deflection behind yawed wind turbine models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schottler, Jannik; Mühle, Franz; Bartl, Jan; Peinke, Joachim; Adaramola, Muyiwa S.; Sætran, Lars; Hölling, Michael

    2017-05-01

    In this wind tunnel campaign, detailed wake measurements behind two different model wind turbines in yawed conditions were performed. The wake deflections were quantified by estimating the rotor-averaged available power within the wake. By using two different model wind turbines, the influence of the rotor design and turbine geometry on the wake deflection caused by a yaw misalignment of 30° could be judged. It was found that the wake deflections three rotor diameters downstream were equal while at six rotor diameters downstream insignificant differences were observed. The results compare well with previous experimental and numerical studies.

  10. Wake response to an ocean-feedback mechanism: Madeira Island case study

    CERN Document Server

    Caldeira, R M A

    2012-01-01

    This discussion focused on the numerical study of a wake episode. The Weather Research and Forecasting model was used in a downscale mode. The current literature focuses the discussion on the adiabatic dynamics of atmospheric wakes. Changes in mountain height and consequently on its relation to the atmospheric inversion layer should explain the shift in wake regimes: from a 'strong-wake' to a 'weak-wake' scenario. Nevertheless, changes in SST variability can also induce similar regime shifts. Increase in evaporation, contributes to increase convection and thus to an uplift of the stratified atmospheric layer, above the critical height, with subsequent internal gravity wave activity.

  11. Long-term oscillations in the sleep/wake cycle of infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diambra, L.; Malta, C. P.; Capurro, A.

    2009-11-01

    The development of circadian sleep-wakefulness rhythm was investigated by a longitudinal study of six normal infants. We propose an entropy based measure for the sleep/wake cycle fragmentation. Our results confirm that the sleep/wake cycle fragmentation and the sleep/wake ratio decrease, while the circadian power increases during the maturation process of infants. In addition to these expected linear trends in the variables devised to quantify sleep consolidation, circadian power and sleep/wake ratio, we found that they present infradian rhythms in the monthly range.

  12. Determination of Wind Turbine Near-Wake Length Based on Stability Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Mikkelsen, Robert Flemming; Sarmast, Sasan

    2014-01-01

    -Stokes equations using the actuator line (ACL) method. The wake is perturbed by applying stochastic or harmonic excitations in the neighborhood of the tips of the blades. The flow field is then analyzed to obtain the stability properties of the tip vortices in the wake of the wind turbine. As a main outcome...... sufficient growth, we provide an analytical relationship between the turbulence intensity and the stable wake length. The analysis leads to a simple expression for determining the length of the near wake. This expression shows that the near wake length is inversely proportional to thrust, tip speed ratio...... and the logarithmic of the turbulence intensity....

  13. Premixed vs basal-bolus insulin regimen in Type 2 diabetes: comparison of clinical outcomes from randomized controlled trials and real-world data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anyanwagu, U; Mamza, J; Gordon, J; Donnelly, R; Idris, I

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate the concordance between data derived from randomized controlled trial (RCT) and real-world estimates of HbA1c and weight change after 24 weeks of initiation of a basal-bolus compared with a premixed insulin regimen in people with Type 2 diabetes. Data eight RCTs were pooled after a systematic review of studies examining basal-bolus (n = 1893) or premixed (n = 1517) regimens. Real-world data were extracted from the UK primary care dataset for people on basal-bolus (n = 7483) or premixed insulin regimens (n=10 744). The mean differences between HbA1c and weight from baseline were calculated using t-tests, while analysis of variance was used to compare the two treatment regimens. Linear regression analyses were used to determine the predictors of this change. Both insulin regimens were associated with HbA1c reductions (real-world data -0.28%; RCT data, -1.4%) and weight gain (real-world data, +0.27 kg; RCT data, +2.96 kg) but there were no significant differences between basal-bolus and premixed insulin. Discordances in the pattern of treatment response were observed, however, between real-world and RCT data for both insulin regimens. For any given baseline HbA1c concentration, the change in HbA1c in the RCTs was greater than in real-world conditions and for those with baseline weight above ~60 kg, RCT data showed overall weight gain in contrast to slight weight loss in the real-world population. Lastly, for both randomized controlled trial and real-world populations, while greater baseline weight was associated with reduced response to treatment, the association was much steeper in the RCT than in the real-world population. In addition, greater baseline weight was associated with greater weight reductions in both premixed insulin and basal-bolus insulin regimens, although to a lesser extent with the latter. These results highlight specific discrepancies in the HbA1c reduction and weight change in insulin regimen between real world versus RCT populations

  14. Test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendixen, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    Bidrag med en kortfattet, introducerende, perspektiverende og begrebsafklarende fremstilling af begrebet test i det pædagogiske univers.......Bidrag med en kortfattet, introducerende, perspektiverende og begrebsafklarende fremstilling af begrebet test i det pædagogiske univers....

  15. Particle Sizes and Self Gravity Wakes in Saturn's A Ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerousek, R. G.; Colwell, J. E.; Esposito, L. W.; Nicholson, P. D.

    2015-12-01

    The Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) and Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) have measured normal optical depths throughout Saturn's rings by stellar occultations covering a wide range of viewing geometries. The UVIS photometer has an effective wavelength of 0.15 µm and a relatively wide (6.0 mrad × 6.4 mrad) field-of-view. VIMS, in occultation mode, measures at an effective wavelength of 2.9 µm and over a single pixel of angular dimensions 0.25 mrad × 0.5 mrad. Occultations measured by VIMS at the same viewing geometry as UVIS occultations overstate the optical depth if particles smaller than 1.22λVIMS/2θ ~ 8.36 mm are present because light diffracted out of the VIMS pixel by those particles is not replaced by neighboring particles. By measuring differential optical depths one can probe the parameters of the ring particle size distribution (i.e. Zebker et al. 1985, Icarus, 64, 531-548). The technique is complicated, however, by the geometric dependence of the optical depth imposed by the non-axisymmetric self-gravity wakes, which are ephemeral elongated aggregates, deformed by Keplerian shear. Beginning with the granola bar wake model of Colwell et al. (2006, Geophys. Res. Lett., 33, L07201), we introduce a free parameter τsmall which represents the excess normal optical depth measured by VIMS due to sub-cm particles between the opaque wakes and combine VIMS and UVIS occultations for particle size analysis while simultaneously determining the properties of the wakes. We find that throughout the A Ring the wake properties generally agree with previously published results (Colwell et al. 2006, Hedman et al. 2007, Astron. J., 133, 2624-2629). We find a significant fraction of sub-cm particles in the inner and outer A Ring and in the troughs of density waves near strong Lindblad resonances. While wake properties vary in the halo regions surrounding these resonances, the abundance of sub-cm particles varies little from 124

  16. Application of Wind Tunnel Free-Flight Technique for Wake Vortex Encounters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon, Jay M.; Jordan, Frank L., Jr.; Stuever, Robert A.; Buttrill, Catherine W.

    1997-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation was conducted in the Langley 30- by 60-Foot Tunnel to assess the free-flight test technique as a tool in research on wake vortex encounters. A typical 17.5-percent scale business-class jet airplane model was flown behind a stationary wing mounted in the forward portion of the wind tunnel test section. The span ratio (model span-generating wingspan) was 0.75. The wing angle of attack could be adjusted to produce a vortex of desired strength. The test airplane model was successfully flown in the vortex and through the vortex for a range of vortex strengths. Data obtained included the model airplane body axis accelerations, angular rates, attitudes, and control positions as a function of vortex strength and relative position. Pilot comments and video records were also recorded during the vortex encounters.

  17. Aerodynamic Characteristic Analysis of Multi-Rotors Using a Modified Free-Wake Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jaewon; Yee, Kwanjung; Oh, Sejong

    Much research is in progress to develop a next-generation rotor system for various aircrafts, including unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) with multi-rotor systems, such as coaxial and tandem rotors. Development and design of such systems requires accurate estimation of rotor performance. The most serious problem encountered during analysis is wake prediction, because wake-wake and wake-rotor interactions make the problem very complex. This study analyzes the aerodynamic characteristics based on the free-wake method, which is both efficient and effective for predicting wake. This code is modified to include the effect of complex planforms as well as thickness by using an unsteady 3D panel method. A time-marching free-wake model is implemented based on the source-doublet panel method that assigns panels to the surface and analyzes them. The numerical wake instability, the most critical problem for analysis, is resolved by adopting slow start-up and by including viscous effects. Also, the instability due to wake interference in tandem rotor analysis is resolved by configuring the initial shapes of the multi-rotor wake as that of a single rotor wake trajectory. The developed code is verified by comparing with previous experimental data for coaxial and tandem rotors.

  18. Estimating the wake deflection downstream of a wind turbine in different atmospheric stabilities: an LES study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Vollmer

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available An intentional yaw misalignment of wind turbines is currently discussed as one possibility to increase the overall energy yield of wind farms. The idea behind this control is to decrease wake losses of downstream turbines by altering the wake trajectory of the controlled upwind turbines. For an application of such an operational control, precise knowledge about the inflow wind conditions, the magnitude of wake deflection by a yawed turbine and the propagation of the wake is crucial. The dependency of the wake deflection on the ambient wind conditions as well as the uncertainty of its trajectory are not sufficiently covered in current wind farm control models. In this study we analyze multiple sources that contribute to the uncertainty of the estimation of the wake deflection downstream of yawed wind turbines in different ambient wind conditions. We find that the wake shapes and the magnitude of deflection differ in the three evaluated atmospheric boundary layers of neutral, stable and unstable thermal stability. Uncertainty in the wake deflection estimation increases for smaller temporal averaging intervals. We also consider the choice of the method to define the wake center as a source of uncertainty as it modifies the result. The variance of the wake deflection estimation increases with decreasing atmospheric stability. Control of the wake position in a highly convective environment is therefore not recommended.

  19. Validation of four LES and a vortex model against stereo-PIV measurements in the near wake of an actuator disc and a wind turbine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lignarolo, Lorenzo E.M.; Mehta, Dhruv; Stevens, Richard J.A.M.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we report the results of a workshop organised by the Delft University of Technology in 2014, aiming at the comparison between different state-of-the-art numerical models for the simulation of wind turbine wakes. The chosen benchmark case is a wind tunnel measurement, where...... of an actuator disc, a case that is highly relevant for full wind farm applications. The comparison has shown that, despite its extreme simplicity, the vortex model is capable of reproducing the wake expansion and the centre line velocity with very high accuracy. Also all tested LES models are able to predict...... stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry was employed to obtain the velocity field and turbulence statistics in the near wake of a two-bladed wind turbine model and of a porous disc, which mimics the numerical actuator used in the simulations. Researchers have been invited to simulate the experimental case...

  20. Extended regimens of the contraceptive vaginal ring versus hormonal oral contraceptives: effects on lipid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guazzelli, Cristina Aparecida Falbo; Barreiros, Fernando Augusto; Barbosa, Ricardo; Torloni, Maria Regina; Barbieri, Marcia

    2012-04-01

    Combined oral contraceptives used in an extended regimen have been studied because of their potential benefits; however, there have been few publications on extended regimens of contraceptive vaginal rings. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of these two extended regimens on the lipid metabolism of women using these contraceptive methods during 1 year. This prospective study enrolled 150 women: 75 used a vaginal contraceptive ring (11.7 mg etonogestrel and 2.7 mg ethinyl estradiol), and 75 used oral contraceptives (30 mcg ethinyl estradiol and 150 mg desogestrel). Both groups used their respective method for 84 days followed by a 7-day pause during 1 year. At baseline and every 3 months during the study period, blood was collected to assess total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides and apolipoprotein (apo) A-I and B. The analysis of variance test was used to analyze differences in the results of these exams over time. A total of 62 vaginal ring and 61 oral contraceptive users completed the study. There were no significant differences in the discontinuation rate, mean total cholesterol and fraction levels, apo B concentration or apo A-I/apo B ratio. Vaginal ring users had significantly higher apo A-1 levels than oral contraceptive users. Despite the vaginal route of administration, the steroids released by the ring had the same effects on the lipid metabolism and lipoprotein levels typically seen with ethinyl estradiol given either by oral or parenteral routes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.