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Sample records for wadden sea barrier

  1. Wadden Sea Mud

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller-Jensen, P.

    The present thesis deals with the transport phenomena of estuarine cohesive sediment from a laboratory and a numerical point of view. The cohesive sediment used throughout the whole process was natural mud from the Danish part of the Wadden sea, Ho Bay. In the laboratory, the work was concentrated...

  2. Wadden Sea Mud

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller-Jensen, P.

    The present thesis deals with the transport phenomena of estuarine cohesive sediment from a laboratory and a numerical point of view. The cohesive sediment used throughout the whole process was natural mud from the Danish part of the Wadden sea, Ho Bay. In the laboratory, the work was concentrated...

  3. Integrating ground-penetrating radar and borehole data from a Wadden Sea barrier island

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars; Møller, I.; Nielsen, L. H.

    2009-01-01

    Sea level rise may have large implications for low-gradient barrier coastal systems. This problem motivated an integrated ground-penetrating radar (GPR) and sedimentological study of the Rømø Wadden Sea barrier island. Crossing W-E and N-S-oriented 100 MHz GPR reflection profiles with a total...... signals varies between 7 and 15 m in the interior of the island where the shallow subsurface is not influenced by saltwater intrusion or fine-grained salt marsh sediments. Analysis of common midpoint reflection data constrains the radar wave velocity distribution in the subsurface and facilitates depth...

  4. Parasites in the Wadden Sea food web

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thieltges, D.W.; Engelsma, M.Y.; Wendling, C.C.; Wegner, M.

    2013-01-01

    While the free-living fauna of the Wadden Sea has received much interest, little is known on the distribution and effects of parasites in the Wadden Sea food web. However, recent studies on this special type of trophic interaction indicate a high diversity of parasites in the Wadden Sea and suggest

  5. Parasites in the Wadden Sea food web

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thieltges, D.W.; Engelsma, M.Y.; Wendling, C.C.; Wegner, K.M.

    2013-01-01

    While the free-living fauna of the Wadden Sea has received much interest, little is known on the distribution and effects of parasites in the Wadden Sea food web. However, recent studies on this special type of trophic interaction indicate a high diversity of parasites in the Wadden Sea and suggest

  6. How a barrier island may react on a sea-level rise: The Holocene to Recent Rømø barrier island, Danish Wadden Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, Peter N.; Nielsen, Lars H.; Møller, Ingelise

    The Rømø barrier island is situated in the northern part of the European Wadden Sea. It has been intensively studied on the basis of recent depositional systems and morphology, seven 25 m long sediment cores, 35 km ground penetrating radar (GPR) reflection profiles with a maximum signal penetration...... of c. 15 m and a resolution of c. 20–30 cm (Nielsen et al., 2009), and dating of 70 core samples using optically stimulated luminescence (OSL). The area has experienced a relative sea-level rise of c. 15 m during the last c. 8000 years. The Recent tidal amplitude reaches c. 1.8 m. During strong wind...... set up the water level increases considerably and the highest measured water level is 4.9 m above mean sea level. The barrier island is c. 14 km long and c. 4 km wide and is separated from the mainland by a c. 8 km wide lagoon. At the northern and southern parts of the island, tidal inlets occur...

  7. Parasites in the Wadden Sea food web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieltges, David W.; Engelsma, Marc Y.; Wendling, Carolin C.; Wegner, K. Mathias

    2013-09-01

    While the free-living fauna of the Wadden Sea has received much interest, little is known on the distribution and effects of parasites in the Wadden Sea food web. However, recent studies on this special type of trophic interaction indicate a high diversity of parasites in the Wadden Sea and suggest a multitude of effects on the hosts. This also includes effects on specific predator-prey relationships and the general structure of the food web. Focussing on molluscs, a major group in the Wadden Sea in terms of biomass and abundance and an important link between primary producers and predators, we review existing studies and exemplify the ecological role of parasites in the Wadden Sea food web. First, we give a brief inventory of parasites occurring in the Wadden Sea, ranging from microparasites (e.g. protozoa, bacteria) to macroparasites (e.g. helminths, parasitic copepods) and discuss the effects of spatial scale on heterogeneities in infection levels. We then demonstrate how parasites can affect host population dynamics by acting as a strong mortality factor, causing mollusc mass mortalities. In addition, we will exemplify how parasites can mediate the interaction strength of predator-prey relationships and affect the topological structure of the Wadden Sea food web as a whole. Finally, we highlight some ongoing changes regarding parasitism in the Wadden Sea in the course of global change (e.g. species introduction, climate change) and identify important future research questions to entangle the role of parasites in the Wadden Sea food web.

  8. Consensus forecasting of intertidal seagrass habitat in the Wadden Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Folmer, E.O.; van Beusekom, J.E.E.; Dolch, T; Gräwe, U.; van Katwijk, M.M.; Kolbe, K.; Philippart, C.J.M.

    2016-01-01

    1. After the dramatic eutrophication-induced decline of intertidal seagrasses in the 1970s, theWadden Sea has shown diverging developments. In the northern Wadden Sea, seagrass bedshave expanded and become denser, while in the southern Wadden Sea, only small beds withlow shoot densities are found. A

  9. The impact of erosion protection by Stone Dams on Salt-Marsh vegetation on Two Wadden Sea Barrier Islands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loon-Steensma, van J.M.; Slim, P.A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes and quantifies the effect of low stone dams on the extent and composition of salt-marsh habitats on two Dutch Wadden islands: Terschelling and Ameland. The stone dams were built to prevent erosion of the salt-marsh edge. Analyses of a series of aerial photographs taken between 1

  10. How a barrier island may react on a sea-level rise: The Holocene to Recent Rømø barrier island, Danish Wadden Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, Peter N.; Nielsen, Lars H.; Møller, Ingelise

    of c. 15 m and a resolution of c. 20–30 cm (Nielsen et al., 2009), and dating of 70 core samples using optically stimulated luminescence (OSL). The area has experienced a relative sea-level rise of c. 15 m during the last c. 8000 years. The Recent tidal amplitude reaches c. 1.8 m. During strong wind...... and related shoreface sand and lagoonal sediments are up to 20 m thick and overlie Weichselian fluvial sand. The first 5000 years the barrier island aggraded and the last 3000 years it prograded despite the relative rising sea level rise of c. 15 m during the last c. 8000 years. This shows......, that if there is a surplus of sand in a tidal area, barrier islands may aggrade even if there is a rise in sea level. If the rate of sea level rise decreases then the barrier island may prograded. With this unique dataset with extremely large amounts of OSL datings from core sediments it has been possible to construct...

  11. The Wadden Sea Region: Towards a science for sustainable development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kabat, P.; Bazelmans, J.; Dijk, van J.; Hermans, P.; Oijen, van T.

    2012-01-01

    The Wadden Sea is one of the largest intertidal areas in the world and has been designated as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in recognition of its unique natural features. Major changes in the morphology and ecology of the Wadden Sea over the past millennium resulted from increasing anthropogenic infl

  12. The Wadden Sea Region : Towards a science for sustainable development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kabat, Pavel; Bazelmans, Jos; van Dijk, Jouke; Herman, Peter M. J.; van Oijen, Tim; Pejrup, Morten; Reise, Karsten; Speelman, Hessel; Wolff, Wim J.

    2012-01-01

    The Wadden Sea is one of the largest intertidal areas in the world and has been designated as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in recognition of its unique natural features. major changes in the morphology and ecology of the Wadden Sea over the past millennium resulted from increasing anthropogenic infl

  13. Evolution of the Rømø barrier island in the Wadden Sea: Impacts of sea-level change on coastal morphodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Lars B; Andersen, Thorbjørn Joest; Johannessen, Peter

    Sandy coastal barriers are abundant along most continents, and they are often intensively engineered to prevent erosion. Therefore, it is important to develop projections of the evolution of this coastal type in periods with changing climate and sea-level. We have used a multidisciplinary approach...... of the barrier island system, and to interpret it in relation to sea-level changes. We found that the various subsystems constituting the barrier system responded differently to Holocene sea-level variations. Beach and shoreface deposition took place during periods of slowly rising sea-level, still stand...

  14. How predictable is high bivalve recruitment in the Wadden Sea after a severe winter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasser, Matthias; Dekker, Rob; Essink, Karel; Günther, Carmen-Pia; Jaklin, Sandra; Kröncke, Ingrid; Madsen, Poul Brinch; Michaelis, Hermann; Vedel, Grace

    2003-02-01

    Higher than average recruitment among bivalves on the intertidal flats of the Wadden Sea was often observed after severe winters in the period 1940-1995. The occurrence of another severe winter in 1995/96 prompted us to test the hypothesis of severe winters leading to universally high bivalve recruitment on a large geographic scale (500 km coastline) in temperate shallow waters. We analysed data sets on bivalve abundance from seven areas in the Dutch, German and Danish Wadden Sea. The longer data sets showed generally higher bivalve recruitment in the 1970s and 1980s than in the 1990s which may be related to the near absence of severe winters since 1987. Considering the period 1988 onwards (the longest possible period in which 1995/96 was the only severe winter), recruitment of Cerastoderma edule was in 1996 - in agreement with our hypothesis - above average in all seven areas investigated. In contrast, recruitment of Macoma balthica and Mya arenaria was for the same period above average only in the southern Wadden Sea (south-west of Jade Bay) but not in the northern Wadden Sea (north of Eiderstedt peninsula). These regional differences may be related to (i) the different topography of the northern Wadden Sea (with barrier islands west of the mainland) compared to the southern Wadden Sea (with barrier islands north of the mainland) and subsequent differential effects of wind-induced currents on bivalve recruitment, (ii) differences in biotic factors such as standing stocks, larval supply or epibenthic predation or (iii) changes in environmental conditions. Our results demonstrate that large-scale comparisons along coasts are an indispensable addition to insights derived from local studies alone.

  15. Evolution of the Rømø barrier island in the Wadden Sea: Impacts of sea-level change on coastal morphodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Lars B; Andersen, Thorbjørn Joest; Johannessen, Peter

    Sandy coastal barriers are abundant along most continents, and they are often intensively engineered to prevent erosion. Therefore, it is important to develop projections of the evolution of this coastal type in periods with changing climate and sea-level. We have used a multidisciplinary approach......, and falling sea-level, whereas wash-over sedimentation was promoted during periods of rapid sea-level rise when shoreface, beach and coastal dune deposits were reworked. In contrast, lagoonal sedimentation has been relatively continuous and kept pace with the long-term Holocene sea-level rise. Our findings...

  16. Luminescence dating of Holocene sedimentary deposits on Rømø, a barrier island in the Wadden Sea, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Anni Tindahl; Murray, Andrew S.; Andersen, Thorbjørn Joest

    2010-01-01

    (SAR) protocol; samples were retrieved from seven sediment cores, each up to 25 m long, taken from locations on the island and within the back-barrier lagoon. The reliability of the OSL results is assessed using preheat plateaus, thermal transfer tests, and dose recovery measurements, and by comparison...... the west, north and south as a result of an abundant sediment supply. Luminescence dating is concluded to be well-suited for establishing precise and accurate chronologies for barrier island deposits, and the technique has provided an excellent basis for the reconstruction of barrier island evolution....

  17. Clay mineralogy, grain size distribution and their correlations with trace metals in the salt marsh sediments of the Skallingen barrier spit, Danish Wadden Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Changling; Bartholdy, Jesper; Christiansen, Christian

    2012-01-01

    metals. The clay assembly of the sediment consists of illite, kaolinite and much less chlorite and smectite. The major clay minerals of illite, kaolinite as well as chlorite correlate very poorly with all the trace metals investigated, due probably to the weak competing strength of these clays compared...... with the other adsorbents and to low availability of the mobile trace metals in the system. Correlation between trace metals and clay minerals may therefore be used as an indicator in environmental assessment. Fine grain fractions of the sediment increased markedly after salt marsh invasion in about 1931......To understand the behavior of trace metals in the salt marsh at Skallingen, Danish Wadden Sea, we investigated a profile from surface to 25 cm depth of the salt marsh sediment, focusing primarily on clay mineralogy and grain size distribution of the sediments and their relationship with trace...

  18. Trends in Wadden Sea Fish Fauna, Part I: Trilateral Cooperation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolle, L.J.; Neudecker, T.; Vorberg, R.; Damm, U.; Diederichs, B.; Jager, Z.; Scholle, J.; Daenhardt, A.; Luerssen, G.; Marencic, H.

    2009-01-01

    The shallow waters of the Wadden Sea and the connected estuaries and coastal waters provide indispensable habitats for a whole range of fish species in the course of their life-cycle. These areas provide spawning, feeding and nursery grounds and serve as transit route for diadromous species migratin

  19. Trends in Wadden Sea Fish Fauna, Part I: Trilateral Cooperation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolle, L.J.; Neudecker, T.; Vorberg, R.; Damm, U.; Diederichs, B.; Jager, Z.; Scholle, J.; Daenhardt, A.; Luerssen, G.; Marencic, H.

    2009-01-01

    The shallow waters of the Wadden Sea and the connected estuaries and coastal waters provide indispensable habitats for a whole range of fish species in the course of their life-cycle. These areas provide spawning, feeding and nursery grounds and serve as transit route for diadromous species

  20. Geological characterization of the Dutch Wadden Sea using shallow reflection seismics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paap, B.F.; Dubelaar, C.W.; Gunnink, J.L.

    2010-01-01

    Mapping of the Dutch Wadden Sea is a major challenge as it is an intertidal zone and therefore has limited accessibility by surveying vessels. Hence, the current subsurface model of the Dutch Wadden Sea is based on a sparse density of lithological information derived from core samples and seismic da

  1. Trilateral Wadden Sea World Heritage Foundation, Exploring added value, strategy and organisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    During, R.; Coninx, I.; Simeonova, V.

    2014-01-01

    Once the Danish part of the Wadden Sea has been accepted for the UNESCO World Heritage List (expected in 2014), the whole of the Wadden Sea will then be enlisted and this offers new opportunities and obligations for integrative and integral management to safeguard its Outstanding Universal Value.

  2. Nature conservation and tourism development in the Dutch Wadden Sea region: a common future?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Revier, Hans

    2013-01-01

    This chapter is about the development of tourism in the Dutch Wadden Sea Region in combination with nature conservation. The main question is whether they have a common future. There are some future points stated: - Nature and landscape of the Wadden Sea are the main pull factors for the tourism de

  3. Quantifying sediment dynamics within the Dutch Wadden Sea using bathymetric monitoring series

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonhögen-Peeters, L.M.; Heteren, S. van; Wiersma, A.P.; Kleine, M.P.E. de; Marges, V.C.

    2013-01-01

    During the last millennium, human intervention has had an increasing impact on the bathymetry of the Wadden Sea. The significance of these human-induced changes for the decadal-scale development of the Wadden Sea in light of natural sediment dynamics is still unknown. We compared a series of 20 th-c

  4. Nature conservation and tourism development in the Dutch Wadden Sea region: a common future?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hans Revier

    2013-01-01

    This chapter is about the development of tourism in the Dutch Wadden Sea Region in combination with nature conservation. The main question is whether they have a common future. There are some future points stated: - Nature and landscape of the Wadden Sea are the main pull factors for the tourism de

  5. Trilateral Wadden Sea World Heritage Foundation, Exploring added value, strategy and organisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    During, R.; Coninx, I.; Simeonova, V.

    2014-01-01

    Once the Danish part of the Wadden Sea has been accepted for the UNESCO World Heritage List (expected in 2014), the whole of the Wadden Sea will then be enlisted and this offers new opportunities and obligations for integrative and integral management to safeguard its Outstanding Universal Value. Ac

  6. Macrobenthos of the subtidal Wadden Sea: revisited after 55 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riesen, W.; Reise, K.

    1982-12-01

    During the years 1923 1926 Hagmeier & Kändler (1927) sampled the macrofauna of subtidal shallows and channels of the Wadden Sea close to the Island of Sylt (German Bight, North Sea). Reinvestigating this study area in 1980, a substantially altered faunal composition was recorded. An approach is made to quantify the comparison in terms of abundance, species richness and diversity of invertebrate taxa. Human interference is assumed to be responsible for the major changes. Natural oyster beds have been overexploited and the local population of Ostrea edulis has been driven to extinction. Subsequently, mussels (Mytilus edulis) spread in the entire region, promoted by shell fishery. Particularly barnacles and many polychaetes took advantage of the expansion of mussel banks which is substantiated by correlation analysis. Reefs of the colonial polychaete Sabellaria spinulosa stood in the way of shrimp trawling and became destroyed together with the associated fauna. A subtidal Zostera marina bed was wiped out in 1934 by a natural epidemic disease but never succeeded in reestablishing itself. The associated fauna disappeared. Large epibenthic predators and scavengers (crabs, snails and starfish) survived all these changes. The total number of species remained approximately at the same level but molluscs experienced losses and polychaetes diversified. Overall abundance increased with a disproportionately large share of a few species (Mytilus edulis, Balanus crenatus, Cerastoderma edule, Scoloplos armiger). The subtidal fauna of the Wadden Sea proved to be vulnerable to human disturbance; thus, the present community can no longer be viewed as the outcome of entirely natural processes.

  7. Residual circulation and freshwater transport in the Dutch Wadden Sea: a numerical modelling study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duran-Matute, M.; Gerkema, T.; de Boer, G.J.; Nauw, J.; Grawe, U.

    2014-01-01

    The Dutch Wadden Sea is a region of intertidal flats located between the chain of Wadden Islands and the Dutch mainland. We present numerical model results on the tidal prisms and residual flows through the tidal inlets and across one of the main watersheds. The model also provides insight into the

  8. Dual nitrate isotopes in the Dutch and German Wadden Sea and its tributary rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Tina; Wiese, Philipp; Dähnke, Kirstin

    2016-04-01

    The Dutch and German Wadden Sea is threatened by the river-induced eutrophication due to riverine nitrate. Despite reduction of nutrient inputs to rivers in the past decades, nitrate inputs remain problematic, also because the estuary of one of the main contributing rivers, the Elbe River, has now developed from a net nitrate sink to a nitrate source. During a sampling campaign in August 2014 we measured nitrate concentration and dual isotope signatures in the Wadden Sea and in two contributing rivers, the Ems and the Elbe River. Our goal was to assess individual riverine contributions and turnover mechanisms of nitrate in the estuaries and the Wadden Sea itself using dual nitrate isotopes as fingerprint signatures. Nitrate concentration in the Ems River and Estuary twice exceeded that of the Elbe River. δ15N and δ18O of nitrate nevertheless showed that denitrification was active in the Ems estuary, removing nitrate, whereas nitrification produced new nitrate in the Elbe Estuary. Surprisingly, Wadden Sea samples appeared not to be entirely dominated by these two riverine source signatures. This suggests that additional turnover mechanisms in the Wadden Sea itself or inputs of nitrate from the open North Sea additionally affect the isotope composition of nitrate in the Dutch and German Wadden Sea.

  9. Residence times in shallow waters help explain regional differences in Wadden Sea eutrophication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwichtenberg, Fabian; Callies, Ulrich; van Beusekom, Justus E. E.

    2016-11-01

    Regional variations in eutrophication levels of tidal basins in the Wadden Sea can be caused by external factors, like organic matter import, and internal factors like the morphology and hydrodynamics of the receiving tidal basin. For instance, benthic nutrients from remineralized organic matter may be more concentrated in shallow basins or diluted in basins with high exchange rates. In addition, the location of a monitoring station may determine which basin-specific water masses are actually observed. In the present paper a hydrodynamic intertidal imprint (IMP) is estimated for ten stations in various tidal basins of the Wadden Sea. The fraction of time water masses spent in intertidal areas prior to observation is calculated by linking the Lagrangian transport module PELETS to already existing hourly reconstructions of currents between 1959 and 2003. Irrespective of water depth, additional calculations of mean residence times (MRT) in the Wadden Sea indicate whether, in the case of low IMP values, water masses originate from coastal areas or tidal channels. Results show distinct regional differences, with highest values in the eastern part of the Dutch sector of the southern Wadden Sea (IMP=77%, MRT=99%) and lowest values in the German/Danish sector of the northern Wadden Sea (IMP=1.1%, MRT=21%). The IMP correlates positively with observed nutrient levels (R2=0.83). Evidently, this residence time-based intertidal signal is pivotal in explaining regional variations in eutrophication levels revealed by long-term comparative data from different monitoring stations.

  10. Rapid colonization of new habitats in the Wadden Sea by the ovoviviparous Littorina saxatilis (Olivi)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelmsen, U.

    1998-09-01

    The intertidal periwinkle Littorina saxatilis completely lacks larval dispersal and adult vagility is low. Although this suggests a low dispersal rate, L. saxatilis is frequently found in recently established habitats “exotic” to the Wadden Sea. Populations occur on man-made structures like dikes, breakwater and groynes, some of which are not older than several years. Furthermore, L. saxatilis is found on marsh grass Spartina anglica, introduced to the Wadden Sea in the 1920s and 1930s, as well as on mats of green macroalgae, which have become an abundant feature on the tidal flats since the late 1970s. Seagrass beds are likely to be the original habitat of L. saxatilis in the Wadden Sea. Since seagrass populations have dramatically declined over the last decades, colonization of new habitat types enabled L. saxatilis to maintain its Wadden Sea populations despite a changing environment. Colonizers can reach new habitats by means of passive transport, especially by rafting on macrophytes and by aerial dispersal attached to birds. In thew Wadden Sea, the ovoviviparously reproducing L. saxatilis has demonstrated its ability to successfully found new populations with only a few individuals. No reduction of genetic variablility (founder effect) was observed in recently established populations.

  11. The Netherlands' environmental policy for the North Sea and Wadden Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beukema, A A; Hekstra, G P; Venema, C

    1986-09-01

    The water quality management of The Netherlands' part of the North Sea (57 000 km(2) continental shelf of which 7600 km(2) is territorial sea to 12 miles) and the Wadden Sea (a wetland area behind the northern coastal islands), is described on the basis of recent scientific studies and governmental policy documents. The links with international conventions and treaties are mentioned. The overall water quality in these areas has significantly deteriorated over the last century, notably since the post-war industrial revival, due to a great number of emissions of heavy metals and organochlorine substances. A dramatic decline of seals and porpoises has occurred. However, over the last few years some emissions have been reduced. A national ecological research programme for the North Sea is developing. Monitoring is concentrated on levels of pollutants as well as on effects upon biota. Baseline standards are now being developed as references for further action against pollution. If the recent trend towards improvement is to continue, it requires that the increased economic activities (notably the mining of oil and gas, petrochemical production, and incineration and dumping of chemical wastes) be kept sufficiently under control. A need is felt for a continued rational harmonization and planning of all activities on the North Sea. An even more stringent planning is required for the Wadden Sea which is now an international nature reserve under the Wetland Convention and is eligible for designation as a Biosphere Reserve under the UNESCO-MAB-programme. The river Rhine as greatest polluter of the North Sea and Wadden Sea urgently needs a clean-up.

  12. Understanding the cultural historical value of the Wadden Sea region : The co-evolution of environment and society in the Wadden Sea area in the Holocene up until early modern times (11,700 BC-1800 AD): An outline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bazelmans, J.; Meier, D.; Nieuwhof, A.; Spek, T.; Vos, P.

    2012-01-01

    The Wadden region is a cultural landscape of exceptional cultural historical value. The present article describes in qualitative terms how the cultural landscape of the Wadden Sea region came about through the complex interaction of people and nature. Human impact on this region has occurred in stag

  13. Holocene evolution of a drowned melt-water valley in the Danish Wadden Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jørn Bjarke Torp; Svinth, Steffen; Bartholdy, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    the total post-glacial transgression, and the reconstructed sea level curve represents the first unbroken curve of this kind from the Danish Wadden Sea, including all phases from the time where sea level first reached the Pleistocene substrate of the area. The sea level has been rising from - 12 m below...... the present level at c. 8400 cal yr BP, interrupted by two minor drops of sea level rise, and the Holocene sequence consists in most places of clay atop......Cores from the salt marshes along the drowned melt-water valley of river Varde Å in the Danish Wadden Sea have been dated and analysed (litho- and biostratigraphically) to reconstruct the Holocene geomorphologic evolution and relative sea level history of the area. The analysed cores cover...

  14. Seasonal occurrence of the invasive ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi in the western Dutch Wadden Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Walraven, Lodewijk; Langenberg, Victor T.; van der Veer, Henk W.

    2013-09-01

    The ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi is an invasive species in northern European waters since 2006. This paper presents the first quantitative data for the western Dutch Wadden Sea based on weekly measurements year-round in 2009 of abundance and size distribution. Due to the short residence time of the water, the seasonal occurrence of this species in the western Dutch Wadden Sea is a reflection of its occurrence in the Dutch coastal zone of the North Sea. M. leidyi was present the whole year round with multiple peaks. Spawning started in May and was followed by an increase in density of 3 orders of magnitude, leading to the first peak in mid-June (highest mean density 360 ind m- 3). After a decrease in July numbers increased again and a second peak occurred in mid-August (highest mean density 342 ind m- 3) during which the highest density of 912 ind m- 3 in a single haul was observed. At peak densities the population consisted almost entirely of small (leidyi. Predatory impact of M. leidyi on fish larvae in the Wadden Sea is likely to be restricted because most fish species spawn early in the year before the first peak of M. leidyi. Nevertheless, through competition for food with other zooplanktivores, the species could have a major influence on the Wadden Sea ecosystem.

  15. Distinction between sortable silts and aggregated particles in muddy intertidal sediments of the East Frisian Wadden Sea, southern North Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Tae Soo; Flemming, Burghard W.; Bartholomä, Alexander

    2007-12-01

    In muddy sediments, the distinction between sortable silt and aggregated silty clay is important for the understanding of fine particle dynamics because both have different hydraulic properties. The Wadden Sea of the southern North Sea is severely depleted in fine-grained sediments mainly due to high energy levels along the diked coastline. As a result, muddy sediments are restricted to a narrow belt along the diked mainland shore. In the present study, the mechanism by which this mud is deposited and how floc deposition and break-up are reflected in the size distribution, has been investigated. For this purpose, surficial sediments from four intertidal nearshore transects were monitored and repeatedly sampled in the course of two years. High-resolution grain-size analyses were performed by an automated settling tube and a Sedigraph particle analyser for the sand and mud fractions, respectively. The grain size frequency distributions of the fine fractions demonstrate that the Wadden Sea muds are composed of two subpopulations, a well-sorted coarse silt and an unsorted silty clay population. A depletion of grain size around 8 μm (7 phi) demarcates the grain-size boundary between the two populations, suggesting that the finer mud population (changing energy regimes lead to apparent seasonal sedimentation patterns in the back-barrier tidal basins. Furthermore, in the course of sample preparation, the flocs and aggregates are broken down into their constituent particles. This mechanical artefact in the size distributions produces an artificial seasonal fining/coarsening pattern. It was found that the comparison of clay/silt and effect of climate change further promotes depletion of fine-grained sediments in the basin.

  16. Foreland development along the advanced seawall at Højer, the Danish Wadden Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Peter

    2006-01-01

    , but has also been influenced by sand accretion, 5) the vegetation of the outer part of the foreland is still open and characterized by beach and dune species, 6) the vegetation of the inner part of the foreland is slowly developing towards a typical Wadden Sea high marsh. In conclusion, the planned...

  17. Distinctly variable mudscapes : Distribution gradients of intertidal macrofauna across the Dutch Wadden Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Compton, Tanya J.; Holthuijsen, Sander; Koolhaas, Anita; Dekinga, Anne; ten Horn, Job; Smith, Jeremy; Galama, Ysbrand; Brugge, Maarten; van der Wal, Daphne; van der Meer, Jaap; van der Veer, Henk W.; Piersma, Theunis

    2013-01-01

    The Wadden Sea is a shallow coastal region, with a large area of sedimentary tidal flats that extends from The Netherlands to Denmark and has been declared a site of international importance in the Dutch and German parts (Ramsar status and UNESCO World Heritage Site). Benthic macrofauna are central

  18. Distinctly variable mudscapes : Distribution gradients of intertidal macrofauna across the Dutch Wadden Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Compton, Tanya J.; Holthuijsen, Sander; Koolhaas, Anita; Dekinga, Anne; ten Horn, Job; Smith, Jeremy; Galama, Ysbrand; Brugge, Maarten; van der Wal, Daphne; van der Meer, Jaap; van der Veer, Henk W.; Piersma, Theunis

    The Wadden Sea is a shallow coastal region, with a large area of sedimentary tidal flats that extends from The Netherlands to Denmark and has been declared a site of international importance in the Dutch and German parts (Ramsar status and UNESCO World Heritage Site). Benthic macrofauna are central

  19. Risk analysis on the import of seed mussels from Norway into the Wadden Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijsman, J.W.M.; Tamis, J.E.; Kaag, N.H.B.M.; Karman, C.C.; Foekema, E.M.; Smaal, A.C.

    2007-01-01

    This report is the result of a risk analysis on the introduction of exotic nonCindigenous species with the import of rope culture mussels from Norway into the Wadden Sea. Based on available literature data and expert judgement, the target species are identified and the risks of these species are ass

  20. Some observations on tourism development in the Dutch Wadden Sea area

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hans Revier; Akke Folmer; Albert Postma

    2012-01-01

    Tourism has become one of the important economic activities in the Dutch Wadden Sea area. The tranquillity, open space, the natural qualities and cultural inheritance of the area attract every year between 1 and 2 million visitors. Especially the islands are a popular holiday destination. Tourism de

  1. Human transformations of the Wadden Sea ecosystem through time : a synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lotze, H.K.; Reise, K; Worm, B.; van Beusekom, J.; Busch, M.; Ehlers, A.; Heinrich, D.; Hoffman, R.C.; Holm, P.; Jensen, C.; Knottnerus, O.S.; Langhanki, N.; Prummel, W.; Vollmer, M.; Wolff, W.J.

    Todays Wadden Sea is a heavily human-altered ecosystem. Shaped by natural forces since its origin 7,500 years ago, humans gradually gained dominance in influencing ecosystem structure and functioning. Here, we reconstruct the timeline of human impacts and the history of ecological changes in the

  2. Effects of suction-dredging for cockles on non-target fauna in the Wadden Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hiddink, JG

    2003-01-01

    Suction dredging for cockles removes large cockles from tidal flats and may also cause mortality of non-target fauna and make the habitat less suitable for some species. This study examines whether suction dredging for cockles on tidal flats of the Dutch Wadden Sea had affected densities of non-targ

  3. High risk exotic species with respect to shellfish transports from the Oosterschelde to the Wadden Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink, van den A.M.; Wijsman, J.W.M.

    2010-01-01

    This study presents the results of a literature review on 11 exotic marine species that are present in the Oosterschelde and could potentially be introduced into the Wadden Sea with shellfish transfers. Ten of the species result from a previous risk study, where they were identified as the species p

  4. Phosphorus limitation during a phytoplankton spring bloom in the western Dutch Wadden Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ly, J.; Philippart, C.J.M.; Kromkamp, J.C.

    2014-01-01

    Like many aquatic ecosystems, the western Dutch Wadden Sea has undergone eutrophication. Due to changes in management policy, nutrient loads, especially phosphorus decreased after the mid-80s. It is still under debate, however, whether nutrients or light is limiting phytoplankton production in the w

  5. Emic perspectives on quality of life: the case of the Danish Wadden Sea Festival

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liburd, J.J.; Derkzen, P.H.M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper sets out to probe how a cultural festival can enhance quality of life (QoL) and identifies possible drivers in the process. The Wadden Sea Festival in Denmark is based on the idea of integrating the coastal environment in the presentation of contemporary art. Specifically, unique tidal

  6. Identities, Communities, and Practices in the Transition Towards Sustainable Mussel Fishery in the Dutch Wadden Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Puente Rodriguez, D.; Swart, J.A.A.; Middag, M.; Windt, v.d. H.J.

    2015-01-01

    The Dutch mussel fishery in the Wadden Sea, a World Natural Heritage Site, is currently involved in a step-by-step transition from the traditional but controversial method of dredging mussel seed from natural beds using trawl nets to alternative sustainable practices. The main objectives of the tran

  7. Human transformations of the Wadden Sea ecosystem through time : a synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lotze, HK; Reise, K; Worm, B; van Beusekom, J; Busch, M; Ehlers, A; Heinrich, D; Hoffmann, RC; Holm, P; Jensen, C; Knottnerus, OS; Langhanki, N; Prummel, W; Vollmer, M; Wolff, WJ

    2005-01-01

    Todays Wadden Sea is a heavily human-altered ecosystem. Shaped by natural forces since its origin 7,500 years ago, humans gradually gained dominance in influencing ecosystem structure and functioning. Here, we reconstruct the timeline of human impacts and the history of ecological changes in the Wad

  8. Net dispersal of harbour seals within the Wadden Sea before and after the 1988 epizootic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ries, Edith H.; Traut, Ilona M.; Brinkman, Albertus G.; Reijnders, Peter J. H.

    1999-05-01

    Harbour seals in the Wadden Sea (The Netherlands, Germany and Denmark) have been monitored by aerial surveys since the 1980s. Annual maximum figures reported in the various regions (38 separate tidal basins) and the number of pups counted were used to estimate vital population parameters and to quantify the net migration of harbour seals within the Wadden Sea before (1980-1987) and after an epizootic (1990-1994). The total pre-whelping population increased at a mean annual rate of 9 and 14%, respectively, and varied considerably among the various regions of the Wadden Sea. The overall mean annual survival was found to increase from 0.88 during the pre-epizootic period to 0.93 during the post-epizootic period. The distribution of pups and of older seals over the 38 separate sub-areas was highly uneven. Based on between-year population changes and the number of pups reported, net dispersal fluxes among the four regions of the Wadden Sea were estimated for the two time intervals. During the pre-epizootic period, only Schleswig-Holstein, Germany, produced a surplus of animals which counter-balanced the low recruitment of the other regions. During the post-epizootic period, the net dispersal fluxes were at a much lower level. Nevertheless, in The Netherlands, a continuous influx of seals was required because the recruitment was insufficient to explain the observed numerical increase. At the level of the 38 separate tidal basins, the actual pattern of dispersal showed that the majority of sub-areas were not self-supporting with respect to the local pup production and thus dependent on the influx of animals. More than 65% of all immigrants originated from only 7 sub-areas, which are considered `key areas' of vital importance for the Wadden Sea harbour seal population.

  9. Public discussion on ground subsidence of the Wadden Sea, 8 September 1993; Openbare discussiedag `Bodemdaling Waddenzee`, 8 september 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindeboom, H.J. [ed.

    1996-12-31

    On the request of a number of members of the Dutch Parliament and the involved industries NAM (Dutch Oil Company) and Elf Petroland, NIOZ organized a workshop on ground subsidence in the Dutch part of the Wadden Sea as a result of gas exploration. In this report contributions of participants which served as the basis for the discussions, are presented. Also a summary is given of the discussions and impressions of the chairpersons. The contributions deal with the historical development of the Wadden Sea, the predicted ground subsidence, the question whether natural transport of sand can keep up with that subsidence, the possible effects on salt marshes and Wadden Sea birds, and the consequences for the total ecosystem of the Wadden Sea

  10. Ecosystem model of the western Wadden Sea: A bridge between science and management?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindeboom, H. J.; van Raaphorst, W.; Ridderinkhof, H.; van der Veer, H. W.

    1989-09-01

    This paper describes the construction, validation and application of a mathematical ecosystem model of the western Wadden Sea. This model is based upon the Ems-Dollard ecosystem model, but also includes a two-dimensional transport submodel, a benthic and epibenthic sublitoral submodel and nutrient regeneration. In 1986, an extensive field programme was executed to collect data for model validation. Apart from the subtidal processes the validation indicates that the model simulates the different state variables reasonably well. The applicability of the model for management purposes was tested in four case studies concerning: dredging activities, eutrophication, commercial mussel cultrue and oil spills and other calamities. It is concluded that the western Wadden Sea model in general is a useful tool in evaluating the impact of certain anthropogenic activities in the area.

  11. Distinctly variable mudscapes: Distribution gradients of intertidal macrofauna across the Dutch Wadden Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compton, Tanya J.; Holthuijsen, Sander; Koolhaas, Anita; Dekinga, Anne; ten Horn, Job; Smith, Jeremy; Galama, Ysbrand; Brugge, Maarten; van der Wal, Daphne; van der Meer, Jaap; van der Veer, Henk W.; Piersma, Theunis

    2013-09-01

    The Wadden Sea is a shallow coastal region, with a large area of sedimentary tidal flats that extends from The Netherlands to Denmark and has been declared a site of international importance in the Dutch and German parts (Ramsar status and UNESCO World Heritage Site). Benthic macrofauna are central to the ecosystem functioning of this area, as they recycle nutrients, decompose organic matter and are an important food source for many secondary consumers, like fish and waterbirds. Due to the environmental gradients characteristic of estuarine systems, it is expected that changes in assemblage composition will be observed across the physical and environmental gradients of the Wadden Sea. First, we explored the spatial variation in assemblage composition of benthic macrofauna across the intertidal part of the Dutch Wadden Sea using 3 years of biomass data. Then, we identified the relative importance of six environmental variables for explaining and predicting changes in assemblage composition across the intertidal areas of the Wadden Sea using generalised dissimilarity modelling (GDM). In accordance with the environmental gradients across this system, the biomass contributed by a few common species differed from west to east and were distinct in the Dollard. In the west, bivalves Mya arenaria, Cerastoderma edule and Ensis directus contributed a relatively large and equal share of the total biomass, whereas C. edule contributed the sole largest share of the total biomass towards the east. The polychaete Alitta succinea became a large share of the total biomass in the upper Ems and in the Dollard estuary, but contributed little elsewhere. Similar to the observed differences in species composition, the spatial patterns in assemblage composition, as predicted by the GDM models, identified the Dollard as distinct and that the prevalence of assemblage types in the west differed to the east. Median grain size, followed by microphytobenthic biomass, and exposure time were the

  12. Alien parasitic copepods in mussels and oysters of the Wadden Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsner, Nikolaus O.; Jacobsen, Sabine; Thieltges, David W.; Reise, Karsten

    2011-09-01

    Molluscan intestinal parasites of the genus Mytilicola, specifically M. intestinalis, were initially introduced into bivalves in the North Sea in the 1930s. It was presumably introduced from the Mediterranean with ship-fouling mussels, then attained epidemic proportions in Mytilus edulis in the 1950s and is now widely established in the North Sea region. Mytilicola orientalis was co-introduced with Pacific oysters to France in the 1970s and in the southern North Sea in the early 1990s. Its main host Crassostrea gigas has massively invaded the Wadden Sea with a concomitant decline in mussels. To explore whether introduced mytilicolid parasites could play a role in the shifting dominance from native mussels to invasive oysters, we analysed 390 mussels and 174 oysters collected around the island of Sylt in the northern Wadden Sea. We show that M. intestinalis has a prevalence >90% and a mean intensity of 4 adult copepods in individual mussels with >50 mm shell length at all sheltered sites. By contrast, none were found in the oysters. However, at one site, we found M. orientalis in C. gigas with a prevalence of 10% and an intensity of 2 per host individual (August 2008). This constitutes the most northern record in Europe for this Pacific parasite until now. Alignments of partial sequences of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (COI) gene and the nuclear internal transcribed spacers (ITS) and 18S rDNA sequences each show a distinct difference between the two species, which confirms our morphological identification. We suggest that the high parasite load in mussels compared to oysters may benefit the continued expansion of C. gigas in the Wadden Sea.

  13. The significance of radionuclides and trace elements in a back barrier tidal area: Results from the German Wadden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnetger, B.; Hinrichs, J.; Dellwig, O.; Brumsack, H.-J. [Institute of Biology and Chemistry of the Marine Enviroment (ICBM), University of Oldenburg, Oldenburg (Germany); Shaw, T. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of South Carolina, Colombia (United States)

    2000-07-01

    Coastal areas like the German Wadden Sea are characterised by processes occurring on short (tides) seasonal (winter/summer), and long (sea level rise) timescales. This causes fluctuations in biological, chemical and physical parameters. In the geological past these parameters were driven by natural mechanisms whereas in the last centuries anthropogenic influences (coastal protection, agriculture) became important. It is more or less unknown how the different processes forming the German Wadden Sea interact together. We investigated the dissolved and particulate phase of the waters of the a back barrier tidal area of the East Frisian Islands. Intertidal and seasonal variations in radionuclides, alkalinity and redox-sensitive trace metals give us evidence to several important sources and processes going on in this area. In summer, spring and autumn, alkalinity as well as Mn concentrations in the dissolved phase are high during low tide and low during high tide. In winter, alkalinity and Mn concentration in the dissolved phase is lower. In the suspended particulate material a high and variable Mn/Al ratio during tidal cycles was found in summer and autumn. A low ratio close to average shale with minor variations during low and high tide was found in winter and spring. Stable sulphur isotopes measured in porewater draining the tidal flats during low tide indicate intense diagenesis by sulphate reducing bacteria. These observations point to a seasonal, microbially driven release of dissolved Mn and carbon species from the subsurface anoxic Wadden Sea sediments. Another source, adding dissolved components to the water of the back-barrier area, can be identified by short lived radium isotopes. {sup 223}Ra and {sup 224}Ra were found to vary by a factor of two during tidal cycles. Most possibly, the source for Ra are the subterranean sands, which are drained during low tide and replenished during high tide. The geochemical comparison between present day and Holocene tidal

  14. The impact of biological invasions on the Wadden Sea food web (INFOWEB)

    OpenAIRE

    de la Vega, Camille; Schückel, Ulrike; Jung, Sarina; Asmus, Harald; Asmus, Ragnhild; Kröncke, Ingrid; C. J. M. Philippart; van der Veer, Henk

    2012-01-01

    Invasive species are a general issue common of every seas in the world. Impacts of biological invasion on the food web of the Wadden Sea will be figure out through 3 related positions (Sarina Jung, PhD student ; Camille de la Vega, PhD student ; Ulrike Schueckel, Post doctoral student) included in the INFOWEB project. To investigate the impact of invasive species on the food web, a good comprehension of the trophic relation and energy fluxes between the different compartments of the food web ...

  15. Abundance and tidal behaviour of pelagic fish in the gateway to the Wadden Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couperus, Bram; Gastauer, Sven; Fässler, Sascha M. M.; Tulp, Ingrid; van der Veer, Henk W.; Poos, Jan Jaap

    2016-03-01

    The shallow coast of The Netherlands is an important habitat for small pelagic fish. They form one of the major links between plankton and the higher trophic levels. Predatory fish, sea mammals and birds rely on small pelagic fish as a major food source. Currently, monitoring of fish in the Dutch coastal zone mainly focuses on demersal species, using bottom trawls and fykes. Four hydro-acoustic surveys were carried out in May and October 2010/2011 in the Marsdiep area, a relatively deep tidal inlet in the western Wadden Sea, to quantify abundances of pelagic fish. The aims of this study were to (1) describe temporal and vertical variations in fish distribution and school dimensions in relation to tide, and (2) estimate biomass of pelagic fish and their proportion to total fish biomass. The biomass of pelagic fish in the Marsdiep area ranged between 23 and 411 kg/ha. These were mainly sprat, but also young herring, anchovy and pilchard. The fish was scattered in small schools with volumes smaller than 5m3 and concentrated in the top 10 m below the surface. There was a clear effect of tidal cycle on school volume and fish abundance, with larger densities and larger schools at high tide compared to low tide. In May, sandeel contributed substantially to the pelagic assemblage, whereas in October sandeel was absent in the trawl catches, most likely because they stayed buried in the seabed from late summer to spring. The presence of pilchard and anchovy confirmed their re-establishment in the Southern North Sea and Wadden Sea. The abundance of pelagic fish exceeded the biomass of demersal fish in the western Wadden Sea by an order of magnitude. This finding is relevant for ecosystem studies. The fact that this study suggests that small pelagics outnumber demersal species to such a large extent calls for a rethinking of the allocation of monitoring effort in the Dutch coastal zone.

  16. Seasonal Variation of Harbor Seal's Diet from the Wadden Sea in Relation to Prey Availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Vega, Camille; Lebreton, Benoit; Siebert, Ursula; Guillou, Gael; Das, Krishna; Asmus, Ragnhild; Asmus, Harald

    2016-01-01

    The Wadden Sea has an important role for marine mammals in terms of resting, nursing and foraging. Harbor seal is the most abundant marine mammal species in this area. The use of the food resources of the Wadden Sea by seals is not clear, and previous studies showed that this species can travel kilometers away from their haul-outs to forage in the North Sea. In this study, we analyzed the stable isotopes of vibrissae from 23 dead harbor seals found on the island of Sylt to investigate their diet. The predator´s carbon and nitrogen isotope compositions were compared to the compositions of different potential prey items from the Sylt-Rømø Bight and from the North Sea in order to study seasonal pattern in the diet and in the foraging location. In parallel, seasonal variation of abundance and biomass of the potential prey items from the Sylt-Rømø Bight were studied and compare to their contribution to the seal´s diet. The results revealed a change in the seal´s diet from pelagic sources in spring to a benthic based diet in summer, and an increasing use of the North Sea resources in fall and winter in accordance with the seasonal variation of the availability of prey in the Sylt-Rømø Bight. PMID:27176227

  17. Seasonal Variation of Harbor Seal's Diet from the Wadden Sea in Relation to Prey Availability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camille de la Vega

    Full Text Available The Wadden Sea has an important role for marine mammals in terms of resting, nursing and foraging. Harbor seal is the most abundant marine mammal species in this area. The use of the food resources of the Wadden Sea by seals is not clear, and previous studies showed that this species can travel kilometers away from their haul-outs to forage in the North Sea. In this study, we analyzed the stable isotopes of vibrissae from 23 dead harbor seals found on the island of Sylt to investigate their diet. The predator´s carbon and nitrogen isotope compositions were compared to the compositions of different potential prey items from the Sylt-Rømø Bight and from the North Sea in order to study seasonal pattern in the diet and in the foraging location. In parallel, seasonal variation of abundance and biomass of the potential prey items from the Sylt-Rømø Bight were studied and compare to their contribution to the seal´s diet. The results revealed a change in the seal´s diet from pelagic sources in spring to a benthic based diet in summer, and an increasing use of the North Sea resources in fall and winter in accordance with the seasonal variation of the availability of prey in the Sylt-Rømø Bight.

  18. On the dynamics of the stocks of blue mussels ( Mytilus edulis L.) in the Danish Wadden Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch-Petersen, Sten; Kristensen, Per Sand

    2001-01-01

    As biological basis for the monitoring programme for the commercially exploited stock(s) of mussels (Mytilus edulis L.) in the Danish Wadden Sea, samples of mussels have been collected regularly since 1986, both from sub-tidal and inter- tidal mussel beds. These samples are the basis for the esti...... with figures from other investigations. These analyses have been the basis for annual assessments of the mussel stocks, which again are used in the current management of mussel fishery in the Danish Wadden Sea.......As biological basis for the monitoring programme for the commercially exploited stock(s) of mussels (Mytilus edulis L.) in the Danish Wadden Sea, samples of mussels have been collected regularly since 1986, both from sub-tidal and inter- tidal mussel beds. These samples are the basis...

  19. Subsidence due to gas production in the Wadden Sea: How to ensure no harm will be done to nature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thienen-Visser, K. van; Breunese, J.N.; Muntendam-Bos, A.G.

    2015-01-01

    The Wadden Sea is a shallow tidal sea in the north of the Netherlands where gas production is ongoing since 1986. Due to the sensitive nature of this area, gas extraction induced subsidence must remain within the "effective subsidence capacity" for the two tidal basins (Pinkegat and Zoutkamperlaag)

  20. Monitoring and change detection of Wadden Sea areas using Lidar data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, A.; Soergel, U.

    2013-10-01

    In coastal areas morphological changes of various kinds are caused by tidal flows, storms, climate change, and human activities. For these reasons a recurrent monitoring becomes necessary in order to detect undesired changes at early stages enabling rapid countermeasures to mitigate or minimize potential harm or hazard. The morphology of the terrain can be represented by highly precise digital terrain models (DTM). Airborne lidar (light detection and ranging) has become a standard method for DTM generation in coastal zones like Wadden Sea areas. In comparison to echo sounding systems, lidar is feasible for data acquisition of large areas. However, only the eulittoral zone can be covered by standard laser because the near-infrared laser pulses are not able to penetrate water which remains, for example, in some tidal channels even during low tide. In the framework of a German research project, we analyse the spatial and temporal variability of Wadden Sea areas in the North Sea. For a systematic monitoring and the detection of morphological changes we compare terrain models of two different epochs in order to determine height differences which can be caused by natural influences or human activities. We focus especially on the analysis of morphological changes near to tidal channels. In order to detect changes we compare the location of edges derived from each DTM based on the gray values' gradients. Our results for a test site in the German Wadden Sea show height differences up to 1 m due to the shifting of tidal channels and relocations of the channels up to 55 m within a period of two years.

  1. Tidal and residual flows in the western Dutch Wadden Sea III: Vorticity balances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridderinkhof, H.

    A vorticity-dynamics approach is used to examine the origin of the small-scale residual current field in the western Dutch Wadden Sea. For a representative part of the Wadden Sea, the magnitude of vorticity and of terms in the balance equation for vorticity is determined on the basis of results from a two-dimensional numerical model. The torque from bottom friction along the side walls of the tidal channels appears to be the dominating mechanism in generating tidal relative vorticity, the magnitude of which is much larger than planetary vorticity. Especially near a tidal inlet, stretching and squeezing of fluid columns is of importance in increasing/decreasing relative vorticity. Averaging over a tidal period shows, compared to the tidal equations, an increased influence of the non-linear advective and streching/squeezing terms in the tidally-averaged balance. However, although the relative influence of these strong non-linear terms increases, the influence of the weak non-linear terms originating in bottom friction cannot be ignored. The mechanism responsible for the headland eddies near a tidal inlet and the topographical eddies in the channels of the Wadden Sea is essentially the same, viz. the transfer of vorticity from a source region where this vorticity is produced by differential bottom friction, to adjacent regions. This transfer of tidal vorticity, or advection, is most effective near a transition from straight to curved isobaths where a gradient in the production of tidal vorticity occurs. This is illustrated by showing the vorticity possessed by a particular fluid column during a tidal excursion. The dominant influence of the bathymetry on the small scale residual current pattern is used for a qualitative discussion of the residual flow field in other parts of our numerical model.

  2. Automated Waterline Detection in the Wadden Sea Using High-Resolution TerraSAR-X Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Wiehle

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an algorithm for automatic detection of the land-water-line from TerraSAR-X images acquired over the Wadden Sea. In this coastal region of the southeastern North Sea, a strip of up to 20 km of seabed falls dry during low tide, revealing mudflats and tidal creeks. The tidal currents transport sediments and can change the coastal shape with erosion rates of several meters per month. This rate can be strongly increased by storm surges which also cause flooding of usually dry areas. Due to the high number of ships traveling through the Wadden Sea to the largest ports of Germany, frequent monitoring of the bathymetry is also an important task for maritime security. For such an extended area and the required short intervals of a few months, only remote sensing methods can perform this task efficiently. Automating the waterline detection in weather-independent radar images provides a fast and reliable way to spot changes in the coastal topography. The presented algorithm first performs smoothing, brightness thresholding, and edge detection. In the second step, edge drawing and flood filling are iteratively performed to determine optimal thresholds for the edge drawing. In the last step, small misdetections are removed.

  3. Species composition and predation pressure of the gelatinous zooplankton community in the western Dutch Wadden Sea before and after the invasion of the ctenophore

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Walraven, L.; Daan, R.; Langenberg, V.T.; van der Veer, H.W.

    2017-01-01

    The ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi A. Agassiz, 1865 is a successful, recent, macroplanktonic invader in European coastal waters, including theDutch Wadden Sea. It occurs year-round in substantial numbers. The effect of M. leidyi on structure of the gelatinous zooplankton community inthe Dutch Wadden S

  4. Policy plans and management measures to restore eelgrass (Zostera marina L.) in the Dutch Wadden Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jonge, V. N.; de Jong, D. J.; van Katwijk, M. M.

    2000-07-01

    The Dutch Wadden Sea has been changed dramatically over the last centuries by human activities like land reclamation and different forms of fishery. This has, amongst other things, led to changes in the number of biological communities. One of the changes was the near extinction of eelgrass (Zostera marina L.) in the Dutch Wadden Sea. The deterioration of the area led to policy plans in the late 1980s that aimed at restoring the original natural communities of which the eelgrass community was one. This paper presents a restoration strategy which contains a selection procedure for suitable transplantation sites. The selection procedure is based on factors such as sediment composition, exposure time, current velocity and wave action. These were combined in a GIS-based map integrating these factors. One important action in the restoration process is to increase the number of freshwater discharge points to meet the requirements of the brackish water community in general and the growing conditions for eelgrass in particular.

  5. Residual currents and bedform migration in a natural tidal inlet (Knudedyb, Danish Wadden Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraccascia, S.; Winter, C.; Ernstsen, V. B.; Hebbeln, D.

    2016-10-01

    The morphology and hydrodynamics of the natural tidal inlet Knudedyb in the Danish Wadden Sea were investigated by the analysis of high resolution bathymetric data and hydrodynamic numerical modeling. In contrast to the expected anticlockwise pattern similar to the other inlets in the Wadden Sea, a clockwise tidal residual current was found, which drives the sediment transport and results from the presence of a confluent meander bend. The channel is draped by bedforms of several hierarchical scales (on average, approximately 155 m long and 2.3 m high), with average sizes decreasing from south to north and seaward (i.e., westward). Primary bedforms in the area are mostly asymmetric ebb-directed and migrate in the ebb direction in the order of 3 m yr- 1. Bedform sections at the northern channel flank show more symmetrical profiles; crests migrate flood-ward, leading to crestal flexing in the central channel. Lateral recirculation cells develop during ebb tide on both sides of the channel seaward of a bend, before the tidal reversal occurs in the rest of the model domain. As a result of the longer flood phase, a main clockwise residual eddy exists in the middle reach of the channel. Bedform migration patterns and hydrodynamic simulations reveal that the pronounced tidal asymmetry in the channel is enhanced by the effects of the channel morphology on the confined flow (at low tide).

  6. Cyclic behavior of sandy shoals on the ebb-tidal deltas of the Wadden Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridderinkhof, W.; Hoekstra, P.; van der Vegt, M.; de Swart, H. E.

    2016-03-01

    Ebb-tidal deltas are bulges of sand that are located seaward of tidal inlets. Many of these deltas feature shoals that cyclically form and migrate towards the coast. The average period between successive shoals that attach to the coast varies among different inlets. In this study, a quantitative assessment of the cyclic behavior of shoals on the ebb-tidal deltas of the Wadden Sea is presented. Analysis of bathymetric data and Landsat satellite images revealed that at the majority of inlets along the Wadden Sea migrating shoals occur. The average period between succeeding shoals correlates to the tidal prism and has values ranging between 4 and 130 years. A larger tidal prism favors larger periods between successive shoal attachments. However, such a relationship was not found for wide inlets with multiple channels. There is a positive relationship between the frequency with which the shoals attach to the coast and their migration velocity, and a negative relationship between the migration velocity of the shoal and the tidal prism. Finally, the data were too sparse to assess whether the longshore sediment transport has a significant effect on the period between successive shoals that attach to the coasts downdrift of the observed tidal inlets.

  7. Influence of light quality and gassing on the vertical migration of diatoms inhabiting the Wadden Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenderoth, Klaus; Rhiel, Erhard

    2004-10-01

    Diatoms inhabiting the Wadden Sea show a rhythmic migration pattern, which is superimposed by the tidal rhythm. In addition to light intensity, light quality has a pronounced influence on the upward-directed migration, thus giving some information on the nature of the relevant photoreceptors. Maximum diatom migration occurred when sediment surfaces were illuminated with blue light. The cell densities in blue light exceeded those of white light control experiments 1.8-fold. Furthermore, we registered a minor peak in the red light region, which reached approximately 60% of the white light controls. Cryptochrome and/or phototropin may thus be involved and act as photoreceptors for the vertical migration pattern. Flushing sediment surfaces of freshly mixed Wadden Sea sediments with air, O2, CO2 or N2 did not show a significant influence of O2 on the upward migration. The disappearance of diatoms from sediment surfaces which were flushed with CO2 is most probably caused by the acidification of the sediment bed.

  8. Ground subsidence Wadden Sea 1977-2011. Precision and reliability of measurements; Bodemdaling Waddenzee 1977-2011. Precisie en betrouwbaarheid uit metingen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houtenbos, A.P.E.M.

    2011-12-15

    What about the subsidence caused by gas exploitation around the Wadden Sea? Is subsidence on the Wadden Sea really manageable by extraction with the 'hand on the faucet'? These and other questions are examined in an analysis of the measurements around the Wadden Sea in the period 1977-2011 [Dutch] Hoe staat het met de bodemdaling door gaswinning rond de Waddenzee? Is bodemdaling op de Waddenzee werkelijk beheersbaar door winning met de 'Hand aan de kraan'? Deze en andere vragen zijn onderzocht in een analyse van de metingen rond de Waddenzee tot over de periode 1977-2011.

  9. Eutrophication as a possible cause of decline in the seagrass Zostera noltii of the dutch Wadden Sea.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Philippart, C.J.M.

    1994-01-01

    The present thesis describes the results of research on the distribution and possible causes for the decrease of the seagrass Z. noltii in the Wadden Sea, carried out from 1986 to 1990. Chapter 2 examines the relation between the distribution of Zostera dominated ecosystems in the international Wadd

  10. Development and distribution of the non-indigenous Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) in the Dutch Wadden Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fey-Hofstede, F.E.; Dankers, N.M.J.A.; Steenbergen, J.; Goudswaard, P.C.

    2010-01-01

    Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) were first observed in the Dutch Wadden Sea near Texel in 1983. The population increased slowly in the beginning but grew exponentially from the mid-1990s onwards, although now some stabilisation seems to be occurring. They occur on a variety of substrates such as

  11. The co-production of power and knowledge around the mussel fisheries transition in the Dutch Wadden Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Molen, Franke; Puente Rodriguez, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Governance practices are places where knowledge and power interconnect. In this paper, the stabilization of a governance practice concerning mussel fisheries in the Dutch Wadden Sea is described and analyzed in terms of the co-production of knowledge and power. In this governance practice,

  12. Mytilus galloprovincialis-type foot-protein-1 alleles occur at low frequency among mussels in the Dutch Wadden Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luttikhuizen, PC; Koolhaas, A; Bol, A; Piersma, T

    2002-01-01

    The presence of M. galloprovincialis-type genes among the population of mussels in the Dutch Wadden Sea, historically described as M edulis, was assessed. We applied the molecular technique in which a fragment of the gene coding for an adhesive protein of the byssus of mussels is amplified by PCR an

  13. Growth and size-dependent loss of newly settled bivalves in two distant regions of the Wadden Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andresen, H.; Dorresteijn, I.; van der Meer, J.

    2013-01-01

    Individual growth and the timing of life history events determine the course of individual body sizes. Hence, these factors can influence size-dependent species interactions, such as predation. In the Wadden Sea, predation by crustaceans plays an important role in the survival of pre-recruit bivalve

  14. Effects of the North Atlantic Oscillation and wind waves on salt marsh dynamics in the Danish Wadden Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Daehyun; Grant, William E.; Cairns, David M.

    2013-01-01

    this notion has been conceptually introduced for the Wadden Sea, no modeling attempts have been made yet. As a proof of concept, this study developed a simulation model using the commercially available STELLAA (R) software, based on long-term data on water level and sedimentation collected at a back...

  15. Risk analysis on the import of seed mussels from the west coast of Sweden into the Wadden Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijsman, J.W.M.; Tamis, J.E.; Kaag, N.H.B.M.; Karman, C.C.; Foekema, E.M.; Smaal, A.C.

    2007-01-01

    This report is the result of a risk analysis on the introduction of exotic non-indigenous species with the import of rope culture mussels from Sweden into the Wadden Sea. Based on available literature data and expert judgement, the target species are identified and the risks of these species are ass

  16. A review of science-policy interactions in the Dutch Wadden Sea - The cockle fishery and gas exploitation controversies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Floor, J.R.; Koppen, van C.S.A.; Lindeboom, H.J.

    2013-01-01

    The potential ecological effects of cockle fisheries and gas exploitation in the Dutch Wadden Sea and their implications for policy and management have been the topic of vigorous societal debates. Ecological science has played crucial but controversial roles in these debates. Several social science

  17. Experiments on Erosion of Mud from the Danish Wadden Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, C.; Larsen, Torben; Petersen, O.

    1994-01-01

    Experiments on erosion and consolidation of natural cohesive sediments from the harbour of Esbjerg located in the Danish Watten Sea were conducted using a rotating annular flume. The objective of the paper is to describe the erosion rate of deposited beds and relate the erosion rate...

  18. Abundance, growth and food demand of the scyphomedusa Aurelia aurita in the western Wadden Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Veer, H. W.; Oorthuysen, W.

    Medusae of Aurelia aurita are found in the western Wadden Sea from the beginning of May till August with maximum numbers of 250 to 500 individuals per 10 3 m 3 during May-June. The existence of a continuous ebb surplus suggests an origin from polyps living in the inner parts of the estuary and a transport or migration of the released medusae towards the North Sea. Growth is fast; a bell size of 20 cm diameter is reached within 3 to 4 months. The species is important as a predator from May to July, reaching maximum carbon biomass values of 12 to 18 g C·10 3 m -3. Predation by A. aurita may affect the recruitment of one of its food sources, viz. fish larvae.

  19. Effects of Fucus vesiculosus covering intertidal mussel beds in the Wadden Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, A.; Reise, K.

    1994-06-01

    The brown alga Fucus vesiculosus forma mytili (Nienburg) Nienhuis covered about 70% of mussel bed ( Mytilus edulis) surface area in the lower intertidal zone of Königshafen, a sheltered sandy bay near the island of Sylt in the North Sea. Mean biomass in dense patches was 584 g ash-free dry weight m-2 in summer. On experimental mussel beds, fucoid cover enhanced mud accumulation and decreased mussel density. The position of mussels underneath algal canopy was mainly endobenthic (87% of mussels with >1/3 of shell sunk into mud). In the absence of fucoids, mussels generated epibenthic garlands (81% of mussels with Fucus vesiculosus on mussel beds in the intertidal Wadden Sea affects mussels and their epibionts negatively, but supports various herbivores and increases overall benthic diversity.

  20. Meat content of cultured mussels (Mytilus edulis) in relation to food supply, eutrophication, and suspended matter concentration in the Dutch Wadden Sea

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Craeymeersch, J; van Stralen, M.l; Bult, T

    2001-01-01

    .... We analysed long-term data sets (from 1952 onwards) on the meat content of cultured mussels, primary production, chlorophyll concentrations, and suspended matter concentration in the dutch Wadden Sea...

  1. Chemical monitoring in the Dutch Wadden Sea by means of benthic invertebrates and fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essink, Karel

    1989-09-01

    In monitoring, it is of utmost importance to carefully define the purpose, the sampling strategy, as well as the analytical chemical and statistical requirements. Surveys are appropriate for describing the geographical variation in environmental contaminant levels. Repeated surveys and recurrentdata collection at permanent locations provide means of detecting temporal trends. Results are presented here of surveys on pollution by trace metals, polychlorinated biphenyls and organochlorine pesticides in the Ems Estuary and Dutch Wadden Sea using Mytilus edulis, Mya arenaria, Arenicoia marina, Nereis diversicolor and Crangon crangon as test organisms. Trends towards decreasing pollution by mercury are illustrated by monitoring data on Mytilus edulis and Zoarces viviparus. It is stressed that the results of chemical monitoring in organisms may be interpreted only in termser the biological effects on the basis of relevant toxicological knowledge and/or additional bio-assays.

  2. Mytilus galloprovincialis-type foot-protein-1 alleles occur at low frequency among mussels in the Dutch Wadden Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luttikhuizen, Pieternella C.; Koolhaas, Anita; Bol, Anneke; Piersma, Theunis

    2002-11-01

    The presence of M. galloprovincialis-type genes among the population of mussels in the Dutch Wadden Sea, historically described as M. edulis, was assessed. We applied the molecular technique in which a fragment of the gene coding for an adhesive protein of the byssus of mussels is amplified by PCR and assayed for length using electrophoresis. Among 321 individual mussels collected in August-October 2001 at 14 sites (5 intertidal, 9 subtidal) widely dispersed over the Dutch Wadden Sea, 6 specimens (collected at 5 sites) were found that showed a heterozygote genotype with both the M. edulis- and the M. galloprovincialis-type alleles being amplified; all others were identified as homozygotes for the M. edulis-type allele. Differentiation in frequencies of heterozygotes among sites was not detected. The fact that the M. galloprovincialis-type allele was present at low frequency (0.0093) may be attributed to one of three possible, and not mutually exclusive, causes: incomplete diagnosticity of this marker, an historically stable introgression zone in the Wadden Sea, or a recent invasion.

  3. Age-dependent zonation of the periwinkle Littorina littorea (L.) in the Wadden Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saier, Bettina

    2000-12-01

    On sedimentary tidal flats near the island of Sylt (German Bight, North Sea) abundance and size distribution of periwinkles, Littorina littorea L., were studied in low intertidal and in shallow and deep subtidal mussel beds ( Mytilus edulis L.). In low intertidal mussel beds, surveys revealed that high densities (1,369±571 m-2) of juvenile snails (≤13 mm) were positively correlated with strong barnacle epigrowth ( Semibalanus balanoides L. and Balanus crenatus Bruguière) on mussels. A subsequent field experiment showed that recruitment of L. littorea was restricted to the intertidal zone. Abundances of periwinkles (213±114 m-2) and barnacles abruptly decreased in the adjacent shallow subtidal zone, which served as a habitat for older snails (>13 mm). L. littorea was completely absent from disjunct deep (5 m) subtidal mussel beds. Snail abundance varied seasonally with maxima of >4,000 m-2 in low intertidal mussel beds in October and minima in July, just before the onset of new recruitment. I suggest that the presence of cracks and crevices among the dense barnacle overgrowth in intertidal mussel beds favoured recruitment and survival of juvenile snails. Larger (older) specimens are assumed to actively migrate to the less favourable adjacent subtidal. Therefore, intertidal mussel beds are considered as nurseries for the population of L. littorea in the Wadden Sea.

  4. Effects of the North Atlantic Oscillation and wind waves on salt marsh dynamics in the Danish Wadden Sea: a quantitative model as proof of concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Daehyun; Grant, William E.; Cairns, David M.; Bartholdy, Jesper

    2013-08-01

    Long-term eustatic sea-level variation has been recognized as a primary factor affecting the hydrological and geomorphic dynamics of salt marshes. However, recent studies suggest that wind waves influenced by atmospheric oscillations also may play an important role in many coastal areas. Although this notion has been conceptually introduced for the Wadden Sea, no modeling attempts have been made yet. As a proof of concept, this study developed a simulation model using the commercially available STELLA® software, based on long-term data on water level and sedimentation collected at a back-barrier marsh on the Skallingen peninsula in Denmark. In the model, the frequency (number year-1) of wind-driven extreme high water level (HWL) events (>130 cm Danish Ordnance Zero) was simulated in terms of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) index. Then, surface accretion (cm year-1) and submergence duration (h year-1) were simulated for the period 1933-2007. The model showed good performances: simulated rates of surface accretion and simulated durations of submergence decreased from 1950 to 1980, the point at which the NAO shifted from its negative to its positive phase, and increased thereafter. Despite continuous increases in surface elevation, increases in simulated submergence duration were apparently due to wind-driven HWL events, which generally increased in frequency after 1980. These findings for the Danish Wadden Sea add to the growing body of evidence that the role of atmospheric oscillations—e.g., the NAO—as drivers of wind-generated water level variations merits more attention in assessing the impact of climate change on coastal marshes.

  5. Acoustic and optical methods to infer water transparency at Time Series Station Spiekeroog, Wadden Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Anne-Christin; Badewien, Thomas H.; Garaba, Shungudzemwoyo P.; Zielinski, Oliver

    2016-11-01

    Water transparency is a primary indicator of optical water quality that is driven by suspended particulate and dissolved material. A data set from the operational Time Series Station Spiekeroog located at a tidal inlet of the Wadden Sea was used to perform (i) an inter-comparison of observations related to water transparency, (ii) correlation tests among these measured parameters, and (iii) to explore the utility of both acoustic and optical tools in monitoring water transparency. An Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler was used to derive the backscatter signal in the water column. Optical observations were collected using above-water hyperspectral radiometers and a submerged turbidity metre. Bio-fouling on the turbidity sensors optical windows resulted in measurement drift and abnormal values during quality control steps. We observed significant correlations between turbidity collected by the submerged metre and that derived from above-water radiometer observations. Turbidity from these sensors was also associated with the backscatter signal derived from the acoustic measurements. These findings suggest that both optical and acoustic measurements can be reasonable proxies of water transparency with the potential to mitigate gaps and increase data quality in long-time observation of marine environments.

  6. Grazing on green algae by the periwinkle Littorina littorea in the Wadden Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelmsen, U.; Reise, K.

    1994-06-01

    On sedimentary tidal flats in the Wadden Sea near the Island of Sylt, the periwinkle Littorina littorea occurred preferentially on clusters and beds of mussels and on shell beds (100 to 350 m-2), achieved moderate densities on green algal patches or mats (20 to 50 m-2), and remained rare on bare sediments (10% of sediment surface appeared in summer on approximately one third of the tidal zone, mainly in the upper and sheltered parts and almost never on mussel and shell beds. In feeding experiments, L. littorea ingested more of the dominant alge, Enteromorpha, than of Ulva, irrespective of whether or not algae were fresh or decaying. The tough thalli of Chaetomorpha were hardly consumed. Snails feeding on Enteromorpha produced fecal pellets from which new growth of Enteromorpha started. In the absence of periwinkles, Enteromorpha developed on mussels and the attached fucoids. Experimentally increased snail densities on sediments prevented green algal development, but the snails were unable to graze down established algal mats. It is concluded that natural densities of L. littorea hardly affect the ephemeral mass development of green algae on sediments. However, where the snails occur at high densities, i.e. on mussel beds, green algal development may be prevented.

  7. Disease prevalence in flounder (Platichthys flesus) from the Dutch Wadden Sea as indicator of environmental quality: A summary of 1988-2005 surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vethaak, A. D.

    2013-09-01

    In 1988, epizootics of ulcer disease in the flatfish flounder in the Dutch Wadden Sea were reported near freshwater drainage sluices of IJsselmeer Lake, locally affecting up to 38.9% of fish. Other diseases such as fin rot and lymphocystis were less frequent, but followed a similar pattern. Results of follow-up surveys in the Wadden Sea in 1994-2005 confirm previous findings and also show significantly elevated ulcer prevalences at other smaller drainage works. The most likely stress factors that contributed to the development of the epizootics at these sites include osmotic stress, adverse water quality conditions including chemical contaminants, nutritional deficiencies, and obstruction to fish migration. It was shown that discharges of IJsselmeer Lake freshwater in 1988-96 had a wide effect on the prevalence and distribution of ulcers and lymphocystis in the western Wadden Sea. A general reduction in disease prevalence in flounder in the entire Dutch Wadden Sea was observed during 1988-2005, which was most likely due to a general improvement in water quality and locally improved habitat conditions for flounder near drainage sluices. Ulcer prevalences outside the two IJsselmeer Lake sluices (Den Oever and Kornwerderzand) declined in this period from approximately 30% to 10% for medium-sized fish. Other skin diseases have also displayed a downward trend at both sites in recent years, with prevalences falling sharply to below 1%. Elsewhere in the Wadden Sea and the Ems-Dollard estuary, disease prevalences have declined towards natural background levels (diseases, especially ulcers, are useful indicators of environmental quality in the Wadden Sea.

  8. Spatial variability in structural and functional aspects of macrofauna communities and their environmental parameters in the Jade Bay (Wadden Sea Lower Saxony, southern North Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schückel, Ulrike; Beck, Melanie; Kröncke, Ingrid

    2013-03-01

    Spatial distribution and functional structure of intertidal benthic macrofauna in relation to environmental variables in the Jade Bay (southern North Sea) were studied and compared with other intertidal areas of the Wadden Sea. A total of 128 stations covering the whole Jade Bay were sampled in summer 2009. A total of 114 taxa were found. Highest species numbers occurred in the subtidal areas, whereas highest mean abundances were found in the upper intertidal areas. Based on species abundance data, six significantly distinct macrofauna communities in the Jade Bay were identified and evaluated with multivariate statistics, univariate correlations and canonical correspondence analysis. Differences in these community patterns were caused by the response of the dominant species ( Hydrobia ulvae, Tubificoides benedii, Pygospio elegans, Caulleriella killariensis, Scoloplos armiger, Urothoe poseidonis, Microprotopus maculatus) to prevailing environmental conditions along the gradient from the lower and exposed sandy intertidal areas via intermediate mixed sediments to the upper mudflat areas. Distribution patterns in relation to tidal zonation were best explained by variability in submergence time, Chlorophyll a (chl a) content and sediment composition (mud content), which are proxies for hydrodynamic conditions and food availability. Species inventory and species richness were comparable with other intertidal areas of the Wadden Sea, but the Jade Bay differs from these areas regarding dominant species. Differences in sediment composition and morphological characteristics (macrotidal versus mesotidal Wadden Sea areas) are discussed for comparison of regional differences.

  9. Passive settlement of Macoma balthica spat on tidal flats of the Wadden Sea and subsequent migration of juveniles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armonies, Werner; Hellwig-Armonies, Monika

    Spatfall of the tellinid bivalve Macoma balthica may occur in fine-grained sediments at different tidal elevations in the Wadden Sea. but it is not clear which mechanism (active habitat selection or passive sinking of larvae, or both) can explain the observed distribution pattern. Spatfall and the subsequent development of juvenile abundances and size distribution were studied along a transect in the northern Wadden Sea near the Island of Sylt. Initial spatfall was highest in the lower intertidal and correlated significantly with hydrographic parameters. The enhanced larval settlement observed in dense aggregates of the tube-building polychaete Lanice conchilega confirmed the prominent role of hydrographic factors in initial spatfall. Subsequently, abundance strongly decreased in the lower intertidal but increased in the upper intertidal due to immigration of newly settled spat from lower sites. By the end of October, abundance was higher in the upper intertidal. Growth of the juveniles was higher in the upper intertidal. It is suggested that (1) initial spatfall is mainly ruled by hydrographic factors without active sediment selection; (2) young Macoma remain highly mobile during the first weeks of their benthic life and by byssus drift may achieve a net transport into areas with weak initial spatfall; (3) at the end of their first winter a second period of high floating activity occurs, bringing them back towards the lower intertidal and shallow subtidal. Thus, by successive postlarval migrations Macoma may several times change the intertidal site occupied during their first year of life. The comparatively low interannual variability of recruitment success noted in this species in the Wadden Sea may be a result of these migrations.

  10. Exploring interactions among intertidal macrozoobenthos of the Dutch Wadden Sea using population growth models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, I. D.; van der Meer, J.; Dekker, R.; Beukema, J. J.; Holmes, S. P.

    2004-11-01

    Using data taken from three long-term monitoring programs, we modelled the population dynamics of 13 common macrozoobenthic species of the Balgzand, an approximately 50 km 2 intertidal area in the Dutch part of the Wadden Sea. In order to identify likely interactions among species, while accounting as much as possible for other factors influencing population dynamics, models included both 'environmental' (water temperature, and phytoplankton concentration) and 'biological' (biomass of potentially interacting species) variables. This approach appeared to be effective at identifying certain types of interactions acting over relatively short time-frames, such as predation and competition for food. Among the species we considered, the strongest effects of this kind appeared to be from what we presume to be predation by Nephtys hombergii, and from competition for food among bivalves. Several of the strongest results of our analysis corroborated expectations derived from previous small-scale surveys or experimental studies, but there were also a number of highly significant results indicating possible interactions which were not immediately explicable, including the apparent positive effect of Macoma balthica on Arenicola marina, and the apparent negative effect of Nephtys hombergii on Mya arenaria. Our results also suggest that year to year changes in Cerastoderma edule and Arenicola marina populations did not have substantial and widespread influences on the population dynamics of the majority of other common infauna, which is not to deny the likely critical importance of recruitment effects and biogenic transformation of the intertidal environment by these species over longer time frames. Our modelling approach could be applied to other long-term data sets, and will become more useful as longer time series become available.

  11. Mapping species abundance by a spatial zero-inflated Poisson model: a case study in the Wadden Sea, the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lyashevska, O.; Brus, D.J.; Van der Meer, J.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the study was to provide a general procedure for mapping spe-cies abundance when data are zero-in?ated and spatially correlated counts. Thebivalve species Macoma balthica was observed on a 5009500 m grid in theDutch part of the Wadden Sea. In total, 66% of the 3451 counts were zeros

  12. Assessing adaptive capacity of institutions to climate change : a comparative case study of the Dutch Wadden Sea and the Venice Lagoon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munaretto, S.; Klostermann, J.E.M.

    2011-01-01

    In this study we assess the adaptive capacity of relevant institutions for ecosystems and environmental management in two complex systems: the Dutch Wadden Sea and the Venice Lagoon. A new tool called the Adaptive Capacity Wheel (ACW) is used to diagnose strengths and weaknesses in the institutional

  13. Flyway protection and the predicament of our migrant birds: A critical look at international conservation policies and the Dutch Wadden Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boere, G.C.; Piersma, T.

    2012-01-01

    The nomination of the Dutch and German parts of the Wadden Sea as a World Heritage Site within the framework of the World Heritage Convention (WHC) represents high-level recognition of the global importance of this area for millions of migratory birds. It was not the first accolade for the unique

  14. Flyway protection and the predicament of our migrant birds : A critical look at international conservation policies and the Dutch Wadden Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boere, Gerard C.; Piersma, Theunis

    2012-01-01

    The nomination of the Dutch and German parts of the Wadden Sea as a World Heritage Site within the framework of the World Heritage Convention (WHC) represents high-level recognition of the global importance of this area for millions of migratory birds. It was not the first accolade for the unique

  15. Quantifying the residual volume transport through a multiple-inlet system in response to wind forcing: The case of the western Dutch Wadden Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duran-Matute, M.; Gerkema, T.; Sassi, M.

    2016-01-01

    In multiple-inlet coastal systems like the western Dutch Wadden Sea, the tides (and their interaction with the bathymetry), the fresh water discharge, and the wind drive a residual flow through the system. In the current paper, we study the effect of the wind on the residual volume transport through

  16. Fishing over the sides or over the stern: does it matter : comparison of two fishing methodologies in the Wadden Sea Demersal Fish Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, C.; Bolle, L.J.; Boois I.J. de, Ingeborg

    2016-01-01

    Since 1972, the Demersal Fish Survey (DFS) in the Wadden Sea has been carried out with the RV Stern. Within a few years this vessel will be replaced by another vessel as a result of the current ship replacement policy of Rijkswaterstaat Rijksrederij. It is not yet clear which vessel will replace RV

  17. Variability in transport of fish eggs and larvae. IV. Interannual variability in larval stage duration of immigrating plaice in the Dutch Wadden Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veer, van der W.; Bolle, L.J.; Geffen, A.J.; Witte, J.IJ.

    2009-01-01

    Larval immigration of plaice Pleuronectes platessa L. into the western Wadden Sea in spring was followed biweekly from 1993 to 2002. For each year (1993 excluded), 150 settling individuals were selected and used for reconstruction of larval stage duration based on otolith daily ring counts. In addit

  18. Long-term patterns in 50 years of scyphomedusae catches in the western Dutch Wadden Sea in relation to climate change and eutrophication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Walraven, L.; Langenberg, V.T.; Dapper, R.; Witte, J.IJ.; Zuur, A.F.; van der Veer, H.W.

    2015-01-01

    Using a unique 50-year high-resolution time series of daily kom-fyke catches, long-term patterns of scyphomedusae in the western Dutch Wadden Sea were analysed and related to changes in environmental conditions [eutrophication in the 1980s–1990s and recent climate change (increased water temperature

  19. Identification of a domoic acid-producing pseudo-Nitzschia species (Bacillariophyceae) in the Dutch Wadden sea with electron microscopy and molecular probes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrieling, Engel G.; Koeman, Reinoud P.T.; Scholin, Christopher A.; Scheerman, Paul; Peperzak, Louis; Veenhuis, Marten; Gieskes, Winfried W.C.

    1996-01-01

    Biological monitoring in the Dutch Wadden Sea between November 1993 and July 1994 revealed Pseudo-nitzschia-like pennate chain-forming diatom species with cell numbers ranging from 10^2 to 10^5 per litre. Cultured isolates and field samples were examined by electron microscopy, which revealed the

  20. Dendrochronology of Atriplex portulacoides and Artemisia maritima in Wadden Sea salt marshes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Decuyper, M.; Slim, P.A.; Loon-Steensma, van J.M.

    2014-01-01

    The study uses a rather unusual method, dendrochronology, to investigate the growth and survival of Atriplex portulacoides L. and Artemisia maritima L. on salt marshes at two field sites on the Dutch North Sea barrier islands of Terschelling and Ameland. By providing information on longevity of thes

  1. Dendrochronology of Atriplex portulacoides and Artemisia maritima in Wadden Sea salt marshes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Decuyper, M.; Slim, P.A.; Loon-Steensma, van J.M.

    2014-01-01

    The study uses a rather unusual method, dendrochronology, to investigate the growth and survival of Atriplex portulacoides L. and Artemisia maritima L. on salt marshes at two field sites on the Dutch North Sea barrier islands of Terschelling and Ameland. By providing information on longevity of

  2. Quantified and applied sea-bed dynamics of the Netherlands Continental Shelf and the Wadden Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, T.A.G.P.; Kleuskens, M.H.P.; Dorst, L.L.; Van der Tak, C.; Doornenbal, P.J.; Van der Spek, A.J.F.; Hoogendoorn, R.M.; Rodriguez Aguilera, D.; Menninga, P.J.; Noorlandt, R.P.

    2012-01-01

    Sedimentary coasts and shallow-sea beds may be dynamic. The large-scaled spatial variation in these dynamics and the smaller-scaled behaviour of individual marine bedforms are largely unknown. Sea-bed dynamics are relevant for the safety of shipping, and therefore for monitoring strategies, and for

  3. Population development and status of harbour seals (Phoca vitulina in the Wadden Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter JH Reijnders

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available An index for the condition of a population should include a measure of the recuperative power or resilience of the population in question. This measure needs to cover both the demographic and physiological condition of the population. Applied to the harbour seal population in the Wadden Sea we therefore address respectively the population development and distribution, and its health condition, and relate these to environmental conditions. The harbour seal population has been severely depleted by hunting in the first half of the 20th century. After hunting was stopped in the mid-1970s the population recovered gradually. This recovery was twice interrupted by Phocine Distemper Virus (PDV outbreaks in 1988 and 2002. These PDV-epizootics reduced the population by 57% and 50% respectively. They also lead to changes in age and sex structure of the population, which gradually returned to a stable age-structure. Despite the reduction in population size by respectively 57% and 50%, the population showed a strong recovery with a growth rate close to the considered maximum possible for this species. The observed changes in the distribution of the population over the 4 sub-regions indicate that distribution is not a static phenomenon. Long term field and pathological investigations point out that the general health status of the population has improved, particularly that of newborn seals (0-6months old. The increasing prevalence of parasites in lungs and intestine warrants continued monitoring of the health status of seals. This is especially relevant in view of the exponential increase of the population, which may finally approach the carrying capacity of the area. Concluding, we canstate that the condition of the population in terms of demographic and health parameters is satisfactory. The best guarantee for maintaining such a favourable conservation status is to abstain from human interferences (e.g. rescue, rehabilitation and release with natural

  4. A review of science-policy interactions in the Dutch Wadden Sea - The cockle fishery and gas exploitation controversies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floor, Judith R.; van Koppen, C. S. A. (Kris); Lindeboom, Han J.

    2013-09-01

    The potential ecological effects of cockle fisheries and gas exploitation in the Dutch Wadden Sea and their implications for policy and management have been the topic of vigorous societal debates. Ecological science has played crucial but controversial roles in these debates. Several social science studies have been dedicated to analysing these roles and making recommendations for the improvement of science-policy interactions. In reviewing these studies, this article aims to draw lessons for (ecological) scientists and policy makers on how to understand and guide the interactions of science and policy in Wadden Sea management. Studies addressing science-policy interactions in the Dutch Wadden Sea can be grouped into three main perspectives, emphasizing the social and economic dynamics of resource management, the role of nature views and discourses in controversies, and the influence of science dynamics in policy and management debates. The review demonstrates that ecological knowledge and ecological scientists have played important roles in the controversies on cockle fisheries and gas exploitation. However, scientific knowledge was not always the most important factor in the decision-making process, and scientific insights were not always used as expected by the scientists. How scientific knowledge is used and interpreted by stakeholders was dependent on their interests, their nature views and on the dominant policy discourses. Ecological knowledge and scientists themselves became part of the policy debates, e.g. in discussions on uncertainty and reliability. The position of scientists in policy debates was strongly influenced by the policy setting and by changes in this setting, e.g. by the operation of mediators or by new interpretations of legal rules. A lesson to be drawn for scientists is that they should reflect on the sort of position - e.g. independent outsider, or engaged stakeholder - they take in a debate. They should also be aware that this position

  5. Sulfur cycling of intertidal Wadden Sea sediments (Konigshafen, Island of Sylt, Germany): sulfate reduction and sulfur gas emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, E.; Bodenbender, J.; Jensen, M. H.; Rennenberg, H.; Jensen, K. M.

    2000-05-01

    Sulfate reduction rates (SRR t) and reduced inorganic sulfur pools (RIS) in Wadden Sea sediment as well as sulfur gas emissions directly to the atmosphere were measured at intervals of 2 to 12 months from 1991 to 1994. Three stations were chosen in the intertidal embayment, Königshafen, representing the range of sediments found in the Wadden Sea: Organic-poor coarse sand, organic-poor and Arenicola marina inhabited medium sand, and organic-rich muddy sand. Maximum SRR t were 2 to 5 times higher in muddy sand than in the sandy sediments. The depth-integrated SRR t varied 12 to 13-fold on a seasonal basis at the three stations. Although temperature controls biochemical processes, the overall control is more complex due to the simultaneous influence of other seasonal factors such as availability of organic matter and oxidation level of surface sediment. The sedimentary RIS pools were low due to iron limitation and contained only 30% acid volatile sulfur (AVS). Muddy sand had up to an order of magnitude more RIS than the two sandy sediments. The turnover of RIS was rapid (turnover time from ˜1 to 32 h), fastest during summer and at the sandy stations. The emission of S-gases was dominated by H 2S during summer (45-67% of the total), and was highest in muddy and lowest in coarse sand. H 2S was less important in early spring (3-49% of the total). Other sulfur gases, such as COS, DMS and CS 2, each accounted for less than 20% of the total sulfur emissions with no specific temporal and spatial pattern. Due to the low content of metals in the sediment, the reduced sulfur pools are cycled rapidly with chemical and biological reoxidation at oxic-anoxic boundaries as a major sink. Thus, the emissions of H 2S account for less than 1‰ of the sulfide produced.

  6. The importance of rivers as nursery grounds for 0- and 1-group flounder ( Platichthys flesus L.) in comparison to the Wadden sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerstan, M.

    From May 1988 to June 1989 selected areas of the German Wadden Sea, the Ems, Weser, Elbe and Eider estuaries as well as in Elbe tributaries were sampled for 0- and 1-group flounder ( Platichthys flesus L.). Estuarine and Wadden Sea sampling was conducted on board commercial shrimp vessels equipped with beam trawls. The Elbe river system was sampled on board a research boat equipped with a similar 3-m beam trawl. Density indices were calculated for the various areas. To estimate the importance of rivers as nursery areas for flounder, river surface area was compared to the area of tidal flats in the Wadden Sea. In all surveys, there was no relationship between fish densities and tow directions with respect to tide. In the Elbe river system flounder densities were not correlated to substrate types but increased significantly with decreasing salinity. Abundances were always lowestt in polyhaline habitats and increased up to 10-fold in mesohaline estuarine areas. In the limnetic tidal sections of the Elbe river and its tributaries densities increased again by factors of 3 to 10. The succession of 1-group modal lengths from limnetic to polyhaline habitats demonstrated that smaller fish preferred less saline waters. 0-group specimens lagging behind in growth did not leave the limnetic river section in winter. The onset of the spawning migration in November was determined by monitoring the length-frequency distributions throughout the year. The possible sources of bias are discussed and gear efficiency is estimated from literature sources. The contribution of rivers to the 0- and 1-group flounder population on the tidal flats of the Wadden Sea is estimated at about 35.1%.

  7. Ground subsidence Wadden Sea 1977-2011. Precision and reliability of measurements. Annex; Bodemdaling Waddenzee 1977-2011. Precisie en betrouwbaarheid uit metingen. Appendix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houtenbos, A.P.E.M.

    2011-12-15

    What about the subsidence caused by gas exploitation around the Wadden Sea? Is subsidence on the Wadden Sea really manageable by extraction with the 'hand on the faucet'? These and other questions are examined in an analysis of the measurements around the Wadden Sea in the period 1977-2011. After publication of the main report on the effects of ground subsidence at the island Ameland-Oost two more aspects were investigated: sedimentation and the speed of ground subsidence. This annex reports on those aspects [Dutch] Hoe staat het met de bodemdaling door gaswinning rond de Waddenzee? Is bodemdaling op de Waddenzee werkelijk beheersbaar door winning met de 'Hand aan de kraan'? Deze en andere vragen zijn onderzocht in een analyse van de metingen rond de Waddenzee tot over de periode 1977-2011. Na publicatie van het hoofdrapport over de effecten van bodemdaling op Ameland-Oost op 9 dec 2011 zijn nog twee aspecten met consequenties voor de bodemdaling op het Wad nader onderzocht: sedimentatie en bodemdalingsnelheid. Deze appendix geeft de resultaten weer.

  8. Organochlorine compounds in blue mussels, Mytilus edulis, and Pacific oysters, Crassostrea gigas, from seven sites in the Lower Saxonian Wadden Sea, Southern North Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dörr, Barbara; Liebezeit, Gerd

    2009-12-01

    Blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) and Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) collected at seven locations in the Lower Saxonian Wadden Sea in January and February 2007 were analysed for organochlorine compounds. Contaminants were present in all samples, albeit with variable amounts and composition. The highest values were found in the Jade Bay. Congener PCB 153 was the contaminant which had the highest content of all organochlorines tested (475.75-937.39 ng/g lipid). DDT was detected in one sample only while DDD and DDE were found in all samples, the latter with contents up to 351.34 ng/g lipid. No clear differentiation could be made in terms of accumulation of organochlorines for M. edulis and C. gigas. Comparison with data from 2001 to 2006 showed an increase in 2007, which may be due to the different season the samples were taken.

  9. Mapping species abundance by a spatial zero-inflated Poisson model: a case study in the Wadden Sea, the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyashevska, Olga; Brus, Dick J; van der Meer, Jaap

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the study was to provide a general procedure for mapping species abundance when data are zero-inflated and spatially correlated counts. The bivalve species Macoma balthica was observed on a 500×500 m grid in the Dutch part of the Wadden Sea. In total, 66% of the 3451 counts were zeros. A zero-inflated Poisson mixture model was used to relate counts to environmental covariates. Two models were considered, one with relatively fewer covariates (model "small") than the other (model "large"). The models contained two processes: a Bernoulli (species prevalence) and a Poisson (species intensity, when the Bernoulli process predicts presence). The model was used to make predictions for sites where only environmental data are available. Predicted prevalences and intensities show that the model "small" predicts lower mean prevalence and higher mean intensity, than the model "large". Yet, the product of prevalence and intensity, which might be called the unconditional intensity, is very similar. Cross-validation showed that the model "small" performed slightly better, but the difference was small. The proposed methodology might be generally applicable, but is computer intensive.

  10. The Elbe flood 2002--toxic effects of transported contaminants in flatfish and mussels of the Wadden Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einsporn, S; Broeg, K; Koehler, A

    2005-04-01

    Cellular changes in livers from flounder (Platichthys flesus L.) and digestive glands of blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) were studied to analyze whether the Elbe flood catastrophe in August 2002 had any deleterious effects on animal health. Flatfish and mussels were sampled at different locations in the Elbe estuary and the Wadden Sea after the flood wave had reached the German Bight. Internationally used core biomarkers (lysosomal membrane stability, biotransformation enzymes) were applied to assess the toxic effects of putatively increased pollution levels. In comparison to earlier data from long-term studies at the same stations, we found a significant impairment in the function of cell organelles (lysosomes) involved in the detoxification and elimination of pollutants in fish liver. Concentrations of relevant contaminants (organochlorines, polychlorinated biphenyls) were analyzed in parallel with cellular biomarkers, and conspicuously raised concentrations of insecticides metabolites were detected. Cell recovery and a clear reduction in contaminant concentrations were observed in fish livers five months after the flood at all sampling sites except the Helgolander Tiefe Rinne.

  11. Determination of the Critical Erosion Threshold of Cohesive Sediments on Intertidal Mudflats Along the Dutch Wadden Sea Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houwing, E.-J.

    1999-10-01

    The bed shear strength on an intertidal mudflat bordering salt marshes along the Dutch Wadden Sea coast was determined by means of an in situ erosion flume (ISEF). Characteristic erosion patterns (type I- and type II-erosion) were observed for most measurements. The critical erosion threshold varied between 0·11-0·18 (Pa) for all measurements and erosion rates varied between 5×10 -5and 3×10 -3(kg m -2 s -1). No clear relationship was found between distinct parameters like bed density, moisture content or biological activity and the critical erosion threshold. A more pronounced effect of the erodability of the mudflat was found when the erosion rate was taken into account. Basically two clusters were distinguished. High mean peak erosion rates of the substratum were found at locations which were characterized by a low mud content of the substratum (below 20% mud by weight). In these situations bed load transport is expected to be the most important process which determined erosion of the bed and erosion of predominantly the sand fraction was found. At higher rates of the mud content (over 20% mud by weight) mean peak erosion rates decreased substantially (an order 6 to 10 times lower) and both erosion of the mud and sand fraction was found.

  12. A 1D model for tides waves and fine sediment in short tidal basins—Application to the Wadden Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Prooijen, Bram Christiaan; Wang, Zheng Bing

    2013-12-01

    In order to simulate the dynamics of fine sediments in short tidal basins, like the Wadden Sea basins, a 1D cross-sectional averaged model is constructed to simulate tidal flow, depth-limited waves, and fine sediment transport. The key for this 1D model lies in the definition of the geometry (width and depth as function of the streamwise coordinate). The geometry is computed by implementing the water level and flow data, from a 2D flow simulation, and the hypsometric curve in the continuity equation. By means of a finite volume method, the shallow-water equations and sediment transport equations are solved. The bed shear stress consists of the sum of shear stresses by waves and flow, in which the waves are computed with a depth-limited growth equation for wave height and wave frequency. A new formulation for erosion of fines from a sandy bed is proposed in the transport equation for fine sediment. It is shown by comparison with 2D simulations and field measurements that a 1D schematization gives a proper representation of the dynamics in short tidal basins.

  13. Spatial and temporal scales of shoreline morphodynamics derived from video camera observations for the island of Sylt, German Wadden Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blossier, Brice; Bryan, Karin R.; Daly, Christopher J.; Winter, Christian

    2017-04-01

    Spatial and temporal scales of beach morphodynamics were assessed for the island of Sylt, German Wadden Sea, based on continuous video camera monitoring data from 2011 to 2014 along a 1.3 km stretch of sandy beach. They served to quantify, at this location, the amount of shoreline variability covered by beach monitoring schemes, depending on the time interval and alongshore resolution of the surveys. Correlation methods, used to quantify the alongshore spatial scales of shoreline undulations, were combined with semi-empirical modelling and spectral analyses of shoreline temporal fluctuations. The data demonstrate that an alongshore resolution of 150 m and a monthly survey time interval capture 70% of the kilometre-scale shoreline variability over the 2011-2014 study period. An alongshore spacing of 10 m and a survey time interval of 5 days would be required to monitor 95% variance of the shoreline temporal fluctuations with steps of 5% changes in variance over space. Although monitoring strategies such as land or airborne surveying are reliable methods of data collection, video camera deployment remains the cheapest technique providing the high spatiotemporal resolution required to monitor subkilometre-scale morphodynamic processes involving, for example, small- to middle-sized beach nourishment.

  14. Growth conditions of 0-group plaice Pleuronectes platessa in the western Wadden Sea as revealed by otolith microstructure analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Joana F. M. F.; Freitas, Vânia; de Paoli, Hélène; Witte, Johannes IJ.; van der Veer, Henk W.

    2016-05-01

    Growth studies based on population-based growth estimates are limited by the fact that they do not take into account differences in age/size structure within the population. To overcome these problems, otolith microstructure analysis is often used to estimate individual growth. Here, we analyse growth of 0-group plaice in the western Wadden Sea in two years: a year preceded by a mild winter (1995) and a year preceded by a severe winter (1996). Growth was analysed by combining information on individual growth based on otolith analysis with predictions of maximum growth (= under optimal food conditions) based on a Dynamic Energy Budget model. Otolith analysis revealed that settlement occurred earlier in 1995 than in 1996. In both years, one main cohort was found, followed by a group of late settlers. No differences in mean length-at-age were found between these groups. DEB modelling suggested that growth was not maximal during the whole growing season: realized growth (the fraction of maximum growth realized by 0-group plaice) declined in the summer, although this decline was relatively small. In addition, late settling individuals exhibited lower realized growth than individuals from the main cohort. This study confirms that growth conditions for 0-group plaice are not optimal and that a growth reduction occurs in summer, as suggested in previous studies.

  15. Spatial and temporal scales of shoreline morphodynamics derived from video camera observations for the island of Sylt, German Wadden Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blossier, Brice; Bryan, Karin R.; Daly, Christopher J.; Winter, Christian

    2016-08-01

    Spatial and temporal scales of beach morphodynamics were assessed for the island of Sylt, German Wadden Sea, based on continuous video camera monitoring data from 2011 to 2014 along a 1.3 km stretch of sandy beach. They served to quantify, at this location, the amount of shoreline variability covered by beach monitoring schemes, depending on the time interval and alongshore resolution of the surveys. Correlation methods, used to quantify the alongshore spatial scales of shoreline undulations, were combined with semi-empirical modelling and spectral analyses of shoreline temporal fluctuations. The data demonstrate that an alongshore resolution of 150 m and a monthly survey time interval capture 70% of the kilometre-scale shoreline variability over the 2011-2014 study period. An alongshore spacing of 10 m and a survey time interval of 5 days would be required to monitor 95% variance of the shoreline temporal fluctuations with steps of 5% changes in variance over space. Although monitoring strategies such as land or airborne surveying are reliable methods of data collection, video camera deployment remains the cheapest technique providing the high spatiotemporal resolution required to monitor subkilometre-scale morphodynamic processes involving, for example, small- to middle-sized beach nourishment.

  16. On the determination of net bedload transport patters in a natural tidal inlet system (Knudedyb in the Danish Wadden Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernstsen, V. B.; Lefebvre, A.; Bartholdy, J.; Bartholomä, A.; Winter, C.

    2012-04-01

    An airborne swath topography survey using a LIDAR (Laser Induced Detection And Ranging or Light Detection And Ranging) system and a ship borne swath bathymetry survey using a multibeam echosounder (MBES) system were carried out within a 100 km2 quadratic section of the natural tidal inlet system Knudedyb in the Danish Wadden Sea. On the basis of the LIDAR data a detailed (0.5 m grid cell size) digital elevation model (DEM) of the dry-lying areas around low water (with the intertidal flats being of primary concern) was generated; whereas the MBES data were used to generate a detailed (also 0.5 m grid cell size) DEM of the tidal inlet main channel. The spatial distribution and characteristics of bedforms in a coastal system potentially yield information on the net bedload transport patterns in the system. The sandy main channel and intertidal flats of the Knudedyb tidal inlet are covered by bedforms. Bedform characterisation using a random field statistical approach (2D spectral analysis, cf. Lefebvre et al. 2011) as well as a discrete approach, in which the geometric variables of individual bedforms are determined (cf. Ernstsen et al. 2010), will be applied to the high-resolution DEMs. Based on these analyses net bedload transport patterns in the Knudedyb tidal inlet system will be determined. The findings will be used to investigate a potential exchange of sand between the main tidal channel and the adjacent intertidal flats. Acknowledgements This work is funded by the Danish Council for Independent Research | Natural Sciences (grant 10-081102) and the German Research Foundation DFG-Research Center / Excellence Cluster "The Ocean in the Earth System".

  17. The effects of shellfish fishery on the ecosystems of the Dutch Wadden Sea and Oosterschelde : final report on the second phase of the scientific evaluation of the Dutch shellfish fishery policy (EVA II)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ens, B.J.; Smaal, A.C.; Vlas, de J.

    2004-01-01

    This publication summarises the findings of the scientific research projects carried out as part of EVA II, the second phase in the evaluation of shellfish fisheries policy in the Zeeland Delta and the Wadden Sea, and relates these findings to other studies on the ecological effects of shellfish fis

  18. Resources for long-distance migration of knots Calidris canutus islandica and C. c. canutus : how broad is the temporal exploitation window of benthic prey in the western and eastern Wadden Sea?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piersma, Theunis; Verkuil, Yvonne; Tulp, Ingrid

    1994-01-01

    In the course of each spring, two subspecies of knots Calidris canutus (islandica wintering in Europe and breeding in the Nearctic, and canutus wintering in west Africa and breeding in Siberia), stage in the international Wadden Sea before their northward flights to the arctic breeding grounds. In M

  19. Impact on bird fauna of a non-native oyster expanding into blue mussel beds in the Dutch Wadden Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waser, Andreas M.; Deuzeman, Symen; Kangeri, Arno K.W.; Winden, van Erik; Postma, Jelle; Boer, de Peter; Meer, van der Jaap; Ens, Bruno J.

    2016-01-01

    Intertidal mussel beds are important for intertidal ecosystems, because they feature a high taxonomic diversity and abundance of benthic organisms and are important foraging grounds for many avian species. After the introduction of the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) into the European Wadden S

  20. Alien parasitic copepods in mussels and oysters of the Wadden Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsner, N.O.; Jacobsen, S.; Thieltges, D.W.; Reise, K.

    2011-01-01

    Molluscan intestinal parasites of the genus Mytilicola, specifically M. intestinalis, were initially introduced into bivalves in the North Sea in the 1930s. It was presumably introduced from the Mediterranean with ship-fouling mussels, then attained epidemic proportions in Mytilus edulis in the 1950

  1. Trends in Wadden Sea Fish Fauna, Part II: Dutch Demersal Fish Survey (DFS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tulp, I.Y.M.; Bolle, L.J.

    2009-01-01

    Shallow waters along the North Sea coast provide nursery areas for juveniles of several fish species, including commercially exploited species, and natural habitat for resident species and seasonal visitors. These areas have gone through major changes in the last decades due to climate change and hu

  2. Trends in Wadden Sea Fish Fauna, Part II: Dutch Demersal Fish Survey (DFS)

    OpenAIRE

    Tulp, I.Y.M.; Bolle, L.J.

    2009-01-01

    Shallow waters along the North Sea coast provide nursery areas for juveniles of several fish species, including commercially exploited species, and natural habitat for resident species and seasonal visitors. These areas have gone through major changes in the last decades due to climate change and human activities, which will likely result in changes in the abundance and species composition of the fish fauna in coastal waters.

  3. Long-term changes in species composition of demersal fish and epibenthic species in the Jade area (German Wadden Sea/Southern North Sea) since 1972

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Julia; Kröncke, Ingrid; Bartholomä, Alexander; Dippner, Joachim W.; Schückel, Ulrike

    2016-11-01

    Within this long-term study, the short- and long-term variability of demersal fish and epibenthic species in relation to temperature and climate-driven environmental changes in the inshore tidal bay system of the Jade area was investigated. Semiquantitative sampling took place once per spring and summer period from 1972 to 2014 by using a 2 m beam trawl at one station in the Jade area (German Wadden Sea/southern North Sea). Min/max autocorrelation analysis (MAFA) and Mann-Kendall analysis revealed significant increasing trends in total abundance and species number. Homogeneity analysis revealed shifts for abundance in spring and summer in the late 1980s and for species number in the late 1980s in spring and early 2000s in summer. Abundances of the estuarine crustacean species Carcinus maenas and Liocarcinus holsatus and of the estuarine fish species Pomatoschistus spp. showed significant increasing abundances since the late 1980s. The marine juvenile species Pleuronectes platessa and Limanda limanda showed significant decreasing abundances, while abundances of Solea solea showed significant increasing abundances since the early 2000s. Abundances of L.holsatus and C. maenas showed mass occurrences since the early 2000s. Spearman correlation analysis revealed significant correlations of temperature and abundance data of some characteristic species. Statistical downscaling analysis revealed significant correlations between observations and climate indicators such as the North Sea Environmental (NSE) Index for spring. Thus, it appears that climate effects influenced the long-term variability of species number and abundance of epibenthic and demersal fish species in the Jade area, resulting in community shifts in the late 1980s and early 2000s.

  4. Long-term population dynamics of breeding bird species in the German Wadden Sea area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vauk, Gottfried; Prüter, Johannes; Hartwig, Eike

    1989-09-01

    For no other group of organisms in coastal areas are there so exact and long-term data available as there are for seabirds. Since the beginning of the 20th century, documentation of population size, especially for species breeding in colonies from the groups gulls, terns and auks, is almost complete. These species act as bio-indicators, and data on fluctuations in their population size are useful as they reflect changes in the state of the marine ecosystem. The population development of some of these seabird species (Herring Gull, Guillemot, Common, Arctic and Sandwich Tern) from the German North Sea coast, which primarily feed on fish, is given. Common to all these species is an exponential increase in numbers in recent years (1970 1985). Possible causes for this development, e.g. pressure from enemies or competitors, availability of breeding places, anthropogenic stress and mortality factors, as well as the direct and indirect anthropogenic-influenced changes in the trophic system due to the increasing eutrophication of coastal waters, are evaluated. Signs of a collapse in the stocks of seabrids resulting from environmental pollution are discussed. Consequences resulting from the ecosystem changes, such as reduction of nutrient discharge into the North Sea and the expansion of biological monitoring, are described.

  5. Turnover of postlarval bivalves in sediments of tidal flats in Königshafen (German Wadden sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armonies, W.

    1994-06-01

    After larval settlement, juvenile bivalves may rapidly re-enter the water column and attain secondary dispersal by byssus-drifting. In order to estimate the quantitative importance of byssus-drifting, the abundance of drifters in the water column, their re-entry into the sediment, and their density in the ambient sediment were measured simultaneously over 3 months on a tidal flat in Königshafen near the Island of Sylt in the North Sea. Turnover of juvenile clams Macoma balthica and cockles Cerastoderma edule was more than once per week in summer, showing strong short-term variability because of semi-lunar rhythms of drifting activity. While there is currently no evidence for active habitat selection in settling M. balthica and C. edule larvae, it is suggested that habitat selection occurs following postlarval migrations.

  6. Integration of TerraSAR-X, RapidEye and airborne lidar for remote sensing of intertidal bedforms on the upper flats of Norderney (German Wadden Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adolph, Winny; Jung, Richard; Schmidt, Alena; Ehlers, Manfred; Heipke, Christian; Bartholomä, Alexander; Farke, Hubert

    2017-04-01

    The Wadden Sea is a large coastal transition area adjoining the southern North Sea uniting ecological key functions with an important role in coastal protection. The region is strictly protected by EU directives and national law and is a UNESCO World Heritage Site, requiring frequent quality assessments and regular monitoring. In 2014 an intertidal bedform area characterised by alternating crests and water-covered troughs on the tidal flats of the island of Norderney (German Wadden Sea sector) was chosen to test different remote sensing methods for habitat mapping: airborne lidar, satellite-based radar (TerraSAR-X) and electro-optical sensors (RapidEye). The results revealed that, although sensitive to different surface qualities, all sensors were able to image the bedforms. A digital terrain model generated from the lidar data shows crests and slopes of the bedforms with high geometric accuracy in the centimetre range, but high costs limit the operation area. TerraSAR-X data enabled identifying the positions of the bedforms reflecting the residual water in the troughs also with a high resolution of up to 1.1 m, but with larger footprints and much higher temporal availability. RapidEye data are sensitive to differences in sediment moisture employed to identify crest areas, slopes and troughs, with high spatial coverage but the lowest resolution (6.5 m). Monitoring concepts may differ in their remote sensing requirements regarding areal coverage, spatial and temporal resolution, sensitivity and geometric accuracy. Also financial budgets limit the selection of sensors. Thus, combining differing assets into an integrated concept of remote sensing contributes to solving these issues.

  7. Integration of TerraSAR-X, RapidEye and airborne lidar for remote sensing of intertidal bedforms on the upper flats of Norderney (German Wadden Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adolph, Winny; Jung, Richard; Schmidt, Alena; Ehlers, Manfred; Heipke, Christian; Bartholomä, Alexander; Farke, Hubert

    2016-11-01

    The Wadden Sea is a large coastal transition area adjoining the southern North Sea uniting ecological key functions with an important role in coastal protection. The region is strictly protected by EU directives and national law and is a UNESCO World Heritage Site, requiring frequent quality assessments and regular monitoring. In 2014 an intertidal bedform area characterised by alternating crests and water-covered troughs on the tidal flats of the island of Norderney (German Wadden Sea sector) was chosen to test different remote sensing methods for habitat mapping: airborne lidar, satellite-based radar (TerraSAR-X) and electro-optical sensors (RapidEye). The results revealed that, although sensitive to different surface qualities, all sensors were able to image the bedforms. A digital terrain model generated from the lidar data shows crests and slopes of the bedforms with high geometric accuracy in the centimetre range, but high costs limit the operation area. TerraSAR-X data enabled identifying the positions of the bedforms reflecting the residual water in the troughs also with a high resolution of up to 1.1 m, but with larger footprints and much higher temporal availability. RapidEye data are sensitive to differences in sediment moisture employed to identify crest areas, slopes and troughs, with high spatial coverage but the lowest resolution (6.5 m). Monitoring concepts may differ in their remote sensing requirements regarding areal coverage, spatial and temporal resolution, sensitivity and geometric accuracy. Also financial budgets limit the selection of sensors. Thus, combining differing assets into an integrated concept of remote sensing contributes to solving these issues.

  8. Effects of herbivorous birds on intertidal seagrass beds in the northern Wadden Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nacken, M.; Reise, K.

    2000-07-01

    During autumn migration (September to December), brent geese (Branta b. bernicla) and wigeon (Anas penelope) feed on the seagrass Zostera noltii in the nearshore, upper tidal zone leeward of the island of Sylt (eastern North Sea). To graze on leaves and shoots above the sediment and on rhizomes and roots below, these birds reworked the entire upper 1 cm layer of sediment eight times within this 3-month period. In addition, brent geese excavated pits 3-10 cm deep by trampling in order to feed on below-ground phytomass. About 12% of the seagrass beds became pitted to an average depth of 4.5 cm. Using net exclosures, it was estimated that birds removed 34 g dry weight m-2 of above-ground and 28 g of below-ground phytomass. This corresponds to 45% of the phytomass in September. Of the overall loss of phytomass from September to December, 63% was caused by birds. Roughly half of the leaves fell off anyway until December and the other half were taken by the birds. Below the ground, phytomass remained almost constant where birds were excluded, while with birds phytomass of rhizomes and roots was halved. In spite of this strong effect, in the next vegetation period the blade density was lower at former exclosure sites compared to the ambient seagrass bed. The underlying process seems to be a self-inhibition of dense overwintering seagrass by mud accretion. Assuming our experimental results can be scaled up to the entire seagrass bed, we hypothesize that in the sheltered upper intertidal zone, seasonal erosion caused by herbivorous geese and ducks is necessary for the persistence of Z. noltii.

  9. Distribution of total mercury in surface sediments of the western Jade Bay, Lower Saxonian Wadden Sea, southern North Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Huafang; Liebezeit, Gerd; Ziehe, Daniel

    2012-04-01

    A total of 114 surface sediment samples was equidistantly collected in the western part of the Jade Bay, southern North Sea, to analyse total mercury contents as well as grain size distribution and total organic carbon (TOC) contents. Total mercury was determined by oxygen combustion-gold amalgamation. Validation, precision and accuracy of the method were evaluated and controlled with two certified reference materials (HISS-1 and MESS-3). Total mercury contents varied between 8 and 243 ng/g dry sediment with a mean value of 103 ng/g dw. The mercury levels in surface sediments showed an inhomogeneous spatial distribution with higher contents in near-dike areas. The values are mostly in the range of natural background values (50–100 ng/g dw) and positively related to TOC and clay/silt contents (Jade Bay are not mercury contaminated. These results also suggested that the current mercury contents of Jade Bay surficial sediments are mostly affected by atmospheric deposition and re-emission.

  10. Tidal cycles of total particulate mercury in the Jade Bay, lower Saxonian Wadden Sea, southern North Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Huafang; Liebezeit, Gerd

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we evaluate the nature of the relationship between particulate matter and total mercury concentrations. For this purpose, we estimate both of the two values in water column over 12-h tidal cycles of the Jade Bay, southern North Sea. Total particulate mercury in 250 mL water samples was determined by oxygen combustion-gold amalgamation. Mercury contents varied from 63 to 259 ng/g suspended particulate matter (SPM) or 3.5-52.8 ng/L in surface waters. Total particulate mercury content (THg(p)) was positively correlated with (SPM), indicating that mercury in tidal waters is mostly associated with (SPM), and that tidal variations of total particulate mercury are mainly due to changes in (SPM) content throughout the tidal cycle. Maximum values for THg(p) were observed during mid-flood and mid-ebb, while the lowest values were determined at low tide and high tide. These data suggest that there are no mercury point sources in the Jade Bay. Moreover, the THg(p) content at low tide and high tide were significantly lower than the values recorded in the bottom sediment of the sampling site (>200 ng/g DW), while THg(p) content during the mid-flood and mid-ebb were comparable to the THg content in the surface bottom sediments. Therefore, changes in THg(p) content in the water column due to tidal forcing may have resulted from re-suspension of underlying surface sediments with relatively high mercury content.

  11. On the evolution of a holocene barrier coast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fruergaard, Mikkel

    of the stratigraphic record of the Earth. Sea-level rise and sediment supply are the two most important factors controlling barrier system evolution. Detailed depositional reconstructions of a number of barrier systems from the Danish Wadden Sea area have been carried out in order to evaluate the sedimentary effects...... in the Danish Wadden Sea as a onsequence of the pronounced convex-concave-convex form of the barrier chain. elatively more sdiment has been deposited where the shoreline is embayed as ompared to the protruding areas. These large-scale variations in sediment supply along the studied shoreline resulted......This thesis investigates the sedimentary evolution of a Holocene barrier coast with special focus on how barrier system stratigraphy is affected by changes in sea-level and sediment supply. Coastal barrier systems comprise about 13% of the world’s coastlines and they are mportant components...

  12. Options for socioeconomic developments in ICZM for the tri-national Wadden area

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, Jouke Van; Broersma, Lourens; Mehnen, Nora

    2016-01-01

    The Wadden Sea Forum has adopted integrated coastal zone management (ICZM) as a process for achieving the sustainable development of the Wadden Sea in a way that is environmentally sound, economically viable and socially beneficial. This requires, besides information about the ecosystem, also inform

  13. Options for socioeconomic developments in ICZM for the tri-national Wadden area

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, Jouke Van; Broersma, Lourens; Mehnen, Nora

    2016-01-01

    The Wadden Sea Forum has adopted integrated coastal zone management (ICZM) as a process for achieving the sustainable development of the Wadden Sea in a way that is environmentally sound, economically viable and socially beneficial. This requires, besides information about the ecosystem, also

  14. Options for socioeconomic developments in ICZM for the tri-national Wadden area

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, Jouke Van; Broersma, Lourens; Mehnen, Nora

    2016-01-01

    The Wadden Sea Forum has adopted integrated coastal zone management (ICZM) as a process for achieving the sustainable development of the Wadden Sea in a way that is environmentally sound, economically viable and socially beneficial. This requires, besides information about the ecosystem, also inform

  15. Ecologically least vulnerable sites for exploration drilling in the Wadden Sea and the North Sea coastal area; Ecologisch minst kwetsbare locaties voor exploratieboringen in de Waddenzee en Noordzee kustzone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindeboom, H.J.; Bergman, M.J.N.; De Gee, A. [eds.

    1996-12-31

    The Dutch Oil Company (NAM, abbreviated in Dutch) applied for a number of exploration drilling in the Dutch part of the Wadden Sea and the North Sea coastal area. NAM is obliged to draft a so-called MER (environmental impact report) to indicate the most environment-friendly alternative for the test drilling. By order of NAM, NIOZ and the IBN-DLO (Institute for Research on Forests and Nature) analyzed samples of the animal life in all the potential sites. Based on the results of the analyses, literature and expert knowledge the ecologically least vulnerable sites and the ecologically least vulnerable season were selected during a workshop. In this report the results are given of the workshop, the field sample analyses and a sailing trip along the sites

  16. On deriving transport pathways and morphodynamics in a tidal inlet from high-resolution MBES and LiDAR surveys: the Knudedyb tidal inlet in the Danish Wadden Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernstsen, Verner Brandbyge; Lefebvre, Alice; Fraccascia, Serena

    and the different transport pathways shaping the system is needed to assess the impact of potentially changing environmental conditions, such as accelerating sea level rise, increasing storm intensities and frequencies, or shifting wind directions. The aim of this study is to investigate the sand transport pathways...... and morphodynamics in a natural tidal inlet system, the Knudedyb tidal inlet in the Danish Wadden Sea, by coupling investigations in the sub-tidal inlet channel and the adjacent inter-tidal and supra-tidal areas to encompass the complete system. More specifically, the objective is to develop a conceptual model...

  17. The impact of ocean acidification and warming on the elemental and stable isotope composition of Fucus vesiculosus in Wadden Sea mesocosm studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winde, Vera; Pansch, Andreas; Fenner, Anna-Kathrina; Voss, Maren; Schmiedinger, Iris; Schneider, Bernd; Asmus, Ragnhild; Asmus, Harald; Böttcher, Michael E.

    2015-04-01

    In the frame of the German BIOACID II project the separate and combined effects of different stress factors (acidification, warming, eutrophication) on the elemental and stable isotope composition of Fucus vesiculosus are investigated by means of benthic mesocosm experiments in coastal waters of the the North Sea. We aim for a calibration of the biogeochemical and stable isotope composition of Fucus in response to single and combined temperature, pCO2 (pH), and nutrient changes. Benthocosm experiments are carried out at the AWI Wadden Sea station in List (Sylt Island, North Sea) with application of different stressors: an increase in temperature and an increase in atmospheric CO2 partial pressure. The experiments run for almost several months per season. The aquatic biogeochemistry (e.g. TA, pH, 13C(DIC)) as well as the elemental and stable isotope composition of the grown Fucus vesiculosus organic tissue were followed. It was found, that the changes in daily biological activity caused by alternating phases of net respiration and photosynthesis created strong variations in the dissolved carbonate system and changes in the carbon isotope composition of DIC. The atmosphere of some experimental set-ups was enriched with gaseous carbon dioxide. This caused fast corresponding changes in the isotopic composition of DIC, thereby acting as a tracer for newly formed organic tissue. The chemical and isotopic parameters of the dissolved carbonate system showed differences between the set ups. The research is supported by BMBF during project BIOACID II, Helmholtz AWI Sylt, and Leibniz IOW

  18. Seasonal variation in parasite infection patterns of marine fish species from the Northern Wadden Sea in relation to interannual temperature fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schade, Franziska M.; Raupach, Michael J.; Mathias Wegner, K.

    2016-07-01

    Marine environmental conditions are naturally changing throughout the year, affecting life cycles of hosts as well as parasites. In particular, water temperature is positively correlated with the development of many parasites and pathogenic bacteria, increasing the risk of infection and diseases during summer. Interannual temperature fluctuations are likely to alter host-parasite interactions, which may result in profound impacts on sensitive ecosystems. In this context we investigated the parasite and bacterial Vibrionaceae communities of four common small fish species (three-spined stickleback Gasterosteus aculeatus, Atlantic herring Clupea harengus, European sprat Sprattus sprattus and lesser sand eel Ammodytes tobianus) in the Northern Wadden Sea over a period of two years. Overall, we found significantly increased relative diversities of infectious species at higher temperature differentials. On the taxon-specific level some macroparasite species (trematodes, nematodes) showed a shift in infection peaks that followed the water temperatures of preceding months, whereas other parasite groups showed no effects of temperature differentials on infection parameters. Our results show that even subtle changes in seasonal temperatures may shift and modify the phenology of parasites as well as opportunistic pathogens that can have far reaching consequences for sensitive ecosystems.

  19. Morphological response of a barrier island system on a catastrophic event

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fruergaard, Mikkel; Kroon, Aart

    2016-01-01

    The AD 1634 North Sea storm is one of the most catastrophic storms along the Wadden Sea coast of Denmark. In this study we show how pre-1634 storm morphology exerted a strong control on the resulting post-storm coastal morphology. Erosional responses associated with the storm were barrier breachi...

  20. Development of a Dynamic Barrier Island (Sylt, Eastern North Sea) Based on High-Resolution Aerial Photographs and GIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolch, T.; Hass, H. C.

    2004-12-01

    Wind and currents are the driving forces for the morphological development of coastlines and islands by giving them their shape, run and structure. This is especially true in highly dynamic areas such as the Wadden Sea in North-Western Europe. In this unique environment changes are continuous and distinct developments can be noticed within decades. The Island of Sylt, located in the Wadden Sea near the German-Danish border, is a sandy barrier island that protects the mainland against storm floods and waves. Thus, it experiences strong erosion (about 1 m coastal retreat per year). The North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), that controls the atmospheric circulation over the North Sea, and northerly currents are the driving forces for the morphological development. Rising sea-level due to global change amplifies the erosion processes and forces people to protect the coastline (in this case beach nourishment). The Koenigshafen, a protected, semi-enclosed bay in the north of the Island of Sylt, can be regarded as representative for the study of many coastal processes that affect the island. In this case study, a long-term series of high resolution aerial photographs of the Koenigshafen (starting in 1936) shows the development of the survey area. Wind and currents affect not only the run of the coastline but also sediment composition and biodynamics in the bay. Looking at the hydrodynamics governing the bay, it should have mostly muddy sediments. Strong westerly winds, however, supply the bay with large amounts of sand from inland dunes and create sandy tidal flats. The long-term development of seagrass and mussel beds can also be retrieved from aerial photographs. In both cases a distinct decline in size can be noticed. Remote sensing and GIS techniques allow monitoring the conditions as well as to reconstruct the past development and to predict future developments.

  1. On the dynamics of compound bedforms in high-energy tidal channels: field observations in the German Bight and the Danish Wadden Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernstsen, Verner B.; Winter, Christian; Becker, Marius; Bartholdy, Jesper

    2010-05-01

    Tidal inlets are a common feature along much of the world's coastlines. They interrupt the alongshore continuity of shoreline processes, and by being exposed to both wave and current forcing, tidal inlets belong to the morphologically most dynamic and complex coastal systems on Earth. The tidal channels in these inlets are characterized by high flow velocities and, accordingly, the channel beds are typically sandy and covered with bedforms. The bedform fields in nature are often complex systems with larger primary-bedforms superimposed by smaller secondary-bedforms (cf. Bartholdy et al., 2002). There is a considerable amount of detailed field investigations on the dynamics of primary-bedforms at various temporal scales, ranging from short- to long-term tide-related cycles to flood hydrographs to seasonality. However, Julien et al. (2002) stated that a composite analysis of primary- and secondary-bedforms is recommended for future studies on resistance to flow. Such knowledge on the behaviour of compound bedforms is still deficient. In this study, we combine the findings on the dynamics of primary- and secondary-bedform height from detailed field investigations carried out in two high-energy tidal channels during 2007 and 2008: the Knudedyb tidal inlet channel in the Danish Wadden Sea and the Innenjade tidal channel in the Jade Bay, German Bight (both survey areas being ebb-dominated). We provide process-based explanations of the bedform behaviour and present a conceptual model of compound bedform dynamics. The conducted field investigations comprised repetitive, simultaneous measurements of high-resolution swath bathymetry (using a multibeam echosounder system) and flow velocity (using an acoustic Doppler current profiler) in combination with detailed spatial mapping of bed material characteristics (from grab sampling of bed material). For an objective and discrete analysis of primary- and secondary-bedforms a modified version of the bedform tracking tool

  2. Mapping of pollutants in sediments of the German Wadden Sea - June, 1989 to June, 1992. Final report January 1993; Schadstoffkartierung in Sedimenten des deutschen Wattenmeeres - Juni 1989 Juni 1992. Abschlussbericht Januar 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koopmann, C. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik; Faller, J. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Chemie; Bernem, K.H. van [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik; Prange, A. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik; Mueller, A. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik

    1994-01-01

    From June 1989 to June 1992 a mapping of inorganic and organic pollutants in the sediments from the entire German Wadden Sea has been carried out. Following the guidelines of the national (Bund/Laender-Messprogramm) and international monitoring programmes for the North Sea (Joint Monitoring Programme) distribution patterns of pollutants according to their type and concentration have been determined in the course of this investigation and the main pollution areas have been established. Based on the results of the mapping of pollutants, as well as on the first findings of the biological mapping, a concept for the monitoring of pollutants in eulittoral sediments of the German Wadden Sea has been developed. (orig.) [Deutsch] Von Juni 1989 bis Juni 1992 wurde eine flaechendeckende Kartierung der anorganischen und organischen Schadstoffe in den Sedimenten des gesamten deutschen Wattenmeeres durchgefuehrt. Im Rahmen dieser Untersuchung wurden sowohl die Verteilungsmuster der Schadstoffe nach Art und Konzentration bestimmt als auch deren Belastungsschwerpunkte im Wattengebiet festgestellt. Dabei wurden die Vorgaben des nationalen (Bund/Laender-Messprogramm) und des internationalen Ueberwachungsprogramms fuer die Nordsee (Joint Monitoring Programme) beruecksichtigt. Auf der Grundlage der Ergebnisse der Schadstoffkartierung sowie ersten Erkenntnissen aus einer zeitgleich aufgenommenen biologischen Kartierung wurde ein Konzeptvorschlag fuer ein Schadstoffmonitoring in den eulitoralen Sedimenten des deutschen Wattenmeeres ausgearbeitet. (orig.)

  3. Coupled penetrometer, MBES and ADCP assessments of tidal variations in surface sediment layer characteristics along active subaqueous dunes, Danish Wadden Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Nina; Hanff, Hendrik; Svenson, Christian; Ernstsen, Verner B.; Lefebvre, Alice; Winter, Christian; Kopf, Achim

    2011-08-01

    In-situ geotechnical measurements of surface sediments were carried out along large subaqueous dunes in the Knudedyb tidal inlet channel in the Danish Wadden Sea using a small free-falling penetrometer. Vertical profiles showed a typical stratification pattern with a resolution of ˜1 cm depicting a thin surface layer of low sediment strength and a stiffer substratum below (quasi-static bearing capacity equivalent: 1-3 kPa in the top layer, 20-140 kPa in the underlying sediment; thickness of the top layer ca. 5-8 cm). Observed variations in the thickness and strength of the surface layer during a tidal cycle were compared to mean current velocities (measured using an acoustic Doppler current profiler, ADCP), high-resolution bathymetry (based on multibeam echo sounding, MBES) and qualitative estimates of suspended sediment distributions in the water column (estimated from ADCP backscatter intensity). The results revealed an ebb dominance in sediment remobilization, and a general accretion of the bed towards low water. A loose top layer occurred throughout the tidal cycle, likely influenced by bedload transport and small events of suspended sediment resettlement (thickness: 6 ± 2 cm). Furthermore, this layer showed a significant increase in thickness (e.g. from 8 cm to 16 cm) related to periods of overall deposition. These findings imply that dynamic penetrometers can conveniently serve to (1) quantify potentially mobile sediments by determining the thickness of a loose sediment surface layer, (2) unravel sediment strength development in potentially mobile sediments and (3) identify sediment accumulation. Such data are an important complement and add a new geotechnical perspective during investigations of sediment remobilization processes in highly dynamic coastal environments.

  4. Possible causes for growth variability and summer growth reduction in juvenile plaice Pleuronectes platessa L. in the western Dutch Wadden Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Veer, Henk W.; Jung, Alexa Sarina; Freitas, Vânia; Philippart, Catharina J. M.; Witte, Johannes IJ.

    2016-05-01

    Growth variability within individuals and among groups and locations and the phenomenon of summer growth reduction has been described for juvenile flatfish in a variety of European coastal areas whereby the underlying causes still remain elusive. Potential mechanisms were tested for juvenile plaice Pleuronectes platessa L. in the western Dutch Wadden Sea, by analysing published and unpublished information from long-term investigations (1986-present). Growth variability did occur and could be explained by differences induced by environmental variability (water temperature), and by non-genetic irreversible adaptation and sex. Dynamic Energy Budget analysis indicated that especially sexually-dimorphic growth in combination with variability in sex ratio could explain most of the variability in growth and the increase in the range of the size of individuals within the population over time. Summer growth reduction was not only observed among 0-group plaice in the intertidal, but also in the subtidal and tidal gullies as well as among I- and II-group plaice. Intraspecific competition for food was not detected but some support for interspecific competition with other predators was found. Also resource competition (due to crowding) with the other abundant epibenthic species (0-, I- and II-group flounder Platichthys flesus; the brown shrimp Crangon crangon; the shore crab Carcinus maenas; the goby species Pomatoschistus minutus and Pomatoschistus microps) could not explain the summer growth reduction. The observed growth reduction coincided with a decrease in stomach content, especially of regenerating body parts of benthic prey items. It is hypothesised that macrozoobenthos becomes less active after the spring phytoplankton bloom, reducing prey availability for juvenile plaice in summer, causing a reduction in food intake and hence in growth.

  5. Spatial and temporal variability of sediment accumulation rates on two tidal flats in Lister Dyb tidal basin, Wadden Sea, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, A.T.; Murray, A.S.; Andersen, T.J.

    2010-01-01

    Depositional processes in intertidal areas are determined both by changes in sea-level and sediment supply. It is known on a millennial timescale that sedimentation normally keeps pace with sea-level rise in a subsiding tidal basin. However, little is known about whether the sedimentation can keep...

  6. Planktomarina temperata gen. nov., sp. nov., belonging to the globally distributed RCA cluster of the marine Roseobacter clade, isolated from the German Wadden Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giebel, Helge-Ansgar; Kalhoefer, Daniela; Gahl-Janssen, Renate; Choo, Yoe-Jin; Lee, Kiyoung; Cho, Jang-Cheon; Tindall, Brian J; Rhiel, Erhard; Beardsley, Christine; Aydogmus, Omer O; Voget, Sonja; Daniel, Rolf; Simon, Meinhard; Brinkhoff, Thorsten

    2013-11-01

    Four heterotrophic bacterial strains belonging to the globally distributed marine RCA (Roseobacter clade-affiliated) cluster (family Rhodobacteraceae, class Alphaproteobacteria) were obtained from coastal seawater samples. Strain RCA23(T) was isolated from a 10(-7) dilution culture inoculated with seawater from the German Wadden Sea (southern North Sea), reflecting the high abundance of RCA bacteria in this habitat. Strains IMCC1909, IMCC1923 and IMCC1933 were isolated from diluted seawater (10(-3)) of the Yellow Sea, South Korea. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence comparison, Octadecabacter antarcticus 307(T) is the closest described relative of the RCA strains, with 95.4-95.5 % sequence similarity. Cells of RCA23(T), IMCC1909, IMCC1923 and IMCC1933 are small motile rods requiring sodium ions. Optimal growth of RCA23(T) occurs at 25 °C and within a very narrow pH range (pH 7-8, optimum pH 7.5). The DNA G+C base content of RCA23(T) is 53.67 mol%. The major respiratory lipoquinone is ubiquinone-10 (Q-10) and the dominant fatty acids (>1 %) are 12 : 1 3-OH, 16 : 1ω7c, 16 : 0, 18 : 1ω7c, 18 : 0 and 11-methyl 18 : 1ω7c. The polar lipid pattern indicated the presence of phosphatidylglycerol, two unidentified aminolipids and two unidentified phospholipids. On marine agar, RCA23(T) forms non-pigmented, transparent to light beige, small (colonies. Strain RCA23(T) harbours all genes for the production of bacteriochlorophyll a (BChl a). Genes encoding the light-harvesting reaction centre of BChl a (pufM) were identified in all RCA strains. No visible pigmentation was observed for any of the strains under laboratory conditions, but spectrophotometric analysis revealed weak production of BChl a by RCA23(T). Morphological, physiological and genotypic features of strain RCA23(T) suggest that it represents a novel species of a new genus within the Rhodobacteraceae, for which we propose the name Planktomarina temperata gen. nov., sp. nov., described

  7. Habitat management affects soil chemistry and allochthonous organic inputs mediating microbial structure and exo-enzyme activity in Wadden Sea salt-marsh soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Peter; Granse, Dirk; Thi Do, Hai; Weingartner, Magdalena; Nolte, Stefanie; Hoth, Stefan; Jensen, Kai

    2016-04-01

    The Wadden Sea (WS) region is Europe's largest wetland and home to approximately 20% of its salt marsh area. Mainland salt marshes of the WS are anthropogenically influenced systems and have traditionally been used for livestock grazing in wide parts. After foundation of WS National Parks in the late 1980s and early 1990s, artificial drainage has been abandoned; however, livestock grazing is still common in many areas of the National Parks and is under ongoing discussion as a habitat-management practice. While studies so far focused on effects of livestock grazing on biodiversity, little is known about how biogeochemical processes, element cycling, and particularly carbon sequestration are affected. Here, we present data from a recent field study focusing on grazing effects on soil properties, microbial exo-enzyme activity, microbial abundance and structure. Exo-enzyme activity was studied conducting digestive enzyme assays for various enzymes involved in C- and N cycling. Microbial abundance and structure was assessed measuring specific gene abundance of fungi and bacteria using quantitative PCR. Soil compaction induced by grazing led to higher bulk density and decreases in soil redox (∆ >100 mV). Soil pH was significantly lower in grazed parts. Further, the proportion of allochthonous organic matter (marine input) was significantly smaller in grazed vs. ungrazed sites, likely caused by a higher sediment trapping capacity of the taller vegetation in the ungrazed sites. Grazing induced changes in bulk density, pH and redox resulted in reduced activity of enzymes involved in microbial C acquisition; however, there was no grazing effect on enzymes involved in N acquisition. While changes in pH, bulk density or redox did not affect microbial abundance and structure, the relative amount of marine organic matter significantly reduced the relative abundance of fungi (F:B ratio). We conclude that livestock grazing directly affects microbial exo-enzyme activity, thus

  8. Changes in distribution patterns of 0-group bivalves in the Wadden Sea: Byssus-drifting releases juveniles from the constraints of hydrography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armonies, W.

    1996-06-01

    grain size distribution and tidal level within the area studied. On a scale of hundreds of metres, there were no consistent correlations between juvenile abundance and sediment granulometry in any species. In summary, it seems that hydrography ruled the initial settlement of larvae to the sediment and strongly influenced the subsequent redistribution of juveniles caused by passive resuspension. The outcome of actively initiated migrations, on the other hand, was only weakly influenced by hydrography. Therefore it is suggested that hydrography plays a dominant role in the initial development of km-scale distributional patterns of just-settled bivalves in the Wadden Sea, while habitat selection is delayed to the byssus-drifting postlarvae phase.

  9. Comparison of two feature selection methods for the separability analysis of intertidal sediments with spectrometric datasets in the German Wadden Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Richard; Ehlers, Manfred

    2016-10-01

    The spectral features of intertidal sediments are all influenced by the same biophysical properties, such as water, salinity, grain size or vegetation and therefore they are hard to separate by using only multispectral sensors. This could be shown by a previous study of Jung et al. (2015). A more detailed analysis of their characteristic spectral feature has to be carried out to understand the differences and similarities. Spectrometry data (i.e., hyperspectral sensors), for instance, have the opportunity to measure the reflection of the landscape as a continuous spectral pattern for each pixel of an image built from dozen to hundreds of narrow spectral bands. This reveals a high potential to measure unique spectral responses of different ecological conditions (Hennig et al., 2007). In this context, this study uses spectrometric datasets to distinguish between 14 different sediment classes obtained from a study area in the German Wadden Sea. A new feature selection method is proposed (Jeffries-Matusita distance bases feature selection; JMDFS), which uses the Euclidean distance to eliminate the wavelengths with the most similar reflectance values in an iterative process. Subsequent to each iteration, the separation capability is estimated by the Jeffries-Matusita distance (JMD). Two classes can be separated if the JMD is greater than 1.9 and if less than four wavelengths remain, no separation can be assumed. The results of the JMDFS are compared with a state-of-the-art feature selection method called ReliefF. Both methods showed the ability to improve the separation by achieving overall accuracies greater than 82%. The accuracies are 4%-13% better than the results with all wavelengths applied. The number of remaining wavelengths is very diverse and ranges from 14 to 213 of 703. The advantage of JMDFS compared with ReliefF is clearly the processing time. ReliefF needs 30 min for one temporary result. It is necessary to repeat the process several times and to average

  10. Barrier response to Holocene sea-level rise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pejrup, Morten; Andersen, Thorbjørn Joest; Johannessen, Peter N

    Normally it is believed that sea-level rise causes coastal barrier retreat. However, sea-level is only one of the parameters determining the long term coastal development of barrier coasts. Sediment supply is an equally important determinant and may overshadow the effects of sea-level rise...... show quite different responses to sea-level rise. The southernmost island Rømø has survived 17 m of sea-level rise at the same position illustrating the control from sediment supply; whereas the northernmost island Skallingen has shifted its position several times during the same period indicating...... a much stronger component of sea-level control. The distance between the islands is only 50 km, and therefore our study shows that prediction of barrier development during a period of rising sea level may be more complicated than formerly believed....

  11. Spatial variation of bed material grain size over a large dune in the Jade Bay tidal channel, German Wadden Sea (preliminary results)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, J. A.; Ernstsen, V. B.

    2007-12-01

    High-resolution bathymetry of a large dune with a height of ~4 m, a length of ~70 m and a cross- channel width of ~400 m was measured in the Jade Bay tidal channel, German Wadden Sea, using a multibeam echosounder (MBES) system. A total of 34 bed material samples were collected along 5 transects (trough-crest-trough) across the dune using a ShipekTM grab sampler. High-resolution flow velocity measurements, by means of an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP), were conducted along 3 of these transects during a tidal cycle. Along the channel, mean grain sizes increase from trough to crest along all 5 transects. This increase is most pronounced in the center of the channel (trough ~340 μm, crest ~610 μm) compared to near the channel sides (trough ~425 μm, crest ~500 μm). Across the channel, mean grain sizes decrease along the crest (center ~610 μm, sides ~500 μm), but increase along the trough (center ~340 μm, sides ~425 μm) from the channel center toward the channel sides. The along-channel increase in mean grain size from trough to crest is coherent with an increase in the maximum near-bed flow velocity (calculated as the average flow velocity in the interval from 1 to 2 m above the bed). Moreover, this increase in near-bed flow velocity from trough to crest is more pronounced in the center of the channel (trough ~0.7 m/s, crest ~1.1 m/s) than near the channel sides (trough ~0.9 m/s, crest ~1.1 m/s), which is in line with the larger gradients in mean grain size in the center than along the sides. The higher flow velocities recorded at the crest relative to the trough is due to flow continuity. The across-track increase in mean grain size in the trough from the channel center toward the channel sides is consistent with an increase in the maximum near-bed flow velocity (center ~0.7 m/s, sides ~0.9 m/s). The decrease in mean grain size on the crest from the channel center toward the channel sides cannot simply be explained by lower near-bed flow velocities

  12. Monitoring of the natural gas exploitation in the Wadden Sea from the locations Moddergat, Lauwersoog and Vierhuizen, Netherlands. Advice of the Audit Committee 2011; Monitoring van de aardgaswinning onder de Waddenzee vanaf de locaties Moddergat, Lauwersoog en Vierhuizen. Advies 2011 van de Auditcommissie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-04-15

    The Dutch governmental decree ('Rijksprojectenbesluit') on the project for natural gas exploitation in the Wadden Sea for the locations Moddergat, Lauwersoog and Vierhuizen gives the Dutch Petroleum Company (NAM) the possibility to produce natural gas under specific conditions in the Wadden Sea area from the six fields Moddergat, Nes, Lauwersoog C, Lauwersoog West, Lauwersoog East and Vierhuizen East. The precondition is that the (dynamic) nature in and around the Wadden Sea is not affected by subsidence as a result of the gas exploitation. For this, the NAM must monitor the subsidence and the nature values and report annually to the Dutch government. Also in the Rijksprojectbesluit it is determined that the Commission for Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA), as the independent auditor, will annually advise the responsible ministers on the EIA-report. This is the 2011 recommendation of the Audit Committee for exploitation of natural gas in the Wadden Sea [Dutch] Het Rijksprojectbesluit Gaswinning onder de Waddenzee vanaf de locaties Moddergat, Lauwersoog en Vierhuizen geeft de Nederlandse Aardolie Maatschappij (NAM) de mogelijkheid om onder randvoorwaarden aardgas te produceren in het Waddenzeegebied uit de zes velden Moddergat, Nes, Lauwersoog C, Lauwersoog West, Lauwersoog Oost en Vierhuizen Oost. De randvoorwaarde is dat de (dynamische) natuur in en rondom de Waddenzee niet wordt aangetast door bodemdaling als gevolg van de gaswinning. Daarvoor moet de NAM de bodemdaling en de natuurwaarden monitoren en jaarlijks rapporteren aan de Nederlandse overheid. Ook is in het Rijksprojectbesluit bepaald dat de Commissie voor de milieueffectrapportage (m.e.r.) als onafhankelijke auditor de verantwoordelijke ministers jaarlijks zal adviseren over deze Rapportage. Dit is het 2011 advies van de Auditcommissie gaswinning onder de Waddenzee.

  13. Transitions in sandflat biota since the 1930s: effects of sea-level rise, eutrophication and biological globalization in the tidal bay Königshafen, northern Wadden Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Juliane; Dolch, Tobias; Reise, Karsten

    2014-06-01

    Conspicuous macrozoobenthos and vegetation of intertidal sandflats in Königshafen (Island of Sylt, SE North Sea) were mapped in 1932, 1988 and 2008. Higher water levels since the 1930s with a concomitant increase in tidal dynamics are assumed to have weakened sediment stability. This dissolved the distinctly banded macrobenthic zonation of the 1930s. Near high water level, cyanobacterial mats with associated beetles, belts of the mudshrimp Corophium volutator and the seagrass Zostera noltii have vanished, while the range of the lugworm Arenicola marina has extended towards the shore. Near low water level, sandy elevations have become permanently submerged because a tidal creek has widened its bed. In 1988, extensive green algal mats and the almost complete absence of seagrass are attributed to peak eutrophication. This partially reversed until 2008. The mussel Mytilus edulis had strongly extended its beds along the creek in 1988. These were taken over by introduced Pacific oysters Crassostrea gigas in 2008. Also in 2008, the cordgrass Spartina anglica, another introduced species, grew into large tussocks where cyanobacterial mats and a Corophium-belt had been mapped in the 1930s. Former benthic patterns may have little chance of resurrection by conventional nature protection because these small-scale shifts represent responses to regional and global change.

  14. Arabian Sea Fronts and Barrier Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    Shcherbina Applied Physics Laboratory 1013 NE 40th St. Seattle, WA 98105 phone: (206)897-1446 fax: (206)543-6785 email: ashcherbina...science questions are: 1. What combination of air-sea interactions and upper-ocean physical processes control mixed layer properties and upper ocean...to identify the optimal experimental site will commence in late 2015, tentatively followed by a reconnaissance deployment of autonomous instruments

  15. Remote forcing annihilates barrier layer in southeastern Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shenoi, S.S.C.; Shankar, D.; Shetye, S.R.

    -1 GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Remote forcing annihilates barrier layer in southeastern Arabian Sea S. S. C. Shenoi, D. Shankar, and S. R. Shetye National Institute of Oceanography, Goa, India. Time-series measurements... thick barrier layer (BL) exists during March{April ow- ing to a surface layer of low-salinity waters advected earlier during December{January from the Bay of Bengal. The BL is almost annihilated by 7 April owing to upwelling. The relic BL that survives...

  16. Punctuated sediment record resulting from channel migration in a shallow sand-dominated micro-tidal lagoon, Northern Wadden Sea, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fruergaard, Mikkel; Andersen, Thorbjørn Joest; Nielsen, Lars Henrik

    2011-01-01

    conclude that long-term (millennial timescale) sediment accumulation in the lagoon was controlled by rising sea-level, whereas short-term (centurial timescale) sediment accumulation was controlled by local erosion and depositional events caused by lateral migration of channels. Records of short-term sea...

  17. Morphodynamics of the structural barrier between the Scotia Sea and the Weddell Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurbatova, Ekaterina; Dubinin, Evgeny

    2014-05-01

    The study area Scotia Sea lies between Antarctica and South America near the Falkland Islands. The structural barrier between the Scotia Sea and the Weddell See represent region with heterogeneous crust and dissected (may be rough) topography. The major part of this barrier is the South Scotia Ridge, which devided South Scotia Sea and North-West Weddell Sea. Intense deep processes in this area reflect general geodynamic settings of the South Atlantic region. The main processes are strike slip zones and different faults activation, they formed relief`s contrast as we know at present. There are fault blocks forming the ridge, abyssal plain of the small spreading basins, microcontinental blocks, volcanic Island arc and deep oceanic trenches. However the major type of the relief in the study region can be characterize as tectonical. Thus Structural barrier between the Scotia and Weddell Seas is a complex system of uplifts and depressions. The occurrence of which is associated with a variety of processes occurring at the boundary of the Scotia and Antarctic plates. We present in this study analysis of the topography and the geodynamic situation of the area, and show the results of analogue experimental modeling. Compound heterogeneous structure of the barrier between Scotia Sea and Weddell Sea involves Bransfield and Phillip Straits, small basins with ocean crust formed as a result of rotation of microblocks (Powell, Jane, Protector), small pull-apart basins along south boundary of Scotia Plate, South Orkney microcontinent, rises Bruce, Discovery, Pirie, Jane, Irizar. Moreover evolution of the East Scotia Ridge has had an influence on the morphology of the study region. Bottom topography, distribution of gravity and magnetic anomalies fields show heterogeneity of the crust in the study area. As a result of complicated structure of this region there are a lot of evolutional versions especially for Central Scotia Sea and South Scotia Sea. Analogue modeling includes two

  18. On the performance of topobathymetric LiDAR in shallow water environments: the Ribe Vesterå river and the Knudedyb tidal inlet in the Danish Wadden Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gergely, Aron; Andersen, Mikkel S.; Teglbrænder-Bjergkvist, Mathias

    Shallow water environments in the land-sea transition zone are challenging to map in high spatial resolution at large spatial scales. Historically this has led to gaps (white ribbons) between terrestrial and marine surveys. Topobathymetric LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging), also referred...... to as green LiDAR which is able to penetrate through water, holds the potential to close this gap. However, water column turbidity poses limitations to the penetration of the green laser beam, and water column refraction of the laser beam poses limitations to the scale of features which can be resolved...... at the seabed. The aim of this study is to investigate the performance of topobathymetric LiDAR in shallow water environments in relation to resolving small-scale morphological features at landscape scale. More specifically, the objectives are: 1) to determine the spatial resolution as well as the horizontal...

  19. Survival of Spoonbills on Wadden Sea islands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bauchau, V.; Horn, H.; Overdijk, O.

    1998-01-01

    The Spoonbill populations in Europe are fragmented and threatened. The dynamics of the species is poorly known but ringing and observation programmes are under way. Here we estimated the local survival of two colour-ringed populations of Spoonbills in the Netherlands. Adult survival and sighting rat

  20. Barriers to Student Participation in At-Sea Internships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunsford, T.; Sullivan, D. E.

    2011-12-01

    The Marine Advanced Technology Education (MATE) Center has run an NSF-funded at-sea internship program since 1999. This program targets students enrolled in marine technology, marine science, introductory engineering, and computer science programs at community colleges and universities. MATE interns work on board research vessels with the University National Oceanographic Laboratory Systems (UNOLS), the United States Coast Guard, and the Institute For Exploration, for periods ranging from one week to six months. The internships vary but generally involve maintaining and operating oceanographic equipment, such as Conductivity Temperature and Depth sensors (CTDs) and carousels, moorings, hydrographic survey equipment, shipboard communications, and Remotely Operated Vehicles. To date 243 students have been placed in internships; approximately 30% are minority and 48% are female. In 2009 and 2010, the MATE Center conducted a national study to examine the barriers to participation in marine technical internships aboard research vessels, including a set of surveys and focus groups and an online survey of 136 college students in six different college technical programs who attended a presentation on the MATE Internship Program. The MATE Center will share the results of this study and the strategies implemented to remove identified barriers to internship participation and increase diversity. Modifications include information on the website for families of potential interns in Spanish and English and videos depicting life on a research vessel. The MATE Center is a national network of educational institutions, marine employers and professional societies working together to improve marine technical education and, in this way, better prepare students for ocean occupations.

  1. The Wadden area, a multiple landscape?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boomars, E.A.M.

    2004-01-01

    The concept ‘multiple landscapes’ implies that one particular landscape can entail different landscapes. Various social groups can ascribe different meanings to the same physical landscape. In this paper the Dutch Wadden area (Lancewad project) is analysed and described as a case of a multiple lands

  2. The barrier layer in the southern region of the South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    By analysing the CTD data in the southernregion of the South China Sea gathered during six cruises between 1989 and 1999, a barrier layer with seasonal variation just like what exists in the equatorial oceans is found in this region. It is the first discovery in such a marginal sea yet.It is strong in autunm and a little weak in summer and winter. The thicker the barrier layer, the higher the average temperature of the upper mixed layer. The region with the thicker barrier layer overlaps the region with the higher average temperature of the upper mixed layer, and accords with the thicker region of the warm pool in the South China Sea got from the Levitus data. The barrier layer in the southern region of the South China Sea has significant influence on the heat storage of the upper ocean there.``

  3. Coastal barrier stratigraphy for Holocene high-resolution sea-level reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costas, Susana; Ferreira, Óscar; Plomaritis, Theocharis A.; Leorri, Eduardo

    2016-12-01

    The uncertainties surrounding present and future sea-level rise have revived the debate around sea-level changes through the deglaciation and mid- to late Holocene, from which arises a need for high-quality reconstructions of regional sea level. Here, we explore the stratigraphy of a sandy barrier to identify the best sea-level indicators and provide a new sea-level reconstruction for the central Portuguese coast over the past 6.5 ka. The selected indicators represent morphological features extracted from coastal barrier stratigraphy, beach berm and dune-beach contact. These features were mapped from high-resolution ground penetrating radar images of the subsurface and transformed into sea-level indicators through comparison with modern analogs and a chronology based on optically stimulated luminescence ages. Our reconstructions document a continuous but slow sea-level rise after 6.5 ka with an accumulated change in elevation of about 2 m. In the context of SW Europe, our results show good agreement with previous studies, including the Tagus isostatic model, with minor discrepancies that demand further improvement of regional models. This work reinforces the potential of barrier indicators to accurately reconstruct high-resolution mid- to late Holocene sea-level changes through simple approaches.

  4. Modeling barrier island response to sea-level rise in the outer Banks, North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Laura J.; List, Jeffrey H.; Williams, S. Jeffress; Stolper, David

    2007-01-01

    An 8500-year Holocene simulation developed in GEOMBEST provides a possible scenario to explain the evolution of barrier coast between Rodanthe and Cape Hatteras, NC. Sensitivity analyses suggest that in the Outer Banks, the rate of sea-level rise is the most important factor in determining how barrier islands evolve. The Holocene simulation provides a basis for future simulations, which suggest that if sea level rises up to 0.88 m by AD 2100, as predicted by the highest estimates of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, the barrier in the study area may migrate on the order of 2.5 times more rapidly than at present. If sea level rises beyond IPCC predictions to reach 1.4–1.9 m above modern sea level by AD 2100, model results suggest that barrier islands in the Outer Banks may become vulnerable to threshold collapse, disintegrating during storm events, by the end of the next century. Consistent with sensitivity analyses, additional simulations indicate that anthropogenic activities, such as increasing the rate of sediment supply through beach nourishment, will only slightly affect barrier island migration rates and barrier island vulnerability to collapse.

  5. Characterizing Surface Transport Barriers in the South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Characterizing Surface Transport Barriers in the South...in mathematical methods for detecting key Lagrangian transport structures in velocity field data sets for spatially complex, time- dependent, ocean...surface flows. Such transport structures are typically not inherently obvious in snapshots of the Eulerian velocity field and require analysis

  6. Exploring the effect of backbarrier dynamics on barrier island response to sea-level rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo-Trueba, J.; Mariotti, G.

    2016-12-01

    Barriers islands and their associated backbarrier environments serve as buffer zones between the coastal ocean and mainland developments, including population centers and infrastructures, and provide a wide range of ecosystem services. Despite their economic and ecological importance, there exists a critical gap in understanding how barrier-marsh-lagoon systems respond to sea-level rise. Here, we address this fundamental knowledge gap by dynamically coupling two existing models: a morphodynamic model for barrier evolution, and a marsh-lagoon model. The barrier model accounts for the interaction between shoreface dynamics and overwash fluxes, which can lead to periodic barrier retreat, due to time lags in the shoreface response, or width drowning, which occurs when the shoreface response rate is insufficient to maintain the barrier geometry during overwash-driven landward migration. The marsh-lagoon model explicitly describes marsh edge processes in both the backbarrier and the interior marshes, and accounts for the modification of the wave regime associated with lagoon width, i.e., fetch. Model results show that a number of factors, which are not typically associated with the dynamics of coastal barriers, can enhance the rate of overwash-driven landward migration by increasing backbarrier accommodation space. For instance, an increase in lagoon width and export of fine sediment from the lagoon via tidal dispersion, and/or an expansion of inland marshes via upland migration, can lessen lagoon sedimentation rates and trigger lagoon deepening. Fast barrier migration rates induced by a deeper lagoon can enhance barrier drowning when onshore directed sediment transport at the shoreface does not respond fast enough. We therefore conclude that the supply of muddy sediments to the backbarrier marsh ecosystems can be essential to maintaining the barrier system under elevated rates of sea level rise. Overall, our findings highlight the importance of incorporating backbarrier

  7. Seasonal variability of the observed barrier layer in the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pankajakshan, T.; Thoppil, P.; Rao, R.R.; Muraleedharan, P.M.; Somayajulu, Y.K.; Gopalakrishna, V.V.; Murthugudde, R.; Reddy, G.V.; Revichandran, C.

    The formation mechanisms of the barrier layer (BL) and its seasonal variability in the Arabian Sea (AS) are studied using a comprehensive dataset of temperature and salinity profiles from Argo and other archives for the AS. Relatively thick BL of 20...

  8. Mid-Holocene sea surface conditions and riverine influence on the inshore Great Barrier Reef

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roche, R.C.; Perry, C.T.; Smithers, S.G.; Leng, M.J.; Grove, C.A.; Sloane, H.J.; Unsworth, C.E.

    2014-01-01

    We present measurements of Sr/Ca, d18O, and spectral luminescence ratios (G/B) from a mid-Holocene Porites sp. microatoll recovered from the nearshore Great Barrier Reef (GBR). These records were used as proxies to reconstruct sea surface temperature (SST), the d18O of surrounding seawater (d18Osw),

  9. Barriers to and opportunities for landward migration of coastal wetlands with sea-level rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enwright, Nicholas M.; Griffith, Kereen T.; Osland, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    In the 21st century, accelerated sea-level rise and continued coastal development are expected to greatly alter coastal landscapes across the globe. Historically, many coastal ecosystems have responded to sea-level fluctuations via horizontal and vertical movement on the landscape. However, anthropogenic activities, including urbanization and the construction of flood-prevention infrastructure, can produce barriers that impede ecosystem migration. Here we show where tidal saline wetlands have the potential to migrate landward along the northern Gulf of Mexico coast, one of the most sea-level rise sensitive and wetland-rich regions of the world. Our findings can be used to identify migration corridors and develop sea-level rise adaptation strategies to help ensure the continued availability of wetland-associated ecosystem goods and services.

  10. Effects of sea-level rise on barrier island groundwater system dynamics: ecohydrological implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masterson, John P.; Fienen, Michael N.; Thieler, E. Robert; Gesch, Dean B.; Gutierrez, Benjamin T.; Plant, Nathaniel G.

    2014-01-01

    We used a numerical model to investigate how a barrier island groundwater system responds to increases of up to 60 cm in sea level. We found that a sea-level rise of 20 cm leads to substantial changes in the depth of the water table and the extent and depth of saltwater intrusion, which are key determinants in the establishment, distribution and succession of vegetation assemblages and habitat suitability in barrier islands ecosystems. In our simulations, increases in water-table height in areas with a shallow depth to water (or thin vadose zone) resulted in extensive groundwater inundation of land surface and a thinning of the underlying freshwater lens. We demonstrated the interdependence of the groundwater response to island morphology by evaluating changes at three sites. This interdependence can have a profound effect on ecosystem composition in these fragile coastal landscapes under long-term changing climatic conditions.

  11. Remote sensing of sea surface temperatures during 2002 Barrier Reef coral bleaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gang; Strong, Alan E.; Skirving, William

    Early in 2002, satellites of the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) detected anomalously high sea surface temperatures (SST) developing in the western Coral Sea, midway along Australia's Great Barrier Reef (GBR). This was the beginning of what was to become the most significant GBR coral bleaching event on record [Wilkinson, 2002]. During this time, NOAA's National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NESDIS) provided satellite data as part of ongoing collaborative work on coral reef health with the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS) and the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA). These data proved invaluable to AIMS and GBRMPA as they monitored and assessed the development and evolution of SSTs throughout the austral summer, enabling them to keep stakeholders, government, and the general public informed and up to date.

  12. New species of Alcyonacea (Octocorallia) from the Great Barrier Reef, South-East Asia, and the Red Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verseveldt, J.

    1982-01-01

    In this paper four new alcyonaceans are described. They are Alcyonium monticulum from the Great Barrier Reef, Cladiella steinen from Thailand, Lemnalia benayahui from the Red Sea, and Siphonogorgia lobata from Taiwan.

  13. Sea spray aerosol in the Great Barrier Reef and the presence of nonvolatile organics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallet, Marc; Cravigan, Luke; Miljevic, Branka; Vaattovaara, Petri; Deschaseaux, Elisabeth; Swan, Hilton; Jones, Graham; Ristovski, Zoran

    2016-06-01

    Sea spray aerosol (SSA) particles produced from the ocean surface in regions of biological activity can vary greatly in size, number and composition, and in their influence on cloud formation. Algal species such as phytoplankton can alter the SSA composition. Numerous studies have investigated nascent SSA properties, but all of these have focused on aerosol particles produced by seawater from noncoral related phytoplankton and in coastal regions. Bubble chamber experiments were performed with seawater samples taken from the reef flat around Heron Island in the Great Barrier Reef during winter 2011. Here we show that the SSA from these samples was composed of an internal mixture of varying fractions of sea salt, semivolatile organics, as well as nonvolatile (below 550°C) organics. A relatively constant volume fraction of semivolatile organics of 10%-13% was observed, while nonvolatile organic volume fractions varied from 29% to 49% for 60 nm SSA. SSA organic fractions were estimated to reduce the activation ratios of SSA to cloud condensation nuclei by up to 14% when compared with artificial sea salt. Additionally, a sea-salt calibration was applied so that a compact time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer could be used to quantify the contribution of sea salt to submicron SSA, which yielded organic volume fractions of 3%-6%. Overall, these results indicate a high fraction of organics associated with wintertime Aitken mode SSA generated from Great Barrier Reef seawater. Further work is required to fully distinguish any differences coral reefs have on SSA composition when compared to open oceans.

  14. Evidence of cormorant-induced mortality, disparate migration strategies and repeatable circadian rhythm in the endangered North Sea houting (Coregonus oxyrinchus): A telemetry study mapping the postspawning migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lasse Fast; Rognon, Paul C.B.; Aarestrup, Kim

    2017-01-01

    , possibly indicating constrained navigation through the lakes. The migration into the Wadden Sea correlated with temperature indicating osmoregulatory constraints of sea entry. Unlike most salmonid species, migration occurred both day and night. Moreover, fish exhibited repeatable individual differences...

  15. Stratigraphy, evolution, and controls of a Holocene transgressive-regressive barrier island under changing sea-level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fruergaard, Mikkel; Møller, Ingelise; Johannessen, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This study provides a detailed reconstruction of the formation of a wave-dominated barrier island and assesses the sedimentological and morphological effects of sea-level changes on barrier evolution. Sedimentological and stratigraphic characteristics of the Holocene deposits are resolved...... with sediments before being transgressed by the still retreating open-ocean shoreline. These events were associated with periods of very rapid landward displacement of up to 10 m yr−1 of the mainland shoreline. After stabilization of the barrier island in its most eastward (i.e., landward) location, the open-ocean...... for this particular barrier island for a sea-level rise higher than about 2 mm yr−1. This gives reason for concern since a number of sea-level change scenarios indicate that such a rate will be reached within a few decades....

  16. Sea sand for reactive barriers; Arena de mar para barreras reactivas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia R, G.; Ordonez R, E.; Ordonez R, En. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Km. 36.5 Carretera Mexico-Toluca, Municipio de Ocoyoacac, 52045 Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2002-07-01

    Some phosphates have the property to suck in radioactive metals in solution, what it is taken in advance to make reactive barriers which are placed in the nuclear waste repositories. In an effort for contributing to the study of this type of materials, it has been obtained the zirconium silicate (ZrSiO{sub 4}) and the alpha zirconium hydrogen phosphate (Zr(HPO{sub 4}) 2H{sub 2}O) starting from sea sand in an easy and economic way. (Author)

  17. Sediment accretion patterns in a salt marsh in relation to sea level rise.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Both, Inge

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Sedimentation processes are determined by different factors, such as the amount of available sediment, hydrodynamic circumstances (wave length, wave flow), morphology (flood frequency, distance to the Wadden Sea, distance to the creek), and struc

  18. Dynamic simulation of storm-driven barrier island morphology under future sea level rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passeri, D. L.; Long, J.; Plant, N. G.; Bilskie, M. V.; Hagen, S. C.

    2016-12-01

    The impacts of short-term processes such as tropical and extratropical storms have the potential to alter barrier island morphology. On the event scale, the effects of storm-driven morphology may result in damage or loss of property, infrastructure and habitat. On the decadal scale, the combination of storms and sea level rise (SLR) will evolve barrier islands. The effects of SLR on hydrodynamics and coastal morphology are dynamic and inter-related; nonlinearities in SLR can cause larger peak surges, lengthier inundation times and additional inundated land, which may result in increased erosion, overwash or breaching along barrier islands. This study uses a two-dimensional morphodynamic model (XBeach) to examine the response of Dauphin Island, AL to storm surge under future SLR. The model is forced with water levels and waves provided by a large-domain hydrodynamic model. A historic validation of hurricanes Ivan and Katrina indicates the model is capable of predicting morphologic response with high skill (0.5). The validated model is used to simulate storm surge driven by Ivan and Katrina under four future SLR scenarios, ranging from 20 cm to 2 m. Each SLR scenario is implemented using a static or "bathtub" approach (in which water levels are increased linearly by the amount of SLR) versus a dynamic approach (in which SLR is applied at the open ocean boundary of the hydrodynamic model and allowed to propagate through the domain as guided by the governing equations). Results illustrate that higher amounts of SLR result in additional shoreline change, dune erosion, overwash and breaching. Compared to the dynamic approach, the static approach over-predicts inundation, dune erosion, overwash and breaching of the island. Overall, results provide a better understanding of the effects of SLR on storm-driven barrier island morphology and support a paradigm shift away from the "bathtub" approach, towards considering the integrated, dynamic effects of SLR.

  19. Barrier layer in the northeastern South China Sea and its formation mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Robust evidence for the barrier layer (BL) in the northeastern South China Sea (SCS) (16°-25°N, 112°-124°E) is presented. The occurrence rate of the BL peaks in the autumn (45.7%) and then the summer (31.1%) and the spring (23.3%), sequently. It is estimated that the annual occurrence rate of the BL reaches about 40.0% in the central northeastern SCS (18°-22°N, 112°-120°E) and the Luzon Strait. Stratification-formed (Rain-formed) mechanism is the major factor responsible for the occurrence of the BL in the northeastern SCS in the spring (the summer and autumn), respectively. The rainfall observation from TRMM provides reliable evidence for the latter.

  20. Dynamical seasonal prediction of summer sea surface temperatures in the Great Barrier Reef

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spillman, C. M.; Alves, O.

    2009-03-01

    Coral bleaching is a serious problem threatening the world coral reef systems, triggered by high sea surface temperatures (SST) which are becoming more prevalent as a result of global warming. Seasonal forecasts from coupled ocean-atmosphere models can be used to predict anomalous SST months in advance. In this study, we assess the ability of the Australian Bureau of Meteorology seasonal forecast model (POAMA) to forecast SST anomalies in the Great Barrier Reef, Australia, with particular focus on the major 1998 and 2002 bleaching events. Advance warning of potential bleaching events allows for the implementation of management strategies to minimise reef damage. This study represents the first attempt to apply a dynamical seasonal model to the problem of coral bleaching and predict SST over a reef system for up to 6 months lead-time, a potentially invaluable tool for reef managers.

  1. Barriers to and enablers of evidence-based practice in perinatal care in the SEA-ORCHID project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Tari; Short, Jacki

    2013-08-01

    The South-East Asia Optimising Reproductive and Child Health in Developing Countries (SEA-ORCHID) project aimed to improve health outcomes for mothers and babies in nine hospitals in South-East Asia by supporting evidence-based perinatal health care. In this research, we aimed to identify and explore the factors that may have acted as barriers to or enablers of evidence-based practice change at each of the hospitals. During the final 6 months of the intervention phase of the project, semi-structured, face-to-face interviews were undertaken with 179 nurses, midwives and doctors from the maternal and neonatal departments at each of the nine participating South-East Asian hospitals. The interviews identified several factors that participants believed had a substantial impact on the effectiveness of the SEA-ORCHID intervention. These included knowledge, skills, hierarchy, multidisciplinarity and leadership, beliefs about consequences, resources, and the nature of the behaviours. The success of the SEA-ORCHID intervention in improving practice may reflect the extent to which tailored strategies were effective in overcoming these barriers. Effective interventions to align practice with evidence rely on identifying and addressing barriers to practice change. The barriers identified in this study may be useful for those designing similar clinical practice improvement projects, as well as for continued efforts to improve practice in the SEA-ORCHID hospitals. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. The complex influences of back-barrier deposition, substrate slope and underlying stratigraphy in barrier island response to sea-level rise: Insights from the Virginia Barrier Islands, Mid-Atlantic Bight, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Owen T.; Moore, Laura J.; Murray, A. Brad

    2015-10-01

    To understand the relative importance of back barrier environment, substrate slope and underlying stratigraphy in determining barrier island response to RSLR (relative sea-level rise), we use a morphological-behavior model (GEOMBEST) to conduct a series of sensitivity experiments, based on late-Holocene hindcast simulations of an island in the U.S. mid-Atlantic Bight (Metompkin Island, VA) having both salt marsh and lagoonal back-barrier environments, and we draw comparisons between these results and future simulations (2000-2100 AD) of island response to RSLR. Sensitivity analyses indicate that, as a whole, the island is highly sensitive to factors that reduce overall sand availability (i.e., high sand-loss rates and substrates containing little sand). Results also indicate that for all predicted future RSLR scenarios tested, islands having high substrate sand proportions (if allowed to migrate freely) will likely remain subaerial for centuries because of sufficient substrate sand supply and elevation to assist in keeping islands above sea level. Simulation results also lead to basic insights regarding the interactions among substrate slope, back-barrier deposition and island migration rates. In contrast to previous studies, which suggest that changes in substrate slope directly affect the island migration trajectory, we find that-in the presence of back-barrier deposition-the connection between substrate slope and island behavior is modulated (i.e., variability in migration rates is dampened) by changes in back-barrier width. These interactions-which tend to produce changes in shoreface sand content-lead to a negative feedback when the back-barrier deposit contains less sand than the underlying layer, resulting in a stable back-barrier width. Alternatively, a positive feedback arises when the back-barrier deposit contains more sand than the underlying layer, resulting in either back-barrier disappearance or perpetual widening.

  3. Upper ocean observations in eastern Caribbean Sea reveal barrier layer within a warm core eddy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudzin, J. E.; Shay, L. K.; Jaimes, B.; Brewster, J. K.

    2017-02-01

    Three-dimensional measurements of a large warm core eddy (WCE) and the Caribbean Current are acquired using oceanic profilers deployed during a NOAA research aircraft study in September 2014 in the eastern Caribbean Sea. Measurements of the near-surface atmosphere are also collected to examine air-sea processes over the eddy. These novel measurements showcase temperature and salinity for the eddy and background flow, upper ocean stratification, a residing barrier layer (BL), velocity structure, and water mass characteristics. The eddy's thermal structure is alike that of WCEs in the Gulf of Mexico (GoM) whereas surrounding waters have relatively deeper isotherms compared to its GoM counterparts. Analyses suggest that upper ocean stratification within the study region is due to a BL. These are the first observations of a BL inside a WCE to the best of our knowledge. Reduced shear comparisons suggest that the upper ocean, especially within the WCE, would be more resistant to tropical cyclone (TC) induced mixing than the GoM because of the BL. The eddy is suspected to originate from North Brazil Current rings, given its fresh anomalies relative to climatology and surrounding waters and its trajectory prior to sampling. Atmospheric measurements suggest the WCE is influencing the lower atmosphere along its boundaries. These observations signify that not only does this WCE have deep thermal structure and modulate the near-surface atmosphere but it is unique because it has a BL. The findings and analyses suggest that a similar eddy could potentially influence air-sea processes, such as those during TC passage.

  4. The Possible Physical Barrier and Coastal Dispersal Strategy for Japanese Grenadier Anchovy, Coilia nasus in the East China Sea and Yellow Sea: Evidence from AFLP Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Qiang Han

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In order to ascertain the taxonomic status of the Ariake Sea population of Japanese grenadier anchovy, Coilia nasus, and assess the contemporary possible genetic barrier between the west and east coastal waters of the East China Sea, we used amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP markers to detect the genetic structure of C. nasus, in the East China Sea and Yellow Sea. Eighty-one individuals of C. nasus were collected from five locations and 12 individuals of Coilia mystus were sampled from the Yangtze River Estuary. A total of 371 loci were detected by five primer combinations, 310 of which were polymorphic (83.56%. Analysis of molecular variation (AMOVA and pairwise fixation index (FST revealed significant genetic differentiation among five samples, indicating limited gene flow among populations. The dendrogram for populations by neighbor-joining (NJ cluster analysis provided evidence of a clear relationship between genetic and geographic patterns, supporting significant genetic differentiation between China coastal populations and Ariake Sea populations. Compared to the genetic divergence between C. nasus and C. mystus, the level of genetic differentiation between China and the Ariake Sea populations of C. nasus is obvious below the species level, indicating isolated populations of C. nasus in the Ariake Sea. Isolation by distance analysis revealed that direct ocean distance with deep-water at the continental slope and high salinity between west and east coastal waters of the East China Sea served as major physical barrier to C. nasus, supporting the coastal dispersal pattern in this estuarine species, and rejecting offshore dispersal strategy.

  5. The possible physical barrier and coastal dispersal strategy for Japanese grenadier anchovy, Coilia nasus in the East China Sea and Yellow Sea: evidence from AFLP markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zhi-Qiang; Han, Gang; Wang, Zhi-Yong; Gao, Tian-Xiang

    2015-02-03

    In order to ascertain the taxonomic status of the Ariake Sea population of Japanese grenadier anchovy, Coilia nasus, and assess the contemporary possible genetic barrier between the west and east coastal waters of the East China Sea, we used amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers to detect the genetic structure of C. nasus, in the East China Sea and Yellow Sea. Eighty-one individuals of C. nasus were collected from five locations and 12 individuals of Coilia mystus were sampled from the Yangtze River Estuary. A total of 371 loci were detected by five primer combinations, 310 of which were polymorphic (83.56%). Analysis of molecular variation (AMOVA) and pairwise fixation index (FST) revealed significant genetic differentiation among five samples, indicating limited gene flow among populations. The dendrogram for populations by neighbor-joining (NJ) cluster analysis provided evidence of a clear relationship between genetic and geographic patterns, supporting significant genetic differentiation between China coastal populations and Ariake Sea populations. Compared to the genetic divergence between C. nasus and C. mystus, the level of genetic differentiation between China and the Ariake Sea populations of C. nasus is obvious below the species level, indicating isolated populations of C. nasus in the Ariake Sea. Isolation by distance analysis revealed that direct ocean distance with deep-water at the continental slope and high salinity between west and east coastal waters of the East China Sea served as major physical barrier to C. nasus, supporting the coastal dispersal pattern in this estuarine species, and rejecting offshore dispersal strategy.

  6. Application of two-barrier model of radioactive agent transport in sea water for analyzing artificial radionuclide release from containers with radioactive waste dumped in Kara Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grishin, Denis S.; Laykin, Andrey I.; Kuchin, Nickolay L.; Platovskikh, Yuri A. [Krylov State Research Center, Saint Petersburg, 44 Moskovskoe shosse, 196158 (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-01

    Modeling of artificial radionuclide transport in sea water is crucial for prognosis of radioecological situation in regions where dumping of radioactive waste had been made and/or accidents with nuclear submarines had taken place. Distribution of artificial radionuclides in bottom sediments can be a detector of radionuclide release from dumped or sunk objects to marine environment. Proper model can determine the dependence between radionuclide distribution in sediments and radionuclide release. Following report describes two-barrier model of radioactive agent transport in sea water. It was tested on data from 1994 - 2013 expeditions to Novaya Zemlya bays, where regular dumping of solid radioactive waste was practiced by the former USSR from the early 1960's until 1990. Two-barrier model agrees with experimental data and allows more accurate determination of time and intensity of artificial radionuclide release from dumped containers. (authors)

  7. Exploring the Importance of Back-barrier Marsh Deposits in Barrier Island Response to Sea Level Rise, Virginia Coast Reserve, U.S.A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, O. T.; Moore, L. J.

    2010-12-01

    As sea level rises, many barrier islands respond by migrating landward via storm-driven overwash processes. Through landward migration, sediment is extracted from the shoreface to supply sand to the island while, at the same time, the island moves to higher elevations. In this way, landward migration may allow an island to persist even as sea level rise rates increase. Intricate geometric relationships dictate both the distance an island must migrate and the amount of sediment required to maintain a subaerial barrier. Our objective is to explore the late-Holocene and potential future response of Metompkin Island (one of the most rapidly migrating barrier island within the Virginia Coast Reserve (VCR)) to sea level rise in order to better understand the role of back-barrier marsh deposits in island evolution. We hypothesize that because the extent of subaerial marsh behind a barrier island partially determines how much sand is required to maintain subaerial exposure, the presence or absence of back-barrier marsh is critical in determining how an island system evolves. More specifically, we hypothesize that the absence of marsh behind southern Metompkin Island contributes to higher observed migration rates relative to the northern half of the island where a substantial marsh is present. We use GEOMBEST (Geomorphic Model of Barrier, Estuarine, and Shoreface Translations), a 2-d cross shore numerical morphological-behavior model, to simulate the evolution of Metompkin Island over the last 4600 years and into the future. We use recent NOAA bathymetry and USGS lidar data to develop a cross-shore profile representing average modern shoreface morphology and stratigraphy (extending 45km offshore) for the study area. Using modern geometric relationships as a guide, we then create a cross-shore profile representing a plausible initial morphology and stratigraphy for model simulations dating back to the oldest evidence of island existence (4600yrs BP). Additional model inputs

  8. Diurnal warming in shallow coastal seas: Observations from the Caribbean and Great Barrier Reef regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, X.; Minnett, P. J.; Berkelmans, R.; Hendee, J.; Manfrino, C.

    2014-07-01

    A good understanding of diurnal warming in the upper ocean is important for the validation of satellite-derived sea surface temperature (SST) against in-situ buoy data and for merging satellite SSTs taken at different times of the same day. For shallow coastal regions, better understanding of diurnal heating could also help improve monitoring and prediction of ecosystem health, such as coral reef bleaching. Compared to its open ocean counterpart which has been studied extensively and modeled with good success, coastal diurnal warming has complicating localized characteristics, including coastline geometry, bathymetry, water types, tidal and wave mixing. Our goal is to characterize coastal diurnal warming using two extensive in-situ temperature and weather datasets from the Caribbean and Great Barrier Reef (GBR), Australia. Results showed clear daily warming patterns in most stations from both datasets. For the three Caribbean stations where solar radiation is the main cause of daily warming, the mean diurnal warming amplitudes were about 0.4 K at depths of 4-7 m and 0.6-0.7 K at shallower depths of 1-2 m; the largest warming value was 2.1 K. For coral top temperatures of the GBR, 20% of days had warming amplitudes >1 K, with the largest >4 K. The bottom warming at shallower sites has higher daily maximum temperatures and lower daily minimum temperatures than deeper sites nearby. The averaged daily warming amplitudes were shown to be closely related to daily average wind speed and maximum insolation, as found in the open ocean. Diurnal heating also depends on local features including water depth, location on different sections of the reef (reef flat vs. reef slope), the relative distance from the barrier reef chain (coast vs. lagoon stations vs. inner barrier reef sites vs. outer rim sites); and the proximity to the tidal inlets. In addition, the influence of tides on daily temperature changes and its relative importance compared to solar radiation was quantified by

  9. Evolution of an intermittent lagoon-barrier system with rising sea level: observations and projections from the Muni-Pomadze lagoon, Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies-Vollum, Sian

    2016-04-01

    Intermittently closed lagoon-barrier systems are a transitory environment between land and sea that are influenced by fluvial and marine processes as well as human activities. Fluvial processes dominate most of the time, when the barrier is closed. However, when the barrier is breached an ephemeral connection between the lagoon and the ocean develops and estuarine-like conditions ensue. As sea level rises, the evolution of these systems from intermittently closed to open is dependent on multiple processes including barrier breaching, fragmentation and overwashing. Human intervention, often to prevent flooding, also has an impact. The Muni-Pomadze lagoon in central Ghana is a small, intermittently closed lagoon-barrier system that supports a local fishing community. A beach-barrier separates the lagoon from the ocean, impounding river water and sediment behind it for most of the year. At the end of a rainy season the barrier may be breached, either naturally or by human intervention to prevent flooding of dwellings on the barrier. Field observation, digital mapping and GIS analysis of the shoreline has enabled an understanding of how the barrier is evolving with rising sea level. The shore face of the barrier has shifted landwards with an average retreat rate of 0.22 m/yr. Small washover fans, developed at low points along the lagoon side of the barrier have developed. However, aerial photos reveal that these fans have remained stable since 1972 (earliest available air photos). The small size and stability of these fans suggests that overwashing is not an important factor in the evolution of the barrier and that the barrier is being eroded rather not moving landward. Erosion is particularly prevalent at the breach end of the barrier with an average rate of loss of 3 metres per year and palm trees that were providing stability to the barrier have been washed away. Unconsolidated sands forming a transient, spit-like feature have replaced the stable barrier, which

  10. Lower Mesophotic Coral Communities (60-125 m Depth) of the Northern Great Barrier Reef and Coral Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englebert, Norbert; Bongaerts, Pim; Muir, Paul R; Hay, Kyra B; Pichon, Michel; Hoegh-Guldberg, Ove

    2017-01-01

    Mesophotic coral ecosystems in the Indo-Pacific remain relatively unexplored, particularly at lower mesophotic depths (≥60 m), despite their potentially large spatial extent. Here, we used a remotely operated vehicle to conduct a qualitative assessment of the zooxanthellate coral community at lower mesophotic depths (60-125 m) at 10 different locations in the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park and the Coral Sea Commonwealth Marine Reserve. Lower mesophotic coral communities were present at all 10 locations, with zooxanthellate scleractinian corals extending down to ~100 metres on walls and ~125 m on steep slopes. Lower mesophotic coral communities were most diverse in the 60-80 m zone, while at depths of ≥100 m the coral community consisted almost exclusively of the genus Leptoseris. Collections of coral specimens (n = 213) between 60 and 125 m depth confirmed the presence of at least 29 different species belonging to 18 genera, including several potential new species and geographic/depth range extensions. Overall, this study highlights that lower mesophotic coral ecosystems are likely to be ubiquitous features on the outer reefs of the Great Barrier Reef and atolls of the Coral Sea, and harbour a generic and species richness of corals that is much higher than thus far reported. Further research efforts are urgently required to better understand and manage these ecosystems as part of the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park and Coral Sea Commonwealth Marine Reserve.

  11. Lower Mesophotic Coral Communities (60-125 m Depth) of the Northern Great Barrier Reef and Coral Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englebert, Norbert; Bongaerts, Pim; Muir, Paul R.; Hay, Kyra B.; Pichon, Michel; Hoegh-Guldberg, Ove

    2017-01-01

    Mesophotic coral ecosystems in the Indo-Pacific remain relatively unexplored, particularly at lower mesophotic depths (≥60 m), despite their potentially large spatial extent. Here, we used a remotely operated vehicle to conduct a qualitative assessment of the zooxanthellate coral community at lower mesophotic depths (60–125 m) at 10 different locations in the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park and the Coral Sea Commonwealth Marine Reserve. Lower mesophotic coral communities were present at all 10 locations, with zooxanthellate scleractinian corals extending down to ~100 metres on walls and ~125 m on steep slopes. Lower mesophotic coral communities were most diverse in the 60–80 m zone, while at depths of ≥100 m the coral community consisted almost exclusively of the genus Leptoseris. Collections of coral specimens (n = 213) between 60 and 125 m depth confirmed the presence of at least 29 different species belonging to 18 genera, including several potential new species and geographic/depth range extensions. Overall, this study highlights that lower mesophotic coral ecosystems are likely to be ubiquitous features on the outer reefs of the Great Barrier Reef and atolls of the Coral Sea, and harbour a generic and species richness of corals that is much higher than thus far reported. Further research efforts are urgently required to better understand and manage these ecosystems as part of the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park and Coral Sea Commonwealth Marine Reserve. PMID:28146574

  12. The potential for sea-level-rise-induced barrier island loss: Insights from the Chandeleur Islands, Louisiana, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Laura J.; Patsch, Kiki; List, Jeffrey H.; Williams, S. Jeffress

    2014-01-01

    As sea level rises and hurricanes become more intense, barrier islands around the world become increasingly vulnerable to conversion from self-sustaining migrating landforms to submerging or subaqueous sand bodies. To explore the mechanism by which such state changes occur and to assess the factors leading to island disintegration, we develop a suite of numerical simulations for the Chandeleur Islands in Louisiana, U.S.A., which appear to be on the verge of this transition. Our results suggest that the Chandeleurs are likely poised to change state, leading to their demise, within decades depending on future storm history. Contributing factors include high rates of relative sea level rise, limited sediment supply, muddy substrate, current island position relative to former Mississippi River distributary channels, and the effects of changes in island morphology on sediment transport pathways. Although deltaic barrier islands are most sensitive to disintegration because of their muddy substrate, the importance of relative sea level rise rate in determining the timing of threshold crossing suggests that the conceptual models for deltaic barrier island formation and disintegration may apply more broadly in the future.

  13. Interactions between barrier islands and backbarrier marshes affect island system response to sea level rise: Insights from a coupled model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, David; Moore, Laura J.; Duran Vinent, Orencio; Fagherazzi, Sergio; Mariotti, Giulio

    2014-09-01

    Interactions between backbarrier marshes and barrier islands will likely play an important role in determining how low-lying coastal systems respond to sea level rise and changes in storminess in the future. To assess the role of couplings between marshes and barrier islands under changing conditions, we develop and apply a coupled barrier island-marsh model (GEOMBEST+) to assess the impact of overwash deposition on backbarrier marsh morphology and of marsh morphology on rates of island migration. Our model results suggest that backbarrier marsh width is in a constant state of change until either the backbarrier basin becomes completely filled or backbarrier marsh deposits have completely eroded away. Results also suggest that overwash deposition is an important source of sediment, which allows existing narrow marshes to be maintained in a long-lasting alternate state (~500 m wide in the Virginia Barrier Islands) within a range of conditions under which they would otherwise disappear. The existence of a narrow marsh state is supported by observations of backbarrier marshes along the eastern shore of Virginia. Additional results suggest that marshes reduce accommodation in the backbarrier bay, which, in turn, decreases island migration rate. As climate change results in sea level rise, and the increased potential for intense hurricanes resulting in overwash, it is likely that these couplings will become increasingly important in determining future system behavior.

  14. Seals at sea: modelling seal distribution in the German bight based on aerial survey data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herr, H.; Scheidat, M.; Lehnert, K.; Siebert, U.

    2009-01-01

    The Wadden Sea is an important habitat for harbour seals and grey seals. They regularly haul-out on sandbanks and islands along the coast. Comparably little is known about the time seals spend at sea and how they use the remainder of the North Sea. Yet, human activity in offshore waters is increasin

  15. Historical changes in the Mississippi-Alabama barrier islands and the roles of extreme storms, sea level, and human activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Robert A.

    2007-01-01

    westward sediment transport by alongshore currents, and Cat Island is being reshaped as it adjusts to post-formation changes in wave and current patterns associated with deposition of the St. Bernard lobe of the Mississippi delta. The principal causes of barrier island land loss are frequent intense storms, a relative rise in sea level, and a deficit in the sediment budget. The only factor that has a historical trend that coincides with the progressive increase in rates of land loss is the progressive reduction in sand supply associated with nearly simultaneous deepening of channels dredged across the outer bars of the three tidal inlets maintained for deep-draft shipping. Neither rates of relative sea level rise nor storm parameters have long-term historical rends that match the increased rates of land loss since the mid 1800s. The historical rates of relative sea level rise in the northern Gulf of Mexico have been relatively constant and storm frequencies and intensities occur in multidecal cycles. However, the most recent land loss accelerations likely related to the increased storm activity since 1995. Considering the predicted trends for storms and sea level related to global warming, it is clear that the barrier islands will continue to lose land area at a rapid rate without a reversal in trend of at least one of the causal factors. The reduction in sand supply related to disruption of the alongshore sediment transport system is the only factor contributing to land loss that can be managed directly. This can be accomplished by placing dredged material so that the adjacent barrier island shores revive it for island nourishment and rebuilding.

  16. Accelerated relative sea-level rise and rapid coastal erosion: Testing a causal relationship for the Louisiana barrier islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    List, J.H.; Sallenger, A.H.; Hansen, M.E.; Jaffe, B.E.

    1997-01-01

    The role of relative sea-level rise as a cause for the rapid erosion of Louisiana's barrier island coast is investigated through a numerical implementation of a modified Bruun rule that accounts for the low percentage of sand-sized sediment in the eroding Louisiana shoreface. Shore-normal profiles from 150 km of coastline west of the Mississippi delta are derived from bathymetric surveys conducted during the 1880s. 1930s and 1980s. An RMS difference criterion is employed to test whether an equilibrium profile form is maintained between survey years. Only about half the studied profiles meet the equilibrium Criterion this represents a significant limitation on the potential applicability of the Bruun rule. The profiles meeting the equilibrium criterion, along with measured rates of relative sea-level rise, are used to hindcast shoreline retreat rates at 37 locations within the study area. Modeled and observed shoreline retreat rates show no significant correlation. Thus in terms of the Bruun approach relative sea-level rise has no power for hindcasting (and presumably forecasting) rates of coastal erosion for the Louisiana barrier islands.

  17. Modeling the barrier-layer formation in the South-Eastern Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Durand, F.; Shankar, D.; DeBoyer Montegut, C.; Shenoi, S.S.C.; Blanke, B.; Madec, G.

    by two complementary processes, the arrival of low-salinity surface waters that are cooled en route to the SEAS and downwelling of waters mostly local to the SEAS in the subsurface layers. The surface waters are partly of Bay-of-Bengal origin...

  18. Benefits of and barriers to SEA follow-up - Theory and practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gachechiladze-Bozhesku, M., E-mail: mayagachechiladze@gmail.com [Center for Environment and Security, Central European University, Nador ut. 9, Budapest 1051 (Hungary); Fischer, T.B., E-mail: fischer@liverpool.ac.uk [School of Environmental Sciences, 4imPiAct research team, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, 74 Bedford Street South, Liverpool L69 7ZQ (United Kingdom)

    2012-04-15

    If SEA is to facilitate 'strategic' changes, it needs to focus on shaping the ways in which strategic initiatives are implemented, not just formulated. This is why follow-up which refers to postdecisional activities of SEA and strategic initiatives is increasingly seen as crucial. However, to date follow-up has only received limited attention in the SEA literature, as well as in practical guidance. The key reasons for why post decision activities are often overlooked are the lack of understanding of its actual benefits and purportedly multiple problems with its accomplishment. This paper reports on the results of a comprehensive literature review and an international e-survey on the topic, as well as an in-depth analysis of six SEA follow-up cases from England and Canada. Practically encountered and perceived benefits of, and obstacles to SEA follow-up are identified and discussed.

  19. High rates of hybridisation reveal fragile reproductive barriers between endangered Australian sea snakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanders, Kate L; Redsted Rasmussen, Arne; Guinea, Michael L.

    2014-01-01

    species have disappeared from Ashmore, the largest of these reefs, over the last 15 years, including two critically endangered Aipysurus species that have also disappeared from neighbouring Hibernia Reef. A third Timor Sea endemic, Aipysurusfuscus, is now known only from Scott and Hibernia reefs, where......The viviparous sea snakes include 62 ecologically diverse species, many of which are of very recent evolutionary origin and have overlapping distributions. Peak sea snake diversity and endemism is recorded from the isolated emergent reefs of the Timor Sea in Northwest Australia. However, nine...... significant and asymmetrical levels of gene flow following species divergence, and highest rates of introgression from the large A. laevis population into the much smaller A. fuscus population. Population assignment analyses recovered two ancestral clusters that broadly corresponded to morphological species...

  20. Test of a non-physical barrier consisting of light, sound, and bubble screen to block upstream movement of sea lamprey in an experimental raceway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miehls, Scott M.; Johnson, Nicholas S.; Hrodey, Pete J.

    2017-01-01

    Control of the invasive Sea Lamprey Petromyzon marinus is critical for management of commercial and recreational fisheries in the Laurentian Great Lakes. Use of physical barriers to block Sea Lampreys from spawning habitat is a major component of the control program. However, the resulting interruption of natural streamflow and blockage of nontarget species present substantial challenges. Development of an effective nonphysical barrier would aid the control of Sea Lampreys by eliminating their access to spawning locations while maintaining natural streamflow. We tested the effect of a nonphysical barrier consisting of strobe lights, low-frequency sound, and a bubble screen on the movement of Sea Lampreys in an experimental raceway designed as a two-choice maze with a single main channel fed by two identical inflow channels (one control and one blocked). Sea Lampreys were more likely to move upstream during trials when the strobe light and low-frequency sound were active compared with control trials and trials using the bubble screen alone. For those Sea Lampreys that did move upstream to the confluence of inflow channels, no combination of stimuli or any individual stimulus significantly influenced the likelihood that Sea Lampreys would enter the blocked inflow channel, enter the control channel, or return downstream.

  1. Impact of life history traits on gene flow: A multispecies systematic review across oceanographic barriers in the Mediterranean Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Pascual, Marta

    2017-05-10

    Marine species can demonstrate strong genetic differentiation and population structure despite the hypothesis of open seas and high connectivity. Some suggested drivers causing the genetic breaks are oceanographic barriers and the species\\' biology. We assessed the relevance of seven major oceanographic fronts on species connectivity while considering their dispersal capacity and life strategy.We systematically reviewed the scientific articles reporting population genetic differentiation along the Mediterranean Sea and across the Atlantic-Mediterranean transition. We retained those considering at least one sampling locality at each side of an oceanographic front, and at least two localities with no-front between them to correctly assess the effect of the front. To estimate the impact of life history characteristics affecting connectivity we considered the planktonic larval duration (PLD) and adult life strategy.Oceanographic barriers in the Mediterranean Sea seem to reduce gene flow globally; however, this effect is not homogeneous considering the life history traits of the species. The effect of the oceanographic fronts reduces gene flow in highly mobile species with PLD larger than 2-4 weeks. Benthic sessile species and/or with short PLD (< 2 weeks) have more significant genetic breaks between localities than species with higher motility; however, genetic differentiation occurs independently of the presence of a front.Genetic connectivity is important for populations to recover from anthropogenic or natural impacts. We show that species with low mobility, mostly habitat-formers, have high genetic differentiation but low gene flow reduction mediated by the front, therefore, considering the importance of these species, we emphasize the vulnerability of the Mediterranean ecosystems and the necessity of protection strategies based on the whole ecosystem.

  2. Modelling Morphological Response of Large Tidal Inlet Systems to Sea Level Rise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dissanayake, P.K.

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation qualitatively investigates the morphodynamic response of a large inlet system to IPCC projected relative sea level rise (RSLR). Adopted numerical approach (Delft3D) used a highly schematised model domain analogous to the Ameland inlet in the Dutch Wadden Sea. Predicted inlet evolut

  3. Planting the SEED : Towards a Spatial Economic Ecological Database for a shared understanding of the Dutch Wadden area

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daams, Michiel N.; Sijtsma, Frans J.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we address the characteristics of a publicly accessible Spatial Economic Ecological Database (SEED) and its ability to support a shared understanding among planners and experts of the economy and ecology of the Dutch Wadden area. Theoretical building blocks for a Wadden SEED are discus

  4. Carbon dioxide uptake by a temperate tidal sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassen, Wim

    2007-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) exchange between the atmosphere and the Wadden Sea, a shallow coastal region along the northern Netherlands, has been measured from April 2006 onwards on a tidal flat and over open water. Tidal flat measurements were done using a flux chamber, and ship borne measurements using a

  5. Drowning of a barrier coastline under rapid rates of relative sea-level rise during the 8.2 ka cooling event: Cause or coincidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellett, C.; Hodgson, D. M.; Lang, A.; Mauz, B.; Plater, A. J.

    2012-12-01

    Examples where barrier landforms and deposits are preserved offshore of a highstand shoreline are rare on contemporary continental shelves, and in the rock record. Therefore, understanding of the conditions required for preservation and the sedimentary processes-response to such factors is limited and heavily dependent on simulation models. Here, an integrated dataset of multibeam bathymetry and 2D seismic reflection profiles has uncovered an exceptionally well preserved drowned barrier complex at Hastings Bank, on the English Channel continental shelf, offshore of southeast England. Mapping of nine seismic stratigraphic units calibrated with lithological information from multiple vibrocores has enabled the interpretation of fluvial, shoreface, barrier, washover fan, back-barrier and tidal environments of deposition. Stratigraphic architecture is used as the basis for landscape evolution reconstructions that reveal phases of barrier progradation, degradation and retreat. Optical Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) dating of shoreface and beach deposits revealed ages in the range of 8.4 ± 0.2 ka and 7.8 ± 0.2 ka. These ages indicate the barrier developed under rapid rates of early Holocene sea-level rise and more specifically, correlate to the time period surrounding the 8.2 ka cooling event and associated sea-level 'jump'. To preserve a barrier beach including the barrier foreshore under such rapid rates of relative sea-level rise, sediment supply would have to be sufficient to keep pace to prevent the shoreline responding through continuous reworking, i.e. rollover. Further, the rate of transgression is conditioned by inherited topography with higher rates of retreat, and hence greater potential for drowning, expected across the shallowly dipping substrate. Using Hastings Bank as an example, it has also been demonstrated that the morphodynamic state of the barrier complex in terms of its ability to respond dynamically to relative sea-level rise, conditions its

  6. Impact of sea-level rise and coral mortality on the wave dynamics and wave forces on barrier reefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldock, T E; Golshani, A; Callaghan, D P; Saunders, M I; Mumby, P J

    2014-06-15

    A one-dimensional wave model was used to investigate the reef top wave dynamics across a large suite of idealized reef-lagoon profiles, representing barrier coral reef systems under different sea-level rise (SLR) scenarios. The modeling shows that the impacts of SLR vary spatially and are strongly influenced by the bathymetry of the reef and coral type. A complex response occurs for the wave orbital velocity and forces on corals, such that the changes in the wave dynamics vary reef by reef. Different wave loading regimes on massive and branching corals also leads to contrasting impacts from SLR. For many reef bathymetries, wave orbital velocities increase with SLR and cyclonic wave forces are reduced for certain coral species. These changes may be beneficial to coral health and colony resilience and imply that predicting SLR impacts on coral reefs requires careful consideration of the reef bathymetry and the mix of coral species.

  7. Seasonal variations in the barrier layer in the South China Sea: characteristics, mechanisms and impact of warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Lili; Wang, Dongxiao

    2016-06-01

    A new observational dataset, the South China Sea Physical Oceanographic Dataset 2014, is examined to investigate the seasonal characteristics, formation mechanisms, and warming effects of the barrier layer (BL) in the South China Sea (SCS). Statistical analysis reveals that the BL is thicker and occurs more frequently during summer and early autumn, while in winter it often coexists with temperature inversions. The formation mechanisms are discussed from the perspective of the controlling regime and the net turbulent energy required for BL evolution. In the initial stage (March-May), the BL is absent due to weak mixing, scarce rainfall and surface warming. In the formation and maintenance stage (June-September), the BL grows in summer and persists into the transition season. The BLs can be classified into three regimes: the flux regime (in the Luzon Strait), the combined regime (in the eastern basin) and the wind regime (southeast of Vietnam). In the attenuation stage (October-February), associated with the winter monsoon, the BL mainly occurs in the combined regime (along the path of western boundary current) and the flux regime (in the southeast corner). The characteristics and generation mechanisms of the temperature inversions near the south Chinese coast, east of Vietnam, and in the Gulf of Thailand are also discussed. Our analysis further demonstrates that the BL has a significant warming effect on upper ocean temperature and heat content in the SCS.

  8. Use of a Florida Gulf Coast Barrier Island by Spring Trans-Gulf Migrants and the Projected Effects of Sea Level Rise on Habitat Availability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lori A Lester

    Full Text Available Barrier islands on the north coast of the Gulf of Mexico are an internationally important coastal resource. Each spring hundreds of thousands of Nearctic-Neotropical songbirds crossing the Gulf of Mexico during spring migration use these islands because they provide the first landfall for individuals following a trans-Gulf migratory route. The effects of climate change, particularly sea level rise, may negatively impact habitat availability for migrants on barrier islands. Our objectives were (1 to confirm the use of St. George Island, Florida by trans-Gulf migrants and (2 to determine whether forested stopover habitat will be available for migrants on St. George Island following sea level rise. We used avian transect data, geographic information systems, remote sensing, and simulation modelling to investigate the potential effects of three different sea level rise scenarios (0.28 m, 0.82 m, and 2 m on habitat availability for trans-Gulf migrants. We found considerable use of the island by spring trans-Gulf migrants. Migrants were most abundant in areas with low elevation, high canopy height, and high coverage of forests and scrub/shrub. A substantial percentage of forest (44% will be lost by 2100 assuming moderate sea level rise (0.82 m. Thus, as sea level rise progresses, less forests will be available for migrants during stopover. Many migratory bird species' populations are declining, and degradation of barrier island stopover habitat may further increase the cost of migration for many individuals. To preserve this coastal resource, conservation and wise management of migratory stopover areas, especially near ecological barriers like the Gulf of Mexico, will be essential as sea levels rise.

  9. Distribution of sea snakes in the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park: observations from 10 yrs of baited remote underwater video station (BRUVS) sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udyawer, Vinay; Cappo, Mike; Simpfendorfer, Colin A.; Heupel, Michelle R.; Lukoschek, Vimoksalehi

    2014-09-01

    The distributions of three species of sea snake (olive sea snake: Aipysurus laevis, spine-bellied sea snake: Lapemis curtus, and ornate sea snake: Hydrophis ocellatus) were estimated over 14° of latitude within the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park (GBRMP) using data from baited remote underwater video stations (BRUVS). A total of 2,471 deployments of BRUVS were made in a range of locations, in sites open and closed to trawl fishing. Sightings of sea snakes were analysed alongside six spatial factors [depth, relative distance across (longitude) and along (latitude) the GBRMP, proximity to land, proximity to the nearest reef, and habitat complexity] to determine the factors that most strongly influenced the distribution and abundance of sea snakes. The results showed a strong latitudinal effect on the distribution of all three sea snake species, with the highest densities and diversities occurring in central and southern GBRMP locations, while the northern Great Barrier Reef was relatively depauperate in terms of both occurrence and diversity. Shallow inshore areas were identified as key habitats for A. laevis and L. curtus, whereas deeper offshore habitats were most important for H. ocellatus. No significant difference was found in the mean number of snakes sighted per hour between sites open and closed to trawling. There was a high degree of congruence in the distribution of sea snakes estimated from the BRUVS data and results from previous trawl and underwater visual surveys, demonstrating the utility of BRUVS to estimate distribution and relative abundance in these species of sea snake at broad spatial scales in a non-extractive manner.

  10. Bathing in a magnesium-rich Dead Sea salt solution improves skin barrier function, enhances skin hydration, and reduces inflammation in atopic dry skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proksch, Ehrhardt; Nissen, Hans-Peter; Bremgartner, Markus; Urquhart, Colin

    2005-02-01

    Magnesium salts, the prevalent minerals in Dead Sea water, are known to exhibit favorable effects in inflammatory diseases. We examined the efficacy of bathing atopic subjects in a salt rich in magnesium chloride from deep layers of the Dead Sea (Mavena(R) Dermaline Mg(46) Dead Sea salt, Mavena AG, Belp, Switzerland). Volunteers with atopic dry skin submerged one forearm for 15 min in a bath solution containing 5% Dead Sea salt. The second arm was submerged in tap water as control. Before the study and at weeks 1-6, transepidermal water loss (TEWL), skin hydration, skin roughness, and skin redness were determined. We found one subgroup with a normal and one subgroup with an elevated TEWL before the study. Bathing in the Dead Sea salt solution significantly improved skin barrier function compared with the tap water-treated control forearm in the subgroup with elevated basal TEWL. Skin hydration was enhanced on the forearm treated with the Dead Sea salt in each group, which means the treatment moisturized the skin. Skin roughness and redness of the skin as a marker for inflammation were significantly reduced after bathing in the salt solution. This demonstrates that bathing in the salt solution was well tolerated, improved skin barrier function, enhanced stratum corneum hydration, and reduced skin roughness and inflammation. We suggest that the favorable effects of bathing in the Dead Sea salt solution are most likely related to the high magnesium content. Magnesium salts are known to bind water, influence epidermal proliferation and differentiation, and enhance permeability barrier repair.

  11. Hydrodynamic, neotectonic and climatic control of the evolution of a barrier beach in the microtidal environment of the NE Ionian Sea (eastern Mediterranean)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulos, Serafim E.; Ghionis, George; Verykiou, Efthymia; Roussakis, Grigoris; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Karditsa, Aikaterini; Alexandrakis, George; Petrakis, Stelios; Sifnioti, Dafni; Panagiotopoulos, Ioannis P.; Andris, Periklis; Georgiou, Panos

    2015-02-01

    The existence of barrier beaches is crucial, as they act as a buffer zone to the associated wetlands, whilst they are sensitive to climate change. The present study offers an insight into the processes controlling the formation and evolution of the Gyra barrier beach (NW coast of the island of Lefkada) in the microtidal, tectonically very active Ionian Sea under the influence of regional climate change and human interference. Such investigations are sparse in the literature. Existing information regarding regional geology, sediment availability and human intervention is combined with the collection of geophysical data, field observations and simulations of nearshore hydro- and sediment dynamics, analysis of climatic variations with respect to offshore wind/wave patterns (including storminess), in situ measurements of recent morphometric changes (2006-2008) and historical shoreline changes (since the 1960s). The recent formation and evolution (mostly under retreat) of the Gyra barrier beach is shown to be the combined result of the regional seismotectonic setting, relative increase of sea level, coastal sediment transport patterns, as well as human impact (negative) on primarily terrestrial sediment influxes. The current erosional trend of the barrier beach is associated with a shift in the wind and wave direction (from SW to NW) of extreme storm events in the Ionian Sea since the 1980s. The regional climatic variations of the last decades are well correlated with the trend of the North Atlantic Oscillation.

  12. Historical changes in the Mississippi-Alabama barrier-island chain and the roles of extreme storms, sea level, and human activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, R.A.

    2008-01-01

    Barrier-island chains worldwide are undergoing substantial changes, and their futures remain uncertain. An historical analysis of a barrier-island chain in the north-central Gulf of Mexico shows that the Mississippi barriers are undergoing rapid systematic land loss and translocation associated with: (1) unequal lateral transfer of sand related to greater updrift erosion compared to downdrift deposition; (2) barrier narrowing resulting from simultaneous erosion of shores along the Gulf and Mississippi Sound; and (3) barrier segmentation related to storm breaching. Dauphin Island, Alabama, is also losing land for some of the same reasons as it gradually migrates landward. The principal causes of land loss are frequent intense storms, a relative rise in sea level, and a sediment-budget deficit. Considering the predicted trends for storms and sea level related to global warming, it is certain that the Mississippi-Alabama (MS-AL) barrier islands will continue to lose land area at a rapid rate unless the trend of at least one causal factor reverses. Historical land-loss trends and engineering records show that progressive increases in land-loss rate correlate with nearly simultaneous deepening of channels dredged across the outer bars of the three tidal inlets maintained for deep-draft shipping. This correlation indicates that channel-maintenance activities along the MS-AL barriers have impacted the sediment budget by disrupting the alongshore sediment transport system and progressively reducing sand supply. Direct management of this causal factor can be accomplished by strategically placing dredged sediment where adjacent barrier-island shores will receive it for island nourishment and rebuilding.

  13. Tourism Development in the Dutch Wadden Area : Spatial-Temporal Characteristics and Monitoring Needs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijtsma, Frans J; Broersma, Lourens; Daams, Michiel N; Hoekstra, H; Werner, Gelijn

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents a spatial and temporal analysis of tourism in the Dutch Wadden area and identifies policy dilemmas and monitoring needs. The analysis is temporal because historical, current and future aspects of tourism development are addressed; it is spatial because the spatial differentiaton

  14. Evolution of foredune barriers at Admiral Bay, Western Australia - Implications for Holocene relative sea levels and extreme wave events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Max; May, Simon Matthias; Scheffers, Anja; Squire, Peter; Pint, Anna; Kelletat, Dieter; Brückner, Helmut

    2014-05-01

    Only few geomorphological studies on the Canning Coast of Western Australia exist to date, most probably reflecting its remoteness and low population density. However, WA's annual gross state product (GSP) growth of ~5 % during the past decade and the highest GSP per capita nationwide resulting from a mining boom increase public attention as well as the demand for precise information on landscape inventory and evolution. In this paper, new data from a sequence of vegetated foredune barriers, gradually being eroded by a migrating estuary inside the macrotidal Admiral Bay (also known as McKelson Creek, Whistle Creek or Panganunganyjal), 110 km southwest of Broome, are presented. Based on sediment cores, DGPS-based elevation transects, and stratigraphical analyses on outcrops of the relict foredunes, we aim at (i) reconstructing lateral coastal changes during the Holocene, (ii) drawing inferences on relative sea-level (RSL) change, and (iii) identifying and dating imprints of extreme-wave events. Sedimentary analyses comprise documentation of bedding structures, foraminiferal content and macrofaunal remains (including shell taphonomy), grain size, and organic matter. Chronological contexts are established using 26 14C-AMS datings. Marine flooding of the pre-Holocene base landward of the 2.5 km-wide foredunes can be pinpointed to 7400-7200 cal BP. A mangrove ecosystem established and was quickly replaced by intertidal coarse sands after only 200-400 years. The high-energy intertidal environment prevailed until c. 4000 cal BP before turning into the present supralittoral mudflat environment. At that time, coastal regression led to beach progradation and isochronic formation of foredune barriers. Drivers of progradation were a stable RSL or gradual RSL fall after the mid-Holocene highstand and a positive sand budget provided by high sublittoral productivity of calcareous shells in combination with erosion at the adjacent sandstone capes and longshore drift. The foredunes

  15. Depredation of common eider, Somateria mollissima, nests on a central Beaufort Sea barrier island: A case where no one wins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, J.A.; Lacroix, D.L.; Flint, P.L.

    2007-01-01

    Along the central Beaufort Sea, Pacific Common Eiders (Somateria mollissima v-nigra) nest on unvegetated, barrier islands; often near nesting Glaucous Gulls (Larus hyperboreus). Nest-site choice likely reflects a strategy of predator avoidance: nesting on islands to avoid mammalian predators and near territorial gulls to avoid other avian predators. We observed a nesting colony of Common Eiders from first nest initiation through nesting termination on Egg Island near Prudhoe Bay, Alaska (2002 - 2003). Resident gulls depredated many eider nests, mostly during initiation. All nests failed when an Arctic Fox (Alopex lagopus) visited the island and flushed hens from their nests, exposing the eggs to depredation by the fox and gulls (resident and non-resident). Common Eiders actively defended nests from gulls, but not from foxes. Likely all three species (i.e., eiders, gulls, and foxes) ultimately achieved negligible benefit from their nest-site selection or predatory activity: (a) island nesting provided no safety from mammalian predators for eiders or gulls, (b) for Common Eiders, nesting near gulls increased egg loss, (c) for Glaucous Gulls, nesting near colonial eiders may have reduced nest success by attracting the fox, and (d) for Arctic Foxes, the depredation was of questionable value, as most eggs were cached and probably not recoverable (due to damage from fall storms). Thus, the predator-prey interactions we observed appear to be a case where little or no fitness advantage was realized by any of the species involved.

  16. Evidence of antibiotic resistance in Enterobacteriales isolated from green sea turtles, Chelonia mydas on the Great Barrier Reef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahasan, Md Shamim; Picard, Jacqueline; Elliott, Lisa; Kinobe, Robert; Owens, Leigh; Ariel, Ellen

    2017-07-15

    This study investigated Enterobacteriales and their antimicrobial resistance in green sea turtles captured adjacent to the central Great Barrier Reef (GBR) and proximate to urban development. Cloacal swabs were taken from 73 green turtles between 2015 and 2016. A total of 154 out of 341 Gram-negative bacterial isolates were identified as Enterobacteriales that represent 16 different species from 9 different genera. The dominant isolates were Citrobacter (30.52%), Edwardsiella (21.43%) and Escherichia (12.34%). The resistance against 12 antibiotics belonging to 6 different classes was determined. The isolates showed highest resistance to β-lactam antibiotics (78.57%) followed by quinolone (50%) and tetracycline classes (46.1%). Approximately one-third (37.7%) of the isolates identified exhibited multidrug-resistance. Isolates recovered from rehabilitated turtles were significantly multidrug resistant (p<0.009) compared to isolates from other study sites. These results provide baseline information on antimicrobial resistance while revealing gaps for further research to evaluate the level of pollution in the GBR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Annual mean sea level and its sensitivity to wind climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerkema, Theo; Duran Matute, Matias

    2017-04-01

    Changes in relative mean sea level affect coastal areas in various ways, such as the risk of flooding, the evolution of barrier island systems, or the development of salt marshes. Long-term trends in these changes are partly masked by variability on shorter time scales. Some of this variability, for instance due to wind waves and tides (with the exception of long-period tides), is easily averaged out. In contrast, inter-annual variability is found to be irregular and large, of the order of several decimeters, as is evident from tide gauge records. This is why the climatic trend, typically of a few millimeters per year, can only be reliably identified by examining a record that is long enough to outweigh the inter-annual and decadal variabilities. In this presentation we examine the relation between the annual wind conditions from meteorological records and annual mean sea level along the Dutch coast. To do this, we need reliable and consistent long-term wind records. Some wind records from weather stations in the Netherlands date back to the 19th century, but they are unsuitable for trend analysis because of changes in location, height, surroundings, instrument type or protocol. For this reason, we will use only more recent, homogeneous wind records, from the past two decades. The question then is whether such a relatively short record is sufficient to find a convincing relation with annual mean sea level. It is the purpose of this work to demonstrate that the answer is positive and to suggest methods to find and exploit such a relation. We find that at the Dutch coast, southwesterly winds are dominant in the wind climate, but the west-east direction stands out as having the highest correlation with annual mean sea level. For different stations in the Dutch Wadden Sea and along the coast, we find a qualitatively similar pattern, although the precise values of the correlations vary. The inter-annual variability of mean sea level can already be largely explained by

  18. Ocean barriers and glaciation: evidence for explosive radiation of mitochondrial lineages in the Antarctic sea slug Doris kerguelenensis (Mollusca, Nudibranchia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Nerida G; Schrödl, M; Halanych, Kenneth M

    2009-03-01

    Strong currents and deep passages of water can be barriers for larval dispersal of continental marine animals, but potential effects on direct developers are under-investigated. We examined the genetic structure of Doris kerguelenensis, a directly developing sea slug that occurs across the Drake Passage, the body of water separating Antarctica from South America. We found deep mitochondrial divergences within populations on both sides of the Drake Passage, and South American animals formed multiple sister-group relationships with Antarctic animals. A generalised molecular clock suggested these trans-Drake pairs diverged during the Pliocene–Pleistocene, after the formation of the Drake Passage. Statistical parsimony methods recovered 29 separate haplotype networks (many sympatric) that likely correlate with allopatric events caused by repeated glacial cycles. Data from 16S were congruent but more conserved than COI, and the estimated ancestral 16S haplotype was widespread. The marked difference in the substitution rates between these two mitochondrial genes results in different estimates of connectivity. Demographic analyses on networks revealed some evidence for selection and expanding populations. Contrasting with the Northern Hemisphere, glaciation in Antarctica appears to have increased rather than reduced genetic diversity. This suggests orbitally forced range dynamics based on Northern Hemisphere phylogeography do not hold for Antarctica. The diverse lineages found in D. kerguelenensis point towards a recent, explosive radiation, likely reflecting multiple refuges during glaciation events, combined with limited subsequent dispersal. Whether recognised as cryptic species or not, genetic diversity in Antarctic marine invertebrates appears higher than expected from morphological analyses, and supports the Antarctic biodiversity pump phenomenon.

  19. Distribution and abundance of anadromous Sea Lamprey Spawners in a fragmented stream: Current status and potential range expansion following barrier removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zydlewski, Joseph; Gardner, Cory; Coghlan Jr., Stephen M.

    2012-01-01

    Dams fragment watersheds and prevent anadromous fishes from reaching historic spawning habitat. Sedgeunkedunk Stream, a small tributary to the Penobscot River (Maine), has been the focus of efforts to reestablish marine-freshwater connectivity and restore anadromous fishes via the removal of two barriers to fish migration. Currently, Petromyzon marinus (Sea Lamprey) is the only anadromous fish known to spawn successfully in the stream downstream of the lowermost dam. Here, we describe the distribution and abundance of a spawning population of Sea Lamprey in Sedgeunkedunk Stream, prior to and in anticipation of habitat increase after the completion of one barrier removal. In 2008, we estimated the abundance of Sea Lamprey and its nests using daily stream surveys and an open-population mark-recapture model. We captured 47 Sea Lamprey and implanted each with a PIT tag so that we could track movements and nest associations of individual fish. The spawning migration began on 18 June, and the last living individual was observed on 27 June. We located 31 nests, distributed from head-of-tide to the lowermost dam; no spawners or nests were observed in the tidally influenced zone or upstream of this dam. Mean longevity in the stream and the number of nests attended were correlated with arrival date; early migrants were alive longer and attended more nests than later migrants. Males were more likely to be observed away from a nest, or attending three or more nests, than were females, which attended usually one or two nests. We observed a negative association between nest abundance and substrate cover by fine sediment. Based on their observed movements in the system, and the extent of their habitat use, we anticipate that spawning Sea Lamprey will recolonize formerly inaccessible habitat after dam removals.

  20. Deep feelings around a shallow coast. A spatial analysis of tourism jobs and the attractivity of nature in the Dutch Wadden area

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijtsma, Frans J.; Daams, Michiel N.; Farjon, Hans; Buijs, Arjen E.

    2012-01-01

    The Dutch Wadden area is an internationally renowned natural area with World Heritage status. Its ecological uniqueness can be attributed to its shallow coastal waters. However, the Wadden area is also a rural area in search of competitive economic activity so as to provide employment to its populat

  1. Deep feelings around a shallow coast. A spatial analysis of tourism jobs and the attractivity of nature in the Dutch Wadden area

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijtsma, Frans J.; Daams, Michiel N.; Farjon, Hans; Buijs, Arjen E.

    2012-01-01

    The Dutch Wadden area is an internationally renowned natural area with World Heritage status. Its ecological uniqueness can be attributed to its shallow coastal waters. However, the Wadden area is also a rural area in search of competitive economic activity so as to provide employment to its populat

  2. Intestinal barrier function of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L. post smolts is reduced by common sea cage environments and suggested as a possible physiological welfare indicator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellis Tim

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fish farmed under high intensity aquaculture conditions are subjected to unnatural environments that may cause stress. Therefore awareness of how to maintain good health and welfare of farmed fish is important. For Atlantic salmon held in sea cages, water flow, dissolved oxygen (DO levels and temperature will fluctuate over time and the fish can at times be exposed to detrimentally low DO levels and high temperatures. This experimental study investigates primary and secondary stress responses of Atlantic salmon post smolts to long-term exposure to reduced and fluctuating DO levels and high water temperatures, mimicking situations in the sea cages. Plasma cortisol levels and cortisol release to the water were assessed as indicators of the primary stress response and intestinal barrier integrity and physiological functions as indicators of secondary responses to changes in environmental conditions. Results Plasma cortisol levels were elevated in fish exposed to low (50% and 60% saturation DO levels and low temperature (9°C, at days 9, 29 and 48. The intestinal barrier function, measured as electrical resistance (TER and permeability of mannitol at the end of the experiment, were reduced at 50% DO, in both proximal and distal intestine. When low DO levels were combined with high temperature (16°C, plasma cortisol levels were elevated in the cyclic 1:5 h at 85%:50% DO group and fixed 50% DO group compared to the control (85% DO group at day 10 but not at later time points. The intestinal barrier function was clearly disturbed in the 50% DO group; TER was reduced in both intestinal regions concomitant with increased paracellular permeability in the distal region. Conclusions This study reveals that adverse environmental conditions (low water flow, low DO levels at low and high temperature, that can occur in sea cages, elicits primary and secondary stress responses in Atlantic salmon post smolts. The intestinal barrier function

  3. The Impacts of Back-Beach Barriers on Sandy Beach Morphology Along the California Coast and Implications for Coastal Change with Future Sea-Level Rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harden, E. L.

    2010-12-01

    Coastal squeeze, or foreshore narrowing, is a result of marine encroachment, such as sea-level rise in the presence of a back-beach barrier, terrestrial encroachment, such as coastal development, or both. In California, the permanent coastal population increased by almost 10 million people between 1980 and 2003, and an additional 130 million beachgoers visit Southern California beaches each year. Beaches in California are an important component of the state and federal economy and provide hundreds of thousands of jobs. Approximately 14% of the California coast from Marin County to the Mexican border is artificially armored with seawalls, rip rap, or revetment, more than half of which protects back-beach developments or lower-lying dynamic regions like harbors and dunes. Many sandy beaches that do not have back-beach armoring are still restricted by commercial and residential infrastructure, parking lots, and roadways. Although these types of coastal infrastructure are not back-beach barriers by intentional design like seawalls and rip rap, they still restrict beaches from landward migration and can cause significant placement loss of the beach. Nearly 67 km, or 44% of the total length of sandy coastline from Long Beach to the U.S.-Mexico border is backed by such infrastructure. This study is part of a broader effort to catalog the extent to which California’s beaches are restricted in the back beach, to describe the effects of back-beach barriers on sandy beach morphology, and to predict how these different beaches might behave with future sea-level rise. Beach morphology, shoreface characteristics, and historical rates of shoreline change were compared between select beaches with back-beach barriers and unrestricted beaches using 1997 LiDAR data and shoreline rates of change published in the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Assessment of Shoreline Change report. Although preliminary results of the morphological analysis show that there is no statistically

  4. Decline of the North Sea houting: protective measures for an endangered anadromous fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Niels; Deacon, Michael; Koed, Anders

    2012-01-01

    Once an abundant fish species in the rivers of the Wadden Sea in northwest Europe, the North Sea houting Coregonus oxyrinchus (NSH) was at the brink of extinction 25 yr ago. The very last stronghold for this species was in the small Danish River Vidaa. In an attempt to preserve this anadromous...... whitefish species, juveniles were hatchery-reared and stocked in 6 Danish rivers flowing into the Wadden Sea. These stocking efforts were fairly successful, and the houting established populations in at least 2 of the rivers, but the underlying problem of habitat degradation and migration obstacles...... they were initially PIT-tagged, indicating some exchange/straying between adjacent rivers. Overall there is a good chance that this unique species was saved in the 11th hour by intervention from managers and the EU...

  5. CaCO3 dissolution by holothurians (sea cucumber): a case study from One Tree Reef, Great Barrier Reef

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, K.; Silverman, J.; Kravitz, B.; Woolsey, E.; Eriksson, H.; Schneider-Mor, A.; Barbosa, S.; Rivlin, T.; Byrne, M.; Caldeira, K.

    2012-12-01

    Holothurians (sea cucumbers) are among the largest and most important deposit feeder in coral reefs. They play a role in nutrient and CaCO3 cycling within the reef structure. As a result of their digestive process they secrete alkalinity due to CaCO3 dissolution and organic matter degradation forming CO2 and ammonium. In a survey at station DK13 on One Three Reef we found that the population density of holothurians was > 1 individual m-2. The dominant sea cucumber species Holothuria leucospilota was collected from DK13. The increase in alkalinity due to CaCO3 dissolution in aquaria incubations was measured to be 47±7 μmol kg-1 in average per individual. Combining this dissolution rate with the sea cucumbers concentrations at DK13 suggest that they may account for a dissolution rate of 34.9±17.8 mmol m-2 day-1, which is equivalent to about half of night time community dissolution measured in DK13. This indicates that in reefs where the sea cucumber population is healthy and protected from fishing they can be locally important in the CaCO3 cycle. Preliminary result suggests that the CaCO3 dissolution rates are not affected by the chemistry of the sea water they are incubated in. Measurements of the empty digestive track volume of two sea cucumbers H. atra and Stichopus herrmanni were 36 ± 4 ml and 151 ± 14 ml, respectively. Based on these measurements it is estimated that these species process 19 ± 2kg and 80 ± 7kg CaCO3 sand yr-1 per individual, respectively. The annual dissolution rates of H. atra and S. herrmanni are 6.5±1.9g and 9.6±1.4g, respectively, suggest that 0.05±0.02% and 0.1±0.02% of the CaCO3 processed through their gut annually is dissolved. During the incubations the CaCO3 dissolution was 0.07±0.01%, 0.04±0.01% and 0.21±0.05% of the fecal casts for H. atra, H. leucospilota and S. herrmanni, respectively. Our result that the primary parameter determining the CaCO3 dissolution by sea cucumber is the amount of carbonate send in their gut

  6. Major changes in the ecology of the Wadden Sea : Human impacts, ecosystem engineering and sediment dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eriksson, Britas Klemens; van der Heide, Tjisse; van de Koppel, Johan; Piersma, Theunis; van der Veer, Henk W.; Olff, Han

    Shallow soft-sediment systems are mostly dominated by species that, by strongly affecting sediment dynamics, modify their local environment. Such ecosystem engineering species can have either sediment-stabilizing or sediment-destabilizing effects on tidal flats. They interplay with abiotic forcing

  7. Cyclic behavior of sandy shoals on the ebb-tidal deltas of the Wadden Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ridderinkhof, W.; Hoekstra, P.; van der Vegt, M.; de Swart, H. E.

    2016-01-01

    Ebb-tidal deltas are bulges of sand that are located seaward of tidal inlets. Many of these deltas feature shoals that cyclically form and migrate towards the coast. The average period between successive shoals that attach to the coast varies among different inlets. In this study, a quantitative ass

  8. Major changes in the ecology of the Wadden Sea: human impacts, ecosystem engineering and sediment dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eriksson, B.K.; van der Heide, T.; Van de Koppel, J.; Piersma, T.; Van der Veer, H.W.; Olff, H.

    2010-01-01

    Shallow soft-sediment systems are mostly dominated by species that, by strongly affecting sediment dynamics, modify their local environment. Such ecosystem engineering species can have either sediment-stabilizing or sediment-destabilizing effects on tidal flats. They interplay with abiotic forcing c

  9. Major changes in the ecology of the Wadden Sea : Human impacts, ecosystem engineering and sediment dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eriksson, Britas Klemens; van der Heide, Tjisse; van de Koppel, Johan; Piersma, Theunis; van der Veer, Henk W.; Olff, Han

    2010-01-01

    Shallow soft-sediment systems are mostly dominated by species that, by strongly affecting sediment dynamics, modify their local environment. Such ecosystem engineering species can have either sediment-stabilizing or sediment-destabilizing effects on tidal flats. They interplay with abiotic forcing c

  10. Erodibility of a mixed mudflat dominated by microphytobenthos and Cerastoderma edule, East Frisian Wadden Sea, Germany

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thorbjørn Joest; Lanuru, Mahatma; van Bernem, Carlo

    2010-01-01

    ). The erodibility of the sediment showed strong temporal variation with high erosion thresholds in spring and late summer and significantly lower thresholds during the rest of the study period. The erosion thresholds were strongly dependent on the contents of chlorophyll a (chl a) and colloidal carbohydrates, both...

  11. Modelling the effects of seed mussel collectors on the western Dutch Wadden Sea ecosystem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkman, A.G.

    2013-01-01

    The bottom fishery for seed mussels is bound to be replaced by alternative methods of seed collection. This change is a result of an agreement between the Dutch Government, fishermen and nature protection organizations. Seed mussel collectors (abbreviated: MZI) are most promising as an alternative f

  12. Metapopulation structure in the lagoon cockle Cerastoderma lamarcki in the northern Wadden Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reise, Karsten

    2003-01-01

    Benthic invertebrates in discontinuous inshore habitats and with short or no pelagic larval dispersal are likely to exhibit regional metapopulation dynamics with partially isolated local populations. Near the island of Sylt, the bivalve Cerastoderma (Cardium) lamarcki (Reeve, 1844, syn. in part with C. glaucum Bruguiére, 1789) was widespread in intertidal seagrass beds, coexisting with the sibling species C. edule (Linné, 1758). However, the last C. lamarcki in this habitat was found in 1980. At present the lagoon cockle is restricted to disjunct ditches, creeks and ponds within island salt marshes. There it differs in year-class structure between localities. Successful recruitment events did not coincide. At one locality, a period with regular recruitment was followed by 5 years of recruitment failure, resulting in an overaged population probably at the rim of extinction. In a nearby brackish pond, extinction was followed by recolonization 3 years later. Other lagoonal habitats which seem to be suitable are without cockles. It is speculated that small and isolated habitats occasionally receive colonizers by eggs and juveniles adhering to avian vectors.

  13. Strengthening coastal zone management in the Wadden Sea by applying ‘knowledge-practice interfaces’

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Puente Rodriguez, D.; Giebels, D.; Jonge, de V.N.

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge management (e.g., production, mobilization, integration) is key to achieve socio-ecological sustainability and to handle the many challenges that distress coastal zones – e.g. finding a balance between ecological conservation and economic development. Building on the concept of

  14. Visions of nature and environmental sustainability : Shellfish harvesting in the Dutch Wadden Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swart, JAA; van der Windt, HJ

    The concept of sustainability has several, sometimes contrasting, meanings that may generate confusion, misunderstanding, and conflict concerning conservation and restoration practices. It is therefore desirable to clarify the concept of sustainability, thereby potentially contributing to mutual

  15. Optical dating of young tidal sediments in the Danish Wadden Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Anni Tindahl; Murray, A. S.; Andersen, Thorbjørn Joest

    2007-01-01

    reliable and reproducible results in cores from sub-, inter- and supra-tidal sediments, ranging from only a few years up to ~1000 years old, confirming its value in the estimation of estuarine accretion rates. With OSL it is, for the first time, possible to date sediment cores from silty and sandy tidal...... We have tested the applicability of optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) to the dating of young estuarine sediments (dating. The degree of bleaching before deposition...... is investigated by examining the age trend in various sediment cores, and where possible, by comparison with independent age control provided by 210Pb dating. The consistency between optical ages and 210Pb ages is shown to be satisfactory on a time-scale down to only a few years. We conclude that OSL provides...

  16. Breaking biogeographic barriers: Molecular and morphological evidences for the Lessepsian invasion of soritid foraminifers to the Mediterranean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkado, G.; Abramovich, S.; Abdu, U.; Almogi-Labin, A.; Pawlowski, J.; Holzmann, M.

    2012-04-01

    In recent years we have been witnessing a large-scale invasion (tropicalization) into the Eastern Mediterranean of many alien tropical species. The main factors that promote this process includes: 1. The ongoing warming of sea surface temperatures in the last decades. 2. The opening of the Suez Canal in 1869 that created an artificial connection between the Mediterranean and the Indo-Pacific realm of the Red Sea. This connection resulted in an ongoing unidirectional migration (termed the Lessepsian migration) of hundreds of species from Red Sea to the Mediterranean Sea. 3. The closure of the Nile River by the High Aswan Dam that blocked its nutrient discharge and created hyper-oligotrophic conditions in the Eastern Mediterranean. Larger symbiont-bearing benthic foraminifera were chosen in this study as an ideal target group for documenting this process. Their main advantage is that some of these species are clearly Indo-Pacific migrants while others represent re-encountering of allopatric populations that were isolated for at least 5.5 m.y. The first stage of this study involved the genetic characterization of soritids. Living specimens of Sorites and Amphisorus morphospecies were collected from the Red Sea and the Mediterranean and their ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences were determined in order to see the genetic relation between these two "recently connected" locations. The morphological characteristics of each specimen were documented by Scanning Electron Microscope micrographs and digital imaging. In the Red Sea, the specimens were collected from two shallow stations (5-6 m water depth) in the Gulf of Elat, representing different habitats: 1. Tur-Yam, characterizes by abundant Halophila sea grass. 2. The Inter University Institution in Elat, characterizes by pebbles with no sea grass. In the Mediterranean, specimens were collected along the shore of Northern Israel at Shikmona, Haifa, one of the few locations along the Israeli Mediterranean coast where living

  17. Impact of sea-level rise on cross-shore sediment transport on fetch-limited barrier reef island beaches under modal and cyclonic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldock, T E; Golshani, A; Atkinson, A; Shimamoto, T; Wu, S; Callaghan, D P; Mumby, P J

    2015-08-15

    A one-dimensional wave model is combined with an analytical sediment transport model to investigate the likely influence of sea-level rise on net cross-shore sediment transport on fetch-limited barrier reef and lagoon island beaches. The modelling considers if changes in the nearshore wave height and wave period in the lagoon induced by different water levels over the reef flat are likely to lead to net offshore or onshore movement of sediment. The results indicate that the effects of SLR on net sediment movement are highly variable and controlled by the bathymetry of the reef and lagoon. A significant range of reef-lagoon bathymetry, and notably shallow and narrow reefs, appears to lead hydrodynamic conditions and beaches that are likely to be stable or even accrete under SLR. Loss of reef structural complexity, particularly on the reef flat, increases the chance of sediment transport away from beaches and offshore.

  18. Reconstruction of Holocene coastal foredune progradation using luminescence dating — An example from the Świna barrier (southern Baltic Sea, NW Poland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimann, Tony; Tsukamoto, Sumiko; Harff, Jan; Osadczuk, Krystyna; Frechen, Manfred

    2011-09-01

    Two sandy spits on the Świna barrier (Wolin and Uznam) provide a very detailed succession of Holocene coastal foredunes and dunes and are regarded as key sites along the southern Baltic Sea coast. Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) dating is proven to be a powerful tool for the reconstruction of Holocene coastal spit evolution and foredune accretion; quartz extracted from the coastal sediments in the study area provides excellent properties for OSL dating. The OSL age from the innermost dune indicates that spit development of the Świna barrier started immediately after rapid sea-level rise of the Littorina transgression decelerated at ~ 6.6 ka. A significant change in the foredune progradation rate occurred during the late Subatlantic transgression at ~ 1.2 ka (800 AD), when migration rates decreased from 2.6 ± 0.7 m a - 1 to 1.3 ± 0.4 m a - 1 . Progradation accelerated again during the "Little Ice Age" between 1550 and 1850 AD. The systematic dating of 28 samples reveals six hiatuses during foredune succession, at ~ 2100 BC, ~ 900 BC, 200 BC-200 AD, ~ 600 AD, ~ 1000 AD, and ~ 1600 AD. The timing of these hiatuses correlates with the phases of transgressive dune development in the surrounding area (Troszyn and Świna) and with phases of increased aeolian activity in other parts of North- and West-Europe. We conclude that four of these phases of foredune erosion/instability and aeolian sediment mobilisation were caused by general climate shifts to cooler and stormier conditions at ~ 2200 BC, ~ 900 BC, ~ 600 AD, and at ~ 1600 AD, the latter corresponding to the "Little Ice Age". The period of increased aeolian activity around 1000 AD is probably to a phase of intensive forest clearance in Central Europe. In contrast, the systematic foredune accretion and foredune plain growth correlates to periods of positive sediment budget, milder and calmer climate, and an intact vegetation cover.

  19. Cross-shelf exchanges between the Coral Sea and the Great Barrier Reef lagoon determined from a regional-scale numerical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiller, Andreas; Herzfeld, Mike; Brinkman, Richard; Rizwi, Farhan; Andrewartha, John

    2015-10-01

    Analyses of the variability in a 3.5-year run of a hydrodynamic model developed for simulating the circulation of the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) are presented. Sea-surface temperature, salinity, currents and cross-shelf transports between the GBR lagoon and the deep ocean offshore are investigated and compare well to available observations. Water mass intrusions and flushing events are critical factors in determining the health of coral reef and continental shelf ecosystems. Results from tracer release experiments provide a synoptic view of the variability of residence times within the GBR and identify critical regions of shelf-ocean exchange. One such region of significant tracer contribution to the shelf is identified in the vicinity of the Pompey Reefs in an area characterised by increased frequency of upslope transported water. Another location of enhanced flux on to the shelf exists in the region bracketing Palm Passage, where the reef matrix is very open, and provides little obstacle to cross-shelf exchange. The Palm Passage location is the origin of a northwards plume of elevated concentration. The model circulation provides a robust and useful picture of the Great Barrier Reef, rendering the model suitable for providing input to biogeochemical and sediment models to simulate, at a broad scale, the ecosystem health, water quality, transport and fate of water and waterborne material, moving through catchments and into the GBR lagoon.

  20. Politiek door de staten: doel- of waarderationeel handelen in het besloten overleg over de Wadden en het openbaar beraad over de ecologische hoofdstructuur

    OpenAIRE

    2001-01-01

    POLITICS BY PROVINCE: Goal-oriented rational action or value-oriented rational action in closed debate on the Wadden region and public consultation on the ecological infrastructure General This thesis is a study of political conduct, and of provincial politics in particular. It is based on three research projects. The first two research projects are empirical studies that examine, respectively, the functioning of the discussion platform for government bodies relating to the Wadden Islands are...

  1. Distribution of two species of sea snakes, Aipysurus laevis and Emydocephalus annulatus, in the southern Great Barrier Reef: metapopulation dynamics, marine protected areas and conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukoschek, V.; Heatwole, H.; Grech, A.; Burns, G.; Marsh, H.

    2007-06-01

    Aipysurus laevis and Emydocephalus annulatus typically occur in spatially discrete populations, characteristic of metapopulations; however, little is known about the factors influencing the spatial and temporal stability of populations or whether specific conservation strategies, such as networks of marine protected areas, will ensure the persistence of species. Classification tree analyses of 35 years of distribution data (90 reefs, surveyed 1-11 times) in the southern Great Barrier Reef (GBR) revealed that longitude was a major factor determining the status of A. laevis on reefs (present = 38, absent = 38 and changed = 14). Reef exposure and reef area were also important; however, these factors did not specifically account for the population fluctuations and the recent local extinctions of A. laevis in this region. There were no relationships between the status of E. annulatus (present = 16, absent = 68 and changed = 6) and spatial or physical variables. Moreover, prior protection status of reefs did not account for the distribution of either species. Biotic factors, such as habitat and prey availability and the distribution of predators, which may account for the observed patterns of distribution, are discussed. The potential for inter-population exchange among sea snake populations is poorly understood, as is the degree of protection that will be afforded to sea snakes by the recently implemented network of No-take areas in the GBR. Data from this study provide a baseline for evaluating the responses of A. laevis and E. annulatus populations to changes in biotic factors and the degree of protection afforded on reefs within an ecosystem network of No-take marine protected areas in the southern GBR.

  2. The influence of sea level and cyclones on Holocene reef flat development: Middle Island, central Great Barrier Reef

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, E. J.; Smithers, S. G.; Lewis, S. E.; Clark, T. R.; Zhao, J. X.

    2016-09-01

    The geomorphology and chronostratigraphy of the reef flat (including microatoll ages and elevations) were investigated to better understand the long-term development of the reef at Middle Island, inshore central Great Barrier Reef. Eleven cores across the fringing reef captured reef initiation, framework accretion and matrix sediments, allowing a comprehensive appreciation of reef development. Precise uranium-thorium ages obtained from coral skeletons revealed that the reef initiated ~7873 ± 17 years before present (yBP), and most of the reef was emplaced in the following 1000 yr. Average rates of vertical reef accretion ranged between 3.5 and 7.6 mm yr-1. Reef framework was dominated by branching corals ( Acropora and Montipora). An age hiatus of ~5000 yr between 6439 ± 19 and 1617 ± 10 yBP was observed in the core data and attributed to stripping of the reef structure by intense cyclones during the mid- to late-Holocene. Large shingle ridges deposited onshore and basset edges preserved on the reef flat document the influence of cyclones at Middle Island and represent potential sinks for much of the stripped material. Stripping of the upper reef structure around the outer margin of the reef flat by cyclones created accommodation space for a thin (energy waves presumably generated by cyclones have significantly influenced both Holocene reef growth and contemporary reef flat geomorphology.

  3. Comparative analysis of time series of marine litter surveyed on beaches and the seafloor in the southeastern North Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Marcus; Krone, Roland; Dederer, Gabriele; Wätjen, Kai; Matthies, Michael

    2015-05-01

    The comparative analysis of marine litter in different marine compartments has rarely been attempted. In this study, long-term time series of marine litter abundance on the seafloor and on the coast, both from the southeastern North Sea, were analyzed for temporal trends and correlations. On four beach sections of 100 m length, mean abundances of total beach litter collected four times a year from 2002 to 2008 varied between 105 and 435 items. Mean densities of total inorganic litter on the seafloor amounted to 10.6 ± 9.7 kg km(-2) in the offshore region (2001-2010) and 13.7 ± 12.6 kg km(-2) in the Wadden Sea (1998-2007), respectively. In the offshore region, there was no significant long-term trend, while in the Wadden Sea, densities of marine litter declined significantly. Correlations between time series were weak, indicating different sources and transport processes responsible for compositions of beach litter and litter on the seafloor. Decreases in inputs from fisheries and substantial export due to resuspension are discussed as reasons for the decrease in litter on the seafloor in the Wadden Sea. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The Mediterranean Sea as a barrier to gene flow: evidence from variation in and around the F7 and F12 genomic regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stoneking Mark

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Mediterranean has a long history of interactions among different peoples. In this study, we investigate the genetic relationships among thirteen population samples from the broader Mediterranean region together with three other groups from the Ivory Coast and Bolivia with a particular focus on the genetic structure between North Africa and South Europe. Analyses were carried out on a diverse set of neutral and functional polymorphisms located in and around the coagulation factor VII and XII genomic regions (F7 and F12. Results Principal component analysis revealed a significant clustering of the Mediterranean samples into North African and South European groups consistent with the results from the hierarchical AMOVA, which showed a low but significant differentiation between groups from the two shores. For the same range of geographic distances, populations from each side of the Mediterranean were found to differ genetically more than populations within the same side. To further investigate this differentiation, we carried out haplotype analyses, which provided partial evidence that sub-Saharan gene flow was higher towards North Africa than South Europe. Conclusions As there is no consensus between the two genomic regions regarding gene flow through the Sahara, it is hard to reach a solid conclusion about its role in the differentiation between the two Mediterranean shores and more data are necessary to reach a definite conclusion. However our data suggest that the Mediterranean Sea was at least partially a barrier to gene flow between the two shores.

  5. The Mediterranean Sea as a barrier to gene flow: evidence from variation in and around the F7 and F12 genomic regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanasiadis, Georgios; González-Pérez, Emili; Esteban, Esther; Dugoujon, Jean-Michel; Stoneking, Mark; Moral, Pedro

    2010-03-27

    The Mediterranean has a long history of interactions among different peoples. In this study, we investigate the genetic relationships among thirteen population samples from the broader Mediterranean region together with three other groups from the Ivory Coast and Bolivia with a particular focus on the genetic structure between North Africa and South Europe. Analyses were carried out on a diverse set of neutral and functional polymorphisms located in and around the coagulation factor VII and XII genomic regions (F7 and F12). Principal component analysis revealed a significant clustering of the Mediterranean samples into North African and South European groups consistent with the results from the hierarchical AMOVA, which showed a low but significant differentiation between groups from the two shores. For the same range of geographic distances, populations from each side of the Mediterranean were found to differ genetically more than populations within the same side. To further investigate this differentiation, we carried out haplotype analyses, which provided partial evidence that sub-Saharan gene flow was higher towards North Africa than South Europe. As there is no consensus between the two genomic regions regarding gene flow through the Sahara, it is hard to reach a solid conclusion about its role in the differentiation between the two Mediterranean shores and more data are necessary to reach a definite conclusion. However our data suggest that the Mediterranean Sea was at least partially a barrier to gene flow between the two shores.

  6. Holocene sea level instability in the southern Great Barrier Reef, Australia: high-precision U-Th dating of fossil microatolls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Nicole D.; Zhao, J.-x.; Welsh, K. J.; Feng, Y.-x.; Smithers, S. G.; Pandolfi, J. M.; Clark, T. R.

    2016-06-01

    Three emergent subfossil reef flats from the inshore Keppel Islands, Great Barrier Reef (GBR), Australia, were used to reconstruct relative sea level (RSL). Forty-two high-precision uranium-thorium (U-Th) dates obtained from coral microatolls and coral colonies (2σ age errors from ±8 to 37 yr) in conjunction with elevation surveys provide evidence in support of a nonlinear RSL regression throughout the Holocene. RSL was as least 0.75 m above present from ~6500 to 5500 yr before present (yr BP; where "present" is 1950). Following this highstand, two sites indicated a coeval lowering of RSL of at least 0.4 m from 5500 to 5300 yr BP which was maintained for ~200 yr. After the lowstand, RSL returned to higher levels before a 2000-yr hiatus in reef flat corals after 4600 yr BP at all three sites. A second possible RSL lowering event of ~0.3 m from ~2800 to 1600 yr BP was detected before RSL stabilised ~0.2 m above present levels by 900 yr BP. While the mechanism of the RSL instability is still uncertain, the alignment with previously reported RSL oscillations, rapid global climate changes and mid-Holocene reef "turn-off" on the GBR are discussed.

  7. Sea surface temperature as a tracer to estimate cross-shelf turbulent diffusivity and flushing time in the Great Barrier Reef lagoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yadan; Ridd, Peter V.

    2015-06-01

    Accurate parameterization of spatially variable diffusivity in complex shelf regions such as the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) lagoon is an unresolved issue for hydrodynamic models. This leads to large uncertainties to the flushing time derived from them and to the evaluation of ecosystem resilience to terrestrially derived pollution. In fact, numerical hydrodynamic models and analytical cross-shore diffusion models have predicted very different flushing times for the GBR lagoon. Nevertheless, scarcity of in situ measurements used previously in the latter method prevents derivation of detailed diffusivity profiles. Here detailed cross-shore profiles of diffusivity were calculated explicitly in a closed form for the first time from the steady state transects of sea surface temperature for different sections of the GBR lagoon. We find that diffusivity remains relatively constant within the inner lagoon (reef-devoid regions, but increases dramatically where the reef matrixes start and fluctuates with reef size and density. The cross-shelf profile of steady state salinity calculated using the derived diffusivity values agrees well with field measurements. The calculated diffusivity values are also consistent with values derived from satellite-tracked drifters. Flushing time by offshore diffusion is of the order of 1 month, suggesting the important role of turbulent diffusion in flushing the lagoon, especially in reef-distributed regions. The results imply that previous very large residence times predicted by numerical hydrodynamic models may result from underestimation of diffusivity. Our findings can guide parameterization of diffusivity in hydrodynamic modeling.

  8. Wave-current interactions in the southern North Sea: The impact on salinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schloen, Julia; Stanev, Emil V.; Grashorn, Sebastian

    2017-03-01

    The interplay between wind waves and currents in the coastal zone of the southern North Sea along with the resulting changes in the salinity distribution are quantified using simulations with the unstructured-grid ocean model SCHISM coupled with the wind wave model WWM III. Several sensitivity runs, which are carried out to estimate the individual contributions of different physical mechanisms and forcing, demonstrated that the density gradients in the coastal zone reduce tidal current by 18%, whereas the wind waves enhance the circulation in some cases. The latter happens when along-shore wind speed approaches ∼10 m s-1 resulting in long-shore currents following the western Dutch coast and the German Wadden Sea islands. The wave-induced transport of salt leads to changes in the horizontal salinity distribution. These are most pronounced in front of barrier islands where coherent patterns caused by the coupling between tides, surface drift, and wind waves reveal salinity changes up to 0.5. The weak stratification of salinity in the coastal zone is mostly destroyed by wind waves. Thus, effects created by wind waves tend to substantially modify the estuarine circulation. An explanation of these important processes in the coastal zone has been given based on an analysis of the ratio between significant wave height and tidal range. This control-parameter, which is relatively small under mild weather conditions, can exceed unity under strong wind conditions in the coastal zone, thus mixing due to waves becomes dominant. The effect of fresh water fluxes from subterranean estuaries is relatively small and confined only in the vicinity of corresponding sources.

  9. A Modern Sr/Ca-δ18O-Sea Surface Temperature Calibration for Isopora Corals in the Great Barrier Reef

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, L. D.; Linsley, B. K.; Potts, D. C.

    2014-12-01

    Most coral-based paleoceanographic studies have used massive colonies of Porites or Faviidae, due to their long, continuously accreted skeletal records and sub-annual resolution, but other sub-massive corals provide an untapped resource. The genus Isopora is a dominant reef builder in some high-energy environments in the tropical western Pacific, and was a major component of cores recovered on IODP Leg 325 off the Great Barrier Reef (GBR). Despite its abundance, Isopora remains largely unexplored and hence underutilized in paleoceanographic studies. We present a modern Sr/Ca-δ18O-Sea Surface Temperature (SST) calibration of modern Isopora corals (n=3) collected from inner and outer reef locations ranging from 1-13m depth by Heron Island in the southern GBR in 2012. Pairing the Isopora Sr/Ca record with monthly SST yielded an average relationship of SST=-11.48×(Sr/Ca)+131.1 (r2 = 0.42-0.78). The Sr/Ca sensitivity of -0.087 mmol/mol/°C is similar to the sensitivity for Porites that was corrected for tissue layer smoothing effects determined by Gagan et al. (2012). The similarity between our Sr/Ca-SST sensitivity and the corrected sensitivity for Porites suggests tissue layer effects are minimal in Isopora. The mean annual SST amplitude recorded by the corals from 2008-2011 (full annual cycles) was 5.3°C and the average δ18O annual cycle of 1.1‰ approximates that expected if salinity had little effect on coral δ18O, assuming a previously established conversion of -0.23‰ (δ18O)/°C for biogenic aragonite. The average annual salinity amplitude of 0.3 in gridded data from around Heron Island supports our conclusion that δ18O variability is forced almost completely by SST. This modern Sr/Ca-SST calibration will expand the paleoceanographic utility of Isopora and, by assisting interpretation of Sr/Ca data from fossil corals collected during IODP 325, will better constrain the timing and magnitude of sea level changes and surface conditions since the Last

  10. Numerical modelling of climate change impacts on freshwater lenses on the North Sea Island of Borkum using hydrological and geophysical methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Sulzbacher

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A numerical, density dependent groundwater model is set up for the North Sea Island of Borkum to estimate climate change impacts on coastal aquifers and especially the situation of barrier islands in the Wadden Sea. The database includes information from boreholes, a seismic survey, a helicopter-borne electromagnetic (HEM survey, monitoring of the freshwater-saltwater boundary by vertical electrode chains in two boreholes, measurements of groundwater table, pumping and slug tests, as well as water samples. Based on a statistical analysis of borehole columns, seismic sections and HEM, a hydrogeological model is set up. The groundwater model is developed using the finite-element programme FEFLOW. The density dependent groundwater model is calibrated on the basis of hydraulic, hydrological and geophysical data, in particular spatial HEM and local monitoring data. Verification runs with the calibrated model show good agreement between measured and computed hydraulic heads. A good agreement is also obtained between measured and computed density or total dissolved solids data for both the entire freshwater lens on a large scale and in the area of the well fields on a small scale.

    For simulating future changes in this coastal groundwater system until the end of the current century, we use the climate scenario A2, specified by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and, in particular, the data for the German North Sea coast. Simulation runs show proceeding salinisation with time beneath the well fields of the two waterworks Waterdelle and Ostland.

    The modelling study shows that the spreading of well fields is an appropriate protection measure against excessive salinisation of the water supply until the end of the current century.

  11. A modern Sr/Ca-δ18O-sea surface temperature calibration for Isopora corals on the Great Barrier Reef

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Logan D.; Linsley, Braddock K.; Potts, Donald C.

    2017-02-01

    Isopora (Acroporidae) is a genus of often encrusting, branching to submassive corals that are common in many shallow habitats on modern and fossil Indo-West Pacific reefs. Although abundant, Isopora is largely absent from paleoceanographic literature. The scarcity of large Porites and the abundance of Isopora retrieved from the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) on Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 325 focused paleoceanographic attention on Isopora. Here we provide the first independent high-resolution calibration of both Sr/Ca and δ18O for temperature analyses based on Isopora and demonstrate its consistency with Porites records. We developed modern skeletal Sr/Ca- and δ18O-sea surface temperature (SST) calibrations based on five modern Isopora colonies from Heron Island in the southern GBR. Pairing the coral Sr/Ca record with monthly SST data yielded Sr/Ca-SST sensitivities from -0.061 ± 0.004 (centered) to -0.083 ± 0.007 (raw) mmol/mol °C-1 based on reduced major axis regressions. These sensitivities are in the middle of the range of published Porites values and overlap most published values for Isopora, -0.075 ± 0.011 to -0.065 ± 0.011 mmol/mol °C-1. The δ18O-SST sensitivities range from -0.184 ± 0.014 (centered) to -0.185 ± 0.014 (raw) ‰ °C-1, assuming that all seasonal variation in δ18O was due to SST. These δ18O-SST sensitivities are smaller than the widely accepted value of -0.23‰ °C-1 for biogenic aragonite but are at the upper end of high-resolution Porites-defined sensitivities that are consistently less than the aforementioned established value. Our results validate the use of Isopora as an alternative source of paleoceanographic records in habitats where large massive Porites are scarce or absent.

  12. Politiek door de staten : doel- of waarderationeel handelen in het besloten overleg over de Wadden en het openbaar beraad over de ecologische hoofdstructuur

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tromp, Gerbrig Heleen Maria

    2001-01-01

    POLITICS BY PROVINCE: Goal-oriented rational action or value-oriented rational action in closed debate on the Wadden region and public consultation on the ecological infrastructure General This thesis is a study of political conduct, and of provincial politics in particular. It is based on three

  13. Politiek door de staten : doel- of waarderationeel handelen in het besloten overleg over de Wadden en het openbaar beraad over de ecologische hoofdstructuur

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tromp, Gerbrig Heleen Maria

    2001-01-01

    POLITICS BY PROVINCE: Goal-oriented rational action or value-oriented rational action in closed debate on the Wadden region and public consultation on the ecological infrastructure General This thesis is a study of political conduct, and of provincial politics in particular. It is based on three res

  14. MOD2SEA: A Coupled Atmosphere-Hydro-Optical Model for the Retrieval of Chlorophyll-a from Remote Sensing Observations in Complex Turbid Waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnaz Arabi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available An accurate estimation of the chlorophyll-a (Chla concentration is crucial for water quality monitoring and is highly desired by various government agencies and environmental groups. However, using satellite observations for Chla estimation remains problematic over coastal waters due to their optical complexity and the critical atmospheric correction. In this study, we coupled an atmospheric and a water optical model for the simultaneous atmospheric correction and retrieval of Chla in the complex waters of the Wadden Sea. This coupled model called MOD2SEA combines simulations from the MODerate resolution atmospheric TRANsmission model (MODTRAN and the two-stream radiative transfer hydro-optical model 2SeaColor. The accuracy of the coupled MOD2SEA model was validated using a matchup data set of MERIS (MEdium Resolution Imaging SpectRometer observations and four years of concurrent ground truth measurements (2007–2010 at the NIOZ jetty location in the Dutch part of the Wadden Sea. The results showed that MERIS-derived Chla from MOD2SEA explained the variations of measured Chla with a determination coefficient of R2 = 0.88 and a RMSE of 3.32 mg·m−3, which means a significant improvement in comparison with the standard MERIS Case 2 regional (C2R processor. The proposed coupled model might be used to generate a time series of reliable Chla maps, which is of profound importance for the assessment of causes and consequences of long-term phenological changes of Chla in the turbid Wadden Sea area.

  15. Optimising the lighting equipment on the Mittelplate drilling and production island in the German Wadden sea tidelands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattfeld, Heiner [RWE Dea AG, Hamburg (Germany); Ehlers, Fabian [RWE Dea AG, Friedrichskoog (Germany); Reichenbach, Marc [ARSU GmbH, Oldenburg (Germany)

    2012-06-15

    Since October 1987, RWE Dea (operator) and Wintershall Holding GmbH (partner) have developed the most significant German oil reservoir in the field Mittelplate. The production of more than 25 million t of crude oil to date has chiefly been carried out via the artificial island Mittelplate located 7 km off the coast near the southern border of the national park known as ''Schleswig-Holsteinisches Wattenmeer'', which also has the status of a world natural heritage site since 2009. The lighting facilities on the Mittelplate drilling and production island were optimised against the backdrop of this sensitive environment. Birds migrating by night are attracted by large-scale artificial light sources, especially when visibility is poor. This leads to impairments for bird life in the form of disorientation, dissipation of energy, collisions and increased decimation by predators. This phenomenon is particularly problematic in offshore regions. As regards the impact of green, blue and red spectral ranges of light, there are contradictory statements in specialist literature. While van de Laar and Poot et al. describe that nocturnally migrating birds are attracted by red light rather than by blue and green light, Evans et al. discovered exactly the opposite. Against this backdrop, RWE Dea AG has abstained from using e. g. green light for the time being, opting for a reduction of the light being emitted into the environment instead. To this end, various measures have been implemented on Mittelplate island to date. All lighting facilities potentially emitting light externally on Mittelplate island were recorded, classified and examined with regard to their optimisation potential. A description of the de-commissioning, switching and optimum alignment of light sources, the installation of light guidance shields as well as control of light sources via the process steering system is given. Moreover, compliance with safety at work rules and regulations is dealt with. In order to document the success of the relevant measures, photographs were taken in darkness subject to identical conditions before and after implementation of the optimisation measures. In strict compliance with safety at work rules and regulations, by implementing these measures it was possible to bring about a mitigation of the impacts of Mittelplate particularly on nocturnally migrating birds. (orig.)

  16. Parasites in harbour seals ( Phoca vitulina) from the German Wadden Sea between two Phocine Distemper Virus epidemics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehnert, K.; Raga, J. A.; Siebert, U.

    2007-12-01

    Parasites were collected from 107 harbour seals ( Phoca vitulina) found on the coasts of Schleswig-Holstein, Germany, between 1997 and 2000. The prevalence of the parasites and their associated pathology were investigated. Eight species of parasites, primarily nematodes, were identified from the examined organs: two anisakid nematodes ( Pseudoterranova decipiens (sensu lato) , Contracaecum osculatum (sensu lato)) from the stomach, Otostrongylus circumlitus (Crenosomatidae) and Parafilaroides gymnurus (Filaroididae) from the respiratory tract, one filarioid nematode ( Acanthocheilonema spirocauda) from the heart, two acanthocephalans, Corynosoma strumosum and C. semerme (Polymorphidae), from the intestine and an ectoparasite, Echinophthirius horridus (Anoplura, Insecta). Lungworm infection was the most prominent parasitological finding and secondary bacterial bronchopneumonia the most pathogenic lesion correlated with the parasites. Heavy nematode burdens in the respiratory tract were highly age-related and more frequent in young seals. A positive correlation was observed between high levels of pulmonary infection and severity of bronchopneumonia. The prevalence of lungworms in this study was higher than in seals that died during the 1988/1989 Phocine Distemper Virus epidemic, and the prevalence of acanthocephalans and heartworms had decreased compared to findings from the first die-off.

  17. On the dynamics of the stocks of blue mussels ( Mytilus edulis L.) in the Danish Wadden Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch-Petersen, Sten; Kristensen, Per Sand

    2001-01-01

    for the estimation of total biomass. They also provide data on size frequency distributions, which have been analysed for cohort identification resulting in length at age data, which again have been used for estimating parameters (L-infinity and K) for the von Bertalanffy growth equation (VBGE) as well as mortality...

  18. Moderate livestock grazing of salt, and brackish marshes benefits breeding birds along the mainland coast of the Wadden Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mandema, F.S.; Tinbergen, J.M.; Ens, B.J.; Koffijberg, K.; Dijkema, K.S.; Bakker, J.P.

    2015-01-01

    Our study investigated how bird species richness and abundance was related to livestock grazing on salt, and brackish marshes, with an emphasis on songbirds, and shorebirds. Survey areas with a high percentage cover of tall vegetation were assumed to have experienced lower livestock grazing

  19. The Influence of Benthic Diatoms and Invertebrates on the Erodibility of an Intertidal Mudflat, the Danish Wadden Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austen, I.; Andersen, T. J.; Edelvang, K.

    1999-07-01

    The erodibility of mudflat surfaces has been investigated in the Lister Dyb tidal area. A description is given of the short-term erosional, depositional history and the main biological factors governing the stability of the sediment surface. The erosion threshold seems mainly to be controlled by the relationship between algal biomass, expressed as chlorophylla content and the abundance of deposit feeders. Benthic microalgae are important for the sediment stabilization due to their production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) during locomotion. The deposit feeder Hydrobia ulvae on the other hand limits the influence of microalgae because diatoms are the main part of their diet. Additionally, H. ulvae produces fecal pellets which can be more easily eroded than the cohesive bed since they seem to behave as individual units losing cohesive properties. Freshly deposited material was more stable than eroded areas, explained by the occurrence of benthic microalgae, which stabilize the sediment surface in areas of accretion. There was a positive correlation between the water content of the surface material and erosion threshold, interpreted as a result of the dominance of biological stabilizing and destabilizing factors at the site. The variation in algal mass and species abundance causes a marked cross-shore variation in erosion threshold with an increase of stability towards the salt marsh line. The reason for this is argued to be the cross-shore variation of exposure time, which governs the growth of microphytobenthos since light exposure declines towards the low-water line. The cross-shore variation of the erosion threshold is discussed in relation to the suspended sediment transport and it is argued that the result of this variation is a tendency for net landward transport of suspended sediment.

  20. The impact of tourism upon some breeding wader species on the isle of Vlieland in the Netherlands' Wadden Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roos, de G.Th.

    1981-01-01

    Birds and man are of importance to eachother, directly and indirectly, positively or negatively.Populations of wild birds may decrease or even become extinct due to human activities because they are threatened directly or because theire characteristic habitats are destroyed. On the other hand, human

  1. Rethinking the interface between ecology and society. The case of the cockle controversy in the Dutch Wadden Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swart, Jac. A. A.; van Andel, Jelte

    1. Applied ecology, like conservation research, may deal with societal issues if its scientifically based interventions have societal consequences. Human utilization plays a significant role in many ecosystems, so conservation ecologists often have to act on the interface between science and

  2. Uncertainties in the assessment of ‘‘significant effect’’ on the Dutch Natura 2000 Wadden Sea site

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Floor, J.R.; Koppen, van C.S.A.; Tatenhove, van J.P.M.

    2016-01-01

    Natura 2000, the nature network based on the European Bird and Habitat Directives, is explicitly grounded on ecological science. To acquire a permit under the Dutch Nature Conservation Act, an appropriate assessment of significant effects must be conducted based on the best available scientific know

  3. The Pillars of Hercules as a bathymetric barrier to gene flow promoting isolation in a global deep-sea shark (Centroscymnus coelolepis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catarino, Diana; Knutsen, Halvor; Veríssimo, Ana; Olsen, Esben Moland; Jorde, Per Erik; Menezes, Gui; Sannæs, Hanne; Stanković, David; Company, Joan Baptista; Neat, Francis; Danovaro, Roberto; Dell'Anno, Antonio; Rochowski, Bastien; Stefanni, Sergio

    2015-12-01

    Knowledge of the mechanisms limiting connectivity and gene flow in deep-sea ecosystems is scarce, especially for deep-sea sharks. The Portuguese dogfish (Centroscymnus coelolepis) is a globally distributed and near threatened deep-sea shark. C. coelolepis population structure was studied using 11 nuclear microsatellite markers and a 497-bp fragment from the mtDNA control region. High levels of genetic homogeneity across the Atlantic (Φ(ST) = -0.0091, F(ST) = 0.0024, P > 0.05) were found suggesting one large population unit at this basin. The low levels of genetic divergence between Atlantic and Australia (Φ(ST) = 0.0744, P 0.05) further suggested that this species may be able to maintain some degree of genetic connectivity even across ocean basins. In contrast, sharks from the Mediterranean Sea exhibited marked genetic differentiation from all other localities studied (Φ(ST) = 0.3808, F(ST) = 0.1149, P shark population over time. Analyses of life history traits allowed the direct comparison among regions providing a complete characterization of this shark's populations. Sharks from the Mediterranean had markedly smaller adult body size and size at maturity compared to Atlantic and Pacific individuals. Together, these results suggest the existence of an isolated and unique population of C. coelolepis inhabiting the Mediterranean that most likely became separated from the Atlantic in the late Pleistocene.

  4. Beached bird surveys indicate decline in chronic oil pollution in the North Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camphuysen, K.C.J. [Netherlands Institute for Sea Research, Texel (Netherlands)

    1998-12-31

    Strandings of oiled seabirds have been a signal of the ongoing problem of chronic oil pollution in the North Sea since the beginning of the twentieth century. Overall numbers of beached birds are subject to enormous fluctuations, being the result, for example, of changes in the amount of oil spilled in the marine environment, currents, the frequency of onshore winds and variations in the numbers of seabirds in a given region. In contrast, oil rates, being the fraction of oiled birds of the total stranded, appeared to be relatively constant while specific for different species and regions. A power analysis of the results of beached bird surveys demonstrated the sensitivity of these data as a tool to monitor trends in oil rates of stranded birds. Rather subtle changes in oil rates could be demonstrated, indicating positive results of attempts to protect certain sea areas (e.g. the Wadden Sea) and a decline in oil rates over time. (author)

  5. Modelling transport and reproduction of the invasive comb jelly Mnemiopsis leidyi in the North Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Molen, Johan

    2014-05-01

    Mnemiopsis leidyi is an invasive comb jelly fish species that originates from the Gulf of Mexico and the US east coast. It has high bloom potential, and can survive in a wide variety of environmental conditions. It was first introduced in Europe through ballast water discharges in the Black Sea, where it was associated with the anchovis stock collapse in the 1990's. From there, it has spread through the Mediterranean Sea. Since the mid 2000's it has been observed in ports and estuaries along the English Channel, the North Sea and the Baltic Sea. In the North Sea, M. leidyi blooms occur in the Scheldt estuaries, the Wadden Sea, and in ports and canals. In winter, M. Leidyi has been observed at sea in the German Bight. A particle tracking model was modified to include a simple reproduction mechanism, using food fields from the coupled hydrodynamics-ecosystem model GETM-ERSEM. The model was used to study the potential spreading and bloom potential of M. Leidyi in the southern North Sea under present and increased temperature conditions. Under present conditions, the model suggested that M. Leidyi can survive in the North Sea, and can be transported over distances of several hundreds of km, enabling connectivity between estuarine populations. It could not, however, bloom at open sea because of temperature constraints. These constraints were lifted for increased temperature scenarios, suggesting increased bloom potential under climate change conditions.

  6. Storm impacts on small barrier islands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kroon, Aart; Fruergaard, Mikkel

    The shorelines of the Baltic Sea and the inner coastal waters in Denmark consist of many barrier islands. These sandy barrier islands were mainly formed in the Holocene and are still very dynamic. The present day changes in the morphology are dominantly governed by storm waves and associated high...

  7. Assessing the impacts of sea-level rise and precipitation change on the surficial aquifer in the low-lying coastal alluvial plains and barrier islands, east-central Florida (USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Han; Wang, Dingbao; Hagen, Scott C.; Medeiros, Stephen C.; Hall, Carlton R.

    2016-11-01

    A three-dimensional variable-density groundwater flow and salinity transport model is implemented using the SEAWAT code to quantify the spatial variation of water-table depth and salinity of the surficial aquifer in Merritt Island and Cape Canaveral Island in east-central Florida (USA) under steady-state 2010 hydrologic and hydrogeologic conditions. The developed model is referred to as the `reference' model and calibrated against field-measured groundwater levels and a map of land use and land cover. Then, five prediction/projection models are developed based on modification of the boundary conditions of the calibrated `reference' model to quantify climate change impacts under various scenarios of sea-level rise and precipitation change projected to 2050. Model results indicate that west Merritt Island will encounter lowland inundation and saltwater intrusion due to its low elevation and flat topography, while climate change impacts on Cape Canaveral Island and east Merritt Island are not significant. The SEAWAT models developed for this study are useful and effective tools for water resources management, land use planning, and climate-change adaptation decision-making in these and other low-lying coastal alluvial plains and barrier island systems.

  8. Assessing the impacts of sea-level rise and precipitation change on the surficial aquifer in the low-lying coastal alluvial plains and barrier islands, east-central Florida (USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Han; Wang, Dingbao; Hagen, Scott C.; Medeiros, Stephen C.; Hall, Carlton R.

    2016-07-01

    A three-dimensional variable-density groundwater flow and salinity transport model is implemented using the SEAWAT code to quantify the spatial variation of water-table depth and salinity of the surficial aquifer in Merritt Island and Cape Canaveral Island in east-central Florida (USA) under steady-state 2010 hydrologic and hydrogeologic conditions. The developed model is referred to as the `reference' model and calibrated against field-measured groundwater levels and a map of land use and land cover. Then, five prediction/projection models are developed based on modification of the boundary conditions of the calibrated `reference' model to quantify climate change impacts under various scenarios of sea-level rise and precipitation change projected to 2050. Model results indicate that west Merritt Island will encounter lowland inundation and saltwater intrusion due to its low elevation and flat topography, while climate change impacts on Cape Canaveral Island and east Merritt Island are not significant. The SEAWAT models developed for this study are useful and effective tools for water resources management, land use planning, and climate-change adaptation decision-making in these and other low-lying coastal alluvial plains and barrier island systems.

  9. Groundwater salinisation in the Wadden Sea area of the Netherlands: quantifying the effects of climate change, sea level rise and anthropogenic interferences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pauw, P.S.; Louw, de P.G.B.; Oude Essink, G.H.P.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogeological research in coastal areas has gained considerable attention over the last decades due to increasing stresses on fresh groundwater resources. Fundamental groundwater flow and solute transport analyses remain essential for a concise understanding of the governing processes that lead to

  10. Mitigating the risk of drowning at low-head dams used as sea lamprey barriers in Ontario[Includes the CSCE forum on professional practice and career development : 1. international engineering mechanics and materials specialty conference : 1. international/3. coastal, estuarine and offshore engineering specialty conference : 2. international/8. construction specialty conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazurek, K.A.; Amos, M. [Saskatchewan Univ., Saskatoon, SK (Canada). Dept. of Civil and Geological Engineering; Hallett, A. [A. Hallett, Sault Ste. Marie, ON (Canada); Katopodis, C. [Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Winnipeg, MB (Canada). Freshwater Inst.

    2009-07-01

    Many low-head dams built within the streams that flow into the Great Lakes serve as barriers to the upstream migration of sea lamprey, an invasive species in the Great Lakes. One of the serious drawbacks to the construction and operation of barriers is the drowning hazard that can be created at such structures. This paper proposed an improved sea lamprey barrier design that would mitigate the dangerous flows that form at the structures, while maintaining the efficacy of the barriers at blocking lamprey. The proposed design involved modifications to low-head dams to eliminate any eddies and vortex flow that may present a drowning hazard. These modifications included steps, an underwater vane, baffles of various configurations, and rock piles. The successful modifications had to redirect the plunging flow over the weir to flow along the water surface and also create a cross-flow to disrupt the formation of any secondary eddies that may entrap a body. 21 refs., 9 figs.

  11. Storm impacts on small barrier islands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kroon, Aart; Fruergaard, Mikkel

    The shorelines of the Baltic Sea and the inner coastal waters in Denmark consist of many barrier islands. These sandy barrier islands were mainly formed in the Holocene and are still very dynamic. The present day changes in the morphology are dominantly governed by storm waves and associated high...... changes in this evolution due to changes in the climate and associated sea levels. We analyzed the morphologic evolution of a series of barrier islands over the last decades using maps, aerial photographs and satellite images. This decadal morphologic evolution was coupled to the frequency and intensity...... of the local extreme events. The characterization of the extreme events was based on the joint probability of the extreme water levels and storm waves for the specific sites. The predicted climate change for the Danish waters will lead to higher water levels and an increase of the overwashes on the barrier...

  12. Efficiency of blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) spat collectors in highly dynamic tidal environments of the Lower Saxonian coast (southern North Sea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Uwe; Liebezeit, Gerd

    2003-07-01

    Traditional mussel culture in the Wadden Sea, southern North Sea, is carried out by taking seed mussels of about 1-4 cm shell length from natural beds and transplanting them to permanently water covered sites. Besides the damage done to the natural beds, the ratio of seeded to harvested mussels is only about 1:1-1.3, i.e. about the same tonnage of mussels seeded is recovered. In addition, this technique relies exclusively on natural spat falls, which do not occur regularly. In order to overcome these difficulties spat collectors have been deployed in the Jade Bay, southern North Sea. These provided suitable settlement grounds for mussel larvae. Blue mussel weights reached weights of about 8-9 kg/m collector rope with maximum shell lengths of 4-5 cm within one growing season.

  13. Breaching vulnerability of coastal barriers under effects of tropical cyclones: a model study on the Hue lagoon - Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuan, T.Q.; Stive, M.J.F.; Verhagen, H.J.

    2006-01-01

    Under effects of tropical cyclones, the coast is subjected to attack both by surge and wave from the sea and by flooding from the bay. These forces pose a serious breaching threat to natural sea-defence works such as barrier spits, barrier islands, lagoon barriers, etc. on the coast. Unintended

  14. Breaching vulnerability of coastal barriers under effects of tropical cyclones: a model study on the Hue lagoon - Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuan, T.Q.; Stive, M.J.F.; Verhagen, H.J.

    2006-01-01

    Under effects of tropical cyclones, the coast is subjected to attack both by surge and wave from the sea and by flooding from the bay. These forces pose a serious breaching threat to natural sea-defence works such as barrier spits, barrier islands, lagoon barriers, etc. on the coast. Unintended brea

  15. Spatial patterns and trends in abundance of larval sandeels in the North Sea: 1950–2005

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynam, Christopher P.; Halliday, Nicholas C.; Höffle, Hannes

    2013-01-01

    with catches by dedicated larval samplers (Gulf and bongo nets) during ICES coordinated surveys in 2004 and 2009. ICES data are also used to explore environmental influences on sandeel distributions. Temporally, CPR data correlate with larval data from plankton surveys off Stonehaven (1999–2005), with sandeel...... 0-group trawl data at the east Fair Isle ground (since 1984), and with recruitment data (since 1983) for the Dogger Banks stock assessment area. Therefore, CPR data may provide an early recruit index of relative abundance for the Dogger Banks assessment area, where the majority of the commercial...... catch of A. marinus is taken, and the Wee Bankie area that is particularly important for seabird foraging. While warm conditions may stimulate the production of sandeel larvae, their natural mortality is typically greater, in the Dogger Banks and Wadden Sea areas, when the larvae are hatched in warm...

  16. Reconnaissance level study Mississippi storm surge barrier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Ledden, M.; Lansen, A.J.; De Ridder, H.A.J.; Edge, B.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports a reconnaissance level study of a storm surge barrier in the Mississippi River. Historical hurricanes have shown storm surge of several meters along the Mississippi River levees up to and upstream of New Orleans. Future changes due to sea level rise and subsidence will further

  17. Reconnaissance level study Mississippi storm surge barrier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Ledden, M.; Lansen, A.J.; De Ridder, H.A.J.; Edge, B.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports a reconnaissance level study of a storm surge barrier in the Mississippi River. Historical hurricanes have shown storm surge of several meters along the Mississippi River levees up to and upstream of New Orleans. Future changes due to sea level rise and subsidence will further inc

  18. De mossen van de Groninger waddeneilanden. 2. Rottumeroog, Vuurtorenduin en Zuiderduin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hesse, C.; Kruijer, H.; Lutterop, D.; Kasemir, G.; Ubels, Richard; Corté, B.; van Gennip, B.

    2004-01-01

    Abstract: The mosses of the Wadden Sea islands Rottumeroog, Vuurtorenduin and Zuiderduin (part 2) This is the second paper on the bryophyte flora of the West Frisian barrier islands Rottumerplaat, Rottumeroog, Vuurtorenduin and Zuiderduin. The first paper (Kruijeret al., 2000) gives an overview of t

  19. Coupled penetrometer, MBES and ADCP assessments of tidal variations of the surface sediment layer along active subaqueous dunes, Danish Wadden Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stark, Nina; Hanff, Henrik; Svenson, Christian

    2011-01-01

    a tidal cycle were compared to mean current velocities (measured using an acoustic Doppler current profiler, ADCP), high-resolution bathymetry (based on multibeam echo sounding, MBES) and qualitative estimates of suspended sediment distributions in the water column (estimated from ADCP backscatter......). Furthermore, this layer showed a significant increase in thickness (e.g. from 8 cm to 16 cm) related to periods of overall deposition. These findings imply that dynamic penetrometers can conveniently serve to (1) quantify potentially mobile sediments by determining the thickness of a loose sediment surface...

  20. Risk assessment on the possible introduction of three predatory snails (Ocinebrellus inornatus, Urosalpinx cinerea, Rapana venosa in the Dutch Wadden Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fey-Hofstede, F.E.; Brink, van den A.M.; Wijsman, J.W.M.; Bos, O.G.

    2010-01-01

    Recently three alien invasive predatory snails have been found in the Dutch marine waters, which are identified by the Ministry of Agriculture, Nature and Food Quality as potential high risk species due to their possible impact on bivalve species (TRCPD/2009/3587). These are: Japanese oyster drill

  1. Field measurements on seasonal variation of the activity of primary producers on a sandy tidal flat in the northern Wadden sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmus, R.

    In 1980 chlorophyll a and biomass of phytoplankton showed two distinct peaks in spring and late summer. Thalassiosira nordenskiöldii dominated the spring bloom, whereas in late summer Thalassiosira eccentrica and Biddulphia rhombus reached a maximum. Microphytobenthos biomass was dominated by the small species Achnanthes hauckiana. Highest biomass of microphytobenthos was attained in late winter. Gross primary productivity of the community amounted to 100 g C · m -2 · a 1 during time of submersion, 68% of which produced by microphytobenthos, 32% by phytoplankton. In spite of increasing production in summer, microphytobenthos did not increase in biomass. This is assumed to be due to grazing by the snail Hydrobia ulvae.

  2. Nature excursions in the Dutch Wadden Sea: tools to integrate tourism, outdoor recreation and nature protection in a natural World Heritage site.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Revier, Hans; Folmer, Akke

    2014-01-01

    Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Monitoring and Management of Visitors in Recreational and Protected Areas (MMV) Local Community and Outdoor Recreation August 20 - 23, 2014 Tallinn, Estonia

  3. Coupled penetrometer, MBES and ADCP assessments of tidal variations of the surface sediment layer along active subaqueous dunes, Danish Wadden Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stark, Nina; Hanff, Henrik; Svenson, Christian;

    2011-01-01

    a tidal cycle were compared to mean current velocities (measured using an acoustic Doppler current profiler, ADCP), high-resolution bathymetry (based on multibeam echo sounding, MBES) and qualitative estimates of suspended sediment distributions in the water column (estimated from ADCP backscatter...

  4. On the dynamics of compound bedforms in high-energy tidal channels: field observations in the German Bight and the Danish Wadden Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernstsen, Verner; Christian, Winter; Becker, Marius

    2010-01-01

    Tidal inlets are a common feature along much of the world’s coastlines. They interrupt the alongshore continuity of shoreline processes, and by being exposed to both wave and current forcing, tidal inlets belong to the morphologically most dynamic and complex coastal systems on Earth. The tidal......). There is a considerable amount of detailed field investigations on the dynamics of primary-bedforms at various temporal scales, ranging from short- to long-term tide-related cycles to flood hydrographs to seasonality. However, Julien et al. (2002) stated that a composite analysis of primary- and secondary...... decreased during ebb tide and increased during flood tide. This was due to erosion and deposition of the crest, as the trough remained practically constant. The erosion of the crest occurred at high energy stages during ebb tide, while the overall deposition on the crest occurred during flood tide. The low...

  5. Nature excursions in the Dutch Wadden Sea: tools to integrate tourism, outdoor recreation and nature protection in a natural World Heritage site.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akke Folmer; Hans Revier

    2014-01-01

    Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Monitoring and Management of Visitors in Recreational and Protected Areas (MMV) Local Community and Outdoor Recreation August 20 - 23, 2014 Tallinn, Estonia

  6. Nature excursions in the Dutch Wadden Sea: tools to integrate tourism, outdoor recreation and nature protection in a natural World Heritage site

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akke Folmer; Hans Revier

    2014-01-01

    Presentation at the 7th International Conference on Monitoring and Management of Visitors in Recreational and Protected Areas (MMV) Local Community and Outdoor Recreation August 20 - 23, 2014 Tallinn, Estonia

  7. Exploitation of a new staging area in the Dutch Wadden Sea by Greylag Geese Anser anser : the importance of food-plant dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, L; van der Wal, R; Esselink, Peter; Siepel, A

    1999-01-01

    The colonisation by Greylag Geese Anser anser of a new autumn migration staging area was studied on the island of Schiermonnikoog, The Netherlands. Over 500 Greylag Geese first visited the island in 1991. During subsequent years, peak numbers rose to 700-900 birds. The geese most likely originated f

  8. New evidence for habitat-specific selection in Wadden Sea Zostera marina populations revealed by genome scanning using SNP and microsatellite markers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oetjen, Katharina; Ferber, Steven; Dankert, Ilka; Reusch, Thorsten B. H.

    2010-01-01

    Eelgrass Zostera marina is an ecosystem-engineering species of outstanding importance for coastal soft sediment habitats that lives in widely diverging habitats. Our first goal was to detect divergent selection and habitat adaptation at the molecular genetic level; hence, we compared three pairs of

  9. What determines the densities of feeding birds on tidal flats? A case study on dunlin, Calidris alpina, in the Wadden Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehls, Georg; Tiedemann, Ralph

    The tidal and seasonal pattern of habitat utilization by dunlin was studied in a tidal-flat area in a shallow bay called Königshafen, island of Sylt, by counting the number of dunlins on marked plots at 10-min intervals over whole tidal cycles. Sediment type, tidal elevation, and seasonal changes in food choice were found to influence the feeding densities of dunlin irrespective of total numbers present in the area. Densities of dunlin were generally highest on low muddy substrates. A preference for high sandy substrates was found in late summer. The tidal pattern of habitat utilization differed between areas. In preferred areas dunlin stayed during the whole emersion period. Other areas were only used by following the moving tide line. Seasonal changes in habitat utilization were apparently triggered by changes in food choice. In spring dunlin fed almost exclusively on polychaetes. In late summer a relatively high proportion of shrimps, Crangon crangon, was found in the diet of dunlins. The preference for shrimps may force the birds to stay away from the tide line, where the shrimps can escape into deeper waters. It is recommended that studies on habitat utilization on tidal flats should consider the tidal behaviour of the target species, as single low-tide counts may not give valid results.

  10. Increasing species richness of the macrozoobenthic fauna on tidal flats of the Wadden Sea by local range expansion and invasion of exotic species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beukema, J.; Dekker, R.

    2011-01-01

    A 40-y series of consistently collected samples (15 fixed sampling sites, constant sampled area of 15 × 0.95 m2, annual sampling only in late-winter/early-spring seasons, and consistent sieving and sorting procedures; restriction to 50 easily recognizable species) of macrozoobenthos on Balgzand, a

  11. On the dynamics of compound bedforms in high-energy tidal channels: field observations in the German Bight and the Danish Wadden Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernstsen, Verner; Christian, Winter; Becker, Marius

    2010-01-01

    Tidal inlets are a common feature along much of the world’s coastlines. They interrupt the alongshore continuity of shoreline processes, and by being exposed to both wave and current forcing, tidal inlets belong to the morphologically most dynamic and complex coastal systems on Earth. The tidal...

  12. On the performance of topobathymetric LiDAR in shallow water environments: the Ribe Vesterå river and the Knudedyb tidal inlet in the Danish Wadden Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gergely, Aron; Andersen, Mikkel S.; Teglbrænder-Bjergkvist, Mathias;

    2015-01-01

    to as green LiDAR which is able to penetrate through water, holds the potential to close this gap. However, water column turbidity poses limitations to the penetration of the green laser beam, and water column refraction of the laser beam poses limitations to the scale of features which can be resolved...... is a function of water depth and water column refraction. The horizontal and vertical precision of the LiDAR system is at sub-decimetre scale at a 95% confidence level. This suggests that topobathymetric LiDAR is capable of resolving relatively small-scale morphological features in challenging shallow water...

  13. On the evolution of a holocene barrier coast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fruergaard, Mikkel

    This thesis investigates the sedimentary evolution of a Holocene barrier coast with special focus on how barrier system stratigraphy is affected by changes in sea-level and sediment supply. Coastal barrier systems comprise about 13% of the world’s coastlines and they are mportant components...... of the barrier system was controlled by changes in the rate of sea-level rise, sediment supply as well as the inherited Pleistocene topography and the regional-scale coastal morphology. The initial Holocene transgression as diachronous and took place between 7.5 to 7.0 ka ago. As the rate of transgression...... progressively decreased, topographically low area flooded more rapidly than opographically high areas. A retrogradational infill stratigraphy was therefore more likely to develop in the rapidly transgressed areas as compared to the elevated areas. It appears that the nuclei of he investigated barrier systems...

  14. Essential and Toxic Elements in Blood Samples of Harbor Seals (Phoca vitulina) from the Islands Helgoland (North Sea) and Anholt (Baltic Sea): A Comparison Study with Urbanized Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakuschke, Antje; Griesel, Simone

    2016-01-01

    The harbor seals (Phoca vitulina) from Helgoland (North Sea) and Anholt (Kattegat, Baltic Sea) are top predators within the marine food web and an indicator species of the environmental contamination. Furthermore, they are a main tourist attraction. Despite these important roles, little is known about the health and pollutant contamination of these seals. The objective of this study was therefore to investigate 18 essential and nonessential/toxic elements (Al, As, Be, Ca, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Mn, Mo, Ni, P, Pb, Rb, S, Se, Sr, and Zn) in blood samples using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and total X-ray-fluorescence spectrometry. Blood concentrations of mineral nutrients, such as Ca, K, P, and S, were within the reference ranges described for harbor seals. Likewise, for the trace elements, As, Be, Rb, Se, and Sr, no significant differences were observed compared with previous studies. Interestingly, blood concentrations of nine nonessential as well as essential trace metals (Al, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Zn) measured significantly lower in the offshore living seals from Helgoland and Anholt compared with results obtained from animals living close to urbanized areas, such as the Wadden Sea and Elbe estuary. This suggests that industrial emissions, sewage deposition, shipping traffic and dredging tasks might be the cause of increased metal concentrations of inshore harbor seals.

  15. On the porosity of barrier layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Mignot

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Barrier layers are defined as the layer between the pycnocline and the thermocline when the latter are different as a result of salinity stratification. We present a revisited 2-degree resolution global climatology of monthly mean oceanic Barrier Layer (BL thickness first proposed by de Boyer Montégut et al. (2007. In addition to using an extended data set, we present a modified computation method that addresses the observed porosity of BLs. We name porosity the fact that barrier layers distribution can, in some areas, be very uneven regarding the space and time scales that are considered. This implies an intermittent alteration of air-sea exchanges by the BL. Therefore, it may have important consequences for the climatic impact of BLs. Differences between the two computation methods are small for robust BLs that are formed by large-scale processes. However, the former approach can significantly underestimate the thickness of short and/or localized barrier layers. This is especially the case for barrier layers formed by mesoscale mechanisms (under the intertropical convergence zone for example and along western boundary currents and equatorward of the sea surface salinity subtropical maxima. Complete characterisation of regional BL dynamics therefore requires a description of the robustness of BL distribution to assess the overall impact of BLs on the process of heat exchange between the ocean interior and the atmosphere.

  16. Large-scale coastal impact induced by a catastrophic storm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fruergaard, Mikkel; Andersen, Thorbjørn Joest; Johannessen, Peter N

    Catastrophic storms and storm surges induce rapid and substantial changes along sandy barrier coasts, potentially causing severe environmental and economic damage. Coastal impacts of modern storms are associated with washover deposition, dune erosion, barrier breaching, and coastline and shoreface...... erosion. Little is however known about the impact of major storms and their post-storm coastal recovery on geologic and historic evolution of barrier systems. We apply high-resolution optically stimulated luminescence dating on a barrier system in the Wadden Sea (Denmark) and show that 5 to 8 meters...... of marine sand accumulated in an aggrading-prograding shoal and on a prograding shoreface during and within 3 to 4 decades (“healing phase”) after the most destructive storm documented for the Wadden Sea. Furthermore, we show that the impact of this storm caused large-scale shoreline erosion and barrier...

  17. Smart parking barrier

    KAUST Repository

    Alharbi, Abdulrazaq M.

    2016-05-06

    Various methods and systems are provided for smart parking barriers. In one example, among others, a smart parking barrier system includes a movable parking barrier located at one end of a parking space, a barrier drive configured to control positioning of the movable parking barrier, and a parking controller configured to initiate movement of the parking barrier, via the barrier drive. The movable parking barrier can be positioned between a first position that restricts access to the parking space and a second position that allows access to the parking space. The parking controller can initiate movement of the movable parking barrier in response to a positive identification of an individual allowed to use the parking space. The parking controller can identify the individual through, e.g., a RFID tag, a mobile device (e.g., a remote control, smartphone, tablet, etc.), an access card, biometric information, or other appropriate identifier.

  18. Grain-size based sea-level reconstruction in the south Bohai Sea during the past 135 kyr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Liang; Chen, Yanping

    2013-04-01

    and sea level. Nature 324, 137-140. Charman, D.J., Roe, H.M., Roland Gehrels, W., 2002. Modern distribution of saltmarsh testate amoebae: regional variability of zonation and response to environmental variables. Journal of Quaternary Science 17, 387-409. Horton, B.P., 1997. Quantification of the indicative meaning of a range of Holocene sea-level index points from the western North Sea, Department of Geography. University of Durham, Durham City, UK, p. 509. Horton, B.P., Corbett, R., Culver, S.J., Edwards, R.J., Hillier, C., 2006. Modern saltmarsh diatom distributions of the Outer Banks, North Carolina, and the development of a transfer function for high resolution reconstructions of sea level. Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science 69, 381-394. IOCAS (Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences), 1985. Bohai Sea Geology. Science Press, Beijing, China. Madsen, A.T., Murray, A.S., Andersen, T.J., Pejrup, M., 2007. Temporal changes of accretion rates on an estuarine salt marsh during the late Holocene -Reflection of local sea level changes? The Wadden Sea, Denmark. Marine Geology 242, 221-233. Mauz, B., Hassler, U., 2000. Luminescence chronology of Late Pleistocene raised beaches in southern Italy: new data of relative sea-level changes. Marine Geology 170, 187-203. Yi, L., Yu, H.J., Ortiz, J.D., Xu, X.Y., Qiang, X.K., Huang, H.J., Shi, X., Deng, C.L., 2012. A reconstruction of late Pleistocene relative sea level in the south Bohai Sea, China, based on sediment grain-size analysis. Sedimentary Geology 281, 88-100. Zong, Y., Shennan, I., Combellick, R.A., Hamilton, S.L., Rutherford, M.M., 2003. Microfossil evidence for land movements associated with the AD 1964 Alaska earthquake. The Holocene 13, 7-20.

  19. Safety-barrier diagrams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duijm, Nijs Jan

    2007-01-01

    are discussed. A simple method for quantification of safety-barrier diagrams is proposed, including situations where safety barriers depend on shared common elements. It is concluded that safety-barrier diagrams provide a useful framework for an electronic data structure that integrates information from risk......Safety-barrier diagrams and the related so-called "bow-tie" diagrams have become popular methods in risk analysis. This paper describes the syntax and principles for constructing consistent and valid safety-barrier diagrams. The relation with other methods such as fault trees and Bayesian networks...... analysis with operational safety management....

  20. Extremal surface barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelhardt, Netta; Wall, Aron C. [Department of Physics, University of California,Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States)

    2014-03-13

    We present a generic condition for Lorentzian manifolds to have a barrier that limits the reach of boundary-anchored extremal surfaces of arbitrary dimension. We show that any surface with nonpositive extrinsic curvature is a barrier, in the sense that extremal surfaces cannot be continuously deformed past it. Furthermore, the outermost barrier surface has nonnegative extrinsic curvature. Under certain conditions, we show that the existence of trapped surfaces implies a barrier, and conversely. In the context of AdS/CFT, these barriers imply that it is impossible to reconstruct the entire bulk using extremal surfaces. We comment on the implications for the firewall controversy.

  1. A study of long-term sea level variability in the East China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Ying; LIN Mingsen; ZHENG Quanan; YE Xiaomin; LI Junyi; ZHU Benlu

    2015-01-01

    From the analyses of the satellite altimeter Maps of Sea Level Anomaly (MSLA) data, tidal gauge sea level data and historical sea level data, this paper investigates the long-term sea level variability in the East China Sea (ECS). Based on the correlation analysis, we calculate the correlation coefficient between tidal gauge and the closest MSLA grid point, then generate the map of correlation coefficient of the entire ECS. The results show that the satellite altimeter MSLA data is effective to observe coastal sea level variability. An important finding is that from map of correlation coefficient we can identify the Kuroshio. The existence of Kuroshio decreases the correlation between coastal and the Pacific sea level. Kurishio likes a barrier or a wall, which blocks the effect of the Pacific and the global change. Moreover, coastal sea level in the ECS is mainly associated with local systems rather than global change. In order to calculate the long-term sea level variability trend, the empirical mode decomposition (EMD) method is applied to derive the trend on each MSLA grid point in the entire ECS. According to the 2-D distribution of the trend and rising rate, the sea level on the right side of the axis of Kuroshio rise faster than in its left side. This result supports the barrier effect of Kuroshio in the ECS. For the entire ECS, the average sea level rose 45.0 mm between 1993 and 2010, with a rising rate of (2.5±0.4) mm/a which is slower than global average. The relatively slower sea level rising rate further proves that sea level rise in the ECS has less response to global change due to its own local system effect.

  2. Barrier transgression driven by aeolian processes along the Portuguese coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costas, Susana; Ferreira, Óscar; Roelvink, Dano

    2017-04-01

    Coastal barriers around the world developed following sea level stabilization about 7000 years ago. Along the Southwestern European coast, this fact was largely supported by recent works exploring the sedimentary record of coastal lagoons and estuaries. However, direct evidences of barrier evolution/age obtained from the actual coastal barriers are rare, limiting our understanding about the dynamics and life time of these systems at long time scales. Here, we reconstruct the evolution of three coastal barriers located along the western Portuguese coast, determining their age, trends and life cycles. For that, we integrate information (stratigraphy and ages) from different coastal deposits indicative of major shifts on evolutionary trends, including published and unpublished data. Examined beach deposits set the age of the explored sand barriers between 6400 and 300 years ago, suggesting the coexistence of very mature and very recent coastal barriers. In addition, the results document the occurrence of transgressive dunefields with ages older than the preserved coastal barriers, supporting the existence of former barriers from which the dunes could derive and migrate inland. The latter suggests the occurrence of episodes of barrier building and shoreline progradation alternating with episodes of inland migration of transgressive dunefields and thus barrier rollover. Resultant trends are carefully examined to identify the major factors driving barrier evolution, with special attention to climate variability and local boundary conditions. Indeed, the episodic response of the explored sand barriers provides indications for shifting wave and wind conditions as a consequence of climate variability. Additionally, inter-site comparison provides significant insights into regional trends and allows rating the identified factors, based on the degree of direct influence over the evolution of the coast. In this regard, the exposure to wind and wave climate, usually linked to

  3. Sea Legs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, Kenneth C.

    Forty-foot, storm-swept seas, Spitzbergen polar bears roaming vast expanses of Arctic ice, furtive exchanges of forbidden manuscripts in Cold War Moscow, the New York city fashion scene, diving in mini-subs to the sea floor hot srings, life with the astronauts, romance and heartbreak, and invading the last bastions of male exclusivity: all are present in this fast-moving, non-fiction account of one woman' fascinating adventures in the world of marine geology and oceanography.

  4. Surveys of breeding birds on Barrier Islands in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Much of the Beaufort Sea coast in northern Alaska is bordered by long, narrow barrier islands. These islands are low elevation and somewhat transitory. The islands...

  5. Barriers to screening mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, Elizabeth A

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer (BRCA) is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer among women in the USA, and mammography is an effective means for the early detection of BRCA. Identifying the barriers to screening mammography can inform research, policy and practice aiming to increase mammography adherence. A literature review was conducted to determine common barriers to screening mammography adherence. PsycINFO and PubMed databases were searched to identify studies published between 2000 and 2012 that examined barriers associated with reduced mammography adherence. Three thematic groups of barriers, based on social ecology, were identified from the literature: healthcare system-level, social and individual-level barriers. Researchers must consider screening behaviour in context and, therefore, should simultaneously consider each level of barriers when attempting to understand screening behaviour and create interventions to increase mammography adherence.

  6. Effects of Mackenzie River Discharge and Bathymetry on Sea Ice in the Beaufort Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nghiem, S. V.; Hall, D. K.; Rigor, I. G; Li, P.; Neumann, G.

    2014-01-01

    Mackenzie River discharge and bathymetry effects on sea ice in the Beaufort Sea are examined in 2012 when Arctic sea ice extent hit a record low. Satellite-derived sea surface temperature revealed warmer waters closer to river mouths. By 5 July 2012, Mackenzie warm waters occupied most of an open water area about 316,000 sq km. Surface temperature in a common open water area increased by 6.5 C between 14 June and 5 July 2012, before and after the river waters broke through a recurrent landfast ice barrier formed over the shallow seafloor offshore the Mackenzie Delta. In 2012, melting by warm river waters was especially effective when the strong Beaufort Gyre fragmented sea ice into unconsolidated floes. The Mackenzie and other large rivers can transport an enormous amount of heat across immense continental watersheds into the Arctic Ocean, constituting a stark contrast to the Antarctic that has no such rivers to affect sea ice.

  7. On the origin of endemic species in the Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    DiBattista, Joseph

    2015-10-19

    Aim The geological and palaeo-climatic forces that produced the unique biodiversity in the Red Sea are a subject of vigorous debate. Here, we review evidence for and against the hypotheses that: (1) Red Sea fauna was extirpated during glacial cycles of the Pleistocene and (2) coral reef fauna found refuge within or just outside the Red Sea during low sea level stands when conditions were inhospitable. Location Red Sea and Western Indian Ocean. Methods We review the literature on palaeontological, geological, biological and genetic evidence that allow us to explore competing hypotheses on the origins and maintenance of shallow-water reef fauna in the Red Sea. Results Palaeontological (microfossil) evidence indicates that some areas of the central Red Sea were devoid of most plankton during low sea level stands due to hypersaline conditions caused by almost complete isolation from the Indian Ocean. However, two areas may have retained conditions adequate for survival: the Gulf of Aqaba and the southern Red Sea. In addition to isolation within the Red Sea, which separated the northern and southern faunas, a strong barrier may also operate in the region: the cold, nutrient-rich water upwelling at the boundary of the Gulf of Aden and the Arabian Sea. Biological data are either inconclusive or support these putative barriers and refugia, but no data set, that we know of rejects them. Genetic evidence suggests that many endemic lineages diverged from their Indian Ocean counterparts long before the most recent glaciations and/or are restricted to narrow areas, especially in the northern Red Sea. Main conclusions High endemism observed in the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden appears to have multiple origins. A cold, nutrient-rich water barrier separates the Gulf of Aden from the rest of the Arabian Sea, whereas a narrow strait separates the Red Sea from the Gulf of Aden, each providing potential isolating barriers. Additional barriers may arise from environmental gradients

  8. Examples of storm impacts on barrier islands: Chapter 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant, Nathaniel G.; Doran, Kara; Stockdon, Hilary F.

    2017-01-01

    This chapter focuses on the morphologic variability of barrier islands and on the differences in storm response. It describes different types of barrier island response to individual storms, as well as the integrated response of barrier islands to many storms. The chapter considers case study on the Chandeleur Island chain, where a decadal time series of island elevation measurements have documented a wide range of barrier island responses to storms and long-term processes that are representative of barrier island behaviour at many other locations. These islands are low elevation, extremely vulnerable to storms and exhibit a diversity of storm responses. Additionally, this location experiences a moderately high rate of relative sea-level rise, increasing its vulnerability to the combined impacts of storms and long-term erosional processes. Understanding how natural processes, including storm impacts and intervening recovery periods interact with man-made restoration processes is also broadly relevant to understand the natural and human response to future storms.

  9. High-resolution reconstruction of a coastal barrier system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fruergaard, Mikkel; Andersen, Thorbjørn Joest; Nielsen, Lars Henrik

    2015-01-01

    from retreat of the barrier island and probably also due to formation of a tidal inlet close to the study area. Continued transgression and shoreface retreat created a distinct hiatus and wave ravinement surface in the seaward part of the CBS before the barrier shoreline stabilised between 5.0 and 4.......5 ka ago. Back-barrier shoreline erosion due to sediment starvation in the back-barrier basin, was pronounced from 4.5 to 2.5 ka ago but the last 2.5 kyr barrier sedimentation has kept up with and outpaced sea-level. The last 0.4 kyr the CBS has been episodically prograding. Sediment accumulation shows...

  10. Satellite tracking of harbour seals on Horns Reef - Use of the Horns Reef wind farm area and the North Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tougaard, J.; Tougaard, S.; Jensen, Thyge [Fisheries and Maritime Museum Esbjerg (Denmark); Ebbesen, I. [Univ. of Sourthern Denmark, Inst. of Biology, Odense (Denmark); Teilmann, J. [NationL Environmental Res. Inst., Roskidle (Denmark)

    2003-03-15

    Ten harbour seals (Phoca vitulina) caught on the Danish Wadden Sea island Roemoe were equipped with satellite linked time depth recorders. The animals were caught on three separate occasions (Jan. 4th, Feb. 18th and May 6th, 2002). The transmitters worked between 49 and 100 days, relaying positional and dive information back via the ARGOS satellite service until beginning of July. Background for the studies is the construction of the Worlds largest off shore wind farm on Horns Reef. Based on previous studies using VHF-transmitters, it was expected that the seals would spend considerable time on Horns Reef. The VHF-telemetry studies showed that the preferred direction for seals leaving the Danish Wadden Sea is NW from Graedyb tidal area outside Esbjerg, the direction directly towards the wind farm area. The previously used VHF-transmitters had a limited detection range and it was decided to equip a number of seals from the same area as before with satellite transmitters. This allows for positioning of the seals in the entire North Sea as well as providing dive summary information, as a transmitter with a depth transducer was chosen for the study. Positional information revealed that animals move about more extensively than previously believed. Substantial variation between animals was observed and each seal seemed to have adopted its own foraging strategy. Some animals travelled to the centre of the North Sea on foraging trips and spent considerable time close to the bottom at 30-70 meters depth. Other seals remained in the German Bight and yet others spent considerable time on and around Horns Reef. The area of Horns reef wind farm constitutes a negligible fraction of the total area visited by the tagged seals. The reef as a whole however, appears to be important to the seals both for foraging and as transit area to other feeding grounds further off shore. The resolution in positional information is not sufficiently high to allow for a detailed study of the effects

  11. Converse Barrier Certificate Theorems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewski, Rafael; Sloth, Christoffer

    2016-01-01

    This paper shows that a barrier certificate exists for any safe dynamical system. Specifically, we prove converse barrier certificate theorems for a class of structurally stable dynamical systems. Other authors have developed a related result by assuming that the dynamical system has neither sing...

  12. Skin barrier function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    Renowned experts present the latest knowledge Although a very fragile structure, the skin barrier is probably one of the most important organs of the body. Inward/out it is responsible for body integrity and outward/in for keeping microbes, chemicals, and allergens from penetrating the skin. Since...... the role of barrier integrity in atopic dermatitis and the relationship to filaggrin mutations was discovered a decade ago, research focus has been on the skin barrier, and numerous new publications have become available. This book is an interdisciplinary update offering a wide range of information...... on the subject. It covers new basic research on skin markers, including results on filaggrin and on methods for the assessment of the barrier function. Biological variation and aspects of skin barrier function restoration are discussed as well. Further sections are dedicated to clinical implications of skin...

  13. Sea Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perovich, D.; Gerland, S.; Hendricks, S.; Meier, Walter N.; Nicolaus, M.; Richter-Menge, J.; Tschudi, M.

    2013-01-01

    During 2013, Arctic sea ice extent remained well below normal, but the September 2013 minimum extent was substantially higher than the record-breaking minimum in 2012. Nonetheless, the minimum was still much lower than normal and the long-term trend Arctic September extent is -13.7 per decade relative to the 1981-2010 average. The less extreme conditions this year compared to 2012 were due to cooler temperatures and wind patterns that favored retention of ice through the summer. Sea ice thickness and volume remained near record-low levels, though indications are of slightly thicker ice compared to the record low of 2012.

  14. Sea level change

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Church, J.A.; Clark, P.U.; Cazenave, A.; Gregory, J.M.; Jevrejeva, S.; Levermann, A.; Merrifield, M.A.; Milne, G.A.; Nerem, R.S.; Nunn, P.D.; Payne, A.J.; Pfeffer, W.T.; Stammer, D.; Unnikrishnan, A.S.

    This chapter considers changes in global mean sea level, regional sea level, sea level extremes, and waves. Confidence in projections of global mean sea level rise has increased since the Fourth Assessment Report (AR4) because of the improved...

  15. Converse Barrier Certificate Theorem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewski, Rafael; Sloth, Christoffer

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a converse barrier certificate theorem for a generic dynamical system.We show that a barrier certificate exists for any safe dynamical system defined on a compact manifold. Other authors have developed a related result, by assuming that the dynamical system has no singular...... points in the considered subset of the state space. In this paper, we redefine the standard notion of safety to comply with generic dynamical systems with multiple singularities. Afterwards, we prove the converse barrier certificate theorem and illustrate the differences between ours and previous work...

  16. Recycler barrier RF buckets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhat, C.M.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    The Recycler Ring at Fermilab uses a barrier rf systems for all of its rf manipulations. In this paper, I will give an overview of historical perspective on barrier rf system, the longitudinal beam dynamics issues, aspects of rf linearization to produce long flat bunches and methods used for emittance measurements of the beam in the RR barrier rf buckets. Current rf manipulation schemes used for antiproton beam stacking and longitudinal momentum mining of the RR beam for the Tevatron collider operation are explained along with their importance in spectacular success of the Tevatron luminosity performance.

  17. [Vascular endothelial Barrier Function].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, A N; Puchinyan, D M; Norkin, I A

    2015-01-01

    Endothelium is an important regulator of selective permeability of the vascular wall for different molecules and cells. This review summarizes current data on endothelial barrier function. Endothelial glycocalyx structure, its function and role in the molecular transport and leukocytes migration across the endothelial barrier are discussed. The mechanisms of transcellular transport of macromolecules and cell migration through endothelial cells are reviewed. Special section of this article addresses the structure and function of tight and adherens endothelial junction, as well as their importance for the regulation of paracellular transport across the endothelial barrier. Particular attention is paid to the signaling mechanism of endothelial barrier function regulation and the factors that influence on the vascular permeability.

  18. Barriers to Effective Listening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulbert, Jack E.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the following barriers which interfere with listening efficiency: content, speaker, medium, distractions, mindset, language, listening speed, and feedback. Suggests ways to combat these obstacles to accurate comprehension. (MM)

  19. Methane excess in Arctic surface water-triggered by sea ice formation and melting

    OpenAIRE

    Damm, E.; Rudels, B.; Schauer, U.; Mau, S.; Dieckmann, G.

    2015-01-01

    Arctic amplification of global warming has led to increased summer sea ice retreat, which influences gas exchange between the Arctic Ocean and the atmosphere where sea ice previously acted as a physical barrier. Indeed, recently observed enhanced atmospheric methane concentrations in Arctic regions with fractional sea-ice cover point to unexpected feedbacks in cycling of methane. We report on methane excess in sea ice-influenced water masses in the interior Arctic Ocean and provide evidence t...

  20. Barriers to SCM implementing

    OpenAIRE

    M.E. Rosli; B. Md Dero; A. R. Ismail; M. N. Ab Rahman

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This paper explores the barriers faced by Malaysian manufacturing companies in successfullyimplementing the Supply Chain Management (SCM). The study has highlighted some pertinent factorsperforming the barriers that are most frequently reported by the studied companies. Sixteen companies, fromservice and manufacturing companies were studied over a period of two years to assess their SCM practicesthrough survey and interview processes.Design/methodology/approach: This part discusses t...

  1. Hedging Double Barriers with Singles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sbuelz, A.

    2000-01-01

    Double barrier options provide risk managers with good-deal flexibility in tailoring portfolio returns.Their hedges offer full protection only if unwound along the barriers.This work provides non-dynamic hedges that project the risk of double barriers on to single barriers.Non-dynamic hedges overcom

  2. Vacuum barrier for excimer lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shurter, Roger P. (Jemez Springs, NM)

    1992-01-01

    A barrier for separating the vacuum area of a diode from the pressurized gas area of an excimer laser. The barrier is a composite material comprising layers of a metal such as copper, along with layers of polyimide, and a matrix of graphite fiber yarns impregnated with epoxy. The barrier is stronger than conventional foil barriers, and allows greater electron throughput.

  3. Vacuum barrier for excimer lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shurter, R.P.

    1992-09-15

    A barrier for separating the vacuum area of a diode from the pressurized gas area of an excimer laser. The barrier is a composite material comprising layers of a metal such as copper, along with layers of polyimide, and a matrix of graphite fiber yarns impregnated with epoxy. The barrier is stronger than conventional foil barriers, and allows greater electron throughput. 3 figs.

  4. Wave transformation across coral reefs under changing sea levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Daniel; Power, Hannah; Vila-Conejo, Ana; Webster, Jody

    2015-04-01

    The transformation of swell waves from deep water across reef flats is the primary process regulating energy regimes in coral reef systems. Coral reefs are effective barriers removing up to 99% of wave energy during breaking and propagation across reef flats. Consequently back-reef environments are often considered low energy with only limited sediment transport and geomorphic change during modal conditions. Coral reefs, and specifically reef flats, therefore provide important protection to tropical coastlines from coastal erosion and recession. However, changes in sea level could lead to significant changes in the dissipation of swell wave energy in coral reef systems with wave heights dependent on the depth over the reef flat. This suggests that a rise in sea level would also lead to significantly higher energy conditions exacerbating the transgressive effects of sea level rise on tropical beaches and reef islands. This study examines the potential implications of different sea level scenarios on the transformation of waves across the windward reef flats of One Tree Reef, southern Great Barrier Reef. Waves were measured on the reef flats and back-reef sand apron of One Tree Reef. A one-dimensional wave model was calibrated and used to investigate wave processes on the reef flats under different mean sea level (MSL) scenarios (present MSL, +1 m MSL, and +2 m MSL). These scenarios represent both potential future sea level states and also the paleo sea level of the late Holocene in the southern Great Barrier Reef. Wave heights were shown to increase under sea level rise, with greater wave induced orbital velocities affecting the bed under higher sea levels. In general waves were more likely to entrain and transport sediment both on the reef flat and in the back reef environment under higher sea levels which has implications for not only forecasted climate change scenarios but also for interpreting geological changes during the late Holocene when sea levels were 1

  5. Dactylogyrids (Monogenoidea) parasitizing the gills of spinefoots (Teleostei: Siganidae): proposal of Glyphidohaptor n. gen., with two new species from the Great Barrier Reef, Australia, and G. plectocirra n. comb. from Ras Mohammed National Park, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kritsky, Delane C; Galli, Paolo; Yang, Tingbao

    2007-02-01

    Nine species of Siganus (Perciformes: Siganidae) were examined for dactylogyrids (Monogenoidea) from the Red Sea, Egypt; the Great Barrier Reef, Australia; and the South China Sea, China. Species of Tetrancistrum were found on siganids from all 3 localities; Pseudohaliotrema spp. were restricted to siganids from the Great Barrier Reef; and species representing Glyphidohaptor n. gen. were found on siganids from the Red Sea and Great Barrier Reef. Siganus argenteus from the Red Sea and Siganus vulpinus from the Great Barrier Reef were negative for dactylogyrid parasites. Glyphidohaptor n. gen. is proposed for 3 species (2 species new to science) and the new species are described: Glyphidohaptor phractophallus n. sp. from Siganus fuscescens from the Great Barrier Reef; Glyphidohaptor sigani n. sp. from Siganus doliatus (type host), Siganus punctatus, Siganus corallinus, and Siganus lineatus from the Great Barrier Reef; and Glyphidohaptor plectocirra (Paperna, 1972) n. comb. (= Pseudohaliotrema plectocirra Paperna, 1972) from Siganus luridus and Siganus rivulatus from the Red Sea.

  6. A Bayesian Network to Predict Barrier Island Geomorphologic Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, B.; Plant, N. G.; Thieler, E. R.; Turecek, A.; Stippa, S.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding how barrier islands along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts of the United States respond to storms and sea-level rise is an important management concern. Although these threats are well recognized, quantifying the integrated vulnerability is challenging due to the range of time and space scalesover which these processes act. Developing datasets and methods to identify the physical vulnerabilities of coastal environments due to storms and sea-level rise thus is an important scientific focus that supports land management decision making. Here we employ a Bayesian Network (BN) to model the interactions between geomorphic variables sampled from existing datasets that capture both storm-and sea-level rise related coastal evolution. The BN provides a means of estimating probabilities of changes in specific geomorphic characteristics such as foredune crest height, beach width, beach height, given knowledge of barrier island width, maximum barrier island elevation, distance from an inlet, the presence of anthropogenic modifications, and long-term shoreline change rates, which we assume to be directly related to sea-level rise. We evaluate BN skill and explore how different constraints, such as shoreline change characteristics (eroding, stable, accreting), distance to nearby inlets and island width, affect the probability distributions of future morphological characteristics. Our work demonstrates that a skillful BN can be constructed and that factors such as distance to inlet, shoreline change rate, and the presence of human alterations have the strongest influences on network performance. For Assateague Island, Maryland/Virginia, USA, we find that different shoreline change behaviors affect the probabilities of specific geomorphic characteristics, such as dune height, which allows us to identify vulnerable locations on the barrier island where habitat or infrastructure may be vulnerable to storms and sea-level rise.

  7. Emergent Behavior of Coupled Barrier Island - Resort Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, D. E.; Werner, B. T.

    2004-12-01

    Barrier islands are attractive sites for resorts. Natural barrier islands experience beach erosion and island overwash during storms, beach accretion and dune building during inter-storm periods, and migration up the continental shelf as sea level rises. Beach replenishment, artificial dune building, seawalls, jetties and groins have been somewhat effective in protecting resorts against erosion and overwash during storms, but it is unknown how the coupled system will respond to long-term sea level rise. We investigate coupled barrier island - resort systems using an agent-based model with three components: natural barrier islands divided into a series of alongshore cells; resorts controlled by markets for tourism and hotel purchases; and coupling via storm damage to resorts and resort protection by government agents. Modeled barrier islands change by beach erosion, island overwash and inlet cutting during storms, and beach accretion, tidal delta growth and dune and vegetation growth between storms. In the resort hotel market, developer agents build hotels and hotel owning agents purchase them using predictions of future revenue and property appreciation, with the goal of maximizing discounted utility. In the tourism market, hotel owning agents set room rental prices to maximize profit and tourist agents choose vacation destinations maximizing a utility based on beach width, price and word-of-mouth. Government agents build seawalls, groins and jetties, and widen the beach and build up dunes by adding sand to protect resorts from storms, enhance beach quality, and maximize resort revenue. Results indicate that barrier islands and resorts evolve in a coupled manner to resort size saturation, with resorts protected against small-to-intermediate-scale storms under fairly stable sea level. Under extended, rapidly rising sea level, protection measures enhance the effect of large storms, leading to emergent behavior in the form of limit cycles or barrier submergence

  8. Barriers to teaching ocean science in Greek schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papathanassiou, Martha; McHugh, Patricia; Domegan, Christine; Gotensparre, Susan; Fauville, Geraldine; Parr, Jon

    2017-04-01

    Most European citizens are not aware of the full extent of the medical, economic, social, political and environmental importance of the sea to Europe and beyond. Most citizens are not aware of how our day-to-day actions can have a cumulative effect on the health of the ocean - a necessary resource that must be protected for all life on the planet Earth to exist. In other words, European citizens lack a sense of "Ocean Literacy" - an understanding of the ocean's influence on us and our influence on the ocean. Sea Change, a 3.5 million EU-funded project started in March 2015, is designed to bring about a fundamental 'Sea Change' in the way European citizens view their relationship with the sea, by empowering them as 'Ocean Literate' citizens - to take direct and sustainable action towards healthy seas and ocean, healthy communities and ultimately, a healthy planet. The project involves 17 partners from nine countries across Europe and will bring about real actions using behavior change and social engagement methodologies. Building upon the latest research on citizen and stakeholder attitudes, perceptions and values, the Sea Change partnership will design and implement mobilisation activities focused on education, community, government agencies, policy makers and citizens. Eight consultations were held around Europe with regards to barriers to teaching ocean science at schools. All project partners used a Collective Intelligence (CI) methodology to involve target group(s) in active, direct participation for Sea Change. CI is a "barriers and value" structuring methodology, a process of critical learning and reflection followed by action, and then by more critical learning to enable mobilisation, design and development 'with' people rather than on their behalf. In Greece, the consultation was carried out by HCMR, the lead partner for Greece. Participants were recruited through personal contact and existing education networks that the HCMR has previously worked with. In

  9. Review of electromagnetic induction for mapping barrier island framework geology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weymer, Bradley A.; Everett, Mark E.; de Smet, Timothy S.; Houser, Chris

    2015-05-01

    The geologic framework controls on modern barrier island transgression and the relationship of these controls to subsurface structure, hydrology and island geomorphology are not well understood. Recent evidence suggests that alongshore variations in pre-Holocene geology of barrier islands modify nearshore hydrodynamic processes and sediment transport, ultimately affecting how barrier islands will respond to relative sea-level rise. Explorations of Holocene barrier island geology are usually based on cores to supplement bathymetric, onshore/offshore seismic and/or ground-penetrating radar (GPR) surveys. The advantages and limitations of these methods with respect to barrier island investigations are briefly described in this review. Alternative near-surface geophysical methods including electromagnetic induction (EMI) sensors are increasingly being used for coastal research because they are non-invasive, provide continuous subsurface information across a variety of sub-environments, and are capable of characterizing large areas in a short time. Although these EMI sensors have shown promise in coastal applications, a number of issues primarily related to subsurface hydrology need to be addressed to fully assess the limitations of this technique. This paper reviews the theory, methodology and applications of EMI in support of geologic framework studies with particular reference to barrier islands. Resolution of these issues will allow EMI sensors to complement and offer significant advantages over traditional methods in support of an improved understanding of large-scale barrier island evolution.

  10. Barriers to cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Womeodu, R J; Bailey, J E

    1996-01-01

    Many barriers to cancer screening have been summarized and discussed. Barriers have been documented in all patient populations, but some groups such as ethnic minorities and the elderly face unique barriers. The barriers to cancer screening, are multifactorial, but much of the responsibility for change must lie with health care providers and the health care delivery industry. This is not to free the patient of all responsibility, but some significant barriers are beyond their direct control. Take, for example, socioeconomic status, disease knowledge, and culturally related perceptions and myths about cancer detection and treatment. The health care industry must do a better job identifying and overcoming these barriers. The significant effects of provider counseling and advice must not be underestimated. Patients must first be advised, and then further actions must be taken if they reject the screening advice. Did they refuse adherence to recommendations because they do not view themselves as susceptible, because of overwhelming personal barriers, or because of a fatalistic attitude toward cancer detection and treatment? If that is the case, physicians and health care institutions must attempt to change perceptions, educate, and personalize the message so that patients accept their disease susceptibility [table: see text]. Multiple patient and provider risk factors have been identified that can be used to target patients particularly at high risk for inadequate cancer screening and providers at high risk for performing inadequate screening. Research has clearly demonstrated the effectiveness of interventions to improve tracking of patient and physician compliance with screening recommendations. Further research is needed to show the impact of managed-care penetration and payer status on screening efforts, and incentive schemes need to be tested that reward institutions and third-party payers who develop uniform standards and procedures for cancer screening. The

  11. Local adaptation and oceanographic connectivity patterns explain genetic differentiation of a marine diatom across the North Sea-Baltic Sea salinity gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöqvist, C; Godhe, A; Jonsson, P R; Sundqvist, L; Kremp, A

    2015-06-01

    Drivers of population genetic structure are still poorly understood in marine micro-organisms. We exploited the North Sea-Baltic Sea transition for investigating the seascape genetics of a marine diatom, Skeletonema marinoi. Eight polymorphic microsatellite loci were analysed in 354 individuals from ten locations to analyse population structure of the species along a 1500-km-long salinity gradient ranging from 3 to 30 psu. To test for salinity adaptation, salinity reaction norms were determined for sets of strains originating from three different salinity regimes of the gradient. Modelled oceanographic connectivity was compared to directional relative migration by correlation analyses to examine oceanographic drivers. Population genetic analyses showed distinct genetic divergence of a low-salinity Baltic Sea population and a high-salinity North Sea population, coinciding with the most evident physical dispersal barrier in the area, the Danish Straits. Baltic Sea populations displayed reduced genetic diversity compared to North Sea populations. Growth optima of low salinity isolates were significantly lower than those of strains from higher native salinities, indicating local salinity adaptation. Although the North Sea-Baltic Sea transition was identified as a barrier to gene flow, migration between Baltic Sea and North Sea populations occurred. However, the presence of differentiated neutral markers on each side of the transition zone suggests that migrants are maladapted. It is concluded that local salinity adaptation, supported by oceanographic connectivity patterns creating an asymmetric migration pattern between the Baltic Sea and the North Sea, determines genetic differentiation patterns in the transition zone.

  12. Mammals of the Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naturescope, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Presents information on sea mammals, including definitions and characteristics of cetaceans, pinnipeds, and sirenians. Contains descriptions of the teaching activities "Whale Music,""Draw A Whale to Scale,""Adopt a Sea Mammal," and "Sea Mammal Sleuths." (TW)

  13. Mammals of the Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naturescope, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Presents information on sea mammals, including definitions and characteristics of cetaceans, pinnipeds, and sirenians. Contains descriptions of the teaching activities "Whale Music,""Draw A Whale to Scale,""Adopt a Sea Mammal," and "Sea Mammal Sleuths." (TW)

  14. Short Sea Shipping: Barriers, Incentives and Feasibility of Truck Ferry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-05

    99 11.2 Value of Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 11.3 Sensitivity Analysis...higher value of time , and as such should be able to bear substantially higher tolls (emphasis mine) [34]. Holguin, et al. analyzed truck-only-tolls as to...comparable. When the ferry in-delivery time is longer, the rate can be lowered from the competing mode’s rate by an amount equal to the shipper’s value of time . Conversely

  15. Support or Barrier?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanden, Guro Refsum; Lønsmann, Dorte

    This study offers a critical look at how corporate-level language management influences front-line language practices among employees in three multinational corporations (MNCs) headquartered in Scandinavia. Based on interview and document data, we examine, firstly, what front-line practices emplo...... to a discussion of how a company’s language policy may be seen as both support and a barrier....

  16. Overcoming Language Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Buda, Yvonne

    1976-01-01

    Many family physicians in Canada experience language and cultural barriers between themselves and their patients. Several aspects of the ensuing problems are described and some practical suggestions for solutions are made. The importance of health education for new Canadians in the family physician's office as well as through the media and community projects is stressed. Imagesp68-ap68-bp70-a PMID:21308059

  17. Barriers to obesity treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauro, Marina; Taylor, Valerie; Wharton, Sean; Sharma, Arya M

    2008-05-01

    Obesity, one of the most prevalent health problems in the Western world, is a chronic and progressive condition. Therefore, as with other chronic diseases, patients with obesity require lifelong treatment. Long-term efficacy and effectiveness of obesity treatments is notoriously poor. This may in part be attributable to the substantial barriers that undermine long-term obesity management strategies. These can include lack of recognition of obesity as a chronic condition, low socioeconomic status, time constraints, intimate saboteurs, and a wide range of comorbidities including mental health, sleep, chronic pain, musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive and endocrine disorders. Furthermore, medications used to treat some of these disorders may further undermine weight-loss efforts. Lack of specific obesity training of health professionals, attitudes and beliefs as well as coverage and availability of obesity treatments can likewise pose important barriers. Health professionals need to take care to identify, acknowledge and address these barriers where possible to increase patient success as well as compliance and adherence with treatments. Failure to do so may further undermine the sense of failure, low self esteem and self efficacy already common among obese individuals. Addressing treatment barriers can save resources and increase the prospect of long-term success.

  18. A coral reef refuge in the Red Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fine, Maoz; Gildor, Hezi; Genin, Amatzia

    2013-12-01

    The stability and persistence of coral reefs in the decades to come is uncertain due to global warming and repeated bleaching events that will lead to reduced resilience of these ecological and socio-economically important ecosystems. Identifying key refugia is potentially important for future conservation actions. We suggest that the Gulf of Aqaba (GoA) (Red Sea) may serve as a reef refugium due to a unique suite of environmental conditions. Our hypothesis is based on experimental detection of an exceptionally high bleaching threshold of northern Red Sea corals and on the potential dispersal of coral planulae larvae through a selective thermal barrier estimated using an ocean model. We propose that millennia of natural selection in the form of a thermal barrier at the southernmost end of the Red Sea have selected coral genotypes that are less susceptible to thermal stress in the northern Red Sea, delaying bleaching events in the GoA by at least a century.

  19. Barrier mechanisms in the Drosophila blood-brain barrier

    OpenAIRE

    Samantha Jane Hindle; Roland Jerome Bainton

    2014-01-01

    The invertebrate blood-brain barrier field is growing at a rapid pace and, in recent years, studies have shown a physiologic and molecular complexity that has begun to rival its vertebrate counterpart. Novel mechanisms of paracellular barrier maintenance through GPCR signaling were the first demonstrations of the complex adaptive mechanisms of barrier physiology. Building upon this work, the integrity of the invertebrate blood-brain barrier has recently been shown to require coordinated funct...

  20. Geophysical characterization of subsurface barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borns, D.J.

    1995-08-01

    An option for controlling contaminant migration from plumes and buried waste sites is to construct a subsurface barrier of a low-permeability material. The successful application of subsurface barriers requires processes to verify the emplacement and effectiveness of barrier and to monitor the performance of a barrier after emplacement. Non destructive and remote sensing techniques, such as geophysical methods, are possible technologies to address these needs. The changes in mechanical, hydrologic and chemical properties associated with the emplacement of an engineered barrier will affect geophysical properties such a seismic velocity, electrical conductivity, and dielectric constant. Also, the barrier, once emplaced and interacting with the in situ geologic system, may affect the paths along which electrical current flows in the subsurface. These changes in properties and processes facilitate the detection and monitoring of the barrier. The approaches to characterizing and monitoring engineered barriers can be divided between (1) methods that directly image the barrier using the contrasts in physical properties between the barrier and the host soil or rock and (2) methods that reflect flow processes around or through the barrier. For example, seismic methods that delineate the changes in density and stiffness associated with the barrier represents a direct imaging method. Electrical self potential methods and flow probes based on heat flow methods represent techniques that can delineate the flow path or flow processes around and through a barrier.

  1. Hydrography of the eastern Arabian Sea during summer monsoon 2002

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D Shankar; S S C Shenoi; R K Nayak; P N Vinayachandran; G Nampoothiri; A M Almeida; G S Michael; M R Ramesh Kumar; D Sundar; O P Sreejith

    2005-10-01

    Hydrographic observations in the eastern Arabian Sea (EAS)during summer monsoon 2002 (during the first phase of the Arabian Sea Monsoon Experiment (ARMEX))include two approximately fortnight-long CTD time series.A barrier layer was observed occasionally during the two time series. These ephemeral barrier layers were caused by in situ rainfall,and by advection of low-salinity (high-salinity)waters at the surface (below the surface mixed layer).These barrier layers were advected away from the source region by the West India Coastal Current and had no discernible effect on the sea surface temperature.The three high-salinity water masses,the Arabian Sea High Salinity Water (ASHSW),Persian Gulf Water (PGW),and Red Sea Water (RSW),and the Arabian Sea Salinity Minimum also exhibited intermittency:they appeared and disappeared during the time series.The concentration of the ASHSW,PGW,and RSWdecreased equatorward,and that of the RSW also decreased offshore.The observations suggest that the RSW is advected equatorward along the continental slope off the Indian west coast.

  2. Vacuum barrier for excimer lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shurter, R.P.

    1990-10-10

    This invention is comprised of a barrier for separating the vacuum area of a diode from the pressurized gas area of an excimer laser. The barrier is a composite material comprising layers of a metal such as copper, along with layers of polyimide, and a matrix of graphite fiber yearns impregnated with epoxy. The barrier is stronger than conventional foil barriers, and allows greater electron throughput.

  3. [The cultural barrier in care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djadaoudjee, Lisa

    2013-11-01

    French cultural diversity is evident within French hospitals, where nurses are confronted with communication problems resulting from the language barrier. While communication is indeed essential, there is another important aspect of caring for a patient for behind the language barrier lies a cultural barrier which must be taken into account in order to provide high-quality care.

  4. Thermal barrier coating materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R. Clarke

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Improved thermal barrier coatings (TBCs will enable future gas turbines to operate at higher gas temperatures. Considerable effort is being invested, therefore, in identifying new materials with even better performance than the current industry standard, yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ. We review recent progress and suggest that an integrated strategy of experiment, intuitive arguments based on crystallography, and simulation may lead most rapidly to the development of new TBC materials.

  5. Ocean barrier layers' effect on tropical cyclone intensification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaguru, Karthik; Chang, Ping; Saravanan, R; Leung, L Ruby; Xu, Zhao; Li, Mingkui; Hsieh, Jen-Shan

    2012-09-04

    Improving a tropical cyclone's forecast and mitigating its destructive potential requires knowledge of various environmental factors that influence the cyclone's path and intensity. Herein, using a combination of observations and model simulations, we systematically demonstrate that tropical cyclone intensification is significantly affected by salinity-induced barrier layers, which are "quasi-permanent" features in the upper tropical oceans. When tropical cyclones pass over regions with barrier layers, the increased stratification and stability within the layer reduce storm-induced vertical mixing and sea surface temperature cooling. This causes an increase in enthalpy flux from the ocean to the atmosphere and, consequently, an intensification of tropical cyclones. On average, the tropical cyclone intensification rate is nearly 50% higher over regions with barrier layers, compared to regions without. Our finding, which underscores the importance of observing not only the upper-ocean thermal structure but also the salinity structure in deep tropical barrier layer regions, may be a key to more skillful predictions of tropical cyclone intensities through improved ocean state estimates and simulations of barrier layer processes. As the hydrological cycle responds to global warming, any associated changes in the barrier layer distribution must be considered in projecting future tropical cyclone activity.

  6. Environmental impact of sea bass cage farming in the north Adriatic Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Lanari

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of the research was to reduce the organic and nutrient load under the net pen fish farms. An exper- iment was conducted to study the effects of artificial barriers fixed under a set of sea cages in order to reduce the envi- ronmental impact. The artificial barriers were made of four submerged galvanized steel pipes coated with plastic and placed on the sea floor (10 m depth in the Trieste gulf. The experimental design was as follows: control (C, cages with barriers (B, cages without barriers (WB. Measurements were taken on the surface as well as at 4 and 8m of depth. The trial lasted from the end of June 2000 to December 2001. Water quality parameters were not significantly influenced by the fish cages. Surface samples were characterised by lower levels of salinity and higher levels of oxygen and nitrate compared to those taken at 4 and 8 m. The artificial barriers favoured the establishment of a rich epiphytic fauna that took advantage of the presence of organic matter derived from fish cages. The two species Nucula nucleusand Neanthes caudataand the total bacterial counts were identified as potential indicators of pollution under the fish cage farms.

  7. White sea radioactivity assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aliev, R.A. [Lomonosov Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation). Skobeltsyn Inst. of Nuclear Physics]|[Lomonosov Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation). Chemistry Dept.]|[Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Shirshov Inst. of Oceanology; Kalmykov, S.N.; Lisitzin, A.P. [Lomonosov Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation). Chemistry Dept.

    2004-07-01

    The aim of the present work is to estimate potential sources and chronology of pollution of the White Sea (Russia) by artificial radionuclides. White Sea is semi-closed water body connected with Barents Sea by a narrow strait. Thus, pollution of White Sea may be caused by highly polluted Barents waters and river (mainly Northern Dvina) run-off. This is the first detailed investigation of radioactivity of White Sea sediment records. (orig.)

  8. Using a Bayesian network to predict barrier island geomorphologic characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Ben; Plant, Nathaniel G.; Thieler, E. Robert; Turecek, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    Quantifying geomorphic variability of coastal environments is important for understanding and describing the vulnerability of coastal topography, infrastructure, and ecosystems to future storms and sea level rise. Here we use a Bayesian network (BN) to test the importance of multiple interactions between barrier island geomorphic variables. This approach models complex interactions and handles uncertainty, which is intrinsic to future sea level rise, storminess, or anthropogenic processes (e.g., beach nourishment and other forms of coastal management). The BN was developed and tested at Assateague Island, Maryland/Virginia, USA, a barrier island with sufficient geomorphic and temporal variability to evaluate our approach. We tested the ability to predict dune height, beach width, and beach height variables using inputs that included longer-term, larger-scale, or external variables (historical shoreline change rates, distances to inlets, barrier width, mean barrier elevation, and anthropogenic modification). Data sets from three different years spanning nearly a decade sampled substantial temporal variability and serve as a proxy for analysis of future conditions. We show that distinct geomorphic conditions are associated with different long-term shoreline change rates and that the most skillful predictions of dune height, beach width, and beach height depend on including multiple input variables simultaneously. The predictive relationships are robust to variations in the amount of input data and to variations in model complexity. The resulting model can be used to evaluate scenarios related to coastal management plans and/or future scenarios where shoreline change rates may differ from those observed historically.

  9. Wave trapping by dual porous barriers near a wall in the presence of bottom undulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaligatla, R. B.; Manisha; Sahoo, T.

    2017-09-01

    Trapping of oblique surface gravity waves by dual porous barriers near a wall is studied in the presence of step type varying bottom bed that is connected on both sides by water of uniform depths. The porous barriers are assumed to be fixed at a certain distance in front of a vertical rigid wall. Using linear water wave theory and Darcy's law for flow past porous structure, the physical problem is converted into a boundary value problem. Using eigenfunction expansion in the uniform bottom bed region and modified mild-slope equation in the varying bottom bed region, the mathematical problem is handled for solution. Moreover, certain jump conditions are used to account for mass conservation at slope discontinuities in the bottom bed profile. To understand the effect of dual porous barriers in creating tranquility zone and minimum load on the sea wall, reflection coefficient, wave forces acting on the barrier and the wall, and surface wave elevation are computed and analyzed for different values of depth ratio, porous-effect parameter, incident wave angle, gap between the barriers and wall and slope length of undulated bottom. The study reveals that with moderate porosity and suitable gap between barriers and sea wall, using dual barriers an effective wave trapping system can be developed which will exert less wave force on the barriers and the rigid wall. The proposed wave trapping system is likely to be of immense help for protecting various facilities/ infrastructures in coastal environment.

  10. Barrier mechanisms in the Drosophila blood-brain barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Jane Hindle

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The invertebrate blood-brain barrier field is growing at a rapid pace and, in recent years, studies have shown a physiologic and molecular complexity that has begun to rival its vertebrate counterpart. Novel mechanisms of paracellular barrier maintenance through GPCR signaling were the first demonstrations of the complex adaptive mechanisms of barrier physiology. Building upon this work, the integrity of the invertebrate blood-brain barrier has recently been shown to require coordinated function of all layers of the compound barrier structure, analogous to signaling between the layers of the vertebrate neurovascular unit. These findings strengthen the notion that many blood-brain barrier mechanisms are conserved between vertebrates and invertebrates, and suggest that novel findings in invertebrate model organisms will have a significant impact on the understanding of vertebrate BBB functions. In this vein, important roles in coordinating localized and systemic signaling to dictate organism development and growth are beginning to show how the blood-brain barrier can govern whole animal physiologies. This includes novel functions of blood-brain barrier gap junctions in orchestrating synchronized neuroblast proliferation, and of blood-brain barrier secreted antagonists of insulin receptor signaling. These advancements and others are pushing the field forward in exciting new directions. In this review, we provide a synopsis of invertebrate blood-brain barrier anatomy and physiology, with a focus on insights from the past 5 years, and highlight important areas for future study.

  11. Assessment of the risk of drowning at low-head dams used as sea lamprey barriers in Ontario[Includes the CSCE forum on professional practice and career development : 1. international engineering mechanics and materials specialty conference : 1. international/3. coastal, estuarine and offshore engineering specialty conference : 2. international/8. construction specialty conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazurek, K.A.; Thomson, J.; Amos, M. [Saskatchewan Univ., Saskatoon, SK (Canada). Dept. of Civil and Geological Engineering; Hallett, A. [A. Hallett, Sault Ste. Marie, ON (Canada); Aktar, A. [Indian Inst. of Technology, Kanpur (India). Dept. of Civil Engineering; Katopodis, C. [Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Winnipeg, MB (Canada). Freshwater Inst.

    2009-07-01

    In 2003, there were 54 fixed-crest lamprey barriers used in the Great Lakes region, with more construction planned. Although the barriers are relatively small structures of about 1-2 m in height, they present a drowning hazard. On the downstream side of the structure, a submerged hydraulic jump creates a strong vortex flow that even an experienced swimmer cannot escape. This study developed a method to assess the risk of hazardous flows at the barrier sites to enable dam owners to decide whether or not mitigative measures need to be undertaken at their sites. This hazard assessment was demonstrated for 2 existing lamprey barriers in Ontario, namely the Duffins Creek Barrier at Ajax and the Little Otter Creek Barrier near Straffordville. However, the work can be applied to the dam safety assessment and the development of potential mitigative strategies for drowning at other low-head dams and weirs. A flow-duration curves was developed for each site in order to determine the risk of having a drowning hazard at the barrier sites. In the flow-duration analysis, the percentage time, or probability, that a given flow rate was equalled or exceeded was calculated directly from observations of the average daily discharge in the channel. 18 refs., 1 tab., 7 figs.

  12. Geomorphologic Evolution of Barrier Islands along the Northern U.S. Gulf of Mexico and Implications for Engineering Design in Barrier Restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Superconstruction (via over- wash and eolian) - Autocompaction (discussed for islands in Virginia) 3. Aggradation and shoal growth Otvos (1970, 1979, 1981, 1985) 4...the island responds to rising sea level by aggradation (through overwash or eolian deposition on the subaerial barrier) until it is drowned and later

  13. Sea ice occurrence predicts genetic isolation in the Arctic fox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geffen, Eli; Waidyaratne, Sitara; Dalén, Love; Angerbjörn, Anders; Vila, Carles; Hersteinsson, Pall; Fuglei, Eva; White, Paula A; Goltsman, Michael; Kapel, Christian M O; Wayne, Robert K

    2007-10-01

    Unlike Oceanic islands, the islands of the Arctic Sea are not completely isolated from migration by terrestrial vertebrates. The pack ice connects many Arctic Sea islands to the mainland during winter months. The Arctic fox (Alopex lagopus), which has a circumpolar distribution, populates numerous islands in the Arctic Sea. In this study, we used genetic data from 20 different populations, spanning the entire distribution of the Arctic fox, to identify barriers to dispersal. Specifically, we considered geographical distance, occurrence of sea ice, winter temperature, ecotype, and the presence of red fox and polar bear as nonexclusive factors that influence the dispersal behaviour of individuals. Using distance-based redundancy analysis and the BIOENV procedure, we showed that occurrence of sea ice is the key predictor and explained 40-60% of the genetic distance among populations. In addition, our analysis identified the Commander and Pribilof Islands Arctic populations as genetically unique suggesting they deserve special attention from a conservation perspective.

  14. Linguistic Barriers and Bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Frederik

    2016-01-01

    The influence of language on social capital in low-skill and ethnically diverse workplaces has thus far received very limited attention within the sociology of work. As the ethnically diverse workplace is an important social space for the construction of social relations bridging different social...... and intercultural communication, this article analyses interviews with 31 employees from two highly ethnically diverse Danish workplaces. The article shows how linguistic barriers such as different levels of majority language competence and their consequent misunderstandings breed mistrust and hostility, whilst...

  15. [Barrier methods of contraception].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, A; Edelman, D A

    1982-01-01

    Vaginal methods of contraception were the earliest types used and some references to them date back to antiquity. Most of the vaginal contraceptive agents identified by the ancient Greeks, Indians, Japanese, and Chinese have been found in modern laboratory tests to have spermicidal properties, but it is doubtful that the methods were fully reliable or were used by many people. During the 19th century the condom, vaginal spermicides, and diaphragm became available. The development of nonoxynol-9 and other nonirritating but effective spermicidal agents improved vaginal contraceptives greatly by the 1950s, but starting in the 1960s newer methods began to replace the vaginal methods. Interest in barrier methods has been reawakened somewhat by concern about the health effects of hormonal methods. At present all barrier methods leave something to be desired. Failure rates of 3-30% for barrier methods in general have been estimated, but the higher rates are believed due to incorrect or inconsistent use. Theoretical failure rates of condoms and diaphragms have been estimated at 3/100 women-years, but in actual use failure rates may reach 15 for condoms and 13 for diaphragms used with spermicides. Use-effectiveness rates are greatly influenced by motivation. For a variety of reasons, the acceptability of barrier methods is low, especially in developing countries. New developments in spermicidal agents include sperm inhibitors, which impede the fertilizing capacity of sperm rather than attempting a spermicidal effect; a number of such agents have been studied and have proven more effective in animal tests than conventional spermicides. Neosampoon, a new spermicidal foam, has attracted an increasing number of users, especially in developing countries. A new condom, made of thin polymers and containing a standard dose of nonoxynol-9, has been designed to dissolve in the vaginal fluid. Further studies are needed of its acceptability, efficacy, and side effects before it becomes

  16. Technical barrier challenges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李思佳

    2014-01-01

    according to a famouse report,the foreign Technical Barriers to Trade(TBT)have some effects on the exports of the People’s Republic of China.Major findings are as follows:(1)TBT makes it more difficult for China to export;(2)TBT increases the costs of Chinese export commodities;(3)TBT causes friction and confilicts in the international trade;(4)SOME developed countries have moved their phase-outs to China and other developing countries,which have become victims of TBT.

  17. Support or Barrier?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanden, Guro Refsum; Lønsmann, Dorte

    This study offers a critical look at how corporate-level language management influences front-line language practices among employees in three multinational corporations (MNCs) headquartered in Scandinavia. Based on interview and document data, we examine, firstly, what front-line practices...... employees use to cross language boundaries in their everyday work, and, secondly, how these practices relate to top-down language management in the case companies. Our findings show that employees are often dependent on ad hoc and informal solutions in cross- language situations, which leads us...... to a discussion of how a company’s language policy may be seen as both support and a barrier....

  18. Optimum Barrier Height for SiC Schottky Barrier Diode

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed Abd El-Latif; Alaa El-Din Sayed Hafez

    2013-01-01

    The study of barrier height control and optimization for Schottky barrier diode (SBD) from its physical parameters have been introduced using particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithm. SBD is the rectifying barrier for electrical conduction across the metal semiconductor (MS) junction and, therefore, is of vital importance to the successful operation of any semiconductor device. 4H-SiC is used as a semiconductor material for its good electrical characteristics with high-power semiconductor ...

  19. Nanomedicine Faces Barriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Debbage

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Targeted nanoparticles have the potential to improve drug delivery efficiencies by more than two orders of magnitude, from the ~ 0.1% which is common today. Most pharmacologically agents on the market today are small drug molecules, which diffuse across the body’s blood-tissue barriers and distribute not only into the lesion, but into almost all organs. Drug actions in the non-lesion organs are an inescapable part of the drug delivery principle, causing “side-effects” which limit the maximally tolerable doses and result in inadequate therapy of many lesions. Nanoparticles only cross barriers by design, so side-effects are not built into their mode of operation. Delivery rates of almost 90% have been reported. This review examines the significance of these statements and checks how far they need qualification. What type of targeting is required? Is a single targeting sufficient? What new types of clinical challenge, such as immunogenicity, might attend the use of targeted nanoparticles?

  20. Higgs vacua behind barriers

    CERN Document Server

    Tamarit, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Scenarios in which the Higgs vacuum arises radiatively and separated from the origin by a potential barrier at zero temperature are known to be attainable in models with extra singlet scalars, which in the limit of zero barrier height give rise to Coleman-Weinberg realizations of electroweak symmetry breaking. However, this requires large values of Higgs-portal couplings or a large number N of singlets. This is quantified in detail by considering, for varying N, the full two-loop effective potential at zero temperature, as well as finite temperature effects including the dominant two-loop corrections due to the singlets. Despite the large couplings, two-loop effects near the electroweak scale are under control, and actually better behaved in models with larger couplings yet fewer singlets. Strong first-order phase transitions are guaranteed even in the Coleman-Weinberg scenarios. Cubic Higgs couplings and Higgs associated-production cross sections exhibit deviations from the Standard Model predictions which c...

  1. Stability of barrier buckets with zero RF-barrier separations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2005-03-01

    A barrier bucket with very small separation between the rf barriers (relative to the barrier widths) or even zero separation has its synchrotron tune decreasing rather slowly from a large value towards the boundary of the bucket. As a result, large area at the bucket edges can become unstable under the modulation of rf voltage and/or rf phase. In addition, chaotic regions may form near the bucket center and extend outward under increasing modulation. Application is made to those barrier buckets used in the process of momentum mining at the Fermilab Recycler Ring.

  2. 7 CFR 1437.310 - Sea grass and sea oats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Sea grass and sea oats. 1437.310 Section 1437.310 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT... Determining Coverage Using Value § 1437.310 Sea grass and sea oats. (a) Sea grass and sea oats are value...

  3. Sea Turtle Interaction Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Sea Turtle Interaction Report is a report sent out in pdf format to authorized individuals that summarizes sea turtle interactions in the longline fishery. The...

  4. Sea Turtle Interaction Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Sea Turtle Interaction Report is a report sent out in pdf format to authorized individuals that summarizes sea turtle interactions in the longline fishery. The...

  5. Sea Lion Diet Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — California sea lions pup and breed at four of the nine Channel Islands in southern California. Since 1981, SWFSC MMTD has been conducting a diet study of sea lions...

  6. Silicon Carbide Schottky Barrier Diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jian H.; Sheng, Kuang; Lebron-Velilla, Ramon C.

    2004-01-01

    This chapter reviews the status of SiC Schottky barrier diode development. The fundamental of Schottky barrier diodes is first provided, followed by the review of high-voltage SiC Schottky barrier diodes, junction-barrier Schottky diodes, and merged-pin-Schottky diodes. The development history is reviewed ad the key performance parameters are discussed. Applications of SiC SBDs in power electronic circuits as well as other areas such as gas sensors, microwave and UV detections are also presented, followed by discussion of remaining challenges.

  7. Translating barriers into potential improvements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Altintzoglou, Themistoklis; Hansen, Karina Birch; Valsdottir, Thora

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to explore potential barriers to seafood consumption by The aim of this study is to explore potential barriers to seafood consumption by young adults and the parents of young children. Knowledge of these barriers will be used to assist the development of new...... to lead to practical input The present study combines qualitative methods to lead to practical input for NPD focusing on overcoming the barriers that keep consumers from choosing existing healthy seafood products. The importance of the consumers' confidence in their ability to successfully prepare...

  8. Countermeasures and barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, Johannes [Oersted - DTU, Automation, Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

    2005-10-01

    In 1973 Haddon proposed ten strategies for reducing and avoiding damages based on a model of potential harmful energy transfer (Haddon, 1973). The strategies apply to a large variety of unwanted phenomena. Haddon's pioneering work on countermeasures has had a major influence on later thinking about safety. Considering its impact it is remarkable that the literature offers almost no discussions related to the theoretical foundations of Haddon's countermeasure strategies. The present report addresses a number of theoretical issues related to Haddon's countermeasure strategies, which are: 1) A reformulation and formalization of Haddon's countermeasure strategies. 2) An identification and description of some of the problems associated with the term 'barrier'. 3) Suggestions for a more precise terminology based on the causal structure of countermeasures. 4) Extending the scope of countermeasures to include sign-based countermeasures. (au)

  9. Linguistic Barriers and Bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Frederik

    2016-01-01

    and intercultural communication, this article analyses interviews with 31 employees from two highly ethnically diverse Danish workplaces. The article shows how linguistic barriers such as different levels of majority language competence and their consequent misunderstandings breed mistrust and hostility, whilst......The influence of language on social capital in low-skill and ethnically diverse workplaces has thus far received very limited attention within the sociology of work. As the ethnically diverse workplace is an important social space for the construction of social relations bridging different social...... groups, the sociology of work needs to develop a better understanding of the way in which linguistic diversity influences the formation of social capital, i.e. resources such as the trust and reciprocity inherent in social relations in such workplaces. Drawing on theories about intergroup contact...

  10. All hands on deck : an interactive perspective on complex common-pool resource management based on case studies in the coastal waters of the Isle of Wight (UK), Connemara (Ireland) and the Dutch Wadden Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steins, N.A.

    1999-01-01

    In 1996, the new fish cages of an Irish salmon farm were sabotaged and juvenile salmon with a value of IR£ 250,000 were released, nearly putting the farm out of business. This deed was an act of protest against the growth of the salmon farming industry. The loss of fishing grounds,

  11. All hands on deck : An interactive perspective on complex common-pool resource management based on case studies in the coastal waters of the Isle of Wight (UK), Connemara (Ireland) and the Dutch Wadden Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steins, N.A.

    1999-01-01

    In 1996, the new fish cages of an Irish salmon farm were sabotaged and juvenile salmon with a value of IR£ 250,000 were released, nearly putting the farm out of business. This deed was an act of protest against the growth of the salmon farming industry. The loss of fishing grounds, ecological and en

  12. All That Unplowed Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    MOSAIC, 1975

    1975-01-01

    Hunting and gathering at sea may fast be approaching their productive limits. Aquaculture - farming at sea - linked to conservation represents the sea's promise. If the system works, it might prove to be the key to supplying large amounts of food and fresh water at no cost in nonrenewable energy resources. (BT)

  13. The Caspian Sea Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostianoy, Andrey; Kosarev, A.

    The systematic description of the knowledge accumulated on the physical oceanography, marine chemistry and pollution, and marine biology of the Caspian Sea forms the basis of this book. It presents the principal characteristic features of the environmental conditions of the sea and their changes in the second half of the 20th century. At present, the principal problems of the Caspian Sea are related to the interannual sea level changes and their forecast and to the estimation of the intensity of the chemical pollution of the sea and its impact upon the biota.

  14. Informal export barriers and poverty

    OpenAIRE

    Porto, Guido G.

    2004-01-01

    The author investigates the poverty impacts of informal export barriers like transport costs, cumbersome customs practices, costly regulations, and bribes. He models these informal barriers as export taxes that distort the efficient allocation of resources. In low-income agricultural economies, this distortion lowers wages and household agricultural income, thereby leading to higher pover...

  15. Barriers to Women in Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Rosemary

    2013-01-01

    The Presiding Officer of the National Assembly for Wales, Rosemary Butler AM, has put the issue of barriers to women in public life at the top of the political agenda in Wales. She has held sessions with women across Wales to find out what those barriers are and how they can be tackled. On International Women's Day in February, she invited…

  16. Barriers to Women in Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Rosemary

    2013-01-01

    The Presiding Officer of the National Assembly for Wales, Rosemary Butler AM, has put the issue of barriers to women in public life at the top of the political agenda in Wales. She has held sessions with women across Wales to find out what those barriers are and how they can be tackled. On International Women's Day in February, she invited…

  17. BARRIERS OF STRATEGIC ALLIANCES ORGANIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladislav M. Sannikov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available General barriers of organization of different types of strategic alliances have beenconsidered in the article. There are several recommendations for overcoming themin cases of international alliances, and in case of work in one state. The article also identified goals and tasks of single coordination center of alliance to overcome organization barriers.

  18. Spanning trees crossing few barriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asano, T.; Berg, M. de; Cheong, O.; Guibas, L.J.; Snoeyink, J.; Tamaki, H.

    2002-01-01

    We consider the problem of finding low-cost spanning trees for sets of n points in the plane, where the cost of a spanning tree is defined as the total number of intersections of tree edges with a given set of m barriers. We obtain the following results: (i) if the barriers are possibly intersecting

  19. Probabilistic design of the steel structure of the new waterway storm surge barrier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manen, S.E. van; Vrouwenvelder, A.C.W.M.; Foeken, R.J. van

    1996-01-01

    As part of the sea defence system along the Dutch coast, a storm surge barrier is under construction in the New Waterway, near Rotterdam. The Dutch Ministry of Public Works requires for this structure that the probability of failure is at most 10' per year (104 in life time of 100 years). This is al

  20. Trade Barrier Elimination, Economics of Scale and Market Competition: Computable General Equilibrium Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Widyastutik Widyastutik

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The ASEAN and its dialogue partner countries agreed to reduce trade barriers in the services sector, one of which is sea transport services. The purpose of this study is to estimate the equivalent tax of non-tariff barriers in the sea transport services. Besides that, this study is going to analyze the economic impacts of the regulatory barriers elimination in the sea transport services of ASEAN and its dialogue partner countries. Using the gravity model, it can be identified that trade barriers of sea transport services sector of ASEAN and dialogue partner countries are still relatively high. Additionally, by adopting IC-IRTS model in Global CGE Model (GTAP, the simulation results show consistent results with the theory of pro-competitive effects. The greater gain from trade is obtained in the CGE model assuming IC-IRTS compared to PC-CRTS. China gains a greater benefit that is indicated by the highest increase in welfare and GDP followed by Japan and AustraliaDOI: 10.15408/sjie.v6i2.5279

  1. Response of wave-dominated and mixed-energy barriers to storms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Masselink, G.; Heteren, S. van

    2014-01-01

    Wave-dominated and mixed-energy barriers are extremely dynamic landforms, responding to processes operating over a spectrum of time scales, ranging from daily-to-monthly fluctuations related to storm and post-storm conditions, to century-to-millennium-scale evolution driven by relative sea-level cha

  2. Vulnerability of Turkish coasts to accelerated sea-level rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpar, Bedri

    2009-06-01

    Accelerated rise in sea-level, and associated geological adjustment, may result in a high impact on shorelines. On the basis of hourly sea-level observations over a 20 year period, sea-level change along the Turkish coast has been investigated. In addition to relative sea-level rise, the high level of human activities in coastal areas puts a significant amount of stress on Turkish coastal zones, especially on coastal lowland plains. Coastal erosion and ground water salinization are the most important impacts and two case studies are discussed in this paper: the Kizilirmak river delta on the Black Sea; and the tourism center of Erdek on the Marmara Sea. Coastal retreat on the Kizilirmak river delta is mostly attributed to decreasing sediment supply to the coast. The shore barriers and the enclosed lagoons are likely to respond readily to future sea-level rise. At Erdek, the most important threat is intrusion of salt water into freshwater systems caused by a combination of accelerated sea-level rise, land reclamation and overexploitation of underground aquifers.

  3. Epistemological barriers to radical behaviorism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donohue, W T; Callaghan, G M; Ruckstuhl, L E

    1998-01-01

    The historian and philosopher of science Gaston Bachelard proposed the concept of epistemological barriers to describe the intellectual challenges encountered by scientists in their work. In order to embrace novel ways of approaching a problem in science, scientists must overcome barriers or obstacles posed by their prior views. For example, Einsteinian physics presents scientists with claims that space is curved and that time and space are on the same continuum. We utilize Bachelard's concept of epistemological barriers to describe the differences between the intellectual journeys students pursuing advanced studies face when attempting to accept cognitive psychology or radical behaviorism. We contend that the folk psychological beliefs that students typically hold when entering these studies pose less challenge to cognitive psychology than to radical behaviorism. We also suggest that these barriers may also partly be involved in the problematic exegesis that has plagued radical behaviorism. In close, we offer some suggestions for dealing with these epistemological barriers.

  4. Epistemological barriers to radical behaviorism

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donohue, William T.; Callaghan, Glenn M.; Ruckstuhl, L. E.

    1998-01-01

    The historian and philosopher of science Gaston Bachelard proposed the concept of epistemological barriers to describe the intellectual challenges encountered by scientists in their work. In order to embrace novel ways of approaching a problem in science, scientists must overcome barriers or obstacles posed by their prior views. For example, Einsteinian physics presents scientists with claims that space is curved and that time and space are on the same continuum. We utilize Bachelard's concept of epistemological barriers to describe the differences between the intellectual journeys students pursuing advanced studies face when attempting to accept cognitive psychology or radical behaviorism. We contend that the folk psychological beliefs that students typically hold when entering these studies pose less challenge to cognitive psychology than to radical behaviorism. We also suggest that these barriers may also partly be involved in the problematic exegesis that has plagued radical behaviorism. In close, we offer some suggestions for dealing with these epistemological barriers. PMID:22478314

  5. SEA and planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoeglehner, G.; Brown, A.L.; Kørnøv, Lone

    2009-01-01

    As the field of strategic environmental assessment (SEA) has matured, the focus has moved from the development of legislation, guidelines and methodologies towards improving the effectiveness of SEA. Measuring and of course achieving effectiveness is both complex and challenging. This paper...... suggests that SEA professionals need to consider 'democratic effectiveness' as well as 'environmental effectiveness' in both 'direct' and 'indirect' outputs. The effectiveness of SEA depends critically on the context within which SEA legislation and guidelines are understood and implemented......, and the relationship of the SEA to the planning activity itself. This paper focuses on the influence that planners have in these implementation processes, postulating the hypothesis that these are key players in achieving effectiveness in SEA. Based upon implementation theory and empirical experience, the paper...

  6. Baltic Sea: Radionuclides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sven Poul; Lüning, Maria; Ilus, Erkki

    2011-01-01

    about 14%. For 90Sr in the Baltic Sea, input from atmospheric fallout from nuclear weapons tests has contributed about 81%, while the contribution from Chernobyl fallout was about 13%. Cesium-137 is the main indicator of Baltic seawater with respect to anthropogenic radioactivity. The highest....... Radioactivity inputs into the Baltic Sea from nuclear reprocessing plants in Western Europe have become of minor importance due to significant reduction of discharges in recent years. In terms of input of 137Cs into the Baltic Sea, Chernobyl fallout has contributed about 82% and nuclear weapons test fallout...... 137Cs values due to their higher concentration factors (CFs). The larger 137Cs values of pike were observed at the coast of the Bothnian Sea. The Baltic Sea is the regional sea in the world with the highest concentrations of 137Cs. The Baltic Sea ranks third in the world with respect to 90Sr...

  7. Baltic Sea: Radionuclides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sven Poul; Lüning, Maria; Ilus, Erkki

    2010-01-01

    about 14%. For 90Sr in the Baltic Sea, input from atmospheric fallout from nuclear weapons tests has contributed about 81%, while the contribution from Chernobyl fallout was about 13%. Cesium-137 is the main indicator of Baltic seawater with respect to anthropogenic radioactivity. The highest....... Radioactivity inputs into the Baltic Sea from nuclear reprocessing plants in Western Europe have become of minor importance due to significant reduction of discharges in recent years. In terms of input of 137Cs into the Baltic Sea, Chernobyl fallout has contributed about 82% and nuclear weapons test fallout...... 137Cs values due to their higher concentration factors (CFs). The larger 137Cs values of pike were observed at the coast of the Bothnian Sea. The Baltic Sea is the regional sea in the world with the highest concentrations of 137Cs. The Baltic Sea ranks third in the world with respect to 90Sr...

  8. Sea piracy and law of the sea

    OpenAIRE

    Hanif, Muhammad Tahir

    2010-01-01

    As the sea become world’s largest source to trade between the nations during the last few decades. Of course there are lots of problems in this regards when we are using the sea on such a large scale. The problem of piracy is most dangerous problems, among the all problems of the sea at the same time. Nations are trying to control this crime individually and collectively but the problem is still on its peak. Lots of international and national laws and conventions are held in this ...

  9. The impact of future sea-level rise on the European Shelf tides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, M. D.; Wells, N. C.; Horsburgh, K. J.; Green, J. A. M.

    2012-03-01

    This paper investigates the effect of future sea-level rise (SLR) on the tides of the northwest European Continental Shelf. The European shelf tide is dominated by semidiurnal constituents. This study therefore focuses primarily on the changes in the M2 tidal constituent and the spring and neap tidal conditions. The validated operational Dutch Continental Shelf Model is run for the present day sea-level as well as 2 and 10 m SLR scenarios. The M2 tidal amplitude responds to SLR in a spatially non-uniform manner, with substantial amplitude increases and decreases in both scenarios. The M2 tidal response is non-linear between 2 and 10 m with respect to SLR, particularly in the North Sea. Under the 2 m SLR scenario the M2 constituent is particularly responsive in the resonant areas of the Bristol Channel and Gulf of St. Malo (with large amplitude decreases) and in the southeastern German Bight and Dutch Wadden Sea (with large amplitude increases). Changes in the spring tide are generally greater still than those in the M2 or neap tides. With 2 m SLR the spring tidal range increases up to 35 cm at Cuxhaven and decreases up to -49 cm at St. Malo. Additionally the changes in the shallow water tides are larger than expected. With SLR the depth, wave speed and wave length (tidal resonance characteristics) are increased causing changes in near resonant areas. In expansive shallow areas SLR causes reduced energy dissipation by bottom friction. Combined these mechanisms result in the migration of the amphidromes and complex patterns of non-linear change in the tide with SLR. Despite the significant uncertainty associated with the rate of SLR over the next century, substantial alterations to tidal characteristics can be expected under a high end SLR scenario. Contrary to existing studies this paper highlights the importance of considering the modification of the tides by future SLR. These substantial future changes in the tides could have wide reaching implications; including

  10. Mesoscale geomorphic change on low energy barrier islands in Chesapeake Bay, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, J. Andrew G.

    2013-10-01

    energy barrier islands closely resemble open ocean barrier islands. Continued reworking leads to widening of the inlets with consequent loss of constriction of tidal flow. The tidal deltas are, thus, no longer maintained and ultimately the island system disintegrates through inlet widening and is transformed to subtidal shoals. Barrier islands at various stages in this evolutionary cycle can be observed around the bay. Mid-bay barrier islands are affected by wave processes from both sides. This helps maintain the barrier island form and enables barrier islands to persist as sediment is exchanged between both sides of the island. Rates of barrier island translation are extremely high (up to 30 m/year over a 12 year period). This is attributed to the low volume of sand, which facilitates complete rollover in short periods. Accelerated sea level rise is likely to hasten the translation rates of marsh fringe barrier islands. The rapid disintegration of most spits compared to the persistence of marsh fringe barrier islands points to a reliance on the marsh as a stabilising point. If the marshes are overstepped by rising sea level as appears to be happening, the complete disintegration of the barrier islands is highly likely.

  11. Development of engineered barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, Kwan Sik; Cho, Won Jin; Lee, Jae Owan; Kim, Seung Soo; Kang, Mu Ja

    1999-03-01

    Engineered barrier development was carried out into the three research fields : waste form, disposal container, and buffer. The waste form field dealt with long-term leaching tests with borosilicate waste glasses surrounded by compacted bentonite. The leach rate decreased with increasing time, and was higher for the waste specimen rich in U and Na. In the container field, preliminary concepts of disposal containers were recommended by conducting structural analysis, thermal analysis, and shielding analysis, and major properties of stainless steel, copper, and titanium as a container material were surveyed. The sensitization degrees of SUS 316 and316L were lower than those of SUS 304 and 304L, respectively. The crevice corrosion of sensitized stainless steel was sensitive to the content of salt. Researches into the buffer included establishment of its performance criteria followed by investigating major properties of buffer using potential material in Korea. Experiments were made for measuring hydraulic conductivities, swelling properties, mechanical properties, thermal conductivities, pore-water chemistry properties, and adsorption properties was also investigated. (author)

  12. Water level response in back-barrier bays unchanged following Hurricane Sandy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aretxabaleta, Alfredo L.; Butman, Bradford; Ganju, Neil K.

    2014-01-01

    On 28–30 October 2012, Hurricane Sandy caused severe flooding along portions of the northeast coast of the United States and cut new inlets across barrier islands in New Jersey and New York. About 30% of the 20 highest daily maximum water levels observed between 2007 and 2013 in Barnegat and Great South Bay occurred in 5 months following Hurricane Sandy. Hurricane Sandy provided a rare opportunity to determine whether extreme events alter systems protected by barrier islands, leaving the mainland more vulnerable to flooding. Comparisons between water levels before and after Hurricane Sandy at bay stations and an offshore station show no significant differences in the transfer of sea level fluctuations from offshore to either bay following Sandy. The post-Hurricane Sandy bay high water levels reflected offshore sea levels caused by winter storms, not by barrier island breaching or geomorphic changes within the bays.

  13. Frequent non-storm washover of barrier islands, Pacific coast of Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, R.A.; Gonzalez, J.L.; Lopez, G.I.; Correa, I.D.

    2000-01-01

    Barrier islands of the Pacific coast of Colombia repeatedly experience severe washover even when breaking waves in the eastern Pacific are low and onshore winds are calm. On the barrier island of El Choncho, recent non-storm washover events have breached a new inlet, caused rapid beach retreat, destroyed a shoreline protection structure, and flooded a small village of indigenous people so frequently that it had to be relocated. Barrier washover may be augmented by lowered land elevations associated with earthquake-induced subsidence or long-term beach retreat, but temporally it is most closely associated with a 20 to 30 cm regional increase in sea level caused by El Nino. The contradiction of a tranquil tropical island scene simultaneously disturbed by hostile turbulent washover may be unique at present, but it exemplifies how coastal plains throughout the world would be affected if sea level were to rise rapidly as a result of global warming.

  14. An Investigation of Groundwater Flow on a Coastal Barrier using Multi Electrode Profiling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Søren Erbs; Christensen, Steen; Rasmussen, Keld Rømer;

    2008-01-01

    probes, having closely spaced electrodes from above the groundwater table to a depth of 5 m below sea level, have been installed and tested. Using this system we will monitor resistivity and thus groundwater salinity variations in space and time. Analyzing the measurements using density dependent......Preliminary geophysical and hydrogeological investigations indicate that multi-electrode profiling (MEP) can be used to monitor groundwater salinity on a coastal barrier where a shallow thin aquifer discharges to the North Sea. A monitoring system including five groups of piezometers and five MEP...... groundwater modeling we hope to be able to quantify how time varying recharge, tides, and storms hitting the barrier affect groundwater flow and discharge to the sea. At the conference we will present monitoring results from the winter and spring 2008....

  15. Salish Sea Genetics - Salish Sea genetic inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Salish Sea comprises most of the Puget Sound water area. Marine species are generally assemblages of discrete populations occupying various ecological niches....

  16. 渤海湾西岸的几道贝壳堤%A Few of Barrier Sand-bars on the West Coast of Bohai Bay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    岳军; Dongyue; 张宝华; 耿秀山; 刘雪松; 赵希涛; 牟林; 张百鸣; 韩芳

    2012-01-01

    There are 6 Barrier Sand-bars are outcropped or buried on the west coast of Bohai Bay. Based on the geological survey, it is found that the plane distribution features texture of the Barrier Sand-bars, which are from the old to the new are roughly parallel with the coast along the west coast of Bohai Bay (from the coast to the sea). The distribution of the Barrier Sand-bars can be divided into two kinds, one is from the new to the old, and the other one is from the old to the new. In this paper, the division of the Barrier Sand-bars from I (old) to VI (new) by using the latter one. Through the description of the material composition and the accumulation characteristics to each barrier sand-bar (figure. 2 to figure. 7) , conducting the mathematical statistics for the geometrical morphological features (table 2), comparing analysis the formation age features and the division scheme (table 3), summing up the biological assemblages (table 1), the result reveal the occurrence, formation age and the tidal level change of the Barrier Sand-bars from I to VI (figure. 8). In the basis of the Barrier Sand-bars as a particular geological carrier, the author try to analysis and reveal the genetic mechanism in a macroscopic view, and consider that the generalized Bohai Sea is inland semi-lagoon or local sea in reality, (table. 4 figure. 9) Shangdong Miaodao Island and Liaodong Peninsula constitute barrier coast for Bohai Sea. After comparing analysis to massive data, the barrier coast is an only essential condition to form kebohe delta and beaked delta, both of which may be a possibility condition to form barrier bars (barrier island, barrier beach) or shell ridges. This result is just main genetic mechanism for the shell ridges.

  17. Mitochondrial DNA control region diversity and population structure of Pacific herring ( Clupea pallasii) in the Yellow Sea and the Sea of Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ming; Gao, Tianxia; Sakurai, Yasunori; Jia, Ning; Zhao, Linlin; Du, Xiao; Jiang, Qun; Lu, Zhichuan

    2011-03-01

    To investigate the genetic variation and population structure of Pacific herring in the Yellow Sea and the genetic differentiation between the Yellow Sea and the Sea of Japan, fragments of 479-bp mitochondrial DNA control region were sequenced for 110 individuals collected from three different periods in the Yellow Sea and one locality in the Sea of Japan. High haplotype diversity and moderate nucleotide diversity were observed in Pacific herring. AMOVA and exact test of population differentiation showed no significant genetic differentiations among the three populations of the Yellow Sea and suggested the populations can be treated as a single panmictic stock in the Yellow Sea. However, a large and significant genetic differentiation ( Φ ST=0.11; P=0.00) was detected between the populations in the Yellow Sea and the Sea of Japan. The high sea water temperature in the Tsushima Strait was thought a barrier to block the gene exchange between populations of the two sea areas. The neutrality tests and mismatch distribution indicated recent population expansion in Pacific herring.

  18. Mitochondrial DNA control region diversity and population structure of Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii)in the Yellow Sea and the Sea of Japan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ming; GAO Tianxiang; SAKURAI Yasunori; JIA Ning; ZHAO Linlin; DU Xiao; JIANG Qun; LU Zhichuang

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the genetic variation and population structure of Pacific herring in the Yellow Sea and the genetic differentiation between the Yellow Sea and the Sea of Japan, fragments of 479-bp mitochondrial DNA control region were sequenced for 110 individuals collected from three different periods in the Yellow Sea and one locality in the Sea of Japan. High haplotype diversity and moderate nucleotide diversity were observed in Pacific herring. AMOVA and exact test of population differentiation showed no significant genetic differentiations among the three populations of the Yellow Sea and suggested the populations can be treated as a single panmictic stock in the Yellow Sea. However, a large and significant genetic differentiation (ΦST=0.11; P=0.00) was detected between the populations in the Yellow Sea and the Sea of Japan. The high sea water temperature in the Tsuslaima Strait was thought a barrier to block the gene exchange between populations of the two sea areas. The neutrality tests and mismatch distribution indicated recent population expansion in Pacific herring.

  19. Tritium/hydrogen barrier development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollenberg, G.W.; Simonen, E.P. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Kalinen, G. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany). International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Team; Terlain, A. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France). Service de la Corrosion, d`Electrochimie et Chimie des Fluides

    1994-06-01

    A review of hydrogen permeation barriers that can be applied to structural metals used in fusion power plants is presented. Both implanted and chemically available hydrogen isotopes must be controlled in fusion plants. The need for permeation barriers appears strongest in Li17-Pb blanket designs, although barriers also appear necessary for other blanket and coolant systems. Barriers that provide greater than a 1000 fold reduction in the permeation of structural metals are desired. In laboratory experiments, aluminide and titanium ceramic coatings provide permeation reduction factors, PRFS, from 1000 to over 100,000 with a wide range of scatter. The rate-controlling mechanism for hydrogen permeation through these barriers may be related to the number and type of defects in the barriers. Although these barriers appear robust and resistant to liquid metal corrosion, irradiation tests which simulate blanket environments result in very low PRFs in comparison to laboratory experiments, i.e., <150. It is anticipated from fundamental research activities that the REID enhancement of hydrogen diffusion in oxides may contribute to the lower permeation reduction factors during in-reactor experiments.

  20. Dead Sea Minerals loaded polymeric nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessy, Alberto; Kubowicz, Stephan; Alderighi, Michele; Bartoli, Cristina; Piras, Anna Maria; Schmid, Ruth; Chiellini, Federica

    2011-10-15

    Therapeutic properties of Dead Sea Water (DSW) in the treatment of skin diseases such as atopic dermatitis, psoriasis and photo aging UV damaged skin have been well established. DSW is in fact rich in minerals such as calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium, zinc and strontium which are known to exploit anti-inflammatory effects and to promote skin barrier recovery. In order to develop a Dead Sea Minerals (DSM) based drug delivery system for topical therapy of skin diseases, polymeric nanoparticles based on Poly (maleic anhydride-alt-butyl vinyl ether) 5% grafted with monomethoxy poly(ethyleneglycol) 2000 MW (PEG) and 95% grafted with 2-methoxyethanol (VAM41-PEG) loaded with DSM were prepared by means of a combined miniemulsion/solvent evaporation process. The resulting nanoparticles were characterized in terms of dimension, morphology, biocompatibility, salt content and release. Cytocompatible spherical nanoparticles possessing an average diameter of about 300 nm, a time controlled drug release profile and a high formulation yield were obtained.

  1. Summer Arctic sea fog

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Synchronous or quasi-synchronous sea-land-air observations were conducted using advanced sea ice, atmospheric and marine instruments during China' s First Arctic Expedition. Based on the Precious data from the expedition, it was found that in the Arctic Ocean, most part of which is covered with ice or is mixed with ice, various kinds of sea fog formed such as advection fog, radiation fog and vapor fog. Each kind has its own characteristic and mechanics of creation. In the southern part of the Arctic Ocean, due to the sufficient warm and wet flow there, it is favorable for advection fog to form,which is dense and lasts a long time. On ice cap or vast floating ice, due to the strong radiation cooling effect, stable radiating fog is likely to form. In floating ice area there forms vapor fog with the appearance of masses of vapor from a boiling pot, which is different from short-lasting land fog. The study indicates that the reason why there are many kinds of sea fog form in the Arctic Ocean is because of the complicated cushion and the consequent sea-air interaction caused by the sea ice distribution and its unique physical characteristics. Sea fog is the atmospheric phenomenon of sea-air heat exchange. Especially, due to the high albedo of ice and snow surface, it is diffcult to absorb great amount of solar radiation during the polar days. Besides, ice is a poor conductor of heat; it blocks the sea-air heat exchange.The sea-air exchange is active in floating ice area where the ice is broken. The sea sends heat to the atmosphere in form of latent heat; vapor fog is a way of sea-air heat exchange influencing the climate and an indicator of the extent of the exchange. The study also indicates that the sea also transports heat to the atmosphere in form of sensible heat when vapor fog occurs.

  2. Abnormal tooth development in a sea lamprey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manion, Patrick J.; Hanson, Lee H.

    1977-01-01

    Sea lampreys en route to their spawning grounds have been captured at mechanical or electrical structures that have been in operation for 1 to 27 spawning seasons (1949-75) on some 167 tributaries of the upper Great Lakes; more than 750,000 were taken in 1949-70 (Smith 1971). Among these lampreys (all of which were routinely examined at the time of capture) was one female (length, 434 mm; weight, 130 g) with markedly underdeveloped teeth. It was captured in May 1968 at an electrical barrier in the Ocqueoc River, a Michigan tributary of Lake Huron

  3. A LOOK AT CULTURAL BARRIERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen A. VRÂNCEANU

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays the global market allows each individual to work in foreign countries. This fact is a great opportunity for business development, but also puts into light the problem of cultural barriers. Ineffective cross-cultural communication and collaboration can harm employees, customers, and other stakeholders. A company with employees from different cultures must acknowledge and understand these barriers in order to overcome them and to obtain the desired performance. The present study aims to expose the cultural barriers encountered by foreigners in a multinational company from Romania.

  4. Barriers in Concurrent Separation Logic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobor, Aquinas; Gherghina, Cristian

    We develop and prove sound a concurrent separation logic for Pthreads-style barriers. Although Pthreads barriers are widely used in systems, and separation logic is widely used for verification, there has not been any effort to combine the two. Unlike locks and critical sections, Pthreads barriers enable simultaneous resource redistribution between multiple threads and are inherently stateful, leading to significant complications in the design of the logic and its soundness proof. We show how our logic can be applied to a specific example program in a modular way. Our proofs are machine-checked in Coq.

  5. Arctic Sea Level Reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Peter Limkilde

    Reconstruction of historical Arctic sea level is very difficult due to the limited coverage and quality of tide gauge and altimetry data in the area. This thesis addresses many of these issues, and discusses strategies to help achieve a stable and plausible reconstruction of Arctic sea level from...... 1950 to today.The primary record of historical sea level, on the order of several decades to a few centuries, is tide gauges. Tide gauge records from around the world are collected in the Permanent Service for Mean Sea Level (PSMSL) database, and includes data along the Arctic coasts. A reasonable...... amount of data is available along the Norwegian and Russian coasts since 1950, and most published research on Arctic sea level extends cautiously from these areas. Very little tide gauge data is available elsewhere in the Arctic, and records of a length of several decades,as generally recommended for sea...

  6. South China Sea Challenge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    China's attempts to solve disputes with ASEAN over the South China Sea help regional peace China's marine economy and security are currently faced with new challenges, requiring careful handling, especially in disputes with ASEAN countries and in promoting common development of the South China Sea. The outcome of how this is dealt with could undoubtedly pave the way for solutions to other oceanic disputes. The South China Sea is located south of

  7. Dilemmas in SEA application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyhne, Ivar

    Dilemmas in SEA Application: The DK Energy SectorIvar Lyhne - lyhne@plan.aau.dk. Based on three years of collaborative research, this paper outlines dilemmas in the application of SEA in the strategic development of the Danish energy sector. The dilemmas are based on concrete examples from practice...... the Danish energy sector) are starting to get it right. Lessons for SEA implementation in similar contexts are proposed....

  8. Wave Run-up on A Vertical Seawall Protected by An Offshore Submerged Barrier

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jing-xin; LIU Hua

    2009-01-01

    Submerged barriers are constructed in coastal zones for shoreline or harbor protection or to prevent the beach ero-sion. In the present study, the wave run-up on a vertical seawall protected by a submerged barrier is analyzed. The phys-ical configurations include a rigid barrier and a long channel of finite depth. For linear water waves, by matching the ve-locity along the barrier and along the gap, the systems of linear equations about the velocity potentials are obtained. The wave run-up is further analyzed for various settings of barrier height and distance between the barrier and the wall, i.e. the chamber length. For nonlinear waves and random sea waves, a numerical model is extended to investigate the effect parameters of the barrier on the wave rim-up against the seawall. Not only the numerical simulations, but also the analyt-ical results illustrate that the wave run-up on the seawall depends very much on the distance between the barrier and the vertical seawall.

  9. Coastal Structures and Barriers 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — This dataset is a compilation of the UCSC Sand Retention Structures, MC Barriers, and USACE Coastal Structures. UCSC Sand Retention Structures originate from a...

  10. and use of barrier techniques

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Attitudes of Nigerian dentists towards hepatitis B vaccination and use of barrier techniques .... tine screening of only high-risk patients has been recommended.“ .... i337-1342. Sote EO. AIDS and infection Control: experiences, attitudes,.

  11. Barriers for recess physical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pawlowski, Charlotte Skau; Tjørnhøj-Thomsen, Tine; Schipperijn, Jasper

    2014-01-01

    they would like to have more secluded areas added to the school playground, even in large schoolyards where lack of space was not a barrier. This aligned with girls' requests for more "hanging-out" facilities, whereas boys primarily wanted activity promoting facilities. CONCLUSION: Based on the results from......BACKGROUND: Many children, in particular girls, do not reach the recommended amount of daily physical activity. School recess provides an opportunity for both boys and girls to be physically active, but barriers to recess physical activity are not well understood. This study explores gender....... This was verified by a thematic analysis of transcripts from the open discussions and go-along interviews. RESULTS: The most frequently identified barriers for both boys and girls were weather, conflicts, lack of space, lack of play facilities and a newly-found barrier, use of electronic devices. While boys...

  12. Coastal Structures and Barriers 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — This dataset is a compilation of the UCSC Sand Retention Structures, MC Barriers, and USACE Coastal Structures. UCSC Sand Retention Structures originate from a...

  13. Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming

    2005-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings will be more aggressively designed to protect gas turbine engine hot-section components in order to meet future engine higher fuel efficiency and lower emission goals. In this presentation, thermal barrier coating development considerations and requirements will be discussed. An experimental approach is established to monitor in real time the thermal conductivity of the coating systems subjected to high-heat-flux, steady-state and cyclic temperature gradients. Advanced low conductivity thermal barrier coatings have also been developed using a multi-component defect clustering approach, and shown to have improved thermal stability. The durability and erosion resistance of low conductivity thermal barrier coatings have been improved utilizing advanced coating architecture design, composition optimization, in conjunction with more sophisticated modeling and design tools.

  14. Guided tissue regeneration. Absorbable barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H L; MacNeil, R L

    1998-07-01

    Over the past 15 years, techniques aimed at regeneration of lost periodontal tissue have become widely used and accepted in clinical practice. Among these techniques are those which use the principles of guided tissue regeneration (GTR), wherein barriers (i.e., membranes) are used to control cell and tissue repopulation of the periodontal wound. A variety of non-absorbable and absorbable barriers have been developed and used for this purpose, with a trend in recent years toward increased use of absorbable GTR materials. This article describes the evolution of absorbable barrier materials and overview materials available for clinical use today. In addition, advantages and disadvantages of these materials are discussed, as well as possible new developments in barrier-based GTR therapy.

  15. Nonlocal reflection by photonic barriers

    OpenAIRE

    Vetter, R. -M.; A. Haibel; Nimtz, G.

    2001-01-01

    The time behaviour of microwaves undergoing partial reflection by photonic barriers was measured in the time and in the frequency domain. It was observed that unlike the duration of partial reflection by dielectric layers, the measured reflection duration of barriers is independent of their length. The experimental results point to a nonlocal behaviour of evanescent modes at least over a distance of some ten wavelengths. Evanescent modes correspond to photonic tunnelling in quantum mechanics.

  16. Schooling Inequality and Language Barriers

    OpenAIRE

    Parker, Susan W.; Rubalcava, Luis; Teruel, Graciela

    2005-01-01

    This article estimates the impact of language barriers on school achievement and the potential ameliorating role of bilingual education. Using large household data sets from poor rural communities in Mexico, we find that parental language (failure to speak Spanish) represents an important barrier to the schooling of indigenous children. We provide an empirical test suggesting that this largely reflects parental human capital related to culture/language, rather than unobserved wealth effects. ...

  17. Basic survey on coal resources in Ariake Sea area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masui, Mitsuharu

    1984-09-21

    This is a contracted NEDO project. Potential existance of coal resources and geological conditions were studied and the following information was acquired. Area examined is the Ariake Sea area with breadth of 12 km (east to west) and 17 km (north to south) between the Miike Coal Mines and the Karatsu Coal Mines. Investigation was made by a marine drilling (depth being 864.8 m and 865.2 m below the sea bottom) and by a marine seismic method. Existence of coal bed groups comparable with the coal bed in the trial section of the Miike Coal Mines was confirmed by the two-drill trial. This indicates that the west end line of the Miike Coal Mines lies further west of the line connecting the Chikugo barrier and the Minenosu barrier. Investigation by a marine earthquake indicates that the upper surface of the coal beds in the investigated area is distributed in the depth of 400 - 1,100 m below the sea level, and that the basic surface is situated at the depth of 700 - 1,400 m below the sea level. This suggests the possibility that the coal beds of the Miike Coal Mines are distributed to reach the western part of the Ariake Sea. (9 figs, 3 tabs)

  18. Economic alternatives for containment barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicholson, P.J.; Jasperse, B.H.; Fisher, M.J. [Geo-Con, Inc., Monroeville, PA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Fixation, barriers, and containment of existing landfills and other disposal areas are often performed by insitu auger type soil mixing and jet grouting. Cement or other chemical reagents are mixed with soil to form both vertical and horizontal barriers. Immobilization of contaminants can be economically achieved by mixing soil and the contaminants with reagents that solidify or stabilize the contaminated area. Developed in Japan, and relatively new to the United States, the first large scale application was for a vertical barrier at the Jackson Lake Dam project in 1986. This technology has grown in both the civil and environmental field since. The paper describes current United States practice for Deep Soil Mixing (over 12 meters in depth), and Shallow Soil Mixing for vertical barriers and stabilization/solidification, and Jet Grouting for horizontal and vertical barriers. Creating very low permeability barriers at depth with minimal surface return often makes these techniques economical when compared to slurry trenches. The paper will discuss equipment, materials, soil and strength parameters, and quality control.

  19. Pelagic sea snakes dehydrate at sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillywhite, Harvey B.; Sheehy, Coleman M.; Brischoux, François; Grech, Alana

    2014-01-01

    Secondarily marine vertebrates are thought to live independently of fresh water. Here, we demonstrate a paradigm shift for the widely distributed pelagic sea snake, Hydrophis (Pelamis) platurus, which dehydrates at sea and spends a significant part of its life in a dehydrated state corresponding to seasonal drought. Snakes that are captured following prolonged periods without rainfall have lower body water content, lower body condition and increased tendencies to drink fresh water than do snakes that are captured following seasonal periods of high rainfall. These animals do not drink seawater and must rehydrate by drinking from a freshwater lens that forms on the ocean surface during heavy precipitation. The new data based on field studies indicate unequivocally that this marine vertebrate dehydrates at sea where individuals may live in a dehydrated state for possibly six to seven months at a time. This information provides new insights for understanding water requirements of sea snakes, reasons for recent declines and extinctions of sea snakes and more accurate prediction for how changing patterns of precipitation might affect these and other secondarily marine vertebrates living in tropical oceans. PMID:24648228

  20. Pelagic sea snakes dehydrate at sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillywhite, Harvey B; Sheehy, Coleman M; Brischoux, François; Grech, Alana

    2014-05-07

    Secondarily marine vertebrates are thought to live independently of fresh water. Here, we demonstrate a paradigm shift for the widely distributed pelagic sea snake, Hydrophis (Pelamis) platurus, which dehydrates at sea and spends a significant part of its life in a dehydrated state corresponding to seasonal drought. Snakes that are captured following prolonged periods without rainfall have lower body water content, lower body condition and increased tendencies to drink fresh water than do snakes that are captured following seasonal periods of high rainfall. These animals do not drink seawater and must rehydrate by drinking from a freshwater lens that forms on the ocean surface during heavy precipitation. The new data based on field studies indicate unequivocally that this marine vertebrate dehydrates at sea where individuals may live in a dehydrated state for possibly six to seven months at a time. This information provides new insights for understanding water requirements of sea snakes, reasons for recent declines and extinctions of sea snakes and more accurate prediction for how changing patterns of precipitation might affect these and other secondarily marine vertebrates living in tropical oceans.

  1. Hindcasting and forecasting macrofauna species distribution for the Jade Bay tidal basin (North Sea, Germany) in response to climatic and environmental changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Anja; Schückel, Ulrike; Beck, Melanie; Bleich, Oliver; Brumsack, Hans-J.; Freund, Holger; Geimecke, Christina; Lettmann, Karsten; Millat, Gerald; Staneva, Joanna; Vanselow, Anna; Westphal, Heiko; Wolff, Jörg-O.; Wurpts, Andreas; Kröncke, Ingrid

    2016-04-01

    During the last decades severe climatic and environmental changes have been monitored for the Jade Bay (German Wadden Sea), causing pronounced changes in the abundance and spatial distribution of characteristic benthic species. Due to their relatively sessile habit, benthic species are ideal organisms for small-scale species distribution modelling (SDM) and important indicators for environmental changes and disturbances. In a first step, the present distribution (representing 2009) was modelled for 10 characteristic macrofauna (> 0.5 mm) species, built on statistical relations between species presences and 11 high-resolution environmental grids. Here, five different presence-absence modelling algorithms were merged (GLM, GBM, RF, MARS, ANN) within the ensemble forecasting platform 'biomod2'. In a second step, the past distribution scenario was reconstructed for the 1970s in order to evaluate the hindcast model results with independent macrofauna data from the 1970s. In a third step, the future macrofauna distribution (representing 2050) was forecasted under potential future habitat conditions, i.e. ongoing sea-level rise and changing biogenic structures (seagrass and mussel beds). Submergence time and sediment characteristics correlated most significantly with the modelled macrofauna distribution at the study site, followed by nutrient supply and topography. The historical macrofauna data evaluated the past distribution scenario model results. Climate change induced sea-level rise and its local implications on the Jade Bay (increased sediment load, rise in the tidal height) explained the changes in the macrofauna distribution patterns since the last four decades. The forecast scenario revealed clear species distribution shifts, range size changes and niche overlap changes.

  2. Phytoplankton of the North Sea and its dynamics: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, P. C.; Lancelot, C.; Gieskes, W. W. C.; Hagmeier, E.; Weichart, G.

    Phytoplankton is the major contributor to algal biomass and primary production of the North Sea, although crops of macroalgae can locally be up to 2000 g C.m -2 along the coast of the U.K. and Norway, and microphytobenthos dominates production in the shallow tidal flat areas bordering the coasts of England, the Netherlands, Germany and Denmark. Data collected since 1932 during the Continuous Plankton Recorder Survey show consistent patterns of geographical, seasonal and annual variation in the distribution of phytoplankton and its major taxonomic components. There is a trend of increased colouration in Recorder silks in the southern North Sea until approximately 1975 since when Colour levels (assumed to be indicative of algal biomass) have declined. In the eutrophic Dutch Wadden Sea the algal crop continued to increase; in Dutch coastal North Sea waters a trend of biomass increase reversed since 1984, apparently due to a reduction in Rhine river outflow. Long-term observations made at Helgoland since the 60's also show trends of increasing nutrients and phytoplankton biomass only to 1984. Adverse effects such as deoxygenation, foam formation and toxin production have been linked to mass concentrations of algae known as blooms. There is no evidence from existing reports for an increase in their frequency, although some years stand out with larger numbers. Occurrence of blooms can partly be explained by hydrographic conditions. More than 30 taxa are recognised as occurring in bloom proportions in the North Sea, approximately one third of which can be toxic. The crop of Bacillariophyceae (diatoms) is not likely to increase with eutrophication due to silicate limitation. An extensive subsurface maximum of armoured dinoflagellates, its abundance gouverned by hydrographic conditions, is the most characteristic feature of the central and northern North Sea in the summer months. Abundance, sometimes dominance, of picoplankton and of species that are not readily detected by

  3. Sea surface temperatures and salinities from platforms in the Barents Sea, Sea of Japan, North Atlantic Ocean, Philippine Sea, Red Sea, and the South China Sea (Nan Hai) from 1896-1950 (NODC Accession 0000506)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Surface temperatures and salinities were collected in the Barents Sea, Sea of Japan, North Atlantic Ocean, Philippine Sea, Red Sea, and South China Sea (Nan Hai)...

  4. Pleistocene barrier bar seaward of ooid shoal complex near Miami, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halley, Robert B.; Shinn, Eugene A.; Hudson, J. Harold; Lidz, Barbara H.

    1977-01-01

    An ooid sand barrier bar of Pleistocene age was deposited along the seaward side of an ooid shoal complex southwest of Miami, Florida. The bar is 35 km long, about 0.8 km wide, elongate parallel with the trend of the ooid shoal complex and perpendicular to channels between individual shoals. A depression 1.6 km wide, interpreted as a back-barrier channel, isolates the bar from the ooid shoals. During sea-level fall and subaerial exposure of the bar, the ooid sand was cemented in place, preventing migration of the barrier. No Holocene analogue of this sand body is recognized, perhaps because of the relative youthfulness of Holocene ooid shoals. This Pleistocene ooid shoal complex, with its reservoir-size barrier bar, may serve as a refined model for exploration in ancient ooid sand belts.

  5. Methane excess in Arctic surface water-triggered by sea ice formation and melting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damm, E; Rudels, B; Schauer, U; Mau, S; Dieckmann, G

    2015-11-10

    Arctic amplification of global warming has led to increased summer sea ice retreat, which influences gas exchange between the Arctic Ocean and the atmosphere where sea ice previously acted as a physical barrier. Indeed, recently observed enhanced atmospheric methane concentrations in Arctic regions with fractional sea-ice cover point to unexpected feedbacks in cycling of methane. We report on methane excess in sea ice-influenced water masses in the interior Arctic Ocean and provide evidence that sea ice is a potential source. We show that methane release from sea ice into the ocean occurs via brine drainage during freezing and melting i.e. in winter and spring. In summer under a fractional sea ice cover, reduced turbulence restricts gas transfer, then seawater acts as buffer in which methane remains entrained. However, in autumn and winter surface convection initiates pronounced efflux of methane from the ice covered ocean to the atmosphere. Our results demonstrate that sea ice-sourced methane cycles seasonally between sea ice, sea-ice-influenced seawater and the atmosphere, while the deeper ocean remains decoupled. Freshening due to summer sea ice retreat will enhance this decoupling, which restricts the capacity of the deeper Arctic Ocean to act as a sink for this greenhouse gas.

  6. Methane excess in Arctic surface water- triggered by sea ice formation and melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damm, E.; Rudels, B.; Schauer, U.; Mau, S.; Dieckmann, G.

    2015-11-01

    Arctic amplification of global warming has led to increased summer sea ice retreat, which influences gas exchange between the Arctic Ocean and the atmosphere where sea ice previously acted as a physical barrier. Indeed, recently observed enhanced atmospheric methane concentrations in Arctic regions with fractional sea-ice cover point to unexpected feedbacks in cycling of methane. We report on methane excess in sea ice-influenced water masses in the interior Arctic Ocean and provide evidence that sea ice is a potential source. We show that methane release from sea ice into the ocean occurs via brine drainage during freezing and melting i.e. in winter and spring. In summer under a fractional sea ice cover, reduced turbulence restricts gas transfer, then seawater acts as buffer in which methane remains entrained. However, in autumn and winter surface convection initiates pronounced efflux of methane from the ice covered ocean to the atmosphere. Our results demonstrate that sea ice-sourced methane cycles seasonally between sea ice, sea-ice-influenced seawater and the atmosphere, while the deeper ocean remains decoupled. Freshening due to summer sea ice retreat will enhance this decoupling, which restricts the capacity of the deeper Arctic Ocean to act as a sink for this greenhouse gas.

  7. Filaggrin and Skin Barrier Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kezic, Sanja; Jakasa, Ivone

    2016-01-01

    The skin barrier function is greatly dependent on the structure and composition of the uppermost layer of the epidermis, the stratum corneum (SC), which is made up of flattened anucleated cells surrounded by highly organized and continuous lipid matrix. The interior of the corneocytes consists mainly of keratin filaments aggregated by filaggrin (FLG) protein. Next, together with several other proteins, FLG is cross-linked into a mechanically robust cornified cell envelope providing a scaffold for the extracellular lipid matrix. In addition to its role for the SC structural and mechanical integrity, FLG degradation products account in part for the water-holding capacity and maintenance of acidic pH of the SC, both crucial for the epidermal barrier homoeostasis by regulating activity of multiple enzymes that control desquamation, lipid synthesis and inflammation. The major determinant of FLG expression in the skin are loss-of-function mutations in FLG, the strongest genetic risk factor for atopic dermatitis (AD), an inflammatory skin disease characterized by a reduced skin barrier function. The prevalence of FLG mutations varies greatly among different populations and ranges from about 10% in Northern Europeans to less than 1% in the African populations. An impaired skin barrier facilitates absorption of potentially hazardous chemicals, which might cause adverse effects in the skin, such as contact dermatitis, or systemic toxicity after their passage into blood. In another direction, a leaky epidermal barrier will lead to enhanced loss of water from the skin. A recent study has shown that even subtle increase in epidermal water loss in newborns increases the risk for AD. Although there are multiple modes of action by which FLG might affect skin barrier it is still unclear whether and how FLG deficiency leads to the reduced skin barrier function. This chapter summarizes the current knowledge in this field obtained from clinical studies, and animal and in vitro models

  8. Somalia ... From the Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-01

    from the Sea, p. 7. 65. Robert D. Heinl, Jr., “Inchon, 1950,” in As- sault from the Sea: Essays on the History of Amphibious Warfare, ed. Merrill L...Mohamed Haji. Historical Dictionary of Somalia. New ed. Lanham, Md.: Scare- crow , 2003. Natsios, Andrew S. U.S. Foreign Policy and the Four Horsemen of

  9. SEA in Southern Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Audouin, M

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available in a number of them. Despite these trends, however, the opportunities that SEA can offer to facilitate sustainable development are not being realized. In this chapter, the authors describe the emergence of SEA in the post-colonial, democratic context...

  10. Oceanography of marginal seas

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    DileepKumar, M.

    dioxide in intermediate layers falls from approx. 1000 mu atm in the southern end to approx. 500 mu atm in the northern Red Sea. Temperature in Atlantis II deep and brine level in Discovery deep in the Red Sea seem to be increasing in recent years...

  11. Diabetes and diet: Managing dietary barriers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Friele, R.D.

    1989-01-01

    This thesis reports on the barriers diabetic patients experience with their diet, and the ways they cope with these barriers. A dietary barrier is a hinderance to a person's well-being, induced by being advised a diet. First inventories were made of possible dietary barriers and ways of coping with

  12. Dilemmas in SEA application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyhne, Ivar

    Dilemmas in SEA Application: The DK Energy SectorIvar Lyhne - lyhne@plan.aau.dk. Based on three years of collaborative research, this paper outlines dilemmas in the application of SEA in the strategic development of the Danish energy sector. The dilemmas are based on concrete examples from practice...... in the implementation of SEA in the sector, and they concern, e.g., strategic choices in transmission network development and ministerial choices on location of energy production units. The paper outlines the roots of the dilemmas as well as their implications for timing and content of SEA. The verdict is that we (in...... the Danish energy sector) are starting to get it right. Lessons for SEA implementation in similar contexts are proposed....

  13. IOMASA SEA ICE DEVELOPMENTS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Søren; Tonboe, Rasmus; Heygster, Georg

    2005-01-01

    Sensitivity studies show that the radiometer ice concentration estimate can be biased by +10% by anomalous atmospheric emissivity and -20% by anomalous ice surface emissivity. The aim of the sea ice activities in EU 5th FP project IOMASA is to improve sea ice concentration estimates at higher...... spatial resolution. The project is in the process of facilitating an ice concentration observing system through validation and a better understanding of the microwave radiative transfer of the sea ice and overlying snow layers. By use of a novel modelling approach, it is possible to better detect...... and determine the circumstances that may lead to anomalous sea ice concentration retrieval as well as to assess and possibly minimize the sensitivities of the retrieval system. Through an active partnership with the SAF on Ocean and Sea Ice, a prototype system will be implemented as an experimental product...

  14. Indicators and SEA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, Jingjing; Kørnøv, Lone; Christensen, Per

    Abstract: Indicators are widely used in SEA to measure, communicate and monitor impacts from a proposed policy, plan or programme, and can improve the effectiveness for the SEA by simplifying the complexity of both assessment and presentation. Indicators can be seen as part of the implementation...... process helping to understand, communicate and, integrate important environmental issues in planning and decision-making. On the other hand, use of indicators can also limit SEA effectiveness, if the ones chosen are biased or limited, if the aggregation gives incorrect interpretation...... and if the information requirement for different target groups is not addressed. Indicators are widely used in SEA to measure, communicate and monitor impacts from a proposed policy, plan or programme, and can improve the effectiveness for the SEA by simplifying the complexity of both assessment and presentation...

  15. IOMASA SEA ICE DEVELOPMENTS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Søren; Tonboe, Rasmus; Heygster, Georg

    2005-01-01

    Sensitivity studies show that the radiometer ice concentration estimate can be biased by +10% by anomalous atmospheric emissivity and -20% by anomalous ice surface emissivity. The aim of the sea ice activities in EU 5th FP project IOMASA is to improve sea ice concentration estimates at higher...... spatial resolution. The project is in the process of facilitating an ice concentration observing system through validation and a better understanding of the microwave radiative transfer of the sea ice and overlying snow layers. By use of a novel modelling approach, it is possible to better detect...... and determine the circumstances that may lead to anomalous sea ice concentration retrieval as well as to assess and possibly minimize the sensitivities of the retrieval system. Through an active partnership with the SAF on Ocean and Sea Ice, a prototype system will be implemented as an experimental product...

  16. Sea level driven marsh expansion in a coupled model of marsh erosion and migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirwan, Matthew L.; Walters, David C.; Reay, William G.; Carr, Joel A.

    2016-05-01

    Coastal wetlands are among the most valuable ecosystems on Earth, where ecosystem services such as flood protection depend nonlinearly on wetland size and are threatened by sea level rise and coastal development. Here we propose a simple model of marsh migration into adjacent uplands and couple it with existing models of seaward edge erosion and vertical soil accretion to explore how ecosystem connectivity influences marsh size and response to sea level rise. We find that marsh loss is nearly inevitable where topographic and anthropogenic barriers limit migration. Where unconstrained by barriers, however, rates of marsh migration are much more sensitive to accelerated sea level rise than rates of edge erosion. This behavior suggests a counterintuitive, natural tendency for marsh expansion with sea level rise and emphasizes the disparity between coastal response to climate change with and without human intervention.

  17. Cytokines and the Skin Barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Malte Baron

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The skin is the largest organ of the human body and builds a barrier to protect us from the harmful environment and also from unregulated loss of water. Keratinocytes form the skin barrier by undergoing a highly complex differentiation process that involves changing their morphology and structural integrity, a process referred to as cornification. Alterations in the epidermal cornification process affect the formation of the skin barrier. Typically, this results in a disturbed barrier, which allows the entry of substances into the skin that are immunologically reactive. This contributes to and promotes inflammatory processes in the skin but also affects other organs. In many common skin diseases, including atopic dermatitis and psoriasis, a defect in the formation of the skin barrier is observed. In these diseases the cytokine composition within the skin is different compared to normal human skin. This is the result of resident skin cells that produce cytokines, but also because additional immune cells are recruited. Many of the cytokines found in defective skin are able to influence various processes of differentiation and cornification. Here we summarize the current knowledge on cytokines and their functions in healthy skin and their contributions to inflammatory skin diseases.

  18. Cylindrical air flow reversal barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woznica, C.; Rodziewicz, M.

    1988-06-01

    Describes an innovative design introduced in the ZMP mine in Zory for quick reversal of ventilation air flow. Geologic mining conditions at the 705 m deep horizon, where the barrier was built, are described. According to the design used until now, a reversal system consisted of safety barriers, ventilation air locks, a ventilation bridge and stopping needed in case of a fire when air flow direction must be reversed. Nine air locks and an expensive concrete ventilation bridge were needed and the air locks had to be operated at 8 points of the region to effect reversal. The new design consists of a 2-storey cylindrical barrier which also fulfills the function of a ventilation bridge. It can be manually or remotely operated by a mechanical or pneumatic system. Tests showed that the new barrier permits immediate air flow reversal while retaining 60% of the original air, which is important in the case of fire and methane hazards. It permits improved seam panelling and splitting of pillars and brings an economy of about 40 million zlotys in construction cost. Design and operation of the barrier is illustrated and ventilation air circulation is explained. 7 figs.

  19. Gracilaria vermiculophylla (Ohmi) Papenfuss, 1967 (Rhodophyta, Gracilariaceae) in northern Europe, with emphasis on Danish conditions, and what to expect in the future

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Mads S.; Stæhr, Peter Anton; Nyberg, Cecilia D.

    2007-01-01

    Gracilaria vermiculophylla, a red macroalga from the West Pacific, was discovered in western Germany (the Wadden Sea) in 2002 and has since also been observed in Sweden (from about 70 km south to about 80 km north of Göteborg), Denmark (Wadden Sea, Horsens Fjord, Limfjorden, Vejle Fjord, Holckenh...

  20. Structure information from fusion barriers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S V S Sastry; S Santra

    2000-06-01

    It is shown that the analysis of fusion barrier distributions is not always an unambiguous test or a ‘fingerprint’ of the structure information of the colliding nuclei. Examples are presented with same fusion barrier distributions for nuclei having different structures. The fusion excitation functions for 16O+208Pb, using the coupled reaction channel (CRC) method and correct structure information, have been analysed. The barrier distributions derived from these excitation functions including many of the significant channels are featureless, although these channels have considerable effects on the fusion excitation function. However, a simultaneous analysis of the fusion, elastic and quasi-elastic channels would fix the structure and the reaction unambiguously

  1. Skin Barrier Function and Allergens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engebretsen, Kristiane Aasen; Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan

    2016-01-01

    The skin is an important barrier protecting us from mechanical insults, microorganisms, chemicals and allergens, but, importantly, also reducing water loss. A common hallmark for many dermatoses is a compromised skin barrier function, and one could suspect an elevated risk of contact sensitization...... and skin barrier status. Psoriasis has traditionally been regarded a Th1-dominated disease, but the discovery of Th17 cells and IL-17 provides new and interesting information regarding the pathogenesis of the disease. Research suggests an inverse relationship between psoriasis and CA, possibly due......) and Th2 (AD) have been proposed as an explanation. Finally, there is convincing evidence that exposure to irritants increases the risk of CS, and patients with ICD are, therefore, at great risk of developing CA. Skin irritation leads to the release of IL-1 and TNF-α, which affects the function of antigen...

  2. The Impact of Anthropogenic Structures on the Delivery of Overwash and the Evolution of Barrier Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, L. J.; Moore, L. J.; Goldstein, E. B.

    2014-12-01

    Climate change-induced sea level rise and the potential for more intense, more frequent storms to occur in the future, will threaten the vitality of barrier islands by lowering their relative elevation and altering the frequency of overwash thereby leading to island narrowing and/or migration. High-density development (e.g., homes, condominiums, hotels, etc.) on many barrier islands may further increase island vulnerability by restricting delivery of sand to the subaerial island via overwash. To explore the potential future response of barrier islands to these factors, we analyzed state-wide pre and post-storm LiDAR surveys of New Jersey and North Carolina conducted in response to Hurricane Sandy (2012) and Nor'Ida (2009) to assess the influence of humans on storm-driven delivery of sand. We compared natural and developed environments of various foundational properties (commercial, residential - slab and residential - piling) by extracting and analyzing shore-perpendicular profiles. We tabulated overwash extent and thickness along each profile to determine the characteristic effects of different types of development in comparison to natural areas. We then used data derived from this profile analysis to inform the overwash component of a 2D barrier island model. Using this model, we assess the long-term (decadal to centurial) impacts of the interruption of sand delivery by anthropogenic structures on barrier island evolution. Through multiple numerical experiments we address a range of scenarios for sea level rise and changes in storminess. Early results suggest that commercial zones having a large frontage area pose the greatest threat to barrier island survivability under scenarios of rapid sea level rise.

  3. NOVEL TSUNAMI BARRIERS AND THEIR APPLICATIONS FOR HYDROELECTRIC ENERGY STORAGE, FISH FARMING, AND FOR LAND RECLAMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans J. Scheel

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The tsunami hazard can be mitigated if the destructive waves generated from earthquakes and landslides can be reflected by a stable submerged vertical barrier before striking coastal communities or important structures. Building such deep walls by conventional submarine technology is difficult. The present study describes the principle and the erection of such submarine defensive walls by a relatively simple efficient and economic technology. This technology is based on lowering high- strength steel fences with horizontal anchors, or two parallel steel fences with distance holders, into the sea and fixing them with rocks deposited from top. Dredged material like gravel or sand can be used for additional filling. This Tsunami-Flooding Barrier (TFB extends a few meters above sea level and carries on top a concrete supply and service road protected on both sides against storm waves by concrete walls. Replaceable surge stoppers (parapets, wave return walls prevent overtopping and erosion of the seaward barrier face. The TFBs protect the coastline against tsunami and the highest storm waves from hurricanes, but also can provide protection from oil spills or other contaminations from the ocean and thus protect flora, fauna, coral reefs and beaches. Channels and gates allow navigation and can be closed quickly upon a tsunami or storm warning. The construction costs can be eventually compensated by using the reservoirs between coast and barriers for hydroelectric energy storage (using pump-turbines in the barriers or for fish-farming, or alternatively the reservoir can be filled with rocks, rubble, gravel, sand and covered with soil in order to reclaim new land. Tidal energy can be generated by installing turbines within these barriers. Also, this submarine architecture may be applied to protect pillars of bridges and offshore platforms, and for erecting “roads” into the sea to connect near-shore platforms and wind-parks with the coast and

  4. Sound propagation over curved barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Allan D.; Main, Geoffrey L.; Kearns, James A.; Hsieh, H.-A.

    1986-01-01

    Wide barriers with curved tops are studied with emphasis placed on circumstances whereby the local radius of curvature R of the barrier is continuous along the surface and is large compared to a wavelength. Results analogous to those given by Hayek et al. (1978) are reviewed and extended to cases where the radius of curvature and the surface impedance may vary with position. Circumstances not easily interpreted within the framework of the model proposed by Keller (1956) and Hayek et al. are also considered.

  5. The Solution to Green Barrier

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cui Yan

    2009-01-01

    @@ The recovery process of world economy is rough and full of twists and turns.Especially the trade protectionism,having reemerged under the mask of"green barrier",is making a great impact on the slowly recovering world economy and trade.Then,what are the characteristics of trade barriers in the post-crisis era?Where is the outlet of Chinese manufacturing industry?With these questions,ourreporter interviewed Professor Zhou Shijian,Standing Director to China Association of International Trade and Senior Researcher to SINO-US Relationship Research Centre of Tsinghua University.

  6. Dead sea water intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy-Khademi, Floris; Brooks, Rebecca; Maayan, Channa; Tenenbaum, Ariel; Wexler, Isaiah D

    2012-08-01

    Near drowning in the Dead Sea is associated with both respiratory manifestations and severe electrolyte abnormalities. It is often difficult to distinguish between the contributions of sea water aspiration or ingestion to clinical manifestations. We present a unique case of accidental ingestion of a large amount of Dead Sea water through a gastrostomy tube in which a patient with familial dysautonomia presented with severe electrolyte disturbances. Forced diuresis with large amounts of intravenous fluids resulted in clinical and biochemical improvement. Full recovery was achieved after 2 days of treatment.

  7. Systems study on engineered barriers: barrier performance analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stula, R.T.; Albert, T.E.; Kirstein, B.E.; Lester, D.H.

    1980-09-01

    A performance assessment model for multiple barrier packages containing unreprocessed spent fuel has been modified and applied to several package designs. The objective of the study was to develop information to be used in programmatic decision making concerning engineered barrier package design and development. The assessment model, BARIER, was developed in previous tasks of the System Study on Engineered Barriers (SSEB). The new version discussed in this report contains a refined and expanded corrosion rate data base which includes pitting, crack growth, and graphitization as well as bulk corrosion. Corrosion rates for oxic and anoxic conditions at each of the two temperature ranges are supplied. Other improvements include a rigorous treatment of radionuclide release after package failure which includes resistance of damaged barriers and backfill, refined temperature calculations that account for convection and radiation, a subroutine to calculate nuclear gamma radiation field at each barrier surface, refined stress calculations with reduced conservatism and various coding improvements to improve running time and core usage. This report also contains discussion of alternative scenarios to the assumed flooded repository as well as the impact of water exclusion backfills. The model was used to assess post repository closure performance for several designs which were all variation of basic designs from the Spent Unreprocessed Fuel (SURF) program. Many designs were found to delay the onset of leaching by at least a few hundreds of years in all geologic media. Long delay times for radionuclide release were found for packages with a few inches of sorption backfill. Release of uranium, plutonium, and americium was assessed.

  8. The north Sulu Sea productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Z.

    2009-12-01

    The Sulu Sea is a part of the western North Pacific. It is a closed sea for its deep water and a semi-closed sea for its upper layer. The Sulu Sea exchanges mainly surface waters with the South China Sea and the Celebes Sea. The Sulu Sea is more productive than the adjacent South China Sea (Jones, 2002). On the basis of MERIS satellite observations from 2002 to 2008, we focus on the high-chlorophyll area as an indicator of the abundance of primary productivity in the Sulu Sea. Strong chlorophyll concentration in the north Sulu Sea close to the Mindoro Strait mainly occurs from December to March and low chlorophyll concentration happens in April to November. The adjacent South China Sea on the other side of Mindoro Strait has shown persistent signs of low chlorophyll concentration. Based on 1/8° Global Navy Coastal Ocean Model, the intrusion of the South China Sea waters through the Mindoro Strait to the Sulu Sea from April to November is the main reason for the low chlorophyll concentration observed in the north Sulu Sea. During April to November, the South China Sea waters flow through the Mindoro Strait and stay on the surface of the north Sulu Sea because of their low density. The north Sulu Sea waters mix with fresher waters coming from the South China Sea without new nutrients supply. When the inflow from South China Sea to Sulu Sea ceases in December to March, the upwelling due to the summer monsoon wind becomes an important mechanism supplying deep nutrients to the surface water which lead to high chlorophyll concentration. Jones, I.S.F., 2002. Primary production in the Sulu Sea. Proceedings of the Indian Academy of Sciences-Earth and Planetary Sciences 111, 209-213.

  9. Plastic Schottky barrier solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldrop, James R.; Cohen, Marshall J.

    1984-01-24

    A photovoltaic cell structure is fabricated from an active medium including an undoped, intrinsically p-type organic semiconductor comprising polyacetylene. When a film of such material is in rectifying contact with a magnesium electrode, a Schottky-barrier junction is obtained within the body of the cell structure. Also, a gold overlayer passivates the magnesium layer on the undoped polyacetylene film.

  10. Seasonal breaching of coastal barriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuan, Thieu Quang

    2007-01-01

    Natural or unintended breaching can be catastrophic, causing loss of human lives and damage to infrastructures, buildings and natural habitats. Quantitative understand-ing of coastal barrier breaching is therefore of great importance to vulnerability as-sessment of protection works as well as to

  11. Functional barriers: Properties and evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feigenbaum, A.; Dole, P.; Aucejo, S.; Dainelli, D.; Cruz Garcia, C. de la; Hankemeier, T.; N'Gono, Y.; Papaspyrides, C.D.; Paseiro, P.; Pastorelli, S.; Pavlidou, S.; Pennarun, P.Y.; Saillard, P.; Vidal, L.; Vitrac, O.; Voulzatis, Y.

    2005-01-01

    Functional barriers are multilayer structures deemed to prevent migration of some chemicals released by food-contact materials into food. In the area of plastics packaging, different migration behaviours of mono- and multilayer structures are assessed in terms of lag time and of their influence of t

  12. Communication Barriers in Distance Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isman, Aytekin; Dabaj, Fahme; Altinay, Fahriye; Altinay, Zehra

    2003-01-01

    Communication is a key concept as being the major tool for people in order to satisfy their needs. It is an activity which refers as process and effective communication requires qualified communication with the elimination of communication barriers. As it is known, distance education is a new trend by following contemporary facilities and tools…

  13. FX barriers with smile dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baker, Glyn; Beneder, Reimer; Zilber, Alex

    2004-01-01

    Our mandate in this work has been to isolate the features of smile consistent models that are most relevant to the pricing of barrier options. We consider the two classical approaches of stochastic and (parametric) local volatility. Although neither has been particularly successful in practice their

  14. Planar doped barrier subharmonic mixers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, T. H.; East, J. R.; Haddad, G. I.

    1992-01-01

    The Planar Doped Barrier (PDB) diode is a device consisting of a p(+) doping spike between two intrinsic layers and n(+) ohmic contacts. This device has the advantages of controllable barrier height, diode capacitance and forward to reverse current ratio. A symmetrically designed PDB has an anti-symmetric current vs. voltage characteristic and is ideal for use as millimeter wave subharmonic mixers. We have fabricated such devices with barrier heights of 0.3, 0.5 and 0.7 volts from GaAs and InGaAs using a multijunction honeycomb structure with junction diameters between one and ten microns. Initial RF measurements are encouraging. The 0.7 volt barrier height 4 micron GaAs devices were tested as subharmonic mixers at 202 GHz with an IF frequency of 1 GHz and had 18 dB of conversion loss. The estimated mismatch loss was 7 dB and was due to higher diode capacitance. The LO frequency was 100.5 GHz and the pump power was 8 mW.

  15. Barrier/Cu contact resistivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reid, J.S.; Nicolet, M.A. [California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States); Angyal, M.S.; Lilienfeld, D.; Shacham-Diamand, Y. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Smith, P.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-10-17

    The specific contact resistivity of Cu with ({alpha} + {beta})-Ta, TiN, {alpha}-W, and amorphous-Ta{sub 36}Si{sub 14}N{sub 50} barrier films is measured using a novel four-point-probe approach. Geometrically, the test structures consist of colinear sets of W-plugs to act as current and voltage probes that contact the bottom of a planar Cu/barrier/Cu stack. Underlying Al interconnects link the plugs to the current source and voltmeter. The center-to-center distance of the probes ranges from 3 to 200 {micro}m. Using a relation developed by Vu et al., a contact resistivity of roughly 7 {times} 10{sup {minus}9} {Omega} cm{sup 2} is obtained for all tested barrier/Cu combinations. By reflective-mode small-angle X-ray scattering, the similarity in contact resistivity among the barrier films may be related to interfacial impurities absorbed from the deposition process.

  16. Sea Scallop Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The standardized NEFSC Sea Scallop Survey began in 1980 and has covered an area from Cape Hatteras to Georges Bank. The survey aims to determine the distribution and...

  17. Pollution of coastal seas

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Varkey, M.J.

    cities. Various types of wastes, if not properly treated, would cause serious pollution of these shallow seas endangering marine life and spoiling recreational facilities. Different polluting agents like sewage, chemicals, industrial coolants etc...

  18. A Sea Floor Penetrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    processed through an analog-to-digital (A/D) converter, and stored in the memory of a mini-computer. Computer algorithms are applied to the deceleration data to provide real-time sea floor classification.

  19. Baltic Sea: Radionuclides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sven Poul; Lüning, Maria; Ilus, Erkki

    2011-01-01

    The most significant source of anthropogenic radioactivity in the Baltic Sea is fallout from the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in 1986. The second most important source is global fallout from atmospheric nuclear weapons tests carried out during the late 1950s and early 1960s....... Radioactivity inputs into the Baltic Sea from nuclear reprocessing plants in Western Europe have become of minor importance due to significant reduction of discharges in recent years. In terms of input of 137Cs into the Baltic Sea, Chernobyl fallout has contributed about 82% and nuclear weapons test fallout...... about 14%. For 90Sr in the Baltic Sea, input from atmospheric fallout from nuclear weapons tests has contributed about 81%, while the contribution from Chernobyl fallout was about 13%. Cesium-137 is the main indicator of Baltic seawater with respect to anthropogenic radioactivity. The highest...

  20. South China Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, B; Blackmore, G

    2001-12-01

    The South China Sea is poorly understood in terms of its marine biota, ecology and the human impacts upon it. What is known is most often contained in reports and workshop and conference documents that are not available to the wider scientific community. The South China Sea has an area of some 3.3 million km2 and depths range from the shallowest coastal fringe to 5377 m in the Manila Trench. It is also studded with numerous islets, atolls and reefs many of which are just awash at low tide. It is largely confined within the Tropic of Cancer and, therefore, experiences a monsoonal climate being influenced by the Southwest Monsoon in summer and the Northeast Monsoon in winter. The South China Sea is a marginal sea and, therefore, largely surrounded by land. Countries that have a major influence on and claims to the sea include China, Malaysia, the Philippines and Vietnam, although Thailand, Indonesia and Taiwan have some too. The coastal fringes of the South China Sea are home to about 270 million people that have had some of the fastest developing and most vibrant economies on the globe. Consequently, anthropogenic impacts, such as over-exploitation of resources and pollution, are anticipated to be huge although, in reality, relatively little is known about them. The Indo-West Pacific biogeographic province, at the centre of which the South China Sea lies, is probably the world's most diverse shallow-water marine area. Of three major nearshore habitat types, i.e., coral reefs, mangroves and seagrasses, 45 mangrove species out of a global total of 51, most of the currently recognised 70 coral genera and 20 of 50 known seagrass species have been recorded from the South China Sea. The island groups of the South China Sea are all disputed and sovereignty is claimed over them by a number of countries. Conflicts have in recent decades arisen over them because of perceived national rights. It is perhaps because of this that so little research has been undertaken on the

  1. South China Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morton, Brian [Hong Kong Univ., Swire Inst. of Marine Science, Hong Kong (China); Hong Kong Univ., Dept. of Ecology and Biodiversity, Hong Kong (China); Blackmore, Graham [Hong Kong Univ. of Science and Technology, Dept. of Biology, Hong Kong (China)

    2001-07-01

    The South China Sea is poorly understood in terms of its marine biota, ecology and the human impacts upon it. What is known is most often contained in reports and workshops and conference documents that are not available to the wider scientific community. The South China Sea has an area of some 3.3 million km{sup 2} and depths range from the shallowest coastal fringe to 5377m in the Manila Trench. It is also studded with numerous islets, atolls and reefs many of which are just awash at low tide. It is largely confined within the Tropic of Cancer and, therefore, experiences a monsoonal climate being influenced by the Southwest Monsoon in summer and the Northeast Monsoon in winter. The South China Sea is a marginal sea and, therefore, largely surrounded by land. Countries that have a major influence on and claims to the sea include China, Malaysia, the Philippines and Vietnam, although Thailand, Indonesia and Taiwan have some too. The coastal fringes of the South China Sea are home to about 270 million people that have had some of the fastest developing and most vibrant economics on the globe. Consequently, anthropogenic impacts, such as over-exploitation of resources and pollution, are anticipated to be huge although, in reality, relatively little is known about them. The Indo-West Pacific biogeographic province, at the centre of which the South China Sea lies, is probably the world's most diverse shallow-water marine area. Of three major nearshore habitat types, i.e., coral reefs, mangroves and seagrasses, 45 mangrove species out of a global total of 51, most of the currently recognised 70 coral genera and 20 of 50 known seagrass species have been recorded from the South China Sea. The island groups of the South China Sea are all disputed and sovereignty is claimed over them by a number of countries. Conflicts have in recent decades arisen over them because of perceived national rights. It is perhaps because of this that so little research has been undertaken

  2. South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Brian; Blackmore, Graham

    2001-01-01

    The South China Sea is poorly understood in terms of its marine biota, ecology and the human impacts upon it. What is known is most often contained in reports and workshop and conference documents that are not available to the wider scientific community. The South China Sea has an area of some 3.3 million km2 and depths range from the shallowest coastal fringe to 5377 m in the Manila Trench. It is also studded with numerous islets, atolls and reefs many of which are just awash at low tide. It is largely confined within the Tropic of Cancer and, therefore, experiences a monsoonal climate being influenced by the Southwest Monsoon in summer and the Northeast Monsoon in winter. The South China Sea is a marginal sea and, therefore, largely surrounded by land. Countries that have a major influence on and claims to the sea include China, Malaysia, the Philippines and Vietnam, although Thailand, Indonesia and Taiwan have some too. The coastal fringes of the South China Sea are home to about 270 million people that have had some of the fastest developing and most vibrant economies on the globe. Consequently, anthropogenic impacts, such as over-exploitation of resources and pollution, are anticipated to be huge although, in reality, relatively little is known about them. The Indo-West Pacific biogeographic province, at the centre of which the South China Sea lies, is probably the world's most diverse shallow-water marine area. Of the three major nearshore habitat types, i.e., coral reefs, mangroves and seagrasses, 45 mangrove species out of a global of 51, most of the currently recognised 70 coral genera and 20 of 50 known seagrass species have been recorded from the South China Sea. The island groups of the South China Sea are all disputed and sovereignty is claimed over them by a number of countries. Conflicts have in recent decades arisen over them because of perceived national rights. It is perhaps because of this that so little research has been undertaken on the South

  3. Contemporary sea level rise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazenave, Anny; Llovel, William

    2010-01-01

    Measuring sea level change and understanding its causes has considerably improved in the recent years, essentially because new in situ and remote sensing observations have become available. Here we report on most recent results on contemporary sea level rise. We first present sea level observations from tide gauges over the twentieth century and from satellite altimetry since the early 1990s. We next discuss the most recent progress made in quantifying the processes causing sea level change on timescales ranging from years to decades, i.e., thermal expansion of the oceans, land ice mass loss, and land water-storage change. We show that for the 1993-2007 time span, the sum of climate-related contributions (2.85 +/- 0.35 mm year(-1)) is only slightly less than altimetry-based sea level rise (3.3 +/- 0.4 mm year(-1)): approximately 30% of the observed rate of rise is due to ocean thermal expansion and approximately 55% results from land ice melt. Recent acceleration in glacier melting and ice mass loss from the ice sheets increases the latter contribution up to 80% for the past five years. We also review the main causes of regional variability in sea level trends: The dominant contribution results from nonuniform changes in ocean thermal expansion.

  4. Raccoon removal reduces sea turtle nest depredation in the Ten Thousand Islands of Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garmestani, A.S.; Percival, H.F.

    2005-01-01

    Predation by raccoons, Procyon lotor marinus (L.), is the primary cause of sea turtle nest loss in the Ten Thousand Islands archipelago. Four islands within Ten Thousand Islands National Wildlife Refuge were surveyed for sea turtle nesting activity from 1991-95. Raccoons depredated 76-100% of nests on Panther Key from 1991-94, until 14 raccoons were removed in 1995 resulting in 0% depredation and 2 more were removed in 1996 resulting in 0% depredation. Raccoon removal may be an effective management option for increasing sea turtle nest survival on barrier islands.

  5. Coastal Erosion and Flooding Hazards on the North Sea Coast at Thyboron, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Per; Sørensen, Carlo Sass; Nielsen, Peter

    Since a breach of the coastal barrier in 1862, the Thyboron Channel connecting the North Sea and the Lim Fiord has been artificially maintained by construction of breakwaters and groins on the North Sea coast and inside the channel, respectively. Sand nourishment schemes have since the 1980s...... counteracted the natural erosion in the upper profile on the North Sea coast where the alongshore sediment transport converges towards the channel and deposits up to 1 million m3/y on the flood tidal delta inside the fiord, Figure 1....

  6. Seasonal Dynamical Prediction of Coral Bleaching in the Great Barrier Reef, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spillman, C. M.; Alves, O.

    2009-05-01

    Sea surface temperature (SST) is now recognised as the primary cause of mass coral bleaching events. Coral bleaching occurs during times of stress, particularly when SSTs exceed the coral colony's tolerance level. Global warming is potentially a serious threat to the future of the world's reef systems with predictions by the international community that bleaching will increase in both frequency and severity. Advance warning of anomalous sea surface temperatures, and thus potential bleaching events, would allow for the implementation of management strategies to minimise reef damage. Seasonal SST forecasts from the coupled ocean-atmosphere model POAMA (Bureau of Meteorology) have skill in the Great Barrier Reef (Australia) several months into the future. We will present model forecasts and probabilistic products for use in reef management, and assess model skill in the region. These products will revolutionise the way in which coral bleaching events are monitored and assessed in the Great Barrier Reef and Australian region.

  7. Barriers to improvements in energy efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, A.K.N.

    1991-10-01

    To promote energy-efficiency improvements, actions may be required at one or more levels -- from the lowest level of the consumer (residential, commercial, industrial, etc.) through the highest level of the global agencies. But barriers to the implementation of energy-efficiency improvements exist or can arise at all these levels. Taking up each one of these barriers in turn, the paper discusses specific measures that can contribute to overcoming the barriers. However, a one-barrier-one-measure approach must be avoided. Single barriers may in fact involve several sub-barriers. Also, combinations of measures are much more effective in overcoming barriers. In particular, combinations of measures that simultaneously overcome several barriers are most successful. The paper discusses the typology of barriers, explores their origin and suggests measures that by themselves or in combination with other measures, will overcome these barriers. Since most of the barriers dealt with can be found in the ``barriers`` literature, any originality in the paper lies in its systematic organization, synoptic view and holistic treatment of this issue. This paper is intended to initiate a comprehensive treatment of barriers, their origins and the measures that contribute to overcoming them. Hopefully, such a treatment will facilitate the implementation of energy-efficiency improvements involving a wide diversity of ever-changing energy end uses and consumer preferences.

  8. Barriers to improvements in energy efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, A.K.N.

    1991-10-01

    To promote energy-efficiency improvements, actions may be required at one or more levels -- from the lowest level of the consumer (residential, commercial, industrial, etc.) through the highest level of the global agencies. But barriers to the implementation of energy-efficiency improvements exist or can arise at all these levels. Taking up each one of these barriers in turn, the paper discusses specific measures that can contribute to overcoming the barriers. However, a one-barrier-one-measure approach must be avoided. Single barriers may in fact involve several sub-barriers. Also, combinations of measures are much more effective in overcoming barriers. In particular, combinations of measures that simultaneously overcome several barriers are most successful. The paper discusses the typology of barriers, explores their origin and suggests measures that by themselves or in combination with other measures, will overcome these barriers. Since most of the barriers dealt with can be found in the barriers'' literature, any originality in the paper lies in its systematic organization, synoptic view and holistic treatment of this issue. This paper is intended to initiate a comprehensive treatment of barriers, their origins and the measures that contribute to overcoming them. Hopefully, such a treatment will facilitate the implementation of energy-efficiency improvements involving a wide diversity of ever-changing energy end uses and consumer preferences.

  9. Projecting future sea level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayan, Daniel R.; Bromirski, Peter; Hayhoe, Katharine; Tyree, Mary; Dettinger, Mike; Flick, Reinhard

    2006-01-01

    California’s coastal observations and global model projections indicate that California’s open coast and estuaries will experience increasing sea levels over the next century. Sea level rise has affected much of the coast of California, including the Southern California coast, the Central California open coast, and the San Francisco Bay and upper estuary. These trends, quantified from a small set of California tide gages, have ranged from 10–20 centimeters (cm) (3.9–7.9 inches) per century, quite similar to that estimated for global mean sea level. So far, there is little evidence that the rate of rise has accelerated, and the rate of rise at California tide gages has actually flattened since 1980, but projections suggest substantial sea level rise may occur over the next century. Climate change simulations project a substantial rate of global sea level rise over the next century due to thermal expansion as the oceans warm and runoff from melting land-based snow and ice accelerates. Sea level rise projected from the models increases with the amount of warming. Relative to sea levels in 2000, by the 2070–2099 period, sea level rise projections range from 11–54 cm (4.3–21 in) for simulations following the lower (B1) greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions scenario, from 14–61 cm (5.5–24 in) for the middle-upper (A2) emission scenario, and from 17–72 cm (6.7–28 in) for the highest (A1fi) scenario. In addition to relatively steady secular trends, sea levels along the California coast undergo shorter period variability above or below predicted tide levels and changes associated with long-term trends. These variations are caused by weather events and by seasonal to decadal climate fluctuations over the Pacific Ocean that in turn affect the Pacific coast. Highest coastal sea levels have occurred when winter storms and Pacific climate disturbances, such as El Niño, have coincided with high astronomical tides. This study considers a range of projected future

  10. Patient advocacy: barriers and facilitators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikravesh Mansoure

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the two recent decades, advocacy has been a topic of much debate in the nursing profession. Although advocacy has embraced a crucial role for nurses, its extent is often limited in practice. While a variety of studies have been generated all over the world, barriers and facilitators in the patient advocacy have not been completely identified. This article presents the findings of a study exploring the barriers and facilitators influencing the role of advocacy among Iranian nurses. Method This study was conducted by grounded theory method. Participants were 24 Iranian registered nurses working in a large university hospital in Tehran, Iran. Semi-structured interviews were used for data collection. All interviews were transcribed verbatim and simultaneously Constant comparative analysis was used according to the Strauss and Corbin method. Results Through data analysis, several main themes emerged to describe the factors that hindered or facilitated patient advocacy. Nurses in this study identified powerlessness, lack of support, law, code of ethics and motivation, limited communication, physicians leading, risk of advocacy, royalty to peers, and insufficient time to interact with patients and families as barriers to advocacy. As for factors that facilitated nurses to act as a patient advocate, it was found that the nature of nurse-patient relationship, recognizing patients' needs, nurses' responsibility, physician as a colleague, and nurses' knowledge and skills could be influential in adopting the advocacy role. Conclusion Participants believed that in this context taking an advocacy role is difficult for nurses due to the barriers mentioned. Therefore, they make decisions and act as a patient's advocate in any situation concerning patient needs and status of barriers and facilitators. In most cases, they can not act at an optimal level; instead they accept only what they can do, which we called 'limited advocacy' in

  11. Pelagic molybdenum concentration anomalies and the impact of sediment resuspension on the molybdenum budget in two tidal systems of the North Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Nicole; Dellwig, Olaf; Beck, Melanie; Gräwe, Ulf; Neubert, Nadja; Nägler, Thomas F.; Badewien, Thomas H.; Brumsack, Hans-Jürgen; van Beusekom, Justus E. E.; Böttcher, Michael E.

    2013-10-01

    The seasonal dynamics of molybdenum (Mo) were studied in the water column of two tidal basins of the German Wadden Sea (Sylt-Rømø and Spiekeroog) between 2007 and 2011. In contrast to its conservative behaviour in the open ocean, both, losses of more than 50% of the usual concentration level of Mo in seawater and enrichments up to 20% were observed repeatedly in the water column of the study areas. During early summer, Mo removal by adsorption on algae-derived organic matter (e.g. after Phaeocystis blooms) is postulated to be a possible mechanism. Mo bound to organic aggregates is likely transferred to the surface sediment where microbial decomposition enriches Mo in the pore water. First δ98/95Mo data of the study area disclose residual Mo in the open water column being isotopically heavier than MOMo (Mean Ocean Molybdenum) during a negative Mo concentration anomaly, whereas suspended particulate matter shows distinctly lighter values. Based on field observations a Mo isotope enrichment factor of ε = -0.3‰ has been determined which was used to argue against sorption on metal oxide surfaces. It is suggested here that isotope fractionation is caused by biological activity and association to organic matter. Pelagic Mo concentration anomalies exceeding the theoretical salinity-based concentration level, on the other hand, cannot be explained by replenishment via North Sea waters alone and require a supply of excess Mo. Laboratory experiments with natural anoxic tidal flat sediments and modelled sediment displacement during storm events suggest fast and effective Mo release during the resuspension of anoxic sediments in oxic seawater as an important process for a recycling of sedimentary sulphide bound Mo into the water column.

  12. Initialization and state updating utilizing the OpenDA platform and Sentinel Satellite Series data for ecological modeling in the North Sea*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemba, Alexander; El Serafy, Ghada

    2017-04-01

    Ecological modeling relies on the mathematical reconstruction of natural processes which results in a simplification of interactions between a vast number of ecological functions and variables. Despite this simplification, models are able to provide an approximation of the future states of environmental systems, however, inherit therein is a degree of uncertainty due to the simplifications. In order to compensate for these uncertainties and resulting errors, it is possible to anneal real world measurements from both Remote Sensing and In-Situ observations into the model space utilizing data assimilation. Given this, the OpenDA platform and related algorithms are employed in order to initialize the model space and update the model states during hindcasting simulations in order to provide an optimal departure state from which forecasts can be made. Through such a method, future model states have a reduced uncertainty band and provide deterministic results with higher accuracy. This methodology is applied to the prediction of chlorophyll-a concentrations within the southern coastal zone of the North Sea, focusing primarily on the Dutch coastal zone and the Wadden Sea. By utilizing data assimilation with the Sentinel Satellite Series data, an improved forecast is obtained as seen through a comparison of both purely deterministic runs as well as ensemble results which do not implement DA. Various combination of Sentinel data re used in order to evaluate the efficacy and benefit of introducing multiple data sets in the DA process for Coastal and Estuarine Ecological modeling. *This work has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 641762

  13. A Bayesian network approach to predicting nest presence of thefederally-threatened piping plover (Charadrius melodus) using barrier island features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gieder, Katherina D.; Karpanty, Sarah M.; Frasera, James D.; Catlin, Daniel H.; Gutierrez, Benjamin T.; Plant, Nathaniel G.; Turecek, Aaron M.; Thieler, E. Robert

    2014-01-01

    Sea-level rise and human development pose significant threats to shorebirds, particularly for species that utilize barrier island habitat. The piping plover (Charadrius melodus) is a federally-listed shorebird that nests on barrier islands and rapidly responds to changes in its physical environment, making it an excellent species with which to model how shorebird species may respond to habitat change related to sea-level rise and human development. The uncertainty and complexity in predicting sea-level rise, the responses of barrier island habitats to sea-level rise, and the responses of species to sea-level rise and human development necessitate a modelling approach that can link species to the physical habitat features that will be altered by changes in sea level and human development. We used a Bayesian network framework to develop a model that links piping plover nest presence to the physical features of their nesting habitat on a barrier island that is impacted by sea-level rise and human development, using three years of data (1999, 2002, and 2008) from Assateague Island National Seashore in Maryland. Our model performance results showed that we were able to successfully predict nest presence given a wide range of physical conditions within the model’s dataset. We found that model predictions were more successful when the range of physical conditions included in model development was varied rather than when those physical conditions were narrow. We also found that all model predictions had fewer false negatives (nests predicted to be absent when they were actually present in the dataset) than false positives (nests predicted to be present when they were actually absent in the dataset), indicating that our model correctly predicted nest presence better than nest absence. These results indicated that our approach of using a Bayesian network to link specific physical features to nest presence will be useful for modelling impacts of sea-level rise- or human

  14. Morphological impacts of extreme storms on sandy beaches and barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, R.A.; Sallenger, A.H.

    2003-01-01

    Historical extreme storms that struck the Gulf Coast and Atlantic Coast regions of the United States caused several different styles of morphological response and resulted in a wide range of washover penetration distances. The post- storm erosional responses included dune scarps, channel incisions, and washouts, whereas depositional responses included perched fans, washover terraces, and sheetwash lineations. Maximum inland extent of washover penetration ranged from approximately 100 to 1000 m and estimated sediment volumes associated with these deposits ranged from about 10 to 225 m 3/m of beach. Unusual styles of morphological response (sheetwash lineations and incised channels) and maximum washover penetration distances are closely correlated, and they also correspond to storm intensity as denned by the Saffir-Simpson wind-speed scale. The regional morphological responses and washover penetration distances are controlled primarily by the interactions among heights and durations of storm surge relative to adjacent land elevations, differences in water levels between the ocean and adjacent lagoon, constructive and destructive interference of storm waves, and alongshore variations in nearshore bathymetry. For barrier segments that are entirely submerged during the storm, impacts can be enhanced by the combined influences of shallow water depths and organized flow within the wind field. The greatest washover penetrations and sediment accumulations are products of shallow water, confined flow, and high wind stress. Transport and deposition of washover sediments across barrier islands and into the adjacent lagoon are common processes along the Gulf of Mexico but not along the western Atlantic Ocean. This fundamental difference in storm impact underscores how microtidal and mesotidal barriers respond respectively to extreme storms, and provides insight into how different types of barrier islands will likely respond to future extreme storms and to a relative rise in sea

  15. Dielectric barrier discharges applied for optical spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, S.; Schütz, A.; Klute, F. D.; Kratzer, J.; Franzke, J.

    2016-09-01

    The present review reflects the importance of dielectric barrier discharges for optical spectrometric detection in analytical chemistry. In contrast to usual discharges with a direct current the electrodes are separated by at least one dielectric barrier. There are two main features of the dielectric barrier discharges: they can serve as dissociation and excitation devices as well as ionization sources, respectively. This article portrays various application fields of dielectric barrier discharges in analytical chemistry used for elemental and molecular detection with optical spectrometry.

  16. Penetration through the Skin Barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jesper Bo; Benfeldt, Eva; Holmgaard, Rikke

    2016-01-01

    . During recent decades, the latter has received increased attention as a route for intentionally delivering drugs to patients. This has stimulated research in methods for sampling, measuring and predicting percutaneous penetration. Previous chapters have described how different endogenous, genetic...... and exogenous factors may affect barrier characteristics. The present chapter introduces the theory for barrier penetration (Fick's law), and describes and discusses different methods for measuring the kinetics of percutaneous penetration of chemicals, including in vitro methods (static and flow......-through diffusion cells) as well as in vivo methods (microdialysis and microperfusion). Then follows a discussion with examples of how different characteristics of the skin (age, site and integrity) and of the penetrants (size, solubility, ionization, logPow and vehicles) affect the kinetics of percutaneous...

  17. Security barriers with automated reconnaissance

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, James O; Baird, Adam D; Tullis, Barclay J; Nolte, Roger Allen

    2015-04-07

    An intrusion delaying barrier includes primary and secondary physical structures and can be instrumented with multiple sensors incorporated into an electronic monitoring and alarm system. Such an instrumented intrusion delaying barrier may be used as a perimeter intrusion defense and assessment system (PIDAS). Problems with not providing effective delay to breaches by intentional intruders and/or terrorists who would otherwise evade detection are solved by attaching the secondary structures to the primary structure, and attaching at least some of the sensors to the secondary structures. By having multiple sensors of various types physically interconnected serves to enable sensors on different parts of the overall structure to respond to common disturbances and thereby provide effective corroboration that a disturbance is not merely a nuisance or false alarm. Use of a machine learning network such as a neural network exploits such corroboration.

  18. Geochronologic evidence for a possible MIS-11 emergent barrier/beach-ridge in southeastern Georgia, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markewich, H.W.; Pavich, M.J.; Schultz, A.P.; Mahan, S.A.; Aleman-Gonzalez, W. B.; Bierman, P.R.

    2013-01-01

    Predominantly clastic, off-lapping, transgressive, near-shore marine sediment packages that are morphologically expressed as subparallel NE-trending barriers, beach ridges, and associated back-barrier areas, characterize the near-surface stratigraphic section between the Savannah and the Ogeechee Rivers in Effingham County, southeastern Georgia. Each barrier/back-barrier (shoreline) complex is lower than and cut into a higher/older complex. Each barrier or shoreline complex overlies Miocene strata. No direct age data are available for these deposits. Previous researchers have disagreed on their age and provenance. Using luminescence and meteoric beryllium-10 (10Be) inventory analyses, we estimated a minimum age for the largest, westernmost, morphologically identifiable, and topographically-highest, barrier/beach-ridge (the Wicomico shoreline barrier) and constrained the age of a suite of younger barrier/beach-ridges that lie adjacent and seaward of the Wicomico shoreline barrier. At the study site, the near-shore marine/estuarine deposits underlying the Wicomico shoreline barrier are overlain by eolian sand and an intervening zone-of-mixing. Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) data indicate ages of ≤43 ka for the eolian sand and 116 ka for the zone-of-mixing. Meteoric 10Be and pedostratigraphic data indicate minimum residence times of 33.4 ka for the eolian sand, 80.6 ka for the zone-of-mixing, and 247 ka for the paleosol. The combined OSL and 10Be age data indicate that, at this locality, the barrier/beach ridge has a minimum age of about 360 ka. This age for the Wicomico shoreline-barrier deposit is the first for any Pleistocene near-shore marine/estuarine deposit in southeast Georgia that is conclusively older than 80 ka. The 360-ka minimum age is in agreement with other geochronologic data for near-coastline deposits in Georgia and South Carolina. The geomorphic position of this barrier/beach-ridge is similar to deposits in South Carolina considered to be

  19. Geochronologic evidence for a possible MIS-11 emergent barrier/beach-ridge in southeastern Georgia, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markewich, H. W.; Pavich, M. J.; Schultz, A. P.; Mahan, S. A.; Aleman-Gonzalez, W. B.; Bierman, P. R.

    2013-01-01

    Predominantly clastic, off-lapping, transgressive, near-shore marine sediment packages that are morphologically expressed as subparallel NE-trending barriers, beach ridges, and associated back-barrier areas, characterize the near-surface stratigraphic section between the Savannah and the Ogeechee Rivers in Effingham County, southeastern Georgia. Each barrier/back-barrier (shoreline) complex is lower than and cut into a higher/older complex. Each barrier or shoreline complex overlies Miocene strata. No direct age data are available for these deposits. Previous researchers have disagreed on their age and provenance. Using luminescence and meteoric beryllium-10 (10Be) inventory analyses, we estimated a minimum age for the largest, westernmost, morphologically identifiable, and topographically-highest, barrier/beach-ridge (the Wicomico shoreline barrier) and constrained the age of a suite of younger barrier/beach-ridges that lie adjacent and seaward of the Wicomico shoreline barrier. At the study site, the near-shore marine/estuarine deposits underlying the Wicomico shoreline barrier are overlain by eolian sand and an intervening zone-of-mixing. Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) data indicate ages of ≤43 ka for the eolian sand and 116 ka for the zone-of-mixing. Meteoric 10Be and pedostratigraphic data indicate minimum residence times of 33.4 ka for the eolian sand, 80.6 ka for the zone-of-mixing, and 247 ka for the paleosol. The combined OSL and 10Be age data indicate that, at this locality, the barrier/beach ridge has a minimum age of about 360 ka. This age for the Wicomico shoreline-barrier deposit is the first for any Pleistocene near-shore marine/estuarine deposit in southeast Georgia that is conclusively older than 80 ka. The 360-ka minimum age is in agreement with other geochronologic data for near-coastline deposits in Georgia and South Carolina. The geomorphic position of this barrier/beach-ridge is similar to deposits in South Carolina considered to be

  20. The status of coral reef ecology research in the Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Berumen, Michael L.

    2013-06-21

    The Red Sea has long been recognized as a region of high biodiversity and endemism. Despite this diversity and early history of scientific work, our understanding of the ecology of coral reefs in the Red Sea has lagged behind that of other large coral reef systems. We carried out a quantitative assessment of ISI-listed research published from the Red Sea in eight specific topics (apex predators, connectivity, coral bleaching, coral reproductive biology, herbivory, marine protected areas, non-coral invertebrates and reef-associated bacteria) and compared the amount of research conducted in the Red Sea to that from Australia\\'s Great Barrier Reef (GBR) and the Caribbean. On average, for these eight topics, the Red Sea had 1/6th the amount of research compared to the GBR and about 1/8th the amount of the Caribbean. Further, more than 50 % of the published research from the Red Sea originated from the Gulf of Aqaba, a small area (<2 % of the area of the Red Sea) in the far northern Red Sea. We summarize the general state of knowledge in these eight topics and highlight the areas of future research priorities for the Red Sea region. Notably, data that could inform science-based management approaches are badly lacking in most Red Sea countries. The Red Sea, as a geologically "young" sea located in one of the warmest regions of the world, has the potential to provide insight into pressing topics such as speciation processes as well as the capacity of reef systems and organisms to adapt to global climate change. As one of the world\\'s most biodiverse coral reef regions, the Red Sea may yet have a significant role to play in our understanding of coral reef ecology at a global scale. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  1. A bridge too far: dispersal barriers and cryptic speciation in an Arabian Peninsula grouper (Cephalopholis hemistiktos)

    KAUST Repository

    Priest, Mark

    2015-12-12

    Aim: We use genetic and age-based analyses to assess the evidence for a biogeographical barrier to larval dispersal in the yellowfin hind, Cephalopholis hemistiktos, a commercially important species found across the Arabian Peninsula. Location: Red Sea, Gulf of Aden, Gulf of Oman and Arabian Gulf. Methods: Mitochondrial DNA cytochrome-c oxidase subunit-I and nuclear DNA (S7) sequences were obtained for C. hemistiktos sampled throughout its distributional range. Phylogeographical and population-level analyses were used to assess patterns of genetic structure and to identify barriers to dispersal. Concurrently, age-based demographic analyses using otoliths determined differences in growth and longevity between regions. Results: Our analyses revealed significant genetic structure congruent with growth parameter differences observed across sampling sites, suggesting cryptic speciation between populations in the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden versus the Gulf of Oman and Arabian Gulf. Coalescence analyses indicated these two regions have been isolated for > 800,000 years. Main conclusions: Our results indicate historical disruption to gene flow and a contemporary dispersal barrier in the Arabian Sea, which C. hemistiktos larvae are unable to effectively traverse. This provides yet another example of a (cryptic) species with high dispersive potential whose range is delimited by a lack of suitable habitat between locations or an inability to successfully recruit at the range edge. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Postglacial Fringing-Reef to Barrier-Reef conversion on Tahiti links Darwin's reef types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchon, Paul; Granados-Corea, Marian; Abbey, Elizabeth; Braga, Juan C.; Braithwaite, Colin; Kennedy, David M.; Spencer, Tom; Webster, Jody M.; Woodroffe, Colin D.

    2014-01-01

    In 1842 Charles Darwin claimed that vertical growth on a subsiding foundation caused fringing reefs to transform into barrier reefs then atolls. Yet historically no transition between reef types has been discovered and they are widely considered to develop independently from antecedent foundations during glacio-eustatic sea-level rise. Here we reconstruct reef development from cores recovered by IODP Expedition 310 to Tahiti, and show that a fringing reef retreated upslope during postglacial sea-level rise and transformed into a barrier reef when it encountered a Pleistocene reef-flat platform. The reef became stranded on the platform edge, creating a lagoon that isolated it from coastal sediment and facilitated a switch to a faster-growing coral assemblage dominated by acroporids. The switch increased the reef's accretion rate, allowing it to keep pace with rising sea level, and transform into a barrier reef. This retreat mechanism not only links Darwin's reef types, but explains the re-occupation of reefs during Pleistocene glacio-eustacy. PMID:24845540

  3. Article Including Environmental Barrier Coating System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang N. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An enhanced environmental barrier coating for a silicon containing substrate. The enhanced barrier coating may include a bond coat doped with at least one of an alkali metal oxide and an alkali earth metal oxide. The enhanced barrier coating may include a composite mullite bond coat including BSAS and another distinct second phase oxide applied over said surface.

  4. Barrierer for realisering af energibesparelser i bygninger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Michael

    2004-01-01

    For få bygningsejere går i gang med at investere i energibesparelser. Årsagen tilskrives en række barrierer, som møder den enkelte bygningsejer, når denne vil i gang med at foretage energirenoveringer. Men ikke alle barrierer handler om barrierer i traditionel forstand, men om tilbageholdenhed. Den...

  5. Market barriers to welfare product innovations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Binnekamp, M.H.A.; Ingenbleek, P.T.M.

    2006-01-01

    New products that are based on higher animal welfare standards encounter several barriers on the road to market acceptance. The authors focus on the Dutch poultry sector and distinguish between retailer and consumer barriers. Retailer barriers include the powerful position of retailers, the price co

  6. Design of the Muong Chuoi Barrier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Vliegen, K.; Van Oorschot, N.; Meinen, N.; Van Dijk, S.; Reimert, Z.

    2013-01-01

    Ho Chi Minh City has to deal with severe flooding in the rainy season. To prevent the city from this flooding, MARD set up plan 1547. The main idea of the plan is to build a ring dike around HCMC in combination with several movable tidal barriers. One of these barriers is the Muong Chuoi Barrier. I

  7. Barriers to Mammography among Inadequately Screened Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, Carolyn R. T.; Roberts, Summer; Cheng, Meng-Ru; Crayton, Eloise V.; Jackson, Sherrill; Politi, Mary C.

    2015-01-01

    Mammography use has increased over the past 20 years, yet more than 30% of women remain inadequately screened. Structural barriers can deter individuals from screening, however, cognitive, emotional, and communication barriers may also prevent mammography use. This study sought to identify the impact of number and type of barriers on mammography…

  8. Market barriers to welfare product innovations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Binnekamp, M.H.A.; Ingenbleek, P.T.M.

    2006-01-01

    New products that are based on higher animal welfare standards encounter several barriers on the road to market acceptance. The authors focus on the Dutch poultry sector and distinguish between retailer and consumer barriers. Retailer barriers include the powerful position of retailers, the price

  9. Flexible pile thermal barrier insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, G. E.; Fell, D. M.; Tesinsky, J. S. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A flexible pile thermal barrier insulator included a plurality of upstanding pile yarns. A generally planar backing section supported the upstanding pile yarns. The backing section included a plurality of filler yarns forming a mesh in a first direction. A plurality of warp yarns were looped around said filler yarns and pile yarns in the backing section and formed a mesh in a second direction. A binder prevented separation of the yarns in the backing section.

  10. Overcome barriers to career success

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raudsepp, E.

    1983-04-01

    A test is given to determine if an engineer suffers from one of the three barriers to technical success: fear of success, fear of failure, or perfectionism. As in most such tests, the middle way is best. Successful engineers know that perfection cannot be attained, that they don't have time to worry about failure or success, and that by aiming and perservering in doing things well, success can be achieved.

  11. Removing Barriers to Interdisciplinary Research

    CERN Document Server

    Jacobs, Naomi

    2010-01-01

    A significant amount of high-impact contemporary scientific research occurs where biology, computer science, engineering and chemistry converge. Although programmes have been put in place to support such work, the complex dynamics of interdisciplinarity are still poorly understood. In this paper we interrogate the nature of interdisciplinary research and how we might measure its "success", identify potential barriers to its implementation, and suggest possible mechanisms for removing these impediments.

  12. Wet Work and Barrier Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fartasch, Manigé

    2016-01-01

    Wet work defined as unprotected exposure to humid environments/water; high frequencies of hand washing procedures or prolonged glove occlusion is believed to cause irritant contact dermatitis in a variety of occupations. This review considers the recent studies on wet-work exposure and focuses on its influence on barrier function. There are different methods to study the effect of wet work on barrier function. On the one hand, occupational cohorts at risk can be monitored prospectively by skin bioengineering technology and clinical visual scoring systems; on the other hand, experimental test procedures with defined application of water, occlusion and detergents are performed in healthy volunteers. Both epidemiological studies and the results of experimental procedures are compared and discussed. A variety of epidemiological studies analyze occupational cohorts at risk. The measurement of transepidermal water loss, an indicator of the integrity of the epidermal barrier, and clinical inspection of the skin have shown that especially the frequencies of hand washing and water contact/contact to aqueous mixtures seem to be the main factors for the occurrence of barrier alterations. On the other hand, in a single cross-sectional study, prolonged glove wearing (e.g. occlusion for 6 h per shift in clean-room workers) without exposure to additional hazardous substances seemed not to affect the skin negatively. But regarding the effect of occlusion, there is experimental evidence that previously occluded skin challenged with sodium lauryl sulfate leads to an increased susceptibility to the irritant with an aggravation of the irritant reaction. These findings might have relevance for the real-life situation in so far as after occupational glove wearing, the skin is more susceptible to potential hazards to the skin even during leisure hours.

  13. Lake Borgne Surge Barrier Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    Savant , and Darla C. McVan September 2010 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. ERDC/CHL TR-10-10 September 2010 Lake...Borgne Surge Barrier Study S. Keith Martin, Gaurav Savant , and Darla C. McVan Coastal and Hydraulics Laboratory U.S. Army Engineer Research and...conducted by Keith Martin, Dr. Gaurav Savant , and Darla C. McVan. This work was conducted at the Coastal and Hydraulics Laboratory (CHL) of the

  14. The Dead Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    The Dead Sea is the lowest point on Earth at 418 meters below sea level, and also one of the saltiest bodies of water on Earth with a salinity of about 300 parts-per-thousand (nine times greater than ocean salinity). It is located on the border between Jordan and Israel, and is fed by the Jordan River. The Dead Sea is located in the Dead Sea Rift, formed as a result of the Arabian tectonic plate moving northward away from the African Plate. The mineral content of the Dead Sea is significantly different from that of ocean water, consisting of approximately 53% magnesium chloride, 37% potassium chloride and 8% sodium chloride. In the early part of the 20th century, the Dead Sea began to attract interest from chemists who deduced that the Sea was a natural deposit of potash and bromine. From the Dead Sea brine, Israel and Jordan produce 3.8 million tons potash, 200,000 tons elemental bromine, 45,000 tons caustic soda, 25, 000 tons magnesium metal, and sodium chloride. Both countries use extensive salt evaporation pans that have essentially diked the entire southern end of the Dead Sea. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet. ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining

  15. The Dead Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    The Dead Sea is the lowest point on Earth at 418 meters below sea level, and also one of the saltiest bodies of water on Earth with a salinity of about 300 parts-per-thousand (nine times greater than ocean salinity). It is located on the border between Jordan and Israel, and is fed by the Jordan River. The Dead Sea is located in the Dead Sea Rift, formed as a result of the Arabian tectonic plate moving northward away from the African Plate. The mineral content of the Dead Sea is significantly different from that of ocean water, consisting of approximately 53% magnesium chloride, 37% potassium chloride and 8% sodium chloride. In the early part of the 20th century, the Dead Sea began to attract interest from chemists who deduced that the Sea was a natural deposit of potash and bromine. From the Dead Sea brine, Israel and Jordan produce 3.8 million tons potash, 200,000 tons elemental bromine, 45,000 tons caustic soda, 25, 000 tons magnesium metal, and sodium chloride. Both countries use extensive salt evaporation pans that have essentially diked the entire southern end of the Dead Sea. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet. ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining

  16. Diazotrophic microbial community of coastal microbial mats of the southern North Sea.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bauersachs, T.; Compaoré, J.; Severin, I.; Hopmans, E.C.; Schouten, S.; Stal, L.J.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.

    2011-01-01

    The diazotrophic community in microbial mats growing along the shore of the North Sea barrier island Schiermonnikoog (The Netherlands) was studied using microscopy, lipid biomarkers, stable carbon (δ13CTOC) and nitrogen (δ15N) isotopes as well as by constructing and analyzing 16S rRNA gene

  17. Diazotrophic microbial community of coastal microbial mats of the southern North Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bauersachs, T.; Compaoré, J.; Severin, I.; Hopmans, E.C.; Schouten, S.; Stal, L.J.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.

    2011-01-01

    The diazotrophic community in microbial mats growing along the shore of the North Sea barrier island Schiermonnikoog (The Netherlands) was studied using microscopy, lipid biomarkers, stable carbon (delta(13)C(TOC)) and nitrogen (delta(15)N) isotopes as well as by constructing and analyzing 16S rRNA

  18. Diazotrophic microbial community of coastal microbial mats of the southern North Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bauersachs, T.; Compaore, J.; Severin, I.; Hopmans, E.C.; Schouten, S.; Stal, L.J.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.

    2011-01-01

    The diazotrophic community in microbial mats growing along the shore of the North Sea barrier island Schiermonnikoog (The Netherlands) was studied using microscopy, lipid biomarkers, stable carbon (δ13CTOC) and nitrogen (δ15N) isotopes as well as by constructing and analyzing 16S rRNA gene

  19. Protection of New York City Urban Fabric With Low-Cost Textile Storm Surge Barriers

    CERN Document Server

    Bolonkin, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    Textile storm surge barriers, sited at multiple locations, are literally extensions of the city world famous urban fabric - another manifestation of the dominance of the City over local Nature. Textile Storm Surge Barriers (TSSB) are intended to preserve the City from North Atlantic Ocean hurricanes that cause sea waves impacting the densely populated and high-value real estate, instigating catastrophic, and possibly long-term, infrastructure and monetary losses. Complicating TSSB installation macroproject planning is the presence of the Hudson and other rivers, several small tidal straits, future climate change and other factors. We conclude that TSSB installations made of homogeneous construction materials are worthwhile investigating because they may be less expensive to build, and more easily replaced following any failure, than concrete and steel storm surge barriers, which are also made of homogeneous materials. We suppose the best macroproject outcome will develop in the perfect Macro-engineering plann...

  20. Perceived Sodium Reduction Barriers Among Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease: Which Barriers Are Important and Which Patients Experience Barriers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meuleman, Yvette; Hoekstra, Tiny; Dekker, Friedo W; van der Boog, Paul J M; van Dijk, Sandra

    2017-09-08

    The purposes of this study were to assess the importance of perceived sodium reduction barriers among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and identify associated sociodemographic, clinical, and psychosocial factors. A total of 156 patients with CKD completed a questionnaire assessing sodium reduction barriers (18 self-formulated items), depressive symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory), perceived autonomy support (Modified Health Care Climate Questionnaire), and self-efficacy (Partners in Health Questionnaire). Factor analysis was used to identify barrier domains. Correlation coefficients were computed to examine relationships between barrier domains and patient characteristics. Nine barrier domains were identified. Barriers perceived as important were as follows: high sodium content in products, lack of sodium feedback, lack of goal setting and discussing strategies for sodium reduction, and not experiencing CKD-related symptoms (mean scores > 3.0 on 5-point scales, ranging from 1 'no barrier' to 5 'very important barrier'). Other barriers (knowledge, attitude, coping skills when eating out, and professional support) were rated as moderately important (rated around midpoint), and the barrier 'intrinsic motivation' was rated as somewhat important (mean score = 1.9). Sodium reduction barrier domains were not associated with gender and kidney function, but were associated with age, level of education, number of comorbidities, perceived autonomy support, depressive symptoms, and self-efficacy (range r = 0.17-0.35). Patients with lower self-efficacy and perceived autonomy support scores experienced most sodium reduction barriers. Patients with CKD experience multiple important sodium reduction barriers and could benefit from support strategies that target various sodium reduction barriers and strengthen beliefs regarding self-efficacy and autonomy support. Additionally, environmental interventions should be implemented to reduce sodium levels in processed