WorldWideScience

Sample records for wafer-level cu-cu bonds

  1. Analyses of crack growth along interface of patterned wafer-level Cu-Cu bonds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo; Hutchinson, John W.

    2009-01-01

    A preliminary theoretical study is carried out of the role of micron-scale patterning on the interface toughness of bonded Cu-to-Cu nanometer-scale films. The work is motivated by the experimental studies of [Tadepalli, R., Turner. K.T., Thompson, C.V., 2008b. Effects of patterning on the interface...... toughness of wafer-level Cu-Cu bonds. Acta Materialia 56, 438-447; Tadepalli, R., Turner, K.T., Thompson, C.V., 2008c. Mixed-mode interface toughness of wafer-level Cu-Cu bonds using asymmetric chevron test. J. Mech. Phys. Solids 56, 707-718.] wherein 400 nm Cu films were deposited in a variety of patterns...... on Si wafer substrates. Specimens were then produced by bringing the Cu surfaces into contact creating thermo-compression bonds. Interface toughness of these specimens was experimentally measured. The present study focuses on interface patterns comprised of bonded strips, called lines, alternating...

  2. Investigation of Surface Pre-Treatment Methods for Wafer-Level Cu-Cu Thermo-Compression Bonding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koki Tanaka

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available To increase the yield of the wafer-level Cu-Cu thermo-compression bonding method, certain surface pre-treatment methods for Cu are studied which can be exposed to the atmosphere before bonding. To inhibit re-oxidation under atmospheric conditions, the reduced pure Cu surface is treated by H2/Ar plasma, NH3 plasma and thiol solution, respectively, and is covered by Cu hydride, Cu nitride and a self-assembled monolayer (SAM accordingly. A pair of the treated wafers is then bonded by the thermo-compression bonding method, and evaluated by the tensile test. Results show that the bond strengths of the wafers treated by NH3 plasma and SAM are not sufficient due to the remaining surface protection layers such as Cu nitride and SAMs resulting from the pre-treatment. In contrast, the H2/Ar plasma–treated wafer showed the same strength as the one with formic acid vapor treatment, even when exposed to the atmosphere for 30 min. In the thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS measurement of the H2/Ar plasma–treated Cu sample, the total number of the detected H2 was 3.1 times more than the citric acid–treated one. Results of the TDS measurement indicate that the modified Cu surface is terminated by chemisorbed hydrogen atoms, which leads to high bonding strength.

  3. Bond strength of W-Cu/CuCr integrated material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范志康; 梁淑华; 薛旭

    2001-01-01

    The bond strength of W-Cu/CuCr integrated material was investigated. The results show that the fracture of W-Cu/CuCr integrated material often takes place at W-Cu/CuCr interface. Some alloying elements enhance the bond of W and CuCr alloy, which results in the increase of the strength of the W-Cu/CuCr interface. And the fracture of the WCu/CuCr integrated material occurs in the CuCr alloy part, not at the W-Cu/CuCr interface. Chromium in CuCr alloy part of the integrated material can improve Cr diffusing from the CuCr alloy to W-Cu composite and can be alloyed (near the W-Cu/CuCr interface) in the W-Cu composite. Thus the strength of W-Cu/CuCr interface is also increased.

  4. Wafer level bonding using localized radio-frequency induction heating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    A wafer level bonding technique by localized induction heating has been developed and demonstrated in this paper.A suitable fabrication process scheme has also been established for the localized induction heating and bonding.It takes only about 20 seconds to complete the bonding process.The temperatures of solder loops and the central area of solder loops are above 300°C and below 70°C,respectively.Due to the solder reflow,robust and hermetic glass wafer bonding is accomplished,and the average tensile strength is 6.42 MPa.Under-heated or over-heated bonding has been found to result in cracks at bonding interfaces and sputtering layer,which degrades the bonding qualities.

  5. Methods for characterization of wafer-level encapsulation applied on silicon to LTCC anodic bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M. F.; Ghavanini, F. A.; Haasl, S.; Löfgren, L.; Persson, K.; Rusu, C.; Schjølberg-Henriksen, K.; Enoksson, P.

    2010-06-01

    This paper presents initial results on generic characterization methods for wafer-level encapsulation. The methods, developed specifically to evaluate anodic bonding of low-temperature cofired ceramics (LTCC) to Si, are generally applicable to wafer-level encapsulation. Different microelectromechanical system (MEMS) structures positioned over the whole wafer provide local information about the bond quality. The structures include (i) resonating cantilevers as pressure sensors for bond hermeticity, (ii) resonating bridges as stress sensors for measuring the stress induced by the bonding and (iii) frames/mesas for pull tests. These MEMS structures have been designed, fabricated and characterized indicating that local information can easily be obtained. Buried electrodes to enable localized bonding have been implemented and their effectiveness is indicated from first results of the novel Si to LTCC anodic bonding.

  6. Si-gold-glass hybrid wafer bond for 3D-MEMS and wafer level packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Jayaprakash; Pratap, Rudra

    2017-01-01

    We report a relatively low temperature (MEMS device integration and wafer level packaging. We demonstrate the process by realizing a simple MEMS cantilever beam and a complex MEMS gyroscope structure. These structures are characterized for ohmic contact and electromechanical response to verify the electrical interconnect and the mechanical strength of the structure at the bond interface.

  7. Characterization of wafer-level bonded hermetic packages using optical leak detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Ani; Wang, Kaiying; Aasmundtveit, Knut; Hoivik, Nils

    2009-07-01

    For MEMS devices required to be operated in a hermetic environment, one of the main reliability issues is related to the packaging methods applied. In this paper, an optical method for testing low volume hermetic cavities formed by anodic bonding between glass and SOI (silicon on insulator) wafer is presented. Several different cavity-geometry structures have been designed, fabricated and applied to monitor the hermeticity of wafer level anodic bonding. SOI wafer was used as the cap wafer on which the different-geometry structures were fabricated using standard MEMS technology. The test cavities were bonded using SOI wafers to glass wafers at 400C and 1000mbar pressure inside a vacuum bonding chamber. The bonding voltage varies from 200V to 600V. The bonding strength between glass and SOI wafer was mechanically tested using shear tester. The deformation amplitudes of the cavity cap surface were monitored by using an optical interferometer. The hermeticity of the glass-to-SOI wafer level bonding was characterized through observing the surface deformation in a 6 months period in atmospheric environment. We have observed a relatively stable micro vacuum-cavity.

  8. Cost-Efficient Wafer-Level Capping for MEMS and Imaging Sensors by Adhesive Wafer Bonding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon J. Bleiker

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Device encapsulation and packaging often constitutes a substantial part of the fabrication cost of micro electro-mechanical systems (MEMS transducers and imaging sensor devices. In this paper, we propose a simple and cost-effective wafer-level capping method that utilizes a limited number of highly standardized process steps as well as low-cost materials. The proposed capping process is based on low-temperature adhesive wafer bonding, which ensures full complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS compatibility. All necessary fabrication steps for the wafer bonding, such as cavity formation and deposition of the adhesive, are performed on the capping substrate. The polymer adhesive is deposited by spray-coating on the capping wafer containing the cavities. Thus, no lithographic patterning of the polymer adhesive is needed, and material waste is minimized. Furthermore, this process does not require any additional fabrication steps on the device wafer, which lowers the process complexity and fabrication costs. We demonstrate the proposed capping method by packaging two different MEMS devices. The two MEMS devices include a vibration sensor and an acceleration switch, which employ two different electrical interconnection schemes. The experimental results show wafer-level capping with excellent bond quality due to the re-flow behavior of the polymer adhesive. No impediment to the functionality of the MEMS devices was observed, which indicates that the encapsulation does not introduce significant tensile nor compressive stresses. Thus, we present a highly versatile, robust, and cost-efficient capping method for components such as MEMS and imaging sensors.

  9. Vertical integration of array-type miniature interferometers at wafer level by using multistack anodic bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei-Shan; Wiemer, Maik; Froemel, Joerg; Enderlein, Tom; Gessner, Thomas; Lullin, Justine; Bargiel, Sylwester; Passilly, Nicolas; Albero, Jorge; Gorecki, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    In this work, vertical integration of miniaturized array-type Mirau interferometers at wafer level by using multi-stack anodic bonding is presented. Mirau interferometer is suitable for MEMS metrology and for medical imaging according to its vertical-, lateral- resolutions and working distances. Miniaturized Mirau interferometer can be a promising candidate as a key component of an optical coherence tomography (OCT) system. The miniaturized array-type interferometer consists of a microlens doublet, a Si-based MEMS Z scanner, a spacer for focus-adjustment and a beam splitter. Therefore, bonding technologies which are suitable for heterogeneous substrates are of high interest and necessary for the integration of MEMS/MOEMS devices. Multi-stack anodic bonding, which meets the optical and mechanical requirements of the MOEMS device, is adopted to integrate the array-type interferometers. First, the spacer and the beam splitter are bonded, followed by bonding of the MEMS Z scanner. In the meanwhile, two microlenses, which are composed of Si and glass wafers, are anodically bonded to form a microlens doublet. Then, the microlens doublet is aligned and bonded with the scanner/spacer/beam splitter stack. The bonded array-type interferometer is a 7- wafer stack and the thickness is approximately 5mm. To separate such a thick wafer stack with various substrates, 2-step laser cutting is used to dice the bonded stack into Mirau chips. To simplify fabrication process of each component, electrical connections are created at the last step by mounting a Mirau chip onto a flip chip PCB instead of through wafer vias. Stability of Au/Ti films on the MEMS Z scanner after anodic bonding, laser cutting and flip chip bonding are discussed as well.

  10. Wafer-level integration of NiTi shape memory alloy on silicon using Au-Si eutectic bonding

    OpenAIRE

    Gradin, Henrik; Bushra, Sobia; Braun, Stefan; Stemme, Göran; van der Wijngaart, Wouter

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on the wafer level integration of NiTi shape memory alloy (SMA) sheets with silicon substrates through Au-Si eutectic bonding. Different bond parameters, such as Au layer thicknesses and substrate surface treatments were evaluated. The amount of gold in the bond interface is the most important parameter to achieve a high bond yield; the amount can be determined by the barrier layers between the Au and Si or by the amount of Au deposition. Deposition of a gold layer of more ...

  11. Wafer-level packaging and laser bonding as an approach for silicon-into-lab-on-chip integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brettschneider, T.; Dorrer, C.; Bründel, M.; Zengerle, R.; Daub, M.

    2013-05-01

    A novel approach for the integration of silicon biosensors into microfluidics is presented. Our approach is based on wafer-level packaging of the silicon die and a laser-bonding process of the resulting mold package into a polymer-multilayer stack. The introduction of a flexible and 40 μm thin hot melt foil as an intermediate layer enables laser bonding between materials with different melting temperatures, where standard laser welding processes cannot be employed. All process steps are suitable for mass production, e.g. the approach does not involve any dispensing steps for glue or underfiller. The integration approach was demonstrated and evaluated regarding process technology by wafer-level redistribution of daisy chain silicon dies representing a generic biosensor. Electrical connection was successfully established and laser-bonding tensile strength of 5.7 N mm-2 and burst pressure of 587 kPa at a temperature of 100 °C were achieved for the new material combination. The feasibility of the complete packaging approach was shown by the fabrication of a microfluidic flow cell with embedded mold package.

  12. Investigation of Wafer Level Au-Si Eutectic Bonding of Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) with Silicon

    OpenAIRE

    Bushra, Sobia

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this research work was to investigate the low temperature gold silicon eutectic bonding of SMA with silicon wafers. The research work was carried out to optimize a bond process with better yield and higher bond strength. The gold layer thickness, processing temperature, diffusion barrier, adhesive layer, and the removal of silicon oxide are the important parameters in determining a reliable and uniform bond. Based on the previous work on Au-Si eutectic bonding, 7 different Si...

  13. Wafer-level hermetic thermo-compression bonding using electroplated gold sealing frame planarized by fly-cutting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farisi, Muhammad Salman Al; Hirano, Hideki; Frömel, Jörg; Tanaka, Shuji

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a novel wafer-level hermetic packaging technology for heterogeneous device integration is presented. Hermetic sealing is achieved by low-temperature thermo-compression bonding using electroplated Au micro-sealing frame planarized by single-point diamond fly-cutting. The proposed technology has significant advantages compared to other established processes in terms of integration of micro-structured wafer, vacuum encapsulation and electrical interconnection, which can be achieved at the same time. Furthermore, the technology is also achievable for a bonding frame width as narrow as 30 μm, giving it an advantage from a geometry perspective, and bonding temperatures as low as 300 °C, making it advantageous for temperature-sensitive devices. Outgassing in vacuum sealed cavities is studied and a cavity pressure below 500 Pa is achieved by introducing annealing steps prior to bonding. The pressure of the sealed cavity is measured by zero-balance method utilizing diaphragm-structured bonding test devices. The leak rate into the packages is determined by long-term sealed cavity pressure measurement for 1500 h to be less than 2.0× {{10}-14} Pa m3s-1. In addition, the bonding shear strength is also evaluated to be higher than 100 MPa.

  14. Wafer level vacuum packaging of scanning micro-mirrors using glass-frit and anodic bonding methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langa, S.; Drabe, C.; Kunath, C.; Dreyhaupt, A.; Schenk, H.

    2013-03-01

    In this paper the authors report about the six inch wafer level vacuum packaging of electro-statically driven two dimensional micro-mirrors. The packaging was done by means of two types of wafer bonding methods: anodic and glass frit. The resulting chips after dicing are 4 mm wide, 6 mm long and 1.6 mm high and the residual pressure inside the package after dicing was estimated to be between 2 and 20 mbar. This allowed us to reduce the driving voltage of the micro-mirrors by more than 40% compared to the driving voltage without vacuum packaging. The vacuum stability after 5 months was verified by measurement using the so called "membrane method". Persistence of the vacuum was proven. No getter materials were used for packaging.

  15. Material size effects on crack growth along patterned wafer-level Cu–Cu bonds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo; Niordson, Christian Frithiof; Hutchinson, John W.

    2013-01-01

    The role of micron-scale patterning on the interface toughness of bonded Cu-to-Cu nanometer-scale films is analyzed, motivated by experimental studies of Tadepalli, Turner and Thompson. In the experiments 400nm Cu films were deposited in various patterns on Si wafer substrates and then bonded...... together. Crack growth along the bond interface is here studied numerically using finite element analyses. The experiments have shown that plasticity in the Cu films makes a major contribution to the macroscopic interface toughness. To account for the size dependence of the plastic flow a strain gradient...... plasticity model is applied here for the metal. A cohesive zone model is applied to represent the crack growth along the bond between the two Cu films. This cohesive zone model incorporates the effect of higher order stresses in the continuum, such that the higher order tractions on the crack faces decay...

  16. Design and fabrication of high performance wafer-level vacuum packaging based on glass-silicon-glass bonding techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinwen; Jiang, Wei; Wang, Xin; Zhou, Jilong; Yang, Huabing

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, a high performance wafer-level vacuum packaging technology based on GSG triple-layer sealing structure for encapsulating large mass inertial MEMS devices fabricated by silicon-on-glass bulk micromachining technology is presented. Roughness controlling strategy of bonding surfaces was proposed and described in detail. Silicon substrate was thinned and polished by CMP after the first bonding with the glass substrate and was then bonded with the glass micro-cap. Zr thin film was embedded into the concave of the micro-cap by a shadow-mask technique. The glass substrate was thinned to about 100 µm, wet etched through and metalized for realizing vertical feedthrough. During the fabrication, all patterning processes were operated carefully so as to reduce extrusive fragments to as little as possible. In addition, a high-performance micro-Pirani vacuum gauge was integrated into the package for monitoring the pressure and the leak rate further. The result shows that the pressure in the package is about 120 Pa and has no obvious change for more than one year indicating 10-13 stdcc s-1 leak rate.

  17. An electrical test method for quality detecting of wafer level eutectic bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lemin; Jiao, Binbin; Ku, Will; Tseng, Li-Tien; Kong, Yanmei; Chien, Yu-Hao; Yun, Shichang; Chen, Dapeng

    2017-01-01

    As the costs of packaging and testing account for a substantial portion of microelectromechanical system (MEMS) devices, an effective and convenient characterization method is urgent to be investigated to lower the cost. In this paper, an electrical test method was utilized, and the test key used for a four-probe current-voltage test was designed to monitor the quality of the AuSn eutectic bonding. The electrical test can directly detect whether or not voids existed in the bonding layer. The difference in alloy state, for example, the existence of the (Au, Ni) 3Sn2 phase confirmed by the scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy test, can also be reflected by resistivity variation. The electrical test can be implemented automatically and conveniently unlike other characterization methods. Therefore, it is suitable to be applied in quality inspection in industrial production.

  18. High-Q Wafer Level Package Based on Modified Tri-Layer Anodic Bonding and High Performance Getter and Its Evaluation for Micro Resonant Pressure Sensor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liying Wang; Xiaohui Du; Lingyun Wang; Zhanhao Xu; Chenying Zhang; Dandan Gu

    2017-01-01

    In order to achieve and maintain a high quality factor (high-Q) for the micro resonant pressure sensor, this paper presents a new wafer level package by adopting cross-layer anodic bonding technique of the glass/silicon/silica (GSS...

  19. High-Q Wafer Level Package Based on Modified Tri-Layer Anodic Bonding and High Performance Getter and Its Evaluation for Micro Resonant Pressure Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liying; Du, Xiaohui; Wang, Lingyun; Xu, Zhanhao; Zhang, Chenying; Gu, Dandan

    2017-03-16

    In order to achieve and maintain a high quality factor (high-Q) for the micro resonant pressure sensor, this paper presents a new wafer level package by adopting cross-layer anodic bonding technique of the glass/silicon/silica (GSS) stackable structure and integrated Ti getter. A double-layer structure similar to a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafer is formed after the resonant layer and the pressure-sensitive layer are bonded by silicon direct bonding (SDB). In order to form good bonding quality between the pressure-sensitive layer and the glass cap layer, the cross-layer anodic bonding technique is proposed for vacuum package by sputtering Aluminum (Al) on the combination wafer of the pressure-sensitive layer and the resonant layer to achieve electrical interconnection. The model and the bonding effect of this technique are discussed. In addition, in order to enhance the performance of titanium (Ti) getter, the prepared and activation parameters of Ti getter under different sputtering conditions are optimized and discussed. Based on the optimized results, the Ti getter (thickness of 300 nm to 500 nm) is also deposited on the inside of the glass groove by magnetron sputtering to maintain stable quality factor (Q). The Q test of the built testing system shows that the number of resonators with a Q value of more than 10,000 accounts for more than 73% of the total. With an interval of 1.5 years, the Q value of the samples remains almost constant. It proves the proposed cross-layer anodic bonding and getter technique can realize high-Q resonant structure for long-term stable operation.

  20. High-Q Wafer Level Package Based on Modified Tri-Layer Anodic Bonding and High Performance Getter and Its Evaluation for Micro Resonant Pressure Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liying Wang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to achieve and maintain a high quality factor (high-Q for the micro resonant pressure sensor, this paper presents a new wafer level package by adopting cross-layer anodic bonding technique of the glass/silicon/silica (GSS stackable structure and integrated Ti getter. A double-layer structure similar to a silicon-on-insulator (SOI wafer is formed after the resonant layer and the pressure-sensitive layer are bonded by silicon direct bonding (SDB. In order to form good bonding quality between the pressure-sensitive layer and the glass cap layer, the cross-layer anodic bonding technique is proposed for vacuum package by sputtering Aluminum (Al on the combination wafer of the pressure-sensitive layer and the resonant layer to achieve electrical interconnection. The model and the bonding effect of this technique are discussed. In addition, in order to enhance the performance of titanium (Ti getter, the prepared and activation parameters of Ti getter under different sputtering conditions are optimized and discussed. Based on the optimized results, the Ti getter (thickness of 300 nm to 500 nm is also deposited on the inside of the glass groove by magnetron sputtering to maintain stable quality factor (Q. The Q test of the built testing system shows that the number of resonators with a Q value of more than 10,000 accounts for more than 73% of the total. With an interval of 1.5 years, the Q value of the samples remains almost constant. It proves the proposed cross-layer anodic bonding and getter technique can realize high-Q resonant structure for long-term stable operation.

  1. Wafer-level vacuum/hermetic packaging technologies for MEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Hyun; Mitchell, Jay; Welch, Warren; Lee, Sangwoo; Najafi, Khalil

    2010-02-01

    An overview of wafer-level packaging technologies developed at the University of Michigan is presented. Two sets of packaging technologies are discussed: (i) a low temperature wafer-level packaging processes for vacuum/hermeticity sealing, and (ii) an environmentally resistant packaging (ERP) technology for thermal and mechanical control as well as vacuum packaging. The low temperature wafer-level encapsulation processes are implemented using solder bond rings which are first patterned on a cap wafer and then mated with a device wafer in order to encircle and encapsulate the device at temperatures ranging from 200 to 390 °C. Vacuum levels below 10 mTorr were achieved with yields in an optimized process of better than 90%. Pressures were monitored for more than 4 years yielding important information on reliability and process control. The ERP adopts an environment isolation platform in the packaging substrate. The isolation platform is designed to provide low power oven-control, vibration isolation and shock protection. It involves batch flip-chip assembly of a MEMS device onto the isolation platform wafer. The MEMS device and isolation structure are encapsulated at the wafer-level by another substrate with vertical feedthroughs for vacuum/hermetic sealing and electrical signal connections. This technology was developed for high performance gyroscopes, but can be applied to any type of MEMS device.

  2. Wafer-Level Vacuum Packaging of Smart Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, Allan; Temple, Dorota S

    2016-10-31

    The reach and impact of the Internet of Things will depend on the availability of low-cost, smart sensors-"low cost" for ubiquitous presence, and "smart" for connectivity and autonomy. By using wafer-level processes not only for the smart sensor fabrication and integration, but also for packaging, we can further greatly reduce the cost of sensor components and systems as well as further decrease their size and weight. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art in the wafer-level vacuum packaging technology of smart sensors. We describe the processes needed to create the wafer-scale vacuum microchambers, focusing on approaches that involve metal seals and that are compatible with the thermal budget of complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) integrated circuits. We review choices of seal materials and structures that are available to a device designer, and present techniques used for the fabrication of metal seals on device and window wafers. We also analyze the deposition and activation of thin film getters needed to maintain vacuum in the ultra-small chambers, and the wafer-to-wafer bonding processes that form the hermetic seal. We discuss inherent trade-offs and challenges of each seal material set and the corresponding bonding processes. Finally, we identify areas for further research that could help broaden implementations of the wafer-level vacuum packaging technology.

  3. Wafer-Level Vacuum Packaging of Smart Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan Hilton

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The reach and impact of the Internet of Things will depend on the availability of low-cost, smart sensors—“low cost” for ubiquitous presence, and “smart” for connectivity and autonomy. By using wafer-level processes not only for the smart sensor fabrication and integration, but also for packaging, we can further greatly reduce the cost of sensor components and systems as well as further decrease their size and weight. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art in the wafer-level vacuum packaging technology of smart sensors. We describe the processes needed to create the wafer-scale vacuum microchambers, focusing on approaches that involve metal seals and that are compatible with the thermal budget of complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS integrated circuits. We review choices of seal materials and structures that are available to a device designer, and present techniques used for the fabrication of metal seals on device and window wafers. We also analyze the deposition and activation of thin film getters needed to maintain vacuum in the ultra-small chambers, and the wafer-to-wafer bonding processes that form the hermetic seal. We discuss inherent trade-offs and challenges of each seal material set and the corresponding bonding processes. Finally, we identify areas for further research that could help broaden implementations of the wafer-level vacuum packaging technology.

  4. Wafer level 3-D ICs process technology

    CERN Document Server

    Tan, Chuan Seng; Reif, L Rafael

    2009-01-01

    This book focuses on foundry-based process technology that enables the fabrication of 3-D ICs. The core of the book discusses the technology platform for pre-packaging wafer lever 3-D ICs. However, this book does not include a detailed discussion of 3-D ICs design and 3-D packaging. This is an edited book based on chapters contributed by various experts in the field of wafer-level 3-D ICs process technology. They are from academia, research labs and industry.

  5. Efficient C-O and C-N bond forming cross-coupling reactions catalyzed by core-shell structured Cu/Cu2O nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Elshewy, Ahmed M.

    2013-12-01

    Oxygen and Nitrogen containing compounds are of utmost importance due to their interesting and diverse biological activities. The construction of the C-O and C–N bonds is of significance as it opens avenues for the introduction of ether and amine linkages in organic molecules. Despite significant advancements in this field, the construction of C-O and C–N bonds is still a major challenge for organic chemists, due to the involvement of harsh reaction conditions or the use of expensive catalysts or ligands in many cases. Thus, it is a challenge to develop alternative, milder, cheaper and more reproducible methodologies for the construction of these types of bonds. Herein, we introduce a new efficient ligand free catalytic system for C-O and C-N bond formation reactions.

  6. Wafer-level assembly and sealing of a MEMS nanoreactor for in situ microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mele, L.; Santagata, F.; Panraud, G.; Morana, B.; Tichelaar, F.D.; Creemer, J.F.; Sarro, P.M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a new process for the fabrication of MEMS-based nanoreactors for in situ atomic-scale imaging of nanoparticles under relevant industrial conditions. The fabrication of the device is completed fully at wafer level in an ISO 5 clean room and it is based on silicon fusion bonding

  7. Wafer level test solutions for IR sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giessmann, Sebastian; Werner, Frank-Michael

    2014-05-01

    Wafer probers provide an established platform for performing electrical measurements at wafer level for CMOS and similar process technologies. For testing IR sensors, the requirements are beyond the standard prober capabilities. This presentation will give an overview about state of the art IR sensor probing systems reaching from flexible engineering solutions to automated production needs. Cooled sensors typically need to be tested at a target temperature below 80 K. Not only is the device temperature important but also the surrounding environment is required to prevent background radiation from reaching the device under test. To achieve that, a cryogenic shield is protecting the movable chuck. By operating that shield to attract residual gases inside the chamber, a completely contamination-free test environment can be guaranteed. The use of special black coatings are furthermore supporting the removal of stray light. Typically, probe card needles are operating at ambient (room) temperature when connecting to the wafer. To avoid the entrance of heat, which can result in distorted measurements, the probe card is fully embedded into the cryogenic shield. A shutter system, located above the probe field, is designed to switch between the microscope view to align the sensor under the needles and the test relevant setup. This includes a completely closed position to take dark current measurements. Another position holds a possible filter glass with the required aperture opening. The necessary infrared sources to stimulate the device are located above.

  8. Wafer-level vacuum packaging for an optical readout bi-material cantilever infrared FPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuyu; Zhou, Xiaoxiong; Yu, Xiaomei

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we report the design and fabrication of an uncooled infrared (IR) focal plane array (FPA) on quartz substrate and the wafer-level vacuum packaging for the IR FPA in view of an optical readout method. This FPA is composed of bi-material cantilever array which fabricated by the Micro-Electro Mechanical System (MEMS) technology, and the wafer-level packaging of the IR FPA is realized based on AuSn solder bonding technique. The interface of soldering is observed by scan electron microscope (SEM), which indicates that bonding interface is smooth and with no bubbles. The air leakage rate of packaged FPA is measured to be 1.3×10-9 atm·cc/s.

  9. A Lateral Differential Resonant Pressure Microsensor Based on SOI-Glass Wafer-Level Vacuum Packaging

    OpenAIRE

    Bo Xie; Yonghao Xing; Yanshuang Wang; Jian Chen; Deyong Chen; Junbo Wang

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the fabrication and characterization of a resonant pressure microsensor based on SOI-glass wafer-level vacuum packaging. The SOI-based pressure microsensor consists of a pressure-sensitive diaphragm at the handle layer and two lateral resonators (electrostatic excitation and capacitive detection) on the device layer as a differential setup. The resonators were vacuum packaged with a glass cap using anodic bonding and the wire interconnection was realized using a mask-free ...

  10. Wafer-level manufacturing technology of glass microlenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gossner, U.; Hoeftmann, T.; Wieland, R.; Hansch, W.

    2014-08-01

    In high-tech products, there is an increasing demand to integrate glass lenses into complex micro systems. Especially in the lighting industry LEDs and laser diodes used for automotive applications require encapsulated micro lenses. To enable low-cost production, manufacturing of micro lenses on wafer level base using a replication technology is a key technology. This requires accurate forming of thousands of lenses with a diameter of 1-2 mm on a 200 mm wafer compliant with mass production. The article will discuss the technical aspects of a lens manufacturing replication process and the challenges, which need to be solved: choice of an appropriate master for replication, thermally robust interlayer coating, choice of replica glass, bonding and separation procedure. A promising approach for the master substrate material is based on a lens structured high-quality glass wafer with high melting point covered by a coating layer of amorphous silicon or germanium. This layer serves as an interlayer for the glass bonding process. Low pressure chemical vapor deposition and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition processes allow a deposition of layer coatings with different hydrogen and doping content influencing their chemical and physical behavior. A time reduced molding process using a float glass enables the formation of high quality lenses while preserving the recyclability of the mother substrate. The challenge is the separation of the replica from the master mold. An overview of chemical methods based on optimized etching of coating layer through small channels will be given and the impact of glass etching on surface roughness is discussed.

  11. 3D互连中光刻与晶圆级键合技术面临的挑战,趋势及解决方案%Challenges, Trends and Solutions for 3D Interconnects in Lithography and Wafer Level Bonding Techniques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Margarete Zoberbier; Erwin Hell; Kathy Cook; Marc Hennemayer; Dr.-Ing.Barbara Neubert

    2010-01-01

    Technology advances such as 3D Integration are expanding the potential applications of products into mass markets such as consumer electronics. These new technologies are also pushing the envelope of what's currently possible for many production processes, including lithography processes and wafer bonding.There is still the need to coat, pattern and etch structures. This paper will explore some of the lithographic challenges associated with 3D interconnection technology. Wafer bonding techniques as used in the 3D Packaging will be described with all the challenges and available solutions and trends.Furthermore a new Maskalinger technology will be introduced which allows extreme alignment accuracy assisted by pattern recognition down to 0.25 μm.An overall introduction on the challenges, trends and solutions for 3D interconnects in lithography and Wafer Level bonding techniques and the SUSS's equipment platform will be described accordingly to the needed processes. The processing issues encountered in those techniques will be discussed with a focus on wafer bonding and lithography steps.%目前,3D集成技术的优势正在扩展消费类电子产品的潜在应用进入批量市场.这些新技术也在推进着当前许多生产工艺中的一些封装技术包括光刻和晶圆键合成为可能.其中还需要涂胶,作图和蚀刻结构.探讨一些与三维互连相关的光刻技术的挑战.用于三维封装的晶圆键合技术将结合这些挑战和可用的解决方案及发展趋势一并介绍.此外还介绍了一种新的光刻设备,它可通过图形识别技术的辅助实现低于0.25μm的最终对准精度.对于采用光刻和晶圆级键合技术在三维互连中的挑战,趋势和解决方案及SUSS公司设备平台的整体介绍将根据工艺要求来描述.在这些技术中遇到的工艺问题将集中在晶圆键合和光刻工序方面重点讨论.

  12. Selective low temperature microcap packaging technique through flip chip and wafer level alignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, C. T.

    2004-04-01

    In this study, a new technique of selective microcap bonding for packaging 3-D MEMS (Micro Electro Mechanical Systems) devices is presented. Microcap bonding on a selected area of the host wafer was successfully demonstrated through flip chip and wafer level alignment. A passivation treatment was developed to separate the microcap from the carrier wafer. A thick metal nickel (Ni) microcap was fabricated by an electroplating process. Its stiffness is superior to that of thin film poly-silicon made by the surface micromachining technique. For the selective microcap packaging process, photo definable materials served as the intermediate adhesive layer between the host wafer and the metal microcap on the carrier wafer. Several types of photo definable material used as the adhesive layer were tested and characterized for bonding strength. The experimental result shows that excellent bonding strength at low bonding temperature can be achieved.

  13. Wafer-level fabrication of arrays of glass lens doublets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passilly, Nicolas; Perrin, Stéphane; Albero, Jorge; Krauter, Johann; Gaiffe, Olivier; Gauthier-Manuel, Ludovic; Froehly, Luc; Lullin, Justine; Bargiel, Sylwester; Osten, Wolfgang; Gorecki, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    Systems for imaging require to employ high quality optical components in order to dispose of optical aberrations and thus reach sufficient resolution. However, well-known methods to get rid of optical aberrations, such as aspherical profiles or diffractive corrections are not easy to apply to micro-optics. In particular, some of these methods rely on polymers which cannot be associated when such lenses are to be used in integrated devices requiring high temperature process for their further assembly and separation. Among the different approaches, the most common is the lens splitting that consists in dividing the focusing power between two or more optical components. In here, we propose to take advantage of a wafer-level technique, devoted to the generation of glass lenses, which involves thermal reflow in silicon cavities to generate lens doublets. After the convex lens sides are generated, grinding and polishing of both stack sides allow, on the first hand, to form the planar lens backside and, on the other hand, to open the silicon cavity. Nevertheless, silicon frames are then kept and thinned down to form well-controlled and auto-aligned spacers between the lenses. Subsequent accurate vertical assembly of the glass lens arrays is performed by anodic bonding. The latter ensures a high level of alignment both laterally and axially since no additional material is required. Thanks to polishing, the generated lens doublets are then as thin as several hundreds of microns and compatible with micro-opto-electro-systems (MOEMS) technologies since they are only made of glass and silicon. The generated optical module is then robust and provide improved optical performances. Indeed, theoretically, two stacked lenses with similar features and spherical profiles can be almost diffraction limited whereas a single lens characterized by the same numerical aperture than the doublet presents five times higher wavefront error. To demonstrate such assumption, we fabricated glass

  14. Preparation of wafer-level glass cavities by a low-cost chemical foaming process (CFP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Jintang; Chen, Boyin; Lin, Wei; Wong, Ching-Ping; Zhang, Di; Xu, Chao; Liu, Junwen; Huang, Qing-An

    2011-04-21

    A novel foaming process-chemical foaming process (CFP)-using foaming agents to fabricate wafer-level micro glass cavities including channels and bubbles was investigated. The process consists of the following steps sequentially: (1) shallow cavities were fabricated by a wet etching on a silicon wafer; (2) powders of a proper foaming agent were placed in a silicon cavity, named 'mother cavity', on the etched silicon surface; (3) the silicon cavities were sealed with a glass wafer by anodic bonding; (4) the bonded wafers were heated to above the softening point of the glass, and baked for several minutes, when the gas released by the decomposition of the foaming agent in the 'mother cavity' went into the other sealed interconnected silicon cavities to foam the softened glass into cylindrical channels named 'daughter channels', or spherical bubbles named 'son bubbles'. Results showed that wafer-level micro glass cavities with smooth wall surfaces were achieved successfully without contamination by the CFP. A model for the CFP was proposed to predict the final shape of the glass cavity. Experimental results corresponded with model predictions. The CFP provides a low-cost avenue to preparation of micro glass cavities of high quality for applications such as micro-reactors, micro total analysis systems (μTAS), analytical and bio-analytical applications, and MEMS packaging.

  15. A wafer-level vacuum package using glass-reflowed silicon through-wafer interconnection for nano/micro devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Joo-Young; Yoo, Seung-Hyun; Yoo, Byung-Wook; Kim, Yong-Kweon

    2012-07-01

    We propose a vacuum wafer-level packaging (WLP) process using glass-reflowed silicon via for nano/micro devices (NMDs). A through-wafer interconnection (TWIn) substrate with silicon vias and reflowed glass is introduced to accomplish a vertical feed-through of device. NMDs are fabricated in the single crystal silicon (SCS) layer which is formed on the TWIn substrate by Au eutectic bonding including Cr adhesion layer. The WLPof the devices is achieved with the capping glass wafer anodically bonded to the SCS layer. In order to demonstrate the successful hermetic packaging, we fabricated the micro-Pirani gauge in the SCS layer, and packaged it in the wafer-level. The vacuum level inside the packaging was measured to be 3.1 Torr with +/- 0.12 Torr uncertainty, and the packaging leakage was not detected during 24 hour after the packaging.

  16. Small footprint wafer-level vacuum packaging using compressible gold sealing rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antelius, Mikael; Stemme, Göran; Niklaus, Frank

    2011-08-01

    A novel low-temperature wafer-level vacuum packaging process is presented. The process uses plastically deformed gold rings as sealing structures in combination with flux-free soldering to provide the bond force for a sealing wafer. This process enables the separation of the sealing and the bonding functions both spatially on the wafer and temporally in different process steps, which results in reduced areas for the sealing rings and prevents outgassing from the solder process in the cavity. This enables space savings and yields improvements. We show the experimental result of the hermetic sealing. The leak rate into the packages is determined, by measuring the package lid deformation over 10 months, to be lower than 3.5 × 10-13 mbar l s-1, which is suitable for most MEMS packages. The pressure inside the produced packages is measured to be lower than 10 mbar.

  17. Use of nanoporous columnar thin film in the wafer-level packaging of MEMS devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byung-Kee; Choi, Dong-Hoon; Yoon, Jun-Bo

    2010-04-01

    This paper presents a new packaging technology that uses a nanoporous columnar thin film to seal microelectromechanical system (MEMS) devices at the wafer level. In the proposed packaging process, the processing temperature is 350 °C. The process is relatively inexpensive compared to wafer level packaging processes, because the wafer-bonding step is eliminated and the die size is shrunk. In the suggested approach, a sputtered columnar thin film at room temperature forms vertical nanopores as etch holes, and an air cavity is formed by the removal of a sacrificial layer through the nanopores in the columnar membrane. Subsequent hermetic vacuum packaging of the cavity is achieved by depositing thin films over the membrane under low pressure. The hermeticity of the packaging was verified by using an optical surface morphology microscope to measure the deflection change of the sealing membrane before and after breaking of the vacuum through an interconnected membrane. The long-term hermeticity was monitored by measuring the maximum central deflection of the PECVD sealing layer over a period of 170 days. The precise pressure (0.7 Torr) and short-term (30 days) pressure change inside the cavity were measured by encapsulated Ni Pirani gauges, representing packaged freestanding MEMS devices.

  18. Study on localized induction heating for wafer level packaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Micro-electro-mechanical systems(MEMS)are being developed as a new multi-disciplinary technology,which will undoubtedly have a revolutionary impact on the future of human life.However,with the development of MEMS technology,the packaging has become the main technical obstacle to the commercialization of MEMS.An approach to MEMS packaging by high-frequency electromagnetic induction heating at wafer level is presented in terms of numerical simulation and experimental study.The structure of inductor is firstly designed and optimized.Then the heating situation of PCB board is verified.The results indicate that the heat impact on the chip during the packaging process can be effectively reduced by local induction heating packaging,therefore the thermal stress on the chip is considerably lowered.This method can effectively improve the reliability of the MEMS devices.

  19. A Lateral Differential Resonant Pressure Microsensor Based on SOI-Glass Wafer-Level Vacuum Packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Bo; Xing, Yonghao; Wang, Yanshuang; Chen, Jian; Chen, Deyong; Wang, Junbo

    2015-09-21

    This paper presents the fabrication and characterization of a resonant pressure microsensor based on SOI-glass wafer-level vacuum packaging. The SOI-based pressure microsensor consists of a pressure-sensitive diaphragm at the handle layer and two lateral resonators (electrostatic excitation and capacitive detection) on the device layer as a differential setup. The resonators were vacuum packaged with a glass cap using anodic bonding and the wire interconnection was realized using a mask-free electrochemical etching approach by selectively patterning an Au film on highly topographic surfaces. The fabricated resonant pressure microsensor with dual resonators was characterized in a systematic manner, producing a quality factor higher than 10,000 (~6 months), a sensitivity of about 166 Hz/kPa and a reduced nonlinear error of 0.033% F.S. Based on the differential output, the sensitivity was increased to two times and the temperature-caused frequency drift was decreased to 25%.

  20. Room Temperature Radiolytic Synthesized Cu@CuAlO2-Al2O3 Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alam Abedini

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Colloidal Cu@CuAlO2-Al2O3 bimetallic nanoparticles were prepared by a gamma irradiation method in an aqueous system in the presence of polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP and isopropanol respectively as a colloidal stabilizer and scavenger of hydrogen and hydroxyl radicals. The gamma irradiation was carried out in a 60Co gamma source chamber with different doses up to 120 kGy. The formation of Cu@CuAlO2-Al2O3 nanoparticles was observed initially by the change in color of the colloidal samples from colorless to brown. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR confirmed the presence of bonds between polymer chains and the metal surface at all radiation doses. Results of transmission electron microscopy (TEM, energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX, and X-ray diffraction (XRD showed that Cu@CuAlO2-Al2O3 nanoparticles are in a core-shell structure. By controlling the absorbed dose and precursor concentration, nanoclusters with different particle sizes were obtained. The average particle diameter increased with increased precursor concentration and decreased with increased dose. This is due to the competition between nucleation, growth, and aggregation processes in the formation of nanoclusters during irradiation.

  1. Fast wafer-level detection and control of interconnect reliability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Sean; Molyneaux, James; Mathewson, Alan

    2000-08-01

    Many of the technological advances in the semiconductor industry have led to dramatic increases in device density and performance in conjunction with enhanced circuit reliability. As reliability is improved, the time taken to characterize particular failure modes with traditional test methods is getting substantially longer. Furthermore, semiconductor customers expect low product cost and fast time-to-market. The limits of traditional reliability testing philosophies are being reached and new approaches need to be investigated to enable the next generation of highly reliable products to be tested. This is especially true in the area of IC interconnect, where significant challenges are predicted for the next decade. A number of fast, wafer level test methods exist for interconnect reliability evaluation. The relative abilities of four such methods to detect the quality and reliability of IC interconnect over very short test times are evaluated in this work. Four different test structure designs are also evaluated and the results are bench-marked against conventional package level Median Time to Failure results. The Isothermal test method combine with SWEAT-type test structures is shown to be the most suitable combination for defect detection and interconnect reliability control over very short test times.

  2. MEMS Wafer-level Packaging Technology Using LTCC Wafer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohri, Mamoru; Esashi, Masayoshi; Tanaka, Shuji

    This paper describes a versatile and reliable wafer-level hermetic packaging technology using an anodically-bondable low temperature co-fired ceramic (LTCC) wafer, in which multi-layer electrical feedthroughs can be embedded. The LTCC wafer allows many kinds of micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS) to be more flexibly designed and more easily packaged. The hermeticity of vacuum-sealed cavities was confirmed after 3000 cycles of thermal shock (-40°C×30min/+125°C×30min) by diaphragm method. To practically apply the LTCC wafer to a variety of MEMS, the electrical connection between MEMS on a Si wafer and feedthroughs in the LTCC should be established by a simple and reliable method. We have developed a new electrical connection methods; The electrical connection is established by porous Au bumps, which are a part of Au vias exposed in wet-etched cavities on the LTCC wafer. 100% yield of both electrical connection and hermetic sealing was demonstrated. A thermal shock test up to 3000 cycles confirmed the reliability of this packaging technology.

  3. Effects of Phenolic Resin Addition on the Electrical Conductivity and Mechanical Strength of Nano-Copper Paste Formed Cu-Cu Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Runhua; Shen, Jun; Xie, Fuxing; Zuo, Yang; Wu, Dong

    2017-07-01

    Cu-Cu joints bonded by nano-copper pastes with different amounts of phenolic resin were developed at a low temperature (240°C) and a low pressure (1 MPa). The shear strengths of the joints were measured and the bonding layers were observed by scanning electron microscopy. The electrical conductivity of the joints was tested by a parameter analyzer. The results indicated that 2% phenolic resin in the pastes doubled the shear strength of Cu-Cu joints compared to joints made with 0%, 5% and 8% phenolic, because it filled the voids and coated sintered Cu nanoparticles in the joints without affecting the electrical conductivity of the Cu-Cu joint. This was because 2% phenolic paste prevented Cu nanoparticles from oxidation. However, 8% phenolic resin led to an increase of electrical resistivity due to the insulating property of phenolic resin, and a decrease of shear strength due to the hindrance to sintering between the nanoparticles.

  4. Development of wafer-level-packaging technology for simultaneous sealing of accelerometer and gyroscope under different pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aono, T.; Suzuki, K.; Kanamaru, M.; Okada, R.; Maeda, D.; Hayashi, M.; Isono, Y.

    2016-10-01

    This research demonstrates a newly developed anodic bonding-based wafer-level-packaging technique to simultaneously seal an accelerometer in the atmosphere and a gyroscope in a vacuum with a glass cap for micro-electromechanical systems sensors. It is necessary for the accelerometer, with a damping oscillator, to be sealed in the atmosphere to achieve a high-speed response. As the gyroscope can achieve high sensitivity with a large displacement at the resonant frequency without air-damping, the gyroscope must be sealed in a vacuum. The technique consists of three processing steps: the first bonding step in the atmosphere for the accelerometer, the pressure control step and the second bonding step in a vacuum for the gyroscope. The process conditions were experimentally determined to achieve higher shear strength at the interface of the packaging. The packaging performance of the accelerometer and gyroscope after wafer-level packaging was also investigated using a laser Doppler velocimeter at room temperature. The amplitude at the resonant frequency of the accelerometer was reduced by air damping, and the quality factor of the gyroscope showed a value higher than 1000. The reliability of the gyroscope was also confirmed by a thermal cyclic test and an endurance test at high humidity and high temperature.

  5. Wafer-level testing and test during burn-in for integrated circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Bahukudumbi, Sudarshan

    2010-01-01

    Wafer-level testing refers to a critical process of subjecting integrated circuits and semiconductor devices to electrical testing while they are still in wafer form. Burn-in is a temperature/bias reliability stress test used in detecting and screening out potential early life device failures. This hands-on resource provides a comprehensive analysis of these methods, showing how wafer-level testing during burn-in (WLTBI) helps lower product cost in semiconductor manufacturing.Engineers learn how to implement the testing of integrated circuits at the wafer-level under various resource constrain

  6. A Lateral Differential Resonant Pressure Microsensor Based on SOI-Glass Wafer-Level Vacuum Packaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Xie

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the fabrication and characterization of a resonant pressure microsensor based on SOI-glass wafer-level vacuum packaging. The SOI-based pressure microsensor consists of a pressure-sensitive diaphragm at the handle layer and two lateral resonators (electrostatic excitation and capacitive detection on the device layer as a differential setup. The resonators were vacuum packaged with a glass cap using anodic bonding and the wire interconnection was realized using a mask-free electrochemical etching approach by selectively patterning an Au film on highly topographic surfaces. The fabricated resonant pressure microsensor with dual resonators was characterized in a systematic manner, producing a quality factor higher than 10,000 (~6 months, a sensitivity of about 166 Hz/kPa and a reduced nonlinear error of 0.033% F.S. Based on the differential output, the sensitivity was increased to two times and the temperature-caused frequency drift was decreased to 25%.

  7. Very large scale heterogeneous integration (VLSHI) and wafer-level vacuum packaging for infrared bolometer focal plane arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsberg, Fredrik; Roxhed, Niclas; Fischer, Andreas C.; Samel, Björn; Ericsson, Per; Hoivik, Nils; Lapadatu, Adriana; Bring, Martin; Kittilsland, Gjermund; Stemme, Göran; Niklaus, Frank

    2013-09-01

    Imaging in the long wavelength infrared (LWIR) range from 8 to 14 μm is an extremely useful tool for non-contact measurement and imaging of temperature in many industrial, automotive and security applications. However, the cost of the infrared (IR) imaging components has to be significantly reduced to make IR imaging a viable technology for many cost-sensitive applications. This paper demonstrates new and improved fabrication and packaging technologies for next-generation IR imaging detectors based on uncooled IR bolometer focal plane arrays. The proposed technologies include very large scale heterogeneous integration for combining high-performance, SiGe quantum-well bolometers with electronic integrated read-out circuits and CMOS compatible wafer-level vacuum packing. The fabrication and characterization of bolometers with a pitch of 25 μm × 25 μm that are arranged on read-out-wafers in arrays with 320 × 240 pixels are presented. The bolometers contain a multi-layer quantum well SiGe thermistor with a temperature coefficient of resistance of -3.0%/K. The proposed CMOS compatible wafer-level vacuum packaging technology uses Cu-Sn solid-liquid interdiffusion (SLID) bonding. The presented technologies are suitable for implementation in cost-efficient fabless business models with the potential to bring about the cost reduction needed to enable low-cost IR imaging products for industrial, security and automotive applications.

  8. Through-glass copper via using the glass reflow and seedless electroplating processes for wafer-level RF MEMS packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ju-Yong; Lee, Sung-Woo; Lee, Seung-Ki; Park, Jae-Hyoung

    2013-08-01

    We present a novel method for the fabrication of void-free copper-filled through-glass-vias (TGVs), and their application to the wafer-level radio frequency microelectromechanical systems (RF MEMS) packaging scheme. By using the glass reflow process with a patterned silicon mold, a vertical TGV with smooth sidewall and fine pitch could be achieved. Bottom-up void-free filling of the TGV is successfully demonstrated through the seedless copper electroplating process. In addition, the proposed process allows wafer-level packaging with glass cap encapsulation using the anodic bonding process, since the reflowed glass interposer is only formed in the device area surrounded with silicon substrate. A simple coplanar waveguide (CPW) line was employed as the packaged device to evaluate the electrical characteristics and thermo-mechanical reliability of the proposed packaging structure. The fabricated packaging structure showed a low insertion loss of 0.116 dB and a high return loss of 35.537 dB at 20 GHz, which were measured through the whole electrical path, including the CPW line, TGVs and contact pads. An insertion loss lower than 0.1 dB and a return loss higher than 30 dB could be achieved at frequencies of up to 15 GHz, and the resistance of the single copper via was measured to be 36 mΩ. Furthermore, the thermo-mechanical reliability of the proposed packaging structure was also verified through thermal shock and pressure cooker test.

  9. High Performance Microaccelerometer with Wafer-level Hermetic Packaged Sensing Element and Continuous-time BiCMOS Interface Circuit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Hyoungho [School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Seoul National University (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sangjun [School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Seoul National University (Korea, Republic of); Paik, Seung-Joon [School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Seoul National University (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Byoung-doo [School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Seoul National University (Korea, Republic of); Park, Yonghwa [School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Seoul National University (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sangmin [School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Seoul National University (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sungwook [SML Electronics, Inc. (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Chul [SML Electronics, Inc. (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ahra [SML Electronics, Inc. (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Kwangho [SML Electronics, Inc. (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Jaesang [SML Electronics, Inc. (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Dong-il [School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Seoul National University (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-04-01

    A microaccelerometer with highly reliable, wafer-level packaged MEMS sensing element and fully differential, continuous time, low noise, BiCMOS interface circuit is fabricated. The MEMS sensing element is fabricated on a (111)-oriented SOI wafer by using the SBM (Sacrificial/Bulk Micromachining) process. To protect the silicon structure of the sensing element and enhance the reliability, a wafer level hermetic packaging process is performed by using a silicon-glass anodic bonding process. The interface circuit is fabricated using 0.8 {mu}m BiCMOS process. The capacitance change of the MEMS sensing element is amplified by the continuous-time, fully-differential transconductance input amplifier. A chopper-stabilization architecture is adopted to reduce low-frequency noise including 1/f noise. The fabricated microaccelerometer has the total noise equivalent acceleration of 0.89 {mu}g/{radical}Hz, the bias instability of 490 {mu}g, the input range of {+-}10 g, and the output nonlinearity of {+-}0.5 %FSO.

  10. 三维互连中光刻及晶圆级键合技术的挑战、趋势和解决方案%Challenges, Trends and Solutions for 3D Interconnects in Lithography and Wafer Level Bonding Techniques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Margarete Zoberbier; Erwin Hell; Kathy Cook; Marc Hennemayer; Dr.-Ing. Barbara Neubert

    2009-01-01

    基于它的技术优势三雏集成技术正在不断地被应用到新的产品中,也包括被应用到消费电子产品里.同时也对许多工艺提出了新的要求,其中也包括光刻和晶圆级键合.三维集成技术还是需要光刻工艺来完成图形的转换,为此,讨论了三维集成工艺对工艺设备和技术提出的挑战.介绍了SUSS公司与三维技术相关的产品.着重讨论与三维集成工艺相关的光刻和键合工艺.描述了三维集成对它们提出的挑战以及目前已有的解决方案和前景.并介绍一款新的具有0.25μm对准精度的接近接触式光刻机.%Technology advances such as 3D Integration are expanding the potential applications of products into mass markets such as consumer electronics. These new technologies are also pushing the envelope of what's currently possible for many production processes, including lithography processes and wafer bonding.There is the need to coat, pattern and etch structures which may have tens or even hundreds of microns in height. This paper will explore some of the lithographic challenges associated with 3D interconnection technology, where use of the vertical dimension has necessitated new methods of conformally coating high topography, new imaging techniques to align various masking levels to the underlying patterns, and new exposure techniques to accomplish high fidelity patterning over such high structures. Wafer bonding techniques as used in the 3D Packaging will be described with all the challenges and available solutions and trends. Furthermore a new Maskalinger technology will be introduced which allows extreme alignment accuracy assisted by pattern recognition down to 0.25 μm.

  11. Wafer-level heterogeneous 3D integration for MEMS and NEMS

    OpenAIRE

    Niklaus, Frank; Lapisa, Martin; Bleiker, Simon J.; Dubois, Valentin; Roxhed, Niclas; Fischer, Andreas C.; Forsberg, Fredrik; Stemme, Goran; Grogg, Daniel; Despont, Michel

    2012-01-01

    In this paper the state-of-the-art in wafer-level heterogeneous 3D integration technologies for micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) and nano-electromechanical systems (NEMS) is reviewed. Various examples of commercial and experimental heterogeneous 3D integration processes for MEMS and NEMS devices are presented and discussed. QC 20120907

  12. Wafer-level packaging with compression-controlled seal ring bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farino, Anthony J

    2013-11-05

    A device may be provided in a sealed package by aligning a seal ring provided on a first surface of a first semiconductor wafer in opposing relationship with a seal ring that is provided on a second surface of a second semiconductor wafer and surrounds a portion of the second wafer that contains the device. Forcible movement of the first and second wafer surfaces toward one another compresses the first and second seal rings against one another. A physical barrier against the movement, other than the first and second seal rings, is provided between the first and second wafer surfaces.

  13. Novel Bonding technologies for wafer-level transparent packaging of MOEMS

    CERN Document Server

    Kirchberger, H; Wimpliger, M

    2008-01-01

    Depending on the type of Micro-Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS), packaging costs are contributing up to 80% of the total device cost. Each MEMS device category, its function and operational environment will individually dictate the packaging requirement. Due to the lack of standardized testing procedures, the reliability of those MEMS packages sometimes can only be proven by taking into consideration its functionality over lifetime. Innovation with regards to cost reduction and standardization in the field of packaging is therefore of utmost importance to the speed of commercialisation of MEMS devices. Nowadays heavily driven by consumer applications the MEMS device market is forecasted to enjoy a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) above 13%, which is when compared to the IC device market, an outstanding growth rate. Nevertheless this forecasted value can drift upwards or downwards depending on the rate of innovation in the field of packaging. MEMS devices typically require a specific fabrication process wher...

  14. Wafer-Level Patterned and Aligned Polymer Nanowire/Micro- and Nanotube Arrays on any Substrate

    KAUST Repository

    Morber, Jenny Ruth

    2009-05-25

    A study was conducted to fabricate wafer-level patterned and aligned polymer nanowire (PNW), micro- and nanotube arrays (PNT), which were created by exposing the polymer material to plasma etching. The approach for producing wafer-level aligned PNWs involved a one-step inductively coupled plasma (ICP) reactive ion etching process. The polymer nanowire array was fabricated in an ICP reactive ion milling chamber with a pressure of 10mTorr. Argon (Ar), O 2, and CF4 gases were released into the chamber as etchants at flow rates of 15 sccm, 10 sccm, and 40 sccm. Inert gasses, such as Ar-form positive ions were incorporated to serve as a physical component to assist in the material degradation process. One power source (400 W) was used to generate dense plasma from the input gases, while another power source applied a voltage of approximately 600V to accelerate the plasma toward the substrate.

  15. Novel SU-8 based vacuum wafer-level packaging for MEMS devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murillo, Gonzalo; Davis, Zachary James; Keller, Stephan Urs

    2010-01-01

    This work presents a simple and low-cost SU-8 based wafer-level vacuum packaging method which is CMOS and MEMS compatible. Different approaches have been investigated by taking advantage of the properties of SU-8, such as chemical resistance, optical transparence, mechanical reliability and versa......This work presents a simple and low-cost SU-8 based wafer-level vacuum packaging method which is CMOS and MEMS compatible. Different approaches have been investigated by taking advantage of the properties of SU-8, such as chemical resistance, optical transparence, mechanical reliability......, an indirect vacuum level measurement has been carried out by comparing the different quality factors of a test cantilever resonator when this element is packed or unpacked....

  16. Improving wafer level CD uniformity for logic applications utilizing mask level metrology and process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Avi; Trautzsch, Thomas; Buttgereit, Ute; Graitzer, Erez; Hanuka, Ori

    2013-09-01

    Critical Dimension Uniformity (CDU) is one of the key parameters necessary to assure good performance and reliable functionality of any integrated circuit (IC). The extension of 193nm based lithography usage combined with design rule shrinkage makes process control, in particular the wafer level CDU control, an extremely important and challenging task in IC manufacturing. In this study the WLCD-CDC closed loop solution offered by Carl Zeiss SMS was examined. This solution aims to improve the wafer level intra-field CDU without the need to run wafer prints and extensive wafer CD metrology. It combines two stand-alone tools: The WLCD tool which measures CD based on aerial imaging technology while applying the exact scanner-used illumination conditions to the photomask and the CDC tool which utilizes an ultra-short femto-second laser to write intra-volume shading elements (Shade-In Elements™) inside the photomask bulk material. The CDC process changes the dose going through the photomask down to the wafer, hence the wafer level intra-field CDU improves. The objective of this study was to evaluate how CDC process is affecting the CD for different type of features and pattern density which are typical for logic and system on chip (SOC) devices. The main findings show that the linearity and proximity behavior is maintained by the CDC process and CDU and CDC Ratio (CDCR) show a linear behavior for the different feature types. Finally, it was demonstrated that the CDU errors of the targeted (critical) feature have been effectively eliminated. In addition, the CDU of all other features have been significantly improved as well.

  17. Ultra-thin wafer-level camera with 720p resolution using micro-optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brückner, Andreas; Oberdörster, Alexander; Dunkel, Jens; Reimann, Andreas; Müller, Martin; Wippermann, Frank

    2014-09-01

    We propose a microoptical approach to ultra-compact optics for real-time vision systems that are inspired by the compound eyes of insects. The demonstrated module achieves 720p resolution with a total track length of 2.0 mm which is about 1.5 times shorter than comparable conventional miniaturized optics. The partial images that are separately recorded in multiple optical channels are stitched together to form a final image of the whole FOV by means of image processing. The microlens arrays are realized by microoptical fabrication techniques on wafer-level which are suitable for a potential application in high volume e.g. for consumer electronic products.

  18. Microfluidic reactor synthesis and photocatalytic behavior of Cu@Cu{sub 2}O nanocomposite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Lei, E-mail: xulei_kmust@aliyun.com [National Local Joint Laboratory of Engineering Application of Microwave Energy and Equipment Technology, Faculty of Metallurgical and Energy Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); Mechanical Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Srinivasakannan, C. [Chemical Engineering Program, The Petroleum Institute, PO Box 253, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Peng, Jinhui, E-mail: jhpeng@kmust.edu.cn [National Local Joint Laboratory of Engineering Application of Microwave Energy and Equipment Technology, Faculty of Metallurgical and Energy Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); Yan, Mi [Faculty of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Zhang, Di [Mechanical Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Zhang, Libo [National Local Joint Laboratory of Engineering Application of Microwave Energy and Equipment Technology, Faculty of Metallurgical and Energy Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • The Cu@Cu{sub 2}O nanocomposites were synthesized in microfluidic reactor followed by oxidation process. • The Cu@Cu{sub 2}O composite particle is on nanoscale exhibiting an open bicontinuous structure. • The amount of Cu{sub 2}O can be controlled by varying drying temperature. • The binary Cu@Cu{sub 2}O–H{sub 2}O{sub 2} systems exhibit an excellent photocatalyst for degradation methylene blue under UV irradiation. - Abstract: The Cu@Cu{sub 2}O nanocomposites were synthesized by solution-phase synthesis of Cu nanoparticles in microfluidic reactor at room temperature, followed by controlling the oxidation process. The size, morphology, elemental compositions, and the chemical composition on the surface of Cu@Cu{sub 2}O nanocomposite were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Experimental results demonstrated that the surface of the Cu nanoparticles was oxidized to Cu{sub 2}O which serves as the shell of nanoparticle. The amount of Cu{sub 2}O can be controlled by varying the drying temperature. Additionally the binary Cu@Cu{sub 2}O nanocomposite along with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} exhibited its potential as an excellent photocatalyst for degradation of methylene blue (MB) under UV irradiation.

  19. CMOS-MEMS Test-Key for Extracting Wafer-Level Mechanical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Zen Chang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper develops the technologies of mechanical characterization of CMOS-MEMS devices, and presents a robust algorithm for extracting mechanical properties, such as Young’s modulus, and mean stress, through the external electrical circuit behavior of the micro test-key. An approximate analytical solution for the pull-in voltage of bridge-type test-key subjected to electrostatic load and initial stress is derived based on Euler’s beam model and the minimum energy method. Then one can use the aforesaid closed form solution of the pull-in voltage to extract the Young’s modulus and mean stress of the test structures. The test cases include the test-key fabricated by a TSMC 0.18 μm standard CMOS process, and the experimental results refer to Osterberg’s work on the pull-in voltage of single crystal silicone microbridges. The extracted material properties calculated by the present algorithm are valid. Besides, this paper also analyzes the robustness of this algorithm regarding the dimension effects of test-keys. This mechanical properties extracting method is expected to be applicable to the wafer-level testing in micro-device manufacture and compatible with the wafer-level testing in IC industry since the test process is non-destructive.

  20. Wafer-level chip-scale packaging analog and power semiconductor applications

    CERN Document Server

    Qu, Shichun

    2015-01-01

    This book presents a state-of-art and in-depth overview in analog and power WLCSP design, material characterization, reliability, and modeling. Recent advances in analog and power electronic WLCSP packaging are presented based on the development of analog technology and power device integration. The book covers in detail how advances in semiconductor content, analog and power advanced WLCSP design, assembly, materials, and reliability have co-enabled significant advances in fan-in and fan-out with redistributed layer (RDL) of analog and power device capability during recent years. Along with new analog and power WLCSP development, the role of modeling is a key to assure successful package design. An overview of the analog and power WLCSP modeling and typical thermal, electrical, and stress modeling methodologies is also provided. This book also: ·         Covers the development of wafer-level power discrete packaging with regular wafer-level design concepts and directly bumping technology ·    �...

  1. Development of Copper-Catalyzed Electrophilic Trifluoromethylation and Exploiting Cu/Cu2O Nanowires with Novel Catalytic Reactivity

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Huaifeng

    2014-06-01

    This thesis is based on research in Cu-catalyzed electrophilic trifluoromethylation and exploiting Cu/Cu2O nanowires with novel catalytic reactivity for developing of catalytic and greener synthetic methods. A large number of biological active pharmaceuticals and agrochemicals contain fluorine substituents (-F) or trifluoromethyl groups (-CF3) because these moieties often result in profound changes of their physical, chemical, and biological properties, such as metabolic stability and lipophilicity. For this reason, the introduction of fluorine or trifluoromethyl groups into organic molecules has attracted intensive attention. Among them, transition metal-catalyzed trifluoromethylation reactions has proved to be an efficient and reliable strategy to construct carbon-fluorine (C-F) and carbontrifluoromethyl (C-CF3) bond. We have developed a catalytic process for the first time for trifluoromethylation of terminal alkynes with Togni’s reagent, affording trifluoromethylated acetylenes in good to excellent yields. The reaction is conducted at room temperature and exhibits tolerance to a range of functional groups. Derived from this discovery, the extension of work of copper catalyzed electrophilic trifluoromethylation were investigated which include the electrophilic trifluoromethylation of arylsulfinate salts and electrophilic trifluoromethylation of organotrifluoroborates. Because of growing environmental concern, the development of greener synthetic methods has drawn much attention. Nano-sized catalysts are environment-friendly and an attractive green alternative to the conventional homogeneous catalysts. The nano-sized catalysts can be easily separated from the reaction mixture due to their insolubility and thus they can be used recycled. Notably, because of the high reactivities of nano-sized metal catalysts, the use of ligands can be avoided and the catalysts loadings can be reduced greatly. Moreover, the nano-sized catalysts can increase the exposed surface

  2. Ultraclean wafer-level vacuum-encapsulated silicon ring resonators for timing and frequency references

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xereas, George; Chodavarapu, Vamsy P.

    2016-07-01

    We present the design and development of breath-mode silicon ring resonators fabricated using a commercial pure-play microfabrication process that provides ultraclean wafer-level vacuum-encapsulation. The micromechanical resonators are fabricated in MEMS integrated design for inertial sensors process that is developed by Teledyne DALSA Semiconductor Inc. The ring resonators are designed to operate with a relatively low DC polarization voltage, starting at 5 V, while providing a high frequency-quality factor product. We study the quality of the vacuum packaging using an automated testing setup over an extended time period. We study the effect of motional resistance on the performance of MEMS resonators. The fabricated devices had a resonant frequency of 10 MHz with the quality factor exceeding 8.4×104.

  3. Output blue light evaluation for phosphor based smart white LED wafer level packages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolahdouz, Zahra; Rostamian, Ali; Kolahdouz, Mohammadreza; Ma, Teng; van Zeijl, Henk; Zhang, Kouchi

    2016-02-22

    This study presents a blue light detector for evaluating the output light of phosphor based white LED package. It is composed of a silicon stripe-shaped photodiode designed and implemented in a 2 μm BiCMOS process which can be used for wafer level integration of different passive and active devices all in just 5 lithography steps. The final device shows a high selectivity to blue light. The maximum responsivity at 480 nm is matched with the target blue LED illumination. The designed structure have better responsivity compared to simple photodiode structure due to reducing the effect of dead layer formation close to the surface because of implantation. It has also a two-fold increase in the responsivity and quantum efficiency compared to previously similar published sensors.

  4. Effect of permanganate treatment on through mold vias for an embedded wafer level package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Se-Hoon; Park, Ji-Yeon; Kim, Young-Ho

    2013-07-01

    In this study, a through mold via (TMV) interconnect was developed for an embedded wafer level package (EMWLP) to enable 3D packing applications. The effects of the shape and surface roughness of the epoxy molding wafer on the quality of electroless Cu metallization were investigated for the vertical interconnection. The mold compound is a composite material composed of epoxy resin and filler particles. Therefore, the effect of the amount of filler particles was studied to optimize the shape of the epoxy molding by applying two types of laser drilling modes. In addition, the electroless Cu plating process was optimized to deposit a Cu seed layer along the TMV sidewall. To optimize the TMV process, a desmear process was applied to improve the shape of the TMV sidewall and adhesion between the epoxy molding compound and the dielectric polymer for multilayer metallization.

  5. Post-CMOS wafer level growth of carbon nanotubes for low-cost microsensors-a proof of concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santra, Sumita; Guha, Prasanta K; Zhong, Guofang; Robertson, John; Milne, William I; Udrea, Florin [Engineering Department, University of Cambridge, 9 JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0FA (United Kingdom); Ali, Syed Z [Cambridge CMOS Sensors Ltd, Wellington House, East Road, Cambridge CB1 1BH (United Kingdom); Covington, James A; Gardner, Julian W, E-mail: ss778@cam.ac.uk [School of Engineering, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)

    2010-12-03

    Here we demonstrate a novel technique to grow carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on addressable localized areas, at wafer level, on a fully processed CMOS substrate. The CNTs were grown using tungsten micro-heaters (local growth technique) at elevated temperature on wafer scale by connecting adjacent micro-heaters through metal tracks in the scribe lane. The electrical and optical characterization show that the CNTs are identical and reproducible. We believe this wafer level integration of CNTs with CMOS circuitry enables the low-cost mass production of CNT sensors, such as chemical sensors.

  6. Synthesis, Characterization and Catalytic Activity of Cu/Cu2O Nanoparticles Prepared in Aqueous Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayed M. Badawy

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Copper/Copper oxide (Cu/Cu2O nanoparticles were synthesized by modified chemical reduction method in an aqueous medium using hydrazine as reducing agent and copper sulfate pentahydrate as precursor. The Cu/Cu2O nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray Diffraction (XRD, Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence (EDXRF, Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM, and Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM. The analysis revealed the pattern of face-centered cubic (fcc crystal structure of copper Cu metal and cubic cuprites structure for Cu2O. The SEM result showed monodispersed and agglomerated particles with two micron sizes of about 180 nm and 800 nm, respectively. The TEM result showed few single crystal particles of face-centered cubic structures with average particle size about 11-14 nm. The catalytic activity of Cu/Cu2O nanoparticles for the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide was investigated and compared with manganese oxide MnO2. The results showed that the second-order equation provides the best correlation for the catalytic decomposition of H2O2 on Cu/Cu2O. The catalytic activity of hydrogen peroxide by Cu/Cu2O is less than the catalytic activity of MnO2 due to the presence of copper metal Cu with cuprous oxide Cu2O. © 2015 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reservedReceived: 6th January 2015; Revised: 14th March 2015; Accepted: 15th March 2015How to Cite: Badawy, S.M., El-Khashab, R.A., Nayl, A.A. (2015. Synthesis, Characterization and Catalytic Activity of Cu/Cu2O Nanoparticles Prepared in Aqueous Medium. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 10 (2: 169-174. (doi:10.9767/bcrec.10.2.7984.169-174 Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.10.2.7984.169-174  

  7. Robust Wafer-Level Thin-Film Encapsulation (Packaging) of Microstructures (MEMS) using Low Stress PECVD Silicon Carbide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rajaraman, V.; Pakula, L.S.; Pham, H.T.M.; Sarro, P.M.; French, P.J.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a new low-cost, CMOS-compatible and robust wafer-level encapsulation technique developed using a stress-optimised PECVD SiC as the capping and sealing material, imparting harsh environment capability. This technique has been applied for the fabrication and encapsulation of a wide

  8. Robust Wafer-Level Thin-Film Encapsulation (Packaging) of Microstructures (MEMS) using Low Stress PECVD Silicon Carbide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rajaraman, V.; Pakula, L.S.; Pham, H.T.M.; Sarro, P.M.; French, P.J.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a new low-cost, CMOS-compatible and robust wafer-level encapsulation technique developed using a stress-optimised PECVD SiC as the capping and sealing material, imparting harsh environment capability. This technique has been applied for the fabrication and encapsulation of a wide

  9. A wafer level vacuum encapsulated capacitive accelerometer fabricated in an unmodified commercial MEMS process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merdassi, Adel; Yang, Peng; Chodavarapu, Vamsy P

    2015-03-25

    We present the design and fabrication of a single axis low noise accelerometer in an unmodified commercial MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS) process. The new microfabrication process, MEMS Integrated Design for Inertial Sensors (MIDIS), introduced by Teledyne DALSA Inc. allows wafer level vacuum encapsulation at 10 milliTorr which provides a high Quality factor and reduces noise interference on the MEMS sensor devices. The MIDIS process is based on high aspect ratio bulk micromachining of single-crystal silicon layer that is vacuum encapsulated between two other silicon handle wafers. The process includes sealed Through Silicon Vias (TSVs) for compact design and flip-chip integration with signal processing circuits. The proposed accelerometer design is sensitive to single-axis in-plane acceleration and uses a differential capacitance measurement. Over ±1 g measurement range, the measured sensitivity was 1 fF/g. The accelerometer system was designed to provide a detection resolution of 33 milli-g over the operational range of ±100 g.

  10. Fabrication of piezoelectric P(VDF-TrFE) microcantilevers by wafer-level surface micromachining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Sharon Roslyn; Yao, Kui; Eng Hock Tay, Francis

    2013-09-01

    A wafer-level microfabrication process using standard cleanroom facilities was established and implemented to batch produce free-standing poly(vinylidine fluoride-trifluoroethylene) (P(VDF-TrFE)) piezoelectric microelectromechanical systems cantilevers via surface micromachining. Furthermore, the fabrication of a prototype of double-level cantilevers was demonstrated. The fabrication of working piezoelectric polymer cantilever structures required the deposition and patterning of multiple polymer and metal layers including the pattering and removal of the sacrificial layer, which posed many challenging limitations on the chemicals and processing conditions. Dedicatedly selected chemicals and materials were used in our fabrication, including water soluble PVA with an appropriate molecular weight and degree of hydrolysis as the sacrificial layer for releasing the cantilever structure. The temperature in the whole process was kept low with controlled durations, due to the sensitivity of the polymers to thermal impacts. The P(VDF-TrFE) active layers, after going through the fabrication, exhibited ferroelectric and piezoelectric properties comparable to the intact films. Furthermore, the free-standing P(VDF-TrFE) cantilevers exhibited piezoelectric vibrations under electrical excitation. This low temperature fabrication method, which only involves mild chemicals, also has the potential to be integrated with CMOS processes.

  11. A Wafer Level Vacuum Encapsulated Capacitive Accelerometer Fabricated in an Unmodified Commercial MEMS Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel Merdassi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We present the design and fabrication of a single axis low noise accelerometer in an unmodified commercial MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS process. The new microfabrication process, MEMS Integrated Design for Inertial Sensors (MIDIS, introduced by Teledyne DALSA Inc. allows wafer level vacuum encapsulation at 10 milliTorr which provides a high Quality factor and reduces noise interference on the MEMS sensor devices. The MIDIS process is based on high aspect ratio bulk micromachining of single-crystal silicon layer that is vacuum encapsulated between two other silicon handle wafers. The process includes sealed Through Silicon Vias (TSVs for compact design and flip-chip integration with signal processing circuits. The proposed accelerometer design is sensitive to single-axis in-plane acceleration and uses a differential capacitance measurement. Over ±1 g measurement range, the measured sensitivity was 1fF/g. The accelerometer system was designed to provide a detection resolution of 33 milli-g over the operational range of ±100 g.

  12. Compensation Method for Die Shift Caused by Flow Drag Force in Wafer-Level Molding Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simo Yeon

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Wafer-level packaging (WLP is a next-generation semiconductor packaging technology that is important for realizing high-performance and ultra-thin semiconductor devices. However, the molding process, which is a part of the WLP process, has various problems such as a high defect rate and low predictability. Among the various defect factors, the die shift primarily determines the quality of the final product; therefore, predicting the die shift is necessary to achieve high-yield production in WLP. In this study, the die shift caused by the flow drag force of the epoxy molding compound (EMC is evaluated from the die shift of a debonded molding wafer. Experimental and analytical methods were employed to evaluate the die shift occurring during each stage of the molding process and that resulting from the geometrical changes after the debonding process. The die shift caused by the EMC flow drag force is evaluated from the data on die movements due to thermal contraction/expansion and warpage. The relationship between the die shift and variation in the die gap is determined through regression analysis in order to predict the die shift due to the flow drag force. The results can be used for die realignment by predicting and compensating for the die shift.

  13. Wafer bonding using Cu-Sn intermetallic bonding layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flötgen, C.; Pawlak, M.; Pabo, E.; Wiel, H.J. van de; Hayes, G.R.; Dragoi, V.

    2014-01-01

    Wafer-level Cu-Sn intermetallic bonding is an interesting process for advanced applications in the area of MEMS and 3D interconnects. The existence of two intermetallic phases for Cu-Sn system makes the wafer bonding process challenging. The impact of process parameters on final bonding layer

  14. Bimetallic AgCu/Cu2O hybrid for the synergetic adsorption of iodide from solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Ping; Liu, Ying; Liu, Xiaodong; Wang, Yuechan; Liang, Jie; Zhou, Qihang; Dai, Yuexuan; Jiao, Yan; Chen, Shouwen; Yang, Yi

    2017-08-01

    To further improve the capacity of Cu2O to absorb I(-) anions from solution, and to understand the difference between the adsorption mechanisms of Ag/Cu2O and Cu/Cu2O adsorbents, bimetallic AgCu was doped into Cu2O through a facile solvothermal route. Samples were characterized and employed to adsorb I(-) anions under different experimental conditions. The results show that the Cu content can be tuned by adding different volumes of Ag sols. After doping bimetallic AgCu, the adsorption capacity of the samples can be increased from 0.02 mmol g(-1) to 0.52 mmol g(-1). Moreover, the optimal adsorption is reached within only 240 min. Meanwhile, the difference between the adsorption mechanisms of Ag/Cu2O and Cu/Cu2O adsorbents was verified, and the cooperative adsorption mechanism of the AgCu/Cu2O hybrid was proposed and verified. In addition, the AgCu/Cu2O hybrid showed excellent selectivity, e.g., its adsorption efficiencies are 85.1%, 81.9%, 85.9% and 85.7% in the presence of the Cl(-), CO3(2-), SO4(2-) and NO3(-) competitive anions, respectively. Furthermore, the AgCu/Cu2O hybrid can worked well in other harsh environments (e.g., acidic, alkaline and seawater environments). Therefore, this study is expected to promote the development of Cu2O into a highly efficient adsorbent for the removal of iodide from solution. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. 圆片级真空封装技术在MEMS陀螺中的应用%Application of Wafer-Level Vacuum Packaging Technology for MEMS Gyroscopes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨静; 张富强

    2012-01-01

    In order to maintain the vacuum required for MEMS silicon micro gyroscopes, the wafer-level vacuum hermetic packaging of MEMS silicon micro gyroscopes was realized using the silicon-glass anodic bonding for two times and long-term vacuum maintenance technology. The manufactu-ring process consists of bonding the silicon and glass, etching the silicon vibration structure on the silicon-glass base by DRIE, packaging in a vacuum environment of 10-5 mbar (1 mbar= 100 Pa) by MEMS wafer-level anodic bonding and achieving long-term vacuum by using getters. The test results show that the fabricated silicon micro gyroscope has the smooth anodic bonding interface without any bubble, and the leakage rate is lower than 5. 0× 10-8 atm·cm3/s. After the ceramic packaging for chips, the measured quality factor is higher than 12 000 under the static condition. And the performance is stable without change after the continuous monitoring for one year.%为维持MEMS硅微陀螺的真空度,利用两次硅-玻璃阳极键合和真空长期维持技术,实现了MEMS硅微陀螺的圆片级真空气密性封装.制作过程包括:先将硅和玻璃键合,在硅-玻璃衬底上采用DRIE工艺刻蚀出硅振动结构;再利用MEMS圆片级阳极键合工艺在10-5 mbar(1 mbar=100 Pa)真空环境中进行封装;最后利用吸气剂实现圆片的长期真空气密性.经测试,采用这种方式制作出的硅微陀螺键合界面均匀平整无气泡,漏率低于5.0×10-8atm·cm3/s.对芯片进行陶瓷封装,静态下测试得出品质因数超过12 000,并对样品进行连续一年监测,性能稳定无变化.

  16. Molded, wafer level optics for long wave infra-red applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franks, John

    2016-05-01

    For many years, the Thermal Imaging market has been driven by the high volume consumer market. The first signs of this came with the launch of night vision systems for cars, first by Cadillac and Honda and then, more successfully by BMW, Daimler and Audi. For the first time, simple thermal imaging systems were being manufactured at the rate of more than 10,000 units a year. This step change in volumes enabled a step change in system costs, with thermal imaging moving into the consumer's price range. Today we see that the consumer awareness and the consumer market continues to increase with the launch of a number of consumer focused smart phone add-ons. This has brought a further step change in system costs, with the possibility to turn your mobile phone into a thermal imager for under $250. As the detector technology has matured, the pixel pitches have dropped from 50μm in 2002 to 12 μm or even 10μm in today's detectors. This dramatic shrinkage in size has had an equally dramatic effect on the optics required to produce the image on the detector. A moderate field of view that would have required a focal length of 40mm in 2002 now requires a focal length of 8mm. For wide field of view applications and small detector formats, focal lengths in the range 1mm to 5mm are becoming common. For lenses, the quantity manufactured, quality and costs will require a new approach to high volume Infra-Red (IR) manufacturing to meet customer expectations. This, taken with the SwaP-C requirements and the emerging requirement for very small lenses driven by the new detectors, suggests that wafer scale optics are part of the solution. Umicore can now present initial results from an intensive research and development program to mold and coat wafer level optics, using its chalcogenide glass, GASIR®.

  17. Recent developments in wafer-level fabrication of micro-optical multi-aperture imaging systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitel, R.; Dannberg, P.; Brückner, A.; Bräuer, A.

    2011-10-01

    Micro-optical systems, that utilize multiple channels for imaging instead of a single one, are frequently discussed for ultra-compact applications such as digital cameras. The strategy of their fabrication differs due to different concepts of image formation. Illustrated by recently implemented systems for multi-aperture imaging, typical steps of wafer-level fabrication are discussed in detail. In turn, the made progress may allow for additional degrees of freedom in optical design. Pressing ahead with very short overall lengths and multiple diaphragm array layers, results in the use of extremely thin glass substrates down to 100 microns in thickness. The desire for a wide field of view for imaging has led to chirped arrays of microlenses and diaphragms. Focusing on imaging quality, aberrations were corrected by introducing toroidal lenslets and elliptical apertures. Such lenslets had been generated by thermal reflow of lithographic patterned photoresist and subsequent molding. Where useful, the system's performance can be further increased by applying aspheric microlenses from reactive ion etching (RIE) transfer or by achromatic doublets from superimposing two moldings with different polymers. Multiple diaphragm arrays prevent channel crosstalk. But using simple metal layers may lead to multiple reflections and an increased appearance of ghost images. A way out are low reflecting black matrix polymers that can be directly patterned by lithography. But in case of environmental stability and high resolution, organic coatings should be replaced by patterned metal coatings that exhibit matched antireflective layers like the prominent black chromium. The mentioned components give an insight into the fabrication process of multi-aperture imaging systems. Finally, the competence in each step decides on the overall image quality.

  18. Reliability and Characteristics of Wafer-Level Chip-Scale Packages under Current Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Po-Ying; Kung, Heng-Yu; Lai, Yi-Shao; Hsiung Tsai, Ming; Yeh, Wen-Kuan

    2008-02-01

    In this work, we present a novel approach and method for elucidating the characteristics of wafer-level chip-scale packages (WLCSPs) for electromigration (EM) tests. The die in WLCSP was directly attached to the substrate via a soldered interconnect. The shrinking of the area of the die that is available for power, and the solder bump also shrinks the volume and increases the density of electrons for interconnect efficiency. The bump current density now approaches to 106 A/cm2, at which point the EM becomes a significant reliability issue. As known, the EM failure depends on numerous factors, including the working temperature and the under bump metallization (UBM) thickness. A new interconnection geometry is adopted extensively with moderate success in overcoming larger mismatches between the displacements of components during current and temperature changes. Both environments and testing parameters for WLCSP are increasingly demanded. Although failure mechanisms are considered to have been eliminated or at least made manageable, new package technologies are again challenging its process, integrity and reliability. WLCSP technology was developed to eliminate the need for encapsulation to ensure compatibility with smart-mount technology (SMT). The package has good handing properties but is now facing serious reliability problems. In this work, we investigated the reliability of a WLCSP subjected to different accelerated current stressing conditions at a fixed ambient temperature of 125 °C. A very strong correlation exists between the mean time to failure (MTTF) of the WLCSP test vehicle and the mean current density that is carried by a solder joint. A series of current densities were applied to the WLCSP architecture; Black's power law was employed in a failure mode simulation. Additionally, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was adopted to determine the differences existing between high- and low-current-density failure modes.

  19. Low temperature activation of Au/Ti getter film for application to wafer-level vacuum packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ming; Moulin, Johan; Lani, Sébastien; Hallais, Géraldine; Renard, Charles; Bosseboeuf, Alain

    2015-03-01

    Non-evaporable getter (NEG) thin films based on alloys of transition metals have been studied by various authors for vacuum control in wafer-level packages of micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS). These materials have typically a relatively high activation temperature (300-450 °C) which is incompatible with some temperature sensitive MEMS devices. In this work we investigate the potential of Au/Ti system with a thin or ultrathin non oxidizable Au layer as a low activation temperature getter material. In this bilayer system, gettering activation is produced by thermal outdiffusion of titanium atoms through the gold film. The outdiffusion kinetics of titanium was modelled and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) at various temperatures. Results confirm that Au/Ti bilayer is a promising getter material for wafer-level packaging with an activation temperature below 300 °C for 1 h annealing time.

  20. Utilizing an Adaptive Grey Model for Short-Term Time Series Forecasting: A Case Study of Wafer-Level Packaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Che-Jung Chang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The wafer-level packaging process is an important technology used in semiconductor manufacturing, and how to effectively control this manufacturing system is thus an important issue for packaging firms. One way to aid in this process is to use a forecasting tool. However, the number of observations collected in the early stages of this process is usually too few to use with traditional forecasting techniques, and thus inaccurate results are obtained. One potential solution to this problem is the use of grey system theory, with its feature of small dataset modeling. This study thus uses the AGM(1,1 grey model to solve the problem of forecasting in the pilot run stage of the packaging process. The experimental results show that the grey approach is an appropriate and effective forecasting tool for use with small datasets and that it can be applied to improve the wafer-level packaging process.

  1. Sputtered Encapsulation as Wafer Level Packaging for Isolatable MEMS Devices: A Technique Demonstrated on a Capacitive Accelerometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azrul Azlan Hamzah

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses sputtered silicon encapsulation as a wafer level packaging approach for isolatable MEMS devices. Devices such as accelerometers, RF switches, inductors, and filters that do not require interaction with the surroundings to function, could thus be fully encapsulated at the wafer level after fabrication. A MEMSTech 50g capacitive accelerometer was used to demonstrate a sputtered encapsulation technique. Encapsulation with a very uniform surface profile was achieved using spin-on glass (SOG as a sacrificial layer, SU-8 as base layer, RF sputtered silicon as main structural layer, eutectic gold-silicon as seal layer, and liquid crystal polymer (LCP as outer encapsulant layer. SEM inspection and capacitance test indicated that the movable elements were released after encapsulation. Nanoindentation test confirmed that the encapsulated device is sufficiently robust to withstand a transfer molding process. Thus, an encapsulation technique that is robust, CMOS compatible, and economical has been successfully developed for packaging isolatable MEMS devices at the wafer level.

  2. Operations and Performance of RHIC as a Cu-Cu Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Pilat, Fulvia Caterina; Bai, Mei; Barton, Donald; Beebe-Wang, Joanne; Blaskiewicz, Michael; Brennan, Joseph M; Bruno, Donald; Cameron, Peter; Connolly, Roger; De Long, Joseph; Drees, Angelika; Fischer, Wolfram; Ganetis, George; Gardner, Chris J; Glenn, Joseph; Harvey, Margaret; Hayes, Thomas; Hseuh Hsiao Chaun; Huang, Haixin; Ingrassia, Peter; Iriso, Ubaldo; Lee, Roger C; Litvinenko, Vladimir N; Luo, Yun; MacKay, William W; Marr, Gregory J; Marusic, Al; Michnoff, Robert; Montag, Christoph; Morris, John; Nicoletti, Tony; Oerter, Brian; Ptitsyn, Vadim; Roser, Thomas; Russo, Thomas; Sandberg, Jon; Satogata, Todd; Schultheiss, Carl; Tepikian, Steven; Tomas, Rogelio; Trbojevic, Dejan; Tsoupas, Nicholaos; Tuozzolo, Joseph; Vetter, Kurt; Zaltsman, Alex; Zeno, Keith; Zhang, S Y; Zhang, Wu

    2005-01-01

    The 5th year of RHIC operations, started in November 2004 and expected to last till June 2005, consists of a physics run with Cu-Cu collisions at 100 GeV/u followed by one with polarized protons at 100 GeV. We will address here overall performance of the RHIC complex used for the first time as a Cu-Cu collider, and compare it with previous operational experience with Au, PP and asymmetric d-Au collisions. We will also discuss operational improvements, such as a ?* squeeze to 85cm in the high luminosity interaction regions from the design value of 1m, system improvements and machine performance limitations, such as vacuum pressure rise, intra-beam scattering, and beam beam interaction.

  3. OPERATIONS AND PERFORMANCE OF RHIC AS A CU-CU COLLIDER.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PILAT, R.; AHRENS, L.; BAI, M.; BARTON, D.S.; ET AL.

    2005-05-16

    The 5th year of RHIC operations, started in November 2004 and expected to last till June 2005, consists of a physics run with Cu-Cu collisions at 100 GeV/u followed by one with polarized protons (pp) at 100 GeV [l]. We will address here the overall performance of the RHIC complex used for the first time as a Cu-Cu collider, and compare it with previous operational experience with Au, PP and asymmetric d-Au collisions. We will also discuss operational improvements, such as a {beta}* squeeze to 85cm in the high luminosity interaction regions from the design value of 1m, system improvements, machine performance and limitations, and address reliability and uptime issues.

  4. An unusual coordination polymer containing Cu(+) ions and featuring possible Cu...Cu `cuprophilic' interactions: poly[di-μ-chlorido-(μ4-3,5-diaminobenzoato-κ(4)O:O':N:N')tricopper(I)(3 Cu-Cu)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosa, Muhammad Kaleem; Wood, Paul T; Humphrey, Simon M; Harrison, William T A

    2016-01-01

    Compounds containing copper(I) are of interest for their role in biological processes. The nature of short (coordination polymer, [Cu3(C7H7N2O2)Cl2]n, was formed from the in situ reduction of CuCl2 in the presence of 3,5-diaminobenzoic acid and KOH under hydrothermal conditions. Its complex crystal structure contains ten distinct Cu(I) atoms, two of which lie on crystallographic inversion centres. The copper coordination geometries include near-linear CuOCl and CuN2, T-shaped CuOCl2 and distorted tetrahedral CuOCl3 groups. Each Cu(I) atom is also associated with two adjacent metal atoms, with Cu...Cu distances varying from 2.7350 (14) to 3.2142 (13) Å; if all these are regarded as `cuprophilic' interactions, then infinite [-101] zigzag chains of Cu(I) atoms occur in the crystal. The structure is consolidated by N-H...Cl hydrogen bonds.

  5. An electret-based energy harvesting device with a wafer-level fabrication process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crovetto, Andrea; Wang, Fei; Hansen, Ole

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a MEMS energy harvesting device which is able to generate power from two perpendicular ambient vibration directions. A CYTOP polymer is used both as the electret material for electrostatic transduction and as a bonding interface for low-temperature wafer bonding. The device...... is also discussed. With a final chip size of about 1 cm2, a power output of 32.5 nW is successfully harvested with an external load of 17 MΩ, when a harmonic vibration source with an RMS acceleration amplitude of 0.03 g (∼0.3 m s−2) and a resonant frequency of 179 Hz is applied. These results can...

  6. Delocalized mixed-valence bi- and trinuclear complexes with short Cu-Cu bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lei; Powell, Douglas R; Klein, Eric L; Grohmann, Andreas; Houser, Robert P

    2007-08-20

    Two mixed-valence copper complexes were synthesized with ligands N-(2-pyridylmethyl)acetamide (Hpmac) and N,N'-(2-methyl-2-pyridylpropan-1,3-diyl)bis(acetamide) (H2pp(ac)2). Dimer [Cu2(pmac)2]OTf and trimer [Cu3(pp(ac)2)2].NaOTf both contain fully delocalized, mixed-valence Cu(1.5)Cu(1.5) moieties.

  7. Synthesis of MOF templated Cu/CuO@TiO2 nanocomposites for synergistic hydrogen production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Indranil; Pal, Ujjwal

    2016-02-14

    A copper metal-organic framework (Cu-MOF) provides access to Cu/CuO@TiO2 hybrid nanocomposites with highly dispersive copper species adsorbed on a TiO2 semiconducting system. This novel nanostructure exhibits efficient hydrogen evolution performance under solar illumination of intensity ∼1 Sun. The rate of H2 production was systematically optimized under different operational parameters. Experimental observation reveals that mesoporous Cu/CuO@TiO2 nanocomposite with 0.5 wt% Cu loading showed the highest rate of H2 production (286 mmol g(-1) h(-1)), which is considerably higher than that of CuO loaded TiO2 prepared using a conventional impregnation method. This high photocatalytic H2 production activity is attributed predominantly to the presence of surface deposited Cu(0) species and the small size of the heterojunction (1-2 nm) between CuO and TiO2, which facilitate interfacial charge carrier transfer from the TiO2 nanoparticles. The catalyst showed good recyclability under prolonged exposure (30 h) to solar irradiation. Unlike many Pt decorated TiO2 photocatalysts, this hybrid photocatalyst provides an inexpensive means of harnessing solar energy.

  8. Growth and magnetic properties dependence of the Co–Cu/Cu films electrodeposited under high magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franczak, Agnieszka, E-mail: agnieszka.franczak@mtm.kuleuven.be [Laboratoire d’Ingénierie et Sciences des Matériaux (LISM EA 4695), Université de Reims Champagne-Ardenne, UFR Sciences et Naturelles, Bat. 6, Moulin de la Housse, BP 1039, 51687 Reims Cedex 2 (France); Department of Materials Science (MTM), KU Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 44, 3001 Haverlee (Leuven) (Belgium); Levesque, Alexandra [Laboratoire d’Ingénierie et Sciences des Matériaux (LISM EA 4695), Université de Reims Champagne-Ardenne, UFR Sciences et Naturelles, Bat. 6, Moulin de la Housse, BP 1039, 51687 Reims Cedex 2 (France); Zabinski, Piotr [Laboratory of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry, Faculty of Non-Ferrous Metals, AGH University of Science and Technology, al. A. Mickiewicza 30, 30059 Krakow (Poland); Li, Donggang [Key Laboratory of Electromagnetic Processing of Materials (Ministry of Education), Northeastern University, 314 Box, 110004 Shenyang (China); Czapkiewicz, Maciej [Department of Electronics, AGH University of Science and Technology, al. A. Mickiewicza 30, 30059 Krakow (Poland); Kowalik, Remigiusz [Laboratory of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry, Faculty of Non-Ferrous Metals, AGH University of Science and Technology, al. A. Mickiewicza 30, 30059 Krakow (Poland); Bohr, Frédéric [Laboratoire d’Ingénierie et Sciences des Matériaux (LISM EA 4695), Université de Reims Champagne-Ardenne, UFR Sciences et Naturelles, Bat. 6, Moulin de la Housse, BP 1039, 51687 Reims Cedex 2 (France); and others

    2015-07-15

    The present work is focused on the investigations of magnetic properties dependence on microstructure of Co–Cu/Cu films electrodeposited under superimposed high magnetic field. The experimental results indicate a strong effect of an external magnetic field on the morphology of deposited films, more precisely on the Co:Cu ratio that determines the film growth. It is shown that the Co–Cu/Cu films electrodeposited without superimposed magnetic field consisted of two clearly visible features: compact film with incorporated granular particles. Under a superimposed external high magnetic field the privilege growth of the particles was induced. As a consequence, development of the well-defined branched structure of Co–Cu/Cu film was observed. In contrary, the phase compositional investigations do not reveal any changes in the phase formation during electrodeposition under magnetic field conditions. Thus, it is assumed that a strong growth of Co–Cu/Cu films in (111) direction under magnetic or non-magnetic electrodeposition conditions is related with the growth of Cu (111) plane and embedded into it some of the Co fcc atoms of same (111) orientation, as well as the Co hcp atoms that grows in the (002) direction. This non-equilibrium growth of Co–Cu/Cu films under magnetic deposition conditions affects strongly the magnetic properties of deposited films, revealing that films obtained under magnetic fields higher than 3 T were no more magnetic materials. - Highlights: • Co–Cu/Cu electrodeposits were obtained at elevated temperature under HMFs. • The effects of HMFs on microstructure and magnetic properties were investigated. • Interesting morphological changes due to HMFs has been observed. • Changes in Co:Cu ratio due to HMFs modified the magnetic properties of deposits.

  9. Wafer-level vacuum-packaged two-axis MEMS scanning mirror for pico-projector application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Ulrich; Senger, Frank; Janes, Joachim; Mallas, Christian; Stenchly, Vanessa; von Wantoch, Thomas; Quenzer, Hans-Joachim; Weiss, Manfred

    2014-03-01

    Hermetic wafer level packaging of optical MEMS scanning mirrors is essential for mass-market applications. It is the key to enable reliable low-cost mass producible scanning solutions. Vacuum packaging of resonant MEMS scanning mirrors widens the parameter range specifically with respect to scan angle and scan frequency. It also allows extending the utilizable range of mirror aperture size based on the fact that the energy of the high-Q oscillator can be effectively conserved and accumulated. But there are also some drawbacks associated with vacuum packaging. This paper discusses the different advantageous and disadvantageous aspects of vacuum packaging of MEMS scanning mirrors with respect to laser projection displays. Improved MEMS scanning mirror designs are being presented which focus on overcoming previous limitations. Finally an outlook is presented on the suitability of this technology for very large aperture scanning mirrors to be used in high power laser applications.

  10. A high-Q resonant pressure microsensor with through-glass electrical interconnections based on wafer-level MEMS vacuum packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhenyu; Chen, Deyong; Wang, Junbo; Li, Yinan; Chen, Jian

    2014-12-16

    This paper presents a high-Q resonant pressure microsensor with through-glass electrical interconnections based on wafer-level MEMS vacuum packaging. An approach to maintaining high-vacuum conditions by integrating the MEMS fabrication process with getter material preparation is presented in this paper. In this device, the pressure under measurement causes a deflection of a pressure-sensitive silicon square diaphragm, which is further translated to stress build up in "H" type doubly-clamped micro resonant beams, leading to a resonance frequency shift. The device geometries were optimized using FEM simulation and a 4-inch SOI wafer was used for device fabrication, which required only three photolithographic steps. In the device fabrication, a non-evaporable metal thin film as the getter material was sputtered on a Pyrex 7740 glass wafer, which was then anodically bonded to the patterned SOI wafer for vacuum packaging. Through-glass via holes predefined in the glass wafer functioned as the electrical interconnections between the patterned SOI wafer and the surrounding electrical components. Experimental results recorded that the Q-factor of the resonant beam was beyond 22,000, with a differential sensitivity of 89.86 Hz/kPa, a device resolution of 10 Pa and a nonlinearity of 0.02% F.S with the pressure varying from 50 kPa to 100 kPa. In addition, the temperature drift coefficient was less than -0.01% F.S/°C in the range of -40 °C to 70 °C, the long-term stability error was quantified as 0.01% F.S over a 5-month period and the accuracy of the microsensor was better than 0.01% F.S.

  11. A High-Q Resonant Pressure Microsensor with Through-Glass Electrical Interconnections Based on Wafer-Level MEMS Vacuum Packaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenyu Luo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a high-Q resonant pressure microsensor with through-glass electrical interconnections based on wafer-level MEMS vacuum packaging. An approach to maintaining high-vacuum conditions by integrating the MEMS fabrication process with getter material preparation is presented in this paper. In this device, the pressure under measurement causes a deflection of a pressure-sensitive silicon square diaphragm, which is further translated to stress build up in “H” type doubly-clamped micro resonant beams, leading to a resonance frequency shift. The device geometries were optimized using FEM simulation and a 4-inch SOI wafer was used for device fabrication, which required only three photolithographic steps. In the device fabrication, a non-evaporable metal thin film as the getter material was sputtered on a Pyrex 7740 glass wafer, which was then anodically bonded to the patterned SOI wafer for vacuum packaging. Through-glass via holes predefined in the glass wafer functioned as the electrical interconnections between the patterned SOI wafer and the surrounding electrical components. Experimental results recorded that the Q-factor of the resonant beam was beyond 22,000, with a differential sensitivity of 89.86 Hz/kPa, a device resolution of 10 Pa and a nonlinearity of 0.02% F.S with the pressure varying from 50 kPa to 100 kPa. In addition, the temperature drift coefficient was less than −0.01% F.S/°C in the range of −40 °C to 70 °C, the long-term stability error was quantified as 0.01% F.S over a 5-month period and the accuracy of the microsensor was better than 0.01% F.S.

  12. A High-Q Resonant Pressure Microsensor with Through-Glass Electrical Interconnections Based on Wafer-Level MEMS Vacuum Packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhenyu; Chen, Deyong; Wang, Junbo; Li, Yinan; Chen, Jian

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a high-Q resonant pressure microsensor with through-glass electrical interconnections based on wafer-level MEMS vacuum packaging. An approach to maintaining high-vacuum conditions by integrating the MEMS fabrication process with getter material preparation is presented in this paper. In this device, the pressure under measurement causes a deflection of a pressure-sensitive silicon square diaphragm, which is further translated to stress build up in “H” type doubly-clamped micro resonant beams, leading to a resonance frequency shift. The device geometries were optimized using FEM simulation and a 4-inch SOI wafer was used for device fabrication, which required only three photolithographic steps. In the device fabrication, a non-evaporable metal thin film as the getter material was sputtered on a Pyrex 7740 glass wafer, which was then anodically bonded to the patterned SOI wafer for vacuum packaging. Through-glass via holes predefined in the glass wafer functioned as the electrical interconnections between the patterned SOI wafer and the surrounding electrical components. Experimental results recorded that the Q-factor of the resonant beam was beyond 22,000, with a differential sensitivity of 89.86 Hz/kPa, a device resolution of 10 Pa and a nonlinearity of 0.02% F.S with the pressure varying from 50 kPa to 100 kPa. In addition, the temperature drift coefficient was less than −0.01% F.S/°C in the range of −40 °C to 70 °C, the long-term stability error was quantified as 0.01% F.S over a 5-month period and the accuracy of the microsensor was better than 0.01% F.S. PMID:25521385

  13. 基于尺寸效应的Cu/CuNi薄膜热电偶灵敏度研究%Study on the sensitivity of Cu/CuNi thin-film thermocouple based on size effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨丽红; 赵源深

    2011-01-01

    采用磁控溅射法在镀有SiO2阻挡层的基底上制备了一系列的Cu/CuNi薄膜热电偶,其厚度分别为0.5,1.0,1.5和2.0 μm,测得四种Cu/CuNi薄膜热电偶的灵敏度,分别为46.47,45.23,44.32和43.98 μV/℃,通过实验和理论研究了薄膜热电偶灵敏度S与厚度δ之间的关系.结果表明:Cu/CuNi薄膜热电偶的灵敏度高于普通Cu/CuNi热电偶;在薄膜厚度大于临界厚度的情况下,薄膜热电偶的灵敏度S随着厚度的倒数l/δ增大而升高.%A series of Cu/CuNi thin film thermocouples with different thicknesses of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 μm were prepared on the substrates with SiO2 linings by means of magnetron sputtering. After static calibration by experiments, the sensitivities of the prepared thermocouples were obtained respectively of 46.67, 45.23, 44.32 and 43.98 μV/°C. The relationship between sensitivity and thickness of Cu/CuNi thin-film thermocouple was studied by experiments and theory. The results show that the sensitivities of Cu/CuNi thin-film thermocouples are higher than that of ordinary thermocouples; when the thickness of the thin-film is greater than the critical value, the sensitivity (S) of thin-film thermocouple will increase with the increasing of the reciprocal of thickness (1/δ).

  14. A combined model for pseudorapidity distributions in Cu-Cu collisions at BNL-RHIC energies

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Zhjin; Huang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    The charged particles produced in nucleus-nucleus collisions come from leading particles and those frozen out from the hot and dense matter created in collisions. The leading particles are conventionally supposed having Gaussian rapidity distributions normalized to the number of participants. The hot and dense matter is assumed to expand according to the unified hydrodynamics, a hydro model which unifies the features of Landau and Hwa-Bjorken model, and freeze out into charged particles from a space-like hypersurface with a proper time of Tau_FO . The rapidity distribution of this part of charged particles can be derived out analytically. The combined contribution from both leading particles and unified hydrodynamics is then compared against the experimental data performed by BNL-RHIC-PHOBOS Collaboration in different centrality Cu-Cu collisions at sqrt(s_NN)=200 and 62.4 GeV, respectively. The model predictions are in well consistent with experimental measurements.

  15. Punicalagin Green Functionalized Cu/Cu2O/ZnO/CuO Nanocomposite for Potential Electrochemical Transducer and Catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuku, X.; Kaviyarasu, K.; Matinise, N.; Maaza, M.

    2016-09-01

    A novel ternary Punica granatum L-Cu/Cu2O/CuO/ZnO nanocomposite was successfully synthesised via green route. In this work, we demonstrate that the green synthesis of metal oxides is more viable and facile compare to other methods, i.e., physical and chemical routes while presenting a potential electrode for energy applications. The prepared nanocomposite was characterised by both microscopic and spectroscopic techniques. High-resolution scanning electron microscopy (HRSEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques revealed different transitional phases with an average nanocrystallite size of 29-20 mm. It was observed that the nanocomposites changed from amorphous-slightly crystalline Cu/Cu2O to polycrystalline Cu/Cu2O/CuO/ZnO at different calcination temperatures (room temperature-RT- 600 °C). The Cu/Cu2O/ZnO/CuO metal oxides proved to be highly crystalline and showed irregularly distributed particles with different sizes. Meanwhile, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy confirmed the purity while together with ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy proved the proposed mechanism of the synthesised nanocomposite. UV-Vis showed improved catalytic activity of the prepared metal oxides, evident by narrow band gap energy. The redox and electrochemical properties of the prepared nanocomposite were achieved by cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance (EIS) and galvanostatic charge-discharge (GCD). The maximum specific capacitance ( C s) was calculated to be 241 F g-1 at 50 mV s-1 for Cu/Cu2O/CuO/ZnO nanoplatelets structured electrode. Moreover, all the CuO nanostructures reveal better power performance, excellent rate as well as long term cycling stability. Such a study will encourages a new design for a wide spectrum of materials for smart electronic device applications.

  16. A wafer-level 3D packaging structure with Benzocyclobutene as a dielectric for multichip module fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geng Fei; Ding Xiaoyun; Xu Gaowei; Luo Le, E-mail: leluo@mail.sim.ac.c [Graduate University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2009-10-15

    A new wafer-level 3D packaging structure with Benzocyclobutene (BCB) as interlayer dielectrics (ILDs) for multichip module fabrication is proposed for application in the Ku-band wave. The packaging structure consists of two layers of BCB films and three layers of metallized films, in which the monolithic microwave IC (MMIC), thin film resistors, striplines and microstrip lines are integrated. Wet etched cavities fabricated on the silicon substrate are used for mounting active and passive components. BCB layers cover the components and serve as ILDs for interconnections. Gold bumps are used as electric interconnections between different layers, which eliminates the need to prepare vias by costly dry etching and deposition processes. In order to get high-quality BCB films for the subsequent chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) and multilayer metallization processes, the BCB curing profile is optimized and the roughness of the BCB film after the CMP process is kept lower than 10 nm. The thermal, mechanical and electrical properties of the packaging structure are investigated. The thermal resistance can be controlled below 2 {sup 0}C/W. The average shear strength of the gold bumps on the BCB surface is around 70 N/mm{sup 2}. The performances of MMIC and interconnection structure at high frequencies are optimized and tested. The S-parameters curves of the packaged MMIC shift slightly showing perfect transmission character. The insertion loss change after the packaging process is less than 1 dB range at the operating frequency and the return loss is less than -8 dB from 10 to 15 GHz.

  17. Cu-Sn transient liquid phase wafer bonding for MEMS applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flötgen, C.; Pawlak, M.; Pabo, E.; Wiel, H.J. van de; Hayes, G.R.; Dragoi, V.

    2013-01-01

    The impact of process parameters on final bonding layer quality was investigated for Transient Liquid Phase (TLP) wafer-level bonding based on the Cu-Sn system. Subjects of this investigation were bonding temperature profile, bonding time and contact pressure as well as the choice of metal

  18. J/psi Production in sqrt (s_NN)= 200 GeV Cu+Cu Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Adare, A; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Al-Bataineh, H; Alexander, J; Aoki, K; Aphecetche, L; Armendariz, R; Aronson, S H; Asai, J; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Baldisseri, Alberto; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, Y; Bickley, A A; Boissevain, J G; Borel, H; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Büsching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Butsyk, S; Campbell, S; Chang, B S; Charvet, J L; Chernichenko, S; Chiba, J; Chi, C Y; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Churyn, A; Cianciolo, V; Cleven, C R; Cole, B A; Comets, M P; Constantin, P; Csanad, M; Csrgo, T; Dahms, T; Das, K; Dávid, G; Deaton, M B; Dehmelt, K; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; d'Enterria, D; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dietzsch, O; Dion, A; Donadelli, M; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Dubey, A K; Durum, A; Dzhordzhadze, V; Efremenko, Yu V; Egdemir, J; Ellinghaus, F; Emam, W S; Enokizono, A; Enyo, H; Esumi, S; Eyser, K O; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Finger, M; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Zeev; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fusayasu, T; Gadrat, S; Garishvili, I; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grosse-Perdekamp, M; Gunji, T; Gustafsson, H; Hachiya, T; Hadj Henni, A; Haegemann, A C; Haggerty, J S; Hamagaki, H; Han, R; Harada, H; Hartouni, E P; Haruna, K; Haslum, E; Hayano, R; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; He, X; Hiejima, H; Hill, J C; Hobbs, R; Hohlmann, M; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hornback, D; Ichihara, T; Imai, K; Inaba, M; Inoue, Y; Isenhower, D; Isenhower, L; Ishihara, M; Isobe, T; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Jacak, B V; Jia, J; Jin, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Kajihara, F; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kamin, J; Kaneta, M; Kang, J H; Kanou, H; Kawall, D; Kazantsev, A V; Khanzadeev, A; Kikuchi, J; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, E; Kinney, E; Kiss, A; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Klay, J; Klein-Bösing, C; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Krl, A; Kravitz, A; Kubart, J; Kunde, G J; Kurihara, N; Kurita, a K; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y S; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Lee, D M; Lee, M K; Lee, T; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Lenzi, B; Lika, T; Litvinenko, A; Liu, M X; Li, X; Love, B; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Malik, M D; Man'ko, V I; Mao, Y; Maek, L; Masui, H; Matathias, F; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; Miake, s Y; Mike, P; Miki, K; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mishra, M; Mitchell, J T; Mitrovski, s M; Morreale, A; Morrison, D P; Moukhanova, T V; Mukhopadhyay, D; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagata, Y; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nakagawa, I; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Norman, B E; Nyanin, A S; O'Brien, E; Oda, S X; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Okada, H; Okada, K; Oka, M; Omiwade, O O; Oskarsson, A; Ouchida, M; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, J; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Pei, H; Peng, J C; Pereira, H; Peresedov, V; Peressounko, D Yu; Pinkenburg, C; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Qu, H; Rak, J; Rakotozafindrabe, A; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Rembeczki, S; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Roche, G; Romana, A; Rosati, M; Rosendahl, S S E; Rosnet, P; Rukoyatkin, P; Rykov, V L; Sahlmueller, B; Saitô, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakai, S; Sakata, H; Samsonov, V; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Sharma, D; Shein, I; Shevel, A; Shibata, T A; Shigaki, K; Shimomura, M; Shoji, K; Sickles, A; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Silvestre, C; Sim, K S; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Skutnik, S; Sluneka, M; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sørensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Staley, F; Stankus, cP W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Suire, C; Sziklai, J; Tabaru, T; Takagi, S; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tanaka, Y; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Taranenko, A; Tarjn, P; Thomas, T L; Togawa, M; Toia, A; Tojo, J; Tomaek, L; Torii, H; Towell, as R S; Tram, V-N; Tserruya, Itzhak; Tsuchimoto, Y; Vale, C; Valle, H; van Hecke, H W; Velkovska, J; Vertesi, R; Vinogradov, A A; Virius, M; Vrba, V; Vznuzdaev, E; Wagner, M; Walker, D; Wang, X R; Watanabe, Y; Wessels, J; White, S N; Winter, D; Woody, C L; Wysocki, M; Xie, W; Yamaguchi, Y L; Yanovich, A; Yasin, Z; Ying, J; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Younus, I; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zaudtke, O; Zhang, C; Zhou, S; Zimnyi, J; Zolin, L

    2008-01-01

    Yields for J/psi production in Cu+Cu collisions at sqrt (s_NN)= 200 GeV have been measured by the PHENIX experiment over the rapidity range |y| < 2.2 at transverse momenta from 0 to beyond 5 GeV/c. The invariant yield is obtained as a function of rapidity, transverse momentum and collision centrality, and compared with results in p+p and Au+Au collisions at the same energy. The Cu+Cu data provide greatly improved precision over existing Au+Au data for J/psi production in collisions with small to intermediate numbers of participants, providing a key constraint that is needed for disentangling cold and hot nuclear matter effects.

  19. Anodic bonding using a hybrid electrode with a two-step bonding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Luo; Jing, Xie; Yang, Zhang; Chaobo, Li; Yang, Xia

    2012-06-01

    A two-step bonding process using a novel hybrid electrode is presented. The effects of different electrodes on bonding time, bond strength and the bonded interface are analyzed. The anodic bonding is studied using a domestic bonding system, which carries out a detailed analysis of the integrity of the bonded interface and the bond strength measurement. With the aid of the hybrid electrode, a bubble-free anodic bonding process could be accomplished within 15-20 min, with a shear strength in excess of 10 MPa. These results show that the proposed method has a high degree of application value, including in most wafer-level MEMS packaging.

  20. Energy and system size dependence of φ meson production in Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abelev, B.I.; Bai, Y.; Benedosso, F.; Botje, M.A.J.; Braidot, E; Mischke, A.; Peitzmann, T.; Russcher, M.J.; Snellings, R.J.M.; van Leeuwen, M.

    2009-01-01

    We study the beam-energy and system-size dependence of φ meson production (using the hadronic decay mode φ→ K+K−) by comparing the new results from Cu + Cu collisions and previously reported Au+Au collisions at √ sNN = 62.4 and 200 GeV measured in the STAR experiment at RHIC. Data presented in this

  1. Direct jet reconstruction in p + p and Cu+ Cu collisions at PHENIX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi Lai, Yue

    2010-02-01

    Jet reconstruction in heavy ion collisions provides a direct measurement of the medium-induced parton energy loss and the in- medium fragmentation properties, and therefore can significantly enhance our understanding of the energy loss mechanism and medium property. However, the presence of a high multiplicity background prevents the direct application of traditional jet reconstruction techniques, which is e.g. known to give rise to a false apparent jet yield. Unlike at the LHC, the small jet cross section relative to the large background fluctuation makes the application to RHIC particularly difficult. We developed an algorithm that reconstructs jets using a Gaussian filter, which is both collinear/infrared safe and cone-like, but enhances the core versus periphery signal and therefore stabilizes the jet definition at the presence of a strongly fluctuating background and/or any detector aperture edges. This is then combined with a fake jet rejection strategy that can suppress the false background jet yield well below the jet production rate at RHIC. We show results from its application to the PHENIX p + p and Cu+ Cu data, including jet spectra, RAA, jet-jet correlations, and fragmentation functions. Their theoretical implications will be discussed. )

  2. Direct jet reconstruction in p + p and Cu + Cu at PHENIX

    CERN Document Server

    Lai, Yue-Shi

    2009-01-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider collides heavy nuclei at ultrarelativistic energies, creating a strongly interacting, partonic medium that is opaque to the passage of high energy quarks and gluons. Direct jet reconstruction applied to these collision systems provides a crucial constraint on the mechanism for in-medium parton energy loss and jet-medium interactions. However, traditional jet reconstruction algorithm operating in the large soft background at RHIC give rise to fake jets well above the intrinsic production rate of high-pT partons, impeding the detection of the low cross section jet signal at RHIC energies. We developed a new jet reconstruction algorithm that uses a Gaussian filter to locate and reconstruct the jet energy. This algorithm is combined with a fake jet rejection scheme that provides efficient jet reconstruction with acceptable fake rate in a background environment up to the central Au + Au collision at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV. We present results of its application in p + p and Cu + Cu...

  3. Micro/Nano Gas Sensors: A New Strategy Towards In-Situ Wafer-Level Fabrication of High-Performance Gas Sensing Chips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lei; Dai, Zhengfei; Duan, Guotao; Guo, Lianfeng; Wang, Yi; Zhou, Hong; Liu, Yanxiang; Cai, Weiping; Wang, Yuelin; Li, Tie

    2015-01-01

    Nano-structured gas sensing materials, in particular nanoparticles, nanotubes, and nanowires, enable high sensitivity at a ppb level for gas sensors. For practical applications, it is highly desirable to be able to manufacture such gas sensors in batch and at low cost. We present here a strategy of in-situ wafer-level fabrication of the high-performance micro/nano gas sensing chips by naturally integrating microhotplatform (MHP) with nanopore array (NPA). By introducing colloidal crystal template, a wafer-level ordered homogenous SnO2 NPA is synthesized in-situ on a 4-inch MHP wafer, able to produce thousands of gas sensing units in one batch. The integration of micromachining process and nanofabrication process endues micro/nano gas sensing chips at low cost, high throughput, and with high sensitivity (down to ~20 ppb), fast response time (down to ~1 s), and low power consumption (down to ~30 mW). The proposed strategy of integrating MHP with NPA represents a versatile approach for in-situ wafer-level fabrication of high-performance micro/nano gas sensors for real industrial applications. PMID:26001035

  4. A 45° saw-dicing process applied to a glass substrate for wafer-level optical splitter fabrication for optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciel, M. J.; Costa, C. G.; Silva, M. F.; Gonçalves, S. B.; Peixoto, A. C.; Ribeiro, A. Fernando; Wolffenbuttel, R. F.; Correia, J. H.

    2016-08-01

    This paper reports on the development of a technology for the wafer-level fabrication of an optical Michelson interferometer, which is an essential component in a micro opto-electromechanical system (MOEMS) for a miniaturized optical coherence tomography (OCT) system. The MOEMS consists on a titanium dioxide/silicon dioxide dielectric beam splitter and chromium/gold micro-mirrors. These optical components are deposited on 45° tilted surfaces to allow the horizontal/vertical separation of the incident beam in the final micro-integrated system. The fabrication process consists of 45° saw dicing of a glass substrate and the subsequent deposition of dielectric multilayers and metal layers. The 45° saw dicing is fully characterized in this paper, which also includes an analysis of the roughness. The optimum process results in surfaces with a roughness of 19.76 nm (rms). The actual saw dicing process for a high-quality final surface results as a compromise between the dicing blade’s grit size (#1200) and the cutting speed (0.3 mm s-1). The proposed wafer-level fabrication allows rapid and low-cost processing, high compactness and the possibility of wafer-level alignment/assembly with other optical micro components for OCT integrated imaging.

  5. Intermetallic Compound Formation Mechanisms for Cu-Sn Solid-Liquid Interdiffusion Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H.; Wang, K.; Aasmundtveit, K. E.; Hoivik, N.

    2012-09-01

    Cu-Sn solid-liquid interdiffusion (SLID) bonding is an evolving technique for wafer-level packaging which features robust, fine pitch and high temperature tolerance. The mechanisms of Cu-Sn SLID bonding for wafer-level bonding and three-dimensional (3-D) packaging applications have been studied by analyzing the microstructure evolution of Cu-Sn intermetallic compounds (IMCs) at elevated temperature up to 400°C. The bonding time required to achieve a single IMC phase (Cu3Sn) in the final interconnects was estimated according to the parabolic growth law with consideration of defect-induced deviation. The effect of predominantly Cu metal grain size on the Cu-Sn interdiffusion rate is discussed. The temperature versus time profile (ramp rate) is critical to control the morphology of scallops in the IMC. A low temperature ramp rate before reaching the bonding temperature is believed to be favorable in a SLID wafer-level bonding process.

  6. Time-dependent of characteristics of Cu/CuS/n-GaAs/In structure produced by SILAR method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sağlam, M.; Güzeldir, B., E-mail: msaglam@atauni.edu.tr

    2016-09-15

    Highlights: • The CuS thin film used at Cu/n-GaAs structure is grown by SILAR method. • There has been no report on ageing of characteristics of this junction in the literature. • The properties of Cu/CuS/n-GaAs/In structure are examined with different methods. • It has been shown that Cu/CuS/n-GaAs/In structure has a stable interface. - Abstract: The aim of this study is to explain effects of the ageing on the electrical properties of Cu/n-GaAs Shottky barrier diode with Copper Sulphide (CuS) interfacial layer. CuS thin films are deposited on n-type GaAs substrate by Successive Ionic Layer Adsorption and Reaction (SILAR) method at room temperature. The structural and the morphological properties of the films have been carried out by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) techniques. The XRD analysis of as-grown films showed the single-phase covellite, with hexagonal crystal structure built around two preferred orientations corresponding to (102) and (108) atomic planes. The ageing effects on the electrical properties of Cu/CuS/n-GaAs/In structure have been investigated. The current–voltage (I–V) measurements at room temperature have been carried out to study the change in electrical characteristics of the devices as a function of ageing time. The main electrical parameters, such as ideality factor (n), barrier height (Φ{sub b}), series resistance (R{sub s}), leakage current (I{sub 0}), and interface states (N{sub ss}) for this structure have been calculated. The results show that the main electrical parameters of device remained virtually unchanged.

  7. Evolution of structures in two particle correlations in RHIC Cu+Cu collisions as a function of centrality and momentum

    CERN Document Server

    De Silva, L C

    2009-01-01

    Two particle correlation measurements in heavy ion collisions at RHIC have shown an extended near side correlation in $\\Delta\\eta$ relative to p+p for both, momentum triggered and untriggered analyses. This phenomenon is also known as the "ridge". An investigation into the momentum and centrality dependence of two particle correlations is presented for Cu+Cu 200 GeV collisions from the STAR experiment. We extract the amplitude, $\\Delta\\eta$ and $\\Delta\\phi$ widths from the near side correlation structure, and show how its parameters depend on centrality and the lower transverse momentum cut-off. Implications for the origin of the ridge will be discussed.

  8. Photo-reduced Cu/CuO nanoclusters on TiO2 nanotube arrays as highly efficient and reusable catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Zhao; Liu, Chang; Qi, Kun; Cui, Xiaoqiang

    2017-01-01

    Non-noble metal nanoparticles are becoming more and more important in catalysis recently. Cu/CuO nanoclusters on highly ordered TiO2 nanotube arrays are successfully developed by a surfactant-free photoreduction method. This non-noble metal Cu/CuO-TiO2 catalyst exhibits excellent catalytic activity and stability for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) to 4-aminophenol (4-AP) with the presence of sodium borohydride (NaBH4). The rate constant of this low-cost Cu/CuO based catalyst is even higher than that of the noble metal nanoparticles decorated on the same TiO2 substrate. The conversion efficiency remains almost unchanged after 7 cycles of recycling. The recycle process of this Cu/CuO-TiO2 catalyst supported by Ti foil is very simple and convenient compared with that of the common powder catalysts. This catalyst also exhibited great catalytic activity to other organic dyes, such as methylene blue (MB), rhodamine B (RhB) and methyl orange (MO). This highly efficient, low-cost and easily reusable Cu/CuO-TiO2 catalyst is expected to be of great potential in catalysis in the future.

  9. Indium-free, highly transparent, flexible Cu2O/Cu/Cu2O mesh electrodes for flexible touch screen panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Ju; Kim, Hyo-Joong; Seo, Ki-Won; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Kim, Tae-Wong; Kim, Han-Ki

    2015-11-01

    We report on an indium-free and cost-effective Cu2O/Cu/Cu2O multilayer mesh electrode grown by room temperature roll-to-roll sputtering as a viable alternative to ITO electrodes for the cost-effective production of large-area flexible touch screen panels (TSPs). By using a low resistivity metallic Cu interlayer and a patterned mesh structure, we obtained Cu2O/Cu/Cu2O multilayer mesh electrodes with a low sheet resistance of 15.1 Ohm/square and high optical transmittance of 89% as well as good mechanical flexibility. Outer/inner bending test results showed that the Cu2O/Cu/Cu2O mesh electrode had a mechanical flexibility superior to that of conventional ITO films. Using the diamond-patterned Cu2O/Cu/Cu2O multilayer mesh electrodes, we successfully demonstrated TSPS of the flexible film-film type and rigid glass-film-film type TSPs. The TSPs with Cu2O/Cu/Cu2O mesh electrode were used to perform zoom in/out functions and multi-touch writing, indicating that these electrodes are promising cost-efficient transparent electrodes to substitute for conventional ITO electrodes in large-area flexible TSPs.

  10. Photo-reduced Cu/CuO nanoclusters on TiO2 nanotube arrays as highly efficient and reusable catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Zhao; Liu, Chang; Qi, Kun; Cui, Xiaoqiang

    2017-01-01

    Non-noble metal nanoparticles are becoming more and more important in catalysis recently. Cu/CuO nanoclusters on highly ordered TiO2 nanotube arrays are successfully developed by a surfactant-free photoreduction method. This non-noble metal Cu/CuO-TiO2 catalyst exhibits excellent catalytic activity and stability for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) to 4-aminophenol (4-AP) with the presence of sodium borohydride (NaBH4). The rate constant of this low-cost Cu/CuO based catalyst is even higher than that of the noble metal nanoparticles decorated on the same TiO2 substrate. The conversion efficiency remains almost unchanged after 7 cycles of recycling. The recycle process of this Cu/CuO-TiO2 catalyst supported by Ti foil is very simple and convenient compared with that of the common powder catalysts. This catalyst also exhibited great catalytic activity to other organic dyes, such as methylene blue (MB), rhodamine B (RhB) and methyl orange (MO). This highly efficient, low-cost and easily reusable Cu/CuO-TiO2 catalyst is expected to be of great potential in catalysis in the future. PMID:28071708

  11. Onset of pi(0) suppression studied in Cu+Cu collisions at sqrt S NN=22.4, 62.4, and 200 GeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adare, A; Afanasiev, S; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Al-Bataineh, H; Alexander, J; Aoki, K; Aphecetche, L; Armendariz, R; Aronson, S H; Asai, J; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Bai, M; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Baldisseri, A; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Basye, A T; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Baumann, C; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, A; Berdnikov, Y; Bickley, A A; Boissevain, J G; Borel, H; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Butsyk, S; Camacho, C M; Campbell, S; Chang, B S; Chang, W C; Charvet, J-L; Chernichenko, S; Chiba, J; Chi, C Y; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choudhury, R K; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Churyn, A; Cianciolo, V; Citron, Z; Cleven, C R; Cole, B A; Comets, M P; Constantin, P; Csanád, M; Csörgo, T; Dahms, T; Dairaku, S; Das, K; David, G; Deaton, M B; Dehmelt, K; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; d'Enterria, D; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dietzsch, O; Dion, A; Donadelli, M; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Dubey, A K; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Dzhordzhadze, V; Efremenko, Y V; Egdemir, J; Ellinghaus, F; Emam, W S; Engelmore, T; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Eyser, K O; Fadem, B; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Finger, M; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fusayasu, T; Gadrat, S; Garishvili, I; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grosse Perdekamp, M; Gunji, T; Gustafsson, H-A; Hachiya, T; Hadj Henni, A; Haegemann, C; Haggerty, J S; Hamagaki, H; Han, R; Harada, H; Hartouni, E P; Haruna, K; Haslum, E; Hayano, R; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; He, X; Hiejima, H; Hill, J C; Hobbs, R; Hohlmann, M; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hornback, D; Huang, S; Ichihara, T; Ichimiya, R; Ikeda, Y; Imai, K; Imrek, J; Inaba, M; Inoue, Y; Isenhower, D; Isenhower, L; Ishihara, M; Isobe, T; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Ivanischev, D; Jacak, B V; Jia, J; Jin, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Kajihara, F; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kamin, J; Kaneta, M; Kang, J H; Kanou, H; Kapustinsky, J; Kawall, D; Kazantsev, A V; Kempel, T; Khanzadeev, A; Kijima, K M; Kikuchi, J; Kim, B I; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, E; Kim, S H; Kinney, E; Kiriluk, K; Kiss, A; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Klay, J; Klein-Boesing, C; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Koster, J; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Král, A; Kravitz, A; Kubart, J; Kunde, G J; Kurihara, N; Kurita, K; Kurosawa, M; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y-S; Lai, Y S; Lajoie, J G; Layton, D; Lebedev, A; Lee, D M; Lee, K B; Lee, M K; Lee, T; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Lenzi, B; Liebing, P; Liska, T; Litvinenko, A; Liu, H; Liu, M X; Li, X; Love, B; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Malik, M D; Manko, V I; Mannel, E; Mao, Y; Masek, L; Masui, H; Matathias, F; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; Means, N; Meredith, B; Miake, Y; Mikes, P; Miki, K; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mishra, M; Mitchell, J T; Mitrovski, M; Mohanty, A K; Morino, Y; Morreale, A; Morrison, D P; Moukhanova, T V; Mukhopadhyay, D; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagata, Y; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nagy, M I; Nakagawa, I; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Niita, T; Norman, B E; Nouicer, R; Nyanin, A S; O'Brien, E; Oda, S X; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Okada, H; Okada, K; Oka, M; Omiwade, O O; Onuki, Y; Oskarsson, A; Ouchida, M; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, J; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Pei, H; Peng, J-C; Pereira, H; Peresedov, V; Peressounko, D Yu; Pinkenburg, C; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Qu, H; Rak, J; Rakotozafindrabe, A; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Rembeczki, S; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Roach, D; Roche, G; Rolnick, S D; Romana, A; Rosati, M; Rosendahl, S S E; Rosnet, P; Rukoyatkin, P; Ruzicka, P; Rykov, V L; Sahlmueller, B; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakai, S; Sakashita, K; Sakata, H; Samsonov, V; Sato, S; Sato, T; Sawada, S; Sedgwick, K; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Semenov, A Yu; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Sharma, D; Shein, I; Shevel, A; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shimomura, M; Shoji, K; Shukla, P; Sickles, A; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Silvestre, C; Sim, K S; Singh, B K; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Skutnik, S; Slunecka, M; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Staley, F; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Suire, C; Sukhanov, A; Sziklai, J; Tabaru, T; Takagi, S; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tanabe, R; Tanaka, Y; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Taranenko, A; Tarján, P; Themann, H; Thomas, T L; Togawa, M; Toia, A; Tojo, J; Tomásek, L; Tomita, Y; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tram, V-N; Tserruya, I; Tsuchimoto, Y; Vale, C; Valle, H; vanHecke, H W; Veicht, A; Velkovska, J; Vertesi, R; Vinogradov, A A; Virius, M; Vrba, V; Vznuzdaev, E; Wagner, M; Walker, D

    2008-10-17

    Neutral pion transverse momentum (p(T)) spectra at midrapidity (|y| less than or approximately 0.35) were measured in Cu+Cu collisions at sqrt[s(NN)]=22.4, 62.4, and 200 GeV. Relative to pi_(0) yields in p+p collisions scaled by the number of inelastic nucleon-nucleon collisions (N(coll) the pi_(0) yields for p(T) more than or approximately 2 GeV/c in central Cu+Cu collisions are suppressed at 62.4 and 200 GeV whereas an enhancement is observed at 22.4 GeV. A comparison with a jet-quenching model suggests that final state parton energy loss dominates in central Cu+Cu collisions at 62.4 and 200 GeV, while the enhancement at 22.4 GeV is consistent with nuclear modifications in the initial state alone.

  12. Production of ω mesons in p + p, d + Au, Cu + Cu, and Au + Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Al-Jamel, A.; Alexander, J.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aphecetche, L.; Aramaki, Y.; Armendariz, R.; Aronson, S. H.; Asai, J.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Baldisseri, A.; Barish, K. N.; Barnes, P. D.; Bassalleck, B.; Basye, A. T.; Bathe, S.; Batsouli, S.; Baublis, V.; Bauer, F.; Baumann, C.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Belmont, R.; Bennett, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bhom, J. H.; Bickley, A. A.; Bjorndal, M. T.; Blau, D. S.; Boissevain, J. G.; Bok, J. S.; Borel, H.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Brown, D. S.; Bucher, D.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Burward-Hoy, J. M.; Butsyk, S.; Camacho, C. M.; Campbell, S.; Caringi, A.; Chai, J.-S.; Chang, B. S.; Charvet, J.-L.; Chen, C.-H.; Chernichenko, S.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiba, J.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, P.; Churyn, A.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cleven, C. R.; Cobigo, Y.; Cole, B. A.; Comets, M. P.; Conesa Del Valle, Z.; Connors, M.; Constantin, P.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dahms, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danchev, I.; Das, K.; Datta, A.; David, G.; Dayananda, M. K.; Deaton, M. B.; Dehmelt, K.; Delagrange, H.; Denisov, A.; D'Enterria, D.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dharmawardane, K. V.; Dietzsch, O.; Dion, A.; Donadelli, M.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Dubey, A. K.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; Dzhordzhadze, V.; D'Orazio, L.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Egdemir, J.; Ellinghaus, F.; Emam, W. S.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Espagnon, B.; Esumi, S.; Eyser, K. O.; Fadem, B.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Forestier, B.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fujiwara, K.; Fukao, Y.; Fung, S.-Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Gadrat, S.; Garishvili, I.; Gastineau, F.; Germain, M.; Glenn, A.; Gong, H.; Gonin, M.; Gosset, J.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grim, G.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Gustafsson, H.-Å.; Hachiya, T.; Hadj Henni, A.; Haegemann, C.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hagiwara, M. N.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Han, R.; Hanks, J.; Harada, H.; Hartouni, E. P.; Haruna, K.; Harvey, M.; Haslum, E.; Hasuko, K.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Heuser, J. M.; Hiejima, H.; Hill, J. C.; Hobbs, R.; Hohlmann, M.; Holmes, M.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hornback, D.; Huang, S.; Hur, M. G.; Ichihara, T.; Ichimiya, R.; Ide, J.; Iinuma, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Inaba, M.; Inoue, Y.; Isenhower, D.; Isenhower, L.; Ishihara, M.; Isobe, T.; Issah, M.; Isupov, A.; Ivanischev, D.; Iwanaga, Y.; Jacak, B. V.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Jin, J.; Jinnouchi, O.; Johnson, B. M.; Jones, T.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kajihara, F.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kamin, J.; Kaneta, M.; Kang, J. H.; Kanou, H.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kasai, M.; Kawagishi, T.; Kawall, D.; Kawashima, M.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kelly, S.; Kempel, T.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kijima, K. M.; Kikuchi, J.; Kim, A.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.; Kim, E. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y.-J.; Kim, Y.-S.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinney, E.; Kiriluk, K.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Kiyomichi, A.; Klay, J.; Klein-Boesing, C.; Kochenda, L.; Kochetkov, V.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kozlov, A.; Král, A.; Kravitz, A.; Kroon, P. J.; Kubart, J.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurihara, N.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Le Bornec, Y.; Leckey, S.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, K.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, M. K.; Lee, T.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitner, E.; Lenzi, B.; Li, X.; Li, X. H.; Lichtenwalner, P.; Liebing, P.; Lim, H.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liška, T.; Litvinenko, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, M. X.; Love, B.; Luechtenborg, R.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Malakhov, A.; Malik, M. D.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Mao, Y.; Mašek, L.; Masui, H.; Matathias, F.; McCain, M. C.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; Means, N.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Mignerey, A. C.; Mikeš, P.; Miki, K.; Miller, T. E.; Milov, A.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mishra, G. C.; Mishra, M.; Mitchell, J. T.; Mitrovski, M.; Mohanty, A. K.; Moon, H. J.; Morino, Y.; Morreale, A.; Morrison, D. P.; Moss, J. M.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Mukhopadhyay, D.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagata, Y.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nam, S.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Nihashi, M.; Norman, B. E.; Nouicer, R.; Nyanin, A. S.; Nystrand, J.; Oakley, C.; O'Brien, E.; Oda, S. X.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Ohnishi, H.; Ojha, I. D.; Oka, M.; Okada, K.; Omiwade, O. O.; Onuki, Y.; Oskarsson, A.; Otterlund, I.; Ouchida, M.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pal, D.; Palounek, A. P. T.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, I. H.; Park, J.; Park, S. K.; Park, W. J.; Pate, S. F.; Pei, H.; Peng, J.-C.; Pereira, H.; Peresedov, V.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, R. P.; Proissl, M.; Purschke, M. L.; Purwar, A. K.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Rembeczki, S.; Reuter, M.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Romana, A.; Rosati, M.; Rosen, C. A.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Rosnet, P.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Ružička, P.; Rykov, V. L.; Ryu, S. S.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakai, S.; Sakashita, K.; Sakata, H.; Samsonov, V.; Sano, S.; Sato, H. D.; Sato, S.; Sato, T.; Sawada, S.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Semenov, A. Yu.; Semenov, V.; Seto, R.; Sharma, D.; Shea, T. K.; Shein, I.; Shevel, A.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shohjoh, T.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Skutnik, S.; Slunečka, M.; Smith, W. C.; Soldatov, A.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Sparks, N. A.; Staley, F.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stepanov, M.; Ster, A.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Sukhanov, A.; Sullivan, J. P.; Sziklai, J.; Tabaru, T.; Takagi, S.; Takagui, E. M.; Taketani, A.; Tanabe, R.; Tanaka, K. H.; Tanaka, Y.; Taneja, S.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tarján, P.; Themann, H.; Thomas, D.; Thomas, T. L.; Togawa, M.; Toia, A.; Tojo, J.; Tomášek, L.; Torii, H.; Towell, R. S.; Tram, V.-N.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Tuli, S. K.; Tydesjö, H.; Tyurin, N.; Vale, C.; Valle, H.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Vinogradov, A. A.; Virius, M.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wagner, M.; Walker, D.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Wei, F.; Wei, R.; Wessels, J.; White, S. N.; Willis, N.; Winter, D.; Wood, J. P.; Woody, C. L.; Wright, R. M.; Wysocki, M.; Xie, W.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yamaura, K.; Yang, R.; Yanovich, A.; Yasin, Z.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; You, Z.; Young, G. R.; Younus, I.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zaudtke, O.; Zhang, C.; Zhou, S.; Zimányi, J.; Zolin, L.

    2011-10-01

    The PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider has measured ω meson production via leptonic and hadronic decay channels in p+p, d+Au, Cu+Cu, and Au+Au collisions at sNN = 200 GeV. The invariant transverse momentum spectra measured in different decay modes give consistent results. Measurements in the hadronic decay channel in Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions show that ω production has a suppression pattern at high transverse momentum, similar to that of π0 and η in central collisions, but no suppression is observed in peripheral collisions. The nuclear modification factors, RAA, are consistent in Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions at similar numbers of participant nucleons.

  13. Energy dependence of pi-zero production in Cu+Cu collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 22.4, 62.4, and 200 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Adare, A; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Al-Bataineh, H; Alexander, J; Aoki, K; Aphecetche, L; Armendariz, R; Aronson, S H; Asai, J; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Bai, M; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Baldisseri, Alberto; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Basye, A T; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Baumann, C; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, A; Berdnikov, Y; Bickley, A A; Boissevain, J G; Borel, H; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Büsching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Butsyk, S; Camacho, C M; Campbell, S; Chang, B S; Chang, W C; Charvet, J L; Chernichenko, S; Chiba, J; Chi, C Y; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choudhury, R K; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Churyn, A; Cianciolo, V; Citron, Z; Cleven, C R; Cole, B A; Comets, M P; Constantin, P; Csanad, M; Csrgo, T; Dahms, T; Dairaku, S; Das, K; Dávid, G; Deaton, M B; Dehmelt, K; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; d'Enterria, D; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dietzsch, O; Dion, A; Donadelli, M; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Dubey, A K; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Dzhordzhadze, V; Efremenko, Yu V; Egdemir, J; Ellinghaus, F; Emam, W S; Engelmore, T; Enokizono, A; Enyo, H; Esumi, S; Eyser, K O; Fadem, B; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Finger, M; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Zeev; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fusayasu, T; Gadrat, S; Garishvili, I; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grosse-Perdekamp, M; Gunji, T; Gustafsson, H; Hachiya, T; Hadj Henni, A; Haegemann, C; Haggerty, J S; Hamagaki, H; Han, AR; Harada, H; Hartouni, E P; Haruna, K; Haslum, E; Hayano, R; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; He, X; Hiejima, H; Hill, J C; Hobbs, R; Hohlmann, M; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hornback, D; Huang, S; Ichihara, T; Ichimiya, R; Ikeda, Y; Imai, K; Imrek, J; Inaba, M; Inoue, Y; Isenhower, D; Isenhower, L; Ishihara, M; Isobe, T; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Ivanischev, D; Jacak, B V; Jia, J; Jin, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Kajihara, F; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kamin, J; Kaneta, M; Kang, J H; Kanou, H; Kapustinsky, J; Kawall, D; Kazantsev, A V; Khanzadeev, A; Kijima, K M; Kikuchi, J; Kim, B I; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, E; Kim, S H; Kinney, E; Kiriluk, K; Kiss, A; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Klay, J; Klein-Bösing, C; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Koster, J; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Krl, A; Kravitz, A; Kubart, J; Kunde, G J; Kurihara, N; Kurita, K; Kurosawa, M; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y S; Lai, Y S; Lajoie, J G; Layton, D; Lebedev, A; Lee, D M; Lee, K B; Lee, M K; Lee, T; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Lenzi, B; Liebing, P; Lika, T; Litvinenko, A; Liu, H; Liu, M X; Li, X; Love, B; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Malik, M D; Man'ko, V I; Mannel, E; Mao, Y; Maek, L; Masui, H; Matathias, F; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; Means, N; Meredith, B; Miake, Y; Mike, P; Miki, K; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mishra, M; Mitchell, J T; Mitrovski, M; Mohanty, A K; Morino, Y; Morreale, A; Morrison, D P; Moukhanova, T V; Mukhopadhyay, D; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagata, Y; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nagy, M I; Nakagawa, I; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Niita, T; Norman, B E; Nouicer, R; Nyanin, A S; O'Brien, E; Oda, S X; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Okada, H; Okada, K; Oka, M; Omiwade, O O; Onuki, Y; Oskarsson, A; Ouchida, M; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, J; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Pei, H; Peng, J C; Pereira, H; Peresedov, V; Peressounko, D Yu; Pinkenburg, C; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Qu, H; Rak, J; Rakotozafindrabe, A; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Rembeczki, S; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Roach, D; Roche, G; Rolnick, S D; Romana, A; Rosati, M; Rosendahl, S S E; Rosnet, P; Rukoyatkin, P; Ruika, P; Rykov, V L; Sahlmueller, B; Saitô, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakai, S; Sakashita, K; Sakata, H; Samsonov, V; Sato, S; Sato, T; Sawada, S; Sedgwick, K; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Semenov, A Yu; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Sharma, D; Shein, I; Shevel, A; Shibata, T A; Shigaki, K; Shimomura, M; Shoji, K; Shukla, P; Sickles, A; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Silvestre, C; Sim, K S; Singh, B K; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Skutnik, S; Sluneka, M; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sørensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Staley, F; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Suire, C; Sukhanov, A; Sziklai, J; Tabaru, T; Takagi, S; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tanabe, R; Tanaka, Y; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Taranenko, A; Tarjn, P; Themann, H; Thomas, T L; Togawa, M; Toia, A; Tojo, J; Tomaek, L; Tomita, Y; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tram, V-N; Tserruya, Itzhak; Tsuchimoto, Y; Vale, C; Valle, H; van Hecke, H W; Veicht, A; Velkovska, J; Vertesi, R; Vinogradov, A A; Virius, M; Vrba, V; Vznuzdaev, E; Wagner, M; Walker, D; Wang, X R; Watanabe, Y

    2008-01-01

    Neutral pion transverse momentum (pT) spectra at mid-rapidity (|y| < 0.35) were measured in Cu+Cu collisions at \\sqrt s_NN = 22.4, 62.4, and 200 GeV. Relative to pi -zero yields in p+p collisions scaled by the number of inelastic nucleon-nucleon collisions (Ncoll) at the respective energies, the pi-zero yields for pT \\ge 2 GeV/c in central Cu+Cu collisions at 62.4 and 200 GeV are suppressed, whereas an enhancement is observed at 22.4 GeV. A comparison with a jet quenching model suggests that final state parton energy loss dominates in central Cu+Cu collisions at 62.4 GeV and 200 GeV, while the enhancement at 22.4 GeV is consistent with nuclear modifications in the initial state alone.

  14. Production of omega mesons in p+p, d+Au, Cu+Cu, and Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN)=200 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Adare, A; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Al-Bataineh, H; Al-Jamel, A; Alexander, J; Angerami, A; Aoki, K; Apadula, N; Aphecetche, L; Aramaki, Y; Armendariz, R; Aronson, S H; Asai, J; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Bai, M; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Baldisseri, A; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Basye, A T; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Bauer, F; Baumann, C; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Belmont, R; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, A; Berdnikov, Y; Bhom, J H; Bickley, A A; Bjorndal, M T; Blau, D S; Boissevain, J G; Bok, J S; Borel, H; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J M; Butsyk, S; Camacho, C M; Campbell, S; Caringi, A; Chai, J -S; Chang, B S; Charvet, J -L; Chen, C -H; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J B; Choudhury, R K; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Churyn, A; Chvala, O; Cianciolo, V; Citron, Z; Cleven, C R; Cobigo, Y; Cole, B A; Comets, M P; del Valle, Z Conesa; Connors, M; Constantin, P; Csanád, M; Csörgő, T; Dahms, T; Dairaku, S; Danchev, I; Das, K; Datta, A; David, G; Dayananda, M K; Deaton, M B; Dehmelt, K; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; d'Enterria, D; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dharmawardane, K V; Dietzsch, O; Dion, A; Donadelli, M; Drachenberg, J L; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Dubey, A K; Durham, J M; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Dzhordzhadze, V; D'Orazio, L; Edwards, S; Efremenko, Y V; Egdemir, J; Ellinghaus, F; Emam, W S; Engelmore, T; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Espagnon, B; Esumi, S; Eyser, K O; Fadem, B; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Finger, M; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Forestier, B; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fung, S -Y; Fusayasu, T; Gadrat, S; Garishvili, I; Gastineau, F; Germain, M; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; de Cassagnac, R Granier; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grim, G; Perdekamp, M Grosse; Gunji, T; Gustafsson, H -Å; Hachiya, T; Henni, A Hadj; Haegemann, C; Haggerty, J S; Hagiwara, M N; Hahn, K I; Hamagaki, H; Hamblen, J; Han, R; Hanks, J; Harada, H; Hartouni, E P; Haruna, K; Harvey, M; Haslum, E; Hasuko, K; Hayano, R; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; Heuser, J M; Hiejima, H; Hill, J C; Hobbs, R; Hohlmann, M; Holmes, M; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hornback, D; Huang, S; Hur, M G; Ichihara, T; Ichimiya, R; Ide, J; Iinuma, H; Ikeda, Y; Imai, K; Inaba, M; Inoue, Y; Isenhower, D; Isenhower, L; Ishihara, M; Isobe, T; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Ivanischev, D; Iwanaga, Y; Jacak, B V; Jia, J; Jiang, X; Jin, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Jones, T; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Jumper, D S; Kajihara, F; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kamin, J; Kaneta, M; Kang, J H; Kanou, H; Kapustinsky, J; Karatsu, K; Kasai, M; Kawagishi, T; Kawall, D; Kawashima, M; Kazantsev, A V; Kelly, S; Kempel, T; Khanzadeev, A; Kijima, K M; Kikuchi, J; Kim, A; Kim, B I; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, E; Kim, E J; Kim, S H; Kim, Y -J; Kim, Y -S; Kim, Y J; Kinney, E; Kiriluk, K; Kiss, Á; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Klay, J; Klein-Boesing, C; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Koster, J; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Král, A; Kravitz, A; Kroon, P J; Kubart, J; Kunde, G J; Kurihara, N; Kurita, K; Kurosawa, M; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y S; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Bornec, Y Le; Leckey, S; Lee, D M; Lee, J; Lee, K; Lee, K B; Lee, K S; Lee, M K; Lee, T; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Leitner, E; Lenzi, B; Li, X; Li, X H; Lichtenwalner, P; Liebing, P; Lim, H; Levy, L A Linden; Liška, T; Litvinenko, A; Liu, H; Liu, M X; Love, B; Luechtenborg, R; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Malik, M D; Manko, V I; Mannel, E; Mao, Y; Mašek, L; Masui, H; Matathias, F; McCain, M C; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; Means, N; Meredith, B; Miake, Y; Mibe, T; Mignerey, A C; Mikeš, P; Miki, K; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mishra, G C; Mishra, M; Mitchell, J T; Mitrovski, M; Mohanty, A K; Moon, H J; Morino, Y; Morreale, A; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Moukhanova, T V; Mukhopadhyay, D; Murakami, T; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagata, Y; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nagy, M I; Nakagawa, I; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, K R; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Nam, S; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Nihashi, M; Norman, B E; Nouicer, R; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; Oakley, C; O'Brien, E; Oda, S X; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Oka, M; Okada, K; Omiwade, O O; Onuki, Y; Oskarsson, A; Otterlund, I; Ouchida, M; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, I H; Park, J; Park, S K; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Pei, H; Peng, J -C; Pereira, H; Peresedov, V; Peressounko, D Yu; Petti, R; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Proissl, M; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Qu, H; Rak, J; Rakotozafindrabe, A; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Rembeczki, S; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Richardson, E; Roach, D; Roche, G; Rolnick, S D; Romana, A; Rosati, M

    2011-01-01

    The PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) has measured omega meson production via leptonic and hadronic decay channels in p+p, d+Au, Cu+Cu, and Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV. The invariant transverse momentum spectra measured in different decay modes give consistent results. Measurements in the hadronic decay channel in Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions show that omega production has a suppression pattern at high transverse momentum, similar to that of pi^0 and eta in central collisions, but no suppression is observed in peripheral collisions. The nuclear modification factors, R_AA, are consistent in Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions at similar numbers of participant nucleons.

  15. Damascene patterned metal/adhesive wafer bonding for three-dimensional integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, J. Jay

    Wafer bonding of damascene patterned metal/adhesive surfaces is explored for a new three-dimensional (3D) integration technology platform. By bonding a pair of damascene patterned metal/adhesive layers, high density micron-sized vias can be formed for interconnection of fully fabricated integrated circuit (IC) dies at the wafer-level. Such via dimensions increase the areal interconnect density by at least two orders of magnitude over current package and die-stacking approaches to 3D integration. The adhesive field-dielectric produces a high critical adhesion energy bond and has the potential to produce void-free bonded interfaces. This new technology platform has been demonstrated by fabricating and characterizing inter-wafer via-chains on 200 mm diameter Si wafers. Copper and partially cured divinylsiloxane bis-benzocyclobutene (BCB) are selected as the metal and adhesive, respectively, and unit processes for this demonstration are described. Typical alignment tolerance is ˜2 mum, and baseline bonding conditions include vacuum of 5x10-4 mbar, bonding force of 10 kN, and two step bonding temperature of 250°C for 60 min followed by 350°C for 60 min. Integration issues associated with the damascene patterning and the wafer bonding processes are discussed, particularly the resulting topography of damascene patterned Cu/BCB. Cross-sectional investigation of bonded and annealed inter-wafer interconnections provides insight into the Cu-Cu and BCB-BCB bonding interfaces. Inter-wafer specific contact resistance is measured to be on the order of 10-7 O-cm 2 for these via-chains. Several material characterization techniques have been explored to evaluate partially cured BCB as an adhesive field-dielectric. To investigate the critical adhesion energy, Gc, four-point bending is utilized to compare surfaces bonded after chemical-mechanical planarization (CMP) and various post-CMP treatments. The Gc of bonded 50% partially cured BCB is measured to be in the range of 32--44 J

  16. Energy and system size dependence of phi meson production in Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    STAR Coll

    2008-10-28

    We study the beam-energy and system-size dependence of {phi} meson production (using the hadronic decay mode {phi} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}) by comparing the new results from Cu + Cu collisions and previously reported Au + Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 62.4 and 200 GeV measured in the STAR experiment at RHIC. Data presented are from midrapidity (|y| < 0.5) for 0.4 < p{sub T} < 5 GeV/c. At a given beam energy, the transverse momentum distributions for {phi} mesons are observed to be similar in yield and shape for Cu + Cu and Au + Au colliding systems with similar average numbers of participating nucleons. The {phi} meson yields in nucleus-nucleus collisions, normalized by the average number of participating nucleons, are found to be enhanced relative to those from p + p collisions with a different trend compared to strange baryons. The enhancement for {phi} mesons is observed to be higher at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV compared to 62.4 GeV. These observations for the produced {phi}(s{bar s}) mesons clearly suggest that, at these collision energies, the source of enhancement of strange hadrons is related to the formation of a dense partonic medium in high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions and cannot be alone due to canonical suppression of their production in smaller systems.

  17. A method for wafer level hermetic packaging of SOI-MEMS devices with embedded vertical feedthroughs using advanced MEMS process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mert Torunbalci, Mustafa; Emre Alper, Said; Akin, Tayfun

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents a novel, inherently simple, and low-cost fabrication and hermetic packaging method developed for SOI-MEMS devices, where a single SOI wafer is used for the fabrication of MEMS structures as well as vertical feedthroughs, while a single glass cap wafer is used for hermetic encapsulation and routing metallization. Hermetic encapsulation can be achieved either with the silicon-glass anodic or Au-Si eutectic bonding techniques. The dies sealed with anodic and Au-Si eutectic bonding provide a low vertical feedthrough resistance around 50 Ω. Glass-to-silicon anodically and Au-Si eutectic bonded seals yield a very stable cavity pressure below 10 mTorr with thin-film getters, which are measured to be stable even after 311 d. The package pressure can be adjusted from 5 mTorr to 20 Torr by using different outgassing, cavity depth, and gettering options. The packaging yield is observed to be around 64% and 84% for the anodic and Au-Si eutectic packages, respectively. The average shear strength of the anodic and eutectic packages is measured to be higher than 17 MPa and 42 MPa, respectively. Temperature cycling, high temperature storage, and ultra-high temperature shock tests result in no degradation in the hermeticity of the packaged chips, proving perfect thermal reliability.

  18. Nuclear modification factors at forward rapidity in Au Au and Cu Cu collisions at \\sqrt{s_NN} = 62.4 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Truls Martin; BRAHMS Collaboration

    2007-08-01

    Data from Au Au, Cu Cu and p p collisions at \\sqrt{s_NN}=62.4 GeV have been collected by the BRAHMS experiment from pseudorapidity η = 0 3.1. Nuclear modification factors, RAA at forward rapidity, with pT up to ~2 GeV/c, which corresponds to more than half of the kinematical limit, are presented together with results from midrapidity for Au Au and Cu Cu collisions. They will also be shown as a function of centrality.

  19. Systematic Study of Azimuthal Anisotropy in Cu$+$Cu and Au$+$Au Collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}} = 62.4$ and 200 GeV

    OpenAIRE

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Al-Jamel, A.; Alexander, J.; Aoki, K.; Aphecetche, L.; Armendariz, R. (R.); Aronson, S H; Asai, J.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.

    2014-01-01

    We have studied the dependence of azimuthal anisotropy $v_2$ for inclusive and identified charged hadrons in Au$+$Au and Cu$+$Cu collisions on collision energy, species, and centrality. The values of $v_2$ as a function of transverse momentum $p_T$ and centrality in Au$+$Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}$=200 GeV and 62.4 GeV are the same within uncertainties. However, in Cu$+$Cu collisions we observe a decrease in $v_2$ values as the collision energy is reduced from 200 to 62.4 GeV. The dec...

  20. Production of omega mesons in p+p, d+Au, Cu+Cu, and Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN)=200 GeV

    OpenAIRE

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Al-Jamel, A.; Alexander, J.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aphecetche, L.; Aramaki, Y.; Armendariz, R. (R.); Aronson, S H

    2011-01-01

    The PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) has measured omega meson production via leptonic and hadronic decay channels in p+p, d+Au, Cu+Cu, and Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV. The invariant transverse momentum spectra measured in different decay modes give consistent results. Measurements in the hadronic decay channel in Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions show that omega production has a suppression pattern at high transverse momentum, similar to that of pi^0 and e...

  1. Nuclear modification factors of phi mesons in d+Au, Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions at sqrt(S_NN)=200 GeV

    OpenAIRE

    PHENIX Collaboration; Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Alexander, J.; Al-Jamel, A.; Angerami, A.; Aoki, K.; Aphecetche, L.; Aramaki, Y.; Armendariz, R. (R.); Aronson, S H

    2010-01-01

    The PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) has performed systematic measurements of phi meson production in the K+K- decay channel at midrapidity in p+p, d+Au, Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions at sqrt(S_NN)=200 GeV. Results are presented on the phi invariant yield and the nuclear modification factor R_AA for Au+Au and Cu+Cu, and R_dA for d+Au collisions, studied as a function of transverse momentum (1

  2. Indium-free, highly transparent, flexible Cu2O/Cu/Cu2O mesh electrodes for flexible touch screen panels

    OpenAIRE

    Dong-Ju Kim; Hyo-Joong Kim; Ki-Won Seo; Ki-Hyun Kim; Tae-Wong Kim; Han-Ki Kim

    2015-01-01

    We report on an indium-free and cost-effective Cu2O/Cu/Cu2O multilayer mesh electrode grown by room temperature roll-to-roll sputtering as a viable alternative to ITO electrodes for the cost-effective production of large-area flexible touch screen panels (TSPs). By using a low resistivity metallic Cu interlayer and a patterned mesh structure, we obtained Cu2O/Cu/Cu2O multilayer mesh electrodes with a low sheet resistance of 15.1?Ohm/square and high optical transmittance of 89% as well as good...

  3. Length separation of single-walled carbon nanotubes and its impact on structural and electrical properties of wafer-level fabricated carbon nanotube-field-effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böttger, Simon; Hermann, Sascha; Schulz, Stefan E.; Gessner, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    For an industrial realization of devices based on single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNTs) such as field-effect transistors (FETs) it becomes increasingly important to consider technological aspects such as intrinsic device structure, integration process controllability as well as yield. From the perspective of a wafer-level integration technology, the influence of SWCNT length on the performance of short-channel CNT-FETs is demonstrated by means of a statistical and comparative study. Therefore, a methodological development of a length separation process based on size-exclusion chromatography was conducted in order to extract well-separated SWCNT dispersions with narrowed length distribution. It could be shown that short SWCNTs adversely affect integrability and reproducibility, underlined by a 25% decline of the integration yield with respect to long SWCNTs. Furthermore, it turns out that the significant changes in electrical performance are directly linked to a SWCNT chain formation in the transistor channel. In particular, CNT-FETs with long SWCNTs outperform reference and short SWCNTs with respect to hole mobility and subthreshold controllability by up to 300% and up to 140%, respectively. As a whole, this study provides a statistical and comparative analysis towards chain-less CNT-FETs fabricated with a wafer-level technology.

  4. Test systems of the STS-XYTER2 ASIC: from wafer-level to in-system verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasinski, Krzysztof; Zubrzycka, Weronika

    2016-09-01

    The STS/MUCH-XYTER2 ASIC is a full-size prototype chip for the Silicon Tracking System (STS) and Muon Chamber (MUCH) detectors in the new fixed-target experiment Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) at FAIR-center, Darmstadt, Germany. The STS assembly includes more than 14000 ASICs. The complicated, time-consuming, multi-step assembly process of the detector building blocks and tight quality assurance requirements impose several intermediate testing to be performed for verifying crucial assembly steps (e.g. custom microcable tab-bonding before wire-bonding to the PCB) and - if necessary - identifying channels or modules for rework. The chip supports the multi-level testing with different probing / contact methods (wafer probe-card, pogo-probes, in-system tests). A huge number of ASICs to be tested restricts the number and kind of tests possible to be performed within a reasonable time. The proposed architectures of test stand equipment and a brief summary of methodologies are presented in this paper.

  5. Charged and strange hadron elliptic flow in Cu+Cu collisions at sqrt(s)NN = 62.4 and 200 GeV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aggarwal, M.M.; Braidot, E; Mischke, A.; Peitzmann, T.; van Leeuwen, M.

    2010-01-01

    We present the results of an elliptic flow, v2, analysis of Cu+Cu collisions recorded with the solenoidal tracker detector (STAR) at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at √sNN=62.4 and 200 GeV. Elliptic flow as a function of transverse momentum, v2(pT), is reported for different collision centr

  6. Systematic Study of Azimuthal Anisotropy in Cu$+$Cu and Au$+$Au Collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}} = 62.4$ and 200~GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Adare, A; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Al-Bataineh, H; Al-Jamel, A; Alexander, J; Aoki, K; Aphecetche, L; Armendariz, R; Aronson, S H; Asai, J; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Baldisseri, A; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Bauer, F; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, Y; Bickley, A A; Bjorndal, M T; Boissevain, J G; Borel, H; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J M; Butsyk, S; Campbell, S; Chai, J -S; Chang, B S; Charvet, J -L; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Churyn, A; Cianciolo, V; Cleven, C R; Cobigo, Y; Cole, B A; Comets, M P; Constantin, P; Csanád, M; Csörgő, T; Dahms, T; Das, K; David, G; Deaton, M B; Dehmelt, K; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; d'Enterria, D; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dietzsch, O; Dion, A; Donadelli, M; Drachenberg, J L; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Dubey, A K; Durum, A; Dzhordzhadze, V; Efremenko, Y V; Egdemir, J; Ellinghaus, F; Emam, W S; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Espagnon, B; Esumi, S; Eyser, K O; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Jr., \\,; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Forestier, B; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fung, S -Y; Fusayasu, T; Gadrat, S; Garishvili, I; Gastineau, F; Germain, M; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; de Cassagnac, R Granier; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Perdekamp, M Grosse; Gunji, T; Gustafsson, H -Å; Hachiya, T; Henni, A Hadj; Haegemann, C; Haggerty, J S; Hagiwara, M N; Hamagaki, H; Han, R; Harada, H; Hartouni, E P; Haruna, K; Harvey, M; Haslum, E; Hasuko, K; Hayano, R; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; Heuser, J M; Hiejima, H; Hill, J C; Hobbs, R; Hohlmann, M; Holmes, M; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hornback, D; Huang, S; Hur, M G; Ichihara, T; Iinuma, H; Imai, K; Inaba, M; Inoue, Y; Isenhower, D; Isenhower, L; Ishihara, M; Isobe, T; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Jacak, B V; Jia, J; Jin, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Kajihara, F; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kamin, J; Kaneta, M; Kang, J H; Kanou, H; Kawagishi, T; Kawall, D; Kazantsev, A V; Kelly, S; Khanzadeev, A; Kikuchi, J; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, E; Kim, Y -S; Kinney, E; Kiss, Á; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Klay, J; Klein-Boesing, C; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Král, A; Kravitz, A; Kroon, P J; Kubart, J; Kunde, G J; Kurihara, N; Kurita, K; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y S; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Bornec, Y Le; Leckey, S; Lee, D M; Lee, M K; Lee, T; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Lenzi, B; Li, X; Li, X H; Lim, H; Liška, T; Litvinenko, A; Liu, M X; Love, B; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Malik, M D; Manko, V I; Mao, Y; Mašek, L; Masui, H; Matathias, F; McCain, M C; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; Miake, Y; Mikeš, P; Miki, K; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mishra, G C; Mishra, M; Mitchell, J T; Mitrovski, M; Morreale, A; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Moukhanova, T V; Mukhopadhyay, D; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagata, Y; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nakagawa, I; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Norman, B E; Nouicer, R; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Oda, S X; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Oka, M; Okada, K; Omiwade, O O; Oskarsson, A; Otterlund, I; Ouchida, M; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, J; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Pei, H; Peng, J -C; Pereira, H; Peresedov, V; Peressounko, D Yu; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Qu, H; Rak, J; Rakotozafindrabe, A; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Rembeczki, S; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Roche, G; Romana, A; Rosati, M; Rosendahl, S S E; Rosnet, P; Rukoyatkin, P; Rykov, V L; Ryu, S S; Sahlmueller, B; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakai, S; Sakata, H; Samsonov, V; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Sharma, D; Shea, T K; Shein, I; Shevel, A; Shibata, T -A; Shigaki, K; Shimomura, M; Shohjoh, T; Shoji, K; Sickles, A; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Silvestre, C; Sim, K S; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Skutnik, S; Slunečka, M; Smith, W C; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Staley, F; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Suire, C; Sullivan, J P; Sziklai, J; Tabaru, T; Takagi, S; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Taranenko, A; Tarján, P; Thomas, T L; Todoroki, T; Togawa, M; Toia, A; Tojo, J; Tomášek, L; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tram, V-N; Tserruya, I; Tsuchimoto, Y; Tuli, S K; Tydesjö, H; Tyurin, N; Vale, C; Valle, H; van Hecke, H W; Velkovska, J; Vértesi, R; Vinogradov, A A; Virius, M; Vrba, V; Vznuzdaev, E; Wagner, M; Walker, D; Wang, X R; Watanabe, Y; Wessels, J; White, S N; Willis, N; Winter, D; Woody, C L; Wysocki, M; Xie, W; Yamaguchi, Y L; Yanovich, A; Yasin, Z; Ying, J; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Younus, I; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zaudtke, O; Zhang, C; Zhou, S; Zimányi, J; Zolin, L

    2014-01-01

    We have studied the dependence of azimuthal anisotropy $v_2$ for inclusive and identified charged hadrons in Au$+$Au and Cu$+$Cu collisions on collision energy, species, and centrality. The values of $v_2$ as a function of transverse momentum $p_T$ and centrality in Au$+$Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}$=200~GeV and 62.4~GeV are the same within uncertainties. However, in Cu$+$Cu collisions we observe a decrease in $v_2$ values as the collision energy is reduced from 200 to 62.4~GeV. The decrease is larger in the more peripheral collisions. By examining both Au$+$Au and Cu$+$Cu collisions we find that $v_2$ depends both on eccentricity and the number of participants, $N_{\\rm part}$. We observe that $v_2$ divided by eccentricity ($\\varepsilon$) monotonically increases with $N_{\\rm part}$ and scales as ${N_{\\rm part}^{1/3}}$. The Cu$+$Cu data at 62.4 GeV falls below the other scaled $v_{2}$ data. For identified hadrons, $v_2$ divided by the number of constituent quarks $n_q$ is independent of hadron species as...

  7. Indium-free, highly transparent, flexible Cu2O/Cu/Cu2O mesh electrodes for flexible touch screen panels

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kim, Dong-Ju; Kim, Hyo-Joong; Seo, Ki-Won; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Kim, Tae-Wong; Kim, Han-Ki

    2015-01-01

    ... production of large-area flexible touch screen panels (TSPs). By using a low resistivity metallic Cu interlayer and a patterned mesh structure, we obtained Cu2O/Cu/Cu2O multilayer mesh electrodes with a low sheet resistance of 15.1...

  8. Measurement of volt-ampere characteristics of the SiPM on wafer level with setup based on the PA200 BlueRay probe station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popova, Elena; Buzhan, Pavel; Kayumov, Fred; Stifutkin, Alexey

    2017-01-01

    Setup for measurement of volt-ampere characteristics of the Silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) on wafer level consisting of the probe station PA200 BlueRay with embedded computer and SourceMeter Keithley 2400 was built. The setup is controlled by the homegrown software which allows adjustment of the measurements accuracy and speed. Firstly, complete I-V curves for a few samples of the chosen SiPM structure on the wafer are measured. Based on it the range of breakdown voltage and current level are defined which are used to correct the software settings. After that the whole wafer scan is made. The resulting I-V curves are used for SiPM selection (sorting) by current value at some predefined overvoltage (the difference between applied voltage and the breakdown one). Breakdown voltage is defined as: max ((dI/dU)/I).

  9. Analysis and wafer-level design of a high-order silicon vibration isolator for resonating MEMS devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Sang Won; Lee, Sangwoo; Perkins, Noel C.; Najafi, Khalil

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the analysis and preliminary design, fabrication, and measurement for mechanical vibration-isolation platforms especially designed for resonating MEMS devices including gyroscopes. Important parameters for designing isolation platforms are specified and the first platform (in designs with cascaded multiple platforms) is crucial for improving vibration-isolation performance and minimizing side-effects on integrated gyroscopes. This isolation platform, made from a thick silicon wafer substrate for an environment-resistant MEMS package, incorporates the functionalities of a previous design including vacuum packaging and thermal resistance with no additional resources. This platform consists of platform mass, isolation beams, vertical feedthroughs, and bonding pads. Two isolation platform designs follow from two isolation beam designs: lateral clamped-clamped beams and vertical torsion beams. The beams function simultaneously as mechanical springs and electrical interconnects. The vibration-isolation platform can yield a multi-dimensional, high-order mechanical low pass filter. The isolation platform possesses eight interconnects within a 12.2 × 12.2 mm2 footprint. The contact resistance ranges from 4-11 Ω depending on the beam design. Vibration measurements using a laser-Doppler vibrometer demonstrate that the lateral vibration-isolation platform suppresses external vibration having frequencies exceeding 2.1 kHz.

  10. Evaluation of [64Cu]Cu-DOTA and [64Cu]Cu-CB-TE2A Chelates for Targeted Positron Emission Tomography with an αvβ6-Specific Peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven H. Hausner

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Significant upregulation of the integrin αvβ6 has been described as a prognostic indicator in several cancers, making it an attractive target for tumor imaging. This study compares variants of a PEGylated αvβ6-targeting peptide, bearing either an [>18F]fluorobenzoyl prosthetic group ([18F]FBA-PEG-A20FMDV2 or different [64Cu]copper chelators (DOTA-PEG-A20FMDV2, CB-TE2A-PEG-A20FMDV2. The compounds were evaluated in vitro by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (against the integrin αvβ6 and the closely related integrin αvβ6 and by cell labeling (αvβ6-positive DX3puroβ6/αvβ6-negative DX3puro and in vivo using micro-positron emission tomography in a mouse model bearing paired DX3puroβ6/Dx3puro xenografts. In vitro, all three compounds showed excellent αvβ6-specific binding (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50](αvβ6 = 3 to g nmol/L; IC50(αvβ3 > 10 (μmol/L. In vivo, they displayed comparable, preferential uptake for the αvβ6-expressmg xenograft over the αvβ6-negative control (> 4:1 ratio at 4 hours postinjection. Whereas [64Cu]Cu-DOTA-PEG-A20FMDV2 resulted in increased levels of radioactivity in the liver, [64Cu]Cu-CB-TE2A-PEG-A20FMDV2 did not. Significantly, both 64Cu-labeled tracers showed unexpectedly high and persistent levels of radioactivity in the kidneys (> 40% injected dose/g at 4 and 12 hours postinjection. The findings underscore the potential influence of the prosthetic group on targeted in vivo imaging of clinically relevant markers such as αvβ6. Despite identical targeting peptide moiety and largely equal in vitro behavior, both 64Cu-labeled tracers displayed inferior pharmacokinetics, making them in their present form less suitable candidates than the 18F-labeled tracer for in vivo imaging of αvβ6

  11. Accelerated Wafer-Level Integrated Circuit Reliability Testing for Electromigration in Metal Interconnects with Enhanced Thermal Modeling, Structure Design, Control of Stress, and Experimental Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Chih-Ching

    Wafer-level electromigration tests have been developed recently to fulfill the need for rapid testing in integrated circuit production facilities. We have developed an improved thermal model-TEARS (Thermal Energy Accounts for the Resistance of the System) that supports these tests. Our model is enhanced by treatments for determination of the thermal conductivity of metal, K_{m}, heat sinking effects of the voltage probes and current lead terminations, and thermoelectric power. Our TEARS analysis of multi-element SWEAT (Standard Wafer-level Electromigration Acceleration Test) structures yields design criteria for the length of current injection leads and choice of voltage probe locations to isolate test units from the heat sinking effect of current lead terminations. This also provides greater insight into the current for thermal runaway. From our TEARS model and Black's equation for lifetime prediction, we have developed an algorithm for a fast and accurate control of stress in SWEAT tests. We have developed a lookup table approach for precise electromigration characterizations without complicated calculations. It decides the peak temperature in the metal, T_ {max}, and the thermal conductivity of the insulator, K_{i}, from an experimental resistance measurement at a given current. We introduce a characteristic temperature, T _{EO}, which is much simpler to use than conventional temperature coefficient of the electrical resistivity of metal for calibration and transfer of calibration data of metallic films as their own temperature sensors. The use of T_{EO} also allows us to establish system specifications for a desirable accuracy in temperature measurement. Our experimental results are the first to show the effects of series elemental SWEAT units on the system failure distribution, spatial failure distribution in SWEAT structures, and bimodal distributions for straight-line structures. The adaptive approach of our TEARS based SWEAT test decides the value of Black

  12. Highly improved resistive switching performances of the self-doped Pt/HfO2:Cu/Cu devices by atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sen; Wang, Wei; Li, QingJiang; Zhao, XiaoLong; Li, Nan; Xu, Hui; Liu, Qi; Liu, Ming

    2016-12-01

    Metal-oxide electrochemical metallization (ECM) memory is a promising candidate for the next generation nonvolatile memory. But this memory suffers from large dispersion of resistive switching parameters due to the intrinsic randomness of the conductive filament. In this work, we have proposed a self-doping approach to improve the resistive switching characteristics. The fabricated Pt/HfO2:Cu/Cu device shows outstanding nonvolatile memory properties, including high uniformity, good endurance, long retention and fast switching speed. The results demonstrate that the self-doping approach is an effective method to improve the metal-oxide ECM memory performances and the self-doped Pt/HfO2:Cu/Cu device has high potentiality for the nonvolatile memory applications in the future.

  13. Co-Design Method and Wafer-Level Packaging Technique of Thin-Film Flexible Antenna and Silicon CMOS Rectifier Chips for Wireless-Powered Neural Interface Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabe, Kenji; Jeewan, Horagodage Prabhath; Yamagiwa, Shota; Kawano, Takeshi; Ishida, Makoto; Akita, Ippei

    2015-12-16

    In this paper, a co-design method and a wafer-level packaging technique of a flexible antenna and a CMOS rectifier chip for use in a small-sized implantable system on the brain surface are proposed. The proposed co-design method optimizes the system architecture, and can help avoid the use of external matching components, resulting in the realization of a small-size system. In addition, the technique employed to assemble a silicon large-scale integration (LSI) chip on the very thin parylene film (5 μm) enables the integration of the rectifier circuits and the flexible antenna (rectenna). In the demonstration of wireless power transmission (WPT), the fabricated flexible rectenna achieved a maximum efficiency of 0.497% with a distance of 3 cm between antennas. In addition, WPT with radio waves allows a misalignment of 185% against antenna size, implying that the misalignment has a less effect on the WPT characteristics compared with electromagnetic induction.

  14. Co-Design Method and Wafer-Level Packaging Technique of Thin-Film Flexible Antenna and Silicon CMOS Rectifier Chips for Wireless-Powered Neural Interface Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Okabe

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a co-design method and a wafer-level packaging technique of a flexible antenna and a CMOS rectifier chip for use in a small-sized implantable system on the brain surface are proposed. The proposed co-design method optimizes the system architecture, and can help avoid the use of external matching components, resulting in the realization of a small-size system. In addition, the technique employed to assemble a silicon large-scale integration (LSI chip on the very thin parylene film (5 μm enables the integration of the rectifier circuits and the flexible antenna (rectenna. In the demonstration of wireless power transmission (WPT, the fabricated flexible rectenna achieved a maximum efficiency of 0.497% with a distance of 3 cm between antennas. In addition, WPT with radio waves allows a misalignment of 185% against antenna size, implying that the misalignment has a less effect on the WPT characteristics compared with electromagnetic induction.

  15. Centrality and rapidity dependence of particle ratios in Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions at \\sqrt{s_NN} = 62.4 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsene, I. C.; BRAHMS Collaboration

    2009-06-01

    We report on preliminary identified particle ratios from Au+Au collisions at \\sqrt{s_NN} = 62.4 GeV in different centrality classes, measured with the BRAHMS spectrometer. Results from Cu+Cu and p+p collisions at mid-rapidity at the same energy are also included. The average transverse momenta of particle spectra, anti-particle to particle ratios and K/π ratios dependence on centrality and rapidity are shown and discussed.

  16. Centrality and rapidity dependence of particle ratios in Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 62.4 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Arsene, Ionut

    2009-01-01

    We report on preliminary identified particle ratios from Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}} = 62.4$ GeV in different centrality classes, measured with the BRAHMS spectrometer. Results from Cu+Cu and p+p collisions at mid-rapidity at the same energy are also included. The average transverse momenta of particle spectra, anti-particle to particle ratios and $K/\\pi$ ratios dependence on centrality and rapidity are shown and discussed.

  17. In situ quantitative study of microstructural evolution at the interface of Sn3.0Ag0.5Cu/Cu solder joint during solid state aging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hailong [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); An, Rong, E-mail: anr@hit.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Micro-systems and Micro-structures Manufacturing, Harbin Institute of Technology, Ministry of Education, Harbin 150080 (China); Wang, Chunqing; Jiang, Zhi [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Cu dissolution during reflowing was mainly occurred under the gaps between scallops. • Though IMC growth was diffusion-controlled, consumption of Cu substrate was not. • Growth of Cu{sub 3}Sn layer in Sn3.0Ag0.5Cu/Cu solder joint was on the both sides. • Ag and Cu lead to a thinner Cu{sub 3}Sn layer due to inhibit the diffusion of Sn into Cu. - Abstract: In situ microstructural evolution at the interface of Sn3.0Ag0.5Cu/Cu solder joint during solid state aging was quantitatively studied by nanoindentation. The morphology of Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} gradually altered from scallop type to layer type. Though the growth of IMCs was diffusion-controlled, the consumption of Cu substrate was not linear with the square root of aging time. At the initial stage of solid state aging, the Cu atoms essential to the growth of IMCs were mainly from the supersaturated solder matrix. When the Cu atoms from supersaturated solder matrix were exhausted, the Cu atoms for the growth of IMCs were primarily from the Cu substrate. In addition, the IMCs formed at this state were principally used to fill up the gaps between scallops. After the gaps disappeared, the consumption of Cu substrate slowed down. Furthermore, the growth of Cu{sub 3}Sn layer in Sn3.0Ag0.5Cu/Cu solder joint was on the both sides with layer type. Since the Sn atoms were inhibited to diffuse into the Cu substrate by the alloying elements of Ag and Cu, the thickness of Cu{sub 3}Sn layer in SnAgCu/Cu solder joint was much thinner than that in pure Sn/Cu solder joint.

  18. Mechanical Behavior of Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu/Cu Solder Joints After Isothermal Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Van Luong; Chung, Chin-Sung; Kim, Ho-Kyung

    2016-01-01

    The tensile impact behavior of lead-free Sn-3Ag-0.5Cu/Cu solder joints aged at 413 K and 453 K for times ranging from 24 h to 1000 h has been investigated in this study. The activation energy for growth of the intermetallic compound (IMC) layer was estimated and compared with literature values. Additionally, the tensile strength of solder joints with IMC thickness of 17.6 μm was found to be more sensitive to the strain rate as compared with solder joints with thinner IMC layers. Equations representing the relationships among the effective stress, strain rate, aging time, and aging temperature as well as IMC thickness were established using matrix laboratory (MATLAB) software. These equations show that the tensile strength decreases with increase in the IMC thickness to about 8 μm, after which it becomes nearly constant when the IMC thickness is between approximately 8 μm and 14 μm, before decreasing significantly when the IMC thickness exceeds 14 μm. The main reason for these characteristics was excessive increase in the IMC thickness of solder joints, causing a change in the stress concentration of the tensile load from the protruding region to the inside of the IMC layer at the same tested strain rate.

  19. Microwave-assisted hydrothermal synthesis of Cu/Cu2O hollow spheres with enhanced photocatalytic and gas sensing activities at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Xinwei; Fan, Huiqing; Tian, Yuming; Zhang, Mingang; Yan, Xiaoyan

    2015-05-01

    Cu/Cu2O nano-heterostructure hollow spheres with a submicron diameter (200-500 nm) were prepared by a microwave-assisted hydrothermal method using Cu(OAc)2·H2O, PVP and ascorbic acid solution as the precursors. The morphology of the products could evolve with the hydrothermal time from solid spheres to thick-shell hollow spheres, then to thin-shell hollow spheres, and finally to nanoparticles. Moreover, the content of Cu in the products could be controlled by adjusting the hydrothermal time. The spontaneous forming of the hollow structure spheres was found to result from the Ostwald ripening effect during the low temperature (100 °C) hydrothermal reaction process. The photocatalytic degradation activities on MO under visible-light irradiation and the gas sensing activities toward the oxidizing NO2 gas of different Cu/Cu2O nano-heterostructure hollow spheres were investigated. As a result, the Cu/Cu2O nano-heterostructure hollow spheres obtained at the hydrothermal time of 30 min, with a rough/porous thin-shell structure and a Cu content of about 10.5 wt%, exhibited the best photocatalytic and gas sensing performances compared with others.

  20. Synthesis of core-shell heterostructured Cu/Cu2O nanowires monitored by in situ XRD as efficient visible-light photocatalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Core-shell heterostructured Cu/Cu2O nanowires with a high aspect ratio were synthesized from Cu foam using a novel oxidation/reduction process. In situ XRD was used as an efficient tool to acquire phase transformation details during the temperature-programmed oxidation of Cu foam and the subsequent reduction process. Based on knowledge of the crucial phase transformation, optimal synthesis conditions for producing high-quality CuO and core-shell Cu/Cu2O nanowires were determined. In favor of efficient charge separation induced by the special core-shell heterostructure and the advanced three-dimensional spatial configuration, Cu/Cu2O nanowires exhibited superior visible-light activity in the degradation of methylene blue. The present study illustrates a novel strategy for fabricating efficiently core-shell heterostructured nanowires and provides the potential for developing their applications in electronic devices, for environmental remediation and in solar energy utilization fields. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  1. A Novel Wafer Level Package Technology for SAW Devices%一种声表面波器件的新型晶圆级封装技术

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冷俊林; 杨静; 毛海燕; 杨正兵; 汤旭东; 余欢; 杨增涛; 董姝; 伍平

    2011-01-01

    Many drawbacks in the traditional package technology of SAW devices were summarized in this paper. To overcome these drawbacks. A novel wafer level package technology for SAW devices using a kind of dry organic film was presented. Through this technology, laminating process, exposing process and developing process were operated twice respectively before the wafer slice. The experimental results showed that the wet organic film which absorbed acoustic waves could act as sound absorption material without adding mass load on IDTs. Far out rejection, uniformity and reliability of the product were improved. This technology had a broad application prospects in package technology for SAW devices.%总结了声表面波(SAW)器件传统封装技术中存在的问题,提出了一种SAW器件新型晶圆级封装技术.采用一种有机物干膜,分别经两次压膜、曝光和显影完成了对SAW芯片在划片前的封装,并用实验进行了验证.实验结果表明,本技术具有在不改变叉指换能器( IDT)质量负载的情况下同时具备吸声的功能,改善器件的带外抑制能力,增强了产品的一致性和可靠性.本技术在SAW器件的封装方面有广阔的应用前景.

  2. Microstructural Evolution of SAC305 Solder Joints in Wafer Level Chip-Scale Packaging (WLCSP) with Continuous and Interrupted Accelerated Thermal Cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Quan; Zhou, Bite; Lee, Tae-Kyu; Bieler, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Four high-strain design wafer level chip scale packages were given accelerated thermal cycling with a 10°C/min ramp rate and 10 min hold times between 0°C and 100°C to examine the effects of continuous and interrupted thermal cycling on the number of cycles to failure. The interruptions given two of the samples were the result of periodic examinations using electron backscattered pattern mapping, leading to room temperature aging of 30 days-2.5 years after increments of about 100 cycles at several stages of the cycling history. The continuous thermal cycling resulted in solder joints with a much larger degree of recrystallization, whereas the interrupted thermal cycling tests led to much less recrystallization, which was more localized near the package side, and the crack was more localized near the interface and had less branching. The failure mode for both conditions was still the same, with cracks nucleating along the high angle grain boundaries formed during recrystallization. In conditions where there were few recrystallized grains, recovery led to formation of subgrains that strengthened the solder, and the higher strength led to a larger driving force for crack growth through the solder, leading to failure after less than half of the cycles in the continuous accelerated thermal cycling condition. This work shows that there is a critical point where sufficient strain energy accumulation will trigger recrystallization, but this point depends on the rate of strain accumulation in each cycle and various recovery processes, which further depends on local crystal orientations, stress state evolution, and specific activated slip and twinning systems.

  3. Cu/Cu2O/CuO nanoparticles: Novel synthesis by exploding wire technique and extensive characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahai, Anshuman; Goswami, Navendu; Kaushik, S. D.; Tripathi, Shilpa

    2016-12-01

    In this article, we explore potential of Exploding Wire Technique (EWT) to synthesize the copper nanoparticles using the copper metal in a plate and wire geometry. Rietveld refinement of X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern of prepared material indicates presence of mixed phases of copper (Cu) and copper oxide (Cu2O). Agglomerates of copper and copper oxide comprised of ∼20 nm average size nanoparticles observed through high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) and energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) spectroscopy. Micro-Raman (μR) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopies of prepared nanoparticles reveal existence of additional minority CuO phase, not determined earlier through XRD and TEM analysis. μR investigations vividly reveal cubic Cu2O and monoclinic CuO phases based on the difference of space group symmetries. In good agreement with μRaman analysis, FTIR stretching modes corresponding to Cu2-O and Cu-O were also distinguished. Investigations of μR and FTIR vibrational modes are in accordance and affirm concurrence of CuO phases besides predominant Cu and Cu2O phase. Quantum confinement effects along with increase of band gaps for direct and indirect optical transitions of Cu/Cu2O/CuO nanoparticles are reflected through UV-vis (UV-vis) spectroscopy. Photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy spots the electronic levels of each phase and optical transitions processes occurring therein. Iterative X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) fitting of core level spectra of Cu (2p3/2) and O (1s), divulges presence of Cu2+ and Cu+ in the lattice with an interesting evidence of O deficiency in the lattice structure and surface adsorption. Magnetic analysis illustrates that the prepared nanomaterial demonstrates ferromagnetic behaviour at room temperature.

  4. Fabrication of electrodeposited Ni-Cu/Cu multilayered films and study of their nanostructures before and after annealing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Kazeminezhad

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available  In this work electrodeposited Ni-Cu/Cu metallic multilayered films with different thicknesses of Ni and Cu were prepared on (100 polycrystalline Cu substrates. The nanostructure of the multilayers was studied using XRD. The existence of satellite peaks in the XRD patterns showed that the multilayered films have superlattice structures. The difference between the intensity of ML(200 and ML(111 peaks showed that the multilayers have a strong texture of (100 as their substrate structures which confirms the epitaxial growth. The morphology of the films was studied by SEM. The SEM images showed that the surface of the films is rough. The samples were also analyzed using EDX and the results showed that the real content of Ni is less than its nominal content this refers to the current efficiency which is less than unity due to hydrogen evolution. In the second stage of the work some identical samples which have the highest order of satellite peaks were electrodeposited. The samples were annealed at different temperatures and times. Their structures were then studied by XRD. The XRD patterns of the annealed samples showed that if the temperature and time of annealing increase, the satellite peaks begin to disappear. It means by increasing these two parameters, the sharpness of the bilayer interface decreases and the multilayered structure tends to become alloy structure. The morphology of the samples was also studied by SEM. The SEM images showed that the surface of the annealed films becomes approximately uniform due to the diffusion of Ni and Cu atoms to Cu and Ni layers, respectively.

  5. Determination of the some electronic parameters of nanostructure copper selenide and Cu/Cu{sub 3}Se{sub 2}/n-GaAs/In structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Güzeldir, B.; Sağlam, M. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Atatürk University, 25240 Erzurum (Turkey); Ateş, A. [Department of Material Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Natural Sciences, Yıldırım Beyazıt University, Ankara (Turkey); Türüt, A. [Department of Physics Engineering, Faculty of Sciences, Istanbul Medeniyet University, 34000 Istanbul (Turkey)

    2015-04-05

    Highlights: • Introducing to a new degree of freedom in the control of effective barrier height by using Cu. • We want to experimentally observe whether or not the diode continues the ideality in the temperature range of 60–400 K. • We have modified the Richardson’s plot using the temperature dependent values of effective area of the patches. - Abstract: The nanostructure copper selenide thin film has been grown on n-type gallium arsenide substrate by Successive Ionic Layer Adsorption and Reaction (SILAR) method. The film has been characterized by X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) measurements. X-ray diffraction analysis of the film confirms a polycrystalline with preferred orientation. The AFM and SEM micrographs of the film reveal smooth and uniform surface pattern without any dark pits, pinholes and microcracks. The Cu/Cu{sub 3}Se{sub 2}/n-GaAs/In structure has been thermally formed in evaporating system after the SILAR process. The electrical analysis of Cu/Cu{sub 3}Se{sub 2}/n-GaAs/In structure has been investigated by means of current–voltage (I–V) measurements in the temperature range of 60–400 K in dark conditions. The values of barrier height (BH) and ideality factor (n) ranged from 0.21 eV and 4.97 (60 K) to 0.83 eV and 1.14 (400 K), respectively. In the calculations, the electrical parameters of the experimental forward bias I–V characteristics of the Cu/Cu{sub 3}Se{sub 2}/n-GaAs/In with the homogeneity in the 60–400 K range have been explained by means of the thermionic emission (TE), considering Gaussian distribution (GD) of BH with linear bias dependence.

  6. Titulações potenciométricas de cátions metálicos tendo como eletrodo indicador o sistema Cu/Cu(II-EDTA Potentiometric titrations of metal cations with edta using the Cu/Cu(II-EDTA system as indicator electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo H. Pereira da Silva

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In potentiometric titrations of metal cations with EDTA the Hg/HgY2- system is usually used to detect the end point. However, the use of mercury has been discouraged in analytical procedures due to its toxicity. In this work the Cu/CuY2- system was used as indicator electrode for potentiometric titrations of some metal cations with EDTA. The solutions of Cu2+, Cd2+, Mn2+, Co2+ and Zn2+ were titrated with Na2EDTA solution in the presence of a small concentration of the CuY2- complex using a copper wire as indicator electrode. The potentiometric titrations with the Cu/CuY2- system showed good correlation when compared with an Hg/HgY2- system.

  7. Centrality Dependence of Charged Hadron Spectra at Forward Rapidities in Cu+Cu Collisions at √ {SNN} = 200\\ GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekele, Selemon

    We present preliminary results for Cu+Cu collisions at √ {SNN} = 200\\ GeV at the BRAHMS experiment from charged hadron spectra and nuclear modification factors as a function of centrality and pseudo-rapidity. Deviations from binary scaling at intermediate and high-pT reveal themselves as a suppression in the transverse momentum distribution of produced particles. The observed suppression depends on the volume of the interaction region through which produced hadrons have to travel. While there is still significant suppression, Rcp seems to depend very little on pseudo-rapidity.

  8. Design of Cu-Cu2O/g-C3N4 nanocomponent photocatalysts for hydrogen evolution under visible light irradiation using water-soluble Erythrosin B dye sensitization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Piyong; Wang, Tingting; Zeng, Heping

    2017-01-01

    Cu-Cu2O nanoparticles (NPs) decorated porous graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) (Cu-Cu2O/g-C3N4) photocatalysts were prepared. When investment of copper source materials in the experiment increased to 7 wt%, the highest H2 evolution rate (400 μmol g-1 h-1) was obtained under visible light irradiation in triethanolamine solution. This is about triple of pure g-C3N4 (140 μmol g-1 h-1). Moreover, various amount of Erythrosin B dye was added into Cu-Cu2O/g-C3N4 photoreaction solution and a significant enhancement of H2 production rate was achieved. The highest H2 production rate was 5000 μmol g-1 h-1 with 5 mg Erythrosin B in photoreaction system. Erythrosin B dye sensitized Cu-Cu2O/g-C3N4 presented stable photocatalytic H2 evolution ability and no noticeable degradation or change of photocatalyst were detected after six recycles. A possible photocatalytic mechanism of Erythrosin B dye sensitized Cu-Cu2O/g-C3N4 for the enhancement of photocatalytic H2 evolution is proposed.

  9. Centrality dependence of pT spectra for identified hadrons in Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions at √SNN=200 GeV

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The centrality dependence of transverse momentum spectra for identified hadrons at midrapidity in Au+Au collisions at √SNN=200GeV is systematically studied in a quark combination model.The pT spectra of π±,K±,P(p-)and A(A)in different centrality bins and the nuclear modification factors(Rcp)for these hadrons are calculated.The centrality dependence of the average collective transverse velocity(β(r)) for the hot and dense quark matter is obtained in Au+An collisions,and it is applied to a relative smaller Cu+Cu collision system.The centrality dependence of pT spectra and the Rcp for π0,K0/s and A in Cu+Cu collisions at √SNN=200 GeV are well described.The results show that(β(r))is only a function of the number of participants Npart and it is independent of the collision system.

  10. Synthesis of Cu/Cu2O nanoparticles by laser ablation in deionized water and their annealing transformation into CuO nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Gondal, M. A.

    2013-08-01

    Nano-structured Cupric Oxide (CuO) has been synthesized using pulsed laser ablation of pure copper in water using Q-switched pulsed laser beam of 532 nm wavelength and, 5 nanosecond pulse duration and laser pulse energy of 100 mJ/pulse. In the initial unannealed colloidal suspension, the nanoparticles of Copper (Cu) and Cuprious oxide (Cu2O) were identified. Further the suspension was dried and annealed at different temperatures and we noticed the product (Cu/Cu2O) was converted predominantly into CuO at annealing temperature of 300 \\'C for 3 hours. As the annealing temperature was raised from 300 to 900 \\'C, the grain sizes of CuO reduced to the range of 9 to 26 nm. The structure and the morphology of the prepared samples were investigated using X-ray diffraction and Transmission Electron Microscope. Photoluminescence and UV absorption spectrometrystudies revealed that the band gap and other optical properties of nano-structured CuO were changed due to post annealing. Fourier transform spectrometry also confirmed the transformation of Cu/Cu2O into CuO. Copyright © 2013 American Scientific Publishers All rights reserved.

  11. Nuclear modification factors of phi mesons in d+Au, Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions at sqrt(S_NN)=200 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Adare, A; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Al-Bataineh, H; Alexander, J; Al-Jamel, A; Angerami, A; Aoki, K; Aphecetche, L; Aramaki, Y; Armendariz, R; Aronson, S H; Asai, J; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Bai, M; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Baldisseri, A; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Basye, A T; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Bauer, F; Baumann, C; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Belmont, R; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, A; Berdnikov, Y; Bhom, J H; Bickley, A A; Bjorndal, M T; Blau, D S; Boissevain, J G; Bok, J S; Borel, H; Borggren, N; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J M; Butsyk, S; Campbell, S; Caringi, A; Cassano, N; Chai, J -S; Chang, B S; Charvet, J -L; Chen, C -H; Chernichenko, S; Chiba, J; Chi, C Y; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J B; Choudhury, R K; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Churyn, A; Chvala, O; Cianciolo, V; Citron, Z; Cleven, C R; Cobigo, Y; Cole, B A; Comets, M P; del Valle, Z Conesa; Connors, M; Constantin, P; Csanad, M; Csorgo, T; Dahms, T; Dairaku, S; Danchev, I; Das, K; Datta, A; David, G; Dayananda, M K; Deaton, M B; Dehmelt, K; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; d'Enterria, D; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dharmawardane, K V; Dietzsch, O; Dion, A; Donadelli, M; Orazio, L D; Drachenberg, J L; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Dubey, A K; Durham, J M; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Dzhordzhadze, V; Edwards, S; Efremenko, Y V; Egdemir, J; Ellinghaus, F; Emam, W S; Engelmore, T; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Espagnon, B; Esumi, S; Eyser, K O; Fadem, B; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Finger, M; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Forestier, B; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fung, S -Y; Fusayasu, T; Gadrat, S; Garishvili, I; Gastineau, F; Germain, M; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; de Cassagnac, R Granier; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grim, G; Perdekamp, M Grosse; Gunji, T; Gustafsson, H -A; Hachiya, T; Henni, A Hadj; Haegemann, C; Haggerty, J S; Hagiwara, M N; Hahn, K I; Hamagaki, H; Hamblen, J; Hanks, J; Han, R; Harada, H; Hartouni, E P; Haruna, K; Harvey, M; Haslum, E; Hasuko, K; Hayano, R; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; Heuser, J M; He, X; Hiejima, H; Hill, J C; Hobbs, R; Hohlmann, M; Holmes, M; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hornback, D; Huang, S; Hur, M G; Ichihara, T; Ichimiya, R; Iinuma, H; Ikeda, Y; Imai, K; Inaba, M; Inoue, Y; Isenhower, D; Isenhower, L; Ishihara, M; Isobe, T; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Ivanischev, D; Iwanaga, Y; Jacak, B V; Jia, J; Jiang, X; Jin, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Jones, T; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Jumper, D S; Kajihara, F; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kamin, J; Kaneta, M; Kang, J H; Kanou, H; Kapustinsky, J; Karatsu, K; Kasai, M; Kawagishi, T; Kawall, D; Kawashima, M; Kazantsev, A V; Kelly, S; Kempel, T; Khanzadeev, A; Kijima, K M; Kikuchi, J; Kim, A; Kim, B I; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, E J; Kim, E; Kim, Y -J; Kim, Y -S; Kinney, E; Kiss, A; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Klay, J; Klein-Boesing, C; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Koster, J; Kotchetkov, D; Kotov, D; Kozlov, A; Kral, A; Kravitz, A; Kroon, P J; Kubart, J; Kunde, G J; Kurihara, N; Kurita, K; Kurosawa, M; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y S; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Le Bornec, Y; Leckey, S; Lee, D M; Lee, J; Lee, K B; Lee, K S; Lee, M K; Lee, T; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Lenzi, B; Lichtenwalner, P; Liebing, P; Lim, H; Levy, L A Linden; Liska, T; Litvinenko, A; Liu, H; Liu, M X; Li, X; Li, X H; Love, B; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Malik, M D; Manko, V I; Mannel, E; Mao, Y; Masek, L; Masui, H; Matathias, F; McCain, M C; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; Means, N; Meredith, B; Miake, Y; Mibe, T; Mignerey, A C; Mikes, P; Miki, K; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mishra, G C; Mishra, M; Mitchell, J T; Mitrovski, M; Mohanty, A K; Moon, H J; Morino, Y; Morreale, A; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Moukhanova, T V; Mukhopadhyay, D; Murakami, T; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagata, Y; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nagy, M I; Nakagawa, I; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, K R; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Nam, S; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Nihashi, M; Norman, B E; Nouicer, R; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; Oakley, C; O'Brien, E; Oda, S X; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Okada, K; Oka, M; Omiwade, O O; Onuki, Y; Oskarsson, A; Otterlund, I; Ouchida, M; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, I H; Park, J; Park, S K; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Pei, H; Peng, J -C; Pereira, H; Peresedov, V; Peressounko, D Yu; Petti, R; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Proissl, M; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Qu, H; Rak, J; Rakotozafindrabe, A; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Rembeczki, S; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Richardson, E; Roach, D; Roche, G; Rolnick, S D; Romana, A; Rosati, M; Rosen, C A; Rosendahl, S S E; Rosnet, P; Rukoyatkin, P; Ruzicka, P; Rykov, V L

    2010-01-01

    The PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) has performed systematic measurements of phi meson production in the K+K- decay channel at midrapidity in p+p, d+Au, Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions at sqrt(S_NN)=200 GeV. Results are presented on the phi invariant yield and the nuclear modification factor R_AA for Au+Au and Cu+Cu, and R_dA for d+Au collisions, studied as a function of transverse momentum (1

  12. Characterization of MEMS-on-tube assembly: reflow bonding of borosilicate glass (Duran ®) tubes to silicon substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mogulkoc, B.; Jansen, H.V.; Berenschot, J.W.; Brake, ter H.J.M.; Knowles, K.M.; Elwenspoek, M.C.

    2009-01-01

    Reflow bonding of borosilicate glass tubes to silicon wafers is a technology which has significant potential for microfluidic applications. The borosilicate glass tubes are designed to be used as an interface and package for wafer-level microfluidic devices. The strength of the resulting package has

  13. PMMA to SU-8 Bonding for Polymer Based Lab-on -a-chip Systems with Integrated Optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Bjarne

    2003-01-01

    An adhesive bonding technique for wafer-level sealing of SU-8 based lab-on-a-chip microsystems with integrated optical components is presented. Microfluidic channels and optical components, e.g. waveguides, are fabricated in cross-linked SU-8 and sealed with a Pyrex glass substrate by means...

  14. Pseudorapidity and pt dependence of identified-particle azimuthal flow for √sNN=200 GeV Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhukova, Victoria

    2008-10-01

    The observation of a strong azimuthal flow signature at RHIC suggests rapid system equilibration leading to an almost perfect fluid state. The longitudinal extent of the flow behavior depends on the formation dynamics for this state and can be studied by measuring the pseudorapidity dependence of the second Fourier component (v2) of the azimuthal angular distribution. We report on a measurement of identified-particle v2 as a function of pt (0.5-2.0 GeV/c), centrality (0-50%), and pseudorapidity (0BRAHMS spectrometers for particle identification (π, K, p) and the BRAHMS global detectors to determine the corresponding reaction-plane angles. Preliminary results for the Au+Au system have been reported earlier. Here we compare the final Au+Au results to new results obtained for the Cu+Cu system.

  15. In-situ synthesis of AgCu/Cu{sub 2}O nanocomposite by mechanical alloying: The effect of the processing on the thermal behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gingu, Oana [University of Craiova, Department IMST, 1st Calugareni, 220037 Drobeta Turnu Severin (Romania); Rotaru, P., E-mail: protaru@central.ucv.ro [University of Craiova, Department of Physics, 13 A.I. Cuza Street, 200585 Craiova (Romania); Milea, A.; Marin, A. [Institute of Physical Chemistry “Ilie Murgulescu” of the Romanian Academy, 202 Splaiul Independentei, P.O. Box 194, 060021 Bucharest (Romania); Nicolicescu, C.; Sima, Gabriela [University of Craiova, Department IMST, 1st Calugareni, 220037 Drobeta Turnu Severin (Romania); Tanasescu, Speranta [Institute of Physical Chemistry “Ilie Murgulescu” of the Romanian Academy, 202 Splaiul Independentei, P.O. Box 194, 060021 Bucharest (Romania)

    2015-04-20

    TG heating curves for Ag–Cu samples vs. the milling time, recorded during the heating. The samples’ mass variation is strongly dependent on the powders’ specific surface, respectively the milling time. - Highlights: • AgCu bimetallic composites reinforced by Cu{sub 2}O has been studied. • The milling time influences the particle size distribution of the particles. • The thermal behavior of the mixtures has been studied by TG and DSC, in argon. • Correlation of thermal stability with thermal expansion properties was made. - Abstract: The influence of the mechanical alloying processing parameters on the elaboration of AgCu-based bimetallic matrix composites reinforced by in-situ synthesized Cu{sub 2}O has been studied. The milling time (20, 45 and 80 h) of the initial 72% mass Ag + 28% mass Cu micrometric powders mixture influences the particle size distribution of the obtained composite particles. After 80 h of mechanical alloying, AgCu/Cu{sub 2}O nanoparticles of 60–80 nm are obtained and their chemical composition at bulk/surface level has been determined by X-ray diffraction and photoelectron spectroscopy. The effect of milling time on the thermal behavior of the powders samples has been studied by thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry measurements in argon atmosphere. The argon chemosorbtive reaction from the particles surface has been identified and the binding energy (0.9–1.99 eV) has been calculated. The isothermal drop calorimetry and the linear thermal expansion measurements were used to evaluate the correlation between thermal stability and thermal expansion properties of the in-situ synthesized AgCu/Cu{sub 2}O nanocomposite.

  16. MEMS packaging with etching and thinning of lid wafer to form lids and expose device wafer bond pads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanchani, Rajen; Nordquist, Christopher; Olsson, Roy H; Peterson, Tracy C; Shul, Randy J; Ahlers, Catalina; Plut, Thomas A; Patrizi, Gary A

    2013-12-03

    In wafer-level packaging of microelectromechanical (MEMS) devices a lid wafer is bonded to a MEMS wafer in a predermined aligned relationship. Portions of the lid wafer are removed to separate the lid wafer into lid portions that respectively correspond in alignment with MEMS devices on the MEMS wafer, and to expose areas of the MEMS wafer that respectively contain sets of bond pads respectively coupled to the MEMS devices.

  17. MEMS packaging with etching and thinning of lid wafer to form lids and expose device wafer bond pads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chanchani, Rajen; Nordquist, Christopher; Olsson, Roy H; Peterson, Tracy C; Shul, Randy J; Ahlers, Catalina; Plut, Thomas A; Patrizi, Gary A

    2013-12-03

    In wafer-level packaging of microelectromechanical (MEMS) devices a lid wafer is bonded to a MEMS wafer in a predermined aligned relationship. Portions of the lid wafer are removed to separate the lid wafer into lid portions that respectively correspond in alignment with MEMS devices on the MEMS wafer, and to expose areas of the MEMS wafer that respectively contain sets of bond pads respectively coupled to the MEMS devices.

  18. $J/\\psi$ production at low $p_T$ in Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}$ = 200 GeV at STAR

    CERN Document Server

    Adamczyk, L; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Alford, J; Anson, C D; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E C; Averichev, G S; Balewski, J; Banerjee, A; Barnovska, Z; Beavis, D R; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai, P; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Borowski, W; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Brovko, S G; Bültmann, S; Bunzarov, I; Burton, T P; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Sánchez, M Calderón de la Barca; Cebra, D; Cendejas, R; Cervantes, M C; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, L; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Chwastowski, J; Codrington, M J M; Corliss, R; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Cui, X; Das, S; Leyva, A Davila; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; de Souza, R Derradi; Dhamija, S; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Ding, F; Djawotho, P; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Engelage, J; Engle, K S; Eppley, G; Eun, L; Evdokimov, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Fedorisin, J; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Gagliardi, C A; Gangadharan, D R; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Gliske, S; Grosnick, D; Guo, Y; Gupta, A; Gupta, S; Guryn, W; Haag, B; Hajkova, O; Hamed, A; Han, L-X; Haque, R; Harris, J W; Hays-Wehle, J P; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Horvat, S; Huang, B; Huang, H Z; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jang, H; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kalinkin, D; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kesich, A; Khan, Z H; Kikola, D P; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konzer, J; Koralt, I; Korsch, W; Kotchenda, L; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kulakov, I; Kumar, L; Kycia, R A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; Leight, W; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, W; Li, X; Li, Y; Li, Z M; Lima, L M; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Don, D M M D Madagodagettige; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; McShane, T S; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, D A; Munhoz, M G; Mustafa, M K; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nogach, L V; Noh, S Y; Novak, J; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Ohlson, A; Okorokov, V; Oldag, E W; Oliveira, R A N; Pachr, M; Page, B S; Pal, S K; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlak, T; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Plyku, D; Poljak, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Pruthi, N K; Przybycien, M; Pujahari, P R; Qiu, H; Quintero, A; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Riley, C K; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Ross, J F; Roy, A; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandacz, A; Sandweiss, J; Sangaline, E; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, W B; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shanmuganathan, P V; Shao, M; Sharma, B; Shen, W Q; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Singaraju, R N; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, D; Smirnov, N; Solanki, D; Sorensen, P; deSouza, U G; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stevens, J R; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Suaide, A A P; Sumbera, M; Sun, X; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Svirida, D N; Symons, T J M; de Toledo, A Szanto; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarnowsky, T; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Trzeciak, B A; Tsai, O D; Turnau, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vanfossen,, J A; Varma, R; Vasconcelos, G M S; Vasiliev, A N; Vertesi, R; Videbæk, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Vossen, A; Wada, M; Walker, M; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y F; Xiao, Z; Xie, W; Xin, K; Xu, H; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Y; Xu, Z; Yan, W; Yang, C; Yang, Y; Ye, Z; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Zawisza, Y; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang,; Zhang, J B; Zhang, S; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, F; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhu, X; Zhu, Y H; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2013-01-01

    The $J/\\psi$ $p_T$ spectrum and nuclear modification factor ($R_{\\textit{AA}}$) are reported for $p_T < 5$ GeV/c and $|y|<1$ from 0-60% central Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}} =200$ GeV at STAR. A significant suppression of $p_T$-integrated $J/\\psi$ production is observed in central Au+Au events, with less suppression observed in Cu+Cu. The $p_T$ dependence of the $R_{\\textit{AA}}$ is observed to increase at a higher $p_T$ region. The data are compared with the previously published RHIC results. Comparing with model calculations, it is found that the invariant yields at low $p_T$ are significantly above hydrodynamic flow predictions but are consistent with models that include color screening and regeneration.

  19. Rapidity and centrality dependence of particle production for identified hadrons in Cu + Cu collisions at √{sNN }=200 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsene, I. C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beavis, D.; Bekele, S.; Besliu, C.; Budick, B.; Bøggild, H.; Chasman, C.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Dalsgaard, H. H.; Debbe, R.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Hagel, K.; Ito, H.; Jipa, A.; Johnson, E. B.; Jørgensen, C. E.; Karabowicz, R.; Katrynska, N.; Kim, E. J.; Larsen, T. M.; Lee, J. H.; Løvhøiden, G.; Majka, Z.; Murray, M. J.; Natowitz, J.; Nielsen, B. S.; Nygaard, C.; Pal, D.; Qviller, A.; Rami, F.; Ristea, C.; Ristea, O.; Röhrich, D.; Sanders, S. J.; Staszel, P.; Tveter, T. S.; Videbæk, F.; Wada, R.; Yang, H.; Yin, Z.; Zgura, I. S.; Brahms Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The BRAHMS collaboration has measured transverse momentum spectra of pions, kaons, protons, and antiprotons at rapidities 0 and 3 for Cu+Cu collisions at √{sNN}=200 GeV. As the collisions become more central the collective radial flow increases while the temperature of kinetic freeze-out decreases. The temperature is lower and the radial flow weaker at forward rapidity. Pion and kaon yields with transverse momenta between 1.5 and 2.5 GeV /c are suppressed for central collisions relative to scaled p +p collisions. This suppression, which increases as the collisions become more central, is consistent with jet quenching models and is also present with comparable magnitude at forward rapidity. At such rapidities, initial state effects may also be present and persistence of the meson suppression to high rapidity may reflect a combination of jet quenching and nuclear shadowing. The ratio of protons to mesons increases as the collisions become more central and is largest at forward rapidities.

  20. Perpendicular Growth Characteristics of Cu-Sn Intermetallic Compounds at the Surface of 99Sn-1Cu/Cu Solder Interconnects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhiwen; Liu, Changqing; Wu, Yiping; An, Bing

    2015-12-01

    The growth of intermetallic compounds (IMCs) on the free surface of 99Sn-1Cu solder joints perpendicular to the interdiffusion direction has been investigated in this work. The specimens were specifically designed and polished to reveal a flat free surface at the solder/Cu interface for investigation. After aging at 175°C for progressively increased durations, the height of the perpendicular IMCs was examined and found to follow a parabolic law with aging duration that could be expressed as y = 0.11√ t, where t is the aging duration in hours and y is the height of the perpendicular IMCs in μm. For comparison, the planar growth of IMCs along the interdiffusion direction was also investigated in 99Sn-1Cu/Cu solder joints. After prolonged aging at 175°C, the thickness of the planar interfacial IMC layers also increased parabolically with aging duration and could be expressed as h_{{IMC}} = 0.27√ t + 4.6, where h is the thickness in μm and t is the time in hours. It was found that both the planar and perpendicular growth of the IMCs were diffusion-controlled processes, but the perpendicular growth of the IMCs was much slower than their planar growth due to the longer diffusion distance. It is proposed that Cu3Sn forms prior to the formation of Cu6Sn5 in the perpendicular IMCs, being the reverse order compared with the planar IMC growth.

  1. Rapidity and centrality dependence of particle production for identified hadrons in Cu+Cu collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}} = 200$ GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Arsene, I C; Beavis, D; Bekele, S; Besliu, C; Budick, B; Bøggild, H; Chasman, C; Christensen, C H; Christiansen, P; Dalsgaard, H H; Debbe, R; Gaardhøje, J J; Hagel, K; Ito, H; Jipa, A; Johnson, E B; Jørgensen, C E; Karabowicz, R; Katrynska, N; Kim, E J; Larsen, T M; Lee, J H; Løvhøiden, G; Majka, Z; Murray, M J; Natowitz, J; Nielsen, B S; Nygaard, C; Pal, D; Qviller, A; Rami, F; Ristea, C; Ristea, O; Rohrich, D; Sanders, S J; Stazel, P; Tveter, T S; Videbæk, F; Wada, R; Yang, H; Yin, Z; Zgura, I S

    2016-01-01

    The BRAHMS collaboration has measured transverse momentum spectra of pions, kaons, protons and antiprotons at rapidities 0 and 3 for Cu+Cu collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}} = 200$ GeV. As the collisions become more central the collective radial flow increases while the temperature of kinetic freeze-out decreases. The temperature is lower and the radial flow weaker at forward rapidity. Pion and kaon yields with transverse momenta between 1.5 and 2.5 GeV/c are suppressed for central collisions relative to scaled $p+p$ collisions. This suppression, which increases as the collisions become more central is consistent with jet quenching models and is also present with comparable magnitude at forward rapidity. At such rapidities initial state effects may also be present and persistence of the meson suppression to high rapidity may reflect a combination of jet quenching and nuclear shadowing. The ratio of protons to mesons increases as the collisions become more central and is largest at forward rapidities.

  2. Interfacial Phenomena in Al/Al, Al/Cu, and Cu/Cu Joints Soldered Using an Al-Zn Alloy with Ag or Cu Additions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pstruś, Janusz; Gancarz, Tomasz

    2014-05-01

    The studies of soldered joints were carried out in systems: Al/solder/Al, Al/solder/Cu, Cu/solder/Cu, where the solder was (Al-Zn)EUT, (Al-Zn)EUT with 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 at.% of Ag and (Al-Zn)EUT with 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 at.% of Cu addition. Brazing was performed at 500 °C for 3 min. The EDS analysis indicated that the composition of the layers starting from the Cu pad was CuZn, Cu5Zn8, and CuZn4, respectively. Wetting tests were performed at 500 °C for 3, 8, 15, and 30 min, respectively. Thickness of the layers and their kinetics of growth were measured based on the SEM micrographs. The formation of interlayers was not observed from the side of Al pads. On the contrary, dissolution of the Al substrate and migration of Al-rich particles into the bulk of the solder were observed.

  3. Exposure studies of core-shell Fe/Fe(3)O(4) and Cu/CuO NPs to lettuce (Lactuca sativa) plants: Are they a potential physiological and nutritional hazard?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo-Reyes, J; Majumdar, S; Botez, C E; Peralta-Videa, J R; Gardea-Torresdey, J L

    2014-02-28

    Iron and copper nanomaterials are widely used in environmental remediation and agriculture. However, their effects on physiological parameters and nutritional quality of terrestrial plants such as lettuce (Lactuca sativa) are still unknown. In this research, 18-day-old hydroponically grown lettuce seedlings were treated for 15 days with core-shell nanoscale materials (Fe/Fe(3)O(4), Cu/CuO) at 10 and 20mg/L, and FeSO(4)·7H(2)O and CuSO(4)·5H(2)O at 10mg/L. At harvest, Fe, Cu, micro and macronutrients were determined by ICP-OES. Also, we evaluated chlorophyll content, plant growth, and catalase (CAT) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) activities. Our results showed that iron ions/NPs did not affect the physiological parameters with respect to water control. Conversely, Cu ions/NPs reduced water content, root length, and dry biomass of the lettuce plants. ICP-OES results showed that nano-Cu/CuO treatments produced significant accumulation of Cu in roots compared to the CuSO(4)·5H(2)O treatment. In roots, all Cu treatments increased CAT activity but decreased APX activity. In addition, relative to the control, nano-Cu/CuO altered the nutritional quality of lettuce, since the treated plants had significantly more Cu, Al and S but less Mn, P, Ca, and Mg. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Measurement of $K_S^0$ and $K^{*0}$ in $p$$+$$p$, $d$$+$Au, and Cu$+$Cu collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}=200$ GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Adare, A; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Akimoto, R; Al-Bataineh, H; Alexander, J; Alfred, M; Angerami, A; Aoki, K; Apadula, N; Aphecetche, L; Aramaki, Y; Armendariz, R; Aronson, S H; Asai, J; Asano, H; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Bai, M; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Baldisseri, A; Bandara, N S; Bannier, B; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Basye, A T; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Baumann, C; Bazilevsky, A; Beaumier, M; Beckman, S; Belikov, S; Belmont, R; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, A; Berdnikov, Y; Bhom, J H; Bickley, A A; Black, D; Blau, D S; Boissevain, J G; Bok, J; Bok, J S; Borel, H; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Bryslawskyj, J; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Butsyk, S; Campbell, S; Caringi, A; Chang, B S; Charvet, J -L; Chen, C -H; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J B; Choudhury, R K; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Churyn, A; Chvala, O; Cianciolo, V; Citron, Z; Cleven, C R; Cole, B A; Comets, M P; del Valle, Z Conesa; Connors, M; Constantin, P; Csanád, M; Csörgő, T; Dahms, T; Dairaku, S; Danchev, I; Das, K; Datta, A; Daugherity, M S; David, G; Dayananda, M K; Deaton, M B; DeBlasio, K; Dehmelt, K; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; d'Enterria, D; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dharmawardane, K V; Dietzsch, O; Ding, L; Dion, A; Do, J H; Donadelli, M; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Dubey, A K; Durham, J M; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Dzhordzhadze, V; D'Orazio, L; Edwards, S; Efremenko, Y V; Egdemir, J; Ellinghaus, F; Emam, W S; Engelmore, T; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Eyser, K O; Fadem, B; Feege, N; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Jr., \\,; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fusayasu, T; Gadrat, S; Gal, C; Gallus, P; Garg, P; Garishvili, I; Ge, H; Giordano, F; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; de Cassagnac, R Granier; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grim, G; Perdekamp, M Grosse; Gu, Y; Gunji, T; Guragain, H; Gustafsson, H -Å; Hachiya, T; Henni, A Hadj; Haegemann, C; Haggerty, J S; Hahn, K I; Hamagaki, H; Hamblen, J; Han, R; Han, S Y; Hanks, J; Harada, H; Hartouni, E P; Haruna, K; Hasegawa, S; Haslum, E; Hayano, R; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; Hiejima, H; Hill, J C; Hobbs, R; Hohlmann, M; Hollis, R S; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hornback, D; Hoshino, T; Huang, S; Ichihara, T; Ichimiya, R; Iinuma, H; Ikeda, Y; Imai, K; Imazu, Y; Inaba, M; Inoue, Y; Iordanova, A; Isenhower, D; Isenhower, L; Ishihara, M; Isobe, T; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Ivanischev, D; Ivanishchev, D; Iwanaga, Y; Jacak, B V; Jeon, S J; Jezghani, M; Jia, J; Jiang, X; Jin, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Jones, T; Joo, E; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Jumper, D S; Kajihara, F; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kamin, J; Kaneta, M; Kang, J H; Kang, J S; Kanou, H; Kapustinsky, J; Karatsu, K; Kasai, M; Kawall, D; Kawashima, M; Kazantsev, A V; Kempel, T; Key, J A; Khachatryan, V; Khanzadeev, A; Kihara, K; Kijima, K M; Kikuchi, J; Kim, A; Kim, B I; Kim, C; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, E; Kim, E -J; Kim, H -J; Kim, M; Kim, Y -J; Kim, Y K; Kinney, E; Kiss, Á; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Klatsky, J; Klay, J; Klein-Boesing, C; Kleinjan, D; Kline, P; Koblesky, T; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Kofarago, M; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Koster, J; Kotchetkov, D; Kotov, D; Kozlov, A; Král, A; Kravitz, A; Kubart, J; Kunde, G J; Kurihara, N; Kurita, K; Kurosawa, M; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y S; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Lee, D M; Lee, J; Lee, K B; Lee, K S; Lee, M K; Lee, S H; Lee, T; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Leitgab, M; Lenzi, B; Li, X; Lichtenwalner, P; Liebing, P; Lim, S H; Levy, L A Linden; Liška, T; Litvinenko, A; Liu, H; Liu, M X; Love, B; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Makek, M; Malakhov, A; Malik, M D; Manion, A; Manko, V I; Mannel, E; Mao, Y; Mašek, L; Masui, H; Matathias, F; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; McGlinchey, D; McKinney, C; Means, N; Meles, A; Mendoza, M; Meredith, B; Miake, Y; Mibe, T; Mignerey, A C; Mikeš, P; Miki, K; Miller, A J; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mishra, D K; Mishra, M; Mitchell, J T; Mitrovski, M; Miyasaka, S; Mizuno, S; Mohanty, A K; Montuenga, P; Moon, H J; Moon, T; Morino, Y; Morreale, A; Morrison, D P; Moukhanova, T V; Mukhopadhyay, D; Murakami, T; Murata, J; Mwai, A; Nagamiya, S; Nagata, Y; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nagy, M I; Nakagawa, I; Nakagomi, H; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, K R; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Nam, S; Nattrass, C; Netrakanti, P K; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Nihashi, M; Niida, T; Norman, B E; Nouicer, R; Novitzky, N; Nyanin, A S; Oakley, C; O'Brien, E; Oda, S X; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Oka, M; Okada, K; Omiwade, O O; Onuki, Y; Koop, J D Orjuela; Oskarsson, A; Ouchida, M; Ozaki, H; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, I H; Park, J; Park, S; Park, S K; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Patel, L; Patel, M; Pei, H; Peng, J -C; Pereira, H

    2014-01-01

    The PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider has performed a systematic study of $K_S^0$ and $K^{*0}$ meson production at midrapidity in $p$$+$$p$, $d$$+$Au, and Cu$+$Cu collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}=200$ GeV. The $K_S^0$ and $K^{*0}$ mesons are reconstructed via their $K_S^0 \\rightarrow \\pi^0(\\rightarrow \\gamma\\gamma)\\pi^0(\\rightarrow\\gamma\\gamma)$ and $K^{*0} \\rightarrow K^{\\pm}\\pi^{\\mp}$ decay modes, respectively. The measured transverse-momentum spectra are used to determine the nuclear modification factor of $K_S^0$ and $K^{*0}$ mesons in $d$$+$Au and Cu$+$Cu collisions at different centralities. In the $d$$+$Au collisions, the nuclear modification factor of $K_S^0$ and $K^{*0}$ mesons is almost constant as a function of transverse momentum and is consistent with unity showing that cold-nuclear-matter effects do not play a significant role in the measured kinematic range. In Cu$+$Cu collisions, within the uncertainties no nuclear modification is registered in peripheral collisions. In c...

  5. 泡沫镍负载 Cu/CuO 微纳结构的制备及其对抗坏血酸的检测研究%Synthesis of Ni Foam-Modified Cu/CuO Micro/Nanostructures and Their Application in AA Detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨彩凤; 秦丽溶; 赵建伟; 贾小亚

    2015-01-01

    利用水热法制备了高电活性的泡沫镍负载Cu/CuO微纳结构 ,形貌与成分分析表明 ,该电极材料从内到外共包含泡沫镍基体、Cu微米颗粒层和CuO纳米结构层三层结构 .电化学测试发现该复合材料在碱性介质中对抗坏血酸具有很好的电催化氧化特性 ,其灵敏度达到6.14 mA/(mmol/L · cm2 ) ,探测范围为1~2.5 mmol/L .%Cu/CuO micro/nanostructures were fabricated on the surface of porous Ni foam by the hydro-thermal method .The products were characterized by XRD ,SEM and EDS .The results revealed that the materials produced were composed of three parts :the Ni foam ,the Cu microparticles and CuO nanostruc-tures .Electrochemical analysis showed that this composite material displayed excellent electrochemical sensitivity and rapid response in detecting AA (ascorbic acid) in an alkaline medium .The sensitivity of the biosensor was found to be 6 .14 mA/(mmol/L · cm2 ) .The linear range for the detection was 1.0 μmol/L to 2.5 mmol/L .

  6. Integration of robust fluidic interconnects using metal to glass anodic bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briand, Danick; Weber, Patrick; de Rooij, Nicolaas F.

    2005-09-01

    This paper reports on the encapsulation of a piezoresistive silicon/Pyrex liquid flow sensor using metal to glass anodic bonding. The bonding technique allowed integrating robust metallic microfluidic interconnects and eliminating the use of glue and O-rings. The bonding parameters of a silicon/Pyrex/metal triple stack were chosen to minimize the residual stress and to obtain a strong and liquid tight bonding interface. The silicon/Pyrex liquid flow sensor was successfully bonded to metallic plates of Kovar and Alloy 42, on which tubes were fixed and a printed circuit board (PCB) was integrated. A post-bonding annealing procedure was developed to reduce the residual bonding stress. The characteristics of the encapsulated liquid flow sensor, such as the temperature coefficient of sensitivity, fulfilled the specifications. Wafer level packaging using metal to glass anodic bonding was considered to reduce the packaging size and cost.

  7. A new manufacture process of Cu-CuNi fine thermocouple%铜-康铜微细热电偶制作新工艺

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周艳; 孙兴华; 钱北行

    2012-01-01

    热电偶是航天器真空热试验中应用最广泛的温度传感器,它的制作工艺决定了其产品的质量和可靠性.文章以铜-康铜微细热电偶的制作工艺为例,提出并实现了一种在惰性气体保护条件下利用高压放电技术进行热电偶焊接制作的工艺方法.这种方法具有操作简单、成品率高的特点,极大提高了热电偶的制作效率,并且解决了热电偶制作过程中因氧化而引入第三种材质的问题.%The thermocouple is the most widely used temperature sensor in the vacuum thermal tests of spacecraft. Its manufacturing process directly affects the product quality and reliability. Taking the manufacturing process of Cu-CuNi fine thermocouple as an example, this paper proposes and has realized a new method to complete the welding of thermocouple by the high-pressure discharge technique under the protection of inert gas. This method is characterized by easier operation and higher rate of acceptability, which greatly improves the efficiency of thermocouple's manufacturing. Besides, the problem of introducing another material during the manufacturing process is avoided.

  8. Colloidal synthesis of Cu-ZnO and Cu@CuNi-ZnO hybrid nanocrystals with controlled morphologies and multifunctional properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Deqian; Gong, Pingyun; Chen, Yuanzhi; Zhang, Qinfu; Xie, Qingshui; Peng, Dong-Liang

    2016-06-02

    Metal-semiconductor hybrid nanocrystals have received extensive attention owing to their multiple functionalities which can find wide technological applications. The utilization of low-cost non-noble metals to construct novel metal-semiconductor hybrid nanocrystals is important and meaningful for their large-scale applications. In this study, a facile solution approach is developed for the synthesis of Cu-ZnO hybrid nanocrystals with well-controlled morphologies, including nanomultipods, core-shell nanoparticles, nanopyramids and core-shell nanowires. In the synthetic strategy, Cu nanocrystals formed in situ serve as seeds for the heterogeneous nucleation and growth of ZnO, and it eventually forms various Cu-ZnO hetero-nanostructures under different reaction conditions. These hybrid nanocrystals possess well-defined and stable heterostructure junctions. The ultraviolet-visible-near infrared spectra reveal morphology-dependent surface plasmon resonance absorption of Cu and the band gap absorption of ZnO. Furthermore, we construct a novel Cu@CuNi-ZnO ternary hetero-nanostructure by incorporating the magnetic metal Ni into the pre-synthesized colloidal Cu nanocrystals. Such hybrid nanocrystals possess a magnetic Cu-Ni intermediate layer between the ZnO shell and the Cu core, and exhibit ferromagnetic/superparamagnetic properties which expand their functionalities. Finally, enhanced photocatalytic activities are observed in the as-prepared non-noble metal-ZnO hybrid nanocrystals. This study not only provides an economical way to prepare high-quality morphology-controlled Cu-ZnO hybrid nanocrystals for potential applications in the fields of photocatalysis and photovoltaic devices, but also opens up new opportunities in designing ternary non-noble metal-semiconductor hybrid nanocrystals with multifunctionalities.

  9. Multimodal Somatostatin Receptor Theranostics Using [64Cu]Cu-/[177Lu]Lu-DOTA-(Tyr3)octreotate and AN-238 in a Mouse Pheochromocytoma Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullrich, Martin; Bergmann, Ralf; Peitzsch, Mirko; Zenker, Erik F.; Cartellieri, Marc; Bachmann, Michael; Ehrhart-Bornstein, Monika; Block, Norman L.; Schally, Andrew V.; Eisenhofer, Graeme; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Pietzsch, Jens; Ziegler, Christian G.

    2016-01-01

    Pheochromocytomas and extra-adrenal paragangliomas (PHEO/PGLs) are rare catecholamine-producing chromaffin cell tumors. For metastatic disease, no effective therapy is available. Overexpression of somatostatin type 2 receptors (SSTR2) in PHEO/PGLs promotes interest in applying therapies using somatostatin analogs linked to radionuclides and/or cytotoxic compounds, such as [177Lu]Lu-DOTA-(Tyr3)octreotate (DOTATATE) and AN-238. Systematic evaluation of such therapies for the treatment of PHEO/PGLs requires sophisticated animal models. In this study, the mouse pheochromocytoma (MPC)-mCherry allograft model showed high tumor densities of murine SSTR2 (mSSTR2) and high tumor uptake of [64Cu]Cu-DOTATATE. Using tumor sections, we assessed mSSTR2-specific binding of DOTATATE, AN-238, and somatostatin-14. Therapeutic studies showed substantial reduction of tumor growth and tumor-related renal monoamine excretion in tumor-bearing mice after treatment with [177Lu]Lu-DOTATATE compared to AN-238 and doxorubicin. Analyses did not show agonist-dependent receptor downregulation after single mSSTR2-targeting therapies. This study demonstrates that the MPC-mCherry model is a uniquely powerful tool for the preclinical evaluation of SSTR2-targeting theranostic applications in vivo. Our findings highlight the therapeutic potential of somatostatin analogs, especially of [177Lu]Lu-DOTATATE, for the treatment of metastatic PHEO/PGLs. Repeated treatment cycles, fractionated combinations of SSTR2-targeting radionuclide and cytotoxic therapies, and other adjuvant compounds addressing additional mechanisms may further enhance therapeutic outcome. PMID:27022413

  10. Carbon Supported Oxide-Rich Pd-Cu Bimetallic Electrocatalysts for Ethanol Electrooxidation in Alkaline Media Enhanced by Cu/CuOx

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zengfeng Guo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Different proportions of oxide-rich PdCu/C nanoparticle catalysts were prepared by the NaBH4 reduction method, and their compositions were tuned by the molar ratios of the metal precursors. Among them, oxide-rich Pd0.9Cu0.1/C (Pd:Cu = 9:1, metal atomic ratio exhibits the highest electrocatalytic activity for ethanol oxidation reaction (EOR in alkaline media. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM confirmed the existence of both Cu and CuOx in the as-prepared Pd0.9Cu0.1/C. About 74% of the Cu atoms are in their oxide form (CuO or Cu2O. Besides the synergistic effect of Cu, CuOx existed in the Pd-Cu bimetallic nanoparticles works as a promoter for the EOR. The decreased Pd 3d electron density disclosed by XPS is ascribed to the formation of CuOx and the spill-over of oxygen-containing species from CuOx to Pd. The low Pd 3d electron density will decrease the adsorption of CH3COads intermediates. As a result, the electrocatalytic activity is enhanced. The onset potential of oxide-rich Pd0.9Cu0.1/C is negative shifted 150 mV compared to Pd/C. The oxide-rich Pd0.9Cu0.1/C also exhibited high stability, which indicated that it is a candidate for the anode of direct ethanol fuel cells (DEFCs.

  11. Impact of 5% NaCl Salt Spray Pretreatment on the Long-Term Reliability of Wafer-Level Packages with Sn-Pb and Sn-Ag-Cu Solder Interconnects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bo; Lee, Tae-Kyu; Liu, Kuo-Chuan

    2011-10-01

    Understanding the sensitivity of Pb-free solder joint reliability to various environmental conditions, such as corrosive gases, low temperatures, and high-humidity environments, is a critical topic in the deployment of Pb-free products in various markets and applications. The work reported herein concerns the impact of a marine environment on Sn-Pb and Sn-Ag-Cu interconnects. Both Sn-Pb and Sn-Ag-Cu solder alloy wafer-level packages, with and without pretreatment by 5% NaCl salt spray, were thermally cycled to failure. The salt spray test did not reduce the characteristic lifetime of the Sn-Pb solder joints, but it did reduce the lifetime of the Sn-Ag-Cu solder joints by over 43%. Although both materials showed strong resistance to corrosion, the localized nature of the corroded area at critical locations in the solder joint caused significant degradation in the Sn-Ag-Cu solder joints. The mechanisms leading to these results as well as the extent, microstructural evolution, and dependency of the solder alloy degradation are discussed.

  12. Colloidal synthesis of Cu-ZnO and Cu@CuNi-ZnO hybrid nanocrystals with controlled morphologies and multifunctional properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Deqian; Gong, Pingyun; Chen, Yuanzhi; Zhang, Qinfu; Xie, Qingshui; Peng, Dong-Liang

    2016-06-01

    Metal-semiconductor hybrid nanocrystals have received extensive attention owing to their multiple functionalities which can find wide technological applications. The utilization of low-cost non-noble metals to construct novel metal-semiconductor hybrid nanocrystals is important and meaningful for their large-scale applications. In this study, a facile solution approach is developed for the synthesis of Cu-ZnO hybrid nanocrystals with well-controlled morphologies, including nanomultipods, core-shell nanoparticles, nanopyramids and core-shell nanowires. In the synthetic strategy, Cu nanocrystals formed in situ serve as seeds for the heterogeneous nucleation and growth of ZnO, and it eventually forms various Cu-ZnO hetero-nanostructures under different reaction conditions. These hybrid nanocrystals possess well-defined and stable heterostructure junctions. The ultraviolet-visible-near infrared spectra reveal morphology-dependent surface plasmon resonance absorption of Cu and the band gap absorption of ZnO. Furthermore, we construct a novel Cu@CuNi-ZnO ternary hetero-nanostructure by incorporating the magnetic metal Ni into the pre-synthesized colloidal Cu nanocrystals. Such hybrid nanocrystals possess a magnetic Cu-Ni intermediate layer between the ZnO shell and the Cu core, and exhibit ferromagnetic/superparamagnetic properties which expand their functionalities. Finally, enhanced photocatalytic activities are observed in the as-prepared non-noble metal-ZnO hybrid nanocrystals. This study not only provides an economical way to prepare high-quality morphology-controlled Cu-ZnO hybrid nanocrystals for potential applications in the fields of photocatalysis and photovoltaic devices, but also opens up new opportunities in designing ternary non-noble metal-semiconductor hybrid nanocrystals with multifunctionalities.Metal-semiconductor hybrid nanocrystals have received extensive attention owing to their multiple functionalities which can find wide technological applications

  13. Wafer-level microstructuring of glassy carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hans, Loïc. E.; Prater, Karin; Kilchoer, Cédric; Scharf, Toralf; Herzig, Hans Peter; Hermerschmidt, Andreas

    2014-03-01

    Glassy carbon is used nowadays for a variety of applications because of its mechanical strength, thermal stability and non-sticking adhesion properties. One application is glass molding that allows to realize high resolution diffractive optical elements on large areas and at affordable price appropriate for mass production. We study glassy carbon microstructuring for future precision compression molding of low and high glass-transition temperature. For applications in optics the uniformity, surface roughness, edge definition and lateral resolution are very important parameters for a stamp and the final product. We study different methods of microstructuring of glassy carbon by etching and milling. Reactive ion etching with different protection layers such as photoresists, aluminium and titanium hard masks have been performed and will be compare with Ion beam etching. We comment on the quality of the structure definition and give process details as well as drawbacks for the different methods. In our fabrications we were able to realize optically flat diffractive structures with slope angles of 80° at typical feature sizes of 5 micron and 700 nm depth qualified for high precision glass molding.

  14. Enhancements of thermal conductivities with Cu, CuO, and carbon nanotube nanofluids and application of MWNT/water nanofluid on a water chiller system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Minsheng; Lin, Mark Chingcheng; Wang, Chichuan

    2011-04-05

    In this study, enhancements of thermal conductivities of ethylene glycol, water, and synthetic engine oil in the presence of copper (Cu), copper oxide (CuO), and multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT) are investigated using both physical mixing method (two-step method) and chemical reduction method (one-step method). The chemical reduction method is, however, used only for nanofluid containing Cu nanoparticle in water. The thermal conductivities of the nanofluids are measured by a modified transient hot wire method. Experimental results show that nanofluids with low concentration of Cu, CuO, or carbon nanotube (CNT) have considerably higher thermal conductivity than identical base liquids. For CuO-ethylene glycol suspensions at 5 vol.%, MWNT-ethylene glycol at 1 vol.%, MWNT-water at 1.5 vol.%, and MWNT-synthetic engine oil at 2 vol.%, thermal conductivity is enhanced by 22.4, 12.4, 17, and 30%, respectively. For Cu-water at 0.1 vol.%, thermal conductivity is increased by 23.8%. The thermal conductivity improvement for CuO and CNT nanofluids is approximately linear with the volume fraction. On the other hand, a strong dependence of thermal conductivity on the measured time is observed for Cu-water nanofluid. The system performance of a 10-RT water chiller (air conditioner) subject to MWNT/water nanofluid is experimentally investigated. The system is tested at the standard water chiller rating condition in the range of the flow rate from 60 to 140 L/min. In spite of the static measurement of thermal conductivity of nanofluid shows only 1.3% increase at room temperature relative to the base fluid at volume fraction of 0.001 (0.1 vol.%), it is observed that a 4.2% increase of cooling capacity and a small decrease of power consumption about 0.8% occur for the nanofluid system at a flow rate of 100 L/min. This result clearly indicates that the enhancement of cooling capacity is not just related to thermal conductivity alone. Dynamic effect, such as nanoparticle dispersion

  15. Enhancements of thermal conductivities with Cu, CuO, and carbon nanotube nanofluids and application of MWNT/water nanofluid on a water chiller system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Minsheng; Lin, Mark Chingcheng; Wang, Chichuan

    2011-12-01

    In this study, enhancements of thermal conductivities of ethylene glycol, water, and synthetic engine oil in the presence of copper (Cu), copper oxide (CuO), and multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT) are investigated using both physical mixing method (two-step method) and chemical reduction method (one-step method). The chemical reduction method is, however, used only for nanofluid containing Cu nanoparticle in water. The thermal conductivities of the nanofluids are measured by a modified transient hot wire method. Experimental results show that nanofluids with low concentration of Cu, CuO, or carbon nanotube (CNT) have considerably higher thermal conductivity than identical base liquids. For CuO-ethylene glycol suspensions at 5 vol.%, MWNT-ethylene glycol at 1 vol.%, MWNT-water at 1.5 vol.%, and MWNT-synthetic engine oil at 2 vol.%, thermal conductivity is enhanced by 22.4, 12.4, 17, and 30%, respectively. For Cu-water at 0.1 vol.%, thermal conductivity is increased by 23.8%. The thermal conductivity improvement for CuO and CNT nanofluids is approximately linear with the volume fraction. On the other hand, a strong dependence of thermal conductivity on the measured time is observed for Cu-water nanofluid. The system performance of a 10-RT water chiller (air conditioner) subject to MWNT/water nanofluid is experimentally investigated. The system is tested at the standard water chiller rating condition in the range of the flow rate from 60 to 140 L/min. In spite of the static measurement of thermal conductivity of nanofluid shows only 1.3% increase at room temperature relative to the base fluid at volume fraction of 0.001 (0.1 vol.%), it is observed that a 4.2% increase of cooling capacity and a small decrease of power consumption about 0.8% occur for the nanofluid system at a flow rate of 100 L/min. This result clearly indicates that the enhancement of cooling capacity is not just related to thermal conductivity alone. Dynamic effect, such as nanoparticle dispersion

  16. Enhancements of thermal conductivities with Cu, CuO, and carbon nanotube nanofluids and application of MWNT/water nanofluid on a water chiller system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Mark

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this study, enhancements of thermal conductivities of ethylene glycol, water, and synthetic engine oil in the presence of copper (Cu, copper oxide (CuO, and multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT are investigated using both physical mixing method (two-step method and chemical reduction method (one-step method. The chemical reduction method is, however, used only for nanofluid containing Cu nanoparticle in water. The thermal conductivities of the nanofluids are measured by a modified transient hot wire method. Experimental results show that nanofluids with low concentration of Cu, CuO, or carbon nanotube (CNT have considerably higher thermal conductivity than identical base liquids. For CuO-ethylene glycol suspensions at 5 vol.%, MWNT-ethylene glycol at 1 vol.%, MWNT-water at 1.5 vol.%, and MWNT-synthetic engine oil at 2 vol.%, thermal conductivity is enhanced by 22.4, 12.4, 17, and 30%, respectively. For Cu-water at 0.1 vol.%, thermal conductivity is increased by 23.8%. The thermal conductivity improvement for CuO and CNT nanofluids is approximately linear with the volume fraction. On the other hand, a strong dependence of thermal conductivity on the measured time is observed for Cu-water nanofluid. The system performance of a 10-RT water chiller (air conditioner subject to MWNT/water nanofluid is experimentally investigated. The system is tested at the standard water chiller rating condition in the range of the flow rate from 60 to 140 L/min. In spite of the static measurement of thermal conductivity of nanofluid shows only 1.3% increase at room temperature relative to the base fluid at volume fraction of 0.001 (0.1 vol.%, it is observed that a 4.2% increase of cooling capacity and a small decrease of power consumption about 0.8% occur for the nanofluid system at a flow rate of 100 L/min. This result clearly indicates that the enhancement of cooling capacity is not just related to thermal conductivity alone. Dynamic effect, such as

  17. Participant and spectator scaling of spectator fragments in Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions at sqrt(sNN) = 19.6 and 22.4 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Alver, B; Baker, M D; Ballintijn, M; Barton, D S; Betts, R R; Bickley, A A; Bindel, R; Budzanowski, A; Busza, W; Carroll, A; Chai, Z; Chetluru, V; Decowski, M P; Garcia, E; Gburek, T; George, N; Gulbrandsen, K; Gushue, S; Halliwell, C; Hamblen, J; Harnarine, I; Heintzelman, G A; Henderson, C; Hofman, D J; Hollis, R S; Holynski, R; Holzman, B; Iordanova, A; Johnson, E; Kane, J L; Katzy, J; Khan, N; Kucewicz, W; Kulinich, P; Kuo, C M; Li, W; Lin, W T; Loizides, C; Manly, S; McLeod, D; Mignerey, A C; Nouicer, R; Olszewski, A; Pak, R; Park, I C; Pernegger, H; Reed, C; Remsberg, L P; Reuter, M; Richardson, E; Roland, C; Roland, G; Rosenberg, L; Sagerer, J; Sarin, P; Sawicki, P; Sedykh, I; Skulski, W; Smith, C E; Stankiewicz, M A; Steinberg, P; Stephans, G S F; Sukhanov, A; Szostak, A; Tang, J L; Tonjes, M B; Trzupek, A; Vale, C; van Nieuwenhuizen, G J; Vaurynovich, S S; Verdier, R; Veres, G I; Walters, P; Wenger, E; Willhelm, D; Wolfs, F L H; Wosiek, B; Wozniak, K; Wuosmaa, A H; Wyngaardt, S; Wyslouch, B

    2015-01-01

    Spectator fragments resulting from relativistic heavy ion collisions, consisting of single protons and neutrons along with groups of stable nuclear fragments up to Nitrogen (Z=7), are measured in PHOBOS. These fragments are observed in Au+Au (sqrt(sNN)=19.6 GeV) and Cu+Cu (22.4 GeV) collisions at high pseudorapidity ($\\eta$). The dominant multiply-charged fragment is the tightly bound Helium ($\\alpha$), with Lithium, Beryllium, and Boron all clearly seen as a function of collision centrality and pseudorapidity. We observe that in Cu+Cu collisions, it becomes much more favorable for the $\\alpha$ fragments to be released than Lithium. The yields of fragments approximately scale with the number of spectator nucleons, independent of the colliding ion. The shapes of the pseudorapidity distributions of fragments indicate that the average deflection of the fragments away from the beam direction increases for more central collisions. A detailed comparison of the shapes for $\\alpha$ and Lithium fragments indicates tha...

  18. Centrality, Rapidity And Transverse-Momentum Dependence of Cold Nuclear Matter Effects on J/Psi Production in D Au, Cu Cu And Au Au Collisions at S(NN)**(1/2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreiro, E.G.; /Santiago de Compostela U.; Fleuret, F.; /Ecole Polytechnique; Lansberg, J.P.; /Ecole Polytechnique /SLAC; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; /SPhN, DAPNIA, Saclay

    2011-11-11

    We have carried out a wide study of Cold Nuclear Matter (CNM) effects on J/{Psi} = production in dAu, CuCu and AuAu collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV. We have studied the effects of three different gluon-shadowing parameterizations, using the usual simplified kinematics for which the momentum of the gluon recoiling against the J/{Psi} is neglected as well as an exact kinematics for a 2 {yields} 2 process, namely g + g {yields} J/{psi} + g as expected from LO pQCD. We have shown that the rapidity distribution of the nuclear modification factor R{sub dAu}, and particularly its anti-shadowing peak, is systematically shifted toward larger rapidities in the 2 {yields} 2 kinematics, irrespective of which shadowing parameterization is used. In turn, we have noted differences in the effective final-state nuclear absorption needed to fit the PHENIX dAu data. Taking advantage of our implementation of a 2 {yields} 2 kinematics, we have also computed the transverse momentum dependence of the nuclear modification factor, which cannot be predicted with the usual simplified kinematics. All the corresponding observables have been computed for CuCu and AuAu collisions and compared to the PHENIX and STAR data. Finally, we have extracted the effective nuclear absorption from the recent measurements of RCP in dAu collisions by the PHENIX collaboration.

  19. Participant and spectator scaling of spectator fragments in Au + Au and Cu + Cu collisions at √{sN N}=19.6 and 22.4 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alver, B.; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Chai, Z.; Chetluru, V.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; Gburek, T.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Harnarine, I.; Heintzelman, G. A.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Li, W.; Lin, W. T.; Loizides, C.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Richardson, E.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Sedykh, I.; Skulski, W.; Smith, C. E.; Stankiewicz, M. A.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sukhanov, A.; Szostak, A.; Tang, J.-L.; Tonjes, M. B.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Vaurynovich, S. S.; Verdier, R.; Veres, G. I.; Walters, P.; Wenger, E.; Willhelm, D.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wyngaardt, S.; Wysłouch, B.; Phobos Collaboration

    2016-08-01

    Spectator fragments resulting from relativistic heavy ion collisions, consisting of single protons and neutrons along with groups of stable nuclear fragments up to nitrogen (Z =7 ), are measured in PHOBOS. These fragments are observed in Au+Au (√{sNN}=19.6 GeV ) and Cu+Cu (22.4 GeV) collisions at high pseudorapidity (η ). The dominant multiply-charged fragment is the tightly bound helium (α ), with lithium, beryllium, and boron all clearly seen as a function of collision centrality and pseudorapidity. We observe that in Cu+Cu collisions, it becomes much more favorable for the α fragments to be released than lithium. The yields of fragments approximately scale with the number of spectator nucleons, independent of the colliding ion. The shapes of the pseudorapidity distributions of fragments indicate that the average deflection of the fragments away from the beam direction increases for more central collisions. A detailed comparison of the shapes for α and lithium fragments indicates that the centrality dependence of the deflections favors a scaling with the number of participants in the collision.

  20. 基于TSV技术的CIS芯片晶圆级封装工艺研究%The Research of CIS Chip Wafer Level Packaging Process Based on TSV

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董西英; 徐成翔

    2011-01-01

    TSV-based packaging technology is a kind of high-end technology currently used in MEMS, memory and three-dimensional integrated circuits.This article discusses the TSV-based CIS chip wafer level packaging process which is in the mass production phase and in a leading position in our country.The emphasis of this work focuses on the theoretical and experimental investigations of executing aluminum etching and photoresist removal before metallic coating, and the induced Ni-breeding problem.It is found that the new process flow can shorten the time of photoresist removal, decrease the residua of photoresist and reduce the number of layers of metallic coating.Extending UPW rinse time in electroplating process each time, avoiding forming Nickel particles in plating solution in EN Ni.Lowering zinc concentration when zinc plating and increase nitric acid cleaning steps therefore circumvent the problem of Ni-breeding.The results are helpful to improve the efficiency, increase the passing rate of the chips greatly and reduce the costs.%基于TSV技术的封装技术是目前MEMS产品、存储器、3D IC封装中的高端和热点技术.本文论述了在国内处于领先并正在量产化研究阶段的基于TSV技术的CIS芯片晶圆级封装工艺流程.通过理论分析和实验,重点研究了在封装流程中将铝刻蚀、去胶提前到金属镀覆之前的意义和所出现的镍滋生问题.研究表明,将铝刻蚀、去胶提前到金属镀覆之前可以缩短去胶时间,减少光刻胶的残留和金属镀覆层数;通过延长金属镀覆过程中每次UPW冲洗时间,在EN Ni中防止镀液结镍,并在镀锌时降低锌液的粘附性和镀锌后增加硝酸清洗步骤,即可消除镍滋生.以上研究对于提高封装效率和合格芯片率,降低成本是很有意义的.

  1. 界面耦合作用对Cu(Ni)/Sn-Ag-Cu/Cu(Ni)BGA 焊点界面IMC形成与演化的影响%EFFECT OF THE CROSS-INTERACTION ON THE FORMATION AND EVOLUTION OF INTERMETALLIC COMPOUNDS IN Cu(Ni)/Sn-Ag-Cu/Cu(Ni) BGA STRUCTURE SOLDER JOINTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李勋平; 周敏波; 夏建民; 马骁; 张新平

    2011-01-01

    研究了焊盘材料界面耦合作用对Cu(Ni)/Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu/Cu(Ni)BGA(Ball Grid Array)结构焊点焊后态和125℃等温时效过程中界面金属间化合物(IMC)的成分、形貌和生长动力学的影响.结果表明,凸点下金属层(UBM)Ni界面IMC的成分与钎料中Cu含量有关,钎料中Cu含量较高时界面IMC为(Cu,Ni)6Sn5,而Cu含量较低时,则生成(Cu,Ni)3Sn4;Cu-Ni耦合易导致Cu/Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu/Ni焊点中钎料/Ni界面IMC异常生长并产生剥离而进入钎料.125℃等温时效过程中,Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu/Cu界面IMC的生长速率常数随钎料中Cu含量增加而提高,Cu-Cu耦合降低一次回流侧IMC生长速率常数;Cu-Ni耦合和Ni-Ni耦合均导致焊点一次回流Ni侧界面IMC的生长速率常数增大,但Ni对界面IMC生长动力学的影响大于Cu;Ni有利于抑制Cu界面Cu3Sn生长,降低界面IMC生长速率,但Cu-Ni耦合对Cu界面Cu3Sn中Kirkendall空洞率无明显影响.%The formation and evolution of interfacial intermetallic compounds (IMCs) in Cu(Ni)/Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu/Cu(Ni) BGA (Ball Grid Array) structure solder joints both in the asreflowed state and undergoing isothermal aging at 125 C were investigated. The results show that there exists a significant cross-interaction effect of the solder pad/under bump metal (UBM) on the composition, morphology and growth kinetics of interfacial IMCs in solder joints. The reactions of solder/Ni UBM strongly depends on the Cu content of the solder, for a high Cu content, a continuous (Cu, Ni)6Sn5 layer forms at the interface, while for a low Cu content, a continuous (Ni, Cu)3Sn4 layer appears at the interface. The cross-interaction of Cu and Ni in Cu/Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu(SAC)/Ni solder joints has obvious influence on the composition and morphology of the interfacial IMC; and the IMC spalling phenomenon occurs at the interface of Ni side. During isothermal aging at 125 ℃, the growth rate constant of the interfacial IMC layer in SAC/Cu and Cu/SAC/Cu joints increases with

  2. Structure Design of MEMS Piezoelectric Vibration Energy Harvester with Wafer-Level Low Vacuum Packaging%圆片级低真空封装的MEMS压电振动能量收集器结构设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张颖异; 温志渝; 邓丽城

    2016-01-01

    MEMS低真空封装技术能为MEMS器件的可动部分提供低阻尼环境,降低能量损耗,有效提高器件的能量转换效率,具有重要的研究意义和应用前景,是MEMS技术的研究热点和难点。为了进一步提高MEMS压电振动能量收集器的输出性能,提出了圆片级低真空封装的共质量块MEMS压电悬臂梁阵列振动能量收集器新结构,通过有限元分析方法对器件结构参数进行了优化设计,在优化结构参数下仿真器件输出性能:在610 Hz、2 gn加速度下,器件的输出电压为8.88 V,输出功率为1220μW,能满足实际应用需求;根据器件结构设计了加工工艺流程,对低真空封装结构的实现和封装工艺探索具有重要意义。%MEMS low vacuum packaging technology can provide low damping environment for the movable part of MEMS devices,decrease the energy loss,and improve the energy conversion efficiency of the devices. So it has im⁃portant research significance and application prospects,and becomes the study hotspot and difficulty of MEMS tech⁃nology. In order to further improve the output performance of MEMS piezoelectric vibration energy harvester,this paper proposes a new structure of wafer-level low vacuum packaged and piezoelectric cantilever array fixed on one sharing mass based MEMS piezoelectric vibration energy harvester,and optimization design and analysis for struc⁃ture parameters of the device is done by finite element method. The output performance is simulated at the opti⁃mized parameters:at 610 Hz and 2 g acceleration,the output voltage of the device is 8.88 V,and the output power is 1 220 mW,which can satisfy the need of practical application. The process flow is designed on the basis of the de⁃vice structure,it will be of great importance in the realization of low vacuum packaging structure and the exploration of package technology.

  3. System Size and Energy Dependence of Jet-Induced Hadron Pair Correlation Shapes in Cu+Cu and Au+Au Collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 and 62.4 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Adare, A; Afanasiev, S; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Al-Bataineh, H; Alexander, J; Al-Jamel, A; Aoki, K; Aphecetche, L; Armendariz, R; Aronson, S H; Asai, J; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Baldisseri, Alberto; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Bauer, F; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, Y; Bickley, A A; Bjorndal, M T; Boissevain, J G; Borel, H; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bruner, N; Bucher, D; Büsching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J M; Butsyk, S; Camard, X; Campbell, S; Chai, J S; Chand, P; Chang, B S; Chang, W C; Charvet, J L; Chernichenko, S; Chiba, J; Chi, C Y; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choudhury, R K; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Churyn, A; Cianciolo, V; Cleven, C R; Cobigo, Y; Cole, B A; Comets, M P; Constantin, P; Csanad, M; Csorg}o, T; Cussonneau, J P; Dahms, T; Das, K; Dávid, G; Deák, F; Deaton, M B; Dehmelt, K; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; D'Enterria, D G; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Devismes, A; Dietzsch, O; Dion, A; Donadelli, M; Drachenberg, J L; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Dubey, A K; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Dzhordzhadze, V; Efremenko, Yu V; Egdemir, J; Ellinghaus, F; Emam, W S; Enokizono, A; Enyo, H; Espagnon, B; Esumi, S; Eyser, K O; Fields, D E; Finck, C; Finger, Miroslav H; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Forestier, B; Fox, B D; Fraenkel, Zeev; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fung, S Y; Fusayasu, T; Gadrat, S; Garishvili, I; Gastineau, F; Germain, M; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grosse-Perdekamp, M; Gunji, T; Gustafsson, A; Hachiya, T; Hadj Henni, A; Haegemann, C; Haggerty, J S; Hagiwara, M N; Hamagaki, H; Han, R; Hansen, A G; Harada, H; Hartouni, E P; Haruna, K; Harvey, M; Haslum, E; Hasuko, K; Hayano, R; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; Heuser, J M; He, X; Hidas, P; Hiejima, H; Hill, J C; Hobbs, R; Hohlmann, M; Holmes, M; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Hoover, A; Horaguchi, T; Hornback, D; Hur, M G; Ichihara, T; Ikonnikov, V V; Imai, K; Inaba, M; Inoue, Y; Inuzuka, M; Isenhower, D; Isenhower, L D; Ishihara, M; Isobe, T; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Jacak, B V; Jia, J; Jin, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Johnson, S C; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Kajihara, F; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kamin, J; Kaneta, M; Kang, J H; Kanou, H; Katou, K; Kawabata, T; Kawagishi, T; Kawall, D; Kazantsev, A V; Kelly, S; Khachaturov, B; Khanzadeev, A; Kikuchi, J; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, E; Kim, G B; Kim, H J; Kim, Y S; Kinney, E; Kiss, A; Kistenev, E P; Kiyomichi, A; Klay, J; Klein-Bösing, C; Kobayashi, H; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Kohara, R; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Kral, A; Kravitz, A; Kroon, P J; Kubart, J; Kuberg, C H; Kunde, G J; Kurihara, N; Kurita, K; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y S; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Le Bornec, Y; Leckey, S; Lee, D M; Lee, M K; Lee, T; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Lenzi, B; Lim, H; Liska, T; Litvinenko, A; Liu, M X; Li, X; Li, X H; Love, B; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Malik, M D; Man'ko, V I; Mao, Y; Martínez, G; Masek, L; Masui, H; Matathias, F; Matsumoto, T; McCain, M C; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; Miake, Y; Mikes, P; Miki, K; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mishra, G C; Mishra, M; Mitchell, J T; Mitrovski, M; Mohanty, A K; Morreale, A; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Moukhanova, T V; Mukhopadhyay, D; Muniruzzaman, M; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagata, Y; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nakagawa, I; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Norman, B E; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Oda, S X; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Okada, H; Okada, K; Oka, M; Omiwade, O O; Oskarsson, A; Otterlund, I; Ouchida, M; Oyama, K; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V S; Papavassiliou, V; Park, J; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Pei, H; Penev, V; Peng, J C; Pereira, H; Peresedov, V; Peressounko, D Yu; Pierson, A; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Qualls, J M; Qu, H; Rak, J; Rakotozafindrabe, A; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Rembeczki, S; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Roche, G; Romana, A; Rosati, M; Rosendahl, S S E; Rosnet, P; Rukoyatkin, P; Rykov, V L; Ryu, S S; Sahlmueller, B; Saitô, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakai, S; Sakata, H; Samsonov, V; Sanfratello, L; Santo, R; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Schutz, Y; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Sharma, D; Shea, T K; Shein, I; Shevel, A; Shibata, T A; Shigaki, K; Shimomura, M; Shohjoh, T; Shoji, K; Sickles, A; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Silvestre, C; Sim, K S; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Skutnik, S; Slunecka, M; Smith, W C; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sørensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Staley, F; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Suire, C; Sullivan, J P; Sziklai, J; Tabaru, T; Takagi, S; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Taranenko, A; Tarjan, P; Thomas, T L; Togawa, M; Toia, A; Tojo, J; Tomasek, L; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tram, V N; Tserruya, Itzhak; Tsuchimoto, Y; Tuli, S K; Tydesjo, H; Tyurin, N; Uam, T J; Vale, C; Valle, H; van Hecke, H W; Velkovska, J; Velkovsky, M; Vertesi, R; Veszpremi, V; Vinogradov, A A; Virius, M; Volkov, M A; Vrba, V; Vznuzdaev, E; Wagner, M; Walker, D; Wang, X R; Watanabe, Y; Wessels, J; White, S N; Willis, N; Winter, D; Wohn, F K; Woody, C L; Wysocki, M; Xie, W; Yamaguchi, Y; Yanovich, A A; Yasin, Z; Ying, J; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Younus, I; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zaudtke, O; Zhang, C; Zhou, S; Zimányi, J; Zolin, L; Zong, X; al, et

    2006-01-01

    We present azimuthal angle correlations of intermediate transverse momentum (1-4 GeV/c) hadrons from {dijets} in Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 62.4 and 200 GeV. The away-side dijet induced azimuthal correlation is broadened, non-Gaussian, and peaked away from \\Delta\\phi=\\pi in central and semi-central collisions in all the systems. The broadening and peak location are found to depend upon the number of participants in the collision, but not on the collision energy or beam nuclei. These results are consistent with sound or shock wave models, but pose challenges to Cherenkov gluon radiation models.

  4. Bond Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, Rachel H.

    2000-01-01

    Notes trends toward increased borrowing by colleges and universities and offers guidelines for institutions that are considering issuing bonds to raise money for capital projects. Discussion covers advantages of using bond financing, how use of bonds impacts on traditional fund raising, other cautions and concerns, and some troubling aspects of…

  5. Near-side azimuthal and pseudorapidity correlations using neutral strange baryons and mesons in d +Au , Cu + Cu, and Au + Au collisions at √{sN N}=200 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abelev, B.; Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Ashraf, M. U.; Attri, A.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, X.; Bairathi, V.; Barnby, L. S.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bombara, M.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Bouchet, J.; Brandenburg, J. D.; Brandin, A. V.; Bunzarov, I.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Chakaberia, I.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chatterjee, A.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, X.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Christie, W.; Contin, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, S.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Esha, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Federic, P.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, Z.; Filip, P.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Fulek, L.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gaillard, L.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Hamad, A. I.; Hamed, A.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; He, L.; Heppelmann, S.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Horvat, S.; Huang, T.; Huang, B.; Huang, X.; Huang, H. Z.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Jentsch, A.; Jia, J.; Jiang, K.; Jones, P. G.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikoła, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Kochenda, L.; Koetke, D. D.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kumar, L.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, C.; Li, Y.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Lin, T.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, S.; Luo, X.; Ma, L.; Ma, R.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Magdy, N.; Majka, R.; Manion, A.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McKinzie, S.; Meehan, K.; Mei, J. C.; Miller, Z. W.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mishra, D.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Niida, T.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Okorokov, V. A.; Olvitt, D.; Page, B. S.; Pak, R.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Pile, P.; Pluta, J.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Posik, M.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Ray, R. L.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Sharma, A.; Sharma, M. K.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, Z.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Sikora, R.; Simko, M.; Singha, S.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Smirnov, D.; Solyst, W.; Song, L.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stepanov, M.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Summa, B.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Sun, X. M.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Tang, Z.; Tang, A. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Tawfik, A.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Todoroki, T.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Tripathy, S. K.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Upsal, I.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Varma, R.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wang, H.; Wang, Y.; Wang, G.; Wang, Y.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, F.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Wen, L.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y.; Xiao, Z. G.; Xie, W.; Xie, G.; Xin, K.; Xu, Y. F.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, N.; Xu, J.; Xu, H.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Q.; Yang, S.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Yang, C.; Ye, Z.; Ye, Z.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhu, X.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    We present measurements of the near side of triggered di-hadron correlations using neutral strange baryons (Λ ,Λ ¯) and mesons (KS0) at intermediate transverse momentum (3 < pT <6 GeV /c ) to look for possible flavor and baryon-meson dependence. This study is performed in d +Au , Cu+Cu, and Au+Au collisions at √{sN N}=200 GeV measured by the STAR experiment at RHIC. The near-side di-hadron correlation contains two structures, a peak which is narrow in azimuth and pseudorapidity consistent with correlations from jet fragmentation, and a correlation in azimuth which is broad in pseudorapidity. The particle composition of the jet-like correlation is determined using identified associated particles. The dependence of the conditional yield of the jet-like correlation on the trigger particle momentum, associated particle momentum, and centrality for correlations with unidentified trigger particles are presented. The neutral strange particle composition in jet-like correlations with unidentified charged particle triggers is not well described by PYTHIA. However, the yield of unidentified particles in jet-like correlations with neutral strange particle triggers is described reasonably well by the same model.

  6. Fabricação e caracterização de termopares Cu/CuNixPy obtidos por deposição eletroquímica.

    OpenAIRE

    Fernando Trevisan Saez Parra

    2008-01-01

    Neste trabalho foram estudadas deposições químicas de ligas CuNixPy e foram fabricados termopares Cu/CuNixPy sobre superfícies de lâminas de silício. Inicialmente, as superfícies foram pré-ativadas em uma solução diluída de ácido fluorídrico contendo PdCl2. Em seguida, foi empregado um banho químico alcalino diluído em água deionizada contendo 15 g/l NiSO4.6H2O; 0,1 a 0,3 g/l CuSO4.5H2O; 15 g/l Na2HPO2.H2O e 60 g/l Na3C6H5O7.2H2O na temperatura de 80OC sendo que NH4OH foi adicionado até que o...

  7. Investigation of Au/Si Eutectic Wafer Bonding for MEMS Accelerometers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongling Li

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Au/Si eutectic bonding is considered to BE a promising technology for creating 3D structures and hermetic packaging in micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS devices. However, it suffers from the problems of a non-uniform bonding interface and complex processes for the interconnection of metal wires. This paper presents a novel Au/Si eutectic wafer bonding structure and an implementation method for MEMS accelerometer packaging. The related processing parameters influencing the Au/Si eutectic bonding quality were widely investigated. It was found that a high temperature of 400 °C with a low heating/cooling rate of 5 °C/min is crucial for successful Au/Si eutectic bonding. High contact force is beneficial for bonding uniformity, but the bonding strength and bonding yield decrease when the contact force increases from 3000 to 5000 N due to the metal squeezing out of the interface. The application of TiW as an adhesion layer on a glass substrate, compared with a commonly used Cr or Ti layer, significantly improves the bonding quality. The bonding strength is higher than 50 MPa, and the bonding yield is above 90% for the presented Au/Si eutectic bonding. Furthermore, the wafer-level vacuum packaging of the MEMS accelerometer was achieved based on Au/Si eutectic bonding and anodic bonding with one process. Testing results show a nonlinearity of 0.91% and a sensitivity of 1.06 V/g for the MEMS accelerometer. This Au/Si eutectic bonding process can be applied to the development of reliable, low-temperature, low-cost fabrication and hermetic packaging for MEMS devices.

  8. Parental Bonding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Paul de Cock

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Estimating the early parent–child bonding relationship can be valuable in research and practice. Retrospective dimensional measures of parental bonding provide a means for assessing the experience of the early parent–child relationship. However, combinations of dimensional scores may provide information that is not readily captured with a dimensional approach. This study was designed to assess the presence of homogeneous groups in the population with similar profiles on parental bonding dimensions. Using a short version of the Parental Bonding Instrument (PBI, three parental bonding dimensions (care, authoritarianism, and overprotection were used to assess the presence of unobserved groups in the population using latent profile analysis. The class solutions were regressed on 23 covariates (demographics, parental psychopathology, loss events, and childhood contextual factors to assess the validity of the class solution. The results indicated four distinct profiles of parental bonding for fathers as well as mothers. Parental bonding profiles were significantly associated with a broad range of covariates. This person-centered approach to parental bonding has broad utility in future research which takes into account the effect of parent–child bonding, especially with regard to “affectionless control” style parenting.

  9. Investigation of the Microstructure and the Mechanical Properties of Cu-NiC Composite Produced by Accumulative Roll Bonding and Coating Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabani, Ali; Toroghinejad, Mohammad Reza

    2015-12-01

    In the present study, Cu-1.8 wt.% NiC (nickel coating) composite was produced by the combination of two methods, including accumulative roll bonding (ARB) and electroplating processes. Electroplating process was done on copper strips in order to produce a nickel-particle-reinforced composite. Microstructure, texture, and the mechanical properties of the produced composite were evaluated during various cycles of ARB using optical and scanning electron microscopes, x-ray diffraction, microhardness, and tensile tests. In addition, the results were compared with Cu-Cu and also Cu-NiS (nickel sheet) samples. It was found that nickel layers were fractured from the first cycle of the process, and nickel fragments were distributed in the copper matrix as the number of cycles was increased. Variation of orientation density of α-, β-, and τ-fibers for the produced composite was examined in different cycles. Microhardness for different elements in different cycles of Cu-NiC was also evaluated. Also, the investigation of the mechanical properties showed that by proceeding the ARB process, the tensile strength of the produced Cu-NiC and Cu-Cu samples was increased. However, improvement in the mechanical properties of composite samples was more noticeable due to the reinforcing effect of nickel particles. The elongation of composite samples showed a decrease in the primary cycles, unlike Cu-Cu ones; however, it was then increased. Finally, by using scanning electron microscopy, the fracture surfaces of Cu-NiC composite were studied to disclose the fracture mechanism of the samples.

  10. Investigation of Bonding Generation during the Drawing of Multifilamentary Wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, X.; Sumption, M. D.; Tomsic, M.; Collings, E. W.

    2006-03-01

    Experimental shear tests and Finite Element Modeling (FEM) have been used to study the generation of bonding during the multi-pass drawing of multifilamentary wire, focusing on the experimental conditions and materials of interest to composite superconductor manufacture. The wires were of two kinds: (1) a simple cylindrical monocore arrangement consisting of a Nb7.5%Ta core inside a Cu can (or sleeve), (2) a six-around-one restack of the monocores. For the modeling a thermo-mechanical, elasto-plastic, finite-element model was employed. Two kinds of simulations were performed: (1) the initial state of the billet was assumed to be without bonding. The FEM simulation was then performed, and from this the normal pressure, deformation, and temperature at the core/sleeve interface were calculated; (2) a pressure welding model was used to estimate the bonding stress generated at the interface by the multi-pass drawing process. On the experimental side, the Cu-clad Nb monocore "billet" was drawn to certain size, restacked into a Cu can to form a 7 restack multifilamentary billet, and then drawn to small size. High resolution scanning electron microscopy was used to observe the characteristics of the Nb/Cu and Cu/Cu interfaces and mechanisms for the observed interfacial bonding were proposed. Furthermore, specially designed shear tests were carried out to determine the interfacial shear load. The results of these led to calculations of the interfacial shear stress (i.e. the bonding stress at the interfaces), the results of which were compared with the FEM predictions in order to establish the validity of the FEM model.

  11. 3D micro-optical lens scanner made by multi-wafer bonding technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargiel, S.; Gorecki, C.; Barański, M.; Passilly, N.; Wiemer, M.; Jia, C.; Frömel, J.

    2013-03-01

    We present the preliminary design, construction and technology of a microoptical, millimeter-size 3-D microlens scanner, which is a key-component for a number of optical on-chip microscopes with emphasis on the architecture of confocal microscope. The construction of the device relies on the vertical integration of micromachined building blocks: top glass lid, silicon electrostatic comb-drive X-Y and Z microactuators with integrated scanning microlenses, ceramic LTCC spacer, and bottom lid with focusing microlens. All components are connected on the wafer level only by sequential anodic bonding. The technology of through wafer vias is applied to create electrical connections through a stack of wafers. More generally, the presented bonding/connection technologies are also of a great importance for the development of various silicon-based devices based on vertical integration scheme. This approach offers a space-effective integration of complex MOEMS devices and an effective integration of various heterogeneous technologies.

  12. Bond Boom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The Ministry of Finance recently kick-started a pilot program allowing local governments of Shanghai and Shenzhen,and Zhejiang and Guangdong provinces to issue bonds for the first time.How will the new policy affect fiscal capacities of local governments and the broader economy? What else should the country do to build a healthy bond market? Economists and experts discussed these issues in an interview with the Shanghai Securities Journal.Edited excerpts follow.

  13. Bond Boom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The Ministry of Finance recently kick-started a pilot program allowing local governments of Shanghai and Shenzhen, and Zhejiang and Guangdong provinces to issue bonds for the first time. How will the new policy affect fiscal capacities of local governments and the broader economy? What else should the country do to build a healthy bond market? Economists and experts discussed these issues in an interview with the ShanghaiSecuritiesJournal. Edited excerpts follow:

  14. Fabrication of SU-8 multilayer microstructures based on successive CMOS compatible adhesive bonding and releasing steps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agirregabiria, M; Blanco, F J; Berganzo, J; Arroyo, M T; Fullaondo, A; Mayora, K; Ruano-López, J M

    2005-05-01

    This paper describes a novel fabrication process based on successive wafer-level bonding and releasing steps for stacking several patterned layers of the negative photoresist EPON SU-8. This work uses a polyimide film to enhance previous low temperature bonding technology. The film acts as a temporary substrate where the SU-8 is photopatterned. The poor adhesion between the polyimide film and SU-8 allows the film to be released after the bonding process, even though the film is still strong enough to carry out photolithography. Using this technique, successive adhesive bonding steps can be carried out to obtain complex 3-D multilayer structures. Interconnected channels with smooth vertical sidewalls and freestanding structures are fabricated. Unlike previous works, all the layers are photopatterned before the bonding process yielding sealed cavities and complex three-dimensional structures without using a sacrificial layer. Adding new SU-8 layers reduces the bonding quality because each additional layer decreases the thickness uniformity and increases the polymer crosslinking level. The effect of these parameters is quantified in this paper. This process guarantees compatibility with CMOS electronics and MEMS. Furthermore, the releasing step leaves the input and the output of the microchannels in contact with the outside world, avoiding the usual slow drilling process of a cover. Hence, in addition to the straightforward integration of electrodes on a chip, this fabrication method facilitates the packaging of these microfluidic devices.

  15. 在RHIC-PHENIX中观测到的AuAu和CuCu碰撞中已鉴别强子产物的标度率特性%Scaling Properties of Identified Hadron Production in Au+Au and Cu+Cu Collisions at RHIC-PHENIX

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Particle type dependences of hadron yield and emission patterns, especially its difference between mesons and baryons, at intermediate pT (2-5GeV/c) is one of the findings in heavy ion collisions at RHIC. A systematic study of identified hadron production was performed in Au+Au/Cu+Cu collisions at (√SNN)=62.4/200GeV, to investigate the possible origins of this difference. In this paper, we show particle ratios, elliptic flow strengths, and their scaling properties.

  16. Ciriottiite, Cu(Cu,Ag3Pb19(Sb,As22(As2S56, the Cu-Analogue of Sterryite from the Tavagnasco Mining District, Piedmont, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Bindi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The new mineral species ciriottiite, ideally Cu(Cu,Ag3Pb19(Sb,As22(As2S56 has been discovered in the Tavagnasco mining district, Piedmont, Italy, as very rare black metallic tubular crystals, up to 150 μm in length, associated with Bi sulfosalts and arsenopyrite. Its Vickers hardness (VHN10 is 203 kg/mm2 (range 190–219. In reflected light, ciriottiite is light grey in color, distinctly anisotropic with brownish to greenish rotation tints. Internal reflections are absent. Reflectance values for the four COM wavelengths (Rmin, Rmax (% (λ in nm are: 33.2, 37.8 (471.1; 31.8, 35.3 (548.3, 31.0, 34.7 (586.6; and 27.9, 32.5 (652.3. Electron microprobe analysis gave (in wt %, average of 5 spot analyses: Cu 2.33 (8, Ag 0.53 (5, Hg 0.98 (6, Tl 0.78 (3, Pb 44.06 (14, As 4.66 (7, Sb 23.90 (10, Bi 1.75 (7, total 99.38 (26. On the basis of 56 S atoms per formula unit, the chemical formula of ciriottiite is Cu3.23(11Ag0.43(4Hg0.43(2Pb18.74(9Tl0.34(1Sb17.30(5As5.48(10Bi0.74(3S56. The main diffraction lines, corresponding to multiple hkl indices, are (d in Å (relative visual intensity: 4.09 (m, 3.91 (m, 3.63 (vs, 3.57 (m, 3.22 (m, 2.80 (mw, 2.07 (s. The crystal structure study revealed ciriottiite to be monoclinic, space group P21/n, with unit-cell parameters a = 8.178 (2, b = 28.223 (6, c = 42.452 (5 Å, β = 93.55 (2°, V = 9779.5 (5 Å3, Z = 4. The crystal structure was refined to a final R1 = 0.118 for 21304 observed reflections. Ciriottiite is the Cu analogue of sterryite and can be described as an expanded derivative of owyheeite. The name ciriottiite honors Marco Ernesto Ciriotti (b. 1945 for his longstanding contribution to mineral systematics.

  17. The fabrication of microfluidic structures by means of full-wafer adhesive bonding using a poly(dimethylsiloxane) catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samel, Björn; Kamruzzaman Chowdhury, M.; Stemme, Göran

    2007-08-01

    In this work, we present the use of a PDMS (poly(dimethylsiloxane)) curing-agent as the intermediate layer for adhesive full-wafer bonding suitable for fabrication of microfluidic structures. The curing-agent of the two-component silicone rubber (Sylgard 184) is spin coated on a substrate, brought into contact with another PDMS layer and heat cured to create an irreversible seal which is as strong as or even stronger than plasma-assisted PDMS bonding. The maximum bond strength is measured to 800 kPa when bonding together PDMS and silicon. The applicability of the new PDMS adhesive bonding method is verified by means of fabricating microfluidic structures. Using this method allows for wafer-level bonding of PDMS to various materials such as PDMS, glass or silicon and more importantly to selectively bond different layers by using a patterned adhesive bonding technique. Moreover, precise alignment of the structural layers is facilitated since curing is initiated upon heat which is an advantage when fabricating multilayer microfluidic devices.

  18. Design for Reliability of Wafer Level MEMS packaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaal, J.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    The world has seen an unrivaled spread of semiconductor technology into virtually any part of society. The main enablers of this semiconductor rush are the decreasing feature size and the constantly decreasing costs of semiconductors. The decreasing costs of semiconductors in general are caused by t

  19. Wafer-Level 3D Integration for ULSI Interconnects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutmann, Ronald J.; Lu, Jian-Qiang

    Three-dimensional (3D) integration in a system-in-a-package (SiP) implementation (packaging-based 3D) is becoming increasingly used in consumer, computer, and communication applications where form factor is critical. In particular, the hand-held market for a growing myriad of voice, data, messaging, and imaging products is enabled by packaging-based 3D integration (i.e., stacking and connecting individual chips). The key drivers are for increased memory capacity and for heterogeneous integration of different IC technologies and functions.

  20. Design for Reliability of Wafer Level MEMS packaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaal, J.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    The world has seen an unrivaled spread of semiconductor technology into virtually any part of society. The main enablers of this semiconductor rush are the decreasing feature size and the constantly decreasing costs of semiconductors. The decreasing costs of semiconductors in general are caused by t

  1. Participant and spectator scaling of spectator fragments in Au + Au and Cu + Cu collisions at sNN=19.6 and 22.4 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alver, B.; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Chai, Z.; Chetluru, V.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; Gburek, T.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Harnarine, I.; Heintzelman, G. A.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Li, W.; Lin, W. T.; Loizides, C.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Richardson, E.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Sedykh, I.; Skulski, W.; Smith, C. E.; Stankiewicz, M. A.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sukhanov, A.; Szostak, A.; Tang, J. -L.; Tonjes, M. B.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Vaurynovich, S. S.; Verdier, R.; Veres, G. I.; Walters, P.; Wenger, E.; Willhelm, D.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wyngaardt, S.; Wysłouch, B.

    2016-08-01

    Spectator fragments resulting from relativistic heavy ion collisions, consisting of single protons and neutrons along with groups of stable nuclear fragments up to nitrogen (Z = 7), are measured in PHOBOS. These fragments are observed in Au+Au (root s(NN) = 19.6 GeV) and Cu+Cu (22.4 GeV) collisions at high pseudorapidity (eta). The dominant multiply-charged fragment is the tightly bound helium (alpha), with lithium, beryllium, and boron all clearly seen as a function of collision centrality and pseudorapidity. We observe that in Cu+Cu collisions, it becomes much more favorable for the alpha fragments to be released than lithium. The yields of fragments approximately scale with the number of spectator nucleons, independent of the colliding ion. The shapes of the pseudorapidity distributions of fragments indicate that the average deflection of the fragments away from the beam direction increases for more central collisions. A detailed comparison of the shapes for alpha and lithium fragments indicates that the centrality dependence of the deflections favors a scaling with the number of participants in the collision.

  2. Understanding Bonds - Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rimmer, Nina Røhr

    2016-01-01

    a specified rate of interest during the life of the bond and to repay the face value of the bond (the principal) when it “matures,” or comes due. Among the types of bonds you can choose from are: Government securities, municipal bonds, corporate bonds, mortgage and asset-backed securities, federal agency...

  3. Low-Temperature Bonding for Silicon-Based Micro-Optical Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiheng Qin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Silicon-based integrated systems are actively pursued for sensing and imaging applications. A major challenge to realize highly sensitive systems is the integration of electronic, optical, mechanical and fluidic, all on a common platform. Further, the interface quality between the tiny optoelectronic structures and the substrate for alignment and coupling of the signals significantly impacts the system’s performance. These systems also have to be low-cost, densely integrated and compatible with current and future mainstream technologies for electronic-photonic integration. To address these issues, proper selection of the fabrication, integration and assembly technologies is needed. In this paper, wafer level bonding with advanced features such as surface activation and passive alignment for vertical electrical interconnections are identified as candidate technologies to integrate different electronics, optical and photonic components. Surface activated bonding, superior to other assembly methods, enables low-temperature nanoscaled component integration with high alignment accuracy, low electrical loss and high transparency of the interface. These features are preferred for the hybrid integration of silicon-based micro-opto-electronic systems. In future, new materials and assembly technologies may emerge to enhance the performance of these micro systems and reduce their cost. The article is a detailed review of bonding techniques for electronic, optical and photonic components in silicon-based systems.

  4. Cross Shear Roll Bonding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels; Bjerregaard, Henrik; Petersen, Søren. B;

    1994-01-01

    The present paper describes an investigation of roll bonding an AlZn alloy to mild steel. Application of cross shear roll bonding, where the two equal sized rolls run with different peripheral speed, is shown to give better bond strength than conventional roll bonding. Improvements of up to 20......-23% in bond strength are found and full bond strength is obtained at a reduction of 50% whereas 65% is required in case of conventional roll bonding. Pseudo cross shear roll bonding, where the cross shear effect is obtained by running two equal sized rolls with different speed, gives the same results....

  5. TEM observation of the Al and Cu interfaces bonded at room temperature by means of the surface activation mehtod. Hyomen kasseikaho ni yoru Al oyobi Cu joon setsugo kaimen no TEM kansatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suga, T.; Miyazawa, K.; Takagi, H. (The Univ. of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Engineering The Univ. of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan))

    1990-06-20

    Al and Cu were bonded to various ceramics and Si by a surface activation method with irradiation of an Ar fast atom beam before bonding at room temperature, and their interfaces were observed by a TEM (transmission electron microscopy). Al was bonded successfully to various oxides and nitrides with bond strengths of 50-100MPa in the vacuum range of 9 {times} 10 {sup {minus} 5}- 2 {times} 10 {sup {minus} 6} Pa, while no macroscopic bonding could be obtained between Cu and ceramics. Amorphous intermediate layers of 10-20nm in thickness were observed in the Al-Al and Al-Si interfaces by the TEM which were possibly formed with the reaction between some residual gases and Al surfaces by irradiation of an Ar fast atom beam. On the other hand, since no intermediate layers but interfacial dislocations were observed in the Cu-Cu interfaces, it was supposed that the direct bonding between Cu lattices was formed. 20 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Wire bonding in microelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Harman, George G

    2010-01-01

    Wire Bonding in Microelectronics, Third Edition, has been thoroughly revised to help you meet the challenges of today's small-scale and fine-pitch microelectronics. This authoritative guide covers every aspect of designing, manufacturing, and evaluating wire bonds engineered with cutting-edge techniques. In addition to gaining a full grasp of bonding technology, you'll learn how to create reliable bonds at exceedingly high yields, test wire bonds, solve common bonding problems, implement molecular cleaning methods, and much more. Coverage includes: Ultrasonic bonding systems and technologies, including high-frequency systems Bonding wire metallurgy and characteristics, including copper wire Wire bond testing Gold-aluminum intermetallic compounds and other interface reactions Gold and nickel-based bond pad plating materials and problems Cleaning to improve bondability and reliability Mechanical problems in wire bonding High-yield, fine-pitch, specialized-looping, soft-substrate, and extreme-temperature wire bo...

  7. Co-deformation and bonding of multi-component billets with application to niobium-tin based superconductor processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xuan

    electron microscopy was used to observe the characteristics of the Nb7.5%Ta/Cu and Cu/Cu interfaces and mechanisms for the observed interfacial bonding were proposed. Furthermore, specially designed shear tests were carried out to determine the interfacial shear load. The results of these led to calculations of the interfacial shear stress (i.e. the bonding stress at the interfaces), the results of which were compared with the FEM predictions in order to establish the validity of the FEM model.

  8. Revised Landau Hydrodynamic Model and Pseudorapidity Distributions of Final Charged Particles in Cu+Cu Collisions%修正的Landau流体力学模型与Cu+Cu碰撞末态带电粒子赝快度分布

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜志进; 李庆广; 张海利

    2013-01-01

    By using the revised Landau hydrodynamic model and taking into account the effect of leading particles, we discussed the pseudorapidity distributions of final charged particles in high energy heavy ion collisions. We argued that the rapidity distributions of leading particles have the Gaussian form with the normalization constant being equal to the number of participants. The investigations show that the results from the hydrodynamic model alone are not consistent with the experimental data carried out by BNL-RHIC-PHOBOS Collaboration in Cu+Cu collisions at (√SNN) = 200 GeV. Only after the contributions from leading particles are included, can the experimental measurements be described well.%采用修正的Landau流体力学模型,并考虑到带头粒子效应,对高能重离子碰撞末态带电粒子的赝快度分布进行了讨论.指出:带头粒子的快度分布应为高斯形式,其正规化常数为参与者数.研究表明:流体力学模型本身与BNL-RHIC-PHOBOS合作组在√sNN=200 GeV的Cu+Cu碰撞中的实验测量符合得不是很好,只有将参与者的贡献包括在内,实验结果才能得到很好的描述.

  9. 电迁移对Ni/Sn3.0Ag0.5Cu/Cu焊点界面反应的影响%EFFECT OF ELECTROMIGRATION ON INTERFACIAL REACTION IN Ni/Sn3.0Ag0.5Cu/Cu FLIP CHIP SOLDER JOINTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄明亮; 陈雷达; 周少明

    2012-01-01

    The effect of electromigration (EM) on the interfacial reaction in Ni/Sn3.0Ag0.5Cu/Cu solder joints was investigated under a current density of 5.0 ×l03 A/cm2 at 150 ℃ All solder joints were aged at 150 ℃ for comparison purpose. It has been found that the (Cu,Ni)6Sn5 intermetallic compounds (IMCs) form at both soIder/Ni and solder/Cu interfaces in the as-reflowed state. During aging at 150 ℃, the thickness of interfacial IMC increases with increasing aging time, and no interfacial IMC transformation occurs even after aging for 800 h. The flowing direction of electrons plays an important role in Cu consumption. When electrons flow from printed circuit board (PCB) to chip, the current crowding effect induces a rapid and localized dissolution of Cu pad on PCB and a formation of microcrack at the Sn3.0Ag0.5Cu/(Cu, Ni)6Sn5 interface. The dissolved Cu atoms are driven towards anode by EM, and a large amount of Cu6Sn5 IMC particles form in solder matrix along the flowing direction of electrons. When electrons flow from chip to PCB, no obvious consumption of Ni underbump metallogy (UBM) has been observed and few Cu6Sn5 IMC particles form in solder matrix near the anode interface. There is no evidence of failure induced by EM in solder joints even after EM for 800 h. To sum up, EM enhances the growth of interfacial (Cu, Ni)6Sn5 at anode side, no matter how the direction of electrons is. The interfacial IMC at anode side is thicker than that at cathode side. The Ni/Sn3.0Ag0.5Cu/Cu solder joint is prone to fail when electrons flowing from Cu to Ni.%研究了温度为150℃,电流密度为5.0×103 A/cm2的条件下电迁移对Ni/Sn3.0Ag0.5Cu/Cu焊点界面反应的影响.回流焊后在Sn3.0Ag0.5Cu/Ni和Sn3.0Ag0.5Cu/Cu的界面上均形成了(Cu,Ni)6Sn5型化合物.时效过程中界面化合物随时效时间增加而增厚,时效800 h后两端的化合物并没有发生转变,仍为(Cu,Ni)6Sn5型.电流方向对Cu基板的消耗起着决定作用.当电子从基板

  10. Bonding with Your Baby

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in infant massage in your area. Breastfeeding and bottle-feeding are both natural times for bonding. Infants respond ... activities include: participating together in labor and delivery feeding ( breast or bottle ); sometimes dad forms a special bond with baby ...

  11. Bond percolation in films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korneta, W.; Pytel, Z.

    1988-04-01

    Bond percolation in films with simple cubic structure is considered. It is assumed that the probability of a bond being present between nearest-neighbor sites depends on the distances to surfaces. Based on the relation between the Potts model and the bond percolation model, and using the mean-field approximation, the phase diagram and profiles of the percolation probability have been obtained.

  12. Acrylic mechanical bond tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wouters, J.M.; Doe, P.J.

    1991-02-01

    The tensile strength of bonded acrylic is tested as a function of bond joint thickness. 0.125 in. thick bond joints were found to posses the maximum strength while the acceptable range of joints varied from 0.063 in. to almost 0.25 in. Such joints are used in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory.

  13. Chemical bond fundamental aspects of chemical bonding

    CERN Document Server

    Frenking, Gernot

    2014-01-01

    This is the perfect complement to ""Chemical Bonding - Across the Periodic Table"" by the same editors, who are two of the top scientists working on this topic, each with extensive experience and important connections within the community. The resulting book is a unique overview of the different approaches used for describing a chemical bond, including molecular-orbital based, valence-bond based, ELF, AIM and density-functional based methods. It takes into account the many developments that have taken place in the field over the past few decades due to the rapid advances in quantum chemica

  14. 演化过程主导的流体力学模型与Cu-Cu在BNL-RHIC能量碰撞中带电粒子的赝快度分布%Evolution-dominated Hydrodynamic Model and the Pseudorapidity Distributions of the Charged Particles Pro duced in Cu-Cu Collisions at BNL-RHIC Energies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜志进; 王杰; 张海丽; 马可

    2014-01-01

    The charged particles resulting in high energy heavy ion collisions consist of two parts: One is from the hot and dense matter produced in collisions. The other is the leading particles. We suppose that the hot and dense matter expands and freezes out into the charged particles according to the evolution-dominated hydrodynamics, and the leading particles are from participants with approximately the same energy. On the basis of this assumption, we get the pseudorapidity distributions of the charged particles produced in high energy heavy ion collisions, and make a comparison with the experimental data presented by PHOBOS Collaboration at BNL-RHIC in Cu-Cu collisions at√sNN=62.4 and 200 GeV. The theoretical predictions are in good accordance with experimental measurements.%高能重离子碰撞产生的带电粒子由两部分组成:一部分来源于碰撞产生的高温高密度物质,另一部分是带头粒子。假设高温高密度物质按照由演化过程主导的流体力学的规律膨胀并冻析为带电粒子,带头粒子来源于参与者且具有大致相同的能量。基于该假设,得到了高能重离子碰撞带电粒子的赝快度分布,并与BNL-RHIC上的PHOBOS合作组在√sNN=62.4与200 GeV的Cu-Cu碰撞中给出的实验结果相比较,理论与实验测量符合得很好。

  15. Equilibrium CO bond lengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demaison, Jean; Császár, Attila G.

    2012-09-01

    Based on a sample of 38 molecules, 47 accurate equilibrium CO bond lengths have been collected and analyzed. These ultimate experimental (reEX), semiexperimental (reSE), and Born-Oppenheimer (reBO) equilibrium structures are compared to reBO estimates from two lower-level techniques of electronic structure theory, MP2(FC)/cc-pVQZ and B3LYP/6-311+G(3df,2pd). A linear relationship is found between the best equilibrium bond lengths and their MP2 or B3LYP estimates. These (and similar) linear relationships permit to estimate the CO bond length with an accuracy of 0.002 Å within the full range of 1.10-1.43 Å, corresponding to single, double, and triple CO bonds, for a large number of molecules. The variation of the CO bond length is qualitatively explained using the Atoms in Molecules method. In particular, a nice correlation is found between the CO bond length and the bond critical point density and it appears that the CO bond is at the same time covalent and ionic. Conditions which permit the computation of an accurate ab initio Born-Oppenheimer equilibrium structure are discussed. In particular, the core-core and core-valence correlation is investigated and it is shown to roughly increase with the bond length.

  16. Copper wire bonding

    CERN Document Server

    Chauhan, Preeti S; Zhong, ZhaoWei; Pecht, Michael G

    2014-01-01

    This critical volume provides an in-depth presentation of copper wire bonding technologies, processes and equipment, along with the economic benefits and risks.  Due to the increasing cost of materials used to make electronic components, the electronics industry has been rapidly moving from high cost gold to significantly lower cost copper as a wire bonding material.  However, copper wire bonding has several process and reliability concerns due to its material properties.  Copper Wire Bonding book lays out the challenges involved in replacing gold with copper as a wire bond material, and includes the bonding process changes—bond force, electric flame off, current and ultrasonic energy optimization, and bonding tools and equipment changes for first and second bond formation.  In addition, the bond–pad metallurgies and the use of bare and palladium-coated copper wires on aluminum are presented, and gold, nickel and palladium surface finishes are discussed.  The book also discusses best practices and re...

  17. Comparison of Gold Bonding with Mercury Bonding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraka, Elfi; Filatov, Michael; Cremer, Dieter

    2009-01-01

    Nine AuX molecules (X = H, O, S, Se, Te, F, Cl, Br, I), their isoelectronic HgX(+) analogues, and the corresponding neutral HgX diatomics have been investigated using NESC (Normalized Elimination of the Small Component) and B3LYP theory to determine relativistic effects for bond dissociation energie

  18. Comparison of Gold Bonding with Mercury Bonding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraka, Elfi; Filatov, Michael; Cremer, Dieter

    2009-01-01

    Nine AuX molecules (X = H, O, S, Se, Te, F, Cl, Br, I), their isoelectronic HgX(+) analogues, and the corresponding neutral HgX diatomics have been investigated using NESC (Normalized Elimination of the Small Component) and B3LYP theory to determine relativistic effects for bond dissociation

  19. The dissociative bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Nirit

    2013-01-01

    Dissociation leaves a psychic void and a lingering sense of psychic absence. How do 2 people bond while they are both suffering from dissociation? The author explores the notion of a dissociative bond that occurs in the aftermath of trauma--a bond that holds at its core an understanding and shared detachment from the self. Such a bond is confined to unspoken terms that are established in the relational unconscious. The author proposes understanding the dissociative bond as a transitional space that may not lead to full integration of dissociated knowledge yet offers some healing. This is exemplified by R. Prince's (2009) clinical case study. A relational perspective is adopted, focusing on the intersubjective aspects of a dyadic relationship. In the dissociative bond, recognition of the need to experience mutual dissociation can accommodate a psychic state that yearns for relationship when the psyche cannot fully confront past wounds. Such a bond speaks to the need to reestablish a sense of human relatedness and connection when both parties in the relationship suffer from disconnection. This bond is bound to a silence that becomes both a means of protection against the horror of traumatic memory and a way to convey unspoken gestures toward the other.

  20. The samurai bond market

    OpenAIRE

    1997-01-01

    Issuance in the samurai bond market has more than tripled over the past several years. Some observers have attributed this growth to a systematic underestimation of credit risk in the market. A detailed review of credit quality, ratings differences, and initial issue pricing in the samurai bond market, however, turns up little evidence to support this concern.

  1. Corporate Bonds in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tell, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Corporate financing is the choice between capital generated by the corporation and capital from external investors. However, since the financial crisis shook the markets in 2007–2008, financing opportunities through the classical means of financing have decreased. As a result, corporations have...... to think in alternative ways such as issuing corporate bonds. A market for corporate bonds exists in countries such as Norway, Germany, France, the United Kingdom and the United States, while Denmark is still behind in this trend. Some large Danish corporations have instead used foreign corporate bonds...... markets. However, NASDAQ OMX has introduced the First North Bond Market in December 2012 and new regulatory framework came into place in 2014, which may contribute to a Danish based corporate bond market. The purpose of this article is to present the regulatory changes in Denmark in relation to corporate...

  2. Effect of ultrasonic power and bonding force on the bonding strength of copper ball bonds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Copper wire, serving as a cost-saving alternative to gold wire, has been used in many high-end thermosonic ball bonding applications. In this paper, the bond shear force, bond shear strength, and the ball bond diameter are adopted to evaluate the bonding quality. It is concluded that the efficient ultrasonic power is needed to soften the ball to form the copper bonds with high bonding strength. However, excessive ultrasonic power would serve as a fatigue loading to weaken the bonding. Excessive or less bonding force would cause cratering in the silicon.

  3. Transversely Compressed Bonded Joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Christian Skodborg; Schmidt, Jacob Wittrup; Stang, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    The load capacity of bonded joints can be increased if transverse pressure is applied at the interface. The transverse pressure is assumed to introduce a Coulomb-friction contribution to the cohesive law for the interface. Response and load capacity for a bonded single-lap joint was derived using...... non-linear fracture mechanics. The results indicated a good correlation between theory and tests. Furthermore, the model is suggested as theoretical base for determining load capacity of bonded anchorages with transverse pressure, in externally reinforced concrete structures....

  4. Handbook of wafer bonding

    CERN Document Server

    Ramm, Peter; Taklo, Maaike M V

    2011-01-01

    Written by an author and editor team from microsystems companies and industry-near research organizations, this handbook and reference presents dependable, first-hand information on bonding technologies.In the first part, researchers from companies and institutions around the world discuss the most reliable and reproducible technologies for the production of bonded wafers. The second part is devoted to current and emerging applications, including microresonators, biosensors and precise measuring devices.

  5. Measurement of thermal contact resistance at Cu-Cu interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Myung Su; Choi, Yeon Suk [Korea Basic Science Institute, Daejeon,(Korea, Republic of)

    2013-06-15

    The thermal contact resistance (TCR) is one of the important components in the cryogenic systems. Especially, cryogenic measurement devices using a cryocooler can be affected by TCR because the systems have to consist of several metal components in contact with each other for heat transferring to the specimen without cryogen. Therefore, accurate measurement and understanding of TCR is necessary for the design of cryogenic measurement device using a cryocooler. The TCR occurs at the interface between metals and it can be affected by variable factors, such as roughness of metal surface, contact area and contact pressure. In this study, we designed TCR measurement system at various temperatures using a cryocooler as a heat sink and used steady state method to measure the TCR between metals. The copper is selected as a specimen in the experiment because it is widely used as a heat transfer medium in the cryogenic measurement devices. The TCR between Cu and Cu is measured for various temperatures and contact pressures. The effect of the interfacial materials on the TCR is also investigated.

  6. Modelling longevity bonds: Analysing the Swiss Re Kortis bond

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    A key contribution to the development of the traded market for longevity risk was the issuance of the Kortis bond, the world's first longevity trend bond, by Swiss Re in 2010. We analyse the design of the Kortis bond, develop suitable mortality models to analyse its payoff and discuss the key risk factors for the bond. We also investigate how the design of the Kortis bond can be adapted and extended to further develop the market for longevity risk.

  7. Fundamentals of fiber bonding in thermally point-bonded nonwovens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chidambaram, Aparna

    Thermal point bonding (TPB) uses heat and pressure to bond a web of fibers at discrete points imparting strength to the manufactured fabric. This process significantly reduces the strength and elongation of the bridging fibers between bond points while strengthening the web. Single fiber experiments were performed with four structurally different polypropylene fibers to analyze the inter-relationships between fiber structure, fiber properties and bonding process. Two fiber types had a low birefringence sheath or surface layer while the remaining had uniform birefringence profiles through their thickness. Bonds were formed between isolated pairs of fibers by subjecting the fibers to a calendering process and simulating TPB process conditions. The dependence of bond strength on bonding temperature and on the type of fiber used was evaluated. Fiber strengths before and after bonding were measured and compared to understand the effect of bonding on fiber strength. Additionally, bonded fiber strength was compared to the strength of single fibers which had experienced the same process conditions as the bonded pairs. This comparison estimated the effect of mechanical damage from pressing fibers together with steel rolls while creating bonds in TPB. Interfiber bond strength increased with bonding temperature for all fiber types. Fiber strength decreased with increasing bonding temperature for all fiber types except for one type of low birefringent sheath fibers. Fiber strength degradation was unavoidable at temperatures required for successful bonding. Mechanical damage from compression of fibers between rolls was an insignificant factor in this strength loss. Thermal damage during bonding was the sole significant contributor to fiber strength degradation. Fibers with low birefringence skins formed strong bonds with minimal fiber strength loss and were superior to fibers without such surface layers in TPB performance. A simple model to predict the behavior of a two-bond

  8. Romanian government bond market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia POP

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The present paper aims to present the level of development reached by Romanian government bond market segment, as part of the country financial market. The analysis will be descriptive (the data series available for Romania are short, based on the secondary data offered by the official bodies involved in the process of issuing and trading the Romanian government bonds (Romanian Ministry of Public Finance, Romanian National Bank and Bucharest Stock Exchange, and also on secondary data provided by the Federation of European Stock Exchanges.To enhance the market credibility as a benchmark, a various combination of measures is necessary; among these measures are mentioned: the extension of the yield curve; the issuance calendars in order to improve transparency; increasing the disclosure of information on public debt issuance and statistics; holding regular meetings with dealers, institutional investors and rating agencies; introducing a system of primary dealers; establishing a repurchase (repo market in the government bond market. These measures will be discussed based on the evolution presented inside the paper.The paper conclude with the fact that, until now, the Romanian government bond market did not provide a benchmark for the domestic financial market and that further efforts are needed in order to increase the government bond market transparency and liquidity.

  9. Safe and Liquid Mortgage Bonds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dick-Nielsen, Jens; Gyntelberg, Jacob; Lund, Jesper

    This paper shows that strict match pass-through funding of covered bonds provides safe and liquid mortgage bonds. Despite a 30% drop in house prices during the 2008 global crisis Danish mortgage bonds remained as liquid as most European government bonds. The Danish pass-through system effectively...... eliminates credit risk from the investor's perspective. Similar to other safe bonds, funding liquidity becomes the main driver of mortgage bond liquidity and this creates commonality in liquidity across markets and countries. These findings have implications for how to design a robust mortgage bond system...

  10. Safe and Liquid Mortgage Bonds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dick-Nielsen, Jens; Gyntelberg, Jacob; Lund, Jesper

    This paper shows that strict match pass-through funding of covered bonds provides safe and liquid mortgage bonds. Despite a 30% drop in house prices during the 2008 global crisis Danish mortgage bonds remained as liquid as most European government bonds. The Danish pass-through system effectively...... eliminates credit risk from the investor's perspective. Similar to other safe bonds, funding liquidity becomes the main driver of mortgage bond liquidity and this creates commonality in liquidity across markets and countries. These findings have implications for how to design a robust mortgage bond system...

  11. The Trouble With Bonds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ In early June,global financial markets gyrated downwards in the wake of central banks'tough language on inflation.At one point bond prices reflected expectations of four rate hikes by the US Federal Reserve (Fed) in the next 12 months.As a result,the dollar firmed,oil prices stabilized,and yield curves flattened around the world.If all these inflation-fighting measures are real,the situation bodes well for bonds.But,I think otherwise.

  12. Anodic bonded graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balan, Adrian; Kumar, Rakesh; Boukhicha, Mohamed; Beyssac, Olivier; Bouillard, Jean-Claude; Taverna, Dario; Sacks, William; Marangolo, Massimiliano; Lacaze, Emanuelle; Gohler, Roger; Escoffier, Walter; Poumirol, Jean-Marie; Shukla, Abhay

    2010-09-01

    We show how to prepare graphene samples on a glass substrate with the anodic bonding method. In this method, a graphite precursor in flake form is bonded to a glass substrate with the help of an electrostatic field and then cleaved off to leave few layer graphene on the substrate. Now that several methods are available for producing graphene, the relevance of our method is in its simplicity and practicality for producing graphene samples of about 100 µm lateral dimensions. This method is also extensible to other layered materials. We discuss some detailed aspects of the fabrication and results from Raman spectroscopy, local probe microscopy and transport measurements on these samples.

  13. Anodic bonded graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balan, Adrian; Kumar, Rakesh; Boukhicha, Mohamed; Beyssac, Olivier; Bouillard, Jean-Claude; Taverna, Dario; Sacks, William; Shukla, Abhay [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, CNRS-UMR7590, Institut de Mineralogie et de Physique des Milieux Condenses, 140 rue de Lourmel, Paris, F-75015 France (France); Marangolo, Massimiliano; Lacaze, Emanuelle; Gohler, Roger [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, CNRS-UMR7588, Institut des Nanosciences de Paris, 140 rue de Lourmel, Paris, F-75015 France (France); Escoffier, Walter; Poumirol, Jean-Marie, E-mail: abhay.shukla@upmc.f [Laboratoire National des Champs Magnetiques Intenses, INSA UPS CNRS, UPR 3228, Universite de Toulouse, 143 avenue de Rangueil, 31400 Toulouse (France)

    2010-09-22

    We show how to prepare graphene samples on a glass substrate with the anodic bonding method. In this method, a graphite precursor in flake form is bonded to a glass substrate with the help of an electrostatic field and then cleaved off to leave few layer graphene on the substrate. Now that several methods are available for producing graphene, the relevance of our method is in its simplicity and practicality for producing graphene samples of about 100 {mu}m lateral dimensions. This method is also extensible to other layered materials. We discuss some detailed aspects of the fabrication and results from Raman spectroscopy, local probe microscopy and transport measurements on these samples.

  14. Hydrogen bonded supramolecular materials

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Zhan-Ting

    2015-01-01

    This book is an up-to-date text covering topics in utilizing hydrogen bonding for constructing functional architectures and supramolecular materials. The first chapter addresses the control of photo-induced electron and energy transfer. The second chapter summarizes the formation of nano-porous materials. The following two chapters introduce self-assembled gels, many of which exhibit unique functions. Other chapters cover the advances in supramolecular liquid crystals and the versatility of hydrogen bonding in tuning/improving the properties and performance of materials. This book is designed

  15. Cooperativity in beryllium bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkorta, Ibon; Elguero, José; Yáñez, Manuel; Mó, Otilia

    2014-03-07

    A theoretical study of the beryllium bonded clusters of the (iminomethyl)beryllium hydride and (iminomethyl)beryllium fluoride [HC(BeX)=NH, X = H, F] molecules has been carried out at the B3LYP/6-311++G(3df,2p) level of theory. Linear and cyclic clusters have been characterized up to the decamer. The geometric, energetic, electronic and NMR properties of the clusters clearly indicate positive cooperativity. The evolution of the molecular properties, as the size of the cluster increases, is similar to those reported in polymers held together by hydrogen bonds.

  16. Hydrogen bond and halogen bond inside the carbon nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weizhou; Wang, Donglai; Zhang, Yu; Ji, Baoming; Tian, Anmin

    2011-02-01

    The hydrogen bond and halogen bond inside the open-ended single-walled carbon nanotubes have been investigated theoretically employing the newly developed density functional M06 with the suitable basis set and the natural bond orbital analysis. Comparing with the hydrogen or halogen bond in the gas phase, we find that the strength of the hydrogen or halogen bond inside the carbon nanotube will become weaker if there is a larger intramolecular electron-density transfer from the electron-rich region of the hydrogen or halogen atom donor to the antibonding orbital of the X-H or X-Hal bond involved in the formation of the hydrogen or halogen bond and will become stronger if there is a larger intermolecular electron-density transfer from the electron-rich region of the hydrogen or halogen atom acceptor to the antibonding orbital of the X-H or X-Hal bond. According to the analysis of the molecular electrostatic potential of the carbon nanotube, the driving force for the electron-density transfer is found to be the negative electric field formed in the carbon nanotube inner phase. Our results also show that the X-H bond involved in the formation of the hydrogen bond and the X-Hal bond involved in the formation of the halogen bond are all elongated when encapsulating the hydrogen bond and halogen bond within the carbon nanotube, so the carbon nanotube confinement may change the blue-shifting hydrogen bond and the blue-shifting halogen bond into the red-shifting hydrogen bond and the red-shifting halogen bond. The possibility to replace the all electron nanotube-confined calculation by the simple polarizable continuum model is also evaluated.

  17. Safe-by-Design CuO Nanoparticles via Fe-Doping, Cu-O Bond Length Variation, and Biological Assessment in Cells and Zebrafish Embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naatz, Hendrik; Lin, Sijie; Li, Ruibin; Jiang, Wen; Ji, Zhaoxia; Chang, Chong Hyun; Köser, Jan; Thöming, Jorg; Xia, Tian; Nel, Andre E; Mädler, Lutz; Pokhrel, Suman

    2017-01-24

    The safe implementation of nanotechnology requires nanomaterial hazard assessment in accordance with the material physicochemical properties that trigger the injury response at the nano/bio interface. Since CuO nanoparticles (NPs) are widely used industrially and their dissolution properties play a major role in hazard potential, we hypothesized that tighter bonding of Cu to Fe by particle doping could constitute a safer-by-design approach through decreased dissolution. Accordingly, we designed a combinatorial library in which CuO was doped with 1-10% Fe in a flame spray pyrolysis reactor. The morphology and structural properties were determined by XRD, BET, Raman spectroscopy, HRTEM, EFTEM, and EELS, which demonstrated a significant reduction in the apical Cu-O bond length while simultaneously increasing the planar bond length (Jahn-Teller distortion). Hazard screening was performed in tissue culture cell lines and zebrafish embryos to discern the change in the hazardous effects of doped vs nondoped particles. This demonstrated that with increased levels of doping there was a progressive decrease in cytotoxicity in BEAS-2B and THP-1 cells, as well as an incremental decrease in the rate of hatching interference in zebrafish embryos. The dissolution profiles were determined and the surface reactions taking place in Holtfreter's solution were validated using cyclic voltammetry measurements to demonstrate that the Cu(+)/Cu(2+) and Fe(2+)/Fe(3+) redox species play a major role in the dissolution process of pure and Fe-doped CuO. Altogether, a safe-by-design strategy was implemented for the toxic CuO particles via Fe doping and has been demonstrated for their safe use in the environment.

  18. Shear bond strength of the Tenure Solution dentin bonding system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkmeier, W W; Cooley, R L

    1989-10-01

    A liquid solution of an oxalate bonding system containing NTG-GMA and PMDM has become commercially available. The bond strength of this oxalate adhesive (Tenure Solution) to dentin was determined by bonding composite resin cylinders to extracted teeth. The bond strengths obtained in this study are compared to the bond strengths obtained in earlier studies with the first and second generation oxalate adhesives whose components were supplied as powders and required mixing. The oxalate solutions developed significantly higher bond strengths than the original powder type systems.

  19. Bonding in cementitious composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mindess, S. (British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada)) Shah, S.P. (Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (USA))

    1988-01-01

    These proceedings discuss the papers presented at the symposium on the subject of high performance cement composites. Some of the topics discussed were; calcium hydroxides treated ceramics microspheres and mechanical properties of high temperature light weight cements; microstructure and chemical variations of class F fly ash; microstructure and bond strength of cement and crack propagation as detected by laser holography and acoustic emission.

  20. Photochemical tissue bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmond, Robert W.; Kochevar, Irene E.

    2012-01-10

    Photochemical tissue bonding methods include the application of a photosensitizer to a tissue and/or tissue graft, followed by irradiation with electromagnetic energy to produce a tissue seal. The methods are useful for tissue adhesion, such as in wound closure, tissue grafting, skin grafting, musculoskeletal tissue repair, ligament or tendon repair and corneal repair.

  1. Thermal Bond System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-10-31

    a twill weave, a crowfoot weave, a satin weave (FIG. 2), and a leno weave. Descriptions of the various weave types can be found in " Composite ...together to define a fabric mesh having first and second opposing woven surfaces. An adhesive bond that is flowable prior to drying is used to wet and

  2. Mechanical Performance and Fracture Behavior of Microscale Cu/Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu/Cu Joints under Electro-tensile Coupled Loads%电-力耦合作用下Cu/Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu/Cu微焊点的拉伸力学性能和断裂行为

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李望云; 秦红波; 周敏波; 张新平

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical performance and fracture behavior of microscale line-type Cu/Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu/Cu joints under electro-tensile coupled loads are investigated, comparing with those in tests under tensile load and under electro-tensile coupled loads following electromigration test. The focus is placed on clarifying the effect of electro-tensile coupled loads with a current density of 1.0×104 A/cm2 on the tensile fracture behavior of joints, and the effect of electro-tensile coupled loads is explained based on Joule heating and electromigraion effect induced by electric current, in terms of the influence of electric current on the diffusion of atoms and vacancies, the change of vacancy concentration, and dislocation slipping and climbing. Results show that the stress-strain curves of solder joints under electro-tensile coupled loads exhibit three distinct stages, i.e., fast deformation stage at the beginning of loading, linear deformation stage, and the accelerating fracture stage. The fast deformation stage is dominated by thermo-elastic deformation induced by Joule heating. It is worth noting that only the linear deformation stage and accelerating fracture stage exist in joints under either tensile load or electro-tensile coupled loads following electromigration test. Furthermore, the fracture strength and strain is the lowest, and the equivalent modulus is the highest in joints under electro-tensile coupled loads following electromigration test, while it is reverse in joints under tensile load. Moreover, the orientation of β-Sn phase tends to rearrange along the direction of electric current and tensile load, and the fracture occurs in the middle of solder joints with a ductile fracture mode regardless loading conditions.%对比研究三明治结构线形Cu/Sn-3.0Ag-0.5Cu/Cu微焊点在拉伸、电-拉伸和电迁移后电-拉伸三种加载模式下的力学行为和断裂特性,并基于电流引发的焦耳热效应和电迁移效应,从电流对原子和空位

  3. Trading in Treasury Bond Futures Contracts and Bonds in Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Belinda Cheung

    2014-01-01

    Treasury bond futures are a key financial product in Australia, with turnover in Treasury bond futures contracts significantly larger than turnover in the market for Commonwealth Government securities (CGS). Treasury bond futures contracts provide a wide variety of market participants with the ability to hedge against, or gain exposure to, interest rate risk. This article discusses some of the features of the Treasury bond futures contract, and how the contract is used to facilitate hedging a...

  4. Indirect bonding technique in orthodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kübra Yıldırım

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available ‘Direct Bonding Technique’ which allows the fixed orthodontic appliances to be directly bonded to teeth without using bands decreased the clinic time for bracket bonding and increased esthetics and oral hygiene during orthodontic treatment. However, mistakes in bracket positioning were observed due to decreased direct visual sight and access to posterior teeth. ‘Indirect Bonding Technique’ was developed for eliminating these problems. Initially, decreased bond strength, higher bond failure rate, periodontal tissue irritation, compromised oral hygiene and increased laboratory time were the main disadvantages of this technique when compared to direct bonding. The newly developed materials and modified techniques help to eliminate these negative consequences. Today, the brackets bonded with indirect technique have similar bond strength with brackets bonded directly. Moreover, indirect and direct bonding techniques have similar effects on periodontal tissues. However, indirect bonding technique requires more attention and precision in laboratory and clinical stage, and has higher cost. Orthodontist's preference between these two bonding techniques may differ according to time spent in laboratory and clinic, cost, patient comfort and personal opinion.

  5. Chip-package nano-structured copper and nickel interconnections with metallic and polymeric bonding interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Ankur

    With the semiconductor industry racing toward a historic transition, nano chips with less than 45 nm features demand I/Os in excess of 20,000 that support computing speed in terabits per second, with multi-core processors aggregately providing highest bandwidth at lowest power. On the other hand, emerging mixed signal systems are driving the need for 3D packaging with embedded active components and ultra-short interconnections. Decreasing I/O pitch together with low cost, high electrical performance and high reliability are the key technological challenges identified by the 2005 International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS). Being able to provide several fold increase in the chip-to-package vertical interconnect density is essential for garnering the true benefits of nanotechnology that will utilize nano-scale devices. Electrical interconnections are multi-functional materials that must also be able to withstand complex, sustained and cyclic thermo-mechanical loads. In addition, the materials must be environmentally-friendly, corrosion resistant, thermally stable over a long time, and resistant to electro-migration. A major challenge is also to develop economic processes that can be integrated into back end of the wafer foundry, i.e. with wafer level packaging. Device-to-system board interconnections are typically accomplished today with either wire bonding or solders. Both of these are incremental and run into either electrical or mechanical barriers as they are extended to higher density of interconnections. Downscaling traditional solder bump interconnect will not satisfy the thermo-mechanical reliability requirements at very fine pitches of the order of 30 microns and less. Alternate interconnection approaches such as compliant interconnects typically require lengthy connections and are therefore limited in terms of electrical properties, although expected to meet the mechanical requirements. A novel chip-package interconnection technology is

  6. China-Russia Bond

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji Zhiye; Ma Zongshi

    2007-01-01

    @@ Thanks to China's successful launching of the Year of Russia, 2006 will surely go down as a milestone in the history of the China-Russia bond. Furthermore, a still-warmer climate will continue to prevail in 2007 when Moscow, in its turn, hosts the Year of China, trying to outshine its next-door neighbor in this regard, as Russian President Vladimir Putin promised in the exchange of new year greetings with his Chinese counterpart, President Hu Jintao.

  7. Direct bonded space maintainers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, V L; Almeida, M A; Mello, H S; Keith, O

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate clinically a bonded space maintainer, which would reduce chair-side time and cost. Sixty appliances were fabricated from 0.7 mm stainless steel round wire and bonded using light-cured composite to the two teeth adjacent to the site of extraction of a posterior primary tooth. Twenty males and sixteen females (age range 5-9-years-old) were selected from the Pedodontic clinic of the State University of Rio de Janeiro. The sixty space maintainers were divided into two groups according to the site in which they were placed: a) absent first primary molar and b) absent second primary molar. Impressions and study models were obtained prior to and 6 months after bonding the appliances. During this period only 8.3% of failures were observed, most of them from occlusal or facial trauma. Student t-test did not show statistically significant alterations in the sizes of the maintained spaces during the trial period.

  8. Coulombic Models in Chemical Bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacks, Lawrence J.

    1986-01-01

    Compares the coulumbic point charge model for hydrogen chloride with the valence bond model. It is not possible to assign either a nonpolar or ionic canonical form of the valence bond model, while the covalent-ionic bond distribution does conform to the point charge model. (JM)

  9. Optimal Investment in Structured Bonds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Pernille; Jørgensen, Peter Løchte

    The paper examines the role of structured bonds in the optimal portfolio of a small retail investor. We consider the typical structured bond essentially repacking an exotic option and a zero coupon bond, i.e. an investment with portfolio insurance. The optimal portfolio is found when the investment...

  10. Mittal bonded tongue thrusting appliance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rekha Mittal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available These days majority of orthodontist includes bonded molar attachment in their inventory to eliminate the discomfort of molar separation during initial appointment and band spaces left at the end of treatment. This article describes a innovative and economical method of attachment of bonded tongue crib if required during the initial or later stages of treatment along with bonded molar tubes.

  11. The chemical bond in inorganic chemistry the bond valence model

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, I David

    2016-01-01

    The bond valence model is a version of the ionic model in which the chemical constraints are expressed in terms of localized chemical bonds formed by the valence charge of the atoms. Theorems derived from the properties of the electrostatic flux predict the rules obeyed by both ionic and covalent bonds. They make quantitative predictions of coordination number, crystal structure, bond lengths and bond angles. Bond stability depends on the matching of the bonding strengths of the atoms, while the conflicting requirements of chemistry and space lead to the structural instabilities responsible for the unusual physical properties displayed by some materials. The model has applications in many fields ranging from mineralogy to molecular biology.

  12. Titanium-Based Getter Solution for Wafer-Level MEMS Vacuum Packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chidambaram, Vivek; Ling, Xie; Bangtao, Chen

    2013-03-01

    Ultrahigh-vacuum conditions can be achieved by employing porous absorbent materials such as Ti, Zr, Ta, and Yt. Commercial getters are primarily Zr-based, since Zr possesses the best adsorption characteristics. Titanium is not considered as a candidate, since adsorption of gases by Ti is significantly reduced due to oxidation and other contamination. In the present work, it is demonstrated that the adsorption property of Ti can be substantially enhanced and benchmarked against other Zr-based commercial getters by employing a sacrificial layer such as Ni over Ti, and also by using other surface engineering techniques. It has been confirmed that, in addition to the activation temperature, the vacuum level during getter activation also plays a pivotal role in influencing the adsorption characteristics of Ti. It has been determined that the getter life could be significantly improved by the reversible adsorption characteristic of H2 gas, facilitating regeneration cycles.

  13. Integrated Solar Power Converters: Wafer-Level Sub-Module Integrated DC/DC Converter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2012-02-09

    Solar ADEPT Project: CU-Boulder is developing advanced power conversion components that can be integrated into individual solar panels to improve energy yields. The solar energy that is absorbed and collected by a solar panel is converted into useable energy for the grid through an electronic component called an inverter. Many large, conventional solar energy systems use one, central inverter to convert energy. CU-Boulder is integrating smaller, microinverters into individual solar panels to improve the efficiency of energy collection. The University’s microinverters rely on electrical components that direct energy at high speeds and ensure that minimal energy is lost during the conversion process—improving the overall efficiency of the power conversion process. CU-Boulder is designing its power conversion devices for use on any type of solar panel.

  14. Self-adaptive phosphor coating technology for wafer-level scale chip packaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Linsong; Rao Haibo; Wang Wei; Wan Xianlong; Liao Junyuan; Wang Xuemei; Zhou Da

    2013-01-01

    A new self-adaptive phosphor coating technology has been successfully developed,which adopted a slurry method combined with a self-exposure process.A phosphor suspension in the water-soluble photoresist was applied and exposed to LED blue light itself and developed to form a conformal phosphor coating with selfadaptability to the angular distribution of intensity of blue light and better-performing spatial color uniformity.The self-adaptive phosphor coating technology had been successfully adopted in the wafer surface to realize a waferlevel scale phosphor conformal coating.The first-stage experiments show satisfying results and give an adequate demonstration of the flexibility of self-adaptive coating technology on application of WLSCP.

  15. Substrate Crosstalk Suppression Using Wafer-Level Packaging: Metalized Through-Substrate Trench Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinaga, S.M.

    2010-01-01

    The demand for miniaturization technology has been increasing over the last decades. Consumer electronics end-users often, if not always, go for more functionality and practicality. This is translated into systems that are more complex and yet smaller in size such as smart cellular phones and portab

  16. IC Compatible Wafer Level Fabrication of Silicon Nanowire Field Effect Transistors for Biosensing Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moh, T.S.Y.

    2013-01-01

    In biosensing, nano-devices such as Silicon Nanowire Field Effect Transistors (SiNW FETs) are promising components/sensors for ultra-high sensitive detection, especially when samples are low in concentration or a limited volume is available. Current processing of SiNW FETs often relies on expensive

  17. Hybrid Wafer-Level Packaging for RF-MEMS and Optoelectronic Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tian, J.

    2013-01-01

    The current trend in electronic packaging research is to integrate more functions into one package, reduce electrical path parasitic, and increase the heat conduction in order to make the final packaged system smaller, more reliable, more functional and more complete, while keeping the packaging

  18. Digital Platform for Wafer-Level MEMS Testing and Characterization Using Electrical Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuno Brito

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The uniqueness of microelectromechanical system (MEMS devices, with their multiphysics characteristics, presents some limitations to the borrowed test methods from traditional integrated circuits (IC manufacturing. Although some improvements have been performed, this specific area still lags behind when compared to the design and manufacturing competencies developed over the last decades by the IC industry. A complete digital solution for fast testing and characterization of inertial sensors with built-in actuation mechanisms is presented in this paper, with a fast, full-wafer test as a leading ambition. The full electrical approach and flexibility of modern hardware design technologies allow a fast adaptation for other physical domains with minimum effort. The digital system encloses a processor and the tailored signal acquisition, processing, control, and actuation hardware control modules, capable of the structure position and response analysis when subjected to controlled actuation signals in real time. The hardware performance, together with the simplicity of the sequential programming on a processor, results in a flexible and powerful tool to evaluate the newest and fastest control algorithms. The system enables measurement of resonant frequency (Fr, quality factor (Q, and pull-in voltage (Vpi within 1.5 s with repeatability better than 5 ppt (parts per thousand. A full-wafer with 420 devices under test (DUTs has been evaluated detecting the faulty devices and providing important design specification feedback to the designers.

  19. Effects of wafer-level packaging on millimetre-wave antennas

    KAUST Repository

    Abutarboush, Hattan

    2011-11-01

    A cost-effective antenna package suitable for mass production mm-wave applications is investigated. Different packaging material that can be possibly used in mm-wave antennas are presented and compared. Moreover, this study investigates different methods of packaging millimetre-wave (60 GHz) MEMS antennas. The paper first introduces the custom needs for optimum operation of the MEMS antenna and then examines the current available enabling technologies for packaging. The sensitivity of the antenna\\'s reflection coefficient, gain and radiation efficiency to the packaging environment is investigated through EM simulations. © 2011 IEEE.

  20. Wafer level reliability monitoring strategy of an advanced multi-process CMOS foundry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scarpa, Andrea; Tao, Guoqiao; Kuper, F.G.

    2000-01-01

    In an advanced multi-process CMOS foundry it is strategically important to make use of an optimum reliability monitoring strategy, in order to be able to run well controlled processes. Philips Semiconductors Business Unit Foundries wafer fab MOS4YOU has developed an end-of-line ultra-fast

  1. High Throughput, High Precision Hot Testing Tool for HBLED Wafer Level Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solarz, Richard [KLA-Tencor Corporation, Milpitas, CA (United States); McCord, Mark [KLA-Tencor Corporation, Milpitas, CA (United States)

    2015-12-31

    The Socrates research effort developed an in depth understanding and demonstrated in a prototype tool new precise methods for teh characterization of color characteristics and flux from individual LEDs for the production of uniform quality lighting. This effort was focused on improving the color quality and consistency of solid state lighting and potentially reducing characterization costs for all LED product types. The patented laser hot testing method was demonstrated to be far more accurate than all current state of the art color and flux characterization methods in use by the solid state lighting industry today. A seperately patented LED grouping method (statistical binning) was demonstrated to be a useful approach to improving utilization of entire lots of large color and flux distributions of manufactured LEDs for high quality color solid-state lighting. At the conclusion of the research in late 2015 the solid-state lighting industry was however generally satisfied with its existing production methods for high quality color products for the small segment of customers that demand it, albeit with added costs.

  2. Hybrid Wafer-Level Packaging for RF-MEMS and Optoelectronic Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tian, J.

    2013-01-01

    The current trend in electronic packaging research is to integrate more functions into one package, reduce electrical path parasitic, and increase the heat conduction in order to make the final packaged system smaller, more reliable, more functional and more complete, while keeping the packaging cos

  3. Wafer level reliability monitoring strategy of an advanced multi-process CMOS foundry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scarpa, Andrea; Tao, Guoqiao; Kuper, Fred G.

    2000-01-01

    In an advanced multi-process CMOS foundry it is strategically important to make use of an optimum reliability monitoring strategy, in order to be able to run well controlled processes. Philips Semiconductors Business Unit Foundries wafer fab MOS4YOU has developed an end-of-line ultra-fast reliabilit

  4. Graphitized silicon carbide microbeams: wafer-level, self-aligned graphene on silicon wafers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunning, Benjamin V; Ahmed, Mohsin; Mishra, Neeraj; Kermany, Atieh Ranjbar; Wood, Barry; Iacopi, Francesca

    2014-08-15

    Currently proven methods that are used to obtain devices with high-quality graphene on silicon wafers involve the transfer of graphene flakes from a growth substrate, resulting in fundamental limitations for large-scale device fabrication. Moreover, the complex three-dimensional structures of interest for microelectromechanical and nanoelectromechanical systems are hardly compatible with such transfer processes. Here, we introduce a methodology for obtaining thousands of microbeams, made of graphitized silicon carbide on silicon, through a site-selective and wafer-scale approach. A Ni-Cu alloy catalyst mediates a self-aligned graphitization on prepatterned SiC microstructures at a temperature that is compatible with silicon technologies. The graphene nanocoating leads to a dramatically enhanced electrical conductivity, which elevates this approach to an ideal method for the replacement of conductive metal films in silicon carbide-based MEMS and NEMS devices.

  5. Design and development of wafer-level near-infrared micro-camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeller, John W.; Rouse, Caitlin; Efstathiadis, Harry; Haldar, Pradeep; Dhar, Nibir K.; Lewis, Jay S.; Wijewarnasuriya, Priyalal; Puri, Yash R.; Sood, Ashok K.

    2015-08-01

    SiGe offers a low-cost alternative to conventional infrared sensor material systems such as InGaAs, InSb, and HgCdTe for developing near-infrared (NIR) photodetector devices that do not require cooling and can offer high bandwidths and responsivities. As a result of the significant difference in thermal expansion coefficients between germanium and silicon, tensile strain incorporated into Ge epitaxial layers deposited on Si utilizing specialized growth processes can extend the operational range of detection to 1600 nm and longer wavelengths. We have fabricated SiGe based PIN detector devices on 300 mm diameter Si wafers in order to take advantage of high throughput, large-area complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology. This device fabrication process involves low temperature epitaxial deposition of Ge to form a thin p+ seed/buffer layer, followed by higher temperature deposition of a thicker Ge intrinsic layer. An n+-Ge layer formed by ion implantation of phosphorus, passivating oxide cap, and then top copper contacts complete the PIN photodetector design. Various techniques including transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) have been employed to characterize the material and structural properties of the epitaxial growth and fabricated detector devices. In addition, electrical characterization was performed to compare the I-V dark current vs. photocurrent response as well as the time and wavelength varying photoresponse properties of the fabricated devices, results of which are likewise presented.

  6. IC Compatible Wafer Level Fabrication of Silicon Nanowire Field Effect Transistors for Biosensing Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moh, T.S.Y.

    2013-01-01

    In biosensing, nano-devices such as Silicon Nanowire Field Effect Transistors (SiNW FETs) are promising components/sensors for ultra-high sensitive detection, especially when samples are low in concentration or a limited volume is available. Current processing of SiNW FETs often relies on expensive

  7. Digital Platform for Wafer-Level MEMS Testing and Characterization Using Electrical Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, Nuno; Ferreira, Carlos; Alves, Filipe; Cabral, Jorge; Gaspar, João; Monteiro, João; Rocha, Luís

    2016-01-01

    The uniqueness of microelectromechanical system (MEMS) devices, with their multiphysics characteristics, presents some limitations to the borrowed test methods from traditional integrated circuits (IC) manufacturing. Although some improvements have been performed, this specific area still lags behind when compared to the design and manufacturing competencies developed over the last decades by the IC industry. A complete digital solution for fast testing and characterization of inertial sensors with built-in actuation mechanisms is presented in this paper, with a fast, full-wafer test as a leading ambition. The full electrical approach and flexibility of modern hardware design technologies allow a fast adaptation for other physical domains with minimum effort. The digital system encloses a processor and the tailored signal acquisition, processing, control, and actuation hardware control modules, capable of the structure position and response analysis when subjected to controlled actuation signals in real time. The hardware performance, together with the simplicity of the sequential programming on a processor, results in a flexible and powerful tool to evaluate the newest and fastest control algorithms. The system enables measurement of resonant frequency (Fr), quality factor (Q), and pull-in voltage (Vpi) within 1.5 s with repeatability better than 5 ppt (parts per thousand). A full-wafer with 420 devices under test (DUTs) has been evaluated detecting the faulty devices and providing important design specification feedback to the designers. PMID:27657087

  8. Digital Platform for Wafer-Level MEMS Testing and Characterization Using Electrical Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, Nuno; Ferreira, Carlos; Alves, Filipe; Cabral, Jorge; Gaspar, João; Monteiro, João; Rocha, Luís

    2016-09-21

    The uniqueness of microelectromechanical system (MEMS) devices, with their multiphysics characteristics, presents some limitations to the borrowed test methods from traditional integrated circuits (IC) manufacturing. Although some improvements have been performed, this specific area still lags behind when compared to the design and manufacturing competencies developed over the last decades by the IC industry. A complete digital solution for fast testing and characterization of inertial sensors with built-in actuation mechanisms is presented in this paper, with a fast, full-wafer test as a leading ambition. The full electrical approach and flexibility of modern hardware design technologies allow a fast adaptation for other physical domains with minimum effort. The digital system encloses a processor and the tailored signal acquisition, processing, control, and actuation hardware control modules, capable of the structure position and response analysis when subjected to controlled actuation signals in real time. The hardware performance, together with the simplicity of the sequential programming on a processor, results in a flexible and powerful tool to evaluate the newest and fastest control algorithms. The system enables measurement of resonant frequency (Fr), quality factor (Q), and pull-in voltage (Vpi) within 1.5 s with repeatability better than 5 ppt (parts per thousand). A full-wafer with 420 devices under test (DUTs) has been evaluated detecting the faulty devices and providing important design specification feedback to the designers.

  9. Delta-Doping at Wafer Level for High Throughput, High Yield Fabrication of Silicon Imaging Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoenk, Michael E. (Inventor); Nikzad, Shoulch (Inventor); Jones, Todd J. (Inventor); Greer, Frank (Inventor); Carver, Alexander G. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Systems and methods for producing high quantum efficiency silicon devices. A silicon MBE has a preparation chamber that provides for cleaning silicon surfaces using an oxygen plasma to remove impurities and a gaseous (dry) NH3 + NF3 room temperature oxide removal process that leaves the silicon surface hydrogen terminated. Silicon wafers up to 8 inches in diameter have devices that can be fabricated using the cleaning procedures and MBE processing, including delta doping.

  10. Heterogeneous Electronics – Wafer Level Integration, Packaging, and Assembly Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This facility integrates active electronics with microelectromechanical (MEMS) devices at the miniature system scale. It obviates current size-, weight-, and power...

  11. Assessing out-of-band flare effects at the wafer level for EUV lithography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, Simi; Naulleau, Patrick; Kemp, Charles; Denham, Paul; Rekawa, Senajith

    2010-01-25

    To accurately estimate the flare contribution from the out-of-band (OOB), the integration of a DUV source into the SEMATECH Berkeley 0.3-NA Micro-field Exposure tool is proposed, enabling precisely controlled exposures along with the EUV patterning of resists in vacuum. First measurements evaluating the impact of bandwidth selected exposures with a table-top set-up and subsequent EUV patterning show significant impact on line-edge roughness and process performance. We outline a simulation-based method for computing the effective flare from resist sensitive wavelengths as a function of mask pattern types and sizes. This simulation method is benchmarked against measured OOB flare measurements and the results obtained are in agreement.

  12. Non-Destructive Damping Measurement for Wafer-Level Packaged Microelectromechanical System (MEMS) Acceleration Switches

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Joint Fuze Technology Program (JFTP) provided the funding behind the production of the 60G MEMS impact switches. The JFTP MEMS impact switches are...Conference 2013, VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, 2013. 8. Zhang W. Energy dissipations in MEMS resonators: fluid damping of flexural resonators...Research Laboratory CAD computer-aided design DUT device under test HEMDP harmonic excitation modal damping predictor JFTP Joint Fuze Technology

  13. Wafer-level micro-optics: trends in manufacturing, testing, packaging, and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelkel, Reinhard; Gong, Li; Rieck, Juergen; Zheng, Alan

    2012-11-01

    Micro-optics is an indispensable key enabling technology (KET) for many products and applications today. Probably the most prestigious examples are the diffractive light shaping elements used in high-end DUV lithography steppers. Highly efficient refractive and diffractive micro-optical elements are used for precise beam and pupil shaping. Micro-optics had a major impact on the reduction of aberrations and diffraction effects in projection lithography, allowing a resolution enhancement from 250 nm to 45 nm within the last decade. Micro-optics also plays a decisive role in medical devices (endoscopes, ophthalmology), in all laser-based devices and fiber communication networks (supercomputer, ROADM), bringing high-speed internet to our homes (FTTH). Even our modern smart phones contain a variety of micro-optical elements. For example, LED flashlight shaping elements, the secondary camera, and ambient light and proximity sensors. Wherever light is involved, micro-optics offers the chance to further miniaturize a device, to improve its performance, or to reduce manufacturing and packaging costs. Wafer-scale micro-optics fabrication is based on technology established by semiconductor industry. Thousands of components are fabricated in parallel on a wafer. We report on the state of the art in wafer-based manufacturing, testing, packaging and present examples and applications for micro-optical components and systems.

  14. Substrate Crosstalk Suppression Using Wafer-Level Packaging: Metalized Through-Substrate Trench Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinaga, S.M.

    2010-01-01

    The demand for miniaturization technology has been increasing over the last decades. Consumer electronics end-users often, if not always, go for more functionality and practicality. This is translated into systems that are more complex and yet smaller in size such as smart cellular phones and portab

  15. Heterogeneous Electronics – Wafer Level Integration, Packaging, and Assembly Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This facility integrates active electronics with microelectromechanical (MEMS) devices at the miniature system scale. It obviates current size-, weight-, and power...

  16. Optimal Investment in Structured Bonds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Pernille; Jørgensen, Peter Løchte

    The paper examines the role of structured bonds in the optimal portfolio of a small retail investor. We consider the typical structured bond essentially repacking an exotic option and a zero coupon bond, i.e. an investment with portfolio insurance. The optimal portfolio is found when the investment...... opportunities consist of a risky reference fund, a risk-free asset and a structured bond. Key model elements are the trading strategy and utility function of the investor. Our numerical results indicate structured bonds do have basis for consideration in the optimal portfolio. The product holdings...

  17. Additional disulfide bonds in insulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Tine N; Pettersson, Ingrid; Huus, Kasper

    2015-01-01

    The structure of insulin, a glucose homeostasis-controlling hormone, is highly conserved in all vertebrates and stabilized by three disulfide bonds. Recently, we designed a novel insulin analogue containing a fourth disulfide bond located between positions A10-B4. The N-terminus of insulin's B......-chain is flexible and can adapt multiple conformations. We examined how well disulfide bond predictions algorithms could identify disulfide bonds in this region of insulin. In order to identify stable insulin analogues with additional disulfide bonds, which could be expressed, the Cβ cut-off distance had...... in comparison to analogues with additional disulfide bonds that were more difficult to predict. In contrast, addition of the fourth disulfide bond rendered all analogues resistant to fibrillation under stress conditions and all stable analogues bound to the insulin receptor with picomolar affinities. Thus...

  18. Bond strength of direct and indirect bonded brackets after thermocycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daub, Jacob; Berzins, David W; Linn, Brandon James; Bradley, Thomas Gerard

    2006-03-01

    Thermocycling simulates the temperature dynamics in the oral environment. With direct bonding, thermocycling reduces the bond strength of orthodontic adhesives to tooth structure. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strengths (SBS) of one direct and two indirect bonding methods/adhesives after thermocycling. Sixty human premolars were divided into three groups. Teeth in group 1 were bonded directly with Transbond XT. Teeth in group 2 were indirect bonded with Transbond XT/Sondhi Rapid Set, which is chemically cured. Teeth in group 3 were indirect bonded with Enlight LV/Orthosolo and light cured. Each sample was thermocycled between 5 degrees C and 55 degrees C for 500 cycles. Mean SBS in groups 1, 2, and 3 were not statistically significantly different (13.6 +/- 2.9, 12.3 +/- 3.0, and 11.6 +/- 3.2 MPa, respectively; P > .05). However, when these values were compared with the results of a previous study using the same protocol, but without thermocycling, the SBS was reduced significantly (P = .001). Weibull analysis further showed that group 3 had the lowest bonding survival rate at the minimum clinically acceptable bond-strength range. The Adhesive Remnant Index was also determined, and group 2 had a significantly (P bond failures at the resin/enamel interface.

  19. Comparison of Bond in Roll-bonded and Adhesively Bonded Aluminums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwensfeir, R. J., Jr.; Trenkler, G.; Delagi, R. G.; Forster, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    Lap-shear and peel test measurements of bond strength have been carried out as part of an investigation of roll bonding of 2024 and 7075 aluminum alloys. Shear strengths of the bonded material in the F temper are in the range of 14 to 16 ksi. Corresponding peel strengths are 120 to 130 lb/inch. These values, which are three to five times those reported in the literature for adhesively bonded 2024 and 7075, are a result of the true metallurgical bond achieved. The effects of heat-treating the bonded material are described and the improvements in bond strength discussed relative to the shear strength of the parent material. The significance of the findings for aerospace applications is discussed.

  20. Bond strength with custom base indirect bonding techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klocke, Arndt; Shi, Jianmin; Kahl-Nieke, Bärbel; Bismayer, Ulrich

    2003-04-01

    Different types of adhesives for indirect bonding techniques have been introduced recently. But there is limited information regarding bond strength with these new materials. In this in vitro investigation, stainless steel brackets were bonded to 100 permanent bovine incisors using the Thomas technique, the modified Thomas technique, and light-cured direct bonding for a control group. The following five groups of 20 teeth each were formed: (1) modified Thomas technique with thermally cured base composite (Therma Cure) and chemically cured sealant (Maximum Cure), (2) Thomas technique with thermally cured base composite (Therma Cure) and chemically cured sealant (Custom I Q), (3) Thomas technique with light-cured base composite (Transbond XT) and chemically cured sealant (Sondhi Rapid Set), (4) modified Thomas technique with chemically cured base adhesive (Phase II) and chemically cured sealant (Maximum Cure), and (5) control group directly bonded with light-cured adhesive (Transbond XT). Mean bond strengths in groups 3, 4, and 5 were 14.99 +/- 2.85, 15.41 +/- 3.21, and 13.88 +/- 2.33 MPa, respectively, and these groups were not significantly different from each other. Groups 1 (mean bond strength 7.28 +/- 4.88 MPa) and 2 (mean bond strength 7.07 +/- 4.11 MPa) showed significantly lower bond strengths than groups 3, 4, and 5 and a higher probability of bond failure. Both the original (group 2) and the modified (group 1) Thomas technique were able to achieve bond strengths comparable to the light-cured direct bonded control group.

  1. 27 CFR 28.66 - Strengthening bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... bonds. In all cases where the penal sum of any bond becomes insufficient, the principal shall either give a strengthening bond with the same surety to attain a sufficient penal sum, or give a new bond to... of any bond to less than its full penal sum. Strengthening bonds shall show the current date...

  2. A simplified indirect bonding technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radha Katiyar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of lingual orthodontics, indirect bonding technique has become an integral part of practice. It involves placement of brackets initially on the models and then their transfer to teeth with the help of transfer trays. Problems encountered with current indirect bonding techniques used are (1 the possibility of adhesive flash remaining around the base of the brackets which requires removal (2 longer time required for the adhesive to gain enough bond strength for secure tray removal. The new simplified indirect bonding technique presented here overcomes both these problems.

  3. Photoinduced hydrogen-bonding dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Tian-Shu; Xu, Jinmei

    2016-09-01

    Hydrogen bonding dynamics has received extensive research attention in recent years due to the significant advances in femtolaser spectroscopy experiments and quantum chemistry calculations. Usually, photoexcitation would cause changes in the hydrogen bonding formed through the interaction between hydrogen donor and acceptor molecules on their ground electronic states, and such transient strengthening or weakening of hydrogen bonding could be crucial for the photophysical transformations and the subsequent photochemical reactions that occurred on a time scale from tens of femtosecond to a few nanoseconds. In this article, we review the combined experimental and theoretical studies focusing on the ultrafast electronic and vibrational hydrogen bonding dynamics. Through these studies, new mechanisms and proposals and common rules have been put forward to advance our understanding of the hydrogen bondings dynamics in a variety of important photoinduced phenomena like photosynthesis, dual fluorescence emission, rotational reorientation, excited-state proton transfer and charge transfer processes, chemosensor fluorescence sensing, rearrangements of the hydrogen-bond network including forming and breaking hydrogen bond in water. Graphical Abstract We review the recent advances on exploring the photoinduced hydrogen bonding dynamics in solutions through a joint approach of laser spectroscopy and theoretical calculation. The reviewed studies have put forward a new mechanism, new proposal, and new rule for a variety of photoinduced phenomena such as photosynthesis, dual fluorescence emission, rotational reorientation, excited-state proton transfer and charge transfer, chemosensor fluorescence sensing, and rearrangements of the hydrogen-bond network in water.

  4. Wafer bonding applications and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Gösele, Ulrich

    2004-01-01

    During the past decade direct wafer bonding has developed into a mature materials integration technology. This book presents state-of-the-art reviews of the most important applications of wafer bonding written by experts from industry and academia. The topics include bonding-based fabrication methods of silicon-on-insulator, photonic crystals, VCSELs, SiGe-based FETs, MEMS together with hybrid integration and laser lift-off. The non-specialist will learn about the basics of wafer bonding and its various application areas, while the researcher in the field will find up-to-date information about this fast-moving area, including relevant patent information.

  5. Bond Growth under Temperature Gradient.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.K. Satyawali

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Grain and bond growth for dry snow are determined by the distribution of temperature andtemperature gradient in the snow matrix. From the standpoint of particle approach and based oncubic packing structure, a bond growth model has been developed for TG metamorphism. The paper.highlights the importance of bond formation and its effect on snow viscosity and finally on the rateof settlement. This is very important for developing a numerical snow pack model if microstructureis considered to be a basic parameter. A few experiments have been carried out to validate bond formation under temperature gradient.

  6. Reactive Bonding Film for Bonding Carbon Foam Through Metal Extrusion

    CERN Document Server

    Chertok, Maxwell; Irving, Michael; Neher, Christian; Tripathi, Mani; Wang, Ruby; Zheng, Gayle

    2016-01-01

    Future tracking detectors, such as those under development for the High Luminosity LHC, will require mechanical structures employing novel materials to reduce mass while providing excellent strength, thermal conductivity, and radiation tolerance. Adhesion methods for such materials are under study at present. This paper demonstrates the use of reactive bonding film as an adhesion method for bonding carbon foam.

  7. Digital Control of Bonding Force for Gold Wire Bonding Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaochu Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to digitally control the bonding force of a wire bonder precisely, this paper uses a DC solenoid as a force source, and by controlling the solenoid’s current, which causes the electromagnetic force, we can control the bonding force that capillary applies. The bonding force control system in this paper is composed of PC (Personal Computer and hypogyny MCU (Micro Controller Unit, which communicate using a RS485 interface. The digital value of a given bonding force is given by the PC to the MCU. By comparing the sampling current of the solenoid, and through PID regulation, D/A converter of the digital potentiometer and the solenoid driver circuit, the half-closed loop control system of bonding force is accomplished. Tuning of the PID parameters is accomplished with fuzzy adaptive control theory and simulated by Matlab simulink. The control system is tested by comparing the desired bonding force and the force actually applied and examming the relationship between bonding quality and bonding force.

  8. 29 CFR 2580.412-19 - Term of the bond, discovery period, other bond clauses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... SECURITY ACT OF 1974 TEMPORARY BONDING RULES General Bond Rules § 2580.412-19 Term of the bond, discovery... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Term of the bond, discovery period, other bond clauses... new bond must be obtained each year. There is nothing in the Act that prohibits a bond for a...

  9. Bonding resin thixotropy and viscosity influence on dentine bond strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niem, Thomas; Schmidt, Alexander; Wöstmann, Bernd

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the influence of bonding resin thixotropy and viscosity on dentine tubule penetration, blister formation and consequently on dentine bond strength as a function of air-blowing pressure (air-bp) intensity. Two HEMA-free, acetone-based, one-bottle self-etch adhesives with similar composition except disparate silica filler contents and different bonding resin viscosities were investigated. The high-filler-containing adhesive (G-Bond) featured a lower viscous bonding resin with inherent thixotropic resin (TR) properties compared to the low-filler-containing adhesive (iBond) exhibiting a higher viscous bonding resin with non-thixotropic resin (NTR) properties. Shear bond strength tests for each adhesive with low (1.5bar; 0.15MPa; n=16) and high (3.0bar; 0.30MPa; n=16) air-bp application were performed after specimen storage in distilled water (24h; 37.0±1.0°C). Results were analysed using a Student's t-test to identify statistically significant differences (padhesive specimens were morphologically characterised by SEM. Statistically significant bond strength differences were obtained for the thixotropic resin adhesive (high-pressure: 24.6MPa, low-pressure: 9.6MPa). While high air-bp specimens provided SEM images revealing resin-plugged dentine tubules, resin tags and only marginally blister structures, low air-bp left copious droplets and open dentine tubules. In contrast, the non-thixotropic resin adhesive showed no significant bond strength differences (high-pressure: 9.3MPa, low-pressure: 7.6MPa). A pressure-dependent distinct influence of bonding resin thixotropy and viscosity on dentine bond strength has been demonstrated. Stronger adhesion with high air-bp application is explained by improved resin fluidity and facilitated resin penetration into dentine tubules. Filler particles used in adhesive systems may induce thixotropic effects in bonding resin layers, accounting for improved free-flowing resin properties. In combination with high air

  10. Pauling bond strength, bond length and electron density distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibbs, Gerald V.; Ross, Nancy L.; Cox, David F.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Iversen, Bo B.; Spackman, M. A.

    2014-01-18

    A power law regression equation, = 1.46(<ρ(rc)>/r)-0.19, connecting the average experimental bond lengths, , with the average accumulation of the electron density at the bond critical point, <ρ(rc)>, between bonded metal M and oxygen atoms, determined at ambient conditions for oxide crystals, where r is the row number of the M atom, is similar to the regression equation R(M-O) = 1.39(ρ(rc)/r)-0.21 determined for three perovskite crystals for pressures as high as 80 GPa. The two equations are also comparable with those, = 1.43(/r)-0.21, determined for a large number of oxide crystals at ambient conditions and = 1.39(/r)-0.22, determined for geometry optimized hydroxyacid molecules, that connect the bond lengths to the average Pauling electrostatic bond strength, , for the M-O bonded interactions. On the basis of the correspondence between the two sets of equations connecting ρ(rc) and the Pauling bond strength s with bond length, it appears that Pauling’s simple definition of bond strength closely mimics the accumulation of the electron density between bonded pairs of atoms. The similarity of the expressions for the crystals and molecules is compelling evidence that the M-O bonded interactions for the crystals and molecules 2 containing the same bonded interactions are comparable. Similar expressions, connecting bond lengths and bond strength, have also been found to hold for fluoride, nitride and sulfide molecules and crystals. The Brown-Shannon bond valence, σ, power law expression σ = [R1/(R(M-O)]N that has found wide use in crystal chemistry, is shown to be connected to a more universal expression determined for oxides and the perovskites, <ρ(rc)> = r[(1.41)/]4.76, demonstrating that the bond valence for a bonded interaction is likewise closely connected to the accumulation of the electron density between the bonded atoms. Unlike the Brown-Shannon expression, it is universal in that it holds for the M

  11. Computational Chemistry of Adhesive Bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Donald H.

    1999-01-01

    This investigation is intended to determine the electrical mechanical, and chemical properties of adhesive bonds at the molecular level. The initial determinations will be followed by investigations of the effects of environmental effects on the chemistry and properties of the bond layer.

  12. SOCIAL BONDING: REGULATION BY NEUROPEPTIDES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia eLieberwirth

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Affiliative social relationships (e.g., among spouses, family members, and friends play an essential role in human society. These relationships affect psychological, physiological, and behavioral functions. As positive and enduring bonds are critical for the overall well-being of humans, it is not surprising that considerable effort has been made to study the neurobiological mechanisms that underlie social bonding behaviors. The present review details the involvement of the nonapeptides, oxytocin (OT and arginine vasopressin (AVP, in the regulation of social bonding in mammals including humans. In particular, we will discuss the role of OT and AVP in the formation of social bonds between partners of a mating pair as well as between parents and their offspring. Furthermore, the role of OT and AVP in the formation of interpersonal bonding involving trust is also discussed.

  13. Quantum Confinement in Hydrogen Bond

    CERN Document Server

    Santos, Carlos da Silva dos; Ricotta, Regina Maria

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the quantum confinement effect is proposed as the cause of the displacement of the vibrational spectrum of molecular groups that involve hydrogen bonds. In this approach the hydrogen bond imposes a space barrier to hydrogen and constrains its oscillatory motion. We studied the vibrational transitions through the Morse potential, for the NH and OH molecular groups inside macromolecules in situation of confinement (when hydrogen bonding is formed) and non-confinement (when there is no hydrogen bonding). The energies were obtained through the variational method with the trial wave functions obtained from Supersymmetric Quantum Mechanics (SQM) formalism. The results indicate that it is possible to distinguish the emission peaks related to the existence of the hydrogen bonds. These analytical results were satisfactorily compared with experimental results obtained from infrared spectroscopy.

  14. Dentin-bonding agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Carlos Gomes

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available New dental restorative materials have been developed to meet not only the functional demands, but esthetics as well, and in the last few years an enormous range of new materials has appeared for use in dentistry. Among them, several adhesive systems, and different operative techniques for each group materials. Therefore, is indispensable for the professional to know about the properties, characteristics, and association of these materials with the dental structures, in order to select and use them correctly. Should conventional self-etching adhesive systems be used? This question encouraged this literature review to be conducted, with the aim of comparing the conventional adhesive systems with the self-etching systems and to look for scientific data that would help professionals to choose which adhesive system to use. When compared to conventional systems, it was noted that the self-etching systems show less sensitivity to technique, especially as regards errors the operator could commit. The self-etching systems, particularly the 2-step type, have shown equivalent values of bond strength, marginal microleakage and performance, therefore, will be an option for direct composite resin restorations in posterior teeth.

  15. 27 CFR 24.153 - Strengthening bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Strengthening bonds. In any instance where the penal sum of the bond on file becomes insufficient, the principal shall either give a strengthening bond with the same surety to attain a sufficient penal sum or give a... limiting the amount of either bond to less than its full penal sum. Strengthening bonds will show...

  16. 27 CFR 19.246 - Strengthening bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Strengthening bonds. In all cases when the penal sum of any bond becomes insufficient, the principal shall either give a strengthening bond with the same surety to attain a sufficient penal sum, or give a new... amount of any bond to less than its full penal sum. Strengthening bonds shall show the current date...

  17. Why are Hydrogen Bonds Directional?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ABHISHEK SHAHI; ELANGANNAN ARUNAN

    2016-10-01

    The recent IUPAC recommendation on the definition of hydrogen bonding points out that directionality is a defining characteristic of a hydrogen bond and the angle ∠X-H-Y is generally linear or 180◦. It also suggests that the X-H· · ·Y angle be greater than 110◦ for an interaction to be characterized as a hydrogenbond but does not provide any rationale for the same. This article reports a rationale for limiting the angle, based on the electron density topology using the quantum theory of atoms in molecules. Electron density topology for common hydrogen bond donors HF, HCl, HBr, HNC, HCN and HCCH are reported in this work. These calculations lead to an interesting observation that the atomic basins of H atom in all these donor molecules are limited justifying the restriction of hydrogen bond angle. Moreover, similar analysis on some hydrogen bonded complexes confirms that beyond this angle the acceptor atom Y starts interacting with the atomic basin on X. However, conclusions based on bond lengths and angles have to be treated with care and as the IUPAC recommendation points out that independent ‘evidence for bond formation’ in every case is important.

  18. Physical Nature of Hydrogen Bond

    CERN Document Server

    Zhyganiuk, I V

    2015-01-01

    The physical nature and the correct definition of hydrogen bond (H-bond) are considered.\\,\\,The influence of H-bonds on the thermodynamic, kinetic, and spectroscopic properties of water is analyzed.\\,\\,The conventional model of H-bonds as sharply directed and saturated bridges between water molecules is incompatible with the behavior of the specific volume, evaporation heat, and self-diffusion and kinematic shear viscosity coefficients of water. On the other hand, it is shown that the variation of the dipole moment of a water molecule and the frequency shift of valence vibrations of a hydroxyl group can be totally explained in the framework of the electrostatic model of H-bond.\\,\\,At the same time, the temperature dependences of the heat capacity of water in the liquid and vapor states clearly testify to the existence of weak H-bonds.\\,\\,The analysis of a water dimer shows that the contribution of weak H-bonds to its ground state energy is approximately 4--5 times lower in comparison with the energy of electr...

  19. Bonding over Dentin Replacement Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meraji, Naghmeh; Camilleri, Josette

    2017-08-01

    Dentin replacement materials are necessary in large cavities to protect the pulp and reduce the bulk of filling material. These materials are layered with a composite resin restorative material. Microleakage caused by poor bonding of composite resin to underlying dentin replacement material will result in pulp damage. The aim of this study was to characterize the interface between dentin replacement materials and composite resin and to measure the shear bond strength after dynamic aging. Biodentine (Septodont, Saint Maur-des-Fosses, France), Theracal LC (Bisco, Schaumburg, IL), and Fuji IX (GC, Tokyo, Japan) were used as dentin replacement materials. They were then overlaid with a total-etch and bonding agent or a self-etch primer and composite resin or a glass ionomer cement. All combinations were thermocycled for 3000 cycles. The interface was characterized using scanning electron microscopy and elemental mapping. Furthermore, the shear bond strength was assessed. The Biodentine surface was modified by etching. The Theracal LC and Fuji IX microstructure was unchanged upon the application of acid etch. The Biodentine and glass ionomer interface showed an evident wide open space, and glass particles from the glass ionomer adhered to the Biodentine surface. Elemental migration was shown with aluminum, barium, fluorine, and ytterbium present in Biodentine from the overlying composite resin. Calcium was more stable. The bond strength between Theracal LC and composite using a total-etch technique followed by self-etch primer achieved the best bond strength values. Biodentine exhibited the weakest bond with complete failure of bonding shown after demolding and thermocycling. Dynamic aging is necessary to have clinically valid data. Bonding composite resin to water-based dentin replacement materials is still challenging, and further alternatives for restoration of teeth using such materials need to be developed. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists

  20. Tensile Bond Strength of Latex-Modified Bonded Concrete Overlays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Cameron; Ramseyer, Chris

    2010-10-01

    The tensile bond strength of bonded concrete overlays was tested using the in-situ pull-off method described in ASTM C 1583 with the goal of determining whether adding latex to the mix design increases bond strength. One slab of ductile concrete (f'c > 12,000 psi) was cast with one half tined, i.e. roughened, and one half steel-troweled, i.e. smooth. The slab surface was sectioned off and overlay mixtures containing different latex contents cast in each section. Partial cores were drilled perpendicular to the surface through the overlay into the substrate. A tensile loading device applied a direct tensile load to each specimen and the load was increased until failure occurred. The tensile bond strength was then calculated for comparison between the specimens.

  1. Integration of European Bond Markets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    I investigate the time variation in the integration of EU government bond markets. The integration is measured by the explanatory power of European factor portfolios for the individual bond markets for each year. The integration of the government bond markets is stronger for EMU than non-EMU memb......-EMU members and stronger for old than new EU members. For EMU countries, the integration is weaker the lower the credit rating is. During the recent crisis periods, the integration is weaker, particularly for EMU countries....

  2. Roll bonding of strained aluminium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staun, Jakob M.

    2003-01-01

    This report investigates roll bonding of pre-strained (å ~ 4) aluminium sheets to produce high strain material from high purity aluminium (99.996%) and commercial pure aluminium (99.6%). The degree of bonding is investigated by optical microscopy and ultrasonic scanning. Under the right...... of the cross rolled volume fraction is found. To further asses this effect, and the anisotropy, it is necessary to acquire knowledge about both texture and microstructure, e.g. by TEM. Roll bonding of pre-strained aluminium is found to be a possible alternative to ARB in the quest for ultra-fine grained...

  3. Roll bonding of strained aluminium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staun, Jakob M.

    2003-01-01

    This report investigates roll bonding of pre-strained (å ~ 4) aluminium sheets to produce high strain material from high purity aluminium (99.996%) and commercial pure aluminium (99.6%). The degree of bonding is investigated by optical microscopy and ultrasonic scanning. Under the right...... of the cross rolled volume fraction is found. To further asses this effect, and the anisotropy, it is necessary to acquire knowledge about both texture and microstructure, e.g. by TEM. Roll bonding of pre-strained aluminium is found to be a possible alternative to ARB in the quest for ultra-fine grained...

  4. PRICING OF MULTIPLE DEFAULTABLE BOND

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JianZhihong; LiChulin

    2002-01-01

    In this paper a generalized defaultable bond pricing formula is derived by assuming that there exists a defaultable forward rate term structure and that firms in the economy interact when default occurs. Generally,The risk-neutral default intensity χQ is not equal to the empirical or actual default intensity λ,. This paper proves that multiple default intensities are invari-ant under equivalent martingale transformation,given a well-diversified portfolio corresponding to the defaultable bond. Thus one can directly apply default intensities and fractional losses empirically estimated to the evaluation of defaultable bonds or contingent claims.

  5. The chemisorptive bond basic concepts

    CERN Document Server

    Clark, Alfred

    1974-01-01

    The Chemisorptive Bond: Basic Concepts describes the basic concepts of the chemisorptive bond on solid surfaces from the simple analogies with ordinary chemical bonds to the quantum-mechanical approaches.This book is composed of 10 chapters and begins with discussions of simple formulas for correlating measurable quantities in chemisorptions and catalysis. The succeeding chapters deal with theories based on quantum-mechanical principles that describe the mutual interactions of atoms of the solid and foreign atoms on the surface. The remaining chapters consider the possible arrangements

  6. Direct Bonded Pontic (Laporan Kasus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhandi Sidjaja

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Advanced science and technology in dentistry enable dental practitioners to modified she bonding techniques in tooth replacement. A pontic made of composite resin bonded to etched enamel of the adjacent teeth can be used in the replacement of one missing anterior tooth with a virgin or sowed adpicent tooth. The advantages of this technique include a one visit treatment, cow cost, good esthetics, less side effects and easy repair or rebounding. Clinical evaluation showed a high success rate therefore with a proper diagnosis and a perfect skill of the direct bonded technique this treatment can be used as an alternative restoration.

  7. 27 CFR 19.245 - Bonds and penal sums of bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bonds and penal sums of... Bonds and penal sums of bonds. The bonds, and the penal sums thereof, required by this subpart, are as follows: Penal Sum Type of bond Basis Minimum Maximum (a) Operations bond: (1) One plant bond—...

  8. 27 CFR 25.94 - Strengthening bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) Requirement. When the penal sum of the brewer's bond (calculated as provided in § 25.93) in effect is not... strengthening bond in sufficient penal sum if the surety is the same as on the bond in effect. If the surety is... bond may not in any way release a former bond or limit a bond to less than the full penal sum. (c)...

  9. Hydrogen bonding in tight environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pirrotta, Alessandro; Solomon, Gemma C.; Franco, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    The single-molecule force spectroscopy of a prototypical class of hydrogen-bonded complexes is computationally investigated. The complexes consist of derivatives of a barbituric acid and a Hamilton receptor that can form up to six simultaneous hydrogen bonds. The force-extension (F-L) isotherms...... of the host-guest complexes are simulated using classical molecular dynamics and the MM3 force field, for which a refined set of hydrogen bond parameters was developed from MP2 ab initio computations. The F-L curves exhibit peaks that signal conformational changes during elongation, the most prominent...... of which is in the 60-180 pN range and corresponds to the force required to break the hydrogen bonds. These peaks in the F-L curves are shown to be sensitive to relatively small changes in the chemical structure of the host molecule. Thermodynamic insights into the supramolecular assembly were obtained...

  10. Modified bonded bridge space maintainer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liegeois, F; Limme, M

    1999-01-01

    The premature loss of primary teeth can create the need for space maintenance and restoration of function. This article presents a fixed bonded space maintainer, which allows space to be maintained with economy of dental tissues.

  11. Weld bonding of stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santos, I. O.; Zhang, Wenqi; Goncalves, V.M.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive theoretical and experimental investigation of the weld bonding process with the purpose of evaluating its relative performance in case of joining stainless steel parts, against alternative solutions based on structural adhesives or conventional spot...

  12. Adhesives for orthodontic bracket bonding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Déborah Daniella Diniz Fonseca

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The advent of acid etching, introduced by Buonocore in 1955, brought the possibility of bonding between the bracket base and enamel, contributing to more esthetic and conservative orthodontics. This direct bracket bonding technique has brought benefits such as reduced cost and time in performing the treatment, as well as making it easier to perform oral hygiene. The aim of this study was to conduct a survey of published studies on orthodontic bracket bonding to dental enamel. It was verified that resin composites and glass ionomer are the most studied and researched materials for this purpose. Resin-modified glass ionomer, with its biocompatibility, capacity of releasing fluoride and no need for acid etching on the tooth structure, has become increasingly popular among dentists. However, due to the esthetic and mechanical properties of light polymerizable resin composite, it continues to be one of the adhesives of choice in the bracket bonding technique and its use is widely disseminated.

  13. Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets Bonded to Zirconium Crowns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehmeti, Blerim; Azizi, Bleron; Kelmendi, Jeta; Iljazi-Shahiqi, Donika; Alar, Željko

    2017-01-01

    Background An increasing demand for esthetic restorations has resulted in an increased use of all-ceramic restorations, such as zirconium. However, one of the challenges the orthodontist must be willing to face is how to increase bond strength between the brackets and various ceramic restorations.Bond strength can beaffected bybracket type, by the material that bracketsaremade of, and their base surface design or retention mode. ​ Aim: of this study was to perform a comparative analysis of the shear bond strength (SBS) of metallic and ceramic orthodontic brackets bonded to all-zirconium ceramic surfaces used for prosthetic restorations, and also to evaluate the fracture mode of these two types of orthodontic brackets. Material and methods Twenty samples/semi-crowns of all-zirconium ceramic, on which orthodontic brackets were bonded, 10 metallic and 10 ceramic polycrystalline brackets, were prepared for this research. SBS has been testedby Universal Testing Machine, with a load applied using a knife edged rod moving at a fixed rate of 1 mm/min, until failure occurred. The force required to debond the brackets was recorded in Newton, then SBS was calculated to MPa. In addition, the samples were analyzed using a digital camera magnifier to determine Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI). Statistical data were processed using t-test, and the level of significance was set at α = 0.05. Results Higher shear bond strength values were observed in metallic brackets bonded to zirconium crowns compared tothoseof ceramic brackets, with a significant difference. During the test, two of the ceramic brackets were partially or totally damaged. Conclusion Metallic brackets, compared to ceramic polycrystalline brackets, seemed tocreate stronger adhesion with all-zirconium surfaces due to their better retention mode. Also, ceramic brackets showed higher fragility during debonding. PMID:28827846

  14. LAMMPS Framework for Directional Dynamic Bonding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    and bond types. When breaking bonds, all angular and dihedral interactions involving broken bonds are removed. The framework allows chemical reactions to be modeled, and use it to simulate a simplistic, coarse-grained DNA model. The resulting DNA dynamics illustrates the power of the present framework.......We have extended the Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator (LAMMPS) to support directional bonds and dynamic bonding. The framework supports stochastic formation of new bonds, breakage of existing bonds, and conversion between bond types. Bond formation can be controlled...... to limit the maximal functionality of a bead with respect to various bond types. Concomitant with the bond dynamics, angular and dihedral interactions are dynamically introduced between newly connected triplets and quartets of beads, where the interaction type is determined from the local pattern of bead...

  15. Halogen bonds in crystal engineering: like hydrogen bonds yet different.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Arijit; Tothadi, Srinu; Desiraju, Gautam R

    2014-08-19

    The halogen bond is an attractive interaction in which an electrophilic halogen atom approaches a negatively polarized species. Short halogen atom contacts in crystals have been known for around 50 years. Such contacts are found in two varieties: type I, which is symmetrical, and type II, which is bent. Both are influenced by geometric and chemical considerations. Our research group has been using halogen atom interactions as design elements in crystal engineering, for nearly 30 years. These interactions include halogen···halogen interactions (X···X) and halogen···heteroatom interactions (X···B). Many X···X and almost all X···B contacts can be classified as halogen bonds. In this Account, we illustrate examples of crystal engineering where one can build up from previous knowledge with a focus that is provided by the modern definition of the halogen bond. We also comment on the similarities and differences between halogen bonds and hydrogen bonds. These interactions are similar because the protagonist atoms-halogen and hydrogen-are both electrophilic in nature. The interactions are distinctive because the size of a halogen atom is of consequence when compared with the atomic sizes of, for example, C, N, and O, unlike that of a hydrogen atom. Conclusions may be drawn pertaining to the nature of X···X interactions from the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD). There is a clear geometric and chemical distinction between type I and type II, with only type II being halogen bonds. Cl/Br isostructurality is explained based on a geometric model. In parallel, experimental studies on 3,4-dichlorophenol and its congeners shed light on the nature of halogen···halogen interactions and reveal the chemical difference between Cl and Br. Variable temperature studies also show differences between type I and type II contacts. In terms of crystal design, halogen bonds offer a unique opportunity in the strength, atom size and interaction gradation; this may be

  16. 27 CFR 26.69 - Strengthening bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Liquors and Articles in Puerto Rico Bonds § 26.69 Strengthening bonds. In all cases where the penal sum of... surety to attain a sufficient penal sum, or give a new bond to cover the entire liability. Strengthening... penal sum. Strengthening bonds shall show the current date of execution and the effective date....

  17. Reduced form models of bond portfolios

    OpenAIRE

    Matti Koivu; Teemu Pennanen

    2010-01-01

    We derive simple return models for several classes of bond portfolios. With only one or two risk factors our models are able to explain most of the return variations in portfolios of fixed rate government bonds, inflation linked government bonds and investment grade corporate bonds. The underlying risk factors have natural interpretations which make the models well suited for risk management and portfolio design.

  18. 27 CFR 24.146 - Bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    .... (c) Wine vinegar plant bond. The proprietor of a wine vinegar plant who withdraws wine from a bonded wine premises without payment of tax for use in the manufacture of vinegar shall file a bond on TTB F 5510.2, Bond Covering Removal to and Use of Wine at Vinegar Plant, to ensure the payment of the tax...

  19. Welding, Bonding and Fastening, 1984

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, J. D. (Editor); Stein, B. A. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    A compilation of papers presented in a joint NASA, American Society for Metals, The George Washington University, American Welding Soceity, and Society of Manufacturing Engineers conference on Welding, Bonding, and Fastening at Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA, on October 23 to 25, 1984 is given. Papers were presented on technology developed in current research programs relevant to welding, bonding, and fastening of structural materials required in fabricating structures and mechanical systems used in the aerospace, hydrospace, and automotive industries. Topics covered in the conference included equipment, hardware and materials used when welding, brazing, and soldering, mechanical fastening, explosive welding, use of unique selected joining techniques, adhesives bonding, and nondestructive evaluation. A concept of the factory of the future was presented, followed by advanced welding techniques, automated equipment for welding, welding in a cryogenic atmosphere, blind fastening, stress corrosion resistant fasteners, fastening equipment, explosive welding of different configurations and materials, solid-state bonding, electron beam welding, new adhesives, effects of cryogenics on adhesives, and new techniques and equipment for adhesive bonding.

  20. Three methods to measure RH bond energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkowitz, J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Ellison, G.B. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry; Gutman, D. [Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1993-03-21

    In this paper the authors compare and contrast three powerful methods for experimentally measuring bond energies in polyatomic molecules. The methods are: radical kinetics; gas phase acidity cycles; and photoionization mass spectroscopy. The knowledge of the values of bond energies are a basic piece of information to a chemist. Chemical reactions involve the making and breaking of chemical bonds. It has been shown that comparable bonds in polyatomic molecules, compared to the same bonds in radicals, can be significantly different. These bond energies can be measured in terms of bond dissociation energies.

  1. Halogen Bonding in Organic Synthesis and Organocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulfield, David; Huber, Stefan M

    2016-10-01

    Halogen bonding is a noncovalent interaction similar to hydrogen bonding, which is based on electrophilic halogen substituents. Hydrogen-bonding-based organocatalysis is a well-established strategy which has found numerous applications in recent years. In light of this, halogen bonding has recently been introduced as a key interaction for the design of activators or organocatalysts that is complementary to hydrogen bonding. This Concept features a discussion on the history and electronic origin of halogen bonding, summarizes all relevant examples of its application in organocatalysis, and provides an overview on the use of cationic or polyfluorinated halogen-bond donors in halide abstraction reactions or in the activation of neutral organic substrates.

  2. FATHER, SOCIAL BOND AND WOMEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SYLVIA DE CASTRO KORGI

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available On the cross-point of two of the most important and inseparable Freudian questions: What is a father?and, What a woman wants?, this paper begins a reflection about the women’s place in the Freudianarticulation of the relationship between the father and the social bond. In fact, the Freudian father, thanksto the law mediation which he is its agent, has as a function the regulation of the pleasure that participatesin the social bond, making this way possible the human community. On the other hand, the support ofthe human community is the bond among brothers, as well as Freud presents it in his foundational textof the Law. How to precise the women’s place in this arrangement? The reflection stands out this thatexceeds the Father’s Law and that Freud sets on women’s account, initially under the figure of heropposition to the culture.

  3. Two Comments on Bond Angles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaister, P.

    1997-09-01

    Tetrahedral Bond Angle from Elementary Trigonometry The alternative approach of using the scalar (or dot) product of vectors enables the determination of the bond angle in a tetrahedral molecule in a simple way. There is, of course, an even more straightforward derivation suitable for students who are unfamiliar with vectors, or products thereof, but who do know some elementary trigonometry. The starting point is the figure showing triangle OAB. The point O is the center of a cube, and A and B are at opposite corners of a face of that cube in which fits a regular tetrahedron. The required bond angle alpha = AÔB; and using Pythagoras' theorem, AB = 2(square root 2) is the diagonal of a face of the cube. Hence from right-angled triangle OEB, tan(alpha/2) = (square root 2) and therefore alpha = 2tan-1(square root 2) is approx. 109° 28' (see Fig. 1).

  4. Bond percolation on multiplex networks

    CERN Document Server

    Hackett, A; Gómez, S; Arenas, A; Gleeson, J P

    2015-01-01

    We present an analytical approach for bond percolation on multiplex networks and use it to determine the expected size of the giant connected component and the value of the critical bond occupation probability in these networks. We advocate the relevance of these tools to the modeling of multilayer robustness and contribute to the debate on whether any benefit is to be yielded from studying a full multiplex structure as opposed to its monoplex projection, especially in the seemingly irrelevant case of a bond occupation probability that does not depend on the layer. Although we find that in many cases the predictions of our theory for multiplex networks coincide with previously derived results for monoplex networks, we also uncover the remarkable result that for a certain class of multiplex networks, well described by our theory, new critical phenomena occur as multiple percolation phase transitions are present. We provide an instance of this phenomenon in a multipex network constructed from London rail and Eu...

  5. Optimal Investment in Structured Bonds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Pernille; Jørgensen, Peter Løchte

    2012-01-01

    and consider different utility functions and trading strategies. Our results show that investors should include structured bonds in their optimal portfolio only if they cannot access the index underlying the option directly and only if the products then provide sufficient diversification to compensate......Retail structured products regularly receive much criticism from financial experts but seem to remain popular with investors. This article considers a generic structured product: the principal-protected index-linked note (structured bond), which resembles a portfolio insurance contract. The purpose...

  6. BOND ORDERING IN NONCRYSTALLINE SOLIDS

    OpenAIRE

    Revesz, A.

    1982-01-01

    From the analysis of optical properties of noncrystalline (nc) and the corresponding crystalline solids with predominantly covalent bonds a bonding order parameter, F, is derived. This parameter reveals differences between nc solids which are characterized by similar degree of short-range-order as, e.g., amorphous Si (F ≤ 0.8) and vitreous SiO2 (F ≈ 1). Both the optical and electrical properties indicate that, in contrast to amorphous solids, the electronic states in vitreous solids may remai...

  7. Performance bond: conditional or unconditional

    OpenAIRE

    Supardi, Azizan; Yaakob, Jamaluddin; Adnan, Hamimah

    2009-01-01

    In construction contracts, a 'performance bond' is a bond taken out by the contractor, usually with a bank or insurance company (in return for payment of a premium), for the benefit of and at the request of the employer, in a stipulated maximum sum of liability and enforceable by the employer in the event of the contractor's default, repudiation or insolvency, as stated by Nigel M Robinson et. al. in his book, Construction Law in Singapore and Malaysia. He further added that there are two typ...

  8. Anodically bonded submicron microfluidic chambers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimov, S; Bennett, R G; Córcoles, A; Levitin, L V; Ilic, B; Verbridge, S S; Saunders, J; Casey, A; Parpia, J M

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of anodic bonding to fabricate cells with characteristic size as large as 7 x 10 mm(2), with height of approximately 640 nm, and without any internal support structure. The cells were fabricated from Hoya SD-2 glass and silicon wafers, each with 3 mm thickness to maintain dimensional stability under internal pressure. Bonding was carried out at 350 degrees C and 450 V with an electrode structure that excluded the electric field from the open region. We detail fabrication and characterization steps and also discuss the design of the fill line for access to the cavity.

  9. Anodically bonded submicron microfluidic chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimov, S.; Bennett, R. G.; Córcoles, A.; Levitin, L. V.; Ilic, B.; Verbridge, S. S.; Saunders, J.; Casey, A.; Parpia, J. M.

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of anodic bonding to fabricate cells with characteristic size as large as 7×10 mm2, with height of ≈640 nm, and without any internal support structure. The cells were fabricated from Hoya SD-2 glass and silicon wafers, each with 3 mm thickness to maintain dimensional stability under internal pressure. Bonding was carried out at 350 °C and 450 V with an electrode structure that excluded the electric field from the open region. We detail fabrication and characterization steps and also discuss the design of the fill line for access to the cavity.

  10. Essays on European bond markets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheung, Y.C.

    2005-01-01

    This dissertation focused on a number of issues that are of importance in the current European bond market. In the past years, the fiscal policy of the Eurozone members, advances in the technology of trading platforms and the introduction of a single currency have reshaped the fixed income markets

  11. Essays on European bond markets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheung, Y.C.

    2005-01-01

    This dissertation focused on a number of issues that are of importance in the current European bond market. In the past years, the fiscal policy of the Eurozone members, advances in the technology of trading platforms and the introduction of a single currency have reshaped the fixed income markets i

  12. Non-bonded ultrasonic transducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eoff, J.M.

    1984-07-06

    A mechanically assembled non-bonded ultrasonic transducer includes a substrate, a piezoelectric film, a wetting agent, a thin metal electrode, and a lens held in intimate contact by a mechanical clamp. No epoxy or glue is used in the assembly of this device.

  13. On double bonds in fullerenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stepenshchikov D. G.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Various distributions of double carbon bonds in the fullerenes have been considered in the paper from the point that they are absent in the pentagonal rings. The appropriate classification of the fullerenes has been built. The results may be used when modeling the fullerenes of a given topology and calculating their physical-chemical properties

  14. Bonding Elastomers To Metal Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickerson, George E.; Kelley, Henry L.

    1990-01-01

    Improved, economical method for bonding elastomers to metals prevents failures caused by debonding. In new technique, vulcanization and curing occur simultaneously in specially designed mold that acts as form for desired shape of elastomer and as container that positions and supports metal parts. Increases interface adhesion between metal, adhesive, and elastomer.

  15. Machine Gun Liner Bond Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-08-01

    explosive bonding of pure tantalum, several tantalum alloys, and Stellite 25 (an alloy of cobalt, chrome , nickel, and tungsten) in a liner...Difficulties have been experienced in machining an explosively- clad tantalum alloy in an M242 Bushmaster barrel [6].) One disadvantage of Stellite 25 was

  16. Effect of moisture, saliva, and blood contamination on the shear bond strength of brackets bonded with a conventional bonding system and self-etched bonding system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Mandava; Mohamed, Shamil; Nayak, Krishna; Shetty, Sharath Kumar; Talapaneni, Ashok Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Background: The success of bonding brackets to enamel with resin bonding systems is negatively affected by contamination with oral fluids such as blood and saliva. The new self-etch primer systems combine conditioning and priming agents into a single application, making the procedure more cost effective. Objective: The purpose of the study was to investigate the effect of moisture, saliva and blood contamination on shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded with conventional bonding system and self-etch bonding system. Materials and Methods: Each system was examined under four enamel surface conditions (dry, water, saliva, and blood), and 80 human teeth were divided into two groups with four subgroups each of 10 according to enamel surface condition. Group 1 used conventional bonding system and Group 2 used self-etched bonding system. Subgroups 1a and 2a under dry enamel surface conditions; Subgroups 1b and 2b under moist enamel surface condition; Subgroups 3a and 3b under saliva enamel surface condition and Subgroup 4a and 4b under blood enamel surface condition. Brackets were bonded, and all the samples were then submitted to a shear bond test with a universal testing machine with a cross head speed of 1mm/sec. Results: The results showed that the contamination reduced the shear bond strength of all groups. In self-etch bonding system water and saliva had significantly higher bond strength when compared to other groups. Conclusion: It was concluded that the blood contamination showed lowest bond strength from both bonding systems. Self-etch bonding system resulted in higher bond strength than conventional bonding system under all conditions except the dry enamel surface. PMID:24678210

  17. Method for fusion bonding thermoplastic composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benatar, A.; Gutowski, T.G.

    1986-10-01

    Bonding of thermoplastic composites is a critical step in the manufacture of aerospace structures. The objective of this project is to investigate different methods for fusion bonding thermoplastic composites quickly, with a good bond strength, and without warping and deconsolidation. This is best accomplished by heating and melting the thermoplastic on the bond surface only, and then pressing the parts together for a fusion bond. For this purpose, a variety of surface heating techniques were examined for bonding of PEEK and J Polymer composites. These included: resistance heating, infrared heating, induction heating, dielectric/microwave heating, and ultrasonic welding. 20 references, 10 figures, 1 table.

  18. Optimising hydrogen bonding in solid wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelund, Emil Tang

    2009-01-01

    The chemical bonds of wood are both covalent bonds within the wood polymers and hydrogen bonds within and between the polymers. Both types of bonds are responsible for the coherence, strength and stiffness of the material. The hydrogen bonds are more easily modified by changes in load, moisture...... and temperature. The distribution of bond lengths was examined using infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) both prior to treatments and after. The results show that the absorbance bands of the spectra related to the hydroxyl and carboxyl stretching vibrations were changed by the treatments. Apparently, the first...

  19. Strength of Bond Covenants and Bond Assessment Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noel Yahanpath

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We examine bond covenants of 29 New Zealand bond issues between 2001 and 2007.Results from the study indicate that protection provided for bondholders is weak and limited.On average, only 2-3 types of covenants are embedded with the issues and only 27% of thesecovenants provide full protection to the bondholders. However, bondholders are not compensated for taking the additional risk. We propose an alternative assessment framework that directly assesses the level of protection offered to bondholders. We calculate thecovenant quality score for the issues and classify them into four levels of protection: very high protection, moderate, low and very low. Recent legislative changes will go some way towards improving investor protection and confidence, but the effect is yet to be seen. This proposed scoring framework can be used by potential investors to complement the traditional credit ratings when making their investment decisions.

  20. Shear bond strength of two resin cements to human root dentin using three dentin bonding agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogos, C; Stavrianos, C; Kolokouris, I; Economides, N; Papadoyannis, I

    2007-01-01

    This study compared the bond strength of two resin cements to human root dentin when used with three bonding agents. The materials used were Rely X ARC and Perma Cem, two one-bottle bonding agents (Single Bond, Bond-1) and one self-etching bonding agent (Clearfil SE Bond). The dentin was obtained from single rooted human teeth, and the specimens were treated with either 15% EDTA or 37% phosphoric acid to remove the smear layer, except in groups where the self-etching bonding agent was used. The resin cements were placed on dentin surfaces with the use of bonding agents. Shear bond strength (SBS) was tested using a single plane shear test assembly. The dentin specimens were divided into 10 groups. Eight groups were pre-treated with EDTA or phosphoric acid to remove the smear layer, followed by a bonding agent (Bond-1 or Single Bond) and resin cement (Rely X or Perma Cem). In the two remaining groups, the smear layer was left intact, and the two resins cements were used in combination with the self-etching bonding agent (Clearfil SE Bond). No statistically significant differences were observed among the eight groups treated with one-bottle bonding agents. The mean bond strengths of the two groups treated with the self-etching bonding agent did not differ significantly from each other but were both significantly greater than the bond strengths of all the other groups. The results of this study also showed that EDTA can be used as an alternative to phosphoric acid in bonding procedures for resin cements. However, the bond strengths of resin cements, in combination with a self-etching bonding agent, were significantly greater than those of the same cements when used with one-bottle bonding agents.

  1. Cooperativity in Surface Bonding and Hydrogen Bonding of Water and Hydroxyl at Metal Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiros, T.; Ogasawara, H.; Naslund, L. A.;

    2010-01-01

    of the mixed phase at metal surfaces. The surface bonding can be considered to be similar to accepting a hydrogen bond, and we can thereby apply general cooperativity rules developed for hydrogen-bonded systems. This provides a simple understanding of why water molecules become more strongly bonded...... to the surface upon hydrogen bonding to OH and why the OH surface bonding is instead weakened through hydrogen bonding to water. We extend the application of this simple model to other observed cooperativity effects for pure water adsorption systems and H3O+ on metal surfaces.......We examine the balance of surface bonding and hydrogen bonding in the mixed OH + H2O overlayer on Pt(111), Cu(111), and Cu(110) via density functional theory calculations. We find that there is a cooperativity effect between surface bonding and hydrogen bonding that underlies the stability...

  2. Implicit Hamiltonian formulation of bond graphs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golo, G.; Schaft, A.J. van der; Breedveld, P.C.; Maschke, B.M.

    2003-01-01

    This paper deals with mathematical formulation of bond graphs. It is proven that the power continuous part of bond graphs, the junction structure, can be associated with a Dirac structure and that equations describing a bond graph model correspond to an implicit port-controlled Hamiltonian system wi

  3. Low temperature anodic bonding to silicon nitride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weichel, Steen; Reus, Roger De; Bouaidat, Salim;

    2000-01-01

    Low-temperature anodic bonding to stoichiometric silicon nitride surfaces has been performed in the temperature range from 3508C to 4008C. It is shown that the bonding is improved considerably if the nitride surfaces are either oxidized or exposed to an oxygen plasma prior to the bonding. Both bulk...

  4. 27 CFR 19.516 - Bond account.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... maximum penal sum, he shall maintain an account of his bond and he shall charge the bond with the amount... return. Where a bond in less than the maximum penal sum has been allocated among two or more plants, as... the penal sum allocated to that plant. (Sec. 201, Pub. L. 85-859, 72 Stat. 1356, as amended (26...

  5. 27 CFR 19.244 - Unit bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... sum which represents the penal sum (computed in accordance with § 19.245) for operations at and withdrawals from each plant. If the penal sum of the bond covering a plant, or the penal sum allocated to any... reflected by the penal sum in the bond for such plant. The unit bond shall be conditioned that the...

  6. 27 CFR 19.243 - Withdrawal bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... to each plant covered by the bond the part of the total sum which represents the penal sum (computed in accordance with § 19.245) for each such plant. If the penal sum of the bond covering a plant, or the penal sum allocated to any plant (where the bond covers more than one plant), is in an amount...

  7. Halogen Bonding in Hypervalent Iodine Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalano, Luca; Cavallo, Gabriella; Metrangolo, Pierangelo; Resnati, Giuseppe; Terraneo, Giancarlo

    Halogen bonds occur when electrophilic halogens (Lewis acids) attractively interact with donors of electron density (Lewis bases). This term is commonly used for interactions undertaken by monovalent halogen derivatives. The aim of this chapter is to show that the geometric features of the bonding pattern around iodine in its hypervalent derivatives justify the understanding of some of the longer bonds as halogen bonds. We suggest that interactions directionality in ionic and neutral λ(3)-iodane derivatives is evidence that the electron density distribution around iodine atoms is anisotropic, a region of most positive electrostatic potential exists on the extensions of the covalent bonds formed by iodine, and these positive caps affect, or even determine, the crystal packing of these derivatives. For instance, the short cation-anion contacts in ionic λ(3)-iodane and λ(5)-iodane derivatives fully match the halogen bond definition and geometrical prerequisites. The same holds for the short contacts the cation of ionic λ(3)-iodanes forms with lone-pair donors or the short contacts given by neutral λ(3)-iodanes with incoming nucleophiles. The longer and weaker bonds formed by iodine in hypervalent compounds are usually called secondary bondings and we propose that the term halogen bond can also be used. Compared to the term secondary bond, halogen bond may possibly be more descriptive of some bonding features, e.g., its directionality and the relationships between structure of interacting groups and interaction strength.

  8. 25 CFR 214.4 - Bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bonds. 214.4 Section 214.4 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF OSAGE RESERVATION LANDS, OKLAHOMA, FOR... reserved to change the amount of the bond in any particular case, or to require a new bond in...

  9. Valence-Bond Theory and Chemical Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Douglas J.; Trinajstic, Nenad

    1990-01-01

    Discussed is the importance of valence bond theory on the quantum-mechanical theory of chemical structure and the nature of the chemical bond. Described briefly are early VB theory, development of VB theory, modern versions, solid-state applications, models, treatment in textbooks, and flaws in criticisms of valence bond theory. (KR)

  10. Hydroxide catalysis bonding of silicon carbide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veggel, A.A. van; Ende, D.A. van den; Bogenstahl, J.; Rowan, S.; Cunningham, W.; Gubbels, G.H.M.; Nijmeijer, H.

    2008-01-01

    For bonding silicon carbide optics, which require extreme stability, hydroxide catalysis bonding is considered [Rowan, S., Hough, J. and Elliffe, E., Silicon carbide bonding. UK Patent 040 7953.9, 2004. Please contact Mr. D. Whiteford for further information: D.Whiteford@admin.gla.ac.uk]. This techn

  11. Heat Bonding of Irradiated Ethylene Vinyl Acetate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slack, D. H.

    1986-01-01

    Reliable method now available for joining parts of this difficult-tobond material. Heating fixture encircles ethylene vinyl acetate multiplesocket part, providing heat to it and to tubes inserted in it. Fixtures specially designed to match parts to be bonded. Tube-and-socket bonds made with this technique subjected to tensile tests. Bond strengths of 50 percent that of base material obtained consistently.

  12. 36 CFR 9.48 - Performance bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Performance bond. 9.48... MINERALS MANAGEMENT Non-Federal Oil and Gas Rights § 9.48 Performance bond. (a) Prior to approval of a plan of operations, the operator shall be required to file a suitable performance bond with...

  13. 43 CFR 23.9 - Performance bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Performance bond. 23.9 Section 23.9 Public... LANDS § 23.9 Performance bond. (a)(1) Upon approval of an exploration plan or mining plan, the operator shall be required to file a suitable performance bond of not less than $2,000 with satisfactory...

  14. 36 CFR 9.13 - Performance bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Performance bond. 9.13... MINERALS MANAGEMENT Mining and Mining Claims § 9.13 Performance bond. (a) Upon approval of a plan of operations the operator shall be required to file a suitable performance bond with satisfactory...

  15. 25 CFR 216.8 - Performance bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Performance bond. 216.8 Section 216.8 Indians BUREAU OF... RECLAMATION OF LANDS General Provisions § 216.8 Performance bond. (a) Upon approval of an exploration plan or mining plan, the operator shall be required to file a suitable performance bond of not less than...

  16. Rebond strength of bonded lingual wire retainers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Westing, K.; Algera, T.J.; Kleverlaan, C.J.

    2012-01-01

    There is no consensus in the literature concerning the rebonding procedure for orthodontic retainers. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the bond and rebond strength of retainers bonded to enamel surfaces with and without composite remnants. The retainers were bonded with Excite and

  17. INVESTIGATION OF BONDING IN OXIDE-FIBER (WHISKER) REINFORCED METALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    CERAMIC FIBERS , BONDING), (*COMPOSITE MATERIALS, BONDING), (*BONDING, CERAMIC FIBERS ), ALUMINUM COMPOUNDS, OXIDES, ZIRCONIUM, NICKEL, TITANIUM, CHROMIUM, SINGLE CRYSTALS, VACUUM, SHEAR STRESSES, SURFACE PROPERTIES, ADDITIVES.

  18. 19 CFR 125.32 - Merchandise delivered to a bonded store or bonded warehouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... warehouse. 125.32 Section 125.32 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Merchandise delivered to a bonded store or bonded warehouse. When merchandise is carried, carted or lightered to and received in a bonded store or bonded warehouse, the proprietor or his representative...

  19. Improving orthodontic bonding to silver amalgam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachrisson, B U; Büyükyilmaz, T; Zachrisson, Y O

    1995-01-01

    Flat rectangular tabs (n = 84) prepared from lathe-cut amalgam (ANA 2000) were subjected to aluminum oxide sandblasting or roughening with a diamond bur. Mandibular incisor edgewise brackets were bonded to these tabs using: Concise (Bis-GMA resin); one of three metal-bonding adhesives, viz., Superbond C&B (4-META resin), Panavia Ex (10-MDP Bis-GMA resin) or Geristore (composite base); and Concise after application of the intermediate resins All-Bond 2 Primers A+B, or the Scotch-Bond Multi-Purpose (SBMP) system. All specimens were stored in water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours before tensile bond strength testing. Alignment and uniform loading during testing were secured by engaging a hook in a circular ring soldered onto the bracket slot before bonding. Similar control brackets (n = 12) were bonded with Concise to extracted caries-free mandibular incisors. Bond failure sites were classified by a modified ARI system. Mean tensile bond strengths in the experimental group ranged from 3.4 to 6.4 MPa--significantly weaker than the control sample (13.2 MPa). Bond failure generally occurred at the amalgam/adhesive interface. Superbond C&B created the strongest bonds to amalgam; according to ANOVA and Duncan's Multiple-Range test, they were significantly stronger than the bonds with Panavia Ex and Concise, with Geristore in between. However, the bond strength of Concise to sandblasted amalgam was comparable to the Superbond C&B bonds when coupled with an intermediate application of All-Bond 2 Primers A+B. The SBMP, on the other hand, was less effective.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Effect of ethanol-wet-bonding technique on resin–enamel bonds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammet Kerim Ayar

    2014-03-01

    Conclusion: The ethanol-wet-bonding technique may increase the bond strength of commercial adhesives to enamel. The chemical composition of the adhesives can affect the bond strength of adhesives when bonding to acid-etched enamel, using the ethanol-wet-bonding technique. Some adhesive systems used in the present study may simultaneously be applied to enamel and dentin using ethanol-wet-bonding. Furthermore, deploying ethanol-wet-bonding for the tested commercial adhesives to enamel can increase the adhesion abilities of these adhesives to enamel.

  1. Effect of diamond bur cutting efficacy on dentin bond strengths of different bonding systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirani F.

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aim: As composite-dentin bond strength is affected by cavity preparation and the bond strength of composite resin to new and used bur prepared dentin has not yet been evaluated, this study evaluated the effects of cutting dentin with different cutting efficacy (new and used of burs on composite-dentin shear bond strength using self-etching primer bonding system and total etching bonding system. "nMaterials and Methods: Sixty caries free human 3rd molar were sectioned in occlosal surface to expose dentin, then polished with silicon carbide paper and randomly divided into four groups. Each group was prepared in a depth of 0.5mm of dentin, using new diamond bur, or used diamond bur. To change into a used bur, each new rough diamond bur had to work on bovine enamel for 30 minutes, under a load of 150g. Then, each group was bonded, using a total etch adhesive (single Bond or a self etch adhesive (clearfil SE Bond So there were 4 groups : 1-SE Bond, New bur; 2-SE Bond , used bur; 3-Single Bond , New bur ; 4-Single Bond, used bur. Similar composite capsules(Filtek Z250 were bonded to dentin surface and cured. specimens were stored in physiologic saline for 48h at 370 c , then put under shearing load to define composite - dentin shear bond strength. Results were interpreted via statistical analysis (T-test & two - way variance. "nResults: Shear bond strength of each group was as follows: 1-(27.3Mpa, 2-(33.5Mpa, 3-(16.9Mpa 4-(19.3Mpa. Statistical analysis proved that shear bond strength of used diamond bur prepared groups (2,4 was more than new diamond bur prepared ones (1,3. This statistical difference, specially, was seen between SE Bond groups (1,2 but not between single Bond groups (3,4. Also, shear bond strength of (SE Bond bonded groups (1,2 were more significantly than (single Bond bonded ones (3,4. "nConclusion: This study show that Bur cutting efficiency influences composite - dentin shear bond strength especially when the

  2. Hydrogen Bonding to Alkanes: Computational Evidence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammerum, Steen; Olesen, Solveig Gaarn

    2009-01-01

    The structural, vibrational, and energetic properties of adducts of alkanes and strong cationic proton donors were studied with composite ab initio calculations. Hydrogen bonding in [D-H+ H-alkyl] adducts contributes to a significant degree to the interactions between the two components, which...... is substantiated by NBO and AIM results. The hydrogen bonds manifest themselves in the same manner as conventional hydrogen bonds, D-H bond elongation, D-H vibrational stretching frequency red shift and intensity increase, and adduct stabilization. The alkane adducts also exhibit elongation of the C-H bonds...

  3. Valuing Convertible Bonds Based on LSRQM Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Convertible bonds are one of the essential financial products for corporate finance, while the pricing theory is the key problem to the theoretical research of convertible bonds. This paper demonstrates how to price convertible bonds with call and put provisions using Least-Squares Randomized Quasi-Monte Carlo (LSRQM method. We consider the financial market with stochastic interest rates and credit risk and present a detailed description on calculating steps of convertible bonds value. The empirical results show that the model fits well the market prices of convertible bonds in China’s market and the LSRQM method is effective.

  4. Diffusion bonding of copper to niobium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Adrian R.

    Processes used to join metal to ceramic at low temperatures have proven to be inefficient because multiple brazing cycles with different brazing temperatures and braze filler metals are required. Even though this is reproducible and robust, it is not ideal due to the manufacturing time and cost associated with multiple brazing cycles. A more efficient and cost effective process is to utilize the diffusion bonding technique to join different metallic layers prior to joining the entire ceramic assembly in one brazing cycle. In this study, the diffusion bonding of copper to niobium was examined. To the author's knowledge, the diffusion bonding of Cu to Nb has not been researched, and the diffusion of Cu into Nb or Nb into Cu has not been observed. A series of diffusion bonding experiments were conducted to determine the optimal bonding time, temperature, and pressure for the Cu-Nb system. The diffusion bonded samples were evaluated using mechanical testing and microscopy. Results from characterization indicate that diffusion of Nb into Cu occurs, and a robust bond with no interfacial voids is formed using different combinations of bonding parameters. The diffusion of Nb into Cu and with failure occurring outside the diffusion bonded region during all mechanical testing indicate that Cu can be bonded to Nb via the diffusion bonding technique.

  5. Bond Strength of Resin Cements to Dentin Using New Universal Bonding Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-30

    indications. The goal of dental adhesives is to provide an equally effective bond to two hard tissues of different nature (Van Meerbeek, 2011). Bonding...tests: An analysis of 50 investigations on bond strength. Quint Int. 1997;28:717–723. Bisco. “All-Bond Universal Light-Cured Dental Adhesive ...Dentsply. “Prime & Bond Elect Universal Dental Adhesive Directions for Use.” Available at: http://www.dentsply.com.au/secure/downloadfile.asp?pid

  6. Liquidity in Government versus Covered Bond Markets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dick-Nielsen, Jens; Gyntelberg, Jacob; Sangill, Thomas

    We present findings on the secondary market liquidity of government and covered bonds in Denmark before, during and after the 2008 financial crisis. The analysis focuses on wholesale trading in the two markets and is based on a complete transaction level dataset covering November 2007 until end...... 2011. Overall, our findings suggest that Danish benchmark covered bonds by and large are as liquid as Danish government bonds - including in periods of market stress. Before the financial crisis of 2008, government bonds were slightly more liquid than covered bonds. During the crisis, trading continued...... in both markets but the government bond market experienced a brief but pronounced decline in market liquidity while liquidity in the covered bond market was more robust - partly reflective of a number of events as well as policy measures introduced in the autumn of 2008. After the crisis, liquidity...

  7. Bonding PMMA microfluidics using commercial microwave ovens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toossi, A.; Moghadas, H.; Daneshmand, M.; Sameoto, D.

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, a novel low-cost, rapid substrate-bonding technique is successfully applied to polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) microfluidics bonding for the first time. This technique uses a thin intermediate metallic microwave susceptor layer at the interface of the bonding site (microchannels) which produces localized heating required for bonding during microwave irradiation. The metallic susceptor pattern is designed using a multiphysics simulation model developed in ANSYS Multiphysics software (high-frequency structural simulation (HFSS) coupled with ANSYS-Thermal). In our experiments, the required microwave energy for bonding is delivered using a relatively inexpensive, widely accessible commercial microwave oven. Using this technique, simple PMMA microfluidics prototypes are successfully bonded and sealed in less than 35 seconds with a minimum measured bond strength of 1.375 MPa.

  8. Liquidity in Government versus Covered Bond Markets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dick-Nielsen, Jens; Gyntelberg, Jacob; Sangill, Thomas

    in both markets but the government bond market experienced a brief but pronounced decline in market liquidity while liquidity in the covered bond market was more robust - partly reflective of a number of events as well as policy measures introduced in the autumn of 2008. After the crisis, liquidity......We present findings on the secondary market liquidity of government and covered bonds in Denmark before, during and after the 2008 financial crisis. The analysis focuses on wholesale trading in the two markets and is based on a complete transaction level dataset covering November 2007 until end...... 2011. Overall, our findings suggest that Danish benchmark covered bonds by and large are as liquid as Danish government bonds - including in periods of market stress. Before the financial crisis of 2008, government bonds were slightly more liquid than covered bonds. During the crisis, trading continued...

  9. Bonds and bands in semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Phillips, Jim

    2009-01-01

    This classic work on the basic chemistry and solid state physics of semiconducting materials is now updated and improved with new chapters on crystalline and amorphous semiconductors. Written by two of the world's pioneering materials scientists in the development of semiconductors, this work offers in a single-volume an authoritative treatment for the learning and understanding of what makes perhaps the world's most important engineered materials actually work. Readers will find: --' The essential principles of chemical bonding, electron energy bands and their relationship to conductive and s

  10. Bump bonding of pixel systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lozano, M. E-mail: manuel.lozano@cnm.es; Cabruja, E.; Collado, A.; Santander, J.; Ullan, M

    2001-11-01

    A pixel detector consists of an array of radiation sensing elements which is connected to an electronic read-out unit. Many different ways of making this connection between these two different devices are currently being used or considered to be used in the next future. Bonding techniques such as flip chip technology can present real advantages because they allow very fine pitch and a high number of I/Os. This paper presents a review of the different flip chip technologies available and their suitability for manufacturing pixel detectors. The particular problems concerning testing of pixel detectors and thermal issues related to them are pointed out.

  11. Bump bonding of pixel systems

    CERN Document Server

    Lozano, M; Collado, A; Santander, J; Ullán, M

    2001-01-01

    A pixel detector consists of an array of radiation sensing elements which is connected to an electronic read-out unit. Many different ways of making this connection between these two different devices are currently being used or considered to be used in the next future. Bonding techniques such as flip chip technology can present real advantages because they allow very fine pitch and a high number of I/Os. This paper presents a review of the different flip chip technologies available and their suitability for manufacturing pixel detectors. The particular problems concerning testing of pixel detectors and thermal issues related to them are pointed out.

  12. Bonded and Stitched Composite Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalewski, Bart F. (Inventor); Dial, William B. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A method of forming a composite structure can include providing a plurality of composite panels of material, each composite panel having a plurality of holes extending through the panel. An adhesive layer is applied to each composite panel and a adjoining layer is applied over the adhesive layer. The method also includes stitching the composite panels, adhesive layer, and adjoining layer together by passing a length of a flexible connecting element into the plurality of holes in the composite panels of material. At least the adhesive layer is cured to bond the composite panels together and thereby form the composite structure.

  13. Actor bonds after relationship dissolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skaates, Maria Anne

    2000-01-01

    Most of the presented papers at the 1st NoRD Workshop can be classified as belonging to the business marketing approach to relationship dissolution. Two papers were conceptual, and the remaining six were empirical studies. The first conceptual study by Skaates (2000) focuses on the nature...... of the actor bonds that remain after a business relationship has ended. The study suggests that an interdisciplinary approach would provide a richer understanding of the phenomenon; this could be achieved by using e.g. Bourdieu's sociological concepts in dissolution research....

  14. Actor bonds after relationship dissolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skaates, Maria Anne

    2000-01-01

    Most of the presented papers at the 1st NoRD Workshop can be classified as belonging to the business marketing approach to relationship dissolution. Two papers were conceptual, and the remaining six were empirical studies. The first conceptual study by Skaates (2000) focuses on the nature...... of the actor bonds that remain after a business relationship has ended. The study suggests that an interdisciplinary approach would provide a richer understanding of the phenomenon; this could be achieved by using e.g. Bourdieu's sociological concepts in dissolution research....

  15. 27 CFR 19.956 - Amount of bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... of bond. The penal sum of the bond is based on the total quantity of distilled spirits to be produced... increased, and the bond is not in the maximum penal sum, a new or strengthening bond shall be obtained....

  16. Implementation of a monolithic capacitive accelerometer in a wafer-level 0.18 µm CMOS MEMS process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Sheng-Hsiang; S-C Lu, Michael; Wu, Po-Chang; Teng, Yu-Chen; Tsai, Hann-Huei; Juang, Ying-Zong

    2012-05-01

    This paper describes the design, fabrication and characterization of a complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) micro-electro-mechanical-system (MEMS) accelerometer implemented in a 0.18 µm multi-project wafer (MPW) CMOS MEMS process. In addition to the standard CMOS process, an additional aluminum layer and a thick photoresist masking layer are employed to achieve etching and microstructural release. The structural thickness of the accelerometer is up to 9 µm and the minimum structural spacing is 2.3 µm. The out-of-plane deflection resulted from the vertical stress gradient over the whole device is controlled to be under 0.2 µm. The chip area containing the micromechanical structure and switched-capacitor sensing circuit is 1.18 × 0.9 mm2, and the total power consumption is only 0.7 mW. Within the sensing range of ±6 G, the measured nonlinearity is 1.07% and the cross-axis sensitivities with respect to the in-plane and out-of-plane are 0.5% and 5.8%, respectively. The average sensitivity of five tested accelerometers is 191.4 mV G-1with a standard deviation of 2.5 mV G-1. The measured output noise floor is 354 µG Hz-1/2, corresponding to a 100 Hz 1 G sinusoidal acceleration. The measured output offset voltage is about 100 mV at 27 °C, and the zero-G temperature coefficient of the accelerometer output is 0.94 mV °C-1 below 85 °C.

  17. Wafer-level packaging technology for RF applications based on a rigid low-loss spacer substrate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polyakov, A.

    2006-01-01

    As mobile portable devices such as cellular system/phones, smart handheld devices and laptop computers acquire wireless connectivity there is a growing demand for greater levels of RF integration. The holy grail of integration is to have a whole set of different components integrated into one chip.

  18. Wafer-level packaging technology for RF applications based on a rigid low-loss spacer substrate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polyakov, A.

    2006-01-01

    As mobile portable devices such as cellular system/phones, smart handheld devices and laptop computers acquire wireless connectivity there is a growing demand for greater levels of RF integration. The holy grail of integration is to have a whole set of different components integrated into one chip.

  19. Mixed-domain simulation and hybrid wafer-level packaging of RF-MEMS devices for wireless applications

    OpenAIRE

    Iannacci, Jacopo

    2007-01-01

    In questa tesi verranno trattati sia il problema della creazione di un ambiente di simulazione a domini fisici misti per dispositivi RF-MEMS, che la definizione di un processo di fabbricazione ad-hoc per il packaging e l’integrazione degli stessi. Riguardo al primo argomento, sarà mostrato nel dettaglio lo sviluppo di una libreria di modelli MEMS all’interno dell’ambiente di simulazione per circuiti integrati Cadence c . L’approccio scelto per la definizione del comportamento elettromeccanico...

  20. Density Functionals of Chemical Bonding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai V. Putz

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The behavior of electrons in general many-electronic systems throughout the density functionals of energy is reviewed. The basic physico-chemical concepts of density functional theory are employed to highlight the energy role in chemical structure while its extended influence in electronic localization function helps in chemical bonding understanding. In this context the energy functionals accompanied by electronic localization functions may provide a comprehensive description of the global-local levels electronic structures in general and of chemical bonds in special. Becke-Edgecombe and author’s Markovian electronic localization functions are discussed at atomic, molecular and solid state levels. Then, the analytical survey of the main workable kinetic, exchange, and correlation density functionals within local and gradient density approximations is undertaken. The hierarchy of various energy functionals is formulated by employing both the parabolic and statistical correlation degree of them with the electronegativity and chemical hardness indices by means of quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR analysis for basic atomic and molecular systems.

  1. Metallic bonding and cluster structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soler, Jose M. [Department of Physics, Lyman Laboratory, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid, (Spain); Beltran, Marcela R. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 70-360, Mexico Distrito Federal, 01000 Mexico (Mexico); Michaelian, Karo [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 20-364, Mexico Distrito Federal, 01000 Mexico (Mexico); Garzon, Ignacio L. [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid, (Spain); Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 20-364, Mexico Distrito Federal, 01000 Mexico (Mexico); Ordejon, Pablo [Institut de Ciencia de Materials de Barcelona-CSIC, Campus de la U.A.B., 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona, (Spain); Sanchez-Portal, Daniel [Department of Physics and Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Artacho, Emilio [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid, (Spain)

    2000-02-15

    Knowledge of the structure of clusters is essential to predict many of their physical and chemical properties. Using a many-body semiempirical Gupta potential (to perform global minimizations), and first-principles density functional calculations (to confirm the energy ordering of the local minima), we have recently found [Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 1600 (1998)] that there are many intermediate-size disordered gold nanoclusters with energy near or below the lowest-energy ordered structure. This is especially surprising because we studied ''magic'' cluster sizes, for which very compact-ordered structures exist. Here, we show how the analysis of the local stress can be used to understand the physical origin of this amorphization. We find that the compact ordered structures, which are very stable for pair potentials, are destabilized by the tendency of metallic bonds to contract at the surface, because of the decreased coordination. The amorphization is also favored by the relatively low energy associated to bondlength and coordination disorder in metals. Although these are very general properties of metallic bonding, we find that they are especially important in the case of gold, and we predict some general trends in the tendency of metallic clusters towards amorphous structures. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  2. Progress in cold roll bonding of metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Long; Nagai, Kotobu; Yin Fuxing [Innovative Materials Engineering Laboratory, National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan)], E-mail: LI.Long@nims.go.jp

    2008-04-01

    Layered composite materials have become an increasingly interesting topic in industrial development. Cold roll bonding (CRB), as a solid phase method of bonding same or different metals by rolling at room temperature, has been widely used in manufacturing large layered composite sheets and foils. In this paper, we provide a brief overview of a technology using layered composite materials produced by CRB and discuss the suitability of this technology in the fabrication of layered composite materials. The effects of process parameters on bonding, mainly including process and surface preparation conditions, have been analyzed. Bonding between two sheets can be realized when deformation reduction reaches a threshold value. However, it is essential to remove surface contamination layers to produce a satisfactory bond in CRB. It has been suggested that the degreasing and then scratch brushing of surfaces create a strong bonding between the layers. Bonding mechanisms, in which the film theory is expressed as the major mechanism in CRB, as well as bonding theoretical models, have also been reviewed. It has also been showed that it is easy for fcc structure metals to bond compared with bcc and hcp structure metals. In addition, hardness on bonding same metals plays an important part in CRB. Applications of composites produced by CRB in industrial fields are briefly reviewed and possible developments of CRB in the future are also described. Corrections were made to the abstract and conclusion of this article on 18 June 2008. The corrected electronic version is identical to the print version. (topical review)

  3. MICROSTRUCTURE CHARACTERISTICS AT THE BOND INTERFACE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Junhui; Han Lei; Zhong Jue

    2005-01-01

    Lift-off and section characteristics at the interface of thermosonic bond are observed by using scanning electron microscope (KYKY2800) with EDS-test. Results show that the peeling underdeveloped bonds simulate a torus (or doughnut) with an unbonded central region and ridged peripheral region is bonded hardly. Inside roundness at flip chip bonding center are discovered. Bond strength is located between the severely ridged periphery and the non-adhering central area of the bond. For constant force and time, the ridged area of the bond pattern increases when more power is applied. For constant force and power, the ridged location of the bonded region moves closer to the bond center with time. Results of EDS-tests at Au-Al and Au-Ag interfaces show that Kirkendall diffusibility at Au-Ag interface occur and the diffusing speed of Au-atomic is faster than that of Ag,and that intermetallic compounds at Au-A1 interface is generated possibly. And these would be helpful for further research about thermosonic bonding.

  4. Chemical Bonding: The Orthogonal Valence-Bond View

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander F. Sax

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Chemical bonding is the stabilization of a molecular system by charge- and spin-reorganization processes in chemical reactions. These processes are said to be local, because the number of atoms involved is very small. With multi-configurational self-consistent field (MCSCF wave functions, these processes can be calculated, but the local information is hidden by the delocalized molecular orbitals (MO used to construct the wave functions. The transformation of such wave functions into valence bond (VB wave functions, which are based on localized orbitals, reveals the hidden information; this transformation is called a VB reading of MCSCF wave functions. The two-electron VB wave functions describing the Lewis electron pair that connects two atoms are frequently called covalent or neutral, suggesting that these wave functions describe an electronic situation where two electrons are never located at the same atom; such electronic situations and the wave functions describing them are called ionic. When the distance between two atoms decreases, however, every covalent VB wave function composed of non-orthogonal atomic orbitals changes its character from neutral to ionic. However, this change in the character of conventional VB wave functions is hidden by its mathematical form. Orthogonal VB wave functions composed of orthonormalized orbitals never change their character. When localized fragment orbitals are used instead of atomic orbitals, one can decide which local information is revealed and which remains hidden. In this paper, we analyze four chemical reactions by transforming the MCSCF wave functions into orthogonal VB wave functions; we show how the reactions are influenced by changing the atoms involved or by changing their local symmetry. Using orthogonal instead of non-orthogonal orbitals is not just a technical issue; it also changes the interpretation, revealing the properties of wave functions that remain otherwise undetected.

  5. Shear bond strength of ceramic and metallic orthodontic brackets bonded with self-etching primer and conventional bonding adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arash, Valiollah; Naghipour, Fatemeh; Ravadgar, Mehdi; Karkhah, Ahmad; Barati, Mohammad Saleh

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Adult patients typically require high-quality orthodontic treatment for ceramic brackets, but some clinicians remain concerned about the bond strength of these brackets. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the shear bond strength and de-bonding characteristics of metallic and ceramic brackets bonded with two types of bonding agents. Methods In an experimental study done in 2013 in Babol, Iran, 120 extracted human maxillary premolar teeth were randomly divided into four groups as follows: HM group: metallic bracket/conventional bonding agent; SM group: metallic bracket/Transbond self-etching primer; HC group: ceramic bracket/conventional bonding agent; SC group: ceramic bracket/Transbond self-etching primer. Twenty-four hours after thermocycling (1000 cycle, 5 °C–55 °C), the shear bond strength values were measured. The amount of resin remaining on the tooth surface (adhesive remnant index: ARI) was determined under a stereomicroscope. Enamel detachment index was evaluated under a scanning electron microscope. To perform statistical analysis, ANOVA, Kruskal–Wallis, and Tukey post-hoc tests were applied. The level of significance was set at p ceramic brackets. In addition, self-etching primer was able to produce fewer bonds compared with the conventional technique. Many samples showed the bracket-adhesive interface failure or failure inside the adhesive. PMID:28243410

  6. The Nature of the Hydrogen Bond Outline of a Comprehensive Hydrogen Bond Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Gilli, Gastone

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogen bond (H-bond) effects are known: it makes sea water liquid, joins cellulose microfibrils in trees, shapes DNA into genes and polypeptide chains into wool, hair, muscles or enzymes. Its true nature is less known and we may still wonder why O-H...O bond energies range from less than 1 to more than 30 kcal/mol without apparent reason. This H-bond puzzle is re-examined here from its very beginning and presented as an inclusive compilation of experimental H-bond energies andgeometries.New concepts emerge from this analysis: new classes of systematically strong H-bonds (CAHBs and RAHBs: cha

  7. Nondestructive Characterization of Quantitative Bonding Strength at a Bonded Solid-Solid Interface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jian-Jun; ZHANG De; MAO Yi-Wei; CHENG Jian-Chun

    2011-01-01

    @@ We propose a nondestructive method to characterize the quantitative bonding strength at a bonded solid-solid interface by a contact acoustic nonlinearity (CAN)microscope.The principle of the CAN microscope is briefly described.The vibration amplitude of the incident focusing wave at the bonded interface is calculated, the standard bonding strength with a complete bonding state is established by the tension test, and the CAN parameter is calibrated.The quantitative contour of bonding strength at the interface could be obtained.The experimental contours of two samples are also presented.

  8. Imaging Hydrogen Bond in Real Space

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Xiu; Liu, Lacheng; Liu, Xiaoqing; Cai, Yingxing; Liu, Nianhua; Wang, Li

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen bond is often assumed to be a purely electrostatic interaction between a electron-deficient hydrogen atom and a region of high electron density. Here, for the first time, we directly image hydrogen bond in real space by room-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) with the assistance of resonant tunneling effect in double barrier mode. STM observations demonstrate that the C=O:HO hydrogen bonds lifted several angstrom meters above metal surfaces appear shuttle-like features with a significant contrast along the direction connected the oxygen and hydrogen atoms of a single hydrogen bond. The off-center location of the summit and the variance of the appearance height for the hydrogen bond with scanning bias reveal that there are certain hybridizations between the electron orbitals of the involved oxygen and hydrogen atoms in the C=O:HO hydrogen bond.

  9. Temperature effect in thermosonic wire bonding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Yun-xin; LONG Zhi-li; HAN Lei; ZHONG Jue

    2006-01-01

    The temperature effect on bonding strength and ultrasonic transmission in a PZT transducer system was investigated. The results show that, the temperature change influences the material features of the bonding interface, such as elastic modulus, tensile strength of gold ball and Ag substrate, which results in different bonding strengths. Moreover, the temperature change also influences the impedance and dissipative ultrasonic energy in the PZT system. The current signal of PZT transducer was analyzed by join time-frequency analysis, which can reveal the current change in a bonding process more clearly and completely. The analysis shows that the bonding parameters influence mutually. These results can help build some criteria for parameter match and optimization in wire bonding processes.

  10. Thermal Conductance through Sapphire-Sapphire Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, T.; Tomaru, T.; Haruyama, T.; Shintomi, T.; Uchinyama, T.; Miyoki, S.; Ohashi, M.; Kuroda, K.

    2003-07-01

    Thermal conductance on sapphire-sapphire bonded interface has been investigated. Two pieces of single crystal sapphire bar with square cross section were bonded together by adhesion free bonding. In two sections of the bar, thermal conductivity was measured between 5 K to 300K. One section contains a bonded interface and the other section measured a thermal conductivity of the sapphire as a reference. No significant thermal resistance due to bonded interface was found from this measurement. Obtained thermal conductivity reaches κ 1 × 104 [W/m·K] in temperature range of T = 20 ˜ 30 K which is a planned operating temperature of a cryogenic mirror of the Large scale Cryogenic Gravitational wave telescope. It looks promising for sapphire bonding technique to improve a heat transfer from a large cryogenic mirror to susp ension wires.

  11. Nanoleakage patterns of four dentin bonding systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H; Burrow, M F; Tyas, M J

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the nanoleakage patterns of four dentin bonding systems. The dentin bonding systems used in this study were: Single Bond, One Coat Bond, Prime & Bond NT/Non Rinse Conditioner (NRC), and PermaQuik. Flat occlusal dentin surfaces from extracted human molars were finished with wet 600-grit silicon carbide paper, and bonded with one of the dentin bonding systems. After 24 h storage at 37 degrees C in water, margins were finished with polishing discs and the surrounding tooth surfaces coated with nail varnish. The samples were immersed in a 50% (w/v) solution of silver nitrate for 24 h, and exposed to photodeveloping solution for 8 h. The samples were cut longitudinally, polished, and mounted on stubs, carbon coated and observed in a Field Emission-SEM using backscattered electron mode. Different nanoleakage patterns were observed with the different adhesive systems. However, accumulations of silver particles were often noted at the base of the hybrid layer for all materials. Single Bond and One Coat Bond demonstrated uptake of silver particles both within the hybrid layer and the adhesive resin. Prime & Bond NT/NRC showed silver staining throughout almost the entire thickness of the hybrid layer. The leakage pattern of PermaQuik revealed loose silver deposition within the hybrid layer. The composition of each adhesive system may play a role in forming the different leakage patterns. The current dentin bonding systems used in this study do not achieve perfect sealing at the restoration/dentin interface, which may influence the durability of the bond to dentin.

  12. Financial Assets [share, bonds] & Ancylia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksoed, Wh-

    2016-11-01

    Instead Elaine Scarry: "Thermonuclear monarchy" reinvent Carry Nation since Aug 17, 1965 the Republic of Indonesia's President speech: "Reach to the Star", for "cancellation" usually found in External Debt herewith retrieved from "the Window of theWorld": Ancylia, feast in March, a month named after Mars, the god of war. "On March 19 they used to put on their biggest performance of gymnastics in order to "bribe" their god for another good year", further we have vacancy & "vacuum tube"- Bulat Air karena Pembuluh, Bulat Kata karena Mufakat" proverb from Minangkabau, West Sumatra. Follows March 19, 1984 are first prototype flight of IAI Astra Jet as well as March 19, 2012 invoice accompanies Electric car Kujang-193, Fainancial Assets [share, bonds] are the answer for "infrastructure" & state owned enterprises assets to be hedged first initial debt per capita accordances. Heartfelt gratitudes to HE. Mr. Ir. Sarwono Kusumaatmadja/PT. Smartfren INDONESIA.

  13. Coherent Control of Bond Making

    CERN Document Server

    Levin, Liat; Rybak, Leonid; Kosloff, Ronnie; Koch, Christiane P; Amitay, Zohar

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate for the first time coherent control of bond making, a milestone on the way to coherent control of photo-induced bimolecular chemical reactions. In strong-field multiphoton femtosecond photoassociation experiments, we find the yield of detected magnesium dimer molecules to be enhanced for positively chirped pulses and suppressed for negatively chirped pulses. Our ab initio model shows that control is achieved by purification via Franck-Condon filtering combined with chirp-dependent Raman transitions. Experimental closed-loop phase optimization using a learning algorithm yields an improved pulse that utilizes vibrational coherent dynamics in addition to chirp-dependent Raman transitions. Our results show that coherent control of binary photo-reactions is feasible even under thermal conditions.

  14. Bond percolation on isoradial graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Grimmett, Geoffrey

    2012-01-01

    In an investigation of percolation on isoradial graphs, we prove the criticality of canonical bond percolation on isoradial embeddings of planar graphs, thus extending celebrated earlier results for homogeneous and inhomogeneous square, triangular, and other lattices. This is achieved via the star-triangle transformation, by transporting the box-crossing property across the family of isoradial graphs. As a consequence, we obtain the universality of these models at the critical point, in the sense that the one-arm and 2j-alternating-arm critical exponents (and therefore also the connectivity and volume exponents) are constant across the family of such percolation processes. The isoradial graphs in question are those that satisfy certain weak conditions on their embedding and on their track system. This class of graphs includes, for example, isoradial embeddings of periodic graphs, and graphs derived from rhombic Penrose tilings.

  15. Effect of surface treatments and bonding agents on the bond strength of repaired composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcanti, Andrea Nóbrega; De Lima, Adriano Fonseca; Peris, Alessandra Rezende; Mitsui, Fabio Hiroyuki Ogata; Marchi, Giselle Maria

    2007-01-01

    An adequate repair procedure depends on high bond strength between the existing composite and the new composite. To evaluate the effect of surface treatments and bonding procedures on the bond strength of repairs performed 24 hours after composite polymerization. Composite specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours. Specimens were allocated into 12 groups (N=10) according to the combination of surface treatment (none, air abrasion, diamond bur) and bonding procedure (none, Single Bond after H(3)PO(4) cleansing, Clearfil SE Bond after H(3)PO(4) cleansing, Clearfil SE Bond without H(3)PO(4) cleansing). The ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of the composite was tested in nonrepaired specimens. Twenty-four hours after repair, specimens were sectioned into three slabs and trimmed to an hourglass shape (1 mm(2) area). Slabs were tested under tension and mean bond strengths analyzed with two-way analysis of variance/Tukey and Dunnett tests (alpha=5%). Two groups resulted in repair bond strengths similar to composite UTS: air abrasion combined with Clearfil SE Bond after H(3)PO(4) cleansing, and air abrasion combined with Clearfil SE Bond without H(3)PO(4) cleansing. Combinations of surface treatments and bonding procedures were not statistically different. When repair procedure was performed 24 hours after composite polymerization, different combinations of surface treatments and bonding procedures affected repair bond strength similarly. There was no statistical difference between the repair bond strength of groups air-abraded and bonded with the self-etching system and composite UTS. Only air abrasion associated with a self-etching system provided repair bond strength comparable to composite UTS.

  16. Competition between Hydrogen Bonds and Coordination Bonds Steered by the Surface Molecular Coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Liangliang; Sun, Qiang; Bao, Meiling; Ma, Honghong; Yuan, Chunxue; Xu, Wei

    2017-04-25

    In addition to the choices of metal atoms/molecular linkers and surfaces, several crucial parameters, including surface temperature, molecular stoichiometric ratio, electrical stimulation, concentration, and solvent effect for liquid/solid interfaces, have been demonstrated to play key roles in the formation of on-surface self-assembled supramolecular architectures. Moreover, self-assembled structural transformations frequently occur in response to a delicate control over those parameters, which, in most cases, involve either conversions from relatively weak interactions to stronger ones (e.g., hydrogen bonds to coordination bonds) or transformations between the comparable interactions (e.g., different coordination binding modes or hydrogen bonding configurations). However, intermolecular bond conversions from relatively strong coordination bonds to weak hydrogen bonds were rarely reported. Moreover, to our knowledge, a reversible conversion between hydrogen bonds and coordination bonds has not been demonstrated before. Herein, we have demonstrated a facile strategy for the regulation of stepwise intermolecular bond conversions from the metal-organic coordination bond (Cu-N) to the weak hydrogen bond (CH···N) by increasing the surface molecular coverage. From the DFT calculations we quantify that the loss in intermolecular interaction energy is compensated by the increased molecular adsorption energy at higher molecular coverage. Moreover, we achieved a reversible conversion from the weak hydrogen bond to the coordination bond by decreasing the surface molecular coverage.

  17. DICOR surface treatments for enhanced bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, L F; Bennett, R J

    1988-06-01

    Treatments for preparing castable ceramic surfaces for enhanced bonding to specially formulated resin-based cements were examined. An ammonium bifluoride etch combined with gamma-methacryloxypropyl-trimethoxysilane produced shear bond strengths higher than when an ammonium bifluoride treatment was used alone. The method of curing the silane was highly significant in the contribution to the cement/substrate bond strength, with the heat-cure producing the highest values. Long-term water storage tests indicated that the cement bond with etch plus silane-treated castable ceramic surfaces (whether heat or chemically cured silane was used) demonstrated no significant decrease in strength after a one-year period.

  18. Fusion bonding of silicon nitride surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reck, Kasper; Østergaard, Christian; Thomsen, Erik Vilain

    2011-01-01

    While silicon nitride surfaces are widely used in many micro electrical mechanical system devices, e.g. for chemical passivation, electrical isolation or environmental protection, studies on fusion bonding of two silicon nitride surfaces (Si3N4–Si3N4 bonding) are very few and highly application...... specific. Often fusion bonding of silicon nitride surfaces to silicon or silicon dioxide to silicon surfaces is preferred, though Si3N4–Si3N4 bonding is indeed possible and practical for many devices as will be shown in this paper. We present an overview of existing knowledge on Si3N4–Si3N4 bonding and new...... results on bonding of thin and thick Si3N4 layers. The new results include high temperature bonding without any pretreatment, along with improved bonding ability achieved by thermal oxidation and chemical pretreatment. The bonded wafers include both unprocessed and processed wafers with a total silicon...

  19. Electric current characteristic of anodic bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jun; Yang, Fang; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Li; Huang, Xian; Zhang, Dacheng

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, a novel current-time model of anodic bonding is proposed and verified experimentally in order to investigate underlying mechanisms of anodic bonding and to achieve real-time monitoring of bonding procedure. The proposed model provides a thorough explanation for the electric current characteristic of anodic bonding. More significantly, it explains two issues which other models cannot explain. One is the sharp rise in current when a voltage is initially applied during anodic bonding. The other is the unexpected large width of depletion layers. In addition, enlargement of the intimately contacted area during anodic bonding can be obtained from the proposed model, which can be utilized to monitor the bonding process. To verify the proposed model, Borofloat33 glass and silicon wafers were adopted in bonding experiments in SUSS SB6 with five different bonding conditions (350 °C 1200 V 370 °C 1200 V 380 °C 1200 V 380 °C 1000 V and 380 °C 1400 V). The results indicate that the observed current data highly coincide with the proposed current-time model. For widths of depletion layers, depth profiling using secondary ion mass spectrometry demonstrates that the calculated values by the model are basically consistent with the experimental values as well.

  20. Bond Tension in Tethered Macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheiko, Sergei S; Panyukov, Sergey; Rubinstein, Michael

    2011-06-14

    The paper presents scaling analysis of mechanical tension generated in densely branched macromolecules tethered to a solid substrate with a short linker. Steric repulsion between branches results in z-fold amplification of tension in the linker, where z is the number of chain-like arms. At large z ~ 100-1000, the generated tension may exceed the strength of covalent bonds and sever the linker. Two types of molecular architectures were considered: polymer stars and polymer "bottlebrushes" tethered to a solid substrate. Depending on the grafting density, one distinguishes the so-called mushroom, loose grafting, and dense grafting regimes. In isolated (mushroom) and loosely tethered bottlebrushes, the linker tension is by a factor of [Formula: see text] smaller than the tension in a tethered star with the same number of arms z. In densely tethered stars, the effect of interchain distance (d) and number of arms (z) on the magnitude of linker tension is given by f ≅ f0z(3/2)(b/d) for stars in a solvent environment and f ≅ f0z(2) (b/d)(2) for dry stars, where b is the Kuhn length and f0 ≅ kBT/b is intrinsic bond tension. These relations are also valid for tethered bottlebrushes with long side chains. However, unlike molecular stars, bottlebrushes demonstrate variation of tension along the backbone f ≅ f0s z(1/2) / d as a function of distance s from the free end of the backbone. In dense brushes [Formula: see text] with z ≅ 1000, the backbone tension increases from f ≅ f0 = 1 pN at the free end of the backbone (s ≅ b) to its maximum f ≅ zf0 ≅ 1 nN at the linker to the substrate (s ≅ zb).

  1. Evaluation of shear bond strength of porcelain bonded to laser welded titanium surface and determination of mode of bond failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Narendra P; Dandekar, Minal; Nadiger, Ramesh K; Guttal, Satyabodh S

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of porcelain to laser welded titanium surface and to determine the mode of bond failure through scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectrophotometry (EDS). Forty five cast rectangular titanium specimens with the dimension of 10 mm x 8 mm x 1 mm were tested. Thirty specimens had a perforation of 2 mm diameter in the centre. These were randomly divided into Group A and B. The perforations in the Group B specimens were repaired by laser welding using Cp Grade II titanium wire. The remaining 15 specimens were taken as control group. All the test specimens were layered with low fusing porcelain and tested for shear bond strength. The debonded specimens were subjected to SEM and EDS. Data were analysed with 1-way analysis of variance and Student's t-test for comparison among the different groups. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed no statistically significant difference in shear bond strength values at a 5% level of confidence. The mean shear bond strength values for control group, Group A and B was 8.4 +/- 0.5 Mpa, 8.1 +/- 0.4 Mpa and 8.3 +/- 0.3 Mpa respectively. SEM/EDS analysis of the specimens showed mixed and cohesive type of bond failure. Within the limitations of the study laser welding did not have any effect on the shear bond strength of porcelain bonded to titanium.

  2. Evaluation of bond strength of brackets using various indirect bonding techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piyush Bolya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Accurate bracket placement has been always an area of interest for all orthodontists. Different types of adhesives for indirect bonding techniques have been introduced recently. However, there is limited information regarding bond strength with these new materials. The aim of this study is to compare and evaluate the bond strength in various indirect bonding techniques when using different primers and adhesives. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro investigation, brackets were bonded to fifty extracted premolars which were divided into five groups (A–E of ten each. Results: The overall comparison of all the techniques produced comparable mean bond strengths that were well within the clinically acceptable range. Group D produced the highest bond strength in comparison to other groups followed by Group E, B, C, and A. Conclusion: In the present study, all the groups have shown shear bond strength of more than 7.8 MPa. Hence, all the five techniques are suitable for clinical use.

  3. Are Bonding Agents being Effective on the Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets Bonded to the Composite?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahimeh Farzanegan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: One of the clinical problems in orthodontics is the bonding of brackets tocomposite restorations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bondstrength of brackets bonded to composite restorations using Excite. Methods:Forty brackets were bonded to composite surfaces, which were embedded inacrylic resin. One of the following four protocols was employed for surfacepreparation of the composite: group 1 37% phosphoric acid for 60 seconds, group2 roughening with a diamond bur plus 37% phosphoric acid for 60 seconds, group3 37% phosphoric acid for 60 seconds and the applying Excite®, group4 roughening with diamond bur plus 37% phosphoric acid for 60 seconds andapplying Excite®. Maxillary central brackets were bonded onto thecomposite prepared samples with Transbond XT. Shear Bond Strength (SBS wasmeasured by a universal testing machine. The ANOVA and Tukey test was utilizedfor data analysis. Results: There was a significant difference betweenthe four groups (P

  4. Shear Bond Strength of DentStat(trademark) for Bracket Bonding to Gold, Ceramic, and Enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-21

    i Shear bond strength of DentStatTM for bracket bonding to gold, ceramic, and enamel . A THESIS Presented to the Faculty of Uniform...in the thesis manuscript entitled: ’Shear Bond Strength of DentStatTM for Bracket Bonding to Gold, Ceramic, and Enamel ’ is appropriately...Ceramic, and Enamel ’ 7. Intended publication/meeting: June 2013 8. "Required by" date: 1 July 2013 9. Date of submission for USU approval: 6 June

  5. Evaluation of bond strength of brackets using various indirect bonding techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Piyush Bolya; Chandresh Shukla; Gunjan Tiwari; Sourabh Bhatt; Saurabh Rathore; Akbar Ali

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Accurate bracket placement has been always an area of interest for all orthodontists. Different types of adhesives for indirect bonding techniques have been introduced recently. However, there is limited information regarding bond strength with these new materials. The aim of this study is to compare and evaluate the bond strength in various indirect bonding techniques when using different primers and adhesives. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro investigation, brackets wer...

  6. Using beryllium bonds to change halogen bonds from traditional to chlorine-shared to ion-pair bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkorta, Ibon; Elguero, José; Mó, Otilia; Yáñez, Manuel; Del Bene, Janet E

    2015-01-21

    Ab initio MP2/aug'-cc-pVTZ calculations have been carried out to investigate the structures, binding energies, and bonding characteristics of binary complexes HFBe:FCl, R2Be:FCl, and FCl:N-base, and of ternary complexes HFBe:FCl:N-base and R2Be:FCl:N-base for R = H, F, Cl; N-base = NH3, NHCH2, NCH. Dramatic synergistic cooperative effects have been found between the Be···F beryllium bonds and the Cl···N halogen bonds in ternary complexes. The Cl···N traditional halogen bonds and the Be···F beryllium bonds in binary complexes become significantly stronger in ternary complexes, while the F-Cl bond weakens. Charge-transfer from F to the empty p(σ) orbital of Be leads to a bending of the XYBe molecule and a change in the hybridization of Be, which in the limit becomes sp(2). As a function of the intrinsic basicity of the nitrogen base and the intrinsic acidity of the Be derivative, the halogen-bond type evolves from traditional to chlorine-shared to ion-pair bonds. The mechanism by which an ion-pair complex is formed is similar to that involved in the dissociative proton attachment process. EOM-CCSD spin-spin coupling constants (1X)J(Cl-N) across the halogen bond in these complexes also provide evidence of the same evolution of the halogen-bond type.

  7. Valence-Bond Concepts in Coordination Chemistry and the Nature of Metal-Metal Bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauling, Linus; Herman, Zelek S.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the valence-bond method, applying it to some coordination compounds of metals, especially those involving metal-metal bonds. Suggests that transition metals can form as many as nine covalent bonds, permitting valence-theory to be extended to transition metal compounds in a more effective way than has been possible before. (JN)

  8. 77 FR 553 - Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Termination; Western Bonding Company

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-05

    ... Supplement No. 4 to the Treasury Department Circular 570; 2011 Revision, published July 1, 2011, at 76 FR... Fiscal Service Surety Companies Acceptable on Federal Bonds: Termination; Western Bonding Company AGENCY... Company (NAIC 13191) under 31 U.S.C. 9305 to qualify as an acceptable surety on Federal bonds...

  9. Comparison of Shear Bond Strengths of three resin systems for a Base Metal Alloy bonded to

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jlali H

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Resin-bonded fixed partial dentures (F.P.D can be used for conservative treatment of partially edentulous"npatients. There are numerous studies regarding the strength of resin composite bond to base meta! alloys. Shear bond"nstrength of three resin systems were invistigated. In this study these systems consisted of: Panavia Ex, Mirage FLC and"nMarathon V. Thirty base metal specimens were prepared from rexillium III alloy and divided into three groups. Then each"ngroup was bonded to enamel of human extracted molar teeth with these systems. All of specimens were stored in water at"n37ac for 48 hours. A shear force was applied to each specimen by the instron universal testing machine. A statistical"nevaluation of the data using one-way analysis of variance showed that there was highly significant difference (P<0.01"nbetween the bond strengths of these three groups."nThe base metal specimens bonded with panavia Ex luting agent, exhibited the highest mean bond strength. Shear bond"nstrength of the specimens bonded to enamel with Mirage F1C showed lower bond strenght than panavia EX. However, the"nlowest bond strength was obtained by the specimens bonded with Marathon V.

  10. Comprehensive analysis of individual pulp fiber bonds quantifies the mechanisms of fiber bonding in paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirn, Ulrich; Schennach, Robert

    2015-05-01

    The process of papermaking requires substantial amounts of energy and wood consumption, which contributes to larger environmental costs. In order to optimize the production of papermaking to suit its many applications in material science and engineering, a quantitative understanding of bonding forces between the individual pulp fibers is of importance. Here we show the first approach to quantify the bonding energies contributed by the individual bonding mechanisms. We calculated the impact of the following mechanisms necessary for paper formation: mechanical interlocking, interdiffusion, capillary bridges, hydrogen bonding, Van der Waals forces, and Coulomb forces on the bonding energy. Experimental results quantify the area in molecular contact necessary for bonding. Atomic force microscopy experiments derive the impact of mechanical interlocking. Capillary bridges also contribute to the bond. A model based on the crystal structure of cellulose leads to values for the chemical bonds. In contrast to general believe which favors hydrogen bonding Van der Waals bonds play the most important role according to our model. Comparison with experimentally derived bond energies support the presented model. This study characterizes bond formation between pulp fibers leading to insight that could be potentially used to optimize the papermaking process, while reducing energy and wood consumption.

  11. 78 FR 36029 - CDFI Bond Guarantee Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-14

    ... financed on a corporate finance basis (i.e., through a Credit Enhancement), any downgrade in the credit.... Bonds will be used to finance Bond Loans to Eligible CDFIs for Eligible Purposes for a period not to... financial strength, stability, durability and liquidity as reflected in its corporate credit ratings...

  12. Parental Bonding and Mental Health in Adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canetti, Laura; Bachar, Eytan; Galili-Weisstub, Esti; De-Nour, Atara Kaplan; Shalev, Arieh Y.

    1997-01-01

    Examines the relationship between parental bonding and mental health in healthy adolescents. Results, based on 847 Israeli high school students, show that those who reported high care and low control (optimal bonding) reported less distress, better general well-being, and better social support than did all other groups. (RJM)

  13. Bonds Issued to Bail Local Governments out

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Zhen

    2009-01-01

    @@ First local bonds sold A total of RMB 3 billion (US$441.2 million) of bonds of the Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region government were successfully sold to underwriters through bidding,said the Chinese Ministry of Finance (MOF) on March 27.

  14. 19 CFR 122.82 - Bond requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bond requirements. 122.82 Section 122.82 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... this subpart. The bond shall be filed in the correct amount with the director of the entry airport....

  15. 27 CFR 25.274 - Bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Pilot Brewing Plants § 25.274 Bond. (a) Requirement. Any person requesting authorization to establish a pilot brewing plant under this subpart shall execute and file a brewer's bond, Form... beer brewed, produced, or received on the premises. (Sec. 4, Pub. L. 91-673, 84 Stat. 2057, as amended...

  16. 25 CFR 226.6 - Bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... the penal sum or not less than $50,000 may be filed on Form G covering all oil, gas and combination... of the bonds required under paragraph (a) of this section, a bond in the penal sum of $150,000 may...

  17. ROLE OF DIASPORA BONDS IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Bunyk

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the problem of the bond issue for the Diaspora as a source of financing of the national economy and a factor of development. We reveal the following factors driving demand in the diaspora bond market: targeting at a project, channels, audience and marketing. The paper shows international experience to attract migrants’ savings and use them to issue bonds. Investors consider diaspora bonds because: firstly, people who have disposable income, who can commit that income or that excess income to a long term investment should look at diaspora bonds: secondly, people who really want to participate in transforming the home country should look at diaspora bond specifically diaspora bonds related to projects: and last but not least, if there are incentives around diaspora bonds for example whether there’s tax incentive and other kinds of incentive, that also should be taken into account. Also we disclosed the possibility of using this type of securities in Ukraine and its expedience.

  18. Traumatic Bonding: Clinical Implications in Incest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    deYoung, Mary; Lowry, Judith A.

    1992-01-01

    "Traumatic bonding" is defined as "the evolution of emotional dependency between...a child and an adult [in] a relationship characterized by periodic sexual abuse." Maintains that the concept holds promise for explaining confusing dynamics of incest. Demonstrates ways in which traumatic bonding can be applied to cases of incest and discusses…

  19. Hydrogen bond dynamics in bulk alcohols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinokita, Keisuke; Cunha, Ana V.; Jansen, Thomas L. C.; Pshenichnikov, Maxim S., E-mail: Maxim.Pchenitchnikov@RuG.nl [Zernike Institute for Advanced Materials, University of Groningen, Nijenborgh 4, 9747 AG Groningen (Netherlands)

    2015-06-07

    Hydrogen-bonded liquids play a significant role in numerous chemical and biological phenomena. In the past decade, impressive developments in multidimensional vibrational spectroscopy and combined molecular dynamics–quantum mechanical simulation have established many intriguing features of hydrogen bond dynamics in one of the fundamental solvents in nature, water. The next class of a hydrogen-bonded liquid—alcohols—has attracted much less attention. This is surprising given such important differences between water and alcohols as the imbalance between the number of hydrogen bonds, each molecule can accept (two) and donate (one) and the very presence of the hydrophobic group in alcohols. Here, we use polarization-resolved pump-probe and 2D infrared spectroscopy supported by extensive theoretical modeling to investigate hydrogen bond dynamics in methanol, ethanol, and isopropanol employing the OH stretching mode as a reporter. The sub-ps dynamics in alcohols are similar to those in water as they are determined by similar librational and hydrogen-bond stretch motions. However, lower density of hydrogen bond acceptors and donors in alcohols leads to the appearance of slow diffusion-controlled hydrogen bond exchange dynamics, which are essentially absent in water. We anticipate that the findings herein would have a potential impact on fundamental chemistry and biology as many processes in nature involve the interplay of hydrophobic and hydrophilic groups.

  20. Expected Business Conditions and Bond Risk Premia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Jonas Nygaard

    This paper studies the predictability of bond risk premia by means of expectations to future business conditions using survey forecasts from the Survey of Professional Forecasters. We show that expected business conditions consistently affect excess bond returns and that the inclusion of expected...

  1. Expected Business Conditions and Bond Risk Premia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Jonas Nygaard

    2017-01-01

    In this article, I study the predictability of bond risk premia by means of expectations to future business conditions using survey forecasts from the Survey of Professional Forecasters. I show that expected business conditions consistently affect excess bond returns and that the inclusion...

  2. Graphene composites containing chemically bonded metal oxides

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Pramoda; S Suresh; H S S Ramakrishna Matte; A Govindaraj

    2013-08-01

    Composites of graphene involving chemically bonded nano films of metal oxides have been prepared by reacting graphene containing surface oxygen functionalities with metal halide vapours followed by exposure to water vapour. The composites have been characterized by electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and other techniques. Magnetite particles chemically bonded to graphene dispersible in various solvents have been prepared and they exhibit fairly high magnetization.

  3. Hydrogen bonds in PC61BM solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Chun-Qi; Li, Wen-Jie; Du, Ying-Ying; Chen, Guang-Hua; Chen, Zheng; Li, Hai-Yang; Li, Hong-Nian

    2015-09-01

    We have studied the hydrogen bonds in PC61BM solids. Inter-molecular interaction is analyzed theoretically for the well-defined monoclinic (P21/n) structure. The results indicate that PC61BM combines into C-H⋯Od bonded molecular chains, where Od denotes the doubly-bonded O atom of PC61BM. The molecular chains are linked together by C-H⋯Os bonds, where Os denotes the singly-bonded O atom of PC61BM. To reveal the consequences of hydrogen bond formation on the structural properties of PC61BM solids (not limited to the monoclinic structure), we design and perform some experiments for annealed samples with the monoclinic (P21/n) PC61BM as starting material. The experiments include differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction and infrared absorption measurements. Structural phase transitions are observed below the melting point. The C-H⋯Od bonds seem persisting in the altered structures. The inter-molecular hydrogen bonds can help to understand the phase separation in polymer/PC61BM blends and may be responsible for the existence of liquid PC61BM.

  4. Strength Optimization of Thermally Bonded Spunbond Nonwovens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataliya Fedorova, Ph.D

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent research on all aspects of thermally point bonded nonwovens has led to considerable improvements in the understanding of material requirements for these nonwovens, the changes that occur during bonding and the resultant deterioration of the mechanical properties of the nonwoven materials. This paper addresses how one may use a bicomponent fiber technology to overcome the shortcomings of the thermal bonding and obtain high strength spunbond fabrics. In particular, we present the utility of islands-in-the-sea (I/S bicomponent fibers for optimizing the strength of thermally bonded fabrics. To examine the role of various bonding temperatures on the fabric performance, pre-consolidated webs were formed and subsequently, thermally bonded. Thus, any influence introduced by potential variations in the structure was minimized. Point-bonded bicomponent samples made up of nylon-6 (N6 as the islands and low density polyethylene (PE as the sea showed great promise with respect to their mechanical properties, suggesting that the use of bicomponent fibers can be beneficial for strength optimization of thermally bonded spunbond nonwovens.

  5. 25 CFR 225.30 - Bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS OIL AND GAS, GEOTHERMAL, AND SOLID MINERALS... Circular No. 570). (b) An operator may file a $75,000 bond for all geothermal, mining, or oil and gas... operator may file a $150,000 bond for full nationwide coverage to cover all geothermal or oil and...

  6. Keeping U.S. Bonds in Hand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    U.S. bonds still comprise a major share of Chinese foreign reserves People are becoming increasingly uneasy about reports saying China is reducing its holdings of U.S.bonds. Currently, China is the sec-ond largest holder of U.S.

  7. Index Driven Price Pressure in Corporate Bonds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dick-Nielsen, Jens

    Inclusion and exclusion of bonds from major indices are information-free, monthly events. At these events, liquidity providers get a significant abnormal return by trading against index trackers. The return is highest for bonds that are excluded because of a recent downgrade with a one-day return...

  8. Measuring of bond. A comparative experimental research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pluijm, R. van der

    1996-01-01

    In the framework of European test methods for masonry a simple test method for bond has to be established. The described research, carried out at Eindhoven University of Technology, tried to contribute to the development of such a test method. In this perspective, the research was focused on bond wr

  9. The Effect of Temperature on Shear Bond Strength of Clearfil SE Bond and Adper Single Bond Adhesive Systems to Dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Nouri

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Statement of the Problem: Monomer viscosity and solvent evaporation can be affected by the adhesive system temperature. Higher temperature can elevate the vapor pressure in solution and penetration of adhesive in smear layer. Bonding mechanism may be influenced by the adhesive temperature. Purpose: This study aimed to evaluate the effect of pre-heating on shear bond strength of etch-and-rinse and self-etching adhesives to ground bovine dentin surfaces, at temperatures of 4˚C, 25˚C and 40˚C. Materials and Method: In this experimental study, 60 maxillary bovine incisors were randomly divided into 6 groups (n=10. The central part of labial dentin surfaces was exposed with a diamond bur and standardized smear layer was creat-ed by using silicon carbide paper (600 grit under water-coolant while the specimens were mounted in acrylic resin. Two adhesive systems, an etch-and-rinse (Adper single bond and a self-etch (Clearfil SE Bond were stored at temperatures of 4˚C, 25˚C and 40˚C for 30 minutes and were then applied on the prepared labial surface according to the manufacturer’s instructions. The composite resin (Z350 was packed in Teflon mold (5 mm in diameter on this surface and was cured. The shear bond strength (MPa was evaluated by universal testing machine (Zwick/Roell Z020, Germany at cross head speed of 1mm/min. The results were statistically analyzed by using ANOVA and Tukey tests (p< 0.05. Results: No significant difference was found between the shear bond strength of Clearfil SE Bond adhesive in different temperature and single Bond adhesive sys-tem at 25 ̊C and 40 ̊C. However, there were significant differences between 4 ̊C of Adper single bond in comparison with 25˚C and 40˚C (p= 0.0001. Conclusion: Pre-heating did not affect the shear bond strength of SE Bond, but could promote the shear bond strength of Adper Single Bond.

  10. Hydrogen Bonds in Excited State Proton Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horke, D. A.; Watts, H. M.; Smith, A. D.; Jager, E.; Springate, E.; Alexander, O.; Cacho, C.; Chapman, R. T.; Minns, R. S.

    2016-10-01

    Hydrogen bonding interactions between biological chromophores and their surrounding protein and solvent environment significantly affect the photochemical pathways of the chromophore and its biological function. A common first step in the dynamics of these systems is excited state proton transfer between the noncovalently bound molecules, which stabilizes the system against dissociation and principally alters relaxation pathways. Despite such fundamental importance, studying excited state proton transfer across a hydrogen bond has proven difficult, leaving uncertainties about the mechanism. Through time-resolved photoelectron imaging measurements, we demonstrate how the addition of a single hydrogen bond and the opening of an excited state proton transfer channel dramatically changes the outcome of a photochemical reaction, from rapid dissociation in the isolated chromophore to efficient stabilization and ground state recovery in the hydrogen bonded case, and uncover the mechanism of excited state proton transfer at a hydrogen bond, which follows sequential hydrogen and charge transfer processes.

  11. Effectiveness of simplified dentin bonding systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, T; Itoh, K; Tani, C; Manabe, A; Yamashita, T; Hisamitsu, H; Wakumoto, S

    1998-03-01

    The effectiveness of newly developed commercial dentin bonding systems (SB, MB II and KB) was evaluated by measuring the contraction gap width of a resin composite restored into a cylindrical dentin cavity prepared in an extracted human molar and by measuring the tensile bond strength to the flat dentin surface. In addition, calcium loss during dentin conditioning was analyzed using electron microanalyses. An experimental dentin bonding system composed of EDTA conditioning, GM solution priming and a bonding agent containing 10-MDP was employed as a control in which it was presumed that contraction gap formation was prevented completely. However, gap formation was observed using the three commercial simplified dentin bonding systems. SEM observation showed that the gap was formed between the resin composite and the top surface of the dentin cavity wall indicating that the fracture occurred at the adhesive interface, but never inside the dentin nor inside the resin composite.

  12. Halogen bonding origin properties and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobza, Pavel [Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, 166 10 Prague (Czech Republic); Regional Center of Advanced Technologies and Materials, Department of Physical Chemistry, Palacky University, 77146 Olomouc (Czech Republic)

    2015-12-31

    σ-hole bonding represents an unusual and novel type of noncovalent interactions in which atom with σ- hole interacts with Lewis base such as an electronegative atom (oxygen, nitrogen, …) or aromatic systems. This bonding is of electrostatic nature since the σ-hole bears a positive charge. Dispersion energy forms equally important energy term what is due to the fact that two heavy atoms (e.g. halogen and oxygen) having high polarizability lie close together (the respective distance is typically shorter than the sum of van der Waals radii). Among different types of σ-hole bondings the halogen bonding is by far the most known but chalcogen and pnictogen bondings are important as well.

  13. Bond diluted anisotropic quantum Heisenberg model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akıncı, Ümit, E-mail: umit.akinci@deu.edu.tr

    2013-10-15

    Effects of the bond dilution on the critical temperatures, phase diagrams and the magnetization behaviors of the isotropic and anisotropic quantum Heisenberg model have been investigated in detail. For the isotropic case, bond percolation threshold values have been determined for several numbers of two (2D) and three (3D) dimensional lattices. In order to investigate the effect of the anisotropy in the exchange interaction on the results obtained for the isotropic model, a detailed investigation has been made on a honeycomb lattice. Some interesting results, such as second order reentrant phenomena in the phase diagrams have been found. - Highlights: • Anisotropic quantum Heisenberg model with bond dilution investigated. • Bond percolation threshold values given for 2D and 3D lattices in isotropic case. • Phase diagrams and ground state magnetizations investigated in detail. • Variation of the bond percolation threshold values with anisotropy determined.

  14. Shedding light on disulfide bond formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostergaard, H; Henriksen, A; Hansen, F G

    2001-01-01

    To visualize the formation of disulfide bonds in living cells, a pair of redox-active cysteines was introduced into the yellow fluorescent variant of green fluorescent protein. Formation of a disulfide bond between the two cysteines was fully reversible and resulted in a >2-fold decrease in the i......To visualize the formation of disulfide bonds in living cells, a pair of redox-active cysteines was introduced into the yellow fluorescent variant of green fluorescent protein. Formation of a disulfide bond between the two cysteines was fully reversible and resulted in a >2-fold decrease...... in the intrinsic fluorescence. Inter conversion between the two redox states could thus be followed in vitro as well as in vivo by non-invasive fluorimetric measurements. The 1.5 A crystal structure of the oxidized protein revealed a disulfide bond-induced distortion of the beta-barrel, as well as a structural...

  15. Atomic diffusion properties in wire bonding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jun-hui; WANG Fu-liang; HAN Lei; DUAN Ji-an; ZHONG Jue

    2006-01-01

    The lift-off characteristics at the interface of thermosonic bond were observed by using scanning electron microscope (JSM-6360LV). The vertical section of bonding point was produced by punching, grinding and ion-sputter thinning, and was tested by using transmission electron microscope (F30). The results show that the atomic diffusion at the bonded interface appears. The thickness of Au/Al interface characterized by atomic diffusion is about 500 nm under ultrasonic and thermal energy. The fracture morphology of lift-off interface is dimples. The tensile fracture appears by pull-test not in bonded interface but in basis material, and the bonded strength at interface is enhanced by diffused atom from the other side.

  16. Cold pressure welding - the mechanisms governing bonding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels

    1979-01-01

    Investigations of the bonding surface in scanning electron microscope after fracture confirm the mechanisms of bond formation in cold pressure welding to be: fracture of work-hardened surface layer, surface expansion increasing the area of virgin surface, extrusion of virgin material through cracks...... of the original surface layer, and establishment of real contact and bonding between virgin material. This implies that normal pressure as well as surface expansion are basic parameters governing the bond strength. Experimental investigations of pressure welding Al-Al under plane strain compression in a specially...... developed equipment allowing independent variation of normal pressure and surface expansion confirm this. Based upon a slip-line analysis of the extrusion through cracks of the surface layer and upon the establishment of real contact between virgin material, a theory for the bond strength as a function...

  17. 1 mil gold bond wire study.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huff, Johnathon; McLean, Michael B.; Jenkins, Mark W.; Rutherford, Brian Milne

    2013-05-01

    In microcircuit fabrication, the diameter and length of a bond wire have been shown to both affect the current versus fusing time ratio of a bond wire as well as the gap length of the fused wire. This study investigated the impact of current level on the time-to-open and gap length of 1 mil by 60 mil gold bond wires. During the experiments, constant current was provided for a control set of bond wires for 250ms, 410ms and until the wire fused; non-destructively pull-tested wires for 250ms; and notched wires. The key findings were that as the current increases, the gap length increases and 73% of the bond wires will fuse at 1.8A, and 100% of the wires fuse at 1.9A within 60ms. Due to the limited scope of experiments and limited data analyzed, further investigation is encouraged to confirm these observations.

  18. Orbital entanglement in bond-formation processes

    CERN Document Server

    Boguslawski, Katharina; Barcza, Gergely; Legeza, Ors; Reiher, Markus

    2013-01-01

    The accurate calculation of the (differential) correlation energy is central to the quantum chemical description of bond-formation and bond-dissociation processes. In order to estimate the quality of single- and multi-reference approaches for this purpose, various diagnostic tools have been developed. In this work, we elaborate on our previous observation [J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 3, 3129 (2012)] that one- and two-orbital-based entanglement measures provide quantitative means for the assessment and classification of electron correlation effects among molecular orbitals. The dissociation behavior of some prototypical diatomic molecules features all types of correlation effects relevant for chemical bonding. We demonstrate that our entanglement analysis is convenient to dissect these electron correlation effects and to provide a conceptual understanding of bond-forming and bond-breaking processes from the point of view of quantum information theory.

  19. Strength of Multiple Parallel Biological Bonds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sulchek, T A; Friddle, R W; Noy, A

    2005-12-07

    Multivalent interactions play a critical role in a variety of biological processes on both molecular and cellular levels. We have used molecular force spectroscopy to investigate the strength of multiple parallel peptide-antibody bonds using a system that allowed us to determine the rupture forces and the number of ruptured bonds independently. In our experiments the interacting molecules were attached to the surfaces of the probe and sample of the atomic force microscope with flexible polymer tethers, and unique mechanical signature of the tethers determined the number of ruptured bonds. We show that the rupture forces increase with the number of interacting molecules and that the measured forces obey the predictions of a Markovian model for the strength of multiple parallel bonds. We also discuss the implications of our results to the interpretation of force spectroscopy measurements in multiple bond systems.

  20. Redox-controlled hydrogen bonding: turning a superbase into a strong hydrogen-bond donor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Ute; Neuhäuser, Christiane; Wiesner, Sven; Kaifer, Elisabeth; Wadepohl, Hubert; Himmel, Hans-Jörg

    2014-05-12

    Herein the synthesis, structures and properties of hydrogen-bonded aggregates involving redox-active guanidine superbases are reported. Reversible hydrogen bonding is switched on by oxidation of the hydrogen-donor unit, and leads to formation of aggregates in which the hydrogen-bond donor unit is sandwiched by two hydrogen-bond acceptor units. Further oxidation (of the acceptor units) leads again to deaggregation. Aggregate formation is associated with a distinct color change, and the electronic situation could be described as a frozen stage on the way to hydrogen transfer. A further increase in the basicity of the hydrogen-bond acceptor leads to deprotonation reactions.

  1. PMMA to Polystyrene bonding for polymer based microfluidic systems

    KAUST Repository

    Fan, Yiqiang

    2013-03-29

    A thermal bonding technique for Poly (methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) to Polystyrene (PS) is presented in this paper. The PMMA to PS bonding was achieved using a thermocompression method, and the bonding strength was carefully characterized. The bonding temperature ranged from 110 to 125 C with a varying compression force, from 700 to 1,000 N (0.36-0.51 MPa). After the bonding process, two kinds of adhesion quantification methods were used to measure the bonding strength: the double cantilever beam method and the tensile stress method. The results show that the bonding strength increases with a rising bonding temperature and bonding force. The results also indicate that the bonding strength is independent of bonding time. A deep-UV surface treatment method was also provided in this paper to lower the bonding temperature and compression force. Finally, a PMMA to PS bonded microfluidic device was fabricated successfully. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  2. 48 CFR 28.105-2 - Patent infringement bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Patent infringement bonds... GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS BONDS AND INSURANCE Bonds and Other Financial Protections 28.105-2 Patent infringement bonds. (a) Contracts providing for patent indemnity may require these bonds only if— (1)...

  3. 31 CFR 316.6 - Purchase of bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Purchase of bonds. 316.6 Section 316....6 Purchase of bonds. Series E bonds were purchased, as follows: (a) Over-the-counter for cash—(1... purchase Series E bonds at banks or other financial institutions authorized to issue such bonds. Stamps...

  4. 31 CFR 346.3 - Purchase of bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Purchase of bonds. 346.3 Section 346... RETIREMENT BONDS § 346.3 Purchase of bonds. (a) Agencies. Individual Retirement Bonds may be purchased over... be able to arrange for the purchase of the bonds through such institutions, but only the...

  5. HYDROGEN BONDING IN POLYMERIC ADSORBENTS BASED ADSORPTION AND SEPARATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUMancai; SHIZuoqing; 等

    2000-01-01

    After a concise introduction of hydrogen bonding effects in solute-solute and solute-solvent bonding,the design of polymeric adsorbents based on hydrogen bonding ,selectivity in adsorption through hydrogen bonding,and characterization of hydrogen bonding in adsorption and separation were reviewed with 28 references.

  6. 49 CFR 587.16 - Adhesive bonding procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Adhesive bonding procedure. 587.16 Section 587.16... Adhesive bonding procedure. Immediately before bonding, aluminum sheet surfaces to be bonded are thoroughly... the abrading process are removed, as these can adversely affect bonding. The adhesive is applied...

  7. Gap measurement and bond strength of five selected adhesive systems bonded to tooth structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbabzadeh, F; Gage, J P; Young, W G; Shahabi, S; Swenson, S M

    1998-06-01

    The ability of a restorative material to bond and seal the interface with tooth structure is perhaps the most significant factor in determining resistance to marginal caries. Thus, the quality and durability of marginal seal and bond strength are major considerations in the selection of restorative materials. The purpose of this study was to compare the bond strength and marginal discrepancies of five adhesive systems: All-Bond 2, Clearfil Liner Bond, KB 200, ProBond and AELITE Bond. Twenty-five buccal and 25 lingual cavities were prepared in 25 caries-free extracted molar teeth, giving 10 cavities for each of the 5 adhesive systems. All teeth were restored with the resin composite Pertac Hybrid, or PRISMA Total Performance Hybrid with their appropriate adhesive systems. After restoration, the teeth were thermocycled, were stained with a 1.5% aqueous solution of a procion dye (reactive orange 14) and sectioned coronally with a saw microtome. Three sections of 200 microns thickness were prepared from each restoration which were then examined microscopically to measure marginal gap widths using a confocal tandem microscope. Shear bond strength measurements were carried out on the dentine bond using a universal testing machine. The All-Bond 2 adhesive system was found to have higher shear bond strength and to have the least gap width at the cementodentinal margin.

  8. Fundamental aspects of recoupled pair bonds. I. Recoupled pair bonds in carbon and sulfur monofluoride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunning, Thom H., E-mail: thdjr@uw.edu; Xu, Lu T.; Takeshita, Tyler Y. [Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 600 S. Mathews Avenue, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    2015-01-21

    The number of singly occupied orbitals in the ground-state atomic configuration of an element defines its nominal valence. For carbon and sulfur, with two singly occupied orbitals in their {sup 3}P ground states, the nominal valence is two. However, in both cases, it is possible to form more bonds than indicated by the nominal valence—up to four bonds for carbon and six bonds for sulfur. In carbon, the electrons in the 2s lone pair can participate in bonding, and in sulfur the electrons in both the 3p and 3s lone pairs can participate. Carbon 2s and sulfur 3p recoupled pair bonds are the basis for the tetravalence of carbon and sulfur, and 3s recoupled pair bonds enable sulfur to be hexavalent. In this paper, we report generalized valence bond as well as more accurate calculations on the a{sup 4}Σ{sup −} states of CF and SF, which are archetypal examples of molecules that possess recoupled pair bonds. These calculations provide insights into the fundamental nature of recoupled pair bonds and illustrate the key differences between recoupled pair bonds formed with the 2s lone pair of carbon, as a representative of the early p-block elements, and recoupled pair bonds formed with the 3p lone pair of sulfur, as a representative of the late p-block elements.

  9. Hydrogen bonding motifs in a hydroxy-bisphosphonate moiety: revisiting the problem of hydrogen bond identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashouri, Mitra; Maghari, Ali; Karimi-Jafari, M H

    2015-05-28

    Bisphosphonates are important therapeutic agents in bone-related diseases and exhibit complex H-bonding networks. To assess the role of H-bonds in biophosphonate stability, a full conformational search was performed for methylenebisphosphonate (MBP) and 1-hydroxyethylidene-1,1-diphosphonate (HEDP) using the MP2 method in conjunction with the continuum solvation model. The most stable structures and their equilibrium populations were analyzed at two protonation states via assignment of H-bonding motifs to each conformer. Geometrical and topological approaches for the identification and characterization of H-bonds were compared with each other, and some of the important correlations between H-bond features were described over the entire conformational space of a hydroxy-bisphosphonate moiety. The topologically derived H-bond energy obtained from the local density of potential energy at bond critical points shows consistent correlations with other measures such as H-bond frequency shift. An inverse power form without an intercept predicts topological H-bond energies from hydrogen-acceptor distances with an RMS error of less than 1 kcal mol(-1). The consistency of this measure was further checked by building a model that reasonably reproduces the relative stabilities of different conformers from their hydrogen-acceptor distances. In all systems, the predictions of this model are improved by the consideration of weak H-bonds that have no bond critical point.

  10. Bonding mechanism of ultrasonic wedge bonding of copper wire on Au/Ni/Cu substrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Yan-hong; WANG Chun-qing; Y. Norman ZHOU

    2008-01-01

    The ultrasonic wedge bonding with d25 μm copper wire was achieved on Au/Ni plated Cu substrate at ambient temperature. Ultrasonic wedge bonding mechanism was investigated by using SEM/EDX, pull test, shear test and microhardness test. The results show that the thinning of the Au layer occurs directly below the center of the bonding tool with the bonding power increasing. The interdiffusion between copper wire and Au metallization during the wedge bonding is assumed negligible, and the wedge bonding is achieved by wear action induced by ultrasonic vibration. The ultrasonic power contributes to enhance the deformation of copper wire due to ultrasonic softening effect which is then followed by the strain hardening of the copper wedge bonding.

  11. The Effect of Post-Bond Heat Treatment on Tensile Property of Diffusion Bonded Austenitic Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Sunghoon; Kim, Sung Kwan; Jang, Changheui [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Sah, Injin [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Diffusion bonding is the key manufacturing process for the micro-channel type heat exchangers. In this study, austenitic alloys such as Alloy 800HT, Alloy 690, and Alloy 600, were diffusion bonded at various temperatures and the tensile properties were measured up to 650 ℃. Tensile ductility of diffusion bonded Alloy 800HT was significantly lower than that of base metal at all test temperatures. While, for Alloy 690 and Alloy 600, tensile ductility of diffusion bonded specimens was comparable to that of base metals up to 500 ℃, above which the ductility became lower. The poor ductility of diffusion bonded specimen could have caused by the incomplete grain boundary migration and precipitates along the bond-line. Application of post-bond heat treatment (PBHT) improved the ductility close to that of base metals up to 550 ℃. Changes in tensile properties were discussed in view of the microstructure in the diffusionbonded area.

  12. Bond Strength of Composite Resin to Pulp Capping Biomaterials after Application of Three Different Bonding Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Jaberi-Ansari

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Bonding of composite resin filling materials to pulp protecting agents produces an adhesive joint which is important for the quality of filling as well as success of restoration. We aimed to assess the bond strength of composite resin to three pulp capping biomaterials: Pro Root mineral trioxide aggregate (PMTA, Root MTA (RMTA and calcium enriched mixture (CEM cement, using three bonding systems [a total-etch (Single Bond and two self-etch systems (Protect bond and SE Bond]. Materials and methods. Ninety acrylic molds, each containing a 6×2-mm hole, were divided into 3 groups and filled with PMTA, RMTA and CEM cements. The samples in each experimental group were then randomly divided into 3 subgroups; Single Bond, Protect Bond and SE Bond bonding systems were applied to the tested materials. Cylindrical forms of composite resin (Z100, 2×2 mm were placed onto the samples and cured. Shear bond strength values were measured for 9 subgroups using a universal testing machine. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA. Results. The average shear bond strengths of Z100 composite resin after application of Single Bond, Protect Bond and SE Bond systems were as follows; PMTA: 5.1±2.42, 4.56±1.96 and 4.52±1.7; RMTA: 4.71±1.77, 4.31±0.56 and 4.79±1.88; and CEM cement: 4.75±1.1, 4.54±1.59 and 4.64±1.78 MPa, respectively. The type of pulp capping material, bonding system and their interacting effects did not have a significant effect on the bond strengths of composite resin to pulp capping biomaterials. Conclusion. Within the limitations of this in vitro study, bond strength of composite resin to two types of MTA as well as CEM cement were similar following application of the total-etch or self-etch bonding systems.

  13. Bond strength of composite resin to pulp capping biomaterials after application of three different bonding systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaberi-Ansari, Zahra; Mahdilou, Maryam; Ahmadyar, Maryam; Asgary, Saeed

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims. Bonding of composite resin filling materials to pulp protecting agents produces an adhesive joint which is important for the quality of filling as well as success of restoration. We aimed to assess the bond strength of composite resin to three pulp capping biomaterials: Pro Root mineral trioxide aggregate (PMTA), Root MTA (RMTA) and calcium enriched mixture (CEM) cement, using three bonding systems [a total-etch (Single Bond) and two self-etch systems (Protect bond and SE Bond)]. Materials and methods. Ninety acrylic molds, each containing a 6×2-mm hole, were divided into 3 groups and filled with PMTA, RMTA and CEM cements. The samples in each experimental group were then randomly divided into 3 sub-groups; Single Bond, Protect Bond and SE Bond bonding systems were applied to the tested materials. Cylindrical forms of composite resin (Z100, 2×2 mm) were placed onto the samples and cured. Shear bond strength values were measured for 9 subgroups using a universal testing machine. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA. Results. The average shear bond strengths of Z100 composite resin after application of Single Bond, Protect Bond and SE Bond systems were as follows; PMTA: 5.1±2.42, 4.56±1.96 and 4.52±1.7; RMTA: 4.71±1.77, 4.31±0.56 and 4.79±1.88; and CEM cement: 4.75±1.1, 4.54±1.59 and 4.64±1.78 MPa, respectively. The type of pulp capping material, bonding system and their interacting effects did not have a significant effect on the bond strengths of composite resin to pulp capping biomaterials. Conclusion. Within the limitations of this in vitrostudy, bond strength of composite resin to two types of MTA as well as CEM cement were similar following application of the total-etch or self-etch bonding systems.

  14. Destination bonding: Hybrid cognition using Instagram

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arup Kumar Baksi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Empirical research has identified the phenomenon of destination bonding as a result of summated physical and emotional values associated with the destination. Physical values, namely natural landscape & other physical settings and emotional values, namely the enculturation processes, have a significant role to play in portraying visitors’ cognitive framework for destination preference. The physical values seemed to be the stimulator for bonding that embodies action or behavior tendencies in imagery. The emotional values were the conditions that lead to affective bonding and are reflected in attitudes for a place which were evident in text narratives. Social networking on virtual platforms offers the scope for hybrid cognitive expression using imagery and text to the visitors. Instagram has emerged as an application-window to capture these hybrid cognitions of visitors. This study focuses on assessing the relationship between hybrid cognition of visitors expressed via Instagram and their bond with the destination. Further to this, the study attempts to examine the impact of hybrid cognition of visitors on the behavioral pattern of prospective visitors to the destination. The study revealed that sharing of visual imageries and related text by the visitors is an expression of the physico-emotional bonding with the destination. It was further established that hybrid cognition strongly asserts destination bonding and has been also found to have moderating impact on the link between destination bonding and electronic-word-of-mouth.

  15. Analysis of Hydrogen Bonds in Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sławomir J. Grabowski

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The determination of crystal structures provides important information on the geometry of species constituting crystals and on the symmetry relations between them. Additionally, the analysis of crystal structures is so conclusive that it allows us to understand the nature of various interactions. The hydrogen bond interaction plays a crucial role in crystal engineering and, in general, its important role in numerous chemical, physical and bio-chemical processes was the subject of various studies. That is why numerous important findings on the nature of hydrogen bonds concern crystal structures. This special issue presents studies on hydrogen bonds in crystals, and specific compounds and specific H-bonded patterns existing in crystals are analyzed. However, the characteristics of the H-bond interactions are not only analyzed theoretically; this interaction is compared with other ones that steer the arrangement of molecules in crystals, for example halogen, tetrel or pnicogen bonds. More general findings concerning the influence of the hydrogen bond on the physicochemical properties of matter are also presented.

  16. Bond strength of repaired amalgam restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Rosalia; Mondragon, Eduardo; Shen, Chiayi

    2015-01-01

    This in vitro study investigated the interfacial flexural strength (FS) of amalgam repairs and the optimal combination of repair materials and mechanical retention required for a consistent and durable repair bond. Amalgam bricks were created, each with 1 end roughened to expose a fresh surface before repair. Four groups followed separate repair protocols: group 1, bonding agent with amalgam; group 2, bonding agent with composite resin; group 3, mechanical retention (slot) with amalgam; and group 4, slot with bonding agent and amalgam. Repaired specimens were stored in artificial saliva for 1, 10, 30, 120, or 360 days before being loaded to failure in a 3-point bending test. Statistical analysis showed significant changes in median FS over time in groups 2 and 4. The effect of the repair method on the FS values after each storage period was significant for most groups except the 30-day storage groups. Amalgam-amalgam repair with adequate condensation yielded the most consistent and durable bond. An amalgam bonding agent could be beneficial when firm condensation on the repair surface cannot be achieved or when tooth structure is involved. Composite resin can be a viable option for amalgam repair in an esthetically demanding region, but proper mechanical modification of the amalgam surface and selection of the proper bonding system are essential.

  17. Nanocrystal-enabled solid state bonding.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    San Diego State University, San Diego, CA; Puskar, Joseph David; Tikare, Veena; Garcia Cardona, Cristina (San Diego State University, San Diego, CA); Reece, Mark; Brewer, Luke N. (Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA); Holm, Elizabeth Ann

    2010-10-01

    In this project, we performed a preliminary set of sintering experiments to examine nanocrystal-enabled diffusion bonding (NEDB) in Ag-on-Ag and Cu-on-Cu using Ag nanoparticles. The experimental test matrix included the effects of material system, temperature, pressure, and particle size. The nanoparticle compacts were bonded between plates using a customized hot press, tested in shear, and examined post mortem using microscopy techniques. NEDB was found to be a feasible mechanism for low-temperature, low-pressure, solid-state bonding of like materials, creating bonded interfaces that were able to support substantial loads. The maximum supported shear strength varied substantially within sample cohorts due to variation in bonded area; however, systematic variation with fabrication conditions was also observed. Mesoscale sintering simulations were performed in order to understand whether sintering models can aid in understanding the NEDB process. A pressure-assisted sintering model was incorporated into the SPPARKS kinetic Monte Carlo sintering code. Results reproduce most of the qualitative behavior observed in experiments, indicating that simulation can augment experiments during the development of the NEDB process. Because NEDB offers a promising route to low-temperature, low-pressure, solid-state bonding, we recommend further research and development with a goal of devising new NEDB bonding processes to support Sandia's customers.

  18. Rapid bonding of Pyrex glass microchips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Yoshitake; Morishima, Keisuke; Kogi, Atsuna; Kikutani, Yoshikuni; Tokeshi, Manabu; Kitamori, Takehiko

    2007-03-01

    A newly developed vacuum hot press system has been specially designed for the thermal bonding of glass substrates in the fabrication process of Pyrex glass microchemical chips. This system includes a vacuum chamber equipped with a high-pressure piston cylinder and carbon plate heaters. A temperature of up to 900 degrees C and a force of as much as 9800 N could be applied to the substrates in a vacuum atmosphere. The Pyrex substrates bonded with this system under different temperatures, pressures, and heating times were evaluated by tensile strength tests, by measurements of thickness, and by observations of the cross-sectional shapes of the microchannels. The optimal bonding conditions of the Pyrex glass substrates were 570 degrees C for 10 min under 4.7 N/mm(2) of applied pressure. Whereas more than 16 h is required for thermal bonding with a conventional furnace, the new system could complete the whole bonding processes within just 79 min, including heating and cooling periods. Such improvements should considerably enhance the production rate of Pyrex glass microchemical chips. Whereas flat and dust-free surfaces are required for conventional thermal bonding, especially without long and repeated heating periods, our hot press system could press a fine dust into glass substrates so that even the areas around the dust were bonded. Using this capability, we were able to successfully integrate Pt/Ti thin film electrodes into a Pyrex glass microchip.

  19. Protection of MOS capacitors during anodic bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schjølberg-Henriksen, K.; Plaza, J. A.; Rafí, J. M.; Esteve, J.; Campabadal, F.; Santander, J.; Jensen, G. U.; Hanneborg, A.

    2002-07-01

    We have investigated the electrical damage by anodic bonding on CMOS-quality gate oxide and methods to prevent this damage. n-type and p-type MOS capacitors were characterized by quasi-static and high-frequency CV-curves before and after anodic bonding. Capacitors that were bonded to a Pyrex wafer with 10 μm deep cavities enclosing the capacitors exhibited increased leakage current and interface trap density after bonding. Two different methods were successful in protecting the capacitors from such damage. Our first approach was to increase the cavity depth from 10 μm to 50 μm, thus reducing the electric field across the gate oxide during bonding from approximately 2 × 105 V cm-1 to 4 × 104 V cm-1. The second protection method was to coat the inside of a 10 μm deep Pyrex glass cavity with aluminium, forming a Faraday cage that removed the electric field across the cavity during anodic bonding. Both methods resulted in capacitors with decreased interface trap density and unchanged leakage current after bonding. No change in effective oxide charge or mobile ion contamination was observed on any of the capacitors in the study.

  20. Atomically Bonded Transparent Superhydrophobic Coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aytug, Tolga [ORNL

    2015-08-01

    Maintaining clarity and avoiding the accumulation of water and dirt on optically transparent surfaces such as US military vehicle windshields, viewports, periscope optical head windows, and electronic equipment cover glasses are critical to providing a high level of visibility, improved survivability, and much-needed safety for warfighters in the field. Through a combination of physical vapor deposition techniques and the exploitation of metastable phase separation in low-alkali borosilicate, a novel technology was developed for the fabrication of optically transparent, porous nanostructured silica thin film coatings that are strongly bonded to glass platforms. The nanotextured films, initially structurally superhydrophilic, exhibit superior superhydrophobicity, hence antisoiling ability, following a simple but robust modification in surface chemistry. The surfaces yield water droplet contact angles as high as 172°. Moreover, the nanostructured nature of these coatings provides increased light scattering in the UV regime and reduced reflectivity (i.e., enhanced transmission) over a broad range of the visible spectrum. In addition to these functionalities, the coatings exhibit superior mechanical resistance to abrasion and are thermally stable to temperatures approaching 500°C. The overall process technology relies on industry standard equipment and inherently scalable manufacturing processes and demands only nontoxic, naturally abundant, and inexpensive base materials. Such coatings, applied to the optical components of current and future combat equipment and military vehicles will provide a significant strategic advantage for warfighters. The inherent self-cleaning properties of such superhydrophobic coatings will also mitigate biofouling of optical windows exposed to high-humidity conditions and can help decrease repair/replacement costs, reduce maintenance, and increase readiness by limiting equipment downtime.

  1. Does fluorine participate in halogen bonding?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskandari, Kiamars; Lesani, Mina

    2015-03-16

    When R is sufficiently electron withdrawing, the fluorine in the R-F molecules could interact with electron donors (e.g., ammonia) and form a noncovalent bond (F⋅⋅⋅N). Although these interactions are usually categorized as halogen bonding, our studies show that there are fundamental differences between these interactions and halogen bonds. Although the anisotropic distribution of electronic charge around a halogen is responsible for halogen bond formations, the electronic charge around the fluorine in these molecules is spherical. According to source function analysis, F is the sink of electron density at the F⋅⋅⋅N BCP, whereas other halogens are the source. In contrast to halogen bonds, the F⋅⋅⋅N interactions cannot be regarded as lump-hole interactions; there is no hole in the valence shell charge concentration (VSCC) of fluorine. Although the quadruple moment of Cl and Br is mainly responsible for the existence of σ-holes, it is negligibly small in the fluorine. Here, the atomic dipole moment of F plays a stabilizing role in the formation of F⋅⋅⋅N bonds. Interacting quantum atoms (IQA) analysis indicates that the interaction between halogen and nitrogen in the halogen bonds is attractive, whereas it is repulsive in the F⋅⋅⋅N interactions. Virial-based atomic energies show that the fluorine, in contrast to Cl and Br, stabilize upon complex formation. According to these differences, it seems that the F⋅⋅⋅N interactions should be referred to as "fluorine bond" instead of halogen bond.

  2. Vacancy formation and strain in low-temperature Cu/Cu(100) growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voter, Arthur F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Uberuaga, Blas P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shim, Yunsic [UNIV. OF TOLEDO; Borovikov, Valery [UNIV. OF TOLEDO

    2008-01-01

    The development of compressive strain in metal thin films grown at low temperature has recently been revealed via X-ray diffraction and explained by the assumption that a large number of vacancies were incorporated into the growing films. The results of the molecular dynamics and parallel temperature-accelerated dynamics simulations suggest that the key factor responsible for the experimentally observed strain is an increased nanoscale surface roughness due to the suppression of thermally activated events combined with the effects of shadowing due to off-normal deposition conditions.

  3. Superconductivity of Cu/CuOx interface formed by shock-wave pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakhray, D. V.; Avdonin, V. V.; Palnichenko, A. V.

    2016-11-01

    A mixture of powdered Cu and CuO has been subjected to shock-wave pressure of 350 kbar with following quenching of the vacuum-encapsulated product to 77 K. The ac magnetic susceptibility measurements of the samples have revealed metastable superconductivity with Tc ≈ 19 K, characterized by glassy dynamics of the shielding currents below Tc . Comparison of the ac susceptibility and the DC magnetization measurements infers that the superconductivity arises within the granular interfacial layer formed between metallic Cu and its oxides due to the shock-wave treatment.

  4. Perpendicular magnetic anisotropy and structural properties of NiCu/Cu multilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruotolo, A.; Bell, C.; Leung, C. W.; Blamire, M. G.

    2004-07-01

    Perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) was studied at low temperature (T=30 K) in dc-magnetron sputtered Ni60Cu40/Cu multilayers. PMA has been observed in many multilayer structures for ferromagnetic layer thicknesses less than a certain thickness t⊥. In general cases t⊥ is less than a few nanometers, making such structures unsuitable for low-cost fabrication techniques. Our results show a strong perpendicular easy direction of magnetization for NiCu layer thickness between 4.2 nm and 34 nm. The thickness t⊥ at which the multilayers change the preferential orientation from perpendicular to in-plane is estimated to be 55 nm. Structural studies show that the low magnetostatic energy density is likely to be the main reason for the large t⊥ value obtained in this system.

  5. Ozonation and sol-gel method to obtain Cu/Cu O nanoparticles from cyanidation wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soria A, M. J.; Puente S, D. M.; Carrillo P, F. R. [Universidad Autonoma de Coahuila, Facultad de Metalurgia, Carretera 57 Km 4.5, 25710 Monclova, Coahuila (Mexico); Garcia C, L. A. [Centro de Investigacion en Quimica Aplicada, Blvd. Enrique Reyna No. 140, Col. Los Pinos, 25253 Saltillo, Coahuila (Mexico); Velazquez S, J., E-mail: frrcarrillo@yahoo.com.mx [University of Texas at San Antonio, Department of Physics and Astronomy, San Antonio TX 78249 (United States)

    2015-07-01

    The extraction process of gold and silver by cyanidation generates large amounts of effluent which also contain contaminants such as cyanide and significant metal values such as copper. This paper presents the results of the removal and recovery of copper from ozonation treatment of a residual aqueous cyanide. The residual solution was treated by ozonation-precipitation to obtain a precipitate of copper. From this, copper nano composites obtained by Pechini modified sol-gel method were obtained. The compounds obtained were characterized by X-ray diffraction, showing a dependence of the type of compounds formed over time of ozonation and heat treatment of the gel. The particle size was measured by scanning electron microscopy and calculated by the Scherrer equation, being between 50 and 120 nm. (Author)

  6. Solitons on H bonds in proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    d'Ovidio, F.; Bohr, H.G.; Lindgård, Per-Anker

    2003-01-01

    system shows that the solitons are spontaneously created and are stable and moving along the helix axis. A perturbation on one of the three H-bond lines forms solitons on the other H bonds as well. The robust solitary wave may explain very long-lived modes in the frequency range of 100 cm(-1) which...... are found in recent x-ray laser experiments. The dynamics parameters of the Toda lattice are in accordance with the usual Lennard-Jones parameters used for realistic H-bond potentials in proteins....

  7. Mechatronic modeling and simulation using bond graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Shuvra

    2009-01-01

    Bond graphs are especially well-suited for mechatronic systems, as engineering system modeling is best handled using a multidisciplinary approach. Bond graphing permits one to see the separate components of an engineering system as a unified whole, and allows these components to be categorized under a few generalized elements, even when they come from different disciplines. In addition to those advantages, the bond graph offers a visual representation of a system from which derivation of the governing equations is algorithmic. This makes the design process accessible to beginning readers, prov

  8. 76 FR 12364 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Bonded Warehouse Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-07

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities: Bonded Warehouse... Bonded Warehouse Regulations. This request for comment is being made pursuant to the Paperwork Reduction... concerning the following information collection: Title: Bonded Warehouse Regulations. OMB Number:...

  9. Composite Bonding to Stainless Steel Crowns Using a New Universal Bonding and Single-Bottle Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Hattan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The aim of this study is to evaluate the shear bond strength of nanocomposite to stainless steel crowns using a new universal bonding system. Material and Methods. Eighty (80 stainless steel crowns (SSCs were divided into four groups (20 each. Packable nanocomposite was bonded to the lingual surface of the crowns in the following methods: Group A without adhesive (control group, Group B using a new universal adhesive system (Scotchbond Universal Adhesive, 3M ESPE, Seefeld, Germany, and Group C and Group D using two different brands of single-bottle adhesive systems. Shear bond strengths were calculated and the types of failure also were recorded. Results. The shear strength of Group B was significantly greater than that of other groups. No significant differences were found between the shear bond strengths of Groups C and D. The control group had significantly lower shear bond strength ( to composite than the groups that utilized bonding agents. Conclusion. Composites bonding to stainless steel crowns using the new universal bonding agent (Scotchbond Universal Adhesive, 3M ESPE, Seefeld, Germany show significantly greater shear bond strengths and fewer adhesive failures when compared to traditional single-bottle systems.

  10. Fatigue de-bond growth in adhesively bonded single lap joints

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P K Sahoo; B Dattaguru; C M Manjunatha; C R L Murthy

    2012-02-01

    The fatigue de-bond growth studies have been conducted on adhesively bonded lap joint specimens between aluminium and aluminium with Redux-319A adhesive with a pre-defined crack of 3 mm at the bond end. The correlations between fracture parameters and the de-bond growth data are established using both numerical and experimental techniques. In the numerical method, geometrically non-linear finite element analyses were carried out on adhesively bonded joint specimen for various de-bond lengths measured from the lap end along the mid-bond line of the adhesive. The finite element results were post processed to estimate the SERR components $G_I$ and $G_{II}$ using the Modified Virtual Crack Closure Integral (MVCCI) procedure. In experimental work, specimens were fabricated and fatigue de-bond growth tests were conducted at a stress ratio $R = −1$. The results obtained from both numerical analyses and testing have been used to generate de-bond growth curve and establish de-bond growth law in the Paris regime for such joints. The de-bond growth rate is primarily function of mode-I SERR component $G_I$ since the rate of growth in shear mode is relatively small. The value of Paris exponent is found to be 6.55. The high value of de-bond growth exponent in Paris regime is expected, since the adhesive is less ductile than conventional metallic materials. This study is important for estimating the life of adhesively bonded joints under both constant and variable amplitude fatigue loads.

  11. Shear bond strength of partial coverage restorations to dentin

    OpenAIRE

    Román Rodríguez, Juan Luis; Agustín Panadero, Rubén; Alonso Pérez Barquero, Jorge; Fons Font, Antonio; Solá Ruiz, María Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    Background When partial coverage restorations (veneers, inlays, onlays…) must be cemented to dentin, bond strength may not reach the same predictable values as to enamel. The purpose of this study was: 1. To compare, with a shear bond test, the bond strength to dentin of a total-etch and a self-etching bonding agent. 2. To determine whether creating microretention improves the bond strength to dentin. Material and Methods Two bonding agents were assayed, Optibond FL® (Kerr), two-bottle adhesi...

  12. Evaluation of a New Nano-filled Bonding Agent for Bonding Orthodontic Brackets as Compared to a Conventional Bonding Agent: An in vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandesh S Pai

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: Although both bonding agents provide clinically acceptable levels of bond strength, the technique to bond the nano-filled Prime and Bond NT is more cumbersome as compared to the Transbond XT material, which makes the latter a more popular choice in the clinical set up. If the application procedures for the Prime and Bond NT can be simplified then it could be a convenient option in the orthodontic practice.

  13. Hydrolyzable polyureas bearing hindered urea bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Hanze; Cheng, Jianjun

    2014-12-10

    Hydrolyzable polymers are widely used materials that have found numerous applications in biomedical, agricultural, plastic, and packaging industrials. They usually contain ester and other hydrolyzable bonds, such as anhydride, acetal, ketal, or imine, in their backbone structures. Here, we report the first design of hydrolyzable polyureas bearing dynamic hindered urea bonds (HUBs) that can reversibly dissociate to bulky amines and isocyanates, the latter of which can be further hydrolyzed by water, driving the equilibrium to facilitate the degradation of polyureas. Polyureas bearing 1-tert-butyl-1-ethylurea bonds that show high dynamicity (high bond dissociation rate), in the form of either linear polymers or cross-linked gels, can be completely degraded by water under mild conditions. Given the simplicity and low cost for the production of polyureas by simply mixing multifunctional bulky amines and isocyanates, the versatility of the structures, and the tunability of the degradation profiles of HUB-bearing polyureas, these materials are potentially of very broad applications.

  14. Water, Hydrogen Bonding and the Microwave Background

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robitaille P.-M.

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available n this work, the properties of the water are briefly revisited. Though liquid water has a fleeting structure, it displays an astonishingly stable network of hydrogen bonds. Thus, even as a liquid, water possesses a local lattice with short range order. The presence of hydroxyl (O-H and hydrogen (H....OH2 bonds within water, indicate that it can simultaneously maintain two separate energy systems. These can be viewed as two very different temperatures. The analysis presented uses results from vibrational spec- troscopy, extracting the force constant for the hydrogen bonded dimer. By idealizing this species as a simple diatomic structure, it is shown that hydrogen bonds within wa- ter should be able to produce thermal spectra in the far infrared and microwave regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. This simple analysis reveals that the oceans have a physical mechanism at their disposal, which is capable of generating the microwave background.

  15. On the photostability of the disulfide bond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stephansen, Anne Boutrup; Larsen, Martin Alex Bjørn; Klein, Liv Bærenholdt;

    2014-01-01

    Photostability is an essential property of molecular building blocks of nature. Disulfides are central in the structure determination of proteins, which is in striking contradiction to the result that the S-S bond is a photochemically labile structural entity that cleaves to form free radicals upon...... on a sub 50 fs timescale without further ado. In a cyclic motif resembling the cysteine-disulfide bond in proteins, light can perturb the S-S bond to generate short-lived diradicaloid species, but the sulfur atoms are conformationally restricted by the ring that prevents the sulfur atoms from flying apart...... the photostability of disulfide-bonds must be ascribed a cyclic structural arrangement....

  16. The correlation theory of the chemical bond

    CERN Document Server

    Szalay, Szilárd; Szilvási, Tibor; Veis, Libor; Legeza, Örs

    2016-01-01

    The notion of chemical bond is a very useful concept in chemistry. It originated at the beginning of chemistry, it is expressive for the classically thinking mind, and the errors arising from the approximative nature of the concept can often be ignored. In the first half of the twentieth century, however, we learned that the proper description of the microworld is given by quantum mechanics. Quantum mechanics gives more accurate results for chemical systems than any preceding model, however, it is very inexpressive for the classically thinking mind. The quantum mechanical description of the chemical bond is given in terms of delocalized bonding orbitals, or, alternatively, in terms of correlations of occupations of localized orbitals. However, in the latter case, multiorbital correlations were treated only in terms of two-orbital correlations, although the structure of multiorbital correlations is far richer; and, in the case of bonds established by more than two electrons, multiorbital correlations represent...

  17. Cryostable lightweight frit bonded silicon mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, F.; McCarter, D.; Tangedahl, M.; Content, D.

    The excellent polishability, low density and relatively high stiffness of silicon make it an attractive candidate for optical applications that require superior performance. Assembly of silicon details by means of glass frit bonding permits significant light weighting thus enhancing the benefit of silicon mirrors. To demonstrate the performance potential, a small lightweight glass frit bonded silicon mirror was fabricated and tested for cryoability. The test mirror was 12.5cm in diameter with a 60cm spherical radius and a maximum thickness, at the perimeter, of 2.5cm. A machined silicon core was used to stiffen the two face sheets of the silicon sandwich. These three elements were assembled, by glass frit bonding, to form the substrate that was polished. The experimental evaluation in a liquid nitrogen cryostat, demonstrated cryostability performance significantly better than required by the mirror specification. Key WordsCryostable, Lightweight, Silicon, Frit Bond, Spherical, Mirror

  18. Handbook of adhesive bonded structural repair

    CERN Document Server

    Wegman, Raymond F

    1992-01-01

    Provides repair methods for adhesive bonded and composite structures; identifies suitable materials and equipment for repairs; describes damage evaluation criteria and techniques, and methods of inspection before and after repair.

  19. Reliable aluminum contact formation by electrostatic bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kárpáti, T.; Pap, A. E.; Radnóczi, Gy; Beke, B.; Bársony, I.; Fürjes, P.

    2015-07-01

    The paper presents a detailed study of a reliable method developed for aluminum fusion wafer bonding assisted by the electrostatic force evolving during the anodic bonding process. The IC-compatible procedure described allows the parallel formation of electrical and mechanical contacts, facilitating a reliable packaging of electromechanical systems with backside electrical contacts. This fusion bonding method supports the fabrication of complex microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and micro-opto-electromechanical systems (MOEMS) structures with enhanced temperature stability, which is crucial in mechanical sensor applications such as pressure or force sensors. Due to the applied electrical potential of  -1000 V the Al metal layers are compressed by electrostatic force, and at the bonding temperature of 450 °C intermetallic diffusion causes aluminum ions to migrate between metal layers.

  20. Anodic bonding of diamond to glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuentes, R. [Materials and Technologies Corp., Poughkeepsie, NY (United States); Trolio, L.M. [Geo-Centers, Inc., Fort Washington, MD (United States); Butler, J.E. [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States)

    1995-12-31

    A method is described for anodically bonding smooth nanocrystalline diamond films to glass substrates to form extremely flat diamond membranes with the smoothest side available of patterning absorber structures to form masks for proximity focused x-ray lithography.

  1. Hydrogen bond dynamics in bulk alcohols

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shinokita, Keisuke; Cunha, Ana V.; Jansen, Thomas L. C.; Pshenichnikov, Maxim S.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen-bonded liquids play a significant role in numerous chemical and biological phenomena. In the past decade, impressive developments in multidimensional vibrational spectroscopy and combined molecular dynamics-quantum mechanical simulation have established many intriguing features of hydrogen

  2. A Variational Inequality from Pricing Convertible Bond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Huiwen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The model of pricing American-style convertible bond is formulated as a zero-sum Dynkin game, which can be transformed into a parabolic variational inequality (PVI. The fundamental variable in this model is the stock price of the firm which issued the bond, and the differential operator in PVI is linear. The optimal call and conversion strategies correspond to the free boundaries of PVI. Some properties of the free boundaries are studied in this paper. We show that the bondholder should convert the bond if and only if the price of the stock is equal to a fixed value, and the firm should call the bond back if and only if the price is equal to a strictly decreasing function of time. Moreover, we prove that the free boundaries are smooth and bounded. Eventually we give some numerical results.

  3. Polyimide weld bonding for titanium alloy joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, R. W.; Kurland, R. M.

    1974-01-01

    Two weld bonding processes were developed for joining titanium alloy; one process utilizes a weld-through technique and the other a capillary-flow technique. The adhesive used for the weld-through process is similar to the P4/A5F system. A new polyimide laminating resin, BFBI/BMPM, was used in the capillary-flow process. Static property information was generated for weld-bonded joints over the temperature range of 219 K (-65 F) to 561 K (+550 F) and fatigue strength information was generated at room temperature. Significant improvement in fatigue strength was demonstrated for weld-bonded joints over spot-welded joints. A demonstration was made of the applicability of the weld-through weld-bonding process for fabricating stringer stiffened skin panels.

  4. Polyimide adhesives for weld-bonding titanium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, R. W.; Sheppard, C. H.; Baucom, R.

    1976-01-01

    Two weld bonding processes were developed for joining titanium alloy; one process utilizes a weld-through technique and the other a capillary-flow technique. The adhesive used for the weld-through process is similar to the P4/A5F system and a new adhesive system, CP/CFA, was used in the capillary-flow process. Static property information was generated for weld-bonded joints over the temperature range of 219K (-65 F) to 561K (550 F) and fatigue strength information was generated at room temperature. Significant improvement in fatigue strength was demonstrated for weld-bonded joints over spot-welded joints. A demonstration was made of the applicability of weld-bonding for fabricating stringer stiffened skin panels.

  5. Ultrasonic Characterization of Interfaces in Composite Bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, N.; Lobkis, O. I.; Rokhlin, S. I.; Cantrell, J. H.

    2010-01-01

    The inverse determination of imperfect interfaces from reflection spectra of normal and oblique incident ultrasonic waves in adhesive bonds of multidirectional composites is investigated. The oblique measurements are complicated by the highly dispersed nature of oblique wave spectra at frequencies above 3MHz. Different strategies for bond property reconstruction, including a modulation method, are discussed. The relation of measured interfacial spring density to the physico-chemical model of a composite interface described by polymer molecular bonds to emulate loss of molecular strength on an adhesive composite interface is discussed. This potentially relates the interfacial (adhesion) strength (number of bonds at the adhesive substrate interface) to the spring constant (stiffness) area density (flux), which is an ultrasonically measurable parameter.

  6. Definition and Application of Topological Index Based on Bond Connectivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhen-dong; YANG Feng; YANG Hai-lang; LUO Ming-dao; QU Song-sheng

    2003-01-01

    Bond connectivity topological index Si based on chemical bonds was defined by using a matrix method.And Si is formed by atomic parameters such as the number of valence electrons,the number of the highest main quantum of atoms and the bonding electrons and bond parameters such as the length of bonds,the electronegativity difference of bonding atoms.The molecular bond connectivity topological index S is composed of Si.The thermodynamic properties of saturated hydrocarbons,unsaturated hydrocarbons,oxygen organic,methane halide and transitional element compounds and the molecular bond connectivity topological index S have an optimal correlative relationship.

  7. Why Local Bonds Failed to Sell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The Central Government is allowing all provincial governments to issue local bonds to help finance the construction of public welfare facilities. But so far investors haven’t shown much interest in the bonds-the first of their kind to be issued in China. Ni Xiaolin, a senior commentator at Xinhua News Agency, discusses why in the following article she wrote for Beijing Review.

  8. Decomposing European bond and equity volatility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Charlotte

    The paper investigates volatility spillover from US and aggregate European asset markets into European national asset markets. A main contribution is that bond and equity volatilities are analyzed simultaneously. A new model belonging to the "volatilityspillover" family is suggested: The conditio...... (stock) volatilities are mainly influenced by bond (stock) effects. Global, regional, and local volatility effects are all important. The introduction of the euro is associated with a structural break....

  9. Bond diluted Ising model in 2D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouamrane Rachid

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The bond diluted Ising model is studied by Monte Carlo method. The simulation is carried out on a two dimensional square lattice with missing bonds and free boundary conditions. The aim of this work is to investigate the thermodynamical properties of this model for different disorder degree parameter σ. The critical temperature is determined from the Binder cumulant and is shown to decreases as the disorder parameter σ increases linearly.

  10. Central bank purchases of government bonds

    OpenAIRE

    Huber, Samuel; Kim, Jaehong

    2015-01-01

    We develop a microfounded model, where agents have the possibility to trade money for government bonds in an over-the-counter market. It allows us to address important open questions about the effects of central bank purchases of government bonds, these being: under what conditions these purchases can be welfare-improving, what incentive problems they mitigate, and how large these effects are. Our main finding is that this policy measure can be welfare-improving, by correcting a pecuniary ext...

  11. Cure Monitoring Techniques for Adhesive Bonding Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-11-01

    Dissipation Factor 21 Derived From Audrey and Phasemeter Data for PH-73 Ad- hesive. Filled symbols represent positive values of tanq .; hollow symbols...bonded joint. Since the absorption of water is a slow diffusion controlled process, it was decided to test the idea by iomursing a siulated bondline in... water . A series of probed bonds (probe 1/4" x 2ŕ) were fabricated between aluminum adherends with a layer of FE? film adjacent to each adherend. This

  12. Biocompatible "click" wafer bonding for microfluidic devices

    OpenAIRE

    Saharil, Farizah; Carlborg, Carl Fredrik; Haraldsson, Tommy; van der Wijngaart, Wouter

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a novel dry wafer bonding concept designed for permanent attachment of micromolded polymer structures to surface functionalized silicon substrates. The method, designed for simultaneous fabrication of many lab-on-chip devices, utilizes a chemically reactive polymer microfluidic structure, which rapidly bonds to a functionalized substrate via "click" chemistry reactions. The microfluidic structure consists of an off-stoichiometry thiol-ene (OSTE) polymer with a very high density o...

  13. Direct bonding applied to space maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaine, T J; Wright, G Z

    1976-01-01

    Based on the conditions of this study, the following conclusions were reached: A success rate of 70 percent seems to justify further investigation into direct bonded space maintainers. A space maintainer directly bonded to the buccal surfaces seems to be efficient in maintaining single tooth spaces. Primary-to-primary appliances were more successful than the primary-to-permanent appliances, which suggests that incomplete first permanent molar eruption and a posterior location affect appliance durability.

  14. A valence bond study of three-center four-electron pi bonding: electronegativity vs electroneutrality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBlase, Andrew; Licata, Megan; Galbraith, John Morrison

    2008-12-18

    Three-center four-electron (3c4e) pi bonding systems analogous to that of the ozone molecule have been studied using modern valence bond theory. Molecules studied herein consist of combinations of first row atoms C, N, and O with the addition of H atoms where appropriate in order to preserve the 3c4e pi system. Breathing orbital valence bond (BOVB) calculations were preformed at the B3LYP/6-31G**-optimized geometries in order to determine structural weights, pi charge distributions, resonance energies, and pi bond energies. It is found that the most weighted VB structure depends on atomic electronegativity and charge distribution, with electronegativity as the dominant factor. By nature, these systems are delocalized, and therefore, resonance energy is the main contributor to pi bond energies. Molecules with a single dominant VB structure have low resonance energies and therefore low pi bond energies.

  15. Metal-Free Oxidative C-C Bond Formation through C-H Bond Functionalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Rishikesh; Matcha, Kiran; Antonchick, Andrey P

    2015-10-12

    The formation of C-C bonds embodies the core of organic chemistry because of its fundamental application in generation of molecular diversity and complexity. C-C bond-forming reactions are well-known challenges. To achieve this goal through direct functionalization of C-H bonds in both of the coupling partners represents the state-of-the-art in organic synthesis. Oxidative C-C bond formation obviates the need for prefunctionalization of both substrates. This Minireview is dedicated to the field of C-C bond-forming reactions through direct C-H bond functionalization under completely metal-free oxidative conditions. Selected important developments in this area have been summarized with representative examples and discussions on their reaction mechanisms. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Halogen-bonding-triggered supramolecular gel formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meazza, Lorenzo; Foster, Jonathan A; Fucke, Katharina; Metrangolo, Pierangelo; Resnati, Giuseppe; Steed, Jonathan W

    2013-01-01

    Supramolecular gels are topical soft materials involving the reversible formation of fibrous aggregates using non-covalent interactions. There is significant interest in controlling the properties of such materials by the formation of multicomponent systems, which exhibit non-additive properties emerging from interaction of the components. The use of hydrogen bonding to assemble supramolecular gels in organic solvents is well established. In contrast, the use of halogen bonding to trigger supramolecular gel formation in a two-component gel ('co-gel') is essentially unexplored, and forms the basis for this study. Here, we show that halogen bonding between a pyridyl substituent in a bis(pyridyl urea) and 1,4-diiodotetrafluorobenzene brings about gelation, even in polar media such as aqueous methanol and aqueous dimethylsulfoxide. This demonstrates that halogen bonding is sufficiently strong to interfere with competing gel-inhibitory interactions and create a 'tipping point' in gel assembly. Using this concept, we have prepared a halogen bond donor bis(urea) gelator that forms co-gels with halogen bond acceptors.

  17. Failure of dissimilar material bonded joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantakopoulou, M.; Deligianni, A.; Kotsikos, G.

    2016-03-01

    Joining of materials in structural design has always been a challenge for engineers. Bolting and riveting has been used for many years, until the emergence of fusion welding which revolutionised construction in areas such as shipbuilding, automotive, infrastructure and consumer goods. Extensive research in the past 50 years has resulted in better understanding of the process and minimised the occurrence of failures associated with fusion welding such as, residual stress cracking, stress corrosion and corrosion fatigue cracking, localised reduction in mechanical properties due to microstructural changes (heat affected zone) etc. Bonding has been a technique that has been proposed as an alternative because it eliminates several of the problems associated with fusion welding. But, despite some applications it has not seen wide use. There is however a renewed interest in adhesively bonded joints, as designers look for ever more efficient structures which inevitably leads to the use and consequently joining of combinations of lightweight materials, often with fundamentally different mechanical and physical properties. This chapter provides a review of adhesively bonded joints and reports on improvements to bonded joint strength through the introduction of carbon nanotubes at the bond interface. Results from various workers in the field are reported as well as the findings of the authors in this area of research. It is obvious that there are several challenges that need to be addressed to further enhance the strength of bonded joints and worldwide research is currently underway to address those shortcomings and build confidence in the implementation of these new techniques.

  18. Molecular model with quantum mechanical bonding information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohórquez, Hugo J; Boyd, Russell J; Matta, Chérif F

    2011-11-17

    The molecular structure can be defined quantum mechanically thanks to the theory of atoms in molecules. Here, we report a new molecular model that reflects quantum mechanical properties of the chemical bonds. This graphical representation of molecules is based on the topology of the electron density at the critical points. The eigenvalues of the Hessian are used for depicting the critical points three-dimensionally. The bond path linking two atoms has a thickness that is proportional to the electron density at the bond critical point. The nuclei are represented according to the experimentally determined atomic radii. The resulting molecular structures are similar to the traditional ball and stick ones, with the difference that in this model each object included in the plot provides topological information about the atoms and bonding interactions. As a result, the character and intensity of any given interatomic interaction can be identified by visual inspection, including the noncovalent ones. Because similar bonding interactions have similar plots, this tool permits the visualization of chemical bond transferability, revealing the presence of functional groups in large molecules.

  19. Dilemmas in zirconia bonding: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obradović-Đuričić Kosovka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a literature review on the resin bond to zirconia ceramic. Modern esthetic dentistry has highly recognized zirconia, among other ceramic materials. Biocompatibility of zirconia, chemical and dimensional stability, excellent mechanical properties, all together could guarantee optimal therapeutical results in complex prosthodontic reconstruction. On the other hand, low thermal degradation, aging of zirconia as well as problematic bonding of zirconia framework to dental luting cements and tooth structures, opened the room for discussion concerning their clinical durability. The well known methods of mechanical and chemical bonding used on glass-ceramics are not applicable for use with zirconia. Therefore, under critical clinical situations, selection of the bonding mechanism should be focused on two important points: high initial bond strength value and long term bond strength between zirconia-resin interface. Also, this paper emphases the use of phosphate monomer luting cements on freshly air-abraded zirconia as the simplest and most effective way for zirconia cementation procedure today.

  20. Clinical effectiveness of contemporary dentin bonding agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krithikadatta, Jogikalmat

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this paper is to review the literature on the clinical effectiveness of contemporary resin-based dentin bonding agents primarily focussing on the longevity of restoration. Materials and Methods: The literature published from June 2004 up to September 2010 was reviewed for clinical trials that tested the effectiveness of dentin bonding agents in the longevity of noncarious class V restoration. Results of each study reported using the USPHS criteria for clinical assessment of restoration were included and tabulated. The American Dental Association guidelines for dentin and enamel adhesives were used as a reference to compare the performance of individual bonding agents. Kruskal–Wallis followed by Mann–Whitney U was done to compare the mean Alfa score percentage for the three categories of bonding systems [etch-and-rinse (ER), self-etch primer (SEP), and self-etch-adhesive (SEA)]. Results: A comparison of the mean Alfa score percentages revealed no difference between the ER, SEP, and SEA categories of bonding systems except for marginal adaptation where ER was found to be superior to SEA. Conclusion: The clinical effectiveness of resin-based bonding agents is comparable among the three categories. PMID:21217944