WorldWideScience

Sample records for wake structure produced

  1. Strongly Stratified Turbulence Wakes and Mixing Produced by Fractal Wakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrieva, Natalia; Redondo, Jose Manuel; Chashechkin, Yuli; Fraunie, Philippe; Velascos, David

    2017-04-01

    This paper describes Shliering and Shadowgraph experiments of the wake induced mixing produced by tranversing a vertical or horizontal fractal grid through the interfase between two miscible fluids at low Atwood and Reynolds numbers. This is a configuration design to models the mixing across isopycnals in stably-stratified flows in many environmental relevant situations (either in the atmosphere or in the ocean. The initial unstable stratification is characterized by a reduced gravity: g' = gΔρ ρ where g is gravity, Δρ being the initial density step and ρ the reference density. Here the Atwood number is A = g' _ 2 g . The topology of the fractal wake within the strong stratification, and the internal wave field produces both a turbulent cascade and a wave cascade, with frecuen parametric resonances, the envelope of the mixing front is found to follow a complex non steady 3rd order polinomial function with a maximum at about 4-5 Brunt-Vaisalla non-dimensional time scales: t/N δ = c1(t/N) + c2g Δρ ρ (t/N)2 -c3(t/N)3. Conductivity probes and Shliering and Shadowgraph visual techniques, including CIV with (Laser induced fluorescence and digitization of the light attenuation across the tank) are used in order to investigate the density gradients and the three-dimensionality of the expanding and contracting wake. Fractal analysis is also used in order to estimate the fastest and slowest growing wavelengths. The large scale structures are observed to increase in wave-length as the mixing progresses, and the processes involved in this increase in scale are also examined.Measurements of the pointwise and horizontally averaged concentrations confirm the picture obtained from past flow visualization studies. They show that the fluid passes through the mixing region with relatively small amounts of molecular mixing,and the molecular effects only dominate on longer time scales when the small scales have penetrated through the large scale structures. The Non

  2. Investigation of aircraft vortex wake structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranov, N. A.; Turchak, L. I.

    2014-11-01

    In this work we analyze the mechanisms of formation of the vortex wake structure of aircraft with different wing shape in the plan flying close to or away from the underlying surface cleaned or released mechanization wing.

  3. Vortical structures in the wake of an undulating fin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewey, Peter A.; Carriou, Antoine; Smits, Alexander J.

    2010-11-01

    Batoid fish such as the manta ray propel themselves through the water by producing a traveling wave motion along the chord of their pectoral fin. Such a motion produces thrust through the development of an unsteady vortex street that results in a jet-like average flow. Digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) is used to characterize the vortical patterns and structures developed in the wake of a manta ray-like fin. A DC servo motor powers a gear train to produce the traveling wave motion; whose frequency and wave length can be varied. The amplitude of the traveling wave motion linearly increases along the span of the fin. Wake morphologies for a wide spectrum of oscillation frequencies and traveling wave wavelengths are identified. A bifurcation from a 2S wake structure to a 2P wake structure is observed as the traveling wave wavelength is decreased, which corresponds to a decrease in efficiency as reported by Clark and Smits (2006). Alteration of the oscillation frequency, and thus Strouhal number, affects vortex interaction and is found to significantly modify the resulting velocity profiles in the wake of the fin. Notably, increasing the Strouhal number beyond optimal conditions, reported by Clark and Smits, corresponds to a reduction in the extent that the jet-like average flow is observed downstream of the fin.

  4. Energy Spread Reduction of Electron Beams Produced via Laser Wake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollock, Bradley Bolt [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Laser wakefield acceleration of electrons holds great promise for producing ultra-compact stages of GeV scale, high quality electron beams for applications such as x-ray free electron lasers and high energy colliders. Ultra-high intensity laser pulses can be self-guided by relativistic plasma waves over tens of vacuum diffraction lengths, to give >1 GeV energy in cm-scale low density plasma using ionization-induced injection to inject charge into the wake at low densities. This thesis describes a series of experiments which investigates the physics of LWFA in the self-guided blowout regime. Beginning with high density gas jet experiments the scaling of the LWFA-produced electron beam energy with plasma electron density is found to be in excellent agreement with both phenomenological theory and with 3-D PIC simulations. It is also determined that self-trapping of background electrons into the wake exhibits a threshold as a function of the electron density, and at the densities required to produce electron beams with energies exceeding 1 GeV a different mechanism is required to trap charge into low density wakes. By introducing small concentrations of high-Z gas to the nominal He background the ionization-induced injection mechanism is enabled. Electron trapping is observed at densities as low as 1.3 x 1018 cm-3 in a gas cell target, and 1.45 GeV electrons are demonstrated for the first time from LWFA. This is currently the highest electron energy ever produced from LWFA. The ionization-induced trapping mechanism is also shown to generate quasi-continuous electron beam energies, which is undesirable for accelerator applications. By limiting the region over which ionization-induced trapping occurs, the energy spread of the electron beams can be controlled. The development of a novel two-stage gas cell target provides the capability to tailor the gas composition in the longitudinal direction, and confine the trapping process to occur only in a

  5. Analysis of Numerically Generated Wake Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ivanell, S.; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Mikkelsen, Robert Flemming;

    2009-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations of the Navier-Stokes equations are performed to achieve a better understanding of the behaviour of wakes generated by wind turbines. The simulations are performed by combining the in-house developed computer code EllipSys3D with the actuator-line methodology. In the a......Direct numerical simulations of the Navier-Stokes equations are performed to achieve a better understanding of the behaviour of wakes generated by wind turbines. The simulations are performed by combining the in-house developed computer code EllipSys3D with the actuator-line methodology...

  6. Turbulent large-scale structure effects on wake meandering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Y.-A.; Masson, C.; Aubrun, S.

    2015-06-01

    This work studies effects of large-scale turbulent structures on wake meandering using Large Eddy Simulations (LES) over an actuator disk. Other potential source of wake meandering such as the instablility mechanisms associated with tip vortices are not treated in this study. A crucial element of the efficient, pragmatic and successful simulations of large-scale turbulent structures in Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) is the generation of the stochastic turbulent atmospheric flow. This is an essential capability since one source of wake meandering is these large - larger than the turbine diameter - turbulent structures. The unsteady wind turbine wake in ABL is simulated using a combination of LES and actuator disk approaches. In order to dedicate the large majority of the available computing power in the wake, the ABL ground region of the flow is not part of the computational domain. Instead, mixed Dirichlet/Neumann boundary conditions are applied at all the computational surfaces except at the outlet. Prescribed values for Dirichlet contribution of these boundary conditions are provided by a stochastic turbulent wind generator. This allows to simulate large-scale turbulent structures - larger than the computational domain - leading to an efficient simulation technique of wake meandering. Since the stochastic wind generator includes shear, the turbulence production is included in the analysis without the necessity of resolving the flow near the ground. The classical Smagorinsky sub-grid model is used. The resulting numerical methodology has been implemented in OpenFOAM. Comparisons with experimental measurements in porous-disk wakes have been undertaken, and the agreements are good. While temporal resolution in experimental measurements is high, the spatial resolution is often too low. LES numerical results provide a more complete spatial description of the flow. They tend to demonstrate that inflow low frequency content - or large- scale turbulent structures - is

  7. Near and far wake structures behind freely flying bats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schunk, Cosima; Swartz, Sharon M.; Breuer, Kenneth S.

    2014-11-01

    While pseudo-volumetric reconstructions of the wakes of flying animals, based on transverse (Trefftz) wake measurements, have become a well-established tool in the study of animal aerodynamics in recent years, there are a number of concerns that persist regarding their use in estimating drag and flight efficiency. Here we report on stereo particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements behind freely flying bats (Eptesicus fuscus) in both the transverse and streamwise planes. The streamwise plane measurements are taken on the wing as well as in the near and far wake region up to eight chord lengths behind the bat. By organizing the data according to the flight speed, wingbeat phase and the spanwise position of the laser sheet on the wing we are able to connect specific features of the wing and body geometry with observed wake structures and thereby construct a detailed time-space map of the wake. Furthermore, we can quantitatively assess wake distortion and assess the validity of lift and drag estimates based on transverse wake measurements. Supported by AFOSR.

  8. Wake structure of an oscillating cylinder in a flowing soap film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stremler, Mark; Yang, Wenchao

    2016-11-01

    When a circular cylinder oscillates with respect to a uniform background flow, a variety of wake patterns can be observed in which multiple vortices are generated during each shedding cycle. Thorough investigations of the possible wake patterns behind a cylinder undergoing forced oscillations have been conducted by C.H.K. Williamson using two-dimensional characterization of a three-dimensional flow. Attempts to reproduce the structural bifurcations using two-dimensional computational models have been only moderately successful. A flowing soap film, an experimental system with quasi-two-dimensional flow, provides an alternative method for investigating the role of system dimensionality in the structure and dynamics of complex vortex wakes. Wake patterns are observed directly through interference fringes caused by thickness variations in the soap film. Such systems have been used for decades to visualize wake structure, but they have not previously been used to conduct an analog of Williamson's work. We will discuss the results of an ongoing parametric study of the wake structure produced by a circular cylinder undergoing forced oscillations transverse to the background flow in an inclined soap film system.

  9. Capturing relativistic wake eld structures in plasmas using ultrashort high-energy electrons as a probe

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, C J; Xu, X L; Li, F; Pai, C -H; Wan, Y; Wu, Y P; Gu, Y Q; Mori, W B; Joshi, C; Lu, W

    2016-01-01

    A new method capable of capturing coherent electric field structures propagating at nearly the speed of light in plasma with a time resolution as small as a few femtoseconds is proposed. This method uses a few femtoseconds long relativistic electron bunch to probe the wake produced in a plasma by an intense laser pulse or an ultra-short relativistic charged particle beam. As the probe bunch traverses the wake, its momentum is modulated by the electric field of the wake, leading to a density variation of the probe after free-space propagation. This variation of probe density produces a snapshot of the wake that can directly give many useful information of the wake structure and its evolution. Furthermore, this snapshot allows detailed mapping of the longitudinal and transverse components of the wakefield. We develop a theoretical model for field reconstruction and verify it using 3-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. This model can accurately reconstruct the wakefield structure in the linear regime...

  10. Numerical investigation of wake structures of slow-flying bats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shizhao; Zhang, Xing; He, Guowei

    2010-11-01

    Recently, some unique features of wake structure in bat flight have been revealed by experiments. It is found that the flow structure of bat flight is more complex than that of bird. A conceptual wake model of bat flight has been "rebuilt" using 2D DPIV images, but there is some risk of missing the details regarding dynamics of 3D vortex structures. Detailed flow information is still needed to understand the unsteady flow in bat flying. In this work, we perform 3D simulation of bat flying at the Reynolds number of 1000 (based on upstream flow and mean chord length) using the immersed boundary method. The geometry and wing-beat kinematics of bat are taken from the work of Watts et al (2001). The topology and evolution of the wake structures are described. The variation of topology in wake structures with the flapping Strouhal number is investigated. Moreover, the link between the generation of high lift and leading edge vortex is also studied.

  11. The structure of subsonic air wakes behind a flat plate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barreras, F.; Dopazo, C. [Centro Politecnico Superior de Ingenieros Area de Mecanica de Fluidos, Zaragoza (Spain); Lozano, A.; Yates, A.J. [LITEC/CSIC, Maria de Luna 3 E-50015-Zaragoza (Spain)

    1999-04-01

    Acetone vapor planar laser-induced fluorescence has been used to visualize the structure of a subsonic air wake behind a flat plate. Longitudinal and transversal wavelengths have been directly measured from the acquired images. The ratio between them has been calculated to be 2/5. (orig.) With 3 figs., 1 tab., 10 refs.

  12. Three-Dimensional Structure of Wind Turbine Wakes as Measured by Scanning Lidar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundquist, Julie [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Bodini, Nicola [University of Colorado; University of Trento; Zardi, Dino [University of Trento

    2017-08-14

    The lower wind speeds and increased turbulence that are characteristic of turbine wakes have considerable consequences on large wind farms: turbines located downwind generate less power and experience increased turbulent loads. The structures of wakes and their downwind impacts are sensitive to wind speed and atmospheric variability. Wake characterization can provide important insights for turbine layout optimization in view of decreasing the cost of wind energy. The CWEX-13 field campaign, which took place between June and September 2013 in a wind farm in Iowa, was designed to explore the interaction of multiple wakes in a range of atmospheric stability conditions. Based on lidar wind measurements, we extend, present, and apply a quantitative algorithm to assess wake parameters such as the velocity deficits, the size of the wake boundaries, and the location of the wake centerlines. We focus on wakes from a row of four turbines at the leading edge of the wind farm to explore variations between wakes from the edge of the row (outer wakes) and those from turbines in the center of the row (inner wakes). Using multiple horizontal scans at different elevations, a three-dimensional structure of wakes from the row of turbines can be created. Wakes erode very quickly during unstable conditions and can in fact be detected primarily in stable conditions in the conditions measured here. During stable conditions, important differences emerge between the wakes of inner turbines and the wakes of outer turbines. Further, the strong wind veer associated with stable conditions results in a stretching of the wake structures, and this stretching manifests differently for inner and outer wakes. These insights can be incorporated into low-order wake models for wind farm layout optimization or for wind power forecasting.

  13. RF heating from wake losses in diagnostics structures

    CERN Document Server

    Métral, E

    2013-01-01

    Heating of diagnostics structures (striplines, buttons, screen vessels, wire scanners, etc.) has been observed at many facilities with higher stored currents. Simulations of wake losses using 3D EM codes are regularly used to estimate the amount of power lost from the bunched beam but on its own this does not tell how much is radiated back into the beam pipe or transmitted into external ports and how much is actually being dissipated in the structure and where. This talk should introduce into the matter, summarise some of the observations at various facilities and illustrate what approaches of detailed simulations have been taken.

  14. Activation of ventral tegmental area dopamine neurons produces wakefulness through dopamine D2-like receptors in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Yo; Suzuki, Yoshiaki; Takahashi, Koji; Yonezawa, Toshiya; Kanda, Takeshi; Takata, Yohko; Cherasse, Yoan; Lazarus, Michael

    2017-01-25

    A growing body of evidence suggests that dopamine plays a role in sleep-wake regulation, but the dopamine-producing brain areas that control sleep-wake states are unclear. In this study, we chemogenetically activated dopamine neurons in the ventral midbrain of mice to examine the role of these neurons in sleep-wake regulation. We found that activation of dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), but not in the substantia nigra, strongly induced wakefulness, although both cell populations expressed the neuronal activity marker c-Fos after chemogenetic stimulation. Analysis of the pattern of behavioral states revealed that VTA activation increased the duration of wakefulness and decreased the number of wakefulness episodes, indicating that wakefulness was consolidated by VTA activation. The increased wakefulness evoked by VTA activation was completely abolished by pretreatment with the dopamine D2/D3 receptor antagonist raclopride, but not by the D1 receptor antagonist SCH23390. These findings indicate that the activation of VTA dopamine neurons promotes wakefulness via D2/D3 receptors.

  15. Wind turbine wake structure and yawed effect analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Yuntian

    In this research, the three-dimensional CFD simulation of the complex flow around a two-bladed rotor based on NREL Phase VI Experiment is presented. Its accuracy is demonstrated by comparing torque, thrust, power and power coefficient with experimental data. Then the wake structure behind the rotor is analyzed by showing the vorticity contour and comparing the velocity distribution behind the rotor with previous studies. Furthermore, a triangle relationship among power, upstream wind speed and yaw angle is given by setting control groups simulation. Reasonable explanations to the simulation results are presented. Finally, a linear relationship between power output and cosine value of yaw angle is found and analyzed.

  16. Wake force computation in the time domain for long structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bane, K.; Weiland, T.

    1983-07-01

    One is often interested in calculating the wake potentials for short bunches in long structures using TBCI. For ultra-relativistic particles it is sufficient to solve for the fields only over a window containing the bunch and moving along with it. This technique reduces both the memory and the running time required by a factor that equals the ratio of the structure length to the window length. For example, for a bunch with sigma/sub z/ of one picosecond traversing a single SLAC cell this improvement factor is 15. It is thus possible to solve for the wakefields in very long structures: for a given problem, increasing the structure length will not change the memory required while only adding linearly to the CPU time needed.

  17. Wake structure and kinematics in two insectivorous bats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubel, Tatjana Y; Hristov, Nickolay I; Swartz, Sharon M; Breuer, Kenneth S

    2016-09-26

    We compare kinematics and wake structure over a range of flight speeds (4.0-8.2 m s(-1)) for two bats that pursue insect prey aerially, Tadarida brasiliensis and Myotis velifer Body mass and wingspan are similar in these species, but M. velifer has broader wings and lower wing loading. By using high-speed videography and particle image velocimetry of steady flight in a wind tunnel, we show that three-dimensional kinematics and wake structure are similar in the two species at the higher speeds studied, but differ at lower speeds. At lower speeds, the two species show significant differences in mean angle of attack, body-wingtip distance and sweep angle. The distinct body vortex seen at low speed in T. brasiliensis and other bats studied to date is considerably weaker or absent in M. velifer We suggest that this could be influenced by morphology: (i) the narrower thorax in this species probably reduces the body-induced discontinuity in circulation between the two wings and (ii) the wing loading is lower, hence the lift coefficient required for weight support is lower. As a result, in M. velifer, there may be a decreased disruption in the lift generation between the body and the wing, and the strength of the characteristic root vortex is greatly diminished, both suggesting increased flight efficiency.This article is part of the themed issue 'Moving in a moving medium: new perspectives on flight'.

  18. Wake-up transceivers for structural health monitoring of bridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumberg, T.; Kokert, J.; Younesi, V.; Koenig, S.; Reindl, L. M.

    2016-04-01

    In this article we present a wireless sensor network to monitor the structural health of a large-scale highway bridge in Germany. The wireless sensor network consists of several sensor nodes that use wake-up receivers to realize latency free and low-power communication. The sensor nodes are either equipped with very accurate tilt sensor developed by Northrop Grumman LITEF GmbH or with a Novatel OEM615 GNSS receiver. Relay nodes are required to forward measurement data to a base station located on the bridge. The base station is a gateway that transmits the local measurement data to a remote server where it can be further analyzed and processed. Further on, we present an energy harvesting system to supply the energy demanding GNSS sensor nodes to realize long term monitoring.

  19. On the peculiar structure of a helical wake vortex behind an inclined prolate spheroid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Fengjian; Andersson, Helge I.; Gallardo, José P.;

    2016-01-01

    The self-similarity law for axisymmetric wakes has for the first time been examined and verified in a complex helical vortex in the far part of an asymmetric wake by means of direct numerical simulation (DNS). The helical vortex is the main coherent flow structure in the transitional non......-axisymmetric wake behind an inclined 6:1 prolate spheroid at Reynolds number 3000 based on the minor axis. The gradual development of the complex helical vortex structure has been described in detail all the way from its inception at the spheroid and into the far wake. We observed a complex vortex composition...... in the generation stage, a rare jet-like wake pattern in the near wake and an abrupt change of helical symmetry in the vortex core without an accompanying change in flow topology, i.e. with no recirculation bubble....

  20. Investigating fundamental properties of wind turbine wake structure using particle image velocimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whale, J. [Univ. of Edinburgh, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

    1997-08-01

    Low Reynolds number flow visualization tests are often used for showing the flow pattern changes associated with changes in lift-coefficients at a higher Reynolds number. In wind turbine studies, analysis of measured wake structures at small scale may reveal fundamental properties of the wake which will offer wake modellers a more complete understanding of rotor flows. Measurements are presented from experiments on a model wind turbine rig conducted in a water channel. The laser-optics technique of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) is used to make simultaneous multi-point measurements of the wake flow behind small-scale rotors. Analysis of the PIV data shows trends in velocity and vorticity structure in the wake. Study of the flow close to the rotor plane reveals information on stalled flow and blade performance. (au)

  1. Influence of Coriolis forces on the structure and evolution of wind-turbine wakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abkar, Mahdi; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2015-11-01

    In this study, large-eddy simulation (LES) is combined with a turbine model to investigate the effect of Coriolis forces on the structure and evolution of wind-turbine wakes. In order to isolate the Coriolis effect on the turbulent wake flow, two set of simulations are performed. In the first set of simulations, atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) flow is driven by the geostrophic forces including the effect of Earth's rotation, while in the second case, the ABL flow is driven by a unidirectional pressure gradient forcing. Both cases have the same mean horizontal velocity and turbulence intensity at the hub height. The simulation results show that the Coriolis forces significantly affect the spatial distribution of the mean velocity deficit and turbulence statistics in the wake region. In particular, it is found that the Coriolis effect, responsible for vertical wind veer, has important lateral wake stretching effects, which in turn significantly impacts the wake recovery and wake meandering characteristics downwind of the turbines. We also apply the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) to LES data of the wake. The results indicate a very high correlation between the most energetic modes and both maximum velocity deficit and wake meandering characteristics.

  2. Study on steady state wind and turbulence environments. [structure of wakes near buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brundidge, K. C.

    1977-01-01

    The structure of wakes and how this structure is related to the size and shape of buildings and other obstacles, and to ambient winds, was investigated. Mean values of natural atmospheric flow were obtained and used in conjunction with theoretical relationships developed by dimensional analysis to establish a model of the flow in the wake. Results indicate that conventional and V/STOL aircraft passing through the wake during takeoff and landing would experience not only a change in turbulence level, but also a change in mean wind speed of a magnitude roughly equivalent to that of the eddy components.

  3. Influence of the Coriolis force on the structure and evolution of wind turbine wakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abkar, Mahdi; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2016-10-01

    In this study, large-eddy simulation combined with a turbine model is used to investigate the effect of vertical wind veer associated with the Coriolis force on the structure and evolution of wind turbine wakes. In order to isolate the Coriolis effect on the wake, two cases are considered. In the first case, atmospheric boundary-layer flow is driven by a geostrophic wind, including the effect of Earth's rotation and the Coriolis force. In the second case, the boundary-layer flow is unidirectional and is forced by an imposed pressure gradient. Both cases have the same mean horizontal velocity and turbulence intensity at the hub height. The simulation results show that the Coriolis force significantly affects the aerodynamics of the wake including the mean velocity deficit, turbulence statistics, and wake-meandering characteristics downwind of the turbine. In particular, when the flow is forced by a geostrophic wind, vertical wind veer causes a skewed spatial structure in the wake. Moreover, the presence of lateral wind shear, in addition to the vertical one, enhances the shear production of turbulent kinetic energy and the turbulent momentum flux. This leads to a larger flow entrainment and, thus, a faster wake recovery compared to the case forced by unidirectional pressure gradient. Consistent with this result, wake meandering is also stronger in both lateral and vertical directions in the case of geostrophic forcing compared to the case with pressure-gradient forcing.

  4. Turbulence Structure in the Wake Region of a Meteorological Tower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthlott, Christian; Fiedler, Franz

    A meteorological tower significantly modifies the air flow, the mean windspeed and wind direction as well as the turbulencestructure of the air. Suchchanges can be noticed in particular in the wake region of the tower.Measurementson the 200 m tower ofForschungszentrum Karlsruhewere carried outusing Solent sonic anemometers in the lee of the towerand cup anemometers on both sides.In the wake region, spectral energydensity is increased in the high-frequency range. Superposition of this disturbance spectrum on the undisturbedspectrum yields a `knee' in the resulting spectrum. In the case of low turbulence intensity with stable stratification,a plateau with a constant energy content is observed in front of the knee.This effect is caused by the new production of turbulence energy from the mean flow as well as by an energy transfer fromlarger to smaller vortices. Power spectra in strongly stable conditionsshow a more rapid decrease of intensity in the region where the inertialsubrange is expected.The relevant scales of wake turbulence are derived from the maximum of the disturbance spectrum.Locations of the high-frequency peak do not depend on atmospheric stability,but are controlled mainly by mean wind speed.Apart from the reduction of the mean wind speed, the spectra and cospectra exhibit a strong anisotropy for such cases.The results demonstrate the significant influence of a tower on turbulence spectra in the wake region.

  5. The wake structure and thrust performance of a rigid low-aspect-ratio pitching panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    BUCHHOLZ, JAMES H. J.; SMITS, ALEXANDER J.

    2009-01-01

    Thrust performance and wake structure were investigated for a rigid rectangular panel pitching about its leading edge in a free stream. For ReC = O(104), thrust coefficient was found to depend primarily on Strouhal number St and the aspect ratio of the panel AR. Propulsive efficiency was sensitive to aspect ratio only for AR less than 0.83; however, the magnitude of the peak efficiency of a given panel with variation in Strouhal number varied inversely with the amplitude to span ratio A/S, while the Strouhal number of optimum efficiency increased with increasing A/S. Peak efficiencies between 9 % and 21 % were measured. Wake structures corresponding to a subset of the thrust measurements were investigated using dye visualization and digital particle image velocimetry. In general, the wakes divided into two oblique jets; however, when operating at or near peak efficiency, the near wake in many cases represented a Kármán vortex street with the signs of the vortices reversed. The three-dimensional structure of the wakes was investigated in detail for AR = 0.54, A/S = 0.31 and ReC = 640. Three distinct wake structures were observed with variation in Strouhal number. For approximately 0.20 0.25, a reorganization of some of the spanwise vorticity yielded a bifurcating wake formed by trains of vortex rings connected to the tips of the horseshoes. For St > 0.5, an additional structure formed from a perturbation of the streamwise leg which caused a spanwise expansion. The wake model paradigm established here is robust with variation in Reynolds number and is consistent with structures observed for a wide variety of unsteady flows. Movies are available with the online version of the paper. PMID:19746195

  6. Effect of Fluid Structure Interaction on the Wake Structure of a Thin Flexible Cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurram, Harika; Subramanian, Chelakara; Kanherkar, Priyanka

    2016-11-01

    Previous studies by the authors of the drag coefficient for thin flexible cylinders (diameter O(mm)) in a cross flow for Reynolds's numbers range between 100-1000 showed about 20 - 30 percent reduction compared to literature values. At free stream low Reynolds number around 100 the spectral analysis of the hotwire signals in the wake showed tonal and broadband frequencies suggesting features similar to transition flows. To better understand the flow behind the cylinder and wake structure interaction with boundary layer for above range of Reynolds number DNS simulations were conducted. The computational study is performed for two cases: (1) flow on rigid thin cylinder, and (2) flow with 3-D fluid structure interaction for the thin cylinder. It is observed the coefficient of drag values computed for the rigid wire were 8 -12 percent lower compared to the experimental results, while simulation with the fluid structure interaction gave results within 4 percent of the experimental values. The wake structure results based on the experiment and computational study will be discussed. Graduate Student.

  7. Spatial characterization of vortical structures and internal waves in stratified turbulent wake using POD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamessis, P.; Gurka, R.; Liberzon, A.

    2008-11-01

    Proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) is applied to 2-D slices of vorticity and horizontal divergence obtained from the 3-D DNS of the stratified turbulent wake of a towed sphere at Re=5x10^3 and Fr=4. Slices are sampled along the stream-depth (Oxz) and stream-span planes (Oxy) at 231 times during the interval Nt[12,35]. POD was chosen amongst the available statistical tools due to its advantage in characterization of simulated and experimentally measured velocity gradient fields, as previously demonstrated for turbulent boundary layers. In the Oxz planes, at the wake centerline, the higher most energetic modes reveal a structure similar of the structure of late-time stratified wakes. Off-set from centerline, the signature of internal waves in the form of forward-inclined coherent beams extending into the ambient becomes evident. The angle of inclination becomes progressively vertical with increasing POD mode. Lower POD modes on the Oyz planes show a layered structure in the wake core with coherent beams radiating out into the ambient over a broad range of angles. Further insight is provided through the relative energy spectra distribution of the vorticity eigenmodes. POD analysis has provided a statistical description of the geometrical features previously observed in instantaneous flow fields of stratified turbulent wakes.

  8. Computational hydrodynamics of animal swimming: boundary element method and three-dimensional vortex wake structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, J Y; Chahine, G L

    2001-12-01

    The slender body theory, lifting surface theories, and more recently panel methods and Navier-Stokes solvers have been used to study the hydrodynamics of fish swimming. This paper presents progress on swimming hydrodynamics using a boundary integral equation method (or boundary element method) based on potential flow model. The unsteady three-dimensional BEM code 3DynaFS that we developed and used is able to model realistic body geometries, arbitrary movements, and resulting wake evolution. Pressure distribution over the body surface, vorticity in the wake, and the velocity field around the body can be computed. The structure and dynamic behavior of the vortex wakes generated by the swimming body are responsible for the underlying fluid dynamic mechanisms to realize the high-efficiency propulsion and high-agility maneuvering. Three-dimensional vortex wake structures are not well known, although two-dimensional structures termed 'reverse Karman Vortex Street' have been observed and studied. In this paper, simulations about a swimming saithe (Pollachius virens) using our BEM code have demonstrated that undulatory swimming reduces three-dimensional effects due to substantially weakened tail tip vortex, resulting in a reverse Karman Vortex Street as the major flow pattern in the three-dimensional wake of an undulating swimming fish.

  9. Wake Vortex Structure Characteristics of a Flexible Oscillating Fin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-dong Wang; Pei Chen; Xiao-qing Zhang

    2008-01-01

    We compute the wake of a two-dimensional and three-dimensional flexible fin in an unsteady flow field with heaving and pitching motions using FLUENT. Deflexion mode is used for a non-uniform cantilever beam with non-uniformly distributed load. The effect of chordwise deflexion length on the characteristics of propulsion is discussed for two-dimensional flexible fin.The thrust coefficient decreases, propulsive efficiency increases and the intensity of turbulence attenuates gradually as the deflexion length increases. For a three-dimensional flexible fin, the intensity of the vortex in the plane of symmetry is higher than that in the plane at 3/4 span length of the caudal fro. But the propulsive performance achieved is not what we expected with the given deflexion mode.

  10. Lagrangian structures and mixing in the wake of a streamwise oscillating cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagney, N.; Balabani, S.

    2016-04-01

    Lagrangian analysis is capable of revealing the underlying structure and complex phenomena in unsteady flows. We present particle-image velocimetry measurements of the wake of a cylinder undergoing streamwise vortex-induced vibrations and calculate the Finite-Time Lyapunov Exponents (FTLE) in backward- and forward-time. The FTLE fields are compared to the phase-averaged vorticity fields for the four different wake modes observed while the cylinder experiences streamwise vortex-induced vibrations. The backward-time FTLE fields characterise the formation of vortices, with the roll up of spiral-shaped ridges coinciding with the roll up of the shear layers to form the vortices. Ridges in the forward-time fields tend to lie perpendicular to the flow direction and separate nearby vortices. The shedding of vortices coincides with a "peel off" process in the forward-time FTLE fields, in which a ridge connected to the cylinder splits into two strips, one of which moves downstream. Particular attention is given to the "wake breathing" process, in which the streamwise motion of the cylinder causes both shear layers to roll up simultaneously and two vortices of opposite sign to be shed into the wake. In this case, the ridges in forward-time FTLE fields are shown to define "vortex cells," in which the new vortices form, and the FTLE fields allow the wake to be decomposed into three distinct regions. Finally, the mixing associated with each wake mode is examined, and it is shown that cross-wake mixing is significantly enhanced when the vibration amplitude is large and the vortices are shed alternately. However, while the symmetric shedding induces large amplitude vibrations, no increase in mixing is observed relative to the von Kármán vortex street observed behind near-stationary bodies.

  11. Propulsion and perception in intermediate Re regimes: aquatic microcrustacean copepod responses to wake structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, J.; Pender Healy, L. A.; Heaphy, M.

    2016-02-01

    Flow sensing by the mechanoreceptive cuticular arrays of sensors on copepods has been shaped by over 400 million years of evolution and plays an important role in predator avoidance, foraging, mating, and rheotaxis. These 3D wakes are produced by animal propulsive activities and contain cues that guide these key survival responses. We have demonstrated that the fluid mechanical and chemical information retained in the hydrodynamic envelope can be interpreted by suitable sensor arrays; copepod sensor arrays are capable of perceiving minute differences in wake structures. Temora longicornis, a coastal marine copepod, and Hesperodiaptomus shoshone, a high-alpine freshwater lake copepod, track laminar trails. High-speed videography coupled with high-magnification Schlieren optics enabled us to visualize the deformation of the trail signal and the propulsive movements of the male copepod. Males followed the trail mimic and our observations show clear differences between the marine and freshwater species. Comparative analyses reveal tracking mechanisms that differ in sensor location with respect to the trail and locomotory kinematics. Copepods perform directed motions that lead them to a stimulus source in the absence of other collimating stimuli. Tracking by the copepod around the trail allows it to have one or numerous sensors inside and outside the trail to facilitate edge detection using spatial sampling. The advantage of this remarkable behavior of following trails fast and accurately is to encounter mates or food patches more frequently, thus contributing to population recruitment and energy transfer up the trophic food web. Precise mate and food finding strategies found for pelagic copepods may be a key adaptation, promoting survival in these open-ocean planktonic populations.

  12. The mathematical structure of the human sleep-wake cycle

    CERN Document Server

    Strogatz, Steven H

    1986-01-01

    Over the past three years I have grown accustomed to the puzzled look which appears on people's faces when they hear that I am a mathematician who studies sleep. They wonder, but are usually too polite to ask, what does mathematics have to do with sleep? Instead they ask the questions that fascinate us all: Why do we have to sleep? How much sleep do we really need? Why do we dream? These questions usually spark a lively discussion leading to the exchange of anecdotes, last night's dreams, and other personal information. But they are questions about the func­ tion of sleep and, interesting as they are, I shall have little more to say about them here. The questions that have concerned me deal instead with the timing of sleep. For those of us on a regular schedule, questions of timing may seem vacuous. We go to bed at night and get up in the morning, going through a cycle of sleeping and waking every 24 hours. Yet to a large extent, the cycle is imposed by the world around us.

  13. Three-dimensional vortex wake structure of flapping wings in hovering flight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Bo; Roll, Jesse; Liu, Yun; Troolin, Daniel R; Deng, Xinyan

    2014-02-06

    Flapping wings continuously create and send vortices into their wake, while imparting downward momentum into the surrounding fluid. However, experimental studies concerning the details of the three-dimensional vorticity distribution and evolution in the far wake are limited. In this study, the three-dimensional vortex wake structure in both the near and far field of a dynamically scaled flapping wing was investigated experimentally, using volumetric three-component velocimetry. A single wing, with shape and kinematics similar to those of a fruitfly, was examined. The overall result of the wing action is to create an integrated vortex structure consisting of a tip vortex (TV), trailing-edge shear layer (TESL) and leading-edge vortex. The TESL rolls up into a root vortex (RV) as it is shed from the wing, and together with the TV, contracts radially and stretches tangentially in the downstream wake. The downwash is distributed in an arc-shaped region enclosed by the stretched tangential vorticity of the TVs and the RVs. A closed vortex ring structure is not observed in the current study owing to the lack of well-established starting and stopping vortex structures that smoothly connect the TV and RV. An evaluation of the vorticity transport equation shows that both the TV and the RV undergo vortex stretching while convecting downwards: a three-dimensional phenomenon in rotating flows. It also confirms that convection and secondary tilting and stretching effects dominate the evolution of vorticity.

  14. Multiple vortex structures in the wake of a rectangular winglet in ground effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Velte, Clara Marika; Hansen, Martin Otto Laver; Okulov, Valery L.

    2016-01-01

    between the axial and the rotational flow. In the current work, even the longitudinal secondary structures detected from measured streamwise vorticity display similar behavior. A regime map depicting the observed stable far wake states of the multiple vortices as a function of winglet height and angle...

  15. The Effect of Geometry on the Wake Structure of a Surface Mounted Obstacle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addepalli, Bhagirath; Pardyjak, Eric; Brown, Michael

    2007-11-01

    Experiments were conducted to better understand the flow structure in the wake of a square cylinder as a function of its height and develop a parameterization for tall buildings for the QUIC-URB wind model. The experiments were conducted in an open-circuit wind tunnel in a fully turbulent boundary layer. 2D PIV was used to measure the flow field along the vertical symmetry plane of the model buildings. Numerous experimental cases were run in which the geometry was varied by increasing the wall-normal height H of a square cylinder (where W=L; L is streamwise length and W is spanwise width) from H/L=1 to H/L=3 in increments of 0.3L. Preliminary results indicate that a saddle point appears for heights greater than H/L=1.6. The saddle is accompanied by a significant modification of the wake structure. This change can be attributed to the enhanced flux of momentum around the sidewall into the near-wake as the height of the model building is increased. Future work will include horizontal plane measurements in the wake of the model building to further explore the mechanisms that lead to the change in the flow structure.

  16. A typical wave wake from high-speed vessels: its group structure and run-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Didenkulova

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available High-amplitude water waves induced by high-speed vessels are regularly observed in Tallinn Bay, the Baltic Sea, causing intense beach erosion and disturbing marine habitants in the coastal zone. Such a strong impact on the coast may be a result of a certain group structure of the wave wake. In order to understand it, here we present an experimental study of the group structure of these wakes at Pikakari beach, Tallinn Bay. The most energetic vessel waves at this location (100 m from the coast at the water depth 2.7 m have amplitudes of about 1 m and periods of 8–10 s and cause maximum run-up heights on a beach up to 1.4 m. These waves represent frequency modulated packets where the largest and longest waves propagate ahead of other smaller amplitude and period waves. Sometimes the groups of different heights and periods can be separated even within one wave wake event. The wave heights within a wake are well described by the Weibull distribution, which has different parameters for wakes from different vessels. Wave run-up heights can also be described by Weibull distribution and its parameters can be connected to the parameters of the distribution of wave heights 100 m from the coast. Finally, the run-up of individual waves within a packet is studied. It is shown that the specific structure of frequency modulated wave packets, induced by high-speed vessels, leads to a sequence of high wave run-ups at the coast, even when the original wave heights are rather moderate. This feature can be a key to understanding the significant impact on coasts caused by fast vessels.

  17. The near wake structure and the development of vorticity behind a model horizontal axis wind turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebert, P.; Wood, D. [The Univ. of Newcastle, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Callaghan (Australia)

    1997-08-01

    The wake of a two bladed model HAWT operating at zero yaw angle and in a steady flow in a wind tunnel was measured using hot wire probes. By phase locked averaging and moving the probe axially and radially the full three dimensional mean flow file was determined. All measurements were within two chord lengths of the blades and at tip speed ratios giving high turbine power output, a condition approaching runaway, and a stalled condition. For all tip speed ratios the wakes were significantly three dimensional. Large velocity variations were associated with vortex structures in the wakes, and irrotational fluctuations caused by the blade bound circulation. The vorticity clearly defined the hub and tip vortices that traced helical paths downstream, with the constant tip vortex pitch inversely proportional to tip speed ratio. Close to the blades the flow was complicated, though vortex roll-up was completed within one chord length. Considerable changes in wake structure occurred with tip speed ratio. At high power output the wake showed tip and hub vortices connected by a diffuse vortex sheet of mostly radial vorticity from the blade boundary layers; blade bound circulation was almost constant. The structure approaching runaway was similar though the hub vortex was not well defined and formed a vortex sheet around the hub which lifted away and diffused. The stalled condition was more complicated, with evidence of incomplete tip and hub vortex formation. The stream-wise velocity of the tip vortex core decreased with increasing tip speed ratio, but this was never aligned with local streamlines. The core of the tip vortex was not circular but more elliptical. A phase locked averaged angular momentum analysis was undertaken, the extra terms introduced through phase locked averaging were small. (Abstract Truncated)

  18. Wake structures of two side by side spheres in a tripped boundary layer flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canli Eyüb

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Two independent spheres were placed in a side by side arrangement and flow structure in the wake region of the spheres was investigated with a Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV system when the spheres were in a boundary layer over a flat plate as a special case. Reynolds number was 5000 based on the sphere diameter which was 42.5 mm. Boundary layer was tripped 8mm away from the leading edge of the flat plate with a 5 mm trip wire. The thickness of the hydrodynamically developed boundary layer was determined as 63mm which was larger than the sphere diameter of D=42.5mm. Wake region of the spheres was examined from point of flow physics for the different sphere locations in the ranges of 0≤G/D ≤1.5 and 0≤S/D ≤1.5 where G and S were the distance between the spheres and the distance between the bottom point of the spheres and the flat plate surface, respectively. Depending on the different sphere locations, instantaneous and time averaged vorticity data, scalar values of time-averaged velocity components and their root mean square (rms values and time averaged vorticity data are presented in the study for the evaluation of wake region of the spheres. It is demonstrated that the gap between the two spheres and the interaction between the gap and the boundary layer greatly affects flow pattern, especially when spheres are located near to the flat plate surface, i.e. S/D=0.1 for 0≤G/D ≤1.5. Different distances between the spheres resulted in various flow patterns as the spheres were approached to the flat plate. The distance S/D=0.1 for all gap values has the strongest effect on the wake structures. Beyond G/D=1.0, the sphere wakes tend to be similar to single sphere case. The instantaneous vorticity fields of the side by side arrangements comprised wavy structures in higher level comparing to an individual sphere case. The gap flow intensifies the occurrence of small scale eddies in the wake region. The submersion rate of the spheres

  19. Wake structures of two side by side spheres in a tripped boundary layer flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canli, Eyüb; Özgören, Muammer; Dogan, Sercan; Hilmi Aksoy, Muharrem; Akilli, Huseyin

    2014-03-01

    Two independent spheres were placed in a side by side arrangement and flow structure in the wake region of the spheres was investigated with a Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) system when the spheres were in a boundary layer over a flat plate as a special case. Reynolds number was 5000 based on the sphere diameter which was 42.5 mm. Boundary layer was tripped 8mm away from the leading edge of the flat plate with a 5 mm trip wire. The thickness of the hydrodynamically developed boundary layer was determined as 63mm which was larger than the sphere diameter of D=42.5mm. Wake region of the spheres was examined from point of flow physics for the different sphere locations in the ranges of 0≤G/D ≤1.5 and 0≤S/D ≤1.5 where G and S were the distance between the spheres and the distance between the bottom point of the spheres and the flat plate surface, respectively. Depending on the different sphere locations, instantaneous and time averaged vorticity data, scalar values of time-averaged velocity components and their root mean square (rms) values and time averaged vorticity data are presented in the study for the evaluation of wake region of the spheres. It is demonstrated that the gap between the two spheres and the interaction between the gap and the boundary layer greatly affects flow pattern, especially when spheres are located near to the flat plate surface, i.e. S/D=0.1 for 0≤G/D ≤1.5. Different distances between the spheres resulted in various flow patterns as the spheres were approached to the flat plate. The distance S/D=0.1 for all gap values has the strongest effect on the wake structures. Beyond G/D=1.0, the sphere wakes tend to be similar to single sphere case. The instantaneous vorticity fields of the side by side arrangements comprised wavy structures in higher level comparing to an individual sphere case. The gap flow intensifies the occurrence of small scale eddies in the wake region. The submersion rate of the spheres actually determines the

  20. Structure of the vortex wake in hovering Anna's hummingbirds (Calypte anna).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, M; Ortega-Jimenez, V M; Dudley, R

    2013-12-22

    Hummingbirds are specialized hoverers for which the vortex wake has been described as a series of single vortex rings shed primarily during the downstroke. Recent findings in bats and birds, as well as in a recent study on Anna's hummingbirds, suggest that each wing may shed a discrete vortex ring, yielding a bilaterally paired wake. Here, we describe the presence of two discrete rings in the wake of hovering Anna's hummingbirds, and also infer force production through a wingbeat with contributions to weight support. Using flow visualization, we found separate vortices at the tip and root of each wing, with 15% stronger circulation at the wingtip than at the root during the downstroke. The upstroke wake is more complex, with near-continuous shedding of vorticity, and circulation of approximately equal magnitude at tip and root. Force estimates suggest that the downstroke contributes 66% of required weight support, whereas the upstroke generates 35%. We also identified a secondary vortex structure yielding 8-26% of weight support. Lift production in Anna's hummingbirds is more evenly distributed between the stroke phases than previously estimated for Rufous hummingbirds, in accordance with the generally symmetric down- and upstrokes that characterize hovering in these birds.

  1. Electron crystallography--the waking beauty of structural biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Christopher R; Unger, Vinzenz M

    2012-08-01

    Since its debut in the mid 1970s, electron crystallography has been a valuable alternative in the structure determination of biological macromolecules. Its reliance on single-layered or double-layered two-dimensionally ordered arrays and the ability to obtain structural information from small and disordered crystals make this approach particularly useful for the study of membrane proteins in a lipid bilayer environment. Despite its unique advantages, technological hurdles have kept electron crystallography from reaching its full potential. Addressing the issues, recent initiatives developed high-throughput pipelines for crystallization and screening. Adding progress in automating data collection, image analysis and phase extension methods, electron crystallography is poised to raise its profile and may lead the way in exploring the structural biology of macromolecular complexes.

  2. The scaling and structure of aquatic animal wakes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Videler, JJ; Stamhuis, EJ; Muller, UK; van Duren, LA

    2002-01-01

    Animal generated water movements are visualized and quantified using two-dimensional particle image velocimetry (PIV). The resulting vector flow fields allow for the study of the distribution of velocity, vorticity and vortices. Structural and temporal aspects of animal-induced flows covering a rang

  3. Coalescing Wind Turbine Wakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S.; Churchfield, M.; Sirnivas, S.; Moriarty, P.; Nielsen, F. G.; Skaare, B.; Byklum, E.

    2015-06-01

    A team of researchers from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Statoil used large-eddy simulations to numerically investigate the merging wakes from upstream offshore wind turbines. Merging wakes are typical phenomena in wind farm flows in which neighboring turbine wakes consolidate to form complex flow patterns that are as yet not well understood. In the present study, three 6-MW turbines in a row were subjected to a neutrally stable atmospheric boundary layer flow. As a result, the wake from the farthest upstream turbine conjoined the downstream wake, which significantly altered the subsequent velocity deficit structures, turbulence intensity, and the global meandering behavior. The complexity increased even more when the combined wakes from the two upstream turbines mixed with the wake generated by the last turbine, thereby forming a “triplet” structure. Although the influence of the wake generated by the first turbine decayed with downstream distance, the mutated wakes from the second turbine continued to influence the downstream wake. Two mirror-image angles of wind directions that yielded partial wakes impinging on the downstream turbines yielded asymmetric wake profiles that could be attributed to the changing flow directions in the rotor plane induced by the Coriolis force. The turbine wakes persisted for extended distances in the present study, which is a result of low aerodynamic surface roughness typically found in offshore conditions.

  4. Flow structures in the wake of heaving and pitching foils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najdzin, Derek; Pardo, Enrique; Leftwich, Megan C.; Bardet, Philippe M.

    2012-11-01

    A 10-bar mechanism drives a cambering hydrofoil in an oscillatory heaving and pitching motion that replicates the flapping motion of a dolphin tail. The mechanism sits on a force-balance with six strain gages that together measure the forces and moments experienced by the fin during an oscillation. Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence is used to image the flow structures created downstream of the cambering fin for a range of Reynolds and Strouhal numbers. The images are taken in the mid-plane, parallel to the bottom of the water tunnel. These results are compared to a rigid foil at matching conditions to investigate the role of camber changes during the flapping cycle.

  5. Investigation on 3Dt wake flow structures of swimming bionic fish

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    G.-X.Shen; G.-K.Tan; G.-J.Lai

    2012-01-01

    A bionic experimental platform was designed for the purpose of investigating time accurate three-dimensional flow field,using digital particle image velocimetry (DSPIV).The wake behind the flapping trail of a robotic fish model was studied at high spatial resolution.The study was performed in a water channel.A robot fish model was designed and built.The model was fixed onto a rigid support framework using a cable-supporting method,with twelve stretched wires.The entire tail of the model can perform prescribed motions in two degrees of freedom,mainly in carangiform mode,by driving its afterbody and lunate caudal fin respectively The DSPIV system was set up to operate in a translational manner,measuring velocity field in a series of parallel slices.Phase locked measurements were repeated for a number of runs,allowing reconstruction of phase average flow field.Vortex structures with phase history of the wake were obtained.The study reveals some new and complex three-dimensional flow structures in the wake of the fish,including "reverse hairpin vortex" and "reverse Karman S-H vortex rings",allowing insight into physics of this complex flow.

  6. Study on wake structure characteristics of a slotted micro-ramp with large-eddy simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiangrui; Chen, Yaohui; Dong, Gang; Liu, Yixin

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, a novel slotted ramp-type micro vortex generator (slotted micro-ramp) for flow separation control is simulated in the supersonic flow of Ma = 1.5, based on large eddy simulation combined with the finite volume method. The wake structure characteristics and control mechanisms of both slotted and standard micro-ramps are presented and discussed. The results show that the wake of standard micro-ramp includes a primary counter-rotating streamwise vortex pair, a train of vortex rings, and secondary vortices. The slotted micro-ramp has more complicated wake structures, which contain a confluent counter-rotating streamwise vortex pair and additional streamwise vortices, with the same rotation generated by slot and the vortex rings enveloping the vortex pair. The additional vortices generated by the slot of the micro-ramp can mix with the primary counter-rotating vortex pair, extend the life time, and strengthen the vortex intensity of primary vortex pair. Moreover, the slot can effectively alleviate, or even eliminate the backflow and decrease the profile drag induced by the standard micro-ramp, therefore improving the efficiency of separation control.

  7. Investigation on 3D t wake flow structures of swimming bionic fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, G.-X.; Tan, G.-K.; Lai, G.-J.

    2012-10-01

    A bionic experimental platform was designed for the purpose of investigating time accurate three-dimensional flow field, using digital particle image velocimetry (DSPIV). The wake behind the flapping trail of a robotic fish model was studied at high spatial resolution. The study was performed in a water channel. A robot fish model was designed and built. The model was fixed onto a rigid support framework using a cable-supporting method, with twelve stretched wires. The entire tail of the model can perform prescribed motions in two degrees of freedom, mainly in carangiform mode, by driving its afterbody and lunate caudal fin respectively. The DSPIV system was set up to operate in a translational manner, measuring velocity field in a series of parallel slices. Phase locked measurements were repeated for a number of runs, allowing reconstruction of phase average flow field. Vortex structures with phase history of the wake were obtained. The study reveals some new and complex three-dimensional flow structures in the wake of the fish, including "reverse hairpin vortex" and "reverse Karman S-H vortex rings", allowing insight into physics of this complex flow.

  8. Chaotic dynamics of large-scale structures in a turbulent wake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varon, Eliott; Eulalie, Yoann; Edwige, Stephie; Gilotte, Philippe; Aider, Jean-Luc

    2017-03-01

    The dynamics of a three-dimensional (3D) bimodal turbulent wake downstream of a square-back Ahmed body are experimentally studied in a wind tunnel through high-frequency wall-pressure probes mapping the rear of the model and a horizontal two-dimensional (2D) velocity field. The barycenters of the pressure distribution over the rear part of the model and the intensity recirculation are found highly correlated. Both described the most energetic large-scale structures dynamics, confirming the relation between the large-scale recirculation bubble and its wall-pressure footprint. Focusing on the pressure, its barycenter trajectory has a stochastic behavior but its low-frequency dynamics exhibit the same characteristics as a weak strange chaotic attractor system, with two well-defined attractors. The low-frequency dynamics associated to the large-scale structures are then analyzed. The largest Lyapunov exponent is first estimated, leading to a low positive value characteristic of strange attractors and weak chaotic systems. Afterwards, analyzing the autocorrelation function of the timeseries, we compute the correlation dimension, larger than two. The signal is finally transformed and analyzed as a telegraph signal, showing that its dynamics correspond to a quasirandom telegraph signal. This is the first demonstration that the low-frequency dynamics of a turbulent 3D wake are not a purely stochastic process but rather a weak chaotic process exhibiting strange attractors. From the flow control point of view, it also opens the path to more simple closed-loop flow-control strategies aiming at the stabilization of the wake and the control of the dynamics of the wake barycenter.

  9. Wake structure and wingbeat kinematics of a house-martin Delichon urbica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosén, M; Spedding, G R; Hedenström, A

    2007-08-22

    The wingbeat kinematics and wake structure of a trained house martin in free, steady flight in a wind tunnel have been studied over a range of flight speeds, and compared and contrasted with similar measurements for a thrush nightingale and a pair of robins. The house martin has a higher aspect ratio (more slender) wing, and is a more obviously agile and aerobatic flyer, catching insects on the wing. The wingbeat is notable for the presence at higher flight speeds of a characteristic pause in the upstroke. The essential characteristics of the wing motions can be reconstructed with a simple two-frequency model derived from Fourier analysis. At slow speeds, the distribution of wake vorticity is more simple than for the other previously measured birds, and the upstroke does not contribute to weight support. The upstroke becomes gradually more significant as the flight speed increases, and although the vortex wake shows a signature of the pause phase, the global circulation measurements are otherwise in good agreement with surprisingly simple aerodynamic models, and with predictions across the different species, implying quite similar aerodynamic performance of the wing sections. The local Reynolds numbers of the wing sections are sufficiently low that the well-known instabilities of attached laminar flows over lifting surfaces, which are known to occur at two to three times this value, may not develop.

  10. Three-dimensional vortex wake structure of a flapping-wing micro aerial vehicle in forward flight configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percin, M.; van Oudheusden, B. W.; Eisma, H. E.; Remes, B. D. W.

    2014-09-01

    This paper investigates the formation and evolution of the unsteady three-dimensional wake structures generated by the flapping wings of the DelFly II micro aerial vehicle in forward flight configuration. Time-resolved stereoscopic particle image velocimetry (Stereo-PIV) measurements were carried out at several spanwise-aligned planes in the wake, so as to allow a reconstruction of the temporal development of the wake of the flapping wings throughout the complete flapping cycle. Simultaneous thrust-force measurements were performed to explore the relation between the wake formation and the aerodynamic force generation mechanisms. The three-dimensional wake configuration was subsequently reconstructed from the planar PIV measurements by two different approaches: (1) a spatiotemporal wake reconstruction obtained by convecting the time-resolved, three-component velocity field data of a single measurement plane with the free-stream velocity; (2) for selected phases in the flapping cycle a direct three-dimensional spatial wake reconstruction is interpolated from the data of the different measurement planes, using a Kriging regression technique. Comparing the results derived from both methods in terms of the behavior of the wake formations, their phase and orientation indicate that the spatiotemporal reconstruction method allows to characterize the general three-dimensional structure of the wake, but that the spatial reconstruction method can reveal more details due to higher streamwise resolution. Comparison of the wake reconstructions for different values of the reduced frequency allows assessing the impact of the flapping frequency on the formation and interaction characteristics of the vortical structures. For low values of the reduced frequency, it is observed that the vortex structure formation of instroke and outstroke is relatively independent of each other, but that increasing interaction occurs at higher reduced frequencies. It is further shown that there is a

  11. Spatial characterization of vortical structures and internal waves in a stratified turbulent wake using proper orthogonal decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamessis, Peter J.; Gurka, Roi; Liberzon, Alex

    2010-08-01

    Proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) has been applied to two-dimensional transects of vorticity obtained from numerical simulations of the stratified turbulent wake of a towed sphere at a Reynolds number Re=(UD)/ν =5×103 and Froude number Fr=2U/(ND)=4 (U and D are characteristic velocity and length scales and N is the stratification frequency). At 231 times during the interval 12wake core in terms of the relative influence of buoyancy on flow dynamics. The geometry of the individual eigenmodes shows a vorticity structure that is buoyancy-controlled at the lowest modes and is increasingly more actively turbulent as modal index is increased. In the wake ambient, i.e., the initially quiescent region outside the turbulent wake, the geometry of the POD modes consists of distinct internal wave rays whose angle to the horizontal is strongly dependent on modal index. Reconstruction of vorticity fields from subranges of POD modes indicates that, both inside the wake core but also in the wave-dominated ambient, each modal subrange is not only associated with a particular flow structure but also a characteristic timescale of motion. These preliminary findings suggest that POD may be a highly suitable alternative to globally defined basis functions in analyzing spatially localized internal wave fields emitted from a turbulent source that are also localized in space. In particular, it may serve as a platform toward an improved understanding of two fundamental questions associated with the nonequilibrium regime of stratified wake evolution: the structural transitions of the vorticity field within the wake core and the radiation of internal waves by the wake.

  12. Wake structure and thrust generation of a flapping foil in two-dimensional flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Anders Peter; Bohr, Tomas; Schnipper, Teis

    2017-01-01

    We present a combined numerical (particle vortex method) and experimental (soap film tunnel) study of a symmetric foil undergoing prescribed oscillations in a two-dimensional free stream. We explore pure pitching and pure heaving, and contrast these two generic types of kinematics. We compare...... measurements and simulations when the foil is forced with pitching oscillations, and we find a close correspondence between flow visualisations using thickness variations in the soap film and the numerically determined vortex structures. Numerically, we determine wake maps spanned by oscillation frequency...

  13. Bifurcation and instability problems in vortex wakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aref, H [Center for Fluid Dynamics and Department of Physics, Technical University of Denmark, Kgs. Lyngby, DK-2800 (Denmark); Broens, M [Center for Fluid Dynamics and Department of Mathematics, Technical University of Denmark, Kgs. Lyngby, DK-2800 (Denmark); Stremler, M A [Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States)

    2007-04-15

    A number of instability and bifurcation problems related to the dynamics of vortex wake flows are addressed using various analytical tools and approaches. We discuss the bifurcations of the streamline pattern behind a bluff body as a vortex wake is produced, a theory of the universal Strouhal-Reynolds number relation for vortex wakes, the bifurcation diagram for 'exotic' wake patterns behind an oscillating cylinder first determined experimentally by Williamson and Roshko, and the bifurcations in topology of the streamlines pattern in point vortex streets. The Hamiltonian dynamics of point vortices in a periodic strip is considered. The classical results of von Karman concerning the structure of the vortex street follow from the two-vortices-in-a-strip problem, while the stability results follow largely from a four-vortices-in-a-strip analysis. The three-vortices-in-a-strip problem is argued to be relevant to the wake behind an oscillating body.

  14. Volumetric imaging of shark tail hydrodynamics reveals a three-dimensional dual-ring vortex wake structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flammang, Brooke E; Lauder, George V; Troolin, Daniel R; Strand, Tyson

    2011-12-22

    Understanding how moving organisms generate locomotor forces is fundamental to the analysis of aerodynamic and hydrodynamic flow patterns that are generated during body and appendage oscillation. In the past, this has been accomplished using two-dimensional planar techniques that require reconstruction of three-dimensional flow patterns. We have applied a new, fully three-dimensional, volumetric imaging technique that allows instantaneous capture of wake flow patterns, to a classic problem in functional vertebrate biology: the function of the asymmetrical (heterocercal) tail of swimming sharks to capture the vorticity field within the volume swept by the tail. These data were used to test a previous three-dimensional reconstruction of the shark vortex wake estimated from two-dimensional flow analyses, and show that the volumetric approach reveals a different vortex wake not previously reconstructed from two-dimensional slices. The hydrodynamic wake consists of one set of dual-linked vortex rings produced per half tail beat. In addition, we use a simple passive shark-tail model under robotic control to show that the three-dimensional wake flows of the robotic tail differ from the active tail motion of a live shark, suggesting that active control of kinematics and tail stiffness plays a substantial role in the production of wake vortical patterns.

  15. 3D-CFD Investigation of Contrails and Volatile Aerosols Produced in the Near-Field of an Aircraft Wake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnier, F.; Ghedhaifi, W.; Vancassel, X.; Khou, J. C.; Montreuil, E.

    2015-12-01

    Civil aviation contributes to degradation of air quality around airport (SOx, NOx, speciated hydrocarbons,…) and climate change through its emissions of greenhouse gases (CO2, water vapor), as well as particulate matters. These particles include soot particles formed in the combustor, volatile aerosols and contrails generated in the aircraft wake. Although the aircraft emissions represent today only about 3% of all those produced on the surface of the earth by other anthropogenic sources, they are mostly released in the very sensitive region of the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere. These emissions have a radiative effect reinforced by specific physical and chemical processes at high altitudes, such as cloud formation and ozone production. In this context, most of the work to-date assessed that the actual effect of aviation on the climate are affected by very large uncertainties, partly due to lack of knowledge on the mechanisms of new particles formation and growth processes in the exhaust plume of the aircraft. The engine exhaust gases are mixed in the ambient air under the influence of the interaction between the jet engine and the wing tip vortices. The characteristics of vortices as well as their interaction with the jet depend on the aircraft airframe especially on the wing geometry and the engine position (distance from the wing tip). The aim of this study is to examine the influence of aircraft parameters on contrail formation using a 3D CFD calculation based on a RANS (Reynolds Average Navier-Stokes) approach. Numerical simulations have been performed using CEDRE, the multiphysics ONERA code for energetics. CEDRE is a CFD code using finite volume methods and unstructured meshes. These meshes are especially appropriate when complex geometries are used. A transport model has been used for condensation of water vapor onto ice particles. Growth is evaluated using a modified Fick's law to mass transfer on particles. In this study, different aircraft

  16. Thrust generation and wake structure for flow across a pitching airfoil at low Reynolds number

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Intesaaf Ashraf; Amit Agrawal; Majid Hassan Khan; Sooraj P; Atul Srivastava; Atul Sharma

    2015-12-01

    In this work, we present detailed particle image velocimetry (PIV) based investigation of wake structure of a pitching airfoil. PIV measurements have been carried out for NACA0015 airfoil at Re = 2900 with reduced frequency range of 1.82–10.92 and pitching angle of 5°. Two different wake structures (reverse Kármán shedding and deflected vortex shedding) are observed over this parameter range. The vorticity decreases substantially over a distance of two chord-lengths. The velocity profile indicates a jet-like flow downstream of the airfoil. It is shown that the jet-like flow downstream of the airfoil is however not a sufficient condition for the generation of thrust. The vortex strength is found to be invariant of the pitching frequency. Certain differences from the reported results are noted, which may be because of difference in the airfoil shape. These results can help improve understanding of the flow behavior as the low Reynolds number range is not well studied.

  17. Field investigation of a wake structure downwind of a VAWT in a windfarm array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, H.T.; Buck, J.W.; Germain, A.C.; Hinchee, M.E.; Solt, T.S.; LeRoy, G.M.; Srnsky, R.A.

    1987-10-01

    The effects of upwind turbine wakes on the performance of a FloWind 17-m VAWT were investigated through a series of field experiments conducted at the FloWind windfarm on Cameron Ridge, Tehachapi, California. The field experiment was conducted within a VAWT array consisting of more than nine VAWTs with separations 3D crosswised by 8D downwind (where D is the turbine diameter) in a staggered configuration. The array is the upwind three rows of VAWTS in a total of six rows that are on top of the Cameron Ridge plateau. The terrain features in the vicinity are reasonably regular, with an upslope of 7 deg on the average; however, several local irregularities are present. The annual hourly averaged wind speed exceeds 8 m/s at the site. The wind field and the power-outputs of nine turbines within the array were measured with wind sensors and power transducers. Nine Gill propeller and 18 Maximum cup anemometers and one direction sensor were mounted on portable and stack-up towers installed upwind and within the turbine array. From the field measurements, the velocity and power/energy deficits were derived under various turbine on/off configurations. Much information was provided to characterize the structure of VAWT wakes and to assess their effects on the performance of downwind turbines. Recommendations are made for optimizing windfarm design and operations as well as for wind energy management.

  18. Similarities and differences in the wake structure generated by different species of bats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubel, Tatjana; Hristov, Nickolay; Swartz, Sharon; Breuer, Kenneth

    2009-11-01

    Flight kinematics and morphology differ greatly between the approx. 1200 bat species and the goal of our project is to understand how these differences affect the flight mechanisms, the generation of aerodynamic forces, and the resultant wake structures. Multiple individuals of three diverse species of bat were flown in the wind tunnel. The three species have different morphology, wing aspect ratio and wing loading, and exhibit different flight behaviors appropriate to their different ecologies. Particle Image Velocimetry in the cross-stream (Trefftz) plane acquired at 200 Hz was used to map the time-resolved wake velocities behind the bat, while three synchronized high-speed cameras monitored the wing motion. The measurements were taken at several flight speeds. Early predictions based on kinematic measurements suggest the development of discrete vortex rings as well as the generation of negative circulation in the wing tip area during the end of the downstroke. These hypotheses are tested and discussed, and the results show distinct differences between the species and as functions of flight speed.

  19. NONLINEAR FLUID DAMPING IN STRUCTURE-WAKE OSCILLATORS IN MODELING VORTEX-INDUCED VIBRATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Li-ming; LING Guo-can; WU Ying-xiang; ZENG Xiao-hui

    2009-01-01

    A Nonlinear Fluid Damping(NFD)in the form of the square-velocity is applied in the response analysis of Vortex-Induced Vibrations(VIV).Its nonlinear hydrodynamic effects on the coupled wake and structure oscillators are investigated.A comparison between the coupled systems with the linear and nonlinear fluid dampings and experiments shows that the NFD model can well describe response characteristics,such as the amplification of body displacement at lock-in and frequency lock-in,both at high and low mass ratios.Particularly,the predicted peak amplitude of the body in the Griffin plot is in good agreement with experimental data and empirical equation,indicating the significant effect of the NFD on the structure motion.

  20. Mean, coherent and stochastic flow structure interactions in the near-wake of an oscillatory foil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siala, Firas; Liburdy, James

    2016-11-01

    Particle image velocimetry measurements are conducted to investigate the transport mechanism of flow kinetic energy in the near-wake of an oscillating foil at a reduced frequency of 0.18-0.2. Velocity triple decomposition is used to decompose the flow into mean, coherent and stochastic fields, and the kinetic energy evolution equations are utilized to study the energy exchange between the three components of the flow fields. The results show that the leading edge vortex (LEV) is responsible in extracting the majority of the free stream kinetic energy via the coherent shear strain. Furthermore, a scale-based model that characterizes the energy content of the LEV is developed. It is shown that coherent kinetic energy produced by the mean rate of strain scales remarkably well with the LEV energy content estimated by the model.

  1. Leg movements during wakefulness in restless legs syndrome: time structure and relationships with periodic leg movements during sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, Raffaele; Manconi, Mauro; Plazzi, Giuseppe; Bruni, Oliviero; Cosentino, Filomena I I; Ferini-Strambi, Luigi; Zucconi, Marco

    2012-05-01

    Approximately one third of patients with restless legs syndrome (RLS) also show periodic leg movements (PLM) during relaxed wake fulness (PLMW). In contrast with the large amount of data published on periodic leg movements during sleep (PLMS), PLMW have received less attention from the scientific community. The objective of this study was to evaluate the correlations/differences of time-structure and response to a dopamine-agonist between PLMW and PLMS in patients with RLS. Ninety idiopathic RLS patients and 28 controls were recruited. Subjects underwent clinical and neurophysiological evaluation, hematological screening, and one or two consecutive full-night polysomnographic studies. A subset of patients received 0.25mg of pramipexole or placebo before the second recording. Polysomnographic recordings were scored and LM activity was analyzed during sleep and during the epochs of wakefulness occurring during the first recording hour. RLS patients had higher LM activity during wakefulness than controls, but with a similar periodicity. Even if correlated, the ability of the PLMW index to predict the PLMS index decreased with increasing LM activity. Intermovement intervals during wakefulness showed one peak only at approximately 4s, gradually decreasing with increasing interval in both patients and controls. The effect of pramipexole was very limited and involved the small periodic portion of LM activity during wakefulness. PLMW index and PLMS index were correlated; however, the magnitude of this correlation was not sufficient to suggest that PLMW can be good predictors of PLMS. Short-interval LM activity during wakefulness and sleep might be linked to the severity of sleep disruption in RLS patients and the differences between their features obtained during wakefulness or sleep might be relevant for the diagnosis of sleep disturbances in RLS. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A study of wake development and structure in constant pressure gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaofeng

    2001-07-01

    Motivated by the application to high-lift aerodynamics for commercial transport aircraft, a systematic investigation into the response of symmetric/asymmetric planar turbulent wake development to constant adverse, zero and favorable pressure gradients has been conducted. The experiments are performed at a Reynolds number of 2.4 × 106 based on the chord of the wake generator. A unique feature of this wake study is that the pressure gradients imposed on the wake flow field are held constant. The experimental measurements involve both conventional Laser Doppler Velocimetry and Hot Wire Anemometry flow field surveys of mean and turbulent quantities including the turbulent kinetic energy budget. In addition, similarity analysis and numerical simulation have also been conducted for this wake study. A focus of the research has been to isolate the effects of both pressure gradient and initial wake asymmetry on the wake development. Experimental results reveal that the pressure gradient has a tremendous influence on the wake development, despite the relatively modest pressure gradients imposed. For a given pressure gradient, the development of an initially asymmetric wake is different from the initially symmetric wake. An explicit similarity solution for the shape parameters of the symmetric wake is obtained and agrees with the experimental results. The turbulent kinetic energy budget measurements of the symmetric wake demonstrate that except for the convection term, the imposed pressure gradient does not change the fundamental flow physics of turbulent kinetic energy transport. Based on the turbulent kinetic energy budget measurements, an approach to correct the bias error associated with the notoriously difficult dissipation estimate is proposed and validated through the comparison of the experimental estimate with a direct numerical simulation result.

  3. Wake Structure of Wind Turbines in Yaw under Uniform Inflow Conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Howland, Michael F; Martinez-Tossas, Luis A; Meyers, Johan; Meneveau, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Reducing wake losses in wind farms by deflecting the wakes through turbine yawing has been shown to be a feasible wind farm controls approach. Nonetheless, the effectiveness of yawing depends not only on the degree of wake deflection but also on the resulting shape of the wake. In this work, the deflection and morphology of wakes behind a wind turbine operating in yawed conditions are studied using wind tunnel experiments of a wind turbine modeled as a porous disk in a uniform inflow. First, by measuring velocity distributions at various downstream positions and comparing with prior studies, we confirm that the non-rotating wind turbine model in yaw generates realistic wake deflections. Second, we characterize the wake shape and make first observations of what is termed a curled wake, displaying significant spanwise asymmetry. The wake curling observed in the experiments is also reproduced qualitatively in large eddy simulations using both actuator disk and actuator line models. When a wind turbine is yawed f...

  4. Bifurcation and instability problems in vortex wakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aref, Hassan; Brøns, Morten; Stremler, Mark A.

    2007-01-01

    A number of instability and bifurcation problems related to the dynamics of vortex wake flows are addressed using various analytical tools and approaches. We discuss the bifurcations of the streamline pattern behind a bluff body as a vortex wake is produced, a theory of the universal Strouhal......-Reynolds number relation for vortex wakes, the bifurcation diagram for "exotic" wake patterns behind an oscillating cylinder first determined experimentally by Williamson & Roshko, and the bifurcations in topology of the streamlines pattern in point vortex streets. The Hamiltonian dynamics of point vortices...... in a periodic strip is considered. The classical results of von Kármán concerning the structure of the vortex street follow from the two-vortices-in-a-strip problem, while the stability results follow largely from a four-vortices-in-a-strip analysis. The three-vortices-in-a-strip problem is argued...

  5. Implications of Stably Stratified Atmospheric Boundary Layer Turbulence on the Near-Wake Structure of Wind Turbines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran Bhaganagar

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Turbulence structure in the wake behind a full-scale horizontal-axis wind turbine under the influence of real-time atmospheric inflow conditions has been investigated using actuator-line-model based large-eddy-simulations. Precursor atmospheric boundary layer (ABL simulations have been performed to obtain mean and turbulence states of the atmosphere under stable stratification subjected to two different cooling rates. Wind turbine simulations have revealed that, in addition to wind shear and ABL turbulence, height-varying wind angle and low-level jets are ABL metrics that influence the structure of the turbine wake. Increasing stability results in shallower boundary layers with stronger wind shear, steeper vertical wind angle gradients, lower turbulence, and suppressed vertical motions. A turbulent mixing layer forms downstream of the wind turbines, the strength and size of which decreases with increasing stability. Height dependent wind angle and turbulence are the ABL metrics influencing the lateral wake expansion. Further, ABL metrics strongly impact the evolution of tip and root vortices formed behind the rotor. Two factors play an important role in wake meandering: tip vortex merging due to the mutual inductance form of instability and the corresponding instability of the turbulent mixing layer.

  6. Simulation of Rotary-Wing Near-Wake Vortex Structures Using Navier-Stokes CFD Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenwright, David; Strawn, Roger; Ahmad, Jasim; Duque, Earl; Warmbrodt, William (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    This paper will use high-resolution Navier-Stokes computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations to model the near-wake vortex roll-up behind rotor blades. The locations and strengths of the trailing vortices will be determined from newly-developed visualization and analysis software tools applied to the CFD solutions. Computational results for rotor nearwake vortices will be used to study the near-wake vortex roll up for highly-twisted tiltrotor blades. These rotor blades typically have combinations of positive and negative spanwise loading and complex vortex wake interactions. Results of the computational studies will be compared to vortex-lattice wake models that are frequently used in rotorcraft comprehensive codes. Information from these comparisons will be used to improve the rotor wake models in the Tilt-Rotor Acoustic Code (TRAC) portion of NASA's Short Haul Civil Transport program (SHCT). Accurate modeling of the rotor wake is an important part of this program and crucial to the successful design of future civil tiltrotor aircraft. The rotor wake system plays an important role in blade-vortex interaction noise, a major problem for all rotorcraft including tiltrotors.

  7. Wind Turbines Wake Aerodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vermeer, L.; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Crespo, A.

    2003-01-01

    The aerodynamics of horizontal axis wind turbine wakes is studied. The contents is directed towards the physics of power extraction by wind turbines and reviews both the near and the far wake region. For the near wake, the survey is restricted to uniform, steady and parallel flow conditions......, thereby excluding wind shear, wind speed and rotor setting changes and yawed conditions. The emphasis is put on measurements in controlled conditions.For the far wake, the survey focusses on both single turbines and wind farm effects, and the experimental and numerical work are reviewed; the main interest...... is to study how the far wake decays downstream, in order to estimate the effect produced in downstream turbines.The article is further restricted to horizontal axis wind turbines and excludes all other types of turbines....

  8. Wind Turbines Wake Aerodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vermeer, L.; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Crespo, A.

    2003-01-01

    The aerodynamics of horizontal axis wind turbine wakes is studied. The contents is directed towards the physics of power extraction by wind turbines and reviews both the near and the far wake region. For the near wake, the survey is restricted to uniform, steady and parallel flow conditions......, thereby excluding wind shear, wind speed and rotor setting changes and yawed conditions. The emphasis is put on measurements in controlled conditions.For the far wake, the survey focusses on both single turbines and wind farm effects, and the experimental and numerical work are reviewed; the main interest...... is to study how the far wake decays downstream, in order to estimate the effect produced in downstream turbines.The article is further restricted to horizontal axis wind turbines and excludes all other types of turbines....

  9. Investigation on the near-wake flow structures of a utility-scale wind turbine using snowflake based flow visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasari, Teja; Toloui, Mostafa; Guala, Michele; Hong, Jiarong

    2015-11-01

    Super-large-scale particle image velocimetry and flow visualization techniques using natural snow particles have been shown as an effective tool to probe the structure of the flow around full-scale wind turbines (Hong et al. Nature Comm. 2014). Here we present a follow-up study based on the data collected during a deployment around the 2.5 MW wind turbine at EOLOS Wind Energy Research Station on April, 4th, 2014. The dataset includes the snow visualization of flow fields from different perspectives in the near wake of the turbine. The motions of the dominant coherent structures including tip, blade root, hub and tower vortices, represented by the snow voids, are examined with the objective of quantifying and correlating their behavior with the meteorological and turbine operating conditions. Some preliminary studies on flow-structure interaction are also performed by correlating the data from strain gauges, accelerometers mounted on the turbine blades, with the flow measurements. The statistical analysis of the motions of blade induced vortices shows a clear impact of atmospheric turbulence and vortex interaction on flow development in the near wake. The result further indicates a strong connection between near-wake vorticity field, turbine operation and structure deformations. The work was supported by National Science Foundation (NSF-CBET-1454259) and the research infrastructure was supported by Department of Energy.

  10. Thrust production and wake structure of a batoid-inspired oscillating fin

    Science.gov (United States)

    CLARK, R. P.; SMITS, A. J.

    2009-01-01

    Experiments are reported on the hydrodynamic performance of a flexible fin. The fin replicates some features of the pectoral fin of a batoid fish (such as a ray or skate) in that it is actuated in a travelling wave motion, with the amplitude of the motion increasing linearly along the span from root to tip. Thrust is found to increase with non-dimensional frequency, and an optimal oscillatory gait is identified. Power consumption measurements lead to the computation of propulsive efficiency, and an optimal efficiency condition is evaluated. Wake visualizations are presented, and a vortex model of the wake near zero net thrust is suggested. Strouhal number effects on the wake topology are also illustrated. PMID:19746188

  11. Undulating fins produce off-axis thrust and flow structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neveln, Izaak D; Bale, Rahul; Bhalla, Amneet Pal Singh; Curet, Oscar M; Patankar, Neelesh A; MacIver, Malcolm A

    2014-01-15

    While wake structures of many forms of swimming and flying are well characterized, the wake generated by a freely swimming undulating fin has not yet been analyzed. These elongated fins allow fish to achieve enhanced agility exemplified by the forward, backward and vertical swimming capabilities of knifefish, and also have potential applications in the design of more maneuverable underwater vehicles. We present the flow structure of an undulating robotic fin model using particle image velocimetry to measure fluid velocity fields in the wake. We supplement the experimental robotic work with high-fidelity computational fluid dynamics, simulating the hydrodynamics of both a virtual fish, whose fin kinematics and fin plus body morphology are measured from a freely swimming knifefish, and a virtual rendering of our robot. Our results indicate that a series of linked vortex tubes is shed off the long edge of the fin as the undulatory wave travels lengthwise along the fin. A jet at an oblique angle to the fin is associated with the successive vortex tubes, propelling the fish forward. The vortex structure bears similarity to the linked vortex ring structure trailing the oscillating caudal fin of a carangiform swimmer, though the vortex rings are distorted because of the undulatory kinematics of the elongated fin.

  12. Coherent structure in the turbulent wake behind a circular cylinder 3. Flow visualization and hot wire measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamane, Ryuichiro; Oshima, Shuzo; Okubo, Masaaki; Kotani, Juzo

    1988-07-01

    In the previous papers the authors have reported that the two-dimensional Kármán vortices behind a circular cylinder are deformed until they form chains of spoon-shaped vortex couples whose spanwise scale is about 8 d, which is a new type of coherent structure. In this report experimental evidence of this structure is presented. Formation process of the structure and the turbulence in it were investigated for the wake behind a circular cylinder with Re = 2100 and 4200 by means of the flow visualization technique, simultaneous hot wire measurements, spanwise correlation measurements, construction of instantaneous velocity field by the conditional sampling method, etc.

  13. Separation of Lift-Generated Vortex Wakes Into Two Diverging Parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossow, Vernon J.; Brown, Anthony P.

    2010-01-01

    As part of an ongoing study of the spreading rate of lift-generated vortex wakes, the present investigation considers possible reasons as to why segments of lift-generated wakes sometimes depart from the main part of the wake to move rapidly in either an upward or downward direction. It is assumed that deficiencies or enhancements of the lift carry over across the fuselage-shrouded wing are the driving mechanism for departures of wake-segments. The computations presented first indicate that upwardly departing wake segments that were observed and photographed could have been produced by a deficiency in lift carryover across the fuselage-shrouded part of the wing. Computations made of idealized vortex wakes indicate that upward departure of a wake segment requires a centerline reduction in the span loading of 70% or more, whether the engines are at idle or robust thrust. Similarly, it was found that downward departure of wake segments is produced when the lift over the center part of the wing is enhanced. However, it was also found that downward departures do not occur without the presence of robust engine-exhaust streams (i.e., engines must NOT be at idle). In those cases, downward departures of a wake segment occurs when the centerline value of the loading is enhanced by any amount between about 10% to 100%. Observations of condensation trails indicate that downward departure of wake segments is rare. Upward departures of wake segments appears to be more common but still rare. A study to determine the part of the aircraft that causes wake departures has not been carried out. However, even though departures of wake segments rarely occur, some aircraft do regularly shed these wake structures. If aircraft safety is to be assured to a high degree of reliability, and a solution for eliminating them is not implemented, existing guidelines for the avoidance of vortex wakes [1,3] may need to be broadened to include possible increases in wake sizes caused by vertical

  14. Three-dimensional structures and turbulence closure of the wake developing in a wall shear layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hah, C.

    1981-01-01

    The turbulent wake interacting with the rotating wall shear layer is investigated analytically and numerically. The turbulent wakes of the rotating blades in a compressor which are interacting with the rotating hub-wall boundary layer are analyzed. A modified version of the closure model of the pressure-strain correlation term in the Reynolds stress transport equation is developed to predict the effect of rotation, which is appreciable for the present flow because the thick hub-wall boundary layer is interacting with the rotor wake. It is noted that the Poisson type equation for the pressure-strain correlation has an extra rotation term when the entire flow field is rotating. This extra rotation term is modeled to accommodate the effect of rotation. In addition, the standard correction for the wall effect is incorporated for the utilized Reynolds stress closure model. The rotation-modified Reynolds stress closure model is used to predict the present flow, and the predictions are compared with the experimental data. The experimental data reveal that the characteristics of the three-dimensional turbulent wake interacting with the wall shear layer are considerably altered by the effects of the wall and the rotation. These features are predicted with good accuracy by the turbulence closure model developed.

  15. Structure of self-gravity wakes in Saturn's A ring as measured by Cassini CIRS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, C.; Brooks, S.; Edgington, S.; Leyrat, C.; Pilorz, S.; Spilker, L.

    2009-01-01

    The CIRS infrared spectrometer onboard the Cassini spacecraft has scanned Saturn's A ring azimuthally from several viewing angles since its orbit insertion in 2004. A quadrupolar asymmetry has been detected in this ring at spacecraft elevations ranging between 16° to 37°. Its fractional amplitude decreases from 22% to 8% from 20° to 37° elevations. The patterns observed in two almost complete azimuthal scans at elevations 20° and 36° strongly favor the self-gravity wakes as the origin of the asymmetry. The elliptical, infinite cylinder model of Hedman et al. [Hedman, M.M., Nicholson, P.D., Salo, H., Wallis, B.D., Buratti, B.J., Baines, K.H., Brown, R.H., Clark, R.N., 2007. Astron. J. 133, 2624-2629] can reproduce the CIRS observations well. Such wakes are found to have an average height-to-spacing ratio H/λ=0.1607±0.0002, a width-over-spacing W/λ=0.3833±0.0008. Gaps between wakes, which are filled with particles, have an optical depth τ=0.1231±0.0005. The wakes mean pitch angle Φ is 70.70°±0.07°, relative to the radial direction. The comparison of ground-based visible data with CIRS observations constrains the A ring to be a monolayer. For a surface mass density of 40 g cm -2 [Tiscarino, M.S., Burns, J.A., Nicholson, P.D., Hedman, M.M., Porco, C.C., 2007. Icarus 189, 14-34], the expected spacing of wakes is λ≈60 m. Their height and width would then be H≈10 m and W≈24 m, values that match the maximum size of particles in this ring as determined from ground-based stellar occultations [French, R.G., Nicholson, P.D., 2000. Icarus 145, 502-523].

  16. Control of flow structure in the wake region of circular cylinder with meshy wire in deep water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burcu Oğuz

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study the aim is decreasing the effect and the intensity of the temporary loads resulted from vortex shedding that have an impact on the cylinder (chimneys, high buildings etc. located in deep water and the object or objects in the wake region and definition of the optimum values (wire thickness and porosity β With different thickness and different porosity ratios the effect of meshy wire that surrounded a circular cylinder of D=50 mm diameter was observed at Re_D=5000. The porosity ratios were four different values between a range of β=0.5-0.8 with an interval of 0.1. The thicknesses of wire were 1 mm, 2 mm, 3 mm and 4 mm. The flow structure in the wake region of circular cylinder was tried to be controlled by meshy wire that surrounded the cylinder. Experiments were carried out by using particle image velocimetry (PIV technique. Comparing with bare cylinder results, turbulence kinetic energy (TKE and Reynolds shear stress values increase with wire thicknesses of b=1 mm, 2 mm for all porosity ratios and decrease with b=3 mm, 4 mm. With porosity ratio of β=0.6 and wire thickness of b=4 mm TKE and Reynolds shear stress results show that meshy wire controls the flow in the wake region of the cylinder. Frequency value results also define that best flow control is obtained with β=0.6 and b=4 mm.

  17. Data-driven RANS for prediction of wind turbine wakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iungo, Giacomo Valerio; Viola, Francesco; Ciri, Umberto; Camarri, Simone; Rotea, Mario A.; Leonardi, Stefano

    2015-11-01

    Wind turbine wakes are highly turbulent flows resulting from the interaction between the atmospheric boundary layer and wake vorticity structures. Measurement technologies, such as wind LiDARs, are currently available to perform velocity measurements in a set of locations of wakes past utility-scale wind turbines; however, computational methods are still needed to predict wake downstream evolution. In this work, a low-computational cost and accurate algorithm is proposed for prediction of the spatial evolution of wind turbine wakes. Reynolds-averaged Navier Stokes equations (RANS) are formulated in cylindrical coordinates and simplified by using a boundary layer type approximation. Turbulence effects are taken into account with a mixing length model calibrated on the available observations. In this study, observations of wind turbine wakes consist in LES data of wakes produced by a wind turbine operating with different incoming wind and loading conditions. The mixing length calibrated on the LES data is constant in the near wake and only affected by the incoming turbulence, whereas further downstream it increases roughly linearly with the downstream position and with increased slope for increasing rotational speed of the turbine.

  18. Producing and optimizing novel materials and structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashrafi, Mahdi

    2011-12-01

    A series of detailed experimental and finite element investigations were carried out to study the response of selected objects which are currently utilized for load carrying. These investigations were later applied to optimize the mechanical performance of the studied structures and materials. First, a number of experiments and detailed finite element simulations were carried out to study the response and failure of single lap joints with non-flat interface under uniaxial tension. The adherents were made from fiber reinforced epoxy composite and the custom-made mold allowed the fibers to follow the profile of the bonded joint interface. The experiments showed that the interface shape has significant effect on the mechanical behavior and strength of the bonded joints. Finite element simulations were performed to estimate the distribution of shear and peeling stresses along the bonded joints and the results were linked to the experimental investigations. Additional parametric calculations were also carried out to highlight the role of interface shape on the distribution of stresses, and inherently the overall strength and behavior of the bonded joints. In addition, the role of a central void on the distribution of the stresses in a bonded joint with flat and non-flat sinusoidal interfaces was investigated. The second topic concerns Wood Plastic Composites (WPC) which are widely used in the industry due to its durability, low cost, and anti-moisture properties in comparison with the natural wood. In this research, we have produced flout shaped WPC samples using African black wood powder and Phenolic resin in a hot compression molding set-up. Initial WPC composites were produced by systematically changing the wood volume fraction. Based on these results the optimum temperature, pressure and wood volume fraction for developing WPC in a form of a flute is developed. A series of experimental procedures were performed to improve mechanical properties of WPC samples by

  19. Agrifood systems and the microbial safety of fresh produce: Trade-offs in the wake of increased sustainability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen-the, Christophe, E-mail: christophe.nguyen-the@avignon.inra.fr [UMR408 SQPOV «Sécurité et Qualité des Produits d' Origine Végétale», INRA, Avignon Université, 84000 Avignon (France); Bardin, Marc, E-mail: marc.bardin@avignon.inra.fr [INRA, UR0407 Plant Pathology, F-84143 Montfavet (France); Berard, Annette, E-mail: annette.berard@avignon.inra.fr [EMMAH, INRA, Avignon Université, 84000 Avignon (France); Berge, Odile, E-mail: odile.berge@avignon.inra.fr [INRA, UR0407 Plant Pathology, F-84143 Montfavet (France); Brillard, Julien, E-mail: julien.brillard@univ-montp2.fr [UMR408 SQPOV «Sécurité et Qualité des Produits d' Origine Végétale», INRA, Avignon Université, 84000 Avignon (France); Broussolle, Véronique, E-mail: veronique.broussolle@avignon.inra.fr [UMR408 SQPOV «Sécurité et Qualité des Produits d' Origine Végétale», INRA, Avignon Université, 84000 Avignon (France); and others

    2016-08-15

    Fresh produce has been a growing cause of food borne outbreaks world-wide prompting the need for safer production practices. Yet fresh produce agrifood systems are diverse and under constraints for more sustainability. We analyze how measures taken to guarantee safety interact with other objectives for sustainability, in light of the diversity of fresh produce agrifood systems. The review is based on the publications at the interface between fresh produce safety and sustainability, with sustainability defined by low environmental impacts, food and nutrition security and healthy life. The paths for more sustainable fresh produce are diverse. They include an increased use of ecosystem services to e.g. favor predators of pests, or to reduce impact of floods, to reduce soil erosion, or to purify run-off waters. In contrast, they also include production systems isolated from the environment. From a socio-economical view, sustainability may imply maintaining small tenures with a higher risk of pathogen contamination. We analyzed the consequences for produce safety by focusing on risks of contamination by water, soil, environment and live stocks. Climate change may increase the constraints and recent knowledge on interactions between produce and human pathogens may bring new solutions. Existing technologies may suffice to resolve some conflicts between ensuring safety of fresh produce and moving towards more sustainability. However, socio-economic constraints of some agri-food systems may prevent their implementation. In addition, current strategies to preserve produce safety are not adapted to systems relying on ecological principles and knowledge is lacking to develop the new risk management approaches that would be needed. - Highlights: • Measures taken to improve safety were assessed for their impact on sustainability. • Fresh produce safety improvements may come at the expense of sustainability. • Environment, food security and human health constituted the

  20. Agrifood systems and the microbial safety of fresh produce: Trade-offs in the wake of increased sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen-The, Christophe; Bardin, Marc; Berard, Annette; Berge, Odile; Brillard, Julien; Broussolle, Véronique; Carlin, Frédéric; Renault, Pierre; Tchamitchian, Marc; Morris, Cindy E

    2016-08-15

    Fresh produce has been a growing cause of food borne outbreaks world-wide prompting the need for safer production practices. Yet fresh produce agrifood systems are diverse and under constraints for more sustainability. We analyze how measures taken to guarantee safety interact with other objectives for sustainability, in light of the diversity of fresh produce agrifood systems. The review is based on the publications at the interface between fresh produce safety and sustainability, with sustainability defined by low environmental impacts, food and nutrition security and healthy life. The paths for more sustainable fresh produce are diverse. They include an increased use of ecosystem services to e.g. favor predators of pests, or to reduce impact of floods, to reduce soil erosion, or to purify run-off waters. In contrast, they also include production systems isolated from the environment. From a socio-economical view, sustainability may imply maintaining small tenures with a higher risk of pathogen contamination. We analyzed the consequences for produce safety by focusing on risks of contamination by water, soil, environment and live stocks. Climate change may increase the constraints and recent knowledge on interactions between produce and human pathogens may bring new solutions. Existing technologies may suffice to resolve some conflicts between ensuring safety of fresh produce and moving towards more sustainability. However, socio-economic constraints of some agri-food systems may prevent their implementation. In addition, current strategies to preserve produce safety are not adapted to systems relying on ecological principles and knowledge is lacking to develop the new risk management approaches that would be needed.

  1. Effect of trailing edge shape on the wake and propulsive performance of pitching panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Buren, Tyler; Floryan, Daniel; Brunner, Daniel; Senturk, Utku; Smits, Alexander

    2016-11-01

    We present the effects of the trailing edge shape on the wake and propulsive performance of a pitching panel with an aspect ratio of 1. The trailing edges are symmetric chevron shapes with convex and concave orientations of varying degree. Concave trailing edges delay the natural vortex bending and compression of the wake, and the streamwise velocity field contains a single jet-like structure. Conversely, convex trailing edges promote wake compression and produce a wake split into four jets. Deviation from the square trailing edge mostly reduces the thrust and efficiency. Supported by the Office of Naval Research under MURI Grant Number N00014-14-1-0533.

  2. Shed Vortex Structure and Phase-Averaged Velocity Statistics in Symmetric/Asymmetric Turbulent Flat Plate Wakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Man Mohan

    2017-01-01

    The near wake of a flat plate is investigated via direct numerical simulations (DNS). Many earlier experimental investigations have used thin plates with sharp trailing edges and turbulent boundary layers to create the wake. This results in large theta divided by D (sub TE) values (theta is the boundary layer momentum thickness towards the end of the plate and D (sub TE) is the trailing edge thickness). In the present study the emphasis is on relatively thick plates with circular trailing edges (CTE) resulting in theta divided by D values less than one (D is the plate thickness and the diameter of the CTE), and vigorous vortex shedding. The Reynolds numbers based on the plate length and D are 1.255 x 10 (sup 6) and 10,000, respectively. Two cases are computed; one with turbulent boundary layers on both the upper and lower surfaces of the plate (statistically the same, symmetric wake, Case TT) and, a second with turbulent and laminar boundary layers on the upper and lower surfaces, respectively (asymmetric case, Case TL). The data and understanding obtained is of considerable engineering interest, particularly in turbomachinery where the pressure side of an airfoil can remain laminar or transitional because of a favorable pressure gradient and the suction side is turbulent. Shed-vortex structure and phase-averaged velocity statistics obtained in the two cases are compared here. The upper negative shed vortices in Case TL (turbulent separating boundary layer) are weaker than the lower positive ones (laminar separating boundary layer) at inception (a factor 1.27 weaker in terms of peak phase-averaged spanwise vorticity at first appearance of a peak). The upper vortices weaken rapidly as they travel downstream. A second feature of interest in Case TL is a considerable increase in the peak phase-averaged, streamwise normal intensity (random component) with increasing streamwise distance (x divided by D) that occurs nears the positive vortex cores. This behavior is

  3. PREFACE: Wake Conference 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barney, Andrew; Nørkær Sørensen, Jens; Ivanell, Stefan

    2015-06-01

    at scientists and PhD students working in the field of wake dynamics. The conference covers the following subject areas: Wake and vortex dynamics, instabilities in trailing vortices and wakes, simulation and measurements of wakes, analytical approaches for modeling wakes, wake interaction and other wind farm investigations. Many people have been involved in producing the 2015 Wake Conference proceedings. The work by the more than 60 reviewers ensuring the quality of the papers is greatly appreciated. The timely evaluation and coordination of the reviews would not have been possible without the work of the section editors: Christian Masson, ÉTS, Fernando Porté-Agel, EPFL, Gerard Schepers, ECN Wind Energy, Gijs Van Kuik, Delft University, Gunner Larsen, DTU Wind Energy, Jakob Mann, DTU Wind Energy, Javier Sanz Rodrigo, CENER, Johan Meyers, KU Leuven, Rebecca Barthelmie, Cornell University, Sandrine Aubrun-Sanches, Université d'Orléans and Thomas Leweke, IRPHE-CNRS. We are also immensely indebted to the very responsive support from the editorial team at IOP Publishing, especially Sarah Toms, during the review process of these proceedings. Visby, Sweden, June 2015 Andrew Barney, Jens Nørkær Sørensen and Stefan Ivanell Uppsala University - Campus Gotland

  4. Numerical Analysis of the Unsteady Propeller Performance in the Ship Wake Modified By Different Wake Improvement Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bugalski Tomasz

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the summary of results of the numerical analysis of the unsteady propeller performance in the non-uniform ship wake modified by the different wake improvement devices. This analysis is performed using the lifting surface program DUNCAN for unsteady propeller analysis. Te object of the analysis is a 7000 ton chemical tanker, for which four different types of the wake improvement devices have been designed: two vortex generators, a pre-swirl stator, and a boundary layer alignment device. These produced five different cases of the ship wake structure: the original hull and hull equipped alternatively with four wake improvement devices. Two different propellers were analyzed in these five wake fields, one being the original reference propeller P0 and the other - a specially designed, optimized propeller P3. Te analyzed parameters were the pictures of unsteady cavitation on propeller blades, harmonics of pressure pulses generated by the cavitating propellers in the selected points and the fluctuating bearing forces on the propeller shaft. Some of the calculated cavitation phenomena were confronted with the experimental. Te objective of the calculations was to demonstrate the differences in the calculated unsteady propeller performance resulting from the application of different wake improvement devices. Te analysis and discussion of the results, together with the appropriate conclusions, are included in the paper.

  5. Numerical Calculations of Wake Fields and Impedances of LHC Collimators' Real Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Frasciello, Oscar; Zobov, Mikhail

    2015-01-01

    The LHC collimators have very complicated mechanical designs including movable jaws made of higly resistive materials, ferrite materials, tiny RF contacts. Since the jaws are moved very close to the circulating beams their contribution in the overall LHC coupling impedance is dominant, with respect to other machine components. For these reasons accurate simulation of collimators' impedance becomes very important and challenging. Besides, several dedicated tests have been performed to verify correct simulations of lossy dispersive material properties, such as resistive wall and ferrites, benchmarking code results with analytical, semi-analytical and other numerical codes outcomes. Here we describe all the performed numerical tests and discuss the results of LHC collimators' impedances and wake fields calculations.

  6. Sleep-wake as a biological rhythm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavie, P

    2001-01-01

    Evidence that the sleep-wake rhythm is generated endogenously has been provided by studies employing a variety of experimental paradigms such as sleep deprivation, sleep displacement, isolating subjects in environments free of time cues, or imposing on subjects sleep-wake schedules widely deviating from 24 hours. The initial observations obtained in isolated subjects revealed that the period of the endogenous circadian pacemaker regulating sleep is of approximately 25 hours. More recent studies, however, in which a more rigorous control of subjects' behavior was exerted, particularly over lighting conditions, have shown that the true periodicity of the endogenous pacemaker deviates from 24 hours by a few minutes only. Besides sleep propensity, the circadian pacemaker has been shown to regulate sleep consolidation, sleep stage structure, and electroencephalographic activities. The pattern of light exposure throughout the 24 hours appears to participate in the entrainment of the circadian pacemaker to the geophysical day-night cycle. Melatonin, the pineal hormone produced during the dark hours, participates in communicating both between the environmental light-dark cycle and the circadian pacemaker, and between the circadian pacemaker and the sleep-wake-generating mechanism. In contrast to prevailing views that have placed great emphasis on homeostatic sleep drive, recent data have revealed a potent circadian cycle in the drive for wakefulness, which is generated by the suprachiasmatic nucleus. This drive reaches a peak during the evening hours just before habitual bedtime.

  7. A stochastic wind turbine wake model based on new metrics for wake characterization: A stochastic wind turbine wake model based on new metrics for wake characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doubrawa, Paula [Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Cornell University, Upson Hall Ithaca 14850 New York USA; Barthelmie, Rebecca J. [Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Cornell University, Upson Hall Ithaca 14850 New York USA; Wang, Hui [Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Cornell University, Upson Hall Ithaca 14850 New York USA; Churchfield, Matthew J. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden 80401 Colorado USA

    2016-08-04

    Understanding the detailed dynamics of wind turbine wakes is critical to predicting the performance and maximizing the efficiency of wind farms. This knowledge requires atmospheric data at a high spatial and temporal resolution, which are not easily obtained from direct measurements. Therefore, research is often based on numerical models, which vary in fidelity and computational cost. The simplest models produce axisymmetric wakes and are only valid beyond the near wake. Higher-fidelity results can be obtained by solving the filtered Navier-Stokes equations at a resolution that is sufficient to resolve the relevant turbulence scales. This work addresses the gap between these two extremes by proposing a stochastic model that produces an unsteady asymmetric wake. The model is developed based on a large-eddy simulation (LES) of an offshore wind farm. Because there are several ways of characterizing wakes, the first part of this work explores different approaches to defining global wake characteristics. From these, a model is developed that captures essential features of a LES-generated wake at a small fraction of the cost. The synthetic wake successfully reproduces the mean characteristics of the original LES wake, including its area and stretching patterns, and statistics of the mean azimuthal radius. The mean and standard deviation of the wake width and height are also reproduced. This preliminary study focuses on reproducing the wake shape, while future work will incorporate velocity deficit and meandering, as well as different stability scenarios.

  8. Marine Structures: consuming and producing energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Preben Terndrup; Jensen, Jørgen Juncher

    2009-01-01

    ; the current global trade could not take place without the use of oceans as a transportation medium. • The oceans have large potential for exploration and future cultivation of living resources in the form of fish and plankton. • The oceans and the ocean floors have large reservoirs of raw materials...... and hydrocarbons. • The oceans receive 70 % of our primary sustainable energy source, i.e. the radiation from the sun; this thermal energy can be harvested in the form of thermal, wind, current or wave energy, salt gradients etc. To exploit these possibilities marine structures are required....

  9. Structural properties of produced CuO/NiO/glass thin layers Produced by chemical method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ramezani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Nickel Oxide and Copper oxide on Nickel Oxide thin layers were produced by chemical bath deposition method. There nano structures were investigated by SEM and EDAX analysis. By producing CuO/NiO/glass sandwich layers nano structure of NiO/glass layer changed and fraction of voids decreases. In sandwich layer physical property of outer layer was dominant

  10. EFFECT OF STRUCTURAL VIBRATIONS ON THE TURBULENT NEAR WAKE%结构振动对湍流近尾迹的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘明侯; Zhou,Y; 等

    2001-01-01

    The structure free vibration cases can be seen in many engineering applications, such as tall buildings, bridges, turbomachinery blades, fuel rods in nuclear reactors, etc. The data of structure free vibration are not well documented . Therefore, the present study concentrates only on the free vibration case. It is well known that vortex shedding from a structure creates unsteady fluid excitation forces. The forces cause structural vibrations which, in turn, influence the flow field and the excitation forces. This process gives rise to a complicated fluid-structure coupling that modifies the vortex shedding frequency, the separation behavior, the magnitude and frequency contents of the unsteady forces, the wake structure and the turbulence field in the near wake and perhaps even the far wake. An experimental study of the fluid-structure interactions had been initiated, with a focus on effect of structural vibrations on the turbulent near wake. The wake velocity field investigations were carried out using two brass cylinders with diameters 3.8 mm and 12.7mm. This choice was dictated by the fact that a large vibration effect on the wake was desired and by the fact that a very inelastic cylinder has to be used to simulate the rigid case.The transverse vibration displacements of cylinders were measured using a laser vibrometer, while hot-wires and laser Doppler anemometer were used to examine the near wake. The flow Reynolds numbers (Re = Uood/v, where Ua is free stream velocity, d is cylinder diameter and v is the fluid kinematic viscosity) were varied from 1000 to 8000 by changing the upstream velocity and by experimenting with cylinders of different diameters. The near wake structure of two cylinders, one relatively rigid and one elastic, were measured in detailed and the data were used to analyze the vibration effects on the mean and turbulence field. It is found that the vibration effects on the near wake are very significant; While the mean velocity after

  11. Passive Wake Vortex Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega, J M

    2001-10-18

    The collapse of the Soviet Union and ending of the Cold War brought about many significant changes in military submarine operations. The enemies that the US Navy faces today and in the future will not likely be superpowers armed with nuclear submarines, but rather smaller, rogue nations employing cheaper diesel/electric submarines with advanced air-independent propulsion systems. Unlike Cold War submarine operations, which occurred in deep-water environments, future submarine conflicts are anticipated to occur in shallow, littoral regions that are complex and noisy. Consequently, non-acoustic signatures will become increasingly important and the submarine stealth technology designed for deep-water operations may not be effective in these environments. One such non-acoustic signature is the surface detection of a submarine's trailing vortex wake. If a submarine runs in a slightly buoyant condition, its diving planes must be inclined at a negative angle of attack to generate sufficient downforce, which keeps the submarine from rising to the surface. As a result, the diving planes produce a pair of counter-rotating trailing vortices that propagate to the water surface. In previous deep-water operations, this was not an issue since the submarines could dive deep enough so that the vortex pair became incoherent before it reached the water surface. However, in shallow, littoral environments, submarines do not have the option of diving deep and, hence, the vortex pair can rise to the surface and leave a distinct signature that might be detectable by synthetic aperture radar. Such detection would jeopardize not only the mission of the submarine, but also the lives of military personnel on board. There has been another attempt to solve this problem and reduce the intensity of trailing vortices in the wakes of military submarines. The research of Quackenbush et al. over the past few years has been directed towards an idea called ''vortex leveraging

  12. Wind tunnel measurements of wake structure and wind farm power for actuator disk model wind turbines in yaw

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howland, Michael; Bossuyt, Juliaan; Kang, Justin; Meyers, Johan; Meneveau, Charles

    2016-11-01

    Reducing wake losses in wind farms by deflecting the wakes through turbine yawing has been shown to be a feasible wind farm control approach. In this work, the deflection and morphology of wakes behind a wind turbine operating in yawed conditions are studied using wind tunnel experiments of a wind turbine modeled as a porous disk in a uniform inflow. First, by measuring velocity distributions at various downstream positions and comparing with prior studies, we confirm that the nonrotating wind turbine model in yaw generates realistic wake deflections. Second, we characterize the wake shape and make observations of what is termed a "curled wake," displaying significant spanwise asymmetry. Through the use of a 100 porous disk micro-wind farm, total wind farm power output is studied for a variety of yaw configurations. Strain gages on the tower of the porous disk models are used to measure the thrust force as a substitute for turbine power. The frequency response of these measurements goes up to the natural frequency of the model and allows studying the spatiotemporal characteristics of the power output under the effects of yawing. This work has been funded by the National Science Foundation (Grants CBET-113380 and IIA-1243482, the WINDINSPIRE project). JB and JM are supported by ERC (ActiveWindFarms, Grant No. 306471).

  13. VLCC前置导管结构设计与强度分析%Structure Design and Stress Assessment of Wake Equalizing Duct for VLCC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘奕谦; 谢小龙

    2013-01-01

    An assessment on resonance risk for a wake equalizing duct is made in this article. By using finite element method and boundary element method, natural frequencies and mode shapes of the wake equalizing duct are got in both air and water. Different strengthening methods are compared and analyzed, and appropriate wake equalizing duct structure design is determined ultimately. According to the requirements of hull load by IACS Common Structural Rules (CSR) and Germanischer Lloyd (GL Rules), possible load on the wake equalizing duct structure in actual operations is analyzed. A three-dimensional finite element model of wake equalizing duct is established, and structural stress levels under various combinations of loads are checked. Design methods of wake equalizing duct structure are investigated by using a simple mechanical model and estimation formulae are verified with finite element analysis.%应用有限元法和流体边界元法得到导管在空气中和水中的固有频率和振型,并对不同的加强方案进行比较分析,最终确定合适的导管结构设计方案。根据IACS共同结构规范(CSR)及德国劳氏船级社(GL RULES)关于船体载荷的要求,对前置导管结构在实际运营中可能受到的载荷进行定量分析。通过建立前置导管三维有限元模型,根据不同载荷组合对导管结构应力水平进行有限元分析校核。并利用简单的力学模型,探讨了导管结构设计验证的方法和剖面模数估算公式。

  14. Star clusters and the structure of the ISM Tunnels and wakes in giant extragalactic HII regions

    CERN Document Server

    Tenorio-Tagle, G; Tenorio-Tagle, Guillermo; Tanco, Gustavo Medina

    1998-01-01

    Several structures have been discovered embedded in regions of recent or ongoing star formation, which point to the importance of the interaction between fast moving wind-blowing stars and their environment. Using hydrodynamic simulations, we investigate the passage through the interstellar medium of a supersonic stellar wind source, and show how it can naturally lead to the formation of tubes, channels and swamps of globules as interfaces are crossed. The results are in excellent agreement with observation of 30 Doradus.

  15. Changes in microbial community structure in the wake of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral-Zettler, Linda A; Rocca, Jennifer D; Lamontagne, Michael G; Dennett, Mark R; Gast, Rebecca J

    2008-12-15

    Hurricanes have the potential to alter the structures of coastal ecosystems and generate pathogen-laden floodwaters thatthreaten public health. To examine the impact of hurricanes on urban systems, we compared microbial community structures in samples collected after Hurricane Katrina and before and after Hurricane Rita. We extracted environmental DNA and sequenced small-subunit rRNA (SSU rRNA) gene clone libraries to survey microbial communities in floodwater, water, and sediment samples collected from Lake Charles, Lake Pontchartrain, the 17th Street and Industrial Canals in New Orleans, and raw sewage. Correspondence analysis showed that microbial communities associated with sediments formed one cluster while communities associated with lake and Industrial Canal water formed a second. Communities associated with water from the 17th Street Canal and floodwaters collected in New Orleans showed similarity to communities in raw sewage and contained a number of sequences associated with possible pathogenic microbes. This suggests that a distinct microbial community developed in floodwaters following Hurricane Katrina and that microbial community structures as a whole might be sensitive indicators of ecosystem health and serve as "sentinels" of water quality in the environment.

  16. When wings touch wakes: understanding locomotor force control by wake wing interference in insect wings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Fritz-Olaf

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the fluid dynamics of force control in flying insects requires the exploration of how oscillating wings interact with the surrounding fluid. The production of vorticity and the shedding of vortical structures within the stroke cycle thus depend on two factors: the temporal structure of the flow induced by the wing's own instantaneous motion and the flow components resulting from both the force production in previous wing strokes and the motion of other wings flapping in close proximity. These wake-wing interactions may change on a stroke-by-stroke basis, confronting the neuro-muscular system of the animal with a complex problem for force control. In a single oscillating wing, the flow induced by the preceding half stroke may lower the wing's effective angle of attack but permits the recycling of kinetic energy from the wake via the wake capture mechanism. In two-winged insects, the acceleration fields produced by each wing may strongly interact via the clap-and-fling mechanism during the dorsal stroke reversal. Four-winged insects must cope with the fact that the flow over their hindwings is affected by the presence of the forewings. In these animals, a phase-shift between the stroke cycles of fore- and hindwing modulates aerodynamic performance of the hindwing via leading edge vortex destruction and changes in local flow condition including wake capture. Moreover, robotic wings demonstrate that phase-lag during peak performance and the strength of force modulation depend on the vertical spacing between the two stroke planes and the size ratio between fore- and hindwing. This study broadly summarizes the most prominent mechanisms of wake-wing and wing-wing interactions found in flapping insect wings and evaluates the consequences of these processes for the control of locomotor forces in the behaving animal.

  17. Vortex wakes of a flapping foil in a flowing soap film

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    We present an experimental study of an oscillating, symmetric foil in a vertically flowing soap film. By varying frequency and amplitude of the oscillation we explore and visualize a variety of wake structures, including von K´arm´an wake, reverse von K´arm´an wake, 2P wake, and 2P+2S wake. We...

  18. Measurements and modeling of flow structure in the wake of a low profile wishbone vortex generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, B. J.; Hingst, W. R.

    1994-01-01

    The results of an experimental examination of the vortex structures shed from a low profile 'wishbone' generator are presented. The vortex generator height relative to the turbulent boundary layer was varied by testing two differently sized models. Measurements of the mean three-dimensional velocity field were conducted in cross-stream planes downstream of the vortex generators. In all cases, a counter-rotating vortex pair was observed. Individual vortices were characterized by three descriptors derived from the velocity data; circulation, peak vorticity, and cross-stream location of peak vorticity. Measurements in the cross plane at two axial locations behind the smaller wishbone characterize the downstream development of the vortex pairs. A single region of stream wise velocity deficit is shared by both vortex cores. This is in contrast to conventional generators, where each core coincides with a region of velocity deficit. The measured cross-stream velocities for each case are compared to an Oseen model with matching descriptors. The best comparison occurs with the data from the larger wishbone.

  19. Wake characteristics of a model ornithopter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juarez, Alfredo; Harlow, Jacob; Allen, James; Ferreira de Sousa, Paulo

    2006-03-01

    This paper details unsteady wake measurements from a model Ornithopther flying in a wind tunnel at representative flight conditions. Testing over a range of Strouhal number, 0.1-0.3, shows that the unsteady wake is composed of coherent vortical structures that resemble vortex rings. A single ring is formed in the wake of each wing during one wing beat. Momentum balance from velocity field measurements are reconciled with unsteady lift and drag measurements from a drag balance.

  20. Jovian Plasmas Torus Interaction with Europa. Plasma Wake Structure and Effect of Inductive Magnetic Field: 3D Hybrid Kinetic Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipatov, A. S.; Cooper, J F.; Paterson, W. R.; Sittler, E. C., Jr.; Hartle, R. E.; Simpson, David G.

    2013-01-01

    The hybrid kinetic model supports comprehensive simulation of the interaction between different spatial and energetic elements of the Europa moon-magnetosphere system with respect to a variable upstream magnetic field and flux or density distributions of plasma and energetic ions, electrons, and neutral atoms. This capability is critical for improving the interpretation of the existing Europa flyby measurements from the Galileo Orbiter mission, and for planning flyby and orbital measurements (including the surface and atmospheric compositions) for future missions. The simulations are based on recent models of the atmosphere of Europa (Cassidy et al., 2007; Shematovich et al., 2005). In contrast to previous approaches with MHD simulations, the hybrid model allows us to fully take into account the finite gyroradius effect and electron pressure, and to correctly estimate the ion velocity distribution and the fluxes along the magnetic field (assuming an initial Maxwellian velocity distribution for upstream background ions). Photoionization, electron-impact ionization, charge exchange and collisions between the ions and neutrals are also included in our model. We consider the models with Oþ þ and Sþ þ background plasma, and various betas for background ions and electrons, and pickup electrons. The majority of O2 atmosphere is thermal with an extended non-thermal population (Cassidy et al., 2007). In this paper, we discuss two tasks: (1) the plasma wake structure dependence on the parameters of the upstream plasma and Europa's atmosphere (model I, cases (a) and (b) with a homogeneous Jovian magnetosphere field, an inductive magnetic dipole and high oceanic shell conductivity); and (2) estimation of the possible effect of an induced magnetic field arising from oceanic shell conductivity. This effect was estimated based on the difference between the observed and modeled magnetic fields (model II, case (c) with an inhomogeneous Jovian magnetosphere field, an inductive

  1. The wake south of the Alps: Dynamics and structure of the lee-side flow and secondary potential vorticity banners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flamant, C.; Richard, E.; Schär, C.; Rotunno, R.; Nance, L.; Sprenger, M.; Benoit, R.

    2004-04-01

    The dynamics and structure of the lee-side flow over the Po valley during a northerly föhn event, which occurred in the framework of the Mesoscale Alpine Programme Special Observation Period (on 8 November 1999 during Intensive Observation Period 15), has been investigated using aircraft data and high-resolution numerical simulations. Numerical simulations were performed with the mesoscale non-hydrostatic model Meso-NH, using three nested domains (with horizontal resolutions 32, 8 and 2 km), the 2 km resolution domain being centred on the Po valley. The basic data-model comparison, and back-trajectory and tracer release analyses, provided evidence that the jet/wake structure of the flow above the Po valley could be reasonably identified with the mountain pass/peak distributions. Measurements from three aircraft flying below the Alps crestline (at 2700, 1500 and 600 m above sea level) along two 350 km east-west legs, designed to be approximately perpendicular to the northerly synoptic flow, were used to compute the potential vorticity (PV) experimentally assuming the lee-side flow to be two-dimensional. (The simplified form of the PV under these assumptions is hereafter referred to as SPV). Due to increasing lee-side flow curvature with decreasing altitude (caused by flow splitting at the scale of the Alps), the experimentally derived SPV was compared to its simulated counterpart.In situ measurements showed that coherent secondary PV banners (PVB2s) do exist downstream of the complex Alpine terrain, as observations show oscillations between positive and negative values of SPV as expected from the simulations. The details of the structure of the SPV field simulated with Meso-NH were found to be different from the observations (i.e. the location of observed maxima and minima of SPV did not match their simulated counterparts at particular points). This is because the correspondence between observed and modelled velocity and potential temperature fields was not good

  2. Wake Identification Based Wake Impact Alleviation Control

    OpenAIRE

    Ehlers, Jana; Fischenberg, Dietrich; Niedermeier, Dominik

    2014-01-01

    During a wake vortex encounter an aircraft is exposed to strong unsteady disturbance velocities which can lead to significant changes in the aircraft attitude and flight path. This can represent a severe safety risk and can result in injuries to the passengers and crew as well as damages to the aircraft. The application of a wake impact alleviation control system can considerably decrease the aircraft’s response during the wake encounter, and hence diminish the pilot workload while reducing t...

  3. Actuator Line Modeling of Wind Turbine Wakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troldborg, Niels

    2009-01-01

    inflow shows that besides an expected vertical skewed wake the wake also becomes increasingly asymmetric in the horizontal direction as it is convected downstream. The latter phenomena, which is also often observed in measurements, is argued to be caused by the rotation of the wake. A detailed study....... Furthermore, it is shown that the main effect governing the large scale meandering of wakes is the large scale structures of the ambient turbulence field. Finally studies are conducted on rows of respectively two and three turbines. The investigation includes evaluation of the loading on the rotors...

  4. Evaluation of 3D Printer Accuracy in Producing Fractal Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikegawa, Kana; Takamatsu, Kyuuichirou; Kawakami, Masaru; Furukawa, Hidemitsu; Mayama, Hiroyuki; Nonomura, Yoshimune

    2017-01-01

    Hierarchical structures, also known as fractal structures, exhibit advantageous material properties, such as water- and oil-repellency as well as other useful optical characteristics, owing to its self-similarity. Various methods have been developed for producing hierarchical geometrical structures. Recently, fractal structures have been manufactured using a 3D printing technique that involves computer-aided design data. In this study, we confirmed the accuracy of geometrical structures when Koch curve-like fractal structures with zero to three generations were printed using a 3D printer. The fractal dimension was analyzed using a box-counting method. This analysis indicated that the fractal dimension of the third generation hierarchical structure was approximately the same as that of the ideal Koch curve. These findings demonstrate that the design and production of fractal structures can be controlled using a 3D printer. Although the interior angle deviated from the ideal value, the side length could be precisely controlled.

  5. Simulation of wind turbine wakes using the actuator line technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Jens N; Mikkelsen, Robert F; Henningson, Dan S; Ivanell, Stefan; Sarmast, Sasan; Andersen, Søren J

    2015-02-28

    The actuator line technique was introduced as a numerical tool to be employed in combination with large eddy simulations to enable the study of wakes and wake interaction in wind farms. The technique is today largely used for studying basic features of wakes as well as for making performance predictions of wind farms. In this paper, we give a short introduction to the wake problem and the actuator line methodology and present a study in which the technique is employed to determine the near-wake properties of wind turbines. The presented results include a comparison of experimental results of the wake characteristics of the flow around a three-bladed model wind turbine, the development of a simple analytical formula for determining the near-wake length behind a wind turbine and a detailed investigation of wake structures based on proper orthogonal decomposition analysis of numerically generated snapshots of the wake.

  6. Simulation of wind turbine wakes using the actuator line technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Jens N.; Mikkelsen, Robert F.; Henningson, Dan S.; Ivanell, Stefan; Sarmast, Sasan; Andersen, Søren J.

    2015-01-01

    The actuator line technique was introduced as a numerical tool to be employed in combination with large eddy simulations to enable the study of wakes and wake interaction in wind farms. The technique is today largely used for studying basic features of wakes as well as for making performance predictions of wind farms. In this paper, we give a short introduction to the wake problem and the actuator line methodology and present a study in which the technique is employed to determine the near-wake properties of wind turbines. The presented results include a comparison of experimental results of the wake characteristics of the flow around a three-bladed model wind turbine, the development of a simple analytical formula for determining the near-wake length behind a wind turbine and a detailed investigation of wake structures based on proper orthogonal decomposition analysis of numerically generated snapshots of the wake. PMID:25583862

  7. Wake-vortex decay in external turbulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuczaj, Arkadiusz K.; Armenio, V.; Fröhlich, J.; Geurts, Bernardus J.

    2010-01-01

    Wake vortices that form behind a moving aircraft represent 11 safety COil cern for other aircraft.s that follow. These tornado-like wake structures may persist for several minutes, extending for many kilometers across the sky. This safety issue is particularly important close to major airports where

  8. Wake-vortex decay in external turbulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, Bernard J.; Kuczaj, Arkadiusz K.; Armenio, V.; Fröhlich, J.; Geurts, B.J.

    2010-01-01

    Wake vortices that form behind a moving aircraft represent 11 safety COil cern for other aircraft.s that follow. These tornado-like wake structures may persist for several minutes, extending for many kilometers across the sky. This safety issue is particularly important close to major airports where

  9. Wake up and Die

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schubart, Rikke

    2013-01-01

    Anmeldelse af den colombianske gyserfilm Volver a morir (eng. titel Wake Up and Die) af Miguel Urrutia......Anmeldelse af den colombianske gyserfilm Volver a morir (eng. titel Wake Up and Die) af Miguel Urrutia...

  10. Dislocation structure produced by an ultrashort shock pulse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuda, Tomoki, E-mail: t-matsu@mapse.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp; Hirose, Akio [Division of Materials and Manufacturing Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Sano, Tomokazu [Division of Materials and Manufacturing Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); JST, CREST, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Arakawa, Kazuto [JST, CREST, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Department of Material Science, Interdisciplinary Faculty of Science and Engineering, Shimane University, Matsue, Shimane 690-8504 (Japan)

    2014-11-14

    We found an ultrashort shock pulse driven by a femtosecond laser pulse on iron generates a different dislocation structure than the shock process which is on the nanosecond timescale. The ultrashort shock pulse produces a highly dense dislocation structure that varies by depth. According to transmission electron microscopy, dislocations away from the surface produce microbands via a network structure similar to a long shock process, but unlike a long shock process dislocations near the surface have limited intersections. Considering the dislocation motion during the shock process, the structure near the surface is attributed to the ultrashort shock duration. This approach using an ultrashort shock pulse will lead to understanding the whole process off shock deformation by clarifying the early stage.

  11. Investigating coherent vortex structures in the near wake of a utility-scale wind turbine using flow visualization with natural snowfalls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasari, Teja; Hong, Jiarong

    2016-11-01

    Flow visualization techniques using natural snowfall have been shown as an effective tool to probe coherent flow structures around utility-scale wind turbines. Here we present a follow-up study using the data collected during multiple deployments from 2014 to 2016 around the 2.5 MW turbine at EOLOS wind energy research station. The data include flow visualization from different perspectives in the near wake of the turbine. Coherent wake structures, including blade tip vortex, trailing vortex sheet, nacelle-generated structures, and tower vortex characterized by the snow voids, are correlated with atmospheric conditions (e.g. turbulence intensity), turbine operational conditions (e.g. power and tip-speed ratio) as well as turbine response (e.g. tower and blade strain). Physical factors and processes that affect the features and the behaviors of tip vortices including their void size and shape, their stability (e.g. meandering and intermittent appearance) and vortex interaction (e.g. vortex merging and leapfrogging) are analyzed. In particular, a strong influence of the tower on tip-vortex structures is demonstrated through simultaneous comparison of vortex voids at elevations below and above the height of nacelle and the plan view visualization. Sponsored by NSF Fluid Dynamics Program.

  12. On the production of flat electron bunches for laser wake field acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Kando, M; Kotaki, H; Koga, J; Bulanov, S V; Tajima, T; Chao, A; Pitthan, R; Schüler, K P; Zhidkov, A G; Nemoto, K

    2006-01-01

    We suggest a novel method for injection of electrons into the acceleration phase of particle accelerators, producing low emittance beams appropriate even for the demanding high energy Linear Collider specifications. In this paper we work out the injection into the acceleration phase of the wake field in a plasma behind a high intensity laser pulse, taking advantage of the laser polarization and focusing. With the aid of catastrophe theory we categorize the injection dynamics. The scheme uses the structurally stable regime of transverse wake wave breaking, when electron trajectory self-intersection leads to the formation of a flat electron bunch. As shown in three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of the interaction of a laser pulse in a line-focus with an underdense plasma, the electrons, injected via the transverse wake wave breaking and accelerated by the wake wave, perform betatron oscillations with different amplitudes and frequencies along the two transverse coordinates. The polarization and focus...

  13. Wind Farm Wake: The Horns Rev Photo Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre-Elouan Réthoré

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to examine the nowadays well-known wind farm wake photographs taken on 12 February 2008 at the offshore Horns Rev 1 wind farm. The meteorological conditions are described from observations from several satellite sensors quantifying clouds, surface wind vectors and sea surface temperature as well as ground-based information at and near the wind farm, including Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA data. The SCADA data reveal that the case of fog formation occurred 12 February 2008 on the 10:10 UTC. The fog formation is due to very special atmospheric conditions where a layer of cold humid air above a warmer sea surface re-condensates to fog in the wake of the turbines. The process is fed by warm humid air up-drafted from below in the counter-rotating swirl generated by the clock-wise rotating rotors. The condensation appears to take place primarily in the wake regions with relatively high axial velocities and high turbulent kinetic energy. The wind speed is near cut-in and most turbines produce very little power. The rotational pattern of spiraling bands produces the large-scale structure of the wake fog.

  14. Dynamic wake meandering modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Gunner Chr.; Madsen Aagaard, Helge; Bingöl, Ferhat;

    , are an integrated part the model complex. For design applications, the computational efficiency of wake deficit prediction is a key issue. Two computationally low cost models are developed for this purpose. The character of the added wake turbulence, generated by the up-stream turbine in the form of shed......We present a consistent, physically based theory for the wake meandering phenomenon, which we consider of crucial importance for the overall description of wind turbine loadings in wind farms. In its present version the model is confined to single wake situations. The model philosophy does, however......, have the potential to include also mutual wake interaction phenomenons. The basic conjecture behind the dynamic wake meandering model is that wake transportation in the atmospheric boundary layer is driven by the large scale lateral- and vertical turbulence components. Based on this conjecture...

  15. 立方体人工鱼礁背涡流的三维涡结构%The 3D vortex structure of cube artificial reef's wake vortex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晓磊; 栾曙光; 陈勇; 张瑞瑾

    2012-01-01

    The paper takes cube artificial reef as an example to make numerical simulation of 3 D flow field under the action of steady flow with CFD software. The simulation reveals the 3D vortex structure of cube artificial reef. The result shows that two symmetrical crosswise vortexes are formed and have opposite directions behind the reef af-ter water flows from the sides of reef, that a streamwise vortex is formed after water flows and falls from the top sur-face of reef, that the size of streamwise vortex is similar to the reef, that crosswise vortex determines the width of wake vortex, that streamwise vortex determines the height of wake vortex, that crosswise vortex and streamwise vor-tex have similar length and determine the length of wake vortex together, and that crosswise vortex and streamwise vortex constitute the 3D vortex structure of cube artificial reefs wake vortex.%以立方体人工鱼礁为例,应用CFD软件对其在定常流作用下的三维流场进行了数值模拟试验,以揭示立方体人工鱼礁背涡流的三维涡结构.结果表明:流过礁体侧面的水体在礁体后形成两个对称的旋转方向相反的展向涡,流经礁体上表面的水体脱落后形成一个尺寸与礁体尺寸相当的流向涡,展向涡宽度决定背涡流流场宽度,流向涡高度决定背涡流流场高度;展向涡和流向涡长度近似相等,二者的长度共同决定背涡流流场的长度;展向涡、流向涡共同构成了人工鱼礁背涡流的三维涡结构.

  16. Moduli inflation with large scale structure produced by topological defects

    CERN Document Server

    Freese, Katherine; Umeda, H; Freese, Katherine; Gherghetta, Tony; Umeda, Hideyuki

    1996-01-01

    It is tempting to inflate along one of the many flat directions that arise in supersymmetric theories. The required flatness of the potential to obtain sufficient inflation and to not overproduce density fluctuations occurs naturally. However, the density perturbations (in the case of a single moduli field) that arise from inflaton quantum fluctuations are too small for structure formation. Here we propose that topological defects (such as cosmic strings), which arise during a phase transition near the end of moduli inflation can provide an alternative source of structure. The strings produced will be `fat', yet have the usual evolution by the time of nucleosynthesis. Possible models are discussed.

  17. Integrated lithography to produce complex structures for spectral engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Csete, Maria; Szalai, Aniko; Szabo, Gabor

    2011-01-01

    An integrated interference and colloid sphere lithography (IICL) method is presented capable of producing complex plasmonic structures consisting of wavelength-scaled periodic arrays of nano-objects with arbitrary array symmetry and controllable nano-scaled sub-structures. The IICL method is based on illumination of colloid sphere monolayers by interference patterns synchronized with sphere arrays along arbitrary crystallographic directions. This nano-kaleidoscope method enables to tune four structure parameters independently: the symmetry and characteristic periodicity of the interference pattern might be varied by the wavelength, number and angle of incidence of the interfering beams; the colloid-spheres' diameter-scaled distance between the nano-objects is controllable by the relative orientation of the interference pattern with respect to the hexagonal lattice of colloid spheres; the size of the individual nano-objects is determined by the colloid-spheres diameter and by the illumination light wavelength ...

  18. Microbes produce nanobacteria-like structures, avoiding cell entombment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bontognali, Tomaso R. R.; Vasconcelos, Crisógono; Warthmann, Rolf J.; Dupraz, Christophe; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; McKenzie, Judith A.

    2008-08-01

    Microsedimentary structures referred to as nanobacteria-likeparticles were described from modern carbonate environments,where they form in close spatial association with sulfate-reducingbacteria (SRB). However, the exact mechanism of their formation,as well as their paleontological significance, remains controversial.Here we report on an investigation of microbe-mineral interactionsin experimentally produced carbonate globules. The experimentswere carried out under anoxic conditions at 30 °C with Desulfovibriobrasiliensis, a SRB known to mediate dolomite formation. Weobserved that extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) secretedby the microbial community play a key role in the mineralizationprocess. Nanobacteria-like particles represent the early stageof carbonate nucleation within the EPS, which progressivelyevolve to larger globules displaying a grainy texture. We excludedthe possibilities that these structures are fossils of nanobacteria,dissolution surfaces, or artifacts created during sample preparation.D. brasiliensis cells are predominantly located outside of theEPS aggregates where mineral growth takes place. As a result,they remain mobile and are rarely entombed within the mineral.This self-preservation behavior may not be limited to D. brasiliensis.Other microbes may produce, or may have produced during thegeological past, biogenic minerals through a similar process.Mineralization within EPS explains why microbial relics arenot necessarily present in biogenic carbonates.

  19. Co-producing social inclusion: the structure/agency conundrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifton, A; Repper, J; Banks, D; Remnant, J

    2013-08-01

    There is a raft of policy guidelines indicating that mental health nurses should be increasing the social inclusion of mental health service users. Despite this there is no universally accepted definition of social inclusion and there is a dearth of empirical evidence on the successful outcome of increasing inclusion for mental health service users. Recognizing the lack of clarity surrounding the concept we have a produced a social inclusion framework to assist mental health professionals and service users to co-produce social inclusive outcomes. Although we agree that social inclusion can be a positive aspect of recovery, we question the extent to which mental health nurses and service users in co-production can overcome the social, economic and political structures that have created the social exclusion in the first place. An understanding and appreciation of the structure/agency conundrum is required if mental health nurses are to engage with service users in an attempt to co-produce socially inclusive outcomes.

  20. How to perform measurements in a hovering animal's wake: physical modelling of the vortex wake of the hawkmoth, Manduca sexta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tytell, Eric D; Ellington, Charles P

    2003-09-29

    The vortex wake structure of the hawkmoth, Manduca sexta, was investigated using a vortex ring generator. Based on existing kinematic and morphological data, a piston and tube apparatus was constructed to produce circular vortex rings with the same size and disc loading as a hovering hawkmoth. Results show that the artificial rings were initially laminar, but developed turbulence owing to azimuthal wave instability. The initial impulse and circulation were accurately estimated for laminar rings using particle image velocimetry; after the transition to turbulence, initial circulation was generally underestimated. The underestimate for turbulent rings can be corrected if the transition time and velocity profile are accurately known, but this correction will not be feasible for experiments on real animals. It is therefore crucial that the circulation and impulse be estimated while the wake vortices are still laminar. The scaling of the ring Reynolds number suggests that flying animals of about the size of hawkmoths may be the largest animals whose wakes stay laminar for long enough to perform such measurements during hovering. Thus, at low advance ratios, they may be the largest animals for which wake circulation and impulse can be accurately measured.

  1. Circadian Sleep-Wake Rhythm of Older Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maaskant, Marijke; van de Wouw, Ellen; van Wijck, Ruud; Evenhuis, Heleen M.; Echteld, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    The circadian sleep-wake rhythm changes with aging, resulting in a more fragmented sleep-wake pattern. In individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID), brain structures regulating the sleep-wake rhythm might be affected. The aims of this study were to compare the sleep-wake rhythm of older adults with ID to that of older adults in the general…

  2. Fusarium graminearum forms mycotoxin producing infection structures on wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boenisch Marike J

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mycotoxin producing fungal pathogen Fusarium graminearum is the causal agent of Fusarium head blight (FHB of small grain cereals in fields worldwide. Although F. graminearum is highly investigated by means of molecular genetics, detailed studies about hyphal development during initial infection stages are rare. In addition, the role of mycotoxins during initial infection stages of FHB is still unknown. Therefore, we investigated the infection strategy of the fungus on different floral organs of wheat (Triticum aestivum L. under real time conditions by constitutive expression of the dsRed reporter gene in a TRI5prom::GFP mutant. Additionally, trichothecene induction during infection was visualised with a green fluorescent protein (GFP coupled TRI5 promoter. A tissue specific infection pattern and TRI5 induction were tested by using different floral organs of wheat. Through combination of bioimaging and electron microscopy infection structures were identified and characterised. In addition, the role of trichothecene production for initial infection was elucidated by a ΔTRI5-GFP reporter strain. Results The present investigation demonstrates the formation of foot structures and compound appressoria by F. graminearum. All infection structures developed from epiphytic runner hyphae. Compound appressoria including lobate appressoria and infection cushions were observed on inoculated caryopses, paleas, lemmas, and glumes of susceptible and resistant wheat cultivars. A specific trichothecene induction in infection structures was demonstrated by different imaging techniques. Interestingly, a ΔTRI5-GFP mutant formed the same infection structures and exhibited a similar symptom development compared to the wild type and the TRI5prom::GFP mutant. Conclusions The different specialised infection structures of F. graminearum on wheat florets, as described in this study, indicate that the penetration strategy of this fungus is far more

  3. Wind Turbine Wake-Redirection Control at the Fishermen's Atlantic City Windfarm: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Churchfield, M.; Fleming, P.; Bulder, B.; White, S.

    2015-05-06

    In this paper, we will present our work towards designing a control strategy to mitigate wind turbine wake effects by redirecting the wakes, specifically applied to the Fishermen’s Atlantic City Windfarm (FACW), proposed for deployment off the shore of Atlantic City, New Jersey. As wind turbines extract energy from the air, they create low-speed wakes that extend behind them. Full wake recovery Full wake recovery to the undisturbed wind speed takes a significant distance. In a wind energy plant the wakes of upstream turbines may travel downstream to the next row of turbines, effectively subjecting them to lower wind speeds, meaning these waked turbines will produce less power.

  4. Simulation and Prediction of Wakes and Wake Interaction in Wind Farms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Søren Juhl

    The highly turbulent wake and the wake interaction of merging wakes between multiple wind turbines are modelled using Large Eddy Simulation (LES) in a general Navier-Stokes solver. The Actuator Line (AL) technique is employed to model the wind turbines, and the aeroelastic computations are fully...... coupled with the flow solver. The numerical simulations include the study of the far wake behind a single turbine, three idealised cases of infinitely long rows of turbines and finally three infinite wind farm scenarios with different spacings. The flow characteristics between the turbines, turbine...... performance, and principal turbulent quantities are examined for the different scenarios. The study focuses on the large coherent structures and movements of the wake behind and between wind turbines. The large coherent structures are analysed using Proper Orthogonal Decoposition (POD). POD constitutes...

  5. Dynamic wake meandering modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, Gunner C.; Aagaard Madsen, H.; Bingoel, F. (and others)

    2007-06-15

    We present a consistent, physically based theory for the wake meandering phenomenon, which we consider of crucial importance for the overall description of wind turbine loadings in wind farms. In its present version the model is confined to single wake situations. The model philosophy does, however, have the potential to include also mutual wake interaction phenomenons. The basic conjecture behind the dynamic wake meandering model is that wake transportation in the atmospheric boundary layer is driven by the large scale lateral- and vertical turbulence components. Based on this conjecture a stochastic model of the downstream wake meandering is formulated. In addition to the kinematic formulation of the dynamics of the 'meandering frame of reference', models characterizing the mean wake deficit as well as the added wake turbulence, described in the meandering frame of reference, are an integrated part the model complex. For design applications, the computational efficiency of wake deficit prediction is a key issue. Two computationally low cost models are developed for this purpose. The character of the added wake turbulence, generated by the up-stream turbine in the form of shed and trailed vorticity, has been approached by analytical as well as by numerical studies. The dynamic wake meandering philosophy has been verified by comparing model predictions with extensive full-scale measurements. These comparisons have demonstrated good agreement, both qualitatively and quantitatively, concerning both flow characteristics and turbine load characteristics. Contrary to previous attempts to model wake loading, the dynamic wake meandering approach opens for a unifying description in the sense that turbine power and load aspects can be treated simultaneously. This capability is a direct and attractive consequence of the model being based on the underlying physical process, and it potentially opens for optimization of wind farm topology, of wind farm operation as

  6. Wake modeling and simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Gunner Chr.; Madsen Aagaard, Helge; Larsen, Torben J.;

    , have the potential to include also mutual wake interaction phenomenons. The basic conjecture behind the dynamic wake meandering (DWM) model is that wake transportation in the atmospheric boundary layer is driven by the large scale lateral- and vertical turbulence components. Based on this conjecture...... and trailed vorticity, has been approached by a simple semi-empirical model essentially based on an eddy viscosity philosophy. Contrary to previous attempts to model wake loading, the DWM approach opens for a unifying description in the sense that turbine power- and load aspects can be treated simultaneously...... methodology has been implemented in the aeroelastic code HAWC2, and example simulations of wake situations, from the small Tjæreborg wind farm, have been performed showing satisfactory agreement between predictions and measurements...

  7. Turbulent wakes of fractal objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staicu, Adrian; Mazzi, Biagio; Vassilicos, J C; van de Water, Willem

    2003-06-01

    Turbulence of a windtunnel flow is stirred using objects that have a fractal structure. The strong turbulent wakes resulting from three such objects which have different fractal dimensions are probed using multiprobe hot-wire anemometry in various configurations. Statistical turbulent quantities are studied within inertial and dissipative range scales in an attempt to relate changes in their self-similar behavior to the scaling of the fractal objects.

  8. Classification of the extracellular fields produced by activated neural structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perry Danielle

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Classifying the types of extracellular potentials recorded when neural structures are activated is an important component in understanding nerve pathophysiology. Varying definitions and approaches to understanding the factors that influence the potentials recorded during neural activity have made this issue complex. Methods In this article, many of the factors which influence the distribution of electric potential produced by a traveling action potential are discussed from a theoretical standpoint with illustrative simulations. Results For an axon of arbitrary shape, it is shown that a quadrupolar potential is generated by action potentials traveling along a straight axon. However, a dipole moment is generated at any point where an axon bends or its diameter changes. Next, it is shown how asymmetric disturbances in the conductivity of the medium surrounding an axon produce dipolar potentials, even during propagation along a straight axon. Next, by studying the electric fields generated by a dipole source in an insulating cylinder, it is shown that in finite volume conductors, the extracellular potentials can be very different from those in infinite volume conductors. Finally, the effects of impulses propagating along axons with inhomogeneous cable properties are analyzed. Conclusion Because of the well-defined factors affecting extracellular potentials, the vague terms far-field and near-field potentials should be abandoned in favor of more accurate descriptions of the potentials.

  9. Hot-wire anemometry for in-flight measurement of aircraft wake vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    A development program has demonstrated that hot-wire anemometry can be used successfully on an aircraft in flight to make measurements of wake vortices produced by another aircraft. The probe, whose wires were made of platinum/rhodium, 10 microns in diameter, provides unambiguous results for inflow angles less than about 35 deg. off the probe axis. The high frequency response capability of the hot-wire system allows detailed measurement of the flow structure, and the study of aircraft hazards associated with wake turbulence.

  10. Oxidative stability during storage of structured lipids produced from fish oil and caprylic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Nina Skall; Xu, Xuebing; Timm Heinrich, Maike;

    2004-01-01

    Structured lipids produced by enzymatic or chemical methods for different applications have been receiving considerable attention. The oxidative stability of a randomized structured lipid (RFO), produced by chemical interesterification from fish oil (FO) and tricaprylin, and a specific structured...

  11. Wakes in Inertial Fusion Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Ian Norman

    Plasma wave wakes, which are the collective oscillatory response near the plasma frequency to the propagation of particles or electromagnetic waves through a plasma, play a critical role in many plasma processes. New results from backwards stimulated Raman scattering (BSRS), in which wakes with phase velocities much less than the speed of light are induced by the beating of counter-propagating light waves, and from electron beam stopping, in which the wakes are produced by the motion of relativistically propagating electrons through the dense plasma, are discussed. Both processes play important roles in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). In BSRS, laser light is scattered backwards out of the plasma, decreasing the energy available to compress the ICF capsule and affecting the symmetry of where the laser energy hits the hohlraum wall in indirect drive ICF. The plasma wave wake can also generate superthermal electrons that can preheat the core and/or the ablator. Electron beam stopping plays a critical role in the Fast Ignition (FI) ICF concept, in which a beam of relativistic electrons is used to heat the target core to ignition temperatures after the compression stage. The beam stopping power determines the effectiveness of the heating process. This dissertation covers new discoveries on the importance of plasma wave wakes in both BSRS and electron beam stopping. In the SRS studies, 1D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations using OSIRIS are performed, which model a short-duration (˜500/ω0 --1FWHM) counter-propagating scattered light seed pulse in the presence of a constant pump laser with an intensity far below the absolute instability threshold for plasma waves undergoing Landau damping. The seed undergoes linear convective Raman amplification and dominates over the amplification of fluctuations due to particle discreteness. The simulation results are in good agreement with results from a coupled-mode solver when special relativity and the effects of finite size PIC

  12. Utilizing Surface Sensors to Identify Wake Regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mengying; Hemati, Maziar S.

    2016-11-01

    Marine swimmers often exploit external flow structures to reduce locomotive effort. To achieve this advantage, these swimmers utilize mechanosensory organs on the surface of their bodies to detect hydrodynamic signals from the surrounding fluid, which can then be used to inform the control task. Recently, there has been a growing interest in developing similar flow sensing systems to achieve enhanced propulsive efficiency and maneuverability in human-engineered underwater vehicles. In particular, much attention has been given to the problem of wake sensing; however, these investigations have concentrated on a restricted class of wakes-i.e., Kármán-type vortex streets-whereas more complicated wake structures can arise in practice. In this talk, we will explore the possibility of identifying wake regimes through the use of surface sensors. Potential flow theory is adopted to simulate the interactions of various wakes with a fish-like body. Wakes in different dynamical regimes impart distinct hydrodynamic signatures on the body, which permits these regimes to be distinguished from one another in an automated fashion. Our results can provide guidance for improving flow sensing capabilities in human-engineered systems and hint at how marine swimmers may sense their hydrodynamic surroundings.

  13. Investigation of Wake-Vortex Aircraft Encounters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sonya T.

    1999-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration is addressing airport capacity enhancements during instrument meteorological conditions though the Terminal Area Productivity (TAP) program. The major goal of the TAP program is to develop the technology that will allow air traffic levels during instrument meteorological condition to approach those achieved during visual operations. The Reduced Spacing Operations (RSO) subelement of TAP at the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) will develop the Aircraft Vortex Spacing System (AVOSS). The purpose of the AVOSS is to integrate current and predicted weather conditions, wake vortex transport and decay knowledge, wake vortex sensor data, and operational definitions of acceptable strengths for vortex encounters to produce dynamic wake vortex separation criteria. The proposed research is in support of the wake vortex hazard definition component of the LaRC AVOSS development research. The research program described in the next section provided an analysis of the static test data and uses this data to evaluate the accuracy vortex/wake-encounter models. The accuracy of these models has not before been evaluated using experimental data. The research results also presented the first analysis of the forces and moments imparted on an airplane during a wake vortex encounter using actual flight test data.

  14. HARP PRIA- Wake

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This HARP was first deployed off of Wake Atoll in 2010. It has been recovered and redeployed multiple times (see time frames for information).

  15. Ionospheric plasma flow over large high-voltage space platforms. I - Ion-plasma-time scale interactions of a plate at zero angle of attack. II - The formation and structure of plasma wake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J.; Hastings, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    The paper presents the theory and particle simulation results for the ionospheric plasma flow over a large high-voltage space platform at a zero angle of attack and at a large angle of attack. Emphasis is placed on the structures in the large, high-voltage regime and the transient plasma response on the ion-plasma time scale. Special consideration is given to the transient formation of the space-charge wake and its steady-state structure.

  16. The impact of reactants composition and temperature on the flow structure in a wake stabilized laminar lean premixed CH4/H2/air flames; mechanism and scaling

    KAUST Repository

    Michaels, D.

    2016-11-11

    In this paper we investigate the role of reactants composition and temperature in defining the steady flow structure in bluff body stabilized premixed flames. The study was motivated by experiments which showed that the flow structure and stability map for different fuels and inlet conditions collapse using the extinction strain rate as the chemical time scale. The investigation is conducted using a laminar lean premixed flame stabilized on a heat conducting bluff-body. Calculations are performed for a wide range of mixtures of CH4/H2/air (0.35 ≤ ϕ ≤ 0.75, 0 ≤ %H2 ≤ 40, 300 ≤ Tin [K] ≤ 500) in order to systematically vary the burning velocity (2.0–35.6 cm/s), dilatation ratio (2.7–6.4), and extinction strain rate (106–2924 1/s). The model is based on a fully resolved unsteady two-dimensional flow with detailed chemistry and species transport, and with no artificial flame anchoring boundary conditions. Calculations reveal that the recirculation zone length correlates with a chemical time scale based on the flame extinction strain rate corresponding to the inlet fuel composition, stoichiometry, pressure and temperature; and are consistent with experimental data in literature. It was found that in the wake region the flame is highly stretched and its location and interaction with the flow is governed by the reactants combustion characteristics under high strain.

  17. Experimental study of surface pattern effects on the propulsive performance and wake of a bio-inspired pitching panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Justin; Kumar, Rajeev; Green, Melissa

    2016-11-01

    Force measurements and stereoscopic particle image velocimetry (PIV) were used to characterize the propulsive performance and wake structure of rigid, bio-inspired trapezoidal pitching panels. In the literature, it has been demonstrated that quantities such as thrust coefficient and propulsive efficiency are affected by changes in the surface characteristics of a pitching panel or foil. More specifically, the variation of surface pattern produces significant changes in wake structure and dynamics, especially in the distribution of vorticity in the wake. Force measurements and PIV data were collected for multiple surface patterns chosen to mimic fish surface morphology over a Strouhal number range of 0.17 to 0.56. Performance quantities are compared with the three-dimensional vortex wake structure for both the patterned and smooth panels to determine the nature and magnitude of surface pattern effects in terms of thrust produced, drag reduced, and wake vortices reshaped and reorganized. This work was supported by the Office of Naval Research under ONR Award No. N00014-14-1-0418.

  18. The wake of hovering flight in bats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Håkansson, Jonas; Hedenström, Anders; Winter, York; Johansson, L. Christoffer

    2015-01-01

    Hovering means stationary flight at zero net forward speed, which can be achieved by animals through muscle powered flapping flight. Small bats capable of hovering typically do so with a downstroke in an inclined stroke plane, and with an aerodynamically active outer wing during the upstroke. The magnitude and time history of aerodynamic forces should be reflected by vorticity shed into the wake. We thus expect hovering bats to generate a characteristic wake, but this has until now never been studied. Here we trained nectar-feeding bats, Leptonycteris yerbabuenae, to hover at a feeder and using time-resolved stereoscopic particle image velocimetry in conjunction with high-speed kinematic analysis we show that hovering nectar-feeding bats produce a series of bilateral stacked vortex loops. Vortex visualizations suggest that the downstroke produces the majority of the weight support, but that the upstroke contributes positively to the lift production. However, the relative contributions from downstroke and upstroke could not be determined on the basis of the wake, because wake elements from down- and upstroke mix and interact. We also use a modified actuator disc model to estimate lift force, power and flap efficiency. Based on our quantitative wake-induced velocities, the model accounts for weight support well (108%). Estimates of aerodynamic efficiency suggest hovering flight is less efficient than forward flapping flight, while the overall energy conversion efficiency (mechanical power output/metabolic power) was estimated at 13%. PMID:26179990

  19. DIELECTRIC WAKE FIELD RESONATOR ACCELERATOR MODULE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirshfield, Jay L.

    2013-11-06

    Results are presented from experiments, and numerical analysis of wake fields set up by electron bunches passing through a cylindrical or rectangular dielectric-lined structure. These bunches excite many TM-modes, with Ez components of the wake fields sharply localized on the axis of the structure periodically behind the bunches. The experiment with the cylindrical structure, carried out at ATF Brookhaven National Laboratory, used up to three 50 MeV bunches spaced by one wake field period (21 cm) to study the superposition of wake fields by measuring the energy loss of each bunch after it passed through the 53-cm long dielectric element. The millimeter-wave spectrum of radiation excited by the passage of bunches is also studied. Numerical analysis was aimed not only to simulate the behavior of our device, but in general to predict dielectric wake field accelerator performance. It is shown that one needs to match the radius of the cylindrical dielectric channel with the bunch longitudinal rms-length to achieve optimal performance.

  20. Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Structures 60 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Wake Island, West Central Pacific.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Structures are derived from two scales of a focal mean analysis on bathymetry and slope. The grid is based on gridded (60 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry,...

  1. Bathymetric Position Index (BPI) Structures 10 m grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Wake Island, West Central Pacific.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — BPI Structures are derived from two scales of a focal mean analysis on bathymetry and slope. The grid is based on gridded (10 m cell size) multibeam bathymetry,...

  2. On helical behavior of turbulence in the ship wake

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GOLBRAIKH Ephim; EIDELMAN Alexander; SOLOVIEV Alex

    2013-01-01

    Turbulent ship wake conservation at a long distance is among unsolved problems at present.It is well known that far wakes have a vortical structure and slowly expand with distance.As was obtained by Dubrovin et al.,slow expansion of the wake may be related to the distribution of turbulent viscosity in it.In our work we study the effect of helicity in the wake on the behavior of turbulent viscosity.Taking into account the helical nature of the wake,we can clarify the difference between turbulence inside and outside the wake on the one hand and slowing down of its expansion with time on the other hand.

  3. Wake fields in the LHCb vertex detector : alternative designs for the wake field suppressor

    CERN Document Server

    Van Bakel, N; Ferro-Luzzi, M

    2000-01-01

    Two previous LHCb notes showed that wake field suppressors are needed to prevent dissipating excessive power in resonating modes of the vertex detector components. This note concentrates on two different designs of the encapsulations of the silicon detectors which can serve as an alternative to the design which uses long thin strips spanned throughout the vertex detector near the beam axis. The quality of wake field suppression with respect to the depth of a corrugated structure is simulated.

  4. The effect of single-horn glaze ice on the vortex structures in the wake of a horizontal axis wind turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Zhe-Yan; Dong, Qiao-Tian; Yang, Zhi-Gang

    2015-02-01

    The present study experimentally investigated the effect of a simulated single-horn glaze ice accreted on rotor blades on the vortex structures in the wake of a horizontal axis wind turbine by using the stereoscopic particle image velocimetry (Stereo-PIV) technique. During the experiments, four horizontal axis wind turbine models were tested, and both "free-run" and "phase-locked" Stereo-PIV measurements were carried out. Based on the "free-run" measurements, it was found that because of the simulated single-horn glaze ice, the shape, vorticity, and trajectory of tip vortices were changed significantly, and less kinetic energy of the airflow could be harvested by the wind turbine. In addition, the "phase-locked" results indicated that the presence of simulated single-horn glaze ice resulted in a dramatic reduction of the vorticity peak of the tip vortices. Moreover, as the length of the glaze ice increased, both root and tip vortex gaps were found to increase accordingly.

  5. Capturing coherent structures and turbulent interfaces in wake flows by means of the Organised Eddy Simulation, OES and by Tomo-PIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deri, E.; Ouvrard, H.; Braza, M.; Hunt, J.; Hoarau, Y.; Cazin, S.; Cid, E.; Harran, G.

    2011-12-01

    The present study aims at a physical analysis of the coherent and chaotic vortex dynamics in the near wake around a flat plate at incidence, to provide new elements in respect of the flow physics turbulence modelling for high-Reynolds number flows around bodies. This constitutes nowadays a challenge in the aeronautics design. A special attention is paid to capture the thin shear layer interfaces downstream of the separation, responsible for aeroacoustics phenomena related to noise reduction and directly linked to an accurate prediction of the aerodynamic forces. The experimental investigation is carried out by means of tomographic PIV. The interaction of the most energetic coherent structures with the random turbulence is discussed. Furthermore, the POD analysis allowed evaluation of 3D phase averaged dynamics as well as the influence of higher modes associated with the finer-scale turbulence. The numerical study by means of the Organised Eddy Simulation, OES approach ensured a reduced turbulence diffusion that allowed development of the von Karman instability and of capturing of the thin shear-layer interfaces, by using appropriate criteria based on vorticity and dissipation rate of kinetic energy. A comparison between the experiments and the simulations concerning the coherent vortex pattern is carried out.

  6. Empirical modeling of single-wake advection and expansion using full-scale pulsed lidar-based measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machefaux, Ewan; Larsen, Gunner Chr.; Troldborg, Niels;

    2015-01-01

    fairly well in the far wake but lacks accuracy in the outer region of the near wake. An empirical relationship, relating maximum wake induction and wake advection velocity, is derived and linked to the characteristics of a spherical vortex structure. Furthermore, a new empirical model for single-wake......In the present paper, single-wake dynamics have been studied both experimentally and numerically. The use of pulsed lidar measurements allows for validation of basic dynamic wake meandering modeling assumptions. Wake center tracking is used to estimate the wake advection velocity experimentally...... and to obtain an estimate of the wake expansion in a fixed frame of reference. A comparison shows good agreement between the measured average expansion and the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) large eddy simulation–actuator line computations. Frandsen’s expansion model seems to predict the wake expansion...

  7. Natural snowfall reveals large-scale flow structures in the wake of a 2.5-MW wind turbine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jiarong; Toloui, Mostafa; Chamorro, Leonardo P; Guala, Michele; Howard, Kevin; Riley, Sean; Tucker, James; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2014-06-24

    To improve power production and structural reliability of wind turbines, there is a pressing need to understand how turbines interact with the atmospheric boundary layer. However, experimental techniques capable of quantifying or even qualitatively visualizing the large-scale turbulent flow structures around full-scale turbines do not exist today. Here we use snowflakes from a winter snowstorm as flow tracers to obtain velocity fields downwind of a 2.5-MW wind turbine in a sampling area of ~36 × 36 m(2). The spatial and temporal resolutions of the measurements are sufficiently high to quantify the evolution of blade-generated coherent motions, such as the tip and trailing sheet vortices, identify their instability mechanisms and correlate them with turbine operation, control and performance. Our experiment provides an unprecedented in situ characterization of flow structures around utility-scale turbines, and yields significant insights into the Reynolds number similarity issues presented in wind energy applications.

  8. Multiple Turbine Wakes

    OpenAIRE

    Machefaux, Ewan; Larsen, Gunner Chr.; Mann, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    Formålet med nærværende forskningsprojekt har dels været at studere wakes efter enkeltstående vindmøller, dels at studere flere interagerende wakes - baseret på så vel fuldskala LiDAR målinger som på detaljerede CFD simuleringer. Indledningsvist er dynamikken af enkelt-wakes studeret gennem analyser af fuldskala (nacelle-baserede) pulsede LiDAR målinger udført på en 500kW vindmølle placeret på testområdet ved DTU’s Risø campus. Som en del af den eksperimentelle analyse er der foretaget en val...

  9. Doppler lidar investigation of wind turbine wake characteristics and atmospheric turbulence under different surface roughness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Xiaochun; Wu, Songhua; Liu, Bingyi

    2017-06-12

    Four field experiments based on Pulsed Coherent Doppler Lidar with different surface roughness have been carried out in 2013-2015 to study the turbulent wind field in the vicinity of operating wind turbine in the onshore and offshore wind parks. The turbulence characteristics in ambient atmosphere and wake area was analyzed using transverse structure function based on Plane Position Indicator scanning mode. An automatic wake processing procedure was developed to determine the wake velocity deficit by considering the effect of ambient velocity disturbance and wake meandering with the mean wind direction. It is found that the turbine wake obviously enhances the atmospheric turbulence mixing, and the difference in the correlation of turbulence parameters under different surface roughness is significant. The dependence of wake parameters including the wake velocity deficit and wake length on wind velocity and turbulence intensity are analyzed and compared with other studies, which validates the empirical model and simulation of a turbine wake for various atmosphere conditions.

  10. Multiple Turbine Wakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machefaux, Ewan; Mann, Jakob

    as part of the experimental analysis. An inflow wind sector of 30° is selected based on both a wind resource and a lidar data assessment. Wake measurements are averaged within a mean wind speed bin of 1 m/s and classified according to atmospheric stability using 3 different approaches: the Obukhov length...... wind are adapted to the thermal stratification using a newly developed spectral tensor, which includes buoyancy effects. Discrepancies are discussed as basis for future model development and improvement. Moreover, the impact of atmospheric stability and terrain on large/small scale wake flow...

  11. Wake Studies of Ornithopters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juarez, Alfredo; Harlow, Jacob; Allen, James; Ferreira de Sousa, Paulo

    2006-11-01

    This paper details experiments using a mechanical ornithopter flying in a low speed wind tunnel. Experiments were conducted for a Strouhal number of 0.3 and Reynolds number of 2300, Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and flow visualization was used to develop quantitative and qualitative information about the nature of the wake. The data shows that the wake is made of a series of discrete vortex rings. The impulse of these rings has been estimated with PIV data and the results correlate well with the lift required to sustain the ornithopter in flight.

  12. Fast particle tracking with wake fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dohlus, M.; Floettmann, K.; Henning, C.

    2012-01-15

    Tracking calculations of charged particles in electromagnetic fields require in principle the simultaneous solution of the equation of motion and of Maxwell's equations. In many tracking codes a simpler and more efficient approach is used: external fields like that of the accelerating structures are provided as field maps, generated in separate computations and for the calculation of self fields the model of a particle bunch in uniform motion is used. We describe how an externally computed wake function can be approximated by a table of Taylor coefficients and how the wake field kick can be calculated for the particle distribution in a tracking calculation. The integrated kick, representing the effect of a distributed structure, is applied at a discrete time. As an example, we use our approach to calculate the emittance growth of a bunch in an undulator beam pipe due to resistive wall wake field effects. (orig.)

  13. Autogenous electrolyte, non-pyrolytically produced solid capacitor structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, D.J.; Armstrong, P.S.; Panitz, J.K.G.

    1998-03-17

    A solid electrolytic capacitor is described having a solid electrolyte comprising manganese dioxide dispersed in an aromatic polyamide capable of further cure to form polyimide linkages, the solid electrolyte being disposed between a first electrode made of valve metal covered by an anodic oxide film and a second electrode opposite the first electrode. The electrolyte autogenously produces water, oxygen, and hydroxyl groups which act as healing substances and is not itself produced pyrolytically. Reduction of the manganese dioxide and the water molecules released by formation of imide linkages result in substantially improved self-healing of anodic dielectric layer defects. 2 figs.

  14. Ising model with conserved magnetization on the human connectome: Implications on the relation structure-function in wakefulness and anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stramaglia, S.; Pellicoro, M.; Angelini, L.; Amico, E.; Aerts, H.; Cortés, J. M.; Laureys, S.; Marinazzo, D.

    2017-04-01

    Dynamical models implemented on the large scale architecture of the human brain may shed light on how a function arises from the underlying structure. This is the case notably for simple abstract models, such as the Ising model. We compare the spin correlations of the Ising model and the empirical functional brain correlations, both at the single link level and at the modular level, and show that their match increases at the modular level in anesthesia, in line with recent results and theories. Moreover, we show that at the peak of the specific heat (the critical state), the spin correlations are minimally shaped by the underlying structural network, explaining how the best match between the structure and function is obtained at the onset of criticality, as previously observed. These findings confirm that brain dynamics under anesthesia shows a departure from criticality and could open the way to novel perspectives when the conserved magnetization is interpreted in terms of a homeostatic principle imposed to neural activity.

  15. Spectral coherence in windturbine wakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hojstrup, J. [Riso National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark)

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes an experiment at a Danish wind farm to investigate the lateral and vertical coherences in the nonequilibrium turbulence of a wind turbine wake. Two meteorological masts were instrumented for measuring profiles of mean speed, turbulence, and temperature. Results are provided graphically for turbulence intensities, velocity spectra, lateral coherence, and vertical coherence. The turbulence was somewhat influenced by the wake, or possibly from aggregated wakes further upstream, even at 14.5 diameters. Lateral coherence (separation 5m) seemed to be unaffected by the wake at 7.5 diameters, but the flow was less coherent in the near wake. The wake appeared to have little influence on vertical coherence (separation 13m). Simple, conventional models for coherence appeared to be adequate descriptions for wake turbulence except for the near wake situation. 3 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Micro helical polymeric structures produced by variable voltage direct electrospinning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shariatpanahi, S.P.; Iraji zad, A.; Abdollahzadeh, I.; Shirsavar, R.; Bonn, D.; Ejtehadi, R.

    2011-01-01

    Direct near field electrospinning is used to produce very long helical polystyrene microfibers in water. The pitch length of helices can be controlled by changing the applied voltage, allowing the production of both microsprings and microchannels. Using a novel high frequency variable voltage electr

  17. Structural studies of exopolysaccharides produced by Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanchez de Medina Herrera, I.M.

    2007-01-01

    Exopolysaccharides (EPSs) produced by lactic acid bacteria are widely used in the food industry, especially for the preparation of dairy products, such as yoghurt and cheese. Their interesting physical and rheological properties make them suitable as gellifying or viscosifying agents in the developm

  18. Synergistic Effects of Turbine Wakes and Atmospheric Stability on Power Production at an Onshore Wind Farm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wharton, S; Lundquist, J K; Marjanovic, N

    2012-01-25

    recovers to its inflow velocity is dependent on the amount ambient turbulence, the amount of wind shear, and topographical and structural effects. The maximum velocity deficit is estimated to occur at 1-2 D but can be longer under low levels of ambient turbulence. Our understanding of turbine wakes comes from wind tunnel experiments, field experiments, numerical simulations, and from studies utilizing both experimental and modeling methods. It is well documented that downwind turbines in multi-Megawatt wind farms often produce less power than upwind turbine rows. These wake-induced power losses have been estimated from 5% to up to 40% depending on the turbine operating settings (e.g., thrust coefficient), number of turbine rows, turbine size (e.g., rotor diameter and hub-height), wind farm terrain, and atmospheric flow conditions (e.g., ambient wind speed, turbulence, and atmospheric stability). Early work by Elliott and Cadogan suggested that power data for different turbulent conditions be segregated to distinguish the effects of turbulence on wind farm power production. This may be especially important for downwind turbines within wind farms, as chaotic and turbulent wake flows increase stress on downstream turbines. Impacts of stability on turbine wakes and power production have been examined for a flat terrain, moderate size (43 turbines) wind farm in Minnesota and for an offshore, 80 turbine wind farm off the coast of Denmark. Conzemius found it difficult to distinguish wakes (i.e., downwind velocity deficits) when the atmosphere was convective as large amounts of scatter were present in the turbine nacelle wind speed data. This suggested that high levels of turbulence broke-up the wake via large buoyancy effects, which are generally on the order of 1 km in size. On the other hand, they found pronounced wake effects when the atmosphere was very stable and turbulence was either suppressed or the length scale was reduced as turbulence in this case was mechanically

  19. Interaction of a swept shock wave and a supersonic wake

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, G.; Zhao, Y. X.; Zhou, J.

    2017-03-01

    The interaction of a swept shock wave and a supersonic wake has been studied. The swept shock wave is generated by a swept compression sidewall, and the supersonic wake is generated by a wake generator. The flow field is visualized with the nanoparticle-based planar laser scattering method, and a supplementary numerical simulation is conducted by solving the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. The results show that the pressure rise induced by the swept shock wave can propagate upstream in the wake, which makes the location where vortices are generated move upstream, thickens the laminar section of the wake, and enlarges the generated vortices. The wake is swept away from the swept compression sidewall by the pressure gradient of the swept shock wave. This pressure gradient is not aligned with the density gradient of the supersonic wake, so the baroclinic torque generates streamwise vorticity and changes the distribution of the spanwise vorticity. The wake shock is curved, so the flow downstream of it is non-uniform, leaving the swept shock wave being distorted. A three-dimensional Mach disk structure is generated when the wake shock interacts with the swept shock wave.

  20. Interaction of a swept shock wave and a supersonic wake

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, G.; Zhao, Y. X.; Zhou, J.

    2017-09-01

    The interaction of a swept shock wave and a supersonic wake has been studied. The swept shock wave is generated by a swept compression sidewall, and the supersonic wake is generated by a wake generator. The flow field is visualized with the nanoparticle-based planar laser scattering method, and a supplementary numerical simulation is conducted by solving the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. The results show that the pressure rise induced by the swept shock wave can propagate upstream in the wake, which makes the location where vortices are generated move upstream, thickens the laminar section of the wake, and enlarges the generated vortices. The wake is swept away from the swept compression sidewall by the pressure gradient of the swept shock wave. This pressure gradient is not aligned with the density gradient of the supersonic wake, so the baroclinic torque generates streamwise vorticity and changes the distribution of the spanwise vorticity. The wake shock is curved, so the flow downstream of it is non-uniform, leaving the swept shock wave being distorted. A three-dimensional Mach disk structure is generated when the wake shock interacts with the swept shock wave.

  1. Hub vortex helical instability as the origin of wake meandering in the lee of a model wind-turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viola, Francesco; Iungo, Giacomo Valerio; Camarri, Simone; Porte-Agel, Fernando; Gallaire, Francois

    2012-11-01

    Wind tunnel measurements were performed for the wake produced by a three-bladed wind turbine immersed in uniform flow. These tests show the presence of a vorticity structure in the near wake region mainly oriented along the streamwise direction, which is denoted as hub vortex. The hub vortex is characterized by oscillations with frequencies lower than the one connected to the rotational velocity of the rotor, which are ascribed to wake meandering by previous works. This phenomenon consists in transversal oscillations of the wind turbine wake, which are excited by the shedding of vorticity structures from the rotor disc acting as a bluff body. In this work temporal and spatial linear stability analyses of a wind turbine wake are performed on a base flow obtained through time-averaged wind tunnel velocity measurements. This study shows that the low frequency spectral component detected experimentally is the result of a convective instability of the hub vortex, which is characterized by a counter-winding single-helix structure. Simultaneous hot-wire measurements confirm the presence of a helicoidal unstable mode of the hub vortex with a streamwise wavenumber roughly equal to the one predicted from the linear instability analysis.

  2. Foraminiferal shell structures: additional cavity systems produced by supplemental skeletons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Bassi

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available This is the second part of the article, published in Mus. Sci. Nat. vol. 2, which illustrates the larger foraminiferal shell structures. In this poster intercoluclar space, canal system, umbilical cavity system, enveloping canal system, and interlamellar cavity system are described and illustrated.

  3. Use of microfasteners to produce damage tolerant composite structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partridge, Ivana K; Hallett, Stephen R

    2016-07-13

    The paper concerns the mechanical performance of continuous fibre/thermosetting polymer matrix composites reinforced in the through-thickness direction with fibrous or metallic rods or threads in order to mitigate against low delamination resistance. Specific illustrations of the effects of microfasteners in reducing delamination crack growth are made for Z-pinned and tufted composites. Response to loading in such 'structured materials' is subject to multiple parameters defining their in-plane and out-of-plane properties. Single microfastener mechanical tests are well suited to establish the crack bridging laws under a range of loading modes, from simple delamination crack opening to shear, and provide the basis for predicting the corresponding response of microfastener arrays, within a given material environment. The fundamental experiments on microfasteners can be used to derive analytical expressions to describe the crack bridging behaviour in a general sense, to cover all possible loadings. These expressions can be built into cohesive element constitutive laws in a finite-element framework for modelling the effects of microfastener arrays on the out-of-plane mechanical response of reinforced structural elements, including the effects of known manufacturing imperfections. Such predictive behaviour can then be used to assess structural integrity under complex loading, as part of the component design process. This article is part of the themed issue 'Multiscale modelling of the structural integrity of composite materials'.

  4. On the Production of Flat Electron Bunches for Laser Wake Field Acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kando, M.; Fukuda, Y.; Kotaki, H.; Koga, J.; Bulanov, S.V.; Tajima, T.; /JAERI, Kyoto; Chao, A.; Pitthan, R.; /SLAC; Schuler, K.-P.; /DESY; Zhidkov, A.G.; /CRIEPI, Tokyo; Nemoto, K.; /CRIEPI, Tokyo

    2006-06-27

    We suggest a novel method for injection of electrons into the acceleration phase of particle accelerators, producing low emittance beams appropriate even for the demanding high energy Linear Collider specifications. In this paper we work out the injection into the acceleration phase of the wake field in a plasma behind a high intensity laser pulse, taking advantage of the laser polarization and focusing. With the aid of catastrophe theory we categorize the injection dynamics. The scheme uses the structurally stable regime of transverse wake wave breaking, when electron trajectory self-intersection leads to the formation of a flat electron bunch. As shown in three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of the interaction of a laser pulse in a line-focus with an underdense plasma, the electrons, injected via the transverse wake wave breaking and accelerated by the wake wave, perform betatron oscillations with different amplitudes and frequencies along the two transverse coordinates. The polarization and focusing geometry lead to a way to produce relativistic electron bunches with asymmetric emittance (flat beam). An approach for generating flat laser accelerated ion beams is briefly discussed.

  5. Trailing Vortex Measurements in the Wake of a Hovering Rotor Blade with Various Tip Shapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Preston B.; Leishman, J. Gordon

    2003-01-01

    This work examined the wake aerodynamics of a single helicopter rotor blade with several tip shapes operating on a hover test stand. Velocity field measurements were conducted using three-component laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV). The objective of these measurements was to document the vortex velocity profiles and then extract the core properties, such as the core radius, peak swirl velocity, and axial velocity. The measured test cases covered a wide range of wake-ages and several tip shapes, including rectangular, tapered, swept, and a subwing tip. One of the primary differences shown by the change in tip shape was the wake geometry. The effect of blade taper reduced the initial peak swirl velocity by a significant fraction. It appears that this is accomplished by decreasing the vortex strength for a given blade loading. The subwing measurements showed that the interaction and merging of the subwing and primary vortices created a less coherent vortical structure. A source of vortex core instability is shown to be the ratio of the peak swirl velocity to the axial velocity deficit. The results show that if there is a turbulence producing region of the vortex structure, it will be outside of the core boundary. The LDV measurements were supported by laser light-sheet flow visualization. The results provide several benchmark test cases for future validation of theoretical vortex models, numerical free-wake models, and computational fluid dynamics results.

  6. 5 nm structures produced by direct laser writing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavel, E [Storex Technologies, Bucharest 020892 (Romania); Jinga, S; Andronescu, E; Vasile, B S [Department of Science and Engineering of Oxide Materials, Faculty of Applied Chemistry and Materials Science, University ' Politehnica' of Bucharest, Bucharest 011061 (Romania); Rotiu, E; Ionescu, L; Mazilu, C, E-mail: eugenp@rdslink.ro [National Glass Institute, Bucharest 032258 (Romania)

    2011-01-14

    Here we present a new approach to overcome the optical diffraction limit by using novel materials. In the paper, we report experimental results obtained by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and optical absorption spectroscopy, for a fluorescent photosensitive glass-ceramic containing rare-earth ions such as samarium (Sm). Using a home built dynamic tester, with a low power laser, we recorded nanostructures having 5 nm line widths. In the line structure, measurements reveal the presence of silver nanocrystals with few nanometre sizes. HRTEM shows that there is a random orientation of the nanocrystals. A writing mechanism with three steps is proposed.

  7. 5 nm structures produced by direct laser writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavel, E; Jinga, S; Andronescu, E; Vasile, B S; Rotiu, E; Ionescu, L; Mazilu, C

    2011-01-14

    Here we present a new approach to overcome the optical diffraction limit by using novel materials. In the paper, we report experimental results obtained by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and optical absorption spectroscopy, for a fluorescent photosensitive glass-ceramic containing rare-earth ions such as samarium (Sm). Using a home built dynamic tester, with a low power laser, we recorded nanostructures having 5 nm line widths. In the line structure, measurements reveal the presence of silver nanocrystals with few nanometre sizes. HRTEM shows that there is a random orientation of the nanocrystals. A writing mechanism with three steps is proposed.

  8. Interaction of Aircraft Wakes From Laterally Spaced Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Fred H.

    2009-01-01

    Large Eddy Simulations are used to examine wake interactions from aircraft on closely spaced parallel paths. Two sets of experiments are conducted, with the first set examining wake interactions out of ground effect (OGE) and the second set for in ground effect (IGE). The initial wake field for each aircraft represents a rolled-up wake vortex pair generated by a B-747. Parametric sets include wake interactions from aircraft pairs with lateral separations of 400, 500, 600, and 750 ft. The simulation of a wake from a single aircraft is used as baseline. The study shows that wake vortices from either a pair or a formation of B-747 s that fly with very close lateral spacing, last longer than those from an isolated B-747. For OGE, the inner vortices between the pair of aircraft, ascend, link and quickly dissipate, leaving the outer vortices to decay and descend slowly. For the IGE scenario, the inner vortices ascend and last longer, while the outer vortices decay from ground interaction at a rate similar to that expected from an isolated aircraft. Both OGE and IGE scenarios produce longer-lasting wakes for aircraft with separations less than 600 ft. The results are significant because concepts to increase airport capacity have been proposed that assume either aircraft formations and/or aircraft pairs landing on very closely spaced runways.

  9. Kinetics and Structure of Superagglomerates Produced by Silane and Acetylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulholland, G. W.; Hamins, A.; Sivathanu, Y.

    1999-01-01

    The evolution of smoke in a laminar diffusion flame involves several steps. The first step is particle inception/nucleation in the high-temperature fuel-rich region of the flame followed by surface growth and coagulation/coalescence of the small particles. As the primary spheres grow in size and lose hydrogen, the colliding particles no longer coalesce but retain their identity as a cluster of primary spheres, termed an agglomerate. Finally, in the upper portion of the flame, the particles enter an oxidizing environment which may lead to partial or complete burnout of the agglomerates. Currently there is no quantitative model for describing the growth of smoke agglomerates up to superagglomerates with an overall dimension of 10 microns and greater. Such particles are produced during the burning of acetylene and fuels containing benzene rings such as toluene and polystyrene. In the case of polystyrene, smoke agglomerates in excess of 1 mm have been observed "raining" out from large fires. Evidence of the formation of superagglomerates in a laminar acetylene/air diffusion flame has been recently reported. Acetylene was chosen as the fuel since the particulate loading in acetylene/air diffusion flames is very high. Photographs were obtained by Sorensen using a microsecond xenon lamp of the "stream" of soot just above the flame. For low flow rates of acetylene, only submicrometer soot clusters are produced and they give rise to the homogeneous appearance of the soot stream. When the flow rate is increased to 1.7 cu cm/s, soot clusters up to 10 microns are formed and they are responsible for the graininess and at a flow rate of 3.4 cu cm/s, a web of interconnected clusters as large as the width of the flame is seen. This interconnecting web of superagglomerates is described as a gel state by Sorensen et al (1998). This is the first observation of a gel for a gas phase system. It was observed that this gel state immediately breaks up into agglomerates due to buoyancy

  10. Genetic structure of a novel biofuel-producing microorganism community

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bruna De Felice; Vito Onofrio Blasi; Olga De Castro; Paola Cennamo; Laura Martino; MArco Trifuoggi; Valerio Condorelli; Valeria Di Onofrio; Marco Guida

    2012-08-01

    Biofuels are an important alternative, renewable source of energy in the face of the ongoing depletion of fossil fuels. Cheese whey is a dairy industry waste characterized by high lactose concentration, which represents a significant environmental problem. Bio-ethanol production by cheese whey could be an effective nonvegetable source for renewable energy production. Here, we report the isolation of a mixed microbial population, able to produce ethanol as main fermentation product from fermenting whey. The microbial consortium has been used to perform a batch fermentation of crude whey in both anoxic and hypoxic conditions. Maximum ethanol concentrations achieved in this study was obtained using the mixed culture in hypoxic conditions, grown at pH 4 and 30°C, with ethanol production yield of 60 g/L. Our research has pointed out an alternative way to both dispose and valorize cheese whey, a dairy by-product that could cause water pollution and harm to the environment if not properly treated.

  11. Structural Characterization of Biogenic Manganese Oxides Produced in Sea Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, S. M.; Bargar, J. R.; Tebo, B. M.

    2003-12-01

    Manganese oxides have been coined as the "scavengers of the sea" and play important roles in both marine and freshwater systems. Natural manganese oxide nanoparticles and grain coatings are ubiquitous in the environment and profoundly impact the quality of sediments via their ability to degrade and sequester contaminants. These oxides are believed to form dominantly via oxidation of Mn(II) by marine and freshwater bacteria and have extremely high sorptive capacities for heavy metals. We have used XANES, EXAFS, and synchrotron (SR)-XRD techniques to study biogenic manganese oxides produced by spores of the marine Bacillus sp., strain SG-1 in seawater as a function of reaction time under fully in-situ conditions. The primary biogenic solid-phase Mn oxide product is a hexagonal layered phyollomanganate with an oxidation state similar to that in delta-MnO2. XRD data show the biooxides to have a phyllomanganate 10 basal plane spacing, suggesting the interlayer is hydrated and contains calcium. As the experiment continues, the initial biooxide changes to show triclinic symmetry. Fits to these EXAFS spectra suggest the octahedral layers have low Mn octahedral site vacancies in the lattice and the latyers bend to accommodate Jahn-Teller distortions creating the change in symmetry. The oxides observed in this study as models of Mn(II) bio-oxidation may be representative of the most abundant manganese oxide phase suspended in the oxic and sub-oxic zones of the oceanic water column.

  12. Structure and Vibrational Spectra of Slags Produced from Radioactive Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinina, G. A.; Stefanovsky, S. V.

    2014-05-01

    The structure of the anionic motif of aluminosilicate and aluminoborosilicate glasses containing simulated slags from a solid radioactive waste incinerator was studied by IR and Raman spectroscopy. Spectra of melted slag were consistent with Si-O tetrahedra with various numbers of bridging O ions and Al-O tetrahedra embedded in the Si-O network in the slag vitreous and crystalline phases (nepheline, nagelschmidtite). Vibrations of doubly and triply bound Si-O tetrahedra and Al-O tetrahedra embedded between them were mainly responsible for the spectra as the content of sodium disilicate fl ux and the glass fraction in the materials increased. Addition of sodium tetraborate fl ux caused the appearance of B-O vibrations of predominantly three-coordinate B and a tendency toward chemical differentiation preceding phase separation.

  13. Coupled wake boundary layer model of wind-farms

    CERN Document Server

    Stevens, Richard J A M; Meneveau, Charles

    2014-01-01

    We present and test a coupled wake boundary layer (CWBL) model that describes the distribution of the power output in a wind-farm. The model couples the traditional, industry-standard wake expansion/superposition approach with a top-down model for the overall wind-farm boundary layer structure. The wake expansion/superposition model captures the effect of turbine positioning, while the top-down portion adds the interaction between the wind-turbine wakes and the atmospheric boundary layer. Each portion of the model requires specification of a parameter that is not known a-priori. For the wake model the wake expansion coefficient is required, while the top-down model requires an effective span-wise turbine spacing within which the model's momentum balance is relevant. The wake expansion coefficient is obtained by matching the predicted mean velocity at the turbine from both approaches, while the effective span-wise turbine spacing depends on turbine positioning and thus can be determined from the wake expansion...

  14. Hub vortex instability within wind turbine wakes: Effects of wind turbulence, loading conditions, and blade aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, Ryan; Viola, Francesco; Camarri, Simone; Gallaire, Francois; Iungo, Giacomo Valerio

    2016-11-01

    The near wake of wind turbines is characterized by the presence of the hub vortex, which is a coherent vorticity structure generated from the interaction between the root vortices and the boundary layer evolving over the turbine nacelle. By moving downstream, the hub vortex undergoes an instability with growth rate, azimuthal and axial wavenumbers determined by the characteristics of the incoming wind and turbine aerodynamics. Thus, a large variability of the hub vortex instability is expected for wind energy applications with consequent effects on wake downstream evolution, wake interactions within a wind farm, power production, and fatigue loads on turbines invested by wakes generated upstream. In order to predict characteristics of the hub vortex instability for different operating conditions, linear stability analysis is carried out by considering different statistics of the incoming wind turbulence, thrust coefficient, tip speed ratio, and blade lift distribution of a wind turbine. Axial and azimuthal wake velocity fields are modeled through Carton-McWilliams velocity profiles by mimicking the presence of the hub vortex, helicoidal tip vortices, and matching the wind turbine thrust coefficient predicted through the actuator disk model. The linear stability analysis shows that hub vortex instability is strongly affected by the wind turbine loading conditions, and specifically it is promoted by a larger thrust coefficient. A higher load of the wind turbines produces an enhanced axial velocity deficit and, in turn, higher shear in the radial direction of the streamwise velocity. The axial velocity shear within the turbine wake is also the main physical mechanism promoting the hub vortex instability when varying the lift distribution over the blade span for a specific loading condition. Cases with a larger velocity deficit in proximity of the wake center and less aerodynamic load towards the blade tip result to be more unstable. Moreover, wake swirl promotes hub

  15. Metallic layered composite materials produced by explosion welding: Structure, properties, and structure of the transition zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mal'tseva, L. A.; Tyushlyaeva, D. S.; Mal'tseva, T. V.; Pastukhov, M. V.; Lozhkin, N. N.; Inyakin, D. V.; Marshuk, L. A.

    2014-10-01

    The structure, morphology, and microhardness of the transition zone in multilayer metallic composite joints are studied, and the cohesion strength of the plates to be joined, the mechanical properties of the formed composite materials, and fracture surfaces are analyzed. The materials to be joined are plates (0.1-1 mm thick) made of D16 aluminum alloy, high-strength maraging ZI90-VI (03Kh12N9K4M2YuT) steel, BrB2 beryllium bronze, and OT4-1 titanium alloy. Composite materials made of different materials are shown to be produced by explosion welding. The dependence of the interface shape (smooth or wavelike) on the physicomechanical properties of the materials to be joined is found. The formation of a wavelike interface is shown to result in the formation of intense-mixing regions in transition zones. Possible mechanisms of layer adhesion are discussed.

  16. Analytical and experimental studies of wakes behind circularly capped bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessler, W. F.

    The wakes behind circularly capped bubbles are examined by means of an experimental and analytical study. A single two-inch diameter bubble is injected into a six by three foot fluid column, one half inch thick, producing an essentially two-dimensional flow. Aspirin powder placed in the fluid column just prior to bubble release highlights the structure of the flow field before dissolving. High speed film and sequenced photographs are taken to document the observed results. Pressure-time measurements are made with sensitive capacitive transducers mounted in the rear column wall and are synchronized with photographs using a high speed clock. Experimental fluids, prepared by mixing water and glycerine in varying proportions, are used to study the effects of viscosity on bubble shape and wake structure. Testing is performed over a range of Reynolds numbers from 14 to 29,655 which includes the transition from circularly capped to ellipsoidal bubble shape. Experimental data is reduced and summarized in convenient dimensionless form to permit comparison with analytical predictions.

  17. Dyspnoea waking from sleep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.O. Yildirim*

    2013-12-01

    Discussion: OSAS, as drivers working people, especially at night, is a disease that leads to serious consequences. Polysomnography is the gold standard for diagnosis and severity of the syndrome, apnoea-hypopnea index (AHI is determined by; AHI = normal  30 is severe. From repetitive episodes of apnoea increased sympathetic nerve activity, oxidative stress, intrathoracic pressure swings, sudden jumps in systemic blood pressure, hypoxia and hypercapnia. Emergency services waking from sleep dyspnoea, lethargy and fatigue in patients admitted with complaints of snoring and OSAS cannot be forgotten.

  18. Wake Dynamics in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Over Complex Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markfort, Corey D.

    The goal of this research is to advance our understanding of atmospheric boundary layer processes over heterogeneous landscapes and complex terrain. The atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) is a relatively thin (˜ 1 km) turbulent layer of air near the earth's surface, in which most human activities and engineered systems are concentrated. Its dynamics are crucially important for biosphere-atmosphere couplings and for global atmospheric dynamics, with significant implications on our ability to predict and mitigate adverse impacts of land use and climate change. In models of the ABL, land surface heterogeneity is typically represented, in the context of Monin-Obukhov similarity theory, as changes in aerodynamic roughness length and surface heat and moisture fluxes. However, many real landscapes are more complex, often leading to massive boundary layer separation and wake turbulence, for which standard models fail. Trees, building clusters, and steep topography produce extensive wake regions currently not accounted for in models of the ABL. Wind turbines and wind farms also generate wakes that combine in complex ways to modify the ABL. Wind farms are covering an increasingly significant area of the globe and the effects of large wind farms must be included in regional and global scale models. Research presented in this thesis demonstrates that wakes caused by landscape heterogeneity must be included in flux parameterizations for momentum, heat, and mass (water vapor and trace gases, e.g. CO2 and CH4) in ABL simulation and prediction models in order to accurately represent land-atmosphere interactions. Accurate representation of these processes is crucial for the predictions of weather, air quality, lake processes, and ecosystems response to climate change. Objectives of the research reported in this thesis are: 1) to investigate turbulent boundary layer adjustment, turbulent transport and scalar flux in wind farms of varying configurations and develop an improved

  19. Experiments on the global instability of confined axisymmetric dense wakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Larry; Juniper, Matthew

    2007-11-01

    Recent theoretical studies [M. Juniper, J. Fluid Mech. 565, 171-195 (2006); M. Juniper and S. Candel, J. Fluid Mech. 482, 257-269 (2003)] predict that confinement increases the hydrodynamic instability of wakes by causing the transition from convective to absolute instability to occur at lower values of shear. Experimental evidence supporting this prediction is presented here for a confined, axisymmetric wake at density ratios, S ≡ ρ1 /ρ2> 1 (i.e. dense wake). The wake was produced by a pair of convergent nozzles mounted concentrically, one within the other, in a low-turbulence wind tunnel facility. Variations in S were achieved by employing two high density gases (S = 1.53 and 5.11) in the inner flow with air in the outer flow. For a fixed S, there existed a critical value of shear above which dominant peaks appeared abruptly in the near-wake velocity spectra, as quantified by hot-wire anemometry. Corresponding high-speed video sequences revealed large-scale, sinuous wake motions. Results on the confined wake's response to externally-applied, acoustic forcing are also presented. The presence of discrete spectral peaks and coordinated instability oscillations suggests the emergence of a self-sustained, global mode.

  20. Improvements in ECN Wake Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Versteeg, M.C. [University of Twente, Enschede (Netherlands); Ozdemir, H.; Brand, A.J. [ECN Wind Energy, Petten (Netherlands)

    2013-08-15

    Wind turbines extract energy from the flow field so that the flow in the wake of a wind turbine contains less energy and more turbulence than the undisturbed flow, leading to less energy extraction for the downstream turbines. In large wind farms, most turbines are located in the wake of one or more turbines causing the flow characteristics felt by these turbines differ considerably from the free stream flow conditions. The most important wake effect is generally considered to be the lower wind speed behind the turbine(s) since this decreases the energy production and as such the economical performance of a wind farm. The overall loss of a wind farm is very much dependent on the conditions and the lay-out of the farm but it can be in the order of 5-10%. Apart from the loss in energy production an additional wake effect is formed by the increase in turbulence intensity, which leads to higher fatigue loads. In this sense it becomes important to understand the details of wake behavior to improve and/or optimize a wind farm layout. Within this study improvements are presented for the existing ECN wake model which constructs the fundamental basis of ECN's FarmFlow wind farm wake simulation tool. The outline of this paper is as follows: first, the governing equations of the ECN wake farm model are presented. Then the near wake modeling is discussed and the results compared with the original near wake modeling and EWTW (ECN Wind Turbine Test Site Wieringermeer) data as well as the results obtained for various near wake implementation cases are shown. The details of the atmospheric stability model are given and the comparison with the solution obtained for the original surface layer model and with the available data obtained by EWTW measurements are presented. Finally the conclusions are summarized.

  1. Rotating Wheel Wake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombard, Jean-Eloi; Xu, Hui; Moxey, Dave; Sherwin, Spencer

    2016-11-01

    For open wheel race-cars, such as Formula One, or IndyCar, the wheels are responsible for 40 % of the total drag. For road cars, drag associated to the wheels and under-carriage can represent 20 - 60 % of total drag at highway cruise speeds. Experimental observations have reported two, three or more pairs of counter rotating vortices, the relative strength of which still remains an open question. The near wake of an unsteady rotating wheel. The numerical investigation by means of direct numerical simulation at ReD =400-1000 is presented here to further the understanding of bifurcations the flow undergoes as the Reynolds number is increased. Direct numerical simulation is performed using Nektar++, the results of which are compared to those of Pirozzoli et al. (2012). Both proper orthogonal decomposition and dynamic mode decomposition, as well as spectral analysis are leveraged to gain unprecedented insight into the bifurcations and subsequent topological differences of the wake as the Reynolds number is increased.

  2. Wind farm array wake losses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, R.W. [Impact Weather, Washougal, WA (United States); McCarthy, E.F. [Wind Economics & Technology, Inc., Martinez, CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    A wind turbine wake study was conducted in the summer of 1987 at an Altamont Pass wind electric generating facility. The wind speed deficits, turbulence, and power deficits from an array consisting of several rows of wind turbines is discussed. A total of nine different test configurations were evaluated for a downwind spacing ranging from 7 rotor diameters (RD) to 34 RD and a cross wind spacing of 1.3 RD and 2.7 RD. Wake power deficits of 15% were measured at 16 RD and power losses of a few percent were even measurable at 27 RD for the closer cross wind spacing. For several rows of turbines separated by 7-9 RD the wake zones overlapped and formed compound wakes with higher velocity deficits. The wind speed and direction turbulence in the wake was much higher than the ambient turbulence. The results from this study are compared to the findings from other similar field measurements.

  3. Three-dimensional wake topology and propulsive performance of low-aspect-ratio pitching-rolling plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chengyu; Dong, Haibo

    2016-07-01

    The wake topology and propulsive performance of low-aspect-ratio plates undergoing a pitching-rolling motion in a uniform stream were numerically investigated by an in-house immersed-boundary-method-based incompressible Navier-Stokes equation solver. A detailed analysis of the vortical structures indicated that the pitching-rolling plate produced double-loop vortices with alternating signs from its trailing edge every half period. These vortices then shed and further evolved into interconnected "double-C"-shaped vortex rings, which eventually formed a bifurcating wake pattern in the downstream. As the wake convected downstream, there was a slight deflection in the spanwise direction to the plate tip, and the contained vortex ring size gradually increased. In addition, the analysis of the propulsive performance indicated that the shedding process of the double-loop vortices led to two peaks in the lift and thrust force production per half cycle. The observation of the double peaks in the force production is in agreement with previous flapping wing studies. Simulations were also used to examine the variations in the wake structures and propulsive performance of the plates over a range of major parameters. The aforementioned vortex structures were found to be quite robust over a range of Strouhal numbers, Reynolds numbers, and plate aspect ratios.

  4. Optimization Under Uncertainty for Wake Steering Strategies: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quick, Julian [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Annoni, Jennifer [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); King, Ryan N [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Dykes, Katherine L [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Fleming, Paul A [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Ning, Andrew [Brigham Young University

    2017-05-01

    Wind turbines in a wind power plant experience significant power losses because of aerodynamic interactions between turbines. One control strategy to reduce these losses is known as 'wake steering,' in which upstream turbines are yawed to direct wakes away from downstream turbines. Previous wake steering research has assumed perfect information, however, there can be significant uncertainty in many aspects of the problem, including wind inflow and various turbine measurements. Uncertainty has significant implications for performance of wake steering strategies. Consequently, the authors formulate and solve an optimization under uncertainty (OUU) problem for finding optimal wake steering strategies in the presence of yaw angle uncertainty. The OUU wake steering strategy is demonstrated on a two-turbine test case and on the utility-scale, offshore Princess Amalia Wind Farm. When we accounted for yaw angle uncertainty in the Princess Amalia Wind Farm case, inflow-direction-specific OUU solutions produced between 0% and 1.4% more power than the deterministically optimized steering strategies, resulting in an overall annual average improvement of 0.2%. More importantly, the deterministic optimization is expected to perform worse and with more downside risk than the OUU result when realistic uncertainty is taken into account. Additionally, the OUU solution produces fewer extreme yaw situations than the deterministic solution.

  5. TRANSVERSE MODES FOR FLAT INTER-BUNCH WAKES*

    CERN Document Server

    Burov, A

    2013-01-01

    If inter-bunch wake fields are flat, i.e. their variations over a bunch length can be neglected, all coherent modes have the same coupled-bunch structure, provided the bunches can be treated as identical by their inner qualities (train theorem). If a flat feedback is strong enough, the transverse modes are single-bunch, provided the inter-bunch wakes are also flat (damper theorem).

  6. Wakes in inhomogeneous plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Kompaneets, Roman; Nosenko, Vladimir; Morfill, Gregor E

    2014-01-01

    The Debye shielding of a charge immersed in a flowing plasma is an old classic problem in plasma physics. It has been given renewed attention in the last two decades in view of experiments with complex plasmas, where charged dust particles are often levitated in a region with strong ion flow. Efforts to describe the shielding of the dust particles in such conditions have been focused on the homogeneous plasma approximation, which ignores the substantial inhomogeneity of the levitation region. We address the role of the plasma inhomogeneity by rigorously calculating the point charge potential in the collisionless Bohm sheath. We demonstrate that the inhomogeneity can dramatically modify the wake, making it non-oscillatory and weaker.

  7. First Lunar Wake Passage of ARTEMIS: Discrimination of Wake Effects and Solar Wind Fluctuations by 3D Hybrid Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiehle, S.; Plaschke, F.; Motschmann, U.; Glassmeier, K. H.; Auster, H. U.; Angelopoulos, V.; Mueller, J.; Kriegel, H.; Georgescu, E.; Halekas, J.; Sibeck, D. G.; McFadden, J. P.

    2011-01-01

    The spacecraft P1 of the new ARTEMIS (Acceleration, Reconnection, Turbulence, and Electrodynamics of the Moon's Interaction with the Sun) mission passed the lunar wake for the first time on February 13, 2010. We present magnetic field and plasma data of this event and results of 3D hybrid simulations. As the solar wind magnetic field was highly dynamic during the passage, a simulation with stationary solar wind input cannot distinguish whether distortions were caused by these solar wind variations or by the lunar wake; therefore, a dynamic real-time simulation of the flyby has been performed. The input values of this simulation are taken from NASA OMNI data and adapted to the P1 data, resulting in a good agreement between simulation and measurements. Combined with the stationary simulation showing non-transient lunar wake structures, a separation of solar wind and wake effects is achieved. An anisotropy in the magnitude of the plasma bulk flow velocity caused by a non-vanishing magnetic field component parallel to the solar wind flow and perturbations created by counterstreaming ions in the lunar wake are observed in data and simulations. The simulations help to interpret the data granting us the opportunity to examine the entire lunar plasma environment and, thus, extending the possibilities of measurements alone: A comparison of a simulation cross section to theoretical predictions of MHD wave propagation shows that all three basic MHD modes are present in the lunar wake and that their expansion governs the lunar wake refilling process.

  8. Performance and wake conditions of a rotor located in the wake of an obstacle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumov, I. V.; Kabardin, I. K.; Mikkelsen, R. F.; Okulov, V. L.; Sørensen, J. N.

    2016-09-01

    Obstacles like forests, ridges and hills can strongly affect the velocity profile in front of a wind turbine rotor. The present work aims at quantifying the influence of nearby located obstacles on the performance and wake characteristics of a downstream located wind turbine. Here the influence of an obstacle in the form of a cylindrical disk was investigated experimentally in a water flume. A model of a three-bladed rotor, designed using Glauert's optimum theory at a tip speed ratio λ = 5, was placed in the wake of a disk with a diameter close to the one of the rotor. The distance from the disk to the rotor was changed from 4 to 8 rotor diameters, with the vertical distance from the rotor axis varied 0.5 and 1 rotor diameters. The associated turbulent intensity of the incoming flow to the rotor changed 3 to '6% due to the influence of the disk wake. In the experiment, thrust characteristics and associated pulsations as a function of the incoming flow structures were measured by strain gauges. The flow condition in front of the rotor was measured with high temporal accuracy using LDA and power coefficients were determine as function of tip speed ratio for different obstacle positions. Furthermore, PIV measurements were carried out to study the development of the mean velocity deficit profiles of the wake behind the wind turbine model under the influence of the wake generated by the obstacle. By use of regression techniques to fit the velocity profiles it was possible to determine velocity deficits and estimate length scales of the wake attenuation.

  9. Proton imaging of an electrostatic field structure formed in laser-produced counter-streaming plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, T.; Kugland, N. L.; Wan, W.; Crowston, R.; Drake, R. P.; Fiuza, F.; Gregori, G.; Huntington, C.; Ishikawa, T.; Koenig, M.; Kuranz, C.; Levy, M. C.; Martinez, D.; Meinecke, J.; Miniati, F.; Murphy, C. D.; Pelka, A.; Plechaty, C.; Presura, R.; Quirós, N.; Remington, B. A.; Reville, B.; Ross, J. S.; Ryutov, D. D.; Sakawa, Y.; Steele, L.; Takabe, H.; Yamaura, Y.; Woolsey, N.; Park, H.-S.

    2016-03-01

    We report the measurements of electrostatic field structures associated with an electrostatic shock formed in laser-produced counter-streaming plasmas with proton imaging. The thickness of the electrostatic structure is estimated from proton images with different proton kinetic energies from 4.7 MeV to 10.7 MeV. The width of the transition region is characterized by electron scale length in the laser-produced plasma, suggesting that the field structure is formed due to a collisionless electrostatic shock.

  10. An Analytic Parameterization of Self-Gravity Wakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiscareno, Matthew S.; Perrine, R. P.; Richardson, D. C.; Hedman, M. M.; Burns, J. A.; Weiss, J. W.; Porco, C. C.

    2008-09-01

    Saturn's dense A and B rings are pervaded by a microstructure dubbed "self-gravity wakes," which arise due to a rough balance between the clumping together of particles under their mutual self-gravity and their shearing apart again due to tidal forces (Julian and Toomre 1966; Salo 1995). This effect causes azimuthal variations in the rings' brightness as seen in images (Franklin et al. 1987; Dones and Porco 1989; Salo et al. 2004; Porco et al. 2008) and in the optical depth as probed by occultations (Colwell et al. 2006; Hedman et al. 2007). The latter papers explain the occultation observations with models that assume widely separated elongated structures that have an optical-depth dichotomy, with nearly-opaque wakes (with optical depth κwake) and a low but relatively constant optical depth in the spaces between the wakes (κgap). However, it is not known whether simulated wakes (not to mention real ones) can be so characterized, nor, if they can, how κwake and κgap respond to environmental parameters such as optical depth and coefficient of restitution. What do observed values of κgap (Colwell et al. 2006; Hedman et al. 2007) tell us about the conditions under which wakes occur? To this end, we determine the distribution of densities in simulated wake cells. Our method uses an adaptive bin size to simultaneously accommodate low-density regions, where particles are sparse (large bins required), and the sharp boundaries between high- and low-density regions (small bins required). The result is a histogram of the local densities within simulated patches of the ring. We apply this method to a suite of simulated wake cells, and will present our results. We further plan to use our results to address the question of whether local disruption of self-gravity wakes can explain the observed brightness of "propeller" structures (Tiscareno et al. 2008, AJ).

  11. Surface Characteristics of Green Island Wakes from Satellite Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Kai-Ho; Hsu, Po-Chun; Ho, Chung-Ru

    2017-04-01

    Characteristics of an island wake induced by the Kuroshio Current flows pass by Green Island, a small island 40 km off southeast of Taiwan is investigated by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite imagery. The MODIS sea surface temperature (SST) and chlorophyll-a (chl-a) imagery is produced at 250-meter resolution from 2014 to 2015 using the SeaDAS software package which is developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The wake occurrence is 59% observed from SST images during the data span. The average cooling area is 190 km2, but the area is significantly changed with wind directions. The wake area is increased during southerly winds and is reduced during northerly winds. Besides, the average cooling SST was about 2.1 oC between the front and rear island. Comparing the temperature difference between the wake and its left side, the difference is 1.96 oC. In addition, the wakes have 1 3 times higher than normal in chlorophyll concentration. The results indicate the island mass effect makes the surface water of Green island wake colder and chl-a higher.

  12. Droplet depinning in a wake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooshanginejad, Alireza; Lee, Sungyon

    2017-03-01

    Pinning and depinning of a windswept droplet on a surface is familiar yet deceptively complex for it depends on the interaction of the contact line with the microscopic features of the solid substrate. This physical picture is further compounded when wind of the Reynolds number greater than 100 blows over pinned drops, leading to the boundary layer separation and wake generation. In this Rapid Communication, we incorporate the well-developed ideas of the classical boundary layer to study partially wetting droplets in a wake created by a leader object. Depending on its distance from the leader, the droplet is observed to exhibit drafting, upstream motion, and splitting, due to the wake-induced hydrodynamic coupling that is analogous to drafting of moving bodies. We successfully rationalize the onset of the upstream motion regime using a reduced model that computes the droplet shape governed by the pressure field inside the wake.

  13. Can increasing albedo of existing ship wakes reduce climate change?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crook, Julia A.; Jackson, Lawrence S.; Forster, Piers M.

    2016-02-01

    Solar radiation management schemes could potentially alleviate the impacts of global warming. One such scheme could be to brighten the surface of the ocean by increasing the albedo and areal extent of bubbles in the wakes of existing shipping. Here we show that ship wake bubble lifetimes would need to be extended from minutes to days, requiring the addition of surfactant, for ship wake area to be increased enough to have a significant forcing. We use a global climate model to simulate brightening the wakes of existing shipping by increasing wake albedo by 0.2 and increasing wake lifetime by ×1440. This yields a global mean radiative forcing of -0.9 ± 0.6 Wm-2 (-1.8 ± 0.9 Wm-2 in the Northern Hemisphere) and a 0.5°C reduction of global mean surface temperature with greater cooling over land and in the Northern Hemisphere, partially offsetting greenhouse gas warming. Tropical precipitation shifts southward but remains within current variability. The hemispheric forcing asymmetry of this scheme is due to the asymmetry in the distribution of existing shipping. If wake lifetime could reach ~3 months, the global mean radiative forcing could potentially reach -3 Wm-2. Increasing wake area through increasing bubble lifetime could result in a greater temperature reduction, but regional precipitation would likely deviate further from current climatology as suggested by results from our uniform ocean albedo simulation. Alternatively, additional ships specifically for the purpose of geoengineering could be used to produce a larger and more hemispherically symmetrical forcing.

  14. Global stability analysis of turbulent 3D wakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigas, Georgios; Sipp, Denis; Juniper, Matthew

    2015-11-01

    At low Reynolds numbers, corresponding to laminar and transitional regimes, hydrodynamic stability theory has aided the understanding of the dynamics of bluff body wake-flows and the application of effective control strategies. However, flows of fundamental importance to many industries, in particular the transport industry, involve high Reynolds numbers and turbulent wakes. Despite their turbulence, such wake flows exhibit organisation which is manifested as coherent structures. Recent work has shown that the turbulent coherent structures retain the shape of the symmetry-breaking laminar instabilities and only those manifest as large-scale structures in the near wake (Rigas et al., JFM vol. 750:R5 2014, JFM vol. 778:R2 2015). Based on the findings of the persistence of the laminar instabilities at high Reynolds numbers, we investigate the global stability characteristics of a turbulent wake generated behind a bluff three-dimensional axisymmetric body. We perform a linear global stability analysis on the experimentally obtained mean flow and we recover the dynamic characteristics and spatial structure of the coherent structures, which are linked to the transitional instabilities. A detailed comparison of the predictions with the experimental measurements will be provided.

  15. The wake of falling disks at low Reynolds numbers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Jie Zhong; Cun-Biao Lee

    2012-01-01

    We visualized the wake structure of circular disks falling vertically in quiescent water.The evolution of the wake was shown to be similar to the flow patterns behind a fixed disk.The Reynolds number,Re =Ud/v,is in the range of 40- 200.With the ascension of Reynolds numbers,a regular bifurcation occurred at the first critical Reynolds number Rec1,leading to a transition from an axisymmetric wake structure to a plane symmetric one; A Hopf bifurcation took place at the second critical Reynolds number Rec2,as the wake structure became unsteady.Plane symmetry of the wake structure was first lost as periodic voaex shedding appeared,but recovered at higher Reynolds number.The difference between the two critical Reynolds numbers was found to be shape-dependent,as we compared our results for thin discs with those for other falling bodies,such as spheres and cones.This observation could be understood in terms of the instability mechanism of the vortical structure.

  16. Application of engineering models to predict wake deflection due to a tilted wind turbine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guntur, Srinivas; Troldborg, Niels; Gaunaa, Mac

    It is a known fact that the power produced by wind turbines operating inside an array decreases due to the wake effects of the upstream turbines. It has been proposed previously to use the yaw mechanism as a potential means to steer the upstream wake away from downstream turbines, however...... such a mechanism introduces control complications due to changing wind directions. Deflecting the wake in the vertical direction using tilt, on the other hand, overcomes this challenge. In this paper, the feasibility of steering wake is explored in a simple uniform inflow case. This is done by trying to model...

  17. Application of engineering models to predict wake deflection due to a tilted wind turbine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guntur, Srinivas; Troldborg, Niels; Gaunaa, Mac

    2012-01-01

    It is a known fact that the power produced by wind turbines operating inside an array decreases due to the wake effects of the upstream turbines. It has been proposed previously to use the yaw mechanism as a potential means to steer the upstream wake away from downstream turbines, however...... such a mechanism introduces control complications due to changing wind directions. Deflecting the wake in the vertical direction using tilt, on the other hand, overcomes this challenge. In this paper, the feasibility of steering wake is explored in a simple uniform inflow case. This is done by trying to model...

  18. A SIMILARITY METHOD FOR LAMINAR WAKE OF POWER-LAW FLUID FLOW AROUND A FLAT PLATE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Cun-fang; Wang Mei-xia

    2003-01-01

    Based on the characteristic equation for power-law fluid and the Prandtl boundary layer equation, using the similarity method similar to that of Newtonian fluids, two similarity variables were given and a normal differential equation was derived for the laminar wake of power-law fluid flow produced by a flat plate. And numerical results were obtained. The results show that the power-law index n has evident influence on the velocity distribution in the wake. In the wake, velocity gradient is larger, and the wake is narrower for larger n.

  19. Impact of trailing edge shape on the wake and propulsive performance of pitching panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Buren, T.; Floryan, D.; Brunner, D.; Senturk, U.; Smits, A. J.

    2017-01-01

    The effects of changing the trailing edge shape on the wake and propulsive performance of a pitching rigid panel are examined experimentally. The panel aspect ratio is AR=1 , and the trailing edges are symmetric chevron shapes with convex and concave orientations of varying degree. Concave trailing edges delay the natural vortex bending and compression of the wake, and the mean streamwise velocity field contains a single jet. Conversely, convex trailing edges promote wake compression and produce a quadfurcated wake with four jets. As the trailing edge shape changes from the most concave to the most convex, the thrust and efficiency increase significantly.

  20. Turbulence characteristics in a supersonic cascade wake flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrew, P.L.; Ng, W.F. (Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States))

    1994-10-01

    The turbulent character of the supersonic wake of a linear cascade of fan airfoils has been studied using a two-component laser-doppler anemometer. The cascade was tested in the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University intermittent wind tunnel facility, where the Mach and Reynolds numbers were 2.36 and 4.8 [times] 10[sup 6], respectively. In addition to mean flow measurements, Reynolds normal and shear stresses were measured as functions of cascade incidence angle and streamwise locations spanning the near-wake and the far-wake. The extremities of profiles of both the mean and turbulent wake properties were found to be strongly influenced by upstream shock-boundary-layer interactions, the strength of which varied with cascade incidence. In contrast, the peak levels of turbulence properties within the shear layer were found to be largely independent of incidence, and could be characterized in terms of the streamwise position only. The velocity defect turbulence level was found to be 23%, and the generally accepted value of the turbulence structural coefficient of 0.30 was found to be valid for this flow. The degree of similarity of the mean flow wake profiles was established, and those profiles demonstrating the most similarity were found to approach a state of equilibrium between the mean and turbulent properties. In general, this wake flow may be described as a classical free shear flow, upon which the influence of upstream shock-boundary-layer interactions has been superimposed.

  1. Wake flow control using a dynamically controlled wind turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Ricardo; Wang, Yeqin; Pol, Suhas; Swift, Andy; Hussain, Fazle; Westergaard, Carsten; Texas Tech University Team

    2016-11-01

    A wind tunnel based "Hyper Accelerated Wind Farm Kinematic-Control Simulator" (HAWKS) is being built at Texas Tech University to emulate controlled wind turbine flow physics. The HAWKS model turbine has pitch, yaw and speed control which is operated in real model time, similar to that of an equivalent full scale turbine. Also, similar to that of a full scale wind turbine, the controls are developed in a Matlab Simulink environment. The current diagnostic system consists of power, rotor position, rotor speed measurements and PIV wake characterization with four cameras. The setup allows up to 7D downstream of the rotor to be mapped. The purpose of HAWKS is to simulate control strategies at turnaround times much faster than CFD and full scale testing. The fundamental building blocks of the simulator have been tested, and demonstrate wake steering for both static and dynamic turbine actuation. Parameters which have been studied are yaw, rotor speed and combinations hereof. The measured wake deflections for static yaw cases are in agreement with previously reported research implying general applicability of the HAWKS platform for the purpose of manipulating the wake. In this presentation the general results will be introduced followed by an analysis of the wake turbulence and coherent structures when comparing static and dynamic flow cases. The outcome of such studies could ultimately support effective wind farm wake flow control strategies. Texas Emerging Technology Fund (ETF).

  2. Sensitivity analysis of small circular cylinders as wake control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneghini, Julio; Patino, Gustavo; Gioria, Rafael

    2016-11-01

    We apply a sensitivity analysis to a steady external force regarding control vortex shedding from a circular cylinder using active and passive small control cylinders. We evaluate the changes on the flow produced by the device on the flow near the primary instability, transition to wake. We numerically predict by means of sensitivity analysis the effective regions to place the control devices. The quantitative effect of the hydrodynamic forces produced by the control devices is also obtained by a sensitivity analysis supporting the prediction of minimum rotation rate. These results are extrapolated for higher Reynolds. Also, the analysis provided the positions of combined passive control cylinders that suppress the wake. The latter shows that these particular positions for the devices are adequate to suppress the wake unsteadiness. In both cases the results agree very well with experimental cases of control devices previously published.

  3. Wind turbine wake characterization using long-range Doppler lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitken, M.; Lundquist, J. K.; Hestmark, K.; Banta, R. M.; Pichugina, Y.; Brewer, A.

    2012-12-01

    Wind turbines extract energy from the freestream flow, resulting in a waked region behind the rotor which is characterized by reduced wind speed and increased turbulence. The velocity deficit in the wake diminishes with distance, as faster-moving air outside is gradually entrained. In a concentrated group of turbines, then, downwind machines experience very different inflow conditions compared to those in the front row. As utility-scale turbines rarely exist in isolation, detailed knowledge of the mean flow and turbulence structure inside wakes is needed to correctly model both power production and turbine loading at modern wind farms. To this end, the Turbine Wake and Inflow Characterization Study (TWICS) was conducted in the spring of 2011 to determine the reduction in wind speeds downstream from a multi-MW turbine located at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) near Boulder, Colorado. Full-scale measurements of wake dynamics are hardly practical or even possible with conventional sensors, such as cup anemometers mounted on meteorological (met) masts. Accordingly, the High Resolution Doppler Lidar (HRDL) developed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Earth System Research Laboratory was employed to investigate the formation and propagation of wakes under varying levels of ambient wind speed, shear, atmospheric stability, and turbulence. HRDL remotely senses line-of-sight wind velocities and has been used in several previous studies of boundary layer aerodynamics. With a fully steerable beam and a maximum range up to about 5 km, depending on atmospheric conditions, HRDL performed a comprehensive survey of the wind flow in front of and behind the turbine to study the shape, meandering, and attenuation of wakes. Due in large part to limited experimental data availability, wind farm wake modeling is still subject to an unacceptable amount of uncertainty, particularly in complex terrain. Here, analytical

  4. On the wake flow of asymmetrically beveled trailing edges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Yaoyi; Pröbsting, Stefan; Stephens, David; Gupta, Abhineet; Morris, Scott C.

    2016-05-01

    Trailing edge and wake flows are of interest for a wide range of applications. Small changes in the design of asymmetrically beveled or semi-rounded trailing edges can result in significant difference in flow features which are relevant for the aerodynamic performance, flow-induced structural vibration and aerodynamically generated sound. The present study describes in detail the flow field characteristics around a family of asymmetrically beveled trailing edges with an enclosed trailing-edge angle of 25° and variable radius of curvature R. The flow fields over the beveled trailing edges are described using data obtained by particle image velocimetry (PIV) experiments. The flow topology for different trailing edges was found to be strongly dependent on the radius of curvature R, with flow separation occurring further downstream as R increases. This variation in the location of flow separation influences the aerodynamic force coefficients, which were evaluated from the PIV data using a control volume approach. Two-point correlations of the in-plane velocity components are considered to assess the structure in the flow field. The analysis shows large-scale coherent motions in the far wake, which are associated with vortex shedding. The wake thickness parameter yf is confirmed as an appropriate length scale to characterize this large-scale roll-up motion in the wake. The development in the very near wake was found to be critically dependent on R. In addition, high-speed PIV measurements provide insight into the spectral characteristics of the turbulent fluctuations. Based on the time-resolved flow field data, the frequency range associated with the shedding of coherent vortex pairs in the wake is identified. By means of time-correlation of the velocity components, turbulent structures are found to convect from the attached or separated shear layers without distinct separation point into the wake.

  5. Composition, Structure and Functional Properties of Protein Concentrates and Isolates Produced from Walnut (Juglans regia L.)

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaoying Mao; Yufei Hua

    2012-01-01

    In this study, composition, structure and the functional properties of protein concentrate (WPC) and protein isolate (WPI) produced from defatted walnut flour (DFWF) were investigated. The results showed that the composition and structure of walnut protein concentrate (WPC) and walnut protein isolate (WPI) were significantly different. The molecular weight distribution of WPI was uniform and the protein composition of DFWF and WPC was complex with the protein aggregation. H0 of WPC was signif...

  6. Wake patterns of the wings and tail of hovering hummingbirds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altshuler, Douglas L.; Princevac, Marko; Pan, Hansheng; Lozano, Jesse

    The flow fields of slowly flying bats and fasterflying birds differ in that bats produce two vortex loops during each stroke, one per wing, and birds produce a single vortex loop per stroke. In addition, the circulation at stroke transition approaches zero in bats but remains strong in birds. It is unknown if these difference derive from fundamental differences in wing morphology or are a consequence of flight speed. Here, we present an analysis of the horizontal flow field underneath hovering Anna's hummingbirds (Calypte anna) to describe the wake of a bird flying at zero forward velocity. We also consider how the hummingbird tail interacts with the wake generated by the wings. High-speed image recording and analysis from three orthogonal perspectives revealed that the wing tips reach peak velocities in the middle of each stroke and approach zero velocity at stroke transition. Hummingbirds use complex tail kinematic patterns ranging from in phase to antiphase cycling with respect to the wings, covering several phase shifted patterns. We employed particle image velocimetry to attain detailed horizontal flow measurements at three levels with respect to the tail: in the tail, at the tail tip, and just below the tail. The velocity patterns underneath the wings indicate that flow oscillates along the ventral-dorsal axis in response to the down- and up-strokes and that the sideways flows with respect to the bird are consistently from the lateral to medial. The region around the tail is dominated by axial flows in dorsal to ventral direction. We propose that these flows are generated by interaction between the wakes of the two wings at the end of the upstroke, and that the tail actively defects flows to generate moments that contribute to pitch stability. The flow fields images also revealed distinct vortex loops underneath each wing, which were generated during each stroke. From these data, we propose a model for the primary flow structures of hummingbirds that more

  7. Wake meandering statistics of a model wind turbine: Insights gained by large eddy simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foti, Daniel; Yang, Xiaolei; Guala, Michele; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2016-08-01

    Wind tunnel measurements in the wake of an axial flow miniature wind turbine provide evidence of large-scale motions characteristic of wake meandering [Howard et al., Phys. Fluids 27, 075103 (2015), 10.1063/1.4923334]. A numerical investigation of the wake, using immersed boundary large eddy simulations able to account for all geometrical details of the model wind turbine, is presented here to elucidate the three-dimensional structure of the wake and the mechanisms controlling near and far wake instabilities. Similar to the findings of Kang et al. [Kang et al., J. Fluid Mech. 744, 376 (2014), 10.1017/jfm.2014.82], an energetic coherent helical hub vortex is found to form behind the turbine nacelle, which expands radially outward downstream of the turbine and ultimately interacts with the turbine tip shear layer. Starting from the wake meandering filtering used by Howard et al., a three-dimensional spatiotemporal filtering process is developed to reconstruct a three-dimensional meandering profile in the wake of the turbine. The counterwinding hub vortex undergoes a spiral vortex breakdown and the rotational component of the hub vortex persists downstream, contributing to the rotational direction of the wake meandering. Statistical characteristics of the wake meandering profile, along with triple decomposition of the flow field separating the coherent and incoherent turbulent fluctuations, are used to delineate the near and far wake flow structures and their interactions. In the near wake, the nacelle leads to mostly incoherent turbulence, while in the far wake, turbulent coherent structures, especially the azimuthal velocity component, dominate the flow field.

  8. Structural investigation of an extracellular polysaccharide produced by the cariogenic bacterium Streptococcus mutans strain UA159

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Bo; Dobruchowska, Justyna M.; Hoogenkamp, Michel A.; Gerwig, Gerrit J.

    2012-01-01

    The structure of an extracellular polysaccharide EPS159 produced from sucrose by Streptococcus mutans UA159 was investigated through the main oligosaccharides obtained from partial acid hydrolysis, monosaccharide/methylation analysis, and 1D/2D H-1 NMR spectroscopy. The results showed that EPS159 co

  9. Solidification Structure of Low Carbon Steel Strips with Different Phosphorus Contents Produced by Strip Casting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Na LI; Zhenyu LIU; Yiqing QIU; Zhaosen LIN; Xianghua LIU; Guodong WANG

    2006-01-01

    In the present paper, low carbon steel strips with different phosphorus contents were produced using a twin roll strip casting process. The solidification structure was studied and its features were analyzed in detail. It was found that the strips possessed a fine microstructure compared with the mould cast steels. With increasing phosphorus content more ferrite has been formed with finer grains.

  10. Tailoring dislocation structures and mechanical properties of nanostructured metals produced by plastic deformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Xiaoxu

    2009-01-01

    The presence of a dislocation structure associated with low-angle dislocation boundaries and interior dislocations is a common and characteristic feature in nanostructured metals produced by plastic deformation, and plays an important role in determining both the strength and ductility of the nan...

  11. Numerical Simulations of Saturn’s B Ring: Granular Friction as a Mediator between Self-gravity Wakes and Viscous Overstability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballouz, Ronald-Louis; Richardson, Derek C.; Morishima, Ryuji

    2017-04-01

    We study the B ring’s complex optical depth structure. The source of this structure may be the complex dynamics of the Keplerian shear and the self-gravity of the ring particles. The outcome of these dynamic effects depends sensitively on the collisional and physical properties of the particles. Two mechanisms can emerge that dominate the macroscopic physical structure of the ring: self-gravity wakes and viscous overstability. Here we study the interplay between these two mechanisms by using our recently developed particle collision method that allows us to better model the inter-particle contact physics. We find that for a constant ring surface density and particle internal density, particles with rough surfaces tend to produce axisymmetric ring features associated with the viscous overstability, while particles with smoother surfaces produce self-gravity wakes.

  12. Gravitationally Induced Density Wake of a Circularly Orbiting Object as an Interpretative Framework of Ubiquitous Spirals and Arcs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyosun

    2011-10-01

    An orbiting object in a gas-rich environment creates a gravitational density wake containing information about the object and its orbit. Using linear perturbation theory, we analyze the observable properties of the gravitational wake due to the object circularly moving in a static homogeneous gaseous medium, in order to derive the Bondi accretion radius rB , the orbital distance rp , and the Mach number {M}_p of the object. Supersonic motion, producing a wake of spiral-onion shell structure, exhibits a single-armed Archimedes spiral and two-centered circular arcs with respect to the line of sight. The pitch angle, arm width, and spacing of the spiral pattern are entirely determined by the orbital distance rp and Mach number {M}_p of the object. The arm-interarm density contrast is proportional to rB , decreasing as a function of distance with a power index of -1. The background density distribution is globally changed from initially uniform to centrally concentrated. The vertical structure of the wake is manifested as circular arcs with the center at the object location. The angular extent of the arcs is determined by the Mach number {M}_p of the object motion. Diagnostic probes of nonlinear wakes such as a detached bow shock, the absence of the definite inner arm boundary, the presence of turbulent low-density eddies, and elongated shapes of arcs are explained in the extension of the linear analysis. The density enhancement at the center is always rB /rp independent of the nonlinearity, suggesting that massive objects can substantially modify the background distribution.

  13. Blue integumentary structural colours in dragonflies (Odonata) are not produced by incoherent Tyndall scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prum, Richard O; Cole, Jeff A; Torres, Rodolfo H

    2004-10-01

    For nearly 80 years, the non-iridescent, blue, integumentary structural colours of dragonflies and damselflies (Odonata) have been attributed to incoherent Tyndall or Rayleigh scattering. We investigated the production of the integumentary structural colours of a damselfly--the familiar bluet, Enallagma civile (Coenagrionidae)--and a dragonfly--the common green darner, Anax junius (Aeshnidae)--using fibre optic spectrophotometry and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The reflectance spectra of both species showed discrete reflectance peaks of approximately 30% reflectance at 475 and 460 nm, respectively. These structural colours are produced by light scattering from closely packed arrays of spheres in the endoplasmic reticulum of box-shaped epidermal pigment cells underlying the cuticle. The observed reflectance spectra do not conform to the inverse fourth power relationship predicted for Tyndall/Rayleigh scattering. Two-dimensional (2-D) Fourier analysis of the TEM images of the colour-producing arrays reveals ring-shaped distributions of Fourier power at intermediate spatial frequencies, documenting a quasiordered nanostructure. The nanostructured Fourier power spectra falsify the assumption of spatial independence of scatterers that is required for incoherent scattering. Radial averages of the Fourier power spectrum indicate that the spheres are substantially nanostructured at the appropriate spatial scale to produce visible colours by coherent scattering. However, the spatial periodicity of the arrays is apparently too large to produce the observed colour by coherent scattering. The nanospheres could have expanded substantially (approximately 50%) during preparation for TEM. Alternatively, coherent light scattering could be occurring both from the surfaces and from structures at the centre of the spheres. These arrays of colour-producing spheres within pigment cells have convergently evolved at least 11-14 times independently within the Odonata. Structural

  14. Elastohydrodynamic wake and wave resistance

    CERN Document Server

    Arutkin, Maxence; Salez, Thomas; Raphaël, Elie

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of a thin elastic sheet lubricated by a narrow layer of liquid is relevant to various situations and length scales. In the continuity of our previous work on viscous wakes, we study theoretically the effects of an external pressure disturbance moving at constant speed along the surface of a thin lubricated elastic sheet. In the comoving frame, the imposed pressure field creates a stationary deformation of the free interface that spatially vanishes in the far-field region. The shape of the wake and the way it decays depend on the speed and size of the external disturbance, as well as the rheological properties of both the elastic and liquid layers. The wave resistance, namely the force that has to be externally furnished in order to maintain the wake, is analyzed in detail.

  15. Linearised CFD Models for Wakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ott, Søren; Berg, Jacob; Nielsen, Morten

    This report describes the development of a fast and reasonably accurate model for the prediction of energy production in oshore wind farms taking wake eects into account. The model has been implemented as a windows application called Fuga which can run in batch mode or as a graphical user interface....... Fuga is brie y described. The model is based on alinearization technique which is described in some detail, and linearized, governing equations are derived and written in a standard form based on a mixed{spectral formulation. A new solution method is used to solve the equations which involves intensive...... use of look{up tables for storage of intermediate results. Due to the linearity of the model, multiple wakes from many turbines can be constructed from the wake of a single, solitary turbine. These are in turn constructed from Fourier components by a fast Fourier integral transform of results derived...

  16. Structural studies of an exopolysaccharide produced by Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus Pal5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrato, Rodrigo V; Meneses, Carlos H S G; Vidal, Marcia S; Santana-Filho, Arquimedes P; Iacomini, Marcello; Sassaki, Guilherme L; Baldani, José I

    2013-10-15

    Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus is a nitrogen-fixing bacterium that has been found colonizing several plants. This acid-tolerant bacterium produces phytohormones that promote plant growth and is also able to grow in high-sugar concentrations. It has been demonstrated that exopolysaccharides (EPS), which are produced by strain Pal5 of G. diazotrophicus, play an important role in plant infection. We have investigated the structure of the EPS, which was produced by a strain of Pal5 grown in liquid medium containing mannitol as the sole carbon source. The results reveal an EPS with Glc, Gal, Man in a molar ratio of 6:3:1, respectively. NMR spectroscopy and chemical derivatization have revealed that the EPS structure has 4-O-substituted units of β-glucose, 3-O-substituted units of β-galactose and 2-O-substituted units of α-mannose. Glucose and galactose units linked at C6 were also found. The structure proposed herein is different from EPS produced by other species of Gluconacetobacter published to date.

  17. Linearised CFD models for wakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ott, S.; Berg, J.; Nielsen, Morten

    2011-12-15

    This report describes the development of a fast and reasonably accurate model for the prediction of energy production in offshore wind farms taking wake effects into account. The model has been implemented as a windows application called Fuga which can run in batch mode or as a graphical user interface. Fuga is briefly described. The model is based on a linearization technique which is described in some detail, and linearized, governing equations are derived and written in a standard form based on a mixed-spectral formulation. A new solution method is used to solve the equations which involves intensive use of look-up tables for storage of intermediate results. Due to the linearity of the model, multiple wakes from many turbines can be constructed from the wake of a single, solitary turbine. These are in turn constructed from Fourier components by a fast Fourier integral transform of results derived from generic look-up tables. Three different models, based on three different closures, are examined: 1) the 'simple closure' using an unperturbed eddy viscosity kucentre dotz. 2) the mixing length closure. 3) the E-epsilon closure. Model results are evaluated against offshore wind farm production data from Horns Rev I and the Nysted wind farm, and a comparison with direct wake measurements in an onshore turbine (Nibe B) is also made. A very satisfactory agreement with data is found for the simple closure. The exception is the near wake, just behind the rotor, where all three linearized models fail. The mixing length closure underestimates wake effects in all cases. The E-epsilon closure overestimates wake losses in the offshore farms while it predicts a too shallow and too wide the wake in the onshore case. The simple closure performs distinctly better than the other two. Wind speed data from the the Horns rev met masts are used to further validate Fuga results with the 'simple' closure. Finally, Roedsand 1 and 2 are used as an example to illustrate

  18. A Neuron-Based Model of Sleep-Wake Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postnova, Svetlana; Peters, Achim; Braun, Hans

    2008-03-01

    In recent years it was discovered that a neuropeptide orexin/hypocretin plays a main role in sleep processes. This peptide is produced by the neurons in the lateral hypothalamus, which project to almost all brain areas. We present a computational model of sleep-wake cycles, which is based on the Hodgkin-Huxley type neurons and considers reciprocal glutaminergic projections between the lateral hypothalamus and the prefrontal cortex. Orexin is released as a neuromodulator and is required to keep the neurons firing, which corresponds to the wake state. When orexin is depleted the neurons are getting silent as observed in the sleep state. They can be reactivated by the circadian signal from the suprachiasmatic nucleus and/or external stimuli (alarm clock). Orexin projections to the thalamocortical neurons also can account for their transition from tonic firing activity during wakefulness to synchronized burst discharges during sleep.

  19. Research on aircraft/vortex-wake interactions to determine acceptable level of wake intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossow, Vernon J.; Tinling, Bruce E.

    1988-01-01

    An evaluation of the literature on large aircraft wake-vortex encounters in flight and in flight simulators has furnished an estimate of the level to which the vortex-induced rolling moments must be reduced in order to be perceived as nonhazardous at a 2-n.mi. separation distance. The criteria are based on the ratio of the vortex-induced acceleration in roll to the aileron-induced roll acceleration. A wake is acceptably alleviated if the ratio of vortex-to-aileron rolling moments is less than about 0.5. When a satisfactory alleviation scheme is identified, the alleviated vortex structure should be inserted into a simulator to ascertain whether the maximum bank angles induced are within tolerable limits.

  20. Vortex wakes generated by robins Erithacus rubecula during free flight in a wind tunnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedenström, A; Rosén, M; Spedding, G R

    2006-04-22

    The wakes of two individual robins were measured in digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) experiments conducted in the Lund wind tunnel. Wake measurements were compared with each other, and with previous studies in the same facility. There was no significant individual variation in any of the measured quantities. Qualitatively, the wake structure and its gradual variation with flight speed were exactly as previously measured for the thrush nightingale. A procedure that accounts for the disparate sources of circulation spread over the complex wake structure nevertheless can account for the vertical momentum flux required to support the weight, and an example calculation is given for estimating drag from the components of horizontal momentum flux (whose net value is zero). The measured circulations of the largest structures in the wake can be predicted quite well by simple models, and expressions are given to predict these and other measurable quantities in future bird flight experiments.

  1. Sleep and Sleep-wake Rhythm in Older Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. van de Wouw-Van Dijk (Ellen)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractEveryone who has experienced poor sleep knows how it affects daytime functioning and wellbeing. A good night’s rest and a stable sleep-wake rhythm are therefore very important. The sleep-wake rhythm is regulated by several brain structures. People with an intellectual disability (ID) all

  2. Notes on the path and wake of a gas bubble rising in pure water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, A.W.G.; Biesheuvel, A.; van Wijngaarden, L.; van Wijngaarden, L.

    2002-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the structure of the wake behind gas bubbles rising at high Reynolds numbers in highly purified water. It describes a schlieren optics technique to visualise the wake. The technique does not contaminate the water, and so does not affect the zero-stress condition at the

  3. Dynamic Loads and Wake Prediction for Large Wind Turbines Based on Free Wake Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cao Jiufa; Wang Tongguang; Long Hui; Ke Shitang; Xu Bofeng

    2015-01-01

    With large scale wind turbines ,the issue of aerodynamic elastic response is even more significant on dy-namic behaviour of the system .Unsteady free vortex wake method is proposed to calculate the shape of wake and aerodynamic load .Considering the effect of aerodynamic load ,inertial load and gravity load ,the decoupling dy-namic equations are established by using finite element method in conjunction of the modal method and equations are solved numerically by Newmark approach .Finally ,the numerical simulation of a large scale wind turbine is performed through coupling the free vortex wake modelling with structural modelling .The results show that this coupling model can predict the flexible wind turbine dynamic characteristics effectively and efficiently .Under the influence of the gravitational force ,the dynamic response of flapwise direction contributes to the dynamic behavior of edgewise direction under the operational condition of steady wind speed .The difference in dynamic response be-tween the flexible and rigid wind turbines manifests when the aerodynamics/structure coupling effect is of signifi-cance in both wind turbine design and performance calculation .

  4. Stratified wake of an accelerating hydrofoil

    CERN Document Server

    Ben-Gida, Hadar; Gurka, Roi

    2015-01-01

    Wakes of towed and self-propelled bodies in stratified fluids are significantly different from non-stratified wakes. Long time effects of stratification on the development of the wakes of bluff bodies moving at constant speed are well known. In this experimental study we demonstrate how buoyancy affects the initial growth of vortices developing in the wake of a hydrofoil accelerating from rest. Particle image velocimetry measurements were applied to characterize the wake evolution behind a NACA 0015 hydrofoil accelerating in water and for low Reynolds number and relatively strong and stably stratified fluid (Re=5,000, Fr~O(1)). The analysis of velocity and vorticity fields, following vortex identification and an estimate of the circulation, reveal that the vortices in the stratified fluid case are stretched along the streamwise direction in the near wake. The momentum thickness profiles show lower momentum thickness values for the stratified late wake compared to the non-stratified wake, implying that the dra...

  5. Structure and tensile properties evaluation of samples produced by Fused Deposition Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajdoš, Ivan; Slota, Ján; Spišák, Emil; Jachowicz, Tomasz; Tor-Swiatek, Aneta

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents the result of a study evaluating the influence of alternative path generation strategy on structure and some mechanical properties of parts produced by Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) technology. Several scientific investigations focused on resolving issues in FDM parts by modifying a path generation strategy to optimize its mechanical properties. In this study, an alternative strategy was proposed with the intention of minimizing internal voids and, thus, to improve mechanical properties. Polycarbonate samples made by this alternative path generation strategy were subjected to tensile strength test and metro-tomography structure evaluation. The results reveal that the structure observed on build models differs from a structure expected from path generation predicted by software Insight 9.1. This difference affected the tensile strength of samples.

  6. Sectoral Structure Change Modeling of European Oil and Gas Producing Country’S Economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perepelkin Viacheslav Alexandrovich

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we consider identifying features of sectoral structuring within the national economy that has definite foreign trade product specialization. Examination of the sector-specific division methodology enabled identification of its strong association with certain sector dominance in the economy. It is against this background that we offer an explanation for the delay in transferring from the post-Soviet to the applicable international classification of economic structure elements in Russia and Belarus. We perform analysis of the three-component P-S-T model (primary, secondary, tertiary sector using statistical and econometric methods and define properties of the sectoral shares dynamics in national economies of oil and gas producing countries. Analysis of the Russian and Norwegian economies’ intersectoral changes suggests that it is necessary for the government to develop and implement selective structural policy to overcome the existing structural disproportions.

  7. Characterization of 316L Steel Cellular Dodecahedron Structures Produced by Selective Laser Melting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konda Gokuldoss Prashanth

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The compression behavior of different 316L steel cellular dodecahedron structures with different density values were studied. The 316L steel structures produced using the selective laser melting process has four different geometries: single unit cells with and without the addition of base plates beneath and on top, and sandwich structures with multiple unit cells with different unit cell sizes. The relation between the relative compressive strength and the relative density was compared using different Gibson-Ashby models and with other published reports. The different aspects of the deformation and the mechanical properties were evaluated and the deformation at distinct loading levels was recorded. Finite element method (FEM simulations were carried out with the defined structures and the mechanical testing results were compared. The calculated theory, simulation estimation, and the observed experimental results are in good agreement.

  8. Tribological behavior of Ti6Al4V cellular structures produced by Selective Laser Melting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolomeu, F; Sampaio, M; Carvalho, O; Pinto, E; Alves, N; Gomes, J R; Silva, F S; Miranda, G

    2017-05-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) technologies enable the fabrication of innovative structures with complex geometries not easily manufactured by traditional processes. Regarding metallic cellular structures with tailored/customized mechanical and wear performance aiming to biomedical applications, Selective Laser Melting (SLM) is a remarkable solution for their production. Focusing on prosthesis and implants, in addition to a suitable Young's modulus it is important to assess the friction response and wear resistance of these cellular structures in a natural environment. In this sense, five cellular Ti6Al4V structures with different open-cell sizes (100-500µm) were designed and produced by SLM. These structures were tribologicaly tested against alumina using a reciprocating sliding ball-on-plate tribometer. Samples were submerged in Phosphate Buffered Saline (PBS) fluid at 37°C, in order to mimic in some extent the human body environment. The results showed that friction and wear performance of Ti6Al4V cellular structures is influenced by the structure open-cell size. The higher wear resistance was obtained for structures with 100µm designed open-cell size due to the higher apparent area of contact to support tribological loading.

  9. Advancements in the Quantification of the Crystal Structure of ZNS Materials Produced in Variable Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Martin

    2016-07-01

    Screens and displays consume tremendous amounts of power. Global trends to significantly consume less power and increase battery life have led to the reinvestigation of electroluminescent materials. The state of the art in ZnS materials has not been furthered in the past 30 years and there is much potential in improving electroluminescent properties of these materials with advanced processing techniques. Self-propagating high temperature synthesis (SHS) utilises a rapid exothermic process involving high energy and nonlinearity coupled with a high cooling rate to produce materials formed outside of normal equilibrium boundaries thus possessing unique properties. The elimination of gravity during this process allows capillary forces to dominate mixing of the reactants which results in a superior and enhanced homogeneity in the product materials. ZnS type materials have been previously conducted in reduced gravity and normal gravity. It has been claimed in literature that a near perfect phases of ZnS wurtzite was produced. Although, the SHS of this material is possible at high pressures, there has been no quantitative information on the actual crystal structures and lattice parameters that were produced in this work. Utilising this process with ZnS doped with Cu, Mn, or rare earth metals such as Eu and Pr leads to electroluminescence properties, thus making this an attractive electroluminescent material. The work described here will revisit the synthesis of ZnS via high pressure SHS and will re-examine the work performed in both normal gravity and in reduced gravity within the ZARM drop tower facility. Quantifications in the lattice parameters, crystal structures, and phases produced will be presented to further explore the unique structure-property performance relationships produced from the SHS of ZnS materials.

  10. Results from a first production of enhanced Silicon Sensor Test Structures produced by ITE Warsaw

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Frey, M.; Grabiec, P.; Grodner, M.; Hänsel, S.; Hartmann, F.; Hoffmann, K.-H.; Hrubec, J.; Krammer, M.; Kucharski, K.; Macchiolo, A.; Marczewski, J.

    2009-01-01

    Monitoring the manufacturing process of silicon sensors is essential to ensure stable quality of the produced detectors. During the CMS silicon sensor production we were utilising small Test Structures (TS) incorporated on the cut-away of the wafers to measure certain process-relevant parameters. Experience from the CMS production and quality assurance led to enhancements of these TS. Another important application of TS is the commissioning of new vendors. The measurements provide us with a good understanding of the capabilities of a vendor's process. A first batch of the new TS was produced at the Institute of Electron Technology in Warsaw Poland. We will first review the improvements to the original CMS test structures and then discuss a selection of important measurements performed on this first batch.

  11. Structure of an extracellular polysaccharide produced by Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain C83

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanhaverbeke, C.; Bosso, C.; Colin-Morel, P.; Gey, C.; Heyraud, A. [Centre de Recherches sur les Macromolecules Vegetales, CNRS and Universite Joseph Fourier, B.P.53, F-38041 Grenoble (France); Gamar-Nourani, L.; Blondeau, K.; Simonet, J.-M. [Institut de Genetique et Microbiologie, Laboratoire de Genetique Moleculaire des Bacteries d' Interet Industriel, CNRS URA 2225, Batiment 360, Universite de Paris Sud, F-91405 Orsay (France)

    1998-12-31

    The extracellular polysaccharide produced by Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain C83 was found to be composed of d-glucose and d-galactose in a molar ratio of 2:3. The primary structure of the polysaccharide was shown by sugar analysis, methylation analysis, FABMS, partial acid hydrolysis and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to consist of a pentasaccharide repeating unit having the following structure:-3)-{alpha}-d-Glcp-(1-2)-{beta}-d-Galf-(1-6)-{alpha}-d-Galp-(1-6) -{alpha}-d-Glcp-(1-3)-{beta}-d-Galf-(1-. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  12. Transition to bluff body dynamics in the wake of vertical axis turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araya, Daniel; Dabiri, John

    2015-11-01

    A unifying characteristic among bluff bodies is a similar wake structure independent of the shape of the body. We present experimental data to demonstrate that the wake of a vertical axis wind/water turbine (VAWT) shares similar features to that of a bluff body, namely a circular cylinder. For a fixed Reynolds number (Re ~ 104) and variable tip-speed ratio, 2D particle image velocimetry (PIV) is used to measure the velocity field in the wake of three different laboratory-scale turbines: a 2-bladed, 3-bladed, and 5-bladed VAWT, each with similar geometry. From the PIV measurements, the time-averaged and dynamic characteristics of the wake are evaluated. In all cases, we observe three distinct regions in the VAWT wake: (1) the near wake, where periodic blade shedding dominates; (2) a transition region, where blade vortices decay and growth of a shear layer instability occurs; (3) the far wake, where bluff body wake oscillations dominate. We further characterize this wake transition with regard to turbine solidity and examine its relation to the mean flow, an important metric for power production within a wind farm.

  13. Numerical simulations of wake interaction between two wind turbines at various inflow conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troldborg, Niels; Larsen, Gunner Chr.; Aagaard Madsen, Helge;

    2011-01-01

    The phenomenon of wake interaction between two wind turbines was analysed using the actuator line technique and full unsteady Navier–Stokes computations. Results are presented for varying mutual distances between the two turbines and both full wake and half wake situations were considered. Furthe...... as the development of wake generated vortex structures. Moreover, the influence of the wake of the upstream turbine on the external aerodynamic loading on the blades of the downstream turbine was studied. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.......The phenomenon of wake interaction between two wind turbines was analysed using the actuator line technique and full unsteady Navier–Stokes computations. Results are presented for varying mutual distances between the two turbines and both full wake and half wake situations were considered....... Furthermore, simulations were carried out at different degrees of ambient turbulence intensity representing laminar, offshore and onshore conditions. From the simulations, the main characteristics of the interacting wakes were extracted including the averaged velocity and turbulence fields as well...

  14. Structure of ultradisperse nickel particles produced by the thermolysis of nickel formate-monoethanol amine complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khvorov, M.M.; Dudchenko, A.K.; Khimchenko, IU.I.

    1986-05-01

    Histograms of the size distribution of ultradisperse nickel particles produced by the thermolysis of amine complexes are plotted using dark-field and light-field electron microscopy data. It is found that the size distribution can be adequately approximated by logarithmically probabilistic functions. The ultradisperse nickel particles feature several types of structure, i.e., faceted stable single crystals coated by an organic film, small aggregates of such crystals, large stable globules, and hexahedral and trihedral crystals. 8 references.

  15. Fatigue of Ti6Al4V Structural Health Monitoring Systems Produced by Selective Laser Melting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Strantza

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Selective laser melting (SLM is an additive manufacturing (AM process which is used for producing metallic components. Currently, the integrity of components produced by SLM is in need of improvement due to residual stresses and unknown fracture behavior. Titanium alloys produced by AM are capable candidates for applications in aerospace and industrial fields due to their fracture resistance, fatigue behavior and corrosion resistance. On the other hand, structural health monitoring (SHM system technologies are promising and requested from the industry. SHM systems can monitor the integrity of a structure and during the last decades the research has primarily been influenced by bionic engineering. In that aspect a new philosophy for SHM has been developed: the so-called effective structural health monitoring (eSHM system. The current system uses the design freedom provided by AM. The working principle of the system is based on crack detection by means of a network of capillaries that are integrated in a structure. The main objective of this research is to evaluate the functionality of Ti6Al4V produced by the SLM process in the novel SHM system and to confirm that the eSHM system can successfully detect cracks in SLM components. In this study four-point bending fatigue tests on Ti6Al4V SLM specimens with an integrated SHM system were conducted. Fractographic analysis was performed after the final failure, while finite element simulations were used in order to determine the stress distribution in the capillary region and on the component. It was proven that the SHM system does not influence the crack initiation behavior during fatigue. The results highlight the effectiveness of the eSHM on SLM components, which can potentially be used by industrial and aerospace applications.

  16. Wake measurements for code validations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kurt Schaldemose

    2009-01-01

    As part of the EU-TOPFARM project a large number of datasets have been identified for verification of wind farm climate models, aeroelastic load and production models of turbines subjected to three dimensional dynamic wake wind field and the aeroelastic production modeling of a whole wind farm de...

  17. Cooling Signs in Wake Debate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, Christina A.

    2011-01-01

    More than a year after dismantling a student-assignment policy based on socioeconomic diversity and setting off a wave of reaction that drew national attention, the Wake County, North Carolina, school board took a step that may turn down the temperature of the intense debate. The board, which has been deeply split on an assignment plan for the…

  18. Irregular sleep-wake syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... normal, but the body clock loses its normal circadian cycle. People with changing work shifts and travelers who ... Abbott SM, Reid KJ, Zee PC. Circadian disorders of the sleep-wake ... Medicine . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2017:chap 40. ...

  19. Computation of Rotorcraft Wake Geometry using NURBS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Hoydonck, W.R.M.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis contains the results of research in the area of rotorcraft aerodynamics with a focus on method development related to the vortical wake generated by rotor blades. It is applied to a vortex tube representation of the wake (using a single NURBS surface) and a simplified filament wake model

  20. NMR-based structural validation of therapeutic antibody produced in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagi, Hirokazu; Fukuzawa, Noriho; Tasaka, Yasushi; Matsuo, Kouki; Zhang, Ying; Yamaguchi, Takumi; Kondo, Sachiko; Nakazawa, Shiori; Hashii, Noritaka; Kawasaki, Nana; Matsumura, Takeshi; Kato, Koichi

    2015-06-01

    We successfully developed a method for metabolic isotope labeling of recombinant proteins produced in transgenic tobacco. This enabled assessment of structural integrity of plant-derived therapeutic antibodies by NMR analysis. A variety of expression vehicles have been developed for the production of promising biologics, including plants, fungi, bacteria, insects, and mammals. Glycoprotein biologics often experience altered folding and post-translational modifications that are typified by variant glycosylation patterns. These differences can dramatically affect their efficacy, as exemplified by therapeutic antibodies. However, it is generally difficult to validate the structural integrity of biologics produced using different expression vehicles. To address this issue, we have developed and applied a stable-isotope-assisted nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy method for the conformational characterization of recombinant antibodies produced in plants. Nicotiana benthamiana used as a vehicle for the production of recombinant immunoglobulin G (IgG) was grown in a (15)N-enriched plant growth medium. The Fc fragment derived from the (15)N-labeled antibody thus prepared was subjected to heteronuclear two-dimensional (2D) NMR measurements. This approach enabled assessment of the structural integrity of the plant-derived therapeutic antibodies by comparing their NMR spectral properties with those of an authentic IgG-Fc derived from mammalian cells.

  1. Prediction and Control of Vortex Dominated and Vortex-wake Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandil, Osama

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the activities and accomplishments under this research grant, including a list of publications and dissertations, produced in the field of prediction and control of vortex dominated and vortex wake flows.

  2. Structure and Microhardness of Cu-Ta Joints Produced by Explosive Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iu. N. Maliutina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The structure and microhardness of Cu-Ta joints produced by explosive welding were studied. It was found that, during explosive welding, an intermediate layer 20⋯40 μm thick with a finely dispersed heterophase structure, formed between the welded copper and tantalum plates. The structure of the layer was studied by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Microvolumes with tantalum particles distributed in a copper matrix and microvolumes of copper particles in a tantalum matrix were detected. The tantalum particles in copper have a size of 5⋯500 nm, with a predominance of 5⋯50 nm particles. A mechanism for the formation of the finely dispersed heterophase structure in explosive welding is proposed. The microhardness of interlayers with the heterophase structure reaches 280 HV, which far exceeds the microhardness of copper (~130 HV and tantalum (~160 HV. Many twins of deformation origin were found in the structure of the copper plate. The effect of heating temperature in the range from 100 to 900∘C on the microhardness of copper, tantalum, and the Cu-Ta welded joint was studied. Upon heating to 900∘C, the microhardness of the intermediate layer decreases from 280 to 150 HV. The reduction in the strength properties of the weld material is mainly due to structural transformations in copper.

  3. Structure and microhardness of cu-ta joints produced by explosive welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maliutina, Iu N; Mali, V I; Bataev, I A; Bataev, A A; Esikov, M A; Smirnov, A I; Skorokhod, K A

    2013-01-01

    The structure and microhardness of Cu-Ta joints produced by explosive welding were studied. It was found that, during explosive welding, an intermediate layer 20⋯40  μ m thick with a finely dispersed heterophase structure, formed between the welded copper and tantalum plates. The structure of the layer was studied by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Microvolumes with tantalum particles distributed in a copper matrix and microvolumes of copper particles in a tantalum matrix were detected. The tantalum particles in copper have a size of 5⋯500 nm, with a predominance of 5⋯50 nm particles. A mechanism for the formation of the finely dispersed heterophase structure in explosive welding is proposed. The microhardness of interlayers with the heterophase structure reaches 280 HV, which far exceeds the microhardness of copper (~130 HV) and tantalum (~160 HV). Many twins of deformation origin were found in the structure of the copper plate. The effect of heating temperature in the range from 100 to 900°C on the microhardness of copper, tantalum, and the Cu-Ta welded joint was studied. Upon heating to 900°C, the microhardness of the intermediate layer decreases from 280 to 150 HV. The reduction in the strength properties of the weld material is mainly due to structural transformations in copper.

  4. Controlled oscillations of a cylinder: forces and wake modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carberry, J.; Sheridan, J.; Rockwell, D.

    2005-08-01

    The wake states from a circular cylinder undergoing controlled sinusoidal oscillation transverse to the free stream are examined. As the frequency of oscillation passes through the natural Kármán frequency there is a transition between two distinctly different wake states: the low- and high-frequency states. The transition corresponds to a change in the structure of the near wake and is also characterized by a jump in the phase and amplitude of both the total and vortex lift. Over the range of flow and oscillation parameters studied the wake states exhibit a number of universal features. The phases of the vortex lift and drag forces have characteristic values for the low- and high-frequency states, which appear to be directly related to the phase of vortex shedding. A split force concept is employed, whereby instantaneous force traces and images allow discrimination between the actual loading and the physics, and their conventional time-averaged representations. The wake states for the forced oscillations show some remarkable similarities to the response branches of elastically mounted cylinders. The equivalence between forced and self-excited oscillations is addressed in detail using concepts of energy transfer.

  5. Recent NASA Wake-Vortex Flight Tests, Flow-Physics Database and Wake-Development Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicroy, Dan D.; Vijgen, Paul M.; Reimer, Heidi M.; Gallegos, Joey L.; Spalart, Philippe R.

    1998-01-01

    A series of flight tests over the ocean of a four engine turboprop airplane in the cruise configuration have provided a data set for improved understanding of wake vortex physics and atmospheric interaction. An integrated database has been compiled for wake characterization and validation of wake-vortex computational models. This paper describes the wake-vortex flight tests, the data processing, the database development and access, and results obtained from preliminary wake-characterization analysis using the data sets.

  6. Determinants of the Effectiveness of Capital Structure Management at Ukrainian Listed Power-Producing Companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mastiuk Dmytro O.

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This article is concerned with a theoretical and practical study on determinants of the effectiveness of capital structure management. The basic theories on the formation and management of the capital structure were allocated; other researches related to studying the capital structure of enterprises was considered. The author considers 19 independent variables of diverse effect level (micro, meso and macro levels and one dependent variable – economically added value, which was selected as an indicator of the effectiveness of capital structure management. The studied period is 14 years from 2003 to 2016 and is based on five listed power-producing companies. Eight key determinants of the effectiveness of capital management were defined. The highest positive impact among certain factors is the rate by the National Bank of Ukraine and profitability, while the strongest negative influences are the levels of competition in the market and of inflation. On results of the study, a series of recommendations for selected power-producing equity companies in Ukraine have been proposed, with the aim of reducing negative influences and enhancing positive effects through the development and selection of financial strategies.

  7. Comparison of two LES codes for wind turbine wake studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chivaee, Hamid Sarlak; Pierella, F.; Mikkelsen, Robert Flemming

    2014-01-01

    are compared in terms of velocity deficit, turbulence kinetic energy and eddy viscosity. It is seen that both codes predict similar near-wake flow structures with the exception of OpenFoam's simulations without the subgrid-scale model. The differences begin to increase with increasing the distance from......For the third time a blind test comparison in Norway 2013, was conducted comparing numerical simulations for the rotor Cp and Ct and wake profiles with the experimental results. As the only large eddy simulation study among participants, results of the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) using...... their in-house CFD solver, EllipSys3D, proved to be more reliable among the other models for capturing the wake profiles and the turbulence intensities downstream the turbine. It was therefore remarked in the workshop to investigate other LES codes to compare their performance with EllipSys3D. The aim...

  8. Analytical Formulas for Short Bunch Wakes in a Flat Dechirper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bane, Karl [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Stupakov, Gennady [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Zagorodnov, Igor [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-03-29

    We develop analytical models of the longitudinal and transverse wakes, on and off axis for realistic structures, and then compare them with numerical calculations, and generally find good agreement. These analytical "first order" formulas approximate the droop at the origin of the longitudinal wake and of the slope of the transverse wakes; they represent an improvement in accuracy over earlier, "zeroth order" formulas. In example calculations for the RadiaBeam/LCLS dechirper using typical parameters, we find a 16% droop in the energy chirp at the bunch tail compared to simpler calculations. With the beam moved to 200 m from one jaw in one dechiper section, one can achieve a 3 MV transverse kick differential over a 30 m length.

  9. An aeroelastic analysis with a generalized dynamic wake

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Cheng J.; Peters, David A.

    1991-01-01

    An aeroelastic model with generalized dynamic wake is developed for application in the integration of aerodynamic, dynamic, and structural optimization of a rotor blade. The investigation is carried out with special attention to efficiency and accuracy of aeroelastic modeling. Each blade is assumed to be an elastic beam undergoing flap bending, lead-lag bending, elastic twist and axial deflections. The nonuniform blade is discretized into finite beam elements, each of which consists of twelve degrees of freedom. Such important blade design variables as pretwist, and chordwise offsets of the blade center of gravity and of the aerodynamic center from the elastic axis have been included in the analysis. Aerodynamic loads are computed from unsteady blade element theory where the rotor three-dimensional unsteady wake is modeled using a generalized dynamic wake theory. The noncirculatory loads based on unsteady thin airfoil theory are also included.

  10. Biosynthesis, chemical structure and structure-activity relationship of orfamide lipopeptides produced by Pseudomonas protegens and related species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zongwang eMa

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Orfamide-type cyclic lipopeptides (CLPs are biosurfactants produced by Pseudomonas and involved in lysis of oomycete zoospores, biocontrol of Rhizoctonia and insecticidal activity against aphids. In this study we compared the biosynthesis, structural diversity, in vitro and in planta activities of orfamides produced by rhizosphere-derived Pseudomonas protegens and related Pseudomonas species. Genetic characterization together with chemical identification revealed that the main orfamide compound produced by the P. protegens group is orfamide A, while the related strains Pseudomonas sp. CMR5c and CMR12a produce orfamide B. Comparison of orfamide fingerprints led to the discovery of two new orfamide homologues (orfamide F and orfamide G in Pseudomonas sp. CMR5c. The structures of these two CLPs were determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR and mass spectrometry (MS analysis. Mutagenesis and complementation showed that orfamides determine the swarming motility of parental Pseudomonas sp. strain CMR5c and their production was regulated by luxR type regulators. Orfamide A and orfamide B differ only in the identity of a single amino acid, while orfamide B and orfamide G share the same amino acid sequence but differ in length of the fatty acid part. The biological activities of orfamide A, orfamide B and orfamide G were compared in further bioassays. The three compounds were equally active against Magnaporthe oryzae on rice, against Rhizoctonia solani AG 4-HGI in in vitro assays, and caused zoospore lysis of Phytophthora and Pythium. Furthermore we could show that orfamides decrease blast severity in rice plants by blocking appressorium formation in M. oryzae. Taken all together, our study shows that orfamides produced by P. protegens and related species have potential in biological control of a broad spectrum of fungal plant pathogens.

  11. Refinement of the crystal structures of biomimetic weddellites produced by microscopic fungus Aspergillus niger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusakov, A. V.; Frank-Kamenetskaya, O. V.; Gurzhiy, V. V.; Zelenskaya, M. S.; Izatulina, A. R.; Sazanova, K. V.

    2014-05-01

    The single-crystal structures of four biomimetic weddellites CaC2O4 · (2 + x)H2O with different contents of zeolitic water ( x = 0.10-0.24 formula units) produced by the microscopic fungus Aspergillus niger were refined from X-ray diffraction data ( R = 0.029-0.038). The effect of zeolitic water content on the structural stability of weddellite was analyzed. The parameter a was shown to increase with increasing x due to the increase in the distance between water molecules along this direction. The water content and structural parameters of the synthesized weddellites are similar to those of weddellites from biofilms and kidney stones.

  12. Bio-Inspired Structural Colors Produced via Self-Assembly of Synthetic Melanin Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ming; Li, Yiwen; Allen, Michael C; Deheyn, Dimitri D; Yue, Xiujun; Zhao, Jiuzhou; Gianneschi, Nathan C; Shawkey, Matthew D; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2015-05-26

    Structural colors arising from interactions of light with submicron scale periodic structures have been found in many species across all taxa, serving multiple biological functions including sexual signaling, camouflage, and aposematism. Directly inspired by the extensive use of self-assembled melanosomes to produce colors in avian feathers, we set out to synthesize and assemble polydopamine-based synthetic melanin nanoparticles in an effort to fabricate colored films. We have quantitatively demonstrated that synthetic melanin nanoparticles have a high refractive index and broad absorption spanning across the UV-visible range, similar to natural melanins. Utilizing a thin-film interference model, we demonstrated the coloration mechanism of deposited films and showed that the unique optical properties of synthetic melanin nanoparticles provide advantages for structural colors over other polymeric nanoparticles (i.e., polystyrene colloidal particles).

  13. Sphaeropsidones, phytotoxic dimedone methyl ethers produced by Diplodia cupressi: a structure-activity relationship study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evidente, Antonio; Maddau, Lucia; Scanu, Bruno; Andolfi, Anna; Masi, Marco; Motta, Andrea; Tuzi, Angela

    2011-04-25

    Sphaeropsidone and episphaeropsidone are two phytotoxic dimedone methyl ethers produced by Diplodia cupressi, the causal agent of a canker disease of cypress in the Mediterranean area. In this study, eight derivatives obtained by chemical modifications and two natural analogues were assayed for phytotoxic and antifungal activities, and a structure-activity relationship was examined. Each compound was tested on nonhost plants and on five fungal pathogenic species belonging to the genus Phytophthora. The results provide insights into structure-activity relationships within these compounds. It was found that the hydroxy group at C-5, the absolute C-5 configuration, the epoxy group, and the C-2 carbonyl group appear to be structural features important in conferring biological activity. The conversion of sphaeropsidone into the corresponding 1,4-dione derivative led to a compound showing greater antifungal activity than its precursor. This finding could be useful in devising new natural fungicides for practical application in agriculture.

  14. Reconstructing three-dimensional wake topology based on planar PIV measurements and pattern recognition analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, C.; Yarusevych, S.

    2016-10-01

    The present study presents a new technique for reconstructing the salient aspects of three-dimensional wake topology based on time-resolved, planar, two-component particle image velocimetry data collected in multiple orthogonal planes. The technique produces conditionally averaged flow field reconstructions based on a pattern recognition analysis of velocity fields. It is validated on the wake of a low-aspect ratio dual step cylinder geometry, consisting of a large diameter cylinder ( D) with small aspect ratio ( L/ D) attached to the mid-span of a small diameter cylinder ( d). For a dual step cylinders with D/ d = 2, and L/ D = 1, numerical and experimental data are considered for ReD = 150 (laminar wake) and for ReD = 2100 (turbulent wake). The results show that the proposed technique successfully reconstructs the dominant periodic wake vortex interactions and can be extended to a wide range of turbulent flows.

  15. Tomographic particle image velocimetry of desert locust wakes: instantaneous volumes combine to reveal hidden vortex elements and rapid wake deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomphrey, Richard J.; Henningsson, Per; Michaelis, Dirk; Hollis, David

    2012-01-01

    Aerodynamic structures generated by animals in flight are unstable and complex. Recent progress in quantitative flow visualization has advanced our understanding of animal aerodynamics, but measurements have hitherto been limited to flow velocities at a plane through the wake. We applied an emergent, high-speed, volumetric fluid imaging technique (tomographic particle image velocimetry) to examine segments of the wake of desert locusts, capturing fully three-dimensional instantaneous flow fields. We used those flow fields to characterize the aerodynamic footprint in unprecedented detail and revealed previously unseen wake elements that would have gone undetected by two-dimensional or stereo-imaging technology. Vortex iso-surface topographies show the spatio-temporal signature of aerodynamic force generation manifest in the wake of locusts, and expose the extent to which animal wakes can deform, potentially leading to unreliable calculations of lift and thrust when using conventional diagnostic methods. We discuss implications for experimental design and analysis as volumetric flow imaging becomes more widespread. PMID:22977102

  16. Tomographic particle image velocimetry of desert locust wakes: instantaneous volumes combine to reveal hidden vortex elements and rapid wake deformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomphrey, Richard J; Henningsson, Per; Michaelis, Dirk; Hollis, David

    2012-12-07

    Aerodynamic structures generated by animals in flight are unstable and complex. Recent progress in quantitative flow visualization has advanced our understanding of animal aerodynamics, but measurements have hitherto been limited to flow velocities at a plane through the wake. We applied an emergent, high-speed, volumetric fluid imaging technique (tomographic particle image velocimetry) to examine segments of the wake of desert locusts, capturing fully three-dimensional instantaneous flow fields. We used those flow fields to characterize the aerodynamic footprint in unprecedented detail and revealed previously unseen wake elements that would have gone undetected by two-dimensional or stereo-imaging technology. Vortex iso-surface topographies show the spatio-temporal signature of aerodynamic force generation manifest in the wake of locusts, and expose the extent to which animal wakes can deform, potentially leading to unreliable calculations of lift and thrust when using conventional diagnostic methods. We discuss implications for experimental design and analysis as volumetric flow imaging becomes more widespread.

  17. Structure of surface layers produced by non-vacuum electron beam boriding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bataev, I.A., E-mail: ivanbataev@ngs.ru [Novosibirsk State Technical University, K. Marks 20, 630092 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Bataev, A.A., E-mail: bataev@adm.nstu.ru [Novosibirsk State Technical University, K. Marks 20, 630092 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Golkovski, M.G., E-mail: M.G.Golkovski@inp.nsk.su [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics SB RAS, Lavrentieva prospect 11, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Krivizhenko, D.S., E-mail: dinylkaa@yandex.ru [Novosibirsk State Technical University, K. Marks 20, 630092 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Losinskaya, A.A., E-mail: anna.losinskaya@mail.ru [Novosibirsk State Technical University, K. Marks 20, 630092 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Lenivtseva, O.G., E-mail: lenivtseva_olga@mail.ru [Novosibirsk State Technical University, K. Marks 20, 630092 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2013-11-01

    The structure and mechanical properties of boronized layers produced on low carbon steel substrates by non-vacuum electron-beam cladding were studied. This process provides high performance and high thickness of coatings and can be used to process large workpieces. In this study, we investigated coatings obtained by one, two or three passes of the electron beam. The thickness of the coatings varied from 0.6 to 1.0 mm, and the maximum hardness achieved was 21 GPa. Structural analysis revealed the oriented growth of eutectic colonies near the primary crystals of iron borides, which was explained by the commonality of the boride phases in the primary Fe{sub 2}B and eutectic Fe{sub 2}B. The eutectic colonies formed during electron-beam cladding consisted of a continuous framework of borides crystals and segregations of α-Fe in the form of oriented fibers. Coatings produced by electron-beam cladding had higher contact-fatigue endurance than those produced by pack boriding.

  18. Boosting Farm Produce Supply

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In the wake of escalating inflation,securing farm produce supply and stablizing grain prices could help to alleviate economic pressure The Chinese Government has pledged to secure a stable supply of farm produce.According to a document released after the annual Central Rural Work Conference held on December 22-23 in Beijing,preventing short supplies of farm produce and avoiding"ex-

  19. Wake vortex alleviation using rapidly actuated segmented Gurney flaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matalanis, Claude G.

    All bodies that generate lift also generate circulation. The circulation generated by large commercial aircraft remains in their wake in the form of trailing vortices. These vortices can be hazardous to following aircraft due to their strength and persistence. To account for this, airports abide by spacing rules which govern the frequency with which aircraft can use their runways when operating in instrument flight rules. These spacing rules are the limiting factor on increasing airport capacity. We conducted an experimental and computational study to assess the potential for using rapidly actuated segmented Gurney flaps, also known as Miniature Trailing Edge Effectors (MiTEs), for active wake vortex alleviation. Wind tunnel tests were performed on a half-span model NACA 0012 wing equipped with an array of 13 independent MITE pairs. The chord-based Reynolds number was around 350,000. Each MiTE could extend 0.015 chord lengths perpendicular to the freestream on the pressure side of the wing. Pressure profiles and a five-hole probe survey in the near wake were used to examine the influence that the MiTEs had upon the wing aerodynamics and the vortex rollup process. Particle image velocimetry was used to measure the static and time-dependent response of the vortex in the intermediate wake to various MiTE actuation schemes. These results were used to form complete initial conditions for vortex filament computations of the far wake evolution. Results from these computations showed that the perturbations created by MiTEs could be used to excite a variety of three-dimensional inviscid vortex instabilities. Finally, the research performed on MiTEs led to the invention of a more practical wake alleviation device: the spanwise actuating Gurney flap. Prototype tests showed that this device could produce similar perturbations to the MiTEs.

  20. Simple identification of Trichophyton tonsurans by chlamydospore-like structures produced in culture media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, Takashi; Anzawa, Kazushi; Sakata, Yuichi; Fujihiro, Machiko

    2013-12-01

    Trichophyton tonsurans is known to be the causative agent of a worldwide epidemic of dermatophytoses among contact sports practitioners, and is spreading among the general population of Japan. Prompt and simple identification of T. tonsurans in diagnostic laboratories is crucial to control infection. The present study evaluated the availability of observation of chlamydospore-like structures grown in culture media as a characteristic for identification of T. tonsurans. Twenty-five strains of T. tonsurans and five strains each of Trichophyton verrucosum, Trichophyton rubrum and Trichophyton mentagrophytes were inoculated on Mycosel agar plates and inoculated Petri dishes were observed by light microscopy from the reverse side. Twenty-three of 25 T. tonsurans strains showed chlamydospore-like structures within 5 days, and all strains at day 8. The numbers of chlamydospore-like structures were very abundant in most strains. The majority of strains of other species showed no chlamydospore-like structures, or very few when present. Positive for chlamydospore-like structures among 15 strains other than T. tonsurans was one strain at day 5 and six strains at day 8. As for the identification of T. tonsurans, presence of chlamydospore-like structures showed 92.0% sensitivity (23/25) and 93.3% specificity (14/15) at day 5, and 100% sensitivity (25/25) and 60.0% specificity (9/15) at day 8. Electron microscopic findings suggest chlamydospore-like structures are not true chlamydospores but are produced by inflation of actively growing hyphae by developing vacuoles in cells. In conclusion, observation of development of chlamydospore-like structures in culture media is the simplest method for identification of T. tonsurans.

  1. Structural properties of ZnO:Al films produced by the sol–gel technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaretskaya, E. P., E-mail: ezaret@ifttp.bas-net.by; Gremenok, V. F. [National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, Scientific and Practical Materials Research Center (Belarus); Semchenko, A. V.; Sidsky, V. V. [Gomel State University (Belarus); Juskenas, R. L. [State Research Institute Center for Physical Sciences and Technology (Lithuania)

    2015-10-15

    ZnO:Al films are produced by sol–gel deposition at temperatures of 350–550°C, using different types of reagents. Atomic-force microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, Raman spectroscopy, and optical transmittance measurements are used to study the dependence of the structural, morphological, and optical properties of the ZnO:Al coatings on the conditions of deposition. The optical conditions for the production of ZnO:Al layers with preferred orientation in the [001] direction and distinguished by small surface roughness are established. The layers produced in the study possess optical transmittance at a level of up to 95% in a wide spectral range and can be used in optoelectronic devices.

  2. Chemical/structural characterization of carbon nanoparticles produced by laser pyrolysis and used for nanotube growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orlanducci, S.; Valentini, F.; Piccirillo, S.; Terranova, M.L.; Botti, S.; Ciardi, R.; Rossi, M.; Palleschi, G

    2004-09-15

    Carbon nanoparticles produced by CO{sub 2} laser pyrolysis have been investigated using morphological and structural probes such as high-resolution scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and electron diffraction, as well as chemical probes, such as gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and fast atom bombardment-mass spectrometry. The produced particles resulted to have a spherical shape and a diameter of about 50 nm with graphitic domains of the order of 80 A. They contain appreciable fractions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, which can be extracted with toluene, as well as fullerene units. The implications of these results for the use of carbon nanopowders in the carbon nanotube synthesis are also discussed.

  3. Structure-Activity Relationships of Bioengineered Heparin/Heparan Sulfates Produced in Different Bioreactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ha Na Kim

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Heparin and heparan sulfate are structurally-related carbohydrates with therapeutic applications in anticoagulation, drug delivery, and regenerative medicine. This study explored the effect of different bioreactor conditions on the production of heparin/heparan sulfate chains via the recombinant expression of serglycin in mammalian cells. Tissue culture flasks and continuously-stirred tank reactors promoted the production of serglycin decorated with heparin/heparan sulfate, as well as chondroitin sulfate, while the serglycin secreted by cells in the tissue culture flasks produced more highly-sulfated heparin/heparan sulfate chains. The serglycin produced in tissue culture flasks was effective in binding and signaling fibroblast growth factor 2, indicating the utility of this molecule in drug delivery and regenerative medicine applications in addition to its well-known anticoagulant activity.

  4. Agricultural Production Structure Optimization:A Case Study of Major Grain Producing Areas, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Sha-sha; LIU Yan-sui; LONG Hua-lou; GUAN Xing-liang

    2013-01-01

    A large number of mathematical models were developed for supporting agricultural production structure optimization decisions; however, few of them can address various uncertainties existing in many factors (e.g., eco-social benefit maximization, food security, employment stability and ecosystem balance). In this study, an interval-probabilistic agricultural production structure optimization model (IPAPSOM) is formulated for tackling uncertainty presented as discrete intervals and/or probability distribution. The developed model improves upon the existing probabilistic programming and inexact optimization approaches. The IPAPSOM considers not only food security policy constraints, but also involves rural households’ income increase and eco-environmental conversation, which can effectively reflect various interrelations among different aspects in an agricultural production structure optimization system. Moreover, it can also help examine the reliability of satisfying (or risk of violating) system constraints under uncertainty. The model is applied to a real case of long-term agricultural production structure optimization in Dancheng County, which is located in Henan Province of Central China as one of the major grain producing areas. Interval solutions associated with different risk levels of constraint violation are obtained. The results are useful for generating a range of decision alternatives under various system benefit conditions, and thus helping decision makers to identify the desired agricultural production structure optimization strategy under uncertainty.

  5. Composition, Structure and Functional Properties of Protein Concentrates and Isolates Produced from Walnut (Juglans regia L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoying Mao

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, composition, structure and the functional properties of protein concentrate (WPC and protein isolate (WPI produced from defatted walnut flour (DFWF were investigated. The results showed that the composition and structure of walnut protein concentrate (WPC and walnut protein isolate (WPI were significantly different. The molecular weight distribution of WPI was uniform and the protein composition of DFWF and WPC was complex with the protein aggregation. H0 of WPC was significantly higher ( p < 0.05 than those of DFWF and WPI, whilst WPI had a higher H0 compared to DFWF. The secondary structure of WPI was similar to WPC. WPI showed big flaky plate like structures; whereas WPC appeared as a small flaky and more compact structure. The most functional properties of WPI were better than WPC. In comparing most functional properties of WPI and WPC with soybean protein concentrate and isolate, WPI and WPC showed higher fat absorption capacity (FAC. Emulsifying properties and foam properties of WPC and WPI in alkaline pH were comparable with that of soybean protein concentrate and isolate. Walnut protein concentrates and isolates can be considered as potential functional food ingredients.

  6. PIV Analysis of Wake Induced by Real Harbor Seal Whiskers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunjevac, Joseph; Rinehart, Aidan; Flaherty, Justin; Zhang, Wei

    2016-11-01

    Harbor Seals are able to accurately detect minute disturbances in the ambient flow using their whiskers, which is attributed to the exceptional capability of the whiskers to suppress vortex-induced vibrations in the wake. To explore potential applications for designing smart devices, such as high-sensitivity underwater flow sensors and drag reduction components, research has studied the role of key parameters of the whisker morphology on wake structure. Due to the inherent variation in size and angle of incidence along the length of whiskers, it is not well understood how a real seal whisker changes wake structure, in particular the vortex shedding behavior. This work aims to understand the flow around a single real seal whisker using Particle Image Velocimetry at low Reynolds numbers (i.e. a few hundred) in a water channel. Variations in flow structure are inspected between several different real whiskers and whisker models. The results will provide insights of the effects of the natural geometry of the harbor seal whiskers on wake flow compared to idealized whisker-like models.

  7. Wake-induced vibrations in Tandem Cylinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mysa, Ravi Chaithanya; Jaiman, Rajeev Kumar

    2015-11-01

    The upstream cylinder is fixed in the tandem cylinders arrangement. The downstream cylinder is placed at a distance of four diameters from the upstream cylinder in the free stream direction and is mounted on a spring. The dynamic response of the downstream cylinder is studied at Reynolds number of 10,000. The transverse displacement amplitude of the downstream cylinder is larger compared to that of single cylinder in the post-lock-in region. The transverse dynamic response of the downstream cylinder in the post-lock-in region is characterized by a dominant low frequency component compared to shed frequency, which is nearer to the structural natural frequency. The interaction of upstream wake with the downstream cylinder is carefully analyzed to understand the introduction of low frequency component in the transverse load along with the shed frequency. We found that the stagnation point moves in proportional to the velocity of the cylinder and is in-phase with the velocity. The low frequency component in the stagnation point movement on the downstream cylinder is sustained by the interaction of upstream wake. The frequencies in the movement of the stagnation point is reflected in the transverse load resulting in large deformation of the cylinder. The authors wish to acknowledge support from A*STAR- SERC and Singapore Maritime Institute.

  8. Large eddy stimulation and experimental measurement of near wake structures of a slotted circular cylinder%开缝圆柱近场尾流的大涡模拟和实验测量

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨锦文; 何意; 鲍锋

    2014-01-01

    The flow around cylinder is one of the classic research issues of fluid mechanics.The modifica-tion of the cylindrical geometry will affect the cylinder’s pressure distribution and near wake flow structures. The present study on slotted cylinder has some certain values in engineering applications such as vortex gen-erator in flow meters and heat convection.Large eddy stimulation based on 3-D Fluent code was carried out for cylinders with slit,with respect to test model of ratio of slit width to diameter s/d =0.15 on five different Reynolds numbers (Re =1500、3000、4400、5837、7200).By the means of qualitative flow visualization and quantitative PIV experiments,the flow patterns between the slit and the shedding vortex of the baseline and slotted cylinder were carefully investigated,measuring and predicting of the shedding vortex frequency were included.The results of numerical simulation agreed well with the experimental measurement.The experi-mental and computational results show that the flow in the slit demonstrated periodic motion,this oscillating vent-flow has greatly altered the near wake flow features.The periodic oscillation in the slit has enhanced the periodicity of the flow around circular cylinder;consequently,the slotted cylinder exhibited an increase in shedding vortex frequency and Strouhal number compared with their baseline case at the same Reynolds numbers.Meanwhile,The wake of the slotted cylinder presented obvious three dimensional features.%基于 Fluent 软件平台采用大涡模拟(LES)的方法对开缝圆柱绕流进行了三维数值仿真,计算了五组不同雷诺数(Re =1500、3000、4400、5837、7200)情况下缝宽比 s/d =0.15的开缝圆柱绕流流场。通过定性的流动显示和定量的 PIV 实验,对 s/d =0.15情况下开缝圆柱内部缝隙流动以及旋涡脱落情况进行了细致研究,并测量了基准圆柱与开缝圆柱的脱落涡频率。数值模拟与实验测量结果符合

  9. Oxidative stability of milk drinks containing structured lipids produced from sunflower oil and caprylic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timm Heinrich, Maike; Xu, Xuebing; Nielsen, Nina Skall;

    2003-01-01

    of adding potential antioxidants EDTA or gallic acid to the milk drink based on SL was investigated. The lipid type significantly affected the oxidative stability of the milk drinks: Milk drink based on SL oxidized faster than milk drink based on RL or SO. The reduced oxidative stability in the SL milk...... drink could not be ascribed was most likely influenced by the structure of the lipid and to a single factor, differences in the process applied to produce and purify the lipids. EDTA was a strong antioxidant, while gallic acid did not exert a distinct antioxidative effect in the milk drink based on SL....

  10. Oxidative stability of structured lipids produced from sunflower oil and caprylic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timm Heinrich, Maike; Xu, Xuebing; Nielsen, Nina Skall

    2003-01-01

    and differences in production/purification, which caused lower tocopherol content and higher initial levels of primary and secondary oxidation products in SL compared with RL and SO. Grindox 117 and gallic acid did not exert a distinct antioxidative effect in the SL oil samples during storage......Traditional sunflower oil (SO), randomized lipid (RL) and specific structured lipid (SL), both produced from SO and tricaprylin/caprylic acid, respectively, were stored for up to 12 wk to compare their oxidative stabilities by chemical and sensory analyses. Furthermore, the effect of adding...

  11. Effects of microbially produced hydrogen sulphide on the corrosion fatigue of offshore structural steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, C.J.; Edyvean, R.G.J.; Brook, R.; Austen, I.M.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of microbially produced hydrogen sulphide (H/sub 2/S) in concentrations up to 450 ppm in natural sea-water on the corrosion fatigue of two high strength micro-alloyed steels has been determined. The crack growth rate increases with increasing H/sub 2/S content but comparisons with environments containing synthetic, added, H/sub 2/S show that the higher levels of biologically generated H/sub 2/S appear less potent than a biological H/sub 2/S. The results are discussed in the light of the possible effects of marine fouling on offshore structures.

  12. Oxidative stability of mayonnaise containing structured lipids produced from sunflower oil and caprylic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Charlotte; Xu, Xuebing; Nielsen, Nina Skall

    2003-01-01

    Mayonnaise based on enzymatically produced specific structured lipid (SL) from sunflower oil and caprylic acid was compared with mayonnaise based on traditional sunflower oil (SO) or chemically randomized lipid (RL) with respect to their oxidative stability, sensory and rheological properties....... Furthermore, the potential antioxidative effect of adding lactoferrin, propyl gallate or EDTA to the mayonnaise with SL was also investigated. Mayonnaise based on SL oxidized faster than mayonnaise based on RL or SO. The reduced oxidative stability in the SL mayonnaise could not be ascribed to a single factor...... gallate and lactoferrin did not exert any antioxidative effect in the SL mayonnaise...

  13. Structure and evolution of flash flood producing storms in a small urban watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Long; Smith, James; Baeck, Mary Lynn; Smith, Brianne; Tian, Fuqiang; Niyogi, Dev

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study is to examine the structure and evolution of storms that produce flash floods in "small" urban watersheds. The study site is Harry's Brook, a 1.1 km2 urban watershed in Princeton, New Jersey. A catalog of 15 storms is developed for Harry's Brook based on paired observations of streamflow and rainfall. Lagrangian analyses of storm properties are based on storm tracking procedures utilizing 3-D radar reflectivity observations from the KDIX (Fort Dix, New Jersey) Weather Surveillance Radar, 1988 Doppler. Analyses focus on the storm elements that were responsible for the peak rainfall rates over the watershed. The 22 July 2006 storm, which produced the record flood peak in the catalog (a unit discharge of 26.8 m3 s-1 km-2) was characterized by thunderstorm cells that produced more than 50 cloud-to-ground lightning strikes and "collapsed" over Harry's Brook. The 3 June 2006 storm, which produced the third largest flood peak (a unit discharge of 11.1 m3 s-1 km-2), was a "low-echo centroid" storm with no lightning. We use cloud-to-ground flash rate, echo top height, maximum reflectivity, and height of maximum reflectivity as key variables for characterizing convective intensity. Storm motion is examined through a time series of storm speed and direction. The 22 July 2006 and 3 June 2006 storms provide end-members of storm properties, centering on "convective intensity," which are associated with flash flooding in small urban watersheds. Extreme 1-15 min rainfall rates are produced by warm season convective systems at both ends of the convective intensity spectrum.

  14. Gravitationally Induced Density Wake of a Circularly Orbiting Object As an Interpretative Framework of Ubiquitous Spirals and Arcs

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Hyosun

    2011-01-01

    An orbiting object in a gas rich environment creates a gravitational density wake containing information about the object and its orbit. Using linear perturbation theory, we analyze the observable properties of the gravitational wake due to the object circularly moving in a static homogeneous gaseous medium, in order to derive the Bondi accretion radius $r_B$, the orbital distance $r_p$, and the Mach number of the object. Supersonic motion, producing a wake of spiral-onion shell structure, exhibits a single-armed Archimedes spiral and two-centered circular arcs with respect to the line of sight. The pitch angle, arm width, and spacing of the spiral pattern are entirely determined by the orbital distance $r_p$ and Mach number of the object. The arm-interarm density contrast is proportional to the Bondi accretion radius, decreasing as a function of distance with a power index of -1. The background density distribution is globally changed from initially uniform to centrally concentrated. The vertical structure o...

  15. Distortion and Residual Stress Control in Integrally Stiffened Structure Produced by Direct Metal Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shih-Yung; Hoffman, Eric K.; Domack, Marcia S.

    2007-01-01

    2-D thermo-mechanical model developed to characterize distortion and residual stresses in integral structure produced by DMD. Demonstrated as a tool to guide experimental development of DMD fabrication process for aero structures. Distortion and residual stresses are local to deposit. Most distortion develops during deposition of the first few layers; Little change in distortion or residual stresses after fifth deposit layer Most of distortion is localized just beneath the build. Thicker build plates and the use of build lands results in greatest decrease in levels of distortion. Pre-straining shown to reduce distortion. Difficult to implement, particularly for complex stiffener arrays. Clamp position has complex effect on distortion and stresses. Overall distortion reduced with decreasing clamp clearance. Larger clamp clearances induce bending. Use of pre-heat and active cooling show minor influence on panel distortion. Generate changes in thermal gradients in the build plate.

  16. Composition, structure and functional properties of protein concentrates and isolates produced from walnut (Juglans regia L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xiaoying; Hua, Yufei

    2012-01-01

    In this study, composition, structure and the functional properties of protein concentrate (WPC) and protein isolate (WPI) produced from defatted walnut flour (DFWF) were investigated. The results showed that the composition and structure of walnut protein concentrate (WPC) and walnut protein isolate (WPI) were significantly different. The molecular weight distribution of WPI was uniform and the protein composition of DFWF and WPC was complex with the protein aggregation. H(0) of WPC was significantly higher (p functional properties of WPI were better than WPC. In comparing most functional properties of WPI and WPC with soybean protein concentrate and isolate, WPI and WPC showed higher fat absorption capacity (FAC). Emulsifying properties and foam properties of WPC and WPI in alkaline pH were comparable with that of soybean protein concentrate and isolate. Walnut protein concentrates and isolates can be considered as potential functional food ingredients.

  17. Structure of the plasma fireball produced by a CO2 laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, E. V.; Bekefi, G.; Ya'akobi, B.

    1971-01-01

    Study of the space and time resolved structure of a helium plasma produced with a repetitive CO2 laser during the first 15 microsec of the afterglow period. The spectra of several neutral and ionized helium lines are used in the determination of the density and temperature profiles of the luminous fireball. It is found that the plasma is comprised of a dense hot core, which emits primarily ionic lines, and a well-defined tenuous outer shell, which is primarily the source of neutral emission lines. This ?two-component' plasma structure develops at about 0.4 microsec after breakdown, at about the time when the luminous fireball dissipates its expansion energy and comes to a virtual standstill.

  18. Effect of modified clays on the structure and functional properties of biofilms produced with zein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Lopes Tavares

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate changes in the structure and some functional properties of biofilms added with modified clays (Cloisite® 15A and Cloisite® 30B prepared by the casting method. The analysis of the microstructure of the films, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, Optical microscopy (MO, and Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR indicated that the addition of clay in the films resulted in the formation of a heterogeneous microstructure, microcomposite or tactoid. Due to the formation of a microcomposite structure, functional properties of the films added with both clays such as opacity, solubility, and permeability to water vapor (PVA, were not better than those of the control film. Thus, it was concluded that although it is possible to produce a film added with modified clays using the casting method, it was not possible to obtain intercalation or exfoliation in a nanocomposite, which would result in improved functional properties.

  19. Capturing relativistic wakefield structures in plasmas using ultrashort high-energy electrons as a probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C J; Hua, J F; Xu, X L; Li, F; Pai, C-H; Wan, Y; Wu, Y P; Gu, Y Q; Mori, W B; Joshi, C; Lu, W

    2016-07-11

    A new method capable of capturing coherent electric field structures propagating at nearly the speed of light in plasma with a time resolution as small as a few femtoseconds is proposed. This method uses a few femtoseconds long relativistic electron bunch to probe the wake produced in a plasma by an intense laser pulse or an ultra-short relativistic charged particle beam. As the probe bunch traverses the wake, its momentum is modulated by the electric field of the wake, leading to a density variation of the probe after free-space propagation. This variation of probe density produces a snapshot of the wake that can directly give many useful information of the wake structure and its evolution. Furthermore, this snapshot allows detailed mapping of the longitudinal and transverse components of the wakefield. We develop a theoretical model for field reconstruction and verify it using 3-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. This model can accurately reconstruct the wakefield structure in the linear regime, and it can also qualitatively map the major features of nonlinear wakes. The capturing of the injection in a nonlinear wake is demonstrated through 3D PIC simulations as an example of the application of this new method.

  20. Capturing relativistic wakefield structures in plasmas using ultrashort high-energy electrons as a probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C. J.; Hua, J. F.; Xu, X. L.; Li, F.; Pai, C.-H.; Wan, Y.; Wu, Y. P.; Gu, Y. Q.; Mori, W. B.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.

    2016-07-01

    A new method capable of capturing coherent electric field structures propagating at nearly the speed of light in plasma with a time resolution as small as a few femtoseconds is proposed. This method uses a few femtoseconds long relativistic electron bunch to probe the wake produced in a plasma by an intense laser pulse or an ultra-short relativistic charged particle beam. As the probe bunch traverses the wake, its momentum is modulated by the electric field of the wake, leading to a density variation of the probe after free-space propagation. This variation of probe density produces a snapshot of the wake that can directly give many useful information of the wake structure and its evolution. Furthermore, this snapshot allows detailed mapping of the longitudinal and transverse components of the wakefield. We develop a theoretical model for field reconstruction and verify it using 3-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. This model can accurately reconstruct the wakefield structure in the linear regime, and it can also qualitatively map the major features of nonlinear wakes. The capturing of the injection in a nonlinear wake is demonstrated through 3D PIC simulations as an example of the application of this new method.

  1. Wake-Effect Minimising Optimal Control of Wind Farms, with Load Reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borchersen, Anders Bech; Larsen, Jesper Abildgaard; Sivabalan, Senthuran

    2014-01-01

    the wake effects in the farm, while maintaining optimal power output. A feature which enables the MPC to spare certain turbines, while maintaining the power output is also implemented. The MPC controller is able to minimize the wake effect in the wind farm, when the power demand is not using the full......A power generating wind turbine causes a speed reduction and an added turbulence to the wind. Wind turbines in wind farms are often caught in these wakes and are found to have a higher structural load than non affected wind turbines. This article investigates the possibility of designing a control...... strategy which optimizes the power production, while minimizing the effect of the wakes in the wind farm. A generic wind farm model which is able to calculate the wind turbines influence on each other is developed. Models for the reduction in wind speed as well as turbulence in the wake effects...

  2. Coseismic conjugate faulting structures produced by the 2016 Mw 7.1 Kumamoto earthquake, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Aiming; Chiba, Tatsuro

    2017-06-01

    Field investigations and analyses of airborne LiDAR data reveal that the 2016 Mw7.1 Kumamoto earthquake produced a ∼40-km-long surface rupture zone with a typical conjugate Riedel shearing fault structure along the pre-existing right-lateral strike-slip Hinagu-Futagawa Fault Zone (HFFZ). The conjugate Riedel shearing structure comprises two sets of coseismic shear fault zones that are oriented to NE-SW to ENE-WSW and WNW-ESE to E-W. The NE-SW to ENE-WSW-trending shear fault zone is characterized by R Riedel shear structures with right-lateral strike-slip displacement of up to 2.5 m, including left-stepping en echelon cracks (T-shear) and mole tracks (P-shear). In contrast, the WNW-ESE to E-W-trending shear fault zone is dominated by R‧ Riedel shear structures with left-lateral displacement of up to 1.3 m, including right-stepping en echelon tension cracks (T) and mole tracks (P), which are concentrated in a zone of <10 m within individual rupture zones. Our findings demonstrate that the coseismic conjugate Riedel shear faulting is mainly controlled by the pre-existing active strike-slip faults of HFFZ under the present E-W compressive stress in the study area, associated with the ongoing penetration of the Philippine Sea Plate into the Eurasian Plate.

  3. Crystal structure of a lactosucrose-producing enzyme, Arthrobacter sp. K-1 β-fructofuranosidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonozuka, Takashi; Tamaki, Akiko; Yokoi, Gaku; Miyazaki, Takatsugu; Ichikawa, Megumi; Nishikawa, Atsushi; Ohta, Yukari; Hidaka, Yuko; Katayama, Kinya; Hatada, Yuji; Ito, Tetsuya; Fujita, Koki

    2012-12-10

    Arthrobacter sp. K-1 β-fructofuranosidase (ArFFase), a glycoside hydrolase family 68 enzyme, catalyzes the hydrolysis and transfructosylation of sucrose. ArFFase is useful for producing a sweetener, lactosucrose (4(G)-β-D-galactosylsucrose). The primary structure of ArFFase is homologous to those of levansucrases, although ArFFase catalyzes mostly hydrolysis when incubated with sucrose alone, even at high concentration. Here, we determined the crystal structure of ArFFase in unliganded form and complexed with fructose. ArFFase consisted of a five-bladed β-propeller fold as observed in levansucrases. The structure of ArFFase was most similar to that of Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus levansucrase (GdLev). The structure of the catalytic cleft of ArFFase was also highly homologous to that of GdLev. However, two amino acid residues, Tyr232 and Pro442 in ArFFase, were not conserved between them. A tunnel observed at the bottom of the catalytic cleft of ArFFase may serve as a water drain or its reservoir.

  4. Structural characterization of biomedical Co–Cr–Mo components produced by direct metal laser sintering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barucca, G., E-mail: g.barucca@univpm.it [SIMAU, Università Politecnica delle Marche, via Brecce Bianche, 60131 Ancona (Italy); Santecchia, E.; Majni, G. [SIMAU, Università Politecnica delle Marche, via Brecce Bianche, 60131 Ancona (Italy); Girardin, E. [DISCO, Università Politecnica delle Marche, via Brecce Bianche, 60131 Ancona (Italy); Bassoli, E.; Denti, L.; Gatto, A. [DIMeC, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, via Vignolese 905/B, Modena 41125 (Italy); Iuliano, L. [DISPEA, Politecnico di Torino, C.so Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy); Moskalewicz, T. [Faculty of Metals Engineering and Industrial Computer Science, AGH University of Science and Technology, Al. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Kraków (Poland); Mengucci, P. [SIMAU, Università Politecnica delle Marche, via Brecce Bianche, 60131 Ancona (Italy)

    2015-03-01

    Direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) is a technique to manufacture complex functional mechanical parts from a computer-aided design (CAD) model. Usually, the mechanical components produced by this procedure show higher residual porosity and poorer mechanical properties than those obtained by conventional manufacturing techniques. In this work, a Co–Cr–Mo alloy produced by DMLS with a composition suitable for biomedical applications was submitted to hardness measurements and structural characterization. The alloy showed a hardness value remarkably higher than those commonly obtained for the same cast or wrought alloys. In order to clarify the origin of this unexpected result, the sample microstructure was investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), electron microscopy (SEM and TEM) and energy dispersive microanalysis (EDX). For the first time, a homogeneous microstructure comprised of an intricate network of thin ε (hcp)-lamellae distributed inside a γ (fcc) phase was observed. The ε-lamellae grown on the {111}{sub γ} planes limit the dislocation slip inside the γ (fcc) phase, causing the measured hardness increase. The results suggest possible innovative applications of the DMLS technique to the production of mechanical parts in the medical and dental fields. - Highlights: • Samples of a Co–Cr–Mo biomedical alloy were produced by direct metal laser sintering. • Hardness values unexpectedly high were attributed to a peculiar microstructure. • Fine lamellae of the ε-phase alternated to the γ-phase were observed for the first time. • A nucleation and growth model for the observed microstructure is proposed.

  5. Counter-rotating vortex pairs in the wake of a vertical axis wind turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolin, Vincent; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2017-04-01

    Despite the rising popularity of vertical axis wind turbines, or VAWTs, the wakes behind these machines is much less well understood than those behind horizontal axis wind turbines, or HAWTs. A thorough understanding of wakes is important as they can cause turbines in wind farms to produce less power than anticipated and increase the fatigue loading on turbines due to vibrations. In order to gain a deeper understanding of the wake behind a vertical axis wind turbine in atmospheric flow stereo-PIV is implemented in a boundary-layer wind tunnel to produce snapshots of the 3-component velocity field in the wake at various downstream positions. The boundaries of the wake are readily observed due to the high velocity gradients and turbulence present here. Two pairs of counter-rotating vortices similar to those in the wake of yawed HAWTs are also observed. An examination of the momentum fluxes behind the turbine demonstrates that the mean flow induced by these vortices entrains a large quantity of momentum from the unperturbed boundary layer flow above the wake. This effect proves to play an even more significant role than turbulence in reintroducing momentum into the wake. In order to comprehend why the VAWT produces these vortices we modify the double-multiple stream-tube model typically used to predict VAWT performance to incorporate crosswind forces. The similarity between VAWT and yawed HAWT wakes is found not to be coincidental as both cases feature rotors which exert a lateral thrust on the incoming wind which leads to the creation of counter-rotating vortex pairs.

  6. Optical and structural properties of PbI2 thin film produced via chemical dipping method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kariper, İ. A.

    2016-06-01

    PbI2 thin films were deposited on glass substrates via chemical bath deposition. The characteristics of PbI2 thin films were examined through their structural and optical properties. X-ray diffraction spectra showed the presence of rhombohedral structure and atom planes were subject to change with the pH of the bath. Scanning electron microscope indicated uniform distribution of grains. Optical properties were examined via UV-VIS; optical spectrum of the thin films was measured at the range of 200-1100 nm wavelength. Optimum pH levels for producing thin films were found to be pH 4-5. It has been observed that transmission and optical band gap ( E g) increased with the pH of the bath, which varied between 66-95 and 2.24-2.50 %, respectively; on the other hand film thickness of PbI2 thin films was decreased with the pH of the bath. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis were in accordance with theoretical value of PbI2 at pH = 4 and 5. Refractive index was negatively correlated with pH of the chemical bath; it has been calculated as 1.97, 1.40, 1.29 and 1.24 for the films produced at pH 2, 3, 4 and 5. The results of the study were compared with similar studies in the literature.

  7. Effects of transgenic fructan-producing potatoes on the community structure of rhizosphere and phyllosphere bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Regina; Behrendt, Undine; Hommel, Bernd; Kropf, Siegfried; Ulrich, Andreas

    2008-11-01

    The rhizosphere and phyllosphere microbial communities of transgenic potatoes producing fructan were studied in comparison with isogenic controls and conventional varieties in a field release experiment over a period of 3 years. Population densities and 16S rRNA gene-based terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis of the rhizosphere bacterial community only displayed the influence of annual and seasonal effects and the influence of field heterogeneity. In contrast, the T-RFLP analysis of the phyllosphere bacteria revealed in two of the 3 years significant differences in the community structure between the transgenic lines producing inulin and the other variants. This effect was studied in more detail through the analysis of bacterial isolates and a 16S rRNA gene clone library obtained from a transgenic line and the control. Both methods revealed a lower genetic diversity in the transgenic line and changes in the abundance of several bacterial groups. The isolates of the transgenic line were dominated by Bacilli, whereas most of the control isolates represented Actinobacteria. The clones were dominated by Proteobacteria, with main differences between both variants in Deltaproteobacteria, Bacilli and Bacteroidetes. However, all in all, the impact of the transgenic lines did not exceed the natural variability of the phyllosphere community structure on potato plants.

  8. Statistical meandering wake model and its application to yaw-angle optimisation of wind farms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thøgersen, E.; Tranberg, B.; Herp, J.; Greiner, M.

    2017-05-01

    The wake produced by a wind turbine is dynamically meandering and of rather narrow nature. Only when looking at large time averages, the wake appears to be static and rather broad, and is then well described by simple engineering models like the Jensen wake model (JWM). We generalise the latter deterministic models to a statistical meandering wake model (SMWM), where a random directional deflection is assigned to a narrow wake in such a way that on average it resembles a broad Jensen wake. In a second step, the model is further generalised to wind-farm level, where the deflections of the multiple wakes are treated as independently and identically distributed random variables. When carefully calibrated to the Nysted wind farm, the ensemble average of the statistical model produces the same wind-direction dependence of the power efficiency as obtained from the standard Jensen model. Upon using the JWM to perform a yaw-angle optimisation of wind-farm power output, we find an optimisation gain of 6.7% for the Nysted wind farm when compared to zero yaw angles and averaged over all wind directions. When applying the obtained JWM-based optimised yaw angles to the SMWM, the ensemble-averaged gain is calculated to be 7.5%. This outcome indicates the possible operational robustness of an optimised yaw control for real-life wind farms.

  9. Ship heading and velocity analysis by wake detection in SAR images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziano, Maria Daniela; D'Errico, Marco; Rufino, Giancarlo

    2016-11-01

    With the aim of ship-route estimation, a wake detection method is developed and applied to COSMO/SkyMed and TerraSAR-X Stripmap SAR images over the Gulf of Naples, Italy. In order to mitigate the intrinsic limitations of the threshold logic, the algorithm identifies the wake features according to the hydrodynamic theory. A post-detection validation phase is performed to classify the features as real wake structures by means of merit indexes defined in the intensity domain. After wake reconstruction, ship heading is evaluated on the basis of turbulent wake direction and ship velocity is estimated by both techniques of azimuth shift and Kelvin pattern wavelength. The method is tested over 34 ship wakes identified by visual inspection in both HH and VV images at different incidence angles. For all wakes, no missed detections are reported and at least the turbulent and one narrow-V wakes are correctly identified, with ship heading successfully estimated. Also, the azimuth shift method is applied to estimate velocity for the 10 ships having route with sufficient angular separation from the satellite ground track. In one case ship velocity is successfully estimated with both methods, showing agreement within 14%.

  10. Sinorhizobium fredii and Sinorhizobium meliloti produce structurally conserved lipopolysaccharides and strain-specific K antigens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reuhs, B.L.; Geller, D.P.; Kim, J.S.; Fox, J.E.; Kolli, V.S.K. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States). Complex Carbohydrate Research Center; Pueppke, S.G. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Dept. of Plant Pathology

    1998-12-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and capsular polysaccharides (K antigens) may influence the interaction of rhizobia with their specific hosts; therefore, the authors conducted a comparative analysis of Sinorhizobium fredii and Sinorhizobium meliloti, which are genetically related, yet symbiotically distinct, nitrogen-fixing microsymbionts of legumes. They found that both species typically produce strain-specific K antigens that consist of 3-deoxy-D-manno-2-octulosonic acid (Kdo), or other 1-carboxy-2-keto-3-deoxy sugars (such as sialic acid), and hexoses. The K antigens of each strain are distinguished by glycosyl composition, anomeric configuration, acetylation, and molecular weight distribution. One consistent difference between the K antigens of S. fredii and those of S. meliloti is the presence of N-acetyl groups in the polysaccharides of the latter. In contrast to the K antigens, the LPS of Sinorhizobium spp. are major common antigens. Rough (R) LPS is the predominant form of LPS produced by cultured cells, and some strains release almost no detectable smooth (S) LPS upon extraction. Sinorhizobium spp. are delineated into two major RLPS core serogroups, which do not correspond to species. The O antigens of the SLPS, when present, have similar degrees of polymerization and appear to be structurally conserved throughout the genus. Interestingly, one strain was found to be distinct from all others: S. fredii HH303 produces a unique K antigen, which contains galacturonic acid and rhamnose, and the RLPS did not fall into either of the RLPS core serogroups. The results of this study indicate that the conserved S- and RLPS of Sinorhizobium spp. lack the structural information necessary to influence host specificity, whereas the variable K antigens may affect strain-cultivar interactions.

  11. Pluto's plasma wake oriented away from the ecliptic plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-de-Tejada, H.; Durand-Manterola, H.; Reyes-Ruiz, M.; Lundin, R.

    2015-01-01

    Conditions similar to those observed in the solar wind interaction with Venus and Mars where there is a planetary atmosphere in the absence of a global intrinsic magnetic field may also be applicable to Pluto. With up to 24 μbars inferred for the Pluto atmosphere it is possible that the feeble solar photon radiation flux that reaches by its orbit, equivalent to ∼10-3 that at Earth, is sufficient to produce an ionization component that can be eroded by the solar wind. In view of the reduced solar wind density (∼10-3 with respect to that at 1 AU) that should be available by Pluto its total kinetic energy will be significantly smaller than that at Earth. However, the parameter values that are implied for the interaction process between the solar wind and the local upper ionosphere are sufficient to produce a plasma wake that should extend downstream from Pluto. In view of its low gravity force the plasma wake should have a wider cross-section than that in the Venus and Mars plasma environment. Since Pluto rotates with the axis tilted ∼30° away from the ecliptic plane the plasma wake will be influenced by a Magnus force that has a large component is the north-south solar polar direction. That force will be responsible for propelling the plasma wake with a component that can be directed away from that plane. It is estimated that transport of solar wind momentum to the upper Pluto's ionosphere implies rotation periods smaller than that of the solid body, and thus large values of the Magnus force that can increase the orientation of the plasma wake away from the ecliptic plane.

  12. Wake Characteristics of a Single Turbine During the CWEX-10/11 Crop Wind-Energy EXperiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajewski, D. A.; Takle, E. S.; Lundquist, J. K.; Rhodes, M. E.; Prueger, J. H.; Oncley, S. O.; Horst, T. W.; Pfeiffer, R.; Hatfield, J.; Spoth, K. K.; Doorenbos, R. K.

    2013-12-01

    In the summer of 2010 and 2011 for the Crop Wind-energy EXperiment (CWEX), flux stations measured differences in micrometeorology upstream and downstream of a single turbine within a large wind farm in Iowa. Profiling LiDARs were positioned upwind and downwind of a single turbine for two months in 2011 to document the wake profiles of mean wind speed and turbulent kinetic energy (TKE). Nacelle-based measurements of wind speed, wind direction, and power produced verified the likely presence of a wake above the downwind flux station. As described in the CWEX overview paper (Rajewski et al. 2013) the flux stations detected (1) turbine-wake events for wakes overhead but not intersecting the surface, (2) wakes with a direct surface influence, and (3) flow perturbations caused by the static pressure field around a line of turbines. We refine our conceptual model of wind turbine flow by comparing downwind-upwind flux and profile station differences for categories of waked and non-waked flow according to turbine hub-height speed and direction, ambient thermal stratification, and the operating status of the turbines. For nighttime stable conditions (some for which a low level jet is present) we measured both within the rotor depth and at the surface higher turbulence and stronger intermittency of the flow on the wake edges as compared to the wake core. We additionally observe frequent periods with 20-30° of directional shear from the surface to the top of the rotor as evidenced by a downwind flux station in non-waked flow with concurrent LiDAR measurement of a wake in the rotor layer. Momentum power spectra and co-spectra of 20-Hz surface data corroborate with previous wind tunnel and numerical simulations of wake turbulence with higher energy intensity but at reduced scales than for non-waked conditions. The spectra demonstrate a return to ambient flow when the wind farm is brought offline.

  13. Formation of Nanocrystalline Structure in 301 Stainless Steel Produced by Martensite Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskandari, M.; Kermanpur, A.; Najafizadeh, A.

    2009-09-01

    The present work aims to obtain the optimum parameters of a thermomechanical treatment for developing a nanocrystalline structure in as-cast AISI 301 austenitic stainless steel. In the first step, the effect of homogenization times of 3 to 13 hours at 1200 °C on the grain size of hot-rolled specimens was studied. The results showed the minimum grain size obtained with homogenization at 1200 °C for 9 hours after hot rolling at the temperature range of 1000 °C to 1200 °C, strain of 0.8, and strain rate of 1.2 s-1. In the second stage, the effects of strain, initial grain size, rolling temperature, and strain path were examined on martensite formation in a thermomechanical process consisting of cold rolling and subsequent annealing. Cold rolling was carried out at -196 °C, -10 °C, and 0 °C with a strain rate of 0.5 s-1 and reductions of 10 to 95 pct, while annealing treatment was conducted at 600 °C to 850 °C for 1 to 50 minutes. The results showed that decreasing the rolling temperature and increasing the strain and initial grain size plus the use of cross rolling resulted in increased volume fraction of the strain-induced martensite during cold rolling and in reduced martensite saturating strain from 0.7 to 0.2, the overall result being enhanced grain refinement of the steel sheets produced. The nanocrystalline austenitic structure with a grain size of about 60 to 80 nm was produced by annealing at 850 °C for 1 minute from the strain-induced martensitic structure formed during cold rolling. It was found that the effect of grain size prior to cold rolling was more pronounced on grain refinement than thickness reduction.

  14. Numerical Simulations of a VAWT in the Wake of a Moving Car

    OpenAIRE

    Wenlong Tian; Zhaoyong Mao; Yukai Li

    2017-01-01

    Wind energy generated from the wake of moving cars has a large energy potential that has not yet been utilized. In this study, a vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT) was used to recover energy from the wakes of moving cars. The turbine was designed to be planted by the side of the car lane and driven by the wake produced by the car. Transient computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were performed to evaluate the performance of the VAWT. The influence of two main factors on the performance...

  15. Human butyrylcholinesterase produced in insect cells: huprine-based affinity purification and crystal structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazzolotto, Xavier; Wandhammer, Marielle; Ronco, Cyril; Trovaslet, Marie; Jean, Ludovic; Lockridge, Oksana; Renard, Pierre-Yves; Nachon, Florian

    2012-08-01

    Butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) is a serine hydrolase that is present in all mammalian tissues. It can accommodate larger substrates or inhibitors than acetylcholinesterase (AChE), the enzyme responsible for hydrolysis of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine in the central nervous system and neuromuscular junctions. AChE is the specific target of organophosphorous pesticides and warfare nerve agents, and BChE is a stoichiometric bioscavenger. Conversion of BChE into a catalytic bioscavenger by rational design or designing reactivators specific to BChE required structural data obtained using a recombinant low-glycosylated human BChE expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells. This expression system yields ≈ 1 mg of pure enzyme per litre of cell culture. Here, we report an improved expression system using insect cells with a fourfold higher yield for truncated human BChE with all glycosylation sites present. We developed a fast purification protocol for the recombinant protein using huprine-based affinity chromatography, which is superior to the classical procainamide-based affinity. The purified BChE crystallized under different conditions and space group than the recombinant low-glycosylated protein produced in Chinese hamster ovary cells. The crystals diffracted to 2.5 Å. The overall monomer structure is similar to the low-glycosylated structure except for the presence of the additional glycans. Remarkably, the carboxylic acid molecule systematically bound to the catalytic serine in the low-glycosylated structure is also present in this new structure, despite the different expression system, purification protocol and crystallization conditions. © 2012 The Authors Journal compilation © 2012 FEBS.

  16. Numerical modeling of initiation of lightning leaders from tall structures by sprite-producing lightning discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasko, V. P.

    2011-12-01

    It is well established by now that large charge transfers between cloud and ground in positive cloud-to-ground lightning discharges (+CGs) can lead to transient electric field enhancements at mesospheric and lower ionospheric altitudes. In these events the electric field can exceed the conventional breakdown field and lead to formation of transient luminous events referred to as sprites and sprite halos [e.g., Qin et al., JGR, 116, A06305, 2011, and references therein]. Stanley and Heavner [Proc. 12th International Conference on Atmospheric Electricity, Versailles, France, 2003] reported that the large and rapid charge transfer of +CGs producing sprites can also initiate upward positive leaders from tall structures. These authors also presented data analysis indicating that structures with >400 m height have a significantly enhanced probability of launching upward positive leaders that may culminate in a -CG return stroke to the structure. The effect can be understood by considering the field intensification at the top of the tall structure combined with fast application of the field preventing formation and shielding effects of ion corona [Brook et al., JGR, 66, 3967, 1961]. In the present work we utilize the most recent modeling approaches developed at Penn State [e.g., Riousset et al., JGR, 115, A00E10, 2010] to quantify the conditions leading to initiation of positive leaders from tall structures following sprite-producing +CGs. Experiments show that the streamer zone transforms into leader when voltage drop along the streamer zone exceeds 400 kV [e.g., Aleksandrov et al., J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys., 38, 1225, 2005]. For a formed leader half of the voltage drops in the streamer zone, and another half in free space ahead of the streamer zone [Bazelyan and Raizer, Lightning physics and lightning protection, p. 62, 2000]. In our analysis therefore we assume that minimum voltage at the tip of the tower should exceed 800 kV for sustainment of upward propagating leader

  17. Fine structure of Langmuir waves produced by a solar electron event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Kurth, W. S.; Williams, D. J.; Bolton, S. J.

    1993-01-01

    Observations of highly structured bursts of Langmuir waves produced by energetic electrons ejected from a solar flare using wideband plasma wave measurements on the Galileo spacecraft are reported. Attention is given to the solar flare that occurred on December 10, 1990, while the spacecraft was at a radial distance of 0.98 AU from the sun. This flare emitted a stream of energetic electrons and an associated type III radio event, both of which were detected by Galileo. A large number of intense Langmuir wave bursts were detected near the local electron plasma frequency, which was about 25 kHz. The bursts, which lasted about 1.5 hr, coincided with the arrival of the solar electrons. The bursts are highly structured and consist mainly of isolated wave packets with durations as short as 1 ms and beat-type waveforms with beat frequencies ranging from 200 to 500 Hz. The highly structured envelopes of these waves are strongly suggestive of nonlinear parametric decay processes such as those predicted by various theories dealing with the saturation of beam-driven electrostatic instabilities.

  18. Using thermal infrared imagery produced by unmanned air vehicles to evaluate locations of ecological road structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sercan Gülci

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The aerial photos and satellite images are widely used and cost efficient data for monitoring and analysis of large areas in forestry activities. Nowadays, accurate and high resolution remote sensing data can be generated for large areas by using Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV integrated with sensors working in various spectral bands. Besides, the UAV systems (UAVs have been used in interdisciplinary studies to produce data of large scale forested areas for desired time periods (i.e. in different seasons or different times of a day. In recent years, it has become more important to conduct studies on determination of wildlife corridors for controlling and planning of habitat fragmentation of wild animals that need vast living areas. The wildlife corridors are a very important base for the determination of a road network planning and placement of ecological road structures (passages, as well as for the assessment of special and sensitive areas such as riparian zones within the forest. It is possible to evaluate wildlife corridors for large areas within a shorter time by using data produced by ground measurements, and remote sensing and viewer systems (i.e. photo-trap, radar and etc., as well as by using remote sensing data generated by UAVs. Ecological behaviors and activities (i.e. sheltering, feeding, mating, etc. of wild animals vary spatially and temporally. Some species are active in their habitats at day time, while some species are active during the night time. One of the most effective methods for evaluation of night time animals is utilizing heat sensitive thermal cameras that can be used to collect thermal infrared images with the night vision feature. When the weather conditions are suitable for a flight, UAVs assist for determining location of corridors effectively and accurately for moving wild animals at any time of the day. Then, the most suitable locations for ecological road structures can be determined based on wildlife corridor

  19. Structure and morphology of regenerated silk nano-fibers produced by electrospinning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarkoob, Shahrzad

    The impressive physical and mechanical properties of natural silk fiberssp1 and the possibility of producing these proteins using biotechnology,sp2 have provided the impetus for recent efforts in both the biosynthesissp{3,4} and the spinning of these protein based biopolymers.sp{5,6,7} The question still remains: whether fibers spun from solutions with similar chemical makeup can produce fibers with similar structures and therefore with the possibility of improved properties. Since genetically engineered silk solutions were not readily available, the first objective of this project was to completely dissolve the Bombyx mori cocoon and the Nephila clavipes dragline silk while maintaining the molecular weight integrity of the polymer. The second objective was to develop a system for re-spinning from very small amount of the resulting silk solutions by the process of electrospinning. The third objective was, to produce regenerated silk fibers with diameters that are several orders of magnitude smaller than the original fibers, suitable for direct observation and analysis by transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction. And finally, to compare these results to structural information obtained from natural (as spun by the organism) fibers to see if the regenerated solutions are able to form the same structure as the original fibers. Both types of silk fibers were successfully dissolved while maintaining the polymer integrity. Small quantities (25-50 mul) of these solutions were used to electrospin fibers with diameters ranging from 8nm-200nm. The fibers were observed by optical, scanning electron, and transmission electron microscopy. These nano fibers showed optical retardation, appeared to have a circular cross-section, and were dimensionally stable at temperatures above 280sp°C. Electron diffraction patterns of annealed electrospun fibers of B. mori and N. clavipes showed reflections, demonstrating orientational and semicrystalline order in the material

  20. Evaluation of Fast-Time Wake Vortex Models using Wake Encounter Flight Test Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Nashat N.; VanValkenburg, Randal L.; Bowles, Roland L.; Limon Duparcmeur, Fanny M.; Gloudesman, Thijs; van Lochem, Sander; Ras, Eelco

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a methodology for the integration and evaluation of fast-time wake models with flight data. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration conducted detailed flight tests in 1995 and 1997 under the Aircraft Vortex Spacing System Program to characterize wake vortex decay and wake encounter dynamics. In this study, data collected during Flight 705 were used to evaluate NASA's fast-time wake transport and decay models. Deterministic and Monte-Carlo simulations were conducted to define wake hazard bounds behind the wake generator. The methodology described in this paper can be used for further validation of fast-time wake models using en-route flight data, and for determining wake turbulence constraints in the design of air traffic management concepts.

  1. Observing the Evolution of Typhoon Wakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-30

    the formation of a sufficiently intense typhoon to begin the cold-wake survey. 1 RESULTS The planning for the ...2010 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2010 to 00-00-2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Observing the Evolution of Typhoon Wakes 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Observing the Evolution of Typhoon Wakes Steven R. Jayne Woods Hole Oceanographic

  2. Effects of Solar Wind Conditions on the Plasma Wake Within a Polar Crater: Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, M. I.; Farrell, W. M.; Stubbs, T. J.

    2011-01-01

    As the solar wind sweeps horizontally past a shadowed lunar crater it simultaneously diffuses toward the surface through an ambipolar process, forming a plasma wake (e.g., Figure 1). Importantly, the resulting electric field structure diverts solar wind protons toward the cold crater floor where they may represent a source of surficial hydrogen. We present a handful of two-dimensional kinetic simulations exploring the range of wake structures and surface particle fluxes possible under various background plasma conditions.

  3. Wake field effects in APT linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurennoy, S.S.

    1998-12-31

    The 1.7-GeV 100-mA CW proton linac is now under design for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) Project. The high current leads to stringent restrictions on allowable beam losses (<1 nA/m), that requires analyzing carefully all possible loss sources. While wake-field effects are usually considered negligible in proton linacs, the author studies these effects for the APT to exclude potential problems at such a high current. Loss factors and resonance frequency spectra of various discontinuities of the vacuum chamber are investigated, both analytically and using 2-D and 3-D simulation codes with a single bunch as well as with many bunches. Here he concentrates on two features specific to the APT linac: loss factors for the design {beta} < 1 and CW beam structure.

  4. Revolutionary Wake Hazard Assessment Tool Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Continuum Dynamics, Inc. (CDI) has developed a Multiple Aircraft Simulation Tool (MAST) that revolutionizes the ability to predict and assess wake interactions...

  5. Wind turbine wake measurement in complex terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, KS; Larsen, GC; Menke, R.; Vasiljevic, N.; Angelou, N.; Feng, J.; Zhu, WJ; Vignaroli, A.; W, W. Liu; Xu, C.; Shen, WZ

    2016-09-01

    SCADA data from a wind farm and high frequency time series measurements obtained with remote scanning systems have been analysed with focus on identification of wind turbine wake properties in complex terrain. The analysis indicates that within the flow regime characterized by medium to large downstream distances (more than 5 diameters) from the wake generating turbine, the wake changes according to local atmospheric conditions e.g. vertical wind speed. In very complex terrain the wake effects are often “overruled” by distortion effects due to the terrain complexity or topology.

  6. Evaluation of the structural behaviour of a port chamber following damages produced in the refractory lining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Constantin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The port chamber used in oil refineries is an exhaust chamber mountedafter the catalytic reactor for retaining and unifying the exhaust hot processgases. The thick steel shell has a refractory lining made of refractorycement called gunite or shotcrete. Damages produced in the refractorylining have serious effects on the thermal generated stresses in the steelshell. The research work aimed to find the level of these stresses in anumerical/experimental approach and to evaluate its consequences onthe service life of this important component of the oil refinery. A complexsequentially coupled physics thermal-structural analysis was performedusing the ANSYS code in order to get the stresses generated by a deepcrack in the shotcrete layer. The results concerning the thermal mappingwere based on previous inspections made with infrared thermography(IRT and made possible an estimation of the remained service life of theport chamber.

  7. LARGE-SCALE VORTICAL STRUCTURES PRODUCED BY AN IMPINGING DENSITY JET IN SHALLOW CROSSFLOW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The large-scale vortical structures produced by an impinging density jet in shallow crossflow were numerically investigated in detail using RNG turbulence model.The scales, formation mechanism and evolution feature of the upstream wall vortex in relation to stagnation point and the Scarf vortex in near field were analyzed. The computed characteristic scales of the upstream vortex show distinguished three-dimensionality and vary with the velocity ratio and the water depth. The Scarf vortex in the near field plays an important role in the lateral concentration distributions of the impinging jet in crossflow. When the velocity ratio is relatively small, there exists a distinct lateral high concentration aggregation zone at the lateral edge between the bottom layer wall jet and the ambient crossflow, which is dominated by the Scarf vortex in the near field.

  8. Structure determination of the neutral exopolysaccharide produced by Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus OLL1073R-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Calsteren, Marie-Rose; Gagnon, Fleur; Nishimura, Junko; Makino, Seiya

    2015-09-01

    The neutral exopolysaccharide (NPS) of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus strain OLL1073R-1 was purified and characterized. The molecular mass was 5.0×10(6) g/mol. Sugar and absolute configuration analyses gave the following composition: d-Glc, 1; d-Gal, 1.5. The NPS was also submitted to periodate oxidation followed by borohydride reduction and Smith degradation. Sugar and methylation analyses, (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance, and mass spectrometry of the NPS or of its specifically modified products allowed determining the repeating unit sequence: {2)Glc(α1-3)Glc(β1-3)[Gal(β1-4)]Gal(β1-4)Gal(α1-}n. The structure is compared to that of exopolysaccharides produced by other Lactobacillus bulgaricus strains.

  9. Solution structure of recombinant somatomedin B domain from vitronectin produced in Pichia pastoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjaergaard, Magnus; Gårdsvoll, Henrik; Hirschberg, Daniel; Nielbo, Steen; Mayasundari, Anand; Peterson, Cynthia B; Jansson, Anna; Jørgensen, Thomas J D; Poulsen, Flemming M; Ploug, Michael

    2007-09-01

    The cysteine-rich somatomedin B domain (SMB) of the matrix protein vitronectin is involved in several important biological processes. First, it stabilizes the active conformation of the plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1); second, it provides the recognition motif for cell adhesion via the cognate integrins (alpha(v)beta(3), alpha(v)beta(5), and alpha(IIb)beta(3)); and third, it binds the complex between urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and its glycolipid-anchored receptor (uPAR). Previous structural studies on SMB have used recombinant protein expressed in Escherichia coli or SMB released from plasma-derived vitronectin by CNBr cleavage. However, different disulfide patterns and three-dimensional structures for SMB were reported. In the present study, we have expressed recombinant human SMB by two different eukaryotic expression systems, Pichia pastoris and Drosophila melanogaster S2-cells, both yielding structurally and functionally homogeneous protein preparations. Importantly, the entire population of our purified, recombinant SMB has a solvent exposure, both as a free domain and in complex with PAI-1, which is indistinguishable from that of plasma-derived SMB as assessed by amide hydrogen ((1)H/(2)H) exchange. This solvent exposure was only reproduced by one of three synthetic SMB products with predefined disulfide connectivities corresponding to those published previously. Furthermore, this connectivity was also the only one to yield a folded and functional domain. The NMR structure was determined for free SMB produced by Pichia and is largely consistent with that solved by X-ray crystallography for SMB in complex with PAI-1.

  10. Transparent layered YAG ceramics with structured Yb doping produced via tape casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hostaša, Jan; Piancastelli, Andreana; Toci, Guido; Vannini, Matteo; Biasini, Valentina

    2017-03-01

    The flexibility of the ceramic production process, in particular in terms of shaping and spatial control of distribution of active ions, is one of the strong points in favor of transparent ceramics. In high power lasers in particular, where thermal management is a critical issue, the finely controlled design of spatial distribution of the doping ions within the laser gain media can reduce undesired thermally induced effects and large temperature gradients, and thus enhance the efficiency and laser beam quality especially under increased thermal load. In the present work transparent structured YAG ceramics with Yb doping were produced by tape casting followed by thermal compression of assembled tapes and sintered under high vacuum. The thermal compression of variously doped tape cast layers is a very promising method because it allows a high precision and good control over dopant distribution in the sintered material. After sintering, the distribution of Yb across the layers was characterized by SEM-EDX and the thickness of Yb diffusion zones between the layers with different Yb content was measured. Optical homogeneity was assessed by means of optical transmittance mapping of the samples and by 2D scanning of laser output. The effect of structured dopant distribution on laser performance was measured in quasi-CW and CW regime with different duty factors. Slope efficiency values higher than 50% were measured both in quasi-CW and in CW lasing conditions. The results are in good agreement with previously calculated predictions, confirming the beneficial effect of structured doping on laser performances and enlightening the impact of the residual scattering losses. Compared to other processing methods, such as the pressing of granulated powders, tape casting followed by thermal compression leads to straight and narrow interfaces between layers with different composition and allows to build structures composed of extremely thin layers with defined dopant content.

  11. Structural characterization of biomedical Co-Cr-Mo components produced by direct metal laser sintering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barucca, G; Santecchia, E; Majni, G; Girardin, E; Bassoli, E; Denti, L; Gatto, A; Iuliano, L; Moskalewicz, T; Mengucci, P

    2015-03-01

    Direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) is a technique to manufacture complex functional mechanical parts from a computer-aided design (CAD) model. Usually, the mechanical components produced by this procedure show higher residual porosity and poorer mechanical properties than those obtained by conventional manufacturing techniques. In this work, a Co-Cr-Mo alloy produced by DMLS with a composition suitable for biomedical applications was submitted to hardness measurements and structural characterization. The alloy showed a hardness value remarkably higher than those commonly obtained for the same cast or wrought alloys. In order to clarify the origin of this unexpected result, the sample microstructure was investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), electron microscopy (SEM and TEM) and energy dispersive microanalysis (EDX). For the first time, a homogeneous microstructure comprised of an intricate network of thin ε (hcp)-lamellae distributed inside a γ (fcc) phase was observed. The ε-lamellae grown on the {111}γ planes limit the dislocation slip inside the γ (fcc) phase, causing the measured hardness increase. The results suggest possible innovative applications of the DMLS technique to the production of mechanical parts in the medical and dental fields. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Statistical Estimators Using Jointly Administrative and Survey Data to Produce French Structural Business Statistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brion Philippe

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Using as much administrative data as possible is a general trend among most national statistical institutes. Different kinds of administrative sources, from tax authorities or other administrative bodies, are very helpful material in the production of business statistics. However, these sources often have to be completed by information collected through statistical surveys. This article describes the way Insee has implemented such a strategy in order to produce French structural business statistics. The originality of the French procedure is that administrative and survey variables are used jointly for the same enterprises, unlike the majority of multisource systems, in which the two kinds of sources generally complement each other for different categories of units. The idea is to use, as much as possible, the richness of the administrative sources combined with the timeliness of a survey, even if the latter is conducted only on a sample of enterprises. One main issue is the classification of enterprises within the NACE nomenclature, which is a cornerstone variable in producing the breakdown of the results by industry. At a given date, two values of the corresponding code may coexist: the value of the register, not necessarily up to date, and the value resulting from the data collected via the survey, but only from a sample of enterprises. Using all this information together requires the implementation of specific statistical estimators combining some properties of the difference estimators with calibration techniques. This article presents these estimators, as well as their statistical properties, and compares them with those of other methods.

  13. Large area and structured epitaxial graphene produced by confinement controlled sublimation of silicon carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Heer, Walt A; Berger, Claire; Ruan, Ming; Sprinkle, Mike; Li, Xuebin; Hu, Yike; Zhang, Baiqian; Hankinson, John; Conrad, Edward

    2011-10-11

    After the pioneering investigations into graphene-based electronics at Georgia Tech, great strides have been made developing epitaxial graphene on silicon carbide (EG) as a new electronic material. EG has not only demonstrated its potential for large scale applications, it also has become an important material for fundamental two-dimensional electron gas physics. It was long known that graphene mono and multilayers grow on SiC crystals at high temperatures in ultrahigh vacuum. At these temperatures, silicon sublimes from the surface and the carbon rich surface layer transforms to graphene. However the quality of the graphene produced in ultrahigh vacuum is poor due to the high sublimation rates at relatively low temperatures. The Georgia Tech team developed growth methods involving encapsulating the SiC crystals in graphite enclosures, thereby sequestering the evaporated silicon and bringing growth process closer to equilibrium. In this confinement controlled sublimation (CCS) process, very high-quality graphene is grown on both polar faces of the SiC crystals. Since 2003, over 50 publications used CCS grown graphene, where it is known as the "furnace grown" graphene. Graphene multilayers grown on the carbon-terminated face of SiC, using the CCS method, were shown to consist of decoupled high mobility graphene layers. The CCS method is now applied on structured silicon carbide surfaces to produce high mobility nano-patterned graphene structures thereby demonstrating that EG is a viable contender for next-generation electronics. Here we present for the first time the CCS method that outperforms other epitaxial graphene production methods.

  14. Structural characterization of an acidic exoheteropolysaccharide produced by the nitrogen-fixing bacterium Burkholderia tropica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrato, Rodrigo V; Sassaki, Guilherme L; Gorin, Philip A J; Cruz, Leonardo M; Pedrosa, Fábio O; Choudhury, Biswa; Carlson, Russell W; Iacomini, Marcello

    2008-09-05

    An acidic exopolysaccharide (EPS) produced by the diazotrophic bacterium Burkholderia tropica, strain Ppe8, was isolated from the culture supernatant of bacteria grown in a synthetic liquid medium containing mannitol and glutamate. Monosaccharide composition showed Rha, Glc and GlcA in a 2.0:2.0:1.0 molar ratio, respectively. Further structural characterization was performed by a combination of NMR, mass spectrometry and chemical methods. Partial acid hydrolysis of EPS provided a mixture of acidic oligosaccharides that were characterized by ESI-MS, giving rise to ions with m/z 193 (GlcA-H)(-), 339 (GlcA,Rha-H)(-), 501 (GlcA,Rha,Glc-H)(-), 647 (GlcA,Rha2,Glc,-H)(-), 809 (GlcA,Rha2,Glc2,-H)(-) and 851 (GlcA,Rha2,Glc2,OAc-H)(-). Carboxyreduced EPS (EPS-CR) had Glc and Rha in a 3:2 ratio, present as d- and l-enantiomers, respectively. Methylation and NMR analysis of EPS and EPS-CR showed a main chain containing 2,4-di-O-Rhap, 3-O-Rhap and 4-O-Glcp. A GlcA side chain unit was found in the acidic EPS, substituting O-4 of α-l-Rhap units. This was observed as a non-reducing end unit of glucopyranose in the EPS-CR. Acetyl esters occured at O-2 of β-l-Rhap units. From the combined results herein, we determined the structure of the exocellular polysaccharide produced by B. tropica, Ppe8, as being a pentasaccharide repeating unit as shown.

  15. Vortex Wakes of Conventional Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-05-01

    Lewellen and Milton Teske , have developed, under the sponsorship of the United States Navy, a digital computer code which allows one to obtain such...178, June 1972. 67. Lewellen, W.S., M.E. Teske , and C.duP. Donaldson: Turbulent Wakes in a Stratified Fluid. Aeronautical Research Associates of...Princeton, Inc. Report No. 226, September 1974. 68. Lewellen, W.S., M.E. Teske , R.M. Contiliano, G.R. Hilst, and C.duP. Donaldson: Invariant Modeling

  16. A prediction model for the vortex shedding noise from the wake of an airfoil or axial flow fan blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C.; Chung, M. K.; Kim, Y.-H.

    1993-06-01

    An analytical model is presented for predicting the vortex shedding noise generated from the wake of axial flow fan blades. The downstream wake of a fan blade is assumed to be dominated by the von Karman vortex street, and the strength and the shedding frequency of the wake vortex are determined from the wake structure model. The fluctuating pressure and lift on the blade surface, which are induced from the vortices in the wake, are analyzed by incorporating the wake model for the von Karman vortex street with thin airfoil theory. The predicted vortex shedding frequency and the overall sound pressure level compare favorably with the measured results for the vortex shedding noise from axial flow fans.

  17. Development and validation of a new two-dimensional wake model for wind turbine wakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tian, Linlin; Zhu, Wei Jun; Shen, Wen Zhong;

    2015-01-01

    of the wake deficit in the crosswind direction. Moreover, a variable wake decay rate is proposed to take into account both the ambient turbulence and the rotor generated turbulence, different from a constant wake decay rate used in the Jensen model. The obtained results are compared to field measurements...

  18. Simulating microinjection experiments in a novel model of the rat sleep-wake regulatory network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz Behn, Cecilia G; Booth, Victoria

    2010-04-01

    This study presents a novel mathematical modeling framework that is uniquely suited to investigating the structure and dynamics of the sleep-wake regulatory network in the brain stem and hypothalamus. It is based on a population firing rate model formalism that is modified to explicitly include concentration levels of neurotransmitters released to postsynaptic populations. Using this framework, interactions among primary brain stem and hypothalamic neuronal nuclei involved in rat sleep-wake regulation are modeled. The model network captures realistic rat polyphasic sleep-wake behavior consisting of wake, rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, and non-REM (NREM) sleep states. Network dynamics include a cyclic pattern of NREM sleep, REM sleep, and wake states that is disrupted by simulated variability of neurotransmitter release and external noise to the network. Explicit modeling of neurotransmitter concentrations allows for simulations of microinjections of neurotransmitter agonists and antagonists into a key wake-promoting population, the locus coeruleus (LC). Effects of these simulated microinjections on sleep-wake states are tracked and compared with experimental observations. Agonist/antagonist pairs, which are presumed to have opposing effects on LC activity, do not generally induce opposing effects on sleep-wake patterning because of multiple mechanisms for LC activation in the network. Also, different agents, which are presumed to have parallel effects on LC activity, do not induce parallel effects on sleep-wake patterning because of differences in the state dependence or independence of agonist and antagonist action. These simulation results highlight the utility of formal mathematical modeling for constraining conceptual models of the sleep-wake regulatory network.

  19. Wing Kinematics and Wake Velocity Characteristics of Bat Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, Sharon

    2005-11-01

    Bats demonstrate unequalled flight characteristics and are capable of highly efficient flight as well as extreme maneuverability at high speeds. They have morphological properties that are unique in the animal world including jointed wings skeletons, elastic wing membranes and very complex wing motions. We report on a series of experiments on bats flying in a flight cage along both a straight path and through a 90-degree turn. Measurements of their kinematic wing motion (using high speed photography) and wake velocity structures (using stereo PIV) are reported. The live animal measurements are also interpreted with the help of a series of companion wind tunnel experiments using model structures that mimic some key features of bat flight mechanics. The results reveal a complex vortex wake structure which is compared and contrasted to that found in bird and insect flight.

  20. Exploring the wake of a dust particle by a continuously approaching test grain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Hendrik, E-mail: hjung@physik.uni-kiel.de; Greiner, Franko; Asnaz, Oguz Han; Piel, Alexander [IEAP, Christian-Albrechts-Universität, D-24098 Kiel (Germany); Carstensen, Jan [ABB Switzerland Ltd., CH-5405 Baden-Daettwil (Switzerland)

    2015-05-15

    The structure of the ion wake behind a dust particle in the plasma sheath of an rf discharge is studied in a two-particle system. The wake formation leads to attractive forces between the negatively charged dust and can cause a reduction of the charge of a particle. By evaluating the dynamic response of the particle system to small external perturbations, these quantities can be measured. Plasma inherent etching processes are used to achieve a continuous mass loss and hence an increasing levitation height of the lower particle, so that the structure of the wake of the upper particle, which is nearly unaffected by etching, can be probed. The results show a significant modification of the wake structure in the plasma sheath to one long potential tail.

  1. Improving practical sensitivity of energy optimized wake-up receivers: proof of concept in 65nm CMOS

    OpenAIRE

    Mazloum, Nafiseh Seyed; Rodrigues, Joachim Neves; Andersson, Oskar; Nejdel, Anders; Edfors, Ove

    2016-01-01

    We present a high performance low-power digital base-band architecture, specially designed for an energy optimized duty-cycled wake-up receiver scheme. Based on a careful wake-up beacon design, a structured wake-up beacon detection technique leads to an architecture that compensates for the implementation loss of a low-power wake-up receiver front-end at low energy and area costs. Design parameters are selected by energy optimization and the architecture is easily scalable to support various ...

  2. Flight Test Analysis of the Forces and Moments Imparted on a B737-100 Airplane During Wake Vortex Encounters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Chistopher L.

    2001-01-01

    Aircraft travel has become a major form of transportation. Several of our major airports are operating near their capacity limit, increasing congestion and delays for travelers. As a result, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has been working in conjunction with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), airline operators, and the airline industry to increase airport capacity without sacrificing public safety. One solution to the problem is to increase the number of airports and build new. runways; yet, this solution is becoming increasingly difficult due to limited space. A better solution is to increase the production per runway. This solution increases the possibility that one aircraft will encounter the trailing wake of another aircraft. Hazardous wake vortex encounters occur when an aircraft encounters the wake produced by a heavier aircraft. This heavy-load aircraft produces high-intensity wake turbulence that redistributes the aerodynamic loads of trailing smaller aircraft. This situation is particularly hazardous for smaller aircraft during takeoffs and landings. In order to gain a better understanding of the wake-vortex/aircraft encounter phenomena, NASA Langley Research Center conducted a series of flight tests from 1995 through 1997. These tests were designed to gather data for the development a wake encounter and wake-measurement data set with the accompanying atmospheric state information. This data set is being compiled into a database that can be used by wake vortex researchers to compare with experimental and computational results. The purpose of this research is to derive and implement a procedure for calculating the wake-vortex/aircraft interaction portion of that database by using the data recorded during those flight tests. There were three objectives to this research. Initially, the wake-induced forces and moments from each flight were analyzed based on varying flap deflection angles. The flap setting alternated between 15

  3. Detection of wind wakes offshore from satellite SAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, M. B.; Hasager, C. B.

    A study is presented on the mapping of ocean wind fields for detection of wind wakes downstream of an offshore wind farm. The study is based on ERS-2 Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) scenes obtained in 2003 over Horns Reef in the North Sea. A large offshore wind farm (80 wind turbines) is located 14-20 km offshore of Denmark on this submerged reef. Meteorological observations are available from an offshore mast; wind speed is measured at four heights up to 62 m and wind direction is measured at 60 m. Maps of wind speed are generated from geophysical model functions (CMOD-4, CMOD-IFR2) with a resolution of 400 m by 400 m using wind direction obtained from in-situ measurements as model input. The wind maps display zones of reduced mean wind speed downstream of the wind farm compared to upwind conditions. The reduction is approximately 10 % immediately behind the wind farm and the wake effect is vanishing over distances in the order of 10 km downstream. This is consistent with wake model predictions. Satellite SAR provides a good estimate of the propagation of wind wakes. Information on how structures affect the local wind climate is useful for wind energy purposes, particularly for siting of future offshore wind farms.

  4. Characterization of ABS specimens produced via the 3D printing technology for drone structural components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro, Carlo Giovanni; Brischetto, Salvatore; Torre, Roberto; Maggiore, Paolo

    2016-07-01

    The Fused Deposition Modelling (FDM) technology is widely used in rapid prototyping. 3D printers for home desktop applications are usually employed to make non-structural objects. When the mechanical stresses are not excessive, this technology can also be successfully employed to produce structural objects, not only in prototyping stage but also in the realization of series pieces. The innovative idea of the present work is the application of this technology, implemented in a desktop 3D printer, to the realization of components for aeronautical use, especially for unmanned aerial systems. For this purpose, the paper is devoted to the statistical study of the performance of a desktop 3D printer to understand how the process performs and which are the boundary limits of acceptance. Mechanical and geometrical properties of ABS (Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene) specimens, such as tensile strength and stiffness, have been evaluated. ASTM638 type specimens have been used. A capability analysis has been applied for both mechanical and dimensional performances. Statistically stable limits have been determined using experimentally collected data.

  5. The influence of the wake of a flapping wing on the production of aerodynamic forces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianghao Wu; Mao Sun; Xing Zhang

    2005-01-01

    The effect of the wake of previous strokes on the aerodynamic forces of a flapping model insect wing is studied using the method of computational fluid dynamics. The wake effect is isolated by comparing the forces and flows of the starting stroke (when the wake has not developed) with those of a later stroke (when the wake has developed). The following has been shown. (1) The wake effect may increase or decrease the lift and drag at the beginning of a half-stroke (downstroke or upstroke), depending on the wing kinematics at stroke reversal. The reason for this is that at the beginning of the half-stroke, the wing "impinges" on the spanwise vorticity generated by the wing during stroke reversal and the distribution of the vorticity is sensitive to the wing kinematics at stroke reversal. (2) The wake effect decreases the lift and increases the drag in the rest part of the half-stroke. This is because the wing moves in a downwash field induced by previous half-stroke's starting vortex, tip vortices and attached leading edge vortex (these vortices form a downwash producing vortex ring). (3) The wake effect decreases the mean lift by 6%-18% (depending on wing kinematics at stroke reversal) and slightly increases the mean drag. Therefore, it is detrimental to the aerodynamic performance of the flapping wing.

  6. Cylinder wake influence on the tonal noise and aerodynamic characteristics of a NACA0018 airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Y.; Fujisawa, N.; Nakano, T.; Nashimoto, A.

    2006-11-01

    The influence of cylinder wake on discrete tonal noise and aerodynamic characteristics of a NACA0018 airfoil is studied experimentally in a uniform flow at a moderate Reynolds number. The experiments are carried out by measuring sound pressure levels and spectrum, separation and the reattachment points, pressure distribution, fluid forces, mean-flow and turbulence characteristics around the airfoil with and without the cylinder wake. Present results indicate that the tonal noise from the airfoil is suppressed by the influence of the cylinder wake and the aerodynamic characteristics are improved in comparison with the case without the cylinder wake. These are mainly due to the separation control of boundary layers over the airfoil caused by the wake-induced transition, which is observed by surface flow visualization with liquid- crystal coating. The PIV measurements of the flow field around the airfoil confirm that highly turbulent velocity fluctuation of the cylinder wake induces the transition of the boundary layers and produces an attached boundary layer over the airfoil. Then, the vortex shedding phenomenon near the trailing edge of pressure surface is removed by the influence of the wake and results in the suppression of tonal noise.

  7. CORE: Common Region Extension Based Multiple Protein Structure Alignment for Producing Multiple Solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Woo-Cheol Kim; Sanghyun Park; Jung-Im Won

    2013-01-01

    Over the past several decades,biologists have conducted numerous studies examining both general and specific functions of proteins.Generally,if similarities in either the structure or sequence of amino acids exist for two proteins,then a common biological function is expected.Protein function is determined primarily based on the structure rather than the sequence of amino acids.The algorithm for protein structure alignment is an essential tool for the research.The quality of the algorithm depends on the quality of the similarity measure that is used,and the similarity measure is an objective function used to determine the best alignment.However,none of existing similarity measures became golden standard because of their individual strength and weakness.They require excessive filtering to find a single alignment.In this paper,we introduce a new strategy that finds not a single alignment,but multiple alignments with different lengths.This method has obvious benefits of high quality alignment.However,this novel method leads to a new problem that the running time for this method is considerably longer than that for methods that find only a single alignment.To address this problem,we propose algorithms that can locate a common region (CORE) of multiple alignment candidates,and can then extend the CORE into multiple alignments.Because the CORE can be defined from a final alignment,we introduce CORE* that is similar to CORE and propose an algorithm to identify the CORE*.By adopting CORE* and dynamic programming,our proposed method produces multiple alignments of various lengths with higher accuracy than previous methods.In the experiments,the alignments identified by our algorithm are longer than those obtained by TM-align by 17% and 15.48%,on average,when the comparison is conducted at the level of super-family and fold,respectively.

  8. Solution structure of acidocin B, a circular bacteriocin produced by Lactobacillus acidophilus M46.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acedo, Jeella Z; van Belkum, Marco J; Lohans, Christopher T; McKay, Ryan T; Miskolzie, Mark; Vederas, John C

    2015-04-01

    Acidocin B, a bacteriocin produced by Lactobacillus acidophilus M46, was originally reported to be a linear peptide composed of 59 amino acid residues. However, its high sequence similarity to gassericin A, a circular bacteriocin from Lactobacillus gasseri LA39, suggested that acidocin B might be circular as well. Acidocin B was purified from culture supernatant by a series of hydrophobic interaction chromatographic steps. Its circular nature was ascertained by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) sequencing. The peptide sequence was found to consist of 58 amino acids with a molecular mass of 5,621.5 Da. The sequence of the acidocin B biosynthetic gene cluster was also determined and showed high nucleotide sequence similarity to that of gassericin A. The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) solution structure of acidocin B in sodium dodecyl sulfate micelles was elucidated, revealing that it is composed of four α-helices of similar length that are folded to form a compact, globular bundle with a central pore. This is a three-dimensional structure for a member of subgroup II circular bacteriocins, which are classified based on their isoelectric points of ∼7 or lower. Comparison of acidocin B with carnocyclin A, a subgroup I circular bacteriocin with four α-helices and a pI of 10, revealed differences in the overall folding. The observed variations could be attributed to inherent diversity in their physical properties, which also required the use of different solvent systems for three-dimensional structural elucidation.

  9. Modeling the Lunar plasma wake

    CERN Document Server

    Holmstrom, M

    2013-01-01

    Bodies that lack a significant atmosphere and internal magnetic fields, such as the Moon and asteroids, can to a first approximation be considered passive absorbers of the solar wind. The solar wind ions and electrons directly impact the surface of these bodies due to the lack of atmosphere, and the interplanetary magnetic field passes through the obstacle relatively undisturbed because the bodies are assumed to be non-conductive. Since the solar wind is absorbed by the body, a wake is created behind the object. This wake is gradually filled by solar wind plasma downstream of the body, through thermal expansion and the resulting ambipolar electric field, along the magnetic field lines. Here we study this plasma expansion into a vacuum using a hybrid plasma solver. In the hybrid approximation, ions are treated as particles, and electrons as a massless fluid. We also derive corresponding one- and two-dimensional model problems that account for the absorbing obstacle. It is found that the absorbing obstacle crea...

  10. The Structure, Problems and Solutions of Fruit Sapling Producing Enterprises in Hatay Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuran Tapkı

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, examined the structure and problems of fruit sapling producing enterprises and offers solutions in The Hatay Province. The data were obtained from 92 enterprises by the method of full count and face to face with producers. Of the 51.15% population in creating family business primary school graduates, the proportion of university graduates remained at 8.62%. The rate of agricultural engineer employment in the businesses is 2.18%. While 64.05% of the enterprisers the father's profession, this profession began taking 3.37's% of nursery education. Average potential family labour is the 4.22 male labour forces in enterprises. The family labour utilization rate was calculated as 50.71%. Of the 88.48% in fruit sapling businesses, 5.32's% in other agricultural productions and 5.22's% in non-agricultural jobs of total used men workforce. The businesses have average total land size of 25.74 acres which it has established 12 acres of fruit sapling production land. While 74.58% of the total fruit sapling land is property, 25.42's% is for rent situation. The operating capital is calculated as the average of 229.308 TL. The most common species of fruit sapling production were citrus (46.20% and olive trees (35.29%. The problems faced by most of the farms in the region were high input prices, excessive bureaucratic procedures preventing memberships into the union, an inadequate amount of support provided by the state, production-threatening diseases of plants and difficulties in finding qualified staff in the region. The results show that enterprises need to increase their production capacity, to unite under one organization to facilitate the resolution of problems.

  11. Statistical analyses of a screen cylinder wake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd Azmi, Azlin; Zhou, Tongming; Zhou, Yu; Cheng, Liang

    2017-02-01

    The evolution of a screen cylinder wake was studied by analysing its statistical properties over a streamwise range of x/d={10-60}. The screen cylinder was made of a stainless steel screen mesh of 67% porosity. The experiments were conducted in a wind tunnel at a Reynolds number of 7000 using an X-probe. The results were compared with those obtained in the wake generated by a solid cylinder. It was observed that the evolution of the statistics in the wake of the screen cylinder was different from that of a solid cylinder, reflecting the differences in the formation of the organized large-scale vortices in both wakes. The streamwise evolution of the Reynolds stresses, energy spectra and cross-correlation coefficients indicated that there exists a critical location that differentiates the screen cylinder wake into two regions over the measured streamwise range. The formation of the fully formed large-scale vortices was delayed until this critical location. Comparison with existing results for screen strips showed that although the near-wake characteristics and the vortex formation mechanism were similar between the two wake generators, variation in the Strouhal frequencies was observed and the self-preservation states were non-universal, reconfirming the dependence of a wake on its initial condition.

  12. Detecting wind turbine wakes with nacelle lidars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Held, D. P.; Larvol, A.; Mann, Jakob

    2017-01-01

    variance is used as a detection parameter for wakes. A one month long measurement campaign, where a continuous-wave lidar on a turbine has been exposed to multiple wake situations, is used to test the detection capabilities. The results show that it is possible to identify situation where a downstream...

  13. Wake Measurements in ECN's Scaled Wind Farm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagenaar, J.W.; Schepers, J.G. [ECN Wind Energy, Petten (Netherlands)

    2013-02-15

    In ECN's scaled wind farm the wake evolution is studied in two different situations. A single wake is studied at two different locations downstream of a turbine and a single wake is studied in conjunction with a triple wake. Here, the wake is characterized by the wind speed ratio, the turbulence intensity, the vertical wind speed and the turbulence (an)isotropy. Per situation all wake measurements are taken simultaneously together with the inflow conditions.

  14. Comparison of a Coupled Near and Far Wake Model With a Free Wake Vortex Code

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pirrung, Georg; Riziotis, Vasilis; Aagaard Madsen, Helge

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the integration of a near wake model for trailing vorticity, which is based on a prescribed wake lifting line model proposed by Beddoes, with a BEM-based far wake model and a 2D shed vorticity model. The resulting coupled aerodynamics model is validated against lifting surface...... computations performed using a free wake panel code. The focus of the description of the aerodynamics model is on the numerical stability, the computation speed and the accuracy of 5 unsteady simulations. To stabilize the near wake model, it has to be iterated to convergence, using a relaxation factor that has...... induction modeling at slow time scales. Finally, the unsteady airfoil aerodynamics model is extended to provide the unsteady bound circulation for the near wake model and to improve 10 the modeling of the unsteady behavior of cambered airfoils. The model comparison with results from a free wake panel code...

  15. Experimental hydrodynamics of fish locomotion: functional insights from wake visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drucker, Eliot G; Lauder, George V

    2002-04-01

    Despite enormous progress during the last twenty years in understanding the mechanistic basis of aquatic animal propulsion-a task involving the construction of a substantial data base on patterns of fin and body kinematics and locomotor muscle function-there remains a key area in which biologists have little information: the relationship between propulsor activity and water movement in the wake. How is internal muscular force translated into external force exerted on the water? What is the pattern of fluid force production by different fish fins (e.g., pectoral, caudal, dorsal) and how does swimming force vary with speed and among species? These types of questions have received considerable attention in analyses of terrestrial locomotion where force output by limbs can be measured directly with force plates. But how can forces exerted by animals moving through fluid be measured? The advent of digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV) has provided an experimental hydrodynamic approach for quantifying the locomotor forces of freely moving animals in fluids, and has resulted in significant new insights into the mechanisms of fish propulsion. In this paper we present ten "lessons learned" from the application of DPIV to problems of fish locomotion over the last five years. (1) Three-dimensional DPIV analysis is critical for reconstructing wake geometry. (2) DPIV analysis reveals the orientation of locomotor reaction forces. (3) DPIV analysis allows calculation of the magnitude of locomotor forces. (4) Swimming speed can have a major impact on wake structure. (5) DPIV can reveal interspecific differences in vortex wake morphology. (6) DPIV analysis can provide new insights into the limits to locomotor performance. (7) DPIV demonstrates the functional versatility of fish fins. (8) DPIV reveals hydrodynamic force partitioning among fins. (9) DPIV shows that wake interaction among fins may enhance thrust production. (10) Experimental hydrodynamic analysis can provide

  16. On the evolution of waking and sleeping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rial, R; Nicolau, M C; Lopez-Garcia, J A; Almirall, H

    1993-02-01

    1. The aim of this paper is to present a new hypothesis to explain the evolution of the sleeping and waking states. 2. We propose that the reptilian waking state and the mammalian slow wave sleep are homologous states. 3. We also propose that instead of looking at the polygraphic sleep as a new evolutive acquisition of mammals and birds, it seems more convenient to look at the full waking state; the "advanced wakefulness" as the true new evolutionary acquisition of these animals. 4. These conclusions are reached after examining some available reports of slow wave electroencephalogram in waking reptiles, some other reports showing signs of rapid eye movement sleep in this same group and the coevolution between sleep states and thermoregulation. Finally, a clear parallelism between sleep ontogeny and phylogeny is shown under the light of the proposed hypothesis.

  17. Efficient Turbulence Modeling for CFD Wake Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Laan, Paul

    , that can accurately and efficiently simulate wind turbine wakes. The linear k-ε eddy viscosity model (EVM) is a popular turbulence model in RANS; however, it underpredicts the velocity wake deficit and cannot predict the anisotropic Reynolds-stresses in the wake. In the current work, nonlinear eddy...... viscosity models (NLEVM) are applied to wind turbine wakes. NLEVMs can model anisotropic turbulence through a nonlinear stress-strain relation, and they can improve the velocity deficit by the use of a variable eddy viscosity coefficient, that delays the wake recovery. Unfortunately, all tested NLEVMs show...... numerically unstable behavior for fine grids, which inhibits a grid dependency study for numerical verification. Therefore, a simpler EVM is proposed, labeled as the k-ε - fp EVM, that has a linear stress-strain relation, but still has a variable eddy viscosity coefficient. The k-ε - fp EVM is numerically...

  18. Wind-Turbine Wakes in a Convective Boundary Layer: A Wind-Tunnel Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Markfort, Corey D.; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2013-02-01

    Thermal stability changes the properties of the turbulent atmospheric boundary layer, and in turn affects the behaviour of wind-turbine wakes. To better understand the effects of thermal stability on the wind-turbine wake structure, wind-tunnel experiments were carried out with a simulated convective boundary layer (CBL) and a neutral boundary layer. The CBL was generated by cooling the airflow to 12-15 °C and heating up the test section floor to 73-75 °C. The freestream wind speed was set at about 2.5 m s-1, resulting in a bulk Richardson number of -0.13. The wake of a horizontal-axis 3-blade wind-turbine model, whose height was within the lowest one third of the boundary layer, was studied using stereoscopic particle image velocimetry (S-PIV) and triple-wire (x-wire/cold-wire) anemometry. Data acquired with the S-PIV were analyzed to characterize the highly three-dimensional turbulent flow in the near wake (0.2-3.2 rotor diameters) as well as to visualize the shedding of tip vortices. Profiles of the mean flow, turbulence intensity, and turbulent momentum and heat fluxes were measured with the triple-wire anemometer at downwind locations from 2-20 rotor diameters in the centre plane of the wake. In comparison with the wake of the same wind turbine in a neutral boundary layer, a smaller velocity deficit (about 15 % at the wake centre) is observed in the CBL, where an enhanced radial momentum transport leads to a more rapid momentum recovery, particularly in the lower part of the wake. The velocity deficit at the wake centre decays following a power law regardless of the thermal stability. While the peak turbulence intensity (and the maximum added turbulence) occurs at the top-tip height at a downwind distance of about three rotor diameters in both cases, the magnitude is about 20 % higher in the CBL than in the neutral boundary layer. Correspondingly, the turbulent heat flux is also enhanced by approximately 25 % in the lower part of the wake, compared to that

  19. Direct structuring of solids by EUV radiation from a table-top laser produced plasma source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkusky, Frank; Bayer, Armin; Peth, Christian; Mann, Klaus

    2009-05-01

    In recent years, technological developments in the area of extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) have experienced great improvements. Currently, the application of EUV radiation apart from microlithography comes more and more into focus. Main goal of our research is to utilize the unique interaction between soft x-ray radiation and matter for probing, modifying, and structuring solid surfaces. In this contribution we present a setup capable of generating and focusing EUV radiation. It consists of a table-top laser-produced plasma source. In order to obtain a small focal spot resulting in high EUV fluence, a modified Schwarzschild objective consisting of two spherical mirrors with Mo/Si multilayer coatings is adapted to this source, simultaneously blocking unwanted out-of-band radiation. By demagnified (10x) imaging of the plasma an EUV spot of 5 μm diameter with a maximum energy density of ~0.72 J/cm² is generated (pulse length 8.8 ns). We present first applications of this integrated source and optics system, demonstrating its potential for high-resolution modification and structuring of solid surfaces. As an example, etch rates for PMMA, PC and PTFE depending on EUV fluences were determined, indicating a linear etch behavior for lower energy densities. In order to investigate changes of the chemical composition of PMMA induced by EUV radiation we present FTIR and NEXAFS measurements on irradiated samples. The latter were performed using the laboratory source tuned to the XUV spectral range around the carbon K-edge (λ ~ 4.4 nm) and a flat-field spectrometer. For showing the potential of this setup, first damage tests were performed on grazing incidence gold mirrors. For these thin Gold films, threshold energy densities could be determined, scaling linear with the film thickness.

  20. Influence of Tip Speed Ratio on Wake Flow Characteristics Utilizing Fully Resolved CFD Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salman Siddiqui, M.; Rasheed, Adil; Kvamsdal, Trond; Tabib, Mandar

    2017-05-01

    Dominant flow structures in the wake region behind the turbine employed in the Blind Test campaign [1], [2] is investigated numerically. The effect on the wake configuration at variable operating conditions are studied. The importance of the introduction of turbine tower inside the numerical framework is highlighted. High-fidelity simulations are performed with Multiple Reference Frame (MRF) numerical methodology. A thorough comparison among the cases is presented, and the wake evolution is analyzed at variable stations downstream of the turbine. Streamlines of flow field traveled towards ground adjacent to turbine tower and strongly dependent on the operating tip speed ratio. Wake is composed of tower shadow superimposed by rotor wake. Shadow of the tower varies from x/R=2 until x/R=4 and breaks down into small vortices with the interaction of rotor wake. This study also shows that the wake distribution consists of two zones; inner zone composed of disturbances generated by blade root, nacelle and the tower, and an outer zone consisting of tip vortices.

  1. Numerical Study of Wake Characteristics in a Horizontal-Axis Hydrokinetic Turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PAULO A.S.F. SILVA

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Over the years most studies on wake characteristics have been devoted to wind turbines, while few works are related to hydrokinetic turbines. Among studies applied to rivers, depth and width are important parameters for a suitable design. In this work, a numerical study of the wake in a horizontal-axis hydrokinetic turbine is performed, where the main objective is an investigation on the wake structure, which can be a constraining factor in rivers. The present paper uses the Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS flow simulation technique, in which the Shear-Stress Transport (SST turbulent model is considered, in order to simulate a free hydrokinetic runner in a typical river flow. The NREL-PHASE VI wind turbine was used to validate the numerical approach. Simulations for a 3-bladed axial hydrokinetic turbine with 10 m diameter were carried out, depicting the expanded helical behavior of the wake. The axial velocity, in this case, is fully recovered at 12 diameters downstream in the wake. The results are compared with others available in the literature and also a study of the turbulence kinetic energy and mean axial velocity is presented so as to assess the influence of proximity of river surface from rotor in the wake geometry. Hence, even for a single turbine facility it is still necessary to consider the propagation of the wake over the spatial domain.

  2. Investigation of wake characteristics in wind farm varying turbulent inflow condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Jisung; Koo, Eunmo; Domingo, Munoz-Esparza; Jin, Emilia Kyung; Linn, Rodman; Lee, Joon Sang

    2016-11-01

    In this study, we investigate the wake characteristics in wind farm varying turbulent property at inlet condition. To solve the flow with wind turbines and its wake, we use large eddy simulation (LES) technique with actuator line method (ALM). The wake characteristics in wind farm is important mainly in performance of wind farm because non-fully recovered wake induced by upstream wind turbines interferes power generation at downstream wind turbines. Turbulent inflow which contains the information of turbulence in atmospheric boundary layer is one of the key factors for describing the wake in wind farm accurately. We perform the quantitative analysis of velocity deficit and turbulent intensity in whole cases. In the comparison between cases with and without turbulent inflow, we observe that wake in case with turbulent inflow is more diffused to span-wise direction. And we analyze the coherent structures behind wind turbines at each row. Through above-analysis, we reveal how the wake is interacted with performance of wind farm. This work was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) Grant funded by the Korean Government (MSIP) (No.2015R1A5A1037668).

  3. Aircraft Wake Vortex Measurement with Coherent Doppler Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Songhua; Liu, Bingyi; Liu, Jintao

    2016-06-01

    Aircraft vortices are generated by the lift-producing surfaces of the aircraft. The variability of near-surface conditions can change the drop rate and cause the cell of the wake vortex to twist and contort unpredictably. The pulsed Coherent Doppler Lidar Detection and Ranging is an indispensable access to real aircraft vortices behavior which transmitting a laser beam and detecting the radiation backscattered by atmospheric aerosol particles. Experiments for Coherent Doppler Lidar measurement of aircraft wake vortices has been successfully carried out at the Beijing Capital International Airport (BCIA). In this paper, the authors discuss the Lidar system, the observation modes carried out in the measurements at BCIA and the characteristics of vortices.

  4. Aircraft Wake Vortex Measurement with Coherent Doppler Lidar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Songhua

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aircraft vortices are generated by the lift-producing surfaces of the aircraft. The variability of near-surface conditions can change the drop rate and cause the cell of the wake vortex to twist and contort unpredictably. The pulsed Coherent Doppler Lidar Detection and Ranging is an indispensable access to real aircraft vortices behavior which transmitting a laser beam and detecting the radiation backscattered by atmospheric aerosol particles. Experiments for Coherent Doppler Lidar measurement of aircraft wake vortices has been successfully carried out at the Beijing Capital International Airport (BCIA. In this paper, the authors discuss the Lidar system, the observation modes carried out in the measurements at BCIA and the characteristics of vortices.

  5. Preliminary study of the mite community structure in different black truffle producing soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikel Queralt

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Aims of the study: The goals of this paper are to provide preliminary data on the composition of the mite community in truffle-producing soils (both wild and plantations; and to elucidate those species which may interact with the black truffle life cycle.Area of study: The study was carried out in two black truffle productive zones in Navarra (Spain, in four different plantations and five wild production areas.Material and Methods: Fauna was extracted using Berlese Tullgren funnels. Animals were separated into taxonomic groups, and mites were identified. To analyse the composition and community structure of the different habitats, parameters such as abundance, species richness, and Shanon Weiner diversity index (H’ were calculated.Main results: A total of 305 mites were recognized, belonging to 58 species representing the three major taxonomic groups (Oribatida, Prostigmata, Mesostigmata.Research highlights: The results show a possible trend towards wild areas having greater diversity and species richness than plantations. Furthermore, community analysis shows differences in species compositions among different study areas, and oribatid mites always exhibit the highest relative abundance and species richness.Keywords: Acari; Tuber melanosporum; Oribatida; Mesostigmata; Prostigmata; truffle orchards. 

  6. Exopolysaccharide produced by Pleurotus sajor-caju: its chemical structure and anti-inflammatory activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Marcia L L; Smiderle, Fhernanda R; Agostini, Franciane; Pereira, Eduardo M; Bonatti-Chaves, Mariane; Wisbeck, Elisabeth; Ruthes, Andréa Caroline; Sassaki, Guilherme L; Cipriani, Thales R; Furlan, Sandra A; Iacomini, Marcello

    2015-04-01

    Edible mushrooms are high nutritional value foods, which contain proteins, fibers, minerals, vitamins, and carbohydrates. Among their carbohydrates are some polysaccharides with recognized therapeutic effects. It was reported in this manuscript the structural characterization and antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of an exopolysaccharide (EPS) produced by Pleurotus sajor-caju. The purified EPS was a mannogalactan (PEIsR), which was composed by mannose (37.0%), galactose (39.7%), and 3-O-methyl-galactose (23.3%). The polysaccharide was purified by freeze-thawing and dialysis, and it was characterized by GC-MS analysis and NMR spectroscopy. The mannogalactan is constituted by a main chain of (1 → 6)-linked α-D-Galp and 3-O-methyl-α-D-Galp units. Some of the α-D-Galp units were substituted at O-2 by non-reducing end units of β-D-Manp. According to the literature review conducted, this is the first time that a methylated polysaccharide was observed on EPS of P. sajor-caju. The mannogalactan was able to reduce the nociception, in vivo, in the writhing and formalin tests and also reduced the carrageenan-induced paw edema, which indicates that it could be an effective antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory agent.

  7. Structural properties of H13 tool steel parts produced with use of selective laser melting technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šafka, J.; Ackermann, M.; Voleský, L.

    2016-04-01

    This paper deals with establishing of building parameters for 1.2344 (H13) tool steel processed using Selective Laser Melting (SLM) technology with layer thickness of 50 µm. In the first part of the work, testing matrix of models in the form of a cube with chamfered edge were built under various building parameters such as laser scanning speed and laser power. Resulting models were subjected to set of tests including measurement of surface roughness, inspection of inner structure with aid of Light Optical Microscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy and evaluation of micro-hardness. These tests helped us to evaluate an influence of changes in building strategy to the properties of the resulting model. In the second part of the work, mechanical properties of the H13 steel were examined. For this purpose, the set of samples in the form of “dog bone” were printed under three different alignments towards the building plate and tested on universal testing machine. Mechanical testing of the samples should then reveal if the different orientation and thus different layering of the material somehow influence its mechanical properties. For this type of material, the producer provides the parameters for layer thickness of 30 µm only. Thus, our 50 µm building strategy brings shortening of the building time which is valuable especially for large models. Results of mechanical tests show slight variation in mechanical properties for various alignment of the sample.

  8. Structural and magnetic properties of "thick" microwires produced by the modernized Ulitovsky-Tailor method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalygina, E. E.; Kharlamova, A. M.; Shalygin, A. N.; Molokanov, V. V.; Umnov, P. P.; Umnova, N. V.; Chueva, T. R.

    2016-10-01

    In this article the results on the detailed investigation of the structural, elastic and magnetic properties of the "thick" Fe73,5Si13,5B9Nb3Cu1 and Fe31Co34Ni10(SiB)25 amorphous microwires with the glass shell, produced by the modernized Ulitovsky-Tailor method, are presented. The diameter of the metallic core of microwires was varied from 50 to 200 μm. It was found that the core has the stable geometric parameters along the microwire length and the smooth (almost without defects) surface. The studied samples are characterized by the weak dispersion of magnetic anisotropy of the near-surface layers and the high homogeneity of the near-surface local magnetic properties. Furthermore, the microwires exhibit the high plasticity and strength. They are not destroyed even after their full tightening into a knot. The strong influence of tensile stress and torsion on the magnetic properties of the microwires was discovered. The comparison of magneto-field behavior of the studied samples was performed.

  9. Structured Mo/Si multilayers for IR-suppression in laser-produced EUV light sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trost, Marcus; Schröder, Sven; Duparré, Angela; Risse, Stefan; Feigl, Torsten; Zeitner, Uwe D; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2013-11-18

    Laser produced plasma sources are considered attractive for high-volume extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) lithography because of their high power at the target wavelength 13.5 nm. However, besides the required EUV light, a large amount of infrared (IR) light from the CO2 drive laser is scattered and reflected from the plasma as well as from the EUV mirrors in the optical system. Since these mirrors typically consist of molybdenum and silicon, the reflectance at IR wavelengths is even higher than in the EUV, which leads to high energy loads in the optical system. One option to reduce this is to structure the EUV multilayer, in particular the collector mirror, with an IR grating that has a high IR-suppression in the zeroth order. In this paper, the characterization of such an optical element is reported, including the IR-diffraction efficiency, the EUV performance (reflectance and scattering), and the relevant surface roughness. The measurement results are directly linked to the individual manufacturing steps.

  10. A 3D bioprinting system to produce human-scale tissue constructs with structural integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyun-Wook; Lee, Sang Jin; Ko, In Kap; Kengla, Carlos; Yoo, James J; Atala, Anthony

    2016-03-01

    A challenge for tissue engineering is producing three-dimensional (3D), vascularized cellular constructs of clinically relevant size, shape and structural integrity. We present an integrated tissue-organ printer (ITOP) that can fabricate stable, human-scale tissue constructs of any shape. Mechanical stability is achieved by printing cell-laden hydrogels together with biodegradable polymers in integrated patterns and anchored on sacrificial hydrogels. The correct shape of the tissue construct is achieved by representing clinical imaging data as a computer model of the anatomical defect and translating the model into a program that controls the motions of the printer nozzles, which dispense cells to discrete locations. The incorporation of microchannels into the tissue constructs facilitates diffusion of nutrients to printed cells, thereby overcoming the diffusion limit of 100-200 μm for cell survival in engineered tissues. We demonstrate capabilities of the ITOP by fabricating mandible and calvarial bone, cartilage and skeletal muscle. Future development of the ITOP is being directed to the production of tissues for human applications and to the building of more complex tissues and solid organs.

  11. [The role of histaminergic system of the brain in the regulation of sleep-wakefulness cycle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koval'zon, V M

    2013-01-01

    The structure, morphological and neurochemical bindings ofhistaminergic system of the brain as one of the most important mechanisms of waking maintenance, are regarded. The biochemistry of histamine turnover and histamine receptors are briefly described. The special role of the relation between histamine and orexin/hypocretin systems is stressed. Some examples of the responses on wakefulness-sleep cycle of the effects of experimental manipulations with the histaminergic system are given.

  12. Determination of real-time predictors of the wind turbine wake meandering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Yann-Aël; Aubrun, Sandrine; Masson, Christian

    2015-03-01

    The present work proposes an experimental methodology to characterize the unsteady properties of a wind turbine wake, called meandering, and particularly its ability to follow the large-scale motions induced by large turbulent eddies contained in the approach flow. The measurements were made in an atmospheric boundary layer wind tunnel. The wind turbine model is based on the actuator disc concept. One part of the work has been dedicated to the development of a methodology for horizontal wake tracking by mean of a transverse hot wire rake, whose dynamic response is adequate for spectral analysis. Spectral coherence analysis shows that the horizontal position of the wake correlates well with the upstream transverse velocity, especially for wavelength larger than three times the diameter of the disc but less so for smaller scales. Therefore, it is concluded that the wake is actually a rather passive tracer of the large surrounding turbulent structures. The influence of the rotor size and downstream distance on the wake meandering is studied. The fluctuations of the lateral force and the yawing torque affecting the wind turbine model are also measured and correlated with the wake meandering. Two approach flow configurations are then tested: an undisturbed incoming flow (modelled atmospheric boundary layer) and a disturbed incoming flow, with a wind turbine model located upstream. Results showed that the meandering process is amplified by the presence of the upstream wake. It is shown that the coherence between the lateral force fluctuations and the horizontal wake position is significant up to length scales larger than twice the wind turbine model diameter. This leads to the conclusion that the lateral force is a better candidate than the upstream transverse velocity to predict in real time the meandering process, for either undisturbed (wake free) or disturbed incoming atmospheric flows.

  13. Electricity producing property and bacterial community structure in microbial fuel cell equipped with membrane electrode assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubaba, Owen; Araki, Yoko; Yamamoto, Shuji; Suzuki, Kei; Sakamoto, Hisatoshi; Matsuda, Atsunori; Futamata, Hiroyuki

    2013-07-01

    It is important for practical use of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) to not only develop electrodes and proton exchange membranes but also to understand the bacterial community structure related to electricity generation. Four lactate fed MFCs equipped with different membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) were constructed with paddy field soil as inoculum. The MEAs significantly affected the electricity-generating properties of the MFCs. MEA-I was made with Nafion 117 solution and the other MEAs were made with different configurations of three kinds of polymers. MFC-I equipped with MEA-I exhibited the highest performance with a stable current density of 55 ± 3 mA m⁻². MFC-III equipped with MEA-III with the highest platinum concentration, exhibited the lowest performance with a stable current density of 1.7 ± 0.1 mA m⁻². SEM observation revealed that there were cracks on MEA-III. These results demonstrated that it is significantly important to prevent oxygen-intrusion for improved MFC performance. By comparing the data of DGGE and phylogenetic analyzes, it was suggested that the dominant bacterial communities of MFC-I were constructed with lactate-fermenters and Fe(III)-reducers, which consisted of bacteria affiliated with the genera of Enterobacter, Dechlorosoma, Pelobacter, Desulfovibrio, Propioniferax, Pelosinus, and Firmicutes. A bacterium sharing 100% similarity to one of the DGGE bands was isolated from MFC-I. The 16S rRNA gene sequence of the isolate shared 98% similarity to gram-positive Propioniferax sp. P7 and it was confirmed that the isolate produced electricity in an MFC. These results suggested that these bacteria are valuable for constructing the electron transfer network in MFC. Copyright © 2013 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Plasmids of Carotenoid-Producing Paracoccus spp. (Alphaproteobacteria) - Structure, Diversity and Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maj, Anna; Dziewit, Lukasz; Czarnecki, Jakub; Wlodarczyk, Miroslawa; Baj, Jadwiga; Skrzypczyk, Grazyna; Giersz, Dorota; Bartosik, Dariusz

    2013-01-01

    Plasmids are components of many bacterial genomes. They enable the spread of a large pool of genetic information via lateral gene transfer. Many bacterial strains contain mega-sized replicons and these are particularly common in Alphaproteobacteria. Considerably less is known about smaller alphaproteobacterial plasmids. We analyzed the genomes of 14 such plasmids residing in 4 multireplicon carotenoid-producing strains of the genus Paracoccus (Alphaproteobacteria): P. aestuarii DSM 19484, P. haeundaensis LG P-21903, P. marcusii DSM 11574 and P. marcusii OS22. Comparative analyses revealed mosaic structures of the plasmids and recombinational shuffling of diverse genetic modules involved in (i) plasmid replication, (ii) stabilization (including toxin-antitoxin systems of the relBE/parDE, tad-ata, higBA, mazEF and toxBA families) and (iii) mobilization for conjugal transfer (encoding relaxases of the MobQ, MobP or MobV families). A common feature of the majority of the plasmids is the presence of AT-rich sequence islets (located downstream of exc1-like genes) containing genes, whose homologs are conserved in the chromosomes of many bacteria (encoding e.g. RelA/SpoT, SMC-like proteins and a retron-type reverse transcriptase). The results of this study have provided insight into the diversity and plasticity of plasmids of Paracoccus spp., and of the entire Alphaproteobacteria. Some of the identified plasmids contain replication systems not described previously in this class of bacteria. The composition of the plasmid genomes revealed frequent transfer of chromosomal genes into plasmids, which significantly enriches the pool of mobile DNA that can participate in lateral transfer. Many strains of Paracoccus spp. have great biotechnological potential, and the plasmid vectors constructed in this study will facilitate genetic studies of these bacteria. PMID:24260361

  15. Structure dependent resistivity and dielectric characteristics of tantalum oxynitride thin films produced by magnetron sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cristea, D., E-mail: daniel.cristea@unitbv.ro [Department of Materials Science, Transilvania University, 500036 Brasov (Romania); Crisan, A. [Department of Materials Science, Transilvania University, 500036 Brasov (Romania); Cretu, N. [Electrical Engineering and Applied Physics Department, Transilvania University, 500036 Brasov (Romania); Borges, J. [Centro de Física, Universidade do Minho, Campus de Gualtar, 4710 - 057 Braga (Portugal); Instituto Pedro Nunes, Laboratório de Ensaios, Desgaste e Materiais, Rua Pedro Nunes, 3030-199 Coimbra (Portugal); SEG-CEMUC, Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Coimbra, 3030-788 Coimbra (Portugal); Lopes, C.; Cunha, L. [Centro de Física, Universidade do Minho, Campus de Gualtar, 4710 - 057 Braga (Portugal); Ion, V.; Dinescu, M. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Lasers Department, “Photonic Processing of Advanced Materials” Group, PO Box MG-16, RO 77125 Magurele-Bucharest (Romania); Barradas, N.P. [Centro de Ciências e Tecnologias Nucleares, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, E.N. 10 ao km 139,7, 2695-066 Bobadela LRS (Portugal); Alves, E. [Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, E.N. 10 ao km 139,7, 2695-066 Bobadela LRS (Portugal); Apreutesei, M. [MATEIS Laboratory-INSA de Lyon, 21 Avenue Jean Capelle, 69621 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Université de Lyon, Institut des Nanotechnologies de Lyon INL-UMR5270, CNRS, Ecole Centrale de Lyon, Ecully F-69134 (France); Munteanu, D. [Department of Materials Science, Transilvania University, 500036 Brasov (Romania)

    2015-11-01

    Highlights: • Tantalum oxynitride thin films have been deposited by magnetron sputtering, in various configurations. • The rising of the reactive gases mixture flow has the consequence of a gradual increase in the non-metallic content in the films, which results in a 10 orders of magnitude resistivity domain. • The higher resistivity films exhibit dielectric constants up to 41 and quality factors up to 70. - Abstract: The main purpose of this work is to present and to interpret the change of electrical properties of Ta{sub x}N{sub y}O{sub z} thin films, produced by DC reactive magnetron sputtering. Some parameters were varied during deposition: the flow of the reactive gases mixture (N{sub 2} and O{sub 2}, with a constant concentration ratio of 17:3); the substrate voltage bias (grounded, −50 V or −100 V) and the substrate (glass, (1 0 0) Si or high speed steel). The obtained films exhibit significant differences. The variation of the deposition parameters induces variations of the composition, microstructure and morphology. These differences cause variation of the electrical resistivity essentially correlated with the composition and structural changes. The gradual decrease of the Ta concentration in the films induces amorphization and causes a raise of the resistivity. The dielectric characteristics of some of the high resistance Ta{sub x}N{sub y}O{sub z} films were obtained in the samples with a capacitor-like design (deposited onto high speed steel, with gold pads deposited on the dielectric Ta{sub x}N{sub y}O{sub z} films). Some of these films exhibited dielectric constant values higher than those reported for other tantalum based dielectric films.

  16. Volatile fatty acids influence on the structure of microbial communities producing PHAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciesielski, Slawomir; Przybylek, Grzegorz

    2014-01-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) can be produced by microorganisms and are a biodegradable alternative to fossil-fuel based plastics. Currently, the focus is on reducing production costs by exploring alternative substrates for PHAs production, and on producing copolymers which are less brittle than monomers. Accordingly, this study used a substrate consisting of wastewater from waste-glycerol fermentation, supplemented with different amounts of acetic and propionic acids. These substrates were used to feed mixed microbial communities enriched from activated sludge in a sequencing batch reactor. A reactor supplemented with 2 mL of acetic acid produced 227.8 mg/L of a homopolymer of hydroxybutyrate (3 HB); 4 mL of acetic acid produced 279.8 mg/L 3 HB; whereas 4 mL of propionic acid produced 673.0 mg/L of a copolymer of 3 HB and 3 HV (hydroxyvalerate). Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis (RISA) was used to show the differences between the communities created in the reactors. Thauera species predominated in biomass that produced 3 HB; Paracoccus denitrificans in the biomass that produced 3 HB-co-3 HV. Because P. denitrificans produced the more desirable copolymer, it may be advantageous to promote its growth in PHAs-producing reactors by adding propionate.

  17. Volatile fatty acids influence on the structure of microbial communities producing PHAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slawomir Ciesielski

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs can be produced by microorganisms and are a biodegradable alternative to fossil-fuel based plastics. Currently, the focus is on reducing production costs by exploring alternative substrates for PHAs production, and on producing copolymers which are less brittle than monomers. Accordingly, this study used a substrate consisting of wastewater from waste-glycerol fermentation, supplemented with different amounts of acetic and propionic acids. These substrates were used to feed mixed microbial communities enriched from activated sludge in a sequencing batch reactor. A reactor supplemented with 2 mL of acetic acid produced 227.8 mg/L of a homopolymer of hydroxybutyrate (3HB; 4 mL of acetic acid produced 279.8 mg/L 3HB; whereas 4 mL of propionic acid produced 673.0 mg/L of a copolymer of 3HB and 3HV (hydroxyvalerate. Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis (RISA was used to show the differences between the communities created in the reactors. Thauera species predominated in biomass that produced 3HB; Paracoccus denitrificans in the biomass that produced 3HB-co-3HV. Because P. denitrificans produced the more desirable copolymer, it may be advantageous to promote its growth in PHAs-producing reactors by adding propionate.

  18. 5th International Conference on Jets, Wakes and Separated Flows

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This volume collects various contributions from the 5th International Conference on Jets, Wakes and Separated Flows (ICJWSF2015) that took place in Stockholm during June 2015. Researchers from all around the world presented their latest results concerning fundamental and applied aspects of fluid dynamics. With its general character, the conference embraced many aspects of fluid dynamics, such as shear flows, multiphase flows and vortex flows, for instance. The structure of the present book reflects the variety of topics treated within the conference i.e. Jets, Wakes, Separated flows, Vehicle aerodynamics, Wall-bounded and confined flows, Noise, Turbomachinery flows, Multiphase and reacting flows, Vortex dynamics, Energy-related flows and a section dedicated to Numerical analyses.

  19. Collision of counterpropagating laser-excited wake bubbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Z G; Yang, L; Zhou, C T; Yu, M Y; Ying, H P; Wang, X G

    2014-06-01

    The collision of wake bubbles behind two counterpropagating laser pulses in rarefied plasma is investigated using particle-in-cell simulation. Special attention is paid to the highly nonlinear dynamics of the electrons in the interaction region. It is found that, as the two bubbles approach each other and collide, the electrons in the interaction region first oscillate in a periodic fashion, forming a quasistationary dense electron density ripple with fairly regular spatial structure. At longer times, the electron motion becomes chaotic, and the density grating is gradually smeared. The electrons escape in the transverse direction, and eventually the two bubbles merge to form a single one. The transition of the electron motion from regular to chaotic is confirmed by analytical modeling using test electrons moving in counterpropagating planar electromagnetic waves. The findings shed light on the dynamics of wake-bubble collisions and the complex behavior induced by multiple laser pulses in plasmas.

  20. Experimental investigation of the wake behind a model of wind turbine in a water flume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okulov, V. L.; Naumov, I. N.; Kabardin, I.; Mikkelsen, R.; Sørensen, J. N.

    2014-12-01

    The flow behind the model of wind turbine rotor is investigated experimentally in a water flume using Particle Image Velocimetry. The study carried out involves rotors of three bladed wind turbine designed using Glauert's optimization. The transitional regime, generally characterized as in between the regime governed by stable organized vortical structures and the turbulent wake, develops from disturbances of the tip and root vorticies through vortex paring and further complex behaviour towards the fully turbulent wake. Our PIV measurements pay special attention to the onset of the instabilities. The near wake characteristics (development of expansion, tip vortex position, deficit velocity and rotation in the wake) have been measured for different tip speed ratio to compare with main assumptions and conclusions of various rotor theories.

  1. Effects of bupropion SR on anterior paralimbic function during waking and REM sleep in depression: preliminary findings using.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nofzinger, E A; Berman, S; Fasiczka, A; Miewald, J M; Meltzer, C C; Price, J C; Sembrat, R C; Wood, A; Thase, M E

    2001-04-10

    This study sought to clarify the effects of bupropion SR on anterior paralimbic function in depressed patients by studying changes in the activation of these structures from waking to REM sleep both before and after treatment. Twelve depressed patients underwent concurrent EEG sleep studies and [18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ([18F]-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) scans during waking and during their second REM period of sleep before and after treatment with bupropion SR. Nine subjects completed pre- and post-treatment waking PET studies. Five subjects completed pre- and post-treatment waking and REM sleep PET studies. Bupropion SR treatment did not suppress electrophysiologic measures of REM sleep, nor did it alter an indirect measure of global metabolism during either waking or REM sleep. Bupropion SR treatment reversed the previously observed deficit in anterior cingulate, medial prefrontal cortex and right anterior insula activation from waking to REM sleep. In secondary analyses, this effect was related to a reduction in waking relative metabolism in these structures following treatment in the absence of a significant effect on REM sleep relative metabolism. The implications of these findings for the relative importance of anterior paralimbic function in REM sleep in depression and for the differential effects of anti-depressant treatment on brain function during waking vs. REM sleep are discussed.

  2. Wake-induced unsteady flows: Their impact on rotor performance and wake rectification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamczyk, J.J. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Brook Park, OH (United States). Lewis Research Center; Celestina, M.L. [Sverdrup Technology, Inc., Brook Park, OH (United States). Dept. of Aeromechanics; Chen, J.P. [Mississippi State Univ., MS (United States). NSF Engineering Research Center

    1996-01-01

    The impact of wake-induced unsteady flows on blade row performance and the wake rectification process is examined by means of numerical simulation. The passage of a stator wake through a downstream rotor is first simulated using a three-dimensional unsteady viscous flow code. The results from this simulation are used to define two steady-state inlet conditions for a three-dimensional viscous flow simulation of a rotor operating in isolation. The results obtained from these numerical simulations are then compared to those obtained form the unsteady simulation both to quantify the impact of the wake-induced unsteady flow field on rotor performance and to identify the flow processes which impact wake rectification. Finally, the results from this comparison study are related to an existing model, which attempts to account for the impact of wake-induced unsteady flows on the performance of multistage turbomachinery.

  3. Plasma wake field XUV radiation source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prono, Daniel S. (Los Alamos, NM); Jones, Michael E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1997-01-01

    A XUV radiation source uses an interaction of electron beam pulses with a gas to create a plasma radiator. A flowing gas system (10) defines a circulation loop (12) with a device (14), such as a high pressure pump or the like, for circulating the gas. A nozzle or jet (16) produces a sonic atmospheric pressure flow and increases the density of the gas for interacting with an electron beam. An electron beam is formed by a conventional radio frequency (rf) accelerator (26) and electron pulses are conventionally formed by a beam buncher (28). The rf energy is thus converted to electron beam energy, the beam energy is used to create and then thermalize an atmospheric density flowing gas to a fully ionized plasma by interaction of beam pulses with the plasma wake field, and the energetic plasma then loses energy by line radiation at XUV wavelengths Collection and focusing optics (18) are used to collect XUV radiation emitted as line radiation when the high energy density plasma loses energy that was transferred from the electron beam pulses to the plasma.

  4. Wake interaction effects on the transition process on turbine blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainsworth, R. W.; Lagraff, J. E.

    1987-10-01

    The characterization of the nozzle guide vane inlet and exit conditions in the Oxford University Isentropic Light Piston Tunnel fully 3-D annular rotating stage has been undertaken. Measurements included hot wire anemometry and pressure/Mach number distributions. Preparations for the rotor heat transfer instrumentation/data acquisition hardware and software are also in progress. Further development of a numerical model to predict the effects of wake passing and transition is reported. The convection of the wake through the passage is predicted, allowing for estimations of the expected times for which the boundary layer is disturbed by the wake fluid. The new model for the random generation and subsequent growth and convection of the turbulent spots produces a time-resolved prediction of the intermittent heat transfer signals by use of a time-marching procedure. By superimposing the two numerical models it is possible to simulate the measured instantaneous heat transfer characteristics and to estimate the effective average intermittency along the blade surface and compare the results to the measured intermittency values.

  5. The development of sleep-wake rhythms and the search for elemental circuits in the infant brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumberg, Mark S; Gall, Andrew J; Todd, William D

    2014-06-01

    Despite the predominance of sleep in early infancy, developmental science has yet to play a major role in shaping concepts and theories about sleep and its associated ultradian and circadian rhythms. Here we argue that developmental analyses help us to elucidate the relative contributions of the brainstem and forebrain to sleep-wake control and to dissect the neural components of sleep-wake rhythms. Developmental analysis also makes it clear that sleep-wake processes in infants are the foundation for those of adults. For example, the infant brainstem alone contains a fundamental sleep-wake circuit that is sufficient to produce transitions among wakefulness, quiet sleep, and active sleep. In addition, consistent with the requirements of a "flip-flop" model of sleep-wake processes, this brainstem circuit supports rapid transitions between states. Later in development, strengthening bidirectional interactions between the brainstem and forebrain contribute to the consolidation of sleep and wake bouts, the elaboration of sleep homeostatic processes, and the emergence of diurnal or nocturnal circadian rhythms. The developmental perspective promoted here critically constrains theories of sleep-wake control and provides a needed framework for the creation of fully realized computational models. Finally, with a better understanding of how this system is constructed developmentally, we will gain insight into the processes that govern its disintegration due to aging and disease.

  6. CFD simulation on Kappel propeller with a hull wake field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shin, Keun Woo; Andersen, Poul; Møller Bering, Rasmus

    2013-01-01

    -water characteristics. The hull wake field is simulated without the propeller flow to check whether it is preserved at the propeller plane or not. Propeller flow simulations are made with mean axial wake varying only along the radius (i.e. circumferentially uniform), whole axial wake and upstream transverse wake...

  7. Comparing satellite SAR and wind farm wake models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasager, Charlotte Bay; Vincent, P.; Husson, R.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to present offshore wind farm wake observed from satellite Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) wind fields from RADARSAT-1/-2 and Envisat and to compare these wakes qualitatively to wind farm wake model results. From some satellite SAR wind maps very long wakes are observed. Th...

  8. Impaired circadian waking arousal in narcolepsy-cataplexy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broughton, R; Krupa, S; Boucher, B; Rivers, M; Mullington, J

    1998-01-01

    The 24-hour sleep/wake distributions of untreated patients with narcolepsy-cataplexy and matched normal habitual nappers were compared using home ambulatory monitoring. Subjects followed their usual sleep patterns including, for the habitual nappers, a self-selected daytime nap. There were no differences in 24-hour totals of sleep between groups other than a small increase in SWS in narcolepsy. Narcolepsy showed greater amounts of day sleep (stages 2, SWS, REM and total sleep) and less night sleep (stage 2, total sleep). Data were collapsed into 5 min epochs and entered into a matrix. The data in the two groups were then "wrapped" (re-aligned) around the 24 hours with phase 0 as each of the times of: evening sleep onset, onset of SWS, mid-point of night sleep and moment of morning awakening. In habitual nappers alignment beginning at morning wake-up produced the highest amplitude, least temporal dispersion and greatest kurtosis of daytime sleep (naps). The 24-hour sleep/wake distribution curves of both subject groups (data aligned at morning wake-up) based on collapsed data into 5 min bins then underwent curve fitting using 15th order polynomial regression. As with visual analyses of the raw data, the curve fits confirmed that the peak in daytime sleep propensity in narcoleptics was earlier by about 40 (2.66 hours). It was concluded that decreased daytime amplitude of a circadian arousal system was the most parsimonious explanation for the increased amount, broader temporal distribution and relative phase advance of day sleep in narcolepsy and that, as well, such a mechanism could explain a number of other features of the disease.

  9. Identification, structure, and characterization of an exopolysaccharide produced by Histophilus somni during biofilm formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apicella Michael A

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Histophilus somni, a gram-negative coccobacillus, is an obligate inhabitant of bovine and ovine mucosal surfaces, and an opportunistic pathogen responsible for respiratory disease and other systemic infections in cattle and sheep. Capsules are important virulence factors for many pathogenic bacteria, but a capsule has not been identified on H. somni. However, H. somni does form a biofilm in vitro and in vivo, and the biofilm matrix of most bacteria consists of a polysaccharide. Results Following incubation of H. somni under growth-restricting stress conditions, such as during anaerobiosis, stationary phase, or in hypertonic salt, a polysaccharide could be isolated from washed cells or culture supernatant. The polysaccharide was present in large amounts in broth culture sediment after H. somni was grown under low oxygen tension for 4-5 days (conditions favorable to biofilm formation, but not from planktonic cells during log phase growth. Immuno-transmission electron microscopy showed that the polysaccharide was not closely associated with the cell surface, and was of heterogeneous high molecular size by gel electrophoresis, indicating it was an exopolysaccharide (EPS. The EPS was a branched mannose polymer containing some galactose, as determined by structural analysis. The mannose-specific Moringa M lectin and antibodies to the EPS bound to the biofilm matrix, demonstrating that the EPS was a component of the biofilm. The addition of N-acetylneuraminic acid to the growth medium resulted in sialylation of the EPS, and increased biofilm formation. Real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analyses indicated that genes previously identified in a putative polysaccharide locus were upregulated when the bacteria were grown under conditions favorable to a biofilm, compared to planktonic cells. Conclusions H. somni is capable of producing a branching, mannose-galactose EPS polymer under growth conditions

  10. X-Ray Wakes in Abell 160

    CERN Document Server

    Drake, N; Sakelliou, I; Pinkney, J C; Drake, Nick; Merrifield, Michael R.; Sakelliou, Irini; Pinkney, Jason C.

    2000-01-01

    `Wakes' of X-ray emission have now been detected trailing behind a few (at least seven) elliptical galaxies in clusters. To quantify how widespread this phenomenon is, and what its nature might be, we have obtained a deep (70 ksec) X-ray image of the poor cluster Abell 160 using the ROSAT HRI. Combining the X-ray data with optical positions of confirmed cluster members, and applying a statistic designed to search for wake-like excesses, we confirm that this phenomenon is observed in galaxies in this cluster. The probability that the detections arise from chance is less than 0.0038. Further, the wakes are not randomly distributed in direction, but are preferentially oriented pointing away from the cluster centre. This arrangement can be explained by a simple model in which wakes arise from the stripping of their host galaxies' interstellar media due to ram pressure against the intracluster medium through which they travel.

  11. CRED REA Algal Assessments Wake Atoll, 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Twelve quadrats were sampled along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 14 sites at Wake Atoll in October...

  12. Free wake models for vortex methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaiser, K. [Technical Univ. Berlin, Aerospace Inst. (Germany)

    1997-08-01

    The blade element method works fast and good. For some problems (rotor shapes or flow conditions) it could be better to use vortex methods. Different methods for calculating a wake geometry will be presented. (au)

  13. Cockpit-based Wake Vortex Visualization Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To prevent aircraft accidents due to wake vortex hazards, FAA procedures specify the minimum separation required between different categories of aircraft. However, a...

  14. 2014 CERN Accelerator Schools: Plasma Wake Acceleration

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    A specialised school on Plasma Wake Acceleration will be held at CERN, Switzerland from 23-29 November, 2014.   This course will be of interest to staff and students in accelerator laboratories, university departments and companies working in or having an interest in the field of new acceleration techniques. Following introductory lectures on plasma and laser physics, the course will cover the different components of a plasma wake accelerator and plasma beam systems. An overview of the experimental studies, diagnostic tools and state of the art wake acceleration facilities, both present and planned, will complement the theoretical part. Topical seminars and a visit of CERN will complete the programme. Further information can be found at: http://cas.web.cern.ch/cas/PlasmaWake2014/CERN-advert.html http://indico.cern.ch/event/285444/

  15. CRED REA Algal Assessments Wake Atoll, 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Twelve quadrats were sampled along 2 consecutively-placed, 25m transect lines as part of Rapid Ecological Assessments conducted at 12 sites at Wake Atoll in April...

  16. Model of the Human Sleep Wake System

    CERN Document Server

    Rogers, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    A model and analysis of the human sleep/wake system is presented. The model is derived using the known neuronal groups, and their various projections, involved with sleep and wake. Inherent in the derivation is the existence of a slow time scale associated with homeostatic regulation, and a faster time scale associated with the dynamics within the sleep phase. A significant feature of the model is that it does not contain a periodic forcing term, common in other models, reflecting the fact that sleep/wake is not dependent upon a diurnal stimulus. Once derived, the model is analyzed using a linearized stability analysis. We then use experimental data from normal sleep-wake systems and orexin knockout systems to verify the physiological validity of the equations.

  17. Structural properties of the solar flare-producing coronal current system developed in an emerging magnetic flux tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magara, Tetsuya

    2017-02-01

    The activity of a magnetic structure formed in the solar corona depends on a coronal current system developed in the structure, which determines how an electric current flows in the corona. To investigate structural properties of the coronal current system responsible for producing a solar flare, we perform magnetohydrodynamic simulation of an emerging magnetic flux tube which forms a coronal magnetic structure. Investigation using fractal dimensional analysis and electric current streamlines reveals that the flare-producing coronal current system relies on a specific coronal current structure of two-dimensional spatiality, which has a sub-region where a nearly anti-parallel magnetic field configuration is spontaneously generated. We discuss the role of this locally generated anti-parallel magnetic field configuration in causing the reconnection of a three-dimensional magnetic field, which is a possible mechanism for producing a flare. We also discuss how the twist of a magnetic flux tube affects structural properties of a coronal current system, showing how much volume current flux is carried into the corona by an emerging flux tube. This gives a way to evaluate the activity of a coronal magnetic structure.

  18. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans made by different basement-membrane-producing tumors have immunological and structural similarities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, U M; Albrechtsen, R; Hassell, J R

    1985-01-01

    Using immunological assays, we determined the relationship between the heparan sulfate proteoglycans produced by two different murine basement-membrane-producing tumors, i.e., the mouse Engelbreth-Holm-Swarm (EHS) tumor and the L2 rat yolk-sac tumor. Antibodies prepared against the heparan sulfate...... mainly heparan sulfate (75%) along with smaller amounts of chondroitin sulfate (19%), whereas the L2 rat yolk-sac tumor produced mainly chondroitin sulfate (76%) with smaller amounts of heparan sulfate (21%). We conclude that these two murine basement-membrane-producing tumors elaborate...... proteoglycans obtained from these two sources immunoprecipitated the same precursor protein with a molecular mass of 400,000 daltons from 35S-methionine pulse-labeled cells of both tumors. Immunohistochemistry showed the heparan sulfate proteoglycan to be distributed in the extracellular matrix and also...

  19. Aircraft Wake Vortex Deformation in Turbulent Atmosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Hennemann, Ingo; Holzaepfel, Frank

    2007-01-01

    Large-scale distortion of aircraft wake vortices appears to play a crucial role for aircraft safety during approach and landing. Vortex distortion is investigated based on large eddy simulations of wake vortex evolution in a turbulent atmosphere. A vortex identification method is developed that can be adapted to the vortex scales of interest. Based on the identified vortex center tracks, a statistics of vortex curvature radii is established. This statistics constitutes the basis for understan...

  20. Wake-Vortex Hazards During Cruise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossow, Vernon J.; James, Kevin D.; Nixon, David (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Even though the hazard posed by lift-generated wakes of subsonic transport aircraft has been studied extensively for approach and departure at airports, only a small amount of effort has gone into the potential hazard at cruise altitude. This paper reports on a studio of the wake-vortex hazard during cruise because encounters may become more prevalent when free-flight becomes available and each aircraft, is free to choose its own route between destinations. In order to address the problem, the various fluid-dynamic stages that vortex wakes usually go through as they age will be described along with estimates of the potential hazard that each stage poses. It appears that a rolling-moment hazard can be just as severe at cruise as for approach at airports, but it only persists for several minutes. However, the hazard posed by the downwash in the wake due to the lift on the generator aircraft persists for tens of minutes in a long narrow region behind the generating aircraft. The hazard consists of severe vertical loads when an encountering aircraft crosses the wake. A technique for avoiding vortex wakes at cruise altitude will be described. To date the hazard posed by lift-generated vortex wakes and their persistence at cruise altitudes has been identified and subdivided into several tasks. Analyses of the loads to be encounter and are underway and should be completed shortly. A review of published literature on the subject has been nearly completed (see text) and photographs of vortex wakes at cruise altitudes have been taken and the various stages of decay have been identified. It remains to study and sort the photographs for those that best illustrate the various stages of decay after they are shed by subsonic transport aircraft at cruise altitudes. The present status of the analysis and the paper are described.

  1. Structural biological study of self-resistance determinants in antibiotic-producing actinomycetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Masanori

    2015-09-01

    As antibiotics act to inhibit the growth of bacteria, the drugs are useful for treating bacterial infectious diseases. However, microorganisms that produce antibiotics must be protected from the lethal effect of their own antibiotic product. In this review, the fruit of our group's current research on self-protection mechanisms of Streptomyces producing antibiotics that inhibit DNA, protein and bacterial cell wall syntheses will be described.

  2. Distributed chaos in turbulent wakes

    CERN Document Server

    Bershadskii, A

    2016-01-01

    Soft and hard spontaneous breaking of space translational symmetry (homogeneity) have been studied in turbulent wakes by means of distributed chaos. In the case of the soft translational symmetry breaking the vorticity correlation integral $\\int_{V} \\langle {\\boldsymbol \\omega} ({\\bf x},t) \\cdot {\\boldsymbol \\omega} ({\\bf x} + {\\bf r},t) \\rangle_{V} d{\\bf r}$ dominates the distributed chaos and the chaotic spectra $\\exp-(k/k_{\\beta})^{\\beta }$ have $\\beta =1/2$. In the case of the hard translational symmetry breaking, control on the distributed chaos is switched from one type of fundamental symmetry to another (in this case to Lagrangian relabeling symmetry). Due to the Noether's theorem the relabeling symmetry results in the inviscid helicity conservation and helicity correlation integral $I=\\int \\langle h({\\bf x},t)~h({\\bf x}+{\\bf r}, t)\\rangle d{\\bf r}$ (Levich-Tsinober invariant) dominates the distributed chaos with $\\beta =1/3$. Good agreement with the experimatal data has been established for turbulent ...

  3. Structural and rheological characterisation of heteropolysaccharides produced by lactic acid bacteria in wheat and sorghum sourdough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galle, Sandra; Schwab, Clarissa; Arendt, Elke K; Gänzle, Michael G

    2011-05-01

    Hydrocolloids improve the volume, texture, and shelf life of bread. Exopolysaccharides (EPS) produced by lactic acid bacteria (LAB) during sourdough fermentation can replace hydrocolloids. It was the aim of this study to determine whether heteropolysaccharides (HePS) synthesized intracellularly from sugar nucleotides by glycosyltransferases are produced in wheat and gluten-free sorghum sourdough at effective levels. The HePS-producing strains Lactobacillus casei FUA3185, L. casei FUA3186, and Lactobacillus buchneri FUA3154 were used; Weissella cibaria 10M producing no EPS in the absence of sucrose served as control strain. Cell suspensions of L. buchneri in MRS showed the highest viscosity at low shear rate. Glycosyltransferase genes responsible of HePS formation in LAB were expressed in sorghum and wheat sourdough. However, only HePS produced by L. buchneri influenced the rheological properties of sorghum sourdoughs but not of wheat sourdoughs. Sorghum sourdough fermented with L. buchneri exhibited a low |G*| compared to the control, indicating a decrease in resistance to deformation. An increase in tan δ indicated decreased elasticity. The use of LAB producing HePS expands the diversity of EPS and increases the variety of cultures for use in baking.

  4. Histamine in the regulation of wakefulness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakkar, Mahesh M

    2011-02-01

    The histaminergic system is exclusively localized within the posterior hypothalamus with projection to almost all the major regions of the central nervous system. Strong and consistent evidence exist to suggest that histamine, acting via H₁ and/or H₃ receptor has a pivotal role in the regulation of sleep-wakefulness. Administration of histamine or H₁ receptor agonists induces wakefulness, whereas administration of H₁ receptor antagonists promotes sleep. The H₃ receptor functions as an auto-receptor and regulates the synthesis and release of histamine. Activation of H₃ receptor reduces histamine release and promotes sleep. Conversely, blockade of H₃ receptor promotes wakefulness. Histamine release in the hypothalamus and other target regions is highest during wakefulness. The histaminergic neurons display maximal activity during the state of high vigilance, and cease their activity during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. The cerebrospinal levels of histamine are reduced in diseased states where hypersomnolence is a major symptom. The histamine deficient L-histidine decarboxylase knockout (HDC KO) mice display sleep fragmentation and increased REM sleep during the light period along with profound wakefulness deficit at dark onset, and in novel environment. Similar results have been obtained when histamine neurons are lesioned. These studies strongly implicate the histaminergic neurons of the TMN to play a critical role in the maintenance of high vigilance state during wakefulness.

  5. Vortex wakes of a flapping foil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schnipper, Teis; Andersen, Anders Peter; Bohr, Tomas

    2009-01-01

    and the shedding process at the sharp trailing edge in detail. This allows us to identify the origins of the vortices in the 2P wake, to understand that two distinct 2P regions are present in the phase diagram due to the timing of the vortex shedding at the leading edge and the trailing edge and to propose......We present an experimental study of a symmetric foil performing pitching oscillations in a vertically flowing soap film. By varying the frequency and amplitude of the oscillation we visualize a variety of wakes with up to 46 vortices per oscillation period, including von Karman vortex street......, inverted von Karman vortex street, 2P wake, 2P+2S wake and novel wakes ranging from 4P to 8P. We map out the wake types in a phase diagram spanned by the width-based Strouhal number and the dimensionless amplitude. We follow the time evolution of the vortex formation near the round leading edge...

  6. [Testing results of telemechanic system controlling train operators wakefulness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serikov, V V; Zakrevskaia, A A; Zakharchenko, D V; Alpaev, D V; At'kova, E O

    2015-01-01

    Expert and instrumental assessment covered efficiency of telemechanic system controlling train operators wakefulness in simulation of real night travel, through special simulator complex "Locomotive operator cabin". The telemechanic system controlling train operators wakefulness, if exploited correctly, provides wakefulness of the train operators at the level sufficient for the effective work. That is supported by distribution of falling asleep cases in experiments with activated or deactivated telemechanic system controlling train operators wakefulness. The study proved efficiency of telemechanic system controlling train operators wakefulness.

  7. Characterization of the supersonic wake of a generic space launcher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreyer, A.-M.; Stephan, S.; Radespiel, R.

    2017-03-01

    The wake flow of a generic axisymmetric space-launcher model is investigated experimentally for flow cases with and without propulsive jet to gain insight into the wake-flow phenomena at a supersonic stage of the flight trajectory which is especially critical with respect to dynamic loads on the structure. Measurements are performed at Mach 2.9 and a Reynolds number Re D = 1.3 × 106 based on model diameter D. The nozzle exit velocity of the jet is at Mach 2.5, and the flow is moderately underexpanded ( p e/ p ∞ = 5.7). The flow topology is described based on velocity measurements in the wake by means of particle image velocimetry and schlieren visualizations. Mean and fluctuating mass-flux profiles are obtained from hot-wire measurements, and unsteady wall-pressure measurements on the main-body base are performed simultaneously. This way, the evolution of the wake flow and its spectral content can be observed along with the footprint of this highly dynamic flow on the launcher main-body base. For the case without propulsive jet, a large separated zone is forming downstream of the main body shoulder, and the flow is reattaching further downstream on the afterbody. The afterexpanding propulsive jet (air) causes a displacement of the shear layer away from the wall, preventing the reattachment of the flow. In the spectral analysis of the baseline case, a dominant frequency around St D = 0.25 is found in the pressure-fluctuation signal at the main-body base of the launcher. This frequency is related to the shedding of the separation bubble and is less pronounced in the presence of the propulsive jet. In the shear layer itself, the spectra obtained from the hot-wire signal have a more broadband low-frequency content, which also reflects the characteristic frequency of turbulent structures convected in the shear layer, a swinging motion ( St D = 0.6), as well as the radial flapping motion of the shear layer ( St D = 0.85), respectively. Moving downstream along the

  8. Synthesis enables a structural revision of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis-produced diterpene, edaxadiene†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangler, Jillian E.; Carson, Cheryl A.; Sorensen, Erik J.

    2011-01-01

    A stereodivergent synthesis of the [3.3.1] bicyclic core of edaxadiene was completed utilizing a key intramolecular oxidative ketone allylation. Significant discrepancies between the spectroscopic data obtained for the synthetic construct and the natural isolate raised questions about the structural assignment of edaxadiene. A subsequent structural reassignment was validated by completion of a total synthesis of the correct structure of the natural product. PMID:22114734

  9. WAKES: Wavelet Adaptive Kinetic Evolution Solvers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardirian, Marine; Afeyan, Bedros; Larson, David

    2016-10-01

    We are developing a general capability to adaptively solve phase space evolution equations mixing particle and continuum techniques in an adaptive manner. The multi-scale approach is achieved using wavelet decompositions which allow phase space density estimation to occur with scale dependent increased accuracy and variable time stepping. Possible improvements on the SFK method of Larson are discussed, including the use of multiresolution analysis based Richardson-Lucy Iteration, adaptive step size control in explicit vs implicit approaches. Examples will be shown with KEEN waves and KEEPN (Kinetic Electrostatic Electron Positron Nonlinear) waves, which are the pair plasma generalization of the former, and have a much richer span of dynamical behavior. WAKES techniques are well suited for the study of driven and released nonlinear, non-stationary, self-organized structures in phase space which have no fluid, limit nor a linear limit, and yet remain undamped and coherent well past the drive period. The work reported here is based on the Vlasov-Poisson model of plasma dynamics. Work supported by a Grant from the AFOSR.

  10. Dynamic Hybrid Simulation of the Lunar Wake During ARTEMIS Crossing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiehle, S.; Plaschke, F.; Angelopoulos, V.; Auster, H.; Glassmeier, K.; Kriegel, H.; Motschmann, U. M.; Mueller, J.

    2010-12-01

    The interaction of the highly dynamic solar wind with the Moon is simulated with the A.I.K.E.F. (Adaptive Ion Kinetic Electron Fluid) code for the ARTEMIS P1 flyby on February 13, 2010. The A.I.K.E.F. hybrid plasma simulation code is the improved version of the Braunschweig code. It is able to automatically increase simulation grid resolution in areas of interest during runtime, which greatly increases resolution as well as performance. As the Moon has no intrinsic magnetic field and no ionosphere, the solar wind particles are absorbed at its surface, resulting in the formation of the lunar wake at the nightside. The solar wind magnetic field is basically convected through the Moon and the wake is slowly filled up with solar wind particles. However, this interaction is strongly influenced by the highly dynamic solar wind during the flyby. This is considered by a dynamic variation of the upstream conditions in the simulation using OMNI solar wind measurement data. By this method, a very good agreement between simulation and observations is achieved. The simulations show that the stationary structure of the lunar wake constitutes a tableau vivant in space representing the well-known Friedrichs diagram for MHD waves.

  11. Simulation of spray dispersion in a simplified heavy vehicle wake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paschkewitz, J S

    2006-01-13

    Simulations of spray dispersion in a simplified tractor-trailer wake have been completed with the goal of obtaining a better understanding of how to mitigate this safety hazard. The Generic Conventional Model (GCM) for the tractor-trailer was used. The impact of aerodynamic drag reduction devices, specifically trailer-mounted base flaps, on the transport of spray in the vehicle wake was considered using the GCM. This analysis demonstrated that base flaps including a bottom plate may actually worsen motorist visibility because of the interaction of fine spray with large vortex flows in the wake. This work suggests that to use computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to design and evaluate spray mitigation strategies the jet or sheet breakup processes can be modeled using an array of injectors of small (< 0.1 mm) water droplets; however the choice of size distribution, injection locations, directions and velocities is largely unknown and requires further study. Possible containment strategies would include using flow structures to 'focus' particles into regions away from passing cars or surface treatments to capture small drops.

  12. A numerical investigation of the role of the turbine rotor scale and the nacelle on wake meandering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foti, Daniel; Yang, Xiaolei; Shen, Lian; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2016-11-01

    Recent analysis of a hydrokinetic turbine and laboratory scale wind turbine reveal that the turbine nacelle has a considerable effect on the turbulence kinetic energy and wake meandering. However, the role of the nacelle on wake meandering for utility-scale wind turbines has not been fully investigated. In this work, a numerical investigation using large eddy simulations of four wind turbines with rotor diameters ranging from laboratory to utility scale reveals similar turbulent structures in the far wake and a comparable wake meandering Strouhal number regardless of rotor size. By reconstructing the wake meandering with three dimensional spatio-temporal filtering process, first proposed in Foti et al., the statistics of the dynamics of the wake meandering are quantified in terms of amplitude and wavelength. Results indicate that the wavelength of wake meandering can be properly scaled by rotor diameter of the turbines for both simulations with and without a nacelle model. The meandering amplitude, on the other hand, is larger for the simulation with a nacelle. This is further quantitative evidence that a nacelle model is imperative to accurately capturing wake meandering. This work was supported by Department of Energy (DE-EE0002980, DE-EE0005482 and DE-AC04-94AL85000), and Sandia National Laboratories.

  13. Design and analysis of small wind turbine blades with wakes similar to those of industrial scale turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanzadeh, Arash; Naughton, Jonathan

    2016-11-01

    A new design approach has been developed for wind turbine blades to be used in wind tunnel experiments that study wind turbine wakes. The approach allows wakes of small scale (2 m diameter) wind turbine rotors to simulate the important physics of wakes generated by a "parent" industrial scale wind turbine rotor despite the difference in size. The design approach forces the normalized normal and tangential force distributions of the small scale wind turbine blades to match those of the "parent" industrial scale wind turbine blades. The wake arises from the interaction between the flow and the blade, which imparts a momentum deficit and rotation to the flow due to the forces created by the blade on the flow. In addition, the wake dynamics and stability are affected by the load distribution across the blade. Thus, it is expected that matching normalized force distributions should result in similar wake structure. To independently assess the blades designed using this approach, the "parent" industrial scale and small scale wind turbine rotors are modeled using a free vortex wake method to study the generation and evolution of the two wakes. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, under Award # DE-SC0012671.

  14. Oxidative stability of mayonnaise and milk drink produced with structured lipids based on fish oil and caprylic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timm Heinrich, Maike; Xu, Xuebing; Nielsen, Nina Skall;

    2004-01-01

    The oxidative stabilities of traditional fish oil (FO), randomized lipids (RFO), or specific structured lipids (SFO) produced from fish oil were compared when incorporated into either milk drink or mayonnaise. Furthermore, the effect of adding the potential antioxidants EDTA (240 mg/kg) or lactof...

  15. Diversity and noise effects in a model of homeostatic regulation of the sleep-wake cycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Patriarca

    Full Text Available Recent advances in sleep neurobiology have allowed development of physiologically based mathematical models of sleep regulation that account for the neuronal dynamics responsible for the regulation of sleep-wake cycles and allow detailed examination of the underlying mechanisms. Neuronal systems in general, and those involved in sleep regulation in particular, are noisy and heterogeneous by their nature. It has been shown in various systems that certain levels of noise and diversity can significantly improve signal encoding. However, these phenomena, especially the effects of diversity, are rarely considered in the models of sleep regulation. The present paper is focused on a neuron-based physiologically motivated model of sleep-wake cycles that proposes a novel mechanism of the homeostatic regulation of sleep based on the dynamics of a wake-promoting neuropeptide orexin. Here this model is generalized by the introduction of intrinsic diversity and noise in the orexin-producing neurons, in order to study the effect of their presence on the sleep-wake cycle. A simple quantitative measure of the quality of a sleep-wake cycle is introduced and used to systematically study the generalized model for different levels of noise and diversity. The model is shown to exhibit a clear diversity-induced resonance: that is, the best wake-sleep cycle turns out to correspond to an intermediate level of diversity at the synapses of the orexin-producing neurons. On the other hand, only a mild evidence of stochastic resonance is found, when the level of noise is varied. These results show that disorder, especially in the form of quenched diversity, can be a key-element for an efficient or optimal functioning of the homeostatic regulation of the sleep-wake cycle. Furthermore, this study provides an example of a constructive role of diversity in a neuronal system that can be extended beyond the system studied here.

  16. Structure and mechanical properties of austenitic 316L steel produced by selective laser melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, P. A.; Zisman, A. A.; Petrov, S. N.; Goncharov, I. S.

    2016-10-01

    The mechanical properties and the impact toughness of austenitic 316L steel produced by selective laser melting at a laser power of 175-190 W have been studied. It is shown that the selective laser melting method makes it possible to significantly increase the strength properties of the steel with some decrease in the ductility and the impact toughness as compared to those of the steel produced by a traditional technology. The laser power influences insignificantly. The methods of making notches and its orientation is found to influence the impact toughness.

  17. A Critical Review of the Transport and Decay of Wake Vortices in Ground Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarpkaya, T.

    2004-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the transport and decay of wake vortices in ground effect and cites a need for a physics-based parametric model. The encounter of a vortex with a solid body is always a complex event involving turbulence enhancement, unsteadiness, and very large gradients of velocity and pressure. Wake counter in ground effect is the most dangerous of them all. The interaction of diverging, area-varying, and decaying aircraft wake vortices with the ground is very complex because both the vortices and the flow field generated by them are altered to accommodate the presence of the ground (where there is very little room to maneuver) and the background turbulent flow. Previous research regarding vortex models, wake vortex decay mechanisms, time evolution within in ground effect of a wake vortex pair, laminar flow in ground effect, and the interaction of the existing boundary layer with a convected vortex are reviewed. Additionally, numerical simulations, 3-dimensional large-eddy simulations, a probabilistic 2-phase wake vortex decay and transport model and a vortex element method are discussed. The devising of physics-based, parametric models for the prediction of (operational) real-time response, mindful of the highly three-dimensional and unsteady structure of vortices, boundary layers, atmospheric thermodynamics, and weather convective phenomena is required. In creating a model, LES and field data will be the most powerful tools.

  18. The relationship between wingbeat kinematics and vortex wake of a thrush nightingale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosén, M; Spedding, G R; Hedenström, A

    2004-11-01

    The wingbeat kinematics of a thrush nightingale Luscinia luscinia were measured for steady flight in a wind tunnel over a range of flight speeds (5-10 m s(-1)), and the results are interpreted and discussed in the context of a detailed, previously published, wake analysis of the same bird. Neither the wingbeat frequency nor wingbeat amplitude change significantly over the investigated speed range and consequently dimensionless measures that compare timescales of flapping vs. timescales due to the mean flow vary in direct proportion to the mean flow itself, with no constant or slowly varying intervals. The only significant kinematic variations come from changes in the upstroke timing (downstroke fraction) and the upstroke wing folding (span ratio), consistent with the gradual variations, primarily in the upstroke wake, previously reported. The relationship between measured wake geometry and wingbeat kinematics can be qualitatively explained by presumed self-induced convection and deformation of the wake between its initial formation and later measurement, and varies in a predictable way with flight speed. Although coarse details of the wake geometry accord well with the kinematic measurements, there is no simple explanation based on these observed kinematics alone that accounts for the measured asymmetries of circulation magnitude in starting and stopping vortex structures. More complex interactions between the wake and wings and/or body are implied.

  19. Flow past a circular cylinder with a permeable wake splitter plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardell, Gregory S.

    1993-08-01

    Measurements in the near wake region of a circular cylinder in a uniform flow in the Reynolds number range 2.5 x 10(exp 3) is approximately less than Re is approximately less than 1.8 x 10(exp 4) with permeable splitter plates spanning the wake center plane are presented. Permeability is defined by the pressure drop across the plates, and the relationship between permeability and plate solidity is determined for a set of plates constructed from woven wire mesh permitting unambiguous characterization of the splitter plates by the solidity. The effects of different solidities on the flow in the near wake are investigated using smoke wire flow visualization, hot-wire anemometry, and measurements of the mean pressure at the cylinder surface, and the results are related to cylinder flow without a splitter plate. Flow visualization results demonstrate that the introduction of low solidity splitter plates does not change the basic near wake structure, and that sufficiently high solidity uncouples the large-scale wake instability from the body, with the primary vortex formation occurring downstream of the separation bubble due to instability of the wake profile. Hot-wire and surface pressure measurements confirm and quantify the flow visualization results, showing that the permeable splitter plates reduce the drag and modify the primary wake frequency. When the solidity is high enough that the wake is convectively unstable, the base pressure is independent of the Reynolds number and solidity. For a wide range of solidities, the same asymptotic value of the Strouhal number is reached at high Reynolds numbers. The relationship between the Strouhal number and the base pressure is discussed.

  20. Structural, vibrational and optical studies on an amorphous Se90P10 alloy produced by mechanical alloying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, E C; Deflon, E; Machado, K D; Silva, T G; Mangrich, A S

    2012-03-21

    We investigated some physicochemical properties of an amorphous Se(90)P(10) alloy produced by mechanical alloying through x-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, optical absorption spectroscopy and EXAFS techniques. The total structure factor obtained from x-ray diffraction and the EXAFS χ(k) oscillations on the Se K edge were used in reverse Monte Carlo simulations to obtain structural information such as average coordination numbers and interatomic distances and the distribution of structural units present in the alloy. In addition, we also determined the vibrational modes and the optical band gap energy of the alloy. © 2012 IOP Publishing Ltd

  1. Structure-property relationship of ceramic coatings on metals produced by laser processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Hosson, J.T.M.; van den Burg, M.; Mazumder, J; Conde, O; Villar, R; Steen, W

    1996-01-01

    This paper concentrates on the mechanical performance of various ceramic coatings of Cr2O3 on steel (SAF2205), as produced by CO2 laser processing. The thickness of the coating that can be applied by laser coating is limited to about 200 mu m setting a limit to the maximum strain energy release rate

  2. Structural elucidation of the EPS of slime producing Brevundimonas vesicularis sp isolated from a paper machine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoef, R.P.; Waard, de P.; Schols, H.A.; Ratto, M.; Siika-aho, M.; Voragen, A.G.J.

    2002-01-01

    The slime forming bacteria Brevundimonas vesicularis sp. was isolated from a paper mill and its EPS was produced on laboratory scale. After production, the exopolysaccharide (EPS) was purified and analysed for its purity and homogeneity, HPSEC revealed one distinct population with a molecular mass o

  3. The vortex wake of blackcaps (Sylvia atricapilla L.) measured using high-speed digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, L C; Hedenström, A

    2009-10-01

    Reconstructing the vortex wake of freely flying birds is challenging, but in the past few years, direct measurements of the wake circulation have become available for a number of species. Streamwise circulation has been measured at different positions along the span of the birds, but no measurements have been performed in the transverse plane. Recent findings from studies of bat wakes have pointed to the importance of transverse plane data for reconstructing the wake topology because important structures may be missed otherwise. We present results of high-speed DPIV measurements in the transverse plane behind freely flying blackcaps. We found novel wake structures previously not shown in birds, including wing root vortices of opposite as well as the same sign as the wing tip vortices. This suggests a more complex wake structure in birds than previously assumed and calls for more detailed studies of the flow over the wings and body, respectively. Based on measurements on birds with and without a tail we also tested hypotheses regarding the function of the tail during steady flight. We were unable to detect any differences in the wake pattern between birds with and without a tail. We conclude that the birds do not use their tail to exploit vortices shed at the wing root during the downstroke. Neither did we find support for the hypothesis that the tail should reduce the drag of the bird. The function of the tail during steady flight thus remains unclear and calls for further investigation in future studies.

  4. Modeling of Wake-vortex Aircraft Encounters. Appendix B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sonya T.

    1999-01-01

    There are more people passing through the world's airports today than at any other time in history. With this increase in civil transport, airports are becoming capacity limited. In order to increase capacity and thus meet the demands of the flying public, the number of runways and number of flights per runway must be increased. In response to the demand, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), in conjunction with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), airport operators, and the airline industry are taking steps to increase airport capacity without jeopardizing safety. Increasing the production per runway increases the likelihood that an aircraft will encounter the trailing wake-vortex of another aircraft. The hazard of a wake-vortex encounter is that heavy load aircraft can produce high intensity wake turbulence, through the development of its wing-tip vortices. A smaller aircraft following in the wake of the heavy load aircraft will experience redistribution of its aerodynamic load. This creates a safety hazard for the smaller aircraft. Understanding this load redistribution is of great importance, particularly during landing and take-off. In this research wake-vortex effects on an encountering 10% scale model of the B737-100 aircraft are modeled using both strip theory and vortex-lattice modeling methods. The models are then compared to wind tunnel data that was taken in the 30ft x 60ft wind tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). Comparisons are made to determine if the models will have acceptable accuracy when parts of the geometry are removed, such as the horizontal stabilizer and the vertical tail. A sensitivity analysis was also performed to observe how accurately the models could match the experimental data if there was a 10% error in the circulation strength. It was determined that both models show accurate results when the wing, horizontal stabilizer, and vertical tail were a part of the geometry. When the horizontal

  5. PIV MEASUREMENTS OF THE NEAR-WAKE FLOW OF AN AIRFOIL ABOVE A FREE SURFACE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The near-wake flow of a NACA0012 airfoils mounted above a water surface were experimentally studied in a wind/wave tunnel. The main objective of this study is to investigate the influence of the free surface on the structure of the airfoil trailing wake. The flow structure was measured with different ride heights between the airfoil and free surface using a Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) system. The Reynolds number based on the chord length of the airfoil was about 3.5×103. For each experimental condition, large amount of instantaneous velocity fields were captured and ensemble-averaged to get the spatial distributions of mean velocity and mean vorticity, as well as turbulence statistics. The results show that the flow structures of the airfoil wake varies remarkably with the change in the ride height.

  6. Superhydrophobic surfaces produced using natural silica-based structures with potential for biomedical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Nuno M.; Reis, R. L.; Mano, J. F.

    2013-01-01

    Publicado em "Journal of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine", vol. 17, supp. 1 (2013) Superhydrophobic surfaces (SHS) are characterized for exhibit extreme water repellency. Where water droplets roll easily and have a contact angle higher than 150º. The inspiration to produce artificial SHS comes from nature, the Lotus leaf. Hierarchical surface topographies at micro/nanoscale are critical for this effect. On biomedical and tissue engineering fields several applications for SHS h...

  7. Do trout swim better than eels? Challenges for estimating performance based on the wake of self-propelled bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tytell, Eric D.

    Engineers and biologists have long desired to compare propulsive performance for fishes and underwater vehicles of different sizes, shapes, and modes of propulsion. Ideally, such a comparison would be made on the basis of either propulsive efficiency, total power output or both. However, estimating the efficiency and power output of self-propelled bodies, and particularly fishes, is methodologically challenging because it requires an estimate of thrust. For such systems traveling at a constant velocity, thrust and drag are equal, and can rarely be separated on the basis of flow measured in the wake. This problem is demonstrated using flow fields from swimming American eels, Anguilla rostrata, measured using particle image velocimetry (PIV) and high-speed video. Eels balance thrust and drag quite evenly, resulting in virtually no wake momentum in the swimming (axial) direction. On average, their wakes resemble those of self-propelled jet propulsors, which have been studied extensively. Theoretical studies of such wakes may provide methods for the estimation of thrust separately from drag. These flow fields are compared with those measured in the wakes of rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, and bluegill sunfish, Lepomis macrochirus. In contrast to eels, these fishes produce wakes with axial momentum. Although the net momentum flux must be zero on average, it is neither spatially nor temporally homogeneous; the heterogeneity may provide an alternative route for estimating thrust. This review shows examples of wakes and velocity profiles from the three fishes, indicating challenges in estimating efficiency and power output and suggesting several routes for further experiments. Because these estimates will be complicated, a much simpler method for comparing performance is outlined, using as a point of comparison the power lost producing the wake. This wake power, a component of the efficiency and total power, can be estimated in a straightforward way from the flow

  8. Tunable Design of Structural Colors Produced by Pseudo-1D Photonic Crystals of Graphene Oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Liping; Qi, Wei; Wang, Mengfan; Huang, Renliang; Su, Rongxin; He, Zhimin

    2016-07-01

    It is broadly observed that graphene oxide (GO) films appear transparent with a thickness of about several nanometers, whereas they appear dark brown or almost black with thickness of more than 1 μm. The basic color mechanism of GO film on a sub-micrometer scale, however, is not well understood. This study reports on GO pseudo-1D photonic crystals (p1D-PhCs) exhibiting tunable structural colors in the visible wavelength range owing to its 1D Bragg nanostructures. Striking structural colors of GO p1D-PhCs could be tuned by simply changing either the volume or concentration of the aqueous GO dispersion during vacuum filtration. Moreover, the quantitative relationship between thickness and reflection wavelength of GO p1D-PhCs has been revealed, thereby providing a theoretical basis to rationally design structural colors of GO p1D-PhCs. The spectral response of GO p1D-PhCs to humidity is also obtained clearly showing the wavelength shift of GO p1D-PhCs at differently relative humidity values and thus encouraging the integration of structural color printing and the humidity-responsive property of GO p1D-PhCs to develop a visible and fast-responsive anti-counterfeiting label. The results pave the way for a variety of potential applications of GO in optics, structural color printing, sensing, and anti-counterfeiting.

  9. Structural study of metastable tetragonal YSZ powders produced via a sol-gel route

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viazzi, Celine [CIRIMAT, Paul Sabatier University, 118 Rte de Narbonne, 31 062 Toulouse Cedex 09 (France)], E-mail: viazzi@chimie.ups-tlse.fr; Bonino, Jean-Pierre; Ansart, Florence; Barnabe, Antoine [CIRIMAT, Paul Sabatier University, 118 Rte de Narbonne, 31 062 Toulouse Cedex 09 (France)

    2008-03-20

    Sol-gel yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) is investigated in this paper. The final aim is to process YSZ powders into stable slurries in order to prepare thick coatings for thermal barrier to be applied on hot turboengine components. In fact, this system is well-known for its excellent thermomechanical resistance at elevated temperatures but the relationship between these performances and the structural and microstructural characteristics of these materials is not fully understood. This paper reports a preliminary study concerning recent progress on the structural properties control of YSZ powders synthesized by sol-gel process and the main advantages of this process compared to conventional methods. As a first step towards this understanding, structural investigations of ZrO{sub 2} doped with various xmol%YO{sub 1.5} coatings, have been performed using X-ray diffraction, structural Rietveld refinement, Raman spectra analysis and transmission electron microscopy. The evolution of the crystallographic structure of YSZ powders after air annealing at various temperatures 1100 deg. C, 1200 deg. Cand 1400 deg. C was studied to well understand the conditions of the formation of desired metastable tetragonal phase (t'). Then, this work should allow to correlate chemical and thermomechanical parameters as YSZ formulation and sol-gel elaboration conditions, temperature and t' phase performances.

  10. Structure of the oligomers obtained by enzymatic hydrolysis of the glucomannan produced by the plant Amorphophallus konjac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cescutti, Paola; Campa, Cristiana; Delben, Franco; Rizzo, Roberto

    2002-11-29

    Dimers and trimers obtained by enzymatic hydrolysis of the glucomannan produced by the plant Amorphophallus konjac were analysed in order to obtain information on the saccharidic sequences present in the polymer. The polysaccharide was digested with cellulase and beta-mannanase and the oligomers produced were isolated by means of size-exclusion chromatography. They were structurally characterised using electrospray mass spectrometry, capillary electrophoresis, and NMR. The investigation revealed that many possible sequences were present in the polymer backbone suggesting a Bernoulli-type chain.

  11. Investigation of Inlet Guide Vane Wakes in a F109 Turbofan Engine with and without Flow Control

    OpenAIRE

    Kozak, Jeffrey D

    2000-01-01

    A series of experiments were conducted in a F109 turbofan engine to investigate the unsteady wake profiles of an Inlet Guide Vane (IGV) at a typical spacing to the downstream fan at subsonic and transonic relative blade velocities. The sharp trailing-edge vanes were designed to produce a wake profile consistent with modern IGV. Time averaged baseline measurements were first performed with the IGV located upstream of the aerodynamic influence of the fan. Unsteady experiments were performed ...

  12. Inlet Guide Vane Wakes Including Rotor Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, R. T.; Fleeter, S.

    2001-02-01

    Fundamental experiments are described directed at the investigation of forcing functions generated by an inlet guide vane (IGV) row, including interactions with the downstream rotor, for application to turbomachine forced response design systems. The experiments are performed in a high-speed research fan facility comprised of an IGV row upstream of a rotor. IGV-rotor axial spacing is variable, with the IGV row able to be indexed circumferentially, thereby allowing measurements to be made across several IGV wakes. With an IGV relative Mach number of 0.29, measurements include the IGV wake pressure and velocity fields for three IGV-rotor axial spacings. The decay characteristics of the IGV wakes are compared to the Majjigi and Gliebe empirical correlations. After Fourier decomposition, a vortical-potential gust splitting analysis is implemented to determine the vortical and potential harmonic wake gust forcing functions both upstream and downstream of the rotor. Higher harmonics of the vortical gust component of the IGV wakes are found to decay at a uniform rate due to viscous diffusion.

  13. Influence of carbonization conditions on micro-pore structure of foundry formed coke produced with char

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jun Qiao; Jianjun Wu; Jingru Zu; Zhiyuan Gao; Guoli Zhou

    2009-07-01

    There are few studies on coke's micro-pore structure in recent years, however, micro-pore structure of foundry coke determines its macroscopically quality index and reactivity in cupola furnace. Effect of such factors on micro-pore structure were investigated under different carbonization conditions with certain ratio of raw materials and material forming process in this article as charging temperature (A); braised furnace time (B); heating rate of the first stage (C)and the second stage (D) and holding time of ultimate temperature (E). Research showed that charging temperature was the most influential factor on the coke porosity, pore volume, pore size and specific surface area. It is suggested that formation of plastic mass and releasing rate of volatile during carbonization period are two main factors on microstructure of foundry coke while charging temperature contributes most to the above factors. 6 refs., 4 figs., 9 tabs.

  14. Structural investigation of two carbon nitride solids produced by cathodic arc deposition and nitrogen implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merchant, A.R.; McCulloch, D.; McKenzie, D.R.; Yin, Y.; Gerstner, E.G. [New South Wales Univ., Kensington, NSW (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    Carbon nitride materials have been the focus of research efforts worldwide. Most materials studied have been amorphous, with only a few groups claiming to have found a crystalline material. In this paper, carbon nitride materials prepared by two different techniques are analysed, and found to be remarkably similar in bonding and structure. The materials appear to have a primarily sp{sup 2} bonded carbon structure with a lower bond length than found in an amorphous carbon. This is explained by nitrogen substituting into `rings` to a saturation level of about one nitrogen per three carbon atoms. No evidence was found for a crystalline structure of formula C{sub 3}N{sub 4}, or any amorphous derivative of it. 16 refs., 1 tab., 5 figs.

  15. Detailed field test of yaw-based wake steering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fleming, P.; Churchfield, M.; Scholbrock, A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a detailed field-test campaign to investigate yaw-based wake steering. In yaw-based wake steering, an upstream turbine intentionally misaligns its yaw with respect to the inflow to deflect its wake away from a downstream turbine, with the goal of increasing total power...... production. In the first phase, a nacelle-mounted scanning lidar was used to verify wake deflection of a misaligned turbine and calibrate wake deflection models. In the second phase, these models were used within a yaw controller to achieve a desired wake deflection. This paper details the experimental...

  16. Structure and properties of joints produced by ultrasound-assisted explosive welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peev, A. P.; Kuz'min, S. V.; Lysak, V. I.; Kuz'min, E. V.; Dorodnikov, A. N.

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents the results of the effect of ultrasound on explosion welded materials. It has been established that simultaneous treatment with ultrasonic vibrations and explosion welding of the materials to be welded has a significant effect on the structure and properties of the heat-affected zone of formed joints.

  17. Evaluation of the dental structure loss produced during maintenance and replacement of occlusal amalgam restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Sardenberg

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate four different approaches to the decision of changing or not defective amalgam restorations in first primary molar teeth concerning the loss of dental structure. Ditched amalgam restorations (n = 11 were submitted to four different treatments, as follows: Control group - polishing and finishing of the restorations were carried out; Amalgam group - the ditched amalgam restorations were replaced by new amalgam restorations; Composite resin group - the initial amalgam restorations were replaced by composite resin restorations; Flowable resin group - the ditching around the amalgam restorations was filled with flowable resin. Images of the sectioned teeth were made and the area of the cavities before and after the procedures was determined by image analysis software to assess structural loss. The data were submitted to ANOVA complemented by the Student Newman Keuls test (p < 0.05. The cavities in all the groups presented significantly greater areas after the procedures. However, the amalgam group showed more substantial dental loss. The other three groups presented no statistically significant difference in dental structure loss after the re-treatments. Thus, replacing ditched amalgam restorations by other similar restorations resulted in a significant dental structure loss while maintaining them or replacing them by resin restorations did not result in significant loss.

  18. Evaluation of the dental structure loss produced during maintenance and replacement of occlusal amalgam restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardenberg, Fernanda; Bonifácio, Clarissa Calil; Braga, Mariana Minatel; Imparato, José Carlos Pettorossi; Mendes, Fausto Medeiros

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate four different approaches to the decision of changing or not defective amalgam restorations in first primary molar teeth concerning the loss of dental structure. Ditched amalgam restorations (n = 11) were submitted to four different treatments, as follows: Control group - polishing and finishing of the restorations were carried out; Amalgam group - the ditched amalgam restorations were replaced by new amalgam restorations; Composite resin group - the initial amalgam restorations were replaced by composite resin restorations; Flowable resin group - the ditching around the amalgam restorations was filled with flowable resin. Images of the sectioned teeth were made and the area of the cavities before and after the procedures was determined by image analysis software to assess structural loss. The data were submitted to ANOVA complemented by the Student Newman Keuls test (p structure loss after the re-treatments. Thus, replacing ditched amalgam restorations by other similar restorations resulted in a significant dental structure loss while maintaining them or replacing them by resin restorations did not result in significant loss.

  19. Isolation and Structure Elucidation of Autolytimycin, A New Compound Produced by Streptomyces Autolyticus JX-47

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Autolytimycin 1 was isolated from the culture filtrate ofStreptomyces autolyticus JX-47,together with two known compounds, lebstatin 2 and 17-O-demethyl-geldanamycin 3. These compounds showed the activities of anti-HSV-I. The structure of 1 was determined by spectral analysis.

  20. Defect structure and mechanical stability of microcrystalline titanium produced by equal channel angular pressing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betekhtin, V. I.; Kadomtsev, A. G.; Narykova, M. V.; Amosova, O. V.; Sklenicka, V.

    2017-01-01

    It is established that increases in nanoporosity and the proportion of high-angle grain boundaries in the process of equal-channel angular pressing are the main structural factors leading to reduction in mechanical stability (durability) of microcrystalline titanium during long-term tests under creeping conditions.

  1. Analysis of the Radar Reflectivity of Aircraft Vortex Wakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariff, Karim; Wray, Alan; Yan, Jerry (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Radar has been proposed as a way to track wake vortices to reduce aircraft spacing and tests have revealed radar echoes from aircraft wakes in clear air. The results are always interpreted qualitatively using Tatarski's theory of weak scattering by isotropic atmospheric turbulence. The goal of the present work was to predict the value of the radar cross-section (RCS) using simpler models. This is accomplished in two steps. First, the refractive index is obtained. Since the structure of the aircraft wakes is different from atmospheric turbulence, three simple mechanisms specific to vortex wakes are considered: (1) Radial density gradient in a two-dimensional vortex, (2) three-dimensional fluctuations in the vortex cores, and (3) Adiabatic transport of the atmospheric fluid in a two-dimensional oval surrounding the pair of vortices. The index of refraction is obtained more precisely for the two-dimensional mechanisms than for the three-dimensional ones. In the second step, knowing the index of refraction, a scattering analysis is performed. Tatarski's weak scattering approximation is kept but the usual assumptions of a far-field and a uniform incident wave are dropped. Neither assumption is generally valid for a wake that is coherent across the radar beam. For analytical insight, a simpler approximation that invokes, in addition to weak scattering, the far-field and wide cylindrical beam assumptions, is also developed and compared with the more general analysis. The predicted RCS values for the oval surround the vortices (mechanism C) agree with the experiments of Bilson conducted over a wide range of frequencies. However, the predictions have a cut-off away from normal incidence which is not present in the measurements. Estimates suggest that this is due to turbulence in the baroclinic vorticity generated at the boundary of the oval. The reflectivity of a vortex itself (mechanism A) is comparable to that of the oval (mechanism C) but cuts-off at frequencies lower

  2. Probing the limitations of isotropic pair potentials to produce ground-state structural extremes via inverse statistical mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, G; Stillinger, F H; Torquato, S

    2013-10-01

    Inverse statistical-mechanical methods have recently been employed to design optimized short-range radial (isotropic) pair potentials that robustly produce novel targeted classical ground-state many-particle configurations. The target structures considered in those studies were low-coordinated crystals with a high degree of symmetry. In this paper, we further test the fundamental limitations of radial pair potentials by targeting crystal structures with appreciably less symmetry, including those in which the particles have different local structural environments. These challenging target configurations demanded that we modify previous inverse optimization techniques. In particular, we first find local minima of a candidate enthalpy surface and determine the enthalpy difference ΔH between such inherent structures and the target structure. Then we determine the lowest positive eigenvalue λ(0) of the Hessian matrix of the enthalpy surface at the target configuration. Finally, we maximize λ(0)ΔH so that the target structure is both locally stable and globally stable with respect to the inherent structures. Using this modified optimization technique, we have designed short-range radial pair potentials that stabilize the two-dimensional kagome crystal, the rectangular kagome crystal, and rectangular lattices, as well as the three-dimensional structure of the CaF(2) crystal inhabited by a single-particle species. We verify our results by cooling liquid configurations to absolute zero temperature via simulated annealing and ensuring that such states have stable phonon spectra. Except for the rectangular kagome structure, all of the target structures can be stabilized with monotonic repulsive potentials. Our work demonstrates that single-component systems with short-range radial pair potentials can counterintuitively self-assemble into crystal ground states with low symmetry and different local structural environments. Finally, we present general principles that offer

  3. Structure and properties of the radiation-induced intermediates produced from HCN in noble gas matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameneva, Svetlana V.; Tyurin, Daniil A.; Feldman, Vladimir I.

    2016-07-01

    In this work we report the results of systematic studies on the radiation-induced transformations in HCN/Ng systems (Ng=Ne, Ar, Kr or Xe) at 7 K using a combination of FTIR and EPR spectroscopy. It was shown that HCN underwent efficient decomposition producing H atoms, CN radicals and HNC isomer. The thermally induced reactions of H atoms in different matrices result in the formation of two isomeric radicals, H2CN and trans-HCNH, the former being predominated. The temperature dependent dynamics of CN and H2CN radicals in a krypton matrix was observed by EPR spectroscopy in solid krypton. The vibrational frequencies, IR intensities and magnetic resonance parameters of H2CN and trans-HCNH radicals calculated at the CCSD(T) level are in reasonable agreement with the experimental results. It was found that HCNH radical could be effectively bleached with visible light. The comparison of experimental and computational data made it possible to assign a new vibrational band at 918 cm-1 in an Ar matrix (and the corresponding bands in Kr and Xe) to trans-HCNH radical. In addition, HKrCN was found in the case of krypton, whereas HXeCN and HXeNC were produced in solid xenon. The reaction mechanisms and contribution of different channels are discussed.

  4. Differences in hydraulic pressure producing efficiency of front suspension units for motorcycles due to structural difference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kajino, Tsutomu; Namazue, Eitaro; Ueno, Yutaka

    1995-12-31

    The front suspension unit for motorcycles is one of the functional parts for which continuous engineering improvement is required for advanced driveability. Especially, the ones for off-road motocross racing are frequently required to have their energy absorbing properties, ability to maintain tire-to-ground contact, driving comfort, etc. to be improved to meet the challenges of the racing courses which include many jumps, to exceed the performance of competitors, and to match the ever-improving performance of the engines and frames. To cope with the situation, the operability, rigidity and hydraulic pressure producing mechanism needs to be upgraded. As part of an improvement program, the authors have developed a air-oil separated front suspension which the authors have called the ``twin chamber`` suspension. In this study, the authors compared the hydraulic pressure producing efficiency of the air-oil separated suspension with that of the conventional single chamber construction. The results of the comparison showed that the twin chamber suspension is less affected by the pressure hysteresis by 8% or more at the piston area and 50% or more at the partition area than the conventional suspension. In addition, for the twin chamber suspension, the rise of pressure becomes smoother to give a quicker response as the velocity increases.

  5. Superhydrophobic hierarchical structures produced through novel low-cost stamp fabrication and hot embossing of thermoplastic film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Chae Hee; Han, Sol Yi; Kim, Kwang; Kim, Wook Bae [Korea Polytechnic University, Siheung (Korea, Republic of); Eo, Jae Dong [SNDENG Co., Ltd., Ansan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    We present a simple and cost-effective method to produce super hydrophobic surfaces in thermoplastic polymer substrates, which contain hierarchical micro/nano structures that resemble lotus leaves. The method involved the fabrication of an Al stamp through the sequential application of laser ablation and anodization to create micro- and nano-structures, respectively. The fabricated patterns on the Al stamp were replicated on the thermoplastic Cyclic olefin copolymer (COC) film surfaces through a hot embossing technique. Static water contact angles were measured to evaluate the hydrophobicity of the patterned COC surfaces. The static water contact angle on the micro/nano hierarchical structured COC surface was measured to be 162.3 .deg. on average. The hot embossing process was repeated 31 times with a nano-structured Al stamp, and the replicated COC surfaces showed consistent water contact angles.

  6. Locomotor forces on a swimming fish: three-dimensional vortex wake dynamics quantified using digital particle image velocimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drucker; Lauder

    1999-01-01

    Quantifying the locomotor forces experienced by swimming fishes represents a significant challenge because direct measurements of force applied to the aquatic medium are not feasible. However, using the technique of digital particle image velocimetry (DPIV), it is possible to quantify the effect of fish fins on water movement and hence to estimate momentum transfer from the animal to the fluid. We used DPIV to visualize water flow in the wake of the pectoral fins of bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus) swimming at speeds of 0.5-1.5 L s(-)(1), where L is total body length. Velocity fields quantified in three perpendicular planes in the wake of the fins allowed three-dimensional reconstruction of downstream vortex structures. At low swimming speed (0.5 L s(-)(1)), vorticity is shed by each fin during the downstroke and stroke reversal to generate discrete, roughly symmetrical, vortex rings of near-uniform circulation with a central jet of high-velocity flow. At and above the maximum sustainable labriform swimming speed of 1.0 L s(-)(1), additional vorticity appears on the upstroke, indicating the production of linked pairs of rings by each fin. Fluid velocity measured in the vicinity of the fin indicates that substantial spanwise flow during the downstroke may occur as vortex rings are formed. The forces exerted by the fins on the water in three dimensions were calculated from vortex ring orientation and momentum. Mean wake-derived thrust (11.1 mN) and lift (3.2 mN) forces produced by both fins per stride at 0.5 L s(-)(1) were found to match closely empirically determined counter-forces of body drag and weight. Medially directed reaction forces were unexpectedly large, averaging 125 % of the thrust force for each fin. Such large inward forces and a deep body that isolates left- and right-side vortex rings are predicted to aid maneuverability. The observed force balance indicates that DPIV can be used to measure accurately large-scale vorticity in the wake of

  7. Joyce the Deconstructionist: Finnegans Wake in Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zangouei J.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Had Finnegans Wake not been written, some seminal post-1950s innovations in the field of modern literary theory and criticism would have been impossible. James Joyce, who seems to have inspiringly influenced the entire sphere of modern literary theory and criticism greatly, is a pioneer of deconstruction too. His last novel, which reflects his deconstructive tendencies, has played a seminal role in the formation of 20th century deconstruction, and comprises an inchoate mass of implicit ideas on the subject. It was perhaps not until Jacques Derrida and his deconstruction techniques that the theory implied by Finnegans Wake really came into focus. This article seeks to delineate Derrida’s theory of deconstruction as well as Joyce's deconstructive aesthetics; and taking a diachronic approach to literary theory and criticism it glances at Finnegans Wake in the light of deconstruction.

  8. Wakes in large offshore wind farms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berthelmie, Rebecca J.; Frandsen, Sten Tronæs; Rathmann, Ole

    2008-01-01

    Power losses due to wind turbine wakes are of the order of 10 and 20% of total power output in large wind farms. The focus of this research carried out within the EC funded UPWIND project is wind speed and turbulence modelling for large wind farms/wind turbines in complex terrain and offshore...... is for five turbines in flat terrain. Finally a complex terrain wind farm will be modelled and compared with observations. For offshore wind farms, the focus is on cases at the Horns Rev wind farm which indicate wind farm models require modification to reduce under-prediction of wake losses while CFD models...... in order to optimise wind farm layouts to reduce wake losses and loads. For complex terrain, a set of three evaluations is underway. The first is a model comparison for a Gaussian Hill where CFD models and wind farm models are being compared for the case of one hilltop wind turbine. The next case...

  9. Actuator Line Modeling of Wind Turbine Wakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troldborg, Niels

    2009-01-01

    This thesis contains a comprehensive 3D Navier-Stokes computational study of the characteristics of wakes of wind turbines operating in various flow conditions including interacting wakes between a row of turbines. The computations were carried out using the actuator line technique combined...... and it is shown that the turbines are subject to rather severe yaw moments, even in situations where the mean wind is oriented along the row. This observation is indicative of large scale dynamics of the wakes....... with the 3D Navier Stokes solver EllipSys3D and a LES turbulence model. Simple models, based on applying body forces in the computational domain, are developed for imposing sheared and turbulent infow and their validity is discussed. A few computations on stand alone turbines are compared to measurements...

  10. Molecular wakes for ultrashort laser pulses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The molecular wake-assisted interaction between two collinear femotosecond laser pulses is investigated in air,which leads to the generation of a controllable 1.8 mJ super-continuum pulse with an elongated self-guided channel due to the cross-phase modulation of the impulsively aligned diatomic molecules in air. For two parallel launched femtosecond laser pulses with a certain spatial separation,controllable attraction and repulsion of the pulses are observed due to the counter-balance among molecular wakes,Kerr and plasma effects,where the molecular wakes show a longer interaction distance than the others to control the propagation of the intense ultrashort laser pulses.

  11. Oxidative stability of mayonnaise and milk drink produced with structured lipids based on fish oil and caprylic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timm Heinrich, Maike; Xu, Xuebing; Nielsen, Nina Skall

    2004-01-01

    The oxidative stabilities of traditional fish oil (FO), randomized lipids (RFO), or specific structured lipids (SFO) produced from fish oil were compared when incorporated into either milk drink or mayonnaise. Furthermore, the effect of adding the potential antioxidants EDTA (240 mg/kg) or lactof......The oxidative stabilities of traditional fish oil (FO), randomized lipids (RFO), or specific structured lipids (SFO) produced from fish oil were compared when incorporated into either milk drink or mayonnaise. Furthermore, the effect of adding the potential antioxidants EDTA (240 mg....../kg) or lactoferrin (1000 mg/kg) to the milk drink based on SFO was investigated. The lipid type significantly affected the oxidative stability of both mayonnaises and milk drinks: The oxidative stability decreased in the order RFO>FO>SFO. The reduced oxidative stability in the SFO food emulsions could...

  12. Analysis of the pore structure of activated carbons produced from paper mill sludge using small angle neutron scattering data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandi, G.; Khalil, N. R.; Littrell, K.; Thiyagarajan, P.

    1999-12-13

    A novel, cost-effective, and environmentally benign process was developed to produce highly efficient carbon-based adsorbents (CBAs) from paper mill sludge. The production process required chemical activation of sludge using zinc chloride and pyrolysis at 750 C in N{sub 2} gas. The produced CBAs were characterized according to their surface area and pore size distribution using N{sub 2}-BET adsorption isotherm data. Further characterization of the surface and pore structure was conducted using a unified exponential/power law approach applied to small angle neutron scattering (SANS) data. The structural features analyzed by SANS revealed the dependence of porosity with zinc chloride concentration. The presence of inaccessible pores was also determined by contrast-match experiments.

  13. Solution structure of recombinant somatomedin B domain from vitronectin produced in Pichia pastoris

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Magnus; Gårdsvoll, Henrik; Hirschberg, Daniel;

    2007-01-01

    The cysteine-rich somatomedin B domain (SMB) of the matrix protein vitronectin is involved in several important biological processes. First, it stabilizes the active conformation of the plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1); second, it provides the recognition motif for cell adhesion via...... S2-cells, both yielding structurally and functionally homogeneous protein preparations. Importantly, the entire population of our purified, recombinant SMB has a solvent exposure, both as a free domain and in complex with PAI-1, which is indistinguishable from that of plasma-derived SMB as assessed...... released from plasma-derived vitronectin by CNBr cleavage. However, different disulfide patterns and three-dimensional structures for SMB were reported. In the present study, we have expressed recombinant human SMB by two different eukaryotic expression systems, Pichia pastoris and Drosophila melanogaster...

  14. Morphology, structure and Raman scattering of carbon nanotubes produced by using mesoporous materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    解思深; 李文治; 王超英; 徐丽雯; 张昊; 张云; 钱露茜

    1997-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes were prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of hydrocarbon gas on various substrates.The effect of substrates on the growth,morphology and structure of carbon nanotubes were investigated.Aligned carbon nanotubes with high density and purity were achieved by CVD on mesoporous silica substrate.The Raman scattering of aligned carbon nanotubes was carried out,and the dependence of the phonon properties on the mi-crostructure of the nanotubes has been discussed.

  15. Evaluation of the dental structure loss produced during maintenance and replacement of occlusal amalgam restorations

    OpenAIRE

    Fernanda Sardenberg; Clarissa Calil Bonifácio; Mariana Minatel Braga; José Carlos Pettorossi Imparato; Fausto Medeiros Mendes

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate four different approaches to the decision of changing or not defective amalgam restorations in first primary molar teeth concerning the loss of dental structure. Ditched amalgam restorations (n = 11) were submitted to four different treatments, as follows: Control group - polishing and finishing of the restorations were carried out; Amalgam group - the ditched amalgam restorations were replaced by new amalgam restorations; Composite resin group -...

  16. Nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes with tunable structure and high yield produced by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jian; Zhang, Yong; Ionescu, Mihnea Ioan; Li, Ruying; Sun, Xueliang

    2011-06-01

    Nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes (CN x) were prepared by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis from mixtures of imidazole and acetonitrile. Imidazole, as an additive, was used to control the structure and nitrogen doping in CN x by adjusting its concentration in the mixtures. Scanning electron microscopy observation showed that the addition of imidazole increased the nanotube growth rate and yield, while decreased the nanotube diameter. Transmission electron microscopy study indicated that the addition of imidazole promoted the formation of a dense bamboo-like structure in CN x. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis demonstrated that the nitrogen content varied from 3.2 to 5.2 at.% in CN x obtained with different imidazole concentrations. Raman spectra study showed that the intensity ratio of D to G bands gradually increased, while that of 2D to G bands decreased, due to increasing imidazole concentration. The yield of CN x made from mixtures of imidazole and acetonitrile can reach 192 mg in 24 min, which is 15 times that of CN x prepared from only acetonitrile. The aligned CN x, with controlled nitrogen doping, tunable structure and high yield, may find applications in developing non-noble catalysts and novel catalyst supports for fuel cells.

  17. Nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes with tunable structure and high yield produced by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Jian; Zhang Yong; Ionescu, Mihnea Ioan; Li Ruying [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, N6A 5B9 (Canada); Sun Xueliang, E-mail: xsun@eng.uwo.ca [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, N6A 5B9 (Canada)

    2011-06-15

    Nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes (CN{sub x}) were prepared by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis from mixtures of imidazole and acetonitrile. Imidazole, as an additive, was used to control the structure and nitrogen doping in CN{sub x} by adjusting its concentration in the mixtures. Scanning electron microscopy observation showed that the addition of imidazole increased the nanotube growth rate and yield, while decreased the nanotube diameter. Transmission electron microscopy study indicated that the addition of imidazole promoted the formation of a dense bamboo-like structure in CN{sub x}. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis demonstrated that the nitrogen content varied from 3.2 to 5.2 at.% in CN{sub x} obtained with different imidazole concentrations. Raman spectra study showed that the intensity ratio of D to G bands gradually increased, while that of 2D to G bands decreased, due to increasing imidazole concentration. The yield of CN{sub x} made from mixtures of imidazole and acetonitrile can reach 192 mg in 24 min, which is 15 times that of CN{sub x} prepared from only acetonitrile. The aligned CN{sub x}, with controlled nitrogen doping, tunable structure and high yield, may find applications in developing non-noble catalysts and novel catalyst supports for fuel cells.

  18. Role of cysteine residues in the structure, stability, and alkane producing activity of cyanobacterial aldehyde deformylating oxygenase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuuki Hayashi

    Full Text Available Aldehyde deformylating oxygenase (AD is a key enzyme for alkane biosynthesis in cyanobacteria, and it can be used as a catalyst for alkane production in vitro and in vivo. However, three free Cys residues in AD may impair its catalytic activity by undesired disulfide bond formation and oxidation. To develop Cys-deficient mutants of AD, we examined the roles of the Cys residues in the structure, stability, and alkane producing activity of AD from Nostoc punctiforme PCC 73102 by systematic Cys-to-Ala/Ser mutagenesis. The C71A/S mutations reduced the hydrocarbon producing activity of AD and facilitated the formation of a dimer, indicating that the conserved Cys71, which is located in close proximity to the substrate-binding site, plays crucial roles in maintaining the activity, structure, and stability of AD. On the other hand, mutations at Cys107 and Cys117 did not affect the hydrocarbon producing activity of AD. Therefore, we propose that the C107A/C117A double mutant is preferable to wild type AD for alkane production and that the double mutant may be used as a pseudo-wild type protein for further improvement of the alkane producing activity of AD.

  19. Wind turbine wake in atmospheric turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rethore, P.-E.

    2009-10-15

    This thesis describes the different steps needed to design a steady-state computational fluid dynamics (CFD) wind farm wake model. The ultimate goal of the project was to design a tool that could analyze and extrapolate systematically wind farm measurements to generate wind maps in order to calibrate faster and simpler engineering wind farm wake models. The most attractive solution was the actuator disc method with the steady state k-epsilon turbulence model. The first step to design such a tool is the treatment of the forces. This thesis presents a computationally inexpensive method to apply discrete body forces into the finite-volume flow solver with collocated variable treatment (EllipSys), which avoids the pressure-velocity decoupling issue. The second step is to distribute the body forces in the computational domain accordingly to rotor loading. This thesis presents a generic flexible method that associates any kind of shapes with the computational domain discretization. The special case of the actuator disc performs remarkably well in comparison with Conway's heavily loaded actuator disc analytical solution and a CFD full rotor computation, even with a coarse discretization. The third step is to model the atmospheric turbulence. The standard k-epsilon model is found to be unable to model at the same time the atmospheric turbulence and the actuator disc wake and performs badly in comparison with single wind turbine wake measurements. A comparison with a Large Eddy Simulation (LES) shows that the problem mainly comes from the assumptions of the eddy-viscosity concept, which are deeply invalidated in the wind turbine wake region. Different models that intent to correct the k-epsilon model's issues are investigated, of which none of them is found to be adequate. The mixing of the wake in the atmosphere is a deeply non-local phenomenon that is not handled correctly by an eddy-viscosity model such as k-epsilon. (author)

  20. Structure characterization of a fucose-containing exopolysaccharide produced by Enterobacter cloacae Z0206.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fengqin; Yang, Hangxian; Wang, Yizhen

    2013-01-30

    A novel high molecular weight (1.1 × 10(6)Da) exopolysaccharide (EPS) produced by Enterobacter cloacae Z0206 strain was isolated by column chromatography. Complete hydrolysis of the EPS followed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analyses showed that the EPS is composed of L-fucose, D-glucose, D-galactose, D-glucuronic acid and pyruvic acid in the approximate molar ratio of 2:1:3:1:1. Partial acid hydrolysis of the purified EPS followed by gel permeation chromatography (GPC) yielded a hexasaccharide. A combination of chemical analysis coupled with mass spectrometry and 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy applied to the oligosaccharide showed that the EPS comprises a heptasaccharide repeating unit.

  1. Relationship between galactomannan structure and physicochemical properties of films produced thereof.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, V R F; Souza, B W S; Teixeira, J A; Vicente, A A; Cerqueira, M A

    2015-12-01

    In this work five sources of galactomannans, Adenanthera pavonina, Cyamopsis tetragonolobus, Caesalpinia pulcherrima, Ceratonia siliqua and Sophora japonica, presenting mannose/galactose ratios of 1.3, 1.7, 2.9, 3.4 and 5.6, respectively, were used to produce galactomannan-based films. These films were characterized in terms of: water vapour, oxygen and carbon dioxide permeabilities (WVP, O 2 P and CO 2 P); moisture content, water solubility, contact angle, elongation-at-break (EB), tensile strength (TS) and glass transition temperature (T g ). Results showed that films properties vary according to the galactomannan source (different galactose distribution) and their mannose/galactose ratio. Water affinity of mannan and galactose chains and the intermolecular interactions of mannose backbone should also be considered being factors that affect films' properties. This work has shown that knowing mannose/galactose ratio of galactomannans is possible to foresee galactomannan-based edible films properties.

  2. Maize heterosis affects the structure and dynamics of indigenous rhizospheric auxins-producing Pseudomonas populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, Christine; Bosco, Marco

    2005-08-01

    A rhizobacterial population of 2430 Pseudomonas isolates, originating from one maize hybrid and from its parents, was screened for auxins production. Four hundred and twelve isolates were found to be auxin producers (aia+), and 27 of them were also part of a previously described PhlD+ sub-population. Interestingly, most part of the aia(+)-PhlD+ isolates came from the hybrid. This finding indicates that heterosis allows an increased colonisation by multi-beneficial PGPR strains. Furthermore, results on the abundance and genetic diversity of aia+ isolates gave evidence that maize root colonisation by aia+ Pseudomonas is an inherited trait regulated by heterosis. In fact, two times more aia+ isolates were obtained from the rhizosphere of the hybrid than from the rhizospheres of the parents, and an amplified rDNA restriction analysis showed that the hybrid increases the genetic diversity of aia+ populations when compared to its parents.

  3. A Novel Ship Wake Detection Method of SAR Images Based on Frequency Domain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Hao; Zhu Minhui

    2003-01-01

    Moving ships produce a set of waves of "V' pattern on the ocean. These waves can often be seen by Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR). The detection of these wakes can provide important information for surveillance of shipping, such as ship traveling direction and speed. A novel approach to the detection of ship wakes in SAR images based on frequency domain is provided in this letter. Compared with traditional Radon-based approaches, computation is reduced by 20%-40% without losing nearly any of detection performance. The testing results using real data and simulation of synthetic SAR images test the algorithm's feasibility and robustness.

  4. Anisotropy of turbulence in wind turbine wakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Elvira, Rafael [Comision Nacional de Energia (Spain); Crespo, Antonio; Migoya, Emilio; Manuel, Fernando [Departamento de Ingenieria Energetica y Fluidomecanica, Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieros Industriales, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Jose Gutierrez Abascal, 2. 28006 Madrid (Spain); Hernandez, Julio [Departamento de Mecanica, ETSII, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, Ciudad Universitaria, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2005-10-01

    This work is mainly dedicated to the study of non-isotropic characteristics of turbulence in wind turbine wakes, specifically the shear layer of the near wake. A calculation method based on an explicit algebraic model for the components of the turbulent stress tensor is proposed, and the results are found to be in acceptable agreement with experimental results. Analytical expressions for the estimation of an upper limit of the global turbulence kinetic energy, k, and the individual contributions of each diagonal term in the turbulent stress tensor are proposed. Their predictions are compared with experimental results.

  5. Non-linear Ion-wake Excitation by Ultra-relativistic Electron Wakefields

    CERN Document Server

    Sahai, Aakash A

    2015-01-01

    The excitation of a non-linear ion-wake by a train of ultra-relativistic plasmons is modeled and its use for a novel regime of positron acceleration is explored. Its channel-like structure is independent of the energy-source driving the bubble-shaped slowly-propagating high phase-velocity electron density waves. The back of the bubble electron compression sucks-in the ions and the space-charge within the bubble expels them, forming a near-void channel with on-axis and bubble-edge density-spikes. The channel-edge density-spike is driven radially outwards as a non-linear ion acoustic-wave by the wake electron thermal pressure. OSIRIS PIC simulations are used to study the ion-wake structure, its evolution and its use for positron acceleration.

  6. Wind Turbine Wake Characterization with Remote Sensing and Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitken, Matthew Lawrence

    Because of the dense arrays at most wind farms, the region of disturbed flow downstream of an individual turbine leads to reduced power production and increased structural loading for its leeward counterparts. Currently, wind farm wake modeling, and hence turbine layout optimization, suffer from an unacceptable degree of uncertainty, largely because of a lack of adequate experimental data for model verification. Accordingly, wake measurements were taken in two separate experiments, (1) using the ground-based High Resolution Doppler Lidar (HRDL) developed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) in the Turbine Wake and Inflow Characterization Study (TWICS) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), and (2) using nacelle-based long-range lidar at a wind farm in the western United States. The vantage point from the nacelle is favorable in that scans can more consistently transect the central part of the wake. The work presented here outlines a set of quantitative procedures for determining critical parameters from these extensive datasets---such as the velocity deficit, the size of the wake boundary, and the location of the wake centerline---and the results are categorized by ambient wind speed, turbulence, and atmospheric stability. Despite specific reference to lidar, the methodology is general and can be applied to extract wake characteristics from other remote sensor datasets, as well as output from numerical simulations. In an effort to help advance computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models of wind turbine wake dynamics, experimental results are compared to a large eddy simulation (LES) of a turbine operating in the stable boundary layer using the actuator disk parameterization in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model. With the wake characteristics described above as metrics for model verification, the simulations show good agreement with the observations. Moreover, new features---namely rotor tilt and drag from the

  7. On the unsteady wake dynamics behind a circular disk using fully 3D proper orthogonal decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jianzhi; Liu, Minghou; Wu, Guang; Gu, Hailin; Yao, Mengyun

    2017-02-01

    In the present work, the wakes behind a circular disk at various transitional regimes are numerically explored using fully 3D proper orthogonal decomposition (POD). The Reynolds numbers considered in this study (Re = 152, 170, 300 and 3000) cover four transitional states, i.e. the reflectional-symmetry-breaking (RSB) mode, the standing wave (SW) mode, a weakly chaotic state, and a higher-Reynolds-number state. Through analysis of the spatial POD modes at different wake states, it is found that a planar-symmetric vortex shedding mode characterized by the first mode pair is persistent in all the states. When the wake develops into a weakly chaotic state, a new vortex shedding mode characterized by the second mode pair begins to appear and completely forms at the higher-Reynolds-number state of Re = 3000, i.e. planar-symmetry-breaking vortex shedding mode. On the other hand, the coherent structure at Re = 3000 extracted from the first two POD modes shows a good resemblance to the wake configuration in the SW mode, while the coherent structure reconstructed from the first four POD modes shows a good resemblance to the wake configuration in the RSB mode. The present results indicate that the dynamics or flow instabilities observed at transitional RSB and SW modes are still preserved in a higher-Reynolds-number regime.

  8. An LES study of vertical-axis wind turbine wakes aerodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abkar, Mahdi; Dabiri, John O.

    2016-11-01

    In this study, large-eddy simulation (LES) combined with a turbine model is used to investigate the structure of the wake behind a vertical-axis wind turbine (VAWT). In the simulations, a recently developed minimum dissipation model is used to parameterize the subgrid-scale stress tensor, while the turbine-induced forces are modeled with an actuator-line technique. The LES framework is first tested in the simulation of the wake behind a model straight-bladed VAWT placed in the water channel, and then used to study the wake structure downwind of a full-scale VAWT sited in the atmospheric boundary layer. In particular, the self-similarity of the wake is examined, and it is found that the wake velocity deficit is well characterized by a two-dimensional elliptical Gaussian distribution. By assuming a self-similar Gaussian distribution of the velocity deficit, and applying mass and momentum conservation, an analytical model is developed and tested to predict the maximum velocity deficit downwind of the turbine.

  9. Structural and magnetic properties of nanocrystalline Fe–Co–Si alloy powders produced by mechanical alloying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shyni, P.C.; Perumal, Alagarsamy, E-mail: perumal@iitg.ernet.in

    2015-11-05

    We report the structural and magnetic properties of nanocrystalline Fe{sub 100−x−y}Co{sub y}Si{sub x} (x = 10, 15, y = 0–20) alloy powders prepared by mechanical alloying process in a planetary ball mill. All the as-milled powders exhibit non-equilibrium α-Fe(Co,Si) solid solution with average crystallite size of 7–11 nm. The lattice constant increases initially up to 10 at.% Co and then decreases with further increase in Co content due to delay in dissolution of Co into Fe lattice by the introduction of more Si. The variations of structural parameters such as average crystallite size, dislocation density and fraction of grain boundary as a function of Co content show good correlations among them. The substitution of Co in Fe{sub 100−x−y}Co{sub y}Si{sub x} alloy powder increases both saturation magnetization and coercivity due to atomic ordering which induce additional magnetic anisotropy. Thermomagnetization studies reveal that Curie temperature (T{sub C}) increases at a rate of 4 K per at.% Co for Co content up to 10 at.% and the rate of increase in T{sub C} reduces to 1.4 K per at.% Co for higher Co addition. The variation of structural and magnetic parameters reveals a strong dependence on the composition of Fe–Co–Si alloy. The observed results show the improvement in soft magnetic properties of nanocrystalline Fe–Co–Si alloy powders by proper substitution of Co and Si for Fe. - Graphical abstract: Structural and magnetic properties of nanocrystalline Fe{sub 100−x−y}Co{sub y}Si{sub x} alloy powders prepared by mechanical alloying process in a planetary ball mill are reported. The non-equilibrium solid solution with nanosized crystallites could be obtained for all the alloy powders. The substitution of Co in Fe{sub 100−x−y}Co{sub y}Si{sub x} alloy powder increases both saturation magnetization and coercivity. The Curie temperature also increases with increasing Co content. The observed results show the improvement in soft magnetic

  10. Control of pore size and structure of tissue engineering scaffolds produced by supercritical fluid processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Tai

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Tissue engineering scaffolds require a controlled pore size and structure to host tissue formation. Supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2 processing may be used to form foamed scaffolds in which the escape of CO2 from a plasticized polymer melt generates gas bubbles that shape the developing pores. The process of forming these scaffolds involves a simultaneous change in phase in the CO2 and the polymer, resulting in rapid expansion of a surface area and changes in polymer rheological properties. Hence, the process is difficult to control with respect to the desired final pore size and structure. In this paper, we describe a detailed study of the effect of polymer chemical composition, molecular weight and processing parameters on final scaffold characteristics. The study focuses on poly(DL-lactic acid (PDLLA and poly(DL-lactic acid-co-glycolic acid (PLGA as polymer classes with potential application as controlled release scaffolds for growth factor delivery. Processing parameters under investigation were temperature (from 5 to 55oC and pressure (from 60 to 230 bar. A series of amorphous PDLLA and PLGA polymers with various molecular weights (from 13 KD to 96 KD and/or chemical compositions (the mole percentage of glycolic acid in the polymers was 0, 15, 25, 35 and 50 respectively were employed. The resulting scaffolds were characterised by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and micro X-ray computed tomography (µCT. This is the first detailed study on using these series polymers for scaffold formation by supercritical technique. This study has demonstrated that the pore size and structure of the supercritical PDLLA and PLGA scaffolds can be tailored by careful control of processing conditions.

  11. Structures and Activity of New Anabaenopeptins Produced by Baltic Sea Cyanobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Spoof

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Anabaenopeptins, bioactive cyclic hexapeptides, were isolated by preparative reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography from an extract of Baltic Sea cyanobacterial bloom material composed of Nodularia spumigena (50%, Aphanizomenon flos-aquae (40% and Dolichospermum spp. (10%. Five new anabaenopeptins and nine previously known anabaenopeptins were isolated, and their putative structures were determined by tandem mass spectrometry. The activity of the peptides against carboxypeptidase A and protein phosphatase 1 as well as chymotrypsin, trypsin and thrombin was tested. All anabaenopeptins inhibited carboxypeptidase A (apart from one anabaenopeptin variant and protein phosphatase 1 with varying potency, but no inhibition against chymotrypsin, trypsin and thrombin was observed.

  12. Structures and Activity of New Anabaenopeptins Produced by Baltic Sea Cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spoof, Lisa; Błaszczyk, Agata; Meriluoto, Jussi; Cegłowska, Marta; Mazur-Marzec, Hanna

    2015-12-30

    Anabaenopeptins, bioactive cyclic hexapeptides, were isolated by preparative reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography from an extract of Baltic Sea cyanobacterial bloom material composed of Nodularia spumigena (50%), Aphanizomenon flos-aquae (40%) and Dolichospermum spp. (10%). Five new anabaenopeptins and nine previously known anabaenopeptins were isolated, and their putative structures were determined by tandem mass spectrometry. The activity of the peptides against carboxypeptidase A and protein phosphatase 1 as well as chymotrypsin, trypsin and thrombin was tested. All anabaenopeptins inhibited carboxypeptidase A (apart from one anabaenopeptin variant) and protein phosphatase 1 with varying potency, but no inhibition against chymotrypsin, trypsin and thrombin was observed.

  13. Metastable Transition Metal Alloys Produced by Rapid Quenching: Structure and Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    U.S. Patent 4,050,931 (1977) to L. E. Tanner, I W. B. Peamon, A Handbook of Lattice Spacings R. Ray and C. F. Clive . and Structures of Metals and...necessarily the best available for this purpose. Artner and Argent x° and Catterall and Barker :" in- impurity analysis (wt pct): Ta (0.15): TI, Fe, 0...pp. 114348. tion line and suggest a change of the partial molar 11. J.A. Cateralland S.M. Barker : I’hnsiePoc. 1964, pp. 577-87. volume of Nb from Vw3

  14. Oxidative stability of mayonnaise containing structured lipids produced from sunflower oil and caprylic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Charlotte; Xu, Xuebing; Nielsen, Nina Skall;

    2003-01-01

    . Furthermore, the potential antioxidative effect of adding lactoferrin, propyl gallate or EDTA to the mayonnaise with SL was also investigated. Mayonnaise based on SL oxidized faster than mayonnaise based on RL or SO. The reduced oxidative stability in the SL mayonnaise could not be ascribed to a single factor......, but was most likely influenced by the structure of the lipid, the lower tocopherol content and the higher initial levels of lipid hydroperoxides and secondary volatile oxidation compounds in the SL itself compared with the RL and traditional sunflower oil employed. EDTA was a strong antioxidant, while propyl...

  15. Iron-Based Amorphous Coatings Produced by HVOF Thermal Spray Processing-Coating Structure and Properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beardsley, M B

    2008-03-26

    The feasibility to coat large SNF/HLW containers with a structurally amorphous material (SAM) was demonstrated on sub-scale models fabricated from Type 316L stainless steel. The sub-scale model were coated with SAM 1651 material using kerosene high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) torch to thicknesses ranging from 1 mm to 2 mm. The process parameters such as standoff distance, oxygen flow, and kerosene flow, were optimized in order to improve the corrosion properties of the coatings. Testing in an electrochemical cell and long-term exposure to a salt spray environment were used to guide the selection of process parameters.

  16. Dispersion of Rayleigh waves produced by nuclear explosions. Crustal structure of western Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. PAYO

    1964-06-01

    Full Text Available Most of the nuclear explosion fired near Novaya-Zemlya
    island from September 1961 to J a n u a r y 1963 (21 in total have been recorded
    on the seismographs of Toledo Observatory. The study of these records,
    mainly concerning the dispersion of Rayleigh waves, has been the purpose
    of this paper.
    A crust-mantle s t r u c t u r e for t h e Zemlya-Toledo p a t h has been determined
    by means of group velocity curves and especially by the phase velocity
    ones obtained from Rayleigh waves of explosions. This structure supposes
    a crust of about 40 kms thick with an upper sedimentary layer with a
    thickness of about 5,5 kms and a shear velocity of 2,3 km/sec.
    The average shear velocity in the granitic and basaltic layers jointly,
    is about 3,65 km/sec, permitting a small ambiguity at the position of the
    Conrad discontinuity between them.
    A velocity of 4,5 km/sec has been assigned for the underlying crust
    material, but a better agreement with the data recorded is obtained by
    taking 0.28 for the Poisson ratio value.
    Dispersion of Rayleigh waves of these explosions has been compared
    to the Rayleigh dispersion of some earthquakes of Eurasia, three of them
    with epicentral distances similar to those of the explosions and other four
    with the same azimuth in respect to that of Toledo-Zemlya, but more
    distants.
    The results do not show any notable difference either in dispersion
    between explosion and earthquakes or in structure of the path considered.
    The phase velocity between Toledo and Malaga Observatories supports
    t h e same above structure for this short path.
    The velocity of Lg waves, which clearly appears on the record of the
    explosions, confirms this admitted structure, which serves to deduce t h e more
    probable transmission mechanism for these channel waves.
    Also atmospheric pressure waves have been recorded on the three

  17. Wake effects characterization using wake oscillator model. Comparison on 2D response with experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Gaurier, Benoît; Cébron, David

    2010-01-01

    A model using wake oscillators is developed to predict the 2D motion in a transverse plan of two rigid cylinders in tandem arrangement. This model of the wake dynamics is validated with experimental data from previous trials which took place at the Ifremer flume tank in Boulogne-sur-Mer, France. The agreement between the model and the experimental results allows using this model as a simple computational tool in the prediction of 2D Vortex-Induced Vibrations (VIV) and, after some futher developments, Wake-Induced Oscillations (WIO) effects.

  18. Wind Speed Estimation and Wake model Re-calibration for Downregulated Offshore Wind Farms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göçmen Bozkurt, Tuhfe; Giebel, Gregor; Kjølstad Poulsen, Niels; Réthoré, Pierre-Elouan; Mirzaei, Mahmood

    2014-05-01

    In recent years, the wind farm sizes have increased tremendously and with increasing installed capacity, the wind farms are requested to downregulate from their maximum possible power more frequently, especially in the offshore environment. Determination of the possible (or available) power is crucial not only because the reserve power has considerable market value but also for wind farm developers to be properly compensated for the loss during downregulation. While the available power calculation is straightforward for a single turbine, it gets rather complicated for the whole wind farm due to the change in the wake characteristics. In fact, the wake losses generated by the upstream turbine(s) decrease during downregulation and the downstream turbines therefore see more wind compared to the normal operation case. Currently, the Transmission System Operators (TSOs) have no real way to determine exactly the available power of a whole wind farm which is downregulated. Therefore, the PossPOW project aims to develop a verified and internationally accepted way to determine the possible power of a down-regulated offshore wind farm. The first phase of the project is to estimate the rotor effective wind speed. Since the nacelle anemometers are not readily available and are known to have reliability issues, the proposed method is to use power, pitch angle and rotational speed as inputs and combine it with a generic Cp model to estimate the wind speed. The performance of the model has been evaluated for both normal operation and downregulation periods using two different case studies: Horns Rev-I wind farm and NREL 5MW single turbine. During downregulation, the wake losses are not as severe and the velocity deficits at the downstream turbines are smaller as if also the wake is "downregulated". On the other hand, in order to calculate the available power, the wakes that would have been produced normally (if the turbines were not curtailed) are of importance, not the

  19. Diversity and noise effects in a model of homeostatic regulation of the sleep-wake cycle

    CERN Document Server

    Patriarca, Marco; Braun, Hans A; Hernández-García, Emilio; Toral, Raúl; 10.1371/journal.pcbi.1002650

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in sleep neurobiology have allowed development of physiologically based mathematical models of sleep regulation that account for the neuronal dynamics responsible for the regulation of sleep-wake cycles and allow detailed examination of the underlying mechanisms. Neuronal systems in general, and those involved in sleep regulation in particular, are noisy and heterogeneous by their nature. It has been shown in various systems that certain levels of noise and diversity can significantly improve signal encoding. However, these phenomena, especially the effects of diversity, are rarely considered in the models of sleep regulation. The present paper is focused on a neuron-based physiologically motivated model of sleep-wake cycles that proposes a novel mechanism of the homeostatic regulation of sleep based on the dynamics of a wake-promoting neuropeptide orexin. Here this model is generalized by the introduction of intrinsic diversity and noise in the orexin-producing neurons in order to study the e...

  20. Actuator Line Simulation of Wake of Wind Turbine Operating in Turbulent Inflow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troldborg, Niels; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Mikkelsen, Robert Flemming

    2007-01-01

    The wake of a wind turbine operating in an atmospheric turbulent inflow without mean shear is simulated using a numerical method, which combines large eddy simulations with an actuator line technique. A turbulent inflow with the same spectral characteristics as the atmosphere is produced....... Furthermore, the results are used to verify the validity of some of the basic assumptions employed in simpler engineering models and to study their bounds of application. The large amount of data from the wake simulation can easily be used in simple engineering methods to model a wind turbine operating...... by introducing time varying body forces in a plane upstream the rotor. The results of the simulation are compared to those obtained on a wind turbine in uniform inflow at the same mean wind speed and from this comparison a number of features of the influence of inflow turbulence on wake dynamics are deduced...

  1. Degradation of oxytetracycline and its impacts on biogas-producing microbial community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coban, Halil; Ertekin, Emine; Ince, Orhan; Turker, Gokhan; Akyol, Çağrı; Ince, Bahar

    2016-07-01

    The effect of veterinary antibiotics in anaerobic digesters is a concern where methane production efficiency is highly dependent on microbial community structure. In this study, both anaerobic degradation of a common veterinary antibiotic, oxytetracycline (OTC), and its effects on an anaerobic digester microbial community were investigated. Qualitative and quantitative molecular tools were used to monitor changes in microbial community structure during a 60-day batch incubation period of cow manure with the addition of different concentrations of the antibiotic. Molecular data were interpreted by a further redundancy analysis as a multivariate statistics approach. At the end of the experiment, approximately 48, 33, and 17 % of the initially added 50, 100, and 200 mg l(-1) of OTC was still present in the serum bottles which reduced the biogas production via accumulation of some of the volatile fatty acids (VFAs). Biogas production was highly correlated with Methanobacteriales and Methanosarcinales gene copy numbers, and those parameters were negatively affected with oxytetracycline and VFA concentrations.

  2. Morphology and Structure of ZnO Nanoparticles Produced by Electrochemical Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara STYPUŁA

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This article presents studies of the morphology and structure of ZnO nanoparticles synthesized by the electrochemical method. Colloidal solutions of the nanoparticles are obtained by an anodic dissolution of metallic zinc in alcohol solutions of lithium chloride containing a small amount of water (5 % vol.. The parameters chosen for the synthesis are based on Zn polarization curves(obtained using the the potentiokinetic (Linear Sweep Voltammetry – LSV and the chronoamperometric method. The synthesis of zinc oxide nanoparticles is carried out in 0.05m LiCl + 5 % H2O alcohol (methanol or propanol solutions during galvanostatic polarization of Zn at 3 mA/cm2 current density. The process is performed in a two-electrode system, where both electrodes (the working anode and cathode are made of zinc. Optical properties, morphology and structure of the colloidal solutions and powders (obtained after evaporating the solvent were studied using the following spectroscopic and microscopic techniques: UltraViolet and Visible Spectroscopy (UV-VIS, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.20.1.4417

  3. On point vortex models of exotic bluff body wakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stremler, Mark A; Basu, Saikat, E-mail: stremler@vt.edu [Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Exotic vortex wakes, in which three or more vortices are generated during each shedding cycle, are frequently found in the wake of an oscillating bluff body. Two common examples are P+S wakes (with 3 vortices) and 2P wakes (with 4 vortices). We consider mathematical models of these wakes consisting of N = 3 or 4 point vortices with constant strengths in an inviscid fluid that is otherwise at rest in a singly-periodic domain. By enforcing constraints on the vortex strengths and, in the case of N = 4, on the symmetry of the vortex locations, the mathematical models reduce to integrable Hamiltonian systems. We compare the point vortex trajectories with two exotic wake patterns reported in the literature. Results support the use of point vortex modeling to investigate vortex dynamics in exotic wakes and suggest the need for additional classification of experimental wake patterns. (paper)

  4. TMCI threshold with space charge and different wake fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balbekov, V. [Fermilab

    2016-08-22

    Transverse mode coupling instability of a bunch with space charge and wake field is considered within the frameworks of the boxcar model. Eigenfunctions of the bunch without wake are used as a basis for the solution of the equations with the wake field included. A dispersion equation for constant wake is presented in the form of an infinite continued fraction and also as the recursive relation with an arbitrary number of the basis functions. Realistic wake fields are considered as well including resistive wall, square, and oscillating wakes. It is shown that the TMCI threshold of the negative wake grows up in absolute value when the SC tune shift increases. Threshold of positive wake goes down at the increasing SC tune shift. The explanation is developed by an analysis of the bunch spectrum.

  5. TMCI threshold with space charge and different wake fields

    CERN Document Server

    Balbekov, V

    2016-01-01

    Transverse mode coupling instability of a bunch with space charge and wake field is considered within the frameworks of the boxcar model. Eigenfunctions of the bunch without wake are used as a basis for the solution of the equations with the wake field included. A dispersion equation for constant wake is presented in the form of an infinite continued fraction and also as the recursive relation with an arbitrary number of the basis functions. Realistic wake fields are considered as well including resistive wall, square, and oscillating wakes. It is shown that the TMCI threshold of the negative wake grows up in absolute value when the SC tune shift increases. Threshold of positive wake goes down at the increasing SC tune shift. The explanation is developed by an analysis of the bunch spectrum.

  6. Structural, thermal, and photoacoustic study of nanocrystalline Cr{sub 3}Ge produced by mechanical alloying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prates, P. B.; Maliska, A. M.; Ferreira, A. S. [Departamento de Engenharia Mecânica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Campus Universitário Trindade, S/N, C.P. 476, 88040-900 Florianópolis, Santa Catarina (Brazil); Poffo, C. M. [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Campus de Araranguá, 88900-000 Araranguá, Santa Catarina (Brazil); Borges, Z. V. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Amazonas, 3000 Japiim, 69077-000 Manaus, Amazonas (Brazil); Lima, J. C. de, E-mail: fsc1jcd@fisica.ufsc.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Campus Universitário Trindade, S/N, C.P. 476, 88040-900 Florianópolis, Santa Catarina (Brazil); Biasi, R. S. de [Seção de Engenharia Mecânica e de Materiais, Instituto Militar de Engenharia, 22290-270 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2015-10-21

    A thermodynamic analysis of the Cr-Ge system suggested that it was possible to produce a nanostructured Cr{sub 3}Ge phase by mechanical alloying. The same analysis showed that, due to low activation energies, Cr-poor crystalline and/or amorphous alloy could also be formed. In fact, when the experiment was performed, Cr{sub 11}Ge{sub 19} and amorphous phases were present for small milling times. For milling times larger than 15 h these additional phases decomposed and only the nanostructured Cr{sub 3}Ge phase remained up to the highest milling time used (32 h). From the differential scanning calorimetry measurements, the Avrami exponent n was obtained, indicating that the nucleation and growth of the nanostructured Cr{sub 3}Ge phase may be restricted to one or two dimensions, where the Cr and Ge atoms diffuse along the surface and grain boundaries. In addition, contributions from three-dimensional diffusion with a constant nucleation rate may be present. The thermal diffusivity of the nanostructured Cr{sub 3}Ge phase was determined by photoacoustic absorption spectroscopy measurements.

  7. Structure and reactivity of Pd-Pt clusters produced by laser vaporization of bulk alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousset, J. L.; Cadrot, A. M.; Lianos, L.; Renouprez, A. J.

    Pd-Pt nanoclusters are obtained by the focusing of an Nd:YAG laser onto rods of alloys. The aggregates, which are produced by plasma cooling via short helium bursts synchronized with the laser pulses, are collected on amorphous carbon or silicon substrates, in a UHV chamber. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) experiments show that the diameters of the clusters range between 1.5 and 4.5 nm, and analytical microscopy indicates that they have the same composition as the vaporized rods. Low-energy ion scattering (LEIS) also shows that the surface of the obtained clusters is Pd enriched: the Pd concentration in the first atomic layer is found to be equal to 38% for a Pd17Pt83 rod composition and 87% for the Pd65 Pt35 alloy. The catalytic activity of these clusters in the hydrogenation of 1,3-butadiene to butenes and butane is measured in static mode, with mass spectrometry detection. The reactivity of the bimetallic clusters is explained by the atomic local order and low-coordination sites considered as ``hot sites''.

  8. Characteristics of behind armor blunt trauma produced by bullets with different structural materials: an experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling-qing WANG

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the effect of structural materials of bullets on behind armor blunt trauma (BABT. Methods Ten healthy male Landraces were randomly divided into two groups (5 each: 56 type 7.62-mm rifle bullet group and SS109 5.56-mm rifle bullet group. The kinetic energy of two types of bullets was adjusted to the same level (about 1880J by the way of grow downwards gunpowder. Then the animals as protected with both grade NIJ Ⅲ ceramic hard armor and grade Ⅱ police soft body armor, were shot at the left midclavicular line of fourth intercostal space (shooting distance was 25m. The damage to the animals was observed. Other 2 healthy male Landraces were selected, and biomechanical sensor was subcutaneously implanted into the soft tissue in precordium and intracalvarium to detect the pressure at the time point of bullet contact under the protection of armor, and the relationship between pressure and damage was analyzed. Results Respiration, heart rate and systolic arterial pressure of animals in two groups were all elevated after injury, but there was no significant difference between the two groups. No obvious change was found on blood oxygen saturation of both groups. Gross anatomy showed the predominant local injury was cardiac and pulmonary contusions. The area of pulmonary hemorrhage of 7.62mm group was 6.00%±3.18%, significantly higher than that of 5.56mm group (3.59%±2.11%, P<0.05. Histopathological examination revealed acute injuries of lung tissues, myocardial tissue and cerebral cortical neurons. The contents of cardiac troponin T (TnT, creatine kinase (CK and creatine kinase-MB (CK-MB isoenzyme were all increased 3 hours after injury, and the rise was higher in 7.62mm group than in 5.56mm group (P<0.05. Biomechanical testing showed the pressure of precordium and intracalvarium was elevated at the moment of bullet contact, and the rise was higher in 7.62mm group than in 5.56mm group (P<0.05. Conclusions

  9. NUMERICAL STUDY OF PARTICLE DISTRIBUTION IN WAKE OF LIQUID-PARTICLE FLOWS PAST A CIRCULAR CYLINDER USING DISCRETE VORTEX METHOD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Particle-laden water flows past a circular cylinder were numerically investigated. The discrete vortex method (DVM) was employed to evaluate the unsteady water flow fields and a Lagrangian approach was applied for tracking individual solid particles. A dispersion function was defined to represent the dispersion scale of the particle.The wake vortex patterns, the distributions and the time series of dispersion functions of particles with different Stokes numbers were obtained. Numerical results show that the particle distribution in the wake of the circular cylinder is closely related to the particle's Stokes number and the structure of wake vortices: (1) the intermediate sized particles with Stokes numbers, St, of 0.25, 1.0 and 4.0 can not enter the vortex cores and concentrate near the peripheries of the vortex structures, (2) in the circular cylinder wake, the dispersion intensity of particles decreases as St is increased from 0.25 to 4.0.

  10. Human regional cerebral glucose metabolism during non-rapid eye movement sleep in relation to waking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nofzinger, Eric A; Buysse, Daniel J; Miewald, Jean M; Meltzer, Carolyn C; Price, Julie C; Sembrat, Robert C; Ombao, Hernando; Reynolds, Charles F; Monk, Timothy H; Hall, Martica; Kupfer, David J; Moore, Robert Y

    2002-05-01

    Sleep is an essential human function. Although the function of sleep has generally been regarded to be restorative, recent data indicate that it also plays an important role in cognition. The neurobiology of human sleep is most effectively analysed with functional imaging, and PET studies have contributed substantially to our understanding of both rapid eye movement (REM) and non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. In this study, PET was used to determine patterns of regional glucose metabolism in NREM sleep compared with waking. We hypothesized that brain structures related to waking cognitive function would show a persistence of function into the NREM sleep state. Fourteen healthy subjects (age range 21-49 years; 10 women, 4 men) underwent concurrent EEG sleep studies and [(18)F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose PET scans during waking and NREM sleep. Whole-brain glucose metabolism declined significantly from waking to NREM sleep. Relative decreases in regional metabolism from waking to NREM sleep occurred in wide areas of frontal, parietal, temporal and occipital association cortex, primary visual cortex, and in anterior/dorsomedial thalamus. After controlling for the whole-brain declines in absolute metabolism, relative increases in regional metabolism from waking to NREM were found bilaterally in the dorsal pontine tegmentum, hypothalamus, basal forebrain, ventral striatum, anterior cingulate cortex and extensive regions of the mesial temporal lobe, including the amygdala and hippocampus, and in the right dorsal parietal association cortex and primary somatosensory and motor cortices. The reductions in relative metabolism in NREM sleep compared with waking are consistent with prior findings from blood flow studies. The relative increases in glucose utilization in the basal forebrain, hypothalamus, ventral striatum, amygdala, hippocampus and pontine reticular formation are new observations that are in accordance with the view that NREM sleep is important to brain

  11. THE STRUCTURE CONTROL OF ALUMINUM FOAMS PRODUCED BY POWDER COMPACTED FOAMING PROCESS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    X.H. You; F. Wang; L.C. Wang

    2004-01-01

    A new technique, powder compact foaming process for the production of aluminum foams has been studied in this article. According to this method, the aluminum powder is mixed with a powder foaming agent (TiH2). Subsequent to mixing, the powder blend is hot compacted to obtain a dense semi-finished product. Upon heating to temperatures within the range of the melting point, the foaming agent decomposes to evolve gas and the semi-finished product expands into a porous cellular aluminum. Foaming process is the key in this method. Based on experiments, the foaming characteristics were mainly analyzed and discussed. Experiments show that the aluminum-foam with closed pores and a uniform cell structure of high porosity can be obtained using this method by adjusting the foaming parameters: the content of foaming agent and foaming temperature.

  12. Purification and Structural Analysis of a Selective Toxin Fraction Produced by the Plant Pathogen Setosphaeria turcica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Li-hui; DONG Jin-gao; WANG Chao-hua; LI Zheng-ping

    2007-01-01

    Thirteen fractions from the pathogenic plant fungus Setosphaeria turcica race 1 were separated and collected using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Their toxic activities were assayed through leaf puncturing on corn differentials (OH43, OH43Htl, OH43Ht2, and OH43HtN), and the results revealed that eight fractions were toxic and fraction 6 was specifically toxic to OH43Htl, which could be taken as a gene-selective toxin fraction. Fraction 6 was finely purified via HPLC and condensed by freeze desiccation. Its chemical structure was analyzed with EI-MS, IR, HMBC, 1H-NMR, and two-dimensional NMR. The results suggested that fraction 6 contained an unsaturated double bond, carbonyl and methylene groups with molecular weight of 142.

  13. Structures of Mesocirculations Producing Tornadoes Associated with Tropical Cyclone Frances (1998)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Gandikota V.; Scheck, Joshua W.; Edwards, Roger; Schaefer, Joseph T.

    2005-08-01

    Radar structures of one mesocyclone and one mesocirculation (the term mesocirculation refers to a class of rotating updrafts, which may or may not be as spatially and temporally large as a typical mesocyclone) that developed a total of four tornadoes in association with Tropical Cyclone (TC) Frances 1998 are presented. One tornado developed within an inner rainband near the time of landfall while three of the other tornadoes developed within an outer rainband nearly 24 hours after the landfall. Radar reflectivities of the tornadic circulations averaged upwards of 40 dBZ while Doppler radar wind components directed toward the radar averaged 11 m s-1. It is realized that although TC Frances was a minimal hurricane it spawned several tornadoes (four of which were studied) causing damage exceeding 2 million. These tornadoes were not all located close to the TC center, serving as a caution to forecasters and emergency personnel that the immediate landfalling area is not the only place to watch.

  14. KISS: Kinetics and Structure of Superagglomerates Produced by Silane and Acetylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulholland, G. W.; Yang, J. C.; Scott, J. H.; Sivithanu, Y.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this study is to understand the process of gas phase agglomeration leading to superagglomerates and a gel-like structure for microgravity (0-g) silane and acetylene flames. Ultimately one would apply this understanding to predicting flame conditions that could lead to the gas phase production of an aero-gel. The approach is to burn acetylene and silane and to analyze the evolution of the soot and silica agglomerates. Acetylene is chosen because it has one of the highest soot volume fractions and there is evidence of super agglomerates being formed in laminar acetylene flames. Silane has the advantage that silica particles are the major combustion product resulting in a particle volume fraction a factor of ten greater than that for a carbonaceous smoke.

  15. SIMULATION OF AIRCRAFT CONDENSATION TRAILS AND WAKE VORTICES INTERACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. O. Aubakirov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A technique of calculation of aircraft condensation trails (contrails and wake vortices interaction is described. The technique is based on a suitable for real-time applications mathematical model of far wake utilizes the method of discrete vortices. The technique is supplemented by account of the influence of axial velocities in the vortex nucleus on contrail and wake vortex location. Results of calculations of contrails and wake vortices interaction for Il-76 and B-747 aircraft are presented.

  16. Effects of spanwise instabilities on the suppression of wake mode in flow over a long rectangular cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yiyang; Taira, Kunihiko; Cattafesta, Louis; Ukeiley, Lawrence

    2016-11-01

    Direct numerical simulation (DNS) and biglobal stability analysis are performed to examine the spanwise effects on the appearance of the so-called wake mode in the flow over long rectangular cavities. The wake mode has been reported to exhibit high-amplitude fluctuations and eject large spanwise vortices in numerical studies, despite its lack of observation in experiments, leaving its existence an open question. The present study focuses on a rectangular cavity flow with aspect ratio of L / D = 6 , free stream Mach number of M∞ = 0 . 6 and ReD = 502 . The properties of the wake mode are revealed via 2D DNS. From the biglobal stability analysis, the wake mode can be captured with a zero spanwise wavenumber. Furthermore, 3D eigenmodes are calculated with spanwise wavelength λ / D ∈ [ 0 . 5 , 2 ] . With the knowledge of the features of the wake mode and the 3D eigenmodes, 3D DNS are performed with width-to-depth ratio of W / D = 1 and 2. We find the flow exhibits the wake mode with W / D = 1 but presents a moderate shear-layer mode with W / D = 2 . Based on the findings, we argue that the spanwise instabilities in flows over wide cavities redistribute energy from spanwise vortices to streamwise vortical structures, which suppresses the emergence of the wake mode in the 3D cavity flows. This work was supported by the US Air Force Office of Scientific Research (Grant FA9550-13-1-0091).

  17. The effect of a biologically produced structure on the benthic copepods of a deep-sea site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thistle, David; Eckman, James E.

    1990-04-01

    In deep-sea soft bottoms, a variety of organisms produce structures that persist for long periods, even after the structures are vacated. It has been hypothesized that these structures are a major source of patchiness in these communities and are important in maintaining the high diversities that characterize the deep sea. Although several studies have shown species' abundances to be correlated with structures, the mechanisms underlying the associations are not known. We attempted to discover these mechanisms, focusing on the responses of benthic copepods to mudballs made by the polychaete Tharyx luticastellus at a site at 1050 m depth in San Diego Trough (32° 52.4'N, 117°45.5'W). It was found that seven out of 40 species responded. Four were more abundant around the structure only when the worm was in residence. These species apparently benefit from some consequences of the worm's presence. Given that bacterial abundance is higher about occupied Tharyx mudballs than nearby controls, it may be that the attractiveness occupied Tharyx mudballs arises from the provision of food. Three species responded to unoccupied mudballs. We measured responses to various types of mudball mimics to determine whether responses were to a habitat provided by the mudball, to a refuge from predation in its vicinity, or to hydrodynamically mediated increases in local food availability. Two of the species appeared to use the mudball as a habitat, the third as a refuge from infaunal predators. The results indicate that biologically produced structures can persist long enough to be viewed as habitat heterogeneity by other species in the community and that this source of patchiness is important to deep-sea species.

  18. Increasing the Efficiency on Producing Radiology Reports for Breast Cancer Diagnosis by Means of Structured Reports. A Comparative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segrelles, J Damian; Medina, Rosana; Blanquer, Ignacio; Martí-Bonmatí, Luis

    2017-05-18

    Radiology reports are commonly written on free-text using voice recognition devices. Structured reports (SR) have a high potential but they are usually considered more difficult to fill-in so their adoption in clinical practice leads to a lower efficiency. However, some studies have demonstrated that in some cases, producing SRs may require shorter time than plain-text ones. This work focuses on the definition and demonstration of a methodology to evaluate the productivity of software tools for producing radiology reports. A set of SRs for breast cancer diagnosis based on BI-RADS have been developed using this method. An analysis of their efficiency with respect to free-text reports has been performed. The methodology proposed compares the Elapsed Time (ET) on a set of radiological reports. Free-text reports are produced with the speech recognition devices used in the clinical practice. Structured reports are generated using a web application generated with TRENCADIS framework. A team of six radiologists with three different levels of experience in the breast cancer diagnosis was recruited. These radiologists performed the evaluation, each one introducing 50 reports for mammography, 50 for ultrasound scan and 50 for MRI using both approaches. Also, the Relative Efficiency (REF) was computed for each report, dividing the ET of both methods. We applied the T-Student (T-S) test to compare the ETs and the ANOVA test to compare the REFs. Both tests were computed using the SPSS software. The study produced three DICOM-SR templates for Breast Cancer Diagnosis on mammography, ultrasound and MRI, using RADLEX terms based on BIRADs 5th edition. The T-S test on radiologists with high or intermediate profile, showed that the difference between the ET was only statistically significant for mammography and ultrasound. The ANOVA test performed grouping the REF by modalities, indicated that there were no significant differences between mammograms and ultrasound scans, but both

  19. Wind turbine wake measurement in complex terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kurt Schaldemose; Larsen, Gunner Chr.; Menke, Robert;

    2016-01-01

    SCADA data from a wind farm and high frequency time series measurements obtained with remote scanning systems have been analysed with focus on identification of wind turbine wake properties in complex terrain. The analysis indicates that within the flow regime characterized by medium to large...

  20. Meteorological Controls on Wind Turbine Wakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barthelmie, Rebecca J.; Hansen, Kurt Schaldemose; Pryor, S.C.

    2013-01-01

    The primary control on the magnitude of the power losses induced by wind turbine wakes in large wind farms is the hub-height wind speed via its link to the turbine thrust coefficient. Hence, at low to moderate wind speeds (between cut-in and rated turbine wind speeds) when the thrust coefficient...

  1. Vortex wakes of a flapping foil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schnipper, Teis; Andersen, Anders Peter; Bohr, Tomas

    2009-01-01

    We present an experimental study of a symmetric foil performing pitching oscillations in a vertically flowing soap film. By varying the frequency and amplitude of the oscillation we visualize a variety of wakes with up to 46 vortices per oscillation period, including von Karman vortex street...

  2. Wakes in large offshore wind farms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berthelmie, Rebecca J.; Frandsen, Sten Tronæs; Rathmann, Ole

    2008-01-01

    Power losses due to wind turbine wakes are of the order of 10 and 20% of total power output in large wind farms. The focus of this research carried out within the EC funded UPWIND project is wind speed and turbulence modelling for large wind farms/wind turbines in complex terrain and offshore in ...

  3. Wake up and Stop Smelling the Coffee

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林芳

    2005-01-01

    The next time someone tells you to wake up and smell the coffee don't take it literally, instead go ahead and chuck2 your coffee making machine as a new study has revealed3 that having more than one cup of coffee a day increases the risk of heart disease and even one cup is ‘risky.'

  4. Simulation of wind turbine wakes using the actuator line technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Mikkelsen, Robert Flemming; Henningson, Dan S.;

    2015-01-01

    The actuator line technique was introduced as a numerical tool to be employed in combination with large eddy simulations to enable the study of wakes and wake interaction in wind farms. The technique is today largely used for studying basic features of wakes as well as for making performance...

  5. 32 CFR 707.10 - Wake illumination light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Wake illumination light. 707.10 Section 707.10... RESPECT TO ADDITIONAL STATION AND SIGNAL LIGHTS § 707.10 Wake illumination light. Naval vessels may display a white spot light located near the stern to illuminate the wake....

  6. Improvement in the surface quality of structural components produced by the RTM-process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michaeli, W.; Dyckhoff, J. [Institute of Plastics Processing, Aachen (Germany)

    1993-12-31

    During the production of long or continuous fiber reinforced structural components in Resin Transfer Moulding (RTM), surface defects like voids, pinholes or unevenness frequently occur. These have to be repaired by manual labor before final painting. The conditions for the formation of voids in the laminate as well as surface defects are investigated by model experiments, making use of a window mould. Generally the resin is assumed to flow through the fiber reinforcement in a plug flow. The investigations indicate that advance either in the nonwovens of the surface or in the center of the laminate depends on the flow front velocity. This can be attributed to a superposition of capillary and flow effects. In order to obtain a high surface quality, the flow front velocity has to be kept within a material-related band width. Otherwise, areas of air enclosure in the laminate or surface defects like pinholes will result. With the aid of a steel mould with a large area, procedural variants are investigated to reduce surface faults and to decrease the air content in the laminate. The analysis indicates that the air content can be significantly reduced by injecting the resin into a cavity filled with gaseous acetone and increasing the cavity pressure during the time of curing. Furthermore the long and short-term waviness of the surface is improved by these process modifications.

  7. Structure and blood compatibility of highly oriented PLA/MWNTs composites produced by solid hot drawing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhengqiu; Zhao, Xiaowen; Ye, Lin; Coates, Phil; Caton-Rose, Fin; Martyn, Michasel

    2014-03-01

    Highly oriented poly(lactic acid) (PLA)/multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) composites were fabricated through solid hot drawing technology in an effort to improve the mechanical properties and blood biocompatibility of PLA as blood-contacting medical devices. It was found that proper MWNTs content and drawing orientation can improve the tensile strength and modulus of PLA dramatically. With the increase in draw ratio, the cold crystallization peak became smaller, and the glass transition and the melting peak of PLA moved to high temperature, while the crystallinity increased, and the grain size decreased, indicating the stress-induced crystallization of PLA during drawing. MWNTs showed a nucleation effect on PLA, leading to the rise in the melting temperature, increase in crystallinity and reduction of spherulite size for the composites. Moreover, the intensity of (002) diffraction of MWNTs increased with draw ratio, indicating that MWNTs were preferentially aligned and oriented during drawing. Microstructure observation demonstrated that PLA matrix had an ordered fibrillar bundle structure, and MWNTs in the composite tended to align parallel to the drawing direction. In addition, the dispersion of MWNTs in PLA was also improved by orientation. Introduction of MWNTs and drawing orientation could significantly enhance the blood compatibility of PLA by prolonging kinetic clotting time, reducing hemolysis ratio and platelet activation.

  8. Naturally Produced Co/CoO Nanocrystalline Magnetic Multilayers: Structure and Inverted Hysteresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santarossa, Francesca; Pappas, Spiridon D; Delimitis, Andreas; Sousanis, Andreas; Poulopoulos, Panagiotis

    2016-05-01

    Cobalt-based multilayers with excellent sequencing are grown via radiofrequency magnetron sputtering with the use of one Co target and natural oxidation. The Co layers are continuous, fully textured {111} and have the face centered cubic structure. At the end of deposition of each Co layer air is let to flow into the vacuum chamber via a fine (leak) valve. The top of Co is oxidized. The oxidized layers consist of cubic CoO crystallites. Near the film surface hexagonal Co(OH)2 is also detected. Magneto-optical Kerr effect hysteresis loops show in-plane magnetized films. The magnetic saturation field in the out-of-plane measurements is large exceeding 12 kOe. This observation supports indirectly the fact that Co is face centered cubic; if it was c-axis textured hexagonal the magnetocrystalline anisotropy would be large resulting in smaller values of the saturation field. As the Co-layer thickness decreases the in-plane loops show reduced remanence, slow approach to magnetic saturation and the out-of-plane loops show inverted hysteresis and/or crossing loop features with sizeable remanence. The effects are discussed with respect to the enhanced orbital magnetic moment of Co and the antiferromagnetic coupling between Co spins at the Co/CoO interface.

  9. Structure and mechanical properties of pyrolytic carbon produced by fluidized bed chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Honorato, E.; Meadows, P.J. [Manchester Materials Science Centre, School of Materials, University of Manchester, Grosvenor Street, Manchester M1 7HS (United Kingdom); Xiao, P. [Manchester Materials Science Centre, School of Materials, University of Manchester, Grosvenor Street, Manchester M1 7HS (United Kingdom)], E-mail: Ping.Xiao@manchester.ac.uk; Marsh, G.; Abram, T.J. [Nexia Solutions Ltd., Springfields PR4 0XJ (United Kingdom)

    2008-11-15

    Pyrolytic carbon was deposited on spherical particles using a multi-spout fluidized bed chemical vapor deposition reactor to fabricate TRISO fuel for the High Temperature Reactor (HTR). Modern techniques such as Raman spectroscopy and nanoindentation supported by porosimetry, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy were employed to analyze the particle coatings directly. Raman spectroscopy and nanoindentation were given special attention due to their capacity to provide information on the internal structure of pyrolytic carbon and its mechanical properties without the necessity of complex sample preparation. The results obtained were used to study the relationship deposition conditions-microstructure-mechanical properties in more detail. Increasing the deposition temperature reduced the density and Young's modulus as porosity and in-plane disorder of carbon domains increased. There was also a change from a laminar microstructure of PyC to that containing more spherical particles. It appeared that anisotropy, domain size and level of graphitization (examined by Raman and TEM) had a strong influence on the mechanical properties. Clear differences were observed between acetylene and the acetylene/propylene mixture as precursor gases.

  10. Wake simulation for wind turbines with a free, prescribed- and hybrid-wake method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bareiss, R.; Guidati, G.; Wagner, S. [Univ. Stuttgart, Inst. fuer Aerodynamik und Gasdynamik, Stuttgart (Germany)

    1997-08-01

    Calculations of the radial distribution and the time history of the induction factors have been performed with a number of different wake models implemented in a vortex-lattice method for tip-speed ratios in the range 1-13. The new models lead to a significant reduction of the computational effort down to 3-27% compared to a free-wake model with errors less than 5%. (au)

  11. The Near Wake of Bluff Bodies in Stratified Fluids and the Emergence of Late Wake Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-29

    Kundu and Ira Cohen. Fluid Mechanics , Third Edition. Elsevier Inc., 2004. [27] S. Lee. A numerical study of the unsteady wake behind a sphere in a...found in the stratified fluid flows is the existence of the standing lee wave, which is a laminar mechanism . Above a Reynolds number of 2000, it is...computational cost to both model the proper fluid mechanics on the sphere and reproduce the far-wake is prohibitively expensive with current

  12. Influence of short rear end tapers on the wake of a simplified square-back vehicle: wake topology and rear drag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Anna-Kristina; Pavia, Giancarlo; Passmore, Martin

    2016-11-01

    As vehicle manufacturers work to reduce energy consumption of all types of vehicles, external vehicle aerodynamics has become increasingly important. Whilst production vehicle shape optimisation methods are well developed, the need to make further advances requires deeper understanding of the highly three-dimensional flow around bluff bodies. In this paper, the wake flow of a generic bluff body, the Windsor body, based on a square-back car geometry, was investigated by means of balance measurements, surface pressure measurements and 2D particle image velocimetry planes. Changes in the wake topology are triggered by the application of short tapers (4 % of the model length) to the top and bottom edges of the base, representing a shape optimisation that is realistic for many modern production vehicles. The base drag is calculated and correlated with the aerodynamic drag data. The results not only show the effectiveness of such small devices in modifying the time average topology of the wake but also shed some light on the effects produced by different levels of upwash and downwash on the bi-stable nature of the wake itself.

  13. Structural characterization of nickel oxide/hydroxide nanosheets produced by CBD technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taşköprü, T., E-mail: ttaskopru@anadolu.edu.tr [Department of Physics, Anadolu University, Eskişehir 26470 (Turkey); Department of Physics, Çankırı Karatekin University, Çankırı 18100 (Turkey); Zor, M.; Turan, E. [Department of Physics, Anadolu University, Eskişehir 26470 (Turkey)

    2015-10-15

    Graphical abstract: SEM images of (a) as deposited β-Ni(OH)2 and (b) NiO samples deposited with pH 10 solution. The inset figures shows the absorbance spectra of (a) β-Ni(OH)2 and (b) NiO samples. - Highlights: • The formation of β-Ni(OH){sub 2} and NiO were confirmed with XRD, SEM, FT-IR and Raman. • Porous nickel oxide was synthesized after heat treatment of nickel hydroxide. • The increase in pH value changes the nanoflake structure to hexagonal nanosheet. • On increasing the pH from 8 to 11, the band gap decreases from 3.52 to 3.37 eV. - Abstract: Nickel hydroxide samples were deposited onto glass substrates using Ni(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}·6H{sub 2}O and aqueous ammonia by chemical bath deposition technique. The influence of pH of solution was investigated by means of X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared, Raman spectroscopy, optical absorption and BET analysis. The as-deposited samples were identified as β-Ni(OH){sub 2}, were transformed into NiO after heat treatment in air at 500 °C for 2 h. Porous nickel oxide nanosheets are obtained by heating nickel hydroxide nanosheets. The optical transitions observed in the absorbance spectra below optical band gap is due to defects or Ni{sup 2+} vacancies in NiO samples. The band gap energy of NiO samples changes between 3.37 and 3.52 eV depending on the pH values.

  14. Generation of large-scale vortex dislocations in a three- dimensional wake-type flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LING; Guocan

    2001-01-01

    ., Eckelmann, H., Vortex splitting and its consequences in the vortex street wake of cylinders at low Reynolds number, Phys. Fluids, 1989, 1: 189.[15]Gerrard, J. H., The three-dimensional structure of the wake of a circular cylinder, J. Fluid Mech., 1996, 25: 143.[16]Gaster, M., Vortex shedding from circular cylinder at low Reynolds number, J. Fluid Mech., 1971, 46: 749.[17]Bearman, P. W., Challenging problems in bluff body wakes, bluff-body wakes, dynamics and instabilities, IUTAM Symposium Gittingen/Germany, 1992, 19.[18]So, A., Maekawa, H., Study of vortex dislocations in the wake of a flat plate with finite thickness, Transactions of the Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers B, 2000, 66: 649.[19]Browand, F. K., Troutt, T. R., The turbulent mixing layer: geometry of large vortices, J. Fluid Mech., 1985, 158: 489.[20]Ling Guocan, Xiong Zhongmin, The three dimensional flow features of interaction between two vortex streets, in Proceedings of the Eighth International Offshore and Polar Engineering Conference, Montréal, Canada, May 24—29, 1998.[21]Pocheau, A., Croquette, V., Gal, P. L., Turbulence in a cylindrical container of Argon near threshold of convection, Phys. Rev. Lett., 1985, 55: 1094.[22]Noack, B. R., Ohle, F., Eckelmann, H., On the cell formation in vortex streets, J. Fluid Mech., 1991, 227: 293.[23]Albarède, R., Provansal, M., Quasi-periodic cylinder wakes and the Ginzburg-Landau model. J. Fluid Mech., 1995, 291: 191.[24]Park, D. S., Redekopp, L. G., Selection principles for spatio-temporal patterns in wake flows, in Proc. IUTAM Symp. on Bluff-body Wake, Dynamics, and Instability, Gittingen, Sept. 7—11, 1992.[25]Monkewitz, P. A., Williamson, C. H. K., Miller, G. D., Phase dynamics of K-rm-n vortices in cylinder wakes, Phys. Fluids, A, 1996, 8: 91.[26]Triantafyllou, G. S., Karniadakis, G. E., Computational reducibility of unsteady viscous flows, Phys. Fluids A, 1990, 2: 653.[27]Xiong, Z. M., Ling, G. C

  15. Using Dynamically Coupled Turbine/Wind Simulations to Investigate the Influence of Atmospheric Turbulence in Turbine Wake Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linn, R.; Koo, E.; Kelley, N. D.; Jonkman, B.; Lundquist, J. K.; Canfield, J.

    2010-12-01

    In order to increase our efficiency of energy capture in wind farms, optimize turbine arrangements, and adapt wind-turbine technology to optimal performance in common atmospheric conditions such as low level jets (LLJ), it is critical to understand the dynamic interactions between turbulence and multiple wind turbines. Ambient atmospheric turbulence interacts with spinning turbines producing the critical mechanism for the recovery of the wind field behind a wind turbine. This turbine-influenced turbulent wind field creates the environment surrounding downstream turbines in a wind farm, thus controlling the amount of wind energy available for harvesting as well as the nature of the wear and tear that downwind turbines endure. The strength of the turbulent structures and their length-scales evolve downstream. Thus, the conditions to which downstream turbines are exposed, their productivity, and potentially their lifespan is a function of their position within the turbulent wake of upstream turbines. A numerical technique, WindBlade, has been developed for characterizing the interaction of spinning wind turbines and unsteady/heterogeneous atmospheric boundary layers at length scales ranging from blade-chord-scale (meters) to turbine-array-scale (multiple kilometers). This implementation of this technique combines an R&D100 winning numerical tool, HIGRAD/FIRETEC, a fully-compressible atmospheric hydrodynamics model with novel techniques to capture forces exchanged between the atmosphere and turbine as it rotates. The blade-induced forces on the wind field over the along the span of spinning turbine blades interacts with any oncoming atmospheric turbulence or shear, thus producing turbine wakes which are functions of turbine blade geometry and pitch, rotation speed, topographic and vegetation influences, and of course ambient wind speed, direction, shear, and turbulence. TurbSim, which creates vertical planes of three-dimensional turbulent wind fields based on empirical

  16. Relationship between Rheological Behaviour and Final Structure of Al2O3 and YSZ Foams Produced by Replica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Y. Gómez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Using rheological parameters of ceramic suspensions, it is possible to taylor the structure of the ceramic foams produced by replica. This method consists in the impregnation of a polymeric flexible template (polyurethane foam with a ceramic suspension (slurry containing the appropriate additives, followed by burning out organic compounds and additives and sintering the ceramic structure. In this work, ceramic foams were produced by the replica method from Al2O3 and 3% Y2O3-ZrO2. Rheological parameters of the ceramic suspensions were investigated to improve the mechanical performance of final structures. Different types and quantities of raw materials were combined in order to select the formulations for ceramic foams. The parameters that have a significant influence on the process are the binder type and the amount of solids. Significant changes on the hysteresis area of the suspensions resulted in a lower density of macrodefects in the material. Likewise, when the shear rate viscosity is enhanced, the thickness of the struts increased proportionally. Lastly, when the hysteresis area magnitude and the ceramic thickness increased, the material with higher uniformity was internally densified, and the stress concentration of the internal defects was smoothed

  17. Low Density Nanocellular Polymers Based on PMMA Produced by Gas Dissolution Foaming: Fabrication and Cellular Structure Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Martín-de León

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the processing conditions needed to produce low density nanocellular polymers based on polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA with relative densities between 0.45 and 0.25, cell sizes between 200 and 250 nm and cell densities higher than 1014 cells/cm3. To produce these nanocellular polymers, the foaming parameters of the gas dissolution foaming technique using CO2 as blowing agent have been optimized. Taking into account previous works, the amount of CO2 uptake was maintained constant (31% by weight for all the materials. Foaming parameters were modified between 40 °C and 110 °C for the foaming temperature and from 1 to 5 min for the foaming time. Foaming temperatures in the range of 80 to 100 °C and foaming times of 2 min allow for production of nanocellular polymers with relative densities as low as 0.25. Cellular structure has been studied in-depth to obtain the processing-cellular structure relationship. In addition, it has been proved that the glass transition temperature depends on the cellular structure. This effect is associated with a confinement of the polymer in the cell walls, and is one of the key reasons for the improved properties of nanocellular polymers.

  18. Morphological and Structural Studies of Titanate and Titania Nanostructured Materials Obtained after Heat Treatments of Hydrothermally Produced Layered Titanate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Hasmizam Razali

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Different types of titanate and titania nanostructured materials have been successfully synthesised and characterized using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD and raman spectroscopy. Elemental analysis was determined by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX analyzer while thermogravimetric-differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC was used to determine thermal stability. In this study, we found that nanotubes were formed during the washing treatment stage with HCl and distilled water. When the pH of the washing solution was 12, sodium titanate nanotubes were obtained, while when the pH of the washing solution was 7, hydrogen titanate nanotubes were obtained. Sodium titanate nanotubes were thermally stable up to 500°C; however, at 700°C, the nanotubes structure transform to solid nanorods. Meanwhile, hydrogen titanate nanotubes decomposed to produce titania nanotubes after heat treatment at 300°C for 2 hours. At 500°C, the tubular structure broke to small segments due to destruction of the nanotube. Further heat treatment at 700°C, led to the destruction and collapse of the nanotubes structure produce titania nanoparticles.

  19. Understanding the structural differences between spherical and rod-shaped human insulin nanoparticles produced by supercritical fluids precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yeonju; Seo, Yongil; Chae, Boknam; Pyo, Dongjin; Chung, Hoeil; Hwang, Hyonseok; Jung, Young Mee

    2015-02-01

    In this study, the thermal denaturation mechanism and secondary structures of two types of human insulin nanoparticles produced by a process of solution-enhanced dispersion by supercritical fluids using dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and ethanol (EtOH) solutions of insulin are investigated using spectroscopic approaches and molecular dynamics calculations. First, the temperature-dependent IR spectra of spherical and rod-shaped insulin nanoparticles prepared from DMSO and EtOH solution, respectively, are analyzed using principal component analysis (PCA) and 2D correlation spectroscopy to obtain a deeper understanding of the molecular structures and thermal behavior of the two insulin particle shapes. All-atom molecular dynamics (AAMD) calculations are performed to investigate the influence of the solvent molecules on the production of the insulin nanoparticles and to elucidate the geometric differences between the two types of nanoparticles. The results of the PCA, the 2D correlation spectroscopic analysis, and the AAMD calculations clearly reveal that the thermal denaturation mechanisms and the degrees of hydrogen bonding in the spherical and rod-shaped insulin nanoparticles are different. The polarity of the solvent might not alter the structure or function of the insulin produced, but the solvent polarity does influence the synthesis of different shapes of insulin nanoparticles.

  20. Increasing length of wakefulness and modulation of hypocretin-1 in the wake-consolidated squirrel monkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeitzer, Jamie M; Buckmaster, Christine L; Lyons, David M; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2007-10-01

    The neuropeptides hypocretins (orexins), the loss of which results in the sleep disorder narcolepsy, are hypothesized to be involved in the consolidation of wakefulness and have been proposed to be part of the circadian-driven alertness signal. To elucidate the role of hypocretins in the consolidation of human wakefulness we examined the effect of wake extension on hypocretin-1 in squirrel monkeys, primates that consolidate wakefulness during the daytime as do humans. Wake was extended up to 7 h with hypocretin-1, cortisol, ghrelin, leptin, locomotion, and feeding, all being assayed. Hypocretin-1 (P sleep deprivation, while ghrelin (P = 0.79) and leptin (P = 1.00) did not change with sleep deprivation. Using cross-correlation and multivariate modeling of these potential covariates along with homeostatic pressure (a measure of time awake/asleep), we found that time of day and homeostatic pressure together explained 44% of the variance in the hypocretin-1 data (P sleep pressure. Concomitants of wakefulness that affect hypocretin-1 in polyphasic species, such as locomotion, food intake, and food deprivation, likely have a more minor role in monophasic species, such as humans.