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Sample records for wakefield accelerator driven

  1. Proton-driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    The construction of ever larger and costlier accelerator facilities has a limited future, and new technologies will be needed to push the energy frontier. Plasma wakefield acceleration is a rapidly developing field and is a promising candidate technology for future high energy colliders. We focus on the recently proposed idea of proton-driven plasma wakefield acceleration and describe the current status and plans for this approach.

  2. Transformer ratio saturation in a beam-driven wakefield accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, J. P.; Martorelli, R.; Pukhov, A.

    2015-12-01

    We show that for beam-driven wakefield acceleration, the linearly ramped, equally spaced train of bunches typically considered to optimise the transformer ratio only works for flat-top bunches. Through theory and simulation, we explain that this behaviour is due to the unique properties of the plasma response to a flat-top density profile. Calculations of the optimal scaling for a train of Gaussian bunches show diminishing returns with increasing bunch number, tending towards saturation. For a periodic bunch train, a transformer ratio of 23 was achieved for 50 bunches, rising to 40 for a fully optimised beam.

  3. AWAKE, The Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Gschwendtner, E.; Amorim, L.; Apsimon, R.; Assmann, R.; Bachmann, A.M.; Batsch, F.; Bauche, J.; Berglyd Olsen, V.K.; Bernardini, M.; Bingham, R.; Biskup, B.; Bohl, T.; Bracco, C.; Burrows, P.N.; Burt, G.; Buttenschon, B.; Butterworth, A.; Caldwell, A.; Cascella, M.; Chevallay, E.; Cipiccia, S.; Damerau, H.; Deacon, L.; Dirksen, P.; Doebert, S.; Dorda, U.; Farmer, J.; Fedosseev, V.; Feldbaumer, E.; Fiorito, R.; Fonseca, R.; Friebel, F.; Gorn, A.A.; Grulke, O.; Hansen, J.; Hessler, C.; Hofle, W.; Holloway, J.; Huther, M.; Jaroszynski, D.; Jensen, L.; Jolly, S.; Joulaei, A.; Kasim, M.; Keeble, F.; Li, Y.; Liu, S.; Lopes, N.; Lotov, K.V.; Mandry, S.; Martorelli, R.; Martyanov, M.; Mazzoni, S.; Mete, O.; Minakov, V.A.; Mitchell, J.; Moody, J.; Muggli, P.; Najmudin, Z.; Norreys, P.; Oz, E.; Pardons, A.; Pepitone, K.; Petrenko, A.; Plyushchev, G.; Pukhov, A.; Rieger, K.; Ruhl, H.; Salveter, F.; Savard, N.; Schmidt, J.; Seryi, A.; Shaposhnikova, E.; Sheng, Z.M.; Sherwood, P.; Silva, L.; Soby, L.; Sosedkin, A.P.; Spitsyn, R.I.; Trines, R.; Tuev, P.V.; Turner, M.; Verzilov, V.; Vieira, J.; Vincke, H.; Wei, Y.; Welsch, C.P.; Wing, M.; Xia, G.; Zhang, H.

    2016-01-01

    The Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment (AWAKE) aims at studying plasma wakefield generation and electron acceleration driven by proton bunches. It is a proof-of-principle R&D experiment at CERN and the world's first proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiment. The AWAKE experiment will be installed in the former CNGS facility and uses the 400 GeV/c proton beam bunches from the SPS. The first experiments will focus on the self-modulation instability of the long (rms ~12 cm) proton bunch in the plasma. These experiments are planned for the end of 2016. Later, in 2017/2018, low energy (~15 MeV) electrons will be externally injected to sample the wakefields and be accelerated beyond 1 GeV. The main goals of the experiment will be summarized. A summary of the AWAKE design and construction status will be presented.

  4. AWAKE, The Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment at CERN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gschwendtner, E. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Adli, E. [University of Oslo, Oslo 0316 (Norway); Amorim, L. [GoLP/Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisbon (Portugal); Apsimon, R. [Cockcroft Institute, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YR (United Kingdom); Assmann, R. [DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Bachmann, A.-M.; Batsch, F. [Max Planck Institute for Physics, Föhringer Ring 6, München 80805 (Germany); Bauche, J. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Berglyd Olsen, V.K. [University of Oslo, Oslo 0316 (Norway); Bernardini, M. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Bingham, R. [STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Biskup, B. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Czech Technical University, Zikova 1903/4, 166 36 Praha 6 (Czech Republic); Bohl, T.; Bracco, C. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Burrows, P.N. [John Adams Institute for Accelerator Science, Oxford (United Kingdom); University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 2JD (United Kingdom); Burt, G. [Cockcroft Institute, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Buttenschön, B. [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Wendelsteinstr. 1, Greifswald 17491 (Germany); Butterworth, A. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Caldwell, A. [Max Planck Institute for Physics, Föhringer Ring 6, München 80805 (Germany); Cascella, M. [UCL, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); and others

    2016-09-01

    The Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment (AWAKE) aims at studying plasma wakefield generation and electron acceleration driven by proton bunches. It is a proof-of-principle R&D experiment at CERN and the world's first proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiment. The AWAKE experiment will be installed in the former CNGS facility and uses the 400 GeV/c proton beam bunches from the SPS. The first experiments will focus on the self-modulation instability of the long (rms ~12 cm) proton bunch in the plasma. These experiments are planned for the end of 2016. Later, in 2017/2018, low energy (~15 MeV) electrons will be externally injected into the sample wakefields and be accelerated beyond 1 GeV. The main goals of the experiment will be summarized. A summary of the AWAKE design and construction status will be presented.

  5. A Proton-Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration experiment at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    The AWAKE Collaboration has been formed in order to demonstrate protondriven plasma wakefield acceleration for the first time. This technology could lead to future colliders of high energy but of a much reduced length compared to proposed linear accelerators. The SPS proton beam in the CNGS facility will be injected into a 10m plasma cell where the long proton bunches will be modulated into significantly shorter micro-bunches. These micro-bunches will then initiate a strong wakefield in the plasma with peak fields above 1 GV/m that will be harnessed to accelerate a bunch of electrons from about 20MeV to the GeV scale within a few meters. The experimental program is based on detailed numerical simulations of beam and plasma interactions. The main accelerator components, the experimental area and infrastructure required as well as the plasma cell and the diagnostic equipment are discussed in detail. First protons to the experiment are expected at the end of 2016 and this will be followed by an initial 3–4 yea...

  6. Multi-proton bunch driven hollow plasma wakefield acceleration in the nonlinear regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yangmei; Xia, Guoxing; Lotov, Konstantin V.; Sosedkin, Alexander P.; Hanahoe, Kieran; Mete-Apsimon, Oznur

    2017-10-01

    Proton-driven plasma wakefield acceleration has been demonstrated in simulations to be capable of accelerating particles to the energy frontier in a single stage, but its potential is hindered by the fact that currently available proton bunches are orders of magnitude longer than the plasma wavelength. Fortunately, proton micro-bunching allows driving plasma waves resonantly. In this paper, we propose using a hollow plasma channel for multiple proton bunch driven plasma wakefield acceleration and demonstrate that it enables the operation in the nonlinear regime and resonant excitation of strong plasma waves. This new regime also involves beneficial features of hollow channels for the accelerated beam (such as emittance preservation and a uniform accelerating field) and long buckets of stable deceleration for the drive beam. The regime is attained at a proper ratio between plasma skin depth, driver radius, hollow channel radius, and micro-bunch period.

  7. Theoretical and experimental studies of plasma channel generation for beam driven plasma wakefield accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tauscher, Gabriele; Mehrling, Timon [University of Hamburg (Germany); Aschikhin, Alexander; Erbe, Jan-Hendrik; Goldberg, Lars; Schwinkendorf, Jan-Patrick [University of Hamburg (Germany); Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Dale, John; Schaper, Lucas; Streeter, Matthew; Schmidt, Bernhard; Osterhoff, Jens [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Plasma-based wakefield acceleration is a promising approach in shrinking the size and cost of future particle accelerators and free-electron lasers. In the FLASHForward project a wakefield accelerator will be driven by an electron bunch from the FLASH accelerator while a multi-TW short pulse laser will pre-ionise a hydrogen gas target to form a plasma. Disentangling the processes of ionisation and wakefield driving enables improved control over the plasma density profiles and therefore over the structure of the wakefields crucially effecting the quality of the accelerated beams. To work out the electron density distribution in the target, we compute the ionisation rates of hydrogen molecules in strong laser fields. To be able to benchmark the predicted behaviour experimentally we also take into account the temporal and spatial laser-intensity profile evolution. The here developed understanding of the underlying processes of plasma generation ultimately allows for tailoring of the focusing geometry and laser-power-profile evolution to achieve desired plasma properties. As a proof of concept, we aim to realise plasmas with tailored shapes experimentally early 2016.

  8. Dynamics of electron acceleration in laser-driven wakefields. Acceleration limits and asymmetric plasma waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popp, Antonia

    2011-12-16

    The experiments presented in this thesis study several aspects of electron acceleration in a laser-driven plasma wave. High-intensity lasers can efficiently drive a plasma wave that sustains electric fields on the order of 100 GV/m. Electrons that are trapped in this plasma wave can be accelerated to GeV-scale energies. As the accelerating fields in this scheme are 3-4 orders of magnitude higher than in conventional radio-frequency accelerators, the necessary acceleration distance can be reduced by the same factor, turning laser-wakefield acceleration (LWFA) into a promising compact, and potentially cheaper, alternative. However, laser-accelerated electron bunches have not yet reached the parameter standards of conventional accelerators. This work will help to gain better insight into the acceleration process and to optimize the electron bunch properties. The 25 fs, 1.8 J-pulses of the ATLAS laser at the Max-Planck-Institute of Quantum Optics were focused into a steady-state flow gas cell. This very reproducible and turbulence-free gas target allows for stable acceleration of electron bunches. Thus the sensitivity of electron parameters to subtle changes of the experimental setup could be determined with meaningful statistics. At optimized experimental parameters, electron bunches of {approx}50 pC total charge were accelerated to energies up to 450 MeV with a divergence of {approx}2 mrad FWHM. As, in a new design of the gas cell, its length can be varied from 2 to 14 mm, the electron bunch energy could be evaluated after different acceleration distances, at two different electron densities. From this evolution important acceleration parameters could be extracted. At an electron density of 6.43. 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} the maximum electric field strength in the plasma wave was determined to be {approx}160 GV/m. The length after which the relativistic electrons outrun the accelerating phase of the electric field and are decelerated again, the so-called dephasing length

  9. Laser Wakefield Accelerators

    OpenAIRE

    Najmudin, Z.

    2017-01-01

    The one-dimensional wakefield generation equations are solved for increasing levels of non-linearity, to demonstrate how they contribute to the overall behaviour of a non-linear wakefield in a plasma. The effect of laser guiding is also studied as a way to increase the interaction length of a laser wakefield accelerator.

  10. High-quality electron beam generation in a proton-driven hollow plasma wakefield accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y.; Xia, G.; Lotov, K. V.; Sosedkin, A. P.; Hanahoe, K.; Mete-Apsimon, O.

    2017-10-01

    Simulations of proton-driven plasma wakefield accelerators have demonstrated substantially higher accelerating gradients compared to conventional accelerators and the viability of accelerating electrons to the energy frontier in a single plasma stage. However, due to the strong intrinsic transverse fields varying both radially and in time, the witness beam quality is still far from suitable for practical application in future colliders. Here we demonstrate the efficient acceleration of electrons in proton-driven wakefields in a hollow plasma channel. In this regime, the witness bunch is positioned in the region with a strong accelerating field, free from plasma electrons and ions. We show that the electron beam carrying the charge of about 10% of 1 TeV proton driver charge can be accelerated to 0.6 TeV with a preserved normalized emittance in a single channel of 700 m. This high-quality and high-charge beam may pave the way for the development of future plasma-based energy frontier colliders.

  11. High-flux electron beams from laser wakefield accelerators driven by petawatt lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Ming; Tesileanu, Ovidiu

    2017-07-01

    Laser wakefield accelerators (LWFAs) are considered to be one of the most competitive next-generation accelerator candidates. In this paper, we will study the potential high-flux electron beam production of an LWFA driven by petawatt-level laser pulses. In our three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, an optimal set of parameters gives ˜ 40 {nC} of charge with 2 {PW} laser power, thus ˜ 400 {kA} of instantaneous current if we assume the electron beam duration is 100 fs. This high flux and its secondary radiation are widely applicable in nuclear and QED physics, industrial imaging, medical and biological studies.

  12. Proton-driven plasma wakefield acceleration: a path to the future of high-energy particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Assmann, R; Bohl, T; Bracco, C; Buttenschön, B; Butterworth, A; Caldwell, A; Chattopadhyay, S; Cipiccia, S; Feldbaumer, E; Fonseca, R A; Goddard, B; Gross, M; Grulke, O; Gschwendtner, E; Holloway, J; Huang, C; Jaroszynski, D; Jolly, S; Kempkes, P; Lopes, N; Lotov, K; Machacek, J; Mandry, S R; McKenzie, J W; Meddahi, M; Militsyn, B L; Moschuering, N; Muggli, P; Najmudin, Z; Noakes, T C Q; Norreys, P A; Öz, E; Pardons, A; Petrenko, A; Pukhov, A; Rieger, K; Reimann, O; Ruhl, H; Shaposhnikova, E; Silva, L O; Sosedkin, A; Tarkeshian, R; Trines, R M G N; Tückmantel, T; Vieira, J; Vincke, H; Wing, M; Xia G , G

    2014-01-01

    New acceleration technology is mandatory for the future elucidation of fundamental particles and their interactions. A promising approach is to exploit the properties of plasmas. Past research has focused on creating large-amplitude plasma waves by injecting an intense laser pulse or an electron bunch into the plasma. However, the maximum energy gain of electrons accelerated in a single plasma stage is limited by the energy of the driver. Proton bunches are the most promising drivers of wakefields to accelerate electrons to the TeV energy scale in a single stage. An experimental program at CERN { the AWAKE experiment { has been launched to study in detail the important physical processes and to demonstrate the power of proton-driven plasma wakefield acceleration. Here we review the physical principles and some experimental considerations for a future proton-driven plasma wakefield accelerator.

  13. Proton-driven plasma wakefield acceleration: a path to the future of high-energy particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Assmann, R; Bohl, T; Bracco, C; Buttenschon, B; Butterworth, A; Caldwell, A; Chattopadhyay, S; Cipiccia, S; Feldbaumer, E; Fonseca, R A; Goddard, B; Gross, M; Grulke, O; Gschwendtner, E; Holloway, J; Huang, C; Jaroszynski, D; Jolly, S; Kempkes, P; Lopes, N; Lotov, K; Machacek, J; Mandry, S R; McKenzie, J W; Meddahi, M; Militsyn, B L; Moschuering, N; Muggli, P; Najmudin, Z; Noakes, T C Q; Norreys, P A; Oz, E; Pardons, A; Petrenko, A; Pukhov, A; Rieger, K; Reimann, O; Ruhl, H; Shaposhnikova, E; Silva, L O; Sosedkin, A; Tarkeshian, R; Trines, R M G N; Tuckmantel, T; Vieira, J; Vincke, H; Wing, M; Xia, G

    2014-01-01

    New acceleration technology is mandatory for the future elucidation of fundamental particles and their interactions. A promising approach is to exploit the properties of plasmas. Past research has focused on creating large-amplitude plasma waves by injecting an intense laser pulse or an electron bunch into the plasma. However, the maximum energy gain of electrons accelerated in a single plasma stage is limited by the energy of the driver. Proton bunches are the most promising drivers of wakefields to accelerate electrons to the TeV energy scale in a single stage. An experimental program at CERN -- the AWAKE experiment -- has been launched to study in detail the important physical processes and to demonstrate the power of proton-driven plasma wakefield acceleration. Here we review the physical principles and some experimental considerations for a future proton-driven plasma wakefield accelerator.

  14. AWAKE Design Report: A Proton-Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Caldwell, A; Lotov, K; Muggli, P; Wing, M

    2013-01-01

    The AWAKE Collaboration has been formed in order to demonstrate proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration for the first time. This technology could lead to future colliders of high energy but of a much reduced length compared to proposed linear accelerators. The SPS proton beam in the CNGS facility will be injected into a 10m plasma cell where the long proton bunches will be modulated into significantly shorter micro-bunches. These micro-bunches will then initiate a strong wakefield in the plasma with peak fields above 1 GV/m that will be harnessed to accelerate a bunch of electrons from about 20MeV to the GeV scale within a few meters. The experimental program is based on detailed numerical simulations of beam and plasma interactions. The main accelerator components, the experimental area and infrastructure required as well as the plasma cell and the diagnostic equipment are discussed in detail. First protons to the experiment are expected at the end of 2015 and this will be followed by an initial 3–4 ye...

  15. Demonstration of a positron beam-driven hollow channel plasma wakefield accelerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessner, Spencer; Adli, Erik; Allen, James M; An, Weiming; Clarke, Christine I; Clayton, Chris E; Corde, Sebastien; Delahaye, J P; Frederico, Joel; Green, Selina Z; Hast, Carsten; Hogan, Mark J; Joshi, Chan; Lindstrøm, Carl A; Lipkowitz, Nate; Litos, Michael; Lu, Wei; Marsh, Kenneth A; Mori, Warren B; O'Shea, Brendan; Vafaei-Najafabadi, Navid; Walz, Dieter; Yakimenko, Vitaly; Yocky, Gerald

    2016-06-02

    Plasma wakefield accelerators have been used to accelerate electron and positron particle beams with gradients that are orders of magnitude larger than those achieved in conventional accelerators. In addition to being accelerated by the plasma wakefield, the beam particles also experience strong transverse forces that may disrupt the beam quality. Hollow plasma channels have been proposed as a technique for generating accelerating fields without transverse forces. Here we demonstrate a method for creating an extended hollow plasma channel and measure the wakefields created by an ultrarelativistic positron beam as it propagates through the channel. The plasma channel is created by directing a high-intensity laser pulse with a spatially modulated profile into lithium vapour, which results in an annular region of ionization. A peak decelerating field of 230 MeV m(-1) is inferred from changes in the beam energy spectrum, in good agreement with theory and particle-in-cell simulations.

  16. Optimizing density down-ramp injection for beam-driven plasma wakefield accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez de la Ossa, A.; Hu, Z.; Streeter, M. J. V.; Mehrling, T. J.; Kononenko, O.; Sheeran, B.; Osterhoff, J.

    2017-09-01

    Density down-ramp (DDR) injection is a promising concept in beam-driven plasma wakefield accelerators for the generation of high-quality witness beams. We review and complement the theoretical principles of the method and employ particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations in order to determine constrains on the geometry of the density ramp and the current of the drive beam, regarding the applicability of DDR injection. Furthermore, PIC simulations are utilized to find optimized conditions for the production of high-quality beams. We find and explain the intriguing result that the injection of an increased charge by means of a steepened ramp favors the generation of beams with lower emittance. Exploiting this fact enables the production of beams with high charge (˜140 pC ), low normalized emittance (˜200 nm ) and low uncorrelated energy spread (0.3%) in sufficiently steep ramps even for drive beams with moderate peak current (˜2.5 kA ).

  17. 9 GeV Energy Gain in a Beam-Driven Plasma Wakefield Accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Litos, M; Allen, J M; An, W; Clarke, C I; Corde, S; Clayton, C E; Frederico, J; Gessner, S J; Green, S Z; Hogan, M J; Joshi, C; Lu, W; Marsh, K A; Mori, W B; Schmeltz, M; Vafaei-Najafabadi, N; Yakimenko, V

    2015-01-01

    An electron beam has gained a maximum energy of 9 GeV per particle in a 1.3 m-long electron beam-driven plasma wakefield accelerator. The amount of charge accelerated in the spectral peak was 28.3 pC, and the root-mean-square energy spread was 5.0%. The mean accelerated charge and energy gain per particle of the 215 shot data set was 115 pC and 5.3 GeV, respectively, corresponding to an acceleration gradient of 4.0 GeV/m at the spectral peak. The mean energy spread of the data set was 5.1%. These results are consistent with the extrapolation of the previously reported energy gain results using a shorter, 36 cm-long plasma source to within 10%, evincing a non-evolving wake structure that can propagate distances of over a meter in length. Wake-loading effects were evident in the data through strong dependencies observed between various spectral properties and the amount of accelerated charge.

  18. A Multibunch Plasma Wakefield Accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Kallos, Efthymios; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Katsouleas, Thomas C; Kimura, Wayne D; Kusche, Karl; Muggli, Patric; Pavlishin, Igor; Pogorelsky, Igor; Yakimenko, Vitaly; Zhou, Feng

    2005-01-01

    We investigate a plasma wakefield acceleration scheme where a train of electron microbunches feeds into a high density plasma. When the microbunch train enters such a plasma that has a corresponding plasma wavelength equal to the microbunch separation distance, a strong wakefield is expected to be resonantly driven to an amplitude that is at least one order of magnitude higher than that using an unbunched beam. PIC simulations have been performed using the beamline parameters of the Brookhaven National Laboratory Accelerator Test Facility operating in the configuration of the STELLA inverse free electron laser (IFEL) experiment. A 65 MeV electron beam is modulated by a 10.6 um CO2 laser beam via an IFEL interaction. This produces a train of ~90 microbunches separated by the laser wavelength. In this paper, we present both a simple theoretical treatment and simulation results that demonstrate promising results for the multibunch technique as a plasma-based accelerator.

  19. Hybrid laser-plasma wakefield acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidding, Bernhard; Heinemann, Thomas; Scherkl, Paul; Ullmann, Daniel; Beaton, Andrew

    2017-10-01

    Laser wakefield accelerators (LWFA) can produce electron bunches with characteristics which suggest they are highly suitable to be used as drivers for electron-beam driven plasma wakefield accelerators (PWFA). The presentation will report on recent experimental results and conceptual advanced which substantiate this idea. It looks as if hybrid LWFA-PWFA systems are highly promising systems to harness specific advantages of PWFA (no dephasing, long acceleration distances, wide potential for ionization injection schemes) realized these in truly compact systems.

  20. Monoenergetic laser wakefield acceleration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. E. Andreev

    2000-02-01

    Full Text Available Three dimensional test particle simulations are applied to optimization of the plasma-channeled laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA operating in a weakly nonlinear regime. Electron beam energy spread, emittance, and luminosity depend upon the proportion of the electron bunch size to the plasma wavelength. This proportion tends to improve with the laser wavelength increase. We simulate a prospective two-stage ∼1GeV LWFA with controlled energy spread and emittance. The input parameters correspond to realistic capabilities of the BNL Accelerator Test Facility that features a picosecond-terawatt CO_{2} laser and a high-brightness electron gun.

  1. Optimizing density down-ramp injection for beam-driven plasma wakefield accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Martinez de la Ossa

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Density down-ramp (DDR injection is a promising concept in beam-driven plasma wakefield accelerators for the generation of high-quality witness beams. We review and complement the theoretical principles of the method and employ particle-in-cell (PIC simulations in order to determine constrains on the geometry of the density ramp and the current of the drive beam, regarding the applicability of DDR injection. Furthermore, PIC simulations are utilized to find optimized conditions for the production of high-quality beams. We find and explain the intriguing result that the injection of an increased charge by means of a steepened ramp favors the generation of beams with lower emittance. Exploiting this fact enables the production of beams with high charge (∼140  pC, low normalized emittance (∼200  nm and low uncorrelated energy spread (0.3% in sufficiently steep ramps even for drive beams with moderate peak current (∼2.5  kA.

  2. Compton scattering x-ray sources driven by laser wakefield acceleration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. V. Hartemann

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent laser wakefield acceleration experiments have demonstrated the generation of femtosecond, nano-Coulomb, low emittance, nearly monokinetic relativistic electron bunches of sufficient quality to produce bright, tunable, ultrafast x-rays via Compton scattering. Design parameters for a proof-of-concept experiment are presented using a three-dimensional Compton scattering code and a laser-plasma interaction particle-in-cell code modeling the wakefield acceleration process; x-ray fluxes exceeding 10^{21}   s^{-1} are predicted, with a peak brightness >10^{19}   photons/(mm^{2} mrad^{2} s   0.1%   bandwidth.

  3. Laser Wakefield Acceleration Driven by a CO2 Laser (STELLA-LW) - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimura, Wayne D

    2008-06-27

    The original goals of the Staged Electron Laser Acceleration – Laser Wakefield (STELLA-LW) program were to investigate two new methods for laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA). In pseudo-resonant LWFA (PR-LWFA), a laser pulse experiences nonlinear pulse steepening while traveling through the plasma. This steepening allows the laser pulse to generate wakefields even though the laser pulse length is too long for resonant LWFA to occur. For the conditions of this program, PR-LWFA requires a minimum laser peak power of 3 TW and a low plasma density (10^16 cm^-3). Seeded self-modulated LWFA (seeded SM-LWFA) combines LWFA with plasma wakefield acceleration (PWFA). An ultrashort (~100 fs) electron beam bunch acts as a seed in a plasma to form a wakefield via PWFA. This wakefield is subsequently amplified by the laser pulse through a self-modulated LWFA process. At least 1 TW laser power and, for a ~100-fs bunch, a plasma density ~10^17 cm^-3 are required. STELLA-LW was located on Beamline #1 at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Accelerator Test Facility (ATF). The ATF TW CO2 laser served as the driving laser beam for both methods. For PR-LWFA, a single bunch was to probe the wakefield produced by the laser beam. For seeded SM-LWFA, the ATF linac would produce two bunches, where the first would be the seed and the second would be the witness. A chicane would compress the first bunch to enable it to generate wakefields via PWFA. The plasma source was a short-length, gas-filled capillary discharge with the laser beam tightly focused in the center of the capillary, i.e., no laser guiding was used, in order to obtain the needed laser intensity. During the course of the program, several major changes had to be made. First, the ATF could not complete the upgrade of the CO2 laser to the 3 TW peak power needed for the PR-LWFA experiment. Therefore, the PR-LWFA experiment had to be abandoned leaving only the seeded SM-LWFA experiment. Second, the ATF discovered that the

  4. Electron beam characteristics of a laser-driven plasma wakefield accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Assamagan, Ketevi A; Chen, S Y; Ent, R; Green, R N; Gueye, P; Keppel, C; Mourou, G; Umstadter, D; Wagner, R

    1999-01-01

    The properties of an electron beam trapped and accelerated in a laser wakefield have been investigated. Plastic scintillating fibers were employed together with position sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PMT) and a series of dipole electro-magnets to study the beam. The measured momentum spectrum peaks around 7 MeV/c with an exponential fall-off at high momenta up to (70.3+- 19.9) MeV/c. The number of electrons detected per bunch is determined to be (2.6+-0.3)x10 sup 1 sup 1.

  5. Planned High-gradient Flat-beam-driven Dielectric Wakefield Experiments at the Fermilab’s Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemery, Francois [NICADD, DeKalb; Mihalcea, Daniel [NICADD, DeKalb; Piot, Philippe [Fermilab; Zhu, Jun [Mianyang CAEP

    2014-07-01

    In beam driven dielectric wakefield acceleration (DWA), high-gradient short-wavelength accelerating fields are generally achieved by employing dielectric-lined waveguides (DLWs)  with small aperture which constraints the beam sizes. In this paper we investigate the possibility of using a low-energy (50-MeV) flat beams to induce high-gradient wakes in a slab-symmetric DLW. We demonstrate via numerical simulations the possibility to produce axial electric field with peak amplitude close to 0.5 GV/m. Our studies are carried out using the Fermilab's Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) photoinjector beamline. We finally discuss a possible experiment that could be performed in the ASTA photoinjector and eventually at higher energies.  

  6. High-quality electron beams from beam-driven plasma accelerators by wakefield-induced ionization injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez de la Ossa, A; Grebenyuk, J; Mehrling, T; Schaper, L; Osterhoff, J

    2013-12-13

    We propose a new and simple strategy for controlled ionization-induced trapping of electrons in a beam-driven plasma accelerator. The presented method directly exploits electric wakefields to ionize electrons from a dopant gas and capture them into a well-defined volume of the accelerating and focusing wake phase, leading to high-quality witness bunches. This injection principle is explained by example of three-dimensional particle-in-cell calculations using the code OSIRIS. In these simulations a high-current-density electron-beam driver excites plasma waves in the blowout regime inside a fully ionized hydrogen plasma of density 5×10(17)cm-3. Within an embedded 100  μm long plasma column contaminated with neutral helium gas, the wakefields trigger ionization, trapping of a defined fraction of the released electrons, and subsequent acceleration. The hereby generated electron beam features a 1.5 kA peak current, 1.5  μm transverse normalized emittance, an uncorrelated energy spread of 0.3% on a GeV-energy scale, and few femtosecond bunch length.

  7. Natural noise and external wakefield seeding in a proton-driven plasma accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. V. Lotov

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available An accurate description of noise levels is of crucial importance for the correct simulation of instability-driven processes, such as the density modulation of a long proton bunch traversing a plasma. To insure that the correct instability develops, a seed field must be larger than the cumulative shot noise. We develop an analytical theory of the noise field and compare it with multidimensional simulations. We find that the natural noise wakefield generated in a plasma by the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron bunches is very low, at the level of 10  kV/m. This fortunate fact eases the requirements on the seed. Our three-dimensional simulations show that even a few tens MeV electron bunch precursor of a very moderate intensity is sufficient to seed the proton bunch self-modulation in plasma.

  8. Electron yield enhancement in a laser wakefield accelerator driven by asymmetric laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leemans, W.P.; Catravas, P.; Esarey, E.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Toth, C.; Trines, R.; Schroeder, C.B.; Shadwick, B.A.; van Tilborg, J.; Faure, J.

    2002-08-01

    The effect of asymmetric laser pulses on electron yield from a laser wakefield accelerator has been experimentally studied using > 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3} plasmas and a 10 TW, > 45 fs, Ti:Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} laser. Laser pulse shape was controlled through non-linear chirp with a grating pair compressor. Pulses (76 fs FWHM) with a steep rise and positive chirp were found to significantly enhance the electron yield compared to pulses with a gentle rise and negative chirp. Theory and simulation show that fast rising pulses can generate larger amplitude wakes that seed the growth of the self-modulation instability and that frequency chirp is of minimal importance for the experimental parameters.

  9. Sapphire capillaries for laser-driven wakefield acceleration in plasma. Fs-laser micromachining and characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwinkendorf, Jan-Patrick

    2012-08-15

    Plasma wakefields are a promising approach for the acceleration of electrons with ultrahigh (10 to 100 GV/m) electric fields. Nowadays, high-intensity laser pulses are routinely utilized to excite these large-amplitude plasma waves. However, several detrimental effects such as laser diffraction, electron-wake dephasing and laser depletion may terminate the acceleration process. Two of these phenomena can be mitigated or avoided by the application of capillary waveguides, e.g. fabricated out of sapphire for longevity. Capillaries may compensate for laser diffraction like a fiber and allow for the creation of tapered gas-density profiles working against the dephasing between the accelerating wave and the particles. Additionally, they offer the possibility of controlled particle injection. This thesis is reporting on the set up of a laser for fs-micromachining of capillaries of almost arbitrary shapes and a test stand for density-profile characterization. These devices will permit the creation of tailored gas-density profiles for controlled electron injection and acceleration inside plasma.

  10. Plasma wakefield acceleration at CLARA facility in Daresbury Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, G., E-mail: guoxing.xia@manchester.ac.uk [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); The Cockcroft Institute, Sci-Tech Daresbury, Daresbury, Warrington (United Kingdom); Nie, Y. [Deutsche Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Mete, O.; Hanahoe, K. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); The Cockcroft Institute, Sci-Tech Daresbury, Daresbury, Warrington (United Kingdom); Dover, M.; Wigram, M.; Wright, J.; Zhang, J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Smith, J. [Tech-X UK Corporation, Daresbury Innovation Centre, Warrington (United Kingdom); Pacey, T.; Li, Y. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); The Cockcroft Institute, Sci-Tech Daresbury, Daresbury, Warrington (United Kingdom); Wei, Y.; Welsch, C. [The Cockcroft Institute, Sci-Tech Daresbury, Daresbury, Warrington (United Kingdom); University of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-01

    A plasma accelerator research station (PARS) has been proposed to study the key issues in electron driven plasma wakefield acceleration at CLARA facility in Daresbury Laboratory. In this paper, the quasi-nonlinear regime of beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration is analysed. The wakefield excited by various CLARA beam settings are simulated by using a 2D particle-in-cell (PIC) code. For a single drive beam, an accelerating gradient up to 3 GV/m can be achieved. For a two bunch acceleration scenario, simulation shows that a witness bunch can achieve a significant energy gain in a 10–50 cm long plasma cell.

  11. A plasma wakefield acceleration experiment using CLARA beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, G., E-mail: guoxing.xia@cockcroft.ac.uk [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); The Cockcroft Institute, Sci-Tech Daresbury, Daresbury, Warrington (United Kingdom); Angal-Kalinin, D.; Clarke, J. [STFC/ASTeC, Daresbury, Warrington (United Kingdom); Smith, J. [Tech-X UK Corporation, Daresbury Innovation Centre, Warrington (United Kingdom); Cormier-Michel, E. [Tech-X Corporation, Boulder, CO (United States); Jones, J.; Williams, P.H.; Mckenzie, J.W.; Militsyn, B.L. [STFC/ASTeC, Daresbury, Warrington (United Kingdom); Hanahoe, K.; Mete, O. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); The Cockcroft Institute, Sci-Tech Daresbury, Daresbury, Warrington (United Kingdom); Aimidula, A.; Welsch, C.P. [The Cockcroft Institute, Sci-Tech Daresbury, Daresbury, Warrington (United Kingdom); The University of Liverpool, Liverpool (United Kingdom)

    2014-03-11

    We propose a Plasma Accelerator Research Station (PARS) based at proposed FEL test facility CLARA (Compact Linear Accelerator for Research and Applications) at Daresbury Laboratory. The idea is to use the relativistic electron beam from CLARA, to investigate some key issues in electron beam transport and in electron beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration, e.g. high gradient plasma wakefield excitation driven by a relativistic electron bunch, two bunch experiment for CLARA beam energy doubling, high transformer ratio, long bunch self-modulation and some other advanced beam dynamics issues. This paper presents the feasibility studies of electron beam transport to meet the requirements for beam driven wakefield acceleration and presents the plasma wakefield simulation results based on CLARA beam parameters. Other possible experiments which can be conducted at the PARS beam line are also discussed.

  12. Strategies for mitigating the ionization-induced beam head erosion problem in an electron-beam-driven plasma wakefield accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. An

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Strategies for mitigating ionization-induced beam head erosion in an electron-beam-driven plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA are explored when the plasma and the wake are both formed by the transverse electric field of the beam itself. Beam head erosion can occur in a preformed plasma because of a lack of focusing force from the wake at the rising edge (head of the beam due to the finite inertia of the electrons. When the plasma is produced by field ionization from the space charge field of the beam, the head erosion is significantly exacerbated due to the gradual recession (in the beam frame of the 100% ionization contour. Beam particles in front of the ionization front cannot be focused (guided causing them to expand as in vacuum. When they expand, the location of the ionization front recedes such that even more beam particles are completely unguided. Eventually this process terminates the wake formation prematurely, i.e., well before the beam is depleted of its energy. Ionization-induced head erosion can be mitigated by controlling the beam parameters (emittance, charge, and energy and/or the plasma conditions. In this paper we explore how the latter can be optimized so as to extend the beam propagation distance and thereby increase the energy gain. In particular we show that, by using a combination of the alkali atoms of the lowest practical ionization potential (Cs for plasma formation and a precursor laser pulse to generate a narrow plasma filament in front of the beam, the head erosion rate can be dramatically reduced. Simulation results show that in the upcoming “two-bunch PWFA experiments” on the FACET facility at SLAC national accelerator laboratory the energy gain of the trailing beam can be up to 10 times larger for the given parameters when employing these techniques. Comparison of the effect of beam head erosion in preformed and ionization produced plasmas is also presented.

  13. Scheme for proton-driven plasma-wakefield acceleration of positively charged particles in a hollow plasma channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Longqing Yi (易龙卿

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A new scheme for accelerating positively charged particles in a plasma-wakefield accelerator is proposed. If the proton drive beam propagates in a hollow plasma channel, and the beam radius is of order of the channel width, the space charge force of the driver causes charge separation at the channel wall, which helps to focus the positively charged witness bunch propagating along the beam axis. In the channel, the acceleration buckets for positively charged particles are much larger than in the blowout regime of the uniform plasma, and stable acceleration over long distances is possible. In addition, phasing of the witness with respect to the wave can be tuned by changing the radius of the channel to ensure the acceleration is optimal. Two-dimensional simulations suggest that, for proton drivers likely available in future, positively charged particles can be stably accelerated over 1 km with the average acceleration gradient of 1.3  GeV/m.

  14. Plasma wakefield acceleration experiments at FACET II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, C.; Adli, E.; An, W.; Clayton, C. E.; Corde, S.; Gessner, S.; Hogan, M. J.; Litos, M.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K. A.; Mori, W. B.; Vafaei-Najafabadi, N.; O’shea, B.; Xu, Xinlu; White, G.; Yakimenko, V.

    2018-03-01

    During the past two decades of research, the ultra-relativistic beam-driven plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA) concept has achieved many significant milestones. These include the demonstration of ultra-high gradient acceleration of electrons over meter-scale plasma accelerator structures, efficient acceleration of a narrow energy spread electron bunch at high-gradients, positron acceleration using wakes in uniform plasmas and in hollow plasma channels, and demonstrating that highly nonlinear wakes in the ‘blow-out regime’ have the electric field structure necessary for preserving the emittance of the accelerating bunch. A new 10 GeV electron beam facility, Facilities for Accelerator Science and Experimental Test (FACET) II, is currently under construction at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory for the next generation of PWFA research and development. The FACET II beams will enable the simultaneous demonstration of substantial energy gain of a small emittance electron bunch while demonstrating an efficient transfer of energy from the drive to the trailing bunch. In this paper we first describe the capabilities of the FACET II facility. We then describe a series of PWFA experiments supported by numerical and particle-in-cell simulations designed to demonstrate plasma wake generation where the drive beam is nearly depleted of its energy, high efficiency acceleration of the trailing bunch while doubling its energy and ultimately, quantifying the emittance growth in a single stage of a PWFA that has optimally designed matching sections. We then briefly discuss other FACET II plasma-based experiments including in situ positron generation and acceleration, and several schemes that are promising for generating sub-micron emittance bunches that will ultimately be needed for both an early application of a PWFA and for a plasma-based future linear collider.

  15. Direct Laser Acceleration in Laser Wakefield Accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, J. L.; Froula, D. H.; Marsh, K. A.; Joshi, C.; Lemos, N.

    2017-10-01

    The direct laser acceleration (DLA) of electrons in a laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) has been investigated. We show that when there is a significant overlap between the drive laser and the trapped electrons in a LWFA cavity, the accelerating electrons can gain energy from the DLA mechanism in addition to LWFA. The properties of the electron beams produced in a LWFA, where the electrons are injected by ionization injection, have been investigated using particle-in-cell (PIC) code simulations. Particle tracking was used to demonstrate the presence of DLA in LWFA. Further PIC simulations comparing LWFA with and without DLA show that the presence of DLA can lead to electron beams that have maximum energies that exceed the estimates given by the theory for the ideal blowout regime. The magnitude of the contribution of DLA to the energy gained by the electron was found to be on the order of the LWFA contribution. The presence of DLA in a LWFA can also lead to enhanced betatron oscillation amplitudes and increased divergence in the direction of the laser polarization. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  16. Oscillating two-stream instability of laser wakefield-driven plasma ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Oscillating two-stream instability; plasma wave; laser wakefield accelerator. Abstract. The laser wakefield-driven plasma wave in a low-density plasma is seen to be susceptible to the oscillating two-stream instability (OTSI). The plasma wave couples to two short wavelength plasma wave sidebands. The pump ...

  17. Electromagnetic radiation from a laser wakefield accelerator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khachatryan, A.G.; van Goor, F.A.; Boller, Klaus J.

    2008-01-01

    Coherent and incoherent electromagnetic radiation emitted from a laser wakefield accelerator is calculated based on Lienard-Wiechert potentials. It is found that at wavelengths longer than the bunch length, the radiation is coherent. The coherent radiation, which typically lies in the infrared

  18. Phase control with two-beam interferometry method in a terahertz dielectric wakefield accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dan; Su, Xiaolu; Yan, Lixin; Du, YingChao; Tian, Qili; Liang, Yifan; Niu, Lujia; Huang, Wenhui; Gai, Wei; Tang, Chuanxiang; Antipov, Sergey

    2017-10-01

    High-gradient, beam-driven wakefield acceleration in THz structures is a promising technology for future free electron lasers and colliders. In this scheme, the main beam is accelerated by the wakefield of the high current drive beam. The time separation between the main and drive beams has to be chosen carefully to ensure that the main beam is in an accelerating phase of the drive's wakefield. THz accelerating structures provide high gradient acceleration due to their small apertures, but their phase control is difficult due to the picosecond-scale period. Here, we report on a wakefield acceleration experiment in a 460 GHz dielectric wakefield accelerator (DWA). The optimum phase of the main beam during the experiment is determined with a two-beam wakefield interferometry (TBI) measurement. This is performed without the measurement of the main and drive beam bunch lengths or their separation. In TBI, the interference of the wakefields produced by the drive and main beams is measured with an integrating THz detector. The TBI signal, as a function of separation between the drive and main beams, exhibits a minimum due to destructive interference of these wakefields, which corresponds to maximum acceleration of the main beam as is confirmed by the energy spectrometer measurement. The maximum energy gain of 0.8 MeV and maximum energy loss of 1.2 MeV for the main beam have been measured, which agrees well with theoretical predictions.

  19. Theory of the dielectric wakefield accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mtingwa, S.K.

    1990-10-01

    The general theory for all angular modes m of the dielectric wakefield accelerator is reformulated. The expressions for the accelerating electric fields and transverse wake forces are written in terms of matrices, the zeros of one of which determine the excitation frequencies of the dielectric structure. In this scheme it is possible to obtain a maximum accelerating gradient of 2.0 megavolts per meter per nanoCoulomb of driver beam charge, for a driver beam of 0.7 millimeters rms bunch length. 29 refs., 5 figs.

  20. Dielectric Wakefield Accelerator to drive the future FEL Light Source.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jing, C.; Power, J.; Zholents, A. (Accelerator Systems Division (APS)); ( HEP); (LLC)

    2011-04-20

    X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) are expensive instruments and a large part of the cost of the entire facility is driven by the accelerator. Using a high-energy gain dielectric wake-field accelerator (DWA) instead of the conventional accelerator may provide a significant cost saving and reduction of the facility size. In this article, we investigate using a collinear dielectric wakefield accelerator to provide a high repetition rate, high current, high energy beam to drive a future FEL x-ray light source. As an initial case study, a {approx}100 MV/m loaded gradient, 850 GHz quartz dielectric based 2-stage, wakefield accelerator is proposed to generate a main electron beam of 8 GeV, 50 pC/bunch, {approx}1.2 kA of peak current, 10 x 10 kHz (10 beamlines) in just 100 meters with the fill factor and beam loading considered. This scheme provides 10 parallel main beams with one 100 kHz drive beam. A drive-to-main beam efficiency {approx}38.5% can be achieved with an advanced transformer ratio enhancement technique. rf power dissipation in the structure is only 5 W/cm{sup 2} in the high repetition rate, high gradient operation mode, which is in the range of advanced water cooling capability. Details of study presented in the article include the overall layout, the transform ratio enhancement scheme used to increase the drive to main beam efficiency, main wakefield linac design, cooling of the structure, etc.

  1. Ultrafast science using Laser Wakefield Accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Alec G. R.

    2016-10-01

    Recent progress in laser wakefield acceleration has led to the emergence of a new generation of electron and X-ray sources that may have considerable benefits for ultrafast science. Laser wakefield acceleration provides radiation pulses that have femtosecond duration and intrinsic synchronisation with the laser source, allowing for pump-probe measurements with unprecedented temporal resolution. These pulses can be used to study ultrafast dynamical phenomena in plasma and dense material, such as transient magnetic fields, rapidly evolving plasma dynamics and crystal lattice oscillations. In this talk, I will review recent experiments in laser wakefield acceleration and energetic photon generation using the laser systems HERCULES and Lambda-Cubed at the University of Michigan and their use for capturing the dynamics of laser-pumped samples. Studies of the electron beam hosing instability and the generation of annular phase space distributions increase X-ray flux while maintaining its femtosecond duration. Single-shot, spectrally resolved absorption measurements in laser pumped foils can be made on ultrafast timescales using this broadband photon source. Ultrafast electron radiography is able to temporally resolve relativistically expanding magnetic fields in high-intensity laser-solid interactions and the evolution of electric fields in low density plasma. Time-resolved electron diffraction captures structural dynamics in crystalline silicon. I will also discuss the technological needs for and potential impact of such revolutionary compact radiation sources for ultrafast science in the future. US Air Force Office of Scientific Research under Award Number FA9550-12-1-0310, the US National Science Foundation Grants No. 1054164, 0935197, 1535628 and 0810979, US Department of Energy Grant No. DE-NA0002372 and Army Research Office Grant No. W911NF1.

  2. Generating ultrarelativistic attosecond electron bunches with laser wakefield accelerators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luttikhof, M.J.H.; Khachatryan, A.G.; van Goor, F.A.; Boller, Klaus J.

    2010-01-01

    Femtosecond electron bunches with ultrarelativistic energies were recently generated by laser wakefield accelerators. Here we predict that laser wakefield acceleration can generate even attosecond bunches, due to a strong chirp of the betatron frequency. We show how the bunch duration scales with

  3. A table-top x-ray FEL based on a laser wakefield accelerator-undulator system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajima, K.; Kawakubo, T.; Nakanishi, H. [National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Ibaraki-ken (Japan)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Ultrahigh-gradient electron acceleration has been confirmed owing to the laser wakefield acceleration mechanism driven by an intense short laser wakefield acceleration mechanism driven by an intense short laser pulse in an underdense plasma. The laser wakefield acceleration makes it possible to build a compact electron linac capable of producing an ultra-short bunched electron beam. While the accelerator is attributed to longitudinal wakefields, transverse wakefields simultaneously generated by a short laser pulse can serve as a plasma undulator with a very short wavelength equal to a half of the plasma wavelength. We propose a new FEL concept for X-rays based on a laser wakefield accelerator-undulator system driven by intense short laser pulses delivered from table-top terawatt lasers. The system is composed of the accelerator stage and the undulator stage in a table-top size. A low energy electron beam is accelerated an bunched into microbunches due to laser wakefields in the accelerator stage. A micro-bunched beam travelling to the opposite direction of driving laser pulses produces coherent X-ray radiation in the undulator stage. A practical configuration and its analyses are presented.

  4. Wakefield monitor development for CLIC accelerating structure

    CERN Document Server

    Peauger, F; Girardot, P; Andersson, A; Riddone, G; Samoshkin, A; Solodko, A; Zennaro, R; Ruber, R

    2010-01-01

    Abstract To achieve high luminosity in CLIC, the accelerating structures must be aligned to an accuracy of 5 μm with respect to the beam trajectory. Position detectors called Wakefield Monitors (WFM) are integrated to the structure for a beam based alignment. This paper describes the requirements of such monitors. Detailed RF design and electromagnetic simulations of the WFM itself are presented. In particular, time domain computations are performed and an evaluation of the resolution is done for two higher order modes at 18 and 24 GHz. The mechanical design of a prototype accelerating structure with WFM is also presented as well as the fabrication status of three complete structures. The objective is to implement two of them in CTF3 at CERN for a feasibility demonstration with beam and high power rf.

  5. Impact of Distributed Injection on Plasma Wakefield Acceleration at FACET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vafaei-Najafabadi, Navid

    2017-10-01

    Impact of Distributed Injection on Plasma Wakefield Acceleration at FACET An electron-beam-driven plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA) will sustain accelerating gradients of tens of GeV/m in a meter-scale plasma. If the transverse radius of the electron beam is not matched to the plasma, the envelope of this drive beam will execute betatron oscillations in the focusing force of the ion column. At its lowest radius in this oscillation cycle, the electric field of the beam can surpass the ionization threshold of elements, leading to ionization injection of these electrons in to the wake. Electrons from each cycle of this betatron oscillation then accumulate at the back of the wake and decrease the accelerating field. The experiments were carried out at FACET, where the drive electron beam had 3 nC of charge and an energy of 20.35 GeV. Two different plasma sources were used: a 30 cm self-ionized Rubidium (Rb) vapor confined by argon (Ar) gas at room-temperature and a partially pre-ionized hydrogen gas. The experimental and simulation evidence for the distributed injection of electrons and their impact on the PWFA at FACET will be presented in this talk. This work was supported by NSF Grant No. PHY-1415386 and DOE Grant No. DE-SC0010064. Work at SLAC was supported by DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-76SF00515.

  6. Applications of laser wakefield accelerator-based light sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Félicie; Thomas, Alec G. R.

    2016-11-01

    Laser-wakefield accelerators (LWFAs) were proposed more than three decades ago, and while they promise to deliver compact, high energy particle accelerators, they will also provide the scientific community with novel light sources. In a LWFA, where an intense laser pulse focused onto a plasma forms an electromagnetic wave in its wake, electrons can be trapped and are now routinely accelerated to GeV energies. From terahertz radiation to gamma-rays, this article reviews light sources from relativistic electrons produced by LWFAs, and discusses their potential applications. Betatron motion, Compton scattering and undulators respectively produce x-rays or gamma-rays by oscillating relativistic electrons in the wakefield behind the laser pulse, a counter-propagating laser field, or a magnetic undulator. Other LWFA-based light sources include bremsstrahlung and terahertz radiation. We first evaluate the performance of each of these light sources, and compare them with more conventional approaches, including radio frequency accelerators or other laser-driven sources. We have then identified applications, which we discuss in details, in a broad range of fields: medical and biological applications, military, defense and industrial applications, and condensed matter and high energy density science.

  7. Observation of acceleration and deceleration in gigaelectron-volt-per-metre gradient dielectric wakefield accelerators

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    O'Shea, B D; Andonian, G; Barber, S K; Fitzmorris, K L; Hakimi, S; Harrison, J; Hoang, P D; Hogan, M J; Naranjo, B; Williams, O B; Yakimenko, V; Rosenzweig, J B

    2016-01-01

    .... To address this need, short wavelength accelerators based on wakefields, where an intense relativistic electron beam radiates the demanded fields directly into the accelerator structure or medium...

  8. Experimental realization of underdense plasma photocathode wakefield acceleration at FACET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherkl, Paul

    2017-10-01

    Novel electron beam sources from compact plasma accelerator concepts currently mature into the driving technology for next generation high-energy physics and light source facilities. Particularly electron beams of ultra-high brightness could pave the way for major advances for both scientific and commercial applications, but their generation remains tremendously challenging. The presentation outlines the experimental demonstration of the world's first bright electron beam source from spatiotemporally synchronized laser pulses injecting electrons into particle-driven plasma wakefields at FACET. Two distinctive types of operation - laser-triggered density downramp injection (``Plasma Torch'') and underdense plasma photocathode acceleration (``Trojan Horse'') - and their intermediate transitions are characterized and contrasted. Extensive particle-in-cell simulations substantiate the presentation of experimental results. In combination with novel techniques to minimize the beam energy spread, the acceleration scheme presented here promises ultra-high beam quality and brightness.

  9. Transverse emittance growth in staged laser-wakefield acceleration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Mehrling

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a study on the emittance evolution of electron bunches, externally injected into laser-driven plasma waves using the three-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC code OSIRIS. Results show order-of-magnitude transverse emittance growth during the injection process, if the electron bunch is not matched to its intrinsic betatron motion inside the wakefield. This behavior is supported by analytic theory reproducing the simulation data to a percent level. The length over which the full emittance growth develops is found to be less than or comparable to the typical dimension of a single plasma module in current multistage designs. In addition, the analytic theory enables the quantitative prediction of emittance degradation in two consecutive accelerators coupled by free-drift sections, excluding this as a scheme for effective emittance-growth suppression, and thus suggests the necessity of beam-matching sections between acceleration stages with fundamental implications on the overall design of staged laser-wakefield accelerators.

  10. Dimuon production by laser-wakefield accelerated electrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Titov

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available We analyze μ^{+}μ^{-} pair production generated by high-energy electrons emerging from a laser-wakefield accelerator. The μ^{+}μ^{-} pairs are created in a solid thick high-Z target, following the electron accelerating plasma region. Numerical estimates are presented for 1 to 10 GeV electron beams which are expected to be reliable in the nearest future. Reactions induced by the secondary bremsstrahlung photons dominate the dimuon production. According to our estimates, a 20 pC electron bunch with energy of 1 (10 GeV may create about 100 (5000 muon pairs. The produced μ^{±} can be used in studying various aspects of muon-related physics in tabletop installations. This may be considered as an important step towards the investigation of more complicated elementary processes induced by laser-driven electrons.

  11. Laser plasma wakefield acceleration gain enhancement by means of accelerating Bessel pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S.; Parola, A.; Di Trapani, P.; Jedrkiewicz, O.

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, we propose an approach to enhance the electron energy gain in standard laser-driven plasma wakefield accelerators, using accelerating Bessel pulses with tunable group velocity so to avoid electron dephasing. We use in the numerical simulations a one-dimensional theoretical model in the linear regime, taking advantage of the "diffraction-free" properties of the localized Bessel beam and thus neglecting transverse effects during the acceleration process. With a multistage tailoring approach, we show a gain enhancement of more than 100 with electron energies that may reach the GeV range over distances shorter than 1 m.

  12. Plasma Channel Guided Laser Wakefield Accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Geddes, C G

    2005-01-01

    High quality electron beams (several 109 electrons above 80 MeV energy with percent energy spread and low divergence) have been produced for the first time in a compact, high gradient, all-optical laser accelerator by extending the interaction distance using a pre-formed plasma density channel to guide the drive laser pulse. Laser-driven accelerators, in which particles are accelerated by the electric field of a plasma wave (wake) driven by the radiation pressure of an intense laser, have over the past decade demonstrated accelerating fields thousands of times greater than those achievable in conventional radio-frequency accelerators. This has spurred interest in them as compact next- generation sources of energetic electrons and radiation. To date, however, acceleration distances have been severely limited by the lack of a controllable method for extending the propagation distance of the focused laser pulse. The ensuing short acceleration distance resulted in low-energy beams with 100 percent electron energy...

  13. Simulation of density measurements in plasma wakefields using photo acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Kasim, Muhammad Firmansyah; Ceurvorst, Luke; Sadler, James; Burrows, Philip N; Trines, Raoul; Holloway, James; Wing, Matthew; Bingham, Robert; Norreys, Peter

    2015-01-01

    One obstacle in plasma accelerator development is the limitation of techniques to diagnose and measure plasma wakefield parameters. In this paper, we present a novel concept for the density measurement of a plasma wakefield using photon acceleration, supported by extensive particle in cell simulations of a laser pulse that copropagates with a wakefield. The technique can provide the perturbed electron density profile in the laser’s reference frame, averaged over the propagation length, to be accurate within 10%. We discuss the limitations that affect the measurement: small frequency changes, photon trapping, laser displacement, stimulated Raman scattering, and laser beam divergence. By considering these processes, one can determine the optimal parameters of the laser pulse and its propagation length. This new technique allows a characterization of the density perturbation within a plasma wakefield accelerator.

  14. Simulation of density measurements in plasma wakefields using photon acceleration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Firmansyah Kasim

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available One obstacle in plasma accelerator development is the limitation of techniques to diagnose and measure plasma wakefield parameters. In this paper, we present a novel concept for the density measurement of a plasma wakefield using photon acceleration, supported by extensive particle in cell simulations of a laser pulse that copropagates with a wakefield. The technique can provide the perturbed electron density profile in the laser’s reference frame, averaged over the propagation length, to be accurate within 10%. We discuss the limitations that affect the measurement: small frequency changes, photon trapping, laser displacement, stimulated Raman scattering, and laser beam divergence. By considering these processes, one can determine the optimal parameters of the laser pulse and its propagation length. This new technique allows a characterization of the density perturbation within a plasma wakefield accelerator.

  15. Laser-plasma lens for laser-wakefield accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Lehe

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Thanks to their compactness and unique properties, laser-wakefield accelerators are currently considered for several innovative applications. However, many of these applications—and especially those that require beam transport—are hindered by the large divergence of laser-accelerated beams. Here we propose a collimating concept that relies on the strong radial electric field of the laser-wakefield to reduce this divergence. This concept utilizes an additional gas jet, placed after the laser-wakefield accelerator. When the laser pulse propagates through this additional gas jet, it drives a wakefield which can refocus the trailing electron bunch. Particle-in-cell simulations demonstrate that this approach can reduce the divergence by at least a factor of 3 for realistic electron bunches.

  16. Oscillating two-stream instability of laser wakefield-driven plasma ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The laser wakefield-driven plasma wave in a low-density plasma is seen to be sus- ceptible to the oscillating ... in vacuum) and hence, these plasma waves are highly suitable for high-energy particle acceleration. The plasma ... over an extended interaction length of ∼10 cm for a CO2 laser. Simulations indicate a.

  17. Particle acceleration and exotic light emission in structured plasma wakefields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Jorge

    2017-10-01

    Twisted Laguerre Gaussian lasers, with orbital angular momentum (OAM), are characterised by twisted wavefronts and doughnut intensity profiles. These lasers provide a transformative set of research directions in a growing range of fields, particularly at intensities below damage thresholds. Here, we explore how the interaction between ultra-intense twisted light and matter could enhance plasma accelerators and light sources. We support our findings with theory and massively parallel three-dimensional particle-in-cell Osiris simulations. Providing a solution to a long-lasting challenge in plasma acceleration, we show that twisted light can excite a nonlinear doughnut blowout suitable for electron and positron focusing and acceleration. This is a new type of wakefield that contrasts with the nonlinear spherical blowout, characterised by positron defocusing forces. Despite being driven by an OAM laser, doughnut plasma waves contain no OAM. This picture changes dramatically, when the laser driver contain multiple OAM levels characterised by distinct frequencies. The corresponding beating pattern results in a spiralling laser intensity profile, known as a light spring, which can excite a twisted plasma wave with OAM. The twisted wakefields accelerate particles both longitudinally and azimuthally. This feature can be exploited towards the generation of relativistic bunches with similar longitudinal and transverse momenta, which changes radiation emission processes. Structured lasers have been produced in the laboratory, using conventional spiral phase plates and plasma based holograms. Here, we demonstrate how to create and amplify ultra-intense OAM lasers in the plasma, through stimulated Raman backscattering. Work supported by FCT (Portugal) Grant No. SFRH/IF/01635/2015.

  18. High-efficiency acceleration of an electron beam in a plasma wakefield accelerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litos, M; Adli, E; An, W; Clarke, C I; Clayton, C E; Corde, S; Delahaye, J P; England, R J; Fisher, A S; Frederico, J; Gessner, S; Green, S Z; Hogan, M J; Joshi, C; Lu, W; Marsh, K A; Mori, W B; Muggli, P; Vafaei-Najafabadi, N; Walz, D; White, G; Wu, Z; Yakimenko, V; Yocky, G

    2014-11-06

    High-efficiency acceleration of charged particle beams at high gradients of energy gain per unit length is necessary to achieve an affordable and compact high-energy collider. The plasma wakefield accelerator is one concept being developed for this purpose. In plasma wakefield acceleration, a charge-density wake with high accelerating fields is driven by the passage of an ultra-relativistic bunch of charged particles (the drive bunch) through a plasma. If a second bunch of relativistic electrons (the trailing bunch) with sufficient charge follows in the wake of the drive bunch at an appropriate distance, it can be efficiently accelerated to high energy. Previous experiments using just a single 42-gigaelectronvolt drive bunch have accelerated electrons with a continuous energy spectrum and a maximum energy of up to 85 gigaelectronvolts from the tail of the same bunch in less than a metre of plasma. However, the total charge of these accelerated electrons was insufficient to extract a substantial amount of energy from the wake. Here we report high-efficiency acceleration of a discrete trailing bunch of electrons that contains sufficient charge to extract a substantial amount of energy from the high-gradient, nonlinear plasma wakefield accelerator. Specifically, we show the acceleration of about 74 picocoulombs of charge contained in the core of the trailing bunch in an accelerating gradient of about 4.4 gigavolts per metre. These core particles gain about 1.6 gigaelectronvolts of energy per particle, with a final energy spread as low as 0.7 per cent (2.0 per cent on average), and an energy-transfer efficiency from the wake to the bunch that can exceed 30 per cent (17.7 per cent on average). This acceleration of a distinct bunch of electrons containing a substantial charge and having a small energy spread with both a high accelerating gradient and a high energy-transfer efficiency represents a milestone in the development of plasma wakefield acceleration into a

  19. Laser wakefield accelerator based light sources: potential applications and requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). NIF and Photon Sciences; Thomas, A. G. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences; Mangles, S. P.D. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom). Blackett Lab.; Banerjee, S. [Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States); Corde, S. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Flacco, A. [ENSTA, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau (France); Litos, M. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Neely, D. [Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC), Oxford (United Kingdom). Rutherford Appleton Lab. (RAL). Central Laser Facility; Viera, J. [Univ. of Lisbon (Portugal). GoLP-Inst. de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear-Lab. Associado; Najmudin, Z. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom). Blackett Lab.; Bingham, R. [Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC), Oxford (United Kingdom). Rutherford Appleton Lab. (RAL). Central Laser Facility; Joshi, C. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering; Katsouleas, T. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States). Platt School of Engineering

    2015-01-15

    In this article we review the prospects of laser wakefield accelerators as next generation light sources for applications. This work arose as a result of discussions held at the 2013 Laser Plasma Accelerators Workshop. X-ray phase contrast imaging, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and nuclear resonance fluorescence are highlighted as potential applications for laser-plasma based light sources. We discuss ongoing and future efforts to improve the properties of radiation from plasma betatron emission and Compton scattering using laser wakefield accelerators for these specific applications.

  20. Theoretical investigation of external injection schemes for laser wakefield acceleration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luttikhof, M.J.H.

    2010-01-01

    This thesis reports on laser wakefield acceleration, a radically new approach for particle acceleration that builds on the huge electric fields that a plasma wave can provide. In this approach, an ultra-short laser pulse of high intensity is sent through a plasma. At sufficient intensity, the

  1. Fine wakefield structure in the blowout regime of plasma wakefield accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. V. Lotov

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available For simulations of plasma wakefield acceleration (PWFA and similar problems, we developed two-dimensional fully electromagnetic fully relativistic hybrid code LCODE. The code is very fast due to explicit use of several simplifying assumptions (quasistatic approximation, ultrarelativistic beam, and the symmetry. With LCODE, we make high-resolution simulations of the blowout regime of PWFA and study the temperature effect on the amplitude of the accelerating field spike.

  2. Electron Rephasing in a Laser-Wakefield Accelerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillaume, E; Döpp, A; Thaury, C; Ta Phuoc, K; Lifschitz, A; Grittani, G; Goddet, J-P; Tafzi, A; Chou, S W; Veisz, L; Malka, V

    2015-10-09

    An important limit for energy gain in laser-plasma wakefield accelerators is the dephasing length, after which the electron beam reaches the decelerating region of the wakefield and starts to decelerate. Here, we propose to manipulate the phase of the electron beam in the wakefield, in order to bring the beam back into the accelerating region, hence increasing the final beam energy. This rephasing is operated by placing an upward density step in the beam path. In a first experiment, we demonstrate the principle of this technique using a large energy spread electron beam. Then, we show that it can be used to increase the energy of monoenergetic electron beams by more than 50%.

  3. Role of Direct Laser Acceleration of Electrons in a Laser Wakefield Accelerator with Ionization Injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, J L; Lemos, N; Amorim, L D; Vafaei-Najafabadi, N; Marsh, K A; Tsung, F S; Mori, W B; Joshi, C

    2017-02-10

    We show the first experimental demonstration that electrons being accelerated in a laser wakefield accelerator operating in the forced or blowout regimes gain significant energy from both the direct laser acceleration (DLA) and the laser wakefield acceleration mechanisms. Supporting full-scale 3D particle-in-cell simulations elucidate the role of the DLA of electrons in a laser wakefield accelerator when ionization injection of electrons is employed. An explanation is given for how electrons can maintain the DLA resonance condition in a laser wakefield accelerator despite the evolving properties of both the drive laser and the electrons. The produced electron beams exhibit characteristic features that are indicative of DLA as an additional acceleration mechanism.

  4. Demonstration of the hollow channel plasma wakefield accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gessner, Spencer J.

    2016-09-17

    A plasma wakefield accelerator is a device that converts the energy of a relativistic particle beam into a large-amplitude wave in a plasma. The plasma wave, or wakefield, supports an enormous electricfield that is used to accelerate a trailing particle beam. The plasma wakefield accelerator can therefore be used as a transformer, transferring energy from a high-charge, low-energy particle beam into a high-energy, low-charge particle beam. This technique may lead to a new generation of ultra-compact, high-energy particle accelerators. The past decade has seen enormous progress in the field of plasma wakefield acceleration with experimental demonstrations of the acceleration of electron beams by several gigaelectron-volts. The acceleration of positron beams in plasma is more challenging, but also necessary for the creation of a high-energy electron-positron collider. Part of the challenge is that the plasma responds asymmetrically to electrons and positrons, leading to increased disruption of the positron beam. One solution to this problem, first proposed over twenty years ago, is to use a hollow channel plasma which symmetrizes the response of the plasma to beams of positive and negative charge, making it possible to accelerate positrons in plasma without disruption. In this thesis, we describe the theory relevant to our experiment and derive new results when needed. We discuss the development and implementation of special optical devices used to create long plasma channels. We demonstrate for the first time the generation of meter-scale plasma channels and the acceleration of positron beams therein.

  5. A high current, short pulse electron source for wakefield accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Ching-Hung.

    1992-01-01

    Design studies for the generation of a high current, short pulse electron source for the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator are presented. An L-band laser photocathode rf gun cavity is designed using the computer code URMEL to maximize the electric field on the cathode surface for fixed frequency and rf input power. A new technique using a curved incoming laser wavefront to minimize the space charge effect near the photocathode is studied. A preaccelerator with large iris to minimize wakefield effects is used to boost the drive beam to a useful energy of around 20 MeV for wakefield acceleration experiments. Focusing in the photocathode gun and the preaccelerator is accomplished with solenoids. Beam dynamics simulations throughout the preaccelerator are performed using particle simulation codes TBCI-SF and PARMELA. An example providing a useful set of operation parameters for the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator is given. The effects of the sagitta of the curved beam and laser amplitude and timing jitter effects are discussed. Measurement results of low rf power level bench tests and a high power test for the gun cavity are presented and discussed.

  6. Observation of acceleration and deceleration in gigaelectron-volt-per-metre gradient dielectric wakefield accelerators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shea, B D; Andonian, G; Barber, S K; Fitzmorris, K L; Hakimi, S; Harrison, J; Hoang, P D; Hogan, M J; Naranjo, B; Williams, O B; Yakimenko, V; Rosenzweig, J B

    2016-09-14

    There is urgent need to develop new acceleration techniques capable of exceeding gigaelectron-volt-per-metre (GeV m(-1)) gradients in order to enable future generations of both light sources and high-energy physics experiments. To address this need, short wavelength accelerators based on wakefields, where an intense relativistic electron beam radiates the demanded fields directly into the accelerator structure or medium, are currently under intense investigation. One such wakefield based accelerator, the dielectric wakefield accelerator, uses a dielectric lined-waveguide to support a wakefield used for acceleration. Here we show gradients of 1.347±0.020 GeV m(-1) using a dielectric wakefield accelerator of 15 cm length, with sub-millimetre transverse aperture, by measuring changes of the kinetic state of relativistic electron beams. We follow this measurement by demonstrating accelerating gradients of 320±17 MeV m(-1). Both measurements improve on previous measurements by and order of magnitude and show promise for dielectric wakefield accelerators as sources of high-energy electrons.

  7. Coaxial two-channel high-gradient dielectric wakefield accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. V. Sotnikov

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A new scheme for a dielectric wakefield accelerator is proposed that employs a cylindrical multizone dielectric structure configured as two concentric dielectric tubes with outer and inner vacuum channels for drive and accelerated bunches. Analytical and numerical studies have been carried out for such coaxial dielectric-loaded structures (CDS for high-gradient acceleration. An analytical theory of wakefield excitation by particle bunches in a multizone CDS has been formulated. Numerical calculations are presented for an example of a CDS using dielectric tubes with dielectric permittivity 5.7, having external diameters of 2.121 and 0.179 mm with inner diameters of 2.095 and 0.1 mm. An annular 5 GeV, 6 nC electron bunch with rms length of 0.035 mm energizes a wakefield on the structure axis having an accelerating gradient of ∼600  MeV/m with a transformer ratio ∼8∶1. The period of the accelerating field is ∼0.33  mm. If the width of the drive bunch channel is decreased, it is possible to obtain an accelerating gradient of >1  GeV/m while keeping the transformer ratio approximately the same. Full numerical simulations using a particle-in-cell code have confirmed results of the linear theory and furthermore have shown the important influence of the quenching wave that restricts the region of the wakefield to within several periods following the drive bunch. Numerical simulations for another example have shown nearly stable transport of drive and accelerated bunches through the CDS, using a short train of drive bunches.

  8. Mitigation of the Hose Instability in Plasma-Wakefield Accelerators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrling, T J; Fonseca, R A; Martinez de la Ossa, A; Vieira, J

    2017-04-28

    Current models predict the hose instability to crucially limit the applicability of plasma-wakefield accelerators. By developing an analytical model which incorporates the evolution of the hose instability over long propagation distances, this work demonstrates that the inherent drive-beam energy loss, along with an initial beam-energy spread, detunes the betatron oscillations of beam electrons and thereby mitigates the instability. It is also shown that tapered plasma profiles can strongly reduce initial hosing seeds. Hence, we demonstrate that the propagation of a drive beam can be stabilized over long propagation distances, paving the way for the acceleration of high-quality electron beams in plasma-wakefield accelerators. We find excellent agreement between our models and particle-in-cell simulations.

  9. A preliminary design of the collinear dielectric wakefield accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zholents, A.; Gai, W.; Doran, S.; Lindberg, R.; Power, J.G.; Strelnikov, N.; Sun, Y.; Trakhtenberg, E.; Vasserman, I. [ANL, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Jing, C.; Kanareykin, A.; Li, Y. [Euclid Techlabs LLC, Solon, OH 44139 (United States); Gao, Q. [Tsinghua University, Beijing (China); Shchegolkov, D.Y.; Simakov, E.I. [LANL, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2016-09-01

    A preliminary design of the multi-meter long collinear dielectric wakefield accelerator that achieves a highly efficient transfer of the drive bunch energy to the wakefields and to the witness bunch is considered. It is made from ~0.5 m long accelerator modules containing a vacuum chamber with dielectric-lined walls, a quadrupole wiggler, an rf coupler, and BPM assembly. The single bunch breakup instability is a major limiting factor for accelerator efficiency, and the BNS damping is applied to obtain the stable multi-meter long propagation of a drive bunch. Numerical simulations using a 6D particle tracking computer code are performed and tolerances to various errors are defined.

  10. Supersonic jets of hydrogen and helium for laser wakefield acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Svensson, K.; Wojda, F.; Senje, L.; Burza, M.; Aurand, B.; Genoud, G.; Persson, A.; Wahlström, C.-G.; Lundh, O.

    2016-01-01

    The properties of laser wakefield accelerated electrons in supersonic gas flows of hydrogen and helium are investigated. At identical backing pressure, we find that electron beams emerging from helium show large variations in their spectral and spatial distributions, whereas electron beams accelerated in hydrogen plasmas show a higher degree of reproducibility. In an experimental investigation of the relation between neutral gas density and backing pressure, it is found that the resulting number density for helium is ∼30% higher than for hydrogen at the same backing pressure. The observed differences in electron beam properties between the two gases can thus be explained by differences in plasma electron density. This interpretation is verified by repeating the laser wakefield acceleration experiment using similar plasma electron densities for the two gases, which then yielded electron beams with similar properties.

  11. Observation of Wakefield Suppression in a Photonic-Band-Gap Accelerator Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simakov, Evgenya I; Arsenyev, Sergey A; Buechler, Cynthia E; Edwards, Randall L; Romero, William P; Conde, Manoel; Ha, Gwanghui; Power, John G; Wisniewski, Eric E; Jing, Chunguang

    2016-02-12

    We report experimental observation of higher order mode (HOM) wakefield suppression in a room-temperature traveling-wave photonic-band-gap (PBG) accelerating structure at 11.700 GHz. It has been long recognized that PBG structures have the potential for reducing long-range wakefields in accelerators. The first ever demonstration of acceleration in a room-temperature PBG structure was conducted in 2005. Since then, the importance of PBG accelerator research has been recognized by many institutions. However, the full experimental characterization of the wakefield spectrum and demonstration of wakefield suppression when the accelerating structure is excited by an electron beam has not been performed to date. We conducted an experiment at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator test facility and observed wakefields excited by a single high charge electron bunch when it passes through a PBG accelerator structure. Excellent HOM suppression properties of the PBG accelerator were demonstrated in the beam test.

  12. Optimization of a train of bunches for plasma wakefield acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martorelli, Roberto

    2016-05-10

    Particle accelerators are a fundamental instrument for the understanding of fundamental mechanism in nature. The need of always higher energies for the particle beams requires a huge increase of the sizes of the accelerators using the actual technology. Moreover the highest energies are achieved nowadays by circular colliders, not perfectly suitable for acceleration of electrons and positrons due to the radiation losses. In order to overcome this problem a new branch of physics studying alternative technique for particle acceleration has been developed. Among the various alternatives a promising one is the plasma wakefield acceleration (PWFA), in which a driver bunch interacts with a cold background plasma, exciting a plasma wave. The electric field of the plasma wave is then used for the acceleration of a second bunch. Such a mechanism allows to reach fields strength far beyond currently available, limited by the dielectric strength of the material. Among the different driver configurations, a promising one is the use of a modulated beam, namely a train of bunches, that provides a coherent interference among the electric fields generated by the single bunches. Such mechanism is subjected to a renewed interest in view of the forthcoming AWAKE experiment at CERN in which the long proton beam produced at the SPS facility is used as a driver. This possibility is achieved thanks to the onset of the self-modulation instability that modulates the long beam in a train of approximately 100 bunches. In order to accelerate the witness bunch to high energies is necessary on the other hand an efficient exchange of energy from the driver to the accelerated bunch, as well as a long duration of the driver so that can propagates for kilometers. This thesis deals with this two last aspects. The aim of this work is to provide an optimization for the modulated driver in order to improve specific features of the PWFA. This work shows the possibility to achieve an improved efficiency

  13. Simulation of a brilliant betatron gamma-ray source from a two-stage wakefield accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davoine, X.; Ferri, J.; Andriyash, I.; Corde, S.; Dopp, A.; Doche, A.; Thaury, C.; Ta Phuoc, K.; Mahieu, B.; Malka, V.; Lifschitz, A.

    2017-10-01

    Thanks to the recent progress in laser-driven plasma acceleration of electrons, the ultra-short, compact and spatially coherent X-ray betatron sources generated in a wakefield accelerator have been successfully applied to high-resolution imaging or ultra-fast probing of matter evolution in the last few years. Here, based on three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we propose an original hybrid scheme in which an electron beam produced in a first stage of laser-driven wakefield, interacts in a second stage with ahigher plasma density to generate a beam-driven wakefield and undergo strong betatron oscillation.This second stage acts as an efficient plasma radiator: we show that this scheme greatly improves the energy efficiency of the source, with about 1% of the laser energy transferred to the radiation, and that the gamma-ray photon energy exceeds the MeV range when using a 15 J laser pulse. This new scheme opens the way to a wide range of applications requiring high-brilliance MeV photon source, such as photo-nuclear reaction study, radiography of dense objects, probing in nuclear physics or electron-positron pair production. This work has been supported by Laserlab-Europe (EU-H2020 654148) and GENCI (access to TGCC/Curie under the Grants No. 2016-056129 and 2016-057594).

  14. Applications of laser wakefield accelerators for biomedical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najmudin, Zulfikar

    2014-10-01

    Laser-wakefield accelerators driven by high-intensity short-pulse lasers are a proven compact source of high-energy electron beams, with energy gains of ~GeV energy in centimetres of plasma demonstrated. One of the main proposed applications for these accelerators is to drive synchrotron light sources, in particular for x-ray applications. It has also been shown that the same plasma accelerator can also act as a wigglers, capable of the production of high brightness and spatially coherent hard x-ray beams. In this latest work, we demonstrate the application of these unique light-sources for biological and medical applications. The experiments were performed with the Astra Gemini laser at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in the UK. Gemini produces laser pulses with energy exceeding 10 J in pulse lengths down to 40 fs. A long focal length parabola (f / 20) is used to focus the laser down to a spot of size approximately 25 μ m (fwhm) into a gas-cell of variable length. Electrons are accelerated to energies up to 1 GeV and a bright beam of x-rays is observed simultaneously with the accelerated beam. The length of the gas cell was optimised to produce high contrast x-ray images of radiographed test objects. This source was then used for imaging a number of interesting medical and biological samples. Full tomographic imaging of a human trabecular bone sample was made with resolution easily exceeding the ~100 μm level required for CT applications. Phase-contrast imaging of human prostrate and mouse neonates at the micron level was also demonstrated. These studies indicate the usefulness of these sources in research and clinical applications. They also show that full 3D imaging can be made possible with this source in a fraction of the time that it would take with a corresponding x-ray tube. The JAI is funded by STFC Grant ST/J002062/1.

  15. Demonstration of a beam loaded nanocoulomb-class laser wakefield accelerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couperus, J P; Pausch, R; Köhler, A; Zarini, O; Krämer, J M; Garten, M; Huebl, A; Gebhardt, R; Helbig, U; Bock, S; Zeil, K; Debus, A; Bussmann, M; Schramm, U; Irman, A

    2017-09-08

    Laser-plasma wakefield accelerators have seen tremendous progress, now capable of producing quasi-monoenergetic electron beams in the GeV energy range with few-femtoseconds bunch duration. Scaling these accelerators to the nanocoulomb range would yield hundreds of kiloamperes peak current and stimulate the next generation of radiation sources covering high-field THz, high-brightness X-ray and γ-ray sources, compact free-electron lasers and laboratory-size beam-driven plasma accelerators. However, accelerators generating such currents operate in the beam loading regime where the accelerating field is strongly modified by the self-fields of the injected bunch, potentially deteriorating key beam parameters. Here we demonstrate that, if appropriately controlled, the beam loading effect can be employed to improve the accelerator's performance. Self-truncated ionization injection enables loading of unprecedented charges of ∼0.5 nC within a mono-energetic peak. As the energy balance is reached, we show that the accelerator operates at the theoretically predicted optimal loading condition and the final energy spread is minimized.Higher beam quality and stability are desired in laser-plasma accelerators for their applications in compact light sources. Here the authors demonstrate in laser plasma wakefield electron acceleration that the beam loading effect can be employed to improve beam quality by controlling the beam charge.

  16. Numerical studies of density transition injection in laser wakefield acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massimo, F.; Lifschitz, A. F.; Thaury, C.; Malka, V.

    2017-08-01

    The quality of laser wakefield accelerated electrons beams is strongly determined by the physical mechanism exploited to inject electrons in the wakefield. One of the techniques used to improve the beam quality is the density transition injection, where the electron trapping occurs as the laser pulse passes a sharp density transition created in the plasma. Although this technique has been widely demonstrated experimentally, the literature lacks theoretical and numerical studies on the effects of all the transition parameters. We thus report and discuss the results of a series of particle in cell (PIC) simulations where the density transition height and downramp length are systematically varied, to show how the electron beam parameters and the injection mechanism are affected by the density transition parameters.

  17. Two-color hybrid laser wakefield and direct laser accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xi; Khudik, V.; Bernstein, A.; Downer, M.; Shvets, G.

    2017-03-01

    We propose and investigate the concept of two-color laser wakefield and direct acceleration (LWDA) scheme in the regime of moderate (10 TW scale) laser powers. The concept utilizes two unequal frequency laser pulses: the leading long-wavelength (λ0 = 0.8 µm) wakefield laser pulse driving a nonlinear plasma wake, and a trailing short-wavelength (λDLA = λ0/2) DLA laser pulse. The combination of the large electric field, yet small ponderomotive pressure of the DLA pulse is shown to be advantageous for producing a higher energy and larger charge electron beam compared with the single frequency LWDA. The sensitivity of the dual-frequency LWDA to synchronization time jitter is also reduced.

  18. Beam manipulation for compact laser wakefield accelerator based free-electron lasers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Loulergue, A; Labat, M; Evain, C; Benabderrahmane, C; Malka, Victor; Couprie, M E

    2015-01-01

    .... After the success of FELs based on conventional acceleration using radio-frequency cavities, an important challenge is the development of FELs based on electron bunching accelerated by a laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA...

  19. Laser wakefield acceleration using wire produced double density ramps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Burza

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel approach to implement and control electron injection into the accelerating phase of a laser wakefield accelerator is presented. It utilizes a wire, which is introduced into the flow of a supersonic gas jet creating shock waves and three regions of differing plasma electron density. If tailored appropriately, the laser plasma interaction takes place in three stages: Laser self-compression, electron injection, and acceleration in the second plasma wave period. Compared to self-injection by wave breaking of a nonlinear plasma wave in a constant density plasma, this scheme increases beam charge by up to 1 order of magnitude in the quasimonoenergetic regime. Electron acceleration in the second plasma wave period reduces electron beam divergence by ≈25%, and the localized injection at the density downramps results in spectra with less than a few percent relative spread.

  20. Laser Wakefield Acceleration Using Wire Produced Double Density Ramps

    CERN Document Server

    Burza, M; Svensson, K; Wojda, F; Persson, A; Hansson, M; Genoud, G; Marklund, M; Wahlström, C -G; Lundh, O

    2012-01-01

    A novel approach to implement and control electron injection into the accelerating phase of a laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) is presented. It utilizes a wire, which is introduced into the flow of a supersonic gas jet creating shock waves and three regions of differing plasma electron density. If tailored appropriately, the laser plasma interaction takes place in three stages: Laser self-compression, electron injection and acceleration in the second plasma wave period. Compared to self-injection by wavebreaking of a nonlinear plasma wave in a constant density plasma, this scheme increases beam charge by up to one order of magnitude in the quasi-monoenergetic regime. Electron acceleration in the second plasma wave period reduces electron beam divergence by approximately 25 %, and the localized injection at the density downramps results in spectra with less than a few percent relative spread.

  1. Multi-gigaelectronvolt acceleration of positrons in a self-loaded plasma wakefield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corde, Sebastien [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Adli, E. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Univ. of Oslo, Oslo (Norway); Allen, J. M. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); An, W. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Clarke, C. I. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Delahaye, J. P. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Frederico, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Gessner, S. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Green, S. Z. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Hogan, M. J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Joshi, C. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Lipkowitz, N. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Litos, M. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Lu, W. [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China); Marsh, K. A. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Mori, W. B. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Schmeltz, M. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Vafaei-Najafabadi, N. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Walz, D. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Yakimenko, V. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Yocky, G. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Clayton, C. E. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2015-08-26

    New accelerator concepts must be developed to make future particle colliders more compact and affordable. The Plasma Wakefield Accelerator (PWFA) is one such concept, where the electric field of a plasma wake excited by a charged-particle bunch is used to accelerate a trailing bunch of particles. To apply plasma acceleration to particle colliders, it is imperative that both the electrons and their antimatter counterpart, the positrons, are efficiently accelerated at high fields using plasmas1. While substantial progress has recently been reported on high-field, high-efficiency acceleration of electrons in a PWFA powered by an electron bunch 2, such an electron-driven wake is unsuitable for the acceleration and focusing of a positron bunch. Here we demonstrate a new regime of PWFA where particles in the front of a single positron bunch transfer their energy to a substantial number of those in the rear of the same bunch by exciting a wakefield in the plasma. In the process, the accelerating field is altered – self-loaded – so that about a billion positrons gain five gigaelectronvolts (GeV) of energy with a narrow energy spread in a distance of just 1.3 meters. They extract about 30% of the wake’s energy and form a spectrally distinct bunch with as low as a 1.8% r.m.s. energy spread. This demonstrated ability of positron-driven plasma wakes to efficiently accelerate a significant number of positrons with a small energy spread may overcome the long-standing challenge of positron acceleration in plasma-based accelerators.

  2. Optical plasma torch electron bunch generation in plasma wakefield accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Wittig

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A novel, flexible method of witness electron bunch generation in plasma wakefield accelerators is described. A quasistationary plasma region is ignited by a focused laser pulse prior to the arrival of the plasma wave. This localized, shapeable optical plasma torch causes a strong distortion of the plasma blowout during passage of the electron driver bunch, leading to collective alteration of plasma electron trajectories and to controlled injection. This optically steered injection is more flexible and faster when compared to hydrodynamically controlled gas density transition injection methods.

  3. Increasing the transformer ratio at the Argonne wakefield accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Jing

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The transformer ratio is defined as the ratio of the maximum energy gain of the witness bunch to the maximum energy loss experienced by the drive bunch (or a bunch within a multidrive bunch train. This plays an important role in the collinear wakefield acceleration scheme. A high transformer ratio is desirable since it leads to a higher overall efficiency under similar conditions (e.g. the same beam loading, the same structure, etc.. One technique to enhance the transformer ratio beyond the ordinary limit of 2 is to use a ramped bunch train. The first experimental demonstration observed a transformer ratio only marginally above 2 due to the mismatch between the drive microbunch length and the frequency of the accelerating structure [C. Jing, A. Kanareykin, J. Power, M. Conde, Z. Yusof, P. Schoessow, and W. Gai, Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 144801 (2007PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.98.144801]. Recently, we revisited this experiment with an optimized microbunch length using a UV laser stacking technique at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator facility and measured a transformer ratio of 3.4. Measurements and data analysis from these experiments are presented in detail.

  4. Dynamics of electron injection in a laser-wakefield accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, J.; Buck, A.; Chou, S.-W.; Schmid, K.; Shen, B.; Tajima, T.; Kaluza, M. C.; Veisz, L.

    2017-08-01

    The detailed temporal evolution of the laser-wakefield acceleration process with controlled injection, producing reproducible high-quality electron bunches, has been investigated. The localized injection of electrons into the wakefield has been realized in a simple way—called shock-front injection—utilizing a sharp drop in plasma density. Both experimental and numerical results reveal the electron injection and acceleration process as well as the electron bunch's temporal properties. The possibility to visualize the plasma wave gives invaluable spatially resolved information about the local background electron density, which in turn allows for an efficient suppression of electron self-injection before the controlled process of injection at the sharp density jump. Upper limits for the electron bunch duration of 6.6 fs FWHM, or 2.8 fs (r.m.s.) were found. These results indicate that shock-front injection not only provides stable and tunable, but also few-femtosecond short electron pulses for applications such as ultrashort radiation sources, time-resolved electron diffraction or for the seeding of further acceleration stages.

  5. Numerical optimization of a plasma wakefield acceleration experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. V. Lotov

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available One possible way to demonstrate both the efficiency and beam quality in a plasma wakefield accelerator is to prepare matched drive and accelerated beams by removing a central slice from a single high-quality electron bunch (parent beam. For parameters of the parent beam given, the question arises how to maximize the number and energy of accelerated particles and minimize their energy spread and emittance. This question is addressed by numerical simulations. The optimum shape of the beams, required plasma length, achievable energy gain, and energy spread are found as functions of the plasma density and parent beam characteristics. The required control accuracy of adjustable beam and plasma parameters is determined.

  6. Energy spread minimization in a cascaded laser wakefield accelerator via velocity bunching (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhijun

    2017-05-01

    We report the observation of energy-spread compensation of electron bunches in a laser wakefield accelerator in experiment. The compensation was caused by the gradient wakefield in plasma wake, and the energy spectra of the bunches evolved during the acceleration so that we propose a new method to diagnose the longitudinal length of the ultrashort electron bunch. By analyzing the energy spectra of electron bunches with different acceleration length, the wakefield gradient difference and the wakefield slope of the bunch could be estimated by combining with the slippage between the plasma wave and the electron bunch, thus the electron bunches' longitudinal length could be estimated. By applying this new method, the longitudinal length of electron bunches with charge of about 40 pC generated from a laser wakefield accelerator was estimated to be (2.4 ± 2.2) μm in experiment, which was in good agreement with three-dimension particle-in-cell simulations.

  7. Enhancement of electron energy to the multi-GeV regime by a dual-stage laser-wakefield accelerator pumped by petawatt laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyung Taek; Pae, Ki Hong; Cha, Hyuk Jin; Kim, I Jong; Yu, Tae Jun; Sung, Jae Hee; Lee, Seong Ku; Jeong, Tae Moon; Lee, Jongmin

    2013-10-18

    Laser-wakefield acceleration offers the promise of a compact electron accelerator for generating a multi-GeV electron beam using the huge field gradient induced by an intense laser pulse, compared to conventional rf accelerators. However, the energy and quality of the electron beam from the laser-wakefield accelerator have been limited by the power of the driving laser pulses and interaction properties in the target medium. Recent progress in laser technology has resulted in the realization of a petawatt (PW) femtosecond laser, which offers new capabilities for research on laser-wakefield acceleration. Here, we present a significant increase in laser-driven electron energy to the multi-GeV level by utilizing a 30-fs, 1-PW laser system. In particular, a dual-stage laser-wakefield acceleration scheme (injector and accelerator scheme) was applied to boost electron energies to over 3 GeV with a single PW laser pulse. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations corroborate the multi-GeV electron generation from the dual-stage laser-wakefield accelerator driven by PW laser pulses.

  8. Beam-driven, Plasma-based Particle Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Muggli, P.

    2016-01-01

    We briefly give some of the characteristics of the beam-driven, plasma-based particle accelerator known as the plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA). We also mention some of the major results that have been obtained since the birth of the concept. We focus on high-energy particle beams where possible.

  9. Wakefield Monitor Experiments with X-Band Accelerating Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Lillestøl, Reidar; Corsini, Roberto; Döbert, Steffen; Farabolini, Wilfrid; Malina, Lukas; Pfingstner, Juergen; Wuensch, Walter

    2015-01-01

    The accelerating structures for CLIC must be aligned with a precision of a few um with respect to the beam trajectory in order to mitigate emittance growth due to transverse wake fields. We report on first results from wake field monitor tests in an X-band structure, with a probe beam at the CLIC Test Facility. The monitors are currently installed in the CLIC Two-Beam Module. In order to fully demonstrate the feasibility of using wakefield monitors for CLIC, the precision of the monitors must be verified using a probe beam while simultaneously filling the structure with high power rf used to drive the accelerating mode. We outline plans to perform such a demonstration in the CLIC Test Facility.

  10. Theory and measurements of emittance preservation in plasma wakefield acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frederico, Joel

    2016-12-01

    In this dissertation, we examine the preservation and measurement of emittance in the plasma wakefield acceleration blowout regime. Plasma wakefield acceleration (PWFA) is a revolutionary approach to accelerating charged particles that has been demonstrated to have the potential for gradients orders of magnitude greater than traditional approaches. The application of PWFA to the design of a linear collider will make new high energy physics research possible, but the design parameters must first be shown to be competitive with traditional methods. Emittance preservation is necessary in the design of a linear collider in order to maximize luminosity. We examine the conditions necessary for circular symmetry in the PWFA blowout regime, and demonstrate that current proposals meet these bounds. We also present an application of beam lamentation which describes the process of beam parameter and emittance matching. We show that the emittance growth saturates as a consequence of energy spread in the beam. The initial beam parameters determine the amount of emittance growth, while the contribution of energy spread is negligible. We also present a model for ion motion in the presence of a beam that is much more dense than the plasma. By combining the model of ion motion and emittance growth, we find the emittance growth due to ion motion is minimal in the case of marginal ion motion. In addition, we present a simulation that validates the ion motion model, which is under further development to examine emittance growth of both marginal and pronounced ion motion. Finally, we present a proof-of-concept of an emittance measurement which may enable the analysis of emittance preservation in future PWFA experiments.

  11. Wakefield damping in a pair of X-band accelerators for linear colliders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger M. Jones

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available We consider the means to damp the wakefield left behind ultrarelativistic charges. In particular, we focus on a pair of traveling wave accelerators operating at an X-band frequency of 11.424 GHz. In order to maximize the efficiency of acceleration, in the context of a linear collider, multiple bunches of charged particles are accelerated within a given pulse of the electromagnetic field. The wakefield left behind successive bunches, if left unchecked, can seriously disturb the progress of trailing bunches and can lead to an appreciable dilution in the emittance of the beam. We report on a method to minimize the influence of the wakefield on trailing bunches. This method entails detuning the characteristic mode frequencies which make up the electromagnetic field, damping the wakefield, and interleaving the frequencies of adjacent accelerating structures. Theoretical predictions of the wakefield and modes, based on a circuit model, are compared with experimental measurements of the wakefield conducted within the ASSET facility at SLAC. Very good agreement is obtained between theory and experiment and this allows us to have some confidence in designing the damping of wakefields in a future linear collider consisting of several thousand of these accelerating structures.

  12. Localization of ionization-induced trapping in a laser wakefield accelerator using a density down-ramp

    CERN Document Server

    Hansson, M.; Ekerfelt, H.; Aurand, B.; Gallardo Ganzalez, I.; Desforges, F. G.; Davoine, X.; Maitrallain, A.; Reymond, S.; Monot, P.; Persson, A.; Dobosz Dufrénoy S.; Wahlström C-G.; Cros, B.; Lundh, O.

    2016-01-01

    We report on a study on controlled trapping of electrons, by field ionization of nitrogen ions, in laser wakefield accelerators in variable length gas cells. In addition to ionization-induced trapping in the density plateau inside the cells, which results in wide, but stable, electron energy spectra, a regime of ionization-induced trapping localized in the density down-ramp at the exit of the gas cells, is found. The resulting electron energy spectra are peaked, with 10% shot-to-shot fluctuations in peak energy. Ionization-induced trapping of electrons in the density down-ramp is a way to trap and accelerate a large number of electrons, thus improving the efficiency of the laser-driven wakefield acceleration.

  13. Optimization and control of electron beams from laser wakefield accelerations using asymmetric laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopal, K.; Gupta, D. N.

    2017-10-01

    Optimization and control of electron beam quality in laser wakefield acceleration are explored by using a temporally asymmetric laser pulse of the sharp rising front portion. The temporally asymmetric laser pulse imparts stronger ponderomotive force on the ambient plasma electrons. The stronger ponderomotive force associated with the asymmetric pulse significantly affects the injection of electrons into the wakefield and consequently the quality of the injected bunch in terms of injected charge, mean energy, and emittance. Based on particle-in-cell simulations, we report to generate a monoenergetic electron beam with reduced emittance and enhanced charge in laser wakefield acceleration using an asymmetric pulse of duration 30 fs.

  14. Automatic Beam Path Analysis of Laser Wakefield Particle Acceleration Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubel, Oliver; Geddes, Cameron G.R.; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Wu, Kesheng; Prabhat,; Weber, Gunther H.; Ushizima, Daniela M.; Messmer, Peter; Hagen, Hans; Hamann, Bernd; Bethel, E. Wes

    2009-10-19

    Numerical simulations of laser wakefield particle accelerators play a key role in the understanding of the complex acceleration process and in the design of expensive experimental facilities. As the size and complexity of simulation output grows, an increasingly acute challenge is the practical need for computational techniques that aid in scientific knowledge discovery. To that end, we present a set of data-understanding algorithms that work in concert in a pipeline fashion to automatically locate and analyze high energy particle bunches undergoing acceleration in very large simulation datasets. These techniques work cooperatively by first identifying features of interest in individual timesteps, then integrating features across timesteps, and based on the information derived perform analysis of temporally dynamic features. This combination of techniques supports accurate detection of particle beams enabling a deeper level of scientific understanding of physical phenomena than hasbeen possible before. By combining efficient data analysis algorithms and state-of-the-art data management we enable high-performance analysis of extremely large particle datasets in 3D. We demonstrate the usefulness of our methods for a variety of 2D and 3D datasets and discuss the performance of our analysis pipeline.

  15. Neutrino-driven wakefield plasma accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios, L. A.; Serbeto, A.

    2003-08-01

    Processos envolvendo neutrinos são importantes em uma grande variedade de fenômenos astrofísicos, como as explosões de supernovas. Estes objetos, assim como os pulsares e as galáxias starburst, têm sido propostos como aceleradores cósmicos de partículas de altas energias. Neste trabalho, um modelo clássico de fluidos é utilizado para estudar a interação não-linear entre um feixe de neutrinos e um plasma não-colisional relativístico de pósitrons e elétrons na presença de um campo magnético. Durante a interação, uma onda híbrida superior de grande amplitude é excitada. Para parâmetros típicos de supernovas, verificamos que partículas carregadas "capturadas" por essa onda podem ser aceleradas a altas energias. Este resultado pode ser importante no estudo de mecanismos aceleradores de partículas em ambientes astrofísicos.

  16. Intense γ ray generated by refocusing laser pulse on wakefield accelerated electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jie; Wang, Jinguang; Li, Yifei; Zhu, Changqing; Li, Minghua; He, Yuhang; Li, Dazhang; Wang, Weimin; Chen, Liming

    2017-09-01

    Ultrafast x/γ ray emission from the combination of laser wake-field acceleration and plasma mirror has been investigated as a promising Thomson scattering source. However, the photon energy and yield of radiation are limited to the intensity of reflected laser pulses. We use the 2D particle in cell simulation to demonstrate that a 75TW driven laser pulse can be refocused on the accelerated electron bunches through a hemispherical plasma mirror with a small f number of 0.25. The energetic electrons with the maximum energy about 350 MeV collide with the reflected laser pulse of a0 = 3.82 at the focal spot, producing high order multi-photon Thomson scattering, and resulting in the scattering spectrum which extends up to 21.2 MeV. Such a high energy γ ray source could be applied to photonuclear reaction and materials science.

  17. Estimation of direct laser acceleration in laser wakefield accelerators using particle-in-cell simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Shaw, J L; Marsh, K A; Tsung, F S; Mori, W B; Joshi, C

    2015-01-01

    Many current laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) experiments are carried out in a regime where the laser pulse length is on the order of or longer than the wake wavelength and where ionization injection is employed to inject electrons into the wake. In these experiments, the trapped electrons will co-propagate with the longitudinal wakefield and the transverse laser field. In this scenario, the electrons can gain a significant amount of energy from both the direct laser acceleration (DLA) mechanism as well as the usual LWFA mechanism. Particle-in-cell (PIC) codes are frequently used to discern the relative contribution of these two mechanisms. However, if the longitudinal resolution used in the PIC simulations is inadequate, it can produce numerical heating that can overestimate the transverse motion, which is important in determining the energy gain due to DLA. We have therefore carried out a systematic study of this LWFA regime by varying the longitudinal resolution of PIC simulations from the standard, bes...

  18. Acceleration of a trailing positron bunch in a plasma wakefield accelerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doche, A; Beekman, C; Corde, S; Allen, J M; Clarke, C I; Frederico, J; Gessner, S J; Green, S Z; Hogan, M J; O'Shea, B; Yakimenko, V; An, W; Clayton, C E; Joshi, C; Marsh, K A; Mori, W B; Vafaei-Najafabadi, N; Litos, M D; Adli, E; Lindstrøm, C A; Lu, W

    2017-10-27

    High gradients of energy gain and high energy efficiency are necessary parameters for compact, cost-efficient and high-energy particle colliders. Plasma Wakefield Accelerators (PWFA) offer both, making them attractive candidates for next-generation colliders. In these devices, a charge-density plasma wave is excited by an ultra-relativistic bunch of charged particles (the drive bunch). The energy in the wave can be extracted by a second bunch (the trailing bunch), as this bunch propagates in the wake of the drive bunch. While a trailing electron bunch was accelerated in a plasma with more than a gigaelectronvolt of energy gain, accelerating a trailing positron bunch in a plasma is much more challenging as the plasma response can be asymmetric for positrons and electrons. We report the demonstration of the energy gain by a distinct trailing positron bunch in a plasma wakefield accelerator, spanning nonlinear to quasi-linear regimes, and unveil the beam loading process underlying the accelerator energy efficiency. A positron bunch is used to drive the plasma wake in the experiment, though the quasi-linear wake structure could as easily be formed by an electron bunch or a laser driver. The results thus mark the first acceleration of a distinct positron bunch in plasma-based particle accelerators.

  19. Physics of Laser-driven plasma-based acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esarey, Eric; Schroeder, Carl B.

    2003-06-30

    The physics of plasma-based accelerators driven by short-pulse lasers is reviewed. This includes the laser wake-field accelerator, the plasma beat wave accelerator, the self-modulated laser wake-field accelerator, and plasma waves driven by multiple laser pulses. The properties of linear and nonlinear plasma waves are discussed, as well as electron acceleration in plasma waves. Methods for injecting and trapping plasma electrons in plasma waves are also discussed. Limits to the electron energy gain are summarized, including laser pulse direction, electron dephasing, laser pulse energy depletion, as well as beam loading limitations. The basic physics of laser pulse evolution in underdense plasmas is also reviewed. This includes the propagation, self-focusing, and guiding of laser pulses in uniform plasmas and plasmas with preformed density channels. Instabilities relevant to intense short-pulse laser-plasma interactions, such as Raman, self-modulation, and hose instabilities, are discussed. Recent experimental results are summarized.

  20. Properties of Trapped Electron Bunches in a Plasma Wakefield Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirby, Neil; /SLAC

    2009-10-30

    Plasma-based accelerators use the propagation of a drive bunch through plasma to create large electric fields. Recent plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA) experiments, carried out at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), successfully doubled the energy for some of the 42 GeV drive bunch electrons in less than a meter; this feat would have required 3 km in the SLAC linac. This dissertation covers one phenomenon associated with the PWFA, electron trapping. Recently it was shown that PWFAs, operated in the nonlinear bubble regime, can trap electrons that are released by ionization inside the plasma wake and accelerate them to high energies. These trapped electrons occupy and can degrade the accelerating portion of the plasma wake, so it is important to understand their origins and how to remove them. Here, the onset of electron trapping is connected to the drive bunch properties. Additionally, the trapped electron bunches are observed with normalized transverse emittance divided by peak current, {epsilon}{sub N,x}/I{sub t}, below the level of 0.2 {micro}m/kA. A theoretical model of the trapped electron emittance, developed here, indicates that the emittance scales inversely with the square root of the plasma density in the non-linear 'bubble' regime of the PWFA. This model and simulations indicate that the observed values of {epsilon}{sub N,x}/I{sub t} result from multi-GeV trapped electron bunches with emittances of a few {micro}m and multi-kA peak currents. These properties make the trapped electrons a possible particle source for next generation light sources. This dissertation is organized as follows. The first chapter is an overview of the PWFA, which includes a review of the accelerating and focusing fields and a survey of the remaining issues for a plasma-based particle collider. Then, the second chapter examines the physics of electron trapping in the PWFA. The third chapter uses theory and simulations to analyze the properties of the trapped

  1. Modeling laser wakefield accelerators in a Lorentz boosted frame

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vay, J.-L.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Grote, D.P.

    2010-09-15

    Modeling of laser-plasma wakefield accelerators in an optimal frame of reference [1] is shown to produce orders of magnitude speed-up of calculations from first principles. Obtaining these speedups requires mitigation of a high frequency instability that otherwise limits effectiveness in addition to solutions for handling data input and output in a relativistically boosted frame of reference. The observed high-frequency instability is mitigated using methods including an electromagnetic solver with tunable coefficients, its extension to accomodate Perfectly Matched Layers and Friedman's damping algorithms, as well as an efficient large bandwidth digital filter. It is shown that choosing theframe of the wake as the frame of reference allows for higher levels of filtering and damping than is possible in other frames for the same accuracy. Detailed testing also revealed serendipitously the existence of a singular time step at which the instability level is minimized, independently of numerical dispersion, thus indicating that the observed instability may not be due primarily to Numerical Cerenkov as has been conjectured. The techniques developed for Cerenkov mitigation prove nonetheless to be very efficient at controlling the instability. Using these techniques, agreement at the percentage level is demonstrated between simulations using different frames of reference, with speedups reaching two orders of magnitude for a 0.1 GeV class stages. The method then allows direct and efficient full-scale modeling of deeply depleted laser-plasma stages of 10 GeV-1 TeV for the first time, verifying the scaling of plasma accelerators to very high energies. Over 4, 5 and 6 orders of magnitude speedup is achieved for the modeling of 10 GeV, 100 GeV and 1 TeV class stages, respectively.

  2. Self-injection threshold in self-guided laser wakefield accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. P. D. Mangles

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A laser pulse traveling through a plasma can excite large amplitude plasma waves that can be used to accelerate relativistic electron beams in a very short distance—a technique called laser wakefield acceleration. Many wakefield acceleration experiments rely on the process of wave breaking, or self-injection, to inject electrons into the wave, while other injection techniques rely on operation without self-injection. We present an experimental study into the parameters, including the pulse energy, focal spot quality, and pulse power, that determine whether or not a wakefield accelerator will self-inject. By taking into account the processes of self-focusing and pulse compression we are able to extend a previously described theoretical model, where the minimum bubble size k_{p}r_{b} required for trapping is not constant but varies slowly with density and find excellent agreement with this model.

  3. Formation of a novel shaped bunch to enhance transformer ratio in collinear wakefield accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Jiang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The transformer ratio, characterizing the ratio of maximum accelerating field behind the drive bunch to the maximum decelerating field inside the drive bunch, is one of the key parameters for characterizing the performance of collinear wakefield accelerators. In this paper the use of electron drive bunches possessing a particular temporal profile (the double-triangular bunch is shown to significantly increase the transformer ratio beyond 2, the limit for a symmetric bunch. The double-triangular bunch is generated using the emittance exchange technique [P. Emma et al., Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 9, 100702 (2006]PRABFM1098-440210.1103/PhysRevSTAB.9.100702. Complete beam simulations have been performed for a collinear wakefield acceleration experiment planned at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator facility including the effects of the physical emittance increase of the bunch in the wakefield device. A transformer ratio of 6.5 and gradient of 20  MV/m is expected in this proof-of-principle experiment for a 3 nC double-triangular bunch traversing a 10 cm long, 200 GHz quartz based dielectric wakefield accelerator structure.

  4. Down-ramp injection and independently controlled acceleration of electrons in a tailored laser wakefield accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hansson

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We report on a study on controlled injection of electrons into the accelerating phase of a plasma wakefield accelerator by tailoring the target density distribution using two independent sources of gas. The tailored density distribution is achieved experimentally by inserting a narrow nozzle, with an orifice diameter of only 400  μm, into a jet of gas supplied from a 2 mm diameter nozzle. The combination of these two nozzles is used to create two regions of different density connected by a density gradient. Using this setup we show independent control of the charge and energy distribution of the bunches of accelerated electron as well as decreased shot-to-shot fluctuations in these quantities compared to self-injection in a single gas jet. Although the energy spectra are broad after injection, simulations show that further acceleration acts to compress the energy distribution and to yield peaked energy spectra.

  5. Down-ramp injection and independently controlled acceleration of electrons in a tailored laser wakefield accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Hansson, M.; Davoine, X.; Ekerfelt, H.; Svensson, K.; Persson, A.; Wahlström, C.-G.; Lundh, O.; 10.1103/PhysRevSTAB.18.071303

    2015-01-01

    We report on a study on controlled injection of electrons into the accelerating phase of a plasma wakefield accelerator by tailoring the target density distribution using two independent sources of gas. The tailored density distribution is achieved experimentally by inserting a narrow nozzle, with an orifice diameter of only 400  μm , into a jet of gas supplied from a 2 mm diameter nozzle. The combination of these two nozzles is used to create two regions of different density connected by a density gradient. Using this setup we show independent control of the charge and energy distribution of the bunches of accelerated electron as well as decreased shot-to-shot fluctuations in these quantities compared to self-injection in a single gas jet. Although the energy spectra are broad after injection, simulations show that further acceleration acts to compress the energy distribution and to yield peaked energy spectra.

  6. Conceptual design of a laser wakefield acceleration experiment with external bunch injection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khachatryan, A.G.; Luttikhof, M.J.H.; Irman, A.; van Goor, F.A.; Verschuur, Jeroen W.J.; Bastiaens, Hubertus M.J.; Boller, Klaus J.

    2006-01-01

    We present a conceptual design of a laser wakefield acceleration experiment where a sub-picosecond electron bunch from a photo-cathode RF linac is injected into a plasma channel just before a laser pulse. The pulse overtakes the bunch which is then trapped, compressed and accelerated in the laser

  7. Enhancement of the Transformer Ratio in a Plasma Wakefield Accelerator Using an Additional Long Laser Pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xi; Khudik, Vladimir; Wang, Tianhong; Shvets, Gennady

    2017-10-01

    Direct laser acceleration (DLA) in both the plasma bubble accelerating regime and the plasma bubble decelerating regime has been recently proposed. Here we introduce the DLA into the beam-driven plasma wakefield acceleration (PWFA), and report the increase of the transformer ratio through DLA. Instead of interacting with the witness beam directly, the long laser pulse interacts with the driving electron beam and accelerates it through the mechanism of DLA in the plasma bubble decelerating regime. The energy of the driving electron beam is maintained for much longer time compared with the standard PWFA. Therefore, the witness beam gains much more energy without losing its beam quality. Due to the long pump depletion length of the laser pulse, the above PWFA scheme is extended from the single stage to the multi-stage and verified through self-consistent 2D PIC simulations. This work is supported by the US DOE Grant DE-SC0007889 and the AFOSR Grant FA9550-14-1-0045.

  8. Capturing Structural Dynamics in Crystalline Silicon Using Chirped Electrons from a Laser Wakefield Accelerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Z-H; Beaurepaire, B; Nees, J A; Gallé, G; Scott, S A; Pérez, J R Sánchez; Lagally, M G; Krushelnick, K; Thomas, A G R; Faure, J

    2016-11-08

    Recent progress in laser wakefield acceleration has led to the emergence of a new generation of electron and X-ray sources that may have enormous benefits for ultrafast science. These novel sources promise to become indispensable tools for the investigation of structural dynamics on the femtosecond time scale, with spatial resolution on the atomic scale. Here, we demonstrate the use of laser-wakefield-accelerated electron bunches for time-resolved electron diffraction measurements of the structural dynamics of single-crystal silicon nano-membranes pumped by an ultrafast laser pulse. In our proof-of-concept study, we resolve the silicon lattice dynamics on a picosecond time scale by deflecting the momentum-time correlated electrons in the diffraction peaks with a static magnetic field to obtain the time-dependent diffraction efficiency. Further improvements may lead to femtosecond temporal resolution, with negligible pump-probe jitter being possible with future laser-wakefield-accelerator ultrafast-electron-diffraction schemes.

  9. Measuring the angular dependence of betatron x-ray spectra in a laser-wakefield accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pollock, B. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Shaw, J. L. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Marsh, K. A. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Ralph, J. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chen, Y. -H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Alessi, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pak, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Clayton, C. E. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Glenzer, S. H. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Joshi, C. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2014-07-22

    This paper presents a new technique to measure the angular dependence of betatron x-ray spectra in a laser-wakefield accelerator. Measurements are performed with a stacked image plates spectrometer, capable of detecting broadband x-ray radiation up to 1 MeV. It can provide measurements of the betatron x-ray spectrum at any angle of observation (within a 40 mrad cone) and of the beam profile. A detailed description of our data analysis is given, along with comparison for several shots. As a result, these measurements provide useful information on the dynamics of the electrons are they are accelerated and wiggled by the wakefield.

  10. Spatial Control of Laser Wakefield Accelerated Electron Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksimchuk, A.; Behm, K.; Zhao, T.; Joglekar, A. S.; Hussein, A.; Nees, J.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Krushelnick, K.; Elle, J.; Lucero, A.; Samarin, G. M.; Sarry, G.; Warwick, J.

    2017-10-01

    The laser wakefield experiments to study and control spatial properties of electron beams were performed using HERCULES laser at the University of Michigan at power of 100 TW. In the first experiment multi-electron beam generation was demonstrated using co-propagating, parallel laser beams with a π-phase shift mirror and showing that interaction between the wakefields can cause injection to occur for plasma and laser parameters in which a single wakefield displays no significant injection. In the second experiment a magnetic triplet quadrupole system was used to refocus and stabilize electron beams at the distance of 60 cm from the interaction region. This produced a 10-fold increase in remote gamma-ray activation of 63Cu using a lead converter. In the third experiment measurements of un-trapped electrons with high transverse momentum produce a 500 mrad (FWHM) ring. This ring is formed by electrons that receive a forward momentum boost by traversing behind the bubble and its size is inversely proportional to the plasma density. The characterization of divergence and charge of this electron ring may reveal information about the wakefield structure and trapping potential. Supported by U.S. Department of Energy and the National Nuclear Security Administration and Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  11. Externally Controlled Injection of Electrons by a Laser Pulse in a Laser Wakefield Electron Accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Chen Szu Yuan; Chen Wei Ting; Chien, Ting-Yei; Lee, Chau-Hwang; Lin, Jiunn-Yuan; Wang, Jyhpyng

    2005-01-01

    Spatially and temporally localized injection of electrons is a key element for development of plasma-wave electron accelerator. Here we report the demonstration of two different schemes for electron injection in a self-modulated laser wakefield accelerator (SM-LWFA) by using a laser pulse. In the first scheme, by implementing a copropagating laser prepulse with proper timing, we are able to control the growth of Raman forward scattering and the production of accelerated electrons. We found that the stimulated Raman backward scattering of the prepulse plays the essential role of injecting hot electrons into the fast plasma wave driven by the pump pulse. In the second scheme, by using a transient density ramp we achieve self-injection of electrons in a SM-LWFA with spatial localization. The transient density ramp is produced by a prepulse propagating transversely to drill a density depression channel via ionization and expansion. The same mechanism of injection with comparable efficiency is also demonstrated wi...

  12. The influence of plasma density decreasement by pre-pulse on the laser wakefield acceleration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke-Gong Dong

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In the laser wakefield acceleration, the generation of electron beam is very sensitive to the plasma density. Not only the laser-wakefield interaction, but also the electron trapping and acceleration would be effected by the plasma density. However, the plasma density could be changed in the experiment by different reasons, which will result in the mismatch of parameters arranged initially. Forward Raman scattering spectrum demonstrated that the interaction density was decreased obviously in the experiment, which was verified by the pre-pulse conditions and two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. It was demonstrated that the plasma density was very important on the self-evolutions and energy coupling of laser pulse and wakefield, and eventually the energy spectrum of electron beam.

  13. Single-shot betatron source size measurement from a laser-wakefield accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Köhler, A.; Zarini, O.; Jochmann, A.; Irman, A.; Schramm, U.; 10.1016/j.nima.2016.02.031

    2016-01-01

    Betatron radiation emitted by accelerated electrons in laser-wakefield accelerators can be used as a diagnostic tool to investigate electron dynamics during the acceleration process. We analyze the spectral characteristics of the emitted Betatron pattern utilizing a 2D x-ray imaging spectroscopy technique. Together with simultaneously recorded electron spectra and x-ray images, the betatron source size, thus the electron beam radius, can be deduced at every shot.

  14. Single-shot betatron source size measurement from a laser-wakefield accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koehler, Alexander; Couperus, Jurjen; Zarini, Omid; Schramm, Ulrich [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Technische Universitaet Dresden (Germany); Jochmann, Axel; Irman, Arie [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Betatron radiation emitted by accelerated electrons in laser-wakefield accelerators can be used as a diagnostic tool to investigate electron dynamics during the acceleration process. We analyse the spectral characteristics of the emitted betatron pattern utilizing a 2D X-ray imaging spectroscopy technique. Together with simultaneously recorded electron spectra and X-ray images, the betatron source size, thus the electron beam radius, can be deduced at every shot.

  15. Coherent and incoherent radiation from a channel-guided laser wakefield accelerator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khachatryan, A.G.; van Goor, F.A.; Boller, Klaus J.

    2008-01-01

    Coherent and incoherent electromagnetic radiation emitted from a channel-guided laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) is calculated based on the Lienard–Wiechert potentials. It is found that at wavelengths longer than the bunch length, the radiation is coherent. The coherent radiation, which typically

  16. Analysis of long-range wakefields in CLIC main Linac Accelerating Structures with Damping Loads

    CERN Document Server

    De Michele, G

    2012-01-01

    The baseline design of the CLIC accelerating structure foresees a moderate detuning and heavy damping of high order modes (HOMs), which are the source of long-range transverse wakefields. Such unwanted fields produce bunch-to-bunch instabilities so the HOMs must be suppressed. In order to damp these modes, the CLIC RF structure is equipped with lossy material inserted into four rectangular waveguides coupled to each accelerating cell. The lossy material absorbs EM (electromagnetic) wave energy with little reflection back to the accelerating cells. In the past, computations of the long-range wake of CLIC accelerating modes have been done using perfectly absorbing boundaries to terminate the damping waveguides. In this paper, 3D EM simulations of CLIC baseline accelerating structure with HOMs damping loads will be presented. A comparison between different EM codes (GdfidL, CST PARTICLE STUDIO®) will be discussed as well as the analysis of different types of absorbing materials with respect to the wakefields da...

  17. Scaling of the Longitudinal Electric Field and Transformer Ratio in a Nonlinear Plasma Wakefield Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blumenfeld, I.; /SLAC; Clayton, C.E.; /UCLA; Decker, F.J.; Hogan, M.J.; /SLAC; Huang, C.; /UCLA; Ischebeck, R.; Iverson, R.H.; /SLAC; Joshi, C.; /UCLA; Katsouleas, T.; /Southern California U.; Kirby, N.; /SLAC; Lu, W.; Marsh, K.A.; Mori, W.B.; /UCLA; Muggli, P.; Oz, E.; /Southern California U.; Siemann, R.H.; Walz, D.R.; /SLAC; Zhou, M.; /UCLA

    2012-06-12

    The scaling of the two important figures of merit, the transformer ratio T and the longitudinal electric field E{sub z}, with the peak drive-bunch current I{sub p}, in a nonlinear plasma wakefield accelerator is presented for the first time. The longitudinal field scales as I{sub P}{sup 0.623{+-}0.007}, in good agreement with nonlinear wakefield theory ({approx}I{sub P}{sup 0.5}), while the unloaded transformer ratio is shown to be greater than unity and scales weakly with the bunch current. The effect of bunch head erosion on both parameters is also discussed.

  18. Scaling of the longitudinal electric field and transformer ratio in a nonlinear plasma wakefield accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Blumenfeld

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The scaling of the two important figures of merit, the transformer ratio T and the longitudinal electric field E_{z}, with the peak drive-bunch current I_{p}, in a nonlinear plasma wakefield accelerator is presented for the first time. The longitudinal field scales as I_{P}^{0.623±0.007}, in good agreement with nonlinear wakefield theory (∼I_{P}^{0.5}, while the unloaded transformer ratio is shown to be greater than unity and scales weakly with the bunch current. The effect of bunch head erosion on both parameters is also discussed.

  19. Controlled injection and acceleration of electrons in plasma wakefields by colliding laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faure, J; Rechatin, C; Norlin, A; Lifschitz, A; Glinec, Y; Malka, V

    2006-12-07

    In laser-plasma-based accelerators, an intense laser pulse drives a large electric field (the wakefield) which accelerates particles to high energies in distances much shorter than in conventional accelerators. These high acceleration gradients, of a few hundreds of gigavolts per metre, hold the promise of compact high-energy particle accelerators. Recently, several experiments have shown that laser-plasma accelerators can produce high-quality electron beams, with quasi-monoenergetic energy distributions at the 100 MeV level. However, these beams do not have the stability and reproducibility that are required for applications. This is because the mechanism responsible for injecting electrons into the wakefield is based on highly nonlinear phenomena, and is therefore hard to control. Here we demonstrate that the injection and subsequent acceleration of electrons can be controlled by using a second laser pulse. The collision of the two laser pulses provides a pre-acceleration stage which provokes the injection of electrons into the wakefield. The experimental results show that the electron beams obtained in this manner are collimated (5 mrad divergence), monoenergetic (with energy spread electron bunch durations shorter than 10 fs. We anticipate that this stable and compact electron source will have a strong impact on applications requiring short bunches, such as the femtolysis of water, or high stability, such as radiotherapy with high-energy electrons or radiography for materials science.

  20. Transverse operator method for wakefields in a rectangular dielectric loaded accelerating structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Baturin

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Cherenkov radiation generated by a relativistic electron bunch in a rectangular dielectric-loaded waveguide is analyzed under the assumption that the dielectric layers are inhomogeneous normal to the beam path. We propose a method that uses eigenfunctions of the transverse operator applied to develop a rigorous full solution for the wakefields that are generated. The dispersion equation for the structure is derived and the wakefield analysis is carried out. The formalism developed here allows the direct solution of the inhomogeneous system of Maxwell equations, an alternative analytic approach to the analysis of wakefields in contrast to the previously used impedance method for rectangular structure analysis. The formalism described here was successfully applied to the analysis of rectangular dielectric-lined structures that have been recently beam tested at the Argonne (ANL/AWA and Brookhaven (BNL/ATF accelerator facilities.

  1. Limitation on the accelerating gradient of a wakefield excited by an ultrarelativistic electron beam in rubidium plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Vafaei-Najafabadi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the viability of using plasmas formed by ionization of high Z, low ionization potential element rubidium (Rb for beam-driven plasma wakefield acceleration. The Rb vapor column confined by argon (Ar buffer gas was used to reduce the expected limitation on the beam propagation length due to head erosion that was observed previously when a lower Z but higher ionization potential lithium vapor was used. However, injection of electrons into the wakefield due to ionization of Ar buffer gas and nonuniform ionization of Rb^{1+} to Rb^{2+} was a possible concern. In this paper we describe experimental results and the supporting simulations which indicate that such ionization of Ar and Rb^{1+} in the presence of combined fields of the beam and the wakefield inside the wake does indeed occur. Some of this charge accumulates in the accelerating region of the wake leading to the reduction of the electric field—an effect known as beam loading. The beam-loading effect is quantified by determining the average transformer ratio ⟨R⟩ which is the maximum energy gained divided by the maximum energy lost by the electrons in the bunch used to produce the wake. ⟨R⟩ is shown to depend on the propagation length and the quantity of the accumulated charge, indicating that the distributed injection of secondary Rb electrons is the main cause of beam loading in this experiment. The average transformer ratio is reduced from 1.5 to less than 1 as the excess charge from secondary ionization increased from 100 to 700 pC. The simulations show that while the decelerating field remains constant, the accelerating field is reduced from its unloaded value of 82 to 46  GeV/m due to this distributed injection of dark current into the wake.

  2. Simulation of electron postacceleration in a two-stage laser wakefield accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. W. Reitsma

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Electron bunches produced in self-modulated laser wakefield experiments usually have a broad energy distribution, with most electrons at low energy (1–3 MeV and only a small fraction at high energy. We propose and investigate further acceleration of such bunches in a channel-guided resonant laser wakefield accelerator. Two-dimensional simulations with and without the effects of self-consistent beam loading are performed and compared. These results indicate that it is possible to trap about 40% of the injected bunch charge and accelerate this fraction to an average energy of about 50 MeV in a plasma channel of a few mm.

  3. Fluid Simulation of relativistic electron beam driven wakefield in the blowout regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Ratan Kumar; Das, Amita; Sengupta, Sudip

    2017-10-01

    Two-dimensional Fluid simulations are employed to study the Wakefield driven by an electron beam in a plasma medium. The 1-D results are recovered when the transverse extent of the beam is chosen to be much longer than its longitudinal extent. Furthermore, it is shown that the blowout structure matches closely with the PIC observations, before the phase mixing. A close comparison of the fluid observations with the analytical modeling made by Lu et al. to PIC observations, have been provided. It is thus interesting to note that a simplified fluid simulation adequately represents the form of the wake potential obtained by sophisticated PIC studies. We also address issues related to particle acceleration in such a potential structure by studying the evolution of injected test particles. A maximum energy gain of 2.8 GeV by the electrons from the back of the driver beam of energy 28.5 GeV in a 10 cm long plasma is shown to be achieved. This is in conformity with the experimental result of Ref.. We observe that maximum energy gain can get doubled to 5.7 GeV when the bunch of test particles was placed near the axial edge of the first blowout structure. Inst. for Plasma Research.

  4. Short-pulse, high-energy radiation generation from laser-wakefield accelerated electron beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumaker, Will

    2013-10-01

    Recent experimental results of laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) of ~GeV electrons driven by the 200TW HERCULES and the 400TW ASTRA-GEMINI laser systems and their subsequent generation of photons, positrons, and neutrons are presented. In LWFA, high-intensity (I >1019 W /cm2), ultra-short (τL counter-propagating, ultra-high intensity (I >1021 W /cm2) laser pulse to undergo inverse Compton scattering and emit a high-peak brightness beam of high-energy photons. Preliminary results and experimental sensitivities of the electron-laser beam overlap are presented. The high-energy photon beams can be spectrally resolved using a forward Compton scattering spectrometer. Moreover, the photon flux can be characterized by a pixelated scintillator array and by nuclear activation and (γ,n) neutron measurements from the photons interacting with a secondary solid target. Monte-Carlo simulations were performed using FLUKA to support the yield estimates. This research was supported by DOE/NSF-PHY 0810979, NSF CAREER 1054164, DARPA AXiS N66001-11-1-4208, SF/DNDO F021166, and the Leverhulme Trust ECF-2011-383.

  5. High-quality stable electron beams from laser wakefield acceleration in high density plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. S. Rao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available High-quality, stable electron beams are produced from self-injected laser wakefield acceleration using the interaction of moderate 3 TW, 45 fs duration Ti:sapphire laser pulses with high density (>5×10^{19}   cm^{−3} helium gas jet plasma. The electron beam has virtually background-free quasimonoenergetic distribution with energy 35.6_{−2.5}^{+3.9}  MeV, charge 3.8_{−1.2}^{+2.8}  pC, divergence and pointing variation ∼10  mrad. The stable and high quality of the electron beam opens an easy way for applications of the laser wakefield accelerator in the future, particularly due to the widespread availability of sub-10 TW class lasers with a number of laser plasma laboratories around the world.

  6. Accelerator-driven X-ray Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Dinh Cong [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-11-09

    After an introduction which mentions x-ray tubes and storage rings and gives a brief review of special relativity, the subject is treated under the following topics and subtopics: synchrotron radiation (bending magnet radiation, wiggler radiation, undulator radiation, brightness and brilliance definition, synchrotron radiation facilities), x-ray free-electron lasers (linac-driven X-ray FEL, FEL interactions, self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE), SASE self-seeding, fourth-generation light source facilities), and other X-ray sources (energy recovery linacs, Inverse Compton scattering, laser wakefield accelerator driven X-ray sources. In summary, accelerator-based light sources cover the entire electromagnetic spectrum. Synchrotron radiation (bending magnet, wiggler and undulator radiation) has unique properties that can be tailored to the users’ needs: bending magnet and wiggler radiation is broadband, undulator radiation has narrow spectral lines. X-ray FELs are the brightest coherent X-ray sources with high photon flux, femtosecond pulses, full transverse coherence, partial temporal coherence (SASE), and narrow spectral lines with seeding techniques. New developments in electron accelerators and radiation production can potentially lead to more compact sources of coherent X-rays.

  7. Beam-based measurements of long-range transverse wakefields in the Compact Linear Collider main-linac accelerating structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Zha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The baseline design of CLIC (Compact Linear Collider uses X-band accelerating structures for its main linacs. In order to maintain beam stability in multibunch operation, long-range transverse wakefields must be suppressed by 2 orders of magnitude between successive bunches, which are separated in time by 0.5 ns. Such strong wakefield suppression is achieved by equipping every accelerating structure cell with four damping waveguides terminated with individual rf loads. A beam-based experiment to directly measure the effectiveness of this long-range transverse wakefield and benchmark simulations was made in the FACET test facility at SLAC using a prototype CLIC accelerating structure. The experiment showed good agreement with the simulations and a strong suppression of the wakefields with an unprecedented minimum resolution of 0.1  V/(pC mm m.

  8. Upper limit for the accelerating gradient in the collinear wakefield accelerator as a function of the transformer ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baturin, S. S.; Zholents, A.

    2017-06-01

    The interrelation between the accelerating gradient and the transformer ratio in the collinear wakefield accelerator has been analyzed. It has been shown that the high transformer ratio and the high efficiency of the energy transfer from the drive bunch to the witness bunch can only be achieved at the expense of the accelerating gradient. Rigorous proof is given that in best cases of meticulously shaped charge density distributions in the drive bunch, the maximum accelerating gradient falls proportionally to the gain in the transformer ratio. Conclusions are verified using several representative examples.

  9. Upper limit for the accelerating gradient in the collinear wakefield accelerator as a function of the transformer ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Baturin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The interrelation between the accelerating gradient and the transformer ratio in the collinear wakefield accelerator has been analyzed. It has been shown that the high transformer ratio and the high efficiency of the energy transfer from the drive bunch to the witness bunch can only be achieved at the expense of the accelerating gradient. Rigorous proof is given that in best cases of meticulously shaped charge density distributions in the drive bunch, the maximum accelerating gradient falls proportionally to the gain in the transformer ratio. Conclusions are verified using several representative examples.

  10. Innovative single-shot diagnostics for electrons from laser wakefield acceleration at FLAME

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisesto, F. G.; Anania, M. P.; Cianchi, A.; Chiadroni, E.; Curcio, A.; Ferrario, M.; Pompili, R.; Zigler, A.

    2017-07-01

    Plasma wakefield acceleration is the most promising acceleration technique known nowadays, able to provide very high accelerating fields (> 100 GV/m), enabling acceleration of electrons to GeV energy in few centimeters. Here we present all the plasma related activities currently underway at SPARC_LAB exploiting the high power laser FLAME. In particular, we will give an overview of the single shot diagnostics employed: Electro Optic Sampling (EOS) for temporal measurement and Optical Transition Radiation (OTR) for an innovative one shot emittance measurements. In detail, the EOS technique has been employed to measure for the first time the longitudinal profile of electric field of fast electrons escaping from a solid target, driving the ions and protons acceleration, and to study the impact of using different target shapes. Moreover, a novel scheme for one shot emittance measurements based on OTR, developed and tested at SPARC_LAB LINAC, used in an experiment on electrons from laser wakefield acceleration still undergoing, will be shown.

  11. Tunable monoenergetic electron beams from independently controllable laser-wakefield acceleration and injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Golovin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the results of experiments on laser-wakefield acceleration in a novel two-stage gas target with independently adjustable density and atomic-composition profiles. We were able to tailor these profiles in a way that led to the separation of the processes of electron injection and acceleration and permitted independent control of both. This resulted in the generation of stable, quasimonoenergetic electron beams with central energy tunable in 50–300 MeV range. For the first time, we are able to independently control the beam charge and energy spread over the entire tunability range.

  12. Summary report : working group 5 on 'electron beam-driven plasma and structure based acceleration concepts'.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conde, M. E.; Katsouleas, T.

    2000-10-19

    The talks presented and the work performed on electron beam-driven accelerators in plasmas and structures are summarized. Highlights of the working group include new experimental results from the E-157 Plasma Wakefield Experiment, the E-150 Plasma Lens Experiment and the Argonne Dielectric Structure Wakefield experiments. The presentations inspired discussion and analysis of three working topics: electron hose instability, ion channel lasers and the plasma afterburner.

  13. Obtaining the Wakefield Due to Cell-to-Cell Misalignments in a Linear Accelerator Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Bane, Karl L. F.; Li, Zenghai

    2001-01-01

    A linear accelerator structure, such as will be used in the linacs of the JLC/NLC collider, is composed of on the order of 100 cells. The cells are constructed as individual cups that are brazed together to form a structure. Fabrication error will result in slight cell-to-cell misalignments along the finished structure. In this report we derive an approximation to the transverse wakefield of a structure with cell-to-cell misalignments in terms of the eigenfunctions and eigenvalues of the erro...

  14. Three electron beams from a laser-plasma wakefield accelerator and the energy apportioning question.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X; Brunetti, E; Gil, D Reboredo; Welsh, G H; Li, F Y; Cipiccia, S; Ersfeld, B; Grant, D W; Grant, P A; Islam, M R; Tooley, M P; Vieux, G; Wiggins, S M; Sheng, Z M; Jaroszynski, D A

    2017-03-10

    Laser-wakefield accelerators are compact devices capable of delivering ultra-short electron bunches with pC-level charge and MeV-GeV energy by exploiting the ultra-high electric fields arising from the interaction of intense laser pulses with plasma. We show experimentally and through numerical simulations that a high-energy electron beam is produced simultaneously with two stable lower-energy beams that are ejected in oblique and counter-propagating directions, typically carrying off 5-10% of the initial laser energy. A MeV, 10s nC oblique beam is ejected in a 30°-60° hollow cone, which is filled with more energetic electrons determined by the injection dynamics. A nC-level, 100s keV backward-directed beam is mainly produced at the leading edge of the plasma column. We discuss the apportioning of absorbed laser energy amongst the three beams. Knowledge of the distribution of laser energy and electron beam charge, which determine the overall efficiency, is important for various applications of laser-wakefield accelerators, including the development of staged high-energy accelerators.

  15. Three electron beams from a laser-plasma wakefield accelerator and the energy apportioning question

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X.; Brunetti, E.; Gil, D. Reboredo; Welsh, G. H.; Li, F. Y.; Cipiccia, S.; Ersfeld, B.; Grant, D. W.; Grant, P. A.; Islam, M. R.; Tooley, M. P.; Vieux, G.; Wiggins, S. M.; Sheng, Z. M.; Jaroszynski, D. A.

    2017-01-01

    Laser-wakefield accelerators are compact devices capable of delivering ultra-short electron bunches with pC-level charge and MeV-GeV energy by exploiting the ultra-high electric fields arising from the interaction of intense laser pulses with plasma. We show experimentally and through numerical simulations that a high-energy electron beam is produced simultaneously with two stable lower-energy beams that are ejected in oblique and counter-propagating directions, typically carrying off 5–10% of the initial laser energy. A MeV, 10s nC oblique beam is ejected in a 30°–60° hollow cone, which is filled with more energetic electrons determined by the injection dynamics. A nC-level, 100s keV backward-directed beam is mainly produced at the leading edge of the plasma column. We discuss the apportioning of absorbed laser energy amongst the three beams. Knowledge of the distribution of laser energy and electron beam charge, which determine the overall efficiency, is important for various applications of laser-wakefield accelerators, including the development of staged high-energy accelerators. PMID:28281679

  16. Imaging laser-wakefield-accelerated electrons using miniature magnetic quadrupole lenses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Weingartner

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The improvement of the energy spread, beam divergence, and pointing fluctuations are some of the main challenges currently facing the field of laser-wakefield acceleration of electrons. We address these issues by manipulating the electron beams after their generation using miniature magnetic quadrupole lenses with field gradients of ∼500  T/m. By imaging electron beams the spectral resolution of dipole magnet spectrometers can be significantly increased, resulting in measured energy spreads down to 1.0% rms at 190 MeV. The focusing of different electron energies demonstrates the tunability of the lens system and could be used to filter out off-target energies in order to reduce the energy spread even further. By collimating the beam, the shot-to-shot spatial stability of the beam is improved by a factor of 5 measured at a distance of 1 m from the source. Additionally, by deliberately transversely offsetting a quadrupole lens, the electron beam can be steered in any direction by several mrad. These methods can be implemented while still maintaining the ultrashort bunch duration and low emittance of the beam and, except for undesired electron energies in the energy filter, without any loss of charge. This reliable and compact control of laser-wakefield accelerated electron beams is independent of the accelerator itself, allowing immediate application of currently available beams.

  17. Influence of a magnetic guide field on wakefield acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Drouin, Mathieu; Harry, Quentin

    2012-01-01

    Enhancement of the trapping and optimization of the beam quality are two key issues of Laser Wake Field Acceleration (LWFA). The influence of stochastic acceleration on the trapping of electrons is compared to the one of cold injection. It is shown that when considering a high intensity wave perturbed by a low intensity counter-propagating wave, in the non-linear blowout regime, the influence of the colliding pulses polarizations (either parallel linear or positive circular) on the beam quality seems weak when the electron density is below $\\sim 10^{-3}$ critical density. The effect of a homogenous constant magnetic field $B_0$, parallel to the direction of propagation of the pump pulse, is studied in the blowout regime. Transverse currents are generated at the rim of the bubble, which results in the amplification of the $B_0$ field at the rear of the bubble. Without $B_0$ field the beam periodically explodes and re-confines, this phenomenon is suppressed when $B_0$ reaches some threshold, which is a function...

  18. Comparison of experimental tests and theory for a rectangular two-channel dielectric wakefield accelerator structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Shchelkunov

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Experimental results are reported for test beam acceleration and deflection in a two-channel, cm-scale, rectangular dielectric-lined wakefield accelerator structure energized by a 14-MeV drive beam. The dominant waveguide mode of the structure is at ∼30  GHz, and the structure is configured to exhibit a high transformer ratio (∼12∶1. Accelerated bunches in the narrow secondary channel of the structure are continuously energized via Cherenkov radiation that is emitted by a drive bunch moving in the wider primary channel. Observed energy gains and losses, transverse deflections, and changes in the test bunch charge distribution compare favorably with predictions of theory.

  19. High gradient, high reliability, and low wakefield accelerating structures for the FERMI FEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serpico, Claudio; Shafqat, Nuaman; Grudiev, Alexej; Vescovo, Roberto

    2017-07-01

    The FERMI seeded free-electron laser (FEL), located at the Elettra laboratory in Trieste, is a 4th generation light source operating in the vacuum ultraviolet to soft X-rays range. The FEL design is based on an external seeding scheme which improves the output pulse coherence and the central wavelength control and reduces the spectral bandwidth. FERMI has achieved its original energy target by producing photon energies above 300 eV from a 1.50 GeV, 600 A peak current, electron beam. However, there is a strong scientific motivation to push the energy envelop further higher to photon energy up to 600 eV to cover both the x-ray absorption edges of nitrogen K (400 eV) and oxygen K (532 eV). To achieve this goal, the electron beam energy will be increased from 1.50 GeV to 1.80 GeV and the peak beam current will be pushed towards 1 kA. This requires essentially the development of more reliable high gradient S-band accelerating structures, with low wakefields contribution up to 1 nC charge per bunch. Accordingly, in the following, we present the design of high gradient, high reliability, and low wakefield S-band accelerating structures for the upgrade program of the FERMI linac.

  20. Reduced 3d modeling on injection schemes for laser wakefield acceleration at plasma scale lengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helm, Anton; Vieira, Jorge; Silva, Luis; Fonseca, Ricardo

    2017-10-01

    Current modelling techniques for laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) are based on particle-in-cell (PIC) codes which are computationally demanding. In PIC simulations the laser wavelength λ0, in μm-range, has to be resolved over the acceleration lengths in meter-range. A promising approach is the ponderomotive guiding center solver (PGC) by only considering the laser envelope for laser pulse propagation. Therefore only the plasma skin depth λp has to be resolved, leading to speedups of (λp /λ0) 2. This allows to perform a wide-range of parameter studies and use it for λ0 Tecnologia (FCT), Portugal, through Grant No. PTDC/FIS-PLA/2940/2014 and PD/BD/105882/2014.

  1. Design and simulation of laser wakefield acceleration with external electron bunch injection in front of the laser pulse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Irman, A.; Luttikhof, M.J.H.; Khachatryan, A.G.; van Goor, F.A.; Verschuur, Jeroen W.J.; Bastiaens, Hubertus M.J.; Boller, Klaus J.

    2007-01-01

    In this article we present a theoretical investigation on an experimental design of a laser wakefield accelerator in which electron bunches from a photocathode radio frequency linac are injected into a capillary discharge plasma channel just in front of a few tens of terawatt drive laser pulse. The

  2. Editorial: Focus on Laser- and Beam-Driven Plasma Accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Chan; Malka, Victor

    2010-04-01

    The ability of short but intense laser pulses to generate high-energy electrons and ions from gaseous and solid targets has been well known since the early days of the laser fusion program. However, during the past decade there has been an explosion of experimental and theoretical activity in this area of laser-matter interaction, driven by the prospect of realizing table-top plasma accelerators for research, medical and industrial uses, and also relatively small and inexpensive plasma accelerators for high-energy physics at the frontier of particle physics. In this focus issue on laser- and beam-driven plasma accelerators, the latest advances in this field are described. Focus on Laser- and Beam-Driven Plasma Accelerators Contents Slow wave plasma structures for direct electron acceleration B D Layer, J P Palastro, A G York, T M Antonsen and H M Milchberg Cold injection for electron wakefield acceleration X Davoine, A Beck, A Lifschitz, V Malka and E Lefebvre Enhanced proton flux in the MeV range by defocused laser irradiation J S Green, D C Carroll, C Brenner, B Dromey, P S Foster, S Kar, Y T Li, K Markey, P McKenna, D Neely, A P L Robinson, M J V Streeter, M Tolley, C-G Wahlström, M H Xu and M Zepf Dose-dependent biological damage of tumour cells by laser-accelerated proton beams S D Kraft, C Richter, K Zeil, M Baumann, E Beyreuther, S Bock, M Bussmann, T E Cowan, Y Dammene, W Enghardt, U Helbig, L Karsch, T Kluge, L Laschinsky, E Lessmann, J Metzkes, D Naumburger, R Sauerbrey, M. Scḧrer, M Sobiella, J Woithe, U Schramm and J Pawelke The optimum plasma density for plasma wakefield excitation in the blowout regime W Lu, W An, M Zhou, C Joshi, C Huang and W B Mori Plasma wakefield acceleration experiments at FACET M J Hogan, T O Raubenheimer, A Seryi, P Muggli, T Katsouleas, C Huang, W Lu, W An, K A Marsh, W B Mori, C E Clayton and C Joshi Electron trapping and acceleration on a downward density ramp: a two-stage approach R M G M Trines, R Bingham, Z Najmudin

  3. Nondestructive diagnostic for electron bunch length in accelerators using the wakefield radiation spectrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Shchelkunov

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available We report the development of a nondestructive technique to measure bunch rms length in the psec range and below, and eventually in the fsec range, by measuring the high-frequency spectrum of wakefield radiation which is caused by the passage of a relativistic electron bunch through a channel surrounded by a dielectric. We demonstrate numerically that the generated spectrum is determined by the rms bunch length, while the specific axial and longitudinal charge distribution is not important. Measurement of the millimeter-wave spectrum will determine the rms bunch length in the psec range. This has been done using a series of calibrated mesh filters and the charge bunches produced by the 50 MeV rf linac system at ATF (Accelerator Test Facility, Brookhaven. We have developed the analysis of the factors crucial for achieving good accuracy in this measurement, and find the experimental data are fully understood by the theory. We point out that this technique also may be used for measuring fsec bunch lengths, using a prepared planar wakefield microstructure.

  4. 2D hydrodynamic simulations of a variable length gas target for density down-ramp injection of electrons into a laser wakefield accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kononenko, O., E-mail: olena.kononenko@desy.de [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Lopes, N.C.; Cole, J.M.; Kamperidis, C.; Mangles, S.P.D.; Najmudin, Z. [The John Adams Institute for Accelerator Science, The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, SW7 2BZ UK (United Kingdom); Osterhoff, J. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Poder, K. [The John Adams Institute for Accelerator Science, The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, SW7 2BZ UK (United Kingdom); Rusby, D.; Symes, D.R. [Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Warwick, J. [Queens University Belfast, North Ireland (United Kingdom); Wood, J.C. [The John Adams Institute for Accelerator Science, The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, SW7 2BZ UK (United Kingdom); Palmer, C.A.J. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-09-01

    In this work, two-dimensional (2D) hydrodynamic simulations of a variable length gas cell were performed using the open source fluid code OpenFOAM. The gas cell was designed to study controlled injection of electrons into a laser-driven wakefield at the Astra Gemini laser facility. The target consists of two compartments: an accelerator and an injector section connected via an aperture. A sharp transition between the peak and plateau density regions in the injector and accelerator compartments, respectively, was observed in simulations with various inlet pressures. The fluid simulations indicate that the length of the down-ramp connecting the sections depends on the aperture diameter, as does the density drop outside the entrance and the exit cones. Further studies showed, that increasing the inlet pressure leads to turbulence and strong fluctuations in density along the axial profile during target filling, and consequently, is expected to negatively impact the accelerator stability.

  5. Phase space linearization and external injection of electron bunches into laser-driven plasma wakefields at REGAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeitler, Benno Michael Georg [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Fakultaet fuer Mathematik, Informatik und Naturwissenschaften

    2017-01-15

    Laser Wake field Acceleration (LWFA) has the potential to become the next-generation acceleration technique for electrons. In particular, the large field gradients provided by these plasma-based accelerators are an appealing property, promising a significant reduction of size for future machines and user facilities. Despite the unique advantages of these sources, however, as of today, the produced electron bunches cannot yet compete in all beam quality criteria compared to conventional acceleration methods. Especially the stability in terms of beam pointing and energy gain, as well as a comparatively large energy spread of LWFA electron bunches require further advancement for their applicability. The accelerated particles are typically trapped from within the plasma which is used to create the large field gradients in the wake of a high-power laser. From this results a lack of control and access to observing the actual electron injection - and, consequently, a lack of experimental verification. To tackle this problem, the injection of external electrons into a plasma wakefield seems promising. In this case, the initial beam parameters are known, so that a back-calculation and reconstruction of the wakefield structure are feasible. Such an experiment is planned at the Relativistic Electron Gun for Atomic Exploration (REGAE). REGAE, which is located at DESY in Hamburg, is a small linear accelerator offering unique beam parameters compatible with the requirements of the planned experiment. The observations and results gained from such an external injection are expected to improve the beam quality and stability of internal injection variants, due to the broadened understanding of the underlying plasma dynamics. Furthermore, an external injection will always be required for so-called staging of multiple LWFA-driven cavities. Also, the demonstration of a suchlike merging of conventional and plasma accelerators gives rise to novel hybrid accelerators, where the matured

  6. ACE3P Computations of Wakefield Coupling in the CLIC Two-Beam Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candel, Arno; Li, Z.; Ng, C.; Rawat, V.; Schussman, G.; Ko, K.; /SLAC; Syratchev, I.; Grudiev, A.; Wuensch, W.; /CERN

    2010-10-27

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) provides a path to a multi-TeV accelerator to explore the energy frontier of High Energy Physics. Its novel two-beam accelerator concept envisions rf power transfer to the accelerating structures from a separate high-current decelerator beam line consisting of power extraction and transfer structures (PETS). It is critical to numerically verify the fundamental and higher-order mode properties in and between the two beam lines with high accuracy and confidence. To solve these large-scale problems, SLAC's parallel finite element electromagnetic code suite ACE3P is employed. Using curvilinear conformal meshes and higher-order finite element vector basis functions, unprecedented accuracy and computational efficiency are achieved, enabling high-fidelity modeling of complex detuned structures such as the CLIC TD24 accelerating structure. In this paper, time-domain simulations of wakefield coupling effects in the combined system of PETS and the TD24 structures are presented. The results will help to identify potential issues and provide new insights on the design, leading to further improvements on the novel CLIC two-beam accelerator scheme.

  7. Simultaneous generation of drive and witness beam for collinear wakefield acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, G.; Power, J. G.; Conde, M.; Doran, D. S.; Gai, W.

    2017-07-01

    Generating the drive and witness bunch for collinear wakefield acceleration (CWFA) requires precise control of the longitudinal bunch shape for each bunch as well as the controlling their separation. The emittance exchange (EEX) beamline and a transverse mask can be used to achieve all of these requirements. First, this EEX-based method can independently control the longitudinal bunch shape of each bunches so that the drive bunch is shaped to generate a high transformer ratio while witness bunch is shaped to suppress its energy spread. Second, the timing jitter between the drive and witness bunch poses a serious limitation to the CWFA scheme but the EEX-based method eliminates this since both bunches are generated at the same time and share the exactly same beamline so there are no relative errors. In this paper, we confirm the feasibility of this EEX-based method for simultaneous generation with simulation for CWFA in a dielectric structure.

  8. Transverse emittance and current of multi-GeV trapped electrons in a plasma wakefield accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Kirby

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Multi-GeV trapped electron bunches in a plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA are observed with normalized transverse emittance divided by peak current, ϵ_{N,x}/I_{t}, below the level of 0.2  μm/kA. A theoretical model of the trapped electron emittance, developed here, indicates that emittance scales inversely with the square root of the plasma density in the nonlinear “bubble” regime of the PWFA. This model and simulations indicate that the observed values of ϵ_{N,x}/I_{t} result from multi-GeV trapped electron bunches with emittances of a few  μm and multi-kA peak currents.

  9. Photon acceleration versus frequency-domain interferometry for laser wakefield diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias, J.M.; Oliveira e Silva, L.; Mendonca, J.T. [GoLP/Centro de Fisica de Plasmas, Inst. Superior Tecnico, Lisbon (Portugal)

    1998-03-01

    A detailed comparison between the photon acceleration diagnostic technique and the frequency-domain interferometric technique for laser wakefield diagnostics, by using ray-tracing equations is presented here. The dispersion effects on the probe beam and the implications of an arbitrary phase velocity of the plasma wave are discussed for both diagnostic techniques. In the presence of large amplitude plasma wave and long interaction distances significant frequency shifts can be observed. The importance of this effect on the determination of the phase and frequency shifts measurements given by each of the two diagnostic techniques, is also analyzed. The accuracy of both diagnostic techniques is discussed and some of their technical problems are reviewed. (author)

  10. Modeling laser pulse evolution in ionizing gas and plasma with application to laser wakefield acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, James Hamilton

    The interaction of high intensity laser pulses with matter is of current research interest not only for potential applications but also due to the interesting non-linear process that can occur with current experimental facilities. Understanding many of the non-linear processes requires significant modeling and simulation effort. We explore several aspects of laser pulse evolution and plasma response in simulations ranging from modeling laser wakefield accelerators to modeling basic ionization processes. First, we present a model that describes the onset and growth of axial modulation found experimentally during the formation of plasma channels formed using an axicon lens. We provide a systematic development that describes this new type of parametric instability and explains the pressure dependence and the mechanism for formation of these axial modulations in the channel. Next, we describe details of a new three-dimensional laser pulse evolution code that we have developed to model propagation in tenuous gas and plasma and we provide relevant information about the validation and testing of the code. We then use this new code to examine the three-dimensional structure of the laser pulse evolving in the presence of ionizing gas. In particular we present results from the first three-dimensional study of the ionization scattering instability. Finally, we examine injecting electrons into laser wakefield accelerators. We examine in detail the injection and trapping characteristics for an electron beam with an initially broad energy distribution and look at the effect of beam loading on the trapping efficiency. We present estimates for the maximum charge that can be trapped from a low energy beam with a Boltzmann type energy distribution.

  11. Energy loss of a high charge bunched electron beam in plasma: Simulations, scaling, and accelerating wakefields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. B. Rosenzweig

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The energy loss and gain of a beam in the nonlinear, “blowout” regime of the plasma wakefield accelerator, which features ultrahigh accelerating fields, linear transverse focusing forces, and nonlinear plasma motion, has been asserted, through previous observations in simulations, to scale linearly with beam charge. Additionally, from a recent analysis by Barov et al., it has been concluded that for an infinitesimally short beam, the energy loss is indeed predicted to scale linearly with beam charge for arbitrarily large beam charge. This scaling is predicted to hold despite the onset of a relativistic, nonlinear response by the plasma, when the number of beam particles occupying a cubic plasma skin depth exceeds that of plasma electrons within the same volume. This paper is intended to explore the deviations from linear energy loss using 2D particle-in-cell simulations that arise in the case of experimentally relevant finite length beams. The peak accelerating field in the plasma wave excited behind the finite-length beam is also examined, with the artifact of wave spiking adding to the apparent persistence of linear scaling of the peak field amplitude into the nonlinear regime. At large enough normalized charge, the linear scaling of both decelerating and accelerating fields collapses, with serious consequences for plasma wave excitation efficiency. Using the results of parametric particle-in-cell studies, the implications of these results for observing severe deviations from linear scaling in present and planned experiments are discussed.

  12. Injection of electrons by colliding laser pulses in a laser wakefield accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Hansson, Martin; Ekerfelt, Henrik; Persson, Anna; Lundh, Olle

    2016-01-01

    To improve the stability and reproducibility of laser wakefield accelerators and to allow for future applications, controlling the injection of electrons is of great importance. This allows us to control the amount of charge in the beams of accelerated electrons and final energy of the electrons. Results are presented from a recent experiment on controlled injection using the scheme of colliding pulses and performed using the Lund multi-terawatt laser. Each laser pulse is split into two parts close to the interaction point. The main pulse is focused on a 2 mm diameter gas jet to drive a nonlinear plasma wave below threshold for self-trapping. The second pulse, containing only a fraction of the total laser energy, is focused to collide with the main pulse in the gas jet under an angle of 150°. Beams of accelerated electrons with low divergence and small energy spread are produced using this set-up. Control over the amount of accelerated charge is achieved by rotating the plane of polarization of the second p...

  13. Efficient modeling of plasma wakefield acceleration in quasi-non-linear-regimes with the hybrid code Architect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marocchino, A.; Massimo, F.; Rossi, A. R.; Chiadroni, E.; Ferrario, M.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we present a hybrid approach aiming to assess feasible plasma wakefield acceleration working points with reduced computation resources. The growing interest for plasma wakefield acceleration and especially the need to control with increasing precision the quality of the accelerated bunch demands for more accurate and faster simulations. Particle in cell codes are the state of the art technique to simulate the underlying physics, however the run-time represents the major drawback. Architect is a hybrid code that treats the bunch kinetically and the background electron plasma as a fluid, initialising bunches in vacuum so to take into account for the transition from vacuum to plasma. Architect solves directly the Maxwell's equations on a Yee lattice. Such an approach allows us to drastically reduce run time without loss of generality or accuracy up to the weakly non linear regime.

  14. Efficient modeling of plasma wakefield acceleration in quasi-non-linear-regimes with the hybrid code Architect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marocchino, A., E-mail: albz.uk@gmail.com [Dipartimento SBAI, “Sapienza” University of Rome and INFN-Roma 1, Rome (Italy); Massimo, F. [Dipartimento SBAI, “Sapienza” University of Rome and INFN-Roma 1, Rome (Italy); Rossi, A.R. [Dipartimento di Fisica, University of Milan and INFN-Milano, Milano (Italy); Chiadroni, E.; Ferrario, M. [INFN-LNF, Frascati (Italy)

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we present a hybrid approach aiming to assess feasible plasma wakefield acceleration working points with reduced computation resources. The growing interest for plasma wakefield acceleration and especially the need to control with increasing precision the quality of the accelerated bunch demands for more accurate and faster simulations. Particle in cell codes are the state of the art technique to simulate the underlying physics, however the run-time represents the major drawback. Architect is a hybrid code that treats the bunch kinetically and the background electron plasma as a fluid, initialising bunches in vacuum so to take into account for the transition from vacuum to plasma. Architect solves directly the Maxwell's equations on a Yee lattice. Such an approach allows us to drastically reduce run time without loss of generality or accuracy up to the weakly non linear regime.

  15. Betatron radiation based diagnostics for plasma wakefield accelerated electron beams at the SPARC-LAB test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shpakov, V.; Anania, M.P.; Biagioni, A.; Chiadroni, E. [INFN - LNF, via Enrico Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Cianchi, A. [INFN - LNF, via Enrico Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); “Tor Vergata” University, via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Rome (Italy); Curcio, A. [INFN - LNF, via Enrico Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Dabagov, S. [INFN - LNF, via Enrico Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute RAS, Leninskiy Prospekt 53, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); NRNU “MEPhI”, Kashirskoe highway 31, 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation); Ferrario, M.; Filippi, F. [INFN - LNF, via Enrico Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Marocchino, A. [Dipartimento SBAI Universitá di Roma ‘La Sapienza’, via Antonio Scarpa 14/16, 00161 Rome (Italy); Paroli, B. [INFN - MI, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milan (Italy); Pompili, R. [INFN - LNF, via Enrico Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Rossi, A.R. [INFN - MI, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milan (Italy); Zigler, A. [Racah Institute of Physics Hebrew University of Jerusalem (Israel)

    2016-09-01

    Recent progress with wake-field acceleration has shown a great potential in providing high gradient acceleration fields, while the quality of the beams remains relatively poor. Precise knowledge of the beam size at the exit from the plasma and matching conditions for the externally injected beams are the key for improvement of beam quality. Betatron radiation emitted by the beam during acceleration in the plasma is a powerful tool for the transverse beam size measurement, being also non-intercepting. In this work we report on the technical solutions chosen at SPARC-LAB for such diagnostics tool, along with expected parameters of betatron radiation. - Highlights: • The betatron radiation parameters in SPARC-LAB wakefiled experiments were studied. • The differences with betatron radiation in other wake-field experiments were highlighted. • The solution for betatron radiation detection was investigated.

  16. Low emittance electron beam generation from a laser wakefield accelerator using two laser pulses with different wavelengths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. L. Xu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Ionization injection triggered by short wavelength laser pulses inside a nonlinear wakefield driven by a longer wavelength laser is examined via multidimensional particle-in-cell simulations. We find that very bright electron beams can be generated through this two-color scheme in either collinear propagating or transverse colliding geometry. For a fixed laser intensity I, lasers with longer/shorter wavelength λ have larger/smaller ponderomotive potential (∝Iλ^{2}. The two-color scheme utilizes this property to separate the injection process from the wakefield excitation process. Very strong wakes can be generated at relatively low laser intensities by using a longer wavelength laser driver (e.g., a 10  μm CO_{2} laser due to its very large ponderomotive potential. On the other hand, a short wavelength laser can produce electrons with very small residual momenta (p_{⊥}∼a_{0}∼sqrt[I]λ inside the wake, leading to electron beams with very small normalized emittances (tens of nm. Using particle-in-cell simulations we show that a ∼10  fs electron beam with ∼4  pC of charge and a normalized emittance of ∼50  nm can be generated by combining a 10  μm driving laser with a 400 nm injection laser, which is an improvement of more than 1 order of magnitude compared to the typical results obtained when a single wavelength laser is used for both the wake formation and ionization injection. With the transverse colliding geometry, simulations show that similarly low emittance and much lower slice energy spread (∼30  keV, comparing with the typical value of few MeV in the longitudinal injection scheme can be simultaneously obtained for electron beams with a few pC charge. Such low slice energy spread may have significant advantages in applications relevant to future coherent light sources driven by plasma accelerators.

  17. Comparisons of time explicit hybrid kinetic-fluid code Architect for Plasma Wakefield Acceleration with a full PIC code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massimo, F., E-mail: francesco.massimo@ensta-paristech.fr [Laboratoire d' Optique Appliquée, ENSTA ParisTech, CNRS, École Polytechnique, Université Paris-Saclay, 828 bd des Maréchaux, 91762 Palaiseau (France); Dipartimento SBAI, Università di Roma “La Sapienza“, Via A. Scarpa 14, 00161 Roma (Italy); Atzeni, S. [Dipartimento SBAI, Università di Roma “La Sapienza“, Via A. Scarpa 14, 00161 Roma (Italy); Marocchino, A. [Dipartimento SBAI, Università di Roma “La Sapienza“, Via A. Scarpa 14, 00161 Roma (Italy); INFN – LNF, via Enrico Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy)

    2016-12-15

    Architect, a time explicit hybrid code designed to perform quick simulations for electron driven plasma wakefield acceleration, is described. In order to obtain beam quality acceptable for applications, control of the beam-plasma-dynamics is necessary. Particle in Cell (PIC) codes represent the state-of-the-art technique to investigate the underlying physics and possible experimental scenarios; however PIC codes demand the necessity of heavy computational resources. Architect code substantially reduces the need for computational resources by using a hybrid approach: relativistic electron bunches are treated kinetically as in a PIC code and the background plasma as a fluid. Cylindrical symmetry is assumed for the solution of the electromagnetic fields and fluid equations. In this paper both the underlying algorithms as well as a comparison with a fully three dimensional particle in cell code are reported. The comparison highlights the good agreement between the two models up to the weakly non-linear regimes. In highly non-linear regimes the two models only disagree in a localized region, where the plasma electrons expelled by the bunch close up at the end of the first plasma oscillation.

  18. Comparisons of time explicit hybrid kinetic-fluid code Architect for Plasma Wakefield Acceleration with a full PIC code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massimo, F.; Atzeni, S.; Marocchino, A.

    2016-12-01

    Architect, a time explicit hybrid code designed to perform quick simulations for electron driven plasma wakefield acceleration, is described. In order to obtain beam quality acceptable for applications, control of the beam-plasma-dynamics is necessary. Particle in Cell (PIC) codes represent the state-of-the-art technique to investigate the underlying physics and possible experimental scenarios; however PIC codes demand the necessity of heavy computational resources. Architect code substantially reduces the need for computational resources by using a hybrid approach: relativistic electron bunches are treated kinetically as in a PIC code and the background plasma as a fluid. Cylindrical symmetry is assumed for the solution of the electromagnetic fields and fluid equations. In this paper both the underlying algorithms as well as a comparison with a fully three dimensional particle in cell code are reported. The comparison highlights the good agreement between the two models up to the weakly non-linear regimes. In highly non-linear regimes the two models only disagree in a localized region, where the plasma electrons expelled by the bunch close up at the end of the first plasma oscillation.

  19. Tailored electron bunches with smooth current profiles for enhanced transformer ratios in beam-driven acceleration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Lemery

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Collinear high-gradient O(GV/m beam-driven wakefield methods for charged-particle acceleration could be critical to the realization of compact, cost-efficient, accelerators, e.g., in support of TeV-scale lepton colliders or multiple-user free-electron laser facilities. To make these options viable, the high accelerating fields need to be complemented with large transformer ratios >2, a parameter characterizing the efficiency of the energy transfer between a wakefield-exciting “drive” bunch to an accelerated “witness” bunch. While several potential current distributions have been discussed, their practical realization appears challenging due to their often discontinuous nature. In this paper we propose several alternative continuously differentiable (smooth current profiles which support enhanced transformer ratios. We especially demonstrate that one of the devised shapes can be implemented in a photo-emission electron source by properly shaping the photocathode-laser pulse. We finally discuss a possible superconducting linear-accelerator concept that could produce shaped drive bunches at high-repetition rates to drive a dielectric-wakefield accelerator with accelerating fields on the order of ∼60  MV/m and a transformer ratio ∼5 consistent with a recently proposed multiuser free-electron laser facility.

  20. Mechanisms for the mitigation of the hose instability in plasma-wakefield accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrling, Timon

    2017-10-01

    The hose instability is a long standing challenge for plasma wakefield accelerators (PWFAs). It results from a coherent coupling between transverse phase space asymmetries of beam particles and plasma electrons. According to current models, the beam centroid displacement is amplified exponentially during the beam propagation in the plasma, resulting in an unstable acceleration process or beam-breakup. However, particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations indicate that these models overestimate the hosing growth rates, suggesting that PWFAs intrinsically provide saturation mechanisms for the hose instability. In this work we review the theory for the hose instability in order to identify and describe diverse mitigation mechanisms. By means of a self-consistent theoretical model that includes the energy exchange between beam and plasma, we show that the beam energy evolution can significantly mitigate the hose instability. We also discuss other mechanisms which disrupt the coherent coupling between beam and plasma, and thereby lead to a saturation or damping of the beam centroid oscillations. In addition, we examine how the transverse beam asymmetries, which seed hosing, can be reduced. Hence, the presented work reveals crucial mechanisms allowing for stable beam acceleration over long distances in PWFAs.

  1. Tomographic characterisation of gas-jet targets for laser wakefield acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Couperus, J.P.; Wolterink, T.A.W.; Jochmann, A.; Zarini, O..; Bastiaens, H.M.J.; Boller, K.J.; Irman, A.; Schramm, U..

    2016-01-01

    Laser wakefield acceleration(LWFA) has emerged as a promising concept for the next generation of high energy electron accelerators. The acceleration medium is provided by a target that creates a local well-defined gas-density profile inside a vacuum vessel. Target development and analysis of the resulting gas-density profiles is an important aspect in the further development of LWFA. Gas-jet targets are widely used in regimes where relatively high electron densities over short interaction lengths are required (up to several millimetres interaction length, plasma densities down to 1018 cm3). In this paper we report a precise characterization of such gas-jet targets by a laser interferometry technique. We show that phase shifts down to 4 mrad can be resolved. Tomographic phase reconstruction enables detection of non-axisymmetrical gas-density profiles which indicates defects in cylindrical nozzles, analysis of slit-nozzles and nozzles with an induced shock-wave density step. In a direct comparison between argon...

  2. Computer simulations of a single-laser double-gas-jet wakefield accelerator concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. G. Hemker

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available We report in this paper on full scale 2D particle-in-cell simulations investigating laser wakefield acceleration. First we describe our findings of electron beam generation by a laser propagating through a single gas jet. Using realistic parameters which are relevant for the experimental setup in our laboratory we find that the electron beam resulting after the propagation of a 0.8 μm, 50 fs laser through a 1.5 mm gas jet has properties that would make it useful for further acceleration. Our simulations show that the electron beam is generated when the laser exits the gas jet, and the properties of the generated beam, especially its energy, depend only weakly on most properties of the gas jet. We therefore propose to use the first gas jet as a plasma cathode and then use a second gas jet placed immediately behind the first to provide additional acceleration. Our simulations of this proposed setup indicate the feasibility of this idea and also suggest ways to optimize the quality of the resulting beam.

  3. High-Flux Femtosecond X-Ray Emission from Controlled Generation of Annular Electron Beams in a Laser Wakefield Accelerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, T Z; Behm, K; Dong, C F; Davoine, X; Kalmykov, S Y; Petrov, V; Chvykov, V; Cummings, P; Hou, B; Maksimchuk, A; Nees, J A; Yanovsky, V; Thomas, A G R; Krushelnick, K

    2016-08-26

    Annular quasimonoenergetic electron beams with a mean energy in the range 200-400 MeV and charge on the order of several picocoulombs were generated in a laser wakefield accelerator and subsequently accelerated using a plasma afterburner in a two-stage gas cell. Generation of these beams is associated with injection occurring on the density down ramp between the stages. This well-localized injection produces a bunch of electrons performing coherent betatron oscillations in the wakefield, resulting in a significant increase in the x-ray yield. Annular electron distributions are detected in 40% of shots under optimal conditions. Simultaneous control of the pulse duration and frequency chirp enables optimization of both the energy and the energy spread of the annular beam and boosts the radiant energy per unit charge by almost an order of magnitude. These well-defined annular distributions of electrons are a promising source of high-brightness laser plasma-based x rays.

  4. Wakefield and RF Kicks Due to Coupler Asymmetry in TESLA-Type Accelerating Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bane, K.L.F.; Adolphsen, C.; Li, Z.; /SLAC; Dohlus, M.; Zagorodnov, I.; /DESY; Gonin, I.; Lunin, A.; Solyak, N.; Yakovlev, V.; /Fermilab; Gjonaj, E.; Weiland, T.; /Darmstadt, Tech. Hochsch.

    2008-07-07

    In a future linear collider, such as the International Linear Collider (ILC), trains of high current, low emittance bunches will be accelerated in a linac before colliding at the interaction point. Asymmetries in the accelerating cavities of the linac will generate fields that will kick the beam transversely and degrade the beam emittance and thus the collider performance. In the main linac of the ILC, which is filled with TESLA-type superconducting cavities, it is the fundamental (FM) and higher mode (HM) couplers that are asymmetric and thus the source of such kicks. The kicks are of two types: one, due to (the asymmetry in) the fundamental RF fields and the other, due to transverse wakefields that are generated by the beam even when it is on axis. In this report we calculate the strength of these kicks and estimate their effect on the ILC beam. The TESLA cavity comprises nine cells, one HM coupler in the upstream end, and one (identical, though rotated) HM coupler and one FM coupler in the downstream end (for their shapes and location see Figs. 1, 2) [1]. The cavity is 1.1 m long, the iris radius 35 mm, and the coupler beam pipe radius 39 mm. Note that the couplers reach closer to the axis than the irises, down to a distance of 30 mm.

  5. Temporal characterization of ultrashort linearly chirped electron bunches generated from a laser wakefield accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Zhang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A new method for diagnosing the temporal characteristics of ultrashort electron bunches with linear energy chirp generated from a laser wakefield accelerator is described. When the ionization-injected bunch interacts with the back of the drive laser, it is deflected and stretched along the direction of the electric field of the laser. Upon exiting the plasma, if the bunch goes through a narrow slit in front of the dipole magnet that disperses the electrons in the plane of the laser polarization, it can form a series of bunchlets that have different energies but are separated by half a laser wavelength. Since only the electrons that are undeflected by the laser go through the slit, the energy spectrum of the bunch is modulated. By analyzing the modulated energy spectrum, the shots where the bunch has a linear energy chirp can be recognized. Consequently, the energy chirp and beam current profile of those bunches can be reconstructed. This method is demonstrated through particle-in-cell simulations and experiment.

  6. Temporal characteristics of monoenergetic electron beams generated by the laser wakefield acceleration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Ohkubo

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Pulse length of quasimonoenergetic electrons accelerated by the wakefield generated by 12 TW, 40 fs laser pulses in a gas jet is determined via spectral measurements using a bolometer to detect coherent transition radiation. A quasimonoenergetic electron beam with its mean energy E=21  MeV, dispersion ΔE=4  MeV, total charge q∼30  pC, and the geometrical emittance 0.07π  mm mrad is generated with high reproducibility. The averaged duration of only the quasimonoenergetic electron bunches peaked around 20 MeV is 130±30  fs (FWHM, while it is 250±70  fs (FWHM for electron bunches with quasimonoenergetic distributions peaked around 4 MeV, at a distance of 180 mm far from the gas jet because of relatively large electron energy spread. Pulse elongation of the electron bunch with the quasimonoenergetic distribution after 180 mm path is 60–220  fs (FWHM. Therefore, the initial duration of the electron bunch at the gas-jet rear is expected to be less than 100  fs (FWHM.

  7. Three electron beams from a laser-plasma wakefield accelerator and the energy apportioning question

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, X; Reboredo Gil, David; Welsh, Gregor H; Li, Y.F; Cipiccia, Silvia; Ersfeld, Bernhard; Grant, D. W; Grant, P. A; Islam, Muhammad; Tooley, M.B; Vieux, Gregory; Wiggins, Sally; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Jaroszynski, Dino

    2017-01-01

    Laser-wakefield accelerators are compact devices capable of delivering ultra-short electron bunches with pC-level charge and MeV-GeV energy by exploiting the ultra-high electric fields arising from the interaction of intense laser pulses with plasma. We show experimentally and through numerical simulations that a high-energy electron beam is produced simultaneously with two stable lowerenergy beams that are ejected in oblique and counter-propagating directions, typically carrying off 5–10% of the initial laser energy. A MeV, 10s nC oblique beam is ejected in a 30°–60° hollow cone, which is filled with more energetic electrons determined by the injection dynamics. A nC-level, 100s keV backward-directed beam is mainly produced at the leading edge of the plasma column. We discuss the apportioning of absorbed laser energy amongst the three beams. Knowledge of the distribution of laser energy and electron beam charge, which determine the overall efficiency, is important for various applications of laser-wake...

  8. Particle dynamics in multistage wakefield collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Cheshkov

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of particles in laser pulse-driven wakefields over multistages in a collider is studied. A map of phase space dynamics over a stage of wakefield acceleration induced by a laser pulse (or electron beam is derived. The entire system of a collider is generated with a product of multiple maps of wakefields, drifts, magnets, etc. This systems map may include offsets of various elements of the accelerator, representing noise and errors arising from the operation of such a complex device. We find that an unmitigated strong focusing of the wakefield coupled with the alignment errors of the position (or laser beam aiming of each wakefield stage and the unavoidable dispersion in individual particle betatron frequencies leads to a phase space mixing and causes a transverse emittance degradation. The rate of the emittance increase is proportional to the number of stages, the energy of the particles, the betatron frequency, the square of the misalignment amplitude, and the square of the betatron phase shift over a single stage. The accelerator with a weakened focus in a channel can, therefore, largely suppress the emittance degradation due to errors.

  9. An accurate Rb density measurement method for a plasma wakefield accelerator experiment using a novel Rb reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Öz, E.; Batsch, F.; Muggli, P.

    2016-09-01

    A method to accurately measure the density of Rb vapor is described. We plan on using this method for the Advanced Wakefield (AWAKE) (Assmann et al., 2014 [1]) project at CERN , which will be the world's first proton driven plasma wakefield experiment. The method is similar to the hook (Marlow, 1967 [2]) method and has been described in great detail in the work by Hill et al. (1986) [3]. In this method a cosine fit is applied to the interferogram to obtain a relative accuracy on the order of 1% for the vapor density–length product. A single-mode, fiber-based, Mach–Zenhder interferometer will be built and used near the ends of the 10 meter-long AWAKE plasma source to be able to make accurate relative density measurement between these two locations. This can then be used to infer the vapor density gradient along the AWAKE plasma source and also change it to the value desired for the plasma wakefield experiment. Here we describe the plan in detail and show preliminary results obtained using a prototype 8 cm long novel Rb vapor cell.

  10. Efficient numerical modelling of the emittance evolution of beams with finite energy spread in plasma wakefield accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehrling, T.J., E-mail: timon.mehrling@desy.de [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Robson, R.E. [Centre for Quantum Dynamics, School of Natural Sciences, Griffith University, Brisbane (Australia); Erbe, J-H.; Osterhoff, J. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, 22607 Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-09-01

    This paper introduces a semi-analytic numerical approach (SANA) for the rapid computation of the transverse emittance of beams with finite energy spread in plasma wakefield accelerators in the blowout regime. The SANA method is used to model the beam emittance evolution when injected into and extracted from realistic plasma profiles. Results are compared to particle-in-cell simulations, establishing the accuracy and efficiency of the procedure. In addition, it is demonstrated that the tapering of vacuum-to-plasma and plasma-to-vacuum transitions is a viable method for the mitigation of emittance growth of beams during their injection and extraction from and into plasma cells.

  11. A bremsstrahlung gamma-ray source based on stable ionization injection of electrons into a laser wakefield accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Döpp, A., E-mail: andreas.doepp@polytechnique.edu [LOA, ENSTA ParisTech, CNRS, École polytechnique, Université Paris-Saclay, 828 bd des Maréchaux, 91762 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Centro de Laseres Pulsados, Parque Cientfico, 37185 Villamayor, Salamanca (Spain); Guillaume, E.; Thaury, C.; Lifschitz, A. [LOA, ENSTA ParisTech, CNRS, École polytechnique, Université Paris-Saclay, 828 bd des Maréchaux, 91762 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Sylla, F. [SourceLAB SAS, 86 rue de Paris, 91400 Orsay (France); Goddet, J-P.; Tafzi, A.; Iaquanello, G.; Lefrou, T.; Rousseau, P. [LOA, ENSTA ParisTech, CNRS, École polytechnique, Université Paris-Saclay, 828 bd des Maréchaux, 91762 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Conejero, E.; Ruiz, C. [Departamento de Física Aplicada, Universidad de Salamanca, Plaza de laMerced s/n, 37008 Salamanca (Spain); Ta Phuoc, K.; Malka, V. [LOA, ENSTA ParisTech, CNRS, École polytechnique, Université Paris-Saclay, 828 bd des Maréchaux, 91762 Palaiseau Cedex (France)

    2016-09-11

    Laser wakefield acceleration permits the generation of ultra-short, high-brightness relativistic electron beams on a millimeter scale. While those features are of interest for many applications, the source remains constraint by the poor stability of the electron injection process. Here we present results on injection and acceleration of electrons in pure nitrogen and argon. We observe stable, continuous ionization-induced injection of electrons into the wakefield for laser powers exceeding a threshold of 7 TW. The beam charge scales approximately with the laser energy and is limited by beam loading. For 40 TW laser pulses we measure a maximum charge of almost 1 nC per shot, originating mostly from electrons of less than 10 MeV energy. The relatively low energy, the high charge and its stability make this source well-suited for applications such as non-destructive testing. Hence, we demonstrate the production of energetic radiation via bremsstrahlung conversion at 1 Hz repetition rate. In accordance with GEANT4 Monte-Carlo simulations, we measure a γ-ray source size of less than 100 μm for a 0.5 mm tantalum converter placed at 2 mm from the accelerator exit. Furthermore we present radiographs of image quality indicators.

  12. A New Technique to Compute Long-Range Wakefields in Accelerating Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Raguin, J Y; Wuensch, Walter

    2002-01-01

    A new technique is proposed to compute the coupling impedances and the long-range wakefields based on a scattering-matrix formalism which relies heavily upon post-processed data from the commercial finite-element code HFSS. To illustrate the speed of this technique, the procedures to compute the long-range wakefields of conventional constant-impedance structures and of structures damped with waveguides are presented. The efficiency and accuracy of the technique is achieved because the characteristics of periodic structures can be computed using single-cell data. Damping and synchronism effects are determined from such a computation.

  13. Plasma Wakefield Excitation in a Cold Magnetized Plasma for Particle Acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmakar, Mithun; Chakrabarti, Nikhil; Sengupta, Sudip

    2017-10-01

    A numerical study has been done to find a travelling wave solution for a highly relativistic electron beam driven cold magnetized plasma. The presence of magnetic field has an effect to reduce thetransformer ratio (the ratio of energy gain to the drive beam energy) from its unmagnetized value. The effects of beam shape and the non-relativistic ion motion on the nonlinear structures of different dynamical variables are also discussed. The results owe its significance in the laboratory context of particle acceleration or in the study of generation of ultrahigh accelerating charged particle by strong plasma wave in astrophysical situations. Department of Atomic Energy of India and Homi Bhaba National Institute.

  14. Tailoring laser wakefield accelerated electron beams. An experimental study on the influence of experimental conditions on electron beam parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couperus, Jurjen P.; Koehler, Alexander; Zarini, Omid; Huebl, Axel; Schramm, Ulrich [Institute of Radiation Physics, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (Germany); Technische Universitaet Dresden (Germany); Jochmann, Axel; Debus, Alexander; Irman, Arie [Institute of Radiation Physics, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) has emerged as a promising concept for the next generation of high energy electron accelerators. In LFWA a high intensity ultrashort laser pulse drives plasma density waves, inducing a high accelerating field gradient in the order of GV/m. To create stable reproducible electron beams, tailoring of experimental parameters like gas density, laser energy and laser pulse duration is required. In this talk we present an overview of our experimental studies with the DRACO (3 J on target, 30 fs) laser on ultrasonic gas-jet targets (He and He-N{sub 2} mixtures). We discuss the influence of experimental parameters on beam parameters like beam charge, shot-to-shot stability and energy distribution, both in the self-injecting bubble regime as well as in the ionisation injection regime.

  15. Laser Wakefield Acceleration: Structural and Dynamic Studies. Final Technical Report ER40954

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Downer, Michael C. [Univ. of Texas at Austin, TX (United States)

    2014-04-30

    -15 seconds) in duration and 150 Joules in energy (equivalent to the muzzle energy of a small pistol bullet). This duration was well matched to the natural electron density oscillation period of plasma of 1/100 atmospheric density, enabling efficient excitation of a plasma wake, while this energy was sufficient to drive a high-amplitude wake of the right shape to produce an energetic, collimated electron beam. Continuing research is aimed at increasing electron energy even further, increasing the number of electrons captured and accelerated, and developing applications of the compact, multi-GeV accelerator as a coherent, hard x-ray source for materials science, biomedical imaging and homeland security applications. The second major advance under this project was to develop new methods of visualizing the laser-driven plasma wake structures that underlie laser-plasma accelerators. Visualizing these structures is essential to understanding, optimizing and scaling laser-plasma accelerators. Yet prior to work under this project, computer simulations based on estimated initial conditions were the sole source of detailed knowledge of the complex, evolving internal structure of laser-driven plasma wakes. In this project we developed and demonstrated a suite of optical visualization methods based on well-known methods such as holography, streak cameras, and coherence tomography, but adapted to the ultrafast, light-speed, microscopic world of laser-driven plasma wakes. Our methods output images of laser-driven plasma structures in a single laser shot. We first reported snapshots of low-amplitude laser wakes in Nature Physics in 2006. We subsequently reported images of high-amplitude laser-driven plasma “bubbles”, which are important for producing electron beams with low energy spread, in Physical Review Letters in 2010. More recently, we have figured out how to image laser-driven structures that change shape while propagating in a single laser shot. The latter techniques, which use

  16. X-ray phase contrast imaging of biological samples using a betatron x-ray source generated in a laser wakefield accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaulagain, U.; Bohacek, K.; Kozlova, M.; Nejdl, J.; Krus, M.; Horny, V.; Mahieu, B.; Ta-Phuoc, K.

    2017-05-01

    In a plasma wakefield accelerator, an intense laser pulse propagates in an under-dense plasma that drives a relativistic plasma wave in which electrons can be injected and accelerated to relativistic energies within a short distance. These accelerated electrons undergo betatron oscillation and emit a collimated X-ray beam along the direction of electron velocity. This X-ray source is characterised with a source size of the order of a micrometer, a pulse duration of the order of femtosecond, and with a high spectral brightness. This novel X-ray source provides an excellent imaging tool to achieve unprecedented high-resolution image through phase contrast imaging. The phase contrast technique has the potential to reveal structures which are invisible with the conventional absorption imaging. In the X-ray phase contrast imaging, the image contrast is obtained thanks to phase shifts induced on the X-rays passing through the sample. It involves the real part of refractive index of the object. Here we present high-resolution phase contrast X-ray images of two biological samples using laser-driven Betatron X-ray source.

  17. Small type accelerator. Try for accelerator driven system

    CERN Document Server

    Mori, Y

    2003-01-01

    FFAG (Fixed-field alternating gradient) accelerator for accelerator driven subcritical reactor, which aims to change from long-lived radioactive waste to short-lived radioactivity, is introduced. It is ring accelerator. The performance needed is proton as accelerator particle, 10MW (total) beam power, about 1GeV beam energy, >30% power efficiency and continuous beam. The feature of FFAG accelerator is constant magnetic field. PoP (Proof-of-principle)-FFAG accelerator, radial type, was run at first in Japan in 2000. The excursion is about some ten cm. In principle, beam can be injected and extracted at any place of ring. The 'multi-fish' acceleration can accelerate beams to 100% duty by repeating acceleration. 150MeV-FFAG accelerator has been started since 2001. It tried to practical use, for example, treatment of cancer. (S.Y.)

  18. Improved ramped bunch train to increase the transformer ratio of a two-channel multimode dielectric wakefield accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. V. Sotnikov

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Here we show a possibility of applying the ramped drive bunch train (RBT technique to a two-channel coaxial dielectric wakefield accelerator (CDWA. For numerical research we study a 28 GHz structure with two nested alumina cylindrical shells having these diameters: outer shell, OD=28.1  mm, ID=27  mm; inner shell, OD=6.35  mm, ID=4.0  mm. The structure is to be excited by a train of four annular bunches having energy 14 MeV and axial rms length 1 mm; the total charge of bunches is 200 nC. In the case of equally charged drive bunches, spaced apart by the principal wakefield wavelength 10.67 mm, we obtained transformer ratio T=3.4. If the bunch charge is increasing as the ratio 1∶3∶5∶7 and the bunches are spaced by one and one-half wavelengths, we obtained T=3.8. We found that if the charge ratios are 1.0∶2.4∶3.5∶5.0 and the spaces between the bunches are 2.5, 2.5, and 4.5 wakefield periods, then T increases strongly, T∼20. The RBT also can be used successfully in a high gradient THz CDWA structure. A particle-in-cell simulation shows that the four drive bunches can move without appreciable distortion.

  19. Fermi Acceleration in driven relativistic billiards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinto, Rafael S., E-mail: rsoaresp@ifi.unicamp.br [Instituto de Fisica ' Gleb Wataghin' , Universidade Estadual de Campinas, 13083-970, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Letelier, Patricio S. [Departamento de Matematica Aplicada, Instituto de Matematica, Estatistica e Computacao Cientifica, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, 13083-859, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2011-08-29

    We show numerical experiments of driven billiards using special relativity. We have the remarkable fact that for the relativistic driven circular and annular concentric billiards, depending on initial conditions and parameters, we observe Fermi Acceleration, absent in the Newtonian case. The velocity for these cases tends to the speed of light very quickly. We find that for the annular eccentric billiard the initial velocity grows for a much longer time than the concentric annular billiard until it asymptotically reach c. -- Highlights: → Fermi Acceleration is studied for relativistic driven billiards. → We studied regular and chaotic billiards with different parameters. → Fermi Acceleration is present even for static regular billiards.

  20. Photoinjector optimization using a derivative-free, model-based trust-region algorithm for the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neveu, N.; Larson, J.; Power, J. G.; Spentzouris, L.

    2017-07-01

    Model-based, derivative-free, trust-region algorithms are increasingly popular for optimizing computationally expensive numerical simulations. A strength of such methods is their efficient use of function evaluations. In this paper, we use one such algorithm to optimize the beam dynamics in two cases of interest at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) facility. First, we minimize the emittance of a 1 nC electron bunch produced by the AWA rf photocathode gun by adjusting three parameters: rf gun phase, solenoid strength, and laser radius. The algorithm converges to a set of parameters that yield an emittance of 1.08 μm. Second, we expand the number of optimization parameters to model the complete AWA rf photoinjector (the gun and six accelerating cavities) at 40 nC. The optimization algorithm is used in a Pareto study that compares the trade-off between emittance and bunch length for the AWA 70MeV photoinjector.

  1. Short energetic electron bunches from laser wakefield accelerator with orthogonally polarized perpendicularly crossed laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horný, Vojtěch; Petržílka, Václav; Klimo, Ondřej; Krůs, Miroslav

    2017-05-01

    Electron acceleration with optical injection by a perpendicularly propagating and orthogonally polarized low intensity laser pulse into a nonlinear plasma wave driven by a short intense laser pulse was explored by particle- in-cell simulations. The scheme presented here provides an energetic electron bunch in the first ion cavity with a low energy spread. The electron bunch short and compact, with the mean energy about 400 MeV and a low energy spread about 10 MeV in time of 6 ps of acceleration. The injected charge is several tens of pC for the low intensity of the injection pulse. Initial positions of electrons forming the energetic bunch are shown and then these electrons are followed during the simulation in order to understand the injection process and determine electron bunch properties.

  2. Optical control of hard X-ray polarization by electron injection in a laser wakefield accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnell, Michael; Sävert, Alexander; Uschmann, Ingo; Reuter, Maria; Nicolai, Maria; Kämpfer, Tino; Landgraf, Björn; Jäckel, Oliver; Jansen, Oliver; Pukhov, Alexander; Kaluza, Malte Christoph; Spielmann, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Laser-plasma particle accelerators could provide more compact sources of high-energy radiation than conventional accelerators. Moreover, because they deliver radiation in femtosecond pulses, they could improve the time resolution of X-ray absorption techniques. Here we show that we can measure and control the polarization of ultra-short, broad-band keV photon pulses emitted from a laser-plasma-based betatron source. The electron trajectories and hence the polarization of the emitted X-rays are experimentally controlled by the pulse-front tilt of the driving laser pulses. Particle-in-cell simulations show that an asymmetric plasma wave can be driven by a tilted pulse front and a non-symmetric intensity distribution of the focal spot. Both lead to a notable off-axis electron injection followed by collective electron–betatron oscillations. We expect that our method for an all-optical steering is not only useful for plasma-based X-ray sources but also has significance for future laser-based particle accelerators. PMID:24026068

  3. Beam-beam instability driven by wakefield effects in linear colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Brinkmann, R; Schulte, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    The vertical beam profile distortions induced by wakefield effects in linear colliders (the so-called ``banana effect'') generate a beam-beam instability at the collision point when the vertical disruption parameter is large. We illustrate this effect in the case of the TESLA linear collider project. We specify the tolerance on the associated emittance growth, which translates into tolerances on injection jitter and, for a given tuning procedure, on structure misalignments. We look for possible cures based on fast orbit correction at the interaction point and using a fast luminosity monitor.

  4. Demonstration of Current Profile Shaping using Double Dog-Leg Emittance Exchange Beam Line at Argonne Wakefield Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Gwanghui [Argonne, HEP; Cho, Moo-Hyun [POSTECH; Conde, Manoel [Argonne, HEP; Doran, Darrell [Argonne, HEP; Gai, Wei [Argonne, HEP; Jing, Chunguang [Euclid Techlabs, Solon; Kim, Kwang-Je [Argonne, HEP; Liu, Wanming [Argonne, HEP; Namkung, Won [POSTECH; Piot, Philippe [Northern Illinois U.; Power, John [Argonne, HEP; Sun, Yin-E [Argonne, HEP; Whiteford, Charles [Argonne, HEP; Wisniewski, Eric [Argonne, HEP; Zholents, Alexander [Argonne, HEP

    2016-06-01

    Emittance exchange (EEX) based longitudinal current profile shaping is the one of the promising current profile shaping technique. This method can generate high quality arbitrary current profiles under the ideal conditions. The double dog-leg EEX beam line was recently installed at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) to explore the shaping capability and confirm the quality of this method. To demonstrate the arbitrary current profile generation, several different transverse masks are applied to generate different final current profiles. The phase space slopes and the charge of incoming beam are varied to observe and suppress the aberrations on the ideal profile. We present current profile shaping results, aberrations on the shaped profile, and its suppression.

  5. Laser-wakefield acceleration of electron beams in a low density plasma channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. P. A. Ibbotson

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The generation of quasimonoenergetic electron beams, with energies greater than 500 MeV, in a laser-plasma accelerator driven by 2.5 J, 80 fs laser pulses guided in a low density plasma channel, is investigated. The laser energy required to achieve electron injection is found to depend strongly on the quality of the input laser focal spot. Simulations show that, although the matched spot size of the plasma channel is greater than the self-focused spot size, the channel assists relativistic self-focusing and enables electron injection to occur at lower plasma densities and laser powers than would be possible without a waveguide.

  6. A tunable electron beam source using trapping of electrons in a density down-ramp in laser wakefield acceleration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekerfelt, Henrik; Hansson, Martin; Gallardo González, Isabel; Davoine, Xavier; Lundh, Olle

    2017-09-25

    One challenge in the development of laser wakefield accelerators is to demonstrate sufficient control and reproducibility of the parameters of the generated bunches of accelerated electrons. Here we report on a numerical study, where we demonstrate that trapping using density down-ramps allows for tuning of several electron bunch parameters by varying the properties of the density down-ramp. We show that the electron bunch length is determined by the difference in density before and after the ramp. Furthermore, the transverse emittance of the bunch is controlled by the steepness of the ramp. Finally, the amount of trapped charge depends both on the density difference and on the steepness of the ramp. We emphasize that both parameters of the density ramp are feasible to vary experimentally. We therefore conclude that this tunable electron accelerator makes it suitable for a wide range of applications, from those requiring short pulse length and low emittance, such as the free-electron lasers, to those requiring high-charge, large-emittance bunches to maximize betatron X-ray generation.

  7. Generating multi-GeV electron bunches using single stage laser wakefield acceleration in a 3D nonlinear regime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Lu

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The extraordinary ability of space-charge waves in plasmas to accelerate charged particles at gradients that are orders of magnitude greater than in current accelerators has been well documented. We develop a phenomenological framework for laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA in the 3D nonlinear regime, in which the plasma electrons are expelled by the radiation pressure of a short pulse laser, leading to nearly complete blowout. Our theory provides a recipe for designing a LWFA for given laser and plasma parameters and estimates the number and the energy of the accelerated electrons whether self-injected or externally injected. These formulas apply for self-guided as well as externally guided pulses (e.g. by plasma channels. We demonstrate our results by presenting a sample particle-in-cell (PIC simulation of a 30   fs, 200 TW laser interacting with a 0.75 cm long plasma with density 1.5×10^{18}  cm^{-3} to produce an ultrashort (10 fs monoenergetic bunch of self-injected electrons at 1.5 GeV with 0.3 nC of charge. For future higher-energy accelerator applications, we propose a parameter space, which is distinct from that described by Gordienko and Pukhov [Phys. Plasmas 12, 043109 (2005PHPAEN1070-664X10.1063/1.1884126] in that it involves lower plasma densities and wider spot sizes while keeping the intensity relatively constant. We find that this helps increase the output electron beam energy while keeping the efficiency high.

  8. Microfabrication of Laser-Driven Accelerator Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowan, Benjamin M

    2003-04-07

    We discuss the potential for using microfabrication techniques for laser-driven accelerator construction. We introduce microfabrication processes in general, and then describe our investigation of a particular trial process. We conclude by considering the issues microfabrication raises for possible future structures.

  9. Note: Real-time monitoring via second-harmonic interferometry of a flow gas cell for laser wakefield acceleration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandi, F; Giammanco, F; Conti, F; Sylla, F; Lambert, G; Gizzi, L A

    2016-08-01

    The use of a gas cell as a target for laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) offers the possibility to obtain stable and manageable laser-plasma interaction process, a mandatory condition for practical applications of this emerging technique, especially in multi-stage accelerators. In order to obtain full control of the gas particle number density in the interaction region, thus allowing for a long term stable and manageable LWFA, real-time monitoring is necessary. In fact, the ideal gas law cannot be used to estimate the particle density inside the flow cell based on the preset backing pressure and the room temperature because the gas flow depends on several factors like tubing, regulators, and valves in the gas supply system, as well as vacuum chamber volume and vacuum pump speed/throughput. Here, second-harmonic interferometry is applied to measure the particle number density inside a flow gas cell designed for LWFA. The results demonstrate that real-time monitoring is achieved and that using low backing pressure gas (<1 bar) and different cell orifice diameters (<2 mm) it is possible to finely tune the number density up to the 10(19) cm(-3) range well suited for LWFA.

  10. Note: Real-time monitoring via second-harmonic interferometry of a flow gas cell for laser wakefield acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandi, F., E-mail: fernando.brandi@ino.it [Intense Laser Irradiation Laboratory (ILIL), Istituto Nazionale di Ottica (INO-CNR), Via Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), Via Morego 30, 16163 Genova (Italy); Giammanco, F.; Conti, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Plasma Diagnostics and Technologies Ltd., via Matteucci n.38/D, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Sylla, F. [SourceLAB SAS, 86 Rue de Paris, 91400 Orsay (France); Lambert, G. [LOA, ENSTA ParisTech, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, Université Paris-Saclay, 828 bd des Maréchaux, 91762 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Gizzi, L. A. [Intense Laser Irradiation Laboratory (ILIL), Istituto Nazionale di Ottica (INO-CNR), Via Moruzzi 1, 56124 Pisa (Italy)

    2016-08-15

    The use of a gas cell as a target for laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) offers the possibility to obtain stable and manageable laser-plasma interaction process, a mandatory condition for practical applications of this emerging technique, especially in multi-stage accelerators. In order to obtain full control of the gas particle number density in the interaction region, thus allowing for a long term stable and manageable LWFA, real-time monitoring is necessary. In fact, the ideal gas law cannot be used to estimate the particle density inside the flow cell based on the preset backing pressure and the room temperature because the gas flow depends on several factors like tubing, regulators, and valves in the gas supply system, as well as vacuum chamber volume and vacuum pump speed/throughput. Here, second-harmonic interferometry is applied to measure the particle number density inside a flow gas cell designed for LWFA. The results demonstrate that real-time monitoring is achieved and that using low backing pressure gas (<1 bar) and different cell orifice diameters (<2 mm) it is possible to finely tune the number density up to the 10{sup 19} cm{sup −3} range well suited for LWFA.

  11. X-Ray and electron beam source characterization from Self-Modulated Laser Wakefield Acceleration experiments at Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Paul; Lemos, Nuno; Albert, Felicie; Shaw, Jessica; Milder, Avi; Marsh, Ken; Pak, Art; Hegelich, Bjorn; Joshi, Chan

    2017-10-01

    The development of a directional, low-divergence, and short-duration (ps and sub-ps) x-ray probes with energies of tens of keV is desirable for the fields of astrophysics, High Energy Density Science and Inertial Confinement Fusion. In this work we focused the Titan laser beam (1 ps and 150 Joules) into a 4mm helium gas jet to produce an electron beam that in turn generates an x-ray beam. The measured Raman Forward Scattering satellites present in the laser spectrum after the interaction, indicate the generation of a Self-modulated laser wakefield accelerator. This accelerator produced an electron beam with energies up to 250 MeV, a divergence of 16 x 40 mrad and a total charge of 6 nC. Using this high-charge relativistic electron beam we explored the combination of three mechanisms to produce an x-ray beam: Betatron, Compton scattering and Bremsstrahlung. We show the generation of a low divergence (mrad), small source size (um) broadband (keV to MeV) x-ray beam that can be used as a backlighter for time-resolved spectroscopy, imaging, and Compton radiography. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. [LLNL-ABS-734746].

  12. Photonic Crystal Laser-Driven Accelerator Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowan, Benjamin M

    2007-08-22

    Laser-driven acceleration holds great promise for significantly improving accelerating gradient. However, scaling the conventional process of structure-based acceleration in vacuum down to optical wavelengths requires a substantially different kind of structure. We require an optical waveguide that (1) is constructed out of dielectric materials, (2) has transverse size on the order of a wavelength, and (3) supports a mode with speed-of-light phase velocity in vacuum. Photonic crystals---structures whose electromagnetic properties are spatially periodic---can meet these requirements. We discuss simulated photonic crystal accelerator structures and describe their properties. We begin with a class of two-dimensional structures which serves to illustrate the design considerations and trade-offs involved. We then present a three-dimensional structure, and describe its performance in terms of accelerating gradient and efficiency. We discuss particle beam dynamics in this structure, demonstrating a method for keeping a beam confined to the waveguide. We also discuss material and fabrication considerations. Since accelerating gradient is limited by optical damage to the structure, the damage threshold of the dielectric is a critical parameter. We experimentally measure the damage threshold of silicon for picosecond pulses in the infrared, and determine that our structure is capable of sustaining an accelerating gradient of 300 MV/m at 1550 nm. Finally, we discuss possibilities for manufacturing these structures using common microfabrication techniques.

  13. Modeling of Laser wakefield acceleration in Lorentz boosted frame using EM-PIC code with spectral solver

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Peicheng; Decyk, Viktor K; An, Weiming; Vieira, Jorge; Tsung, Frank S; Fonseca, Ricardo A; Lu, Wei; Silva, Luis O; Mori, Warren B

    2013-01-01

    Simulating laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) in a Lorentz boosted frame in which the plasma drifts towards the laser with $v_b$ can speedup the simulation by factors of $\\gamma^2_b=(1-v^2_b/c^2)^{-1}$. In these simulations the relativistic drifting plasma inevitably induces a high frequency numerical instability that contaminates the interested physics. Various approaches have been proposed to mitigate this instability. One approach is to solve Maxwell equations in Fourier space (a spectral solver) as this has been shown to suppress the fastest growing modes of this instability in simple test problems using a simple low pass, ring (in two dimensions), or shell (in three dimensions) filter in Fourier space. We describe the development of a fully parallelized, multi-dimensional, particle-in-cell code that uses a spectral solver to solve Maxwell's equations and that includes the ability to launch a laser using a moving antenna. This new EM-PIC code is called UPIC-EMMA and it is based on the components of the U...

  14. High-quality electron beam generation and bright betatron radiation from a cascaded laser wakefield accelerator (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiansheng; Wang, Wentao; Li, Wentao; Qi, Rong; Zhang, Zhijun; Yu, Changhai; Wang, Cheng; Liu, Jiaqi; Qing, Zhiyong; Ming, Fang; Xu, Yi; Leng, Yuxin; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2017-05-01

    One of the major goals of developing laser wakefiled accelerators (LWFAs) is to produce compact high-energy electron beam (e-beam) sources, which are expected to be applied in developing compact x-ray free-electron lasers and monoenergetic gamma-ray sources. Although LWFAs have been demonstrated to generate multi-GeV e-beams, to date they are still failed to produce high quality e beams with several essential properties (narrow energy spread, small transverse emittance and high beam charge) achieved simultaneously. Here we report on the demonstration of a high-quality cascaded LWFA experimentally via manipulating electron injection, seeding in different periods of the wakefield, as well as controlling energy chirp for the compression of energy spread. The cascaded LWFA was powered by a 1-Hz 200-TW femtosecond laser facility at SIOM. High-brightness e beams with peak energies in the range of 200-600 MeV, 0.4-1.2% rms energy spread, 10-80 pC charge, and 0.2 mrad rms divergence are experimentally obtained. Unprecedentedly high 6-dimensional (6-D) brightness B6D,n in units of A/m2/0.1% was estimated at the level of 1015-16, which is very close to the typical brightness of e beams from state-of-the-art linac drivers and several-fold higher than those of previously reported LWFAs. Furthermore, we propose a scheme to minimize the energy spread of an e beam in a cascaded LWFA to the one-thousandth-level by inserting a stage to compress its longitudinal spatial distribution via velocity bunching. In this scheme, three-segment plasma stages are designed for electron injection, e-beam length compression, and e-beam acceleration, respectively. A one-dimensional theory and two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations have demonstrated this scheme and an e beam with 0.2% rms energy spread and low transverse emittance could be generated without loss of charge. Based on the high-quality e beams generated in the LWFA, we have experimentally realized a new scheme to enhance the

  15. Accelerator driven sub-critical core

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, Peter M; Sattarov, Akhdiyor

    2015-03-17

    Systems and methods for operating an accelerator driven sub-critical core. In one embodiment, a fission power generator includes a sub-critical core and a plurality of proton beam generators. Each of the proton beam generators is configured to concurrently provide a proton beam into a different area of the sub-critical core. Each proton beam scatters neutrons within the sub-critical core. The plurality of proton beam generators provides aggregate power to the sub-critical core, via the proton beams, to scatter neutrons sufficient to initiate fission in the sub-critical core.

  16. Neutrino Physics with Accelerator Driven Subcritical Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciuffoli, Emilio

    2017-09-01

    Accelerator Driven Subcritical System (ADS) reactors are being developed around the world, to produce energy and, at the same time, to provide an efficient way to dispose of and to recycle nuclear waste. Used nuclear fuel, by itself, cannot sustain a chain reaction; however in ADS reactors the additional neutrons which are required will be supplied by a high-intensity accelerator. This accelerator will produce, as a by-product, a large quantity of {\\bar{ν }}μ via muon Decay At Rest (µDAR). Using liquid scintillators, it will be possible to to measure the CP-violating phase δCP and to look for experimental signs of the presence of sterile neutrinos in the appearance channel, testing the LSND and MiniBooNE anomalies. Even in the first stage of the project, when the beam energy will be lower, it will be possible to produce {\\bar{ν }}e via Isotope Decay At Rest (IsoDAR), which can be used to provide competitive bounds on sterile neutrinos in the disappearance channel. I will consider several experimental setups in which the antineutrinos are created using accelerators that will be constructed as part of the China-ADS program.

  17. Forward directed x-ray from source produced by relativistic electrons from a Self-Modulated Laser Wakefield Accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, Nuno; Albert, Felicie; Shaw, Jessica; King, Paul; Milder, Avi; Marsh, Ken; Pak, Arthur; Joshi, Chan

    2017-10-01

    Plasma-based particle accelerators are now able to provide the scientific community with novel light sources. Their applications span many disciplines, including high-energy density sciences, where they can be used as probes to explore the physics of dense plasmas and warm dense matter. A recent advance is in the experimental and theoretical characterization of x-ray emission from electrons in the self-modulated laser wakefield regime (SMLWFA) where little is known about the x-ray properties. A series of experiments at the LLNL Jupiter Laser Facility, using the 1 ps 150 J Titan laser, have demonstrated low divergence electron beams with energies up to 300 MeV and 6 nCs of charge, and betatron x-rays with critical energies up to 20 keV. This work identifies two other mechanisms which produce high energy broadband x-rays and gamma-rays from the SMLWFA: Bremsstrahlung and inverse Compton scattering. We demonstrate the use of Compton scattering and bremsstrahlung to generate x/Gamma-rays from 3 keV up to 1.5 MeV with a source size of 50um and a divergence of 100 mrad. This work is an important step towards developing this x-ray light source on large-scale international laser facilities, and also opens up the prospect of using them for applications. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under the contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC.

  18. Beam loading by distributed injection of electrons in a plasma wakefield accelerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vafaei-Najafabadi, N; Marsh, K A; Clayton, C E; An, W; Mori, W B; Joshi, C; Lu, W; Adli, E; Corde, S; Litos, M; Li, S; Gessner, S; Frederico, J; Fisher, A S; Wu, Z; Walz, D; England, R J; Delahaye, J P; Clarke, C I; Hogan, M J; Muggli, P

    2014-01-17

    We show through experiments and supporting simulations that propagation of a highly relativistic and dense electron bunch through a plasma can lead to distributed injection of electrons, which depletes the accelerating field, i.e., beam loads the wake. The source of the injected electrons is ionization of the second electron of rubidium (Rb II) within the wake. This injection of excess charge is large enough to severely beam load the wake, and thereby reduce the transformer ratio T. The reduction of the average T with increasing beam loading is quantified for the first time by measuring the ratio of peak energy gain and loss of electrons while changing the beam emittance. Simulations show that beam loading by Rb II electrons contributes to the reduction of the peak accelerating field from its weakly loaded value of 43  GV/m to a strongly loaded value of 26  GV/m.

  19. High energy electron beams from a laser wakefield acceleration with a long gas jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jaehoon; Hwangbo, Yong Hun; Lee, Shin-Yeong

    2017-09-01

    A long gas jet was used as a gas target for laser wake field acceleration to increase the energy and quality of the electron beam. When the plasma density was 7 × 1018 cm-3, quasi monoenergetic electron beams with a maximum energy of 152 MeV, a beam divergence 3 mrad, and a pointing stability 4 mrad were generated with a 5 mm long gas jet. The maximum energy was close to the theoretical limit predicted from the bubble model. This means that the length of the plasma was sufficiently long to accelerate the electron to the dephasing length after the electrons were self-injected by self-focusing. As the plasma density increased, the dephasing length decreased and the electron energy decreased. The continuous injection with higher density plasmas generated highly diverging beams. As the laser power increased, a number of electron beams with different propagation directions were generated. As shown by the measured shadowgram, the laser was divided into several filaments and each filament accelerated electron beam having different directions. The electron beam generated at this time decreased as the laser energy decreased due the division of the laser into different directions.

  20. Accelerating Science Driven System Design With RAMP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wawrzynek, John [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Researchers from UC Berkeley, in collaboration with the Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, are engaged in developing an Infrastructure for Synthesis with Integrated Simulation (ISIS). The ISIS Project was a cooperative effort for “application-driven hardware design” that engages application scientists in the early parts of the hardware design process for future generation supercomputing systems. This project served to foster development of computing systems that are better tuned to the application requirements of demanding scientific applications and result in more cost-effective and efficient HPC system designs. In order to overcome long conventional design-cycle times, we leveraged reconfigurable devices to aid in the design of high-efficiency systems, including conventional multi- and many-core systems. The resulting system emulation/prototyping environment, in conjunction with the appropriate intermediate abstractions, provided both a convenient user programming experience and retained flexibility, and thus efficiency, of a reconfigurable platform. We initially targeted the Berkeley RAMP system (Research Accelerator for Multiple Processors) as that hardware emulation environment to facilitate and ultimately accelerate the iterative process of science-driven system design. Our goal was to develop and demonstrate a design methodology for domain-optimized computer system architectures. The tangible outcome is a methodology and tools for rapid prototyping and design-space exploration, leading to highly optimized and efficient HPC systems.

  1. Hosing Instability of the Drive Electron Beam in the E157 Plasma-Wakefield Acceleration Experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blue, Brent Edward; /SLAC /UCLA

    2005-10-10

    In the plasma-wakefield experiment at SLAC, known as E157, an ultra-relativistic electron beam is used to both excite and witness a plasma wave for advanced accelerator applications. If the beam is tilted, then it will undergo transverse oscillations inside of the plasma. These oscillations can grow exponentially via an instability know as the electron hose instability. The linear theory of electron-hose instability in a uniform ion column predicts that for the parameters of the E157 experiment (beam charge, bunch length, and plasma density) a growth of the centroid offset should occur. Analysis of the E157 data has provided four critical results. The first was that the incoming beam did have a tilt. The tilt was much smaller than the radius and was measured to be 5.3 {micro}m/{delta}{sub z} at the entrance of the plasma (IP1.) The second was the beam centroid oscillates in the ion channel at half the frequency of the beam radius (betatron beam oscillations), and these oscillations can be predicted by the envelope equation. Third, up to the maximum operating plasma density of E157 ({approx}2 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup -3}), no growth of the centroid offset was measured. Finally, time-resolved data of the beam shows that up to this density, no significant growth of the tail of the beam (up to 8ps from the centroid) occurred even though the beam had an initial tilt.

  2. Laser beam coupling with capillary discharge plasma for laser wakefield acceleration applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagdasarov, G. A.; Sasorov, P. V.; Gasilov, V. A.; Boldarev, A. S.; Olkhovskaya, O. G.; Benedetti, C.; Bulanov, S. S.; Gonsalves, A.; Mao, H.-S.; Schroeder, C. B.; van Tilborg, J.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.; Levato, T.; Margarone, D.; Korn, G.

    2017-08-01

    One of the most robust methods, demonstrated to date, of accelerating electron beams by laser-plasma sources is the utilization of plasma channels generated by the capillary discharges. Although the spatial structure of the installation is simple in principle, there may be some important effects caused by the open ends of the capillary, by the supplying channels etc., which require a detailed 3D modeling of the processes. In the present work, such simulations are performed using the code MARPLE. First, the process of capillary filling with cold hydrogen before the discharge is fired, through the side supply channels is simulated. Second, the simulation of the capillary discharge is performed with the goal to obtain a time-dependent spatial distribution of the electron density near the open ends of the capillary as well as inside the capillary. Finally, to evaluate the effectiveness of the beam coupling with the channeling plasma wave guide and of the electron acceleration, modeling of the laser-plasma interaction was performed with the code INF&RNO.

  3. Optical diagnostics for laser wakefields in plasma channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaul, E. W.; Le Blanc, S. P.; Downer, M. C.

    1998-11-01

    Laser wakefield accelerators can excite large amplitude electrostatic fields (E >= 100 GV/m) which are potentially suitable for compact accelerators and advanced high energy colliders. An accurate diagnostic tool is necessary to test the physical effects in the wakefield predicted by theory and numerical simulations, and to have control over experiments. Frequency domain interferometry (FDI) (C. W. Siders et. al.), Phys. Rev. Lett. 76, 3570 (1995) has been developed in previous work. We experimentally demonstrate single-shot FDI as a sensitive diagnostic technique for probing laser wakefields. To generate wakefields longer than the diffraction limit, optical guiding of the laser pulse is necessary. An optical guide is formed by the hydrodynamic expansion of a cylindrical shock wave driven by a laser heated plasma, which is generated by laser pulse focused with an axicon lens (C. G. Durfee and H. M. Milchberg, Phys. Rev. Lett. 71, 2409 (1993)) to intensities of ~= 10^13 W/cm^2. These are too low to reach multi-photon ionization or significant collisional ionization in <= 1 atm helium. We preionize Helium gas with an electrical discharge for efficient inverse bremsstrahlung absorption of the laser pulse and formation of a plasma channel. Spatially resolved chirped pulse interferometry is used to measure the radial electron density profile of the channel.

  4. Laser-Wakefield driven compact Compton scattering gamma-ray source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Froula, D. H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hartemann, F. V. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Joshi, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2010-04-13

    We propose to demonstrate a novel x-ray and gamma-ray light source based on laser-plasma electron acceleration and Compton scattering at the Jupiter Laser Facility at LLNL. This will provide a new versatile and compact light source capability at the laboratory with very broad scientific applications that are of interest to many disciplines. The source’s synchronization with the seed laser system at a femtosecond time scale (i-e, at which chemical reactions occur) will allow scientists to perform pump-probe experiments with x-ray and gamma-ray beams. Across the laboratory, this will be a new tool for nuclear science, high energy density physics, chemistry, biology, or weapons studies.

  5. E-Beam Driven Accelerators: Working Group Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muggli, P.; /Southern California U.; Ng, J.S.T.; /SLAC

    2005-07-12

    The working group has identified the parameters of an afterburner based on the design of a future linear collider. The new design brings the center of mass energy of the collider from 1 to 2 TeV. The afterburner is located in the final focus section of the collider, operates at a gradient of {approx}4 GeV/m, and is only about 125 m long. Very important issues remain to be addressed, and include the physics and design of the positron side of the afterburner, as well as of the final focus system. Present plasma wakefield accelerator experiments have reached a level of maturity and of relevance to the afterburner, that make it timely to involve the high energy physics and accelerator community in the afterburner design process. The main result of this working group is the first integration of the designs of a future linear collider and an afterburner.

  6. Computationally efficient methods for modelling laser wakefield acceleration in the blowout regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, B. M.; Kalmykov, S. Y.; Beck, A.; Davoine, X.; Bunkers, K.; Lifschitz, A. F.; Lefebvre, E.; Bruhwiler, D. L.; Shadwick, B. A.; Umstadter, D. P.; Umstadter

    2012-08-01

    Electron self-injection and acceleration until dephasing in the blowout regime is studied for a set of initial conditions typical of recent experiments with 100-terawatt-class lasers. Two different approaches to computationally efficient, fully explicit, 3D particle-in-cell modelling are examined. First, the Cartesian code vorpal (Nieter, C. and Cary, J. R. 2004 VORPAL: a versatile plasma simulation code. J. Comput. Phys. 196, 538) using a perfect-dispersion electromagnetic solver precisely describes the laser pulse and bubble dynamics, taking advantage of coarser resolution in the propagation direction, with a proportionally larger time step. Using third-order splines for macroparticles helps suppress the sampling noise while keeping the usage of computational resources modest. The second way to reduce the simulation load is using reduced-geometry codes. In our case, the quasi-cylindrical code calder-circ (Lifschitz, A. F. et al. 2009 Particle-in-cell modelling of laser-plasma interaction using Fourier decomposition. J. Comput. Phys. 228(5), 1803-1814) uses decomposition of fields and currents into a set of poloidal modes, while the macroparticles move in the Cartesian 3D space. Cylindrical symmetry of the interaction allows using just two modes, reducing the computational load to roughly that of a planar Cartesian simulation while preserving the 3D nature of the interaction. This significant economy of resources allows using fine resolution in the direction of propagation and a small time step, making numerical dispersion vanishingly small, together with a large number of particles per cell, enabling good particle statistics. Quantitative agreement of two simulations indicates that these are free of numerical artefacts. Both approaches thus retrieve the physically correct evolution of the plasma bubble, recovering the intrinsic connection of electron self-injection to the nonlinear optical evolution of the driver.

  7. Energy efficiency of laser driven, structure based accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. H. Siemann

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The acceleration efficiency of a laser driven linear accelerator is analyzed. The laser power, loss factor, and impedances determine the maximum charge that can be accelerated and the efficiency of that acceleration. The accelerator structure can be incorporated into a laser cavity. The equation for the resultant laser pulse is derived and analyzed. A specific example is presented, and the steady-state laser pulse shapes, acceleration efficiency, and average unloaded gradient are calculated.

  8. Accelerator-driven Transmutation of Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venneri, Francesco

    1998-04-01

    Nuclear waste from commercial power plants contains large quantities of plutonium, other fissionable actinides, and long-lived fission products that are potential proliferation concerns and create challenges for the long-term storage. Different strategies for dealing with nuclear waste are being followed by various countries because of their geologic situations and their views on nuclear energy, reprocessing and non-proliferation. The current United States policy is to store unprocessed spent reactor fuel in a geologic repository. Other countries are opting for treatment of nuclear waste, including partial utilization of the fissile material contained in the spent fuel, prior to geologic storage. Long-term uncertainties are hampering the acceptability and eventual licensing of a geologic repository for nuclear spent fuel in the US, and driving up its cost. The greatest concerns are with the potential for radiation release and exposure from the spent fuel for tens of thousands of years and the possible diversion and use of the actinides contained in the waste for weapons construction. Taking advantage of the recent breakthroughs in accelerator technology and of the natural flexibility of subcritical systems, the Accelerator-driven Transmutation of Waste (ATW) concept offers the United States and other countries the possibility to greatly reduce plutonium, higher actinides and environmentally hazardous fission products from the waste stream destined for permanent storage. ATW does not eliminate the need for, but instead enhances the viability of permanent waste repositories. Far from being limited to waste destruction, the ATW concept also brings to the table new technologies that could be relevant for next-generation power producing reactors. In the ATW concept, spent fuel would be shipped to the ATW site where the plutonium, transuranics and selected long-lived fission products would be destroyed by fission or transmutation in their first and only pass through the

  9. Towards Attosecond High-Energy Electron Bunches: Controlling Self-Injection in Laser-Wakefield Accelerators Through Plasma-Density Modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tooley, M. P.; Ersfeld, B.; Yoffe, S. R.; Noble, A.; Brunetti, E.; Sheng, Z. M.; Islam, M. R.; Jaroszynski, D. A.

    2017-07-01

    Self-injection in a laser-plasma wakefield accelerator is usually achieved by increasing the laser intensity until the threshold for injection is exceeded. Alternatively, the velocity of the bubble accelerating structure can be controlled using plasma density ramps, reducing the electron velocity required for injection. We present a model describing self-injection in the short-bunch regime for arbitrary changes in the plasma density. We derive the threshold condition for injection due to a plasma density gradient, which is confirmed using particle-in-cell simulations that demonstrate injection of subfemtosecond bunches. It is shown that the bunch charge, bunch length, and separation of bunches in a bunch train can be controlled by tailoring the plasma density profile.

  10. Enhancement of Laser Wakefields via a Backward Raman Amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Joshua; Masson-Laborde, Paul-Edouard; Rozmus, Wojciech; Huller, Stefan; Wilks, Scott

    2017-10-01

    The Backward Raman Amplifier (BRA) is proposed as a possible scheme for improving laser driven plasma wakefields. One- and two-dimensional particle-in-cell code simulations with SCPIC and a 3-Wave coupling model are presented and compared to demonstrate how the BRA can be applied to the laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) in the non-relativistic regime to counteract limitations such as pump depletion, diffraction, and dephasing. Simulation results show that amplification of the driving pulse is strongest in the central high amplitude portion, causing the pulse to shorten both transversely and longitudinally. This results in a reduction or alleviation of the effects of diffraction, an increase in wake amplitude and sustainability, and provides direct insight into new methods of controlling plasma wakes in LWFA and other applications. JL is grateful for support from LLNL through the summer scholar program. JL and WR would like to acknowledge partial support from NSERC.

  11. Advances in laser driven accelerator R&D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leemans, Wim

    2004-08-23

    Current activities (last few years) at different laboratories, towards the development of a laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) are reviewed, followed by a more in depth discussion of results obtained at the L'OASIS laboratory of LBNL. Recent results on laser guiding of relativistically intense beams in preformed plasma channels are discussed. The observation of mono-energetic beams in the 100 MeV energy range, produced by a channel guided LWFA at LBNL, is described and compared to results obtained in the unguided case at LOA, RAL and LBNL. Analysis, aided by particle-in-cell simulations, as well as experiments with various plasma lengths and densities, indicate that tailoring the length of the accelerator has a very beneficial impact on the electron energy distribution. Progress on laser triggered injection is reviewed. Results are presented on measurements of bunch duration and emittance of the accelerated electron beams, that indicate the possibility of generating femtosecond duration electron bunches. Future challenges and plans towards the development of a 1 GeV LWFA module are discussed.

  12. The physics of accelerator driven sub-critical reactors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Accelerator driven systems; nuclear waste transmutation; computer codes; reactor physics; reactor noise; kinetics; burnup; transport theory; Monte Carlo; thorium utilization; neutron multiplication; sub-criticality; sub-critical facilities.

  13. Quantitative single shot and spatially resolved plasma wakefield diagnostics

    CERN Document Server

    Kasim, Muhammad Firmansyah; Ceurvorst, Luke; Levy, Matthew C; Ratan, Naren; Sadler, James; Bingham, Robert; Burrows, Philip N; Trines, Raoul; Wing, Matthew; Norreys, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosing plasma conditions can give great advantages in optimizing plasma wakefield accelerator experiments. One possible method is that of photon acceleration. By propagating a laser probe pulse through a plasma wakefield and extracting the imposed frequency modulation, one can obtain an image of the density modulation of the wakefield. In order to diagnose the wakefield parameters at a chosen point in the plasma, the probe pulse crosses the plasma at oblique angles relative to the wakefield. In this paper, mathematical expressions relating the frequency modulation of the laser pulse and the wakefield density profile of the plasma for oblique crossing angles are derived. Multidimensional particle-in-cell simulation results presented in this paper confirm that the frequency modulation profiles and the density modulation profiles agree to within 10%. Limitations to the accuracy of the measurement are discussed in this paper. This technique opens new possibilities to quantitatively diagnose the plasma wakefie...

  14. Measurements and Simulations of Impedance Reduction Techniques in Particle Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Day, Hugo Alistair; Jones, Roger

    Wakefields and the corresponding frequency-domain phenomenon beam coupling impedance have been well studied for a number of years as a source of beam instabilities within particle accelerators. With the development of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the large beam currents stored in the LHC during fills for physics production, wakefield driven instabilities and strong beam induced heating have become a limiting factors in luminosity production due to both instantaneous luminousity and the available time for collisions.\

  15. Photonic crystal laser-driven accelerator structures

    CERN Document Server

    Cowan, Benjamin

    2005-01-01

    We discuss simulated photonic crystal structure designs, including two- and three-dimensional planar structures and fibers. The discussion of 2D structures demonstrates guiding of a speed-of-light accelerating mode by a defect in a photonic crystal lattice and reveals design considerations and trade-offs. With a three-dimensional lattice, we introduce a candidate geometry and discuss beam dynamics, coupling, and manufacturing techniques for that structure. In addition we discuss W-band scale tests of photonic crystal structures. The computational methods are also discussed.

  16. Intrinsic normalized emittance growth in laser-driven electron accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Migliorati

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Laser-based electron sources are attracting strong interest from the conventional accelerator community due to their unique characteristics in terms of high initial energy, low emittance, and significant beam current. Extremely strong electric fields (up to hundreds of GV/m generated in the plasma allow accelerating gradients much higher than in conventional accelerators and set the basis for achieving very high final energies in a compact space. Generating laser-driven high-energy electron beam lines therefore represents an attractive challenge for novel particle accelerators. In this paper we show that laser-driven electrons generated by the nowadays consolidated TW laser systems, when leaving the interaction region, are subject to a very strong, normalized emittance worsening which makes them quickly unusable for any beam transport. Furthermore, due to their intrinsic beam characteristics, controlling and capturing the full beam current can only be achieved improving the source parameters.

  17. Microwave ion source for accelerator driven sub-critical system

    CERN Document Server

    Cui Bao Qun; Jiang Wei; LiLiQiang; WangRongWen

    2002-01-01

    A microwave ion source is under developing for a demonstration prototype of a accelerator driven sub-critical system at CIAE (China Institute of Atomic Energy), 100 mA hydrogen beam has been extracted from the source through a 7.3 mm aperture in diameter, proton ratio is more than 85%, reliability has been tested for 100 h without any failures

  18. Accelerator driven systems from the radiological safety point of view

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In the proposed accelerator driven systems (ADS) the possible use of several milliamperes of protons of about 1 GeV incident on high mass targets like the molten lead– bismuth eutectic is anticipated to pose radiological problems that have so far not been encountered by the radiation protection community.

  19. Reactivity Monitoring of Accelerator-Driven Nuclear Reactor Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uyttenhove, W.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis provides a methodology and set-up of a reactivity monitoring tool for Accelerator-Driven Systems (ADS). The reactivity monitoring tool should guarantee the operation of an ADS at a safe margin from criticality. Robustness is assured in different aspects of the monitoring tool: the choice

  20. Accelerator driven systems from the radiological safety point of view

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-11-27

    Nov 27, 2015 ... In the proposed accelerator driven systems (ADS) the possible use of several milliamperes of protons of about 1 GeV incident on high mass targets like the molten lead–bismuth eutectic is anticipated to pose radiological problems that have so far not been encountered by the radiation protection community.

  1. The physics of accelerator driven sub-critical reactors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    utilization; neutron multiplication; sub-criticality; sub-critical facilities. PACS Nos 89.30.Gg; 28.41.-I; 28.50.-k. 1. Introduction. Accelerator driven systems (ADS) are attracting worldwide attention increasingly due to their superior safety characteristics and their potential for burning actinide and fission product-waste and energy ...

  2. Rate acceleration of light-driven rotary molecular motors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pollard, Michael M.; Klok, Martin; Pijper, Dirk; Feringa, Ben L.

    2007-01-01

    One of the key challenges in taking light-driven unidirectional rotary motors from discovery to application is to increase the rate of rotation. Herein, we review our ongoing efforts to address this issue by meticulous improvement to the molecular design. To accelerate the rotary cycle, we have

  3. The electron accelerator for the AWAKE experiment at CERN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pepitone, K., E-mail: kevin.pepitone@cern.ch [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Doebert, S., E-mail: steffen.doebert@cern.ch [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Burt, G. [The University of Lancaster, Lancaster (United Kingdom); Chevallay, E.; Chritin, N.; Delory, C.; Fedosseev, V.; Hessler, Ch.; McMonagle, G. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Mete, O. [The University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Verzilov, V. [Triumf, Vancouver (Canada); Apsimon, R. [The University of Lancaster, Lancaster (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-01

    The AWAKE collaboration prepares a proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiment using the SPS beam at CERN. A long proton bunch extracted from the SPS interacts with a high power laser and a 10 m long rubidium vapour plasma cell to create strong wakefields allowing sustained electron acceleration. The electron bunch to probe these wakefields is supplied by a 20 MeV electron accelerator. The electron accelerator consists of an RF-gun and a short booster structure. This electron source should provide beams with intensities between 0.1 and 1 nC, bunch lengths between 0.3 and 3 ps and an emittance of the order of 2 mm mrad. The wide range of parameters should cope with the uncertainties and future prospects of the planned experiments. The layout of the electron accelerator, its instrumentation and beam dynamics simulations are presented.

  4. Resonant Excitation of Selected Modes by a Train of Electron Bunches in a Rectangular Dielectric Wakefield Accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Onishchenko, Ivan N; Onishchenko, Nikolay; Sotnikov, Gennadiy

    2005-01-01

    The dielectric wake field accelerator is based on particle acceleration by wake fields excited in a dielectric waveguide by a regular sequence of electron bunches. Enhancement of the accelerating field can be achieved using two phenomena: coherent excitation by many bunches (multibunch effect) and constructive interference of many excited eigenmodes (multimode effect). It was believed that the latter is possible only for planar slab geometry in which the excited modes are equally spaced in frequency. By analysis and simulation, in this presentation the effect of wake field superposition to high amplitude is demonstrated for arbitrary rectangular geometry that is more realizable in experiment. We find this result using simultaneous multibunch and multimode operation providing the repetition frequency of the bunch sequence is equal to the frequency difference between selected modes, whereupon resonant oscillation takes place. Moreover, it is shown that for an appropriate choice of selected modes and bunch repet...

  5. Accelerated Tests of Soft Errors in Network Systems Using a Compact Accelerator- Driven Neutron Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwashita, Hidenori; Sato, Hirotaka; Arai, Kaoru; Kotanigawa, Takashi; Kino, Koichi; Kamiyama, Takashi; Hiraga, Fujio; Koda, Katsutoshi; Furusaka, Michihiro; Kiyanagi, Yoshiaki

    2017-01-01

    The frequency of neutron-induced soft errors is increasing as devices become more integrated and miniaturized. Therefore, it has become more important recently to check reliability of a recovery system from the soft errors in network systems. For accelerated test, first we have examined possibility of the acceleration tests at a compact accelerator-driven neutron source, which is easy to adjust for soft-error tests and which also has low experimental costs. We selected the electron accelerator-driven neutron source at Hokkaido University as the compact accelerator-driven neutron source. We prepared a new target-reflector assembly composed of heavy metals to provide the fast neutrons, and conducted neutron-induced soft-error experiments on network equipments. As a result, we found that an accelerated rate of soft errors was about 106 times compared with that of the natural environment. We also investigated network equipment soft-error tolerance, fault detection and backup switching processes. Performing such testing before network equipment is actually deployed is critical for development of future network systems. Hence, the compact accelerator-based neutron source is a very useful tool.

  6. Ultrahigh resolution and brilliance laser wakefield accelerator betatron x-ray source for rapid in vivo tomographic microvasculature imaging in small animal models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourmaux, Sylvain; Kieffer, Jean-Claude; Krol, Andrzej

    2017-03-01

    We are developing ultrahigh spatial resolution (FWHM microvasculature imaging micro-CT angiography (μCTA) in small animal models using optimized contrast agent. It exploits Laser Wakefield Accelerator (LWFA) betatron x-ray emission phenomenon. Ultrashort high-intensity laser pulse interacting with a supersonic gas jet produces an ion cavity ("bubble") in the plasma in the wake of the laser pulse. Electrons that are injected into this bubble gain energy, perform wiggler-like oscillations and generate burst of incoherent x-rays with characteristic duration time comparable to the laser pulse duration, continuous synchrotron-like spectral distribution that might extend to hundreds keV, very high brilliance, very small focal spot and highly directional emission in the cone-beam geometry. Such LWFA betatron x-ray source created in our lab produced 1021 -1023 photonsṡ shot-1ṡmrad-2ṡmm-2/0.1%bw with mean critical energy in the12-30 keV range. X-ray source size for a single laser shot was FWHM=1.7 μm x-ray beam divergence 20-30 mrad, and effective focal spot size for multiple shots FWHM= 2 μm. Projection images of simple phantoms and complex biological objects including insects and mice were obtained in single laser shots. We conclude that ultrahigh spatial resolution μCTA (FWHM 2 μm) requiring thousands of projection images could be accomplished using LWFA betatron x-ray radiation in approximately 40 s with our existing 220 TW laser and sub seconds with next generation of ultrafast lasers and x-ray detectors, as opposed to several hours required using conventional microfocal x-ray tubes. Thus, sub second ultrahigh resolution in vivo microtomographic microvasculature imaging (in both absorption and phase contrast mode) in small animal models of cancer and vascular diseases will be feasible with LWFA betatron x-ray source.

  7. Wakefield simulation of solid state plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakimi, Sahel; Nguyen, Tam; Farinella, Deano; Lau, Calvin; Wang, Hsuan-Yu; Taborek, Peter; Tajima, Toshiki

    2017-10-01

    Although it is known that the accelerating gradient of wakefield increases when laser frequency increases (i.e. critical density), there was no adequate technology to make intense X-ray laser until recently. With the advent of the invention of Thin Film Compression, we now see the intense X-ray laser technology that fits this need. We have modified the EPOCH PIC code to include the lattice effect of nanomaterials in our simulations. The present results indicate the accelerating gradient 0.3TeV/cm at the plasma density of 1023cm-3 which agree well with the wakefield theory. This shows the concept of the solid state plasma wakefield in nanomaterials is validated by computation. This result is also consistent with previous findings, in which the lattice effect was neglected.

  8. Laser-driven particle acceleration towards radiobiology and medicine

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This book deals with the new method of laser-driven acceleration for application to radiation biophysics and medicine. It provides multidisciplinary contributions from world leading scientist in order to assess the state of the art of innovative tools for radiation biology research and medical applications of ionizing radiation. The book contains insightful contributions on highly topical aspects of spatio-temporal radiation biophysics, evolving over several orders of magnitude, typically from femtosecond and sub-micrometer scales. Particular attention is devoted to the emerging technology of laser-driven particle accelerators and their applicatio to spatio-temporal radiation biology and medical physics, customization of non-conventional and selective radiotherapy and optimized radioprotection protocols.

  9. Laser-driven proton acceleration with nanostructured targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallières, Simon; Morabito, Antonia; Veltri, Simona; Scisciò, Massimiliano; Barberio, Marianna; Antici, Patrizio

    2017-05-01

    Laser-driven particle acceleration has become a growing field of research, in particular for its numerous interesting applications. One of the most common proton acceleration mechanism that is obtained on typically available multi-hundred TW laser systems is based on the irradiation of thin solid metal foils by the intense laser, generating the proton acceleration on its rear target surface. The efficiency of this acceleration scheme strongly depends on the type of target used. Improving the acceleration mechanism, i.e. enhancing parameters such as maximum proton energy, laminarity, efficiency, monocromaticy, and number of accelerated particles, is heavily depending on the laser-to-target absorption, where obviously cheap and easy to implement targets are best candidates. In this work, we present nanostructured targets that are able to increase the absorption of light compared to what can be achieved with a classical solid (non-nanostructured) target and are produced with a method that is much simpler and cheaper than conventional lithographic processes. Several layers of gold nanoparticles were deposited on solid targets (aluminum, Mylar and multiwalled carbon nanotube buckypaper) and allow for an increased photon absorption. This ultimately permits to increase the laser-to-particle energy transfer, and thus to enhance the yield in proton production. Experimental characterization results on the nanostructured films are presented (UV-Vis spectroscopy and AFM), along with preliminary experimental proton spectra obtained at the JLF-TITAN laser facility at LLNL.

  10. Novel target design for enhanced laser driven proton acceleration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malay Dalui

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate a simple method of preparing structured target for enhanced laser-driven proton acceleration under target-normal-sheath-acceleration scheme. A few layers of genetically modified, clinically grown micron sized E. Coli bacteria cell coated on a thin metal foil has resulted in an increase in the maximum proton energy by about 1.5 times and the total proton yield is enhanced by approximately 25 times compared to an unstructured reference foil at a laser intensity of 1019 W/cm2. Particle-in-cell simulations on the system shows that the structures on the target-foil facilitates anharmonic resonance, contributing to enhanced hot electron production which leads to stronger accelerating field. The effect is observed to grow as the number of structures is increased in the focal area of the laser pulse.

  11. Novel target design for enhanced laser driven proton acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalui, Malay; Kundu, M.; Tata, Sheroy; Lad, Amit D.; Jha, J.; Ray, Krishanu; Krishnamurthy, M.

    2017-09-01

    We demonstrate a simple method of preparing structured target for enhanced laser-driven proton acceleration under target-normal-sheath-acceleration scheme. A few layers of genetically modified, clinically grown micron sized E. Coli bacteria cell coated on a thin metal foil has resulted in an increase in the maximum proton energy by about 1.5 times and the total proton yield is enhanced by approximately 25 times compared to an unstructured reference foil at a laser intensity of 1019 W/cm2. Particle-in-cell simulations on the system shows that the structures on the target-foil facilitates anharmonic resonance, contributing to enhanced hot electron production which leads to stronger accelerating field. The effect is observed to grow as the number of structures is increased in the focal area of the laser pulse.

  12. Laser-driven dielectric electron accelerator for radiobiology researches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Kazuyoshi; Matsumura, Yosuke; Uesaka, Mitsuru; Yoshida, Mitsuhiro; Natsui, Takuya; Aimierding, Aimidula

    2013-05-01

    In order to estimate the health risk associated with a low dose radiation, the fundamental process of the radiation effects in a living cell must be understood. It is desired that an electron bunch or photon pulse precisely knock a cell nucleus and DNA. The required electron energy and electronic charge of the bunch are several tens keV to 1 MeV and 0.1 fC to 1 fC, respectively. The smaller beam size than micron is better for the precise observation. Since the laser-driven dielectric electron accelerator seems to suite for the compact micro-beam source, a phase-modulation-masked-type laser-driven dielectric accelerator was studied. Although the preliminary analysis made a conclusion that a grating period and an electron speed must satisfy the matching condition of LG/λ = v/c, a deformation of a wavefront in a pillar of the grating relaxed the matching condition and enabled the slow electron to be accelerated. The simulation results by using the free FDTD code, Meep, showed that the low energy electron of 20 keV felt the acceleration field strength of 20 MV/m and gradually felt higher field as the speed was increased. Finally the ultra relativistic electron felt the field strength of 600 MV/m. The Meep code also showed that a length of the accelerator to get energy of 1 MeV was 3.8 mm, the required laser power and energy were 11 GW and 350 mJ, respectively. Restrictions on the laser was eased by adopting sequential laser pulses. If the accelerator is illuminated by sequential N pulses, the pulse power, pulse width and the pulse energy are reduced to 1/N, 1/N and 1/N2, respectively. The required laser power per pulse is estimated to be 2.2 GW when ten pairs of sequential laser pulse is irradiated.

  13. Advanced approaches to high intensity laser-driven ion acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henig, Andreas

    2010-04-26

    Since the pioneering work that was carried out 10 years ago, the generation of highly energetic ion beams from laser-plasma interactions has been investigated in much detail in the regime of target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA). Creation of ion beams with small longitudinal and transverse emittance and energies extending up to tens of MeV fueled visions of compact, laser-driven ion sources for applications such as ion beam therapy of tumors or fast ignition inertial con finement fusion. However, new pathways are of crucial importance to push the current limits of laser-generated ion beams further towards parameters necessary for those applications. The presented PhD work was intended to develop and explore advanced approaches to high intensity laser-driven ion acceleration that reach beyond TNSA. In this spirit, ion acceleration from two novel target systems was investigated, namely mass-limited microspheres and nm-thin, free-standing diamond-like carbon (DLC) foils. Using such ultrathin foils, a new regime of ion acceleration was found where the laser transfers energy to all electrons located within the focal volume. While for TNSA the accelerating electric field is stationary and ion acceleration is spatially separated from laser absorption into electrons, now a localized longitudinal field enhancement is present that co-propagates with the ions as the accompanying laser pulse pushes the electrons forward. Unprecedented maximum ion energies were obtained, reaching beyond 0.5 GeV for carbon C{sup 6+} and thus exceeding previous TNSA results by about one order of magnitude. When changing the laser polarization to circular, electron heating and expansion were shown to be efficiently suppressed, resulting for the first time in a phase-stable acceleration that is dominated by the laser radiation pressure which led to the observation of a peaked C{sup 6+} spectrum. Compared to quasi-monoenergetic ion beam generation within the TNSA regime, a more than 40 times

  14. Monoenergetic proton beams accelerated by a radiation pressure driven shock

    CERN Document Server

    Palmer, C A J; Pogorelsky, I; Babzien, M; Dudnikova, G I; Ispiriyan, M; Polyanskiy, M N; Schreiber, J; Shkolnikov, P; Yakimenko, V; Najmudin, Z

    2010-01-01

    High energy ion beams (> MeV) generated by intense laser pulses promise to be viable alternatives to conventional ion beam sources due to their unique properties such as high charge, low emittance, compactness and ease of beam delivery. Typically the acceleration is due to the rapid expansion of a laser heated solid foil, but this usually leads to ion beams with large energy spread. Until now, control of the energy spread has only been achieved at the expense of reduced charge and increased complexity. Radiation pressure acceleration (RPA) provides an alternative route to producing laser-driven monoenergetic ion beams. In this paper, we show the interaction of an intense infrared laser with a gaseous hydrogen target can produce proton spectra of small energy spread (~ 4%), and low background. The scaling of proton energy with the ratio of intensity over density (I/n) indicates that the acceleration is due to the shock generated by radiation-pressure driven hole-boring of the critical surface. These are the fi...

  15. Research opportunities with compact accelerator-driven neutron sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, I.S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Andreani, C., E-mail: carla.andreani@uniroma2.it [Università degli Studi di Roma “Tor Vergata”, Physics Department and NAST Centre, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); CNR-IPCF Sezione di Messina, Messina (Italy); Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche Enrico Fermi, Roma (Italy); Carpenter, J.M. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States); Festa, G., E-mail: giulia.festa@uniroma2.it [Università degli Studi di Roma “Tor Vergata”, Physics Department and NAST Centre, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche Enrico Fermi, Roma (Italy); Gorini, G. [Università degli Studi di Milano—Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Loong, C.-K. [Università degli Studi di Roma “Tor Vergata”, Centro NAST, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Senesi, R. [Università degli Studi di Roma “Tor Vergata”, Physics Department and NAST Centre, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); CNR-IPCF Sezione di Messina, Messina (Italy); Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche Enrico Fermi, Roma (Italy)

    2016-10-13

    Since the discovery of the neutron in 1932 neutron beams have been used in a very broad range of applications, As an aging fleet of nuclear reactor sources is retired the use of compact accelerator-driven neutron sources (CANS) is becoming more prevalent. CANS are playing a significant and expanding role in research and development in science and engineering, as well as in education and training. In the realm of multidisciplinary applications, CANS offer opportunities over a wide range of technical utilization, from interrogation of civil structures to medical therapy to cultural heritage study. This paper aims to provide the first comprehensive overview of the history, current status of operation, and ongoing development of CANS worldwide. The basic physics and engineering regarding neutron production by accelerators, target–moderator systems, and beam line instrumentation are introduced, followed by an extensive discussion of various evolving applications currently exploited at CANS.

  16. Role of accelerator-driven systems in waste incineration scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvatores, M.; Slessarev, I.; Tchistiakov, A. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Direction des Reacteurs Nucleaires; Spiro, M.; Terrien, Y.; Mouney, H.; Vergnes, J.

    1997-12-31

    At CEA accelerator-driven systems (ADS) are studied in the frame of the R and D required to answer the request of a law voted in 1991 by the French Parliament, `to search for solutions allowing to partition and transmute long lived radioactive wastes, in order to reduce their volume and toxicity`. These systems (called `INCAs`) are still at a conceptual level. However, the role of ADS has been clarified as a first step, and this will be the subject of the present paper. (author)

  17. Radiological Impact of the TRIGA Accelerator-Driven Experiment (TRADE)

    OpenAIRE

    Herrera-Martínez, A; Ferrari, A.; Kadi, Y.; Zanini, L.; Parks, G. T.; Rubbia, Carlo; Burgio, N.; Carta, M; Santagata, A.; Cinotti, L

    2002-01-01

    The TRADE project, which is part of the European Roadmap towards the development of Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS), foresees the coupling of a 110 MeV, 2 mA proton cyclotron with the core of a 1 MW Triga research reactor. We performed radioprotection studies using two state-of-the-art computer code packages, FLUKA and EA-MC. We concentrated on the calculation of the neutron and particle flux and dose rates during normal operation as well as in the case of several possible accidents, in orde...

  18. Design Considerations for Plasma Accelerators Driven by Lasers or Particle Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Benedetti, C.; Toth, Cs.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Leemans, W.P.

    2010-06-01

    Plasma accelerators may be driven by the ponderomotive force of an intense laser or the space-charge force of a charged particle beam. The implications for accelerator design and the different physical mechanisms of laser-driven and beam-driven plasma acceleration are discussed. Driver propagation is examined, as well as the effects of the excited plasma wave phase velocity. The driver coupling to subsequent plasma accelerator stages for high-energy physics applications is addressed.

  19. Solid hydrogen target for laser driven proton acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perin, J. P.; Garcia, S.; Chatain, D.; Margarone, D.

    2015-05-01

    The development of very high power lasers opens up new horizons in various fields, such as laser plasma acceleration in Physics and innovative approaches for proton therapy in Medicine. Laser driven proton acceleration is commonly based on the so-called Target Normal Sheath Acceleration (TNSA) mechanisms: a high power laser is focused onto a solid target (thin metallic or plastic foil) and interact with matter at very high intensity, thus generating a plasma; as a consequence "hot" electrons are produced and move into the forward direction through the target. Protons are generated at the target rear side, electrons try to escape from the target and an ultra-strong quasi-electrostatic field (~1TV/m) is generated. Such a field can accelerate protons with a wide energy spectrum (1-200 MeV) in a few tens of micrometers. The proton beam characteristics depend on the laser parameters and on the target geometry and nature. This technique has been validated experimentally in several high power laser facilities by accelerating protons coming from hydrogenated contaminant (mainly water) at the rear of metallic target, however, several research groups are investigating the possibility to perform experiments by using "pure" hydrogen targets. In this context, the low temperature laboratory at CEA-Grenoble has developed a cryostat able to continuously produce a thin hydrogen ribbon (from 40 to 100 microns thick). A new extrusion concept, without any moving part has been carried out, using only the thermodynamic properties of the fluid. First results and perspectives are presented in this paper.

  20. Wakefield in a waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bliokh, Y. P.; Leopold, J. G.; Shafir, G.; Shlapakovski, A.; Krasik, Ya. E.

    2017-06-01

    The feasibility of an experiment which is being set up in our plasma laboratory to study the effect of a wakefield formed by an ultra-short (≤10-9 s) high-power (˜1 GW) microwave (10 GHz) pulse propagating in a cylindrical waveguide filled with an under-dense [(2-5) × 1010 cm-3] plasma is modeled theoretically and simulated by a particle in cell code. It is shown that the radial ponderomotive force plays a circular key role in the wakefield formation by the TM mode waveguide. The model and the simulations show that powerful microwave pulses produce a wakefield at lower plasma density and electric field gradients but larger space and time scales compared to the laser produced wakefield in plasmas, thus providing a more accessible platform for the experimental study.

  1. Particle-in-cell simulations of plasma accelerators and electron-neutral collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L. Bruhwiler

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available We present 2D simulations of both beam-driven and laser-driven plasma wakefield accelerators, using the object-oriented particle-in-cell code XOOPIC, which is time explicit, fully electromagnetic, and capable of running on massively parallel supercomputers. Simulations of laser-driven wakefields with low \\(∼10^{16} W/cm^{2}\\ and high \\(∼10^{18} W/cm^{2}\\ peak intensity laser pulses are conducted in slab geometry, showing agreement with theory and fluid simulations. Simulations of the E-157 beam wakefield experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, in which a 30 GeV electron beam passes through 1 m of preionized lithium plasma, are conducted in cylindrical geometry, obtaining good agreement with previous work. We briefly describe some of the more significant modifications to XOOPIC required by this work, and summarize the issues relevant to modeling relativistic electron-neutral collisions in a particle-in-cell code.

  2. Particle-in-cell simulations of plasma accelerators and electron-neutral collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruhwiler, David L.; Giacone, Rodolfo E.; Cary, John R.; Verboncoeur, John P.; Mardahl, Peter; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, W.P.; Shadwick, B.A.

    2001-10-01

    We present 2-D simulations of both beam-driven and laser-driven plasma wakefield accelerators, using the object-oriented particle-in-cell code XOOPIC, which is time explicit, fully electromagnetic, and capable of running on massively parallel supercomputers. Simulations of laser-driven wakefields with low ({approx}10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2}) and high ({approx}10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) peak intensity laser pulses are conducted in slab geometry, showing agreement with theory and fluid simulations. Simulations of the E-157 beam wakefield experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, in which a 30 GeV electron beam passes through 1 m of preionized lithium plasma, are conducted in cylindrical geometry, obtaining good agreement with previous work. We briefly describe some of the more significant modifications of XOOPIC required by this work, and summarize the issues relevant to modeling relativistic electron-neutral collisions in a particle-in-cell code.

  3. Influence of shock waves on laser-driven proton acceleration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundh, O; Lindau, F; Persson, A; Wahlström, C-G; McKenna, P; Batani, D

    2007-08-01

    The influence of shock waves, driven by amplified spontaneous emission (ASE), on laser-accelerated proton beams is investigated. A local deformation, produced by a cold shock wave launched by the ablation pressure of the ASE pedestal, can under oblique laser irradiation significantly direct the proton beam toward the laser axis. This can be understood in the frame of target normal sheath acceleration as proton emission from an area of the target where the local target normal is shifted toward the laser axis. Hydrodynamic simulations and experimental data show that there exists a window in laser and target parameter space where the target can be significantly deformed and yet facilitate efficient proton acceleration. The dependence of the magnitude of the deflection on target material, foil thickness, and ASE pedestal intensity and duration is experimentally investigated. The deflection angle is found to increase with increasing ASE intensity and duration and decrease with increasing target thickness. In a comparison between aluminum and copper target foils, aluminum is found to yield a larger proton beam deflection. An analytic model is successfully used to predict the proton emission direction.

  4. DOE-HEP Final Report for 2013-2016: Studies of plasma wakefields for high repetition-rate plasma collider, and Theoretical study of laser-plasma proton and ion acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katsouleas, Thomas C. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Sahai, Aakash A. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics

    2016-08-08

    There were two goals for this funded project: 1. Studies of plasma wakefields for high repetition-rate plasma collider, and 2. Theoretical study of laser-plasma proton and ion acceleration. For goal 1, an analytical model was developed to determine the ion-motion resulting from the interaction of non-linear “blow-out” wakefields excited by beam-plasma and laser-plasma interactions. This is key to understanding the state of the plasma at timescales of 1 picosecond to a few 10s of picoseconds behind the driver-energy pulse. More information can be found in the document. For goal 2, we analytically and computationally analyzed the longitudinal instabilities of the laser-plasma interactions at the critical layer. Specifically, the process of “Doppler-shifted Ponderomotive bunching” is significant to eliminate the very high-energy spread and understand the importance of chirping the laser pulse frequency. We intend to publish the results of the mixing process in 2-D. We intend to publish Chirp-induced transparency. More information can be found in the document.

  5. Optmized stability of a modulated driver in a plasma wakefield

    CERN Document Server

    Martorelli, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the transverse stability for a configuration of multiple gaussian bunches subject to the self-generated plasma wakefield. Through a semi-analytical approach we first study the equilibrium configuration for the modulated beam and then we investigate the evolution of the equilibrium configuration due to the emittance-driven expansion of the beam front that results in a rigid backward shift. The rear-directed shift brings the modulated beam out of the equilibrium, with the possibility for some of the bunch particles to be lost with a consequent deterioration of the driver. We look therefore for the proper position of the single bunches that maximize the stability without severely affecting the accelerating field behind the driver. We then compare the results with 3D PIC simulations.

  6. System and safety studies of accelerator driven transmutation systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gudowski, W.; Wallenius, J.; Tucek, K.; Eriksson, Marcus; Carlsson, Johan; Seltborg, P.; Cetnar, J. [Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Nuclear and Reactor Physics

    2001-05-01

    The research on safety of Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Systems (ADS) at the department has been focused on: a) ADS core design and development of advanced nuclear fuel optimised for high transmutation rates and good safety features; b) analysis of ADS-dynamics c) computer code and nuclear data development relevant for simulation and optimization of ADS; d) participation in ADS experiments including 1 MW spallation target manufacturing, subcritical experiments MUSE (CEA-Cadarache). Moreover, during the reporting period the EU-project 'IABAT', co-ordinated by the department has been finished and 4 other projects have been initiated in the frame of the 5th European Framework Programme. Most of the research topics reported in this paper are referred to appendices, which have been published in the open literature. The topics, which are not yet published, are described here in more details.

  7. Accelerator driven sytems from the radiological safety point of view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, P. K.; Nandy, Maitreyee

    2007-02-01

    In the proposed accelerator driven systems (ADS) the possible use of several milliamperes of protons of about 1 GeV incident on high mass targets like the molten lead--bismuth eutectic is anticipated to pose radiological problems that have so far not been encountered by the radiation protection community. Spallation reaction products like high energy gammas, neutrons, muons, pions and several radiotoxic nuclides including Po-210 complicate the situation. In the present paper, we discuss radiation safety measures like bulk shielding, containment of radiation leakage through ducts and penetration and induced activity in the structure to protect radiation workers as well as estimation of sky-shine, soil and ground water activation, release of toxic gases to the environment to protect public as per the stipulations of the regulatory authorities. We recommend the application of the probabilistic safety analysis technique by assessing the probability and criticality of different hazard-initiating events using HAZOP and FMECA.

  8. Thorium as a Fuel for Accelerator Driven Subcritical Electronuclear Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Barashenkov, V S; Singh, V

    2000-01-01

    Neutron yield and energy production in a very large, practically infinite, uranium and thorium target-blocks irradiated by protons with energies in the range 0.1-2 GeV are studied by Monte Carlo method. Though the comparison of uranium and thorium targets shows that the neutron yield in the latter is 30-40 % less and the energy gain is approximatelly two times smaller, accelerator Driven subcritical Systems (ADS) with thorium fuel are very perspective at the bombarding energies higher than several hundreds MeV. An admixture of fissile elements U^{233}, U^{235}, Pu^{239} in the set-up gives larger neutron multiplication which in turn shows better energy amplification. It is argued that due to the practically complete burning of the fuel in such set-up there is no need of technology of conversion of the exhaust fuel.

  9. Role of resistivity gradient in laser-driven ion acceleration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Gizzi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available It was predicted that, when a fast electron beam with some angular spread is normally incident on a resistivity gradient, magnetic field generation can occur that can inhibit beam propagation [A. R. Bell et al., Phys. Rev. E 58, 2471 (1998PLEEE81063-651X10.1103/PhysRevE.58.2471]. This effect can have consequences on the laser-driven ion acceleration. In the experiment reported here, we compare ion emission from laser irradiated coated and uncoated metal foils and we show that the ion beam from the coated target has a much smaller angular spread. Detailed hybrid numerical simulations confirm that the inhibition of fast electron transport through the resistivity gradient may explain the observed effect.

  10. Burnup calculations using serpent code in accelerator driven thorium reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korkmaz, M.E.; Agar, O. [Karamanoglu Mehmetbey Univ., Karaman (Turkey). Physics Dept.; Yigit, M. [Aksaray Univ. (Turkey). Physics Dept.

    2013-07-15

    In this study, burnup calculations have been performed for a sodium cooled Accelerator Driven Thorium Reactor (ADTR) using the Serpent 1.1.16 Monte Carlo code. The ADTR has been designed for burning minor actinides, mixed {sup 232}Th and mixed {sup 233}U fuels. A solid Pb-Bi spallation target in the center of the core is used and sodium as coolant. The system is designed for a heating power of 2 000 MW and for an operation time of 600 days. For burnup calculations the Advanced Matrix Exponential Method CRAM (Chebyshev Rational Approximation Method) and different nuclear data libraries (ENDF7, JEF2.2, JEFF3.1.1) were used. The effective multiplication factor change from 0.93 to 0.97 for different nuclear data libraries during the reactor operation period. (orig.)

  11. Accelerator-driven molten-salt blankets: Physics issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houts, M.G.; Beard, C.A.; Buksa, J.J.; Wiley Davidson, J.; Durkee, J.W.; Perry, R.T.; Poston, D.I. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    1995-01-20

    A number of nuclear physics issues concerning the Los Alamos molten-salt, accelerator-driven plutonium converter are discussed. General descriptions of several concepts using internal and external moderation are presented. Burnup and salt processing requirement calculations are presented for four concepts, indicating that both the high power density externally moderated concept and an internally moderated concept achieve total plutonium burnups approaching 90% at salt processing rates of less than 2 m{sup 3} per year. Beginning-of-life reactivity temperature coefficients and system kinetic response are also discussed. Future research should investigate the effect of changing blanket composition on operational and safety characteristics. {copyright}American Institute of Physcis 1995

  12. Radiological Impact of the TRIGA Accelerator-Driven Experiment (TRADE)

    CERN Document Server

    Herrera-Martínez, A; Kadi, Y; Zanini, L; Parks, G T; Rubbia, Carlo; Burgio, N; Carta, M; Santagata, A; Cinotti, L

    2002-01-01

    The TRADE project, which is part of the European Roadmap towards the development of Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS), foresees the coupling of a 110 MeV, 2 mA proton cyclotron with the core of a 1 MW Triga research reactor. We performed radioprotection studies using two state-of-the-art computer code packages, FLUKA and EA-MC. We concentrated on the calculation of the neutron and particle flux and dose rates during normal operation as well as in the case of several possible accidents, in order to assess the radiation damage and define the design of key components of the facility, such as the beam-line shielding. Both high-energy particle interactions and low-energy neutron transport are treated with a sophisticated method based on a full Monte Carlo simulation, combined with the use of modern nuclear data libraries.

  13. Disposition of nuclear waste using subcritical accelerator-driven systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venneri, F.; Li, N.; Williamson, M.; Houts, M.; Lawrence, G.

    1998-12-31

    Spent fuel from nuclear power plants contains large quantities of Pu, other actinides, and fission products (FP). This creates challenges for permanent disposal because of the long half-lives of some isotopes and the potential for diversion of the fissile material. Two issues of concern for the US repository concept are: (1) long-term radiological risk peaking tens-of-thousands of years in the future; and (2) short-term thermal loading (decay heat) that limits capacity. An accelerator-driven neutron source can destroy actinides through fission, and can convert long-lived fission products to shorter-lived or stable isotopes. Studies over the past decade have established that accelerator transmutation of waste (ATW) can have a major beneficial impact on the nuclear waste problem. Specifically, the ATW concept the authors are evaluating: (1) destroys over 99.9% of the actinides; (2) destroys over 99.9% of the Tc and I; (3) separates Sr-90 and Cs-137; (4) separates uranium from the spent fuel; (5) produces electric power.

  14. Physics design of an accelerator for an accelerator-driven subcritical system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhihui Li

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available An accelerator-driven subcritical system (ADS program was launched in China in 2011, which aims to design and build an ADS demonstration facility with the capability of more than 1000 MW thermal power in multiple phases lasting about 20 years. The driver linac is defined to be 1.5 GeV in energy, 10 mA in current and in cw operation mode. To meet the extremely high reliability and availability, the linac is designed with much installed margin and fault tolerance, including hot-spare injectors and local compensation method for key element failures. The accelerator complex consists of two parallel 10-MeV injectors, a joint medium-energy beam transport line, a main linac, and a high-energy beam transport line. The superconducting acceleration structures are employed except for the radio frequency quadrupole accelerators (RFQs which are at room temperature. The general design considerations and the beam dynamics design of the driver linac complex are presented here.

  15. SU-E-T-472: Characterization of the Very High Energy Electrons, ISO - 250 MeV (VHEE) Beam Generated by ALPHA-X Laser Wakefield Accelerator Beam Line for Utilization in Monte Carlo Simulation for Biomedical Experiment Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskvin, V; Subiel, A; Desrosiers, C; Wiggins, M; Maryanski, M; Mendonca, M; Boyd, M; Sorensen, A; Cipiccia, S; Issac, R; Welsh, G; Brunetti, E; Aniculaesei, C; Jaroszynski, D A

    2012-06-01

    Progress in the development of compact high-energy pulsed laser- plasma wakefield accelerators is opening up the potential for using Very High Energy Electron (VHEEs) beams in the range of 150 - 250 MeV for biomedical studies. Initial experiments using VHEE for this purpose have been carried out using the ALPHA-X laser-plasma wakefield accelerator beam line at the University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, UK. The purpose of this investigation is to use Monte Carlo simulations to plan experiments and compare with characterization of the interaction of the VHEE beam using a dosimeter. An experiment using the VHEE beam to irradiate a muscle-equivalent BANG polymer gel dosimeter has been carried out. Simulations have been used to prepare for the experiments. These were undertaken using the expected average energy for a pulse set and an energy spread approximated by Gaussian distribution. The model was implemented in FLUKA Monte Carlo code with follow up modeling using the Geant4 toolkit. The results have been compared with 1mm̂3 voxel laser CT based measurements of the dose deposited in the BANG dosimeter and with measurement of the induced radioactivity. The results of the measured dose from induced radioactivity have been compared with data from the FLUKA simulations. The beam model based on an average energy of particles in irradiation gives an acceptable estimate of the induced radioactivity and the dose deposited in the BANG dosimeter. Comparison with the dosimeter scanned profiles shows that the structure of the spectra of VHEE beams in the experiment and secondary scattered particles in the beam line should be accounted for in any model. Such model description of the VHEE beam for the ALPHA-X beam line has been developed. Monte Carlo simulations using the FLUKA code is an efficient way to plan a VHEE experiment and analyze data from measurements. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  16. Acceleration and radiation of externally injected electrons in laser plasma wakefield driven by a Laguerre–Gaussian pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Zhong-Chen; Chen, Min; Zhang, Guo-Bo; Luo, Ji; Weng, Su-Ming; Yuan, Xiao-Hui; Liu, Feng; Sheng, Zheng-Ming

    2017-10-01

    Not Available Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11374209, 11374210, and 11774227) and the Major State Basic Research Development Program of China (Grant No. 2015CB859700).

  17. Plasma dynamics and heating/acceleration during driven magnetic reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, C. Z.; Ono, Y.; Inoue, S.; Horiuchi, R.

    2016-12-01

    Highlights of the plasma dynamics and energization during anti-parallel driven magnetic reconnection are presented. The MHD condition breaks down in the entire reconnection layer (the reconnection current layer, the separatrix region and the whole downstream), and the plasma dynamics is also significantly different from the results of the Hall-MHD model. In particular, we explain (1) how electron and ion dynamics decouple and how the charge separation and electrostatic electric field are produced in the reconnection current layer and outflow exhaust and around the separatrix regions, (2) how electrons and ions gain energy in the reconnection current layer, (3) why the electron outflow velocity in the reconnection exhaust reaches super-Alfvenic speed and the ion outflow velocity reaches Alfvenic speed and how the parallel electric field is produced around the separatrix region, (4) how electrons are accelerated by the parallel electric field to form electron beam around the separatrix region and flat-top distribution in the immediate upstream region of the current layer, and (5) how ions gain energy when they move across the separatrix region into the downstream. We will compare the simulation results with observations of MMS and Geotail satellites.

  18. Concept of an Accelerator-Driven Advanced Nuclear Energy System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuesong Yan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The utilization of clean energy is a matter of primary importance for sustainable development as well as a vital approach for solving worldwide energy-related issues. If the low utilization rate of nuclear fuel, nuclear proliferation, and insufficient nuclear safety can be solved, nuclear fission energy could be used as a sustainable and low-carbon clean energy form for thousands of years, providing steady and base-load electrical resources. To address these challenges, we propose an accelerator-driven advanced nuclear energy system (ADANES, consisting of a burner system and a fuel recycle system. In ADANES, the ideal utilization rate of nuclear fuel will be >95%, and the final disposal of nuclear waste will be minimized. The design of a high-temperature ceramic reactor makes the burner system safer. Part of fission products (FPs are removed during the simple reprocessing in the fuel recycle system, significantly reducing the risks of nuclear proliferation of nuclear technology and materials. The ADANES concept integrates nuclear waste transmutation, nuclear fuel breeding, and safety power production, with an ideal closed loop operation of nuclear fission energy, constituting a major innovation of great potential interest for future energy applications.

  19. Transmutation of nuclear waste in accelerator-driven systems

    CERN Document Server

    Herrera-Martínez, A

    2004-01-01

    Today more than ever energy is not only a cornerstone of human development, but also a key to the environmental sustainability of economic activity. In this context, the role of nuclear power may be emphasized in the years to come. Nevertheless, the problems of nuclear waste, safety and proliferation still remain to be solved. It is believed that the use of accelerator-driven systems (ADSs) for nuclear waste transmutation and energy production would address these problems in a simple, clean and economically viable, and therefore sustainable, manner. This thesis covers the major nuclear physics aspects of ADSs, in particular the spallation process and the core neutronics specific to this type of systems. The need for accurate nuclear data is described, together with a detailed analysis of the specific isotopes and energy ranges in which this data needs to be improved and the impact of their uncertainty. Preliminary experimental results for some of these isotopes, produced by the Neutron Time-of-Flight (n_TOF) ...

  20. Thermal hydraulics of accelerator driven system windowless targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno ePanella

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The study of the fluid dynamics of the windowless spallation target of an Accelerator Driven System (ADS is presented. Several target mockup configurations have been investigated: the first one was a symmetrical target, that was made by two concentric cylinders, the other configurations are not symmetrical. In the experiments water has been used as hydraulic equivalent to lead-bismuth eutectic fluid. The experiments have been carried out at room temperature and flow rate up to 24 kg/s. The fluid velocity components have been measured by an ultrasound technique. The velocity field of the liquid within the target region either for the approximately axial-symmetrical configuration or for the not symmetrical ones as a function of the flow rate and the initial liquid level is presented. A comparison of experimental data with the prediction of the finite volume FLUENT code is also presented. Moreover the results of a 2D-3D numerical analysis that investigates the effect on the steady state thermal and flow fields due to the insertion of guide vanes in the windowless target unit of the EFIT project ADS nuclear reactor are presented, by analysing both the cold flow case (absence of power generation and the hot flow case (nominal power generation inside the target unit.

  1. Electron bow-wave injection of electrons in laser-driven bubble acceleration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Y Y; Kawata, S; Yu, T P; Gu, Y Q; Sheng, Z M; Yu, M Y; Zhuo, H B; Liu, H J; Yin, Y; Takahashi, K; Xie, X Y; Liu, J X; Tian, C L; Shao, F Q

    2012-04-01

    An electron injection regime in laser wake-field acceleration, namely electron bow-wave injection, is investigated by two- and three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation as well as analytical model. In this regime electrons in the intense electron bow wave behind the first bubble catch up with the bubble tail and are trapped by the bubble finally, resulting in considerable enhancement of the total trapped electron number. For example, with the increase of the laser intensity from 2 × 10(19) to 1 × 10(20) W/cm(2), the electron trapping changes from normal self-injection to bow-wave injection and the trapped electron number is enhanced by two orders of magnitude. An analytical model is proposed to explain the numerical observation.

  2. Excitation and Control of Plasma Wakefields by Multiple Laser Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowley, J.; Thornton, C.; Arran, C.; Shalloo, R. J.; Corner, L.; Cheung, G.; Gregory, C. D.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Matlis, N. H.; Symes, D. R.; Walczak, R.; Hooker, S. M.

    2017-07-01

    We demonstrate experimentally the resonant excitation of plasma waves by trains of laser pulses. We also take an important first step to achieving an energy recovery plasma accelerator by showing that a plasma wave can be damped by an out-of-resonance trailing laser pulse. The measured laser wakefields are found to be in excellent agreement with analytical and numerical models of wakefield excitation in the linear regime. Our results indicate a promising direction for achieving highly controlled, GeV-scale laser-plasma accelerators operating at multikilohertz repetition rates.

  3. Recent progress in simulation and theory towards using nonlinear plasma wakefields to drive a compact X-FEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xinlu; Lu, Wei; Joshi, Chan; Mori, Warren

    2017-10-01

    Plasma-based wakefield accelerators can generate and accelerate electrons with 10 100 GV/m acceleration gradient. Compared with conventional radio frequency based accelerators, plasma accelerators can much shrink the size and reduce the cost of X-ray Free-electron-lasers which require high quality and high energy electrons. However there are many challenges needed to be overcome before plasma wakefields can generate electron beams with the required beam quality (brightnesses and low energy spreads) inside the plasma and before these beams can be transported from the plasma to the undulator without beam quality degradation. In this talk, we will present our recent progress from PIC simulations and theory on this topic, including concepts for producing beams with unprecedented normalized brightnesses using density down ramp injection in the nonlinear blowout regime, matching the beam out of the plasma using longitudinally tailored plasma profiles, and start-to-end simulations of such plasma wakefied accelerators driven X-FELs. Work supported by NSF and DOE.

  4. Extremely short relativistic-electron-bunch generation in the laser wakefield via novel bunch injection scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Khachatryan

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently a new electron-bunch injection scheme for the laser wakefield accelerator has been proposed [JETP Lett. 74, 371 (2001JTPLA20021-364010.1134/1.1427124; Phys. Rev. E 65, 046504 (2002PLEEE81063-651X10.1103/PhysRevE.65.046504]. In this scheme, a low energy electron bunch, sent in a plasma channel just before a high-intensity laser pulse, is trapped in the laser wakefield, considerably compressed and accelerated to an ultrarelativistic energy. In this paper we show the possibility of the generation of an extremely short (on the order of 1   μm long or a few femtoseconds in duration relativistic-electron-bunch by this mechanism. The initial electron bunch, which can be generated, for example, by a laser-driven photocathode rf gun, should have an energy of a few hundred keVs to a few MeVs, a duration in the picosecond range or less and a relatively low concentration. The trapping conditions and parameters of an accelerated bunch are investigated. The laser pulse dynamics as well as a possible experimental setup for the demonstration of the injection scheme are also considered.

  5. AREAL test facility for advanced accelerator and radiation source concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsakanov, V. M.; Amatuni, G. A.; Amirkhanyan, Z. G.; Aslyan, L. V.; Avagyan, V. Sh.; Danielyan, V. A.; Davtyan, H. D.; Dekhtiarov, V. S.; Gevorgyan, K. L.; Ghazaryan, N. G.; Grigoryan, B. A.; Grigoryan, A. H.; Hakobyan, L. S.; Haroutiunian, S. G.; Ivanyan, M. I.; Khachatryan, V. G.; Laziev, E. M.; Manukyan, P. S.; Margaryan, I. N.; Markosyan, T. M.; Martirosyan, N. V.; Mehrabyan, Sh. A.; Mkrtchyan, T. H.; Muradyan, L. Kh.; Nikogosyan, G. H.; Petrosyan, V. H.; Sahakyan, V. V.; Sargsyan, A. A.; Simonyan, A. S.; Toneyan, H. A.; Tsakanian, A. V.; Vardanyan, T. L.; Vardanyan, A. S.; Yeremyan, A. S.; Zakaryan, S. V.; Zanyan, G. S.

    2016-09-01

    Advanced Research Electron Accelerator Laboratory (AREAL) is a 50 MeV electron linear accelerator project with a laser driven RF gun being constructed at the CANDLE Synchrotron Research Institute. In addition to applications in life and materials sciences, the project aims as a test facility for advanced accelerator and radiation source concepts. In this paper, the AREAL RF photoinjector performance, the facility design considerations and its highlights in the fields of free electron laser, the study of new high frequency accelerating structures, the beam microbunching and wakefield acceleration concepts are presented.

  6. Plasma Accelerators Race to 10 GeV and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsouleas, Tom

    2005-10-01

    This paper reviews the concepts, recent progress and current challenges for realizing the tremendous electric fields in relativistic plasma waves for applications ranging from tabletop particle accelerators to high-energy physics. Experiments in the 90's on laser-driven plasma wakefield accelerators at several laboratories around the world demonstrated the potential for plasma wakefields to accelerate intense bunches of self-trapped particles at rates as high as 100 GeV/m in mm-scale gas jets. These early experiments offered impressive gradients but large energy spread (100%) and short interaction lengths. Major breakthroughs have recently occurred on both fronts. Three groups (LBL-US, LOA-France and RAL-UK) have now entered a new regime of laser wakefield acceleration resulting in 100 MeV mono-energetic beams with up to nanoCoulombs of charge and very small angular spread. Simulations suggest that current lasers are just entering this new regime, and the scaling to higher energies appears attractive. In parallel with the progress in laser-driven wakefields, particle-beam driven wakefield accelerators are making large strides. A series of experiments using the 30 GeV beam of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) has demonstrated high-gradient acceleration of electrons and positrons in meter-scale plasmas. The UCLA/USC/SLAC collaboration has accelerated electrons beyond 1 GeV and is aiming at 10 GeV in 30 cm as the next step toward a ``plasma afterburner,'' a concept for doubling the energy of a high-energy collider in a few tens of meters of plasma. In addition to wakefield acceleration, these and other experiments have demonstrated the rich physics bounty to be reaped from relativistic beam-plasma interactions. This includes plasma lenses capable of focusing particle beams to the highest density ever produced, collective radiation mechanisms capable of generating high-brightness x-ray beams, collective refraction of particles at a plasma interface, and

  7. Operational Characteristics of an Accelerator Driven Fissile Solution System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimpland, Robert Herbert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-11-28

    Operational characteristics represent the set of responses that a nuclear system exhibits during normal operation. Operators rely on this behavior to assess the status of the system and to predict the consequences of off-normal events. These characteristics largely refer to the relationship between power and system operating conditions. The static and dynamic behavior of a chain-reacting system, operating at sufficient power, is primarily governed by reactivity effects. The science of reactor physics has identified and evaluated a number of such effects, including Doppler broadening and shifts in the thermal neutron spectrum. Often these reactivity effects are quantified in the form of feedback coefficients that serve as coupling coefficients relating the neutron population and the physical mechanisms that drive reactivity effects, such as fissile material temperature and density changes. The operational characteristics of such nuclear systems usually manifest themselves when perturbations between system power (neutron population) and system operating conditions arise. Successful operation of such systems requires the establishment of steady equilibrium conditions. However, prior to obtaining the desired equilibrium (steady-state) conditions, an approach from zero-power (startup) must occur. This operational regime may possess certain limiting system conditions that must be maintained to achieve effective startup. Once steady-state is achieved, a key characteristic of this operational regime is the level of stability that the system possesses. Finally, a third operational regime, shutdown, may also possess limiting conditions of operation that must be maintained. This report documents the operational characteristics of a “generic” Accelerator Driven Fissile Solution (ADFS) system during the various operational regimes of startup, steady-state operation, and shutdown. Typical time-dependent behavior for each operational regime will be illustrated, and key system

  8. Thermal-hydraulics of lead bismuth for accelerator driven systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas Schulenberg; Xu Cheng; Robert Stieglitz [Institute for Nuclear and Energy Technologies, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Lead bismuth has been selected as one of the most suitable coolants to be used in accelerator driven systems (ADS) for transmutation of minor actinides. It serves both, as a target material of the spallation source to balance the neutron economy, and as a coolant with high thermal inertia to provide a safe and reliable heat transfer to the secondary power cycle. With the aim to develop the required technologies to enable the later design of such ADS systems, the Karlsruhe Lead bismuth LAboratory KALLA, consisting of three test loops, has been built and set into operation at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe since 2000, keeping more than 45 t of PbBi in operation at temperatures up to 550 deg. C. The test program includes oxygen control systems, heat flux simulation tools, electro-magnetic and mechanical pump technologies, heat transfer and flow measurements, reliability and corrosion tests. In a first test campaign, a technology loop called THESYS was built to develop measurement technologies for the acquisition of scalar quantities, like pressures, temperatures, concentrations, and flow rates, as well as velocity fields, which are required for both operational and scientific purposes. THESYS also allowed to perform generic turbulent heat transfer experiments necessary to provide liquid metal adapted turbulent heat transfer models for ADS design analyses. The second loop, the thermalhydraulic loop THEADES with an installed power of 2.5 MW, has been built to conduct prototypical component experiments for beam windows (e.g. MEGAPIE or MYHRRA) or fuel rod configurations. First test results will be reported. The experimental team is supported by a numerical team who studied the thermal hydraulics of the tested components in order to enable a later transfer of the results to industrial systems. Three different types of codes are being improved: lumped parameter codes (e.g. ATHLET) to perform system analyses for lead bismuth in loops

  9. Femtosecond electron-bunch dynamics in laser wakefields and vacuum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Khachatryan

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in laser wakefield acceleration demonstrated the generation of extremely short (with a duration of a few femtoseconds relativistic electron bunches with relatively low (of the order of couple of percent energy spread. In this article we study the dynamics of such bunches in drift space (vacuum and in channel-guided laser wakefields. Analytical solutions were found for the transverse coordinate of an electron and for the bunch envelope in the wakefield in the case of arbitrary change in the energy. Our results show strong bunch dynamics already on a millimeter scale propagation distance both in plasma and in vacuum. When the bunch propagates in vacuum, its transverse sizes grow considerably; the same is observed for the normalized bunch emittance that worsens the focusability of the bunch. A scheme of two-stage laser wakefield accelerator with small drift space between the stages is proposed. It is found that fast longitudinal betatron phase mixing occurs in a femtosecond bunch when it propagates along the wakefield axis. When bunch propagates off axis, strong bunch decoherence and fast emittance degradation due to the finite bunch length was observed.

  10. Research on accelerator-driven transmutation and studies of experimental facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takizuka, Takakazu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-11-01

    JAERI is carrying out R and Ds on accelerator-driven transmutation systems under the national OMEGA Program that aims at development of the technology to improve efficiency and safety in the final disposal of radioactive waste. Research facilities for accelerator-driven transmutation experiments are proposed to construct within the framework of the planned JAERI Neutron Science Project. This paper describes the features of the proposed accelerator-driven transmutation systems and their technical issues to be solved. A research facility plan under examination is presented. The plan is divided in two phases. In the second phase, technical feasibility of accelerator-driven systems will be demonstrated with a 30-60 MW experimental integrated system and with a 7 MW high-power target facility. (author)

  11. Time-resolved measurements with streaked diffraction patterns from electrons generated in laser plasma wakefield

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhaohan; Nees, John; Hou, Bixue; Krushelnick, Karl; Thomas, Alec; Beaurepaire, Benoît; Malka, Victor; Faure, Jérôme

    2013-10-01

    Femtosecond bunches of electrons with relativistic to ultra-relativistic energies can be robustly produced in laser plasma wakefield accelerators (LWFA). Scaling the electron energy down to sub-relativistic and MeV level using a millijoule laser system will make such electron source a promising candidate for ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) applications due to the intrinsic short bunch duration and perfect synchronization with the optical pump. Recent results of electron diffraction from a single crystal gold foil, using LWFA electrons driven by 8-mJ, 35-fs laser pulses at 500 Hz, will be presented. The accelerated electrons were collimated with a solenoid magnetic lens. By applying a small-angle tilt to the magnetic lens, the diffraction pattern can be streaked such that the temporal evolution is separated spatially on the detector screen after propagation. The observable time window and achievable temporal resolution are studied in pump-probe measurements of photo-induced heating on the gold foil.

  12. Electron bunch injection at an angle into a laser wakefield

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luttikhof, M.J.H.; Khachatryan, A.G.; van Goor, F.A.; Boller, Klaus J.; Mora, P.

    2009-01-01

    External injection of electron bunches longer than the plasma wavelength in a laser wakefield accelerator can lead to the generation of femtosecond ultra relativistic bunches with a couple of percent energy spread. Extensive study has been done on external electron bunch (e.g., one generated by a

  13. Femtosecond electron-bunch dynamics in laser wakefields and vacuum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khachatryan, A.G.; Irman, A.; van Goor, F.A.; Boller, Klaus J.

    2007-01-01

    Recent advances in laser wakefield acceleration demonstrated the generation of extremely short (with a duration of a few femtoseconds) relativistic electron bunches with relatively low (of the order of couple of percent) energy spread. In this article we study the dynamics of such bunches in drift

  14. MEMS-based, RF-driven, compact accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persaud, A.; Seidl, P. A.; Ji, Q.; Breinyn, I.; Waldron, W. L.; Schenkel, T.; Vinayakumar, K. B.; Ni, D.; Lal, A.

    2017-10-01

    Shrinking existing accelerators in size can reduce their cost by orders of magnitude. Furthermore, by using radio frequency (RF) technology and accelerating ions in several stages, the applied voltages can be kept low paving the way to new ion beam applications. We make use of the concept of a Multiple Electrostatic Quadrupole Array Linear Accelerator (MEQALAC) and have previously shown the implementation of its basic components using printed circuit boards, thereby reducing the size of earlier MEQALACs by an order of magnitude. We now demonstrate the combined integration of these components to form a basic accelerator structure, including an initial beam-matching section. In this presentation, we will discuss the results from the integrated multi-beam ion accelerator and also ion acceleration using RF voltages generated on-board. Furthermore, we will show results from Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) fabricated focusing wafers, which can shrink the dimension of the system to the sub-mm regime and lead to cheaper fabrication. Based on these proof-of-concept results we outline a scaling path to high beam power for applications in plasma heating in magnetized target fusion and in neutral beam injectors for future Tokamaks. This work was supported by the Office of Science of the US Department of Energy through the ARPA-e ALPHA program under contracts DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  15. Development of High-Gradient Dielectric Laser-Driven Particle Accelerator Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byer, Robert L. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Edward L. Ginzton Lab.

    2013-11-07

    The thrust of Stanford's program is to conduct research on high-gradient dielectric accelerator structures driven with high repetition-rate, tabletop infrared lasers. The close collaboration between Stanford and SLAC (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center) is critical to the success of this project, because it provides a unique environment where prototype dielectric accelerator structures can be rapidly fabricated and tested with a relativistic electron beam.

  16. Quasi-monoenergetic electron beams from a few-terawatt laser driven plasma acceleration using a nitrogen gas jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, B. S.; Moorti, A.; Chakera, J. A.; Naik, P. A.; Gupta, P. D.

    2017-06-01

    An experimental investigation on the laser plasma acceleration of electrons has been carried out using 3 TW, 45 fs duration titanium sapphire laser pulse interaction with a nitrogen gas jet at an intensity of 2 × 1018 W cm-2. We have observed the stable generation of a well collimated electron beam with divergence and pointing variation ˜10 mrad from nitrogen gas jet plasma at an optimum plasma density around 3 × 1019 cm-3. The energy spectrum of the electron beam was quasi-monoenergetic with an average peak energy and a charge around 25 MeV and 30 pC respectively. The results will be useful for better understanding and control of ionization injection and the laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) of electrons in high-Z gases and also towards the development of practical LWFA for various applications including injectors for high energy accelerators.

  17. Ultrashort laser pulse driven inverse free electron laser accelerator experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. T. Moody

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we discuss the ultrashort pulse high gradient inverse free electron laser accelerator experiment carried out at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory which demonstrated gradients exceeding 200  MV/m using a 4 TW 100 fs long 800 nm Ti:Sa laser pulse. Due to the short laser and electron pulse lengths, synchronization was determined to be one of the main challenges in this experiment. This made necessary the implementation of a single-shot, nondestructive, electro-optic sampling based diagnostics to enable time-stamping of each laser accelerator shot with <100  fs accuracy. The results of this experiment are expected to pave the way towards the development of future GeV-class IFEL accelerators.

  18. Beam dynamics and wakefield suppression in interleaved damped and detuned structures for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    D'Elia, A; Khan, V F; Jones, R M; Latina, A; Nesmiyan, I; Riddone, G

    2013-01-01

    Acceleration of multiple bunches of charged particles in the main linacs of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) with high accelerating fields provides two major challenges: firstly, to ensure the surface electromagnetic fields do not cause electrical breakdown and subsequent surface damage, and secondly, to ensure the beam-excited wakefields are sufficiently suppressed to avoid appreciable emittance dilution. In the baseline design for CLIC, heavy wakefield suppression is used (Q ~ 10) [1] and this ensures the beam quality is well-preserved [2]. Here we discuss an alternative means to suppress the wakefield which relies on strong detuning of the cell dipole frequencies, together with moderate damping, effected by manifolds which are slot-coupled to each accelerating cell. This damped and detuned wakefield suppression scheme is based on the methodology developed for the Japanese Linear Collider/Next Linear Collider (JLC/NLC) [3]. Here we track the multi-bunch beam down the complete collider, u...

  19. Theory of wakefields in a dielectric-filled cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H. Kim

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available An analytical solution of a wakefield from a charge moving on the axis of a dielectric-filled cylindrical cavity is derived. A solution to the wakefield in a waveguide with only a boundary at the cavity entrance is already known. To take into account a boundary at the cavity exit, we introduce an imaginary antibeam, with opposite charge, which is created at the same time when the beam passes the exit boundary and continues to move along with the original beam at the same velocity. Although the beam has been annihilated in the net effect, the original beam and the antibeam produce their own wakefields, respectively, because they were created at different times. These superimposed fields are then mirror reflected as usual by the conducting exit boundary and the wakefield can be obtained by properly mirror reflecting them whenever it reaches a boundary. We find a resonance condition to enhance wakefields with multiple bunches of charges, and show that the acceleration gradient increases under that condition.

  20. Wake-field and space charge effects on high brightness beams calculations and measured results for the laser driven photoelectrons at BNL-ATF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parsa, Z.

    1993-05-01

    We discuss the formalism used to study the effects of the interactions between the highly charged particles and the fields in the accelerating structure, including space charge and wake fields. Some of our calculations and numerical simulation results obtained for the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) high-brightness photoelectron beam at the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) and the measured data at ATF are also included.

  1. High power ring methods and accelerator driven subcritical reactor application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tahar, Malek Haj [Univ. of Grenoble (France)

    2016-08-07

    High power proton accelerators allow providing, by spallation reaction, the neutron fluxes necessary in the synthesis of fissile material, starting from Uranium 238 or Thorium 232. This is the basis of the concept of sub-critical operation of a reactor, for energy production or nuclear waste transmutation, with the objective of achieving cleaner, safer and more efficient process than today’s technologies allow. Designing, building and operating a proton accelerator in the 500-1000 MeV energy range, CW regime, MW power class still remains a challenge nowadays. There is a limited number of installations at present achieving beam characteristics in that class, e.g., PSI in Villigen, 590 MeV CW beam from a cyclotron, SNS in Oakland, 1 GeV pulsed beam from a linear accelerator, in addition to projects as the ESS in Europe, a 5 MW beam from a linear accelerator. Furthermore, coupling an accelerator to a sub-critical nuclear reactor is a challenging proposition: some of the key issues/requirements are the design of a spallation target to withstand high power densities as well as ensure the safety of the installation. These two domains are the grounds of the PhD work: the focus is on the high power ring methods in the frame of the KURRI FFAG collaboration in Japan: upgrade of the installation towards high intensity is crucial to demonstrate the high beam power capability of FFAG. Thus, modeling of the beam dynamics and benchmarking of different codes was undertaken to validate the simulation results. Experimental results revealed some major losses that need to be understood and eventually overcome. By developing analytical models that account for the field defects, one identified major sources of imperfection in the design of scaling FFAG that explain the important tune variations resulting in the crossing of several betatron resonances. A new formula is derived to compute the tunes and properties established that characterize the effect of the field imperfections on the

  2. Study on design of superconducting proton linac for accelerator driven subcritical nuclear power system

    CERN Document Server

    Yu Qi; Xu Tao Guang

    2002-01-01

    As a prior option of the next generation of energy source, the accelerator driven subcritical nuclear power system (ADS) can use efficiently the uranium and thorium resource, transmute the high-level long-lived radioactive wastes and raise nuclear safety. The ADS accelerator should provide the proton beam with tens megawatts. The superconducting linac (SCL) is a good selection of ADS accelerator because of its high efficiency and low beam loss rate. It is constitute by a series of the superconducting accelerating cavities. The cavity geometry is determined by means of the electromagnetic field computation. The SCL main parameters are determined by the particle dynamics computation

  3. Accelerator-driven Medical Sterilization to Replace Co-60 Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroc, Thomas K. [Fermilab; Thangaraj, Jayakar C.T. [Fermilab; Penning, Richard T. [Fermilab; Kephart, Robert D. [Fermilab

    2017-08-11

    This report documents the results of a study prepared at the request of the Office of Radiological Security of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), as part of the Domestic Protect and Reduce mission by the Illinois Accelerator Research Center (IARC) of Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The study included a literature survey of over 80 relevant documents and articles including industry standards, regulatory documents, technical papers, a court case, previous task force reports and industry white papers. The team also conducted interviews or had conversations with over 40 individuals representing over a dozen organizations over the course of its 10-month program. This report summarizes our findings, addresses the specific questions posed to us by NNSA, and concludes with a list of actionable recommendations.

  4. Opportunity of characteristic's improvement for accelerator driven systems

    CERN Document Server

    Kiselev, G V

    2001-01-01

    Review of sentences on the investigation into different variations of electronuclear plants be directed to the improvement in characteristics of the plants in an effort to the efficient disposal of long-lived components of radioactive wastes is presented. Attention is drown to the fact that subcritical reactor with complicated neutron valve can be used. This permits for drop in demand to current of proton accelerator. Briefly description of the process scheme with the indication of problems is given

  5. Enhanced single-stage laser-driven electron acceleration by self-controlled ionization injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Song; Hafz, Nasr A M; Mirzaie, Mohammad; Sokollik, Thomas; Zeng, Ming; Chen, Min; Sheng, Zhengming; Zhang, Jie

    2014-12-01

    We report on overall enhancement of a single-stage laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) using the ionization injection in a mixture of 0.3% nitrogen gas in 99.7% helium gas. Upon the interaction of 30-TW, 30-fs laser pulses with a gas jet of the above gas mixture, >300 MeV electron beams were generated at a helium plasma densities of 3.3-8.5 × 10(18) cm(-3). Compared with the uncontrolled electron self-injection in pure helium gas jet, the ionization injection process due to the presence of ultra-low nitrogen concentrations appears to be self-controlled; it has led to the generation of electron beams with higher energies, higher charge, lower density threshold for trapping, and a narrower energy spread without dark current (low energy electrons) or multiple bunches. It is foreseen that further optimization of such a scheme is expected to bring the electron beam energy-spread down to 1%, making them suitable for driving ultra-compact free-electron lasers.

  6. Relativistic Electron Acceleration with Ultrashort Mid-IR Laser Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feder, Linus; Woodbury, Daniel; Shumakova, Valentina; Gollner, Claudia; Miao, Bo; Schwartz, Robert; Pugžlys, Audrius; Baltuška, Andrius; Milchberg, Howard

    2017-10-01

    We report the first results of laser plasma wakefield acceleration driven by ultrashort mid-infrared laser pulses (λ = 3.9 μm , pulsewidth 100 fs, energy width, as well as trends in the accelerated beam profiles, charge and energy spectra which are supported by 3D particle-in-cell simulations. These results extend earlier work with sub-TW self-modulated laser wakefield acceleration using near IR drivers to the Mid-IR, and enable us to capture time-resolved images of relativistic self-focusing of the laser pulse. This work supported by DOE (DESC0010706TDD, DESC0015516); AFOSR(FA95501310044, FA95501610121); NSF(PHY1535519); DHS.

  7. A "slingshot" laser-driven acceleration mechanism of plasma electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Fiore, Gaetano; Fedele, Renato

    2016-01-01

    We briefly report on the recently proposed [G. Fiore, R. Fedele, U. de Angelis, Phys. Plasmas 21 (2014), 113105], [G. Fiore, S. De Nicola, arXiv:1509.04656] electron acceleration mechanism named "slingshot effect": under suitable conditions the impact of an ultra-short and ultra-intense laser pulse against the surface of a low-density plasma is expected to cause the expulsion of a bunch of superficial electrons with high energy in the direction opposite to that of the pulse propagation; this is due to the interplay of the huge ponderomotive force, huge longitudinal field arising from charge separation, and the finite size of the laser spot.

  8. Observation of 690 MV m-1 Electron Accelerating Gradient with a Laser-Driven Dielectric Microstructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wootton, K.P.; Wu, Z.; /SLAC; Cowan, B.M.; /Tech-X, Boulder; Hanuka, A.; /SLAC /Technion; Makasyuk, I.V.; /SLAC; Peralta, E.A.; Soong, K.; Byer, R.L.; /Stanford U.; England, R.J.; /SLAC

    2016-06-27

    Acceleration of electrons using laser-driven dielectric microstructures is a promising technology for the miniaturization of particle accelerators. In this work, experimental results are presented of relativistic electron acceleration with 690±100 MVm-1 gradient. This is a record-high accelerating gradient for a dielectric microstructure accelerator, nearly doubling the previous record gradient. To reach higher acceleration gradients the present experiment employs 90 fs duration laser pulses.

  9. Status of Wakefield Monitor Experiments at the CLIC Test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Lillestøl, Reidar; Aftab, Namra; Corsini, Roberto; Döbert, Steffen; Farabolini, Wilfrid; Grudiev, Alexej; Javeed, Sumera; Pfingstner, Juergen; Wuensch, Walter

    2016-01-01

    For the very low emittance beams in CLIC, it is vital to mitigate emittance growth which leads to reduced luminosity in the detectors. One factor that leads to emittance growth is transverse wakefields in the accelerating structures. In order to combat this the structures must be aligned with a precision of a few um. For achieving this tolerance, accelerating structures are equipped with wakefield monitors that measure higher-order dipole modes excited by the beam when offset from the structure axis. We report on such measurements, performed using prototype CLIC accelerating structures which are part of the module installed in the CLIC Test Facility 3 (CTF3) at CERN. Measurements with and without the drive beam that feeds rf power to the structures are compared. Improvements to the experimental setup are discussed, and finally remaining measurements that should be performed before the completion of the program are summarized.

  10. Acceleration dynamics of ions in shocks and solitary waves driven by intense laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Min-Qing; Dong, Quan-Li; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Weng, Su-Ming; Chen, Min; Wu, Hui-Chun; Zhang, Jie

    2007-09-01

    The acceleration of ions in collisionless electrostatic shocks and solitary waves, driven by ultrashort intense laser pulses in a thin solid target under different conditions, is investigated theoretically. When a shock is formed, ions with certain initial velocities inside the target can be accelerated by the electrostatic field at the shock front to twice the shock speed. When a solitary wave is formed, only ions located at the rear surface of the target can be accelerated by the solitary wave together with the sheath field formed there.

  11. Conceptual study of high power proton linac for accelerator driven subcritical nuclear power system

    CERN Document Server

    Yu Qi; Ouyang Hua Fu; Xu Tao Guang

    2001-01-01

    As a prior option of the next generation of energy source, the accelerator driven subcritical nuclear power system (ADS) can use efficiently the uranium and thorium resource, transmute the high-level long-lived radioactive wastes and raise nuclear safety. The ADS accelerator should provide the proton beam with tens megawatts. The superconducting linac is a good selection of ADS accelerator because of its high efficiency and low beam loss rate. The ADS accelerator presented by the consists of a 5 MeV radio-frequency quadrupole, a 100 MeV independently phased superconducting cavity linac and a 1 GeV elliptical superconducting cavity linac. The accelerating structures and main parameters are determined and the research and development plan is considered

  12. The GUINEVERE project for Accelerator Driven System physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billebaud, A.; Baylac, M.; Bondoux, D.; Bouvier, J.; Chabod, S.; De Conto, J.M.; Nuttin, A. [LPSC-CNRS-IN2P3/UJF/INPG, 53 Avenue des Martyrs. 38026 Grenoble cedex (France); Baeten, P.; Ait Abderrahim, H.; Bergmans, G.; Chetnitkov, A.; Kochetkov, A.; Vandeplassche, D.; Vermeersch, F.; Vittiglio, G. [SCK.CEN, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Ban, G.; Gautier, J.M.; Lecolley, F.R.; Lecouey, J.L.; Marie, N.; Merrer, Y.; Steckmeyer, J.C. [LPC Caen, ENSICAEN/Universite de Caen/CNRS-IN2P3, 14050 Caen (France); Dessagne, P.; Gaudiot, G.; Heitz, G.; Kerveno, M. [IPHC-DRS/UdS/CNRS-IN2P3, 67037 Strasbourg (France); Granget, G.; Mellier, F. [CEA-Cadarache, 13108 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France); Laune, B.; Reynet, D. [IPNO, CNRS-IN2P3/UPS, 91406 Orsay (France)

    2009-06-15

    The GUINEVERE project is part of the EUROTRANS Integrated Project of the 6. EURATOM Framework Programme. It is mainly devoted to ADS on-line reactivity monitoring validation, subcriticality determination and operational procedures (loading, start-up, shut-down,..) in follow-up of the MUSE experiments. The project consists in coupling a fast lead core, set-up in the VENUS reactor at SCK.CEN Mol (B), with a GENEPI neutron source under construction by CNRS. To accommodate the accelerator in a vertical coupling configuration, the VENUS building is being heightened. The fast core will be loaded with enriched Uranium and will be moderated and reflected with solid lead (zero power experiment). For the purpose of the experimental programme, the neutron source has to be operated not only in pulsed mode but also in continuous mode to investigate the current-to-flux reactivity indicator in representative conditions of a powerful ADS. In this latter mode it is also required to make short beam interruptions to have access to the neutron population decrease as a function of time: from this spectrum it will be possible to apply different analysis techniques such as 'prompt decay' fitting techniques and 'source jerk' techniques. Beam interruptions will be repeated at a programmable frequency to improve time spectra statistics. Different sub-criticality levels (k{sub eff}=0.99, 0.97, 0.95,..) will be investigated in order to obtain a full set of data points for the final overall validation of the methodology. This paper describes the status of the experimental facility assembling, and the foreseen experimental programme to be started. (authors)

  13. Monte Carlo Analysis of the Accelerator-Driven System at Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wonkyeong Kim

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available An accelerator-driven system consists of a subcritical reactor and a controllable external neutron source. The reactor in an accelerator-driven system can sustain fission reactions in a subcritical state using an external neutron source, which is an intrinsic safety feature of the system. The system can provide efficient transmutations of nuclear wastes such as minor actinides and long-lived fission products and generate electricity. Recently at Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI; Kyoto, Japan, a series of reactor physics experiments was conducted with the Kyoto University Critical Assembly and a Cockcroft–Walton type accelerator, which generates the external neutron source by deuterium–tritium reactions. In this paper, neutronic analyses of a series of experiments have been re-estimated by using the latest Monte Carlo code and nuclear data libraries. This feasibility study is presented through the comparison of Monte Carlo simulation results with measurements.

  14. Towards the final BSA modeling for the accelerator-driven BNCT facility at INFN LNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ceballos, C. [Centro de Aplicaciones Tecnlogicas y Desarrollo Nuclear, 5ta y30, Miramar, Playa, Ciudad Habana (Cuba); Esposito, J., E-mail: juan.esposito@lnl.infn.it [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (LNL), via dell' Universita, 2, I-35020 Legnaro (PD) (Italy); Agosteo, S. [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Energia, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy)] [INFN, Sezione di Milano, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Colautti, P.; Conte, V.; Moro, D. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (LNL), via dell' Universita, 2, I-35020 Legnaro (PD) (Italy); Pola, A. [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Energia, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy)] [INFN, Sezione di Milano, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2011-12-15

    Some remarkable advances have been made in the last years on the SPES-BNCT project of the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN) towards the development of the accelerator-driven thermal neutron beam facility at the Legnaro National Laboratories (LNL), aimed at the BNCT experimental treatment of extended skin melanoma. The compact neutron source will be produced via the {sup 9}Be(p,xn) reactions using the 5 MeV, 30 mA beam driven by the RFQ accelerator, whose modules construction has been recently completed, into a thick beryllium target prototype already available. The Beam Shaping Assembly (BSA) final modeling, using both neutron converter and the new, detailed, Be(p,xn) neutron yield spectra at 5 MeV energy recently measured at the CN Van de Graaff accelerator at LNL, is summarized here.

  15. A new awakening for accelerator cavities

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Imagine: an accelerator unbound by length; one that can bring a beam up to the TeV level in just a few hundred metres. Sounds like a dream? Perhaps not for long. At CERN’s Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment (AWAKE), physicists may soon be working to bring this contemporary fairy-tale to life.   The AWAKE experiment in the CNGS facility. Wherever you find a modern linear particle accelerator, you’ll find with it a lengthy series of RF accelerating cavities. Although based on technology first developed over half a century ago, RF cavities have dominated the accelerating world since their inception. However, new developments in plasma accelerator systems may soon be bringing a new player into the game. By harnessing the power of wakefields generated by beams in plasma cells, physicists may be able to produce accelerator gradients of many GV/m –  hundreds of times higher than those achieved in current RF cavities. “Plasma wakef...

  16. EDITORIAL: Laser and plasma accelerators Laser and plasma accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, Robert

    2009-02-01

    This special issue on laser and plasma accelerators illustrates the rapid advancement and diverse applications of laser and plasma accelerators. Plasma is an attractive medium for particle acceleration because of the high electric field it can sustain, with studies of acceleration processes remaining one of the most important areas of research in both laboratory and astrophysical plasmas. The rapid advance in laser and accelerator technology has led to the development of terawatt and petawatt laser systems with ultra-high intensities and short sub-picosecond pulses, which are used to generate wakefields in plasma. Recent successes include the demonstration by several groups in 2004 of quasi-monoenergetic electron beams by wakefields in the bubble regime with the GeV energy barrier being reached in 2006, and the energy doubling of the SLAC high-energy electron beam from 42 to 85 GeV. The electron beams generated by the laser plasma driven wakefields have good spatial quality with energies ranging from MeV to GeV. A unique feature is that they are ultra-short bunches with simulations showing that they can be as short as a few femtoseconds with low-energy spread, making these beams ideal for a variety of applications ranging from novel high-brightness radiation sources for medicine, material science and ultrafast time-resolved radiobiology or chemistry. Laser driven ion acceleration experiments have also made significant advances over the last few years with applications in laser fusion, nuclear physics and medicine. Attention is focused on the possibility of producing quasi-mono-energetic ions with energies ranging from hundreds of MeV to GeV per nucleon. New acceleration mechanisms are being studied, including ion acceleration from ultra-thin foils and direct laser acceleration. The application of wakefields or beat waves in other areas of science such as astrophysics and particle physics is beginning to take off, such as the study of cosmic accelerators considered

  17. Study of ultra-high gradient wakefield excitation by intense ultrashort laser pulses in plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotaki, Hideyuki; Kando, Masaki; Oketa, Takatsugu; Masuda, Shinichi; Koga, James K.; Kondo, Shuji; Kanazawa, Shuhei; Yokoyama, Takashi; Matoba, Toru; Nakajima, Kazuhisa

    2002-10-01

    We investigate a laser wakefield excited by intense laser pulses, and the possibility of generating an intense bright electron source by an intense laser pulse. The coherent wakefield excited by 2 TW, 50 fs laser pulses in a gas-jet plasma around 1018 cm-3 is measured with a time-resolved frequency domain interferometer (FDI). The results show an accelerating wakefield excitation of 20 GeV/m with good coherency. This is the first time-resolved measurement of laser wakefield excitation in a gas-jet plasma. The experimental results agree with the simulation results and linear theory. The pump-probe interferometer system of FDI will be modified to the optical injection system as a relativistic electron beam injector. In 1D particle in cell simulation we obtain results of high quality intense electron beam generation.

  18. Ion acceleration in non-equilibrium plasmas driven by fast drifting electron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, G. [INFN- Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S.Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Università degli Studi di Catania, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, V. S.Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Di Bartolo, F., E-mail: fdibartolo@unime.it [Università di Messina, V.le F. Stagno D’Alcontres 31, 98166, Messina (Italy); Gambino, N. [INFN- Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S.Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Università degli Studi di Catania, Dipartimento di Metodologie Fisiche e Chimiche per L’ingegneria, Viale A.Doria 6, 95125 Catania (Italy); Mascali, D. [INFN- Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S.Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); CSFNSM, Viale A. Doria 6, 95125 Catania (Italy); Romano, F.P. [INFN- Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S.Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); CNR-IBAM Via Biblioteca 4, 95124 Catania (Italy); Anzalone, A.; Celona, L.; Gammino, S. [INFN- Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S.Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Di Giugno, R. [INFN- Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S.Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Università degli Studi di Catania, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, V. S.Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Lanaia, D. [INFN- Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S.Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Miracoli, R. [INFN- Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S.Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Università degli Studi di Catania, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, V. S.Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Serafino, T. [CSFNSM, Viale A. Doria 6, 95125 Catania (Italy); Tudisco, S. [INFN- Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S.Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); CSFNSM, Viale A. Doria 6, 95125 Catania (Italy)

    2013-05-01

    We hereby present results on ion acceleration mechanisms in non equilibrium plasmas generated by microwaves or high intensity laser pulses. Experiments point out that in magnetized plasmas X–B conversion takes place for under resonance values of the magnetic field, i.e. an electromagnetic mode is converted into an electrostatic wave. The strong self-generated electric field, of the order of 10{sup 7} V/m, causes a E × B drift which accelerates both ions and electrons, as it is evident by localized sputtering in the plasma chamber. These fields are similar (in magnitude) to the ones obtainable in laser generated plasmas at intensity of 10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2}. In this latter case, we observe that the acceleration mechanism is driven by electrons drifting much faster than plasma bulk, thus generating an extremely strong electric field ∼10{sup 7} V/m. The two experiments confirm that ions acceleration at low energy is possible with table-top devices and following complementary techniques: i.e. by using microwave-driven (producing CW beams) plasmas, or non-equilibrium laser-driven plasmas (producing pulsed beams). Possible applications involve ion implantation, materials surface modifications, ion beam assisted lithography, etc.

  19. PW-class laser-driven super acceleration systems in underdense plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Masahiro; Zhidkov, Alexei; Kodama, Ryosuke

    2017-10-01

    Probing laser driven super-acceleration systems can be important tool to understand physics related to vacuum, space time, and particle acceleration. We show two proposals to probe the systems through Hawking-like effect using PW class lasers and x-ray free electron lasers. For that we study the interaction of ultrahigh intense laser pulses with intensity 1022 -1024 W/cm2 and underdense plasmas including ion motion and plasma radiation for the first time. While the acceleration w a0ωp /ωL in a wake is not maximal, the pulse propagation is much stable. The effect is that a constantly accelerated detector with acceleration w sees a boson's thermal bath at temperature ℏw / 2 πkB c . We present two designs for x-ray scattering from highly accelerated electrons produced in the plasma irradiated by intense laser pulses for such detection. Properly chosen observation angles enable us to distinguish spectral broadening from Doppler shift with a reasonable photon number. Also, ion motion and radiation damping on the interaction are investigated via fully relativistic 3D particle-in-cell simulation. We observe high quality electron bunches under super-acceleration when transverse plasma waves are excited by ponderomotive force producing plasma channel.

  20. Advanced Accelerator Development Strategy Report: DOE Advanced Accelerator Concepts Research Roadmap Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2016-02-03

    Over a full two day period, February 2–3, 2016, the Office of High Energy Physics convened a workshop in Gaithersburg, MD to seek community input on development of an Advanced Accelerator Concepts (AAC) research roadmap. The workshop was in response to a recommendation by the HEPAP Accelerator R&D Subpanel [1] [2] to “convene the university and laboratory proponents of advanced acceleration concepts to develop R&D roadmaps with a series of milestones and common down selection criteria towards the goal for constructing a multi-TeV e+e– collider” (the charge to the workshop can be found in Appendix A). During the workshop, proponents of laser-driven plasma wakefield acceleration (LWFA), particle-beam-driven plasma wakefield acceleration (PWFA), and dielectric wakefield acceleration (DWFA), along with a limited number of invited university and laboratory experts, presented and critically discussed individual concept roadmaps. The roadmap workshop was preceded by several preparatory workshops. The first day of the workshop featured presentation of three initial individual roadmaps with ample time for discussion. The individual roadmaps covered a time period extending until roughly 2040, with the end date assumed to be roughly appropriate for initial operation of a multi-TeV e+e– collider. The second day of the workshop comprised talks on synergies between the roadmaps and with global efforts, potential early applications, diagnostics needs, simulation needs, and beam issues and challenges related to a collider. During the last half of the day the roadmaps were revisited but with emphasis on the next five to ten years (as specifically requested in the charge) and on common challenges. The workshop concluded with critical and unanimous endorsement of the individual roadmaps and an extended discussion on the characteristics of the common challenges. (For the agenda and list of participants see Appendix B.)

  1. Three-dimensional dielectric photonic crystal structures for laser-driven acceleration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin M. Cowan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the design and simulation of a three-dimensional photonic crystal waveguide for linear laser-driven acceleration in vacuum. The structure confines a synchronous speed-of-light accelerating mode in both transverse dimensions. We report the properties of this mode, including sustainable gradient and optical-to-beam efficiency. We present a novel method for confining a particle beam using optical fields as focusing elements. This technique, combined with careful structure design, is shown to have a large dynamic aperture and minimal emittance growth, even over millions of optical wavelengths.

  2. Ponderomotive scattering of an electron-bunch before injection into a laser wakefield

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khachatryan, A.G.; Luttikhof, M.J.H.; van Goor, F.A.; Boller, Klaus J.

    2006-01-01

    For the purpose of laser wakefield acceleration, it turned out that also the injection of electron bunches longer than a plasma wavelength can generate accelerated femtosecond bunches with relatively low energy spread. This is of high interest because such injecting bunches can be provided, e.g., by

  3. Wire measurement of impedance of an X-band accelerating structure

    CERN Document Server

    Baboi, N; Dolgashev, V A; Jones, R M; Lewandowski, J R; Tantawi, S G; Wang, J W

    2004-01-01

    Several tens of thousands of accelerator structures will be needed for the next generation of linear collders known as the GLC/NLC (Global Linear Collider/Next Linear Collider). To prevent the beam being driven into a disruptive BBU (Beam Break Up) mode or at the very least, the emittance being signifcantly diluted, it is important to damp down the wakefield left by driving bunches to a manageable level. Manufacturing errors and errors in design need to be measurable and compared with predictions. We develop a circuit model of wire-loaded X-band accelerator structures. This enables the wakefield (the inverse transform of the beam impedance) to be readily computed and compared with the wire measurement. We apply this circuit model to the latest series of accelerating for the GLC/NLC. This circuit model is based upon the single-cell model developed in [1] extended here to complete, multi-cell structures.

  4. Sensitivity Analysis of Core Neutronic Parameters in Electron Accelerator-driven Subcritical Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Ebrahimkhani, Marziye; Hassanzadeh, Mostafa; Feghhi, Sayed Amier Hossian; Masti, Darush

    2016-01-01

    Calculation of the core neutronic parameters is one of the key components in all nuclear reactors. In this research, the energy spectrum and spatial distribution of the neutron flux in a uranium target have been calculated. In addition, sensitivity of the core neutronic parameters in accelerator-driven subcritical advanced liquid metal reactors, such as electron beam energy (Ee) and source multiplication coefficient (ks), has been investigated. A Monte Carlo code (MCNPX_2.6) has been used to ...

  5. Wakefield: Community and Library Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trumpeter, Margo C.; Donahue, Mary Ellen

    This community analysis was conducted in order to characterize and identify the information needs of the Wakefield community, and library services and use were evaluated to determine how well the library meets these needs. The study included an examination of the history of the town and its physical characteristics, economic development, and…

  6. Theory of wakefields in a dielectric-lined waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park; Hirshfield

    2000-07-01

    Excitation of wakefields from a short charge bunch moving parallel to the axis of a dielectric-lined cylindrical waveguide is analyzed. This situation amounts to generation of Cerenkov radiation in a transversely bounded system. Wakefields are expanded into an orthonormal set of hybrid electric-magnetic eigenfunctions for this waveguide geometry. The orthonormalization relations for this system are obtained, evidently for the first time, both for a stationary source and for a localized moving source such as a charge bunch; it is shown that these orthonormalization relations differ. Forces arising from wakefields are found, valid within and behind a distributed bunch. Deviation of bunch distribution from axisymmetry leads to generation of dipole modes of significant amplitude that may lead to instability. Poynting's theorem is examined for this system, and it is shown that convected Coulomb field energy must be subtracted from the Poynting flux to obtain the radiation power. This power, which balances drag on the bunch as calculated directly from the fields, is shown to flow in a direction opposite to that of the charge bunch. The results are easily generalized to bunches of arbitrary length and charge distribution, and to a train of such bunches. Numerical examples are presented for monopole, dipole, and quadrupole wakefield forces, and sample electric field patterns are shown to assist in understanding the unusual nature of this type of Cerenkov radiation. For a 2-nC rectangular drive bunch of length 0. 20 mm, moving along the axis of an alumina-lined waveguide (varepsilon=9.50) with inner and outer radii of 0.50 and 5.0 mm, a peak accelerating gradient behind the bunch of 155 MeV/m is predicted. This relatively high magnitude of accelerating gradient suggests that a simple uniform dielectric pipe could be the basis for the structure of a future high-gradient electron/positron linear accelerator, once low-emittance, kiloampere, subpicosecond electron bunches are

  7. Coulomb-driven energy boost of heavy ions for laser-plasma acceleration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braenzel, J; Andreev, A A; Platonov, K; Klingsporn, M; Ehrentraut, L; Sandner, W; Schnürer, M

    2015-03-27

    An unprecedented increase of kinetic energy of laser accelerated heavy ions is demonstrated. Ultrathin gold foils have been irradiated by an ultrashort laser pulse at a peak intensity of 8×10^{19}  W/  cm^{2}. Highly charged gold ions with kinetic energies up to >200  MeV and a bandwidth limited energy distribution have been reached by using 1.3 J laser energy on target. 1D and 2D particle in cell simulations show how a spatial dependence on the ion's ionization leads to an enhancement of the accelerating electrical field. Our theoretical model considers a spatial distribution of the ionization inside the thin target, leading to a field enhancement for the heavy ions by Coulomb explosion. It is capable of explaining the energy boost of highly charged ions, enabling a higher efficiency for the laser-driven heavy ion acceleration.

  8. Operation and reactivity measurements of an accelerator driven subcritical TRIGA reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Kelly, David Sean

    Experiments were performed at the Nuclear Engineering Teaching Laboratory (NETL) in 2005 and 2006 in which a 20 MeV linear electron accelerator operating as a photoneutron source was coupled to the TRIGA (Training, Research, Isotope production, General Atomics) Mark II research reactor at the University of Texas at Austin (UT) to simulate the operation and characteristics of a full-scale accelerator driven subcritical system (ADSS). The experimental program provided a relatively low-cost substitute for the higher power and complexity of internationally proposed systems utilizing proton accelerators and spallation neutron sources for an advanced ADSS that may be used for the burning of high-level radioactive waste. Various instrumentation methods that permitted ADSS neutron flux monitoring in high gamma radiation fields were successfully explored and the data was used to evaluate the Stochastic Pulsed Feynman method for reactivity monitoring.

  9. Ion acceleration in "dragging field" of a light-pressure-driven piston

    CERN Document Server

    Ji, Liangliang; Shen, Baifei

    2013-01-01

    We propose a new acceleration scheme that combines shock wave acceleration (SWA) and light pressure acceleration (LPA). When a thin foil driven by light pressure of an ultra-intense laser pulse propagates in underdense background plasma, it serves as a shock-like piston, trapping and reflecting background protons to ultra-high energies. Unlike in SWA, the piston velocity is not limited by the Mach number and can be highly relativistic. Background protons can be trapped and reflected forward by the enormous "dragging field" potential behind the piston which is not employed in LPA. Our one- and two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations and analytical model both show that proton energies of several tens to hundreds of GeV can be obtained, while the achievable energy in simple LPA is below 10 GeV.

  10. Wakefield and wave propagation at non-linear dispersion

    CERN Document Server

    Smirnov, A V

    2002-01-01

    Synchronous wakefield excitation and wave propagation along a dispersive slow-wave structure is considered. An explicit form for wakefields is obtained for a single bunch in the second and third approximations of dispersion while taking into account the effect of substantial group velocity with respect to charge velocity. Generalized differential equations describing diffused fields induced by a beam current or generated by an external source are derived. Field excitation and propagation near the cut-off is considered including trapped modes in the stopband. This theory can be applied to the fields induced by single bunch and bunch train in Standing Wave and Traveling Wave devices operating near pi-mode, self-consistent beam break-up simulations, RF-generation, pulse propagation, and breakdown study in waveguides as well as some of new methods of acceleration in a dispersive medium.

  11. Mid-IR lasers for energy frontier plasma accelerators and colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogorelsky, I. V.; Babzien, M.; Polyanskiy, M. N.; Kimura, W. D.

    2017-03-01

    Plasma wakefield accelerators driven by solid-state, near-IR lasers have been considered as an alternative to conventional RF accelerators for next-generation TeV-class lepton colliders. Here, we extend this study to the mid-IR spectral domain covered by CO2 lasers. We show that the increase in the laser driver wavelength favors the regime of electron acceleration at a low plasma density and high bunch charge. The revealed benefits from spectral diversification of laser drivers for future colliders and offspring applications validate our reported ongoing efforts in advancing the enabling CO2 laser technology.

  12. LAVENDER: A steady-state core analysis code for design studies of accelerator driven subcritical reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Shengcheng; Wu, Hongchun; Cao, Liangzhi; Zheng, Youqi, E-mail: yqzheng@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Huang, Kai; He, Mingtao; Li, Xunzhao

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • A new code system for design studies of accelerator driven subcritical reactors (ADSRs) is developed. • S{sub N} transport solver in triangular-z meshes, fine deletion analysis and multi-channel thermal-hydraulics analysis are coupled in the code. • Numerical results indicate that the code is reliable and efficient for design studies of ADSRs. - Abstract: Accelerator driven subcritical reactors (ADSRs) have been proposed and widely investigated for the transmutation of transuranics (TRUs). ADSRs have several special characteristics, such as the subcritical core driven by spallation neutrons, anisotropic neutron flux distribution and complex geometry etc. These bring up requirements for development or extension of analysis codes to perform design studies. A code system named LAVENDER has been developed in this paper. It couples the modules for spallation target simulation and subcritical core analysis. The neutron transport-depletion calculation scheme is used based on the homogenized cross section from assembly calculations. A three-dimensional S{sub N} nodal transport code based on triangular-z meshes is employed and a multi-channel thermal-hydraulics analysis model is integrated. In the depletion calculation, the evolution of isotopic composition in the core is evaluated using the transmutation trajectory analysis algorithm (TTA) and fine depletion chains. The new code is verified by several benchmarks and code-to-code comparisons. Numerical results indicate that LAVENDER is reliable and efficient to be applied for the steady-state analysis and reactor core design of ADSRs.

  13. Wakefield Simulation of CLIC PETS Structure Using Parallel 3D Finite Element Time-Domain Solver T3P

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candel, A.; Kabel, A.; Lee, L.; Li, Z.; Ng, C.; Schussman, G.; Ko, K.; /SLAC; Syratchev, I.; /CERN

    2009-06-19

    In recent years, SLAC's Advanced Computations Department (ACD) has developed the parallel 3D Finite Element electromagnetic time-domain code T3P. Higher-order Finite Element methods on conformal unstructured meshes and massively parallel processing allow unprecedented simulation accuracy for wakefield computations and simulations of transient effects in realistic accelerator structures. Applications include simulation of wakefield damping in the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) power extraction and transfer structure (PETS).

  14. Feasibility of an XUV FEL Oscillator Driven by a SCRF Linear Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A. H.; Freund, H. P.; Reinsch, M.

    2014-01-01

    The Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) facility is currently under construction at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. Using a1-ms-long macropulse composed of up to 3000 micropulses, and with beam energies projected from 45 to 800 MeV, the possibility for an extreme ultraviolet (XUV) free-electron laser oscillator (FELO) with the higher energy is evaluated. We have used both GINGER with an oscillator module and the MEDUSA/OPC code to assess FELO saturation prospects at 120 nm, 40 nm, and 13.4 nm. The results support saturation at all of these wavelengths which are also shorter than the demonstrated shortest wavelength record of 176 nm from a storage-ring-based FELO. This indicates linac-driven FELOs can be extended into this XUV wavelength regime previously only reached with single-pass FEL configurations.

  15. Density bunching effects in a laser-driven, near-critical density plasma for ion acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettlinger, Oliver; Sahai, Aakash; Hicks, George; Ditter, Emma-Jane; Dover, Nicholas; Chen, Yu-Hsin; Helle, Michael; Gordon, Daniel; Ting, Antonio; Polyanskiy, Mikhail; Pogorelsky, Igor; Babzien, Marcus; Najmudin, Zulfikar

    2016-10-01

    We present work investigating the interaction of relativistic laser pulses with near-critical density gas targets exhibiting pre-plasma scale lengths of several laser wavelengths. Analytical and computational modelling suggest that the interaction dynamics in a low-Z plasma is a direct result of induced density bunching up to the critical surface. In fact, these bunches can themselves become overcritical and experience significant radiation pressure, accelerating ions to higher energies compared to an ``idealised'' plasma slab target. This work will be used to help explain the observation of ion energies exceeding those predicted by radiation pressure driven hole-boring in recent experiments using the TW CO2 laser at the Accelerator Test Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory.

  16. Compact beam transport system for free-electron lasers driven by a laser plasma accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Liu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Utilizing laser-driven plasma accelerators (LPAs as a high-quality electron beam source is a promising approach to significantly downsize the x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL facility. A multi-GeV LPA beam can be generated in several-centimeter acceleration distance, with a high peak current and a low transverse emittance, which will considerably benefit a compact FEL design. However, the large initial angular divergence and energy spread make it challenging to transport the beam and realize FEL radiation. In this paper, a novel design of beam transport system is proposed to maintain the superior features of the LPA beam and a transverse gradient undulator (TGU is also adopted as an effective energy spread compensator to generate high-brilliance FEL radiation. Theoretical analysis and numerical simulations are presented based on a demonstration experiment with an electron energy of 380 MeV and a radiation wavelength of 30 nm.

  17. Ultra-high-energy cosmic ray acceleration in engine-driven relativistic supernovae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborti, S; Ray, A; Soderberg, A M; Loeb, A; Chandra, P

    2011-02-01

    The origin of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) remains an enigma. They offer a window to new physics, including tests of physical laws at energies unattainable by terrestrial accelerators. They must be accelerated locally, otherwise, background radiations would severely suppress the flux of protons and nuclei, at energies above the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin (GZK) limit. Nearby, gamma ray bursts (GRBs), hypernovae, active galactic nuclei and their flares have all been suggested and debated as possible sources. A local sub-population of type Ibc supernovae (SNe) with mildly relativistic outflows have been detected as sub-energetic GRBs, X-ray flashes and recently as radio afterglows without detected GRB counterparts. Here, we measure the size-magnetic field evolution, baryon loading and energetics, using the observed radio spectra of SN 2009bb. We place such engine-driven SNe above the Hillas line and establish that they can readily explain the post-GZK UHECRs.

  18. New methods for high current fast ion beam production by laser-driven acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margarone, D.; Krasa, J.; Prokupek, J.; Velyhan, A.; Laska, L.; Jungwirth, K.; Mocek, T.; Korn, G.; Rus, B. [Institute of Physics, ASCR, v.v.i., PALS Centre, Prague (Czech Republic); Torrisi, L.; Gammino, S.; Cirrone, P.; Cutroneo, M.; Romano, F. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania, Messina University (Italy); Picciotto, A.; Serra, E. [Fondazione Bruno Kessler - IRST, Trento (Italy); Giuffrida, L. [CELIA, Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications (France); Mangione, A. [ITA - Istituto Tecnologie Avanzate, Trapani (Italy); Rosinski, M.; Parys, P. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw (Poland); and others

    2012-02-15

    An overview of the last experimental campaigns on laser-driven ion acceleration performed at the PALS facility in Prague is given. Both the 2 TW, sub-nanosecond iodine laser system and the 20 TW, femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser, recently installed at PALS, are used along our experiments performed in the intensity range 10{sup 16}-10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. The main goal of our studies was to generate high energy, high current ion streams at relatively low laser intensities. The discussed experimental investigations show promising results in terms of maximum ion energy and current density, which make the laser-accelerated ion beams a candidate for new-generation ion sources to be employed in medicine, nuclear physics, matter physics, and industry.

  19. New methods for high current fast ion beam production by laser-driven acceleration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margarone, D; Krasa, J; Prokupek, J; Velyhan, A; Torrisi, L; Picciotto, A; Giuffrida, L; Gammino, S; Cirrone, P; Cutroneo, M; Romano, F; Serra, E; Mangione, A; Rosinski, M; Parys, P; Ryc, L; Limpouch, J; Laska, L; Jungwirth, K; Ullschmied, J; Mocek, T; Korn, G; Rus, B

    2012-02-01

    An overview of the last experimental campaigns on laser-driven ion acceleration performed at the PALS facility in Prague is given. Both the 2 TW, sub-nanosecond iodine laser system and the 20 TW, femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser, recently installed at PALS, are used along our experiments performed in the intensity range 10(16)-10(19) W∕cm(2). The main goal of our studies was to generate high energy, high current ion streams at relatively low laser intensities. The discussed experimental investigations show promising results in terms of maximum ion energy and current density, which make the laser-accelerated ion beams a candidate for new-generation ion sources to be employed in medicine, nuclear physics, matter physics, and industry.

  20. Numerical simulations of flow field in the target region of accelerator-driven subcritical reactor system

    CERN Document Server

    Chen Hai Yan

    2002-01-01

    Numerical simulations of flow field were performed by using the PHOENICS 3.2 code for the proposed spallation target of accelerator-driven subcritical reactor system (ADS). The fluid motion in the target is axisymmetric and is treated as a 2-D steady-state problem. A body-fitted coordinate system (BFC) is then chosen and a two-dimensional mesh of the flow channel is generated. Results are presented for the ADS target under both upward and downward flow, and for the target with diffuser plate installed below the window under downward flow

  1. MYRRHA project: a Multipurpose Accelerator Driven System (ADS) for R and D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ait Abderrahim, A

    2001-04-01

    The objective of the MYRRHA project is to develop a multipurpose neutron source for research and development applications on the basis of an Accelerator Driven System (ADS). Current activities in this area focus on (1) the continuation and the extension towards ADS of the ongoing programmes at SCK-CEN in the field of reactor materials, fuel and reactor physics research; (2) the enhancement and the triggering of new R and D activities such as nuclear waste transmutation, ADS technology, liquid metal embrittlement; (3) the initiation of medical applications, for example proton therapy and PET production, or proton Based irradiation programmes. Main achievements in these topical areas in 2000 are summarised.

  2. Modeling laser-driven electron acceleration using WARP with Fourier decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, P.; Audet, T. L.; Lehe, R.; Vay, J.-L.; Maynard, G.; Cros, B.

    2016-09-01

    WARP is used with the recent implementation of the Fourier decomposition algorithm to model laser-driven electron acceleration in plasmas. Simulations were carried out to analyze the experimental results obtained on ionization-induced injection in a gas cell. The simulated results are in good agreement with the experimental ones, confirming the ability of the code to take into account the physics of electron injection and reduce calculation time. We present a detailed analysis of the laser propagation, the plasma wave generation and the electron beam dynamics.

  3. Neutronic studies in support of accelerator-driven systems: The MUSE experiments in the MASURCA facility

    OpenAIRE

    Soule, R.; Assal, W.; Chaussonnet, P.; Destouches, C.; Domergue, C.; Jammes, C.; Laurens, J.-M.; Lebrat, J.-F.; Mellier, F.; Perret, G.; Rimpault, G.; Servière, H.; Imel, G.; M. Thomas, G.; Villamarin, D.

    2004-01-01

    The MUSE program (multiplication with an external source) is in progress at the MASURCA critical facility at the Cadarache Research Center of the Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique in France. The program is dedicated to the physics studies of accelerator-driven systems in support of transmutation studies of minor actinides and long-lived fission products. It began in 1995 with the coupling of a Cf source in MASURCA and was followed by a commercial (d,T) source. In 2001, a specially constructed...

  4. Influence of the ablation threshold fluence on laser-driven acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margarone, D.; Velyhan, A.; Torrisi, L.; Cutroneo, M.; Giuffrida, L.; Picciotto, A.; Krasa, J.; Cavallaro, S.; Limpouch, J.; Klimo, O.; Psikal, J.; Proska, J.; Novotny, F.

    2013-05-01

    Laser ablation threshold measurements has been carried out by the nanosecond-class Nd:YAG laser at LNS-INFN in Catania. Advanced targets, such as hydrogen-enriched silicon slabs and sub-micro structured polymeric samples, have been investigated. The estimated ablation fluences are correlated to recent experimental and theoretical results on high intensity laser driven ion acceleration. Characteristics of H-atoms/protons and heavier atoms/ions coming out from the bulk of the irradiated target or from surface contaminants have been determined by optical and time-of-flight spectroscopy as well as mass quadrupole spectrometry.

  5. Efficient laser-driven proton acceleration from cylindrical and planar cryogenic hydrogen jets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obst, Lieselotte; Göde, Sebastian; Rehwald, Martin; Brack, Florian-Emanuel; Branco, João; Bock, Stefan; Bussmann, Michael; Cowan, Thomas E; Curry, Chandra B; Fiuza, Frederico; Gauthier, Maxence; Gebhardt, René; Helbig, Uwe; Huebl, Axel; Hübner, Uwe; Irman, Arie; Kazak, Lev; Kim, Jongjin B; Kluge, Thomas; Kraft, Stephan; Loeser, Markus; Metzkes, Josefine; Mishra, Rohini; Rödel, Christian; Schlenvoigt, Hans-Peter; Siebold, Mathias; Tiggesbäumker, Josef; Wolter, Steffen; Ziegler, Tim; Schramm, Ulrich; Glenzer, Siegfried H; Zeil, Karl

    2017-08-31

    We report on recent experimental results deploying a continuous cryogenic hydrogen jet as a debris-free, renewable laser-driven source of pure proton beams generated at the 150 TW ultrashort pulse laser Draco. Efficient proton acceleration reaching cut-off energies of up to 20 MeV with particle numbers exceeding 10 9 particles per MeV per steradian is demonstrated, showing for the first time that the acceleration performance is comparable to solid foil targets with thicknesses in the micrometer range. Two different target geometries are presented and their proton beam deliverance characterized: cylindrical (∅ 5 μm) and planar (20 μm × 2 μm). In both cases typical Target Normal Sheath Acceleration emission patterns with exponential proton energy spectra are detected. Significantly higher proton numbers in laser-forward direction are observed when deploying the planar jet as compared to the cylindrical jet case. This is confirmed by two-dimensional Particle-in-Cell (2D3V PIC) simulations, which demonstrate that the planar jet proves favorable as its geometry leads to more optimized acceleration conditions.

  6. Simulations of laser-driven ion acceleration from a thin CH target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jaehong; Bulanov, Stepan; Ji, Qing; Steinke, Sven; Treffert, Franziska; Vay, Jean-Luc; Schenkel, Thomas; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, Wim; Vincenti, Henri

    2017-10-01

    2D and 3D computer simulations of laser driven ion acceleration from a thin CH foil using code WARP were performed. As the foil thickness varies from a few nm to μm, the simulations confirm that the acceleration mechanism transitions from the RPA (radiation pressure acceleration) to the TNSA (target normal sheath acceleration). In the TNSA regime, with the CH target thickness of 1 μ m and a pre-plasma ahead of the target, the simulations show the production of the collimated proton beam with the maximum energy of about 10 MeV. This agrees with the experimental results obtained at the BELLA laser facility (I 5 × 18 W / cm2 , λ = 800 nm). Furthermore, the maximum proton energy dependence on different setups of the initialization, i.e., different angles of the laser incidence from the target normal axis, different gradient scales and distributions of the pre-plasma, was explored. This work was supported by LDRD funding from LBNL, provided by the U.S. DOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231, and used resources of the NERSC, a DOE office of Science User Facility supported by the U.S. DOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  7. Investigation of Lead Target Nuclei Used on Accelerator-Driven Systems for Tritium Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tel, E.; Aydin, A.

    2012-02-01

    High-current proton accelerators are being researched at Los Alamos National Laboratory and other laboratories for accelerator production of tritium, transmuting long-lived radioactive waste into shorter-lived products, converting excess plutonium, and producing energy. These technologies make use of spallation neutrons produced in ( p,xn) and ( n,xn) nuclear reactions on high-Z targets. Through ( p,xn) and ( n,xn) nuclear reactions, neutrons are produced and are moderated by heavy water. These moderated neutrons are subsequently captured on 3He to produce tritium via the ( n,p) reaction. Tritium self-sufficiency must be maintained for a commercial fusion power plant. Rubbia succeeded in a proposal of a full scale demonstration plant of the Energy Amplifier. This plant is to be known the accelerator-driven system (ADS). The ADS can be used for production of neutrons in spallation neutron source and they can act as an intense neutron source in accelerator-driven subcritical reactors, capable of incinerating nuclear waste and of producing energy. Thorium and Uranium are nuclear fuels and Lead, Bismuth, Tungsten are the target nuclei in these reactor systems. The spallation targets can be Pb, Bi, W, etc. isotopes and these target material can be liquid or solid. Naturally Lead includes the 204Pb (%1.42), 206Pb (%24.1), 207Pb (%22.1) and 208Pb (%52.3) isotopes. The design of ADS systems and also a fusion-fission hybrid reactor systems require the knowledge of a wide range of better data. In this study, by using Hartree-Fock method with an effective nucleon-nucleon Skyrme interactions rms nuclear charge radii, rms nuclear mass radii, rms nuclear proton, neutron radii and neutron skin thickness were calculated for the 204, 206, 208Pb isotopes . The calculated results have been compared with those of the compiled experimental and theoretical values of other studies.

  8. Invited Review Article: “Hands-on” laser-driven ion acceleration: A primer for laser-driven source development and potential applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreiber, J. [Lehrstuhl für Medizinphysik, Fakultät für Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Am Coulombwall 1, 85748 Garching bei München (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut für Quantenoptik Garching, Hans-Kopfermann-Str. 1, 85748 Garching bei München (Germany); Bolton, P. R.; Parodi, K. [Lehrstuhl für Medizinphysik, Fakultät für Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Am Coulombwall 1, 85748 Garching bei München (Germany)

    2016-07-15

    An overview of progress and typical yields from intense laser-plasma acceleration of ions is presented. The evolution of laser-driven ion acceleration at relativistic intensities ushers prospects for improved functionality and diverse applications which can represent a varied assortment of ion beam requirements. This mandates the development of the integrated laser-driven ion accelerator system, the multiple components of which are described. Relevant high field laser-plasma science and design of controlled optimum pulsed laser irradiation on target are dominant single shot (pulse) considerations with aspects that are appropriate to the emerging petawatt era. The pulse energy scaling of maximum ion energies and typical differential spectra obtained over the past two decades provide guidance for continued advancement of laser-driven energetic ion sources and their meaningful applications.

  9. Supersonic micro-jets and their application to few-cycle laser-driven electron acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid, Karl

    2009-07-23

    This thesis covers the few-cycle laser-driven acceleration of electrons in a laser-generated plasma. The laser system employed in this work is a new development based on optical parametric chirped pulse amplification and is the only multi-TW few-cycle laser in the world. In the experiment, the laser beam is focused onto a supersonic helium gas jet which leads to the formation of a plasma channel. The laser pulse, having an intensity of 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2} propagates through the plasma with an electron density of 2 x 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3} and forms via a highly nonlinear interaction a strongly anharmonic plasma wave. The amplitude of the wave is so large that the wave breaks, thereby injecting electrons from the background plasma into the accelerating phase. The energy transfer from the laser pulse to the plasma is so strong that the maximum propagation distance is limited to the 100 m range. Therefore, gas jets specifically tuned to these requirements have to be employed. The properties of microscopic supersonic gas jets are thoroughly analyzed in this work. Based on numeric flow simulation, this study encompasses several extensive parameter studies that illuminate all relevant features of supersonic flows in microscopic gas nozzles. This allowed the optimized design of de Laval nozzles with exit diameters ranging from 150 {mu}m to 3 mm. The employment of these nozzles in the experiment greatly improved the electron beam quality. After these optimizations, the laser-driven electron accelerator now yields monoenergetic electron pulses with energies up to 50 MeV and charges between one and ten pC. The electron beam has a typical divergence of 5 mrad and comprises an energy spectrum that is virtually free from low energetic background. The electron pulse duration could not yet be determined experimentally but simulations point towards values in the range of 1 fs. The acceleration gradient is estimated from simulation and experiment to be approximately 0.5 TV/m. The

  10. Controllable robust laser driven ion acceleration from near-critical density relativistic self-transparent plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bin; Meyer-Ter-Vehn, Juergen; Ruhl, Hartmut

    2017-10-01

    We introduce an alternative approach for laser driven self-injected high quality ion acceleration. We call it ion wave breaking acceleration. It operates in relativistic self-transparent plasma for ultra-intense ultra-short laser pulses. Laser propagating in a transparent plasma excites an electron wave as well as an ion wave. When the ion wave breaks, a fraction of ions is self-injected into the positive part of the laser driven wake. This leads to a superior ion pulse with peaked energy spectra; in particular in realistic three-dimensional geometry, the injection occurs localized close to the laser axis producing highly directed bunches. A theory is developed to investigate the ion wave breaking dynamics. Three dimensional Particle-in-Cell simulations with pure-gaussian laser pulses and pre-expanded near-critical density plasma targets have been done to verify the theoretical results. It is shown that hundreds of MeV, easily controllable and manipulable, micron-scale size, highly collimated and quasi-mono-energetic ion beams can be produced by using ultra-intense ultra-short laser pulses with total laser energies less than 10 Joules. Such ion beams may find important applications in tumour therapy. B. Liu acknowledges support from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation. B. Liu and H. Ruhl acknowledge supports from the Gauss Centre for Supercomputing (GCS), and the Cluster-of-Excellence Munich Centre for Advanced Photonics (MAP).

  11. Gadd45a deficiency accelerates BCR-ABL driven chronic myelogenous leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maifrede, Silvia; Skorski, Tomasz; Bhatia, Ravi; Hoffman, Barbara; Liebermann, Dan A.

    2017-01-01

    The Gadd45a stress sensor gene is a member in the Gadd45 family of genes that includes Gadd45b & Gadd45g. To investigate the effect of GADD45A in the development of CML, syngeneic wild type lethally irradiated mice were reconstituted with either wild type or Gadd45a null myeloid progenitors transduced with a retroviral vector expressing the 210-kD BCR-ABL fusion oncoprotein. Loss of Gadd45a was observed to accelerate BCR-ABL driven CML resulting in the development of a more aggressive disease, a significantly shortened median mice survival time, and increased BCR-ABL expressing leukemic stem/progenitor cells (GFP+Lin- cKit+Sca+). GADD45A deficient progenitors expressing BCR-ABL exhibited increased proliferation and decreased apoptosis relative to WT counterparts, which was associated with enhanced PI3K-AKT-mTOR-4E-BP1 signaling, upregulation of p30C/EBPa expression, and hyper-activation of p38 and Stat5. Furthermore, Gadd45a expression in samples obtained from CML patients was upregulated in more indolent chronic phase CML samples and down regulated in aggressive accelerated phase CML and blast crisis CML. These results provide novel evidence that Gadd45a functions as a suppressor of BCR/ABL driven leukemia and may provide a unique prognostic marker of CML progression. PMID:28086219

  12. Application of gas-cooled Accelerator Driven System (ADS) transmutation devices to sustainable nuclear energy development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abanades, A., E-mail: abanades@etsii.upm.es [ETSII/Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, J.Gutierrez Abascal, 2-28006 Madrid (Spain); Garcia, C.; Garcia, L. [Instituto Superior de Tecnologia y Ciencias Aplicadas. Quinta de los, Molinos, Ave. Salvador Allende y Luaces, Ciudad de la Habana, CP 10400, Apartado Postal 6163 (Cuba); Escriva, A.; Perez-Navarro, A. [Instituto de Ingenieria Energetica, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, C.P. 46022 Valencia (Spain); Rosales, J. [Instituto Superior de Tecnologia y Ciencias Aplicadas. Quinta de los, Molinos, Ave. Salvador Allende y Luaces, Ciudad de la Habana, CP 10400, Apartado Postal 6163 (Cuba)

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: > Utilization of Accelerator Driven System (ADS) for Hydrogen production. > Evaluation of the potential use of gas-cooled ADS for a sustainable use of Uranium resources by transmutation of nuclear wastes, electricity and Hydrogen production. > Application of the Sulfur-Iodine thermochemical process to subcritical systems. > Application of CINDER90 to calculate burn-up in subcritical systems. - Abstract: The conceptual design of a pebble bed gas-cooled transmutation device is shown with the aim to evaluate its potential for its deployment in the context of the sustainable nuclear energy development, which considers high temperature reactors for their operation in cogeneration mode, producing electricity, heat and Hydrogen. As differential characteristics our device operates in subcritical mode, driven by a neutron source activated by an accelerator that adds clear safety advantages and fuel flexibility opening the possibility to reduce the nuclear stockpile producing energy from actual LWR irradiated fuel with an efficiency of 45-46%, either in the form of Hydrogen, electricity, or both.

  13. Beam transient analyses of Accelerator Driven Subcritical Reactors based on neutron transport method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Mingtao; Wu, Hongchun [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049, Shaanxi (China); Zheng, Youqi, E-mail: yqzheng@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049, Shaanxi (China); Wang, Kunpeng [Nuclear and Radiation Safety Center, PO Box 8088, Beijing 100082 (China); Li, Xunzhao; Zhou, Shengcheng [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049, Shaanxi (China)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • A transport-based kinetics code for Accelerator Driven Subcritical Reactors is developed. • The performance of different kinetics methods adapted to the ADSR is investigated. • The impacts of neutronic parameters deteriorating with fuel depletion are investigated. - Abstract: The Accelerator Driven Subcritical Reactor (ADSR) is almost external source dominated since there is no additional reactivity control mechanism in most designs. This paper focuses on beam-induced transients with an in-house developed dynamic analysis code. The performance of different kinetics methods adapted to the ADSR is investigated, including the point kinetics approximation and space–time kinetics methods. Then, the transient responds of beam trip and beam overpower are calculated and analyzed for an ADSR design dedicated for minor actinides transmutation. The impacts of some safety-related neutronics parameters deteriorating with fuel depletion are also investigated. The results show that the power distribution varying with burnup leads to large differences in temperature responds during transients, while the impacts of kinetic parameters and feedback coefficients are not very obvious. Classification: Core physic.

  14. Extremely short relativistic-electron-bunch generation in the laser wakefield via novel bunch injection scheme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khachatryan, A.G.; van Goor, F.A.; Boller, Klaus J.; Reitsma, A.J.W.; Jaroszynski, D.A.

    2004-01-01

    Recently a new electron-bunch injection scheme for the laser wakefield accelerator has been proposed [JETP Lett. 74, 371 (2001); Phys. Rev. E 65, 046504 (2002)]. In this scheme, a low energy electron bunch, sent in a plasma channel just before a high-intensity laser pulse, is trapped in the laser

  15. Increased p53 activity does not accelerate telomere-driven ageing

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Cao, Isabel; García-Cao, Marta; Tomás-Loba, Antonia; Martin-Caballero, Juan; Flores, Juana M; Klatt, Peter; Blasco, María A; Serrano, Manuel

    2006-01-01

    There is a great interest in determining the impact of p53 on ageing and, for this, it is important to discriminate among the known causes of ageing. Telomere loss is a well-established source of age-associated damage, which by itself can recapitulate ageing in mouse models. Here, we have used a genetic approach to interrogate whether p53 contributes to the elimination of telomere-damaged cells and its impact on telomere-driven ageing. We have generated compound mice carrying three functional copies of the p53 gene (super-p53) in a telomerase-deficient background and we have measured the presence of chromosomal abnormalities and DNA damage in several tissues. We have found that the in vivo load of telomere-derived chromosomal damage is significantly decreased in super-p53/telomerase-null mice compared with normal-p53/telomerase-null mice. Interestingly, the presence of extra p53 activity neither accelerates nor delays telomere-driven ageing. From these observations, we conclude that p53 has an active role in eliminating telomere-damaged cells, and we exclude the possibility of an age-promoting effect of p53 on telomere-driven ageing. PMID:16582880

  16. Gravity-Driven Acceleration and Kinetic Inflation in Noncommutative Brans-Dicke Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasouli, S. M. M.; Vargas Moniz, Paulo

    By assuming the spatially flat FLRW line-element and employing the Hamiltonian formalism, a noncommutative (NC) setting of the Brans-Dicke (BD) theory is introduced. We investigate gravity-driven acceleration and kinetic inflation in this NC BD cosmology. Despite to the commutative case, in which both the scale factor and BD scalar field are obtained in power-law forms (in terms of the cosmic time), in our herein NC model, we see that the power-law scalar factor is multiplied by a dynamical exponential warp factor. This warp factor depends on not only the noncommutative parameter but also the momentum conjugate associated to the BD scalar field. For very small values of this parameter, we obtain an appropriate inflationary solution, which can overcome problems within standard BD cosmology in a more efficient manner. Moreover, we see that a graceful exit from an early acceleration epoch towards a decelerating radiation epoch is provided. For late times, due to the presence of the NC parameter, we obtain a zero acceleration epoch, which can be interpreted as the coarse-grained explanation.

  17. THz cavities and injectors for compact electron acceleration using laser-driven THz sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moein Fakhari

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available We present a design methodology for developing ultrasmall electron injectors and accelerators based on cascaded cavities excited by short multicycle THz pulses obtained from laser-driven THz generation schemes. Based on the developed concept for optimal coupling of the THz pulse, a THz electron injector and two accelerating stages are designed. The designed electron gun consists of a four cell cavity operating at 300 GHz and a door-knob waveguide to coaxial coupler. Moreover, special designs are proposed to mitigate the problem of thermal heat flow and induced mechanical stress to achieve a stable device. We demonstrated a gun based on cascaded cavities that is powered by only 1.1 mJ of THz energy in 300 cycles to accelerate electron bunches up to 250 keV. An additional two linac sections can be added with five and four cell cavities both operating at 300 GHz boosting the bunch energy up to 1.2 MeV using a 4-mJ THz pulse.

  18. Detailed experimental results for high-trapping efficiency and narrow energy spread in a laser-driven accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. D. Kimura

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Presented are details of the staged electron laser acceleration (STELLA experiment, which demonstrated high-trapping efficiency and narrow energy spread in a staged laser-driven accelerator. Trapping efficiencies of up to 80% and energy spreads down to 0.36% (1σ were demonstrated. The experiment validated an approach that may be suitable for the basic design of a laser-driven accelerator system. In this approach, a laser-driven modulator together with a chicane creates a train of microbunches spaced apart by the laser wavelength. These microbunches are sent into a second laser-driven accelerator designed to efficiently trap the microbunches in the ponderomotive potential well of the laser electric field while maintaining a narrow energy spread. The STELLA scientific apparatus and procedures are described in detail. In-depth comparisons between the data and model are given including the predicted energy spectrum, energy-phase plot, and microbunch length profile. Data and model comparisons as a function of the phase delay between the microbunches and the accelerating wave are presented. The model is exercised to reveal how the high-trapping efficiency process evolves during the acceleration process.

  19. Compton MeV Gamma-ray Source on Texas Petawatt Laser-Driven GeV Electron Accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Joseph M.; Tsai, Hai-En; Zgadzaj, Rafal; Wang, Xiaoming; Chang, Vincent; Fazel, Neil; Henderson, Watson; Downer, M. C.; Texas Petawatt Laser Team

    2015-11-01

    Compton Backscatter (CBS) from laser wakefield accelerated (LWFA) electron bunches is a promising compact, femtosecond (fs) source of tunable high-energy photons. CBS x-rays have been produced from LWFAs using two methods: (1) retro-reflection of the LWFA drive pulse via an in-line plasma mirror (PM); (2) scattering of a counter-propagating secondary pulse split from the drive pulse. Previously MeV photons were only demonstrated by the latter method, but the former method is self-aligning. Here, using the Texas Petawatt (TPW) laser and a self-aligned near-retro-reflecting PM, we generate bright CBS γ-rays with central energies higher than 10 MeV. The 100 μm focus of TPW delivers 100 J in 100 fs pulses, with intensity 6x1018 W/cm2 (a0 =1.5), to the entrance of a 6-cm long Helium gas cell. A thin, plastic PM immediately following the gas cell exit retro-reflects the LWFA driving pulse into the oncoming 0.5 - 2 GeV electron beam to produce a directional beam of γ-rays without significant bremsstrahlung background. A Pb-filter pack on a thick, pixelated, CsI(Tl) scintillator is used to estimate the spectrum via differential transmission and to observe the beam profile. Recorded beam profiles indicate a low divergence. Department of Physics, The University of Texas at Austin

  20. Low-charge, hard x-ray free electron laser driven with an X-band injector and accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yipeng Sun (孙一鹏

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available After the successful operation of the Free Electron Laser in Hamburg (FLASH and the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS, soft and hard x-ray free electron lasers (FELs are being built, designed, or proposed at many accelerator laboratories. Acceleration employing lower frequency rf cavities, ranging from L-band to C-band, is usually adopted in these designs. In the first stage bunch compression, higher-frequency harmonic rf system is employed to linearize the beam’s longitudinal phase space, which is nonlinearly chirped during the lower frequency rf acceleration process. In this paper, a hard x-ray FEL design using an all X-band accelerator at 11.424 GHz (from photocathode rf gun to linac end is presented, without the assistance of any harmonic rf linearization. It achieves LCLS-like performance at low charge using X-band linac drivers, which is more versatile, efficient, and compact than ones using S-band or C-band rf technology. It employs initially 42 microns long (rms, low-charge (10 pC electron bunches from an X-band photoinjector. An overall bunch compression ratio of roughly 100 times is proposed in a two stage bunch compressor system. The start-to-end macroparticle 3D simulation employing several computer codes is presented in this paper, where space charge, wakefields, and incoherent and coherent synchrotron radiation effects are included. Employing an undulator with a short period of 1.5 cm, a Genesis FEL simulation shows successful lasing at a wavelength of 0.15 nm with a pulse length of 2 fs and a power saturation length as short as 20 meters, which is equivalent to LCLS low-charge mode. Its overall length of both accelerators and undulators is 180 meters (much shorter than the effective LCLS overall length of 1230 meters, including an accelerator length of 1100 meters and an undulator length of 130 meters, which makes it possible to be built in places where only limited space is available.

  1. A Data-driven Analytic Model for Proton Acceleration by Large-scale Solar Coronal Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozarev, Kamen A.; Schwadron, Nathan A.

    2016-11-01

    We have recently studied the development of an eruptive filament-driven, large-scale off-limb coronal bright front (OCBF) in the low solar corona, using remote observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory’s Advanced Imaging Assembly EUV telescopes. In that study, we obtained high-temporal resolution estimates of the OCBF parameters regulating the efficiency of charged particle acceleration within the theoretical framework of diffusive shock acceleration (DSA). These parameters include the time-dependent front size, speed, and strength, as well as the upstream coronal magnetic field orientations with respect to the front’s surface normal direction. Here we present an analytical particle acceleration model, specifically developed to incorporate the coronal shock/compressive front properties described above, derived from remote observations. We verify the model’s performance through a grid of idealized case runs using input parameters typical for large-scale coronal shocks, and demonstrate that the results approach the expected DSA steady-state behavior. We then apply the model to the event of 2011 May 11 using the OCBF time-dependent parameters derived by Kozarev et al. We find that the compressive front likely produced energetic particles as low as 1.3 solar radii in the corona. Comparing the modeled and observed fluences near Earth, we also find that the bulk of the acceleration during this event must have occurred above 1.5 solar radii. With this study we have taken a first step in using direct observations of shocks and compressions in the innermost corona to predict the onsets and intensities of solar energetic particle events.

  2. Electron bunch length measurement with a wakefield radiation decelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Li

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a novel method to measure the electron bunch length with a dielectric wakefield radiation (DWR decelerator which is composed of two dielectric-lined waveguides (DLWs and an electron spectrometer. When an electron beam passes through a DLW, the DWR is excited which leads to an energy loss of the electron beam. The energy loss is found to be largely dependent on the electron bunch length and can be easily measured by an electron spectrometer which is essential for a normal accelerator facility. Our study shows that this method has a high resolution and a great simplicity.

  3. Group velocity effect on resonant, long-range wake-fields in slow wave structures

    CERN Document Server

    Smirnov, A V

    2002-01-01

    Synchronous wake-fields in a dispersive waveguide are derived in a general explicit form on the basis of a rigorous electro-dynamical approach using Fourier transformations. The fundamental role of group velocity in wake-field propagation, calculation of attenuation, amplitudes, form-factors and loss-factors is analyzed for single bunch radiation. Adiabatic tapering of the waveguide and bunch density variation is taken into account analytically for the time-domain fields. Effects of field 'compression/expansion' and group delays are demonstrated. The role of these effects is discussed for single bunch wake-fields, transient beam loading, BBU and HOMs. A novel waveguide structure with central rf coupling and both positive and negative velocities is proposed. It can be used effectively in both high-energy accelerators and single-section linacs.

  4. Laser-driven electron beam and radiation sources for basic, medical and industrial sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    NAKAJIMA, Kazuhisa

    2015-01-01

    To date active research on laser-driven plasma-based accelerators have achieved great progress on production of high-energy, high-quality electron and photon beams in a compact scale. Such laser plasma accelerators have been envisaged bringing a wide range of applications in basic, medical and industrial sciences. Here inheriting the groundbreaker’s review article on “Laser Acceleration and its future” [Toshiki Tajima, (2010)],1) we would like to review recent progress of producing such electron beams due to relativistic laser-plasma interactions followed by laser wakefield acceleration and lead to the scaling formulas that are useful to design laser plasma accelerators with controllability of beam energy and charge. Lastly specific examples of such laser-driven electron/photon beam sources are illustrated. PMID:26062737

  5. Net Shape Manufacturing of Accelerator Components by High Pressure Combustion Driven Powder Compaction

    CERN Document Server

    Nagarathnam, Karthik

    2005-01-01

    We present an overview of the net shape and cost-effective manufacturing aspects of high density accelerator (normal and superconducting) components (e.g., NLC Copper disks) and materials behavior of copper, stainless steel, refractory materials (W, Mo and TZM), niobium and SiC by innovative high pressure Combustion Driven Compaction (CDC) technology. Some of the unique process advantages include high densities, net-shaping, improved surface finish/quality, suitability for simple/complex geometries, synthesis of single as well as multilayered materials, milliseconds of compaction process time, little or no post-machining, and process flexibility. Some of the key results of CDC fabricated sample geometries, process optimization, sintering responses and structure/property characteristics such as physical properties, surface roughness/quality, electrical conductivity, select microstructures and mechanical properties will be presented. Anticipated applications of CDC compaction include advanced x-ray targets, vac...

  6. Research Programme for the 660 Mev Proton Accelerator Driven MOX-Plutonium Subcritical Assembly

    CERN Document Server

    Barashenkov, V S; Buttseva, G L; Dudarev, S Yu; Polanski, A; Puzynin, I V; Sissakian, A N

    2000-01-01

    The paper presents a research programme of the Experimental Acclerator Driven System (ADS), which employs a subcritical assembly and a 660 MeV proton acceletator operating at the Laboratory of Nuclear Problems of the JINR, Dubna. MOX fuel (25% PuO_2 + 75% UO_2) designed for the BN-600 reactor use will be adopted for the core of the assembly. The present conceptual design of the experimental subcritical assembly is based on a core of a nominal unit capacity of 15 kW (thermal). This corresponds to the multiplication coefficient k_eff = 0.945, energetic gain G = 30 and the accelerator beam power 0.5 kW.

  7. New shielding material development for compact accelerator-driven neutron source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang Hu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The Compact Accelerator-driven Neutron Source (CANS, especially the transportable neutron source is longing for high effectiveness shielding material. For this reason, new shielding material is researched in this investigation. The component of shielding material is designed and many samples are manufactured. Then the attenuation detection experiments were carried out. In the detections, the dead time of the detector appeases when the proton beam is too strong. To grasp the linear range and nonlinear range of the detector, two currents of proton are employed in Pb attenuation detections. The transmission ratio of new shielding material, polyethylene (PE, PE + Pb, BPE + Pb is detected under suitable current of proton. Since the results of experimental neutrons and γ-rays appear as together, the MCNP and PHITS simulations are applied to assisting the analysis. The new shielding material could reduce of the weight and volume compared with BPE + Pb and PE + Pb.

  8. System and safety studies of accelerator driven systems for transmutation. Annual report 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arzhanov, Vasily; Fokau, Andrei; Persson, Calle; Runevall, Odd; Sandberg, Nils; Tesinsky, Milan; Wallenius, Janne; Youpeng Zhang (Div. of Reactor Physics, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2008-05-15

    Within the project 'System and safety studies of accelerator driven systems for transmutation', research on design and safety of sub-critical reactors for recycling of minor actinides is performed. During 2007, the reactor physics division at KTH has calculated safety parameters for EFIT-400 with cermet fuel, permitting to start the transient safety analysis. The accuracy of different reactivity meters applied to the YALINA facility was assessed and neutron detection studies were performed. A model to address deviations from point kinetic behaviour was developed. Studies of basic radiation damage physics included calculations of vacancy formation and activation enthalpies in bcc niobium. In order to predict the oxygen potential of inert matrix fuels, a thermo-chemical model for mixed actinide oxides was implemented in a phase equilibrium code

  9. An Electron Bunch Compression Scheme for a Superconducting Radio Frequency Linear Accelerator Driven Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Tennant, S.V. Benson, D. Douglas, P. Evtushenko, R.A. Legg

    2011-09-01

    We describe an electron bunch compression scheme suitable for use in a light source driven by a superconducting radio frequency (SRF) linac. The key feature is the use of a recirculating linac to perform the initial bunch compression. Phasing of the second pass beam through the linac is chosen to de-chirp the electron bunch prior to acceleration to the final energy in an SRF linac ('afterburner'). The final bunch compression is then done at maximum energy. This scheme has the potential to circumvent some of the most technically challenging aspects of current longitudinal matches; namely transporting a fully compressed, high peak current electron bunch through an extended SRF environment, the need for a RF harmonic linearizer and the need for a laser heater. Additional benefits include a substantial savings in capital and operational costs by efficiently using the available SRF gradient.

  10. System and safety studies of accelerator driven transmutation. Annual Report 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gudowski, W.; Wallenius, J.; Tucek, K.; Eriksson, Marcus; Carlsson, Johan; Seltborg, P.; Cetnar, J.; Chakarova, R.; Westlen, D. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Nuclear and Reactor Physics

    2002-03-01

    The research on safety of Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Systems (ADS) at the Dept. of Nuclear and Reactor Physics has been focused in year 2001 on: a) ADS core design and development of advanced nuclear fuel optimised for high transmutation rates and good safety features; b) analysis of ADS-dynamics; c) computer code and nuclear data development relevant for simulation and optimization of ADS; d) participation in ADS experiments including 1 MW spallation target manufacturing, subcritical experiments MUSE (CEA-Cadarache) and YALINA experiment in Minsk. The Dept. is very actively participating in many European projects in the 5th Framework Programme of the European Community. Most of the research topics reported in this paper are referred to by appendices, which have been published in the open literature. The topics, which are not yet published, are described here in more details.

  11. Lasers As Particle Accelerators In Medicine: From Laser-Driven Protons To Imaging With Thomson Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogorelsky, I. V.; Babzien, M.; Polyanskiy, M. N.; Yakimenko, V.; Dover, N. P.; Palmer, C. A. J.; Najmudin, Z.; Shkolnikov, P.; Williams, O.; Rosenzweig, J.; Oliva, P.; Carpinelli, M.; Golosio, B.; Delogu, P.; Stefanini, A.; Endrizzi, M.

    2011-06-01

    We report our recent progress using a high-power, picosecond CO2 laser for Thomson scattering and ion acceleration experiments. These experiments capitalize on certain advantages of long-wavelength CO2 lasers, such as their high number of photons per energy unit and beneficial wavelength- scaling of the electrons' ponderomotive energy and critical plasma frequency. High X-ray fluxes produced in the interactions of the counter-propagating laser- and electron-beams for obtaining single-shot, high-contrast images of biological objects. The laser, focused on a hydrogen jet, generated a monoenergetic proton beam via the radiation-pressure mechanism. The energy of protons produced by this method scales linearly with the laser's intensity. We present a plan for scaling the process into the range of 100-MeV proton energy via upgrading the CO2 laser. This development will enable an advance to the laser-driven proton cancer therapy.

  12. Shock creation and particle acceleration driven by plasma expansion into a rarefied medium

    CERN Document Server

    Sarri, G; Dieckmann, M E; Borghesi, M

    2010-01-01

    The expansion of a dense plasma through a more rarefied ionised medium is a phenomenon of interest in various physics environments ranging from astrophysics to high energy density laser- matter laboratory experiments. Here this situation is modeled via a 1D Particle-In-Cell simulation; a jump in the plasma density of a factor of 100 is introduced in the middle of an otherwise equally dense electron-proton plasma with an uniform proton and electron temperature of 10eV and 1keV respectively. The diffusion of the dense plasma, through the rarified one, triggers the onset of different nonlinear phenomena such as a strong ion-acoustic shock wave and a rarefaction wave. Secondary structures are detected, some of which are driven by a drift instability of the rarefaction wave. Efficient proton acceleration occurs ahead of the shock, bringing the maximum proton velocity up to 60 times the initial ion thermal speed.

  13. Towards a novel laser-driven method of exotic nuclei extraction−acceleration for fundamental physics and technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishiuchi, M., E-mail: sergei@jaea.go.jp; Sakaki, H.; Esirkepov, T. Zh. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Kansai Photon Science Institute (Japan); Nishio, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Advanced Science Research Center (Japan); Pikuz, T. A.; Faenov, A. Ya. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Kansai Photon Science Institute (Japan); Skobelev, I. Yu. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute for High Temperature (Russian Federation); Orlandi, R. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Advanced Science Research Center (Japan); Pirozhkov, A. S.; Sagisaka, A.; Ogura, K.; Kanasaki, M.; Kiriyama, H.; Fukuda, Y. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Kansai Photon Science Institute (Japan); Koura, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Advanced Science Research Center (Japan); Kando, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Kansai Photon Science Institute (Japan); Yamauchi, T. [Graduate School of Maritime Sciences (Japan); Watanabe, Y. [Kyushu University, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Sciences (Japan); Bulanov, S. V., E-mail: svbulanov@gmail.com; Kondo, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Kansai Photon Science Institute (Japan); and others

    2016-04-15

    A combination of a petawatt laser and nuclear physics techniques can crucially facilitate the measurement of exotic nuclei properties. With numerical simulations and laser-driven experiments we show prospects for the Laser-driven Exotic Nuclei extraction–acceleration method proposed in [M. Nishiuchi et al., Phys, Plasmas 22, 033107 (2015)]: a femtosecond petawatt laser, irradiating a target bombarded by an external ion beam, extracts from the target and accelerates to few GeV highly charged short-lived heavy exotic nuclei created in the target via nuclear reactions.

  14. Monte-Carlo Simulation of the Features of Bi-Reactior Accelerator Driven Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Bznuni, S A; Khudaverdian, A G; Barashenkov, V S; Sosnin, A N; Polyanskii, A A

    2002-01-01

    Parameters of accelerator-driven systems containing two "cascade" subcritical assemblies (liquid metal fast reactor, used as a neutron booster, and a thermal reactor, where main heat production is taking place) are investigated. Three main reactor cores analogous to VVER-1000, MSBR-1000 and CANDU-6 reactors are considered. Functioning in a safe mode (k_{eff}=0.94-0.98) these systems under consideration demonstrate much larger capacity in the wide range of k_{eff} in comparison with analogous systems without intermediate fast booster reactor and simultaneously having the density of thermal neutron flux equal to Phi^{max}=10^{14} cm^{-2}c^{-1} and operating with the fast and thermal zones they are capable to transmute the whole scope of nuclear waste reducing the requirements on the beam current of the accelerator by one order of magnitude. It seems to be the most important in case when molten salt thermal breeder reactor cores are considered as a main heat generating zone.

  15. Analytic approach to nonlinear hydrodynamic instabilities driven by time-dependent accelerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikaelian, K O

    2009-09-28

    We extend our earlier model for Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities to the more general class of hydrodynamic instabilities driven by a time-dependent acceleration g(t) . Explicit analytic solutions for linear as well as nonlinear amplitudes are obtained for several g(t)'s by solving a Schroedinger-like equation d{sup 2}{eta}/dt{sup 2} - g(t)kA{eta} = 0 where A is the Atwood number and k is the wavenumber of the perturbation amplitude {eta}(t). In our model a simple transformation k {yields} k{sub L} and A {yields} A{sub L} connects the linear to the nonlinear amplitudes: {eta}{sup nonlinear} (k,A) {approx} (1/k{sub L})ln{eta}{sup linear} (k{sub L}, A{sub L}). The model is found to be in very good agreement with direct numerical simulations. Bubble amplitudes for a variety of accelerations are seen to scale with s defined by s = {integral} {radical}g(t)dt, while spike amplitudes prefer scaling with displacement {Delta}x = {integral}[{integral}g(t)dt]dt.

  16. Application of variance reduction technique to nuclear transmutation system driven by accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasa, Toshinobu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    In Japan, it is the basic policy to dispose the high level radioactive waste arising from spent nuclear fuel in stable deep strata after glass solidification. If the useful elements in the waste can be separated and utilized, resources are effectively used, and it can be expected to guarantee high economical efficiency and safety in the disposal in strata. Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute proposed the hybrid type transmutation system, in which high intensity proton accelerator and subcritical fast core are combined, or the nuclear reactor which is optimized for the exclusive use for transmutation. The tungsten target, minor actinide nitride fuel transmutation system and the melted minor actinide chloride salt target fuel transmutation system are outlined. The conceptual figures of both systems are shown. As the method of analysis, Version 2.70 of Lahet Code System which was developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory in USA was adopted. In case of carrying out the analysis of accelerator-driven subcritical core in the energy range below 20 MeV, variance reduction technique must be applied. (K.I.)

  17. Design of an electron-accelerator-driven compact neutron source for non-destructive assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, A.; Ikeda, S.; Hayashizaki, N.

    2017-09-01

    The threat of nuclear and radiological terrorism remains one of the greatest challenges to international security, and the threat is constantly evolving. In order to prevent nuclear terrorism, it is important to avoid unlawful import of nuclear materials, such as uranium and plutonium. Development of technologies for non-destructive measurement, detection and recognition of nuclear materials is essential for control at national borders. At Tokyo Institute of Technology, a compact neutron source system driven by an electron-accelerator has been designed for non-destructive assay (NDA). This system is composed of a combination of an S-band (2.856 GHz) RF-gun, a tungsten target to produce photons by bremsstrahlung, a beryllium target, which is suitable for use in generating neutrons because of the low threshold energy of photonuclear reactions, and a moderator to thermalize the fast neutrons. The advantage of this system can accelerate a short pulse beam with a pulse width less than 1 μs which is difficult to produce by neutron generators. The amounts of photons and neutron produced by electron beams were simulated using the Monte Carlo simulation code PHITS 2.82. When the RF-gun is operated with an average electron beam current of 0.1 mA, it is expected that the neutron intensities are 1.19 × 109 n/s and 9.94 × 109 n/s for incident electron beam energies of 5 MeV and 10 MeV, respectively.

  18. Quasi-monoenergetic ion beam acceleration by laser-driven shock and solitary waves in near-critical plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, W. L.; Qiao, B., E-mail: bqiao@pku.edu.cn; Huang, T. W.; Shen, X. F.; You, W. Y. [Center for Applied Physics and Technology, HEDPS, and State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Extreme Optics, Shanxi University, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030006 (China); Yan, X. Q. [Center for Applied Physics and Technology, HEDPS, and State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Wu, S. Z. [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China); Zhou, C. T.; He, X. T. [Center for Applied Physics and Technology, HEDPS, and State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China)

    2016-07-15

    Ion acceleration in near-critical plasmas driven by intense laser pulses is investigated theoretically and numerically. A theoretical model has been given for clarification of the ion acceleration dynamics in relation to different laser and target parameters. Two distinct regimes have been identified, where ions are accelerated by, respectively, the laser-induced shock wave in the weakly driven regime (comparatively low laser intensity) and the nonlinear solitary wave in the strongly driven regime (comparatively high laser intensity). Two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations show that quasi-monoenergetic proton beams with a peak energy of 94.6 MeV and an energy spread 15.8% are obtained by intense laser pulses at intensity I{sub 0} = 3 × 10{sup 20 }W/cm{sup 2} and pulse duration τ = 0.5 ps in the strongly driven regime, which is more advantageous than that got in the weakly driven regime. In addition, 233 MeV proton beams with narrow spread can be produced by extending τ to 1.0 ps in the strongly driven regime.

  19. Antigen-driven bystander effect accelerates epicutaneous sensitization with a new protein allergen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Jhang-Sian

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Exposure to protein allergen epicutaneously, inducing a Th2-dominant immune response, sensitizes the host to the development of atopic disease. Antigen-driven bystander effect demonstrates that polarized T cells could instruct naïve T cells to differentiate into T cells with similar phenotype. In this study, we aimed to determine the contribution of antigen-driven bystander effect on epicutaneous sensitization with a newly introduced protein allergen. BALB/c mice were immunized intraperitoneally with BSA emulsified in alum, known to induce a Th2 response, three weeks before given BSA and OVA epicutaneously. Lymph node cells from these mice restimulated with OVA secreted higher levels IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13 as compared with cells from mice without BSA immunization. In addition, BALB/c mice immunized subcutaneously with BSA emulsified in complete Freund's adjuvant, known to induce a Th1-predominant response, also induced higher Th1 as well as Th2 cytokine response when restimulated with OVA as compared with mice without immunization. We demonstrated that subcutaneous immunization with BSA in CFA induced Th2 as well as Th1 response. The threshold of epicutaneous sensitization to OVA was also reduced, possibly due to increased expressions of IL-4 and IL-10 in the draining lymph nodes during the early phase of sensitization. In conclusion, antigen-driven bystander effect, whether it is of Th1- or Th2-predominant nature, can accelerate epicutaneous sensitization by a newly introduced protein allergen. These results provide a possible explanation for mono- to poly-sensitization spread commonly observed in atopic children.

  20. Laser acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajima, T.; Nakajima, K.; Mourou, G.

    2017-02-01

    The fundamental idea of Laser Wakefield Acceleration (LWFA) is reviewed. An ultrafast intense laser pulse drives coherent wakefield with a relativistic amplitude robustly supported by the plasma. While the large amplitude of wakefields involves collective resonant oscillations of the eigenmode of the entire plasma electrons, the wake phase velocity ˜ c and ultrafastness of the laser pulse introduce the wake stability and rigidity. A large number of worldwide experiments show a rapid progress of this concept realization toward both the high-energy accelerator prospect and broad applications. The strong interest in this has been spurring and stimulating novel laser technologies, including the Chirped Pulse Amplification, the Thin Film Compression, the Coherent Amplification Network, and the Relativistic Mirror Compression. These in turn have created a conglomerate of novel science and technology with LWFA to form a new genre of high field science with many parameters of merit in this field increasing exponentially lately. This science has triggered a number of worldwide research centers and initiatives. Associated physics of ion acceleration, X-ray generation, and astrophysical processes of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays are reviewed. Applications such as X-ray free electron laser, cancer therapy, and radioisotope production etc. are considered. A new avenue of LWFA using nanomaterials is also emerging.

  1. Wakefield Computations for the Injector (Part I)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Limborg-Deprey, C.

    2010-12-13

    In this document, we report on basic wakefield computations used to establish the impedance budget for the LCLS injector. Systematic comparisons between analytic formulae and results from ABCI are done. Finally, a comparison between 2D and 3D wakefield calculations are given for a cross. The three parts of the document are presented as follows: (1) ABCI computations for a few structures (Flange, Bellows...); (2) Comparison analytic with ABCI runs; and (3) Comparison Cross and Cavity using MAFIA.

  2. Exciton-polariton wakefields in semiconductor microcavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terças, H., E-mail: hugo.tercas@uibk.ac.at [Physics of Information Group, Instituto de Telecomunicações, Lisbon (Portugal); Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Innsbruck, Technikerstrasse 25, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Mendonça, J.T., E-mail: titomend@ist.utl.pt [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo SP, 05508-090 Brazil (Brazil); IPFN, Instituto Superior Técnico, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2016-02-22

    We consider the excitation of polariton wakefields due to a propagating light pulse in a semiconductor microcavity. We show that two kinds of wakes are possible, depending on the constituents fraction (either exciton or photon) of the polariton wavefunction. The nature of the wakefields (pure excitonic or polaritonic) can be controlled by changing the speed of propagation of the external pump. This process could be used as a diagnostic for the internal parameters of the microcavity.

  3. Radiation emission from braided electrons in interacting wakefields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallin, Erik; Gonoskov, Arkady; Marklund, Mattias

    2017-09-01

    The radiation emission from electrons wiggling in a laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) process, being initially considered as a parasitic effect for the electron energy gain, can eventually serve as a novel X-ray source, which could be used for diagnostic purposes. Although several schemes for enhancing the X-ray emission in LWFA has been recently proposed and analyzed, finding an efficient way to use and control this radiation emission remains an important problem. Based on analytical estimates and 3D particle-in-cell simulations, we here propose and examine a new method utilizing two colliding LWFA patterns with an angle in between their propagation directions. Varying the angle of collision, the distance of acceleration before the collision and other parameters provide an unprecedented control over the emission parameters. Moreover, we reveal here that for a collision angle of 5°, the two wakefields merge into a single LWFA cavity, inducing strong and stable collective oscillations between the two trapped electron bunches. This results in an X-ray emission which is strongly peaked, both in the spatial and frequency domains. The basic concept of the proposed scheme may pave a way for using LWFA radiation sources in many important applications, such as phase-contrast radiography.

  4. System and safety studies of accelerator driven transmutation. Annual Report 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gudowski, Waclaw; Wallenius, Jan; Tucek, Kamil [Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Nuclear and Reactor Physics] [and others

    2004-12-01

    The research on safety of Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Systems (ADS) at the Dept. of Nuclear and Reactor Physics reported here has been focused on different aspects of safety of the Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Systems and on Transmutation research in more general terms. An overview of the topics of our research is given in the Summary which is followed by detailed reports as separate chapters or subchapters. Some of the research topics reported in this report are referred to appendices, which have been published in the open literature. Topics, which are not yet published, are described with more details in the main part of this report. Main focus has been, as before, largely determined by the programme of the European projects of the 5th Framework Programme in which KTH is actively participating. In particular: a) ADS core design and development of advanced nuclear fuel optimised for high transmutation rates and good safety features. This activity includes even computer modeling of nuclear fuel production. Three different ADS-core concept are being investigated: Conceptual design of Pb-Bi cooled core with nitride fuel so called Sing-Sing Core developed at KTH; Pb-Bi cooled core with oxide fuel so called ANSALDO design for the European Project PDS-XADS; Gas cooled core with oxide fuel a design investigated for the European Project PDS-XADS. b) analysis of potential of advance fuels, in particular nitrides with high content of minor actinides; c) analysis of ADS-dynamics and assessment of major reactivity feedbacks; d) emergency heat removal from ADS; e) participation in ADS: MUSE (CEA-Cadarache), YALINA subcritical experiment in Minsk and designing of the subcritical experiment SAD in Dubna; f) theoretical and simulation studies of radiation damage in high neutron (and/or proton) fluxes; g) computer code and nuclear data development relevant for simulation and optimization of ADS, validation of the MCB code and sensitivity analysis; h) studies of

  5. Ion Motion Induced Emittance Growth of Matched Electron Beams in Plasma Wakefields

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Weiming; Lu, Wei; Huang, Chengkun; Xu, Xinlu; Hogan, Mark J.; Joshi, Chan; Mori, Warren B.

    2017-06-01

    Plasma-based acceleration is being considered as the basis for building a future linear collider. Nonlinear plasma wakefields have ideal properties for accelerating and focusing electron beams. Preservation of the emittance of nano-Coulomb beams with nanometer scale matched spot sizes in these wakefields remains a critical issue due to ion motion caused by their large space charge forces. We use fully resolved quasistatic particle-in-cell simulations of electron beams in hydrogen and lithium plasmas, including when the accelerated beam has different emittances in the two transverse planes. The projected emittance initially grows and rapidly saturates with a maximum emittance growth of less than 80% in hydrogen and 20% in lithium. The use of overfocused beams is found to dramatically reduce the emittance growth. The underlying physics that leads to the lower than expected emittance growth is elucidated.

  6. The participation of IPEN in the IAEA coordinated research projects on accelerators driven systems (ADS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maiorino, J.R.; Santos, A.; Carluccio, T.; Rossi, P.C.R.; Antunes, A.; Oliveira, F. de; Lee, S.M. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: maiorino@ipen.br

    2007-07-01

    This paper describes the participation of the IPEN in the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Projects(CRP) on Analytical and Experimental Benchmark Analysis on ADS and Low Enriched Uranium Fuel Utilization in ADS. The first CRP has as specific objective to improve the present understanding of the coupling of an external neutron source [e.g. a spallation source in the case of the accelerator driven system (ADS)] with a multiplicative sub-critical core, and the second CRP, or collaborative work, the utilization of LEU in existing or planned ADS facilities. IPEN participate in both CRP through a research contract (13388), and although there are several benchmarks defined in both CRP, presently IPEN is participating in the activities related with reactor physics benchmark of the Yalina Booster facility in Belarus, in the analytical and numerical benchmarking of methods and codes for ADS kinetics, and in the ADS target calculations. Besides, since there are plans to introduce a compact neutron generator in a sub critical core of the IPEN-MB-01 facility, a benchmark of a simulation of such project has been proposed in the LEU-ADS CRP. The paper will review the CRPs with details on the activities in which IPEN is participating. (author)

  7. CFD Analysis and Design of Detailed Target Configurations for an Accelerator-Driven Subcritical System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraus, Adam; Merzari, Elia; Sofu, Tanju; Zhong, Zhaopeng; Gohar, Yousry

    2016-08-01

    High-fidelity analysis has been utilized in the design of beam target options for an accelerator driven subcritical system. Designs featuring stacks of plates with square cross section have been investigated for both tungsten and uranium target materials. The presented work includes the first thermal-hydraulic simulations of the full, detailed target geometry. The innovative target cooling manifold design features many regions with complex flow features, including 90 bends and merging jets, which necessitate three-dimensional fluid simulations. These were performed using the commercial computational fluid dynamics code STAR-CCM+. Conjugate heat transfer was modeled between the plates, cladding, manifold structure, and fluid. Steady-state simulations were performed but lacked good residual convergence. Unsteady simulations were then performed, which converged well and demonstrated that flow instability existed in the lower portion of the manifold. It was established that the flow instability had little effect on the peak plate temperatures, which were well below the melting point. The estimated plate surface temperatures and target region pressure were shown to provide sufficient margin to subcooled boiling for standard operating conditions. This demonstrated the safety of both potential target configurations during normal operation.

  8. System and safety studies of accelerator driven transmutation Annual Report 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gudowski, Waclaw; Wallenius, Jan; Arzhanov, Vasily; Jolkkonen, Mikael; Eriksson, Marcus; Seltborg, Per; Westlen, Daniel; Lagerstedt, Christina; Isaksson, Patrick; Persson, Carl-Magnus; Aalander, Alexandra [Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Nuclear and Reactor Physics

    2006-11-15

    The results of the research activities on System and Safety of Accelerator-Driven Transmutation (ADS) at the Department of Nuclear and Reactor Physics are described in this report followed by the Appendices of the relevant scientific papers published in 2005. PhD and Licentiate dissertations of Marcus Ericsson, Per Seltborg, Christina Lagerstedt and Daniel Westlen (see Appendices) reflect the research mainstream of 2005. Year 2005 was also very rich in international activities with ADS in focus. Summary of conferences, seminars and lecturing activities is given in Chapter 9 Research activities of 2005 have been focused on several areas: system and safety studies of ADS; subcritical experiments; ADS source efficiency studies; nuclear fuel cycle analysis; potential of reactor based transmutation; ADS fuel development; simulation of radiation damage; and development of codes and methods. Large part of the research activities has been well integrated with the European projects of the 5th and 6th Framework Programmes of the European Commission in which KTH is actively participating. In particular European projects: RED-IMPACT, CONFIRM, FUTURE, EUROTRANS and NURESIM.

  9. MCNPX simulations of fast neutron diagnostics for accelerator-driven systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habob, Moinul

    2005-12-15

    In accelerator-driven systems, the neutron spectrum will extend all the way up to the incident beam energy, i.e., several hundred MeV or even up to GeV energies. The high neutron energy allows novel diagnostics with a set of measurement techniques that can be used in a sub-critical reactor environment. Such measurements are primarily connected to system safety and validation. This report shows that in-core fast-neutron diagnostics can be employed to monitor changes in the position of incidence of the primary proton beam onto the neutron production target. It has also been shown that fast neutrons can be used to detect temperature-dependent density changes in a liquid lead-bismuth target. Fast neutrons can escape the system via the beam pipe for the incident proton beam. Out-of-core monitoring of these so called back-streaming neutrons could potentially be used to monitor beam changes if the target has a suitable shape. Moreover, diagnostics of back-streaming neutrons might be used for validation of the system design.

  10. Neutron data for accelerator-driven transmutation technologies. Annual Report 2003/2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blomgren, J.; Hildebrand, A.; Nilsson, L.; Mermod, P.; Olsson, N.; Pomp, S.; Oesterlund, M. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Dept. for Neutron Research

    2004-08-01

    The project NATT, Neutron data for Accelerator-driven Transmutation Technology, is performed within the nuclear reactions group of the Dept. of Neutron Research, Uppsala univ. The activities of the group are directed towards experimental studies of nuclear reaction probabilities of importance for various applications, like transmutation of nuclear waste, biomedical effects and electronics reliability. The experimental work is primarily undertaken at the The Svedberg Laboratory (TSL) in Uppsala, where the group has previously developed two world-unique instruments, MEDLEY and SCANDAL. Highlights from the past year: Analysis and documentation has been finalized of previously performed measurements of elastic neutron scattering from hydrogen at 96 MeV. The results corroborate the normalization of previously obtained data at TSL, which have been under debate. This is of importance since this reaction serves as reference for many other measurements. Compelling evidence of the existence of three-body forces in nuclei has been obtained. Within the project, one PhD exam and one licentiate exam has been awarded. One PhD exam and one licentiate exam has been awarded for work closely related to the project. A new neutron beam facility with significantly improved performance has been built and commissioned at TSL.

  11. Absolute reactivity calibration of accelerator-driven systems after RACE-T experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jammes, C. C. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique CEA, Centre de Cadarache, DEN/CAD/DER/SPEx/LPE, 13108 Saint Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Imel, G. R. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Geslot, B. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique CEA, Centre de Cadarache, DEN/CAD/DER/SPEx/LPE, 13108 Saint Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Rosa, R. [Ente per le Nuove Tecnologie, L' Energia e l' Ambiente, Centro della Casaccia, Via Anguillarese, 301, 00060 Roma I (Italy)

    2006-07-01

    The RACE-T experiments that were held in november 2005 in the ENEA-Casaccia research center near Rome allowed us to improve our knowledge of the experimental techniques for absolute reactivity calibration at either startup or shutdown phases of accelerator-driven systems. Various experimental techniques for assessing a subcritical level were inter-compared through three different subcritical configurations SC0, SC2 and SC3, about -0.5, -3 and -6 dollars, respectively. The area-ratio method based of the use of a pulsed neutron source appears as the most performing. When the reactivity estimate is expressed in dollar unit, the uncertainties obtained with the area-ratio method were less than 1% for any subcritical configuration. The sensitivity to measurement location was about slightly more than 1% and always less than 4%. Finally, it is noteworthy that the source jerk technique using a transient caused by the pulsed neutron source shutdown provides results in good agreement with those obtained from the area-ratio technique. (authors)

  12. Nuclear data for accelerator-driven transmutation. Annual report 1998/99

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blomgren, J.; Johansson, C.; Klug, J.; Olsson, N.; Renberg, P.U. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Neutron Research. The Svedberg Lab.

    1999-09-01

    The present project, supported as a research task agreement by the Nuclear Power Inspectorate, the Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co, Barsebaeck Kraft AB and Vattenfall AB, started according to the plan 1998-07-01. From 1999-01-01 the project also receives support from the Defence Research Institute. The primary objective from the supporting organizations is to promote research and research education of relevance for development of the national competence within nuclear energy. The aim of the project is in short to: promote development of the competence within nuclear physics and nuclear technology by supporting PhD students; push forward the international research front regarding fundamental nuclear data within the presently highlighted research area 'accelerator-driven transmutation'; strengthen the Swedish influence within the mentioned research area by expanding the international contact network; and constitute a basis for Swedish participation in the nuclear data activities at IAEA and OECD/NEA. The project is run by the Department of Neutron Research at Uppsala University, and is utilizing the unique neutron beam facility at the national The Svedberg Laboratory (TSL) at Uppsala University. In this document, we give a status report after the first year (1998-07-01--1999-06-30) of the project.

  13. Hydrogen production methods efficiency coupled to an advanced high temperature accelerator driven system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodríguez, Daniel González; Lira, Carlos Alberto Brayner de Oliveira [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Departamento de Energia Nuclear; Fernández, Carlos García, E-mail: danielgonro@gmail.com, E-mail: mmhamada@ipen.br [Instituto Superior de Tecnologías y Ciencias aplicadas (InSTEC), La Habana (Cuba)

    2017-07-01

    The hydrogen economy is one of the most promising concepts for the energy future. In this scenario, oil is replaced by hydrogen as an energy carrier. This hydrogen, rather than oil, must be produced in volumes not provided by the currently employed methods. In this work two high temperature hydrogen production methods coupled to an advanced nuclear system are presented. A new design of a pebbled-bed accelerator nuclear driven system called TADSEA is chosen because of the advantages it has in matters of transmutation and safety. For the conceptual design of the high temperature electrolysis process a detailed computational fluid dynamics model was developed to analyze the solid oxide electrolytic cell that has a huge influence on the process efficiency. A detailed flowsheet of the high temperature electrolysis process coupled to TADSEA through a Brayton gas cycle was developed using chemical process simulation software: Aspen HYSYS®. The model with optimized operating conditions produces 0.1627 kg/s of hydrogen, resulting in an overall process efficiency of 34.51%, a value in the range of results reported by other authors. A conceptual design of the iodine-sulfur thermochemical water splitting cycle was also developed. The overall efficiency of the process was calculated performing an energy balance resulting in 22.56%. The values of efficiency, hydrogen production rate and energy consumption of the proposed models are in the values considered acceptable in the hydrogen economy concept, being also compatible with the TADSEA design parameters. (author)

  14. Ultra-High Gradient Channeling Acceleration in Nanostructures: Design/Progress of Proof-of-Concept (POC) Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Young Min [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States). Northern Illinois Center for Accelerator & Detector Development; Green, A. [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States). Northern Illinois Center for Accelerator & Detector Development; Lumpkin, A. H. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Thurman-Keup, R. M. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Shiltsev, V. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Zhang, X. [Shanhai Inst. of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Shanghai (China); Farinella, D. M. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Taborek, P. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Tajima, T. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Wheeler, J. A. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Center for Ultrafast Optical Science and FOCUS Center; Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, Palaiseau (France). Lab. d' Optique Appliquee; Mourou, G. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Center for Ultrafast Optical Science and FOCUS Center; Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, Palaiseau (France). Lab. d' Optique Appliquee

    2016-09-16

    A short bunch of relativistic particles or a short-pulse laser perturbs the density state of conduction electrons in a solid crystal and excites wakefields along atomic lattices in a crystal. Under a coupling condition the wakes, if excited, can accelerate channeling particles with TeV/m acceleration gradients in principle since the density of charge carriers (conduction electrons) in solids n0 = ~ 1020 – 1023 cm-3 is significantly higher than what can be obtained in gaseous plasma. Nanostructures have some advantages over crystals for channeling applications of high power beams. The dechanneling rate can be reduced and the beam acceptance increased by the large size of the channels. For beam-driven acceleration, a bunch length with a sufficient charge density would need to be in the range of the plasma wavelength to properly excite plasma wakefields, and channeled particle acceleration with the wakefields must occur before the ions in the lattices move beyond the restoring threshold. In the case of the excitation by short laser pulses, the dephasing length is appreciably increased with the larger channel, which enables channeled particles to gain sufficient amounts of energy. This paper describes simulation analyses on beam- and laser (X-ray)-driven accelerations in effective nanotube models obtained from Vsim and EPOCH codes. Experimental setups to detect wakefields are also outlined with accelerator facilities at Fermilab and NIU. In the FAST facility, the electron beamline was successfully commissioned at 50 MeV and it is being upgraded toward higher energies for electron accelerator R&D. The 50 MeV injector beamline of the facility is used for X-ray crystal-channeling radiation with a diamond target. It has been proposed to utilize the same diamond crystal for a channeling acceleration POC test. Another POC experiment is also designed for the NIU accelerator lab with time-resolved electron diffraction. Recently, a

  15. Toward integrated laser-driven ion accelerator systems at the photo-medical research center in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolton, P.R., E-mail: bolton.paul@jaea.go.j [Photo-Medical Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 8-1-7 Umemidai Kizugawa-shi, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Hori, T.; Kiriyama, H.; Mori, M.; Sakaki, H. [Photo-Medical Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 8-1-7 Umemidai Kizugawa-shi, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Sutherland, K. [Hokkaido University, School of Medicine, Sapporo-shi, Kita-ku, Kita 12 Jo, Nishi 5 Chome 060-0812 (Japan); Suzuki, M. [Photo-Medical Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 8-1-7 Umemidai Kizugawa-shi, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Wu, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Yogo, A. [Photo-Medical Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 8-1-7 Umemidai Kizugawa-shi, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan)

    2010-08-01

    Goals and early progress at the Photo-Medical Research Center are summarized. Laser-driven ion beam radiotherapy can require compact repetition-rated laser systems with peak powers approaching the PW level. Laser development at PMRC is outlined. Our parallel experimental and simulation efforts aimed at the development of a prototype ion beamline as an integrated laser-driven ion accelerator system are presented. In addition some of our first medical and radiobiological experimental investigations, proton-induced double strand breaking in human cancer cells and simulations of optimum dose distributions for ocular melanoma are discussed. Recommended components of a balanced and comprehensive PMRC agenda are given.

  16. Neutron data for accelerator-driven transmutation technologies. Annual Report 2002/2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blomgren, J.; Hildebrand, A.; Mermod, P.; Olsson, N.; Pomp, S.; Oesterlund, M. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Dept. for Neutron Research

    2003-08-01

    The project NATT, Neutron data for Accelerator-driven Transmutation Technology, is performed within the nuclear reactions group of the Department for neutron research, Uppsala university. The activities of the group is directed towards experimental studies of nuclear reaction probabilities of importance for various applications, like transmutation of nuclear waste, biomedical effects and electronics reliability. The experimental work is primarily undertaken at the The Svedberg Laboratory (TSL) in Uppsala, where the group has previously developed two world-unique instruments, MEDLEY and SCANDAL. Highlights from the past year: Analysis and documentation has been finalized of previously performed measurements of elastic neutron scattering from carbon and lead at 96 MeV. The precision in the results surpasses all previous data by at least an order of magnitude. These measurements represent the highest energy in neutron scattering where the ground state has been resolved. The results show that all previous theory work has underestimated the probability for neutron scattering at the present energy by 0-30 %. A new method for measurements of absolute probabilities for neutron-induced nuclear reactions with experimental techniques only has been developed. Previously, only two such methods have been known. One student has reached his PhD exam. Two PhD students have been accepted. TSL has decided to build a new neutron beam facility with significantly improved performance for these, and similar, activities. A new instrument for measurements of inelastic neutron scattering has been built, tested and found to meet the specifications. This work has been performed in collaboration with two French research groups from Caen and Nantes. The instrument is intended to be used for a series of experiments during the coming years. Previous work by the group on nuclear data for assessment of electronics reliability has lead to a new industry standard in the USA.

  17. Three-dimensional analysis of wakefields generated by flat electron beams in planar dielectric-loaded structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Mihalcea

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available An electron bunch passing through a dielectric-lined waveguide generates Čerenkov radiation that can result in a high-peak axial electric field suitable for acceleration of a subsequent bunch. Axial fields beyond gigavolt-per-meter are attainable in structures with sub-mm sizes depending on the achievement of suitable electron bunch parameters. A promising configuration consists of using a planar dielectric structure driven by flat electron bunches. In this paper we present a three-dimensional analysis of wakefields produced by flat beams in planar dielectric structures thereby extending the work of Tremaine, Rosenzweig, and Schoessow, Phys. Rev. E 56, 7204 (1997PLEEE81063-651X10.1103/PhysRevE.56.7204] on the topic. We especially provide closed-form expressions for the normal frequencies and field amplitudes of the excited modes and benchmark these analytical results with finite-difference time-domain particle-in-cell numerical simulations. Finally, we implement a semianalytical algorithm into a popular particle-tracking program thereby enabling start-to-end high-fidelity modeling of linear accelerators based on dielectric-lined planar waveguides.

  18. Activity report of working party on reactor physics of accelerator-driven system. July 1999 to March 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-02-01

    Under the Research Committee on Reactor Physics, the Working Party on Reactor Physics of Accelerator-Driven System (ADS-WP) was set in July 1999 to review and investigate special subjects related to reactor physics research for the Accelerator-Driven Subcritical System (ADS). The ADS-WP, at the first meeting, discussed a guideline of its activity for two years and decided to concentrate upon three subjects: (1) neutron transport calculations in high energy range, (2) static and kinetic (safety-related) characteristics of subcritical system, and (3) system design including ADS concepts and elemental technology developments required. The activity of ADS-WP continued from July 1999 to March 2001. In this duration, the members of ADS-WP met together four times and discussed the above subjects. In addition, the ADS-WP conducted a questionnaire on requests and proposals for the plan of Transmutation Physics Experimental Facility in the High-Intensity Proton Accelerator Project, which is a joint project between JAERI and KEK (High Energy Accelerator Research Organization). This report summarizes the results obtained by the above ADS-WP activity. (author)

  19. Phase-space holes due to electron and ion beams accelerated by a current-driven potential ramp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Goldman

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available One-dimensional open-boundary simulations have been carried out in a current-carrying plasma seeded with a neutral density depression and with no initial electric field. These simulations show the development of a variety of nonlinear localized electric field structures: double layers (unipolar localized fields, fast electron phase-space holes (bipolar fields moving in the direction of electrons accelerated by the double layer and trains of slow alternating electron and ion phase-space holes (wave-like fields moving in the direction of ions accelerated by the double layer. The principal new result in this paper is to show by means of a linear stability analysis that the slow-moving trains of electron and ion holes are likely to be the result of saturation via trapping of a kinetic-Buneman instability driven by the interaction of accelerated ions with unaccelerated electrons.

  20. High quality electron bunch generation with CO2-laser plasma accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, L G; Xu, J C; Ji, L L; Zhang, X M; Wang, W P; Zhao, X Y; Yi, L Q; Yu, Y H; Shi, Y; Xu, T J; Xu, Z Z

    2014-01-01

    CO2 laser-driven electron acceleration is demonstrated with particle-in-cell simulation in low-density plasma. An intense CO2 laser pulse with long wavelength excites wakefield. The bubble behind it has a broad space to sustain a large amount of electrons before reaching its charge saturation limit. A transversely propagating inject pulse is used to induce and control the ambient electron injection. The accelerated electron bunch with total charge up to 10 nC and the average charge per energy interval of more than 0.6 nC/MeV are obtained. Plasma-based electron acceleration driven by intense CO2 laser provides a new potential way to generate high-charge electron bunch with low energy spread, which has broad applications, especially for X-ray generation by table-top FEL and bremsstrahlung.

  1. Market Driven Design of Accelerator Systems for Sterilization of Medical Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitham, K.

    1997-05-01

    Historically, most scientific accelerator systems are the primary ingredient of a given facility. In commercial applications of accelerators the customers' needs are for a system in which the accelerator is a part of a process. In the case of the sterilization of medical products, the accelerator is part of a process which ensures a sterile dose to FDA standards to a variety of products. The process includes a variety of hardware and specifications for parameters that are unrelated to accelerator technology. In addition, the customers are in general unfamiliar with accelerator technology. This creates the need for a different approach to design including a multidisciplined group of designers as well as the need for the design of equipment that has industrial reliability, so as to be useable for long periods of time by relatively low skill operators. In addition, the systems must be highly cost efficient, because the accelerator technology will be competing with alternative technologies which invariably are less expensive. This paper describes the design of the TB 10/15 accelerator system which is currently being operated in several places around the world. The description includes the market needs that were addressed and how the system was designed to meet them. Log No. 3006

  2. Accelerator-driven sub-critical reactor system (ADS) for nuclear ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... as well as for nuclear energy generation utilizing thorium as fuel. In India, there is an interest in the programmes of development of high-energy and high-current accelerators due to the potential of ADS in utilizing the vast resources of thorium in the country for nuclear power generation. The accelerator related activities ...

  3. Turbulent Rayleigh-Taylor flow driven by time-varying accelerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaprabhu, Praveen; Lawrie, Andrew; Muthuraman, Karthik; UNC-LMFA Collaboration

    2011-11-01

    We report on numerical simulations of turbulent Rayleigh-Taylor flow subject to variable acceleration histories. The acceleration profiles were inspired by experiments and theoretical studies, and include an impulsive acceleration, accel-decel profiles, as well as a constant drive as the baseline case. The simulations were performed using the MOBILE software, a variable-density, incompressible fluid flow code. The advection algorithm employs a 3rd-order, monotonicity-preserving upwind scheme, allowing the definition of sharp interfaces in the flow, while pressure convergence is accelerated by the use of a multi-grid scheme. The simulations are initialized with two classes of perturbations: narrow-band, short-wavelength modes and broadband with long-wavelength modes. The effect of initial amplitudes on the perturbations is investigated under the variable drive conditions. The acceleration profiles are capable of producing stages of ``demixing,'' useful in validating turbulence models of RTI.

  4. On the way to stabilized laser-driven GeV electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, Shao-wei; Weineisen, Tobias; Fuchs, Matthias; Popp, Antonia; Major, Zsuzsanna; Weingartner, Raphael; Ahmad, Izhar; Schmid, Karl; Marx, Benjamin; Krausz, Ferenc; Gruener, Florian; Karsch, Stefan [Max-Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, Munich (Germany); Ludwig-Maximilians University, Munich (Germany); Osterhoff, Jens [LOASIS Program, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore (United States); Schroeder, Hartmut; Haas, Harald [Max-Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, Munich (Germany); Rowlands-Rees, Tom; Hooker, Simon [University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-01

    Laser-driven-wakefield electron accelerators have shown electron beams with energies of up to 1 GeV from a centimeter-scale plasma accelerator. In order to achieve higher electron energies, these acceleration distances need to be increased. This can be realized with a discharge capillary. However, a discharge typically introduces instabilities on both pointing and energy of the generated electrons. In order to improve the stability, we demonstrate a preliminary test of a modified discharge which includes a pre-pulse circuit before the firing of the main pulse. We also show gas density shaping by a laser- machined nozzle which should be able to make a more precise injection in the capillary accelerator thus reducing the energy instability.

  5. Conceptual design of minor actinides burner with an accelerator-driven subcritical system.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Y.; Gohar, Y. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2011-11-04

    In the environmental impact study of the Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository, the limit of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) for disposal is assessed at 70,000 metric tons of heavy metal (MTHM), among which 63,000 MTHM are the projected SNF discharge from U.S. commercial nuclear power plants though 2011. Within the 70,000 MTHM of SNF in storage, approximately 115 tons would be minor actinides (MAs) and 585 tons would be plutonium. This study describes the conceptual design of an accelerator-driven subcritical (ADS) system intended to utilize (burn) the 115 tons of MAs. The ADS system consists of a subcritical fission blanket where the MAs fuel will be burned, a spallation neutron source to drive the fission blanket, and a radiation shield to reduce the radiation dose to an acceptable level. The spallation neutrons are generated from the interaction of a 1 GeV proton beam with a lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) or liquid lead target. In this concept, the fission blanket consists of a liquid mobile fuel and the fuel carrier can be LBE, liquid lead, or molten salt. The actinide fuel materials are dissolved, mixed, or suspended in the liquid fuel carrier. Therefore, fresh fuel can be fed into the fission blanket to adjust its reactivity and to control system power during operation. Monte Carlo analyses were performed to determine the overall parameters of an ADS system utilizing LBE as an example. Steady-state Monte Carlo simulations were studied for three fission blanket configurations that are similar except that the loaded amount of actinide fuel in the LBE is either 5, 7, or 10% of the total volume of the blanket, respectively. The neutron multiplication factor values of the three configurations are all approximately 0.98 and the MA initial inventories are each approximately 10 tons. Monte Carlo burnup simulations using the MCB5 code were performed to analyze the performance of the three conceptual ADS systems. Preliminary burnup analysis shows that all three conceptual ADS

  6. Demonstration of electron acceleration in a laser-driven dielectric microstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta, E. A.; Soong, K.; England, R. J.; Colby, E. R.; Wu, Z.; Montazeri, B.; McGuinness, C.; McNeur, J.; Leedle, K. J.; Walz, D.; Sozer, E. B.; Cowan, B.; Schwartz, B.; Travish, G.; Byer, R. L.

    2013-11-01

    The enormous size and cost of current state-of-the-art accelerators based on conventional radio-frequency technology has spawned great interest in the development of new acceleration concepts that are more compact and economical. Micro-fabricated dielectric laser accelerators (DLAs) are an attractive approach, because such dielectric microstructures can support accelerating fields one to two orders of magnitude higher than can radio-frequency cavity-based accelerators. DLAs use commercial lasers as a power source, which are smaller and less expensive than the radio-frequency klystrons that power today's accelerators. In addition, DLAs are fabricated via low-cost, lithographic techniques that can be used for mass production. However, despite several DLA structures having been proposed recently, no successful demonstration of acceleration in these structures has so far been shown. Here we report high-gradient (beyond 250MeVm-1) acceleration of electrons in a DLA. Relativistic (60-MeV) electrons are energy-modulated over 563+/-104 optical periods of a fused silica grating structure, powered by a 800-nm-wavelength mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser. The observed results are in agreement with analytical models and electrodynamic simulations. By comparison, conventional modern linear accelerators operate at gradients of 10-30MeVm-1, and the first linear radio-frequency cavity accelerator was ten radio-frequency periods (one metre) long with a gradient of approximately 1.6MeVm-1 (ref. 5). Our results set the stage for the development of future multi-staged DLA devices composed of integrated on-chip systems. This would enable compact table-top accelerators on the MeV-GeV (106-109eV) scale for security scanners and medical therapy, university-scale X-ray light sources for biological and materials research, and portable medical imaging devices, and would substantially reduce the size and cost of a future collider on the multi-TeV (1012eV) scale.

  7. Study of particle transport in a high power spallation target for an accelerator-driven transmutation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shetty, Nikhil Vittal

    2013-01-31

    AGATE is a project envisaged to demonstrate the feasibility of transmutation in a gas (helium) cooled accelerator-driven system using solid spallation target. Development of the spallation target module and assessing its safety aspects are studied in this work. According to the AGATE concept parameters, 600 MeV protons are delivered on to the segmented tungsten spallation target. The Monte Carlo toolkit Geant4 has been used in the simulation of particle transport. Binary cascade is used to simulate intra-nuclear cascades, along with the G4NDL neutron data library for low energy neutrons (<20 MeV).

  8. Observational Signatures Of The Gamma Rays From Bright Blazars And Wakefield Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abazajian, Kevork; Canac, Nicolas; Tajima, Toshiki; Ebisuzaki, Toshikazu; Horiuchi, Shunsaku

    2017-10-01

    Gamma-ray observations have detected a strong variability in blazar luminosity in the gamma ray over time scales as short as several minutes. We show, for the first time, that the correlation of spectrum with intensity is consistent with the behavior with luminosity of blazar SEDs along a blazar sequence for low synchrotron peak blazars. We show that the observational signatures of variability with ux are consistent with wakefield acceleration of electrons initiated by instabilities in the blazar accretion disk. This mechanism produces time variations as short as intervals of 100 seconds. The wakefield mechanism also predicts a reduction of electron spectral index with an increase in gamma-ray luminosity, which could be detected in higher energy observations well above the inverse Compton peak.

  9. System and safety studies of accelerator driven transmutation. Annual Report 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gudowski, W.; Wallenius, J.; Tucek, K.; Eriksson, Marcus; Carlsson, Johan; Seltborg, P.; Cetnar, J.; Chakarova, R.; Jollkonen, Mikael; Westlen, D. [Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Nuclear and Reactor Physics

    2003-06-01

    The research on safety of Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Systems (ADS) at the Dept. of Nuclear and Reactor Physics has been largely determined by the program of the European projects of the the 5th Framework Programme. In particular: a) ADS core design and development of advanced nuclear fuel optimized for high transmutation rates and good safety features. This activity includes computer modeling of nuclear fuel production. Three different ADS-core concept are being investigated: Conceptual design of Pb-Bi cooled core with nitride fuel - so called Sing-Sing Core; Pb-Bi cooled core with oxide fuel; Gas cooled core with oxide fuel - both designs investigated for the European Project PDS-XADS; b) analysis of ADS-dynamics and assessment of major reactivity feedbacks; c) emergency heat removal from ADS; d) participation in ADS experiments including 1 MW spallation target manufacturing, subcritical experiments MUSE, YALINA subcritical experiment in Minsk and designing of the subcritical experiment SAD in Dubna; e) material studies for ADS, in particular theoretical and simulation studies of radiation damage in high neutron (or proton) fluxes; f) computer code and nuclear data development relevant for simulation and optimization of ADS, special efforts were put in the frame of the European Project PDS-XADS to perform sensitivity studies of the different nuclear data libraries; g) studies of transmutation potential of critical reactors in particular High Temp Gas Cooled Reactor. Most important finding and conclusions from our studies: A strong positive void coefficient was found for lead/bismuth cooled cores. This considerable void effect is attributed to a high fraction of americium (60%) in the fuel. It was found that void reactivity insertion rates increases with P/D; in response to the beam overpower accident the Pb/Bi-cooled core featured the twice longer grace time compared to the sodium-cooled core; an important safety issue is the high void worth that could

  10. The Strongest Acceleration of >40 keV Electrons by ICME-driven Shocks at 1 au

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liu; Wang, Linghua; Li, Gang; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.; He, Jiansen; Tu, Chuanyi; Tian, Hui; Bale, Stuart D.

    2018-01-01

    We present two case studies of the in-situ electron acceleration during the 2000 February 11 shock and the 2004 July 22 shock, with the strongest electron flux enhancement at 40 keV across the shock, among all the quasi-perpendicular and quasi-parallel ICME-driven shocks observed by the WIND 3DP instrument from 1995 through 2014 at 1 au. We find that for this quasi-perpendicular (quasi-parallel) shock on 2000 February 11 (2004 July 22), the shocked electron differential fluxes at ∼0.4–50 keV in the downstream generally fit well to a double-power-law spectrum, J ∼ E ‑β , with an index of β ∼ 3.15 (4.0) at energies below a break at ∼3 keV (∼1 keV) and β ∼ 2.65 (2.6) at energies above. For both shock events, the downstream electron spectral indices appear to be similar for all pitch angles, which are significantly larger than the index prediction by diffusive shock acceleration. In addition, the downstream electron pitch-angle distributions show the anisotropic beams in the anti-sunward-traveling direction, while the ratio of the downstream over ambient fluxes appears to peak near 90° pitch angles, at all energies of ∼0.4–50 keV. These results suggest that in both shocks, shock drift acceleration likely plays an important role in accelerating electrons in situ at 1 au. Such ICME-driven shocks could contribute to the formation of solar wind halo electrons at energies ≲2 keV, as well as the production of solar wind superhalo electrons at energies ≳2 keV in interplanetary space.

  11. Electric and magnetic wakefields in a plasma channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pallavi Jha

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available A detailed analytical study of plasma wakefield generation in a wide parabolic plasma channel is reported. A perturbative technique involving orders of the incident laser beam and the effects of inhomogeneity of the plasma density is used to obtain explicit electric as well as magnetic wakefields. The axial and transverse forces acting on a test electron due to the wakefields have been evaluated.

  12. Automated analysis for detecting beams in laser wakefield simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ushizima, Daniela M.; Rubel, Oliver; Prabhat, Mr.; Weber, Gunther H.; Bethel, E. Wes; Aragon, Cecilia R.; Geddes, Cameron G.R.; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Hamann, Bernd; Messmer, Peter; Hagen, Hans

    2008-07-03

    Laser wakefield particle accelerators have shown the potential to generate electric fields thousands of times higher than those of conventional accelerators. The resulting extremely short particle acceleration distance could yield a potential new compact source of energetic electrons and radiation, with wide applications from medicine to physics. Physicists investigate laser-plasma internal dynamics by running particle-in-cell simulations; however, this generates a large dataset that requires time-consuming, manual inspection by experts in order to detect key features such as beam formation. This paper describes a framework to automate the data analysis and classification of simulation data. First, we propose a new method to identify locations with high density of particles in the space-time domain, based on maximum extremum point detection on the particle distribution. We analyze high density electron regions using a lifetime diagram by organizing and pruning the maximum extrema as nodes in a minimum spanning tree. Second, we partition the multivariate data using fuzzy clustering to detect time steps in a experiment that may contain a high quality electron beam. Finally, we combine results from fuzzy clustering and bunch lifetime analysis to estimate spatially confined beams. We demonstrate our algorithms successfully on four different simulation datasets.

  13. Proposed Few-optical Cycle Laser-driven ParticleAccelerator Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plettner, T.; Lu, P.; Byer, R.L.; /Stanford U., Ginzton Lab.

    2006-10-06

    We describe a transparent dielectric grating accelerator structure that is designed for ultra-short laser pulse operation. The structure is based on the principle of periodic field reversal to achieve phase synchronicity for relativistic particles, however to preserve ultra-short pulse operation it does not resonate the laser field in the vacuum channel. The geometry of the structure appears well suited for application with high average power lasers and high thermal loading. Finally, it shows potential for an unloaded gradient of 10 GeV/m with 10 fsec laser pulses and the possibility to accelerate 10{sup 6} electrons per bunch at an efficiency of 8%. The fabrication procedure and a proposed near term experiment with this accelerator structure are presented.

  14. Relativistic harmonics for turbulent wakefield diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuramitsu, Yasuhiro; Chen, Shih-Hung

    2017-06-01

    The propagation properties of relativistic harmonics excited in a plasma with an intense laser pulse is investigated theoretically and numerically. Focusing on the frequency separation, a cold electron fluid model in two spatial dimension is discussed to obtain the harmonic amplitude. The theoretical predictions are verified by performing particle-in-cell simulations in two spatial dimensions. When the laser amplitude is large, the strong ponderomotive force expels the electrons, creating a large amplitude density structures associated with the wakefield. The harmonics propagate obliquely with respect to the laser propagation direction, which is well represented by the structure of the high density layer resulting from the transverse poderomotive force. We also discuss a possible experimental setup to observe the density structures relevant to wakefield.

  15. Climate-driven vertical acceleration of Icelandic crust measured by continuous GPS geodesy

    KAUST Repository

    Compton, Kathleen

    2015-02-06

    © 2015 The Authors. Earth\\'s present-day response to enhanced glacial melting resulting from climate change can be measured using Global Positioning System (GPS) technology. We present data from 62 continuously operating GPS instruments in Iceland. Statistically significant upward velocity and accelerations are recorded at 27 GPS stations, predominantly located in the Central Highlands region of Iceland, where present-day thinning of the Iceland ice caps results in velocities of more than 30mm/yr and uplift accelerations of 1-2mm/yr2. We use our acceleration estimates to back calculate to a time of zero velocity, which coincides with the initiation of ice loss in Iceland from ice mass balance calculations and Arctic warming trends. We show, through a simple inversion, a direct relationship between ice mass balance measurements and vertical position and show that accelerated unloading is required to reproduce uplift observations for a simple elastic layer over viscoelastic half-space model.

  16. Data acquisition, control, and analysis for the Argonne Advanced Accelerator Test Facility (AATF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoessow, P.

    1989-01-01

    The AATF has been used to study wakefield acceleration and focusing in plasmas and rf structures. A PC-based system is described which incorporates the functions of beamline control and acquisition, storage, and preliminary analysis of video images from luminescent screen beam diagnostics. General features of the offline analysis of wakefield data are also discussed. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Revisiting the lid-driven cavity flow problem: Review and new steady state benchmarking results using GPU accelerated code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamer A. AbdelMigid

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a broad account of the lid-driven cavity flow problem which is an important benchmark problem for the validation of CFD codes. A comprehensive review of the literature on the problem is presented and discussed, and available benchmarking results are compared in tabulated format to provide a comprehensive source of validation data. In addition, the problem was solved using a Graphical Processing Unit (GPU accelerated in-house code developed by the authors (https://github.com/TamerAbdelmigid/DrivenCavity_FVM.git, which solves the steady Navier-Stokes equations, using the Finite Volume Method (FVM in primitive variable formulation. Case studies of steady incompressible flow in a 2D lid-driven square cavity are investigated for 100 < Re < 5000. Detailed second order spatially accurate results are verified and presented in a tabulated form for the sake of serving as benchmark dataset for future works on the same problem. In the present work, collocated grid arrangement along with a uniform structured Cartesian grid up to 1301 × 1301 was used.

  18. Neutronic design study of accelerator driven system (ADS) for Jordan subcritical reactor as a neutron source for nuclear research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xoubi, Ned

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, a preliminary neutronic design study of an accelerator driven subcritical system for Jordan Subcritical Assembly (JSA) is presented. The conceptual design of coupling the JSA core with proton accelerator and spallation target is investigated, and its feasibility as a neutron source for nuclear research, and possibly for target irradiation and isotope production evaluated. 3D MCNPX model of the JSA reactor, the accelerator beam, and the Pb target was developed, based on actual reactor parameters. MCNPX calculations were carried out to estimate the absolute radial and axial neutron flux in the reactor, and to calculate the multiplication factor K eff and heat generated in the reactor. Numerical results showed an enormous increase in the neutron flux, by seven orders of magnitude, compared to the current JSA core design using Pu-Be source. In this research the results obtained are discussed and compared with those of the JSA, and do confirm the feasibility of utilizing the JSA as a viable nuclear research facility with adequate neutron flux. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Self-generated surface magnetic fields inhibit laser-driven sheath acceleration of high-energy protons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatsutsumi, M; Sentoku, Y; Korzhimanov, A; Chen, S N; Buffechoux, S; Kon, A; Atherton, B; Audebert, P; Geissel, M; Hurd, L; Kimmel, M; Rambo, P; Schollmeier, M; Schwarz, J; Starodubtsev, M; Gremillet, L; Kodama, R; Fuchs, J

    2018-01-18

    High-intensity lasers interacting with solid foils produce copious numbers of relativistic electrons, which in turn create strong sheath electric fields around the target. The proton beams accelerated in such fields have remarkable properties, enabling ultrafast radiography of plasma phenomena or isochoric heating of dense materials. In view of longer-term multidisciplinary purposes (e.g., spallation neutron sources or cancer therapy), the current challenge is to achieve proton energies well in excess of 100 MeV, which is commonly thought to be possible by raising the on-target laser intensity. Here we present experimental and numerical results demonstrating that magnetostatic fields self-generated on the target surface may pose a fundamental limit to sheath-driven ion acceleration for high enough laser intensities. Those fields can be strong enough (~10 5  T at laser intensities ~10 21  W cm -2 ) to magnetize the sheath electrons and deflect protons off the accelerating region, hence degrading the maximum energy the latter can acquire.

  20. Experimental results from the VENUS-F critical reference state for the GUINEVERE accelerator driven system project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uyttenhove, W.; Baeten, P.; Ban, G.; Billebaud, A.; Chabod, S.; Dessagne, P.; Kerveno, M.; Kochetkov, A.; Lecolley, F. R.; Lecouey, J. L.; Marie, N.; Mellier, F.; Steckmeyer, J. C.; Thyebault, H. E.; Vittiglio, G.; Wagemans, J. [SCK.CEN, Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, Boeretang 200, BE-2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2011-07-01

    The GUINEVERE (Generation of Uninterrupted Intense Neutron pulses at the lead Venus Reactor) project was launched in 2006 within the framework of FP6 EUROTRANS in order to validate on-line reactivity monitoring and subcriticality level determination in Accelerator Driven Systems. Therefore the VENUS reactor at SCK.CEN in Mol (Belgium) was modified towards a fast core (VENUS-F) and coupled to the GENEPI-3C accelerator built by CNRS The accelerator can operate in both continuous and pulsed mode. The VENUS-F core is loaded with enriched Uranium and reflected with solid lead. A well-chosen critical reference state is indispensable for the validation of the on-line subcriticality monitoring methodology. Moreover a benchmarking tool is required for nuclear data research and code validation. In this paper the design and the importance of the critical reference state for the GUINEVERE project are motivated. The results of the first experimental phase on the critical core are presented. The control rods worth is determined by the rod drop technique and the application of the Modified Source Multiplication (MSM) method allows the determination of the worth of the safety rods. The results are implemented in the VENUS-F core certificate for full exploitation of the critical core. (authors)

  1. COAXIAL TWO-CHANNEL DIELECTRIC WAKE FIELD ACCELERATOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirshfield, Jay L. [Omega-P, Inc.

    2013-04-30

    Theory, computations, and experimental apparatus are presented that describe and are intended to confirm novel properties of a coaxial two-channel dielectric wake field accelerator. In this configuration, an annular drive beam in the outer coaxial channel excites multimode wakefields which, in the inner channel, can accelerate a test beam to an energy much higher than the energy of the drive beam. This high transformer ratio is the result of judicious choice of the dielectric structure parameters, and of the phase separation between drive bunches and test bunches. A structure with cm-scale wakefields has been build for tests at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator Laboratory, and a structure with mm-scale wakefields has been built for tests at the SLAC FACET facility. Both tests await scheduling by the respective facilities.

  2. Accelerating the development of transparent graphene electrodes through basic science driven chemical functionalization.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Calvin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Beechem, III, Thomas Edwin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ohta, Taisuke [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brumbach, Michael T. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wheeler, David Roger [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Veneman, Alexander [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gearba, I. Raluca [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Stevenson, Keith J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Chemical functionalization is required to adapt graphenes properties to many applications. However, most covalent functionalization schemes are spontaneous or defect driven and are not suitable for applications requiring directed assembly of molecules on graphene substrates. In this work, we demonstrated electrochemically driven covalent bonding of phenyl iodoniums onto epitaxial graphene. The amount of chemisorption was demonstrated by varying the duration of the electrochemical driving potential. Chemical, electronic, and defect states of phenyl-modified graphene were studied by photoemission spectroscopy, spatially resolved Raman spectroscopy, and water contact angle measurement. Covalent attachment rehybridized some of the delocalized graphene sp2 orbitals to localized sp3 states. Control over the relative spontaneity (reaction rate) of covalent graphene functionalization is an important first step to the practical realization of directed molecular assembly on graphene. More than 10 publications, conference presentations, and program highlights were produced (some invited), and follow-on funding was obtained to continue this work.

  3. Matching sub-fs electron bunches for laser-driven plasma acceleration at SINBAD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, J., E-mail: jun.zhu@desy.de [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Universität Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany); Assmann, R.W.; Dorda, U.; Marchetti, B. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, DESY, Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-09-01

    We present theoretical and numerical studies of matching sub-femtosecond space-charge-dominated electron bunch into the Laser-plasma Wake Field Accelerator (LWFA) foreseen at the SINBAD facility. The longitudinal space-charge (SC) effect induced growths of the energy spread and longitudinal phase-space chirp are major issues in the matching section, which will result in bunch elongation, emittance growth and spot size dilution. In addition, the transverse SC effect would lead to a mismatch of the beam optics if it were not compensated for. Start-to-end simulations and preliminary optimizations were carried out in order to understand the achievable beam parameters at the entrance of the plasma accelerator.

  4. STUDIES OF A FREE ELECTRON LASER DRIVEN BY A LASER-PLASMA ACCELERATOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montgomery, A.; Schroeder, C.; Fawley, W.

    2008-01-01

    A free electron laser (FEL) uses an undulator, a set of alternating magnets producing a periodic magnetic fi eld, to stimulate emission of coherent radiation from a relativistic electron beam. The Lasers, Optical Accelerator Systems Integrated Studies (LOASIS) group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) will use an innovative laserplasma wakefi eld accelerator to produce an electron beam to drive a proposed FEL. In order to optimize the FEL performance, the dependence on electron beam and undulator parameters must be understood. Numerical modeling of the FEL using the simulation code GINGER predicts the experimental results for given input parameters. Among the parameters studied were electron beam energy spread, emittance, and mismatch with the undulator focusing. Vacuum-chamber wakefi elds were also simulated to study their effect on FEL performance. Energy spread was found to be the most infl uential factor, with output FEL radiation power sharply decreasing for relative energy spreads greater than 0.33%. Vacuum chamber wakefi elds and beam mismatch had little effect on the simulated LOASIS FEL at the currents considered. This study concludes that continued improvement of the laser-plasma wakefi eld accelerator electron beam will allow the LOASIS FEL to operate in an optimal regime, producing high-quality XUV and x-ray pulses.

  5. Radiation from laser accelerated electron bunches: Coherent terahertz and femtosecond X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leemans, W.P.; Esarey, E.; van Tilborg, J.; Michel, P.A.; Schroeder, C.B.; Toth, Cs.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Shadwick, B.A.

    2004-10-01

    Electron beam based radiation sources provide electromagnetic radiation for countless applications. The properties of the radiation are primarily determined by the properties of the electron beam. Compact laser driven accelerators are being developed that can provide ultra-short electron bunches (femtosecond duration) with relativistic energies reaching towards a GeV. The electron bunches are produced when an intense laser interacts with a dense plasma and excites a large amplitude plasma density modulation (wakefield) that can trap background electrons and accelerate them to high energies. The short pulse nature of the accelerated bunches and high particle energy offer the possibility of generating radiation from one compact source that ranges from coherent terahertz to gamma rays. The intrinsic synchronization to a laser pulse and unique character of the radiation offers a wide range of possibilities for scientific applications. Two particular radiation source regimes are discussed: Coherent terahertz emission and x-ray emission based on betatron oscillations and Thomson scattering.

  6. Feasibility of Optical Transition Radiation Imaging for Laser-driven Plasma Accelerator Electron-Beam Diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A. H. [Fermilab; Rule, D. W. [Unlisted, US, MD; Downer, M. C. [Texas U.

    2017-10-09

    We report the initial considerations of using linearly polarized optical transition radiation (OTR) to characterize the electron beams of laser plasma accelerators (LPAs) such as at the Univ. of Texas at Austin. The two LPAs operate at 100 MeV and 2-GeV, and they currently have estimated normalized emittances at ~ 1-mm mrad regime with beam divergences less than 1/γ and beam sizes to be determined at the micron level. Analytical modeling results indicate the feasibility of using these OTR techniques for the LPA applications.

  7. A “slingshot” laser-driven acceleration mechanism of plasma electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiore, Gaetano, E-mail: gaetano.fiore@na.infn.it [Dip. di Matematica e Applicazioni, Università “Federico II”, Complesso Universitario M. S. Angelo, Via Cintia, 80126 Napoli (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Napoli, Complesso Universitario M. S. Angelo, Via Cintia, 80126 Napoli (Italy); De Nicola, Sergio [SPIN-CNR, Complesso Universitario M. S. Angelo, Via Cintia, 80126 Napoli (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Napoli, Complesso Universitario M. S. Angelo, Via Cintia, 80126 Napoli (Italy)

    2016-09-01

    We briefly report on the recently proposed Fiore et al. [1] and Fiore and De Nicola [2] electron acceleration mechanism named “slingshot effect”: under suitable conditions the impact of an ultra-short and ultra-intense laser pulse against the surface of a low-density plasma is expected to cause the expulsion of a bunch of superficial electrons with high energy in the direction opposite to that of the pulse propagation; this is due to the interplay of the huge ponderomotive force, huge longitudinal field arising from charge separation, and the finite size of the laser spot.

  8. Monte Carlo studies of accelerator driven systems energy and spatial distribution of neutrons in multiplying and non-multiplying media

    CERN Document Server

    Hashemi-Nezhad, S R; Brandt, R; Krivopustov, M I; Kulakov, B A; Odoj, R; Sosnin, A N; Wan, J S; Westmeier, W

    2002-01-01

    The LAHET code system is used to study the behaviour of the spallation neutrons resulting from the interaction of 2.5 GeV/c protons with a massive lead target within a large (approx 32 m sup 3) lead and graphite moderating environments. The spatial and energy distribution of the neutrons with presence and absence of a fissile material in Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS) are investigated. It is shown that the energy spectra of the neutrons in graphite and lead moderators are very different and such difference is expected to result in noticeable differences in the nuclear waste transmutation abilities of the ADSs that use graphite and lead for neutron moderation and storage.

  9. Ion acceleration driven by a relativistic electron beam under a strong magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Toshihiro; Antonsen, Thomas; Mima, Kunioki

    2017-10-01

    We have been investigating about an electron beam propagation under a strong magnetic field and found a very interesting phenomena. It is a generation of a large amplitude whistler wave, which is amplified by a nonlinear coupling of obliquely propagating circularly polarized waves. Since the previous work did not include ion motions, such a giant whistler wave mainly affects on beam electrons and they stagnate due to a large ponderomotive force of the electromagnetic wave. In order to investigate the influence of the strong wave on background ions, we have developed a new PIC code which has an open (upstream and downstream) boundaries. By using the new code, we have been studying the kinetic behavior of ions in a circumstance generating a large whistler wave. As a result, it is found that the electrostatic field induced by the stagnated beam electrons not only creates a density dip in the background electrons but also accelerates background ions. We will discuss the relation between the ion acceleration and a formation of a collisionless shock wave. This work was supported by a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (B), 15H03758.

  10. a Simulation Study of Beam Driven Instabilities and Solitary Structures in the Auroral Acceleration Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Perry Clayton

    Various problems associated with the model particle distributions and assumptions for auroral acceleration are considered using particle in cell plasma simulation techniques. We have considered the presence and effects of microinstabilities in two regions along auroral field lines. At low altitude, where ions which have been accelerated up out of the ionosphere have a small relative drift (due to mass ratio), the plasma is unstable to an ion two-stream instability. We will show that the heating due to the two-stream instability does not distort the distribution function sufficiently to prevent double layer formation at higher altitude. However, under certain circumstances heating by the oblique two-stream modes is capable of forming conic like distributions. At higher altitude, it has been suggested that the presence of a background ion population may have a significant effect on the formation of weak double layers. We will show that in such a system, a weak beam-plasma instability couples to the acoustic modes in the background ion population seeding the formation of ion phase space holes. Such structures propagate at the acoustic speed of the background ion population, in the direction of the ion beam (opposite of the direction of propagation for such structures in the standart two-species model) and, given a drift of the background electrons, they may develop into double layers. This may explain previous discrepancies between observations of such structures and theoretical prediction of their behavior.

  11. Assessment of candidates for target window material in accelerator-driven molybdenum-99 production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strons, Philip [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Bailey, James [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Makarashvili, Vakhtang [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Chemerisov, Sergey [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gromov, Roman [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Vandegrift, George [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-10-01

    NorthStar Medical Technologies is pursuing production of an important medical isotope, Mo-99, through a photo-nuclear reaction of a Mo-100 target using a high-power electron accelerator. The current target utilizes an Inconel 718 window. The purpose of this study was to evaluate other candidate materials for the target window, which separates the high-pressure helium gas inside the target from the vacuum inside the accelerator beamline and is subjected to significant stress. Our initial analysis assessed the properties (density, thermal conductivity, maximum stress, minimum window thickness, maximum temperature, and figure of merit) for a range of materials, from which the three most promising were chosen: Inconel 718, 250 maraging steel, and standard-grade beryllium. These materials were subjected to further analysis to determine the effects of thermal and mechanical strain versus beam power at varying thicknesses. Both beryllium and the maraging steel were calculated to withstand more than twice as high beam power than Inconel 718.

  12. Proton Acceleration Driven by a Nanosecond Laser from a Cryogenic Thin Solid-Hydrogen Ribbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Margarone

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A high-power pulsed laser is focused onto a solid-hydrogen target to accelerate forward a collimated stream of protons in the range 0.1–1 MeV, carrying a very high energy of about 30 J (∼5% laser-ion conversion efficiency and extremely large charge of about ∼0.1  mC per laser pulse. This result is achieved for the first time through the combination of a sophisticated target system (H_{2} thin ribbon operating at cryogenic temperature (∼10  K and a very hot H plasma (∼300  keV “hot electron” temperature generated by a subnanosecond laser with an intensity of ∼3×10^{16}  W/cm^{2}. Both the H plasma and the accelerated proton beam are fully characterized by in situ and ex situ diagnostics. Results obtained using the ELISE (experiments on laser interaction with solid hydrogen H_{2} target delivery system at PALS (Prague kJ-class laser facility are presented and discussed along with potential multidisciplinary applications.

  13. High repetition rate laser-driven MeV ion acceleration at variable background pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Joseph; Ngirmang, Gregory; Orban, Chris; Feister, Scott; Morrison, John; Frische, Kyle; Chowdhury, Enam; Roquemore, W. M.

    2017-10-01

    Ultra-intense laser-plasma interactions (LPI) can produce highly energetic photons, electrons, and ions with numerous potential real-world applications. Many of these applications will require repeatable, high repetition targets that are suitable for LPI experiments. Liquid targets can meet many of these needs, but they typically require higher chamber pressure than is used for many low repetition rate experiments. The effect of background pressure on the LPI has not been thoroughly studied. With this in mind, the Extreme Light group at the Air Force Research Lab has carried out MeV ion and electron acceleration experiments at kHz repetition rate with background pressures ranging from 30 mTorr to >1 Torr using a submicron ethylene glycol liquid sheet target. We present these results and provide two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation results that offer insight on the thresholds for the efficient acceleration of electrons and ions. This research is supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under LRIR Project 17RQCOR504 under the management of Dr. Riq Parra and Dr. Jean-Luc Cambier. Support was also provided by the DOD HPCMP Internship Program.

  14. Bunch decompression for laser-plasma driven free-electron laser demonstration schemes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Seggebrock

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs require a very high electron beam quality in terms of emittance and energy spread. Since 2004 high quality electrons produced by laser-wakefield accelerators have been demonstrated, but the electron quality up to now did not allow the operation of a compact x-ray FEL using these electrons. Maier et al. [Phys. Rev. X 2, 031019 (2012PRXHAE2160-330810.1103/PhysRevX.2.031019] suggested a concept for a proof-of-principle experiment allowing FEL operation in the vacuum ultraviolet range based on an optimized undulator and bunch decompression using electron bunches from a laser-plasma accelerator as currently available. In this paper we discuss in more detail how a chicane can be used as a bunch stretcher instead of a bunch compressor to allow the operation of a laser-wakefield accelerator driven FEL using currently available electrons. A scaling characterizing the impact of bunch decompression on the gain length is derived and the feasibility of the concept is tested numerically in a demanding scenario.

  15. Subcritical Multiplication Parameters of the Accelerator-Driven System with 100 MeV Protons at the Kyoto University Critical Assembly

    OpenAIRE

    Jae-Yong Lim; Cheol Ho Pyeon; Takahiro Yagi; Tsuyoshi Misawa

    2012-01-01

    Basic experiments on the accelerator-driven system (ADS) at the Kyoto University Critical Assembly are carried out by combining a solid-moderated and -reflected core with the fixed-field alternating gradient accelerator. The reaction rates are measured by the foil activation method to obtain the subcritical multiplication parameters. The numerical calculations are conducted with the use of MCNPX and JENDL/HE-2007 to evaluate the reaction rates of activation foils set in the core region and at...

  16. Wakefield measurement using principal component analysis on bunch-by-bunch information during transient state of injection in a storage ring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhichu Chen

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Wakefields and beam instabilities are important issues for a storage ring and are described by various theoretical formalisms. Direct measurements of the beam motion related to different dynamical mechanisms are a useful input to accelerator optimization. This paper reports on an experimental method based on a simplified wakefield model, where bunch-by-bunch position information were monitored during the transient injection process at the Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility. Processing the bunch-by-bunch data by means of the principal component analysis allowed for immediate operational improvements—such as in situ compensation of the kicker leakage, and energy matching between the booster and the storage ring.

  17. Lead cooled heterogeneous accelerator driven molten-fluoride blanket for incineration of long-lived radioactive wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopatkin, A.V.; Matyushechkin, V.M.; Tretyakov, I.T. [Research and Development Inst. of Power Engineering, Moscow (Russian Federation); Blagovolin, P.P.; Kazaritsky, V.D. [State Scientific Centre, Moscow (Russian Federation). Inst. of Theoretical and Experimental Physics; Kostenkov, V.I.; Chuvilin, D.Yu. [I.V. Kurchatov Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1997-09-01

    This paper presents a tentative design description and evaluation of the basic parameters of a lead cooled heterogeneous accelerator driven molten fluoride blanket. The proton beam of a 1 GeV accelerator strikes the blanket from below and generates spallation neutrons in the flow of lead, which serves as a target. These neutrons leave the target zone and get into a heterogeneous blanket with separated volumes of molten salts and lead. Fissile materials are dissolved in the salt. On getting into the molten salt volume the neutrons cause fission (transmutation) of the actinides, the produced heat being removed by circulation of molten lead. Two versions of the blanket design are examined. The first version: molten salt circulates in the fuel channels, while lead cools the channels flowing through the interchannel space (the salt channel design). The second version: it is lead that circulates in the channels, while molten salt takes up the interchannel space (the lead channel design). A preliminary blanket design study showed that both blanket designs possess a potential for improving performance. At present time the blanket design, mentioned above as the salt channel design, seems to be more promising. 1 ref., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Locomotion analysis of a vibration-driven system with three acceleration-controlled internal masses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiong Zhan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The controlled motion of a rigid body in the horizontal plane is investigated in this article. Three internal and acceleration-controlled masses are used to actuate the system. Dry friction acting between the system and the plane is isotropic. The dynamics of two basic motions of the system, that is, rectilinear and rotary motions, are first studied. Then by combining these two basic types of motions, planar locomotion of the system is constructed. Two typical planar trajectories of the system, that is, oblique lines and curve lines, are proposed and both approached with folding lines. The slope of the oblique lines and the curvature of the curves can be adjusted by varying the drive parameters, and the planar locomotion is thus controlled. To achieve a maximum average velocity, the drive parameters are optimized.

  19. Laser-driven particle acceleration for radiobiology and radiotherapy: where we are and where we are going

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giulietti, Antonio

    2017-05-01

    Radiation therapy of tumors progresses continuously and so do devices, sharing a global market of about $ 4 billions, growing at an annual rate exceeding 5%. Most of the progress involves tumor targeting, multi-beam irradiation, reduction of damage on healthy tissues and critical organs, dose fractioning. This fast-evolving scenario is the moving benchmark for the progress of the laser-based accelerators towards clinical uses. As for electrons, both energy and dose requested by radiotherapy are available with plasma accelerators driven by lasers in the power range of tens of TW but several issues have still to be faced before getting a prototype device for clinical tests. They include capability of varying electron energy, stability of the process, reliability for medical users. On the other side hadron therapy, presently applied to a small fraction of cases but within an exponential growth, is a primary option for the future. With such a strong motivation, research on laser-based proton/ion acceleration has been supported in the last decade in order to get performances suitable to clinical standards. None of these performances has been achieved so far with laser techniques. In the meantime a rich crop of data have been obtained in radiobiological experiments performed with beams of particles produced with laser techniques. It is quite significant however that most of the experiments have been performed moving bio samples to laser labs, rather moving laser equipment to bio labs or clinical contexts. This give us the measure that laser community cannot so far provide practical devices usable by non-laser people.

  20. PEPSI-Dock: a detailed data-driven protein-protein interaction potential accelerated by polar Fourier correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neveu, Emilie; Ritchie, David W; Popov, Petr; Grudinin, Sergei

    2016-09-01

    Docking prediction algorithms aim to find the native conformation of a complex of proteins from knowledge of their unbound structures. They rely on a combination of sampling and scoring methods, adapted to different scales. Polynomial Expansion of Protein Structures and Interactions for Docking (PEPSI-Dock) improves the accuracy of the first stage of the docking pipeline, which will sharpen up the final predictions. Indeed, PEPSI-Dock benefits from the precision of a very detailed data-driven model of the binding free energy used with a global and exhaustive rigid-body search space. As well as being accurate, our computations are among the fastest by virtue of the sparse representation of the pre-computed potentials and FFT-accelerated sampling techniques. Overall, this is the first demonstration of a FFT-accelerated docking method coupled with an arbitrary-shaped distance-dependent interaction potential. First, we present a novel learning process to compute data-driven distant-dependent pairwise potentials, adapted from our previous method used for rescoring of putative protein-protein binding poses. The potential coefficients are learned by combining machine-learning techniques with physically interpretable descriptors. Then, we describe the integration of the deduced potentials into a FFT-accelerated spherical sampling provided by the Hex library. Overall, on a training set of 163 heterodimers, PEPSI-Dock achieves a success rate of 91% mid-quality predictions in the top-10 solutions. On a subset of the protein docking benchmark v5, it achieves 44.4% mid-quality predictions in the top-10 solutions when starting from bound structures and 20.5% when starting from unbound structures. The method runs in 5-15 min on a modern laptop and can easily be extended to other types of interactions. https://team.inria.fr/nano-d/software/PEPSI-Dock sergei.grudinin@inria.fr. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e

  1. Generation of high-field narrowband terahertz radiation by counterpropagating plasma wakefields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timofeev, I. V.; Annenkov, V. V.; Volchok, E. P.

    2017-10-01

    It is found that nonlinear interaction of plasma wakefields driven by counterpropagating laser or particle beams can efficiently generate high-power electromagnetic radiation at the second harmonic of the plasma frequency. Using a simple analytical theory and particle-in-cell simulations, we show that this phenomenon can be attractive for producing high-field ( ˜10 MV/cm) tunable terahertz radiation with a narrow line width. For laser drivers produced by existing petawatt-class systems, this nonlinear process opens the way to the generation of gigawatt, multi-millijoule terahertz pulses which are not presently available for any other generating schemes.

  2. Accelerator-driven transmutation of high-level waste from the defense and commercial sectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowman, C.; Arthur, E.; Beard, C. [and others

    1996-09-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The major goal has been to develop accelerator transmutation of waste (ATW) system designs that will thoroughly and rapidly transmute nuclear waste, including plutonium from dismantled weapons and spent reactor fuel, while generating useful electrical power and without producing a long-lived radioactive waste stream. We have identified and quantified the unique qualities of subcritical nuclear systems and their capabilities in bringing about the complete destruction of plutonium. Although the 1191 subcritical systems involved in our most effective designs radically depart from traditional nuclear reactor concepts, they are based on extrapolations of existing technologies. Overall, care was taken to retain the highly desired features that nuclear technology has developed over the years within a conservative design envelope. We believe that the ATW systems designed in this project will enable almost complete destruction of nuclear waste (conversion to stable species) at a faster rate and without many of the safety concerns associated with the possible reactor approaches.

  3. Nanomedical science and laser-driven particle acceleration: promising approaches in the prethermal regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauduel, Y. A.

    2017-05-01

    A major challenge of spatio-temporal radiation biomedicine concerns the understanding of biophysical events triggered by an initial energy deposition inside confined ionization tracks. This contribution deals with an interdisciplinary approach that concerns cutting-edge advances in real-time radiation events, considering the potentialities of innovating strategies based on ultrafast laser science, from femtosecond photon sources to advanced techniques of ultrafast TW laser-plasma accelerator. Recent advances of powerful TW laser sources ( 1019 W cm-2) and laser-plasma interactions providing ultra-short relativistic particle beams in the energy domain 5-200 MeV open promising opportunities for the development of high energy radiation femtochemistry (HERF) in the prethermal regime of secondary low-energy electrons and for the real-time imaging of radiation-induced biomolecular alterations at the nanoscopic scale. New developments would permit to correlate early radiation events triggered by ultrashort radiation sources with a molecular approach of Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE). These emerging research developments are crucial to understand simultaneously, at the sub-picosecond and nanometric scales, the early consequences of ultra-short-pulsed radiation on biomolecular environments or integrated biological entities. This innovating approach would be applied to biomedical relevant concepts such as the emerging domain of real-time nanodosimetry for targeted pro-drug activation and pulsed radio-chimiotherapy of cancers.

  4. Generating high brightness electron beams using density down ramp injection in nonlinear plasma wakefields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalichaouch, Thamine; Xu, Xinlu; Davidson, Asher; Yu, Peicheng; An, Weiming; Joshi, Chan; Zhang, Chaojie; Mori, Warren; Li, Fei; Lu, Wei; Fonseca, Ricardo

    2017-10-01

    In the past few decades, there has been much progress in theory, simulation, and experiment towards using Plasma wakefield acceleration (PWFA) and Laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) as the basis for designing and building compact x-ray free-electron-lasers (XFEL) as well as a next generation linear collider. Recently, ionization injection and density downramp injection have been proposed and demonstrated as controllable injection schemes for generating high quality relativistic electron beams. We present the concepts and full 3D simulation results using OSIRIS which show that downramp injection can generate electron beams with unprecedented brightnesses. However, full-3D simulations of plasma-based acceleration can be computationally intensive, sometimes taking millions of cpu-hours. Due to the near azimuthal symmetry in PWFA and LWFA, quasi-3D simulations using a cylindrical geometry are computationally more efficient than 3D Cartesian simulations since only the first few harmonics are needed in ϕ to capture the 3D physics of most problems. We also present results from the quasi-3D approach on downramp injection and compare the results against full 3D simulations. Work supported by NSF and DOE.

  5. Multi-GPU Acceleration of Branchless Distance Driven Projection and Backprojection for Clinical Helical CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Ayan; Politte, David G; Whiting, Bruce R; Williamson, Jeffrey F; O'Sullivan, Joseph A

    2017-01-01

    Model-based image reconstruction (MBIR) techniques have the potential to generate high quality images from noisy measurements and a small number of projections which can reduce the x-ray dose in patients. These MBIR techniques rely on projection and backprojection to refine an image estimate. One of the widely used projectors for these modern MBIR based technique is called branchless distance driven (DD) projection and backprojection. While this method produces superior quality images, the computational cost of iterative updates keeps it from being ubiquitous in clinical applications. In this paper, we provide several new parallelization ideas for concurrent execution of the DD projectors in multi-GPU systems using CUDA programming tools. We have introduced some novel schemes for dividing the projection data and image voxels over multiple GPUs to avoid runtime overhead and inter-device synchronization issues. We have also reduced the complexity of overlap calculation of the algorithm by eliminating the common projection plane and directly projecting the detector boundaries onto image voxel boundaries. To reduce the time required for calculating the overlap between the detector edges and image voxel boundaries, we have proposed a pre-accumulation technique to accumulate image intensities in perpendicular 2D image slabs (from a 3D image) before projection and after backprojection to ensure our DD kernels run faster in parallel GPU threads. For the implementation of our iterative MBIR technique we use a parallel multi-GPU version of the alternating minimization (AM) algorithm with penalized likelihood update. The time performance using our proposed reconstruction method with Siemens Sensation 16 patient scan data shows an average of 24 times speedup using a single TITAN X GPU and 74 times speedup using 3 TITAN X GPUs in parallel for combined projection and backprojection.

  6. Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Compact Dielectric Wakefield Accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    macroparticles. Additionally the laser is chosen to have a transverse rms spot size of σc = 0.8 mm and rms duration of σt = 1 ps. A solenoidal lens is...photocathode laser . . . . . . . . . . 24 3.3 Experimental realization of a linearly-ramped bunch with a multifrequency linac...Experimental Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 5.2 Simulation and Analysis of a THz pulse propagation in a SLAB DLW

  7. Detection of inverse Compton scattering in plasma wakefield experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohlen, Simon

    2016-12-15

    Inverse Compton scattering (ICS) is the process of scattering of photons and electrons, where the photons gain a part of the electrons energy. In combination with plasma wakefield acceleration (PWA), ICS offers a compact MeV γ-ray source. A numerical study of ICS radiation produced in PWA experiments at FLASHForward was performed, using an ICS simulation code and the results from particle-in-cell modelling. The possibility of determining electron beam properties from measurements of the γ-ray source was explored for a wide range of experimental conditions. It was found that information about the electron divergence, the electron spectrum and longitudinal information can be obtained from measurements of the ICS beams for some cases. For the measurement of the ICS profile at FLASHForward, a CsI(Tl) scintillator array was chosen, similar to scintillators used in other ICS experiments. To find a suitable detector for spectrum measurements, an experimental test of a Compton spectrometer at the RAL was conducted. This test showed that a similar spectrometer could also be used at FLASHForward. However, changes to the spectrometer could be needed in order to use the pair production effect. In addition, further studies using Geant4 could lead to a better reconstruction of the obtained data. The studies presented here show that ICS is a promising method to analyse electron parameters from PWA experiments in further detail.

  8. Impact of intermediate and high energy nuclear data on the neutronic safety parameters of MYRRHA accelerator driven system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankovskiy, Alexey; Çelik, Yurdunaz; Eynde, Gert Van den

    2017-09-01

    Perturbation of external neutron source can cause significant local power changes transformed into undesired safety-related events in an accelerator driven system. Therefore for the accurate design of MYRRHA sub-critical core it is important to evaluate the uncertainty of power responses caused by the uncertainties in nuclear reaction models describing the particle transport from primary proton energy down to the evaluated nuclear data table range. The calculations with a set of models resulted in quite low uncertainty on the local power caused by significant perturbation of primary neutron yield from proton interactions with lead and bismuth isotopes. The considered accidental event of prescribed proton beam shape loss causes drastic increase in local power but does not practically change the total core thermal power making this effect difficult to detect. In the same time the results demonstrate a correlation between perturbed local power responses in normal operation and misaligned beam conditions indicating that generation of covariance data for proton and neutron induced neutron multiplicities for lead and bismuth isotopes is needed to obtain reliable uncertainties for local power responses.

  9. Conceptual design for accelerator-driven sodium-cooled sub-critical transmutation reactors using scale laws

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kwang Gu; Chang, Soon Heung [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    The feasibility study on conceptual design methodology for accelerator-driven sodium-cooled sub-critical transmutation reactors has been conducted to optimize the design parameters from the scale laws and validates the reactor performance with the integrated code system. A 1000 MWth sodium-cooled sub-critical transmutation reactor has been scaled and verified through the methodology in this paper, which is referred to Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR). A Pb-Bi target material and a partitioned fuel are the liquid phases, and they are cooled by the circulation of secondary Pb-Bi coolant and by primary sodium coolant, respectively. Overall key design parameters are generated from the scale laws and they are improved and validated by the integrated code system. Integrated Code System (ICS) consists of LAHET, HMCNP, ORIGEN2, and COMMIX codes and some files. Through ICS the target region, the core region, and thermal-hydraulic related regions are analyzed once-through Results of conceptual design are attached in this paper. 5 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab. (Author)

  10. Hybrid TE-TM scheme for time domain numerical calculations of wakefields in structures with walls of finite conductivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andranik Tsakanian

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In particle accelerators a preferred direction, the direction of motion, is well defined. If in a numerical calculation the (numerical dispersion in this direction is suppressed, a quite coarse mesh and moderate computational resources can be used to reach accurate results even for extremely short electron bunches. Several approaches have been proposed in the past decades to reduce the accumulated dispersion error in wakefield calculations for perfectly conducting structures. In this paper we extend the TE/TM splitting algorithm to a new hybrid scheme that allows for wakefield calculations in structures with walls of finite conductivity. The conductive boundary is modeled by one-dimensional wires connected to each boundary cell. A good agreement of the numerical simulations with analytical results and other numerical approaches is obtained.

  11. Wakefield Computations for the CLIC PETS using the Parallel Finite Element Time-Domain Code T3P

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candel, A; Kabel, A.; Lee, L.; Li, Z.; Ng, C.; Schussman, G.; Ko, K.; /SLAC; Syratchev, I.; /CERN

    2009-06-19

    In recent years, SLAC's Advanced Computations Department (ACD) has developed the high-performance parallel 3D electromagnetic time-domain code, T3P, for simulations of wakefields and transients in complex accelerator structures. T3P is based on advanced higher-order Finite Element methods on unstructured grids with quadratic surface approximation. Optimized for large-scale parallel processing on leadership supercomputing facilities, T3P allows simulations of realistic 3D structures with unprecedented accuracy, aiding the design of the next generation of accelerator facilities. Applications to the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) Power Extraction and Transfer Structure (PETS) are presented.

  12. Proposed Physics Experiments for Laser-Driven Electron Linear Acceleration in a Dielectric Loaded Vacuum, Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byer, Robert L. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Applied Physics. Edward L. Ginzton Lab.

    2016-07-08

    This final report summarizes the last three years of research on the development of advanced linear electron accelerators that utilize dielectric wave-guide vacuum channels pumped by high energy laser fields to accelerate beams of electrons.

  13. Physics design of a 10 MeV injector test stand for an accelerator-driven subcritical system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Yan

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The 10 MeV accelerator-driven subcritical system (ADS Injector I test stand at Institute of High Energy Physics (IHEP is a testing facility dedicated to demonstrate one of the two injector design schemes [Injector Scheme-I, which works at 325 MHz], for the ADS project in China. The injector is composed of two parts, the linac part and the beam dump line. The former is designed on the basis of 325 MHz four-vane type copper structure radio frequency quadrupole and superconducting (SC spoke cavities with β=0.12. The latter is designed to transport the beam coming out of the SC section of the linac to the beam dump, where the beam transverse profile is fairly enlarged and unformed to simplify the beam target design. The SC section consists of two cryomodules with 14 β=0.12 Spoke cavities, 14 solenoid and 14 BPMs in total. The first challenge in the physics design comes from the necessary space required for the cryomodule separation where the periodical lattice is destroyed at a relatively lower energy of ∼5  MeV. Another challenge is the beam dump line design, as it will be the first beam dump line being built by using a step field magnet for the transverse beam expansion and uniformity in the world. This paper gives an overview of the physics design study together with the design principles and machine construction considerations. The results of an optimized design, fabrication status and end to end simulations including machine errors are presented.

  14. Emission of strong Terahertz pulses from laser wakefields in weakly coupled plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Divya, E-mail: dsingh@rajdhani.du.ac.in [PWAPA Laboratory, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110 016 (India); Department of Physics & Electronics, Rajdhani College, University of Delhi, Raja Garden, Ring Road, New Delhi 110015 (India); Malik, Hitendra K. [PWAPA Laboratory, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110 016 (India)

    2016-09-01

    The present paper discusses the laser plasma interaction for the wakefield excitation and the role of external magnetic field for the emission of Terahertz radiation in a collisional plasma. Flat top lasers are shown to be more appropriate than the conventional Gaussian lasers for the effective excitation of wakefields and hence, the generation of strong Terahertz radiation through the transverse component of wakefield.

  15. MuSiC: a Multibunch and multiparticle Simulation Code with an alternative approach to wakefield effects

    CERN Document Server

    Migliorati, M

    2015-01-01

    The simulation of beam dynamics in presence of collective effects requires a strong computational effort to take into account, in a self consistent way, the wakefield acting on a given charge and produced by all the others. Generally this is done by means of a convolution integral or sum. Moreover, if the electromagnetic fields consist of resonant modes with high quality factors, responsible, for example, of coupled bunch instabilities, a charge is also affected by itself in previous turns, and a very long record of wakefield must be properly taken into account. In this paper we present a new simulation code for the longitudinal beam dynamics in a circular accelerator, which exploits an alternative approach to the currently used convolution sum, reducing the computing time and avoiding the issues related to the length of wakefield for coupled bunch instabilities. With this approach it is possible to simulate, without the need of a large computing power, simultaneously, the single and multi-bunch beam dynamics...

  16. Modeling two-stage bunch compression with wakefields: Macroscopic properties and microbunching instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Bosch

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available In a two-stage compression and acceleration system, where each stage compresses a chirped bunch in a magnetic chicane, wakefields affect high-current bunches. The longitudinal wakes affect the macroscopic energy and current profiles of the compressed bunch and cause microbunching at short wavelengths. For macroscopic wavelengths, impedance formulas and tracking simulations show that the wakefields can be dominated by the resistive impedance of coherent edge radiation. For this case, we calculate the minimum initial bunch length that can be compressed without producing an upright tail in phase space and associated current spike. Formulas are also obtained for the jitter in the bunch arrival time downstream of the compressors that results from the bunch-to-bunch variation of current, energy, and chirp. Microbunching may occur at short wavelengths where the longitudinal space-charge wakes dominate or at longer wavelengths dominated by edge radiation. We model this range of wavelengths with frequency-dependent impedance before and after each stage of compression. The growth of current and energy modulations is described by analytic gain formulas that agree with simulations.

  17. Development of an X-Band Dielectric-Based Wakefield Power Extractor for Potential CLIC Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Jing, C -J; Kanareykin, A; Schoessow, P; Conde, M E; Gai, W; Power, J G; Syratchev, I

    2011-01-01

    In the past decade, tremendous efforts have been put into the development of the CLIC Power Extraction and Transfer Structure (PETS), and significant progress has been made. However, one concern remains the manufacturing cost of the PETS, particularly considering the quantities needed for a TeV machine. A dielectric-based wakefield power extractor in principle is much cheaper to build. A low surface electric field to gradient ratio is another big advantage of the dielectric-loaded accelerating/decelerating structure. We are currently investigating the possibility of using a cost-effective dielectric-based wakefield power extractor as an alternative to the CLIC PETS. We designed a 12 GHz dielectric-based power extractor which has a similar performance to CLIC PETS with parameters 23 mm beam channel, 240 ns pulse duration, 135 MW output per structure using the CLIC drive beam. In order to study potential rf breakdown issues, as a first step we are building a 11.424 GHz dielectric-based power extractor scaled fr...

  18. Loss of Egr1, a human del5q gene, accelerates BCR-ABL driven chronic myelogenous leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maifrede, Silvia; Magimaidas, Andrew; Sha, Xiaojin; Mukherjee, Kaushiki; Liebermann, Dan A.; Hoffman, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    There is substantial evidence that early growth response-1 (Egr1) gene, a zinc-finger transcription factor, behaves as a tumor suppressor in leukemia. This includes reports from this laboratory that constitutive Egr1 overrides leukemia conferred by deregulated c-Myc or E2F-1 in the M1 myeloid leukemic cell line by promoting differentiation. To investigate the effect of Egr1 on the initiation and progression of Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML), lethally irradiated syngeneic wild type mice were reconstituted with bone marrow (BM) from either wild type or Egr1 null mice transduced with a 210-kD BCR-ABL-expressing MSCV-retrovirus (bone marrow transplantation {BMT}). Loss of Egr1 was observed to accelerate the development of BCR-ABL driven leukemia in recipient mice, resulting in the development of a more aggressive disease, a significantly shortened median survival time, and increased BCR-ABL expressing leukemic stem/progenitor cells (GFP+Lin-cKit+Sca+). Egr1 deficient progenitors expressing BCR-ABL exhibited decreased apoptosis, and increased cell viability and proliferation relative to WT counterparts. Secondary BMT of BCR-ABL BM revealed that loss of Egr1 resulted in enrichment of LSCs, consistent with shorter survival time and more aggressive disease of these mice compared to WT counterparts. Furthermore, serial re-plating colony assays indicated that loss of Egr1 increased self-renewal ability of BCR-ABL expressing BM. These novel findings on the tumor suppressor role of Egr1 in CML provide the impetus to study the effect of altering Egr1 expression in AML, where the overall five year survival rate remains low. The effect of loss of Egr1 in CML could reflect its established functions in normal hematopoiesis, maintaining quiescence of HSCs and driving terminal differentiation to the monocyte/macrophage lineage. Gain of function studies should validate these conclusions and provide further rationale for increased Egr1 as a therapeutic target in AML. PMID:29050203

  19. Wakefields in the LCLS Undulator Transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bane, Karl L.F.; /SLAC; Zagorodnov, Igor A.; /DESY

    2005-08-15

    We have studied longitudinal wakefields of very short bunches in non-cylindrically symmetric (3D) vacuum chamber transitions using analytical models and the computer program ECHO. The wake (for pairs of well-separated, non-smooth transitions) invariably is resistive, with its shape proportional to the bunch distribution. For the example of an elliptical collimator in a round beam pipe we have demonstrated that--as in the cylindrically symmetric (2D) case--the wake can be obtained from the static primary field of the beam alone. We have obtained the wakes of the LCLS rectangular-to-round transitions using indirect (numerical) field integration combined with a primary beam field calculation. For the LCLS 1 nC bunch charge configuration we find that the total variation in wake-induced energy change is small (0.03% in the core of the beam, 0.15% in the horns of the distribution) compared to that due to the resistive wall wakes of the undulator beam pipe (0.6%).

  20. Simulation of Wakefield Effect in ILC IR Chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pei, S; Seryi, A.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; /SLAC

    2008-06-26

    To achieve super high luminosity, high current beams with very short bunch length are needed, which carry high intensity EM fields. For ILC, two bunch trains with bunch length of 300 {micro}m and bunch charge of 3.2nC are needed to collide at the IR to achieve the ILC luminosity goals. When the 300 {micro}m bunches pass through the IR chamber, wakefields will be excited, which will cause HOM power flowing through the IR chamber beam pipe to the final doublets due to the high frequency characteristic of the induced wakefields. Since superconducting technology is adopted for the final doublets of ILC BDS, whose operation stability might be affected by the HOM power produced at the IR chamber, quench might happen. In this paper, we did some analytical estimation and numerical simulation on the wakefield effects in ILC IR chamber.

  1. Wakefield dechirping with a dielectrically lined waveguide at ELBE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reimann, Franziska; Rienen, Ursula van [Universitaet Rostock, Institut fuer Allgemeine Elektrotechnik (Germany); Michel, Peter; Lehnert, Ulf [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden-Rossendorf (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Dielectrically lined waveguides are planned to be used as a passive wakefield dechirper for the electron beam at the ELBE facility of the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden Rossendorf. In this work we introduce the design of such a passive wakefield dechirper based on the analysis of dielectrically lined rectangular waveguides with a semi-analytical model developed at the University of Rostock. The generality of this model allows for a quick calculation of the wakefields of numerous different beam types via the Green's function method. In this work, we present the dechirped phase-spaces of a variety of beam distributions, as well as the theoretically possible dechirping for the ELBE beam. Furthermore, we present an experimental structure planned at the ELBE facility to verify the calculated dechirping effect.

  2. Side-coupled slab-symmetric structure for high-gradient acceleration using terahertz power

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. B. Yoder

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available A slab-symmetric dielectric-loaded accelerator structure, consisting of a vacuum gap between dielectric-lined conducting walls, is described. The device is resonantly excited by an external drive laser which is side coupled into the acceleration region; a novel coupling scheme, which consists of an array of narrow, equally spaced slots in the upper structure boundary, is presented and analyzed in detail. This structure partakes of the advantages of earlier slab-symmetric optical acceleration proposals, but will use a terahertz-frequency external radiation source (λ=340   μm, allowing realistic electron beams to be used in a proof-of-principle experiment. Two- and three-dimensional electromagnetic simulations are used to verify the mode patterns and study the effects of the couplers, including time-dependent calculations of the filling of the structure and particle-in-cell computations of the beam wakefields. Details of the resonance are found to be highly sensitive to the coupling slot geometry: the presence of the couplers can lead to frequency detuning, changes in the field breakdown limits and overall Q factor, and distortions of the field pattern. Beam wakefields are enhanced by the presence of the slots, but found to have no significant effect on the beam transport. The resonant accelerating fields, which are nearly constant along the short transverse direction, are found to have between 10 and 15 times the amplitude of the driving radiation, with only a small (<10% admixture of other nonaccelerating modes. Field gradients are computed to be near 100  MV/m when the structure is driven with 100 MW of terahertz laser power. Possible manufacturing methods for a prototype device are discussed.

  3. Mary Wakefield: Health Resources and Services Administrator. Interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakefield, Mary

    2014-06-01

    Dr. Mary Wakefield is the administrator of the Health Resources and Services Administration. She came from the University of North Dakota, where she directed the Center for Rural Health. She has served as director of the Center for Health Policy, Research and Ethics at George Mason University and has worked with the World Health Organization's Global Programme on AIDS in Geneva, Switzerland. She is a fellow in the American Academy of Nursing and was elected to the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies. A native of North Dakota, Wakefield holds a doctoral degree in nursing from the University of Texas.

  4. Laser-Based Electron Acceleration Experiment in KERI/APRI-GIST

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Guang-Hoon; Hafz, Nasr; Ko Do Kyeong; Lee Jong Min; Suk, Hyyong; Yu, T J

    2005-01-01

    Laser-based acceleration of charged particles has been of interest since laser wakefield produces very strong longitudinal electrical field to accelerate electrons upto relativistic energy. Recently, 20TW Ti:sapphire laser system, with pulse width of 30 fs and energy pf 600 mJ, was installed in APRI-GIST. The laser pulse is focused onto a gas jet to produce plasma and accelerate electrons in the scheme of self-modulated laser wakefield acceleration. Details of laser system and diagnostic results of electron beam will be discussed

  5. Beam Coupling to Optical Scale Accelerating Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sears, C.M.; Byer, R.L.; Colby, E.R.; Cowan, B.M.; Ischebeck, R.; Lincoln, M.R.; Siemann, R.H.; Spencer, J.E.; /SLAC; Plettner, T.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2007-03-27

    Current research efforts into structure based laser acceleration of electrons utilize beams from standard RF linacs. These beams must be coupled into very small structures with transverse dimensions comparable to the laser wavelength. To obtain decent transmission, a permanent magnet quadrupole (PMQ) triplet with a focusing gradient of 560 T/m is used to focus into the structure. Also of interest is the induced wakefield from the structure, useful for diagnosing potential accelerator structures or as novel radiation sources.

  6. Wake potentials and impedances for the ATA (Advanced Test Accelerator) induction cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craig, G.D.

    1990-09-04

    The AMOS Wakefield Code is used to calculate the impedances of the induction cell used in the Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) at Livermore. We present the wakefields and impedances for multipoles m = 0, 1 and 2. The ATA cell is calculated to have a maximum transverse impedance of approximately 1000 {Omega}/m at 875 MHz with a quality factor Q = 5. The sensitivity of the impedance spectra to modeling variations is discussed.

  7. Enhanced electron yield from a laser-plasma accelerator using high-Z gas jet targets

    CERN Document Server

    Mirzaie, Mohammad; Li, Song; Sokollik, Thomas; He, Fei; Cheng, Ya; Sheng, Zhengming; Zhang, Jie

    2014-01-01

    An investigation of the multi-hundred MeV electron beam yield (charge) form helium, nitrogen, neon and argon gas jet plasmas in a laser-plasma wakefield acceleration experiment was carried out. The charge measurement has been made via imaging the electron beam intensity profile on a fluorescent screen into a 14-bit charge coupled device (CCD) which was cross-calibrated with nondestructive electronics-based method. Within given laser and plasma parameters, we found that laser-driven low Z- gas jet targets generate high-quality and well-collimated electron beams with reasonable yields at the level of 10-100 pC. On the other hand, filamentary electron beams which were observed from high-Z gas jets at higher densities reached much higher yield. Evidences for cluster formation were clearly observed in high-Z gases, especially in the argon gas jet target where we received the highest yield of ~ 3 nC

  8. Experimental Investigation of an X-Band Tunable Dielectric Accelerating Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Kanareykin, Alex; Karmanenko, Sergei F; Nenasheva, Elisaveta; Power, John G; Schoessow, Paul; Semenov, Alexei

    2005-01-01

    Experimental study of a new scheme to tune the resonant frequency for dielectric based accelerating structure (driven either by the wakefield of a beam or an external rf source) is underway. The structure consists of a single layer of conventional dielectric surrounded by a very thin layer of ferroelectric material situated on the outside. Carefully designed electrodes are attached to a thin layer of ferroelectric material. A DC bias can be applied to the electrodes to change the permittivity of the ferroelectric layer and therefore, the dielectric overall resonant frequency can be tuned. In this paper, we present the test results for an 11.424 GHz rectangular DLA prototype structure that the ferroelectric material's dielectric constant of 500 and show that a frequency tuning range of 2% can be achieved. If successful, this scheme would compensate for structure errors caused by ceramic waveguide machining tolerances and dielectric constant heterogeneity.

  9. Simulation and characterization of the RF system and global stability analysis at the REGAE linear electron accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayet, Frank

    2012-12-15

    LAOLA (LAboratory for Laser- and beam-driven plasma Acceleration), is a collaboration between groups from DESY and the University of Hamburg. Its mission is to complement basic research in the relatively new field of plasma wakefield acceleration (PWA) by an explicit combination with DESY's conventional, modern accelerators. The linear electron accelerator REGAE is designed to produce sub 10 fs low charge electron bunches with ultra-low emittance at a repetition rate of 50 Hz. The planned experiments include femtosecond electron diffraction (R.J. Dwayne Miller), as well as the probing of laser induced plasma wakefields with well characterized bunches (LAOLA). They all require high bunch time of flight stability down to 10 fs. The REGAE machine consists of two RF cavities, both fed by a single klystron. While the first one - the gun cavity - is used for acceleration of the electrons, the second one - the buncher cavity - can be used to reduce the electron bunch length. This scheme only works for a specific RF phase relation between the two cavities. This thesis is split into two parts. In the first one the implications of the unique two cavity design on day-to-day machine operation are analyzed. To this end an analytical model of the RF system is developed, which is necessary for understanding how to individually adjust the cavity phases. In the second part the influence of the setup on time of flight stability is discussed with an emphasis on phase jitter compensation. RF phase stability measurements reveal that the current machine setup allows for a time of flight stability down to 50 fs right after the gun.

  10. Wakefields generated by electron beams passing through a waveguide loaded with a slightly dispersive active medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey V. Tyukhtin

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The wakefields of a relativistic electron beam passing through a waveguide loaded with an active medium with weak resonant dispersion are considered. For the calculations in this paper, the parameters of the medium are those of a solution of fullerene (C_{60} in a nematic liquid crystal that exhibits activity in the X-band. It is shown that several of the TM accelerating modes can be amplified for the geometries under consideration; structures in which higher order modes are amplified exhibit essential advantages as PASERs. In particular, the amplification of the highest mode occurs in a structure loaded with a rather thick active medium layer that maximizes the energy stored by the active medium.

  11. Optimum design and criticality safety of a beam-shaping assembly with an accelerator-driven subcritical neutron multiplier for boron neutron capture therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraga, F

    2015-12-01

    The beam-shaping assembly for boron neutron capture therapies with a compact accelerator-driven subcritical neutron multiplier was designed so that an epithermal neutron flux of 1.9×10(9) cm(-2) s(-1) at the treatment position was generated by 5 MeV protons in a beam current of 2 mA. Changes in the atomic density of (135)Xe in the nuclear fuel due to the operation of the beam-shaping assembly were estimated. The criticality safety of the beam-shaping assembly in terms of Xe poisoning is discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Progress of plasma wakefield self-modulation experiments at FACET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adli, E., E-mail: Erik.Adli@fys.uio.no [Department of Physics, University of Oslo, N-0316 Oslo (Norway); SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Berglyd Olsen, V.K.; Lindstrøm, C.A. [Department of Physics, University of Oslo, N-0316 Oslo (Norway); SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Muggli, P.; Reimann, O. [Max Planck Institute for Physics, Munich (Germany); Vieira, J.M.; Amorim, L.D. [GoLP/Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Téchnico, Universidade de Lisboa, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Clarke, C.I.; Gessner, S.J.; Green, S.Z.; Hogan, M.J.; Litos, M.D.; O' Shea, B.D.; Yakimenko, V. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Clayton, C.; Marsh, K.A.; Mori, W.B.; Joshi, C.; Vafaei-Najafabadi, N.; Williams, O. [University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Simulations and theory predict that long electron and positron beams may under favorable conditions self-modulate in plasmas. We report on the progress of experiments studying the self-modulation instability in plasma wakefield experiments at FACET. The experimental results obtained so far, while not being fully conclusive, appear to be consistent with the presence of the self-modulation instability.

  13. Self-consistent Simulation of Microparticle and Ion Wakefield Configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, Dustin; Brooks, Beau; Ellis, Naoki; Matthews, Lorin; Hyde, Truell

    2017-10-01

    In a complex plasma, positively charged ions often have a directed flow with respect to the negatively charged dust grains. The resulting interaction between the dust and the flowing plasma creates an ion wakefield downstream from the dust particles, with the resulting positive space region modifying the interaction between the grains and contributing to the observed dynamics and equilibrium structure of the system. Here we present a proof of concept method that uses a molecular dynamics simulation to model the ion wakefield allowing the dynamics of the dust particles to be determined self-consistently. The trajectory of each ion is calculated including the forces from all other ions, which are treated as ``Yukawa particles'' and shielded from thermal electrons and the forces of the charged dust particles. Both the dust grain charge and the wakefield structure are also self-consistently determined for various particle configurations. The resultant wakefield potentials are then used to provide dynamic simulations of dust particle pairs. These results will be employed to analyze the formation and dynamics of field-aligned chains in CASPER's PK4 experiment onboard the International Space Station, allowing examination of extended dust chains without the masking force of gravity. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grants PHY-1414523 and PHY-1740203.

  14. Design of a high average-power FEL driven by an existing 20 MV electrostatic-accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimel, I.; Elias, L.R. [Univ. of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States)

    1995-12-31

    There are some important applications where high average-power radiation is required. Two examples are industrial machining and space power-beaming. Unfortunately, up to date no FEL has been able to show more than 10 Watts of average power. To remedy this situation we started a program geared towards the development of high average-power FELs. As a first step we are building in our CREOL laboratory, a compact FEL which will generate close to 1 kW in CW operation. As the next step we are also engaged in the design of a much higher average-power system based on a 20 MV electrostatic accelerator. This FEL will be capable of operating CW with a power output of 60 kW. The idea is to perform a high power demonstration using the existing 20 MV electrostatic accelerator at the Tandar facility in Buenos Aires. This machine has been dedicated to accelerate heavy ions for experiments and applications in nuclear and atomic physics. The necessary adaptations required to utilize the machine to accelerate electrons will be described. An important aspect of the design of the 20 MV system, is the electron beam optics through almost 30 meters of accelerating and decelerating tubes as well as the undulator. Of equal importance is a careful design of the long resonator with mirrors able to withstand high power loading with proper heat dissipation features.

  15. High Gradient Accelerator Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Temkin, Richard [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Physics. Plasma Science and Fusion Center

    2016-07-12

    The goal of the MIT program of research on high gradient acceleration is the development of advanced acceleration concepts that lead to a practical and affordable next generation linear collider at the TeV energy level. Other applications, which are more near-term, include accelerators for materials processing; medicine; defense; mining; security; and inspection. The specific goals of the MIT program are: • Pioneering theoretical research on advanced structures for high gradient acceleration, including photonic structures and metamaterial structures; evaluation of the wakefields in these advanced structures • Experimental research to demonstrate the properties of advanced structures both in low-power microwave cold test and high-power, high-gradient test at megawatt power levels • Experimental research on microwave breakdown at high gradient including studies of breakdown phenomena induced by RF electric fields and RF magnetic fields; development of new diagnostics of the breakdown process • Theoretical research on the physics and engineering features of RF vacuum breakdown • Maintaining and improving the Haimson / MIT 17 GHz accelerator, the highest frequency operational accelerator in the world, a unique facility for accelerator research • Providing the Haimson / MIT 17 GHz accelerator facility as a facility for outside users • Active participation in the US DOE program of High Gradient Collaboration, including joint work with SLAC and with Los Alamos National Laboratory; participation of MIT students in research at the national laboratories • Training the next generation of Ph. D. students in the field of accelerator physics.

  16. Experimental study on neutronics in bombardment of thick targets by high energy proton beams for accelerator-driven sub-critical system

    CERN Document Server

    Guo Shi Lun; Shi Yong Qian; Shen Qing Biao; Wan Jun Sheng; Brandt, R; Vater, P; Kulakov, B A; Krivopustov, M I; Sosnin, A N

    2002-01-01

    The experimental study on neutronics in the target region of accelerator-driven sub-critical system is carried out by using the high energy accelerator in Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia. The experiments with targets U(Pb), Pb and Hg bombarded by 0.533, 1.0, 3.7 and 7.4 GeV proton beams show that the neutron yield ratio of U(Pb) to Hg and Pb to Hg targets is (2.10 +- 0.10) and (1.76 +- 0.33), respectively. Hg target is disadvantageous to U(Pb) and Pb targets to get more neutrons. Neutron yield drops along 20 cm thick targets as the thickness penetrated by protons increases. The lower the energy of protons, the steeper the neutron yield drops. In order to get more uniform field of neutrons in the targets, the energy of protons from accelerators should not be lower than 1 GeV. The spectra of secondary neutrons produced by different energies of protons are similar, but the proportion of neutrons with higher energy gradually increases as the proton energy increases

  17. Basic concept for an accelerator-driven subcritical system to be used as a long-pulse neutron source for Condensed Matter research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vivanco, R., E-mail: raul.vivanco.sanchez@gmail.com [ESS-BILBAO, Parque Tecnológico Bizkaia, Laida Bidea, Edificio 207 B Planta Baja, 48160 Derio (Spain); Instituto de Fusión Nuclear - UPM, ETS Ingenieros Industriales, C/ José Gutiérrez Abascal, 2, 28006 Madrid Spain (Spain); Ghiglino, A.; Vicente, J.P. de; Sordo, F.; Terrón, S.; Magán, M. [ESS-BILBAO, Parque Tecnológico Bizkaia, Laida Bidea, Edificio 207 B Planta Baja, 48160 Derio (Spain); Instituto de Fusión Nuclear - UPM, ETS Ingenieros Industriales, C/ José Gutiérrez Abascal, 2, 28006 Madrid Spain (Spain); Perlado, J.M. [Instituto de Fusión Nuclear - UPM, ETS Ingenieros Industriales, C/ José Gutiérrez Abascal, 2, 28006 Madrid Spain (Spain); Bermejo, F.J. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, IEM-CSIC, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Serrano 123, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-12-11

    A model for an accelerator-driven subcritical system to be operated as a source of cold neutrons for Condensed Matter research is developed at the conceptual level. Its baseline layout relies upon proven accelerator, spalattion target and fuel array technologies, and consists in a proton accelerator able to deliver some 67.5 mA of proton beam with kinetic energy 0.6 GeV, a pulse length of 2.86 ms, and repetition rate of 14 Hz. The particle beam hits a target of conventional design that is surrounded by a multiplicative core made of fissile/fertile material, composed by a subcritical array of fuel bars made of aluminium Cermet cooled by light water poisoned with boric acid. Relatively low enriched uranium is chosen as fissile material. An optimisation of several parameters is carried out, using as components of the objective function several characteristics pertaining the cold neutron pulse. The results show that the optimal device will deliver up to 80% of the cold neutron flux expected for some of the ongoing projects using a significantly lower proton beam power than that managed in such projects. The total power developed within the core rises up to 22.8 MW, and the criticality range shifts to a final k{sub eff} value of around 0.9 after the 50 days cycle.

  18. Propagation speed, linear stability, and ion acceleration in radially imploding Hall-driven electron-magnetohydrodynamic shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, A. S.; Swanekamp, S. B.; Jackson, S. L.; Mosher, D.; Ottinger, P. F.

    2018-01-01

    Plasma density gradients are known to drive magnetic shocks in electron-magnetohydrodynamics. Previous slab modeling has been extended to cylindrical modeling of radially imploding shocks. The main new effect of the cylindrical geometry is found to be a radial dependence in the speed of shock propagation. This is shown here analytically and in numerical simulations. Ion acceleration by the magnetic shock is shown to possibly become substantial, especially in the peaked structures that develop in the shock because of electron inertia.

  19. Gamma-ray generation from laser-driven electron resonant acceleration: In the non-QED and the QED regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, B.; Chang, H. X.; Xie, Y.; Xu, Z.; He, X. T.

    2017-12-01

    Electron acceleration and γ-ray emission by circularly polarized laser pulses interacting with near-critical-density plasmas are systematically investigated for both the non-quantum-electrodynamic (non-QED) and QED regimes. In the non-QED regime, since electron density in the plasma channel is small and the self-generated electromagnetic fields are weak, only a few electrons can achieve the resonant acceleration, leading to weak γ-ray emission. However, when it comes to the QED regime, the radiation recoil force significantly affects the electron dynamics, which helps in not only the trapping of electrons, but also the relaxing of the condition for electrons to hit the resonance with laser fields, resulting in the formation of an ultradense helical electron bunch under resonant acceleration in the plasma channel. Therefore, an intense γ-ray pulse with unprecedented flux can be generated. Theoretical analysis and three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations are carried out to compare the dynamics in two different regimes.

  20. Two-stage acceleration of externally injected electrons in plasma bubble derived from the combination of DLA and LWFA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khudik, Vladimir; Wang, Tianhong; Vicuna, Daniel; Zhang, Xi; Shvets, Gennady

    2017-10-01

    Simultaneous interactions of accelerated electrons directly with a laser pulse and with a laser wakefield are studied using a novel quasistatic 3D particle-in-cell code. Relativistic electrons externally injected into the plasma bubble's decelerating phase can gain significant energy through the direct laser acceleration (DLA) mechanism from the driving laser pulse, increasing the amplitude of betatron oscillations. With time, the resonant interaction condition is violated, leading to gradual dephasing between electrons and laser wave, and to eventual slipping of the electrons to the back of the plasma bubble. After that, the oscillating electrons experience the second stage of acceleration gaining energy only from the bubble wakefield. We analyze each stage of acceleration and show that electrons undergoing two stages emits much more X-ray radiation compared with those accelerated during one wakefield stage. This work was supported by DOE Grant DESC0007889 and by AFOSR Grant FA9550-16-1-0013.

  1. PIC simulation of electron acceleration in an underdense plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Darvish Molla

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the interesting Laser-Plasma phenomena, when the laser power is high and ultra intense, is the generation of large amplitude plasma waves (Wakefield and electron acceleration. An intense electromagnetic laser pulse can create plasma oscillations through the action of the nonlinear pondermotive force. electrons trapped in the wake can be accelerated to high energies, more than 1 TW. Of the wide variety of methods for generating a regular electric field in plasmas with strong laser radiation, the most attractive one at the present time is the scheme of the Laser Wake Field Accelerator (LWFA. In this method, a strong Langmuir wave is excited in the plasma. In such a wave, electrons are trapped and can acquire relativistic energies, accelerated to high energies. In this paper the PIC simulation of wakefield generation and electron acceleration in an underdense plasma with a short ultra intense laser pulse is discussed. 2D electromagnetic PIC code is written by FORTRAN 90, are developed, and the propagation of different electromagnetic waves in vacuum and plasma is shown. Next, the accuracy of implementation of 2D electromagnetic code is verified, making it relativistic and simulating the generating of wakefield and electron acceleration in an underdense plasma. It is shown that when a symmetric electromagnetic pulse passes through the plasma, the longitudinal field generated in plasma, at the back of the pulse, is weaker than the one due to an asymmetric electromagnetic pulse, and thus the electrons acquire less energy. About the asymmetric pulse, when front part of the pulse has smaller time rise than the back part of the pulse, a stronger wakefield generates, in plasma, at the back of the pulse, and consequently the electrons acquire more energy. In an inverse case, when the rise time of the back part of the pulse is bigger in comparison with that of the back part, a weaker wakefield generates and this leads to the fact that the electrons

  2. Wakefield Calculations for Radiation Stopper 1 (RST1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Limborg-Deprey, C.

    2010-12-13

    The main result of this note is that no wakefield mitigation is required for the Radiation Stopper (RST1) in the LCLS injector. The RST1 geometry is not symmetric in the vertical direction, and we derive a slight modification to the diffraction model wake for a cylindrically symmetric (2D) cavity that can be used for this problem. Performing a full 3D MAFIA calculation for the nominal 1 mm (rms) long bunch, we show that the modified diffraction model well describes the wakefields generated in RST1. The results imply an on-axis emittance growth of 0.0075%, well below the 0.5% tolerance threshold. To reach the 0.5% threshold the beam would need to be mis-steered by a large amount - 7 mm - from the axis. One reason that the effect is small is that the beta functions at the RST1 are small.

  3. The mechanical design and fabrication of 162.5 MHz buncher for China accelerator driven sub-critical system injector II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niu, Hai Hua; Li, Youtang [Lanzhou University of Technology, Lanzhou (China); He, Yuan; Zhang, Bin; Huang, Shichun; Yuan, Chenzhang; Jia, Huan; Zhang, Shenghu [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou (China)

    2017-08-15

    A buncher is one of the main pieces of equipment in the medium energy beam transport line (MEBT) for China accelerator driven sub-critical system (C-ADS) Injector II. To focus the beam longitudinally and match the beam for the acceptance of the superconducting linac section, two room temperature quarter wave resonator (QWR) bunchers with frequency of 162.5 MHz have been designed as parts of the MEBT. According to the beam transmission matching of the MEBT and the geometric parameters requirements of bunchers, the unique mechanical structure and the main processing technology of buncher cavities and their couplers and tuners are described in this paper. The fabrication of bunchers and their parts have been completed and tested at high power, the test results agree well with the design requirements. These bunchers work well for about two years in Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  4. The mechanical design and fabrication of 162.5 MHz buncher for China accelerator driven sub-critical system injector II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haihua Niu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available A buncher is one of the main pieces of equipment in the medium energy beam transport line (MEBT for China accelerator driven sub-critical system (C-ADS Injector II. To focus the beam longitudinally and match the beam for the acceptance of the superconducting linac section, two room temperature quarter wave resonator (QWR bunchers with frequency of 162.5 MHz have been designed as parts of the MEBT. According to the beam transmission matching of the MEBT and the geometric parameters requirements of bunchers, the unique mechanical structure and the main processing technology of buncher cavities and their couplers and tuners are described in this paper. The fabrication of bunchers and their parts have been completed and tested at high power, the test results agree well with the design requirements. These bunchers work well for about two years in Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  5. Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET) at SLAC and its Radiological Considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, X.S.; Leitner, M.Santana; Vollaire, J.

    2011-08-22

    Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET) in SLAC will be used to study plasma wakefield acceleration. FLUKA Monte Carlo code was used to design a maze wall to separate FACET project and LCLS project to allow persons working in FACET side during LCLS operation. Also FLUKA Monte Carlo code was used to design the shielding for FACET dump to get optimum design for shielding both prompt and residual doses, as well as reducing environmental impact. FACET will be an experimental facility that provides short, intense pulses of electrons and positrons to excite plasma wakefields and study a variety of critical issues associated with plasma wakefield acceleration [1]. This paper describes the FACET beam parameters, the lay-out and its radiological issues.

  6. On the significance of the energy correlations of spallation neutrons on the neutron fluctuations in accelerator-driven subcritical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Pázsit, I; Fhager, V

    2000-01-01

    Studies of neutron fluctuations in spallation-driven subcritical systems require the use of energy-dependent master equations. In particular, calculation of the second moment of the neutron distribution requires knowledge on the energy correlations (two-point distributions) of the source particles. It is shown here that such correlations will exist even if the energies of all neutrons, generated in any single spallation event, are independent, provided that the energy distribution of the neutrons for separate spallation events is dependent on the number of neutrons generated. A simple model of number dependence of the energy spectrum is constructed, and the arising energy correlations are calculated. The error in calculating the second moment of the neutron distribution, arising when assuming zero correlations (i.e. using only one-particle energy spectra), is estimated in a simple model of neutron slowing down.

  7. YALINA facility a sub-critical Accelerator- Driven System (ADS) for nuclear energy research facility description and an overview of the research program (1997-2008).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gohar, Y.; Smith, D. L.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2010-04-28

    The YALINA facility is a zero-power, sub-critical assembly driven by a conventional neutron generator. It was conceived, constructed, and put into operation at the Radiation Physics and Chemistry Problems Institute of the National Academy of Sciences of Belarus located in Minsk-Sosny, Belarus. This facility was conceived for the purpose of investigating the static and dynamic neutronics properties of accelerator driven sub-critical systems, and to serve as a neutron source for investigating the properties of nuclear reactions, in particular transmutation reactions involving minor-actinide nuclei. This report provides a detailed description of this facility and documents the progress of research carried out there during a period of approximately a decade since the facility was conceived and built until the end of 2008. During its history of development and operation to date (1997-2008), the YALINA facility has hosted several foreign groups that worked with the resident staff as collaborators. The participation of Argonne National Laboratory in the YALINA research programs commenced in 2005. For obvious reasons, special emphasis is placed in this report on the work at YALINA facility that has involved Argonne's participation. Attention is given here to the experimental program at YALINA facility as well as to analytical investigations aimed at validating codes and computational procedures and at providing a better understanding of the physics and operational behavior of the YALINA facility in particular, and ADS systems in general, during the period 1997-2008.

  8. Multi-GeV electron beam and high brightness betatron x-ray generation in recent Texas Petawatt laser-driven plasma accelerator experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoming; Zgadzaj, Rafal; Fazel, Neil; Li, Zhengyan; Zhang, Xi; Henderson, Watson; Chang, Yen-Yu; Korzekwa, Rick; Tsai, H.-E.; Quevedo, Hernan; Dyer, Gilliss; Gaul, Erhard; Martinez, Mikael; Bernstein, Aaron; Spinks, Michael; Gordan, Joseph; Donovan, Michael; Khudik, Vladimir; Shvets, Gennady; Ditmire, Todd; Downer, Michael

    2014-10-01

    Compact laser-plasma accelerators (LPAs) driven by petawatt (PW) lasers have produced highly collimated, quasi-monoenergetic multi-GeV electron bunches with ~100 pC charge, which are promising sources of ultrafast x-rays. Here we report three recent advances in PW-LPA performance brought about by optimizing the focal volume of the Texas PW laser with a deformable mirror. First, we accelerated electrons up to 3 GeV with hundreds of pC over 1 GeV and 1 GeV, 10% >2 GeV). Third, by introducing a double-peaked laser focus, creating a ``double bubble'' that subsequently merged, we significantly increased electron charge (0.5 nC) above 1 GeV, while producing brighter (1022photon/mm2/rad/0.1%), harder (up to 30 keV) betatron x-rays, characterized by a multi-metal filter pack and phase-contrast imaging. We observe evidence of dimuon production by irradiating a high-Z target with this high-charge, GeV electron beam.

  9. Subcritical Multiplication Parameters of the Accelerator-Driven System with 100 MeV Protons at the Kyoto University Critical Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Yong Lim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Basic experiments on the accelerator-driven system (ADS at the Kyoto University Critical Assembly are carried out by combining a solid-moderated and -reflected core with the fixed-field alternating gradient accelerator. The reaction rates are measured by the foil activation method to obtain the subcritical multiplication parameters. The numerical calculations are conducted with the use of MCNPX and JENDL/HE-2007 to evaluate the reaction rates of activation foils set in the core region and at the location of the target. Here, a comparison between the measured and calculated eigenvalues reveals a relative difference of around 10% in C/E values. A special mention is made of the fact that the reaction rate analyses in the subcritical systems demonstrate apparently the actual effect of moving the tungsten target into the core on neutron multiplication. A series of further ADS experiments with 100 MeV protons needs to be carried out to evaluate the accuracy of subcritical multiplication parameters.

  10. CLIC Waveguide Damped Accelerating Structure Studies

    CERN Document Server

    Dehler, M; Wuensch, Walter

    1996-01-01

    Studies of waveguide damped 30 GHz accelerating structures for multibunching in CLIC are described. Frequency discriminated damping using waveguides with a lowest cutoff frequency above the fundamental but below the higher order modes was considered. The wakefield behavior was investigated using time domain MAFIA computations over up to 20 cells and for frequencies up to 150 GHz. A configuration consisting of four T-cross-sectioned waveguides per cell reduces the transverse wake below 1% at typical CLIC bunch spacings.

  11. Measurement and correction of accelerator optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmerman, F.

    1998-06-01

    This report reviews procedures and techniques for measuring, correcting and controlling various optics parameters of an accelerator, including the betatron tune, beta function, betatron coupling, dispersion, chromaticity, momentum compaction factor, and beam orbit. The techniques described are not only indispensable for the basic set-up of an accelerator, but in addition the same methods can be used to study more esoteric questions as, for instance, dynamic aperture limitations or wakefield effects. The different procedures are illustrated by examples from several accelerators, storage rings, as well as linacs and transport lines.

  12. TWO-CHANNEL DIELECTRIC WAKE FIELD ACCELERATOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2012-05-30

    Experimental results are reported for test beam acceleration and deflection in a two-channel, cm-scale, rectangular dielectric-lined wakefield accelerator structure energized by a 14-MeV drive beam. The dominant waveguide mode of the structure is at {approx}30 GHz, and the structure is configured to exhibit a high transformer ratio ({approx}12:1). Accelerated bunches in the narrow secondary channel of the structure are continuously energized via Cherenkov radiation that is emitted by a drive bunch moving in the wider primary channel. Observed energy gains and losses, transverse deflections, and changes in the test bunch charge distribution compare favorably with predictions of theory.

  13. Problems and Good Practice in Post-Compulsory Educational Provision for Travellers: The Wakefield Kushti Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hately-Broad, Barbara

    2004-01-01

    This paper considers the work of the Wakefield Local Education Authority (LEA) Kushti Project in the UK. This project, focused on the Traveller population in England, is aimed specifically at the post-16 Traveller population in Wakefield, West Yorkshire. Generally, the paper considers the project in three broad areas: recruitment, retention and…

  14. Accelerated evolution of Fetuin-A (FETUA, also AHSG) is driven by positive Darwinian selection, not GC-biased gene conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döring, Yvonne; Zechner, Ulrich; Roos, Christian; Rosenkranz, David; Zischler, Hans; Herlyn, Holger

    2010-09-01

    Human Fetuin-A (FETUA, also termed AHSG) is a serum protein composed of two cystatin-like domains D1 and D2 of together 235 amino acids (aa) and an unrelated domain D3 of 114 aa. Though the protein plays a role in diverse physiological and pathological processes, comparably little is known about sequence evolution of FETUA. We therefore analyzed its molecular evolution on the basis of coding sequences of 16 primate species. Ratios of non-synonymous to synonymous substitution rates (d(n)/d(s)=omega) suggest that a previously reported acceleration of sequence evolution of exon 7, which encodes domain D3, is driven by positive selection instead of neutral evolution. Irrespective of the maximum likelihood model used, a remarkable 40% of codon sites is estimated to be positively selected in domain D3, with an average omega of 4.3. Analyses of GC/AT- and AT/GC-substitutions reveal that GC-biased gene conversion (gBGC) cannot explain the observed pattern. We thus reject the extended null model of molecular evolution (neutral evolution and gBGC) and conclude that positive Darwinian selection contributes to the sequence evolution of FETUA domain D3. Remarkably, domain D3 of human FETUA is characterized by a significant accumulation of proteolytic cleavage sites. Though speculative at present, the accelerated evolution of domain D3 might be due to the evolution of differential cleavage site patterns across primates reflecting different paths to achieve one goal, the decomposition of FETUA under pathological conditions. Present analyses use a PERL-script ("Substitution Bias Indicator", SBI) for the extraction of the numbers of GC/AT- and AT/GC-substitutions from supplemental results files of PAML analyses. The script is available upon request and the presented approach of testing the extended null hypothesis of molecular evolution can be transferred to every other protein coding locus. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Resonantly Enhanced Betatron Hard X-rays from Ionization Injected Electrons in a Laser Plasma Accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, K.; Li, Y. F.; Li, D. Z.; Chen, L. M.; Tao, M. Z.; Ma, Y.; Zhao, J. R.; Li, M. H.; Chen, M.; Mirzaie, M.; Hafz, N.; Sokollik, T.; Sheng, Z. M.; Zhang, J.

    2016-01-01

    Ultrafast betatron x-ray emission from electron oscillations in laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) has been widely investigated as a promising source. Betatron x-rays are usually produced via self-injected electron beams, which are not controllable and are not optimized for x-ray yields. Here, we present a new method for bright hard x-ray emission via ionization injection from the K-shell electrons of nitrogen into the accelerating bucket. A total photon yield of 8 × 108/shot and 108 photons with energy greater than 110 keV is obtained. The yield is 10 times higher than that achieved with self-injection mode in helium under similar laser parameters. The simulation suggests that ionization-injected electrons are quickly accelerated to the driving laser region and are subsequently driven into betatron resonance. The present scheme enables the single-stage betatron radiation from LWFA to be extended to bright γ-ray radiation, which is beyond the capability of 3rd generation synchrotrons. PMID:27273170

  16. Resistive wall wakefields of short bunches at cryogenic temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Stupakov

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We present calculations of the longitudinal wakefields at cryogenic temperatures for extremely short bunches, characteristic for modern x-ray free electron lasers. The calculations are based on the equations for the surface impedance in the regime of the anomalous skin effect in metals. This paper extends and complements an earlier analysis of B. Podobedov, Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 12, 044401 (2009. into the region of very high frequencies associated with bunch lengths in the micron range. We study in detail the case of a rectangular bunch distribution for parameters of interest of LCLS-II with a superconducting undulator.

  17. Operating plasma density issues on large-scale laser-plasma accelerators toward high-energy frontier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhisa Nakajima

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Consideration of laser-driven plasma-based electron/positron accelerators with a 2 TeV center-of-mass energy is presented, employing a multistaging scheme consisting of successive multi-GeV laser wakefield accelerators operated at the plasma density range of 10^{15}–10^{18}  cm^{-3} in the quasilinear regime. A total accelerator length is determined by an operating plasma density and a coupling distance allowed for both laser and beam focusing systems. We investigate beam dynamics and synchrotron radiation due to the betatron oscillation of the beam in laser-plasma acceleration, characterizing the beam qualities such as energy spread and transverse emittance. According to the criteria on the beam qualities for applications and available laser sources, the operating plasma density will be optimized. We note that in the low density operation the required wall-plug power for the laser driver will be much reduced in comparison with the high-density options.

  18. Analytic model for electromagnetic fields in the bubble regime of plasma wakefield in non-uniform plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovanov, A. A.; Kostyukov, I. Yu.; Thomas, J.; Pukhov, A.

    2017-10-01

    Based on a model of plasma wakefield in the strongly nonlinear (bubble) regime, we develop a lowest-order perturbation theory for the components of electromagnetic fields inside and outside the bubble using the assumption of small thickness of the electron sheath on the boundary of the bubble. Unlike previous models, we derive simple explicit expressions for the components of electromagnetic fields not only in the vicinity of the center of the bubble, but in the whole volume of the bubble (including the areas of driving or accelerated bunches) as well as outside it. Moreover, we apply the results to the case of radially non-uniform plasma and, in particular, to plasma with a hollow channel. The obtained results are verified with 3D particle-in-cell simulations which show a good correspondence to our model.

  19. A tapered damped accelerating structure for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Dehler, M; Wuensch, Walter

    1998-01-01

    A new 30 GHz multibunch accelerating structure incorporating both damping and detuning has been designed for the Compact LInear Collider (CLIC). Each cell of the 150-cell structure is damped by its ow n set of four radial waveguides resulting in a Q of 16 for the lowest dipole mode. A simple linear taper of the beam-pipe dimension provides a detuning frequency spread of 2 GHz (5.4%). Predictions of the transverse wakefield levels in this structure have been made using both uncoupled, and two-band coupled equivalent circuit models with non-perfect loads. The short-range wakefield has been calcula ted to be about 1000 V/(pC.mm.m) decreasing to less than 1% at the second bunch (0.67 ns) and with a long time level below 0.1%.

  20. Energy loss and longitudinal wakefield of relativistic short proton bunches in electron clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Boine-Frankenheim

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our study is the numerical computation of the wakefield and energy loss per unit length for relativistic, short (<10  ns proton bunches interacting with an electron cloud inside the beam pipe. We present analytical expressions for the energy loss in the impulse kick approximation. For the simulation of the wakefields a 2D self-consistent, electrostatic particle-in-cell (PIC code is employed. Results for the energy loss and for the wakefields are presented for the parameter scope of the CERN LHC and SPS. For selected parameters the results are compared to a three-dimensional (3D electromagnetic PIC code.

  1. Directed high-power THz radiation from transverse laser wakefield excited in an electron density filament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalmykov, Serge; Englesbe, Alexander; Elle, Jennifer; Domonkos, Matthew; Schmitt-Sody, Andreas

    2017-10-01

    A tightly focused femtosecond, weakly relativistic laser pulse partially ionizes the ambient gas, creating a string (a ``filament'') of electron density, locally reducing the nonlinear index and compensating for the self-focusing effect caused by bound electrons. While maintaining the filament over many Rayleigh lengths, the pulse drives inside it a three-dimensional (3D) wave of charge separation - the plasma wake. If the pulse waist size is much smaller than the Langmuir wavelength, electron current in the wake is mostly transverse. Electrons, driven by the wake across the sharp radial boundary of the filament, lose coherence within 2-3 periods of wakefield oscillations, and the wake decays. The laser pulse is thus accompanied by a short-lived, almost aperiodic electron current coupled to the sharp index gradient. The comprehensive 3D hydrodynamic model shows that this structure emits a broad-band THz radiation, with the highest power emitted in the near-forward direction. The THz radiation pattern contains information on wake currents surrounding the laser pulse, thus serving as an all-optical diagnostic tool. The results are tested in cylindrical and full 3D PIC simulations using codes WAKE and EPOCH.

  2. Parallel Higher-order Finite Element Method for Accurate Field Computations in Wakefield and PIC Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candel, A.; Kabel, A.; Lee, L.; Li, Z.; Limborg, C.; Ng, C.; Prudencio, E.; Schussman, G.; Uplenchwar, R.; Ko, K.; /SLAC

    2009-06-19

    Over the past years, SLAC's Advanced Computations Department (ACD), under SciDAC sponsorship, has developed a suite of 3D (2D) parallel higher-order finite element (FE) codes, T3P (T2P) and Pic3P (Pic2P), aimed at accurate, large-scale simulation of wakefields and particle-field interactions in radio-frequency (RF) cavities of complex shape. The codes are built on the FE infrastructure that supports SLAC's frequency domain codes, Omega3P and S3P, to utilize conformal tetrahedral (triangular)meshes, higher-order basis functions and quadratic geometry approximation. For time integration, they adopt an unconditionally stable implicit scheme. Pic3P (Pic2P) extends T3P (T2P) to treat charged-particle dynamics self-consistently using the PIC (particle-in-cell) approach, the first such implementation on a conformal, unstructured grid using Whitney basis functions. Examples from applications to the International Linear Collider (ILC), Positron Electron Project-II (PEP-II), Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and other accelerators will be presented to compare the accuracy and computational efficiency of these codes versus their counterparts using structured grids.

  3. Advanced Electron Linacs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siemann, R.

    2005-02-14

    The research into advanced acceleration concepts for electron linear accelerators being pursued at SLAC is reviewed. This research includes experiments in laser acceleration, plasma wakefield acceleration, and mmwavelength RF driven accelerators.

  4. Mutant PIK3CA accelerates HER2-driven transgenic mammary tumors and induces resistance to combinations of anti-HER2 therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanker, Ariella B.; Pfefferle, Adam D.; Balko, Justin M.; Kuba, María Gabriela; Young, Christian D.; Sánchez, Violeta; Sutton, Cammie R.; Cheng, Hailing; Perou, Charles M.; Cook, Rebecca S.; Arteaga, Carlos L.

    2013-01-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2; ERBB2) amplification and phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase, catalytic subunit alpha (PIK3CA) mutations often co-occur in breast cancer. Aberrant activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway has been shown to correlate with a diminished response to HER2-directed therapies. We generated a mouse model of HER2-overexpressing (HER2+), PIK3CAH1047R-mutant breast cancer. Mice expressing both human HER2 and mutant PIK3CA in the mammary epithelium developed tumors with shorter latencies compared with mice expressing either oncogene alone. HER2 and mutant PIK3CA also cooperated to promote lung metastases. By microarray analysis, HER2-driven tumors clustered with luminal breast cancers, whereas mutant PIK3CA tumors were associated with claudin-low breast cancers. PIK3CA and HER2+/PIK3CA tumors expressed elevated transcripts encoding markers of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and stem cells. Cells from HER2+/PIK3CA tumors more efficiently formed mammospheres and lung metastases. Finally, HER2+/PIK3CA tumors were resistant to trastuzumab alone and in combination with lapatinib or pertuzumab. Both drug resistance and enhanced mammosphere formation were reversed by treatment with a PI3K inhibitor. In sum, PIK3CAH1047R accelerates HER2-mediated breast epithelial transformation and metastatic progression, alters the intrinsic phenotype of HER2-overexpressing cancers, and generates resistance to approved combinations of anti-HER2 therapies. PMID:23940356

  5. High-quality electron beams from a helical inverse free-electron laser accelerator

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Duris, J; Musumeci, P; Babzien, M; Fedurin, M; Kusche, K; Li, R K; Moody, J; Pogorelsky, I; Polyanskiy, M; Rosenzweig, J B; Sakai, Y; Swinson, C; Threlkeld, E; Williams, O; Yakimenko, V

    2014-01-01

    .... By using an undulator magnetic field in combination with a laser, GeV m(-1) gradients may be sustained over metre-scale distances using laser intensities several orders of magnitude less than those used in laser wake-field accelerators...

  6. Progress toward NLC / GLC prototype accelerator structures

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, J W; Arkan, T; Baboi, N; Boffo, C; Bowden, G B; Burke, D L; Carter, H; Chan, J; Cornuelle, J; Döbert, Steffen; Dolgashev, Valery A; Finley, D; Gonin, I; Higashi, Y; Higo, T; Jones, R M; Khabiboulline, T; Kume, T; Lewandowski, J; Li, Z; Miller, R H; Mishra, S; Morozumi, Y; Nantista, C; Pearson, C; Romanov, G; Ruth, Ronald D; Solyak, N; Tantawi, S; Toge, N; Ueno, K; Wilson, P B; Xiao, L

    2004-01-01

    The accelerator structure groups for NLC (Next Linear Collider) and GLC (Global Linear Colliders) have successfully collaborated on the research and development of a major series of advanced accelerator structures based on room-temperature technology at X-band frequency. The progress in design, simulation, microwave measurement and high gradient tests are summarized in this paper. The recent effort in design and fabrication of the accelerator structure prototype for the main linac is presented in detail including HOM (High Order Mode) suppression and couplers, fundamental mode couplers, optimized accelerator cavities as well as plans for future structures. We emphasize techniques to reduce the field on the surface of the copper structures (in order to achieve high accelerating gradients), limit the dipole wakefields (to relax alignment tolerance and prevent a beam break up instability) and improve shunt impedance (to reduce the RF power required).

  7. Ultrafast phase-contrast imaging of laser driven shocks using LWFA Betatron X-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, David; Rutherford, Michael; Eakins, Daniel; Wood, Jonathan; Poder, Kristjan; Lopes, Nelson; Mangles, Stuart

    2017-06-01

    In recent years Betatron X-rays produced within a laser-plasma wakefield accelerator (LWFA) have emerged as a potential alternative to advanced photon sources, such as Synchrotrons and X-ray free-electron lasers. LWFA Betatron X-rays offer the attractive combination of high brilliance, short pulse duration, and high-energy polychromatic X-rays, which make them particularly suitable for imaging highly transient events such as shock wave evolution in solids. We describe pioneering experiments on the 400 TW Astra Gemini laser at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, UK, imaging laser driven targets using Betatron X-rays. Shock waves were driven into thick aluminum foils using a 30J IR long-pulse (30ns), and stroboscopically radiographed perpendicular to the shock propagation direction using a 40 fs Betatron X-ray pulse (10-30 keV). The resulting high resolution (4 μm) radiograph time-sequence captured the shock wave propagation, and ultimate evolution of jets and spallation formed on the rear grooved surface of the aluminum targets. The measured dynamic radiographs are compared to 2D Hyades simulations, demonstrating a new capability to benchmark radiation-hydrocode modeling of laser-target interaction.

  8. Analysis and comparison between electric and magnetic power couplers for accelerators in Free Electron Lasers (FEL)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serpico, C., E-mail: claudio.serpico@elettra.eu [Elettra - Sincrotrone Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Grudiev, A. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Vescovo, R. [University of Trieste, Trieste (Italy)

    2016-10-11

    Free-electron lasers represent a new and exciting class of coherent optical sources possessing broad wavelength tunability and excellent optical-beam quality. The FERMI seeded free-electron laser (FEL), located at the Elettra laboratory in Trieste, is driven by a 200 m long, S-band linac: the high energy part of the linac is equipped with 6 m long backward traveling wave (BTW) structures. The structures have small iris radius and a nose cone geometry which allows for high gradient operation. Development of new high-gradient, S-band accelerating structures for the replacement of the existing BTWs is under consideration. This paper investigates two possible solutions for the RF power couplers suitable for a linac driven FEL which require reduced wakefields effects, high operating gradient and very high reliability. The first part of the manuscript focuses on the reduction of residual field asymmetries, while in the second analyzes RF performances, the peak surface fields and the expected breakdown rate. In the conclusion, two solutions are compared and pros and cons are highlighted.

  9. Application of Plasma Waveguides to High Energy Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milchberg, Howard M

    2013-03-30

    The eventual success of laser-plasma based acceleration schemes for high-energy particle physics will require the focusing and stable guiding of short intense laser pulses in reproducible plasma channels. For this goal to be realized, many scientific issues need to be addressed. These issues include an understanding of the basic physics of, and an exploration of various schemes for, plasma channel formation. In addition, the coupling of intense laser pulses to these channels and the stable propagation of pulses in the channels require study. Finally, new theoretical and computational tools need to be developed to aid in the design and analysis of experiments and future accelerators. Here we propose a 3-year renewal of our combined theoretical and experimental program on the applications of plasma waveguides to high-energy accelerators. During the past grant period we have made a number of significant advances in the science of laser-plasma based acceleration. We pioneered the development of clustered gases as a new highly efficient medium for plasma channel formation. Our contributions here include theoretical and experimental studies of the physics of cluster ionization, heating, explosion, and channel formation. We have demonstrated for the first time the generation of and guiding in a corrugated plasma waveguide. The fine structure demonstrated in these guides is only possible with cluster jet heating by lasers. The corrugated guide is a slow wave structure operable at arbitrarily high laser intensities, allowing direct laser acceleration, a process we have explored in detail with simulations. The development of these guides opens the possibility of direct laser acceleration, a true miniature analogue of the SLAC RF-based accelerator. Our theoretical studies during this period have also contributed to the further development of the simulation codes, Wake and QuickPIC, which can be used for both laser driven and beam driven plasma based acceleration schemes. We

  10. Accelerators in Science and Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Kailas, S

    2002-01-01

    Accelerators built for basic research in frontier areas of science have become important and inevitable tools in many areas of science and technology. Accelerators are examples of science driven high technology development. Accelerators are used for a wide ranging applications, besides basic research. Accelerator based multidisciplinary research holds great promise

  11. Computational investigation of 99Mo, 89Sr, and 131I production rates in a subcritical UO2(NO32 aqueous solution reactor driven by a 30-MeV proton accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Gholamzadeh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of subcritical aqueous homogenous reactors driven by accelerators presents an attractive alternative for producing 99Mo. In this method, the medical isotope production system itself is used to extract 99Mo or other radioisotopes so that there is no need to irradiate common targets. In addition, it can operate at much lower power compared to a traditional reactor to produce the same amount of 99Mo by irradiating targets. In this study, the neutronic performance and 99Mo, 89Sr, and 131I production capacity of a subcritical aqueous homogenous reactor fueled with low-enriched uranyl nitrate was evaluated using the MCNPX code. A proton accelerator with a maximum 30-MeV accelerating power was used to run the subcritical core. The computational results indicate a good potential for the modeled system to produce the radioisotopes under completely safe conditions because of the high negative reactivity coefficients of the modeled core. The results show that application of an optimized beam window material can increase the fission power of the aqueous nitrate fuel up to 80%. This accelerator-based procedure using low enriched uranium nitrate fuel to produce radioisotopes presents a potentially competitive alternative in comparison with the reactor-based or other accelerator-based methods. This system produces ∼1,500 Ci/wk (∼325 6-day Ci of 99Mo at the end of a cycle.

  12. The coupled dipole modes of the NLC accelerator structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bane, K.L.F.; Gluckstern, R.; Holtkamp, N.

    1992-03-01

    The proposed accelerator cavity of the Next Linear Collider (NLC) is a disk-loaded structure composed of 200 cells, operating at 11.42 GHz. The proposed mode of operation is to accelerate bunches in trains of 10, with a bunch spacing of 42 cm. One problem is that one bunch in a train can excite transverse wakefields in the accelerator cavity which, in turn, can deflect following bunches and result in emittance growth. A method of curing this problem is to detune the transverse modes of the cavity. Beam dynamics simulations for the NLC have shown that by keeping the transverse wakefield at the positions of the nine trailing bunches at or below 1 MW/nC/m{sup 2} we can void emittance growth. Earlier, approximate calculations of the wakefields, which did not include the cell-to-cell coupling of the modes, have shown that by the proper Gaussian detuning the above level of cancellation can be achieved. A specific goal of this report is to see if this conclusion still holds when coupling is included in the calculation. Note that in this paper we focus on the modes belonging to the first dipole passband, which are the most important. A special feature of these modes in the detuned NLC cavity is that the cell-to-cell coupling changes sign somewhere in the middle of the structure.

  13. Contribution to a proposition for a long term development of nuclear energy: the TASSE concept (Thorium based Accelerator driven System with Simplified fuel cycle for long term Energy Production); Contribution a une proposition d'un developpement a long terme de l'energie nucleaire: le concept TASSE (Thorium based Accelerator driven System with Simplified fuel cycle for long term Energy Production)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berthou, V

    2000-10-30

    Nuclear industry creates waste which are in the middle of the discussion concerning the Nuclear Energy future. At this time, important decisions for the Energy production must be taken, so numerous researches are conducted within the framework of the Bataille law. The goal of these studies is to find a range of solutions concerning the waste management. An innovative system, called TASSE (Thorium based Accelerator driven System with Simplified fuel cycle for long term Energy production), is studied in this thesis. This reactor is included in a long term strategy, and is destined for the renewal of the reactor park. In the first part of this work, the main characteristics of TASSE have been defined. They are commensurate with some specific requirements such as: to insure a large time to the Nuclear Energy, to reduce the waste production in an important way, to eliminate waste already stocked in the present park, to insure the non proliferation, and to be economically competitive. Neutronics studies of TASSE have been done. A calculation procedure has been developed to reach the system equilibrium state. Several types of molten salts as well as a pebble-bed fuel have been studied. Thus, an optimal fuel has been brought out in regard to some parameters such as the burn up level, the spectrum, the waste toxicity, the cycle type. Eventually, various TASSE core layout have been envisaged. (author)

  14. Time domain numerical calculations of the short electron bunch wakefields in resistive structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsakanian, Andranik

    2010-10-15

    The acceleration of electron bunches with very small longitudinal and transverse phase space volume is one of the most actual challenges for the future International Linear Collider and high brightness X-Ray Free Electron Lasers. The exact knowledge on the wake fields generated by the ultra-short electron bunches during its interaction with surrounding structures is a very important issue to prevent the beam quality degradation and to optimize the facility performance. The high accuracy time domain numerical calculations play the decisive role in correct evaluation of the wake fields in advanced accelerators. The thesis is devoted to the development of a new longitudinally dispersion-free 3D hybrid numerical scheme in time domain for wake field calculation of ultra short bunches in structures with walls of finite conductivity. The basic approaches used in the thesis to solve the problem are the following. For materials with high but finite conductivity the model of the plane wave reflection from a conducting half-space is used. It is shown that in the conductive half-space the field components perpendicular to the interface can be neglected. The electric tangential component on the surface contributes to the tangential magnetic field in the lossless area just before the boundary layer. For high conducting media, the task is reduced to 1D electromagnetic problem in metal and the so-called 1D conducting line model can be applied instead of a full 3D space description. Further, a TE/TM (''transverse electric - transverse magnetic'') splitting implicit numerical scheme along with 1D conducting line model is applied to develop a new longitudinally dispersion-free hybrid numerical scheme in the time domain. The stability of the new hybrid numerical scheme in vacuum, conductor and bound cell is studied. The convergence of the new scheme is analyzed by comparison with the well-known analytical solutions. The wakefield calculations for a number of

  15. Efficiency Versus Instability in Plasma Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebedev, Valeri [Fermilab; Burov, Alexey [Fermilab; Nagaitsev, Sergei [Fermilab

    2017-01-05

    Plasma wake-field acceleration in a strongly nonlinear (a.k.a. the blowout) regime is one of the main candidates for future high-energy colliders. For this case, we derive a universal efficiency-instability relation, between the power efficiency and the key instability parameter of the witness bunch. We also show that in order to stabilize the witness bunch in a regime with high power efficiency, the bunch needs to have high energy spread, which is not presently compatible with collider-quality beam properties. It is unclear how such limitations could be overcome for high-luminosity linear colliders.

  16. Transverse mode coupling instability threshold with space charge and different wakefields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balbekov, V.

    2017-03-01

    Transverse mode coupling instability of a single bunch with space charge (SC) and a wakefield is considered within the framework of the boxcar model. Eigenfunctions of the bunch without a wake are used as a basis for the solution of the equations with the wakefield included. A dispersion equation for a constant wake is presented in the form of an infinite continued fraction and also as the recursive relation with an arbitrary number of basis functions. Realistic wakefields are considered as well including resistive wall, square, and oscillating wakes. It is shown that the transverse mode coupling instability threshold of the negative wake grows in absolute value when the SC tune shift increases. The threshold of the positive wake goes down at increasing the SC tune shift. The explanation is developed by an analysis of the bunch spectrum.

  17. Miniaturization Techniques for Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, James E.

    2003-05-27

    The possibility of laser driven accelerators [1] suggests the need for new structures based on micromachining and integrated circuit technology because of the comparable scales. Thus, we are exploring fully integrated structures including sources, optics (for both light and particle) and acceleration in a common format--an accelerator-on-chip (AOC). Tests suggest a number of preferred materials and techniques but no technical or fundamental roadblocks at scales of order 1 {micro}m or larger.

  18. Geometric wakefield regimes study of a rectangular tapered collimator for ATF2

    CERN Document Server

    Fuster-Martinez, Nuria; Latina, Andrea; Snuverink, Jochem

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we study the discrepancy found between the wakefield impact effect induced by a rectangular tapered collimator prototype for ATF2 calculated using analytical models, calculated from CST PS numerical simulations and implemented in the tracking code PLACET v1.0.0. In order to get consistent results between the analytical calculations, CST PS simulations and the tracking code PLACET v1.0.0 the collimator wakefield module in PLACET v1.0.0 has to be modified. The changes have been implemented in the tracking code PLACET v1.0.1.

  19. Awakening the potential of plasma acceleration

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Civil engineering has begun for the new AWAKE experiment, which looks to push the boundaries of particle acceleration. This proof-of-principle experiment will harness the power of wakefields generated by proton beams in plasma cells, producing accelerator gradients hundreds of times higher than those used in current RF cavities.   Civil engineering works are currently ongoing at the AWAKE facility. As one of CERN's accelerator R&D experiments, the AWAKE project is rather unique. Like all of CERN's experiments, AWAKE is a collaborative endeavour with institutes and organisations participating around the world. "But unlike fixed-target experiments, where the users take over once CERN has delivered the facility, in AWAKE, the synchronised proton, electron and laser beams provided by CERN are an integral part of the experiment," explains Edda Gschwendtner, CERN AWAKE project leader. "So, of course, CERN's involvement in the project goes well...

  20. Design of the Compact Linear Collider main linac accelerating structure made from two halves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Zha

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Milling on two longitudinally split halves is one method to manufacture accelerating structures. This method is simple and allows one to avoid electromagnetic fields at bonding joints, making it attractive in manufacturing high-gradient accelerating structures. An X-band structure design with strong wakefield damping based on this manufacturing approach is studied in this work as an alternative design for the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC main linac accelerating structures. The geometry of the structure is optimized to greatly reduce the surface fields, improve the efficiency, and suppress the wakefield. This structure features the baseline design of the CLIC main linac with additional advantages. This study may serve as a reference for designing other high frequency-band corrugated structures.