WorldWideScience

Sample records for wages climbing fast

  1. Fast food prices, obesity, and the minimum wage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotti, Chad; Tefft, Nathan

    2013-03-01

    Recent proposals argue that a fast food tax may be an effective policy lever for reducing population weight. Although there is growing evidence for a negative association between fast food prices and weight among adolescents, less is known about adults. That any measured relationship to date is causal is unclear because there has been no attempt to separate variation in prices on the demand side from that on the supply side. We argue that the minimum wage is an exogenous source of variation in fast food prices, conditional on income and employment. In two-stage least-squares analyses, we find little evidence that fast food price changes affect adult BMI or obesity prevalence. Results are robust to including controls for area and time fixed effects, area time trends, demographic characteristics, substitute prices, numbers of establishments and employment in related industries, and other potentially related factors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Mechanical Synthesis for Easy and Fast Operation in Climbing and Walking Robots

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzalez-Rodriguez, Antonio; Angel G. Gonzalez-Rodriguez; Morales, Rafael

    2010-01-01

    Two different designs have been presented that contribute new approaches towards existing mechanical schemes. The first prototype is a stair-climbing wheelchair designed with a new approach, based on splitting the stair-climbing process into two sub-problems: the ascent of each single step, and the positioning of the rear and front axles. Each sub-problem is solved by using two independent mechanisms which are linked to create the final wheelchair. This new wheelchair has been modeled, built ...

  3. Reservation wages and starting wages

    OpenAIRE

    van Ophem, Hans; Hartog, Joop; Berkhout, Peter

    2011-01-01

    We analyse a unique data set that combines reservation wage and actually paid wage for a large sample of Dutch recent higher education graduates. On average, accepted wages are almost 8% higher than reservation wages, but there is no fixed proportionality. We find that the difference between reservation wage and accepted wage is virtually random, as search theory predicts. We also find that most information contained in the accepted wage is included in the reservation wage, as one would predi...

  4. Reservation wages and starting wages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ophem, H.; Hartog, J.; Berkhout, P.

    2011-01-01

    We analyse a unique data set that combines reservation wage and actually paid wage for a large sample of Dutch recent higher education graduates. On average, accepted wages are almost 8% higher than reservation wages, but there is no fixed proportionality. We find that the difference between

  5. CLIMBING WALL

    CERN Multimedia

    1999-01-01

    The FIRE AND RESCUE Group of TIS Commission informs that the climbing wall in the yard of the Fire-fighters Station, is intended for the sole use of the members of that service, and recalls that access to this installation is forbidden for safety reasons to all persons not belonging to the Service.CERN accepts no liability for damage or injury suffered as a result of failure to comply with this interdiction.TIS/DI

  6. New Minimum Wage Research: A Symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrenberg, Ronald G.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Includes "Introduction" (Ehrenberg); "Effect of the Minimum Wage [MW] on the Fast-Food Industry" (Katz, Krueger); "Using Regional Variation in Wages to Measure Effects of the Federal MW" (Card); "Do MWs Reduce Employment?" (Card); "Employment Effects of Minimum and Subminimum Wages" (Neumark,…

  7. Technical Tree Climbing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Peter

    Tree climbing offers a safe, inexpensive adventure sport that can be performed almost anywhere. Using standard procedures practiced in tree surgery or rock climbing, almost any tree can be climbed. Tree climbing provides challenge and adventure as well as a vigorous upper-body workout. Tree Climbers International classifies trees using a system…

  8. Reservation wages, expected wages and unemployment

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Sarah; Taylor, Karl

    2013-01-01

    We model unemployment duration, reservation and expected wages simultaneously for individuals not in work, where wage expectations are identified via an exogenous policy shock. The policy shock increased expected wages, which were found to be positively associated with reservation wages.

  9. Wage Dispersion and Decentralization of Wage Bargaining

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Christian Møller; le Maire, Christian Daniel; Munch, Jakob R.

    2013-01-01

    This article studies how decentralization of wage bargaining from sector to firm level influences wage levels and wage dispersion. We use detailed panel data covering a period of decentralization in the Danish labor market. The decentralization process provides variation in the individual worker......, we also find that wages are more dispersed under firm-level bargaining compared to more centralized wage-setting systems....

  10. Achieving Great Heights: The Climbing Child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Readdick, Christine A.; Park, Jennifer J.

    1998-01-01

    Addresses the importance of climbing in early childhood and issues of facilitating children's climbing skills. Considers why children climb, when they learn, how they climb, socializing the climbing child, and creating safe, developmentally appropriate climbing environments for children. (JPB)

  11. Indoor climbing walls in Prague

    OpenAIRE

    Schwarzová, Veronika

    2012-01-01

    This work presents the indoor climbing walls in climbing centers for the public in Prague. It creates an overview of qualitative and quantitative characteristics of indoor climbing walls in Prague. Thesis allowing ordinary users and the general public interested in climbing easier selection of the appropriate climbing wall according on their level, the safety requirements, background, but also the place of residence.

  12. Minimum Wage Effects throughout the Wage Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumark, David; Schweitzer, Mark; Wascher, William

    2004-01-01

    This paper provides evidence on a wide set of margins along which labor markets can adjust in response to increases in the minimum wage, including wages, hours, employment, and ultimately labor income. Not surprisingly, the evidence indicates that low-wage workers are most strongly affected, while higher-wage workers are little affected. Workers…

  13. Wage Dispersion and Decentralization of Wage Bargaining

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Christian M.; Le Maire, Christian Daniel; Munch, Jakob Roland

    This paper studies how decentralization of wage bargaining from sector to firm level influences wage levels and wage dispersion. We use a detailed panel data set covering a period of decentralization in the Danish labor market. The decentralization process provides exogenous variation in the indi......This paper studies how decentralization of wage bargaining from sector to firm level influences wage levels and wage dispersion. We use a detailed panel data set covering a period of decentralization in the Danish labor market. The decentralization process provides exogenous variation...... in the individual worker's wage-setting system that facilitates identification of the effects of decentralization. Consistent with predictions we find that wages are more dispersed under firm-level bargaining compared to more centralized wage-setting systems. However, the differences across wage-setting systems...

  14. Energy system contributions in indoor rock climbing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertuzzi, Rômulo Cássio de Moraes; Franchini, Emerson; Kokubun, Eduardo; Kiss, Maria Augusta Peduti Dal Molin

    2007-10-01

    The present study cross-sectionally investigated the influence of training status, route difficulty and upper body aerobic and anaerobic performance of climbers on the energetics of indoor rock climbing. Six elite climbers (EC) and seven recreational climbers (RC) were submitted to the following laboratory tests: (a) anthropometry, (b) upper body aerobic power, and (c) upper body Wingate test. On another occasion, EC subjects climbed an easy, a moderate, and a difficult route, whereas RC subjects climbed only the easy route. The fractions of the aerobic (W(AER)), anaerobic alactic (W(PCR)) and anaerobic lactic (W[La(-)]) systems were calculated based on oxygen uptake, the fast component of excess post-exercise oxygen uptake, and changes in net blood lactate, respectively. On the easy route, the metabolic cost was significantly lower in EC [40.3 (6.5) kJ] than in RC [60.1 (8.8) kJ] (P climbing an easy route were 39.7 (5.0), 34.0 (5.8), and 26.3% (3.8), respectively. These results indicate that the main energy systems required during indoor rock climbing are the aerobic and anaerobic alactic systems. In addition, climbing economy seems to be more important for the performance of these athletes than improved energy metabolism.

  15. Reducing Rock Climbing Risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attarian, Aram

    1998-01-01

    Provides checklists that can be used as risk-management tools to evaluate rock-climbing programs: developing goals, policies, and procedures; inspecting the climbing environment; maintaining and inspecting equipment; protecting participants; and managing staff (hiring, training, retraining, and evaluating) and campers (experience level, needs, and…

  16. Lifting as You Climb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Debra R.

    2009-01-01

    This article addresses leadership themes and answers leadership questions presented to "Exchange" by the Panel members who attended the "Exchange" Panel of 300 Reception in Dallas, Texas, last November. There is an old proverb that encourages people to lift as they climb: "While you climb a mountain, you must not forget others along the way." With…

  17. Efficiency wages and bargaining

    OpenAIRE

    Walsh, Frank

    2005-01-01

    I argue that in contrast to the literature to date efficiency wage and bargaining solutions will typically be independent. If the bargained wage satisfies the efficiency wage constraint efficiency wages are irrelevant. If it does not, typically we have the efficiency wage solution and bargaining is irrelevant.

  18. Wage Leadership in Construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    LEADERSHIP IN CONSTRUCTION Wage leadership is the theory that wage increases in one sector lead to imitative increases elsewhere. In this paper we...test this theory in a large industry where wage leadership is supposed to be dominant- construction. Alternate theories of wage determination (excess...demand, real wage bargaining) are also tested, along with %he efficacy of the 1971-73 wagecotls BACKGROUND The theory of wage leadership is an important

  19. The Rock Climbing Teaching Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudlas, John

    The product of 10 years of rock climbing instruction, this guide provides material from which an instructor can teach basic climbing concepts and safety skills as well as conduct a safe, enjoyable rock climbing class in a high school setting. It is designed for an instructor with limited experience in climbing; however, the need for teacher…

  20. The Social Climbing Game

    CERN Document Server

    Bardoscia, Marco; Livan, Giacomo; Marsili, Matteo; Tessone, Claudio J

    2012-01-01

    The structure of a society depends, to some extent, on the incentives of the individuals they are composed of. We study a stylized model of this interplay, that suggests that the more individuals aim at climbing the social hierarchy, the more society's hierarchy gets strong. Such a dependence is sharp, in the sense that a persistent hierarchical order emerges abruptly when the preference for social status gets larger than a threshold. This phase transition has its origin in the fact that the presence of a well defined hierarchy allow agents to climb it, thus reinforcing it, whereas in a "disordered" society it is harder for agents to find out whom they should connect to in order to become more central. Interestingly, a social order emerges when agents strive harder to climb society and it results in a state of reduced social mobility, as a consequence of ergodicity breaking, where climbing is more difficult.

  1. Minimalistic Dynamic Climbing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    number of robots have been designed for climbing locomotion, they are mostly quasistatic. The Alicia3 robot climbs walls by using pneumatic adhesion at...one or more of three “cups” connected by two links (Longo and Muscato, 2006). 18 (a) adhesive : Suction and Magnets (b) spines (c) brute force gripper...footholds, as well as motions to those footholds, that keep the robot in static equilibrium at all times (Bretl, 2006). Gecko -inspired directional dry

  2. Ladder Climbing Robot

    OpenAIRE

    Anu Wilson; Haripriya R. P.; Rijul Reji P.; Sukesh S. Menon

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a new design of a robotic system having two arms that is suitable of motion in uneven surfaces as well as climbing ladders. Ladder climbing is an essential mode of locomotion for navigating industrial environments and conducting maintenance tasks in buildings, trees and other man-made structures. The motion of robot is mapped by hand movements. An arduino board is used to control the whole operation. It collects data from the controller and sends it to the robot (wi...

  3. Accreditation for Indoor Climbing Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayfield, Peter

    To ensure that the rapidly growing climbing gym industry maintains the excellent safety record established so far, the Climbing Gym Association (CGA) has developed the Peer Review and Accreditation Program, a process of review between qualified and experienced CGA reviewers and a climbing facility operator to assess the facility's risk management…

  4. The impact of minimum wage adjustments on Vietnamese wage inequality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Henrik; Rand, John; Torm, Nina

    Using Vietnamese Labour Force Survey data we analyse the impact of minimum wage changes on wage inequality. Minimum wages serve to reduce local wage inequality in the formal sectors by decreasing the gap between the median wages and the lower tail of the local wage distributions. In contrast, local...... wage inequality is increased in the informal sectors. Overall, the minimum wages decrease national wage inequality. Our estimates indicate a decrease in the wage distribution Gini coefficient of about 2 percentage points and an increase in the 10/50 wage ratio of 5-7 percentage points caused...

  5. Mortgage Debt and Wages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wood, James

    2016-01-01

    Different approaches to mortgage debt may impact wages, how homeowners engage with employers and welfare services, and economic growth.......Different approaches to mortgage debt may impact wages, how homeowners engage with employers and welfare services, and economic growth....

  6. Multitasking and Wages

    OpenAIRE

    Görlich, Dennis; Snower, Dennis J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper sheds light on how changes in the organization of work can help to understand increasing wage inequality. We present a theoretical model in which workers with a wider span of competence (higher level of multitasking) earn a wage premium. Since abilities and opportunities to expand the span of competence are distributed unequally among workers across and within education groups, our theory helps to explain (1) rising wage inequality between groups, and (2) rising wage inequality wit...

  7. Age, Wage and Productivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ours, J.C.; Stoeldraijer, L.

    2010-01-01

    Previous empirical studies on the effect of age on productivity and wages find contradicting results. Some studies find that if workers grow older there is an increasing gap between productivity and wages, i.e. wages increase with age while productivity does not or does not increase at the same

  8. Minimum wage hikes and the wage growth of low-wage workers

    OpenAIRE

    Joanna K Swaffield

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents difference-in-differences estimates of the impact of the British minimum wage on the wage growth of low-wage employees. Estimates of the probability of low-wage employees receiving positive wage growth have been significantly increased by the minimum wage upratings or hikes. However, whether the actual wage growth of these workers has been significantly raised or not depends crucially on the magnitude of the minimum wage hike considered. Findings are consistent with employ...

  9. 75 FR 37457 - Maintenance Wage Rate Wage Recommendation and Maintenance Wage Survey; Report of Additional...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-29

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Maintenance Wage Rate Wage Recommendation and Maintenance Wage Survey; Report of... adopt prevailing wage rates for maintenance laborers and mechanics, and to approve or refer to the U.S... Lists the Following Information Title of Proposal: Maintenance Wage Rate Wage Recommendation and...

  10. 75 FR 4099 - Maintenance Wage Rate Wage Recommendation and Maintenance Wage Survey; Report of Additional...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-26

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Maintenance Wage Rate Wage Recommendation and Maintenance Wage Survey; Report of... adopt prevailing wage rates for maintenance laborers and mechanics, and to approve or refer to the U.S... lists the following information: Title of Proposal: Maintenance Wage Rate Wage Recommendation and...

  11. The Wage and Employment Dynamics of Minimum Wage Workers

    OpenAIRE

    William E. Even; David A. Macpherson

    2004-01-01

    This study uses 20 years of short panel data sets on minimum wage workers to examine the wage and employment dynamics of minimum wage workers. Compared to workers earning above the minimum wage, minimum wage workers differ substantially in several ways. First, minimum wage workers are much more likely to be new entrants and much more likely to exit the labor market. Second, changes in industry and occupation and access to job training are particularly important to improving the wages of minim...

  12. The impact of minimum wage adjustments on Vietnamese wage inequality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Henrik; Rand, John; Torm, Nina

    Using Vietnamese Labour Force Survey data we analyse the impact of minimum wage changes on wage inequality. Minimum wages serve to reduce local wage inequality in the formal sectors by decreasing the gap between the median wages and the lower tail of the local wage distributions. In contrast, local...... wage inequality is increased in the informal sectors. Overall, the minimum wages decrease national wage inequality. Our estimates indicate a decrease in the wage distribution Gini coefficient of about 2 percentage points and an increase in the 10/50 wage ratio of 5-7 percentage points caused...... by the adjustment of the minimum wages from 2011to 2012 that levelled the minimum wage across economic sectors....

  13. Upper limb injuries associated with rock climbing.

    OpenAIRE

    Bannister, P; Foster, P

    1986-01-01

    Four cases of upper limb injuries secondary to rock-climbing or training for rock climbing are presented. All four cases had diagnosis and treatment delayed because of unawareness of the range of injuries seen in high grade rock climbing.

  14. Rising above the Minimum Wage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Even, William; Macpherson, David

    An in-depth analysis was made of how quickly most people move up the wage scale from minimum wage, what factors influence their progress, and how minimum wage increases affect wage growth above the minimum. Very few workers remain at the minimum wage over the long run, according to this study of data drawn from the 1977-78 May Current Population…

  15. TEACHING PERSONNEL WAGES

    OpenAIRE

    Tatiana Klyachko

    2014-01-01

    In 2013, the principle focus in the Russian education system was placed upon raising teaching personnel wages, because these wages are linked to wages of the nursery-school teacher and teaching personnel of the extended education system. During the same year, the Center for Continuing Education Economics under the Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration conducted a monitoring of teachers’ reaction to changes to their financial conditions. The monitoring-base...

  16. Preparticipation Evaluation for Climbing Sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Aaron D; Davis, Christopher; Paterson, Ryan; Cushing, Tracy A; Ng, Pearlly; Peterson, Charles S; Sedgwick, Peter E; McIntosh, Scott E

    2015-12-01

    Climbing is a popular wilderness sport among a wide variety of professional athletes and amateur enthusiasts, and many styles are performed across many environments. Potential risks confront climbers, including personal health or exacerbation of a chronic condition, in addition to climbing-specific risks or injuries. Although it is not common to perform a preparticipation evaluation (PPE) for climbing, a climber or a guide agency may request such an evaluation before participation. Formats from traditional sports PPEs can be drawn upon, but often do not directly apply. The purpose of this article was to incorporate findings from expert opinion from professional societies in wilderness medicine and in sports medicine, with findings from the literature of both climbing epidemiology and traditional sports PPEs, into a general PPE that would be sufficient for the broad sport of climbing. The emphasis is on low altitude climbing, and an overview of different climbing styles is included. Knowledge of climbing morbidity and mortality, and a standardized approach to the PPE that involves adequate history taking and counseling have the potential for achieving risk reduction and will facilitate further study on the evaluation of the efficacy of PPEs. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Tree climbing and human evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkataraman, Vivek V.; Kraft, Thomas S.; Dominy, Nathaniel J.

    2013-01-01

    Paleoanthropologists have long argued—often contentiously—about the climbing abilities of early hominins and whether a foot adapted to terrestrial bipedalism constrained regular access to trees. However, some modern humans climb tall trees routinely in pursuit of honey, fruit, and game, often without the aid of tools or support systems. Mortality and morbidity associated with facultative arboreality is expected to favor behaviors and anatomies that facilitate safe and efficient climbing. Here we show that Twa hunter–gatherers use extraordinary ankle dorsiflexion (>45°) during climbing, similar to the degree observed in wild chimpanzees. Although we did not detect a skeletal signature of dorsiflexion in museum specimens of climbing hunter–gatherers from the Ituri forest, we did find that climbing by the Twa is associated with longer fibers in the gastrocnemius muscle relative to those of neighboring, nonclimbing agriculturalists. This result suggests that a more excursive calf muscle facilitates climbing with a bipedally adapted ankle and foot by positioning the climber closer to the tree, and it might be among the mechanisms that allow hunter–gatherers to access the canopy safely. Given that we did not find a skeletal correlate for this observed behavior, our results imply that derived aspects of the hominin ankle associated with bipedalism remain compatible with vertical climbing and arboreal resource acquisition. Our findings challenge the persistent arboreal–terrestrial dichotomy that has informed behavioral reconstructions of fossil hominins and highlight the value of using modern humans as models for inferring the limits of hominin arboreality. PMID:23277565

  18. Employment effects of minimum wages

    OpenAIRE

    Neumark, David

    2014-01-01

    The potential benefits of higher minimum wages come from the higher wages for affected workers, some of whom are in low-income families. The potential downside is that a higher minimum wage may discourage employers from using the low-wage, low-skill workers that minimum wages are intended to help. Research findings are not unanimous, but evidence from many countries suggests that minimum wages reduce the jobs available to low-skill workers.

  19. Gradual collective wage bargaining

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dobbelaere, S.; Luttens, R.I.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an alternative implementation of firm-level collective wage bargaining, where bargaining proceeds as a finite sequence of sessions between a firm and a union of variable size. We investigate the impact of such a 'gradual' union on the wage-employment contract in an economy with

  20. Foreign Firms, Domestic Wages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malchow-Møller, Nikolaj; Markusen, James R.; Schjerning, Bertel

    large domestic firms. The empirical implications of the model are tested on matched employer-employee data from Denmark. Consistent with the theory, we find considerable evidence of higher wages and wage growth in large and/or foreign-owned firms. These effects survive controlling for individual...

  1. Climbing the Needs Pyramids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Lomas

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Abraham Maslow’s theory of human adult motivation is often represented by a pyramid image showing two proposals: First, the five needs stages in emergent order of hierarchical ascension and second, a percentage of the adult population suggested to occupy each needs tier. Specifically, Maslow proposed that adults would be motivated to satisfy their unfilled needs until they reached the hierarchy’s apex and achieved self-transcendence. Yet how adults can purposefully ascend Maslow’s pyramid through satisfying unfilled needs remains elusive. This brief article challenges this on the theory’s 70th anniversary by presenting a new image of the needs hierarchy, based on ecological design principles to support adults’ purposeful endeavors to climb the needs pyramid.

  2. Import, Offshoring and Wages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosse, Henrik Barslund; Maitra, Madhura

    Offshoring firms are found to pay higher average wages than purely domestic firms. We provide a unifying empirical approach by capturing the different channels through which offshoring may explain this wage difference: (i) due to change in the composition of workers (skill composition effect) (ii......) because all existing workers get higher pay (rent sharing effect). Using Danish worker-firm data we explain how much each channel contributes to higher wages. To estimate the causal effect of offshoring on wages we use China’s accession to the WTO in December 2001 - and the soon after boom in Chinese...... exports - as positive exogenous shocks to the incentive to offshore to China. Both skill composition and rent sharing effects are found to be important in explaining the resultant gain in wages. We also show that the firm’s timing in the offshoring process determines the relative importance of a channel...

  3. Wages and commuting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mulalic, Ismir; Ommeren, Jos N. van; Pilegaard, Ninette

    2011-01-01

    We examine the causal effect of commuting distance on workers' wages in a quasi-natural experiments setting using information on all workers in Denmark. We account for endogeneity of distance by using changes in distance that are due to firms’ relocations. For the range of commuting distances where...... income tax reductions associated with commuting do not apply, one kilometre increase in commuting distance induces a wage increase of about 0.42%, suggesting an hourly compensation of about half of the hourly net wage. Our findings are consistent with wage bargaining theory and suggest a bargaining power...... parameter of about 0.50. Due to the experimental setup we are able to exclude many competing explanations of the wage-distance relationship....

  4. The physiology of rock climbing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, Luisa V; Rhodes, Edward C; Taunton, Jack E

    2006-01-01

    In general, elite climbers have been characterised as small in stature, with low percentage body fat and body mass. Currently, there are mixed conclusions surrounding body mass and composition, potentially because of variable subject ability, method of assessment and calculation. Muscular strength and endurance in rock climbers have been primarily measured on the forearm, hand and fingers via dynamometry. When absolute hand strength was assessed, there was little difference between climbers and the general population. When expressed in relation to body mass, elite-level climbers scored significantly higher, highlighting the potential importance of low body mass. Rock climbing is characterised by repeated bouts of isometric contractions. Hand grip endurance has been measured by both repeated isometric contractions and sustained contractions, at a percentage of maximum voluntary contraction. Exercise times to fatigue during repeated isometric contractions have been found to be significantly better in climbers when compared with sedentary individuals. However, during sustained contractions until exhaustion, climbers did not differ from the normal population, emphasising the importance of the ability to perform repeated isometric forearm contractions without fatigue becoming detrimental to performance. A decrease in handgrip strength and endurance has been related to an increase in blood lactate, with lactate levels increasing with the angle of climbing. Active recovery has been shown to provide a better rate of recovery and allows the body to return to its pre-exercised state quicker. It could be suggested that an increased ability to tolerate and remove lactic acid during climbing may be beneficial. Because of increased demand placed upon the upper body during climbing of increased difficulty, possessing greater strength and endurance in the arms and shoulders could be advantageous. Flexibility has not been identified as a necessary determinant of climbing success

  5. 14 CFR 31.17 - Performance: Climb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Performance: Climb. 31.17 Section 31.17... STANDARDS: MANNED FREE BALLOONS Flight Requirements § 31.17 Performance: Climb. (a) Each balloon must be capable of climbing at least 300 feet in the first minute after takeoff with a steady rate of climb...

  6. Safer mountain climbing using the climbing heartbeat index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Akio; Nose, Hiroshi

    2003-09-01

    As the numbers of middle-aged and elderly mountain climbers have increased with the general aging of the population, accidents during mountain climbing have increased recently. A possible cause of such accidents is an excessively difficult expedition plan. To enjoy safe mountain climbing, the plans must take account of the climber's fitness level. We developed a method to plan mountain climbing using the climbing heartbeat index (CHI). This study is based on the assumption that the work expended when climbing a mountain is equal to the potential energy of the body and load weights elevated to the height of the mountain, and that the work is proportional to the heart rate. The CHI was calculated by the following equation The CHI values examined in this study ( n = 94) showed very small standard deviations and were significantly correlated with the maximum oxygen uptake, .VO(2 max) (ml kg(-1) min(-1)) ( r = -0.934, P < 0.01); it showed a characteristic value corresponding to the fitness level in each subject. In addition, this value remained nearly unchanged even when the load was changed. Therefore, if the CHI value of an individual is known (it can be estimated from .VO(2 max)), safer mountain climbing can be planned accordingly. Once determined, this CHI value can be used repeatedly unless the fitness level of the individual changes.

  7. Imaging of rock climbing injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinoli, Carlo; Bianchi, Stefano; Cotten, Anne

    2005-12-01

    Competition climbing has grown increasingly in popularity, and many people are being drawn to this sport with a parallel increase in the occurrence of sport-related injuries. One of the most common and unique lesions occurring in the rock climbing population is the closed rupture of the flexor pulley system of the fingers. This lesion is strictly related to some climbing techniques in which the entire body weight is placed on fingerholds, which causes bowstringing of the flexor tendons with subsequent loss of strength across the full range of motion of the finger. This article summarizes the current literature regarding the application of imaging modalities in the diagnosis of rock climbing injuries with a specific focus on ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging. Biomechanics of the sporting activity and resultant pathophysiologic and clinical considerations concerning flexor pulley system injuries are also discussed.

  8. Wages or Fringes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Tor; Kristensen, Nicolai

    2014-01-01

    The two key predictions of hedonic wage theory are that there is a trade-off between wages and nonmonetary rewards and that the latter can be used as a sorting device by firms to attract and retain the kind of employees they desire. We use the vignettes method to estimate individuals' willingness......-to-pay for fringe benefits and job amenities. We find negative wage-fringe trade-offs, considerable heterogeneity in willingness-to-pay for fringe benefits, and signs of sorting....

  9. Wages or Fringes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Tor Viking; Kristensen, Nicolai

    The two key predictions of hedonic wage theory are that there is a trade-o¤ between wages and nonmonetary rewards and that the latter can be used as a sorting device by firms to attract and retain the kind of employees they desire. Empirical analysis of these topics are scarce as they require...... negative wage-fringe trade-offs, con-siderable heterogeneity in willingness to pay for fringe benefits, and signs of sorting. The findings imply that personnel economics models can be applied also to the analysis of nonmonetary rewards....

  10. Specialization, Outsourcing and Wages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch, Jakob Roland; Rose Skaksen, Jan

    2005-01-01

    arising from an increase in the extent of the market for intermediate goods, domestic outsourcing tends to increase wages for both unskilled and skilled labor. We use a panel data set of workers in Danish manufacturing industries to show that domestic and foreign outsurcing affect wages as predicted......This paper studies the impact of outsourcing on individual wages. In contrast to the standard approach in the literature, we focus on domestic outsourcing as well as foreign outsourcing. By using a simple theoretical model, we argue that, if outsourcing is associated with specialization gains...

  11. Gender, Motivation, Experience and Wages

    OpenAIRE

    Joanna Swaffield

    2000-01-01

    Using data from the British Household Panel Survey, 1991-97 this paper investigates the structure of the female wage equation and the gender wage differential. The discriminatory portion of the gender wage differential is overstated by over 40% when inadequate measures of female labour market experience are included in the wage equation. The degree of labour market motivation, aspirations and constraints are found to have a significant impact on the female wage. Moreover, the impact of time o...

  12. Specialization, outsourcing and wages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch, Jakob Roland; Skaksen, Jan Rose

    2009-01-01

    This paper studies the impact of outsourcing on individual wages. In contrast to the standard approach in the literature, we focus on domestic outsourcing as well as foreign outsourcing. We argue that if outsourcing is associated with specialization gains arising from an increase in the division ...... of labor, domestic outsourcing tends to increase wages for both unskilled and skilled labor. We use a panel data set of workers in Danish manufacturing industries to show that domestic and foreign outsourcing affect wages as predicted.......This paper studies the impact of outsourcing on individual wages. In contrast to the standard approach in the literature, we focus on domestic outsourcing as well as foreign outsourcing. We argue that if outsourcing is associated with specialization gains arising from an increase in the division...

  13. Public sector wages

    OpenAIRE

    B. Eugène

    2011-01-01

    Remuneration paid by public administrations in Belgium amounted to one-quarter of their primary expenditure in 2010. Because current conditions call for fiscal consolidation, it is important to examine whether this component of spending could be a source of budget savings, including by adjusting wages. The article focuses principally on wage gaps between the public sector and the private sector. The authors are especially interested in the situation in Belgium as compared with those of nine o...

  14. FAST

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zuidmeer-Jongejan, Laurian; Fernandez-Rivas, Montserrat; Poulsen, Lars K.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: The FAST project (Food Allergy Specific Immunotherapy) aims at the development of safe and effective treatment of food allergies, targeting prevalent, persistent and severe allergy to fish and peach. Classical allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT), using subcutaneous injections with aqu......ABSTRACT: The FAST project (Food Allergy Specific Immunotherapy) aims at the development of safe and effective treatment of food allergies, targeting prevalent, persistent and severe allergy to fish and peach. Classical allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT), using subcutaneous injections...... with aqueous food extracts may be effective but has proven to be accompanied by too many anaphylactic side-effects. FAST aims to develop a safe alternative by replacing food extracts with hypoallergenic recombinant major allergens as the active ingredients of SIT. Both severe fish and peach allergy are caused...... in depth serological and cellular immune analyses will be performed, allowing identification of novel biomarkers for monitoring treatment efficacy. FAST aims at improving the quality of life of food allergic patients by providing a safe and effective treatment that will significantly lower their threshold...

  15. Physiology of difficult rock climbing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Phillip B

    2004-04-01

    The purpose of this review is to explore existing research on the physiological aspects of difficult rock climbing. Findings will be categorized into the areas of an athlete profile and an activity model. An objective here is to describe high-level climbing performance; thus the focus will primarily be on studies that involve performances at the 5.11/6c (YDS/French) level of difficulty or higher. Studies have found climbers to be small in stature with low body mass and low body fat. Although absolute strength values are not unusual, strength to body mass ratio is high in accomplished climbers. There is evidence that muscular endurance and high upper body power are important. Climbers do not typically possess extremely high aerobic power, typically averaging between 52-55 ml.kg(-1).min(-1) for maximum oxygen uptake. Performance time for a typical ascent ranges from 2 to 7 min and oxygen uptake (VO2) averages around 20-25 ml.kg(-1).min(-1) over this period. Peaks of over 30 ml.kg(-1).min(-1) for VO2 have been reported. VO2 tends to plateau during sustained climbing yet remains elevated into the post-climb recovery period. Blood lactate accumulates during ascent and remains elevated for over 20 min post-climbing. Handgrip endurance decreases to a greater degree than handgrip strength with severe climbing. On the basis of this review, it appears that a specific training program for high-level climbing would include components for developing high, though not elite-level, aerobic power; specific muscular strength and endurance; ATP-PC and anaerobic glycolysis system power and capacity; and some minimum range of motion for leg and arm movements.

  16. Migration and the Wage Curve:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brücker, Herbert; Jahn, Elke J.

      Based on a wage curve approach we examine the labor market effects of migration in Germany. The wage curve relies on the assumption that wages respond to a change in the unemployment rate, albeit imperfectly. This allows one to derive the wage and employment effects of migration simultaneously...... with a vocational degree. The wage and employment effects of migration are moderate: a 1 percent increase in the German labor force through immigration increases the aggregate unemployment rate by less than 0.1 percentage points and reduces average wages by less 0.1 percent. While native workers benefit from...

  17. Climbing Walls and Climbing Tuitions. A Delta Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirshstein, Rita J.; Kadamus, James A.

    2012-01-01

    High-end amenities like rock climbing walls on college campuses have become an easy target for those attempting to explain rising tuitions. This Delta Perspective looks beyond the media attention surrounding these "frills" to examine more serious questions about spending on campus facilities, college spending in general, and the real drivers of…

  18. Wages in Benin. WageIndicator survey 2012

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Besamusca, J.; Tijdens, K.; Ngeh Tingum, E.; Sena Alinsato, A.

    2013-01-01

    This WageIndicator Data Report presents the results of the face-to-face WageIndicator survey in Benin, conducted between the 15th and 19th of October 2012. The survey aimed to measure in detail the wages earned by Beninese workers, including the self-employed. In total 2,002 persons were interviewed

  19. Interpreting Minimum Wage Effects on Wage Distributions: A Cautionary Tale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.J. Flinn

    2003-01-01

    textabstractWhile it is tempting to infer the welfare effects of minimum wage changes from empirical observations on pre- and post-change wage distributions, in this exercise we have attempted to point out the hazards of doing so. We have focused on wage distributions in this paper, but this

  20. Wages in Rwanda. WageIndicator survey 2012

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Besamusca, J.; Tijdens, K.; Ngeh Tingum, E.; Mbassana, M.E.

    2013-01-01

    This WageIndicator Data Report presents the results of the face-to-face WageIndicator survey in Rwanda, conducted between the 27th of October and the 3rd of December 2012. The survey aimed to measure in detail the wages earned by Rwandan workers. In total 2,074 persons were interviewed in towns in

  1. Rural hospital wages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Ann M.

    1989-01-01

    Average fiscal year 1982 wages from 2,302 rural American hospitals were used to test for a gradient descending from hospitals in counties adjacent to metropolitan areas to those not adjacent. Considerable variation in the ratios of adjacent to nonadjacent averages existed. No statistically significant difference was found, however. Of greater importance in explaining relative wages within States were occupational mix, mix of part-time and full-time workers, case mix, presence of medical residencies, and location in a high-rent county within the State. Medicare already adjusts payments for only two of these variables. PMID:10313454

  2. Upper limb injuries associated with rock climbing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannister, P; Foster, P

    1986-01-01

    Four cases of upper limb injuries secondary to rock-climbing or training for rock climbing are presented. All four cases had diagnosis and treatment delayed because of unawareness of the range of injuries seen in high grade rock climbing. PMID:3730754

  3. Re-Establishing a Clean Climbing Ethic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attarian, Aram

    This paper addresses environmental impact issues associated with rock climbing and stresses the importance of reestablishing a clean climbing ethic through climber education and ethical considerations. The adventure sport of rock climbing has grown considerably over the last decade: it is estimated that there are currently over 200,000 rock…

  4. A Climbing Class' Reinvention of Angles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fyhn, Anne Birgitte

    2008-01-01

    A previous study shows how a twelve-year-old girl discovers angles in her narrative from a climbing trip. Based on this research, the girl's class takes part in one day of climbing and half a day of follow-up work at school. The students mathematise their climbing with respect to angles and they express themselves in texts and drawings. Their…

  5. 36 CFR 13.910 - Mountain climbing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mountain climbing. 13.910 Section 13.910 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... Provisions § 13.910 Mountain climbing. (a) Climbing Mount McKinley or Mount Foraker without a permit is...

  6. Climbing fiber signaling and cerebellar gain control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Ohtsuki (Gen); C. Piochon (Claire); C.R.W. Hansel (Christian)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThe physiology of climbing fiber signals in cerebellar Purkinje cells has been studied since the early days of electrophysiology. Both the climbing fiber-evoked complex spike and the role of climbing fiber activity in the induction of long-term depression (LTD) at parallel fiber-Purkinje

  7. 20 CFR 404.1041 - Wages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Wages. 404.1041 Section 404.1041 Employees...- ) Employment, Wages, Self-Employment, and Self-Employment Income Wages § 404.1041 Wages. (a) The term wages means remuneration paid to you as an employee for employment unless specifically excluded. Wages are...

  8. Hill-climbing Higgs inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinno, Ryusuke; Kaneta, Kunio; Oda, Kin-ya

    2018-01-01

    We propose a realization of cosmic inflation with the Higgs field when the Higgs potential has degenerate vacua by employing the recently proposed idea of hill-climbing inflation. The resultant inflationary predictions exhibit a sizable deviation from those of the ordinary Higgs inflation.

  9. Hybrid robot climbing system design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purna Irawan, Agustinus; Halim, Agus; Kurniawan, Hengky

    2017-09-01

    This research aims to develop a climbing hybrid robot, especially to design the structure of robot that quite strong and how to build an optimal mechanism for transmitting the motor’s rotation and torque to generate movement up the pole. In this research we use analytical methods using analysis software, simulation, a prototype, and robot trial. The result showed that robot could climb a pole by with maximum velocity 0.33m/s with a 20 kg load. Based on a weight diversity trial between 10 kg and 20 kg we obtained climb up load factor with value 0.970 ± 0.0223 and climb down load factor with value 0.910 ± 0.0163. Displacement of the frame structure was 7.58 mm. To minimize this displacement, the gate system was used so as to optimize the gripper while gripping the pole. The von Misses stress in the roller was 48.49 MPa, with 0.12 mm of displacement. This result could be a reference for robot development in further research.

  10. Indoor Climbing Structure Buying Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Susan

    1991-01-01

    Discusses purposes and effectiveness of indoor climbing structures and offers general safety guidelines. Provides a guide to products from 14 companies. The guide describes the equipment, age and weight range, guarantees, price range, and shipping. Addresses, telephone, and FAX numbers of each company are listed. (SH)

  11. Pole climbing challenges and solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murdoch, W.S.

    2009-09-15

    This article discussed methods of improving the safety of electricity linemen when climbing poles. A fall restrict system (FRS) program was recently implemented by the Indianapolis Power and Light (IPL) company. However, workers using the program were fatigued by the double belting requirements. Scenarios were then examined in order to solve the problems experienced by the linemen. A Brazilian method of climbing was then adapted for use with a rope positioning device (RPD) developed to accommodate IPL work practices and pole applications. The final pole climbing system was developed after consulting with a group of IPL linemen. The RPD system was tested alongside a conventional fall restrict system. The test demonstrated that the RPD system required significantly less time to complete than the conventional system. The climber was also able to use a 100 per cent fall protection system on a heavily obstructed pole with no greater effort than free climbing. It was concluded that the system can also be used in a Belay configuration to reduce rescue times and control fall distances. 5 figs.

  12. Movement phase detection in climbing*

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dovgalecs, Vladislavs; Boulanger, Jérémie; Orth, Dominic; Hérault, Romain; Coeurjolly, Jean François; Davids, Keith; Seifert, Ludovic

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to propose a method to automatically detect the different types of behavioural states in climbing. One climber traversed an easy route (5c difficulty on French scale) of 10 m height with a top-rope. Five inertial measurement units (IMU) (3D accelerometer, 3D gyroscope, 3D

  13. Wage differentials among Appalachian sawmills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles H. Wolf

    1977-01-01

    Wage differences among Appalachian sawmills were investigated, using multiple-regression analysis. Wages and fringe benefits were found to vary with type of product sawed, education of the work force, distance to urban areas, general wage levels, and use of collective-bargaining agreements between management and labor.

  14. The physiological effect of a 'climb assist' device on vertical ladder climbing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, Peter James; Burgess, Katherine; Cooper, Kay; Stewart, Arthur D

    2017-07-01

    'Climb assist' claims to reduce strain when climbing ladders; however, no research has yet substantiated this. The purpose of this study was to assess the physiological and psychophysical effects of climb assist on 30 m ladder climbing at a minimum acceptable speed. Eight participants (six male and two female) climbed a 30 m ladder at 24 rungs per minute with and without climb assist, and were monitored for heart rate (HR), [Formula: see text]O2 and rate of perceived exertion (RPE). All three variables decreased significantly (p climb assist with [Formula: see text]O2 decreasing by 22.5%, HR by 14.8% and RPE decreasing by a mean of 2.3 units on the 10-point Borg scale. When descending the ladder [Formula: see text]O2 decreased by a mean of 42% compared to that ascending. At the minimal acceptable climbing speed climb assist decreases the physiological strain on climbers, as demonstrated by reduced [Formula: see text]O2, HR and perceived exertion. Practitioner Summary: 'Climb assist' systems claim to reduce strain when climbing, however; no research has yet been published to substantiate this. A crossover study compared [Formula: see text]O2, HR and RPE at a minimal acceptable climbing speed with and without climb assist. Climb assist significantly reduced all variables confirming it reduces strain when climbing.

  15. Wages and commuting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mulalic, Ismir; Ommeren, Jos N. van; Pilegaard, Ninette

    2011-01-01

    We examine the causal effect of commuting distance on workers' wages in a quasi-natural experiments setting using information on all workers in Denmark. We account for endogeneity of distance by using changes in distance that are due to firms’ relocations. For the range of commuting distances whe...

  16. Body composition and wages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Roy; Tekin, Erdal

    2010-07-01

    This paper examines the relationship between body composition and wages in the United States. We develop measures of body composition--body fat (BF) and fat-free mass (FFM)--using data on bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) that are available in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III and estimate wage models for respondents in the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979. Previous research uses body size or BMI as measures of obesity despite a growing concern that they do not distinguish between body fat and fat-free body mass or adequately control for non-homogeneity inside the human body. Therefore, measures presented in this paper represent a useful alternative to BMI-based proxies of obesity. Our results indicate that BF is associated with decreased wages for both males and females among whites and blacks. We also present evidence suggesting that FFM is associated with increased wages. We show that these results are not the artifacts of unobserved heterogeneity. Finally, our findings are robust to numerous specification checks and to a large number of alternative BIA prediction equations from which the body composition measures are derived. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Foreign Firms, Domestic Wages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malchow-Møller, Nikolaj; Markusen, James R.; Schjerning, Bertel

    Many papers have documented a wage premium in foreign-owned and large firms. However, there is very little formal theory in the literature and empirical analyses are typically not based on hypotheses which are rigorously derived from theory. This paper contributes to the theory-empirics gap by de...

  18. Foreign Firms, Domestic Wages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malchow-Møller, Nikolaj; Schjerning, Bertel; R. Markusen, James

    2013-01-01

    Three types of theories have been used to explain the wage premium in foreign firms: the theories of heterogeneous workers, heterogeneous learning, and heterogeneous firms. We set up a model that explicitly encompasses two of these theories, and that can illustrate the third. This unifying framew...

  19. Wage Dispersion, Public Sector Wages and the Stagnating Danish Gender Wage Gap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gupta, Nabanita Datta; Oaxaca, Ronald L.; Smith, Nina

    1998-01-01

    , the impact of the changing wage structure between the public and private sectors is investigated. The analysis is based on the Juhn-Murphy-Pierce decomposition applied to a pooled wage regression model. The equivalence between the former and the Oaxaca-Ransom generalized wage decomposition is established...

  20. Changes in lower extremity peak angles, moments and muscle activations during stair climbing at different speeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Jacqueline; Freisinger, Greg; Pan, Xueliang; Siston, Robert; Schmitt, Laura; Chaudhari, Ajit

    2015-12-01

    Stair climbing is a common daily activity, yet there is no basic knowledge on how lower extremity joint angles, moments or muscle activations are affected by stair climbing speed. This information will determine whether speed matching is necessary for stair climbing studies. Moreover, changes in lower extremity biomechanics during stair climbing at different speeds will aid in the clinical interpretation of a patient's maximal stair climbing speed. Thirty healthy participants provided consent. Kinematics, kinetics, and muscle activations were collected on a three step staircase. Subjects climbed the staircase at normal, slow and fast self-selected speeds. Linear mixed models for repeated measures were used to study the associations between speed and the lower extremity peak joint angles and moments, and muscle activations. The peak hip flexion and extension moments increased with increasing speed, while peak knee flexion moment did not vary consistently with speed. The peak muscle activations varied consistently with respect to the sagittal plane kinetics. These results suggest that in healthy subjects, the hip is the greatest contributor when modulating stair climbing speed, while additional knee contributions do not appear necessary to increase speed. Further stair studies should consider speed matching in order to accurately assess biomechanical differences. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Rural Hospital Wages and the Area Wage Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Kathleen; Slifkin, Rebecca T.; Howard, Hilda A.

    2002-01-01

    We examined data on hospital hourly wages and the prospective payment system (PPS) wage index from 1990 to 1997, to determine if incremental changes to the index have improved its precision and equity as a regional cost adjuster. The differential between average rural and urban PPS hourly wages has declined by almost one-fourth over the 8-year study period. Nearly one-half of the decrease is attributable to regulatory and reporting changes in the annual hospital wage survey. Patterns of within-market wage variation across rural-urban continuum codes identify three separate sub-markets within the State-level aggregates defining rural labor markets. Geographic reclassification decisions appear to eliminate one of the three. Remaining systematic within-market rural wage differences work to the reimbursement advantage of hospitals in the smaller and more isolated communities. PMID:12545604

  2. Technology, Employment and Wages

    OpenAIRE

    Addison, John T.; Teixeira, Paulino

    2001-01-01

    This paper examines the contribution of technological change to changes in the structure of relative employment and wages. Even if the nature of demand-side forces is fairly clear – international trade being of secondary importance because of the modest size of the between-industry employment shifts – the identification of the fundamental causes of skill-biased technological change, the techniques involved, and the manner of their adoption by firms is not transparent. Accordingly the skill-bi...

  3. Fit-climbing test: a field test for indoor rock climbing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertuzzi, Rômulo; Franchini, Emerson; Tricoli, Valmor; Lima-Silva, Adriano E; Pires, Flávio De Oliveira; Okuno, Nilo M; Kiss, Maria A P D M

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an indoor rock-climbing test on an artificial wall (Fit-climbing test). Thirteen climbers (elite group [EG] = 6; recreational group [RG] = 7) performed the following tests: (a) familiarization in the Fit-climbing test, (b) the Fit-climbing test, and (c) a retest to evaluate the Fit-climbing test's reliability. Gas exchange, blood lactate concentration, handgrip strength, and heart rate were measured during the test. Oxygen uptake during the Fit-climbing test was not different between groups (EG = 8.4 ± 1.1 L; RG = 7.9 ± 1.5 L, p > 0.05). The EG performance (120 ± 7 movements) was statistically higher than the RG climbers' performance (78 ± 13 movements) during the Fit-climbing test. Consequently, the oxygen cost per movement during the Fit-climbing test of the EG was significantly lower than that of the RG (p climbing test (p climbing test (p > 0.05). Furthermore, the performance in the Fit-climbing test presented high reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.97). Therefore, the performance during the Fit-climbing test may be an alternative to evaluate rock climbers because of its specificity and relation to oxygen cost per movement during climbing.

  4. Wage discrimination and partial compliance with the minimum wage law

    OpenAIRE

    Yang-Ming Chang; Bhavneet Walia

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a simple model to characterize the discriminatory behavior of a non-complying firm in a minimum-wage economy. In the analysis, the violating firm pays one “favored†group of workers the statutory minimum and the other “non-favored†group of workers a sub-minimum. We find conditions under which law enforcement is ineffective in improving the between-group wage differentials. We show that an increase in the minimum wage raises the sub-minimum wage and employment of wor...

  5. Low-Wage Counties Face Locational Disadvantages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Robert; Cromartie, John B.

    2000-01-01

    Small populations and remoteness are the most salient features of low-wage counties. These locational attributes coincide with fewer high-wage jobs, yet low wages within industries define low-wage counties more than industry composition. Although adults in low-wage counties have less education and labor force participation overall, the role played…

  6. 5 CFR 551.301 - Minimum wage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minimum wage. 551.301 Section 551.301... FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Minimum Wage Provisions Basic Provision § 551.301 Minimum wage. (a)(1) Except... employees wages at rates not less than the minimum wage specified in section 6(a)(1) of the Act for all...

  7. 5 CFR 551.311 - Subminimum wage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Subminimum wage. 551.311 Section 551.311... FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Minimum Wage Provisions Subminimum Wage § 551.311 Subminimum wage. An agency... minimum wage specified in section 6(a)(1) of the Act. ...

  8. The Minimum Wage Spike in the Search Economy with Wage-Posting

    OpenAIRE

    Natalya Y. Shelkova

    2009-01-01

    Empirical wage and wage offer distributions exhibit substantial clustering in economies with a mandated minimum wage, the phenomenon knows as the minimum wage spike, as well as wage dispersion. Existing search-theoretic literature does not replicate both of the empirical phenomena simultaneously. This paper attempts to reconcile the two under assumptions of wage-posting, urn-ball matching and firm productive heterogeneity. A non-degenerate minimum wage spike and wage dispersion are obtained w...

  9. [Arm injuries due to sport climbing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruens, M L; Dobbelaar, P; Koes, B W; Coert, J H

    2008-08-16

    There are 26 large climbing centres and 44 smaller indoor or outdoor climbing walls in The Netherlands at this time. Hand and finger injuries are the most common types of sport climbing injuries. Most injuries are caused by overstraining. Injuries include avulsion fractures, arthrosis, pulley rupture, damage to joint capsule and collateral ligaments, 'gamekeeper's thumb', 'climber's finger', lumbrical shift syndrome, 'climber's elbow', shoulder injuries and nerve compression syndromes. Treatment is usually conservative. Depending on the extent of damage surgical intervention may be indicated.

  10. 20 CFR 404.1247 - When to report wages-for wages paid prior to 1987.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false When to report wages-for wages paid prior to... Report Wages and Contributions-for Wages Paid Prior to 1987 § 404.1247 When to report wages—for wages paid prior to 1987. A State shall report wages for the calendar year in which they were actually paid...

  11. Do recruitment ties affect wages?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anna Folke; Rand, John; Torm, Nina Elisabeth

    This paper examines the extent to which recruitment ties affect individual wage outcomes in small and medium scale manufacturing firms. Based on a unique matched employer-employee dataset from Vietnam we find that there is a significant positive wage premium associated with obtaining a job through...... an informal contact, when controlling for standard determinants of wage compensation. Moreover, we show that the mechanism through which informal contacts affect wages depends on the type of recruitment tie used. The findings are robust across location, firm size categories and different worker types....

  12. Climb Hard, Train Harder: Supplemental Training Techniques for Improved Rock Climbing Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larew, Bradley; Haibach-Beach, Pamela

    2017-01-01

    Climbing is an increasingly popular recreational activity that has attracted interest from a wide variety of populations, likely because of the increasing availability and challenge of climbing. Many children and adolescents are introduced to rock climbing in adventure programming units in their schools. Through physical education, children are…

  13. Efficacy of pre-ascent climbing route visual inspection in indoor sport climbing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanchez, X.; Lambert, Ph; Jones, G.; Llewellyn, D. J.

    Pre-ascent climbing route visual inspection (route preview) has been suggested as a key climbing performance parameter although its role has never been verified experimentally. We examined the efficacy of this perceptual-cognitive skill on indoor sport climbing performance. Twenty-nine male

  14. Wages in Guinea. WageIndicator survey 2012

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Besamusca, J.; Tijdens, K.; Ngeh Tingum, E.; Diallo, H.

    2013-01-01

    This WageIndicator Data Report presents the results of the face-to-face survey on wages and working conditions in Guinea, conducted between the 13th of September and 2nd of October 2012. In total 1,962 persons were interviewed, the majority in urban areas. More male than female workers were

  15. Interindustry Wage Differentials and the Gender Wage Gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Judith; Wolff, Edward N.

    1995-01-01

    Wages of female workers differ significantly by industry. The average woman earns about 65% as much as the average man; 12%-22% of the gap is explained by differences in patterns of interindustry wage differentials and 15%-19% by differences in gender distribution of workers. Combined industry effects explain about one-third of the gender wage…

  16. The wage transition in developed countries and its implications for China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baaquie, Belal Ehsan; Roehner, Bertrand M.; Wang, Qing-hai

    2017-03-01

    The expression "wage transition" refers to the fact that over the past three decades in almost all developed economies wage increases have leveled off. There has been a widening divergence and decoupling between wages on the one hand and GDP per capita on the other hand. Yet, in China wages and GDP per capita climbed in sync (at least up to now). In the first part of the paper we present comparative statistical evidence which measures the extent of the wage transition effect. In a second part we consider the reasons of this phenomenon, in particular we explain how the transfers of labor from low productivity sectors (such as agriculture) to high productivity sectors (such as manufacturing) are the driver of productivity growth, particularly through their synergetic effects. Although rural flight represents only one of these effects, it is certainly the most visible because of the geographical relocation that it implies; it is also the most well-defined statistically. Moreover, it will be seen that it is a good indicator of the overall productivity and attractiveness of the non-agricultural sector. Because this model accounts fairly well for the observed evolution in industrialized countries, we use it to predict the rate of Chinese economic growth in coming decades. Our forecast for the average annual growth of real wages ranges from 4% to 6% depending on how well China will control offshoring and the development of its healthcare sector.

  17. Hill climbing algorithms and trivium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borghoff, Julia; Knudsen, Lars Ramkilde; Matusiewicz, Krystian

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes a new method to solve certain classes of systems of multivariate equations over the binary field and its cryptanalytical applications. We show how heuristic optimization methods such as hill climbing algorithms can be relevant to solving systems of multivariate equations....... A characteristic of equation systems that may be efficiently solvable by the means of such algorithms is provided. As an example, we investigate equation systems induced by the problem of recovering the internal state of the stream cipher Trivium. We propose an improved variant of the simulated annealing method...... that seems to be well-suited for this type of system and provide some experimental results....

  18. Leadership Skills and Wages

    OpenAIRE

    Kuhn, Peter; Weinberger, Catherine

    2003-01-01

    American business is devoting a growing share of resources to identifying and developing a worker characteristic called ³leadership skill². Is there such a thing, and is it rewarded in labor markets? Using the Project Talent, NLS72 and High School and Beyond datasets, we show that men who occupied leadership positions in high school earn more as adults, even when cognitive skills are held constant. The pure leadership-wage effect varies, depending on definitions and time period, from four ...

  19. Wage inflation and worker uncertainty

    OpenAIRE

    Mark E. Schweitzer

    1997-01-01

    Compares two possible explanations of why pay increases continue to be moderate in a vigorous labor market--workers' uncertainty about their jobs and human resource managers' wage-setting behavior--and looks at how each explanation matches the evidence on the timing of inflation and wage changes.

  20. Wage Increases Moderate in 1981.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sackley, Arthur

    1982-01-01

    According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, most wage series rose more slowly in 1981, with much of the slowdown in the fourth quarter; when adjusted for inflation, they showed declines, although the wage-price gap was narrower. (Author/CT)

  1. Globalization, Roundaboutness, and Relative Wages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.F. François (Joseph); K. Grier; D.R. Nelson

    2004-01-01

    textabstractWe depart from the trade and wages literature and its emphasis on North-South trade, examining North-North by developing the basic linkages between trade-based integration and relative wages in an Ethier-type division of labor model. Using this model we identify a formal relationship

  2. Wage Mobility Patterns in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pavlopoulos, D.

    2007-01-01

    Wage mobility is in the heart of economic research and political debate on the future of the European labour markets. This study deals with substantial and methodological issues concerning wage mobility. It fits in the tradition of labour economists that are particularly interested in measuring the

  3. Fibrillar Adhesive for Climbing Robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamess, Aaron; White, Victor E.

    2013-01-01

    A climbing robot needs to use its adhesive patches over and over again as it scales a slope. Replacing the adhesive at each step is generally impractical. If the adhesive or attachment mechanism cannot be used repeatedly, then the robot must carry an extra load of this adhesive to apply a fresh layer with each move. Common failure modes include tearing, contamination by dirt, plastic deformation of fibers, and damage from loading/ unloading. A gecko-like fibrillar adhesive has been developed that has been shown useful for climbing robots, and may later prove useful for grasping, anchoring, and medical applications. The material consists of a hierarchical fibrillar structure that currently contains two levels, but may be extended to three or four levels in continuing work. The contacting level has tens of thousands of microscopic fibers made from a rubberlike material that bend over and create intimate contact with a surface to achieve maximum van der Waals forces. By maximizing the real area of contact that these fibers make and minimizing the bending energy necessary to achieve that contact, the net amount of adhesion has been improved dramatically.

  4. Indoor climbing elicits plasma oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, José; Ferreira, Rita; Marques, Franklim; Olivera, Eduardo; Soares, José; Ascensão, António

    2007-06-01

    Indoor climbing is a worldwide sport with particular physiological and physical demands. The purpose of this study was to analyze the effect of sustained indoor climbing until exhaustion on plasma oxidative stress markers, and to relate it to whole-body dynamic exercise performed at the same percentage of maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max). Fourteen male indoor climbers continuously climbed a competition-style route until exhaustion. Oxygen consumption and heart rate were continuously monitored during the climbing exercise. One week later, subjects performed a treadmill running protocol with the same duration and percentage of VO2max as that of climbing exercise. Blood samples were collected at rest, immediately after, and 1 h after both exercise protocols to analyze plasma levels of reduced (GSH) and oxidized (GSSG) glutathione, malondialdehyde (MDA), protein sulfhydryl (-SH) and carbonyl (CG) groups, total antioxidant status (TAS) and uric acid (UA), and total blood leukocytes, neutrophil, and lymphocyte counts. Compared with running, climbing significantly increased the %GSSG, MDA, CG, TAS, and UA and decreased the GSH and -SH content. Blood counts of total leukocytes and neutrophils increased immediately after and 1 h after both running and climbing (Pclimbing than in running (Pclimbing (Pindoor climbing induces plasma oxidative stress. Moreover, results suggest that an ischemia-reperfusion prooxidant-based mechanism related to climbers' sustained and intermittent isometric forearm muscle contractions might have significantly contributed to observed plasma oxidative stress.

  5. The epidemiology of rock-climbing injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, G; Asghar, A; Llewellyn, D J

    2008-09-01

    To determine the prevalence and nature of rock-climbing injuries, and the factors associated with these injuries. A retrospective cross-sectional study. Rock climbers were recruited at five outdoor and six indoor climbing venues in the UK. 201 active rock climbers (163 male, 38 female climbers) aged 16-62 years. Rock climbing behaviours and key demographics. Injuries requiring medical attention or withdrawal from participation for > or = 1 day. Around 50% of climbers had sustained > or = 1 injury in the past 12 months, causing a total of 275 distinct anatomical injuries. 21 climbers (10%) had sustained acute climbing injuries as a result of a fall, 67 (33%) had chronic overuse injuries, and 57 (28%) had acute injuries caused by strenuous climbing moves. Dedicated climbers participating in different forms of rock climbing more often and at a higher level of technical difficulty may be more prone to injury, particularly overuse injuries of the finger and shoulder. The principal sources of treatment or advice sought by climbers were physiotherapists (18%), other climbers (14%) and doctors (11%). Climbing frequency and technical difficulty are associated with climbing injuries occurring at both indoor and outdoor venues, particularly cumulative trauma to the upper extremities.

  6. National Tree Climbing Guide [2015 Electronic Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerry Berdeen; Burnham Chamberlain; Teryl Grubb; Art Henderson; Brock Mayo; Manfred Mielke; Kathryn Purcell; Dennis Ringnes; Marc Roberts; Donna Stubbs; Micah Thorning

    2015-01-01

    The Forest Service Tree Climbing Program provides direction that protects Forest Service employees while ascending, descending, and working aloft in trees by establishing national direction based on recognized industry standards, procedures and practices. Climbing and working in trees demands specialized equipment and skills. The potential for a serious injury or fatal...

  7. A Climbing Girl's Reflections about Angles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fyhn, Anne Birgitte

    2006-01-01

    The main research question in this paper is whether a climbing discourse can be a resource for a school-geometry discourse. The text is based on a 12-year old girl's story from an exciting climbing trip during her summer holiday. The girl uncovers some of her knowledge that had been invisible to her; she is guided to see some relations between her…

  8. Tracked robot controllers for climbing obstacles autonomously

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Isabelle

    2009-05-01

    Research in mobile robot navigation has demonstrated some success in navigating flat indoor environments while avoiding obstacles. However, the challenge of analyzing complex environments to climb obstacles autonomously has had very little success due to the complexity of the task. Unmanned ground vehicles currently exhibit simple autonomous behaviours compared to the human ability to move in the world. This paper presents the control algorithms designed for a tracked mobile robot to autonomously climb obstacles by varying its tracks configuration. Two control algorithms are proposed to solve the autonomous locomotion problem for climbing obstacles. First, a reactive controller evaluates the appropriate geometric configuration based on terrain and vehicle geometric considerations. Then, a reinforcement learning algorithm finds alternative solutions when the reactive controller gets stuck while climbing an obstacle. The methodology combines reactivity to learning. The controllers have been demonstrated in box and stair climbing simulations. The experiments illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach for crossing obstacles.

  9. The impact of the minimum wage on the wage distribution: Evidence from Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    Pelek, Selin

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the effect of the minimum wage on the entire wage distribution. More specifically, we address the issue of wage inequality by taking into account the potential distributional outcomes of the minimum wage legislation. We decompose the wage differences and the changes in the wage inequality before and after the sizeable minimum wage increase in 2004 following the methodology introduced by DiNardo, Fortin and Lemieux (1996). We use a non-parametric reweighting appro...

  10. First overview on chronic injuries in sport climbing: proposal for a change in reporting of injuries in climbing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grønhaug, Gudmund; Norberg, Marius

    2016-01-01

    Climbing as a youth sport is growing fast. This is mostly due to indoor walls for training attracting youngsters. With hard training from young ages it is vital to be able to pinpoint training regimes to avoid injuries in athletes. Furthermore, it is vital to know what injuries are most common in the sport to be able to prevent them. Such an overview on injuries does not exist to date. The aim of this overview is to summon the injuries described in published research and to extract the most common. Two literature searches were conducted in PubMed, on 11 August 2013 and 19 August 2015. The searches gave 1409 titles. All titles were carefully examined for the possible finding of descriptions of climbing-related chronic injuries. This led to the reading of 96 abstracts and then to a final inclusion of 47 papers of which 17 described chronic climbing-related injuries. We found descriptions of 45 chronic injuries in those 17 papers. Owing to methodological differences, lack of reporting strategies and non-use of control groups in the included papers, it is not possible to conclude on which groups of climbers are more prone to injuries or to state which injuries are the most prevalent among climbers.

  11. Efficacy of pre-ascent climbing route visual inspection in indoor sport climbing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, X; Lambert, Ph; Jones, G; Llewellyn, D J

    2012-02-01

    Pre-ascent climbing route visual inspection (route preview) has been suggested as a key climbing performance parameter although its role has never been verified experimentally. We examined the efficacy of this perceptual-cognitive skill on indoor sport climbing performance. Twenty-nine male climbers, divided into intermediate, advanced and expert climbing level groups, climbed two indoor sport routes matching their climbing level and, where applicable, routes below their climbing level. At each level, one route was climbed with a preview, where participants benefited from a 3-min pre-ascent climbing route visual inspection. Performance was assessed in terms of output (route completion) and form (number and duration of moves and stops). Route preview did not influence the output performance. Climbers using visual inspection were no more likely to finish the ascent than those without the option of using visual inspection. Conversely, route preview did influence form performance; climbers made fewer, and shorter stops during their ascent following a preview of the route. Form performances differences remained when baseline ability levels were taken into account, although for shorter duration of stops only with expert climbers benefiting most from route preview. The ability to visually inspect a climb before its ascent may represent an essential component of performance optimization. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  12. Indoor rock climbing: who gets injured?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, D; Royle, T; Marshall, T

    2001-01-01

    Objectives—To determine the frequency of overuse injury in indoor climbers, the common sites of such injury, and the factors that influence the probability that a climber will have sustained an overuse injury while climbing indoors. Method—A semisupervised questionnaire was used to survey overuse injury in 295 spectators and competitors at the Entre-Prises World Climbing Championships held in Birmingham 3–5 December 1999. Statistical analysis included simple cross tabulations, calculation of odds ratios, and multiple logistic regression to explore the effect of several factors simultaneously. Results—Some 44% of respondents had sustained an overuse injury, 19% at more than one site. The most common site of injury was the fingers. Univariate analysis showed that the probability of having sustained a climbing injury is higher in men (p = 0.009), those who have climbed for more than 10 years (p = 0.006), those who climb harder routes (pclimbing injury is linear. Multivariate analysis removed the effect of sex as an independent predictor. Conclusions—Many climbers sustain overuse injury. The most at risk are those with the most ability and dedication to climbing. Climbers should be aware of the risk factors that influence injury and be able to spot the signs and symptoms of injury once they occur. Key Words: rock climbing; overuse injury; pulley tendon PMID:11375878

  13. A prospective study of rock climbing injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, J P; McNaughton, G W; Grant, P T

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study the rate, causes, and nature of rock climbing injuries presenting to an accident and emergency (A&E) department. METHODS: Patients presenting with rock climbing injuries to an urban A&E department were studied prospectively for one year. RESULTS: 19 rock climbers presented during the year, at a rate of one per 2774 A&E attendances. Fourteen climbers were injured on outdoor cliffs and five on the local indoor climbing wall, where the safety mats were noted to be in poor condition. Eighteen climbers had been injured during falls, 17 hitting the ground. Twelve of these climbers sustained fractures, four of which were missed on initial attendance. The remaining climber sustained the characteristic A2 pulley finger injury, which was treated conservatively with a good result. CONCLUSIONS: The risks of rock climbing in Britain would be reduced if lead climbers arranged protection at earlier stages of climbs. Sports centres with climbing walls should regularly inspect and repair their safety equipment. It is important for staff in A&E departments to appreciate the large forces involved in any climbing fall, in order that significant injuries are not missed. Those treating injured climbers should also be aware of the specific injuries to which elite climbers are predisposed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8799601

  14. Effects of Sport Climbing on Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steimer, Julia; Weissert, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune and neurodegenerative disease of the central nervous system (CNS) with different types of disease courses (relapsing-remitting, secondary-progressive, primary progressive) that leads to physical as well as mental disability. The symptoms comprise paresis or/and paralysis, ataxia, bladder dysfunction, visual problems as well as effects on cognition. There is limited data regarding the possible effects of sport climbing respectively therapeutic climbing on patients with MS. Sport climbing offers many potentially beneficial effects for patients with MS since there are effects on coordination, muscular strength, and cognition to name the most relevant ones. Also, disease models in rodents point toward such positive outcomes of climbing. Therefore, we assessed the currently available research literature on general effects of physical exercise, impact of climbing on body and mind and therapeutic climbing for prevention or therapy for the treatment of MS. The sparse published controlled trials that investigated this sport activity on different groups of patients with neurological or geriatric diseases grossly differ in study design and outcome parameters. Nevertheless, it appears that climbing offers the opportunity to improve some of the symptoms of patients with MS and can contribute to an enhanced quality of life.

  15. Do Students Expect Compensation for Wage Risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweri, Juerg; Hartog, Joop; Wolter, Stefan C.

    2011-01-01

    We use a unique data set about the wage distribution that Swiss students expect for themselves ex ante, deriving parametric and non-parametric measures to capture expected wage risk. These wage risk measures are unfettered by heterogeneity which handicapped the use of actual market wage dispersion as risk measure in earlier studies. Students in…

  16. 29 CFR 779.17 - Wage and wage payments to tipped employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Wage and wage payments to tipped employees. 779.17 Section 779.17 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... ACT AS APPLIED TO RETAILERS OF GOODS OR SERVICES General Some Basic Definitions § 779.17 Wage and wage...

  17. 29 CFR 4.168 - Wage payments-deductions from wages paid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Wage payments-deductions from wages paid. 4.168 Section 4... Standards Compliance with Compensation Standards § 4.168 Wage payments—deductions from wages paid. (a) The wage requirements of the Act will not be met where unauthorized deductions, rebates, or refunds reduce...

  18. 49 CFR 238.407 - Anti-climbing mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Anti-climbing mechanism. 238.407 Section 238.407... Equipment § 238.407 Anti-climbing mechanism. (a) Each power car shall have an anti-climbing mechanism at its... before the anti-climbing mechanism fully engages. (b) Interior train coupling points between units...

  19. A multisector model of efficiency wages

    OpenAIRE

    Walsh, Frank

    1999-01-01

    The pattern of effort and wages is derived in a multisector efficiency wage model. Firms choose effort endogenously. Easily monitored or low-turnover jobs have high effort and may have low wages in equilibrium. Empirical wage differentials from a measure of supervision are smaller than observed industry differentials that have been attributed to efficiency wage models and are closer to those predicted by the model. Workers can search for and avail of on-the-job offers. If sectors grow at diff...

  20. The wage transition in developed countries and its implications for China

    CERN Document Server

    Baaquie, Belal; Wang, Qinghai

    2016-01-01

    The expression "wage transition" refers to the fact that over the past two or three decades in all developed economies wage increases have levelled off. There has been a widening divergence and decoupling between wages on the one hand and GDP per capita on the other hand. Yet, in China wages and GDP per capita climbed in sync (at least up to now). In the first part of the paper we present comparative statistical evidence which measures the extent of the wage transition effect. In a second part we consider the reasons of this phenomenon, in particular we explain how the transfers of labor from low productivity sectors (such as agriculture) to high productivity sectors (such as manufacturing) are the driver of productivity growth, particularly through their synergetic effects. Although rural flight represents only one of these effects, it is certainly the most visible because of the geographical relocation that it implies; it is also the most well-defined statistically. Moreover, it will be seen that it is a go...

  1. Wages, Amenities and Negative Attitudes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waisman, Gisela; Larsen, Birthe

    We exploit the regional variation in negative attitudes towards immigrants to Sweden in order to analyse the consequences of the attitudes on immigrants welfare. We find that attitudes towards immigrants are of importance: they both affect their labour market outcomes and their quality of life. W...... interpret the negative effect on wages as evidence of labour market discrimination. We estimate the welfare effects of negative attitudes, through their wage and local amenities, for immigrants with different levels of skills, origin, gender and age....

  2. Wages and Higher Education Participation

    OpenAIRE

    Eleftheriou, Konstantinos; Athanasiou, George; Petrakis, Panagiotis

    2009-01-01

    The paper develops a model for the screening mechanism for higher education, within an adverse selection framework. Specifically it examines the effect of wage earned by high school graduates on higher education participation. The model pinpoints a positive relation between the “high school” wage and the number of candidates entered in higher education with positive influences on the quality of selection mechanism. An empirical examination is conducted, using U.S. data, in order to investigat...

  3. PSYCHOPHYSICAL BENEFITS OF ROCK-CLIMBING ACTIVITY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallotta, Maria Chiara; Emerenziani, Gian Pietro; Monteiro, Maria Dolores; Iasevoli, Luigi; Iazzoni, Sara; Baldari, Carlo; Guidetti, Laura

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the psychophysical effects of rock climbing with a supervised fitness training in adults. Thirty-three healthy participants (M age=32 yr., SD=7) participated in rock climbing or in fitness training. The participants' functional fitness, anxiety, and mood states were tested before and after 3 mo. of training. There was significant improvement of physical fitness in both groups after the intervention period. Anxiety significantly decreased after each single training session at the end of both courses. Differential effects in the rock-climbing group, as compared to the fitness group, emerged only on Vigor. Specifically, the rock-climbing group showed a decreasing trend in Vigor while the fitness group showed an increasing trend of Vigor after the intervention.

  4. Indoor rock climbing: who gets injured?

    OpenAIRE

    Wright, D; Royle, T; Marshall, T

    2001-01-01

    Objectives—To determine the frequency of overuse injury in indoor climbers, the common sites of such injury, and the factors that influence the probability that a climber will have sustained an overuse injury while climbing indoors.

  5. Control of a stair climbing wheelchair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nor Maniha Abdul Ghani

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents investigations into the control of a stair climbing wheelchair particularly for indoor usage. A virtual wheelchair model is developed using Visual Nastran software and linked with Matlab/Simulink for control purposes. The goals are to have a simple, compact and stable stairs climbing wheelchair in order to complete the ascending and descending tasks. The challenges are to ensure the wheelchair seat always stay at the upright position and to control both the front and rear wheel motors while climbing. PID control is used to provide appropriate torque to both front and rear wheels as well as at to the wheelchair seat during climbing. Results show that the wheelchair movement can be controlled smoothly and the seat maintained at the desired position with the adapted approach.

  6. The behavioural ecology of climbing plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianoli, Ernesto

    2015-02-12

    Climbing plants require an external support to grow vertically and enhance light acquisition. Vines that find a suitable support have greater performance and fitness than those that remain prostrate. Therefore, the location of a suitable support is a key process in the life history of climbing plants. Numerous studies on climbing plant behaviour have elucidated mechanistic details of support searching and attachment. Far fewer studies have addressed the ecological significance of support-finding behaviour and the factors that affect it. Without this knowledge, little progress can be made in the understanding of the evolution of support-finding behaviour in climbers. Here I review studies addressing ecological causes and consequences of support finding and use by climbing plants. I also propose the use of behavioural ecology theoretical frameworks to study climbing plant behaviour. I show how host tree attributes may determine the probability of successful colonization for the different types of climbers, and examine the evidence of environmental and genetic control of circumnutation behaviour and phenotypic responses to support availability. Cases of oriented vine growth towards supports are highlighted. I discuss functional responses of vines to the interplay between herbivory and support availability under different abiotic environments, illustrating with one study case how results comply with a theoretical framework of behavioural ecology originally conceived for animals. I conclude stressing that climbing plants are suitable study subjects for the application of behavioural-ecological theory. Further research under this framework should aim at characterizing the different stages of the support-finding process in terms of their fit with the different climbing modes and environmental settings. In particular, cost-benefit analysis of climbing plant behaviour should be helpful to infer the selective pressures that have operated to shape current climber ecological

  7. Can the Introduction of a Minimum Wage in FYR Macedonia Decrease the Gender Wage Gap?

    OpenAIRE

    Angel-Urdinola, Diego F.

    2008-01-01

    This paper relies on a simple framework to understand the gender wage gap in Macedonia, and simulates how the gender wage gap would behave after the introduction of a minimum wage. First, it presents a new - albeit simple - decomposition of the wage gap into three factors: (i) a wage level factor, which measures the extent to which the gender gap is driven by differences in wage levels amo...

  8. Injury risk evaluation in sport climbing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhof, A; Hennig, F F; Schöffl, I; Schöffl, V

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify and rate acute sport climbing injuries. Acute sport climbing injuries occurring from 2002 to 2006 were retrospectively assessed with a standardized web based questionnaire. A total number of 1962 climbers reported 699 injuries, which is equivalent to 0.2 injuries per 1 000 h of sport participation. Most (74.4%) of the injuries were of minor severity rated NACA I or NACA II. Injury distribution between the upper (42.6%) and lower extremities (41.3%) was similar, with ligament injuries, contusions and fractures being the most common injury types. Years of climbing experience (pclimbing time per week during summer (pclimbing experience (pclimbing level (pclimbing was lower than in previous studies on general rock climbing and higher than in studies on indoor climbing. In order to perform inter-study comparisons of future studies on climbing injuries, the use of a systematic and standardized scoring system (UIAA score) is essential. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Indoor rock climbing: who gets injured?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, D M; Royle, T J; Marshall, T

    2001-06-01

    To determine the frequency of overuse injury in indoor climbers, the common sites of such injury, and the factors that influence the probability that a climber will have sustained an overuse injury while climbing indoors. A semisupervised questionnaire was used to survey overuse injury in 295 spectators and competitors at the Entre-Prises World Climbing Championships held in Birmingham 3-5 December 1999. Statistical analysis included simple cross tabulations, calculation of odds ratios, and multiple logistic regression to explore the effect of several factors simultaneously. Some 44% of respondents had sustained an overuse injury, 19% at more than one site. The most common site of injury was the fingers. Univariate analysis showed that the probability of having sustained a climbing injury is higher in men (p = 0.009), those who have climbed for more than 10 years (p = 0.006), those who climb harder routes (pclimbing injury is linear. Multivariate analysis removed the effect of sex as an independent predictor. Many climbers sustain overuse injury. The most at risk are those with the most ability and dedication to climbing. Climbers should be aware of the risk factors that influence injury and be able to spot the signs and symptoms of injury once they occur.

  10. Migration and the Wage-Settings Curve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brücker, Herbert; Jahn, Elke

    Germany on basis of a wage-setting curve. The wage-setting curve relies on the assumption that wages respond to a hange in the unemployment rate, albeit imperfectly. This allows one to derive the wage and employment effects of migration simultaneously in a general equilibrium framework. Using...... administrative micro data we find that the elasticity of the wage-setting curve is particularly high for young workers and workers with an university degree, while it is low for older workers and workers with a vocational degree. The wage and employment effects of migration are moderate: a 1 percent increase...

  11. Manufacturing real wages in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia López V

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we analyse the recent evolution and determinants of real wages in Mexico’s manufacturing sector, using theories based on the assumption of imperfect competition both in the product and in the labour markets, especially wage-bargain theory, insider-outsider and mark-up models. We show evidence that the Mexican labour market does not behave as a traditional competitive market. The proposed explanation for this fact is that some workers benefit from advantages when compared with others, so that they can get a greater share of the proceedings of the productive process. Also, we find that changes in the degree of competition in the market for output influence the behaviour of real wages.

  12. Adaptive Trajectory Prediction Algorithm for Climbing Flights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Charles Alexander; Thipphavong, David P.; Erzberger, Heinz

    2012-01-01

    Aircraft climb trajectories are difficult to predict, and large errors in these predictions reduce the potential operational benefits of some advanced features for NextGen. The algorithm described in this paper improves climb trajectory prediction accuracy by adjusting trajectory predictions based on observed track data. It utilizes rate-of-climb and airspeed measurements derived from position data to dynamically adjust the aircraft weight modeled for trajectory predictions. In simulations with weight uncertainty, the algorithm is able to adapt to within 3 percent of the actual gross weight within two minutes of the initial adaptation. The root-mean-square of altitude errors for five-minute predictions was reduced by 73 percent. Conflict detection performance also improved, with a 15 percent reduction in missed alerts and a 10 percent reduction in false alerts. In a simulation with climb speed capture intent and weight uncertainty, the algorithm improved climb trajectory prediction accuracy by up to 30 percent and conflict detection performance, reducing missed and false alerts by up to 10 percent.

  13. Hand Injury in Rock Climbing: Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzi, A; Pivato, G; Pegoli, L

    2016-02-01

    With the amazing increasing in number of participants, rock climbing has become a popular sport in the last decade. A growing number of participants, with different skill level, inevitably leads to an increased number of injuries related to this practice. The kind of lesions that can be observed in rock-climbers is very specific and often involves the hand. For this reason is very important for any hand surgeon that is exposed to sport injuries to know which and the most common injuries related to this sport and which are the basic principles for the treatment of those. The aim of this article is to review the literature that has been published in the last ten year in this topic. On the NCBI database 22 articles where found that where related to rock climbing lesion affecting the hand or the whole body. Differences where found according to kind of rock climbing activity that was analyzed, alpine climb leads to more serious injuries, often affecting the lower limb, while in sport and recreational rock climbing the upper limb and the hand are definitely the most affected parts. Flexor pulley lesions, followed by fractures and strains are the most common lesions affecting the hand that are related to this practice.

  14. Occupational Experience, Mobility, and Wages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groes, Fane

    In this paper we present how occupational tenure relates to wage growth and occupational mobility in Danish data. We show that the Danish data produces qualitatively similar results as found in U.S. data with respect to an increase in average wages when experience in an occupation increases. In a...... also is true for workers switching occupation and rm. After ve years of experience in an occupation the average probability of switching any type of occupation, including occupation and rm switches, has fallen from 25% to 12%....

  15. "Explaining the Gender Wage Gap in Georgia"

    OpenAIRE

    Khitarishvili, Tamar

    2009-01-01

    This paper evaluates gender wage differentials in Georgia between 2000 and 2004. Using ordinary least squares, we find that the gender wage gap in Georgia is substantially higher than in other transition countries. Correcting for sample selection bias using the Heckman approach further increases the gender wage gap. The Blinder Oaxaca decomposition results suggest that most of the wage gap remains unexplained. The explained portion of the gap is almost entirely attributed to industrial variab...

  16. The Early Career Gender Wage Gap

    OpenAIRE

    Sami Napari

    2006-01-01

    In Finland the gender wage gap increases significantly during the first 10 years after labor market entry accounting most of the life-time increase in the gender wage gap. This paper focuses on the early career gender wage differences among university graduates and considers several explanations for the gender wage gap based on the human capital theory, job mobility and labor market segregation. Gender differences in the accumulation of experience and in the type of education explain about 16...

  17. Rising wage inequality, the decline of collective bargaining, and the gender wage gap

    OpenAIRE

    Antonczyk, Dirk; Fitzenberger, Bernd; Sommerfeld, Katrin

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates the increase in wage inequality, the decline in collective bargaining, and the development of the gender wage gap in West Germany between 2001 and 2006. Based on detailed linked employer-employee data, we show that wage inequality is rising strongly – driven not only by real wage increases at the top of the wage distribution, but also by real wage losses below the median. Coverage by collective wage bargaining plummets by 16.5 (19.1) percentage points for male (female)...

  18. Age, wage and productivity in Dutch manufacturing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ours, J.C.; Stoeldraijer, L.

    2011-01-01

    Previous empirical studies on the effect of age on productivity and wages find contradicting results. Some studies find that if workers grow older there is an increasing gap between productivity and wages, i.e. wages increase with age while productivity does not or does not increase at the same

  19. Do Some Workers Have Minimum Wage Careers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrington, William J.; Fallick, Bruce C.

    2001-01-01

    Most workers who begin their careers in minimum-wage jobs eventually gain more experience and move on to higher paying jobs. However, more than 8% of workers spend at least half of their first 10 working years in minimum wage jobs. Those more likely to have minimum wage careers are less educated, minorities, women with young children, and those…

  20. Does the Minimum Wage Affect Welfare Caseloads?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Marianne E.; Spetz, Joanne; Millar, Jane

    2005-01-01

    Although minimum wages are advocated as a policy that will help the poor, few studies have examined their effect on poor families. This paper uses variation in minimum wages across states and over time to estimate the impact of minimum wage legislation on welfare caseloads. We find that the elasticity of the welfare caseload with respect to the…

  1. Understanding the Minimum Wage: Issues and Answers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Employment Policies Inst. Foundation, Washington, DC.

    This booklet, which is designed to clarify facts regarding the minimum wage's impact on marketplace economics, contains a total of 31 questions and answers pertaining to the following topics: relationship between minimum wages and poverty; impacts of changes in the minimum wage on welfare reform; and possible effects of changes in the minimum wage…

  2. Wage Setting in Democratic Labour Unions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filges, Trine

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, we analyse the wage setting of a democratic labour union. The union members differ with respect to their employment probabilities. The union wage only changes if the parameters of the median member change. An exogenous shock to revenue may increase the wage, even if labour demand...

  3. Climbing therapy under PK-tailored prophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stemberger, M; Schmit, E; Czepa, D; Kurnik, K; Spannagl, M

    2014-01-01

    Climbing has a low risk of injury and strengthens the entire musculature. Due to its benefits in physical and mental health as well as its high fun factor climbing is an established way of therapy. So far, the usefulness of climbing therapy has not been shown for people with haemophilia (PWH). A crucial requirement for physical activity in PWH is regular prophylaxis. As the patient's individual pharmacokinetic (PK) response varies significantly, PK-tailored prophylaxis may decrease bleeding frequency. We describe a man (age 25 years) with severe haemophilia A who took part in an 8.5-month weekly climbing program under PK-tailored prophylaxis. Bleeding frequency, factor consumption, joint health (Haemophilia Joint Health Score, HJHS), quality of life (Haemo-QoL-A) and climbing performance (UIAA scale) were assessed before and after the training. Prior to the study, the patient was on demand treatment. The patient was started on standard prophylaxis for a 2 months period and then observed for 6.5 months under PK-tailored prophylaxis. PK-tailored prophylaxis was targeted to a trough level of 1-3%. For high-impact activities a factor activity >15%, for low-impact activities a factor activity >5% was suggested. Climbing therapy was safe. The bleeding rate decreased from 14 (2012) to 1 (during the study period of 8.5 months). The one bleeding event was due to a missed infusion and was not triggered by physical activity. The elimination half-life using Bayesian statistics was determined to be 16h. Using this half-life for PK-tailored prophylaxis reduced the factor VIII consumption in comparison to standard prophylaxis. Joint health was particularly improved in the categories range of motion and swelling. Quality of life scores stayed at a high level. Climbing performance improved by 1 grade. The combination of PK-tailored prophylaxis with therapeutic climbing improved clinical outcome in this young adult with severe haemophilia. The tailored concept for high- and low

  4. Artificial Rock Climbing Walls--Innovative Adventure Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attarian, Aram

    1989-01-01

    The history, advantages, and disadvantages of artificial rock climbing walls (used to instruct individuals in the sport of rock climbing) are discussed. Additional topics include designing an artificial wall, types of walls, various uses, and risk management. (IAH)

  5. Prediction of indoor climbing performance in women rock climbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Christopher B; Starek, Joanna E; Fleck, Steven J; Byrnes, William C

    2004-02-01

    In an attempt to more clearly understand the strength characteristics of female rock climbers and whether those variables affect and predict climbing performance, 2 indoor climbing performance tests (route and bouldering) were compared to a series of muscular strength tests performed by moderate (n = 6), intermediate (n = 6), and expert (n = 6) female rock climbers. Significant differences (p climbing specific hand strength, as well as 1-arm lock-off strength when expressed as a strength-to-weight ratio. Multiple correlations showed that these variables (r > 0.426) as well as a questionnaire of past climbing performance (r > 0.86) significantly correlated to the tests of indoor climbing performance. In conclusion, climbing-specific tests of hand strength and of one arm lock-off strength reliably and sensitively measured 2 significant variables in the performance of indoor rock climbing, and a questionnaire of past best performance may be an accurate tool for the prediction of indoor climbing performance.

  6. Foreign Acquisition, Wages and Productivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandick, Roger

    2011-01-01

    This paper studies the effect of foreign acquisition on wages and total factor productivity (TFP) in the years following a takeover by using unique detailed firm-level data for Sweden for the period 1993-2002. The paper takes particular account of the potential endogeneity of the acquisition...

  7. Foreign Acquisition, Wages and Productivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandick, Roger

    This paper studies the effect of foreign acquisition on wages and total factor productivity (TFP) in the years following a takeover by using unique detailed firm-level data for Sweden for the period 1993-2002. The paper takes particular account of the potential endogeneity of the acquisition...

  8. Waging Peace in Our Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantieri, Linda; Patti, Janet

    1996-01-01

    Describes a program that seeks to change the values and culture of the school by combining the teaching of social and emotional skills with training in conflict resolution and diversity issues. Provides examples of how to "wage peace" in the schools and gives examples of advancements made through program efforts. (RJM)

  9. Finding Wage and Salary Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Suzanne M.; Petruzzi, Heidi Ann

    1995-01-01

    Identifies sources for assisting patrons with occupational and industrial wage queries. Discusses books, vocational guides, indexes, trade associations, trade unions, commercial services, government publications and agencies, journals, universities and research centers, and online sources, and also provides a list of sources. (AEF)

  10. Employee benefits or wage increase?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Duda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper comes from a survey done during the years 2007–2009. It focused on employee satisfaction with the provision of employee benefits. The research included 21 companies, 7 companies were from the engineering sector, 7 companies from the food industry, 3 companies represented the budgetary sphere, 3 companies the services sector and one company operates in pharmaceutical industry.The questionnaire survey consisted of 14 questions, including 5 identification-questions. The paper presents results of the questions on dealing with employees’ awareness of employee benefits and on choosing between employees’ preferences of wage increase or increase in value of benefits provided.Employees are informed about all options of providing employee benefits. Only in 3 cases employees stated dissatisfaction with information. This answer was related with the responses to the second monitored question. Employees of these companies preferred pay increases before benefits’ increases. There was no effect of gender of the respondents, neither the influence of the sector of operation, in the preference of increases in wages or in benefits. Exceptions were the employees of companies operating in the financial sector, who preferred employee benefits before a wage increase. It was found that employees of companies who participated in research in 2009, preferred wage increases before the extension of employee benefits, although the value of the net wage increase is lower than the monetary value of benefits increase.The paper is a part of solution of the research plan MSM 6215648904 The Czech economy in the process of integration and globalization, and the development of agricultural sector and the sector of services under the new conditions of the integrated European market.

  11. Estimating the effects of wages on obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, DaeHwan; Leigh, John Paul

    2010-05-01

    To estimate the effects of wages on obesity and body mass. Data on household heads, aged 20 to 65 years, with full-time jobs, were drawn from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics for 2003 to 2007. The Panel Study of Income Dynamics is a nationally representative sample. Instrumental variables (IV) for wages were created using knowledge of computer software and state legal minimum wages. Least squares (linear regression) with corrected standard errors were used to estimate the equations. Statistical tests revealed both instruments were strong and tests for over-identifying restrictions were favorable. Wages were found to be predictive (P low wages increase obesity prevalence and body mass.

  12. Education and Wages of Vocational Training Graduates

    OpenAIRE

    González Betancor, Sara M.; C. Delia Dávila Quintana; José A. Gil Jurado

    2005-01-01

    This paper attempts to explain individual variation in wages by estimating different wage equations. The study has two goals: first, to analyze the effect of years of schooling on the wages of vocational training graduates using a more precise measure for schooling than that commonly used in wage equations; and second, to analyze the effect on these wages of the match or mismatch between the knowledge and the skills acquired in the schooling and the needs of the job. The analysis shows that k...

  13. Coordination in Climbing: Effect of Skill, Practice and Constraints Manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, Dominic; Davids, Keith; Seifert, Ludovic

    2016-02-01

    Climbing is a physical activity and sport involving many subdisciplines. Minimization of prolonged pauses, use of a relatively simple path through a route and smooth transitions between movements broadly define skilled coordination in climbing. To provide an overview of the constraints on skilled coordination in climbing and to explore future directions in this emerging field. A systematic literature review was conducted in 2014 and retrieved studies reporting perceptual and movement data during climbing tasks. To be eligible for the qualitative synthesis, studies were required to report perceptual or movement data during climbing tasks graded for difficulty. Qualitative synthesis of 42 studies was carried out, showing that skilled coordination in climbing is underpinned by superior perception of climbing opportunities; optimization of spatial-temporal features pertaining to body-to-wall coordination, the climb trajectory and hand-to-hold surface contact; and minimization of exploratory behaviour. Improvements in skilled coordination due to practice are related to task novelty and the difficulty of the climbing route relative to the individual's ability level. Perceptual and motor adaptations that improve skilled coordination are highly significant for improving the climbing ability level. Elite climbers exhibit advantages in detection and use of climbing opportunities when visually inspecting a route from the ground and when physically moving though a route. However, the need to provide clear guidelines on how to improve climbing skill arises from uncertainties regarding the impacts of different practice interventions on learning and transfer.

  14. 49 CFR 238.205 - Anti-climbing mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Anti-climbing mechanism. 238.205 Section 238.205... Equipment § 238.205 Anti-climbing mechanism. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, all..., 2010, shall have at both the forward and rear ends an anti-climbing mechanism capable of resisting an...

  15. 21 CFR 890.3890 - Stair-climbing wheelchair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Stair-climbing wheelchair. 890.3890 Section 890...) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3890 Stair-climbing wheelchair. (a) Identification. A stair-climbing wheelchair is a device with wheels that is intended for...

  16. Understanding the City Size Wage Gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum-Snow, Nathaniel; Pavan, Ronni

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we decompose city size wage premia into various components. We base these decompositions on an estimated on-the-job search model that incorporates latent ability, search frictions, firm-worker match quality, human capital accumulation and endogenous migration between large, medium and small cities. Counterfactual simulations of the model indicate that variation in returns to experience and differences in wage intercepts across location type are the most important mechanisms contributing to observed city size wage premia. Variation in returns to experience is more important for generating wage premia between large and small locations while differences in wage intercepts are more important for generating wage premia betwen medium and small locations. Sorting on unobserved ability within education group and differences in labor market search frictions and distributions of firm-worker match quality contribute little to observed city size wage premia. These conclusions hold for separate samples of high school and college graduates.

  17. Psychophysiological possibility of mountaineers and climbers specializing in speed climbing and climbing difficulty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zh.L. Kozina

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was comparative characterization of psycho-physiological features of elite athletes the representatives of the climbing on the complexity, speed and climbers. The study included 26 elite athletes (age 19-22 years. It is shown that athletes much more accurately reproduce a time interval of 30 seconds, compared with a time interval of 1 minute. Revealed that the climbers (climbing speed and in some cases, climbers (climbing difficultyshow significantly better results on tests of reaction rate under difficult conditions. Found higher rates of mobility and strength of nervous processes in rock climbers compared with climbers. This fact is related to the specific training and competitive activities of climbing, which requires a global concentration or under conditions of maximum circa power voltage.

  18. Comparative analysis of trunk muscle activities in climbing of during upright climbing at different inclination angles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Byung-Joon; Kim, Joong-Hwi; Kim, Jang-Hwan; Choi, Byeong-Ho

    2015-10-01

    [Purpose] This study was performed to provide evidence for the therapeutic exercise approach through a compative analysis of muscle activities according to climbing wall inclination. [Subjects and Methods] Twentyfour healthy adult subjects without climbing experience performed static exercises at a therapeutic climbing at with various inclination angles (0°, 10°, 20°), and the activities of the trunk muscles (rectus abdominis, obliquus externus abdominis, obliquus internus abdominis, erector spinae) were measured using surface electromyography (EMG) for 7 seconds. [Results] Significant differences were found between the inclination angles of 10° and 0°, as well as 20° in the rectus abdominis, obliquus internus abdominis, right obliquus externus abdominis, and right erector spinae. [Conclusion] Based on measurements of trunk muscle activity in a static climbing standing position at different angles, significant changes in muscle activity appear to be induced at 10 degrees. Therefore, the results appear to provide clinically relevant evidence.

  19. Climbing plants: attachment adaptations and bioinspired innovations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burris, Jason N; Lenaghan, Scott C; Stewart, C Neal

    2017-11-29

    Climbing plants have unique adaptations to enable them to compete for sunlight, for which they invest minimal resources for vertical growth. Indeed, their stems bear relatively little weight, as they traverse their host substrates skyward. Climbers possess high tensile strength and flexibility, which allows them to utilize natural and manmade structures for support and growth. The climbing strategies of plants have intrigued scientists for centuries, yet our understanding about biochemical adaptations and their molecular undergirding is still in the early stages of research. Nonetheless, recent discoveries are promising, not only from a basic knowledge perspective, but also for bioinspired product development. Several adaptations, including nanoparticle and adhesive production will be reviewed, as well as practical translation of these adaptations to commercial applications. We will review the botanical literature on the modes of adaptation to climb, as well as specialized organs-and cellular innovations. Finally, recent molecular and biochemical data will be reviewed to assess the future needs and new directions for potential practical products that may be bioinspired by climbing plants.

  20. Getting Off the Ground with Rock Climbing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamee, Jeff; Steffen, Jeff

    2001-01-01

    Describes how to teach rock climbing to elementary school students using balance dome cones, which are small, cylindrical- shaped cones that are rounded at the top, seven inches in diameter, and four inches high. Students step on the cones as they explore and discover their balance limits in various unnatural movement positions. Individual and…

  1. [Accident statistics at "indoor climbing walls"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöffl, V; Winkelmann, H P

    1999-03-01

    During a period of 6 month the risk of significant injuries on indoor climbing walls was survived. A total of 25,163 visitors were registrated at the 10 walls. Overall only 4 significant injuries were found, the injury-risk per visit was 0.016%.

  2. The tree-climbing crabs of Trinidad

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hagen, von Heinrich-Otto

    1977-01-01

    An annotated list of the brachyuran (12) and anomuran (1) tree-climbing crabs of Trinidad (West Indies) is presented (see Table 1 for species names). Some of the species mentioned (e.g. Aratus pisonii, Goniopsis cruentata) are well-known treeclimbers, in others (e.g. Sesarma roberti, S. ricordi)

  3. Nonlinear Wage Responses to Internal and External Factors

    OpenAIRE

    Johansen, Kåre

    2002-01-01

    The paper tests whether or not the effects on sectoral wages of internal and external factors depend upon the sector’s relative wage position. The key hypothesis is that workers in low—wage sectors are more concerned with relative wages than workers in high wage sectors. To test the hypothesis, we make use of panel data and formulate a smooth transition regression model including relative wages as the transition variable. The empirical results provide strong evidence of nonlinear wage respons...

  4. Kinematic and Dynamic Analysis of a Cable-Climbing Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Fengyu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available To inspect broken cables or a cracked protective layer on cable-stayed bridges, a cable-climbing robot has been proposed and designed. In this paper, the complex 3D obstacles that may be encountered on cables are theoretically described, in order to investigate the obstacle-climbing capability of the cable-climbing robot. A climbing model is then proposed and used to design the robot. In the climbing model, two driven wheels are independently supported with a spring. Kinematics and dynamics models are further derived for the obstacle-climbing capabilities of the driving and driven wheels of the robot. In addition, the robot's obstacle-climbing tracks and its obstacle-climbing performance are simulated. Payload and obstacle-climbing experiments were conducted on the climbing robot in the laboratory. Based on the results of the simulation and the experiments, we obtained the variation of the driving torque in obstacle climbing. The contribution of this paper is intended to provide a basis for the precise motion control of the robot.

  5. Real and Money Wage Rates

    OpenAIRE

    John T. Dunlop

    1998-01-01

    In the General Theory, John Maynard Keynes held money and real wage rates move in opposite directions. In expansion, prices increase faster because of increasing costs and a rise in the proportion of product going to profits. Neoclassical economists held similarly. Money illusion of workers supported their common view. The author's 1938 article rather showed a procyclical pattern, significant to macroeconomic models of the economy. Contemporary literature with new elements of compensation and...

  6. Dust exposure in indoor climbing halls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinbruch, Stephan; Dirsch, Thomas; Ebert, Martin; Hofmann, Heiko; Kandler, Konrad

    2008-05-01

    The use of hydrated magnesium carbonate hydroxide (magnesia alba) for drying the hands is a strong source for particulate matter in indoor climbing halls. Particle mass concentrations (PM10, PM2.5 and PM1) were measured with an optical particle counter in 9 indoor climbing halls and in 5 sports halls. Mean values for PM10 in indoor climbing halls are generally on the order of 200-500 microg m(-3). For periods of high activity, which last for several hours, PM10 values between 1000 and 4000 microg m(-3) were observed. PM(2.5) is on the order of 30-100 microg m(-3) and reaches values up to 500 microg m(-3), if many users are present. In sports halls, the mass concentrations are usually much lower (PM10 indoor climbing were observed. The size distribution and the total particle number concentration (3.7 nm-10 microm electrical mobility diameter) were determined in one climbing hall by an electrical aerosol spectrometer. The highest number concentrations were between 8000 and 12 000 cm(-3), indicating that the use of magnesia alba is no strong source for ultrafine particles. Scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis revealed that virtually all particles are hydrated magnesium carbonate hydroxide. In-situ experiments in an environmental scanning electron microscope showed that the particles do not dissolve at relative humidities up to 100%. Thus, it is concluded that solid particles of magnesia alba are airborne and have the potential to deposit in the human respiratory tract. The particle mass concentrations in indoor climbing halls are much higher than those reported for schools and reach, in many cases, levels which are observed for industrial occupations. The observed dust concentrations are below the current occupational exposure limits in Germany of 3 and 10 mg m(-3) for respirable and inhalable dust. However, the dust concentrations exceed the German guide lines for work places without use of hazardous substances. In addition

  7. Where the Minimum Wage Bites Hard: the Introduction of the UK National Minimum Wage to a Low Wage Sector

    OpenAIRE

    Stephen Machin; Alan Manning; Lupin Rahman

    2002-01-01

    Between 1993 and April 1999 there was no minimum wage in the United Kingdom (except in agriculture). In this paper we study the effects of the introduction of a National Minimum Wage (NMW) in April 1999 on one heavily affected sector, the residential care homes industry. This sector contains a large number of low paid workers and as such can be viewed as being very vulnerable to minimum wage legislation. We look at the impact on both wages and employment. Our results suggest that the minimum ...

  8. DAILY WAGES COMPARISON FOR WAGE EMPLOYEES IN THE PUBLIC AND PRIVATE SECTORS IN PALESTINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed SALAMA

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the daily wages of employees in the public and private sectors in Palestine. Based on the Palestinian Central Bureau of Statistics (PCBS labour force survey, the author used a paired samples t-test to examine the difference in wages among the public sector, private sector, and Israel and the settlements between 2000 and 2015. The results show that the maximum wages are among the workers who work in Israel and the settlements. The wages in the public sector have become slightly higher than the wages in the private sector since 2005. The daily wages of wage employees in Israel and the settlements are significantly different from the public and private sectors. The employees’ daily wages in public and private sectors are strongly correlated, but there is no significant difference between the two sectors in the West Bank. Regarding Gaza strip, the correlation is moderate and there is a significant difference between the two sectors.

  9. Globalization and the Gender Wage Gap

    OpenAIRE

    Remco H. Oostendorp

    2009-01-01

    There are several theoretical reasons why globalization will have a narrowing as well as widening effect on the gender wage gap, but little is known about the actual impact, except for a number of country studies. The author provides a cross-country study of the impact of globalization on the occupational gender wage gap, based on the rarely used but most far-ranging survey of wages around ...

  10. Human Capital and Wages in Exporting Firms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch, Jakob Roland; Skaksen, Jan Rose

    2006-01-01

    This paper studies the link between a firms education level, export performance and wages of its workers. We argue that firms may escape intence competition in international markets by using high skilled workers to differentiate their products. This story is consistent with our empirical results....... an export wage premium, but it accrues to workers in firms with high skill intensities.Keywords: Exports, Wages, Human Capital, Rent Sharing, Matched Worker-Firm DataJEL Classification: J30, F10, I20...

  11. Rock climbing-related subclavian vein thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutter, Christoph; Monasterio, Erik; Schöffl, Volker

    2015-10-01

    Paget-Schroetter syndrome, also known as upper extremity deep venous thrombosis (UEDVT), is a rare condition, characterised by a (sub-) total occlusion of the axillary-subclavian venous system due to thrombosis. UEDVT is the most common vascular condition among athletes so far; although the general incidence is low, this problem will become more frequent as a result of increased participation in climbing sports. The purpose of this report is to illustrate two cases in rock climbers where UEDVT developed during rock climbing or bouldering. Fortunately, both patients were diagnosed relatively early after the symptoms began, despite the ambiguity of UEDVT symptoms. This relatively unfamiliar condition may become more highly recognised as a potentially serious differential diagnosis of unspecific pain of the shoulder. Rock climbers are disposed to develop UEDVT due to frequent stress on the upper extremities during training or competition. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  12. Reducing dust exposure in indoor climbing gyms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinbruch, Stephan; Dirsch, Thomas; Kandler, Konrad; Ebert, Martin; Heimburger, Gerhard; Hohenwarter, Franz

    2012-08-01

    As users of indoor climbing gyms are exposed to high concentrations (PM(10) up to 4000 μg m(-3); PM(2.5) up to 500 μg m(-3)) of hydrated magnesium carbonate hydroxide (magnesia alba), reduction strategies have to be developed. In the present paper, the influence of the use of different kinds of magnesia alba on dust concentrations is investigated. Mass concentrations, number concentrations and size distributions of particles in indoor climbing gyms were determined with an optical particle counter, a synchronized, hybrid ambient real-time particulate monitor and an electrical aerosol spectrometer. PM(10) obtained with these three different techniques generally agreed within 25%. Seven different situations of magnesia alba usage were studied under controlled climbing activities. The use of a suspension of magnesia alba in ethanol (liquid chalk) leads to similar low mass concentrations as the prohibition of magnesia alba. Thus, liquid chalk appears to be a low-budget option to reduce dust concentrations. Magnesia alba pressed into blocks, used as powder or sieved to 2-4 mm diameter, does not lead to significant reduction of the dust concentrations. The same is true for chalk balls (powder enclosed in a sack of porous mesh material). The promotion of this kind of magnesia alba as a means of exposure reduction (as seen in many climbing gyms) is not supported by our results. Particle number concentrations are not influenced by the different kinds of magnesia alba used. The particle size distributions show that the use of magnesia alba predominantly leads to emission of particles with diameters above 1 μm.

  13. Stair Climbing in a Quadruped Robot

    OpenAIRE

    Shen-Chiang Chen; Chih-Chung Ko; Cheng-Hsin Li; Pei-Chun Lin

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports the algorithm of trajectory planning and the strategy of four-leg coordination for quasi-static stair climbing in a quadruped robot. This development is based on the geometrical interactions between robot legs and the stair, starting from single-leg analysis, followed by two-leg collaboration, and then four-leg coordination. In addition, a brief study on the robot’s locomotion stability is also included. Finally, simulation and experimental testing were executed to evaluate...

  14. Rock climbing injury rates and associated risk factors in a general climbing population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backe, S; Ericson, L; Janson, S; Timpka, T

    2009-12-01

    The objective was to examine injury rates and associated risk factors in a representative sample of climbers. A random sample (n=606) of the Swedish Climbing Association members was sent a postal survey, with an effective response rate of 63%. Self-reported data regarding climbing history, safety practices and retrospective accounts of injury events (recall period 1.5 years) were obtained. Descriptive statistical methods were used to calculate injury incidences, and a two-step method including zero-inflated Poisson's regression analysis of re-injuries was used to determine the combination of risk factors that best explained individual injury rates. Overall, 4.2 injuries per 1000 climbing hours were reported, overuse injuries accounting for 93% of all injuries. Inflammatory tissue damages to fingers and wrists were the most common injury types. The multivariate analysis showed that overweight and practicing bouldering generally implied an increased primary injury risk, while there was a higher re-injury risk among male climbers and a lower risk among the older climbers. The high percentage of overuse injuries implies that climbing hours and loads should be gradually and systematically increased, and climbers regularly controlled for signs and symptoms of overuse. Further study of the association between body mass index and climbing injury is warranted.

  15. 29 CFR 516.2 - Employees subject to minimum wage or minimum wage and overtime provisions pursuant to section 6...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Employees subject to minimum wage or minimum wage and... Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS RECORDS TO BE KEPT BY EMPLOYERS General Requirements § 516.2 Employees subject to minimum wage or minimum wage...

  16. Characteristics of Climbing Plants Community in Rambut Island Wildlife Reserve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nani Rahayu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Climbing plants are major component of tropical forest and play important role in many aspects of forest dynamic, balancing the micro-climate and provide food, shelter, nest material for wildlife especially bird. Inspite of their importance, climbing plants are often neglected. This research was aimed to describe the characteristics of climbing plants communities in three different ecosystems in Rambut Island Wildlife Reserve (RIWR. Climbing plants inventory in dryland, beach and ecotone forest were done by combining transect and quadrat method. The plots made in each ecosystem were 53, 27 and 85 respectively. A total of 37 climbing plants species consisted of 19 families were identifed and their contribution to species richness in RIWR reached 25,7 %. The climbing plants found in dryland, coastal and ecotone forest were 27 species (17 families, 23 species (16 families dan 16 species (12 families respectively. The species richness of climbing plants in all ecosystem were low, but the dryland forest was the richest due to the more fertile soils and vegetation structure complexity. In general, the species diversity and evenness in all ecosystem were low because of certain species domination. Dioscorea bulbifera was dominant in dryland and beach forest while Ipomoea violacea was dominant in ecotone forest. The domination of D. bulbifera influenced the similarity of climbing plants communities among ecosystem. Dominance, density and distribution of climbing plants indicated invasion of certain climbing plants species in RIWR. Keywords: diversity, forest, liana, vine

  17. Emotional labor demands and compensating wage differentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glomb, Theresa M; Kammeyer-Mueller, John D; Rotundo, Maria

    2004-08-01

    The concept of emotional labor demands and their effects on workers has received considerable attention in recent years, with most studies concentrating on stress, burnout, satisfaction, or other affective outcomes. This study extends the literature by examining the relationship between emotional labor demands and wages at the occupational level. Theories describing the expected effects of job demands and working conditions on wages are described. Results suggest that higher levels of emotional labor demands are associated with lower wage rates for jobs low in cognitive demands and with higher wage rates for jobs high in cognitive demands. Implications of these findings are discussed. (c) 2004 APA

  18. Low-Wage Work in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westergård-Nielsen, Niels Chr.

    2008-01-01

    of collective bargaining help regulate working conditions in the absence of strong government regulation. Denmark's rate of low-wage work-8.5 percent-is the lowest of the five countries under analysis. In Low-Wage Work in Denmark, a team of Danish researchers combines comprehensive national registry data...... not stay in low-wage jobs for long. Many go on to higher paying jobs, while a significant minority ends up relying temporarily on income support and benefits sustained by one of the highest tax rates in the world.  Low-Wage Work in Denmark provides an insightful look at the particularities of the Danish...

  19. Return to experience and initial wage level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, K.L.; Vejlin, R.

    2014-01-01

    This paper estimates the relationship between initial wage and return to experience. We use a Mincer-like wage model to non-parametrically estimate this relationship allowing for an unobservable individual permanent effect in wages and unobservable individual return to experience. The relationship...... between return to experience and unobservable individual ability is negative when conditioning on educational attainment, while the relationship between return to experience and educational attainment is positive. We link our findings to three main theories of wage growth, namely search, unobserved...

  20. Return to Experience and Initial Wage Level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Kenneth Lykke; Vejlin, Rune Majlund

    This paper estimates the relationship between initial wage and return to experience. We use a Mincer-like wage model to nonparametrically estimate this relationship allowing for an unobservable individual permanent effect in wages and unobservable individual return to experience. The relationship...... between return to experience and unobservable individual ability is negative when conditioning on educational attainment while the relationship between return to experience and educational attainment is positive. We link our finding to two main theories of wage growth, namely search and human capital. We...

  1. Do Immigrants Affect Firm-Specific Wages?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malchow-Møller, Nikolaj; Munch, Jakob R.; Skaksen, Jan Rose

    2012-01-01

    We propose and test a novel effect of immigration on wages. Existing studies have focused on the wage effects that result from changes in the aggregate labour supply in a competitive labour market. We argue that if labour markets are not fully competitive, immigrants might also affect wage...... formation at the most disaggregate level – the workplace. Using linked employer-employee data, we find that an increased use of low-skilled immigrant workers has a significantly negative effect on the wages of native workers at the workplace – also when controlling for potential endogeneity of the immigrant...

  2. Efficiency Wages : Signals or Incentives? An Empirical Study of the Relationship between Wage and Commitment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muehlau, P.; Lindenberg, S.M.

    2003-01-01

    Efficiency wage theories argue that firms induce their employees to work in a more disciplined way by paying high wages. Two basic mechanisms have been pointed out in economics about how these wage premia motivate employees. The incentives-driven ‘shirking model’ implies that employees who have a

  3. EFFECT OF AN ON-SIGHT LEAD ON THE PHYSIOLOGICAL AND PSYCHOLOGICAL RESPONSES TO ROCK CLIMBING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick Draper

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Rock climbing is a multi-discipline activity that encompasses forms such as bouldering, top roping and lead climbing on natural and artificial climbing surfaces. A major focus of research has been explanation of physiological functioning. More recent research indicates that anxiety levels are elevated for less experienced climbers and in response to lead climbing ascents. Research regarding the demands of rock climbing has placed a lesser focus on the interaction of psychological and physiological factors. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of an on-sight lead climb on the physiological and psychological demands of the climb in comparison with a subsequent lead climb. Ten intermediate level climbers volunteered to complete the two climbing trials, on-sight lead climb (OSLC and second lead climb (LC2. Climb time, lactate concentrations (baseline, pre climb, post climb and 15 min post climb, heart rate (1 min pre climb, peak HR, 1 min post climb and average climb across the duration of the climb, oxygen consumption, pre climb anxiety (CSAI-2R were assessed for each climber for both trials. Results indicated that there were significant differences in self reported pre climb somatic and cognitive anxiety (t(9 = 2.79, p = 0.01, t(9 = 1.94, p = 0.043, climb time (t(9 = 3.07, p = 0.0052 and post climb lactate concentrations between the climbs (t(9 = 2.58, p = 0.015. These results indicate that psychological as well as physiological stress impact upon the response to rock climbing. The higher anxiety levels associated with an OSLC are likely to have influenced the physiological responses for the intermediate climbers in this study. Future studies should take into account the type of climbing, experience of climbers and the number of ascents as well as taking into account the interaction between physiological and psychological factors in response to rock climbing

  4. The effects of savings on reservation wages and search effort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammers, M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses the interrelations among wealth, reservation wages and search effort. A theoretical job search model predicts wealth to affect reservation wages positively, and search effort negatively. Subsequently, reduced form equations for reservation wages and search intensity take these

  5. Climbing Stairs, Handrail Use, and Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stessman, J; Rottenberg, Y; Jacobs, J M

    2017-01-01

    Negotiating stairs is identified as a challenging task by older people, and using a handrail to climb stairs is a compensatory gait strategy to overcome mobility difficulties. We examine the association between handrail use to climb stairs at increasing ages, and long term survival. Data were collected by the Jerusalem Longitudinal Study, which is a prospective study of a representative sample from the 1920-1921 birth-cohort living in West Jerusalem. Comprehensive assessment at home in 1990, 1998, and 2005, at ages 70 (n=446), 78 (n=897), and 85 (n=1041) included direct questioning concerning handrail use for climbing stairs. Mortality data were collected from age 70-90. The frequency of handrail use to climb stairs at ages 70, 78, 85 years was 23.1% (n=103/446), 41.0% (n=368/897), and 86.7% (n=903/1041) respectively. Handrail use was associated throughout follow-up with a consistent pattern of negative demographic, functional and medical parameters. Between ages 70-78, 70-90, 78-85, 78-90, and 85-90, survival was significantly lower among subjects using a handrail, with unadjusted mortality Hazard Ratios of HR 1.57 (95%CI, 1.01-2.42), HR 1.65 (95%CI, 1.27-2.14), HR 1.78 (95%CI, 1.41-2.25), HR 1.71 (95%CI, 1.41-2.06), and HR 1.53 (95%CI, 1.01-2.33) respectively. HR's remained significant at all ages after adjusting for sociodemographic factors (gender, education, marital, and financial status), and common medical conditions (ischemic heart disease, hypertension, diabetes, chronic pain), as well as between ages 78-85 and 78-90 after adjusting for functional covariables (self-rated health, physical activity, depression, BMI and ADL difficulties). Using a handrail to climb stairs is increasingly common with rising age, was associated with a negative profile of health parameters and is associated with subsequent mortality.

  6. Numerical analysis of a unique mode of locomotion: vertical climbing by Pacific lamprey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Q; Moser, M; Kemp, P

    2011-03-01

    Pacific lampreys are capable of climbing vertical wetted surfaces through a two-phase (bending and stretching) locomotion mode using the oral disc for adherence. We investigate the physical mechanism and performance of this process by using a continuous beam model. Two mechanisms, one akin to the jumping process and the other related to the fast stretching of the body, have been identified. This locomotion mode may inspire biomimetic designs of anguilliform swimming devices capable of overcoming steep obstacles. By using a genetic algorithm simulation we identify the combination of kinematic parameters corresponding to optimal efficiency (defined as the gravitational potential energy gained in each climbing step divided by the energy spent to activate the motion). These parameters are similar to laboratory observations of lamprey motion, suggesting that this type of locomotion has been optimized for maximum efficiency through evolution.

  7. Numerical analysis of a unique mode of locomotion: vertical climbing by Pacific lamprey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Q [Department of Structural Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Moser, M [Fish Ecology Division, Northwest Fisheries Science Center, National Marine Fisheries Service, Seattle, WA (United States); Kemp, P, E-mail: qizhu@ucsd.edu [International Centre for Ecohydraulics Research, Faculty of Engineering and the Environment, University of Southampton, Southampton (United Kingdom)

    2011-03-15

    Pacific lampreys are capable of climbing vertical wetted surfaces through a two-phase (bending and stretching) locomotion mode using the oral disc for adherence. We investigate the physical mechanism and performance of this process by using a continuous beam model. Two mechanisms, one akin to the jumping process and the other related to the fast stretching of the body, have been identified. This locomotion mode may inspire biomimetic designs of anguilliform swimming devices capable of overcoming steep obstacles. By using a genetic algorithm simulation we identify the combination of kinematic parameters corresponding to optimal efficiency (defined as the gravitational potential energy gained in each climbing step divided by the energy spent to activate the motion). These parameters are similar to laboratory observations of lamprey motion, suggesting that this type of locomotion has been optimized for maximum efficiency through evolution.

  8. Multi-step motion planning: Application to free-climbing robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretl, Timothy Wolfe

    This dissertation addresses the problem of planning the motion of a multi-limbed robot to "free-climb" vertical rock surfaces. Free-climbing relies on natural features and friction (such as holes or protrusions) rather than special fixtures or tools. It requires strength, but more importantly it requires deliberate reasoning: not only must the robot decide how to adjust its posture to reach the next feature without falling, it must plan an entire sequence of steps, where each one might have future consequences. This process of reasoning is called multi-step planning. A multi-step planning framework is presented for computing non-gaited, free-climbing motions. This framework derives from an analysis of a free-climbing robot's configuration space, which can be decomposed into constraint manifolds associated with each state of contact between the robot and its environment. An understanding of the adjacency between manifolds motivates a two-stage strategy that uses a candidate sequence of steps to direct the subsequent search for motions. Three algorithms are developed to support the framework. The first algorithm reduces the amount of time required to plan each potential step, a large number of which must be considered over an entire multi-step search. It extends the probabilistic roadmap (PRM) approach based on an analysis of the interaction between balance and the topology of closed kinematic chains. The second algorithm addresses a problem with the PRM approach, that it is unable to distinguish challenging steps (which may be critical) from impossible ones. This algorithm detects impossible steps explicitly, using automated algebraic inference and machine learning. The third algorithm provides a fast constraint checker (on which the PRM approach depends), in particular a test of balance at the initially unknown number of sampled configurations associated with each step. It is a method of incremental precomputation, fast because it takes advantage of the sample

  9. Higher education, wages, and polarization

    OpenAIRE

    Robert G. Valletta

    2015-01-01

    The earnings gap between people with a college degree and those with no education beyond high school has been growing since the late 1970s. Since 2000, however, the gap has grown more for those who have earned a post-graduate degree as well. The divergence between workers with college degrees and those with graduate degrees may be one manifestation of rising labor market polarization, which benefits those earning the highest and the lowest wages relatively more than those in the middle of the...

  10. Descriptive Epidemiology, Medical Evaluation, and Outcomes of Rock Climbing Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, James W; Henrie, A Michael; Teramoto, Masaru; Medina, Edward; Willick, Stuart E

    2017-09-01

    To gather epidemiologic data on injury type, treatment, and recovery from rock climbing injuries. Design: retrospective cross-sectional study. web-based survey. rock climbers who sustained a climbing-related injury during the prior 24 months. Criteria for inclusion: aged ≥18 years; participation in rock climbing at least 4 times per year in the United States. none. percentage of injured climbers seeking medical care, providers seen, subspecialty referral, development of chronic problems, factors affecting return to climbing, injuries by climbing type, body region, and injury type. Data were collected over a 60-day period using the Research Electronic Data Capture (REDCap) survey system. Seven hundred and eight surveys were collected from 553 male and 155 female climbers. Thirteen hundred ninety seven injuries were reported, and 975 injuries were suitable for analysis. The most common provider initially seen was a primary care provider. Subspecialty referral was commonly obtained. Injury patterns differed by climbing type. The percentage of respondents that returned to climbing before their injury was fully healed was 51.1%, and 44.9% of respondents developed chronic problems related to their climbing injury. Twenty-eight percent of respondents were unable to return to their previous level of climbing performance. Several factors were associated with delayed recovery from climbing injury. A significant number of climbers sought healthcare after injury. A majority of climbers who sought treatment were referred to subspecialist providers. About one-half of climbers were symptomatic when they returned to climbing and developed chronic problems after injury. Factors associated with slower return to climbing included increasing age, smoking, fractures, and surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Energy cost of sport rock climbing in elite performers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, J.; Marino, F.; Hill, C.; Gwinn, T.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess oxygen uptake (VO2), blood lactate concentration ([La(b)]), and heart rate (HR) response during indoor and outdoor sport climbing. METHODS: Seven climbers aged 25 (SE 1) years, with a personal best ascent without preview or fall (on sight) ranging from 6b to 7a were assessed using an indoor vertical treadmill with artificial rock hand/foot holds and a discontinuous protocol with climbing velocity incremented until voluntary fatigue. On a separate occasion the subjects performed a 23.4 m outdoor rock climb graded 5c and taking 7 min 36 s (SE 33 s) to complete. Cardiorespiratory parameters were measured using a telemetry system and [La(b)] collected at rest and after climbing. RESULTS: Indoor climbing elicited a peak oxygen uptake (VO2climb-peak) and peak HR (HRpeak) of 43.8 (SE 2.2) ml/kg/min and 190 (SE 4) bpm, respectively and increased blood lactate concentration [La(b)] from 1.4 (0.1) to 10.2 (0.6) mmol/l (p climbing VO2 and HR increased to about 75% and 83% of VO2climb-peak and HRpeak, respectively. [La(b)] increased from 1.3 (0.1) at rest to 4.5 mmol/l (p climb. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that for elite climbers outdoor sport rock climbs of five to 10 minutes' duration and moderate difficulty require a significant portion of the VO2climb-peak. The higher HR and VO2 for outdoor climbing and the increased [La(b)] could be the result of repeated isometric contractions, particularly from the arm and forearm muscles. 


 PMID:10027051

  12. Energy expenditure and physiological responses during indoor rock climbing.

    OpenAIRE

    Mermier, C M; Robergs, R A; McMinn, S M; Heyward, V H

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To report the physiological responses of indoor rock climbing. METHODS: Fourteen experienced climbers (nine men, five women) performed three climbing trials on an indoor climbing wall. Subjects performed three trials of increasing difficulty: (a) an easy 90 degrees vertical wall, (b) a moderately difficult negatively angled wall (106 degrees), and (c) a difficult horizontal overhang (151 degrees). At least 15 minutes separated each trial. Expired air was collected in a Douglas bag...

  13. The epidemiology of injury in mountaineering, rock and ice climbing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöffl, Volker; Morrison, Audry; Schöffl, Isabelle; Küpper, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Climbing and mountaineering sports are gaining more and more public interest. This chapter reviews scientific studies on injuries and accidents in climbing and mountaineering sports to evaluate the danger of these sports and their specific injuries and preventive measures. An initial PubMed query was performed using the key words 'rock climbing', 'sport climbing', 'mountaineering', 'alpine injuries' and 'climbing injuries'. More than 500 extracted papers were analyzed which gave information on injury, mortality/fatality, prevention and risk factors. Cross-references were also scanned according to the above given criteria. Also the data sources of the UIAA and IFSC Medical Commissions were analyzed. Overall, alpine (traditional) climbing has a higher injury risk than sport climbing, especially indoor climbing. Alpine and ice climbing have more objective dangers which can affect climber safety. Overall injury rates are low, nevertheless fatalities do occur in all climbing disciplines. Altitude-related illnesses/injuries also occur in mountaineering. Most injuries in sport climbing are overstrain injuries of the upper extremity. In alpine climbing, injuries mostly occur through falls which affect the lower extremity. Objective reporting of the injury site and severity varied in most studies according to the injury definition and methodology used. This creates differences in the injury and fatality results and conclusions, which in turn makes inter-study comparisons difficult. In future studies, the UIAA MedCom score for mountain injuries should be used to guarantee inter-study comparability. Evidence in preventive measures is low and further studies must be performed in this field. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Sport climbing from a medical point of view

    OpenAIRE

    Schweizer, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Rock climbing, sport climbing and bouldering are highly popular new sport disciplines. An increasing number of indoor climbing gyms throughout the country offer the possibility to perform the sport regularly independently from the weather. As a result a variety of new pathologies like the closed flexor tendon pulley rupture of the finger and syndromes caused by overuse mainly in the upper extremity have appeared and should be familiar to physicians and therapists working in the field of sport...

  15. Indoor Competition Climbing as a Context for Positive Youth Development

    OpenAIRE

    Barry A. Garst; Garrett A. Stone; Ryan J. Gagnon

    2016-01-01

    Climbing as a competitive youth sport is rapidly expanding in both participation and popularity as it has transitioned from an unorganized recreational activity to a formalized sport with a national governing body, organized competitions, formal coaching, and team structure. In spite of this growth, little to no research has been conducted regarding indoor competition climbing as a developmental experience for youth. This study examined the contributions of indoor competition climbing to yout...

  16. Intersectionopoly: A Simulation of the Wage Gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paino, Maria; May, Matthew; Burrington, Lori A.; Becker, Jacob H.

    2017-01-01

    This article describes a simulation activity designed to teach students about the wage gap. The wage gap is an important topic in many sociology classrooms, but it can be difficult to convey the accumulated disadvantage experienced by women and racial/ethnic minorities to students using in-class discussions, lectures, or assigned readings alone.…

  17. Wage Discrimination against Handicapped Men and Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, William G.; Lambrinos, James

    1985-01-01

    The extent of discrimination against handicapped men and women is estimated in this article. Observed wage differentials are corrected for selectivity bias. Results indicate that almost one-third of the wage differential for men and close to one-half for women can be attributed to discrimination. Handicapped women are also subjected to sex…

  18. The Effect of Overskilling Dynamics on Wages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavromaras, Kostas; Mahuteau, Stephane; Sloane, Peter; Wei, Zhang

    2013-01-01

    We use a random-effects dynamic probit model to estimate the effect of overskilling dynamics on wages. We find that overskilling mismatch is common and more likely among those who have been overskilled in the past. It is also highly persistent, in a manner that is inversely related to educational level. Yet, the wages of university graduates are…

  19. Innovation and wage polarisation in European industries

    OpenAIRE

    Croci Angelini, Elisabetta; Farina, Francesco; Pianta, Mario

    2008-01-01

    By linking different innovation indicators and education to the polarisation of wages by skill level within industries, the paper aims to find out the importance of sectoral structure: industry analysis analysis of levels of polarisation (not change) so to test the relevance of technology and educational factors in polarisation of wages

  20. Welfare Careers and Low Wage Employment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Joe A.; Ferman, Louis A.

    A sample of 1010 low-wage workers in Detroit (stratified by sex and welfare status) were interviewed in 1969. Data were collected on background characteristics, labor market experiences, and work career histories. The data relate to sexism as an important determinant of income in low-wage groups (women earn less and have lower status jobs),…

  1. Foreign Ownership Wage Premia in Emerging Economies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Tor Viking; Pytlikova, Mariola

    differential. Both white and blue collar workers as well as skilled and unskilled employees obtain a foreign ownership wage premium. Foreign ownership premia are more prevalent in older and less technologically advanced firms. Joint estimation of productivity and wage equations show that, controlling for human...

  2. Foreign Ownership Wage Premia in Emerging Economies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Tor; Pytlikova, Mariola

    2011-01-01

    differential. Both white and blue collar workers as well as skilled and unskilled employees obtain a foreign ownership wage premium. Foreign ownership premia are more prevalent in older and less technologically advanced firms. Joint estimation of productivity and wage equations show that, controlling for human...

  3. Social networks and wage outcomes in Vietnam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anna Folke; Torm, Nina Elisabeth

    2011-01-01

    This paper analyzes the relationship between the use of informal contacts and wage outcomes using matched employer-employee data from small and medium firms in Vietnam. We find that obtaining a job through knowing another worker in the firm generally is positively associated with individual wages...

  4. Educational Mismatch and Wages: A Panel Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Thomas K.

    2002-01-01

    Using a large German Socioeconomic Panel data set for the period 1984-98, investigates the wage effects of two different measures of educational mismatch, overeducation and undereducation, when controlling for unobserved heterogeneity. Finds that wages differences between overeducated and undereducated workers totally disappear in most cases.…

  5. Gender Wage Disparities among the Highly Educated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Dan A.; Haviland, Amelia M.; Sanders, Seth G.; Taylor, Lowell J.

    2008-01-01

    We examine gender wage disparities for four groups of college-educated women--black, Hispanic, Asian, and non-Hispanic white--using the National Survey of College Graduates. Raw log wage gaps, relative to non-Hispanic white male counterparts, generally exceed -0.30. Estimated gaps decline to between -0.08 and -0.19 in nonparametric analyses that…

  6. Efficiency Wages and the Business Cycle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Canton, E.J.F.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents a simple efficiency wage model to explain the transmission from exogenous productivity shocks to levels of economic activity. Higher real wages and rising unemployment induce workers to increase their effort. The disciplining effect of unemployment on the effort level has an

  7. Minimum Wage Effects in the Longer Run

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumark, David; Nizalova, Olena

    2007-01-01

    Exposure to minimum wages at young ages could lead to adverse longer-run effects via decreased labor market experience and tenure, and diminished education and training, while beneficial longer-run effects could arise if minimum wages increase skill acquisition. Evidence suggests that as individuals reach their late 20s, they earn less the longer…

  8. The Wage Curve in the Nordic Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Erik Strøjer; Albæk, K.; Asplund, R.

    This report focusses on wage formation in the Nordic countries with a special attention to the effect from changes in local unemployment on the local wage level. The book gives a comprehensive and comparable study of this topic in the five Nordic countries which may be of great value for research......This report focusses on wage formation in the Nordic countries with a special attention to the effect from changes in local unemployment on the local wage level. The book gives a comprehensive and comparable study of this topic in the five Nordic countries which may be of great value...... for researchers or civil servants with a deeper interest in labour market problems. The main result from this study is that the wage formation at the regional level is rather inflexible in the short run in all five Nordic countries, with no effect from changes in local unemployment on the local wage level...... regions in the long run. One explanation put forward for this slow speed of regional wage adjustment is the rather centralized bargaining system on the labour market in the Nordic countries. Wages are set according to the average unemployment rate for the economy as a whole, and differences in regional...

  9. 24 CFR 574.655 - Wage rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Wage rates. 574.655 Section 574.655 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF... COMMUNITY FACILITIES HOUSING OPPORTUNITIES FOR PERSONS WITH AIDS Other Federal Requirements § 574.655 Wage...

  10. Results-based Rewards - Leveraging Wage Increases?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregn, Kirsten

    2005-01-01

    A good seven years ago, as a part of a large-scale pay reform, the Danish public sector introduced results-based rewards (RBR), i.e. a pay component awarded for achieving or exceeding targets set in advance. RBR represent a possibility for combining wage-earners interests in higher wages with a g...

  11. Determinants of general practitioners' wages in England.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morris, S.; Goudie, R.; Sutton, M.; Gravelle, H.; Elliott, R.; Hole, A.R.; Ma, A.; Sibbald, B.S.; Skatun, D.

    2011-01-01

    We analyse the determinants of annual net income and wages (net income/hours) of general practitioners (GPs) using data for 2271 GPs in England recorded during Autumn 2008. The average GP had an annual net income of pound97,500 and worked 43 h per week. The mean wage was pound51 per h. Net income

  12. Wage Adjustment Practices and the Link between Price and Wages: Survey Evidence from Colombian Firms *

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Iregui

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores firms’ wage adjustment practices in the Colombian formal labor market; specifically, the timing and frequency of wage increases, as well as the link between wage and price changes. We use a survey of 1,305 firms belonging to all economic sectors. The results show that most firms adjust base wages annually, increases were concentrated around observed inflation and none of the firms cut wages. Moreover, factors associated with the performance of firms and workers alike are the main determinants of wage adjustments. The link between wages and price changes is stronger in sectors where labor costs represent a higher share of total costs and in firms operating in sectors with higher labor productivity.

  13. The Czech Wage Distribution and the Minimum Wage Impacts: the Empirical Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kateřina Duspivová

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A well-fi tting wage distribution is a crucial precondition for economic modeling of the labour market processes.In the fi rst part, this paper provides the evidence that – as for wages in the Czech Republic – the most oft enused log-normal distribution failed and the best-fi tting one is the Dagum distribution. Th en we investigatethe role of wage distribution in the process of the economic modeling. By way of an example of the minimumwage impacts on the Czech labour market, we examine the response of Meyer and Wise’s (1983 model to theDagum and log-normal distributions. Th e results suggest that the wage distribution has important implicationsfor the eff ects of the minimum wage on the shape of the lower tail of the measured wage distribution andis thus an important feature for interpreting the eff ects of minimum wages.

  14. Tree Climbing Robot Design, Kinematics and Motion Planning

    CERN Document Server

    Lam, Tin Lun

    2012-01-01

    Climbing robot is a challenging research topic that has gained much attention from researchers. Most of the robots reported in the literature are designed to climb on manmade structures, but seldom robots are designed for climbing natural environment such as trees. Trees and manmade structures are very different in nature. It brings different aspects of technical challenges to the robot design. In this book, you can find a collection of the cutting edge technologies in the field of tree-climbing robot and the ways that animals climb. It provides a valuable reference for robot designers to select appropriate climbing methods in designing tree-climbing robots for specific purposes. Based on the study, a novel bio-inspired tree-climbing robot with several breakthrough performances has been developed and presents in this book. It is capable of performing various actions that is impossible in the state-of-the-art tree-climbing robots, such as moving between trunk and branches. This book also proposes several appro...

  15. Injuries at the 2005 World Championships in Rock Climbing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöffl, Volker Rainer; Kuepper, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the injury risk associated with indoor rock climbing competition. All injuries reported to medical personnel at the 2005 World Championships in Rock Climbing were recorded and analyzed. Four hundred forty-three climbers (273 men, 170 women) from 55 countries participated in 3 separate disciplines totaling 520 climbing days. Only 4 of 18 acute medical problems that were treated were significant injuries, resulting in an injury rate of 3.1 per 1000 hours. Indoor rock climbing competition has a low injury risk and a very good safety profile.

  16. Sport climbing from a medical point of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweizer, Andreas

    2012-10-11

    Rock climbing, sport climbing and bouldering are highly popular new sport disciplines. An increasing number of indoor climbing gyms throughout the country offer the possibility to perform the sport regularly independently from the weather. As a result a variety of new pathologies like the closed flexor tendon pulley rupture of the finger and syndromes caused by overuse mainly in the upper extremity have appeared and should be familiar to physicians and therapists working in the field of sports medicine. An overview of the most common and most specific climbing related injuries as well as their diagnosis and treatment options with a focus on the upper extremity are presented.

  17. Smith’s theory of wages and its impact on the theory of wages in the 19th century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojanović Božo

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Adam Smith has not accepted subsistence theory of wages as an explanation of wages. He can be marked not only as a founder of wages-fund theory, but also of the bargaining theory of wages. Wage-fund doctrine dominated the next hundred years of English economics. Besides, Smith’s explanation of the differentials in wage rates among occupations were accepted by his successors for a century. That was the first step into direction of human capital theory.

  18. WAGE FLEXIBILITY IN THE CONTEMPORARY SOCIETY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TECULESCU Silviu Alexandru

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper follows to offer the most efficient solutions for the attainment by Romania of the economic development level associated to the Western European countries. It proposes the division of the flexibility of labour market in three components, namely: internal flexibility, external flexibility and wage flexibility. The analysis performed within the present study will emphasize the wage flexibility. Wage flexibility can be classified in four components: a plans of individual and group incentives; b plans of assigning wages out of productivity; c plans of distribution of profits and, respectively, d plans of suggestions. The labour market flexibility, in general, and especially the wage flexibility contributes to the increase of employee motivation at the workplace, aspect which leeds to the growth of labour productivity, through this one being put the bases of the medium- and long-term economic development.

  19. Cyclicality of Wages and Union Power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morin, Annaïg

    2017-01-01

    This paper examines how trade unions shape the volatility of wages over the business cycle. I present a dynamic stochastic model of the labor market that integrates two main features: search frictions and trade unions. Because of search frictions, each job match yields an economic surplus...... that is shared between the worker and the firm. Therefore, I can decompose the volatility of wages into two components: the volatility of the match surplus and the volatility of the worker share of the surplus. Starting from the unions' objective function, I show that under collective wage bargaining, the worker......: the union wage premium fluctuates counter-cyclically, and employment is more cyclical but less persistent when wages are collectively bargained....

  20. The relationship between climbing ability and physiological responses to rock climbing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baláš, Jiří; Panáčková, Michaela; Strejcová, Barbora; Martin, Andrew J; Cochrane, Darryl J; Kaláb, Miloš; Kodejška, Jan; Draper, Nick

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between submaximal and maximal physiological responses to rock climbing for climbers of differing abilities. Twenty-six male climbers performed a submaximal climbing test on a known circuit at 90° (vertical) and 105° (15° overhanging) inclination and speed 25 movements · min(-1). A maximal test was undertaken on a similar circuit at the same speed with inclination increasing by 10° for each successive 3 min stage. Mean oxygen consumption and heart rate (HR) increased with wall inclination and climbers reached a mean (± SD) peak VO2 of 40.3 ± 3.5 mL · kg(-1) · min(-1) during the maximal test. Self-reported climbing ability was negatively correlated with VO2 and HR during the submaximal test at 90° (VO2, r = -0.82; HR, and r = -0.66) and at 105° (VO2, r = -0.84; HR, and r = -0.78) suggesting an increased exercise economy for climbers with a higher ability level. Findings from this study indicate that there is a relationship between wall inclination and the physiological demand of a climb. However, the increased technical ability and fitness of higher level climbers appears to an extent to offset the increased demand through improved exercise economy which in turn leads to an increased time to exhaustion and an improvement in performance.

  1. Static analysis of a climbing wall

    OpenAIRE

    Kurinčič, Rok

    2013-01-01

    The first part of the thesis captures a structural design of a supporting structure of a climbing tower. The most efficient geometry of the structure has been chosen. The thesis consists of a determination of an external load, which besides a dead load works on the construction. In the calculation there were considered influences of the dead load, a wind load and a live load of climbers. In the continuation of the thesis a static analisys of the supporting structure has been done. Furth...

  2. Brief Intense Stair Climbing Improves Cardiorespiratory Fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Mary K; Baglole, Jessica H; Martin, Brian J; Macinnis, Martin J; Gurd, Brendon J; Gibala, Martin J

    2017-02-01

    Sprint interval training (SIT) is a time-efficient strategy to improve cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF); however, most protocols have been studied in laboratory settings and require specialized equipment. We investigated the efficacy of brief intense stair climbing as a practical model of SIT to improve CRF. Two separate studies, each consisting of an acute and chronic phase, were conducted in a total of 31 sedentary women (age = 24 ± 10 yr, body mass index = 23 ± 4 kg·m). The acute phase of study 1 established that the mean HR, blood [lactate], and RPE were similar when participants (n = 8) performed an SIT protocol that involved 3 × 20-s "all-out" efforts of either continuously ascending stairs or cycling. The chronic phase demonstrated that CRF, as determined by peak oxygen uptake (V˙O2peak), increased by 12% or ~1 MET (8.27 ± 1.05 to 9.25 ± 1.01 METs, P = 0.002) when participants (n = 12) performed the 3 × 20-s stair climbing protocol 3 d·wk for 6 wk. The acute phase of study 2 established that HR and RPE were similar when participants (n = 11) performed three different stair climbing protocols: the 3 × 20-s continuous ascent model used in study 1 and two 3 × 60-s models of ascending and descending either one or two flights of stairs (P > 0.05). The chronic phase demonstrated that V˙O2peak increased by 7% (8.91 ± 1.30 to 9.51 ± 1.52 METs, P = 0.01) when the same group of participants performed the one-flight 3 × 60-s protocol 3 d·wk for 6 wk. The Cederholm index determined from an oral glucose tolerance test was 57 ± 17 and 64 ± 21 mg·L·mmol·mU·min before and after training, respectively (P = 0.056). Brief, intense stair climbing is a practical, time-efficient strategy to improve CRF in previously untrained women.

  3. Bouldering: an alternative strategy to long-vertical climbing in root-climbing hortensias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granados Mendoza, Carolina; Isnard, Sandrine; Charles-Dominique, Tristan; Van den Bulcke, Jan; Rowe, Nick P; Van Acker, Joris; Goetghebeur, Paul; Samain, Marie-Stéphanie

    2014-10-06

    In the Neotropics, the genus Hydrangea of the popular ornamental hortensia family is represented by climbing species that strongly cling to their support surface by means of adhesive roots closely positioned along specialized anchoring stems. These root-climbing hortensia species belong to the nearly exclusive American Hydrangea section Cornidia and generally are long lianescent climbers that mostly flower and fructify high in the host tree canopy. The Mexican species Hydrangea seemannii, however, encompasses not only long lianescent climbers of large vertical rock walls and coniferous trees, but also short 'shrub-like' climbers on small rounded boulders. To investigate growth form plasticity in root-climbing hortensia species, we tested the hypothesis that support variability (e.g. differences in size and shape) promotes plastic responses observable at the mechanical, structural and anatomical level. Stem bending properties, architectural axis categorization, tissue organization and wood density were compared between boulder and long-vertical tree-climbers of H. seemannii. For comparison, the mechanical patterns of a closely related, strictly long-vertical tree-climbing species were investigated. Hydrangea seemannii has fine-tuned morphological, mechanical and anatomical responses to support variability suggesting the presence of two alternative root-climbing strategies that are optimized for their particular environmental conditions. Our results suggest that variation of some stem anatomical traits provides a buffering effect that regulates the mechanical and hydraulic demands of two distinct plant architectures. The adaptive value of observed plastic responses and the importance of considering growth form plasticity in evolutionary and conservation studies are discussed. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  4. Footwear in rock climbing: Current practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHenry, R D; Arnold, G P; Wang, W; Abboud, R J

    2015-09-01

    Many rock climbers wear ill-fitting and excessively tight footwear during activity. However, there is insufficient evidence of the extent or harms of this practice. To investigate footwear use in rock climbers with a focus on issues surrounding fit. A cross-sectional study with active rock climbers of over one year of experience completing a survey on their activity and footwear. Additionally, the authors quantified foot and shoe lengths and sizes alongside demographic data. Ill-fitting and excessively tight footwear was found in 55 out of 56 rock climbers. Foot pain during activity was also commonplace in 91% of the climbers. A mean size reduction of almost 4 UK shoe sizes was found between the climbers' street shoe size and that of their climbing footwear using a calibrated foot/shoe ruler. There is an unfortunate association of climbers of higher abilities seeking a tighter shoe fit (prock climbers, further investigation may aim to quantify its impact and seek a solution balancing climbing performance while mitigating foot injury. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Climbing behaviour in three African rodent species | Earl | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The climbing ability and propensity of Thallomys paedidcus, Praomys natalensis and Saccostomus campestrls were studied in the laboratory. Thallomys was morphologically and psychologically best adapted to arboreal life, although Praomyshad the highest climbing frequency, largely attributable to a greater exploratory ...

  6. Dislocation climb in two-dimensional discrete dislocation dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davoudi, K.M.; Nicola, L.; Vlassak, J.J.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, dislocation climb is incorporated in a two-dimensional discrete dislocation dynamics model. Calculations are carried out for polycrystalline thin films, passivated on one or both surfaces. Climb allows dislocations to escape from dislocation pile-ups and reduces the strain-hardening

  7. A Unit Plan for A Basic Rock Climbing Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcomb, Brian L.

    This instructional unit is comprised of four lessons dealing with conducting a four part class in basic rock climbing. The class is suitable, with modifications, for small private parties, small groups such as the Boy Scouts, or larger, organized groups such as climbing clubs. Four instructional methods are used: instructional media,…

  8. Comparison of lactate sampling sites for rock climbing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryer, S; Draper, N; Dickson, T; Blackwell, G; Winter, D; Ellis, G

    2011-06-01

    Comparisons of capillary blood lactate concentrations pre and post climb have featured in the protocols of many rock climbing studies, with most researchers obtaining samples from the fingertip. The nature of rock climbing, however, places a comparatively high physiological loading on the foreaand fingertips. Indeed, the fingertips are continually required for gripping and this makes pre-climb sampling at this site problematic. The purpose of our study was to examine differences in capillary blood lactate concentrations from samples taken at the fingertip and first (big) toe in a rock climbing context. 10 participants (9 males and 1 female) completed climbing bouts at 3 different angles (91°, 100° and 110°). Capillary blood samples were taken simultaneously from the fingertip and first toe pre and post climb. A limit of agreement plot revealed all data points to be well within the upper and lower bounds of the 95% population confidence interval. Subsequent regression analysis revealed a strong relationship (R (2)=0.94, y=0.940x + 0.208) between fingertip and first toe capillary blood lactate concentrations. Findings from our study suggest that the toe offers a valid alternative site for capillary blood lactate concentration analysis in a rock climbing context. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Clay-shoveler's fracture during indoor rock climbing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaloostian, Paul E; Kim, Jennifer E; Calabresi, Peter A; Bydon, Ali; Witham, Timothy

    2013-03-01

    Indoor rock climbing is becoming more popular for people of all ages. Despite the tremendous interest in this competitive sport, participants are made aware of the dangers associated with participating. The authors present the first reported case of a clay-shoveler's fracture at the T1 spinous process during indoor rock climbing. They describe the management and natural history of this fracture and discuss management strategies for this increasingly popular recreational sport.A 14-year-old competitive indoor rock climber presented with acute-onset midline thoracic pain at T1 while indoor rock climbing. He reported no recent falls or trauma but stated that the pain came on abruptly while rock climbing. On examination, he was neurologically intact except for significant tenderness to palpation at the T1 spinous process. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a minimally displaced T1 spinous process fracture with evidence of significant surrounding muscular edema, suggesting an acute fracture. He was treated conservatively with anti-inflammatory drugs, complete climbing restriction, and rest. He continued to have focal upper back pain at the level of the fracture over the next 4 months. He was unable to climb for 4 months until his pain resolved after conservative treatment of climbing restriction, pain control, and rest.This is the first documented case of a clay-shoveler's fracture sustained in a pediatric patient directly attributable to indoor rock climbing. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  10. Park Managers Attitudes toward Climbing: Implications for Future Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, Michael G.; Harwell, Rick

    This study examined park managers' attitudes toward adventure climbing and climbing regulations, especially concerning the management of: (1) conflicts (among visitors competing for use of the same resource); (2) impact on the environment; and (3) risk (i.e. implications for rescue and legal liability problems). Questionnaires were sent randomly…

  11. Promoting workplace stair climbing: sometimes, not interfering is the best.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Åvitsland, Andreas; Solbraa, Ane Kristiansen; Riiser, Amund

    2017-01-01

    Stair climbing is a vigorous activity and can lead to several health benefits. Studies seeking to increase stair climbing in various public locations have shown positive effects, while results from similar studies conducted in the workplace are inconclusive. This study examined stair climbing in the workplace, and monitored effects from a single- and a combined intervention. Interventions were inspired by nudging, the libertarian method of influencing behavior. By quasi-experimental design, stair- and elevator traffic in two office buildings was monitored preceding-, during- and following interventions with stair leading footprints alone, and combined with stair-riser banners. Chi square tests were applied to determine differences between baseline and the subsequent periods. Web-based questionnaires were distributed after follow-up period. Elevators and stairs were used 45 237 times, of which 89.6% was stair use. Intervention site stair climbing at baseline (79.0%) was significantly reduced with footprints (-5.1%, p climbing at the control site (94.2%) remained stable (p > 0.027). Stair climbing was significantly reduced during the intervention periods. Use of stair leading footprints alone, or combined with stair-riser banners in an attempt to influence stair climbing may be ineffective, or cause a negative reaction, when applied in a workplace with a pre-existing high amount of stair climbing.

  12. Climbing ripple structure and associated storm-lamination from a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    with minor amounts of very fine quartz sand and silt. The climbing ripple structures exhibit a complex pattern of superposition of different types (type A, B and S) within cosets pointing to a fluctuating rate of suspension deposition versus bedform migration, and an unsteady character of the flow. Close association of climbing ...

  13. City Climber: a new generation of mobile robot with wall-climbing capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Jizhong; Morris, William; Chakravarthy, Narashiman; Calle, Angel

    2006-05-01

    This paper introduces a new generation wall-climbing robots named as City-climber, which has the capabilities to climb walls, walk on ceilings, and transit between different surfaces. Unlike the traditional wall-climbing robots, the Cityclimber robots use aerodynamic attraction which achieves good balance between strong adhesion force and high mobility. Since the City-climber robots don't require perfect sealing as the vacuum suction technique does, the robots can move on virtually any kinds of smooth or rough surfaces. The other novelties of the City-climber robots are the modular design and high-performance on-board processing unit. The former feature achieves booth fast motion of each module on planar surfaces and smooth transition between the surfaces by a set of two modules. The latter feature makes the real-time signal processing and autonomous operation possible. We envision that the City-climber robots be used in urban environments for search and rescue, weapon/tool delivery, inspection and surveillance purposes. To increase the hardware and software reconfigurability, the self-contained City-climber robots use system-on-programmable-chip (SoPC) technology for on-board perception and motion control. The video display several versions of the City-Climber prototypes, illustrating the main areas of functionality and results of several key experimental tests, including 4.2kg payload, operation on rough surfaces, locomotion over surface gaps, and inverted operation on ceiling, to name a few.

  14. An Empirical Analysis of the Relationship between Minimum Wage ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A preliminary test provides evidence of correlation between minimum wage and investment, thereby allowing for an examination of the wage-growth relationship. Four equations are used to determine the relationship between minimum wage and economic growth. The results from the simple regression of minimum wage ...

  15. 29 CFR 531.59 - The tip wage credit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false The tip wage credit. 531.59 Section 531.59 Labor... § 531.59 The tip wage credit. In determining compliance with the wage payment requirements of the Act... such employee in the workweek for which the wage payment is made. This credit is in addition to any...

  16. Rank Regressions, Wage Distributions, and the Gender Gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortin, Nicole M.; Lemieux, Thomas

    1998-01-01

    Current Population Survey data from 1979 and 1991 were used to decompose changes in the gender wage gap into three components: skill distribution, wage structure, and improvements in women's position. Relative wage gains by women may have been a source of increasing wage inequality among men. (SK)

  17. Minimum Wage Laws and the Distribution of Employment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Kevin

    The desirability of raising the minimum wage long revolved around just one question: the effect of higher minimum wages on the overall level of employment. An even more critical effect of the minimum wage rests on the composition of employment--who gets the minimum wage job. An examination of employment in eating and drinking establishments…

  18. Minimum Wages, Technological Progress and Loss of Skill

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Birthe

    1998-01-01

    productive sector and in the antiquated sector, respectively. In this framework, the implications of a shock with a minimum wage law is compared to the implications when wages are perfectly flexible. The economic variables considered are short-term and long-term unemployment, wages and wage disparity...

  19. 48 CFR 52.222-16 - Approval of Wage Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Approval of Wage Rates. 52....222-16 Approval of Wage Rates. As prescribed in 22.407(b), insert the following clause: Approval of Wage Rates (FEB 1988) All straight time wage rates, and overtime rates based thereon, for laborers and...

  20. 26 CFR 31.3301-4 - When wages are paid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false When wages are paid. 31.3301-4 Section 31.3301... Unemployment Tax Act (Chapter 23, Internal Revenue Code of 1954) § 31.3301-4 When wages are paid. Wages are paid when actually or constructively paid. Wages are constructively paid when they are credited to the...

  1. 29 CFR 783.45 - Deductions from wages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Deductions from wages. 783.45 Section 783.45 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR STATEMENTS OF GENERAL... TO EMPLOYEES EMPLOYED AS SEAMEN Computation of Wages and Hours § 783.45 Deductions from wages. Where...

  2. 26 CFR 31.3401(a)-2 - Exclusions from wages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Exclusions from wages. 31.3401(a)-2 Section 31... Collection of Income Tax at Source § 31.3401(a)-2 Exclusions from wages. (a) In general. (1) The term “wages... specifically excepted from wages under section 3401(a). (2) The exception attaches to the remuneration for...

  3. 29 CFR 783.44 - Board and lodging as wages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Board and lodging as wages. 783.44 Section 783.44 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR STATEMENTS OF GENERAL... TO EMPLOYEES EMPLOYED AS SEAMEN Computation of Wages and Hours § 783.44 Board and lodging as wages...

  4. 20 CFR 616.10 - Reuse of employment and wages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Reuse of employment and wages. 616.10 Section 616.10 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR INTERSTATE ARRANGEMENT FOR COMBINING EMPLOYMENT AND WAGES § 616.10 Reuse of employment and wages. Employment and wages...

  5. Tax reform for low-wage workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seipel, M M

    2000-01-01

    As a result of the recent implementation of work-oriented antipoverty programs, more welfare recipients can be expected to be working in low-wage jobs. With these jobs there is little hope that these workers' incomes will rise above the poverty level. One way to help support these low-wage workers is through tax reform. Although low-wage workers pay little or no federal tax, they still pay high payroll and local taxes. To help such workers keep more of their earnings, refundable taxes like earned income tax credit and child refund taxes should be expanded, and sales taxes on food should be eliminated.

  6. The Effect of Overskilling Dynamics on Wages

    OpenAIRE

    Mavromaras, Kostas G.; Mahuteau, Stéphane; Sloane, Peter J.; Wei, Zhang

    2012-01-01

    We use a random effects dynamic probit model to estimate the effect of overskilling dynamics on wages. We find that overskilling mismatch is common and more likely among those who have been overskilled in the past. It is also highly persistent, in a manner that is inversely related to educational level. Yet, the wages of university graduates are reduced more by past overskilling, than for any other education level. A possible reason for this wage effect is that graduates tend to be in better-...

  7. Wage and Labor Union in Manufacturing Sector

    OpenAIRE

    Pipit Pitriyan; Adiatma Y.M Siregar

    2012-01-01

    The presence of Labor Unions is expected to provide a higher bargaining power for its members so that the rights of workers can be better acknowledged. In Indonesia, presently, the role of unions is more highlighted in the determination of the minimum wage. This study aims to estimate the the role of labor union on wage determination of Indonesia’s labor intensive manufacturing sector and whether wage differentials occurs among labor union member/non-member of Indonesia’s labor intensive manu...

  8. Real wages in Australia and Canada, 1870-1913

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greasley, David; Madsen, Jakob Brøchner; Oxley, Les

    2000-01-01

    Australia's and Canada's real wage experiences between 1870 and 1913 were distinctive. Faster productivity growth underpinned Canada's overtaking of Australia's wage levels. The globalization forces of migration and trade also shaped their comparative wages, principally by reducing wage growth...... in Canada. Immigration increased slightly Australia's real wages, but reduced wage levels in Canada, and tempered there the beneficial effects of rising productivity and improving terms of trade. In contrast, wage earners' share of national income rose after 1890 in Australia, with the productivity slowdown...... hitting chiefly rents and profits. Distributional shifts favouring wage earners in Australia, and the depressing effects of mass immigration on wages in Canada, limited Canada's wage lead before 1914, despite her faster productivity growth...

  9. An exploration of self-efficacy as a motivation for rock climbing and its impact on frequency of climbs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwin Gomez; Eddie Hill; Amy Ackerman

    2008-01-01

    This study utilizes the theoretical framework of self-efficacy to explore the role it plays in rock climbing. Data were gathered from on-site self-administered surveys to rock-climbers in three different locations (N=72). A conceptual model was developed to consider the relationship between selfefficacy and frequency of rock climbing. The initial factor of self-...

  10. Effect of an on-sight lead on the physiological and psychological responses to rock climbing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draper, Nick; Jones, Glenys A; Fryer, Simon; Hodgson, Chris; Blackwell, Gavin

    2008-01-01

    Rock climbing is a multi-discipline activity that encompasses forms such as bouldering, top roping and lead climbing on natural and artificial climbing surfaces. A major focus of research has been explanation of physiological functioning. More recent research indicates that anxiety levels are elevated for less experienced climbers and in response to lead climbing ascents. Research regarding the demands of rock climbing has placed a lesser focus on the interaction of psychological and physiological factors. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of an on-sight lead climb on the physiological and psychological demands of the climb in comparison with a subsequent lead climb. Ten intermediate level climbers volunteered to complete the two climbing trials, on-sight lead climb (OSLC) and second lead climb (LC2). Climb time, lactate concentrations (baseline, pre climb, post climb and 15 min post climb), heart rate (1 min pre climb, peak HR, 1 min post climb and average climb across the duration of the climb), oxygen consumption, pre climb anxiety (CSAI-2R) were assessed for each climber for both trials. Results indicated that there were significant differences in self reported pre climb somatic and cognitive anxiety (t(9) = 2.79, p = 0.01, t(9) = 1.94, p = 0.043), climb time (t(9) = 3.07, p = 0.0052) and post climb lactate concentrations between the climbs (t(9) = 2.58, p = 0.015). These results indicate that psychological as well as physiological stress impact upon the response to rock climbing. The higher anxiety levels associated with an OSLC are likely to have influenced the physiological responses for the intermediate climbers in this study. Future studies should take into account the type of climbing, experience of climbers and the number of ascents as well as taking into account the interaction between physiological and psychological factors in response to rock climbing. Key pointsFor intermediate climbers, there are significant differences in

  11. 5 CFR 532.261 - Special wage schedules for leader and supervisory schedules for leader and supervisory wage...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Special wage schedules for leader and supervisory schedules for leader and supervisory wage employees in the Puerto Rico wage area. 532.261 Section... RATE SYSTEMS Prevailing Rate Determinations § 532.261 Special wage schedules for leader and supervisory...

  12. Wages, wage violations, and pesticide safety experienced by migrant farmworkers in North Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Erin; Nguyen, Ha T; Isom, Scott; Quandt, Sara A; Grzywacz, Joseph G; Chen, Haiying; Arcury, Thomas A

    2011-01-01

    Farmworkers have the potential to receive wages that fail to meet minimum wage standards. This analysis describes wages and minimum wage violations among farmworkers, and it determines associations of wage violations with personal characteristics and pesticide safety regulation violations. Data are from a cross-sectional survey of 300 eastern North Carolina farmworkers conducted in June through August, 2009. Most farmworkers (90.0%) were paid by the hour, but 11.7 percent received piece-rate pay. Wage violations were prevalent among farmworkers: 18.3 percent of all farmworkers, 45.3 percent of farmworkers without H-2A visas, and 3.6 percent of farmworkers with H-2A visas experienced wage violations. Most farmworkers experienced numerous pesticide safety violations. Personal characteristics were not associated with wage violations among farmworkers without H-2A visas, but some pesticide safety violations were associated with wage violations. The association of violations indicates that some growers generally violate regulations. Greater enforcement of all regulations is needed.

  13. WAGES, WAGE VIOLATIONS, AND PESTICIDE SAFETY EXPERIENCED BY MIGRANT FARMWORKERS IN NORTH CAROLINA*

    Science.gov (United States)

    ROBINSON, ERIN; NGUYEN, HA T.; ISOM, SCOTT; QUANDT, SARA A.; GRZYWACZ, JOSEPH G.; CHEN, HAIYING; ARCURY, THOMAS A.

    2012-01-01

    Farmworkers have the potential to receive wages that fail to meet minimum wage standards. This analysis describes wages and minimum wage violations among farmworkers, and it determines associations of wage violations with personal characteristics and pesticide safety regulation violations. Data are from a cross-sectional survey of 300 eastern North Carolina farmworkers conducted in June through August, 2009. Most farmworkers (90.0%) were paid by the hour, but 11.7 percent received piece-rate pay. Wage violations were prevalent among farmworkers: 18.3 percent of all farmworkers, 45.3 percent of farmworkers without H-2A visas, and 3.6 percent of farmworkers with H-2A visas experienced wage violations. Most farmworkers experienced numerous pesticide safety violations. Personal characteristics were not associated with wage violations among farmworkers without H-2A visas, but some pesticide safety violations were associated with wage violations. The association of violations indicates that some growers generally violate regulations. Greater enforcement of all regulations is needed. PMID:21733804

  14. Wage determination and discrimination among older workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, J F

    1979-09-01

    In this study, the determinants of the wage rates of a large sample of individuals aged 58 to 63 are first analyzed. Second, an explanation for the large discrepancies existing between the average wage rates earned by whites and nonwhites and by men and women is attempted. Human capital and geographic variables were found to be important wage determinants. Education, vocational training, years of job tenure, health, region of residence and local cost of living were significant explanators, especially for whites. Differences in these variables, however, cannot completely explain the wage differentials that exist by race and sex. There is a large unexplained component (especially in the male-female comparison) offering evidence of race and sex discrimination among older workers. In the case of sex discrimination, much of the problem appears to be occupational segregation--the crowding of women into low paying industries and occupations.

  15. Vacancy Duration, Wage Offers, and Job Requirements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Tor Viking; Chen, Long-Hwa

    is concerned with how vacancy durations vary with firms' minimum wage offers and minimum job requirements (regarding education, skills, age, gender and earlier work experience). The empirical analysis is based on ten employer surveys carried out by the DGBAS on Taiwan during the period 1996-2006. We estimate...... logistic discrete hazard models with a rich set of job and firm characteristics as explanatory variables. The results show that vacancies associated with higher wage offers take, ceteris paribus, longer to be filled. The impact of firms' wage offers and credential requirements does not vary over...... the business cycle. However, firms vary their skills requirements over the business cycle: our empirical analysis shows that, for a given wage offer, requirements are stricter in recessions and downturns. Separating between reasons for posting vacancies turned out important in explaining differences in vacancy...

  16. Quantitative Research on the Minimum Wage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfarb, Robert S.

    1975-01-01

    The article reviews recent research examining the impact of minimum wage requirements on the size and distribution of teenage employment and earnings. The studies measure income distribution, employment levels and effect on unemployment. (MW)

  17. Impact of the Minimum Wage on Compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Michael N.; Candland, Charles W.

    1979-01-01

    Assesses the impact of increases in the minimum wage on salary schedules, provides guidelines for creating a philosophy to deal with the impact, and outlines options and presents recommendations. (IRT)

  18. Weight and wages: fat versus lean paychecks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Euna; Norton, Edward C; Stearns, Sally C

    2009-05-01

    Past empirical work has shown a negative relationship between the body mass index (BMI) and wages in most cases. We improve on this work by allowing the marginal effect of non-linear BMI groups to vary by gender, age, and type of interpersonal relationships required in each occupation. We use the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (1982-1998). We find that the often-reported negative relationship between the BMI and wages is larger in occupations requiring interpersonal skills with presumably more social interactions. Also, the wage penalty increases as the respondents get older beyond their mid-twenties. We show that being overweight and obese penalizes the probability of employment across all race-gender subgroups except black women and men. Our results for the obesity-wage association can be explained by either consumers or employers having distaste for obese workers. (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Globalization and the Gender Wage Gap

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Remco H. Oostendorp

    There are several theoretical reasons why globalization will have a narrowing as well as a widening effect on the gender wage gap, but little is known about the actual impact, except for some country studies...

  20. Fertility timing, wages, and human capital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, M L; Bloom, D E; Neumark, D

    1993-02-01

    This theoretical model posits that women who delay child bearing will be more likely to invest in human capital (training that enhances productivity but is costly). This investment is conditioned by a greater discount rate than an economy-wide growth rate of wages for non-human capital investor women. The aim of the model is to present a more unified view of relationships between wages and fertility timing identified in earlier research. The empirical analyses, using ordinary least squares techniques, was based on data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Young Women, 1968-82 annually, for a sample of 1817 White working women aged 28-38 in 1982. Data were available for wages, education, work experience, age, number of children, and the percentage in occupations (manager, professional, administrative, service, and blue collar). First wages of women not in school and without a first birth were obtained for 991 women in the sample. Descriptive statistics revealed that the average early wage of late child bearers was 37% higher than the average early wage of early child bearers and 43% higher for 1982 wages. Childless women, compared to early child bearers, experienced a growth in wages from 31-38%. The assumptions in the theoretical model were 1) that all women were equally productive in the labor market in the beginning; 2) that women bore only one child; 3) that women worked continuously for a period of time, except for time out for child bearing; 4) that all women had the option of investing in one type of human capital, which cost the same for all women; 5) that the only source of income was the woman's own earnings; and 6) that a woman's lifetime utility was a function of the present value of her lifetime income and the intervening time period for child birth. Differences in education, experience, tenure, and wages were strongly associated with differences in fertility timing. The results revealed that wages were higher for delayed child bearers, primarily

  1. [Association between trunk muscle activation and wall inclination during various static climbing positions: implications for therapeutic climbing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzybowski, C; Donath, L; Wagner, H

    2014-06-01

    Sport climbing has been increasingly applied as therapy for patients with orthopaedic problems. Results from previous intervention studies have already revealed positive effects, especially for people with back problems, although there is a lack of baseline knowledge regarding the general effects of climbing. The aim of this present study is to investigate the muscle activation of the trunk while performing various static climbing positions at different inclination angles. SUBJECTS/MATERIAL AND METHODS: Thirteen healthy adults without climbing experience were asked to hold three static climbing positions (base position, lifting a hand, lifting a foot) at three different handhold set-ups and six wall inclination angles (0°, 4°, 8°, 12°, 15°, 18°) for 5 seconds each. Bilateral muscle activity of Erector spinae, Multifidus, Latissimus dorsi, Obliquus externus abdominis, Obliquus internus abdominis and Rectus abdominis was measured using surface electromyography. Data were analysed for each muscle and climbing condition separately. Compared to the vertical wall, the muscle activity starts to differ significantly (p ≤ 0.05) from 12° onwards. This inclination angle particularly affects the activity of all muscles when lifting a hand (0.000 ≤ p ≤ 0.048). The oblique abdominal muscles did not show any or little effects when lifting a foot or being in the base position, while all other muscles demonstrate a continuous increase. The EMG data were normalised to the corresponding base position and analysed for each muscle and climbing condition separately. Inclinable climbing walls are an appropriate method to increase muscle activity. Compared to the base position, activation of the oblique abdominal muscles, which are relevant for a stable trunk, is increased only when a hand is lifted. Climbing walls used for therapy should offer variable inclination angles. Further research should concentrate on the development and evaluation of climbing exercises for

  2. Analisis Implementasi Standar Keselamatan dan Pemakaian Peralatan Panjat Tebing untuk Meningkatkan Keselamatan Kerja pada Kegiatan Sport Climbing (Studi pada Fpti Jawa Tengah)

    OpenAIRE

    Jayanti, M.Sc, dr. Siswi; Lestyanto, M.Si, dr. Daru; Pongky Sugiarto, Febrina

    2013-01-01

    Broadly speaking, the climbing wall is divided into two: Climbing Natural and Artificial Climbing. Artificial Climbing identical with Sport Climbing or Climbing Achievement commandeered By FPTI (Indonesian Rock Climbing Federation). Since rock climbing is a high-risk activity that is necessary to conduct research on the safety standards of rock climbing. The purpose of this study was to analyzeimplementation of safety standards and the use of rock climbing equipment to improve safety work in ...

  3. Random social networks, unemployment and wage inequality

    OpenAIRE

    Ioannides, Y.M.; Soetevent, A.R.

    2006-01-01

    Empirical studies of labor markets show that social contacts are an important source of job-related information. At the same time, wage differences among workers may be explained only in part by differences in individual background characteristics. Such findings motivate our model in which differences in "social connectedness" among otherwise identical workers result in wage inequality and differences in unemployment rates. The model of this paper allows for heterogeneity in the number of con...

  4. The Relationship between Climbing Ability and Physiological Responses to Rock Climbing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Baláš

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between submaximal and maximal physiological responses to rock climbing for climbers of differing abilities. Methods. Twenty-six male climbers performed a submaximal climbing test on a known circuit at 90° (vertical and 105° (15° overhanging inclination and speed 25 movements·min−1. A maximal test was undertaken on a similar circuit at the same speed with inclination increasing by 10° for each successive 3 min stage. Results. Mean oxygen consumption and heart rate (HR increased with wall inclination and climbers reached a mean (±SD peak V˙O2 of 40.3 ± 3.5 mL·kg−1·min−1 during the maximal test. Self-reported climbing ability was negatively correlated with V˙O2 and HR during the submaximal test at 90° (V˙O2, r=−0.82; HR, and r=−0.66 and at 105° (V˙O2, r=−0.84; HR, and r=−0.78 suggesting an increased exercise economy for climbers with a higher ability level. Conclusion. Findings from this study indicate that there is a relationship between wall inclination and the physiological demand of a climb. However, the increased technical ability and fitness of higher level climbers appears to an extent to offset the increased demand through improved exercise economy which in turn leads to an increased time to exhaustion and an improvement in performance.

  5. Physiological determinants of climbing-specific finger endurance and sport rock climbing performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeod, D; Sutherland, D L; Buntin, L; Whitaker, A; Aitchison, T; Watt, I; Bradley, J; Grant, S

    2007-10-01

    The aim of the study was to examine several physiological responses to a climbing-specific task to identify determinants of endurance in sport rock climbing. Finger strength and endurance of intermediate rock climbers (n = 11) and non-climbers (n = 9) were compared using climbing-specific apparatus. After maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) trials, two isometric endurance tests were performed at 40% (s = 2.5%) MVC until volitional exhaustion (continuous contractions and intermittent contractions of 10 s, with 3 s rest between contractions). Changes in muscle blood oxygenation and muscle blood volume were recorded in the flexor digitorum superficialis using near infra-red spectroscopy. Statistical significance was set at P climbing-specific endurance, was greater for climbers in the intermittent test (climbers: 51,769 N x s, s = 12,229; non-climbers: 35,325 N x s, s = 9724) but not in the continuous test (climbers: 21,043 N x s, s = 4474; non-climbers: 15,816 N x s, s = 6263). Recovery of forearm oxygenation during rest phases (intermittent test) explained 41.1% of the variability in the force-time integral. Change in total haemoglobin was significantly greater in non-climbers (continuous test) than climbers (P = 0.023--40% test timepoint, P = 0.014--60% test timepoint). Pressor responses were similar between groups and not related to the force-time integral for either test. We conclude that muscle re-oxygenation during rest phases is a predictor of endurance performance.

  6. The Relationship between Climbing Ability and Physiological Responses to Rock Climbing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Andrew J.; Cochrane, Darryl J.; Kaláb, Miloš; Kodejška, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Aim. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between submaximal and maximal physiological responses to rock climbing for climbers of differing abilities. Methods. Twenty-six male climbers performed a submaximal climbing test on a known circuit at 90° (vertical) and 105° (15° overhanging) inclination and speed 25 movements·min−1. A maximal test was undertaken on a similar circuit at the same speed with inclination increasing by 10° for each successive 3 min stage. Results. Mean oxygen consumption and heart rate (HR) increased with wall inclination and climbers reached a mean (±SD) peak V˙O2 of 40.3 ± 3.5 mL·kg−1 ·min−1 during the maximal test. Self-reported climbing ability was negatively correlated with V˙O2 and HR during the submaximal test at 90° (V˙O2, r = −0.82; HR, and r = −0.66) and at 105° (V˙O2, r = −0.84; HR, and r = −0.78) suggesting an increased exercise economy for climbers with a higher ability level. Conclusion. Findings from this study indicate that there is a relationship between wall inclination and the physiological demand of a climb. However, the increased technical ability and fitness of higher level climbers appears to an extent to offset the increased demand through improved exercise economy which in turn leads to an increased time to exhaustion and an improvement in performance. PMID:24587742

  7. Climbing with adhesion: from bioinspiration to biounderstanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutkosky, Mark R

    2015-08-06

    Bioinspiration is an increasingly popular design paradigm, especially as robots venture out of the laboratory and into the world. Animals are adept at coping with the variability that the world imposes. With advances in scientific tools for understanding biological structures in detail, we are increasingly able to identify design features that account for animals' robust performance. In parallel, advances in fabrication methods and materials are allowing us to engineer artificial structures with similar properties. The resulting robots become useful platforms for testing hypotheses about which principles are most important. Taking gecko-inspired climbing as an example, we show that the process of extracting principles from animals and adapting them to robots provides insights for both robotics and biology.

  8. Bedform climbing in theory and nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, D.M.; Hunter, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    Where bedforms migrate during deposition, they move upward (climb) with respect to the generalized sediment surface. Sediment deposited on each lee slope and not eroded during the passage of a following trough is left behind as a cross-stratified bed. Where sediment is transported solely by downcurrent migration of two-dimensional bedforms the thickness of cross-stratified beds is equal to the decrease in bedform cross-sectional area divided by the migration distance over which that size decrease occurs; where bedforms migrate more than one spacing while depositing cross-strata, bed thickness is only a fraction of bedform height. Equations that describe this depositional process are used to explain observations on actual dunes and to predict dune sizes for ancient sandstones. -from Authors

  9. Energy expenditure and physiological responses during indoor rock climbing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mermier, C M; Robergs, R A; McMinn, S M; Heyward, V H

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To report the physiological responses of indoor rock climbing. METHODS: Fourteen experienced climbers (nine men, five women) performed three climbing trials on an indoor climbing wall. Subjects performed three trials of increasing difficulty: (a) an easy 90 degrees vertical wall, (b) a moderately difficult negatively angled wall (106 degrees), and (c) a difficult horizontal overhang (151 degrees). At least 15 minutes separated each trial. Expired air was collected in a Douglas bag after four minutes of climbing and heart rate (HR) was recorded continuously using a telemetry unit. Arterialised blood samples were obtained from a hyperaemised ear lobe at rest and one or two minutes after each trial for measurement of blood lactate. RESULTS: Significant differences were found between trials for HR, lactate, oxygen consumption (VO2), and energy expenditure, but not for respiratory exchange ratio. Analysis of the HR and VO2 responses indicated that rock climbing does not elicit the traditional linear HR-VO2 relationship characteristic of treadmill and cycle ergometry exercise. During the three trials, HR increased to 74-85% of predicted maximal values and energy expenditure was similar to that reported for running at a moderate pace (8-11 minutes per mile). CONCLUSIONS: These data indicate that indoor rock climbing is a good activity to increase cardiorespiratory fitness and muscular endurance. In addition, the traditional HR-VO2 relationship should not be used in the analysis of this sport, or for prescribing exercise intensity for climbing. PMID:9298558

  10. Energy expenditure and physiological responses during indoor rock climbing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mermier, C M; Robergs, R A; McMinn, S M; Heyward, V H

    1997-09-01

    To report the physiological responses of indoor rock climbing. Fourteen experienced climbers (nine men, five women) performed three climbing trials on an indoor climbing wall. Subjects performed three trials of increasing difficulty: (a) an easy 90 degrees vertical wall, (b) a moderately difficult negatively angled wall (106 degrees), and (c) a difficult horizontal overhang (151 degrees). At least 15 minutes separated each trial. Expired air was collected in a Douglas bag after four minutes of climbing and heart rate (HR) was recorded continuously using a telemetry unit. Arterialised blood samples were obtained from a hyperaemised ear lobe at rest and one or two minutes after each trial for measurement of blood lactate. Significant differences were found between trials for HR, lactate, oxygen consumption (VO2), and energy expenditure, but not for respiratory exchange ratio. Analysis of the HR and VO2 responses indicated that rock climbing does not elicit the traditional linear HR-VO2 relationship characteristic of treadmill and cycle ergometry exercise. During the three trials, HR increased to 74-85% of predicted maximal values and energy expenditure was similar to that reported for running at a moderate pace (8-11 minutes per mile). These data indicate that indoor rock climbing is a good activity to increase cardiorespiratory fitness and muscular endurance. In addition, the traditional HR-VO2 relationship should not be used in the analysis of this sport, or for prescribing exercise intensity for climbing.

  11. Leaf mimicry in a climbing plant protects against herbivory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianoli, Ernesto; Carrasco-Urra, Fernando

    2014-05-05

    Mimicry refers to adaptive similarity between a mimic organism and a model. Mimicry in animals is rather common, whereas documented cases in plants are rare, and the associated benefits are seldom elucidated [1, 2]. We show the occurrence of leaf mimicry in a climbing plant endemic to a temperate rainforest. The woody vine Boquila trifoliolata mimics the leaves of its supporting trees in terms of size, shape, color, orientation, petiole length, and/or tip spininess. Moreover, sequential leaf mimicry occurs when a single individual vine is associated with different tree species. Leaves of unsupported vines differed from leaves of climbing plants closely associated with tree foliage but did not differ from those of vines climbing onto leafless trunks. Consistent with an herbivory-avoidance hypothesis, leaf herbivory on unsupported vines was greater than that on vines climbing on trees but was greatest on vines climbing onto leafless trunks. Thus, B. trifoliolata gains protection against herbivory not merely by climbing and thus avoiding ground herbivores [3] but also by climbing onto trees whose leaves are mimicked. Unlike earlier cases of plant mimicry or crypsis, in which the plant roughly resembles a background or color pattern [4-7] or mimics a single host [8, 9], B. trifoliolata is able to mimic several hosts. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Biomechanical Analyses of Stair-climbing while Dual-tasking

    OpenAIRE

    Vallabhajosula, Srikant; Tan, Chi Wei; Mukherjee, Mukul; Davidson, Austin J.; Stergiou, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Stair-climbing while doing a concurrent task like talking or holding an object is a common activity of daily living which poses high risk for falls. While biomechanical analyses of overground walking during dual-tasking have been studied extensively, little is known on the biomechanics of stair-climbing while dual-tasking. We sought to determine the impact of performing a concurrent cognitive or motor task during stair-climbing. We hypothesized that a concurrent cognitive task will have a gre...

  13. Wages in the food chain in Burundi: WageIndicator survey 2013

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijdens, K.; Besamusca, J.; Ndereyahaga, R.

    2013-01-01

    This WageIndicator Data Report presents the results of the face-to-face WageIndicator survey of the labour force conducted between the 7th of April and the 29th of April 2013 in all provinces of Burundi. In total 1,679 persons were interviewed; 52% were men, 48% women and 43% were under 30 years of

  14. Wages in the food chain in South Sudan: WageIndicator survey 2013

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Besamusca, J.; Tijdens, K.

    2013-01-01

    This WageIndicator Data Report presents the results of the face-to-face WageIndicator survey in South Sudan, conducted between the 1st of June and the 19th of July 2013 in the southern and eastern regions of South Sudan. In total 1,329 persons were interviewed; 71% were men, 29% women and 37% were

  15. Wages in the food chain in Ethiopia: WageIndicator survey 2013

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijdens, K.; Besamusca, J.; Asteraye, N.

    2013-01-01

    This WageIndicator Data Report presents the results of the face-to-face WageIndicator survey in Ethiopia, conducted between the 2rd of March and the 20th of May 2013 in all provinces of Ethiopia. In total 2,126 persons were interviewed; 53% were men, 47% women and 48% were under 30 years of age. The

  16. Wages in the food chain in Mozambique: WageIndicator survey 2013

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijdens, K.; Besamusca, J.

    2013-01-01

    This WageIndicator Data Report presents the results of the face-to-face WageIndicator survey of the labour force, conducted between the 27th of May and the 1st of June 2013 in all provinces of Mozambique. In total 1,679 persons were interviewed; 53% were men, 47% women and 43% were under 30 years

  17. Inter-Industry Wage Differentials and the Gender Wage Gap: An Identification Problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horrace, William C.; Oaxaca, Ronald L.

    2001-01-01

    States that a method for estimating gender wage gaps by industry yields estimates that vary according to arbitrary choice of omitted reference groups. Suggests alternative methods not susceptible to this problem that can be applied to other contexts, such as racial, union/nonunion, and immigrant/native wage differences. (SK)

  18. Evolutionary novelty versus exaptation: oral kinematics in feeding versus climbing in the waterfall-climbing Hawaiian Goby Sicyopterus stimpsoni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Joshua A; Maie, Takashi; Schoenfuss, Heiko L; Blob, Richard W

    2013-01-01

    Species exposed to extreme environments often exhibit distinctive traits that help meet the demands of such habitats. Such traits could evolve independently, but under intense selective pressures of extreme environments some existing structures or behaviors might be coopted to meet specialized demands, evolving via the process of exaptation. We evaluated the potential for exaptation to have operated in the evolution of novel behaviors of the waterfall-climbing gobiid fish genus Sicyopterus. These fish use an "inching" behavior to climb waterfalls, in which an oral sucker is cyclically protruded and attached to the climbing surface. They also exhibit a distinctive feeding behavior, in which the premaxilla is cyclically protruded to scrape diatoms from the substrate. Given the similarity of these patterns, we hypothesized that one might have been coopted from the other. To evaluate this, we filmed climbing and feeding in Sicyopterus stimpsoni from Hawai'i, and measured oral kinematics for two comparisons. First, we compared feeding kinematics of S. stimpsoni with those for two suction feeding gobiids (Awaous guamensis and Lentipes concolor), assessing what novel jaw movements were required for algal grazing. Second, we quantified the similarity of oral kinematics between feeding and climbing in S. stimpsoni, evaluating the potential for either to represent an exaptation from the other. Premaxillary movements showed the greatest differences between scraping and suction feeding taxa. Between feeding and climbing, overall profiles of oral kinematics matched closely for most variables in S. stimpsoni, with only a few showing significant differences in maximum values. Although current data cannot resolve whether oral movements for climbing were coopted from feeding, or feeding movements coopted from climbing, similarities between feeding and climbing kinematics in S. stimpsoni are consistent with evidence of exaptation, with modifications, between these behaviors. Such

  19. The impact of minimum wage on female employment in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Kawaguchi, Daiji; Yamada, Ken

    2004-01-01

    The statutory minimum wage in Japan is revised every year and increases by almost the same amount across prefectures, regardless of the disparity in the wage distribution across prefectures. Due to this feature of minimum wagesetting, the minimum wage cuts into the wage distribution deeply in rural Japan. We examine the impact of the minimum wage on employment, focus-ing on middle-aged women, who are known to be typical, low-wage workers in Japan. The results, based on a panel estimation, sug...

  20. The Flexor Tendon Pulley System and Rock Climbing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Crowley, Timothy

    Rock climbing has increased in popularity over the past two decades. Closed traumatic rupture of the finger flexor tendon pulleys is rare among the general population but is seen much more commonly in rock climbers...

  1. Functional predictors of stair-climbing speed in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinman, Martha R; O'Connell, Janelle K; Dorr, Melissa; Hardin, Robyn; Tumlinson, Allison B; Varner, Bria

    2014-01-01

    Falls on stairs are a common cause of injury and death among older adults. Although stair climbing is a component of some instruments that assess activities of daily living, normal speeds for safe stairway ambulation have not been established. Furthermore, little is known about which components of functional mobility are most highly associated with stair-climbing speed. The purposes of this study were to determine the range of normal stair-climbing speeds for ambulatory, community-dwelling older adults and identify which functional mobility tests could best explain this speed. Twenty men and 34 women older than 65 years completed 6 functional mobility tests, including timed heel rises, timed chair stands, functional reach, one-legged stance time (OLST), a timed step test (alternately touching a step 10 times), and self-selected gait speed. Participants were then timed as they ascended and descended a flight of 8 to 10 steps. Combined ascent-descent times were used to calculate stair-climbing speed in steps per second. Stepwise regression techniques determined the best functional predictors for stair-climbing speed. Participants ascended and descended stairs at an average speed of 1.3 steps per second; men tended to ambulate stairs more quickly than women. The best predictors of stair-climbing speed were usual gait speed and OLST (R = 0.79; P = .01), which explained 63% of the variance in stair-climbing speed. Our results were similar to others who reported stair-climbing speeds ranging from 1.1 to 1.7 steps per second for older adults. However, the 2 predictors identified in this study provide a simpler and more accurate model for estimating stair-climbing speed than has been previously reported. Further research is needed to determine whether this speed is sufficient for negotiating stairs in an emergency. In addition, further study is needed to determine which tests/measures best differentiate individuals who can and cannot independently climb a typical flight of

  2. A Survey of Wall Climbing Robots: Recent Advances and Challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Shunsuke Nansai; Rajesh Elara Mohan

    2016-01-01

    In recent decades, skyscrapers, as represented by the Burj Khalifa in Dubai and Shanghai Tower in Shanghai, have been built due to the improvements of construction technologies. Even in such newfangled skyscrapers, the façades are generally cleaned by humans. Wall climbing robots, which are capable of climbing up vertical surfaces, ceilings and roofs, are expected to replace the manual workforce in façade cleaning works, which is both hazardous and laborious work. Such tasks require these rob...

  3. The flexor tendon pulley system and rock climbing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, Timothy P

    2012-06-01

    Rock climbing has increased in popularity over the past two decades. Closed traumatic rupture of the finger flexor tendon pulleys is rare among the general population but is seen much more commonly in rock climbers. This article reviews the anatomy and biomechanics of the finger flexor tendon pulleys, how they may be injured in rock climbing and how these injuries are best diagnosed and managed.

  4. Self-reported ability assessment in rock climbing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draper, Nick; Dickson, Tabitha; Blackwell, Gavin; Fryer, Simon; Priestley, Sefton; Winter, David; Ellis, Greg

    2011-05-01

    Level of ability within rock climbing is generally expressed in terms of a "best ascent", rated using various grading systems within the sport. The most common method of obtaining this information is via self-report. The aim of this study was to examine the validity of self-reported climbing grades. Twenty-nine competitive rock climbers (17 males, 12 females) were first asked to report their current (defined as within the last 12 months) best on-sight lead ascent grade (Aus/NZ). The participants then climbed a specifically designed indoor route, under on-sight conditions (one attempt, no route practice or preview), to obtain an assessed grade. The route increased in difficulty, and was such that the distance achieved by the climber corresponded to a particular grade. The mean (±standard deviation) self-reported and assessed grade was 22.6 ± 3.4 and 22.0 ± 3.0 (Aus/NZ) respectively. Despite slight over- and underestimations in males and females respectively, there was no statistically significant difference between self-reported and assessed on-sight climbing grades. The results of this study suggest that self-reported climbing grades provide a valid and accurate reflection of climbing ability.

  5. Foot use during vertical climbing in chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunderlich, R E; Ischinger, S B

    2017-08-01

    Upright bipedalism is a hallmark of hominin locomotion, however debates continue regarding the extent of arboreal locomotion and the nature of bipedalism practiced by early hominins. Pedal form and function play a prominent role in these debates, as the foot is the element that directly interacts with the locomotor substrate. Recent finds have substantially increased the availability of associated foot remains of early hominins and emphasized the enigmatic nature of the early evolution of human bipedalism. New discoveries of associated forefoot remains have afforded the opportunity to assess relative proportions across the forefoot of fossil hominins and illuminated the need for data on relative loading across the forefoot in extant hominoids. In order to provide functional data with which to examine the relationship between bony features and load distribution across the forefoot during climbing, we present the first analysis of plantar pressure distribution across the forefoot of chimpanzees climbing a vertical support. Chimpanzees load the medial metatarsals and first toe disproportionately during vertical climbing. Peak pressures on these elements occur at the end of stance phase during climbing and are higher than on any other elements of the foot. Toe pressures are considerably higher during vertical climbing than during knuckle-walking or movement on horizontal poles, supporting the notion that the plantarly-broad and dorsally-narrow metatarsal heads in chimpanzees and some early hominins are associated with close-packing of the metatarsophalangeal joint during climbing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Improving patient safety: lessons from rock climbing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Nic

    2012-02-01

    How to improve patient safety remains an intractable problem, despite large investment and some successes. Academics have argued that the root of the problem is a lack of a comprehensive 'safety culture' in hospitals. Other safety-critical industries such as commercial aviation invest heavily in staff training to develop such a culture, but comparable programmes are almost entirely absent from the health care sector. In rock climbing and many other dangerous activities, the 'buddy system' is used to ensure that safety systems are adhered to despite adverse circumstances. This system involves two or more people using simple checks and clear communication to prevent problems causing harm. Using this system as an example could provide a simple, original and entertaining way of introducing medical students to the idea that human factors are central to ensuring patient safety. Teaching the buddy system may improve understanding and acceptance of other patient safety initiatives, and could also be used by junior doctors as a tool to improve the safety of their practice. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2012.

  7. COMMENTS ON THE INTERDEPENDENCE BETWEEN THE MINIMUM WAGE, PRICES AND OTHER TYPES OF WAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona GHITA

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Most of the times, the minimum wage is regarded as main instrument of poverty diminishment. From the experience of developed countries it results that the increase of the minimum wage must carefully be determined so as not to trigger negative effects on employment, and not to exceed the one of the average wage. The International Monetary Fund has shown concern with respect to the consequences of increasing minimum wage, indicating that even agreeing with social programmes, the significant increase of the minimum wage above the level of labour productivity increase shall hinder the deflation process ad the Romanian economic competitiveness and that would affect, finally, more population categories with lowest incomes. The paper researches, in its first part, the relation between the minimum wage, the average wage and the level of inflation from the theoretical viewpoint, and in the second a statistical analysis is performed with respect to the evolution of these indicators and the relationship between them in Romania for the period after 1990.

  8. Wage Inequality and the Location of Cities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farrokhi, Farid; Jinkins, David

    In cross-sectional American census data, we document that isolated cities tend to have less wage inequality. To explain this correlation and other correlations between population and wages, we build an equilibrium empirical model that incorporates high and low-skill labor, costly trade, and both...... agglomeration and congestion forces. The model bridges the gap between the spatial inequality literature which abstracts from geography, and the economic geography literature which abstracts from inequality. We find that geographical location explains 9.2% of observed variation in wage inequality across...... American cities. In counterfactual experiments, we find that reductions in domestic trade costs benefit all American workers and decrease welfare inequality. We also examine the effects on inequality and welfare of both regional and national skill-biased technology shocks. We find that in larger cities...

  9. Home Ownership, Job Duration, and Wages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch, Jakob Roland; Rosholm, Michael; Svarer, Michael

    We investigate the impact of home ownership on individual job mobility and wages in Denmark. We find that home ownership has a negative impact on job-to-job mobility both in terms of transition into new local jobs and new jobs outside the local labour market. In addition, there is a clear negativ...... effect of home ownership on the unemployment risk and a positive impact on wages. These results are robust to different strategies for correcting for the possible endogeneity of the home owner variable......We investigate the impact of home ownership on individual job mobility and wages in Denmark. We find that home ownership has a negative impact on job-to-job mobility both in terms of transition into new local jobs and new jobs outside the local labour market. In addition, there is a clear negative...

  10. Office of Child Support and Enforcement (OCSE) State Wage Alerts

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The OCSE State Wage Alert is a quarterly match which detects SSI overpayments by identifying unreported wage and unemployment data provided to the Office of Child...

  11. Period effects, cohort effects, and the narrowing gender wage gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Colin; Pearlman, Jessica

    2013-11-01

    Despite the abundance of sociological research on the gender wage gap, questions remain. In particular, the role of cohorts is under investigated. Using data from the Current Population Survey, we use age-period-cohort analysis to uniquely estimate age, period, and cohort effects on the gender wage gap. The narrowing of the gender wage gap that occurred between 1975 and 2009 is largely due to cohort effects. Since the mid-1990s, the gender wage gap has continued to close absent of period effects. While gains in female wages contributed to declines in the gender wage gap for cohorts born before 1950, for later cohorts the narrowing of the gender wage gap is primarily a result of declines in male wages. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Wage inequality and team production: an experimental analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartling, B.; von Siemens, F.A.

    2011-01-01

    Numerous survey studies report that human resource managers curb wage inequality with the intent to avoid detrimental effects on workers' morale. However, there exists little controlled empirical evidence demonstrating that horizontal social comparisons and wage inequality have adverse effects on

  13. Human Capital Heterogeneity: University Choice and Wages

    OpenAIRE

    Navon, Guy

    2006-01-01

    This paper analyzes the impact of post-secondary education on wages in Israel. The focus is on the impact of university choice on individual wages controlling for the degree acquired and the area of study. Although the raw data indicate that universities command a different return to education, the paper shows that this is due to the selection of more able individuals to particular universities and not to differences in the quality of education offered. The paper is based on a unique data set...

  14. The Gender Wage Gap and Domestic Violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizer, Anna

    2010-09-01

    Three quarters of all violence against women is perpetrated by domestic partners. This study exploits exogenous changes in the demand for labor in female-dominated industries to estimate the impact of the male-female wage gap on domestic violence. Decreases in the wage gap reduce violence against women, consistent with a household bargaining model. These findings shed new light on the health production process as well as observed income gradients in health and suggest that in addition to addressing concerns of equity and efficiency, pay parity can also improve the health of American women via reductions in violence.

  15. Product market integration, rents and wage inequality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Torben M.; Sørensen, Allan

    Globalization in the form of product market integration affects labour markets and produces winners and losers. While there are aggregate gains, it is in general ambiguous how inequality is affected. We explore this issue in a Ricardian model and show that it depends on the balance between...... "protection" and "specialization" rents. In particular, wage inequality among similar workers (residual wage inequality) may be U-shaped, at first decreasing and then increasing in the process of product market integration. Consequently, there may be gains in both the efficiency and the equity dimension until...

  16. Relative Wage Effects of German Unions

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, Christoph M

    1994-01-01

    In contrast to the United States or the United Kingdom where union status is generally tied to the job, the typical unionized worker in Germany is a member of an industry union and there is no direct institutional link between union membership and the worker's wage. Using micro data from the period 1978--88, this paper demonstrates the absence of relative union wage effects in the traditional sense. Union membership is an indicator for the labour force attachment of female workers, however. T...

  17. Effects of Health on Wages of Australian Men

    OpenAIRE

    Lixin Cai

    2007-01-01

    As a form of human capital health like education determines individuals’ productivity and thus wage rates. While there are numerous overseas studies that examine the effect of health on wages, research on this issue using Australian data is scarce. This paper uses the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) survey to investigate the effect of health on the wages of working-age Australian men. A simultaneous equation model of health and wages is estimated to account for endo...

  18. Wage curves for Spain evidence from the family budget survey

    OpenAIRE

    Sanromà, Esteve; Ramos Lobo, Raúl

    2003-01-01

    This study explores the existence of a wage curve for Spain. To quantify this relationship for the Spanish economy, we used individual data from the EPF 1990-1991. The results show the presence of a wage curve with an elasticity of -0.13. The availability of very detailed information on wages and unemployment has also shown that less protected labour market groups - young workers, manual workers and building sector workers- have a higher elasticity of wages to local unemployment. These ...

  19. The Effects of Job Evaluation Systems on Wage Effects of Education and Over-education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akkerman, A.; Allen, J.

    2009-01-01

    Unions are held responsible for various wage effects, such as higher wages and wage compression. In this paper we investigate another possible union effect on wages: are the actions of unions responsible for the observed relation between required education and wages? It is well known that wages are

  20. Research on Dynamics and Stability in the Stairs-Climbing of a Tracked Mobile Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weijun Tao

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Aiming at the functional requirement of climbing up the stairs, the dynamics and stability during a tracked mobile robot's climbing of stairs is studied. First, from the analysis of its cross-country performance, the mechanical structure of the tracked mobile robot is designed and the hardware composition of its control system is given. Second, based on the analysis to its stairs-climbing process, the dynamical model of stairs-climbing is established by using the classical mechanics method. Next, the stability conditions for its stairs-climbing are determined and an evaluation method of its stairs-climbing stability is proposed, based on a mechanics analysis on the robot's backwards tumbling during the stairs-climbing process. Through simulation and experiments, the effectiveness of the dynamical model and the stability evaluation method of the tracked mobile robot in stairs-climbing is verified, which can provide design and analysis foundations for the tracked mobile robots' stairs-climbing.

  1. 29 CFR 525.10 - Prevailing wage rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... services which only provide entry level wage data are not acceptable as sources for prevailing wage... OF WORKERS WITH DISABILITIES UNDER SPECIAL CERTIFICATES § 525.10 Prevailing wage rates. (a) A.... Such data may be obtained by surveying comparable firms in the area that employ primarily nondisabled...

  2. Trend of Average Wages as Indicator of Hypothetical Money Illusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Daszkowski

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The definition of wage in Poland not before 1998 includes any value of social security contribution. Changed definition creates higher level of reported wages, but was expected not to influence the take home pay. Nevertheless, the trend of average wages, after a short period, has returned to its previous line. Such effect is explained in the term of money illusion.

  3. Education, Educational Mismatch, and Wage Inequality: Evidence for Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budria, Santiago; Moro-Egido, Ana I.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we explore the connection between education and wage inequality in Spain for the period 1994-2001. Drawing on quantile regression, we describe the conditional wage distribution of different populations groups. We find that higher education is associated with higher wage dispersion. A contribution of the paper is that we explicitly…

  4. 29 CFR 510.20 - Wage surveys in Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Wage surveys in Puerto Rico. 510.20 Section 510.20 Labor... RICO Classification of Industries § 510.20 Wage surveys in Puerto Rico. (a) The legislative history to... qualify for an extended minimum wage phase-in, the government of Puerto Rico would be required to furnish...

  5. The Gender Wage Gap by Education in Italy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mussida, C.; Picchio, M.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: This paper studies the gender wage gap by educational attainment in Italy using the 1994–2001 ECHP data. We estimate wage distributions in the presence of covariates and sample selection separately for highly and low educated men and women. Then, we decompose the gender wage gap across all

  6. Wage Differentials between Women and Men in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, LIsbeth; Deding, Mette

    In this working paper we present the first male/female analysis carried out on new wage statistical data from Statistics Denmark. The purpose of the analysis is to uncover factors of importance to the differences of men’s and women’s hourly wages and furthermore to make up any wage differential...

  7. 48 CFR 22.1007 - Requirement to obtain wage determinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Amended 22.1007 Requirement to obtain wage determinations. The contracting officer shall obtain wage... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Requirement to obtain wage determinations. 22.1007 Section 22.1007 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION...

  8. Wage structure and the incentive effects of promotions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Herpen, M.; Cools, C.; van Praag, M.

    2006-01-01

    This paper studies wage structure characteristics and their incentive effects within one firm. Based on personnel records and an employee survey, we provide evidence that wages are attached to jobs and that promotions play a dominant role as a wage determinant. We furthermore show that a promotion

  9. Wage structure and the incentive effect of promotions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Herpen, M.; Cools, K.; van Praag, C.M.

    2004-01-01

    This paper studies wage structure characteristics and their consequent incentive effects empirically. Based on personnel records and an employee survey, we provide evidence that wages are attached to jobs and that promotions play a dominant role as a wage determinant. Our findings indicate

  10. Employment Effects of Minimum and Subminimum Wages. Recent Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumark, David

    Using a specially constructed panel data set on state minimum wage laws and labor market conditions, Neumark and Wascher (1992) presented evidence that countered the claim that minimum wages could be raised with no cost to employment. They concluded that estimates indicating that minimum wages reduced employment on the order of 1-2 percent for a…

  11. Minimum Wage Effects on Educational Enrollments in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Gail A.; Cruickshank, Amy A.

    2007-01-01

    This paper empirically examines the impact of minimum wages on educational enrollments in New Zealand. A significant reform to the youth minimum wage since 2000 has resulted in some age groups undergoing a 91% rise in their real minimum wage over the last 10 years. Three panel least squares multivariate models are estimated from a national sample…

  12. 41 CFR 50-201.1101 - Minimum wages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Minimum wages. 50-201... Contracts PUBLIC CONTRACTS, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR 201-GENERAL REGULATIONS § 50-201.1101 Minimum wages. Determinations of prevailing minimum wages or changes therein will be published in the Federal Register by the...

  13. The Minimum Wage and the Employment of Teenagers. Recent Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallick, Bruce; Currie, Janet

    A study used individual-level data from the National Longitudinal Study of Youth to examine the effects of changes in the federal minimum wage on teenage employment. Individuals in the sample were classified as either likely or unlikely to be affected by these increases in the federal minimum wage on the basis of their wage rates and industry of…

  14. 29 CFR 783.43 - Computation of seaman's minimum wage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Computation of seaman's minimum wage. 783.43 Section 783.43...'s minimum wage. Section 6(b) requires, under paragraph (2) of the subsection, that an employee...'s minimum wage requirements by reason of the 1961 Amendments (see §§ 783.23 and 783.26). Although...

  15. The Impact Of Minimum Wage On Employment Level And ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This research work has been carried out to analyze the critical impact of minimum wage of employment level and productivity in Nigeria. A brief literature on wage and its determination was highlighted. Models on minimum wage effect are being look into. This includes research work done by different economist analyzing it ...

  16. Minimum Wages and Skill Acquisition: Another Look at Schooling Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumark, David; Wascher, William

    2003-01-01

    Examines the effects of minimum wage on schooling, seeking to reconcile some of the contradictory results in recent research using Current Population Survey data from the late 1970s through the 1980s. Findings point to negative effects of minimum wages on school enrollment, bolstering the findings of negative effects of minimum wages on enrollment…

  17. 29 CFR 4.159 - General minimum wage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true General minimum wage. 4.159 Section 4.159 Labor Office of... General minimum wage. The Act, in section 2(b)(1), provides generally that no contractor or subcontractor... a contract less than the minimum wage specified under section 6(a)(1) of the Fair Labor Standards...

  18. Inter-Industry Wage Differentials and Job Flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krause, M.U.

    2002-01-01

    The paper explores the relationship between job flows and wages in the U.S. manufacturing sector, where wage differentials for seemingly identical workers and job reallocation rates are shown to be negatively correlated across 3-digit industries.High wage industries have the lowest turnover of jobs,

  19. Unemployment in Kenya: Some economic factors affecting wage ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article analyses the economic factors affecting wage employment in Kenya, where open unemployment fell from 15 per cent in 1998/1999 to 13 per cent in 2005/2006. As of 2005/2006, wage employment constituted 13 per cent of the total working population, which implies that doubling wage employment will absorb ...

  20. Employment Duration and Resistance to Wage Reductions : Experimental Evidence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burda, M.; Güth, W.; Kirchsteiger, G.; Uhlig, H.F.H.V.S.

    1998-01-01

    One of the long-standing puzzles in economics is why wages do not fall sufficiently in recessions so as to avoid increases in unemployment. Put differently, if the competitive market wage declines, why don't employers simply force their employees to accept lower wages as well? As an alternative to

  1. 29 CFR 500.81 - Payment of wages when due.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Payment of wages when due. 500.81 Section 500.81 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS MIGRANT AND SEASONAL AGRICULTURAL WORKER PROTECTION Worker Protections Wages and Payroll Standards § 500.81 Payment of...

  2. 42 CFR 413.231 - Adjustment for wages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Adjustment for wages. 413.231 Section 413.231... Disease (ESRD) Services and Organ Procurement Costs § 413.231 Adjustment for wages. (a) CMS adjusts the labor-related portion of the base rate to account for geographic differences in the area wage levels...

  3. 17 CFR 256.920 - Salaries and wages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Salaries and wages. 256.920... COMPANY ACT OF 1935 2. Expense § 256.920 Salaries and wages. (a) This account shall include salaries, wages, bonuses and other consideration for services, with the exception of director's fees paid directly...

  4. 26 CFR 509.113 - Government wages, salaries, and pensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 19 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Government wages, salaries, and pensions. 509...) REGULATIONS UNDER TAX CONVENTIONS SWITZERLAND General Income Tax § 509.113 Government wages, salaries, and pensions. (a) General. Under Article XI of the convention any wage, salary, or similar compensation, or any...

  5. 29 CFR 5.11 - Disputes concerning payment of wages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Disputes concerning payment of wages. 5.11 Section 5.11... Provisions and Procedures § 5.11 Disputes concerning payment of wages. (a) This section sets forth the procedure for resolution of disputes of fact or law concerning payment of prevailing wage rates, overtime...

  6. 42 CFR 412.266 - Availability of wage data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Availability of wage data. 412.266 Section 412.266... Review Board Composition and Procedures § 412.266 Availability of wage data. A hospital may obtain the average hourly wage data necessary to prepare its application to the MGCRB from Federal Register documents...

  7. Labor market reforms and wage inequality in Korea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Hyeon-Kyeong; Skott, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Temporary workers make up a sizeable part of the labor force in many countries and typically receive wages that are significantly lower than their permanent counterparts. This paper uses an efficiency wage model to explain the wage gap between temporary and permanent workers. High-performing temp...

  8. Trend of Average Wages as Indicator of Hypothetical Money Illusion

    OpenAIRE

    Julian Daszkowski

    2010-01-01

    The definition of wage in Poland not before 1998 includes any value of social security contribution. Changed definition creates higher level of reported wages, but was expected not to influence the take home pay. Nevertheless, the trend of average wages, after a short period, has returned to its previous line. Such effect is explained in the term of money illusion.

  9. Hemodynamic and cardiorespiratory predictors of sport rock climbing performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryer, Simon; Giles, David; Palomino, Inmaculada Garrido; Puerta, Alejandro de la O; Romero, Vanesa España

    2017-03-13

    Rock climbing performance has been suggested to involve a notable contribution from the aerobic metabolism. Previously it has been shown that forearm oxygenation kinetics can be used to distinguish ability groups and predict red-point sport climbing performance. Currently it is not known if forearm oxygenation kinetics, or a sport specific assessment of cardiorespiratory fitness best predicts sport rock climbing performance. The aim of the study was to determine whether forearm oxidative capacity index, maximal de-oxygenation (Δ score) during a treadwall V[Combining Dot Above]O[SUBSCRIPT TWO]peak test, treadwall V[Combining Dot Above]O[SUBSCRIPT TWO]peak, or running V[Combining Dot Above]O[SUBSCRIPT TWO]max best predicts self-reported sport climbing performance. Twenty-one male sport rock climbers completed a treadwall V[Combining Dot Above]O[SUBSCRIPT TWO]peak, running V[Combining Dot Above]O[SUBSCRIPT TWO]max and an assessment of near infrared spectroscopy derived oxidative capacity index. Linear regression, adjusted for age and experience (years), revealed that forearm oxidative capacity index, treadwall maximal de-oxygenation (Δ) and treadwall V[Combining Dot Above]O[SUBSCRIPT TWO]peak all significantly predicted self-reported red-point sport climbing ability (Adj R[SUBSCRIPT TWO] =-0.398; -0.255; 0.374 respectively), whereas treadmill running V[Combining Dot Above]O2max did not (Adj R[SUBSCRIPT TWO] =0.-0.052). Additionally, multiple regression suggested that the combined significant aerobic predictors accounted for 67% of the variance in red-point climbing ability. Findings suggest that training for sport rock climbing performance should look to incorporate modalities which focus on 1) improving local forearm aerobic capacity, and 2) improving whole body aerobic capacity using sport-specific apparatus such as treadwalls.

  10. Foot overuse diseases in rock climbing: an epidemiologic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buda, Roberto; Di Caprio, Francesco; Bedetti, Letizia; Mosca, Massimiliano; Giannini, Sandro

    2013-01-01

    Literature examining the incidence of foot diseases in rock climbing is limited to traumatic injuries. We examined a large sample of climbers, assessed the chronic diseases of the foot, and correlated them with foot morphology, shoe type, and type of climbing practiced. Between May 1 and September 30, 2009, 144 climbers (mean age, 31.7 years) were examined to analyze the effect of rock climbing on the various foot diseases found at the time of the evaluation. Eighty-six percent of the climbers were affected by a pathologic condition. Nail disease was found in 65.3% of patients, followed by recurrent ankle sprains (27.8%), retrocalcaneal bursitis (19.4%), Achilles tendinitis (12.5%), metatarsalgia (12.5%), and plantar fasciitis (5.6%). Male sex, the use of high-type shoes, the high degree of climbing difficulty, and the competitive level were often related to the onset of foot diseases. Climbing shoes are usually smaller than common footwear. This "shoe-size reduction" averaged 2.3 sizes, forcing the foot into a supinated and cavus posture that favors lateral instability. The posterior edge of the shoe aperture produces increased pressure on the heel, with retrocalcaneal bursitis. Overuse foot diseases related to rock climbing are particularly frequent and debilitating. Detailed knowledge of these diseases and their predisposing factors may help us implement effective preventive or therapeutic measures, including changes in the type of climbing, correction of body weight, degree of difficulty, footwear, orthoses, and measures that maximize the support of the foot to the ground.

  11. Biomechanical analyses of stair-climbing while dual-tasking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallabhajosula, Srikant; Tan, Chi Wei; Mukherjee, Mukul; Davidson, Austin J; Stergiou, Nicholas

    2015-04-13

    Stair-climbing while doing a concurrent task like talking or holding an object is a common activity of daily living which poses high risk for falls. While biomechanical analyses of overground walking during dual-tasking have been studied extensively, little is known on the biomechanics of stair-climbing while dual-tasking. We sought to determine the impact of performing a concurrent cognitive or motor task during stair-climbing. We hypothesized that a concurrent cognitive task will have a greater impact on stair climbing performance compared to a concurrent motor task and that this impact will be greater on a higher-level step. Ten healthy young adults performed 10 trials of stair-climbing each under four conditions: stair ascending only, stair ascending and performing subtraction of serial sevens from a three-digit number, stair ascending and carrying an empty opaque box and stair ascending, performing subtraction of serial sevens from a random three-digit number and carrying an empty opaque box. Kinematics (lower extremity joint angles and minimum toe clearance) and kinetics (ground reaction forces and joint moments and powers) data were collected. We found that a concurrent cognitive task impacted kinetics but not kinematics of stair-climbing. The effect of dual-tasking during stair ascent also seemed to vary based on the different phases of stair ascent stance and seem to have greater impact as one climbs higher. Overall, the results of the current study suggest that the association between the executive functioning and motor task (like gait) becomes stronger as the level of complexity of the motor task increases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Climbing stairs after outpatient rehabilitation for a lower-limb amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Laat, Fred A; Rommers, Gerardus M; Dijkstra, Pieter U; Geertzen, Jan H; Roorda, Leo D

    2013-08-01

    To study the necessity and ability to climb stairs in persons after a lower-limb amputation (LLA) and the relation of this ability with personal and clinical variables. Cross-sectional study. Outpatient department of a rehabilitation center. Persons with an LLA (N=155; mean age ± SD, 64.1 ± 11.2y; 73% men). Not applicable. The necessity to climb stairs was assessed with the Prosthetic Profile of the Amputee. Several indicators of the ability to climb stairs were assessed including: (1) independence in climbing stairs with a handrail and (2) without a handrail, according to the Locomotor Capabilities Index; (3) numbers of floors actually climbed, according to a rating scale; and (4) limitations in climbing stairs, according to the Climbing Stairs Questionnaire (range, 0-100, with higher scores indicating less limitations). Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to investigate the associations between the ability to climb stairs and personal and clinical variables. Of the participants, 47% had to climb stairs. The ability to climb stairs was: (1) 62% independently climbed stairs with a handrail and (2) 21% without a handrail; (3) 32% didn't climb any stairs, 34% climbed half a floor or 1 floor, and 34% climbed ≥ 2 floors; (4) the median sum score (interquartile range) of the Climbing Stairs Questionnaire was 38 (19-63), indicating marked limitations. Older participants and women were less able to climb stairs with and without a handrail. A considerable number of persons with an LLA have to climb stairs in their home environment. Many of them, especially older participants and women, are particularly hampered in their ability to climb stairs. Copyright © 2013 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Beyond conventional wage discrimination analysis: Assessing comprehensive wage distributions of males and females using structured additive distributional regression

    OpenAIRE

    Sohn, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a new comprehensive framework for analysing wage discrimination. This framework assesses wage discrimination on the grounds of conditional wage distributions (rather than just conditional means), regards the whole population (rather than just those in work) and employs a more general definition of work based on Margaret Reid's "third party criterion" (rather than a definition based on payment). Examining wage discrimination with respect to gender in Germany, we find ...

  14. Random social networks, unemployment and wage inequality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ioannides, Y.M.; Soetevent, A.R.

    2006-01-01

    Empirical studies of labor markets show that social contacts are an important source of job-related information. At the same time, wage differences among workers may be explained only in part by differences in individual background characteristics. Such findings motivate our model in which

  15. Starting wages respond to employer's risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhout, P.; Hartog, J.; van Ophem, H

    2009-01-01

    Firms hiring fresh graduates face uncertainty on the future productivity of workers. Theory suggests that starting wages reflect this, with lower pay for greater uncertainty. We use the dispersion of exam grades within a field of education as an indicator of the unobserved heterogeneity that

  16. Entrepreneurship, job creation and wage growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malchow-Møller, Nikolaj; Schjerning, Bertel; Sørensen, Anders

    2011-01-01

      This paper analyses the importance of entrepreneurs for job creation and wage growth. Relying on unique data that cover all establishments, firms and individuals in the Danish private sector, we are able to distil a number of different subsets from the total set of new establishments - subsets...

  17. Entrepreneurship, Job Creation, and Wage Growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malchow-Møller, Nikolaj; Schjerning, Bertel; Sørensen, Anders

    This paper analyses the importance of entrepreneurs for job creation and wage growth. Relying on unique data that cover all establishments, firms and individuals in the Danish private sector, we are able to distil a number of different subsets from the total set of new establishments - subsets...

  18. Home Ownership, Job Duration, and Wages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch, Jakob Roland; Rosholm, Michael; Svarer, Michael

    We investigate the impact of home ownership on individual job mobility and wages in Denmark. We find that home ownership has a negative impact on job-to-job mobilityboth in terms of transition into new local jobs and new jobs outside the local labourmarket. In addition, there is a clear negative...

  19. Immigration, Endogenous Technology Adoption and Wages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ray Chaudhuri, A.; Pandey, Manish

    2015-01-01

    We document that immigration to U.S. states has increased the mass of workers at the lower range of the skill distribution. We use this change in skill distribution of workers to analyze the effect of immigration on wages. Our model allows firms to endogenously respond to the immigration-induced

  20. The Wage Gap and Administrative Salaries Today.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Kirk D.

    1992-01-01

    Analysis of national data on college administrator salaries by gender, minority/nonminority status, years of service, and institution type found that wage gaps related to gender and minority status persisted in 1991-92 but that interaction of length of service with other study variables explained a significant amount of this gap. (MSE)

  1. Gender, race & the veteran wage gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vick, Brandon; Fontanella, Gabrielle

    2017-01-01

    This paper analyzes earnings outcomes of Iraq/Afghanistan-era veterans. We utilize the 2009-2013 American Community Survey and a worker-matching methodology to decompose wage differences between veteran and non-veteran workers. Among fully-employed, 25-40 year-olds, veteran workers make 3% less than non-veteran workers. While male veterans make 9% less than non-veterans, female and black veterans experience a wage premium (2% and 7% respectively). Decomposition of the earnings gap identifies some of its sources. Relatively higher rates of disability and lower rates of educational attainment serve to increase the overall wage penalty against veterans. However, veterans work less in low-paying occupations than non-veterans, serving to reduce the wage penalty. Finally, among male and white subgroups, non-veterans earn more in the top quintile due largely to having higher educational attainment and greater representation in higher-paying occupations, such as management. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Globalization and the gender wage gap

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostendorp, R.H.

    2009-01-01

    There are several theoretical reasons why globalization will have a narrowing as well as a widening effect on the gender wage gap, but little is known about the actual impact, except for some country studies. This study contributes to the literature in three respects. First, it is a large

  3. Relative Deprivation and the Gender Wage Gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Linda A.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses how gender differences in the value of pay, based on relative deprivation theory, explain women's paradoxical contentment with lower wages. Presents a model of pay satisfaction to integrate value-based and comparative-referent explanations of the relationship between gender and pay satisfaction. Discusses economic approaches to the…

  4. Catching Hipo's: Screening, Wages and Unemployment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.C.W. Janssen (Maarten)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper, I study the wage a firm sets to attract high ability workers (hipo's) in situations of unemployment. I show that the higher unemployment, the larger a firm's incentives to sort high and low ability workers. Moreover, workers will signal their (high) ability in situations

  5. Home Ownership, Job Duration, and Wages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roland-Munch, Jakob; Svarer, Michael; Rosholm, Michael

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the impact of home ownership on individual job mobility and wages in Denmark. We find that home ownership has a negative impact on job-to-job mobility both in terms of transition into new local jobs and new jobs outside the local labor market. In addition, there is a clear negative...

  6. Cyclicality of Wages and Union Power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morin, Annaïg

    This paper examines how trade unions shape the volatility of wages over the business cycle. I present a dynamic stochastic model of the labor market that integrates two main features: search frictions and trade unions. Because of search frictions, each job match yields an economic surplus that is...

  7. Estimating Gender Wage Gaps: A Data Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Judith A.; Thornton, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    In the authors' 2011 "JEE" article, "Estimating Gender Wage Gaps," they described an interesting class project that allowed students to estimate the current gender earnings gap for recent college graduates using data from the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE). Unfortunately, since 2012, NACE no longer…

  8. Human Capital and Wages in Exporting Firms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch, Jakob Roland; Skaksen, Jan Rose

    This paper studies the link between a firms education level, export performance and wages of its workers. We argue that firms may escape intense competition in international markets by using high skilled workers to differentiate their products. This story is consistent with our empirical results....

  9. Human capital and wages in exporting firms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch, Jakob Roland; Skaksen, Jan Rose

    2008-01-01

    This paper studies the link between the education level of workers, export performance and wages. We argue that firms may escape intense competition in international markets by using high skilled workers to differentiate their products. This story is consistent with our empirical results. Using a...

  10. The Consequences of Indexing the Minimum Wage to Average Wages in the U.S. Economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macpherson, David A.; Even, William E.

    The consequences of indexing the minimum wage to average wages in the U.S. economy were analyzed. The study data were drawn from the 1974-1978 May Current Population Survey (CPS) and the 180 monthly CPS Outgoing Rotation Group files for 1979-1993 (approximate annual sample sizes of 40,000 and 180,000, respectively). The effects of indexing on the…

  11. Decomposing wage distributions on a large data set - a quantile regression analysis of the gender wage gap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albæk, Karsten; Brink Thomsen, Lars

    in this paper. Decompositions show that most of the glass ceiling is related to segregation in the form of either composition effects or different returns to males and females. A counterfactual wage distribution without differences in the constant terms (or ‘discrimination’) implies substantial changes...... in gender wage differences in the lower part of the wage distribution....

  12. Comparison of plasma cortisol sampling sites for rock climbing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, T; Fryer, S; Draper, N; Winter, D; Ellis, G; Hamlin, M

    2012-12-01

    Blood samples for the determination of plasma cortisol concentration are generally obtained via venipuncture or capillary sampling at the fingertip. During rock climbing the upper body, forearms and fingertips are subject to continual loading and gripping making sampling at these sites problematic. The purpose of this study was to examine differences in plasma cortisol concentrations from capillary samples taken at the fingertip and first (big) toe in a rock climbing context. Nine (8 males, 1 female) climbers completed a succession of climbing bouts at three different angles (91°,100° and 110°). Capillary blood samples were taken simultaneously from the fingertip and first toe pre and post climb at each angle. Plasma samples were collected via centrifugation and subsequently analysed for cortisol using an Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) kit. All standards and samples were analysed in duplicate. Intra assay coeffiecients of variation (CV%) were 5.91% and 7.94% for finger and toe respectively. A limits of agreement plot revealed all data points to be well within upper and lower bounds of the 95% population confidence interval. Paired samples t-tests (for finger and toe) indicated there were no significant differences between sample sites. Subsequent regression analysis revealed a strong relationship (R2=0.78, y=1.031x - 2.079) between fingertip and first toe capillary plasma cortisol concentrations. Findings suggest that the first toe offers a valid alternative sampling site for plasma cortisol concentration in a rock climbing context.

  13. Physiological responses to rock climbing in young climbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Audry Birute; Schöffl, Volker Rainer

    2007-12-01

    Key questions regarding the training and physiological qualities required to produce an elite rock climber remain inadequately defined. Little research has been done on young climbers. The aim of this paper was to review literature on climbing alongside relevant literature characterising physiological adaptations in young athletes. Evidence-based recommendations were sought to inform the training of young climbers. Of 200 studies on climbing, 50 were selected as being appropriate to this review, and were interpreted alongside physiological studies highlighting specific common development growth variables in young climbers. Based on injury data, climbers younger than 16 years should not participate in international bouldering competitions and intensive finger strength training is not recommended. The majority of climbing foot injuries result from wearing too small or unnaturally shaped climbing shoes. Isometric and explosive strength improvements are strongly associated with the latter stages of sexual maturation and specific ontogenetic development, while improvement in motor abilities declines. Somatotyping that might identify common physical attributes in elite climbers of any age is incomplete. Accomplished adolescent climbers can now climb identical grades and compete against elite adult climbers aged up to and >40 years. High-intensity sports training requiring leanness in a youngster can result in altered and delayed pubertal and skeletal development, metabolic and neuroendocrine aberrations and trigger eating disorders. This should be sensitively and regularly monitored. Training should reflect efficacious exercises for a given sex and biological age.

  14. Indoor Competition Climbing as a Context for Positive Youth Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry A. Garst

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Climbing as a competitive youth sport is rapidly expanding in both participation and popularity as it has transitioned from an unorganized recreational activity to a formalized sport with a national governing body, organized competitions, formal coaching, and team structure. In spite of this growth, little to no research has been conducted regarding indoor competition climbing as a developmental experience for youth. This study examined the contributions of indoor competition climbing to youth development outcomes based on qualitative responses collected from 623 parents and climbers (youth and adults in late Fall 2014. Themes were constructed related to climbing as a youth development experience, including: holistic development; supportive relationships; confidence and self-efficacy; and sportsmanship and character development. Holistic development, which included growth in the areas of strength and health, cognition and mental conditioning, and social skills, appears to be a hallmark of the sport of indoor competition climbing. The identified themes mapped well to the 5Cs model of positive youth development (PYD, providing evidence for the existence of the 5Cs among youth who play sports. In response to calls for intentionality in youth programming, future research examining underlying programming, coaching, and parenting mechanisms that contribute to PYD is recommended.

  15. Shading performance of a vertical deciduous climbing plant canopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ip, Kenneth; Lam, Marta; Miller, Andrew [Centre for Sustainability of the Built Environment, School of Environment and Technology, University of Brighton, Cockcroft Building, Lewes Road, Brighton BN2 4GJ, East Sussex (United Kingdom)

    2010-01-15

    Deciduous climbing plant canopies strategically integrated to building facades can act as dynamic solar shading devices responsive to the seasonal climatic changes. Maximum shading occurs in the summer when the plant is at its peak growth. The shedding of leaves in autumn and winter reduces the shading and allows beneficial solar radiation to be absorbed by the opaque surface of the building facade or penetrated through the windows to the building interior. Although climbing plants have long been used for moderating the microclimate of buildings, there are very few scientific investigations to quantify such effects. This paper reports the findings of a study with specific focus on the shading performance of a vertical deciduous climbing plant canopy. It justifies the selection of Virginia Creeper as an appropriate plant for growth in the UK climate and describes the planting, monitoring and analysis procedures adopted to determine a proposed dynamic Bioshading Coefficient Function - which is used to represent the shading performance of the climbing plant canopy over its annual growing and wilting cycle. A thermal model was developed which identified the key parameters required for establishing the Bioshading Coefficients. Two climbing plant canopies (referred to as Bioshaders) were set up in an existing building in Southeast UK and monitored for 2 years. Measured data were used to calculate a series of daily Bioshading Coefficients which were subsequently applied to establish the Bioshading Coefficient Function. The research also identified issues affecting the indoor environment as a result of the application of Bioshaders. (author)

  16. Climbing robot actuated by meso-hydraulic artificial muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Matthew; Fitzgerald, Jason; Miller, Samuel; Saltzman, Jonah; Kim, Sangkyu; Lin, Yong; Garcia, Ephrahim

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents the design, construction, experimental characterization, and system testing of a legged, wall-climbing robot actuated by meso-scale hydraulic artificial muscles. While small wall-climbing robots have seen increased research attention in recent years, most authors have primarily focused on designs for the gripping and adhesion of the robot to the wall, while using only standard DC servo-motors for actuation. This project seeks to explore and demonstrate a different actuation mechanism that utilizes hydraulic artificial muscles. A four-limb climbing robot platform that includes a full closed-loop hydraulic power and control system, custom hydraulic artificial muscles for actuation, an on-board microcontroller and RF receiver for control, and compliant claws with integrated sensing for gripping a variety of wall surfaces has been constructed and is currently being tested to investigate this actuation method. On-board power consumption data-logging during climbing operation, analysis of the robot kinematics and climbing behavior, and artificial muscle force-displacement characterization are presented to investigate and this actuation method.

  17. Therapeutic use of sport climbing for patients with multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Ožura

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Sport climbing is a form of exercise that requires complex and variable movement. Because of the use of the so-called "top-rope system", this is a safe activity appropriate for individuals with physical disabilities. Therefore, climbing might prove to be an effective form of therapy for patients with multiple sclerosis. Multiple sclerosis is a chronic neurological disease that may include motor and cognitive deficits as well as affective disturbances. The illness is characterized by multifocal areas of brain damage (plaques, as consequence of autoimmune inflammation. Sport climbing might be a potentially useful activity for treating spasticity, improving a person's self image and certain aspects of cognition, such as attention and executive functions, as well as for managing emotional disturbances. All of the above are areas where patients with multiple sclerosis might be in need of assistance. The article also describes the experience of a patient with multiple sclerosis who was enrolled in our climbing program. Future research is needed to evaluate the effect of climbing therapy for patients with multiple sclerosis.

  18. Progressive Taxation, Wage Bargaining, and Endogenous Working Time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreiner, Claus Thustrup

    This paper analyses the impact of tax reforms that decrease income tax progression in an equilibrium search model with wage bargaining and endogenous individual working time. The working time is either bargained together with the hourly wage (case 1) or determined solely by workers after bargaining...... over the wage (case 2). In both cases reducing tax progression increases working time of employed and, more interestingly, increases unambiguously wages and unemployment. Wages and unemployment rise more and working time and production less in case 1 compared to case 2; probably making case 2 countries...

  19. The Dispersion of Employees' Wage Increase and Firm Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grund, Christian; Westergård-Nielsen, Niels Chr.

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies examining intra-firm wage dispersion and firm performance have focused on wage levels. The authors of this study argue that for purposes of comparing wage dispersion's positive incentive effects with its adverse morale effects, the dispersion of wage increases is more revealing t...... that the dispersion of wage growth within firms generally had a negative association with firm performance. The results are robust across industries and categories of firm size, but are mainly driven by white-collar rather than blue-collar workers....

  20. Quantile regression analysis of body mass and wages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johar, Meliyanni; Katayama, Hajime

    2012-05-01

    Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979, we explore the relationship between body mass and wages. We use quantile regression to provide a broad description of the relationship across the wage distribution. We also allow the relationship to vary by the degree of social skills involved in different jobs. Our results find that for female workers body mass and wages are negatively correlated at all points in their wage distribution. The strength of the relationship is larger at higher-wage levels. For male workers, the relationship is relatively constant across wage distribution but heterogeneous across ethnic groups. When controlling for the endogeneity of body mass, we find that additional body mass has a negative causal impact on the wages of white females earning more than the median wages and of white males around the median wages. Among these workers, the wage penalties are larger for those employed in jobs that require extensive social skills. These findings may suggest that labor markets reward white workers for good physical shape differently, depending on the level of wages and the type of job a worker has. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. A Critical Review of Waging in Indonesian Law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agusmidah Agusmidah

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article is comprehensive look of waging in Indonesian law. Waging in employment still pose a problem. No details of the principle of fair and decent with the policies or the application of the rules of waging, always give rise to new issues and discourse. For the Government, to apply fair and decent wage does not merely make the norm on paper but should be able to guarantee the implementation of the norms in society. This paper uses the literature method with the concept approach. This article discover that the wage disputes can be avoided whereas industrial society interpret the wages in return for the sacrifice that has been given and is able to meet the needs of food, clothing and housing. Then it is not worth it if one party for their maximum benefit utilizing weakness of workers by making the waging system that ignores the principle of fair and decent.

  2. Physician assistant wages and employment, 2000-2025.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quella, Alicia; Brock, Douglas M; Hooker, Roderick S

    2015-06-01

    This study sought to assess physician assistant (PA) wages, make comparisons with other healthcare professionals, and project their earnings to 2025. The Bureau of Labor Statistics PA employment datasets were probed, and 2013 wages were used to explore median wage differences between large employer categories and 14 years of historical data (2000-2013). Median wages of PAs, family physicians and general practitioners, pharmacists, registered nurses, advanced practice nurses, and physical therapists were compared. Linear regression was used to project the PA median wage to 2025. In 2013, the median hourly wage for a PA employed in a clinical role was $44.70. From 2000 to 2013, PA wages increased by 40% compared with the cumulative inflation rate of 35.3%. This suggests that demand exceeds supply, a finding consistent with similar clinicians such as family physicians. A predictive model suggests that PA employment opportunities and remuneration will remain high through 2025.

  3. A Survey of Wall Climbing Robots: Recent Advances and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunsuke Nansai

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades, skyscrapers, as represented by the Burj Khalifa in Dubai and Shanghai Tower in Shanghai, have been built due to the improvements of construction technologies. Even in such newfangled skyscrapers, the façades are generally cleaned by humans. Wall climbing robots, which are capable of climbing up vertical surfaces, ceilings and roofs, are expected to replace the manual workforce in façade cleaning works, which is both hazardous and laborious work. Such tasks require these robotic platforms to possess high levels of adaptability and flexibility. This paper presents a detailed review of wall climbing robots categorizing them into six distinct classes based on the adhesive mechanism that they use. This paper concludes by expanding beyond adhesive mechanisms by discussing a set of desirable design attributes of an ideal glass façade cleaning robot towards facilitating targeted future research with clear technical goals and well-defined design trade-off boundaries.

  4. Pure climb creep mechanism drives flow in Earth's lower mantle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boioli, Francesca; Carrez, Philippe; Cordier, Patrick; Devincre, Benoit; Gouriet, Karine; Hirel, Pierre; Kraych, Antoine; Ritterbex, Sebastian

    2017-03-01

    At high pressure prevailing in the lower mantle, lattice friction opposed to dislocation glide becomes very high, as reported in recent experimental and theoretical studies. We examine the consequences of this high resistance to plastic shear exhibited by ringwoodite and bridgmanite on creep mechanisms under mantle conditions. To evaluate the consequences of this effect, we model dislocation creep by dislocation dynamics. The calculation yields to an original dominant creep behavior for lower mantle silicates where strain is produced by dislocation climb, which is very different from what can be activated under high stresses under laboratory conditions. This mechanism, named pure climb creep, is grain-size-insensitive and produces no crystal preferred orientation. In comparison to the previous considered diffusion creep mechanism, it is also a more efficient strain-producing mechanism for grain sizes larger than ca. 0.1 mm. The specificities of pure climb creep well match the seismic anisotropy observed of Earth's lower mantle.

  5. Upper-limb power test in rock-climbing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laffaye, G; Collin, J-M; Levernier, G; Padulo, J

    2014-07-01

    The goal of the present study was to validate a new ecological power-test on athletes of different levels and to assess rock climbers' profiles (boulderers vs. route climbers). 34 athletes divided into novice, skilled and elite groups performed the arm-jump board test (AJ). Power, time, velocity, and efficiency index were recorded. Validity was assessed by comparing the distance with the value extracted from the accelerometer (500 Hz) and the reliability of intra- and inter-session scores. Moreover, a principal component analysis (PCA) was used to assess the climbers' profiles. The AJ test was quite valid, showing a low systematic bias of -0.88 cm (-1.25%) and low limits of agreement (climbing, and can effectively distinguish between climbing athletes of different competitive levels. Thus, the AJ may be suitable for field assessment of upper limb strength in climbing practitioners. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Strange Beta: Chaotic Variations for Indoor Rock Climbing Route Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Caleb; Bradley, Elizabeth

    2011-04-01

    In this paper we apply chaotic systems to the task of sequence variation for the purpose of aiding humans in setting indoor rock climbing routes. This work expands on prior work where similar variations were used to assist in dance choreography and music composition. We present a formalization for transcription of rock climbing problems and a variation generator that is tuned for this domain and addresses some confounding problems, including a new approach to automatic selection of initial conditions. We analyze our system with a large blinded study in a commercial climbing gym in cooperation with experienced climbers and expert route setters. Our results show that our system is capable of assisting a human setter in producing routes that are at least as good as, and in some cases better than, those produced traditionally.

  7. Influence of climbing style on physiological responses during indoor rock climbing on routes with the same difficulty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Geus, Bas; Villanueva O'Driscoll, Seán; Meeusen, Romain

    2006-11-01

    The objectives of this study were to (1) continuously assess oxygen uptake and heart rate; (2) quantify the extent to which maximal whole-body cardiorespiratory capacity is utilized during climbing on four routes with the same difficulty but different steepness and/or displacement. Fifteen expert climbers underwent a maximal graded exercise test (MT), on a treadmill, in order to assess their maximal physiological capacity. After MT, four sport routes, equal in difficulty rating but different in steepness and/or displacement, were climbed. Oxygen uptake and heart rate were continuously measured. Respiratory exchange ratio (RER) was calculated. Blood lactate concentration and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) were taken before and directly after climbing. Data were expressed as peak values (HRpeak, VO2peak and RERpeak) and as averages over the entire climb (HRavg, VO2avg and RERavg). During climbing, higher HRpeak and HRavg were found in routes with a vertical upward displacement in comparison to traversing routes with a horizontal displacement. The average absolute and relative oxygen uptake was significantly lower in the traversing route in comparison with the three other routes. The traverse is done at a lower percent of the running maximum. Comparing four routes with the same difficulty but different steepness and/or displacement shows that (1) routes with an upward displacement causes the highest peak and average heart rate; (2) routes with a vertical displacement on overhanging wall is physiologically the most demanding; (3) the traverse is physiologically the less demanding.

  8. Research on a Micro Flip Robot That Can Climb Stairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianzhong Wang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Micro mobile robots (MMRs can operate in rugged, narrow or dangerous regions; thus, they are widely used in numerous areas including surveillance, rescue and exploration. In urban environments, stairs are common obstacles, ones that such robots find difficult to manoeuvre over. The authors analysed the research status of MMRs, particularly in terms of difficulties when performing stair climbing and present a novel type of MMR called the micro flip robot (MFRobot. A support arm subassembly was added to the centre of a wheeled chassis; using this structure, the MFRobot can climb stairs when a flipping mode is utilized. Based on this structure, the authors established a kinematic model of the stair-climbing process and analysed the force conditions for the key status, contributing to the existing knowledge of robot design. An MFRobot prototype was produced and the stair-climbing experiments, as well as experiments on manoeuvring through rubble regions and slope surfaces, were conducted. The results show that the MFRobot can rapidly climb common stairs and can easily manoeuvre through a rubble region. The maximum slope angle the robot can climb was shown to be about 35° for concrete and wooden slope surfaces. In the case where the robot needed to be equipped with sensors, particularly a camera, the camera was equipped on the support arm of robot. The MFRobot prototype weighs 2.5 kg and is easily transportable. This structure can resolve contradictions between portability and performance in terms of overcoming obstacles; in addition, operational effectiveness can be improved using this structure.

  9. The CLASSIC/CLIMB Data Reduction: The Math

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Brummelaar, T.

    2014-09-01

    This chapter describes the methods used to extract closure phase from CLIMB data and visibility amplitude from both the CLASSIC and CLIMB beam combiners. It also includes a rather exhaustive description of the theory behind these methods. This high degree of detail is partly because previous publications of this theory contain errors, and partly because having done all this work it*s nice to have it written up in full somewhere, and being slightly beyond the thesis writing stage, this is only possible for me in a chapter like this.

  10. Physiological responses in rock climbing with repeated ascents over a 10-week period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    España-Romero, Vanesa; Jensen, Randall L; Sanchez, Xavier; Ostrowski, Megan L; Szekely, Jay E; Watts, Phillip B

    2012-03-01

    The purpose was to analyze the physiological responses and energy expenditure during repeated ascents of the same climbing route over a 10-week period. Nine climbers completed nine ascents of a specific route spaced 1 week apart. Expired air was analyzed continuously during each ascent, and time of ascent was recorded to the nearest second. Energy expenditure during climbing (EE(CLM)), and during climbing +10 min recovery (EE(TOT)) was calculated by the Weir and Zuntz equations. Differences among ascents 1, 4, 6 and 9 were analyzed by repeated measures ANOVA. Climbing time was longer for ascent 1 compared with ascents 4, 6 and 9 (P climbing route decreased the climbing time and absolute energy expenditure during climbing. Initially, the decrease in climbing energy expenditure is accompanied by an increase in energy expenditure during recovery; however, by the ninth ascent, the total energy expenditure of the task is lower than for ascent 1.

  11. Application of Nadal Limit in the prediction of wheel climb derailment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-16

    Application of the Nadal Limit to the prediction of wheel climb derailment is presented along with the effect of pertinent geometric and material parameters. Conditions which : contribute to this climb include wheelset angle of attack, contact angle,...

  12. 78 FR 39649 - Physical Medicine Devices; Reclassification of Stair-Climbing Wheelchairs; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-02

    ... of Stair-Climbing Wheelchairs; Correction AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Proposed...-climbing wheelchairs. The document was published with typographical errors in the DATES section of the...

  13. Minimum Wages and Regional Disparity: An analysis on the evolution of price-adjusted minimum wages and their effects on firm profitability (Japanese)

    OpenAIRE

    Morikawa, Masayuki

    2013-01-01

    This paper, using prefecture level panel data, empirically analyzes 1) the recent evolution of price-adjusted regional minimum wages and 2) the effects of minimum wages on firm profitability. As a result of rapid increases in minimum wages in the metropolitan areas since 2007, the regional disparity of nominal minimum wages has been widening. However, the disparity of price-adjusted minimum wages has been shrinking. According to the analysis of the effects of minimum wages on profitability us...

  14. Effect of pretreatments and processing conditions on anti-nutritional factors in climbing bean flours

    OpenAIRE

    Emmanuel Mugabo; Emmanuel Ohene Afoakwa; George Annor; Bernard Rwubatse

    2017-01-01

    It is difficult for many Rwandans to utilize climbing bean seeds (Phaseolus vulgaris. L) mainly because of longer cooking time (2 hours) and the high consumption of basic fuel. Climbing beans also contain anti-nutritional factors such tannins, phytates, trypsin inhibitors and phytohemagglutinins that limit nutrient absorption. One way to solve this problem is to utilize the flour of climbing beans made from different treatments and processing methods. In this study, climbing beans were pre-tr...

  15. Research on Dynamics and Stability in the Stairs-climbing of a Tracked Mobile Robot

    OpenAIRE

    Weijun Tao; Yi Ou; Hutian Feng

    2012-01-01

    Aiming at the functional requirement of climbing up the stairs, the dynamics and stability during a tracked mobile robot's climbing of stairs is studied. First, from the analysis of its cross-country performance, the mechanical structure of the tracked mobile robot is designed and the hardware composition of its control system is given. Second, based on the analysis to its stairs-climbing process, the dynamical model of stairs-climbing is established by using the classical mechanics method. N...

  16. Job Satisfaction and Co-worker Wages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clark, Andrew E.; Kristensen, Nicolai; Westergård-Nielsen, Niels Chr.

    This paper uses matched employer-employee panel data to show that individual job satisfaction is higher when other workers in the same establishment are better-paid. This runs contrary to a large literature which has found evidence of income comparisons in subjective well-being. We argue that the......This paper uses matched employer-employee panel data to show that individual job satisfaction is higher when other workers in the same establishment are better-paid. This runs contrary to a large literature which has found evidence of income comparisons in subjective well-being. We argue...... that the difference hinges on the nature of the reference group. We here use co-workers. Their wages not only induce jealousy, but also provide a signal about the worker's own future earnings. Our positive estimated coefficient on others' wages shows that this positive future earnings signal outweighs any negative...

  17. HIV, wages, and the skill premium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinescu, Ioana

    2014-09-01

    The HIV epidemic has dramatically decreased labor supply among prime-age adults in Sub-Saharan Africa. Using within-country variation in regional HIV prevalence and a synthetic panel, I find that HIV significantly increases the capital-labor ratio in urban manufacturing firms. The impact of HIV on average wages is positive but imprecisely estimated. In contrast, HIV has a large positive impact on the skill premium. The impact of HIV on the wages of low skilled workers is insignificantly different from 0, and is strongly dampened by competition from rural migrants. The HIV epidemic disproportionately increases the incomes of high-skilled survivors, thus increasing inequality. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Efficiency wages, unemployment and international factor movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, B

    1998-09-01

    "This paper examines the implications of unemployment resulting from efficiency wages for international factor movements in a standard Heckscher-Ohlin model where the relative size of the endowments of skilled and unskilled workers and the efficiency wage induced unemployment level in the unskilled labour market are simultaneously determined given the population, supply of capital and its distribution in the economy.... It is shown that the optimum labour inflow in the market with domestic distortion and the optimum capital inflow are always positive because they reduce the severity of distortion by raising employment and income for the residents. The income and employment of foreigners also increase. Under this situation the optimum labour or capital outflow on the other hand is always zero. These conclusions directly contradict the result obtained for international factor movements in the presence of exogenously determined unemployment." excerpt

  19. Changes in handgrip force and blood lactate as response to simulated climbing competition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gajewski

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to estimate post-competition changes in handgrip strength and blood lactate in climbers and relationships of the studied variables with declared climbing ability of the tested athletes. Twenty one male climbers volunteered to take part in the experiment. Each subject took part in simulated lead climbing competition on the artificial wall – (difficulty 7a in French scale. The blood lactate concentration was measured pre-climbing and then 3 min and 30 min post-climbing. Grip force of both hands (dominant and non-dominant was measured twice – pre-climbing and 1 min post-climbing (semi-final. Maximum heart rate during climbing reached 181.4±7.7 beats per minute. Lactate concentration amounted to 6.35±1.50 mmol/l and 2.28±0.66 mmol/l 3 min and 30 min post-climbing, respectively. Handgrip force related to body mass (averaged for both hands decreased significantly from 7.39±1.30 N/kg pre-climbing to 6.57±1.05 N/kg 1 min post-climbing. Self reported climbing ability was correlated with lactate concentration and handgrip force, as well. It was demonstrated that athletes reporting higher climbing ability showed better lactate recovery.

  20. Relative Importance of Four Muscle Groups for Indoor Rock Climbing Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deyhle, Michael R; Hsu, Hung-Sheng; Fairfield, Timothy J; Cadez-Schmidt, Taryn L; Gurney, Burke A; Mermier, Christine M

    2015-07-01

    Little research is available to guide training programs for rock climbers. To help meet this need, we sought to determine the relative importance of 4 muscle groups for rock climbing performance. Eleven male climbers were familiarized with an indoor climbing route before 5 separate days of testing. On testing days, subjects were randomly assigned to climb with no prefatiguing exercise (control climb) or after a prefatiguing exercise designed to specifically target the digit flexors (DF), shoulder adductors (SA), elbow flexors (EF), or lumbar flexors (LF). Immediately after the prefatiguing exercise, the subject climbed the route as far as possible without rest until failure. The number of climbing moves was recorded for each climb. Surface electromyography of the target muscles was recorded during the prefatigue. Fewer climbing moves were completed after prefatigue of the DF (50 ± 18%) and EF (78 ± 22%) (p ≤ 0.05) compared with the control climb. The number of moves completed after prefatigue of the LF and SA were not statistically significant compared with the control climb (p > 0.05). The short time lapse between the end of prefatiguing exercise and the start of climbing (transit time), which may have allowed for some recovery, was not different among trials (p > 0.05). Electromyography median frequency was reduced from beginning to end of each prefatiguing exercise. These results suggest that among the muscle groups studied in men, muscular endurance of DF and EF muscle groups is especially important for rock climbing on 40° overhanging terrain.

  1. Self-reported difficulty in climbing up or down stairs in nondisabled elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verghese, Joe; Wang, Cuiling; Xue, Xiaonan; Holtzer, Roee

    2008-01-01

    To examine clinical and functional correlates of self-reported difficulty in climbing up or climbing down stairs in older adults. Cross-sectional survey. Community sample. Older adults (N=310; mean age, 79.7 y; 62% women), without disability or dementia. Not applicable. Clinical and functional status as well as activity limitations (able to perform activities of daily living [ADLs] with some difficulty). Of the 310 subjects, 140 reported difficulties in climbing up and 83 in climbing down stairs (59 both). Self-reported difficulty in climbing up stairs was associated with hypertension, arthritis, and depressive symptoms. Difficulty in climbing up stairs was also associated with poor balance and grip strength as well as neurologic gait abnormalities. Subjects with difficulty climbing down stairs had more falls. Both activities were associated with leg claudication, fear of falling, non-neurologic gait abnormalities, and slow gait. Examined individually, self-reported difficulty climbing down stairs captured a wider spectrum of ADL limitations than climbing up stairs. However, combined difficulty in both phases of stair climbing had a stronger association with activity limitations (vs no difficulty; odds ratio, 6.58; 95% confidence interval, 3.35-12.91) than difficulty in any one phase alone. Self-reported difficulty in climbing up and down stairs revealed commonalities as well as differences in related clinical correlates. Difficulty in both climbing up and down stairs should be separately assessed to better capture clinical and functional status in older adults.

  2. 36 CFR 13.1312 - Climbing and walking on Exit Glacier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Climbing and walking on Exit... General Provisions § 13.1312 Climbing and walking on Exit Glacier. Except for areas designated by the Superintendent, climbing or walking on, in, or under Exit Glacier is prohibited within 1/2 mile of the glacial...

  3. Climbing Fiber Burst Size and Olivary Sub-threshold Oscillations in a Network Setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.R. de Gruijl (Jornt); P. Bazzigaluppi (Paolo); M.T.G. de Jeu (Marcel); C.I. de Zeeuw (Chris)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe inferior olivary nucleus provides one of the two main inputs to the cerebellum: the so-called climbing fibers. Activation of climbing fibers is generally believed to be related to timing of motor commands and/or motor learning. Climbing fiber spikes lead to large all-or-none action

  4. 75 FR 23151 - Noxious Weeds; Old World Climbing Fern and Maidenhair Creeper

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-03

    ... Inspection Service 7 CFR Parts 360 and 361 Noxious Weeds; Old World Climbing Fern and Maidenhair Creeper... noxious weed regulations by adding Old World climbing fern (Lygodium microphyllum (Cavanilles) R. Brown... Old World climbing fern (Lygodium microphyllum (Cavanilles) R. Brown) and maidenhair creeper (Lygodium...

  5. The effect of Medicaid wage pass-through programs on the wages of direct care workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baughman, Reagan A; Smith, Kristin

    2010-05-01

    Despite growing demand for nursing and home health care as the US population ages, compensation levels in the low-skill nursing labor market that provides the bulk of long-term care remain quite low. The challenge facing providers of long-term care is that Medicaid reimbursement rates for nursing home and home health care severely restrict the wage growth that is necessary to attract workers, resulting in high turnover and labor shortages. Almost half of US states have responded by enacting "pass-through" provisions in their Medicaid programs, channeling additional long-term care funding directly to compensation of lower-skill nursing workers. We test the effect of Medicaid wage pass-through programs on hourly wages for direct care workers. We estimate several specifications of wage models using employment data from the 1996 and 2001 panels of the Survey of Income and Program Participation for nursing, home health, and personal care aides. The effect of pass-through programs is identified by an indicator variable for states with programs; 20 states adopted pass-throughs during the sample period. Workers in states with pass-through programs earn as much as 12% more per hour than workers in other states after those programs are implemented. Medicaid wage pass-through programs appear to be a viable policy option for raising compensation levels of direct care workers, with an eye toward improving recruitment and retention in long-term care settings.

  6. Manufacturing Employment and Wage Differentials After Structural Adjustment Reforms in Colombia: An Efficiency Wages Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Taborda

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of the structural reforms in Colombia one of the most important policy proposals was reducing rigidities in the labor market. A perspective to assess the results of such reforms is the analysis of the relationship between firm employment and wage differentials in manufacturing before and after the reforms. If the labor reforms reached the intended objective of making more flexible the labor market, the employment levels must change faster, along with the behavior of wages and other labor costs, given some characteristics of firms and the economy. This paper addresses this topic proposing a model of wage differential and employment growth and testing its propositions before and after the structural reforms and controlling for industry and firm characteristics. A first finding is the confirmation of the positive relationship proposed between intra-industry wage differential and employment. In the inter-industry wage differential estimation, we find heterogeneous responses depending on the industry and a reduction in the autonomous labor turnover.

  7. Non-formal education, overeducation and wages

    OpenAIRE

    SANDRA NIETO; RAÚL RAMOS

    2013-01-01

    Why do overeducated workers participate in non-formal education activities? Do not they suffer from an excess of education? Using microdata from the Spanish sample of the 2007 Adult Education Survey, we have found that overeducated workers participate more than the rest in non-formal education and that they earn higher wages than overeducated workers who did not participate. This result can be interpreted as evidence that non-formal education allows overeducated workers to acquire new abiliti...

  8. Patent Protection, Technological Change and Wage Inequality

    OpenAIRE

    Shiyuan Pan; Heng-fu Zou; Tailong Li

    2010-01-01

    We develop a directed-technological-change model to address the issue of the optimal patent system and investigate how the optimal patent system influences the direction of technological change and the inequality of wage, where patents are categorized as skill- and labor-complementary. The major results are: (i) Finite patent breadth maximizes the social welfare level; (ii) Optimal patent breadth increases with the amount of skilled (unskilled) workers; (iii) Optimal patent protection is skil...

  9. Are low wages risk factors for hypertension?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigh, J Paul; Du, Juan

    2012-12-01

    Socio-economic status (SES) is strongly correlated with hypertension. But SES has several components, including income and correlations in cross-sectional data need not imply SES is a risk factor. This study investigates whether wages-the largest category within income-are risk factors. We analysed longitudinal, nationally representative US data from four waves (1999, 2001, 2003 and 2005) of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics. The overall sample was restricted to employed persons age 25-65 years, n = 17 295. Separate subsamples were constructed of persons within two age groups (25-44 and 45-65 years) and genders. Hypertension incidence was self-reported based on physician diagnosis. Our study was prospective since data from three base years (1999, 2001, 2003) were used to predict newly diagnosed hypertension for three subsequent years (2001, 2003, 2005). In separate analyses, data from the first base year were used to predict time-to-reporting hypertension. Logistic regressions with random effects and Cox proportional hazards regressions were run. Negative and strongly statistically significant correlations between wages and hypertension were found both in logistic and Cox regressions, especially for subsamples containing the younger age group (25-44 years) and women. Correlations were stronger when three health variables-obesity, subjective measures of health and number of co-morbidities-were excluded from regressions. Doubling the wage was associated with 25-30% lower chances of hypertension for persons aged 25-44 years. The strongest evidence for low wages being risk factors for hypertension among working people were for women and persons aged 25-44 years.

  10. Determinants of general practitioners' wages in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Stephen; Goudie, Rosalind; Sutton, Matt; Gravelle, Hugh; Elliott, Robert; Hole, Arne Risa; Ma, Ada; Sibbald, Bonnie; Skåtun, Diane

    2011-02-01

    We analyse the determinants of annual net income and wages (net income/hours) of general practitioners (GPs) using data for 2271 GPs in England recorded during Autumn 2008. The average GP had an annual net income of £97,500 and worked 43 h per week. The mean wage was £51 per h. Net income and wages depended on gender, experience, list size, partnership size, whether or not the GP worked in a dispensing practice, whether they were salaried of self-employed, whether they worked in a practice with a nationally or locally negotiated contract, and the characteristics of the local population (proportion from ethnic minorities, rurality, and income deprivation). The findings have implications for pay discrimination by GP gender and ethnicity, GP preferences for partnership size, incentives for competition for patients, and compensating differentials for local population characteristics. They also shed light on the attractiveness to GPs in England of locally negotiated (personal medical services) versus nationally negotiated (general medical services) contracts.

  11. Ageing, productivity and wages in Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahlberg, Bernhard; Freund, Inga; Crespo Cuaresma, Jesús; Prskawetz, Alexia

    2013-06-01

    Current demographic developments in industrialized countries and their consequences for workforce ageing challenge the sustainability of intergenerational transfers and economic growth. A shrinking share of the young workforce will have to support a growing share of elderly, non-working people. Therefore, the productivity of the workforce is central to a sustainable economic future. Using a new matched employer-employee panel dataset for Austrian firms for the period 2002-2005, we study the relationship between the age structure of employees, labour productivity and wages. These data allow us to account, simultaneously, for both socio-demographic characteristics of employees and firm heterogeneity, in order to explain labour productivity and earnings. Our results indicate that firm productivity is not negatively related to the share of older employees it employs. We also find no evidence for overpayment of older employees. Our results do not show any association between wages and the share of older employees. Furthermore, we find a negative relationship between the share of young employees and labour productivity as well as wages, which is more prevalent in the industry and construction sector.

  12. Ageing, productivity and wages in Austria☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahlberg, Bernhard; Freund, Inga; Crespo Cuaresma, Jesús; Prskawetz, Alexia

    2013-01-01

    Current demographic developments in industrialized countries and their consequences for workforce ageing challenge the sustainability of intergenerational transfers and economic growth. A shrinking share of the young workforce will have to support a growing share of elderly, non-working people. Therefore, the productivity of the workforce is central to a sustainable economic future. Using a new matched employer–employee panel dataset for Austrian firms for the period 2002–2005, we study the relationship between the age structure of employees, labour productivity and wages. These data allow us to account, simultaneously, for both socio-demographic characteristics of employees and firm heterogeneity, in order to explain labour productivity and earnings. Our results indicate that firm productivity is not negatively related to the share of older employees it employs. We also find no evidence for overpayment of older employees. Our results do not show any association between wages and the share of older employees. Furthermore, we find a negative relationship between the share of young employees and labour productivity as well as wages, which is more prevalent in the industry and construction sector. PMID:23734070

  13. Leading Organizational Change Is Like Climbing a Mountain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Judith

    2004-01-01

    Leading organizational change is like climbing a mountain. Transformational leaders must prepare to lead change, understand the process and nature of change, and provide the essential gear so that those involved can be successful. The author draws on the literature and personal experiences as a hiker and change leader to provide a guide for…

  14. Distributed mechatronics controller for modular wall climbing robot

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Tlale, NS

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Practical wall climbing robots that are used for applications requiring them to be fitted with task specific tools should be large enough to carry the additional tool payload. As size of robot is increased, inflexible body frame of wall...

  15. Climbing ripple structure and associated storm-lamination from a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The Mesoproterozoic Pandikunta Limestone, a shallow water carbonate platform succession in the Pranhita–Godavari Valley, south India, displays well developed climbing ripple lamination and storm deposited structures, such as HCS, wave ripple-lamination, combined-flow ripple-lamination and low angle trough ...

  16. Agronomic description of new improved climbing bean varieties

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The climbing bean on the fanners preferences of seed yield, resistance to disease~, seed size, cooking time, adaptability, days to maturity, (;Ooking time and seed .... The form er two are particularly large seeded; Umubano and Vuninkingi are well adapted to both medium and high altitude seed quality. Variety Ngwinurare ...

  17. Nutrient composition of climbing and prostrate vegetable cowpea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-10-20

    Oct 20, 2008 ... The study evaluated the nutrient content of different accessions of two vegetable cowpea genotypes. The mineral content of the vegetable cowpea accessions were high. Potassium content of the accessions of the climbing genotype “Akidi enu” ranged from 1.25 to 1.52% with a mean value of 1.43 ±.

  18. Heart Infections Spike as Injection-Drug Abuse Climbs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fullstory_166386.html Heart Infections Spike as Injection-Drug Abuse Climbs: CDC Typical endocarditis patient is white, young and from a rural area, report says To use the sharing features on this page, please ... white injection drug users in rural areas are increasingly being hospitalized ...

  19. 0g Climbing - The Challenge of Walking in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrose, Robert O.; Rehnmark, Frederik; Goza, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Space walking is poorly named, as it has little in common with how animals walk on Earth. Space walking is more akin to mountain climbing in scuba gear, while parachuting in a freefall-an odd combination of effects and equipment to help people do a demanding job. Robots are now being studied for service in this same domain, working on large scale space structures like the Space Station, servicing science or military platforms in high orbit, or riding on the outside of a space craft in transit to Mars, the Moon or other destinations. What have we learned about climbing in 0g? How should machines be controlled for serving in this role? What can they do to overcome the problems that humans have faced? In order to move about in this environment, a robot must be able to climb autonomously, using gaits that smoothly manage its momentum and that minimize contact forces (walking lightly) while providing for safety in the event of an emergency requiring the system to stop. All three of these objectives are now being explored at NASA's Johnson Space Center, using the Robonaut system and a set of mockups that emulate the 0g condition. NASA's goal for Robonaut is to develop the control technology that will allow it to climb on the outside of the Space Shuttle, the Space Station, and satellite mockups at JSC, enabling the robot to perform EVA task setups or serve as an Astronaut's assistant.

  20. Piper (Piperaceae) in the Solomon Islands: the climbing species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gardner, R.O.

    2010-01-01

    Eleven climbing species of Piper in the Solomon Islands are recognized: P. abbreviatum, P. betle, P. bosnicanum, P. caninum, P. celtidiforme, P. fragile, P. insectifugum (syn. P. austrocaledonicum), P. interruptum, P. macropiper, P. majusculum, and, as the only endemic, P. sclerophloeum, for which a

  1. Comparative Effect of Forward and Backward Stair Climbing on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Both interventions had no significant effect on the participants' systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure and heart rate. Forward stair climbing is more effective in improving the CE of apparently healthy young adults and, hence, for improving cardiovascular endurance in rehabilitation and athletic training.

  2. Effects of climbing on core strength and mobility in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehlbauer, T; Stuerchler, M; Granacher, U

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the impact of an indoor climbing training and detraining program on core/handgrip strength and trunk mobility in men and women. 28 young sedentary adults participated in this study and were assigned to an intervention (30±3 years) or a control (29±2 years) group. The intervention group participated in 8 weeks (2 times/week) of indoor climbing training, followed by 8 weeks of detraining. Tests included the measurement of maximal isometric strength (MIS) of the trunk flexors/extensors, the assessment of trunk mobility in the sagittal (SAP) and the coronal (CRP) plane as well as testing of handgrip strength. After training, significant improvements were observed in MIS of the trunk flexors/extensors (~19-22%, all pindoor climbing training program conducted in sedentary adults proved to be feasible (i. e., attendance rate of 89.4%) and effective. It is suggested that indoor climbing should be permanently conducted to maintain the observed improvements in core muscle strength and trunk mobility. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Foot placement cues used by chameleons while walking and climbing

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Old world chameleons spend much time on branches of trees and shrubs. We studied the cues used by chameleons in positioning their feet while walking and climbing. Chameleons moving on dowels of varying position and diameter were videotaped to determine the sequence and location of each footfall. Visual cliff ...

  4. relative performance of staking techniques on yield of climbing bean ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    techniques, namely (i) sticks, (ii) strings, and (iii) maize intercropped with climbing beans during the cropping seasons 2010B and 2011A on 10 sites of ... Use of strings as staking materials can replace the use of sticks without a reduction in production. .... Production economics-theory of firm. An introduction to economics: ...

  5. relative performance of staking techniques on yield of climbing bean ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    such as banana and sisal fibres has been identified to be a potential alternative. In Burundi, for instance, where banana fibre is sufficiently available, fibres can offer the benefit of reduced utilisation of stakes. The objective of this study was to identify the most suitable staking option of climbing beans in Burundi, targeting ...

  6. Dynamics of Stride Interval Characteristics during Continuous Stairmill Climbing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffalt, Peter C.; Vallabhajosula, Srikant; Renz, Jessica J.; Mukherjee, Mukul; Stergiou, Nicholas

    2017-01-01

    It has been shown that statistical persistence in stride intervals characteristics exist during walking, running and cycling and were speed-dependent among healthy young adults. The purpose of this study was to determine if such statistical persistence in stride time interval, stride length and stride speed also exists during self-paced continuous stairmill climbing and if the strength is dependent on stepping rate. Stride time, stride length, and stride speed were collected from nine healthy participants during 3 min of stairmill climbing at 100, 110, and 120% of their preferred stepping rate (PSR) and 5 min of treadmill walking at preferred walking speed (PWS). The amount of variability (assessed by standard deviation and coefficient of variation) and dynamics (assessed by detrended fluctuation analysis and sample entropy) of the stride time, stride length, and stride speed time series were investigated. The amounts of variability were significantly higher during stairmill climbing for the stride time, stride length, and stride speed and did only change with increased stepping rate for stride speed. In addition to a more irregular pattern during stairmill climbing, the detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) revealed that the stride length fluctuations were statistical anti-persistent for all subjects. On a group level both stride time and stride speed fluctuations were characterized by an uncorrelated pattern which was more irregular compared to that during treadmill walking. However, large inter-participant differences were observed for these two variables. In addition, the dynamics did not change with increase in stepping rate. PMID:28878688

  7. Relative performance of staking techniques on yield of climbing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is an important staple grain legume in the Great Lakes Region of Africa. In addition, it is a major source of proteins, energy and micro-nutrients (e.g. Fe and Zn), especially for smallholder farmers. The climbing bean is particularly more productive, an efficient land user and tolerant to ...

  8. Nutrient composition of climbing and prostrate vegetable cowpea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study evaluated the nutrient content of different accessions of two vegetable cowpea genotypes. The mineral content of the vegetable cowpea accessions were high. Potassium content of the accessions of the climbing genotype “Akidi enu” ranged from 1.25 to 1.52% with a mean value of 1.43 ± 0.13% while in the ...

  9. Piper (Piperaceae) in New Guinea: the climbing species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gardner, R.O.

    2012-01-01

    Sixteen climbing Piper species are accepted for New Guinea. The three endemics, P. arfakianum, P. subcanirameum and P. versteegii, are fully described. Eight taxa of unclear circumscription are noted. A new variety of P. macropiper, endemic to Morobe Province of Papua New Guinea, is described. The

  10. Piper (Piperaceae) in the Philippine Islands: the climbing species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gardner, R.O.

    2006-01-01

    Piper in the Philippine Islands is reviewed. Fifteen climbing species are recognized (many fewer than in previous treatments) and distinguished in a key. Most are widely distributed through Malesia, with ranges that end eastwards in the Solomon Islands or Australia. Piper myrmecophilum, the only

  11. Hold design supports learning and transfer of climbing fluency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orth, Dominic; Davids, Keith; Seifert, Ludovic

    2014-01-01

    Being a discipline with a broad range of genres, rock climbing is an activity where participants seek to generalize the skills they learn in different performance contexts. A training strategy for achieving skill transfer was explored in a group of experienced climbers. Specifically, we tested the

  12. Comparative Effect of Forward and Backward Stair Climbing on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    olagbegi

    for improving cardiovascular endurance in rehabilitation and athletic training. KEY WORDS: .... of fatigue for a period of 3 minutes. Immediately ..... and athletic training. However, considering the observed effect of backward stair climbing on diastolic blood pressure, there is a need for further studies to examine the effect of ...

  13. Full-body movement pattern recognition in climbing*

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seifert, Ludovic; Dovgalecs, Vladislavs; Boulanger, Jérémie; Orth, Dominic; Hérault, Romain; Davids, Keith

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to propose a method for full-body movement pattern recognition in climbing, by computing the 3D unitary vector of the four limbs and pelvis during performance. One climber with an intermediate skill level traversed two easy routes of similar rates of difficulty (5c

  14. Lung function and dust in climbing halls: two pilot studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshammer, Hanns; Shahraki, Shifra; Mondel, Thomas; Gebhart, Patrik

    2016-12-01

    In climbing halls, high levels of dust are found because magnesia powder is used to dry hands. Concerns have been raised about possible health effects after reports from asthmatics experiencing worsening of symptoms while or after climbing. We investigated acute and sub-acute effects of climbing in dusty halls on lung function in two pilot studies. The first study examined 109 climbers before and after a climbing activity that lasted at least 1 h. In the second study, 25 climbers from different age classes participated in a 2-day climbing competition. Of these, 24 agreed to take part in our investigation, but only 22 provided valid lung function tests on both days. The climbers underwent lung function tests before the first round of the competition (in the morning), after the second round approximately 3 h later and in the morning of the second day before the competition started again. In the first study, we found acute effects, a decline in lung function immediately after the exposure, likely due to protective reflexes of the bronchial muscles and stronger declines in persons with higher exhaled nitric oxide (NO) pre-climbing. In the second study, we also expected sub-acute effects on the next day due to inflammation. On the first day of the competition (second study), dust levels at a central monitor increased over time in a linear manner. Most of the dust was in the size range between 2.5 and 10 μm and dust levels of particulate matter (PM10) reached 0.5 mg/m3. There was a decline in lung function over 24 h in persons with higher exhaled NO levels pre-exposure. All spirometric parameters were affected though the effects were not statistically significant in all cases. Younger age classes started earlier in the morning. Because of the increasing trend in dust levels we expected stronger effects with higher numbers but for the acute effects the reverse was true, possibly because younger climbers use magnesia more or with less experience thus causing higher

  15. Influences of microhabitat constraints and rock-climbing disturbance on cliff-face vegetation communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntz, Kathryn Lynne; Larson, Douglas W

    2006-06-01

    Many researchers report that rock climbing has significant negative effects on cliff biota. Most work on climbing disturbance, however has not controlled for variation in microsite characteristics when comparing areas with and without climbing presence. Additionally, some researchers do not identify the style or difficulty level of climbing routes sampled or select climbing routes that do not represent current trends in the sport. We solved these problems by sampling climbing areas used by advanced "sport" climbers and quantifying differences in microtopography between climbed and control cliffs. We determined whether differences in vegetation existed between pristine and sport-climbed cliff faces when microsite factors were not controlled. We then determined the relative influence of the presence of climbing, cliff-face microtopography, local physical factors, and regional geography on the richness, abundance, and community composition of cliff-face vascular plants, bryophytes, and lichens. When we did not control for microsite differences among cliffs, our results were consistent with the majority of prior work on impacts of climbing (i.e., sport-climbed cliff faces supported a lower mean richness of vascular plants and bryophytes and significantly different frequencies of individual species when compared with pristine cliff faces). When we investigated the relative influences of microtopography and climbing disturbance, however the differences in vegetation were not related to climbing disturbance but rather to the selection by sport climbers of cliff faces with microsite characteristics that support less vegetation. Climbed sites had not diverged toward a separate vegetation community; instead, they supported a subset of the species found on pristine cliff faces. Prior management recommendations to restrict development of new climbing routes should be reevaluated based on our results.

  16. 29 CFR 1.3 - Obtaining and compiling wage rate information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Obtaining and compiling wage rate information. For the purpose of making wage determinations, the... prevailing wage requirements. (b) The following types of information may be considered in making wage rate... system is to be performed shall be consulted. Before making a determination of wage rates for such a...

  17. Multiple Equilibria and Minimum Wages in Labor Markets with Informational Frictions and Heterogeneous Production Technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.J. van den Berg (Gerard)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractIt is often argued that a mandatory minimum wage is binding only if the wage density displays a spike at it. In this paper we analyze a model with wage setting, search frictions, and heterogeneous production technologies, in which imposition of a minimum wage affects wages even though,

  18. 76 FR 31785 - Prevailing Rate Systems; Abolishment of Cumberland, ME, as a Nonappropriated Fund Federal Wage...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-02

    ... Nonappropriated Fund Federal Wage System Wage Area AGENCY: U.S. Office of Personnel Management. ACTION: Interim... rule ] to abolish the Cumberland, Maine, nonappropriated fund (NAF) Federal Wage System (FWS) wage area and redefine Cumberland, Kennebec, and Penobscot Counties, ME, to the York, ME, NAF wage area...

  19. 77 FR 11383 - Prevailing Rate Systems; Abolishment of Monmouth, NJ, as a Nonappropriated Fund Federal Wage...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-27

    ... Wage System Wage Area AGENCY: U.S. Office of Personnel Management. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The U.S..., nonappropriated fund (NAF) Federal Wage System (FWS) wage area and redefine Monmouth County, NJ, to the Burlington, NJ, NAF wage area. These changes are necessary because the closure of Fort Monmouth left the Monmouth...

  20. Worker and Firm Heterogeneity in Wage Growth: An AKM approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Kenneth Lykke; Vejlin, Rune Majlund

    This paper estimates a wage growth equation containing human capital variables known from the traditional Mincerian wage equation with year, worker and firm fixed effects included as well. The paper thus contributes further to the large empirical literature on unobserved heterogeneity following...... the work of Abowd, Kramarz, and Margolis (1999). Our main contribution is to extend the analysis from wage levels to wage growth. The specification enables us to estimate the individual specific and firm specific fixed effects and their degree of explanation on wage growth. The analysis is conducted using...... Danish longitudinal matched employer-employee data from 1980 to 2006. We find that the worker fixed effect dominates both the firm fixed effect and the effect of the observed covariates. Worker effects are estimated to explain seven to twelve per cent of the variance in wage growth while firm effects...

  1. Residential Location, Job Location, and Wages: Theory and Empirics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejlin, Rune Majlund

    I develop a stylized partial on-the-job equilibrium search model which incorporate a spatial dimension. Workers reside on a circle and can move at a cost. Each point on the circle has a wage distribution. Implications about wages and job mobility are drawn from the model and tested on Danish...... matched employer-employee data. The model predictions hold true. I find that workers working farther away from their residence earn higher wages. When a worker is making a job-to-job transition where he changes workplace location he experiences a higher wage change than a worker making a job-to-job...... transition without changing workplace location. However, workers making a job-to-job transition which makes the workplace location closer to the residence experiences a wage drop. Furthermore, low wage workers and workers with high transportation costs are more likely to make job-to-job transitions, but also...

  2. Wage determination in the union and nonunion sectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloch, F E; Kuskin, M S

    1978-01-01

    This study contains estimates of wage equations for white male union and nonunion employees. The authors find that nonunion wages are generally more responsive than union wages to individuals' education and experience and to regional price-level variation. Despite those differences, however, estimates of union-nonunion wage differentials based on these separate equations do not differ greatly from a differential obtained from a union dummy variable in an equation based on combined union and nonunion observations. Union-nonunion differentials vary widely across occupational groups and are generally larger in the lower skilled and more highly unionized occupations. The results for manufacturing, for which additional industry data are available, indicate a negative impact of high concentration ratios on the wages of all workers and a greater impact of establishment size on nonunion than on union wages. Data were drawn from the May 1973 Current Population Survey.

  3. Wage differentials between college graduates with and without learning disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, David L; Verbeek, Roelant L

    2002-01-01

    Wage differential studies examining legally protected groups typically focus on gender or racial differences. Legislation also fully protects individuals with learning disabilities (LD). This article is the first to decompose wage differentials between adults with and without LD. An original data set of college graduates with documented LD was constructed, and these individuals were compared to a control group from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY). Our results show that much of the observed lower wages for individuals with LD is due to differences in productivity characteristics. However, there is an unexplained portion of the wage gap that could possibly be considered wage discrimination against individuals with LD. This possibility seems smaller due to the fact that the subsample of the employers who knew of the employee's learning disabilities did not appear to pay significantly lower wages to these individuals. Alternative hypotheses are discussed, as are sample-specific issues.

  4. An Equilibrium Analysis of the Gender Wage Gap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Elisabeth Hermann

    This paper develops a theory of the gender wage gap. In a general equilibrium model, spouses devide their labor between a formal sector and a home sector. Due to indivisibility effects, productivity of labor in the formal sector is negatively related to labor used in the home; at the same time......; whereas they allocate their labor differently, if they expect to earn different wage rates. The latter situation manifests itself in a gender wage gap. By use of numerical examples, we show that welfare is highest when spouses allocate labor equally. We relate this finding to policy recommendations...... labor inputs are complementary in home production. We show that initial beliefs about the gender wage gap are self-fulfilling, and a central result is multiplicity of equilibria. Spouses allocate their labor equally, if they expect to earn the same wage rates, which ex post reinforces equal wage rates...

  5. Metabolic demands of rock climbing in transfemoral amputees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Highsmith, M J; Kahle, J T; Fox, J L; Shaw, K L; Quillen, W S; Mengelkoch, L J

    2010-01-01

    This pilot study compared the energy expenditure required to climb an indoor rock wall, in amputees utilizing five prosthetic configurations. Three experienced climbers (1M age 21 yr, 2F ages 30 and 49 yr) with unilateral transfemoral amputation climbed a 9.14 m indoor rock wall, 5.9 Yosemite Decimal Scale rating, using the following prosthetic configurations: 1. no prosthesis; 2. stubby prosthesis-foot forward; 3. stubby prosthesis-foot backward; 4. articulated prosthesis-knee unlocked; 5. articulated prosthesis-knee locked. Subjects climbed three times with each configuration resulting in 15 climbs per subject. Metabolic data was collected using the COSMED K4b(2) system. VO(2) was 15, 18 and 20% greater in the articulated unlocked condition (mean+/-SE: 20.5+/-0.8 ml.kg (-1).min (-1)), and 11, 13 and 15% greater in the articulated locked condition (19.7+/-0.9 ml.kg (-1).min (-1)), compared to the no prosthesis (17.8+/-0.7 ml.kg (-1).min (-1)), stubby backward (17.4+/-0.7 ml.kg (-1).min (-1)) and stubby forward (17.1+/-0.9 ml.kg (-1).min (-1)) conditions. Participants expended 11-20% more energy using the articulated prostheses than with the stubby and no prosthesis conditions. In persons with transfemoral amputation, use of an articulated prosthesis in indoor rock climbing may be a disadvantage in many aspects including competition, training, rehabilitation and satisfaction with the activity. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart, New York.

  6. Trends in U.S. Wage Inequality: Revising the Revisionists

    OpenAIRE

    Autor, David H.; Katz, Lawrence F.; Kearney, Melissa S.

    2008-01-01

    A recent "revisionist" literature characterizes the pronounced rise in U.S. wage inequality since 1980 as an "episodic" event of the first half of the 1980s driven by nonmarket factors (particularly a falling real minimum wage) and concludes that continued increases in wage inequality since the late 1980s substantially reflect the mechanical confounding effects of changes in labor force composition. Analyzing data from the Current Population Survey for 1963 to 2005, we find limited support fo...

  7. Changes in the Czech wage structure: Does immigration matter?

    OpenAIRE

    Kamil DYBCZAK; Galuščák, Kamil

    2010-01-01

    Using the Albrecht et al. (2003) version of the Machado and Mata (2005) decomposition technique along the wage distribution, we find that immigrant workers do not affect changes in the Czech wage structure between 2002 and 2006 despite their substantial inflows. Instead, changes in the wage structure are explained solely by increasing returns of native workers, while changes in the observed characteristics of native workers, particularly a rising level of education, are responsible for increa...

  8. Recent Twists of the Wage Structure and Technology Diffusion

    OpenAIRE

    James D Adams

    1994-01-01

    This paper is an empirical study of the impact on U.S. wage structure of domestic technology, foreign technology, and import penetration. A model is presented which combines factor proportions theory with a version of growth theory. The model, which assumes two levels of skill, suggests that domestic technology raises both wages, while foreign technology, on a simple interpretation, lowers both. Trade at a constant technology, as usual, lowers the wage of that class of labor used intensively ...

  9. Examining Determinants of Foreign Wage Premiums in China

    OpenAIRE

    Theresa M. Greaney; Yao Li

    2014-01-01

    We estimate foreign ownership wage premiums for every 3-digit manufacturing industry in China and discover a wide range of premiums both for so-called "foreign" ownership and for overseas Chinese ownership of firms. Foreign ownership generates larger and more prevalent wage premiums than overseas Chinese ownership of firms, but both types of foreign ownership produce wage premiums that respond similarly in hypothesis testing of determinants. Using the number of computers per worker as an indi...

  10. DYNAMIC TRENDS OF WAGE IN UKRAINE: PROSPECTS OF EUROPEAN INTEGRATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganna KATARANCHUK

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the main trends of the national economy and the dynamics of wages in Ukraine and other postsocialist countries in terms of the prospects of Ukraine's integration into the European economic and social space. The estimation of the impact of the wage indices for the welfare of citizens. The basic factors of Ukraine’s backlog in terms of wages from other countries and the possibilities and prospects of solving this problem are determined

  11. Skill composition : exploring a wage-based skill measure

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsen, Øivind Anti; Raknerud, Arvid; Rybalka, Marina; Skjerpen, Terje

    2008-01-01

    This study explores a wage-based skill measure using information from a wage equation. Evidence from matched employer-employee data show that skill is attributable to variables other than educational length, for instance experience and type of education. Applying our wage-based skill measure to TFP growth analysis, the TFP growth decreases, indicating that more of the change in value-added is picked up by our skill measure than when using a purely education-based skill measure.

  12. Informality and minimum wages by cohort in Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jhon James Mora

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to analyze the effect of minimum wage levels on the decision to join the informal job sector. We estimated a pseudo panel model of engagement in the informal sector using an IV-probit. Our results show that an increased wage gap-the relative difference between observed and minimum wage-has not only a disincentive effect on the probability of joining informality, but also leads to a substitution effect between younger and older cohorts.

  13. 26 CFR 31.3401(a)-1 - Wages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Wages. 31.3401(a)-1 Section 31.3401(a)-1... Income Tax at Source § 31.3401(a)-1 Wages. (a) In general. (1) The term “wages” means all remuneration..., pensions, and retired pay are wages within the meaning of the statute if paid as compensation for services...

  14. 29 CFR 1620.12 - Wage “rate.”

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Wage ârate.â 1620.12 Section 1620.12 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION THE EQUAL PAY ACT § 1620.12 Wage “rate.” (a) The term wage “rate,” as used in the EPA, refers to the standard or measure by which an...

  15. 29 CFR 3.10 - Methods of payment of wages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Methods of payment of wages. 3.10 Section 3.10 Labor Office... IN WHOLE OR IN PART BY LOANS OR GRANTS FROM THE UNITED STATES § 3.10 Methods of payment of wages. The payment of wages shall be by cash, negotiable instruments payable on demand, or the additional forms of...

  16. Essays on Wage and Price Formation in Sweden

    OpenAIRE

    Friberg, Kent

    2004-01-01

    Study IReal Wage Determination in the Swedish Engineering Industry This study uses the monopoly union model to examine the determination of real wages and in particular the effects of active labour market programmes (ALMPs) on real wages in the engineering industry. Quarterly data for the period 1970:1 to 1996:4 are used in a cointegration framework, utilising the Johansen's maximum likelihood procedure. On a basis of the Johansen (trace) test results, vector error correction (VEC) models are...

  17. Do MincerianWage Equations Inform How Schooling Influences Productivity?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Christian; Growiec, Jakub

    2017-01-01

    We study the links between the Mincerian wage equation (the cross-sectional relationship between wages and years of schooling) and the human capital production function (the causal effect of schooling on labor productivity). Based on a stylized Mincerian general equilibrium model with imperfect...... substitutability across skill types and ex ante identical workers, we demonstrate that the mechanism of compensating wage differentials renders the Mincerian wage equation uninformative for the human capital production function. Proper identification of the human capital production function should take...

  18. Direct and indirect effects of body weight on adult wages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Euna; Norton, Edward C; Powell, Lisa M

    2011-12-01

    Previous estimates of the association between body weight and wages in the literature have been conditional on education and occupation. In addition to the effect of current body weight status (body mass index (BMI) or obesity) on wages, this paper examines the indirect effect of body weight status in the late-teenage years on wages operating through education and occupation choice. Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 data, for women, we find that a one-unit increase in BMI is directly associated with 1.83% lower hourly wages whereas the indirect BMI wage penalty is not statistically significant. Neither a direct nor an indirect BMI wage penalty is found for men. However, results based on clinical weight classification reveal that the indirect wage penalty occurs to a larger extent at the upper tail of the BMI distribution for both men and women via the pathways of education and occupation outcomes. Late-teen obesity is indirectly associated with 3.5% lower hourly wages for both women and men. These results are important because they imply that the total effect of obesity on wages is significantly larger than has been estimated in previous cross-sectional studies. 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Period Effects, Cohort Effects, and the Narrowing Gender Wage Gap

    OpenAIRE

    Campbell, Colin; Pearlman, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    Despite the abundance of sociological research on the gender wage gap, questions remain. In particular, the role of cohorts is under investigated. Using data from the Current Population Survey, we use Age-Period-Cohort analysis to uniquely estimate age, period, and cohort effects on the gender wage gap. The narrowing of the gender wage gap that occurred between 1975 and 2009 is largely due to cohort effects. Since the mid-1990s, the gender wage gap has continued to close absent of period effe...

  20. Employer Sanctions and the Wages of Mexican Immigrants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Brownell

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Wage differences between authorized and unauthorized Mexican immigrants can be explained by human capital factors prior to the 1986 passage of employer sanctions, which prohibited knowingly hiring unauthorized aliens. However, a significant post-1986 wage differential has been interpreted as employers “passing along” expected costs of sanctions through lower wages for unauthorized immigrants. I test this explanation using administrative data on employer sanctions enforcement, finding employer sanctions enforcement levels are related to Mexican immigrants’ wages but have no statistically significant differential effect based on legal status. Estimated savings to employers due to the pay gap are orders of magnitude larger than actual fines.

  1. Multinationals, Cross-border Acquisitions and Wage Dispersion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heyman, Fredrik; Sjöholm, Fredrik; Tingvall, Patrick Gustavsson

    2011-01-01

    We examine the impact of cross-border acquisitions on intra-firm wage dispersion using a detailed Swedish linked employer-employee data set including data on all firms and about 50% of the Swedish labour force with information on job-tasks and education. Foreign acquisitions of domestic...... multinationals and local firms increase wage dispersion but so do also other types of cross-border acquisitions. Hence, it is the acquisition itself rather than foreign ownership that increases wage dispersion. The positive wage effect is concentrated to CEOs and other managers, whereas other groups are either...

  2. Low Wage Mobility in Denmark, Germany and the United States

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deding, Mette

    In this working paper, mobility out of low wage employment in Denmark, Germany, and the United States is studied. Data used for the analysis are the Danish Longitudinal Database – a representative sample of the Danish population, and the PSID-GSOEP Equivalent File Data. Mobility is analysed...... as the transition out of low wage in 1993 and 1995 respectively, conditional on low wage in 1992. The econometric model takes selection into low wage in 1992 into account, and results clearly state the importance. At the aggregate level, mobility patterns are similar in Denmark and Germany, while mobility...

  3. The Hillary Climber trumps manual testing: an automatic system for studying Drosophila climbing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willenbrink, Alex M; Gronauer, Margo K; Toebben, Leon F; Kick, Daniel R; Wells, Madalyn; Zhang, Bing

    Climbing or negative geotaxis is an innate behavior of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. There has been considerable interest in using this simple behavior to gain insights into the changes in brain function associated with aging, influence of drugs, mutated genes, and human neurological disorders. At present, most climbing tests are conducted manually and there is a lack of a simple and automatic device for repeatable and quantitative analysis of fly climbing behavior. Here we present an automatic fly climbing system, named the Hillary Climber (after Sir Edmund Hillary), that can replace the human manual tapping of vials with a mechanical tapping mechanism to provide more consistent force and reduce variability between the users and trials. Following tapping the HC records fly climbing, tracks the fly climbing path, and analyzes the velocity of individual flies and the percentage of successful climbers. The system is relatively simple to build, easy to operate, and efficient and reliable for climbing tests.

  4. Physiological responses to indoor rock-climbing and their relationship to maximal cycle ergometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheel, A William; Seddon, Nicholas; Knight, Andrew; McKenzie, Donald C; R Warburton, Darren E

    2003-07-01

    To quantify the cardiorespiratory responses to indoor climbing during two increasingly difficult climbs and relate them to whole-body dynamic exercise. It was hypothesized that as climbing difficulty increased, oxygen consumption ([V02] and heart rate would increase, and that climbing would require utilization of a significant fraction of maximal cycling values. Elite competitive sport rock climbers (6 male, 3 female) completed two data collection sessions. The first session was completed at an indoor climbing facility, and the second session was an incremental cycle test to exhaustion. During indoor climbing subjects were randomly assigned to climb two routes designated as "harder" or "easier" based on their previous best climb. Subjects wore a portable metabolic system, which allowed measurement of oxygen consumption [V02], minute ventilation ([V02]E), respiratory exchange ratio (RER), and heart rate. During the second session, maximal values for [V02], [V02]E, RER, and heart rate were determined during an incremental cycle test to exhaustion. Heart rate and [VO2], expressed as percent of cycling maximum, were significantly higher during harder climbing compared with easier climbing. During harder climbing, %HR(max) was significantly higher than %[V02] (2max) (89.6% vs 51.2%), and during easier climbing, %HR(max) was significantly higher than %[V02] (2max) (66.9% vs 45.3%). With increasing levels of climbing difficulty, there is a rise in both heart rate and [V02]. However, there is a disproportional rise in heart rate compared with [V02], which we attribute to the fact that climbing requires the use of intermittent isometric contractions of the arm musculature and the reliance of both anaerobic and aerobic metabolism.

  5. Wage Consequences of Rapid Tertiary Education Expansion in a Developing Economy: The Case of Thailand

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Paweenawat, Sasiwimon Warunsiri; Vechbanyongratana, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    .... The results show that the incidence of overeducation is greatest among younger cohorts. Quantile wage regression results suggest that overeducation wage penalties for older workers capture the impact of unobserved low ability on wages...

  6. Do Minimum Wages in Latin America and the Caribbean Matter? Evidence from 19 Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Nicolai; Cunningham, Wendy

    Despite the existence of minimum wage legislation in most Latin American countries, there is little empirical evidence demonstrating its impact on the distribution of wages. In this study, cross-country data for 19 Latin American and Caribbean (LAC) countries is analyzed to gain an understanding...... of if and how minimum wages affect wage distributions in LAC countries. Although there is no single minimum wage institution in the LAC region, we find regional trends. Minimum wages affect the wage distribution in both the formal and, especially, the informal sector, both at the minimum wage and at multiples...... of the minimum. The minimum does not uniformly benefit low-wage workers: in countries where the minimum wage is relatively low compared to mean wages, the minimum wage affects the more disadvantaged segments of the labor force, namely informal sector workers, women, young and older workers, and the low skilled...

  7. Wages during the crisis period in the context of their impact of the labor potential

    OpenAIRE

    H. Kulikov

    2011-01-01

    The paper evaluates the influence of the current economic crisis on wages, shadowing wages, employment, and the relationship between wages and productivity in the context of conservation and development of Ukraine's labor potential.

  8. Acute injury risk and severity in indoor climbing-a prospective analysis of 515,337 indoor climbing wall visits in 5 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöffl, Volker R; Hoffmann, Georg; Küpper, Thomas

    2013-09-01

    Rock climbing's popularity continues to rise, with people of all ages regularly participating in the sport. Climbing literature suggests climbers get injured mostly in their upper extremities. Most studies on climbing injury analysis are conducted retrospectively, with all the inherent problems of a retrospective setup (no exact time collection, biased injury perception, etc). Prospective data are still missing. We prospectively evaluated all attendees of a major German indoor climbing gym in Stuttgart, Germany, with bouldering and lead climbing facilities. Attendee's age, sex, and time spent climbing were electronically recorded on each visit. All acute injuries were graded using the Medical Commission of the Union Internationale des Associations d'Alpinisme Score. Injury cause, belayers' and climbers' experience, and outcome were additionally analyzed. During a 5-year period (2007-2011), 515,337 visits to the climbing wall were registered, of which 63.6% were by male visitors, 36.4% female, within an age of 8-80 years (median, 34 years). The average time of climbing was 2 hours 47 minutes. Thirty climbing injuries were recorded, 22 were in male and 8 in female climbers with a total mean age of 27.5 ± 10.6 years. Acute injuries happened in 6 cases while bouldering, in 16 cases while lead climbing, in 7 cases while top roping, and in 1 case as a third person (not climbing or belaying) while watching another climber. Bouldering injuries were mostly the result of falls onto the mat, whereas in lead and top rope climbing various scenarios happened. Fifteen (50%) injuries were Medical Commission of the Union Internationale des Associations d'Alpinisme grade 2, 13 (43%) were grade 3, and 2 (7%) were grade 4, with no fatalities. The overall injury rate was 0.02 injuries per 1000 hours of climbing activities. This was the first study to accurately record time spent indoor climbing digitally and evaluate the acute injuries prospectively in a large cohort. There were few

  9. Ideological Wage Inequalities? The Technical/Social Dualism and the Gender Wage Gap in Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cech, Erin A.

    2013-01-01

    Can professional cultures contribute to wage inequality? Recent literature has demonstrated how widely held cultural biases reproduce ascriptive inequalities in the workforce, but cultural belief systems "within" professions have largely been ignored as mechanisms of intra-profession inequality. I argue that cultural ideologies about professional…

  10. Wages and Skills Utilization: Effect of Broad Skills and Generic Skills on Wages in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Catherine R.; Ng, Michael Chi Man; Sung, Johnny; Loke, Fiona

    2013-01-01

    Many people go for training to upgrade their skills which is hoped to pave the way for better pay. But what are the kinds of skills that really affect wages? Employers have emphasized the value of generic skills such as interpersonal and communication skills, teamwork and problem solving. Does possession of these skills translate to at least the…

  11. LABOR FLEXICURITY IN THE WAGE POLICY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AVRAM COSTIN DANIEL

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, economists and specialists in human resources have shown a growing interest for more efficient wage policy, one that proves to be judiciously developed and in accordance with the specific activity of each entity. Therefore, an effective wage policy should be part of the general policy of the firm and should answer, on the one hand to the general requirements of increasing the efficiency of the activity and on the other hand to provide stimulation and motivation for the staff so to achieve not only individual performance but bring along added value to the overall business performance. This article is part of a broader research conducted by authors in the field of wages and labor market flexicurity. In elaborating this article we have appealed to an exhaustive analysis of EU law regarding remuneration of labor, in general, and labor flexicurity, in particular, the opinions of experts in the field were considered and their opinions, or some legal texts, the most significant ones, were presented in this work in a summary form. A critical documentary work on Community regulations and Romanian legislation, foreign specialized literature and the one published in our country was performed while conducting the research. The theoretical approach of flexicurity is different from state to state within the European Union in relation to the development and diversification of the labor market of each state. In some countries the efforts can focus on the firms for retraining, requalification, while in others the focus should be put on training during periods of inactivity or unemployment.

  12. Are low wages risk factors for hypertension?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Juan

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Socio-economic status (SES) is strongly correlated with hypertension. But SES has several components, including income and correlations in cross-sectional data need not imply SES is a risk factor. This study investigates whether wages—the largest category within income—are risk factors. Methods: We analysed longitudinal, nationally representative US data from four waves (1999, 2001, 2003 and 2005) of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics. The overall sample was restricted to employed persons age 25–65 years, n = 17 295. Separate subsamples were constructed of persons within two age groups (25–44 and 45–65 years) and genders. Hypertension incidence was self-reported based on physician diagnosis. Our study was prospective since data from three base years (1999, 2001, 2003) were used to predict newly diagnosed hypertension for three subsequent years (2001, 2003, 2005). In separate analyses, data from the first base year were used to predict time-to-reporting hypertension. Logistic regressions with random effects and Cox proportional hazards regressions were run. Results: Negative and strongly statistically significant correlations between wages and hypertension were found both in logistic and Cox regressions, especially for subsamples containing the younger age group (25–44 years) and women. Correlations were stronger when three health variables—obesity, subjective measures of health and number of co-morbidities—were excluded from regressions. Doubling the wage was associated with 25–30% lower chances of hypertension for persons aged 25–44 years. Conclusions: The strongest evidence for low wages being risk factors for hypertension among working people were for women and persons aged 25–44 years. PMID:22262559

  13. Entrepreneurship, job creation and wage growth

    OpenAIRE

    Malchow-Møller, Nikolaj; Schjerning, Bertel; Sørensen, Anders

    2011-01-01

    This paper analyses the importance of entrepreneurs in terms of job creation and wage growth. Relying on unique data that cover all establishments, firms and individuals in the Danish private sector, we are able to distil a number of different subsets from the total set of new establishments—subsets which allow us to more precisely capture the “truly new” or “entrepreneurial” establishments than has been possible in previous studies. Using these data, we find that while new establishments in ...

  14. Skill asymmetries, increasing wage inequality and unemployment

    OpenAIRE

    Skott, Peter; Auerbach, Paul

    2000-01-01

    Using a simple model with two levels of skill, we assume that high-skill workers who fail to get high-skill jobs may accept low-skill positions; low-skill workers do not have the analogous option of filling high-skill positions. This asymmetry implies that a slowdown in Hicks-neutral technical change (or other adverse, skill-neutral shocks) may cause an increase in wage inequality, both between and within skill categories, as well as an increase in unemployment, especially among low-skill wor...

  15. The Effect of Minimum Wages on Youth Employment in Canada: A Panel Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Terence

    2003-01-01

    Canadian panel data 1988-90 were used to compare estimates of minimum-wage effects based on a low-wage/high-worker sample and a low-wage-only sample. Minimum-wage effect for the latter is nearly zero. Different results for low-wage subgroups suggest a significant effect for those with longer low-wage histories. (Contains 26 references.) (SK)

  16. [CLIMBING HIGHER--COMMON INJURIES IN ROCK CLIMBERS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobel, Dafna; Constantin, Naama; Or, Omer

    2016-06-01

    Rock climbing is becoming an increasingly popular sport in Israel with more and more climbing walls being built in the cities and new routes being traced on cliffs around the country. Our account describes the case of a 15 years old climber with chronic pain (without trauma) in the 3rd finger of the right hand. A stress fracture, involving the proximal interphalangeal joint (SH3) of the middle phalanx, was diagnosed. The fracture healed following two months of rest with gradual return to activity. As this sport becomes more common, there is an increasing need for knowledge about the characteristic injuries, their diagnosis and treatment. Although considered an extreme sport, most of the injuries are overuse injuries, mainly to the upper limbs. Finger flexor tendon pulley rupture being one of the most common. Diagnosis is based on history, physical examination and ultrasonography. Conservative treatment is successful for most injuries, while more complicated cases require surgical intervention.

  17. Sport-specific power assessment for rock climbing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draper, N; Dickson, T; Blackwell, G; Priestley, S; Fryer, S; Marshall, H; Shearman, J; Hamlin, M; Winter, D; Ellis, G

    2011-09-01

    The popularity of rock climbing has resulted in a growing research base for the sport. However, at present there is a lack of sport-specific measures of performance in the field. The aim of this study was to examine the use of the powerslap test as a sport specific power measure. The participants in this study were categorised into four different ability groups (novice, intermediate, advanced and elite) based on self reported lead grade. Two separate experiments were conducted to determine validity and reliability. The powerslap test was conducted on a revolution board with two variations - wide and narrow grip, for both sides of the body. The test started with the climber hanging at full extension from two holds from which a pull up movement was made releasing one hand to slap a scaled score board above. There was a significant relationship between powerslap scores and climbing ability (Left Wide: r=0.7, Pclimbing performance.

  18. How and when infants learn to climb stairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Sarah E; Theuring, Carolin; Adolph, Karen E

    2007-02-01

    Seven hundred and thirty-two parents reported when and how their infants learned to climb stairs. Children typically mastered stair ascent (mean age=10.97 months) several months after crawling onset and several weeks prior to descent (mean age=12.53 months). Most infants (94%) crawled upstairs the first time they ascended independently. Most infants (76%) turned around and backed at initial descent. Other descent strategies included scooting down sitting, walking, and sliding down face first. Children with stairs in their home were more likely to learn to ascend stairs at a younger age, devise backing as a descent strategy, and be explicitly taught to descend by their parents than children without stairs in their home. However, all infants learned to descend stairs at the same age, regardless of the presence of stairs in their home. Parents' teaching strategies and infants' access to stairs worked together to constrain development and to influence the acquisition of stair climbing milestones.

  19. Rock climbing alters plant species composition, cover, and richness in Mediterranean limestone cliffs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorite, Juan; Serrano, Fabio; Lorenzo, Adrián; Cañadas, Eva M; Ballesteros, Miguel; Peñas, Julio

    2017-01-01

    Rock climbing is among the outdoor activities that have undergone the highest growth since the second half of the 20th century. As a result, cliff habitats, historically one of the least disturbed by human colonization worldwide, are facing more intense human pressure than ever before. However, there is little data on the impact of this activity in plant-communities, and such information is indispensable for adequate manager decision-making. The goal of this study was to determine the impact of rock climbing on plant communities in terms of cover, richness, and composition in relation to climbing intensity on typical Mediterranean limestone cliffs. Three rock-climbing sites were selected in the Baetic range (SE Spain), corresponding to qualitative categories of climbing frequentation: i)"low" (low frequentation with intermittent climbing), ii)"medium" (high frequentation without overcrowding), and iii) "high" (high frequentation with overcrowding). Within each site, we selected climbing routes and adjacent areas free of climbing, then we carried out a photoplot-based sampling by rappelling. We analysed the images to calculate: richness, species cover, and total cover. This study shows that rock climbing negatively affected the cliff plant community at all three study sites. A significant decrease in plant cover, species richness and a shift in the community composition were recorded for climbed areas, the cover being the variable most sensitive to rock climbing. Impact observed proved to be related to the frequentation level. Low-frequentation sites, with usually more specialized climbers, underwent relatively mild damages, whereas at high frequentation sites the impact was severe and the conservation of the species, especially rare ones, became jeopardized. Our study is the first one available to investigate climbing impact on plant communities in Mediterranean areas, but more research on the impact of rock climbing is needed to assess the regulation of this

  20. Rock climbing alters plant species composition, cover, and richness in Mediterranean limestone cliffs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Lorite

    Full Text Available Rock climbing is among the outdoor activities that have undergone the highest growth since the second half of the 20th century. As a result, cliff habitats, historically one of the least disturbed by human colonization worldwide, are facing more intense human pressure than ever before. However, there is little data on the impact of this activity in plant-communities, and such information is indispensable for adequate manager decision-making. The goal of this study was to determine the impact of rock climbing on plant communities in terms of cover, richness, and composition in relation to climbing intensity on typical Mediterranean limestone cliffs. Three rock-climbing sites were selected in the Baetic range (SE Spain, corresponding to qualitative categories of climbing frequentation: i"low" (low frequentation with intermittent climbing, ii"medium" (high frequentation without overcrowding, and iii "high" (high frequentation with overcrowding. Within each site, we selected climbing routes and adjacent areas free of climbing, then we carried out a photoplot-based sampling by rappelling. We analysed the images to calculate: richness, species cover, and total cover. This study shows that rock climbing negatively affected the cliff plant community at all three study sites. A significant decrease in plant cover, species richness and a shift in the community composition were recorded for climbed areas, the cover being the variable most sensitive to rock climbing. Impact observed proved to be related to the frequentation level. Low-frequentation sites, with usually more specialized climbers, underwent relatively mild damages, whereas at high frequentation sites the impact was severe and the conservation of the species, especially rare ones, became jeopardized. Our study is the first one available to investigate climbing impact on plant communities in Mediterranean areas, but more research on the impact of rock climbing is needed to assess the regulation

  1. 77 FR 33490 - Long Elevator & Machine Company, Inc., Including Workers Whose Unemployment Insurance (UI) Wages...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-06

    ... Unemployment Insurance (UI) Wages Were Reported Through Kone, Inc., Riverton, IL; Notice of Affirmative...., including workers whose unemployment insurance (UI) wages were reported through KONE Inc., Riverton...

  2. Climbing fiber synapse elimination in cerebellar Purkinje cells

    OpenAIRE

    Watanabe, Masahiko; Kano, Masanobu

    2011-01-01

    Innervation of Purkinje cells (PCs) by multiple climbing fibers (CFs) is refined into mono-innervation during the first three postnatal weeks of rodents' life. In this review article, we will integrate the current knowledge on developmental process and mechanisms of CF synapse elimination. In the "creeper" stage of CF innervation (postnatal day 0 (P0)∼), CFs creep among PC somata to form transient synapses on immature dendrites. In the "pericellular nest" stage (P5∼), CFs densely surround and...

  3. Rock Climbing Injuries: Acute and Chronic Repetitive Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Connie Y; Torriani, Martin; Huang, Ambrose J

    2016-01-01

    Rock climbing has increased in popularity as a sport, and specific injuries related to its practice are becoming more common. Chronic repetitive injuries are more common than acute injuries, although acute injuries tend to be more severe. We review both acute and chronic upper and lower extremity injuries. Understanding the injury pattern in rock climbers is important for accurate diagnosis. Copyright © 2015 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Factors Influencing Physical Risk Taking in Rock Climbing

    OpenAIRE

    Marcus K. Taylor; Gould, Daniel R.; Hardy, Lew; Woodman, Tim

    2006-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate factors influencing physical risk taking in the sport of rock climbing. Specifically, the relationships between physical risk taking, sensation seeking, spheres of control, and desirability of control were examined. One hundred five rock climbers from the United States completed a series of surveys measuring each of the above-mentioned psychological variables. As predicted, physical risk taking demonstrated significant positive relationships to both tota...

  5. Stair climbing in the functional assessment of lung resection candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koegelenberg, Coenraad F N; Diacon, Andreas H; Irani, Sarosh; Bolliger, Chris T

    2008-01-01

    Algorithms for the pre-operative evaluation of lung resection candidates with impaired lung function invariably include maximum oxygen uptake (VO(2)MAX) as a critical parameter of functional reserves, with a VO(2)MAX >or=20 ml/kg/min generally considered sufficient for pneumonectomy. Stair climbing is a low-cost alternative to assess exercise capacity. As stair climbing is not standardised, we aimed to compare the altitude reached and the speed of ascent with VO(2)MAX measured by cycle ergometry. We prospectively enrolled 44 pulmonary resection candidates (mean age: 47.6 +/- 12.5 years) with an FEV(1) speed of ascent were compared to VO(2)MAX. Forty-three patients reached a 20-metre elevation. Thirteen of them, as well as the patient who did not reach this height, had a VO(2)MAX speed of ascent and VO(2)MAX/kg (R(2) = 0.67), but not between altitude and VO(2)MAX/kg. All 24 patients with a speed >or=15 m/min had a VO(2)MAX >or=20 ml/kg/min. Thirty-nine of 40 patients with a speed >or=12 m/min had a VO(2)MAX >or=15 ml/kg/min. The average speed of ascent during stair climbing was an accurate semiquantitative predictor of VO(2)MAX/kg, whereas altitude was not. We were able to identify potential cut-off values for lobectomy or pneumonectomy. Pending validation with clinical endpoints, stair climbing may replace formal exercise testing at much lower costs in a large proportion of lung resection candidates. (c) 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Do minimum wages reduce poverty? Evidence from Central America ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2010-12-16

    Dec 16, 2010 ... Toward inclusive growth. Minimum wages are designed to reduce poverty and inequality. This key labour market policy intervention represents a common social protection policy in many Latin American countries. Raising minimum wages has traditionally been considered a way to protect poor workers and ...

  7. 20 CFR 404.221 - Computing your average monthly wage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... is rounded down to $502. (e) “Deemed” average monthly wage for certain deceased veterans of World War II. Certain deceased veterans of World War II are “deemed” to have an average monthly wage of $160... years; or (iii) 1974, we count the years beginning with 1951 and ending with the year before you reached...

  8. Justice at work: minimum wage laws and social equality

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rogers, Brishen

    2014-01-01

    ... to relate to one another as equals. This ideal of "social equality" is most commonly associated with republican and communitarian theories of justice, but it is also central to major strands of egalitarian liberalism. Minimum wage laws advance social equality, and do so better than direct transfers, in several ways. They increase workers' wages...

  9. 29 CFR 525.21 - Lowering of wage rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lowering of wage rates. 525.21 Section 525.21 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS EMPLOYMENT... which would affect the productivity of the worker with a disability or which would result in the...

  10. Payroll tax reduction in Brazil : Effects on employment and wages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.R. Scherer (Clóvis)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractThis paper evaluates the effects of the elimination of a payroll tax on employment and wages in four manufacturing and service sectors in Brazil in early 2012. This tax, which accounted for 20 percent of the wage bill, was levied on employers and financed social security programmes. This

  11. The informal sector wage gap among Vietnamese micro-firms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torm, Nina Elisabeth; Rand, John

    2012-01-01

    Based on unique firm survey data from 2009, this paper examines the wage differential between formal and informal manufacturing household enterprises in Vietnam. Using the Blinder–Oaxaca decomposition method, we investigate whether the wage gap is attributed mostly to differences in observable...

  12. Economic development and wage inequality: A complex system analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbardella, Angelica; Pugliese, Emanuele; Pietronero, Luciano

    2017-01-01

    Adapting methods from complex system analysis, this paper analyzes the features of the complex relationship between wage inequality and the development and industrialization of a country. Development is understood as a combination of a monetary index, GDP per capita, and a recently introduced measure of a country's economic complexity: Fitness. Initially the paper looks at wage inequality on a global scale, over the time period 1990-2008. Our empirical results show that globally the movement of wage inequality along with the ongoing industrialization of countries has followed a longitudinally persistent pattern comparable to the one theorized by Kuznets in the fifties: countries with an average level of development suffer the highest levels of wage inequality. Next, the study narrows its focus on wage inequality within the United States. By using data on wages and employment in the approximately 3100 US counties over the time interval 1990-2014, it generalizes the Fitness-Complexity metric for geographic units and industrial sectors, and then investigates wage inequality between NAICS industries. The empirical time and scale dependencies are consistent with a relation between wage inequality and development driven by institutional factors comparing countries, and by change in the structural compositions of sectors in a homogeneous institutional environment, such as the counties of the United States.

  13. Multinationals versus domestic firms: wages, working hours and industrial relations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Klaveren, M.; Tijdens, K.

    2011-01-01

    This Working Paper aims to present and discuss recent evidence on the effect of Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) on wages, working conditions and industrial relations. It presents a. an overview of the available literature on the effects of FDI on wages, particularly in developed countries; b. the

  14. The Gender Wage Gap: A Comparison of Australia and Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, Michael P.; Shannon, Michael

    1996-01-01

    Data from the 1989 Canadian Labour Market Activity Survey and 1989-90 Australian Income Distribution Survey suggest that a lower rate of return to education and labor market experience and a lower level of wage inequality in Australia are responsible for the smaller gender wage gap in Australia than in Canada. (SK)

  15. The Phantom Gender Difference in the College Wage Premium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, William H. J.

    2011-01-01

    A growing literature seeks to explain why so many more women than men now attend college. A commonly cited stylized fact is that the college wage premium is, and has been, higher for women than for men. After identifying and correcting a bias in estimates of college wage premiums, I find that there has been essentially no gender difference in the…

  16. Seniority wages and the role of firms in retirement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frimmel, W.; Horvath, T.; Schnalzenberger, M.; Winter-Ebmer, R.

    2015-01-01

    In general, retirement is seen as a pure labor supply phenomenon, but firms can have strong incentives to send expensive older workers into retirement. Based on the seniority wage model developed by Lazear (1979), we discuss steep seniority wage profiles as incentives for firms to dismiss older

  17. Inefficient Self-Selection into Education and Wage Inequality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordine, Patrizia; Rose, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes a theoretical framework where "within graduates" wage inequality is related to overeducation/educational mismatch in the labor market. We show that wage inequality may arise because of inefficient self-selection into education in the presence of ability-complementary technological progress and asymmetric information…

  18. Does Effeciency Wage Hypothesis Hold in Tanzanian Labour Market?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The primary objective of this paper is to test the hypothesis of efficiency wage in the context of Tanzania labour market. The test is facilitated via estimating the correlation between firm level productivity and firm level weighted average wage in Tanzania manufacturing enterprises. The study uses panel dimension of the data ...

  19. Community College Enrollment, College Major, and the Gender Wage Gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Andrew M.; Leigh, Duane E.

    2000-01-01

    Independent cross-sections developed using National Longitudinal Survey data reveal a decrease in the gender wage gap from 1989-1994 due to fewer differences in tenure and full-time employment. Disaggregating education by two- and four-year providers and college major accounts for 8.5-11% of the narrower wage gap for the period. (SK)

  20. Residual Wage Differences by Gender: Bounding the Estimates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakellariou, Chris N.; Patrinos, Harry A.

    1996-01-01

    Uses data from the 1986 Canadian labor market activity survey file to derive estimates of residual gender wage gap differences. Investigates these estimates' dependence on experimental design and on assumptions about discrimination-free wage structures. Residual differences persist, even after restricting the sample to a group of highly motivated,…

  1. 26 CFR 1.199-2 - Wage limitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... that W-2 wages must have been included in a return filed with the Social Security Administration (SSA... wages must be reported on return filed with the Social Security Administration—(i) In general. The term... selling expenses that are not includible in CGS and are definitely related to all of X's gross income. For...

  2. Is a Minimum Wage an Appropriate Instrument for Redistribution?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.A.F. Gerritsen (Aart); B. Jacobs (Bas)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractWe analyze the redistributional (dis)advantages of a minimum wage over income taxation in competitive labor markets, without imposing assumptions on the (in)efficiency of labor rationing. Compared to a distributionally equivalent tax change, a minimum-wage increase raises involuntary

  3. The Minimum Wage, Restaurant Prices, and Labor Market Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaronson, Daniel; French, Eric; MacDonald, James

    2008-01-01

    Using store-level and aggregated Consumer Price Index data, we show that restaurant prices rise in response to minimum wage increases under several sources of identifying variation. We introduce a general model of employment determination that implies minimum wage hikes cause prices to rise in competitive labor markets but potentially fall in…

  4. The Effect of Minimum Wage Rates on High School Completion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, John Robert; Hamrock, Caitlin

    2010-01-01

    Does increasing the minimum wage reduce the high school completion rate? Previous research has suffered from (1. narrow time horizons, (2. potentially inadequate measures of states' high school completion rates, and (3. potentially inadequate measures of minimum wage rates. Overcoming each of these limitations, we analyze the impact of changes in…

  5. The impact of minimum wages on youth employment in Portugal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.C. Pereira

    2003-01-01

    textabstractFrom January 1, 1987, the legal minimum wage for workers aged 18 and 19 in Portugal was uprated to the full adult rate, generating a 49.3% increase between 1986 and 1987 in the legal minimum wage for this age group. This shock is used as a ?natural experiment? to evaluate the impact of

  6. Economic development and wage inequality: A complex system analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugliese, Emanuele; Pietronero, Luciano

    2017-01-01

    Adapting methods from complex system analysis, this paper analyzes the features of the complex relationship between wage inequality and the development and industrialization of a country. Development is understood as a combination of a monetary index, GDP per capita, and a recently introduced measure of a country’s economic complexity: Fitness. Initially the paper looks at wage inequality on a global scale, over the time period 1990–2008. Our empirical results show that globally the movement of wage inequality along with the ongoing industrialization of countries has followed a longitudinally persistent pattern comparable to the one theorized by Kuznets in the fifties: countries with an average level of development suffer the highest levels of wage inequality. Next, the study narrows its focus on wage inequality within the United States. By using data on wages and employment in the approximately 3100 US counties over the time interval 1990–2014, it generalizes the Fitness-Complexity metric for geographic units and industrial sectors, and then investigates wage inequality between NAICS industries. The empirical time and scale dependencies are consistent with a relation between wage inequality and development driven by institutional factors comparing countries, and by change in the structural compositions of sectors in a homogeneous institutional environment, such as the counties of the United States. PMID:28926577

  7. Reassessing the Wage Penalty for Temps in Germany

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jahn, Elke

    and region. But temps already suffer from a marked wage decline before entering the temporary help sector. Nevertheless, temporary agency employment does not leave a long lasting scar. Three quarters after leaving the sector, temps no longer suffer from a wage penalty. A recent change in the law set a high...

  8. Consumption Taxes and Economic Efficiency with Idiosyncratic Wage Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Shinichi; Smetters, Kent

    2005-01-01

    Fundamental tax reform is examined in an overlapping-generations model in which heterogeneous agents face idiosyncratic wage shocks and longevity uncertainty. A progressive income tax is replaced with a flat consumption tax. If idiosyncratic wage shocks are insurable (i.e., no risk), this reform improves (interim) efficiency, a result consistent…

  9. Individual Wealth, Reservation Wages and Transitions into Employment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloemen, H.G.; Stancanelli, E.G.F.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the relationship between financial wealth, reservation wages and labour market transitions. According to the theory, higher levels of wealth will result in higher reservation wages and lower employment probabilities. We test for the validity of this assumption by

  10. Job-to-Job Transitions, Sorting, and Wage Growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jinkins, David; Morin, Annaïg

    In this paper, we measure the contribution of match quality to the wage growth experienced by job movers. Using the Danish matched employer-employee data, we reject the exogenous mobility assumption needed to estimate a standard fixedeffects wage regression. To estimate firm fixed effects, we exp...

  11. Job-to-job Transitions, Sorting, and Wage Growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jinkins, David; Morin, Annaïg

    We measure the contribution of match quality to the wage growth experienced by job movers. We reject the exogenous mobility assumption needed to estimate a standard fixed-effects wage regression in the Danish matched employer-employee data. We exploit the sub-sample of workers hired from unemploy...

  12. Does Effeciency Wage Hypothesis Hold in Tanzanian Labour Market?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    some characteristics self-select into payment schemes that have efficiency wage aspects. Keywords: Efficiency Wage ... productivity. This is because labour is one of the factors of production, and once in a Cobb. Douglas that assumes constant returns to scale, it is not possible to increase labour without change in capital.

  13. Wealth, wages and wedlock : Explaining the college gender gap reversal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijnders, Laurie

    2017-01-01

    We study the role of changes in the wage structure and expectations about marriage in explaining the college gender gap reversal. With strongly diminishing marginal utility of wealth and in the presence of a gender wage gap, single women have a greater incentive than single men to invest in

  14. Six months into Myanmar's minimum wage: Reflecting on progress ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-04-25

    Apr 25, 2016 ... Employment and Growth. ​Six months ago, the Government of Myanmar established a national minimum wage, expecting that it would stimulate investment in the garment industry. The new wage, 3,600 Kyat (3 US$) a day, is as much as 4.5 times more than unskilled entry-level workers were earning.

  15. Six months into Myanmar's minimum wage: Reflecting on progress ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Employment and Growth. ​Six months ago, the Government of Myanmar established a national minimum wage, expecting that it would stimulate investment in the garment industry. The new wage, 3,600 Kyat (3 US$) a day, is as much as 4.5 times more than unskilled entry-level workers were earning. Half a year later, ...

  16. 46 CFR 282.21 - Wages of officers and crew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... OPERATORS OPERATING-DIFFERENTIAL SUBSIDY FOR LINER VESSELS ENGAGED IN ESSENTIAL SERVICES IN THE FOREIGN COMMERCE OF THE UNITED STATES Calculation of Subsidy Rates § 282.21 Wages of officers and crew. (a... (x) Penalty cargo bonuses. (c) Method of calculating U.S. wage cost (WC) Two different calculations...

  17. Foreign ownership and its effects on employment and wages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brännlund, Runar; Nordström, Leif Jonas; Stage, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we study how foreign ownership of Swedish companies affects employment and wages. To study these effects, we specify a model based on the assumption that the Swedish labour market can be described as one where trade unions and employers bargain over employment and wages. Our...

  18. Do minimum wages reduce poverty? Evidence from Central America ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The estimates suggest that a 10% increase in the real minimum wage leads employment in the formal sector to fall by approximately 1% in Costa Rica, 3% in Nicaragua and 10% in El Salvador. KEY CHOICES. Evidence suggests that minimum wages are not an efficient way to reduce poverty in Central American countries.

  19. A wheelchair with lever propulsion control for climbing up and down stairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Kai; Eguchi, Yosuke; Suzuki, Kenji

    2016-08-01

    This study proposes a novel stair-climbing wheelchair based on lever propulsion control using the human upper body. Wheelchairs are widely used as supporting locomotion devices for people with acquired lower limb disabilities. However, steps and stairs are critical obstacles to locomotion, which restrict their activities when using wheelchairs. Previous research focused on power-assisted, stair-climbing wheelchairs, which were large and heavy due to its large actuators and mechanisms. In the previous research, we proposed a wheelchair with lever propulsion mechanism and presented its feasibility of climbing up the stairs. The developed stair-climbing wheelchair consists of manual wheels with casters for planar locomotion and a rotary-leg mechanism based on lever propulsion that is capable of climbing up stairs. The wheelchair also has a passive mechanism powered by gas springs for posture transition to shift the user's center of gravity between the desired positions for planar locomotion and stair-climbing. In this paper, we present an advanced study on both climbing up and going down using lever propulsion control by the user's upper body motion. For climbing down the stairs, we reassembled one-way clutches used for the rotary-leg mechanism to help a user climb down the stairs through lever operation. We also equipped the wheelchair with sufficient torque dampers. The frontal wheels were fixed while climbing down the stairs to ensure safety. Relevant experiments were then performed to investigate its performance and verify that the wheelchair users can operate the proposed lever propulsion mechanism.

  20. Evaluation of injury and fatality risk in rock and ice climbing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöffl, Volker; Morrison, Audry; Schwarz, Ulrich; Schöffl, Isabelle; Küpper, Thomas

    2010-08-01

    Rock and ice climbing are widely considered to be 'high-risk' sporting activities that are associated with a high incidence of severe injury and even death, compared with more mainstream sports. However, objective scientific data to support this perception are questionable. Accordingly, >400 sport-specific injury studies were analysed and compared by quantifying the injury incidence and objectively grading the injury severity (using the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics score) per 1000 hours of sporting participation. Fatalities were also analysed. The analysis revealed that fatalities occurred in all sports, but it was not always clear whether the sport itself or pre-existing health conditions contributed or caused the deaths. Bouldering (ropeless climbing to low heights), sport climbing (mostly bolt protected lead climbing with little objective danger) and indoor climbing (climbing indoors on artificial rock structures), showed a small injury rate, minor injury severity and few fatalities. As more objective/external dangers exist for alpine and ice climbing, the injury rate, injury severity and fatality were all higher. Overall, climbing sports had a lower injury incidence and severity score than many popular sports, including basketball, sailing or soccer; indoor climbing ranked the lowest in terms of injuries of all sports assessed. Nevertheless, a fatality risk remains, especially in alpine and ice climbing. In the absence of a standard definition for a 'high-risk' sport, categorizing climbing as a high-risk sport was found to be either subjective or dependent on the definition used. In conclusion, this analysis showed that retrospective data on sport-specific injuries and fatalities are not reported in a standardized manner. To improve preventative injury measures for climbing sports, it is recommended that a standardized, robust and comprehensive sport-specific scoring model should be developed to report and fully evaluate the injury risk, severity