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Sample records for w-135 diph tox

  1. An outer membrane vesicle vaccine for prevention of serogroup A and W-135 meningococcal disease in the African meningitis belt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norheim, G; Tunheim, G; Næss, L M; Kristiansen, P A; Caugant, D A; Rosenqvist, E

    2012-08-01

    The bacterium Neisseria meningitidis of serogroups A and W-135 has in the recent decade caused most of the cases of meningococcal meningitis in the African meningitis belt, and there is currently no efficient and affordable vaccine available demonstrated to protect against both these serogroups. Previously, deoxycholate-extracted outer membrane vesicle (OMV) vaccines against serogroup B meningococci have been shown to be safe and induce protection in humans in clonal outbreaks. The serogroup A and W-135 strains isolated from meningitis belt epidemics demonstrate strikingly limited variation in major surface-exposed protein structures. We have here investigated whether the OMV vaccine strategy also can be applied to prevent both serogroups A and W-135 meningococcal disease. A novel vaccine combining OMV extracted from recent African serogroup A and W-135 strains and adsorbed to aluminium hydroxide was developed and its antigenic characteristics and immunogenicity were studied in mice. The specificity of the antibody responses was analysed by immunoblotting and serum bactericidal activity (SBA) assays. Moreover, the bivalent A+W-135 vaccine was compared with monovalent A and W-135 OMV vaccines. The bivalent OMV vaccine was able to induce similar SBA titres as the monovalent A or W-135 OMV towards both serogroups. High SBA titres were also observed against a meningococcal serogroup C strain. These results show that subcapsular antigens may be of importance when developing broadly protective and affordable vaccines for the meningitis belt. © 2012 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Immunology © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Meningococcal vaccine A,C,W135,Y: conjugated to tetanus toxoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    A meningococcal vaccine conjugated to protein CRM 197 (Menveo) is the standard vaccine for immunisation against invasive meningococcal infections caused by serogroups A, C, W135 andY, beginning at age 2 years. Nimenrix, another vaccine against meningococcal groups A, C,W135 and Y, conjugated to tetanus toxoid, was authorised for use in the European Union, starting at age 1 year. The two tetravalent meningococcal conjugate vaccines have not been compared in head-to-head trials. Four immunogenicity studies compared the tetravalent conjugate vaccine Nimenrix with an unconjugated tetravalent meningococcal vaccine in children and adults aged 2 to 55 years. The results showed that Nimenrix was more immunogenic than the unconjugated vaccine. Two immunogenicity studies showed that Nimenrix was at least as immunogenic as monovalent (group C) meningococcal conjugate vaccines in children aged from 1 to 2 years and from 2 to 10 years. In one study, prior vaccination with an unconjugated tetravalent meningococcal vaccine had little impact on the immunogenicity of a booster dose of the conjugate vaccine Nimenrix. Concomitant administration with other vaccines does not affect the immunogenicity of Nimenrix. Nimenrix causes more frequent local and systemic adverse reactions than the unconjugated tetravalent meningococcal vaccine and monovalent group C meningococcal conjugate vaccines. In children over 2 years of age, Nimenrix has no advantages over Menveo for vaccination against meningococcal serogroups A, C, W135 andY. In contrast, between the ages of 1 and 2 years, Nimenrix is the only vaccine with established immunogenicity. In addition, it has an acceptable harm-benefit balance.

  3. Meningococcal quadrivalent (serogroups A, C, W135 and Y) tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine (Nimenrix™).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croxtall, Jamie D; Dhillon, Sohita

    2012-12-24

    Nimenrix™ (MenACWY-TT) is a quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine, comprising the polysaccharide serogroups A, C, W135 and Y, and tetanus toxoid (TT) as carrier protein. It is the first quadrivalent vaccine (administered as a single dose) to be approved in Europe for active immunization of individuals aged ≥ 12 months against invasive meningococcal disease caused by Neisseria meningitidis serogroups A, C, W135 and Y. Administration of a single dose of Nimenrix™ elicited a strong immune response against all four vaccine serogroups in healthy toddlers aged 12-23 months, children and adolescents aged 2-17 years and adults aged 18-55 years in randomized, multicentre, phase III trials. In toddlers, Nimenrix™ was noninferior to Meningitec® in terms of seroresponse rates against meningococcal serogroup C 42 days post-vaccination. In children, adolescents and adults, Nimenrix™ was noninferior to Mencevax™ in terms of vaccination response rates against all four serogroups 1 month post-vaccination. Furthermore, several phase II studies and a phase III trial showed that the immune response elicited by Nimenrix™ in all age groups persisted for 7-42 months after the primary vaccination (when evaluated by rabbit serum bactericidal activity), with the vaccine also inducing immune memory in toddlers. In addition, several randomized, multicentre, phase III, noninferiority trials showed that when coadministered with other childhood vaccines or a seasonal flu vaccine, the immunogenicity of Nimenrix™ or that of the coadministered vaccine was generally not altered. Nimenrix® was generally well tolerated in all age groups whether administered as a single vaccine or coadministered with other routine vaccines. The incidence of grade 3 local or systemic solicited adverse events during the first 4 days following vaccination and of serious adverse events over an extended follow-up period of up to 6 months was low (<4.5%). Although protective effectiveness and longer

  4. Meningococcal Serogroup A, C, W-135 and Y Conjugated Vaccine : A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hepkema, Hiltsje; Pouwels, Koen B.; van der Ende, Arie; Westra, Tjalke A.; Postma, Maarten J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: In 2002, vaccination with a serogroup C meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MenC) was introduced in the Netherlands for all children aged 14 months. Despite its success, herd immunity may wane over time. Recently, a serogroup A,C,W-135, Y meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MenACWY) was licens

  5. ToxCast/ToxRefDB

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — ToxCast is used as a cost-effective approach for efficiently prioritizing the toxicity testing of thousands of chemicals. It uses data from state-of-the-art high...

  6. Epidemiological investigation on an imported W135 epidemic cerebrospinal meningitis case%“外地来穗”W135群流行性脑脊髓膜炎病例的流行病学调查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔敏; 蔡衍珊; 许建雄; 王大虎; 张欣强; 谭慧峰; 吴德平; 王鸣

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate an imported epidemic cerebrospinal meningitis case and in order to provide scientific basis for marking and adjusting prevention and control measures. Method Collecting the cases, carrying out cross - sectional investigation and laboratory test, according Diagnostic criteria of epidemic cerebrospinal meningitis ( WS295 -2008) which issued by Ministry of Public Health of P. R. China to diagnosis the disease. Results The patient admission with fever and ecchymosis. C. S. F was detected by PCR and the results showed CrgA ( + ) and siaD ( + ) . Neisseria meningitidis (W135) was detected in a throat swab sample of close contact person and this bacteria were sensitive to 12 kinds of antibacterials, such as ceftriaxone, azithromycin, ciprofloxacin, etc. Conclusions This was the second case of popular type epidemic meningitis caused by Neisseria meningitidis ( W135) in Guangdong Province. For imported cases, medical institutions in all level should fulfill their duty respectively, collaborate with each other and enhance the information communication. Epidemic meningitis threatens still existed and prevention and measures should be strengthened.%目的 对1起“外地来穗”W135群流脑病例进行流行病学调查,为制订和调整流脑防治措施提供科学依据.方法 现场采用病例收集、现况调查、实验室检测,病例诊断按照中华人民共和国卫生部发布的《流行性脑脊髓膜炎诊断标准( WS295 - 2008)》执行.结果 患者以急性发病、反复发热伴全身瘀斑、瘀点入院,脑脊液样品经PCR扩增检测CrgA基因阳性,siaD (W135)阳性.密切接触者咽拭标本中1例检出并被鉴定为W135群脑膜炎奈瑟氏菌,该菌株对头孢曲松、阿齐霉素、环丙沙星等12种抗菌药物均敏感.结论 该病例是广东省第2例由W135群脑膜炎奈瑟氏菌引起的普通型流脑病例;对于外地病例,各级医疗机构应严格按照流脑监测方案要求,履行各自职

  7. Validación del ensayo bactericida en suero para los serogrupos A, C y W135 de Neisseria meningitidis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara Cedré

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available El ensayo bactericida en suero se considera la herramienta más eficaz para medir el estado de la inmunidad en individuos vacunados contra N. meningitidis y constituye el soporte analítico para el desarrollo de las vacunas a base de polisacáridos. Las normas de Buenas Prácticas de Fabricación y control de la calidad de productos farmacéuticos plantean que la validación debe aplicarse tanto a los procesos de fabricación como a los métodos de análisis y de control. Es de particular interés en el caso de los bioensayos con resultados más variables que los métodos fisicoquímicos. Por esta razón se llevó a cabo la validación del ensayo bactericida por el método de la placa inclinada, para los serogrupos A, C y W135 , mediante la determinación de la precisión, especificidad, exactitud y robustez del mismo. Los resultados estuvieron dentro del criterio de aceptación para este tipo de prueba, por lo que se considera apto para la evaluación de la respuesta inmune estimulada por vacunas polisacarídicas de los serogrupos A, C y W 135 contra la meningitis meningocócica.

  8. A、C、Y、W135群脑膜炎球菌多糖疫苗安全性观察%Safety of tetravalent meningococcal A, C, Y,W135 vaccine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汤妍; 张吉凯; 梁剑; 蒋详顺; 苏家立; 谢学海; 夏艳辉; 邓寿平; 冯社庄

    2013-01-01

    目的 观察A、C、Y、W135群脑膜炎球菌多糖疫苗在广东省广宁县和博罗县2~7岁人群中免疫后的安全性.方法 研究者主动观察疫苗接种后30 min,6、12、24、48、72 h的局部和全身反应并记录在疫苗接种日记卡上,通过主动报告和定期随访的形式收集4天~4周期间的异常反应情况.结果 共接种观察了2 974名适龄儿童,发生疫苗接种不良事件378例,异常反应率12.71%,其中发热反应率10.96%,局部反应发生率1.85%;疫苗接种后30min至72 h期间的全身和局部反应率分别为8.61%和1.82%.不良反应分级主要为2级以下,未观察到严重不良事件.所有全身反应症状和局部反应症状分别消失于接种后12 d内和6d内.结论 A、C、Y、W135群脑膜炎球菌多糖疫苗在2~7岁人群中接种有较好的安全性.%Objective To evaluate the safety of tetravalent meningococcal A,C,Y,W135 vaccine in the population (aged 2-7 years old) from Boluo and Guangning county,Guangdong province.Methods Local and systemic reactions were recorded at 30 min,6,12,24,48 and 72 h after vaccination.Abnormal reactions were also recorded in the following 4 weeks.Results 2 974 children were vaccinated.378 cases (12.71%) had adverse events.The incidence of fever and local reaction was 10.96% and 1.85%,respectively.The incidence of systemic and local reaction occurred at 30 min to 72 h after immunization was 8.61% and 1.82%,respectively.Most of the side effects were classified as Grade 2 adverse reaction.Conclusion The tetravalent meningococcal A,C,Y,W135 vaccine was found to be safe for the children with an aged of 2-7 years old.

  9. ToxCast Dashboard

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ToxCast Dashboard helps users examine high-throughput assay data to inform chemical safety decisions. To date, it has data on over 9,000 chemicals and information from more than 1,000 high-throughput assay endpoint components.

  10. PCR analysis and molecular characters of the first serogroup W135 meningococcal disease case in Shanxi province%山西省首例W135群流行性脑脊髓膜炎的PCR鉴定及多位点测序分型分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚素霞; 郝瑞娥; 张秋香; 杨红霞

    2016-01-01

    目的:对2013年4月太原市发现的1例 W135群流行性脑脊髓膜炎(流脑)死亡病例进行 PCR鉴定及测序分析。方法对疑似流脑病例进行流行病学调查,血清及淤点/斑组织液进行 crgA 基因及基因siaD(W135)PCR 鉴定,并进行多位点测序分型(MLST)。结果该病例证实为 W135群脑膜炎奈瑟菌引起的,采用多位点测序分型(MLST)对该株菌的基因组7个管家基因进行 DNA 测序,属于 ST-11序列群。结论该病例是山西省首例感染 W135群流脑菌并死亡的病例,提示我们要加强流脑病原学监测。%Objective To analyze the PCR and molecular characters of the first serogroup W135 meningo-coccal death case in Shanxi province on April,2013.Methods Epidemiological survey of suspected epidemic cere-brospinal meningitis case was conducted,blood serum and petechia tissue fluid samples were identified by PCR for crgA gene and siaD gene of W 135.Multilocus sequence typing(MLST)was performed for determining the sequence types(STs).Results The patient in the case died of serogroup W135 Neisseria meningitides,which belonged to ST-11.Conclusion This is the first case died of serogroup W135 Neisseria meningitidis in Shanxi province,which prompts that the surveillance of meningococcal pathogeny should be strengthened.

  11. Role of ToxS in the proteolytic cascade of virulence regulator ToxR in Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almagro-Moreno, Salvador; Root, Michael Z; Taylor, Ronald K

    2015-12-01

    Two of the primary virulence regulators of Vibrio cholerae, ToxR and TcpP, function together with cognate effector proteins. ToxR undergoes regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP) during late stationary phase in response to nutrient limitation at alkaline pH; however, the specific function of its cognate ToxS remains unresolved. In this work, we found that ToxR rapidly becomes undetectable in a ΔtoxS mutant when cultures are exposed to either starvation conditions or after alkaline pH shock individually. A ΔtoxS mutant enters into a dormant state associated with the proteolysis of ToxR at a faster rate than wild-type, closely resembling a ΔtoxR mutant. Using a mutant with a periplasmic substitution in ToxS, we found that the proteases DegS and DegP function additively with VesC and a novel protease, TapA, to degrade ToxR in the mutant. Overall, the results shown here reveal a role for ToxS in the stabilization of ToxR by protecting the virulence regulator from premature proteolysis. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. High-Throughput Screening in ToxCast/Tox21 (FutureToxII)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addressing safety aspects of drugs and environmental chemicals relies extensively on animal testing. However, the quantity of chemicals needing assessment and challenges of species extrapolation require development of alternative approaches. The EPA’s ToxCast program addresses th...

  13. High prevalence of Neisseria meningitidis hypervirulent lineages and emergence of W135:P1.5,2:ST-11 clone in Southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidlich, Luciana; Baethgen, Ludmila F; Mayer, Leonard W; Moraes, Camile; Klein, Cecília C; Nunes, Luciana S; Rios, Sílvia da S; Kmetzsch, Claudete I; Rossetti, Maria L R; Zaha, Arnaldo

    2008-10-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize Neisseria meningitidis strains causing invasive disease in Rio Grande do Sul (RS), during 2003-2005, monitoring the occurrence of hypervirulent lineages, as well as to determine the diversity of PorA VR types for the corresponding isolates and clinical specimens. Isolates and clinical specimens were characterized by MLST and PorA VR typing. This study demonstrated high prevalence of some hypervirulent lineages and emergence of new ones, including the emergence of lineages W135:P1.5,2:ST-11 complex, and C:P1.22,14-6:ST-103 complex. These lineages are probably responsible for the increasing incidence of serogroups C and W135, despite the overall decrease in serogroup B cases during the period. The most prevalent complex was serogroup B ST-32/ET-5 complex. The most prevalent PorA types found for serogroup B were P1.19,15, P1.7,16, and P1.18-1,3, representing a different distribution of PorA types compared to other states of Brazil. This study highlights the importance of monitoring each population, even within the same country. The different distribution of PorA VR types in RS has implications in vaccine design and efficacy. Detailed and accurate meningococcal characterization is an important element in studies of meningococcal epidemiology, population biology, and evolution and provides information for the design of control strategies.

  14. Immunogenicity and hereditary stability of Neisseria meningitidis serogroup W135/Y strains used in conjugate vaccine production%制备疫苗用W135/Y群脑膜炎球菌菌种的免疫原性及遗传稳定性观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘钰; 李冶珊; 焦梦; 刘梅影; 王义萍; 陈敬; 张燕斌; 王平; 王雪薇; 林海涛; 焦小玲

    2010-01-01

    目的 为保证生产四价流脑(A、C、W135、Y群)结合疫苗质量一致性和可控性,对分离自国内的W135、Y群脑膜炎球菌CMCC(B)29037株和CMCC(B)29028株进行免疫原性及遗传稳定性观察.方法 将W135/Y群脑膜炎球菌工作种子批菌种分别连续传代至30代,并收获3、5、10、15、20、25及30代次菌液,对各代次菌进行免疫原性、抗原性、生化反应、毒性、毒力测定,并将30代次菌发酵培养后提取荚膜多糖进行质量分析.结果 CMCC(B)29037株和CMCC(B)29028株工作种子批菌种诱导小鼠产生总IgG抗体分别为1∶1114和1∶2229,杀菌抗体水平与IgG抗体间差异无统计学意义;试管凝集效价均达到1∶320,生化检定两菌株均发酵葡萄糖、麦芽糖,不发酵果糖、蔗糖、甘露醇和乳糖;两菌株的LD50均>109,30代次内各代次菌的免疫原性、抗原性、生化反应和毒性均无差异.30代次菌液脑腔毒性测定显示均无病理改变,用第30代次菌生产的W135/Y群脑膜炎球菌荚膜多糖各项检定指标均合格.结论 分离自国内的CMCC(B)29037株和CMCC(B)29028株为脑膜炎球菌W135/Y群菌株,免疫原性、抗原性好,生化反应合格、安全性良好,连续传至30代次仍保持较好的安全性和免疫原性,30代次菌纯化的W135/Y群脑膜炎球菌荚膜多糖质量符合质控要求,可以用作四价流脑结合疫苗生产株.%Objective To evaluate the immunogenic stability and hereditary stability of Neisseria meningitides serogroup W135/Y[CMCC(B)29037/CMCC(B)29028]within all the passages,which isolated from china.Methods The toxicity of the 3rd,5th,10th,15th,20th,25th and 30th passage of the Neisseria meningitidis was assayed in mice.Serological detection and biochemical detection were measured,and immunized mice subcutaneously.The antigeeicity of each passage of Neisseria meningitides serogroup W135/Y were measured by serum bactericidal test and the indirect ELISA.With the 30 passage of

  15. Establishment of a method for determination of polysaccharide contents in groups A, C, Y, W135 meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine%A、C、Y、W135群脑膜炎球菌多糖疫苗多糖含量测定方法的建立

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖詹蓉; 潘殊男; 李世慧; 栗妍; 张萍

    2011-01-01

    目的 建立测定A、C、Y、W135群脑膜炎球菌(meningococcus,Men)多糖疫苗(groups A,C,Y,W135 menignococcal polysaccharide vaccine,MPV4)多糖含量的火箭免疫电泳(rocket immunoelectro-phoresis,RIE)法.方法 分别用A、C、Y、W135群Men菌液,A、C、Y、W135群Men菌液加弗氏佐剂,A、C、Y、W135群Men多糖-牛白蛋白结合物免疫家兔,制备特异性抗血清.将制备的抗血清以一定的比例加入琼脂糖凝胶制成平板,并将纯化的多糖作为定量参考品加入抗原孔进行RIE.以多糖含量和对应的RIE峰高作标准曲线并建立直线回归方程.采用优化的RIE法测定MPV4多糖含量和分子大小.结果 菌液加佐剂制备的抗血清效价较理想.在确定的电泳条件下,建立的RIE法制备的标准曲线呈现良好的线性关系,相关系数值均>0.98.该法特异性较好,未检出各多糖间的交叉反应.采用该法测定的3批MPV4的多糖含量、分子大小及回收率均与先前的检定结果相符,均符合质控标准.结论 建立的RIE法可作为MPV4多糖抗原含量的测定方法.%Objective To establish a rocket immunoelectrophoresis (ME) method for determination of polysaccharide contents in groups A,C,Y,W135 meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine (MPV4). Methods Rabbits were immunized with meningococcal groups A,C,Y,W135 suspensions, mixture of Freund adjuvant with meningococcal suspension and meningococcal polysaccharide-bovine albumin conjugate, respectively.Specific antisera were prepared. The specific antisera were added to agarose gel with a certain proportion to pave plate, and pure polysaccharides as quantitative references were added into gel holes to carry out RIE.Standard curves were made with polysaccharide concentrations and precipitation peaks formed by RIE, and linear regression equations were established. Polysaccharide contents and molecular sizes in MPV4 were determined by the established RIE methed. Results Optimal antiserum titers were obtained

  16. In-TOX-icating neurogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Karow, Marisa; Berninger, Benedikt

    2015-01-01

    Early development of the mammalian cerebral cortex proceeds via a sequence of proliferative and differentiative steps from neural stem cells toward neurons and glia. However, how these steps are molecularly orchestrated is still only partially understood. In this issue of The EMBO Journal, Artegiani and colleagues implicate Tox, a HMG-box transcription factor previously known only for its role in lymphocyte development, in early cortical development.

  17. Persistence of immune responses after a single dose of Novartis meningococcal serogroup A, C, W-135 and Y CRM-197 conjugate vaccine (Menveo®) or Menactra® among healthy adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Christopher J; Baxter, Roger; Anemona, Alessandra; Ciavarro, Giuseppe; Dull, Peter

    2010-11-01

    The persistence of human bactericidal activity (hSBA) responses in adolescents was assessed 22 months after vaccination with one dose of Menveo® (MenACWY-CRM; Novartis) or Menactra® (MCV4) (sanofi pasteur). The proportion of subjects with hSBA titers ≥8 was significantly higher among recipients of MenACWY-CRM than MCV4 for serogroups A, W-135 and Y.

  18. ToxChip and its applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@\tToxChip is the molecular biological technology which has been developed based on genome and DNA microarray technologies. It will be able to make the sci-entists evaluate the toxicity of extraneous toxicants at the molecular level. ToxChip was successfully developed by a group of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) researchers in the United States in 1999[1]. The technology bears revolutionary significance on the traditional toxicology. It foretells the epoch in which DNA effects of environmental dangers and toxi-cants can be made certain rapidly and efficiently to fall. ToxChip will pioneer novel approaches for medicine, environmental and ecological toxicologies.

  19. Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH): ToxFAQs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a state: This map displays locations where Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) is known to be present. On ... I get more information? ToxFAQs TM for Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) ( Hidrocarburos Totales de Petróleo (TPH) ) August ...

  20. Chemical Function Predictions for Tox21 Chemicals

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Random forest chemical function predictions for Tox21 chemicals in personal care products uses and "other" uses. This dataset is associated with the following...

  1. TOX3 mutations in breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Owain Jones

    Full Text Available TOX3 maps to 16q12, a region commonly lost in breast cancers and recently implicated in the risk of developing breast cancer. However, not much is known of the role of TOX3 itself in breast cancer biology. This is the first study to determine the importance of TOX3 mutations in breast cancers. We screened TOX3 for mutations in 133 breast tumours and identified four mutations (three missense, one in-frame deletion of 30 base pairs in six primary tumours, corresponding to an overall mutation frequency of 4.5%. One potentially deleterious missense mutation in exon 3 (Leu129Phe was identified in one tumour (genomic DNA and cDNA. Whilst copy number changes of 16q12 are common in breast cancer, our data show that mutations of TOX3 are present at low frequency in tumours. Our results support that TOX3 should be further investigated to elucidate its role in breast cancer biology.

  2. SDS-PAGE y análisis densitométrico para determinar la concentración de lipopolisacáridos de Neisseria meningitidis serogrupos A, W135 y X

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maribel Cuello

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Desde hace varios años el Instituto Finlay, en colaboración con el Instituto Noruego para la Salud Pública, trabajan en un proyecto para la obtención de candidatos vacunales a partir de vesículas de membrana externa (VME de Neisseria meningitidis serogrupos A, W135 y X. Por ello es necesario establecer las especificaciones de calidad para el lipopolisacárido (LPS, principal causante de la pirogenicidad de estas vacunas. El objetivo de este reporte fue establecer las condiciones del SDS-PAGE como método de control de la calidad de las VME como ingrediente farmacéutico activo (IFA, provenientes de N. meningitidis serogrupos A, W135 y X. Se determinaron los inmunotipos y las concentraciones de LPS contaminantes, para lo cual se utilizaron geles de SDS-PAGE al 15% y muestras de LPS de los diferentes serogrupos de N. meningitidis. Se realizó el revelado de los geles con tinción con plata específica para LPS y los resultados se analizaron en un densitómetro GS-800 (Bio-Rad , controlado por el programa "Quantity One". Se obtuvieron curvas patrones para cada LPS que determinaron la concentración de LPS en estas muestras y se comprobó la utilidad del método al cuantificar la concentración de LPS en muestras de IFAs de VME de los diferentes serogrupos de N. meningitidis. Así se estableció la metodología para determinar la concentración de LPS de N. meningitidis serogrupos A, X y W135 en muestras de IFA de VME con el SDS-PAGE y se confirmaron las especificaciones de calidad establecidas para este parámetro.

  3. Critical appraisal of a quadrivalent CRM(197) conjugate vaccine against meningococcal serogroups A, C W-135 and Y (Menveo) in the context of treatment and prevention of invasive disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bröker, Michael; Cooper, Brian; Detora, Lisa M; Stoddard, Jeffrey J

    2011-01-01

    Worldwide, invasive meningococcal disease affects about 500,000 people annually. Case fatality in developed countries averages 10%, and higher rates are reported in less prosperous regions. According to the World Health Organization, the most important pathogenic serogroups are A, B, C, W-135, X, and Y. Clinical features of invasive meningococcal disease make diagnosis and management difficult. Antibiotic measures are recommended for prophylaxis after exposure and for treatment of invasive meningococcal disease cases; however, resistant strains may be emerging. Vaccines are generally regarded as the best preventative measure for invasive meningococcal disease. Polysaccharide vaccines against serogroups A, C, W-135, and Y using protein conjugation technology have clear advantages over older plain polysaccharide formulations without a protein component. The first quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MenACWY-D) was licensed in the US in 2005. More recently, MenACWY-CRM (Menveo(®)) was licensed in Europe, the US, the Middle East, and Latin America. MenACWY-CRM uses cross-reactive material 197, a nontoxic mutant of diphtheria toxin, as the carrier protein. MenACWY-CRM offers robust immunogenicity in all age groups, with a tolerability profile similar to that of a plain polysaccharide vaccine. Given its potential for protecting persons from infancy to old age, MenACWY-CRM offers the opportunity to protect broad populations against invasive meningococcal disease. The most optimal strategy for use of the vaccine has to be assessed country by country on the basis of local epidemiology, individual health care systems, and need.

  4. Combined meningococcal serogroup A and W135 outer-membrane vesicles activate cell-mediated immunity and long-term memory responses against non-covalent capsular polysaccharide A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeu, Belkis; Lastre, Miriam; García, Luis; Cedré, Bárbara; Mandariote, Aleida; Fariñas, Mildrey; Oliva, Reynaldo; Rosenqvist, Einar; Pérez, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Outer-membrane vesicles (OMVs) have inherent adjuvant properties, and many vaccines use OMV as vaccine components. Utilizing the adjuvant properties of OMV could lead to the formulation of vaccines that are less expensive and potentially more immunogenic than covalently conjugated polysaccharide vaccines. We evaluated the adjuvant effect in Balb/c mice of combinations of OMV from Neisseria meningitidis serogroup A and W135 as compared to that of the non-covalently conjugated capsular polysaccharide A. Both antigens were adsorbed onto aluminum hydroxide. The mice were given a booster dose of plain polysaccharide A to stimulate an immunologic memory response. Subclasses determination and cytokine assays demonstrated the capacity of OMV to induce a IgG2a/IgG2b isotype profile and IFN-γ production, suggesting the induction of a Th1 pattern immune response. Lymphoproliferative responses to OMVs were high, with affinity maturation of antibodies observed. Bactericidal titers after the booster dose were also observed. Memory B cells and long-term memory T cells were also detected. The results of this study indicate that combined meningococcal serogroup A and W135 OMV can activate cell-mediated immunity and induce a long-term memory response.

  5. Retrospective_Mining_of_Tox_Data_Anemia_Case_Study_RegToxPharm Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Data from a study to critically examine some of the issues of using data from ToxRefDB, a database largely composed of guideline studies for pesticidal active...

  6. FutureTox III: Bridges for Translation

    Science.gov (United States)

    The present document describes key discussion points and outcomes of a Society of Toxicology (SOT) Contemporary Concepts in Toxicology (CCT) Workshop, entitled FutureTox III1,2 that was held in Crystal City, Virginia, November 19-20, 2015. The workshop built on the many lessons l...

  7. CompTox Chemistry Dashboard webinar

    Science.gov (United States)

    The CompTox Chemistry Dashboard is part of a suite of dashboards developed by EPA to help evaluate the safety of chemicals. The dashboard provides access to a variety of information on over 700,000 chemicals currently in use. Within the application, users

  8. Analysis of Chemical Bioactivity through In Vitro Profiling using ToxCast and Tox21 High-Throughput Screening (China tox. conf. TATT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safety assessment of drugs and environmental chemicals relies extensively on animal testing. However, the quantity of chemicals needing assessment and challenges of species extrapolation drive the development of alternative approaches. The EPA’s ToxCast and the multiagency Tox21 ...

  9. Analysis of Chemical Bioactivity through In Vitro Profiling using ToxCast and Tox21 High-Throughput Screening (China tox. conf. TATT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safety assessment of drugs and environmental chemicals relies extensively on animal testing. However, the quantity of chemicals needing assessment and challenges of species extrapolation drive the development of alternative approaches. The EPA’s ToxCast and the multiagency Tox21 ...

  10. ToxCast HTS Assay Development and Retrofitting: Strategies ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    A presentation to EC JRC partners on new ToxCast HTS assay methods and strategies to address current limitations to HTS methods Slide presentation to EC JRC partners on new ToxCast HTS assay methods and strategies to address current limitations to HTS methods.

  11. A knowledge-informed chemotype approach to mining the ToxCast/Tox21 chemical-data landscape (WC9)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ToxCast and Tox21 chemical libraries currently exceed 2000 and 8000 unique chemicals, respectively, and span a broad diversity of chemical use-types, functionality, and toxicity mechanism and endpoint space. These libraries function as mechanism probes across hundreds of high-th...

  12. The tetravalent meningococcal serogroups A, C, W-135, and Y tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine is immunogenic with a clinically acceptable safety profile in subjects previously vaccinated with a tetravalent polysaccharide vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dbaibo, Ghassan; Van der Wielen, Marie; Reda, Mariam; Medlej, Fouad; Tabet, Carelle; Boutriau, Dominique; Sumbul, Anne; Anis, Sameh; Miller, Jacqueline M

    2012-08-01

    The immunogenicity and safety of the tetravalent meningococcal serogroups A, C, W-135, and Y tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine (MenACWY-TT) were evaluated in subjects previously vaccinated with a tetravalent meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine and in subjects without previous meningococcal vaccination. In this phase II, open, controlled study (NCT00661557), healthy subjects aged 4.5-34 years received one dose of MenACWY-TT at month 0. Subjects in the MPS group (n=192) had received polysaccharide vaccine in a study conducted 30-42 months earlier; age-matched subjects in the noMPS control group (n=79) had received no meningococcal vaccination within the past 10 years. Serum bactericidal activity using rabbit complement (rSBA) was measured at month 0 and month 1. At month 1, ≥97.0% of subjects had rSBA titers ≥1:128. Post-vaccination rSBA geometric mean titers (GMTs) were ≥3.9-fold higher than pre-vaccination in both treatment groups. Exploratory analyses showed no statistically significant differences between groups in percentages of subjects with rSBA titers ≥1:8 and ≥1:128, but significantly lower rSBA GMTs and vaccine response rates for each serogroup in the MPS versus the noMPS group. MenACWY-TT had an acceptable safety profile in both groups. These results suggest that MenACWY-TT could be used in vaccination programs irrespective of the pre-vaccination status with polysaccharide vaccine. Copyright © 2012 International Society for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. ADME-Tox profiles of some food additives and pesticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craciun, Dana; Modra, Dorina; Isvoran, Adriana

    2015-12-01

    Within this study we compute the Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism, Excretion and Toxicity (ADME-Tox) profiles of several commonly used food additives and some pesticides. As expected, all the food additives considered in this study provided to be safe, their ADME-Tox profiles indicating that they have a good oral bioavailability and they do not produce phosphoslipidosis. The ADME-Tox profiles of the pesticides indicate that, with a few exceptions, they are highly toxic (some of them being not approved in the EU, but still used in other countries) and may cause many diseases. Our results are in good agreement with published data concerning the considered food additives and pesticides revealing that the ADME-Tox profiling method may be successfully used to test other chemicals than drug candidates.

  14. The light organ symbiont Vibrio fischeri possesses a homolog of the Vibrio cholerae transmembrane transcriptional activator ToxR.

    OpenAIRE

    Reich, K A; Schoolnik, G K

    1994-01-01

    A cross-hybridizing DNA fragment to Vibrio cholerae toxR was cloned from the nonpathogenic light organ symbiont Vibrio fischeri, and three proteins homologous to V. cholerae ToxR, ToxS, and HtpG were deduced from its DNA sequence. V. fischeri ToxR was found to activate a V. cholerae ToxR-regulated promoter, and an antiserum raised against the amino-terminal domain of V. cholerae ToxR cross-reacts V. fischeri ToxR.

  15. Differential epigenetic regulation of TOX subfamily high mobility group box genes in lung and breast cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathewos Tessema

    Full Text Available Aberrant cytosine methylation affects regulation of hundreds of genes during cancer development. In this study, a novel aberrantly hypermethylated CpG island in cancer was discovered within the TOX2 promoter. TOX2 was unmethylated in normal cells but 28% lung (n = 190 and 23% breast (n = 80 tumors were methylated. Expression of two novel TOX2 transcripts identified was significantly reduced in primary lung tumors than distant normal lung (p<0.05. These transcripts were silenced in methylated lung and breast cancer cells and 5-Aza-2-deoxycytidine treatment re-expressed both. Extension of these assays to TOX, TOX3, and TOX4 genes that share similar genomic structure and protein homology with TOX2 revealed distinct methylation profiles by smoking status, histology, and cancer type. TOX was almost exclusively methylated in breast (43% than lung (5% cancer, whereas TOX3 was frequently methylated in lung (58% than breast (30% tumors. TOX4 was unmethylated in all samples and showed the highest expression in normal lung. Compared to TOX4, expression of TOX, TOX2 and TOX3 in normal lung was 25, 44, and 88% lower, respectively, supporting the premise that reduced promoter activity confers increased susceptibility to methylation during lung carcinogenesis. Genome-wide assays revealed that siRNA-mediated TOX2 knockdown modulated multiple pathways while TOX3 inactivation targeted neuronal development and function. Although these knockdowns did not result in further phenotypic changes of lung cancer cells in vitro, the impact on tissue remodeling, inflammatory response, and cell differentiation pathways suggest a potential role for TOX2 in modulating tumor microenvironment.

  16. Immunogenicity and safety of a quadrivalent meningococcal serogroups A, C, W-135 and Y tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine (MenACWY-TT) administered to adults aged 56 Years and older: results of an open-label, randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dbaibo, Ghassan; El-Ayoubi, Nabil; Ghanem, Soha; Hajar, Farah; Bianco, Veronique; Miller, Jacqueline M; Mesaros, Narcisa

    2013-05-01

    The burden of invasive meningococcal disease is substantial in older adults in whom the case fatality rate is high. Travelers to regions with high rates of meningococcal disease, such as Hajj pilgrims, are at increased risk of meningococcal infection, and disease transmission from travelers to their close contacts has been documented. In younger individuals, meningococcal conjugate vaccines offer advantages over polysaccharide vaccines in terms of duration of protection and boostability, and induction of herd immune effects through reductions in nasopharyngeal carriage of meningococci. To date, few data are available evaluating meningococcal conjugate vaccine use in adults >55 years of age. To evaluate the immunogenicity and safety of quadrivalent meningococcal serogroups A, C, W-135 and Y vaccine with all serogroups conjugated to tetanus toxoid (MenACWY-TT, Nimenrix™, GlaxoSmithKline, Belgium) and a licensed quadrivalent polysaccharide vaccine (MenPS, Mencevax™ GlaxoSmithKline, Belgium) in adults >55 years of age. This was a phase IIIb, open-label, randomized (3:1), controlled study conducted at one study center in Lebanon. A total of 400 healthy adults between 56 and 103 years of age without previous MenPS or tetanus toxoid vaccination within the previous 5 years or meningococcal conjugate vaccination at any time previously were included. They received a single-dose vaccination with MenACWY-TT or MenPS with blood sampling before and 1 month after vaccination. The main outcome measures were serum bactericidal activity (rabbit complement source: rSBA) vaccine response (VR) rate [rSBA titer of ≥1:32 in initially seronegative subjects (rSBA titer <1:8); ≥4-fold increase in subjects with pre-vaccination rSBA titers between 1:8 and 1:128, and ≥2-fold increase in subjects with pre-vaccination rSBA titers ≥1:128]. The percentages of subjects with rSBA titers ≥1:8 and ≥1:128 and rSBA geometric mean titers (GMTs) were assessed. Solicited adverse events

  17. In silico ADME/Tox: the state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekins, Sean; Rose, John

    2002-01-01

    The field of computational (in silico) ADME/Tox (absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity) is receiving increased attention due a better appreciation that these molecular properties should be considered earlier in the drug discovery process. This report briefly reviews selected papers presented at the 220th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society, Washington, DC, 20-24 August, 2000, and describes the types of ADME/Tox computational models presented, the results obtained, and relevant recent publications that coincide with the work reported.

  18. TOX3 (TNRC9) Over Expression in Bladder Cancer Cells Decreases Cellular Proliferation and Triggers an Interferon-Like Response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkenkamp-Demtroder, Karin; Mansilla Castaño, Francisco; Dyrskjøt, Lars

    2013-01-01

    urothelium. Microarray expression profiling of human bladder cancer cells over expressing TOX3 followed by Pathway analysis showed that TOX3 Overexpression mainly affected the Interferon Signaling Pathway. TOX3 up regulation induced the expression of several genes with a gamma interferon activation site (GAS......), e.g. STAT1. In vitro functional studies showed that TOX3 was able to bind to the GAS-sequence located at the STAT1 promoter. siRNA mediated knockdown of TOX3 in RT4 bladder cancer cells decreased STAT1 expression suggesting a direct impact of TOX3 on STAT1. Immunoprecipitation of TOX3 over......Background: Human TOX3 (TOX high mobility group box family member 3) regulates Ca2+ dependent transcription in neurons and has been associated with breast cancer susceptibility. Aim of the study was to investigate the expression of TOX3 in bladder cancer tissue samples and to identify genes...

  19. TOX3 (TNRC9) overexpression in bladder cancer cells decreases cellular proliferation and triggers an interferon-like response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkenkamp-Demtröder, Karin; Mansilla, Francisco; Andersen, Lars Dyrskjøt

    2013-01-01

    urothelium. Microarray expression profiling of human bladder cancer cells overexpressing TOX3 followed by Pathway analysis showed that TOX3 overexpression mainly affected the Interferon Signaling Pathway. TOX3 upregulation induced the expression of several genes with a gamma interferon activation site (GAS......), e.g. STAT1. In vitro functional studies showed that TOX3 was able to bind to the GAS-sequence located at the STAT1 promoter. siRNA mediated knockdown of TOX3 in RT4 bladder cancer cells decreased STAT1 expression suggesting a direct impact of TOX3 on STAT1. Immunoprecipitation of TOX3 overexpressing......Background Human TOX3 (TOX high mobility group box family member 3) regulates Ca2+-dependent transcription in neurons and has been associated with breast cancer susceptibility. Aim of the study was to investigate the expression of TOX3 in bladder cancer tissue samples and to identify genes...

  20. TOX3 (TNRC9) overexpression in bladder cancer cells decreases cellular proliferation and triggers an interferon-like response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkenkamp-Demtröder, Karin; Mansilla, Francisco; Andersen, Lars Dyrskjøt

    2013-01-01

    urothelium. Microarray expression profiling of human bladder cancer cells overexpressing TOX3 followed by Pathway analysis showed that TOX3 overexpression mainly affected the Interferon Signaling Pathway. TOX3 upregulation induced the expression of several genes with a gamma interferon activation site (GAS......), e.g. STAT1. In vitro functional studies showed that TOX3 was able to bind to the GAS-sequence located at the STAT1 promoter. siRNA mediated knockdown of TOX3 in RT4 bladder cancer cells decreased STAT1 expression suggesting a direct impact of TOX3 on STAT1. Immunoprecipitation of TOX3 overexpressing......Background Human TOX3 (TOX high mobility group box family member 3) regulates Ca2+-dependent transcription in neurons and has been associated with breast cancer susceptibility. Aim of the study was to investigate the expression of TOX3 in bladder cancer tissue samples and to identify genes...

  1. A small unstructured region in Vibrio cholerae ToxT mediates the response to positive and negative effectors and ToxT proteolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Joshua J; Plecha, Sarah C; Withey, Jeffrey H

    2015-02-01

    Vibrio cholerae is the causative agent of the severe diarrheal disease cholera. The production of the virulence factors that are required for human disease is controlled by a complex network of transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulators. ToxT is the transcription regulator that directly controls the production of the two major virulence factors, toxin-coregulated pilus (TCP) and cholera toxin (CT). The solved crystal structure of ToxT revealed an unstructured region in the N-terminal domain between residues 100 and 110. This region and the surrounding amino acids have been previously implicated in ToxT proteolysis, resistance to inhibition by negative effectors, and ToxT dimerization. To better characterize this region, site-directed mutagenesis was performed to assess the effects on ToxT proteolysis and bile sensitivity. This analysis identified specific mutations within this unstructured region that prevent ToxT proteolysis and other mutations that reduce inhibition by bile and unsaturated fatty acids. In addition, we found that mutations that affect the sensitivity of ToxT to bile also affect the sensitivity of ToxT to its positive effector, bicarbonate. These results suggest that a small unstructured region in the ToxT N-terminal domain is involved in multiple aspects of virulence gene regulation and response to human host signals.

  2. Toxicogenomics Investigation Under the eTOX Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taboureau, Olivier; Hersey, Anne; Audouze, Karine Marie Laure

    2012-01-01

    paradigms within the industry. Microarray technologies have the ability to generate massive amounts of gene expression information as an initial step to decipher the molecular mechanisms of toxicologic changes, i.e. toxicogenomics. In the context of the eTOX consortium, one of public private partnership...

  3. ToxR Antagonizes H-NS Regulation of Horizontally Acquired Genes to Drive Host Colonization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misha I Kazi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The virulence regulator ToxR initiates and coordinates gene expression needed by Vibrio cholerae to colonize the small intestine and cause disease. Despite its prominence in V. cholerae virulence, our understanding of the direct ToxR regulon is limited to four genes: toxT, ompT, ompU and ctxA. Here, we determine ToxR's genome-wide DNA-binding profile and demonstrate that ToxR is a global regulator of both progenitor genome-encoded genes and horizontally acquired islands that encode V. cholerae's major virulence factors and define pandemic lineages. We show that ToxR shares more than a third of its regulon with the histone-like nucleoid structuring protein H-NS, and antagonizes H-NS binding at shared binding locations. Importantly, we demonstrate that this regulatory interaction is the critical function of ToxR in V. cholerae colonization and biofilm formation. In the absence of H-NS, ToxR is no longer required for V. cholerae to colonize the infant mouse intestine or for robust biofilm formation. We further illustrate a dramatic difference in regulatory scope between ToxR and other prominent virulence regulators, despite similar predicted requirements for DNA binding. Our results suggest that factors in addition to primary DNA structure influence the ability of ToxR to recognize its target promoters.

  4. Bicarbonate increases binding affinity of Vibrio cholerae ToxT to virulence gene promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Joshua J; Withey, Jeffrey H

    2014-11-01

    The major Vibrio cholerae virulence gene transcription activator, ToxT, is responsible for the production of the diarrhea-inducing cholera toxin (CT) and the major colonization factor, toxin coregulated pilus (TCP). In addition to the two primary virulence factors mentioned, ToxT is responsible for the activation of accessory virulence genes, such as aldA, tagA, acfA, acfD, tcpI, and tarAB. ToxT activity is negatively modulated by bile and unsaturated fatty acids found in the upper small intestine. Conversely, previous work identified another intestinal signal, bicarbonate, which enhances the ability of ToxT to activate production of CT and TCP. The work presented here further elucidates the mechanism for the enhancement of ToxT activity by bicarbonate. Bicarbonate was found to increase the activation of ToxT-dependent accessory virulence promoters in addition to those that produce CT and TCP. Bicarbonate is taken up into the V. cholerae cell, where it positively affects ToxT activity by increasing DNA binding affinity for the virulence gene promoters that ToxT activates regardless of toxbox configuration. The increase in ToxT binding affinity in the presence of bicarbonate explains the elevated level of virulence gene transcription.

  5. PanDaTox: A tool for accelerated metabolic engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amitai, Gil; Sorek, Rotem

    2012-07-18

    Metabolic engineering is often facilitated by cloning of genes encoding enzymes from various heterologous organisms into E. coli. Such engineering efforts are frequently hampered by foreign genes that are toxic to the E. coli host. We have developed PanDaTox (www.weizmann.ac.il/pandatox), a web-based resource that provides experimental toxicity information for more than 1.5 million genes from hundreds of different microbial genomes. The toxicity predictions, which were extensively experimentally verified, are based on serial cloning of genes into E. coli as part of the Sanger whole genome shotgun sequencing process. PanDaTox can accelerate metabolic engineering projects by allowing researchers to exclude toxic genes from the engineering plan and verify the clonability of selected genes before the actual metabolic engineering experiments are conducted.

  6. The EPA CompTox Chemistry Dashboard - an online resource ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Computational Toxicology Program integrates advances in biology, chemistry, and computer science to help prioritize chemicals for further research based on potential human health risks. This work involves computational and data driven approaches that integrate chemistry, exposure and biological data. As an outcome of these efforts the National Center for Computational Toxicology (NCCT) has measured, assembled and delivered an enormous quantity and diversity of data for the environmental sciences including high-throughput in vitro screening data, in vivo and functional use data, exposure models and chemical databases with associated properties. A series of software applications and databases have been produced over the past decade to deliver these data. Recent work has focused on the development of a new architecture that assembles the resources into a single platform. With a focus on delivering access to Open Data streams, web service integration accessibility and a user-friendly web application the CompTox Dashboard provides access to data associated with ~720,000 chemical substances. These data include research data in the form of bioassay screening data associated with the ToxCast program, experimental and predicted physicochemical properties, product and functional use information and related data of value to environmental scientists. This presentation will provide an overview of the CompTox Dashboard and its va

  7. In Vitro Bioactivity in ToxCast Assays for Fruit and Vegetable Juices (TDS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ToxCast and Tox21 programs have generated in vitro screening data for over 1000 chemicals to aid in hazard identification and setting chemical testing priorities. These data, together with in vitro pharmacokinetic data, are used to infer possible toxic responses and external ...

  8. Predictive models of prenatal developmental toxicity from ToxCast high-throughput screening data

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA's ToxCast™ project is profiling the in vitro bioactivity of chemicals to assess pathway-level and cell-based signatures that correlate with observed in vivo toxicity. We hypothesized that developmental toxicity in guideline animal studies captured in the ToxRefDB database wou...

  9. The Tox21 robotic platform for the assessment of environmental chemicals--from vision to reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attene-Ramos, Matias S; Miller, Nicole; Huang, Ruili; Michael, Sam; Itkin, Misha; Kavlock, Robert J; Austin, Christopher P; Shinn, Paul; Simeonov, Anton; Tice, Raymond R; Xia, Menghang

    2013-08-01

    Since its establishment in 2008, the US Tox21 inter-agency collaboration has made great progress in developing and evaluating cellular models for the evaluation of environmental chemicals as a proof of principle. Currently, the program has entered its production phase (Tox21 Phase II) focusing initially on the areas of modulation of nuclear receptors and stress response pathways. During Tox21 Phase II, the set of chemicals to be tested has been expanded to nearly 10,000 (10K) compounds and a fully automated screening platform has been implemented. The Tox21 robotic system combined with informatics efforts is capable of screening and profiling the collection of 10K environmental chemicals in triplicate in a week. In this article, we describe the Tox21 screening process, compound library preparation, data processing, and robotic system validation.

  10. An analysis of the Gene-Tox Carcinogen Data Base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesnow, S; Bergman, H

    1988-01-01

    The Gene-Tox Carcinogen Data Base is an evaluated source of cancer data on 506 chemicals selected in part for their previous assessment in genetic toxicology bioassays. This data base has been analyzed for the distribution of these chemicals into chemical classes. The major chemical classes (6% or greater of the total data base) are: acyl-, alkyl-, and aryl-halides; alcohols and phenols; aliphatic and aromatic amines, amides, and sulfonamides; benzene-ring-containing chemicals; organo-lead, -mercury, -phosphorous compounds, metals and derivatives, phosphoric acid esters, and phosphoramides; and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Cancer studies representing a subset of the Gene-Tox Carcinogen Data Base, 199 chemicals which were rated as Sufficient Positive/Negative or Limited Positive/Negative, were examined for distribution of those studies by animal species, gender, route of chemical administration, duration of study, major tumor sites, and major tumor types. These analyses revealed that the Gene-Tox Carcinogen Data Base contains a large number of lifetime studies involving the rat and mouse treated by oral routes of administration. The major organs that were targets were: liver, lung, skin, forestomach, bladder, and mammary gland, while the major tumor types were: carcinoma, sarcoma, papilloma, and adenoma. Chemicals in the data base have been assessed for species-specific carcinogenic effects, and these results indicate that for mice and rats there is a high correspondence (85%). This number is higher than that (71%) reported by Tennant et al. (1986) based on the recent results of 72 chronic cancer bioassays performed by the National Toxicology Program. This difference is probably based on the nature of the chemicals selected for inclusion in both data bases. Although the absolute value of this correspondence is unknown, it would seem to be within this range. When chemicals in the Gene-Tox Carcinogen Data Base were examined for their previous evaluation in 73

  11. SnTox3 acts in effector triggered susceptibility to induce disease on wheat carrying the Snn3 gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaohui Liu

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The necrotrophic fungus Stagonospora nodorum produces multiple proteinaceous host-selective toxins (HSTs which act in effector triggered susceptibility. Here, we report the molecular cloning and functional characterization of the SnTox3-encoding gene, designated SnTox3, as well as the initial characterization of the SnTox3 protein. SnTox3 is a 693 bp intron-free gene with little obvious homology to other known genes. The predicted immature SnTox3 protein is 25.8 kDa in size. A 20 amino acid signal sequence as well as a possible pro sequence are predicted. Six cysteine residues are predicted to form disulfide bonds and are shown to be important for SnTox3 activity. Using heterologous expression in Pichia pastoris and transformation into an avirulent S. nodorum isolate, we show that SnTox3 encodes the SnTox3 protein and that SnTox3 interacts with the wheat susceptibility gene Snn3. In addition, the avirulent S. nodorum isolate transformed with SnTox3 was virulent on host lines expressing the Snn3 gene. SnTox3-disrupted mutants were deficient in the production of SnTox3 and avirulent on the Snn3 differential wheat line BG220. An analysis of genetic diversity revealed that SnTox3 is present in 60.1% of a worldwide collection of 923 isolates and occurs as eleven nucleotide haplotypes resulting in four amino acid haplotypes. The cloning of SnTox3 provides a fundamental tool for the investigation of the S. nodorum-wheat interaction, as well as vital information for the general characterization of necrotroph-plant interactions.

  12. Profiling of the Tox21 Chemical Collection for Mitochondrial ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a variety of disorders including cancer, diabetes, and neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases. Understanding how different environmental chemicals and drug-like molecules impact mitochondrial function represents an initial step in predicting exposure-related toxic effects and defining a possible role for such compounds in the onset of various diseases. OBJECTIVES: To identify individual chemicals and general structural features associated with the disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). METHODS: We used a multiplexed quantitative high throughput screening (qHTS) approach combined with informatics tools to screen the Tox21 10,000 compound library (~8300 unique chemicals) at 15 concentrations in triplicate to identify chemicals and structural features that are associated with changes in MMP in HepG2 cells. RESULTS: In the primary screening, approximately 11% of the compounds (913 unique compounds) decreased the MMP after 1 h of treatment without affecting cell viability. Additionally, 309 compounds decreased MMP over a concentration range that also produced measurable cytotoxicity [half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) in MMP assay/IC50 in viability assay) ≤ 3, pclusters that constitute the Tox21 library (76 of 651 clusters) were significantly enriched for compounds that decreased the MMP. CONCLUSIONS: Our multiplexed qHTS approach

  13. Outbreak of serotype W135 Neisseria meningitidis in central river ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-06-21

    Jun 21, 2012 ... Contact history with relatives, who had fever in previous 2 weeks prior to illness was ... Periodic infections occur in seasonal and annual cycles, .... under 5 years of age [Table 1] with the highest attack rate in early school aged ...

  14. Estandarización de ensayos inmunoenzimáticos (ELISA para la cuantificación de anticuerpos IgG inducidos por una vacuna de vesículas de membrana externa de los serogrupos A y W135 de Neisseria meningitidis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleida Mandiarote

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available La enfermedad meningocócica es una afección invasiva, de amplia incidencia mundial, cuyo agente causal es la bacteria gramnegativa Neisseria meningitidis . Existen vacunas polisacarídicas sin conjugar o conjugadas, contra cuatro de los cinco serogrupos responsables del 95% de los casos en el mundo. Para el serogrupo B, cuyo polisacárido es pobremente inmunogénico, se han evaluado varios candidatos vacunales producidos a base de vesículas de membrana externa. La determinación de la actividad bactericida y la cuantificación de IgG por ELISA han sido los métodos más utilizados en la medición de la respuesta inmune generada por vacunas contra la meningitis meningocócica. El segundo de estos métodos es utilizado en el Instituto Finlay como ensayo de inmunogenicidad para la liberación de lotes de VA-MENGOC-BC®. Como parte de una colaboración con investigadores noruegos, se trabaja en la obtención de un candidato vacunal contra los serogrupos A y W135 , basado en vesículas de membrana externa. En el presente trabajo se describe la estandarización de un ELISA para ser utilizado en la evaluación de la respuesta inmune del candidato vacunal bivalente.

  15. Methodological validation of rocket immunoelectrophoresis(RIE)for determination of serogroup C meningococcal polysaccharide content in the tetravalent serogroup A/C/W135/Y meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine%火箭免疫电泳法定量检测4价脑膜炎球菌多糖疫苗中C群脑膜炎球菌多糖含量的方法学验证

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林云; 李冶珊; 高华; 王平; 王建华; 刘梅影; 郭京蓉; 王雪薇

    2008-01-01

    目的 验证用火箭免疫电泳法(rocket immunoelectrophoresis,RIE)检测4价脑膜炎球菌多糖疫苗(tetravalent serogroup A/C/W135/Y meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine,MPV4)中C群多糖含量的可靠性.方法以系列浓度的C群多糖溶液为标准,采用RIE对MPV4中C群多糖含量进行重复测定.结果最佳线性范围为30~86 mg/L,相关系数(r)均大于0.985;MPV4与C群多糖参比品的剂量反应曲线之间具有良好的平行性;在精密度试验中,试验内CV为6.08%~8.07%,试验间CV为7.24%~9.19%;A、W135和Y群多糖及乳糖不引起非特异性免疫反应.结论本法的线性、精密度和专属性均符合验证要求,可作为定量检测MPV4中C群多糖含量的方法.%Objective To validate the reliability of RIE for determination of serogroup C meningo-coccal polysaccharide(MenC PS)content in the tetravalent serogroup A/C/W135/Y meningococcal poly-saccharide vaccine(MPV4). Methods A series of concentrations of MenC PS as standards, MenC PS content in MPV4 was determined by RIE repeatly to validate linearity, precision and specificity. Results The optimal linear range was 30-86 mg/L and the coefficients of correlation(r)were>0.985. There was parallelism between the dose response curve of MenC PS and MPV4. The coefficients of variation for in-tra-assay and inter-assay precision were 6.08 %-8.07% and 7.24%-9.19%, respectively. No cross reac-tions were observed with serogroup A, W135 and Y meningococcal polysaccharide, as well as lactose. Conclusions The linearity, precision and specificity of this method are good. It is suitable for quantitative determination of MenC PS content in MPV4.

  16. Intersection of toxicogenomics and high throughput screening in the Tox21 program: an NIEHS perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrick, B Alex; Paules, Richard S; Tice, Raymond R

    Humans are exposed to thousands of chemicals with inadequate toxicological data. Advances in computational toxicology, robotic high throughput screening (HTS), and genome-wide expression have been integrated into the Tox21 program to better predict the toxicological effects of chemicals. Tox21 is a collaboration among US government agencies initiated in 2008 that aims to shift chemical hazard assessment from traditional animal toxicology to target-specific, mechanism-based, biological observations using in vitro assays and lower organism models. HTS uses biocomputational methods for probing thousands of chemicals in in vitro assays for gene-pathway response patterns predictive of adverse human health outcomes. In 1999, NIEHS began exploring the application of toxicogenomics to toxicology and recent advances in NextGen sequencing should greatly enhance the biological content obtained from HTS platforms. We foresee an intersection of new technologies in toxicogenomics and HTS as an innovative development in Tox21. Tox21 goals, priorities, progress, and challenges will be reviewed.

  17. Generation of a ToxA knockout strain of the wheat tan spot pathogen Pyrenophora tritici-repentis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffat, Caroline S; See, Pao Theen; Oliver, Richard P

    2014-12-01

    The necrotrophic fungal pathogen Pyrenophora tritici-repentis causes tan spot, a major disease of wheat, throughout the world. The proteinaceous effector ToxA is responsible for foliar necrosis on ToxA-sensitive wheat genotypes. The single copy ToxA gene was deleted from a wild-type race 1 P. tritici-repentis isolate via homologous recombination of a knockout construct. Expression of the ToxA transcript was found to be absent in transformants (toxa), as was ToxA protein production in fungal culture filtrates. Plant bioassays were conducted to test transformant pathogenicity. The toxa strains were unable to induce necrosis on ToxA-sensitive wheat genotypes. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of a targeted gene knockout in P. tritici-repentis. The ability to undertake gene deletions will facilitate the characterization of other pathogenicity effectors of this economically significant necrotroph.

  18. Comparison of diverse nanomaterial bioactivity profiles based on high-throughput screening (HTS) in ToxCast™ (FutureToxII)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most nanomaterials (NMs) in commerce lack hazard data. Efficient NM testing requires suitable toxicity tests for prioritization of NMs to be tested. The EPA’s ToxCast program is screening NM bioactivities and ranking NMs by their bioactivities to inform targeted testing planning....

  19. Comparison of diverse nanomaterial bioactivity profiles based on high-throughput screening (HTS) in ToxCast™ (FutureToxII)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most nanomaterials (NMs) in commerce lack hazard data. Efficient NM testing requires suitable toxicity tests for prioritization of NMs to be tested. The EPA’s ToxCast program is screening NM bioactivities and ranking NMs by their bioactivities to inform targeted testing planning....

  20. 20150323 - The U.S. EPA ToxCast Program: Moving from Data Generation to Application (SOT Tox21 update symposium presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. EPA ToxCast program is entering its tenth year. Significant learning and progress have occurred towards collection, analysis, and interpretation of the data. The library of ~1,800 chemicals has been subject to ongoing characterization (e.g., identity, purity, stability...

  1. Chemical landscape analysis with the OpenTox framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeliazkova, Nina; Jeliazkov, Vedrin

    2012-01-01

    , the method is implemented as part of an existing open source Ambit package and could be accessed via an OpenTox API compliant web service and via an interactive application, running within a modern, JavaScript enabled web browser. Combined with the functionalities already offered by the OpenTox framework, like data sharing and remote calculations, it could be a useful tool for exploring chemical landscapes online.

  2. ToxDBScan: Large-Scale Similarity Screening of Toxicological Databases for Drug Candidates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Römer

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We present a new tool for hepatocarcinogenicity evaluation of drug candidates in rodents. ToxDBScan is a web tool offering quick and easy similarity screening of new drug candidates against two large-scale public databases, which contain expression profiles for substances with known carcinogenic profiles: TG-GATEs and DrugMatrix. ToxDBScan uses a set similarity score that computes the putative similarity based on similar expression of genes to identify chemicals with similar genotoxic and hepatocarcinogenic potential. We propose using a discretized representation of expression profiles, which use only information on up- or down-regulation of genes as relevant features. Therefore, only the deregulated genes are required as input. ToxDBScan provides an extensive report on similar compounds, which includes additional information on compounds, differential genes and pathway enrichments. We evaluated ToxDBScan with expression data from 15 chemicals with known hepatocarcinogenic potential and observed a sensitivity of 88 Based on the identified chemicals, we achieved perfect classification of the independent test set. ToxDBScan is publicly available from the ZBIT Bioinformatics Toolbox.

  3. The Role of TOX in the Development of Innate Lymphoid Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corey R. Seehus

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available TOX, an evolutionarily conserved member of the HMG-box family of proteins, is essential for the development of various cells of both the innate and adaptive immune system. TOX is required for the development of CD4+ T lineage cells in the thymus, including natural killer T and T regulatory cells, as well as development of natural killer cells and fetal lymphoid tissue inducer cells, the latter required for lymph node organogenesis. Recently, we have identified a broader role for TOX in the innate immune system, demonstrating that this nuclear protein is required for generation of bone marrow progenitors that have potential to give rise to all innate lymphoid cells. Innate lymphoid cells, classified according to transcription factor expression and cytokine secretion profiles, derive from common lymphoid progenitors in the bone marrow and require Notch signals for their development. We discuss here the role of TOX in specifying CLP toward an innate lymphoid cell fate and hypothesize a possible role for TOX in regulating Notch gene targets during innate lymphoid cell development.

  4. The Role of TOX in the Development of Innate Lymphoid Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seehus, Corey R; Kaye, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    TOX, an evolutionarily conserved member of the HMG-box family of proteins, is essential for the development of various cells of both the innate and adaptive immune system. TOX is required for the development of CD4(+) T lineage cells in the thymus, including natural killer T and T regulatory cells, as well as development of natural killer cells and fetal lymphoid tissue inducer cells, the latter required for lymph node organogenesis. Recently, we have identified a broader role for TOX in the innate immune system, demonstrating that this nuclear protein is required for generation of bone marrow progenitors that have potential to give rise to all innate lymphoid cells. Innate lymphoid cells, classified according to transcription factor expression and cytokine secretion profiles, derive from common lymphoid progenitors in the bone marrow and require Notch signals for their development. We discuss here the role of TOX in specifying CLP toward an innate lymphoid cell fate and hypothesize a possible role for TOX in regulating Notch gene targets during innate lymphoid cell development.

  5. EPA Project Updates: DSSTox and ToxCast Generating New ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPAs National Center for Computational Toxicology is building capabilities to support a new paradigm for toxicity screening and prediction. The DSSTox project is improving public access to quality structure-annotated chemical toxicity information in less summarized forms than traditionally employed in SAR modeling, and in ways that facilitate data-mining, and data read-across. The DSSTox Structure-Browser, launched in September 2007, provides structure searchability across all published DSSTox toxicity-related inventory, and is enabling linkages between previously isolated toxicity data resources. As of early March 2008, the public DSSTox inventory as been integrated into PubChem, allowing a user to take full advantage of PubChem structure-activity and bioassay clustering features. The most recent DSSTox version of Carcinogenic Potency Database file (CPDBAS) illustrates ways in which various summary definitions of carcinogenic activity can be employed in modeling and data mining. Phase I of the ToxCast project is generating high-throughput screening data from several hundred biochemical and cell-based assays for a set of 320 chemicals, mostly pesticide actives, with rich toxicology profiles. Incorporating and expanding traditional SAR Concepts into this new high-throughput and data-rich would pose conceptual and practical challenges, but also holds great promise for improving predictive capabilities. EPA's National Center for Computational Toxicology is bu

  6. Characterization of ToxCast Phase II compounds disruption of ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The development of multi-well microelectrode array (mwMEA) systems has increased in vitro screening throughput making them an effective method to screen and prioritize large sets of compounds for potential neurotoxicity. In the present experiments, a multiplexed approach was used to determine compound effects on both neural function and cell health in primary cortical networks grown on mwMEA plates following exposure to ~1100 compounds from EPA’s Phase II ToxCast libraries. On DIV 13, baseline activity (40 min) was recorded prior to exposure to each compound at 40 µM. DMSO and the GABAA antagonist bicuculline (BIC) were included as controls on each mwMEA plate. Changes in spontaneous network activity (mean firing rate; MFR) and cell viability (lactate dehydrogenase; LDH and CellTiter Blue; CTB) were assessed within the same well following compound exposure. Activity calls (“hits”) were established using the 90th and 20th percentiles of the compound-induced change in MFR (medians of triplicates) across all tested compounds; compounds above (top 10% of compounds increasing MFR), and below (bottom 20% of compounds decreasing MFR) these thresholds, respectively were considered hits. MFR was altered beyond one of these thresholds by 322 compounds. Four compound categories accounted for 66% of the hits, including: insecticides (e.g. abamectin, lindane, prallethrin), pharmaceuticals (e.g. haloperidol, reserpine), fungicides (e.g. hexaconazole, fenamidone), and h

  7. 20150503 - Tutorial Video Series: Using Stakeholder Outreach to Increase Usage of ToxCast Data (SETAC EU)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The limited amount of toxicity data on thousands of chemicals found in consumer products has led to the development of research endeavors such as the U.S. EPA’s Toxicity Forecaster (ToxCast). ToxCast uses high-throughput screening technology to evaluate thousands of chemica...

  8. Structure Identification Using High Resolution Mass Spectrometry Data and the EPA’s CompTox Chemistry Dashboard (EAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The iCSS CompTox Dashboard is a publicly accessible dashboard provided by the National Center for Computation Toxicology at the US-EPA. It serves a number of purposes, including providing a chemistry database underpinning many of our public-facing projects (e.g. ToxCast and ExpoC...

  9. Predicting Developmental Toxicity of ToxCast Phase I Chemicals Using Human Embryonic Stem Cells and Metabolomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA’s ToxRefDB contains prenatal guideline study data from rats and rabbits for over 240 chemicals that overlap with the ToxCast in vitro high throughput screening project. A subset of these compounds were tested in Stemina Biomarker Discovery's developmental toxicity platform, a...

  10. Evaluation of 1066 ToxCast Chemicals in a human stem cell assay for developmental toxicity (SOT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    To increase the diversity of assays used to assess potential developmental toxicity, the ToxCast chemical library was screened in the Stemina devTOX quickPREDICT assay using human embryonic stem (hES) cells. A model for predicting teratogenicity was based on a training set of 23 ...

  11. Structure Identification Using High Resolution Mass Spectrometry Data and the EPA’s CompTox Chemistry Dashboard (EAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The iCSS CompTox Dashboard is a publicly accessible dashboard provided by the National Center for Computation Toxicology at the US-EPA. It serves a number of purposes, including providing a chemistry database underpinning many of our public-facing projects (e.g. ToxCast and ExpoC...

  12. Molecular cloning and characterization of a ToxA-like gene from the maize pathogen Cochliobolus heterostrophus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ToxA, the first discovered fungal proteinaceous host-selective toxin, was originally identified from the tan spot fungus Pyrenophora tritici-repentis (Ptr). Homologues of the PtrToxA gene have not been identified from any other ascomycetes except the leaf/glume blotch fungus Stagonospora nodorum, w...

  13. Regulation of virulence in Vibrio cholerae: the ToxR regulon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childers, Brandon M; Klose, Karl E

    2007-06-01

    Vibrio cholerae is a gram-negative bacterium that is the causative agent of cholera. This disease consists of enormous fluid loss through stools, which can be fatal. Cholera epidemics appear in explosive outbreaks that have occurred repeatedly throughout history. The virulence factors toxin coregulated pilus (TCP) and cholera toxin (CT) are essential for colonization of the host and enterotoxicity, respectively. These virulence factors are under the control of ToxT, an AraC/XylS family protein that activates transcription of the genes encoding TCP and CT. ToxT is under the control of a virulence regulatory cascade known as the ToxR regulon, which responds to environmental stimuli to ensure maximal virulence-factor induction within the human intestine. An understanding of this intricate signaling pathway is essential for the development of methods to treat and prevent this devastating disease.

  14. Effect of toxin-g from Tityus serrulatus scorpion venom on gastric emptying in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Bucaretchi

    1999-04-01

    Full Text Available The effect of toxin-g from Tityus serrulatus scorpion venom on the gastric emptying of liquids was studied in 176 young adult male Wistar rats (2-3 months of age divided into subgroups of 8 animals each. Toxin-g was injected iv at doses of 25, 37.5, 50 or 100 µg/kg and the effect on gastric emptying was assessed 30 min and 8 h later. A time-course study was also performed by injecting 50 µg of toxin-g /kg and measuring the effect on gastric emptying at times 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8, 24 and 48 h post-venom. Each envenomed animal was paired with its saline control and all received a saline test meal solution containing phenol red (60 µg/ml as a marker. Ten minutes after administering the test meal by gavage the animals were sacrificed and gastric retention was determined by measuring the residual marker concentration of the test meal. A significant delay in gastric emptying, at 30 min and 8 h post-venom, was observed only after 50 and 100 µg of toxin-g /kg compared to control values. The responses to these two doses were significantly different after 8 h post-venom. Toxin-g (50 µg/kg significantly delayed the gastric emptying of liquids at all times studied, with a peak response at 4 h after toxin administration compared to control values. These results indicate that the iv injection of toxin-g may induce a rapid, intense and sustained inhibition of gastric emptying 0.25 to 48 h after envenomation.

  15. ToxR of Vibrio cholerae affects biofilm, rugosity and survival with Acanthamoeba castellanii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeru Soni P

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vibrio cholerae causes the diarrheal disease cholera and utilizes different survival strategies in aquatic environments. V. cholerae can survive as free-living or in association with zooplankton and can build biofilm and rugose colonies. The bacterium expresses cholera toxin (CT and toxin-coregulated pilus (TCP as the main virulence factors. These factors are co-regulated by a transcriptional regulator ToxR, which modulates expression of outer membrane proteins (OmpU and (OmpT. The aims of this study were to disclose the role of ToxR in expression of OmpU and OmpT, biofilm and rugose colony formation as well as in association with the free-living amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii at different temperatures. Results The toxR mutant V. cholerae produced OmpT, significant biofilm and rugose colonies compared to the wild type that produced OmpU, decreased biofilm and did not form rugoes colonies at 30°C. Interestingly, neither the wild type nor toxR mutant strain could form rugose colonies in association with the amoebae. However, during the association with the amoebae it was observed that A. castellanii enhanced survival of V. cholerae wild type compared to toxR mutant strain at 37°C. Conclusions ToxR does seem to play some regulatory role in the OmpT/OmpU expression shift, the changes in biofilm, rugosity and survival with A. castellanii, suggesting a new role for this regulatory protein in the environments.

  16. O período toxêmico da esquistossomose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Leocádio

    1969-06-01

    Full Text Available O A. apresenta seis casos de pacientes observados durante o período toxêmico da esquistosomose mansônica. Dêstes, um foi de mulher cuja sintomatologia datava de um ano. Concebeu e deu à luz durante a enfermidade. Apresentava sinais de fibrose hepática quando do primeiro exame, ainda na vigência de sintomas do período agudo da enfermidade. Todos êstes pacientes apresentavam febre, dores abdominais, hepatoesplenomegalia e outras manifestações que têm sido descritas neste período da parasitose. Como notas dominantes no hemograma, leucocitose com eosinofilia, como ocorre nas infecções por helmintos com ciclo textrino, e anemia. Esta, nem todos apresentavam. Além de alterações do equilíbrio proteico e de resultados da exploração funcional do fígado, o A. chamou a atenção para a hípoglicemia e hipocolesterolemia encontradas em alguns dos observados. Foi digno de registro, também, a positividade tardia da intradermorreação para diagnóstico da esquistosomose. Todos os pacientes foram submetidos a tratamento antimonial, com bom resultado. Como reação colateral devemos mencionar a exacerbação da febre forçando, por vêzes à interrupção do mesmo. O A. faz referências a outros recursos terapêuticos empregados no Oriente: o F30.066, um nitrofurano de uso oral, e as sementes de Cucurbita moshata. Sugere a investigação em animais e no homem com sementes de abóbora outrora empregadas como tenifugo

  17. Modeling Exposure in the Tox21 in Vitro Bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Fabian C; Henneberger, Luise; König, Maria; Bittermann, Kai; Linden, Lukas; Goss, Kai-Uwe; Escher, Beate I

    2017-05-15

    High-throughput in vitro bioassays are becoming increasingly important in the risk characterization of anthropogenic chemicals. Large databases gather nominal effect concentrations (Cnom) for diverse modes of action. However, the biologically effective concentration can substantially deviate due to differences in chemical partitioning. In this study, we modeled freely dissolved (Cfree), cellular (Ccell), and membrane concentrations (Cmem) in the Tox21 GeneBLAzer bioassays for a set of neutral and ionogenic organic chemicals covering a large physicochemical space. Cells and medium constituents were experimentally characterized for their lipid and protein content, and partition constants were either collected from the literature or predicted by mechanistic models. The chemicals exhibited multifaceted partitioning to proteins and lipids with distribution ratios spanning over 8 orders of magnitude. Modeled Cfree deviated over 5 orders of magnitude from Cnom and can be compared to in vivo effect data, environmental concentrations, and the unbound fraction in plasma, which is needed for the in vitro to in vivo extrapolation. Ccell was relatively constant for chemicals with membrane lipid-water distribution ratios of 1000 or higher and proportional to Cnom. Representing a sum parameter for exposure that integrates the entire dose from intracellular partitioning, Ccell is particularly suitable for the effect characterization of chemicals with multiple target sites and the calculation of their relative effect potencies. Effective membrane concentrations indicated that the specific effects of very hydrophobic chemicals in multiple bioassays are occurring at concentrations close to baseline toxicity. The equilibrium partitioning model including all relevant system parameters and a generic bioassay setup is attached as an excel workbook to this paper and can readily be applied to diverse in vitro bioassays.

  18. Single-molecule tracking in live Vibrio cholerae reveals that ToxR recruits the membrane-bound virulence regulator TcpP to the toxT promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Beth L; Matson, Jyl S; DiRita, Victor J; Biteen, Julie S

    2015-04-01

    Vibrio cholerae causes the human disease cholera by producing a potent toxin. The V. cholerae virulence pathway involves an unusual transcription step: the bitopic inner-membrane proteins TcpP and ToxR activate toxT transcription. As ToxT is the primary direct transcription activator in V. cholerae pathogenicity, its regulation by membrane-localized activators is key in the disease process. However, the molecular mechanisms by which membrane-localized activators engage the transcription process have yet to be uncovered in live cells. Here we report the use of super-resolution microscopy, single-molecule tracking, and gene knockouts to examine the dynamics of individual TcpP proteins in live V. cholerae cells with cholerae to that in mutant strains lacking either toxR or the toxT promoter, we determine that TcpP mobility is greater in the presence of its interaction partners than in their absence. Our findings support a mechanism in which ToxR recruits TcpP to the toxT promoter for transcription activation. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Analysis of Transcriptome Changes Induced by Ptr ToxA in Wheat Provides Insights into the Mechanisms of Plant Susceptibility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Iovanna Pandelova; Melania E Betts; Viola A. Manning; Larry J. Wilhelm; Todd C. Mockler; Lynda M. Ciuffetti

    2009-01-01

    To obtain greater insight into the molecular events underlying plant disease susceptibility, we studied tran-scriptome changes induced by a host-selective toxin of Pyrenophora tritici-repentis, Ptr ToxA (ToxA), on its host plant, wheat. Transcriptional profiling of ToxA-treated leaves of a ToxA-sensitive wheat cultivar was performed using the GeneChip~(R) Wheat Genome Array. An improved and up-to-date annotation of the wheat microarray was generated and a new tool for array data analysis (BRAT) was developed, and both are available for public use via a web-based in-terface. Our data indicate that massive transcriptional reprogramming occurs due to ToxA treatment, including cellular responses typically associated with defense. In addition, this study supports previous results indicating that ToxA-induced cell death is triggered by impairment of the photosynthetic machinery and accumulation of reactive oxygen species. Based on results of this study, we propose that ToxA acts as both an elicitor and a virulence factor.

  20. Comparison of multi-media transport and transformation models: Regional fugacity model vs. CalTOX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maddalena, R.L.; McKone, T.E.; Layton, D.W.; Hsieh, D.P.H. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Environmental Toxicology

    1994-12-31

    Two multimedia fugacity based environmental transport and transformation models are summarized and compared. The regional fugacity model published by Mackay and Paterson (1991), termed Fug3ONT, is a four compartment steady-state model designed to simulate the relative distribution of nonionic in a multimedia system. CalTOX is a seven compartment multimedia total exposure model for hazardous waste sites. Both models are based on the principles of fugacity. CalTOX, however, separates the soil into three layers and uses a new approach to estimate the diffusive mass transfer rate in soil. These differences result in lower estimates of the steady-state contaminant concentrations of six different chemicals in the root soil of CalTOX as compared to the bulk soil of Fug3ONT. The difference is greatest for compounds such as 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin and Benzo(a)pyrene where estimates from CalTOX and Fug3ONT differ by more than 3 orders of magnitude. The models provide similar estimates, however, for the distribution of six environmentally relevant chemicals among the air, water, sediment and surface soil.

  1. Comparison of multi-media transport and transformation models: regional fugacity model vs. CalTOX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddalena, R L; McKone, T E; Layton, D W; Hsieh, D P

    1995-03-01

    Two multimedia environmental transport and transformation computer models are summarized and compared. The regional fugacity model published by Mackay and Paterson (1991), termed Fug3ONT, is a four compartment steady-state model designed to simulate the relative distribution of nonionic organic chemicals in a multimedia system. CalTOX is a seven compartment multimedia total exposure model for hazardous waste sites. Both models are based on the principles of fugacity. CalTOX, however, separates the soil into three layers (surface, root, and vadose) and uses a different approach to estimate the diffusive mass transfer rate in soil. These differences result in lower estimates of the steady-state contaminant concentrations of six environmentally relevant chemicals in the root soil of CalTOX as compared to the bulk soil of Fug3ONT. The difference is greatest for compounds with low mobility in soil such as 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin and Benzo(a)pyrene where estimates from CalTOX and Fug3ONT differ by more than 3 orders of magnitude. Otherwise, the models provide similar estimates for the distribution of the six chemicals among the air, water, sediment and surface soil.

  2. Highlight report: Launch of a large integrated European in vitro toxicology project: EU-ToxRisk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshian, Mardas; Kamp, Hennicke; Hengstler, Jan; Leist, Marcel; van de Water, Bob

    2016-05-01

    The integrated European project, EU-ToxRisk, proudly sees itself as "flagship" exploring new alternative-to-animal approaches to chemical safety evaluation. It promotes mechanism-based toxicity testing and risk assessment according to the principles laid down for toxicology for the twenty-first century. The project was officially launched in January 2016 with a kickoff meeting in Egmond aan Zee, the Netherlands. Over 100 scientists representing academia and industry as well as regulatory authorities attended the inaugural meeting. The project will integrate advances in in vitro and in silico toxicology, read-across methods, and adverse outcome pathways. EU-ToxRisk will continue to make use of the case study strategy deployed in SEURAT-1, a FP7 initiative ended in December 2015. Even though the development of new non-animal methods is one target of EU-ToxRisk, the project puts special emphasis on their acceptance and implementation in regulatory contexts. This €30 million Horizon 2020 project involves 38 European partners and one from the USA. EU-ToxRisk aims at the "development of a new way of risk assessment."

  3. Multivariate analysis of toxicity experimental results of environmental endpoints. (FutureToxII)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The toxicity of hundreds of chemicals have been assessed in laboratory animal studies through EPA chemical regulation and toxicological research. Currently, over 5000 laboratory animal toxicity studies have been collected in the Toxicity Reference Database (ToxRefDB). In addition...

  4. ToxPlorerTM: A Comprehensive Knowledgebase of Toxicity Pathways Using Ontology-driven Information Extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Realizing the potential of pathway-based toxicity testing requires a fresh look at how we describe phenomena leading to adverse effects in vivo, how we assess them in vitro and how we extrapolate them in silico across chemicals, doses and species. We developed the ToxPlorer™ fram...

  5. 75 FR 43162 - Tetrahedron, Inc., with Subcontractors: Syracuse Research Corporation; Tox Path, Inc; and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-23

    ... AGENCY Tetrahedron, Inc., with Subcontractors: Syracuse Research Corporation; Tox Path, Inc; and... business information (CBI) by the submitter, will be transferred to Tetrahedron, Inc., and its... CFR 2.307(h)(3) and 2.308(i)(2). Tetrahedron, Inc., and its subcontractors: Syracuse...

  6. FORUM - FutureTox II: In vitro Data and In Silico Models for Predictive Toxicology

    Science.gov (United States)

    FutureTox II, a Society of Toxicology Contemporary Concepts in Toxicology workshop, was held in January, 2014. The meeting goals were to review and discuss the state of the science in toxicology in the context of implementing the NRC 21st century vision of predicting in vivo resp...

  7. ToxPi GUI: An interactive visualization tool for transparent integration of data from diverse sources of evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motivation: Scientists and regulators are often faced with complex decisions, where use of scarce resources must be prioritized using collections of diverse information. The Toxicological Prioritization Index (ToxPi™) was developed to enable integration of multiple sources of evi...

  8. The development of innate lymphoid cells requires TOX-dependent generation of a common innate lymphoid cell progenitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seehus, Corey R; Aliahmad, Parinaz; de la Torre, Brian; Iliev, Iliyan D; Spurka, Lindsay; Funari, Vincent A; Kaye, Jonathan

    2015-06-01

    Diverse innate lymphoid cell (ILC) subtypes have been defined on the basis of effector function and transcription factor expression. ILCs derive from common lymphoid progenitors, although the transcriptional pathways that lead to ILC-lineage specification remain poorly characterized. Here we found that the transcriptional regulator TOX was required for the in vivo differentiation of common lymphoid progenitors into ILC lineage-restricted cells. In vitro modeling demonstrated that TOX deficiency resulted in early defects in the survival or proliferation of progenitor cells, as well as ILC differentiation at a later stage. In addition, comparative transcriptome analysis of bone marrow progenitors revealed that TOX-deficient cells failed to upregulate many genes of the ILC program, including genes that are targets of Notch, which indicated that TOX is a key determinant of early specification to the ILC lineage.

  9. Quantitative Structure-Use Relationship Model Predictions to evaluate Tox21 Chemicals as Functional Substitutes and Candidate Alternatives

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset provides a prediction for all Tox21 chemicals with available QSUR descriptors across all 41 valid QSUR models developed with FUse. This dataset is...

  10. Identification of Fusarium virguliforme FvTox1-Interacting Synthetic Peptides for Enhancing Foliar Sudden Death Syndrome Resistance in Soybean.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Wang

    Full Text Available Soybean is one of the most important crops grown across the globe. In the United States, approximately 15% of the soybean yield is suppressed due to various pathogen and pests attack. Sudden death syndrome (SDS is an emerging fungal disease caused by Fusarium virguliforme. Although growing SDS resistant soybean cultivars has been the main method of controlling this disease, SDS resistance is partial and controlled by a large number of quantitative trait loci (QTL. A proteinacious toxin, FvTox1, produced by the pathogen, causes foliar SDS. Earlier, we demonstrated that expression of an anti-FvTox1 single chain variable fragment antibody resulted in reduced foliar SDS development in transgenic soybean plants. Here, we investigated if synthetic FvTox1-interacting peptides, displayed on M13 phage particles, can be identified for enhancing foliar SDS resistance in soybean. We screened three phage-display peptide libraries and discovered four classes of M13 phage clones displaying FvTox1-interacting peptides. In vitro pull-down assays and in vivo interaction assays in yeast were conducted to confirm the interaction of FvTox1 with these four synthetic peptides and their fusion-combinations. One of these peptides was able to partially neutralize the toxic effect of FvTox1 in vitro. Possible application of the synthetic peptides in engineering SDS resistance soybean cultivars is discussed.

  11. GlutenTox® Pro Test for the Detection of Gluten in Select Foods and Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Síglez, Miguel A; Nocea, Bárbara; del Mar Pérez, María; Ma García, Eva; León, Laura; Galera, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    The GlutenTox® Pro Test is an immunochromatographic test for the detection of gluten in foods and on surfaces with varying compositions and levels of processing, from raw foods/ingredients to final product testing. The Method Developer evaluation for the validation of the GlutenTox Pro Test Kit (Biomedal Diagnostics, Sevilla, Spain) for the detection of gluten in foods and on surfaces was conducted at Biomedal, S. L., Camas, Sevilla, Spain. The GlutenTox Pro test method was evaluated by testing the following: cross-reactivity, interference, specificity and sensitivity, robustness, stability, lot-to-lot variation, food matrix, and environmental surface. To evaluate the performance of the GlutenToxPro test for the detection of gluten, 10 matrixes were selected: rice flour, bread/biscuit, rolled oat, pâté, and yogurt (and a second bread matrix for incurred sampled testing) for the food matrix study and food-grade painted wood, plastic, rubber, sealed ceramic, and stainless steel for the environmental surface matrix study. For the food matrix study, 30 replicates were evaluated at six spiked levels of gluten (0, 3, 8, 15, 25, and 45 ppm) against four detection thresholds (5, 10, 20, and 40 ppm) for each food matrix. Additionally, 10 replicates were evaluated at a concentration of 10,000 ppm using all four detection thresholds only for rice flour matrix. Three replicates of each concentration level of gluten were analyzed using paired samples by the AOAC OMA 2012.01 reference method for each food matrix. For the environmental surface study, 30 replicates were evaluated at a low spike level of gluten (16 ng/16 cm2), five replicates at a high spike level of gluten (400 ng/16 cm2), and five replicates at an unspiked control level (0 ng/16 cm2) for each surface matrix. Upon completion of testing, the probability of detection values and confidence intervals were calculated and plotted versus the concentration level as determined by the reference method when applicable. An

  12. Mutagenesis and functional characterization of the RNA and protein components of the toxIN abortive infection and toxin-antitoxin locus of Erwinia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blower, T R; Fineran, P C; Johnson, M J; Toth, I K; Humphreys, D P; Salmond, G P C

    2009-10-01

    Bacteria are constantly challenged by bacteriophage (phage) infection and have developed multiple adaptive resistance mechanisms. These mechanisms include the abortive infection systems, which promote "altruistic suicide" of an infected cell, protecting the clonal population. A cryptic plasmid of Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica, pECA1039, has been shown to encode an abortive infection system. This highly effective system is active across multiple genera of gram-negative bacteria and against a spectrum of phages. Designated ToxIN, this two-component abortive infection system acts as a toxin-antitoxin module. ToxIN is the first member of a new type III class of protein-RNA toxin-antitoxin modules, of which there are multiple homologues cross-genera. We characterized in more detail the abortive infection phenotype of ToxIN using a suite of Erwinia phages and performed mutagenesis of the ToxI and ToxN components. We determined the minimal ToxI RNA sequence in the native operon that is both necessary and sufficient for abortive infection and to counteract the toxicity of ToxN. Furthermore, site-directed mutagenesis of ToxN revealed key conserved amino acids in this defining member of the new group of toxic proteins. The mechanism of phage activation of the ToxIN system was investigated and was shown to have no effect on the levels of the ToxN protein. Finally, evidence of negative autoregulation of the toxIN operon, a common feature of toxin-antitoxin systems, is presented. This work on the components of the ToxIN system suggests that there is very tight toxin regulation prior to suicide activation by incoming phage.

  13. Value of shared preclinical safety studies – The eTOX database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharine Briggs

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A first analysis of a database of shared preclinical safety data for 1214 small molecule drugs and drug candidates extracted from 3970 reports donated by thirteen pharmaceutical companies for the eTOX project (www.etoxproject.eu is presented. Species, duration of exposure and administration route data were analysed to assess if large enough subsets of homogenous data are available for building in silico predictive models. Prevalence of treatment related effects for the different types of findings recorded were analysed. The eTOX ontology was used to determine the most common treatment-related clinical chemistry and histopathology findings reported in the database. The data were then mined to evaluate sensitivity of established in vivo biomarkers for liver toxicity risk assessment. The value of the database to inform other drug development projects during early drug development is illustrated by a case study.

  14. Molecular similarity-based predictions of the Tox21 screening outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malgorzata Natalia Drwal

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available To assess the toxicity of new chemicals and drugs, regulatory agencies require in vivo testing for many toxic endpoints, resulting in millions of animal experiments conducted each year. However, following the Replace, Reduce, Refine (3R principle, the development and optimization of alternative methods, in particular in silico methods, has been put into focus in the recent years. It is generally acknowledged that the more complex a toxic endpoint, the more difficult it is to model. Therefore, computational toxicology is shifting from modelling general and complex endpoints to the investigation and modelling of pathways of toxicity and the underlying molecular effects.The U.S. Toxicology in the 21st Century (Tox21 initiative has screened a large library of compounds, including approximately 10K environmental chemicals and drugs, for different mechanisms responsible for eliciting toxic effects, and made the results publicly available. Through the Tox21 Data Challenge, the consortium has established a platform for computational toxicologists to develop and validate their predictive models.Here, we present a fast and successful method for the prediction of different outcomes of the nuclear receptor and stress response pathway screening from the Tox21 Data Challenge 2014. The method is based on the combination of molecular similarity calculations and a naïve Bayes machine learning algorithm and has been implemented as a KNIME pipeline. Molecules are represented as binary vectors consisting of a concatenation of common two-dimensional molecular fingerprint types with topological compound properties. The prediction method has been optimized individually for each modelled target and evaluated in a cross-validation as well as with the independent Tox21 validation set. Our results show that the method can achieve good prediction accuracies and rank among the top algorithms submitted to the prediction challenge, indicating its broad applicability in

  15. Toxicokinetiek van benzo(a)pyreen bij de Riv:TOX rat na herhaalde orale toediening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olling M; Lusthof KJ; Kroese ED; Beenen J; Klaassen R; BFT

    1995-01-01

    Benzo(a)pyrene was administered once daily (30 mg/kg) by gavage to 12 male and 12 female Riv:TOX rats, for 15 days on five successive days per week, in the form of a solution in soy oil. Blood samples were taken over a period of 12 hours on the first day of administration (day 1) and on day 12 from

  16. Profiling 976 ToxCast Chemicals across 331 Enzymatic and Receptor Signaling Assays

    OpenAIRE

    Sipes, Nisha S.; Martin, Matthew T.; Kothiya, Parth; Reif, David M; Richard S Judson; Richard, Ann M.; Houck, Keith A.; Dix, David J.; Kavlock, Robert J.; Thomas B Knudsen

    2013-01-01

    Understanding potential health risks is a significant challenge due to the large numbers of diverse chemicals with poorly characterized exposures and mechanisms of toxicities. The present study analyzes 976 chemicals (including failed pharmaceuticals, alternative plasticizers, food additives, and pesticides) in Phases I and II of the U.S. EPA’s ToxCast project across 331 cell-free enzymatic and ligand-binding high-throughput screening (HTS) assays. Half-maximal activity concentrations (AC50) ...

  17. Towards a new age of virtual ADME/TOX and multidimensional drug discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekins, Sean; Boulanger, Bruno; Swaan, Peter W.; Hupcey, Maggie A. Z.

    2002-05-01

    With the continual pressure to ensure follow-up molecules to billion dollar blockbuster drugs, there is a hurdle in profitability and growth for pharmaceutical companies in the next decades. With each success and failure we increasingly appreciate that a key to the success of synthesized molecules through the research and development process is the possession of drug-like properties. These properties include an adequate bioactivity as well as adequate solubility, an ability to cross critical membranes (intestinal and sometimes blood-brain barrier), reasonable metabolic stability and of course safety in humans. Dependent on the therapeutic area being investigated it might also be desirable to avoid certain enzymes or transporters to circumvent potential drug-drug interactions. It may also be important to limit the induction of these same proteins that can result in further toxicities. We have clearly moved the assessment of in vitro absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity (ADME/TOX) parameters much earlier in the discovery organization than a decade ago with the inclusion of higher throughput systems. We are also now faced with huge amounts of ADME/TOX data for each molecule that need interpretation and also provide a valuable resource for generating predictive computational models for future drug discovery. The present review aims to show what tools exist today for visualizing and modeling ADME/TOX data, what tools need to be developed, and how both the present and future tools are valuable for virtual filtering using ADME/TOX and bioactivity properties in parallel as a viable addition to present practices.

  18. Proteolysis of virulence regulator ToxR is associated with entry of Vibrio cholerae into a dormant state.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador Almagro-Moreno

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Vibrio cholerae O1 is a natural inhabitant of aquatic environments and causes the diarrheal disease, cholera. Two of its primary virulence regulators, TcpP and ToxR, are localized in the inner membrane. TcpP is encoded on the Vibrio Pathogenicity Island (VPI, a horizontally acquired mobile genetic element, and functions primarily in virulence gene regulation. TcpP has been shown to undergo regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP in response to environmental conditions that are unfavorable for virulence gene expression. ToxR is encoded in the ancestral genome and is present in non-pathogenic strains of V. cholerae, indicating it has roles outside of the human host. In this study, we show that ToxR undergoes RIP in V. cholerae in response to nutrient limitation at alkaline pH, a condition that occurs during the stationary phase of growth. This process involves the site-2 protease RseP (YaeL, and is dependent upon the RpoE-mediated periplasmic stress response, as deletion mutants for the genes encoding these two proteins cannot proteolyze ToxR under nutrient limitation at alkaline pH. We determined that the loss of ToxR, genetically or by proteolysis, is associated with entry of V. cholerae into a dormant state in which the bacterium is normally found in the aquatic environment called viable but nonculturable (VBNC. Strains that can proteolyze ToxR, or do not encode it, lose culturability, experience a change in morphology associated with cells in VBNC, yet remain viable under nutrient limitation at alkaline pH. On the other hand, mutant strains that cannot proteolyze ToxR remain culturable and maintain the morphology of cells in an active state of growth. Overall, our findings provide a link between the proteolysis of a virulence regulator and the entry of a pathogen into an environmentally persistent state.

  19. Proteolysis of Virulence Regulator ToxR Is Associated with Entry of Vibrio cholerae into a Dormant State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almagro-Moreno, Salvador; Kim, Tae K.; Skorupski, Karen; Taylor, Ronald K.

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae O1 is a natural inhabitant of aquatic environments and causes the diarrheal disease, cholera. Two of its primary virulence regulators, TcpP and ToxR, are localized in the inner membrane. TcpP is encoded on the Vibrio Pathogenicity Island (VPI), a horizontally acquired mobile genetic element, and functions primarily in virulence gene regulation. TcpP has been shown to undergo regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP) in response to environmental conditions that are unfavorable for virulence gene expression. ToxR is encoded in the ancestral genome and is present in non-pathogenic strains of V. cholerae, indicating it has roles outside of the human host. In this study, we show that ToxR undergoes RIP in V. cholerae in response to nutrient limitation at alkaline pH, a condition that occurs during the stationary phase of growth. This process involves the site-2 protease RseP (YaeL), and is dependent upon the RpoE-mediated periplasmic stress response, as deletion mutants for the genes encoding these two proteins cannot proteolyze ToxR under nutrient limitation at alkaline pH. We determined that the loss of ToxR, genetically or by proteolysis, is associated with entry of V. cholerae into a dormant state in which the bacterium is normally found in the aquatic environment called viable but nonculturable (VBNC). Strains that can proteolyze ToxR, or do not encode it, lose culturability, experience a change in morphology associated with cells in VBNC, yet remain viable under nutrient limitation at alkaline pH. On the other hand, mutant strains that cannot proteolyze ToxR remain culturable and maintain the morphology of cells in an active state of growth. Overall, our findings provide a link between the proteolysis of a virulence regulator and the entry of a pathogen into an environmentally persistent state. PMID:25849031

  20. Using ToxCast to Explore Chemical Activities and Hazard Traits: A Case Study With Ortho-Phthalates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Nathalie; Iyer, Shoba; Hackett, Edward; Lock, Bennett H; Sandy, Martha; Zeise, Lauren; Solomon, Gina; Marty, Melanie

    2016-06-01

    US EPA's Toxicity Forecaster (ToxCastTM) is a tool with potential use in evaluating safer consumer products, conducting chemical alternatives analyses, prioritizing chemicals for exposure monitoring, and ultimately performing screening-level risk assessments. As a case study exploring a potential use of ToxCast, we evaluated ToxCast results for ortho-phthalates focused on the well-established toxicological endpoints of some members of this class. We compared molecular perturbations measured in ToxCast assays with the known apical toxicity endpoints of o-phthalates reported in the open literature to broadly reflect on the predictive capability of the high-throughput screening (HTS) assays. We grouped the ToxCast assays into defined sets to examine o-phthalate activity and potency. This study revealed several links between key molecular events assayed in vitro and chemical-specific hazard traits. In general, parent o-phthalates are more active than their monoester metabolites. The medium-chain length o-phthalate group is also more active than other o-phthalate groups, as supported by Toxicological Priority Index ranking and statistical methods. Some HTS assay results correlated with in vivo findings, but others did not. For example, there was a notable lack of assay activity to explain the known male reproductive toxicity of these compounds. Ultimately, HTS data resources such as ToxCast may inform us of sensitive upstream toxicity endpoints and may assist in the rapid identification of environmental chemical hazards for screening and prioritization. However, this case study shows that the absence of positive results in ToxCast in vitro assays cannot be interpreted as absence of related in vivo toxicity, and limited biological coverage by the assays remains a concern.

  1. [Establishment of breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cell line stably over-expressing human TOX high mobility group box family member 3].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Cuicui; Yue, Liling; Yang, Ying; Jian, Baiyu; Ma, Liwei; Liu, Jicheng

    2014-11-01

    To construct the lentiviral expression vector of human TOX high mobility group box family member 3 (TOX3) gene and the MDA-MB-231 cell line which stably over-expresses TOX3 gene. TOX3 gene was synthesized by the gene synthesis method and amplified by PCR, and then cloned into pLVEF-1a/GFP-Puro vector to construct pLVEF-1a/GFP-Puro-TOX3 lentiviral vector. After restriction enzyme analysis and sequence identification, the lentiviral vector was packaged and the titer was detected. The human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells were transfected with the recombinant lentiviral vector and cultured selectively by puromycin to acquire stably transfected cells. MDA-MB-231 cells which expressed GFP were observed by fluorescence microcopy. And the expression levels of TOX3 mRNA and protein in transfected MDA-MB-231 cells were detected by real-time quantitative PCR(qRT-PCR) and Western blotting, respectively. Restriction enzyme digestion and sequence analysis demonstrated that the lentiviral expression vectors of pLVEF-1a/GFP-Puro and pLVEF-1a/GFP-Puro-TOX3 were successfully constructed, and the viral titers were respectively 2×10(8) TU/mL and 1×10(8) TU/mL after lentiviral packaging. And after being transfected, more than 95% cells expressed GFP under a fluorescence microscope. The results of qRT-PCR and Western blotting showed that, when compared with the MDA-MB-231-NC negative control group, the expression of TOX3 mRNA and protein significantly increased in the MDA-MB-231-TOX3 group. The study successfully constructed lentiviral expression vector of TOX3 gene and obtained MDA-MB-231 cell line stably over-expressing TOX3 gene by transfection with the recombinant vector.

  2. Enhanced interaction of Vibrio cholerae virulence regulators TcpP and ToxR under oxygen-limiting conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Fenxia; Liu, Zhi; Jabeen, Nusrat; Birdwell, L Dillon; Zhu, Jun; Kan, Biao

    2014-04-01

    Vibrio cholerae is the causative agent of the diarrheal disease cholera. The ability of V. cholerae to colonize and cause disease requires the intricately regulated expression of a number of virulence factors during infection. One of the signals sensed by V. cholerae is the presence of oxygen-limiting conditions in the gut. It has been shown that the virulence activator AphB plays a key role in sensing low oxygen concentrations and inducing the transcription of another key virulence activator, TcpP. In this study, we used a bacterial two-hybrid system to further examine the effect of oxygen on different virulence regulators. We found that anoxic conditions enhanced the interaction between TcpP and ToxR, identified as the first positive regulator of V. cholerae virulence genes. We further demonstrated that the TcpP-ToxR interaction was dependent on the primary periplasmic protein disulfide formation enzyme DsbA and cysteine residues in the periplasmic domains of both ToxR and TcpP. Furthermore, we showed that in V. cholerae, an interaction between TcpP and ToxR is important for virulence gene induction. Under anaerobic growth conditions, we detected ToxR-TcpP heterodimers, which were abolished in the presence of the reducing agent dithiothreitol. Our results suggest that V. cholerae may sense intestinal anoxic signals by multiple components to activate virulence.

  3. Causal Inferences from Mining ToxCast Data and the Biomedical Literature for Molecular Pathways and Cellular Processes in Cleft Palate (SOT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sixty-five chemicals in the ToxCast high-throughput screening (HTS) dataset have been linked to cleft palate based on data from ToxRefDB (rat or rabbit prenatal developmental toxicity studies) or from literature reports. These compounds are structurally diverse and thus likely to...

  4. The cysteine rich necrotrophic effector SnTox1 produced by Stagonospora nodorum triggers susceptibility of wheat lines harboring Snn1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaohui Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The wheat pathogen Stagonospora nodorum produces multiple necrotrophic effectors (also called host-selective toxins that promote disease by interacting with corresponding host sensitivity gene products. SnTox1 was the first necrotrophic effector identified in S. nodorum, and was shown to induce necrosis on wheat lines carrying Snn1. Here, we report the molecular cloning and validation of SnTox1 as well as the preliminary characterization of the mechanism underlying the SnTox1-Snn1 interaction which leads to susceptibility. SnTox1 was identified using bioinformatics tools and verified by heterologous expression in Pichia pastoris. SnTox1 encodes a 117 amino acid protein with the first 17 amino acids predicted as a signal peptide, and strikingly, the mature protein contains 16 cysteine residues, a common feature for some avirulence effectors. The transformation of SnTox1 into an avirulent S. nodorum isolate was sufficient to make the strain pathogenic. Additionally, the deletion of SnTox1 in virulent isolates rendered the SnTox1 mutated strains avirulent on the Snn1 differential wheat line. SnTox1 was present in 85% of a global collection of S. nodorum isolates. We identified a total of 11 protein isoforms and found evidence for strong diversifying selection operating on SnTox1. The SnTox1-Snn1 interaction results in an oxidative burst, DNA laddering, and pathogenesis related (PR gene expression, all hallmarks of a defense response. In the absence of light, the development of SnTox1-induced necrosis and disease symptoms were completely blocked. By comparing the infection processes of a GFP-tagged avirulent isolate and the same isolate transformed with SnTox1, we conclude that SnTox1 may play a critical role during fungal penetration. This research further demonstrates that necrotrophic fungal pathogens utilize small effector proteins to exploit plant resistance pathways for their colonization, which provides important insights into the molecular

  5. 1.65 Å resolution structure of the AraC-family transcriptional activator ToxT from Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiaqin; Wehmeyer, Graham; Lovell, Scott; Battaile, Kevin P; Egan, Susan M

    2016-09-01

    ToxT is an AraC-family transcriptional activator protein that controls the expression of key virulence factors in Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of cholera. ToxT directly activates the expression of the genes that encode the toxin-coregulated pilus and cholera toxin, and also positively auto-regulates its own expression from the tcp promoter. The crystal structure of ToxT has previously been solved at 1.9 Å resolution (PDB entry 3gbg). In this study, a crystal structure of ToxT at 1.65 Å resolution with a similar overall structure to the previously determined structure is reported. However, there are distinct differences between the two structures, particularly in the region that extends from Asp101 to Glu110. This region, which can influence ToxT activity but was disordered in the previous structure, can be traced entirely in the current structure.

  6. Structure of Vibrio cholerae ToxT reveals a mechanism for fatty acid regulation of virulence genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowden, Michael J.; Skorupski, Karen; Pellegrini, Maria; Chiorazzo, Michael G.; Taylor, Ronald K.; Kull, F. Jon (Dartmouth)

    2010-03-04

    Cholera is an acute intestinal infection caused by the bacterium Vibrio cholerae. In order for V. cholerae to cause disease, it must produce two virulence factors, the toxin-coregulated pilus (TCP) and cholera toxin (CT), whose expression is controlled by a transcriptional cascade culminating with the expression of the AraC-family regulator, ToxT. We have solved the 1.9 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of ToxT, which reveals folds in the N- and C-terminal domains that share a number of features in common with AraC, MarA, and Rob as well as the unexpected presence of a buried 16-carbon fatty acid, cis-palmitoleate. The finding that cis-palmitoleic acid reduces TCP and CT expression in V. cholerae and prevents ToxT from binding to DNA in vitro provides a direct link between the host environment of V. cholerae and regulation of virulence gene expression.

  7. Evaluation of ToxA and Vibrio parahaemolyticus lysate on humoral immune response and immune-related genes in Pacific red snapper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Becerril, Martha; Maldonado-García, Minerva; Guluarte, Crystal; León-Gallo, Amalia; Rosales-Mendoza, Sergio; Ascencio, Felipe; Hirono, Ikuo; Angulo, Carlos

    2016-09-01

    Immunogenicity of ToxA and Vibrio parahaemolyticus lysate was evaluated in a double immunostimulation scheme in Pacific red snapper after V. parahaemolyticus infection. Three groups of Pacific red snapper were intraperitonealy (i.p.) injected with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS group), ToxA of V. parahaemolyticus (ToxA-Vp group) or V. parahaemolyticus lysate (lysate-Vp group) (first injection, day 1; second injection, day 7). Fish were subsequently infected with live V. parahaemolyticus. Humoral immune parameters in skin mucus and serum were evaluated on days 1, 7, 8 and 14 days post-immunostimulation and 7 days post-infection. Moreover expression of immune-related genes was quantified by real time PCR in head-kidney leukocytes, spleen, liver, and intestine. The ToxA-Vp-treated group showed a higher anti-protease and catalase activity in skin mucus when compared with the PBS group. Measurements of SOD and CAT activities showed an increment in both activities a day after the second boost with ToxA-Vp or lysate-Vp. Interestingly, IgM levels in mucus and transcripts were enhanced followed the ToxA-Vp treatment even after challenge. Furthermore, IL-1β was strongly expressed in all analyzed cell or tissues followed ToxA-Vp or Vp-lysate treatments. Finally, SOD and CAT gene expression was up-regulated in fish immunostimulated with either treatment ToxA-Vp or lysate-Vp, mainly after infection in head-kidney leukocytes and intestine. This is the first study where the effects of ToxA from V. parahaemolyticus in the immune system of Pacific red snapper was evaluated. These results suggest that ToxA-Vp would positively affect humoral immune response and up-regulate expression of genes involved in the immune system function; and could help in the control of V. parahaemolyticus infection in Pacific red snapper Lutjanus peru, an economic important fish in Mexico.

  8. Identifying developmental toxicity pathways for a subset of ToxCast chemicals using human embryonic stem cells and metabolomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleinstreuer, N.C., E-mail: kleinstreuer.nicole@epa.gov [NCCT, US EPA, RTP, NC 27711 (United States); Smith, A.M.; West, P.R.; Conard, K.R.; Fontaine, B.R. [Stemina Biomarker Discovery, Inc., Madison, WI 53719 (United States); Weir-Hauptman, A.M. [Covance, Inc., Madison, WI 53704 (United States); Palmer, J.A. [Stemina Biomarker Discovery, Inc., Madison, WI 53719 (United States); Knudsen, T.B.; Dix, D.J. [NCCT, US EPA, RTP, NC 27711 (United States); Donley, E.L.R. [Stemina Biomarker Discovery, Inc., Madison, WI 53719 (United States); Cezar, G.G. [Stemina Biomarker Discovery, Inc., Madison, WI 53719 (United States); University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Metabolomics analysis was performed on the supernatant of human embryonic stem (hES) cell cultures exposed to a blinded subset of 11 chemicals selected from the chemical library of EPA's ToxCast Trade-Mark-Sign chemical screening and prioritization research project. Metabolites from hES cultures were evaluated for known and novel signatures that may be indicative of developmental toxicity. Significant fold changes in endogenous metabolites were detected for 83 putatively annotated mass features in response to the subset of ToxCast chemicals. The annotations were mapped to specific human metabolic pathways. This revealed strong effects on pathways for nicotinate and nicotinamide metabolism, pantothenate and CoA biosynthesis, glutathione metabolism, and arginine and proline metabolism pathways. Predictivity for adverse outcomes in mammalian prenatal developmental toxicity studies used ToxRefDB and other sources of information, including Stemina Biomarker Discovery's predictive DevTox Registered-Sign model trained on 23 pharmaceutical agents of known developmental toxicity and differing potency. The model initially predicted developmental toxicity from the blinded ToxCast compounds in concordance with animal data with 73% accuracy. Retraining the model with data from the unblinded test compounds at one concentration level increased the predictive accuracy for the remaining concentrations to 83%. These preliminary results on a 11-chemical subset of the ToxCast chemical library indicate that metabolomics analysis of the hES secretome provides information valuable for predictive modeling and mechanistic understanding of mammalian developmental toxicity. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We tested 11 environmental compounds in a hESC metabolomics platform. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Significant changes in secreted small molecule metabolites were observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Perturbed mass features map to pathways critical for normal

  9. Analysis of Vibrio cholerae toxR function by construction of toxR gene deficient strains of Vibrio cholerae%霍乱弧菌毒力表达调控基因toxR缺失株的构建及其功能的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈建平; 高守一; 刘延清; 祁国明; 何九芽

    2001-01-01

    Objective To analyze toxR gene function of Vibrio cholerae byconstruction of toxR gene deficient strains of Vibrio cholerae IEM101-4 and 569B-43. Methods A 2.5kb tetracycline gene fragment was homo-recombined into a toxR gene site in genome of Vibrio cholerae IEM101 and 569B using suicide plasmid pGp704 and integrative recombination method, and constructed 2 toxR gene deficient strains of Vibrio cholerae IEM101-4 and 569B-43. We analyzed the CT production and outer membrane protein of toxR gene deficient strains of Vibrio cholerae and donor strains. Results GM1-ELISA assay of CT toxin of Vibrio cholerae showed that the level of CT production of the toxR gene deficient strain, 569B-43 was much lower than that of donor strain 569B, the P/N value of toxR gene deficient strain 569B-43 was 1.82, the P/N value of 569B was 4.52. No difference was found between IEM101 and the toxR gene deficient strains IEM101-4 in CT production. SDS-PAGE analysis of outer membrane protein of Vibrio cholerae showed that the toxR gene deficient strains, IEM101-4 and 569B-43 all showed 40kD and 43kD outer membrane protein bands, while which were not present in the donor strains IEM101 and 569B. Conclusion ToxR gene is an up-regulator for the expression of ctx gene, and a down-regulator for the expression of 40kD and 43kD outer membrane protein coding genes.%目的 通过构建霍乱弧菌toxR基因缺失株来研究toxR基因对霍乱弧菌减毒菌株IEM101和高产毒株569B毒力表达的调控作用。方法 采用自杀性质粒和接合转移技术,将2个中间含有四环素基因的toxR基因分别与霍乱弧菌减毒株IEM101和高产毒株569B染色体toxR基因重组,从而获得toxR基因缺失株IEM101-4和569B-43,并对2个toxR基因缺失株和其原出发菌株的霍乱肠毒素的产率和主要外膜蛋白图谱进行比较。结果 采用GM1-ELISA检测受测菌CT基因表达,toxR基因缺失株569B-43的P/N值为1.82,而其原出发菌株569B的P/N为4.52

  10. AMBIT RESTful web services: an implementation of the OpenTox application programming interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeliazkova Nina

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The AMBIT web services package is one of the several existing independent implementations of the OpenTox Application Programming Interface and is built according to the principles of the Representational State Transfer (REST architecture. The Open Source Predictive Toxicology Framework, developed by the partners in the EC FP7 OpenTox project, aims at providing a unified access to toxicity data and predictive models, as well as validation procedures. This is achieved by i an information model, based on a common OWL-DL ontology ii links to related ontologies; iii data and algorithms, available through a standardized REST web services interface, where every compound, data set or predictive method has a unique web address, used to retrieve its Resource Description Framework (RDF representation, or initiate the associated calculations. The AMBIT web services package has been developed as an extension of AMBIT modules, adding the ability to create (Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship (QSAR models and providing an OpenTox API compliant interface. The representation of data and processing resources in W3C Resource Description Framework facilitates integrating the resources as Linked Data. By uploading datasets with chemical structures and arbitrary set of properties, they become automatically available online in several formats. The services provide unified interfaces to several descriptor calculation, machine learning and similarity searching algorithms, as well as to applicability domain and toxicity prediction models. All Toxtree modules for predicting the toxicological hazard of chemical compounds are also integrated within this package. The complexity and diversity of the processing is reduced to the simple paradigm "read data from a web address, perform processing, write to a web address". The online service allows to easily run predictions, without installing any software, as well to share online datasets and models. The

  11. NanoE-Tox: New and in-depth database concerning ecotoxicity of nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katre Juganson

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The increasing production and use of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs inevitably results in their higher concentrations in the environment. This may lead to undesirable environmental effects and thus warrants risk assessment. The ecotoxicity testing of a wide variety of ENMs rapidly evolving in the market is costly but also ethically questionable when bioassays with vertebrates are conducted. Therefore, alternative methods, e.g., models for predicting toxicity mechanisms of ENMs based on their physico-chemical properties (e.g., quantitative (nanostructure-activity relationships, QSARs/QNARs, should be developed. While the development of such models relies on good-quality experimental toxicity data, most of the available data in the literature even for the same test species are highly variable. In order to map and analyse the state of the art of the existing nanoecotoxicological information suitable for QNARs, we created a database NanoE-Tox that is available as . The database is based on existing literature on ecotoxicology of eight ENMs with different chemical composition: carbon nanotubes (CNTs, fullerenes, silver (Ag, titanium dioxide (TiO2, zinc oxide (ZnO, cerium dioxide (CeO2, copper oxide (CuO, and iron oxide (FeOx; Fe2O3, Fe3O4. Altogether, NanoE-Tox database consolidates data from 224 articles and lists altogether 1,518 toxicity values (EC50/LC50/NOEC with corresponding test conditions and physico-chemical parameters of the ENMs as well as reported toxicity mechanisms and uptake of ENMs in the organisms. 35% of the data in NanoE-Tox concerns ecotoxicity of Ag NPs, followed by TiO2 (22%, CeO2 (13%, and ZnO (10%. Most of the data originates from studies with crustaceans (26%, bacteria (17%, fish (13%, and algae (11%. Based on the median toxicity values of the most sensitive organism (data derived from three or more articles the toxicity order was as follows: Ag > ZnO > CuO > CeO2 > CNTs > TiO2 > FeOx. We believe NanoE-Tox database contains

  12. AMBIT RESTful web services: an implementation of the OpenTox application programming interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeliazkova, Nina; Jeliazkov, Vedrin

    2011-05-16

    The AMBIT web services package is one of the several existing independent implementations of the OpenTox Application Programming Interface and is built according to the principles of the Representational State Transfer (REST) architecture. The Open Source Predictive Toxicology Framework, developed by the partners in the EC FP7 OpenTox project, aims at providing a unified access to toxicity data and predictive models, as well as validation procedures. This is achieved by i) an information model, based on a common OWL-DL ontology ii) links to related ontologies; iii) data and algorithms, available through a standardized REST web services interface, where every compound, data set or predictive method has a unique web address, used to retrieve its Resource Description Framework (RDF) representation, or initiate the associated calculations.The AMBIT web services package has been developed as an extension of AMBIT modules, adding the ability to create (Quantitative) Structure-Activity Relationship (QSAR) models and providing an OpenTox API compliant interface. The representation of data and processing resources in W3C Resource Description Framework facilitates integrating the resources as Linked Data. By uploading datasets with chemical structures and arbitrary set of properties, they become automatically available online in several formats. The services provide unified interfaces to several descriptor calculation, machine learning and similarity searching algorithms, as well as to applicability domain and toxicity prediction models. All Toxtree modules for predicting the toxicological hazard of chemical compounds are also integrated within this package. The complexity and diversity of the processing is reduced to the simple paradigm "read data from a web address, perform processing, write to a web address". The online service allows to easily run predictions, without installing any software, as well to share online datasets and models. The downloadable web application

  13. Inroads to Predict in Vivo Toxicology—An Introduction to the eTOX Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg D. Wichard

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available There is a widespread awareness that the wealth of preclinical toxicity data that the pharmaceutical industry has generated in recent decades is not exploited as efficiently as it could be. Enhanced data availability for compound comparison (“read-across”, or for data mining to build predictive tools, should lead to a more efficient drug development process and contribute to the reduction of animal use (3Rs principle. In order to achieve these goals, a consortium approach, grouping numbers of relevant partners, is required. The eTOX (“electronic toxicity” consortium represents such a project and is a public-private partnership within the framework of the European Innovative Medicines Initiative (IMI. The project aims at the development of in silico prediction systems for organ and in vivo toxicity. The backbone of the project will be a database consisting of preclinical toxicity data for drug compounds or candidates extracted from previously unpublished, legacy reports from thirteen European and European operation-based pharmaceutical companies. The database will be enhanced by incorporation of publically available, high quality toxicology data. Seven academic institutes and five small-to-medium size enterprises (SMEs contribute with their expertise in data gathering, database curation, data mining, chemoinformatics and predictive systems development. The outcome of the project will be a predictive system contributing to early potential hazard identification and risk assessment during the drug development process. The concept and strategy of the eTOX project is described here, together with current achievements and future deliverables.

  14. QuickTox Kit for QuickScan Ochratoxin-A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Alan H; Roberts, Russell W; Ziemer, Wayne

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative, reader-based lateral flow technology is utilized for determination of ochratoxin contamination levels in wheat by the QuickTox Kit for QuickScan Ochratoxin-A. Naturally contaminated wheat samples were used to challenge the assay in the range of 0-100 ppb in linearity, selectivity, robustness, and stability, and in internal and external matrix studies. Performance was judged against criteria established by the AOAC Research Institute Performance Tested Method program prior to beginning the validation studies. All data produced during this work conformed to the acceptance criteria. Linear dose responses with R2 exceeding 0.97 and RSDr values between 6.22 and 17.10% for positive samples were observed in linearity and internal and external matrix studies. Ochratoxin A (OTA) and ochratoxin B (OTB) were detected by the assay. Assay sensitivity towards OTB was approximately 50% relative to OTA detection. Other common mycotoxins did not affect assay results. Variations in assay timing, temperature, and sample volume encompassed in the robustness study did not yield results outside the acceptable range. Determination of ochratoxin in wheat is facilitated using the QuickTox Kit for QuickScan Ochratoxin-A kit.

  15. The eTOX Library of Public Resources for in Silico Toxicity Prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cases, M; Pastor, M; Sanz, F

    2013-01-01

    (1000-1500 characters) In spite of the increasing amount of public access resources that offer original data related to drug toxicology, the successful exploitation of such data for the development of in silico predictive models is still limited by the quality of the data available, its integrability and its coverage for each toxicity endpoint. This work describes the strategy developed by the IMI eTOX consortium for identifying and compiling data and other related resources from the biomedical literature and a wide spectrum of public on-line sources. The main result of this effort is a large web-based structured library containing links to articles of toxicological relevance (data that can be used for modeling purposes, computational models, and toxicity mechanisms), public databases, standardized vocabularies and modeling tools. All this material has been manually reviewed, systematically evaluated and grouped into different categories. The library has been made public at the eTOX website (http://www.etoxproject.eu/), where it is updated on a monthly basis, constituting a useful resource for affording the in silico toxicity prediction of novel drug candidates.

  16. Developing predictions of in vivo developmental toxicity of ToxCast chemicals using mouse embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developing predictions of in vivo developmental toxicity of ToxCast chemicals using mouse embryonic stem cells S. Hunter, M. Rosen, M. Hoopes, H. Nichols, S. Jeffay, K. Chandler1, Integrated Systems Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Labor...

  17. CAirTOX, An inter-media transfer model for assessing indirect exposures to hazardous air contaminants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKone, T.E.

    1994-01-01

    Risk assessment is a quantitative evaluation of information on potential health hazards of environmental contaminants and the extent of human exposure to these contaminants. As applied to toxic chemical emissions to air, risk assessment involves four interrelated steps. These are (1) determination of source concentrations or emission characteristics, (2) exposure assessment, (3) toxicity assessment, and (4) risk characterization. These steps can be carried out with assistance from analytical models in order to estimate the potential risk associated with existing and future releases. CAirTOX has been developed as a spreadsheet model to assist in making these types of calculations. CAirTOX follows an approach that has been incorporated into the CalTOX model, which was developed for the California Department of Toxic Substances Control, With CAirTOX, we can address how contaminants released to an air basin can lead to contamination of soil, food, surface water, and sediments. The modeling effort includes a multimedia transport and transformation model, exposure scenario models, and efforts to quantify uncertainty in multimedia, multiple-pathway exposure assessments. The capacity to explicitly address uncertainty has been incorporated into the model in two ways. First, the spreadsheet form of the model makes it compatible with Monte-Carlo add-on programs that are available for uncertainty analysis. Second, all model inputs are specified in terms of an arithmetic mean and coefficient of variation so that uncertainty analyses can be carried out.

  18. Developing predictions of in vivo developmental toxicity of ToxCast chemicals using mouse embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developing predictions of in vivo developmental toxicity of ToxCast chemicals using mouse embryonic stem cells S. Hunter, M. Rosen, M. Hoopes, H. Nichols, S. Jeffay, K. Chandler1, Integrated Systems Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Labor...

  19. Building Scientific Confidence in the Development and Evaluation of Read-Across Using Tox21 Approaches (SOT Annual Meeting)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acceptance of read-across is an ongoing challenge and several efforts are underway to identify and address major uncertainties associated with read-across. Several approaches have been proposed but to date few case studies if any have evaluated how Tox21 approaches may be instruc...

  20. Alternative Testing Strategy Example: Bioactivity Profilign of Diverse Engineering Nanomaterials via High-throughput Screening in ToxCast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most of the over 2800 nanomaterials (NMs) in commerce lack hazard data. Efficient NM testing requires suitable toxicity tests for prioritization of NMs to be tested. The EPA’s ToxCast program is evaluating HTS assays to prioritize NMs for targeted testing. Au, Ag, CeO2, Cu(O2), T...

  1. The ToxAvapA toxin-antitoxin locus contributes to the survival of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae during infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Dabin; Kordis, Alexis A; Sonenshine, Daniel E; Daines, Dayle A

    2014-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is an opportunistic pathogen that is a common cause of acute and recurrent mucosal infections. One uncharacterized NTHi toxin-antitoxin (TA) module, NTHI1912-1913, is a host inhibition of growth (higBA) homologue. We hypothesized that this locus, which we designated toxAvapA, contributed to NTHi survival during infection. We deleted toxAvapA and determined that growth of the mutant in defined media was not different from the parent strain. We tested the mutant for persistence during long-term in vitro co-culture with primary human respiratory tissues, which revealed that the ΔtoxAvapA mutant was attenuated for survival. We then performed challenge studies using the chinchilla model of otitis media and determined that mutant survival was also reduced in vivo. Following purification, the toxin exhibited ribonuclease activity on RNA in vitro, while the antitoxin did not. A microarray comparison of the transcriptome revealed that the tryptophan biosynthetic regulon was significantly repressed in the mutant compared to the parent strain. HPLC studies of conditioned medium confirmed that there was no significant difference in the concentration of tryptophan remaining in the supernatant, indicating that the uptake of tryptophan by the mutant was not affected. We conclude that the role of the NTHi toxAvapA TA module in persistence following stress is multifactorial and includes effects on essential metabolic pathways.

  2. Virtual Liver: Estimating Proliferation and Apoptosis of Hepatocytes Exposed to Environmental Chemicals Using ToxCastTM Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. EPA’s ToxCastTM program has screened over a thousand chemicals for potential toxicity using hundreds of high-throughput, in vitro assays. The U.S. EPA’s Virtual Liver (v-Liver™) is a cellular systems model of hepatic tissues that enables the estimation of in vivo effects...

  3. Evaluation of Compatibility of ToxCast High-Throughput/High-Content Screening Assays with Engineered Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    High-throughput and high-content screens are attractive approaches for prioritizing nanomaterial hazards and informing targeted testing due to the impracticality of using traditional toxicological testing on the large numbers and varieties of nanomaterials. The ToxCast program a...

  4. Farmacokinetiek en biologische beschikbaarheid van benzo(a)pyreen (BaP) in de RIV:tox rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lusthof KJ; Olling M; Kroese ED; Beenen J; Poelen MJ; Vaessen HAMG; Kamp CG van de

    1993-01-01

    Eight groups of six male RIV:tox rats received oral and intravenous doses of benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) in a parallel study plan. Intravenously and orally four dose levels were administered. BaF was dissolved in soybean oil for oral administration, and in glycofurol for intravenous administration. The dos

  5. K-12 Students Flock To ToxTown In San Diego: Results of an SOT K-12 Education Outreach Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Just prior to the start of the 2015 Annual Meeting in San Diego, hundreds of K-12 students, teachers, and science enthusiasts visited the ToxTown booth at the annual San Diego Festival of Science and Engineering grand finale event, EXPO Day. Over 20,000 attendees participated in ...

  6. Screening ToxCast™ Phase I Chemicals in a Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytotoxicity (ACDC) Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    An Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytotoxicity (ACDC) in vitro assay with mouse embryonic stem cells was used to screen the ToxCast Phase I chemical library for effects on cellular differentiation and cell number. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) established the ...

  7. Identifying developmental toxicity pathways for a subset of ToxCast chemicals using human embryonic stem cells and metabolomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metabolomics analysis was performed on the supernatant of human embryonic stem (hES) cell cultures exposed to a blinded subset of 11 chemicals selected from the chemical library of EPA's ToxCast™ chemical screening and prioritization research project. Metabolites from hES cultur...

  8. Inferring Toxicological Responses of HepG2 Cells from ToxCast High Content Imaging Data (SOT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding the dynamic perturbation of cell states by chemicals can aid in for predicting their adverse effects. High-content imaging (HCI) was used to measure the state of HepG2 cells over three time points (1, 24, and 72 h) in response to 976 ToxCast chemicals for 10 differe...

  9. The ToxAvapA toxin-antitoxin locus contributes to the survival of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae during infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dabin Ren

    Full Text Available Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi is an opportunistic pathogen that is a common cause of acute and recurrent mucosal infections. One uncharacterized NTHi toxin-antitoxin (TA module, NTHI1912-1913, is a host inhibition of growth (higBA homologue. We hypothesized that this locus, which we designated toxAvapA, contributed to NTHi survival during infection. We deleted toxAvapA and determined that growth of the mutant in defined media was not different from the parent strain. We tested the mutant for persistence during long-term in vitro co-culture with primary human respiratory tissues, which revealed that the ΔtoxAvapA mutant was attenuated for survival. We then performed challenge studies using the chinchilla model of otitis media and determined that mutant survival was also reduced in vivo. Following purification, the toxin exhibited ribonuclease activity on RNA in vitro, while the antitoxin did not. A microarray comparison of the transcriptome revealed that the tryptophan biosynthetic regulon was significantly repressed in the mutant compared to the parent strain. HPLC studies of conditioned medium confirmed that there was no significant difference in the concentration of tryptophan remaining in the supernatant, indicating that the uptake of tryptophan by the mutant was not affected. We conclude that the role of the NTHi toxAvapA TA module in persistence following stress is multifactorial and includes effects on essential metabolic pathways.

  10. Evaluation of the Neuroactivity of ToxCast Compounds Using Multi-well Microelectrode Array Recordings in Primary Cortical Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evaluation of the Neuroactivity of ToxCast Compounds Using Multi-well Microelectrode Array Recordings in Primary Cortical Neurons P Valdivia1, M Martin2, WR LeFew3, D Hall3, J Ross1, K Houck2 and TJ Shafer3 1Axion Biosystems, Atlanta GA and 2NCCT, 3ISTD, NHEERL, ORD, US EPA, RT...

  11. ToxEvaluator: an integrated computational platform to aid the interpretation of toxicology study-related findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, D; Wiegers, T C; Enayetallah, A; Kibbey, C; Gosink, M; Koza-Taylor, P; Mattingly, C J; Lawton, M

    2016-01-01

    Attempts are frequently made to investigate adverse findings from preclinical toxicology studies in order to better understand underlying toxicity mechanisms. These efforts often begin with limited information, including a description of the adverse finding, knowledge of the structure of the chemical associated with its cause and the intended pharmacological target. ToxEvaluator was developed jointly by Pfizer and the Comparative Toxicogenomics Database (http://ctdbase.org) team at North Carolina State University as an in silico platform to facilitate interpretation of toxicity findings in light of prior knowledge. Through the integration of a diverse set of in silico tools that leverage a number of public and proprietary databases, ToxEvaluator streamlines the process of aggregating and interrogating diverse sources of information. The user enters compound and target identifiers, and selects adverse event descriptors from a safety lexicon and mapped MeSH disease terms. ToxEvaluator provides a summary report with multiple distinct areas organized according to what target or structural aspects have been linked to the adverse finding, including primary pharmacology, structurally similar proprietary compounds, structurally similar public domain compounds, predicted secondary (i.e. off-target) pharmacology and known secondary pharmacology. Similar proprietary compounds and their associated in vivo toxicity findings are reported, along with a link to relevant supporting documents. For similar public domain compounds and interacting targets, ToxEvaluator integrates relationships curated in Comparative Toxicogenomics Database, returning all direct and inferred linkages between them. As an example of its utility, we demonstrate how ToxEvaluator rapidly identified direct (primary pharmacology) and indirect (secondary pharmacology) linkages between cerivastatin and myopathy.

  12. A ToxA-like protein from Cochliobolus heterostrophus induces light-dependent leaf necrosis and acts as a virulence factor with host selectivity on maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shunwen; Gillian Turgeon, B; Edwards, Michael C

    2015-08-01

    ToxA, the first discovered fungal proteinaceous host-selective toxin (HST), was originally identified in 1989 from the tan spot fungus Pyrenophora tritici-repentis (Ptr). About 25years later, a homolog was identified in the leaf/glume blotch fungus Stagonospora nodorum (Parastagonospora nodorum), also a pathogen of wheat. Here we report the identification and function of a ToxA-like protein from the maize pathogen Cochliobolus heterostrophus (Ch) that possesses necrosis-inducing activity specifically against maize. ChToxA is encoded by a 535-bp open reading frame featuring a ToxA-specific intron with unusual splicing sites (5'-ATAAGT…TAC-3') at conserved positions relative to PtrToxA. The protein shows 64% similarity to PtrToxA and is predicted to adopt a similar three-dimensional structure, although lacking the arginyl-glycyl-aspartic acid (RGD) motif reported to be required for internalization into sensitive wheat mesophyll cells. Reverse-transcriptase PCR revealed that the ChTOXA gene expression is up-regulated in planta, relative to axenic culture. Plant assays indicated that the recombinant ChToxA protein induces light-dependent leaf necrosis in a host-selective manner on maize inbred lines. Gene deletion experiments confirmed that ChtoxA mutants are reduced in virulence on specific ChToxA-sensitive maize lines, relative to virulence caused by wild-type strains. Database searches identified potential ChToxA homologues in other plant-pathogenic ascomycetes. Sequence and phylogenetic analyses revealed that the corresponding ToxA-like proteins include one member recently shown to be associated with formation of penetration hypha. These results provide the first evidence that C. heterostrophus is capable of producing proteinaceous HSTs as virulence factors in addition to well-known secondary metabolite-type toxins produced biosynthetically by polyketide synthase megaenzymes. Further studies on ChToxA may provide new insights into effector evolution in host

  13. Vibrio cholerae leuO Transcription Is Positively Regulated by ToxR and Contributes to Bile Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ante, Vanessa M; Bina, X Renee; Howard, Mondraya F; Sayeed, Sameera; Taylor, Dawn L; Bina, James E

    2015-11-01

    Vibrio cholerae is an aquatic organism and facultative human pathogen that colonizes the small intestine. In the small intestine, V. cholerae is exposed to a variety of antimicrobial compounds, including bile. V. cholerae resistance to bile is multifactorial and includes alterations in the membrane permeability barrier that are mediated by ToxR, a membrane-associated transcription factor. ToxR has also been shown to be required for activation of the LysR family transcription factor leuO in response to cyclic dipeptides. LeuO has been implicated in the regulation of multiple V. cholerae phenotypes, including biofilm production and virulence. In this study, we investigated the effects of bile on leuO expression. We show that leuO transcription increased in response to bile and bile salts but not in response to other detergents. The bile-dependent increase in leuO expression was dependent on ToxR, which was found to bind directly to the leuO promoter. The periplasmic domain of ToxR was required for basal leuO expression and for the bile-dependent induction of both leuO and ompU transcription. V. cholerae mutants that did not express leuO exhibited increased bile susceptibility, suggesting that LeuO contributes to bile resistance. Our collective results demonstrate that ToxR activates leuO expression in response to bile and that LeuO is a component of the ToxR-dependent responses that contribute to bile resistance. The success of Vibrio cholerae as a human pathogen is dependent upon its ability to rapidly adapt to changes in its growth environment. Growth in the human gastrointestinal tract requires the expression of genes that provide resistance to host antimicrobial compounds, including bile. In this work, we show for the first time that the LysR family regulator LeuO mediates responses in V. cholerae that contribute to bile resistance. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO) for Severe Toxicological Exposures: Review of the Toxicology Investigators Consortium (ToxIC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, G S; Levitan, R; Wiegand, T J; Lowry, J; Schult, R F; Yin, S

    2016-03-01

    Although there have been many developments related to specific strategies for treating patients after poisoning exposures, the mainstay of therapy remains symptomatic and supportive care. One of the most aggressive supportive modalities is extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). Our goal was to describe the use of ECMO for toxicological exposures reported to the American College of Medical Toxicology (ACMT) Toxicology Investigators Consortium (ToxIC). We performed a retrospective review of the ACMT ToxIC Registry from January 1, 2010 to December 31, 2013. Inclusion criteria included patients aged 0 to 89 years, evaluated between January 2010 through December 2013, and received ECMO for toxicological exposure. There were 26,271 exposures (60 % female) reported to the ToxIC Registry, 10 (0.0004 %) received ECMO: 4 pediatric (18 years). Time of initiation of ECMO ranged from 4 h to 4 days, with duration from 15 h to 12 days. Exposures included carbon monoxide/smoke inhalation (2), bitter almonds, methanol, and several medications including antihistamines (2), antipsychotic/antidepressant (2), cardiovascular drugs (2), analgesics (2), sedative/hypnotics (2), and antidiabetics (2). Four ECMO patients received cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) during their hospital course, and the overall survival rate was 80 %. ECMO was rarely used for poisoning exposures in the ACMT ToxIC Registry. ECMO was utilized for a variety of ages and for pharmaceutical and non-pharmaceutical exposures. In most cases, ECMO was administered prior to cardiovascular failure, and survival rate was high. If available, ECMO may be a valid treatment modality.

  15. Association of three SNPs in TOX3 and breast cancer risk: Evidence from 97275 cases and 128686 controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Long, Xinghua

    2015-01-01

    The associations of SNPs in TOX3 gene with breast cancer risk were investigated by some Genome-wide association studies and epidemiological studies, but the study results were contradictory. To derive a more precise estimate of the associations, we conducted a meta-analysis. ORs with 95% CI were used to assess the strength of association between TOX3 polymorphisms and breast cancer risk in fixed or random effect model. A total of 37 publications with 97275 cases and 128686 controls were identified. We observed that the rs3803662 C > T, rs12443621 A > G and rs8051542 C > T were all correlated with increased risk of breast cancer. In the stratified analyses by ethnicity, significantly elevated risk was detected for all genetic models of the three SNPs in Caucasians. In Asian populations, there were significant associations of rs3803662 and rs8051542 with breast cancer risk. Whereas there was no evidence for statistical significant association between the three SNPs and breast cancer risk in Africans. Additionally, we observed different associations of rs3803662 with breast cancer risk based on different ER subtype and BRCA1/BRCA2 mutation carriers. In conclusion, the meta-analysis suggested that three SNPs in TOX3 were significantly associated with breast cancer risk in different populations.

  16. Detection of total and pathogenic Vibrio parahaemolyticus in shellfish: comparison of PCR protocols using pR72H or toxR targets with a culture method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosec, Jean-Philippe; Simon, Marie; Causse, Véronique; Boudjemaa, Mireille

    2009-02-15

    PCR protocols directly applied to enrichment broth cultures were compared with a culture method based on the ISO reference for detection of Vibrio parahaemolyticus in 57 natural bivalve mollusc samples. Comparisons were made on different primer pairs specifically targeting the V. parahaemolyticus-specific toxR gene (Vp-toxR) and pR72H fragment, and also tdh and trh hemolysin genes. The PCR method using these different primer pairs and the culture method were also examined for their limits of detection (LOD). The LODs ranged from 7-24 pg of purified DNA per reaction tube (RT) for primer pair Vp-toxR, but for primer pair pR72H, varied greatly depending on the V. parahaemolyticus strains used (0.7 pg-10.6 ng/RT). The Vp-toxR and pR72H primers allowed the detection of V. parahaemolyticus in 25 and 8 out of the 57 samples, respectively, while only 3 V. parahaemolyticus-positive samples were obtained by the culture method. The effective presence of V. parahaemolyticus in the Vp-toxR-positive samples was confirmed by sequencing the PCR products. The trh and Vp-toxR genes were simultaneously detected in 14% of the samples, which were thus considered as presumptively contaminated with pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus. These results emphasize the need for an efficient survey of both the total and pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus present in seafood in France. The PCR protocol targeting Vp-toxR followed by tdh and trh genes is an efficient and reliable method for the detection of total and presumptively pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus in bivalve molluscs.

  17. CalTOX (registered trademark), A multimedia total exposure model spreadsheet user's guide. Version 4.0(Beta)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKone, T.E.; Enoch, K.G.

    2002-08-01

    CalTOX has been developed as a set of spreadsheet models and spreadsheet data sets to assist in assessing human exposures from continuous releases to multiple environmental media, i.e. air, soil, and water. It has also been used for waste classification and for setting soil clean-up levels at uncontrolled hazardous wastes sites. The modeling components of CalTOX include a multimedia transport and transformation model, multi-pathway exposure scenario models, and add-ins to quantify and evaluate uncertainty and variability. All parameter values used as inputs to CalTOX are distributions, described in terms of mean values and a coefficient of variation, rather than as point estimates or plausible upper values such as most other models employ. This probabilistic approach allows both sensitivity and uncertainty analyses to be directly incorporated into the model operation. This manual provides CalTOX users with a brief overview of the CalTOX spreadsheet model and provides instructions for using the spreadsheet to make deterministic and probabilistic calculations of source-dose-risk relationships.

  18. LimTox: a web tool for applied text mining of adverse event and toxicity associations of compounds, drugs and genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañada, Andres; Capella-Gutierrez, Salvador; Rabal, Obdulia; Oyarzabal, Julen; Valencia, Alfonso; Krallinger, Martin

    2017-05-22

    A considerable effort has been devoted to retrieve systematically information for genes and proteins as well as relationships between them. Despite the importance of chemical compounds and drugs as a central bio-entity in pharmacological and biological research, only a limited number of freely available chemical text-mining/search engine technologies are currently accessible. Here we present LimTox (Literature Mining for Toxicology), a web-based online biomedical search tool with special focus on adverse hepatobiliary reactions. It integrates a range of text mining, named entity recognition and information extraction components. LimTox relies on machine-learning, rule-based, pattern-based and term lookup strategies. This system processes scientific abstracts, a set of full text articles and medical agency assessment reports. Although the main focus of LimTox is on adverse liver events, it enables also basic searches for other organ level toxicity associations (nephrotoxicity, cardiotoxicity, thyrotoxicity and phospholipidosis). This tool supports specialized search queries for: chemical compounds/drugs, genes (with additional emphasis on key enzymes in drug metabolism, namely P450 cytochromes-CYPs) and biochemical liver markers. The LimTox website is free and open to all users and there is no login requirement. LimTox can be accessed at: http://limtox.bioinfo.cnio.es. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  19. Toxicological screening in urine: comparison of two automated HPLC screening systems, toxicological identification system (TOX.I.S.*) versus REMEDI-HS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönberg, Lena; Grobosch, Thomas; Lampe, Dagmar; Kloft, Charlotte

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the comparison of two automated high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) screening systems, a newly developed toxicological identification system (TOX.I.S.) versus the commercially available Remedi-HS (Bio-Rad), is presented. Urine samples from 405 cases screened positive for amphetamines, cocaine, and opiates by immunological assays and confirmed by GC-MS were analyzed with both systems. In more than 80% (TOX.I.S.) and 78% (Remedi-HS) of the cases (except for cocaine), the results obtained by both HPLC methods showed agreement with the earlier obtained results by immunoassay prescreening and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The evaluation showed that both automated HPLC methods led to comparable results and can be used alternatively. As the confirmation results for cocaine were rather poor (45% TOX.I.S., 54% Remedi-HS) in comparison to GC-MS, the TOX.I.S. was further optimized for the detection of the cocaine metabolite benzoylecgonine (BEC). The BEC method improved the detectability of BEC from 45% to 80%. Besides confirmation screening, the use of both systems in cases of acute intoxications was investigated. Information about basic compounds was obtained from urine screening by both systems, which therefore were useful as complementary techniques in the toxicological laboratory. The TOX.I.S. offers advantages such as common equipment, modern software, and higher versatility with the opportunity to establish additional methods in the system.

  20. FutureTox II: in vitro data and in silico models for predictive toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, Thomas B; Keller, Douglas A; Sander, Miriam; Carney, Edward W; Doerrer, Nancy G; Eaton, David L; Fitzpatrick, Suzanne Compton; Hastings, Kenneth L; Mendrick, Donna L; Tice, Raymond R; Watkins, Paul B; Whelan, Maurice

    2015-02-01

    FutureTox II, a Society of Toxicology Contemporary Concepts in Toxicology workshop, was held in January, 2014. The meeting goals were to review and discuss the state of the science in toxicology in the context of implementing the NRC 21st century vision of predicting in vivo responses from in vitro and in silico data, and to define the goals for the future. Presentations and discussions were held on priority concerns such as predicting and modeling of metabolism, cell growth and differentiation, effects on sensitive subpopulations, and integrating data into risk assessment. Emerging trends in technologies such as stem cell-derived human cells, 3D organotypic culture models, mathematical modeling of cellular processes and morphogenesis, adverse outcome pathway development, and high-content imaging of in vivo systems were discussed. Although advances in moving towards an in vitro/in silico based risk assessment paradigm were apparent, knowledge gaps in these areas and limitations of technologies were identified. Specific recommendations were made for future directions and research needs in the areas of hepatotoxicity, cancer prediction, developmental toxicity, and regulatory toxicology.

  1. Modelling the Tox21 10 K chemical profiles for in vivo toxicity prediction and mechanism characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ruili; Xia, Menghang; Sakamuru, Srilatha; Zhao, Jinghua; Shahane, Sampada A; Attene-Ramos, Matias; Zhao, Tongan; Austin, Christopher P; Simeonov, Anton

    2016-01-26

    Target-specific, mechanism-oriented in vitro assays post a promising alternative to traditional animal toxicology studies. Here we report the first comprehensive analysis of the Tox21 effort, a large-scale in vitro toxicity screening of chemicals. We test ∼ 10,000 chemicals in triplicates at 15 concentrations against a panel of nuclear receptor and stress response pathway assays, producing more than 50 million data points. Compound clustering by structure similarity and activity profile similarity across the assays reveals structure-activity relationships that are useful for the generation of mechanistic hypotheses. We apply structural information and activity data to build predictive models for 72 in vivo toxicity end points using a cluster-based approach. Models based on in vitro assay data perform better in predicting human toxicity end points than animal toxicity, while a combination of structural and activity data results in better models than using structure or activity data alone. Our results suggest that in vitro activity profiles can be applied as signatures of compound mechanism of toxicity and used in prioritization for more in-depth toxicological testing.

  2. Profiling 976 ToxCast chemicals across 331 enzymatic and receptor signaling assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipes, Nisha S; Martin, Matthew T; Kothiya, Parth; Reif, David M; Judson, Richard S; Richard, Ann M; Houck, Keith A; Dix, David J; Kavlock, Robert J; Knudsen, Thomas B

    2013-06-17

    Understanding potential health risks is a significant challenge due to the large numbers of diverse chemicals with poorly characterized exposures and mechanisms of toxicities. The present study analyzes 976 chemicals (including failed pharmaceuticals, alternative plasticizers, food additives, and pesticides) in Phases I and II of the U.S. EPA's ToxCast project across 331 cell-free enzymatic and ligand-binding high-throughput screening (HTS) assays. Half-maximal activity concentrations (AC50) were identified for 729 chemicals in 256 assays (7,135 chemical-assay pairs). Some of the most commonly affected assays were CYPs (CYP2C9 and CYP2C19), transporters (mitochondrial TSPO, norepinephrine, and dopaminergic), and GPCRs (aminergic). Heavy metals, surfactants, and dithiocarbamate fungicides showed promiscuous but distinctly different patterns of activity, whereas many of the pharmaceutical compounds showed promiscuous activity across GPCRs. Literature analysis confirmed >50% of the activities for the most potent chemical-assay pairs (54) but also revealed 10 missed interactions. Twenty-two chemicals with known estrogenic activity were correctly identified for the majority (77%), missing only the weaker interactions. In many cases, novel findings for previously unreported chemical-target combinations clustered with known chemical-target interactions. Results from this large inventory of chemical-biological interactions can inform read-across methods as well as link potential targets to molecular initiating events in adverse outcome pathways for diverse toxicities.

  3. Genetic and Genomic Dissection of the Cochliobolus heterostrophus Tox1 Locus Controlling Biosynthesis of the Polyketide Virulence Factor T-toxin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turgeon, Barbara G.; Baker, Scott E.

    2007-04-27

    Fungal pathogenesis to plants is an intricate developmental process requiring biological components found in most fungi, as well as factors that are unique to fungal taxa that participate in particular fungus–plant interactions. The host-selective polyketide toxin known as T-toxin produced by Cochliobolus heterostrophus race T, a highly virulent pathogen of maize, is an intriguing example of the latter type of virulence determinant. The Tox1 locus, which controls biosynthesis of T-toxin, originally defined as a single genetic locus, it is, in fact, two exceedingly complex loci on two chromosomes that are reciprocally translocated with respect to their counterparts in weakly pathogenic race O. Race O lacks the Tox1 locus and does not produce T-toxin. Highly virulent race T was first recognized when it caused an epidemic of Southern Corn Leaf Blight, which devastated the US corn crop in 1970. The evolutionary origin of the Tox1 locus remains unknown.

  4. VirtualToxLab — A platform for estimating the toxic potential of drugs, chemicals and natural products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vedani, Angelo, E-mail: angelo.vedani@unibas.ch [Biographics Laboratory 3R, Klingelbergstrasse 50, 4056 Basel (Switzerland); Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 50, 4056 Basel (Switzerland); Dobler, Max [Biographics Laboratory 3R, Klingelbergstrasse 50, 4056 Basel (Switzerland); Smieško, Martin [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 50, 4056 Basel (Switzerland)

    2012-06-01

    The VirtualToxLab is an in silico technology for estimating the toxic potential (endocrine and metabolic disruption, some aspects of carcinogenicity and cardiotoxicity) of drugs, chemicals and natural products. The technology is based on an automated protocol that simulates and quantifies the binding of small molecules towards a series of proteins, known or suspected to trigger adverse effects. The toxic potential, a non-linear function ranging from 0.0 (none) to 1.0 (extreme), is derived from the individual binding affinities of a compound towards currently 16 target proteins: 10 nuclear receptors (androgen, estrogen α, estrogen β, glucocorticoid, liver X, mineralocorticoid, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, progesterone, thyroid α, and thyroid β), four members of the cytochrome P450 enzyme family (1A2, 2C9, 2D6, and 3A4), a cytosolic transcription factor (aryl hydrocarbon receptor) and a potassium ion channel (hERG). The interface to the technology allows building and uploading molecular structures, viewing and downloading results and, most importantly, rationalizing any prediction at the atomic level by interactively analyzing the binding mode of a compound with its target protein(s) in real-time 3D. The VirtualToxLab has been used to predict the toxic potential for over 2500 compounds: the results are posted on (http://www.virtualtoxlab.org). The free platform — the OpenVirtualToxLab — is accessible (in client–server mode) over the Internet. It is free of charge for universities, governmental agencies, regulatory bodies and non-profit organizations. -- Highlights: ► In silico technology for estimating the toxic potential of drugs and chemicals. ► Simulation of binding towards 16 proteins suspected to trigger adverse effects. ► Mechanistic interpretation and real-time 3D visualization. ► Accessible over the Internet. ► Free of charge for universities, governmental agencies, regulatory bodies and NPOs.

  5. CalTOX, a multimedia total exposure model for hazardous-waste sites; Part 1, Executive summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKone, T.E.

    1993-06-01

    CalTOX has been developed as a spreadsheet model to assist in health-risk assessments that address contaminated soils and the contamination of adjacent air, surface water, sediments, and ground water. The modeling effort includes a multimedia transport and transformation model, exposure scenario models, and efforts to quantify and reduce uncertainty in multimedia, multiple-pathway exposure models. This report provides an overview of the CalTOX model components, lists the objectives of the model, describes the philosophy under which the model was developed, identifies the chemical classes for which the model can be used, and describes critical sensitivities and uncertainties. The multimedia transport and transformation model is a dynamic model that can be used to assess time-varying concentrations of contaminants introduced initially to soil layers or for contaminants released continuously to air or water. This model assists the user in examining how chemical and landscape properties impact both the ultimate route and quantity of human contact. Multimedia, multiple pathway exposure models are used in the CalTOX model to estimate average daily potential doses within a human population in the vicinity of a hazardous substances release site. The exposure models encompass twenty-three exposure pathways. The exposure assessment process consists of relating contaminant concentrations in the multimedia model compartments to contaminant concentrations in the media with which a human population has contact (personal air, tap water, foods, household dusts soils, etc.). The average daily dose is the product of the exposure concentrations in these contact media and an intake or uptake factor that relates the concentrations to the distributions of potential dose within the population.

  6. VirtualToxLab - a platform for estimating the toxic potential of drugs, chemicals and natural products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedani, Angelo; Dobler, Max; Smieško, Martin

    2012-06-01

    The VirtualToxLab is an in silico technology for estimating the toxic potential (endocrine and metabolic disruption, some aspects of carcinogenicity and cardiotoxicity) of drugs, chemicals and natural products. The technology is based on an automated protocol that simulates and quantifies the binding of small molecules towards a series of proteins, known or suspected to trigger adverse effects. The toxic potential, a non-linear function ranging from 0.0 (none) to 1.0 (extreme), is derived from the individual binding affinities of a compound towards currently 16 target proteins: 10 nuclear receptors (androgen, estrogen α, estrogen β, glucocorticoid, liver X, mineralocorticoid, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, progesterone, thyroid α, and thyroid β), four members of the cytochrome P450 enzyme family (1A2, 2C9, 2D6, and 3A4), a cytosolic transcription factor (aryl hydrocarbon receptor) and a potassium ion channel (hERG). The interface to the technology allows building and uploading molecular structures, viewing and downloading results and, most importantly, rationalizing any prediction at the atomic level by interactively analyzing the binding mode of a compound with its target protein(s) in real-time 3D. The VirtualToxLab has been used to predict the toxic potential for over 2500 compounds: the results are posted on http://www.virtualtoxlab.org. The free platform - the OpenVirtualToxLab - is accessible (in client-server mode) over the Internet. It is free of charge for universities, governmental agencies, regulatory bodies and non-profit organizations.

  7. EU framework 6 project: predictive toxicology (PredTox)--overview and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suter, Laura; Schroeder, Susanne; Meyer, Kirstin; Gautier, Jean-Charles; Amberg, Alexander; Wendt, Maria; Gmuender, Hans; Mally, Angela; Boitier, Eric; Ellinger-Ziegelbauer, Heidrun; Matheis, Katja; Pfannkuch, Friedlieb

    2011-04-15

    In this publication, we report the outcome of the integrated EU Framework 6 PROJECT: Predictive Toxicology (PredTox), including methodological aspects and overall conclusions. Specific details including data analysis and interpretation are reported in separate articles in this issue. The project, partly funded by the EU, was carried out by a consortium of 15 pharmaceutical companies, 2 SMEs, and 3 universities. The effects of 16 test compounds were characterized using conventional toxicological parameters and "omics" technologies. The three major observed toxicities, liver hypertrophy, bile duct necrosis and/or cholestasis, and kidney proximal tubular damage were analyzed in detail. The combined approach of "omics" and conventional toxicology proved a useful tool for mechanistic investigations and the identification of putative biomarkers. In our hands and in combination with histopathological assessment, target organ transcriptomics was the most prolific approach for the generation of mechanistic hypotheses. Proteomics approaches were relatively time-consuming and required careful standardization. NMR-based metabolomics detected metabolite changes accompanying histopathological findings, providing limited additional mechanistic information. Conversely, targeted metabolite profiling with LC/GC-MS was very useful for the investigation of bile duct necrosis/cholestasis. In general, both proteomics and metabolomics were supportive of other findings. Thus, the outcome of this program indicates that "omics" technologies can help toxicologists to make better informed decisions during exploratory toxicological studies. The data support that hypothesis on mode of action and discovery of putative biomarkers are tangible outcomes of integrated "omics" analysis. Qualification of biomarkers remains challenging, in particular in terms of identification, mechanistic anchoring, appropriate specificity, and sensitivity.

  8. Evolutionary history of x-tox genes in three lepidopteran species: origin, evolution of primary and secondary structure and alternative splicing, generating a repertoire of immune-related proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Alençon, Emmanuelle; Bierne, Nicolas; Girard, Pierre-Alain; Magdelenat, Ghislaine; Gimenez, Sylvie; Seninet, Imène; Escoubas, Jean-Michel

    2013-01-01

    The proteins of the X-tox family have imperfectly conserved tandem repeats of several defensin-like motifs known as cysteine-stabilized αβ (CS-αβ) motifs. These immune-related proteins are inducible and expressed principally in hemocytes, but they have lost the antimicrobial properties of the ancestral defensins from which they evolved. We compared x-tox gene structure and expression in three lepidopteran species (Spodoptera frugiperda, Helicoverpa armigera and Bombyx mori). Synteny and phylogenetic analyses showed that the x-tox exons encoding CS-αβ motifs were phylogenetically closely related to defensin genes mapping to chromosomal positions close to the x-tox genes. We were able to define two groups of paralogous x-tox exons (three in Noctuids) that each followed the expected species tree. These results suggest that the ancestor of the three species already possessed an x-tox gene with at least two proto-domains, and an additional duplication/fusion should have occurred in the ancestor of the two noctuid species. An expansion of the number of exons subsequently occurred in each lineage. Alternatively, the proto x-tox gene possessed more copy and each group of x-tox domains might undergo concerted evolution through gene conversion. Accelerated protein evolution was detected in x-tox domains when compared to related defensins, concomitantly to multiplication of exons and/or the possible activation of concerted evolution. The x-tox genes of the three species have similar structural organizations, with repeat motifs composed of CS-αβ-encoding exons flanked by introns in phase 1. Diverse mechanisms underlie this organization: (i) the acquisition of new repeat motifs, (ii) the duplication of preexisting repeat motifs and (iii) the duplication of modules. A comparison of gDNA and cDNA structures showed that alternative splicing results in the production of multiple X-tox protein isoforms from the x-tox genes. Differences in the number and sequence of CS

  9. 肠出血性大肠杆菌O157:H7 toxB基因的分片段克隆和表达%Cloning and expression of toxB gene in segments from enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张雪寒; 栾晓婷; 何孔旺; 倪艳秀; 周俊明

    2014-01-01

    Based on the toxB sequence on GenBank, six primers were designed to amp1ify the toxB gene. The PCR fragments and pGEX-4T-1 vector were digested with EcoRⅠ and XhoⅠ, 1igated with T4 DNA 1igase and transformed into the comp1ement BL21(p1ys)to construct recombinant BL21(p1ys)( pGEX-4T-1-toxB). After induced by IPTG, recombi-nant ToxB proteins were expressed. SDS-PAGE ana1ysis revea1ed that the mo1ecu1ar mass of six recombinant ToxB proteins were 8. 1×104, 8. 3×104, 8. 4×104, 8. 3×104, 8. 0×104 and 8. 7×104, respective1y. Western b1otting assay using rabbit sera against EHEC O157 : H7 as primary antibody indicated that a11 six recombinant proteins had good immunogenicities.%根据GenBank已有toxB基因全长序列,分别设计6对引物扩增toxB基因,克隆到质粒pGEX-4T-1,构建重组菌BL21(p1ys)(pGEX-4T-1-toxB),IPTG诱导表达重组蛋白质,用Western b1ot鉴定重组蛋白质免疫原性. toxB基因片段大小分别为1531 bp、1590 bp、1609 bp、1603 bp、1525 bp和1690 bp,重组蛋白质分子量分别为8.1×104、8.3×104、8.4×104、8.3×104、8.0×104和8.7×104.以兔源EHEC O157: H7抗血清为一抗,Western b1ot分析结果显示6个重组蛋白质均具有良好的免疫原性.

  10. The ToxBank Data Warehouse: Supporting the Replacement of In Vivo Repeated Dose Systemic Toxicity Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohonen, Pekka; Benfenati, Emilio; Bower, David; Ceder, Rebecca; Crump, Michael; Cross, Kevin; Grafström, Roland C; Healy, Lyn; Helma, Christoph; Jeliazkova, Nina; Jeliazkov, Vedrin; Maggioni, Silvia; Miller, Scott; Myatt, Glenn; Rautenberg, Michael; Stacey, Glyn; Willighagen, Egon; Wiseman, Jeff; Hardy, Barry

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the SEURAT-1 (Safety Evaluation Ultimately Replacing Animal Testing-1) research cluster, comprised of seven EU FP7 Health projects co-financed by Cosmetics Europe, is to generate a proof-of-concept to show how the latest technologies, systems toxicology and toxicogenomics can be combined to deliver a test replacement for repeated dose systemic toxicity testing on animals. The SEURAT-1 strategy is to adopt a mode-of-action framework to describe repeated dose toxicity, combining in vitro and in silico methods to derive predictions of in vivo toxicity responses. ToxBank is the cross-cluster infrastructure project whose activities include the development of a data warehouse to provide a web-accessible shared repository of research data and protocols, a physical compounds repository, reference or "gold compounds" for use across the cluster (available via wiki.toxbank.net), and a reference resource for biomaterials. Core technologies used in the data warehouse include the ISA-Tab universal data exchange format, REpresentational State Transfer (REST) web services, the W3C Resource Description Framework (RDF) and the OpenTox standards. We describe the design of the data warehouse based on cluster requirements, the implementation based on open standards, and finally the underlying concepts and initial results of a data analysis utilizing public data related to the gold compounds. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. A new class of inhibitors of the AraC family virulence regulator Vibrio cholerae ToxT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodbrey, Anne K.; Onyango, Evans O.; Pellegrini, Maria; Kovacikova, Gabriela; Taylor, Ronald K.; Gribble, Gordon W.; Kull, F. Jon

    2017-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae is responsible for the diarrheal disease cholera that infects millions of people worldwide. While vaccines protecting against cholera exist, and oral rehydration therapy is an effective treatment method, the disease will remain a global health threat until long-term solutions such as improved sanitation and access to clean water become widely available. Because of this, there is a pressing need for potent therapeutics that can either mitigate cholera symptoms, or act prophylactically to prevent the virulent effects of a cholera infection. Here we report the design, synthesis, and characterization of a set of compounds that bind and inhibit ToxT, the transcription factor that directly regulates the two primary V. cholerae virulence factors. Using the folded structure of the monounsaturated fatty acid observed in the X-ray structure of ToxT as a template, we designed ten novel compounds that inhibit the virulence cascade to a greater degree than any known inhibitor. Our findings provide a structural and functional basis for the development of viable antivirulence therapeutics that combat cholera and, potentially, other forms of bacterial pathogenic disease. PMID:28332578

  12. Conjugated Linoleic Acid Reduces Cholera Toxin Production In Vitro and In Vivo by Inhibiting Vibrio cholerae ToxT Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Withey, Jeffrey H; Nag, Drubhajyoti; Plecha, Sarah C; Sinha, Ritam; Koley, Hemanta

    2015-12-01

    The severe diarrheal disease cholera is endemic in over 50 countries. Current therapies for cholera patients involve oral and/or intravenous rehydration, often combined with the use of antibiotics to shorten the duration and intensity of the disease. However, as antibiotic resistance increases, treatment options will become limited. Linoleic acid has been shown to be a potent negative effector of V. cholerae virulence that acts on the major virulence transcription regulator protein, ToxT, to inhibit virulence gene expression. ToxT activates transcription of the two major virulence factors required for disease, cholera toxin (CT) and toxin-coregulated pilus (TCP). A conjugated form of linoleic acid (CLA) is currently sold over the counter as a dietary supplement and is generally recognized as safe by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. This study examined whether CLA could be used as a new therapy to reduce CT production, which, in turn, would decrease disease duration and intensity in cholera patients. CLA could be used in place of traditional antibiotics and would be very unlikely to generate resistance, as it affects only virulence factor production and not bacterial growth or survival. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. A new class of inhibitors of the AraC family virulence regulator Vibrio cholerae ToxT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodbrey, Anne K; Onyango, Evans O; Pellegrini, Maria; Kovacikova, Gabriela; Taylor, Ronald K; Gribble, Gordon W; Kull, F Jon

    2017-03-23

    Vibrio cholerae is responsible for the diarrheal disease cholera that infects millions of people worldwide. While vaccines protecting against cholera exist, and oral rehydration therapy is an effective treatment method, the disease will remain a global health threat until long-term solutions such as improved sanitation and access to clean water become widely available. Because of this, there is a pressing need for potent therapeutics that can either mitigate cholera symptoms, or act prophylactically to prevent the virulent effects of a cholera infection. Here we report the design, synthesis, and characterization of a set of compounds that bind and inhibit ToxT, the transcription factor that directly regulates the two primary V. cholerae virulence factors. Using the folded structure of the monounsaturated fatty acid observed in the X-ray structure of ToxT as a template, we designed ten novel compounds that inhibit the virulence cascade to a greater degree than any known inhibitor. Our findings provide a structural and functional basis for the development of viable antivirulence therapeutics that combat cholera and, potentially, other forms of bacterial pathogenic disease.

  14. Conjugated Linoleic Acid Reduces Cholera Toxin Production In Vitro and In Vivo by Inhibiting Vibrio cholerae ToxT Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nag, Drubhajyoti; Plecha, Sarah C.; Sinha, Ritam; Koley, Hemanta

    2015-01-01

    The severe diarrheal disease cholera is endemic in over 50 countries. Current therapies for cholera patients involve oral and/or intravenous rehydration, often combined with the use of antibiotics to shorten the duration and intensity of the disease. However, as antibiotic resistance increases, treatment options will become limited. Linoleic acid has been shown to be a potent negative effector of V. cholerae virulence that acts on the major virulence transcription regulator protein, ToxT, to inhibit virulence gene expression. ToxT activates transcription of the two major virulence factors required for disease, cholera toxin (CT) and toxin-coregulated pilus (TCP). A conjugated form of linoleic acid (CLA) is currently sold over the counter as a dietary supplement and is generally recognized as safe by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. This study examined whether CLA could be used as a new therapy to reduce CT production, which, in turn, would decrease disease duration and intensity in cholera patients. CLA could be used in place of traditional antibiotics and would be very unlikely to generate resistance, as it affects only virulence factor production and not bacterial growth or survival. PMID:26392502

  15. Identification of ToxA-Interacting Proteins Suggests a Possible Role for Pathogenesis-Related Protein 1(PR-1) in Mediating Stagonospora Nodorum-wheat Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ToxA is a proteinaceous host-selective toxin produced by the wheat fungal pathogens Stagonospora nodorum and Pyrenophora tritici-repentis. Sensitivity to the toxin and susceptibility to the fungus are both controlled by a single dominant gene (Tsn1) in the host. Map-based cloning has revealed that T...

  16. Kiemgetallen van facultatief anaerobe bacterien en relatieve gewichten van thymus, milt en coecum bij N:NIH muizen en Riv:TOX ratten, gehouden onder SPF condities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boot R; Bakker RHG; Veenema JL; LPM

    1994-01-01

    This report describes variations in the levels of groups of facultatively anaerobic bacteria in the intestinal tract and the relative weights of caecum, thymus and spleen in N:NIH mice and Riv:TOX rats kept under SPF conditions. Considerable variation in the composition of the enteric bacterial

  17. CAirTOX: A compartment model for assessing the fate of and human exposure to toxic-chemical emissions to air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKone, T.E.

    1993-10-01

    CAirTOX has been developed as a spreadsheet model to assist in making a risk assessment of toxic air emissions. With CAirTOX, one can address how contaminants released to an air basin can lead to contamination of soil, food, surface water, and sediments. The modeling effort includes a multimedia transport and transformation model, exposure scenario models, and efforts to quantify uncertainty in multimedia, multiple-pathway exposure assessments. The multimedia transport and transformation model is a steady-state, but non-equilibrium model that can be used to assess concentrations of contaminants released continuously to air. In Part 1, the authors describe the multimedia transport and transformation model used to determine the fate of air emissions. In Part 2, they describe inputs and data needs for CAirTOX and the development of a set of landscape factors, which can be used to represent regional air basin/water-shed systems in California. In Part 3, they describe the multiple-pathway exposure scenarios and exposure algorithms. In Part 4, they compare the HRA approach and results and the CAirTOX exposure equations. In Part 5, they consider model sensitivity and uncertainty to determine how variability and uncertainty in model inputs affects the precision, accuracy, and credibility of the model output.

  18. Computation Modeling of Limb-bud Dysmorphogenesis: Predicting Cellular Dynamics and Key Events in Developmental Toxicity with a Multicellular Systems Model (FutureToxII)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congenital limb malformations are among the most frequent malformation occurs in humans, with a frequency of about 1 in 500 to 1 in 1000 human live births. ToxCast is profiling the bioactivity of thousands of chemicals based on high-throughput (HTS) and computational methods that...

  19. High-throughput Screening of ToxCast™ Phase I Chemicals in a Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell (mESC) Assay Reveals Disruption of Potential Toxicity Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little information is available regarding the potential for many commercial chemicals to induce developmental toxicity. The mESC Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytoxicity (ACDC) assay is a high-throughput screen used to close this data gap. Thus, ToxCast™ Phase I chemicals wer...

  20. Meeting Report: FutureTox II: Contemporary Concepts in Toxicology “Pathways to Prediction: In Vitro and In Silico Models for Predictive Toxicology”

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Society of Toxicology (SOT) held avery successful FutureTox II Contemporary Concepts in Toxicology (CCT) Conference in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, on January 16th and 17th, 2014. There were over 291 attendees representing industry, government and academia; the sessions were ...

  1. LiverTox: Advanced QSAR and Toxicogeomic Software for Hepatotoxicity Prediction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, P-Y.; Yuracko, K. (YAHSGS, LLC)

    2011-02-25

    YAHSGS LLC and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) established a CRADA in an attempt to develop a predictive system using a pre-existing ORNL computational neural network and wavelets format. This was in the interest of addressing national needs for toxicity prediction system to help overcome the significant drain of resources (money and time) being directed toward developing chemical agents for commerce. The research project has been supported through an STTR mechanism and funded by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences beginning Phase I in 2004 (CRADA No. ORNL-04-0688) and extending Phase II through 2007 (ORNL NFE-06-00020). To attempt the research objectives and aims outlined under this CRADA, state-of-the-art computational neural network and wavelet methods were used in an effort to design a predictive toxicity system that used two independent areas on which to base the system’s predictions. These two areas were quantitative structure-activity relationships and gene-expression data obtained from microarrays. A third area, using the new Massively Parallel Signature Sequencing (MPSS) technology to assess gene expression, also was attempted but had to be dropped because the company holding the rights to this promising MPSS technology went out of business. A research-scale predictive toxicity database system called Multi-Intelligent System for Toxicogenomic Applications (MISTA) was developed and its feasibility for use as a predictor of toxicological activity was tested. The fundamental focus of the CRADA was an attempt and effort to operate the MISTA database using the ORNL neural network. This effort indicated the potential that such a fully developed system might be used to assist in predicting such biological endpoints as hepatotoxcity and neurotoxicity. The MISTA/LiverTox approach if eventually fully developed might also be useful for automatic processing of microarray data to predict modes of action. A technical paper describing the

  2. The eTOX Data-Sharing Project to Advance in Silico Drug-Induced Toxicity Prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montserrat Cases

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The high-quality in vivo preclinical safety data produced by the pharmaceutical industry during drug development, which follows numerous strict guidelines, are mostly not available in the public domain. These safety data are sometimes published as a condensed summary for the few compounds that reach the market, but the majority of studies are never made public and are often difficult to access in an automated way, even sometimes within the owning company itself. It is evident from many academic and industrial examples, that useful data mining and model development requires large and representative data sets and careful curation of the collected data. In 2010, under the auspices of the Innovative Medicines Initiative, the eTOX project started with the objective of extracting and sharing preclinical study data from paper or pdf archives of toxicology departments of the 13 participating pharmaceutical companies and using such data for establishing a detailed, well-curated database, which could then serve as source for read-across approaches (early assessment of the potential toxicity of a drug candidate by comparison of similar structure and/or effects and training of predictive models. The paper describes the efforts undertaken to allow effective data sharing intellectual property (IP protection and set up of adequate controlled vocabularies and to establish the database (currently with over 4000 studies contributed by the pharma companies corresponding to more than 1400 compounds. In addition, the status of predictive models building and some specific features of the eTOX predictive system (eTOXsys are presented as decision support knowledge-based tools for drug development process at an early stage.

  3. The eTOX data-sharing project to advance in silico drug-induced toxicity prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cases, Montserrat; Briggs, Katharine; Steger-Hartmann, Thomas; Pognan, François; Marc, Philippe; Kleinöder, Thomas; Schwab, Christof H; Pastor, Manuel; Wichard, Jörg; Sanz, Ferran

    2014-11-14

    The high-quality in vivo preclinical safety data produced by the pharmaceutical industry during drug development, which follows numerous strict guidelines, are mostly not available in the public domain. These safety data are sometimes published as a condensed summary for the few compounds that reach the market, but the majority of studies are never made public and are often difficult to access in an automated way, even sometimes within the owning company itself. It is evident from many academic and industrial examples, that useful data mining and model development requires large and representative data sets and careful curation of the collected data. In 2010, under the auspices of the Innovative Medicines Initiative, the eTOX project started with the objective of extracting and sharing preclinical study data from paper or pdf archives of toxicology departments of the 13 participating pharmaceutical companies and using such data for establishing a detailed, well-curated database, which could then serve as source for read-across approaches (early assessment of the potential toxicity of a drug candidate by comparison of similar structure and/or effects) and training of predictive models. The paper describes the efforts undertaken to allow effective data sharing intellectual property (IP) protection and set up of adequate controlled vocabularies) and to establish the database (currently with over 4000 studies contributed by the pharma companies corresponding to more than 1400 compounds). In addition, the status of predictive models building and some specific features of the eTOX predictive system (eTOXsys) are presented as decision support knowledge-based tools for drug development process at an early stage.

  4. Real-time cell toxicity profiling of Tox21 10K compounds reveals cytotoxicity dependent toxicity pathway linkage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Jui-Hua; Huang, Ruili; Lin, Ja-An; Sedykh, Alexander; Zhao, Jinghua; Tice, Raymond R; Paules, Richard S; Xia, Menghang; Auerbach, Scott S

    2017-01-01

    Cytotoxicity is a commonly used in vitro endpoint for evaluating chemical toxicity. In support of the U.S. Tox21 screening program, the cytotoxicity of ~10K chemicals was interrogated at 0, 8, 16, 24, 32, & 40 hours of exposure in a concentration dependent fashion in two cell lines (HEK293, HepG2) using two multiplexed, real-time assay technologies. One technology measures the metabolic activity of cells (i.e., cell viability, glo) while the other evaluates cell membrane integrity (i.e., cell death, flor). Using glo technology, more actives and greater temporal variations were seen in HEK293 cells, while results for the flor technology were more similar across the two cell types. Chemicals were grouped into classes based on their cytotoxicity kinetics profiles and these classes were evaluated for their associations with activity in the Tox21 nuclear receptor and stress response pathway assays. Some pathways, such as the activation of H2AX, were associated with the fast-responding cytotoxicity classes, while others, such as activation of TP53, were associated with the slow-responding cytotoxicity classes. By clustering pathways based on their degree of association to the different cytotoxicity kinetics labels, we identified clusters of pathways where active chemicals presented similar kinetics of cytotoxicity. Such linkages could be due to shared underlying biological processes between pathways, for example, activation of H2AX and heat shock factor. Others involving nuclear receptor activity are likely due to shared chemical structures rather than pathway level interactions. Based on the linkage between androgen receptor antagonism and Nrf2 activity, we surmise that a subclass of androgen receptor antagonists cause cytotoxicity via oxidative stress that is associated with Nrf2 activation. In summary, the real-time cytotoxicity screen provides informative chemical cytotoxicity kinetics data related to their cytotoxicity mechanisms, and with our analysis, it is

  5. Risk-Association of Five SNPs in TOX3/LOC643714 with Breast Cancer in Southern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuanqiu He

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The specific mechanism by which low-risk genetic variants confer breast cancer risk is currently unclear, with contradictory evidence on the role of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in TOX3/LOC643714 as a breast cancer susceptibility locus. Investigations of this locus using a Chinese population may indicate whether the findings initially identified in a European population are generalizable to other populations, and may provide new insight into the role of genetic variants in the etiology of breast cancer. In this case-control study, 623 Chinese female breast cancer patients and 620 cancer-free controls were recruited to investigate the role of five SNPs in TOX3/LOC643714 (rs8051542, rs12443621, rs3803662, rs4784227, and rs3112612; Linkage disequilibrium (LD pattern analysis was performed. Additionally, we evaluated how these common SNPs influence the risk of specific types of breast cancer, as defined by estrogen receptor (ER status, progesterone receptor (PR status and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2 status. Significant associations with breast cancer risk were observed for rs4784227 and rs8051542 with odds ratios (OR of 1.31 ((95% confidence intervals (CI, 1.10–1.57 and 1.26 (95% CI, 1.02–1.56, respectively, per T allele. The T-rs8051542 allele was significantly associated with ER-positive and HER2-negative carriers. No significant association existed between rs12443621, rs3803662, and rs3112612 polymorphisms and risk of breast cancer. Our results support the hypothesis that the applicability of a common susceptibility locus must be confirmed among genetically different populations, which may together explain an appreciable fraction of the genetic etiology of breast cancer.

  6. Performance of the TechLab C. DIFF CHEK-60 enzyme immunoassay (EIA) in combination with the C. difficile Tox A/B II EIA kit, the Triage C. difficile panel immunoassay, and a cytotoxin assay for diagnosis of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snell, Heather; Ramos, Meredith; Longo, Sue; John, Michael; Hussain, Zafar

    2004-10-01

    We compared a recently marketed enzyme immunoassay for glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), TechLab's C. DIFF CHEK-60 (TL-GDH), in combination with the C. difficile Tox A/B II enzyme immunoassay (Tox-A/B) with (i) the Triage C. difficile test, which detects both GDH (TR-GDH) and toxin A (TR-Tox-A); (ii) an in-house cytotoxin assay (C-Tox); and (iii) stool cultures for C. difficile. All C. difficile isolates were tested for the presence of the toxin genes by PCR. If a toxin gene-positive strain of Clostridium difficile was recovered and a toxin was detected by any method, the result was considered to be truly positive. Eighty-seven of 93 and 79 of 93 C. difficile culture-positive samples were also TL-GDH and TR-GDH positive, respectively. No test was able to detect toxin in all samples with true-positive results. Tox-A/B and TR-Tox-A in combination with the GDH detection tests and C-Tox were able to identify 52 and 50 samples with true-positive results. Tox-A/B and TR-Tox-A would have missed 15 and 31% of cases of C. difficile-associated diarrhea, respectively, if used alone.

  7. E-SovTox: An online database of the main publicly-available sources of toxicity data concerning REACH-relevant chemicals published in the Russian language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sihtmäe, Mariliis; Blinova, Irina; Aruoja, Villem; Dubourguier, Henri-Charles; Legrand, Nicolas; Kahru, Anne

    2010-08-01

    A new open-access online database, E-SovTox, is presented. E-SovTox provides toxicological data for substances relevant to the EU Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH) system, from publicly-available Russian language data sources. The database contains information selected mainly from scientific journals published during the Soviet Union era. The main information source for this database - the journal, Gigiena Truda i Professional'nye Zabolevania [Industrial Hygiene and Occupational Diseases], published between 1957 and 1992 - features acute, but also chronic, toxicity data for numerous industrial chemicals, e.g. for rats, mice, guinea-pigs and rabbits. The main goal of the abovementioned toxicity studies was to derive the maximum allowable concentration limits for industrial chemicals in the occupational health settings of the former Soviet Union. Thus, articles featured in the database include mostly data on LD50 values, skin and eye irritation, skin sensitisation and cumulative properties. Currently, the E-SovTox database contains toxicity data selected from more than 500 papers covering more than 600 chemicals. The user is provided with the main toxicity information, as well as abstracts of these papers in Russian and in English (given as provided in the original publication). The search engine allows cross-searching of the database by the name or CAS number of the compound, and the author of the paper. The E-SovTox database can be used as a decision-support tool by researchers and regulators for the hazard assessment of chemical substances.

  8. TOX连接技术在板件连接中的应用%Application of TOX Joining Technology in the Sheet Metal Industry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐宽强

    2013-01-01

    With the intense competition and rapid development of modern sheet metal manufacturing industry, higher requirements to joining technology used in metal sheet were raised, traditional spot welding and riveting as non-detachable metal sheet spot jointing way have disadvantages in economy and technology, and limitations in usage. TOX joining is a new technique of joining method, or called rivetless riveting. This paper mainly introduced the principle of TOX joining, its advantages compared with other joining methods, and TOX joining mould &- devices and its application in the sheet metal industry.%现代钣金制造业的激烈竞争和快速发展,对行业中金属板件的连接技术提出了越来越高的要求,传统的点焊、铆接作为业界常用的不可拆卸式金属板件的点连接方法,均存在着经济及技术上的不足和使用上的局限性.TOX连接是一种新的连接技术,又称为无铆钉铆接.本文主要介绍了TOX连接的原理,TOX连接与其他点连接方式相比的优越性,TOX连接采用的模具和设备及其在板件连接中的具体应用.

  9. Alterações ultra-estruturais do hepatocito na forma aguda (toxêmica da esquistossomose mansoni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Raso

    1978-12-01

    Full Text Available Os aa. estudaram as alterações ultra-estruturais do hepatócito na forma aguda, toxêmica, da esquístossomose em sete pacientes, membros de uma mesma família, infectatos em idênticas condições em um córrego existente no município de Sabará (MG e não tratados especificamente para a esquistossomose. O estudo vem confirmar a nossa assertiva de que, na esquistossomose, não hâ um ataque direto e sistematizado aos hepatócitos e que as lesões destes são secundárias e decorrem, principalmente, das alterações do sistema vascular estromático. Nos sete casos estudados as alterações ultra-estruturais foram inespecfficas, pouco acentuadas e se caracterizaram sobretudo pelas modificações das organelas citoplasmáticas (dilatação das cisternas do reticulo, apagamento das cristas mitocondriais, desacoplamento de ribossomas, acúmulo de glicogênio. Foi freqüente, também, a presença de lisossomosvolumosos, inclusões e corpos residuais nos hepatócitos Estes achados à microscopia eletrônica espelham o comportamento funcional do hepatócito na vigência da forma aguda, toxêmica, da esquistossomose e explicam o freqüente encontro de células claras à microscopia óptica.The authors study the ultrastructural changes within the hepatocyte in the acute (toxemic form of schistosomiasis. The seven studied patients were all from the same family infected under the same conditions at a creek near Sabara city, state of Minas Gerais, and they did not go under any specific therapy rega rding schistosomiasis. This report confirms our assertive that, there is not a primary and systematical attack directed to hepatocytes and their lesions are subordinated to changes within the stromatic vascular system. The ultrastructural changes found in the seven studied cases were all mild and non-specific and were characterized by citoplasmic organelles changes specially: (dilation of the reticulum's cisterns, effacement of mitochondrias cristae

  10. Using Online Tool (iPrior) for Modeling ToxCast™ Assays Towards Prioritization of Animal Toxicity Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelaziz, Ahmed; Sushko, Yurii; Novotarskyi, Sergii; Körner, Robert; Brandmaier, Stefan; Tetko, Igor V

    2015-01-01

    The use of long-term animal studies for human and environmental toxicity estimation is more discouraged than ever before. Alternative models for toxicity prediction, including QSAR studies, are gaining more ground. A recent approach is to combine in vitro chemical profiling and in silico chemical descriptors with the knowledge about toxicity pathways to derive a unique signature for toxicity endpoints. In this study we investigate the ToxCast™ Phase I data regarding their ability to predict long-term animal toxicity. We investigated thousands of models constructed in an effort to predict 61 toxicity endpoints using multiple descriptor packages and hundreds of in vitro assays. We investigated the use of in vitro assays and biochemical pathways on model performance. We identified 10 toxicity endpoints where biologically derived descriptors from in vitro assays or pathway perturbations improved the model prediction ability. In vivo toxicity endpoints proved generally challenging to model. Few models were possible to readily model with a balanced accuracy (BA) above 0.7. We also constructed in silico models to predict the outcome of 144 in vitro assays. This showed better statistical metrics with 79 out of 144 assays having median balanced accuracy above 0.7. This suggests that the in vitro datasets have a better modelability than in vivo animal toxicities for the given datasets. Moreover, we published an online platform (http://iprior.ochem.eu) that automates large-scale model building and analysis.

  11. Design of a testing strategy using non-animal based test methods: lessons learnt from the ACuteTox project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp-Schneider, Annette; Prieto, Pilar; Kinsner-Ovaskainen, Agnieszka; Stanzel, Sven

    2013-06-01

    In the framework of toxicology, a testing strategy can be viewed as a series of steps which are taken to come to a final prediction about a characteristic of a compound under study. The testing strategy is performed as a single-step procedure, usually called a test battery, using simultaneously all information collected on different endpoints, or as tiered approach in which a decision tree is followed. Design of a testing strategy involves statistical considerations, such as the development of a statistical prediction model. During the EU FP6 ACuteTox project, several prediction models were proposed on the basis of statistical classification algorithms which we illustrate here. The final choice of testing strategies was not based on statistical considerations alone. However, without thorough statistical evaluations a testing strategy cannot be identified. We present here a number of observations made from the statistical viewpoint which relate to the development of testing strategies. The points we make were derived from problems we had to deal with during the evaluation of this large research project. A central issue during the development of a prediction model is the danger of overfitting. Procedures are presented to deal with this challenge. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Distribution of the ompA-types among ruminant and swine pneumonic strains of Pasteurella multocida exhibiting various cap-locus and toxA patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vougidou, C; Sandalakis, V; Psaroulaki, A; Siarkou, V; Petridou, E; Ekateriniadou, L

    2015-05-01

    Pasteurella multocida is an important pathogen in food-producing animals and numerous virulence genes have been identified in an attempt to elucidate the pathogenesis of pasteurellosis. Currently, some of these genes including the capsule biosynthesis genes, the toxA and the OMPs-encoding genes have been suggested as epidemiological markers. However, the number of studies concerning ruminant isolates is limited, while, no attempt has ever been made to investigate the existence of ompA sequence diversity among P. multocida isolates. The aim of the present study was the comparative analysis of 144 P. multocida pneumonic isolates obtained from sheep, goats, cattle and pigs by determining the distribution of the ompA-types in conjunction with the cap-locus and toxA patterns. The ompA genotypes of the isolates were determined using both a PCR-RFLP method and DNA sequence analysis. The most prevalent capsule biosynthesis gene among the isolates was capA (86.1%); a noticeable, however, rate of capD-positive isolates (38.6%) was found among the ovine isolates that had been associated primarily with the capsule type A in the past. Moreover, an unexpectedly high percentage of toxA-positive pneumonic isolates was noticed among small ruminants (93.2% and 85.7% in sheep and goats, respectively), indicating an important epidemiological role of toxigenic P. multocida for these species. Despite their great heterogeneity, certain ompA-genotypes were associated with specific host species, showing evidence of a host preference. The OmpA-based PCR-RFLP method developed proved to be a valuable tool in typing P. multocida strains.

  13. Tox21Challenge to build predictive models of nuclear receptor and stress response pathways as mediated by exposure to environmental chemicals and drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruili eHuang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tens of thousands of chemicals with poorly understood biological properties are released into the environment each day. High-throughput screening (HTS is potentially a more efficient and cost-effective alternative to traditional toxicity tests. Using HTS, one can profile chemicals for potential adverse effects and prioritize a manageable number for more in-depth testing. Importantly, it can provide clues to mechanism of toxicity. The Tox21 program has generated >50 million quantitative high-throughput screening (qHTS data points. A library of several thousands of compounds, including environmental chemicals and drugs, is screened against a panel of nuclear receptor and stress response pathway assays. The National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS has organized an International data challenge in order to crowd-source data and build predictive toxicity models. This Challenge asks a crowd of researchers to use these data to elucidate the extent to which the interference of biochemical and cellular pathways by compounds can be inferred from chemical structure data. The data generated against the Tox21 library served as the training set for this modeling Challenge. The competition attracted participants from 18 different countries to develop computational models aimed at better predicting chemical toxicity. The winning models from nearly 400 model submissions all achieved >80% accuracy. Several models exceeded 90% accuracy, which was measured by area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC-ROC. Combining the winning models with the knowledge already gained from Tox21 screening data are expected to improve the community’s ability to prioritize novel chemicals with respect to potential human health concern.

  14. The Fatty Acid Regulator FadR Influences the Expression of the Virulence Cascade in the El Tor Biotype of Vibrio cholerae by Modulating the Levels of ToxT via Two Different Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacikova, Gabriela; Lin, Wei; Taylor, Ronald K; Skorupski, Karen

    2017-04-01

    FadR is a master regulator of fatty acid (FA) metabolism that coordinates the pathways of FA degradation and biosynthesis in enteric bacteria. We show here that a ΔfadR mutation in the El Tor biotype of Vibrio cholerae prevents the expression of the virulence cascade by influencing both the transcription and the posttranslational regulation of the master virulence regulator ToxT. FadR is a transcriptional regulator that represses the expression of genes involved in FA degradation, activates the expression of genes involved in unsaturated FA (UFA) biosynthesis, and also activates the expression of two operons involved in saturated FA (SFA) biosynthesis. Since FadR does not bind directly to the toxT promoter, we determined whether the regulation of any of its target genes indirectly influenced ToxT. This was accomplished by individually inserting a double point mutation into the FadR-binding site in the promoter of each target gene, thereby preventing their activation or repression. Although preventing FadR-mediated activation of fabA, which encodes the enzyme that carries out the first step in UFA biosynthesis, did not significantly influence either the transcription or the translation of ToxT, it reduced its levels and prevented virulence gene expression. In the mutant strain unable to carry out FadR-mediated activation of fabA, expressing fabA ectopically restored the levels of ToxT and virulence gene expression. Taken together, the results presented here indicate that V. cholerae FadR influences the virulence cascade in the El Tor biotype by modulating the levels of ToxT via two different mechanisms.IMPORTANCE Fatty acids (FAs) play important roles in membrane lipid homeostasis and energy metabolism in all organisms. In Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of the acute intestinal disease cholera, they also influence virulence by binding into an N-terminal pocket of the master virulence regulator, ToxT, and modulating its activity. FadR is a transcription factor

  15. Acute Toxicity Prediction in Multiple Species by Leveraging Mechanistic ToxCast Mitochondrial Inhibition Data and Simulation of Oral Bioavailability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhhatarai, Barun; Wilson, Daniel M; Bartels, Michael J; Chaudhuri, Shubhra; Price, Paul S; Carney, Edward W

    2015-10-01

    There is great interest in assessing the in vivo toxicity of chemicals using nonanimal alternatives. However, acute mammalian toxicity is not adequately predicted by current in silico or in vitro approaches. Mechanisms of acute toxicity are likely conserved across invertebrate, aquatic, and mammalian species, suggesting that dose-response concordance would be high and in vitro mechanistic data could predict responses in multiple species under conditions of similar bioavailability. We tested this hypothesis by comparing acute toxicity between rat, daphnia, and fish and by comparing their respective acute data to inhibition of mitochondria membrane potential (MMP) using U.S. Environmental Protection Agency ToxCast in vitro high-throughput screening data. Logarithmic scatter plots of acute toxicity data showed a clear relationship between fish, daphnia, and intravenous rat but not oral rat data. Similar plots versus MMP showed a well-delineated upper boundary for fish, daphnia, and intravenous data but were scattered without an upper boundary for rat oral data. Adjustments of acute oral rat toxicity values by simulating fractional absorption and CYP-based metabolism as well as removing compounds with hydrolyzable linkages or flagged as substrates for glucuronidation delineated an upper boundary for rat oral toxicity versus MMP. Mitochondrial inhibition at low concentrations predicted highly acutely toxic chemicals for fish and daphnia but not the rat where toxicity was often attenuated. This use of a single high-throughput screening assay to predict acute toxicity in multiple species represents a milestone and highlights the promise of such approaches but also the need for refined tools to address systemic bioavailability and the impact of limited absorption and first pass metabolism.

  16. ToxGen: an improved reference database for the identification of type B-trichothecene genotypes in Fusarium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Type B trichothecenes, which pose a serious hazard to consumer health, occur worldwide in grains. These mycotoxins are produced mainly by three different trichothecene genotypes/chemotypes: 3ADON (3-acetyldeoxynivalenol), 15ADON (15-acetyldeoxynivalenol) and NIV (nivalenol), named after these three major mycotoxin compounds. Correct identification of these genotypes is elementary for all studies relating to population surveys, fungal ecology and mycotoxicology. Trichothecene producers exhibit enormous strain-dependent chemical diversity, which may result in variation in levels of the genotype’s determining toxin and in the production of low to high amounts of atypical compounds. New high-throughput DNA-sequencing technologies promise to boost the diagnostics of mycotoxin genotypes. However, this requires a reference database containing a satisfactory taxonomic sampling of sequences showing high correlation to actually produced chemotypes. We believe that one of the most pressing current challenges of such a database is the linking of molecular identification with chemical diversity of the strains, as well as other metadata. In this study, we use the Tri12 gene involved in mycotoxin biosynthesis for identification of Tri genotypes through sequence comparison. Tri12 sequences from a range of geographically diverse fungal strains comprising 22 Fusarium species were stored in the ToxGen database, which covers descriptive and up-to-date annotations such as indication on Tri genotype and chemotype of the strains, chemical diversity, information on trichothecene-inducing host, substrate or media, geographical locality, and most recent taxonomic affiliations. The present initiative bridges the gap between the demands of comprehensive studies on trichothecene producers and the existing nucleotide sequence databases, which lack toxicological and other auxiliary data. We invite researchers working in the fields of fungal taxonomy, epidemiology and mycotoxicology to join the

  17. ToxAlerts: a Web server of structural alerts for toxic chemicals and compounds with potential adverse reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sushko, Iurii; Salmina, Elena; Potemkin, Vladimir A; Poda, Gennadiy; Tetko, Igor V

    2012-08-27

    The article presents a Web-based platform for collecting and storing toxicological structural alerts from literature and for virtual screening of chemical libraries to flag potentially toxic chemicals and compounds that can cause adverse side effects. An alert is uniquely identified by a SMARTS template, a toxicological endpoint, and a publication where the alert was described. Additionally, the system allows storing complementary information such as name, comments, and mechanism of action, as well as other data. Most importantly, the platform can be easily used for fast virtual screening of large chemical datasets, focused libraries, or newly designed compounds against the toxicological alerts, providing a detailed profile of the chemicals grouped by structural alerts and endpoints. Such a facility can be used for decision making regarding whether a compound should be tested experimentally, validated with available QSAR models, or eliminated from consideration altogether. The alert-based screening can also be helpful for an easier interpretation of more complex QSAR models. The system is publicly accessible and tightly integrated with the Online Chemical Modeling Environment (OCHEM, http://ochem.eu). The system is open and expandable: any registered OCHEM user can introduce new alerts, browse, edit alerts introduced by other users, and virtually screen his/her data sets against all or selected alerts. The user sets being passed through the structural alerts can be used at OCHEM for other typical tasks: exporting in a wide variety of formats, development of QSAR models, additional filtering by other criteria, etc. The database already contains almost 600 structural alerts for such endpoints as mutagenicity, carcinogenicity, skin sensitization, compounds that undergo metabolic activation, and compounds that form reactive metabolites and, thus, can cause adverse reactions. The ToxAlerts platform is accessible on the Web at http://ochem.eu/alerts, and it is constantly

  18. 食品中副溶血性弧菌toxR和tdh基因双色荧光PCR检测方法的建立%Detection of Vibrio parahaemolyticus toxR and tdh genes in foods by dual-color fluorescent real-time PCR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹冬梅; 袁慕云; 许龙岩; 曹际娟

    2013-01-01

    Objective To establish a novel method to specifically detect Vibrio parahaemolyticus toxR and tdh genes in food by dual-color fluorescent real-time PCR. Methods The primers and probes targeting the toxR (transmembrane transcription activator) and tdh (thermostable direct hemolysin) were designed, and their specificity and sensitivity were tested with the Taqman probe dual-color fluorescent real-time PCR amplifica-tion system. The optimized method was used to detect the isolated bacterial strains and to explore the distribu-tion of toxR and tdh genes. Results Amplification curves of both toxR and tdh genes were obtained from standard V. parahaemolyticus strains and the three V. parahaemolyticus strains isolated from food-poisoning patients. However, no such amplification curve was observed for all the other newly isolated 31 bacterial strains, including Vibrio alginolyticus and L. monocytogenes from the genus Vibrio and the family Enterobacteriaceae. All the 37 food V. parahaemolyticus strains did not carry the tdh virulence gene. Furthermore, the detection sensitivity of this novel method reached 3.6×102 cfu/mL. Conclusion The novel dual-color fluorescent real-time PCR method was able to specifically and effectively detect V. parahaemolyticus in food samples.%目的建立对副溶血性弧菌(Vibrio parahaemolyticus)特异性检测 toxR(跨膜转录激活蛋白)基因和tdh(热稳定性直接溶血素)毒力基因的Taqman探针双色荧光PCR检测方法。方法根据副溶血性弧菌toxR基因和tdh基因,分别设计引物和探针,建立Taqman探针双色荧光PCR扩增体系,进行特异性、灵敏度试验;对副溶血性弧菌分离菌株实施检测,了解其tdh基因和tdh基因分布情况。结果结果表明,副溶血性弧菌标准菌株和3株从食物中毒患者中分离获得的分离株均出现toxR基因和tdh扩增曲线,而溶藻弧菌、单增李斯特菌等31株弧菌属其他菌株和肠杆菌科的菌株未见

  19. Emergence and molecular characterisation of non-toxigenic tox gene-bearing Corynebacterium diphtheriae biovar mitis in the United Kingdom, 2003-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakikhany, K; Neal, S; Efstratiou, A

    2014-06-05

    Non-toxigenic Corynebacterium diphtheriae have become increasingly recognised as emerging pathogens across Europe causing severe invasive disease. A subset of non-toxigenic C. diphtheriae are ‘non-toxigenic tox gene-bearing’ (NTTB) strains; these strains are genotypically toxpositive, but do not express the protein. The circulation of NTTB strains was first observed during the 1990s upsurge of diphtheria in Eastern Europe but has not been reported in other European countries. Circulation of NTTB strains could be considered an increased risk for diphtheria and other related diseases, given their possible role as a tox gene reservoir with the theoretical risk of re-emerging toxin expression. Here we report the characterisation of 108 non-toxigenic C. diphtheriae biovar mitis isolates submitted to the World Health Organization (WHO) Global Reference Centre for Diphtheria at Public Health England, London, between 2003 and 2012, in order to determine the presence of NTTB strains. Using molecular methods, five NTTB isolates were identified; four human isolates (MLST type 212) and one isolate from a companion cat (MLST type 40). The emergence of these strains could indicate continuation of the circulation of potentially toxigenic strains and appropriate laboratory diagnostic methods should be used for detection. Given the complacency that currently exists in Europe awareness with regards to diphtheria diagnostics must be enhanced.

  20. Fine-Mapping the Wheat Snn1 Locus Conferring Sensitivity to the Parastagonospora nodorum Necrotrophic Effector SnTox1 Using an Eight Founder Multiparent Advanced Generation Inter-Cross Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockram, James; Scuderi, Alice; Barber, Toby; Furuki, Eiko; Gardner, Keith A; Gosman, Nick; Kowalczyk, Radoslaw; Phan, Huyen P; Rose, Gemma A; Tan, Kar-Chun; Oliver, Richard P; Mackay, Ian J

    2015-09-28

    The necrotrophic fungus Parastagonospora nodorum is an important pathogen of one of the world's most economically important cereal crops, wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). P. nodorum produces necrotrophic protein effectors that mediate host cell death, providing nutrients for continuation of the infection process. The recent discovery of pathogen effectors has revolutionized disease resistance breeding for necrotrophic diseases in crop species, allowing often complex genetic resistance mechanisms to be broken down into constituent parts. To date, three effectors have been identified in P. nodorum. Here we use the effector, SnTox1, to screen 642 progeny from an eight-parent multiparent advanced generation inter-cross (i.e., MAGIC) population, genotyped with a 90,000-feature single-nucleotide polymorphism array. The MAGIC founders showed a range of sensitivity to SnTox1, with transgressive segregation evident in the progeny. SnTox1 sensitivity showed high heritability, with quantitative trait locus analyses fine-mapping the Snn1 locus to the short arm of chromosome 1B. In addition, a previously undescribed SnTox1 sensitivity locus was identified on the long arm of chromosome 5A, termed here QSnn.niab-5A.1. The peak single-nucleotide polymorphism for the Snn1 locus was converted to the KASP genotyping platform, providing breeders and researchers a simple and cheap diagnostic marker for allelic state at Snn1. Copyright © 2015 Cockram et al.

  1. Incorporating bioavailability into toxicity assessment of Cu-Ni, Cu-Cd, and Ni-Cd mixtures with the extended biotic ligand model and the WHAM-F(tox) approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Hao; Vijver, Martina G; He, Erkai; Liu, Yang; Wang, Peng; Xia, Bing; Smolders, Erik; Versieren, Liske; Peijnenburg, Willie J G M

    2015-12-01

    There are only a limited number of studies that have developed appropriate models which incorporate bioavailability to estimate mixture toxicity. Here, we explored the applicability of the extended biotic ligand model (BLM) and the WHAM-F(tox) approach for predicting and interpreting mixture toxicity, with the assumption that interactions between metal ions obey the BLM theory. Seedlings of lettuce Lactuca sativa were exposed to metal mixtures (Cu-Ni, Cu-Cd, and Ni-Cd) contained in hydroponic solutions for 4 days. Inhibition to root elongation was the endpoint used to quantify the toxic response. Assuming that metal ions compete with each other for binding at a single biotic ligand, the extended BLM succeeded in predicting toxicity of three mixtures to lettuce, with more than 82% of toxicity variation explained. There were no significant differences in the values of f(mix50) (i.e., the overall amounts of metal ions bound to the biotic ligand inducing 50% effect) for the three mixture combinations, showing the possibility of extrapolating these values to other binary metal combinations. The WHAM-F(tox) approach showed a similar level of precision in estimating mixture toxicity while requiring fewer parameters than the BLM-f(mix) model. External validation of the WHAM-F(tox) approach using literature data showed its applicability for other species and other mixtures. The WHAM-F(tox) model is suitable for delineating mixture effects where the extended BLM also applies. Therefore, in case of lower data availability, we recommend the lower parameterized WHAM-F(tox) as an effective approach to incorporate bioavailability in quantifying mixture toxicity.

  2. Testing of chemicals for genetic activity with Saccharomyces cerevisiae: a report of the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency Gene-Tox Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmermann, F.K.; von Borstel, R.C.; von Halle, E.S.; Parry, J.M.; Siebert, D.; Zetterberg, G.; Barale, R.; Loprieno, N.

    1984-01-01

    This review article with over 200 references summarizes the results of mutation screening tests with 492 chemicals using saccharomyces cerevisiae as the test organism. In addition, an extensive description of S. cerevisiae as a test organism is given. Yeast can be used to study genetic effects both in mitotic and in meiotic cells because it can be cultured as a stable haploid or a stable diploid. The most commonly used genetic endpoint has been mitotic recombination either as mitotic crossing-over or mitotic gene conversion. Data were available on tests with 492 chemicals, of which 249 were positive, as reported in 173 articles or reports. The genetic test/carcinogenicity accuracy was 0.74, based on the carcinogen listing established in the gene-tox program. The yeast tests supplement the bacterial tests for detecting agents that act via radical formation, antibacterial drugs, and other chemicals interfering with chromosome segregation and recombination processes.

  3. Editor's Highlight: Screening ToxCast Prioritized Chemicals for PPARG Function in a Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cell Model of Adipogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Briana; Doheny, Daniel L; Black, Michael B; Pendse, Salil N; Wetmore, Barbara A; Clewell, Rebecca A; Andersen, Melvin E; Deisenroth, Chad

    2017-01-01

    The developmental origins of obesity hypothesis posits a multifaceted contribution of factors to the fetal origins of obesity and metabolic disease. Adipocyte hyperplasia in gestation and early childhood may result in predisposition for obesity later in life. Rodent in vitro and in vivo studies indicate that some chemicals may directly affect adipose progenitor cell differentiation, but the human relevance of these findings is unclear. The nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARG) is the master regulator of adipogenesis. Human adipose-derived stem cells (hASC) isolated from adipose tissue express endogenous isoforms of PPARG and represent a biologically relevant cell-type for evaluating activity of PPARG ligands. Here, a multi-endpoint approach based on a phenotypic adipogenesis assay was applied to screen a set of 60 chemical compounds identified in ToxCast Phase I as PPARG active (49) or inactive (11). Chemicals showing activity in the adipogenesis screen were further evaluated in a series of 4 orthogonal assays representing 7 different key events in PPARG-dependent adipogenesis, including gene transcription, protein expression, and adipokine secretion. An siRNA screen was also used to evaluate PPARG-dependence of the adipogenesis phenotype. A universal concentration-response design enabled inter-assay comparability and implementation of a weight-of-evidence approach for bioactivity classification. Collectively, a total of 14/49 (29%) prioritized chemicals were identified with moderate-to-strong activity for human adipogenesis. These results provide the first integrated screening approach of prioritized ToxCast chemicals in a human stem cell model of adipogenesis and provide insight into the capacity of PPARG-activating chemicals to modulate early life programming of adipose tissue.

  4. Editor’s Highlight: Screening ToxCast Prioritized Chemicals for PPARG Function in a Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cell Model of Adipogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Briana; Doheny, Daniel L.; Black, Michael B.; Pendse, Salil N.; Wetmore, Barbara A.; Clewell, Rebecca A.; Andersen, Melvin E.; Deisenroth, Chad

    2017-01-01

    The developmental origins of obesity hypothesis posits a multifaceted contribution of factors to the fetal origins of obesity and metabolic disease. Adipocyte hyperplasia in gestation and early childhood may result in predisposition for obesity later in life. Rodent in vitro and in vivo studies indicate that some chemicals may directly affect adipose progenitor cell differentiation, but the human relevance of these findings is unclear. The nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARG) is the master regulator of adipogenesis. Human adipose-derived stem cells (hASC) isolated from adipose tissue express endogenous isoforms of PPARG and represent a biologically relevant cell-type for evaluating activity of PPARG ligands. Here, a multi-endpoint approach based on a phenotypic adipogenesis assay was applied to screen a set of 60 chemical compounds identified in ToxCast Phase I as PPARG active (49) or inactive (11). Chemicals showing activity in the adipogenesis screen were further evaluated in a series of 4 orthogonal assays representing 7 different key events in PPARG-dependent adipogenesis, including gene transcription, protein expression, and adipokine secretion. An siRNA screen was also used to evaluate PPARG-dependence of the adipogenesis phenotype. A universal concentration-response design enabled inter-assay comparability and implementation of a weight-of-evidence approach for bioactivity classification. Collectively, a total of 14/49 (29%) prioritized chemicals were identified with moderate-to-strong activity for human adipogenesis. These results provide the first integrated screening approach of prioritized ToxCast chemicals in a human stem cell model of adipogenesis and provide insight into the capacity of PPARG-activating chemicals to modulate early life programming of adipose tissue. PMID:27664422

  5. Tox_esterase_2016

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — individual values for liver detoxification for each human sample and for each chemical. This dataset is associated with the following publication: Moser, G., and S....

  6. ToxFAQs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 4,4'-Methylenedianiline | 4,4-Metilendianilina Malathion | Malatión Manganese * Other Languages... Mercury * Other Languages... Mercury * Other Languages... ... contacting the ATSDR Information Center at: Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry Division of Toxicology and ...

  7. Multilocus sequence analysis of the central clade of the genus Vibrio by using the 16S rRNA, recA, pyrH, rpoD, gyrB, rctB and toxR genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual, Javier; Macián, M Carmen; Arahal, David R; Garay, Esperanza; Pujalte, María J

    2010-01-01

    The central clade of the genus Vibrio, also called the Vibrio core group, comprises six species that are tightly related (DNA-DNA reassociation values are very close to 70 % for most species pairs). Identification of novel strains to the species level within this group is troublesome and results are quite often dependent on the methodology employed. Therefore, this group represents an excellent framework to test the robustness of multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) not only for inferring phylogeny but also as an identification tool without the need for DNA-DNA hybridization assays. The genes selected, 16S rRNA, recA, pyrH, rpoD, gyrB, rctB and toxR, were amplified by direct PCR from 44 Vibrio core-group strains. Subsequent analysis allowed us to recognize toxR and rpoD as the most resolving individual genes and showed that concatenated sequences of rpoD, rctB and toxR were more useful than concatenated sequences of all seven genes. To validate our conclusions, MLSA similarities have been correlated with DNA-DNA relatedness values obtained in this study and values taken from the literature. Although the seven concatenated genes gave the best correlation, the concatenated sequences of rpoD, rctB and toxR have the practical advantage of showing a considerable gap between the maximal interspecies similarity and the minimal intraspecies similarity recorded, meaning that they can be used quite conveniently for species identification of vibrios.

  8. Regulatory perspectives of Type II prodrug development and time-dependent toxicity management: nonclinical Pharm/Tox analysis and the role of comparative toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kuei-Meng; Farrelly, James G

    2007-07-01

    Many therapeutic agents are prepared in prodrug forms, which are classified into Type I, II and subtypes A, B based on their sites of conversion. Recently, an increasing number of INDs have appeared as Type II prodrugs that often contain dual tracks of toxicity profile exploration, one on the prodrug and another on the active drug. A comparative toxicology analysis is introduced here to assist reviewers to evaluate the dual toxicity profiles effectively. The analysis helps determine which toxicity is contributed by the prodrug itself, its intermediates, or the active drug itself. As prodrug INDs, or any other new molecular entity (NME) INDs progress into advanced phases of toxicology development, analysis of time-dependent component of toxicity expression, regarding the emergence of new target organs over time, becomes more significant. A strategy is developed to address Pharm/Tox issues such as what duration is required for a toxicity to emerge at the exposure level achieved or dose studied, how many animals in the group are affected, whether the toxicity is a cross-species phenomenon, and whether it is reversible, etc. In conclusion, dual-track comparative toxicology can be useful in the understanding of Type II prodrug's mechanism of toxicity, and that time-dependent toxicology analysis offers means to detecting new toxicity emergence over time. Both approaches could significantly facilitate secondary and tertiary review processes during IND development of a prodrug or NME.

  9. Adaptation of the ToxRTool to Assess the Reliability of Toxicology Studies Conducted with Genetically Modified Crops and Implications for Future Safety Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Michael S; DeSesso, John M; Williams, Amy Lavin; Michalek, Suzanne; Hammond, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    To determine the reliability of food safety studies carried out in rodents with genetically modified (GM) crops, a Food Safety Study Reliability Tool (FSSRTool) was adapted from the European Centre for the Validation of Alternative Methods' (ECVAM) ToxRTool. Reliability was defined as the inherent quality of the study with regard to use of standardized testing methodology, full documentation of experimental procedures and results, and the plausibility of the findings. Codex guidelines for GM crop safety evaluations indicate toxicology studies are not needed when comparability of the GM crop to its conventional counterpart has been demonstrated. This guidance notwithstanding, animal feeding studies have routinely been conducted with GM crops, but their conclusions on safety are not always consistent. To accurately evaluate potential risks from GM crops, risk assessors need clearly interpretable results from reliable studies. The development of the FSSRTool, which provides the user with a means of assessing the reliability of a toxicology study to inform risk assessment, is discussed. Its application to the body of literature on GM crop food safety studies demonstrates that reliable studies report no toxicologically relevant differences between rodents fed GM crops or their non-GM comparators.

  10. QSAR models for predicting acute toxicity of pesticides in rainbow trout using the CORAL software and EFSA's OpenFoodTox database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toropov, Andrey A; Toropova, Alla P; Marzo, Marco; Dorne, Jean Lou; Georgiadis, Nikolaos; Benfenati, Emilio

    2017-07-01

    Optimal (flexible) descriptors were used to establish quantitative structure - activity relationships (QSAR) for toxicity of pesticides (n=116) towards rainbow trout. A heterogeneous set of hundreds of pesticides has been used, taken from the EFSA's chemical Hazards Database: OpenFoodTox. Optimal descriptors are preparing from simplified molecular input-line entry system (SMILES). So-called, correlation weights of different fragments of SMILES are calculating by the Monte Carlo optimization procedure where correlation coefficient between endpoint and optimal descriptor plays role of the target function. Having maximum of the correlation coefficient for the training set, one can suggest that the optimal descriptor calculated with these correlation weights can correlate with endpoint for external validation set. This approach was checked up with three different distributions into the training (≈85%) set and external validation (≈15%) set. The statistical characteristics of these models are (i) for training set correlation coefficient (r(2)) ranges 0.72-0.81, and root mean squared error (RMSE) ranges 0.54-1.25; (ii) for external (validation) set r(2) ranges 0.74-0.84; and RMSE ranges 0.64-0.75. Computational experiments have shown that presence of chlorine, fluorine, sulfur, and aromatic fragments is promoter of increase for the toxicity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Real-time growth kinetics measuring hormone mimicry for ToxCast chemicals in T-47D human ductal carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotroff, Daniel M; Dix, David J; Houck, Keith A; Kavlock, Robert J; Knudsen, Thomas B; Martin, Matthew T; Reif, David M; Richard, Ann M; Sipes, Nisha S; Abassi, Yama A; Jin, Can; Stampfl, Melinda; Judson, Richard S

    2013-07-15

    High-throughput screening (HTS) assays capable of profiling thousands of environmentally relevant chemicals for in vitro biological activity provide useful information on the potential for disrupting endocrine pathways. Disruption of the estrogen signaling pathway has been implicated in a variety of adverse health effects including impaired development, reproduction, and carcinogenesis. The estrogen-responsive human mammary ductal carcinoma cell line T-47D was exposed to 1815 ToxCast chemicals comprising pesticides, industrial chemicals, pharmaceuticals, personal care products, cosmetics, food ingredients, and other chemicals with known or suspected human exposure potential. Cell growth kinetics were evaluated using real-time cell electronic sensing. T-47D cells were exposed to eight concentrations (0.006-100 μM), and measurements of cellular impedance were repeatedly recorded for 105 h. Chemical effects were evaluated based on potency (concentration at which response occurs) and efficacy (extent of response). A linear growth response was observed in response to prototypical estrogen receptor agonists (17β-estradiol, genistein, bisphenol A, nonylphenol, and 4-tert-octylphenol). Several compounds, including bisphenol A and genistein, induced cell growth comparable in efficacy to that of 17β-estradiol, but with decreased potency. Progestins, androgens, and corticosteroids invoked a biphasic growth response indicative of changes in cell number or cell morphology. Results from this cell growth assay were compared with results from additional estrogen receptor (ER) binding and transactivation assays. Chemicals detected as active in both the cell growth and ER receptor binding assays demonstrated potencies highly correlated with two ER transactivation assays (r = 0.72; r = 0.70). While ER binding assays detected chemicals that were highly potent or efficacious in the T-47D cell growth and transactivation assays, the binding assays lacked sensitivity in detecting

  12. RicoTox: web sobre riesgo químico. Experiencia en la enseñanza universitaria de Toxicología Ambiental y Salud Pública

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AL Oropesa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available RicoTox (Riesgo Químico de Tóxicos es una página web elaborada por estudiantes de la asignatura "Toxicología Ambiental y Salud Pública" en la Facultad de Ciencias de la Universidad de Extremadura (http://www.ricotox.weebly.com. Para ello se emplea la metodología del Aprendizaje Basado en Problemas recomendada en el Espacio Europeo de Educación Superior. Los objetivos perseguidos con esta experiencia son: contribuir y hacer accesible la información disponible sobre el riesgo asociado a la manipulación inadecuada de las sustancias químicas y educar en relación a su correcta manipulación. En ella se abordan diversas sustancias químicas, aportándose información toxicológica y reguladora, casos clínicos de exposición humana y recomendaciones de uso de dichas sustancias. Desde el punto de vista docente, la metodología planteada presenta tres características: 1 motivación inicial e instrucción metodológica realizadas con el grupo completo, 2 los grupos de estudiantes trabajan fuera del horario de clases y se autorregulan autónomamente, siguiendo instrucciones aportadas al inicio de la actividad, y 3 disponibilidad completa del tutor para orientar a los estudiantes a lo largo del desarrollo de la actividad (tutorías. Esta metodología logra un nivel de desarrollo de competencias instrumentales, sistémicas y profesionales para los estudiantes muy satisfactorio.

  13. Overview of results from the WaterTox intercalibration and environmental testing phase II program: part 2, ecotoxicological evaluation of drinking water supplies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Baez, M C; Sánchez, W A; Dutka, B J; Ronco, A; Castillo, G; Pica-Granados, Y; Castillo, L E; Ridal, J; Arkhipchuk, V; Srivastava, R C

    2002-01-01

    Because of rapid population growth, industrial development, and intensified agricultural production increasing amounts of chemicals are being released into the environment, polluting receiving water bodies around the world. Given the potential health risk associated with the presence of toxicants in water sources used for drinking yet the scarcity of available data, there is a need to evaluate these waters and develop strategies to reduce and prevent their contamination. The present study examined the applicability of a battery of simple, inexpensive bioassays in environmental management and the relevance of the test results in establishing the toxicological quality of water sources and drinking water within the framework of the eight-country WaterTox Network, sponsored by the International Development Research Centre, Ottawa, Canada. Seventy-six samples were collected from surface and groundwater sources and seven samples from drinking water treatment plants. Each sample was tested with a core battery of bioassays (Daphnia magna, Hydra attenuata, and Lactuca sativa root inhibition tests) and a limited set of physical and chemical parameters. In addition, three labs included the Selenastrum capricornutum test. When no toxic effects were found with the battery, samples were concentrated 10x using a solid-phase extraction (SPE) procedure. Nonconcentrated natural water samples produced a toxic response in 24% of cases with all three core bioassays. When all bioassays are considered, the percentage of raw samples showing toxicity with at least one bioassay increased to 60%. Of seven treated drinkingwater samples, four showed toxicity with at least one bioassay, raising the possibility that treatment processes in these instances were unable to remove toxic contaminants. The Daphnia magna and Hydra attenuata tests indicated a high level of sensitivity overall. Although only three of the eight countries used S. capricornutum, it proved to be an efficient and reliable

  14. Immunogenicity of meningococcal quadrivalent (serogroup A, C, W135 and Y) tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrino, Paolo; Perrone, Valentina; Radice, Sonia; Capuano, Annalisa; Clementi, Emilio

    2015-02-01

    Meningococcal meningitis represents one of the leading cause of bacterial meningitis in developed countries. Among the thirteen described serogroups, only five are usually responsible of invasive infections making immunisation against multiple serogroups the best strategy to protect individuals from this disease. Herein we carried out a systematic review and meta-analysis, in accordance with the PRISMA statement, of the recently EU-licensed meningococcal ACWY-tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine (MenACWY-TT). We included 15 randomised clinical trials, comparing MenACWY-TT and Men-PS (ten studies), MenACWY-TT and MenC-CRM197 (four studies) and MenACWY-TT and MenACWY-DT (one study). All studies included in the meta-analysis showed high immunogenicity for MenACWY-TT vaccines in all tested serogroups. Our results suggest that the MenACWY-TT vaccine is as immunogenic as the other commercial available meningococcal vaccines.

  15. A Tox21 Approach to Altered Epigenetic Landscapes: Assessing Epigenetic Toxicity Pathways Leading to Altered Gene Expression and Oncogenic Transformation In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig L. Parfett

    2017-06-01

    A, UHRF1, CTCF, HOTAIR and ANRIL were found to have experimental evidence showing that functional perturbations played “driver” roles in human cellular transformation. Measurement of epigenotoxicants presents challenges for short-term carcinogenicity testing, especially in the high-throughput modes emphasized in the Tox21 chemicals testing approach. There is need to develop and validate in vitro tests to detect both, locus-specific, and genome-wide, epigenetic alterations with causal links to oncogenic cellular phenotypes. Some recent examples of cell-based high throughput chemical screening assays are presented that have been applied or have shown potential for application to epigenetic endpoints.

  16. A Tox21 Approach to Altered Epigenetic Landscapes: Assessing Epigenetic Toxicity Pathways Leading to Altered Gene Expression and Oncogenic Transformation In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parfett, Craig L.; Desaulniers, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    , HOTAIR and ANRIL) were found to have experimental evidence showing that functional perturbations played “driver” roles in human cellular transformation. Measurement of epigenotoxicants presents challenges for short-term carcinogenicity testing, especially in the high-throughput modes emphasized in the Tox21 chemicals testing approach. There is need to develop and validate in vitro tests to detect both, locus-specific, and genome-wide, epigenetic alterations with causal links to oncogenic cellular phenotypes. Some recent examples of cell-based high throughput chemical screening assays are presented that have been applied or have shown potential for application to epigenetic endpoints. PMID:28587163

  17. ToxCast Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Background: Chemical toxicity testing is being transformed by advances in biology and computer modeling, concerns over animal use and the thousands of environmental...

  18. A database of IC50 values and principal component analysis of results from six basal cytotoxicity assays, for use in the modelling of the in vivo and in vitro data of the EU ACuteTox project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clothier, Richard; Dierickx, Paul; Lakhanisky, Thaly; Fabre, Myriam; Betanzos, Monica; Curren, Rodger; Sjöström, Michael; Raabe, Hans; Bourne, Nicola; Hernandez, Vanessa; Mainez, Jessica; Owen, Monika; Watts, Sarah; Anthonissen, Roel

    2008-11-01

    The main aim of the ACuteTox project (part of the EU 6th Framework programme) is to demonstrate that animal tests for acute systemic toxicity can be replaced by alternative in vitro assays. In this project, data for 97 reference chemicals were collected in the AcuBase database, designed to handle deposited in vitro and in vivo (human and animal) data. To demonstrate the applicability of in vitro basal cytotoxicity tests and in vitro-in vivo modelling, it was deemed necessary to obtain data that were generated via defined standard operating procedures. The molar basal cytotoxicity IC50 values (the 50% inhibitory concentrations for the endpoint measured) for a mouse fibroblast cell line (3T3), a human hepatic cell line (HepG2), a rat hepatic cell line (Fa32), and a human neutrophil cell line (HL-60), were compared, and gave an R(2) correlation of 0.83. To identify chemicals that showed differential cytotoxicity to the various cell types involved, principal component analysis (PCA) was undertaken independently, once all the results had been returned. This showed that colchicine, cycloheximide, digoxin, 5-fluorouracil and hexachlorobenzene gave the lowest correlations with the first score vector of the PCA. The results presented are to be used to identify outliers that need to be further studied via the use of tissue-specific in vitro assays.

  19. Performance of TechLab C. DIFF QUIK CHEK and TechLab C. DIFFICILE TOX A/B II for the detection of Clostridium difficile in stool samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Romina C; John, Michael A; Ayotte, Diane L; Covacich, Alexia; Milburn, Susan; Hussain, Zafar

    2007-09-01

    Two membrane-bound enzyme immunoassays by TechLab, Blacksburg, VA, were evaluated and compared with the Triage Micro C. difficile Panel (Biosite Diagnostics, San Diego, CA), with culture, and with cytotoxic assay. The TechLab panels were C. DIFF QUIK CHEK (QC-GDH) and C. DIFFICILE TOX A/B II (QC-toxinA/B), which detect glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and Clostridium difficile toxins A and B, respectively. The Triage Panel detects GDH (TR-GDH) and toxin A (TR-toxinA). Stool samples were inoculated onto CCFA plates (Q-Labs, Quebec, Canada) after alcohol shock, and suspected colonies were identified by the MicroScreen C. difficile latex slide agglutination test (Microgen Bioproducts, Surrey, UK). TR-GDH, TR-toxinA, QC-GDH, and QC-toxinA/B tests were performed according to the manufacturers' instructions on all the samples. Samples positive for GDH or culture but negative for TR-toxinA and QC-toxinA/B were further tested by cytotoxin assay (CTA). CTA was also performed on samples that caused blackening of the Triage Micro C. difficile Panel. A total of 313 of 401 stool samples were negative for GDH and toxins (78%). Eighty-eight samples were positive either for GDH or culture or both. Thirteen of these could not be evaluated for C. difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD) because CTA test was not performed. Toxin/s was detected at least by one method in 46 (11.8%) of 388 samples that were positive for culture or GDH and were considered diagnostic of CDAD. The QC-GDH was more sensitive than culture and TR-GDH for the detection of C. difficile. However, in 18GDH-positive samples positive for either of the Triage or TechLab immunoassays, the culture remained negative. Ten (2%) results of the Triage immunoassays could not be evaluated because of discoloration of the panels. QC-GDH (93.5%) was more sensitive for detecting the presence of toxin-producing C. difficile than TR-GDH (79.5%). TR-toxinA was more specific for detecting the presence of toxin-producing C. difficile than QC

  20. The immunogenicity and safety of an investigational meningococcal serogroups A, C, W-135 and Y tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine (ACWY-TT) compared with a licensed meningococcal tetravalent polysaccharide vaccine

    OpenAIRE

    Dbaibo, Ghassan; Macalalad, Noel; Reyes, Mari Rose Aplasca-De Los; Dimaano, Efren; Bianco, Véronique; Baine, Yaela; Miller, Jacqueline

    2012-01-01

    Immunogenicity and safety of ACWY-TT compared with licensed ACWY polysaccharide vaccine (MenPS) in healthy adults, and lot-to-lot consistency of three ACWY-TT lots were evaluated in a phase 3, open, controlled study. Adults aged 18–55 y were randomized to receive ACWY-TT (one of three lots) or MenPS. Serum bactericidal antibodies (rSBA) were measured pre- and 1 mo post-vaccination. Adverse events (AEs) were assessed 4 d (solicited symptoms) and 31 d (unsolicited symptoms) post-vaccination. Se...

  1. An investigational tetravalent meningococcal serogroups A, C, W-135 and Y-tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine co-administered with Infanrix™ hexa is immunogenic, with an acceptable safety profile in 12-23-month-old children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knuf, Markus; Pantazi-Chatzikonstantinou, Anna; Pfletschinger, Ulrich; Tichmann-Schumann, Irmingard; Maurer, Hartwig; Maurer, Lothar; Fischbach, Thomas; Zinke, Henrike; Pankow-Culot, Heidemarie; Papaevangelou, Vassiliki; Bianco, Veronique; Van der Wielen, Marie; Miller, Jacqueline M

    2011-06-06

    Tetravalent meningococcal serogroups ACWY conjugate vaccines will provide an advantage to those at most risk of invasive meningococcal disease; namely young children. Co-administration of ACWY-TT with DTaP-HBV-IPV/Hib was assessed in a randomized trial in 793 children aged 12-23 months. Pre-specified criteria for non-inferiority of immunogenicity following co-administration versus separate ACWY-TT and DTaP-HBV-IPV/Hib administration were reached. One month post-vaccination, ≥ 97.3% of ACWY-TT vaccinees had rSBA titres ≥ 1:8 (all serogroups). Seroprotection/seropositivity rates against DTaP-HBV-IPV/Hib antigens were ≥ 98.2%. The safety profile of co-administration was similar to that of DTaP-HBV-IPV/Hib alone. ACWY-TT and DTaP-HBV-IPV/Hib co-administration during the second year would facilitate introduction of ACWY-TT into routine toddler vaccination schedules.

  2. 酶联免疫法与间接血凝法检测实验动物家兔弓形虫抗体的结果比较%Comparison between the results of testing TOX-Ab in laboratory animal-rabbit using ELISA and IHA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘严; 李彩云; 陈啸天; 张超; 潘学营

    2014-01-01

    目的:分析比较酶联免疫法(ELISA)和间接血凝法(IHA)在本实验室检测实验用家兔弓形虫特异性抗体的可行性。方法应用ELISA和IHA两种方法平行检测实验感染弓形虫的12只家兔阳性血清和未感染过弓形虫的30只正常家兔阴性血清中的弓形虫特异性抗体。比较两种方法敏感性、特异性、检测效率及Youden指数并运用kappa值进行一致性的评价。结果 IHA法的敏感性41.67%,特异性93.33%,ELISA法的敏感性100%,特异性100%。ELISA方法的敏感性、特异性、检测效率及Youden指数都在IHA方法之上。两种方法的总符合率是78.57%。kappa值=0.3998。结论 ELISA法与IHA法在本次平行检测中的一致性较差。ELISA方法敏感性、特异性明显优于IHA方法,更适用于实验动物家兔的弓形虫特异性抗体的检测。%ObjectiveTo analyze and compare the feasibility of using ELISA and IHA in our laboratory for testing specific TOX-Ab in laboratory rabbit.Methods Used ELISA and IHA methods for a parallelized testing of the specific TOX-Ab contained in both the positive serum of 12 rabbits infected with toxoplasma gondii and negative serum of 30 uninfected rabbits, thus to compare the sensibility, specificity, testing efficiency and Youden index between the two methods before applying Kappa values for a consistency evaluation.Results The sensibility and specificity of IHA was 41.67% and 93.33% respectively, while that for ELISA are both 100%. The sensibility, specificity, testing efficiency and Youden index for ELISA are higher than that of IHA. The total consistency rate for such two methods was 78.57% with Kappa value equals to 0.3998.Conclusion The consistency between the use of ELISA and IHA for this parallelized testing is relatively poor, and ELISA is notably better than IHA in terms of sensitivity and specificity, therefore it is more suitable to be applied in the testing of the specific TOX-Ab in laboratory

  3. The potent and selective α4β2*/α6*-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor partial agonist 2-[5-[5-((S)Azetidin-2-ylmethoxy)-3-pyridinyl]-3-isoxazolyl]ethanol demonstrates antidepressive-like behavior in animal models and a favorable ADME-tox profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Li-Fang; Brek Eaton, J; Zhang, Han-Kun; Sabath, Emily; Hanania, Taleen; Li, Guan-Nan; van Breemen, Richard B; Whiteaker, Paul; Liu, Qiang; Wu, Jie; Chang, Yong-Chang; Lukas, Ronald J; Brunner, Dani; Kozikowski, Alan P

    2014-04-01

    Preclinical and clinical studies demonstrated that the inhibition of cholinergic supersensitivity through nicotinic antagonists and partial agonists can be used successfully to treat depressed patients, especially those who are poor responders to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). In our effort to develop novel antidepressant drugs, LF-3-88 was identified as a potent nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) partial agonist with subnanomolar to nanomolar affinities for β2-containing nAChRs (α2β2, α3β2, α4β2, and α4β2*) and superior selectivity away from α3β4 - (K i > 10(4) nmol/L) and α7-nAChRs (K i > 10(4) nmol/L) as well as 51 other central nervous system (CNS)-related neurotransmitter receptors and transporters. Functional activities at different nAChR subtypes were characterized utilizing (86)Rb(+) ion efflux assays, two-electrode voltage-clamp (TEVC) recording in oocytes, and whole-cell current recording measurements. In mouse models, administration of LF-3-88 resulted in antidepressive-like behavioral signatures 15 min post injection in the SmartCube® test (5 and 10 mg/kg, i.p.; about 45-min session), decreased immobility in the forced swim test (1-3 mg/kg, i.p.; 1-10 mg/kg, p.o.; 30 min pretreatment, 6-min trial), and decreased latency to approach food in the novelty-suppressed feeding test after 29 days chronic administration once daily (5 mg/kg but not 10 mg/kg, p.o.; 15-min trial). In addition, LF-3-88 exhibited a favorable profile in pharmacokinetic/ADME-Tox (absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity) assays. This compound was also shown to cause no mortality in wild-type Balb/CJ mice when tested at 300 mg/kg. These results further support the potential of potent and selective nicotinic partial agonists for use in the treatment of depression.

  4. Oxide-Bridged Heterobimetallic Aluminum/Zirconium Catalysts for Ethylene Polymerization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boulho, Cedric; Zijlstra, Harmen S.; Harder, Sjoerd

    2015-01-01

    A bimetallic aluminum/zirconium complex Cp*Zr-2(Me)OAl(DIPH) [DIPH-H-2 = 3,3-bis(2-methylallyl)-(1,1-biphenyl)-2,2-diol; Cp* = C5Me5] was prepared in good yield by the reaction of (DIPH)AlMe with Cp*Zr-2(Me)OH. In contrast to Roesky's catalyst, Cp2Zr(Me)O(Me)Al(DIPP-nacnac) {DIPP-nacnac = CH[(CMe)(2

  5. ToxCast Communications and Outreach Strategy (SETAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    US EPA's Chemical Safety for Sustainability Research Program has been using in vitro testing methods in an effort to accelerate the pace of chemical evaluations and address the significant lack of health and environmental data on the thousands of chemicals found in commonly used ...

  6. Hijos de madre toxémica: neutropenia y trombocitopenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio D. Pereira

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available La enfermedad hipertensiva del embarazo, particulamente la toxemia, se ha asociado con neutropenia y trombocitopenia en el recién nacido. En un estudio previo se había encontrado muy poca asociación con estos eventos. En la presente investigación, mediante métodos hematológicos, se estudiaron 70 hijos de madres con toxemia severa los días 1 y 5 de vida; sólo 44 niños asistieron a control el día 5. Se encontró que la trombocitopenia en la práctica era inexistente y que la neutropenia fue más escasa de lo informado en la literatura.

  7. Hijos de madre toxémica: neutropenia y trombocitopenia.

    OpenAIRE

    Fabio D. Pereira; Reynaldo Miranda; Carmen de Rosero; Jorge Estupiñán

    2009-01-01

    La enfermedad hipertensiva del embarazo, particulamente la toxemia, se ha asociado con neutropenia y trombocitopenia en el recién nacido. En un estudio previo se había encontrado muy poca asociación con estos eventos. En la presente investigación, mediante métodos hematológicos, se estudiaron 70 hijos de madres con toxemia severa los días 1 y 5 de vida; sólo 44 niños asistieron a control el día 5. Se encontró que la trombocitopenia en la práctica era inexistente y que la neutropenia fue más e...

  8. Can we estimate the accuracy of ADME-Tox predictions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetko, Igor V; Bruneau, Pierre; Mewes, Hans-Werner; Rohrer, Douglas C; Poda, Gennadiy I

    2006-08-01

    There have recently been developments in the methods used to access the accuracy of the prediction and applicability domain of absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity models, and also in the methods used to predict the physicochemical properties of compounds in the early stages of drug development. The methods are classified into two main groups: those based on the analysis of similarity of molecules, and those based on the analysis of calculated properties. An analysis of octanol-water distribution coefficients is used to exemplify the consistency of estimated and calculated accuracy of the ALOGPS program (http://www.vcclab.org) to predict in-house and publicly available datasets.

  9. ToxGuides: Quick Reference Pocket Guide for Toxicological Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... L Lead [PDF, 79KB] M Malathion [PDF, 110KB] Manganese [PDF, 119KB] Methoxychlor [PDF, 107KB] N Nickel [PDF, ... contacting the ATSDR Information Center at: Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry Division of Toxicology and ...

  10. Structure Identification Using the US EPA's CompTox Chemistry Dashboard (CompTox CoP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Community of practice webinar presentation on the Identification of unknowns in non-targeted analyses (NTA) requires the integration of complementary data types to generate a confident consensus structure.

  11. New Chemical/Biological Profiling and Informatics Approaches for Exploring Mutagenicity & Carcinogenicity: Updates of EPA ToxCast and Tox21 Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA’s National Center for Computational Toxicology is building capabilities to support a new paradigm for toxicity screening and prediction through harnessing of legacy toxicity data, creation of data linkages, and generation of new in vitro screening data. In association with EP...

  12. Redox Disrupting Potential of ToxCast™Chemicals Ranked by Activity in Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little is known regarding the adverse outcome pathways responsible for developmental toxicity following exposure to chemicals. An evaluation of Toxoast™ Phase I chemicals in an adherent mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) assay revealed a redox sensitive pathway that correlated with...

  13. Phenotypic screening of the ToxCast chemical library to classify toxic and therapeutic mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addressing the safety aspects of drugs and environmental chemicals has historically been undertaken through animal testing. However, the quantity of chemicals in need of assessment and the challenges of species extrapolation require the development of alternative approaches. Our ...

  14. Predicting Toxic and Therapeutic Mechanisms of the ToxCast Chemical Library by Phenotypic Screening (SOT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addressing safety aspects of drugs and environmental chemicals relies extensively on animal testing. However the quantity of chemicals needing assessment and challenges of species extrapolation require development of alternative approaches. Using 8 primary human cell systems (Bio...

  15. Analysis of a ToxCast™ HTS Toxicity Signature for putative Vascular Disruptor Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent studies have shown the importance of blood vessel formation during embryo development and the strong correlation to developmental toxicity. Several developmental toxicants, such as thalidomide, have been identified which specifically target the forming embryonic vasculatur...

  16. Trihalomethanes (THMs as Percentage of Total Organic Halogen (TOX at Varying Experimental Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Pourmoghaddas

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Ammonia in air can be hazardous to human and animal life and should be removed from the environment. Recently the removal of environmental pollutants such as ammonia by means of natural and modified zeolites has attracted a lot of attention and interests. In this study the capability of three Iranian natural zeolites (Clinoptilolite in point of view of removal of ammonia from air was investigated. Through this research, different zeolites from various regions of Iran including Semnan, Meyaneh, and Firoozkooh resources were considered to be studied. These samples of zeolites were ground and granulized into 425 µm to 4 mm and were utilized in dynamic sorption experiments. Curves of sorption were plotted and breakthrough and saturated points of zeolite samples were obtained. The adsorption capacities at different ammonia concentrations, temperatures, and flow – rates were also calculated. Results obtained showed that, the natural Iranian zeolite (Clinoptilolite was identified to be more efficient adsorbent than the others to remove ammonia from the air. In the same conditions, the obtained breakthrough time for clinoptilolite sample of Meyaneh was longer than the others ( 135min , while, the adsorption capacity of Semnan clinoptilolite was higher than adsorbents ( 6.30 mg /g (P<0.0001.

  17. Profiling 976 ToxCast chemicals across 331 enzymatic and receptor signaling assays (Communities of Practice)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding potential health risks is a significant challenge for large numbers of diverse chemicals with poorly characterized exposures and mechanisms of toxicities. The present study analyzes chemical-target activity profiles of 976 chemicals (including failed pharmaceuticals...

  18. Redox Disrupting Potential of ToxCast™Chemicals Ranked by Activity in Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little is known regarding the adverse outcome pathways responsible for developmental toxicity following exposure to chemicals. An evaluation of Toxoast™ Phase I chemicals in an adherent mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) assay revealed a redox sensitive pathway that correlated with...

  19. The EPA CompTox Chemistry Dashboard - an online resource for environmental chemists (ACS Spring Meeting)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Computational Toxicology Program integrates advances in biology, chemistry, and computer science to help prioritize chemicals for further research based on potential human health risks. This work involves computational and data drive...

  20. Evaluation of food-relevant chemicals in the ToxCast high-throughput screening program

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Thousands of chemicals are directly added to or come in contact with food, many of which have undergone little to no toxicological evaluation. The landscape of the...

  1. The EPA CompTox Chemistry Dashboard - an online resource for environmental chemists (ACS Spring Meeting)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Computational Toxicology Program integrates advances in biology, chemistry, and computer science to help prioritize chemicals for further research based on potential human health risks. This work involves computational and data drive...

  2. Identifying known unknowns using the US EPA's CompTox Chemistry Dashboard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemical features observed using high-resolution mass spectrometry can be tentatively identified using online chemical reference databases by searching molecular formulae and monoisotopic masses and then rank-ordering of the hits using appropriate relevance criteria. The most li...

  3. Development and Evaluation of a Hyperbaric Toxic Gas Monitor (SubTox) for Disabled Submarines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    olor L eg end: User E ntered Values  from  tes t data C alculated values  s ent to the  S ubtox  via Modbus F ixed Values Gas  s ensor  # 1 PR E S S UR E...Gas  Value Gas  S ensor PR S  S ensor ATM ppm mV mV 1 0 [Air] 2499 1287 1 85 3176 2 3290 3 3354 4 3413 5 3460 5 3460 3646 Pcomp data is  extracted...from the  above  entries  for uploading  to Item Description Value R eg is ter Add Gas  S ensor Offs et 2499 40177 S lope 7.965 40179 PR S  S ensor Offs

  4. Tutorial Video Series: Using Stakeholder Outreach to Increase Usage of ToxCast Data (SOT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christina Baghdikian1, Tina Bahadori2, Russell S. Thomas2, Kevin Crofton2 and Monica Linnenbrink2; 1ASPPH Fellow Hosted by U.S. EPA Office of Research and Development, 2U.S. EPA Office of Research and Development, Durham, NCTutorial Video Series: Using Stakeholder Outreach to Inc...

  5. Computational Model of Secondary Palate Fusion and Disruption ChemResTox Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Morphogenetic events are driven by cell-generated physical forces and complex cellular dynamics. To improve our capacity to predict developmental effects from...

  6. An Evaluation of the PCB-TOX-SPOT Water Toxicity Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-15

    the assay was 6-8.5, (Nirit Ulitzur, e-mail communication), so stock solutions were titrated (if necessary) with either 1N HCl or 1N NaOH to meet the...this report. Pentachlorophenate (PCP) (sodium) was prepared by titrating pentachlorophenol in 50 millimolar (mM) phosphate buffer with 1 molar... titration Sigma-Aldrich 24 hrs NA Sodium hypochlorite [chlorine residual] 76881-52-9 4º C / dark amperometric titration Riedel-de Haën Fine

  7. Heavy Metals in ToxCast: Relevance to Food Safety (SOT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human exposure to heavy metals occurs through food contamination due to industrial processes, vehicle emissions and farming methods. Specific toxicity endpoints have been associated with metal exposures, e.g. lead and neurotoxicity; however, numerous varieties of heavy metals hav...

  8. Identifying Known Unknowns Using the USEPA CompTox Chemistry Dashboard AnalytBioanlytChem Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — In this research, the performance of the Dashboard for identifying “known unknowns” was evaluated against that of the online ChemSpider database, one of the primary...

  9. Novel potentiometry immunoassay with amplified sensitivity for diphtheria antigen based on Nafion, colloidal Ag and polyvinyl butyral as matrixes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Dianping; Yuan, Ruo; Chai, Yaqin; Zhang, Linyan; Zhong, Xia; Dai, Jianyuan; Liu, Yan

    2004-11-30

    A novel potentiometry immunoassay with amplified sensitivity has been developed for the detection of diphtheria antigen (Diph) via immobilizing diphtheria antibody (anti-Diph) on a platinum electrode based on Nafion, colloidal Ag (Ag), and polyvinyl butyral (PVB) as matrixes in this study. The modified procedure was further characterized by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). The influence and factors influencing the performance of resulting immunosensor were studied in detail. The resulting immunosensor exhibited sigmoid curve with log Diph concentrations, high sensitivity (51.4 mV/decade), wide linear range from 8 to 800 ng ml(-1) with a detection limit of 1.5 ng ml(-1), rapid potentiometric response (6 months). Analytical results of clinical samples show that the developed immunoassay is comparable with the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) method, implying a promising alternative approach for detecting diphtheria antigen in the clinical diagnosis.

  10. FAF-Drugs2: Free ADME/tox filtering tool to assist drug discovery and chemical biology projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miteva Maria A

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drug discovery and chemical biology are exceedingly complex and demanding enterprises. In recent years there are been increasing awareness about the importance of predicting/optimizing the absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity (ADMET properties of small chemical compounds along the search process rather than at the final stages. Fast methods for evaluating ADMET properties of small molecules often involve applying a set of simple empirical rules (educated guesses and as such, compound collections' property profiling can be performed in silico. Clearly, these rules cannot assess the full complexity of the human body but can provide valuable information and assist decision-making. Results This paper presents FAF-Drugs2, a free adaptable tool for ADMET filtering of electronic compound collections. FAF-Drugs2 is a command line utility program (e.g., written in Python based on the open source chemistry toolkit OpenBabel, which performs various physicochemical calculations, identifies key functional groups, some toxic and unstable molecules/functional groups. In addition to filtered collections, FAF-Drugs2 can provide, via Gnuplot, several distribution diagrams of major physicochemical properties of the screened compound libraries. Conclusion We have developed FAF-Drugs2 to facilitate compound collection preparation, prior to (or after experimental screening or virtual screening computations. Users can select to apply various filtering thresholds and add rules as needed for a given project. As it stands, FAF-Drugs2 implements numerous filtering rules (23 physicochemical rules and 204 substructure searching rules that can be easily tuned.

  11. Screening the ToxCast Phase I Chemical Library for inhibition of Deiodinase Type I enzyme activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyroid hormone (TH) signaling in vertebrates is dependent upon coordination of multiple key events including iodide uptake, hormone synthesis, metabolism and elimination, to maintain proper homeostasis of the hormones. Deiodinase enzymes interconvert THs between less active and...

  12. Toxicity of Exhaust Gases and Particles from IC-Engines -- International Activities Survey (EngToxIn)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czerwinski, J. [University for Applied Sciences, Biel-Bienne (Switzerland)

    2011-09-15

    Exhaust gases from engines, as well as from other combustion -- and industrial processes contain different gaseous, semi volatile and solid compounds which are toxic. Some of these compounds are not regarded by the respective legislations; some new substances may appear, due to the progressing technical developments and new systems of exhaust gas aftertreatment. The toxical effects of exhaust gases as whole aerosols (i.e. all gaseous components together with particle matter and nanoparticles) can be investigated in a global way, by exposing the living cells, or cell cultures to the aerosol, which means a simultaneous superposition of all toxic effects from all active components. On several places researchers showed, that this method offers more objective results of validation of toxicity, than other methods used up to date. It also enables a relatively quick insight in the toxic effects with consideration of all superimposed influences of the aerosol. This new methodology can be applied for all kinds of emission sources. It bears potentials of giving new contributions to the present state of knowledge in this domain and can in some cases lead to a change of paradigma. The present report gives short information about the activities concerning the research on toxicity of exhaust gases from IC-engines in different countries. It also gives some ideas about research of information sources. It can be stated that there are worldwide a lot of activities concerning health effects. They have different objectives, different approaches and methodologies and rarely the results can be directly compared to each other. Nevertheless there also are some common lines and with appropriate efforts there are possible ways to establish the harmonised biological test procedures.

  13. Gene expression analysis of precision cut human liver slices indicate stable expression of ADME-Tox related genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elferink, M.; Olinga, P.; Van Leeuwen, E.; Bauerschmidt, S.; Polman, J.; Schoonen, W.; Heisterkamp, S.; Groothuis, G.

    2010-01-01

    In the process of drug development it is of high importance to test the safety of new drugs with predictive value for human toxicity. Currently, for toxicity studies toxicogenomic analysis of changes in gene expression profile of the liver is increasingly applied. Toxicity screening based on animal

  14. Gene expression analysis of precision-cut human liver slices indicates stable expression of ADME-Tox related genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elferink, M. G. L.; Olinga, P.; van Leeuwen, E. M.; Bauerschmidt, S.; Polman, J.; Schoonen, W. G.; Heisterkamp, S. H.; Groothuis, G. M. M.

    2011-01-01

    In the process of drug development it is of high importance to test the safety of new drugs with predictive value for human toxicity. A promising approach of toxicity testing is based on shifts in gene expression profiling of the liver. Toxicity screening based on animal liver cells cannot be direct

  15. ACToR Chemical Structure processing using Open Source ChemInformatics Libraries (FutureToxII)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ACToR (Aggregated Computational Toxicology Resource) is a centralized database repository developed by the National Center for Computational Toxicology (NCCT) at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Free and open source tools were used to compile toxicity data from ove...

  16. Profiling of the Tox21 Chemical Collection for Mitochondrial Function: I. Compounds that Decrease Mitochondrial Membrane Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a variety of disorders including cancer, diabetes, and neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases. Understanding how different environmental chemicals and drug-like molecules impact mitochondrial function rep...

  17. Invloed van morfine en methadon op het afweersysteem. Resultaten van een zesweekse studie bij de Riv:TOX rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Laan JW; van Loveren H; Krajnc-Franken MAM; de Groot G; Loeber JG; Krajnc EI

    1988-01-01

    Drugsverslaafden hebben door hun levensstijl een grotere kans op virusziekten zoals Hepatitis-B en AIDS. Drugs, zoals heroine en methadon, zouden hierbij een bevorderende invloed kunnen hebben door de weerstand voor infecties te verminderen. In dit rapport worden de resultaten samengevat van een s

  18. Effects of ToxCast Phase I Chemicals on Steroidogenesis in H295R Human Adrenocortical Carcinoma cells (SOT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steroid hormones are essential for proper development and reproduction. Disruption of steroidogenesis by environmental toxicants results in altered hormone levels causing adverse reproductive and developmental effects. H295R human adrenocortical carcinoma cells were used to evalu...

  19. A new class of inhibitors of the AraC family virulence regulator Vibrio cholerae ToxT

    OpenAIRE

    Woodbrey, Anne K.; Onyango, Evans O.; Maria Pellegrini; Gabriela Kovacikova; Taylor, Ronald K.; Gordon W. Gribble; Jon Kull, F.

    2017-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae is responsible for the diarrheal disease cholera that infects millions of people worldwide. While vaccines protecting against cholera exist, and oral rehydration therapy is an effective treatment method, the disease will remain a global health threat until long-term solutions such as improved sanitation and access to clean water become widely available. Because of this, there is a pressing need for potent therapeutics that can either mitigate cholera symptoms, or act prophylac...

  20. A toxicity signature for species-specific disruption of embryonic vasculogenesis derived from ToxCast in vitro profiling data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blood vessel formation is crucial for normal embryo development and is sensitive to disruption by diverse teratogens. Recent studies have begun to reveal the cell signaling networks underlying vasculogenesis and angiogenesis and how these pathways might be perturbed by specific c...

  1. Prioritizing Environmental Chemicals for Obesity and Diabetes Outcomes Research: A Screening Approach Using ToxCast High Throughput Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Diabetes and obesity are major threats to public health in the US and abroad. Understanding the role chemicals in our environment play in the development of these conditions is an emerging issue in environmental health, although identifying and prioritizing chemicals ...

  2. Using ToxCast data to reconstruct dynamic cell state trajectories and estimate toxicological points of departure.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Background: High-content imaging (HCI) allows simultaneous measurement of multiple cellular phenotypic changes and is an important tool for evaluating the biological...

  3. Use of the HepaRG Cell Line to Assess Potential Human Hepatotoxicity of ToxCast™ Chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    The HepaRG cell line is a promising model system for predicting human hepatotoxicity in part because of the greater capacity to metabolize chemicals than other cell models. We hypothesized that this cell line would be a relevant model for toxicity testing of industrial chemicals....

  4. Update on EPA’s ToxCast Program: Providing High Throughput Decision Support Tools for Chemical Risk Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    The field of toxicology is on the cusp of a major transformation in how the safety and hazard of chemicals are evaluated for potential effects on human health and the environment. Brought on by the recognition of the limitations of the current paradigm in terms of cost, time, and...

  5. InterProScan Result: CK545671 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CK545671 CK545671_3_ORF2 6440533BF3B86908 PANTHER PTHR11573:SF6 RIBONUCLEOSIDE-DIPH...OSPHATE REDUCTASE LARGE CHAIN 1.1e-104 T IPR000788 unintegrated Molecular Function: ribonucleoside-diphospha...te reductase activity (GO:0004748)|Cellular Component: ribonucleoside-diphosphate reductase complex (GO:0005971)|Biological Process: DNA replication (GO:0006260) ...

  6. InterProScan Result: CK515212 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CK515212 CK515212_2_ORF1 C451A033982001B8 PANTHER PTHR23409 RIBONUCLEOSIDE-DIPHOSPH...ATE REDUCTASE SMALL CHAIN 1e-30 T IPR000358 Ribonucleotide reductase Molecular Function: ribonucleoside-diph...osphate reductase activity (GO:0004748)|Biological Process: deoxyribonucleoside diphosphate metabolic process (GO:0009186)|Biological Process: oxidation reduction (GO:0055114) ...

  7. InterProScan Result: CK545671 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CK545671 CK545671_3_ORF2 6440533BF3B86908 PANTHER PTHR11573 RIBONUCLEOSIDE-DIPHOSPH...ATE REDUCTASE LARGE CHAIN 1.1e-104 T IPR000788 Ribonucleotide reductase large subunit, C-terminal Molecular Function: ribonu...cleoside-diphosphate reductase activity (GO:0004748)|Cellular Component: ribonucleoside-diph

  8. Drug: D00669 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available cellular function 44 Allergic agents 441 Antihistamines 4411 Diphenhydramines D00...TIHISTAMINES, ANESTHETICS, ETC. D04AA Antihistamines for topical use D04AA32 Diph...ticholinergics Diphenhydramine D00669 Diphenhydramine hydrochloride (JP16/USP) Respiratory Tract/Pulmonary Agents Antihistamine

  9. The cda GenoTox assay: A new and sensitive method for detection of environmental genotoxins, including nitroarenes and aromatic amines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Trine G.; Hansen, Lars Henrik; Binderup, Mona-Lise;

    2007-01-01

    A new bacterial test system for detection of genotoxic compounds was developed, based on two new Sahnonella typhimurium tester strains, TGO1 and TGO2. Both strains contain a gene fusion between a strong SOS-promotor, P-cda, and the gfp gene, which allows detection of genotoxic compounds that indu...

  10. Tiered High-Throughput Screening Approach to Identify Thyroperoxidase Inhibitors within the ToxCast Phase I and II Chemical Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    High-throughput screening (HTS) for potential thyroid–disrupting chemicals requires a system of assays to capture multiple molecular-initiating events (MIEs) that converge on perturbed thyroid hormone (TH) homeostasis. Screening for MIEs specific to TH-disrupting pathways is limi...

  11. Characterization of ToxCast Phase II compounds disruption of spontaneous network activity in cortical networks grown on multi-well microelectrode array (mwMEA) plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The development of multi-well microelectrode array (mwMEA) systems has increased in vitro screening throughput making them an effective method to screen and prioritize large sets of compounds for potential neurotoxicity. In the present experiments, a multiplexed approach was used...

  12. Regulation by ToxR-Like Proteins Converges on vttRB Expression To Control Type 3 Secretion System-Dependent Caco2-BBE Cytotoxicity in Vibrio cholerae

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Kelly A.; Sofia, Madeline K.; Weaver, Jacob W. A.; Christopher H. Seward; Dziejman, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Genes carried on the type 3 secretion system (T3SS) pathogenicity island of Vibrio cholerae non-O1/non-O139 serogroup strain AM-19226 must be precisely regulated in order for bacteria to cause disease. Previously reported results showed that both T3SS function and the presence of bile are required to cause Caco2-BBE cell cytotoxicity during coculture with strain AM-19226. We therefore investigated additional parameters affecting in vitro cell death, including bacterial load and the role of th...

  13. Data from Tiered High-Throughput Screening Approach to Identify Thyroperoxidase Inhibitors within the ToxCast Phase I and II Chemical Libraries

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — High-throughput screening for potential thyroid-disrupting chemicals requires a system of assays to capture multiple molecular-initiating events (MIEs) that converge...

  14. Toxicity of Exhaust Gases and Particles from IC-Engines – International Activities Survey (EngToxIn). 2nd Information Report for IEA Implementing Agreement AMF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czerwinski, J. [University for Applied Sciences, Biel-Bienne (Switzerland)

    2012-10-15

    Exhaust gases from engines, as well as from other technical combustion processes contain gaseous, semi volatile and solid compounds which are toxic. Some of these compounds are not yet limited by the respective legislations; but may need to be based on ongoing health research findings and some new substances did appear recently, due to the progressing technical developments providing new systems of exhaust gas aftertreatment. A new approach described here is that the toxic effects of exhaust gases as an aerosol containing gaseous components as well as particulate matter and nanoparticles can be investigated in a global way, by exposing the living cells, or cell cultures to the aerosol, which means a simultaneous superposition of all toxic effects from all active components. At several research sites it has been showed, that this method offers more objective results of validation of toxicity, than other methods used until now. It also enables a relatively quick insight in the toxic effects with consideration of all superimposed influences of the aerosol. This new methodology can be applied for all kinds of emission sources. It also bears the potential of giving new contributions to the present state of knowledge in this domain and can in some cases lead to a change of paradigma. The present report gives information about activities concerning the research on toxicity of exhaust gases from IC-engines in different countries. It also gives some ideas about the available information sources. The general situation and the basic information have not changed much so the chapters 1 and 2 are repeated from the last year report, [1] with only a few modifications. We observe fast increasing research activities concerning health effects worldwide. They have different objectives, different approaches and methodologies and sometimes the results can be directly compared to each other. There are mostly common lines and with appropriate efforts there might be possible ways to establish even a harmonised biological test procedure.

  15. Real-Time Growth Kinetics Measuring Hormone Mimicry for ToxCast Chemicals in T‑47D Human Ductal Carcinoma Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    High-throughput screening (HTS) assays capable of profiling thousands of environmentally relevant chemicals for in vitro biological activity provide useful information on the potential for disrupting endocrine pathways. Disruption of the estrogen signaling pathway has been implic...

  16. Novel design and controls for focused DNA microarrays: applications in quality assurance/control and normalization for the Health Canada ToxArray™

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lambert Iain B

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarray normalizations typically apply methods that assume absence of global transcript shifts, or absence of changes in internal control features such as housekeeping genes. These normalization approaches are not appropriate for focused arrays with small sets of genes where a large portion may be expected to change. Furthermore, many microarrays lack control features that can be used for quality assurance (QA. Here, we describe a novel external control series integrated with a design feature that addresses the above issues. Results An EC dilution series that involves spike-in of a single concentration of the A. thaliana chlorophyll synthase gene to hybridize against spotted dilutions (0.000015 to 100 μM of a single complimentary oligonucleotide representing the gene was developed. The EC series is printed in duplicate within each subgrid of the microarray and covers the full range of signal intensities from background to saturation. The design and placement of the series allows for QA examination of frequently encountered problems in hybridization (e.g., uneven hybridizations and printing (e.g., cross-spot contamination. Additionally, we demonstrate that the series can be integrated with a LOWESS normalization to improve the detection of differential gene expression (improved sensitivity and predictivity over LOWESS normalization on its own. Conclusion The quality of microarray experiments and the normalization methods used affect the ability to measure accurate changes in gene expression. Novel methods are required for normalization of small focused microarrays, and for incorporating measures of performance and quality. We demonstrate that dilution of oligonucleotides on the microarray itself provides an innovative approach allowing the full dynamic range of the scanner to be covered with a single gene spike-in. The dilution series can be used in a composite normalization to improve detection of differential gene expression and to provide quality control measures.

  17. Effect of cell wall deficiency on Tox gene of Corynebacterium diphtheriae%细胞壁缺陷对白喉棒状杆菌Tox基因影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    易旭; 王和

    2006-01-01

    目的 探讨细胞壁缺陷对白喉棒状杆菌毒力基因及其表达的影响.方法 以非高渗分离培养法诱导并获得产毒性白喉棒状杆菌稳定L型纯培养物,提取白喉棒状杆菌稳定L型的染色体DNA,用Tox基因特异性引物进行PCR扩增,并进行序列测定和分析.分别采用对流免疫电泳(CIEP)和十二烷基磺酸钠-不连续聚丙烯酰胺凝胶电泳(SDS-PAGE)检测白喉棒状杆菌稳定L型可溶性代谢产物中的白喉毒素蛋白质.结果 白喉棒状杆菌在氨苄青霉素作用下可发生细胞壁缺陷而成为L型,该稳定L型的传代培养物可仍然保留同其亲代细菌型一致的Tox基因及其核苷酸序列;但在其可溶性代谢产物中并未检测到白喉毒素蛋白质.结论 白喉棒状杆菌稳定L型虽然保留了Tox基因但并不能表达白喉毒素蛋白质,提示细胞壁缺陷可影响Tox基因在宿主菌细胞内的表达.

  18. IN VITRO METHOD FOR EXPRESSION OF TOXIN PRODUCTION IN NON-TOXIGENIC CORYNEBACTERIUM SPP. WITH “SILENT” TOX-GENE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Gabrielyan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The «in vitro method» for expression of toxin-production by phenotypically non-toxigenic strains of C. diphtheriae containing the “silent” toxin gene has been developed. The method can be characterised as rapid, economical, not demanding use of experimental animals, available to practical and scientific laboratories. Optimal conditions using this method were defined: nutrient mediums, frequency rate of passages, which provided restoration of toxin production. This method allowed to restore toxin-production in 10 out of 18 tested strains of C. diphtheriae with the “silent” toxin gene. Moreover, there was an increase of toxin roduction of by C. ulcerans and C. diphtheriae var. intermedius to the level allowing to detect toxin in the standard tests. The phenotype of a toxin-producing was defined by the Elek-test and ICS (immunechromatography set.

  19. Regulation by ToxR-Like Proteins Converges on vttRB Expression To Control Type 3 Secretion System-Dependent Caco2-BBE Cytotoxicity in Vibrio cholerae

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Kelly A.; Sofia, Madeline K.; Weaver, Jacob W. A.; Seward, Christopher H.; Dziejman, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Genes carried on the type 3 secretion system (T3SS) pathogenicity island of Vibrio cholerae non-O1/non-O139 serogroup strain AM-19226 must be precisely regulated in order for bacteria to cause disease. Previously reported results showed that both T3SS function and the presence of bile are required to cause Caco2-BBE cell cytotoxicity during coculture with strain AM-19226. We therefore investigated additional parameters affecting in vitro cell death, including bacterial load and the role of th...

  20. [Meningococcal disease: always present. Serogroup changes in the Southern Cone].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Eduardo Luis; Debbag, Roberto

    2012-12-01

    Meningococcal disease (MD) caused by Neisseria meningitidis is a condition with high mortality rates in childhood. Serogroup W135 N. meningitidis (MenW135) is usually associated with 1 to 8% of MD cases worldwide, and with a low carriage rate. During March 2000, an increase in the number of cases of MenW135 in Saudi Arabia was reported that coincided with the Hajj pilgrimage (Hajj-2000 strain). Mayer et al studied MenW135 strains from outbreaks related with this pilgrimage and found that all had been caused by the same hypervirulent clone (ST-11/complex ET-37). The circulation of this strain could also be documented in Latin America. In the last years, changes in serogroup prevalence have been observed in the region, the increase of MenW135 in the Southern Cone being the most significant. N. meningitidis infections of several serogroups including MenW135 may be prevented with chemoprophylaxis with antibiotics and quadrivalent vaccines. Better knowledge of the global epidemiology through the new molecular techniques, jointly with the availability of vaccines are the most relevant tools to control hyperendemic or epidemic periods of MD.

  1. InterProScan Result: BY931783 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available BY931783 BY931783_6_ORF1 07B35F7B573E99BB PANTHER PTHR11573:SF6 RIBONUCLEOSIDE-DIPH...OSPHATE REDUCTASE LARGE CHAIN 6.9e-72 T IPR000788 unintegrated Molecular Function: ribonucleoside-diphosphat...e reductase activity (GO:0004748)|Cellular Component: ribonucleoside-diphosphate reductase complex (GO:0005971)|Biological Process: DNA replication (GO:0006260) ...

  2. Acute Pancreatitis due to the use of Rufinamide

    OpenAIRE

    Oya Balci; Taner Sezer

    2016-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a acute inflammatory process involving the pancreas. The incidence of acute pancreatitis during childhood has been estimated to be 3.6-13.2/100.000. The common causes of acute pancreatitis in childhood are infections, choledekolithiasis, abdominal trauma, and drugs. Drug induced pancreatitis accounts for approximately 13-25 % of acute pancreatitis cases in childhood. Among different drugs, anticonvulsants; most commonly valproic asit, carbamezepine, ethosuximide and diph...

  3. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Detection of Tumor Cells by Targeting Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptors with Gd-Loaded Low-Density Lipoprotein Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simonetta Geninatti Crich

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Gd-DO3A-diph and Gd-AAZTAC17 are lipophilic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI agents that display high affinity for low-density lipoprotein (LDL particles. However, on binding to LDL, Gd-DO3A-diph shows a decreased hydration that results in a lower enhancement of water proton relaxation rate. Conversely, GdAAZTAC17 displays a strong relaxation enhancement at the imaging fields. Each LDL particle can load up to 100 and 400 UNITS of Gd-DO3A-diph and Gd-AAZTAC17, respectively. Their LDL adducts are taken up by human hepatoblastoma G2 (HepG2 and melanoma B16 tumor cells when added to the incubation medium. T, measurements of the labeled cells indicate that Gd-AAZTAC17 is significantly more efficient than Gd-DO3A-diph. Furthermore, it has been found that HepG2 hepatoma cells can internalize higher amounts of Gd-AAZTAC17 than B16 cells and the involvement of LDL receptors (LDLRs has been demonstrated in competition assays with free LDL. Gd-AAZTAC17/LDL adduct proved to be an efficient probe in the magnetic resonance (MR visualization of subcutaneous tumors in animal models obtained by injecting B16 melanoma cells into the right flank of mice. Finally, confocal microscopy validation of the distribution of LDL-based probes in the tumor has been obtained by doping the Gd-AAZTAC17/LDL adduct with a fluorescent phospholipid moiety.

  4. A processed noncoding RNA regulates an altruistic bacterial antiviral system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blower, Tim R; Pei, Xue Y; Short, Francesca L; Fineran, Peter C; Humphreys, David P; Luisi, Ben F; Salmond, George P C

    2011-02-01

    The ≥ 10³⁰ bacteriophages on Earth relentlessly drive adaptive coevolution, forcing the generation of protective mechanisms in their bacterial hosts. One such bacterial phage-resistance system, ToxIN, consists of a protein toxin (ToxN) that is inhibited in vivo by a specific RNA antitoxin (ToxI); however, the mechanisms for this toxicity and inhibition have not been defined. Here we present the crystal structure of the ToxN-ToxI complex from Pectobacterium atrosepticum, determined to 2.75-Å resolution. ToxI is a 36-nucleotide noncoding RNA pseudoknot, and three ToxI monomers bind to three ToxN monomers to generate a trimeric ToxN-ToxI complex. Assembly of this complex is mediated entirely through extensive RNA-protein interactions. Furthermore, a 2'-3' cyclic phosphate at the 3' end of ToxI, and catalytic residues, identify ToxN as an endoRNase that processes ToxI from a repetitive precursor but is regulated by its own catalytic product.

  5. Antifungal Activity and Action Mechanism of Histatin 5-Halocidin Hybrid Peptides against Candida ssp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Juhye; Jyoti, Md. Anirban; Song, Ho-Yeon; Jang, Woong Sik

    2016-01-01

    The candidacidal activity of histatin 5 is initiated through cell wall binding, followed by translocation and intracellular targeting, while the halocidin peptide exerts its activity by attacking the Candida cell membrane. To improve antimicrobial activities and to understand the killing mechanism of two peptides, six hybrid peptides were designed by conjugating histatin 5 and halocidin. A comparative approach was established to study the activity, salt tolerance, cell wall glucan binding assay, cytotoxicity, generation of ROS and killing kinetics. CD spectrometry was conducted to evaluate secondary structures of these hybrid peptides. Furthermore the cellular localization of hybrid peptides was investigated by confocal fluorescence microscopy. Of the six hybrid congeners, di-PH2, di-WP2 and HHP1 had stronger activities than other hybrid peptides against all tested Candida strains. The MIC values of these peptides were 1–2, 2–4 and 2–4 μg/ml, respectively. Moreover, none of the hybrid peptides was cytotoxic in the hemolytic assay and cell-based cytotoxicity assay. Confocal laser microscopy showed that di-PH2 and HHP1 were translocated into cytoplasm whereas di-WP2 was accumulated on surface of C. albicans to exert their candidacidal activity. All translocated peptides (Hst 5, P113, di-PH2) were capable of generating intracellular ROS except HHP1. Additionally, the KFH residues at C-terminal end of these peptides were assumed for core sequence for active translocation. PMID:26918792

  6. Drinking Water (Environmental Health Student Portal)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in Tox Town (Tox Town - National Library of Medicine) - Description of what agricultural runoff is and its hazardous effects on the environment. Commercially Bottled Water (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) - Provides information about different types ...

  7. Toxicity Reference Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Toxicity Reference Database (ToxRefDB) contains approximately 30 years and $2 billion worth of animal studies. ToxRefDB allows scientists and the interested...

  8. A catalog of putative adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) that will enhance the utility of ToxCast high throughput screening data for hazard identification, delivered via a putative AOP knowledgebase and a ToxCast assay annotation file that can be linked with the iCSS dashboard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A number of putative AOPs for several distinct MIEs of thyroid disruption have been formulated for amphibian metamorphosis and fish swim bladder inflation. These have been entered into the AOP knowledgebase on the OECD WIKI.

  9. A catalog of putative adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) that will enhance the utility of ToxCast high throughput screening data for hazard identification, delivered via a putative AOP knowledgebase and a ToxCast assay annotation file that can be linked with the iCSS dashboard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A number of putative AOPs for several distinct MIEs of thyroid disruption have been formulated for amphibian metamorphosis and fish swim bladder inflation. These have been entered into the AOP knowledgebase on the OECD WIKI.

  10. Phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of Neisseria meningitidis disease-causing strains in Argentina, 2010.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Sorhouet-Pereira

    Full Text Available Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of 133 isolates of Neisseria meningitidis obtained from meningococcal disease cases in Argentina during 2010 were performed by the National Reference Laboratory as part of a project coordinated by the PAHO within the SIREVA II network. Serogroup, serotype, serosubtype and MLST characterization were performed. Minimum Inhibitory Concentration to penicillin, ampicillin, ceftriaxone, rifampin, chloramphenicol, tetracycline and ciprofloxacin were determined and interpreted according to CLSI guidelines. Almost 49% of isolates were W135, and two serotype:serosubtype combinations, W135:2a:P1.5,2:ST-11 and W135:2a:P1.2:ST-11 accounted for 78% of all W135 isolates. Serogroup B accounted for 42.1% of isolates, and was both phenotypically and genotypically diverse. Serogroup C isolates represented 5.3% of the dataset, and one isolate belonging to the ST-198 complex was non-groupable. Isolates belonged mainly to the ST-11 complex (48% and to a lesser extent to the ST-865 (18%, ST-32 (9,8% and the ST-35 complexes (9%. Intermediate resistance to penicillin and ampicillin was detected in 35.4% and 33.1% of isolates respectively. Two W135:2a:P1.5,2:ST-11:ST-11 isolates presented resistance to ciprofloxacin associated with a mutation in the QRDR of gyrA gene Thr91-Ile. These data show serogroup W135 was the first cause of disease in Argentina in 2010, and was strongly associated with the W135:2a:P1.5,2:ST-11 epidemic clone. Serogroup B was the second cause of disease and isolates belonging to this serogroup were phenotypically and genotypically diverse. The presence of isolates with intermediate resistance to penicillin and the presence of fluorquinolone-resistant isolates highlight the necessity and importance of maintaining and strengthening National Surveillance Programs.

  11. Selectivity and self-assembly in the control of a bacterial toxin by an antitoxic noncoding RNA pseudoknot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Francesca L; Pei, Xue Y; Blower, Tim R; Ong, Shue-Li; Fineran, Peter C; Luisi, Ben F; Salmond, George P C

    2013-01-15

    Bacterial small RNAs perform numerous regulatory roles, including acting as antitoxic components in toxin-antitoxin systems. In type III toxin-antitoxin systems, small processed RNAs directly antagonize their toxin protein partners, and in the systems characterized the toxin and antitoxin components together form a trimeric assembly. In the present study, we sought to define how the RNA antitoxin, ToxI, inhibits its potentially lethal protein partner, ToxN. We show through cross-inhibition experiments with the ToxIN systems from Pectobacterium atrosepticum (ToxIN(Pa)) and Bacillus thuringiensis (ToxIN(Bt)) that ToxI RNAs are highly selective enzyme inhibitors. Both systems have an "addictive" plasmid maintenance phenotype. We demonstrate that ToxI(Pa) can inhibit ToxN(Pa) in vitro both in its processed form and as a repetitive precursor RNA, and this inhibition is linked to the self-assembly of the trimeric complex. Inhibition and self-assembly are both mediated entirely by the ToxI(Pa) RNA, with no requirement for cellular factors or exogenous energy. Finally, we explain the origins of ToxI antitoxin selectivity through our crystal structure of the ToxIN(Bt) complex. Our results show how a processed RNA pseudoknot can inhibit a deleterious protein with exquisite molecular specificity and how these self-contained and addictive RNA-protein pairs can confer different adaptive benefits in their bacterial hosts.

  12. Investigation of Toxoplasma Infection in Spontaneous Abortion Females%自然流产妇女弓形虫感染的调查研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈华明; 柴辉; 乐周萍; 廖慧芳

    2004-01-01

    目的探讨自然流产妇女与弓形虫(Tox)感染的相关性.方法采用酶联免疫吸附试验(ELISA)对自然流产的476例孕妇外周血进行了弓形虫循环抗原(CAg)和特异性抗体(Tox-IgM,Tox-IgG)的检测,并和正常妊娠妇女作比较;应用聚合酶链反应(PCR)技术对经ELISA测定为阳性的14例孕妇流产物进行Tox-DNA检测.结果流产组CAg,Tox-IgM,Tox-IgG等阳性率分别为5.25%,6.30%,11.76%,其中CAg及Tox-IgM阳性率与正常孕妇相比,差异有非常显著性(P<0.01);14例流产物中Tox-DNA阳性8例,阳性率为57.14%.结论Tox可通过胎盘传给胎儿,引起流产;孕妇急性感染与自然流产有相关性,CAg,Tox-IgM,CAg+Tox-IgM阳性率与发生流产次数呈正相关.

  13. Viral evasion of a bacterial suicide system by RNA-based molecular mimicry enables infectious altruism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blower, Tim R; Evans, Terry J; Przybilski, Rita; Fineran, Peter C; Salmond, George P C

    2012-01-01

    Abortive infection, during which an infected bacterial cell commits altruistic suicide to destroy the replicating bacteriophage and protect the clonal population, can be mediated by toxin-antitoxin systems such as the Type III protein-RNA toxin-antitoxin system, ToxIN. A flagellum-dependent bacteriophage of the Myoviridae, ΦTE, evolved rare mutants that "escaped" ToxIN-mediated abortive infection within Pectobacterium atrosepticum. Wild-type ΦTE encoded a short sequence similar to the repetitive nucleotide sequence of the RNA antitoxin, ToxI, from ToxIN. The ΦTE escape mutants had expanded the number of these "pseudo-ToxI" genetic repeats and, in one case, an escape phage had "hijacked" ToxI from the plasmid-borne toxIN locus, through recombination. Expression of the pseudo-ToxI repeats during ΦTE infection allowed the phage to replicate, unaffected by ToxIN, through RNA-based molecular mimicry. This is the first example of a non-coding RNA encoded by a phage that evolves by selective expansion and recombination to enable viral suppression of a defensive bacterial suicide system. Furthermore, the ΦTE escape phages had evolved enhanced capacity to transduce replicons expressing ToxIN, demonstrating virus-mediated horizontal transfer of genetic altruism.

  14. Viral evasion of a bacterial suicide system by RNA-based molecular mimicry enables infectious altruism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim R Blower

    Full Text Available Abortive infection, during which an infected bacterial cell commits altruistic suicide to destroy the replicating bacteriophage and protect the clonal population, can be mediated by toxin-antitoxin systems such as the Type III protein-RNA toxin-antitoxin system, ToxIN. A flagellum-dependent bacteriophage of the Myoviridae, ΦTE, evolved rare mutants that "escaped" ToxIN-mediated abortive infection within Pectobacterium atrosepticum. Wild-type ΦTE encoded a short sequence similar to the repetitive nucleotide sequence of the RNA antitoxin, ToxI, from ToxIN. The ΦTE escape mutants had expanded the number of these "pseudo-ToxI" genetic repeats and, in one case, an escape phage had "hijacked" ToxI from the plasmid-borne toxIN locus, through recombination. Expression of the pseudo-ToxI repeats during ΦTE infection allowed the phage to replicate, unaffected by ToxIN, through RNA-based molecular mimicry. This is the first example of a non-coding RNA encoded by a phage that evolves by selective expansion and recombination to enable viral suppression of a defensive bacterial suicide system. Furthermore, the ΦTE escape phages had evolved enhanced capacity to transduce replicons expressing ToxIN, demonstrating virus-mediated horizontal transfer of genetic altruism.

  15. Expression of a single-chain variable-fragment antibody against a Fusarium virguliforme toxin peptide enhances tolerance to sudden death syndrome in transgenic soybean plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brar, Hargeet K; Bhattacharyya, Madan K

    2012-06-01

    Plants do not produce antibodies. However, plants can correctly assemble functional antibody molecules encoded by mammalian antibody genes. Many plant diseases are caused by pathogen toxins. One such disease is the soybean sudden death syndrome (SDS). SDS is a serious disease caused by the fungal pathogen Fusarium virguliforme. The pathogen, however, has never been isolated from diseased foliar tissues. Thus, one or more toxins produced by the pathogen have been considered to cause foliar SDS. One of these possible toxins, FvTox1, was recently identified. We investigated whether expression of anti-FvTox1 single-chain variable-fragment (scFv) antibody in transgenic soybean can confer resistance to foliar SDS. We have created two scFv antibody genes, Anti-FvTox1-1 and Anti-FvTox1-2, encoding anti-FvTox1 scFv antibodies from RNAs of a hybridoma cell line that expresses mouse monoclonal anti-FvTox1 7E8 antibody. Both anti-FvTox1 scFv antibodies interacted with an antigenic site of FvTox1 that binds to mouse monoclonal anti-FvTox1 7E8 antibody. Binding of FvTox1 by the anti-FvTox1 scFv antibodies, expressed in either Escherichia coli or transgenic soybean roots, was initially verified on nitrocellulose membranes. Expression of anti-FvTox1-1 in stable transgenic soybean plants resulted in enhanced foliar SDS resistance compared with that in nontransgenic control plants. Our results suggest that i) FvTox1 is an important pathogenicity factor for foliar SDS development and ii) expression of scFv antibodies against pathogen toxins could be a suitable biotechnology approach for protecting crop plants from toxin-induced diseases.

  16. TTCs for oral exposure: Identification of outliers in Cramer class I, II and III using the combined database of RepDose (FhG), Toxbase (TNO), Munro and ToxRefDB (USEPA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Thresholds of Toxicological Concern (TTC) are generic human exposure threshold for structural groups of chemicals below which no risk to human health is assumed and therefore no further testing is needed. Different thresholds have been developed for oral exposure e.g. for gen...

  17. TTCs for oral exposure: Identification of outliers in Cramer class I, II and III using the combined database of RepDose (FhG), Toxbase (TNO), Munro and ToxRefDB (USEPA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Thresholds of Toxicological Concern (TTC) are generic human exposure threshold for structural groups of chemicals below which no risk to human health is assumed and therefore no further testing is needed. Different thresholds have been developed for oral exposure e.g. for gen...

  18. Integrative data mining of high-throughput in vitro screens, in vivo data, and disease information to identify Adverse Outcome Pathway (AOP) signatures:ToxCast high-throughput screening data and Comparative Toxicogenomics Database (CTD) as a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Adverse Outcome Pathway (AOP) framework provides a systematic way to describe linkages between molecular and cellular processes and organism or population level effects. The current AOP assembly methods however, are inefficient. Our goal is to generate computationally-pr...

  19. Improved coreceptor usage prediction and genotypic monitoring of R5-to-X4 transition by motif analysis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 env V3 loop sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Mark A; Li, Fu-Sheng; van 't Wout, Angélique B; Nickle, David C; Shriner, Daniel; He, Hong-Xia; McLaughlin, Sherry; Shankarappa, Raj; Margolick, Joseph B; Mullins, James I

    2003-12-01

    Early in infection, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) generally uses the CCR5 chemokine receptor (along with CD4) for cellular entry. In many HIV-1-infected individuals, viral genotypic changes arise that allow the virus to use CXCR4 (either in addition to CCR5 or alone) as an entry coreceptor. This switch has been associated with an acceleration of both CD3(+) T-cell decline and progression to AIDS. While it is well known that the V3 loop of gp120 largely determines coreceptor usage and that positively charged residues in V3 play an important role, the process of genetic change in V3 leading to altered coreceptor usage is not well understood. Further, the methods for biological phenotyping of virus for research or clinical purposes are laborious, depend on sample availability, and present biosafety concerns, so reliable methods for sequence-based "virtual phenotyping" are desirable. We introduce a simple bioinformatic method of scoring V3 amino acid sequences that reliably predicts CXCR4 usage (sensitivity, 84%; specificity, 96%). This score (as determined on the basis of position-specific scoring matrices [PSSM]) can be interpreted as revealing a propensity to use CXCR4 as follows: known R5 viruses had low scores, R5X4 viruses had intermediate scores, and X4 viruses had high scores. Application of the PSSM scoring method to reconstructed virus phylogenies of 11 longitudinally sampled individuals revealed that the development of X4 viruses was generally gradual and involved the accumulation of multiple amino acid changes in V3. We found that X4 viruses were lost in two ways: by the dying off of an established X4 lineage or by mutation back to low-scoring V3 loops.

  20. A first meningococcal meningitis case caused by serogroup Ⅹ Neisseria meningitidis strains in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Chao; UANG Ying-chun; ZHANG Tie-gang; HE Jing-guo; WU Jiang; CHEN Li-juan; LIU Jun-feng; PANG Xing-huo; YANG Jie; SHAO Zhu-jun

    2008-01-01

    @@ Neisseria meningitidis is the leading cause of bacterial meningitis and classified into 13 serogroups based on the immunological reactivity of the capsular polysaccharide.1 Serogroups A,B,C,W135 and Y are the most common causes of meningitis.2

  1. Host-selective toxins of Pyrenophora tritici-repentis induce common responses associated with host susceptibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iovanna Pandelova

    Full Text Available Pyrenophora tritici-repentis (Ptr, a necrotrophic fungus and the causal agent of tan spot of wheat, produces one or a combination of host-selective toxins (HSTs necessary for disease development. The two most studied toxins produced by Ptr, Ptr ToxA (ToxA and Ptr ToxB (ToxB, are proteins that cause necrotic or chlorotic symptoms respectively. Investigation of host responses induced by HSTs provides better insight into the nature of the host susceptibility. Microarray analysis of ToxA has provided evidence that it can elicit responses similar to those associated with defense. In order to evaluate whether there are consistent host responses associated with susceptibility, a similar analysis of ToxB-induced changes in the same sensitive cultivar was conducted. Comparative analysis of ToxA- and ToxB-induced transcriptional changes showed that similar groups of genes encoding WRKY transcription factors, RLKs, PRs, components of the phenylpropanoid and jasmonic acid pathways are activated. ROS accumulation and photosystem dysfunction proved to be common mechanism-of-action for these toxins. Despite similarities in defense responses, transcriptional and biochemical responses as well as symptom development occur more rapidly for ToxA compared to ToxB, which could be explained by differences in perception as well as by differences in activation of a specific process, for example, ethylene biosynthesis in ToxA treatment. Results of this study suggest that perception of HSTs will result in activation of defense responses as part of a susceptible interaction and further supports the hypothesis that necrotrophic fungi exploit defense responses in order to induce cell death.

  2. Analysis of Ingredient Lists to Quantitatively Characterize Chemicals in Consumer Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    The EPA’s ExpoCast program is developing high throughput (HT) approaches to generate the needed exposure estimates to compare against HT bioactivity data generated from the US inter-agency Tox21 and the US EPA ToxCast programs. Assessing such exposures for the thousands of...

  3. Insights into Tan Spot and Stem Rust Resistance and Susceptibility by Studying the Pre-Green Revolution Global Collection of Wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Sidrat; Sehgal, Sunish Kumar; Jin, Yue; Turnipseed, Brent; Ali, Shaukat

    2017-01-01

    Tan spot (TS), caused by the fungus Pyrenophora tritici-repentis (Died) Drechs, is an important foliar disease of wheat and has become a threat to world wheat production since the 1970s. In this study a globally diverse pre-1940s collection of 247 wheat genotypes was evaluated against Ptr ToxA, P. tritici-repentis race 1, and stem rust to determine if; (i) acquisition of Ptr ToxA by the P. tritici-repentis from Stagonospora nodorum led to increased pathogen virulence or (ii) incorporation of TS susceptibility during development stem rust resistant cultivars led to an increase in TS epidemics globally. Most genotypes were susceptible to stem rust; however, a range of reactions to TS and Ptr ToxA were observed. Four combinations of disease-toxin reactions were observed among the genotypes; TS susceptible-Ptr ToxA sensitive, TS susceptible-Ptr ToxA insensitive, TS resistant-Ptr ToxA insensitive, and TS resistant-Ptr ToxA toxin sensitive. A weak correlation (r = 0.14 for bread wheat and −0.082 for durum) was observed between stem rust susceptibility and TS resistance. Even though there were no reported epidemics in the pre-1940s, TS sensitive genotypes were widely grown in that period, suggesting that Ptr ToxA may not be an important factor responsible for enhanced prevalence of TS.

  4. Identifying Structural Alerts Based on Zebrafish Developmental Morphological Toxicity (TDS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebrafish constitute a powerful alternative animal model for chemical hazard evaluation. To provide an in vivo complement to high-throughput screening data from the ToxCast program, zebrafish developmental toxicity screens were conducted on the ToxCast Phase I (Padilla et al., 20...

  5. High Throughput PBTK: Evaluating EPA’s Open-Source Data and Tools for Dosimetry and Exposure Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thousands of chemicals have been profiled by high-throughput screening (HTS) programs such as ToxCast and Tox21; these chemicals are tested in part because most of them have limited or no data on hazard, exposure, or toxicokinetics (TK). While HTS generates in vitro bioactivity d...

  6. Genomic analysis and tools for the Septoria nodorum blotch susceptibility gene Snn2 in wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Septoria nodorum blotch of wheat is caused by Parastagonospora nodorum and leads to significant yield losses as well as reductions in grain quality and grain weight. The wheat Snn2 gene confers sensitivity to the necrotrophic effector SnTox2 of P. nodorum. A compatible Snn2-SnTox2 interaction is imp...

  7. EPAs DSSTox Chemical Database: A Resource for the Non-Targeted Testing Community (EPA NTA workshop)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA’s DSSTox database project, which includes coverage of the ToxCast and Tox21 high-throughput testing inventories, provides high-quality chemical-structure files for inventories of toxicological and environmental relevance. A feature of the DSSTox project, which differentiates ...

  8. Building Scientific Confidence in the Development and ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Building Scientific Confidence in the Development and Evaluation of Read-Across Using Tox21 Approaches Slide presentation at GlobalChem conference and workshop in Washington, DC on Case Study on Building Scientific Confidence in the Development and Evaluation of Read-Across Using Tox21 Approaches

  9. DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY OF 2-CHLORO-2'-DEOXYADENOSINE IN THE RAT: INDUCTION OF LUMBAR HERNIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY OF 2-CHLORO-2'DEOXYADENOSINE IN THE RAT: INDUCTION OF LUMBAR HERNIA. C. Lau1, M.G. Narotsky1, D. Lui1, D. Best1, R.W. Setzer2, T.B. Knudsen3. 1Reprod. Tox. Div., 2Exp. Tox. Div., NHEERL, US EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA, 3Dept. Path. Anat. Cell Bio...

  10. Toxicarioside N induces apoptosis in human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cell by activating the p38MAPK pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Huan-Ge; Zhou, Song-Lin; Lin, Ying-Ying; Dai, Hao-Fu; Huang, Feng-Ying

    2017-09-22

    Natural plant compounds with potent proliferation inhibition and apoptosis induction properties have been screened as novel anticancer drugs. Toxicarioside N (Tox N) was isolated from the seeds of the tropical plant Antiaris toxicaria in Hainan province, China. To our knowledge, the effects that Tox N has on the apoptosis of SGC-7901 cells and its potential mechanism have never been investigated. In this study, we detected the anticancer activities of Tox N and explored the potential mechanism in the human gastrointestinal cancer cell line SGC-7901. Here, we found that Tox N inhibited SGC-7901 cell growth in a dose- and time-dependent manner and induced apoptosis in cells based on cell morphology and flow cytometry analyses. Additionally, the SGC-7901 cell treated with Tox N up-regulated the expression level of cleaved caspase-3/9 and PARP, increased the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, and led to the release of cytochrome c into the cytoplasm. In addition, Tox N treatment led to the phosphorylation of p38MAPK. SB203580, a p38MAPK inhibitor, partially attenuated Tox N induced apoptosis by preventing the activation of caspase-3/9 and PARP. Our results indicated for the first time that Tox N can induce SGC-7901 cells apoptosis by activating the p38MAPK pathway.

  11. Gclust Server: 201225 [Gclust Server

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 201225 Vvy_VV0998 Cluster Sequences - 176 transmembrane regulatory protein ToxS 1 1....00e-90 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 3.23 0.0 Show 201225 Cluster ID 201225 Sequence ID Vvy_VV0998 Link to cluster sequen

  12. Precision-cut intestinal slices : alternative model for drug transport, metabolism, and toxicology research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Ming; de Graaf, Inge A M; Groothuis, Geny M M

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity (ADME-tox) processes of drugs are of importance and require preclinical investigation intestine in addition to the liver. Various models have been developed for prediction of ADME-tox in the intestine. In this review, pre

  13. Non-opsonic phagocytosis of homologous non-toxigenic and toxigenic Corynebacterium diphtheriae strains by human U-937 macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Cíntia Silva; dos Santos, Louisy Sanches; de Souza, Monica Cristina; dos Santos Dourado, Fernanda; de Souza de Oliveira Dias, Alexandre Alves; Sabbadini, Priscila Soares; Pereira, Gabriela Andrade; Cabral, Maulori Curié; Hirata Junior, Raphael; de Mattos-Guaraldi, Ana Luíza

    2010-01-01

    As interactions between bacteria and macrophages dictate the outcome of most infectious diseases, analyses of molecular mechanisms of non-opsonic phagocytosis should lead to new approaches for the prevention of diphtheria and systemic Corynebacterium diphtheriae infections. The present study aimed to evaluate human macrophage-bacteria interactions in the absence of opsonin antibodies and the influence of the tox gene on this process. Homologous C. diphtheriae tox+ and tox- strains were evaluated for adhesion, entering and survival within U-937 human macrophages at different incubation periods. Higher numbers of viable bacteria associated with and internalized by macrophages were demonstrated for the tox+ strain. However, viable intracellular bacteria were detected at T-24 hr only for the tox- strain. Cytoskeletal inhibitors, cytochalasin E, genistein and colchicine, inhibited intracellular viability of both strains at different levels. Bacterial replication was evidenced at T-24 hr in supernatants of monolayers infected with the tox- strain. Host cell death and nuclear alterations were evidenced by the Trypan blue exclusion assay and DAPI fluorescence microscopy. ELISA of histone-associated DNA fragments allowed detection of apoptosis and necrosis induced by tox+ and tox- strains at T-1 hr and T-3 hr. In conclusion, human macrophages in the absence of opsonins may not be promptly effective at killing diphtheria bacilli. The presence of the tox gene influences the susceptibility of C. diphtheriae to human macrophages and the outcome of non-opsonic phagocytosis. C. diphtheriae strains exhibit strategies to survive within macrophages and to exert apoptosis and necrosis in human phagocytic cells, independent of the tox gene.

  14. Toxicology ontology perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Barry; Apic, Gordana; Carthew, Philip; Clark, Dominic; Cook, David; Dix, Ian; Escher, Sylvia; Hastings, Janna; Heard, David J; Jeliazkova, Nina; Judson, Philip; Matis-Mitchell, Sherri; Mitic, Dragana; Myatt, Glenn; Shah, Imran; Spjuth, Ola; Tcheremenskaia, Olga; Toldo, Luca; Watson, David; White, Andrew; Yang, Chihae

    2012-01-01

    The field of predictive toxicology requires the development of open, public, computable, standardized toxicology vocabularies and ontologies to support the applications required by in silico, in vitro, and in vivo toxicology methods and related analysis and reporting activities. In this article we review ontology developments based on a set of perspectives showing how ontologies are being used in predictive toxicology initiatives and applications. Perspectives on resources and initiatives reviewed include OpenTox, eTOX, Pistoia Alliance, ToxWiz, Virtual Liver, EU-ADR, BEL, ToxML, and Bioclipse. We also review existing ontology developments in neighboring fields that can contribute to establishing an ontological framework for predictive toxicology. A significant set of resources is already available to provide a foundation for an ontological framework for 21st century mechanistic-based toxicology research. Ontologies such as ToxWiz provide a basis for application to toxicology investigations, whereas other ontologies under development in the biological, chemical, and biomedical communities could be incorporated in an extended future framework. OpenTox has provided a semantic web framework for the implementation of such ontologies into software applications and linked data resources. Bioclipse developers have shown the benefit of interoperability obtained through ontology by being able to link their workbench application with remote OpenTox web services. Although these developments are promising, an increased international coordination of efforts is greatly needed to develop a more unified, standardized, and open toxicology ontology framework.

  15. Safety and efficacy of botulinum toxin A for the treatment of spasticity in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: results of a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Costa, Juan F; Máñez, Inmaculada; Alabajos, Ana; Guevara Salazar, Maricruz; Roda, Cristina; Sevilla, Teresa

    2016-10-01

    Spasticity can be a very disabling problem in some amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) phenotypes, such as upper motor neuron-dominant ALS (UMN-D ALS) and primary lateral sclerosis (PLS). Our aim is to describe the safety and efficacy of botulinum toxin A (BoTox-A) for improving gait in those ALS phenotypes. UMN-D ALS and PLS outpatients experiencing gait disturbances, secondary to moderate-to-severe spasticity despite optimized oral medication, were offered BoTox-A treatment. Stretching exercises were indicated to complement BoTox-A effect, and ankle-foot orthotics were prescribed when appropriate. Tolerance (muscle strength, disease progression rate) and efficacy (10-m walk test) were measured at baseline and after treatment. Eight out of 122 ALS outpatients were offered BoTox-A treatment. One declined and the other seven were administered BoTox-A in the lower limbs, every 5-8 months. All of them experienced improvement in the clinical outcome and all but one referred subjective improvement. Moreover, after a median follow-up of 16 months and three injections, BoTox-A effect was maintained with no adverse events. This study provides class IV evidence that BoTox-A is safe , and could be beneficial in the short term and long term in a subset of ALS patients with moderate-to-severe spasticity.

  16. Use of High Throughput Screening Data in IARC Monograph ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purpose: Evaluation of carcinogenic mechanisms serves a critical role in IARC monograph evaluations, and can lead to “upgrade” or “downgrade” of the carcinogenicity conclusions based on human and animal evidence alone. Three recent IARC monograph Working Groups (110, 112, and 113) pioneered analysis of high throughput in vitro screening data from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s ToxCast program in evaluations of carcinogenic mechanisms. Methods: For monograph 110, ToxCast assay data across multiple nuclear receptors were used to test the hypothesis that PFOA acts exclusively through the PPAR family of receptors, with activity profiles compared to several prototypical nuclear receptor-activating compounds. For monographs 112 and 113, ToxCast assays were systematically evaluated and used as an additional data stream in the overall evaluation of the mechanistic evidence. Specifically, ToxCast assays were mapped to 10 “key characteristics of carcinogens” recently identified by an IARC expert group, and chemicals’ bioactivity profiles were evaluated both in absolute terms (number of relevant assays positive for bioactivity) and relative terms (ranking with respect to other compounds evaluated by IARC, using the ToxPi methodology). Results: PFOA activates multiple nuclear receptors in addition to the PPAR family in the ToxCast assays. ToxCast assays offered substantial coverage for 5 of the 10 “key characteristics,” with the greates

  17. Natural solar photolysis of total organic chlorine, bromine and iodine in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abusallout, Ibrahim; Hua, Guanghui

    2016-04-01

    Municipal wastewater has been increasingly used to augment drinking water supplies due to the growing water scarcity. Wastewater-derived disinfection byproducts (DBPs) may negatively affect the aquatic ecosystems and human health of downstream communities during water reuse. The objective of this research was to determine the degradation kinetics of total organic chlorine (TOCl), bromine (TOBr) and iodine (TOI) in water by natural sunlight irradiation. Outdoor solar photolysis experiments were performed to investigate photolytic degradation of the total organic halogen (TOX) formed by fulvic acid and real water and wastewater samples. The results showed that TOX degradation by sunlight irradiation followed the first-order kinetics with half-lives in the range of 2.6-10.7 h for different TOX compounds produced by fulvic acid. The TOX degradation rates were generally in the order of TOI > TOBr ≅ TOCl(NH2Cl) > TOCl(Cl2). High molecular weight TOX was more susceptible to solar photolysis than corresponding low molecular weight halogenated compounds. The nitrate and sulfite induced indirect TOX photolysis rates were less than 50% of the direct photolysis rates under the conditions of this study. Fulvic acid and turbidity in water reduced TOX photodegradation. These results contribute to a better understanding of the fate of chlorinated, brominated and iodinated DBPs in surface waters.

  18. Allelopathy as an emergent, exploitable public good in the bloom-forming microalga Prymnesium parvum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, William W; Espinosa, Noelle J; Eldakar, Omar T; Hackett, Jeremiah D

    2013-06-01

    Many microbes cooperatively secrete extracellular products that favorably modify their environment. Consistent with social evolution theory, structured habitats play a role in maintaining these traits in microbial model systems, by localizing the benefits and separating strains that invest in these products from 'cheater' strains that benefit without paying the cost. It is thus surprising that many unicellular, well-mixed microalgal populations invest in extracellular toxins that confer ecological benefits upon the entire population, for example, by eliminating nutrient competitors (allelopathy). Here we test the hypotheses that microalgal exotoxins are (1) exploitable public goods that benefit all cells, regardless of investment, or (2) nonexploitable private goods involved in cell-level functions. We test these hypotheses with high-toxicity (TOX+) and low-toxicity (TOX-) strains of the damaging, mixotrophic microalga Prymnesium parvum and two common competitors: green algae and diatoms. TOX+ actually benefits from dense populations of competing green algae, which can also be prey for P. parvum, yielding a relative fitness advantage over coexisting TOX-. However, with nonprey competitors (diatoms), TOX- increases in frequency over TOX+, despite benefiting from the exclusion of diatoms by TOX+. An evolutionary unstable, ecologically devastating public good may emerge from traits selected at lower levels expressed in novel environments. © 2013 The Author(s). Evolution © 2013 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  19. Risk for meningococcal disease associated with the Hajj 2001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-02-16

    Every year approximately two million pilgrims from more than 140 countries gather in Saudi Arabia for a pilgrimage to the holy places of Islam known as the Hajj. Coinciding with the Hajj pilgrimage during March 2000, Saudi Arabian health officials identified an outbreak of meningococcal disease; a substantial proportion of the isolates were the bacterial strain Neisseria meningitidis serogroup W-135. Four cases of meningococcal disease subsequently were identified among the estimated 15,000 pilgrims returning to the United States, their close contacts, and community. In addition, approximately 400 cases of meningococcal disease caused by N. meningitidis serogroup W-135 wereidentified worldwide during 2000. Whether an outbreak of meningococcal disease will recur in 2001 is unknown.

  20. Age-Dependent Neisseria meningitidis Serogroup C Class-Specific Antibody Concentrations and Bactericidal Titers in Sera from Young Children from Montana Immunized with a Licensed Polysaccharide Vaccine

    OpenAIRE

    Maslanka, Susan E; Tappero, Jordan W.; Plikaytis, Brian D.; Brumberg, Robert S.; Dykes, Janet K.; Gheesling, Linda L.; Donaldson, Kimberley B. J.; Schuchat, Anne; Pullman, John; Jones, Maryann; Bushmaker, Julie; Carlone, George M.

    1998-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis serogroup C bactericidal titers and class-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) antibody concentrations were measured in sera from 173 children (1 to 5 years old) before and 6 weeks and 7 months following vaccination with a quadrivalent (A/C/Y/W-135) polysaccharide vaccine. The immune responses of the children were compared with those of 40 adults 6 weeks postvaccination. Both bactericidal titers and ELISA antibody concentrations were significantly higher i...

  1. Epidemiology, molecular characterization and antibiotic resistance of Neisseria meningitidis from patients ≤15 years in Manhica, rural Mozambique.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Belén Ibarz-Pavón

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The epidemiology of meningococcal disease in Mozambique and other African countries located outside the "meningitis belt" remains widely unknown. With the event of upcoming vaccines microbiological and epidemiological information is urgently needed. METHODS: Prospective surveillance for invasive bacterial infections was conducted at the Manhiça District hospital (rural Mozambique among hospitalized children below 15 years of age. Available Neisseria meningitidis isolates were serogrouped and characterized by Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST. Antibiotic resistance was also determined. RESULTS: Between 1998 and 2008, sixty-three cases of confirmed meningococcal disease (36 meningitis, 26 sepsis and 1 conjunctivitis were identified among hospitalized children. The average incidence rate of meningococcal disease was 11.6/100,000 (8/100,000 for meningitis and 3.7/100,000 for meningococcemia, respectively. There was a significant rise on the number of meningococcal disease cases in 2005-2006 that was sustained till the end of the surveillance period. Serogroup was determined for 43 of the 63 meningococcal disease cases: 38 serogroup W-135, 3 serogroup A and 2 serogroup Y. ST-11 was the most predominant sequence type and strongly associated with serogroup W-135. Two of the three serogroup A isolates were ST-1, and both serogroup Y isolates were ST-175. N. meningitidis remained highly susceptible to all antibiotics used for treatment in the country, although the presence of isolates presenting intermediate resistance to penicillin advocates for continued surveillance. CONCLUSIONS: Our data show a high rate of meningococcal disease in Manhiça, Mozambique, mainly caused by serogroup W-135 ST-11 strains, and advocates for the implementation of a vaccination strategy covering serogroup W-135 meningococci in the country.

  2. 生きること、生きるもの

    OpenAIRE

    柴田, 早穂

    2010-01-01

    高錫青銅(Cu82%+Sn18%) 陶製鋳型(粘土・木炭粉・籾殻炭粉・籾殻・麻・真土)による蝋型鋳造、焼き入れ w110Xd220Xh190mm w135Xd115Xh220mm w100Xd85Xh150mm w60Xd50Xh125mm w80Xd65Xh90

  3. Antibacterial Potential and Antioxidant Activity of Polyphenols of Sesbania grandiflora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.B. Ouattara

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The antibacterial and antioxidant activity of Sesbanial grandiflora used in traditional pharmacopeia in Burkina Faso and elsewhere was evaluated. Aqueous, methanolic and hydro-acetone extractions were carried out on the leaves, stems, and granules, pods of fruit and roots of the plant. The phytochimic groups were identified by the tests of characterization, then quantified by the tests of proportioning of total phenolics, flavonoides and tanins. Specific compounds to these phytochimic groups were also identified by the analysis in Thin layer chromatography among which the gallic acid, the caffeic acid, Kaempferol, Quercetin, Rutin. An important antioxidant activity of the same extracts was evaluated by the test of reduction of the stable radical, the 2,2-diphényl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH* and the test of reduction of iron (FRAP. This activity is related to phenolic compounds contained in the extracts. Extracts also expressed a good antibacterial activity.

  4. Relationships Between Clinico-Epidemiological Patterns of Invasive Meningococcal Infections and Complement Deficiencies in French South Pacific Islands (New Caledonia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daures, Maguy; John, Michele; Balter, Cécile Veysseyre; Simon, Olivier; Barguil, Yann; Missotte, Isabelle; Grangeon, Jean-Paul; Laumond-Barny, Sylvie; Noel, Martine; Besson-Leaud, Laurent; Spasic, Pierre-Emmanuel; de Suremain, Aurélie; Gourinat, Ann-Claire; Descloux, Elodie

    2015-01-01

    Invasive Meningococcal Disease (IMD) is three fold more common in New Caledonia (NC) than in metropolitan France and many IMD cases (35.7%) are due to Y and W135 serogroups. The purpose of our study was to identify IMD risk factors in NC. A retrospective study of all IMD cases that occurred in NC between 2005 and 2011 was conducted. Socio-environmental, clinical and biological data were collected. A search for immune deficiency was proposed to all cases. IMD presentation and outcome were compared according to meningoccal serogroups and the complement deficiency status (C-deficiency). Sixty-six sporadic IMD cases (29 B serogroup, 20 Y or W135, 6 C, 1 A, 10 unknown) occurred in 64 patients often cases of late complement component deficiency. Patients with C-deficiency were mainly Melanesian (92.8%) originating from the Loyalty Islands (62.1%). They were mostly infected with Y/W135 (42.9%) or B serogroups (32.1%). They often developed later and more severe disease than patients without C-deficiency (need for intensive cares in 60% versus 28.0% of cases, p = 0.01). A high prevalence of C-deficiency in the Melanesian population may explain epidemiological and clinical features of IMD in NC. Our results imply an adaptation of meningococcal vaccine strategies in NC.

  5. Nasopharyngeal Carriage Rate and Serogroups of Neisseria meningitidis in Turkish recruits upon entry to the military

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Basustaoglu

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to determine nasopharyngeal carriage rate and serogroup of Neisseria meningitidis strains isolated from Turkish recruits upon entry to the military. Material and Methods: Nasopharyngeal swab samples were obtained from 1995 soldiers and were inoculated immediately on BBL-modified Thayer-Martin medium plates. The plates were examined for the presence of colonies showing the typical morphology of N. meningitidis. Suspect colonies were screened for oxidase reactivity, and positive colonies were Gram stained. If Gram-negative diplococci were present, a biochemical profile by the API NH system was used for confirmation. Serogrouping of the meningococcal isolates was performed by a slide agglutination technique. Findings: The nasopharyngeal carriage rate of N. meningitidis was found to be 4.2% (n=83. Of these meningococci, 15.6% (n=13 were serogroup Y, 10.8% (n=9 were serogroup W-135, 9.6% (n=8 were serogroup C, 6.1% (n=5 were serogroup B, 2.4% (n=2 were serogroup A. The 46 isolates (55.4% were detected as nonserogroupable. Conclusion: Since serogroup Y and W-135 are predominant in this study population, it was suggest that Turkish recruits should be vaccinated by quadrivalent vaccine (A,C,Y, and W-135 upon the military instead of A+C polysaccharide vaccine and now quadrivalent vaccine has been carried out. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2011; 10(4.000: 447-450

  6. District decision-making for health in low-income settings: a feasibility study of a data-informed platform for health in India, Nigeria and Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avan, Bilal Iqbal; Berhanu, Della; Umar, Nasir; Wickremasinghe, Deepthi; Schellenberg, Joanna

    2016-09-01

    Low-resource settings often have limited use of local data for health system planning and decision-making. To promote local data use for decision-making and priority setting, we propose an adapted framework: a data-informed platform for health (DIPH) aimed at guiding coordination, bringing together key data from the public and private sectors on inputs and processes. In working to transform this framework from a concept to a health systems initiative, we undertook a series of implementation research activities including background assessment, testing and scaling up of the intervention. This first paper of four reports the feasibility of the approach in a district health systems context in five districts of India, Nigeria and Ethiopia. We selected five districts using predefined criteria and in collaboration with governments. After scoping visits, an in-depth field visit included interviews with key health stakeholders, focus group discussions with service-delivery staff and record review. For analysis, we used five dimensions of feasibility research based on the TELOS framework: technology and systems, economic, legal and political, operational and scheduling feasibility. We found no standardized process for data-based district level decision-making, and substantial obstacles in all three countries. Compared with study areas in Ethiopia and Nigeria, the health system in Uttar Pradesh is relatively amenable to the DIPH, having relative strengths in infrastructure, technological and technical expertise, and financial resources, as well as a district-level stakeholder forum. However, a key challenge is the absence of an effective legal framework for engagement with India's extensive private health sector. While priority-setting may depend on factors beyond better use of local data, we conclude that a formative phase of intervention development and pilot-testing is warranted as a next step.

  7. TOXNET: Toxicology Data Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for over 600 chemicals from authoritative groups worldwide Animal Testing Alternatives ALTBIB Resources on Alternatives to the Use of Live Vertebrates in Biomedical Research and Testing Archived, No Longer Updated ... cancer tests (1980-2011) GENE-TOX Genetic Toxicology ...

  8. Toxoplasmosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you get it?Toxoplasmosis (say: tox-oh-plaz-moh-sis) is an infection caused by a tiny ... warm water, especially before you eat or prepare food.Wash your hands thoroughly after handling raw meat, ...

  9. Dust Storms: Why Are Dust Storms a Concern?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Radon Solvents Styrene Sulfur Dioxide Toluene Uranium Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) For Educators Introduction Tox Town-Based Curriculum Units / Science Club Careers in Environmental Health, Chemistry, and Toxicology More Resources Dust Storms en español ...

  10. Mercury and Your Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Risk of Exposure to Mercury Learn About Mercury What is Mercury What is Metallic mercury? Toxicological Profile ToxFAQs Mercury Resources CDC’s National Biomonitoring Program Factsheet on Mercury ...

  11. ADVANCED COMPUTATIONAL METHODS IN DOSE MODELING: APPLICATION OF COMPUTATIONAL BIOPHYSICAL TRANSPORT, COMPUTATIONAL CHEMISTRY, AND COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Computational toxicology (CompTox) leverages the significant gains in computing power and computational techniques (e.g., numerical approaches, structure-activity relationships, bioinformatics) realized over the last few years, thereby reducing costs and increasing efficiency i...

  12. hexane extracts of the husk of Cocos nucifera

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-04-25

    Apr 25, 2011 ... effects of seed essential oil and organic extracts from Zizyphus jujuba. J. Food. Chem. Tox. ... prostate cancer cell lines by green tea component, (-)- ... Quantitative analysis of polymeric procyanidins (tannins) from grape.

  13. Rapid detection and molecular differentiation of toxigenic Corynebacterium diphtheriae and Corynebacterium ulcerans strains by LightCycler PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sing, Andreas; Berger, Anja; Schneider-Brachert, Wulf; Holzmann, Thomas; Reischl, Udo

    2011-07-01

    The systemic symptoms of diphtheria are caused by the tox-encoded diphtheria toxin (DT) which is produced by toxigenic Corynebacterium spp. Besides the classical agent C. diphtheriae, the zoonotic pathogen C. ulcerans has increasingly been reported as an emerging pathogen for diphtheria. The reliable detection of toxigenic Corynebacterium spp. is of substantial importance for both diphtheria surveillance in the public health sector and the clinical workup of a patient with diphtherialike symptoms. Since the respective tox genes of C. diphtheriae and C. ulcerans differ from each other in both DNA and amino acid sequence, both tox genes should be covered by novel real-time PCR methods. We describe the development and validation of a LightCycler PCR assay which reliably recognizes tox genes from both C. diphtheriae and C. ulcerans and differentiates the respective target genes by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) hybridization probe melting curve analysis.

  14. Functional Use Database (FUse)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — There are five different files for this dataset: 1. A dataset listing the reported functional uses of chemicals (FUse) 2. All 729 ToxPrint descriptors obtained from...

  15. Quantitative Structure-Use Relationship (QSUR) Model Descriptors

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This data set contains ToxPrint finger prints for all chemicals in FUse that had QSAR-ready SMILES strings as well as select physicochemical properties from the...

  16. 78 FR 45542 - Request for Information: The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences/National...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-29

    ... evaluation; and develop predictive models for biological response in humans. Currently, the primary Tox21... of compound-induced biological response(s) in order to characterize toxicity pathways;...

  17. THE CELLULAR AND GENOMIC RESPONSE OF AN IMMORTALIZED MICROGLIA CELL LINE (BV2) TO CONCENTRATED AMBIENT PARTICULATE MATTER

    Science.gov (United States)

    This manuscript describes cellular and genomic evidence that microglia exposed to concentrated air pollutants (CAPs). These were CAPs achieved from a previous study in which sub-chronically exposed transgenic animals develop neurodegeneration (Veronesi et al., Inhalation Tox,...

  18. STUDY OF ABNORMAL PREGNANCY OUTCOME AMONG TOXOPLASMA IGM-POSITIVE PREGNANT WOMEN IN WUHAN%武汉市弓形虫IgM阳性孕妇异常妊娠结局研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    索庆丽; 刘胜武; 姚婷

    2011-01-01

    [目的]摸清武汉市孕妇TOX感染率和TOX-IgM阳性孕妇异常妊娠状况,为预防和治疗孕妇TOX感染提供参考依据.[方法]取孕妇血清1 m1,用ELISA法检测血清中TOX-IgM和TOX-IgG,对TOX-IgM阳性孕妇和TOX-IgM阴性对照组孕妇妊娠状况和结局进行定期追踪,采用两组或多组比较x2检验进行统计分析.[结果]孕妇TOX-IgM阳性率为5.50%,早孕和中晚TOX-IgM阳性孕妇异常妊娠百分比显著高于对照组孕妇的百分比,在TOX感染引起的异常妊娠中,流产和晚期流产居首位,其次是胎死宫内,胎儿宫内发育迟缓排第3位,胎儿神经系统畸形排第4位,早产最低.[结论]TOX感染可导致异常妊娠结局的发生,医疗保健机构要加强TOX防治知识的宣教,培养育龄期妇女良好生活和饮食习惯,针对孕妇感染特点,加强孕期各阶段的监测和防治工作,减少不良妊娠结局的发生,提高出生人口素质.%[Objective] To find out the TOX infection rate among pregnant women and abnormal pregnancy status in TOX-IgM positive pregnant women in Wuhan, to provide references to prevent and treat Toxoplasma infected pregnant women. [Methods] Took pregnancy serum 1 ml, detected serum TOX-IgM and TOX-IgG with ELISA method. Track the pregnancy outcomes between TOX-IgM positive and negative pregnant respective during early, middle and late pregnancy. Statistic analysis was applied by Chi-square test. [Results] The TOX-IgM positive rate was 5.50%in pregnant women. The percentage of ab normal pregnancy among TOX—IgM positive pregnant women was significantly higher than the negative control group of pregnant women in every period of pregnancy. Abortion and late abortion constituted the highest ratio, followed by fetal death, the third was the intrauterine growth retardation.Fetal nervous system malformation ( fetal hydrocephalus, fetal microcephaly, anen cephaly and fetal brain meningocele) was the fourth .Premature ratio was relatively low

  19. Collaborative development of predictive toxicology applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardy Barry

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract OpenTox provides an interoperable, standards-based Framework for the support of predictive toxicology data management, algorithms, modelling, validation and reporting. It is relevant to satisfying the chemical safety assessment requirements of the REACH legislation as it supports access to experimental data, (Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship models, and toxicological information through an integrating platform that adheres to regulatory requirements and OECD validation principles. Initial research defined the essential components of the Framework including the approach to data access, schema and management, use of controlled vocabularies and ontologies, architecture, web service and communications protocols, and selection and integration of algorithms for predictive modelling. OpenTox provides end-user oriented tools to non-computational specialists, risk assessors, and toxicological experts in addition to Application Programming Interfaces (APIs for developers of new applications. OpenTox actively supports public standards for data representation, interfaces, vocabularies and ontologies, Open Source approaches to core platform components, and community-based collaboration approaches, so as to progress system interoperability goals. The OpenTox Framework includes APIs and services for compounds, datasets, features, algorithms, models, ontologies, tasks, validation, and reporting which may be combined into multiple applications satisfying a variety of different user needs. OpenTox applications are based on a set of distributed, interoperable OpenTox API-compliant REST web services. The OpenTox approach to ontology allows for efficient mapping of complementary data coming from different datasets into a unifying structure having a shared terminology and representation. Two initial OpenTox applications are presented as an illustration of the potential impact of OpenTox for high-quality and consistent structure

  20. Molecular analysis of exotoxin A associated with antimicrobial resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated from patients in Tehran hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nour Amirmozafari

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim:  Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a unique bacteria that in order to survive in different environments by complex adaptation process can make changes in his virulence genes expression and drug resistance. The aim of this research is the investigation of existence of a logical association between toxA gene and antibiotic resistance in strains possess the gene. Materials and Methods: Antibiogram test by disk diffusion method (Kirby Bauer was performed according to CLSI protocols. In this study, the existence of toxA gene with the help of polymerase chain reaction (PCR in 102 clinical isolates from blood samples, wound, urine and trachea was examined. Chi-square test was used to investigate the relationship between exotoxin A and antibiotic resistance. Results: The 81 strains (79.4% had toxA gene. Frequency of toxA genes in isolated strains from different infections were wound (91.4%, blood (85.7%, trachea (72.7%, and urine (42.1%. Multiple resistance index in strains possess the toxA gene was calculated 75%. Chi 2 test to determine the relationship between drug resistance and gene toxA was significant (P<0.05. Conclusions: The significant chi-square test and an increase in multi-resistant strains possessing the toxA gene, can represent a considerable genetic switch between exotoxin A activity and resistance to antibiotics in the blood, urine, tracheal, wound infections Respectively, which lead to turn genes on of drug resistance regulating in bacteria. The results of this study will be verified by southern blot, analysis of the expression of toxA gene and determine the mechanism of resistance in resistant strains Methods.

  1. Host cell contact induces expression of virulence factors and VieA, a cyclic di-GMP phosphodiesterase, in Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Amit K; Bhagat, Abha; Chowdhury, Rukhsana

    2013-05-01

    Vibrio cholerae, a noninvasive bacterium, colonizes the intestinal epithelium and secretes cholera toxin (CT), a potent enterotoxin that causes the severe fluid loss characteristic of the disease cholera. In this study, we demonstrate that adherence of V. cholerae to the intestinal epithelial cell line INT 407 strongly induces the expression of the major virulence genes ctxAB and tcpA and the virulence regulatory gene toxT. No induction of toxR and tcpP, which encode transcriptional activators of toxT, was observed in adhered bacteria, and the adherence-dependent upregulation of toxT expression was independent of ToxR and TcpP. A sharp increase in the expression of the vieA gene, which encodes a cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) phosphodiesterase, was observed in INT 407-adhered V. cholerae immediately after infection. Induction of toxT, ctxAB, and tcpA in INT 407-adhered vieA mutant strain O395 ΔvieA was consistently lower than in the parent strain, although no effect was observed in unadhered bacteria, suggesting that VieA has a role in the upregulation of toxT expression specifically in host cell-adhered V. cholerae. Furthermore, though VieA has both a DNA binding helix-turn-helix domain and an EAL domain conferring c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase activity, the c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase activity of VieA is necessary and sufficient for the upregulation of toxT expression.

  2. Characterization of a Mutant Diphtheria Toxin that is Defective in Binding to Cell Membrane Receptors on Vero Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-08-13

    R.K. , and Barksdale, L. (1969) Genetic analysis of tox"*" and tox bacteriophages of Corynebacterium diphtheriae . J. Virol. _3. 586-598 76. Holmes...A sensitive cytotoxicity assay was used to screen the supernatants of cultures of Corynebacterium diphtheriae that were Infected with the...beads were coupled to diphtheria toxin and were incubated with resistant mouse macrophages or with sensitive guinea pig macrophages . Although both

  3. Wheat PR-1 proteins are targeted by necrotrophic pathogen effector proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breen, Susan; Williams, Simon J; Winterberg, Britta; Kobe, Bostjan; Solomon, Peter S

    2016-10-01

    Recent studies have identified that proteinaceous effectors secreted by Parastagonospora nodorum are required to cause disease on wheat. These effectors interact in a gene-for-gene manner with host-dominant susceptibilty loci, resulting in disease. However, whilst the requirement of these effectors for infection is clear, their mechanisms of action remain poorly understood. A yeast-two-hybrid library approach was used to search for wheat proteins that interacted with the necrotrophic effector SnTox3. Using this strategy we indentified an interaction between SnTox3 and the wheat pathogenicity-related protein TaPR-1-1, and confirmed it by in-planta co-immunprecipitation. PR-1 proteins represent a large family (23 in wheat) of proteins that are upregulated early in the defence response; however, their function remains ellusive. Interestingly, the P. nodorum effector SnToxA has recently been shown to interact specifically with TaPR-1-5. Our analysis of the SnTox3-TaPR-1 interaction demonstrated that SnTox3 can interact with a broader range of TaPR-1 proteins. Based on these data we utilised homology modeling to predict, and validate, regions on TaPR-1 proteins that are likely to be involved in the SnTox3 interaction. Precipitating from this work, we identified that a PR-1-derived defence signalling peptide from the C-terminus of TaPR-1-1, known as CAPE1, enhanced the infection of wheat by P. nodorum in an SnTox3-dependent manner, but played no role in ToxA-mediated disease. Collectively, our data suggest that P. nodorum has evolved unique effectors that target a common host-protein involved in host defence, albeit with different mechanisms and potentially outcomes.

  4. 两类Chebyshev零点的NeWman型有理算子逼近|x|的渐近性质%The asymptotic property of approximation to|x| by Newman-type rational operators at the two kinds of Chebyshev nodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴慧丽

    2006-01-01

    设X={xk∶k=1,2,…,n}是区间(0,1]上n个互不相同点的集合,令pn(x)=∏nk=1(xk+x),rn(X;x)=xpn(x)-pn(-x)/pn(x)+pn(+x),本文给出了当X=U={xk=cosk/2n+1π∶k=1,2…,n},X=T={xk=sin 2k-1/4nπ∶k=1,2,…,n}时,maxx≤1‖x|-rn(U;x)|及maxx≤1‖x|-rn(T;x)|的渐近表达式.

  5. Two Polyketide Synthase-encoding Genes are Required for Biosynthesis of the Polyketide Virulence Factor, T-toxin, by Cochliobolus heterostrophus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, Scott E.; Kroken, Scott; Inderbitzin, Patrik; Asvarak, Thipa; Li, Bi-Yu; Shi, Liang; Yoder, Olen C.; Turgeon, Barbara G.

    2006-03-01

    Cochliobolus heterostrophus race T, causal agent of Southern Corn Leaf Blight, requires T-toxin (a family of C35 – C49 polyketides) for high virulence on T-cytoplasm maize. Production of T-toxin is controlled by two unlinked loci, Tox1A and Tox1B, carried on 1.2 Mb of DNA not found in race O, a mildly virulent form of the fungus that does not produce T-toxin, or in any other Cochliobolus spp. or closely related fungus. PKS1, a polyketide synthase (PKS)-encoding gene at Tox1A and DEC1, a decarboxylase-encoding gene at Tox1B, are necessary for T-toxin production. Although there is evidence that additional genes are required for T-toxin production, efforts to clone them have been frustrated because the genes are located in highly repeated, A+T-rich DNA. To overcome this difficulty, Ligation specificity-based Expression Analysis Display (LEAD), a comparative AFLP/gel fractionation/capillary sequencing procedure was applied to cDNAs from a near isogenic pair of race T (Tox1+) and race O (Tox1-) strains. This led to discovery of PKS2, a second PKS-encoding gene that maps at Tox1A and is required for both T-toxin biosynthesis and high virulence to maize. Thus, the carbon chain of each T-toxin family member is likely assembled by action of two PKSs, which produce two polyketides, one of which may act as the starter unit for biosynthesis of the mature T-toxin molecule.

  6. The effect of resveratrol on contractility of non-pregnant rat uterus: the contribution of K(+) channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novakovic, R; Ilic, B; Beleslin-Cokic, B; Radunovic, N; Heinle, H; Scepanovic, R; Gojkovic-Bukarica, L

    2013-12-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate resveratrol (1-100 μM) effect on the spontaneous rhythmic contractions (SRC), oxytocin-induced (0.2 nM, POxC) phasic and tonic (20 nM, TOxC) contractions of isolated rat uterus. The SRC and POxC were more sensitive to resveratrol than TOxC (pD2 values: 4.53 and 4.66 versus 4.06). Different blockers of K(+) channels (glibenclamide, tetraethylamonium, iberiotoxin, 4-aminopyridine) antagonized the response to resveratrol on the SRC and phasic contractions, but did not antagonize the effect of resveratrol on the TOxC. In order to compare the relaxant activities of resveratrol on the TOxC with that of potassium channel openers, a separate experiments with NS 1619, a highly specific big Ca(2+)-sensitive K(+) (BKCa) channels opener and pinacidil, a predominant opener of ATP-sensitive K(+) (KATP) channels were done. NS 1619 (10-100 μM) and pinacidil (10-100 μM) produced more potent inhibition of TOxC than resveratrol (pD2 values were 6.00 and 5.29). Iberiotoxin, a highly selective BKCa channels blocker, antagonized the response to NS 1619 and glibenclamide, a highly selective KATP channels blocker, antagonized the response to pinacidil on the TOxC. To test K(+)- and extracellular Ca(2+)- independent mechanism(s) of resveratrol on TOxC, a K(+)-rich, Ca(2+)-free solution was used. Under this condition, only high concentrations (≥30 μM) of resveratrol inhibited TOxC. Western blots analysis confirmed expression of Kir6.1, Kir6.2, KCa1.1, Kv2.1 and Kv4.2. channel proteins in myometrium. Thus, the effect of resveratrol is dependent on the types of contractions. The inhibitory response of resveratrol on the SRC and phasic contractions involves different myometrial K(+)- channels. When applied in high concentrations, resveratrol has an additional K(+)- channels independent mechanism(s) of action. As the effects of NS 1619, pinacidil and resveratrol on the TOxC are different, we can conclud that resveratrol does not behave as a classical

  7. Epidemiology and antibiotic resistance of bacterial meningitis in Dapaong, northern Togo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Simplice D Karou; Abago Balaka; Mitiname Bamok; Damhan Tchelougou; Malki Assih; Kokou Anani; Kodjo Agbonoko; Jacques Simpore; Comlan de Souza

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To assess the seasonality of the bacterial meningitis and the antibiotic resistance of incriminated bacteria over the last three years in the northern Togo. Methods: From January 2007 to January 2010, 533 cerebrospinal fluids (CSF) samples were collected from patients suspected of meningitis in the Regional Hospital of Dapaong (northern Togo). After microscopic examination, samples were cultured for bacterial identification and antibiotic susceptibility. Results:The study included 533 patients (306 male and 227 female) aged from 1 day to 55 years [average age (13.00±2.07) years]. Bacterial isolation and identification were attempted for 254/533 (47.65%) samples. The bacterial species identified were:Neisseria meningitidis A (N. meningitidis A) (58.27%), Neisseria meningitidis W135 (N. meningitidis W135) (7.09%), Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae) (26.77%), Haemophilus influenza B (H. influenza B) (6.30%) and Enterobacteriaceae (1.57%). The results indicated that bacterial meningitis occur from November to May with a peak in February for H. influenzae and S. pneumoniae and March for Neisseriaceae. The distribution of positive CSF with regards to the age showed that subjects between 6 and 12 years followed by subjects of 0 to 5 years were most affected with respective frequencies of 67.82% and 56.52% (P20%for both bacterial strains), macrolides (resistance rate> 30%for H. influenzae) quinolones (resistance rate>15%for H. influenzae and N. meningitidis W135). Over three years, the prevalence of S. pneumoniae significantly increased from 8.48%to 73.33%(P<0.001), while the changes in the prevalence of H. influenzae B were not statistically significant: 4.24%, vs. 8.89%, (P= 0.233). Conclusions:Our results indicate that data in African countries differ depending on geographical location in relation to the African meningitis belt. This underlines the importance of epidemiological surveillance of bacterial meningitis.

  8. Occurrence of virulence genes among Vibrio cholerae and Vibrio parahaemolyticus strains from treated wastewaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khouadja, Sadok; Suffredini, Elisabetta; Baccouche, Besma; Croci, Luciana; Bakhrouf, Amina

    2014-10-01

    Pathogenic Vibrio species are an important cause of foodborne illnesses. The aim of this study was to describe the occurrence of potentially pathogenic Vibrio species in the final effluents of a wastewater treatment plant and the risk that they may pose to public health. During the 1-year monitoring, a total of 43 Vibrio strains were isolated: 23 Vibrio alginolyticus, 1 Vibrio cholerae, 4 Vibrio vulnificus, and 15 Vibrio parahaemolyticus. The PCR investigation of V. parahaemolyticus and V. cholerae virulence genes (tlh, trh, tdh, toxR, toxS, toxRS, toxT, zot, ctxAB, tcp, ace, vpi, nanH) revealed the presence of some of these genes in a significant number of strains. Intraspecies variability and genetic relationships among the environmental isolates were analyzed by random amplified polymorphic DNA-PCR (RAPD-PCR). We report the results of the first isolation and characterization of an environmental V. cholerae non-O1 non-O139 and of a toxigenic V. parahaemolyticus strain in Tunisia. We suggest that non-pathogenic Vibrio might represent a marine reservoir of virulence genes that can be transmitted between strains by horizontal transfer.

  9. Characterization of pathogenicity island prophage in clinical and environmental strains of Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi-Barzelighi, H; Bakhshi, B; Rastegar Lari, A; Pourshafie, M R

    2011-12-01

    In this study 86 isolates of Vibrio cholerae were analysed for their adhesive properties and the presence of pathogenicity island genes. With the exception of three isolates, all of the other clinical isolates (92.5%) contained an intact TCP (toxin-co-regulated pilus) gene cluster. In contrast, 95% of all environmental non-O1-non-O139 isolates were negative for the TCP gene cluster. The majority of clinical isolates (82.5%) possessed the complete vibrio pathogenicity island (VPI) gene cluster and had a similar RFLP pattern, while only a single environmental strain possessed an almost complete VPI cluster (lacking 0.4 kb in the tcpA and toxT region). The result showed that the isolates with tcpA(+)/toxT(+) had a strong attachment for HT-29 and Vero cells, whereas isolates with tcpA(+)/toxT(-) or tcpA(-)/toxT(-) genomic characteristics showed no autoagglutination and weak attachment for the cell lines. Two environmental strains (tcpA(-)/toxT(-)) showed strong adhesive properties to the cell lines, indicating that non-fimbrial adhesive factors are involved in the environmental V. cholerae strains in the absence of TCP.

  10. Malonate inhibits virulence gene expression in Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minato, Yusuke; Fassio, Sara R; Häse, Claudia C

    2013-01-01

    We previously found that inhibition of the TCA cycle, either through mutations or chemical inhibition, increased toxT transcription in Vibrio cholerae. In this study, we found that the addition of malonate, an inhibitor of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), decreased toxT transcription in V. cholerae, an observation inconsistent with the previous pattern observed. Unlike another SDH inhibitor, 2-thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTFA), which increased toxT transcription and slightly inhibited V. cholerae growth, malonate inhibited toxT transcription in both the wild-type strain and TCA cycle mutants, suggesting malonate-mediated inhibition of virulence gene expression is independent to TCA cycle activity. Addition of malonate also inhibited ctxB and tcpA expressions but did not affect aphA, aphB, tcpP and toxR expressions. Malonate inhibited cholera toxin (CT) production in both V. cholerae classical biotype strains O395N1 and CA401, and El Tor biotype strain, N16961. Consistent with previous reports, we confirmed that these strains of V. cholerae did not utilize malonate as a primary carbon source. However, we found that the addition of malonate to the growth medium stimulated V. cholerae growth. All together, these results suggest that metabolizing malonate as a nutrient source negatively affects virulence gene expression in V. cholerae.

  11. A novel quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction method for detecting toxigenic Pasteurella multocida in nasal swabs from swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherrer, Simone; Frei, Daniel; Wittenbrink, Max Michael

    2016-12-01

    Progressive atrophic rhinitis (PAR) in pigs is caused by toxigenic Pasteurella multocida. In Switzerland, PAR is monitored by selective culture of nasal swabs and subsequent polymerase chain reaction (PCR) screening of bacterial colonies for the P. multocida toxA gene. A panel of 203 nasal swabs from a recent PAR outbreak were used to evaluate a novel quantitative real-time PCR for toxigenic P. multocida in porcine nasal swabs. In comparison to the conventional PCR with a limit of detection of 100 genome equivalents per PCR reaction, the real-time PCR had a limit of detection of 10 genome equivalents. The real-time PCR detected toxA-positive P. multocida in 101 samples (49.8%), whereas the conventional PCR was less sensitive with 90 toxA-positive samples (44.3%). In comparison to the real-time PCR, 5.4% of the toxA-positive samples revealed unevaluable results by conventional PCR. The approach of culture-coupled toxA PCR for the monitoring of PAR in pigs is substantially improved by a novel quantitative real-time PCR.

  12. Formation of halogenated organic byproducts during medium-pressure UV and chlorine coexposure of model compounds, NOM and bromide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Quan; Shang, Chii; Zhang, Xiangru; Ding, Guoyu; Yang, Xin

    2011-12-01

    When chlorine is applied before or during UV disinfection of bromide-containing water, interactions between chlorine, bromide and UV light are inevitable. Formation of halogenated organic byproducts was studied during medium-pressure UV (MPUV) and chlorine coexposure of phenol, nitrobenzene and benzoic acid and maleic acid, chosen to represent electron-donating aromatics, electron-withdrawing aromatics, and aliphatic structures in natural organic matter (NOM), respectively. All were evaluated in the presence and absence of bromide. MPUV and chlorine coexposure of phenol produced less total organic halogen (TOX, a collective parameter for halogenated organic byproducts) than chlorination in the dark, and more haloacetic acids instead of halophenols. Increases in TOX were found in the coexposure of nitrobenzene and benzoic acid, but maleic acid was rather inert during coexposure. The presence of bromide increased the formation of brominated TOX but did not significantly affect total TOX formation, in spite of the fact that it reduced hydroxyl radical levels. MPUV and chlorine coexposure of NOM gave a higher differential UV absorbance of NOM and a larger shift to lower molecular weight compounds than chlorination in the dark. However, TOX formation with NOM remained similar to that observed from dark chlorination.

  13. DoD Cost Analysis Guidance and Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-12-01

    Itemis 3-9 ’TABLE’S TAB P!E TIFlF IIAGF 2-1 Cost Analysis -improvemnent Group (CAIG) Tim etab Ic 2-11 De’i’en:sc Acquisition Prolgraw Life’-Cycle Cost...relationship to other systems. 1.1.3 System- Configuration. This section identifies the cquipmenleit (hardwvare and software ) work breakdown structure (W135) for...furnished commercial off-ti,: ~ (COTS) software should be addressed in thle discussion. Where Goverrnlent-fu, .’ ’.cd equipment or inron~ertx’ is

  14. Molecular characterization of invasive Neisseria meningitidis strains isolated in Chile during 2010-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barra, Gisselle N; Araya, Pamela A; Fernandez, Jorge O; Gabastou, Jean-Marc; Hormazábal, Juan Carlos; Seoane, Mabel; Pidal, Paola C; Valenzuela, Maria T; Ibarz-Pavón, Ana Belén

    2013-01-01

    With the upcoming licensure of Outer Membrane Protein-based vaccines against meningococcal disease, data on disease incidence and molecular characteristic of circulating N. meningitidis strains in Latin American countries is needed. Chile is, to date, one of the few countries in the region that has performed this type of work in a comprehensive collection of disease-associated strains from two consecutive years, 2010-2011. A total of 119 N. meningitidis strains isolated from patients with invasive disease in Chile in 2010-2011 were characterized by the National Reference Laboratory. Serogroup determination, MLST and porA typing were performed. Serogroup B was predominant in both study years, but W135 experienced a noticeable increase in 2011 compared to 2010. ST-11 complex, ST-41/44 complex ST-32 complex were the most prevalent among the isolates, and were strongly associated with serogroups W135 (ST-11 Complex) and B (ST-41/44 and ST-32 complexes). Likewise, the major porA types detected were strongly associated with these three clonal complexes: P1.5,2 was found exclusively among W135:ST-11 isolates, whereas P1.7, 2-3 was only detected in C:ST-11. ST-41/44 isolates mainly had P1.10-8, and ST-32 complex were associated with a P1.18-8 porA. Our data show disease-associated N. meningitidis circulating in Chile are similar to those found in other parts of the world. The increase on W135:ST-11 isolates observed in 2011 foretold the unusual epidemiological situation experienced in the country in 2012, and MLST data show that this strain is indistinguishable from the one linked to the global Hajj 2000-related outbreak that occurred in 2001. Finally, this work demonstrates the importance of maintaining a strong national surveillance program integrating clinical, epidemiological and laboratory data and incorporating gold standard diagnostic and characterization techniques that allow the data to be compared all over the world.

  15. Molecular Characterization of Invasive Neisseria meningitidis Strains Isolated in Chile during 2010–2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barra, Gisselle N.; Araya, Pamela A.; Fernandez, Jorge O.; Gabastou, Jean-Marc; Hormazábal, Juan Carlos; Seoane, Mabel; Pidal, Paola C.; Valenzuela, Maria T.; Ibarz-Pavón, Ana Belén

    2013-01-01

    Background With the upcoming licensure of Outer Membrane Protein-based vaccines against meningococcal disease, data on disease incidence and molecular characteristic of circulating N. meningitidis strains in Latin American countries is needed. Chile is, to date, one of the few countries in the region that has performed this type of work in a comprehensive collection of disease-associated strains from two consecutive years, 2010–2011. Methods A total of 119 N. meningitidis strains isolated from patients with invasive disease in Chile in 2010–2011 were characterized by the National Reference Laboratory. Serogroup determination, MLST and porA typing were performed. Results Serogroup B was predominant in both study years, but W135 experienced a noticeable increase in 2011 compared to 2010. ST-11 complex, ST-41/44 complex ST-32 complex were the most prevalent among the isolates, and were strongly associated with serogroups W135 (ST-11 Complex) and B (ST-41/44 and ST-32 complexes). Likewise, the major porA types detected were strongly associated with these three clonal complexes: P1.5,2 was found exclusively among W135:ST-11 isolates, whereas P1.7, 2–3 was only detected in C:ST-11. ST-41/44 isolates mainly had P1.10-8, and ST-32 complex were associated with a P1.18-8 porA. Conclusions Our data show disease-associated N. meningitidis circulating in Chile are similar to those found in other parts of the world. The increase on W135:ST-11 isolates observed in 2011 foretold the unusual epidemiological situation experienced in the country in 2012, and MLST data show that this strain is indistinguishable from the one linked to the global Hajj 2000-related outbreak that occurred in 2001. Finally, this work demonstrates the importance of maintaining a strong national surveillance program integrating clinical, epidemiological and laboratory data and incorporating gold standard diagnostic and characterization techniques that allow the data to be compared all over the world

  16. Update: assessment of risk for meningococcal disease associated with the Hajj 2001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-03-30

    During late March and early April 2000, four cases of meningococcal disease caused by Neisseria meningitidis serogroup W-135 were identified among U.S. pilgrims returning from the Hajj in Saudi Arabia, their close contacts, and communities. These cases occurred as part of a larger epidemic in which approximately 400 cases caused by a similar and unusual strain were identified worldwide. The Hajj, an annual pilgrimage to the major holy places of Islam, is attended by approximately two million persons from approximately 140 countries, including an estimated 15,000 from the United States.

  17. Molecular characterization of invasive Neisseria meningitidis strains isolated in Chile during 2010-2011.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisselle N Barra

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: With the upcoming licensure of Outer Membrane Protein-based vaccines against meningococcal disease, data on disease incidence and molecular characteristic of circulating N. meningitidis strains in Latin American countries is needed. Chile is, to date, one of the few countries in the region that has performed this type of work in a comprehensive collection of disease-associated strains from two consecutive years, 2010-2011. METHODS: A total of 119 N. meningitidis strains isolated from patients with invasive disease in Chile in 2010-2011 were characterized by the National Reference Laboratory. Serogroup determination, MLST and porA typing were performed. RESULTS: Serogroup B was predominant in both study years, but W135 experienced a noticeable increase in 2011 compared to 2010. ST-11 complex, ST-41/44 complex ST-32 complex were the most prevalent among the isolates, and were strongly associated with serogroups W135 (ST-11 Complex and B (ST-41/44 and ST-32 complexes. Likewise, the major porA types detected were strongly associated with these three clonal complexes: P1.5,2 was found exclusively among W135:ST-11 isolates, whereas P1.7, 2-3 was only detected in C:ST-11. ST-41/44 isolates mainly had P1.10-8, and ST-32 complex were associated with a P1.18-8 porA. CONCLUSIONS: Our data show disease-associated N. meningitidis circulating in Chile are similar to those found in other parts of the world. The increase on W135:ST-11 isolates observed in 2011 foretold the unusual epidemiological situation experienced in the country in 2012, and MLST data show that this strain is indistinguishable from the one linked to the global Hajj 2000-related outbreak that occurred in 2001. Finally, this work demonstrates the importance of maintaining a strong national surveillance program integrating clinical, epidemiological and laboratory data and incorporating gold standard diagnostic and characterization techniques that allow the data to be compared all

  18. Meningococcal factor H binding proteins in epidemic strains from Africa: implications for vaccine development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolando Pajon

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Factor H binding protein (fHbp is an important antigen for vaccines against meningococcal serogroup B disease. The protein binds human factor H (fH, which enables the bacteria to resist serum bactericidal activity. Little is known about the vaccine-potential of fHbp for control of meningococcal epidemics in Africa, which typically are caused by non-group B strains.We investigated genes encoding fHbp in 106 serogroup A, W-135 and X case isolates from 17 African countries. We determined complement-mediated bactericidal activity of antisera from mice immunized with recombinant fHbp vaccines, or a prototype native outer membrane vesicle (NOMV vaccine from a serogroup B mutant strain with over-expressed fHbp. Eighty-six of the isolates (81% had one of four prevalent fHbp sequence variants, ID 4/5 (serogroup A isolates, 9 (W-135, or 74 (X in variant group 1, or ID 22/23 (W-135 in variant group 2. More than one-third of serogroup A isolates and two-thirds of W-135 isolates tested had low fHbp expression while all X isolates tested had intermediate or high expression. Antisera to the recombinant fHbp vaccines were generally bactericidal only against isolates with fHbp sequence variants that closely matched the respective vaccine ID. Low fHbp expression also contributed to resistance to anti-fHbp bactericidal activity. In contrast to the recombinant vaccines, the NOMV fHbp ID 1 vaccine elicited broad anti-fHbp bactericidal activity, and the antibodies had greater ability to inhibit binding of fH to fHbp than antibodies elicited by the control recombinant fHbp ID 1 vaccine.NOMV vaccines from mutants with increased fHbp expression elicit an antibody repertoire with greater bactericidal activity than recombinant fHbp vaccines. NOMV vaccines are promising for prevention of meningococcal disease in Africa and could be used to supplement coverage conferred by a serogroup A polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccine recently introduced in some sub

  19. Meningococcal vaccine evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianni Bona

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Neisseria meningitidis is a leading cause of bacterial sepsis and meningitis worldwide. Although polysaccharide and glycoconjugate vaccines have been developed for serogroups A, C, Y and W-135, currently there are no broadly effective vaccines available for the prevention of meningococcal B disease. A general overview of the burden of the disease and the strains prevalence in the world with the focus in particular on the Italian situation is provided in this article, together with the vaccinations developed and under evaluation.

  20. SURVEY ON V. CHOLERAE, V. VULNIFICUS AND V. PARAHAEMOLYTICUS IN BIVALVE MOLLUSCS OF THE ADRIATIC SEA AND PROPOSAL OF AN ANALYTICAL PROTOCOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.L. Valeri

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Bivalve molluscs from Adriatic sea were analyzed for V. parahaemolyticus, V. cholerae e V. vulnificus presence. The isolates on TCBS Agar and m-CPC Agar were selected on the basis of a new biochemical screening, that showed a good performance, because among 2344 strains from primary culture only 237 (10% were presumptively assigned to the species of interest. The PCR analyses was performed for the target genes toxR hlyA, ctxA, tcpI (V. cholerae, toxR, tl, tdh, trh (V. parahaemolyticus, vvhA and viuB (V. vulnificus. Among the 9 strains confirmed to belong to V. parahaemolyticus specie, 6 were sucrose positive. On 215 samples of molluscs only 5 resulted positive for V. parahaemolyticus being toxR+, tl+, although non pathogenic (tdh-, trh-, and none for V. cholerae e V. vulnificus.

  1. 异常孕产史与弓形虫感染关系的研究%Study on Relationship between History of Abnormal Pregnancy and the Infection of Toxoplasmosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵蕴珍; 张颖; 李岩; 张秀玲

    2004-01-01

    目的:探讨异常孕产史与弓形虫感染的关系.方法:采用PCR方法对1135例有异常孕产史妇女及7141例正常妊娠妇女进行TOX-DNA检测.结果:异常孕产史组TOX-DNA阳性率1.50%,对照组TOX-DNA阳性率0.43%,两者有显著性差异(X2=21.11,P<0.01).结论:异常孕产史与弓形虫感染有一定的相关性.

  2. RNA thermometer controls temperature-dependent virulence factor expression in Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Gregor G; Kortmann, Jens; Narberhaus, Franz; Klose, Karl E

    2014-09-30

    Vibrio cholerae is the bacterium that causes the diarrheal disease cholera. The bacteria experience a temperature shift as V. cholerae transition from contaminated water at lower temperatures into the 37 °C human intestine. Within the intestine, V. cholerae express cholera toxin (CT) and toxin-coregulated pilus (TCP), two main virulence factors required for disease. CT and TCP expression is controlled by the transcriptional activator protein ToxT. We identified an RNA thermometer motif in the 5' UTR of toxT, with a fourU anti-Shine-Dalgarno (SD) element that base pairs with the SD sequence to regulate ribosome access to the mRNA. RNA probing experiments demonstrated that the fourU element allowed access to the SD sequence at 37 °C but not at 20 °C. Moreover, mutations within the fourU element (U5C, U7C) that strengthened base-pairing between the anti-SD and SD sequences prevented access to the SD sequence even at 37 °C. Translation of ToxT-FLAG from the native toxT UTR was enhanced at 37 °C, compared with 25 °C in both Escherichia coli and V. cholerae. In contrast, the U5C, U7C UTR prevented translation of ToxT-FLAG even at 37 °C. V. cholerae mutants containing the U5C, U7C UTR variant were unable to colonize the infant mouse small intestine. Our results reveal a previously unknown regulatory mechanism consisting of an RNA thermometer that controls temperature-dependent translation of toxT, facilitating V. cholerae virulence at a relevant environmental condition found in the human intestine.

  3. Suppression of Virulence of Toxigenic Vibrio cholerae by Anethole through the Cyclic AMP (cAMP)-cAMP Receptor Protein Signaling System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahid, M Shamim Hasan; Awasthi, Sharda Prasad; Asakura, Masahiro; Chatterjee, Shruti; Hinenoya, Atsushi; Faruque, Shah M; Yamasaki, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    Use of natural compounds as antivirulence drugs could be an alternative therapeutic approach to modify the outcome of bacterial infections, particularly in view of growing resistance to available antimicrobials. Here, we show that sub-bactericidal concentration of anethole, a component of sweet fennel seed, could suppress virulence potential in O1 El Tor biotype strains of toxigenic Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of the ongoing 7th cholera pandemic. The expression of cholera toxin (CT) and toxin coregulated pilus (TCP), the major virulence factors of V. cholerae, is controlled through a regulatory cascade involving activation of ToxT with synergistic coupling interaction of ToxR/ToxS with TcpP/TcpH. We present evidence that anethole inhibits in vitro expression of CT and TCP in a toxT-dependent but toxR/toxS-independent manner and through repression of tcpP/tcpH, by using bead-ELISA, western blotting and quantitative real-time RT-PCR assays. The cyclic AMP (cAMP)-cAMP receptor protein (CRP) is a well-studied global signaling system in bacterial pathogens, and this complex is known to suppress expression of tcpP/tcpH in V. cholerae. We find that anethole influences the virulence regulatory cascade by over-expressing cyaA and crp genes. Moreover, suppression of toxigenic V. cholerae-mediated fluid accumulation in ligated ileum of rabbit by anethole demonstrates its potentiality as an antivirulence drug candidate against the diseases caused by toxigenic V. cholerae. Taken altogether, these results revealing a mechanism of virulence inhibition in V. cholerae by the natural compound anethole, may have relevance in designing antivirulence compounds, particularly against multiple antibiotic resistant bacterial pathogens.

  4. Analysis on the investigation of toxoplasma in 148 cases of pregnant women%148例孕妇弓形虫感染分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆军; 陆鸣; 方玉荣; 吴(S)

    1999-01-01

    对148例孕妇(妊娠八周至妊娠七个月),运用酶联免疫吸附试验(ELISA)检测静脉血弓形虫(Toxoplasma godii, TO)抗体;即Tox-IgG抗体和Tox-IgM抗体,发现近年来有猫犬接触史(指现在或曾经养过猫犬的)孕妇弓形虫感染率明显高于无猫犬接触史孕妇(P<0.05),两者有显著性差异.

  5. 铜绿假单胞菌外毒素A的调控基因

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡晓梅; 胡福泉

    2001-01-01

    铜绿假单胞菌(绿脓杆菌)外毒素A(PEA)为该菌最主要的致病物质,由toxA基因编码.本文综述PEA的调控基因,包括正调控基因regA、regB、lasR、ptxR、vfr和负调控基因fur、ptxS.regA是影响toxA转录的最主要基因.除lasR外,其余其因均在转录水平上通过regA调控PEA的产量.

  6. Quadruplex PCR for simultaneous detection of serotype, biotype, toxigenic potential, and central regulating factor of Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khuntia, Hemant Kumar; Pal, Bibhuti Bhusan; Chhotray, Guru Prasada

    2008-07-01

    A quadruplex PCR was developed for the simultaneous detection of genes specific for Vibrio cholerae O1 and/or O139 serogroup (wbe and/or wbf), cholera toxin A subunit (ctxA), toxin-coregulated pilus (tcpA), and central regulating protein ToxR (toxR) in a single tube reaction. This is a simple, rapid, and accurate approach for the detection of toxigenic V. cholerae O1 and/or O139 and can prevent the rapid spread of the disease by early detection.

  7. Serogroup quantitation of multivalent polysaccharide and polysaccharide-conjugate meningococcal vaccines from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Matthew C; Gibeault, Sabrina; Filippenko, Vasilisa; Ye, Qiang; Wang, Junzhi; Kunkel, Jeremy P

    2013-07-01

    The active components of most meningococcal vaccines are four antigenic serogroup capsular polysaccharides (A, C, Y, W135). The vaccines, monovalent or multivalent mixtures of either free polysaccharides or polysaccharides conjugated to antigenic carrier proteins, may be in liquid or lyophilised formulations, with or without excipients. Acid hydrolysis and chromatographic methods for serogroup quantitation, which were previously optimised and qualified using polysaccharide-based standards and a narrow range of real vaccines, are here challenged with multiple lots of a broad assortment of additional multivalent polysaccharide-based meningococcal vaccine products. Centrifugal filtration successfully removed all interfering lactose excipient without loss of polysaccharides to allow for the determination of Y and W135 serogroups. Replicate operations by three different analysts indicated high method reproducibility. Results indicated some lot-to-lot and product-to-product variations. However, all vaccines were within general specifications for each serogroup polysaccharide, with the exception of all lots of one polysaccharide vaccine - which by these methods were found to be deficient in the serogroup A component only. These robust techniques are very useful for the evaluation of antigen content and consistency of manufacture. The deformulation, hydrolysis and chromatographic methods may be adaptable for the evaluation of other types of polysaccharide-based vaccines.

  8. Imunidade conferida por vacinas anti-meningocócicas Immunity confered by anti-meningococci vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucimar Gonçalves Milagres

    1993-06-01

    Full Text Available Em razão da recente epidemia de doença meningocócica causada por N. meningitidis B na Grande São Paulo, Brasil, foi feita revisão das epidemias dessa doença ocorridas no Brasil desde o início do século e uma análise das vacinas atuais contra N. meningitidis A, C, Y e W135. Também são discutidos os mais recentes avanços no desenvolvimento e aplicação de vacina contra M meningitidis B, um desafio constante para os maiores centros de pesquisa de todo o mundo.In view of a recent epidemic of meningococcal disease caused by serogroup B N. meningitidis in the Greater S. Paulo area (Brazil, a review of the epidemics that occurred in Brazil during the period from 1900 to 1990 is presented. The current status of vaccines against N. meningitidis A.C.Y. and W135 is analysed. The recent advances in the development and effectiveness of B. meningococci vaccines are discussed.

  9. Influence of silybin on biophysical properties of phospholipid bilayers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Olga WESO(L)OWSKA; Krystyna MICHALAK; Barbara (L)ANIA-PIETRZAK; Micha(l) KU(Z)D(Z)A(L); Kamila STA(N)CZAK; Daniela MOSI(A)DZ; Piotr DOBRYSZYCKI; Andrzej O(Z)YHAR; Ma(l)gorzata KOMOROWSKA; Andrzej B HENDRICH

    2007-01-01

    Aim: Silybin (silibinin)is major biologically active flavonolignan extracted from milk thistle (Sylibum marianum). Its biological activities include hepato-protection, anticancer properties, and antioxidant- and membrane-stabilizing functions. Al-though membranes are postulated to be one of the cellular targets for silybin, little is known about its interaction with phospholipid bilayers. Methods: In the present work, the interactions of silybin with phosphatidylcholine bilayers were studied in detail using fluorescence spectroscopy, microcalorimetry and electron spin resonance techniques. Results: The results showed that silybin interacted with the surface of lipid bilayers. It affected the generalized polarization of the fluores-cent probe Prodan, while not influencing the more deeplylocated Laurdan. Silybin lowered the main phospholipid phase transition temperature as judged by microcalorimetry, and caused the immobilization of spin probe Tempo-palmitate located on the surface of membranes. The mobility of spin probes 5-and 16-doxylstearic acid was not affected by silybin. Silybin-induced quenching of 1,6-diphe-nyl-1,3,5-hexatriene fluorescence indicated that some flavonoid molecules parti-tioned into the hydrophobic region of membranes, which did not change signifi-cantly the biophysical properties of the deeper membrane regions. Conclusion: Such a behavior of silybin in membranes is in accordance with its postulated biological functions and neglectable side effects of therapies using silybin.

  10. Effect of Photodynamic Therapy with BPD-MA on the Proliferation and Apoptosis of Human Bladder Cancer Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chuanshan Xu; Shiming Wu; Zhigang Wang; Lehua Yu; Qing Yang

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To explore the effect of photodynamic therapy with benzoporphyrin derivative monoacid ring A (BPD-MA) on the proliferation and apoptosis of human bladder cancer cells.METHODS Rhotosensitization of BPD-MA was activated with a red light laser (632.8 nm) delivered at 10 mw/cm2 to give a total dose of 2.4 J/cm2.Cellular proliferative activity was measured using the 3-(4,5-dimethylethiazil-2-yl)-2,5-Diph3-eyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and 3H-thymidine incorporation. Cell apoptosis was determined with flow cytometry analysis and the terminal deoxyuridine nicked-labeling (TUNEL) assay.RESULTS At 24 h post photodynamic treatment, photodynamic therapy significantly decreased cellular proliferative activity. The rate of apoptosis in BIU-87 cells 8 h after photodynamic treatment significantly increased up to 26.11± 2.59% as analyzed with flow cytometry. In situ labeling of DNA cleavage products with the terminal deoxyuridine nicked-labeling (TUNEL) assay reinforced these observations, BPD-MA-mediated photosensitization increased the number of TUNEL-positive cells compared to the controls. However, laser irradiation alone, BPD-MA alone and sham radiation did not affect cellular proliferative activity or apoptosis of the human bladder cancer BIU-87 cells.CONCLUSION Photodynamic therapy with BPD-MA significantly decreases cellular proliferative activity and enhances apoptosis. Therapy using this method might be a promising approach to treat patients with bladder cancer.

  11. Modulatory effects of the fruits of Tribulus terrestris L. on the function of atopic dermatitis-related calcium channels, Orai1 and TRPV3

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joo Hyun Nam; Hyo Won Jung; Young-Won Chin; Woo Kyung Kim; Hyo Sang Bae

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To examine the effects of Tribulus terrestris L. (T. terrestris) extract on the modulation of calcium channels to evaluate its use in topical agents for treatment of atopic dermatitis. Methods: The 70% methanol extract of T. terrestris was prepared. Human HEK293T cells with over-expressed calcium release-activated calcium channel protein 1 (Orai1), transient receptor potential vanilloid 1, or transient receptor potential vanilloid 3 (TRPV3) were treated with T. terrestris extract. Modulation of ion channels was measured using a conventional whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Results: T. terrestris extract (100 mg/mL) significantly inhibited Orai1 activity in Orai1-stromal interaction molecule 1 co-overexpressed HEK293T cells. In addition, T. terrestris extract significantly increased the TRPV3 activity compared with 2-Aminoethyl diphe-nylborinate (100 mmol/L), which induces the full activation of TRPV3. Conclusions: Our results suggest that T. terrestris extract may have a therapeutic po-tential for recovery of abnormal skin barrier pathologies in atopic dermatitis through modulating the activities of calcium ion channels, Orai1 and TRPV3. This is the first study to report the modulatory effect of a medicinal plant on the function of ion channels in skin barrier.

  12. ACYW135群脑膜炎球菌多糖结合疫苗的研制%Development of groups ACYW135 meningococcal polysaccharide conjugate vaccine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张明华; 任涛; 曹欣; 唐秀丽; 韩菲; 王婷婷; 胡鹏; 张美香; 郝倩

    2013-01-01

    Objective To prepare a safe and effective quadrivalent meningococcal polysaccharide conjugate vaccine.Methods Groups A,C,Y and W135 meningococcal polysaccharide were activated by cyanogen bromide,respectively.With 1,6-adipic acid dihydrazide as linking agent,monovalent meningococcal polysaccharide conjugate vaccines were prepared by carbodiimide-mediated coupling of meningococcal polysaccharide with carrier protein diphtheria toxoid (DT),then groups ACYW135 meningococcal polysaccharide-DT conjugate vaccine (ACYW135-DT) was prepared by mixing each monovalent meningococcal polysaccharide conjugate vaccine in a certain proportion.Mice were immunized with ACYW135-DT,and antibodies to each polysaccharide were detected by indirect ELISA.The statistical analysis of the results were made by t test.Results Each index of the prepared ACYW135-DT achieved quality control standard.ACYW135-DT had a good safety and immunogenicity.The levels of IgG antibodies to group A (t =24.487,P<0.01),group C (t =17.056,P <0.01),group Y (t =26.213,P <0.01) and group W135 (t =17.392,P <0.01) polysaccharides in mice immunized with ACYW135-DT were significantly higher than those in mice immunized quadrivalent meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine.Conclusion ACYW135-DT is successfully prepared with this technology.%目的 制备安全有效的四价脑膜炎球菌多糖结合疫苗.方法 用溴化氰分别将A、C、Y、W135群脑膜炎球菌多糖活化,以己二酸二酰肼作为连接剂,碳化二亚胺作为偶联剂,先制备单价A、C、Y、W135群脑膜炎球菌多糖-白喉类毒素(diphtheria toxoid,DT)结合疫苗,再配比制成ACYW135群脑膜炎球菌多糖结合疫苗(groups ACYW135 meningococcal polysaccharide-DT conjugate vaccine,ACYW135-DT).以ACYW135-DT免疫小鼠,用间接ELISA检测小鼠血清抗各多糖抗体,采用t检验对检测结果进行统计学分析.结果 制备的ACYW135-DT的各项指标均达到质控标准,而且ACYW 135-DT具有良好

  13. Molecular epidemiology and emergence of worldwide epidemic clones of Neisseria meningitidis in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Hsiu-Li

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Meningococcal disease is infrequently found in Taiwan, a country with 23 million people. Between 1996 and 2002, 17 to 81 clinical cases of the disease were reported annually. Reported cases dramatically increased in 2001–2002. Our record shows that only serogroup B and W135 meningococci have been isolated from patients with meningococcal disease until 2000. However, serogroup A, C and Y meningococci were detected for the first time in 2001 and continued to cause disease through 2002. Most of serogroup Y meningococcus infections localized in Central Taiwan in 2001, indicating that a small-scale outbreak of meningococcal disease had occurred. The occurrence of a meningococcal disease outbreak and the emergence of new meningococcal strains are of public health concern. Methods Neisseria meningitidis isolates from patients with meningococcal disease from 1996 to 2002 were collected and characterized by serogrouping, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE and multilocus sequence typing (MLST. The genetic relatedness and clonal relationship between the isolates were analyzed by using the PFGE patterns and the allelic profiles of the sequence types (STs. Results Serogroups A, B, C, W135, Y, and non-serogroupable Neisseria meningitidis were, respectively, responsible for 2%, 50%, 2%, 35%, 9%, and 2% of 158 culture-confirmed cases of meningococcal disease in 1996–2002. Among 100 N. meningitidis isolates available for PFGE and MLST analyses, 51 different PFGE patterns and 30 STs were identified with discriminatory indices of 0.95 and 0.87, respectively. Of the 30 STs, 21 were newly identified and of which 19 were found in serogroup B isolates. A total of 40 PFGE patterns were identified in 52 serogroup B isolates with the patterns distributed over several distinct clusters. In contrast, the isolates within each of the serogroups A, C, W135, and Y shared high levels of PFGE pattern similarity. Analysis of the allelic profile of the

  14. REDOX DISRUPTING POTENTIAL OF TOXCAST CHEMICALS RANKED BY ACTIVITY IN MOUSE EMBRYONIC STEM CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    To gain insight regarding the adverse outcome pathways leading to developmental toxicity following exposure to chemicals, we evaluated ToxCast™ Phase I chemicals in an adherent mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) assay and identified a redox sensitive pathway that correlated with al...

  15. Student employment opportunities within ORD, with an emphasis on MED

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is a talk to undergraduate Juniors and Seniors in the UW-Madison School of Pharmacy's Pharm/Tox program about student employment opportunities w/in ORD such as SSC, ORISE, etc. wtih an emphasis on MED. I would classify as this as Outreach: how to navigate EPA websites to f...

  16. Meta-analysis of aquatic chronic chemical toxicity data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic toxicity data from the open literature and from tests submitted for pesticide registration were extracted and assembled into a database, AquaChronTox, with a flexible search interface. Data were captured at a treatment and, when available, replicate level to support conc...

  17. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U04054-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available icology Modeling. 48 0.40 1 ( GP047791 ) Sequence 2420 from patent US 7469185. 48 0...ocyte Toxicity Modeling. 48 0.40 1 ( DD268934 ) Molecular Hepatotoxicology Modeling. 48 0.40 1 ( DD194036 ) Cardiotoxin Molecular Tox

  18. Optimizing the performance of the amphipod, Hyalella azteca, in chronic toxicity tests: Results of feeding studies with various foods and feeding regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The freshwater amphipod, Hyalella azteca, is a common organism used for sediment toxicity testing. Standard methods for 10-d and 42-d sediment toxicity tests with H. azteca were last revised and published by USEPA/ASTM in 2000. While Hyalella azteca methods exist for sediment tox...

  19. ROLES OF EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR (EGF) AND TRANSFORMING GROWTH FACTOR-ALPHA (TGF-A) IN MEDIATION OF DIOXIN (TCDD)-INDUCED DELAYS IN DEVELOPMENT OF THE MOUSE MAMMARY GLAND

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roles of Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF) and Transforming Growth Factor-alpha (TGF-a) in Mediation of Dioxin (TCDD)-Induced Delays in Development of the Mouse Mammary Gland.Suzanne E. Fenton, Barbara Abbott, Lamont Bryant, and Angela Buckalew. U.S. EPA, NHEERL, Reproductive Tox...

  20. Resource Guide to Careers in Toxicology, 3rd Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Society of Toxicology, Reston, VA.

    This resource guide was prepared by the Tox 90's Educational Issues Task Force of the Society of Toxicology. The introduction provides information on the Society of Toxicology and financial support for graduate students in toxicology. Other sections include career opportunities in toxicology, academic and postdoctoral programs in toxicology, and…

  1. 75 FR 43425 - Distribution of Source Material to Exempt Persons and to General Licensees and Revision of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-26

    ... kidney function when ingested or inhaled in large quantities.\\1\\ Thorium dioxide is classified as a ``known carcinogen'' by the U.S. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry and has been linked to... and Human Services, Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. ``ToxFAQs TM '' for...

  2. 78 FR 32309 - Distribution of Source Material to Exempt Persons and to General Licensees and Revision of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-29

    ... radiation. Uranium exhibits toxic chemical properties that can impair kidney function when ingested or... for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry and has been linked to lung and liver diseases.\\2\\ Because... Substances and Disease Registry. ``ToxFAQs TM for Uranium,'' 1999. \\2\\ U.S. Department of Health and...

  3. 78 FR 9689 - Notification of a Public Meeting of the Chartered Science Advisory Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-11

    ... research that integrates advances in molecular biology, chemistry and innovative computer science to more...Tox) to advance risk assessment; on EPA's retrospective study of the costs of EPA regulations; and on... swine and dairy animal feeding operations]; and (3) to discuss information provided in the...

  4. Waterborne Diseases & Illnesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... It Algae Blooms (Tox Town - National Library of Medicine) - Describes the hazardous environmental effects of algae blooms. High Tides, Red Tides, and Not-so-White Water (Washington State Department of Health) - Describes problems such as flooding, diseases, and too much salt that result from high ...

  5. An adverse outcome pathway framework for neural tube and axial defects mediated by modulation of retinoic acid homeostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tonk, Elisa C. M.; Pennings, Jeroen L. A.; Piersma, Aldert H.

    2015-01-01

    Developmental toxicity can be caused through a multitude of mechanisms and can therefore not be captured through a single simple mechanistic paradigm. However, it may be possible to define a selected group of overarching mechanisms that might allow detection of the vast majority of developmental tox

  6. Common breast cancer susceptibility alleles and the risk of breast cancer for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: Implications for risk prediction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.C. Antoniou (Antonis); J. Beesley (Jonathan); L. McGuffog (Lesley); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); S. Healey (Sue); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); Y.C. Ding (Yuan); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); J.N. Weitzel (Jeffrey); H. Lynch (Henry); C. Isaacs (Claudine); P.A. Ganz (Patricia); G. Tomlinson (Gail); O.I. Olopade (Olofunmilayo); F.J. Couch (Fergus); X. Wang (Xing); N.M. Lindor (Noralane); V.S. Pankratz (Shane); P. Radice (Paolo); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); B. Peissel (Bernard); D. Zaffaroni (D.); M. Barile (Monica); A. Viel (Alessandra); A. Allavena (Anna); V. Dall'Olio (Valentina); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); C. Szabo (Csilla); M. Zikan (Michal); K. Claes (Kathleen); B. Poppe (Bruce); L. Foretova (Lenka); P.L. Mai (Phuong); M.H. Greene (Mark); G. Rennert (Gad); F. Lejbkowicz (Flavio); G. Glendon (Gord); H. Ozcelik (Hilmi); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); M. Thomassen (Mads); A-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); L. Sunde (Lone); D. Cruger (Dorthe); U.B. Jensen; M.A. Caligo (Maria); E. Friedman (Eitan); B. Kaufman (Bella); Y. Laitman (Yael); R. Milgrom (Roni); M. Dubrovsky (Maya); S. Cohen (Shimrit); Å. Borg (Åke); H. Jernström (H.); A. Lindblom (Annika); J. Rantala (Johanna); M. Stenmark-Askmalm (M.); B. Melin (Beatrice); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); S.M. Domchek (Susan); A. Jakubowska (Anna); J. Lubinski (Jan); T. Huzarski (Tomasz); A. Osorio (Ana); A. Lasa (Adriana); M. Durán (Mercedes); M.I. Tejada; J. Godino (Javier); J. Benitez (Javier); U. Hamann (Ute); M. Kriege (Mieke); N. Hoogerbrugge (Nicoline); R.B. van der Luijt (Rob); C.J. van Asperen (Christi); P. Devilee (Peter); E.J. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); M.J. Blok (Marinus); C.M. Aalfs (Cora); F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); M.A. Rookus (Matti); M. Cook (Margaret); C.T. Oliver (Clare); D. Frost (Debra); D. Conroy (Don); D.G. Evans (Gareth); F. Lalloo (Fiona); G. Pichert (Gabriella); R. Davidson (Rosemarie); T.J. Cole (Trevor); J. Paterson (Joan); S.V. Hodgson (Shirley); P.J. Morrison (Patrick); M.E. Porteous (Mary); L.J. Walker (Lisa); M.J. Kennedy (John); H. Dorkins (Huw); S. Peock (Susan); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); A. de Pauw (Antoine); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); V. Bonadona (Valérie); C. Lasset (Christine); H. Dreyfus (Hélène); D. Leroux (Dominique); A. hardouin (Agnès); P. Berthet (Pascaline); L. Faivre (Laurence); C. Loustalot (Catherine); T. Noguchi (Tetsuro); H. Sobol (Hagay); E. Rouleau (Etienne); C. Nogues (Catherine); M. Frenay (Marc); L. Vénat-Bouvet (Laurence); J. Hopper (John); M.J. Daly (Mark); M-B. Terry (Mary-beth); E.M. John (Esther); S.S. Buys (Saundra); Y. Yassin (Yosuf); A. Miron (Alexander); D. Goldgar (David); C.F. Singer (Christian); C. Dressler (Catherina); D. Gschwantler-Kaulich (Daphne); G. Pfeiler (Georg); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); L. Jnson (Lars); B.A. Agnarsson (Bjarni); T. Kircchoff (Tomas); K. Offit (Kenneth); V. Devlin (Vincent); A. Dutra-Clarke (Ana); M. Piedmonte (Marion); G.C. Rodriguez (Gustavo); K. Wakeley (Katie); J.F. Boggess (John); J. Basil (Jack); P.E. Schwartz (Peter); S.V. Blank (Stephanie); A.E. Toland (Amanda); M. Montagna (Marco); C. Casella (Cinzia); E.N. Imyanitov (Evgeny); L. Tihomirova (Laima); I. Blanco (Ignacio); C. Lazaro (Conxi); S.J. Ramus (Susan); L. Sucheston (Lara); B.Y. Karlan (Beth); J. Gross (Jenny); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); C. Engel (Christoph); A. Meindl (Alfons); M. Lochmann (Magdalena); N. Arnold (Norbert); S. Heidemann (Simone); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); D. Niederacher (Dieter); C. Sutter (Christian); H. Deissler (Helmut); D. Gadzicki (Dorothea); S. Preisler-Adams (Sabine); K. Kast (Karin); I. Schönbuchner (Ines); T. Caldes (Trinidad); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); J. Simard (Jacques); A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); H. Holland (Helene); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); R. Platte (Radka); D.F. Easton (Douglas)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe known breast cancer susceptibility polymorphisms in FGFR2, TNRC9/TOX3, MAP3K1, LSP1, and 2q35 confer increased risks of breast cancer for BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. We evaluated the associations of 3 additional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs4973768 in SLC4A7/NEK10,

  7. 2785-IJBCS-Article-Blaise Donou

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hp

    total (200 mg/L), le nickel (2,5 mg/L) et le chrome (< 0,1mg/L). © 2016 International .... par colorimétrie avec le bichromate de potassium (MA. 315 – DCO 1.0 ... Bio-essai de toxicité avec les bactéries Méthode Hach Tox Track. RESULTATS.

  8. Optimizing the performance of the amphipod, Hyalella azteca, in chronic toxicity tests: Results of feeding studies with various foods and feeding regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The freshwater amphipod, Hyalella azteca, is a common organism used for sediment toxicity testing. Standard methods for 10-d and 42-d sediment toxicity tests with H. azteca were last revised and published by USEPA/ASTM in 2000. While Hyalella azteca methods exist for sediment tox...

  9. A Biologically Informed Framework for the Analysis of the PPAR Signaling Pathway using a Bayesian Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    The US EPA’s ToxCastTM program seeks to combine advances in high-throughput screening technology with methodologies from statistics and computer science to develop high-throughput decision support tools for assessing chemical hazard and risk. To develop new methods of analysis of...

  10. Gene expression profiles of Aspergillus flavus isolates responding to oxidative stress in different culture media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aflatoxin contamination of peanut by Aspergillus flavus is exacerbated by drought stress. Drought also stimulates the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in plant tissues implying a correlation between ROS and aflatoxin production. Here, we performed gene expression analysis by RNAseq of tox...

  11. Exposure Space: Integrating Exposure Data and Modeling with Toxicity Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent advances have been made in high-throughput (HTP) toxicity testing, e.g. from ToxCast, which will ultimately be combined with HTP predictions of exposure potential to support next-generation chemical safety assessment. Rapid exposure methods are essential in selecting chemi...

  12. New insights into the roles of host gene-necrotrophic effector interactions in governing susceptibility of durum wheat to tan spot and Septoria nodorum blotch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan spot and Septoria nodorum blotch (SNB) are important diseases of wheat caused by the necrotrophic fungi Pyrenophora tritici-repentis and Parastagonospora nodorum, respectively. The P. tritici-repentis necrotrophic effector (NE) Ptr ToxB causes tan spot when recognized by the Tsc2 gene. The NE To...

  13. Retrospective Mining of Toxicology Data to Discover Multispecies and Chemical Class Effects: Anemia as a Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Predictive toxicity models (in vitro to in vivo, QSAR, read-across) rely on large amounts of accurate in vivo data. Here, we analyze the quality of in vivo data from the Toxicity Reference Database (ToxRefDB), using chemical-induced anemia as an example. Considerations include v...

  14. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U06506-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 3e-08 3 ( DJ019170 ) Molecular Nephrotoxicology Modeling. 54 3e-08 3 ( DJ007525 ) Primary rat hepatocyte tox...icity modeling. 54 3e-08 3 ( DD269914 ) Molecular Hepatotoxicology Modeling. 54 3e-08 3 ( BD301471 ) Identif

  15. A genome-wide approach to discovery of small RNAs involved in regulation of virulence in Vibrio cholerae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evan S Bradley

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Small RNAs (sRNAs are becoming increasingly recognized as important regulators in bacteria. To investigate the contribution of sRNA mediated regulation to virulence in Vibrio cholerae, we performed high throughput sequencing of cDNA generated from sRNA transcripts isolated from a strain ectopically expressing ToxT, the major transcriptional regulator within the virulence gene regulon. We compared this data set with ToxT binding sites determined by pulldown and deep sequencing to identify sRNA promoters directly controlled by ToxT. Analysis of the resulting transcripts with ToxT binding sites in cis revealed two sRNAs within the Vibrio Pathogenicity Island. When deletions of these sRNAs were made and the resulting strains were competed against the parental strain in the infant mouse model of V. cholerae colonization, one, TarB, displayed a variable colonization phenotype dependent on its physiological state at the time of inoculation. We identified a target of TarB as the mRNA for the secreted colonization factor, TcpF. We verified negative regulation of TcpF expression by TarB and, using point mutations that disrupted interaction between TarB and tpcF mRNA, showed that loss of this negative regulation was primarily responsible for the colonization phenotype observed in the TarB deletion mutant.

  16. Common breast cancer susceptibility alleles and the risk of breast cancer for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: Implications for risk prediction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.C. Antoniou (Antonis); J. Beesley (Jonathan); L. McGuffog (Lesley); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); S. Healey (Sue); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); Y.C. Ding (Yuan); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); J.N. Weitzel (Jeffrey); H. Lynch (Henry); C. Isaacs (Claudine); P.A. Ganz (Patricia); G. Tomlinson (Gail); O.I. Olopade (Olofunmilayo); F.J. Couch (Fergus); X. Wang (Xing); N.M. Lindor (Noralane); V.S. Pankratz (Shane); P. Radice (Paolo); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); B. Peissel (Bernard); D. Zaffaroni (D.); M. Barile (Monica); A. Viel (Alessandra); A. Allavena (Anna); V. Dall'Olio (Valentina); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); C. Szabo (Csilla); M. Zikan (Michal); K. Claes (Kathleen); B. Poppe (Bruce); L. Foretova (Lenka); P.L. Mai (Phuong); M.H. Greene (Mark); G. Rennert (Gad); F. Lejbkowicz (Flavio); G. Glendon (Gord); H. Ozcelik (Hilmi); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); M. Thomassen (Mads); A-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); L. Sunde (Lone); D. Cruger (Dorthe); U.B. Jensen; M.A. Caligo (Maria); E. Friedman (Eitan); B. Kaufman (Bella); Y. Laitman (Yael); R. Milgrom (Roni); M. Dubrovsky (Maya); S. Cohen (Shimrit); Å. Borg (Åke); H. Jernström (H.); A. Lindblom (Annika); J. Rantala (Johanna); M. Stenmark-Askmalm (M.); B. Melin (Beatrice); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); S.M. Domchek (Susan); A. Jakubowska (Anna); J. Lubinski (Jan); T. Huzarski (Tomasz); A. Osorio (Ana); A. Lasa (Adriana); M. Durán (Mercedes); M.I. Tejada; J. Godino (Javier); J. Benitez (Javier); U. Hamann (Ute); M. Kriege (Mieke); N. Hoogerbrugge (Nicoline); R.B. van der Luijt (Rob); C.J. van Asperen (Christi); P. Devilee (Peter); E.J. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); M.J. Blok (Marinus); C.M. Aalfs (Cora); F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); M.A. Rookus (Matti); M. Cook (Margaret); C.T. Oliver (Clare); D. Frost (Debra); D. Conroy (Don); D.G. Evans (Gareth); F. Lalloo (Fiona); G. Pichert (Gabriella); R. Davidson (Rosemarie); T.J. Cole (Trevor); J. Paterson (Joan); S.V. Hodgson (Shirley); P.J. Morrison (Patrick); M.E. Porteous (Mary); L.J. Walker (Lisa); M.J. Kennedy (John); H. Dorkins (Huw); S. Peock (Susan); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); A. de Pauw (Antoine); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); V. Bonadona (Valérie); C. Lasset (Christine); H. Dreyfus (Hélène); D. Leroux (Dominique); A. hardouin (Agnès); P. Berthet (Pascaline); L. Faivre (Laurence); C. Loustalot (Catherine); T. Noguchi (Tetsuro); H. Sobol (Hagay); E. Rouleau (Etienne); C. Nogues (Catherine); M. Frenay (Marc); L. Vénat-Bouvet (Laurence); J. Hopper (John); M.J. Daly (Mark); M-B. Terry (Mary-beth); E.M. John (Esther); S.S. Buys (Saundra); Y. Yassin (Yosuf); A. Miron (Alexander); D. Goldgar (David); C.F. Singer (Christian); C. Dressler (Catherina); D. Gschwantler-Kaulich (Daphne); G. Pfeiler (Georg); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); L. Jnson (Lars); B.A. Agnarsson (Bjarni); T. Kircchoff (Tomas); K. Offit (Kenneth); V. Devlin (Vincent); A. Dutra-Clarke (Ana); M. Piedmonte (Marion); G.C. Rodriguez (Gustavo); K. Wakeley (Katie); J.F. Boggess (John); J. Basil (Jack); P.E. Schwartz (Peter); S.V. Blank (Stephanie); A.E. Toland (Amanda); M. Montagna (Marco); C. Casella (Cinzia); E.N. Imyanitov (Evgeny); L. Tihomirova (Laima); I. Blanco (Ignacio); C. Lazaro (Conxi); S.J. Ramus (Susan); L. Sucheston (Lara); B.Y. Karlan (Beth); J. Gross (Jenny); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); C. Engel (Christoph); A. Meindl (Alfons); M. Lochmann (Magdalena); N. Arnold (Norbert); S. Heidemann (Simone); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); D. Niederacher (Dieter); C. Sutter (Christian); H. Deissler (Helmut); D. Gadzicki (Dorothea); S. Preisler-Adams (Sabine); K. Kast (Karin); I. Schönbuchner (Ines); T. Caldes (Trinidad); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); J. Simard (Jacques); A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); H. Holland (Helene); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); R. Platte (Radka); D.F. Easton (Douglas)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe known breast cancer susceptibility polymorphisms in FGFR2, TNRC9/TOX3, MAP3K1, LSP1, and 2q35 confer increased risks of breast cancer for BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. We evaluated the associations of 3 additional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs4973768 in SLC4A7/NEK10,

  17. Common breast cancer susceptibility alleles and the risk of breast cancer for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: implications for risk prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antoniou, Antonis C; Beesley, Jonathan; McGuffog, Lesley;

    2010-01-01

    The known breast cancer susceptibility polymorphisms in FGFR2, TNRC9/TOX3, MAP3K1, LSP1, and 2q35 confer increased risks of breast cancer for BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. We evaluated the associations of 3 additional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs4973768 in SLC4A7/NEK10, rs650495...

  18. Common Breast Cancer Susceptibility Alleles and the Risk of Breast Cancer for BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers : Implications for Risk Prediction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antoniou, Antonis C.; Beesley, Jonathan; McGuffog, Lesley; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Healey, Sue; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Lynch, Henry T.; Isaacs, Claudine; Ganz, Patricia A.; Tomlinson, Gail; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Couch, Fergus J.; Wang, Xianshu; Lindor, Noralane M.; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Radice, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Barile, Monica; Viel, Alessandra; Allavena, Anna; Dall'Olio, Valentina; Peterlongo, Paolo; Szabo, Csilla I.; Zikan, Michal; Claes, Kathleen; Poppe, Bruce; Foretova, Lenka; Mai, Phuong L.; Greene, Mark H.; Rennert, Gad; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Andrulis, Irene L.; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Sunde, Lone; Cruger, Dorthe; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Caligo, Maria; Friedman, Eitan; Kaufman, Bella; Laitman, Yael; Milgrom, Roni; Dubrovsky, Maya; Cohen, Shimrit; Borg, Ake; Jernstroem, Helena; Lindblom, Annika; Rantala, Johanna; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Melin, Beatrice; Nathanson, Kate; Domchek, Susan; Jakubowska, Ania; Lubinski, Jan; Huzarski, Tomasz; Osorio, Ana; Lasa, Adriana; Duran, Mercedes; Tejada, Maria-Isabel; Godino, Javier; Benitez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Kriege, Mieke; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; van der Luijt, Rob B.; van Asperen, Christi J.; Devilee, Peter; Meijers-Heijboer, E. J.; Blok, Marinus J.; Aalfs, Cora M.; Hogervorst, Frans; Rookus, Matti; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare; Frost, Debra; Conroy, Don; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Pichert, Gabriella; Davidson, Rosemarie; Cole, Trevor; Cook, Jackie; Paterson, Joan; Hodgson, Shirley; Morrison, Patrick J.; Porteous, Mary E.; Walker, Lisa; Kennedy, M. John; Dorkins, Huw; Peock, Susan; Godwin, Andrew K.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; de Pauw, Antoine; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Bonadona, Valerie; Lasset, Christine; Dreyfus, Helene; Leroux, Dominique; Hardouin, Agnes; Berthet, Pascaline; Faivre, Laurence; Loustalot, Catherine; Noguchi, Tetsuro; Sobol, Hagay; Rouleau, Etienne; Nogues, Catherine; Frenay, Marc; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Hopper, John L.; Daly, Mary B.; Terry, Mary B.; John, Esther M.; Buys, Saundra S.; Yassin, Yosuf; Miron, Alexander; Goldgar, David; Singer, Christian F.; Dressler, Anne Catharina; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Pfeiler, Georg; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Jnson, Lars; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Offit, Kenneth; Devlin, Vincent; Dutra-Clarke, Ana; Piedmonte, Marion; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Wakeley, Katie; Boggess, John F.; Basil, Jack; Schwartz, Peter E.; Blank, Stephanie V.; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Montagna, Marco; Casella, Cinzia; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Tihomirova, Laima; Blanco, Ignacio; Lazaro, Conxi; Ramus, Susan J.; Sucheston, Lara; Karlan, Beth Y.; Gross, Jenny; Schmutzler, Rita; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Lochmann, Magdalena; Arnold, Norbert; Heidemann, Simone; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Niederacher, Dieter; Sutter, Christian; Deissler, Helmut; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Kast, Karin; Schoenbuchner, Ines; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Aittomaeki, Kristiina; Nevanlinna, Heli; Simard, Jacques; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Holland, Helene; Chen, Xiaoqing; Platte, Radka; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.

    2010-01-01

    The known breast cancer susceptibility polymorphisms in FGFR2, TNRC9/TOX3, MAP3K1, LSP1, and 2q35 confer increased risks of breast cancer for BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. We evaluated the associations of 3 additional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs4973768 in SLC4A7/NEK10, rs6504950 i

  19. Development and Application of In Vitro Models for Screening Drugs and Environmental Chemicals that Predict Toxicity in Animals and Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Development and Application of In Vitro Models for Screening Drugs and Environmental Chemicals that Predict Toxicity in Animals and Humans (Presented by James McKim, Ph.D., DABT, Founder and Chief Science Officer, CeeTox) (5/25/2012)

  20. CHIMERA CBRN protective suit. Advanced embodiment design. Final report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogerd, C.P.; Smit, B. de; Olarte, C.; Kane, G.; Bie, M. de; Megen, X. van; Schenk, J.; Hooop, J. de

    2015-01-01

    The Chimera project started of with the following design challenge: Designing a switchable CBRN (chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear) protective suit for soldiers, one phase being a regular work state and the other phase being a protective state to enable the soldier to get away from the tox

  1. Development of a Systems Computational Model to Investigate Early Biological Events in Hepatic Activation of Constitutive Androstane Receptor (CAR) by Phenobarbital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Activation of the nuclear receptor CAR (constitutive active/androstane receptor) is implicated in the control several key biological events such as metabolic pathways. Here, we combined data from literature with information obtained from in vitro assays in the US EPA ToxCast dat...

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF AN IN VITRO RADIOACTIVE IODIDE UPTAKE ASSAY (RAIU) WITH HUMAN NIS-EXPRESSING HEK293T-EPA CELL LINE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many high-throughput screening (HTPS) assays are available in the US EPA ToxCast program for estrogen and androgen pathways; only a limited number of assays exist for thyroid pathways. One potential target of thyroid-disrupting chemicals is the active uptake of iodide into the t...

  3. Structure Identification Using High Resolution Mass Spectrometry Data and the EPAs Chemistry Dashboard (ACS Fall meeting)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The iCSS Chemistry Dashboard is a publicly accessible dashboard provided by the National Center for Computation Toxicology at the US-EPA. It serves a number of purposes, including providing a chemistry database underpinning many of our public-facing projects (e.g. ToxCast and Exp...

  4. DEFENSE DES CULTURES La nécrose du collet du colza : analyse de la distribution du champignon dans la plante à l’aide d’outils moléculaires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmit Jacques

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Les composantes (Tox+ et Tox0 du complexe impliqué dans la nécrose du collet du colza ont été suivies au cours du temps et dans la plante, à l’aide d’outils moléculaires (ITS, ISSR, afin de clarifier leurs rôles respectifs dans les dégâts de nécrose, de préciser les relations entre les symptômes foliaires précoces et les nécroses du collet tardives et d’évaluer l’étendue de la colonisation de la plante, en conditions naturelles, pendant deux cycles culturaux successifs. Les deux composantes, présentes en permanence, varient en proportion selon la période de culture et l’organe considérés. La composante Tox+, qui prédomine aux deux extrêmes du cycle cultural, sur feuille en automne et au collet en fin de végétation, est responsable des dégâts de nécrose. L’analyse topographique de la région du collet indique que tous les tissus, fortement colonisés par de nombreuses souches Tox+ distinctes, constituent un site privilégié de confrontation entre souches différentes, favorable à la reproduction sexuée du champignon.

  5. An exposure:activity profiling method for interpreting high-throughput screening data for estrogenic activity--proof of concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Richard A; Friedman, Katie Paul; Simon, Ted W; Marty, M Sue; Patlewicz, Grace; Rowlands, J Craig

    2015-04-01

    Rapid high throughput in vitro screening (HTS) assays are now available for characterizing dose-responses in assays that have been selected for their sensitivity in detecting estrogen-related endpoints. For example, EPA's ToxCast™ program recently released endocrine assay results for more than 1800 substances and the interagency Tox21 consortium is in the process of releasing data for approximately 10,000 chemicals. But such activity measurements alone fall short for the purposes of priority setting or screening because the relevant exposure context is not considered. Here, we extend the method of exposure:activity profiling by calculating the exposure:activity ratios (EARs) using human exposure estimates and AC50 values for a range of chemicals tested in a suite of seven estrogenic assays in ToxCast™ and Tox21. To provide additional context, relative estrogenic exposure:activity quotients (REEAQ) were derived by comparing chemical-specific EARs to the EAR of the ubiquitous dietary phytoestrogen, genistein (GEN). Although the activity of a substance in HTS-endocrine assays is not a measure of health hazard or risk, understanding how such a dose compares to human exposures provides a valuable additional metric that can be used in decision-making; substances with small EARs and REEAQs would indicate low priority for further endocrine screening or testing.

  6. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TGUT-25-0001 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TGUT-25-0001 ref|NP_001004193.1| reproductive homeobox on X chromosome, 8 [Mus... musculus] gb|AAQ94736.1| TOX [Mus musculus] emb|CAM17357.1| reproductive homeobox 8 [Mus musculus] NP_001004193.1 0.005 44% ...

  7. Multiscale Systems Modeling of Male Reproductive Tract Defects: from Genes to Populations (SOT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The reproductive tract is a complex, integrated organ system with diverse embryology and unique sensitivity to prenatal environmental exposures that disrupt morphoregulatory processes and endocrine signaling. U.S. EPA’s in vitro high-throughput screening (HTS) database (ToxCastDB...

  8. Dicty_cDB: VSE387 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ocara canis cathepsin Z1 prepro... 115 7e-25 T29872( T29872 )hypothetical protein F...some... 162 5e-39 U30877_1( U30877 |pid:none) Urechis caupo cathepsin B-like proteas... 117 3e-25 AF143817_1( AF143817 |pid:none) Tox

  9. AcEST: DK962740 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ocara canis G... 249 9e-66 sp|P50880|RL3_CAEEL 60S ribosomal protein L3 OS=Caenorha...-67 sp|P59671|RL3_NEUCR 60S ribosomal protein L3 OS=Neurospora crass... 251 2e-66 sp|P49149|RL3_TOXCA 60S ribosomal protein L3 OS=Tox

  10. Use of high-throughput in vitro toxicity screening data in cancer hazard evaluations by IARC Monograph Working Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Weihsueh A; Guyton, Kathryn Z; Martin, Matthew T; Reif, David M; Rusyn, Ivan

    2017-07-24

    Evidence regarding carcinogenic mechanisms serves a critical role in International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) Monograph evaluations. Three recent IARC Working Groups pioneered inclusion of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ToxCast program high-throughput screening (HTS) data to supplement other mechanistic evidence. In Monograph V110, HTS profiles were compared between perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and prototypical activators across multiple nuclear receptors. For Monograph V112 -113, HTS assays were mapped to 10 key characteristics of carcinogens identified by an IARC expert group, and systematically considered as an additional mechanistic data stream. Both individual assay results and ToxPi-based rankings informed mechanistic evaluations. Activation of multiple nuclear receptors in HTS assays showed that PFOA targets peroxisome proliferator activated and other receptors. ToxCast assays substantially covered 5 of 10 key characteristics, corroborating literature evidence of "induces oxidative stress" and "alters cell proliferation, cell death or nutrient supply" and filling gaps for "modulates receptor-mediated effects." Thus, ToxCast HTS data were useful both in evaluating specific mechanistic hypotheses and in the overall evaluation of mechanistic evidence. However, additional HTS assays are needed to provide more comprehensive coverage of the 10 key characteristics of carcinogens that form the basis of current IARC mechanistic evaluations.

  11. Vergelijking van drie Wistarrattestammen met betrekking tot de werkingsduur en het farmacokinetisch profiel van desmethyldiazepam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Laan JW; de Groot G

    1988-01-01

    In het kader van het onderzoek naar de afhankelijkheid van benzodiazepinen is een vergelijking gemaakt tussen drie rattestammen, namelijk Cpb: WU, Riv:TOX en Crl:(WI)BR met betrekking tot de werkingsduur van desmethyldiazepam (DMD) na orale toediening in een model waarbij de onderdrukking van de nac

  12. Characterization of Pyrenophora tritici-repentis (Tan Spot of Wheat) Races in Baltic States and Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Sidrat; Sehgal, Sunish Kumar; Ali, Shaukat; Liatukas, Zilvinas; Ittu, Mariana; Kaur, Navjot

    2017-01-01

    Tan spot, caused by the fungus Pyrenophora triticirepentis, is economically important foliar disease in Latvia, Lithuania, and Romania; however, race structure from Baltic States and Romania is not known. In this study, we performed genotypic and phenotypic race characterization of a large collection of P. triticirepentis isolates from these countries to determine race structure and utilize this information for better disease management and breeding wheat for tan spot resistance. We characterized 231 single spore isolates from Latvia (n = 15), Lithuania (n = 107), and Romania (n = 109) for Ptr ToxA and Ptr ToxB genes using two genes specific primers. A subset (139) of 231 isolates were further characterized for their race structure by inoculating them individually on tan spot wheat differentials set. Majority (83%) of the 231 isolates amplified Ptr ToxA gene suggesting prevalence of race 1 and 2. Further, phenotypic characterization of 139 isolates also showed wide prevalence of races 1 (68%), 2 (8%), 3 (11%), and 4 (5%) were also identified from Baltic States as well as Romania. Eighteen of the isolates (13%) did not seem to be of any of the eight known races as they lacked Ptr ToxA gene but they behaved like either race 1 or race 2, suggesting possibility of novel toxins in these isolates as their virulence tools.

  13. Prediction of Clinically Relevant Safety Signals of Nephrotoxicity through Plasma Metabolite Profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. B. Mattes

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Addressing safety concerns such as drug-induced kidney injury (DIKI early in the drug pharmaceutical development process ensures both patient safety and efficient clinical development. We describe a unique adjunct to standard safety assessment wherein the metabolite profile of treated animals is compared with the MetaMap Tox metabolomics database in order to predict the potential for a wide variety of adverse events, including DIKI. To examine this approach, a study of five compounds (phenytoin, cyclosporin A, doxorubicin, captopril, and lisinopril was initiated by the Technology Evaluation Consortium under the auspices of the Drug Safety Executive Council (DSEC. The metabolite profiles for rats treated with these compounds matched established reference patterns in the MetaMap Tox metabolomics database indicative of each compound’s well-described clinical toxicities. For example, the DIKI associated with cyclosporine A and doxorubicin was correctly predicted by metabolite profiling, while no evidence for DIKI was found for phenytoin, consistent with its clinical picture. In some cases the clinical toxicity (hepatotoxicity, not generally seen in animal studies, was detected with MetaMap Tox. Thus metabolite profiling coupled with the MetaMap Tox metabolomics database offers a unique and powerful approach for augmenting safety assessment and avoiding clinical adverse events such as DIKI.

  14. Inhibition of the sodium-translocating NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase [Na+-NQR] decreases cholera toxin production in Vibrio cholerae O1 at the late exponential growth phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minato, Yusuke; Fassio, Sara R; Reddekopp, Rylan L; Häse, Claudia C

    2014-01-01

    Two virulence factors produced by Vibrio cholerae, cholera toxin (CT) and toxin-corregulated pilus (TCP), are indispensable for cholera infection. ToxT is the central regulatory protein involved in activation of CT and TCP expression. We previously reported that lack of a respiration-linked sodium-translocating NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (Na(+)-NQR) significantly increases toxT transcription. In this study, we further characterized this link and found that Na(+)-NQR affects toxT expression only at the early-log growth phase, whereas lack of Na(+)-NQR decreases CT production after the mid-log growth phase. Such decreased CT production was independent of toxT and ctxB transcription. Supplementing a respiratory substrate, l-lactate, into the growth media restored CT production in the nqrA-F mutant, suggesting that decreased CT production in the Na(+)-NQR mutant is dependent on electron transport chain (ETC) activity. This notion was supported by the observations that two chemical inhibitors, a Na(+)-NQR specific inhibitor 2-n-Heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline N-oxide (HQNO) and a succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) inhibitor, thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTFA), strongly inhibited CT production in both classical and El Tor biotype strains of V. cholerae. Accordingly, we propose the main respiratory enzyme of V. cholerae, as a potential drug target to treat cholera because human mitochondria do not contain Na(+)-NQR orthologs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Structure Identification Using High Resolution Mass Spectrometry Data and the EPAs Chemistry Dashboard (ACS Fall meeting)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The iCSS Chemistry Dashboard is a publicly accessible dashboard provided by the National Center for Computation Toxicology at the US-EPA. It serves a number of purposes, including providing a chemistry database underpinning many of our public-facing projects (e.g. ToxCast and Exp...

  16. 78 FR 32248 - Notice of Receipt of a Request to Voluntarily Cancel Certain Pesticide Registrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-29

    ... Mosquito Repellant Coils. 10807-436 Konk Insect Killer. 13283-20 Rainbow Point Three Wasp & Ant Spray... Pressurized Spray 2523. 5178-5 Kilmos PF Mosquito Repellent Coils. 5178-10 Kilmos PF Mosquito Repellent Sticks... Spira Area Mosquito Repellent. 43917-8 Spira Punks Mosquito Coils II. 45385-9 Chem-Tox Insect...

  17. Installation Restoration Program. Phase I. Records Search, Hancock Field, New York.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-07-01

    Additional services include laboratory, x-ray, pharmacy, immunizations and optometry. Physical examinations for non-military persons are not available... Diazinon Pyr imidinyl) Phosphorothioate (None Determined) D-Tox 0, O-Diethyl---(3,51 6-Trichloro-2- Dursban 4E, Pyr idyl) Phosphoroth ioate Dursban

  18. Protective effect of DNA vaccine encoding pseudomonas exotoxin A and PcrV against acute pulmonary P. aeruginosa Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingzi Jiang

    Full Text Available Infections with Pseudomonas aeruginosa have been a long-standing challenge for clinical therapy because of complex pathogenesis and resistance to antibiotics, thus attaching importance to explore effective vaccines for prevention and treatment. In the present study, we constructed a novel DNA vaccine by inserting mutated gene toxAm encoding Pseudomonas Exotoxin A and gene pcrV encoding tip protein of the type III secretion system into respective sites of a eukaryotic plasmid pIRES, named pIRES-toxAm-pcrV, and next evaluated the efficacy of the vaccine in murine acute Pseudomonas pneumonia models. Compared to DNA vaccines encoding single antigen, mice vaccinated with pIRES-toxAm-pcrV elicited higher levels of antigen-specific serum immunoglobulin G (IgG, enhanced splenic cell proliferation and cytokine secretion in response to Pseudomonas aeruginosa antigens, additionally PAO1 challenge in mice airway resulted in reduced bacteria burden and milder pathologic changes in lungs. Besides, it was observed that immunogenicity and protection could be promoted by the CpG ODN 1826 adjuvant. Taken together, it's revealed that recombinant DNA vaccine pIRES-toxAm-pcrV was a potential candidate for immunotherapy of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection and the CpG ODN 1826 a potent stimulatory adjuvant for DNA vaccination.

  19. 77 FR 10516 - Notice of Receipt of Requests To Voluntarily Cancel Certain Pesticide Registrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-22

    ... protected through regulations.gov or email. The regulations.gov Web site is an ``anonymous access'' system...-09036 RTU PCNB Seed Pentachloronitroben Protectant. zene. 005481-09037 Gustafson Apron...-00170 CB-38-2 For Insect Pyrethrins, Control. Piperonyl Butoxide. 010807-00101 Repco-Tox...

  20. SERDP CU-1129 Biological Assessment for Characterizing Contamination Risk at the Genetic-, Individual-, and Population-Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-04-14

    amphipod. Environ. Tox. Chem. 18, 1783-1790. Hagan, C.R., Rudin, C.M. (2002). Mobile genetic element activation and genotoxic cancer therapy : potential...Mol. Gen. Genet. 257, 497-504 (1998). 13. Arkhipova, I.R., & Morrison, H.G. Three retrotransposon families in the genome of Giardia lamblia: two

  1. Generation of GHS Scores from TEST and online sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alternatives assessment frameworks such as DfE (Design for the Environment) evaluate chemical alternatives in terms of human health effects, ecotoxicity, and fate. T.E.S.T. (Toxicity Estimation Software Tool) can be utilized to evaluate human health in terms of acute oral rat tox...

  2. Maritime Evaluation of Aerosol Fire Knock Down Tools. Part 2: Toxicity and Corrosion Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    i 2014 Fire Research Group Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering University of Waterloo Waterloo ON Canada N2L 3G1 E. Weckman, A...Topic, T. Sheehan and G.Hitchman MARITIME EVALUATION OF AEROSOL FIRE KNOCK DOWN TOOLS PART 2: TOX CITY AND CORROSION POTENTIAL February, 2014 A report...Exposure .............................. 64 Exposure of Wiped and Unwiped Computer Discs ............................................................ 66

  3. Computational Approach using Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells to Define a Mechanistic Applicability Domain for Prenatal Developmental Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Identification of mechanisms responsible for adverse developmental effects is the first step in creating predictive toxicity models. Identification of putative mechanisms was performed by co-analyzing three datasets for the effects of ToxCast phase Ia and II chemicals: 1.In vitro...

  4. Sensitirity of biofilf cultures of toxigenic stains of Сorynebacteriumdiphtheria to antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yana Frolova

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The task of our investigation was to study the sensitivity of Diphtheria agent from biofilm to antibacterial remedies. It was shown that typical cultures of museum and circulated strains of C.diphtheriae gravis tox+ has had different sensitivity to antibiotics.

  5. Corynebacterium ulcerans 0102 carries the gene encoding diphtheria toxin on a prophage different from the C. diphtheriae NCTC 13129 prophage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sekizuka Tsuyoshi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Corynebacterium ulcerans can cause a diphtheria-like illness, especially when the bacterium is lysogenized with a tox gene-carrying bacteriophage that produces diphtheria toxin. Acquisition of toxigenicity upon phage lysogenization is a common feature of C. ulcerans and C. diphtheriae. However, because of a lack of C. ulcerans genome information, a detailed comparison of prophages has not been possible between these two clinically important and closely related bacterial species. Results We determined the whole genome sequence of the toxigenic C. ulcerans 0102 isolated in Japan. The genomic sequence showed a striking similarity with that of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis and, to a lesser extent, with that of C. diphtheriae. The 0102 genome contained three distinct prophages. One of these, ΦCULC0102-I, was a tox-positive prophage containing genes in the same structural order as for tox-positive C. diphtheriae prophages. However, the primary structures of the individual genes involved in the phage machinery showed little homology between the two counterparts. Conclusion Taken together, these results suggest that the tox-positive prophage in this strain of C. ulcerans has a distinct origin from that of C. diphtheriae NCTC 13129.

  6. Fatty acid alkyl esters as solvents: An evaluation of the kauri-butanol value. Comparison to hydrocarbons, dimethyl diesters and other oxygenates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esters, most commonly methyl esters, of vegetable oils or animal fats or other lipid feedstocks have found increasing use as an alternative diesel fuel known as biodiesel. However, biodiesel also has good solvent properties, a feature rendered additionally attractive by its biodegradability, low tox...

  7. DEVELOPMENT OF AN IN VITRO RADIOACTIVE IODIDE UPTAKE ASSAY (RAIU) WITH HUMAN NIS-EXPRESSING HEK293T-EPA CELL LINE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many high-throughput screening (HTPS) assays are available in the US EPA ToxCast program for estrogen and androgen pathways; only a limited number of assays exist for thyroid pathways. One potential target of thyroid-disrupting chemicals is the active uptake of iodide into the t...

  8. 5th Bionanotox and Applications International Research Conference, Peabody, Little Rock, Arkansas, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabb, Taneicie; Chowdhury, Parimal

    2011-06-01

    "BioNanoTox and Toxicity: using Technology to Advance Discovery" was this year's theme at the 5th BioNanoTox and Applications International Research Conference held at the Peabody Hotel, Little Rock, Arkansas on November 4-5th, 2010. This year, the international participation in this conference increased to 25 countries spanning the globe. The conference began with opening remarks by Paul Howard, Associate Director of the National Center for Toxicological Research, Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, Arkansas, United States. Two keynote speakers, Dr. Ananth V. Annapragada and Dr. Merle G. Paule presented lectures on "Toxicity of Novel Nanoparticles for CT imaging" and "The Biology of Neurotoxicity: using Technology to Advance Discovery", respectively. Teachers, students, faculty, and scientists presented oral and poster presentations on fundamental and translational research related to BioNanoTox and related fields of science. Six presentation sessions were held over the two-day conference. There were 31 presentations and 39 posters from disciplines ranging from biology to chemistry, toxicology, nanotechnology, computational sciences, mathematics, engineering, plant science, and biotechnology. Poster presentation awards were presented to three high school students, three high school teachers, and three college students. In addition to poster awards a memorial, travel, and BioNanoTox award were presented. This year's meeting paved the way for a more outstanding meeting for the future.

  9. 生育期妇女及儿童的优生优育项目检测及其指导意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐公民; 金大治

    2008-01-01

    @@ ToRCH是4种病原微生物英文名称的缩写,其中TOX(Toxoplasma gondii)是弓形体、RV(Rubellavirus)是风疹病毒、CMV(Cytomegalo virus)是巨细胞病毒,HSV(Herpes simplex virus)是单纯疱疹病毒Ⅰ/Ⅱ型.

  10. TERATOGENIC RESPONSES ARE MODULATED IN MICE LACKING EXPRESSION OF EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR (EGF) AND TRANSFORMING GROWTH FACTOR-ALPHA (TGF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    TITLE:TERATOGENIC RESPONSES ARE MODULATED IN MICE LACKING EXPRESSION OF EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR (EGF) AND TRANSFORMING GROWTH FACTOR-ALPHA (TGF). AUTHORS (ALL): Abbott, Barbara D.1; Best, Deborah S.1; Narotsky, Michael G.1. SPONSOR NAME: None INSTITUTIONS (ALL): 1. Repro Tox ...

  11. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U11492-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available TOX14879.b1_M24.ab1 CTO(XYZ) dandelion Taraxacum... 190 4e-50 3 ( DY806628 ) CTOX14785.b1_A02.ab1 CTO(XYZ) dandelion... Taraxacum... 190 4e-50 3 ( DY806656 ) CTOX14814.b1_K08.ab1 CTO(XYZ) dandelion Taraxacum... 190 4e-5

  12. Common Breast Cancer Susceptibility Alleles and the Risk of Breast Cancer for BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers : Implications for Risk Prediction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antoniou, Antonis C.; Beesley, Jonathan; McGuffog, Lesley; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Healey, Sue; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Lynch, Henry T.; Isaacs, Claudine; Ganz, Patricia A.; Tomlinson, Gail; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Couch, Fergus J.; Wang, Xianshu; Lindor, Noralane M.; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Radice, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Barile, Monica; Viel, Alessandra; Allavena, Anna; Dall'Olio, Valentina; Peterlongo, Paolo; Szabo, Csilla I.; Zikan, Michal; Claes, Kathleen; Poppe, Bruce; Foretova, Lenka; Mai, Phuong L.; Greene, Mark H.; Rennert, Gad; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Andrulis, Irene L.; Thomassen, Mads; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Sunde, Lone; Cruger, Dorthe; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Caligo, Maria; Friedman, Eitan; Kaufman, Bella; Laitman, Yael; Milgrom, Roni; Dubrovsky, Maya; Cohen, Shimrit; Borg, Ake; Jernstroem, Helena; Lindblom, Annika; Rantala, Johanna; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Melin, Beatrice; Nathanson, Kate; Domchek, Susan; Jakubowska, Ania; Lubinski, Jan; Huzarski, Tomasz; Osorio, Ana; Lasa, Adriana; Duran, Mercedes; Tejada, Maria-Isabel; Godino, Javier; Benitez, Javier; Hamann, Ute; Kriege, Mieke; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; van der Luijt, Rob B.; van Asperen, Christi J.; Devilee, Peter; Meijers-Heijboer, E. J.; Blok, Marinus J.; Aalfs, Cora M.; Hogervorst, Frans; Rookus, Matti; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare; Frost, Debra; Conroy, Don; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Pichert, Gabriella; Davidson, Rosemarie; Cole, Trevor; Cook, Jackie; Paterson, Joan; Hodgson, Shirley; Morrison, Patrick J.; Porteous, Mary E.; Walker, Lisa; Kennedy, M. John; Dorkins, Huw; Peock, Susan; Godwin, Andrew K.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; de Pauw, Antoine; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Bonadona, Valerie; Lasset, Christine; Dreyfus, Helene; Leroux, Dominique; Hardouin, Agnes; Berthet, Pascaline; Faivre, Laurence; Loustalot, Catherine; Noguchi, Tetsuro; Sobol, Hagay; Rouleau, Etienne; Nogues, Catherine; Frenay, Marc; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Hopper, John L.; Daly, Mary B.; Terry, Mary B.; John, Esther M.; Buys, Saundra S.; Yassin, Yosuf; Miron, Alexander; Goldgar, David; Singer, Christian F.; Dressler, Anne Catharina; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Pfeiler, Georg; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Jnson, Lars; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Offit, Kenneth; Devlin, Vincent; Dutra-Clarke, Ana; Piedmonte, Marion; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Wakeley, Katie; Boggess, John F.; Basil, Jack; Schwartz, Peter E.; Blank, Stephanie V.; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Montagna, Marco; Casella, Cinzia; Imyanitov, Evgeny; Tihomirova, Laima; Blanco, Ignacio; Lazaro, Conxi; Ramus, Susan J.; Sucheston, Lara; Karlan, Beth Y.; Gross, Jenny; Schmutzler, Rita; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engel, Christoph; Meindl, Alfons; Lochmann, Magdalena; Arnold, Norbert; Heidemann, Simone; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Niederacher, Dieter; Sutter, Christian; Deissler, Helmut; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Kast, Karin; Schoenbuchner, Ines; Caldes, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Aittomaeki, Kristiina; Nevanlinna, Heli; Simard, Jacques; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Holland, Helene; Chen, Xiaoqing; Platte, Radka; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.

    2010-01-01

    The known breast cancer susceptibility polymorphisms in FGFR2, TNRC9/TOX3, MAP3K1, LSP1, and 2q35 confer increased risks of breast cancer for BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. We evaluated the associations of 3 additional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs4973768 in SLC4A7/NEK10, rs6504950 i

  13. Screening for angiogenic inhibitors in zebrafish to evaluate a predictive model for developmental vascular toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemically-induced vascular toxicity during embryonic development may cause a wide range of adverse effects. To identify putative vascular disrupting chemicals (pVDCs), a predictive signature was constructed from U.S. EPA ToxCast high-throughput screening (HTS) assays that map to...

  14. Alginate Immobilization of Metabolic Enzymes (AIME) for High-Throughput Screening Assays (SOT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alginate Immobilization of Metabolic Enzymes (AIME) for High-Throughput Screening Assays DE DeGroot, RS Thomas, and SO SimmonsNational Center for Computational Toxicology, US EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC USAThe EPA’s ToxCast program utilizes a wide variety of high-throughput s...

  15. TERATOGENIC RESPONSES ARE MODULATED IN MICE LACKING EXPRESSION OF EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR (EGF) AND TRANSFORMING GROWTH FACTOR-ALPHA (TGF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    TITLE:TERATOGENIC RESPONSES ARE MODULATED IN MICE LACKING EXPRESSION OF EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR (EGF) AND TRANSFORMING GROWTH FACTOR-ALPHA (TGF). AUTHORS (ALL): Abbott, Barbara D.1; Best, Deborah S.1; Narotsky, Michael G.1. SPONSOR NAME: None INSTITUTIONS (ALL): 1. Repro Tox ...

  16. Student employment opportunities within ORD, with an emphasis on MED

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is a talk to undergraduate Juniors and Seniors in the UW-Madison School of Pharmacy's Pharm/Tox program about student employment opportunities w/in ORD such as SSC, ORISE, etc. wtih an emphasis on MED. I would classify as this as Outreach: how to navigate EPA websites to f...

  17. Evaluation of quail and chicken embryos for the detection of botulinum toxin serotypes A, B, E and F activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comparison of quail (Coturnix japonica) and chicken (Gallus domesticus) embryos for the detection of BoNT/A activity was conducted using equal dosages of toxin/g of embryo (quail at 7 g and chickens at 48 g). Quail embryos were injected at 0, 0.5 to 50 ng adn chicken embryos at 0, 3.4 to 342 ng and...

  18. Predicting total organic halide formation from drinking water chlorination using quantitative structure-property relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luilo, G B; Cabaniss, S E

    2011-10-01

    Chlorinating water which contains dissolved organic matter (DOM) produces disinfection byproducts, the majority of unknown structure. Hence, the total organic halide (TOX) measurement is used as a surrogate for toxic disinfection byproducts. This work derives a robust quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) for predicting the TOX formation potential of model compounds. Literature data for 49 compounds were used to train the QSPR in moles of chlorine per mole of compound (Cp) (mol-Cl/mol-Cp). The resulting QSPR has four descriptors, calibration [Formula: see text] of 0.72 and standard deviation of estimation of 0.43 mol-Cl/mol-Cp. Internal and external validation indicate that the QSPR has good predictive power and low bias (‰<‰1%). Applying this QSPR to predict TOX formation by DOM surrogates - tannic acid, two model fulvic acids and two agent-based model assemblages - gave a predicted TOX range of 136-184 µg-Cl/mg-C, consistent with experimental data for DOM, which ranged from 78 to 192 µg-Cl/mg-C. However, the limited structural variation in the training data may limit QSPR applicability; studies of more sulfur-containing compounds, heterocyclic compounds and high molecular weight compounds could lead to a more widely applicable QSPR.

  19. Safety Review Panel (SRP) Special Topic Presentation on the Iodine Compatible Water Container (ICWC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Evan A.

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the safety requirements for the Iodine Compatible Water Container (ICWC). The topics include: 1) ICWC Team; 2) Purpose of presentation; 3) Background/Description of ICWC System; 4) Current status of ICWC Project; 5) HTV launch NCR Processing; 6) Tox 1 containment NCR processing; and 7) ISS on-orbit failure propagation and fault tolerance NCR processing.

  20. A functional gene cluster for toxoflavin biosynthesis in the genome of the soil bacterium Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toxoflavin is a broad-spectrum toxin best known for its role in virulence of Burkholderia glumae, which causes panicle blight of rice. A gene cluster containing homologs of toxoflavin biosynthesis genes (toxA-E) of B. glumae is present in the genome of Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5, a biological contr...

  1. From cell lines to tissues: extrapolation of transcriptional effects to human tissues (SOT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new suite of assays in the metabolically-competent, human hepatocyte-derived HepaRG cell line has been added to the ToxCast screening suite. For 1066 chemicals we have evaluated the chemical treatment-induced changes in expression for a diverse set of 93 genes representative of...

  2. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U11414-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ecticidal tox... 77 2e-12 AP007255_1841( AP007255 |pid:none) Magnetospirillum magne... CP000448_360( CP000448 |pid:none) Syntrophomonas wolfei subsp. wol... 77 2e-12 DQ400808_1( DQ400808 |pid:none) Yersinia sp. MH-1 ins

  3. MEETINGS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Events Calendar 2011January 19-20, BioBusiness London, United Kingdom January 27-28Predictive Human Toxicity and ADME/Tox Studies 2011Brussels, Belgium January 29-February 2LabAutomation 2011Palm Springs, United StatesFebruary 1-22011 Pharma Market Research

  4. MEETINGS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Events Calendar 2011 January 19-20, BioBusiness London,United Kingdom January 27-28 Predictive Human Toxicity and ADME/Tox Studies 2011 Brussels,Belgium January 29-February 2 LabAutomation 2011 Palm Springs,United States February 1-2 2011 Pharma Market Research Conference Parsippany,United States

  5. 正常育龄妇女TORCH感染的检测分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张秀贞; 刘学亮; 刘洋

    2010-01-01

    @@ TORCH是一组能引起孕妇宫内感染的病原微生物,即包括巨细胞病毒(cytomegalo viru,CMV)、风疹病毒(rebulla vius,RV)、弓形虫(toxoplasma,TOX)、单纯疱疹病毒(herpes simplex vius,HSV).

  6. Development and application of a real-time PCR assay for detection of Vibrio parahaemolyticuss in oyster%牡蛎中副溶血弧菌荧光定量PCR检测方法的建立及其应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林强; 李宁求; 付小哲; 刘礼辉; 石存斌; 吴淑勤

    2011-01-01

    以副溶血弧菌毒素调控基因(toxin regulations,toxR)作为靶标基因,设计特异性引物及TaqMan探针,以含toxR基因的质粒为模板,建立质粒拷贝数与CT值的标准曲线,分别采用含toxR基因质粒、纯培养的副溶血弧菌和添加副溶血弧菌的牡蛎(Ostrea)模拟样品进行灵敏度试验,结果表明,其灵敏度分别为15拷贝、18 CFU/mL和180CFU/mL.同一个样品的30次重复性试验表明,试验内及试验间的变异系数分别为0.95%和1.5%.结果显示,本研究建立的副溶血弧菌荧光定量PcR检测方法特异性强、灵敏度高、重复性好,可用于牡蛎等水产品中副溶血弧菌的定量检测.%Vibrio parahaemolyticus (VP) is a pathogen that is the leading cause of shellfish-associated cases of bacterial food poisoning.To establish a real-time PCR for quantitative analysis of toxR gene, a pair of specific primers and TaqMan fluorescent probe of toxR gene of VP were designed.The positive recombinant plasmids of toxR gene served as templates to establish standard curve, which showed corresponding relationship between the copies of plasmids and threshold cycle (CT)values.The lowest limit detection was 15 copies of toxR gene for plasmid, and the sensitivity of pure cultures and simulated oyster sample was 18 CFU/mL and 180 CFU/g, respectively.The coefficient of variation was 0.95% for intra-assay test and 1.5% for inter-assay test.One hundred and sixty eight positively established samples were detected from 178 oysters collected from a farm in Guangdong Province.The result showed that the real-time PCR assay for VP had high specificity, sensitivity, repeatability and it was time saving, so it can be used for detecting and monitoring VP in aquatic products.

  7. A review of the genotoxicity of marketed pharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, R D; Green, J W

    2001-05-01

    Information in the 1999 Physician's Desk Reference as well as from the peer-reviewed published literature was used to evaluate the genotoxicity of marketed pharmaceuticals. This survey is a compendium of genotoxicity information and a means to gain perspective on the inherent genotoxicity of structurally diverse pharmaceuticals. Data from 467 marketed drugs were collected. Excluded from analysis were anti-cancer drugs and nucleosides, which are expected to be genotoxic, steroids, biologicals and peptide-based drugs. Of the 467 drugs, 115 had no published gene-tox data. This group was comprised largely of acutely administered drugs such as antibiotics, antifungals, antihistamines decongestants and anesthetics. The remaining 352 had at least one standard gene-tox assay result. Of these, 101 compounds (28.7%) had at least one positive assay result in the pre-ICH/OECD standard four-test battery (bacterial mutagenesis, in vitro cytogenetics, mouse lymphoma assay (MLA), in vivo cytogenetics). Per assay type, the percentage of positive compounds was: bacterial mutagenesis test, 27/323 (8.3%); in vitro cytogenetics 55/222 (24.8%); MLA 24/96 (25%); in vivo cytogenetics 29/252 (11.5%). Of the supplemental genetic toxicology test findings reported, the sister chromatid exchange (SCE) assay had the largest percentage of positives 17/39 (43.5%) and mammalian mutagenesis assays (excluding MLA) had the lowest percentage of positives 2/91 (2.2%). The predictive value of genetic toxicology findings for 2-year bioassay outcomes is difficult to assess since carcinogenicity can occur via non-genotoxic mechanisms. Nevertheless, the following survey findings were made: 201 drugs had both gene-tox data and rodent carcinogenicity data. Of these, 124 were negative and 77 were equivocal or positive for carcinogenicity in at least 1 gender/1 species. Of the 124 non-carcinogens, 100 had no positive gene-tox findings. Of the remaining 24, 19 were positive in in vitro cytogenetics assays. Among

  8. Comparison between the two-step and the three-step algorithms for the detection of toxigenic Clostridium difficile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M O Qutub

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate usefulness of applying either the two-step algorithm (Ag-EIAs and CCNA or the three-step algorithm (all three assays for better confirmation of toxigenic Clostridium difficile. The antigen enzyme immunoassays (Ag-EIAs can accurately identify the glutamate dehydrogenase antigen of toxigenic and nontoxigenic Clostridium difficile. Therefore, it is used in combination with a toxin-detecting assay [cell line culture neutralization assay (CCNA, or the enzyme immunoassays for toxins A and B (TOX-A/BII EIA] to provide specific evidence of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhoea. Materials and Methods: A total of 151 nonformed stool specimens were tested by Ag-EIAs, TOX-A/BII EIA, and CCNA. All tests were performed according to the manufacturer′s instructions and the results of Ag-EIAs and TOX-A/BII EIA were read using a spectrophotometer at a wavelength of 450 nm. Results: A total of 61 (40.7%, 38 (25.3%, and 52 (34.7% specimens tested positive with Ag-EIA, TOX-A/BII EIA, and CCNA, respectively. Overall, the sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value, and positive predictive value for Ag-EIA were 94%, 87%, 96.6%, and 80.3%, respectively. Whereas for TOX-A/BII EIA, the sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value, and positive predictive value were 73.1%, 100%, 87.5%, and 100%, respectively. With the two-step algorithm, all 61 Ag-EIAs-positive cases required 2 days for confirmation. With the three-step algorithm, 37 (60.7% cases were reported immediately, and the remaining 24 (39.3% required further testing by CCNA. By applying the two-step algorithm, the workload and cost could be reduced by 28.2% compared with the three-step algorithm. Conclusions: The two-step algorithm is the most practical for accurately detecting toxigenic Clostridium difficile, but it is time-consuming.

  9. Role of biomarkers of nephrotoxic acute kidney injury in deliberate poisoning and envenomation in less developed countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Fahim; Endre, Zoltan H; Buckley, Nicholas A

    2015-07-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) has diverse causes and is associated with increased mortality and morbidity. In less developed countries (LDC), nephrotoxic AKI (ToxAKI) is common and mainly due to deliberate ingestion of nephrotoxic pesticides, toxic plants or to snake envenomation. ToxAKI shares some pathophysiological pathways with the much more intensively studied ischaemic AKI, but in contrast to ischaemic AKI, most victims are young, previously healthy adults. Diagnosis of AKI is currently based on a rise in serum creatinine. However this may delay diagnosis because of the kinetics of creatinine. Baseline creatinine values are also rarely available in LDC. Novel renal injury biomarkers offer a way forward because they usually increase more rapidly in AKI and are normally regarded as absent or very low in concentration, thereby reducing the need for a baseline estimate. This should increase sensitivity and speed of diagnosis. Specificity should also be increased for urine biomarkers since many originate from the renal tubular epithelium. Earlier diagnosis of ToxAKI should allow earlier initiation of appropriate therapy. However, translation of novel biomarkers of ToxAKI into clinical practice requires better understanding of non-renal factors in poisoning that alter biomarkers and the influence of dose of nephrotoxin on biomarker performance. Further issues are establishing LDC population-based normal ranges and assessing sampling and analytical parameters for low resource settings. The potential role of renal biomarkers in exploring ToxAKI aetiologies for chronic kidney disease of unknown origin (CKDu) is a high research priority in LDC. Therefore, developing more sensitive biomarkers for early diagnosis of nephrotoxicity is a critical step to making progress against AKI and CKDu in the developing world. © 2015 The British Pharmacological Society.

  10. Characterization and PCR Detection Of Binary, Pir-Like Toxins from Vibrio parahaemolyticus Isolates that Cause Acute Hepatopancreatic Necrosis Disease (AHPND) in Shrimp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirikharin, Ratchanok; Taengchaiyaphum, Suparat; Sanguanrut, Piyachat; Chi, Thanh Duong; Mavichak, Rapeepat; Proespraiwong, Porranee; Nuangsaeng, Bunlung; Thitamadee, Siripong; Flegel, Timothy W.; Sritunyalucksana, Kallaya

    2015-01-01

    Unique isolates of Vibrio parahaemolyticus (VPAHPND) have previously been identified as the causative agent of acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND) in shrimp. AHPND is characterized by massive sloughing of tubule epithelial cells of the hepatopancreas (HP), proposed to be induced by soluble toxins released from VPAHPND that colonize the shrimp stomach. Since these toxins (produced in broth culture) have been reported to cause AHPND pathology in reverse gavage bioassays with shrimp, we used ammonium sulfate precipitation to prepare protein fractions from broth cultures of VPAHPND isolates for screening by reverse gavage assays. The dialyzed 60% ammonium sulfate fraction caused high mortality within 24–48 hours post-administration, and histological analysis of the moribund shrimp showed typical massive sloughing of hepatopancreatic tubule epithelial cells characteristic of AHPND. Analysis of the active fraction by SDS-PAGE revealed two major bands at marker levels of approximately 16 kDa (ToxA) and 50 kDa (ToxB). Mass spectrometry analysis followed by MASCOT analysis revealed that both proteins had similarity to hypothetical proteins of V. parahaemolyticus M0605 (contig034 GenBank accession no. JALL01000066.1) and similarity to known binary insecticidal toxins called 'Photorhabdus insect related' proteins A and B (Pir-A and Pir-B), respectively, produced by the symbiotic, nematode bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens. In in vivo tests, it was shown that recombinant ToxA and ToxB were both required in a dose dependent manner to cause AHPND pathology, indicating further similarity to Pir-A and -B. A single-step PCR method was designed for detection of the ToxA gene and was validated using 104 bacterial isolates consisting of 51 VPAHPND isolates, 34 non-AHPND VP isolates and 19 other isolates of bacteria commonly found in shrimp ponds (including other species of Vibrio and Photobacterium). The results showed 100% specificity and sensitivity for detection of

  11. Characterization and PCR Detection Of Binary, Pir-Like Toxins from Vibrio parahaemolyticus Isolates that Cause Acute Hepatopancreatic Necrosis Disease (AHPND in Shrimp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratchanok Sirikharin

    Full Text Available Unique isolates of Vibrio parahaemolyticus (VPAHPND have previously been identified as the causative agent of acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND in shrimp. AHPND is characterized by massive sloughing of tubule epithelial cells of the hepatopancreas (HP, proposed to be induced by soluble toxins released from VPAHPND that colonize the shrimp stomach. Since these toxins (produced in broth culture have been reported to cause AHPND pathology in reverse gavage bioassays with shrimp, we used ammonium sulfate precipitation to prepare protein fractions from broth cultures of VPAHPND isolates for screening by reverse gavage assays. The dialyzed 60% ammonium sulfate fraction caused high mortality within 24-48 hours post-administration, and histological analysis of the moribund shrimp showed typical massive sloughing of hepatopancreatic tubule epithelial cells characteristic of AHPND. Analysis of the active fraction by SDS-PAGE revealed two major bands at marker levels of approximately 16 kDa (ToxA and 50 kDa (ToxB. Mass spectrometry analysis followed by MASCOT analysis revealed that both proteins had similarity to hypothetical proteins of V. parahaemolyticus M0605 (contig034 GenBank accession no. JALL01000066.1 and similarity to known binary insecticidal toxins called 'Photorhabdus insect related' proteins A and B (Pir-A and Pir-B, respectively, produced by the symbiotic, nematode bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens. In in vivo tests, it was shown that recombinant ToxA and ToxB were both required in a dose dependent manner to cause AHPND pathology, indicating further similarity to Pir-A and -B. A single-step PCR method was designed for detection of the ToxA gene and was validated using 104 bacterial isolates consisting of 51 VPAHPND isolates, 34 non-AHPND VP isolates and 19 other isolates of bacteria commonly found in shrimp ponds (including other species of Vibrio and Photobacterium. The results showed 100% specificity and sensitivity for

  12. Comparative endpoint sensitivity of in vitro estrogen agonist assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreier, David A; Connors, Kristin A; Brooks, Bryan W

    2015-07-01

    Environmental and human health implications of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), particularly xenoestrogens, have received extensive study. In vitro assays are increasingly employed as diagnostic tools to comparatively evaluate chemicals, whole effluent toxicity and surface water quality, and to identify causative EDCs during toxicity identification evaluations. Recently, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) initiated ToxCast under the Tox21 program to generate novel bioactivity data through high throughput screening. This information is useful for prioritizing chemicals requiring additional hazard information, including endocrine active chemicals. Though multiple in vitro and in vivo techniques have been developed to assess estrogen agonist activity, the relative endpoint sensitivity of these approaches and agreement of their conclusions remain unclear during environmental diagnostic applications. Probabilistic hazard assessment (PHA) approaches, including chemical toxicity distributions (CTD), are useful for understanding the relative sensitivity of endpoints associated with in vitro and in vivo toxicity assays by predicting the likelihood of chemicals eliciting undesirable outcomes at or above environmentally relevant concentrations. In the present study, PHAs were employed to examine the comparative endpoint sensitivity of 16 in vitro assays for estrogen agonist activity using a diverse group of compounds from the USEPA ToxCast dataset. Reporter gene assays were generally observed to possess greater endpoint sensitivity than other assay types, and the Tox21 ERa LUC BG1 Agonist assay was identified as the most sensitive in vitro endpoint for detecting an estrogenic response. When the sensitivity of this most sensitive ToxCast in vitro endpoint was compared to the human MCF-7 cell proliferation assay, a common in vitro model for biomedical and environmental monitoring applications, the ERa LUC BG1 assay was several orders of magnitude less

  13. Toxicity of proton-metal mixtures in the field: Linking stream macroinvertebrate species diversity to chemical speciation and bioavailability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stockdale, Anthony [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Lancaster Environment Centre, Library Avenue, Bailrigg, Lancaster LA1 4AP (United Kingdom); Tipping, Edward, E-mail: et@ceh.ac.uk [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Lancaster Environment Centre, Library Avenue, Bailrigg, Lancaster LA1 4AP (United Kingdom); Lofts, Stephen [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Lancaster Environment Centre, Library Avenue, Bailrigg, Lancaster LA1 4AP (United Kingdom); Ormerod, Stephen J. [Catchment Research Group, Cardiff School of Biosciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF10 3US (United Kingdom); Clements, William H. [Department of Fish, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523 (United States); Blust, Ronny [Ecophysiology, Biochemistry and Toxicology Group, Department of Biology, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium)

    2010-10-01

    Understanding metal and proton toxicity under field conditions requires consideration of the complex nature of chemicals in mixtures. Here, we demonstrate a novel method that relates streamwater concentrations of cationic metallic species and protons to a field ecological index of biodiversity. The model WHAM-F{sub TOX} postulates that cation binding sites of aquatic macroinvertebrates can be represented by the functional groups of natural organic matter (humic acid), as described by the Windermere Humic Aqueous Model (WHAM6), and supporting field evidence is presented. We define a toxicity function (F{sub TOX}) by summing the products: (amount of invertebrate-bound cation) x (cation-specific toxicity coefficient, {alpha}{sub i}). Species richness data for Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera and Trichoptera (EPT), are then described with a lower threshold of F{sub TOX}, below which all organisms are present and toxic effects are absent, and an upper threshold above which organisms are absent. Between the thresholds the number of species declines linearly with F{sub TOX}. We parameterised the model with chemistry and EPT data for low-order streamwaters affected by acid deposition and/or abandoned mines, representing a total of 412 sites across three continents. The fitting made use of quantile regression, to take into account reduced species richness caused by (unknown) factors other than cation toxicity. Parameters were derived for the four most common or abundant cations, with values of {alpha}{sub i} following the sequence (increasing toxicity) H{sup +} < Al < Zn < Cu. For waters affected mainly by H{sup +} and Al, F{sub TOX} shows a steady decline with increasing pH, crossing the lower threshold near to pH 7. Competition effects among cations mean that toxicity due to Cu and Zn is rare at lower pH values, and occurs mostly between pH 6 and 8.

  14. Regulated intramembrane proteolysis of the virulence activator TcpP in Vibrio cholerae is initiated by the tail-specific protease (Tsp).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teoh, Wei Ping; Matson, Jyl S; DiRita, Victor J

    2015-09-01

    Vibrio cholerae uses a multiprotein transcriptional regulatory cascade to control expression of virulence factors cholera toxin and toxin-co-regulated pilus. Two proteins in this cascade are ToxR and TcpP - unusual membrane-localized transcription factors with relatively undefined periplasmic domains and transcription activator cytoplasmic domains. TcpP and ToxR function with each other and two other membrane-localized proteins, TcpH and ToxS, to activate transcription of toxT, encoding the direct activator of toxin and pilus genes. Under some conditions, TcpP is degraded in a two-step proteolytic pathway known as regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP), thereby inactivating the cascade. The second step in this proteolytic pathway involves the zinc metalloprotease YaeL; V. cholerae cells lacking YaeL accumulate a truncated yet active form of TcpP termed TcpP*. We hypothesized that a protease acting prior to YaeL degrades TcpP to TcpP*, which is the substrate of YaeL. In this study, we demonstrate that a C-terminal protease called Tsp degrades TcpP to form TcpP*, which is then acted upon by YaeL. We present evidence that TcpH and Tsp serve to protect full-length TcpP from spurious proteolysis by YaeL. Cleavage by Tsp occurs in the periplasmic domain of TcpP and requires residues TcpPA172 and TcpPI174 for wild-type activity. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Evaluation of a new immunochromatography test for rapid and simultaneous detection of Clostridium difficile antigen and toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samra, Zmira; Madar-Shapiro, Liora; Aziz, Mahanez; Bishara, Jihad

    2013-07-01

    Clostridium difficile infection is considered the most common cause of nosocomial infectious diarrhea among adults in the developed world. It is responsible for virtually all cases of pseudomembranous colitis. The Tox A/B enzyme immunoassay (EIA) is the most widely used test for the detection of C. difficile toxins A and B. However, it is associated with poor sensitivity and an unacceptable high rate of false-negative results. To evaluate the performance of the C. DIFF QUIK CHEK COMPLETE assay, designed to simultaneously detect C. difficile-produced glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and toxins A and B. Using the C. DIFF QUIK CHEK COMPLETE assay, the Tox A/B EIA, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR), we tested 223 stool specimens from hospitalized patients with antibiotics-associated diarrhea. Sensitivity and specificity, and positive and negative predictive values (PPV, NPV) were calculated for the C. DIFF QUIK CHEK COMPLETE test and the Tox A/B EIA against PCR RESULTS: The C. DIFF QUIK CHEK COMPLETE test had a sensitivity of 83.5% and specificity of 94.3% compared to PCR for Tox A/B, with 93.7% correlation (PPV 98.5%, NPV 91.7%). The Tox A/B EIA yielded corresponding values of 72.1% and 93.1%, with 85.6% correlation (PPV 85.1%, NPV 85.8%). Given the importance of an early and appropriate diagnosis of Clostridium difficile-associated infection, the C. DIFF QUIK CHEK COMPLETE test may be of huge benefit to practitioners.

  16. Discovery of peptide ligands through docking and virtual screening at nicotinic acetylcholine receptor homology models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leffler, Abba E; Kuryatov, Alexander; Zebroski, Henry A; Powell, Susan R; Filipenko, Petr; Hussein, Adel K; Gorson, Juliette; Heizmann, Anna; Lyskov, Sergey; Tsien, Richard W; Poget, Sébastien F; Nicke, Annette; Lindstrom, Jon; Rudy, Bernardo; Bonneau, Richard; Holford, Mandë

    2017-09-19

    Venom peptide toxins such as conotoxins play a critical role in the characterization of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) structure and function and have potential as nervous system therapeutics as well. However, the lack of solved structures of conotoxins bound to nAChRs and the large size of these peptides are barriers to their computational docking and design. We addressed these challenges in the context of the α4β2 nAChR, a widespread ligand-gated ion channel in the brain and a target for nicotine addiction therapy, and the 19-residue conotoxin α-GID that antagonizes it. We developed a docking algorithm, ToxDock, which used ensemble-docking and extensive conformational sampling to dock α-GID and its analogs to an α4β2 nAChR homology model. Experimental testing demonstrated that a virtual screen with ToxDock correctly identified three bioactive α-GID mutants (α-GID[A10V], α-GID[V13I], and α-GID[V13Y]) and one inactive variant (α-GID[A10Q]). Two mutants, α-GID[A10V] and α-GID[V13Y], had substantially reduced potency at the human α7 nAChR relative to α-GID, a desirable feature for α-GID analogs. The general usefulness of the docking algorithm was highlighted by redocking of peptide toxins to two ion channels and a binding protein in which the peptide toxins successfully reverted back to near-native crystallographic poses after being perturbed. Our results demonstrate that ToxDock can overcome two fundamental challenges of docking large toxin peptides to ion channel homology models, as exemplified by the α-GID:α4β2 nAChR complex, and is extendable to other toxin peptides and ion channels. ToxDock is freely available at rosie.rosettacommons.org/tox_dock.

  17. Meningococcal disease: changes in epidemiology and prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Q

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Qiuzhi Chang,1 Yih-Ling Tzeng,2 David S Stephens1–31Department of Epidemiology, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, 2Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, 3Laboratories of Microbial Pathogenesis, Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Atlanta, GAAbstract: The human bacterial pathogen Neisseria meningitidis remains a serious worldwide health threat, but progress is being made toward the control of meningococcal infections. This review summarizes current knowledge of the global epidemiology and the pathophysiology of meningococcal disease, as well as recent advances in prevention by new vaccines. Meningococcal disease patterns and incidence can vary dramatically, both geographically and over time in populations, influenced by differences in invasive meningococcal capsular serogroups and specific genotypes designated as ST clonal complexes. Serogroup A (ST-5, ST-7, B (ST-41/44, ST-32, ST-18, ST-269, ST-8, ST-35, C (ST-11, Y (ST-23, ST-167, W-135 (ST-11 and X (ST-181 meningococci currently cause almost all invasive disease. Serogroups B, C, and Y are responsible for the majority of cases in Europe, the Americas, and Oceania; serogroup A has been associated with the highest incidence (up to 1000 per 100,000 cases and large outbreaks of meningococcal disease in sub-Saharan Africa and previously Asia; and serogroups W-135 and X have emerged to cause major disease outbreaks in sub-Saharan Africa. Significant declines in meningococcal disease have occurred in the last decade in many developed countries. In part, the decline is related to the introduction of new meningococcal vaccines. Serogroup C polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccines were introduced over a decade ago, first in the UK in a mass vaccination campaign, and are now widely used; multivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccines containing serogroups A, C, W-135, and/or Y were first used for adolescents in the US in 2005 and have now expanded

  18. Serum screening of TORCH infection in 1358 pregnant women in Mianyang city%绵阳地区1358例孕妇TORCH感染的血清学筛查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭碧; 陈勇; 曾白华

    2013-01-01

    Objective To understand the situation of TORCH infection in pregnant women in Mianyang city. Methods TORCH IgM and IgG were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in the serum of 1 358 pregnant women. Results The positive rates of TORCH (TOX, RV, CMV, HSV Ⅰ and Ⅱ) IgM antibody infection were 0.15%, 1.18%, 0.37%, 0.44%, 0.22%, respectively, and those of TORCH IgG antibody infection were 6.12%, 63.99%, 94.70%, 92.49%, 17.82%, respectively. Four kinds of screening results were found: IgG (+) IgM (-): 83 cases of TOX, 869 cases of RV, 1 286 cases of CMV, 1 256 cases of HSV Ⅰ, 242 cases of HSV Ⅱ; IgG (-) IgM (+): one case of TOX, 7 cases of RV, 3 cases of CMV, 5 cases of HSV Ⅰ,3 cases of HSV Ⅱ; IgG (+) IgM (+): One case of TOX, 9 cases of RV, 2 cases of CMV, one cases of HSV Ⅰ, 0 case of HSV Ⅱ; IgG (-) IgM (-):1 273 cases of TOX, 473 cases of RV, 67 cases of CMV, 96 cases of HSV Ⅰ,1 113 cases of HSV Ⅱ. Conclusion TORCH IgM and TORCH IgG tests before pregnancy and during pregnancy can help understand the condition of TORCH infection, and provide basis for taking measures, which is very meaningful to prenatal and postnatal care.%目的 了解绵阳地区妊娠妇女TORCH感染的情况.方法 采用酶联免疫吸附试验(ELISA)对1358例孕妇血清同时进行TORCH的IgM和IgG检测.结果 孕妇TORCH(TOX、RV、CMV、HSV Ⅰ和HSV Ⅱ)IgM抗体感染的阳性率分别为0.15%、1.18%、0.37%、0.44%、0.22%; TORCH-IgG抗体感染的阳性率分别为6.12%、63.99%、94.70%、92.49%、17.82%.TORCH相关抗体检查4种筛查结果:lgG (+)IgM(-):TOX 83例,RV869例,CMV 1 286例,HSV Ⅰ 1 256例,HSV Ⅱ242例;IgG (-)IgM(+):TOX 1例,RV7例,CMV 3例,HSV Ⅰ 5例,HSV Ⅱ3例;IgG(+)IgM(+):TOX 1例,RV9例,CMV2例,HSV Ⅰ 1例,HSV Ⅱ0例;IgG (-)IgM(-):TOX 1 273例,RV 473例,CMV67例,HSV Ⅰ 96例,HSV Ⅱ1 113例.结论 孕前或孕期妇女同时进行TORCH-IgM/IgG检测,可及时了解孕妇TORCH感染阶段,尽早

  19. 光伏并网式家用空调系统性能的实验研究%Experimental Investigation on the Performance of Household Air Conditioning System with Grid-connected Photovoltaic Generation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金听祥; 徐笑锋

    2015-01-01

    With the base of traditional air conditioning system, the grid-connected photovoltaic household air conditioning sys-tem based on the solar photovoltaic power generation technology is designed in this paper. The power with the solar photovoltaic power generation technology is transformed into the household power of 220 V and 50 Hz by inverter. The household air condi-tioning system is then driven by the transformed power and national grid. The performance of the photovoltaic grid-connected household air conditioning system was tested by Enthalpy Difference Lab under the different power ( 100 W, 135 W and 185 W) of solar panels. The experimental results show that under normal cooling conditions, the average power consumption of the air conditioning system with the different power (100 W, 135 W and 185 W) of solar panels are 52 W, 78 W and 104 W lower than that of the traditional air conditioning system respectively. Similarly, energy efficiency ratios of the air conditioning system with the different power (100 W, 135 W and 185 W) of solar panels are 4. 2%, 5. 5% and 10. 2% lower than that of the tra-ditional air conditioning system respectively. Under heating mode, the average power consumption of the air conditioning system with the different power (100 W, 135 W and 185 W) of solar panels are 68 W, 84 W and 116 W lower than that of the tradi-tional air conditioning system, and the coefficients of performances are 6. 4%, 8% and 11% lower than that of the traditional air conditioning system. It can be concluded that the photovoltaic grid-connected household air conditioning system is feasible.%针对目前的家用空调系统,本文设计了一种以太阳能光伏发电技术为基础,与国家电网并网,共同驱动空调工作的系统,称为光伏并网式家用空调系统。利用光伏发电技术,通过逆变器将太阳能提供的电力转变为220 V、50 Hz家用电源,实现与市电电网的并网,来共同驱动空调运行。利用焓差实验室,

  20. Laboratory Analysis and PFGE Typing of the Neisseria Meningitidis Strains Isolated from the First Serogruop C Neisseria Meningitidis Death Case and her Close Contacts in Zhangjiajie City%张家界市首例C群流脑死亡病例及其密接人群中分离的脑膜炎奈瑟菌实验室分析和PFGE分型

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田晓辉; 夏昕; 王敏; 戴德芳

    2012-01-01

    目的 了解张家界市首例C群流脑死亡病例及其密切接触人群中分离到的11株脑膜炎奈瑟菌的病原学特征及其流行关系. 方法 经培养及生化鉴定后,对菌株进行血清学及聚合酶链反应(PCR)鉴定分群,最后采用最低抑菌浓度(MIC)琼脂稀释法进行药敏试验;脉冲场凝胶电泳对菌株进行PFGE分型分析. 结果 通过生化、血清学和PCR实验共鉴定到9株C群脑膜炎奈瑟菌和2株W135群脑膜炎奈瑟菌,药敏试验中所有菌株对青霉素、氨苄西林、米诺环素、头孢曲松、头孢噻肟、氯霉素、阿奇霉素、美罗培南和利福平全部敏感;对复方磺胺甲噁唑全部耐药;对环丙沙星和左氧氟沙星部分耐药,PFGE结果显示11株菌株共分为两个带型,其中9株C群脑膜炎奈瑟菌菌株带型完全相同. 结论 C群和W135群可能成为新的流脑流行群引起疾病,分离的菌株对大部分抗生素仍较敏感,但要注意耐药趋势,造成该病例死亡的病原菌为C群脑膜炎奈瑟菌,与其密接同学中分离到的C群脑膜炎奈瑟菌的PFGE分型呈现高度一致性,提示为同一克隆群.%Objective To explore the pathogenic characteristics and the epidemic associations of the 11 Neisseria meningitidis strains isolated from the first serogroup C Neisseria meningitidis death case and her close contacts in Zhangjiajie City. Methods After culture and biochemical identification, the Neisseria meningitidis strains isolated were identified and clustered by serological and PCR tests. Drug sensitivity was tested for minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) by agar dilution method. Molecular typing was performed by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Results Nine serogroup C strains and two serogroup W135 strains were identified by biochemical, serological and PCR tests. All of the 11 strains were sensitive to penicillin, ampicillin, minocycline, ceftriaxone, cefotaxime, chloramphenicol, azithromycin, meropenem

  1. Imunidade conferida por vacinas anti-meningocócicas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milagres Lucimar Gonçalves

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Em razão da recente epidemia de doença meningocócica causada por N. meningitidis B na Grande São Paulo, Brasil, foi feita revisão das epidemias dessa doença ocorridas no Brasil desde o início do século e uma análise das vacinas atuais contra N. meningitidis A, C, Y e W135. Também são discutidos os mais recentes avanços no desenvolvimento e aplicação de vacina contra M meningitidis B, um desafio constante para os maiores centros de pesquisa de todo o mundo.

  2. Imunidade conferida por vacinas anti-meningocócicas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucimar Gonçalves Milagres

    1993-06-01

    Full Text Available Em razão da recente epidemia de doença meningocócica causada por N. meningitidis B na Grande São Paulo, Brasil, foi feita revisão das epidemias dessa doença ocorridas no Brasil desde o início do século e uma análise das vacinas atuais contra N. meningitidis A, C, Y e W135. Também são discutidos os mais recentes avanços no desenvolvimento e aplicação de vacina contra M meningitidis B, um desafio constante para os maiores centros de pesquisa de todo o mundo.

  3. Use of MenACWY-CRM in adolescents in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Steven; Block, Stan L

    2013-03-01

    Adolescents constitute a high-risk group for invasive meningococcal disease. MenACWY-CRM (Menveo, Novartis Vaccines, Cambridge, MA) is a quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine indicated to prevent invasive meningococcal disease caused by Neisseria meningitidis serogroups A, C, W-135, and Y. It has been approved for use in persons age 2-55 years. The tolerability and immunogenicity of MenACWY-CRM in adolescents have been ascertained in phase 2 and 3 trials against MPSV4 (Menomune, sanofi pasteur, Swiftwater, PA), an unconjugated quadrivalent meningococcal vaccine, and MenACWY-D (Menactra, sanofi pasteur), another conjugated quadrivalent meningococcal vaccine. Clinical trials also have demonstrated that MenACWY-CRM is well tolerated and immunogenic when administered to adolescents concomitantly with the combined tetanus, diphtheria, and acellular pertussis vaccine (Boostrix, GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals, Rixensart, Belgium) and the quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine (Gardasil, Merck & Co., Inc., Whitehouse Station, NJ).

  4. Polymorphism of nadA gene of Neisseria meningitidis in China%中国脑膜炎奈瑟菌nadA基因多态性分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙晓芳; 杨郝亮; 周海健; 朱兵清; 徐丽; 高源; 邵祝军

    2012-01-01

    目的 了解我国脑膜炎奈瑟菌(Neisseria meningitidis,Nm)主要黏附蛋白(Neisseria adhesion A,NadA)编码基因nadA的多态性特征,以期研究我国主要流行Nm菌株NadA蛋白的流行病学意义及NadA蛋白作为脑膜炎球菌蛋白疫苗候选蛋白研发的可行性.方法 选取我国26个省(市、自治区)1963-2012年间不同血清群代表性Nm菌株230株,采用多位点序列分型(muliti-locus sequence typing,MLST)、PCR、斑点杂交、基因测序等方法,检测Nm菌株基因型特征、nadA基因分布的多态性及其基因序列特征,利用BioEdit、Mega 4.0等软件对nadA基因序列进行比对分析.结果 我国230株不同血清群的Nm菌株中,nadA+菌株55株,仅存在于ST-5complex(序列群)的A群和ST-11complex的W135群Nm菌株中,B、C及其他血清群Nm菌株nadA-.nadA+菌株基因型以variant 3(V3)型为主(54/55),包括5种亚型(NadA V3.1~3.5),同源性高达99%以上.结论 我国Nm菌株中,仅ST-5complex的A群和ST-11complex的W135群菌株存在NadA黏附蛋白,型别以variant 3型为主.B群菌株不含有NadA蛋白,variant 3型NadA蛋白不适合作为我国B群Nm(B meningococci,MenB)蛋白疫苗的候选蛋白.%Objective To understand the polymorphism of nadA gene of Neisseria meningitidis isolates in China, investigate the epidemiological significance of NadA protein of major N. meningitidis strains circulated in China and explore the feasibility of developing NadA protein based N. meningitidis vaccine. Methods Totally 230 N. meningitidis strains isolated in 26 provinces from 1963 to 2012 were analyzed by using muliti locus sequence typing(MLST), PCR, dot blotting assay and gene sequencing. The sequences of nadA genes were aligned by using BioEdit and Mega 4. 0 software. Results Of the 230 N. meningitidis strains, only 55 were nadA positive. All the nadA positive N. meningitidis strains belonged to serogroup A ( ST-5 complex) and serogroup W135 ( ST-11 complex). No nadA positive strains

  5. Construction of aptamer-based surface plasma resonance biosensor microarray for the rapid detection of toxoplasma godii and cytomegalovirus IgG antibodies%快速检测TOX、CMV IgG抗体的适配子型SPR传感器微阵列的初步构建

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘星; 秦莲花; 罗阳; 苗杰; 王丰; 黄庆; 黄君富; 胡忠义; 府伟灵

    2012-01-01

    Objective To construct the aptamer-based surface plasma resonance ( SPR) microarray for rapid assay of toxoplasma gondii (TOX) and cytomegalovirus (CMV) IgG antibodies. Methods Aptamers of the TOX gondii and CMV IgG antibodies were screened with the SELEX technique and integrated into the real-time online analyzing system on the SPR biosensor. Hybridization of TOX and CMV IgG antibodies in solution was detected according to the probe molecules fixed on the surface of biosensor. The stability and linear detection range of this assay were further investigated. Results The novel rapid method could assay the TOX and CMV IgG antibodies with a good stability and a linear assay range of 20 to 300 μmol/L. Conclusion The stability of the rapid assay we established is good. Combined SPR biosensor and aptamer techniques have a broad prospect in clinical assay of TOX and CMV IgG antibody level.%目的 初步构建弓形虫(toxoplas ma gondii,TOX)、巨细胞病毒(cytomegalovirus,CMV)IgG抗体的适配子型SPR传感器微阵列的快速检测方法.方法 采用SELEX技术筛选TOX、CMV IgG的适配子,并将其整合于SPR生物传感器实时在线分析系统,通过在传感器表面固定探针分子,对溶液中的TOX、CMV IgG进行杂交检测,并进一步研究该检测方法的稳定性与线性检范围.结果 该新型快速检测方法能够实现对TOX、CMV IgG的实时检测,检测系统稳定性良好,八通道间检测时互不影响,线性检测范围为20~300 μmol/L.结论 该实验建立的快速检测方法,具有稳定性好等优点,SPR传感器技术结合适配子技术在临床诊断工作中有着广阔的应用前景.

  6. Investigation of TORCH infection in women of chi1d-bearing age in Hangzhou%杭州地区育龄妇女TORCH感染调查分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程玉兰

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the prevalence of TORCH infection in Hangzhou area. Methods 4798 women of chi1d-bearing age were tested for antibodies with ELISA. Results TOX-IgM、RV-IgM、CMV-IgM、HSV-I-IgM and HSV-II–IgM positive rates were 0.69%、1.06%、0.54%、0.6% and 0.23% respectively;TOX-IgG、RV-IgG、HSV-Ⅰ- IgG and HSV-Ⅱ-IgG positive rates were 2.38%、73.9%、10.3% and 6.29% .TOX infection was more likely happened in winter, with positive rate of 1.26%;CMV,HSV-I, HSV-II infection had no obvious seasonal difference.Age played no influence on Torch infection,too. Conclusion Season and age had no significant effect on TORCH infection, but it is important to prevent TOX infection in winter. TORCH infection in women of childbearing age should be detected and prevented to improve reproductive quality.%  目的了解杭州地区育龄妇女TORCH感染情况及其流行特点.方法应用ELISA技术检测4798例育龄妇女血清中TORCH特异性抗体.结果 TOX-IgM、RV-IgM、CMV-IgM、HSV-Ⅰ-IgM及HSV-Ⅱ-IgM的阳性率分别为0.69%、1.06%、0.54%、0.6%及0.23%;TOX-IgG、RV-IgG、HSV-Ⅰ- IgG及HSV-Ⅱ- IgG的阳性率分别为2.38%、73.9%、10.3%及6.29%.TORCH感染者中,TOX冬季高发,阳性率为1.26%;CMV,HSV-Ⅰ,HSV-Ⅱ感染率没有明显季节差异.TORCH感染率没有年龄段差异.结论季节和年龄对TORCH感染影响不明显,但是冬季对于预防TOX感染有重要意义.育龄妇女应进行TORCH感染的检测和预防,以提高生育质量.

  7. Australian Meningococcal Surveillance Programme annual report, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahra, Monica M; Enriquez, Rodney P

    2014-12-31

    In 2013, there were 143 laboratory-confirmed cases of invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) analysed by the Australian National Neisseria Network (NNN). This was the lowest number of laboratory confirmed IMD cases referred to the NNN since the inception of the Australian Meningococcal Surveillance Programme in 1994. Probable and laboratory confirmed IMD is notifiable in Australia. There were 149 IMD cases notified to the National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System in 2013. Meningococcal serogrouping was determined for 139/143 laboratory confirmed IMD cases; 74.8% (104 cases) were serogroup B infections; 5.8% (8 cases) were serogroup C infections; 8.6% (12 cases) were serogroup W135; and 10.8% (15 cases) were serogroup Y. Primary and secondary disease peaks were observed, respectively, in those aged 4 years or less, and in adolescents (15-19 years). Serogroup B cases predominated in all jurisdictions and age groups, except for those aged 65 years or over where serogroup Y predominated. The overall proportion and number of IMD caused by serogroup B decreased from previous years. The number of cases of IMD caused by serogroup C was low, and has been proportionally stable over recent years. The number of IMD cases caused by W135 and Y serogroups was similar to previous years but the proportion has increased with the overall reduction in numbers of IMD cases. Molecular typing was performed on 92 of the 93 IMD isolates, and 23 of the 50 cases confirmed by nucleic acid amplification testing. In 2013, the most common porA genotype circulating in Australia was P1.7-2,4. All IMD isolates tested were susceptible to ceftriaxone; ciprofloxacin and rifampicin. Decreased susceptibility to penicillin was observed in 78.5% of isolates.

  8. Molecular Characterization of Invasive Meningococcal Isolates from Countries in the African Meningitis Belt before Introduction of a Serogroup A Conjugate Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caugant, Dominique A.; Kristiansen, Paul A.; Wang, Xin; Mayer, Leonard W.; Taha, Muhamed-Kheir; Ouédraogo, Rasmata; Kandolo, Denis; Bougoudogo, Flabou; Sow, Samba; Bonte, Laurence

    2012-01-01

    Background The serogroup A conjugate meningococcal vaccine, MenAfriVac, was introduced in mass vaccination campaigns in December 2010 in Burkina Faso, Mali and Niger. In the coming years, vaccination will be extended to other African countries at risk of epidemics. To document the molecular characteristics of disease-causing meningococcal strains circulating in the meningitis belt of Africa before vaccine introduction, the World Health Organization Collaborating Centers on Meningococci in Europe and United States established a common strain collection of 773 isolates from cases of invasive meningococcal disease collected between 2004 and 2010 from 13 sub-Saharan countries. Methodology All isolates were characterized by multilocus sequence typing, and 487 (62%) were also analyzed for genetic variation in the surface antigens PorA and FetA. Antibiotic susceptibility was tested for part of the collection. Principal Findings Only 19 sequence types (STs) belonging to 6 clonal complexes were revealed. ST-5 clonal complex dominated with 578 (74.8%) isolates. All ST-5 complex isolates were remarkably homogeneous in their PorA (P1.20,9) and FetA (F3-1) and characterized the serogroup A strains which have been responsible for most epidemics during this time period. Sixty-eight (8.8%) of the 773 isolates belonged to the ST-11 clonal complex which was mainly represented by serogroup W135, while an additional 38 (4.9%) W135 isolates belonged to the ST-175 complex. Forty-eight (6.2%) serogroup X isolates from West Africa belonged to the ST-181 complex, while serogroup X cases in Kenya and Uganda were caused by an unrelated clone, ST-5403. Serogroup X, ST-181, emerged in Burkina Faso before vaccine introduction. Conclusions In the seven years preceding introduction of a new serogroup A conjugate vaccine, serogroup A of the ST-5 clonal complex was identified as the predominant disease-causing strain. PMID:23029368

  9. Antibody persistence and immune memory 15 months after priming with an investigational tetravalent meningococcal tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine (MenACWY-TT) in toddlers and young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knuf, Markus; Baine, Yaela; Bianco, Veronique; Boutriau, Dominique; Miller, Jacqueline M

    2012-07-01

    The present extension study, conducted in children originally vaccinated at 12-14 mo or 3-5 y of age, assessed antibody persistence and immune memory induced by an investigational tetravalent meningococcal serogroups A, C, W-135 and Y tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine (MenACWY-TT). In the original study, participants were randomized to receive one dose of MenACWY-TT or licensed age-appropriate meningococcal control vaccines. Fifteen months post-vaccination, all participants underwent serum sampling to evaluate antibody persistence and participants previously vaccinated as toddlers received a polysaccharide challenge to assess immune memory development. Exploratory comparisons showed that (1) All children and ≥ 92.3% of the toddlers maintained serum bactericidal (rSBA) titers ≥ 1:8 at 15 mo post MenACWY-TT vaccination; statistically significantly higher rSBA geometric mean titers (GMTs) were observed compared with control vaccines. (2) At one month after polysaccharide challenge, all toddlers primed with MenACWY-TT or with the monovalent serogroup C conjugate vaccine had rSBA titers ≥ 1:8 and ≥ 1:128 for serogroup C and similar rSBA-GMTs; rSBA-GMTs for serogroups A, W-135 and Y were statistically significantly higher in toddlers primed with MenACWY-TT compared with the control vaccine. Thus, a single dose of MenACWY-TT induced persisting antibodies in toddlers and children and immune memory in toddlers. This study has been registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov NCT00126984.

  10. Trends and variations in the epidemiology of meningococcal disease in Kuwait 1987-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husain, Entesar H; Barakat, Mohammad; Al-Saleh, Mosaab

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) conjugate vaccine and conjugate pneumococcal vaccine into routine childhood vaccination in Kuwait has resulted in the emergence of Neisseria meningitidis as the leading cause of invasive bacterial infection in children. Currently, a quadrivalent ACYW-135 meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine is administered as part of routine childhood vaccination in Kuwait at the age of 2 years. Conjugate meningococcal vaccines have been shown to be more effective in preventing meningococcal infection in young children. The objective of this study was to describe the epidemiology of meningococcal disease (MD) in Kuwait and evaluate the need for conjugate vaccine in routine childhood immunization. We have reviewed the MD surveillance data from the communicable disease unit, Ministry of Health, Kuwait during the period from 1987 to 2013. The analysis included microbiologically confirmed cases of N. meningitidis in the blood and cerebrospinal fluid. There were 293 cases of confirmed MD during the study period. Two hundred and four cases (70%) were in children ≤ 14 years of age. The mean incidence rate was 0.5/100,000 persons. The dominant serogroups were W-135 and B, accounting for 80 cases (32%) each. Serogroup B accounted for 69/204 (34%) of all cases in children ≤ 14 years and serogroup A accounted for 36/89 40% of all adult cases. There were three outbreaks: 1987 (caused by serogroup A), 1989 (caused by serogroup W-135) and 2002 (caused by serogroup B). The mean case fatality rate was 13.5%. In conclusion, despite childhood routine vaccination with ACYW-135 polysaccharide vaccine, infants and young children remain at high risk for MD, which supports the introduction of conjugate meningococcal vaccine to the routine childhood vaccination schedule.

  11. Highly Efficient Labeling of Human Lung Cancer Cells Using Cationic Poly-L-lysine-Assisted Magnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xueqin Wang; Huiru Zhang; Hongjuan Jing; Liuqing Cui

    2015-01-01

    Cell labeling with magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) is increasingly a routine approach in the cell-based cancer treatment. However, cell labeling with magnetic IONPs and their leading effects on the biological properties of human lung carcinoma cells remain scarcely reported. Therefore, in the present study the magnetic c-Fe2O3 nanoparticles (MNPs) were firstly synthesized and surface-modified with cationic poly-L-lysine (PLL) to construct the PLL-MNPs, which were then used to magnetically label human A549 lung cancer cells. Cell viability and proliferation were evaluated with propidium iodide/fluorescein diacetate double staining and standard 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-diphe-nyl-tetrazolium) bromide assay, and the cytoskeleton was immunocytochemically stained. The cell cycle of the PLL-MNP-labeled A549 lung cancer cells was analyzed using flow cytometry. Apoptotic cells were fluorescently analyzed with nuclear-specific staining after the PLL-MNP labeling. The results showed that the constructed PLL-MNPs efficiently magnetically labeled A549 lung cancer cells and that, at low concentrations, labeling did not affect cellular viability, proliferation capability, cell cycle, and apoptosis. Furthermore, the cytoskeleton in the treated cells was detected intact in comparison with the untreated counterparts. However, the results also showed that at high concentration (400 lg mL-1), the PLL-MNPs would slightly impair cell viability, proliferation, cell cycle, and apoptosis and disrupt the cytoskeleton in the treated A549 lung cancer cells. Therefore, the present results indicated that the PLL-MNPs at adequate concentrations can be efficiently used for labeling A549 lung cancer cells and could be considered as a feasible approach for magnetic targeted anti-cancer drug/gene delivery, targeted diagnosis, and therapy in lung cancer treatment.

  12. Magnetic field dependence of spin-lattice relaxation in three iron group salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ablart, G.; Pescia, J.

    1980-08-01

    An extension is proposed to the iron group of the Orbach-Huang theory outlined for the relaxation field dependence in rare-earth salts. The general equation T-11=T-110(H2+12μ'H2dip+μH2n)(H2+12H2dip+H2n) remains valid, but new expressions are given for μ' and T-110 (if exchange predominates μ'1 and Hexch replace μ' and Hdip). They are used to compute the coefficients in three salts selected as permitting calculation in CrK alum, CuK double sulfate, and FeK alum. The internal field is typically dipolar in the first and the third while it is due to exchange in the second; furthermore, the third ion is in a S state. The parameters at 77 K have also been measured at frequencies of 0.2, 0.7, 4 and from 8.2 to 12.4 GHz by the resonant modulation method, investigating the field dependence of T1. The agreement between theory and experiment is good in iron alum, in spite of complex calculations in this salt. It is excellent in copper double sulfate and rather moderate in chromium alum. There is a careful discussion of all the assumptions used in computation. To determine T10, the temperature dependence of T1 has also been measured, T ranging from 50 to 150 K. Calculation and experiment are in good agreement, adopting for the upper limit of the I8 Van Vleck integral a value close to the Debye temperature in chromium alum, but higher by a factor 1.6 in copper double sulfate and 2 in iron alum.

  13. Genotypes associated with virulence in environmental isolates of O1/O139 Vibrio cholerae in Guangdong province%广东省外环境O1/O139群霍乱弧菌毒力基因分型

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李柏生; 谭海玲; 邓小玲; 柯碧霞; 陈经雕; 刘美真; 何冬梅; 柯昌文

    2012-01-01

    目的 分析广东省外环境来源O1/O139群霍乱弧菌毒力基因的携带及基因分型特征,为霍乱防控提供依据.方法 选取2008 -2009年广东省O1/O139群霍乱弧菌水体分离株69株,水产品分离株16株和同期病例分离株5株,应用多重聚合酶链反应对ctxA、ace、zot、tcpA、tcpl、hlyA、ompU、toxR等8种毒力基因进行检测和分型分析.结果 90株O1/O139群霍乱弧菌均携带hlyA和toxR基因;5株病例菌株中有3株携带8种毒力基因,另外2株小川型菌株为非产毒株,基因型为hlyA+ toxR+ ompU+ zot+ tcpA+ tcpl+型和hlyA+ toxR+ tcpA+型;水体菌株中,稻叶型菌株以hlyA+ toxR+ ompU+ ace+ zot+ tcpl+型(34.15%)为主,小川型(66.67%)和O139群(70%)以hlyA+ toxR+型为主;水产品菌株中,稻叶型菌株以hlyA+ toxR+ ompU+ tcpl+型(75.00%)为主,小川型菌株各种基因型别均有分布,无明显优势基因型别.结论 广东省外环境来源O1/O139群霍乱弧菌以非产毒株广泛存在,毒力基因型别多样.%Objective To analyze the virulence genes and genotyping characteristics of environmental O1/O139 Vibrio cholerae{ V. cholerae) in Guangdong province and to provide the basis for the prevention and control of cholera. Methods Eight pairs of primers were designed according to ctxA,ace,zot,tcpA ,tcpl,hlyA ,ompU,and toxR. The multiplex PCR(MPCR) was established to detect 90 V. cholerae O1/O139 strains isolated between 2008 and 2009(69 aquatic strains, 16 sea food strains and 5 clinical strains). Genotypes associated with the virulence were determined then according to the result of the MPCR. Results The hlyA and toxR genes were positive in all the isolates. Three of five clinical isolates were detected for eight virulence genes and the other two isolates displayed the genotype of virulence with taxR+ ,ompU+ ,zot+ ,tcpA+ ,tcpl+ ,hlyA+ toxR+ ,and tcpA+. For the aquatic isolates, 14 Inaba strains(34. 15% ,14/41) were hlyA+ ,toxR+ ,ompU+ ,ace+ ,zot+ ,tcpI+ .while

  14. Delivery, Effect on Cell Viability, and Plasticity of Modified Aptamer Constructs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gissberg, Olof; Zaghloul, Eman M; Lundin, Karin E

    2016-01-01

    AS1411 is a g-quadruplex-forming aptamer capable of selectively entering cancer cells by nucleolin receptor-mediated uptake. In this study, we investigated the cell internalization properties and plasticity of AS1411 carrying different locked nucleic acid-containing cargo oligonucleotides (ONs......) for delivery into A549 and U2OS cells. We found that internalization efficiency is highly governed by ON cargo chemistry and composition since the inherent antitumor properties of AS1411 were lost when attached to a nontoxic ON, noTox. However, a toxic ON, Tox, demonstrated potent cytotoxicity after aptamer...... insights to the design and future applications of aptamer-guided delivery of ON cargo to cancer cells....

  15. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U01604-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1-12B16 in ... 46 0.032 3 ( AC138988 ) Homo sapiens chromosome 5 clone RP13-661B12, WORK... 48 0.035 3 ( ES451289 ) 26259 Myzus... persicae 2001-12 (red), Fenton Myzus ... 46 0.036 2 ( AL84450... Citrus Aphid Tox... 46 0.037 2 ( CN583285 ) USDA-FP_126349 Acyrthosiphon pisum, Pea Aphid Acy... 46 0.037 2 ( ES449828 ) 24797 Myzus... persicae 2001-12 (red), Fenton Myzus ... 46 0.037 2 ( AF069101 ) Uroleucon astrono...hid Tox... 46 0.051 2 ( ES450943 ) 25913 Myzus persicae 2001-12 (red), Fenton Myzus ... 46 0.051 2 ( CB93621

  16. Hepatotoxicity by Drugs: The Most Common Implicated Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Einar S. Björnsson

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury (DILI is an underreported and underestimated adverse drug reaction. Information on the documented hepatotoxicity of drugs has recently been made available by a website that can be accessed in the public domain: LiverTox (http://livertox.nlm.nih.gov. According to critical analysis of the hepatotoxicity of drugs in LiverTox, 53% of drugs had at least one case report of convincing reports of liver injury. Only 48 drugs had more than 50 case reports of DILI. Amoxicillin-clavulanate is the most commonly implicated agent leading to DILI in the prospective series. In a recent prospective study, liver injury due to amoxicillin-clavulanate was found to occur in approximately one out of 2300 users. Drugs with the highest risk of DILI in this study were azathioprine and infliximab.

  17. Effect of Grain Size on the Threshold Voltage for Double-Gate Polycrystaline Silicon MOSFET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alka Panwar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of grain size (D on the threshold voltage (Vth for double gate polycrystalline silicon MOSFET is investigated theoretically in terms of grain boundary trap states (NT. It is found that the threshold voltage (Vth increases non-linearly with increasing silicon-oxide thickness (tox for all values of grain size (D. However the threshold voltage is seen to have smaller values for same tox for the larger grains. This may be attributed to the reduction in the number of trap states in the depletion regions on either side of a grain boundary. Finally the dependence of threshold voltage (Vth on various parameters such as the doping concentration, interface trap state density and field penetration from drain to source are explored out. The results of these findings are in good agreement with those available in the literature. For large grain poly silicon MOSFET the threshold voltage is seen to approach the single crystal value.

  18. 疑似弓形虫、巨细胞病毒及风疹病毒感染患儿的血清学分析%Serdogical analysis on suspicious infection with toxoplasmosis, cytomegalovirus and rubella virus in 1 164children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴俊琪; 王苏华; 童爱飞; 郑昭璟; 徐瑞龙

    2010-01-01

    @@ 在小儿感染性疾病中,弓形虫(toxoplasmosis,TOX)、巨细胞病毒(cytomegalovirus,CMV)和风疹病毒(rubellavirus,RV)是重要的致畸病原体.这些病原体感染后的早期症状和体征相似,易误诊、误治,引起患儿多器官、多系统损害[1-2].因此,TOX、CMV和RV感染的早期诊断和治疗对疾病的预后极为重要.本文对浙江省金华市中心医院收治的1 164例疑似患儿进行TOX-IgM、CMV-IgM和RV-IgM血清学检测,并对临床表现进行分析.

  19. SYNTHESIS, STRUCTURE AND PROPERTIES OF INTERPENETRATING SULFONIC ACID RESINS WITH HIGH CAPACITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Hede; LI Guoming

    1989-01-01

    Two series of interpenetrating sulfonic acid resins (ISAR), 10 × n and n × 10 ,were prepared by means of the wet method, and the physicochemical, thermodynamic and kinetic properties of the ISAR were measured . The results show: 10 × n resins exhibit better properties than n × 10 ones ,mainly in higher apparent degree of crosslinking and larger conformational entropy effect, among which , 10 × 1 resin exhibits the best thermodynamic and kinetic properties. In the DTA graphs of n × 10 resins, there are two Tg and two Tox, but in those of 10 × n, only one Tg and one Tox . This result well supports the conclusion that 10 × n resins have much better interpenetrating structural aspects.

  20. Hepatotoxicity by Drugs: The Most Common Implicated Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björnsson, Einar S

    2016-02-06

    Idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is an underreported and underestimated adverse drug reaction. Information on the documented hepatotoxicity of drugs has recently been made available by a website that can be accessed in the public domain: LiverTox (http://livertox.nlm.nih.gov). According to critical analysis of the hepatotoxicity of drugs in LiverTox, 53% of drugs had at least one case report of convincing reports of liver injury. Only 48 drugs had more than 50 case reports of DILI. Amoxicillin-clavulanate is the most commonly implicated agent leading to DILI in the prospective series. In a recent prospective study, liver injury due to amoxicillin-clavulanate was found to occur in approximately one out of 2300 users. Drugs with the highest risk of DILI in this study were azathioprine and infliximab.

  1. Serologic and molecular characterization of Vibrio parahaemolyticus strains isolated from seawater and fish products of the Gulf of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera-García, María Eugenia; Vázquez-Salinas, Carlos; Quiñones-Ramírez, Elsa Irma

    2004-11-01

    The thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH) and TDH-related hemolysin (TRH) are the main virulence factors of Vibrio parahaemolyticus. We isolated V. parahaemolyticus from seawater, fish, and oysters obtained from the Pueblo Viejo Lagoon in Veracruz, determined the serogroups, phenotypically and genotypically characterized TDH and TRH, and investigated the presence of the toxR gene. A total of 46 V. parahaemolyticus strains were isolated, and all of them amplified the 368-bp toxR gene fragment. The trh gene was not identified in any of the strains; 4 of the 46 strains were Kanagawa phenomenon (KP) positive and amplified the 251-bp tdh gene fragment. The most frequent serogroup was serogroup O3. This is the first report of the presence of KP-positive tdh-positive environmental V. parahaemolyticus strains in Mexico.

  2. Improving the hit-to-lead process: data-driven assessment of drug-like and lead-like screening hits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunberg, Tobias; Hendrix, Martin; Hillisch, Alexander; Lobell, Mario; Meier, Heinrich; Schmeck, Carsten; Wild, Hanno; Hinzen, Berthold

    2006-02-01

    Drug-like and lead-like hits derived from HTS campaigns provide good starting points for lead optimization. However, too strong emphasis on potency as hit-selection parameter might hamper the success of such projects. A detailed absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicology (ADME-Tox) profiling is needed to help identify hits with a minimum number of (known) liabilities. This is particularly true for drug-like hits. Herein, we describe how to break down large numbers of screening hits and we provide a comprehensive overview of the strengths and weaknesses for each structural class. The overall profile (e.g. ligand efficiency, selectivity and ADME-Tox) is the distinctive feature that will define the priority for follow-up.

  3. Photonic Front-End and Comparator Processor for a Sigma-Delta Modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    bipolar transistor (HBT) technology would need to be demonstrated for an on-chip integrated circuit design. 40 THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK 41...MODELS USED .MODEL QX PNP (BF=34.188) .MODEL QY PNP (BF=32.52) .MODEL DX D(N=0.001 TT=1E-15) .MODEL NMOS NMOS(KP=1 TOX=100U VTO=0.39 W

  4. Effect of a constructed wetland on disinfection byproducts: Removal processes and production of precursors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostad, C.E.; Martin, B.S.; Barber, L.B.; Leenheer, J.A.; Daniel, S.R.

    2000-01-01

    The fate of halogenated disinfection byproducts (DBPs) in treatment wetlands and the changes in the DBP formation potential as wastewater treatment plant (WWTP)-derived water moves through the wetlands were investigated. Wetland inlet and outlet samples were analyzed for total organic halide (TOX), trihalomethanes (TH M), haloacetic acids (HAA), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and UV absorbance. Removal of DBPs by the wetland ranged from 13 to 55% for TOX, from 78 to 97% for THM, and from 67 to 96% for HAA. The 24-h and 7-day nonpurgeable total organic halide (NPTOX), THM, and HAA formation potential yields were determined at the inlet and outlet of these wetlands. The effect of wetlands on the production of DBP precursors and their DBP-formation potential yield from wastewater was dramatic. The wetlands increased DBP yield up to a factor of almost 30. Specific changes in the DOC precursors were identified using 13C NMR spectroscopy.The fate of halogenated disinfection byproducts (DBPs) in treatment wetlands and the changes in the DBP formation potential as wastewater treatment plant (WWTP)-derived water moves through the wetlands were investigated. Wetland inlet and outlet samples were analyzed for total organic halide (TOX), trihalomethanes (THM), haloacetic acids (HAA), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and UV absorbance. Removal of DBPs by the wetland ranged from 13 to 55% for TOX, from 78 to 97% for THM, and from 67 to 96% for HAA. The 24-h and 7-day nonpurgeable total organic halide (NPTOX), THM, and HAA formation potential yields were determined at the inlet and outlet of these wetlands. The effect of wetlands on the production of DBP precursors and their DBP-formation potential yield from wastewater was dramatic. The wetlands increased DBP yield up to a factor of almost 30. Specific changes in the DOC precursors were identified using 13C NMR spectroscopy.

  5. Multidrug-Resistant Vibrio cholerae O1 was Responsible for a Cholera Outbreak in 2013 in Bagalkot, North Karnataka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Debdutta; Dey, Shuchismita; Roy, Subarna; Parande, Mahantesh V; Telsang, M; Seema, M H; Parande, Aisha V; Mantur, Basappa G

    2015-01-01

    Cholera is a major cause of illness in the developing world. During the monsoon season, small sporadic clusters of cholera cases are reported on an annual basis in Karnataka, India. During the monsoons of 2013, there was a cholera outbreak in Badami, a remote area of Bagalkot district in Karnataka. The multi-drug-resistant Vibrio cholerae O1 serotype Ogawa was found to be responsible for this outbreak. On 5 August 2013, a 30-year-old woman presented with severe dehydration and watery diarrhea at the Aganwadi Health Centre in Badami. A total of 49 suspected cholera cases were reported, with an attack rate of 3.5%. The V. cholerae isolates exhibited resistance to a wide range of drugs, including ampicillin, co-trimoxazole, nitrofurantoin, carbenicillin, and third generation cephalosporins, and showed reduced susceptibility to third generation fluoroquinolones. All of the cephalosporin-resistant V. cholerae strains produced extended-spectrum beta-lactamase. All V. cholerae O1 isolates harbored virulent genes (ctxA, ctxB, tcpA El Tor, Tox S, VPI, ToxT, ToxR, ToxRS, ace, zot, and tcpP) and were found to be genetically similar as determined by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA fingerprinting assay. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a cholera outbreak in the district of Bagalkot. The resistance of V. cholerae to commonly used antimicrobial drugs is becoming a major public health concern in the region as clinicians are left with a limited choice of antibiotics for the treatment of cholera.

  6. Ecological and laboratory studies on the role of luminous bacteria and their luminescence in coastal pollution surveillance

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramaiah, N.; Chandramohan, D.

    environment (Hastings & Nealson, 1981). Their bioluminescence, being extremely sensitive to the toxicants, has been employed in bioassays for detecting nano or picomolar concentrations of impurities in pharmaceuticals (Hastings, 1976) and in the food... there are investigations employing Micro- tox ® or other bacterial bioluminescence tests for detecting environmentally toxic agents (Schiewe et al., 1985; Buelow & Klein, 1987), from the available literature it appears that there are no attempts to enumerate...

  7. Pangenomic study of Corynebacterium diphtheriae that provides insights into the genomic diversity of pathogenic isolates from cases of classical diphtheria, endocarditis, and pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trost, Eva; Blom, Jochen; Soares, Siomar de Castro; Huang, I-Hsiu; Al-Dilaimi, Arwa; Schröder, Jasmin; Jaenicke, Sebastian; Dorella, Fernanda A; Rocha, Flavia S; Miyoshi, Anderson; Azevedo, Vasco; Schneider, Maria P; Silva, Artur; Camello, Thereza C; Sabbadini, Priscila S; Santos, Cíntia S; Santos, Louisy S; Hirata, Raphael; Mattos-Guaraldi, Ana L; Efstratiou, Androulla; Schmitt, Michael P; Ton-That, Hung; Tauch, Andreas

    2012-06-01

    Corynebacterium diphtheriae is one of the most prominent human pathogens and the causative agent of the communicable disease diphtheria. The genomes of 12 strains isolated from patients with classical diphtheria, endocarditis, and pneumonia were completely sequenced and annotated. Including the genome of C. diphtheriae NCTC 13129, we herewith present a comprehensive comparative analysis of 13 strains and the first characterization of the pangenome of the species C. diphtheriae. Comparative genomics showed extensive synteny and revealed a core genome consisting of 1,632 conserved genes. The pangenome currently comprises 4,786 protein-coding regions and increases at an average of 65 unique genes per newly sequenced strain. Analysis of prophages carrying the diphtheria toxin gene tox revealed that the toxoid vaccine producer C. diphtheriae Park-Williams no. 8 has been lysogenized by two copies of the ω(tox)(+) phage, whereas C. diphtheriae 31A harbors a hitherto-unknown tox(+) corynephage. DNA binding sites of the tox-controlling regulator DtxR were detected by genome-wide motif searches. Comparative content analysis showed that the DtxR regulons exhibit marked differences due to gene gain, gene loss, partial gene deletion, and DtxR binding site depletion. Most predicted pathogenicity islands of C. diphtheriae revealed characteristics of horizontal gene transfer. The majority of these islands encode subunits of adhesive pili, which can play important roles in adhesion of C. diphtheriae to different host tissues. All sequenced isolates contain at least two pilus gene clusters. It appears that variation in the distributed genome is a common strategy of C. diphtheriae to establish differences in host-pathogen interactions.

  8. Occurrence of Vibrio Parahaemolyticus, Vibrio Cholerae and Vibrio Vulnificus in the Clam Ruditapes Philippinarum (Adams & Reeve, 1850) from Emilia Romagna and Sardinia, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passalacqua, Pier Luca; Zavatta, Emanuele; Bignami, Giorgia; Serraino, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Marine vibrios, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, V. vulnificus and V. cholerae are responsible of the majority of food-borne human infections by consumption of bivalve shellfish. The aim of the present study was to ascertain the occurrence of these bacteria, and their potential pathogenicity, in the Manila clam R. philippinarum from Emilia Romagna (ER) and Sardinia (SR) regions, Italy. Isolation was performed on CHROMagarTM vibrio with subculture on (thiosulfate-citrate-bile salts-sucrose) Agar and m-modified-cellobiose-polymyxin b-colistin (-CPC) Agar. Suspected strains were purified, biochemically characterized and genotyped by simplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the specie-specific and pathogenic gene markers: V. parahaemolyticus (toxRP, tdh and trh); V. vulnificus (vvhA, hsp, vcgC, vcgE, CPS operon allele 1, CPS operon allele 2, 16s-rRNA operon allele A, 16s-rRNA operon allele B; V. cholerae (toxRC, hlya, tcpI, tcpA, ctxA, ctxB, stn/sto). Moreover a multiplex PCR was applied to the SR bivalve shellfish, for the simultaneous detection of the three targets directly on homogenate samples, targeting the species-specific gene for V. cholerae (toxRC), V. parahaemolyticus (toxRP) and V. vulnificus (vvhA). As a result of phenotyping and genotyping of isolates, bivalve shellfish from ER resulted positive for V. parahaemolyticus (27.8%) and V. vulnificus (10.1%), but negative for V. cholerae. Shellfish from SR resulted positive for V. parahaemolyticus (30.3%), V. vulnificus (6.1%) and V. cholerae (3%). No significant differences emerged between the two areas (P>0.05). PMID:27800436

  9. Human intake fraction of toxic pollutants: a model comparison between caltox and uses-lca

    OpenAIRE

    Huijbregts, Mark A J; Geelen, Loes M.J.; Edgar G. Hertwich; McKone, Thomas E.; Meent, Dik van de

    2004-01-01

    In Life Cycle Assessment and Comparative Risk Assessment potential human exposure to toxic pollutants can be expressed as the human intake fraction (iF), representing the fraction of the quantity emitted that enters the human population. To assess model uncertainty in the human intake fraction, ingestion and inhalation iFs of 367 substances emitted to air and freshwater were calculated with two commonly applied multi-media fate and exposure models, CalTOX and USES-LCA. Comparison of the ...

  10. Common breast cancer susceptibility alleles are associated with tumor subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: results from the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mulligan, Anna Marie; Couch, Fergus J; Barrowdale, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    -negative breast cancer risk for both BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. In BRCA2 carriers, SNPs in FGFR2, TOX3, LSP1, SLC4A7/NEK10, 5p12, 2q35, and1p11.2 were significantly associated with ER-positive but not ER-negative disease. Similar results were observed when differentiating breast cancer cases by PR status...

  11. Common breast cancer susceptibility alleles are associated with tumour subtypes in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mulligan, Anna Marie; Couch, Fergus J; Barrowdale, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    -negative breast cancer risk for both BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers. In BRCA2 carriers, SNPs in FGFR2, TOX3, LSP1, SLC4A7/NEK10, 5p12, 2q35, and1p11.2 were significantly associated with ER-positive but not ER-negative disease. Similar results were observed when differentiating breast cancer cases by PR status...

  12. Occurrence of Vibrio Parahaemolyticus, Vibrio Cholerae and Vibrio Vulnificus in the Clam Ruditapes Philippinarum (Adams & Reeve, 1850) from Emilia Romagna and Sardinia, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passalacqua, Pier Luca; Zavatta, Emanuele; Bignami, Giorgia; Serraino, Andrea; Serratore, Patrizia

    2016-01-18

    Marine vibrios, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, V. vulnificus and V. cholerae are responsible of the majority of food-borne human infections by consumption of bivalve shellfish. The aim of the present study was to ascertain the occurrence of these bacteria, and their potential pathogenicity, in the Manila clam R. philippinarum from Emilia Romagna (ER) and Sardinia (SR) regions, Italy. Isolation was performed on CHROMagar(TM) vibrio with subculture on (thiosulfate-citrate-bile salts-sucrose) Agar and m-modified-cellobiose-polymyxin b-colistin (-CPC) Agar. Suspected strains were purified, biochemically characterized and genotyped by simplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the specie-specific and pathogenic gene markers: V. parahaemolyticus (toxRP, tdh and trh); V. vulnificus (vvhA, hsp, vcgC, vcgE, CPS operon allele 1, CPS operon allele 2, 16s-rRNA operon allele A, 16s-rRNA operon allele B; V. cholerae (toxRC, hlya, tcpI, tcpA, ctxA, ctxB, stn/sto). Moreover a multiplex PCR was applied to the SR bivalve shellfish, for the simultaneous detection of the three targets directly on homogenate samples, targeting the species-specific gene for V. cholerae (toxRC), V. parahaemolyticus (toxRP) and V. vulnificus (vvhA). As a result of phenotyping and genotyping of isolates, bivalve shellfish from ER resulted positive for V. parahaemolyticus (27.8%) and V. vulnificus (10.1%), but negative for V. cholerae. Shellfish from SR resulted positive for V. parahaemolyticus (30.3%), V. vulnificus (6.1%) and V. cholerae (3%). No significant differences emerged between the two areas (P>0.05).

  13. Pangenomic Study of Corynebacterium diphtheriae That Provides Insights into the Genomic Diversity of Pathogenic Isolates from Cases of Classical Diphtheria, Endocarditis, and Pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trost, Eva; Blom, Jochen; de Castro Soares, Siomar; Huang, I-Hsiu; Al-Dilaimi, Arwa; Schröder, Jasmin; Jaenicke, Sebastian; Dorella, Fernanda A.; Rocha, Flavia S.; Miyoshi, Anderson; Azevedo, Vasco; Schneider, Maria P.; Silva, Artur; Camello, Thereza C.; Sabbadini, Priscila S.; Santos, Cíntia S.; Santos, Louisy S.; Hirata, Raphael; Mattos-Guaraldi, Ana L.; Efstratiou, Androulla; Schmitt, Michael P.; Ton-That, Hung

    2012-01-01

    Corynebacterium diphtheriae is one of the most prominent human pathogens and the causative agent of the communicable disease diphtheria. The genomes of 12 strains isolated from patients with classical diphtheria, endocarditis, and pneumonia were completely sequenced and annotated. Including the genome of C. diphtheriae NCTC 13129, we herewith present a comprehensive comparative analysis of 13 strains and the first characterization of the pangenome of the species C. diphtheriae. Comparative genomics showed extensive synteny and revealed a core genome consisting of 1,632 conserved genes. The pangenome currently comprises 4,786 protein-coding regions and increases at an average of 65 unique genes per newly sequenced strain. Analysis of prophages carrying the diphtheria toxin gene tox revealed that the toxoid vaccine producer C. diphtheriae Park-Williams no. 8 has been lysogenized by two copies of the ωtox+ phage, whereas C. diphtheriae 31A harbors a hitherto-unknown tox+ corynephage. DNA binding sites of the tox-controlling regulator DtxR were detected by genome-wide motif searches. Comparative content analysis showed that the DtxR regulons exhibit marked differences due to gene gain, gene loss, partial gene deletion, and DtxR binding site depletion. Most predicted pathogenicity islands of C. diphtheriae revealed characteristics of horizontal gene transfer. The majority of these islands encode subunits of adhesive pili, which can play important roles in adhesion of C. diphtheriae to different host tissues. All sequenced isolates contain at least two pilus gene clusters. It appears that variation in the distributed genome is a common strategy of C. diphtheriae to establish differences in host-pathogen interactions. PMID:22505676

  14. Determination of Short-Chain Chlorinated Paraffins by Carbon Skeleton Gas Chromatography

    OpenAIRE

    PELLIZZATO FRANCESCA; RICCI MARINA; HELD ANDREA; EMONS HENDRIK

    2008-01-01

    Short-Chain Chlorinated Paraffins (SCCPs) are highly complex technical mixtures of polychlorinated n-alkanes with a chlorination degree between 50 and 70 % by mass, and a linear carbon chain length from C10 to C13, constituted by thousands of homologues, diastereomers and enantiomers. They have been used in many different applications, such as extreme pressure additives in lubricants and cutting fluids, plasticizers in PVC, and flame retardants in paints, adhesives and sealants. SCCPs are tox...

  15. Development and Evaluation of a Hyperbaric Toxic Gas Monitor (SUBTOX) for Disabled Submarines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    DEVELOPMENT AND EVALUATION OF A HYPERBARIC TOXIC GAS MONITOR (SUBTOX) FOR DISABLED SUBMARINES... HYPERBARIC TOXIC GAS MONITOR (SUBTOX) FOR DISABLED SUBMARINES 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) R. S. Lillo...period (2004–2012), Navy Experimental Diving Unit (NEDU) helped ENMET Corp. to develop the first hyperbaric toxic gas analyzer (SubTox) to monitor

  16. Ecotoxicological serious soil contamination concentrations: Fourth series of compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Posthumus R; Crommentuijn T; Plassche EJ van de; CSR

    1998-01-01

    De interventiewaarde voor bodem en grondwater is gebaseerd op de integratie van een humaan toxicologisch ernstige bodem verontreinigingsconcentratie of HUM-TOX EBVC en ecotoxicologische ernstige bodemverontreiningsconcentratie of ECOTOX EBVC. In dit rapport zijn voorstellen voor ECOTOX EBVC's gedaan voor de zogenaamde 4e serie stoffen. De data beschikbaarheid was laag voor alle in dit rapport opgenomen stoffen. Voor geen van de stoffen was het mogelijk om een HC50 voor zowel terrestrisch...

  17. Revolutions in Science and Technology: Future Threats to US National Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    Stockpiling of Bacteriological (Biological) and Tox in Weapons and on their Destruction. 73 Ken Alibek and Stephen Handelman. Biohazard: The Chilling True...Carol D. Leonnig, and Del Quentin Wilber , "Scientist Set to Discuss Plea Bargain in Deadly Attacks Commits Suicide," Washington Post, August 2, 2008...and Carrie Johnsen, Del Quentin Wilber , and Dan Eggen, "Evidence ;~,gainst Scientist Detailed," Washington Post, August 7, 2008. 124 Michael J

  18. Mechanisms of Cell Injury with Hepatotoxic Chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-05-01

    protective effect of mercaptopropionyl glycine, Biochem. Pharmacol., 26:31-35. Lau, S. S., G. D. Abrams , and V. G. Zannoni (1979), Severity of hepatic...Hepatic microsomal epoxida- tion of bromobenzene to phenols and its toxicological implica- tion, Tox. Appl. Pharmacol., 50:309-318. Lau, S. S., G. D. Abrams ... Floyd , P. R. McCay, E. r,. Janzen, and E. P. Davis (1978), Spin-trapping of the trichloromethyl radical produced during NADPH oxidation in the presence

  19. 75 FR 44240 - Cancellation of Pesticides for Non-Payment of Year 2010 Registration Maintenance Fees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-28

    ... 001677-00221 Dairyglide AM 001677-00222 Sanova 335 001719-00024 BLP Jack Tar Marine Finishes Vinyl Anti-Fouling 473-73 001719-00034 Jack Tar Vinyl Antifouling Blue 473-33 001719-00038 ZIN-TOX 202 Water Based...-00003 Anti-Growth 073912-00002 ANTX 75 073912-00003 Roach X Paste 074412-00001 Trident 51...

  20. Occurrence of Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Vibrio cholerae and Vibrio vulnificus in the clam Ruditapes philippinarum (Adams & Reeve, 1850 from Emilia Romagna and Sardinia, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pier Luca Passalacqua

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Marine vibrios, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, V. vulnificus and V. cholerae are responsible of the majority of food-borne human infections by consumption of bivalve shellfish. The aim of the present study was to ascertain the occurrence of these bacteria, and their potential pathogenicity, in the Manila clam R. philippinarum from Emilia Romagna (ER and Sardinia (SR regions, Italy. Isolation was performed on CHROMagarTM vibrio with subculture on (thiosulfate-citrate-bile salts-sucrose Agar and m-modified-cellobiose-polymyxin bcolistin (-CPC Agar. Suspected strains were purified, biochemically characterized and genotyped by simplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR for the specie-specific and pathogenic gene markers: V. parahaemolyticus (toxRP, tdh and trh; V. vulnificus (vvhA, hsp, vcgC, vcgE, CPS operon allele 1, CPS operon allele 2, 16s-rRNA operon allele A, 16s-rRNA operon allele B; V. cholerae (toxRC, hlya, tcpI, tcpA, ctxA, ctxB, stn/sto. Moreover a multiplex PCR was applied to the SR bivalve shellfish, for the simultaneous detection of the three targets directly on homogenate samples, targeting the species-specific gene for V. cholerae (toxRC, V. parahaemolyticus (toxRP and V. vulnificus (vvhA. As a result of phenotyping and genotyping of isolates, bivalve shellfish from ER resulted positive for V. parahaemolyticus (27.8% and V. vulnificus (10.1%, but negative for V. cholerae. Shellfish from SR resulted positive for V. parahaemolyticus (30.3%, V. vulnificus (6.1% and V. cholerae (3%. No significant differences emerged between the two areas (P>0.05.

  1. Combination bacteriolytic therapy for the treatment of experimental tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Dang, Long H.; Bettegowda, Chetan; Huso, David L.; Kinzler, Kenneth W.; Vogelstein, Bert

    2001-01-01

    Current chemotherapeutic approaches for cancer are in part limited by the inability of drugs to destroy neoplastic cells within poorly vascularized compartments of tumors. We have here systematically assessed anaerobic bacteria for their capacity to grow expansively within avascular compartments of transplanted tumors. Among 26 different strains tested, one (Clostridium novyi) appeared particularly promising. We created a strain of C. novyi devoid of its lethal tox...

  2. Cholera toxin expression by El Tor Vibrio cholerae in shallow culture growth conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobaxin, Mayra; Martínez, Haydee; Ayala, Guadalupe; Holmgren, Jan; Sjöling, Asa; Sánchez, Joaquín

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae O1 classical, El Tor and O139 are the primary biotypes that cause epidemic cholera, and they also express cholera toxin (CT). Although classical V. cholerae produces CT in various settings, the El Tor and O139 strains require specific growth conditions for CT induction, such as the so-called AKI conditions, which consist of growth in static conditions followed by growth under aerobic shaking conditions. However, our group has demonstrated that CT production may also take place in shallow static cultures. How these type of cultures induce CT production has been unclear, but we now report that in shallow culture growth conditions, there is virtual depletion of dissolved oxygen after 2.5 h of growth. Concurrently, during the first three to 4 h, endogenous CO2 accumulates in the media and the pH decreases. These findings may explain CT expression at the molecular level because CT production relies on a regulatory cascade, in which the key regulator AphB may be activated by anaerobiosis and by low pH. AphB activation stimulates TcpP synthesis, which induces ToxT production, and ToxT directly stimulates ctxAB expression, which encodes CT. Importantly, ToxT activity is enhanced by bicarbonate. Therefore, we suggest that in shallow cultures, AphB is activated by initial decreases in oxygen and pH, and subsequently, ToxT is activated by intracellular bicarbonate that has been generated from endogenous CO2. This working model would explain CT production in shallow cultures and, possibly, also in other growth conditions.

  3. A 10-minute point-of-care assay for detection of blood protein adducts resulting from low level exposure to organophosphate nerve agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanDine, Robert; Babu, Uma Mahesh; Condon, Peter; Mendez, Arlene; Sambursky, Robert

    2013-03-25

    The OrganoTox test is a rapid, point-of-care assay capable of detecting clinically relevant organophosphate (OP) poisoning after low-level exposure to sarin, soman, tabun, or VX chemical nerve agents. The test utilizes either a finger stick peripheral blood sample or plasma specimen. While high-level nerve agent exposure can quickly lead to death, low-level exposure produces vague, nondescript signs and symptoms that are not easily clinically differentiated from other conditions. In initial testing, the OrganoTox test was used to detect the presence of blood protein-nerve agent adducts in exposed blood samples. In order to mimic the in vivo exposure as closely as possible, nerve agents stored in organic solvents were spiked in minute quantities into whole blood samples. For performance testing, 40 plasma samples were spiked with sarin, soman, tabun, or VX and 10 normal plasma samples were used as the negative control. The 40 nerve agent-spiked plasma samples included 10 replicates of each agent. At the clinically relevant low-level exposure of 10 ng/ml, the OrganoTox test demonstrated 100% sensitivity for soman, tabun, and VX and 80% sensitivity for sarin. The OrganoTox test demonstrated greater than 97% specificity with 150 blood samples obtained from healthy adults. No cross-reactivity or interference from pesticide precursor compounds was found. A rapid test for nerve agent exposure will help identify affected patients earlier in the clinical course and trigger more appropriate medical management in a more timely manner.

  4. Comprehensive microRNA profiling in acetaminophen toxicity identifies novel circulating biomarkers for human liver and kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vliegenthart, A D B; Shaffer, J M; Clarke, J I; Peeters, L E J; Caporali, A; Bateman, D N; Wood, D M; Dargan, P I; Craig, D G; Moore, J K; Thompson, A I; Henderson, N C; Webb, D J; Sharkey, J; Antoine, D J; Park, B K; Bailey, M A; Lader, E; Simpson, K J; Dear, J W

    2015-10-22

    Our objective was to identify microRNA (miRNA) biomarkers of drug-induced liver and kidney injury by profiling the circulating miRNome in patients with acetaminophen overdose. Plasma miRNAs were quantified in age- and sex-matched overdose patients with (N = 27) and without (N = 27) organ injury (APAP-TOX and APAP-no TOX, respectively). Classifier miRNAs were tested in a separate cohort (N = 81). miRNA specificity was determined in non-acetaminophen liver injury and murine models. Sensitivity was tested by stratification of patients at hospital presentation (N = 67). From 1809 miRNAs, 75 were 3-fold or more increased and 46 were 3-fold or more decreased with APAP-TOX. A 16 miRNA classifier model accurately diagnosed APAP-TOX in the test cohort. In humans, the miRNAs with the largest increase (miR-122-5p, miR-885-5p, miR-151a-3p) and the highest rank in the classifier model (miR-382-5p) accurately reported non-acetaminophen liver injury and were unaffected by kidney injury. miR-122-5p was more sensitive than ALT for reporting liver injury at hospital presentation, especially combined with miR-483-3p. A miRNA panel was associated with human kidney dysfunction. In mice, miR-122-5p, miR-151a-3p and miR-382-5p specifically reported APAP toxicity - being unaffected by drug-induced kidney injury. Profiling of acetaminophen toxicity identified multiple miRNAs that report acute liver injury and potential biomarkers of drug-induced kidney injury.

  5. Evaluation of the performance of C. DIFF QUIK CHEK COMPLETE and its usefulness in a hospital setting with a high prevalence of Clostridium difficile infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hae-Sun; Lee, Miae

    2017-01-01

    Rapid and accurate diagnosis of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is crucial for patient care, infection control, and efficient surveillance. We evaluated C. DIFF QUIK CHEK COMPLETE (QCC; TechLab), which detects glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) antigen (QCC-Ag) and toxin A/B (QCC-Tox) simultaneously, and compared it to the laboratory diagnostics for CDI currently in use in a tertiary hospital setting with a high prevalence of CDI. QCC, RIDASCREEN C. difficile toxin A/B assay (Toxin EIA; R-Biopharm AG), chromID C. difficile agar (bioMérieux) culture (ChromID culture), and Xpert C. difficile PCR assay (Xpert PCR; Cepheid) were performed according to the manufacturers' instructions. Performances of the assays were compared against that of Xpert PCR as a reference. Of the 231 loose stool specimens, 83 (35.9%) were positive by Xpert PCR. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were 97.6%, 93.9%, 90.0%, and 98.6%, respectively, for QCC-Ag and 55.4%, 100%, 100%, and 80.0%, respectively, for QCC-Tox. The median threshold cycle values of the QCC-Tox(+) specimens were lower than those of the QCC-Tox(-) specimens. Results of QCC as an initial screening test were confirmed in 81.0% (187/231) of samples; these specimens did not require further testing. QCC is a rapid, easy, and cost-effective method that would be a useful first-line screening assay for laboratory diagnosis of CDI in a tertiary hospital with a high prevalence of CDI. A two-step algorithm using QCC as an initial screening tool, followed by Xpert PCR as a confirmatory test, is a practical and cost-effective approach. Copyright © 2016 American Federation for Medical Research.

  6. Weighted Feature Significance: A Simple, Interpretable Model of Compound Toxicity Based on the Statistical Enrichment of Structural Features

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Ruili; Southall, Noel; Xia, Menghang; Cho, Ming-Hsuang; Jadhav, Ajit; Nguyen, Dac-Trung; Inglese, James; Tice, Raymond R.; Austin, Christopher P.

    2009-01-01

    In support of the U.S. Tox21 program, we have developed a simple and chemically intuitive model we call weighted feature significance (WFS) to predict the toxicological activity of compounds, based on the statistical enrichment of structural features in toxic compounds. We trained and tested the model on the following: (1) data from quantitative high–throughput screening cytotoxicity and caspase activation assays conducted at the National Institutes of Health Chemical Genomics Center, (2) dat...

  7. Site Inspection Report for Former Nansemond Ordnance Depot, Suffolk, VA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    bioavailability of arsenic from sediment compared to drinking water (Roberts et al. 2007) the resulting screening criteria likely overestimate risks for...Lowney, and M.V. Ruby. 2007. Relative oral bioavailability of arsenic from contaminated soils measured in the Cynomolgus monkey. Tox. Sci. 95(1...relatively low bioavailability of arsenic from sediment compared to drinking water…the screening criteria for arsenic are considered conservative in

  8. The Toxicology Investigators Consortium Case Registry—The 2012 Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Wiegand, Timothy; Wax, Paul; Smith, Eric; Hart, Katherine; Brent, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    In 2010, the American College of Medical Toxicology (ACMT) established its Case Registry, the Toxicology Investigators Consortium (ToxIC). All cases are entered prospectively and include only suspected and confirmed toxic exposures cared for at the bedside by board-certified or board-eligible medical toxicologists at its participating sites. The primary aims of establishing this Registry include the development of a realtime toxico-surveillance system in order to identify and describe current...

  9. miR-223 regulates cell growth and targets proto-oncogenes in mycosis fungoides/cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGirt, Laura Y; Adams, Clare M; Baerenwald, Devin A; Zwerner, Jeffrey P; Zic, John A; Eischen, Christine M

    2014-04-01

    The pathogenesis of the cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL), mycosis fungoides (MF), is unclear. MicroRNA (miRNA) are small noncoding RNAs that target mRNA leading to reduced mRNA translation. Recently, specific miRNA were shown to be altered in CTCL. We detected significantly reduced expression of miR-223 in early-stage MF skin, and further decreased levels of miR-223 in advanced-stage disease. CTCL peripheral blood mononuclear cells and cell lines also had reduced miR-223 as compared with controls. Elevated expression of miR-223 in these cell lines reduced cell growth and clonogenic potential, whereas inhibition of miR-223 increased cell numbers. Investigations into putative miR-223 targets with oncogenic function, including E2F1 and MEF2C, and the predicted miR-223 target, TOX, revealed that all three were targeted by miR-223 in CTCL. E2F1, MEF2C, and TOX proteins were decreased with miR-223 overexpression, whereas miR-223 inhibition led to increased protein levels in CTCL. In addition, we showed that the 3'-UTR of TOX mRNA was a genuine target of miR-223. Therefore, reduced levels of miR-223 in MF/CTCL lead to increased expression of E2F1, MEF2C, and TOX, which likely contributes to the development and/or progression of CTCL. Thus, miR-223 and its targets may be useful for the development of new therapeutics for MF/CTCL.

  10. Application of nanotechnology in antimicrobial finishing of biomedical textiles

    OpenAIRE

    Zille, Andrea; Almeida, Luís; Amorim, M. T. Pessoa de; CARNEIRO, Noémia; Esteves, M. de Fátima; Silva, Carla J. S. M.; Souto, A. Pedro

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the antimicrobial nanofinishing of biomedical textiles has become a very active, high-growth research field, assuming great importance among all available material surface modifications in the textile industry. This review offers the opportunity to update and critically discuss the latest advances and applications in this field. The survey suggests an emerging new paradigm in the production and distribution of nanoparticles for biomedical textile applications based on non-tox...

  11. In vitro and in vivo expression of virulence genes in Vibrio isolates belonging to the Harveyi clade in relation to their virulence towards gnotobiotic brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruwandeepika, H A Darshanee; Defoirdt, Tom; Bhowmick, Patit Paban; Karunasagar, Indrani; Karunasagar, Iddya; Bossier, Peter

    2011-02-01

    Vibrios belonging to the Harveyi clade are pathogenic marine bacteria affecting both vertebrates and invertebrates, thereby causing a severe threat to the aquaculture industry. In this study, the expression of haemolysin, metalloprotease, serine protease, the quorum sensing master regulator LuxR and the virulence regulator ToxR in different Harveyi clade isolates was measured with reverse transcriptase real-time PCR with specific primers. There was relatively low variation in the in vitro expression levels of the quorum sensing master regulator luxR (sevenfold), whereas for the other genes, the difference in expression between the isolates showing lowest and highest expression levels was over 25-fold. Furthermore, there was a significant correlation between expression levels of toxR and luxR and between the expression levels of these regulators and the protease genes. The expression levels of luxR, toxR and haemolysin were negatively correlated with the survival of brine shrimp larvae challenged with the isolates. Finally, a non-virulent, a moderately virulent and a strongly virulent isolate were selected to study in vivo expression of the virulence genes during infection of gnotobiotic brine shrimp larvae. The in vivo gene expression study showed a clear difference in virulence gene expression between both virulent isolates and the non-virulent isolate.

  12. Nevada Test Site 2001 Data Report: Groundwater Monitoring Program Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y. E. Townsend

    2002-02-01

    This report is a compilation of the calendar year 2001 groundwater sampling results from the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS). Contamination indicator data are presented in control chart and tabular form with investigation levels (ILs) indicated. Gross water chemistry data are presented in graphical and tabular form. Other information in the report includes, the Cumulative Chronology for Area 5 RWMS Groundwater Monitoring Program, a brief description of the site hydrogeology, and the groundwater sampling procedure. Wells Ue5PW-1, Ue5PW-2, and Ue5PW-3 were sampled semiannually for the required analytes: pH, specific conductance, major cations/anions, metals, tritium, total organic carbon (TOC), and total organic halogen (TOX). Due to detections of TOC and TOX in some samples collected in 2000, a plan, as approved by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP), was executed to collect an increased number and type of samples in 2001. Results from all samples collected in 2001 were below ILs. These data indicate that there has been no measurable impact to the uppermost aquifer from the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulated unit within the Area 5 RWMS and confirm that the detections of TOC and TOX in 2000 were false positives. There were no major changes noted in the monitored groundwater elevation. There continues to be an extremely small gradient to the northeast with an average flow velocity of less than one foot per year.

  13. A simple and sensitive biosensor strain for detecting toxoflavin using β-galactosidase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Okhee; Lee, Yongsang; Han, Inyoung; Kim, Hongsup; Goo, Eunhye; Kim, Jinwoo; Hwang, Ingyu

    2013-12-15

    In this study, we developed a simple and sensitive biosensor for the determination of toxoflavin (which is toxic to various plants, fungi, animals, and bacteria) in natural samples based on β-galactosidase activity. The proposed toxoflavin detection method for toxin-producing bacteria or toxin-contaminated foods is simple and cost effective. Burkholderia glumae, a species known to cause rice grain rot and wilt in various field crops, produces toxoflavin under the control of a LysR-type transcriptional regulator ToxR and its ligand toxoflavin. As the expression of toxoflavin biosynthetic genes requires toxoflavin as a co-activator of ToxR, a novel biosensor stain was constructed based on lacZ reporter gene integration into the first gene of the toxoflavin biosynthesis operon, toxABCDE of B. glumae. The biosensor was composed of a sensor strain (COK71), substrates (X-gal or ONPG), and culture medium, without any complex preparation process. We demonstrated that the biosensor strain is highly specific to toxoflavin, and can quantify relative amounts of toxoflavin compared with known concentrations of toxoflavin. The proposed method was reliable and simple; samples containing 50-500 nM of toxoflavin could be analyzed. More importantly, the proposed biosensor strain could identify toxoflavin-producing bacteria in real samples. The excellent performance of this biosensor is useful for diagnostic purposes, such as detecting toxoflavin-contaminated foods and environmental samples.

  14. Computer Simulation of Embryonic Systems: What can a ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    (1) Standard practice for assessing developmental toxicity is the observation of apical endpoints (intrauterine death, fetal growth retardation, structural malformations) in pregnant rats/rabbits following exposure during organogenesis. EPA’s computational toxicology research program (ToxCast) generated vast in vitro cellular and molecular effects data on >1858 chemicals in >600 high-throughput screening (HTS) assays. The diversity of assays has been increased for developmental toxicity with several HTS platforms, including the devTOX-quickPredict assay from Stemina Biomarker Discovery utilizing the human embryonic stem cell line (H9). Translating these HTS data into higher order-predictions of developmental toxicity is a significant challenge. Here, we address the application of computational systems models that recapitulate the kinematics of dynamical cell signaling networks (e.g., SHH, FGF, BMP, retinoids) in a CompuCell3D.org modeling environment. Examples include angiogenesis (angiodysplasia) and dysmorphogenesis. Being numerically responsive to perturbation, these models are amenable to data integration for systems Toxicology and Adverse Outcome Pathways (AOPs). The AOP simulation outputs predict potential phenotypes based on the in vitro HTS data ToxCast. A heuristic computational intelligence framework that recapitulates the kinematics of dynamical cell signaling networks in the embryo, together with the in vitro profiling data, produce quantitative pr

  15. Sensitivity of different aquatic bioassays in the assessment of a new natural formicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burga-Perez, Karen F; Toumi, Hela; Cotelle, Sylvie; Ferard, Jean-François; Radetski, Claudemir M

    2013-01-01

    Agrochemicals have the potential to cause deleterious effects on living organisms and therefore they must be subjected to various (eco)toxicological studies and monitoring programs in order to protect human health and the environment. The aim of this study was to assess the ecotoxicity of a new natural formicide with a battery of three classical and three ecotox-kit tests. The former tests were performed with Aliivibrio fischeri bacteria (Lumistox test), the cladoceran Daphnia magna and Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata algae, and the latter with Thamnotoxkit F(TM) (Thamnocephalus platyurus), Ostracodtoxkit F® (Heterocypris incongruens) and LuminoTox (photosynthetic enzyme complexes). In the range of formicide concentrations tested (from 0.06 to 2.0 g L(-1)), the measurement endpoint values varied from 0.79 g L(-1) for the algal test to > 2 g L(-1) for the LuminoTox and Ostracodtoxkit F® tests. Hierarchical sensitivity ranking based on the no-observed effect concentration (NOEC) values established to assess the formicide ecotoxicity was as follows: algal growth inhibition test ≈ daphnid immobilization test ≈ bacterial luminescence inhibition test > Thamnotoxkit F™ > LuminoTox > Ostracodtoxkit F®. Overall, results from the battery of bioassays showed that this formicide preparation presents low ecotoxicity as compared to the aquatic ecotoxicity of presently commercialized formicides. In conclusion, classical aquatic bioassays are more sensitive than ecotox-kit tests in the assessment and monitoring of the new natural formicide.

  16. Breast cancer susceptibility variants alter risk in familial ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latif, A; McBurney, H J; Roberts, S A; Lalloo, F; Howell, A; Evans, D G; Newman, W G

    2010-12-01

    Recent candidate gene and genome wide association studies have revealed novel loci associated with an increased risk of breast cancer. We evaluated the effect of these breast cancer associated variants on ovarian cancer risk in individuals with familial ovarian cancer both with and without BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. A total of 158 unrelated white British women (54 BRCA1/2 mutation positive and 104 BRCA1/2 mutation negative) with familial ovarian cancer were genotyped for FGFR2, TNRC9/TOX3 and CASP8 variants. The p.Asp302His CASP8 variant was associated with reduced ovarian cancer risk in the familial BRCA1/2 mutation negative ovarian cancer cases (P = 0.016). The synonymous TNRC9/TOX3 (Ser51) variant was present at a significantly lower frequency than in patients with familial BRCA1/2 positive breast cancer (P = 0.0002). Our results indicate that variants in CASP8 and TNRC9/TOX3 alter the risk of disease in individuals affected with familial ovarian cancer.

  17. Detection, Identification, and Prevalence of Pathogenic Vibrio parahaemolyticus in Fish and Coastal Environment in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaboudi, Akram R; Ababneh, Mustafa; Osaili, Tareq M; Al Shloul, Khalaf

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is widely distributed in the marine environments and considered the leading cause of human gastroenteritis in Asian countries. A total of 150 marketed fish and 50 water and sediment samples from the Gulf of Aqaba were examined for the prevalence of pathogenic strains of V. parahaemolyticus. A total of 132 typical isolates obtained from the primary selective medium (thiosulfate-citrate bile salt sucrose agar) and showed positive biochemical properties were subjected to confirmation by polymerase chain reaction targeting the gyrB and toxR genes. These genes were confirmed at rates of 82% (108 isolates) and 72% (95 isolates), respectively. The toxR positive isolates were tested for the presence of thermolabile hemolysin (tlh), thermostable direct hemolysin (tdh), and tdh-related hemolysin (trh) virulence genes. Accordingly, the prevalence rates of pathogenic V. parahaemolyticus were 4%, 8%, and 12% in sediment, water, and fish samples, respectively. The 16S rRNA amplification and sequences were conducted for confirmation of the isolates and showing the relatedness among these isolates. The results showed that both 16S rRNA and toxR assays had same sensitivity and tested isolates had high nucleotide similarity irrespective of their sources.

  18. Q-TWiST analysis of lapatinib combined with capecitabine for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrill, B; Amonkar, M M; Stein, S; Walker, M; Geyer, C; Cameron, D

    2008-09-02

    The addition of lapatinib (Tykerb/Tyverb) to capecitabine (Xeloda) delays disease progression more effectively than capecitabine monotherapy in women with previously treated HER2+ metastatic breast cancer (MBC). The quality-adjusted time without symptoms of disease or toxicity of treatment (Q-TWiST) method was used to compare treatments. The area under survival curves was partitioned into health states: toxicity (TOX), time without symptoms of disease progression or toxicity (TWiST), and relapse period until death or end of follow-up (REL). Average times spent in each state, weighted by utility, were derived and comparisons of Q-TWiST between groups performed with varying combinations of the utility weights. Utility weights of 0.5 for both TOX and REL, that is, counting 2 days of TOX or REL as 1 day of TWiST, resulted in a 7-week difference in quality-adjusted survival favouring combination therapy (P=0.0013). The Q-TWiST difference is clinically meaningful and was statistically significant across an entire matrix of possible utility weights. Results were robust in sensitivity analyses. An analysis with utilities based on EQ-5D scores was consistent with the above findings. Combination therapy of lapatinib with capecitabine resulted in greater quality-adjusted survival than capecitabine monotherapy in trastuzumab-refractory MBC patients.

  19. Quality of life and quality-adjusted survival (Q-TWiST) in patients receiving dose-intensive or standard dose chemotherapy for high-risk primary breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhard, J; Zahrieh, D; Zhang, J J; Martinelli, G; Basser, R; Hürny, C; Forbes, J F; Aebi, S; Yeo, W; Thürlimann, B; Green, M D; Colleoni, M; Gelber, R D; Castiglione-Gertsch, M; Price, K N; Goldhirsch, A; Coates, A S

    2008-01-15

    Quality of life (QL) is an important consideration when comparing adjuvant therapies for early breast cancer, especially if they differ substantially in toxicity. We evaluated QL and Q-TWiST among patients randomised to adjuvant dose-intensive epirubicin and cyclophosphamide administered with filgrastim and progenitor cell support (DI-EC) or standard-dose anthracycline-based chemotherapy (SD-CT). We estimated the duration of chemotherapy toxicity (TOX), time without disease symptoms and toxicity (TWiST), and time following relapse (REL). Patients scored QL indicators. Mean durations for the three transition times were weighted with patient reported utilities to obtain mean Q-TWiST. Patients receiving DI-EC reported worse QL during TOX, especially treatment burden (month 3: PQ-TWiST was 1.8 months longer for patients receiving DI-EC (95% CI, -2.5 to 6.1). Q-TWiST favoured DI-EC for most values of utilities attached to TOX and REL. Despite greater initial toxicity, quality-adjusted survival was similar or better with dose-intensive treatment as compared to standard treatment. Thus, QL considerations should not be prohibitive if future intensive therapies show superior efficacy.

  20. [The sensitivity to antibiotics of biofilm cultures of toxigenic strains Corynebacterium diphtheriae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frolova, Ya N; Kharseyeva, G G; Mironov, A Yu

    2014-06-01

    The article presents analysis of sensitivity to antibacterial preparations of typical and biofilm culture of museum strain of Corynebacterium diphtheriae gravis tox+ SV-665. The strain was obtained from the L.A. Tarasevitch state research institute of standardization and control of medical biological preparations. The second strain C. diphtheriaecirculates gravis tox+ circulates in population of the Rostov oblast and it was recovered from patient with diagnosis of "localized form of diphtheria" by bacteriologic laboratory "1002 CGSEN SKVO" of Rostov-on-Don. The week and month biofilm cultures of both strains of C. diphtheriae gravis tox+ were used. The sensitivity to antibacterial preparations of typical and biofilm cultures of museum and circulating in population strains of agent of diphtheria were detected using minimal suppressing concentration by technique of serial dilutions in fluid growth medium. It is demonstrated that the most effective in respect of C. diphtheriae are such preparations as cefotaxinum, gentamycinum, lincomycin, canamycin and cefasolin. The sensitivity of pathogen in composition of biofilm to these preparations has no changes.