WorldWideScience

Sample records for w-135 diph tox

  1. Meningococcal Serogroup A, C, W-135 and Y Conjugated Vaccine : A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hepkema, Hiltsje; Pouwels, Koen B.; van der Ende, Arie; Westra, Tjalke A.; Postma, Maarten J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: In 2002, vaccination with a serogroup C meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MenC) was introduced in the Netherlands for all children aged 14 months. Despite its success, herd immunity may wane over time. Recently, a serogroup A,C,W-135, Y meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MenACWY) was

  2. ToxCast/ToxRefDB

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — ToxCast is used as a cost-effective approach for efficiently prioritizing the toxicity testing of thousands of chemicals. It uses data from state-of-the-art high...

  3. Immunochemical studies and genetic background of two Neisseria meningitidis isolates expressing unusual capsule polysaccharide antigens with specificities of both serogroup Y and W135.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Raymond S W; Tsai, Chao Ming; Henderson, Averil M; Tyler, Shaun; Law, Dennis K S; Zollinger, Wendell; Jamieson, Frances

    2008-03-01

    We described 2 unusual Neisseria meningitidis strains isolated from epidemiologically unrelated invasive meningococcal disease cases in Ontario, Canada. Both isolates have features typical of serogroup Y N. meningitidis: are of serotype 2c, are of the multi-locus sequence types typical of the serogroup Y strains in Canada, and are genotyped as serogroup Y based on a previously described PCR-ELISA method that detects the serogroup-Y-specific siaD gene. However, both strains were poly-agglutinable in both anti-Y and anti-W135 antisera. Further studies on 1 of these 2 isolates showed the presence of glucose and galactose as well as sialic acids in its purified capsular polysaccharide, suggesting the presence of both serogroup Y and serogroup W135 polysaccharides. Rabbit antisera produced to this strain contained antibodies to both purified serogroup Y and serogroup W135 capsular polysaccharides. Absorption experiments with either serogroup Y or serogroup W135 bacteria confirmed the presence of antibodies to these 2 different polysaccharides. DNA sequencing of the cps operon from both isolates revealed a siaD gene with 99.7% homology to the published siaD sequence from a serogroup Y strain but with 3 point mutations that all resulted in amino acid changes. How these strains may affect results of routine surveillance, PCR diagnosis, and immuno-protection by vaccination are discussed.

  4. RapidTox Dashboard

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ToxCast Dashboard helps users examine high-throughput assay data to inform chemical safety decisions. To date, it has data on over 9,000 chemicals and information from more than 1,000 high-throughput assay endpoint components.

  5. ToxCast Dashboard

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ToxCast Dashboard helps users examine high-throughput assay data to inform chemical safety decisions. To date, it has data on over 9,000 chemicals and information from more than 1,000 high-throughput assay endpoint components.

  6. Biotransformation and ToxCast™

    Science.gov (United States)

    A major focus in toxicology research is the development of in vitro methods to predict in vivo chemical toxicity. Within the EPA ToxCast program, a broad range of in vitro biochemical and cellular assays have been deployed to profile the biological activity of 320 ToxCast Phase I...

  7. Immunogenicity of fractional doses of tetravalent a/c/y/w135 meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine: results from a randomized non-inferiority controlled trial in Uganda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe J Guerin

    Full Text Available Neisseria meningitidis serogroup A is the main causative pathogen of meningitis epidemics in sub-Saharan Africa. In recent years, serogroup W135 has also been the cause of epidemics. Mass vaccination campaigns with polysaccharide vaccines are key elements in controlling these epidemics. Facing global vaccine shortage, we explored the use of fractional doses of a licensed A/C/Y/W135 polysaccharide meningococcal vaccine.We conducted a randomized, non-inferiority trial in 750 healthy volunteers 2-19 years old in Mbarara, Uganda, to compare the immune response of the full dose of the vaccine versus fractional doses (1/5 or 1/10. Safety and tolerability data were collected for all subjects during the 4 weeks following the injection. Pre- and post-vaccination sera were analyzed by measuring serum bactericidal activity (SBA with baby rabbit complement. A responder was defined as a subject with a > or =4-fold increase in SBA against a target strain from each serogroup and SBA titer > or =128. For serogroup W135, 94% and 97% of the vaccinees in the 1/5- and 1/10-dose arms, respectively, were responders, versus 94% in the full-dose arm; for serogroup A, 92% and 88% were responders, respectively, versus 95%. Non-inferiority was demonstrated between the full dose and both fractional doses in SBA seroresponse against serogroups W135 and Y, in total population analysis. Non-inferiority was shown between the full and 1/5 doses for serogroup A in the population non-immune prior to vaccination. Non-inferiority was not shown for any of the fractionate doses for serogroup C. Safety and tolerability data were favourable, as observed in other studies.While the advent of conjugate A vaccine is anticipated to largely contribute to control serogroup A outbreaks in Africa, the scale-up of its production will not cover the entire "Meningitis Belt" target population for at least the next 3 to 5 years. In view of the current shortage of meningococcal vaccines for Africa

  8. ToxRefDB - Release user-friendly web-based tool for mining ToxRefDB

    Science.gov (United States)

    The updated URL link is for a table of NCCT ToxCast public datasets. The next to last row of the table has the link for the US EPA ToxCast ToxRefDB Data Release October 2014. ToxRefDB provides detailed chemical toxicity data in a publically accessible searchable format. ToxRefD...

  9. Persistence of immune responses after a single dose of Novartis meningococcal serogroup A, C, W-135 and Y CRM-197 conjugate vaccine (Menveo®) or Menactra® among healthy adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Christopher J; Baxter, Roger; Anemona, Alessandra; Ciavarro, Giuseppe; Dull, Peter

    2010-11-01

    The persistence of human bactericidal activity (hSBA) responses in adolescents was assessed 22 months after vaccination with one dose of Menveo® (MenACWY-CRM; Novartis) or Menactra® (MCV4) (sanofi pasteur). The proportion of subjects with hSBA titers ≥8 was significantly higher among recipients of MenACWY-CRM than MCV4 for serogroups A, W-135 and Y.

  10. Chemical Function Predictions for Tox21 Chemicals

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Random forest chemical function predictions for Tox21 chemicals in personal care products uses and "other" uses. This dataset is associated with the following...

  11. Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH): ToxFAQs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a state: This map displays locations where Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) is known to be present. On ... I get more information? ToxFAQs TM for Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) ( Hidrocarburos Totales de Petróleo (TPH) ) August ...

  12. TOX3 mutations in breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Owain Jones

    Full Text Available TOX3 maps to 16q12, a region commonly lost in breast cancers and recently implicated in the risk of developing breast cancer. However, not much is known of the role of TOX3 itself in breast cancer biology. This is the first study to determine the importance of TOX3 mutations in breast cancers. We screened TOX3 for mutations in 133 breast tumours and identified four mutations (three missense, one in-frame deletion of 30 base pairs in six primary tumours, corresponding to an overall mutation frequency of 4.5%. One potentially deleterious missense mutation in exon 3 (Leu129Phe was identified in one tumour (genomic DNA and cDNA. Whilst copy number changes of 16q12 are common in breast cancer, our data show that mutations of TOX3 are present at low frequency in tumours. Our results support that TOX3 should be further investigated to elucidate its role in breast cancer biology.

  13. Safety of Combination of a Tetravalent Meningococcal Conjugate Vaccine Against Serogroups A, C, Y, W-135 With Other Vaccine Preparations: a Prospective Study of a Series of Cases Among Healthy Children and Children With Various Health Abnormalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leyla S. Namazova-Baranova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Meningococcal infection is an acute disease caused by Neisseria meningitidis, which proceeds with a diverse clinical aspect from nasopharyngitis to meningococcal meningitis and meningococcemia. Since 2014, a tetravalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine has been registered in Russia. This vaccine creates protection against serogroups A, C, W-135, Y and can be used from the age of nine months to 55 years. The actual issue is a vaccine tolerability, including when combined with other vaccine preparations.Objective: Our aim was to evaluate the safety of a tetravalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine against serogroups A, C, Y and W-135 when it is combined with other vaccine preparations.Methods. A prospective full-design study assessed the tolerability of immunization with a meningococcal conjugate vaccine, both in case of monovaccination and in combination with a pneumococcal 13-valent conjugate vaccine, measles-mumps-rubella, viral hepatitis A, influenza, and chicken pox vaccines.Results. 97 children aged from 9 months to 18 years were vaccinated, 20 of them were healthy and 77 had medical issues (with allergic pathology, ENT diseases, cardiovascular and nervous system diseases, lung diseases as well as orphan diseases. Among vaccinated children, general reactions were observed in 3/97 (3.1% children, local reactions — in 5 (5.2%. The post-vaccination period passed asymptomatically and uneventfully in the prevailing majority of children vaccinated with a tetravalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine (in 91, 93.8%.Conclusion. The immunization with a tetravalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine against serogroups A, C, Y, W-135 is well tolerated, both in case of monovaccination and in combination with other vaccine preparations, in healthy children of different age groups and in patients with different health status.

  14. Critical appraisal of a quadrivalent CRM197 conjugate vaccine against meningococcal serogroups A, C W-135 and Y (Menveo®) in the context of treatment and prevention of invasive disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bröker, Michael; Cooper, Brian; DeTora, Lisa M; Stoddard, Jeffrey J

    2011-01-01

    Worldwide, invasive meningococcal disease affects about 500,000 people annually. Case fatality in developed countries averages 10%, and higher rates are reported in less prosperous regions. According to the World Health Organization, the most important pathogenic serogroups are A, B, C, W-135, X, and Y. Clinical features of invasive meningococcal disease make diagnosis and management difficult. Antibiotic measures are recommended for prophylaxis after exposure and for treatment of invasive meningococcal disease cases; however, resistant strains may be emerging. Vaccines are generally regarded as the best preventative measure for invasive meningococcal disease. Polysaccharide vaccines against serogroups A, C, W-135, and Y using protein conjugation technology have clear advantages over older plain polysaccharide formulations without a protein component. The first quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MenACWY-D) was licensed in the US in 2005. More recently, MenACWY-CRM (Menveo®) was licensed in Europe, the US, the Middle East, and Latin America. MenACWY-CRM uses cross-reactive material 197, a nontoxic mutant of diphtheria toxin, as the carrier protein. MenACWY-CRM offers robust immunogenicity in all age groups, with a tolerability profile similar to that of a plain polysaccharide vaccine. Given its potential for protecting persons from infancy to old age, MenACWY-CRM offers the opportunity to protect broad populations against invasive meningococcal disease. The most optimal strategy for use of the vaccine has to be assessed country by country on the basis of local epidemiology, individual health care systems, and need. PMID:21904459

  15. Critical appraisal of a quadrivalent CRM(197) conjugate vaccine against meningococcal serogroups A, C W-135 and Y (Menveo) in the context of treatment and prevention of invasive disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bröker, Michael; Cooper, Brian; Detora, Lisa M; Stoddard, Jeffrey J

    2011-01-01

    Worldwide, invasive meningococcal disease affects about 500,000 people annually. Case fatality in developed countries averages 10%, and higher rates are reported in less prosperous regions. According to the World Health Organization, the most important pathogenic serogroups are A, B, C, W-135, X, and Y. Clinical features of invasive meningococcal disease make diagnosis and management difficult. Antibiotic measures are recommended for prophylaxis after exposure and for treatment of invasive meningococcal disease cases; however, resistant strains may be emerging. Vaccines are generally regarded as the best preventative measure for invasive meningococcal disease. Polysaccharide vaccines against serogroups A, C, W-135, and Y using protein conjugation technology have clear advantages over older plain polysaccharide formulations without a protein component. The first quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MenACWY-D) was licensed in the US in 2005. More recently, MenACWY-CRM (Menveo(®)) was licensed in Europe, the US, the Middle East, and Latin America. MenACWY-CRM uses cross-reactive material 197, a nontoxic mutant of diphtheria toxin, as the carrier protein. MenACWY-CRM offers robust immunogenicity in all age groups, with a tolerability profile similar to that of a plain polysaccharide vaccine. Given its potential for protecting persons from infancy to old age, MenACWY-CRM offers the opportunity to protect broad populations against invasive meningococcal disease. The most optimal strategy for use of the vaccine has to be assessed country by country on the basis of local epidemiology, individual health care systems, and need.

  16. Retrospective_Mining_of_Tox_Data_Anemia_Case_Study_RegToxPharm Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Data from a study to critically examine some of the issues of using data from ToxRefDB, a database largely composed of guideline studies for pesticidal active...

  17. Critical appraisal of a quadrivalent CRM197 conjugate vaccine against meningococcal serogroups A, C W-135 and Y (Menveo® in the context of treatment and prevention of invasive disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bröker M

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Michael Bröker, Brian Cooper, Lisa M DeTora, Jeffrey J StoddardGlobal Medical Affairs, Novartis Vaccines and Diagnostics, Marburg, Germany, and Cambridge, MA, USAAbstract: Worldwide, invasive meningococcal disease affects about 500,000 people annually. Case fatality in developed countries averages 10%, and higher rates are reported in less prosperous regions. According to the World Health Organization, the most important pathogenic serogroups are A, B, C, W-135, X, and Y. Clinical features of invasive meningococcal disease make diagnosis and management difficult. Antibiotic measures are recommended for prophylaxis after exposure and for treatment of invasive meningococcal disease cases; however, resistant strains may be emerging. Vaccines are generally regarded as the best preventative measure for invasive meningococcal disease. Polysaccharide vaccines against serogroups A, C, W-135, and Y using protein conjugation technology have clear advantages over older plain polysaccharide formulations without a protein component. The first quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MenACWY-D was licensed in the US in 2005. More recently, MenACWY-CRM (Menveo® was licensed in Europe, the US, the Middle East, and Latin America. MenACWY-CRM uses cross-reactive material 197, a nontoxic mutant of diphtheria toxin, as the carrier protein. MenACWY-CRM offers robust immunogenicity in all age groups, with a tolerability profile similar to that of a plain polysaccharide vaccine. Given its potential for protecting persons from infancy to old age, MenACWY-CRM offers the opportunity to protect broad populations against invasive meningococcal disease. The most optimal strategy for use of the vaccine has to be assessed country by country on the basis of local epidemiology, individual health care systems, and need.Keywords: invasive meningococcal disease, quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine, Neisseria meningitidis

  18. A randomized study to assess the immunogenicity, antibody persistence and safety of a tetravalent meningococcal serogroups A, C, W-135 and Y tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine in children aged 2–10 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesikari, Timo; Forstén, Aino; Boutriau, Dominique; Bianco, Véronique; Van der Wielen, Marie; Miller, Jacqueline M.

    2012-01-01

    Incidence of meningococcal diseases is high in children, and effective vaccines are needed for this age group. In this phase II, open, controlled study, 309 children aged 2–10 y from Finland were randomized (3:1) into two parallel groups to receive one dose of meningococcal ACWY-tetanus toxoid conjugate vaccine (ACWY-TT group; n = 231) or a licensed meningococcal ACWY polysaccharide vaccine (Men-PS group; n = 78). Serum bactericidal activity using rabbit complement (rSBA) was evaluated up to three years post-vaccination. Exploratory comparisons suggested that rSBA vaccine response rates and geometric mean titers (GMTs) for each serogroup at one month post-vaccination and rSBA GMTs for serogroups A, W-135 and Y up to three years post-vaccination were higher in the ACWY-TT compared with Men-PS group, but did not detect any difference between groups in terms of rSBA-MenC GMTs at three years post-vaccination; this is explained by the higher proportion of children from the Men-PS group who were excluded because they were re-vaccinated with a monovalent meningococcal serogroup C vaccine due to loss of protective antibody levels against this serogroup. Although there was a higher incidence of local reactogenicity in the ACWY-TT group, general and unsolicited symptoms reporting rates were comparable in both groups. This study showed that MenACWY-TT was immunogenic with a clinically acceptable safety profile in children aged 2–10 y. MenACWY-TT induced higher functional antibody titers for all serogroups, which persisted longer for serogroups A, W-135 and Y, than the MenACWY polysaccharide vaccine. This study has been registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov NCT00427908. PMID:23032168

  19. CompTox Chemistry Dashboard webinar

    Science.gov (United States)

    The CompTox Chemistry Dashboard is part of a suite of dashboards developed by EPA to help evaluate the safety of chemicals. The dashboard provides access to a variety of information on over 700,000 chemicals currently in use. Within the application, users

  20. FutureTox III: Bridges for Translation

    Science.gov (United States)

    The present document describes key discussion points and outcomes of a Society of Toxicology (SOT) Contemporary Concepts in Toxicology (CCT) Workshop, entitled FutureTox III1,2 that was held in Crystal City, Virginia, November 19-20, 2015. The workshop built on the many lessons l...

  1. QSAR Classification of ToxCast and Tox21 Chemicals on the Basis of Estrogen Receptor Assays (FutureToxII)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ToxCast and Tox21 programs have tested ~8,200 chemicals in a broad screening panel of in vitro high-throughput screening (HTS) assays for estrogen receptor (ER) agonist and antagonist activity. The present work uses this large in vitro data set to develop in silico QSAR model...

  2. Global spredning af meningokok serogruppe w135

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergård, Dorthe; David, Kim P

    2008-01-01

    Worldwide, meningococcal meningitis and sepsis cause 500,000 cases of illness and 50,000 deaths annually. The increase in global travel activity has resulted in a change in the epidemiology of infectious diseases, and an accumulation of evidence now indicates a connection between pilgrimage and t...

  3. Understanding the Biology and Technology of ToxCast and Tox21 Assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ToxCast high-throughput toxicity (HTT) testing methods have been developed to evaluate the hazard potential of diverse environmental, industrial and consumer product chemicals. The main goal is prioritizing the compounds of greatest concern for more detailed toxicological stu...

  4. FutureTox III: Bridges for Translation | Science Inventory | US ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The present document describes key discussion points and outcomes of a Society of Toxicology (SOT) Contemporary Concepts in Toxicology (CCT) Workshop, entitled FutureTox III1,2 that was held in Crystal City, Virginia, November 19-20, 2015. The workshop built on the many lessons learned from the first 10 years of TT21 and the first two workshops in the FutureTox series (for summary of FutureTox II see (Knudsen et al., 2015); for summary of FutureTox I see (Rowlands et al., 2014)). FutureTox III was attended in person and via webcast by more than 300 scientists from government research and regulatory agencies, research institutes, academia, and the chemical and pharmaceutical industries in Europe, Canada, and the United States. The meeting materials for FutureTox III, currently available to meeting registrants at http://www.toxicology.org/events/shm/cct/meetings.asp#upcoming-pnl-open, will be open to the public on November 29, 2016. At this workshop, participants reviewed and discussed the state of the science in toxicology and human risk and exposure assessment with a focus on moving TT21 science into the arena of regulatory decision-making. This manuscript describes the outcome of the FutureTox III 'contemporary concepts in toxicology' conference of the Society Toxicology, held November 2015 in Crystal City VA.

  5. eMolTox: prediction of molecular toxicity with confidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Changge; Svensson, Fredrik; Zoufir, Azedine; Bender, Andreas

    2018-03-07

    In this work we present eMolTox, a web server for the prediction of potential toxicity associated with a given molecule. 174 toxicology-related in vitro/vivo experimental datasets were used for model construction and Mondrian conformal prediction was used to estimate the confidence of the resulting predictions. Toxic substructure analysis is also implemented in eMolTox. eMolTox predicts and displays a wealth of information of potential molecular toxicities for safety analysis in drug development. The eMolTox Server is freely available for use on the web at http://xundrug.cn/moltox. chicago.ji@gmail.com or ab454@cam.ac.uk. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  6. Toxicology Testing in the 21st Century (Tox21)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tox21 researchers aim to develop better toxicity assessment methods to quickly and efficiently test whether certain chemical compounds have the potential to disrupt processes in the human body that may lead to negative health effects.

  7. Toxicology in the 21st Century (Tox21)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tox21 researchers aim to develop better toxicity assessment methods to quickly and efficiently test whether certain chemical compounds have the potential to disrupt processes in the human body that may lead to negative health effects.

  8. ADME-Tox profiles of some food additives and pesticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craciun, Dana; Modra, Dorina; Isvoran, Adriana

    2015-12-01

    Within this study we compute the Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism, Excretion and Toxicity (ADME-Tox) profiles of several commonly used food additives and some pesticides. As expected, all the food additives considered in this study provided to be safe, their ADME-Tox profiles indicating that they have a good oral bioavailability and they do not produce phosphoslipidosis. The ADME-Tox profiles of the pesticides indicate that, with a few exceptions, they are highly toxic (some of them being not approved in the EU, but still used in other countries) and may cause many diseases. Our results are in good agreement with published data concerning the considered food additives and pesticides revealing that the ADME-Tox profiling method may be successfully used to test other chemicals than drug candidates.

  9. TOX sets the stage for innate lymphoid cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spits, Hergen

    2015-01-01

    Like T cells and B cells, innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) develop from common lymphoid progenitors, but how commitment to the ILC lineage is regulated has remained unclear. The transcriptional regulator TOX is important in this process

  10. Differential epigenetic regulation of TOX subfamily high mobility group box genes in lung and breast cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathewos Tessema

    Full Text Available Aberrant cytosine methylation affects regulation of hundreds of genes during cancer development. In this study, a novel aberrantly hypermethylated CpG island in cancer was discovered within the TOX2 promoter. TOX2 was unmethylated in normal cells but 28% lung (n = 190 and 23% breast (n = 80 tumors were methylated. Expression of two novel TOX2 transcripts identified was significantly reduced in primary lung tumors than distant normal lung (p<0.05. These transcripts were silenced in methylated lung and breast cancer cells and 5-Aza-2-deoxycytidine treatment re-expressed both. Extension of these assays to TOX, TOX3, and TOX4 genes that share similar genomic structure and protein homology with TOX2 revealed distinct methylation profiles by smoking status, histology, and cancer type. TOX was almost exclusively methylated in breast (43% than lung (5% cancer, whereas TOX3 was frequently methylated in lung (58% than breast (30% tumors. TOX4 was unmethylated in all samples and showed the highest expression in normal lung. Compared to TOX4, expression of TOX, TOX2 and TOX3 in normal lung was 25, 44, and 88% lower, respectively, supporting the premise that reduced promoter activity confers increased susceptibility to methylation during lung carcinogenesis. Genome-wide assays revealed that siRNA-mediated TOX2 knockdown modulated multiple pathways while TOX3 inactivation targeted neuronal development and function. Although these knockdowns did not result in further phenotypic changes of lung cancer cells in vitro, the impact on tissue remodeling, inflammatory response, and cell differentiation pathways suggest a potential role for TOX2 in modulating tumor microenvironment.

  11. TOX3 (TNRC9) overexpression in bladder cancer cells decreases cellular proliferation and triggers an interferon-like response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkenkamp-Demtröder, Karin; Mansilla, Francisco; Andersen, Lars Dyrskjøt

    2013-01-01

    Background Human TOX3 (TOX high mobility group box family member 3) regulates Ca2+-dependent transcription in neurons and has been associated with breast cancer susceptibility. Aim of the study was to investigate the expression of TOX3 in bladder cancer tissue samples and to identify genes...... urothelium. Microarray expression profiling of human bladder cancer cells overexpressing TOX3 followed by Pathway analysis showed that TOX3 overexpression mainly affected the Interferon Signaling Pathway. TOX3 upregulation induced the expression of several genes with a gamma interferon activation site (GAS......), e.g. STAT1. In vitro functional studies showed that TOX3 was able to bind to the GAS-sequence located at the STAT1 promoter. siRNA mediated knockdown of TOX3 in RT4 bladder cancer cells decreased STAT1 expression suggesting a direct impact of TOX3 on STAT1. Immunoprecipitation of TOX3 overexpressing...

  12. TOX3 (TNRC9) Over Expression in Bladder Cancer Cells Decreases Cellular Proliferation and Triggers an Interferon-Like Response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkenkamp-Demtroder, Karin; Mansilla Castaño, Francisco; Dyrskjøt, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Background: Human TOX3 (TOX high mobility group box family member 3) regulates Ca2+ dependent transcription in neurons and has been associated with breast cancer susceptibility. Aim of the study was to investigate the expression of TOX3 in bladder cancer tissue samples and to identify genes...... urothelium. Microarray expression profiling of human bladder cancer cells over expressing TOX3 followed by Pathway analysis showed that TOX3 Overexpression mainly affected the Interferon Signaling Pathway. TOX3 up regulation induced the expression of several genes with a gamma interferon activation site (GAS......), e.g. STAT1. In vitro functional studies showed that TOX3 was able to bind to the GAS-sequence located at the STAT1 promoter. siRNA mediated knockdown of TOX3 in RT4 bladder cancer cells decreased STAT1 expression suggesting a direct impact of TOX3 on STAT1. Immunoprecipitation of TOX3 over...

  13. Seroprevalence and placental transmission of maternal antibodies specific for Neisseria meningitidis Serogroups A, C, Y and W135 and influence of maternal antibodies on the immune response to a primary course of MenACWY-CRM vaccine in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard-Rohner, Geraldine; Snape, Matthew D; Kelly, Dominic F; O'Connor, Daniel; John, Tessa; Kibwana, Elizabeth; Parks, Hannah; Ford, Karen; Dull, Peter M; Pollard, Andrew J

    2013-07-01

    Maternal antibodies give neonates some protection against bacterial infection. We measured antibodies against Neisseria meningitidis serogroups A, C, Y and W135 in mothers and their 2-month-old infants at study enrollment. We also assessed the impact of maternal antibody present at 2 months of age on the immune response to a primary course of quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MenACWY-CRM197) given at 2 and 4 months of age. This was a single-center, open-label, randomized study undertaken in Oxford, United Kingdom. Two hundred sixteen healthy infants were enrolled in the study and vaccinated with MenACWY-CRM197 at 2 and 4 months of age. Blood was obtained from all mothers, in a subset of infants at 2 months and all infants at 5 months. Antibody and memory B-cell responses at 5 months were correlated with maternal antibodies. Mothers had low IgG antibodies against serogroups C, W135 and Y polysaccharides, but high serogroup A antibody, whereas 61-78% had protective human complement serum bactericidal activity (hSBA) (≥1:4) for serogroups C, W135 and Y but only 31% for serogroup A. Only 9%, 32%, 45% and 19% of 2-month-old infants had hSBA ≥1:4 for serogroups A, C, W135 and Y, respectively. Maternal antibody had little association on responses to MenACWY-CRM197, except a moderate negative association between MenC-specific bactericidal antibody at 2 and 5 months (r = -0.5, P = 0.006, n = 28) and between carrier-specific IgG antibody at 2 months and MenC-specific hSBA/IgG antibody at 5 months (r = -0.4, P = 0.02 and 0.04, n = 32 and 23). Nonetheless, 90% of infants achieved protective MenC-hSBA titers after vaccination at 2 and 4 months of age. The levels of serogroup-specific meningococcal antibodies were low in mothers and 2-month-old infants. Immunizing mothers before or during pregnancy with meningococcal conjugate vaccines might increase antibody levels in early infancy and provide protection against infection due to N. meningitidis.

  14. Metabolism Retrofit Strategies for ToxCast Assays (BOSC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The EPA’s ToxCast program utilizes a wide variety of high-throughput screening assays (HTS) to assess chemical perturbations of molecular and cellular endpoints. A limitation of many HTS assays used for toxicity assessment is the lack of xenobiotic metabolism (XM) which precludes...

  15. Chemical and HTS Profiling of 63 Cleft Palate Teratogens from ToxCast (FutureTox III)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleft palate is a common human birth defect that has been linked to both genetic and environmental factors. To characterize the potential molecular targets and biological processes across mechanistically diverse teratogens that cause cleft palate, we mined the ToxCast high-throug...

  16. 20180416 - Understanding the Biology and Technology of ToxCast and Tox21 Assays (SETAC Durham NC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ToxCast high-throughput toxicity (HTT) testing methods have been developed to evaluate the hazard potential of diverse environmental, industrial and consumer product chemicals. The main goal is prioritizing the compounds of greatest concern for more detailed toxicological stu...

  17. Cheminformatics Analysis of EPA ToxCast Chemical Libraries ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    An important goal of toxicology research is the development of robust methods that use in vitro and chemical structure information to predict in vivo toxicity endpoints. The US EPA ToxCast program is addressing this goal using ~600 in vitro assays to create bioactivity profiles on a set of 320 compounds, mostly pesticide actives, that have well characterized in vivo toxicity. These 320 compounds (EPA-320 set evaluated in Phase I of ToxCast) are a subset of a much larger set of ~10,000 candidates that are of interest to the EPA (called here EPA-10K). Predictive models of in vivo toxicity are being constructed from the in vitro assay data on the EPA-320 chemical set. These models require validation on additional chemicals prior to wide acceptance, and this will be carried out by evaluating compounds from EPA-10K in Phase II of ToxCast. We have used cheminformatics approaches including clustering, data visualization, and QSAR to develop models for EPA-320 that could help prioritizing EPA-10K validation chemicals. Both chemical descriptors, as well as calculated physicochemical properties have been used. Compounds from EPA-10K are prioritized based on their similarity to EPA-320 using different similarity metrics, with similarity thresholds defining the domain of applicability for the predictive models built for EPA-320 set. In addition, prioritized lists of compounds of increasing dissimilarity from the EPA-320 have been produced, to test the ability of the EPA-320

  18. In silico ADME-Tox modeling: progress and prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqahtani, Saeed

    2017-11-01

    Although significant progress has been made in high-throughput screening of absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion, and toxicity (ADME-Tox) properties in drug discovery and development, in silico ADME-Tox prediction continues to play an important role in facilitating the appropriate selection of candidate drugs by pharmaceutical companies prior to expensive clinical trials. Areas covered: This review provides an overview of the available in silico models that have been used to predict the ADME-Tox properties of compounds. It also provides a comprehensive overview and summarization of the latest modeling methods and algorithms available for the prediction of physicochemical characteristics, ADME properties, and drug toxicity issues. Expert opinion: The in silico models currently available have greatly contributed to the knowledge of screening approaches in the early stages of drug discovery and the development process. As the definitive goal of in silico molding is to predict the pharmacokinetics and disposition of compounds in vivo by assembling all kinetic processes within one global model, PBPK models can serve this purpose. However, much work remains to be done in this area to generate more data and input parameters to build more reliable and accurate prediction models.

  19. ToxCast Chemical Landscape: Paving the Road to 21st Century Toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Ann M; Judson, Richard S; Houck, Keith A; Grulke, Christopher M; Volarath, Patra; Thillainadarajah, Inthirany; Yang, Chihae; Rathman, James; Martin, Matthew T; Wambaugh, John F; Knudsen, Thomas B; Kancherla, Jayaram; Mansouri, Kamel; Patlewicz, Grace; Williams, Antony J; Little, Stephen B; Crofton, Kevin M; Thomas, Russell S

    2016-08-15

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) ToxCast program is testing a large library of Agency-relevant chemicals using in vitro high-throughput screening (HTS) approaches to support the development of improved toxicity prediction models. Launched in 2007, Phase I of the program screened 310 chemicals, mostly pesticides, across hundreds of ToxCast assay end points. In Phase II, the ToxCast library was expanded to 1878 chemicals, culminating in the public release of screening data at the end of 2013. Subsequent expansion in Phase III has resulted in more than 3800 chemicals actively undergoing ToxCast screening, 96% of which are also being screened in the multi-Agency Tox21 project. The chemical library unpinning these efforts plays a central role in defining the scope and potential application of ToxCast HTS results. The history of the phased construction of EPA's ToxCast library is reviewed, followed by a survey of the library contents from several different vantage points. CAS Registry Numbers are used to assess ToxCast library coverage of important toxicity, regulatory, and exposure inventories. Structure-based representations of ToxCast chemicals are then used to compute physicochemical properties, substructural features, and structural alerts for toxicity and biotransformation. Cheminformatics approaches using these varied representations are applied to defining the boundaries of HTS testability, evaluating chemical diversity, and comparing the ToxCast library to potential target application inventories, such as used in EPA's Endocrine Disruption Screening Program (EDSP). Through several examples, the ToxCast chemical library is demonstrated to provide comprehensive coverage of the knowledge domains and target inventories of potential interest to EPA. Furthermore, the varied representations and approaches presented here define local chemistry domains potentially worthy of further investigation (e.g., not currently covered in the testing library or

  20. 20180312 - Profiling the ToxCast library with a pluripotent human (H9) embryonic stem cell assay (SOT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Stemina devTOX quickPredict platform (STM) is a human pluripotent H9 stem cell-based assay that predicts developmental toxicants. Using the STM model, we screened 1065 ToxCast chemicals and entered the data into the ToxCast data analysis pipeline. Model performance was 83.3% ...

  1. ToxCast Workflow: High-throughput screening assay data processing, analysis and management (SOT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    US EPA’s ToxCast program is generating data in high-throughput screening (HTS) and high-content screening (HCS) assays for thousands of environmental chemicals, for use in developing predictive toxicity models. Currently the ToxCast screening program includes over 1800 unique c...

  2. Tutorial Video Series: Using Stakeholder Outreach to Increase Usage of ToxCast Data (SETAC EU)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The limited amount of toxicity data on thousands of chemicals found in consumer products has led to the development of research endeavors such as the U.S. EPA’s Toxicity Forecaster (ToxCast). ToxCast uses high-throughput screening technology to evaluate thousands of chemicals for...

  3. The Tox21 robotic platform for the assessment of environmental chemicals--from vision to reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attene-Ramos, Matias S; Miller, Nicole; Huang, Ruili; Michael, Sam; Itkin, Misha; Kavlock, Robert J; Austin, Christopher P; Shinn, Paul; Simeonov, Anton; Tice, Raymond R; Xia, Menghang

    2013-08-01

    Since its establishment in 2008, the US Tox21 inter-agency collaboration has made great progress in developing and evaluating cellular models for the evaluation of environmental chemicals as a proof of principle. Currently, the program has entered its production phase (Tox21 Phase II) focusing initially on the areas of modulation of nuclear receptors and stress response pathways. During Tox21 Phase II, the set of chemicals to be tested has been expanded to nearly 10,000 (10K) compounds and a fully automated screening platform has been implemented. The Tox21 robotic system combined with informatics efforts is capable of screening and profiling the collection of 10K environmental chemicals in triplicate in a week. In this article, we describe the Tox21 screening process, compound library preparation, data processing, and robotic system validation. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Applying network analysis and Nebula (neighbor-edges based and unbiased leverage algorithm) to ToxCast data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Hao; Luo, Heng; Ng, Hui Wen; Meehan, Joe; Ge, Weigong; Tong, Weida; Hong, Huixiao

    2016-01-01

    ToxCast data have been used to develop models for predicting in vivo toxicity. To predict the in vivo toxicity of a new chemical using a ToxCast data based model, its ToxCast bioactivity data are needed but not normally available. The capability of predicting ToxCast bioactivity data is necessary to fully utilize ToxCast data in the risk assessment of chemicals. We aimed to understand and elucidate the relationships between the chemicals and bioactivity data of the assays in ToxCast and to develop a network analysis based method for predicting ToxCast bioactivity data. We conducted modularity analysis on a quantitative network constructed from ToxCast data to explore the relationships between the assays and chemicals. We further developed Nebula (neighbor-edges based and unbiased leverage algorithm) for predicting ToxCast bioactivity data. Modularity analysis on the network constructed from ToxCast data yielded seven modules. Assays and chemicals in the seven modules were distinct. Leave-one-out cross-validation yielded a Q(2) of 0.5416, indicating ToxCast bioactivity data can be predicted by Nebula. Prediction domain analysis showed some types of ToxCast assay data could be more reliably predicted by Nebula than others. Network analysis is a promising approach to understand ToxCast data. Nebula is an effective algorithm for predicting ToxCast bioactivity data, helping fully utilize ToxCast data in the risk assessment of chemicals. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Prediction of metabolites of epoxidation reaction in MetaTox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudik, A V; Dmitriev, A V; Bezhentsev, V M; Lagunin, A A; Filimonov, D A; Poroikov, V V

    2017-10-01

    Biotransformation is a process of the chemical modifications which may lead to the reactive metabolites, in particular the epoxides. Epoxide reactive metabolites may cause the toxic effects. The prediction of such metabolites is important for drug development and ecotoxicology studies. Epoxides are formed by some oxidation reactions, usually catalysed by cytochromes P450, and represent a large class of three-membered cyclic ethers. Identification of molecules, which may be epoxidized, and indication of the specific location of epoxide functional group (which is called SOE - site of epoxidation) are important for prediction of epoxide metabolites. Datasets from 355 molecules and 615 reactions were created for training and validation. The prediction of SOE is based on a combination of LMNA (Labelled Multilevel Neighbourhood of Atom) descriptors and Bayesian-like algorithm implemented in PASS software and MetaTox web-service. The average invariant accuracy of prediction (AUC) calculated in leave-one-out and 20-fold cross-validation procedures is 0.9. Prediction of epoxide formation based on the created SAR model is included as the component of MetaTox web-service ( http://www.way2drug.com/mg ).

  6. Outbreak of serotype W135 Neisseria meningitidis in central river ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-06-21

    Jun 21, 2012 ... program on immunization schedule of the Gambia and other countries within the meningitic epidemic belt. Key words: Neisseria ... The African meningitis belt extends from Ethiopia in the. East, to Senegal in the West within ..... surveillance and management system at the national level for effective control of ...

  7. Effects of experimental Neisseria meningitis W135 infection on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJB SERVER

    2006-09-04

    Sep 4, 2006 ... oxygen and energy demand at the expense of increased intracranial pressure due to ... multilocus electrophoresis (Selander et al., 1986) at the Central. Laboratory of ..... Part I. Intl. J. Sports Med. 22(7):467–481. Tan TQ ...

  8. Outbreak of serotype W135 Neisseria meningitidis in central river ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-06-21

    Jun 21, 2012 ... References. 1. Gambia Ministry of Health and Social welfare. Epidemiology and disease control unit Banjul; 2012. 2. World Health Organization. Control of epidemic meningococcal disease. In: Practical Guidelines. 2nd ed. Geneva: World Health Organization; 1998. Available from: http://www.who.int/emc.

  9. Estandarización de ensayos inmunoenzimáticos (ELISA para la cuantificación de anticuerpos IgG inducidos por una vacuna de vesículas de membrana externa de los serogrupos A y W135 de Neisseria meningitidis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleida Mandiarote

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available La enfermedad meningocócica es una afección invasiva, de amplia incidencia mundial, cuyo agente causal es la bacteria gramnegativa Neisseria meningitidis . Existen vacunas polisacarídicas sin conjugar o conjugadas, contra cuatro de los cinco serogrupos responsables del 95% de los casos en el mundo. Para el serogrupo B, cuyo polisacárido es pobremente inmunogénico, se han evaluado varios candidatos vacunales producidos a base de vesículas de membrana externa. La determinación de la actividad bactericida y la cuantificación de IgG por ELISA han sido los métodos más utilizados en la medición de la respuesta inmune generada por vacunas contra la meningitis meningocócica. El segundo de estos métodos es utilizado en el Instituto Finlay como ensayo de inmunogenicidad para la liberación de lotes de VA-MENGOC-BC®. Como parte de una colaboración con investigadores noruegos, se trabaja en la obtención de un candidato vacunal contra los serogrupos A y W135 , basado en vesículas de membrana externa. En el presente trabajo se describe la estandarización de un ELISA para ser utilizado en la evaluación de la respuesta inmune del candidato vacunal bivalente.

  10. Intersection of toxicogenomics and high throughput screening in the Tox21 program: an NIEHS perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrick, B Alex; Paules, Richard S; Tice, Raymond R

    Humans are exposed to thousands of chemicals with inadequate toxicological data. Advances in computational toxicology, robotic high throughput screening (HTS), and genome-wide expression have been integrated into the Tox21 program to better predict the toxicological effects of chemicals. Tox21 is a collaboration among US government agencies initiated in 2008 that aims to shift chemical hazard assessment from traditional animal toxicology to target-specific, mechanism-based, biological observations using in vitro assays and lower organism models. HTS uses biocomputational methods for probing thousands of chemicals in in vitro assays for gene-pathway response patterns predictive of adverse human health outcomes. In 1999, NIEHS began exploring the application of toxicogenomics to toxicology and recent advances in NextGen sequencing should greatly enhance the biological content obtained from HTS platforms. We foresee an intersection of new technologies in toxicogenomics and HTS as an innovative development in Tox21. Tox21 goals, priorities, progress, and challenges will be reviewed.

  11. Deiodinase 1 Screening of ToxCast Phase 1 Chemical Library

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This excel spreadsheet contains the resultant data for over from inhibition assays with human Deiodinase 1 screened against the ToxCast Phase 1 chemical library and...

  12. ToxReporter: viewing the genome through the eyes of a toxicologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosink, Mark

    2016-01-01

    One of the many roles of a toxicologist is to determine if an observed adverse event (AE) is related to a previously unrecognized function of a given gene/protein. Towards that end, he or she will search a variety of public and propriety databases for information linking that protein to the observed AE. However, these databases tend to present all available information about a protein, which can be overwhelming, limiting the ability to find information about the specific toxicity being investigated. ToxReporter compiles information from a broad selection of resources and limits display of the information to user-selected areas of interest. ToxReporter is a PERL-based web-application which utilizes a MySQL database to streamline this process by categorizing public and proprietary domain-derived information into predefined safety categories according to a customizable lexicon. Users can view gene information that is 'red-flagged' according to the safety issue under investigation. ToxReporter also uses a scoring system based on relative counts of the red-flags to rank all genes for the amount of information pertaining to each safety issue and to display their scored ranking as an easily interpretable 'Tox-At-A-Glance' chart. Although ToxReporter was originally developed to display safety information, its flexible design could easily be adapted to display disease information as well.Database URL: ToxReporter is freely available at https://github.com/mgosink/ToxReporter. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  13. OpenTox predictive toxicology framework: toxicological ontology and semantic media wiki-based OpenToxipedia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tcheremenskaia, Olga; Benigni, Romualdo; Nikolova, Ivelina; Jeliazkova, Nina; Escher, Sylvia E; Batke, Monika; Baier, Thomas; Poroikov, Vladimir; Lagunin, Alexey; Rautenberg, Micha; Hardy, Barry

    2012-04-24

    The OpenTox Framework, developed by the partners in the OpenTox project (http://www.opentox.org), aims at providing a unified access to toxicity data, predictive models and validation procedures. Interoperability of resources is achieved using a common information model, based on the OpenTox ontologies, describing predictive algorithms, models and toxicity data. As toxicological data may come from different, heterogeneous sources, a deployed ontology, unifying the terminology and the resources, is critical for the rational and reliable organization of the data, and its automatic processing. The following related ontologies have been developed for OpenTox: a) Toxicological ontology - listing the toxicological endpoints; b) Organs system and Effects ontology - addressing organs, targets/examinations and effects observed in in vivo studies; c) ToxML ontology - representing semi-automatic conversion of the ToxML schema; d) OpenTox ontology- representation of OpenTox framework components: chemical compounds, datasets, types of algorithms, models and validation web services; e) ToxLink-ToxCast assays ontology and f) OpenToxipedia community knowledge resource on toxicology terminology.OpenTox components are made available through standardized REST web services, where every compound, data set, and predictive method has a unique resolvable address (URI), used to retrieve its Resource Description Framework (RDF) representation, or to initiate the associated calculations and generate new RDF-based resources.The services support the integration of toxicity and chemical data from various sources, the generation and validation of computer models for toxic effects, seamless integration of new algorithms and scientifically sound validation routines and provide a flexible framework, which allows building arbitrary number of applications, tailored to solving different problems by end users (e.g. toxicologists). The OpenTox toxicological ontology projects may be accessed via the OpenTox

  14. Extending the Derek-Meteor Workflow to Predict Chemical-Toxicity Space Impacted by Metabolism: Application to ToxCast and Tox21 Chemical Inventories

    Science.gov (United States)

    A central aim of EPA’s ToxCast project is to use in vitro high-throughput screening (HTS) profiles to build predictive models of in vivo toxicity. Where assays lack metabolic capability, such efforts may need to anticipate the role of metabolic activation (or deactivation). A wo...

  15. ProTox: a web server for the in silico prediction of rodent oral toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drwal, Malgorzata N; Banerjee, Priyanka; Dunkel, Mathias; Wettig, Martin R; Preissner, Robert

    2014-07-01

    Animal trials are currently the major method for determining the possible toxic effects of drug candidates and cosmetics. In silico prediction methods represent an alternative approach and aim to rationalize the preclinical drug development, thus enabling the reduction of the associated time, costs and animal experiments. Here, we present ProTox, a web server for the prediction of rodent oral toxicity. The prediction method is based on the analysis of the similarity of compounds with known median lethal doses (LD50) and incorporates the identification of toxic fragments, therefore representing a novel approach in toxicity prediction. In addition, the web server includes an indication of possible toxicity targets which is based on an in-house collection of protein-ligand-based pharmacophore models ('toxicophores') for targets associated with adverse drug reactions. The ProTox web server is open to all users and can be accessed without registration at: http://tox.charite.de/tox. The only requirement for the prediction is the two-dimensional structure of the input compounds. All ProTox methods have been evaluated based on a diverse external validation set and displayed strong performance (sensitivity, specificity and precision of 76, 95 and 75%, respectively) and superiority over other toxicity prediction tools, indicating their possible applicability for other compound classes. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  16. The Role of TOX in the Development of Innate Lymphoid Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seehus, Corey R; Kaye, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    TOX, an evolutionarily conserved member of the HMG-box family of proteins, is essential for the development of various cells of both the innate and adaptive immune system. TOX is required for the development of CD4(+) T lineage cells in the thymus, including natural killer T and T regulatory cells, as well as development of natural killer cells and fetal lymphoid tissue inducer cells, the latter required for lymph node organogenesis. Recently, we have identified a broader role for TOX in the innate immune system, demonstrating that this nuclear protein is required for generation of bone marrow progenitors that have potential to give rise to all innate lymphoid cells. Innate lymphoid cells, classified according to transcription factor expression and cytokine secretion profiles, derive from common lymphoid progenitors in the bone marrow and require Notch signals for their development. We discuss here the role of TOX in specifying CLP toward an innate lymphoid cell fate and hypothesize a possible role for TOX in regulating Notch gene targets during innate lymphoid cell development.

  17. The Role of TOX in the Development of Innate Lymphoid Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corey R. Seehus

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available TOX, an evolutionarily conserved member of the HMG-box family of proteins, is essential for the development of various cells of both the innate and adaptive immune system. TOX is required for the development of CD4+ T lineage cells in the thymus, including natural killer T and T regulatory cells, as well as development of natural killer cells and fetal lymphoid tissue inducer cells, the latter required for lymph node organogenesis. Recently, we have identified a broader role for TOX in the innate immune system, demonstrating that this nuclear protein is required for generation of bone marrow progenitors that have potential to give rise to all innate lymphoid cells. Innate lymphoid cells, classified according to transcription factor expression and cytokine secretion profiles, derive from common lymphoid progenitors in the bone marrow and require Notch signals for their development. We discuss here the role of TOX in specifying CLP toward an innate lymphoid cell fate and hypothesize a possible role for TOX in regulating Notch gene targets during innate lymphoid cell development.

  18. Analysis of ToxCast data for food-relevant compounds by ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ToxCast program has generated a wealth of in vitro high throughput screening data, and best approaches for the interpretation and use of these data remain undetermined. We present case studies comparing the ToxCast and in vivo toxicity data for two food contact substances using the RISK21 approach. Available exposure data, toxicity data, and model predictions were analyzed for sodium pyrithione and dibutyltin dichloride. In-vitro to in-vivo extrapolation (IVIVE) was performed to determine oral equivalent doses (OEDs) for the ToxCast data bioactivity. For sodium pyrithione, calculated OEDs corresponded to doses that demonstrated toxicity in animal studies. For dibutyltin dichloride, calculated OEDs were below the doses that demonstrated toxicity in animals, but this was confounded by the conservative estimates used in the IVIVE calculations. These studies highlight the potential of the ToxCast approach while also indicating areas where additional data or predictive tools are needed. We present case studies comparing the ToxCast and in vivo toxicity data for two food contact substances using the RISK21 approach.

  19. ToxCast Profiling in a Human Stem Cell Assay for ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standard practice for assessing disruptions in embryogenesis involves testing pregnant animals of two species, typically rats and rabbits, exposed during major organogenesis and evaluated just prior to term. Under this design the major manifestations of developmental toxicity are observed as one or more apical endpoints including intrauterine death, fetal growth retardation, structural malformations and variations. Alternative approaches to traditional developmental toxicity testing have been proposed in the form of in vitro data (e.g., embryonic stem cells, zebrafish embryos, HTS assays) and in silico models (e.g., computational toxicology). To increase the diversity of assays used to assess developmental toxicity in EPA’s ToxCast program, we tested the chemicals in Stemina’s metabolomics-based platform that utilizes the commecrially available H9 human embryonic stem cell line. The devTOXqP dataset for ToxCast of high-quality based on replicate samples and model performance (82% balanced accuracy, 0.71 sensitivity and 1.00 specificity). To date, 136 ToxCast chemicals (12.8% of 1065 tested) were positive in this platform; 48 triggered the biomarker signal without any change in hESC viability and 88 triggered activity concurrent with effects on cell viability. Work is in progress to complete the STM dataset entry into the TCPL, compare data with results from zFish and mESC platforms, profile bioactivity (ToxCastDB), endpoints (ToxRefDB), chemotypes (DSSTox)

  20. Structure Identification Using High Resolution Mass Spectrometry Data and the EPA’s CompTox Chemistry Dashboard (EAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The iCSS CompTox Dashboard is a publicly accessible dashboard provided by the National Center for Computation Toxicology at the US-EPA. It serves a number of purposes, including providing a chemistry database underpinning many of our public-facing projects (e.g. ToxCast and ExpoC...

  1. “httk”: EPA’s Tool for High Throughput Toxicokinetics (CompTox CoP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thousands of chemicals have been pro?led by high-throughput screening programs such as ToxCast and Tox21; these chemicals are tested in part because most of them have limited or no data on hazard, exposure, or toxicokinetics. Toxicokinetic models aid in predicting tissue concentr...

  2. An Evaluation of ToxCast Angiogenic Disruptors for Effects on Mitochondrial Bioactivity Profiles (Teratology Society Annual Meeting)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angiogenesis is a critical developmental process and a potential target for chemical teratogenesis. Over one-tenth of the Tox21 library of 10,000 compounds have been shown to disrupt mitochondrial function [Attene-Ramos et al., 2015]. Previous studies utilizing ToxCast chemicals ...

  3. Predicting Developmental Toxicity of ToxCast Phase I Chemicals Using Human Embryonic Stem Cells and Metabolomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA’s ToxRefDB contains prenatal guideline study data from rats and rabbits for over 240 chemicals that overlap with the ToxCast in vitro high throughput screening project. A subset of these compounds were tested in Stemina Biomarker Discovery's developmental toxicity platform, a...

  4. Molecular cloning and characterization of a ToxA-like gene from the maize pathogen Cochliobolus heterostrophus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ToxA, the first discovered fungal proteinaceous host-selective toxin, was originally identified from the tan spot fungus Pyrenophora tritici-repentis (Ptr). Homologues of the PtrToxA gene have not been identified from any other ascomycetes except the leaf/glume blotch fungus Stagonospora nodorum, w...

  5. Characterization of ToxCast Phase II compounds disruption of ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The development of multi-well microelectrode array (mwMEA) systems has increased in vitro screening throughput making them an effective method to screen and prioritize large sets of compounds for potential neurotoxicity. In the present experiments, a multiplexed approach was used to determine compound effects on both neural function and cell health in primary cortical networks grown on mwMEA plates following exposure to ~1100 compounds from EPA’s Phase II ToxCast libraries. On DIV 13, baseline activity (40 min) was recorded prior to exposure to each compound at 40 µM. DMSO and the GABAA antagonist bicuculline (BIC) were included as controls on each mwMEA plate. Changes in spontaneous network activity (mean firing rate; MFR) and cell viability (lactate dehydrogenase; LDH and CellTiter Blue; CTB) were assessed within the same well following compound exposure. Activity calls (“hits”) were established using the 90th and 20th percentiles of the compound-induced change in MFR (medians of triplicates) across all tested compounds; compounds above (top 10% of compounds increasing MFR), and below (bottom 20% of compounds decreasing MFR) these thresholds, respectively were considered hits. MFR was altered beyond one of these thresholds by 322 compounds. Four compound categories accounted for 66% of the hits, including: insecticides (e.g. abamectin, lindane, prallethrin), pharmaceuticals (e.g. haloperidol, reserpine), fungicides (e.g. hexaconazole, fenamidone), and h

  6. Effect of toxin-g from Tityus serrulatus scorpion venom on gastric emptying in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Bucaretchi

    1999-04-01

    Full Text Available The effect of toxin-g from Tityus serrulatus scorpion venom on the gastric emptying of liquids was studied in 176 young adult male Wistar rats (2-3 months of age divided into subgroups of 8 animals each. Toxin-g was injected iv at doses of 25, 37.5, 50 or 100 µg/kg and the effect on gastric emptying was assessed 30 min and 8 h later. A time-course study was also performed by injecting 50 µg of toxin-g /kg and measuring the effect on gastric emptying at times 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8, 24 and 48 h post-venom. Each envenomed animal was paired with its saline control and all received a saline test meal solution containing phenol red (60 µg/ml as a marker. Ten minutes after administering the test meal by gavage the animals were sacrificed and gastric retention was determined by measuring the residual marker concentration of the test meal. A significant delay in gastric emptying, at 30 min and 8 h post-venom, was observed only after 50 and 100 µg of toxin-g /kg compared to control values. The responses to these two doses were significantly different after 8 h post-venom. Toxin-g (50 µg/kg significantly delayed the gastric emptying of liquids at all times studied, with a peak response at 4 h after toxin administration compared to control values. These results indicate that the iv injection of toxin-g may induce a rapid, intense and sustained inhibition of gastric emptying 0.25 to 48 h after envenomation.

  7. O período toxêmico da esquistossomose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Leocádio

    1969-06-01

    Full Text Available O A. apresenta seis casos de pacientes observados durante o período toxêmico da esquistosomose mansônica. Dêstes, um foi de mulher cuja sintomatologia datava de um ano. Concebeu e deu à luz durante a enfermidade. Apresentava sinais de fibrose hepática quando do primeiro exame, ainda na vigência de sintomas do período agudo da enfermidade. Todos êstes pacientes apresentavam febre, dores abdominais, hepatoesplenomegalia e outras manifestações que têm sido descritas neste período da parasitose. Como notas dominantes no hemograma, leucocitose com eosinofilia, como ocorre nas infecções por helmintos com ciclo textrino, e anemia. Esta, nem todos apresentavam. Além de alterações do equilíbrio proteico e de resultados da exploração funcional do fígado, o A. chamou a atenção para a hípoglicemia e hipocolesterolemia encontradas em alguns dos observados. Foi digno de registro, também, a positividade tardia da intradermorreação para diagnóstico da esquistosomose. Todos os pacientes foram submetidos a tratamento antimonial, com bom resultado. Como reação colateral devemos mencionar a exacerbação da febre forçando, por vêzes à interrupção do mesmo. O A. faz referências a outros recursos terapêuticos empregados no Oriente: o F30.066, um nitrofurano de uso oral, e as sementes de Cucurbita moshata. Sugere a investigação em animais e no homem com sementes de abóbora outrora empregadas como tenifugo

  8. A Data Analysis Pipeline Accounting for Artifacts in Tox21 Quantitative High-Throughput Screening Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Jui-Hua; Sedykh, Alexander; Huang, Ruili; Xia, Menghang; Tice, Raymond R

    2015-08-01

    A main goal of the U.S. Tox21 program is to profile a 10K-compound library for activity against a panel of stress-related and nuclear receptor signaling pathway assays using a quantitative high-throughput screening (qHTS) approach. However, assay artifacts, including nonreproducible signals and assay interference (e.g., autofluorescence), complicate compound activity interpretation. To address these issues, we have developed a data analysis pipeline that includes an updated signal noise-filtering/curation protocol and an assay interference flagging system. To better characterize various types of signals, we adopted a weighted version of the area under the curve (wAUC) to quantify the amount of activity across the tested concentration range in combination with the assay-dependent point-of-departure (POD) concentration. Based on the 32 Tox21 qHTS assays analyzed, we demonstrate that signal profiling using wAUC affords the best reproducibility (Pearson's r = 0.91) in comparison with the POD (0.82) only or the AC(50) (i.e., half-maximal activity concentration, 0.81). Among the activity artifacts characterized, cytotoxicity is the major confounding factor; on average, about 8% of Tox21 compounds are affected, whereas autofluorescence affects less than 0.5%. To facilitate data evaluation, we implemented two graphical user interface applications, allowing users to rapidly evaluate the in vitro activity of Tox21 compounds. © 2015 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  9. FORUM - FutureTox II: In vitro Data and In Silico Models for Predictive Toxicology

    Science.gov (United States)

    FutureTox II, a Society of Toxicology Contemporary Concepts in Toxicology workshop, was held in January, 2014. The meeting goals were to review and discuss the state of the science in toxicology in the context of implementing the NRC 21st century vision of predicting in vivo resp...

  10. Tox21: Putting a Lens on the Vision of Toxicity Testing in the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    In response to the release of the NRC report on "Toxicity Testing in the 21st Century, a Vision and Strategy" (NRC, 2007), two NIH institutes and EPA formed a collaboration (Tox21) to 1) identify mechanisms of chemically induced biological activity, 2) prioritize chemicals for mo...

  11. Legacy data sharing to improve drug safety assessment: the eTOX project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanz, Ferran; Pognan, François; Steger-Hartmann, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    The sharing of legacy preclinical safety data among pharmaceutical companies and its integration with other information sources offers unprecedented opportunities to improve the early assessment of drug safety. Here, we discuss the experience of the eTOX project, which was established through...

  12. ToxPlorerTM: A Comprehensive Knowledgebase of Toxicity Pathways Using Ontology-driven Information Extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Realizing the potential of pathway-based toxicity testing requires a fresh look at how we describe phenomena leading to adverse effects in vivo, how we assess them in vitro and how we extrapolate them in silico across chemicals, doses and species. We developed the ToxPlorer™ fram...

  13. ToxCast Data Expands Universe of Chemical-Gene Interactions (SOT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Characterizing the effects of chemicals in biological systems is often summarized by chemical-gene interactions, which have sparse coverage in literature. The ToxCast chemical screening program has produced bioactivity data for nearly 2000 chemicals and over 450 gene targets. Thi...

  14. Highlight report: Launch of a large integrated European in vitro toxicology project: EU-ToxRisk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshian, Mardas; Kamp, Hennicke; Hengstler, Jan; Leist, Marcel; van de Water, Bob

    2016-05-01

    The integrated European project, EU-ToxRisk, proudly sees itself as "flagship" exploring new alternative-to-animal approaches to chemical safety evaluation. It promotes mechanism-based toxicity testing and risk assessment according to the principles laid down for toxicology for the twenty-first century. The project was officially launched in January 2016 with a kickoff meeting in Egmond aan Zee, the Netherlands. Over 100 scientists representing academia and industry as well as regulatory authorities attended the inaugural meeting. The project will integrate advances in in vitro and in silico toxicology, read-across methods, and adverse outcome pathways. EU-ToxRisk will continue to make use of the case study strategy deployed in SEURAT-1, a FP7 initiative ended in December 2015. Even though the development of new non-animal methods is one target of EU-ToxRisk, the project puts special emphasis on their acceptance and implementation in regulatory contexts. This €30 million Horizon 2020 project involves 38 European partners and one from the USA. EU-ToxRisk aims at the "development of a new way of risk assessment."

  15. 75 FR 43162 - Tetrahedron, Inc., with Subcontractors: Syracuse Research Corporation; Tox Path, Inc; and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-23

    ... obligations of the contract. DATES: Tetrahedron, Inc., and its subcontractors: Syracuse Research Corporation... contract to perform work for OPP, and access to this information will enable Tetrahedron, Inc., and its... Contract No. EP-W-10-013, Tetrahedron, Inc., and its subcontractors: Syracuse Research Corporation, Tox...

  16. Quantitative Structure-Use Relationship Model Predictions to evaluate Tox21 Chemicals as Functional Substitutes and Candidate Alternatives

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset provides a prediction for all Tox21 chemicals with available QSUR descriptors across all 41 valid QSUR models developed with FUse. This dataset is...

  17. CBirTox is a selective antigen-specific agonist of the Treg-IgA-microbiota homeostatic pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie L Alexander

    Full Text Available Cultivating an environment of mutualism between host cells and the microbiota is vital, and dysregulation of this relationship is associated with multiple immune disorders including metabolic and skin diseases, asthma, allergy, and Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD. One prominent mechanism for maintaining homeostasis is the protective regulatory T cell (Treg- Immunoglobulin A (IgA pathway toward microbiota antigens, in which Tregs maintain homeostasis and provide critical survival factors to IgA+ B cells. In order to amplify the Treg-IgA pathway, we have generated a fusion protein, CBirTox, comprised of a portion of the carboxy terminus of CBir1, a microbiota flagellin, genetically coupled to Cholera Toxin B subunit (CTB via the A2 linker of CT. Both dendritic cells (DCs and B cells pulsed with CBirTox selectively induced functional CD4+Foxp3+ Tregs in vitro, and CBirTox augmented CD4+Foxp3+ cell numbers in vivo. The induced Foxp3 expression was independent of retinoic acid (RA signaling but was inhibited by neutralization of TGF-β. CBirTox treatment of B cells downregulated mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR signaling. Furthermore, CBirTox-pulsed DCs induced substantial production of IgA from naïve B cells. Collectively these data demonstrate that CBirTox represents a novel approach to bolstering the Treg-IgA pathway at the host-microbiota interface.

  18. ToxPi Graphical User Interface 2.0: Dynamic exploration, visualization, and sharing of integrated data models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvel, Skylar W; To, Kimberly; Grimm, Fabian A; Wright, Fred A; Rusyn, Ivan; Reif, David M

    2018-03-05

    Drawing integrated conclusions from diverse source data requires synthesis across multiple types of information. The ToxPi (Toxicological Prioritization Index) is an analytical framework that was developed to enable integration of multiple sources of evidence by transforming data into integrated, visual profiles. Methodological improvements have advanced ToxPi and expanded its applicability, necessitating a new, consolidated software platform to provide functionality, while preserving flexibility for future updates. We detail the implementation of a new graphical user interface for ToxPi (Toxicological Prioritization Index) that provides interactive visualization, analysis, reporting, and portability. The interface is deployed as a stand-alone, platform-independent Java application, with a modular design to accommodate inclusion of future analytics. The new ToxPi interface introduces several features, from flexible data import formats (including legacy formats that permit backward compatibility) to similarity-based clustering to options for high-resolution graphical output. We present the new ToxPi interface for dynamic exploration, visualization, and sharing of integrated data models. The ToxPi interface is freely-available as a single compressed download that includes the main Java executable, all libraries, example data files, and a complete user manual from http://toxpi.org .

  19. Value of shared preclinical safety studies - The eTOX database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Katharine; Barber, Chris; Cases, Montserrat; Marc, Philippe; Steger-Hartmann, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    A first analysis of a database of shared preclinical safety data for 1214 small molecule drugs and drug candidates extracted from 3970 reports donated by thirteen pharmaceutical companies for the eTOX project (www.etoxproject.eu) is presented. Species, duration of exposure and administration route data were analysed to assess if large enough subsets of homogenous data are available for building in silico predictive models. Prevalence of treatment related effects for the different types of findings recorded were analysed. The eTOX ontology was used to determine the most common treatment-related clinical chemistry and histopathology findings reported in the database. The data were then mined to evaluate sensitivity of established in vivo biomarkers for liver toxicity risk assessment. The value of the database to inform other drug development projects during early drug development is illustrated by a case study.

  20. Toxicokinetiek van benzo(a)pyreen bij de Riv:TOX rat na herhaalde orale toediening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olling M; Lusthof KJ; Kroese ED; Beenen J; Klaassen R; BFT

    1995-01-01

    Benzo(a)pyrene was administered once daily (30 mg/kg) by gavage to 12 male and 12 female Riv:TOX rats, for 15 days on five successive days per week, in the form of a solution in soy oil. Blood samples were taken over a period of 12 hours on the first day of administration (day 1) and on day 12 from

  1. In Vitro Screening of Environmental Chemicals for Targeted Testing Prioritization: The ToxCast Project

    OpenAIRE

    Judson, Richard S.; Houck, Keith A.; Kavlock, Robert J.; Knudsen, Thomas B.; Martin, Matthew T.; Mortensen, Holly M.; Reif, David M.; Rotroff, Daniel M.; Shah, Imran; Richard, Ann M.; Dix, David J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Chemical toxicity testing is being transformed by advances in biology and computer modeling, concerns over animal use, and the thousands of environmental chemicals lacking toxicity data. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency?s ToxCast program aims to address these concerns by screening and prioritizing chemicals for potential human toxicity using in vitro assays and in silico approaches. Objectives This project aims to evaluate the use of in vitro assays for understanding the ty...

  2. Development and Evaluation of a Hyperbaric Toxic Gas Monitor (SubTox) for Disabled Submarines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    air near the CO2 scrubbers was sampled, the common amine/ ammonia smell was present. And while no NH3 sensor was installed in the SubTox, no monitored...under pressure, the eight gases — ammonia , carbon monoxide, chlorine, hydrogen chloride, hydrogen cyanide, hydrogen sulfide, nitrogen dioxide, and...gases for which SEALs have been defined: ammonia (NH3), carbon monoxide (CO), chlorine (Cl2), hydrogen chloride (HCl), hydrogen cyanide (HCN

  3. TOXsIgN: a cross-species repository for toxicogenomic signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darde, Thomas A; Gaudriault, Pierre; Beranger, Rémi; Lancien, Clément; Caillarec-Joly, Annaëlle; Sallou, Olivier; Bonvallot, Nathalie; Chevrier, Cécile; Mazaud-Guittot, Séverine; Jégou, Bernard; Collin, Olivier; Becker, Emmanuelle; Rolland, Antoine D; Chalmel, Frédéric

    2018-01-27

    At the same time that toxicologists express increasing concern about reproducibility in this field, the development of dedicated databases has already smoothed the path toward improving the storage and exchange of raw toxicogenomic data. Nevertheless, none provides access to analyzed and interpreted data as originally reported in scientific publications. Given the increasing demand for access to this information, we developed TOXsIgN, a repository for TOXicogenomic sIgNatures. The TOXsIgN repository provides a flexible environment that facilitates online submission, storage, and retrieval of toxicogenomic signatures by the scientific community. It currently hosts 754 projects that describe more than 450 distinct chemicals and their 8491 associated signatures. It also provides users with a working environment containing a powerful search engine as well as bioinformatics/biostatistics modules that enable signature comparisons or enrichment analyses. The TOXsIgN repository is freely accessible at http://toxsign.genouest.org. Website implemented in Python, JavaScript, and MongoDB, with all major browsers supported. frederic.chalmel@inserm.fr. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author (2018). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  4. Proteolysis of virulence regulator ToxR is associated with entry of Vibrio cholerae into a dormant state.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador Almagro-Moreno

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Vibrio cholerae O1 is a natural inhabitant of aquatic environments and causes the diarrheal disease, cholera. Two of its primary virulence regulators, TcpP and ToxR, are localized in the inner membrane. TcpP is encoded on the Vibrio Pathogenicity Island (VPI, a horizontally acquired mobile genetic element, and functions primarily in virulence gene regulation. TcpP has been shown to undergo regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP in response to environmental conditions that are unfavorable for virulence gene expression. ToxR is encoded in the ancestral genome and is present in non-pathogenic strains of V. cholerae, indicating it has roles outside of the human host. In this study, we show that ToxR undergoes RIP in V. cholerae in response to nutrient limitation at alkaline pH, a condition that occurs during the stationary phase of growth. This process involves the site-2 protease RseP (YaeL, and is dependent upon the RpoE-mediated periplasmic stress response, as deletion mutants for the genes encoding these two proteins cannot proteolyze ToxR under nutrient limitation at alkaline pH. We determined that the loss of ToxR, genetically or by proteolysis, is associated with entry of V. cholerae into a dormant state in which the bacterium is normally found in the aquatic environment called viable but nonculturable (VBNC. Strains that can proteolyze ToxR, or do not encode it, lose culturability, experience a change in morphology associated with cells in VBNC, yet remain viable under nutrient limitation at alkaline pH. On the other hand, mutant strains that cannot proteolyze ToxR remain culturable and maintain the morphology of cells in an active state of growth. Overall, our findings provide a link between the proteolysis of a virulence regulator and the entry of a pathogen into an environmentally persistent state.

  5. Using the US EPA's CompTox Dashboard to support identification and screening of emerging organic contaminants in the environment (ACS Spring National meeting) 2 of 7

    Science.gov (United States)

    The US EPA’s iCSS CompTox Dashboard is a curated, publicly accessible resource provided by the National Center for Computational Toxicology (https://comptox.epa.gov). The Dashboard provides support for toxicology and risk assessment within and external to the EPA (including ToxC...

  6. Causal Inferences from Mining ToxCast Data and the Biomedical Literature for Molecular Pathways and Cellular Processes in Cleft Palate (SOT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sixty-five chemicals in the ToxCast high-throughput screening (HTS) dataset have been linked to cleft palate based on data from ToxRefDB (rat or rabbit prenatal developmental toxicity studies) or from literature reports. These compounds are structurally diverse and thus likely to...

  7. Mass-Spectrometry Based Structure Identification of "Known-Unknowns" Using the EPA's CompTox Dashboard (ACS Spring National Meeting) 4 of 7

    Science.gov (United States)

    The CompTox Dashboard is a publicly accessible database provided by the National Center for Computational Toxicology at the US-EPA. The dashboard provides access to a database containing ~720,000 chemicals and integrates a number of our public-facing projects (e.g. ToxCast and Ex...

  8. Analysis of ToxCast data for food-relevant compounds by comparison with in vivo data using the RISK21 approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ToxCast program has generated a wealth of in vitro high throughput screening data, and best approaches for the interpretation and use of these data remain undetermined. We present case studies comparing the ToxCast and in vivo toxicity data for two food contact substances us...

  9. The cysteine rich necrotrophic effector SnTox1 produced by Stagonospora nodorum triggers susceptibility of wheat lines harboring Snn1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaohui Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The wheat pathogen Stagonospora nodorum produces multiple necrotrophic effectors (also called host-selective toxins that promote disease by interacting with corresponding host sensitivity gene products. SnTox1 was the first necrotrophic effector identified in S. nodorum, and was shown to induce necrosis on wheat lines carrying Snn1. Here, we report the molecular cloning and validation of SnTox1 as well as the preliminary characterization of the mechanism underlying the SnTox1-Snn1 interaction which leads to susceptibility. SnTox1 was identified using bioinformatics tools and verified by heterologous expression in Pichia pastoris. SnTox1 encodes a 117 amino acid protein with the first 17 amino acids predicted as a signal peptide, and strikingly, the mature protein contains 16 cysteine residues, a common feature for some avirulence effectors. The transformation of SnTox1 into an avirulent S. nodorum isolate was sufficient to make the strain pathogenic. Additionally, the deletion of SnTox1 in virulent isolates rendered the SnTox1 mutated strains avirulent on the Snn1 differential wheat line. SnTox1 was present in 85% of a global collection of S. nodorum isolates. We identified a total of 11 protein isoforms and found evidence for strong diversifying selection operating on SnTox1. The SnTox1-Snn1 interaction results in an oxidative burst, DNA laddering, and pathogenesis related (PR gene expression, all hallmarks of a defense response. In the absence of light, the development of SnTox1-induced necrosis and disease symptoms were completely blocked. By comparing the infection processes of a GFP-tagged avirulent isolate and the same isolate transformed with SnTox1, we conclude that SnTox1 may play a critical role during fungal penetration. This research further demonstrates that necrotrophic fungal pathogens utilize small effector proteins to exploit plant resistance pathways for their colonization, which provides important insights into the molecular

  10. Structure of Vibrio cholerae ToxT reveals a mechanism for fatty acid regulation of virulence genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowden, Michael J.; Skorupski, Karen; Pellegrini, Maria; Chiorazzo, Michael G.; Taylor, Ronald K.; Kull, F. Jon (Dartmouth)

    2010-03-04

    Cholera is an acute intestinal infection caused by the bacterium Vibrio cholerae. In order for V. cholerae to cause disease, it must produce two virulence factors, the toxin-coregulated pilus (TCP) and cholera toxin (CT), whose expression is controlled by a transcriptional cascade culminating with the expression of the AraC-family regulator, ToxT. We have solved the 1.9 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of ToxT, which reveals folds in the N- and C-terminal domains that share a number of features in common with AraC, MarA, and Rob as well as the unexpected presence of a buried 16-carbon fatty acid, cis-palmitoleate. The finding that cis-palmitoleic acid reduces TCP and CT expression in V. cholerae and prevents ToxT from binding to DNA in vitro provides a direct link between the host environment of V. cholerae and regulation of virulence gene expression.

  11. Identifying developmental toxicity pathways for a subset of ToxCast chemicals using human embryonic stem cells and metabolomics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleinstreuer, N.C.; Smith, A.M.; West, P.R.; Conard, K.R.; Fontaine, B.R.; Weir-Hauptman, A.M.; Palmer, J.A.; Knudsen, T.B.; Dix, D.J.; Donley, E.L.R.; Cezar, G.G.

    2011-01-01

    Metabolomics analysis was performed on the supernatant of human embryonic stem (hES) cell cultures exposed to a blinded subset of 11 chemicals selected from the chemical library of EPA's ToxCast™ chemical screening and prioritization research project. Metabolites from hES cultures were evaluated for known and novel signatures that may be indicative of developmental toxicity. Significant fold changes in endogenous metabolites were detected for 83 putatively annotated mass features in response to the subset of ToxCast chemicals. The annotations were mapped to specific human metabolic pathways. This revealed strong effects on pathways for nicotinate and nicotinamide metabolism, pantothenate and CoA biosynthesis, glutathione metabolism, and arginine and proline metabolism pathways. Predictivity for adverse outcomes in mammalian prenatal developmental toxicity studies used ToxRefDB and other sources of information, including Stemina Biomarker Discovery's predictive DevTox® model trained on 23 pharmaceutical agents of known developmental toxicity and differing potency. The model initially predicted developmental toxicity from the blinded ToxCast compounds in concordance with animal data with 73% accuracy. Retraining the model with data from the unblinded test compounds at one concentration level increased the predictive accuracy for the remaining concentrations to 83%. These preliminary results on a 11-chemical subset of the ToxCast chemical library indicate that metabolomics analysis of the hES secretome provides information valuable for predictive modeling and mechanistic understanding of mammalian developmental toxicity. -- Highlights: ► We tested 11 environmental compounds in a hESC metabolomics platform. ► Significant changes in secreted small molecule metabolites were observed. ► Perturbed mass features map to pathways critical for normal development and pregnancy. ► Arginine, proline, nicotinate, nicotinamide and glutathione pathways were affected.

  12. Identifying developmental toxicity pathways for a subset of ToxCast chemicals using human embryonic stem cells and metabolomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleinstreuer, N.C., E-mail: kleinstreuer.nicole@epa.gov [NCCT, US EPA, RTP, NC 27711 (United States); Smith, A.M.; West, P.R.; Conard, K.R.; Fontaine, B.R. [Stemina Biomarker Discovery, Inc., Madison, WI 53719 (United States); Weir-Hauptman, A.M. [Covance, Inc., Madison, WI 53704 (United States); Palmer, J.A. [Stemina Biomarker Discovery, Inc., Madison, WI 53719 (United States); Knudsen, T.B.; Dix, D.J. [NCCT, US EPA, RTP, NC 27711 (United States); Donley, E.L.R. [Stemina Biomarker Discovery, Inc., Madison, WI 53719 (United States); Cezar, G.G. [Stemina Biomarker Discovery, Inc., Madison, WI 53719 (United States); University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Metabolomics analysis was performed on the supernatant of human embryonic stem (hES) cell cultures exposed to a blinded subset of 11 chemicals selected from the chemical library of EPA's ToxCast Trade-Mark-Sign chemical screening and prioritization research project. Metabolites from hES cultures were evaluated for known and novel signatures that may be indicative of developmental toxicity. Significant fold changes in endogenous metabolites were detected for 83 putatively annotated mass features in response to the subset of ToxCast chemicals. The annotations were mapped to specific human metabolic pathways. This revealed strong effects on pathways for nicotinate and nicotinamide metabolism, pantothenate and CoA biosynthesis, glutathione metabolism, and arginine and proline metabolism pathways. Predictivity for adverse outcomes in mammalian prenatal developmental toxicity studies used ToxRefDB and other sources of information, including Stemina Biomarker Discovery's predictive DevTox Registered-Sign model trained on 23 pharmaceutical agents of known developmental toxicity and differing potency. The model initially predicted developmental toxicity from the blinded ToxCast compounds in concordance with animal data with 73% accuracy. Retraining the model with data from the unblinded test compounds at one concentration level increased the predictive accuracy for the remaining concentrations to 83%. These preliminary results on a 11-chemical subset of the ToxCast chemical library indicate that metabolomics analysis of the hES secretome provides information valuable for predictive modeling and mechanistic understanding of mammalian developmental toxicity. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We tested 11 environmental compounds in a hESC metabolomics platform. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Significant changes in secreted small molecule metabolites were observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Perturbed mass features map to pathways critical for normal

  13. CalTOX, a multimedia total exposure model for hazardous-waste sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKone, T.E.

    1993-06-01

    CalTOX has been developed as a spreadsheet model to assist in health-risk assessments that address contaminated soils and the contamination of adjacent air, surface water, sediments, and ground water. The modeling effort includes a multimedia transport and transformation model, exposure scenario models, and efforts to quantify and reduce uncertainty in multimedia, multiple-pathway exposure models. This report provides an overview of the CalTOX model components, lists the objectives of the model, describes the philosophy under which the model was developed, identifies the chemical classes for which the model can be used, and describes critical sensitivities and uncertainties. The multimedia transport and transformation model is a dynamic model that can be used to assess time-varying concentrations of contaminants introduced initially to soil layers or for contaminants released continuously to air or water. This model assists the user in examining how chemical and landscape properties impact both the ultimate route and quantity of human contact. Multimedia, multiple pathway exposure models are used in the CalTOX model to estimate average daily potential doses within a human population in the vicinity of a hazardous substances release site. The exposure models encompass twenty-three exposure pathways. The exposure assessment process consists of relating contaminant concentrations in the multimedia model compartments to contaminant concentrations in the media with which a human population has contact (personal air, tap water, foods, household dusts soils, etc.). The average daily dose is the product of the exposure concentrations in these contact media and an intake or uptake factor that relates the concentrations to the distributions of potential dose within the population

  14. AMBIT RESTful web services: an implementation of the OpenTox application programming interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeliazkova Nina

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The AMBIT web services package is one of the several existing independent implementations of the OpenTox Application Programming Interface and is built according to the principles of the Representational State Transfer (REST architecture. The Open Source Predictive Toxicology Framework, developed by the partners in the EC FP7 OpenTox project, aims at providing a unified access to toxicity data and predictive models, as well as validation procedures. This is achieved by i an information model, based on a common OWL-DL ontology ii links to related ontologies; iii data and algorithms, available through a standardized REST web services interface, where every compound, data set or predictive method has a unique web address, used to retrieve its Resource Description Framework (RDF representation, or initiate the associated calculations. The AMBIT web services package has been developed as an extension of AMBIT modules, adding the ability to create (Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship (QSAR models and providing an OpenTox API compliant interface. The representation of data and processing resources in W3C Resource Description Framework facilitates integrating the resources as Linked Data. By uploading datasets with chemical structures and arbitrary set of properties, they become automatically available online in several formats. The services provide unified interfaces to several descriptor calculation, machine learning and similarity searching algorithms, as well as to applicability domain and toxicity prediction models. All Toxtree modules for predicting the toxicological hazard of chemical compounds are also integrated within this package. The complexity and diversity of the processing is reduced to the simple paradigm "read data from a web address, perform processing, write to a web address". The online service allows to easily run predictions, without installing any software, as well to share online datasets and models. The

  15. NanoE-Tox: New and in-depth database concerning ecotoxicity of nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katre Juganson

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The increasing production and use of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs inevitably results in their higher concentrations in the environment. This may lead to undesirable environmental effects and thus warrants risk assessment. The ecotoxicity testing of a wide variety of ENMs rapidly evolving in the market is costly but also ethically questionable when bioassays with vertebrates are conducted. Therefore, alternative methods, e.g., models for predicting toxicity mechanisms of ENMs based on their physico-chemical properties (e.g., quantitative (nanostructure-activity relationships, QSARs/QNARs, should be developed. While the development of such models relies on good-quality experimental toxicity data, most of the available data in the literature even for the same test species are highly variable. In order to map and analyse the state of the art of the existing nanoecotoxicological information suitable for QNARs, we created a database NanoE-Tox that is available as . The database is based on existing literature on ecotoxicology of eight ENMs with different chemical composition: carbon nanotubes (CNTs, fullerenes, silver (Ag, titanium dioxide (TiO2, zinc oxide (ZnO, cerium dioxide (CeO2, copper oxide (CuO, and iron oxide (FeOx; Fe2O3, Fe3O4. Altogether, NanoE-Tox database consolidates data from 224 articles and lists altogether 1,518 toxicity values (EC50/LC50/NOEC with corresponding test conditions and physico-chemical parameters of the ENMs as well as reported toxicity mechanisms and uptake of ENMs in the organisms. 35% of the data in NanoE-Tox concerns ecotoxicity of Ag NPs, followed by TiO2 (22%, CeO2 (13%, and ZnO (10%. Most of the data originates from studies with crustaceans (26%, bacteria (17%, fish (13%, and algae (11%. Based on the median toxicity values of the most sensitive organism (data derived from three or more articles the toxicity order was as follows: Ag > ZnO > CuO > CeO2 > CNTs > TiO2 > FeOx. We believe NanoE-Tox database contains

  16. AMBIT RESTful web services: an implementation of the OpenTox application programming interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeliazkova, Nina; Jeliazkov, Vedrin

    2011-05-16

    The AMBIT web services package is one of the several existing independent implementations of the OpenTox Application Programming Interface and is built according to the principles of the Representational State Transfer (REST) architecture. The Open Source Predictive Toxicology Framework, developed by the partners in the EC FP7 OpenTox project, aims at providing a unified access to toxicity data and predictive models, as well as validation procedures. This is achieved by i) an information model, based on a common OWL-DL ontology ii) links to related ontologies; iii) data and algorithms, available through a standardized REST web services interface, where every compound, data set or predictive method has a unique web address, used to retrieve its Resource Description Framework (RDF) representation, or initiate the associated calculations.The AMBIT web services package has been developed as an extension of AMBIT modules, adding the ability to create (Quantitative) Structure-Activity Relationship (QSAR) models and providing an OpenTox API compliant interface. The representation of data and processing resources in W3C Resource Description Framework facilitates integrating the resources as Linked Data. By uploading datasets with chemical structures and arbitrary set of properties, they become automatically available online in several formats. The services provide unified interfaces to several descriptor calculation, machine learning and similarity searching algorithms, as well as to applicability domain and toxicity prediction models. All Toxtree modules for predicting the toxicological hazard of chemical compounds are also integrated within this package. The complexity and diversity of the processing is reduced to the simple paradigm "read data from a web address, perform processing, write to a web address". The online service allows to easily run predictions, without installing any software, as well to share online datasets and models. The downloadable web application

  17. Evaluation of Computational Docking to Identify Pregnane X Receptor Agonists in the ToxCast Database

    OpenAIRE

    Kortagere, Sandhya; Krasowski, Matthew D.; Reschly, Erica J.; Venkatesh, Madhukumar; Mani, Sridhar; Ekins, Sean

    2010-01-01

    Background The pregnane X receptor (PXR) is a key transcriptional regulator of many genes [e.g., cytochrome P450s (CYP2C9, CYP3A4, CYP2B6), MDR1] involved in xenobiotic metabolism and excretion. Objectives As part of an evaluation of different approaches to predict compound affinity for nuclear hormone receptors, we used the molecular docking program GOLD and a hybrid scoring scheme based on similarity weighted GoldScores to predict potential PXR agonists in the ToxCast database of pesticides...

  18. Variability of Pasteurella multocida isolated from Icelandic sheep and detection of the toxA gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einarsdottir, Thorbjorg; Gunnarsson, Eggert; Sigurdardottir, Olof G; Jorundsson, Einar; Fridriksdottir, Vala; Thorarinsdottir, Gudridur E; Hjartardottir, Sigridur

    2016-09-01

    Pasteurella multocida can be part of the upper respiratory flora of animals, but under conditions of stress or immunocompromisation, the bacteria can cause severe respiratory symptoms. In this study, we compared 10 P. multocida isolates from Icelandic sheep with respiratory symptoms and 19 isolates from apparently healthy abattoir sheep. We examined capsule type, genetic variability and the presence of the toxA gene in the two groups. Surprisingly, we found that all ovine P. multocida isolates examined in this study carried the toxA gene, which markedly differs from what has been published from other studies. Interestingly, all isolates from abattoir animals were capsule type D, whilst bacteria isolated from animals with clinical respiratory symptoms had capsule type A, D or F. Examination of seven housekeeping genes indicated that the clinical respiratory isolates were significantly more heterogeneous than the abattoir isolates (P<0.05, two-tailed Mann-Whitney U test). The results suggest that there may be at least two groups of P. multocida in sheep - a genetically homogeneous group that resides in the respiratory tract and a genetically heterogeneous group that is the predominant cause of disease.

  19. OpenVirtualToxLab--a platform for generating and exchanging in silico toxicity data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedani, Angelo; Dobler, Max; Hu, Zhenquan; Smieško, Martin

    2015-01-22

    The VirtualToxLab is an in silico technology for estimating the toxic potential--endocrine and metabolic disruption, some aspects of carcinogenicity and cardiotoxicity--of drugs, chemicals and natural products. The technology is based on an automated protocol that simulates and quantifies the binding of small molecules towards a series of currently 16 proteins, known or suspected to trigger adverse effects: 10 nuclear receptors (androgen, estrogen α, estrogen β, glucocorticoid, liver X, mineralocorticoid, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, progesterone, thyroid α, thyroid β), four members of the cytochrome P450 enzyme family (1A2, 2C9, 2D6, 3A4), a cytosolic transcription factor (aryl hydrocarbon receptor) and a potassium ion channel (hERG). The toxic potential of a compound--its ability to trigger adverse effects--is derived from its computed binding affinities toward these very proteins: the computationally demanding simulations are executed in client-server model on a Linux cluster of the University of Basel. The graphical-user interface supports all computer platforms, allows building and uploading molecular structures, inspecting and downloading the results and, most important, rationalizing any prediction at the atomic level by interactively analyzing the binding mode of a compound with its target protein(s) in real-time 3D. Access to the VirtualToxLab is available free of charge for universities, governmental agencies, regulatory bodies and non-profit organizations. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. Probing the ToxCastTM Chemical Library for Predictive Signatures of Developmental Toxicity - Poster at Teratology Society Annual Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA’s ToxCast™ project is profiling the in vitro bioactivity of chemical compounds to assess pathway-level and cell-based signatures that correlate with observed in vivo toxicity. We hypothesize that cell signaling pathways are primary targets for diverse environmental chemicals ...

  1. Developing predictions of in vivo developmental toxicity of ToxCast chemicals using mouse embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developing predictions of in vivo developmental toxicity of ToxCast chemicals using mouse embryonic stem cells S. Hunter, M. Rosen, M. Hoopes, H. Nichols, S. Jeffay, K. Chandler1, Integrated Systems Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Labor...

  2. Modulation of Xenobiotic Metabolizing Enzyme and Transporter Gene Expression in Primary Cultures of Human Hepatocytes by ToxCast Chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    ToxCast chemicals were assessed for induction or suppression of xenobiotic metabolizing enzyme and transporter gene expression using primary human hepatocytes. The mRNA levels of 14 target and 2 control genes were measured: ABCB1, ABCB11, ABCG2, SLCO1B1, CYP1A1, CYP1A2, CYP2B6, C...

  3. Virtual Liver: Estimating Proliferation and Apoptosis of Hepatocytes Exposed to Environmental Chemicals Using ToxCastTM Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. EPA’s ToxCastTM program has screened over a thousand chemicals for potential toxicity using hundreds of high-throughput, in vitro assays. The U.S. EPA’s Virtual Liver (v-Liver™) is a cellular systems model of hepatic tissues that enables the estimation of in vivo effects...

  4. Human Pluripotent Stem Cell-Based Assay Predicts Developmental Toxicity Potential of ToxCast Chemicals (ACT meeting)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worldwide initiatives to screen for toxicity potential among the thousands of chemicals currently in use require inexpensive and high-throughput in vitro models to meet their goals. The devTOX quickPredict platform is an in vitro human pluripotent stem cell-based assay used to as...

  5. Extrapolation of mammalian-based ToxCast assay results to non-mammalian species to evaluate endocrine disruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    In vitro high-throughput screening (HTS) and in silico technologies have emerged as 21st century tools for chemical hazard identification. In 2007 the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) launched the ToxCast Program, which has screened thousands of chemicals in hundreds of...

  6. CAirTOX, An inter-media transfer model for assessing indirect exposures to hazardous air contaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKone, T.E.

    1994-01-01

    Risk assessment is a quantitative evaluation of information on potential health hazards of environmental contaminants and the extent of human exposure to these contaminants. As applied to toxic chemical emissions to air, risk assessment involves four interrelated steps. These are (1) determination of source concentrations or emission characteristics, (2) exposure assessment, (3) toxicity assessment, and (4) risk characterization. These steps can be carried out with assistance from analytical models in order to estimate the potential risk associated with existing and future releases. CAirTOX has been developed as a spreadsheet model to assist in making these types of calculations. CAirTOX follows an approach that has been incorporated into the CalTOX model, which was developed for the California Department of Toxic Substances Control, With CAirTOX, we can address how contaminants released to an air basin can lead to contamination of soil, food, surface water, and sediments. The modeling effort includes a multimedia transport and transformation model, exposure scenario models, and efforts to quantify uncertainty in multimedia, multiple-pathway exposure assessments. The capacity to explicitly address uncertainty has been incorporated into the model in two ways. First, the spreadsheet form of the model makes it compatible with Monte-Carlo add-on programs that are available for uncertainty analysis. Second, all model inputs are specified in terms of an arithmetic mean and coefficient of variation so that uncertainty analyses can be carried out

  7. Chemical-Gene Interactions from ToxCast Bioactivity Data Expands Universe of Literature Network-Based Associations (SOT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Characterizing the effects of chemicals in biological systems is often summarized by chemical-gene interactions, which have sparse coverage in the literature. The ToxCast chemical screening program has produced bioactivity data for nearly 2000 chemicals and over 450 gene targets....

  8. Comparative Analysis of Predictive Models for Liver Toxicity Using ToxCast Assays and Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships (MCBIOS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comparative Analysis of Predictive Models for Liver Toxicity Using ToxCast Assays and Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships Jie Liu1,2, Richard Judson1, Matthew T. Martin1, Huixiao Hong3, Imran Shah1 1National Center for Computational Toxicology (NCCT), US EPA, RTP, NC...

  9. Identifying developmental toxicity pathways for a subset of ToxCast chemicals using human embryonic stem cells and metabolomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metabolomics analysis was performed on the supernatant of human embryonic stem (hES) cell cultures exposed to a blinded subset of 11 chemicals selected from the chemical library of EPA's ToxCast™ chemical screening and prioritization research project. Metabolites from hES cultur...

  10. (ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE and TECHNOLOGY) An Intuitive Approach for Predicting Human Risk with the Tox21 10k Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    In vitro to in vivo extrapolation (IVIVE) analyses translating high-throughput screening (HTS) data to human relevance have been limited. This is the first time IVIVE approaches and exposure comparisons have explored the entire Tox21 federal collaboration’s 10,000 chemi...

  11. Evaluation of the Neuroactivity of ToxCast Compounds Using Multi-well Microelectrode Array Recordings in Primary Cortical Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evaluation of the Neuroactivity of ToxCast Compounds Using Multi-well Microelectrode Array Recordings in Primary Cortical Neurons P Valdivia1, M Martin2, WR LeFew3, D Hall3, J Ross1, K Houck2 and TJ Shafer3 1Axion Biosystems, Atlanta GA and 2NCCT, 3ISTD, NHEERL, ORD, US EPA, RT...

  12. Developmental status of bioassays in genetic toxicology: a report of Phase II of the US Environmental Protection Agency Gene-Tox program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brusick, D; Auletta, A

    1985-01-01

    The Gene-Tox Program was structured around two phases of genetic test data evaluation. The first phase consisted of 36 Work Group reports, each evaluating the results and performance of a specific bioassay. The second phase consisted of a plan to summarize the information provided by the Work Groups. The Gene-Tox Coordinating Committee was to be responsible for Phase II, and several subgroups were assigned specific goals in implementing this analysis. This report deals with Goal I which is to identify the developmental status of the individual bioassays reviewed by the Gene-Tox Work Groups in the first phase of the Program. 5 references, 6 tables.

  13. Development of a toxR-based loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay for detecting Vibrio parahaemolyticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ge Beilei

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a leading cause of seafood-related bacterial gastroenteritis and outbreaks worldwide. Sensitive and specific detection methods are needed to better control V. parahaemolyticus infections. This study aimed at developing a highly specific and sensitive loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP assay for detecting V. parahaemolyticus in oysters. A set of five LAMP primers, two outer, two inner, and one loop were designed based on the published V. parahaemolyticus toxR sequence. Specificity of the assay was evaluated using a panel of 36 V. parahaemolyticus and 39 other strains. The assay sensitivity was determined using serial dilutions of V. parahaemolyticus ATCC 27969 culture ranging from 108 CFU/ml to extinction. The assay was also tested in experimentally inoculated oyster samples. Results The toxR-based LAMP assay was able to specifically detect all of the 36 V. parahaemolyticus strains without amplification from 39 other strains. The detection limit was 47-470 cells per reaction in pure culture, up to 100-fold more sensitive than that of toxR-PCR. When applied in spiked oysters, the assay was able to detect 1.1 × 105 V. parahaemolyticus cells per gram of oyster without enrichment, up to 100-fold more sensitive than that of toxR-PCR. Standard curves generated for detecting V. parahaemolyticus in both pure culture and spiked oyster samples showed good linear relationship between cell numbers and the fluorescence or turbidity signals. Conclusions The toxR-based LAMP assay developed in this study was sensitive, specific, and quantitative, holding great potential for future field detection of V. parahaemolyticus in raw oysters.

  14. Overview of Provisional Peer-Reviewed Toxicity Values (PPRTVs), Alternative Methods in Human Health Risk Assessment, and the RapidTox Dashboard

    Science.gov (United States)

    This poster provides an overview of three key lines of ongoing work at EPA/ORD/NCEA-CIN: Provisional Peer-Reviewed Toxicity Values (PPRTVs), Alternative Methods in Human Health Risk Assessment, and the RapidTox Dashboard collaboration.

  15. ADME-Tox profiling of some low molecular weight water soluble chitosan derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Isvoran

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Within this study we use a few computational tools for predicting absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity (ADME-Tox, pharmacokinetics profiles, toxic/adverse effects, carcinogenicity, cardiotoxicity and endocrine disruption of some of low molecular weight water soluble derivatives of chitosan that are used in wound healing. Investigated compounds do not possess drug-like properties, their pharmacokinetics profiles reveal poor gastrointestinal absorption and low skin penetration. Chitosan derivatives cannot pass the blood-brain barrier and they are not able to inhibit the enzymes of the cytochrome P450 that are involved in the metabolism of xenobiotics. They do not reflect carcinogenicity and cardiotoxicity and reveal only a low probability to be endocrine disruptors. The main side effects in humans of the investigated compounds are: weight loss, acidosis, gastrointestinal toxicity, respiratory failure. This information is especially important for professional exposure and accidental contamination with these compounds.

  16. Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO) for Severe Toxicological Exposures: Review of the Toxicology Investigators Consortium (ToxIC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, G S; Levitan, R; Wiegand, T J; Lowry, J; Schult, R F; Yin, S

    2016-03-01

    Although there have been many developments related to specific strategies for treating patients after poisoning exposures, the mainstay of therapy remains symptomatic and supportive care. One of the most aggressive supportive modalities is extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). Our goal was to describe the use of ECMO for toxicological exposures reported to the American College of Medical Toxicology (ACMT) Toxicology Investigators Consortium (ToxIC). We performed a retrospective review of the ACMT ToxIC Registry from January 1, 2010 to December 31, 2013. Inclusion criteria included patients aged 0 to 89 years, evaluated between January 2010 through December 2013, and received ECMO for toxicological exposure. There were 26,271 exposures (60 % female) reported to the ToxIC Registry, 10 (0.0004 %) received ECMO: 4 pediatric (18 years). Time of initiation of ECMO ranged from 4 h to 4 days, with duration from 15 h to 12 days. Exposures included carbon monoxide/smoke inhalation (2), bitter almonds, methanol, and several medications including antihistamines (2), antipsychotic/antidepressant (2), cardiovascular drugs (2), analgesics (2), sedative/hypnotics (2), and antidiabetics (2). Four ECMO patients received cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) during their hospital course, and the overall survival rate was 80 %. ECMO was rarely used for poisoning exposures in the ACMT ToxIC Registry. ECMO was utilized for a variety of ages and for pharmaceutical and non-pharmaceutical exposures. In most cases, ECMO was administered prior to cardiovascular failure, and survival rate was high. If available, ECMO may be a valid treatment modality.

  17. A genetic polymorphism in TOX3 is associated with survival of gastric cancer in a Chinese population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojing Zhang

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Recently, genetic polymorphism (rs3803662C>T in TOX3 was reported to induce the risk of breast cancer. In this study, we hypothesized that rs3803662 could influence gastric cancer survival outcomes. METHODS: With multiplex SNaPshot method, we genotyped TOX3 rs3803662 in 880 gastric patients with surgical resection. The association between genotype and survival outcomes was performed by the Kaplan-Meier method, Cox regression analysis models and the log-rank test. RESULTS: There was no association in the analyses of rs3803662 and survival of gastric cancer. However, the stratified analysis by histology showed that rs3803662 CT/TT genotype was associated with a significantly better survival for diffuse-type gastric cancer (log-rank p = 0.030, hazard ratio [HR]  = 0.67, 95% confidence interval [CI]  = 0.46-0.96, than the CC genotype. In addition, this favorable effect was especially obvious among gastric cancer patients with tumor size >5 cm, T3 and T4 depth of invasion, lymph node metastasis, no drinking, no distant metastasis, no chemotherapy and gastric cardia cancer. CONCLUSIONS: TOX3 rs3803662 might play an important role in the prognostic outcome and treatment of gastric cancer, especially perhaps further help in explaining the reduced risk of death associated with diffuse-type gastric cancer.

  18. ToxR regulates the production of lipoproteins and the expression of serum resistance in Vibrio cholerae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsot, C.; Taxman, E.; Mekalanos, J.J.

    1991-01-01

    The genes encoding three lipoproteins of Vibrio cholerae were identified by a combination of DNA sequence analysis and [ 3 H]palmitate labeling of hybrid proteins encoded by TnphoA gene fusions. The expression of these three lipoproteins, TagA, AcfD, and TcpC, was controlled by ToxR, the cholera toxin transcriptional activator. The involvement of other bacterial lipoproteins in conferring resistance ot the bactericidal effects of complement prompted us to examine this possibility in V. cholerae. Remarkably, mutations in toxR and tcp genes (including tcpC), involved in the biogenesis of the toxin coregulated pili, rendered V. cholerae about 10 4 - 10 6 times more sensitive to the vibriocidal activity of antibody and complement. Since V. cholerae is a noninvasive organism and toxR and tcp mutants are highly defective in intestinal colonization in animals and humans, these results raise the possibility that resistance to a gut-associated, complement-like bactericidal activity may be a major virulence determinant of V. cholerae and other enterobacterial species

  19. Evaluation of the on-site immunoassay drug-screening device Triage-TOX in routine forensic autopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tominaga, Mariko; Michiue, Tomomi; Maeda, Hitoshi

    2015-11-01

    Instrumental identification of drugs with quantification is essential in forensic toxicology, while on-site immunoassay urinalysis drug-screening devices conveniently provide preliminary information when adequately used. However, suitable or sufficient urine specimens are not always available. The present study evaluated the efficacy of a new on-site immunoassay drug-screening device Triage-TOX (Alere Inc., San Diego, CA, USA), which has recently been developed to provide objective data on the one-step automated processor, using 51 urine and 19 pericardial fluid samples from 66 forensic autopsy cases, compared with Triage-Drug of Abuse (DOA) and Monitect-9. For benzodiazepines, the positive predictive value and specificity of Triage-TOX were higher than those of Triage-DOA; however, sensitivity was higher with Monitect-9, despite frequent false-positives. The results for the other drugs with the three devices also included a few false-negatives and false-positives. These observations indicate the applicability of Triage-TOX in preliminary drug screening using urine or alternative materials in routine forensic autopsy, when a possible false-negative is considered, especially for benzodiazepines, providing objective information; however, the combined use of another device such as Monitect-9 can help minimize misinterpretation prior to instrumental analysis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Small-molecule inhibitors of toxT expression in Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthouard, Rebecca; DiRita, Victor J

    2013-08-06

    Vibrio cholerae, a Gram-negative bacterium, infects humans and causes cholera, a severe disease characterized by vomiting and diarrhea. These symptoms are primarily caused by cholera toxin (CT), whose production by V. cholerae is tightly regulated by the virulence cascade. In this study, we designed and carried out a high-throughput chemical genetic screen to identify inhibitors of the virulence cascade. We identified three compounds, which we named toxtazin A and toxtazin B and B', representing two novel classes of toxT transcription inhibitors. All three compounds reduce production of both CT and the toxin-coregulated pilus (TCP), an important colonization factor. We present evidence that toxtazin A works at the level of the toxT promoter and that toxtazins B and B' work at the level of the tcpP promoter. Treatment with toxtazin B results in a 100-fold reduction in colonization in an infant mouse model of infection, though toxtazin A did not reduce colonization at the concentrations tested. These results add to the growing body of literature indicating that small-molecule inhibitors of virulence genes could be developed to treat infections, as alternatives to antibiotics become increasingly needed. V. cholerae caused more than 580,000 infections worldwide in 2011 alone (WHO, Wkly. Epidemiol. Rec. 87:289-304, 2012). Cholera is treated with an oral rehydration therapy consisting of water, glucose, and electrolytes. However, as V. cholerae is transmitted via contaminated water, treatment can be difficult for communities whose water source is contaminated. In this study, we address the need for new therapeutic approaches by targeting the production of the main virulence factor, cholera toxin (CT). The high-throughput screen presented here led to the identification of two novel classes of inhibitors of the virulence cascade in V. cholerae, toxtazin A and toxtazins B and B'. We demonstrate that (i) small-molecule inhibitors of virulence gene production can be

  1. LimTox: a web tool for applied text mining of adverse event and toxicity associations of compounds, drugs and genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañada, Andres; Capella-Gutierrez, Salvador; Rabal, Obdulia; Oyarzabal, Julen; Valencia, Alfonso; Krallinger, Martin

    2017-07-03

    A considerable effort has been devoted to retrieve systematically information for genes and proteins as well as relationships between them. Despite the importance of chemical compounds and drugs as a central bio-entity in pharmacological and biological research, only a limited number of freely available chemical text-mining/search engine technologies are currently accessible. Here we present LimTox (Literature Mining for Toxicology), a web-based online biomedical search tool with special focus on adverse hepatobiliary reactions. It integrates a range of text mining, named entity recognition and information extraction components. LimTox relies on machine-learning, rule-based, pattern-based and term lookup strategies. This system processes scientific abstracts, a set of full text articles and medical agency assessment reports. Although the main focus of LimTox is on adverse liver events, it enables also basic searches for other organ level toxicity associations (nephrotoxicity, cardiotoxicity, thyrotoxicity and phospholipidosis). This tool supports specialized search queries for: chemical compounds/drugs, genes (with additional emphasis on key enzymes in drug metabolism, namely P450 cytochromes-CYPs) and biochemical liver markers. The LimTox website is free and open to all users and there is no login requirement. LimTox can be accessed at: http://limtox.bioinfo.cnio.es. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  2. In vitro screening of environmental chemicals for targeted testing prioritization: the ToxCast project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judson, Richard S; Houck, Keith A; Kavlock, Robert J; Knudsen, Thomas B; Martin, Matthew T; Mortensen, Holly M; Reif, David M; Rotroff, Daniel M; Shah, Imran; Richard, Ann M; Dix, David J

    2010-04-01

    Chemical toxicity testing is being transformed by advances in biology and computer modeling, concerns over animal use, and the thousands of environmental chemicals lacking toxicity data. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's ToxCast program aims to address these concerns by screening and prioritizing chemicals for potential human toxicity using in vitro assays and in silico approaches. This project aims to evaluate the use of in vitro assays for understanding the types of molecular and pathway perturbations caused by environmental chemicals and to build initial prioritization models of in vivo toxicity. We tested 309 mostly pesticide active chemicals in 467 assays across nine technologies, including high-throughput cell-free assays and cell-based assays, in multiple human primary cells and cell lines plus rat primary hepatocytes. Both individual and composite scores for effects on genes and pathways were analyzed. Chemicals displayed a broad spectrum of activity at the molecular and pathway levels. We saw many expected interactions, including endocrine and xenobiotic metabolism enzyme activity. Chemicals ranged in promiscuity across pathways, from no activity to affecting dozens of pathways. We found a statistically significant inverse association between the number of pathways perturbed by a chemical at low in vitro concentrations and the lowest in vivo dose at which a chemical causes toxicity. We also found associations between a small set of in vitro assays and rodent liver lesion formation. This approach promises to provide meaningful data on the thousands of untested environmental chemicals and to guide targeted testing of environmental contaminants.

  3. FutureTox II: in vitro data and in silico models for predictive toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, Thomas B; Keller, Douglas A; Sander, Miriam; Carney, Edward W; Doerrer, Nancy G; Eaton, David L; Fitzpatrick, Suzanne Compton; Hastings, Kenneth L; Mendrick, Donna L; Tice, Raymond R; Watkins, Paul B; Whelan, Maurice

    2015-02-01

    FutureTox II, a Society of Toxicology Contemporary Concepts in Toxicology workshop, was held in January, 2014. The meeting goals were to review and discuss the state of the science in toxicology in the context of implementing the NRC 21st century vision of predicting in vivo responses from in vitro and in silico data, and to define the goals for the future. Presentations and discussions were held on priority concerns such as predicting and modeling of metabolism, cell growth and differentiation, effects on sensitive subpopulations, and integrating data into risk assessment. Emerging trends in technologies such as stem cell-derived human cells, 3D organotypic culture models, mathematical modeling of cellular processes and morphogenesis, adverse outcome pathway development, and high-content imaging of in vivo systems were discussed. Although advances in moving towards an in vitro/in silico based risk assessment paradigm were apparent, knowledge gaps in these areas and limitations of technologies were identified. Specific recommendations were made for future directions and research needs in the areas of hepatotoxicity, cancer prediction, developmental toxicity, and regulatory toxicology. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Activity profiles of 309 ToxCastTM chemicals evaluated across 292 biochemical targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knudsen, Thomas B.; Houck, Keith A.; Sipes, Nisha S.; Singh, Amar V.; Judson, Richard S.; Martin, Matthew T.; Weissman, Arthur; Kleinstreuer, Nicole C.; Mortensen, Holly M.; Reif, David M.; Rabinowitz, James R.; Setzer, R. Woodrow; Richard, Ann M.; Dix, David J.; Kavlock, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the potential health risks posed by environmental chemicals is a significant challenge elevated by the large number of diverse chemicals with generally uncharacterized exposures, mechanisms, and toxicities. The present study is a performance evaluation and critical analysis of assay results for an array of 292 high-throughput cell-free assays aimed at preliminary toxicity evaluation of 320 environmental chemicals in EPA's ToxCast TM project (Phase I). The chemicals (309 unique, 11 replicates) were mainly precursors or the active agent of commercial pesticides, for which a wealth of in vivo toxicity data is available. Biochemical HTS (high-throughput screening) profiled cell and tissue extracts using semi-automated biochemical and pharmacological methodologies to evaluate a subset of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), CYP450 enzymes (CYPs), kinases, phosphatases, proteases, HDACs, nuclear receptors, ion channels, and transporters. The primary screen tested all chemicals at a relatively high concentration 25 μM concentration (or 10 μM for CYP assays), and a secondary screen re-tested 9132 chemical-assay pairs in 8-point concentration series from 0.023 to 50 μM (or 0.009-20 μM for CYPs). Mapping relationships across 93,440 chemical-assay pairs based on half-maximal activity concentration (AC50) revealed both known and novel targets in signaling and metabolic pathways. The primary dataset, summary data and details on quality control checks are available for download at (http://www.epa.gov/ncct/toxcast/).

  5. VirtualToxLab — A platform for estimating the toxic potential of drugs, chemicals and natural products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vedani, Angelo, E-mail: angelo.vedani@unibas.ch [Biographics Laboratory 3R, Klingelbergstrasse 50, 4056 Basel (Switzerland); Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 50, 4056 Basel (Switzerland); Dobler, Max [Biographics Laboratory 3R, Klingelbergstrasse 50, 4056 Basel (Switzerland); Smieško, Martin [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 50, 4056 Basel (Switzerland)

    2012-06-01

    The VirtualToxLab is an in silico technology for estimating the toxic potential (endocrine and metabolic disruption, some aspects of carcinogenicity and cardiotoxicity) of drugs, chemicals and natural products. The technology is based on an automated protocol that simulates and quantifies the binding of small molecules towards a series of proteins, known or suspected to trigger adverse effects. The toxic potential, a non-linear function ranging from 0.0 (none) to 1.0 (extreme), is derived from the individual binding affinities of a compound towards currently 16 target proteins: 10 nuclear receptors (androgen, estrogen α, estrogen β, glucocorticoid, liver X, mineralocorticoid, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, progesterone, thyroid α, and thyroid β), four members of the cytochrome P450 enzyme family (1A2, 2C9, 2D6, and 3A4), a cytosolic transcription factor (aryl hydrocarbon receptor) and a potassium ion channel (hERG). The interface to the technology allows building and uploading molecular structures, viewing and downloading results and, most importantly, rationalizing any prediction at the atomic level by interactively analyzing the binding mode of a compound with its target protein(s) in real-time 3D. The VirtualToxLab has been used to predict the toxic potential for over 2500 compounds: the results are posted on (http://www.virtualtoxlab.org). The free platform — the OpenVirtualToxLab — is accessible (in client–server mode) over the Internet. It is free of charge for universities, governmental agencies, regulatory bodies and non-profit organizations. -- Highlights: ► In silico technology for estimating the toxic potential of drugs and chemicals. ► Simulation of binding towards 16 proteins suspected to trigger adverse effects. ► Mechanistic interpretation and real-time 3D visualization. ► Accessible over the Internet. ► Free of charge for universities, governmental agencies, regulatory bodies and NPOs.

  6. CalTOX, a multimedia total exposure model for hazardous-waste sites; Part 1, Executive summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKone, T.E.

    1993-06-01

    CalTOX has been developed as a spreadsheet model to assist in health-risk assessments that address contaminated soils and the contamination of adjacent air, surface water, sediments, and ground water. The modeling effort includes a multimedia transport and transformation model, exposure scenario models, and efforts to quantify and reduce uncertainty in multimedia, multiple-pathway exposure models. This report provides an overview of the CalTOX model components, lists the objectives of the model, describes the philosophy under which the model was developed, identifies the chemical classes for which the model can be used, and describes critical sensitivities and uncertainties. The multimedia transport and transformation model is a dynamic model that can be used to assess time-varying concentrations of contaminants introduced initially to soil layers or for contaminants released continuously to air or water. This model assists the user in examining how chemical and landscape properties impact both the ultimate route and quantity of human contact. Multimedia, multiple pathway exposure models are used in the CalTOX model to estimate average daily potential doses within a human population in the vicinity of a hazardous substances release site. The exposure models encompass twenty-three exposure pathways. The exposure assessment process consists of relating contaminant concentrations in the multimedia model compartments to contaminant concentrations in the media with which a human population has contact (personal air, tap water, foods, household dusts soils, etc.). The average daily dose is the product of the exposure concentrations in these contact media and an intake or uptake factor that relates the concentrations to the distributions of potential dose within the population.

  7. VirtualToxLab — A platform for estimating the toxic potential of drugs, chemicals and natural products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vedani, Angelo; Dobler, Max; Smieško, Martin

    2012-01-01

    The VirtualToxLab is an in silico technology for estimating the toxic potential (endocrine and metabolic disruption, some aspects of carcinogenicity and cardiotoxicity) of drugs, chemicals and natural products. The technology is based on an automated protocol that simulates and quantifies the binding of small molecules towards a series of proteins, known or suspected to trigger adverse effects. The toxic potential, a non-linear function ranging from 0.0 (none) to 1.0 (extreme), is derived from the individual binding affinities of a compound towards currently 16 target proteins: 10 nuclear receptors (androgen, estrogen α, estrogen β, glucocorticoid, liver X, mineralocorticoid, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, progesterone, thyroid α, and thyroid β), four members of the cytochrome P450 enzyme family (1A2, 2C9, 2D6, and 3A4), a cytosolic transcription factor (aryl hydrocarbon receptor) and a potassium ion channel (hERG). The interface to the technology allows building and uploading molecular structures, viewing and downloading results and, most importantly, rationalizing any prediction at the atomic level by interactively analyzing the binding mode of a compound with its target protein(s) in real-time 3D. The VirtualToxLab has been used to predict the toxic potential for over 2500 compounds: the results are posted on (http://www.virtualtoxlab.org). The free platform — the OpenVirtualToxLab — is accessible (in client–server mode) over the Internet. It is free of charge for universities, governmental agencies, regulatory bodies and non-profit organizations. -- Highlights: ► In silico technology for estimating the toxic potential of drugs and chemicals. ► Simulation of binding towards 16 proteins suspected to trigger adverse effects. ► Mechanistic interpretation and real-time 3D visualization. ► Accessible over the Internet. ► Free of charge for universities, governmental agencies, regulatory bodies and NPOs.

  8. Metal mixture toxicity to aquatic biota in laboratory experiments: Application of the WHAM-F{sub TOX} model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tipping, E., E-mail: et@ceh.ac.uk; Lofts, S.

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: •Metal accumulation by living organisms is successfully simulated with WHAM. •Modelled organism-bound metal provides a measure of toxic exposure. •The toxic potency of individual bound metals is quantified by fitting toxicity data. •Eleven laboratory mixture toxicity data sets were parameterised. •Relatively little variability amongst individual test organisms is indicated. -- Abstract: The WHAM-F{sub TOX} model describes the combined toxic effects of protons and metal cations towards aquatic organisms through the toxicity function (F{sub TOX}), a linear combination of the products of organism-bound cation and a toxic potency coefficient (α{sub i}) for each cation. Organism-bound, metabolically-active, cation is quantified by the proxy variable, amount bound by humic acid (HA), as predicted by the WHAM chemical speciation model. We compared published measured accumulations of metals by living organisms (bacteria, algae, invertebrates) in different solutions, with WHAM predictions of metal binding to humic acid in the same solutions. After adjustment for differences in binding site density, the predictions were in reasonable line with observations (for logarithmic variables, r{sup 2} = 0.89, root mean squared deviation = 0.44), supporting the use of HA binding as a proxy. Calculated loadings of H{sup +}, Al, Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb and UO{sub 2} were used to fit observed toxic effects in 11 published mixture toxicity experiments involving bacteria, macrophytes, invertebrates and fish. Overall, WHAM-F{sub TOX} gave slightly better fits than a conventional additive model based on solution concentrations. From the derived values of α{sub i}, the toxicity of bound cations can tentatively be ranked in the order: H < Al < (Zn–Cu–Pb–UO{sub 2}) < Cd. The WHAM-F{sub TOX} analysis indicates much narrower ranges of differences amongst individual organisms in metal toxicity tests than was previously thought. The model potentially provides a means to

  9. EU Framework 6 Project: Predictive Toxicology (PredTox)-overview and outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suter, Laura; Schroeder, Susanne; Meyer, Kirstin; Gautier, Jean-Charles; Amberg, Alexander; Wendt, Maria; Gmuender, Hans; Mally, Angela; Boitier, Eric; Ellinger-Ziegelbauer, Heidrun; Matheis, Katja; Pfannkuch, Friedlieb

    2011-01-01

    In this publication, we report the outcome of the integrated EU Framework 6 Project: Predictive Toxicology (PredTox), including methodological aspects and overall conclusions. Specific details including data analysis and interpretation are reported in separate articles in this issue. The project, partly funded by the EU, was carried out by a consortium of 15 pharmaceutical companies, 2 SMEs, and 3 universities. The effects of 16 test compounds were characterized using conventional toxicological parameters and 'omics' technologies. The three major observed toxicities, liver hypertrophy, bile duct necrosis and/or cholestasis, and kidney proximal tubular damage were analyzed in detail. The combined approach of 'omics' and conventional toxicology proved a useful tool for mechanistic investigations and the identification of putative biomarkers. In our hands and in combination with histopathological assessment, target organ transcriptomics was the most prolific approach for the generation of mechanistic hypotheses. Proteomics approaches were relatively time-consuming and required careful standardization. NMR-based metabolomics detected metabolite changes accompanying histopathological findings, providing limited additional mechanistic information. Conversely, targeted metabolite profiling with LC/GC-MS was very useful for the investigation of bile duct necrosis/cholestasis. In general, both proteomics and metabolomics were supportive of other findings. Thus, the outcome of this program indicates that 'omics' technologies can help toxicologists to make better informed decisions during exploratory toxicological studies. The data support that hypothesis on mode of action and discovery of putative biomarkers are tangible outcomes of integrated 'omics' analysis. Qualification of biomarkers remains challenging, in particular in terms of identification, mechanistic anchoring, appropriate specificity, and sensitivity.

  10. Profiling of the Tox21 Chemical Collection for Mitochondrial Function to Identify Compounds that Acutely Decrease Mitochondrial Membrane Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attene-Ramos, Matias S.; Huang, Ruili; Michael, Sam; Witt, Kristine L.; Richard, Ann; Tice, Raymond R.; Simeonov, Anton; Austin, Christopher P.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a variety of disorders including cancer, diabetes, and neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases. Understanding whether different environmental chemicals and druglike molecules impact mitochondrial function represents an initial step in predicting exposure-related toxicity and defining a possible role for such compounds in the onset of various diseases. Objectives: We sought to identify individual chemicals and general structural features associated with changes in mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). Methods: We used a multiplexed [two end points in one screen; MMP and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content] quantitative high throughput screening (qHTS) approach combined with informatics tools to screen the Tox21 library of 10,000 compounds (~ 8,300 unique chemicals) at 15 concentrations each in triplicate to identify chemicals and structural features that are associated with changes in MMP in HepG2 cells. Results: Approximately 11% of the compounds (913 unique compounds) decreased MMP after 1 hr of treatment without affecting cell viability (ATP content). In addition, 309 compounds decreased MMP over a concentration range that also produced measurable cytotoxicity [half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) in MMP assay/IC50 in viability assay ≤ 3; p Tice RR, Simeonov A, Austin CP, Xia M. 2015. Profiling of the Tox21 chemical collection for mitochondrial function to identify compounds that acutely decrease mitochondrial membrane potential. Environ Health Perspect 123:49–56; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1408642 PMID:25302578

  11. CompNanoTox2015: novel perspectives from a European conference on computational nanotoxicology on predictive nanotoxicology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bañares, Miguel A. [Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica, ICP, CSIC, Madrid, Spain,; Haase, Andrea [German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR), Department of Chemical and Product Safety, Berlin, Germany,; Tran, Lang [Statistics and Toxicology Section, Institute of Occupational Medicine, Edinburgh, UK,; Lobaskin, Vladimir [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland,; Oberdörster, Günter [Department of Environmental Medicine, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, USA,; Rallo, Robert [Departament d’Enginyeria Informatica i Matematiques, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Tarragona, Spain,; Advanced Computing, Mathematics, and Data Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA, USA,; Leszczynski, Jerzy [Interdisciplinary Nanotoxicity Center, Jackson State University, Jackson, MS, USA,; Hoet, Peter [Public Health, Unit Lung Toxicology, K. U. Leuven, Leuven, Belgium,; Korenstein, Rafi [Faculty of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel,; Hardy, Barry [Technology Park Basel, Douglas Connect GmbH, Basel, Switzerland,; Puzyn, Tomasz [Laboratory of Environmental Chemometrics, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Gdansk, Gdansk, Poland

    2017-08-09

    A first European Conference on Computational Nanotoxicology, CompNanoTox, was held in November 2015 in Benahavís, Spain with the objectives to disseminate and integrate results from the European modeling and database projects (NanoPUZZLES, ModENPTox, PreNanoTox, MembraneNanoPart, MODERN, eNanoMapper and EU COST TD1204 MODENA) as well as to create synergies within the European NanoSafety Cluster. This conference was supported by the COST Action TD1204 MODENA on developing computational methods for toxicological risk assessment of engineered nanoparticles and provided a unique opportunity for crossfertilization among complementary disciplines. The efforts to develop and validate computational models crucially depend on high quality experimental data and relevant assays which will be the basis to identify relevant descriptors. The ambitious overarching goal of this conference was to promote predictive nanotoxicology, which can only be achieved by a close collaboration between the computational scientists (e.g. database experts, modeling experts for structure, (eco) toxicological effects, performance and interaction of nanomaterials) and experimentalists from different areas (in particular toxicologists, biologists, chemists and material scientists, among others). The main outcome and new perspectives of this conference are summarized here.

  12. Neurospora crassa tox-1 Gene Encodes a pH- and Temperature-Tolerant Mini-Cellulase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yue; Zhang, Qiongsi; Luo, Yiquan; Zhang, Ying; Luo, Xi; Wang, Yuchuan; Cao, Weiguo; Pinto, Vito De; Liu, Qiuyun; Li, Gang

    2016-06-15

    Cellulases that endure extreme conditions are essential in various industrial sectors. This study reports a mini-cellulase gene tox-1 from Neurospora crassa. The gene tox-1 was cloned in Escherichia coli after chimerization with the YebF gene and substitutions of certain isoleucine and valine with leucine residues. The yeast transformants could grow on rice straw-agar medium. The 44-amino acid peptide and its two mutant variants displayed potent cellulase activities in Congo Red assay and enzymatic assays. Conservative replacements with leucine have substantially increased the stabilities and half-lives of the peptides at alkaline pH and low and high temperatures and also the tolerance to organic solvents and surfactants, on the basis of activities toward cellose. The small size of the mini-cellulase would allow for commercially viable automatic chemical peptide synthesis. This work suggests that conservative leucine replacements may serve as a general strategy in the engineering of more robust enzymes with special features with little loss of activities.

  13. LuminoTox : a tool for the rapid detection of PAH, BPC and chlorobenzenes in waste water and sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellemare, F.; Boucher, N.; Lorrain, L.; Rouette, M.E.; Perron, E. [Lab-bell Inc., Shawnigan, PQ (Canada)

    2005-07-01

    The LuminoTox is a portable fluorimetric detection device capable of assessing water toxicity in 10 to 15 minutes. The toxicity of a water sample is indicated by the modification of fluorescence parameters within isolated both isolated photosynthetic complexes (PECs) and photosynthetic algae (SAPs). An array of 4 LEDs and photodetectors is used to determine fluorescence emissions from PEPs and SAPs. Fluorescence data is then transferred to a computer for analysis. A kinetic detection mode is currently being developed for the tool. This paper provided details of a test conducted to demonstrate the kinetic detection capabilities of the new design. Sediment containing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), polychlorinated biphenyls, and chlorobenzene were used in the analysis. Results showed that the fluorescence kinetic mode yielded improved sensitivity with molecules acting on the electron transport chain downstream from the tool's photosystem. The test demonstrated that the LuminoTox technology is capable of accurately monitoring the presence of PAHs, PCBs, and chlorobenzenes. It was concluded that the tool is sensitive to a wide range of pollutants and can be used to analyze complex waste water and slurries. 15 refs., 2 tabs., 1 fig.

  14. Conjugated Linoleic Acid Reduces Cholera Toxin Production In Vitro and In Vivo by Inhibiting Vibrio cholerae ToxT Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Withey, Jeffrey H; Nag, Drubhajyoti; Plecha, Sarah C; Sinha, Ritam; Koley, Hemanta

    2015-12-01

    The severe diarrheal disease cholera is endemic in over 50 countries. Current therapies for cholera patients involve oral and/or intravenous rehydration, often combined with the use of antibiotics to shorten the duration and intensity of the disease. However, as antibiotic resistance increases, treatment options will become limited. Linoleic acid has been shown to be a potent negative effector of V. cholerae virulence that acts on the major virulence transcription regulator protein, ToxT, to inhibit virulence gene expression. ToxT activates transcription of the two major virulence factors required for disease, cholera toxin (CT) and toxin-coregulated pilus (TCP). A conjugated form of linoleic acid (CLA) is currently sold over the counter as a dietary supplement and is generally recognized as safe by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. This study examined whether CLA could be used as a new therapy to reduce CT production, which, in turn, would decrease disease duration and intensity in cholera patients. CLA could be used in place of traditional antibiotics and would be very unlikely to generate resistance, as it affects only virulence factor production and not bacterial growth or survival. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  15. The ToxBank Data Warehouse: Supporting the Replacement of In Vivo Repeated Dose Systemic Toxicity Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohonen, Pekka; Benfenati, Emilio; Bower, David; Ceder, Rebecca; Crump, Michael; Cross, Kevin; Grafström, Roland C; Healy, Lyn; Helma, Christoph; Jeliazkova, Nina; Jeliazkov, Vedrin; Maggioni, Silvia; Miller, Scott; Myatt, Glenn; Rautenberg, Michael; Stacey, Glyn; Willighagen, Egon; Wiseman, Jeff; Hardy, Barry

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the SEURAT-1 (Safety Evaluation Ultimately Replacing Animal Testing-1) research cluster, comprised of seven EU FP7 Health projects co-financed by Cosmetics Europe, is to generate a proof-of-concept to show how the latest technologies, systems toxicology and toxicogenomics can be combined to deliver a test replacement for repeated dose systemic toxicity testing on animals. The SEURAT-1 strategy is to adopt a mode-of-action framework to describe repeated dose toxicity, combining in vitro and in silico methods to derive predictions of in vivo toxicity responses. ToxBank is the cross-cluster infrastructure project whose activities include the development of a data warehouse to provide a web-accessible shared repository of research data and protocols, a physical compounds repository, reference or "gold compounds" for use across the cluster (available via wiki.toxbank.net), and a reference resource for biomaterials. Core technologies used in the data warehouse include the ISA-Tab universal data exchange format, REpresentational State Transfer (REST) web services, the W3C Resource Description Framework (RDF) and the OpenTox standards. We describe the design of the data warehouse based on cluster requirements, the implementation based on open standards, and finally the underlying concepts and initial results of a data analysis utilizing public data related to the gold compounds. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. The EPA CompTox Dashboard and Underpinning Software Architecture – a platform for data integration for environmental chemistry data (ACS Fall Meeting 7 of 12)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The CompTox Dashboard was developed by the Environmental Protection Agency’s National Center for Computational Toxicology. This dashboard has been architected in a manner that allows for the deployment of multiple “applications”, both as publicly available databases, and for dep...

  17. Real-time prediction of Physicochemical and Toxicological Endpoints Using the Web-based CompTox Chemistry Dashboard (ACS Fall meeting) 10 of 12

    Science.gov (United States)

    The EPA CompTox Chemistry Dashboard developed by the National Center for Computational Toxicology (NCCT) provides access to data for ~750,000 chemical substances. The data include experimental and predicted data for physicochemical, environmental fate and transport and toxicologi...

  18. Using semi-automated curation workflows to collect, organize, and curate the data and models necessary to support the EPA CompTox chemical dashboard (ACS Spring meeting)

    Science.gov (United States)

    With the increasing need to leverage data and models to perform cutting edge analyses within the environmental science community, collection and organization of that data into a readily accessible format for consumption is a pressing need. The EPA CompTox chemical dashboard is i...

  19. CAirTOX: A compartment model for assessing the fate of and human exposure to toxic-chemical emissions to air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKone, T.E.

    1993-10-01

    CAirTOX has been developed as a spreadsheet model to assist in making a risk assessment of toxic air emissions. With CAirTOX, one can address how contaminants released to an air basin can lead to contamination of soil, food, surface water, and sediments. The modeling effort includes a multimedia transport and transformation model, exposure scenario models, and efforts to quantify uncertainty in multimedia, multiple-pathway exposure assessments. The multimedia transport and transformation model is a steady-state, but non-equilibrium model that can be used to assess concentrations of contaminants released continuously to air. In Part 1, the authors describe the multimedia transport and transformation model used to determine the fate of air emissions. In Part 2, they describe inputs and data needs for CAirTOX and the development of a set of landscape factors, which can be used to represent regional air basin/water-shed systems in California. In Part 3, they describe the multiple-pathway exposure scenarios and exposure algorithms. In Part 4, they compare the HRA approach and results and the CAirTOX exposure equations. In Part 5, they consider model sensitivity and uncertainty to determine how variability and uncertainty in model inputs affects the precision, accuracy, and credibility of the model output.

  20. Cheminformatics and Data Mining Approaches for Exploring the Alternatives Testing Landscsape: Case Studies in ToxCast and Skin Sensitization (BOSC CSS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheminformatics approaches and structure-based rules are being used to evaluate and explore the ToxCast chemical landscape and associated high-throughput screening (HTS) data. We have shown that the library provides comprehensive coverage of the knowledge domains and target inven...

  1. The US EPA CompTox Chemistry Dashboard as a source of data to fill data gaps for chemical sources of risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemical risk assessment is both time-consuming and difficult because it requires the assembly of data for chemicals generally distributed across multiple sources. The US EPA CompTox Chemistry Dashboard is a publicly accessible web-based application providing access to various da...

  2. Predicting dermal penetration for ToxCast chemicals using in silico estimates for diffusion in combination with physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Predicting dermal penetration for ToxCast chemicals using in silico estimates for diffusion in combination with physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling.Evans, M.V., Sawyer, M.E., Isaacs, K.K, and Wambaugh, J.With the development of efficient high-throughput (HT) in ...

  3. Computation Modeling of Limb-bud Dysmorphogenesis: Predicting Cellular Dynamics and Key Events in Developmental Toxicity with a Multicellular Systems Model (FutureToxII)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congenital limb malformations are among the most frequent malformation occurs in humans, with a frequency of about 1 in 500 to 1 in 1000 human live births. ToxCast is profiling the bioactivity of thousands of chemicals based on high-throughput (HTS) and computational methods that...

  4. Cross-species extrapolation of mammalian-based ToxCast Data using Sequence Alignment to Predict Across Species Susceptibility (SeqAPASS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    In vitro high-throughput screening (HTS) and in silico technologies have emerged as 21st century tools for chemical hazard identification. In 2007 the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) launched the ToxCast Program, which has screened thousands of chemicals in hundreds of...

  5. The CompTox Chemistry Dashboard: a community data resource for environmental chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Antony J; Grulke, Christopher M; Edwards, Jeff; McEachran, Andrew D; Mansouri, Kamel; Baker, Nancy C; Patlewicz, Grace; Shah, Imran; Wambaugh, John F; Judson, Richard S; Richard, Ann M

    2017-11-28

    Despite an abundance of online databases providing access to chemical data, there is increasing demand for high-quality, structure-curated, open data to meet the various needs of the environmental sciences and computational toxicology communities. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) web-based CompTox Chemistry Dashboard is addressing these needs by integrating diverse types of relevant domain data through a cheminformatics layer, built upon a database of curated substances linked to chemical structures. These data include physicochemical, environmental fate and transport, exposure, usage, in vivo toxicity, and in vitro bioassay data, surfaced through an integration hub with link-outs to additional EPA data and public domain online resources. Batch searching allows for direct chemical identifier (ID) mapping and downloading of multiple data streams in several different formats. This facilitates fast access to available structure, property, toxicity, and bioassay data for collections of chemicals (hundreds to thousands at a time). Advanced search capabilities are available to support, for example, non-targeted analysis and identification of chemicals using mass spectrometry. The contents of the chemistry database, presently containing ~ 760,000 substances, are available as public domain data for download. The chemistry content underpinning the Dashboard has been aggregated over the past 15 years by both manual and auto-curation techniques within EPA's DSSTox project. DSSTox chemical content is subject to strict quality controls to enforce consistency among chemical substance-structure identifiers, as well as list curation review to ensure accurate linkages of DSSTox substances to chemical lists and associated data. The Dashboard, publicly launched in April 2016, has expanded considerably in content and user traffic over the past year. It is continuously evolving with the growth of DSSTox into high-interest or data-rich domains of interest to EPA, such

  6. LiverTox: Advanced QSAR and Toxicogeomic Software for Hepatotoxicity Prediction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, P-Y.; Yuracko, K. (YAHSGS, LLC)

    2011-02-25

    YAHSGS LLC and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) established a CRADA in an attempt to develop a predictive system using a pre-existing ORNL computational neural network and wavelets format. This was in the interest of addressing national needs for toxicity prediction system to help overcome the significant drain of resources (money and time) being directed toward developing chemical agents for commerce. The research project has been supported through an STTR mechanism and funded by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences beginning Phase I in 2004 (CRADA No. ORNL-04-0688) and extending Phase II through 2007 (ORNL NFE-06-00020). To attempt the research objectives and aims outlined under this CRADA, state-of-the-art computational neural network and wavelet methods were used in an effort to design a predictive toxicity system that used two independent areas on which to base the system’s predictions. These two areas were quantitative structure-activity relationships and gene-expression data obtained from microarrays. A third area, using the new Massively Parallel Signature Sequencing (MPSS) technology to assess gene expression, also was attempted but had to be dropped because the company holding the rights to this promising MPSS technology went out of business. A research-scale predictive toxicity database system called Multi-Intelligent System for Toxicogenomic Applications (MISTA) was developed and its feasibility for use as a predictor of toxicological activity was tested. The fundamental focus of the CRADA was an attempt and effort to operate the MISTA database using the ORNL neural network. This effort indicated the potential that such a fully developed system might be used to assist in predicting such biological endpoints as hepatotoxcity and neurotoxicity. The MISTA/LiverTox approach if eventually fully developed might also be useful for automatic processing of microarray data to predict modes of action. A technical paper describing the

  7. The eTOX Data-Sharing Project to Advance in Silico Drug-Induced Toxicity Prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montserrat Cases

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The high-quality in vivo preclinical safety data produced by the pharmaceutical industry during drug development, which follows numerous strict guidelines, are mostly not available in the public domain. These safety data are sometimes published as a condensed summary for the few compounds that reach the market, but the majority of studies are never made public and are often difficult to access in an automated way, even sometimes within the owning company itself. It is evident from many academic and industrial examples, that useful data mining and model development requires large and representative data sets and careful curation of the collected data. In 2010, under the auspices of the Innovative Medicines Initiative, the eTOX project started with the objective of extracting and sharing preclinical study data from paper or pdf archives of toxicology departments of the 13 participating pharmaceutical companies and using such data for establishing a detailed, well-curated database, which could then serve as source for read-across approaches (early assessment of the potential toxicity of a drug candidate by comparison of similar structure and/or effects and training of predictive models. The paper describes the efforts undertaken to allow effective data sharing intellectual property (IP protection and set up of adequate controlled vocabularies and to establish the database (currently with over 4000 studies contributed by the pharma companies corresponding to more than 1400 compounds. In addition, the status of predictive models building and some specific features of the eTOX predictive system (eTOXsys are presented as decision support knowledge-based tools for drug development process at an early stage.

  8. Real-time cell toxicity profiling of Tox21 10K compounds reveals cytotoxicity dependent toxicity pathway linkage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jui-Hua Hsieh

    Full Text Available Cytotoxicity is a commonly used in vitro endpoint for evaluating chemical toxicity. In support of the U.S. Tox21 screening program, the cytotoxicity of ~10K chemicals was interrogated at 0, 8, 16, 24, 32, & 40 hours of exposure in a concentration dependent fashion in two cell lines (HEK293, HepG2 using two multiplexed, real-time assay technologies. One technology measures the metabolic activity of cells (i.e., cell viability, glo while the other evaluates cell membrane integrity (i.e., cell death, flor. Using glo technology, more actives and greater temporal variations were seen in HEK293 cells, while results for the flor technology were more similar across the two cell types. Chemicals were grouped into classes based on their cytotoxicity kinetics profiles and these classes were evaluated for their associations with activity in the Tox21 nuclear receptor and stress response pathway assays. Some pathways, such as the activation of H2AX, were associated with the fast-responding cytotoxicity classes, while others, such as activation of TP53, were associated with the slow-responding cytotoxicity classes. By clustering pathways based on their degree of association to the different cytotoxicity kinetics labels, we identified clusters of pathways where active chemicals presented similar kinetics of cytotoxicity. Such linkages could be due to shared underlying biological processes between pathways, for example, activation of H2AX and heat shock factor. Others involving nuclear receptor activity are likely due to shared chemical structures rather than pathway level interactions. Based on the linkage between androgen receptor antagonism and Nrf2 activity, we surmise that a subclass of androgen receptor antagonists cause cytotoxicity via oxidative stress that is associated with Nrf2 activation. In summary, the real-time cytotoxicity screen provides informative chemical cytotoxicity kinetics data related to their cytotoxicity mechanisms, and with our

  9. Cell-Based High-Throughput Screening for Aromatase Inhibitors in the Tox21 10K Library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shiuan; Hsieh, Jui-Hua; Huang, Ruili; Sakamuru, Srilatha; Hsin, Li-Yu; Xia, Menghang; Shockley, Keith R; Auerbach, Scott; Kanaya, Noriko; Lu, Hannah; Svoboda, Daniel; Witt, Kristine L; Merrick, B Alex; Teng, Christina T; Tice, Raymond R

    2015-10-01

    Multiple mechanisms exist for endocrine disruption; one nonreceptor-mediated mechanism is via effects on aromatase, an enzyme critical for maintaining the normal in vivo balance of androgens and estrogens. We adapted the AroER tri-screen 96-well assay to 1536-well format to identify potential aromatase inhibitors (AIs) in the U.S. Tox21 10K compound library. In this assay, screening with compound alone identifies estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) agonists, screening in the presence of testosterone (T) identifies AIs and/or ERα antagonists, and screening in the presence of 17β-estradiol (E2) identifies ERα antagonists. Screening the Tox-21 library in the presence of T resulted in finding 302 potential AIs. These compounds, along with 31 known AI actives and inactives, were rescreened using all 3 assay formats. Of the 333 compounds tested, 113 (34%; 63 actives, 50 marginal actives) were considered to be potential AIs independent of cytotoxicity and ER antagonism activity. Structure-activity analysis suggested the presence of both conventional (eg, 1, 2, 4, - triazole class) and novel AI structures. Due to their novel structures, 14 of the 63 potential AI actives, including both drugs and fungicides, were selected for confirmation in the biochemical tritiated water-release aromatase assay. Ten compounds were active in the assay; the remaining 4 were only active in high-throughput screen assay, but with low efficacy. To further characterize these 10 novel AIs, we investigated their binding characteristics. The AroER tri-screen, in high-throughput format, accurately and efficiently identified chemicals in a large and diverse chemical library that selectively interact with aromatase. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Risk-Association of Five SNPs in TOX3/LOC643714 with Breast Cancer in Southern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuanqiu He

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The specific mechanism by which low-risk genetic variants confer breast cancer risk is currently unclear, with contradictory evidence on the role of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in TOX3/LOC643714 as a breast cancer susceptibility locus. Investigations of this locus using a Chinese population may indicate whether the findings initially identified in a European population are generalizable to other populations, and may provide new insight into the role of genetic variants in the etiology of breast cancer. In this case-control study, 623 Chinese female breast cancer patients and 620 cancer-free controls were recruited to investigate the role of five SNPs in TOX3/LOC643714 (rs8051542, rs12443621, rs3803662, rs4784227, and rs3112612; Linkage disequilibrium (LD pattern analysis was performed. Additionally, we evaluated how these common SNPs influence the risk of specific types of breast cancer, as defined by estrogen receptor (ER status, progesterone receptor (PR status and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2 status. Significant associations with breast cancer risk were observed for rs4784227 and rs8051542 with odds ratios (OR of 1.31 ((95% confidence intervals (CI, 1.10–1.57 and 1.26 (95% CI, 1.02–1.56, respectively, per T allele. The T-rs8051542 allele was significantly associated with ER-positive and HER2-negative carriers. No significant association existed between rs12443621, rs3803662, and rs3112612 polymorphisms and risk of breast cancer. Our results support the hypothesis that the applicability of a common susceptibility locus must be confirmed among genetically different populations, which may together explain an appreciable fraction of the genetic etiology of breast cancer.

  11. E-SovTox: An online database of the main publicly-available sources of toxicity data concerning REACH-relevant chemicals published in the Russian language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sihtmäe, Mariliis; Blinova, Irina; Aruoja, Villem; Dubourguier, Henri-Charles; Legrand, Nicolas; Kahru, Anne

    2010-08-01

    A new open-access online database, E-SovTox, is presented. E-SovTox provides toxicological data for substances relevant to the EU Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH) system, from publicly-available Russian language data sources. The database contains information selected mainly from scientific journals published during the Soviet Union era. The main information source for this database - the journal, Gigiena Truda i Professional'nye Zabolevania [Industrial Hygiene and Occupational Diseases], published between 1957 and 1992 - features acute, but also chronic, toxicity data for numerous industrial chemicals, e.g. for rats, mice, guinea-pigs and rabbits. The main goal of the abovementioned toxicity studies was to derive the maximum allowable concentration limits for industrial chemicals in the occupational health settings of the former Soviet Union. Thus, articles featured in the database include mostly data on LD50 values, skin and eye irritation, skin sensitisation and cumulative properties. Currently, the E-SovTox database contains toxicity data selected from more than 500 papers covering more than 600 chemicals. The user is provided with the main toxicity information, as well as abstracts of these papers in Russian and in English (given as provided in the original publication). The search engine allows cross-searching of the database by the name or CAS number of the compound, and the author of the paper. The E-SovTox database can be used as a decision-support tool by researchers and regulators for the hazard assessment of chemical substances. 2010 FRAME.

  12. The Vitotox and ToxTracker assays: A two-test combination for quick and reliable assessment of genotoxic hazards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ates, Gamze; Favyts, Dorien; Hendriks, Giel; Derr, Remco; Mertens, Birgit; Verschaeve, Luc; Rogiers, Vera; Y Doktorova, Tatyana

    2016-11-01

    To ensure safety for humans, it is essential to characterize the genotoxic potential of new chemical entities, such as pharmaceutical and cosmetic substances. In a first tier, a battery of in vitro tests is recommended by international regulatory agencies. However, these tests suffer from inadequate specificity: compounds may be wrongly categorized as genotoxic, resulting in unnecessary, time-consuming, and expensive in vivo follow-up testing. In the last decade, novel assays (notably, reporter-based assays) have been developed in an attempt to overcome these drawbacks. Here, we have investigated the performance of two in vitro reporter-based assays, Vitotox and ToxTracker. A set of reference compounds was selected to span a variety of mechanisms of genotoxic action and applicability domains (e.g., pharmaceutical and cosmetic ingredients). Combining the performance of the two assays, we achieved 93% sensitivity and 79% specificity for prediction of gentoxicity for this set of compounds. Both assays permit quick high-throughput analysis of drug candidates, while requiring only small quantities of the test substances. Our study shows that these two assays, when combined, can be a reliable method for assessment of genotoxicity hazard. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Organs-on-a-chip: Current applications and consideration points for in vitro ADME-Tox studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Seiichi

    2018-02-01

    Assay systems using in vitro cultured cells are increasingly applied for evaluation of the efficacy, safety, and toxicity of drug candidates. In vitro cell-based assays have two main applications in the drug discovery process: searching for a compound that is effective against the target disease (seed investigation) and confirmation of safety during use of the identified compounds (safety assessment). Currently available in vitro cell-based assays have been designed to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity in single organs, but the in vivo pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of the administered drug candidates have not been considered. Thus, an evaluation system that interconnects cell culture units, one of which has appropriate drug metabolism activities and the other assesses the efficacy and toxicity of compounds, is needed. Accordingly, the in vitro ADME-Tox culture system known as organs-on-a-chip has been proposed. In this review, after introducing the organs-on-a-chip system, the evaluation of enterohepatic circulation and the gut-liver axis relationship will be presented as an example of the application of the organs-on-a-chip system for ADME studies based on inter-organ network. Additionally, the functions required for the organs-on-a-chip system and the necessity of standardization of cells mounted on the chip system will be discussed. Copyright © 2018 The Japanese Society for the Study of Xenobiotics. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. TIC-Tox: A preliminary discussion on identifying the forcing agents of DBP-mediated toxicity of disinfected water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plewa, Michael J; Wagner, Elizabeth D; Richardson, Susan D

    2017-08-01

    The disinfection of drinking water is a major public health achievement; however, an unintended consequence of disinfection is the generation of disinfection by-products (DBPs). Many of the identified DBPs exhibit in vitro and in vivo toxicity, generate a diversity of adverse biological effects, and may be hazards to the public health and the environment. Only a few DBPs are regulated by several national and international agencies and it is not clear if these regulated DBPs are the forcing agents that drive the observed toxicity and their associated health effects. In this study, we combine analytical chemical and biological data to resolve the forcing agents associated with mammalian cell cytotoxicity of drinking water samples from three cities. These data suggest that the trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids may be a small component of the overall cytotoxicity of the organic material isolated from disinfected drinking water. Chemical classes of nitrogen-containing DBPs, such as the haloacetonitriles and haloacetamides, appear to be the major forcing agents of toxicity in these samples. These findings may have important implications for the design of epidemiological studies that primarily rely on the levels of THMs to define DBP exposure among populations. The TIC-Tox approach constitutes a beginning step in the process of identifying the forcing agents of toxicity in disinfected water. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Design of a testing strategy using non-animal based test methods: lessons learnt from the ACuteTox project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp-Schneider, Annette; Prieto, Pilar; Kinsner-Ovaskainen, Agnieszka; Stanzel, Sven

    2013-06-01

    In the framework of toxicology, a testing strategy can be viewed as a series of steps which are taken to come to a final prediction about a characteristic of a compound under study. The testing strategy is performed as a single-step procedure, usually called a test battery, using simultaneously all information collected on different endpoints, or as tiered approach in which a decision tree is followed. Design of a testing strategy involves statistical considerations, such as the development of a statistical prediction model. During the EU FP6 ACuteTox project, several prediction models were proposed on the basis of statistical classification algorithms which we illustrate here. The final choice of testing strategies was not based on statistical considerations alone. However, without thorough statistical evaluations a testing strategy cannot be identified. We present here a number of observations made from the statistical viewpoint which relate to the development of testing strategies. The points we make were derived from problems we had to deal with during the evaluation of this large research project. A central issue during the development of a prediction model is the danger of overfitting. Procedures are presented to deal with this challenge. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Distribution of the ompA-types among ruminant and swine pneumonic strains of Pasteurella multocida exhibiting various cap-locus and toxA patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vougidou, C; Sandalakis, V; Psaroulaki, A; Siarkou, V; Petridou, E; Ekateriniadou, L

    2015-05-01

    Pasteurella multocida is an important pathogen in food-producing animals and numerous virulence genes have been identified in an attempt to elucidate the pathogenesis of pasteurellosis. Currently, some of these genes including the capsule biosynthesis genes, the toxA and the OMPs-encoding genes have been suggested as epidemiological markers. However, the number of studies concerning ruminant isolates is limited, while, no attempt has ever been made to investigate the existence of ompA sequence diversity among P. multocida isolates. The aim of the present study was the comparative analysis of 144 P. multocida pneumonic isolates obtained from sheep, goats, cattle and pigs by determining the distribution of the ompA-types in conjunction with the cap-locus and toxA patterns. The ompA genotypes of the isolates were determined using both a PCR-RFLP method and DNA sequence analysis. The most prevalent capsule biosynthesis gene among the isolates was capA (86.1%); a noticeable, however, rate of capD-positive isolates (38.6%) was found among the ovine isolates that had been associated primarily with the capsule type A in the past. Moreover, an unexpectedly high percentage of toxA-positive pneumonic isolates was noticed among small ruminants (93.2% and 85.7% in sheep and goats, respectively), indicating an important epidemiological role of toxigenic P. multocida for these species. Despite their great heterogeneity, certain ompA-genotypes were associated with specific host species, showing evidence of a host preference. The OmpA-based PCR-RFLP method developed proved to be a valuable tool in typing P. multocida strains. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. Applying physical science techniques and CERN technology to an unsolved problem in radiation treatment for cancer: the multidisciplinary 'VoxTox' research programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnet, Neil G; Scaife, Jessica E; Romanchikova, Marina; Thomas, Simon J; Bates, Amy M; Wong, Emma; Noble, David J; Shelley, Leila Ea; Bond, Simon J; Forman, Julia R; Hoole, Andrew Cf; Barnett, Gillian C; Brochu, Frederic M; Simmons, Michael Pd; Jena, Raj; Harrison, Karl; Yeap, Ping Lin; Drew, Amelia; Silvester, Emma; Elwood, Patrick; Pullen, Hannah; Sultana, Andrew; Seah, Shannon Yk; Wilson, Megan Z; Russell, Simon G; Benson, Richard J; Rimmer, Yvonne L; Jefferies, Sarah J; Taku, Nicolette; Gurnell, Mark; Powlson, Andrew S; Schönlieb, Carola-Bibiane; Cai, Xiaohao; Sutcliffe, Michael Pf; Parker, Michael A

    2017-06-01

    The VoxTox research programme has applied expertise from the physical sciences to the problem of radiotherapy toxicity, bringing together expertise from engineering, mathematics, high energy physics (including the Large Hadron Collider), medical physics and radiation oncology. In our initial cohort of 109 men treated with curative radiotherapy for prostate cancer, daily image guidance computed tomography (CT) scans have been used to calculate delivered dose to the rectum, as distinct from planned dose, using an automated approach. Clinical toxicity data have been collected, allowing us to address the hypothesis that delivered dose provides a better predictor of toxicity than planned dose.

  18. ToxAlerts: a Web server of structural alerts for toxic chemicals and compounds with potential adverse reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sushko, Iurii; Salmina, Elena; Potemkin, Vladimir A; Poda, Gennadiy; Tetko, Igor V

    2012-08-27

    The article presents a Web-based platform for collecting and storing toxicological structural alerts from literature and for virtual screening of chemical libraries to flag potentially toxic chemicals and compounds that can cause adverse side effects. An alert is uniquely identified by a SMARTS template, a toxicological endpoint, and a publication where the alert was described. Additionally, the system allows storing complementary information such as name, comments, and mechanism of action, as well as other data. Most importantly, the platform can be easily used for fast virtual screening of large chemical datasets, focused libraries, or newly designed compounds against the toxicological alerts, providing a detailed profile of the chemicals grouped by structural alerts and endpoints. Such a facility can be used for decision making regarding whether a compound should be tested experimentally, validated with available QSAR models, or eliminated from consideration altogether. The alert-based screening can also be helpful for an easier interpretation of more complex QSAR models. The system is publicly accessible and tightly integrated with the Online Chemical Modeling Environment (OCHEM, http://ochem.eu). The system is open and expandable: any registered OCHEM user can introduce new alerts, browse, edit alerts introduced by other users, and virtually screen his/her data sets against all or selected alerts. The user sets being passed through the structural alerts can be used at OCHEM for other typical tasks: exporting in a wide variety of formats, development of QSAR models, additional filtering by other criteria, etc. The database already contains almost 600 structural alerts for such endpoints as mutagenicity, carcinogenicity, skin sensitization, compounds that undergo metabolic activation, and compounds that form reactive metabolites and, thus, can cause adverse reactions. The ToxAlerts platform is accessible on the Web at http://ochem.eu/alerts, and it is constantly

  19. ToxGen: an improved reference database for the identification of type B-trichothecene genotypes in Fusarium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Kulik

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Type B trichothecenes, which pose a serious hazard to consumer health, occur worldwide in grains. These mycotoxins are produced mainly by three different trichothecene genotypes/chemotypes: 3ADON (3-acetyldeoxynivalenol, 15ADON (15-acetyldeoxynivalenol and NIV (nivalenol, named after these three major mycotoxin compounds. Correct identification of these genotypes is elementary for all studies relating to population surveys, fungal ecology and mycotoxicology. Trichothecene producers exhibit enormous strain-dependent chemical diversity, which may result in variation in levels of the genotype’s determining toxin and in the production of low to high amounts of atypical compounds. New high-throughput DNA-sequencing technologies promise to boost the diagnostics of mycotoxin genotypes. However, this requires a reference database containing a satisfactory taxonomic sampling of sequences showing high correlation to actually produced chemotypes. We believe that one of the most pressing current challenges of such a database is the linking of molecular identification with chemical diversity of the strains, as well as other metadata. In this study, we use the Tri12 gene involved in mycotoxin biosynthesis for identification of Tri genotypes through sequence comparison. Tri12 sequences from a range of geographically diverse fungal strains comprising 22 Fusarium species were stored in the ToxGen database, which covers descriptive and up-to-date annotations such as indication on Tri genotype and chemotype of the strains, chemical diversity, information on trichothecene-inducing host, substrate or media, geographical locality, and most recent taxonomic affiliations. The present initiative bridges the gap between the demands of comprehensive studies on trichothecene producers and the existing nucleotide sequence databases, which lack toxicological and other auxiliary data. We invite researchers working in the fields of fungal taxonomy, epidemiology and

  20. ToxGen: an improved reference database for the identification of type B-trichothecene genotypes in Fusarium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulik, Tomasz; Abarenkov, Kessy; Buśko, Maciej; Bilska, Katarzyna; van Diepeningen, Anne D; Ostrowska-Kołodziejczak, Anna; Krawczyk, Katarzyna; Brankovics, Balázs; Stenglein, Sebastian; Sawicki, Jakub; Perkowski, Juliusz

    2017-01-01

    Type B trichothecenes, which pose a serious hazard to consumer health, occur worldwide in grains. These mycotoxins are produced mainly by three different trichothecene genotypes/chemotypes: 3ADON (3-acetyldeoxynivalenol), 15ADON (15-acetyldeoxynivalenol) and NIV (nivalenol), named after these three major mycotoxin compounds. Correct identification of these genotypes is elementary for all studies relating to population surveys, fungal ecology and mycotoxicology. Trichothecene producers exhibit enormous strain-dependent chemical diversity, which may result in variation in levels of the genotype's determining toxin and in the production of low to high amounts of atypical compounds. New high-throughput DNA-sequencing technologies promise to boost the diagnostics of mycotoxin genotypes. However, this requires a reference database containing a satisfactory taxonomic sampling of sequences showing high correlation to actually produced chemotypes. We believe that one of the most pressing current challenges of such a database is the linking of molecular identification with chemical diversity of the strains, as well as other metadata. In this study, we use the Tri12 gene involved in mycotoxin biosynthesis for identification of Tri genotypes through sequence comparison. Tri12 sequences from a range of geographically diverse fungal strains comprising 22 Fusarium species were stored in the ToxGen database, which covers descriptive and up-to-date annotations such as indication on Tri genotype and chemotype of the strains, chemical diversity, information on trichothecene-inducing host, substrate or media, geographical locality, and most recent taxonomic affiliations. The present initiative bridges the gap between the demands of comprehensive studies on trichothecene producers and the existing nucleotide sequence databases, which lack toxicological and other auxiliary data. We invite researchers working in the fields of fungal taxonomy, epidemiology and mycotoxicology to join the

  1. Computer simulations and modeling-assisted ToxR screening in deciphering 3D structures of transmembrane α-helical dimers: ephrin receptor A1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volynsky, P E; Mineeva, E A; Goncharuk, M V; Ermolyuk, Ya S; Arseniev, A S; Efremov, R G

    2010-01-01

    Membrane-spanning segments of numerous proteins (e.g. receptor tyrosine kinases) represent a novel class of pharmacologically important targets, whose activity can be modulated by specially designed artificial peptides, the so-called interceptors. Rational construction of such peptides requires understanding of the main factors driving peptide–peptide association in lipid membranes. Here we present a new method for rapid prediction of the spatial structure of transmembrane (TM) helix–helix complexes. It is based on computer simulations in membrane-like media and subsequent refinement/validation of the results using experimental studies of TM helix dimerization in a bacterial membrane by means of the ToxR system. The approach was applied to TM fragments of the ephrin receptor A1 (EphA1). A set of spatial structures of the dimer was proposed based on Monte Carlo simulations in an implicit membrane followed by molecular dynamics relaxation in an explicit lipid bilayer. The resulting models were employed for rational design of wild-type and mutant genetic constructions for ToxR assays. The computational and the experimental data are self-consistent and provide an unambiguous spatial model of the TM dimer of EphA1. The results of this work can be further used to develop new biologically active 'peptide interceptors' specifically targeting membrane domains of proteins

  2. [Ideas and methods on efficient screening of traditional medicines for anti-osteoporosis activity based on M-Act/Tox integrated evaluation using zebrafish].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mo; Ling, Jie; Chen, Ying; Song, Jie; Sun, E; Shi, Zi-Qi; Feng, Liang; Jia, Xiao-Bin; Wei, Ying-Jie

    2017-11-01

    The increasingly apparent liver injury problems of bone strengthening Chinese medicines have brought challenges for clinical application, and it is necessary to consider both effectiveness and safety in screening anti-osteoporosis Chinese medicines. Metabolic transformation is closely related to drug efficacy and toxicity, so it is significant to comprehensively consider metabolism-action/toxicity(M-Act/Tox) for screening anti-osteoporosis Chinese medicines. The current evaluation models and the number of compounds(including metabolites) severely restrict efficient screening in vivo. By referring to previous relevant research and domestic and abroad literature, zebrafish M-Act/Tox integrative method was put forward for efficiently screening anti-osteoporosis herb medicines, which has organically integrated zebrafish metabolism model, osteoporosis model and toxicity evaluation method. This method can break through the bottleneck and blind spots that trace compositions can't achieve efficient and integrated in vivo evaluation, and realize both efficient and comprehensive screening on anti-osteoporosis traditional medicines based on in vivo process taking both safety and effectiveness into account, which is significant to accelerate discovery of effective and safe innovative traditional Chinese medicines for osteoporosis. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  3. Developmental Effects of the ToxCast™ Phase I and Phase II Chemicals in Caenorhabditis elegans and Corresponding Responses in Zebrafish, Rats, and Rabbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Windy A.; Smith, Marjolein V.; Co, Caroll A.; Pirone, Jason R.; Rice, Julie R.; Shockley, Keith R.; Freedman, Jonathan H.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Modern toxicology is shifting from an observational to a mechanistic science. As part of this shift, high-throughput toxicity assays are being developed using alternative, nonmammalian species to prioritize chemicals and develop prediction models of human toxicity. Methods: The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) was used to screen the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) ToxCast™ Phase I and Phase II libraries, which contain 292 and 676 chemicals, respectively, for chemicals leading to decreased larval development and growth. Chemical toxicity was evaluated using three parameters: a biologically defined effect size threshold, half-maximal activity concentration (AC50), and lowest effective concentration (LEC). Results: Across both the Phase I and Phase II libraries, 62% of the chemicals were classified as active ≤ 200 μM in the C. elegans assay. Chemical activities and potencies in C. elegans were compared with those from two zebrafish embryonic development toxicity studies and developmental toxicity data for rats and rabbits. Concordance of chemical activity was higher between C. elegans and one zebrafish assay across Phase I chemicals (79%) than with a second zebrafish assay (59%). Using C. elegans or zebrafish to predict rat or rabbit developmental toxicity resulted in balanced accuracies (the average value of the sensitivity and specificity for an assay) ranging from 45% to 53%, slightly lower than the concordance between rat and rabbit (58%). Conclusions: Here, we present an assay that quantitatively and reliably describes the effects of chemical toxicants on C. elegans growth and development. We found significant overlap in the activity of chemicals in the ToxCast™ libraries between C. elegans and zebrafish developmental screens. Incorporating C. elegans toxicological assays as part of a battery of in vitro and in vivo assays provides additional information for the development of models to predict a chemical

  4. Testing of chemicals for genetic activity with Saccharomyces cerevisiae: a report of the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency Gene-Tox Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmermann, F.K.; von Borstel, R.C.; von Halle, E.S.; Parry, J.M.; Siebert, D.; Zetterberg, G.; Barale, R.; Loprieno, N.

    1984-01-01

    This review article with over 200 references summarizes the results of mutation screening tests with 492 chemicals using saccharomyces cerevisiae as the test organism. In addition, an extensive description of S. cerevisiae as a test organism is given. Yeast can be used to study genetic effects both in mitotic and in meiotic cells because it can be cultured as a stable haploid or a stable diploid. The most commonly used genetic endpoint has been mitotic recombination either as mitotic crossing-over or mitotic gene conversion. Data were available on tests with 492 chemicals, of which 249 were positive, as reported in 173 articles or reports. The genetic test/carcinogenicity accuracy was 0.74, based on the carcinogen listing established in the gene-tox program. The yeast tests supplement the bacterial tests for detecting agents that act via radical formation, antibacterial drugs, and other chemicals interfering with chromosome segregation and recombination processes.

  5. Clinical significance of combined detection of multiple serum antibodies (AsAb, EmAb, AcAb, AoAb, ToxAb) in infertile women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jing; Jiang Li; Lu Ya

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To determine the clinical significance of combined detection of multiple serum antibodies in infertile women. Methods; Serum multiple antibodies were examined in 120 infertile women, including 88 failed to get pregnancy and 32 with repeated spontaneous abortion. The antibodies tested were: (1) anti-sperm antibody (AsAb) (2) endometrial antibody (EmAb) (3) anti-cardiophospholipid antibody (AcAb) (4) Anti-ovarian antibody (AoAb) and Toxoplasmosis antibody (ToxAb). Results: In 48 of the infertile women, none of the five antibodies were positive (40% of 120). The rest were: one antibody positive--38/120 or 31.6%; two antibodies positive--31/120 or 25.83%, three and four antibodies positive--4/120 or 3.33%. None of the women were positive with all five antibodies. Conclusion: Immune factor was the chief cause of infertility in women. (authors)

  6. Genes for carbon metabolism and the ToxA virulence factor in Pseudomonas aeruginosa are regulated through molecular interactions of PtxR and PtxS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelali Daddaoua

    Full Text Available Homologs of the transcriptional regulator PtxS are omnipresent in Pseudomonas, whereas PtxR homologues are exclusively found in human pathogenic Pseudomonas species. In all Pseudomonas sp., PtxS with 2-ketogluconate is the regulator of the gluconate degradation pathway and controls expression from its own promoter and also from the P(gad and P(kgu for the catabolic operons. There is evidence that PtxS and PtxR play a central role in the regulation of exotoxin A expression, a relevant primary virulence factor of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We show using DNaseI-footprint analysis that in P. aeruginosa PtxR binds to the -35 region of the P(toxA promoter in front of the exotoxin A gene, whereas PtxS does not bind to this promoter. Bioinformatic and DNaseI-footprint analysis identified a PtxR binding site in the P(kgu and P(gad promoters that overlaps the -35 region, while the PtxS operator site is located 50 bp downstream from the PtxR site. In vitro, PtxS recognises PtxR with nanomolar affinity, but this interaction does not occur in the presence of 2-ketogluconate, the specific effector of PtxS. DNAaseI footprint assays of P(kgu and P(gad promoters with PtxS and PtxR showed a strong region of hyper-reactivity between both regulator binding sites, indicative of DNA distortion when both proteins are bound; however in the presence of 2-ketogluconate no protection was observed. We conclude that PtxS modulates PtxR activity in response to 2-ketogluconate by complex formation in solution in the case of the P(toxA promoter, or via the formation of a DNA loop as in the regulation of gluconate catabolic genes. Data suggest two different mechanisms of control exerted by the same regulator.

  7. Tox_esterase_2016

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — individual values for liver detoxification for each human sample and for each chemical. This dataset is associated with the following publication: Moser, G., and S....

  8. ToxFAQs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hidrógeno y flúor Formaldehyde | Formaldehido Fuel Oils / Kerosene | Aceites combustibles G Gasoline, Automotive | Gasolina de automóvil Glutaraldehyde * ... Uranium * Other Languages... Used Mineral-based Crankcase Oil | Aceite Usado de Cárter V Vanadium * Other Languages... ...

  9. Adaptation of the ToxRTool to Assess the Reliability of Toxicology Studies Conducted with Genetically Modified Crops and Implications for Future Safety Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Michael S; DeSesso, John M; Williams, Amy Lavin; Michalek, Suzanne; Hammond, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    To determine the reliability of food safety studies carried out in rodents with genetically modified (GM) crops, a Food Safety Study Reliability Tool (FSSRTool) was adapted from the European Centre for the Validation of Alternative Methods' (ECVAM) ToxRTool. Reliability was defined as the inherent quality of the study with regard to use of standardized testing methodology, full documentation of experimental procedures and results, and the plausibility of the findings. Codex guidelines for GM crop safety evaluations indicate toxicology studies are not needed when comparability of the GM crop to its conventional counterpart has been demonstrated. This guidance notwithstanding, animal feeding studies have routinely been conducted with GM crops, but their conclusions on safety are not always consistent. To accurately evaluate potential risks from GM crops, risk assessors need clearly interpretable results from reliable studies. The development of the FSSRTool, which provides the user with a means of assessing the reliability of a toxicology study to inform risk assessment, is discussed. Its application to the body of literature on GM crop food safety studies demonstrates that reliable studies report no toxicologically relevant differences between rodents fed GM crops or their non-GM comparators.

  10. High-Throughput Screening and Quantitative Chemical Ranking for Sodium-Iodide Symporter Inhibitors in ToxCast Phase I Chemical Library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Hallinger, Daniel R; Murr, Ashley S; Buckalew, Angela R; Simmons, Steven O; Laws, Susan C; Stoker, Tammy E

    2018-05-01

    Thyroid uptake of iodide via the sodium-iodide symporter (NIS) is the first step in the biosynthesis of thyroid hormones that are critical for health and development in humans and wildlife. Despite having long been a known target of endocrine disrupting chemicals such as perchlorate, information regarding NIS inhibition activity is still unavailable for the vast majority of environmental chemicals. This study applied a previously validated high-throughput approach to screen for NIS inhibitors in the ToxCast phase I library, representing 293 important environmental chemicals. Here 310 blinded samples were screened in a tiered-approach using an initial single-concentration (100 μM) radioactive-iodide uptake (RAIU) assay, followed by 169 samples further evaluated in multi-concentration (0.001 μM-100 μM) testing in parallel RAIU and cell viability assays. A novel chemical ranking system that incorporates multi-concentration RAIU and cytotoxicity responses was also developed as a standardized method for chemical prioritization in current and future screenings. Representative chemical responses and thyroid effects of high-ranking chemicals are further discussed. This study significantly expands current knowledge of NIS inhibition potential in environmental chemicals and provides critical support to U.S. EPA's Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program (EDSP) initiative to expand coverage of thyroid molecular targets, as well as the development of thyroid adverse outcome pathways (AOPs).

  11. The combined SPE:ToxY-PAM phytotoxicity assay; application and appraisal of a novel biomonitoring tool for the aquatic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengtson Nash, S M; Schreiber, U; Ralph, P J; Müller, J F

    2005-01-15

    Mounting concerns regarding the environmental impact of herbicides has meant a growing requirement for accurate, timely information regarding herbicide residue contamination of, in particular, aquatic systems. Conventional methods of detection remain limited in terms of practicality due to high costs of operation and the specialised information that analysis provides. A new phytotoxicity bioassay was trialled for the detection of herbicide residues in filter-purified (Milli-Q) as well as natural waters. The performance of the system, which combines solid-phase extraction (SPE) with the ToxY-PAM dual-channel yield analyser (Heinz Walz GmbH), was tested alongside the traditional method of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). The assay methodology was found to be highly sensitive (LOD 0.1 ng L(-1) diuron) with good reproducibility. The study showed that the assay protocol is time effective and can be employed for the aquatic screening of herbicide residues in purified as well as natural waters.

  12. Demonstration that Australian Pasteurella multocida isolates from sporadic outbreaks of porcine pneumonia are non-toxigenic (toxA-) and display heterogeneous DNA restriction endonuclease profiles compared with toxigenic isolates from herds with progressive atrophic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djordjevic, S P; Eamens, G J; Ha, H; Walker, M J; Chin, J C

    1998-08-01

    Capsular types A and D of Pasteurella multocida cause economic losses in swine because of their association with progressive atrophic rhinitis (PAR) and enzootic pneumonia. There have been no studies comparing whole-cell DNA profiles of isolates associated with these two porcine respiratory diseases. Twenty-two isolates of P. multocida from diseased pigs in different geographic localities within Australia were characterised genotypically by restriction endonuclease analysis (REA) with the enzyme CfoI. Seven of 12 P. multocida isolates from nasal swabs from pigs in herds where PAR was either present or suspected displayed a capsular type D phenotype. These were shown to possess the toxA gene by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Southern hybridisation, and further substantiated by production of cytotoxin in vitro. The CfoI profile of one of these seven isolates, which was from the initial outbreak of PAR in Australia (in Western Australia, WA), was identical with profiles of all six other toxigenic isolates from sporadic episodes in New South Wales (NSW). The evidence suggests that the strain involved in the initial outbreak was responsible for the spread of PAR to the eastern states of Australia. Another 10 isolates, representing both capsular types A and D, were isolated exclusively from porcine lung lesions after sporadic outbreaks of enzootic pneumonia in NSW and WA. CfoI restriction endonuclease profiles of these isolates revealed considerable genomic heterogeneity. Furthermore, none of these possessed the toxA gene. This suggests that P. multocida strains with the toxA gene do not have a competitive survival advantage in the lower respiratory tract or that toxin production does not play a role in the pathology of pneumonic lesions, or both. REA with polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and silver staining was found to be a practical and discriminatory tool for epidemiological tracing of P. multocida outbreaks associated with PAR or pneumonia in pigs.

  13. In vitro sensitivity of granulo-monocytic progenitors as a new toxicological cell system and endpoint in the ACuteTox Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerrato, Laura; Valeri, Antonio; Bueren, Juan A.; Albella, Beatriz

    2009-01-01

    The ACuteTox Project (part of the EU 6th Framework Programme) was started up in January 2005. The aim of this project is to develop a simple and robust in vitro strategy for prediction of human acute systemic toxicity, which could replace animal tests used for regulatory purposes. Our group is responsible for the characterization of the effect of the reference chemicals on the hematopoietic tissue. CFU-GM assay based on the culture of human mononuclear cord blood cells has been used to characterize the effects of the selected compounds on the myeloid progenitors. Previous results have shown the relevance of the CFU-GM assay for the prediction of human acute neutropenia after treatment of antitumoral compounds, and this assay has been recently approved by the ECVAM's Scientific Advisory Committee. Among the compounds included in the study there were pharmaceuticals, environmental pollutants and industrial chemicals. Eleven out of 55 chemicals did not show any cytotoxic effect at the maximum concentration tested. The correlation coefficients of CFU-GM IC50, IC70 and IC90 values with human LC50 values (50% lethal concentration calculated from time-related sublethal and lethal human blood concentrations) were 0.4965, 0.5106 and 0.5142 respectively. Although this correlation is not improve respect to classical in vitro basal cytotoxicity tests such as 3T3 Neutral Red Uptake, chemicals which deviate substantially in the correlation with these assays (colchicine, digoxin, 5-Fluorouracil and thallium sulfate) fitted very well in the linear regression analysis of the CFU-GM progenitors. The results shown in the present study indicate that the sensitivity of CFU-GM progenitors correlates better than the sensitivity of HL-60 cells with human LC50 values and could help to refine the predictability for human acute systemic toxicity when a given chemical may affect to the hematopoietic myeloid system.

  14. A Tox21 Approach to Altered Epigenetic Landscapes: Assessing Epigenetic Toxicity Pathways Leading to Altered Gene Expression and Oncogenic Transformation In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig L. Parfett

    2017-06-01

    A, UHRF1, CTCF, HOTAIR and ANRIL were found to have experimental evidence showing that functional perturbations played “driver” roles in human cellular transformation. Measurement of epigenotoxicants presents challenges for short-term carcinogenicity testing, especially in the high-throughput modes emphasized in the Tox21 chemicals testing approach. There is need to develop and validate in vitro tests to detect both, locus-specific, and genome-wide, epigenetic alterations with causal links to oncogenic cellular phenotypes. Some recent examples of cell-based high throughput chemical screening assays are presented that have been applied or have shown potential for application to epigenetic endpoints.

  15. Morbilidad y mortalidad en neonatos hijos de madres toxémicas Morbidity and mortality related to infants of toxemic mothers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanett Sarmiento Portal

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCCIÓN. La preeclampsia-eclampsia se caracteriza por edema, hipertensión arterial y proteinuria presente entre la vigésima semana de la gestación hasta 14 días después del parto. La presente investigación se realizó con el objetivo de analizar la morbilidad y mortalidad en neonatos hijos de madres toxémicas, en el Hospital «Abel Santamaría», en Pinar del Río. MÉTODOS. Se realizó un estudio observacional, ambispectivo, longitudinal, descriptivo, en el período entre el 1 de enero de 2006 y el 31 de diciembre de 2007. Se estudiaron 129 neonatos cuyas madres presentaron hipertensión durante el embarazo. Se analizaron las variables: tipo de hipertensión, vía del nacimiento, prematuridad, Apgar, peso, crecimiento intrauterino, morbilidad y mortalidad. RESULTADOS. Predominó la hipertensión arterial (HTA inducida por el embarazo y el nacimiento por cesárea (74,4 %. La HTA crónica y con toxemia sobreañadida se relacionó con mayores porcentajes de prematuridad, crecimiento intrauterino retardado y Apgar bajo. La morbilidad predominante fue la hipoxia al nacer (22,5 %, seguida por la enterocolitis necrosante (12,4 % y el síndrome de dificultad respiratoria (10,8 %. La tasa de mortalidad fue de 1,3 por 1000 nacidos vivos y la de letalidad ascendió a 31 por cada 100 casos. CONCLUSIONES. La hipertensión arterial en el embarazo influye negativamente en una serie de parámetros perinatales, entre los cuales destacan en nuestro medio el incremento de las cesáreas, el bajo peso al nacer, el crecimiento intrauterino retardado y la hipoxia al nacer, entre otras patologías.INTRODUCTION: Pre-eclampsia-eclampsia is characterized by edema, high blood pressure and proteinuria present between the twentieth weeks of pregnancy up to 14 postpartum. Aim of present research was to analyze morbidity and mortality in infants of toxemic mothers at "Abel Santamiría Cuadrado' Hospital, Pinar del Río province. METHODS: A observational

  16. ToxCast Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Background: Chemical toxicity testing is being transformed by advances in biology and computer modeling, concerns over animal use and the thousands of environmental...

  17. Ensemble-based ADME-Tox profiling and virtual screening for the discovery of new inhibitors of the Leishmania mexicana cysteine protease CPB2.8ΔCTE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scala, Angela; Rescifina, Antonio; Micale, Nicola; Piperno, Anna; Schirmeister, Tanja; Maes, Louis; Grassi, Giovanni

    2018-02-01

    In an effort to identify novel molecular warheads able to inhibit Leishmania mexicana cysteine protease CPB2.8ΔCTE, fused benzo[b]thiophenes and β,β'-triketones emerged as covalent inhibitors binding the active site cysteine residue. Enzymatic screening showed a moderate-to-excellent activity (12%-90% inhibition of the target enzyme at 20 μm). The most promising compounds were selected for further profiling including in vitro cell-based assays and docking studies. Computational data suggest that benzo[b]thiophenes act immediately as non-covalent inhibitors and then as irreversible covalent inhibitors, whereas a reversible covalent mechanism emerged for the 1,3,3'-triketones with a Y-topology. Based on the predicted physicochemical and ADME-Tox properties, compound 2b has been identified as a new drug-like, non-mutagen, non-carcinogen, and non-neurotoxic lead candidate. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  18. In Vivo and In Vitro Activities and ADME-Tox Profile of a Quinolizidine-Modified 4-Aminoquinoline: A Potent Anti-P. falciparum and Anti-P. vivax Blood-Stage Antimalarial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoletta Basilico

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Natural products are a prolific source for the identification of new biologically active compounds. In the present work, we studied the in vitro and in vivo antimalarial efficacy and ADME-Tox profile of a molecular hybrid (AM1 between 4-aminoquinoline and a quinolizidine moiety derived from lupinine (Lupinus luteus. The aim was to find a compound endowed with the target product profile-1 (TCP-1: molecules that clear asexual blood-stage parasitaemia, proposed by the Medicine for Malaria Venture to accomplish the goal of malaria elimination/eradication. AM1 displayed a very attractive profile in terms of both in vitro and in vivo activity. By using standard in vitro antimalarial assays, AM1 showed low nanomolar inhibitory activity against chloroquine-sensitive and resistant P. falciparum strains (range IC50 16–53 nM, matched with a high potency against P. vivax field isolates (Mean IC50 29 nM. Low toxicity and additivity with artemisinin derivatives were also demonstrated in vitro. High in vivo oral efficacy was observed in both P. berghei and P. yoelii mouse models with IC50 values comparable or better than those of chloroquine. The metabolic stability in different species and the pharmacokinetic profile in the mouse model makes AM1 a compound worth further investigation as a potential novel schizonticidal agent.

  19. From Classical Toxicology to Tox21: Some Critical Conceptual and Technological Advances in the Molecular Understanding of the Toxic Response Beginning From the Last Quarter of the 20th Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhuri, Supratim; Patton, Geoffrey W; Chanderbhan, Ronald F; Mattia, Antonia; Klaassen, Curtis D

    2018-01-01

    Toxicology has made steady advances over the last 60+ years in understanding the mechanisms of toxicity at an increasingly finer level of cellular organization. Traditionally, toxicological studies have used animal models. However, the general adoption of the principles of 3R (Replace, Reduce, Refine) provided the impetus for the development of in vitro models in toxicity testing. The present commentary is an attempt to briefly discuss the transformation in toxicology that began around 1980. Many genes important in cellular protection and metabolism of toxicants were cloned and characterized in the 80s, and gene expression studies became feasible, too. The development of transgenic and knockout mice provided valuable animal models to investigate the role of specific genes in producing toxic effects of chemicals or protecting the organism from the toxic effects of chemicals. Further developments in toxicology came from the incorporation of the tools of "omics" (genomics, proteomics, metabolomics, interactomics), epigenetics, systems biology, computational biology, and in vitro biology. Collectively, the advances in toxicology made during the last 30-40 years are expected to provide more innovative and efficient approaches to risk assessment. A goal of experimental toxicology going forward is to reduce animal use and yet be able to conduct appropriate risk assessments and make sound regulatory decisions using alternative methods of toxicity testing. In that respect, Tox21 has provided a big picture framework for the future. Currently, regulatory decisions involving drugs, biologics, food additives, and similar compounds still utilize data from animal testing and human clinical trials. In contrast, the prioritization of environmental chemicals for further study can be made using in vitro screening and computational tools. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology 2017. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the

  20. Application of ToxCast High-Throughput Screening and ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slide presentation at the SETAC annual meeting on High-Throughput Screening and Modeling Approaches to Identify Steroidogenesis Distruptors Slide presentation at the SETAC annual meeting on High-Throughput Screening and Modeling Approaches to Identify Steroidogenssis Distruptors

  1. Toxicogenomics Investigation Under the eTOX Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taboureau, Olivier; Hersey, Anne; Audouze, Karine Marie Laure

    2012-01-01

    Attrition of drug candidates during pre-clinical development due to toxicity, especially hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity, is an important and continuing problem in the pharmaceutical industry. The reasons for this trend may be multifactorial and there is a need to improve toxicity testing parad...

  2. Phytochemical, Antimicrobial and ToxIicological evaluation of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Peperomia pellucida is widely used in traditional medicine for the treatment of abscesses, acne, boils, arthritis, wound healing, inflammation and gout. This study was to evaluate the phytochemical composition, antimicrobial activities and toxicological profiles of the chloroform and methanol extracts of P. pellucida. Chemical ...

  3. Predicting_Systemic_Toxicity_Effects_ArchTox_2017_Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — In an effort to address a major challenge in chemical safety assessment, alternative approaches for characterizing systemic effect levels, a predictive model was...

  4. Reações locais e níveis de antitoxina circulante decorrentes de administração do toxóide tetânico: estudo comparativo entre Ped-o-Jet e seringa hipodérmica Local reactions and antitoxin levels induced by the administration of tetanus toxoid: a comparative study between Ped-o-Jet and hypodermic syringe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Aratangy Pluciennik

    1985-06-01

    Full Text Available Com o objetivo de comparar reações locais e conversão sorológica apresentadas por adultos que receberam o toxóide tetânico através de Ped-o-Jet (via subcutânea ou de seringa hipodérmica (via intramuscular, o toxóide foi administrado a 472 recrutas do Exército. Em observações realizadas 4 e 24 horas após a vacinação verificou-se que as reações locais dos indivíduos vacinados com Ped-o-Jet eram significativamente mais freqüentes e mais intensas do que aquelas dos vacinados com seringa hipodérmica, não tendo ocorrido, entretanto, reações graves. A conversão sorológica dos não imunes vacinados com Ped-o-Jet ocorreu numa freqüência maior do que nos indivíduos vacinados com seringa hipodérmica. Conclui-se portanto, que o Ped-o-Jet pode ser utilizado em campanhas de vacinação em massa contra o tétano, embora a via de administração preferencial, até o momento, seja a intramuscular.This paper deals with the administration of tetanus toxoid to 472 army recruits, 50% of which received the vaccine subcutaneously using a Ped-o-Jet pressure injector and the remaining subjects received the vaccine intramuscularly, with hypodermic syringe and needle. The objective was to draw comparative conclusions regarding local reactions and serumconvertion in those young adults. Local reactions were observed four and 24 hours after immunization. Although significantly more frequent and intense in individuals receiving the toxoid by jet injection than in those inoculated with hypodermic syringe, no serious reactions were registered. At the first observation, local reactions occured in 64% of black men vaccinated by Ped-o-Jet and in only 31% of those vaccinated by syringe; 70% of the non-black showed local reactions when vaccinated by Ped-o-Jet and 21% when vaccinated by hypodermic syringe. At the second observation, black men vaccinated by Ped-o-Jet showed local reactions in 78% of the cases and in 3% when vaccinated by syringe; 87% of

  5. DSSTox: The Open Environmental Chemistry Data underlying the CompTox Chemical Dashboard (OpenTox USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The DSSTox project has long been dedicated to the idea of making chemical information linked to environmental or toxicological data of interest freely available. Since its first posting of data files in 2004, DSSTox database development has consistently focused on enabling data ...

  6. Structure Identification Using the US EPA's CompTox Chemistry Dashboard (CompTox CoP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Community of practice webinar presentation on the Identification of unknowns in non-targeted analyses (NTA) requires the integration of complementary data types to generate a confident consensus structure.

  7. ToxCast Profiling in a Human Stem Cell Assay for Developmental Toxicity (CompTox CoP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standard practice for assessing disruptions in embryogenesis involves testing pregnant animals of two species, typically rats and rabbits, exposed during major organogenesis and evaluated just prior to term. Under this design the major manifestations of developmental toxicity are...

  8. Intracranial contrast transit times on digital subtraction angiography decrease more in patients with delayed intraparenchymal hemorrhage after Pipeline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunozzi, Denise; Shakur, Sophia F; Charbel, Fady T; Alaraj, Ali

    2018-04-01

    Background Pipeline embolization devices (PEDs) are used for endovascular treatment of cerebral aneurysms but can be associated with delayed ipsilateral intraparenchymal hemorrhage (DIPH). Changes in intracranial hemodynamics after PED are poorly understood. Objective Here, we assess hemodynamic changes after PED in patients and compare these changes in patients with and without DIPH (DIPH+ and DIPH-). Methods Records of patients with distal internal carotid artery (ICA) aneurysms treated with PED at our institution between 2012 and 2017 were retrospectively reviewed. Regions of interest were selected proximally to PED over the cavernous ICA and distally over the middle cerebral artery (MCA), and then transit times were determined using syngo iFlow software (Siemens). Ratio of MCA to ICA transit time was compared before, after treatment, and at follow-up. Ratios were also compared between DIPH+ and DIPH- subgroups. Correlations between aneurysm size, age, and ratios were investigated. Results Fifty-three patients were included. The ratio of MCA to ICA transit time decreased significantly after PED deployment (1.13 vs. 1.22, p transit time decreases following PED treatment and decreases more in patients with DIPH. These contrast transit time changes can be detected in real time immediately after PED deployment.

  9. The EPA CompTox Chemistry Dashboard - an online resource for environmental chemists (ACS Spring Meeting)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Computational Toxicology Program integrates advances in biology, chemistry, and computer science to help prioritize chemicals for further research based on potential human health risks. This work involves computational and data drive...

  10. Case Study III: The Construction of a Nanotoxicity Database - The MOD-ENP-TOX Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vriens, Hanne; Mertens, Dominik; Regret, Renaud; Lin, Pinpin; Locquet, Jean-Pierre; Hoet, Peter

    2017-01-01

    The amount of experimental studies on the toxicity of nanomaterials is growing fast. Interpretation and comparison of these studies is a complex issue due to the high amount of variables possibly determining the toxicity of nanomaterials.Qualitative databases providing a structured combination, integration and quality evaluation of the existing data could reveal insights that cannot be seen from different studies alone. A few database initiatives are under development but in practice very little data is publicly available and collaboration between physicists, toxicologists, computer scientists and modellers is needed to further develop databases, standards and analysis tools.In this case study the process of building a database on the in vitro toxicity of amorphous silica nanoparticles (NPs) is described in detail. Experimental data were systematically collected from peer reviewed papers, manually curated and stored in a standardised format. The result is a database in ISA-Tab-Nano including 68 peer reviewed papers on the toxicity of 148 amorphous silica NPs. Both the physicochemical characterization of the particles and their biological effect (described in 230 in vitro assays) were stored in the database. A scoring system was elaborated in order to evaluate the reliability of the stored data.

  11. Redox Disrupting Potential of ToxCast™Chemicals Ranked by Activity in Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little is known regarding the adverse outcome pathways responsible for developmental toxicity following exposure to chemicals. An evaluation of Toxoast™ Phase I chemicals in an adherent mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) assay revealed a redox sensitive pathway that correlated with...

  12. ToxCast and Virtual Embryo: in vitro data and in silico models for predictive toxicology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human populations may be exposed to thousands of chemicals only a fraction of which have detailed toxicity data. Traditional in vivo animal testing is costly, lengthy and normally conducted with dosages that exceed relatively insensitive to concentrations of chemicals at realisti...

  13. Evaluation of food-relevant chemicals in the ToxCast high-throughput screening program

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Thousands of chemicals are directly added to or come in contact with food, many of which have undergone little to no toxicological evaluation. The landscape of the...

  14. Analysis of a ToxCast™ HTS Toxicity Signature for putative Vascular Disruptor Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent studies have shown the importance of blood vessel formation during embryo development and the strong correlation to developmental toxicity. Several developmental toxicants, such as thalidomide, have been identified which specifically target the forming embryonic vasculatur...

  15. Evaluation and comparison of bisphenol A analog activity using ToxCast data (SOT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is used in consumer products and industrial applications, primarily in plastics, and has been detected in the environment, human urine, blood, and breast milk. Mainly studied as an endocrine disruptor, other toxicities, including obesity, metabolic conditions s...

  16. HTS Data and In Silico Models for High-Throughout Risk Assessment (FutureTox II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A significant challenge in toxicology is the “too many chemicals” problem. Humans and environmental species are exposed to as many as tens of thousands of chemicals, few of which have been thoroughly tested using standard in vivo test methods. This talk will discuss several appro...

  17. Quantitative Prediction of Systemic Toxicity Points of Departure (OpenTox USA 2017)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human health risk assessment associated with environmental chemical exposure is limited by the tens of thousands of chemicals little or no experimental in vivo toxicity data. Data gap filling techniques, such as quantitative models based on chemical structure information, are c...

  18. Computational Model of Secondary Palate Fusion and Disruption ChemResTox Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Morphogenetic events are driven by cell-generated physical forces and complex cellular dynamics. To improve our capacity to predict developmental effects from...

  19. Heavy Metals in ToxCast: Relevance to Food Safety (SOT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human exposure to heavy metals occurs through food contamination due to industrial processes, vehicle emissions and farming methods. Specific toxicity endpoints have been associated with metal exposures, e.g. lead and neurotoxicity; however, numerous varieties of heavy metals hav...

  20. Identifying known unknowns using the US EPA's CompTox Chemistry Dashboard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemical features observed using high-resolution mass spectrometry can be tentatively identified using online chemical reference databases by searching molecular formulae and monoisotopic masses and then rank-ordering of the hits using appropriate relevance criteria. The most li...

  1. Minimal_Set_of_In_Vitro_ER_Agonist_Assays_Selection_RegToxPharm_Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — A dataset for the manuscript which demonstrates that it is possible to achieve levels of performance equivalent to the full 16 assay ER agonist model against both in...

  2. Identifying Known Unknowns Using the USEPA CompTox Chemistry Dashboard AnalytBioanlytChem Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — In this research, the performance of the Dashboard for identifying “known unknowns” was evaluated against that of the online ChemSpider database, one of the primary...

  3. tcpl: The ToxCast Pipeline for High-Throughput Screening Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motivation: The large and diverse high-throughput chemical screening efforts carried out by the US EPAToxCast program requires an efficient, transparent, and reproducible data pipeline.Summary: The tcpl R package and its associated MySQL database provide a generalized platform fo...

  4. The CompTox Chemistry Dashboard - A Community Data Resource for Environmental Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despite an abundance of online databases providing access to chemical data, there is increasing demand for high-quality, structure-curated, open data to meet the various needs of the environmental sciences and computational toxicology communities. The U.S. Environmental Protectio...

  5. International Suspect Screening: NORMAN Suspect Exchange meets the US EPA CompTox Chemistry Dashboard (ICCE 2017 Oslo)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Members of the European NORMAN Network of Environmental Laboratories (www.norman-network.com) have many substance lists, including targets, suspects, surfactants, perfluorinated substances and regulated, partially confidential data sets of complex mixtures. The NORMAN Suspect Lis...

  6. Survey of ecotoxicologically-relevant reproductive endpoint coverage within the ECOTOX database across ToxCast ER agonists (ASCCT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. EPA’s Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program (EDSP) has been charged with screening thousands of chemicals for their potential to affect the endocrine systems of humans and wildlife. In vitro high throughput screening (HTS) assays have been proposed as a way to prioritize...

  7. Classification of nervous system withdrawn and approved drugs with ToxPrint features via machine learning strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onay, Aytun; Onay, Melih; Abul, Osman

    2017-04-01

    Early-phase virtual screening of candidate drug molecules plays a key role in pharmaceutical industry from data mining and machine learning to prevent adverse effects of the drugs. Computational classification methods can distinguish approved drugs from withdrawn ones. We focused on 6 data sets including maximum 110 approved and 110 withdrawn drugs for all and nervous system diseases to distinguish approved drugs from withdrawn ones. In this study, we used support vector machines (SVMs) and ensemble methods (EMs) such as boosted and bagged trees to classify drugs into approved and withdrawn categories. Also, we used CORINA Symphony program to identify Toxprint chemotypes including over 700 predefined chemotypes for determination of risk and safety assesment of candidate drug molecules. In addition, we studied nervous system withdrawn drugs to determine the key fragments with The ParMol package including gSpan algorithm. According to our results, the descriptors named as the number of total chemotypes and bond CN_amine_aliphatic_generic were more significant descriptors. The developed Medium Gaussian SVM model reached 78% prediction accuracy on test set for drug data set including all disease. Here, bagged tree and linear SVM models showed 89% of accuracies for phycholeptics and psychoanaleptics drugs. A set of discriminative fragments in nervous system withdrawn drug (NSWD) data sets was obtained. These fragments responsible for the drugs removed from market were benzene, toluene, N,N-dimethylethylamine, crotylamine, 5-methyl-2,4-heptadiene, octatriene and carbonyl group. This paper covers the development of computational classification methods to distinguish approved drugs from withdrawn ones. In addition, the results of this study indicated the identification of discriminative fragments is of significance to design a new nervous system approved drugs with interpretation of the structures of the NSWDs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Gene expression analysis of precision-cut human liver slices indicates stable expression of ADME-Tox related genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elferink, M. G. L.; Olinga, P.; van Leeuwen, E. M.; Bauerschmidt, S.; Polman, J.; Schoonen, W. G.; Heisterkamp, S. H.; Groothuis, G. M. M.

    2011-01-01

    In the process of drug development it is of high importance to test the safety of new drugs with predictive value for human toxicity. A promising approach of toxicity testing is based on shifts in gene expression profiling of the liver. Toxicity screening based on animal liver cells cannot be

  9. ACToR Chemical Structure processing using Open Source ChemInformatics Libraries (FutureToxII)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ACToR (Aggregated Computational Toxicology Resource) is a centralized database repository developed by the National Center for Computational Toxicology (NCCT) at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Free and open source tools were used to compile toxicity data from ove...

  10. FAF-Drugs2: Free ADME/tox filtering tool to assist drug discovery and chemical biology projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miteva Maria A

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drug discovery and chemical biology are exceedingly complex and demanding enterprises. In recent years there are been increasing awareness about the importance of predicting/optimizing the absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity (ADMET properties of small chemical compounds along the search process rather than at the final stages. Fast methods for evaluating ADMET properties of small molecules often involve applying a set of simple empirical rules (educated guesses and as such, compound collections' property profiling can be performed in silico. Clearly, these rules cannot assess the full complexity of the human body but can provide valuable information and assist decision-making. Results This paper presents FAF-Drugs2, a free adaptable tool for ADMET filtering of electronic compound collections. FAF-Drugs2 is a command line utility program (e.g., written in Python based on the open source chemistry toolkit OpenBabel, which performs various physicochemical calculations, identifies key functional groups, some toxic and unstable molecules/functional groups. In addition to filtered collections, FAF-Drugs2 can provide, via Gnuplot, several distribution diagrams of major physicochemical properties of the screened compound libraries. Conclusion We have developed FAF-Drugs2 to facilitate compound collection preparation, prior to (or after experimental screening or virtual screening computations. Users can select to apply various filtering thresholds and add rules as needed for a given project. As it stands, FAF-Drugs2 implements numerous filtering rules (23 physicochemical rules and 204 substructure searching rules that can be easily tuned.

  11. Evaluation of an adherent mouse embryonic stem cell in vitro assay to predict developmental toxicity of ToxCast chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The potential for most environmental chemicals to produce developmental toxicity is unknown. Mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) assays are an alternative in vitro model to assess chemicals. The chemical space evaluated using mESC and compared to in vivo is limited. We used an adher...

  12. Screening the ToxCast Phase I Chemical Library for inhibition of Deiodinase Type I enzyme activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyroid hormone (TH) signaling in vertebrates is dependent upon coordination of multiple key events including iodide uptake, hormone synthesis, metabolism and elimination, to maintain proper homeostasis of the hormones. Deiodinase enzymes interconvert THs between less active and...

  13. A toxicity signature for species-specific disruption of embryonic vasculogenesis derived from ToxCast in vitro profiling data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blood vessel formation is crucial for normal embryo development and is sensitive to disruption by diverse teratogens. Recent studies have begun to reveal the cell signaling networks underlying vasculogenesis and angiogenesis and how these pathways might be perturbed by specific c...

  14. Toxicity of Exhaust Gases and Particles from IC-Engines -- International Activities Survey (EngToxIn)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czerwinski, J [University for Applied Sciences, Biel-Bienne (Switzerland)

    2011-09-15

    Exhaust gases from engines, as well as from other combustion -- and industrial processes contain different gaseous, semi volatile and solid compounds which are toxic. Some of these compounds are not regarded by the respective legislations; some new substances may appear, due to the progressing technical developments and new systems of exhaust gas aftertreatment. The toxical effects of exhaust gases as whole aerosols (i.e. all gaseous components together with particle matter and nanoparticles) can be investigated in a global way, by exposing the living cells, or cell cultures to the aerosol, which means a simultaneous superposition of all toxic effects from all active components. On several places researchers showed, that this method offers more objective results of validation of toxicity, than other methods used up to date. It also enables a relatively quick insight in the toxic effects with consideration of all superimposed influences of the aerosol. This new methodology can be applied for all kinds of emission sources. It bears potentials of giving new contributions to the present state of knowledge in this domain and can in some cases lead to a change of paradigma. The present report gives short information about the activities concerning the research on toxicity of exhaust gases from IC-engines in different countries. It also gives some ideas about research of information sources. It can be stated that there are worldwide a lot of activities concerning health effects. They have different objectives, different approaches and methodologies and rarely the results can be directly compared to each other. Nevertheless there also are some common lines and with appropriate efforts there are possible ways to establish the harmonised biological test procedures.

  15. Vicia cytogenetic tests for environmental mutagens. A report of the US Environmental Protection Agency gene-tox program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, T H

    1982-01-01

    Vicia root-tip mitotic and pollen mother-cell meiotic tests are two major kinds of cytogenetic tests for environmental mutagens. According to the present review, 81 of 85 earlier studies used mitotic tests to determine the frequencies of chromosome or chromatid aberrations and/or sister-chromatid exchange from root-tip meristematic cells; only 4 used meiotic tests to determine the frequencies of chromosome aberration from pollen mother cells. Treatment of root-tip meristem can be done by allowing the newly germinated roots to absorb the chemical mutagens from a water solution. Pollen mother cells can be treated by spraying the solution or pipetting the liquid over the flower buds. After an appropriate recovery time, the samples are fixed and stained, and the slides are prepared for metaphase or anaphase figures for scoring aberration frequencies. Slides for meiotic tests are prepared for metaphase I and/or Anaphase I stages for scoring chromosome aberration frequencies. Results of both cytogenetic tests should be expressed in terms of number of breaks per cell or per 100 cells. Test results of 76 chemicals from 32 classes in this review indicate that the Vicia root-tip mitotic test is reliable, efficient, and relatively inexpensive. These results also reveal that antibiotics are most frequently studied, followed by alkyl sulfones, pyrimidine, and purine derivatives. Of all the agents studied through root-tip mitotic tests, about 90% gave positive responses; antibiotics (phyleomycin and bleomycin) had very high mutagenicity (less than 1 ppM gave positive response).

  16. FAF-Drugs2: free ADME/tox filtering tool to assist drug discovery and chemical biology projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagorce, David; Sperandio, Olivier; Galons, Hervé; Miteva, Maria A; Villoutreix, Bruno O

    2008-09-24

    Drug discovery and chemical biology are exceedingly complex and demanding enterprises. In recent years there are been increasing awareness about the importance of predicting/optimizing the absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity (ADMET) properties of small chemical compounds along the search process rather than at the final stages. Fast methods for evaluating ADMET properties of small molecules often involve applying a set of simple empirical rules (educated guesses) and as such, compound collections' property profiling can be performed in silico. Clearly, these rules cannot assess the full complexity of the human body but can provide valuable information and assist decision-making. This paper presents FAF-Drugs2, a free adaptable tool for ADMET filtering of electronic compound collections. FAF-Drugs2 is a command line utility program (e.g., written in Python) based on the open source chemistry toolkit OpenBabel, which performs various physicochemical calculations, identifies key functional groups, some toxic and unstable molecules/functional groups. In addition to filtered collections, FAF-Drugs2 can provide, via Gnuplot, several distribution diagrams of major physicochemical properties of the screened compound libraries. We have developed FAF-Drugs2 to facilitate compound collection preparation, prior to (or after) experimental screening or virtual screening computations. Users can select to apply various filtering thresholds and add rules as needed for a given project. As it stands, FAF-Drugs2 implements numerous filtering rules (23 physicochemical rules and 204 substructure searching rules) that can be easily tuned.

  17. Structure identification by Mass Spectrometry Non-Targeted Analysis using the US EPA’s CompTox Chemistry Dashboard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Identification of unknowns in mass spectrometry based non-targeted analyses (NTA) requires the integration of complementary pieces of data to arrive at a confident, consensus structure. Researchers use chemical reference databases, spectral matching, fragment prediction tools, r...

  18. Using ToxCast data to reconstruct dynamic cell state trajectories and estimate toxicological points of departure.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Background: High-content imaging (HCI) allows simultaneous measurement of multiple cellular phenotypic changes and is an important tool for evaluating the biological...

  19. A Redox Sensitive Pathway in the Mouse ES Cell Assay Modeled From ToxCast HTS Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    The broad chemical landscape coupled with the lack of developmental toxicity information across most environmental chemicals has motivated the need for high- throughput screening methods and predictive models of developmental toxicity. Towards this end, we used the mouse embryoni...

  20. Stakeholder engagement and feedback efforts to increase use of the iCSS ToxCast Dashboard (SETAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the era of ‘Big Data’ research, many government agencies are engaged in generating and making public large amounts of data that underly both research and regulatory decisions. Public access increases the ‘democratization’ of science by enhancing transparency and access. Howev...

  1. Diisopropylammonium methanesulfonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido J. Reiss

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The title molecular salt, C6H16N+·CH3SO3−, has been determined at 150 K. Two diisopropylammonium cations (dipH and two anions form N—H...O hydrogen-bonded cyclic dimers lying around centers of symmetry. Only two of the three O atoms of the methanesulfonate anion are involved in hydrogen bonding, resulting in slightly longer S—O bond lengths. The title structure represents an example of a sulfonate anion that is part of a hydrogen-bonding R44(12 graph-set motif, which is well known for related dipH acetates. Additionally, the Raman and the IR spectroscopic data for the title compound are presented.

  2. 2333-IJBCS-Article-Ulrich Maloueki

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hp

    Activité antioxydante par le radical 1,1- diphényl-2-picrylhydrazyle (DPPH). Un composé à activité antioxydante mis en présence du radical libre DPPH. (couleur violet), vire en jaune en donnant un proton au radical. Evaluation qualitative par chromatographie sur couche mince (CCM). La réalisation de la CCM a été.

  3. A comparison of temporal, spatial and parallel phase shifting algorithms for digital image plane holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arroyo, M P; Lobera, J

    2008-01-01

    This paper investigates the performance of several phase shifting (PS) techniques when using digital image plane holography (DIPH) as a fluid velocimetry technique. The main focus is on increasing the recording system aperture in order to overcome the limitation on the little light available in fluid applications. Some experiments with small rotations of a fluid-like solid object have been used to test the ability of PS-DIPH to faithfully reconstruct the object complex amplitude. Holograms for several apertures and for different defocusing distances have been recorded using spatial phase shifting (SPS) or temporal phase shifting (TPS) techniques. The parallel phase shifted holograms (H PPS ) have been generated from the TPS holograms (H TPS ). The data obtained from TPS-DIPH have been taken as the true object complex amplitude, which is used to benchmark that recovered using the other techniques. The findings of this work show that SPS and PPS are very similar indeed, and suggest that both can work for bigger apertures yet retain phase information

  4. Pesticide presence in Great Lakes tributaries and comparison to ToxCast and other water quality benchmarks to screen for potential biological effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Product Description:Pesticides are a broad category of current use chemicals that pose potential threats to aquatic organisms in and around the Great Lakes basin. In this study, we monitored for over 200 pesticides or their break down products in 16 major tributaries to the Great...

  5. Free online access to experimental and predicted chemical properties through the EPA’s CompTox Chemistry Dashboard (ACS Spring meeting)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The increasing number and size of public databases is facilitating the collection of chemical structures and associated experimental data for QSAR modeling. However, the performance of QSAR models is highly dependent not only on the modeling methodology, but also on the quality o...

  6. Detection of Tox A Gene in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strains Isolated from Dairy Products Using PCR and Determining the Antibiotic Resistance Pattern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faeze Zadsafar

    2017-08-01

    Conclusion: Due to high presence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in raw milk and existence of antibiotic resistance genes in this bacterium, applying appropriate strategies for hygiene control in animal husbandries, is necessary to prevent the spread of bacteria.

  7. Tiered High-Throughput Screening Approach to Identify Thyroperoxidase Inhibitors within the ToxCast Phase I and II Chemical Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    High-throughput screening (HTS) for potential thyroid–disrupting chemicals requires a system of assays to capture multiple molecular-initiating events (MIEs) that converge on perturbed thyroid hormone (TH) homeostasis. Screening for MIEs specific to TH-disrupting pathways is limi...

  8. Screening the ToxCast Phase 1, 2, and e1k chemical libraries for inhibition of Deiodinase Types 1, 2 and 3 enzyme activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyroid hormone (TH) homeostasis is dependent on multiple proteins for TH synthesis, transport, and peripheral metabolism and elimination. Deiodinase enzymes play an essential role in converting THs between active and inactive forms by deiodinating the pro-hormone thyroxine (T4) ...

  9. Screening the ToxCast Phase I, II, and e1K Chemical Libraries for Inhibition of Deiodinase Type 1,2 and 3 Enzyme Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyroid hormone (TH) signaling and homeostasis is dependent upon coordination of multiple key events including thyroidal iodide uptake and hormone synthesis, and peripheral metabolism and elimination. Deiodinase enzymes play an essential role in converting the pro-hormone thyroxi...

  10. Screening the ToxCast Phase 1, 2, and e1k Chemical Libraries for Inhibition of Deiodinase Type 1, 2 and 3 Enzyme Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyroid hormone (TH) homeostasis is dependent on multiple proteins for TH synthesis, transport, and peripheral metabolism and elimination. Deiodinase enzymes play an essential role in converting THs between active and inactive forms by converting the pro-hormone thyroxine (T4) to...

  11. The cda GenoTox assay: A new and sensitive method for detection of environmental genotoxins, including nitroarenes and aromatic amines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Trine G.; Hansen, Lars Henrik; Binderup, Mona-Lise

    2007-01-01

    A new bacterial test system for detection of genotoxic compounds was developed, based on two new Sahnonella typhimurium tester strains, TGO1 and TGO2. Both strains contain a gene fusion between a strong SOS-promotor, P-cda, and the gfp gene, which allows detection of genotoxic compounds that indu...

  12. Tradescantia cytogenetic tests (root-tip mitosis, pollen mitosis, pollen mother-cell meiosis). A report of the US Environmental Protection Agency gene-tox program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, T H

    1982-01-01

    3 kinds of cytogenetic tests for screening of environmental mutagens were established for Tradescantia, namely, root-tip mitosis, pollen mitosis, and pollen mother-cell meiosis (commonly referred to as the Tradescantia-micronucleus (Trad-MCN) test). All these tests are technically simple, inexpensive, and can yield reliable results in a relatively short time (36 to 72 h). The root-tip mitosis test is suitable only for liquid agents, while pollen mitosis is suitable for both liquid and gaseous agents. Pollen tube mitotic chromosomes are extremely sensitive to mutagens; therefore, they are good materials for detecting very low concentrations of mutagens. Both root-tip mitosis and pollen mitosis tests use chromosome and/or chromatid aberrations as end points for scoring. The Trad-MCN test is suitable for both liquid and gaseous agents. In addition, it is especially suitable for in situ monitoring of water and air pollutants. Of the 12 chemicals tested, 5-fluorouracil and 1,2-dibromoethane indicate that they are very potent mutagens based on the effective dosages used to produce a positive response. Sulfur dioxide, ethyl methanesulfonate, sodium azide, Phosdrin, and Bladex rank next in potency.

  13. A workflow to investigate exposure and pharmacokinetic influences on high-throughput in vitro chemical screening based on adverse outcome pathways, OpenTox USA 2015 Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adverse outcome pathways (AOP) link known population outcomes to a molecular initiating event (MIE) that can be quantified using high-throughput in vitro methods. Practical application of AOPs in chemical-specific risk assessment requires consideration of exposure and absorption,...

  14. Data from Tiered High-Throughput Screening Approach to Identify Thyroperoxidase Inhibitors within the ToxCast Phase I and II Chemical Libraries

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — High-throughput screening for potential thyroid-disrupting chemicals requires a system of assays to capture multiple molecular-initiating events (MIEs) that converge...

  15. Toxicity of Exhaust Gases and Particles from IC-Engines – International Activities Survey (EngToxIn). 2nd Information Report for IEA Implementing Agreement AMF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czerwinski, J. [University for Applied Sciences, Biel-Bienne (Switzerland)

    2012-10-15

    Exhaust gases from engines, as well as from other technical combustion processes contain gaseous, semi volatile and solid compounds which are toxic. Some of these compounds are not yet limited by the respective legislations; but may need to be based on ongoing health research findings and some new substances did appear recently, due to the progressing technical developments providing new systems of exhaust gas aftertreatment. A new approach described here is that the toxic effects of exhaust gases as an aerosol containing gaseous components as well as particulate matter and nanoparticles can be investigated in a global way, by exposing the living cells, or cell cultures to the aerosol, which means a simultaneous superposition of all toxic effects from all active components. At several research sites it has been showed, that this method offers more objective results of validation of toxicity, than other methods used until now. It also enables a relatively quick insight in the toxic effects with consideration of all superimposed influences of the aerosol. This new methodology can be applied for all kinds of emission sources. It also bears the potential of giving new contributions to the present state of knowledge in this domain and can in some cases lead to a change of paradigma. The present report gives information about activities concerning the research on toxicity of exhaust gases from IC-engines in different countries. It also gives some ideas about the available information sources. The general situation and the basic information have not changed much so the chapters 1 and 2 are repeated from the last year report, [1] with only a few modifications. We observe fast increasing research activities concerning health effects worldwide. They have different objectives, different approaches and methodologies and sometimes the results can be directly compared to each other. There are mostly common lines and with appropriate efforts there might be possible ways to establish even a harmonised biological test procedure.

  16. An evaluation of human sperm as indicators of chemically induced alterations of spermatogenic function. A report of the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency Gene-Tox Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wyrobek, A.J.; Gordon, L.A.; Burkhart, J.G.; Francis, M.W.; Kapp, R.W. Jr.; Letz, G.; Malling, H.V.; Topham, J.C.; Whorton, M.D.

    1983-05-01

    To evaluate the utility of sperm tests as indichangesators of chemical effects on human spermatogenesis, the literature on 4 sperm tests used to assess chemically induced testicular dysfunction was reviewed. The tests surveyed included sperm count, motility, morphology (seminal cytology), and double Y-body (a fluorescence-based test thought to detect Y-chromosomal nondisjunction). There were 132 papers that provided sufficient data for evaluation. These reports encompassed 89 different chemical exposures: 53 were to single agents; 14 to complex mixtures; and 22 to combinations of 2 or more identified agents. Approximately 85% of the exposures were to experimental or therapeutic drugs, 10% were to occupational or environmental agents, and 5% were to drugs for personal use. The most common sperm parameter studied was sperm count. The 89 exposures reviewed were grouped into 4 classes: those which adversely effected spermatogenesis, as measured by one or more of the sperm test; those suggestive of improving semen quality; those showing inconclusive evidence of adverse effects from exposure; and those showing no significant changes. Since the reviewed reports had a large variety of study designs, and since every attempt was made to include all reports with interpretable data, these classifications were based on reviewing committee decisions rather than on uniform statistical criteria. This review gives strong evidence that human sperm tests can be used to identify chemicals that affect sperm production, but because of our limited understanding of underlying mechanisms, the extent to which they can detect mutagens, carcinogens or agents that affect fertility remains uncertain. For the very few agents studied with both human and mouse sperm tests, similar test-responses were seen. An overall comparison of the 4 human sperm tests suggests that no one test is biologically more responsive than another.

  17. 20180318 - Structure identification by Mass Spectrometry Non-Targeted Analysis using the US EPA’s CompTox Chemistry Dashboard (ACS Spring)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Identification of unknowns in mass spectrometry based non-targeted analyses (NTA) requires the integration of complementary pieces of data to arrive at a confident, consensus structure. Researchers use chemical reference databases, spectral matching, fragment prediction tools, r...

  18. Toxicity Reference Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Toxicity Reference Database (ToxRefDB) contains approximately 30 years and $2 billion worth of animal studies. ToxRefDB allows scientists and the interested...

  19. Organic halogens in landfill leachates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøn, C.; Christensen, J. B.; Jensen, Dorthe Lærke

    2000-01-01

    Using a group parameter, total organic halogens (TOX), high TOX concentrations were found in leachates and leachate contaminated groundwaters at two Danish mixed sanitary and hazardous waste sites. With commonly used screening procedures for organic contaminants, the individual halogenated organi...

  20. Genetic mapping of the regulator gene determining enterotoxin synthesis in Vibrio cholerae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnova, N.I.; Livanova, L.F.; Shaginyan, I.A.; Motin, V.L.

    1986-01-01

    Data on the genetic mapping of mutation tox-7 (the mutation affecting the synthesis of the cholera toxin) were obtained by conjugation crosses between the atoxigenic donor strain Vibrio cholerae Eltor and the toxigenic recipient strain V. cholera classica. The molecular and genetic analysis of the Tox - recombinants indicated that, when the synthesis of the cholera toxin is disrupted in these strains, the tox-7 mutation (which impairs the regulator gene tox) is gained. Close linkage between the tox-7 and pur-63 mutations was established (during the selection procedure there was 81.1% combined transfer with respect to marker pur-63 situated in the donor strain chromosome more proximal than mutation tox-7). The markers were localized in the following order in the region under investigation: asp-cys-nal-pur-61-trp-his-pur-63-tox-7-ile

  1. Integrative data mining of high-throughput in vitro screens, in vivo data, and disease information to identify Adverse Outcome Pathway (AOP) signatures:ToxCast high-throughput screening data and Comparative Toxicogenomics Database (CTD) as a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Adverse Outcome Pathway (AOP) framework provides a systematic way to describe linkages between molecular and cellular processes and organism or population level effects. The current AOP assembly methods however, are inefficient. Our goal is to generate computationally-pr...

  2. Sero-epidemiological evaluation of clonal diversity and antimicrobial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Multilocus enzyme electrophoretic typing further stratified the W135 isolates as members of the ET-37 complex. Five (15.2%), 6 (18.2%) and 7 (21.2%) of the 33 culture–positive isolates displayed resistance to ampicillin and chlorampehnicol and intermediate resistance to penicillin. Resistance pattern characterization ...

  3. Association of meningococcal serotypes with the course of disease: serotypes 2a and 2b in the Netherlands, 1959-1981

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spanjaard, L.; Bol, P.; de Marie, S.; Zanen, H. C.

    1987-01-01

    Case histories of 692 patients with meningococcal disease due to serogroup B, C, or W (W-135) were reviewed to study the association of the serotypes 2a and 2b with the course of disease. The case-fatality rate in group B disease was significantly associated with serotype 2b (B:2b) strains (P =

  4. A first meningococcal meningitis case caused by serogroup Ⅹ Neisseria meningitidis strains in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Chao; UANG Ying-chun; ZHANG Tie-gang; HE Jing-guo; WU Jiang; CHEN Li-juan; LIU Jun-feng; PANG Xing-huo; YANG Jie; SHAO Zhu-jun

    2008-01-01

    @@ Neisseria meningitidis is the leading cause of bacterial meningitis and classified into 13 serogroups based on the immunological reactivity of the capsular polysaccharide.1 Serogroups A,B,C,W135 and Y are the most common causes of meningitis.2

  5. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pattern of morbidity and mortality of newborns admitted into the sick and special care baby unit of Enugu State University Teaching Hospital, Enugu state. Abstract PDF · Vol 18, No 1 (2015) - Articles Outbreak of serotype W135 Neisseria meningitidis in central river region of the Gambia between February and June 2012: A ...

  6. Meningococcal serogroup A, C, W₁₃₅ and Y conjugated vaccine: a cost-effectiveness analysis in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hepkema, Hiltsje; Pouwels, Koen B.; van der Ende, Arie; Westra, Tjalke A.; Postma, Maarten J.

    2013-01-01

    In 2002, vaccination with a serogroup C meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MenC) was introduced in the Netherlands for all children aged 14 months. Despite its success, herd immunity may wane over time. Recently, a serogroup A,C,W135,Y meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MenACWY) was licensed for use in

  7. Host-selective toxins of Pyrenophora tritici-repentis induce common responses associated with host susceptibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iovanna Pandelova

    Full Text Available Pyrenophora tritici-repentis (Ptr, a necrotrophic fungus and the causal agent of tan spot of wheat, produces one or a combination of host-selective toxins (HSTs necessary for disease development. The two most studied toxins produced by Ptr, Ptr ToxA (ToxA and Ptr ToxB (ToxB, are proteins that cause necrotic or chlorotic symptoms respectively. Investigation of host responses induced by HSTs provides better insight into the nature of the host susceptibility. Microarray analysis of ToxA has provided evidence that it can elicit responses similar to those associated with defense. In order to evaluate whether there are consistent host responses associated with susceptibility, a similar analysis of ToxB-induced changes in the same sensitive cultivar was conducted. Comparative analysis of ToxA- and ToxB-induced transcriptional changes showed that similar groups of genes encoding WRKY transcription factors, RLKs, PRs, components of the phenylpropanoid and jasmonic acid pathways are activated. ROS accumulation and photosystem dysfunction proved to be common mechanism-of-action for these toxins. Despite similarities in defense responses, transcriptional and biochemical responses as well as symptom development occur more rapidly for ToxA compared to ToxB, which could be explained by differences in perception as well as by differences in activation of a specific process, for example, ethylene biosynthesis in ToxA treatment. Results of this study suggest that perception of HSTs will result in activation of defense responses as part of a susceptible interaction and further supports the hypothesis that necrotrophic fungi exploit defense responses in order to induce cell death.

  8. Measuring Impact of EPAs Computational Toxicology Research (BOSC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Computational Toxicology (CompTox) research at the EPA was initiated in 2005. Since 2005, CompTox research efforts have made tremendous advances in developing new approaches to evaluate thousands of chemicals for potential health effects. The purpose of this case study is to trac...

  9. HTTK: R Package for High-Throughput Toxicokinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thousands of chemicals have been profiled by high-throughput screening programs such as ToxCast and Tox21; these chemicals are tested in part because most of them have limited or no data on hazard, exposure, or toxicokinetics. Toxicokinetic models aid in predicting tissue concent...

  10. Estimating Likelihood of Fetal In Vivo Interactions Using In Vitro HTS Data (Teratology meeting)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tox21/ToxCast efforts provide in vitro concentration-response data for thousands of compounds. Predicting whether chemical-biological interactions observed in vitro will occur in vivo is challenging. We hypothesize that using a modified model from the FDA guidance for drug intera...

  11. In Silico Prediction of Physicochemical Properties of Environmental Chemicals Using Molecular Fingerprints and Machine Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    There are little available toxicity data on the vast majority of chemicals in commerce. High-throughput screening (HTS) studies, such as those being carried out by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ToxCast program in partnership with the federal Tox21 research progra...

  12. In-silico structure activity relationship study of toxicity endpoints by QSAR modeling (SOT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Several thousand chemicals were tested in 700 toxicity-related in-vitro HTS bioassays through the EPA’s ToxCast and Tox21 projects. This chemical set only covers a portion of the chemical space of interest for environmental exposure, leading to a need to fill data gaps with alter...

  13. High Throughput PBTK: Evaluating EPA’s Open-Source Data and Tools for Dosimetry and Exposure Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thousands of chemicals have been profiled by high-throughput screening (HTS) programs such as ToxCast and Tox21; these chemicals are tested in part because most of them have limited or no data on hazard, exposure, or toxicokinetics (TK). While HTS generates in vitro bioactivity d...

  14. Fun with High Throughput Toxicokinetics (CalEPA webinar)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thousands of chemicals have been profiled by high-throughput screening (HTS) programs such as ToxCast and Tox21. These chemicals are tested in part because there are limited or no data on hazard, exposure, or toxicokinetics (TK). TK models aid in predicting tissue concentrations ...

  15. Defining the taxonomic domain of applicability for mammalian-based high-throughput screening assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cell-based high throughput screening (HTS) technologies are becoming mainstream in chemical safety evaluations. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Toxicity Forecaster (ToxCastTM) and the multi-agency Tox21 Programs have been at the forefront in advancing this science, m...

  16. TOXPERT: An Expert System for Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, R. J.; Osimitz, T. G.; Oleson, A.

    1988-01-01

    TOXPERT is an artificial intelligence based system used to model product safety, toxicology (TOX) and regulatory (REG) decision processes. An expert system shell uses backward chaining rule control to link “marketing approval” goals to the type of product, REG agency, exposure conditions and TOX. Marketing risks are primarily a function of the TOX, hazards and exposure potential. The method employed differentiates between REG requirements in goal seeking control for various types of products. This is accomplished by controlling rule execution by defining frames for each REG agency. In addition, TOXPERT produces classifications of TOX ratings and suggested product labeling. This production rule system uses principles of TOX, REGs, corporate guidelines and internal “rules of thumb.” TOXPERT acts as an advisor for this narrow domain. Advantages are that it can make routine decisions freeing professional's time for more complex problem solving, provide backup and training.

  17. Environmental T4-Family Bacteriophages Evolve to Escape Abortive Infection via Multiple Routes in a Bacterial Host Employing "Altruistic Suicide" through Type III Toxin-Antitoxin Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bihe; Akusobi, Chidiebere; Fang, Xinzhe; Salmond, George P C

    2017-01-01

    Abortive infection is an anti-phage mechanism employed by a bacterium to initiate its own death upon phage infection. This reduces, or eliminates, production of viral progeny and protects clonal siblings in the bacterial population by an act akin to an "altruistic suicide." Abortive infection can be mediated by a Type III toxin-antitoxin system called ToxIN Pa consisting of an endoribonuclease toxin and RNA antitoxin. ToxIN Pa is a heterohexameric quaternary complex in which pseudoknotted RNA inhibits the toxicity of the toxin until infection by certain phages causes destabilization of ToxIN Pa , leading to bacteriostasis and, eventually, lethality. However, it is still unknown why only certain phages are able to activate ToxIN Pa . To try to address this issue we first introduced ToxIN Pa into the Gram-negative enterobacterium, Serratia sp. ATCC 39006 ( S 39006) and then isolated new environmental S 39006 phages that were scored for activation of ToxIN Pa and abortive infection capacity. We isolated three T4-like phages from a sewage treatment outflow point into the River Cam, each phage being isolated at least a year apart. These phages were susceptible to ToxIN Pa -mediated abortive infection but produced spontaneous "escape" mutants that were insensitive to ToxIN Pa . Analysis of these resistant mutants revealed three different routes of escaping ToxIN Pa , namely by mutating asiA (the product of which is a phage transcriptional co-activator); by mutating a conserved, yet functionally unknown, orf84 ; or by deleting a 6.5-10 kb region of the phage genome. Analysis of these evolved escape mutants may help uncover the nature of the corresponding phage product(s) involved in activation of ToxIN Pa .

  18. INVESTIGATION OF THE TOTAL ORGANIC HALOGEN ANALYTICAL METHOD AT THE WASTE SAMPLING CHARACTERIZATION FACILITY (WSCF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DOUGLAS JG; MEZNARICH HD, PHD; OLSEN JR; ROSS GA; STAUFFER M

    2008-01-01

    Total organic halogen (TOX) is used as a parameter to screen groundwater samples at the Hanford Site. Trending is done for each groundwater well, and changes in TOX and other screening parameters can lead to costly changes in the monitoring protocol. The Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility (WSCF) analyzes groundwater samples for TOX using the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) SW-846 method 9020B (EPA 1996a). Samples from the Soil and Groundwater Remediation Project (S and GRP) are submitted to the WSCF for analysis without information regarding the source of the sample; each sample is in essence a 'blind' sample to the laboratory. Feedback from the S and GRP indicated that some of the WSCF-generated TOX data from groundwater wells had a number of outlier values based on the historical trends (Anastos 2008a). Additionally, analysts at WSCF observed inconsistent TOX results among field sample replicates. Therefore, the WSCF lab performed an investigation of the TOX analysis to determine the cause of the outlier data points. Two causes were found that contributed to generating out-of-trend TOX data: (1) The presence of inorganic chloride in the groundwater samples: at inorganic chloride concentrations greater than about 10 parts per million (ppm), apparent TOX values increase with increasing chloride concentration. A parallel observation is the increase in apparent breakthrough of TOX from the first to the second activated-carbon adsorption tubes with increasing inorganic chloride concentration. (2) During the sample preparation step, excessive purging of the adsorption tubes with oxygen pressurization gas after sample loading may cause channeling in the activated-carbon bed. This channeling leads to poor removal of inorganic chloride during the subsequent wash step with aqueous potassium nitrate. The presence of this residual inorganic chloride then produces erroneously high TOX values. Changes in sample preparation were studied to more

  19. Toxicology ontology perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Barry; Apic, Gordana; Carthew, Philip; Clark, Dominic; Cook, David; Dix, Ian; Escher, Sylvia; Hastings, Janna; Heard, David J; Jeliazkova, Nina; Judson, Philip; Matis-Mitchell, Sherri; Mitic, Dragana; Myatt, Glenn; Shah, Imran; Spjuth, Ola; Tcheremenskaia, Olga; Toldo, Luca; Watson, David; White, Andrew; Yang, Chihae

    2012-01-01

    The field of predictive toxicology requires the development of open, public, computable, standardized toxicology vocabularies and ontologies to support the applications required by in silico, in vitro, and in vivo toxicology methods and related analysis and reporting activities. In this article we review ontology developments based on a set of perspectives showing how ontologies are being used in predictive toxicology initiatives and applications. Perspectives on resources and initiatives reviewed include OpenTox, eTOX, Pistoia Alliance, ToxWiz, Virtual Liver, EU-ADR, BEL, ToxML, and Bioclipse. We also review existing ontology developments in neighboring fields that can contribute to establishing an ontological framework for predictive toxicology. A significant set of resources is already available to provide a foundation for an ontological framework for 21st century mechanistic-based toxicology research. Ontologies such as ToxWiz provide a basis for application to toxicology investigations, whereas other ontologies under development in the biological, chemical, and biomedical communities could be incorporated in an extended future framework. OpenTox has provided a semantic web framework for the implementation of such ontologies into software applications and linked data resources. Bioclipse developers have shown the benefit of interoperability obtained through ontology by being able to link their workbench application with remote OpenTox web services. Although these developments are promising, an increased international coordination of efforts is greatly needed to develop a more unified, standardized, and open toxicology ontology framework.

  20. Use of High Throughput Screening Data in IARC Monograph ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purpose: Evaluation of carcinogenic mechanisms serves a critical role in IARC monograph evaluations, and can lead to “upgrade” or “downgrade” of the carcinogenicity conclusions based on human and animal evidence alone. Three recent IARC monograph Working Groups (110, 112, and 113) pioneered analysis of high throughput in vitro screening data from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s ToxCast program in evaluations of carcinogenic mechanisms. Methods: For monograph 110, ToxCast assay data across multiple nuclear receptors were used to test the hypothesis that PFOA acts exclusively through the PPAR family of receptors, with activity profiles compared to several prototypical nuclear receptor-activating compounds. For monographs 112 and 113, ToxCast assays were systematically evaluated and used as an additional data stream in the overall evaluation of the mechanistic evidence. Specifically, ToxCast assays were mapped to 10 “key characteristics of carcinogens” recently identified by an IARC expert group, and chemicals’ bioactivity profiles were evaluated both in absolute terms (number of relevant assays positive for bioactivity) and relative terms (ranking with respect to other compounds evaluated by IARC, using the ToxPi methodology). Results: PFOA activates multiple nuclear receptors in addition to the PPAR family in the ToxCast assays. ToxCast assays offered substantial coverage for 5 of the 10 “key characteristics,” with the greates

  1. Host translational inhibition by Pseudomonas aeruginosa Exotoxin A Triggers an immune response in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwan, Deborah L; Kirienko, Natalia V; Ausubel, Frederick M

    2012-04-19

    Intestinal epithelial cells are exposed to both innocuous and pathogenic microbes, which need to be distinguished to mount an effective immune response. To understand the mechanisms underlying pathogen recognition, we investigated how Pseudomonas aeruginosa triggers intestinal innate immunity in Caenorhabditis elegans, a process independent of Toll-like pattern recognition receptors. We show that the P. aeruginosa translational inhibitor Exotoxin A (ToxA), which ribosylates elongation factor 2 (EF2), upregulates a significant subset of genes normally induced by P. aeruginosa. Moreover, immune pathways involving the ATF-7 and ZIP-2 transcription factors, which protect C. elegans from P. aeruginosa, are required for preventing ToxA-mediated lethality. ToxA-responsive genes are not induced by enzymatically inactive ToxA protein but can be upregulated independently of ToxA by disruption of host protein translation. Thus, C. elegans has a surveillance mechanism to recognize ToxA through its effect on protein translation rather than by direct recognition of either ToxA or ribosylated EF2. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Consensus recommendation for meningococcal disease prevention for Hajj and Umra pilgrimage/travel medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibl, A; Tufenkeji, H; Khalil, M; Memish, Z

    2013-04-01

    The Islamic Hajj to Makkah (Mecca) has been associated with outbreaks of invasive meningococcal disease and the global spread of Neisseria meningitidis serogroup W-135. For Hajj pilgrims the quadrivalent vaccination against serogroups A, C, W-135 and Y is a mandatory requirement. Novel conjugate vaccines may provide benefits for the community by reduction of carriage. With the introduction of the new generation of quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccines (Menveo, Menactra, and others pending license) and their recent implementation in Saudi Arabia, experts from 11 countries in the Middle East region met at a Meningococcal Leadership Forum (MLF), in Dubai in May 2010 to exchange opinions on meningococcal disease and prevention strategies. These experts discussed the importance of introducing conjugate vaccines for pilgrims and travellers, and elaborated a consensus recommendation to support healthcare professionals and decision-makers.

  3. 生きること、生きるもの

    OpenAIRE

    柴田, 早穂

    2010-01-01

    高錫青銅(Cu82%+Sn18%) 陶製鋳型(粘土・木炭粉・籾殻炭粉・籾殻・麻・真土)による蝋型鋳造、焼き入れ w110Xd220Xh190mm w135Xd115Xh220mm w100Xd85Xh150mm w60Xd50Xh125mm w80Xd65Xh90

  4. Nasopharyngeal Carriage Rate and Serogroups of Neisseria meningitidis in Turkish recruits upon entry to the military

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Basustaoglu

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to determine nasopharyngeal carriage rate and serogroup of Neisseria meningitidis strains isolated from Turkish recruits upon entry to the military. Material and Methods: Nasopharyngeal swab samples were obtained from 1995 soldiers and were inoculated immediately on BBL-modified Thayer-Martin medium plates. The plates were examined for the presence of colonies showing the typical morphology of N. meningitidis. Suspect colonies were screened for oxidase reactivity, and positive colonies were Gram stained. If Gram-negative diplococci were present, a biochemical profile by the API NH system was used for confirmation. Serogrouping of the meningococcal isolates was performed by a slide agglutination technique. Findings: The nasopharyngeal carriage rate of N. meningitidis was found to be 4.2% (n=83. Of these meningococci, 15.6% (n=13 were serogroup Y, 10.8% (n=9 were serogroup W-135, 9.6% (n=8 were serogroup C, 6.1% (n=5 were serogroup B, 2.4% (n=2 were serogroup A. The 46 isolates (55.4% were detected as nonserogroupable. Conclusion: Since serogroup Y and W-135 are predominant in this study population, it was suggest that Turkish recruits should be vaccinated by quadrivalent vaccine (A,C,Y, and W-135 upon the military instead of A+C polysaccharide vaccine and now quadrivalent vaccine has been carried out. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2011; 10(4.000: 447-450

  5. Drug design: structure- and ligand-based approaches

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Merz, Kenneth M; Ringe, Dagmar; Reynolds, Charles H

    2010-01-01

    ..., computational ADME-Tox, and drug discovery case studies. A variety of authors from academic and commercial institutions all over the world have contributed to this book, which is illustrated with more than 200 images...

  6. Functional Use Database (FUse)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — There are five different files for this dataset: 1. A dataset listing the reported functional uses of chemicals (FUse) 2. All 729 ToxPrint descriptors obtained from...

  7. Association of water-borne diseases morbidity pattern and water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1Department of Env ronmental Management and Tox cology, Un vers ty of Agr culture, PMB 2240,. Abeokuta, Ogun .... and a modern sector) that has implications for ... plastered with cement. ..... residents are at–risk of water-borne diseases.

  8. ECOTOX Knowledgebase: New tools for data visualization and database interoperability (poster)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ECOTOXicology knowledgebase (ECOTOX) is a comprehensive, curated database that summarizes toxicology data from single chemical exposure studies to terrestrial and aquatic organisms. The ECOTOX Knowledgebase provides risk assessors and researchers consistent information on tox...

  9. Mercury and Your Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Risk of Exposure to Mercury Learn About Mercury What is Mercury What is Metallic mercury? Toxicological Profile ToxFAQs Mercury Resources CDC’s National Biomonitoring Program Factsheet on Mercury ...

  10. 76 FR 40924 - Current List of Laboratories and Instrumented Initial Testing Facilities Which Meet Minimum...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-12

    ..., Division of Workplace Programs, SAMHSA/CSAP, Room 2-1042, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, Maryland 20857...., NOVAMANN (Ontario), Inc.). MedTox Laboratories, Inc., 402 W. County Road D, St. Paul, MN 55112, 651-636...

  11. 76 FR 75889 - Current List of Laboratories and Instrumented Initial Testing Facilities Which Meet Minimum...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-05

    ..., Division of Workplace Programs, SAMHSA/CSAP, Room 2-1042, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, Maryland 20857... (Ontario), Inc.). MedTox Laboratories, Inc., 402 W. County Road D, St. Paul, MN 55112, (651) 636-7466/(800...

  12. 76 FR 31969 - Current List of Laboratories and Instrumented Initial Testing Facilities Which Meet Minimum...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-02

    ..., Division of Workplace Programs, SAMHSA/CSAP, Room 2-1042, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, Maryland 20857...., NOVAMANN (Ontario), Inc.). MedTox Laboratories, Inc., 402 W. County Road D, St. Paul, MN 55112, 651-636...

  13. 78 FR 14100 - Current List of Laboratories and Instrumented Initial Testing Facilities Which Meet Minimum...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-04

    ..., Division of Workplace Programs, SAMHSA/CSAP, Room 2-1042, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, Maryland 20857... Laboratory Services, a Division of LabOne, Inc.,) MedTox Laboratories, Inc., 402 W. County Road D, St. Paul...

  14. 75 FR 45128 - Current List of Laboratories Which Meet Minimum Standards To Engage in Urine Drug Testing for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-02

    .../CSAP, Room 2-1042, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, Maryland 20857; 240-276-2600 (voice), 240-276-2610... Analytics Inc., NOVAMANN (Ontario), Inc.) MedTox Laboratories, Inc., 402 W. County Road D, St. Paul, MN...

  15. 77 FR 69642 - Current List of Laboratories and Instrumented Initial Testing Facilities Which Meet Minimum...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-20

    ..., Division of Workplace Programs, SAMHSA/CSAP, Room 2-1042, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, Maryland 20857... (Ontario), Inc.) MedTox Laboratories, Inc., 402 W. County Road D, St. Paul, MN 55112, 651-636-7466/800-832...

  16. 77 FR 71605 - Current List of Laboratories and Instrumented Initial Testing Facilities Which Meet Minimum...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-03

    ... Hersh, Division of Workplace Programs, SAMHSA/CSAP, Room 2-1042, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville... Analytics Inc., NOVAMANN (Ontario), Inc.) MedTox Laboratories, Inc., 402 W. County Road D, St. Paul, MN...

  17. 77 FR 126 - Current List of Laboratories and Instrumented Initial Testing Facilities Which Meet Minimum...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-03

    ..., Division of Workplace Programs, SAMHSA/CSAP, Room 2-1042, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, Maryland 20857....). MedTox Laboratories, Inc., 402 W. County Road D, St. Paul, MN 55112, (651) 636-7466/(800) 832-3244...

  18. 76 FR 24501 - Current List of Laboratories and Instrumented Initial Testing Facilities Which Meet Minimum...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-02

    ..., Division of Workplace Programs, SAMHSA/CSAP, Room 2-1042, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, Maryland 20857... (Ontario), Inc.) MedTox Laboratories, Inc., 402 W. County Road D, St. Paul, MN 55112, 651-636-7466/800-832...

  19. 76 FR 161 - Current List of Laboratories and Instrumented Initial Testing Facilities Which Meet Minimum...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-03

    ..., Division of Workplace Programs, SAMHSA/CSAP, Room 2-1042, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, Maryland 20857... certification maintenance program. MedTox Laboratories, Inc., 402 W. County Road D,St. Paul, MN 55112. 651-636...

  20. 77 FR 26022 - Current List of Laboratories and Instrumented Initial Testing Facilities Which Meet Minimum...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-02

    ..., Division of Workplace Programs, SAMHSA/CSAP, Room 2-1042, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, Maryland 20857...., NOVAMANN (Ontario), Inc.). MedTox Laboratories, Inc., 402 W. County Road D, St. Paul, MN 55112, 651-636...

  1. 76 FR 6147 - Current List of Laboratories and Instrumented Initial Testing Facilities Which Meet Minimum...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-03

    ..., Division of Workplace Programs, SAMHSA/CSAP, Room 2-1042, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, Maryland 20857....) MedTox Laboratories, Inc., 402 W. County Road D, St. Paul, MN 55112. 651-636-7466/800-832-3244. Metro...

  2. 77 FR 5037 - Current List of Laboratories and Instrumented Initial Testing Facilities Which Meet Minimum...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    ..., Division of Workplace Programs, SAMHSA/CSAP, Room 2-1042, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, Maryland 20857...., NOVAMANN (Ontario), Inc.); MedTox Laboratories, Inc., 402 W. County Road D, St. Paul, MN 55112, 651-636...

  3. 78 FR 33429 - Current List of Laboratories and Instrumented Initial Testing Facilities Which Meet Minimum...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-04

    ..., Division of Workplace Programs, SAMHSA/CSAP, Room 2-1042, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, Maryland 20857....). MedTox Laboratories, Inc., 402 W. County Road D, St. Paul, MN 55112, 651-636-7466/800-832-3244. Metro...

  4. 76 FR 46309 - Current List of Laboratories and Instrumented Initial Testing Facilities Which Meet Minimum...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-02

    ..., Division of Workplace Programs, SAMHSA/CSAP, Room 2-1042, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, Maryland 20857... (Ontario), Inc.) MedTox Laboratories, Inc., 402 W. County Road D, St. Paul, MN 55112, 651-636-7466/800-832...

  5. 78 FR 72684 - Current List of Laboratories and Instrumented Initial Testing Facilities Which Meet Minimum...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-03

    ... INFORMATION CONTACT: Giselle Hersh, Division of Workplace Programs, SAMHSA/CSAP, Room 7-1051, One Choke Cherry..., a Division of LabOne, Inc.) MedTox Laboratories, Inc., 402 W. County Road D, St. Paul, MN 55112, 651...

  6. 77 FR 32653 - Current List of Laboratories and Instrumented Initial Testing Facilities Which Meet Minimum...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    ... Hersh, Division of Workplace Programs, SAMHSA/CSAP, Room 2-1042, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville... Analytics Inc., NOVAMANN (Ontario), Inc.). MedTox Laboratories, Inc., 402 W. County Road D, St. Paul, MN...

  7. 78 FR 59946 - Current List of Laboratories and Instrumented Initial Testing Facilities Which Meet Minimum...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    ... INFORMATION CONTACT: Giselle Hersh, Division of Workplace Programs, SAMHSA/CSAP, Room 7-1051, One Choke Cherry....). MedTox Laboratories, Inc., 402 W. County Road D, St. Paul, MN 55112, 651-636-7466/800-832-3244. Metro...

  8. 77 FR 20832 - Current List of Laboratories and Instrumented Initial Testing Facilities Which Meet Minimum...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-06

    ..., Division of Workplace Programs, SAMHSA/CSAP, Room 2-1042, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, Maryland 20857...., NOVAMANN (Ontario), Inc.). MedTox Laboratories, Inc., 402 W. County Road D, St. Paul, MN 55112, 651-636...

  9. 77 FR 54597 - Current List of Laboratories and Instrumented Initial Testing Facilities Which Meet Minimum...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-05

    ..., Division of Workplace Programs, SAMHSA/CSAP, Room 2-1042, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, Maryland 20857...., NOVAMANN (Ontario), Inc.). MedTox Laboratories, Inc., 402 W. County Road D, St. Paul, MN 55112, 651-636...

  10. Quantitative Structure-Use Relationship (QSUR) Model Descriptors

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This data set contains ToxPrint finger prints for all chemicals in FUse that had QSAR-ready SMILES strings as well as select physicochemical properties from the...

  11. Metal and proton toxicity to lake zooplankton: A chemical speciation based modelling approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stockdale, Anthony; Tipping, Edward; Lofts, Stephen; Fott, Jan; Garmo, Øyvind A.; Hruska, Jakub; Keller, Bill; Löfgren, Stefan; Maberly, Stephen C.; Majer, Vladimir; Nierzwicki-Bauer, Sandra A.; Persson, Gunnar; Schartau, Ann-Kristin; Thackeray, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    The WHAM-F TOX model quantifies the combined toxic effects of protons and metal cations towards aquatic organisms through the toxicity function (F TOX ), a linear combination of the products of organism-bound cation and a toxic potency coefficient for each cation. We describe the application of the model to predict an observable ecological field variable, species richness of pelagic lake crustacean zooplankton, studied with respect to either acidification or the impacts of metals from smelters. The fitted results give toxic potencies increasing in the order H + TOX to relate combined toxic effects of protons and metal cations towards lake crustacean zooplankton. • The fitted results give toxic potencies increasing in the order H + TOX model has been applied to field data for pelagic lake crustacean zooplankton. The fitted results give metal toxic potencies increasing in the order H + < Al < Cu < Zn < Ni

  12. Collaborative development of predictive toxicology applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Barry; Douglas, Nicki; Helma, Christoph; Rautenberg, Micha; Jeliazkova, Nina; Jeliazkov, Vedrin; Nikolova, Ivelina; Benigni, Romualdo; Tcheremenskaia, Olga; Kramer, Stefan; Girschick, Tobias; Buchwald, Fabian; Wicker, Joerg; Karwath, Andreas; Gütlein, Martin; Maunz, Andreas; Sarimveis, Haralambos; Melagraki, Georgia; Afantitis, Antreas; Sopasakis, Pantelis; Gallagher, David; Poroikov, Vladimir; Filimonov, Dmitry; Zakharov, Alexey; Lagunin, Alexey; Gloriozova, Tatyana; Novikov, Sergey; Skvortsova, Natalia; Druzhilovsky, Dmitry; Chawla, Sunil; Ghosh, Indira; Ray, Surajit; Patel, Hitesh; Escher, Sylvia

    2010-08-31

    OpenTox provides an interoperable, standards-based Framework for the support of predictive toxicology data management, algorithms, modelling, validation and reporting. It is relevant to satisfying the chemical safety assessment requirements of the REACH legislation as it supports access to experimental data, (Quantitative) Structure-Activity Relationship models, and toxicological information through an integrating platform that adheres to regulatory requirements and OECD validation principles. Initial research defined the essential components of the Framework including the approach to data access, schema and management, use of controlled vocabularies and ontologies, architecture, web service and communications protocols, and selection and integration of algorithms for predictive modelling. OpenTox provides end-user oriented tools to non-computational specialists, risk assessors, and toxicological experts in addition to Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) for developers of new applications. OpenTox actively supports public standards for data representation, interfaces, vocabularies and ontologies, Open Source approaches to core platform components, and community-based collaboration approaches, so as to progress system interoperability goals.The OpenTox Framework includes APIs and services for compounds, datasets, features, algorithms, models, ontologies, tasks, validation, and reporting which may be combined into multiple applications satisfying a variety of different user needs. OpenTox applications are based on a set of distributed, interoperable OpenTox API-compliant REST web services. The OpenTox approach to ontology allows for efficient mapping of complementary data coming from different datasets into a unifying structure having a shared terminology and representation.Two initial OpenTox applications are presented as an illustration of the potential impact of OpenTox for high-quality and consistent structure-activity relationship modelling of REACH

  13. Collaborative development of predictive toxicology applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardy Barry

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract OpenTox provides an interoperable, standards-based Framework for the support of predictive toxicology data management, algorithms, modelling, validation and reporting. It is relevant to satisfying the chemical safety assessment requirements of the REACH legislation as it supports access to experimental data, (Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship models, and toxicological information through an integrating platform that adheres to regulatory requirements and OECD validation principles. Initial research defined the essential components of the Framework including the approach to data access, schema and management, use of controlled vocabularies and ontologies, architecture, web service and communications protocols, and selection and integration of algorithms for predictive modelling. OpenTox provides end-user oriented tools to non-computational specialists, risk assessors, and toxicological experts in addition to Application Programming Interfaces (APIs for developers of new applications. OpenTox actively supports public standards for data representation, interfaces, vocabularies and ontologies, Open Source approaches to core platform components, and community-based collaboration approaches, so as to progress system interoperability goals. The OpenTox Framework includes APIs and services for compounds, datasets, features, algorithms, models, ontologies, tasks, validation, and reporting which may be combined into multiple applications satisfying a variety of different user needs. OpenTox applications are based on a set of distributed, interoperable OpenTox API-compliant REST web services. The OpenTox approach to ontology allows for efficient mapping of complementary data coming from different datasets into a unifying structure having a shared terminology and representation. Two initial OpenTox applications are presented as an illustration of the potential impact of OpenTox for high-quality and consistent structure

  14. Quorum-sensing regulators control virulence gene expression in Vibrio cholerae

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Jun; Miller, Melissa B.; Vance, Russell E.; Dziejman, Michelle; Bassler, Bonnie L.; Mekalanos, John J.

    2002-01-01

    The production of virulence factors including cholera toxin and the toxin-coregulated pilus in the human pathogen Vibrio cholerae is strongly influenced by environmental conditions. The well-characterized ToxR signal transduction cascade is responsible for sensing and integrating the environmental information and controlling the virulence regulon. We show here that, in addition to the known components of the ToxR signaling circuit, quorum-sensing regulators are involved in regulation of V. ch...

  15. Molecular analysis of exotoxin A associated with antimicrobial resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated from patients in Tehran hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nour Amirmozafari

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim:  Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a unique bacteria that in order to survive in different environments by complex adaptation process can make changes in his virulence genes expression and drug resistance. The aim of this research is the investigation of existence of a logical association between toxA gene and antibiotic resistance in strains possess the gene. Materials and Methods: Antibiogram test by disk diffusion method (Kirby Bauer was performed according to CLSI protocols. In this study, the existence of toxA gene with the help of polymerase chain reaction (PCR in 102 clinical isolates from blood samples, wound, urine and trachea was examined. Chi-square test was used to investigate the relationship between exotoxin A and antibiotic resistance. Results: The 81 strains (79.4% had toxA gene. Frequency of toxA genes in isolated strains from different infections were wound (91.4%, blood (85.7%, trachea (72.7%, and urine (42.1%. Multiple resistance index in strains possess the toxA gene was calculated 75%. Chi 2 test to determine the relationship between drug resistance and gene toxA was significant (P<0.05. Conclusions: The significant chi-square test and an increase in multi-resistant strains possessing the toxA gene, can represent a considerable genetic switch between exotoxin A activity and resistance to antibiotics in the blood, urine, tracheal, wound infections Respectively, which lead to turn genes on of drug resistance regulating in bacteria. The results of this study will be verified by southern blot, analysis of the expression of toxA gene and determine the mechanism of resistance in resistant strains Methods.

  16. Pu recycling in a full Th-MOX PWR core. Part I: Steady state analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fridman, E.; Kliem, S.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Detailed 3D 100% Th-MOX PWR core design is developed. → Pu incineration increased by a factor of 2 as compared to a full MOX PWR core. → The core controllability under steady state conditions is demonstrated. - Abstract: Current practice of Pu recycling in existing Light Water Reactors (LWRs) in the form of U-Pu mixed oxide fuel (MOX) is not efficient due to continuous Pu production from U-238. The use of Th-Pu mixed oxide (TOX) fuel will considerably improve Pu consumption rates because virtually no new Pu is generated from thorium. In this study, the feasibility of Pu recycling in a typical pressurized water reactor (PWR) fully loaded with TOX fuel is investigated. Detailed 3-dimensional 100% TOX and 100% MOX PWR core designs are developed. The full MOX core is considered for comparison purposes. The design stages included determination of Pu loading required to achieve 18-month fuel cycle assuming three-batch fuel management scheme, selection of poison materials, development of the core loading pattern, optimization of burnable poison loadings, evaluation of critical boron concentration requirements, estimation of reactivity coefficients, core kinetic parameters, and shutdown margin. The performance of the MOX and TOX cores under steady-state condition and during selected reactivity initiated accidents (RIAs) is compared with that of the actual uranium oxide (UOX) PWR core. Part I of this paper describes the full TOX and MOX PWR core designs and reports the results of steady state analysis. The TOX core requires a slightly higher initial Pu loading than the MOX core to achieve the target fuel cycle length. However, the TOX core exhibits superior Pu incineration capabilities. The significantly degraded worth of control materials in Pu cores is partially addressed by the use of enriched soluble boron and B 4 C as a control rod absorbing material. Wet annular burnable absorber (WABA) rods are used to flatten radial power distribution

  17. Double-Track Electrochemical Green Approach for Simultaneous Dissolution Profiling of Naproxen Sodium and Diphenhydramine Hydrochloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shehata, Mostafa A; Fawaz, Esraa M; El-Rahman, Mohamed K Abd; Abdel-Moety, Ezzat M

    2017-11-30

    Acquisition of the dissolution profiles of more than single active ingredient in a multi-analyte pharmaceutical formulation is a mandatory manufacturing practice that is dominated by utilization of the off-line separation-based chromatographic methods. This contribution adopts a new "Double-Track" approach with the ultimate goal of advancing the in-line potentiometric sensors to their most effective applicability for simultaneous acquisition of the dissolution profiles of two active ingredients in a binary pharmaceutical formulation. The unique abilities of these sensors for real-time measurements is the key driver for adoption of "green analytical chemistry" (GAC) principles aiming to expand the application of eco-friendly analytical methods With the aim of performing a side-by-side comparison, this work investigates the degree of adherence of ISEs to the 12 principles of GAC in multicomponent dissolution profiling with respect to the HPLC. For the proof of concept, a binary mixture of naproxen sodium (NAPR) and diphenhydramine hydrochloride (DIPH) marketed as Aleve pm ® tablets was selected as a model for which dissolution profiles were attained by two techniques. The first "Double-Track" in-line strategy depends on dipping two highly integrated membrane sensors for continuous monitoring of the dissolution of each active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) by tracing the e.m.f change over the time scale. For the determination of NAPR, sensor I was developed using tridodecyl methyl ammonium chloride as an anion exchanger, while sensor II was developed for the determination of DIPH using potassium tetrakis (4-chlorophenyl) borate as a cation exchanger. The second off-line strategy utilizes a separation-based HPLC method via off-line tracking the increase of peak area by UV detection at 220nm over time using a mobile phase of acetonitrile: water (90:10) pH 3. The advantages of the newly introduced "Double-Track" approach regarding GAC principles are highlighted, and

  18. Self-protection of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci from its toxin, tabtoxinine-β-lactam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knight, T.J.; Durbin, R.D.; Langston-Unkefer, P.J.

    1987-01-01

    An extracellular toxin, tabtoxinine-β-lactam (TβL), is produced by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci. This toxin irreversibly inhibits its target, glutamine synthetase; yet P. syringae pv. tabaci retains significant amounts of glutamine synthetase activity during toxin production in culture. As part of our investigation of the self-protection of P. syringae pv. tabaci, the authors compared the effects of TβL on Tox + (TβL-producing, insensitive to TβL) and Tox - (TβL nonproducing, sensitive to TΛ) strains. The extent of protection afforded to the Tox - strain when induced to adenylylate glutamine synthetase was tested. It was concluded that an additional protection mechanism was required. A detoxification activity was found in the Tox + strain which opens the ε-lactam ring to TβL to produce the inactive, open-chain form, tabtoxinine. Whole cells of the Tox + strain incubated for 24 h with [ 14 C]TβL (0.276 μmol/3 x 10 10 cells) contained [ 14 C]tabtoxinine (0.056 μmol), and the medium contained TβL (0.226 μmol). Extracts of spheroplasts of the Tox + stain also converted TβL to tabtoxinine, whereas extracts of the Tox - strain did not alter TβL. The conversion was time dependent and stoichiometric and was destroyed by boiling for 30 min or by the addition of 5mM EDTA. Penicillin, a possible substrate and competitive inhibitor of this lactamase activity, inhibited the conversion of TΛ to tabtoxinine. Periplasmic fluid did not catalyze the conversion of TβL

  19. Effect of temperature and pH on dehalogenation of total organic chlorine, bromine and iodine in drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abusallout, Ibrahim; Rahman, Shamimur; Hua, Guanghui

    2017-11-01

    Disinfection byproduct (DBP) concentrations in drinking water distribution systems and indoor water uses depend on competitive formation and degradation reactions. This study investigated the dehalogenation kinetics of total organic chlorine (TOCl), bromine (TOBr) and iodine (TOI) produced by fulvic acid under different pH and temperature conditions, and total organic halogen (TOX) variations in a treated drinking water under simulated distribution system and heating scenarios. TOX dehalogenation rates were generally in the order of TOI ≅ TOCl(NH 2 Cl) > TOBr > TOCl(Cl 2 ). The half-lives of different groups of TOX compounds formed by fulvic acid varied between 27 and 139 days during incubation at 20 °C and 0.98-2.17 days during heating at 55 °C. Base-catalyzed reactions played a major role in TOX degradation as evidenced by enhanced dehalogenation under high pH conditions. The results of heating of a treated water in the presence of residuals showed that TOX concentrations of chlorinated samples increased rapidly when chlorine residuals were present and then gradually decreased after chlorine residuals were exhausted. The final TOX concentrations of chlorinated samples after heating showed moderate decreases with increasing ambient water ages. Chloraminated samples with different ambient water ages exhibited similar final TOX concentrations during simulated distribution system and heating experiments. This study reinforces the importance of understanding DBP variations in indoor water uses as wells as in distribution systems to provide more accurate DBP information for exposure assessment and regulatory determination. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. INVESTIGATION OF THE TOTAL ORGANIC HALOGEN ANALYTICAL METHOD AT THE WASTE SAMPLING AND CHARACTERIZATION FACILITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douglas, J.G.; Meznarich, H.K.; Olsen, J.R.; Ross, G.A.; Stauffer, M.

    2009-01-01

    Total organic halogen (TOX) is used as a parameter to screen groundwater samples at the Hanford Site. Trending is done for each groundwater well, and changes in TOX and other screening parameters can lead to costly changes in the monitoring protocol. The Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility (WSCF) analyzes groundwater samples for TOX using the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) SW-S46 method 9020B (EPA 1996a). Samples from the Soil and Groundwater Remediation Project (SGRP) are submitted to the WSCF for analysis without information regarding the source of the sample; each sample is in essence a ''blind'' sample to the laboratory. Feedback from the SGRP indicated that some of the WSCF-generated TOX data from groundwater wells had a number of outlier values based on the historical trends (Anastos 200Sa). Additionally, analysts at WSCF observed inconsistent TOX results among field sample replicates. Therefore, the WSCF lab performed an investigation of the TOX analysis to determine the cause of the outlier data points. Two causes were found that contributed to generating out-of-trend TOX data: (1) The presence of inorganic chloride in the groundwater samples: at inorganic chloride concentrations greater than about 10 parts per million (ppm), apparent TOX values increase with increasing chloride concentration. A parallel observation is the increase in apparent breakthrough of TOX from the first to the second activated-carbon adsorption tubes with increasing inorganic chloride concentration. (2) During the sample preparation step, excessive purging of the adsorption tubes with oxygen pressurization gas after sample loading may cause channeling in the activated carbon bed. This channeling leads to poor removal of inorganic chloride during the subsequent wash step with aqueous potassium nitrate. The presence of this residual inorganic chloride then produces erroneously high TOX values. Changes in sample preparation were studied to more effectively

  1. Precision-cut intestinal slices: alternative model for drug transport, metabolism, and toxicology research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; de Graaf, Inge A M; Groothuis, Geny M M

    2016-01-01

    The absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity (ADME-tox) processes of drugs are of importance and require preclinical investigation intestine in addition to the liver. Various models have been developed for prediction of ADME-tox in the intestine. In this review, precision-cut intestinal slices (PCIS) are discussed and highlighted as model for ADME-tox studies. This review provides an overview of the applications and an update of the most recent research on PCIS as an ex vivo model to study the transport, metabolism and toxicology of drugs and other xenobiotics. The unique features of PCIS and the differences with other models as well as the translational aspects are also discussed. PCIS are a simple, fast, and reliable ex vivo model for drug ADME-tox research. Therefore, PCIS are expected to become an indispensable link in the in vitro-ex vivo-in vivo extrapolation, and a bridge in translation of animal data to the human situation. In the future, this model may be helpful to study the effects of interorgan interactions, intestinal bacteria, excipients and drug formulations on the ADME-tox properties of drugs. The optimization of culture medium and the development of a (cryo)preservation technique require more research.

  2. Tutorial Video Series: Using Stakeholder Outreach to Increase ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The limited amount of toxicity data on thousands of chemicals found in consumer products has led to the development of research endeavors such as the U.S. EPA’s Toxicity Forecaster (ToxCast). ToxCast uses high-throughput screening technology to evaluate thousands of chemicals for potential toxicity. At the end of 2013, U.S. EPA released ToxCast chemical data on almost 2,000 chemicals through the interactive Chemical Safety for Sustainability (iCSS) Dashboard. The iCSS Dashboard provides public access to the high-throughput screening data that can be used to inform the evaluation of the safety of chemicals. U.S. EPA recognized early in the development of ToxCast that stakeholder outreach was needed in order to translate the complex scientific information featured in the iCSS Dashboard and data, with the goal of educating the diverse user community through targeted efforts to increase data usage and analysis. Through survey feedback and the request of stakeholders, a series of tutorial videos to demonstrate how to access and use the data has been planned, and the first video of the series has been released to guide data usage. This presentation will describe the video tutorial strategy including an overview of: 1) Stakeholder outreach goals and approach; 2) Planning, production, and dissemination of tutorial videos; 3) Overview of Survey Feedback; 4) Overview of tutorial video usage statistics and usage of the ToxCast data. This stakeholder-outreach approach

  3. Evaluation and comparison of bisphenol A analog activity ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is used in consumer products and industrial applications, primarily in plastics, and has been detected in the environment, human urine, blood, and breast milk. Mainly studied as an endocrine disruptor, other toxicities, including obesity, metabolic conditions such as diabetes, and neurodevelopmental effects have also been associated with exposure to BPA, indicating that its effects may not be limited to estrogenicity. In addition, a number of BPA analogs are in use and may exhibit other additional toxicities. To address these unknowns, we examined the bioactivity of 21 BPA analogs across a selection of ToxCast/Tox21 assays grouped by 7 gene sets including estrogen receptor (ER), androgen receptor (AR), thyroid receptor (TR), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR), pregnane x receptor (PXR), aromatase (AROM), and aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR). The most active compounds were bisphenol AF (BPAF) (ER, AR, AROM, AHR), bisphenol A glycidyl methacrylate (TR), 3,3’,5,5’-tetrabromobisphenol A (PPAR) and bisphenol B (BPB) (PXR). We used these data to produce toxicological prioritization index (ToxPi) scores and images to integrate and visually compare the toxicity profiles across all gene sets. The compounds with highest ToxPi scores were BPAF, BPA and BPB. We also mapped the intended gene targets for all ToxCast assays to their associated KEGG BRITE protein families in order to characterize their toxicity profiles on a broader spectr

  4. Machine learning can differentiate venom toxins from other proteins having non-toxic physiological functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranko Gacesa

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Ascribing function to sequence in the absence of biological data is an ongoing challenge in bioinformatics. Differentiating the toxins of venomous animals from homologues having other physiological functions is particularly problematic as there are no universally accepted methods by which to attribute toxin function using sequence data alone. Bioinformatics tools that do exist are difficult to implement for researchers with little bioinformatics training. Here we announce a machine learning tool called ‘ToxClassifier’ that enables simple and consistent discrimination of toxins from non-toxin sequences with >99% accuracy and compare it to commonly used toxin annotation methods. ‘ToxClassifer’ also reports the best-hit annotation allowing placement of a toxin into the most appropriate toxin protein family, or relates it to a non-toxic protein having the closest homology, giving enhanced curation of existing biological databases and new venomics projects. ‘ToxClassifier’ is available for free, either to download (https://github.com/rgacesa/ToxClassifier or to use on a web-based server (http://bioserv7.bioinfo.pbf.hr/ToxClassifier/.

  5. Seguridad, reactogenicidad e inmunogenicidad de una nueva vacuna de polisacáridos meningocócicos en adultos jóvenes cubanos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossana Estruch–de la Guardia

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó un estudio aleatorizado, controlado y a doble ciegas, en 352 adultos jóvenes cubanos entre 18 y 35 años de edad, con el objetivo de evaluar la seguridad, reactogenicidad y la inmunogenicidad de una nueva vacuna de polisacáridos de Neisseria meningitidis serogrupos A, C y W135, producida por el Instituto Finlay de Vacunas (La Habana, Cuba, con respecto a su similar comercial Mencevax® ACW de Glaxo Smith Kline. Se tomaron muestras de suero antes y 28 días después de la vacunación. La reactogenicidad de ambas vacunas fue similar. Los síntomas y signos, tanto locales como generales fueron leves y aparecieron principalmente durante las primeras 48 h después de la vacunación. Ningún sujeto presentó eventos adversos graves durante los 28 días del período de vigilancia. La vacuna en estudio mostró ser segura y poco reactogénica; sus porcentajes de seroconversión a los 28 días posteriores a la vacunación fueron de: 92,19 % para el serogrupo A, 88,89 % para C y 90,06 % para W135. No se detectaron diferencias con respecto a la seroconversión. La seroprotección alcanzada con la vacuna en estudio fue de 98,44 %, 91,81 % y 95,32 % para los serogrupos A, C y W135 respectivamente y no fue inferior con respecto a la vacuna control para los tres serogrupos estudiados.

  6. Epidemiology and antibiotic resistance of bacterial meningitis in Dapaong, northern Togo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Simplice D Karou; Abago Balaka; Mitiname Bamok; Damhan Tchelougou; Malki Assih; Kokou Anani; Kodjo Agbonoko; Jacques Simpore; Comlan de Souza

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To assess the seasonality of the bacterial meningitis and the antibiotic resistance of incriminated bacteria over the last three years in the northern Togo. Methods: From January 2007 to January 2010, 533 cerebrospinal fluids (CSF) samples were collected from patients suspected of meningitis in the Regional Hospital of Dapaong (northern Togo). After microscopic examination, samples were cultured for bacterial identification and antibiotic susceptibility. Results:The study included 533 patients (306 male and 227 female) aged from 1 day to 55 years [average age (13.00±2.07) years]. Bacterial isolation and identification were attempted for 254/533 (47.65%) samples. The bacterial species identified were:Neisseria meningitidis A (N. meningitidis A) (58.27%), Neisseria meningitidis W135 (N. meningitidis W135) (7.09%), Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae) (26.77%), Haemophilus influenza B (H. influenza B) (6.30%) and Enterobacteriaceae (1.57%). The results indicated that bacterial meningitis occur from November to May with a peak in February for H. influenzae and S. pneumoniae and March for Neisseriaceae. The distribution of positive CSF with regards to the age showed that subjects between 6 and 12 years followed by subjects of 0 to 5 years were most affected with respective frequencies of 67.82% and 56.52% (P20%for both bacterial strains), macrolides (resistance rate> 30%for H. influenzae) quinolones (resistance rate>15%for H. influenzae and N. meningitidis W135). Over three years, the prevalence of S. pneumoniae significantly increased from 8.48%to 73.33%(P<0.001), while the changes in the prevalence of H. influenzae B were not statistically significant: 4.24%, vs. 8.89%, (P= 0.233). Conclusions:Our results indicate that data in African countries differ depending on geographical location in relation to the African meningitis belt. This underlines the importance of epidemiological surveillance of bacterial meningitis.

  7. Meningococcal factor H binding proteins in epidemic strains from Africa: implications for vaccine development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolando Pajon

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Factor H binding protein (fHbp is an important antigen for vaccines against meningococcal serogroup B disease. The protein binds human factor H (fH, which enables the bacteria to resist serum bactericidal activity. Little is known about the vaccine-potential of fHbp for control of meningococcal epidemics in Africa, which typically are caused by non-group B strains.We investigated genes encoding fHbp in 106 serogroup A, W-135 and X case isolates from 17 African countries. We determined complement-mediated bactericidal activity of antisera from mice immunized with recombinant fHbp vaccines, or a prototype native outer membrane vesicle (NOMV vaccine from a serogroup B mutant strain with over-expressed fHbp. Eighty-six of the isolates (81% had one of four prevalent fHbp sequence variants, ID 4/5 (serogroup A isolates, 9 (W-135, or 74 (X in variant group 1, or ID 22/23 (W-135 in variant group 2. More than one-third of serogroup A isolates and two-thirds of W-135 isolates tested had low fHbp expression while all X isolates tested had intermediate or high expression. Antisera to the recombinant fHbp vaccines were generally bactericidal only against isolates with fHbp sequence variants that closely matched the respective vaccine ID. Low fHbp expression also contributed to resistance to anti-fHbp bactericidal activity. In contrast to the recombinant vaccines, the NOMV fHbp ID 1 vaccine elicited broad anti-fHbp bactericidal activity, and the antibodies had greater ability to inhibit binding of fH to fHbp than antibodies elicited by the control recombinant fHbp ID 1 vaccine.NOMV vaccines from mutants with increased fHbp expression elicit an antibody repertoire with greater bactericidal activity than recombinant fHbp vaccines. NOMV vaccines are promising for prevention of meningococcal disease in Africa and could be used to supplement coverage conferred by a serogroup A polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccine recently introduced in some sub

  8. Eastern-Western Arctic Sea Ice Analysis, 1982.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-03-01

    FOREWJRD The U.S. Navy has a long and colorful history of polar .. The purpose of exploration and currently is an active participant in the growing with...65W ?,Of/ 7 A 005 CENTER IKEA IUCE F E I, 170TE 175E ISO 1T5W l7OW 15W 160w 15sw 5OW 145W 140W 135W 75E 704 656 60E 50E 40E 30E 20E WE 0 IOW 20W 30W

  9. [Meningococcal disease: frequently asked questions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cofré, José

    2012-12-01

    On account of an increase of serogroup W135 meningococcal disease (M.D.) observed in Santiago, Chile, during last two years the medical community has experienced an avidity to update their knowledge about M.D. treatment and its prevention. In a queries and answers mode, the following topics on M.D. are presented: nasopharyngeal carriage and its importance, immunity and protection against the disease, reasons to choice ceftriaxone as the first line antibiotic in treatment, rationality and indications of chemoprophylaxis, fundamentals and advantages of conjugate vaccines, its indications, schedules, contraindications and decisions making in public health.

  10. Effect of quercetin on apoptosis of PANC-1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joo Hyun; Lee, Han-Beom; Jung, Gum O; Oh, Jung Taek; Park, Dong Eun; Chae, Kwon Mook

    2013-12-01

    To investigate the chemotherapeutic effect of quercetin against cancer cells, signaling pathway of apoptosis was explored in human pancreatic cells. Various anticancer drugs including adriamycin, cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and gemcitabine were used. Cell viability was measured by 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphe-nyltetra zolium bromide assay. Apoptosis was determined by 4'-6-diamidino-2-phenylindole nuclei staining and flow cytometry in PANC-1 cells treated with 50 µg/mL quercetin for 24 hours. Expression of endoplas mic reticulum (ER) stress mediators including, Grp78/Bip, p-PERK, PERK, ATF4, ATF6 and GADD153/CHOP proteins were measured by Western blot analysis. Mitochondrial membrane potential was measured by fluorescence staining with JC-1, rhodamine 123. Quercetin induced the apoptosis of PANC-1, which was characterized as nucleic acid and genomic DNA fragmentation, chromatin condensation, and sub-G0/G1 fraction of cell cycle increase. But not adriamycin, cisplatin, gemcitabine, and 5-FU. PANC-1 cells were markedly sensitive to quercetin. Treatment with quercetin resulted in the increased accumulation of intracellular Ca(2+) ion. Treatment with quercetin also increased the expression of Grp78/Bip and GADD153/CHOP protein and induced mitochondrial dysfunction. Quercetin exerted cytotoxicity against human pancreatic cancer cells via ER stress-mediated apoptotic signaling including reactive oxygen species production and mitochondrial dysfunction. These data suggest that quercetin may be an important modulator of chemosensitivity of cancer cells against anticancer chemotherapeutic agents.

  11. SURVEY ON V. CHOLERAE, V. VULNIFICUS AND V. PARAHAEMOLYTICUS IN BIVALVE MOLLUSCS OF THE ADRIATIC SEA AND PROPOSAL OF AN ANALYTICAL PROTOCOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.L. Valeri

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Bivalve molluscs from Adriatic sea were analyzed for V. parahaemolyticus, V. cholerae e V. vulnificus presence. The isolates on TCBS Agar and m-CPC Agar were selected on the basis of a new biochemical screening, that showed a good performance, because among 2344 strains from primary culture only 237 (10% were presumptively assigned to the species of interest. The PCR analyses was performed for the target genes toxR hlyA, ctxA, tcpI (V. cholerae, toxR, tl, tdh, trh (V. parahaemolyticus, vvhA and viuB (V. vulnificus. Among the 9 strains confirmed to belong to V. parahaemolyticus specie, 6 were sucrose positive. On 215 samples of molluscs only 5 resulted positive for V. parahaemolyticus being toxR+, tl+, although non pathogenic (tdh-, trh-, and none for V. cholerae e V. vulnificus.

  12. Inverse gene-for-gene interactions contribute additively to tan spot susceptibility in wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhaohui; Zurn, Jason D; Kariyawasam, Gayan; Faris, Justin D; Shi, Gongjun; Hansen, Jana; Rasmussen, Jack B; Acevedo, Maricelis

    2017-06-01

    Tan spot susceptibility is conferred by multiple interactions of necrotrophic effector and host sensitivity genes. Tan spot of wheat, caused by Pyrenophora tritici-repentis, is an important disease in almost all wheat-growing areas of the world. The disease system is known to involve at least three fungal-produced necrotrophic effectors (NEs) that interact with the corresponding host sensitivity (S) genes in an inverse gene-for-gene manner to induce disease. However, it is unknown if the effects of these NE-S gene interactions contribute additively to the development of tan spot. In this work, we conducted disease evaluations using different races and quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis in a wheat recombinant inbred line (RIL) population derived from a cross between two susceptible genotypes, LMPG-6 and PI 626573. The two parental lines each harbored a single known NE sensitivity gene with LMPG-6 having the Ptr ToxC sensitivity gene Tsc1 and PI 626573 having the Ptr ToxA sensitivity gene Tsn1. Transgressive segregation was observed in the population for all races. QTL mapping revealed that both loci (Tsn1 and Tsc1) were significantly associated with susceptibility to race 1 isolates, which produce both Ptr ToxA and Ptr ToxC, and the two genes contributed additively to tan spot susceptibility. For isolates of races 2 and 3, which produce only Ptr ToxA and Ptr ToxC, only Tsn1 and Tsc1 were associated with tan spot susceptibility, respectively. This work clearly demonstrates that tan spot susceptibility in this population is due primarily to two NE-S interactions. Breeders should remove both sensitivity genes from wheat lines to obtain high levels of tan spot resistance.

  13. Residual oxygen time model for oxygen partial pressure near 130 kPa (1.3 atm).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shykoff, Barbara E

    2015-01-01

    A two-part residual oxygen time model predicts the probability of detectible pulmonary oxygen toxicity P(P[O2tox]) after dives with oxygen partial pressure (PO2) approximately 130 kPa, and provides a tool to plan dive series with selected risk of P[O2tox]. Data suggest that pulmonary oxygen injury at this PO2 is additive between dives. Recovery begins after a delay and continues during any following dive. A logistic relation expresses P(P[O2tox]) as a function of dive duration (T(dur)) [hours]: P(P[O2tox]) = 100/[1+exp (3.586-0.49 x T(dur))] This expression maps T(dur) to P(P[O2tox]) or, in the linear mid-portion of the curve, P(P[O2tox]) usefully to T(dur). For multiple dives or during recovery, it maps to an equivalent dive duration, T(eq). T(eq) was found after second dives of duration T(dur 2). Residual time from the first dive t(r) = T(eq) - T(dur2). With known t(r), t and T(dur) a recovery model was fitted. t(r) = T(dur) x exp [-k x((t-5)/T(dur)2], where t = t - 5 hours, k = 0.149 for resting, and 0.047 for exercising divers, and t represents time after surfacing. The fits were assessed for 1,352 man-dives. Standard deviations of the residuals were 8.5% and 18.3% probability for resting or exercise dives, respectively.

  14. Suppression of Virulence of Toxigenic Vibrio cholerae by Anethole through the Cyclic AMP (cAMP-cAMP Receptor Protein Signaling System.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Shamim Hasan Zahid

    Full Text Available Use of natural compounds as antivirulence drugs could be an alternative therapeutic approach to modify the outcome of bacterial infections, particularly in view of growing resistance to available antimicrobials. Here, we show that sub-bactericidal concentration of anethole, a component of sweet fennel seed, could suppress virulence potential in O1 El Tor biotype strains of toxigenic Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of the ongoing 7th cholera pandemic. The expression of cholera toxin (CT and toxin coregulated pilus (TCP, the major virulence factors of V. cholerae, is controlled through a regulatory cascade involving activation of ToxT with synergistic coupling interaction of ToxR/ToxS with TcpP/TcpH. We present evidence that anethole inhibits in vitro expression of CT and TCP in a toxT-dependent but toxR/toxS-independent manner and through repression of tcpP/tcpH, by using bead-ELISA, western blotting and quantitative real-time RT-PCR assays. The cyclic AMP (cAMP-cAMP receptor protein (CRP is a well-studied global signaling system in bacterial pathogens, and this complex is known to suppress expression of tcpP/tcpH in V. cholerae. We find that anethole influences the virulence regulatory cascade by over-expressing cyaA and crp genes. Moreover, suppression of toxigenic V. cholerae-mediated fluid accumulation in ligated ileum of rabbit by anethole demonstrates its potentiality as an antivirulence drug candidate against the diseases caused by toxigenic V. cholerae. Taken altogether, these results revealing a mechanism of virulence inhibition in V. cholerae by the natural compound anethole, may have relevance in designing antivirulence compounds, particularly against multiple antibiotic resistant bacterial pathogens.

  15. Application of a bacterial whole cell biosensor for the rapid detection of cytotoxicity in heavy metal contaminated seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Zhisong; Luan, Xiao; Jiang, Huichao; Li, Qian; Xu, Guangfei; Sun, Chengjun; Zheng, Li; Song, Yizhi; Davison, Paul A; Huang, Wei E

    2018-06-01

    A toxicity biosensor Acinetobacter baylyi Tox2 was constructed with the host strain A. baylyi ADP1 harboring a new and medium-copy-number plasmid pWH1274_lux, and was applied to detect the cytotoxicity of heavy metal contaminated seawater. The gene cassette luxCDABE was controlled by constitutively expressed promoter P tet on pWH1274_lux and the bioluminescence intensity of the biosensor reduces in proportional to the concentrations of toxic compounds. A. baylyi Tox2 exhibits tolerance to salinity, hence it is applicable to seawater samples. A. baylyi Tox2 and Mugilogobius chulae were exposed to different concentrations of heavy metals (Hg 2+ , Zn 2+ , Cu 2+ , and Cd 2+ ) in artificial seawater for performance comparison and Pearson correlation analysis showed a significant correlation (p heavy metal contaminated seawater. Furthermore, A. baylyi Tox2 was used to evaluate cytotoxicity of field-collected seawater samples. The results indicate that there was a significant correlation between the luminescence inhibition ratio (IR) of A. baylyi Tox2 and heavy metal concentrations detected by ICP-MS in the samples. Two seawater samples, which contained a high concentration of total heavy metals, exhibited stronger cytotoxicity than the samples containing low concentrations of heavy metals. In conclusion, A. baylyi Tox2 can be used as an alternative tool to aquatic animals for the evaluation of the cytotoxicity of heavy metal contamination in the marine environment. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Overdiagnosis of Clostridium difficile Infection in the Molecular Test Era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polage, Christopher R; Gyorke, Clare E; Kennedy, Michael A; Leslie, Jhansi L; Chin, David L; Wang, Susan; Nguyen, Hien H; Huang, Bin; Tang, Yi-Wei; Lee, Lenora W; Kim, Kyoungmi; Taylor, Sandra; Romano, Patrick S; Panacek, Edward A; Goodell, Parker B; Solnick, Jay V; Cohen, Stuart H

    2015-11-01

    Clostridium difficile is a major cause of health care-associated infection, but disagreement between diagnostic tests is an ongoing barrier to clinical decision making and public health reporting. Molecular tests are increasingly used to diagnose C difficile infection (CDI), but many molecular test-positive patients lack toxins that historically defined disease, making it unclear if they need treatment. To determine the natural history and need for treatment of patients who are toxin immunoassay negative and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) positive (Tox-/PCR+) for CDI. Prospective observational cohort study at a single academic medical center among 1416 hospitalized adults tested for C difficile toxins 72 hours or longer after admission between December 1, 2010, and October 20, 2012. The analysis was conducted in stages with revisions from April 27, 2013, to January 13, 2015. Patients undergoing C difficile testing were grouped by US Food and Drug Administration-approved toxin and PCR tests as Tox+/PCR+, Tox-/PCR+, or Tox-/PCR-. Toxin results were reported clinically. Polymerase chain reaction results were not reported. The main study outcomes were duration of diarrhea during up to 14 days of treatment, rate of CDI-related complications (ie, colectomy, megacolon, or intensive care unit care) and CDI-related death within 30 days. Twenty-one percent (293 of 1416) of hospitalized adults tested for C difficile were positive by PCR, but 44.7% (131 of 293) had toxins detected by the clinical toxin test. At baseline, Tox-/PCR+ patients had lower C difficile bacterial load and less antibiotic exposure, fecal inflammation, and diarrhea than Tox+/PCR+ patients (P difficile by either method. Exclusive reliance on molecular tests for CDI diagnosis without tests for toxins or host response is likely to result in overdiagnosis, overtreatment, and increased health care costs.

  17. Suppression of Virulence of Toxigenic Vibrio cholerae by Anethole through the Cyclic AMP (cAMP)-cAMP Receptor Protein Signaling System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahid, M Shamim Hasan; Awasthi, Sharda Prasad; Asakura, Masahiro; Chatterjee, Shruti; Hinenoya, Atsushi; Faruque, Shah M; Yamasaki, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    Use of natural compounds as antivirulence drugs could be an alternative therapeutic approach to modify the outcome of bacterial infections, particularly in view of growing resistance to available antimicrobials. Here, we show that sub-bactericidal concentration of anethole, a component of sweet fennel seed, could suppress virulence potential in O1 El Tor biotype strains of toxigenic Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of the ongoing 7th cholera pandemic. The expression of cholera toxin (CT) and toxin coregulated pilus (TCP), the major virulence factors of V. cholerae, is controlled through a regulatory cascade involving activation of ToxT with synergistic coupling interaction of ToxR/ToxS with TcpP/TcpH. We present evidence that anethole inhibits in vitro expression of CT and TCP in a toxT-dependent but toxR/toxS-independent manner and through repression of tcpP/tcpH, by using bead-ELISA, western blotting and quantitative real-time RT-PCR assays. The cyclic AMP (cAMP)-cAMP receptor protein (CRP) is a well-studied global signaling system in bacterial pathogens, and this complex is known to suppress expression of tcpP/tcpH in V. cholerae. We find that anethole influences the virulence regulatory cascade by over-expressing cyaA and crp genes. Moreover, suppression of toxigenic V. cholerae-mediated fluid accumulation in ligated ileum of rabbit by anethole demonstrates its potentiality as an antivirulence drug candidate against the diseases caused by toxigenic V. cholerae. Taken altogether, these results revealing a mechanism of virulence inhibition in V. cholerae by the natural compound anethole, may have relevance in designing antivirulence compounds, particularly against multiple antibiotic resistant bacterial pathogens.

  18. Biochemical Characterization and Structural Basis of Reactivity and Regioselectivity Differences between Burkholderia thailandensis and Burkholderia glumae 1,6-Didesmethyltoxoflavin N-Methyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenwick, Michael K; Almabruk, Khaled H; Ealick, Steven E; Begley, Tadhg P; Philmus, Benjamin

    2017-08-01

    Burkholderia glumae converts the guanine base of guanosine triphosphate into an azapteridine and methylates both the pyrimidine and triazine rings to make toxoflavin. Strains of Burkholderia thailandensis and Burkholderia pseudomallei have a gene cluster encoding seven putative biosynthetic enzymes that resembles the toxoflavin gene cluster. Four of the enzymes are similar in sequence to BgToxBCDE, which have been proposed to make 1,6-didesmethyltoxoflavin (1,6-DDMT). One of the remaining enzymes, BthII1283 in B. thailandensis E264, is a predicted S-adenosylmethionine (SAM)-dependent N-methyltransferase that shows a low level of sequence identity to BgToxA, which sequentially methylates N6 and N1 of 1,6-DDMT to form toxoflavin. Here we show that, unlike BgToxA, BthII1283 catalyzes a single methyl transfer to N1 of 1,6-DDMT in vitro. In addition, we investigated the differences in reactivity and regioselectivity by determining crystal structures of BthII1283 with bound S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) or 1,6-DDMT and SAH. BthII1283 contains a class I methyltransferase fold and three unique extensions used for 1,6-DDMT recognition. The active site structure suggests that 1,6-DDMT is bound in a reduced form. The plane of the azapteridine ring system is orthogonal to its orientation in BgToxA. In BthII1283, the modeled SAM methyl group is directed toward the p orbital of N1, whereas in BgToxA, it is first directed toward an sp 2 orbital of N6 and then toward an sp 2 orbital of N1 after planar rotation of the azapteridine ring system. Furthermore, in BthII1283, N1 is hydrogen bonded to a histidine residue whereas BgToxA does not supply an obvious basic residue for either N6 or N1 methylation.

  19. The effectiveness of removing precursors of chlorinated organic substances in pilot water treatment plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolska, Małgorzata; Szerzyna, Sławomir; Machi, Justyna; Mołczan, Marek; Adamski, Wojciech; Wiśniewski, Jacek

    2017-11-01

    The presence of organic substances in the water intaken for consumption could be hazardous to human health due to the potential formation of disinfection by-products (TOX). The study were carried out in the pilot surface water treatment system consisting of coagulation, sedimentation, filtration, ozonation, adsorption and disinfection. Due to continuous operation of the system and interference with the parameters of the processes it was possible not only assess the effectiveness of individual water treatment processes in removing TOX, but also on factors participating on the course of unit processes.

  20. Delivery, Effect on Cell Viability, and Plasticity of Modified Aptamer Constructs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gissberg, Olof; Zaghloul, Eman M; Lundin, Karin E

    2016-01-01

    AS1411 is a g-quadruplex-forming aptamer capable of selectively entering cancer cells by nucleolin receptor-mediated uptake. In this study, we investigated the cell internalization properties and plasticity of AS1411 carrying different locked nucleic acid-containing cargo oligonucleotides (ONs......) for delivery into A549 and U2OS cells. We found that internalization efficiency is highly governed by ON cargo chemistry and composition since the inherent antitumor properties of AS1411 were lost when attached to a nontoxic ON, noTox. However, a toxic ON, Tox, demonstrated potent cytotoxicity after aptamer...

  1. El ácido siálico N-acetilado es inmunogénico e induce anticuerpos protectores contra Neisseria meningitidis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory R. Moe

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Recently, we showed that monoclonal antibodies (mAbs that are reactive with derivatives of polysialic acid containing de-N-acetylated neuraminic acid (Neu residues are protective against N. meningitidis group B strains (Moe et al. 2005, Infect Immun 73:2123; Flitter et al., in preparation. In addition, we found that fully de-N-acetylated PSA (i.e. poly alpha 2,8 Neu conjugated to tetanus toxoid (DeNAc elicits IgM and IgG antibodies of all subclasses in mice that bind to group B strains, activate human complement deposition, are protective in an infant rat model of meningococcal bacteremia and are bactericidal against group C strains (Moe et al, in press. We show here that anti-DeNAc mAbs, DA1 and DA2 (both IgM, are reactive with polysaccharides containing Neu, bind to group B, C, W135 and Y but not X strains grown in chemically defined media (CDM. However, when the group X strain is grown in CDM supplemented with human plasma, DA2 binds. Also both mAbs mediate bactericidal activity against B, C, W135, and X strains with human complement. The esults suggests that N. meningitidis express and/or acquire zwitterionic de-N-acetyl sialic acid antigens that can be the target of protective antibodies.

  2. Molecular epidemiology and emergence of worldwide epidemic clones of Neisseria meningitidis in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Hsiu-Li

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Meningococcal disease is infrequently found in Taiwan, a country with 23 million people. Between 1996 and 2002, 17 to 81 clinical cases of the disease were reported annually. Reported cases dramatically increased in 2001–2002. Our record shows that only serogroup B and W135 meningococci have been isolated from patients with meningococcal disease until 2000. However, serogroup A, C and Y meningococci were detected for the first time in 2001 and continued to cause disease through 2002. Most of serogroup Y meningococcus infections localized in Central Taiwan in 2001, indicating that a small-scale outbreak of meningococcal disease had occurred. The occurrence of a meningococcal disease outbreak and the emergence of new meningococcal strains are of public health concern. Methods Neisseria meningitidis isolates from patients with meningococcal disease from 1996 to 2002 were collected and characterized by serogrouping, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE and multilocus sequence typing (MLST. The genetic relatedness and clonal relationship between the isolates were analyzed by using the PFGE patterns and the allelic profiles of the sequence types (STs. Results Serogroups A, B, C, W135, Y, and non-serogroupable Neisseria meningitidis were, respectively, responsible for 2%, 50%, 2%, 35%, 9%, and 2% of 158 culture-confirmed cases of meningococcal disease in 1996–2002. Among 100 N. meningitidis isolates available for PFGE and MLST analyses, 51 different PFGE patterns and 30 STs were identified with discriminatory indices of 0.95 and 0.87, respectively. Of the 30 STs, 21 were newly identified and of which 19 were found in serogroup B isolates. A total of 40 PFGE patterns were identified in 52 serogroup B isolates with the patterns distributed over several distinct clusters. In contrast, the isolates within each of the serogroups A, C, W135, and Y shared high levels of PFGE pattern similarity. Analysis of the allelic profile of the

  3. Meta-analysis of aquatic chronic chemical toxicity data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic toxicity data from the open literature and from tests submitted for pesticide registration were extracted and assembled into a database, AquaChronTox, with a flexible search interface. Data were captured at a treatment and, when available, replicate level to support conc...

  4. ExpoCast: Exposure Science for Prioritization and Toxicity Testing (S)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The US EPA is completing the Phase I pilot for a chemical prioritization research program, called ToxCast. Here EPA is developing methods for using computational chemistry, high-throughput screening, and toxicogenomic technologies to predict potential toxicity and prioritize limi...

  5. ExpoCast: Exposure Science for Prioritization and Toxicity Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    The US EPA is completing the Phase I pilot for a chemical prioritization research program, called ToxCastTM. Here EPA is developing methods for using computational chemistry, high-throughput screening, and toxicogenomic technologies to predict potential toxicity and prioritize l...

  6. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U06506-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 3e-08 3 ( DJ019170 ) Molecular Nephrotoxicology Modeling. 54 3e-08 3 ( DJ007525 ) Primary rat hepatocyte tox...icity modeling. 54 3e-08 3 ( DD269914 ) Molecular Hepatotoxicology Modeling. 54 3e-08 3 ( BD301471 ) Identif

  7. Drug Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... testing, substance abuse testing, toxicology screen, tox screen, sports doping tests What is it used for? Drug screening is used to find out whether or not a person has taken a certain drug or drugs. It ... Sports organizations. Professional and collegiate athletes usually need to ...

  8. Updates on EPA’s High-Throughput Exposure Forecast (ExpoCast) Research Project (CPCP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent research advances by the ORD ExpoCast project (CSS Rapid Exposure and Dosimetry) are presented to the computational toxicology community in the context of prioritizing chemicals on a risk-basis using joint ExpoCast and ToxCast predictions. Recent publications by Wambaugh e...

  9. Prediction of Clinically Relevant Safety Signals of Nephrotoxicity through Plasma Metabolite Profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. B. Mattes

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Addressing safety concerns such as drug-induced kidney injury (DIKI early in the drug pharmaceutical development process ensures both patient safety and efficient clinical development. We describe a unique adjunct to standard safety assessment wherein the metabolite profile of treated animals is compared with the MetaMap Tox metabolomics database in order to predict the potential for a wide variety of adverse events, including DIKI. To examine this approach, a study of five compounds (phenytoin, cyclosporin A, doxorubicin, captopril, and lisinopril was initiated by the Technology Evaluation Consortium under the auspices of the Drug Safety Executive Council (DSEC. The metabolite profiles for rats treated with these compounds matched established reference patterns in the MetaMap Tox metabolomics database indicative of each compound’s well-described clinical toxicities. For example, the DIKI associated with cyclosporine A and doxorubicin was correctly predicted by metabolite profiling, while no evidence for DIKI was found for phenytoin, consistent with its clinical picture. In some cases the clinical toxicity (hepatotoxicity, not generally seen in animal studies, was detected with MetaMap Tox. Thus metabolite profiling coupled with the MetaMap Tox metabolomics database offers a unique and powerful approach for augmenting safety assessment and avoiding clinical adverse events such as DIKI.

  10. apple juice's clarification process by using cassava and rice starch

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    2015-11-30

    Nov 30, 2015 ... TOX 56-81, NERICA 1, IR 841, and Special rice, were tested for cashew apple ..... the phenolic hydroxyl groups of the tannins and the carbonyl groups of the .... charge on the particles has to be neutralised to near zero charge.

  11. Structure Identification Using High Resolution Mass Spectrometry Data and the EPAs Chemistry Dashboard (ACS Fall meeting)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The iCSS Chemistry Dashboard is a publicly accessible dashboard provided by the National Center for Computation Toxicology at the US-EPA. It serves a number of purposes, including providing a chemistry database underpinning many of our public-facing projects (e.g. ToxCast and Exp...

  12. 20180311 - High Throughput Transcriptomics: From screening to pathways (SOT 2018)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The EPA ToxCast effort has screened thousands of chemicals across hundreds of high-throughput in vitro screening assays. The project is now leveraging high-throughput transcriptomic (HTTr) technologies to substantially expand its coverage of biological pathways. The first HTTr sc...

  13. Evaluating High Throughput Toxicokinetics and Toxicodynamics for IVIVE (WC10)

    Science.gov (United States)

    High-throughput screening (HTS) generates in vitro data for characterizing potential chemical hazard. TK models are needed to allow in vitro to in vivo extrapolation (IVIVE) to real world situations. The U.S. EPA has created a public tool (R package “httk” for high throughput tox...

  14. Use of high-throughput in vitro toxicity screening data in cancer hazard evaluations by IARC Monograph Working Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Weihsueh A; Guyton, Kathryn Z; Martin, Matthew T; Reif, David M; Rusyn, Ivan

    2018-01-01

    Evidence regarding carcinogenic mechanisms serves a critical role in International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) Monograph evaluations. Three recent IARC Working Groups pioneered inclusion of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ToxCast program high-throughput screening (HTS) data to supplement other mechanistic evidence. In Monograph V110, HTS profiles were compared between perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and prototypical activators across multiple nuclear receptors. For Monograph V112-113, HTS assays were mapped to 10 key characteristics of carcinogens identified by an IARC expert group, and systematically considered as an additional mechanistic data stream. Both individual assay results and ToxPi-based rankings informed mechanistic evaluations. Activation of multiple nuclear receptors in HTS assays showed that PFOA targets not only peroxisome proliferator activated receptors, but also other receptors. ToxCast assays substantially covered 5 of 10 key characteristics, corroborating literature evidence of "induces oxidative stress" and "alters cell proliferation, cell death or nutrient supply" and filling gaps for "modulates receptor-mediated effects." Thus, ToxCast HTS data were useful both in evaluating specific mechanistic hypotheses and in contributing to the overall evaluation of mechanistic evidence. However, additional HTS assays are needed to provide more comprehensive coverage of the 10 key characteristics of carcinogens that form the basis of current IARC mechanistic evaluations.

  15. Evaluation of In Vitro Biotransformation Using HepaRG Cells to Improve High-Throughput Chemical Hazard Prediction: A Toxicogenomics Analysis (SOT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The US EPA’s ToxCast program has generated a wealth of data in >600 in vitro assayson a library of 1060 environmentally relevant chemicals and failed pharmaceuticals to facilitate hazard identification. An inherent criticism of many in vitro-based strategies is the inability of a...

  16. Identification of Chemical Features Linked to Thyroperoxidase Inhibition (SOT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disruption of maternal serum thyroid hormone (TH) adversely affects fetal neurodevelopment. Therefore, assay development within the US EPA ToxCast program is ongoing to enable screening for chemicals that may disrupt TH, in support of the Endocrine Disruption Screening Program (E...

  17. The benthic regeneration of N and P in the Great Brak estuary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to investigate the flux of inorganic nutrients (NH4 +, TOxN [NO3 - + NO2 -], SRP) as well as total N and P across the sediment–water interface in the estuary. There have been very few studies on nutrient cycling and benthic pelagic coupling in South African estuaries. This study showed that the ...

  18. Quantitative Nuclease Protection Assays (qNPA) as Windows into Chemical-Induced Adaptive Response in Cultures of Primary Human Hepatocytes (Concentration and Time-Response)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cultures of primary human hepatocytes have been shown to be dynamic in vitro model systems that retain liver-like functionality (e.g. metabolism, transport, induction). We have utilized these culture models to interrogate 309 ToxCast chemicals. The study design characterized both...

  19. A High-Throughput Screening Assay to Detect Thyroperoxidase Inhibitors (Teratology Society)

    Science.gov (United States)

    In support of the Endocrine Disruption Screening Program (EDSP21), the US EPA ToxCast program is developing assays to enable screening for chemicals that may disrupt thyroid hormone synthesis. Thyroperoxidase (TPO) is critical for TH synthesis and is a known target of thyroid-dis...

  20. the influence of the dressing procedure on the (mesophilic) bacterial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    for 24 hours to determine the mesophilic bacterial count. Point values were transformed to/x + t before analyses of variance were conducted. Least significant difference (L.S.D.) tests were per- formed on all the mean values obtained from the carcass sites and the dressing line positions except in the case of position I of the ...

  1. Toxcast Profiling in a Human Stem Cell Assay for Developmental Toxicity (SOT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    We correlated the ToxCast library in a metabolic biomarker-based in vitro assay (Stemina devTOXqP) utilizing human embryonic stem (hES) cells (H9 line). This assay identifies the concentration of a chemical that disrupts cellular metabolism in a manner indicative of teratogenic...

  2. REDOX DISRUPTING POTENTIAL OF TOXCAST CHEMICALS RANKED BY ACTIVITY IN MOUSE EMBRYONIC STEM CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    To gain insight regarding the adverse outcome pathways leading to developmental toxicity following exposure to chemicals, we evaluated ToxCast™ Phase I chemicals in an adherent mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) assay and identified a redox sensitive pathway that correlated with al...

  3. Fungal bis-Naphthopyrones as Inhibitors of Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype A

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-02

    compounds that appeared in all three rescored hit lists. The second, the MET-TOX list, consisted of 570 compounds that passed an imposed metabolism ...Delitschia sp. (JS 300) isolated from a sample of kangaroo dung collected in Australia. The talaroderxines were originally described as metabolites of

  4. 77 FR 22321 - National Toxicology Program (NTP) Interagency Center for the Evaluation of Alternative...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-13

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Toxicology Program (NTP) Interagency Center for... (HTS) Assays for the Tox21 Initiative AGENCY: Division of the National Toxicology Program (DNTP...: April 5, 2012. John R. Bucher, Associate Director, National Toxicology Program. [FR Doc. 2012-8942 Filed...

  5. Resource Guide to Careers in Toxicology, 3rd Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Society of Toxicology, Reston, VA.

    This resource guide was prepared by the Tox 90's Educational Issues Task Force of the Society of Toxicology. The introduction provides information on the Society of Toxicology and financial support for graduate students in toxicology. Other sections include career opportunities in toxicology, academic and postdoctoral programs in toxicology, and…

  6. Systems Toxicology of Embryo Development (9th Copenhagen Workshop)

    Science.gov (United States)

    An important consideration for predictive toxicology is to identify developmental hazards utilizing mechanism-based in vitro assays (e.g., ToxCast) and in silico multiscale models. Steady progress has been made with agent-based models that recapitulate morphogenetic drivers for a...

  7. Toxicity assessment of reference and natural freshwater sediments with the luminotox assay

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dellamatrice, PM

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available to exist between LuminoTox-Solid Phase Assay (Lum-SPA) and Microtox Solid Phase Assay (Mic-SPA) indicating that both tests display a similar toxicity response pattern for CRM sediments having differing contaminant profiles. The sediment elutriate Lum...

  8. Differentiating pathway-specific from nonspecific effects in high-throughput toxicity data: A foundation for prioritizing adverse outcome pathway development

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s ToxCast program has screened thousands of chemicals for biological activity, primarily using high-throughput in vitro bioassays. Adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) offer a means to link pathway-specific biological activities with potential ...

  9. 75 FR 76995 - National Toxicology Program (NTP); Center for the Evaluation of Risks to Human Reproduction...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-10

    ... at the workshop. Registration to attend the workshop is closed; however, slides presented during the....O. Box 12233, MD K2-04, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (mail), 919-541-5021 (telephone), or thayer... (``Tox21'') high throughput screening initiative. Identify data gaps and areas for future evaluation...

  10. Gene expression profiles of Aspergillus flavus isolates responding to oxidative stress in different culture media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aflatoxin contamination of peanut by Aspergillus flavus is exacerbated by drought stress. Drought also stimulates the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in plant tissues implying a correlation between ROS and aflatoxin production. Here, we performed gene expression analysis by RNAseq of tox...

  11. Re-evaluation of solid-phase adsorption and desorption techniques for isolation of trace organic pollutants from chlorinated water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onodera, S; Nagatsuka, A; Rokuhara, T; Asakura, T; Hirayama, N; Suzuki, S

    1993-07-16

    Amberlite XAD resin and activated carbon columns were tested for their abilities to concentrate trace organic pollutants in chlorinated water. Both XAD-2 and XAD-7 resin columns (20 ml) were capable of adsorbing about 30% of total organic halogen (TOX) present in 20 l of drinking water (pH 7) containing about 100 micrograms/l of TOX, whereas the carbon column (10 ml) adsorbed over 90% of TOX. The adsorption capacity of XAD-7 resin was found to be strongly dependent on the solution pH, as compared with those of XAD-2 and carbon adsorbents. Soxhlet and sonication extractions were also evaluated for their abilities to recover the adsorbed organics from the adsorbents, by measurements of TOX, chromatographable compounds and mutagenicity in the eluates. Soxhlet extraction gave higher recoveries than sonication, as measured with the above indices, but these differences were generally small (ca. 20%), with exception of the carbon extracts. The XAD-2 and XAD-7 extracts of drinking water also showed about 3-4 times higher mutagenic activity than the carbon extracts.

  12. In silico study of in vitro GPCR assays by QSAR modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. EPA is screening thousands of chemicals of environmental interest in hundreds of in vitro high-throughput screening (HTS) assays (the ToxCast program). One goal is to prioritize chemicals for more detailed analyses based on activity in molecular initiating events (MIE) o...

  13. COMMUNITY SCALE STREAM TAXA SENSITIVITIES TO DIFFERENT COMPOSITIONS OF EXCESS TOTAL DISSOLVED SOLIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Model stream chronic dosing studies (42 d) were conducted with three total dissolved solids (TDS) recipes. The recipes differed in composition of major ions. Community scale emergence was compared with single-species responses conducted simultaneously using the whole effluent tox...

  14. Comparison and Analysis of Toxcast Data with In Vivo Data for Food-Relevant Compounds Using The Risk21 Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ToxCast program has generated a great wealth of in vitro high throughput screening (HTS) data on a large number of compounds, providing a unique resource of information on the bioactivity of these compounds. However, analysis of these data are ongoing, and interpretation and ...

  15. Using Machine Learning Models to Predict Functional Use (Interagency Alternatives Assessment Workshop)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This presentation will outline how data was collected on how chemicals are used in products, models were built using this data to then predict how chemicals can be used in products, and, finally, how combining this information with Tox21 in vitro assays can be use to rapidly scre...

  16. [ADMAdda5]-microcystins in Planktothrix agardhii strain PH-123 (cyanobacteria) -  importance for monitoring of microcystins in the environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laub, J.; Henriksen, P.; Brittain, S.M.

    2002-01-01

    Two major and two minor microcystins (MCYST) were isolated from a hepatotoxic Danish strain of Planktothrix agardhii (Gomont) Anagnostidis et Komárek by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The microcystins were characterized by UV spectroscopy, amino acid analysis, fast atom bo...... in Wiley InterScience (www.interscience.wiley.com). DOI 10.1002/tox.10042...

  17. Relationship between firewood usage and urinary Cr, Cu and As in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    All participants answered a questionnaire concerning exposure and were tested for urinary Cr, Cu and As, while the urine of 29 participants was also tested for toxic As (As(tox)). Results. Multivariate analysis showed that the time spent in close proximity to the wood, as well as the quantity of wood used for cooking and for ...

  18. 5th Bionanotox and Applications International Research Conference, Peabody, Little Rock, Arkansas, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabb, Taneicie; Chowdhury, Parimal

    2011-06-01

    "BioNanoTox and Toxicity: using Technology to Advance Discovery" was this year's theme at the 5th BioNanoTox and Applications International Research Conference held at the Peabody Hotel, Little Rock, Arkansas on November 4-5th, 2010. This year, the international participation in this conference increased to 25 countries spanning the globe. The conference began with opening remarks by Paul Howard, Associate Director of the National Center for Toxicological Research, Food and Drug Administration, Jefferson, Arkansas, United States. Two keynote speakers, Dr. Ananth V. Annapragada and Dr. Merle G. Paule presented lectures on "Toxicity of Novel Nanoparticles for CT imaging" and "The Biology of Neurotoxicity: using Technology to Advance Discovery", respectively. Teachers, students, faculty, and scientists presented oral and poster presentations on fundamental and translational research related to BioNanoTox and related fields of science. Six presentation sessions were held over the two-day conference. There were 31 presentations and 39 posters from disciplines ranging from biology to chemistry, toxicology, nanotechnology, computational sciences, mathematics, engineering, plant science, and biotechnology. Poster presentation awards were presented to three high school students, three high school teachers, and three college students. In addition to poster awards a memorial, travel, and BioNanoTox award were presented. This year's meeting paved the way for a more outstanding meeting for the future.

  19. Retrofit Strategies for Incorporating Xenobiotic Metabolism into High Throughput Screening Assays (EMGS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The US EPA’s ToxCast program is designed to assess chemical perturbations of molecular and cellular endpoints using a variety of high-throughput screening (HTS) assays. However, existing HTS assays have limited or no xenobiotic metabolism which could lead to a mischaracterization...

  20. Common breast cancer susceptibility alleles and the risk of breast cancer for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers: implications for risk prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antoniou, Antonis C; Beesley, Jonathan; McGuffog, Lesley

    2010-01-01

    The known breast cancer susceptibility polymorphisms in FGFR2, TNRC9/TOX3, MAP3K1, LSP1, and 2q35 confer increased risks of breast cancer for BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. We evaluated the associations of 3 additional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs4973768 in SLC4A7/NEK10, rs650495...

  1. SeqAPASS to evaluate conservation of high-throughput screening targets across non-mammalian species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cell-based high-throughput screening (HTS) and computational technologies are being applied as tools for toxicity testing in the 21st century. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) embraced these technologies and created the ToxCast Program in 2007, which has served as a...

  2. Developing, Applying, and Evaluating Models for Rapid Screening of Chemical Exposures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnot, J.; Shin, H.; Ernstoff, Alexi

    2015-01-01

    provides an introduction to underlying principles of some models used for exposure- and risk-based HTS for chemical prioritization for human health, including tools used in the ExpoDat project (USEtox, RAIDAR, CalTox) and other initiatives (SHEDS-HT). Case study examples of HTS include(i) model...

  3. 75 FR 62842 - Current List of Laboratories Which Meet Minimum Standards To Engage in Urine Drug Testing for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-13

    ..., Room 2-1042, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, Maryland 20857; 240-276-2600 (voice), 240-276-2610 (fax...., NOVAMANN (Ontario), Inc.) MedTox Laboratories, Inc., 402 W. County Road D, St. Paul, MN 55112, 651-636-7466...

  4. 75 FR 5088 - Current List of Laboratories Which Meet Minimum Standards To Engage in Urine Drug Testing for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    .../CSAP, Room 2-1042, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, Maryland 20857; 240-276-2600 (voice), 240-276-2610...., NOVAMANN (Ontario), Inc.). MedTox Laboratories, Inc., 402 W. County Road D, St. Paul, MN 55112, 651-636...

  5. 78 FR 46996 - Current List of Laboratories and Instrumented Initial Testing Facilities Which Meet Minimum...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-02

    ..., Room 7-1051, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, Maryland 20857; 240-276-2600 (voice), 240-276-2610 (fax....) MedTox Laboratories, Inc., 402 W. County Road D, St. Paul, MN 55112, 651-636-7466/800-832-3244 Metro...

  6. 75 FR 9229 - Current List of Laboratories Which Meet Minimum Standards To Engage in Urine Drug Testing for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    .../CSAP, Room 2-1042, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, Maryland 20857; 240-276-2600 (voice), 240-276-2610... (Ontario), Inc.) MedTox Laboratories, Inc., 402 W. County Road D, St. Paul, MN 55112, 651-636-7466/800-832...

  7. 75 FR 75485 - Current List of Laboratories Which Meet Minimum Standards To Engage in Urine Drug Testing for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-03

    ..., Room 2-1042, One Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, Maryland 20857; 240-276-2600 (voice), 240-276-2610 (fax...., NOVAMANN (Ontario), Inc.). MedTox Laboratories, Inc., 402 W. County Road D, St. Paul, MN 55112. 651-636...

  8. Optimizing the performance of the amphipod, Hyalella azteca, in chronic toxicity tests: Results of feeding studies with various foods and feeding regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The freshwater amphipod, Hyalella azteca, is a common organism used for sediment toxicity testing. Standard methods for 10-d and 42-d sediment toxicity tests with H. azteca were last revised and published by USEPA/ASTM in 2000. While Hyalella azteca methods exist for sediment tox...

  9. Development of a Systems Computational Model to Investigate Early Biological Events in Hepatic Activation of Constitutive Androstane Receptor (CAR) by Phenobarbital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Activation of the nuclear receptor CAR (constitutive active/androstane receptor) is implicated in the control several key biological events such as metabolic pathways. Here, we combined data from literature with information obtained from in vitro assays in the US EPA ToxCast dat...

  10. Alginate Immobilization of Metabolic Enzymes (AIME) for High-Throughput Screening Assays (SOT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alginate Immobilization of Metabolic Enzymes (AIME) for High-Throughput Screening Assays DE DeGroot, RS Thomas, and SO SimmonsNational Center for Computational Toxicology, US EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC USAThe EPA’s ToxCast program utilizes a wide variety of high-throughput s...

  11. 20180416 - Retrofitting an Estrogen Receptor Transactivation Assay with Metabolic Competence Using Alginate Immobilization of Metabolic Enzymes (AIME) (SETAC HTS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The VM7Luc4E2 estrogen receptor (ER) transactivation assay is an OECD approved method (TG 457) for the detection of ER agonists and antagonists, and is also part of the Tox21 high-throughput screening (HTS) portfolio. Despite international acceptance as a screening assay, immorta...

  12. 20180312 - Retrofitting an Estrogen Receptor Transactivation Assay with Metabolic Competence Using Alginate Immobilization of Metabolic Enzymes (AIME) (SOT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The VM7Luc4E2 estrogen receptor (ER) transactivation assay is an OECD approved method (TG 457) for the detection of ER agonists and antagonists, and is also part of the Tox21 high-throughput screening (HTS) portfolio. Despite its international acceptance as a screening assay, imm...

  13. Chemical Screening for Bioactivated Electrophilic Metabolites Using Alginate Immobilization of Metabolic Enzymes (AIME) (SOT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The US EPA's ToxCast program is designed to assess chemical perturbations of molecular and cellular endpoints using a variety of high-throughput screening (HTS) assays. However, existing HTS assays have limited or no xenobiotic metabolism which could lead to a mischaracterization...

  14. Predictive Toxicology and Computer Simulation of Male Reproductive Development (Duke U KURe and PMRC research day)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The reproductive tract is a complex, integrated organ system with diverse embryology and unique sensitivity to prenatal environmental exposures that disrupt morphoregulatory processes and endocrine signaling. U.S. EPA’s in vitro high-throughput screening (HTS) database (ToxCastDB...

  15. Multiscale Systems Modeling of Male Reproductive Tract Defects: from Genes to Populations (SOT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The reproductive tract is a complex, integrated organ system with diverse embryology and unique sensitivity to prenatal environmental exposures that disrupt morphoregulatory processes and endocrine signaling. U.S. EPA’s in vitro high-throughput screening (HTS) database (ToxCastDB...

  16. Experimental investigation of N-MOS inversion layers in the electric quantum limit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalnitsky, A.; Boothroyd, A.R.; Ellul, J.P.; Tarr, N.G.; Weaver, L.; Beerkens, R.G.C.

    1992-01-01

    The authors report on the exptl. detn. of inversion electron charge d., silicon surface potential, and effective electron mobility vs. oxide elec. field, for NMOSFETs with gate oxide thickness Tox = 2.2 nm operating far beyond the limit of applicability of Boltzmann relations in the inversion layer.

  17. TNO and CBRN defence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2015-01-01

    Within the Defence, Safety & Security branch of TNO a dedicated department focuses on Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear (CBRN) Protection. This is a world class research department consisting of about 50 people and a High Tox laboratory that is the only facility in The Netherlands that

  18. Retrospective Mining of Toxicology Data to Discover Multispecies and Chemical Class Effects: Anemia as a Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Predictive toxicity models (in vitro to in vivo, QSAR, read-across) rely on large amounts of accurate in vivo data. Here, we analyze the quality of in vivo data from the Toxicity Reference Database (ToxRefDB), using chemical-induced anemia as an example. Considerations include v...

  19. Results of RCRA groundwater quality assessment at the 216-B-3 Pond Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnett, D.B.; Teel, S.S.

    1997-06-01

    This document describes a groundwater quality assessment of the 216-B-3 pond system, a Resources Conservation and Recovery act of 1976 (RCRA) waste facility. In 1990, sampling and chemical analysis of groundwater underlying the facility indicated that the contamination indicator parameters, total organic halogens (TOX), and total organic carbon (TOC) had exceeded established limits in two wells. This discovery placed the facility into RCRA groundwater assessment status and subsequently led to a more detailed hydrochemical analysis of groundwater underlying the facility. Comprehensive chemical analyses of groundwater samples from 1994 through 1996 revealed one compound, tris (2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TRIS2CH), that may have contributed to elevated TOX concentrations. No compound was identified as a contributor to TOC. Detailed evaluations of TOX, TOC, and TRIS2CH and comparison of occurrences of these parameters led to conclusions that (1) with few exceptions, these constituents occur at low concentrations below or near limits of quantitation; (2) it is problematic whether the low concentrations of TRIS2CH represent a contaminant originating from the facility or if it is a product of well construction; and (3) given the low and diminishing concentration of TOX, TOC, and TRIS2CH, no further investigation into the occurrent of these constituents is justified. Continued groundwater monitoring should include an immediate recalculation of background critical means of upgradient/downgradient comparisons and a return to seminannual groundwater monitoring under a RCRA indicator parameter evaluation program

  20. Evaluation of quail and chicken embryos for the detection of botulinum toxin serotypes A, B, E and F activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comparison of quail (Coturnix japonica) and chicken (Gallus domesticus) embryos for the detection of BoNT/A activity was conducted using equal dosages of toxin/g of embryo (quail at 7 g and chickens at 48 g). Quail embryos were injected at 0, 0.5 to 50 ng adn chicken embryos at 0, 3.4 to 342 ng and...

  1. A Critical Review of the Drug/Performance Literature. Volume II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-12-01

    Cannabis Drug Tolerance Drugs and Stress Amphetamine Depressants Drug Users Ethanol Behavior Drug Abuse Drug Withdrawal Hallucinogens Cannabinoids Drug...Therapeutics Clin Tox Clinical Toxicology Couw Psychopharm Communications in Psychopharmacology Comp Psychiat Comprehensive Psychiatry Current Ther Res Current...European Journal of Toxicology Exp Neurol Experimental Neurology EEG Clin Neurophys EEG Clinical Neurophysiology EEG J EEG Journal Ger Med German Medicine

  2. Application of first order rate kinetics to explain changes in bloom toxicity—the importance of understanding cell toxin quotas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Philip T.; Willis, Anusuya; Burford, Michele A.

    2018-04-01

    Cyanobacteria are oxygenic photosynthetic Gram-negative bacteria that can form potentially toxic blooms in eutrophic and slow flowing aquatic ecosystems. Bloom toxicity varies spatially and temporally, but understanding the mechanisms that drive these changes remains largely a mystery. Changes in bloom toxicity may result from changes in intracellular toxin pool sizes of cyanotoxins with differing molecular toxicities, and/or from changes in the cell concentrations of toxic and non-toxic cyanobacterial species or strains within bloom populations. We show here how first-order rate kinetics at the cellular level can be used to explain how environmental conditions drive changes in bloom toxicity at the ecological level. First order rate constants can be calculated for changes in cell concentration (μ c: specific cell division rate) or the volumetric biomass concentration (μ g: specific growth rate) between short time intervals throughout the cell cycle. Similar first order rate constants can be calculated for changes in nett volumetric cyanotoxin concentration (μ tox: specific cyanotoxin production rate) over similar time intervals. How μ c (or μ g ) covaries with μ tox over the cell cycle shows conclusively when cyanotoxins are being produced and metabolised, and how the toxicity of cells change in response to environment stressors. When μ tox/μ c>1, cyanotoxin cell quotas increase and individual cells become more toxic because the nett cyanotoxin production rate is higher than the cell division rate. When μ tox/μ c=1, cell cyanotoxin quotas remains fixed because the nett cyanotoxin production rate matches the cell division rate. When μ tox/μ ccyanotoxin cell quota decreases because either the nett cyanotoxin production rate is lower than the cell division rate, or metabolic breakdown and/or secretion of cyanotoxins is occurring. These fundamental equations describe cyanotoxin metabolism dynamics at the cellular level and provide the necessary

  3. Role of biomarkers of nephrotoxic acute kidney injury in deliberate poisoning and envenomation in less developed countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Fahim; Endre, Zoltan H; Buckley, Nicholas A

    2015-07-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) has diverse causes and is associated with increased mortality and morbidity. In less developed countries (LDC), nephrotoxic AKI (ToxAKI) is common and mainly due to deliberate ingestion of nephrotoxic pesticides, toxic plants or to snake envenomation. ToxAKI shares some pathophysiological pathways with the much more intensively studied ischaemic AKI, but in contrast to ischaemic AKI, most victims are young, previously healthy adults. Diagnosis of AKI is currently based on a rise in serum creatinine. However this may delay diagnosis because of the kinetics of creatinine. Baseline creatinine values are also rarely available in LDC. Novel renal injury biomarkers offer a way forward because they usually increase more rapidly in AKI and are normally regarded as absent or very low in concentration, thereby reducing the need for a baseline estimate. This should increase sensitivity and speed of diagnosis. Specificity should also be increased for urine biomarkers since many originate from the renal tubular epithelium. Earlier diagnosis of ToxAKI should allow earlier initiation of appropriate therapy. However, translation of novel biomarkers of ToxAKI into clinical practice requires better understanding of non-renal factors in poisoning that alter biomarkers and the influence of dose of nephrotoxin on biomarker performance. Further issues are establishing LDC population-based normal ranges and assessing sampling and analytical parameters for low resource settings. The potential role of renal biomarkers in exploring ToxAKI aetiologies for chronic kidney disease of unknown origin (CKDu) is a high research priority in LDC. Therefore, developing more sensitive biomarkers for early diagnosis of nephrotoxicity is a critical step to making progress against AKI and CKDu in the developing world. © 2015 The British Pharmacological Society.

  4. Hollow nanogold microsphere-signalized lateral flow immuno dipstick for the sensitive determination of the neurotoxin brevetoxin B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Kangyao; Wu, Jiachang; Li, Yineng; Wu, Yarong; Huang, Tianfu; Tang, Dianping

    2014-01-01

    We report on a new membrane-based lateral-flow assay for the rapid determination of the algal biotoxin brevetoxin B (BrevTox) that can be found in fish. Hollow nanogold microspheres (HGMS) with an average size of 45 nm were synthesized by using the reverse micelle method, followed by functionalization with monoclonal mouse anti-BrevTox antibody (mAb-HGMS). They served as the signalling reagent. Bovine serum albumin-BrevTox conjugate and rabbit anti-mouse IgG antibody were manually spotted on the nitrocellulose membrane and served as reagents for the test line and control line, respectively. Both spherical gold nanoparticle-labeled anti-BrevTox antibody (mAb-AuNP) and mAb-HGMS conjugate were investigated with respect to their suitability as signal-transduction tags, and the latter was found to give improved analytical features. The HGMS-based labeling method was then also studied in terms of performance in the immuno dipstick assay. Under optimal conditions, the visual detection limit (cut-off value) of the mAb-AuNP based assay is 1.5 ng mL −1 , while the sensitivity of the mAb-HGMS based assay is as low as 0.1 ng mL −1 . Yes/no decisions can be made within 10 min without the need for expensive instrumentation. The results for the analysis of target BrevTox in spiked fish samples showed a good correlation with data obtained with the commercial ELISA. Importantly, the assay gave no false negative results. (author)

  5. Characterization and PCR Detection Of Binary, Pir-Like Toxins from Vibrio parahaemolyticus Isolates that Cause Acute Hepatopancreatic Necrosis Disease (AHPND in Shrimp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratchanok Sirikharin

    Full Text Available Unique isolates of Vibrio parahaemolyticus (VPAHPND have previously been identified as the causative agent of acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND in shrimp. AHPND is characterized by massive sloughing of tubule epithelial cells of the hepatopancreas (HP, proposed to be induced by soluble toxins released from VPAHPND that colonize the shrimp stomach. Since these toxins (produced in broth culture have been reported to cause AHPND pathology in reverse gavage bioassays with shrimp, we used ammonium sulfate precipitation to prepare protein fractions from broth cultures of VPAHPND isolates for screening by reverse gavage assays. The dialyzed 60% ammonium sulfate fraction caused high mortality within 24-48 hours post-administration, and histological analysis of the moribund shrimp showed typical massive sloughing of hepatopancreatic tubule epithelial cells characteristic of AHPND. Analysis of the active fraction by SDS-PAGE revealed two major bands at marker levels of approximately 16 kDa (ToxA and 50 kDa (ToxB. Mass spectrometry analysis followed by MASCOT analysis revealed that both proteins had similarity to hypothetical proteins of V. parahaemolyticus M0605 (contig034 GenBank accession no. JALL01000066.1 and similarity to known binary insecticidal toxins called 'Photorhabdus insect related' proteins A and B (Pir-A and Pir-B, respectively, produced by the symbiotic, nematode bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens. In in vivo tests, it was shown that recombinant ToxA and ToxB were both required in a dose dependent manner to cause AHPND pathology, indicating further similarity to Pir-A and -B. A single-step PCR method was designed for detection of the ToxA gene and was validated using 104 bacterial isolates consisting of 51 VPAHPND isolates, 34 non-AHPND VP isolates and 19 other isolates of bacteria commonly found in shrimp ponds (including other species of Vibrio and Photobacterium. The results showed 100% specificity and sensitivity for

  6. Reaction of Global Collection of Rye (Secale cereale L. to Tan Spot and Pyrenophora tritici-repentis Races in South Dakota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidrat Abdullah

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Rye (Secale cereale L. serves as an alternative host of Pyrenophora tritici-repentis (PTR the cause of tan spot on wheat. Rye is cultivated as a forage or cover crop and overlaps with a significant portion of wheat acreage in the U.S. northern Great Plains; however, it is not known whether the rye crop influences the evolution of PTR races. We evaluated a global collection of 211 rye accessions against tan spot and assessed the diversity in PTR population on rye in South Dakota. All the rye genotypes were inoculated with PTR races 1 and 5, and infiltrated with Ptr ToxA and Ptr ToxB, at seedling stage. We observed 21% of the genotypes exhibited susceptibility to race 1, whereas, 39% were susceptible to race 5. All 211 accessions were insensitive to both the Ptr toxins. It indicates that though rye exhibits diversity in reaction to tan spot, it lacks Ptr ToxA and ToxB sensitivity genes. This suggests that unknown toxins or other factors can lead to PTR establishment in rye. We characterized the race structure of 103 PTR isolates recovered from rye in South Dakota. Only 22% of the isolates amplified Ptr ToxA gene and were identified as race 1 based on their phenotypic reaction on the differential set. The remaining 80 isolates were noted to be race 4. Our results show that races 1 and 4 are prevalent on rye in South Dakota with a higher frequency of race 4, suggesting a minimal role of rye in the disease epidemiology.

  7. Reaction of Global Collection of Rye (Secale cereale L.) to Tan Spot and Pyrenophora tritici-repentis Races in South Dakota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Sidrat; Sehgal, Sunish K; Glover, Karl D; Ali, Shaukat

    2017-06-01

    Rye ( Secale cereale L.) serves as an alternative host of Pyrenophora tritici-repentis ( PTR ) the cause of tan spot on wheat. Rye is cultivated as a forage or cover crop and overlaps with a significant portion of wheat acreage in the U.S. northern Great Plains; however, it is not known whether the rye crop influences the evolution of PTR races. We evaluated a global collection of 211 rye accessions against tan spot and assessed the diversity in PTR population on rye in South Dakota. All the rye genotypes were inoculated with PTR races 1 and 5, and infiltrated with Ptr ToxA and Ptr ToxB, at seedling stage. We observed 21% of the genotypes exhibited susceptibility to race 1, whereas, 39% were susceptible to race 5. All 211 accessions were insensitive to both the Ptr toxins. It indicates that though rye exhibits diversity in reaction to tan spot, it lacks Ptr ToxA and ToxB sensitivity genes. This suggests that unknown toxins or other factors can lead to PTR establishment in rye. We characterized the race structure of 103 PTR isolates recovered from rye in South Dakota. Only 22% of the isolates amplified Ptr ToxA gene and were identified as race 1 based on their phenotypic reaction on the differential set. The remaining 80 isolates were noted to be race 4. Our results show that races 1 and 4 are prevalent on rye in South Dakota with a higher frequency of race 4, suggesting a minimal role of rye in the disease epidemiology.

  8. Toxicity of proton-metal mixtures in the field: Linking stream macroinvertebrate species diversity to chemical speciation and bioavailability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stockdale, Anthony [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Lancaster Environment Centre, Library Avenue, Bailrigg, Lancaster LA1 4AP (United Kingdom); Tipping, Edward, E-mail: et@ceh.ac.uk [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Lancaster Environment Centre, Library Avenue, Bailrigg, Lancaster LA1 4AP (United Kingdom); Lofts, Stephen [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Lancaster Environment Centre, Library Avenue, Bailrigg, Lancaster LA1 4AP (United Kingdom); Ormerod, Stephen J. [Catchment Research Group, Cardiff School of Biosciences, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF10 3US (United Kingdom); Clements, William H. [Department of Fish, Wildlife, and Conservation Biology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523 (United States); Blust, Ronny [Ecophysiology, Biochemistry and Toxicology Group, Department of Biology, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium)

    2010-10-01

    Understanding metal and proton toxicity under field conditions requires consideration of the complex nature of chemicals in mixtures. Here, we demonstrate a novel method that relates streamwater concentrations of cationic metallic species and protons to a field ecological index of biodiversity. The model WHAM-F{sub TOX} postulates that cation binding sites of aquatic macroinvertebrates can be represented by the functional groups of natural organic matter (humic acid), as described by the Windermere Humic Aqueous Model (WHAM6), and supporting field evidence is presented. We define a toxicity function (F{sub TOX}) by summing the products: (amount of invertebrate-bound cation) x (cation-specific toxicity coefficient, {alpha}{sub i}). Species richness data for Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera and Trichoptera (EPT), are then described with a lower threshold of F{sub TOX}, below which all organisms are present and toxic effects are absent, and an upper threshold above which organisms are absent. Between the thresholds the number of species declines linearly with F{sub TOX}. We parameterised the model with chemistry and EPT data for low-order streamwaters affected by acid deposition and/or abandoned mines, representing a total of 412 sites across three continents. The fitting made use of quantile regression, to take into account reduced species richness caused by (unknown) factors other than cation toxicity. Parameters were derived for the four most common or abundant cations, with values of {alpha}{sub i} following the sequence (increasing toxicity) H{sup +} < Al < Zn < Cu. For waters affected mainly by H{sup +} and Al, F{sub TOX} shows a steady decline with increasing pH, crossing the lower threshold near to pH 7. Competition effects among cations mean that toxicity due to Cu and Zn is rare at lower pH values, and occurs mostly between pH 6 and 8.

  9. 光伏并网式家用空调系统性能的实验研究%Experimental Investigation on the Performance of Household Air Conditioning System with Grid-connected Photovoltaic Generation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金听祥; 徐笑锋

    2015-01-01

    With the base of traditional air conditioning system, the grid-connected photovoltaic household air conditioning sys-tem based on the solar photovoltaic power generation technology is designed in this paper. The power with the solar photovoltaic power generation technology is transformed into the household power of 220 V and 50 Hz by inverter. The household air condi-tioning system is then driven by the transformed power and national grid. The performance of the photovoltaic grid-connected household air conditioning system was tested by Enthalpy Difference Lab under the different power ( 100 W, 135 W and 185 W) of solar panels. The experimental results show that under normal cooling conditions, the average power consumption of the air conditioning system with the different power (100 W, 135 W and 185 W) of solar panels are 52 W, 78 W and 104 W lower than that of the traditional air conditioning system respectively. Similarly, energy efficiency ratios of the air conditioning system with the different power (100 W, 135 W and 185 W) of solar panels are 4. 2%, 5. 5% and 10. 2% lower than that of the tra-ditional air conditioning system respectively. Under heating mode, the average power consumption of the air conditioning system with the different power (100 W, 135 W and 185 W) of solar panels are 68 W, 84 W and 116 W lower than that of the tradi-tional air conditioning system, and the coefficients of performances are 6. 4%, 8% and 11% lower than that of the traditional air conditioning system. It can be concluded that the photovoltaic grid-connected household air conditioning system is feasible.%针对目前的家用空调系统,本文设计了一种以太阳能光伏发电技术为基础,与国家电网并网,共同驱动空调工作的系统,称为光伏并网式家用空调系统。利用光伏发电技术,通过逆变器将太阳能提供的电力转变为220 V、50 Hz家用电源,实现与市电电网的并网,来共同驱动空调运行。利用焓差实验室,

  10. Imunidade conferida por vacinas anti-meningocócicas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milagres Lucimar Gonçalves

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Em razão da recente epidemia de doença meningocócica causada por N. meningitidis B na Grande São Paulo, Brasil, foi feita revisão das epidemias dessa doença ocorridas no Brasil desde o início do século e uma análise das vacinas atuais contra N. meningitidis A, C, Y e W135. Também são discutidos os mais recentes avanços no desenvolvimento e aplicação de vacina contra M meningitidis B, um desafio constante para os maiores centros de pesquisa de todo o mundo.

  11. Pneumonia caused by Neisseria meningitidis: report of a case and review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acosta M, Rafael E; Rada E, Robin A

    2010-01-01

    Pneumonia caused by Neisseria meningitidis, a gram-negative diplococcus affecting only humans, is a rare disease that was first recognized more than 60 years ago. The infection is usually manifested as meningitis and septicemia with cutaneous manifestations. Involvement of the lower respiratory tract is much less frequently diagnosed, partly because this microorganism can be present in the oropharyngeal flora of up to 10% of asymptomatic people. The serotypes most frequently involved in lung infections are: B, Y, and W-135. Serotype Y has been held to be most important. In cases of pneumonia, diagnosis has to be reached by isolation of the microorganism in blood and/or pleural fluid. Mortality is low, and person-to-person transmission, although documented, is rare. Complications such as pulmonary abscess, pleural effusion, and pericarditis are infrequent.

  12. LC and LD50 values of Bacillus thuringiensis Serovar japonensis strain buibui toxin to Oriental beetle and northern masked chafer larvae (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashtoly, Tamer A; El-Zemaity, Mohamed El-Said; Hussien, Mohamed I; Alm, Steven R

    2009-10-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis serovar japonensis strain Buibui has the potential to be an important control agent for pest scarabs. Bioassays were designed to test B. t. japonensis against two of the major turf and ornamental scarab pests infesting turfgrasses and ornamentals and to serve as a basis for further tests against other scarab pests. LC and LD50 values of B. t. serovarjaponensis strain Buibui toxin and spores were determined by four different bioassays for the oriental beetle, Anomala orientalis (Waterhouse), and northern masked chafer, Cyclocephala borealis Arrow. Oriental beetle larvae were bioassayed in autoclaved and nonautoclaved soil from where they were collected (Kingston, RI [native]), in nonautoclaved soil from where the northern masked chafer larvae were collected (Groton, CT [foreign]), and per os. Northern masked chafer larvae were bioassayed in autoclaved and nonautoclaved soil from where they were collected (Groton, CT [native]), in nonautoclaved soil from where the oriental beetle larvae were collected (Kingston, RI [foreign]) and per os. LC50 values of 3.93 microg toxin/g autoclaved native soil, 1.80 microg toxin/g nonautoclaved native soil, and 0.42 microg toxin/g nonautoclaved foreign soil and an LD50 value of 0.41 microg per os were determined at 14 d forA. orientalis. LC50 values of 588.28 microg toxin/g autoclaved native soil, 155.10 microg toxin/g nonautoclaved native soil, 265.32 microg toxin/g nonautoclaved foreign soil, and LD50 of 5.21 microg per os were determined at 14 d (soils) and 10 d (per os) for C. borealis. There were significant differences in LC50 values for oriental beetles in autoclaved, nonautoclaved native soil and nonautoclaved foreign soil. There were significant differences in LCo values for northern masked chafers in autoclaved and nonautoclaved native soil. B. t. japonensis can be applied now for control of oriental beetles at rates that are economically competitive with synthetic chemicals. If we can determine the

  13. [Serological survey on Toxoplasma gondii infection in pregnant women with history of adverse pregnancy in Bazhou area, Hebei Province].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming-Hui, Zhu; Li-Juan, Xu; Zhen-Wei, Xue

    2016-06-22

    To investigate the Toxoplasma gondii infection status in pregnant women with history of adverse pregnancy and risk factors in Bazhou area, Hebei Province. A total of 302 pregnant women with the history of adverse pregnancy were chosen as respondents (an experimental group) in the hospital from March 2012 to December 2015, and 197 pregnant women without the history of adverse pregnancy as a control group. TOX-IgG and TOX-IgM were detected by using ELISA in two groups. The risk factors of Toxoplasma infection were surveyed by questionnaires. The total positive rate of Toxoplasma antibodies was 28.15% (85/302) in the experimental group, which was significantly higher than that [9.64%(19/197)] in the control group, and the difference was statistically significant ( χ 2 = 24.76, P <0.05). The positive rates of TOX-IgM, TOX-IgG and TOX-IgM + TOX-IgG were 6.95% (21/302), 18.54% (56/302), and 2.65% (8/302) respectively in the experimental group, which were higher than 2.03% (4/197), 7.61% (15/197), and 0% (0/197) respectively in the control group ( χ 2 = 6.07, 11.67, 3.76, all P <0.05). The questionnaire survey showed that the proportions of keeping pets, cutting board regardless, liking to eat hot pot or barbecue, eating raw meat, often eating in the restaurant in the pregnant women with Toxoplasma infection were higher than those in the pregnant women without Toxoplasma infection, and the differences were statistically significant ( χ 2 = 22.57, 3.96, 5.87, 7.40, 4.86, all P <0.05), and therefore, the above unhealthy habits may be important risk factors. Toxoplasma infection could lead to adverse pregnancy outcomes. Therefore, the above-mentioned unhealthy habits should be avoided, especially during pregnancy period.

  14. [Vaccinal strategies in response to new epidemiological challenges in 2010. Reasonable hope for a "B" meningococcal vaccine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, P

    2010-08-01

    In 2010, vaccines have achieved good effectiveness against invasive meningococcal infection. Development of monovalent and bivalent polysaccharide (PS) vaccines in the 70s and later of tetravalent PS vaccine (ACWY) was followed by development in 2003 of a trivalent ACW vaccine in response to the W135 or mixed A/W135 epidemics that appeared in Africa. More recently PS-conjugated vaccines have shown numerous advantages in comparison with PS vaccines. Mass vaccination campaigns with the C-conjugated vaccine have almost completely eradicated group C meningitis in the UK. It is hoped that introduction of the A-conjugated vaccine MenAfriVac in Africa at the end of year 2010 will end group A meningococcal epidemics in the meningitis belt. The problem of group B meningococcal meningitis has not been completely resolved. For the B strain that has been implicated in hyperendemic waves, a protein vaccine has been produced from outer membrane vesicles (OMV). Use of OMV vaccines achieved good results in Norway and recently in New Zealand. The Norwegian vaccine was also used in Normandy since the strain responsible for the Norman epidemic showed the same PorA as the Norwegian strain. In this regard, a major limitation for OMV vaccines is that they are effective only against the immuno-dominant porin A protein. Current efforts to develop a vaccine against group B meningococci causing sporadic cases are promising. Research is being focused on a blend of surface proteins targeting most of circulating isolates. Field tests will be carried out in the next years, but it is probable that the efficacy of these vaccines will be short-lived since meningococcal antigens vary over time.

  15. KARIER MENINGITIS MENINGOKOK PADA JEMAAH HAJI INDONESIA TAHUN 1993-2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarwo Handayani

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Research and routine survey of meningococcal meningitis on Indonesian hajj pilgrims have been conducted since 1993 until now. This paper consists of several research and routine survey of meningococcal meningitis during 1993 and 2003. The objectives of the test were determining the meningococcal meningitis carrier on hajj pilgrims, determining the serogroup of N. meningitidis and knowing sensitivity of bacteria to several antibiotics. The result showed increasing of meningococcal meningitis carrier in 1993 up to 1996, that was 1.3% - 9,4% respectively. This proportion of meningococcal meningitis carrier in the case groups decreased after given of rifampicin in 1994 and cyprofloxacin in 1997 as a chemoprophilactic. The result of the study in 1997 indiciated that the carrier rate of groups with cyprofloxacin (1.4% was lower than rifampicin group (1.4%. Most of the isolated bacteria of N. meningitidis in 1996 and 1997 were resistant to rifampicin (sensitivity test was 0-33%. Serogroup B of N. meningitidis were found dominantly between 1993 and 1999, it changed to be serogroup W135 from 2000 to 2003. The changes related  with the majority cases of meningococcal meningitis in another countries that caused by serogroup W135. Because  of  that  since 2002, immunization program has given a tetravalen (serogroup ACYW135 meningococcal vaccine to all of Indonesian hajj pilgrims. The carrier of meningococcal meningitis is still found in hajj pilgrims and their contact. More attention must be given, caused of meningococcal meningitis serogroup B vaccine is not available. The further researches are needed especially for subtype of N. meningitidis, effectivity of the drug choice and development of meningococcal meningitis vaccine serogroup B.

  16. Review of meningitis surveillance data, upper West Region, Ghana 2009-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuoh, Robert Domo; Nyarko, Kofi Mensah; Nortey, Priscilla; Sackey, Samuel Oko; Lwanga, Noora Charles; Ameme, Donne Kofi; Nuolabong, Culbert; Abdulai, Marijanatu; Wurapa, Fredrick; Afari, Edwin

    2016-01-01

    The Upper West region of Ghana is within the meningitis belt. Analysis of long term surveillance data is necessary for understanding changes in the disease occurrence. We analyzed five years of surveillance data to describe by person, place and time and to determine trends in meningitis. Meningitis surveillance data from Ghana Health Service in the Upper West Region, from 2009 to 2013 were reviewed. Data was obtained from District-Health Information Management System and line list from the Disease Control Unit. Population figures (denominators) and rainfall data were also analyzed. Within the period 980 cases of meningitis were reported in the region, 507(52%) females and 473(48%) males. The mean age of cases was 20.1years and standard deviation 18.8 years with, 77.6 %( 761/980) cases occurring in persons aged under 30 years. Children under five years were 19.3% (190/980). Attack rates ranged from 6.1/100,000 population in the Daffiama-bussei-Issa-district to 47.5/100,000 in Jirapa. Overall case fatality rate of meningitis was 12.2% with 14deaths/100,000 population. Bacterial agents were isolated from 35% (245/702) of CSF. Majority were Streptococcus pneumonia 48.2 % ( 122/258), and N. meningitides Y/W 135 40.3% (102/258). Meningitis was found to be seasonal with peaks in the dry season. Meningitis in the region is seasonal, and showed a decreasing trend. Jirapa, Lawra, Nadowli and Wa West districts had the highest burden. Control effort of the disease should focus on vaccination against streptococcus pneumonia and N. meningitis W135 especially within crowded settlements such as boarding schools.

  17. OCORRÊNCIA NATURAL DE MICOTOXINAS EM MILHO (Zea mays L.) E SUA INFLUÊNCIA NO DESEMPENHO DE FRANGOS DE CORTE

    OpenAIRE

    Maurício Schneider Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    Fungos podem ser encontrados em toda a natureza e são de conhecida ocorrência na cultura do milho. Aqueles que possuem a capacidade de produzir substâncias tóxicas para humanos e animais, a partir de seu metabolismo secundário, denominam-se fungos toxígenos e os metabólitos produzidos são denominados micotoxinas. Devido a presença de diversas espécies fúngicas toxígenas na lavoura de milho, a ocorrência de um grande número de metabólitos é esperada. Além de ocorrerem em sua forma nativa, mico...

  18. A Reevaluation of X-Irradiation Induced Phocomelia and Proximodistal Limb Patterning

    OpenAIRE

    Galloway, Jenna L.; Delgado, Irene; Ros, Maria A.; Tabin, Clifford J.

    2009-01-01

    Phocomelia is a devastating, rare congenital limb malformation in which the long bones are shorter than normal, with the upper portion of the limb being most severely affected. In extreme cases, the hands or fingers are attached directly to the shoulder and the most proximal elements (those closest to the shoulder) are entirely missing. This disorder, previously known in both autosomal recessive and sporadic forms, showed a marked increase in incidence in the early 1960s due to the tragic tox...

  19. High pressure modulated transport and signaling functions of membrane proteins in models and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogel, R F; Linke, K; Teichert, H; Ehrmann, M A

    2008-01-01

    Cellular membranes serve in the separation of compartments, recognition of the environment, selective transport and signal transduction. Membrane lipids and membrane proteins play distinct roles in these processes, which are affected by environmental chemical (e. g. pH) or physical (e. g. pressure and temperature) changes. High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) affects fluidity and integrity of bacterial membranes instantly during the ramp, resulting in a loss of membrane potential and vital membrane protein functions. We have used the multiple drug transporter LmrA from Lactococcus lactis and ToxR, a membrane protein sensor from Photobacterium profundum, a deep-sea bacterium, and Vibrio cholerae to study membrane protein interaction and functionality in proteolioposomes and by the use of in vivo reporter systems, respectively. Both proteins require dimerization in the phospholipid bilayer for their functionality, which was favoured in the liquid crystalline lipid phase with ToxR and LmrA. Whereas LmrA, which resides in liposomes consisting of DMPC, DMPC/cholesterol or natural lipids, lost its ATPase activity above 20 or 40 MPa, it maintained its active dimeric structure in DOPC/DPPC/cholesterol liposomes up to 120 MPa. By using a specific indicator strain in which the dimerisation of ToxR initiates the transcription of lacZ it was demonstrated, that the amino acid sequence of the transmembrane domain influences HHP stability of ToxR dimerization in vivo. Thus, both the lipid structure and the nature of the protein affect membrane protein interaction. It is suggested that the protein structure determines basic functionality, e.g. principle ability or kinetics to dimerize to a functional complex, while the lipid environment modulates this property

  20. Role of the Helicobacter pylori virulence factors vacuolating cytotoxin, CagA, and urease in a mouse model of disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiara, P; Marchetti, M; Blaser, M J; Tummuru, M K; Cover, T L; Segal, E D; Tompkins, L S; Rappuoli, R

    1995-10-01

    The pathogenic role of Helicobacter pylori virulence factors has been studied with a mouse model of gastric disease. BALB/c mice were treated orally with different amounts of sonic extracts of cytotoxic H. pylori strains (NCTC 11637, 60190, 84-183, and 87A300 [CagA+/Tox+]). The pathological effects on histological sections of gastric mucosae were assessed and were compared with the effects of treatments with extracts from noncytotoxic strains (G21 and G50 [CagA-/Tox-]) and from strains that express either CagA alone (D931 [CagA+/Tox-]) or the cytotoxin alone (G104 [CagA-/Tox+]). The treatment with extracts from cytotoxic strains induced various epithelial lesions (vacuolation, erosions, and ulcerations), recruitment of inflammatory cells in the lamina propria, and a marked reduction of the mucin layer. Extracts of noncytotoxic strains induced mucin depletion but no other significant pathology. Crude extracts of strain D931, expressing CagA alone, caused only mild infiltration of inflammatory cells, whereas extracts of strain G104, expressing cytotoxin alone, induced extensive epithelial damage but little inflammatory reaction. Loss of the mucin layer was not associated with a cytotoxic phenotype, since this loss was observed in mice treated with crude extracts of all strains. The pathogenic roles of CagA, cytotoxin, and urease were further assessed by using extracts of mutant strains of H. pylori defective in the expression of each of these virulence factors. The results obtained suggest that (i) urease activity does not play a significant role in inducing the observed gastric damage, (ii) cytotoxin has an important role in the induction of gastric epithelial cell lesions but not in eliciting inflammation, and (iii) other components present in strains which carry the cagA gene, but distinct from CagA itself, are involved in eliciting the inflammatory response.

  1. Mutations in the Histone-like Nucleoid Structuring Regulatory Gene (hns) Decrease the Adherence of Shiga Toxin-producing Escherichia coli 091:H21 Strain B2F1 to Human Colonic Epithelial Cells and Increase the Production of Hemolysin

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-10-19

    osmoregulation of outer membrane proteins and virulence determinants in Vibrio cholerae requires toxR. J. Bacteriol. 170:2575-2583. Mobley, H. L., D. M. Green...produced by ETEC organisms is homologous to the toxin encoded by Y: cholerae . These toxins are the primary cause of the watery diarrhea associated with ETEC...Escherichia coli as a cause ofdiarrhea among children in Mexico . J. Clin. Microbiol. 25:1913-1919. Maurelli, A. T., and P. J. Sansonetti. 1988

  2. Recent advances in fluorination techniques and their anticipated impact on drug metabolism and toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, Cormac D.; Sandford, Graham

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Fluorine’s unique physicochemical properties make it a key element for incorporation into pharmacologically active compounds. Its presence in a drug can alter a number of characteristics that affect ADME-Tox, which has prompted efforts at improving synthetic fluorination procedures. Areas covered: This review describes the influence of fluorine on attributes such as potency, lipophilicity, metabolic stability and bioavailablility and how the effects observed are related to the p...

  3. Potential fluoride toxicity from oral medicaments: A review

    OpenAIRE

    Rizwan Ullah; Muhammad Sohail Zafar; Nazish Shahani

    2017-01-01

    The beneficial effects of fluoride on human oral health are well studied. There are numerous studies demonstrating that a small amount of fluoride delivered to the oral cavity decreases the prevalence of dental decay and results in stronger teeth and bones. However, ingestion of fluoride more than the recommended limit leads to toxicity and adverse effects. In order to update our understanding of fluoride and its potential toxicity, we have described the mechanisms of fluoride metabolism, tox...

  4. Determination of Short-Chain Chlorinated Paraffins by Carbon Skeleton Gas Chromatography

    OpenAIRE

    PELLIZZATO FRANCESCA; RICCI MARINA; HELD ANDREA; EMONS HENDRIK

    2008-01-01

    Short-Chain Chlorinated Paraffins (SCCPs) are highly complex technical mixtures of polychlorinated n-alkanes with a chlorination degree between 50 and 70 % by mass, and a linear carbon chain length from C10 to C13, constituted by thousands of homologues, diastereomers and enantiomers. They have been used in many different applications, such as extreme pressure additives in lubricants and cutting fluids, plasticizers in PVC, and flame retardants in paints, adhesives and sealants. SCCPs are tox...

  5. Continuous Autoregulatory Indices Derived from Multi-modal Monitoring: Each One is Not Like the Other.

    OpenAIRE

    Zeiler, Frederick; Donnelly, Joseph; Menon, David Krishna; Smieleweski, P; Zweifel, C; Brady, K; Czosnyka, Marek

    2017-01-01

    We assess the relationships between various continuous measures of autoregulatory capacity in an adult TBI cohort. We assessed relationships between autoregulatory indices derived from intracranial pressure (ICP: PRx, PAx, RAC), Transcranial Doppler (TCD: Mx, Sx, Dx), brain tissue-oxygenation (ORx), and spatially resolved near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS resolved: TOx, THx). Relationships between indices were assessed using Pearson correlation coefficient, Friedman (KW) test, Principle compon...

  6. Analysis of Zolpidem in Postmortem Fluids and Tissues Using Ultra-Performance Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    in postmortem fluids and tissues. 17. Key Words 18. Distribution Statement Forensic Toxicology , Zolpidem, Ambien, Postmortem Distribution, LC/MS/MS...Institute (CAMI) toxicology database identified 10 fatalities from separate avia- tion accidents that were reported positive for zolpidem and also...Sample Selection and Storage A search of the CAMI toxicology database (ToxFLO, DiscoverSoft Development, LLC; Oklahoma City, OK) identi- fied 10

  7. Comments for the Update to the ATSDR Toxicological Profile for JP-5 and JP-8 Occurring in FY14

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-30

    Exposure Chamber. Made of stainless steel, about the size and shape of an attaché case, this IN-TOX product will hold up to 24 mice, each contained in...hydrocarbon markers (n- octane, n-decane, n-tetradecane, toluene, ethylbenzene , and m-xylene)” is incomplete and therefore incorrect. The model, in...aromatic hydrocarbon markers (n-octane, n-decane, n- tetradecane, toluene, ethylbenzene , and m-xylene), plus three chemical lumped compartments based

  8. Hematologic and Selected Hepatic Changes Produced by Substituted p-Bensoquinones in the Rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-07-01

    DIVISION OF NUTRITION TECHNOLOGY *DIVISION OF CUTANEOUS HAZARDS I LEECE D IBAI7 TA EMENl AU I __ b rouleISO, Ca. JULYV 1980 CD, LA. 9=3TIRMAN ARMY...jaundice, anemia, hemoglobinuria, and cachexia (8). In previous studies, we found that benzoquinone tox- icity in rats resulted in respiratory depression...randomly housed in stainless steel wire-bottomed cages, one to a cage, and fed a stock diet (Rodent Laboratory Chow #5001, Ralston Purina Co., St. Louis

  9. Abiotic stress miRNomes in the Triticeae

    OpenAIRE

    Alptekin, Burcu; Langridge, Peter; Budak, Hikmet

    2016-01-01

    The continued growth in world population necessitates increases in both the quantity and quality of agricultural production. Triticeae members, particularly wheat and barley, make an important contribution to world food reserves by providing rich sources of carbohydrate and protein. These crops are grown over diverse production environments that are characterized by a range of environmental or abiotic stresses. Abiotic stresses such as drought, heat, salinity, or nutrient deficiencies and tox...

  10. Development and validation of an LC?MS/MS method for the determination of biogenic amines in wines and beers

    OpenAIRE

    Nalazek-Rudnicka, Katarzyna; Wasik, Andrzej

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Biogenic amines are group of organic, basic, nitrogenous compounds that naturally occur in plant, microorganism, and animal organisms. Biogenic amines are mainly produced through decarboxylation of amino acids. They are formed during manufacturing of some kind of food and beverages such as cheese, wine, or beer. Histamine, cadaverine, agmatine, tyramine, putrescine, and ?-phenylethylamine are the most common biogenic amines found in wines and beers. This group of compounds can be tox...

  11. Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies Novel Restless Legs Syndrome Susceptibility Loci on 2p14 and 16q12.1

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Winkelmann, J.; Czamara, D.; Schormair, B.; Knauf, F.; Schulte, E. C.; Vodička, Pavel

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 7 (2011), e1002171 ISSN 1553-7390 R&D Projects: GA MZd NR8563 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) MSM0021620849; GA MŠk(CZ) MSM0021620816 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : TOX3 * transcription * common genetic-variants Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 8.694, year: 2011

  12. Installation Restoration Program. Phase II. Confirmation/Quantification Stage I for Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Dayton, Ohio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-09-01

    nitrate, chlor- ide, sulfate, boron, iron manga - nese, sodium, TOC, TOX, and phenol. Sample six leachate seeps for specific conductance, chlor- ide...Primary Drinking Water Standard of 10 mg/l for nitrate. No boron, iron or manga - nese were found in MW-17. Sodium was detected at 35 mg/l in the well...Thomas, 1976, "Control Pro- Leis, W., and A. Metry, " Multimedia Pathways of Con- gram for Leachate Affecting a Multiple Aquifer System, taminant

  13. Evaluation of the performance of C. DIFF QUIK CHEK COMPLETE and its usefulness in a hospital setting with a high prevalence of Clostridium difficile infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hae-Sun; Lee, Miae

    2017-01-01

    Rapid and accurate diagnosis of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is crucial for patient care, infection control, and efficient surveillance. We evaluated C. DIFF QUIK CHEK COMPLETE (QCC; TechLab), which detects glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) antigen (QCC-Ag) and toxin A/B (QCC-Tox) simultaneously, and compared it to the laboratory diagnostics for CDI currently in use in a tertiary hospital setting with a high prevalence of CDI. QCC, RIDASCREEN C. difficile toxin A/B assay (Toxin EIA; R-Biopharm AG), chromID C. difficile agar (bioMérieux) culture (ChromID culture), and Xpert C. difficile PCR assay (Xpert PCR; Cepheid) were performed according to the manufacturers' instructions. Performances of the assays were compared against that of Xpert PCR as a reference. Of the 231 loose stool specimens, 83 (35.9%) were positive by Xpert PCR. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were 97.6%, 93.9%, 90.0%, and 98.6%, respectively, for QCC-Ag and 55.4%, 100%, 100%, and 80.0%, respectively, for QCC-Tox. The median threshold cycle values of the QCC-Tox(+) specimens were lower than those of the QCC-Tox(-) specimens. Results of QCC as an initial screening test were confirmed in 81.0% (187/231) of samples; these specimens did not require further testing. QCC is a rapid, easy, and cost-effective method that would be a useful first-line screening assay for laboratory diagnosis of CDI in a tertiary hospital with a high prevalence of CDI. A two-step algorithm using QCC as an initial screening tool, followed by Xpert PCR as a confirmatory test, is a practical and cost-effective approach. Copyright © 2016 American Federation for Medical Research.

  14. High pressure modulated transport and signaling functions of membrane proteins in models and in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, R F; Linke, K; Teichert, H; Ehrmann, M A [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Technische Mikrobiologie, Weihenstephaner Steig 16, 85350 Freising (Germany)], E-mail: rudi.vogel@wzw.tum.de

    2008-07-15

    Cellular membranes serve in the separation of compartments, recognition of the environment, selective transport and signal transduction. Membrane lipids and membrane proteins play distinct roles in these processes, which are affected by environmental chemical (e. g. pH) or physical (e. g. pressure and temperature) changes. High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) affects fluidity and integrity of bacterial membranes instantly during the ramp, resulting in a loss of membrane potential and vital membrane protein functions. We have used the multiple drug transporter LmrA from Lactococcus lactis and ToxR, a membrane protein sensor from Photobacterium profundum, a deep-sea bacterium, and Vibrio cholerae to study membrane protein interaction and functionality in proteolioposomes and by the use of in vivo reporter systems, respectively. Both proteins require dimerization in the phospholipid bilayer for their functionality, which was favoured in the liquid crystalline lipid phase with ToxR and LmrA. Whereas LmrA, which resides in liposomes consisting of DMPC, DMPC/cholesterol or natural lipids, lost its ATPase activity above 20 or 40 MPa, it maintained its active dimeric structure in DOPC/DPPC/cholesterol liposomes up to 120 MPa. By using a specific indicator strain in which the dimerisation of ToxR initiates the transcription of lacZ it was demonstrated, that the amino acid sequence of the transmembrane domain influences HHP stability of ToxR dimerization in vivo. Thus, both the lipid structure and the nature of the protein affect membrane protein interaction. It is suggested that the protein structure determines basic functionality, e.g. principle ability or kinetics to dimerize to a functional complex, while the lipid environment modulates this property.

  15. High pressure modulated transport and signaling functions of membrane proteins in models and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, R. F.; Linke, K.; Teichert, H.; Ehrmann, M. A.

    2008-07-01

    Cellular membranes serve in the separation of compartments, recognition of the environment, selective transport and signal transduction. Membrane lipids and membrane proteins play distinct roles in these processes, which are affected by environmental chemical (e. g. pH) or physical (e. g. pressure and temperature) changes. High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) affects fluidity and integrity of bacterial membranes instantly during the ramp, resulting in a loss of membrane potential and vital membrane protein functions. We have used the multiple drug transporter LmrA from Lactococcus lactis and ToxR, a membrane protein sensor from Photobacterium profundum, a deep-sea bacterium, and Vibrio cholerae to study membrane protein interaction and functionality in proteolioposomes and by the use of in vivo reporter systems, respectively. Both proteins require dimerization in the phospholipid bilayer for their functionality, which was favoured in the liquid crystalline lipid phase with ToxR and LmrA. Whereas LmrA, which resides in liposomes consisting of DMPC, DMPC/cholesterol or natural lipids, lost its ATPase activity above 20 or 40 MPa, it maintained its active dimeric structure in DOPC/DPPC/cholesterol liposomes up to 120 MPa. By using a specific indicator strain in which the dimerisation of ToxR initiates the transcription of lacZ it was demonstrated, that the amino acid sequence of the transmembrane domain influences HHP stability of ToxR dimerization in vivo. Thus, both the lipid structure and the nature of the protein affect membrane protein interaction. It is suggested that the protein structure determines basic functionality, e.g. principle ability or kinetics to dimerize to a functional complex, while the lipid environment modulates this property.

  16. Cholera toxin expression by El Tor Vibrio cholerae in shallow culture growth conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobaxin, Mayra; Martínez, Haydee; Ayala, Guadalupe; Holmgren, Jan; Sjöling, Asa; Sánchez, Joaquín

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae O1 classical, El Tor and O139 are the primary biotypes that cause epidemic cholera, and they also express cholera toxin (CT). Although classical V. cholerae produces CT in various settings, the El Tor and O139 strains require specific growth conditions for CT induction, such as the so-called AKI conditions, which consist of growth in static conditions followed by growth under aerobic shaking conditions. However, our group has demonstrated that CT production may also take place in shallow static cultures. How these type of cultures induce CT production has been unclear, but we now report that in shallow culture growth conditions, there is virtual depletion of dissolved oxygen after 2.5 h of growth. Concurrently, during the first three to 4 h, endogenous CO2 accumulates in the media and the pH decreases. These findings may explain CT expression at the molecular level because CT production relies on a regulatory cascade, in which the key regulator AphB may be activated by anaerobiosis and by low pH. AphB activation stimulates TcpP synthesis, which induces ToxT production, and ToxT directly stimulates ctxAB expression, which encodes CT. Importantly, ToxT activity is enhanced by bicarbonate. Therefore, we suggest that in shallow cultures, AphB is activated by initial decreases in oxygen and pH, and subsequently, ToxT is activated by intracellular bicarbonate that has been generated from endogenous CO2. This working model would explain CT production in shallow cultures and, possibly, also in other growth conditions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Integration of biological responses from a suite of bioassays for the Venice Lagoon (Italy) through sediment toxicity index - Part A: Development and comparison of two methodological approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Losso, Chiara; Novelli, Alessandra Arizzi; De Salvador, Davide; Ghetti, Pier Francesco; Ghirardini, Annamaria Volpi

    2010-01-01

    Marine and coastal quality assessment, based on test batteries involving a wide array of endpoints, organisms and test matrices, needs for setting up toxicity indices that integrate multiple toxicological measures for decision-making processes and that classify the continuous toxicity response into discrete categories according to the European Water Framework Directive. Two toxicity indices were developed for the lagoon environment such as the Venice Lagoon. Stepwise procedure included: the construction of a database that identified test-matrix pairs (indicators); the selection of a minimum number of ecotoxicological indicators, called toxicological core metrics (CMs-tox) on the basis of specific criteria; the development of toxicity scores for each CM-tox; the integration of the CMs-tox into two indices, the Toxicity Effect Index (TEI), based on the transformation of Toxic Unit (TU) data that were integrated as logarithmic sum, and the Weighted Average Toxicity Index (WATI), starting from toxicity classes integrated as weighted mean. Results from the indices are compared; advantages and drawbacks of both approaches are discussed. - Two toxicity indices were set up and compared to integrate toxicity data from a battery of bioassays for the Venice lagoon.

  18. A High-Content Live-Cell Viability Assay and Its Validation on a Diverse 12K Compound Screen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiaravalli, Jeanne; Glickman, J Fraser

    2017-08-01

    We have developed a new high-content cytotoxicity assay using live cells, called "ImageTOX." We used a high-throughput fluorescence microscope system, image segmentation software, and the combination of Hoechst 33342 and SYTO 17 to simultaneously score the relative size and the intensity of the nuclei, the nuclear membrane permeability, and the cell number in a 384-well microplate format. We then performed a screen of 12,668 diverse compounds and compared the results to a standard cytotoxicity assay. The ImageTOX assay identified similar sets of compounds to the standard cytotoxicity assay, while identifying more compounds having adverse effects on cell structure, earlier in treatment time. The ImageTOX assay uses inexpensive commercially available reagents and facilitates the use of live cells in toxicity screens. Furthermore, we show that we can measure the kinetic profile of compound toxicity in a high-content, high-throughput format, following the same set of cells over an extended period of time.

  19. Two enzymes involved in biosynthesis of the host-selective phytotoxin HC-toxin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walton, J.D.

    1987-01-01

    Cochliobolus carbonum race 1 produces a cyclic tetrapeptide HC-toxin, which is necessary for its exceptional virulence on certain varieties of maize. Previous genetic analysis of HC-toxin production by the fungus has indicated that a single genetic locus controls HC-toxin production. Enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of HC-toxin have been sought by following the precedents established for the biosynthetic enzymes of cyclic peptide antibiotics. Two enzymatic activities from C. carbonum race 1 were found, a D-alanine- and an L-proline-dependent ATP/PP/sub i/ exchange, which by biochemical and genetic criteria were shown to be involved in the biosynthesis of HC-toxin. These two activities were present in all tested race 1 isolates of C. carbonum, which produce HC-toxin, and in none of the tested race 2 and race 3 isolates, which do not produce the toxin. In a genetic cross between two isolates of C. carbonum differing at the tox locus, all tox + progeny had both activities, and all tox - progeny lacked both activities

  20. Evaluation of trace organic contaminants in ultra-pure water production processes by measuring total organic halogen formation potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urano, Kohei; Iwase, Yoko

    1984-01-01

    A new procedure for the determination of organic substances in water with high accuracy and high sensitivity was proposed, in which a hypochlorite is added to water, and the resultant total amount of organic halogen compounds (TOX formation potential) was measured, and it was applied to the evaluation of trace organic contaminants in ultra-pure water production process. In this investigation, the TOX formation potential of the raw water which was to be used for the ultra-pure water production process, intermediately treated water and ultra-pure water was measured to clarify the behavior of organic substances in the ultra-pure water production process and to demonstrate the usefulness of this procedure to evaluate trace organic contaminants in water. The measurement of TOX formation potential requires no specific technical skill, and only a short time, and gives accurate results, therefore, it is expected that the water quality control in the ultra-pure water production process can be performed more exactly by applying this procedure. (Yoshitake, I.)

  1. Characterization of Vibrio parahaemolyticus isolated from oysters in Korea: Resistance to various antibiotics and prevalence of virulence genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Chang-Ho; Shin, YuJin; Jang, SeokCheol; Yu, HongSik; Kim, SuKyung; An, Sera; Park, Kunbawui; So, Jae-Seong

    2017-05-15

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus, found frequently in oysters, is the most prevalent gastroenteritis-causing pathogen in Korea and in several other Asian countries. This study monitored changes in the environmental parameters and occurrence of V. parahaemolyticus in oyster aquaculture sites. Of the 44 presumed V. parahaemolyticus isolates obtained, when tested against 16 antibiotics, 90.9, 86.4, and 75.0% of the 44 isolates exhibited resistance to vancomycin, ampicillin, and streptomycin, respectively. PCR analysis for the presence of the toxR gene confirmed 31 of the 44 isolates as being positive V. parahaemolyticus strains. The toxR positive isolates were tested for the presence of thermostable direct hemolysin (tdh) and tdh-related hemolysin (trh) virulence genes. Only 9.1% toxR positive isolate exhibit the trh gene and none of the isolates were tested positive for tdh. The occurrence of multi drug resistance strains in the environment could be an indication of excessive usage of antibiotics in agriculture and aquaculture fields. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Prioritizing Environmental Chemicals for Obesity and Diabetes ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Diabetes and obesity are major threats to public health in the US and abroad. Understanding the role chemicals in our environment play in the development of these conditions is an emerging issue in environmental health, although identifying and prioritizing chemicals for testing beyond those already implicated in the literature is a challenge. This review is intended to help researchers generate hypotheses about chemicals potentially contributing to diabetes and obesity-related health outcomes by summarizing relevant findings from the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ToxCast high-throughput screening (HTS) program. Objectives: To develop new hypotheses around environmental chemicals of potential interest for diabetes- or obesity-related outcomes using high throughput screening data. Methods: Identify ToxCast assay targets relevant to several biological processes related to diabetes and obesity (insulin sensitivity in peripheral tissue, pancreatic islet and beta cell function, adipocyte dierentiation, and feeding behavior) and present chemical screening data against those assay targets to identify chemicals of potential interest. Discussion: Results of this screening-level analysis suggest that the spectrum of environmental chemicals to consider in research related to diabetes and obesity is much broader than indicated from research papers and reviews published in the peer-reviewed literature. Testing of hypotheses based on ToxCast data will a

  3. Primary human polarized small intestinal epithelial barriers respond differently to a hazardous and an innocuous protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, A D; Zimmermann, C; Delaney, B; Hurley, B P

    2017-08-01

    An experimental platform employing human derived intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) line monolayers grown on permeable Transwell ® filters was previously investigated to differentiate between hazardous and innocuous proteins. This approach was effective at distinguishing these types of proteins and perturbation of monolayer integrity, particularly transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER), was the most sensitive indicator. In the current report, in vitro indicators of monolayer integrity, cytotoxicity, and inflammation were evaluated using primary (non-transformed) human polarized small intestinal epithelial barriers cultured on Transwell ® filters to compare effects of a hazardous protein (Clostridium difficile Toxin A [ToxA]) and an innocuous protein (bovine serum albumin [BSA]). ToxA exerted a reproducible decrease on barrier integrity at doses comparable to those producing effects observed from cell line-derived IEC monolayers, with TEER being the most sensitive indicator. In contrast, BSA, tested at concentrations substantially higher than ToxA, did not cause changes in any of the tested variables. These results demonstrate a similarity in response to certain proteins between cell line-derived polarized IEC models and a primary human polarized small intestinal epithelial barrier model, thereby reinforcing the potential usefulness of cell line-derived polarized IECs as a valid experimental platform to differentiate between hazardous and non-hazardous proteins. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Consensus models to predict endocrine disruption for all ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humans are potentially exposed to tens of thousands of man-made chemicals in the environment. It is well known that some environmental chemicals mimic natural hormones and thus have the potential to be endocrine disruptors. Most of these environmental chemicals have never been tested for their ability to disrupt the endocrine system, in particular, their ability to interact with the estrogen receptor. EPA needs tools to prioritize thousands of chemicals, for instance in the Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program (EDSP). Collaborative Estrogen Receptor Activity Prediction Project (CERAPP) was intended to be a demonstration of the use of predictive computational models on HTS data including ToxCast and Tox21 assays to prioritize a large chemical universe of 32464 unique structures for one specific molecular target – the estrogen receptor. CERAPP combined multiple computational models for prediction of estrogen receptor activity, and used the predicted results to build a unique consensus model. Models were developed in collaboration between 17 groups in the U.S. and Europe and applied to predict the common set of chemicals. Structure-based techniques such as docking and several QSAR modeling approaches were employed, mostly using a common training set of 1677 compounds provided by U.S. EPA, to build a total of 42 classification models and 8 regression models for binding, agonist and antagonist activity. All predictions were evaluated on ToxCast data and on an exte

  5. Integration of biological responses from a suite of bioassays for the Venice Lagoon (Italy) through sediment toxicity index - Part A: Development and comparison of two methodological approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Losso, Chiara, E-mail: closso@unive.i [Environmental Sciences Department, University Ca' Foscari of Venice, Campo della Celestia 2737/b, I-30122 Venice (Italy); Novelli, Alessandra Arizzi [Environmental Sciences Department, University Ca' Foscari of Venice, Campo della Celestia 2737/b, I-30122 Venice (Italy); De Salvador, Davide [Physics Department, Padova University, via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); Ghetti, Pier Francesco; Ghirardini, Annamaria Volpi [Environmental Sciences Department, University Ca' Foscari of Venice, Campo della Celestia 2737/b, I-30122 Venice (Italy)

    2010-12-15

    Marine and coastal quality assessment, based on test batteries involving a wide array of endpoints, organisms and test matrices, needs for setting up toxicity indices that integrate multiple toxicological measures for decision-making processes and that classify the continuous toxicity response into discrete categories according to the European Water Framework Directive. Two toxicity indices were developed for the lagoon environment such as the Venice Lagoon. Stepwise procedure included: the construction of a database that identified test-matrix pairs (indicators); the selection of a minimum number of ecotoxicological indicators, called toxicological core metrics (CMs-tox) on the basis of specific criteria; the development of toxicity scores for each CM-tox; the integration of the CMs-tox into two indices, the Toxicity Effect Index (TEI), based on the transformation of Toxic Unit (TU) data that were integrated as logarithmic sum, and the Weighted Average Toxicity Index (WATI), starting from toxicity classes integrated as weighted mean. Results from the indices are compared; advantages and drawbacks of both approaches are discussed. - Two toxicity indices were set up and compared to integrate toxicity data from a battery of bioassays for the Venice lagoon.

  6. Integration of biological responses from a suite of bioassays for the Venice Lagoon (Italy) through sediment toxicity index - part A: development and comparison of two methodological approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losso, Chiara; Novelli, Alessandra Arizzi; De Salvador, Davide; Ghetti, Pier Francesco; Ghirardini, Annamaria Volpi

    2010-12-01

    Marine and coastal quality assessment, based on test batteries involving a wide array of endpoints, organisms and test matrices, needs for setting up toxicity indices that integrate multiple toxicological measures for decision-making processes and that classify the continuous toxicity response into discrete categories according to the European Water Framework Directive. Two toxicity indices were developed for the lagoon environment such as the Venice Lagoon. Stepwise procedure included: the construction of a database that identified test-matrix pairs (indicators); the selection of a minimum number of ecotoxicological indicators, called toxicological core metrics (CMs-tox) on the basis of specific criteria; the development of toxicity scores for each CM-tox; the integration of the CMs-tox into two indices, the Toxicity Effect Index (TEI), based on the transformation of Toxic Unit (TU) data that were integrated as logarithmic sum, and the Weighted Average Toxicity Index (WATI), starting from toxicity classes integrated as weighted mean. Results from the indices are compared; advantages and drawbacks of both approaches are discussed. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Designing a Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship for the ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toxicokinetic models serve a vital role in risk assessment by bridging the gap between chemical exposure and potentially toxic endpoints. While intrinsic metabolic clearance rates have a strong impact on toxicokinetics, limited data is available for environmentally relevant chemicals including nearly 8000 chemicals tested for in vitro bioactivity in the Tox21 program. To address this gap, a quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) for intrinsic metabolic clearance rate was developed to offer reliable in silico predictions for a diverse array of chemicals. Models were constructed with curated in vitro assay data for both pharmaceutical-like chemicals (ChEMBL database) and environmentally relevant chemicals (ToxCast screening) from human liver microsomes (2176 from ChEMBL) and human hepatocytes (757 from ChEMBL and 332 from ToxCast). Due to variability in the experimental data, a binned approach was utilized to classify metabolic rates. Machine learning algorithms, such as random forest and k-nearest neighbor, were coupled with open source molecular descriptors and fingerprints to provide reasonable estimates of intrinsic metabolic clearance rates. Applicability domains defined the optimal chemical space for predictions, which covered environmental chemicals well. A reduced set of informative descriptors (including relative charge and lipophilicity) and a mixed training set of pharmaceuticals and environmentally relevant chemicals provided the best intr

  8. Accelerating Adverse Outcome Pathway (AOP) development ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Adverse Outcome Pathway (AOP) framework is increasingly being adopted as a tool for organizing and summarizing the mechanistic information connecting molecular perturbations by environmental stressors with adverse outcomes relevant for ecological and human health outcomes. However, the conventional process for assembly of these AOPs is time and resource intensive, and has been a rate limiting step for AOP use and development. Therefore computational approaches to accelerate the process need to be developed. We previously developed a method for generating computationally predicted AOPs (cpAOPs) by association mining and integration of data from publicly available databases. In this work, a cpAOP network of ~21,000 associations was established between 105 phenotypes from TG-GATEs rat liver data from different time points (including microarray, pathological effects and clinical chemistry data), 994 REACTOME pathways, 688 High-throughput assays from ToxCast and 194 chemicals. A second network of 128,536 associations was generated by connecting 255 biological target genes from ToxCast to 4,980 diseases from CTD using either HT screening activity from ToxCast for 286 chemicals or CTD gene expression changes in response to 2,330 chemicals. Both networks were separately evaluated through manual extraction of disease-specific cpAOPs and comparison with expert curation of the relevant literature. By employing data integration strategies that involve the weighting of n

  9. Analysis of Ingredient Lists to Quantitatively Characterize ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The EPA’s ExpoCast program is developing high throughput (HT) approaches to generate the needed exposure estimates to compare against HT bioactivity data generated from the US inter-agency Tox21 and the US EPA ToxCast programs. Assessing such exposures for the thousands of chemicals in consumer products requires data on product composition. This is a challenge since quantitative product composition data are rarely available. We developed methods to predict the weight fractions of chemicals in consumer products from weight fraction-ordered chemical ingredient lists, and curated a library of such lists from online manufacturer and retailer sites. The probabilistic model predicts weight fraction as a function of the total number of reported ingredients, the rank of the ingredient in the list, the minimum weight fraction for which ingredients were reported, and the total weight fraction of unreported ingredients. Weight fractions predicted by the model compared very well to available quantitative weight fraction data obtained from Material Safety Data Sheets for products with 3-8 ingredients. Lists were located from the online sources for 5148 products containing 8422 unique ingredient names. A total of 1100 of these names could be located in EPA’s HT chemical database (DSSTox), and linked to 864 unique Chemical Abstract Service Registration Numbers (392 of which were in the Tox21 chemical library). Weight fractions were estimated for these 864 CASRN. Using a

  10. High-throughput literature mining to support read-across ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Building scientific confidence in the development and evaluation of read-across remains an ongoing challenge. Approaches include establishing systematic frameworks to identify sources of uncertainty and ways to address them. One source of uncertainty is related to characterizing biological similarity. Many research efforts are underway such as structuring mechanistic data in adverse outcome pathways and investigating the utility of high throughput (HT)/high content (HC) screening data. A largely untapped resource for read-across to date is the biomedical literature. This information has the potential to support read-across by facilitating the identification of valid source analogues with similar biological and toxicological profiles as well as providing the mechanistic understanding for any prediction made. A key challenge in using biomedical literature is to convert and translate its unstructured form into a computable format that can be linked to chemical structure. We developed a novel text-mining strategy to represent literature information for read across. Keywords were used to organize literature into toxicity signatures at the chemical level. These signatures were integrated with HT in vitro data and curated chemical structures. A rule-based algorithm assessed the strength of the literature relationship, providing a mechanism to rank and visualize the signature as literature ToxPIs (LitToxPIs). LitToxPIs were developed for over 6,000 chemicals for a varie

  11. Tribbles ortholog NIPI-3 and bZIP transcription factor CEBP-1 regulate a Caenorhabditis elegans intestinal immune surveillance pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwan, Deborah L; Feinbaum, Rhonda L; Stroustrup, Nicholas; Haas, Wilhelm; Conery, Annie L; Anselmo, Anthony; Sadreyev, Ruslan; Ausubel, Frederick M

    2016-12-07

    Many pathogens secrete toxins that target key host processes resulting in the activation of immune pathways. The secreted Pseudomonas aeruginosa toxin Exotoxin A (ToxA) disrupts intestinal protein synthesis, which triggers the induction of a subset of P. aeruginosa-response genes in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We show here that one ToxA-induced C. elegans gene, the Tribbles pseudokinase ortholog nipi-3, is essential for host survival following exposure to P. aeruginosa or ToxA. We find that NIPI-3 mediates the post-developmental expression of intestinal immune genes and proteins and primarily functions in parallel to known immune pathways, including p38 MAPK signaling. Through mutagenesis screening, we identify mutants of the bZIP C/EBP transcription factor cebp-1 that suppress the hypersusceptibility defects of nipi-3 mutants. NIPI-3 is a negative regulator of CEBP-1, which in turn negatively regulates protective immune mechanisms. This pathway represents a previously unknown innate immune signaling pathway in intestinal epithelial cells that is involved in the surveillance of cellular homeostasis. Because NIPI-3 and CEBP-1 are also essential for C. elegans development, NIPI-3 is analogous to other key innate immune signaling molecules such as the Toll receptors in Drosophila that have an independent role during development.

  12. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in Regulator-Encoding Genes Have an Additive Effect on Virulence Gene Expression in a Vibrio cholerae Clinical Isolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carignan, Bailey M; Brumfield, Kyle D; Son, Mike S

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae is the etiological agent of the infectious disease cholera, which is characterized by vomiting and severe watery diarrhea. Recently, V. cholerae clinical isolates have demonstrated increased virulence capabilities, causing more severe symptoms with a much higher rate of disease progression than previously observed. We have identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in four virulence-regulatory genes (hapR, hns, luxO, and vieA) of a hypervirulent V. cholerae clinical isolate, MQ1795. Herein, all SNPs and SNP combinations of interest were introduced into the prototypical El Tor reference strain N16961, and the effects on the production of numerous virulence-related factors, including cholera toxin (CT), the toxin-coregulated pilus (TCP), and ToxT, were analyzed. Our data show that triple-SNP (hapR hns luxO and hns luxO vieA) and quadruple-SNP combinations produced the greatest increases in CT, TCP, and ToxT production. The hns and hns luxO SNP combinations were sufficient for increased TCP and ToxT production. Notably, the hns luxO vieA triple-SNP combination strain produced TCP and ToxT levels similar to those of MQ1795. Certain SNP combinations (hapR and hapR vieA) had the opposite effect on CT, TCP, and ToxT expression. Interestingly, the hns vieA double-SNP combination strain increased TCP production while decreasing CT production. Our findings suggest that SNPs identified in the four regulatory genes, in various combinations, are associated with increased virulence capabilities observed in V. cholerae clinical isolates. These studies provide insight into the evolution of highly virulent strains. IMPORTANCE Cholera, an infectious disease of the small intestine caused by the aquatic bacterium Vibrio cholerae, often results in vomiting and acute watery diarrhea. If left untreated or if the response is too slow, the symptoms can quickly lead to extreme dehydration and ultimately death of the patient. Recent anecdotal evidence of cholera

  13. Herbal extracts in the treatment of Diabetic Foot Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana Kustova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: One of the most serious complications of diabetes is the formation of Diabetic Foot Syndrome. Herbal extracts that combine high antioxidant and antimicrobial properties can be used to treat the resulting neuropathy. The aim of this study was to determine antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of crude extracts isolated from plants growing in Kazakhstan, which could be used to develop products for treatment of Diabetic Foot Syndrome. Method: Different solvents, including dichloromethane and ethanol, were used to prepare plant extracts. The crude extracts from the plants were tested for antimicrobial activity using a modified version of the CLSI/NCCLS methods. All organisms were obtained from American Type Culture Collection. These included the fungi Candida glabrata ATTC 90030, the bacteria Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 29213, and Methicillin-resistant S. aureus ATCC 43300. The 2,2-diphеnyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH assay, 2,2-azinobis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid diammonium salt (ABTS radical scavenging assay were used to analyzed the antioxidant capacity. Results: The results clearly indicate that antibacterial and antifungal activities vary with plant species. Dichloromethane extracts produced favorable results in all assays. Epilobium hirsutum, Rhodiola quadrifida, Rumex confertus showed antifungal activity against Candida glabrata in all extracts where IC50 less than 3 μg/ml. Rumex confertus, Glycyrrhiza Uralensis and Vexibia alopecuroides showed anti-fungal activity against Staphylococcus aureus (IC50 =10.80 μg/ml, (IC50 =11.10 μg/ml, (IC50 =3.05 μg/ml and Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (IC50 =16.20 μg/ml, (IC50 =11.00 μg/ml, (IC50 =2.90 μg/ml respectively.  In spite of this, Vexibia alopecuroides extract showed no antioxidant activity. The other extracts showed a dose dependent ABTS scavenging activity. IC50 values were for the following: 6.6 μg/ml Epilobium hirsutum; 4.5 μg/ml Rumex confertus; 3.8

  14. An evaluation of emerging vaccines for childhood meningococcal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Christopher B

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Meningococcal meningitis is a major cause of disease worldwide, with frequent epidemics particularly affecting an area of sub-Saharan Africa known as the “meningitis belt”. Neisseria meningitidis group A (MenA is responsible for major epidemics in Africa. Recently W-135 has emerged as an important pathogen. Currently, the strategy for control of such outbreaks is emergency use of meningococcal (MC polysaccharide vaccines, but these have a limited ability to induce herd immunity and elicit an adequate immune response in infant and young children. In recent times initiatives have been taken to introduce meningococcal conjugate vaccine in these African countries. Currently there are two different types of MC conjugate vaccines at late stages of development covering serogroup A and W-135: a multivalent MC conjugate vaccine against serogroup A,C,Y and W-135; and a monovalent conjugate vaccine against serogroup A. We aimed to perform a structured assessment of these emerging meningococcal vaccines as a means of reducing global meningococal disease burden among children under 5 years of age. Methods We used a modified CHNRI methodology for setting priorities in health research investments. This was done in two stages. In the first stage we systematically reviewed the literature related to emerging MC vaccines relevant to 12 criteria of interest. In Stage II, we conducted an expert opinion exercise by inviting 20 experts (leading basic scientists, international public health researchers, international policy makers and representatives of pharmaceutical companies. They answered questions from CHNRI framework and their “collective optimism” towards each criterion was documented on a scale from 0 to 100%. Results For MenA conjugate vaccine the experts showed very high level of optimism (~ 90% or more for 7 out of the 12 criteria. The experts felt that the likelihood of efficacy on meningitis was very high (~ 90%. Deliverability

  15. Immunogenicity and safety of concomitant administration of a combined hepatitis A/B vaccine and a quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberer, Martin; Burchard, Gerd; Jelinek, Tomas; Reisinger, Emil C; Meyer, Seetha; Forleo-Neto, Eduardo; Dagnew, Alemnew F; Arora, Ashwani Kumar

    2015-01-01

    This phase 3b randomized, open-label study evaluated the immunogenicity and safety of coadministration of a hepatitis A and/or B vaccine with a quadrivalent oligosaccharide meningococcal CRM197 -conjugate vaccine (MenACWY-CRM), in the context of an accelerated hepatitis A and/or B immunization schedule. A total of 252 healthy adult subjects were randomized to three groups to receive hepatitis A/B only (HepA/B), hepatitis A/B coadministered with MenACWY-CRM (HepA/B+MenACWY-CRM), or MenACWY-CRM only (MenACWY-CRM). Hepatitis A and/or B vaccination was administered in the form of a single booster dose or a primary three-dose series, depending on the hepatitis A and/or B vaccination history of subjects. Antibody responses to hepatitis A/B vaccination were assessed 1 month following the last hepatitis A and/or B dose. Serum bactericidal activity with human complement (hSBA) against meningococcal serogroups A, C, W-135, and Y was assessed 1 month post-MenACWY-CRM vaccination. Safety was monitored throughout the study. At 1 month following the final hepatitis A and/or B vaccination, concomitant administration of hepatitis A/B and MenACWY-CRM was non-inferior to administration of hepatitis A/B alone in terms of geometric mean concentrations of antibodies against the hepatitis A and B antigens. One month post-MenACWY-CRM vaccination, the percentages of subjects achieving hSBA titers ≥8 for serogroups A, C, W-135, and Y in the HepA/B+MenACWY-CRM group (76, 87, 99, and 94%, respectively) were comparable to those in the MenACWY-CRM group (67, 82, 96, and 88%, respectively). The percentages of subjects reporting adverse events (AEs) were similar across study groups and a majority of the reported AEs were mild to moderate in nature. There were no study vaccine-related serious AEs. MenACWY-CRM can be administered concomitantly with a hepatitis A and/or B vaccine in the context of an accelerated hepatitis A and/or B immunization schedule without increasing safety concerns

  16. Meningococcal serogroup A, C, W₁₃₅ and Y conjugated vaccine: a cost-effectiveness analysis in the Netherlands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiltsje Hepkema

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In 2002, vaccination with a serogroup C meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MenC was introduced in the Netherlands for all children aged 14 months. Despite its success, herd immunity may wane over time. Recently, a serogroup A,C,W135,Y meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MenACWY was licensed for use in subjects of 12 months of age and above. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of meningococcal vaccination at 14 months and an additional vaccination at the age of 12 years, both with the MenACWY vaccine. METHODS: A decision analysis cohort model, with 185,000 Dutch newborns, was used to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of different immunization strategies. For strategies including a vaccination at 12 years of age, an additional cohort with adolescents aged 12 years was followed. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER was estimated for the current disease incidence and for a scenario when herd immunity is lost. RESULTS: Vaccination with MenACWY at 14 months is cost-saving. Vaccinating with MenACWY at 14 months and at 12 years would prevent 7 additional cases of meningococcal serogroup A,C,W135,Y disease in the birth cohort and adolescent cohort followed for 99 years compared to the current vaccine schedule of a single vaccination with MenC at 14 months. With the current incidence, this strategy resulted in an ICER of €635,334 per quality adjusted life year. When serogroup C disease incidence returns to pre-vaccination levels due to a loss of vaccine-induced herd-immunity, vaccination with MenACWY at 14 months and at 12 years would be cost-saving. CONCLUSIONS: Routine vaccination with MenACWY is cost-saving. With the current epidemiology, a booster-dose with MenACWY is not likely cost-effective. When herd immunity is lost, a booster-dose has the potential of being cost-effective. A dynamic model should be developed for more precise estimation of the cost-effectiveness of the prevention of disappearance of herd immunity.

  17. The selection of a model microalgal species as biomaterial for a novel aquatic phytotoxicity assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bengtson Nash, S.M. [National Research Centre for Environmental Toxicology, University of Queensland, Brisbane QLD 4108 (Australia)]. E-mail: s.nash@uq.edu.au; Quayle, P.A. [National Research Centre for Environmental Toxicology, University of Queensland, Brisbane QLD 4108 (Australia); Schreiber, U. [Lehrstuhl Botanik I, Julius-von-Sachs-Institut fuer Biowissenschaften, Universitaet Wuerzburg, D-97082 Wuerzburg (Germany); Mueller, J.F. [National Research Centre for Environmental Toxicology, University of Queensland, Brisbane QLD 4108 (Australia)

    2005-05-15

    A phytotoxicity assay based on the ToxY-PAM dual-channel yield analyser has been developed and successfully incorporated into field assessments for the detection of phytotoxicants in water. As a means of further exploring the scope of the assay application and of selecting a model biomaterial to complement the instrument design, nine algal species were exposed to four chemical substances deemed of priority for water quality monitoring purposes (chlorpyrifos, copper, diuron and nonylphenol ethoxylate). Inter-species differences in sensitivity to the four toxicants varied by a factor of 1.9-100. Measurements of photosystem-II quantum yield using these nine single-celled microalgae as biomaterial corroborated previous studies which have shown that the ToxY-PAM dual-channel yield analyser is a highly sensitive method for the detection of PS-II impacting herbicides. Besides Phaeodactylum tricornutum, the previously applied biomaterial, three other species consistently performed well (Nitzschia closterium, Chlorella vulgaris and Dunaliella tertiolecta) and will be used in further test optimisation experiments. In addition to sensitivity, response time was evaluated and revealed a high degree of variation between species and toxicants. While most species displayed relatively weak and slow responses to copper, C. vulgaris demonstrated an IC{sub 10} of 51 {mu}g L{sup -1}, with maximum response measured within 25 minutes and inhibition being accompanied by a large decrease in fluorescence yield. The potential for this C. vulgaris-based bioassay to be used for the detection of copper is discussed. There was no evidence that the standard ToxY-PAM protocol, using these unicellular algae species, could be used for the detection of chlorpyrifos or nonylphenol ethoxylate at environmentally relevant levels.

  18. The selection of a model microalgal species as biomaterial for a novel aquatic phytotoxicity assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bengtson Nash, S.M.; Quayle, P.A.; Schreiber, U.; Mueller, J.F.

    2005-01-01

    A phytotoxicity assay based on the ToxY-PAM dual-channel yield analyser has been developed and successfully incorporated into field assessments for the detection of phytotoxicants in water. As a means of further exploring the scope of the assay application and of selecting a model biomaterial to complement the instrument design, nine algal species were exposed to four chemical substances deemed of priority for water quality monitoring purposes (chlorpyrifos, copper, diuron and nonylphenol ethoxylate). Inter-species differences in sensitivity to the four toxicants varied by a factor of 1.9-100. Measurements of photosystem-II quantum yield using these nine single-celled microalgae as biomaterial corroborated previous studies which have shown that the ToxY-PAM dual-channel yield analyser is a highly sensitive method for the detection of PS-II impacting herbicides. Besides Phaeodactylum tricornutum, the previously applied biomaterial, three other species consistently performed well (Nitzschia closterium, Chlorella vulgaris and Dunaliella tertiolecta) and will be used in further test optimisation experiments. In addition to sensitivity, response time was evaluated and revealed a high degree of variation between species and toxicants. While most species displayed relatively weak and slow responses to copper, C. vulgaris demonstrated an IC 10 of 51 μg L -1 , with maximum response measured within 25 minutes and inhibition being accompanied by a large decrease in fluorescence yield. The potential for this C. vulgaris-based bioassay to be used for the detection of copper is discussed. There was no evidence that the standard ToxY-PAM protocol, using these unicellular algae species, could be used for the detection of chlorpyrifos or nonylphenol ethoxylate at environmentally relevant levels

  19. Six rapid tests for direct detection of Clostridium difficile and its toxins in fecal samples compared with the fibroblast cytotoxicity assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgeon, David K; Novicki, Thomas J; Quick, John; Carlson, LaDonna; Miller, Pat; Ulness, Bruce; Cent, Anne; Ashley, Rhoda; Larson, Ann; Coyle, Marie; Limaye, Ajit P; Cookson, Brad T; Fritsche, Thomas R

    2003-02-01

    Clostridium difficile is one of the most frequent causes of nosocomial gastrointestinal disease. Risk factors include prior antibiotic therapy, bowel surgery, and the immunocompromised state. Direct fecal analysis for C. difficile toxin B by tissue culture cytotoxin B assay (CBA), while only 60 to 85% sensitive overall, is a common laboratory method. We have used 1,003 consecutive, nonduplicate fecal samples to compare six commercially available immunoassays (IA) for C. difficile detection with CBA: Prima System Clostridium difficile Tox A and VIDAS Clostridium difficile Tox A II, which detect C. difficile toxin A; Premier Cytoclone A/B and Techlab Clostridium difficile Tox A/B, which detect toxins A and B; and ImmunoCard Clostridium difficile and Triage Micro C. difficile panels, which detect toxin A and a species-specific antigen. For all tests, Triage antigen was most sensitive (89.1%; negative predictive value [NPV] = 98.7%) while ImmunoCard was most specific (99.7%; positive predictive value [PPV] = 95.0%). For toxin tests only, Prima System had the highest sensitivity (82.2%; NPV = 98.0%) while ImmunoCard had the highest specificity (99.7%; PPV = 95.0%). Hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) patients contributed 44.7% of all samples tested, and no significant differences in sensitivity or specificity were noted between HSCT and non-HSCT patients. IAs, while not as sensitive as direct fecal CBA, produce reasonable predictive values, especially when both antigen and toxin are detected. They also offer significant advantages over CBA in terms of turnaround time and ease of use.

  20. Computational Breakthrough of Natural Lead Hits from the Genus of Arisaema against Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kant, Kamal; Lal, Uma Ranjan; Ghosh, Manik

    2018-01-01

    To date, efforts for the prevention and treatment of human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection have been still vain, and there is no safe and effective clinical accepted vaccine. Arisaema genus has claimed for various traditional bioactivities, but scientific assessments are quite limited. This encouraged us to carry out our present study on around 60 phytoconstituents of different Arisaema species as a natural inhibitor against the human RSV. Selected 60 phytochemical entities were evaluated on the docking behavior of human RSV receptor (PDB: 4UCC) using Maestro 9.3 (Schrödinger, LLC, Cambridge, USA). Furthermore, kinetic properties and toxicity nature of top graded ligands were analyzed through QikProp and ProTox tools. Notably, rutin (glide score: -8.49), schaftoside (glide score: -8.18) and apigenin-6,8-di-C-β-D-galactoside (glide score - 7.29) have resulted in hopeful natural lead hits with an ideal range of kinetic descriptors values. ProTox tool (oral rodent toxicity) has resulted in likely toxicity targets of apex-graded tested ligands. Finally, the whole efforts can be explored further as a model to confirm its anti-human RSV potential with wet laboratory experiments. Rutin, schaftoside, and apigenin-6,8-di-C-β-D-galactoside showed promising top hits docking profile against human respiratory syncytial virusMoreover, absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion properties (QikProp) of top hits resulted within an ideal range of kinetic descriptorsProTox tool highlighted toxicity class ranges, LD 50 values, and possible toxicity targets of apex-graded tested ligands. Abbreviations used: RSV: Respiratory syncytial virus, PRRSV: Porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome virus, ADME-T: Absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity.

  1. Biocontrol of the Sugarcane Borer Eldana saccharina by Expression of the Bacillus thuringiensis cry1Ac7 and Serratia marcescens chiA Genes in Sugarcane-Associated Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downing, Katrina J.; Leslie, Graeme; Thomson, Jennifer A.

    2000-01-01

    The cry1Ac7 gene of Bacillus thuringiensis strain 234, showing activity against the sugarcane borer Eldana saccharina, was cloned under the control of the tac promoter. The fusion was introduced into the broad-host-range plasmid pKT240 and the integration vector pJFF350 and without the tac promoter into the broad-host-range plasmids pML122 and pKmM0. These plasmids were introduced into a Pseudomonas fluorescens strain isolated from the phylloplane of sugarcane and the endophytic bacterium Herbaspirillum seropedicae found in sugarcane. The ptac-cry1Ac7 construct was introduced into the chromosome of P. fluorescens using the integration vector pJFF350 carrying the artificial interposon Omegon-Km. Western blot analysis showed that the expression levels of the integrated cry1Ac7 gene were much higher under the control of the tac promoter than under the control of its endogenous promoter. It was also determined that multicopy expression in P. fluorescens and H. seropedicae of ptac-cry1Ac7 carried on pKT240 caused plasmid instability with no detectable protein expression. In H. seropedicae, more Cry1Ac7 toxin was produced when the gene was cloned under the control of the Nmr promoter on pML122 than in the opposite orientation and bioassays showed that the former resulted in higher mortality of E. saccharina larvae than the latter. P. fluorescens 14::ptac-tox resulted in higher mortality of larvae than did P. fluorescens 14::tox. An increased toxic effect was observed when P. fluorescens 14::ptac-tox was combined with P. fluorescens carrying the Serratia marcescens chitinase gene chiA, under the control of the tac promoter, integrated into the chromosome. PMID:10877771

  2. The multimedia models for the evaluation of exposure bond to the atmospheric emissions of classified installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnard, R.

    2001-12-01

    Risk assessment and environmental impacts studies are realized to preserve the public health. Today one of the most used approach is the use of an atmospheric dispersion model to assess the risks. The data are then injected in a calculation software of exposure bond to polluted soils, to evaluate the risks of non direct exposure. This report details and evaluates the models corresponding to the need: the methodology for assessing Health Risks associated with multiple pathways of exposure to combustor, human health risk assessment proto col for hazardous waste combustion facilities, EUSES, CALTOX, MEPAS, MEND-TOX, RESRAD, MMSOILS, FRAMES-HWIR, PC-GEMS and TRIM. (A.L.B.)

  3. Copper zinc tin sulfide-based thin film solar cells

    CERN Document Server

    Ito, Kentaro

    2014-01-01

    Beginning with an overview and historical background of Copper Zinc Tin Sulphide (CZTS) technology, subsequent chapters cover properties of CZTS thin films, different preparation methods of CZTS thin films, a comparative study of CZTS and CIGS solar cell, computational approach, and future applications of CZTS thin film solar modules to both ground-mount and rooftop installation. The semiconducting compound (CZTS) is made up earth-abundant, low-cost and non-toxic elements, which make it an ideal candidate to replace Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) and CdTe solar cells which face material scarcity and tox

  4. Toxigenic Corynebacterium ulcerans isolated from a free-roaming red fox (Vulpes vulpes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sting, Reinhard; Ketterer-Pintur, Sandra; Contzen, Matthias; Mauder, Norman; Süss-Dombrowski, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Corynebacterium (C.) ulcerans could be isolated from the spleen of a red fox (Vulpes vulpes) that had been found dead in the state of Baden-Württemberg, Germany. Pathohistological examination suggested that the fox had died of distemper, as was confirmed by PCR. The isolate was identified biochemically, by MALDI-TOF MS, FT-IR and by partial 16S rRNA, rpoB and tox gene sequencing. Using the Elek test the C. ulcerans isolate demonstrated diphtheria toxin production. FT-IR and sequencing data obtained from the C. ulcerans isolate from the red fox showed higher similarity to isolates from humans than to those from wild game.

  5. Induction and selection of mutants from in vitro cultured plant cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yung Il; Kim, Jae Sung; Shin, In Chul; Lee, Sang Jae [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-07-01

    Mutant cell lines are useful for biochemical, physiological and genetical material for marker in various genetic manipulation experiments and for the direct use in crop plant improvement. Mutant selection may lead to the production of plants showing resistance or tolerance to specific environmental stress, such as solinity, drought, toxed metals, herbicides, pathogens and low temperature. In this review, these included the production of the somatic variation, the selection process itself and stability of the selected characters in cell culture and regenerated plant. Which would seem to be useful for improving plants and securring genetic resources. 45 refs. (Author).

  6. Environmental assessment of amine-based carbon capture Scenario modelling with life cycle assessment (LCA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brekke, Andreas; Askham, Cecilia; Modahl, Ingunn Saur; Vold, Bjoern Ivar; Johnsen, Fredrik Moltu

    2012-07-01

    This report contains a first attempt at introducing the environmental impacts associated with amines and derivatives in a life cycle assessment (LCA) of gas power production with carbon capture and comparing these with other environmental impacts associated with the production system. The report aims to identify data gaps and methodological challenges connected both to modelling toxicity of amines and derivatives and weighting of environmental impacts. A scenario based modelling exercise was performed on a theoretical gas power plant with carbon capture, where emission levels of nitrosamines were varied between zero (gas power without CCS) to a worst case level (outside the probable range of actual carbon capture facilities). Because of extensive research and development in the areas of solvents and emissions from carbon capture facilities in the latter years, data used in the exercise may be outdated and results should therefore not be taken at face value.The results from the exercise showed: According to UseTox, emissions of nitrosamines are less important than emissions of formaldehyde with regard to toxicity related to operation of (i.e. both inputs to and outputs from) a carbon capture facility. If characterisation factors for emissions of metals are included, these outweigh all other toxic emissions in the study. None of the most recent weighting methods in LCA include characterisation factors for nitrosamines, and these are therefore not part of the environmental ranking.These results shows that the EDecIDe project has an important role to play in developing LCA methodology useful for assessing the environmental performance of amine based carbon capture in particular and CCS in general. The EDecIDe project will examine the toxicity models used in LCA in more detail, specifically UseTox. The applicability of the LCA compartment models and site specificity issues for a Norwegian/Arctic situation will be explored. This applies to the environmental compartments

  7. High Throughput Transcriptomics @ USEPA (Toxicology ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ideal chemical testing approach will provide complete coverage of all relevant toxicological responses. It should be sensitive and specific It should identify the mechanism/mode-of-action (with dose-dependence). It should identify responses relevant to the species of interest. Responses should ideally be translated into tissue-, organ-, and organism-level effects. It must be economical and scalable. Using a High Throughput Transcriptomics platform within US EPA provides broader coverage of biological activity space and toxicological MOAs and helps fill the toxicological data gap. Slide presentation at the 2016 ToxForum on using High Throughput Transcriptomics at US EPA for broader coverage biological activity space and toxicological MOAs.

  8. The multimedia models for the evaluation of exposure bond to the atmospheric emissions of classified installations; Les modeles multimedia pour l'evaluation des expositions liees aux emissions atmospheriques des installations classees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnard, R

    2001-12-15

    Risk assessment and environmental impacts studies are realized to preserve the public health. Today one of the most used approach is the use of an atmospheric dispersion model to assess the risks. The data are then injected in a calculation software of exposure bond to polluted soils, to evaluate the risks of non direct exposure. This report details and evaluates the models corresponding to the need: the methodology for assessing Health Risks associated with multiple pathways of exposure to combustor, human health risk assessment proto col for hazardous waste combustion facilities, EUSES, CALTOX, MEPAS, MEND-TOX, RESRAD, MMSOILS, FRAMES-HWIR, PC-GEMS and TRIM. (A.L.B.)

  9. Dynamics of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in surface sediments of Cochin estuary, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramzi, A.;; Rahman, K.H.; Gireeshkumar, T.R.; Balachandran, K.K.; Jacob, C.; Chandramohanakumar, N

    - ters, Sediments, and Shrimps of Estero de Urias, an Estuary in Mexico, and Their Tox- icological Effects Scientific World Journal. Joseph, M.L., 2004. Status Report on Periyar River, Centre for Water Resource Develop- Parinos, C., Gogou, A., 2016... to particu- ent (Guzzella and De Marine Pollution Bulletin 114 (2017) 1081–1087 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect Marine Pollut l seincreases for the last four decades; so did concentrations of Cd, Zn, Hg and Pb (Mohan et al., 2012; Ranjitha...

  10. The Use of Stimulable Bioluminescence From Dinoflagellates as a Means of Detecting Toxicity in the Marine Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-03-01

    AND SSTýTL FUNDINCG NUMI)) W, TIHE USE OF STIMt LABILE BIOLUMINESCENCE FROM DI NOIFLAGELLATk. PH: M1E69 AS A MEAN’S OF DETrECTING ToxicITY IN THE...bioluminescence dinoflagellates for asseossmnent of toxic effects when exposed to a single tox~icant or mixture. Successful use of this type of bioassav... tributyltin chloride (TFITCI), Copper (11) Sulfate (CuSO 4 I. zinc sulfate (ZnSO4 ), or storm drain effluent. Stimulable bioluminescence was measured at

  11. Iron exclusion in rice genotypes as affected by different vapor pressure deficit conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram Kumar Shrestha

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Root iron (Fe exclusion capacity of four lowland rice genotypes were evaluated in increasing rate of Fe2+ stresses (0, 500, 1000 and 1500 mg/L in growing medium under the conditions of low and high vapor pressure deficit. Rice root excluded significantly higher amount of iron under dry atmospheric condition (655 mg Fe/g root dry matter than moist atmospheric condition (118 mg Fe/g root dry matter. But their iron exclusion capacity reduced when they were gradually exposed to the higher levels of Fe stress. Tolerant genotype such as TOX3107 excluded more iron when they were exposed to dry atmospheric condition.

  12. Genome-Based Comparison of Clostridioides difficile: Average Amino Acid Identity Analysis of Core Genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabal, Adriana; Jun, Se-Ran; Jenjaroenpun, Piroon; Wanchai, Visanu; Nookaew, Intawat; Wongsurawat, Thidathip; Burgess, Mary J; Kothari, Atul; Wassenaar, Trudy M; Ussery, David W

    2018-02-14

    Infections due to Clostridioides difficile (previously known as Clostridium difficile) are a major problem in hospitals, where cases can be caused by community-acquired strains as well as by nosocomial spread. Whole genome sequences from clinical samples contain a lot of information but that needs to be analyzed and compared in such a way that the outcome is useful for clinicians or epidemiologists. Here, we compare 663 public available complete genome sequences of C. difficile using average amino acid identity (AAI) scores. This analysis revealed that most of these genomes (640, 96.5%) clearly belong to the same species, while the remaining 23 genomes produce four distinct clusters within the Clostridioides genus. The main C. difficile cluster can be further divided into sub-clusters, depending on the chosen cutoff. We demonstrate that MLST, either based on partial or full gene-length, results in biased estimates of genetic differences and does not capture the true degree of similarity or differences of complete genomes. Presence of genes coding for C. difficile toxins A and B (ToxA/B), as well as the binary C. difficile toxin (CDT), was deduced from their unique PfamA domain architectures. Out of the 663 C. difficile genomes, 535 (80.7%) contained at least one copy of ToxA or ToxB, while these genes were missing from 128 genomes. Although some clusters were enriched for toxin presence, these genes are variably present in a given genetic background. The CDT genes were found in 191 genomes, which were restricted to a few clusters only, and only one cluster lacked the toxin A/B genes consistently. A total of 310 genomes contained ToxA/B without CDT (47%). Further, published metagenomic data from stools were used to assess the presence of C. difficile sequences in blinded cases of C. difficile infection (CDI) and controls, to test if metagenomic analysis is sensitive enough to detect the pathogen, and to establish strain relationships between cases from the same

  13. R and D progress report 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-03-01

    The Institute of Toxicology ITOX, established at the end of 1992 by the merger of the partial institute IGT/TOX with the biophysics task force HS, investigates health hazards from environmentally and technically relevant nocuous substances. The toxicological investigation material comprises informative cell models. They range from cells capable of immunity to multicellular spheroids. The objects of investigation are mainly material toxins such as gaseous pollutants, dust, heavy metals and their compounds as well as components of technical materials (for instance, fullerene). In addition, however, questions relating to the effects of low-frequency electromagnetic waves on human health are also studied. (orig./MG) [de

  14. A proposal for a test method for assessment of hazard property HP 12 (“Release of an acute toxic gas”) in hazardous waste classification - Experience from 49 waste

    OpenAIRE

    Hennebert , Pierre; Samaali , Ismahen; Molina , Pauline

    2016-01-01

    International audience; A stepwise method for assessment of the HP 12 is proposed and tested with 49 waste samples. The hazard property HP 12 is defined as “Release of an acute toxic gas”: waste which releases acute toxic gases (Acute Tox. 1, 2 or 3) in contact with water or an acid. When a waste contains a substance assigned to one of the following supplemental hazards EUH029, EUH031 and EUH032, it shall be classified as hazardous by HP 12 according to test methods or guidelines (EC, 2014a, ...

  15. The Toxicity of Inhaled Sulphur Mustard

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    lobes, weighed and then dried in an oven (40 oC). The samples were weighed daily until a stable weight had been achieved (approx. 5 days), to...into account). Lung samples were taken, weighed and then dried in an oven (40o C) until a stable weight had been achieved, to determine lung wet...large porcine model: A 6 hour study. Inhal. Tox. (in press). 16. Garner JP, Watts S, Parry C, Bird J and Kirkman E. 2009. Development of a large

  16. Induction and selection of mutants from in vitro cultured plant cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yung Il; Kim, Jae Sung; Shin, In Chul; Lee, Sang Jae

    1994-07-01

    Mutant cell lines are useful for biochemical, physiological and genetical material for marker in various genetic manipulation experiments and for the direct use in crop plant improvement. Mutant selection may lead to the production of plants showing resistance or tolerance to specific environmental stress, such as solinity, drought, toxed metals, herbicides, pathogens and low temperature. In this review, these included the production of the somatic variation, the selection process itself and stability of the selected characters in cell culture and regenerated plant. Which would seem to be useful for improving plants and securring genetic resources. 45 refs. (Author)

  17. Tumor Immunotherapy by Gene-circuit Recruited Immunomodulatory Systems (TIGRIS) for Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Commercial Assays CytoTox 96 Non-Radioactive Cytotoxicity Assay Kit Promega Cat #G1780 Human IFN-g DuoSet ELISA R&D systems Cat #DY285 Human CCL21/6Ckine...DuoSet ELISA R&D systems Cat #DY366 Human IL-12 p70 DuoSet ELISA R&D systems Cat #DY1270 Cell Culture Reagents DMEM Life Technologies Cat #10569-044...after 24h and IFN-g concentration determined by Human IFN-g DuoSet ELISA (R&D systems, Min- neapolis, MN; catalog #DY285). Multiple-Output Circuit

  18. Recent trends in laboratory automation in the pharmaceutical industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, M L; Stinger, T

    2001-05-01

    The impact of robotics and automation on the pharmaceutical industry over the last two decades has been significant. In the last ten years, the emphasis of laboratory automation has shifted from the support of manufactured products and quality control of laboratory applications, to research and development. This shift has been the direct result of an increased emphasis on the identification, development and eventual marketing of innovative new products. In this article, we will briefly identify and discuss some of the current trends in laboratory automation in the pharmaceutical industry as they apply to research and development, including screening, sample management, combinatorial chemistry, ADME/Tox and pharmacokinetics.

  19. Two cases of cutaneous diphtheria associated with occupational pig contact in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, A; Boschert, V; Konrad, R; Schmidt-Wieland, T; Hörmansdorfer, S; Eddicks, M; Sing, A

    2013-12-01

    In 2010, two independent cases of cutaneous diphtheria caused by toxigenic C. ulcerans were identified in Germany. Both patients had intense occupational contact with pigs. Diagnostic work-up comprising biochemical differentiation, rpoB sequencing, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF) analysis, real-time tox PCR and Elek test as well as public health measures including an intensified source tracing involving 83 asymptomatic pigs of an associated pig farm are presented. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  20. DETEKSI GEN-GEN PENYANDI FAKTOR VIRULENSI PADA BAKTERI VIBRIO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ince Ayu Khairani Kadriah

    2011-04-01

    menggunakan isolat bakteri yang diisolasi dari budidaya udang windu di berbagai daerah di Sulawesi Selatan dan Jawa. Pada penelitian ini digunakan primer spesifik untuk mendeteksi gen-gen virulen toxR gene, hemolysin (vvh gene, dan GyrB gene dengan metode PCR. Dari 35 isolat yang diisolasi, 20 isolat terdeteksi memiliki gen virulensi dan 8 di antaranya memiliki dua gen virulen. Spesies bakteri yang memiliki gen virulen adalah: V.harveyi, V. parahaemolyticus, V. mimicus, dan V. campbelli

  1. Design synthesis and biological evaluation of 2-methylphenyl semicarbazone derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manmohan Singhal

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available We have used pharmacophore hybridization technique of drug design and designed a pharmacophore model 2-methylphenylsemicarbazone which is having hydrogen acceptor site, hydrogen donor site, lipophilic site etc using ligandscout-2.02 software. A series of 2-methylphenyl-semicarbazone was synthesized and evaluated for their antipyretic activity using boiled cow milk induced pyrexia in rabbits. Compound 11 was the most active compound. The possible metabolites of some selected synthesized chalconesemicarbazones were predicted by computational method using Pallas version-3.1 ADME-Tox prediction software. The major pathway of metabolism was found to be p-hydroxylation and amide hydrolysis.

  2. Arsenic-transforming microbes and their role in biomining processes

    OpenAIRE

    Drewniak, L.; Sklodowska, A.

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that microorganisms can dissolve different minerals and use them as sources of nutrients and energy. The majority of rock minerals are rich in vital elements (e.g., P, Fe, S, Mg and Mo), but some may also contain toxic metals or metalloids, like arsenic. The toxicity of arsenic is disclosed after the dissolution of the mineral, which raises two important questions: (1) why do microorganisms dissolve arsenic-bearing minerals and release this metal into the environment in a tox...

  3. Installation Restoration Program. Phase 2. Confirmation/Quantification. Stage 2. Elmendorf Air Force Base, Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-03-01

    ALSK /. WEL 47 6 e WEL WEL 5 1 WEL 47- WELL 48 WELL 32 EL4 ~;:~:WELL WELL 47 WEL 24L4 WELL 2 7 WELL 25 WELL3 8A WELL 51 WEL 2LL9 WEL 1~’WEL 42 WELL...the abandoned cell of this landfill. Water quality in W-5 is degraded, with TOX at 80 Itrg/L and oil and grease at 5.8 mg/L. Specific conductance and...in a protective foam-lined case. The cell is tested before going into the field using the test feature and is repaired by the manufacturer as

  4. Immunogenicity of MenACWY-CRM in Korean Military Recruits: Influence of Tetanus-Diphtheria Toxoid Vaccination on the Vaccine Response to MenACWY-CRM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Han Wool; Park, In Ho; You, Sooseong; Yu, Hee Tae; Oh, In Soo; Sung, Pil Soo; Shin, Eui Cheol; Kim, Kyung Hyo

    2016-11-01

    The quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MenACWY-CRM) has been introduced for military recruits in Korea since 2012. This study was performed to evaluate the immunogenicity of MenACWY-CRM in Korean military recruits. In addition, the influence of tetanus-diphtheria toxoids (Td) vaccination on the vaccine response to MenACWY-CRM was analyzed. A total of 75 military recruits were enrolled. Among them, 18 received a dose of MenACWY-CRM only (group 1), and 57 received Td three days before MenACWY-CRM immunization (group 2). The immunogenicity of MenACWY-CRM was compared between the two groups. The serum bactericidal activity with baby rabbit complement was measured before and three weeks after immunization against serogroups A, C, W-135, and Y. The geometric mean titers (GMTs) against four serogroups were significantly increased in both groups after immunization. Compared to group 2, group 1 exhibited significantly higher vaccine responses in several aspects: post-immune GMTs against serogroup A and C, seroresponse rates against serogroup A, and a fold increases of titers against serogroup A, C, and Y. MenACWY-CRM was immunogenic against all vaccine-serogroups in Korean military recruits. Vaccine response to MenACWY-CRM was influenced by Td administered three days earlier.

  5. Randomized trial on the safety, tolerability, and immunogenicity of MenACWY-CRM, an investigational quadrivalent meningococcal glycoconjugate vaccine, administered concomitantly with a combined tetanus, reduced diphtheria, and acellular pertussis vaccine in adolescents and young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparini, Roberto; Conversano, Michele; Bona, Gianni; Gabutti, Giovanni; Anemona, Alessandra; Dull, Peter M; Ceddia, Francesca

    2010-04-01

    This study evaluated the safety, tolerability, and immunogenicity of an investigational quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine, MenACWY-CRM, when administered concomitantly with a combined tetanus, reduced diphtheria, and acellular pertussis (Tdap) vaccine, in subjects aged 11 to 25 years. Subjects received either MenACWY-CRM and Tdap, MenACWY-CRM and saline placebo, or Tdap and saline placebo. No significant increase in reactogenicity and no clinically significant vaccine-related adverse events (AEs) occurred when MenACWY-CRM and Tdap were administered concomitantly. Similar immunogenic responses to diphtheria, tetanus, and meningococcal (serogroups A, C, W-135, and Y) antigens were observed, regardless of concomitant vaccine administration. Antipertussis antibody responses were comparable between vaccine groups for filamentous hemagglutinin and were slightly lower, although not clinically significantly, for pertussis toxoid and pertactin when the two vaccines were administered concomitantly. These results indicate that the investigational MenACWY-CRM vaccine is well tolerated and immunogenic and that it can be coadministered with Tdap to adolescents and young adults.

  6. Safety and immunogenicity of one dose of MenACWY-CRM, an investigational quadrivalent meningococcal glycoconjugate vaccine, when administered to adolescents concomitantly or sequentially with Tdap and HPV vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arguedas, A; Soley, C; Loaiza, C; Rincon, G; Guevara, S; Perez, A; Porras, W; Alvarado, O; Aguilar, L; Abdelnour, A; Grunwald, U; Bedell, L; Anemona, A; Dull, P M

    2010-04-19

    This Phase III study evaluates an investigational quadrivalent meningococcal CRM(197) conjugate vaccine, MenACWY-CRM (Novartis Vaccines), when administered concomitantly or sequentially with two other recommended adolescent vaccines; combined tetanus, reduced diphtheria and acellular pertussis (Tdap), and human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine. In this single-centre study, 1620 subjects 11-18 years of age, were randomized to three groups (1:1:1) to receive MenACWY-CRM concomitantly or sequentially with Tdap and HPV. Meningococcal serogroup-specific serum bactericidal assay using human complement (hSBA), and antibodies to Tdap antigens and HPV virus-like particles were determined before and 1 month after study vaccinations. Proportions of subjects with hSBA titres > or =1:8 for all four meningococcal serogroups (A, C, W-135, Y) were non-inferior for both concomitant and sequential administration. Immune responses to Tdap and HPV antigens were comparable when these vaccines were given alone or concomitantly with MenACWY-CRM. All vaccines were well tolerated; concomitant or sequential administration did not increase reactogenicity. MenACWY-CRM was well tolerated and immunogenic in subjects 11-18 years of age, with comparable immune responses to the four serogroups when given alone or concomitantly with Tdap or HPV antigens. This is the first demonstration that these currently recommended adolescent vaccines could be administered concomitantly without causing increased reactogenicity. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Use of MenACWY-CRM in adolescents in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Steven; Block, Stan L

    2013-03-01

    Adolescents constitute a high-risk group for invasive meningococcal disease. MenACWY-CRM (Menveo, Novartis Vaccines, Cambridge, MA) is a quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine indicated to prevent invasive meningococcal disease caused by Neisseria meningitidis serogroups A, C, W-135, and Y. It has been approved for use in persons age 2-55 years. The tolerability and immunogenicity of MenACWY-CRM in adolescents have been ascertained in phase 2 and 3 trials against MPSV4 (Menomune, sanofi pasteur, Swiftwater, PA), an unconjugated quadrivalent meningococcal vaccine, and MenACWY-D (Menactra, sanofi pasteur), another conjugated quadrivalent meningococcal vaccine. Clinical trials also have demonstrated that MenACWY-CRM is well tolerated and immunogenic when administered to adolescents concomitantly with the combined tetanus, diphtheria, and acellular pertussis vaccine (Boostrix, GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals, Rixensart, Belgium) and the quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine (Gardasil, Merck & Co., Inc., Whitehouse Station, NJ). Copyright © 2013 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Meningitis caused by Neisseria Meningitidis, Hemophilus Influenzae Type B and Streptococcus Pneumoniae during 2005–2012 in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceyhan, Mehmet; Gürler, Nezahat; Ozsurekci, Yasemin; Keser, Melike; Aycan, Ahmet Emre; Gurbuz, Venhar; Salman, Nuran; Camcioglu, Yildiz; Dinleyici, Ener Cagri; Ozkan, Sengul; Sensoy, Gulnar; Belet, Nursen; Alhan, Emre; Hacimustafaoglu, Mustafa; Celebi, Solmaz; Uzun, Hakan; Faik Oner, Ahmet; Kurugol, Zafer; Ali Tas, Mehmet; Aygun, Denizmen; Oncel, Eda Karadag; Celik, Melda; Yasa, Olcay; Akin, Fatih; Coşkun, Yavuz

    2014-01-01

    Successful vaccination policies for protection from bacterial meningitis are dependent on determination of the etiology of bacterial meningitis. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples were obtained prospectively from children from 1 month to ≤ 18 years of age hospitalized with suspected meningitis, in order to determine the etiology of meningitis in Turkey. DNA evidence of Neisseria meningitidis (N. meningitidis), Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae), and Hemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) was detected using multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In total, 1452 CSF samples were evaluated and bacterial etiology was determined in 645 (44.4%) cases between 2005 and 2012; N. meningitidis was detected in 333 (51.6%), S. pneumoniae in 195 (30.2%), and Hib in 117 (18.1%) of the PCR positive samples. Of the 333 N. meningitidis positive samples 127 (38.1%) were identified as serogroup W-135, 87 (26.1%) serogroup B, 28 (8.4%) serogroup A and 3 (0.9%) serogroup Y; 88 (26.4%) were non-groupable. As vaccines against the most frequent bacterial isolates in this study are available and licensed, these results highlight the need for broad based protection against meningococcal disease in Turkey. PMID:25483487

  9. Asymtomatic carriage of Neisseria meningitidis and Neisseria lactamica in relation to Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae colonization in healthy children: Apropos of 1400 children sampled

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakir, Mustafa; Yagci, Aysegul; Ulger, Nurver; Akbenlioglu, Cengiz; Ilki, Arzu; Soyletir, Guner

    2001-01-01

    Meningococcal disease is one of the most important causes of morbidity and mortality among children in many parts of the world. Main reservoir of carriage and site of meningococcal dissemination appears to be the upper respiratory tract. Colonization of Neisseria meningitidis and lactamica and factors affecting this carriage were determined in a group of healthy children aged 0-10 years. Meningococcus and N. lactamica carriage were detected in 17 (1.23%) and 245 (17.7%) of 1382 subjects, respectively. Number (%) of serogroups for meningococci was 1 (6), 5 (29), 0 (0), 1 (6), 1 (6), and 9 (53) for A, B, C, D, W135, and Y, respectively. Having more than three household members, elementary school attendance, pharyngeal carriage of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae were associated with carriage of meningococci, whereas age less than 24-month was associated with carriage of N. lactamica. There was a reverse carriage rate between N. meningitidis and N. lactamica by age which may suggest a possible protective role of N. lactamica against meningococcal colonization among pre-school children

  10. [Surveillance of Neisseria meningitidis in Argentina, 1993-2005: distribution of serogroups, serotypes and serosubtypes isolated from invasive disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiávetta, L; Chávez, E; Ruzic, A; Mollerach, M; Regueira, M

    2007-01-01

    Neisseria meningitidis is an important cause of meningitis, bacteremia and septic shock syndrome. We herein present the distribution of serogroups, serotypes and serosubtypes of 2244 isolates of N. meningitidis from patients with meningitis or meningococcemia, received within the period 1993-2005, in the National Reference Laboratory, INEI-ANLIS "Dr. Carlos G. Malbrán", from 33 Argentine hospitals that are included in a National Network devoted to for the study of bacterial meningitis. Between 1993-1995, serogroup B was prevalent (66%) whereas in the period from 1995-2001, serogroup C prevailed (65%). However, following but after that period, the prevalence of serogroup B was recovered. In the last 5 years of the studied period, the serogroups Y and W135 represented as a whole a 15.6% as a whole whereas up to the year 2000 during the first 6 years they accounted for it was of 4.7%. Higher diversity in the distribution of serotypes and serosubtypes was observed within serogroup B. The nonsubtypable isolates throughout the period of study represented the 52.8%, this high percentage demonstrates the limited capacity of the serotyping for the determination of meningococcal/meningococcus subtypes. of meningococco.

  11. Study of 138 Neisseria meningitidis strains isolated from blood or cerebrospinal fluid in Lombardy between 2007 and 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Daprai

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Neisseria meningitidis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Haemophilus influenzae type b cause the majority of cases of bacterial septicaemia in children and young adults. Disease epidemiology is evolving rapidly due to the introduction of vaccines and changing in bacterial antibiotic-resistance patterns. (Asymptomatic nasopharyngeal colonization with Neisseria meningitides occurs in 5-10% of adult. The aim of this study was to calculate the frequency of each serogroup of this pathogens involved in invasive infection and to study susceptibility to antibiotics of these strains. Between March 2007 and June 2010 we received, from 43 hospitals of Lombardy, 138 strains of Neisseria meningitidis, from 138 patients aged (2-80yrs. The most frequent serogroup was B (58%, followed by serogroup C (34%, serogroup G (4% and W 135 (2%. Serogroup A end X accounted for 1% of invasive infection, each. We observed a decrease in susceptibility towards penicillin in 38% of strains. In addition we studied, by REP- PCR, genotype of 9 strains selected on the basis of epidemiological data.Among these strains, 3 different clusters according to the 3 small epidemic outbreaks occurred between June and September 2009, were recognised. Seven of these strains, although belonged to the same serogroup, brought about two different clusters. The present findings demonstrated that phenotypic data are not sufficient to define epidemic clusters, therefore molecular genotyping is required.

  12. An Integrated Chemical Environment to Support 21st-Century Toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Shannon M; Phillips, Jason; Sedykh, Alexander; Tandon, Arpit; Sprankle, Catherine; Morefield, Stephen Q; Shapiro, Andy; Allen, David; Shah, Ruchir; Maull, Elizabeth A; Casey, Warren M; Kleinstreuer, Nicole C

    2017-05-25

    SUMMARY : Access to high-quality reference data is essential for the development, validation, and implementation of in vitro and in silico approaches that reduce and replace the use of animals in toxicity testing. Currently, these data must often be pooled from a variety of disparate sources to efficiently link a set of assay responses and model predictions to an outcome or hazard classification. To provide a central access point for these purposes, the National Toxicology Program Interagency Center for the Evaluation of Alternative Toxicological Methods developed the Integrated Chemical Environment (ICE) web resource. The ICE data integrator allows users to retrieve and combine data sets and to develop hypotheses through data exploration. Open-source computational workflows and models will be available for download and application to local data. ICE currently includes curated in vivo test data, reference chemical information, in vitro assay data (including Tox21 TM /ToxCast™ high-throughput screening data), and in silico model predictions. Users can query these data collections focusing on end points of interest such as acute systemic toxicity, endocrine disruption, skin sensitization, and many others. ICE is publicly accessible at https://ice.ntp.niehs.nih.gov. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP1759.

  13. Computational Assessment of Pharmacokinetics and Biological Effects of Some Anabolic and Androgen Steroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Marin; Roman, Diana Larisa; Ostafe, Vasile; Ciorsac, Alecu; Isvoran, Adriana

    2018-02-05

    The aim of this study is to use computational approaches to predict the ADME-Tox profiles, pharmacokinetics, molecular targets, biological activity spectra and side/toxic effects of 31 anabolic and androgen steroids in humans. The following computational tools are used: (i) FAFDrugs4, SwissADME and admetSARfor obtaining the ADME-Tox profiles and for predicting pharmacokinetics;(ii) SwissTargetPrediction and PASS online for predicting the molecular targets and biological activities; (iii) PASS online, Toxtree, admetSAR and Endocrine Disruptomefor envisaging the specific toxicities; (iv) SwissDock to assess the interactions of investigated steroids with cytochromes involved in drugs metabolism. Investigated steroids usually reveal a high gastrointestinal absorption and a good oral bioavailability, may inhibit someof the human cytochromes involved in the metabolism of xenobiotics (CYP2C9 being the most affected) and reflect a good capacity for skin penetration. There are predicted numerous side effects of investigated steroids in humans: genotoxic carcinogenicity, hepatotoxicity, cardiovascular, hematotoxic and genitourinary effects, dermal irritations, endocrine disruption and reproductive dysfunction. These results are important to be known as an occupational exposure to anabolic and androgenic steroids at workplaces may occur and because there also is a deliberate human exposure to steroids for their performance enhancement and anti-aging properties.

  14. Virulence factors in environmental and clinical Vibrio cholerae from endemic areas in Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Racheal W. Kimani

    2014-10-01

    Objectives: The objectives of the study were to determine the environmental reservoirs of V. cholerae during an interepidemic period in Kenya and to characterise their virulence factors. Methods: One hundred (50 clinical, 50 environmental samples were tested for V. cholerae isolates using both simplex and multiplex polymerase chain reaction. Results: Both sediments and algae from fishing and landing bays yielded isolates of V. cholerae. Clinical strains were characterised along with the environmental strains for comparison. All clinical strains harboured ctxA, tcpA (El Tor, ompU, zot, ace, toxR, hylA (El Tor and tcpI genes. Prevalence for virulence genes in environmental strains was hylA (El Tor (10%, toxR (24%, zot (22%, ctxA (12%,tcpI (8%, hylA (26% and tcpA (12%. Conclusion: The study sites, including landing bays and beaches, contained environmental V. cholerae, suggesting that these may be reservoirs for frequent epidemics. Improved hygiene and fish-handling techniques will be important in reducing the persistence of reservoirs.

  15. An Optimized Protocol for DNA Extraction from Wheat Seeds and Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification (LAMP to Detect Fusarium graminearum Contamination of Wheat Grain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Moslem

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A simple, rapid, and efficient method for isolating genomic DNA from germinated seeds of wheat that is free from polysaccharides and polyphenols is reported. DNA was extracted, treated with RNase, measured and tested for completeness using agarose gel electrophoresis. DNA purification from wheat grains yielded abundant, amplifiable DNA with yields typically between 100 and 200 ng DNA/mg. The effectiveness and reliability of the method was tested by assessing quantity and quality of the isolated DNA using three PCR-based markers. Inter-simple sequence repeats (ISSRs were used to assess the genetic diversity between different wheat varieties. Specific PCR primer pair Tox5-1/Tox5-2 and a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP procedure were used to detect genomic DNA of Fusarium graminearum in contaminated wheat seeds. In this method there is no need to use liquid nitrogen for crushing germinated seedlings. The protocol takes approximately one hour to prepare high quality DNA. In combination with the LAMP assay it is a fast and cost-effective alternative to traditional diagnostic methods for the early detection of toxigenic fusaria in cereals.

  16. Predicting the carcinogenicity of chemicals with alternative approaches: recent advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benigni, Romualdo

    2014-09-01

    Alternative approaches to the rodent bioassay are necessary for early identification of problematic drugs and biocides during the development process, and are the only practicable tool for assessing environmental chemicals with no or adequate safety documentation. This review informs on: i) the traditional prescreening through genotoxicity testing; ii) an integrative approach that assesses DNA-reactivity and ability to disorganize tissues; iii) new applications of omics technologies (ToxCast/Tox21 project); iv) a pragmatic approach aimed at filling data gaps by intrapolating/extrapolating from similar chemicals (read-across, category formation). The review also approaches the issue of the concerns about false-positive and false-negative results that prevents a wider acceptance and use of alternatives. The review addresses strengths and limitations of various proposals, and concludes on the need of differential approaches to the issue of false negatives and false positives. False negatives can be eliminated or reduced below the variability of the animal assay with conservative quantitative structure-activity relationships or in vitro tests; false positives can be cleared with ad hoc mechanistically based follow-ups. This framework can permit a reduction of animal testing and a better protection of human health.

  17. Tiered High-Throughput Screening Approach to Identify ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    High-throughput screening (HTS) for potential thyroid–disrupting chemicals requires a system of assays to capture multiple molecular-initiating events (MIEs) that converge on perturbed thyroid hormone (TH) homeostasis. Screening for MIEs specific to TH-disrupting pathways is limited in the US EPA ToxCast screening assay portfolio. To fill one critical screening gap, the Amplex UltraRed-thyroperoxidase (AUR-TPO) assay was developed to identify chemicals that inhibit TPO, as decreased TPO activity reduces TH synthesis. The ToxCast Phase I and II chemical libraries, comprised of 1,074 unique chemicals, were initially screened using a single, high concentration to identify potential TPO inhibitors. Chemicals positive in the single concentration screen were retested in concentration-response. Due to high false positive rates typically observed with loss-of-signal assays such as AUR-TPO, we also employed two additional assays in parallel to identify possible sources of nonspecific assay signal loss, enabling stratification of roughly 300 putative TPO inhibitors based upon selective AUR-TPO activity. A cell-free luciferase inhibition assay was used to identify nonspecific enzyme inhibition among the putative TPO inhibitors, and a cytotoxicity assay using a human cell line was used to estimate the cellular tolerance limit. Additionally, the TPO inhibition activities of 150 chemicals were compared between the AUR-TPO and an orthogonal peroxidase oxidation assay using

  18. Uncertainty Quantification in High Throughput Screening ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Using uncertainty quantification, we aim to improve the quality of modeling data from high throughput screening assays for use in risk assessment. ToxCast is a large-scale screening program that analyzes thousands of chemicals using over 800 assays representing hundreds of biochemical and cellular processes, including endocrine disruption, cytotoxicity, and zebrafish development. Over 2.6 million concentration response curves are fit to models to extract parameters related to potency and efficacy. Models built on ToxCast results are being used to rank and prioritize the toxicological risk of tested chemicals and to predict the toxicity of tens of thousands of chemicals not yet tested in vivo. However, the data size also presents challenges. When fitting the data, the choice of models, model selection strategy, and hit call criteria must reflect the need for computational efficiency and robustness, requiring hard and somewhat arbitrary cutoffs. When coupled with unavoidable noise in the experimental concentration response data, these hard cutoffs cause uncertainty in model parameters and the hit call itself. The uncertainty will then propagate through all of the models built on the data. Left unquantified, this uncertainty makes it difficult to fully interpret the data for risk assessment. We used bootstrap resampling methods to quantify the uncertainty in fitting models to the concentration response data. Bootstrap resampling determines confidence intervals for

  19. Analysis of Chemical Bioactivity through In Vitro Profiling ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safety assessment of drugs and environmental chemicals relies extensively on animal testing. However, the quantity of chemicals needing assessment and challenges of species extrapolation drive the development of alternative approaches. The EPA’s ToxCast and the multiagency Tox21 programs address this through use of an extensive in vitro screening program to generate data on a large library of important environmental chemicals. These in vitro assays encompass both cell-free, biochemical assays targeting proteins that may be potential molecular initiating events and cellular assays that provide coverage of critical signaling pathways and toxicity phenotypes. Effects on model organisms such as the developing zebrafish, are also part of the testing strategy. A variety of computational approaches are used to analyze the resulting complex data sets to gain insight in to inherent biological activity of chemicals and possible mechanisms of toxicity. Several case studies including identification of modulators of estrogen receptor and aromatic hydrocarbon receptor pathways with effects in primary human cell systems will be described. In addition, existing in vivo data from a subset of the chemicals was used to anchor predictive models using in vitro data for a number of adverse endpoints including reproductive and developmental toxicities. The strengths and weaknesses of this approach will be described. This work does not necessarily reflect official Agency policy. Pres

  20. Short Toxin-like Proteins Abound in Cnidaria Genomes

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    Michal Linial

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Cnidaria is a rich phylum that includes thousands of marine species. In this study, we focused on Anthozoa and Hydrozoa that are represented by the Nematostella vectensis (Sea anemone and Hydra magnipapillata genomes. We present a method for ranking the toxin-like candidates from complete proteomes of Cnidaria. Toxin-like functions were revealed using ClanTox, a statistical machine-learning predictor trained on ion channel inhibitors from venomous animals. Fundamental features that were emphasized in training ClanTox include cysteines and their spacing along the sequences. Among the 83,000 proteins derived from Cnidaria representatives, we found 170 candidates that fulfill the properties of toxin-like-proteins, the vast majority of which were previously unrecognized as toxins. An additional 394 short proteins exhibit characteristics of toxin-like proteins at a moderate degree of confidence. Remarkably, only 11% of the predicted toxin-like proteins were previously classified as toxins. Based on our prediction methodology and manual annotation, we inferred functions for over 400 of these proteins. Such functions include protease inhibitors, membrane pore formation, ion channel blockers and metal binding proteins. Many of the proteins belong to small families of paralogs. We conclude that the evolutionary expansion of toxin-like proteins in Cnidaria contributes to their fitness in the complex environment of the aquatic ecosystem.

  1. Genetic toxicology in the 21st century: Reflections and future ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    A symposium at the 40th anniversary of the Environmental Mutagen Society, held from October 24–28, 2009 in St. Louis, MO, surveyed the current status and future directions of genetic toxicology. This article summarizes the presentations and provides a perspective on the future. An abbreviated history is presented, highlighting the current standard battery of genotoxicity assays and persistent challenges. Application of computational toxicology to safety testing within a regulatory setting is discussed as a means for reducing the need for animal testing and human clinical trials, and current approaches and applications of in silico genotoxicity screening approaches across the pharmaceutical industry were surveyed and are reported here. The expanded use of toxicogenomics to illuminate mechanisms and bridge genotoxicity and carcinogenicity, and new public efforts to use high-throughput screening technologies to address lack of toxicity evaluation for the backlog of thousands of industrial chemicals in the environment are detailed. The Tox21 project involves coordinated efforts of four U.S. Government regulatory/research entities to use new and innovative assays to characterize key steps in toxicity pathways, including genotoxic and nongenotoxic mechanisms for carcinogenesis. Progress to date, highlighting preliminary test results from the National Toxicology Program is summarized. Finally, an overview is presented of ToxCast™, a related research program of the

  2. New publicly available chemical query language, CSRML, to support chemotype representations for application to data mining and modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chihae; Tarkhov, Aleksey; Marusczyk, Jörg; Bienfait, Bruno; Gasteiger, Johann; Kleinoeder, Thomas; Magdziarz, Tomasz; Sacher, Oliver; Schwab, Christof H; Schwoebel, Johannes; Terfloth, Lothar; Arvidson, Kirk; Richard, Ann; Worth, Andrew; Rathman, James

    2015-03-23

    Chemotypes are a new approach for representing molecules, chemical substructures and patterns, reaction rules, and reactions. Chemotypes are capable of integrating types of information beyond what is possible using current representation methods (e.g., SMARTS patterns) or reaction transformations (e.g., SMIRKS, reaction SMILES). Chemotypes are expressed in the XML-based Chemical Subgraphs and Reactions Markup Language (CSRML), and can be encoded not only with connectivity and topology but also with properties of atoms, bonds, electronic systems, or molecules. CSRML has been developed in parallel with a public set of chemotypes, i.e., the ToxPrint chemotypes, which are designed to provide excellent coverage of environmental, regulatory, and commercial-use chemical space, as well as to represent chemical patterns and properties especially relevant to various toxicity concerns. A software application, ChemoTyper has also been developed and made publicly available in order to enable chemotype searching and fingerprinting against a target structure set. The public ChemoTyper houses the ToxPrint chemotype CSRML dictionary, as well as reference implementation so that the query specifications may be adopted by other chemical structure knowledge systems. The full specifications of the XML-based CSRML standard used to express chemotypes are publicly available to facilitate and encourage the exchange of structural knowledge.

  3. An optimized protocol for DNA extraction from wheat seeds and Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification (LAMP) to detect Fusarium graminearum contamination of wheat grain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd-Elsalam, Kamel; Bahkali, Ali; Moslem, Mohamed; Amin, Osama E; Niessen, Ludwig

    2011-01-01

    A simple, rapid, and efficient method for isolating genomic DNA from germinated seeds of wheat that is free from polysaccharides and polyphenols is reported. DNA was extracted, treated with RNase, measured and tested for completeness using agarose gel electrophoresis. DNA purification from wheat grains yielded abundant, amplifiable DNA with yields typically between 100 and 200 ng DNA/mg. The effectiveness and reliability of the method was tested by assessing quantity and quality of the isolated DNA using three PCR-based markers. Inter-simple sequence repeats (ISSRs) were used to assess the genetic diversity between different wheat varieties. Specific PCR primer pair Tox5-1/Tox5-2 and a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) procedure were used to detect genomic DNA of Fusarium graminearum in contaminated wheat seeds. In this method there is no need to use liquid nitrogen for crushing germinated seedlings. The protocol takes approximately one hour to prepare high quality DNA. In combination with the LAMP assay it is a fast and cost-effective alternative to traditional diagnostic methods for the early detection of toxigenic fusaria in cereals.

  4. Virulence Genotyping of Pasteurella multocida Isolated from Multiple Hosts from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laxmi Narayan Sarangi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, 108 P. multocida isolates recovered from various host animals such as cattle, buffalo, swine, poultry (chicken, duck, and emu and rabbits were screened for carriage of 8 virulence associated genes. The results revealed some unique information on the prevalence of virulence associated genes among Indian isolates. With the exception of toxA gene, all other virulence associated genes were found to be regularly distributed among host species. Association study between capsule type and virulence genes suggested that pfhA, nanB, and nanH genes were regularly distributed among all serotypes with the exception of CapD, whereas toxA gene was found to be positively associated with CapD and CapA. The frequency of hgbA and nanH genes among swine isolates of Indian origin was found to be less in comparison to its equivalents around the globe. Interestingly, very high prevalence of tbpA gene was observed among poultry, swine, and rabbit isolates. Likewise, very high prevalence of pfhA gene (95.3% was observed among Indian isolates, irrespective of host species origin.

  5. Virulence genotyping of Pasteurella multocida isolated from multiple hosts from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarangi, Laxmi Narayan; Priyadarshini, Adyasha; Kumar, Santosh; Thomas, Prasad; Gupta, Santosh Kumar; Nagaleekar, Viswas Konasagara; Singh, Vijendra Pal

    2014-01-01

    In this study, 108 P. multocida isolates recovered from various host animals such as cattle, buffalo, swine, poultry (chicken, duck, and emu) and rabbits were screened for carriage of 8 virulence associated genes. The results revealed some unique information on the prevalence of virulence associated genes among Indian isolates. With the exception of toxA gene, all other virulence associated genes were found to be regularly distributed among host species. Association study between capsule type and virulence genes suggested that pfhA, nanB, and nanH genes were regularly distributed among all serotypes with the exception of CapD, whereas toxA gene was found to be positively associated with CapD and CapA. The frequency of hgbA and nanH genes among swine isolates of Indian origin was found to be less in comparison to its equivalents around the globe. Interestingly, very high prevalence of tbpA gene was observed among poultry, swine, and rabbit isolates. Likewise, very high prevalence of pfhA gene (95.3%) was observed among Indian isolates, irrespective of host species origin.

  6. Prediction of post-operative necrosis after mastectomy: A pilot study utilizing optical diffusion imaging spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xie Xian-Jin

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Flap necrosis and epidermolysis occurs in 18-30% of all mastectomies. Complications may be prevented by intra-operative detection of ischemia. Currently, no technique enables quantitative valuation of mastectomy skin perfusion. Optical Diffusion Imaging Spectroscopy (ViOptix T.Ox Tissue Oximeter measures the ratio of oxyhemoglobin to deoxyhemoglobin over a 1 × 1 cm area to obtain a non-invasive measurement of perfusion (StO2. Methods This study evaluates the ability of ViOptix T.Ox Tissue Oximeter to predict mastectomy flap necrosis. StO2 measurements were taken at five points before and at completion of dissection in 10 patients. Data collected included: demographics, tumor size, flap length/thickness, co-morbidities, procedure length, and wound complications. Results One patient experienced mastectomy skin flap necrosis. Five patients underwent immediate reconstruction, including the patient with necrosis. Statistically significant factors contributing to necrosis included reduction in medial flap StO2 (p = 0.0189, reduction in inferior flap StO2 (p = 0.003, and flap length (p = 0.009. Conclusion StO2 reductions may be utilized to identify impaired perfusion in mastectomy skin flaps.

  7. An Integrative data mining approach to identifying Adverse ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Adverse Outcome Pathway (AOP) framework is a tool for making biological connections and summarizing key information across different levels of biological organization to connect biological perturbations at the molecular level to adverse outcomes for an individual or population. Computational approaches to explore and determine these connections can accelerate the assembly of AOPs. By leveraging the wealth of publicly available data covering chemical effects on biological systems, computationally-predicted AOPs (cpAOPs) were assembled via data mining of high-throughput screening (HTS) in vitro data, in vivo data and other disease phenotype information. Frequent Itemset Mining (FIM) was used to find associations between the gene targets of ToxCast HTS assays and disease data from Comparative Toxicogenomics Database (CTD) by using the chemicals as the common aggregators between datasets. The method was also used to map gene expression data to disease data from CTD. A cpAOP network was defined by considering genes and diseases as nodes and FIM associations as edges. This network contained 18,283 gene to disease associations for the ToxCast data and 110,253 for CTD gene expression. Two case studies show the value of the cpAOP network by extracting subnetworks focused either on fatty liver disease or the Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor (AHR). The subnetwork surrounding fatty liver disease included many genes known to play a role in this disease. When querying the cpAOP

  8. Merging Models and Biomonitoring Data to Characterize Sources andPathways of Human Exposure to Organophosphorous Pesticides in the SalinasValley of California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKone, Thomas E.; Castorina, Rosemary; Kuwabara, Yu; Harnly,Martha E.; Eskenazi, Brenda; Bradman, Asa

    2006-06-01

    By drawing on human biomonitoring data and limited environmental samples together with outputs from the CalTOX multimedia, multipathway source-to-dose model, we characterize cumulative intake of organophosphorous (OP) pesticides in an agricultural region of California. We assemble regional OP pesticide use, environmental sampling, and biological tissue monitoring data for a large and geographically dispersed population cohort of 592 pregnant Latina women in California (the CHAMACOS cohort). We then use CalTOX with regional pesticide usage data to estimate the magnitude and uncertainty of exposure and intake from local sources. We combine model estimates of intake from local sources with food intake based on national residue data to estimate for the CHAMACOS cohort cumulative median OP intake, which corresponds to expected levels of urinary dialkylphosphate (DAP) metabolite excretion for this cohort. From these results we develop premises about relative contributions from different sources and pathways of exposure. We evaluate these premises by comparing the magnitude and variation of DAPs in the CHAMACOS cohort with the whole U.S. population using data from the National Health and Nutrition Evaluation Survey (NHANES). This comparison supports the premise that in both populations diet is the common and dominant exposure pathway. Both the model results and biomarker comparison supports the observation that the CHAMACOS population has a statistically significant higher intake of OP pesticides that appears as an almost constant additional dose among all participants. We attribute the magnitude and small variance of this intake to non-dietary exposure in residences from local sources.

  9. Rchemcpp: a web service for structural analoging in ChEMBL, Drugbank and the Connectivity Map.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klambauer, Günter; Wischenbart, Martin; Mahr, Michael; Unterthiner, Thomas; Mayr, Andreas; Hochreiter, Sepp

    2015-10-15

    We have developed Rchempp, a web service that identifies structurally similar compounds (structural analogs) in large-scale molecule databases. The service allows compounds to be queried in the widely used ChEMBL, DrugBank and the Connectivity Map databases. Rchemcpp utilizes the best performing similarity functions, i.e. molecule kernels, as measures for structural similarity. Molecule kernels have proven superior performance over other similarity measures and are currently excelling at machine learning challenges. To considerably reduce computational time, and thereby make it feasible as a web service, a novel efficient prefiltering strategy has been developed, which maintains the sensitivity of the method. By exploiting information contained in public databases, the web service facilitates many applications crucial for the drug development process, such as prioritizing compounds after screening or reducing adverse side effects during late phases. Rchemcpp was used in the DeepTox pipeline that has won the Tox21 Data Challenge and is frequently used by researchers in pharmaceutical companies. The web service and the R package are freely available via http://shiny.bioinf.jku.at/Analoging/ and via Bioconductor. hochreit@bioinf.jku.at Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. ACToR Chemical Structure processing using Open Source ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    ACToR (Aggregated Computational Toxicology Resource) is a centralized database repository developed by the National Center for Computational Toxicology (NCCT) at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Free and open source tools were used to compile toxicity data from over 1,950 public sources. ACToR contains chemical structure information and toxicological data for over 558,000 unique chemicals. The database primarily includes data from NCCT research programs, in vivo toxicity data from ToxRef, human exposure data from ExpoCast, high-throughput screening data from ToxCast and high quality chemical structure information from the EPA DSSTox program. The DSSTox database is a chemical structure inventory for the NCCT programs and currently has about 16,000 unique structures. Included are also data from PubChem, ChemSpider, USDA, FDA, NIH and several other public data sources. ACToR has been a resource to various international and national research groups. Most of our recent efforts on ACToR are focused on improving the structural identifiers and Physico-Chemical properties of the chemicals in the database. Organizing this huge collection of data and improving the chemical structure quality of the database has posed some major challenges. Workflows have been developed to process structures, calculate chemical properties and identify relationships between CAS numbers. The Structure processing workflow integrates web services (PubChem and NIH NCI Cactus) to d

  11. Compound toxicity screening and structure-activity relationship modeling in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planson, Anne-Gaëlle; Carbonell, Pablo; Paillard, Elodie; Pollet, Nicolas; Faulon, Jean-Loup

    2012-03-01

    Synthetic biology and metabolic engineering are used to develop new strategies for producing valuable compounds ranging from therapeutics to biofuels in engineered microorganisms. When developing methods for high-titer production cells, toxicity is an important element to consider. Indeed the production rate can be limited due to toxic intermediates or accumulation of byproducts of the heterologous biosynthetic pathway of interest. Conversely, highly toxic molecules are desired when designing antimicrobials. Compound toxicity in bacteria plays a major role in metabolic engineering as well as in the development of new antibacterial agents. Here, we screened a diversified chemical library of 166 compounds for toxicity in Escherichia coli. The dataset was built using a clustering algorithm maximizing the chemical diversity in the library. The resulting assay data was used to develop a toxicity predictor that we used to assess the toxicity of metabolites throughout the metabolome. This new tool for predicting toxicity can thus be used for fine-tuning heterologous expression and can be integrated in a computational-framework for metabolic pathway design. Many structure-activity relationship tools have been developed for toxicology studies in eukaryotes [Valerio (2009), Toxicol Appl Pharmacol, 241(3): 356-370], however, to the best of our knowledge we present here the first E. coli toxicity prediction web server based on QSAR models (EcoliTox server: http://www.issb.genopole.fr/∼faulon/EcoliTox.php). Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Case Study: Organotypic human in vitro models of embryonic ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morphogenetic fusion of tissues is a common event in embryonic development and disruption of fusion is associated with birth defects of the eye, heart, neural tube, phallus, palate, and other organ systems. Embryonic tissue fusion requires precise regulation of cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions that drive proliferation, differentiation, and morphogenesis. Chemical low-dose exposures can disrupt morphogenesis across space and time by interfering with key embryonic fusion events. The Morphogenetic Fusion Task uses computer and in vitro models to elucidate consequences of developmental exposures. The Morphogenetic Fusion Task integrates multiple approaches to model responses to chemicals that leaad to birth defects, including integrative mining on ToxCast DB, ToxRefDB, and chemical structures, advanced computer agent-based models, and human cell-based cultures that model disruption of cellular and molecular behaviors including mechanisms predicted from integrative data mining and agent-based models. The purpose of the poster is to indicate progress on the CSS 17.02 Virtual Tissue Models Morphogenesis Task 1 products for the Board of Scientific Counselors meeting on Nov 16-17.

  13. Biogas from MSW landfill: Composition and determination of chlorine content with the AOX (adsorbable organically bound halogens) technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rey, M.D.; Font, R.; Aracil, I.

    2013-01-01

    An exhaustive characterization of the biogas from some waste disposal facilities has been carried out. The analysis includes the main components (methane, carbon dioxide, nitrogen and oxygen) as well as trace components such as hydrogen sulphide, ammonia and VOCs (volatile organic compounds) including siloxanes and halogenated compounds. VOCs were measured by GC/MS (Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry) using two different procedures: thermal desorption of the Tenax TA and Carbotrap 349 tubes and SPME (Solid Phase Micro-Extraction). A method has been established to measure the total halogen content of the biogas with the AOX (adsorbable organically bound halogens) technique. The equipment used to analyze the samples was a Total Organic Halogen Analyzer (TOX-100). Similar results were obtained when comparing the TOX (Total Organic Halogen) values with those obtained by GC/MS. The halogen content in all the samples was under 22 mg Cl/Nm 3 which is below the limit of 150 mg/Nm 3 proposed in the Spanish Regulations for any use of the biogas. The low chlorine content in the biogas studied, as well as the low content of other trace compounds, makes it suitable for use as a fuel for electricity generating engines

  14. Diagnosis of Clostridium difficile-associated disease: examination of multiple algorithms using toxin EIA, glutamate dehydrogenase EIA and loop-mediated isothermal amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamber, A I; Fitzsimmons, K; Cunniffe, J G; Beasor, C C; Mackintosh, C A; Hobbs, G

    2012-01-01

    The laboratory diagnosis of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) needs to be accurate and timely to ensure optimal patient management, infection control and reliable surveillance. Three methods are evaluated using 810 consecutive stool samples against toxigenic culture: CDT TOX A/B Premier enzyme immunoassay (EIA) kit (Meridian Bioscience, Europe), Premier EIA for C. difficile glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) (Meridian Bioscience, Europe) and the Illumigene kit (Meridian Bioscience, Europe), both individually and within combined testing algorithms. The study revealed that the CDT TOX A/B Premier EIA gave rise to false-positive and false-negative results and demonstrated poor sensitivity (56.47%), compared to Premier EIA for C. difficile GDH (97.65%), suggesting this GDH EIA can be a useful negative screening method. Results for the Illumigene assay alone showed sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value (NPV) and positive predictive value (PPV) of 91.57%, 98.07%, 99.03% and 84.44%, respectively. A two-stage algorithm using Premier EIA for C. difficile GDH/Illumigene assay yielded superior results compared with other testing algorithms (91.57%, 98.07%, 99.03% and 84.44%, respectively), mirroring the Illumigene performance. However, Illumigene is approximately half the cost of current polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods, has a rapid turnaround time and requires no specialised skill base, making it an attractive alternative to assays such as the Xpert C. difficile assay (Cepheid, Sunnyvale, CA). A three-stage algorithm offered no improvement and would hamper workflow.

  15. Relationship of the Interaction Between Two Quantitative Trait Loci with γ-Globin Expression in β-Thalassemia Intermedia Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    NickAria, Shiva; Haghpanah, Sezaneh; Ramzi, Mani; Karimi, Mehran

    2018-05-10

    Globin switching is a significant factor on blood hemoglobin (Hb) level but its molecular mechanisms have not yet been identified, however, several quantitative trait loci (QTL) and polymorphisms involved regions on chromosomes 2p, 6q, 8q and X account for variation in the γ-globin expression level. We studied the effect of interaction between a region on intron six of the TOX gene, chromosome 8q (chr8q) and XmnI locus on the γ-globin promoter, chr11p on γ-globin expression in 150 β-thalassemia intermedia (β-TI) patients, evaluated by statistical interaction analysis. Our results showed a significant interaction between one QTL on intron six of the TOX gene (rs9693712) and XmnI locus that effect γ-globin expression. Interchromosomal interaction mediates through transcriptional machanisms to preserve true genome architectural features, chromosomes localization and DNA bending. This interaction can be a part of the unknown molecular mechanism of globin switching and regulation of gene expression.

  16. Systems Toxicology of Male Reproductive Development ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adverse trends in male reproductive health have been reported for increased rates of testicular germ cell tumor, low semen quality, cryptorchidism, and hypospadias. An association with prenatal environmental exposure has been inferred from human and animal studies underlying male reproductive developmental defects. The present study established the links between environmental chemicals, molecular targets, and adverse outcomes using U.S. EPA animal study (ToxRefDB) and high-throughput screening (ToxCast) databases. This systems-based approach revealed a phenotypic hierarchy across 63 chemicals and a pleiotropic in vitro bioactivity profile. Although estrogenic and anti-androgenic activities have been extensively studied in male reproductive developmental toxicity, the present study showed these receptor targets to be only a subset of the potential landscape of molecular targets. A variety of chemical (e.g. phthalates, conazoles, carbamates, and phenol compounds) and bioactivity (e.g. nuclear receptors, vascular remodeling proteins, and cytochrome-P450 reductases) clusters further suggested multiple pathways leading to the adverse outcomes. This points to the need for multi-scale systems models to predict whether the occurrence of one adverse outcome may predict the risk of another. Imbalances in androgen and estrogen signaling have been a general focus in male reproductive toxicology research. While a number of recent studies have demonstrated that both hormonal

  17. Glucose- but not rice-based oral rehydration therapy enhances the production of virulence determinants in the human pathogen Vibrio cholerae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane Kühn

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite major attempts to prevent cholera transmission, millions of people worldwide still must address this devastating disease. Cholera research has so far mainly focused on the causative agent, the bacterium Vibrio cholerae, or on disease treatment, but rarely were results from both fields interconnected. Indeed, the treatment of this severe diarrheal disease is mostly accomplished by oral rehydration therapy (ORT, whereby water and electrolytes are replenished. Commonly distributed oral rehydration salts also contain glucose. Here, we analyzed the effects of glucose and alternative carbon sources on the production of virulence determinants in the causative agent of cholera, the bacterium Vibrio cholerae during in vitro experimentation. We demonstrate that virulence gene expression and the production of cholera toxin are enhanced in the presence of glucose or similarly transported sugars in a ToxR-, TcpP- and ToxT-dependent manner. The virulence genes were significantly less expressed if alternative non-PTS carbon sources, including rice-based starch, were utilized. Notably, even though glucose-based ORT is commonly used, field studies indicated that rice-based ORT performs better. We therefore used a spatially explicit epidemiological model to demonstrate that the better performing rice-based ORT could have a significant impact on epidemic progression based on the recent outbreak of cholera in Haiti. Our results strongly support a change of carbon source for the treatment of cholera, especially in epidemic settings.

  18. Differential modulation of FXR activity by chlorophacinone and ivermectin analogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Chia-Wen [NIH Chemical Genomics Center, National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Hsieh, Jui-Hua [National Toxicology Program, National Institutes of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Huang, Ruili [NIH Chemical Genomics Center, National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Pijnenburg, Dirk [PamGene International B.V., Wolvenhoek 10, 5211 HH ' s-Hertogenbosch (Netherlands); Khuc, Thai [NIH Chemical Genomics Center, National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Hamm, Jon [Integrated Laboratory System, Inc., Morrisville, NC (United States); Zhao, Jinghua; Lynch, Caitlin [NIH Chemical Genomics Center, National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Beuningen, Rinie van [PamGene International B.V., Wolvenhoek 10, 5211 HH ' s-Hertogenbosch (Netherlands); Chang, Xiaoqing [Integrated Laboratory System, Inc., Morrisville, NC (United States); Houtman, René [PamGene International B.V., Wolvenhoek 10, 5211 HH ' s-Hertogenbosch (Netherlands); Xia, Menghang, E-mail: mxia@mail.nih.gov [NIH Chemical Genomics Center, National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2016-12-15

    Chemicals that alter normal function of farnesoid X receptor (FXR) have been shown to affect the homeostasis of bile acids, glucose, and lipids. Several structural classes of environmental chemicals and drugs that modulated FXR transactivation were previously identified by quantitative high-throughput screening (qHTS) of the Tox21 10 K chemical collection. In the present study, we validated the FXR antagonist activity of selected structural classes, including avermectin anthelmintics, dihydropyridine calcium channel blockers, 1,3-indandione rodenticides, and pyrethroid pesticides, using in vitro assay and quantitative structural-activity relationship (QSAR) analysis approaches. (Z)-Guggulsterone, chlorophacinone, ivermectin, and their analogs were profiled for their ability to alter CDCA-mediated FXR binding using a panel of 154 coregulator motifs and to induce or inhibit transactivation and coactivator recruitment activities of constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), liver X receptor alpha (LXRα), or pregnane X receptor (PXR). Our results showed that chlorophacinone and ivermectin had distinct modes of action (MOA) in modulating FXR-coregulator interactions and compound selectivity against the four aforementioned functionally-relevant nuclear receptors. These findings collectively provide mechanistic insights regarding compound activities against FXR and possible explanations for in vivo toxicological observations of chlorophacinone, ivermectin, and their analogs. - Highlights: • A subset of Tox21 chemicals was investigated for FXR antagonism. • In vitro and computational approaches were used to evaluate FXR antagonists. • Chlorophacinone and ivermectin had distinct patterns in modulating FXR activity.

  19. Chemical stabilization of porous silicon for enhanced biofunctionalization with immunoglobulin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Naveas, Vicente Torres Costa, Dario Gallach, Jacobo Hernandez-Montelongo, Raul Jose Martín Palma, Josefa Predenstinacion Garcia-Ruiz and Miguel Manso-Silván

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Porous silicon (PSi is widely used in biological experiments, owing to its biocompatibility and well-established fabrication methods that allow tailoring its surface. Nevertheless, there are some unresolved issues such as deciding whether the stabilization of PSi is necessary for its biological applications and evaluating the effects of PSi stabilization on the surface biofunctionalization with proteins. In this work we demonstrate that non-stabilized PSi is prone to detachment owing to the stress induced upon biomolecular adsorption. Biofunctionalized non-stabilized PSi loses the interference properties characteristic of a thin film, and groove-like structures resulting from a final layer collapse were observed by scanning electron microscopy. Likewise, direct PSi derivatization with 3-aminopropyl-triethoxysilane (APTS does not stabilize PSi against immunoglobulin biofunctionalization. To overcome this problem, we developed a simple chemical process of stabilizing PSi (CoxPSi for biological applications, which has several advantages over thermal stabilization (ToxPSi. The process consists of chemical oxidation in H2O2, surface derivatization with APTS and a curing step at 120 °C. This process offers integral homogeneous PSi morphology, hydrophilic surface termination (contact angle θ = 26° and highly efficient derivatized and biofunctionalized PSi surfaces (six times more efficient than ToxPSi. All these features are highly desirable for biological applications, such as biosensing, where our results can be used for the design and optimization of the biomolecular immobilization cascade on PSi surfaces.

  20. Novel transcriptome assembly and comparative toxicity pathway analysis in mahi-mahi (Coryphaena hippurus) embryos and larvae exposed to Deepwater Horizon oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Elvis Genbo; Mager, Edward M.; Grosell, Martin; Hazard, E. Starr; Hardiman, Gary; Schlenk, Daniel

    2017-03-01

    The impacts of Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil on morphology and function during embryonic development have been documented for a number of fish species, including the economically and ecologically important pelagic species, mahi-mahi (Coryphaena hippurus). However, further investigations on molecular events and pathways responsible for developmental toxicity have been largely restricted due to the limited molecular data available for this species. We sought to establish the de novo transcriptomic database from the embryos and larvae of mahi-mahi exposed to water accommodated fractions (HEWAFs) of two DWH oil types (weathered and source oil), in an effort to advance our understanding of the molecular aspects involved during specific toxicity responses. By high throughput sequencing (HTS), we obtained the first de novo transcriptome of mahi-mahi, with 60,842 assembled transcripts and 30,518 BLAST hits. Among them, 2,345 genes were significantly regulated in 96hpf larvae after exposure to weathered oil. With comparative analysis to a reference-transcriptome-guided approach on gene ontology and tox-pathways, we confirmed the novel approach effective for exploring tox-pathways in non-model species, and also identified a list of co-expressed genes as potential biomarkers which will provide information for the construction of an Adverse Outcome Pathway which could be useful in Ecological Risk Assessments.