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Sample records for vzaimodejstvie chekpojnt-genov rad9

  1. Response of alternative splice isoforms of OsRad9 gene from Oryza sativa to environmental stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui; Wang, Wenguo; Li, Fosheng; Wang, Qingwei; Wang, Shenghua; Xu, Ying; Chen, Fang

    2017-07-14

    Rad9 protein plays an important role in cell-cycle checkpoint signal transduction in human and yeast cells, but knowledge about Rad9 in plants is limited. This study reports that the Rad9 gene of rice can generate the transcript products OsRad9.1 and OsRad9.2 through alternative splicing. OsRad9.1, with all nine exons, is the main cell-cycle checkpoint protein involved in the response of rice to genotoxic stresses (ultraviolet radiation and antibiotic stress), environmental stresses (drought, salt, and heavy metal stress), and auxin stimuli (2,4-D, IAA, and IBA). Meanwhile, transcript isoform OsRad9.2, which lost exon7 and exon8, showed different preferential stimulation effects on these stresses and pollen development duration. These results might indicat that besides the monitoring and repair of DNA damage, Rad9 might involve in the development of pollen.

  2. TLK1 and Rad9 Cooperate in XRT-Refractory CaP

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    believed to be responsible for the action of TLKs in double-strand break repair and radioprotection . METHODS. Western blotting and RT-PCR were used...mechanism of TLK1B-mediated radioprotection . In fact, the effect of TLK1B on survival from DSB-mediated cell killing must be mediated by its activity on Rad9...While we were working out the molecular mechanisms of radioprotection by TLK1B and Rad9, three studies were published which portend the high

  3. The rad9 gene of Coprinus cinereus encodes a proline-rich protein required for meiotic chromosome condensation and synapsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seitz, L.C.; Tang, Keliang; Cummings, W.J.; Zolan, M.E. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States)

    1996-04-01

    The rad9 gene of Coprinus cinereus is essential for the normal completion of meiosis. We examined surface-spread preparations of wild-type and rad9-1 nuclei from the meiotic stages of karyogamy through metaphase I, and we determined the primary sequence, structure, and meiotic expression of the rad9 gene. In wild-type C. cinereus, karyogamy is followed by condensation and alignment of homologous chromosomes. Condensation and axial core development largely precede synapsis, which often initiates at telomeres. A diffuse diplotene phase coincides with dissolution of the synaptonemal complex, and subsequently chromosomes further condense as the cells progress into metaphase I. In contrast, although karyogamy and nucleolar fusion are apparently normal in rad9-1 basidia, only short stretches of synaptonemal complex form. These correlate with stretches of condensed chromatin, mostly at apparent chromosome ends, and regions of presumptive triple synapsis are numerous. rad9-1 basidia enter the diffuse stages of early diplotene, and then 50% of these cells enter metaphase I by the criteria of nucleolar elimination and at least some chromatin condensation. rad9 gene expression is induced after gamma irradiation and during meiosis. The gene has 27 exons and encodes a predicted protein of 2157 amino acids, with a proline-rich amino terminus. 62 refs., 10 figs.

  4. The Rad9 Gene of Coprinus Cinereus Encodes a Proline-Rich Protein Required for Meiotic Chromosome Condensation and Synapsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitz, L. C.; Tang, K.; Cummings, W. J.; Zolan, M. E.

    1996-01-01

    The rad9 gene of Coprinus cinereus is essential for the normal completion of meiosis. We examined surface-spread preparations of wild-type and rad9-1 nuclei from the meiotic stages of karyogamy through metaphase I, and we determined the primary sequence, structure, and meiotic expression of the rad9 gene. In wild-type C. cinereus, karyogamy is followed by condensation and alignment of homologous chromosomes. Condensation and axial core development largely precede synapsis, which often initiates at telomeres. A diffuse diplotene phase coincides with dissolution of the synaptonemal complex, and subsequently chromosomes further condense as the cells progress into metaphase I. In contrast, although karyogamy and nucleolar fusion are apparently normal in rad9-1 basidia, only short stretches of synaptonemal complex form. These correlate with stretches of condensed chromatin, mostly at apparent chromosome ends, and regions of presumptive triple synapsis are numerous. rad9-1 basidia enter the diffuse stage of early diplotene, and then 50% of these cells enter metaphase I by the criteria of nucleolar elimination and at least some chromatin condensation. rad9 gene expression is induced after gamma irradiation and during meiosis. The gene has 27 exons and encodes a predicted protein of 2157 amino acids, with a proline-rich amino terminus. PMID:8846891

  5. Phosphorylation of Rad9 at serine 328 by cyclin A-Cdk2 triggers apoptosis via interfering Bcl-xL.

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    Zhuo Zhan

    Full Text Available Cyclin A-Cdk2, a cell cycle regulated Ser/Thr kinase, plays important roles in a variety of apoptoticprocesses. However, the mechanism of cyclin A-Cdk2 regulated apoptosis remains unclear. Here, we demonstrated that Rad9, a member of the BH3-only subfamily of Bcl-2 proteins, could be phosphorylated by cyclin A-Cdk2 in vitro and in vivo. Cyclin A-Cdk2 catalyzed the phosphorylation of Rad9 at serine 328 in HeLa cells during apoptosis induced by etoposide, an inhibitor of topoisomeraseII. The phosphorylation of Rad9 resulted in its translocation from the nucleus to the mitochondria and its interaction with Bcl-xL. The forced activation of cyclin A-Cdk2 in these cells by the overexpression of cyclin A,triggered Rad9 phosphorylation at serine 328 and thereby promoted the interaction of Rad9 with Bcl-xL and the subsequent initiation of the apoptotic program. The pro-apoptotic effects regulated by the cyclin A-Cdk2 complex were significantly lower in cells transfected with Rad9S328A, an expression vector that encodes a Rad9 mutant that is resistant to cyclin A-Cdk2 phosphorylation. These findings suggest that cyclin A-Cdk2 regulates apoptosis through a mechanism that involves Rad9phosphorylation.

  6. [Interaction between checkpoint genes RAD9, RAD17, RAD24, and RAD53 involved in the determination of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae sensitivity to ionizing radiation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koltovaia, N A; Nikulushkina, Iu V; Kadyshevskaia, E Iu; Roshchina, M P; Devin, A B

    2008-08-01

    Mechanisms for genetic control of cell division cycle (checkpoint control) have been studied in most detail in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To clarify the role of checkpoint genes RAD9, RAD17, RAD24, and RAD53 in cell radioresistance, double mutants were analyzed for cell sensitivity to ionizing radiation. Double mutants carrying mutations in combination with mutation rad9Delta were shown to manifest the epistatic type of interaction. Our results suggest that checkpoint genes RAD9, RAD17, RAD24, and RAD53 belong to a single epistatic group designated RAD9 and govern the same pathway. Genes RAD9 and RAD53 have a positive effect on sensitivity to gamma-radiation, whereas RAD17 and RAD24 have a negative effect. Interactions between mutations may differ when considering their sensitivity to gamma-radiation and UV light; mutations rad9Delta and rad24Delta were shown to manifest the additive effect in the first case and epistatic effect in the second.

  7. Radiosensitivity to high energy iron ions is influenced by heterozygosity for Atm, Rad9 and Brca1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, G.; Smilenov, L. B.; Lieberman, H. B.; Ludwig, T.; Hall, E. J.

    2010-09-01

    Loss of function of DNA repair genes has been implicated in the development of many types of cancer. In the last several years, heterozygosity leading to haploinsufficiency for proteins involved in DNA repair was shown to play a role in genomic instability and carcinogenesis after DNA damage is induced, for example by ionizing radiation. Since the effect of heterozygosity for one gene is relatively small, we hypothesize that predisposition to cancer could be a result of the additive effect of heterozygosity for two or more genes critical to pathways that control DNA damage signaling, repair or apoptosis. We investigated the role of heterozygosity for Atm, Rad9 and Brca1 on cell oncogenic transformation and cell survival induced by 1 GeV/ n56Fe ions. Our results show that cells heterozygous for both Atm and Rad9 or Atm and Brca1 have high survival rates and are more sensitive to transformation by high energy iron ions when compared with wild-type controls or cells haploinsufficient for only one of these proteins. Since mutations or polymorphisms for similar genes exist in a small percentage of the human population, we have identified a radiosensitive sub-population. This finding has several implications. First, the existence of a radiosensitive sub-population may distort the shape of the dose-response relationship. Second, it would not be ethical to put exceptionally radiosensitive individuals into a setting where they may potentially be exposed to substantial doses of radiation.

  8. ATR, Claspin and the Rad9-Rad1-Hus1 complex regulate Chk1 and Cdc25A in the absence of DNA damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Claus Storgaard; Syljuåsen, Randi G; Lukas, Jiri

    2004-01-01

    The ATR and Chk1 kinases are essential to maintain genomic integrity. ATR, with Claspin and the Rad9-Rad1-Hus1 complex, activates Chk1 after DNA damage. Chk1-mediated phosphorylation of the Cdc25A phosphatase is required for the mammalian S-phase checkpoint. Here, we show that during physiological...... S phase the regulation of the Chk1-Cdc25A pathway depends on ATR, Claspin, Rad9, and Hus1. Human cells with chemically or genetically ablated ATR showed inhibition of Chk1-dependent phosphorylation of Cdc25A, and they accumulated Cdc25A without external DNA damage. Furthermore, si......RNA-mediated depletion of Claspin, Rad9 and Hus1 also stabilized Cdc25A. ATR ablation also inhibited the activatory phosphorylation of Chk1 on serine 345. Thus, the ATR-Chk1-Cdc25A pathway represents an integral part of physiological S-phase progression, and interference with this mechanism undermines viability...

  9. Survival and growth of yeast without telomere capping by Cdc13 in the absence of Sgs1, Exo1, and Rad9.

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    Hien-Ping Ngo

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Maintenance of telomere capping is absolutely essential to the survival of eukaryotic cells. Telomere capping proteins, such as Cdc13 and POT1, are essential for the viability of budding yeast and mammalian cells, respectively. Here we identify, for the first time, three genetic modifications that allow budding yeast cells to survive without telomere capping by Cdc13. We found that simultaneous inactivation of Sgs1, Exo1, and Rad9, three DNA damage response (DDR proteins, is sufficient to allow cell division in the absence of Cdc13. Quantitative amplification of ssDNA (QAOS was used to show that the RecQ helicase Sgs1 plays an important role in the resection of uncapped telomeres, especially in the absence of checkpoint protein Rad9. Strikingly, simultaneous deletion of SGS1 and the nuclease EXO1, further reduces resection at uncapped telomeres and together with deletion of RAD9 permits cell survival without CDC13. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis studies show that cdc13-1 rad9Delta sgs1Delta exo1Delta strains can maintain linear chromosomes despite the absence of telomere capping by Cdc13. However, with continued passage, the telomeres of such strains eventually become short and are maintained by recombination-based mechanisms. Remarkably, cdc13Delta rad9Delta sgs1Delta exo1Delta strains, lacking any Cdc13 gene product, are viable and can grow indefinitely. Our work has uncovered a critical role for RecQ helicases in limiting the division of cells with uncapped telomeres, and this may provide one explanation for increased tumorigenesis in human diseases associated with mutations of RecQ helicases. Our results reveal the plasticity of the telomere cap and indicate that the essential role of telomere capping is to counteract specific aspects of the DDR.

  10. A Rad53 independent function of Rad9 becomes crucial for genome maintenance in the absence of the Recq helicase Sgs1.

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    Ida Nielsen

    Full Text Available The conserved family of RecQ DNA helicases consists of caretaker tumour suppressors, that defend genome integrity by acting on several pathways of DNA repair that maintain genome stability. In budding yeast, Sgs1 is the sole RecQ helicase and it has been implicated in checkpoint responses, replisome stability and dissolution of double Holliday junctions during homologous recombination. In this study we investigate a possible genetic interaction between SGS1 and RAD9 in the cellular response to methyl methane sulphonate (MMS induced damage and compare this with the genetic interaction between SGS1 and RAD24. The Rad9 protein, an adaptor for effector kinase activation, plays well-characterized roles in the DNA damage checkpoint response, whereas Rad24 is characterized as a sensor protein also in the DNA damage checkpoint response. Here we unveil novel insights into the cellular response to MMS-induced damage. Specifically, we show a strong synergistic functionality between SGS1 and RAD9 for recovery from MMS induced damage and for suppression of gross chromosomal rearrangements, which is not the case for SGS1 and RAD24. Intriguingly, it is a Rad53 independent function of Rad9, which becomes crucial for genome maintenance in the absence of Sgs1. Despite this, our dissection of the MMS checkpoint response reveals parallel, but unequal pathways for Rad53 activation and highlights significant differences between MMS- and hydroxyurea (HU-induced checkpoint responses with relation to the requirement of the Sgs1 interacting partner Topoisomerase III (Top3. Thus, whereas earlier studies have documented a Top3-independent role of Sgs1 for an HU-induced checkpoint response, we show here that upon MMS treatment, Sgs1 and Top3 together define a minor but parallel pathway to that of Rad9.

  11. A Structural Hinge in Eukaryotic MutY Homologues Mediates Catalytic Activity and Rad9-Rad1-Hus1 Checkpoint Complex Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P Luncsford; D Chang; G Shi; J Bernstein; A Madabushi; D Patterson; A Lu; E Toth

    2011-12-31

    The DNA glycosylase MutY homologue (MYH or MUTYH) removes adenines misincorporated opposite 8-oxoguanine as part of the base excision repair pathway. Importantly, defects in human MYH (hMYH) activity cause the inherited colorectal cancer syndrome MYH-associated polyposis. A key feature of MYH activity is its coordination with cell cycle checkpoint via interaction with the Rad9-Rad1-Hus1 (9-1-1) complex. The 9-1-1 complex facilitates cell cycle checkpoint activity and coordinates this activity with ongoing DNA repair. The interdomain connector (IDC, residues 295-350) between the catalytic domain and the 8-oxoguanine recognition domain of hMYH is a critical element that maintains interactions with the 9-1-1 complex. We report the first crystal structure of a eukaryotic MutY protein, a fragment of hMYH (residues 65-350) that consists of the catalytic domain and the IDC. Our structure reveals that the IDC adopts a stabilized conformation projecting away from the catalytic domain to form a docking scaffold for 9-1-1. We further examined the role of the IDC using Schizosaccharomyces pombe MYH as model system. In vitro studies of S. pombe MYH identified residues I261 and E262 of the IDC (equivalent to V315 and E316 of the hMYH IDC) as critical for maintaining the MYH/9-1-1 interaction. We determined that the eukaryotic IDC is also required for DNA damage selection and robust enzymatic activity. Our studies also provide the first evidence that disruption of the MYH/9-1-1 interaction diminishes the repair of oxidative DNA damage in vivo. Thus, preserving the MYH/9-1-1 interaction contributes significantly to minimizing the mutagenic potential of oxidative DNA damage.

  12. ORF Alignment: NC_001148 [GENIUS II[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ... Rad53 In Complex With A Rad9-Derived Phosphothreonine ... (At T155) Peptide pdb|1J4Q|A Ch...ain A, Nmr Structure Of ... The Fha1 Domain Of Rad53 In Complex With A Rad9-Derived... ... Rad53 In Complex With A Rad9-Derived Phosphothreonine ... (At T155) P...eptide pdb|1K3Q|A Chain A, Nmr Structure Of ... The Fha1 Domain Of Rad53 In Complex With A Rad9-Derived

  13. Mechanisms and Components of the DNA Damage Checkpoint

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-09-01

    indeed phosphorylated in vivo. To directly identify sites of in vivo phosphorylation on Rad9, I planned to use tryptic phosphopeptide mapping ( TPM ...amounts (mCi) of radioactive 32p. Furthermore, TPM is most successful on smaller proteins that yield a simpler tryptic peptide map. Nonetheless, as...Tell-dependent manner, and DNA checkpoints attenuate the mutagenicity , gRad53 specifically interacts with phosphorylated Rad9 instabilityoind

  14. Radiosensitive and mitotic recombination phenotypes of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae dun1 mutant defective in DNA damage-inducible gene expression.

    OpenAIRE

    Fasullo, M; Koudelik, J; AhChing, P; Giallanza, P; Cera, C

    1999-01-01

    The biological significance of DNA damage-induced gene expression in conferring resistance to DNA-damaging agents is unclear. We investigated the role of DUN1-mediated, DNA damage-inducible gene expression in conferring radiation resistance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The DUN1 gene was assigned to the RAD3 epistasis group by quantitating the radiation sensitivities of dun1, rad52, rad1, rad9, rad18 single and double mutants, and of the dun1 rad9 rad52 triple mutant. The dun1 and rad52 single...

  15. Production and Characterization of Radiation-Sensitive Meiotic Mutants of Coprinus Cinereus

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    Zolan, M. E.; Tremel, C. J.; Pukkila, P. J.

    1988-01-01

    We have isolated four γ-ray-sensitive mutants of the basidiomycete Coprinus cinereus. When homozygous, two of these (rad 3-1 and rad 9-1) produce fruiting bodies with very few viable basidiospores, the products of meiosis in this organism. A less radiation-sensitive allele of RAD 3, rad 3-2, causes no apparent meiotic defect in homozygous strains. Quantitative measurements of oidial survival of rad 3-1;rad 9-1 double mutants compared to the single mutants indicated that rad 3-1 and rad 9-1 mutants are defective in the same DNA repair pathway. In the few viable basidiospores that are produced by these two strains, essentially normal levels of meiotic recombination can be detected. None of the mutants exhibits increased sensitivity to UV radiation. Cytological examination of meiotic chromosomes from mutant and wild-type fruiting bodies showed that rad 3-1 homozygous strains fail to condense and pair homologous chromosomes during prophase I. Although rad 9-1 strains are successful at chromosome pairing, meiosis is usually not completed in these mutants. PMID:3197952

  16. Efficient isolation and mapping of rad genes of the fungus Coprinus cinereus using chromosome-specific libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolan, M E; Crittenden, J R; Heyler, N K; Seitz, L C

    1992-01-01

    We have constructed cosmid libraries from electrophoretically separated chromosomes of the basidiomycete Coprinus cinereus. These libraries greatly facilitate the isolation of genes by complementation of mutant phenotypes and are particularly useful for map-based cloning strategies. From a library constructed from two co-migrating C.cinereus chromosomes, we isolated a clone that complements the C.cinereus rad9-1 mutation. Examination of this clone showed that it complements both the repair and meiotic defects of this mutant. Restriction fragment length polymorphism mapping using a portion of this clone showed that it maps to the rad9 locus. In addition, a single copy of transforming DNA is sufficient to complement the rad9-1 defects. Thus, we believe we have cloned the rad9 gene itself. We also used a chromosome-specific library and backcrossed isolates to rapidly identify a cosmid clone which is tightly linked to the rad11 locus and is therefore a suitable starting point for a chromosome walk. These rapid methods of gene mapping and isolation should be applicable to any organism with separable chromosomes. Images PMID:1354851

  17. Identification of a novel delta9-fatty acid desaturase gene and its promoter from oil-producing fungus Rhizopus arrhizus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Dongsheng; Zhou, Hao; Yang, Zhe; Zhang, Xinxin; Xing, Laijun; Li, Mingchun

    2009-01-01

    Reverse Transcriptional Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR), Rapid Amplification of the cDNA ends (RACE) and Thermal asymmetric interlaced (TAIL)-PCR were used successfully to clone the open reading frame (1,377 bp) of delta9-fatty acid desaturase gene (named as RAD9) and its promoter region from oil-producing fungi Rhizopus arrhizus. Functional identification of the protein was done by sub-cloning RAD9 into the expression vector pYES2.0 to generate a recombinant plasmid pYRAD9, which was then subsequently transformed into Saccharomyces cerevisiae delta9-fatty acid desaturase mutation strain L8-14C to be expressed under the control of GAL1 promoter. The transformant containing RAD9 named as L8-14C-pYRAD9 could grow on the synthetic minimal medium plate with out oleic acid supplement. Fatty acid analysis also showed that the transformant contained 16:1 and 18:1. This indicated that pYRAD9 could successfully complement the mutation of L8-14C. Computational analysis of the nucleotide sequence of RAD9 promoter showed several basic transcriptional elements including a CAAT box, a GC box, a CACCC box, two TATA boxes and also several putative target-binding sites for transcription factors, which have been reported to be involved in the regulation of lipid metabolism. Preliminary functional analysis of this promoter in S. cerevisiae was done using lacZ report gene.

  18. Increased sensitivity of DNA damage response-deficient cells to stimulated microgravity-induced DNA lesions.

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    Nan Li

    Full Text Available Microgravity is a major stress factor that astronauts have to face in space. In the past, the effects of microgravity on genomic DNA damage were studied, and it seems that the effect on genomic DNA depends on cell types and the length of exposure time to microgravity or simulated microgravity (SMG. In this study we used mouse embryonic stem (MES and mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF cells to assess the effects of SMG on DNA lesions. To acquire the insight into potential mechanisms by which cells resist and/or adapt to SMG, we also included Rad9-deleted MES and Mdc1-deleted MEF cells in addition to wild type cells in this study. We observed significant SMG-induced DNA double strand breaks (DSBs in Rad9-/- MES and Mdc1-/- MEF cells but not in their corresponding wild type cells. A similar pattern of DNA single strand break or modifications was also observed in Rad9-/- MES. As the exposure to SMG was prolonged, Rad9-/- MES cells adapted to the SMG disturbance by reducing the induced DNA lesions. The induced DNA lesions in Rad9-/- MES were due to SMG-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS. Interestingly, Mdc1-/- MEF cells were only partially adapted to the SMG disturbance. That is, the induced DNA lesions were reduced over time, but did not return to the control level while ROS returned to a control level. In addition, ROS was only partially responsible for the induced DNA lesions in Mdc1-/- MEF cells. Taken together, these data suggest that SMG is a weak genomic DNA stress and can aggravate genomic instability in cells with DNA damage response (DDR defects.

  19. Dpb11/TopBP1 contributes to genomicstability via homologous recombinationand checkpoint signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Germann, Susanne Manuela

    Homologous recombination (HR) is essential for maintaining genome integrity and is a major pathway for repairing (DSBs). DPB11 is an essential gene conserved from yeast to human (TopBP1), which is involved in initiation of DNA replication and DNA checkpoint signaling. We found that Dpb11 forms foci...... signaling. Importantly, Dpb11 foci are independent of checkpoint kinases Mec1 and Tel1, as well as Rad9, further strengthening the upstream position of Dpb11 in the DNA damage checkpoint response. Moreover, dpb11-PF has a defect in S-phase checkpoint function, albeit to a lesser extent than dpb11-1. Altered...

  20. Endogenous DNA abasic sites cause cell death in the absence of Apn1, Apn2 and Rad1/Rad10 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Guillet, Marie; Boiteux, Serge

    2002-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, mutations in APN1, APN2 and either RAD1 or RAD10 genes are synthetic lethal. In fact, apn1 apn2 rad1 triple mutants can form microcolonies of ∼300 cells. Expression of Nfo, the bacterial homologue of Apn1, suppresses the lethality. Turning off the expression of Nfo induces G2/M cell cycle arrest in an apn1 apn2 rad1 triple mutant. The activation of this checkpoint is RAD9 dependent and allows residual DNA repair. The Mus81/Mms4 complex was identified as one of the...

  1. Elevated levels of the polo kinase Cdc5 override the Mec1/ATR checkpoint in budding yeast by acting at different steps of the signaling pathway.

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    Roberto Antonio Donnianni

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Checkpoints are surveillance mechanisms that constitute a barrier to oncogenesis by preserving genome integrity. Loss of checkpoint function is an early event in tumorigenesis. Polo kinases (Plks are fundamental regulators of cell cycle progression in all eukaryotes and are frequently overexpressed in tumors. Through their polo box domain, Plks target multiple substrates previously phosphorylated by CDKs and MAPKs. In response to DNA damage, Plks are temporally inhibited in order to maintain the checkpoint-dependent cell cycle block while their activity is required to silence the checkpoint response and resume cell cycle progression. Here, we report that, in budding yeast, overproduction of the Cdc5 polo kinase overrides the checkpoint signaling induced by double strand DNA breaks (DSBs, preventing the phosphorylation of several Mec1/ATR targets, including Ddc2/ATRIP, the checkpoint mediator Rad9, and the transducer kinase Rad53/CHK2. We also show that high levels of Cdc5 slow down DSB processing in a Rad9-dependent manner, but do not prevent the binding of checkpoint factors to a single DSB. Finally, we provide evidence that Sae2, the functional ortholog of human CtIP, which regulates DSB processing and inhibits checkpoint signaling, is regulated by Cdc5. We propose that Cdc5 interferes with the checkpoint response to DSBs acting at multiple levels in the signal transduction pathway and at an early step required to resect DSB ends.

  2. Human CDK18 promotes replication stress signaling and genome stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, Giancarlo; Staples, Christopher J; Ganesh, Anil; Patterson, Karl W; Bryne, Dominic P; Myers, Katie N; Patil, Abhijit A; Eyers, Claire E; Maslen, Sarah; Skehel, J Mark; Eyers, Patrick A; Collis, Spencer J

    2016-10-14

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) coordinate cell cycle checkpoints with DNA repair mechanisms that together maintain genome stability. However, the myriad mechanisms that can give rise to genome instability are still to be fully elucidated. Here, we identify CDK18 (PCTAIRE 3) as a novel regulator of genome stability, and show that depletion of CDK18 causes an increase in endogenous DNA damage and chromosomal abnormalities. CDK18-depleted cells accumulate in early S-phase, exhibiting retarded replication fork kinetics and reduced ATR kinase signaling in response to replication stress. Mechanistically, CDK18 interacts with RAD9, RAD17 and TOPBP1, and CDK18-deficiency results in a decrease in both RAD17 and RAD9 chromatin retention in response to replication stress. Importantly, we demonstrate that these phenotypes are rescued by exogenous CDK18 in a kinase-dependent manner. Collectively, these data reveal a rate-limiting role for CDK18 in replication stress signalling and establish it as a novel regulator of genome integrity. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  3. Probing the Mec1ATR Checkpoint Activation Mechanism with Small Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanrooij, Paulina H; Tannous, Elias; Kumar, Sandeep; Navadgi-Patil, Vasundhara M; Burgers, Peter M

    2016-01-01

    Yeast Mec1, the ortholog of human ATR, is the apical protein kinase that initiates the cell cycle checkpoint in response to DNA damage and replication stress. The basal activity of Mec1 kinase is activated by cell cycle phase-specific activators. Three distinct activators stimulate Mec1 kinase using an intrinsically disordered domain of the protein. These are the Ddc1 subunit of the 9-1-1 checkpoint clamp (ortholog of human and Schizosaccharomyces pombe Rad9), the replication initiator Dpb11 (ortholog of human TopBP1 and S. pombe Cut5), and the multifunctional nuclease/helicase Dna2. Here, we use small peptides to determine the requirements for Mec1 activation. For Ddc1, we identify two essential aromatic amino acids in a hydrophobic environment that when fused together are proficient activators. Using this increased insight, we have been able to identify homologous motifs in S. pombe Rad9 that can activate Mec1. Furthermore, we show that a 9-amino acid Dna2-based peptide is sufficient for Mec1 activation. Studies with mutant activators suggest that binding of an activator to Mec1 is a two-step process, the first step involving the obligatory binding of essential aromatic amino acids to Mec1, followed by an enhancement in binding energy through interactions with neighboring sequences. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. Systematic Analysis of the DNA Damage Response Network in Telomere Defective Budding Yeast

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    Eva-Maria Holstein

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Functional telomeres are critically important to eukaryotic genetic stability. Scores of proteins and pathways are known to affect telomere function. Here, we report a series of related genome-wide genetic interaction screens performed on budding yeast cells with acute or chronic telomere defects. Genetic interactions were examined in cells defective in Cdc13 and Stn1, affecting two components of CST, a single stranded DNA (ssDNA binding complex that binds telomeric DNA. For comparison, genetic interactions were also examined in cells with defects in Rfa3, affecting the major ssDNA binding protein, RPA, which has overlapping functions with CST at telomeres. In more complex experiments, genetic interactions were measured in cells lacking EXO1 or RAD9, affecting different aspects of the DNA damage response, and containing a cdc13-1 induced telomere defect. Comparing fitness profiles across these data sets helps build a picture of the specific responses to different types of dysfunctional telomeres. The experiments show that each context reveals different genetic interactions, consistent with the idea that each genetic defect causes distinct molecular defects. To help others engage with the large volumes of data, the data are made available via two interactive web-based tools: Profilyzer and DIXY. One particularly striking genetic interaction observed was that the chk1∆ mutation improved fitness of cdc13-1 exo1∆ cells more than other checkpoint mutations (ddc1∆, rad9∆, rad17∆, and rad24∆, whereas, in cdc13-1 cells, the effects of all checkpoint mutations were similar. We show that this can be explained by Chk1 stimulating resection—a new function for Chk1 in the eukaryotic DNA damage response network.

  5. An essential function for the ATR-activation-domain (AAD of TopBP1 in mouse development and cellular senescence.

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    Zhong-Wei Zhou

    Full Text Available ATR activation is dependent on temporal and spatial interactions with partner proteins. In the budding yeast model, three proteins - Dpb11(TopBP1, Ddc1(Rad9 and Dna2 - all interact with and activate Mec1(ATR. Each contains an ATR activation domain (ADD that interacts directly with the Mec1(ATR:Ddc2(ATRIP complex. Any of the Dpb11(TopBP1, Ddc1(Rad9 or Dna2 ADDs is sufficient to activate Mec1(ATR in vitro. All three can also independently activate Mec1(ATR in vivo: the checkpoint is lost only when all three AADs are absent. In metazoans, only TopBP1 has been identified as a direct ATR activator. Depletion-replacement approaches suggest the TopBP1-AAD is both sufficient and necessary for ATR activation. The physiological function of the TopBP1 AAD is, however, unknown. We created a knock-in point mutation (W1147R that ablates mouse TopBP1-AAD function. TopBP1-W1147R is early embryonic lethal. To analyse TopBP1-W1147R cellular function in vivo, we silenced the wild type TopBP1 allele in heterozygous MEFs. AAD inactivation impaired cell proliferation, promoted premature senescence and compromised Chk1 signalling following UV irradiation. We also show enforced TopBP1 dimerization promotes ATR-dependent Chk1 phosphorylation. Our data suggest that, unlike the yeast models, the TopBP1-AAD is the major activator of ATR, sustaining cell proliferation and embryonic development.

  6. Interactions of Human Mismatch Repair Proteins MutSα and MutLα with Proteins of the ATR-Chk1 Pathway*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yiyong; Fang, Yanan; Shao, Hongbing; Lindsey-Boltz, Laura; Sancar, Aziz; Modrich, Paul

    2010-01-01

    At clinically relevant doses, chemotherapeutic SN1 DNA methylating agents induce an ATR-mediated checkpoint response in human cells that is dependent on functional MutSα and MutLα. Deficiency of either mismatch repair activity renders cells highly resistant to this class of drug, but the mechanisms linking mismatch repair to checkpoint activation have remained elusive. In this study we have systematically examined the interactions of human MutSα and MutLα with proteins of the ATR-Chk1 pathway using both nuclear extracts and purified proteins. Using nuclear co-immunoprecipitation, we have detected interaction of MutSα with ATR, TopBP1, Claspin, and Chk1 and interaction of MutLα with TopBP1 and Claspin. We were unable to detect interaction of MutSα or MutLα with Rad17, Rad9, or replication protein A in the extract system. Use of purified proteins confirmed direct interaction of MutSα with ATR, TopBP1, and Chk1 and of MutLα with TopBP1. MutSα-Claspin and MutLα-Claspin interactions were not demonstrable with purified proteins, suggesting that extract interactions are indirect or depend on post-translational modification. Use of a modified chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that proliferating cell nuclear antigen, ATR, TopBP1, and Chk1 are recruited to chromatin in a MutLα- and MutSα-dependent fashion after N-methyl-N′-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine treatment. However, chromatin enrichment of replication protein A, Claspin, Rad17-RFC, and Rad9-Rad1-Hus1 was not detected in these experiments. Although our failure to observe enrichment of the latter activities could be due to sensitivity limitations, these observations may indicate a novel mechanism for ATR activation. PMID:20029092

  7. Abasic sites linked to dUTP incorporation in DNA are a major cause of spontaneous mutations in absence of base excision repair and Rad17-Mec3-Ddc1 (9-1-1) DNA damage checkpoint clamp in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collura, Ada; Kemp, Patricia Auffret Van Der; Boiteux, Serge

    2012-03-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, inactivation of base excision repair (BER) AP endonucleases (Apn1p and Apn2p) results in constitutive phosphorylation of Rad53p and delay in cell cycle progression at the G2/M transition. These data led us to investigate genetic interactions between Apn1p, Apn2p and DNA damage checkpoint proteins. The results show that mec1 sml1, rad53 sml1 and rad9 is synthetic lethal with apn1 apn2. In contrast, apn1 apn2 rad17, apn1 apn2 ddc1 and apn1 apn2 rad24 triple mutants are viable, although they exhibit a strong Can(R) spontaneous mutator phenotype. In these strains, high Can(R) mutation rate is dependent upon functional uracil DNA N-glycosylase (Ung1p) and mutation spectra are dominated by AT to CG events. The results point to a role for Rad17-Mec3-Ddc1 (9-1-1) checkpoint clamp in the prevention of mutations caused by abasic (AP) sites linked to incorporation of dUTP into DNA followed by the excision of uracil by Ung1p. The antimutator role of the (9-1-1) clamp can either rely on its essential function in the induction of the DNA damage checkpoint or to another function that specifically impacts DNA repair and/or mutagenesis at AP sites. Here, we show that the abrogation of the DNA damage checkpoint is not sufficient to enhance spontaneous mutagenesis in the apn1 apn2 rad9 sml1 quadruple mutant. Spontaneous mutagenesis was also explored in strains deficient in the two major DNA N-glycosylases/AP-lyases (Ntg1p and Ntg2p). Indeed, apn1 apn2 ntg1 ntg2 exhibits a strong Ung1p-dependent Can(R) mutator phenotype with a spectrum enriched in AT to CG, like apn1 apn2 rad17. However, genetic analysis reveals that ntg1 ntg2 and rad17 are not epistatic for spontaneous mutagenesis in apn1 apn2. We conclude that under normal growth conditions, dUTP incorporation into DNA is a major source of AP sites that cause high genetic instability in the absence of BER factors (Apn1p, Apn2p, Ntg1p and Ntg2p) and Rad17-Mec3-Ddc1 (9-1-1) checkpoint clamp in yeast

  8. Molecular Signatures in the Prevention of Radiation Damage by the Synergistic Effect of N-Acetyl Cysteine and Qingre Liyan Decoction, a Traditional Chinese Medicine, Using a 3-Dimensional Cell Culture Model of Oral Mucositis

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    Maria P. Lambros

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Qingre Liyan decoction (QYD, a Traditional Chinese medicine, and N-acetyl cysteine (NAC have been used to prevent radiation induced mucositis. This work evaluates the protective mechanisms of QYD, NAC, and their combination (NAC-QYD at the cellular and transcriptional level. A validated organotypic model of oral mucosal consisting of a three-dimensional (3D cell tissue-culture of primary human keratinocytes exposed to X-ray irradiation was used. Six hours after the irradiation, the tissues were evaluated by hematoxylin and eosin (H and E and a TUNEL assay to assess histopathology and apoptosis, respectively. Total RNA was extracted and used for microarray gene expression profiling. The tissue-cultures treated with NAC-QYD preserved their integrity and showed no apoptosis. Microarray results revealed that the NAC-QYD caused the upregulation of genes encoding metallothioneins, HMOX1, and other components of the Nrf2 pathway, which protects against oxidative stress. DNA repair genes (XCP, GADD45G, RAD9, and XRCC1, protective genes (EGFR and PPARD, and genes of the NFκB pathway were upregulated. Finally, tissue-cultures treated prophylactically with NAC-QYD showed significant downregulation of apoptosis, cytokines and chemokines genes, and constrained damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs. NAC-QYD treatment involves the protective effect of Nrf2, NFκB, and DNA repair factors.

  9. Methylation of histone H3 lysine-79 by Dot1p plays multiple roles in the response to UV damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostelman, Lindsey J; Keller, Andrew M; Albrecht, Ashley M; Arat, Arzu; Thompson, Jeffrey S

    2007-03-01

    Various proteins have been found to play roles in both the repair of UV damaged DNA and heterochromatin-mediated silencing in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In particular, factors that are involved in the methylation of lysine-79 of histone H3 by Dot1p have been implicated in both processes, suggesting a bipartite function for this modification. We find that a dot1 null mutation and a histone H3 point mutation at lysine-79 cause increased sensitivity to UV radiation, suggesting that lysine-79 methylation is important for efficient repair of UV damage. Epistasis analysis between dot1 and various UV repair genes indicates that lysine-79 methylation plays overlapping roles within the nucleotide excision, post-replication and recombination repair pathways, as well as RAD9-mediated checkpoint function. In contrast, epistasis analysis with the H3 lysine-79 point mutation indicates that the lysine-to-glutamic acid substitution exerts specific effects within the nucleotide excision repair and post-replication repair pathways, suggesting that this allele only disrupts a subset of the functions of lysine-79 methylation. The overall results indicate the existence of distinct and separable roles of histone H3 lysine-79 methylation in the response to UV damage, potentially serving to coordinate the various repair processes.

  10. A 7 Mb region within 11q13 may contain a high penetrance gene for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa-Rosa, Juan Manuel; Pita, Guillermo; González-Neira, Anna; Milne, Roger L; Fernandez, Victoria; Ruivenkamp, Claudia; van Asperen, Christi J; Devilee, Peter; Benitez, Javier

    2009-11-01

    Familial breast cancer represents up to 5% of all breast cancer cases. Recently, our group has performed a new SNP-based linkage study in 19 non-BRCA1/2 families. We found that a single family was linked to regions in two different chromosomes (11q13 and 14q21), and observed a non-parametric LOD score of 11.5 in both regions. In the present study, we ruled out any possible translocation between the chromosomes. We also used both a panel of STRs and an indirect approach based on HapMap data to narrow down these regions from 28 to 7 Mb in chromosome 11 and from 14.5 to 8.5 Mb in chromosome 14. We performed a mutational screening on candidate genes in 11q13 (NUMA1, FGF3, CCND1, RAD9A, RNF121, FADD and hsa-mir-192), and on FOXA1 in 14q21. Although we have not found any deleterious mutations in the coding region of these genes, data from STR markers confirm 11q13 as a candidate region to contain a breast cancer susceptibility gene.

  11. Ccr4-not complex mRNA deadenylase activity contributes to DNA damage responses in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traven, Ana; Hammet, Andrew; Tenis, Nora; Denis, Clyde L; Heierhorst, Jörg

    2005-01-01

    DNA damage checkpoints regulate gene expression at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level. Some components of the yeast Ccr4-Not complex, which regulates transcription as well as transcript turnover, have previously been linked to DNA damage responses, but it is unclear if this involves transcriptional or post-transcriptional functions. Here we show that CCR4 and CAF1, which together encode the major cytoplasmic mRNA deadenylase complex, have complex genetic interactions with the checkpoint genes DUN1, MRC1, RAD9, and RAD17 in response to DNA-damaging agents hydroxyurea (HU) and methylmethane sulfonate (MMS). The exonuclease-inactivating ccr4-1 point mutation mimics ccr4Delta phenotypes, including synthetic HU hypersensitivity with dun1Delta, demonstrating that Ccr4-Not mRNA deadenylase activity is required for DNA damage responses. However, ccr4Delta and caf1Delta DNA damage phenotypes and genetic interactions with checkpoint genes are not identical, and deletions of some Not components that are believed to predominantly function at the transcriptional level rather than mRNA turnover, e.g., not5Delta, also lead to increased DNA damage sensitivity and synthetic HU hypersensitivity with dun1Delta. Taken together, our data thus suggest that both transcriptional and post-transcriptional functions of the Ccr4-Not complex contribute to the DNA damage response affecting gene expression in a complex manner.

  12. Rad53 kinase activation-independent replication checkpoint function of the N-terminal forkhead-associated (FHA1) domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, Brietta L; Tenis, Nora; Heierhorst, Jörg

    2004-09-17

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rad53 has crucial functions in many aspects of the cellular response to DNA damage and replication blocks. To coordinate these diverse roles, Rad53 has two forkhead-associated (FHA) phosphothreonine-binding domains in addition to a kinase domain. Here, we show that the conserved N-terminal FHA1 domain is essential for the function of Rad53 to prevent the firing of late replication origins in response to replication blocks. However, the FHA1 domain is not required for Rad53 activation during S phase, and as a consequence of defective downstream signaling, Rad53 containing an inactive FHA1 domain is hyperphosphorylated in response to replication blocks. The FHA1 mutation dramatically hypersensitizes strains with defects in the cell cycle-wide checkpoint pathways (rad9Delta and rad17Delta) to DNA damage, but it is largely epistatic with defects in the replication checkpoint (mrc1Delta). Altogether, our data indicate that the FHA1 domain links activated Rad53 to downstream effectors in the replication checkpoint. The results reveal an important mechanistic difference to the homologous Schizosaccharomyces pombe FHA domain that is required for Mrc1-dependent activation of the corresponding Cds1 kinase. Surprisingly, despite the severely impaired replication checkpoint and also G(2)/M checkpoint functions, the FHA1 mutation by itself leads to only moderate viability defects in response to DNA damage, highlighting the importance of functionally redundant pathways.

  13. Cell Cycle Checkpoint Proteins p21 and Hus1 Regulating Intercellular Signaling Induced By Alpha Particle Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lijun; Zhao, Ye; Wang, Jun; Hang, Haiying

    In recent years, the attentions for radiation induced bystander effects (RIBE) have been paid on the intercellular signaling events connecting the irradiated and non-irradiated cells. p21 is a member of the Cip/Kip family and plays essential roles in cell cycle progression arrest after cellular irradiation. DNA damage checkpoint protein Hus1 is a member of the Rad9-Rad1-Hus1 complex and functions as scaffold at the damage sites to facilitate the activation of downstream effectors. Using the medium trasfer method and the cells of MEF, MEF (p21-/-), MEF (p21-/-Hus1-/-) as either medium donor or receptor cells, it was found that with 5cGy alpha particle irradiation, the bystander cells showed a significant induction of -H2AX for normal MEFs (p¡0.05). However, the absence of p21 resulted in deficiency in inducing bystander effects. Further results indicated p21 affected the intercellular DNA damage signaling mainly through disrupting the production or release of the damage signals from irradiated cells. When Hus1 and p21 were both knocked out, an obvious induction of -H2AX recurred in bystander cells and the induction of -H2AX was GJIC (gap junction-mediated intercellular communication) dependent, indicating the interrelationship between p21 and Hus1 regulated the production and relay of DNA damage signals from irradiated cells to non-irradiated bystander cells.

  14. The amino-terminal tails of histones H2A and H3 coordinate efficient base excision repair, DNA damage signaling and postreplication repair in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meas, Rithy; Smerdon, Michael J.; Wyrick, John J.

    2015-01-01

    Histone amino-terminal tails (N-tails) are required for cellular resistance to DNA damaging agents; therefore, we examined the role of histone N-tails in regulating DNA damage response pathways in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Combinatorial deletions reveal that the H2A and H3 N-tails are important for the removal of MMS-induced DNA lesions due to their role in regulating the basal and MMS-induced expression of DNA glycosylase Mag1. Furthermore, overexpression of Mag1 in a mutant lacking the H2A and H3 N-tails rescues base excision repair (BER) activity but not MMS sensitivity. We further show that the H3 N-tail functions in the Rad9/Rad53 DNA damage signaling pathway, but this function does not appear to be the primary cause of MMS sensitivity of the double tailless mutants. Instead, epistasis analyses demonstrate that the tailless H2A/H3 phenotypes are in the RAD18 epistasis group, which regulates postreplication repair. We observed increased levels of ubiquitylated PCNA and significantly lower mutation frequency in the tailless H2A/H3 mutant, indicating a defect in postreplication repair. In summary, our data identify novel roles of the histone H2A and H3 N-tails in (i) regulating the expression of a critical BER enzyme (Mag1), (ii) supporting efficient DNA damage signaling and (iii) facilitating postreplication repair. PMID:25897129

  15. ETAA1 acts at stalled replication forks to maintain genome integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, Thomas E.; Luzwick, Jessica W.; Kavanaugh, Gina; Carroll, Clinton; Dungrawala, Huzefa; Glick, Gloria G.; Feldkamp, Michael D.; Putney, Reid; Chazin, Walter J.; Cortez, David

    2017-01-01

    The ATR checkpoint kinase coordinates cellular responses to DNA replication stress. Budding yeast contain three activators of Mec1 (the ATR orthologue); however, only TOPBP1 is known to activate ATR in vertebrates. We identified ETAA1 as a replication stress response protein in two proteomic screens. ETAA1-deficient cells accumulate double-strand breaks, sister chromatid exchanges, and other hallmarks of genome instability. They are also hyper-sensitive to replication stress and have increased frequencies of replication fork collapse. ETAA1 contains two RPA-interaction motifs that localize ETAA1 to stalled replication forks. It also interacts with several DNA damage response proteins including the BLM/TOP3α/RMI1/RMI2 and ATR/ATRIP complexes. It binds ATR/ATRIP directly using a motif with sequence similarity to the TOPBP1-ATR activation domain; and like TOPBP1, ETAA1 acts as a direct ATR activator. ETAA1 functions in parallel to the TOPBP1/RAD9/HUS1/RAD1 pathway to regulate ATR and maintain genome stability. Thus, vertebrate cells contain at least two ATR activating proteins. PMID:27723720

  16. Genetic evidence for a role of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mph1 in recombinational DNA repair under replicative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panico, Evandro Rocco; Ede, Christopher; Schildmann, Michael; Schürer, Kirsten Anke; Kramer, Wilfried

    2010-01-01

    In yeast as in human, DNA helicases play critical roles in assisting replication fork progression. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae MPH1 gene, homologue of human FANCM, has been involved in homologous recombination and DNA repair. We describe a synthetic growth defect of an mph1 deletion if combined with an srs2 deletion that can result-depending on the genetic background-in synthetic lethality. The lethality is suppressed by mutations in homologous recombination (rad51, rad52, rad55, rad57) and in the DNA damage checkpoint (rad9, rad24, rad17). Importantly, rad54 and mph1, epistatic for damage sensitivity, are subadditive for spontaneous mutator phenotype. Therefore, Mph1 could be placed at the Rad51-mediated strand invasion process, with a function distinct from Rad54. Moreover, siz1 mutation is viable with mph1 and additive for DNA damage sensitivity. mph1 srs2 double mutants, isolated in a background where they are viable, are synergistically sensitive to DNA damage. Moderate overexpression of SGS1 partially suppresses this sensitivity. Finally, we observe an epistatic relationship in terms of sensitivity to camptothecin of mms4 or mus81 to mph1. Overall, our results support a role of Mph1 in assisting replication progression. We propose two models for the resumption of DNA synthesis under replicative stress where Mph1 is placed at the sister chromatid interaction step.

  17. Lysine residue 185 of Rad1 is a topological but not a functional counterpart of lysine residue 164 of PCNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niek Wit

    Full Text Available Monoubiquitylation of the homotrimeric DNA sliding clamp PCNA at lysine residue 164 (PCNA(K164 is a highly conserved, DNA damage-inducible process that is mediated by the E2/E3 complex Rad6/Rad18. This ubiquitylation event recruits translesion synthesis (TLS polymerases capable of replicating across damaged DNA templates. Besides PCNA, the Rad6/Rad18 complex was recently shown in yeast to ubiquitylate also 9-1-1, a heterotrimeric DNA sliding clamp composed of Rad9, Rad1, and Hus1 in a DNA damage-inducible manner. Based on the highly similar crystal structures of PCNA and 9-1-1, K185 of Rad1 (Rad1(K185 was identified as the only topological equivalent of PCNA(K164. To investigate a potential role of posttranslational modifications of Rad1(K185 in DNA damage management, we here generated a mouse model with a conditional deletable Rad1(K185R allele. The Rad1(K185 residue was found to be dispensable for Chk1 activation, DNA damage survival, and class switch recombination of immunoglobulin genes as well as recruitment of TLS polymerases during somatic hypermutation of immunoglobulin genes. Our data indicate that Rad1(K185 is not a functional counterpart of PCNA(K164.

  18. Three Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen-Like Proteins Found in the Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Aeropyrum pernix: Interactions with the Two DNA Polymerases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daimon, Katsuya; Kawarabayasi, Yutaka; Kikuchi, Hisashi; Sako, Yoshihiko; Ishino, Yoshizumi

    2002-01-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is an essential component in the eukaryotic DNA replication machinery, in which it works for tethering DNA polymerases on the DNA template to accomplish processive DNA synthesis. The PCNA also interacts with many other proteins in important cellular processes, including cell cycle control, DNA repair, and an apoptotic pathway in the domain Eucarya. We identified three genes encoding PCNA-like sequences in the genome of Aeropyrum pernix, a crenarchaeal archaeon. We cloned and expressed these genes in Escherichia coli and analyzed the gene products. All three PCNA homologs stimulated the primer extension activities of the two DNA polymerases, polymerase I (Pol I) and Pol II, identified in A. pernix to various extents, among which A. pernix PCNA 3 (ApePCNA3) provided a most remarkable effect on both Pol I and Pol II. The three proteins were confirmed to exist in the A. pernix cells. These results suggest that the three PCNAs work as the processivity factor of DNA polymerases in A. pernix cells under different conditions. In Eucarya, three checkpoint proteins, Hus1, Rad1, and Rad9, have been proposed to form a PCNA-like ring structure and may work as a sliding clamp for the translesion DNA polymerases. Therefore, it is very interesting that three active PCNAs were found in one archaeal cell. Further analyses are necessary to determine whether each PCNA has specific roles, and moreover, how they reveal different functions in the cells. PMID:11790738

  19. Ontogeny of Unstable Chromosomes Generated by Telomere Error in Budding Yeast.

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    Tracey Beyer

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available DNA replication errors at certain sites in the genome initiate chromosome instability that ultimately leads to stable genomic rearrangements. Where instability begins is often unclear. And, early instability may form unstable chromosome intermediates whose transient nature also hinders mechanistic understanding. We report here a budding yeast model that reveals the genetic ontogeny of genome rearrangements, from initial replication error to unstable chromosome formation to their resolution. Remarkably, the initial error often arises in or near the telomere, and frequently forms unstable chromosomes. Early unstable chromosomes may then resolve to an internal "collection site" where a dicentric forms and resolves to an isochromosome (other outcomes are possible at each step. The initial telomere-proximal unstable chromosome is increased in mutants in telomerase subunits, Tel1, and even Rad9, with no known telomere-specific function. Defects in Tel1 and in Rrm3, a checkpoint protein kinase with a role in telomere maintenance and a DNA helicase, respectively, synergize dramatically to generate unstable chromosomes, further illustrating the consequence of replication error in the telomere. Collectively, our results suggest telomeric replication errors may be a common cause of seemingly unrelated genomic rearrangements located hundreds of kilobases away.

  20. Signaling pathways of replication stress in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo, Benjamin; Crabbé, Laure; Pasero, Philippe

    2017-03-01

    Eukaryotic cells activate the S-phase checkpoint in response to a variety of events affecting the progression of replication forks, collectively referred to as replication stress. This signaling pathway is divided in two branches: the DNA damage checkpoint (DDC) and the DNA replication checkpoint (DRC). Both pathways are activated by the sensor kinase Mec1 and converge on the effector kinase Rad53. However, the DDC operates throughout the cell cycle and depends on the checkpoint mediator Rad9 to activate Rad53, whereas the DRC is specific to S phase and is mediated by Mrc1 and other fork components to signal replication impediments. In this review, we summarize current knowledge on these two pathways, with a focus on the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in which many important aspects of the replication stress response were discovered. We also discuss the differences and similarities between DDC and DRC and speculate on how these pathways cooperate to ensure the complete and faithful duplication of the yeast genome under various replication stress conditions. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Ontogeny of Unstable Chromosomes Generated by Telomere Error in Budding Yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinert, Ted

    2016-01-01

    DNA replication errors at certain sites in the genome initiate chromosome instability that ultimately leads to stable genomic rearrangements. Where instability begins is often unclear. And, early instability may form unstable chromosome intermediates whose transient nature also hinders mechanistic understanding. We report here a budding yeast model that reveals the genetic ontogeny of genome rearrangements, from initial replication error to unstable chromosome formation to their resolution. Remarkably, the initial error often arises in or near the telomere, and frequently forms unstable chromosomes. Early unstable chromosomes may then resolve to an internal "collection site" where a dicentric forms and resolves to an isochromosome (other outcomes are possible at each step). The initial telomere-proximal unstable chromosome is increased in mutants in telomerase subunits, Tel1, and even Rad9, with no known telomere-specific function. Defects in Tel1 and in Rrm3, a checkpoint protein kinase with a role in telomere maintenance and a DNA helicase, respectively, synergize dramatically to generate unstable chromosomes, further illustrating the consequence of replication error in the telomere. Collectively, our results suggest telomeric replication errors may be a common cause of seemingly unrelated genomic rearrangements located hundreds of kilobases away. PMID:27716774

  2. Loss of yeast peroxiredoxin Tsa1p induces genome instability through activation of the DNA damage checkpoint and elevation of dNTP levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hei-Man Vincent Tang

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Peroxiredoxins are a family of antioxidant enzymes critically involved in cellular defense and signaling. Particularly, yeast peroxiredoxin Tsa1p is thought to play a role in the maintenance of genome integrity, but the underlying mechanism is not understood. In this study, we took a genetic approach to investigate the cause of genome instability in tsa1Delta cells. Strong genetic interactions of TSA1 with DNA damage checkpoint components DUN1, SML1, and CRT1 were found when mutant cells were analyzed for either sensitivity to DNA damage or rate of spontaneous base substitutions. An elevation in intracellular dNTP production was observed in tsa1Delta cells. This was associated with constitutive activation of the DNA damage checkpoint as indicated by phosphorylation of Rad9/Rad53p, reduced steady-state amount of Sml1p, and induction of RNR and HUG1 genes. In addition, defects in the DNA damage checkpoint did not modulate intracellular level of reactive oxygen species, but suppressed the mutator phenotype of tsa1Delta cells. On the contrary, overexpression of RNR1 exacerbated this phenotype by increasing dNTP levels. Taken together, our findings uncover a new role of TSA1 in preventing the overproduction of dNTPs, which is a root cause of genome instability.

  3. Individual Genetic Susceptibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eric J. Hall

    2008-12-08

    Risk estimates derived from epidemiological studies of exposed populations, as well as the maximum permissible doses allowed for occupational exposure and exposure of the public to ionizing radiation are all based on the assumption that the human population is uniform in its radiosensitivity, except for a small number of individuals, such as ATM homozygotes who are easily identified by their clinical symptoms. The hypothesis upon which this proposal is based is that the human population is not homogeneous in radiosensitiviry, but that radiosensitive sub-groups exist which are not easy to identify. These individuals would suffer an increased incidence of detrimental radiation effects, and distort the shape of the dose response relationship. The radiosensitivity of these groups depend on the expression levels of specific proteins. The plan was to investigate the effect of 3 relatively rare, high penetrate genes available in mice, namely Atm, mRad9 & Brca1. The purpose of radiation protection is to prevent! deterministic effects of clinical significance and limit stochastic effects to acceptable levels. We plan, therefore to compare with wild type animals the radiosensitivity of mice heterozygous for each of the genes mentioned above, as well as double heterozygotes for pairs of genes, using two biological endpoints: a) Ocular cataracts as an important and relevant deterministic effect, and b) Oncogenic transformation in cultured embryo fibroblasts, as a surrogate for carcinogenesis, the most relevant stochastic effect.

  4. trt-1 is the Caenorhabditis elegans catalytic subunit of telomerase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina Meier

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Mutants of trt-1, the Caenorhabditis elegans telomerase reverse transcriptase, reproduce normally for several generations but eventually become sterile as a consequence of telomere erosion and end-to-end chromosome fusions. Telomere erosion and uncapping do not cause an increase in apoptosis in the germlines of trt-1 mutants. Instead, late-generation trt-1 mutants display chromosome segregation defects that are likely to be the direct cause of sterility. trt-1 functions in the same telomere replication pathway as mrt-2, a component of the Rad9/Rad1/Hus1 (9-1-1 proliferating cell nuclear antigen-like sliding clamp. Thus, the 9-1-1 complex may be required for telomerase to act at chromosome ends in C. elegans. Although telomere erosion limits replicative life span in human somatic cells, neither trt-1 nor telomere shortening affects postmitotic aging in C. elegans. These findings illustrate effects of telomere dysfunction in C. elegans mutants lacking the catalytic subunit of telomerase, trt-1.

  5. Characterization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae dna2 Mutants Suggests a Role for the Helicase Late in S Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorentino, David F.; Crabtree, Gerald R.

    1997-01-01

    The TOR proteins, originally identified as targets of the immunosuppressant rapamycin, contain an ATM-like “lipid kinase” domain and are required for early G1 progression in eukaryotes. Using a screen to identify Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants requiring overexpression of Tor1p for viability, we have isolated mutations in a gene we call ROT1 (requires overexpression of Tor1p). This gene is identical to DNA2, encoding a helicase required for DNA replication. As with its role in cell cycle progression, both the N-terminal and C-terminal regions, as well as the kinase domain of Tor1p, are required for rescue of dna2 mutants. Dna2 mutants are also rescued by Tor2p and show synthetic lethality with tor1 deletion mutants under specific conditions. Temperature-sensitive (Ts) dna2 mutants arrest irreversibly at G2/M in a RAD9- and MEC1-dependent manner, suggesting that Dna2p has a role in S phase. Frequencies of mitotic recombination and chromosome loss are elevated in dna2 mutants, also supporting a role for the protein in DNA synthesis. Temperature-shift experiments indicate that Dna2p functions during late S phase, although dna2 mutants are not deficient in bulk DNA synthesis. These data suggest that Dna2p is not required for replication fork progression but may be needed for a later event such as Okazaki fragment maturation. PMID:9398673

  6. Expression of a Human Cytochrome P450 in Yeast Permits Analysis of Pathways for Response to and Repair of Aflatoxin-Induced DNA Damage†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yingying; Breeden, Linda L.; Zarbl, Helmut; Preston, Bradley D.; Eaton, David L.

    2005-01-01

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) is a human hepatotoxin and hepatocarcinogen produced by the mold Aspergillus flavus. In humans, AFB1 is primarily bioactivated by cytochrome P450 1A2 (CYP1A2) and 3A4 to a genotoxic epoxide that forms N7-guanine DNA adducts. A series of yeast haploid mutants defective in DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoints were transformed with human CYP1A2 to investigate how these DNA adducts are repaired. Cell survival and mutagenesis following aflatoxin B1 treatment was assayed in strains defective in nucleotide excision repair (NER) (rad14), postreplication repair (PRR) (rad6, rad18, mms2, and rad5), homologous recombinational repair (HRR) (rad51 and rad54), base excision repair (BER) (apn1 apn2), nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) (yku70), mismatch repair (MMR) (pms1), translesion synthesis (TLS) (rev3), and checkpoints (mec1-1, mec1-1 rad53, rad9, and rad17). Together our data suggest the involvement of homologous recombination and nucleotide excision repair, postreplication repair, and checkpoints in the repair and/or tolerance of AFB1-induced DNA damage in the yeast model. Rev3 appears to mediate AFB1-induced mutagenesis when error-free pathways are compromised. The results further suggest unique roles for Rad5 and abasic endonuclease-dependent DNA intermediates in regulating AFB1-induced mutagenicity. PMID:15988000

  7. Endogenous DNA abasic sites cause cell death in the absence of Apn1, Apn2 and Rad1/Rad10 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillet, Marie; Boiteux, Serge

    2002-06-03

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, mutations in APN1, APN2 and either RAD1 or RAD10 genes are synthetic lethal. In fact, apn1 apn2 rad1 triple mutants can form microcolonies of approximately 300 cells. Expression of Nfo, the bacterial homologue of Apn1, suppresses the lethality. Turning off the expression of Nfo induces G(2)/M cell cycle arrest in an apn1 apn2 rad1 triple mutant. The activation of this checkpoint is RAD9 dependent and allows residual DNA repair. The Mus81/Mms4 complex was identified as one of these back-up repair activities. Furthermore, inactivation of Ntg1, Ntg2 and Ogg1 DNA N-glycosylase/AP lyases in the apn1 apn2 rad1 background delayed lethality, allowing the formation of minicolonies of approximately 10(5) cells. These results demonstrate that, under physiological conditions, endogenous DNA damage causes death in cells deficient in Apn1, Apn2 and Rad1/Rad10 proteins. We propose a model in which endogenous DNA abasic sites are converted into 3'-blocked single-strand breaks (SSBs) by DNA N-glycosylases/AP lyases. Therefore, we suggest that the essential and overlapping function of Apn1, Apn2, Rad1/Rad10 and Mus81/Mms4 is to repair 3'-blocked SSBs using their 3'-phosphodiesterase activity or their 3'-flap endonuclease activity, respectively.

  8. Expression of a human cytochrome p450 in yeast permits analysis of pathways for response to and repair of aflatoxin-induced DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yingying; Breeden, Linda L; Zarbl, Helmut; Preston, Bradley D; Eaton, David L

    2005-07-01

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) is a human hepatotoxin and hepatocarcinogen produced by the mold Aspergillus flavus. In humans, AFB1 is primarily bioactivated by cytochrome P450 1A2 (CYP1A2) and 3A4 to a genotoxic epoxide that forms N7-guanine DNA adducts. A series of yeast haploid mutants defective in DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoints were transformed with human CYP1A2 to investigate how these DNA adducts are repaired. Cell survival and mutagenesis following aflatoxin B1 treatment was assayed in strains defective in nucleotide excision repair (NER) (rad14), postreplication repair (PRR) (rad6, rad18, mms2, and rad5), homologous recombinational repair (HRR) (rad51 and rad54), base excision repair (BER) (apn1 apn2), nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) (yku70), mismatch repair (MMR) (pms1), translesion synthesis (TLS) (rev3), and checkpoints (mec1-1, mec1-1 rad53, rad9, and rad17). Together our data suggest the involvement of homologous recombination and nucleotide excision repair, postreplication repair, and checkpoints in the repair and/or tolerance of AFB1-induced DNA damage in the yeast model. Rev3 appears to mediate AFB1-induced mutagenesis when error-free pathways are compromised. The results further suggest unique roles for Rad5 and abasic endonuclease-dependent DNA intermediates in regulating AFB1-induced mutagenicity.

  9. Low-Dose Radiation Cataract and Genetic Determinants of Radiosensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleiman, Norman Jay [Columbia University

    2013-11-30

    The lens of the eye is one of the most radiosensitive tissues in the body. Ocular ionizing radiation exposure results in characteristic, dose related, progressive lens changes leading to cataract formation. While initial, early stages of lens opacification may not cause visual disability, the severity of such changes progressively increases with dose until vision is impaired and cataract extraction surgery may be required. Because of the transparency of the eye, radiation induced lens changes can easily be followed non-invasively over time. Thus, the lens provides a unique model system in which to study the effects of low dose ionizing radiation exposure in a complex, highly organized tissue. Despite this observation, considerable uncertainties remain surrounding the relationship between dose and risk of developing radiation cataract. For example, a growing number of human epidemiological findings suggest significant risk among various groups of occupationally and accidentally exposed individuals and confidence intervals that include zero dose. Nevertheless, questions remain concerning the relationship between lens opacities, visual disability, clinical cataract, threshold dose and/or the role of genetics in determining radiosensitivity. Experimentally, the response of the rodent eye to radiation is quite similar to that in humans and thus animal studies are well suited to examine the relationship between radiation exposure, genetic determinants of radiosensitivity and cataractogenesis. The current work has expanded our knowledge of the low-dose effects of X-irradiation or high-LET heavy ion exposure on timing and progression of radiation cataract and has provided new information on the genetic, molecular, biochemical and cell biological features which contribute to this pathology. Furthermore, findings have indicated that single and/or multiple haploinsufficiency for various genes involved in DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoint control, such as Atm, Brca1 or Rad9

  10. Prevention of DNA Rereplication Through a Meiotic Recombination Checkpoint Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole A. Najor

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, unnatural stabilization of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor Sic1 during meiosis can trigger extra rounds of DNA replication. When programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs are generated but not repaired due to absence of DMC1, a pathway involving the checkpoint gene RAD17 prevents this DNA rereplication. Further genetic analysis has now revealed that prevention of DNA rereplication also requires MEC1, which encodes a protein kinase that serves as a central checkpoint regulator in several pathways including the meiotic recombination checkpoint response. Downstream of MEC1, MEK1 is required through its function to inhibit repair between sister chromatids. By contrast, meiotic recombination checkpoint effectors that regulate gene expression and cyclin-dependent kinase activity are not necessary. Phosphorylation of histone H2A, which is catalyzed by Mec1 and the related Tel1 protein kinase in response to DSBs, and can help coordinate activation of the Rad53 checkpoint protein kinase in the mitotic cell cycle, is required for the full checkpoint response. Phosphorylation sites that are targeted by Rad53 in a mitotic S phase checkpoint response are also involved, based on the behavior of cells containing mutations in the DBF4 and SLD3 DNA replication genes. However, RAD53 does not appear to be required, nor does RAD9, which encodes a mediator of Rad53, consistent with their lack of function in the recombination checkpoint pathway that prevents meiotic progression. While this response is similar to a checkpoint mechanism that inhibits initiation of DNA replication in the mitotic cell cycle, the evidence points to a new variation on DNA replication control.

  11. X-ray survival characteristics and genetic analysis for nineSaccharomyces deletion mutants that affect radiation sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Game, John C.; Williamson, Marsha S.; Baccari, Clelia

    2006-07-21

    We examine ionizing radiation (IR) sensitivity and epistasisrelationships of several Saccharomyces mutants affectingpost-translational modifications of histones H2B and H3. Mutantsbre1delta, lge1delta, and rtf1delta, defective in histone H2B lysine 123ubiquitination, show IR sensitivity equivalent to that of the dot1deltamutant that we reported on earlier, consistent with published findingsthat Dot1p requires H2B K123 ubiquitination to fully methylate histone H3K79. This implicates progressive K79 methylation rather thanmono-methylation in IR resistance. The set2delta mutant, defective in H3K36 methylation, shows mild IR sensitivity whereas mutants that abolishH3 K4 methylation resemble wild type. The dot1delta, bre1delta, andlge1delta mutants show epistasis for IR sensitivity. The paf1deltamutant, also reportedly defective in H2B K123 ubiquitination, confers nosensitivity. The rad6delta, rad51null, rad50delta, and rad9deltamutations are epistatic to bre1? and dot1delta, but rad18delta andrad5delta show additivity with bre1delta, dot1delta, and each other. Thebre1delta rad18delta double mutant resembles rad6delta in sensitivity;thus the role of Rad6p in ubiquitinating H2B accounts for its extrasensitivity compared to rad18delta. We conclude that IR resistanceconferred by BRE1 and DOT1 is mediated through homologous recombinationalrepair, not postreplication repair, and confirm findings of a G1checkpoint role for the RAD6/BRE1/DOT1 pathway.

  12. The KYxxL motif in Rad17 protein is essential for the interaction with the 9–1–1 complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukumoto, Yasunori, E-mail: fukumoto@faculty.chiba-u.jp [Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba University, Chiba 260-8675 (Japan); Ikeuchi, Masayoshi; Nakayama, Yuji [Department of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, Kyoto Pharmaceutical University, Kyoto 607-8414 (Japan); Yamaguchi, Naoto, E-mail: nyama@faculty.chiba-u.jp [Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba University, Chiba 260-8675 (Japan)

    2016-09-02

    ATR-dependent DNA damage checkpoint is the major DNA damage checkpoint against UV irradiation and DNA replication stress. The Rad17–RFC and Rad9–Rad1–Hus1 (9–1–1) complexes interact with each other to contribute to ATR signaling, however, the precise regulatory mechanism of the interaction has not been established. Here, we identified a conserved sequence motif, KYxxL, in the AAA+ domain of Rad17 protein, and demonstrated that this motif is essential for the interaction with the 9–1–1 complex. We also show that UV-induced Rad17 phosphorylation is increased in the Rad17 KYxxL mutants. These data indicate that the interaction with the 9–1–1 complex is not required for Rad17 protein to be an efficient substrate for the UV-induced phosphorylation. Our data also raise the possibility that the 9–1–1 complex plays a negative regulatory role in the Rad17 phosphorylation. We also show that the nucleotide-binding activity of Rad17 is required for its nuclear localization. - Highlights: • We have identified a conserved KYxxL motif in Rad17 protein. • The KYxxL motif is crucial for the interaction with the 9–1–1 complex. • The KYxxL motif is dispensable or inhibitory for UV-induced Rad17 phosphorylation. • Nucleotide binding of Rad17 is required for its nuclear localization.

  13. Interaction of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 2 (Apn2) with Myh1 DNA glycosylase in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jin; Hwang, Bor-Jang; Chang, Po-Wen; Toth, Eric A; Lu, A-Lien

    2014-03-01

    Oxidative DNA damage is repaired primarily by the base excision repair (BER) pathway in a process initiated by removal of base lesions or mismatched bases by DNA glycosylases. MutY homolog (MYH, MUTYH, or Myh1) is a DNA glycosylase which excises adenine paired with the oxidative lesion 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoG, or G°), thus reducing G:C to T:A mutations. The resulting apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) site is processed by an AP-endonuclease or a bifunctional glycosylase/lyase. We show here that the major Schizosaccharomyces pombe AP endonuclease, Apn2, binds to the inter-domain connector located between the N- and C-terminal domains of Myh1. This Myh1 inter-domain connector also interacts with the Hus1 subunit of the Rad9-Rad1-Hus1 checkpoint clamp. Mutagenesis studies indicate that Apn2 and Hus1 bind overlapping but different sequence motifs on Myh1. Mutation on I(261) of Myh1 reduces its interaction with Hus1, but only slightly attenuates its interaction with Apn2. However, E(262) of Myh1 is a key determinant for both Apn2 and Hus1 interactions. Like human APE1, Apn2 has 3'-phosphodiesterase activity. However, unlike hAPE1, Apn2 has a weak AP endonuclease activity which cleaves the AP sites generated by Myh1 glycosylase. Functionally, Apn2 stimulates Myh1 glycosylase activity and Apn2 phosphodiesterase activity is stimulated by Myh1. The cross stimulation of Myh1 and Apn2 enzymatic activities is dependent on their physical interaction. Thus, Myh1 and Apn2 constitute an initial BER complex. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. APE2 is required for ATR-Chk1 checkpoint activation in response to oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Jeremy; Patel, Yogin; Lentz, Barry L; Yan, Shan

    2013-06-25

    The base excision repair pathway is largely responsible for the repair of oxidative stress-induced DNA damage. However, it remains unclear how the DNA damage checkpoint is activated by oxidative stress at the molecular level. Here, we provide evidence showing that hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) triggers checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) phosphorylation in an ATR [ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and Rad3-related]-dependent but ATM-independent manner in Xenopus egg extracts. A base excision repair protein, Apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease 2 (APE2, APN2, or APEX2), is required for the generation of replication protein A (RPA)-bound single-stranded DNA, the recruitment of a checkpoint protein complex [ATR, ATR-interacting protein (ATRIP), and Rad9] to damage sites, and H2O2-induced Chk1 phosphorylation. A conserved proliferating cell nuclear antigen interaction protein box of APE2 is important for the recruitment of APE2 to H2O2-damaged chromatin. APE2 3'-phosphodiesterase and 3'-5' exonuclease activity is essential for single-stranded DNA generation in the 3'-5' direction from single-stranded breaks, referred to as single-stranded break end resection. In addition, APE2 associates with Chk1, and a serine residue (S86) in the Chk1-binding motif of APE2 is essential for Chk1 phosphorylation, indicating a Claspin-like but distinct role for APE2 in ATR-Chk1 signaling. Our data indicate that APE2 plays a vital and previously unexpected role in ATR-Chk1 checkpoint signaling in response to oxidative stress. Thus, our findings shed light on a distinct mechanism of how an ATR-Chk1-dependent DNA damage checkpoint is mediated by APE2 in the oxidative stress response.

  15. The amino-terminal tails of histones H2A and H3 coordinate efficient base excision repair, DNA damage signaling and postreplication repair in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meas, Rithy; Smerdon, Michael J; Wyrick, John J

    2015-05-26

    Histone amino-terminal tails (N-tails) are required for cellular resistance to DNA damaging agents; therefore, we examined the role of histone N-tails in regulating DNA damage response pathways in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Combinatorial deletions reveal that the H2A and H3 N-tails are important for the removal of MMS-induced DNA lesions due to their role in regulating the basal and MMS-induced expression of DNA glycosylase Mag1. Furthermore, overexpression of Mag1 in a mutant lacking the H2A and H3 N-tails rescues base excision repair (BER) activity but not MMS sensitivity. We further show that the H3 N-tail functions in the Rad9/Rad53 DNA damage signaling pathway, but this function does not appear to be the primary cause of MMS sensitivity of the double tailless mutants. Instead, epistasis analyses demonstrate that the tailless H2A/H3 phenotypes are in the RAD18 epistasis group, which regulates postreplication repair. We observed increased levels of ubiquitylated PCNA and significantly lower mutation frequency in the tailless H2A/H3 mutant, indicating a defect in postreplication repair. In summary, our data identify novel roles of the histone H2A and H3 N-tails in (i) regulating the expression of a critical BER enzyme (Mag1), (ii) supporting efficient DNA damage signaling and (iii) facilitating postreplication repair. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  16. DNA damage repair genes controlling human papillomavirus (HPV episome levels under conditions of stability and extreme instability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terri G Edwards

    Full Text Available DNA damage response (DDR genes and pathways controlling the stability of HPV episomal DNA are reported here. We set out to understand the mechanism by which a DNA-binding, N-methylpyrrole-imidazole hairpin polyamide (PA25 acts to cause the dramatic loss of HPV DNA from cells. Southern blots revealed that PA25 alters HPV episomes within 5 hours of treatment. Gene expression arrays identified numerous DDR genes that were specifically altered in HPV16 episome-containing cells (W12E by PA25, but not in HPV-negative (C33A cells or in cells with integrated HPV16 (SiHa. A siRNA screen of 240 DDR genes was then conducted to identify enhancers and repressors of PA25 activity. Serendipitously, the screen also identified many novel genes, such as TDP1 and TDP2, regulating normal HPV episome stability. MRN and 9-1-1 complexes emerged as important for PA25-mediated episome destruction and were selected for follow-up studies. Mre11, along with other homologous recombination and dsDNA break repair genes, was among the highly significant PA25 repressors. The Mre11 inhibitor Mirin was found to sensitize HPV episomes to PA25 resulting in a ∼5-fold reduction of the PA25 IC50. A novel assay that couples end-labeling of DNA to Q-PCR showed that PA25 causes strand breaks within HPV DNA, and that Mirin greatly enhances this activity. The 9-1-1 complex member Rad9, a representative PA25 enhancer, was transiently phosphorylated in response to PA25 treatment suggesting that it has a role in detecting and signaling episome damage by PA25 to the cell. These results establish that DNA-targeted compounds enter cells and specifically target the HPV episome. This action leads to the activation of numerous DDR pathways and the massive elimination of episomal DNA from cells. Our findings demonstrate that viral episomes can be targeted for elimination from cells by minor groove binding agents, and implicate DDR pathways as important mediators of this process.

  17. DNA damage repair genes controlling human papillomavirus (HPV) episome levels under conditions of stability and extreme instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Terri G; Vidmar, Thomas J; Koeller, Kevin; Bashkin, James K; Fisher, Chris

    2013-01-01

    DNA damage response (DDR) genes and pathways controlling the stability of HPV episomal DNA are reported here. We set out to understand the mechanism by which a DNA-binding, N-methylpyrrole-imidazole hairpin polyamide (PA25) acts to cause the dramatic loss of HPV DNA from cells. Southern blots revealed that PA25 alters HPV episomes within 5 hours of treatment. Gene expression arrays identified numerous DDR genes that were specifically altered in HPV16 episome-containing cells (W12E) by PA25, but not in HPV-negative (C33A) cells or in cells with integrated HPV16 (SiHa). A siRNA screen of 240 DDR genes was then conducted to identify enhancers and repressors of PA25 activity. Serendipitously, the screen also identified many novel genes, such as TDP1 and TDP2, regulating normal HPV episome stability. MRN and 9-1-1 complexes emerged as important for PA25-mediated episome destruction and were selected for follow-up studies. Mre11, along with other homologous recombination and dsDNA break repair genes, was among the highly significant PA25 repressors. The Mre11 inhibitor Mirin was found to sensitize HPV episomes to PA25 resulting in a ∼5-fold reduction of the PA25 IC50. A novel assay that couples end-labeling of DNA to Q-PCR showed that PA25 causes strand breaks within HPV DNA, and that Mirin greatly enhances this activity. The 9-1-1 complex member Rad9, a representative PA25 enhancer, was transiently phosphorylated in response to PA25 treatment suggesting that it has a role in detecting and signaling episome damage by PA25 to the cell. These results establish that DNA-targeted compounds enter cells and specifically target the HPV episome. This action leads to the activation of numerous DDR pathways and the massive elimination of episomal DNA from cells. Our findings demonstrate that viral episomes can be targeted for elimination from cells by minor groove binding agents, and implicate DDR pathways as important mediators of this process.

  18. Genetic Variants in CD44 and MAT1A Confer Susceptibility to Acute Skin Reaction in Breast Cancer Patients Undergoing Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mumbrekar, Kamalesh Dattaram; Bola Sadashiva, Satish Rao [Department of Radiation Biology and Toxicology, School of Life Sciences, Manipal University, Manipal, Karnataka (India); Kabekkodu, Shama Prasada [Department of Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences, Manipal University, Manipal, Karnataka (India); Fernandes, Donald Jerard [Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Shirdi Saibaba Cancer Hospital and Research Centre, Kasturba Hospital, Manipal, Karnataka (India); Vadhiraja, Bejadi Manjunath [Department of Radiation Oncology, Manipal Hospital, Bengaluru, Karnataka (India); Suga, Tomo; Shoji, Yoshimi; Nakayama, Fumiaki; Imai, Takashi [Advanced Radiation Biology Research Program, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Satyamoorthy, Kapaettu, E-mail: ksatyamoorthy@yahoo.com [Department of Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences, Manipal University, Manipal, Karnataka (India)

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Heterogeneity in radiation therapy (RT)-induced normal tissue toxicity is observed in 10% of cancer patients, limiting the therapeutic outcomes. In addition to treatment-related factors, normal tissue adverse reactions also manifest from genetic alterations in distinct pathways majorly involving DNA damage–repair genes, inflammatory cytokine genes, cell cycle regulation, and antioxidant response. Therefore, the common sequence variants in these radioresponsive genes might modify the severity of normal tissue toxicity, and the identification of the same could have clinical relevance as a predictive biomarker. Methods and Materials: The present study was conducted in a cohort of patients with breast cancer to evaluate the possible associations between genetic variants in radioresponsive genes described previously and the risk of developing RT-induced acute skin adverse reactions. We tested 22 genetic variants reported in 18 genes (ie, NFE2L2, OGG1, NEIL3, RAD17, PTTG1, REV3L, ALAD, CD44, RAD9A, TGFβR3, MAD2L2, MAP3K7, MAT1A, RPS6KB2, ZNF830, SH3GL1, BAX, and XRCC1) using TaqMan assay-based real-time polymerase chain reaction. At the end of RT, the severity of skin damage was scored, and the subjects were dichotomized as nonoverresponders (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grade <2) and overresponders (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grade ≥2) for analysis. Results: Of the 22 single nucleotide polymorphisms studied, the rs8193 polymorphism lying in the micro-RNA binding site of 3′-UTR of CD44 was significantly (P=.0270) associated with RT-induced adverse skin reactions. Generalized multifactor dimensionality reduction analysis showed significant (P=.0107) gene–gene interactions between MAT1A and CD44. Furthermore, an increase in the total number of risk alleles was associated with increasing occurrence of overresponses (P=.0302). Conclusions: The genetic polymorphisms in radioresponsive genes act as genetic modifiers of acute normal tissue toxicity

  19. Use of yeast for detection of endogenous abasic lesions, their source, and their repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boiteux, Serge; Guillet, Marie

    2006-01-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites are expected to be one of the most frequent endogenous lesions in DNA. AP sites are potentially lethal and mutagenic. Data shows that the simultaneous inactivation of two AP endonucleases (Apn1 and Apn2) and of the nuclease Rad1-Rad10 causes cell death in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We suggest that the essential function of Apn1, Apn2, and Rad1-Rad10 is to repair endogenous AP sites and related 3'-blocked single strand breaks. This data led us to conclude that the burden of endogenous AP sites is not compatible with life in absence of DNA repair. This chapter describes two genetic assays to investigate origin, repair, and biological consequences of endogenous AP sites in yeast. The first assay relies on genetic crosses and tetrad analysis and uses the apn1 apn2 rad1 triple mutant. The apn1 apn2 rad1 triple mutant is unviable; however, it can form microcolonies. By means of genetic crosses, apn1 apn2 rad1 x quadruple mutants are generated. The size of the colonies formed by each quadruple mutant is compared to that of the apn1 apn2 rad1 triple mutant. Three classes of genes (x) were identified: (i) genes whose inactivation aggravates the phenotype (reduces microcolony size), such as RAD9, RAD50, RAD51, RAD52, MUS81, and MRE11; (ii) genes whose inactivation alleviates the phenotype, such as UNG1, NTG1, and NTG2; and (iii) genes whose inactivation is neutral, such as MAG1 or OGG1. The second assay uses the apn1 apn2 rad14 triple mutant, which is viable but exhibits a spontaneous mutator phenotype. This mutant was used in a colethal screen. This assay allowed the identification of mutation in DNA repair genes such as RAD1 or RAD50, as well as a mutation in the DUT1 gene coding for the dUTPase, which has impact on the formation of AP sites in DNA. A model that summarizes our present and puzzling data on the origin and repair of endogenous AP sites is also presented.

  20. Genetic Control of the Trigger for the G2/M Checkpoint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, Eric J. [Columbia University; Smilenov, Lubomir B. [Columbia University; Young, Erik F. [Columbia University

    2013-10-01

    The work undertaken in this project addressed two seminal areas of low dose radiation biology that are poorly understood and controversial. These areas are the challenge to the linear-no-threshold (LNT) paradigm at low doses of radiation and, the fundamental elements of radiation bystander effect biology Genetic contributions to low dose checkpoint engagement: The LNT paradigm is an extrapolation of known, measured cancer induction endpoints. Importantly, data for lower doses is often not available. Debatably, radiation protection standards have been introduced which are prudently contingent on the adherence of cancer risk to the established trend seen at higher doses. Intriguing findings from other labs have hinted at separate DNA damage response programs that engage at low or high levels of radiation. Individual radiation sensitivity commensurate with hemizygosity for a radiation sensitivity gene has been estimated at 1-2% in the U.S.. Careful interrogation of the DNA damage response at low doses of radiation became important and served as the basis for this grant. Several genes were tested in combinations to determine if combined haploinsufficiency for multiple radiosensitizing genes could render a cell more sensitive to lower levels of acute radiation exposure. We measured a classical radiation response endpoint, cell cycle arrest prior to mitosis. Mouse embryo fibroblasts were used and provided a uniform, rapidly dividing and genetically manipulable population of study. Our system did not report checkpoint engagement at acute doses of gamma rays below 100 mGy. The system did report checkpoint engagement reproducibly at 500 mGy establishing a threshold for activation between 100 and 500 mGy. Engagement of the checkpoint was ablated in cells nullizygous for ATM but was otherwise unperturbed in cells combinatorially haploinsufficient for ATM and Rad9, ATM and PTEN or PTEN and Rad9. Taken together, these experiments tell us that, in a sensitive fibroblast culture