WorldWideScience

Sample records for vuv laboratory measurements

  1. VUV irradiance measurement of a 2.45 GHz microwave-driven hydrogen discharge

    CERN Document Server

    Komppula, J; Kalvas, T; Koivisto, H; Kronholm, R; Laulainen, J; Myllyperkiö, P

    2015-01-01

    Absolute values of VUV-emission of a 2.45 GHz microwave-driven hydrogen discharge are reported. The measurements were performed with a robust and straightforward method based on a photodiode and optical filters. It was found that the volumetric photon emission rate in the VUV-range (80-250 nm) is $10^{16}$-$10^{17}$ 1/cm$^3$s, which corresponds to approximately 8% dissipation of injected microwave power by VUV photon emission. The volumetric emission of characteristic emission bands was utilized to diagnostics of molecular plasma processes including volumetric rates of ionization, dissociation and excitation to high vibrational levels and metastable states. The estimated reaction rates imply that each injected molecule experiences several inelastic electron impact collisions. The upper limit for the total density of metastable neutrals ($2S$ atoms and $c^3\\Pi_u$ molecules) was estimated to be approximately 0.5% of the neutral gas density.

  2. Temperature-dependent absorption cross-section measurements of 1-butene (1-C4H8) in VUV and IR

    KAUST Repository

    Es-sebbar, Et-touhami

    2013-01-01

    Vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and infrared (IR) absorption cross-section measurements of 1-butene (1-C4H8; CH2=CHCH2CH3; Butylene) are reported over the temperature range of 296-529K. The VUV measurements are performed between 115 and 205nm using synchrotron radiation as a tunable VUV light source. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy is employed to measure absorption cross-section and band strengths in the IR region between 1.54 and 25μm (~6500-400cm-1). The measured room-temperature VUV and IR absorption cross-sections are compared with available literature data and are found to be in good agreement. The oscillator strength for the electronic transition (A1A\\'→X1A\\') around 150-205nm is determined to be 0.32±0.01.The gas temperature has a strong effect on both VUV and IR spectra. Measurements made in the VUV region show that the peak value of the band cross-section decreases and the background continuum increases with increasing gas temperature. This behavior is due to a change in the rotational and vibrational population distribution of 1-butene molecule. Similar changes in rotational population are observed in the IR spectra. Moreover, variation of the IR spectra with temperature is used to measure the enthalpy difference between syn and skew conformations of 1-butene and is found to be 0.24±0.03. kcal/mol, which is in excellent agreement with values reported in the literature. The measurements reported in this work will provide the much-needed spectroscopic information for the development of high-temperature quantitative diagnostics in combustion applications and validation of atmospheric chemistry models of extra-solar planets. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  3. The measurement of various molecules of pyrolysis gas of coal by using VUV-SPI-TOFMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Norihiro; Nishifuji, Masayuki; Hayash, Shun-ichi

    2013-04-01

    We developed and tested a system that combines a vacuum ultraviolet single photon ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer (VUV-SPI-TOFMS) with a Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) spectrometer and used it for the simultaneous detection of the various compounds generated during the pyrolysis of coal. We characterized the performance of the system, including its limits of detection and time resolution. We also determined the various compounds that could be detected using the system. The instrument exhibited a laboratory-determined detection limit that was in the parts per billion volume (ppbv) range and a detection time of 10 s for most of the aromatic compounds generated during the pyrolysis process. In addition, using this system, it was possible to determine the correlation between the pyrolysis temperature and the various compounds generated from different types of coals during the pyrolysis process.

  4. Semiconductor Electrical Measurements Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Semiconductor Electrical Measurements Laboratory is a research laboratory which complements the Optical Measurements Laboratory. The laboratory provides for Hall...

  5. Precision VUV Spectro-Polarimetry for Solar Chromospheric Magnetic Field Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, R.; Bando, T.; Hara, H.; Ishikawa, S.; Kano, R.; Kubo, M.; Katsukawa, Y.; Kobiki, T.; Narukage, N.; Suematsu, Y.; Tsuneta, S.; Aoki, K.; Miyagawa, K.; Ichimoto, K.; Kobayashi, K.; Auchère, F.; Clasp Team

    2014-10-01

    The Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter (CLASP) is a VUV spectro-polarimeter optimized for measuring the linear polarization of the Lyman-α line (121.6 nm) to be launched in 2015 with NASA's sounding rocket (Ishikawa et al. 2011; Narukage et al. 2011; Kano et al. 2012; Kobayashi et al. 2012). With this experiment, we aim to (1) observe the scattering polarization in the Lyman-α line, (2) detect the Hanle effect, and (3) assess the magnetic fields in the upper chromosphere and transition region for the first time. The polarization measurement error consists of scale error δ a (error in amplitude of linear polarization), azimuth error Δφ (error in the direction of linear polarization), and spurious polarization ɛ (false linear polarization signals). The error ɛ should be suppressed below 0.1% in the Lyman-α core (121.567 nm ±0.02 nm), and 0.5% in the Lyman-α wing (121.567 nm ±0.05 nm), based on our scientific requirements shown in Table 2 of Kubo et al. (2014). From scientific justification, we adopt Δ φzero at the Sun center due to symmetric geometry. In order to clarify whether we will be able to achieve the required polarization sensitivity and accuracy via these steps, we exercise polarization error budget, by investigating all the possible causes and their magnitudes of polarization errors, all of which are not necessarily verified by the polarization calibration. Based on these error budgets, we conclude that a polarization sensitivity of 0.1% in the line core, δ abudgets throughout the course of these tests.

  6. Measuring the temporal coherence of a high harmonic generation setup employing a Fourier transform spectrometer for the VUV/XUV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terschlüsen, J.A., E-mail: Joachim.Terschluesen@physics.uu.se; Agåker, M.; Svanqvist, M.; Plogmaker, S.; Nordgren, J.; Rubensson, J.-E.; Siegbahn, H.; Söderström, J.

    2014-12-21

    In this experiment we used an 800 nm laser to generate high-order harmonics in a gas cell filled with Argon. Of those photons, a harmonic with 42 eV was selected by using a time-preserving grating monochromator. Employing a modified Mach–Zehnder type Fourier transform spectrometer for the VUV/XUV it was possible to measure the temporal coherence of the selected photons to about 6 fs. We demonstrated that not only could this kind of measurement be performed with a Fourier transform spectrometer, but also with some spatial resolution without modifying the XUV source or the spectrometer.

  7. Integration of monitoring layer in control measurement system for VUV-FEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozniak, Krzysztof

    2005-09-01

    The work presents an 8-channel control system for a superconducting cavity accelerating module ACC1 of the VUVFEL machine. The integration was described of a monitoring layer with the DSP control layer realized in the programmable Xilinx VirtexII V4000 circuit. The implementation was realized in the VHDL. The hardware multiplication blocks were used which are embedded in the FPGA circuit. The final implementation of the device was presented. The device works in the real time, according to the nominal demands of the VUV-FEL machine. The paper describes the monitoring layer. There were shortly characterized particular functional blocks of the layers implemented in the FPGA circuit. There was presented a computer process of system supervision which uses the monitoring layer. Some chosen examples were presented to illustrate the real-time monitoring processes during the nominal work conditions of the VUV-FEL machine.

  8. A VUV photoionization measurement and ab-initio calculation of the ionization energy of gas phase SiO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostko, Oleg; Ahmed, Musahid; Metz, Ricardo B.

    2008-12-05

    In this work we report on the detection and vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization of gas phase SiO2 generated in situ via laser ablation of silicon in a CO2 molecular beam. The resulting species are investigated by single photon ionization with tunable VUV synchrotron radiation and mass analyzed using reflectron mass spectrometry. Photoionization efficiency (PIE) curves are recorded for SiO and SiO2 and ionization energy estimates are revealed from such measurements. A state-to-state ionizationenergy of 12.60 (+-0.05) eV is recorded by fitting two prominent peaks in the PIE curve for the following process: 1SUM O-Si-O --> 2PRODg [O-Si-O]+. Electronic structure calculations aid in the interpretation of the photoionization process and allow for identification of the symmetric stretch of 2PRODg [O-Si-O]+ which is observed in the PIE spectrum to be 0.11 eV (890 cm-1) above the ground state of the cation and agrees with the 892 cm-1 symmetric stretch frequency calculated at the CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ level.

  9. Semiconductor Laser Measurements Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Semiconductor Laser Measurements Laboratory is equipped to investigate and characterize the lasing properties of semiconductor diode lasers. Lasing features such...

  10. Atmospheric Measurements Laboratory (AML)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Atmospheric Measurements Laboratory (AML) is one of the nation's leading research facilities for understanding aerosols, clouds, and their interactions. The AML...

  11. In situ measurement of VUV/UV radiation from low-pressure microwave-produced plasma in Ar/O2 gas mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias, E. J.; Mitschker, F.; Fiebrandt, M.; Bibinov, N.; Awakowicz, P.

    2017-08-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) spectral irradiance is determined in low-pressure microwave-produced plasma, which is regularly used for polymer surface treatment. The re-emitted fluorescence in the UV/VIS spectral range from a sodium salicylate layer is measured. This fluorescence is related to VUV/UV radiation in different spectral bands based on cut-off filters. The background produced by direct emitted radiation in the fluorescence spectral region is quantified using a specific background filter, thus enabling the use of the whole fluorescence spectral range. A novel procedure is applied to determine the absolute value of the VUV/UV irradiance on a substrate. For that, an independent measurement of the absolute spectral emissivity of the plasma in the UV is performed. The measured irradiances on a substrate from a 25 Pa Ar/O2-produced plasma are in the range of 1015-1016 (photon~ s-1 cm-2). These values include the contribution from impurities present in the discharge.

  12. Real-time monitoring of trace-level VOCs by an ultrasensitive compact lamp-based VUV photoionization mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, W. Q.; Shu, J. N.; Zhang, P.; Li, Z.; Li, N. N.; Liang, M.; Yang, B.

    2015-06-01

    In this study, we report on the development of a compact lamp-based vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization mass spectrometer (PIMS; hereafter referred to as VUV-PIMS) in our laboratory; it is composed of a radio frequency-powered VUV lamp, a VUV photoionizer, an ion-immigration region, and a reflection time-of-flight mass spectrometer. By utilizing the novel photoionizer consisting of a photoionization cavity and a VUV light baffle, extremely low background noise was obtained. An ultrasensitive detection limit (2σ) of 3 pptv was achieved for benzene after an acquisition time of 10 s. To examine its potential for application in real-time sample monitoring, the developed VUV-PIMS was employed for the continuous measurement of urban air for six days in Beijing, China. Strong signals of trace-level volatile organic compounds such as benzene and its alkylated derivatives were observed in the mass spectra. These initial experimental results reveal that the instrument can be used for the online monitoring of trace-level species in the atmosphere.

  13. Real-time monitoring of trace-level VOCs by an ultrasensitive lamp-based VUV photoionization mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, W. Q.; Shu, J. N.; Zhang, P.; Li, Z.; Li, N. N.; Liang, M.; Yang, B.

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we report on the development of a lamp-based vacuum ultraviolet photoionization mass spectrometer (VUV-PIMS) in our laboratory; it is composed of a radio-frequency-powered VUV lamp, a VUV photoionizer, an ion-migration lens assembly, and a reflection time-of-flight mass spectrometer. By utilizing the novel photoionizer consisting of a photoionization cavity and a VUV light baffle, the baselines of the mass spectra decreased from 263.6 ± 15.7 counts to 4.1 ± 1.8 counts. A detection limit (2σ) of 3 pptv was achieved for benzene after an acquisition time of 10 s. To examine its potential for real-time monitoring applications of samples, the developed VUV-PIMS was employed for the continuous measurement of urban air for 6 days in Beijing, China. Strong signals of trace-level volatile organic compounds, such as benzene and its alkylated derivatives, were observed in the mass spectra. These initial experimental results reveal that the instrument can be used for the online monitoring of trace-level species in the atmosphere.

  14. VUV absorption spectroscopy measurements of the role of fast neutral atoms in a high-power gap breakdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filuk; Bailey; Cuneo; Lake; Nash; Noack; Maron

    2000-12-01

    The maximum power achieved in a wide variety of high-power devices, including electron and ion diodes, z pinches, and microwave generators, is presently limited by anode-cathode gap breakdown. A frequently discussed hypothesis for this effect is ionization of fast neutral atoms injected throughout the anode-cathode gap during the power pulse. We describe a newly developed diagnostic tool that provides a direct test of this hypothesis. Time-resolved vacuum-ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy is used to directly probe fast neutral atoms with 1-mm spatial resolution in the 10-mm anode-cathode gap of the SABRE 5 MV, 1 TW applied-B ion diode. Absorption spectra collected during Ar RF glow discharges and with CO2 gas fills confirm the reliability of the diagnostic technique. Throughout the 50-100 ns ion diode pulses no measurable neutral absorption was seen, setting upper limits of (0.12-1.5)x10(14) cm(-3) for ground-state fast neutral atom densities of H, C, N, O, and F. The absence of molecular absorption bands also sets upper limits of (0.16-1.2)x10(15) cm(-3) for common simple molecules. These limits are low enough to rule out ionization of fast neutral atoms as a breakdown mechanism. Breakdown due to ionization of molecules is also found to be unlikely. This technique can now be applied to quantify the role of neutral atoms in other high-power devices.

  15. Electron impact dissociation and VUV photoabsorption of frozen formamide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivaraman, Bhala; Raja Sekhar, B. N.; Nair, B. G.

    2014-01-01

    We report the results of an extensive study of formamide (HCONH2) ices carried out under experimental conditions that simulate those found in the interstellar medium (ISM). Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) and Infrared (IR) spectroscopic techniques were used to measure photoabsorption cross sections of t...

  16. Laboratory Measurements for Deuterated Astrochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillenbrand, Pierre-Michel; Bowen, Kyle Patrick; Miller, Kenneth A.; De Ruette, Nathalie; Urbain, Xavier; Savin, Daniel Wolf

    2017-06-01

    Deuterated molecules are powerful probes of the cold interstellar medium (ISM). Observations of D-bearing molecules are used to infer the chemistry of the ISM and to trace out physical conditions such as density, ionization fraction, and thermal history. The chemistry of the cold ISM results from a complicated interplay between gas-phase processes, reactions on dust grain surfaces, and chemistry occurring both in and on the icy mantles of dust grains. Our focus here is on an improved understanding of the relevant deuterated gas-phase chemistry. At the low temperatures and densities typical of the cold ISM, much of this chemistry is driven by binary ion-neutral reactions, which are typically barrierless and exoergic (as compared to neutral-neutral reactions which often have significant activation energies).One of the biggest challenges in generating a reliable deuterated gas-phase astrochemical network is the uncertainty of the necessary rate coefficients. The vast majority of available chemical kinetic data are for fully hydrogenated species. For those D-bearing reactions where no laboratory data are available, two approaches have been adopted for converting the fully hydrogenated data into partial- and fully-deuterated species. The first approach simply “clones” the H-bearing reactions into D-bearing reactions and assumes that the rate coefficients are the same. The second approach uses a simple mass scaling relationship based on the Langevin formalism.We have initiated a series of laboratory measurements aimed at resolving this issue. For this we use our novel dual-source, merged fast-beams apparatus, which enables us to study reactions of neutral atoms and charged molecules. Using co-propagating beams enables us to achieve collision energies corresponding to temperatures as low as 25 K, limited only by the divergences of the two beams. Recently we have measured the reaction C + H2+(D2+) forming CH+(CD+) + H(D). We are now studying D + H3+(D2H+) forming H2D

  17. Performance of diamond detectors for VUV applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    BenMoussa, A.; Theissen, A.; Scholze, F.; Hochedez, J. F.; Schühle, U.; Schmutz, W.; Haenen, K.; Stockman, Y.; Soltani, A.; McMullin, D.; Vest, R. E.; Kroth, U.; Laubis, C.; Richter, M.; Mortet, V.; Gissot, S.; Delouille, V.; Dominique, M.; Koller, S.; Halain, J. P.; Remes, Z.; Petersen, R.; D'Olieslaeger, M.; Defise, J.-M.

    2006-11-01

    We report on experimental results with photodetectors made of diamond. the Large Yield Radiometer (LYRA), will use such detectors for the first time for a solar physics space instrument. A (LYRA) set of measurement campaigns was carried out to obtain their XUV-to-VIS characterization (responsivity, linearity, stability, homogeneity). The responsivity has been measured from the XUV to the NIR, in the wavelength range 1-1127 nm (i.e. 1240-1.1 eV). The diamond detectors exhibit a photoresponse varying in the 40-75 mA/W range at 7 nm and demonstrate a visible rejection ratio (200 versus 500 nm) larger than four orders of magnitude. We show that diamond photodetectors are sensitive sensors for VUV photons, stable within a few percent, with a good linearity and moderate homogeneity.

  18. Performance of diamond detectors for VUV applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BenMoussa, A. [Royal Observatory of Belgium, Circular Avenue 3, B-1180 Brussels (Belgium)]. E-mail: ali.benmoussa@oma.be; Theissen, A.; Hochedez, J.F.; Gissot, S.; Delouille, V.; Dominique, M. [Royal Observatory of Belgium, Circular Avenue 3, B-1180 Brussels (Belgium); Scholze, F. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Abbestr. 2-12, D-10587 Berlin (Germany); Schuehle, U. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Sonnensystemforschung, D-37191 Katlenburg-Lindau (Germany); Schmutz, W. [Physikalisch-Meteorologisches Observatorium Davos, World Radiation Center, CH-7260 Davos Dorf (Switzerland); Haenen, K.; D' Olieslaeger, M. [Institute for Materials Research, Limburgs Universitair Centrum, Wetenschapspark 1, B-3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium)]|[Division IMOMEC, IMEC vzw, Wetenschapspark 1, B-3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); Stockman, Y. [Centre Spatial de Liege, Av. Pre Aily B-4031 Angleur (Belgium); Soltani, A. [Institut d' Electronique, de Microelectronique et de Nanotechnologie (IEMN) F-59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); McMullin, D. [Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), 4555 Overlook Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Vest, R.E. [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), 100 Bureau Drive, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Kroth, U.; Laubis, C.; Richter, M. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Abbestr. 2-12, D-10587 Berlin (Germany); Mortet, V. [Institute for Materials Research, Limburgs Universitair Centrum, Wetenschapspark 1, B-3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); Koller, S. [Physikalisch-Meteorologisches Observatorium Davos, World Radiation Center, CH-7260 Davos Dorf (Switzerland); Halain, J.P; Defise, J.-M. [Centre Spatial de Liege, Av. Pre Aily B-4031 Angleur (Belgium); Remes, Z. [Institute for Materials Research, Limburgs Universitair Centrum, Wetenschapspark 1, B-3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); Petersen, R. [Division IMOMEC, IMEC vzw, Wetenschapspark 1, B-3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium)

    2006-11-30

    We report on experimental results with photodetectors made of diamond. the Large Yield Radiometer (LYRA), will use such detectors for the first time for a solar physics space instrument. A (LYRA) set of measurement campaigns was carried out to obtain their XUV-to-VIS characterization (responsivity, linearity, stability, homogeneity). The responsivity has been measured from the XUV to the NIR, in the wavelength range 1-1127 nm (i.e. 1240-1.1 eV). The diamond detectors exhibit a photoresponse varying in the 40-75 mA/W range at 7 nm and demonstrate a visible rejection ratio (200 versus 500 nm) larger than four orders of magnitude. We show that diamond photodetectors are sensitive sensors for VUV photons, stable within a few percent, with a good linearity and moderate homogeneity.

  19. Duke storage rink UV/VUV FEL: Status and prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litvinenko, V.N.; Burnham, B.; Madey, J.M.J. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    The 1 GeV Duke storage ring was successfully commissioned with parameters exceeding initial specification. The OK-4 FEL has arrived at the Duke FEL laboratory from the Novosibirsk Institute of Nuclear Physics. The OK-4 installation and commissioning is in progress. In this paper we describe the up-to-date status of the Duke storage ring and the OK-4 FEL. The projected performance of the OK-4 UV/VUV FEL is presented based on the electron beam parameters achieved. Initial plans to operate the OK-4 UV/VUV FEL at the Duke 1 GeV storage ring are outlined. Future plans and prospects of both the OK-4 FEL and the Duke storage ring are discussed.

  20. Design of ITER divertor VUV spectrometer and prototype test at KSTAR tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seon, Changrae; Hong, Joohwan; Song, Inwoo; Jang, Juhyeok; Lee, Hyeonyong; An, Younghwa; Kim, Bosung; Jeon, Taemin; Park, Jaesun; Choe, Wonho; Lee, Hyeongon; Pak, Sunil; Cheon, MunSeong; Choi, Jihyeon; Kim, Hyeonseok; Biel, Wolfgang; Bernascolle, Philippe; Barnsley, Robin; O'Mullane, Martin

    2017-12-01

    Design and development of the ITER divertor VUV spectrometer have been performed from the year 1998, and it is planned to be installed in the year 2027. Currently, the design of the ITER divertor VUV spectrometer is in the phase of detail design. It is optimized for monitoring of chord-integrated VUV signals from divertor plasmas, chosen to contain representative lines emission from the tungsten as the divertor material, and other impurities. Impurity emission from overall divertor plasmas is collimated through the relay optics onto the entrance slit of a VUV spectrometer with working wavelength range of 14.6-32 nm. To validate the design of the ITER divertor VUV spectrometer, two sets of VUV spectrometers have been developed and tested at KSTAR tokamak. One set of spectrometer without the field mirror employs a survey spectrometer with the wavelength ranging from 14.6 nm to 32 nm, and it provides the same optical specification as the spectrometer part of the ITER divertor VUV spectrometer system. The other spectrometer with the wavelength range of 5-25 nm consists of a commercial spectrometer with a concave grating, and the relay mirrors with the same geometry as the relay mirrors of the ITER divertor VUV spectrometer. From test of these prototypes, alignment method using backward laser illumination could be verified. To validate the feasibility of tungsten emission measurement, furthermore, the tungsten powder was injected in KSTAR plasmas, and the preliminary result could be obtained successfully with regard to the evaluation of photon throughput. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Atomic and Molecular Data and their Applications", edited by Gordon W.F. Drake, Jung-Sik Yoon, Daiji Kato, Grzegorz Karwasz.

  1. Laboratory measurements and modeling of molecular photoabsorption in the ultraviolet for planetary atmospheres applications: diatomic sulfur and sulfur monoxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Glenn

    2016-07-01

    Our research program comprises the measurement and modeling of ultraviolet molecular photoabsorption cross sections with the highest practical resolution. It supports efforts to interpret and model observations of planetary atmospheres. Measurement and modeling efforts on diatomic sulfur (S _{2}) and sulfur monoxide (SO) are in progress. S _{2}: Interpretations of atmospheric (Io, Jupiter, cometary comae) S _{2} absorption features are hindered by a complete lack of laboratory cross section data in the ultraviolet. We are working to quantify the photoabsorption spectrum of S _{2} from 240 to 300 nm based on laboratory measurements and theoretical calculations. We have constructed an experimental apparatus to produce a stable column of S _{2} vapor at a temperature of 800 K. High-resolution measurements of the absorption spectrum of the strong B - X system of S _{2} were completed using the NIST VUV-FTS at Gaithersburg, Maryland. These measurements are currently being incorporated into a coupled-channel model of the absorption spectrum of S _{2} to quantify the contributions from individual band features and to establish the mechanisms responsible for the strong predissociation signature of the B - X system. A successful coupled channels model can then be used to calculate the B - X absorption spectrum at any temperature. SO: There has been a long-standing need for high-resolution cross sections of sulfur monoxide radicals in the ultraviolet and vacuum ultraviolet regions, where the molecule strongly predissociates, for modeling the atmospheres of Io and Venus, and most recently for understanding sulfur isotope effects in the ancient (pre-O _{2}) atmosphere of Earth. We have produced a measurable column of SO in a continuous-flow DC discharge cell, using SO _{2} as a parent molecule. Photoabsorption measurements were recently recorded on the DESIRS beamline of the SOLEIL synchrotron, taking advantage of the high-resolution VUV-FTS on that beamline. A number of

  2. Laboratory testing & measurement on optical imaging systems

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Theron, B

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the workshop was for participants to interactively discuss (with regard to optical imaging or optical imaging systems): Local end-user needs; What those needs imply for associated new & existing laboratory testing & measurement...

  3. Rain Erosion/Measurement Impact Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The FARM Rain Erosion/Impact Measurement Lab develops solutions for deficiencies in the ability of materials, coatings and designs to withstand a severe operational...

  4. Measurement quality assurance for radioassay laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCurdy, D.E. [Yankee Atomic Environmental Laboratory, Boston, MA (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Until recently, the quality of U.S. radioassay laboratory services has been evaluated by a limited number of governmental measurement assurance programs (MAPs). The major programs have been limited to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). In 1988, an industry MAP was established for the nuclear power utility industry through the U.S. Council for Energy Awareness/National Institute of Standards and Technology (USCEA/NIST). This program functions as both a MAP for utility laboratories and/or their commercial contractor laboratories, and as a traceability program for the U.S. radioactive source manufacturers and the utility laboratories. Each of these generic MAPs has been initiated and is maintained to serve the specific needs of the sponsoring agency or organization. As a result, there is diversification in their approach, scope, requirements, and degree of traceability to NIST. In 1987, a writing committee was formed under the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) N42.2 committee to develop a standard to serve as the basis document for the creation of a national measurement quality assurance (MQA) program for radioassay laboratories in the U.S. The standard is entitled, {open_quotes}Measurement Quality Assurance For Radioassay Laboratories.{open_quotes} The document was developed to serve as a guide for MQA programs maintained for the specialized sectors of the radioassay community, such as bioassay, routine environmental monitoring, environmental restoration and waste management, radiopharmaceuticals, and nuclear facilities. It was the intent of the writing committee to develop a guidance document that could be utilized to establish a laboratory`s specific data quality objectives (DQOs) that govern the operational requirements of the radioassay process, including mandated protocols and recommendations.

  5. Accreditation - Its relevance for laboratories measuring radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palsson, S.E. [Icelandic Radiation Protection Inst. (Iceland)

    2001-11-01

    Accreditation is an internationally recognised way for laboratories to demonstrate their competence. Obtaining and maintaining accreditation is, however, a costly and time-consuming procedure. The benefits of accreditation also depend on the role of the laboratory. Accreditation may be of limited relevance for a research laboratory, but essential for a laboratory associated with a national authority and e.g. issuing certificates. This report describes work done within the NKSBOK-1.1 sub-project on introducing accreditation to Nordic laboratories measuring radionuclides. Initially the focus was on the new standard ISO/IEC 17025, which was just in a draft form at the time, but which provides now a new framework for accreditation of laboratories. Later the focus was widened to include a general introduction to accreditation and providing through seminars a forum for exchanging views on the experience laboratories have had in this field. Copies of overheads from the last such seminar are included in the appendix to this report. (au)

  6. Laboratory setup for temperature and humidity measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Eimre, Kristjan

    2015-01-01

    In active particle detectors, the temperature and humidity conditions must be under constant monitoring and control, as even small deviations from the norm cause changes to detector characteristics and result in a loss of precision. To monitor the temperature and humidity, different kinds of sensors are used, which must be calibrated beforehand to ensure their accuracy. To calibrate the large number of sensors that are needed for the particle detectors and other laboratory work, a calibration system is needed. The purpose of the current work was to develop a laboratory setup for temperature and humidity sensor measurements and calibration.

  7. Time resolved 3D momentum imaging of ultrafast dynamics by coherent VUV-XUV radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sturm, F. P., E-mail: fpsturm@lbl.gov [Ultrafast X-Ray Science Lab, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Institut für Kernphysik, Universität Frankfurt, Max-von-Laue Str. 1, D-60438 Frankfurt (Germany); Wright, T. W.; Ray, D.; Zalyubovskaya, I.; Shivaram, N.; Slaughter, D. S.; Belkacem, A.; Weber, Th. [Ultrafast X-Ray Science Lab, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Ranitovic, P. [Ultrafast X-Ray Science Lab, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); ELI-ALPS, ELI-Hu Nkft, Dugonics ter 13, Szeged H6720 (Hungary)

    2016-06-15

    We present a new experimental setup for measuring ultrafast nuclear and electron dynamics of molecules after photo-excitation and ionization. We combine a high flux femtosecond vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and extreme ultraviolet (XUV) source with an internally cold molecular beam and a 3D momentum imaging particle spectrometer to measure electrons and ions in coincidence. We describe a variety of tools developed to perform pump-probe studies in the VUV-XUV spectrum and to modify and characterize the photon beam. First benchmark experiments are presented to demonstrate the capabilities of the system.

  8. Environmental Measurements Laboratory 2002 Unit Performance Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2001-10-01

    This EML Unit Performance Plan provides the key goals and performance measures for FY 2002 and continuing to FY 2003. The purpose of the Plan is to inform EML's stakeholders and customers of the Laboratory's products and services, and its accomplishments and future challenges. Also incorporated in the Unit Performance Plan is EML's Communication Plan for FY 2002.

  9. Electrical measurements in the laboratory practice

    CERN Document Server

    Bartiromo, Rosario

    2016-01-01

    This book covers the basic theory of electrical circuits, describes analog and digital instrumentation, and applies modern methods to evaluate uncertainties in electrical measurements. It is comprehensive in scope and is designed specifically to meet the needs of students in physics and electrical engineering who are attending laboratory classes in electrical measurements. The topics addressed in individual chapters include the analysis of continuous current circuits; sources of measurement uncertainty and their combined effect; direct current measurements; analysis of alternating current circuits; special circuits including resonant circuits, frequency filters and impedance matching networks; alternating current measurements; analog and digital oscilloscopes; non-sinusoidal waveforms and circuit excitation by pulses; distributed parameter components and transmission lines. Each chapter is equipped with a number of problems. A special appendix describes a series of nine experiments, in each case providing a p...

  10. Measuring preschool learning engagement in the laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliday, Simone E; Calkins, Susan D; Leerkes, Esther M

    2017-11-16

    Learning engagement is a critical factor for academic achievement and successful school transitioning. However, current methods of assessing learning engagement in young children are limited to teacher report or classroom observation, which may limit the types of research questions one could assess about this construct. The current study investigated the validity of a novel assessment designed to measure behavioral learning engagement among young children in a standardized laboratory setting and examined how learning engagement in the laboratory relates to future classroom adjustment. Preschool-aged children (N = 278) participated in a learning-based Tangrams task and Story sequencing task and were observed based on seven behavioral indicators of engagement. Confirmatory factor analysis supported the construct validity for a behavioral engagement factor composed of six of the original behavioral indicators: attention to instructions, on-task behavior, enthusiasm/energy, persistence, monitoring progress/strategy use, and negative affect. Concurrent validity for this behavioral engagement factor was established through its associations with parent-reported mastery motivation and pre-academic skills in math and literacy measured in the laboratory, and predictive validity was demonstrated through its associations with teacher-reported classroom learning behaviors and performance in math and reading in kindergarten. These associations were found when behavioral engagement was observed during both the nonverbal task and the verbal story sequencing tasks and persisted even after controlling for child minority status, gender, and maternal education. Learning engagement in preschool appears to be successfully measurable in a laboratory setting. This finding has implications for future research on the mechanisms that support successful academic development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Environmental Measurements Laboratory program review, December 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volchok, H.L.; de Planque, G. (EDS.)

    1984-03-01

    This volume contains all of the written material that was submitted to the panel of Reviewers in advance of a Program Review conducted by the US Department of Energy, Office of Health and Environmental Research at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) December 7-9, 1983. In addition to a general introduction there are nineteen papers grouped into the five broad program categories covering all of the scientific and engineering projects of the Laboratory: Natural Radioactivity and Radiation, Anthropogenic Radioactivity and Radiation, Non-nuclear, Quality Assurance, and Development and Support. These short articles, for the most part, focus on the rationale for EML's involvement in each project, emphasizing their relevance to the EML and Department of Energy missions. Project results and their interpretation were presented at the Review and can be found in the material referenced in this volume.

  12. The VUV instrument SPICE for Solar Orbiter: performance ground testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Martin E.; Morris, Nigel; Griffin, Douglas K.; Eccleston, Paul; Anderson, Mark; Pastor Santos, Carmen; Bruzzi, Davide; Tustain, Samuel; Howe, Chris; Davenne, Jenny; Grundy, Timothy; Speight, Roisin; Sidher, Sunil D.; Giunta, Alessandra; Fludra, Andrzej; Philippon, Anne; Auchere, Frederic; Hassler, Don; Davila, Joseph M.; Thompson, William T.; Schuehle, Udo H.; Meining, Stefan; Walls, Buddy; Phelan, P.; Dunn, Greg; Klein, Roman M.; Reichel, Thomas; Gyo, Manfred; Munro, Grant J.; Holmes, William; Doyle, Peter

    2017-08-01

    SPICE is an imaging spectrometer operating at vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) wavelengths, 70.4 - 79.0 nm and 97.3 - 104.9 nm. It is a facility instrument on the Solar Orbiter mission, which carries 10 science instruments in all, to make observations of the Sun's atmosphere and heliosphere, at close proximity to the Sun, i.e to 0.28 A.U. at perihelion. SPICE's role is to make VUV measurements of plasma in the solar atmosphere. SPICE is designed to achieve spectral imaging at spectral resolution >1500, spatial resolution of several arcsec, and two-dimensional FOV of 11 x16arcmins. The many strong constraints on the instrument design imposed by the mission requirements prevent the imaging performance from exceeding those of previous instruments, but by being closer to the sun there is a gain in spatial resolution. The price which is paid is the harsher environment, particularly thermal. This leads to some novel features in the design, which needed to be proven by ground test programs. These include a dichroic solar-transmitting primary mirror to dump the solar heat, a high in-flight temperature (60deg.C) and gradients in the optics box, and a bespoke variable-line-spacing grating to minimise the number of reflective components used. The tests culminate in the systemlevel test of VUV imaging performance and pointing stability. We will describe how our dedicated facility with heritage from previous solar instruments, is used to make these tests, and show the results, firstly on the Engineering Model of the optics unit, and more recently on the Flight Model. For the keywords, select up to 8 key terms for a search on your manuscript's subject.

  13. VUV photoabsorption spectroscopy of amorphous and crystalline sulphur dioxide films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtom, P. D.; Dawes, A.; Davis, M. P.; Webb, S. M.; Hoffmann, S. V.; Mukerji, R. J.; Mason, N. J.

    Sulphur dioxide, SO2 is one of the simplest sulphur compounds and has been observed widely in the interstellar medium and in the solar system. It has also been observed in the atmospheres of Venus and Io and on the surface of Europa. Gaseous sulphur dioxide has recently been observed for the first time in the extragalactic medium. (Martin et al 1979). Five SO2 transitions detected towards NGC 253 with a total column density of 7 x 1013 cm-1 have been reported. SO2 is also present on Io, in solid, liquid and gaseous form. For example solid phase SO2 was suggested as the source for the 4.05-4.08 μm feature of SO2 seen in the spectrum of Io (Smythe, Nelson & Nash 1979),(Fanale et al 1979). To date most studies of SO2 spectroscopy have been in the gaseous phase with only a few experiments reported on solid SO2. We have used the UV1 beam line on the ASTRID synchrotron based at the University of Aarhus in Denmark to measure the VUV spectrum of condensed phase SO2 over the range of 120 - 350 nm and in the temperature range of 25 - 80 K. (For a full description of our equipment see Dawes, Holtom & Mason 2003). In this poster we report the results of a detailed study of the spectroscopy of solid SO2 in the VUV and UV. At 25 K the VUV spectrum for a fast deposited film (2.8 μm/hr) suggests an amorphous ice layer is formed, in contrast a slow deposition (0.21 μ m/hr) suggests that a more crystalline ice is formed. Annealing (heating of the 25 K fast deposited ice) to 80 K revealed a phase change producing crystalline SO2 ice from the originally amorphous sample. Such spectroscopic features might be used to determine thermal histories of planetary ice. Further details will be presented at the conference.

  14. Real-time ultrasensitive VUV-PIMS detection of representative endogenous volatile markers in cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen; Shu, Jinian; Zhang, Peng; Sun, Wanqi; Yang, Bo; Zhang, Haixu

    2016-01-01

    Identifying endogenous volatile organic compounds (VOCs) as markers for different cancers currently requires time-consuming procedures and specialized operators. The objective of this study was to develop a rapid and simple method for measuring VOCs at trace levels. A simple vacuum ultraviolet photoionization mass spectrometer (VUV-PIMS) was used to detect trace levels of dimethyl trisulfide (DMTS), dimethyl sulfide (DMS), and 2-butanone, which correspond to volatile biomarker candidates present in the exhaled breath of patients with breast, liver, and lung cancers, respectively. The practicality of measuring endogenous VOCs using VUV-PIMS was confirmed by detecting them in cultured cell lines. The abovementioned VOCs were detected with high sensitivity by VUV-PIMS. The limits of detection (LODs) for DMTS, DMS, and 2-butanone were 3.1, 3.9, and 23.2 pptv, respectively, under ambient conditions, which surpass the sensitivity of nearly all other MS-based techniques. Moreover, relatively high concentrations of 2-butanone and DMS were observed in VOCs emitted from the A549 lung cancer cell line and the HepG2 liver cancer cell line, respectively. Our results show that VUV-PIMS may serve as a reliable method for real-time measurement of endogenous volatile cancer biomarkers.

  15. Degradation of naproxen by UV, VUV photolysis and their combination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arany, Eszter [Research Group of Environmental Chemistry, Institute of Chemistry, University of Szeged, Rerrich Béla tér 1, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary); Szabó, Rita Katalin [Research Group of Environmental Chemistry, Institute of Chemistry, University of Szeged, Rerrich Béla tér 1, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary); Laboratoire de Chimie et Microbiologie de l’Eau (LCME), CNRS UMR 6008, ESIP Université de Poitiers, Poitiers (France); Apáti, László [Research Group of Environmental Chemistry, Institute of Chemistry, University of Szeged, Rerrich Béla tér 1, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary); Alapi, Tünde [Research Group of Environmental Chemistry, Institute of Chemistry, University of Szeged, Rerrich Béla tér 1, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary); Department of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, University of Szeged, Dóm tér 7, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary); Ilisz, István [Department of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, University of Szeged, Dóm tér 7, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary); Mazellier, Patrick [Institut des Sciences Moléculaires, Laboratoire de Physico et Toxico Chimie de l’Environnement, CNRS UMR 5255, Université de Bordeaux, Bordeaux (France); Dombi, András [Research Group of Environmental Chemistry, Institute of Chemistry, University of Szeged, Rerrich Béla tér 1, H-6720 Szeged (Hungary); and others

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • The efficiency of the methods increased in the following order: UV < VUV < UV/VUV. • The degradation inhibiting effect of dissolved O{sub 2} increased in the order: UV < UV/VUV < VUV. • In absence of dissolved O{sub 2} the radical pathway dominates during the UV/VUV photolysis. • In presence of dissolved O{sub 2} some synergistic effect of UV and VUV lights occurs. • VUV irradiation results in complete mineralization of NAP. -- Abstract: Naproxen is a widely used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug. Recently, this medicine was detected both in natural waters (up to 1.5 μg L{sup −1}) and in sewage treatment plant effluents (up to 5.2 μg L{sup −1}). Moreover, naproxen is only partly eliminated by classical processes used in sewage treatment plants. Therefore, its degradation is of utmost interest. Advanced oxidation processes proved to be the most suitable methods for the elimination of persistent organic contaminants. In this work ultraviolet (UV, 254 nm), vacuum ultraviolet photolysis (VUV, 172 nm) and their combination (UV/VUV, 254/185 nm) were investigated. The efficiency of the methods increased in the following order: UV < VUV < UV/VUV photolysis. However, VUV irradiation was found to mineralize the contaminant molecule most effectively. The chemical structures of three out of four aromatic by-products and of some aliphatic carboxylic acids were presumed. The effects of dissolved O{sub 2} and the initial concentration of naproxen on the degradation were also investigated.

  16. Deuterium Enrichment of PAHs by VUV Irradiation of Interstellar Ices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Max P.; Sandford, Scott A.; Allamandola, Louis J.; Gillette, J. Seb; Zare, Richard N.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Laboratory results demonstrate that polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) rapidly exchange their hydrogen atoms with those of nearby molecules when they are frozen into low-temperature ices and exposed to vacuum ultraviolet radiation. As a result, PAHs quickly become deuterium-enriched when VUV irradiated in D-containing ices. This mechanism has important consequences for several astrophysical issues owing to the ubiquitous nature of PAHs in the interstellar medium. For example, this process may explain the deuterium enrichments found in PAHs in meteorites and interplanetary dust particles. These results also provide general predictions about the molecular siting of the deuterium on aromatic materials in meteorites if this process produced a significant fraction of their D-enrichment.

  17. Laboratory measurements and astronomical search for cyanomethanimine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melosso, M.; Melli, A.; Puzzarini, C.; Codella, C.; Spada, L.; Dore, L.; Degli Esposti, C.; Lefloch, B.; Bachiller, R.; Ceccarelli, C.; Cernicharo, J.; Barone, V.

    2018-02-01

    Context. C-cyanomethanimine (HNCHCN), existing in the two Z and E isomeric forms, is a key prebiotic molecule, but, so far, only the E isomer has been detected toward the massive star-forming region Sagittarius B2(N) using transitions in the radio wavelength domain. Aims: With the aim of detecting HNCHCN in Sun-like-star forming regions, the laboratory investigation of its rotational spectrum has been extended to the millimeter-/submillimeter-wave (mm-/submm-) spectral window in which several unbiased spectral surveys have been already carried out. Methods: High-resolution laboratory measurements of the rotational spectrum of C-cyanomethanimine were carried out in the 100-420 GHz range using a frequency-modulation absorption spectrometer. We then searched for the C-cyanomethanimine spectral features in the mm-wave range using the high-sensitivity and unbiased spectral surveys obtained with the IRAM 30-m antenna in the ASAI context, the earliest stages of star formation from starless to evolved Class I objects being sampled. Results: For both the Z and E isomers, the spectroscopic work has led to an improved and extended knowledge of the spectroscopic parameters, thus providing accurate predictions of the rotational signatures up to 700 GHz. So far, no C-cyanomethanimine emission has been detected toward the ASAI targets, and upper limits of the column density of 1011-1012 cm-2 could only be derived. Consequently, the C-cyanomethanimine abundances have to be less than a few 10-10 for starless and hot-corinos. A less stringent constraint, ≤10-9, is obtained for shocks sites. Conclusions: The combination of the upper limits of the abundances of C-cyanomethanimine together with accurate laboratory frequencies up to 700 GHz poses the basis for future higher sensitivity searches around Sun-like-star forming regions. For compact (typically less than 1″) and chemically enriched sources such as hot-corinos, the use of interferometers as NOEMA and ALMA in their extended

  18. Communication: Direct measurements of nascent O({sup 3}P{sub 0,1,2}) fine-structure distributions and branching ratios of correlated spin-orbit resolved product channels CO(ã{sup 3}Π; v) + O({sup 3}P{sub 0,1,2}) and CO(Χ{sup ~1}Σ{sup +}; v) + O({sup 3}P{sub 0,1,2}) in VUV photodissociation of CO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Zhou; Chang, Yih Chung; Gao, Hong; Benitez, Yanice; Song, Yu; Ng, C. Y., E-mail: cyng@chem.ucdavis.edu, E-mail: wmjackson@ucdavis.edu; Jackson, W. M., E-mail: cyng@chem.ucdavis.edu, E-mail: wmjackson@ucdavis.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Davis, Davis, California 95616 (United States)

    2014-06-21

    We present a generally applicable experimental method for the direct measurement of nascent spin-orbit state distributions of atomic photofragments based on the detection of vacuum ultraviolet (VUV)-excited autoionizing-Rydberg (VUV-EAR) states. The incorporation of this VUV-EAR method in the application of the newly established VUV-VUV laser velocity-map-imaging-photoion (VMI-PI) apparatus has made possible the branching ratio measurement for correlated spin-orbit state resolved product channels, CO(ã{sup 3}Π; v) + O({sup 3}P{sub 0,1,2}) and CO(Χ{sup ~1}Σ{sup +}; v) + O({sup 3}P{sub 0,1,2}), formed by VUV photoexcitation of CO{sub 2} to the 4s(1{sub 0}{sup 1}) Rydberg state at 97,955.7 cm{sup −1}. The total kinetic energy release (TKER) spectra obtained from the O{sup +} VMI-PI images of O({sup 3}P{sub 0,1,2}) reveal the formation of correlated CO(ã{sup 3}Π; v = 0–2) with well-resolved v = 0–2 vibrational bands. This observation shows that the dissociation of CO{sub 2} to form the spin-allowed CO(ã{sup 3}Π; v = 0–2) + O({sup 3}P{sub 0,1,2}) channel has no potential energy barrier. The TKER spectra for the spin-forbidden CO(Χ{sup ~1}Σ{sup +}; v) + O({sup 3}P{sub 0,1,2}) channel were found to exhibit broad profiles, indicative of the formation of a broad range of rovibrational states of CO(Χ{sup ~1}Σ{sup +})  with significant vibrational populations for v = 18–26. While the VMI-PI images for the CO(ã{sup 3}Π; v = 0–2) + O({sup 3}P{sub 0,1,2}) channel are anisotropic, indicating that the predissociation of CO{sub 2} 4s(1{sub 0}{sup 1}) occurs via a near linear configuration in a time scale shorter than the rotational period, the angular distributions for the CO(Χ{sup ~1}Σ{sup +}; v) + O({sup 3}P{sub 0,1,2}) channel are close to isotropic, revealing a slower predissociation process, which possibly occurs on a triplet surface via an intersystem crossing mechanism.

  19. Environmental Measurements Laboratory 1994 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chieco, N.A. [ed.; Krey, P.W.; Beck, H.L.

    1995-08-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) for the calendar year 1994 and it serves as an annual report to the Director of the Office of Energy Research (ER), the Associate Director and staff of the Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER), the manager and staff of the Chicago Field Office, and the authors colleagues. Emphasized are the progress and accomplishments of the year, rather than future plans or expectations. The technical summaries are grouped according to the following seven general program areas: environmental radiation and radioactivity; radiation transport and dosimetry; environmental radon, thoron, and related aerosols; atmospheric and surface pollutant studies related to global climate change; atmospheric chemistry; metrology, consultation, and emergency response; environmental management. EML`s mission is to address important scientific questions concerning human health and environmental impacts. Through its multidisciplinary staff, EML conducts experimental and theoretical research on radioactive and other energy-related pollutants, and provides DOE and other federal agencies with the in-house capability to respond effectively and efficiently with regard to quality assurance activities, environmental issues and related national security issues.

  20. Environmental Measurements Laboratory, annual report 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krey, P.W.; Heit, M. [eds.

    1996-07-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) for the calendar year 1995 and serves as an annual report to the Director of the Office of Energy Research (ER), the Associate Director and staff of the Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER), the Manager and staff of the Chicago Operations Office, and our colleagues. Emphasized are the progress and accomplishments of the year, rather than future plans or expectations. The technical summaries are grouped according to the following seven research program areas: (1) Environmental Radiation and Radioactivity; (2) Radiation Transport and Dosimetry; (3) Environmental Radon, Thoron, and Related Aerosols; (4) Atmospheric and Surface Pollutant Studies Related to Global Climate Change; (5) Atmospheric Chemistry; and (6) Metrology, Consultation, and Emergency Response Environmental Management The mission of EML is to address important scientific questions concerning human health and environmental impacts. Through its multidisciplinary staff, EML conducts experimental and theoretical research on radioactive and other energy-related pollutants and provides DOE and other federal agencies with the in-house capability to respond effectively and efficiently with regard to quality assurance activities, environmental issues, and related national security issues.

  1. A VUV prism spectrometer for RICH radiator refractometry

    CERN Document Server

    Moyssides, P G; Fokitis, E

    2000-01-01

    A prism spectrometer has been developed to operate in the VUV wavelength range from 120 to 200 nm. It can be used as a pre- disperser in conjunction with a Fabry-Perot based gas refractometer. This instrument has also been used to measure the refractive index of the liquid radiator C/sub 6/F/sub 14/ in various spectral lines. This radiator is used in the RICH detectors of the DELPHI experiment and has been proposed for ALICE, and LHCb experiments. The spectral resolution of the system is improved as the wavelength decreases and the data are consistent with a wavelength accuracy about 0.4 nm at 140 nm. The results for the dispersion curve of the above liquid are presented. (17 refs).

  2. Reconstructing the Solar VUV Irradiance Over the Past 60 Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlin, Phillip C.

    2011-01-01

    Actual observations of the solar spectral irradiance are extremely limited on climate time scales; therefore, various empirical models use solar proxies to reconstruct the actual output of the Sun over long time scales. The Flare Irradiance Spectral Model (FISM) is an empirical model of the solar irradiance spectrum from 0.1 to 190 nm at 1 nm spectral resolution and on a I-minute time cadence. The goal of FISM is to provide accurate solar spectral irradiances over the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV: 0-200 nm) range as input for ionospheric and thermospheric. A brief overview of the proxies used in the FISM model will be given, and also discussed is how the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) will contribute to improving FISM estimates and its accuracies. Also presented will be a discussion of other solar irradiance proxies and measurements, and their associated uncertainties, used for solar spectral reconstructions.

  3. An inter-laboratory comparison of urinary 3-hydroxypropylmercapturic acid measurement demonstrates good reproducibility between laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bailey Brian

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biomarkers have been used extensively in clinical studies to assess toxicant exposure in smokers and non-smokers and have recently been used in the evaluation of novel tobacco products. The urinary metabolite 3-HPMA, a metabolite of the major tobacco smoke toxicity contributor acrolein, is one example of a biomarker used to measure exposure to tobacco smoke. A number of laboratories have developed liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS based methods to measure urinary 3-HPMA; however, it is unclear to what extent the data obtained by these different laboratories are comparable. Findings This report describes an inter-laboratory comparison carried out to evaluate the comparability of 3-HPMA measurement between four laboratories. A common set of spiked and authentic smoker and non-smoker urine samples were used. Each laboratory used their in-house LC-MS/MS method and a common internal standard. A comparison of the repeatability ('r', reproducibility ('R', and coefficient of variation for 3-HPMA demonstrated that within-laboratory variation was consistently lower than between-laboratory variation. The average inter-laboratory coefficient of variation was 7% for fortified urine samples and 16.2% for authentic urine samples. Together, this represents an inter-laboratory variation of 12.2%. Conclusion The results from this first inter-laboratory comparison for the measurement of 3-HPMA in urine demonstrate a reasonably good consensus between laboratories. However, some consistent measurement biases were still observed between laboratories, suggesting that additional work may be required to further reduce the inter-laboratory coefficient of variation.

  4. A syncrhronized FIR/VUV light source at Jefferson Lab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinn, Michelle D. [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2013-05-31

    This slide show presents an introduction to Free-Electron Lasers (FELs) and what makes the JLab FELs unique. Ways of exploring the nature of matter with the FEL are shown, including applications in the THz, IR, UV, and VUV. The Jefferson Lab FEL Facility is unique in its high average brightness in the THz, and IR -- VUV spectral regions and Sub ps-pulses at MHz repetition rates. With an installation of a rebuilt 'F100' cryomodule the linac energy will increase to > 150MeV. This will permit lasing further into the UV and extend VUV. With the swap of our CEBAF-style cryounit for an improved booster, we could lase in the VUV. Addition of a wiggler and optical cavity slightly canted from the UV beamline would allow simultaneous lasing of UV and THz for high E-field 2 color experiments.

  5. Molecular beam studies of unimolecular and bimolecular chemical reaction dynamics using VUV synchrotron radiation as a product probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blank, David Andrew [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1997-08-01

    This dissertation describes the use of a new molecular beam apparatus designed to use tunable VUV synchrotron radiation for photoionization of the products from scattering experiments. The apparatus was built at the recently constructed Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, a third generation 1-2 GeV synchrotron radiation source. The new apparatus is applied to investigations of the dynamics of unimolecular reactions, photodissociation experiments, and bimolecular reactions, crossed molecular beam experiments. The first chapter describes the new apparatus and the VUV radiation used for photoionization. This is followed by a number of examples of the many advantages provided by using VUV photoionization in comparison with the traditional technique of electron bombardment ionization. At the end of the chapter there is a discussion of the data analysis employed in these scattering experiments. The remaining four chapters are complete investigations of the dynamics of four chemical systems using the new apparatus and provide numerous additional examples of the advantages provided by VUV photoionizaiton of the products. Chapters 2-4 are photofragment translational spectroscopy studies of the photodissociation dynamics of dimethyl sulfoxide, acrylonitrile, and vinyl chloride following absorption at 193 mn. All of these systems have multiple dissociation channels and provide good examples of the ability of the new apparatus to unravel the complex UV photodissociation dynamics that can arise in small polyatomic molecules.

  6. Characterization of Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) Radiation for the Development of a Fluorescent Lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasina, Khatun; K. Sharma, A.; K. Barhai, P.

    2011-08-01

    A negative unipolar pulsed voltage is applied to study internal electrical parameters of the xenon filled dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) sources. The VUV radiation emitted from these sources is characterized by means of the photoluminescence intensity of the red phosphor pellet. The red phosphor converts the VUV radiation into visible radiation and the emission spectra include a peak at 619.56 nm. The emission characteristics of the red phosphor are analyzed in terms of the pressure-distance (pd), rise time and frequency of the pulsed voltage waveform. The emission intensity measured at different operational conditions confirms that the formation and decay of the xenon excimer, Xe2*, increase with the increase in reduced electric field, E/N. After exceeding certain limits of E/N, the intensity of Xe2* decreases rapidly.

  7. VUV photon-induced ionization/dissociation of antipyrine and propyphenazone: mass spectrometric and theoretical insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Liulin; Zhang, Lidong; Guo, Huijun; Jia, Liangyuan; Pan, Yang; Yin, Hao; Qi, Fei

    2010-07-01

    Two analgesic and anti-inflammatory drugs, antipyrine and propyphenazone, were investigated with infrared laser desorption/tunable synchrotron vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization mass spectrometry (IR LD/VUV PIMS) and theoretical calculations. Mass spectra of the two drugs were measured at various photon energies. Fragment ions were gradually produced as photon energy increases. The structural assignment of the dominant fragment ions was supported by the results from a commercial electron impact time-of-flight mass spectrometer (EI-TOF MS). Primary fragmentation pathways were established from experimental observations combining with theoretical calculations. Methyl radical elimination is a common fragmentation pathway for two analytes. However, for propyphenazone cation, isopropyl group elimination to form antipyrine cation is another competitive pathway. 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. The role of VUV radiation in the inactivation of bacteria with an atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    CERN Document Server

    Schneider, Simon; Ellerweg, Dirk; Denis, Benjamin; Narberhaus, Franz; Bandow, Julia E; Benedikt, Jan

    2011-01-01

    A modified version of a micro scale atmospheric pressure plasma jet (\\mu-APPJ) source, so-called X-Jet, is used to study the role of plasma generated VUV photons in the inactivation of E. coli bacteria. The plasma is operated in He gas or a He/O2 mixture and the X-Jet modification of the jet geometry allows effective separation of heavy reactive particles (such as O atoms or ozone molecules) from the plasma-generated photons. The measurements of the evolution of zone of inhibitions formed in monolayers of vegetative E. coli bacteria, of VUV emission intensity and of positive ion spectra show that photochemistry in the gas phase followed by photochemistry products impacting on bacteria can result in bacterial inactivation. Interestingly, this process is more effective than direct inactivation by VUV radiation damage. Mainly protonated water cluster ions are detected by mass spectrometry indicating that water impurity has to be carefully considered. The measurements indicate that the combination of the presence...

  9. Earth System Research Laboratory Long-Term Surface Aerosol Measurements

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Aerosol measurements began at the NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL) Global Monitoring Division (GMD) baseline observatories in the mid-1970's with the...

  10. Temporal VUV Emission Characteristics Related to Generations and Losses of Metastable Atoms in Xenon Pulsed Barrier Discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motomura, Hideki; Loo, Ka Hong; Ikeda, Yoshihisa; Jinno, Masafumi; Aono, Masaharu

    Although xenon pulsed dielectric barrier discharge is one of the most promising substitutes for mercury low-pressure discharge for fluorescent lamps, the efficacy of xenon fluorescent lamp is not enough for practical use for general lighting. To improve the efficacy it is indispensable to clarify mechanisms of vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) emissions, which excite phosphor, from xenon discharge related to plasma characteristics. In this paper emission waveforms and temporal change of metastable atom density are measured and temporal VUV emission characteristics related to generations and losses of metastable atoms in xenon pulsed barrier discharge is investigated. It is shown that the lamp efficacy is improved by about 10% with shorter pulse in which the two VUV emission peaks in a pulse are overlapped. It is also shown that at the lower pressure of 1.3 kPa metastable atoms generated during on-period of the voltage pulse are not efficiently consumed for VUV emissions in the off-period of the voltage pulse because of lower rate of three-body collision and quenching. This fact is thought to be one of the reasons why the lamp efficacy is low at lower pressure.

  11. Measuring meaningful learning in the undergraduate chemistry laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, Kelli R.

    The undergraduate chemistry laboratory has been an essential component in chemistry education for over a century. The literature includes reports on investigations of singular aspects laboratory learning and attempts to measure the efficacy of reformed laboratory curriculum as well as faculty goals for laboratory learning which found common goals among instructors for students to learn laboratory skills, techniques, experimental design, and to develop critical thinking skills. These findings are important for improving teaching and learning in the undergraduate chemistry laboratory, but research is needed to connect the faculty goals to student perceptions. This study was designed to explore students' ideas about learning in the undergraduate chemistry laboratory. Novak's Theory of Meaningful Learning was used as a guide for the data collection and analysis choices for this research. Novak's theory states that in order for meaningful learning to occur the cognitive, affective, and psychomotor domains must be integrated. The psychomotor domain is inherent in the chemistry laboratory, but the extent to which the cognitive and affective domains are integrated is unknown. For meaningful learning to occur in the laboratory, students must actively integrate both the cognitive domain and the affective domains into the "doing" of their laboratory work. The Meaningful Learning in the Laboratory Instrument (MLLI) was designed to measure students' cognitive and affective expectations and experiences within the context of conducting experiments in the undergraduate chemistry laboratory. Evidence for the validity and reliability of the data generated by the MLLI were collected from multiple quantitative studies: a one semester study at one university, a one semester study at 15 colleges and universities across the United States, and a longitudinal study where the MLLI was administered 6 times during two years of general and organic chemistry laboratory courses. Results from

  12. Projectile Measurements and Instrumentation Laboratory Mass Property Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-09-01

    measurement are the linear scale, the scale with a vernier , the micrometer screw, and the multip ymg lever (or gear) system as represented in the dial...ravaraa alda II nacaaaary and Idmntlly by block numbor) Aass Property Measurement Equipment Vernier Caliper Optical Comparator Triple Beam...gage micrometer Thj accuracy of the final measurement when using these mechanical methods is dependent not only on the device but on the skill of the

  13. New developments on diamond photodetector for VUV solar observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Moussa, A.; Soltani, A.; Haenen, K.; Kroth, U.; Mortet, V.; Barkad, H. A.; Bolsee, D.; Hermans, C.; Richter, M.; DeJaeger, J. C.; Hochedez, J. F.

    2008-03-01

    A new large-size metal-semiconductor-metal photoconductor device of 4.6 mm in diameter based on diamond material has been reprocessed and characterized in the vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) wavelength range. The metal finger contacts have been processed to 2 µm in width with spacing between the contacts of 5 µm for a bias voltage of 5 V. The responsivity, stability, linearity and homogeneity have been tested. Solutions and progresses on diamond processing are identified and are reported. In the VUV wavelength range of interest, the diamond photodetector is sensitive with a maximum response of 48 mA W-1 at 210 nm with a corresponding external quantum efficiency of 42%, homogenous and stable under short irradiation. It indicates a 200-400 nm rejection ratio of more than four orders of magnitude and demonstrates the advantages of diamond-based detectors in terms of high rejection ratio and high output signal for VUV solar observation missions.

  14. CIV VUV FPI Interferometer for Transition Region Magnetography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary, G. A.

    2005-01-01

    Much in the same way photonics harnesses light for engineering and technology applications, solar physics harnesses light for the remote sensing of the sun. In photonics the vacuum ultraviolet region offers shorter wavelength and higher energies per photon, while in solar physics the VUV allows the remote sensing of the upper levels of the solar atmosphere where magnetic fields dominate the physics. Understanding solar magnetism is a major aim for astrophysics and for understanding solar-terrestrial interaction. The poster is on our instrument development program for a high-spectral-resolution, high-finesse, Vacuum Ultraviolet Fabry-Perot Interferometer (VUV FPI) for obtaining narrow-passband images, magnetograms, and Dopplergrams of the transition region emission line of CIV (155nm). The poster will cover how the V W interferometer will allow us to understand solar magnetism, what is special about the MSFC VUV FPI, and why the University of Toronto F2 eximer has been of particular value to this program.

  15. A laboratory goniometer system for measuring reflectance and emittance anisotropy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roosjen, P.P.J.; Clevers, J.G.P.W.; Bartholomeus, H.; Schaepman, M.E.; Schaepman-Strub, G.; Jalink, H.; Schoor, van der R.; Jong, de A.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, a laboratory goniometer system for performing multi-angular measurements under controlled illumination conditions is described. A commercially available robotic arm enables the acquisition of a large number of measurements over the full hemisphere within a short time span making it

  16. The role of models in measurement outside the laboratory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boumans, M.

    2013-01-01

    For measurement outside the laboratory, uncertainty evaluations have to be model-based. Therefore models should not only represent the measurand but also its environment. For measurement in social science these models will be too complex, therefore instead of white-box models, grey-box

  17. Laboratory measurements of gravel thermal properties. A methodology proposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cultrera, Matteo; Peron, Fabio; Bison, Paolo; Dalla Santa, Giorgia; Bertermann, David; Muller, Johannes; Bernardi, Adriana; Galgaro, Antonio

    2017-04-01

    Gravel thermal properties measurements at laboratory level is quite challenging due to several technical and logistic issues, mainly connected to the sediment sizes and the variability of their mineralogical composition. The direct measurement of gravel thermal properties usually are not able to involve a representative volume of geological material, consequently the thermal measurements performed produce much dispersed results and not consistent due to the large interstitial voids and the poor physical contact with the measuring sensors. With the aim of directly provide the measurement of the gravel thermal properties, a new methodology has been developed and some results are already available on several gravel deposits samples around Europe. Indeed, a single guarded hot plate Taurus Instruments TLP 800 measured the gravel thermal properties. Some instrumental adjustments were necessary to adapt the measuring devices and to finalize the thermal measurements on gravels at the IUAV FISTEC laboratory (Environmental Technical Physics Laboratory of Venice University). This device usually provides thermal measurements according to ISO 8302, ASTM C177, EN 1946-2, EN 12664, EN 12667 and EN 12939 for building materials. A preliminary calibration has been performed comparing the outcomes obtained with the single guarded hot plate with a needle probe of a portable thermal conductivity meter (ISOMET). Standard sand (ISO 67:2009) is used as reference material. This study is provided under the Cheap-GSHPs project that has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation program under grant agreement no. 657982

  18. Vacuum ultraviolet emission spectrum measurement of a microwave-discharge hydrogen-flow lamp in several configurations: Application to photodesorption of CO ice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y.-J.; Wu, C.-Y. R. [Space Sciences Center and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089-1341 (United States); Chuang, K.-J.; Chu, C.-C.; Yih, T.-S. [Department of Physics, National Central University, Jhongli City, Taoyuan County 32054, Taiwan (China); Muñoz Caro, G. M. [Centro de Astrobiología, INTA-CSIC, Torrejón de Ardoz, E-28850 Madrid (Spain); Nuevo, M. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Ip, W.-H., E-mail: yujung@usc.edu [Graduate Institute of Astronomy, National Central University, Jhongli City, Taoyuan County 32049, Taiwan (China)

    2014-01-20

    We report measurements of the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) emission spectra of a microwave-discharge hydrogen-flow lamp (MDHL), a common tool in astrochemistry laboratories working on ice VUV photoprocessing. The MDHL provides hydrogen Ly-α (121.6 nm) and H{sub 2} molecular emission in the 110-180 nm range. We show that the spectral characteristics of the VUV light emitted in this range, in particular the relative proportion of Ly-α to molecular emission bands, strongly depend on the pressure of H{sub 2} inside the lamp, the lamp geometry (F type versus T type), the gas used (pure H{sub 2} versus H{sub 2} seeded in He), and the optical properties of the window used (MgF{sub 2} versus CaF{sub 2}). These different configurations are used to study the VUV irradiation of CO ice at 14 K. In contrast to the majority of studies dedicated to the VUV irradiation of astrophysical ice analogs, which have not taken into consideration the emission spectrum of the MDHL, our results show that the processes induced by photons in CO ice from a broad energy range are different and more complex than the sum of individual processes induced by monochromatic sources spanning the same energy range, as a result of the existence of multistate electronic transitions and discrepancy in absorption cross sections between parent molecules and products in the Ly-α and H{sub 2} molecular emission ranges.

  19. Science outside the laboratory measurement in field science and economics

    CERN Document Server

    Boumans, Marcel

    2015-01-01

    The conduct of most of social science occurs outside the laboratory. Such studies in field science explore phenomena that cannot for practical, technical, or ethical reasons be explored under controlled conditions. These phenomena cannot be fully isolated from their environment or investigated by manipulation or intervention. Yet measurement, including rigorous or clinical measurement, does provide analysts with a sound basis for discerning what occurs under field conditions, and why. In Science Outside the Laboratory, Marcel Boumans explores the state of measurement theory, its reliability, and the role expert judgment plays in field investigations from the perspective of the philosophy of science. Its discussion of the problems of passive observation, the calculus of observation, the two-model problem, and model-based consensus uses illustrations drawn primarily from economics. Rich in research and discussion, the volume clarifies the extent to which measurement provides valid information about objects an...

  20. Use of VUV Radiation to Control Elastomer Seal Adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    deGroh, Henry C., III; Puleo, Bernadette J.; Waters, Deborah L.

    2013-01-01

    Due to their wide operating temperatures and low leakage rates, silicone elastomers are the only class of flight qualified elastomer materials that currently meet NASA's needs for various seal applications, which include docking and hatch seals for future space exploration vehicles. However, silicone elastomers are naturally sticky and exhibit sizeable adhesion when mated against metals and other silicone surfaces. This undesirable adhesion can make undocking spacecraft or opening a hatch problematic. Two approaches that can be used to reduce seal adhesion include use of grease or, application of low doses of atomic oxygen (AO). This paper investigates a third approach: the application of light doses of vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation. Presented are the adhesion and leakage characteristics of S0383-70 silicone elastomer exposed to various VUV doses in the 115 to 200 nm wavelength range. The data indicate that adhesion is expected to be less than the target threshold maximum of 2 lb/in(exp2) after about 1 J/cm(exp2) of VUV exposure for seal-to-metal configurations and after 2 J/cm(exp2) for seal-to-seal configurations with no significant damage, or increase in seal leakage. This paper shows that VUV, without AO or grease, can be an effective means to reduce adhesion to the desired levels necessary for space seals with minimal change in seal leak rates.

  1. Measuring the gravitational constant in a university laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stepanov, Nikolai S; Shisharin, Alexandr V [N.I. Lobachevskii Nizhnii Novgorod State University, Nizhnii Novgorod (Russian Federation)

    2002-05-31

    A setup for measuring gravitational constant in a university laboratory is described. The setup includes a torsion pendulum which swings under the action of gravitational attraction from test masses whose positions are made to change periodically in phase with pendulum oscillations by a special device. The gravity constant is calculated from the amplitude of steady-state oscillations. The experimental and calculation procedure is described and measurement errors are estimated. (methodological notes)

  2. Synchrontron VUV and Soft X-Ray Radiation Effects on Aluminized Teflon FEP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dever, Joyce A.; Townsend, Jacqueline A.; Gaier, James R.; Jalics, Alice I.

    1998-01-01

    Surfaces of the aluminized Teflon FEP multi-layer thermal insulation on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) were found to be cracked and curled in some areas at the time of the second servicing, mission in February 1997, 6.8 years after HST was deployed in low Earth orbit (LEO). As part of a test program to assess environmental conditions which would produce embrittlement sufficient to cause cracking of Teflon on HST, samples of Teflon FEP with a backside layer of vapor deposited aluminum were exposed to vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and soft x-ray radiation of various energies using facilities at the National Synchrotron Light Source. Brookhaven National Laboratory. Samples were exposed to synchrotron radiation of narrow energy bands centered on energies between 69 eV and 1900 eV. Samples were analyzed for ultimate tensile strength and elongation. Results will be compared to those of aluminized Teflon FEP retrieved from HST after 3.6 years and 6.8 years on orbit and will he referenced to estimated HST mission doses of VUV and soft x-ray radiation.

  3. Characteristics and performance of the Los Alamos VUV beamline at the NSLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, R. J.; Trela, W. J.; Michaud, F. D.; Southworth, S. H.; Alkire, R. W.; Roy, P.; Rothe, R.; Walsh, P. J.; Shinn, N.

    1988-04-01

    We describe the design and performance of the Los Alamos VUV synchrotron radiation beamline, U3C, on the VUV ring of the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The beamline uses separate function optics to collect and focus the horizontally and vertically diverging beam. The monochromator is a grazing incidence Rowland circle instrument of the extended grasshopper design (ERG). A postmonochromator refocusing mirror is used to focus or collimate the diverging beam from the monochromator. The beamline control and diagnostics systems are also discussed. Particular emphasis in the design has been placed on the reduction of stray and harmonic light. Higher order light is reduced by a grazing angle mirror low pass filter installed immediately downstream from the monochromator while stray light is reduced through the use of baffles and thin film filters. Also included in the line is a differential pumping section that permits gas phase and other experiments requiring pressures in the 10 -5 to 10 -4 Torr range to be coupled to the beamline.

  4. Measurement Instruments and Software Used in Biotribology Research Laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyurin Andrei

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Precision measurements of friction processes have a key role in a variety of industrial processes. The emergence of fine electronic circuit techniques greatly expands capabilities of control. There are some difficulties for their full implementation today, especially when it regards the accuracy and frequency of measurements. The motion-measuring method in real-time system is considered in this article, paying special attention to increased accuracy. This method is based on rapid analog digital converter (ADC, transmission program and digital signal processor (DSP algorithms. Description of laboratory devices is included: Tribal-T and universal friction machine (MTU-01 designed for “Pin on disc” tests. Great emphasis is placed on the usability of accelerometers. The present study examined the collected data via laboratory system for data acquisition and control, and processing it in the laboratory of Biotribology. Laboratory supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA algorithms is described below. Task of regulation is not considered. This paper describes only methods of automatic control theory to analyze the frictional quality.

  5. VUV free electron laser with a distributed feedback cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, J.; Fujita, M.; Asakawa, M. [Osaka Univ. (Japan)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Development of FEL to the VUV/x-ray regime is looked as one of the possible directions to its success. For eliminating the need for optical cavities, difficult to be built at that regime, we propose a VUV (50nm) SASE FEL. According to Pellegrini`s scaling law, for a 290MeV/200A e-beam passing through a 10.8m long and 2cm period wiggler, a high peak power 85.5MW and a high average brightness 2.44 X 10{sup +21} (photons/[mm{sup 2}.mrad{sup 2}.bw]) can be obtained. However, it requires {epsilon} n=2.3mm.mrad and {Delta}{gamma}/{gamma} = 0.15% about one order above the practical parameters we can realize. For enhancing the efficiency and decreasing the requirements on the e-beam quality and the wiggler length, we put forward a concept of VUV FEL with a distributed feedback cavity. In x-ray region, the natural periodicity of crystals provides strong Bragg coupling and it has been demonstrated as the parametric radiation. In vuv region, current intense research on superlattice can provide a periodical structure with a short period in 250 {Angstrom} order. High-performance vuv multilayer coatings on the inner-wall of the waveguide are used to guide the spontaneous emission and decrease the x-ray ohmic losses on the roundtrip passes. By this DFB cavity structure, it is expected to realize the lasing in a smaller size. Other practical methods such as the optical klystron for shortening the wiggler length and the tapper wiggler for enhancing the saturation power are also considered. The analytical considerations are based on the 1-D FEL equations and 1-D perturbation theory of dielectric waveguide.

  6. Laboratory Measurement of Bidirectional Reflectance of Radiometric Tarps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowlton, Kelly

    2004-01-01

    This experiment measured the reflectance of tarps with ground instruments in order to check radiometric calibration, validate atmospheric correction, and predict at-sensor radiance for satellite instruments. The procedure of this experiment is as follows: 1) Assemble laboratory apparatus to duplicate ground reference measurement geometry and satellite measurement geometry; 2) Measure spectral radiance with Optronics OL 750 double monochromator/spectroradiometer; 3) Measure radiance of NIST-calibrated Spectralon panel irradiated by collimated light at incidence angle of calibrated reflectance (20 deg, 30 deg, 40 deg, or 50 deg), viewing normal to panel surface; 4) Measure radiance of Spectralon panel irradiated at incidence angle equal to solar zenith angle at time of overpass; 5) Calculate reflectance of Spectralon panel irradiated at solar zenith angle, viewing normal to panel surface (ground geometry).

  7. A laboratory goniometer system for measuring reflectance and emittance anisotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roosjen, Peter P J; Clevers, Jan G P W; Bartholomeus, Harm M; Schaepman, Michael E; Schaepman-Strub, Gabriela; Jalink, Henk; van der Schoor, Rob; de Jong, Arjan

    2012-12-13

    In this paper, a laboratory goniometer system for performing multi-angular measurements under controlled illumination conditions is described. A commercially available robotic arm enables the acquisition of a large number of measurements over the full hemisphere within a short time span making it much faster than other goniometers. In addition, the presented set-up enables assessment of anisotropic reflectance and emittance behaviour of soils, leaves and small canopies. Mounting a spectrometer enables acquisition of either hemispherical measurements or measurements in the horizontal plane. Mounting a thermal camera allows directional observations of the thermal emittance. This paper also presents three showcases of these different measurement set-ups in order to illustrate its possibilities. Finally, suggestions for applying this instrument and for future research directions are given, including linking the measured reflectance anisotropy with physically-based anisotropy models on the one hand and combining them with field goniometry measurements for joint analysis with remote sensing data on the other hand. The speed and flexibility of the system offer a large added value to the existing pool of laboratory goniometers.

  8. Radon Mitigation Approach in a Laboratory Measurement Room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Blanco-Rodríguez

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Radon gas is the second leading cause of lung cancer, causing thousands of deaths annually. It can be a problem for people or animals in houses, workplaces, schools or any building. Therefore, its mitigation has become essential to avoid health problems and to prevent radon from interfering in radioactive measurements. This study describes the implementation of radon mitigation systems at a radioactivity laboratory in order to reduce interferences in the different works carried out. A large set of radon concentration samples is obtained from measurements at the laboratory. While several mitigation methods were taken into account, the final applied solution is explained in detail, obtaining thus very good results by reducing the radon concentration by 76%.

  9. Radon Mitigation Approach in a Laboratory Measurement Room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco-Rodríguez, Patricia; Fernández-Serantes, Luis Alfonso; Otero-Pazos, Alberto; Calvo-Rolle, José Luis; de Cos Juez, Francisco Javier

    2017-05-11

    Radon gas is the second leading cause of lung cancer, causing thousands of deaths annually. It can be a problem for people or animals in houses, workplaces, schools or any building. Therefore, its mitigation has become essential to avoid health problems and to prevent radon from interfering in radioactive measurements. This study describes the implementation of radon mitigation systems at a radioactivity laboratory in order to reduce interferences in the different works carried out. A large set of radon concentration samples is obtained from measurements at the laboratory. While several mitigation methods were taken into account, the final applied solution is explained in detail, obtaining thus very good results by reducing the radon concentration by 76%.

  10. Photodissociation of Small Molecules and Photoionization of Free Radicals Using the VUV Velocity-Map Imaging Photoion and Photoelectron Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hong

    The tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) laser generated through the two-photon resonance-enhanced four-wave mixing scheme is combined with the newly developed time-slice velocity map imaging photoion method to study the photodissociation of small molecules in the VUV region, and with the velocity map imaging photoelectron method to study the photoionization of free radicals. The photodissociation dynamics of NO in the energy region around 13.5 eV has been investigated. Branching ratios of the three lowest dissociation channels of 12C 16O that produce C(3P) + O(3P), C( 1D) + O(3P) and C(3P) + O(1D) are measured for the first time in the VUV region from 102,500 cm-1 to 110,500 cm-1, valuable information of the dissociation dynamics for this prototype system has been deduced. We demonstrated an experiment that has two independently tunable VUV lasers and a time-slice velocity map imaging setup, this provides us a global way to perform systematic state-selected photodissociation of small molecules via state-selected detection of the atomic products in the VUV region. The velocity map imaging photoelectron method was successfully used to obtain the photoelectron spectrum of the propargyl radical (C3H3) via a single VUV photoionization process. The propargyl radical is generated by the 193 nm laser photodissociation of the precursor C3H3Cl. This is the first time that the velocity map imaging photoelectron method is used to get the photoelectron spectra of free radicals, indicating that it is a powerful technique for studying the photoionization of free radicals which are always hard to be produced with high enough number densities for spectroscopic studies. This dissertation is mainly based on the following peer-reviewed journal articles: 1. Hong Gao, Yang Pan, Lei Yang, Jingang Zhou, C. Y. Ng and William M. Jackson. "Time-slice velocity-map ion imaging studies of the Photodissociation of NO in the vacuum ultraviolet region", the Journal of Chemical Physics, 136, 134302

  11. Atmospheric radionuclide concentrations measured by Pacific Northwest Laboratory since 1961

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, J.A.; Thomas, C.W.

    1981-03-01

    The atmospheric concentrations of a wide spectrum of radionuclides produced by nuclear weapons, nuclear reactors, cosmic rays, radon and thoron decay and the SNAP-9A burn-up ({sup 238}Pu) have been measured at Richland, Washington, since 1961; at Barrow, Alaska, since 1964; and at other stations for shorter periods of time. There has been considerable concern over the health hazard presented by these radionuclides, but it has also been recognized that atmospheric mixing and deposition rates can be determined from their measurement. Therefore, Pacific Northwest Laboratory began the continuous measurement of the atmospheric concentrations of a wide spectrum of radionuclides produced by nuclear weapons, nuclear reactors, cosmic rays, and radon and thoron decay. This report will discuss the concentrations of the longer-lived radionuclides (T 1/2 > 12 days). The concentrations of shorter-lived radionuclides measured following Chinese nuclear tests since 1972 are discussed in another report.

  12. Atmospheric radionuclide concentrations measured by Pacific Northwest Laboratory since 1961

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, J.A.; Thomas, C.W.

    1981-03-01

    The atmospheric concentrations of a wide spectrum of radionuclides produced by nuclear weapons, nuclear reactors, cosmic rays, radon and thoron decay and the SNAP-9A burn-up ([sup 238]Pu) have been measured at Richland, Washington, since 1961; at Barrow, Alaska, since 1964; and at other stations for shorter periods of time. There has been considerable concern over the health hazard presented by these radionuclides, but it has also been recognized that atmospheric mixing and deposition rates can be determined from their measurement. Therefore, Pacific Northwest Laboratory began the continuous measurement of the atmospheric concentrations of a wide spectrum of radionuclides produced by nuclear weapons, nuclear reactors, cosmic rays, and radon and thoron decay. This report will discuss the concentrations of the longer-lived radionuclides (T 1/2 > 12 days). The concentrations of shorter-lived radionuclides measured following Chinese nuclear tests since 1972 are discussed in another report.

  13. Recent development of VUV-based processes for air pollutants degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haibao eHuang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available As air pollution become more and more serious nowadays, it is essential to find out a way to efficiently degrade the air pollutants. Vacuum ultraviolet (VUV-based processes are an emerging and promising technologies for environmental remediation such as air cleaning, wastewater treatment and air/water disinfection. With VUV irradiation, photolysis, photocatalyst is and ozone-assisted oxidation are involved at the same time, resulting in the fast degradation of air pollutants because of their strong oxidizing capacity. The mechanisms of how the oxidants are produced and reacted are discussed in this review. This paper mainly focuses on the three VUV-based oxidation processes including VUV photolysis, VUV combined with ozone-assisted oxidation and VUV-PCO with emphasis on their mechanisms and applications. Also, the outlooks of these processes are outlined in this paper.

  14. VUV photochemistry simulation of planetary upper atmosphere using synchrotron radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, Nathalie; Giuliani, Alexandre; Correia, Jean Jacques; Cernogora, Guy

    2013-07-01

    The coupling of a gas reactor, named APSIS, with a vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) beamline at the SOLEIL synchrotron radiation facility, for a photochemistry study of gas mixtures, is reported. The reactor may be irradiated windowless with gas pressures up to hundreds of millibar, and thus allows the effect of energetic photons below 100 nm wavelength to be studied on possibly dense media. This set-up is perfectly suited to atmospheric photochemistry investigations, as illustrated by a preliminary report of a simulation of the upper atmospheric photochemistry of Titan, the largest satellite of Saturn. Titan's atmosphere is mainly composed of molecular nitrogen and methane. Solar VUV irradiation with wavelengths no longer than 100 nm on the top of the atmosphere enables the dissociation and ionization of nitrogen, involving a nitrogen chemistry specific to nitrogen-rich upper atmospheres.

  15. Latest developments at the ALBA magnetic measurements laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcos, J.; Massana, V.; García, L.; Campmany, J.

    2018-02-01

    ALBA is a third-generation synchrotron light source that has been in operation since 2012 near Barcelona. A magnetic measurements laboratory has been associated with the facility since its very early stages and has been active for the last 20 years. In the first part of this work, the different instruments available at the laboratory are described, and a brief overview of the measurement campaigns carried out during its 20 years of history is presented. In the second part, a more detailed description of the approach to Hall probe measurements adopted at ALBA is offered, with an explanation of the methods and ancillary equipment that have been developed along the years in order to improve the accuracy of the system. In the third part, a new concept of Hall probe bench devoted to the measurement of closed structures is presented. The in-house design and building of a prototype for such a bench is described, together with its mechanical and magnetic characterization. As a conclusion, the first results obtained with this bench are discussed.

  16. A Microwave Plasma Discharge in Rare Gases as a VUV Source for Planetary Atmospheric Photochemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Tigrine, Sarah; Carrasco, Nathalie; Vettier, Ludovic; Cernogora, Guy

    2016-01-01

    International audience; The aim of this work is to show that micro-wave discharges in rare gases, can be an efficient windowless VUV photon source for planetaryatmospheric photochemistry experiments. In this context, we perform a microwave discharge (surfatron) in a neon gas flow. We characterizethe VUV photon flux emitted in different conditions, when working in the mbar pressure range, and compare it to synchrotron VUV fluxes alsoused for similar applications.

  17. Laboratory Measurements of Particulate Matter Concentrations from Asphalt Pavement Abrasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fullová Daša

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The issue of emissions from road traffic is compounded by the fact that the number of vehicles and driven kilometres increase each year. Road traffic is one of the main sources of particulate matter and traffic volume is still increasing and has unpleasant impact on longevity of the pavements and the environment. Vehicle motions cause mechanical wearing of the asphalt pavement surface - wearing course by vehicle tyres. The contribution deals with abrasion of bituminous wearing courses of pavements. The asphalt mixtures of wearing courses are compared in terms of mechanically separated particulate matter. The samples of asphalt mixtures were rutted in wheel tracking machine. The particulate matter measurements were performed in laboratory conditions. The experimental laboratory measurements make it possible to sample particulates without contamination from exhaust emissions, abraded particles from vehicles, resuspension of road dust and climate affects. The contribution offers partial results of measurements on six trial samples of asphalt mixtures with different composition. It presents particulate matter morphology and the comparison of rutted asphalt samples in terms of PM mass concentrations and chemical composition.

  18. Permissible limits for uncertainty of measurement in laboratory medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeckel, Rainer; Wosniok, Werner; Gurr, Ebrhard; Peil, Burkhard

    2015-07-01

    The international standard ISO 15189 requires that medical laboratories estimate the uncertainty of their quantitative test results obtained from patients' specimens. The standard does not provide details how and within which limits the measurement uncertainty should be determined. The most common concept for establishing permissible uncertainty limits is to relate them on biological variation defining the rate of false positive results or to base the limits on the state-of-the-art. The state-of-the-art is usually derived from data provided by a group of selected medical laboratories. The approach on biological variation should be preferred because of its transparency and scientific base. Hitherto, all recommendations were based on a linear relationship between biological and analytical variation leading to limits which are sometimes too stringent or too permissive for routine testing in laboratory medicine. In contrast, the present proposal is based on a non-linear relationship between biological and analytical variation leading to more realistic limits. The proposed algorithms can be applied to all measurands and consider any quantity to be assured. The suggested approach tries to provide the above mentioned details and is a compromise between the biological variation concept, the GUM uncertainty model and the technical state-of-the-art.

  19. Laser guide star measurements at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedman, H.; Avicola, K.; Bissinger, H.; Brase, J.; Duff, J.; Gavel, D.; Horton, J.; Max, C.; Olivier, S.; Rapp, D.; Salmon, T.; Smauley, D.; Waltjen, K.

    1993-02-01

    Recent studies from the Laser Guide Star Project at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory are presented. Photometry of the return signal has shown that the photon return is approximately 10 photons/cm{sup 2}ms at the pupil of the receiving telescope in agreement with a detailed model of the sodium interaction. Wavefronts of the laser guide star have also been measured with a Shack-Hartmann technique and power spectra have been shown to agree with those of nearby natural stars. Plans for closed loop demonstrations using the laser guide star at LLNL and nearby Lick Observatory are discussed.

  20. A laboratory procedure for measuring and georeferencing soil colour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques-Mateu, A.; Balaguer-Puig, M.; Moreno-Ramon, H.; Ibanez-Asensio, S.

    2015-04-01

    Remote sensing and geospatial applications very often require ground truth data to assess outcomes from spatial analyses or environmental models. Those data sets, however, may be difficult to collect in proper format or may even be unavailable. In the particular case of soil colour the collection of reliable ground data can be cumbersome due to measuring methods, colour communication issues, and other practical factors which lead to a lack of standard procedure for soil colour measurement and georeferencing. In this paper we present a laboratory procedure that provides colour coordinates of georeferenced soil samples which become useful in later processing stages of soil mapping and classification from digital images. The procedure requires a laboratory setup consisting of a light booth and a trichromatic colorimeter, together with a computer program that performs colour measurement, storage, and colour space transformation tasks. Measurement tasks are automated by means of specific data logging routines which allow storing recorded colour data in a spatial format. A key feature of the system is the ability of transforming between physically-based colour spaces and the Munsell system which is still the standard in soil science. The working scheme pursues the automation of routine tasks whenever possible and the avoidance of input mistakes by means of a convenient layout of the user interface. The program can readily manage colour and coordinate data sets which eventually allow creating spatial data sets. All the tasks regarding data joining between colorimeter measurements and samples locations are executed by the software in the background, allowing users to concentrate on samples processing. As a result, we obtained a robust and fully functional computer-based procedure which has proven a very useful tool for sample classification or cataloging purposes as well as for integrating soil colour data with other remote sensed and spatial data sets.

  1. Laboratory Performance Evaluation Report of SEL 421 Phasor Measurement Unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Zhenyu; faris, Anthony J.; Martin, Kenneth E.; Hauer, John F.; Bonebrake, Christopher A.; Shaw, James M.

    2007-12-01

    PNNL and BPA have been in close collaboration on laboratory performance evaluation of phasor measurement units for over ten years. A series of evaluation tests are designed to confirm accuracy and determine measurement performance under a variety of conditions that may be encountered in actual use. Ultimately the testing conducted should provide parameters that can be used to adjust all measurements to a standardized basis. These tests are performed with a standard relay test set using recorded files of precisely generated test signals. The test set provides test signals at a level and in a format suitable for input to a PMU that accurately reproduces the signals in both signal amplitude and timing. Test set outputs are checked to confirm the accuracy of the output signal. The recorded signals include both current and voltage waveforms and a digital timing track used to relate the PMU measured value with the test signal. Test signals include steady-state waveforms to test amplitude, phase, and frequency accuracy, modulated signals to determine measurement and rejection bands, and step tests to determine timing and response accuracy. Additional tests are included as necessary to fully describe the PMU operation. Testing is done with a BPA phasor data concentrator (PDC) which provides communication support and monitors data input for dropouts and data errors.

  2. UV-VUV diagnostics for the Advanced Photon Source SASE FEL

    CERN Document Server

    Hartog, P D; Benson, C; Erdmann, M; Lumpkin, Alex H; Makarov, O; Petra, M; Tieman, B; Trakhtenberg, E; Wiemerslage, G

    2002-01-01

    The Advanced Photon Source self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) free-electron laser (FEL) uses diagnostics between undulator sections to characterize the light and the electron beam. These diagnostics enable z-dependent measurements of the exponential growth of the radiation and of the microbunching. The original diagnostics were designed for visible light. To enable measurements down to 265 nm, UV-enhanced cameras and fused-silica lenses have been installed. We have now designed a diagnostics suite that will enable us to continue measurements down to 50 nm using reflective optics and back-illuminated CCD cameras operating in vacuum. We describe the enhancements to the diagnostics for operation in the UV and VUV.

  3. Laboratory Protocol for Measuring the Bioaccumulation of Mercury by Earthworms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffy, D.; Nichols, A.; McLaughlin, A.

    2007-12-01

    Protocol was developed for a series of laboratory tests to determine if Canadian earthworms ( Lumbricus terrestris) can hyperaccumulate mercury from the soil in which they live. Two batches of 300 hundred worms each were measured for mercury uptake by establishing 3 populations (one control and two of known contamination). Populations were sampled every two weeks. Worm lengths were measured as an indicator of worm age and health. Worm tissue was processed by a modified EPA Method 7470 consisting of freeze drying, vacuum extraction, oxidation and acid extraction of the mercury. Each sample needed 2.000 g dry weight of worm tissue required 5 to 6 worms to be homogenized. Mercury concentration in the extraction fluid was measured by a CETAC M-6100 cold vapor mercury analyzer with an ASX-400 Autosampler having a method detection limit of 0.05 ppb. QA/QC activities such as calibration of instrumentation, spike samples, blank samples, reagent control samples, triplicate samples, and standard samples ensure acurate and precise measurements of mercury levels in tissue samples.

  4. A straightforward method for Vacuum-Ultraviolet flux measurements: The case of the hydrogen discharge lamp and implications for solid-phase actinometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fulvio, D., E-mail: daniele.fulvio@uni-jena.de, E-mail: dfu@oact.inaf.it; Brieva, A. C.; Jäger, C. [Laboratory Astrophysics Group of the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy at the Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Institute of Solid State Physics, Helmholtzweg 3, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Cuylle, S. H.; Linnartz, H. [Raymond and Beverly Sackler Laboratory for Astrophysics, Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Henning, T. [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-07-07

    Vacuum-Ultraviolet (VUV) radiation is responsible for the photo-processing of simple and complex molecules in several terrestrial and extraterrestrial environments. In the laboratory such radiation is commonly simulated by inexpensive and easy-to-use microwave-powered hydrogen discharge lamps. However, VUV flux measurements are not trivial and the methods/devices typically used for this purpose, mainly actinometry and calibrated VUV silicon photodiodes, are not very accurate or expensive and lack of general suitability to experimental setups. Here, we present a straightforward method for measuring the VUV photon flux based on the photoelectric effect and using a gold photodetector. This method is easily applicable to most experimental setups, bypasses the major problems of the other methods, and provides reliable flux measurements. As a case study, the method is applied to a microwave-powered hydrogen discharge lamp. In addition, the comparison of these flux measurements to those obtained by O{sub 2} actinometry experiments allow us to estimate the quantum yield (QY) values QY{sub 122} = 0.44 ± 0.16 and QY{sub 160} = 0.87 ± 0.30 for solid-phase O{sub 2} actinometry.

  5. ICES ON TITAN: LABORATORY MEASUREMENTS THAT COMPLEMENT THE HUYGENS PROBE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. ROBINSON; ET AL

    2000-08-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The composition of the cold bodies in the outer solar system may hold some of the key molecular clues concerning the composition of the prestellax molecular cloud that gave rise to the solar system. We studied the physical chemistry and heterogeneous (gas/surface) reactivity of extraterrestrial ice analogs of the surfaces of Saturn's moon Titan. This program coupled our surface spectroscopic techniques with physical adsorption measurements. We addressed several of the pressing questions regarding Titan such as: Is storage of hydrocarbons in Titan's water ice crust feasible? Do heterogeneous processes influence the atmospheric chemical composition of Titan? Are phase transitions to be expected? These data can be incorporated into photochemical models with the goal of improved modeling of the chemical composition and meteorology of Titan's atmosphere. Titan will be probed by the Cassini-Huygens Mission. Our results on Titan ice analogs can be used to help interpret the mission data.

  6. Advances in standardization of laboratory measurement procedures: implications for measuring biomarkers of folate and vitamin B-12 status in NHANES

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bock, Jay L; Eckfeldt, John H

    2011-01-01

    Population studies such as NHANES analyze large numbers of laboratory measurements and are often performed in different laboratories using different measurement procedures and over an extended period of time...

  7. Results from laboratory and field testing of nitrate measuring spectrophotometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snazelle, Teri T.

    2015-01-01

    Five ultraviolet (UV) spectrophotometer nitrate analyzers were evaluated by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Hydrologic Instrumentation Facility (HIF) during a two-phase evaluation. In Phase I, the TriOS ProPs (10-millimeter (mm) path length), Hach NITRATAX plus sc (5-mm path length), Satlantic Submersible UV Nitrate Analyzer (SUNA, 10-mm path length), and S::CAN Spectro::lyser (5-mm path length) were evaluated in the HIF Water-Quality Servicing Laboratory to determine the validity of the manufacturer's technical specifications for accuracy, limit of linearity (LOL), drift, and range of operating temperature. Accuracy specifications were met in the TriOS, Hach, and SUNA. The stock calibration of the S::CAN required two offset adjustments before the analyzer met the manufacturer's accuracy specification. Instrument drift was observed only in the S::CAN and was the result of leaching from the optical path insert seals. All tested models, except for the Hach, met their specified LOL in the laboratory testing. The Hach's range was found to be approximately 18 milligrams nitrogen per liter (mg-N/L) and not the manufacturer-specified 25 mg-N/L. Measurements by all of the tested analyzers showed signs of hysteresis in the operating temperature tests. Only the SUNA measurements demonstrated excessive noise and instability in temperatures above 20 degrees Celsius (°C). The SUNA analyzer was returned to the manufacturer at the completion of the Phase II field deployment evaluation for repair and recalibration, and the performance of the sensor improved significantly.

  8. VUV optical ring resonator for Duke storage ring free electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, S.H.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Madey, J.M.J. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    The conceptual design of the multifaceted-mirror ring resonator for Duke storage ring VUV FEL is presented. The expected performance of the OK-4 FEL with ring resonator is described. We discuss in this paper our plans to study reflectivity of VUV mirrors and their resistivity to soft X-ray spontaneous radiation from OK-4 undulator.

  9. Laboratory Comparison of Aerosol Optical Property Measurement Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massoli, P.; Baynard, T.; Lack, D.; Ravishankara, A.; Lovejoy, E.

    2006-12-01

    Aerosol particles influence the global radiative balance with their optical properties, i.e., the ability of scattering and/or absorbing the incoming solar radiation (aerosol direct effect). Because this ability depends on aerosol characteristics such as composition, size distribution and mixing state, it is critical to link aerosol optical,physical and chemical properties to emissions for better assessing the regional and global impact of different aerosol types. During 2006, NOAA ERSL/CSD performed a series of laboratory based comparison studies to address the performance, uncertainties, and biases of both existing and newly developed instruments to measure aerosol optical properties. These investigations included measurements of extinction using cavity ring-down spectrometers (CRD-AES),scattering by a TSI nephelometer, and absorption by a Photoacoustic spectrometer (PAS) and a Radiance Research Particle Soot Absorption Photometer (PSAP). In this work we compare the optical properties derived for several aerosol types and mixtures by using various combinations of CRD-AES, nephelometer, and PSAP measurements. Our results indicate that such properties significantly depend on composition and mixing state of aerosols. We complete the study with top-of-the-atmosphere radiative forcing estimates and we compare the newly obtained values with what has been reported in past calculations.

  10. Measuring influenza laboratory capacity: use of a tool to measure improvements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Pam; Aden, Tricia; Cheng, Po Yung; Moen, Ann

    2017-06-15

    To collect information, identify training needs, and assist with influenza capacity building voluntary laboratory capacity assessments were conducted using a standardized tool in CDC cooperative agreement countries. To understand the usefulness of comparing results from repeat assessments and to determine if targeted training supported improvements, this paper details comparison of assessment results of conducting 17 repeat laboratory assessments between 2009 and 2013. Laboratory assessments were conducted by SMEs in 17 laboratories (16 countries). We reviewed the quantitative assessment results of the laboratories that conducted both an initial and follow up assessment between 2009 to 2013 using repeated measures of Anova, (Mixed procedure of SAS (9.3)). Additionally, we compared the overall summary scores and the assessor recommendations from the two assessments. We were able to document a statistically significant improvement between the first and second assessments both on an aggregate as well as individual indicator score. Within the international capacity tool three of the eight categories recorded statistically significant improvement (equipment, management, and QA/QC), while the other tool categories (molecular, NIC, specimen, safety and virology) showed improvement in scores although not statistically significant. We found that using a standardized tool and quantitative framework is useful for documenting capacity and performance improvement in identified areas over time. The use of the tool and standard reports with assessor recommendations assisted laboratories with establishing, maintaining, and improving influenza laboratory practices. On-going assessments and the consistent application of the analytic framework over time will continue to aid in building a measurement knowledge base for laboratory capacity.

  11. Measuring Dynamic Kidney Function in an Undergraduate Physiology Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medler, Scott; Harrington, Frederick

    2013-01-01

    Most undergraduate physiology laboratories are very limited in how they treat renal physiology. It is common to find teaching laboratories equipped with the capability for high-resolution digital recordings of physiological functions (muscle twitches, ECG, action potentials, respiratory responses, etc.), but most urinary laboratories still rely on…

  12. Optimizing laboratory-based radon flux measurements for sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanyotha, Supitcha; Kranrod, Chutima; Kritsananuwat, Rawiwan; Lane-Smith, Derek; Burnett, William C

    2016-07-01

    Radon flux via diffusion from sediments and other materials may be determined in the laboratory by circulating air through the sample and a radon detector in a closed loop. However, this approach is complicated by the necessity of having to determine the total air volume in the system and accounting for any small air leaks that can arise if using extended measurement periods. We designed a simple open-loop configuration that includes a measured mass of wet sediment and water inside a gas-tight reaction flask connected to a drying system and a radon-in-air analyzer. Ambient air flows through two charcoal columns before entering the reaction vessel to eliminate incoming radon. After traveling through the reaction flask, the air passes the drier and the radon analyzer and is then vented. After some time, the radon activity will reach a steady state depending upon the airflow rate. With this approach, the radon flux via diffusion is simply the product of the steady-state radon activity (Bq/m(3)) multiplied by the airflow rate (mL/min). We demonstrated that this setup could produce good results for materials that produce relatively high radon fluxes. We also show that a modified closed system approach, including radon removal of the incoming air by charcoal filtration in a bypass, can produce very good results including samples with very low emission rates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Implementing planetary protection measures on the Mars Science Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benardini, James N; La Duc, Myron T; Beaudet, Robert A; Koukol, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL), comprising a cruise stage; an aeroshell; an entry, descent, and landing system; and the radioisotope thermoelectric generator-powered Curiosity rover, made history with its unprecedented sky crane landing on Mars on August 6, 2012. The mission's primary science objective has been to explore the area surrounding Gale Crater and assess its habitability for past life. Because microbial contamination could profoundly impact the integrity of the mission and compliance with international treaty was required, planetary protection measures were implemented on MSL hardware to verify that bioburden levels complied with NASA regulations. By applying the proper antimicrobial countermeasures throughout all phases of assembly, the total bacterial endospore burden of MSL at the time of launch was kept to 2.78×10⁵ spores, well within the required specification of less than 5.0×10⁵ spores. The total spore burden of the exposed surfaces of the landed MSL hardware was 5.64×10⁴, well below the allowed limit of 3.0×10⁵ spores. At the time of launch, the MSL spacecraft was burdened with an average of 22 spores/m², which included both planned landed and planned impacted hardware. Here, we report the results of a campaign to implement and verify planetary protection measures on the MSL flight system.

  14. Effects of inorganics on the degradation of micropollutants with vacuum UV (VUV) advanced oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duca, Clara; Imoberdorf, Gustavo; Mohseni, Madjid

    2017-05-12

    This research focused on the effects of inorganic water constituents on the efficiency of vacuum UV (VUV) for the degradation of micropollutants in surface water supplies. Atrazine was used as a model miropollutant, and bicarbonate, sulphate, and nitrate were used as the most common inorganic constituents in the water matrix. First, the absorbance of radiation at 254 and 185 nm was measured in the presence of different ions. At 254 nm, only nitrate showed a measurable absorption coefficient of [Formula: see text] = 3.51 M[Formula: see text] cm[Formula: see text], and all other ions showed a molar absorption coefficient below the detection limit. However, at 185 nm, all the ions showed high absorption coefficients, with nitrate giving the highest absorption coefficient of [Formula: see text] = 5568 M[Formula: see text] cm[Formula: see text]. Second, the hydroxyl radical (HO[Formula: see text]) scavenging effects of the same inorganic ions were evaluated; nitrate and bicarbonate showed a negative effect during the UV/H2O2 and VUV advanced oxidation processes. Sulfate was photolyzed with 185 nm UV to form HO[Formula: see text], and for this reason, it assisted the degradation of the target micropollutant, as demonstrated by increases in the degradation rate constant. An additional component of this work involved developing a method for measuring the quantum yield of atrazine at 185 nm. This made it possible to distinguish the contribution of OH radical attach from that of direct photolysis towards the degradation of atrazine.

  15. Atmospheric pressure photoionization using tunable VUV synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giuliani, A., E-mail: alexandre.giuliani@synchrotron-soleil.fr [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L' Orme des Merisiers, Saint Aubin, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); INRA, U1008 CEPIA, Rue de la Geraudiere, F-44316 Nantes (France); Giorgetta, J.-L.; Ricaud, J.-P. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L' Orme des Merisiers, Saint Aubin, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Jamme, F. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L' Orme des Merisiers, Saint Aubin, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); INRA, U1008 CEPIA, Rue de la Geraudiere, F-44316 Nantes (France); Rouam, V.; Wien, F. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L' Orme des Merisiers, Saint Aubin, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Laprevote, O. [Laboratoire de Spectrometrie de Masse, ICSN-CNRS, 1 Avenue de la Terrasse, 91190 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Laboratoire de Chimie-Toxicologie Analytique et cellulaire, IFR 71, Faculte des Sciences Pharmaceutiques et Biologiques, Universite Paris Descartes, 4 Avenue de l' Observatoire, 75006 Paris (France); Refregiers, M. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L' Orme des Merisiers, Saint Aubin, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2012-05-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Coupling of an atmospheric pressure photoionization source with a vacuum ultra-violet (VUV) beamline. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The set up allows photoionization up to 20 eV. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compared to classical atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI), our set up offers spectral purity and tunability. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Allows photoionization mass spectrometry on fragile and hard to vaporize molecules. - Abstract: We report here the first coupling of an atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) source with a synchrotron radiation beamline in the vacuum ultra-violet (VUV). A commercial APPI source of a QStar Pulsar i from AB Sciex was modified to receive photons from the DISCO beamline at the SOLEIL synchrotron radiation facility. Photons are delivered at atmospheric pressure in the 4-20 eV range. The advantages of this new set up, termed SR-APPI, over classical APPI are spectral purity and continuous tunability. The technique may also be used to perform tunable photoionization mass spectrometry on fragile compounds difficult to vaporize by classical methods.

  16. Reconstructing the Solar VUV Irradiance over the Past 60 Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlin, Phillip

    2010-01-01

    The Flare Irradiance Spectral Model (FISM) is an empirical model of the solar irradiance spectrum from 0.1 to 190 nm at I nm spectral resolution and on a 1-minute time cadence. The goal of FISM is to provide accurate solar spectral irradiances over the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV: 0-200 nm) range as input for ionospheric and thermospheric models, as well as climate studies over 60 years. A brief overview of the FISM model will be given, and also discussed is how the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) will contribute to improving FISM and its accuracies. Results will also be shown quantifying the VUV contributions to the total flare energy budget, and more importantly discuss the increased errors associated by not including flares in the solar energy input to the Earth's system. Concluding the talk will be a discussion of the proxies, and their associated uncertainties, used for solar spectral reconstructions prior to 1947 going back hundreds of years.

  17. Toward a direct comparison of field and laboratory goniometer measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dangel, S.; Verstraete, M.; Schopfer, J.; Kneubuehler, M.; Schaepman, M.E.; Itten, K.I.

    2005-01-01

    Field and laboratory goniometers are widely used in the remote sensing community to assess spectrodirectional reflection properties of selected targets. Even when the same target and goniometer system are used, field and laboratory results cannot directly be compared due to inherent differences,

  18. Agreement of two different laboratory methods used to measure electrolytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venencia Albert

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of our study was to do an agreement analysis of two different laboratory methods used to measure electrolytes i.e., between the ISE based Beckman Coulter Synchron CX9 PRO Biochemistry analyzer and RAL′s Ion3 Flame Photometer (Tιcnica para el Laboratorio, Barcelona, Spain, in serum samples. Materials and Methods: This cross sectional study was done over a period of three months from September′09 through December′09 on routine biochemistry samples. A total of 6492 samples were received for routine biochemistry analysis from those 630 blood samples were randomly processed for this study. Two ml of sample was taken in a plain gel tube (LABTECH Disposables, Ahmedabad, India, centrifuged and further processed using both systems within one hour of the sampling to obtain the Na and K concentrations in the samples. The bias and variability of differences in measured values were analyzed according to Bland and Altman method. Results: Flame photometry method has drawbacks such as low throughput, requires manual operation, is a time consuming procedure. Ion selective electrodes technique is a more universal method for the high throughput determination of electrolytes in physiological samples; Beckman Coulter Synchron CX9 PRO is an example of such a system. The mean difference between the two methods (standard minus test and 95% limits of agreement for sodium in serum was -7.8±17.3 (-42.2 to 26.6 and in urine was -22±41 (-104 to 60. Similarly, the mean difference between the two methods for potassium values in serum was found to be -0.25±0.75 (-1.75 to 1.25 and in urine was -5.3±38.9 (-83.1 to 72.5. With 95% confidence interval, the value of sodium and potassium as determined by both the methods lie between the upper and lower limit showing 95% limits of agreement. Conclusion: Good degree of agreement was seen on comparing the two methods for measuring the electrolytes; the use of Synchron CX9 in place of Flame photometer for

  19. Agreement of two different laboratory methods used to measure electrolytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Venencia; Subramanian, Arulselvi; Rangarajan, Kanchana; Pandey, Ravindra Mohan

    2011-07-01

    The aim of our study was to do an agreement analysis of two different laboratory methods used to measure electrolytes i.e., between the ISE based Beckman Coulter Synchron CX9 PRO Biochemistry analyzer and RAL's Ion3 Flame Photometer (Técnica para el Laboratorio, Barcelona, Spain), in serum samples. This cross sectional study was done over a period of three months from September'09 through December'09 on routine biochemistry samples. A total of 6492 samples were received for routine biochemistry analysis from those 630 blood samples were randomly processed for this study. Two ml of sample was taken in a plain gel tube (LABTECH Disposables, Ahmedabad, India), centrifuged and further processed using both systems within one hour of the sampling to obtain the Na and K concentrations in the samples. The bias and variability of differences in measured values were analyzed according to Bland and Altman method. Flame photometry method has drawbacks such as low throughput, requires manual operation, is a time consuming procedure. Ion selective electrodes technique is a more universal method for the high throughput determination of electrolytes in physiological samples; Beckman Coulter Synchron CX9 PRO is an example of such a system. The mean difference between the two methods (standard minus test) and 95% limits of agreement for sodium in serum was -7.8±17.3 (-42.2 to 26.6) and in urine was -22±41 (-104 to 60). Similarly, the mean difference between the two methods for potassium values in serum was found to be -0.25±0.75 (-1.75 to 1.25) and in urine was -5.3±38.9 (-83.1 to 72.5). With 95% confidence interval, the value of sodium and potassium as determined by both the methods lie between the upper and lower limit showing 95% limits of agreement. Good degree of agreement was seen on comparing the two methods for measuring the electrolytes; the use of Synchron CX9 in place of Flame photometer for electrolyte analysis in serum and urine is justified or use the two

  20. Beam Line Commissioning of a UV/VUV FEL at Jefferson Lab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, Stephen; Blackburn, Keith; Bullard, Daniel; Clavero Perez, Cesar; Coleman, James; Dickover, Cody; Douglas, David; Ellingsworth, Forrest; Evtushenko, Pavel; Hernandez-Garcia, Carlos; Gould, Christopher; Gubeli, Joseph; Hardy, David; Jordan, Kevin; Klopf, John; James, Kortze; Legg, Robert; Marchlik, Matthew; Moore, Steven; Neil, George; Powers, Thomas; Sexton, Daniel; Shinn, Michelle D; Tennant, Christopher; Walker, Richard; Williams, Gwyn; Wilson, Frederick

    2011-08-01

    Many novel applications in photon sciences require very high brightness and/or short pulses in the vacuum ultra-violet (VUV). Jefferson Lab has commissioned a UV oscillator with high gain and has transported the third harmonic of the UV to a user lab. The experimental performance of the UV FEL is much better than simulated performance in both gain and efficiency. This success is important for efforts to push towards higher gain FELs at short wavelengths where mirrors absorb strongly. We will report on efforts to characterize the UV laser and the VUV coherent harmonics as well as designs to lase directly in the VUV wavelength range.

  1. VUV-SX spherical grating monochromator beam lines at BEPC and HESYRL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Deming; Wang, Wei; Wang, Motuo; Liu, Jing; He, Wei; Zhang, Yijuan; Liu, Wumin; Sao, Beibei; Xie, Qi; Zheng, Hongwei; Wu, Chuancou; Cong, Zhibing; Zong, Congcang; Xu, Pengsou; Cai, Yong

    1990-05-01

    Two VUV-SX spherical grating monochromator (SGM) beam lines have been designed and constructed for laboratories in China; one for the Beijing Electron-Positron Collider (BEPC) and one for the Hefei Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (HESYRL). Each of them will cover a wide spectral range, approximately 10-1000 eV, with four or five spherical laminar gratings. Tuning of the wavelength in the monochromators is achieved by rotation of the grating and translation of a pair of stepping-motor-driven slits to follow the Rowland circle to improve the monochromator's performance. The prefocusing mirrors are different on the BEPC and HESYRL beam lines. To accept 20 mrad of the synchrotron radiation horizontally from the 800-MeV HESYRL ring, a combined Kirkpatrick-Baez-type mirror set has been developed. The 1240-mm-long horizontal prefocusing mirror consists of four 310 mm × 70 mm × 40 mm gold-coated Zerodur spherical mirrors, each of which is independently adjustable in three dimensions. In the BEPC SGM beam line, a toroidal nickel-coated aluminum prefocusing mirror intercepts up to 4.5 mrad at a distance of 12 m from the source. A heat-pipe cooling system has also been designed for this mirror to accommodate the higher power from the 2.2-2.8 GeV beam stored in BEPC in its dedicated SR mode. The optical ray tracing results, the mechanics, and control systems are described in this paper.

  2. PHYSICAL PROPERTY MEASUREMENTS OF LABORATORY PREPARED SALTSTONE GROUT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, E.; Cozzi, A.; Edwards, T.

    2014-05-05

    The Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) built two new Saltstone Disposal Units (SDU), SDU 3 and SDU 5, in 2013. The variable frequency drive (VFD) for the grout transfer hose pump tripped due to high current demand by the motor during the initial radioactive saltstone transfer to SDU 5B on 12/5/2013. This was not observed during clean cap processing on July 5, 2013 to SDU 3A, which is a slightly longer distance from the SPF than is SDU 5B. Saltstone Design Authority (SDA) is evaluating the grout pump performance and capabilities to transfer the grout processed in SPF to SDU 3/5. To assist in this evaluation, grout physical properties are required. At this time, there are no rheological data from the actual SPF so the properties of laboratory prepared samples using simulated salt solution or Tank 50 salt solution will be measured. The physical properties of grout prepared in the laboratory with de-ionized water (DI) and salt solutions were obtained at 0.60 and 0.59 water to premix (W/P) ratios, respectively. The yield stress of the DI grout was greater than any salt grout. The plastic viscosity of the DI grout was lower than all of the salt grouts (including salt grout with admixture). When these physical data were used to determine the pressure drop and fluid horsepower for steady state conditions, the salt grouts without admixture addition required a higher pressure drop and higher fluid horsepower to transport. When 0.00076 g Daratard 17/g premix was added, both the pressure drop and fluid horsepower were below that of the DI grout. Higher concentrations of Daratard 17 further reduced the pressure drop and fluid horsepower. The uncertainty in the single point Bingham Plastic parameters is + 4% of the reported values and is the bounding uncertainty. Two different mechanical agitator mixing protocols were followed for the simulant salt grout, one having a total mixing time of three minutes and the other having a time of 10 minutes. The Bingham Plastic parameters

  3. VUV/UV/Chlorine as an Enhanced Advanced Oxidation Process for Organic Pollutant Removal from Water: Assessment with a Novel Mini-Fluidic VUV/UV Photoreaction System (MVPS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mengkai; Qiang, Zhimin; Hou, Pin; Bolton, James R; Qu, Jiuhui; Li, Peng; Wang, Chen

    2016-06-07

    Vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and ultraviolet (UV)/chlorine processes are regarded as two of many advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). Because of the similar cost of VUV/UV and UV lamps, a combination of VUV and UV/chlorine (i.e., VUV/UV/chlorine) may enhance the removal of organic pollutants in water but without any additional power input. In this paper, a mini-fluidic VUV/UV photoreaction system (MVPS) was developed for bench-scale experiments, which could emit both VUV (185 nm) and UV (254 nm) or solely UV beams with a nearly identical UV photon fluence. The photon fluence rates of UV and VUV output by the MVPS were determined to be 8.88 × 10(-4) and 4.93 × 10(-5) einstein m(-2) s(-1), respectively. The VUV/UV/chlorine process exhibited a strong enhancement concerning the degradation of methylene blue (MB, a model organic pollutant) as compared to the total performance of the VUV/UV and UV/chlorine processes, although the photon fluence of the VUV only accounted for 5.6% of that of the UV. An acidic pH favored MB degradation by the VUV/UV/chlorine process. The synergistic mechanism of the VUV/UV/chlorine process was mainly ascribed to the effective use of (•)OH for pollutant removal through formation of longer-lived secondary radicals (e.g., (•)OCl). This study demonstrates that the new VUV/UV/chlorine process, as an enhanced AOP, can be applied as a highly effective and energy-saving technology for small-scale water and wastewater treatment.

  4. A SYNCHRONIZED FIR/VUV LIGHT SOURCE AT JEFFERSON LAB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen Benson, David Douglas, George Neil, Michelle D. Shinn, Gwyn Williams

    2012-07-01

    We describe a dual free-electron laser (FEL) configuration on the UV Demo FEL at Jefferson Lab that allows simultaneous lasing at FIR/THz and UV wavelengths. The FIR/THz source would be an FEL oscillator with a short wiggler providing nearly diffraction-limited pulses with pulse energy exceeding 50 microJoules. The FIR source would use the exhaust beam from a UVFEL. The coherent harmonics in the VUV from the UVFEL are out-coupled through a hole. The FIR source uses a shorter resonator with either hole or edge coupling to provide very high power FIR pulses. Simulations indicate excel-lent spectral brightness in the FIR region with over 100 W/cm-1 output.

  5. VUV Spectroscopy of the Sun as a Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kankelborg, Charles; Philip, Judge; Winebarger, Amy R.; Kobayashi, Ken; Smart, Roy

    2017-08-01

    We describe a new sounding rocket mission to obtain the first high resolution, high quality VUV (100-200 nm) spectrum of the Sun-as-a-star. Our immediate science goal is to understand better the processes of chromospheric and coronal heating. HST data exist for a dozen or so Sun-like stars of a quality already beyond our ability to construct a comparable sun-as-a-star UV spectrum. The solar spectrum we obtain will enable us to understand the nature of magnetic energy dissipation as a Sun-like star evolves, and the dependence of magnetic activity on stellar mass and metallicity. This poster presents the instrument design, scientific prospects, and broader impacts of the proposed mission.

  6. Science outside the laboratory: measurement in field science and economics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boumans, M.

    2015-01-01

    The conduct of most of social science occurs outside the laboratory. Such studies in field science explore phenomena that cannot for practical, technical, or ethical reasons be explored under controlled conditions. These phenomena cannot be fully isolated from their environment or investigated by

  7. Inter-laboratory variability of haemoglobin measurements obtained ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Accurate and precise tests results generated by clinical laboratories would assist correct decision making in the diagnosis and management of patients. Quality assurance, which comprises of internal quality control (IQC) and external quality assessment (EQA), is intended to ensure the reliability of the ...

  8. Fluorescence quantum yield measurements of fluorescent proteins: a laboratory experiment for a biochemistry or molecular biophysics laboratory course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Kathryn P; Dillon, Rebecca; Knowles, Michelle K

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins are commonly used in cell biology to assess where proteins are within a cell as a function of time and provide insight into intracellular protein function. However, the usefulness of a fluorescent protein depends directly on the quantum yield. The quantum yield relates the efficiency at which a fluorescent molecule converts absorbed photons into emitted photons and it is necessary to know for assessing what fluorescent protein is the most appropriate for a particular application. In this work, we have designed an upper-level, biochemistry laboratory experiment where students measure the fluorescence quantum yields of fluorescent proteins relative to a standard organic dye. Four fluorescent protein variants, enhanced cyan fluorescent protein (ECFP), enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), mCitrine, and mCherry, were used, however the methods described are useful for the characterization of any fluorescent protein or could be expanded to fluorescent quantum yield measurements of organic dye molecules. The laboratory is designed as a guided inquiry project and takes two, 4 hr laboratory periods. During the first day students design the experiment by selecting the excitation wavelength, choosing the standard, and determining the concentration needed for the quantum yield experiment that takes place in the second laboratory period. Overall, this laboratory provides students with a guided inquiry learning experience and introduces concepts of fluorescence biophysics into a biochemistry laboratory curriculum. © 2014 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  9. Uncooled Radiation Hard SiC Schottky VUV Detectors Capable of Single Photon Sensing Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project seeks to design, fabricate, characterize and commercialize very large area, uncooled and radiative hard 4H-SiC VUV detectors capable of near single...

  10. Hydrated electron based decomposition of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) in the VUV/sulfite system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yurong; Liu, Tongzhou; Wang, Hongjie; Han, Huili; Dong, Wenyi

    2017-12-31

    As one of the most reactive species, hydrated electron (eaq(-)) is promising for reductive decomposition of recalcitrant organic pollutants, such as perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS). In this study, PFOS decomposition using a vacuum ultraviolet (VUV)/sulfite system was systematically investigated in comparison with sole VUV and ultraviolet (UV)/sulfite systems. A fast and nearly complete (97.3%) PFOS decomposition was observed within 4h from its initial concentration of 37.2μM in the VUV/sulfite system. The observed rate constant (kobs) for PFOS decomposition in the studied system was 0.87±0.0060h(-1), which was nearly 7.5 and 2 folds faster than that in sole VUV and UV/sulfite systems, respectively. Compared to previously studied UV/sulfite system, VUV/sulfite system enhanced PFOS decomposition in both weak acidic and alkaline pH conditions. In weak acidic condition (pH6.0), PFOS predominantly decomposed via direct VUV photolysis, whereas in alkaline condition (pH>9.0), PFOS decomposition was mainly induced by eaq(-) generated from both sulfite and VUV photolytic reactions. At a fixed initial solution pH (pH10.0), PFOS decomposition kinetics showed a positive linear dependence with sulfite dosage. The co-presence of humic acid (HA) and NO3(-) obviously suppressed PFOS decomposition, whereas HCO3(-) showed marginal inhibition. A few amount of short chain perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs) were detected in PFOS decomposition process, and a high defluorination efficiency (75.4%) was achieved. These results suggested most fluorine atoms in PFOS molecule ultimately mineralized into fluoride ions, and the mechanisms for PFOS decomposition in the VUV/sulfite system were proposed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Validating an Indirect Measure of Clarity of Feelings: Evidence from Laboratory and Naturalistic Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lischetzke, Tanja; Angelova, Rozalina; Eid, Michael

    2011-01-01

    This study analyzed the reliability and validity of an indirect measure of clarity of feelings that is based on response latencies (RTs) of mood ratings. Fifty-two participants completed a laboratory session and an experience-sampling week with 6 measurement occasions per day. Shorter RT of mood ratings measured in the laboratory (but not…

  12. Measuring Meaningful Learning in the Undergraduate General Chemistry and Organic Chemistry Laboratories: A Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, Kelli R.; Bretz, Stacey Lowery

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how students learn in the undergraduate chemistry teaching laboratory is an essential component to developing evidence-based laboratory curricula. The Meaningful Learning in the Laboratory Instrument (MLLI) was developed to measure students' cognitive and affective expectations and experiences for learning in the chemistry…

  13. Laboratory fire behavior measurements of chaparral crown fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    C. Sanpakit; S. Omodan; D. Weise; M Princevac

    2015-01-01

    In 2013, there was an estimated 9,900 wildland fires that claimed more than 577,000 acres of land. That same year, about 542 prescribed fires were used to treat 48,554 acres by several agencies in California. Being able to understand fires using laboratory models can better prepare individuals to combat or use fires. Our research focused on chaparral crown fires....

  14. Development of a high-speed vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) imaging system for the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Fan; Ming, Tingfeng; Wang, Yumin; Wang, Zhijun; Long, Feifei; Zhuang, Qing; Li, Guoqiang; Liang, Yunfeng; Gao, Xiang

    2017-07-01

    A high-speed vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) imaging system for edge plasma studies is being developed on the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). Its key optics is composed of an inverse type of Schwarzschild telescope made of a set of Mo/Si multilayer mirrors, a micro-channel plate (MCP) equipped with a P47 phosphor screen and a high-speed camera with CMOS sensors. In order to remove the contribution from low-energy photons, a Zr filter is installed in front of the MCP detector. With this optics, VUV photons with a wavelength of 13.5 nm, which mainly come from the line emission from intrinsic carbon (C vi: n = 4-2 transition) or the Ly-α line emission from injected Li iii on the EAST, can be selectively measured two-dimensionally with both high temporal and spatial resolutions. At present, this system is installed to view the plasma from the low field side in a horizontal port in the EAST. It has been operated routinely during the 2016 EAST experiment campaign, and the first result is shown in this work. To roughly evaluate the system performance, synthetic images are created. And it indicates that this system mainly measures the edge localized emissions by comparing the synthetic images and experimental data.

  15. A new broadly tunable (7.4-10.2 eV) laser based VUV light source and its first application to aerosol mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, S. J.; Campuzano-Jost, P.; Simpson, E. A.; Robb, D. B.; Burak, I.; Blades, M. W.; Hepburn, J. W.; Bertram, A. K.

    2009-01-01

    A laser based vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light source using resonance enhanced four wave difference mixing in xenon gas was developed for near threshold ionization of organics in atmospheric aerosol particles. The source delivers high intensity pulses of VUV light (in the range of 1010 to 1013 photons/pulse depending on wavelength, 5 ns FWHM) with a continuously tunable wavelength from 122 nm (10.2 eV) to 168 nm (7.4 eV)E The setup allows for tight (energies spanning the full wavelength range of the VUV source. The measured appearance energies are very close to the literature values of the ionization energies for all seven species. The effectiveness of the source for single particle studies was demonstrated by analysis of individual caffeine aerosols vaporized by a pulsed CO2 laser in an ion trap mass spectrometer. Mass spectra from single particles down to 300 nm in diameter were collected. Excellent signal to noise characteristics for these small particles give a caffeine detection limit of 8 × 105 molecules which is equivalent to a single 75 nm aerosol, or approximately 1.5% of a 300 nm particleE The appearance energy of caffeine originating from the aerosol was also measured and found to be 7.91 ± 0.05 eV, in good agreement with literature values.

  16. Modifications to a Laboratory-Scale Confined Laser Ignition Chamber for Pressure Measurements to 70 MPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    ARL-MR-0964 ● SEP 2017 US Army Research Laboratory Modifications to a Laboratory-Scale Confined Laser Ignition Chamber for...US Army Research Laboratory Modifications to a Laboratory-Scale Confined Laser Ignition Chamber for Pressure Measurements to 70 MPa by...that notwithstanding any other provision of law, no person shall be subject to any penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if

  17. Comparison of field-measured radon diffusion coefficients with laboratory-measured coefficients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepel, E.A.; Silker, W.B.; Thomas, V.W.; Kalkwarf, D.R.

    1983-04-01

    Experiments were conducted to compare radon diffusion coefficients determined for 0.1-m depths of soils by a steady-state method in the laboratory and diffusion coefficients evaluated from radon fluxes through several-fold greater depths of the same soils covering uranium-mill tailings. The coefficients referred to diffusion in the total pore volume of the soils and are equivalent to values for the quantity, D/P, in the Generic Environmental Impact Statement on Uranium Milling prepared by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Two soils were tested: a well-graded sand and an inorganic clay of low plasticity. For the flux evaluations, radon was collected by adsorption on charcoal following passive diffusion from the soil surface and also from air recirculating through an aluminum tent over the soil surface. An analysis of variance in the flux evaluations showed no significant difference between these two collection methods. Radon diffusion coefficients evaluated from field data were statistically indistinguishable, at the 95% confidence level, from those measured in the laboratory; however, the low precision of the field data prevented a sensitive validation of the laboratory measurements. From the field data, the coefficients were calculated to be 0.03 +- 0.03 cm/sup 2//s for the sand cover and 0.0036 +- 0.0004 cm/sup 2//s for the clay cover. The low precision in the coefficients evaluated from field data was attributed to high variation in radon flux with time and surface location at the field site.

  18. Sequim Marine Research Laboratory routine environmental measurements during CY-1978. [Monitoring for laboratory-related radioactivity and pollutants in environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houston, J.R.; Blumer, P.J.

    1979-03-01

    Environmental data collected during 1978 in the vicinity of the Marine Research Laboratory show continued compliance with all applicable state and federal regulations and furthermore show no detectable change from conditions that existed in previous years. Samples collected for radiological analysis included soil, drinking water, bay water, clams, and seaweed. Radiation dose rates at 1 meter aboveground were also measured.

  19. Achieving continuous improvement in laboratory organization through performance measurements: a seven-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, Maria; López-Garrigós, Maite; Gutiérrez, Mercedes; Lugo, Javier; Sirvent, Jose Vicente; Uris, Joaquin

    2010-01-01

    Laboratory performance can be measured using a set of model key performance indicators (KPIs). The design and implementation of KPIs are important issues. KPI results from 7 years are reported and their implementation, monitoring, objectives, interventions, result reporting and delivery are analyzed. The KPIs of the entire laboratory process were obtained using Laboratory Information System (LIS) registers. These were collected automatically using a data warehouse application, spreadsheets and external quality program reports. Customer satisfaction was assessed using surveys. Nine model laboratory KPIs were proposed and measured. The results of some examples of KPIs used in our laboratory are reported. Their corrective measurements or the implementation of objectives led to improvement in the associated KPIs results. Measurement of laboratory performance using KPIs and a data warehouse application that continuously collects registers and calculates KPIs confirmed the reliability of indicators, indicator acceptability and usability for users, and continuous process improvement.

  20. Behavioral Health and Performance Laboratory Standard Measures (BHP-SM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Thomas J.; Cromwell, Ronita

    2017-01-01

    The Spaceflight Standard Measures is a NASA Johnson Space Center Human Research Project (HRP) project that proposes to collect a set of core measurements, representative of many of the human spaceflight risks, from astronauts before, during and after long-duration International Space Station (ISS) missions. The term "standard measures" is defined as a set of core measurements, including physiological, biochemical, psychosocial, cognitive, and functional, that are reliable, valid, and accepted in terrestrial science, are associated with a specific and measurable outcome known to occur as a consequence of spaceflight, that will be collected in a standardized fashion from all (or most) crewmembers. While such measures might be used to define standards of health and performance or readiness for flight, the prime intent in their collection is to allow longitudinal analysis of multiple parameters in order to answer a variety of operational, occupational, and research-based questions. These questions are generally at a high level, and the approach for this project is to populate the standard measures database with the smallest set of data necessary to indicate further detailed research is required. Also included as standard measures are parameters that are not outcome-based in and of-themselves, but provide ancillary information that supports interpretation of the outcome measures, e.g., nutritional assessment, vehicle environmental parameters, crew debriefs, etc. The project's main aim is to ensure that an optimized minimal set of measures is consistently captured from all ISS crewmembers until the end of Station in order to characterize the human in space. -This allows the HRP to identify, establish, and evaluate a common set of measures for use in spaceflight and analog research to: develop baselines, systematically characterize risk likelihood and consequences, and assess effectiveness of countermeasures that work for behavioral health and performance risk factors

  1. Solar-Blind Diamond Detectors for Lyra, the Solar VUV Radiometer on Board Proba II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benmoussa, A.; Hochedez, J.-F.; Schmutz, W. K.; Schühle, U.; Nesládek, M.; Stockman, Y.; Kroth, U.; Richter, M.; Theissen, A.; Remes, Z.; Haenen, K.; Mortet, V.; Koller, S.; Halain, J. P.; Petersen, R.; Dominique, M.; D'Olieslaeger, M.

    2003-12-01

    Fabrication, packaging and experimental results on the calibration of metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) photodetectors made on diamond are reported. LYRA (Lyman-α RAdiometer onboard PROBA-2) will use diamond detectors for the first time in space for a solar physics instrument. A set of measurement campaigns was designed to obtain the XUV-to-VIS responsivity of the devices and other characterizations. The measurements of responsivity in EUV and VUV spectral ranges (40 240 nm) have been carried out by the Physkalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Germany at the electron storage ring BESSY II. The longer wavelength range from 210 to 1127 nm was measured with monochromatic light by using a Xe-lamp at IMO-IMOMEC. The diamond detectors exhibit a photoresponse which lie in the 35 65 mA/W range at 200 nm (corresponding to an external quantum efficiency of 20 40%) and indicate a visible rejection ratio (200 500 nm) higher than four orders of magnitude.

  2. Verification of Electromagnetic Field Measurements via Inter-laboratory Comparison Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mann

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available An inter-laboratory comparison of field strength measurements was conducted in order to verify the comparability of high-frequency electromagnetic field measurements. For this purpose, 17 participating teams hosted by the working group "procedures of exposure determination" of the LAI (Länderausschuss für Immissionsschutz, state committee on immission control determined the field strength at given stations around a hospital situation. At those stations very different signals were generated, such as sine wave signals at 27MHz and 433MHz, signals from a diathermy device in Continuous-Wave (CW and Pulse-Width-Modulation (PWM mode, from a GSM base station at 900MHz and 1800MHz, from a UMTS base station, from a babyphone device and from a DECT cordless phone. This contribution describes the evaluation of the measured values and the approach to the computation of a reference value. Considering various sources of electromagnetic fields in the areas of personal safety at work and of immission control, the most important results are presented and the conclusions drawn are discussed.

  3. Laboratory measurements of heterogeneous reactions on sulfuric acid surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Leah R.; Manion, Jeffrey A.; Golden, David M.; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    1994-01-01

    Increasing evidence from field, modeling, and laboratory studies suggests that heterogeneous reactions on stratospheric sulfate aerosol particles may contribute to global ozone depletion. Using a Knudsen cell reactor technique, the authors have studied the uptake, reactivity, and solubility of several trace atmospheric species on cold sulfuric acid surfaces representative of stratospheric aerosol particles. The results suggest that the heterogeneous conversion of N2O5 to HNO3 is fast enough to significantly affect the partitioning of nitrogen species in the global stratosphere and thus contribute to global ozone depletion. The hydrolysis of ClONO2 is slower and unlikely to be important under normal conditions at midlatitudes. The solubilities of HCl and HNO3 in sulfuric acid down to 200 K were found to be quite low. For HCl, this means that little HCl is available for reaction on the surfaces of stratospheric sulfate aerosol particles. The low solubility of HNO3 means that this product of heterogeneous reactions will enter the gas phase, and the denitrification observed in polar regions is unlikely to occur in the global stratosphere.

  4. Deuterium Fractionation in Analogs of Interstellar Ices: Laboratory Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandford, Scott A.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A question of key interest in the field of Astrobiology is the extent to which organic compounds made in space may play a role in the origin of life in planetary systems. In general, the best proof that at least some interstellar materials survive incorporation into forming stellar/planetary systems is their identification in extraterrestrial samples through detection of the isotopic anomalies they may carry. In the case of organic compounds, the chief isotopic anomalies that might be expected are the enrichment of D and 15N. and such enrichments are seen in primitive extraterrestrial materials, for example, in the organics in carbonaceous chondrites and interplanetary dust particles. In my talk I will review the various astrochemical processes by which deuterium can become enriched in organic compounds and will discuss some recent laboratory experiments that examine one of these processes in particular. name]y the UV photolysis of interstellar ices. Finally, I will review the current state of our knowledge of D enrichments in primitive solar system materials and discuss the constraints these data place on the relative importance of the various possible interstellar D enrichment processes.

  5. Performance of a novel VUV bending magnet beamline

    CERN Document Server

    Song, Y F; Hsieh, T F; Huang, L R; Chung, S C; Cheng, N F; Hsiung, G Y; Wang, D J; Chen, C T; Tsang, K L

    2001-01-01

    A novel high resolution, high flux bending magnet beamline with an energy range from 5 to 40 eV has been constructed at SRRC. This Dragon-like beamline, which horizontally collects 50 mrad of synchrotron radiation from a bending magnet source, uses four cylindrical gratings with an included angle of 140 deg. and a movable curved exit slit. The average photon flux with an energy resolving power of 1000 is about 2x10 sup 1 sup 2 photons/s, which is among the highest of all existing VUV bending magnet beamlines. An energy resolving power of 24,000 at 6.8 eV has been obtained from the Schumann-Runge bands (B sup 3 limit construction operator in a limit construction/sum L: summation operator operator End lower limit of a limit construction u lower limit End limit End sup - /leftarrow/gets A: =leftward arrow X sup 3 limit construction operator in a limit construction/sum L: summation operator operator End lower limit of a limit construction g lower limit End limit End sup -) absorption spectra of O sub 2 gas. A pho...

  6. Variation in the measurement of DNA damage by comet assay measured by the ECVAG dagger inter-laboratory validation trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forchhammer, Lykke; Johansson, Clara; Loft, Steffen

    2010-01-01

    The comet assay has become a popular method for the assessment of DNA damage in biomonitoring studies and genetic toxicology. However, few studies have addressed the issue of the noted inter-laboratory variability of DNA damage measured by the comet assay. In this study, 12 laboratories analysed ...

  7. Combined Reactor and Microelectrode Measurements in Laboratory Grown Biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Tove; Harremoës, Poul

    1994-01-01

    A combined biofilm reactor-/microelectrode experimental set-up has been constructed, allowing for simultaneous reactor mass balances and measurements of concentration profiles within the biofilm. The system consists of an annular biofilm reactor equipped with an oxygen microelectrode. Experiments...

  8. Radon measurements during the building of a low-level laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Antanasijevic, R; Bikit, I; Banjanac, R; Dragic, A; Joksimovic, D; Krmpotic, D; Udovicic, V; Vukovic, J

    1999-01-01

    Radon measurements were provided during the different stages of building of a low-level laboratory in Belgrade. The depth of the laboratory is 12 m, equivalent to 30 m of water with an area of 45 m sup 2. The whole of the laboratory is hermetically lined with 1 mm A1 foil and is ventilated with filtered air. Radon concentrations were measured with the CR-39 detector as well as via the gamma-ray spectroscopic measurements. The radon concentrations in the air were achieved to 20 Bqm sup - sup 3 and reduction of secondary and tertiary cosmic-ray fluxes is five times when ventilation, filtering and sealing was applied.

  9. 48 CFR 1552.211-80 - Data standards for the transmission of laboratory measurement results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Texts of Provisions and Clauses 1552.211-80 Data standards for the transmission of laboratory... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Data standards for the transmission of laboratory measurement results. 1552.211-80 Section 1552.211-80 Federal Acquisition Regulations...

  10. Clinical evaluation of analytical variations in serum creatinine measurements : why laboratories should abandon Jaffe techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drion, Iefke; Cobbaert, Christa; Groenier, Klaas H.; Weykamp, Cas; Bilo, Henk J. G.; Wetzels, Jack F. M.; Kleefstra, Nanne

    2012-01-01

    Background: Non-equivalence in serum creatinine (SCr) measurements across Dutch laboratories and the consequences hereof on chronic kidney disease (CKD) staging were examined. Methods: National data from the Dutch annual external quality organization of 2009 were used. 144 participating laboratories

  11. VUV-absorption cross section of carbon dioxide from 150 to 800 K and applications to warm exoplanetary atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venot, O.; Bénilan, Y.; Fray, N.; Gazeau, M.-C.; Lefèvre, F.; Es-sebbar, Et.; Hébrard, E.; Schwell, M.; Bahrini, C.; Montmessin, F.; Lefèvre, M.; Waldmann, I. P.

    2018-01-01

    Context. Most exoplanets detected so far have atmospheric temperatures significantly higher than 300 K. Often close to their star, they receive an intense UV photons flux that triggers important photodissociation processes. The temperature dependency of vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) absorption cross sections are poorly known, leading to an undefined uncertainty in atmospheric models. Similarly, data measured at low temperatures similar to those of the high atmosphere of Mars, Venus, and Titan are often lacking. Aims: Our aim is to quantify the temperature dependency of the VUV absorption cross sections of important molecules in planetary atmospheres. We want to provide high-resolution data at temperatures prevailing in these media, and a simple parameterisation of the absorption in order to simplify its use in photochemical models. This study focuses on carbon dioxide (CO2). Methods: We performed experimental measurements of CO2 absorption cross sections with synchrotron radiation for the wavelength range (115-200 nm). For longer wavelengths (195-230 nm), we used a deuterium lamp and a 1.5 m Jobin-Yvon spectrometer. We used these data in our one-dimensional (1D) thermo-photochemical model in order to study their impact on the predicted atmospheric compositions. Results: The VUV absorption cross section of CO2 increases with the temperature. The absorption we measured at 150 K seems to be close to the absorption of CO2 in the fundamental ground state. The absorption cross section can be separated into two parts: a continuum and a fine structure superimposed on the continuum. The variation in the continuum of absorption can be represented by the sum of three Gaussian functions. Using data at high temperature in thermo-photochemical models significantly modifies the abundance and the photodissociation rates of many species in addition to CO2, such as methane and ammonia. These deviations have an impact on synthetic transmission spectra, leading to variations of up to 5 ppm

  12. Optimization of a seeding option for the VUV free electron laser at DESY

    CERN Document Server

    Saldin, E L; Yurkov, M V

    2000-01-01

    In order to get fully coherent radiation from the Free Electron Laser (FEL) amplifier starting from the shot noise, it is foreseen to implement a seeding option into the VUV FEL being under construction at DESY (DESY print TESLA-FEL 95-03, Hamburg, DESY, 1995, Seeding option for the VUV free electron laser at DESY: joint DESY and GKSS proposal; Available at DESY upon request only). It consists of an additional undulator, a bypass for electrons and an X-ray monochromator. This paper presents the results of optimization of the seeding option for the VUV FEL providing maximal spectral brightness at minimal shot-to-shot intensity fluctuations. Calculations are performed with three-dimensional, time-dependent simulation code FAST (Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 429 (1999) 233).

  13. Key Performance Indicators to Measure Improvement After Implementation of Total Laboratory Automation Abbott Accelerator a3600.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miler, Marijana; Nikolac Gabaj, Nora; Dukic, Lora; Simundic, Ana-Maria

    2017-12-27

    The aim of the study was to estimate improvement of work efficiency in the laboratory after implementation of total laboratory automation (TLA) by Abbott Accelerator a3600 in the laboratory with measuring different key performance indicators (KPIs) before and after TLA implementation. The objective was also to recommend steps for defining KPIs in other laboratories. For evaluation of improvement 10 organizational and/or technical KPIs were defined for all phases of laboratory work and measured before (November 2013) and after (from 2015 to 2017) TLA implementation. Out of 10 defined KPIs, 9 were successfully measured and significantly improved. Waiting time for registration of samples in the LIS was significantly reduced from 16 (9-28) to 9 (6-16) minutes after TLA (P 6 after TLA. Although median turnaround time TAT for potassium and troponin was higher (for approximately 20 min), number of outliers with TAT >60 min expressed as sigma values were satisfying (>3). Implementation of the TLA improved the most of the processes in our laboratory with 9 out of 10 properly defined and measured KPIs. With proper planning and defining of KPIs, every laboratory could measure changes in daily workflow.

  14. An approach to establish the uncertainty budget of catalytic activity concentration measurements in a reference laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rami, Laura; Canalias, Francesca

    2015-04-01

    Reference laboratories providing reference services recognized by the Joint Committee for Traceability in Laboratory Medicine (JCTLM) must be accredited as calibration laboratories according to ISO 17025 and ISO 15195. These standards require laboratories to establish an uncertainty budget, in which the uncertainty contributions of the relevant uncertainty components are specified. We present a model to estimate the measurement uncertainty of creatine kinase catalytic activity concentration results obtained by IFCC primary reference measurement procedure. The measurement uncertainty has been estimated by following the next steps: 1) specification of the measurand; 2) identification of the most relevant uncertainty sources; 3) estimation of standard uncertainties by either type A or type B evaluation; 4) estimation of combined uncertainty while taking into account sensitivity coefficients, as well as existence of correlated uncertainty sources; and 5) estimation of expanded uncertainty with a defined coverage probability. The estimated expanded uncertainty was 2.2% (k=2). Uncertainty sources with a significant contribution to the measurement uncertainty were the following: pH adjustment (0.68%), absorbance accuracy (0.48%), wavelength adjustment (0.20%), reaction temperature (0.19%), volume fraction of sample (0.15%) and absorbance linearity (0.06%). The present model is an approach to establish the uncertainty budget of primary reference procedures for the measurement of the catalytic activity concentration of enzymes, and aims at being an example to be followed by other reference laboratories, as well as by laboratories that carry out primary reference measurement procedures.

  15. Operation of the European FEL at ELETTRA Below 190 nm A Tunable Laser Source for VUV Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    De Ninno, G; Curbis, F; Danailov, M B; Diviacco, B; Marsi, M; Trovò, M

    2005-01-01

    Thanks to an intensive technological effort in the framework of the EEC Contract HPRI CT-2001-50025 (EUFELE), the European FEL at ELETTRA was able to break the previous record for the shortest wavelength of an FEL oscillator. Novel solutions were adopted for multilayer mirrors to allow FEL operation in the wavelength region between 160 and 190 nm, which is one of the main targets of the project. The characteristics of the FEL pulses measured at 176 nm (spectral profiles, high intensity, meV bandpass, MHz repetition rate) make it a competitive light source for spectroscopy, in particular for fluorescence studies in the VUV spectral range. Proof of principle experiments have been performed on different types of silica glasses, yielding information on the mechanisms of light absorption in this material.

  16. VUV photoionization of acetamide studied by electron/ion coincidence spectroscopy in the 8-24 eV photon energy range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwell, Martin, E-mail: Martin.Schwell@lisa.u-pec.fr [LISA UMR CNRS 7583, Universite Paris Est Creteil and Universite Paris Diderot, Institut Pierre Simon Laplace, 61 Avenue du General de Gaulle, 94010 Creteil (France); Benilan, Yves; Fray, Nicolas; Gazeau, Marie-Claire; Es-Sebbar, Et. [LISA UMR CNRS 7583, Universite Paris Est Creteil and Universite Paris Diderot, Institut Pierre Simon Laplace, 61 Avenue du General de Gaulle, 94010 Creteil (France); Garcia, Gustavo A.; Nahon, Laurent [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L' Orme des Merisiers, St. Aubin, B.P. 48, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Champion, Norbert [LERMA UMR CNRS 8112, Observatoire de Paris-Meudon, 5 place Jules-Jansen, 92195 Meudon (France); Leach, Sydney, E-mail: Sydney.Leach@obspm.fr [LERMA UMR CNRS 8112, Observatoire de Paris-Meudon, 5 place Jules-Jansen, 92195 Meudon (France)

    2012-01-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We study the VUV photoionization of acetamide in the 8-24 eV photon energy range. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electron/ion coincidence measurements are performed using synchrotron radiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The adiabatic ionization energy of acetamide is determined by TPEPICO measurements. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer VUV induced fragmentation pathways of acetamide are assigned and discussed. - Abstract: A VUV photoionization study of acetamide was carried out over the 8-24 eV photon energy range using synchrotron radiation and photoelectron/photoion coincidence (PEPICO) spectroscopy. Threshold photoelectron photoion coincidence (TPEPICO) measurements were also made. Photoion yield curves and branching ratios were measured for the parent ion and six fragment ions. The adiabatic ionization energy of acetamide was determined as I.E. (1{sup 2}A Prime ) = (9.71 {+-} 0.02) eV, in agreement with an earlier reported photoionization mass spectrometry (PIMS) value. The adiabatic energy of the first excited state of the ion, 1{sup 2}A Double-Prime , was determined to be Almost-Equal-To 10.1 eV. Assignments of the fragment ions and the pathways of their formation by dissociative photoionization were made. The neutral species lost in the principal dissociative photoionization processes are CH{sub 3}, NH{sub 2}, NH{sub 3}, CO, HCCO and NH{sub 2}CO. Heats of formation are derived for all ions detected and are compared with literature values. Some astrophysical implications of these results are discussed.

  17. New Improvements in Magnetic Measurements Laboratory of the ALBA Synchrotron Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campmany, Josep; Marcos, Jordi; Massana, Valentí

    ALBA synchrotron facility has a complete insertion devices (ID) laboratory to characterize and produce magnetic devices needed to satisfy the requirements of ALBA's user community. The laboratory is equipped with a Hall-probe bench working in on-the-fly measurement mode allowing the measurement of field maps of big magnetic structures with high accuracy, both in magnetic field magnitude and position. The whole control system of this bench is based on TANGO. The Hall probe calibration range extends between sub-Gauss to 2 Tesla with an accuracy of 100 ppm. Apart from the Hall probe bench, the ID laboratory has a flipping coil bench dedicated to measuring field integrals and a Helmholtz coil bench specially designed to characterize permanent magnet blocks. Also, a fixed stretched wire bench is used to measure field integrals of magnet sets. This device is specifically dedicated to ID construction. Finally, the laboratory is equipped with a rotating coil bench, specially designed for measuring multipolar devices used in accelerators, such as quadrupoles, sextupoles, etc. Recent improvements of the magnetic measurements laboratory of ALBA synchrotron include the design and manufacturing of very thin 3D Hall probe heads, the design and manufacturing of coil sensors for the Rotating coil bench based on multilayered PCB, and the improvement of calibration methodology in order to improve the accuracy of the measurements. ALBA magnetic measurements laboratory is open for external contracts, and has been widely used by national and international institutes such as CERN, ESRF or CIEMAT, as well as magnet manufacturing companies, such as ANTEC, TESLA and I3 M. In this paper, we will present the main features of the measurement benches as well as improvements made so far.

  18. Investigation and Analysis of Hemoglobin A1c Measurement Systems’ Performance for 135 Laboratories in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hai-Jian; Zhang, Tian-Jiao; Zeng, Jie; Hu, Cui-Hua; Ma, Rong; Zhang, Chuan-Bao

    2017-01-01

    Background: Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) measurement is of great value for the diagnosis and monitoring of diabetes. Many manufacturers have developed various experiments to determine the HbA1c concentration. However, the longitudinal use of these tests requires strict quality management. This study aimed to analyze the quality of HbA1c measurement systems in China using six sigma techniques to help improve their performances. Methods: A total of 135 laboratories were involved in this investigation in 2015. Bias values and coefficients of variation were collected from an HbA1c trueness verification external quality assessment program and an internal quality control program organized by the National Center of Clinical Laboratories in China. The sigma (σ) values and the quality goal index (QGI) were used to evaluate the performances of different groups, which were divided according to principles and instruments. Results: The majority of participants (88, 65.2%) were scored as “improvement needed (σ laboratories needed to improve their measurement performance. Only 8.2% (11/135) of the laboratories were scored as “world class (σ ≥ 6)”. Among all the 88 laboratories whose σ values were below 3, 52 (59.1%) and 23 (26.1%) laboratories needed to improve measurement precision (QGI 1.2), respectively; the remaining laboratories (13, 14.8%) needed to improve both measurement precision and trueness. In addition, 16.1% (5/31) and 15.0% (3/20) of the laboratories in “TOSOH” and “ARKRAY” groups, respectively, were scored as “world class”, whereas none of the laboratories in “BIO-RAD” group were scored as “world class”. Conclusions: This study indicated that, although participating laboratories were laboratories with better performance in China, the performances were still unsatisfactory. Actions should be taken to improve HbA1c measurement performance before we can include HbA1c assays in diabetes diagnosis in China. PMID:28469104

  19. Methods of Estimation the Reliability and Increasing the Informativeness of the Laboratory Results (Analysis of the Laboratory Case of Measurement the Indicators of Thyroid Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N A Kovyazina

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the study was to demonstrate the multilevel laboratory quality management system and point at the methods of estimating the reliability and increasing the amount of information content of the laboratory results (on the example of the laboratory case. Results. The article examines the stages of laboratory quality management which has helped to estimate the reliability of the results of determining Free T3, Free T4 and TSH. The measurement results are presented by the expanded uncertainty and the evaluation of the dynamics. Conclusion. Compliance with mandatory measures for laboratory quality management system enables laboratories to obtain reliable results and calculate the parameters that are able to increase the amount of information content of laboratory tests in clinical decision making.

  20. Amendment of the guideline for requirements for measuring laboratories; Novellierung der Richtlinie ueber Anforderungen an Inkorporationsmessstellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koenig, K.; Dalheimer, A.; Dettmann, K.; Hartmann, M.; Nosske, D.; Scheler, R. [Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz Oberschleissheim/Berlin (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    Following the Amendment of the Radiation Protection Ordinance of July 2001, it is also required to review the ''Guideline for Requirements for Measuring Laboratories'' and to consider the essential modifications, such as new limits for the effective dose and for organ doses, new biokinetic and dosimetric models, and requirements to incorporation laboratories already laid down in the Radiation Protection Ordinance. Whereas the activity to be proved for the respective monitoring procedures, which is the basic requirement for the laboratories, has already been assessed, the discussions are still going on about additional points of the guideline, i.e. laboratory equipment or details of the measurement and analyses procedures. Moreover, the international discussion with regard to incorporation monitoring should be taken into account, particularly on the european level. (orig.)

  1. A study of enhanced performance of VUV/UV process for the degradation of micropollutants from contaminated water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Mehdi; Mohseni, Madjid

    2015-08-30

    VUV/UV is a chemical-free and straightforward solution for the degradation of emerging contaminants from water sources. The objective of this work was to investigate the feasibility of VUV/UV advanced oxidation process for the effective degradation of a target micropollutant, atrazine, under continuous flow operation of 0.5-6.5L/min. To provide an in-depth understanding of process, a comprehensive computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model, incorporating flow hydrodynamics, 185nm VUV and 254nm UV radiation propagation along with a complete kinetic scheme, was developed and validated experimentally. The experimental degradation rates and CFD predicted values showed great consistency with less than 2.9% average absolute relative deviation (AARD). Utilizing the verified model, energy-efficiency of the VUV/UV process under a wide range of reactor configurations was assessed in terms of electrical energy-per-order (EEO), OH concentration as well as delivered UV and VUV dose distributions. Thereby, the extent of mixing and circulation zones was found as key parameter controlling the treatment economy and energy-efficiency of the VUV/UV process. Utilizing a CFD-driven baffle design strategy, an improved VUV/UV process with up to 72% reduction in the total electrical energy requirement of atrazine degradation was introduced and verified experimentally. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The procedures manual of the Environmental Measurements Laboratory. Volume 1, 28. edition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chieco, N.A. [ed.

    1997-02-01

    This manual covers procedures and technology currently in use at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory. An attempt is made to be sure that all work carried out will be of the highest quality. Attention is focused on the following areas: quality assurance; sampling; radiation measurements; analytical chemistry; radionuclide data; special facilities; and specifications.

  3. Measuring and Predicting Counterproductivity in the Laboratory Using Integrity and Personality Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikulay, Shawn M.; Goffin, Richard D.

    1998-01-01

    Laboratory-based measures of workplace fraud, rule breaking, and pilferage were developed and used to assess the validity associated with the use of integrity scores from the Employment Inventory (G. E. Paajanen, 1985) for 133 undergraduates. The usefulness of the developed criterion measures was supported. (SLD)

  4. Laboratory measurements of scattering matrix elements of randomly oriented Mars analog palagonite particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muñoz, O.; Volten, H.; Hovenier, J.W.; Laan, E.; Roush, T.; Stam, D.

    2008-01-01

    We present laboratory measurements for Martian analog particles, consisting of palagonite. We measured all elements of the scattering matrix as functions of the scattering angle from 3 to 174 degrees at a wavelength of 632.8 nm. The results may be used in studies of the Martian atmosphere.

  5. The effect of noise in a performance measure on work motivation: A real effort laboratory experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sloof, R.; van Praag, C.M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports the results of an individual real effort laboratory experiment where subjects are paid for measured performance. Measured performance equals actual performance plus noise. We compare a stable environment where the noise is small with a volatile environment where the noise is

  6. The Quartz-Crystal Microbalance in an Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment: Measuring Mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsionsky, Vladimir

    2007-01-01

    The study explains the quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) technique, which is often used as an undergraduate laboratory experiment for measuring the mass of a system. QCM can be used as a mass sensor only when the measured mass is rigidly attached to the surface.

  7. Simultaneous removal of NO and SO2 using vacuum ultraviolet light (VUV)/heat/peroxymonosulfate (PMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yangxian; Wang, Yan; Wang, Qian; Pan, Jianfeng; Zhang, Jun

    2018-01-01

    Simultaneous removal process of SO2 and NO from flue gas using vacuum ultraviolet light (VUV)/heat/peroxymonosulfate (PMS) in a VUV spraying reactor was proposed. The key influencing factors, active species, reaction products and mechanism of SO2 and NO simultaneous removal were investigated. The results show that vacuum ultraviolet light (185 nm) achieves the highest NO removal efficiency and yield of and under the same test conditions. NO removal is enhanced at higher PMS concentration, light intensity and oxygen concentration, and is inhibited at higher NO concentration, SO2 concentration and solution pH. Solution temperature has a double impact on NO removal. CO2 concentration has no obvious effect on NO removal. and produced from VUV-activation of PMS play a leading role in NO removal. O3 and ·O produced from VUV-activation of O2 also play an important role in NO removal. SO2 achieves complete removal under all experimental conditions due to its very high solubility in water and good reactivity. The highest simultaneous removal efficiency of SO2 and NO reaches 100% and 91.3%, respectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Hydrocarbons in interstellar ice analogues : UV-vis spectroscopy and VUV photochemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuylle, Steven Hendrik

    2015-01-01

    This thesis treats the chemical behaviour of carbonaceous molecules in water-dominated interstellar ices. VUV photons are considered as the chemical trigger to induce solid state chemistry as it is omnipresent. Lyman- radiation occurs even in dense molecular clouds as a result of cosmic ray

  9. Time-resolved VUV spectroscopy in the EXTRAP-T2 reversed field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedqvist, Anders; Rachlew-Källne, Elisabeth

    1998-09-01

    Time-resolved VUV spectroscopy has been used to investigate the effects of impurities in a reversed field pinch operating with a resistive shell. Results of electron temperature, impurity ion densities, particle confinement time and 0741-3335/40/9/004/img1 together with a description of the interpretation and the equipment are presented.

  10. The high-resolution absorption spectroscopy branch on the VUV beamline DESIRS at SOLEIL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Nelson; Joyeux, Denis; Roudjane, Mourad; Gil, Jean François; Pilette, Bertrand; Archer, Lucy; Ito, Kenji; Nahon, Laurent

    2016-07-01

    A VUV absorption spectroscopy facility designed for ultra-high spectral resolution is in operation as a dedicated branch on the DESIRS beamline at Synchrotron SOLEIL. This branch includes a unique VUV Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) and a dedicated versatile gas sample chamber. The FTS instrument can cover a large UV-VUV spectral range from 4 to 30 eV, with an ultimate line width of 0.08 cm(-1) on a large spectral window, ΔE/E = 7%, over which all spectral features can be acquired in a multiplex way. The performance can be considered to be a middle ground between broadband moderate-resolution spectrometers based on gratings and ultra-high-spectral-resolution VUV tunable-laser-based techniques over very narrow spectral windows. The various available gaseous-sample-handling setups, which function over a wide range of pressures and temperatures, and the acquisition methodology are described. A selection of experimental results illustrates the performance and limitations of the FTS-based facility.

  11. Variability in baseline laboratory measurements of the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladwig, R; Vigo, A; Fedeli, L M G; Chambless, L E; Bensenor, I; Schmidt, M I; Vidigal, P G; Castilhos, C D; Duncan, B B

    2016-08-01

    Multi-center epidemiological studies must ascertain that their measurements are accurate and reliable. For laboratory measurements, reliability can be assessed through investigation of reproducibility of measurements in the same individual. In this paper, we present results from the quality control analysis of the baseline laboratory measurements from the ELSA-Brasil study. The study enrolled 15,105 civil servants at 6 research centers in 3 regions of Brazil between 2008-2010, with multiple biochemical analytes being measured at a central laboratory. Quality control was ascertained through standard laboratory evaluation of intra- and inter-assay variability and test-retest analysis in a subset of randomly chosen participants. An additional sample of urine or blood was collected from these participants, and these samples were handled in the same manner as the original ones, locally and at the central laboratory. Reliability was assessed with the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), estimated through a random effects model. Coefficients of variation (CV) and Bland-Altman plots were additionally used to assess measurement variability. Laboratory intra and inter-assay CVs varied from 0.86% to 7.77%. From test-retest analyses, the ICCs were high for the majority of the analytes. Notably lower ICCs were observed for serum sodium (ICC=0.50; 95%CI=0.31-0.65) and serum potassium (ICC=0.73; 95%CI=0.60-0.83), due to the small biological range of these analytes. The CVs ranged from 1 to 14%. The Bland-Altman plots confirmed these results. The quality control analyses showed that the collection, processing and measurement protocols utilized in the ELSA-Brasil produced reliable biochemical measurements.

  12. Proficiency Tests for Environmental Radioactivity Measurement Organized by an Accredited Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubert, Cédric; Osmond, Mélanie

    2008-08-01

    For 40 years, STEME (Environmental Sample Processing and Metrology Department) organized international proficiency testing (PT) exercises formerly for WHO (World Health Organization) and EC (European Community) and currently for ASN (French Nuclear Safety Authority). Five PT exercises are organized each year for the measurement of radionuclides (alpha, beta and gamma) in different matrixes (water, soil, biological and air samples) at environmental levels. ASN can deliver a French ministerial agreement to participate on environmental radioactivity measurements French network for laboratories asking it [1]. Since 2006, November, STEME is the first French entity obtaining a COFRAC (French Committee of Accreditation) accreditation as "Interlaboratory Comparisons" for the organization of proficiency tests for environmental radioactivity measurement according to standard International Standard Organization (ISO) 17025 and guide ISO 43-1. STEME has in charge to find, as far as possible, real sample or to create, by radionuclide adding, an adapted sample. STEME realizes the sampling, the samples preparation and the dispatching. STEME is also accredited according to Standard 17025 for radioactivity measurements in environmental samples and determines homogeneity, stability and reference values. After the reception of participating laboratories results, STEME executes statistical treatments in order to verify the normal distribution, to eliminate outliers and to evaluate laboratories performance. Laboratories participate with several objectives, to obtain French agreement, to prove the quality of their analytical performance in regards to standard 17025 or to validate new methods or latest developments. For 2 years, in addition to usual PT exercises, new PT about alpha or beta measurement in air filters, radioactive iodine in carbon cartridges or measurement of environmental dosimeters are organized. These PT exercises help laboratories to improve radioactive measurements

  13. Accuracy of soil heat flux plate measurements in coarse substrates - Field measurements versus a laboratory test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weber, S.; Graf, A.; Heusinkveld, B.G.

    2007-01-01

    The in-situ performance of heat flux plates within coarse porous substrates might be limited due to poor contact between plate and substrate. We tested this behaviour with a simple laboratory set-up. Two test substrates were placed above a reference material of known thermal conductivity between a

  14. X-ray CT and Laboratory Measurements on Glacial Till Subsoil Cores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lamande, Mathieu André Maurice; Wildenschild, Dorthe; Berisso, Feto Esimo

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to articulate the potential of medical computed tomographic (CT) scanning for analyzing soil structure (macroporosity, soil matrix density, number of macropores) and how these estimates compare with, and complement, traditional laboratory measurements (bulk density, total...... was significant at the bottom of the same columns. This was not detectable by classical laboratory measurements. Variations in air permeability could be related to the CT-estimated number of pores but not to the CT-estimated air-filled macroporosity. Despite using a coarse resolution, the combination...... of visualization and traditional laboratory measurements proved valuable in identifying the persistent effects of subsoil compaction and the differences in soil structure among the two investigated subsoil layers. However, we recommend to systematically perform a sensitivity analysis to the segmentation threshold...

  15. Conformity assessment of the measurement accuracy in testing laboratories using a software application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniţă, A.

    2017-02-01

    This article presents a method for assessing the accuracy of the measurements obtained at different tests conducted in laboratories by implementing the interlaboratory comparison method (organization, performance and evaluation of measurements of tests on the same or similar items by two or more laboratories under predetermined conditions). The program (independent software application), realised by the author and described in this paper, analyses the measurement accuracy and performance of testing laboratory by comparing the results obtained from different tests, using the modify Youden diagram, helping identify different types of errors that can occur in measurement, according to ISO 13528:2015, Statistical methods for use in proficiency testing by interlaboratory comparison. A case study is presented in the article by determining the chemical composition of identical samples from five different laboratories. The Youden diagram obtained from this study case was used to identify errors in the laboratory testing equipment. This paper was accepted for publication in Proceedings after double peer reviewing process but was not presented at the Conference ROTRIB’16

  16. Note: Measurement system for the radiative forcing of greenhouse gases in a laboratory scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    The radiative forcing of the greenhouse gases has been studied being based on computational simulations or the observation of the real atmosphere meteorologically. In order to know the greenhouse effect more deeply and to study it from various viewpoints, the study on it in a laboratory scale is important. We have developed a direct measurement system for the infrared back radiation from the carbon dioxide (CO2) gas. The system configuration is similar with that of the practical earth-atmosphere-space system. Using this system, the back radiation from the CO2 gas was directly measured in a laboratory scale, which roughly coincides with meteorologically predicted value.

  17. Background reduction for low-level nuclear measurements in an INAA Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viadero, R.; Landsberger, S. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The majority of research carried out in the University of Illinois Neutron Activation Analysis Laboratory utilizes one of three nuclear spectrometry systems. In particular, the laboratory`s Compton suppression apparatus is widely used for making measurements because of the low radioactive background level it provides. This system consists of a p-type closed-end coaxial high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector with an 18% intrinsic efficiency and a 12- x 12-in. cylindrical NaI (Tl) crystal. The device is situated on the second floor of the university`s Materials Research Laboratory, directly adjacent to the sample preparation and storage room. Research was initiated to further shield this nuclear spectrometry system, ensuring background levels of radiation are as low as reasonably achievable, given its location.

  18. Ionization of cytosine monomer and dimer studied by VUV photoionization and electronic structure calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostko, Oleg; Bravaya, Ksenia; Krylov, Anna; Ahmed, Musahid

    2009-12-14

    We report a combined theoretical and experimental study of ionization of cytosine monomers and dimers. Gas-phase molecules are generated by thermal vaporization of cytosine followed by expansion of the vapor in a continuous supersonic jet seeded in Ar. The resulting species are investigated by single photon ionization with tunable vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron radiation and mass analyzed using reflectron mass spectrometry. Energy onsets for the measured photoionization efficiency (PIE) spectra are 8.60+-0.05 eV and 7.6+-0.1 eV for the monomer and the dimer, respectively, and provide an estimate for the adiabatic ionization energies (AIE). The first AIE and the ten lowest vertical ionization energies (VIEs) for selected isomers of cytosine dimer computed using equation-of-motion coupled-cluster (EOM-IP-CCSD) method are reported. The comparison of the computed VIEs with the derivative of the PIE spectra, suggests that multiple isomers of the cytosine dimer are present in the molecular beam. The calculations reveal that the large red shift (0.7 eV) of the first IE of the lowest-energy cytosine dimer is due to strong inter-fragment electrostatic interactions, i.e., the hole localized on one of the fragments is stabilized by the dipole moment of the other. A sharp rise in the CH+ signal at 9.20+-0.05 eV is ascribed to the formation of protonated cytosine by dissociation of the ionized dimers. The dominant role of this channel is supported by the computed energy thresholds for the CH+ appearance and the barrierless or nearly barrierless ionization-induced proton transfer observed for five isomers of the dimer.

  19. Rapid and Adaptable Measurement of Protein Thermal Stability by Differential Scanning Fluorimetry: Updating a Common Biochemical Laboratory Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R. Jeremy; Savas, Christopher J.; Kartje, Zachary; Hoops, Geoffrey C.

    2014-01-01

    Measurement of protein denaturation and protein folding is a common laboratory technique used in undergraduate biochemistry laboratories. Differential scanning fluorimetry (DSF) provides a rapid, sensitive, and general method for measuring protein thermal stability in an undergraduate biochemistry laboratory. In this method, the thermal…

  20. Useful measures and models for analytical quality management in medical laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westgard, James O

    2016-02-01

    The 2014 Milan Conference "Defining analytical performance goals 15 years after the Stockholm Conference" initiated a new discussion of issues concerning goals for precision, trueness or bias, total analytical error (TAE), and measurement uncertainty (MU). Goal-setting models are critical for analytical quality management, along with error models, quality-assessment models, quality-planning models, as well as comprehensive models for quality management systems. There are also critical underlying issues, such as an emphasis on MU to the possible exclusion of TAE and a corresponding preference for separate precision and bias goals instead of a combined total error goal. This opinion recommends careful consideration of the differences in the concepts of accuracy and traceability and the appropriateness of different measures, particularly TAE as a measure of accuracy and MU as a measure of traceability. TAE is essential to manage quality within a medical laboratory and MU and trueness are essential to achieve comparability of results across laboratories. With this perspective, laboratory scientists can better understand the many measures and models needed for analytical quality management and assess their usefulness for practical applications in medical laboratories.

  1. Measuring automatic associations: validation of algorithms for the Implicit Association Test (IAT) in a laboratory setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glashouwer, Klaske A; Smulders, Fren T Y; de Jong, Peter J; Roefs, Anne; Wiers, Reinout W H J

    2013-03-01

    In their paper, "Understanding and using the Implicit Association Test: I. An improved scoring algorithm", Greenwald, Nosek, and Banaji (2003) investigated different ways to calculate the IAT-effect. However, up to now, it remained unclear whether these findings - based on internet data - also generalize to laboratory settings. Therefore, the main goal of the present study was to cross-validate scoring algorithms for the IAT in a laboratory setting, specifically in the domain of psychopathology. Four known IAT algorithms and seven alternative IAT algorithms were evaluated on several performance criteria in the large-scale laboratory sample of the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (N = 2981) in which two IATs were included to obtain measurements of automatic self-anxious and automatic self-depressed associations. Results clearly demonstrated that the D(2SD)-measure and the D(600)-measure as well as an alternative algorithm based on the correct trials only (D(noEP)-measure) are suitable to be used in a laboratory setting for IATs with a fixed order of category combinations. It remains important to further replicate these findings, especially in studies that include outcome measures of more spontaneous kinds of behaviors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A FMEA clinical laboratory case study: how to make problems and improvements measurable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capunzo, Mario; Cavallo, Pierpaolo; Boccia, Giovanni; Brunetti, Luigi; Pizzuti, Sante

    2004-01-01

    The authors have experimented the application of the Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA) technique in a clinical laboratory. FMEA technique allows: a) to evaluate and measure the hazards of a process malfunction, b) to decide where to execute improvement actions, and c) to measure the outcome of those actions. A small sample of analytes has been studied: there have been determined the causes of the possible malfunctions of the analytical process, calculating the risk probability index (RPI), with a value between 1 and 1,000. Only for the cases of RPI > 400, improvement actions have been implemented that allowed a reduction of RPI values between 25% to 70% with a costs increment of FMEA technique can be applied to the processes of a clinical laboratory, even if of small dimensions, and offers a high potential of improvement. Nevertheless, such activity needs a thorough planning because it is complex, even if the laboratory already operates an ISO 9000 Quality Management System.

  3. Synthesis and photoluminescence of inorganic borate host red emitting VUV phosphor YCaBO4:Eu3+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingle, J. T.; Gawande, A. B.; Sonekar, R. P.; Nagpure, P. A.; Omanwar, S. K.

    2013-06-01

    The red emitting borate host phosphor YCaBO4:Eu3+ has been prepared by a novel solution combustion technique. The synthesis is based on the exothermic reaction between the fuel (Urea) and Oxidizer (Ammonium nitrate). The photoluminescence properties of the powder samples of YCaBO4:Eu3+ has been investigated under UV and VUV excitation. The phosphor shows strong absorption in UV and VUV region and exhibits intense red emission upon excited by 254 nm UV and 173 nm VUV radiation. Under UV 254 nm excitation, YCaBO4:Eu3+ exhibits intense red emission around 610 nm. Under VUV excitation of 173 nm, the phosphor emits intense red emission around 610 nm and few weak emissions. These weak emissions could be suppressed by annealing the sample repeatedly at proper temperature and the borate phosphor YCaBO4:Eu3+ could be a good red emitting phosphor for PDP display and mercury free lamps.

  4. Results of measurements at a laboratory condensation heat exchanger with a corrugated minichanel tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Hrubý

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This article present a short selection of results obtained from measurements done at a laboratory condensation heat-exchanger with a corrugated mini-channel tube. It also touches a little the metering method and design of the heat-exchanger.

  5. Measurement of the Compressibility Factor of Gases: A Physical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varberg, Thomas D.; Bendelsmith, Andrew J.; Kuwata, Keith T.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we describe an experiment for the undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory in which students measure the compressibility factor of two gases, helium and carbon dioxide, as a function of pressure at constant temperature. The experimental apparatus is relatively inexpensive to construct and is described and diagrammed in detail.…

  6. 48 CFR 1511.011-80 - Data standards for the transmission of laboratory measurement results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Data standards for the transmission of laboratory measurement results. 1511.011-80 Section 1511.011-80 Federal Acquisition Regulations System ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY ACQUISITION PLANNING DESCRIBING AGENCY NEEDS 1511.011-80 Data...

  7. "Chips with Everything": A Laboratory Exercise for Comparing Subjective and Objective Measurements of Potato Chips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Cathy

    2005-01-01

    The following laboratory exercise was designed to aid student understanding of the differences between subjective and objective measurements. Students assess the color and texture of different varieties of potato chip (crisps) by means of an intensity rating scale and a rank test and objectively with a colorimeter and texture analyzer. For data…

  8. Clinical evaluation of analytical variations in serum creatinine measurements: why laboratories should abandon Jaffe techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drion, I.; Cobbaert, C.; Groenier, K.H.; Weykamp, C.; Bilo, H.J.; Wetzels, J.F.; Kleefstra, N.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Non-equivalence in serum creatinine (SCr) measurements across Dutch laboratories and the consequences hereof on chronic kidney disease (CKD) staging were examined. METHODS: National data from the Dutch annual external quality organization of 2009 were used. 144 participating

  9. The procedures manual of the Environmental Measurements Laboratory. Volume 2, 28. edition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chieco, N.A. [ed.

    1997-02-01

    This report contains environmental sampling and analytical chemistry procedures that are performed by the Environmental Measurements Laboratory. The purpose of environmental sampling and analysis is to obtain data that describe a particular site at a specific point in time from which an evaluation can be made as a basis for possible action.

  10. Air-conditioned university laboratories: Comparing CO2 measurement for centralized and split-unit systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hussin

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Universities are designed for higher education learning, and improving university indoor air quality (IAQ is essential to the enhanced performances of students and staff members alike. The majority of IAQ problems are due to inadequate ventilation in university buildings. Carbon Dioxide (CO2 measurements have become a commonly used screening test of IAQ because measurement levels can be used to evaluate the amount of ventilation and general comfort. This paper examines CO2 field measurement for undergraduate practical classes. Ten air conditioned laboratories with ventilation were chosen for CO2 field measurement. CO2 was monitored under indoor and outdoor conditions. Indoor CO2 concentration for Laboratories 1 and 10 is observed to be higher than 1000 ppm which indicated inadequate ventilation, while other laboratories showed CO2 concentrations less than 1000 ppm. Air capacity and outdoor air were calculated based on the design documentation. A comparison between design and actual outdoor air/person values indicates that the air conditioning systems of the laboratories had adequate ventilation.

  11. Application of peer instruction in the laboratory task of measuring the effective mass of a spring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chun-Ling; Hou, Zhen-Yu; Si, Yu-Chang; Wen, Xiao-Qing; Tang, Lei

    2017-11-01

    Peer instruction (PI) is an effective interactive approach to teaching and learning that has principally been used to modify the experience of learning in traditional physics lecture settings. This article further illustrates how the concept of PI can be effectively applied in the physics student laboratory setting. The setting used is a laboratory task that calls for the measurement of the effective mass of the spring of a Jolly balance. Through PI the students gain a better understanding of what is meant by the construct ‘effective mass of a spring’, and thereby competently work out how the mass, shape, wire diameter, and number of turns of the spring can all affect the effective mass of the spring. Furthermore, using stopwatches the students were also able to appreciate how recorded times at the equilibrium position had greater uncertainty than measurements made at the maximum displacement. This led to their calculations of the effective mass of the spring being impressively close to the theoretical value. Such laboratory tasks are extremely challenging to introductory level students and the success attained by the students in this study indicates that there is much potential in the application of PI in laboratory settings. PI should be used to teach in the laboratory and results should be reported in order for our community to build on these experiences. This article is a contribution to that effort.

  12. Measurement accuracy of alveolar soft tissue contour using a laboratory laser scanner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Daisuke; Kobayashi, Mariko; Tanaka, Kenko; Watanabe, Tsuneaki; Nakamura, Tetsuro; Ueda, Kazuhiko; Nagano, Takatoshi

    2017-08-02

    Steric analysis of morphological changes is important for evaluation of surgical techniques. This study was performed to assess the measurement accuracy of alveolar soft tissue contour with a laboratory laser scanner. The width of the maxillary alveolar soft tissue contour was evaluated in 20 volunteers. Measurement sites were established in the alveolar soft tissue contour of the maxillary incisor and canine areas. Each site was evaluated by direct measurement with a microcaliper for each subject (DMM) and image measurement using a laboratory laser scanner (IMS). The accuracy of measurement methods was evaluated. Additionally, two plaster models obtained from the same subjects were scanned and superimposed, and the nonoverlapping areas were measured. Each measurement method exhibited a strong correlation (r = 0.89). The interclass correlation coefficient (single measure) between examiners was also high for each measurement method (PMM 0.978; IMS 0.997). In the superimposed images of the two plaster models, the distance of the nonoverlapping region was only 0.06 ± 0.08 mm in the labial aspect and 0.07 ± 0.09 mm in the palatal aspect. The image measurement of the scanning data shows high accuracy in evaluation of the alveolar soft tissue contour. This technique is useful for evaluation of chronological changes in the alveolar contour after soft and hard tissue augmentation.

  13. Measuring Residential Ventilation System Airflows: Part 1 – Laboratory Evaluation of Airflow Meter Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stratton, J. Chris [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Division; Turner, W. J. N. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Division; Wray, Craig P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Division; Walker, Iain S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Division

    2012-11-12

    Building codes increasingly require tighter homes and mechanical ventilation per ASHRAE Standard 62.2. These ventilation flows must be measured so that energy is not wasted with over ventilation and occupants’ health is not compromised by under ventilation. Flow hoods are used to measure these ventilation flows, but there is currently no standard specifying the measurement procedure and measurement devices that should be used. This study evaluates the accuracy of six commercially available flow hoods under laboratory conditions configured to emulate a residential mechanical ventilation duct system. The measurements taken with the flow hoods were compared to simultaneous measurements taken by an in-line reference flow meter having a known uncertainty. Results indicate that powered flow hoods yield more accurate measurements than non-powered flow hoods, and that a majority of the flow hoods measured inlet flows more accurately than outlet flows. In several cases, there was little resemblance between the manufacturers’ stated accuracy and the accuracy we found in our laboratory measurements. It is clear that current flow hood calibration procedures may not consider field application variables such as flow asymmetry, flow angle, and flow direction. A new flow hood measurement standard that takes these ‘real world’ conditions into account should be developed to ensure that residential buildings receive the intended ventilation flows.

  14. Measuring Residential Ventilation System Airflows: Part 1 – Laboratory Evaluation of Airflow Meter Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stratton, J. Chris [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Division; Turner, W. J. N. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Division; Wray, Craig P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Division; Walker, Iain S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Division

    2012-11-30

    Building codes increasingly require tighter homes and mechanical ventilation per ASHRAE Standard 62.2. These ventilation flows must be measured so that energy is not wasted with over ventilation and occupants’ health is not compromised by under ventilation. Flow hoods are used to measure these ventilation flows, but there is currently no standard specifying the measurement procedure and measurement devices that should be used. This study evaluates the accuracy of six commercially available flow hoods under laboratory conditions configured to emulate a residential mechanical ventilation duct system. The measurements taken with the flow hoods were compared to simultaneous measurements taken by an in-line reference flow meter having a known uncertainty. Results indicate that powered flow hoods yield more accurate measurements than non-powered flow hoods, and that a majority of the flow hoods measured inlet flows more accurately than outlet flows. In several cases, there was little resemblance between the manufacturers’ stated accuracy and the accuracy we found in our laboratory measurements. It is clear that current flow hood calibration procedures may not consider field application variables such as flow asymmetry, flow angle, and flow direction. A new flow hood measurement standard that takes these ‘real world’ conditions into account should be developed to ensure that residential buildings receive the intended ventilation flows.

  15. Methodologically controlled variations in laboratory and field pH measurements in waterlogged soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elberling, Bo; Matthiesen, Henning

    2007-01-01

    We have tested the reliability and consistency of conventional pH measurements made on water-soil mixtures with respect to sieving, drying, ratio of water to soil, and time of shaking prior to measurement. The focus is on a waterlogged soil where the preservation potential of archaeological...... artefacts is critical. But the study includes agricultural and forest soils for comparison. At a waterlogged site, Laboratory results were compared with three different field methods: calomel pH probes inserted in the soil from pits, pH measurements of soil solution extracted from the soil, and pH profiles...... using a solid-state pH electrode pushed into the soil from the surface. Comparisons between in situ and laboratory methods revealed differences of more than 1 pH unit. The content of dissolved ions in soil solution and field observations of O2 and CO2 concentrations were used in the speciation model...

  16. Evaluation of the Efficacy and Correlation between Blood Glucose Measured Using Glucometers and Enzymatic Laboratory Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Rasouli

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available

    Background and Objectives: Diabetes Mellitus (DM is the most common chronic metabolic disease, with many complications including renal failure, blindness and non-traumatic amputation, so it is important to monitor and regulate blood glucose. Considering how easy home blood glucose monitoring is, we decided to evaluate the performance of two available glucometers for detection of blood glucose compared with standard laboratory methods.

     

    Methods: In this analytical study, we compared the capillary blood glucose levels of 60 volunteers with mean age of 32.8±9.6 years in Tabriz Mehr Laboratory as determined by test strips (two different Glucometers with venous blood glucose levels’ measurements by the enzymatic method (the standard laboratory kit. Data were analyzed using one way-ANOVA test, T-test, Pearson correlation and Bland and Altman plot.

     

    Results: The mean differences of No: 1 and No: 2 Glucometers with enzymatic laboratory method were 20.78±11.61 and 4.5±3.76mg/dl respectively. The one way ANOVA test indicated significant differences between three methods (p<0.05. Further Duncan's test revealed significant differences between two devices (p=0.001 and device No.1 and laboratory method (p=0.001; however, the differences between device No.2 and laboratory method were not statistically significant (p=0.83.

     

    Conclusion: According to the results, calibrating the devices with laboratory instruments in order to make major clinical decisions is recommended.

  17. Simulation of VUV electroluminescence in micropattern gaseous detectors: the case of GEM and MHSP

    CERN Document Server

    Oliveira, C.A.B.; Schindler, H.; Ferreira, A.L.; Monteiro, C.M.B.; dos Santos, J.M.F.; Biagi, S.; Veenhof, R.; Veloso, J.F.C.A.

    2012-01-01

    Electroluminescence produced during avalanche development in gaseous avalanche detectors is an useful information for triggering, calorimetry and tracking in gaseous detectors. Noble gases present high electroluminescence yields, emitting mainly in the VUV region. The photons can provide signal readout if appropriate photosensors are used. Micropattern gaseous detectors are good candidates for signal amplification in high background and/or low rate experiments due to their high electroluminescence yields and radiopurity. In this work, the VUV light responses of the Gas Electron Multiplier and of the Micro-Hole Strip Plate, working with pure xenon, are simulated and studied in detail using a new and versatile C++ toolkit. It is shown that the solid angle subtended by a photosensor placed bellow the microstructures depends on the operating conditions. The obtained absolute EL yields, determined for different gas pressures and as functions of the applied voltage, are compared with those determined experimentally...

  18. Core outcome measures for opioid abuse liability laboratory assessment studies in humans: IMMPACT recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comer, Sandra D.; Zacny, James P.; Dworkin, Robert H.; Turk, Dennis C.; Bigelow, George E.; Foltin, Richard W.; Jasinski, Donald R.; Sellers, Edward M.; Adams, Edgar H.; Balster, Robert; Burke, Laurie B.; Cerny, Igor; Colucci, Robert D.; Cone, Edward; Cowan, Penney; Farrar, John T.; Haddox, J. David; Haythornthwaite, Jennifer A.; Hertz, Sharon; Jay, Gary W.; Johanson, Chris-Ellyn; Junor, Roderick; Katz, Nathaniel P.; Klein, Michael; Kopecky, Ernest A.; Leiderman, Deborah B.; McDermott, Michael P.; O’Brien, Charles; O’Connor, Alec B.; Palmer, Pamela P.; Raja, Srinivasa N.; Rappaport, Bob A.; Rauschkolb, Christine; Rowbotham, Michael C.; Sampaio, Cristina; Setnik, Beatrice; Sokolowska, Marta; Stauffer, Joseph W.; Walsh, Sharon L.

    2012-01-01

    A critical component in development of opioid analgesics is assessment of their abuse liability (AL). Standardization of approaches and measures used in assessing AL has the potential to facilitate comparisons across studies, research laboratories, and drugs. The goal of this report is to provide consensus recommendations regarding core outcome measures for assessing abuse potential of opioid medications in humans in a controlled laboratory setting. Although many of the recommended measures are appropriate for assessing the AL of medications from other drug classes, the focus here is on opioid medications because they present unique risks from both physiological (e.g., respiratory depression, physical dependence) and public health (e.g., individuals in pain) perspectives. A brief historical perspective on AL testing is provided and then those measures that can be considered primary and secondary outcomes and possible additional outcomes in AL assessment are discussed. These outcome measures include: (1) subjective effects (some of which comprise the primary outcome measures, including drug liking); (2) physiological responses; (3) drug self-administration behavior; and (4) cognitive and psychomotor performance. Prior to presenting recommendations for standardized approaches and measures to be used in AL assessments, the appropriateness of using these measures in clinical trials with patients in pain is discussed. PMID:22998781

  19. Laboratory Astrophysics, QED, and other Measurements using the EBIT Calorimeter Spectrometer at LLNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, G V; Adams, J S; Beiersdorfer, P; Clementson, J; Frankel, M; Kahn, S M; Kelley, R L; Kilbourne, C A; Koutroumpa, D; Leutenegger, M; Porter, F S; Thorn, D B; Trabert, E

    2009-08-25

    We have used the EBIT Calorimeter Spectrometer (ECS), a microcalorimeter instrument built by the calorimeter group at the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, to make a variety of measurements since its installation at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's EBIT facility. These include measurements of charge exchange between neutral gas and K- and L-shell ions, measurements of the X-ray transmission efficiency of optical blocking filters, high resolution measurements of transition energies for high-Z, highly charged ions, and measurements of M and L-shell emission from highly charged tungsten following on earlier measurements of L-shell gold. Our results will see application in the interpretation of the spectra from the Jovian atmosphere and of the diffuse soft X-ray background, in tests of QED, and in diagnosing inertial and magnetic confinement fusion plasmas. These measurements augment previous laboratory astrophysics, atomic physics, and calibration measurements made using earlier versions of NASA's microcalorimeter spectrometer.

  20. Laboratory measurements in a turbulent, swirling flow. [measurement of soot inside a flame-tube burner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoult, D. P.

    1979-01-01

    Measurements of soot inside a flame-tube burner using a special water-flushed probe are discussed. The soot is measured at a series of points at each burner, and upon occasion gaseous constitutents NO, CO, hydrocarbons, etc., were also measured. Four geometries of flame-tube burners were studied, as well as a variety of different fuels. The role of upstream geometry on the downstream pollutant formation was studied. It was found that the amount of soot formed in particularly sensitive to how aerodynamically clean the configuration of the burner is upstream of the injector swirl vanes. The effect of pressure on soot formation was also studied. It was found that beyond a certain Reynolds number, the peak amount of soot formed in the burner is constant.

  1. Degradation of Solar Array Components in a Combined UV/VUV High Temperature Test Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nömayr Christel

    2017-01-01

    A design verification test under UV/VUV conditions of sun exposed materials and technologies on component level is presented which forms part of the overall verification and qualification of the solar array design of the MTM and MPO. The test concentrates on the self-contamination aspects and the resulting performance losses of the solar array under high intensity and elevated temperature environment representative for the photovoltaic assembly (PVA.

  2. Image Evaluation of the High Resolution VUV Spectrometer at SURF II by Ray Tracing

    OpenAIRE

    Das, N. C.; Madden, R. P.; Seyoum, H. M.

    1998-01-01

    A high resolution VUV spectroscopic facility has been in use for several years at SURF II, the Synchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility at the National Institute of Standards and Technology in Gaithersburg, Maryland. At this facility, a combination of three cylindrical mirrors is utilized to focus the light originating in the storage ring onto the horizontal entrance slit of the spectrometer. The spectrometer uses a 6.65 m concave grating having a groove density of 4800 lines/mm in the off-...

  3. Clinical evaluation of analytical variations in serum creatinine measurements: why laboratories should abandon Jaffe techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drion Iefke

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-equivalence in serum creatinine (SCr measurements across Dutch laboratories and the consequences hereof on chronic kidney disease (CKD staging were examined. Methods National data from the Dutch annual external quality organization of 2009 were used. 144 participating laboratories examined 11 pairs of commutable, value-assigned SCr specimens in the range 52–262 μmol/L, using Jaffe or enzymatic techniques. Regression equations were created for each participating laboratory (by regressing values as measured by participating laboratories on the target values of the samples sent by the external quality organization; area under the curves were examined and used to rank laboratories. The 10th and 90th percentile regression equation were selected for each technique separately. To evaluate the impact of the variability in SCr measurements and its eventual clinical consequences in a real patient population, we used a cohort of 82424 patients aged 19–106 years. The SCr measurements of these 82424 patients were introduced in the 10th and 90th percentile regression equations. The newly calculated SCr values were used to calculate an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR using the 4-variable Isotope Dilution Mass Spectrometry traceable Modification of Diet in Renal Disease formula. Differences in CKD staging were examined, comparing the stratification outcomes for Jaffe and enzymatic SCr techniques. Results Jaffe techniques overestimated SCr: 21%, 12%, 10% for SCr target values 52, 73 and 94 μmol/L, respectively. For enzymatic assay these values were 0%, -1%, -2%, respectively. eGFR using the MDRD formula and SCr measured by Jaffe techniques, staged patients in a lower CKD category. Downgrading to a lower CKD stage occurred in 1-42%, 2-37% and 12–78.9% of patients for the 10th and 90th percentile laboratories respectively in CKD categories 45–60, 60–90 and >90 ml/min/1.73 m2. Using enzymatic techniques, downgrading

  4. Characterization of sulphate scaling formation damage from laboratory measurements to predict well productivity decline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bedrikovetsky, P.G.; Monteiro, R. [Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense (UENF), Macae, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Engenharia e Exploracao de Petroleo (LENEP); Moraes, G.P. [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica (CEFET), Macae, RJ (Brazil). Unidade de Ensino Descentralizada (UNED-Macae); Lopes Junior, R.P. [PETROBRAS, Macae, RJ (Brazil). Unidade de Negocios da Bacia de Campos; Rosario, F.F.; Bezerra, M.C. [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas (CENPES)

    2004-07-01

    Barium sulphate scaling is a chronicle disaster during offshore waterflood project where injected and formation waters are incompatible, and their mixing causes salt precipitation. It was detected in several fields of Campos Basin. The mathematical model for sulphate precipitation contains two empirical parameters: the reaction kinetics coefficient that characterizes how fast the precipitation is going on, and the formation damage coefficient showing which permeability impairment the precipitation causes. Knowledge of these two parameters is essential for reliable prediction of the well productivity decline during sea/produced water injection. These parameters are empirical and depend on rock properties; therefore they should be determined from laboratory coreflood tests by forcing the injected and formation waters through rock. Despite these tests have been presented in numerous papers, there were no attempts to determine the model coefficients from laboratory data in order to perform the laboratory-data-based reservoir simulation. A new method for simultaneous determination of both coefficients from the coreflood data is developed. The method determines the kinetic coefficient from ion concentration measurements at the core effluent; then the formation damage coefficient is determined from the pressure drop measurements. The laboratory procedures are routine, the data are available in the literature. The method is based on inverse problem for reactive flow in rocks. The inverse solution is obtained from the exact quasi steady state concentration profile during coreflood. The proposed method furnishes unique values for two coefficients, and the solution is stable with respect to small perturbations of the measured values. The laboratory data on sulphate scaling by CENPES/PETROBRAS, Brazil, and Herriot-Watt University, UK, were treated, and the data were used for prediction of productivity decline in Campos Basin reservoir. The well behaviour forecast and history

  5. Mounted Smartphones as Measurement and Control Platforms for Motor-Based Laboratory Test-Beds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jared A. Frank

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory education in science and engineering often entails the use of test-beds equipped with costly peripherals for sensing, acquisition, storage, processing, and control of physical behavior. However, costly peripherals are no longer necessary to obtain precise measurements and achieve stable feedback control of test-beds. With smartphones performing diverse sensing and processing tasks, this study examines the feasibility of mounting smartphones directly to test-beds to exploit their embedded hardware and software in the measurement and control of the test-beds. This approach is a first step towards replacing laboratory-grade peripherals with more compact and affordable smartphone-based platforms, whose interactive user interfaces can engender wider participation and engagement from learners. Demonstrative cases are presented in which the sensing, computation, control, and user interaction with three motor-based test-beds are handled by a mounted smartphone. Results of experiments and simulations are used to validate the feasibility of mounted smartphones as measurement and feedback control platforms for motor-based laboratory test-beds, report the measurement precision and closed-loop performance achieved with such platforms, and address challenges in the development of platforms to maintain system stability.

  6. Serial exhaled nitric oxide measurements in the assessment of laboratory animal allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Richard S; Smith, Andrew D; Cowan, Jan O; Schofield, John C; Herbison, G Peter; Taylor, D Robin

    2008-03-01

    Laboratory animal allergy (LAA) may cause eosinophilic airway inflammation, for which exhaled nitric oxide (FE(NO)) measurements are sensitive and specific. Our objective was to assess whether serial FE(NO) measurements might detect exposure-related inflammation in laboratory animal workers. METHODS. Fifty laboratory animal workers participated. Measurements of FE(NO) and spirometry were obtained at baseline (Friday) and twice-daily following a weekend with no animal contact. Eleven of 50 subjects had work-related symptoms, and 2 of 11 had positive serology for LAA. Baseline FE(NO) was high (> 150 ppb) in the two seropositive subjects and increased progressively during the working week in one subject, confirming exposure-driven airway inflammation. In seronegative subjects, mean FE(NO) levels were 19.8 (standard deviation [SD], 20.1) and 21.7 (SD, 20.8) in the symptomatic and nonsymptomatic groups, respectively, with no significant changes in FE(NO) over time. Serial FE(NO) measurements may provide complementary information in the assessment of possible occupational sensitisation. The sensitivity and specificity of this approach to diagnosing occupational asthma requires further evaluation.

  7. Mounted Smartphones as Measurement and Control Platforms for Motor-Based Laboratory Test-Beds †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Jared A.; Brill, Anthony; Kapila, Vikram

    2016-01-01

    Laboratory education in science and engineering often entails the use of test-beds equipped with costly peripherals for sensing, acquisition, storage, processing, and control of physical behavior. However, costly peripherals are no longer necessary to obtain precise measurements and achieve stable feedback control of test-beds. With smartphones performing diverse sensing and processing tasks, this study examines the feasibility of mounting smartphones directly to test-beds to exploit their embedded hardware and software in the measurement and control of the test-beds. This approach is a first step towards replacing laboratory-grade peripherals with more compact and affordable smartphone-based platforms, whose interactive user interfaces can engender wider participation and engagement from learners. Demonstrative cases are presented in which the sensing, computation, control, and user interaction with three motor-based test-beds are handled by a mounted smartphone. Results of experiments and simulations are used to validate the feasibility of mounted smartphones as measurement and feedback control platforms for motor-based laboratory test-beds, report the measurement precision and closed-loop performance achieved with such platforms, and address challenges in the development of platforms to maintain system stability. PMID:27556464

  8. Photoinduced intermolecular dynamics and subsequent fragmentation in VUV-ionized acetamide clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarkanovskaja, Marta; Kooser, Kuno; Levola, Helena; Nõmmiste, Ergo; Kukk, Edwin

    2016-09-01

    Photofragmentation of small gas-phase acetamide clusters (CH3CONH2)n (n ≤ 10) produced by a supersonic expansion source has been studied using time-of-flight ion mass spectroscopy combined with tunable vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron radiation. Fragmentation channels of acetamide clusters under VUV photoionization resulting in protonated and ammoniated clusters formation were identified with the discussion about the preceding intramolecular rearrangements. Acetamide-2,2,2-d3 clusters were also studied in an experiment with a gas discharge lamp as a VUV light source; comparison with the main experiment gave insights into the mechanism of formation of protonated acetamide clusters, indicating that proton transfer from amino group plays a dominant role in that process. Geometry of the acetamide dimer was discussed and the most stable arrangement was concluded to be achieved when subunits of the dimer are connected via two N—H⋯O —C hydrogen bonds. Also, the influence of the photon energy on the stability of the clusters and their fragmentation channels has been examined.

  9. Photochemical decomposition of perfluorooctanoic acid in aqueous periodate with VUV and UV light irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, M.H.; Wang, B.B.; Yu, H.S.; Wang, L.L.; Yuan, S.H. [Environmental Science Research Institution, College of Environment Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Chen, J., E-mail: chenjing@mail.hust.edu.cn [Environmental Science Research Institution, College of Environment Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2010-07-15

    The photochemical decomposition of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) in aqueous periodate (IO{sub 4}{sup -}) was investigated under two types of low-pressure mercury lamps: one emits at 254 nm light (UV light) and the other emits both 254 nm and 185 nm light (VUV light). PFOA decomposed efficiently under VUV light irradiation while it decomposed poorly under UV light irradiation. The addition of IO{sub 4}{sup -} significantly increased the rate of decomposition and defluorination of PFOA irradiated with UV light whereas it decreased both processes under VUV irradiation. Reactive radical (IO{sub 3}{center_dot}) generated by photolysis of IO{sub 4}{sup -} initiated the oxidation of PFOA in UV process. Aquated electrons (e{sub aq}{sup -}), generated from water homolysis, scavenged IO{sub 4}{sup -} resulting in decrease of reactive radical species production and PFOA decomposition. The shorter-chain perfluorocarboxylic acids (PFCAs) formed in a stepwise manner from long-chain PFCAs.

  10. 2D X-ray scanner and its uses in laboratory reservoir characterization measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maloney, D.; Doggett, K.

    1997-08-01

    X-ray techniques are used in petroleum laboratories for a variety of reservoir characterization measurements. This paper describes the configuration of a 2D X-ray scanner and many of the ways in which it simplifies and improves accuracy`s of laboratory measurements. Linear X-ray scanners are most often used to provide descriptions of fluid saturations within core plugs during flow tests. We configured our linear scanner for both horizontal and vertical movement. Samples can be scanned horizontally, vertically, or according to horizontal and vertical grids. X-ray measurements are fast, allowing measurements of two- and three-phase fluid saturations during both steady- and unsteady-state flow processes. Rock samples can be scanned while they are subjected to stress, pore pressure, and temperature conditions simulating those of a petroleum reservoir. Many types of measurements are possible by selecting appropriate X-ray power settings, dopes, filters, and collimator configurations. The scanner has been used for a variety of applications besides fluid saturation measurements. It is useful for measuring porosity distributions in rocks, concentrations of X-ray dopes within flow streams during tracer tests, gap widths in fracture flow cells, fluid interface levels in PVT cells and fluid separators, and other features and phenomena.

  11. Understanding water uptake in bioaerosols using laboratory measurements, field tests, and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, Zahra; Ratnesar-Shumate, Shanna A.; Buckley, Thomas J.; Kalter, Jeffrey M.; Gilberry, Jerome U.; Eshbaugh, Jonathan P.; Corson, Elizabeth C.; Santarpia, Joshua L.; Carter, Christopher C.

    2013-05-01

    Uptake of water by biological aerosols can impact their physical and chemical characteristics. The water content in a bioaerosol can affect the backscatter cross-section as measured by LIDAR systems. Better understanding of the water content in controlled-release clouds of bioaerosols can aid in the development of improved standoff detection systems. This study includes three methods to improve understanding of how bioaerosols take up water. The laboratory method measures hygroscopic growth of biological material after it is aerosolized and dried. Hygroscopicity curves are created as the humidity is increased in small increments to observe the deliquescence point, then the humidity is decreased to observe the efflorescence point. The field component of the study measures particle size distributions of biological material disseminated into a large humidified chamber. Measurements are made with a Twin-Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (APS, TSI, Inc), -Relative Humidity apparatus where two APS units measure the same aerosol cloud side-by-side. The first operated under dry conditions by sampling downstream of desiccant dryers, the second operated under ambient conditions. Relative humidity was measured within the sampling systems to determine the difference in the aerosol water content between the two sampling trains. The water content of the bioaerosols was calculated from the twin APS units following Khlystov et al. 2005 [1]. Biological material is measured dried and wet and compared to laboratory curves of the same material. Lastly, theoretical curves are constructed from literature values for components of the bioaerosol material.

  12. An automated image analysis system to measure and count organisms in laboratory microcosms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François Mallard

    Full Text Available 1. Because of recent technological improvements in the way computer and digital camera perform, the potential use of imaging for contributing to the study of communities, populations or individuals in laboratory microcosms has risen enormously. However its limited use is due to difficulties in the automation of image analysis. 2. We present an accurate and flexible method of image analysis for detecting, counting and measuring moving particles on a fixed but heterogeneous substrate. This method has been specifically designed to follow individuals, or entire populations, in experimental laboratory microcosms. It can be used in other applications. 3. The method consists in comparing multiple pictures of the same experimental microcosm in order to generate an image of the fixed background. This background is then used to extract, measure and count the moving organisms, leaving out the fixed background and the motionless or dead individuals. 4. We provide different examples (springtails, ants, nematodes, daphnia to show that this non intrusive method is efficient at detecting organisms under a wide variety of conditions even on faintly contrasted and heterogeneous substrates. 5. The repeatability and reliability of this method has been assessed using experimental populations of the Collembola Folsomia candida. 6. We present an ImageJ plugin to automate the analysis of digital pictures of laboratory microcosms. The plugin automates the successive steps of the analysis and recursively analyses multiple sets of images, rapidly producing measurements from a large number of replicated microcosms.

  13. An automated image analysis system to measure and count organisms in laboratory microcosms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallard, François; Le Bourlot, Vincent; Tully, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    1. Because of recent technological improvements in the way computer and digital camera perform, the potential use of imaging for contributing to the study of communities, populations or individuals in laboratory microcosms has risen enormously. However its limited use is due to difficulties in the automation of image analysis. 2. We present an accurate and flexible method of image analysis for detecting, counting and measuring moving particles on a fixed but heterogeneous substrate. This method has been specifically designed to follow individuals, or entire populations, in experimental laboratory microcosms. It can be used in other applications. 3. The method consists in comparing multiple pictures of the same experimental microcosm in order to generate an image of the fixed background. This background is then used to extract, measure and count the moving organisms, leaving out the fixed background and the motionless or dead individuals. 4. We provide different examples (springtails, ants, nematodes, daphnia) to show that this non intrusive method is efficient at detecting organisms under a wide variety of conditions even on faintly contrasted and heterogeneous substrates. 5. The repeatability and reliability of this method has been assessed using experimental populations of the Collembola Folsomia candida. 6. We present an ImageJ plugin to automate the analysis of digital pictures of laboratory microcosms. The plugin automates the successive steps of the analysis and recursively analyses multiple sets of images, rapidly producing measurements from a large number of replicated microcosms.

  14. The novel use of objective laboratory school tasks to measure stress responses in children with ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigal, Sharon B; Truong, Carmen; Stehli, Annamarie

    2012-09-01

    To pilot the novel use of 2 existing laboratory school measures--the Permanent Product Measure of Performance (PERMP) and the Grammar Task--as provoking stimuli of stress, and to observe the effects of medication and stress on children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Children received individually determined optimal doses of an oral methylphenidate stimulant medication on 1 of 2 consecutive modified laboratory school days, which is a setting that is known for being a reliable measure of the exact timing of treatment effects. Blood pressure and heart rate measurements collected after administration of the PERMP, an ability-adjusted math test, were presumed to be stress related when compared with baseline data. In addition, children ranked their stress levels on a stress rating scale and completed the Grammar Task as a measure of academic performance. Seven subjects enrolled in and completed the study. The results suggest that children with ADHD demonstrate a decreased stress response when medicated, as measured by blood pressure, heart rate, and academic performance. Completion of a more difficult PERMP was associated with an increased stress response. This study supports an expanded use of both the PERMP and Grammar Task. Future controlled studies should include larger samples and other indicants of stress responses, particularly peripherally circulating catecholamine levels.

  15. Laboratory Evaluation of Air Flow Measurement Methods for Residential HVAC Returns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, Iain; Stratton, Chris

    2015-07-01

    This project improved the accuracy of air flow measurements used in commissioning California heating and air conditioning systems in Title 24 (Building and Appliance Efficiency Standards), thereby improving system performance and efficiency of California residences. The research team at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory addressed the issue that typical tools used by contractors in the field to test air flows may not be accurate enough to measure return flows used in Title 24 applications. The team developed guidance on performance of current diagnostics as well as a draft test method for use in future evaluations. The series of tests performed measured air flow using a range of techniques and devices. The measured air flows were compared to reference air flow measurements using inline air flow meters built into the test apparatus. The experimental results showed that some devices had reasonable results (typical errors of 5 percent or less) but others had much bigger errors (up to 25 percent).

  16. Impact of a do-not-do intervention on 12 laboratory measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambrana-García, J L; Macías Blanco, C; Fernández-Suárez, A; Peñacoba Masa, A; Olivares Durán, M J; Aguilar Benítez, J M; Zambrana-Luque, J L

    2017-11-01

    In recent years, various scientific societies and healthcare organisations have created recommendations aimed at decreasing the use of healthcare interventions that have shown no efficacy or effectiveness. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of an intervention on 12 do-not-do recommendations regarding the laboratory in 7 hospital centres. Before-after study conducted in 7 hospital centres of Cordoba and Jaen during 2015 and 2016. Based on the recommendations of existing scientific societies, a consensus was reached on various actions regarding laboratory measurements. We analysed the number and cost of measuring 6 tumour markers (carcinoembryonic antigen, prostate-specific antigen, carbohydrate antigen [CA] 15.3, CA125, CA19.9 and alpha-fetoprotein), thyrotropin, T3, T4, glycated haemoglobin, urea, ferritin and antigliadin antibodies, before and after implementing the consensus. Compared with the previous year, there were 55,902 fewer laboratory measurements (-19%) in 2016, with an overall savings of €82,100. The reduction in the number of measurements occurred mainly in plasma urea (-50.3%) and in the tumour markers CA125 (-16%), CA19.9 (-11.6%) and CA15.3 (-10.5%). The most pronounced savings were achieved in the measurements of urea (-€21,002), thyroid hormones (-€12,716) and thyrotropin (-€7,638). The adoption and consensus of do-not-do recommendations among healthcare levels resulted in a significant reduction in unnecessary measurements. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  17. Meta-audit of laboratory ISO accreditation inspections: measuring the old emperor's clothes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Ian G; Smye, Michael; Wallace, Ian J C

    2016-02-01

    Accreditation to ISO/IEC 17025 is required for EC official food control and veterinary laboratories by Regulation (EC) No. 882/2004. Measurements in hospital laboratories and clinics are increasingly accredited to ISO/IEC 15189. Both of these management standards arose from command and control military standards for factory inspection during World War II. They rely on auditing of compliance and have not been validated internally as assessment bodies require of those they accredit. Neither have they been validated to criteria outside their own ideology such as the Cochrane principles of evidence-based medicine which might establish whether any benefit exceeds their cost. We undertook a retrospective meta-audit over 14 years of internal and external laboratory audits that checked compliance with ISO 17025 in a public health laboratory. Most noncompliances arose solely from clauses in the standard and would not affect users. No effect was likely from 91% of these. Fewer than 1% of noncompliances were likely to have consequences for the validity of results or quality of service. The ISO system of compliance auditing has the performance characteristics of a poor screening test. It adds substantially to costs and generates more noise (false positives) than informative signal. Ethical use of resources indicates that management standards should not be used unless proven to deliver the efficacy, effectiveness, and value required of modern healthcare interventions. © 2015 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Laboratory and field trials of Coriolis mass flow metering for three-phase flow measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Feibiao; Henry, Manus; Tombs, Michael

    2014-04-01

    A new three-phase flow metering technology is discussed in this paper, which combines Coriolis mass flow and water cut readings and without applying any phase separation [1]. The system has undergone formal laboratory trials at TUV NEL (National Engineering Laboratory), UK and at VNIIR (National Flow Laboratory), Kazan, Russia; a number of field trials have taken place in Russia. Laboratory trial results from the TUV NEL will be described in detail. For the 50mm (2") metering system, the total liquid flow rate ranged from 2.4 kg/s up to 11 kg/s, the water cut ranged from 0% to 100%, and the gas volume fraction (GVF) from 0 to 50%. In a formally observed trial, 75 test points were taken at a temperature of approximately 40 °C and with a skid inlet pressure of approximately 350 kPa. Over 95% of the test results fell within the desired specification, defined as follows: the total (oil + water) liquid mass flow error should fall within ± 2.5%, and the gas mass flow error within ± 5.0%. The oil mass flow error limit is ± 6.0% for water cuts less than 70%, while for water cuts between 70% and 95% the oil mass flow error limit is ± 15.0%. These results demonstrate the potential for using Coriolis mass flow metering combined with water cut metering for three-phase (oil/water/gas) measurement.

  19. Measurements of energetic particle radiation in transit to Mars on the Mars Science Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeitlin, C; Hassler, D M; Cucinotta, F A; Ehresmann, B; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R F; Brinza, D E; Kang, S; Weigle, G; Böttcher, S; Böhm, E; Burmeister, S; Guo, J; Köhler, J; Martin, C; Posner, A; Rafkin, S; Reitz, G

    2013-05-31

    The Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft, containing the Curiosity rover, was launched to Mars on 26 November 2011, and for most of the 253-day, 560-million-kilometer cruise to Mars, the Radiation Assessment Detector made detailed measurements of the energetic particle radiation environment inside the spacecraft. These data provide insights into the radiation hazards that would be associated with a human mission to Mars. We report measurements of the radiation dose, dose equivalent, and linear energy transfer spectra. The dose equivalent for even the shortest round-trip with current propulsion systems and comparable shielding is found to be 0.66 ± 0.12 sievert.

  20. Laboratory investigation of a passive acoustic method for measurement of underwater gas seep ebullition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Chad A; Wilson, Preston S

    2012-01-01

    Passive acoustic techniques are of interest as a low-power means of quantifying underwater point-source gas ebullition. Toward the development of systems for logging natural seep activity, laboratory experiments were performed that exploited the bubble's Minnaert natural frequency for the measurement of gas flow from a model seep. Results show agreement among acoustic, optical, and gas trap ebullition measurements over the range of emission rates from 0 to 10 bubbles per second. A mathematical model is proposed to account for the real gas behavior of bubbles which cannot be approximated as ideal, such as methane at marine depths exceeding 30 m. © 2012 Acoustical Society of America.

  1. A software-based lock-in measurement for student laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuss, David T.

    2018-02-01

    A student laboratory experiment is presented that introduces the concept of a lock-in measurement through the exploration of the relationship between the power detected from a modulated light source and the distance between the source and the detector. The lock-in measurement is done in software using time-ordered data for both the reference and the detector signals. The achievable experimental sensitivity is shown to increase by several orders of magnitude over the simple case without using modulation. In addition, the student becomes familiar with selected computational techniques pertinent to large data sets.

  2. Photometrics Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose:The Photometrics Laboratory provides the capability to measure, analyze and characterize radiometric and photometric properties of light sources and filters,...

  3. Characterization of Orbital Debris Photometric Properties Derived from Laboratory-Based Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowardin, H.; Abercromby, K.; Barker, E.; Seitzer, P.; Schildknecht, T.

    2010-01-01

    To better characterize and model optical data acquired from ground-based telescopes, the Optical Measurements Center (OMC) at NASA/JSC attempts to emulate illumination conditions seen in space using equipment and techniques that parallel telescopic observations and source-target-sensor orientations. The OMC uses a 75 Watt Xenon arc lamp as a solar simulator, an SBIG CCD camera with standard Johnson/Bessel filters, and a robotic arm to simulate an object's position and rotation. The laboratory uses known shapes, materials suspected to be consistent with the orbital debris population, and three phase angles to best match the lighting conditions of the telescope based data. The fourteen objects studied in the laboratory are fragments or materials acquired through ground-tests of scaled-model satellites/rocket bodies as well as material samples in more/less "flight-ready" condition. All fragments were measured at 10 increments in a full 360 rotation at 6 , 36 , and 60 phase angles. This paper will investigate published color photometric data for a series of orbital debris targets and compare it to the empirical photometric measurements generated in the OMC. Using the data acquired over specific rotational angles through different filters (B, V, R, I), a color index is acquired (B-R, R-I). Using these values and their associated lightcurves, this laboratory data is compared to observational data obtained on the 1 m telescope of the Astronomical Institute of the University of Bern (AUIB), the 0.9 m operated by the Small- and Medium-Aperture Research Telescope System (SMARTS) Consortium and the Curtis-Schmidt 0.6 m Michigan Orbital Debris Space Debris Telescope both located at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO). An empirical based optical characterization model will be presented to provide preliminary correlations between laboratory based and telescope-based data in the context of classification of GEO debris objects.

  4. Mixed waste landfill corrective measures study final report Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peace, Gerald (Jerry) L.; Goering, Timothy James (GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM)

    2004-03-01

    The Mixed Waste Landfill occupies 2.6 acres in the north-central portion of Technical Area 3 at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico. The landfill accepted low-level radioactive and mixed waste from March 1959 to December 1988. This report represents the Corrective Measures Study that has been conducted for the Mixed Waste Landfill. The purpose of the study was to identify, develop, and evaluate corrective measures alternatives and recommend the corrective measure(s) to be taken at the site. Based upon detailed evaluation and risk assessment using guidance provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the New Mexico Environment Department, the U.S. Department of Energy and Sandia National Laboratories recommend that a vegetative soil cover be deployed as the preferred corrective measure for the Mixed Waste Landfill. The cover would be of sufficient thickness to store precipitation, minimize infiltration and deep percolation, support a healthy vegetative community, and perform with minimal maintenance by emulating the natural analogue ecosystem. There would be no intrusive remedial activities at the site and therefore no potential for exposure to the waste. This alternative poses minimal risk to site workers implementing institutional controls associated with long-term environmental monitoring as well as routine maintenance and surveillance of the site.

  5. Exposure to electromagnetic fields from smart utility meters in GB; part I) laboratory measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyman, Azadeh; Addison, Darren; Mee, Terry; Goiceanu, Cristian; Maslanyj, Myron; Mann, Simon

    2017-05-01

    Laboratory measurements of electric fields have been carried out around examples of smart meter devices used in Great Britain. The aim was to quantify exposure of people to radiofrequency signals emitted from smart meter devices operating at 2.4 GHz, and then to compare this with international (ICNIRP) health-related guidelines and with exposures from other telecommunication sources such as mobile phones and Wi-Fi devices. The angular distribution of the electric fields from a sample of 39 smart meter devices was measured in a controlled laboratory environment. The angular direction where the power density was greatest was identified and the equivalent isotropically radiated power was determined in the same direction. Finally, measurements were carried out as a function of distance at the angles where maximum field strengths were recorded around each device. The maximum equivalent power density measured during transmission around smart meter devices at 0.5 m and beyond was 15 mWm-2 , with an estimation of maximum duty factor of only 1%. One outlier device had a maximum power density of 91 mWm-2 . All power density measurements reported in this study were well below the 10 W m-2 ICNIRP reference level for the general public. Bioelectromagnetics. 2017;38:280-294. © 2017 Crown copyright. BIOELECTROMAGNETICS © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Crown copyright. BIOELECTROMAGNETICS © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Laboratory Evaluation of Air Flow Measurement Methods for Residential HVAC Returns for New Instrument Standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, Iain [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Stratton, Chris [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-08-01

    This project improved the accuracy of air flow measurements used in commissioning California heating and air conditioning systems in Title 24 (Building and Appliance Efficiency Standards), thereby improving system performance and efficiency of California residences. The research team at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory addressed the issue that typical tools used by contractors in the field to test air flows may not be accurate enough to measure return flows used in Title 24 applications. The team developed guidance on performance of current diagnostics as well as a draft test method for use in future evaluations. The study team prepared a draft test method through ASTM International to determine the uncertainty of air flow measurements at residential heating ventilation and air conditioning returns and other terminals. This test method, when finalized, can be used by the Energy Commission and other entities to specify required accuracy of measurement devices used to show compliance with standards.

  7. LABORATORY EVALUATION OF AIR FLOW MEASUREMENT METHODS FOR RESIDENTIAL HVAC RETURNS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, Iain; Stratton, Chris

    2015-02-01

    This project improved the accuracy of air flow measurements used in commissioning California heating and air conditioning systems in Title 24 (Building and Appliance Efficiency Standards), thereby improving system performance and efficiency of California residences. The research team at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory addressed the issue that typical tools used by contractors in the field to test air flows may not be accurate enough to measure return flows used in Title 24 applications. The team developed guidance on performance of current diagnostics as well as a draft test method for use in future evaluations. The series of tests performed measured air flow using a range of techniques and devices. The measured air flows were compared to reference air flow measurements using inline air flow meters built into the test apparatus. The experimental results showed that some devices had reasonable results (typical errors of 5 percent or less) but others had much bigger errors (up to 25 percent). Because manufacturers’ accuracy estimates for their equipment do not include many of the sources of error found in actual field measurements (and replicated in the laboratory testing in this study) it is essential for a test method that could be used to determine the actual uncertainty in this specific application. The study team prepared a draft test method through ASTM International to determine the uncertainty of air flow measurements at residential heating ventilation and air conditioning returns and other terminals. This test method, when finalized, can be used by the Energy Commission and other entities to specify required accuracy of measurement devices used to show compliance with standards.

  8. The Laboratory Course Assessment Survey: A Tool to Measure Three Dimensions of Research-Course Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corwin, Lisa A.; Runyon, Christopher; Robinson, Aspen; Dolan, Erin L.

    2015-01-01

    Course-based undergraduate research experiences (CUREs) are increasingly being offered as scalable ways to involve undergraduates in research. Yet few if any design features that make CUREs effective have been identified. We developed a 17-item survey instrument, the Laboratory Course Assessment Survey (LCAS), that measures students’ perceptions of three design features of biology lab courses: 1) collaboration, 2) discovery and relevance, and 3) iteration. We assessed the psychometric properties of the LCAS using established methods for instrument design and validation. We also assessed the ability of the LCAS to differentiate between CUREs and traditional laboratory courses, and found that the discovery and relevance and iteration scales differentiated between these groups. Our results indicate that the LCAS is suited for characterizing and comparing undergraduate biology lab courses and should be useful for determining the relative importance of the three design features for achieving student outcomes. PMID:26466990

  9. Laboratory Facilities and Measurement Techniques for Beamed-Energy-Propulsion Experiments in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Antonio Carlos; Chanes Júnior, José Brosler; Cordeiro Marcos, Thiago Victor; Pinto, David Romanelli; Santos Vilela, Renan Guilherme; Barros Galvão, Victor Alves; Mantovani, Arthur Freire; da Costa, Felipe Jean; dos Santos Assenção, José Adeildo; dos Santos, Alberto Monteiro; de Paula Toro, Paulo Gilberto; Sala Minucci, Marco Antonio; da Silveira Rêgo, Israel; Salvador, Israel Irone; Myrabo, Leik N.

    2011-11-01

    Laser propulsion is an innovative concept of accessing the space easier and cheaper where the propulsive energy is beamed to the aerospace vehicle in flight from ground—or even satellite-based high-power laser sources. In order to be realistic about laser propulsion, the Institute for Advanced Studies of the Brazilian Air Force in cooperation with the United States Air Force and the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute are seriously investigating its basic physics mechanisms and engineering aspects at the Henry T. Hamamatsu Laboratory of Hypersonic and Aerothermodynamics in São José dos Campos, Brazil. This paper describes in details the existing facilities and measuring systems such as high-power laser devices, pulsed-hypersonic wind tunnels and high-speed flow visualization system currently utilized in the laboratory for experimentation on laser propulsion.

  10. SIDRA instrument for measurements of particle fluxes at satellite altitudes. Laboratory prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudnik, O. V.; Prieto, M.; Kurbatov, E. V.; Sanchez, S.; Timakova, T. G.; Spassky, A. V.; Dubina, V. N.; Parra, P.

    2013-01-01

    The design concept and first set of results are presented for electronic modules of a laboratory prototype of the small-size satellite instrument SIDRA intended for measurements of charged particle fluxes in outer space. The working prototype consists of a detector assembly based on high-purity silicon and fast scintillation detectors, modules of analogue and digital processing, and a secondary power supply module. The first results are discussed of a Monte-Carlo simulation of the instrument with the use of the GEANT4 toolkit and of measurements of the main parameters of charge-sensitive pre-amplifiers, shapers, and peak detectors. Results of calibration measurements with the use of radioactive sources and beams of accelerated charged particles are presented.

  11. Mars' surface radiation environment measured with the Mars Science Laboratory's Curiosity rover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassler, Donald M; Zeitlin, Cary; Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F; Ehresmann, Bent; Rafkin, Scot; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L; Brinza, David E; Weigle, Gerald; Böttcher, Stephan; Böhm, Eckart; Burmeister, Soenke; Guo, Jingnan; Köhler, Jan; Martin, Cesar; Reitz, Guenther; Cucinotta, Francis A; Kim, Myung-Hee; Grinspoon, David; Bullock, Mark A; Posner, Arik; Gómez-Elvira, Javier; Vasavada, Ashwin; Grotzinger, John P

    2014-01-24

    The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) on the Mars Science Laboratory's Curiosity rover began making detailed measurements of the cosmic ray and energetic particle radiation environment on the surface of Mars on 7 August 2012. We report and discuss measurements of the absorbed dose and dose equivalent from galactic cosmic rays and solar energetic particles on the martian surface for ~300 days of observations during the current solar maximum. These measurements provide insight into the radiation hazards associated with a human mission to the surface of Mars and provide an anchor point with which to model the subsurface radiation environment, with implications for microbial survival times of any possible extant or past life, as well as for the preservation of potential organic biosignatures of the ancient martian environment.

  12. Comparison between laboratory measurements, simulations, and analytical predictions of the transverse wall impedance at low frequencies

    CERN Document Server

    Roncarolo, F; Kroyer, T; Metral, E; Mounet, N; Salvant, B; Zotter, B

    2009-01-01

    The prediction of the transverse wall beam impedance at the first unstable betatron line (8 kHz) of the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is of paramount importance for understanding and controlling the related coupled-bunch instabilities. Until now only novel analytical formulas were available at this frequency. Recently, laboratory measurements and numerical simulations were performed to cross-check the analytical predictions. The experimental results based on the measurement of the variation of a probe coil inductance in the presence of (i) sample graphite plates, (ii) stand-alone LHC collimator jaws, and (iii) a full LHC collimator assembly are presented in detail. The measurement results are compared to both analytical theories and simulations. In addition, the consequences for the understanding of the LHC impedance are discussed.

  13. The uncertainty in physical measurements an introduction to data analysis in the physics laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Fornasini, Paolo

    2008-01-01

    All measurements of physical quantities are affected by uncertainty. Understanding the origin of uncertainty, evaluating its extent and suitably taking it into account in data analysis is essential for assessing the degree of accuracy of phenomenological relationships and physical laws in both scientific research and technological applications. The Uncertainty in Physical Measurements: An Introduction to Data Analysis in the Physics Laboratory presents an introduction to uncertainty and to some of the most common procedures of data analysis. This book will serve the reader well by filling the gap between tutorial textbooks and highly specialized monographs. The book is divided into three parts. The first part is a phenomenological introduction to measurement and uncertainty: properties of instruments, different causes and corresponding expressions of uncertainty, histograms and distributions, and unified expression of uncertainty. The second part contains an introduction to probability theory, random variable...

  14. Bayesian inference of spectral induced polarization parameters for laboratory complex resistivity measurements of rocks and soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bérubé, Charles L.; Chouteau, Michel; Shamsipour, Pejman; Enkin, Randolph J.; Olivo, Gema R.

    2017-08-01

    Spectral induced polarization (SIP) measurements are now widely used to infer mineralogical or hydrogeological properties from the low-frequency electrical properties of the subsurface in both mineral exploration and environmental sciences. We present an open-source program that performs fast multi-model inversion of laboratory complex resistivity measurements using Markov-chain Monte Carlo simulation. Using this stochastic method, SIP parameters and their uncertainties may be obtained from the Cole-Cole and Dias models, or from the Debye and Warburg decomposition approaches. The program is tested on synthetic and laboratory data to show that the posterior distribution of a multiple Cole-Cole model is multimodal in particular cases. The Warburg and Debye decomposition approaches yield unique solutions in all cases. It is shown that an adaptive Metropolis algorithm performs faster and is less dependent on the initial parameter values than the Metropolis-Hastings step method when inverting SIP data through the decomposition schemes. There are no advantages in using an adaptive step method for well-defined Cole-Cole inversion. Finally, the influence of measurement noise on the recovered relaxation time distribution is explored. We provide the geophysics community with a open-source platform that can serve as a base for further developments in stochastic SIP data inversion and that may be used to perform parameter analysis with various SIP models.

  15. Incorporating spectroscopy and measurement technology into the high school chemistry laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbert, Emily Ann

    Science and technology are becoming increasingly important in maintaining a healthy economy at home and a competitive edge on the world stage, though that is just one facet affected by inadequate science education in the United States. Engaging students in the pursuit of knowledge and giving them the skills to think critically are paramount. One small way to assist in achieving these goals is to increase the quality and variety of technology-rich activities conducted in high school classrooms. Incorporating more laboratory measurement technology into high schools may incite more student interest in the processes and practices of science and may allow students to learn to think more critically about their data and what it represents. The first objective of the work described herein was to determine what measurement technology is being used in schools and to what extent, as well as to determine other teacher needs and preferences. Second, the objective was to develop a new program to provide incoming freshmen (or rising seniors) with measurement technology training they did not receive in high school, and expose them to new research and career opportunities in science. The final objective was to create a technology-rich classroom laboratory activity for use in high schools.

  16. Sensor set-up for wireless measurement of automotive rim and wheel parameters in laboratory conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borecki, M.; Prus, P.; Korwin-Pawlowski, M. L.; Rychlik, A.; Kozubel, W.

    2017-08-01

    Modern rims and wheels are tested at the design and production stages. Tests can be performed in laboratory conditions and on the ride. In the laboratory, complex and costly equipment is used, as for example wheel balancers and impact testers. Modern wheel balancers are equipped with electronic and electro-mechanical units that enable touch-less measurement of dimensions, including precision measurement of radial and lateral wheel run-out, automatic positioning and application of the counterweights, and vehicle wheel set monitoring - tread wear, drift angles and run-out unbalance. Those tests are performed by on-wheel axis measurements with laser distance meters. The impact tester enables dropping of weights from a defined height onto a wheel. Test criteria are the loss of pressure of the tire and generation of cracks in the wheel without direct impact of the falling weights. In the present paper, a set up composed of three accelerometers, a temperature sensor and a pressure sensor is examined as the base of a wheel tester. The sensor set-up configuration, on-line diagnostic and signal transmission are discussed.

  17. Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment: Measuring Matter Antimatter Asymmetries at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Parkes, Chris; Gutierrez, J

    2015-01-01

    This document is the student manual for a third year undergraduate laboratory experiment at the University of Manchester. This project aims to measure a fundamental difference between the behaviour of matter and antimatter through the analysis of data collected by the LHCb experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. The three-body dmecays $B^\\pm \\rightarrow h^\\pm h^+ h^-$, where $h^\\pm$ is a $\\pi^\\pm$ or $K^\\pm$ are studied. The inclusive matter antimatter asymmetry is calculated, and larger asymmetries are searched for in localized regions of the phase-space.

  18. A new method of measuring gravitational acceleration in an undergraduate laboratory program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiaochu; Wang, Chang; Xiao, Yunhuan; Schulte, Jurgen; Shi, Qingfan

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents a high accuracy method to measure gravitational acceleration in an undergraduate laboratory program. The experiment is based on water in a cylindrical vessel rotating about its vertical axis at a constant speed. The water surface forms a paraboloid whose focal length is related to rotational period and gravitational acceleration. This experimental setup avoids classical source errors in determining the local value of gravitational acceleration, so prevalent in the common simple pendulum and inclined plane experiments. The presented method combines multiple physics concepts such as kinematics, classical mechanics and geometric optics, offering the opportunity for lateral as well as project-based learning.

  19. A VUV detection system for the direct photonic identification of the first excited isomeric state of 229Th

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiferle, Benedict; von der Wense, Lars; Laatiaoui, Mustapha; Thirolf, Peter G.

    2016-03-01

    With an expected energy of 7.6(5) eV, 229Th possesses the lowest excited nuclear state in the landscape of all presently known nuclei. The energy corresponds to a wavelength of about 160 nm and would conceptually allow for an optical laser excitation of a nuclear transition. We report on a VUV optical detection system that was designed for the direct detection of the isomeric ground-state transition of 229Th. 229(m)Th ions originating from a 233U α-recoil source are collected on a micro electrode that is placed in the focus of an annular parabolic mirror. The latter is used to parallelize the UV fluorescence that may emerge from the isomeric ground-state transition of 229Th. The parallelized light is then focused by a second annular parabolic mirror onto a CsI-coated position-sensitive MCP detector behind the mirror exit. To achieve a high signal-to-background ratio, a small spot size on the MCP detector needs to be achieved. Besides extensive ray-tracing simulations of the optical setup, we present a procedure for its alignment, as well as test measurements using a D2 lamp, where a focal-spot size of ≈100 μm has been achieved. Assuming a purely photonic decay, a signal-to-background ratio of ≈7000:1 could be achieved.

  20. Improvement of the quality of work in a biochemistry laboratory via measurement system analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming-Shu; Liao, Chen-Mao; Wu, Ming-Hsun; Lin, Chih-Ming

    2016-10-31

    An adequate and continuous monitoring of operational variations can effectively reduce the uncertainty and enhance the quality of laboratory reports. This study applied the evaluation rule of the measurement system analysis (MSA) method to estimate the quality of work conducted in a biochemistry laboratory. Using the gauge repeatability & reproducibility (GR&R) approach, variations in quality control (QC) data among medical technicians in conducting measurements of five biochemical items, namely, serum glucose (GLU), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), uric acid (UA), sodium (Na) and chloride (Cl), were evaluated. The measurements of the five biochemical items showed different levels of variance among the different technicians, with the variances in GLU measurements being higher than those for the other four items. The ratios of precision-to-tolerance (P/T) for Na, Cl and GLU were all above 0.5, implying inadequate gauge capability. The product variation contribution of Na was large (75.45% and 31.24% in normal and abnormal QC levels, respectively), which showed that the impact of insufficient usage of reagents could not be excluded. With regard to reproducibility, high contributions (of more than 30%) of variation for the selected items were found. These high operator variation levels implied that the possibility of inadequate gauge capacity could not be excluded. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) of GR&R showed that the operator variations in GLU measurements were significant (F=5.296, P=0.001 in the normal level and F=3.399, P=0.015 in the abnormal level, respectively). In addition to operator variations, product variations of Na were also significant for both QC levels. The heterogeneity of variance for the five technicians showed significant differences for the Na and Cl measurements in the normal QC level. The accuracy of QC for five technicians was identified for further operational improvement. This study revealed that MSA can be used to evaluate product and

  1. National Synchrotron Light Source user`s manual: Guide to the VUV and x-ray beamlines. Fifth edition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gmuer, N.F. [ed.

    1993-04-01

    The success of the National Synchrotron Light Source is based, in large part, on the size of the user community and the diversity of the scientific and technical disciplines represented by these users. As evidence of this success, the VUV Ring has just celebrated its 10th anniversary and the X-ray Ring will do the same in 1995. In order to enhance this success, the NSLS User`s Manual: Guide to the VUV and X-Ray Beamlines - Fifth Edition, is being published. This Manual presents to the scientific community-at-large the current and projected architecture, capabilities and research programs of the various VUV and X-ray beamlines. Also detailed is the research and computer equipment a General User can expect to find and use at each beamline when working at the NSLS. The Manual is updated periodically in order to keep pace with the constant changes on these beamlines.

  2. Measuring the Bed Load velocity in Laboratory flumes using ADCP and Digital Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conevski, Slaven; Guerrero, Massimo; Rennie, Colin; Bombardier, Josselin

    2017-04-01

    Measuring the transport rate and apparent velocity of the bedload is notoriously hard and there is not a certain technique that would obtain continues data. There are many empirical models, based on the estimation of the shear stress, but only few involve direct measurement of the bed load velocity. The bottom tracking (BT) mode of an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) has been used many times to estimate the apparent velocity of the bed load. Herein is the basic idea, to exploit the bias of the BT signal towards the bed load movement and to calibrate this signal with traditional measuring techniques. These measurements are quite scarce and seldom reliable since there are not taken in controlled conditions. So far, no clear confirmation has been conducted in laboratory-controlled conditions that would attest the assumptions made in the estimation of the apparent bed load velocity, nor in the calibration of the empirical equations. Therefore, this study explores several experiments under stationary conditions, where the signal of the ADCP BT mode is recorded and compared to the bed load motion recorded by digital camera videography. The experiments have been performed in the hydraulic laboratories of Ottawa and Bologna, using two different ADCPs and two different high resolution cameras. In total, more then 30 experiments were performed for different sediment mixtures and different hydraulic conditions. In general, a good match is documented between the apparent bed load velocity measured by the ADCP and the videography. The slight deviation in single experiments can be explained by gravel particles inhomogeneity, difficult in reproducing the same hydro-sedimentological conditions and the randomness of the backscattering strength.

  3. Questionnaire and laboratory measures of eating behavior: Associations with energy intake and BMI in a community sample of working adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Simone A; Mitchell, Nathan R; Wolfson, Julian; Finlayson, Graham; Blundell, John E; Jeffery, Robert W

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The present research compared a self-report measure of usual eating behaviors with two laboratory-based behavioral measures of food reward and food preference. Methods Eating behaviors were measured among 233 working adults. A self-report measure was the Three Factor Eating Questionnaire (TFEQ) Restraint, Disinhibition and Hunger subscales. Laboratory measures were the (RVF) and Explicit Liking (EL) and Implicit Wanting (IW) for high fat food. Outcome measures were body mass index (BMI), and energy intake measured using three 24-hour dietary recalls. Results Significant bivariate associations were observed between each of the eating behavior measures and energy intake, but only Disinhibition and Hunger were associated with BMI. Multiple regression results showed RVF and EL and IW predicted energy intake independent of the TFEQ scales but did not predict BMI. Conclusion Laboratory and self-report measures capture unique aspects of individual differences in eating behaviors that are associated with energy intake. PMID:24096082

  4. Questionnaire and laboratory measures of eating behavior. Associations with energy intake and BMI in a community sample of working adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Simone A; Mitchell, Nathan R; Wolfson, Julian; Finlayson, Graham; Blundell, John E; Jeffery, Robert W

    2014-01-01

    The present research compared a self-report measure of usual eating behaviors with two laboratory-based behavioral measures of food reward and food preference. Eating behaviors were measured among 233 working adults. A self-report measure was the Three Factor Eating Questionnaire (TFEQ) Restraint, Disinhibition and Hunger subscales. Laboratory measures were the (RVF) and Explicit Liking (EL) and Implicit Wanting (IW) for high fat food. Outcome measures were body mass index (BMI), and energy intake measured using three 24-h dietary recalls. Significant bivariate associations were observed between each of the eating behavior measures and energy intake, but only Disinhibition and Hunger were associated with BMI. Multiple regression results showed RVF and EL and IW predicted energy intake independent of the TFEQ scales but did not predict BMI. Laboratory and self-report measures capture unique aspects of individual differences in eating behaviors that are associated with energy intake. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Routine internal- and external-quality control data in clinical laboratories for estimating measurement and diagnostic uncertainty using GUM principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnusson, Bertil; Ossowicki, Haakan; Rienitz, Olaf; Theodorsson, Elvar

    2012-05-01

    Healthcare laboratories are increasingly joining into larger laboratory organizations encompassing several physical laboratories. This caters for important new opportunities for re-defining the concept of a 'laboratory' to encompass all laboratories and measurement methods measuring the same measurand for a population of patients. In order to make measurement results, comparable bias should be minimized or eliminated and measurement uncertainty properly evaluated for all methods used for a particular patient population. The measurement as well as diagnostic uncertainty can be evaluated from internal and external quality control results using GUM principles. In this paper the uncertainty evaluations are described in detail using only two main components, within-laboratory reproducibility and uncertainty of the bias component according to a Nordtest guideline. The evaluation is exemplified for the determination of creatinine in serum for a conglomerate of laboratories both expressed in absolute units (μmol/L) and relative (%). An expanded measurement uncertainty of 12 μmol/L associated with concentrations of creatinine below 120 μmol/L and of 10% associated with concentrations above 120 μmol/L was estimated. The diagnostic uncertainty encompasses both measurement uncertainty and biological variation, and can be estimated for a single value and for a difference. This diagnostic uncertainty for the difference for two samples from the same patient was determined to be 14 μmol/L associated with concentrations of creatinine below 100 μmol/L and 14 % associated with concentrations above 100 μmol/L.

  6. Indirect measurements of sweat electrolyte concentration in the laboratory diagnosis of cystic fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heeley, M.; Woolf, D.; Heeley, A.

    2000-01-01

    AIM—To investigate whether analytical methods based on the colligative physical chemical properties of ions or solutes in sweat are less effective than the specific measurement of electrolytes in the diagnosis of cystic fibrosis (CF).
METHODS—A single sweat sample was collected (Macroduct) from each of 211 infants and children, of whom 57 had CF, for the measurment of sodium, chloride, osmolality, and conductivity.
RESULTS—The ranges within which CF and non-CF individual values overlapped (equivocal ranges), were wider for sodium and osmolality measurement than for chloride or conductivity. Neither of the latter two measurements provided a discriminatory advantage over the other. The utilisation of broadly based age related ranges for non-CF control subjects served to improve the discriminatory power of all four measurements to an extent that, in this cohort, both chloride and conductivity provided complete discrimination.
CONCLUSION—Sweat conductivity is as effective as chloride measurement in the laboratory diagnosis of CF.

 PMID:10799439

  7. Contact Thermocouple Methodology and Evaluation for Temperature Measurement in the Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Ethan J.; Pawlik, Ralph J.; Krause, David L.

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory testing of advanced aerospace components very often requires highly accurate temperature measurement and control devices, as well as methods to precisely analyze and predict the performance of such components. Analysis of test articles depends on accurate measurements of temperature across the specimen. Where possible, this task is accomplished using many thermocouples welded directly to the test specimen, which can produce results with great precision. However, it is known that thermocouple spot welds can initiate deleterious cracks in some materials, prohibiting the use of welded thermocouples. Such is the case for the nickel-based superalloy MarM-247, which is used in the high temperature, high pressure heater heads for the Advanced Stirling Converter component of the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator space power system. To overcome this limitation, a method was developed that uses small diameter contact thermocouples to measure the temperature of heater head test articles with the same level of accuracy as welded thermocouples. This paper includes a brief introduction and a background describing the circumstances that compelled the development of the contact thermocouple measurement method. Next, the paper describes studies performed on contact thermocouple readings to determine the accuracy of results. It continues on to describe in detail the developed measurement method and the evaluation of results produced. A further study that evaluates the performance of different measurement output devices is also described. Finally, a brief conclusion and summary of results is provided.

  8. Combined UV-C/H2O2-VUV processes for the treatment of an actual slaughterhouse wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naderi, Kambiz Vaezzadeh; Bustillo-Lecompte, Ciro Fernando; Mehrvar, Mehrab; Abdekhodaie, Mohammad Jafar

    2017-05-04

    In this study, a three-factor, three-level Box-Behnken design with response surface methodology were used to maximize the TOC removal and minimize the H2O2 residual in the effluent of the combined UV-C/H2O2-VUV system for the treatment of an actual slaughterhouse wastewater (SWW) collected from one of the meat processing plants in Ontario, Canada. The irradiation time and the initial concentrations of total organic carbon (TOCo) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2o) were the three predictors, as independent variables, studied in the design of experiments. The multiple response approach was used to obtain desirability response surfaces at the optimum factor settings. Subsequently, the optimum conditions to achieve the maximum percentage TOC removal of 46.19% and minimum H2O2 residual of 1.05% were TOCo of 213 mg L-1, H2O2o of 450 mg L-1, and irradiation time of 9 min. The attained optimal operating conditions were validated with a complementary test. Consequently, the TOC removal of 45.68% and H2O2 residual of 1.03% were achieved experimentally, confirming the statistical model reliability. Three individual processes, VUV alone, VUV/H2O2, and UV-C/H2O2, were also evaluated to compare their performance for the treatment of the actual SWW using the optimum parameters obtained in combined UV-C/H2O2-VUV processes. Results confirmed that an adequate combination of the UV-C/H2O2-VUV processes is essential for an optimized TOC removal and H2O2 residual. Finally, respirometry analyses were also performed to evaluate the biodegradability of the SWW and the BOD removal efficiency of the combined UV-C/H2O2-VUV processes.

  9. Gain length dependence on phase shake in the VUV-FEL at the TESLA Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pflueger, J. [DESY/HASYLAB, Hamburg (Germany); Schneidmiller, E.A. [Automatic Systems Corporation, Samara (Russian Federation); Pierini, P. [INFN, Milano (Italy)

    1995-12-31

    The TTF VUV FEL, which is in its design stage at DESY, consists of a 30 m long SASE FEL which will radiate around 6 nm, driven by a superconducting linac with final energy of 1 GeV. One of the important issues in its design is the undulator performance, which is studied in this paper. The present setup, including FODO lattice, is discussed in this paper. Results of simulations, including the realistic wiggler field errors and beam stearing, are presented. Dependence of the performance, in particular the gain and saturation length as well as the saturation peak power, on the wiggler field errors is discussed.

  10. Sc-Si normal incidence mirrors for a VUV interval of 35-50 nm

    CERN Document Server

    Uspenskii, Y A; Vinogradov, A V; Fedorenko, A I; Kondratenko, V V; Pershin, Y P; Zubarev, E N; Mrowka, S; Schäfers, F

    2000-01-01

    The Sc/Si multilayers are suggested as high-reflectivity coatings for a VUV interval of 35-50 nm. Fabricated mirrors show the normal incidence reflectivity of 30-50% which is high enough to effectively manipulate the beams of synchrotron radiation and compact discharge and laser-driven X-ray lasers. The obtained values are not, however, limiting for the Sc/Si coatings. Theoretical estimations as well as electron microscopy studies of Sc-Si interfaces indicate a large potential for further raising the reflectivity.

  11. The validity of temperature-sensitive ingestible capsules for measuring core body temperature in laboratory protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwent, David; Zhou, Xuan; van den Heuvel, Cameron; Sargent, Charli; Roach, Greg D

    2011-10-01

    The human core body temperature (CBT) rhythm is tightly coupled to an endogenous circadian pacemaker located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the anterior hypothalamus. The standard method for assessing the status of this pacemaker is by continuous sampling of CBT using rectal thermometry. This research sought to validate the use of ingestible, temperature-sensitive capsules to measure CBT as an alternative to rectal thermometry. Participants were 11 young adult males who had volunteered to complete a laboratory protocol that extended across 12 consecutive days. A total of 87 functional capsules were ingested and eliminated by participants during the laboratory internment. Core body temperature samples were collected in 1-min epochs and compared to paired samples collected concurrently via rectal thermistors. Agreement between samples that were collected using ingestible sensors and rectal thermistors was assessed using the gold-standard limits of agreement method. Across all valid paired samples collected during the study (n = 120,126), the mean difference was 0.06°C, whereas the 95% CI (confidence interval) for differences was less than ±0.35°C. Despite the overall acceptable limits of agreement, systematic measurement bias was noted across the initial 5 h of sensor-transit periods and attributed to temperature gradations across the alimentary canal.

  12. Correlation between rating scales and sleep laboratory measurements in restless legs syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Borreguero, Diego; Larrosa, Oscar; de la Llave, Yolanda; Granizo, Juan José; Allen, Richard

    2004-11-01

    The aim of this study was to test the external validity of the International Restless Legs Scale (IRLS) by assessment of the correlation between IRLS scores and objective measures of severity such as polysomnography (PSG) and Suggested Immobilization Test (SIT). Correlation analysis between rating scales for RLS (IRLS and Johns Hopkins RLS Scale--JHRLSS) and sleep laboratory measurements in untreated RLS patients. The study included 30 untreated patients diagnosed with RLS according to the criteria of the International RLS Study Group. Diagnostic procedures included physical exam, laboratory analysis, PSG and a nocturnal SIT. Statistical analysis was performed by means of Spearman's correlations and Kruskal-Wallis test. IRLS correlated significantly with Periodic Leg Movement of Sleep-index (PLMS), and PLMS-arousal index during PSG as well as with Periodic Leg Movement of Wakefulness (PLMW) during SIT (SIT-PLMW) (all r=0.4; p<0.01). There was no correlation between IRLS and the number of PLMW in PSG (PSG-PLMW) or any other sleep variable during PSG. Nor was any correlation found between IRLS scores and ferritin, age, duration of illness or any other clinical variables. This study represents the first demonstration of a correlation between IRLS and objective parameters of motor dysfunction such as PLMS-index or SIT. This finding is particularly relevant for the design of future clinical trials. Furthermore, the association between PLMS and SIT-PLMW supports the view that both PLMS and PLMW might share a common mechanism.

  13. Measurement Of Electromagnetic Field Radiation In The Internet Halls And Educational Computer Laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghanim Thiab Hasan

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available     There are more concerns about possible health effects related to electromagnetic fields from computer monitors and other video display terminals because of the widespread using of computers in laboratories ,offices and internet halls. This research aims to detect the effect of electromagnetic field radiations in these halls and laboratories and study the successful ways of minimizing its negative  health  effect on human health. The research has been performed on both the mathematical calculations and practical measurements. The obtaining results show that the practical measurements are consistent with the  mathematical calculations results. Comparison of  these results with the safety standard guideline  limits shows that they are within the acceptable exposuring limits recommended by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection  (ICNIRP and that means there is no health risk from exposure to these fields if the exposure is within the acceptable limits.     

  14. Compendium of the Environmental Measurements Laboratory's research projects related to the Chernobyl nuclear accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volchok, H L; Chieco, N [comps.

    1986-10-01

    Following the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear reactor power station in the USSR on April 26, 1986, the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) initiated a number of research projects as follows: (1) selected sites in both the Deposition and Surface Air networks were alerted and their sampling protocols adjusted to accommodate the anticipated arrival times and activity concentrations of the Chernobyl debris; (2) a number of cooperative programs involving field work, sampling, analysis and data interpretation were set up with institutions and scientists in other countries; (3) EML's Regional Baseline Station at Chester, NJ, as well as the roof of the Laboratory in New York City, provided bases for sampling and measurements to study the radionuclide concentrations, radiation levels, physical characteristics and potential biological implications of the Chernobyl fallout on the northeastern United States; and (4) the resulting fallout from the Chernobyl accident provided an 'experiment of opportunity' in that it enabled us to study fresh fission product deposition using collection systems resurrected from the 1950's and 1960's for comparison with current state-of-the-art methodology. The 13 reports of this volume have been entered separately into the data base.

  15. Non-Contact Methods for Measuring Front Cavity Depths of Laboratory Standard Microphones Using a Depth-Measuring Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedzelnitsky, Victor; Wagner, Randall P

    2008-01-01

    To achieve an acceptable degree of accuracy at high frequencies in some standardized methods for primary calibration of laboratory standard (LS) microphones, the front cavity depth lfc of each microphone must be known. This dimension must be measured using non-contact methods to prevent damage to the microphone diaphragm. The basic capabilities of an optical depth-measuring microscope were demonstrated by the agreement of its measurements within 0.7 μm of the known values of reference gage blocks. Using this microscope, two basic methods were applied to measure lfc . One (D) uses direct measurements at the microphone front surface annulus and conventional data reduction techniques. The other (GB) uses measurements at the surface of a gage block placed on the annulus, and plane-fitting data reduction techniques intended to reduce the effects of the slightly imperfect geometries of the microphones. The GB method was developed to provide a smoother surface of measurement than the relatively rough surface of the annulus, and to simulate the contact that occurs between the annulus and the smooth, plane surface of an acoustic coupler during microphone calibration. Using these methods, full data sets were obtained at 33 measurement positions (D), or 25 positions (GB). In addition, D and GB subsampling methods were applied by using subsamples of either the D or the GB full data sets. All these methods were applied to six LS microphones, three each of two different types. The GB subsampling methods are preferred for several reasons. The measurement results for lfc obtained by these methods agree well with those obtained by the GB method using the full data set. The expanded uncertainties of results from the GB subsampling methods are not very different from the expanded uncertainty of results from the GB method using the full data set, and are smaller than the expanded uncertainties of results from the D subsampling methods. Measurements of lfc using the GB subsampling

  16. ADVANTAGES AND DISADVANTAGES OF MODERN LABORATORY MEASUREMENT OF THE COEFFICIENT OF PERMEABILITY FOR SOIL MATERIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Želimir Veinović

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Permeability tests are one of the most often performed experiments in geotechnics. Conventional methods conducted by oedometer and triaxial apparatus have many disadvantages, the most significant being the test duration. As a consequence, errors in permeability measurements could occur. On the contrary, by applying modern flow-pump method, permeability measurements can be obtained much more rapidly. Moreover, the permeability/void ratio relation can be obtained by using adequate laboratory devices. This is particularly important for soft materials, since their permeability could vary within several orders of magnitude depending on the variation of void ratio. The article presents advantages and disadvantages of the flow-pump method performed in a modified triaxial cell and hydraulic oedometer, in comparison with conventional constant head and falling head methods. The specimens were prepared from the waste stone dust, which is the product of final dimension stone processing (the paper is published in Croatian.

  17. Long term indoor radon measurements in the pelletron laboratory at the UNAM physics institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinosa, G.; Golzarri, J. I.; Lopez, K.; Rickards, J., E-mail: espinosa@fisica.unam.m [UNAM, Instituto de Fisica, Apdo. Postal 20-364, 01000 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2011-02-15

    The results of six months of continuous measurement of the indoor radon concentration levels in the building where the Physics Institute 3 MV Pelletron particle accelerator is located are presented. This study has three major objectives: a) to know the actual values of the levels of indoor radon in this installation, where personnel spend many hours and sometimes days; b) assess the radiological risk from radon inhalation for personnel working permanently in the laboratory, as well as incidental users; and c) establish, if necessary, time limits for continuous permanence on the location for indoor radon exposure. Passive nuclear track detectors and dynamic systems were employed, covering six months (August, 2009 to January, 2010). For the calculation of internal dose the Radon Individual Dose Calculator was used. The results indicate that the indoor radon levels are below the US EPA recommended levels (400 Bq/m{sup 3}) in workplaces. The measurements help to establish levels for workplaces in Mexico. (Author)

  18. The Bloomsburg University Goniometer (B.U.G.) Laboratory: An Integrated Laboratory for Measuring Bidirectional Reflectance Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepard, M. K.

    2001-01-01

    We have constructed a photometric goniometer for measuring the full bidirectional reflectance function of planetary analog materials. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  19. Simultaneous nitrate reduction and acetaminophen oxidation using the continuous-flow chemical-less VUV process as an integrated advanced oxidation and reduction process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moussavi, Gholamreza, E-mail: moussavi@modares.ac.ir; Shekoohiyan, Sakine

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Simultaneous advanced oxidation and reduction processes were explored in VUV system. • Complete reduction of nitrate to N{sub 2} was achieved at the presence of acetaminophen. • Complete degradation of acetaminophen was achieved at the presence of nitrate. • Over 95% of acetaminophen was mineralized in the VUV photoreactor. • VUV is a chemical-less advanced process for treating water emerging contaminants. - Abstract: This work was aimed at investigating the performance of the continuous-flow VUV photoreactor as a novel chemical-less advanced process for simultaneously oxidizing acetaminophen (ACT) as a model of pharmaceuticals and reducing nitrate in a single reactor. Solution pH was an important parameter affecting the performance of VUV; the highest ACT oxidation and nitrate reduction attained at solution pH between 6 and 8. The ACT was oxidized mainly by HO· while the aqueous electrons were the main working agents in the reduction of nitrate. The performance of VUV photoreactor improved with the increase of hydraulic retention time (HRT); the complete degradation of ACT and ∼99% reduction of nitrate with 100% N{sub 2} selectivity achieved at HRT of 80 min. The VUV effluent concentrations of nitrite and ammonium at HRT of 80 min were below the drinking water standards. The real water sample contaminated with the ACT and nitrate was efficiently treated in the VUV photoreactor. Therefore, the VUV photoreactor is a chemical-less advanced process in which both advanced oxidation and advanced reduction reactions are accomplished. This unique feature possesses VUV photoreactor as a promising method of treating water contaminated with both pharmaceutical and nitrate.

  20. Measurements of the neutron spectrum in transit to Mars on the Mars Science Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, J; Ehresmann, B; Zeitlin, C; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R F; Hassler, D M; Reitz, G; Brinza, D E; Appel, J; Böttcher, S; Böhm, E; Burmeister, S; Guo, J; Lohf, H; Martin, C; Posner, A; Rafkin, S

    2015-04-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft, containing the Curiosity rover, was launched to Mars on 26 November 2011. Although designed for measuring the radiation on the surface of Mars, the Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) measured the radiation environment inside the spacecraft during most of the 253-day, 560-million-kilometer cruise to Mars. An important factor for determining the biological impact of the radiation environment inside the spacecraft is the specific contribution of neutrons with their high biological effectiveness. We apply an inversion method (based on a maximum-likelihood estimation) to calculate the neutron and gamma spectra from the RAD neutral particle measurements. The measured neutron spectrum (12-436 MeV) translates into a radiation dose rate of 3.8±1.2 μGy/day and a dose equivalent of 19±5 μSv/day. Extrapolating the measured spectrum (0.1-1000 MeV), we find that the total neutron-induced dose rate is 6±2 μGy/day and the dose equivalent rate is 30±10 μSv/day. For a 360 day round-trip from Earth to Mars with comparable shielding, this translates into a neutron induced dose equivalent of about 11±4 mSv. Copyright © 2015 The Committee on Space Research (COSPAR). Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Inter-laboratory comparison of HITU power measurement methods and capabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenderka, K V [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Bundesallee 100, 38116 Braunschweig (Germany); Durando, G [Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica (INRIM), Strada delle Cacce 91, 10135 Torino (Italy); Karaboece, B [Tuebitak Ulusal Metroloji Enstituesue (UME), P.K. 54 41470 Gebze-Kocaeli (Turkey); Rajagopal, S; Shaw, A, E-mail: kvjend@ieee.org [National Physical Laboratory (NPL), Hampton Road, Teddington, TW11 0LW (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-01

    High Intensity Therapeutic Ultrasound (HITU) is gaining in importance among the spectrum of therapeutic options to combat cancer. HITU has already been approved and is in clinical use for the treatment of organs like the prostate, the liver and the uterus. Nevertheless, the metrology of the applied high power ultrasound fields, and in consequence, reliable treatment planning and monitoring, is still a challenge. As part of a European Metrology Research Programme project, the four National Metrology Institutes from the UK, Germany, Italy and Turkey conducted an inter-laboratory comparison of their power measurement capabilities at power levels of 5, 25, 75 and 150 W each at frequencies of 1.1, 1.5 and 3.3 MHz. The task was to measure the total, time-averaged ultrasonic output power, emitted by the circulated transducers under specified electrical excitation conditions into an anechoic water load, and the actual rms transducer input voltage. The output value to be reported was the electro-acoustic radiation conductance including the associated standard and expanded uncertainties. Several different measurement techniques were applied to gain further insight into HITU power measurement. The deviations from the calculated comparison reference value found for the different techniques are discussed and conclusions for the further improvement of measuring procedures are drawn.

  2. Dynamics of synchrotron VUV-induced intracluster reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grover, J.R. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Photoionization mass spectrometry (PIMS) using the tunable vacuum ultraviolet radiation available at the National Synchrotron Light Source is being exploited to study photoionization-induced reactions in small van der Waals mixed complexes. The information gained includes the observation and classification of reaction paths, the measurement of onsets, and the determination of relative yields of competing reactions. Additional information is obtained by comparison of the properties of different reacting systems. Special attention is given to finding unexpected features, and most of the reactions investigated to date display such features. However, understanding these reactions demands dynamical information, in addition to what is provided by PIMS. Therefore the program has been expanded to include the measurement of kinetic energy release distributions.

  3. Radon measurement laboratories. An educational experience based on school and university cooperation

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Cicco, F.; Balzano, E.; Limata, B. N.; Masullo, M. R.; Quarto, M.; Roca, V.; Sabbarese, C.; Pugliese, M.

    2017-11-01

    There is a growing interest in engaging students and the general public about the meaning and objectives of doing science. When it is possible students can learn by actively engaging in the practices of science, conducting investigations, sharing ideas with their peers, teachers and scientists, learning to work with measuring apparatuses, to acquire and process data and use models so as to interpret phenomena. This is a process that requires a gradual collective growth. Schools and universities can both benefit from this cooperation. This paper presents activities of a project focusing on the radon survey in high schools. The ENVIRAD (environmental radioactivity) educational project involved about 2500 students and some tens of teachers in measurements while using solid state nuclear track detectors. This experience began about 15 years ago and is still carried out by various national projects managed by the same research group. The measurements and data analysis have been done in school laboratories and in the university radioactivity laboratory. Several hundred students were also involved in the transduction and signal processing. In some cases, pupils have also been involved in citizen awareness and the dissemination of this experience has kicked off a follow-up project explicitly addressed to citizens. The project has led to the opportunity to learn science through a real physics experiment. The students’ enthusiasm allowed the collection of a relevant amount of data which benefitted both the regional survey on radon and the improvement of nuclear physics teaching at school. Through the project activities it was possible to recognize the interdisciplinary connections among different scientific disciplines connected to radioactivity.

  4. Evaluation of Various Pulse-Decay Laboratory Permeability Measurement Techniques for Highly Stressed Coals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Ruimin; Harpalani, Satya; Pandey, Rohit

    2017-02-01

    The transient technique for laboratory permeability measurement, proposed by Brace et al. (J Geophys Res 73:2225-2236, 1968) and widely used for conventional gas reservoir rocks, is the preferred method when testing low-permeability rocks in the laboratory. However, Brace et al.'s solution leads to considerable errors since it does not take into account compressive storage and sorption effect when applied to sorptive rocks, such as, coals and shales. To verify the applicability of this solution when used to characterize fluid flow behavior of coal, an in-depth investigation of permeability evolution for flow of helium and methane depletion was conducted for San Juan coals using the pressure pulse-decay method under best replicated in situ conditions. Three permeability solutions, Brace et al.'s (1968), Dicker and Smits's (International meeting on petroleum engineering, Society of Petroleum Engineers, 1988) and Cui et al.'s (Geofluids 9:208-223, 2009), were utilized to establish the permeability trends. Both helium and methane permeability results exhibited very small difference between the Brace et al.'s solution and Dicker and Smits's solution, indicating that the effect of compressive storage is negligible. However, methane permeability enhancement at low pressures due to coal matrix shrinkage resulting from gas desorption can be significant and this was observed in pressure response plots and the estimated permeability values using Cui et al.'s solution only. Therefore, it is recommended that Cui et al.'s solution be employed to correctly include the sorption effect when testing coal permeability using the transient technique. A series of experiments were also carried out to establish the stress-dependent permeability trend under constant effective stress condition, and then quantify the sole contribution of the sorption effect on permeability variation. By comparison with the laboratory data obtained under in situ stress/strain condition, it was verified that

  5. Mitigation of the impact of terrestrial contamination on organic measurements from the Mars Science Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Kate, Inge L; Canham, John S; Conrad, Pamela G; Errigo, Therese; Katz, Ira; Mahaffy, Paul R

    2008-06-01

    The objective of the 2009 Mars Science Laboratory (MSL), which is planned to follow the Mars Exploration Rovers and the Phoenix lander to the surface of Mars, is to explore and assess quantitatively a site on Mars as a potential habitat for present or past life. Specific goals include an assessment of the past or present biological potential of the target environment and a characterization of its geology and geochemistry. Included in the 10 investigations of the MSL rover is the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite, which is designed to obtain trace organic measurements, measure water and other volatiles, and measure several light isotopes with experiment sequences designed for both atmospheric and solid-phase samples. SAM integrates a gas chromatograph, a mass spectrometer, and a tunable laser spectrometer supported by sample manipulation tools both within and external to the suite. The sub-part-per-billion sensitivity of the suite for trace species, particularly organic molecules, along with a mobile platform that will contain many kilograms of organic materials, presents a considerable challenge due to the potential for terrestrial contamination to mask the signal of martian organics. We describe the effort presently underway to understand and mitigate, wherever possible within the resource constraints of the mission, terrestrial contamination in MSL and SAM measurements.

  6. Monitoring ice thickness and elastic properties from the measurement of leaky guided waves: A laboratory experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, Ludovic; Lachaud, Cédric; Théry, Romain; Predoi, Mihai V; Marsan, David; Larose, Eric; Weiss, Jérôme; Montagnat, Maurine

    2017-11-01

    The decline of Arctic sea ice extent is one of the most spectacular signatures of global warming, and studies converge to show that this decline has been accelerating over the last four decades, with a rate that is not reproduced by climate models. To improve these models, relying on comprehensive and accurate field data is essential. While sea ice extent and concentration are accurately monitored from microwave imagery, an accurate measure of its thickness is still lacking. Moreover, measuring observables related to the mechanical behavior of the ice (such as Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, etc.) could provide better insights in the understanding of sea ice decline, by completing current knowledge so far acquired mostly from radar and sonar data. This paper aims at demonstrating on the laboratory scale that these can all be estimated simultaneously by measuring seismic waves guided in the ice layer. The experiment consisted of leaving a water tank in a cold room in order to grow an ice layer at its surface. While its thickness was increasing, ultrasonic guided waves were generated with a piezoelectric source, and measurements were subsequently inverted to infer the thickness and mechanical properties of the ice with very good accuracy.

  7. Evaluation of the effects of space allowance on measures of animal welfare in laboratory mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailoo, Jeremy D; Murphy, Eimear; Varholick, Justin A; Novak, Janja; Palme, Rupert; Würbel, Hanno

    2018-01-15

    We studied how space allowance affects measures of animal welfare in mice by systematically varying group size and cage type across three levels each in both males and females of two strains of mice (C57BL/6ByJ and BALB/cByJ; n = 216 cages, a total of 1152 mice). This allowed us to disentangle the effects of total floor area, group size, stocking density, and individual space allocation on a broad range of measures of welfare, including growth (food and water intake, body mass); stress physiology (glucocorticoid metabolites in faecal boli); emotionality (open field behaviour); brain function (recurrent perseveration in a two-choice guessing task); and home-cage behaviour (activity, stereotypic behaviour). While increasing group size was associated with a decrease in food and water intake in general, and more specifically with increased attrition due to escalated aggression in male BALB mice, no other consistent effects of any aspect of space allowance were found with respect to the measures studied here. Our results indicate that within the range of conditions commonly found in laboratory mouse housing, space allowance as such has little impact on measures of welfare, except for group size which may be a risk factor for escalating aggression in males of some strains.

  8. Laboratory and field performance of a laser particle counter for measuring aeolian sand transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugenholtz, Chris H.; Barchyn, Thomas E.

    2011-03-01

    This paper reports the results of laboratory and field tests that evaluate the performance of a new laser particle counter for measuring aeolian sand transport. The Wenglor® model YH03PCT8 ("Wenglor") consists of a laser (655 nm), photo sensor, and switching circuit. When a particle passes through the 0.6 mm diameter, 30 mm long laser beam, the sensor outputs a digital signal. Laboratory tests with medium sand and a vertical gravity flume show that the Wenglor count rate scales approximately linearly with mass flux up to the saturation point of the sensor, after which the count rate decreases despite increasing mass flux. Saturation depends on the diameter and concentration of particles in the airstream and may occur during extreme events in the field. Below saturation sensor performance is relatively consistent; the mean difference between average count rate response was between 50 and 100 counts. Field tests provide a complimentary frame of reference for evaluating the performance of the Wenglor under varying environmental conditions and to gauge its performance with respect to a collocated piezoelectric impact sensor (Sensit H11-B). During 136.5 h of deployment on an active sand dune the relative proportion of time sand transport recorded by two Wenglors was 0.09% and 0.79%, compared to 4.68% by the Sensit H11-B. The weak performance of the Wenglors is attributed to persistent lens contamination from adhesion of sand grains on the sensors after rainfall. However, during dry and windy conditions the Wenglor performance improved substantially; sensors measured a concentration of sand particles in the airstream more than seven times greater than that measured by the Sensit. Between the two Wenglors, the mean absolute count rate difference was 6.16 counts per second, with a standard deviation of 8.53 counts per second. For short-term measurement campaigns in dry conditions, therefore, the Wenglor is relatively consistent and can outperform the Sensit in detecting

  9. The Laboratory Course Assessment Survey: A Tool to Measure Three Dimensions of Research-Course Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corwin, Lisa A; Runyon, Christopher; Robinson, Aspen; Dolan, Erin L

    2015-01-01

    Course-based undergraduate research experiences (CUREs) are increasingly being offered as scalable ways to involve undergraduates in research. Yet few if any design features that make CUREs effective have been identified. We developed a 17-item survey instrument, the Laboratory Course Assessment Survey (LCAS), that measures students' perceptions of three design features of biology lab courses: 1) collaboration, 2) discovery and relevance, and 3) iteration. We assessed the psychometric properties of the LCAS using established methods for instrument design and validation. We also assessed the ability of the LCAS to differentiate between CUREs and traditional laboratory courses, and found that the discovery and relevance and iteration scales differentiated between these groups. Our results indicate that the LCAS is suited for characterizing and comparing undergraduate biology lab courses and should be useful for determining the relative importance of the three design features for achieving student outcomes. © 2015 L. A. Corwin et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2015 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  10. Estimating areal production of intertidal microphytobenthos based on spatio-temporal community dynamics and laboratory measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Guo Ying; Chung, Ik Kyo

    2009-12-01

    In situ Microphytobenthic community dynamics were combined with laboratory measurement of predominant species by fluorescence methods to estimate the areal primary production. Field investigation of community dynamics of microphytobenthos (MPB) was conducted from August 2006 to August 2007 in intertidal flats of the Nakdong River estuary, Korea. MPB Biomass varied between 0.47 and 16.58 μg cm-3 in the surface 1 cm sediment, with two dominant diatom species, Amphora coffeaeformis and Navicula sp., occupying average 77.2 ± 14.9% of total number of MPB cells. The biomass was higher in the slightly muddy sand sites than that in the sand site, and showed different pattern of seasonal variation. The profile of vertical distribution of biomass was an exponential decrease trend with depth in sediments. The biomass proportions in the uppermost 3 mm were 57.6% and 37.8% with and without the presence of biofilm, respectively. The two dominant species were cultured in laboratory, and their photosynthetic parameters, rETRmax (relative maximum electron transport rate), α (light utilization coefficient) and E k (light saturation parameter) were derived from rETR (relative ETR)-irradiance curves by Imaging- PAM (pulse amplitude modulated) fluorometry. The rETR-irradiance curves showed no significant difference of photosynthetic activities between the two species. The areal potential production ranged from 0.74 to 2.22 g C m-2 d-1.

  11. Photofragmentation spectra of halogenated methanes in the VUV photon energy range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cartoni, Antonella, E-mail: antonella.cartoni@uniroma1.it [Dipartimento di Chimica e Tecnologie del Farmaco, Sapienza Università di Roma, P.le Aldo Moro 5, Roma 00185 (Italy); Bolognesi, Paola; Fainelli, Ettore; Avaldi, Lorenzo [CNR-IMIP, Area della Ricerca di Roma 1, Monterotondo Scalo (Rm) 00015 (Italy)

    2014-05-14

    In this paper an investigation of the photofragmentation of dihalomethanes CH{sub 2}X{sub 2} (X = F, Cl, Br, I) and chlorinated methanes (CH{sub n}Cl{sub 4−n} with n = 0–3) with VUV helium, neon, and argon discharge lamps is reported and the role played by the different halogen atoms is discussed. Halogenated methanes are a class of molecules used in several fields of chemistry and the study of their physical and chemical proprieties is of fundamental interest. In particular their photodissociation and photoionization are of great importance since the decomposition of these compounds in the atmosphere strongly affects the environment. The results of the present work show that the halogen-loss is the predominant fragmentation channel for these molecules in the VUV photon energy range and confirm their role as reservoir of chlorine, bromine, and iodine atoms in the atmosphere. Moreover, the results highlight the peculiar feature of CH{sub 2}F{sub 2} as a source of both fluorine and hydrogen atoms and the characteristic formation of I{sub 2}{sup +} and CH{sub 2}{sup +} ions from the photofragmentation of the CH{sub 2}I{sub 2} molecule.

  12. VUV photoionization and dissociative photoionization of the prebiotic molecule acetyl cyanide: Theory and experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellili, A.; Hochlaf, M., E-mail: hochlaf@univ-mlv.fr, E-mail: martin.schwell@lisa.u-pec.fr [Laboratoire Modélisation et Simulation Multi Echelle, MSME UMR 8208 CNRS, Université Paris-Est, 5 bd Descartes, 77454 Marne-la-Vallée (France); Schwell, M., E-mail: hochlaf@univ-mlv.fr, E-mail: martin.schwell@lisa.u-pec.fr; Bénilan, Y.; Fray, N.; Gazeau, M.-C. [Laboratoire Interuniversitaire des Systèmes Atmosphériques (LISA), UMR 7583 CNRS, Institut Pierre et Simon Laplace, Universités Paris-Est Créteil et Paris Diderot, 61 Avenue du Général de Gaulle, 94010 Créteil (France); Mogren Al-Mogren, M. [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, King Saud University, P.O. Box 2455, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Guillemin, J.-C. [Institut des Sciences Chimiques de Rennes, Ecole Nationale Supérieure de Chimie de Rennes, CNRS, UMR 6226, Allée de Beaulieu, CS 50837, 35708 Rennes Cedex 7 (France); Poisson, L. [Laboratoire Francis Perrin, CNRS URA 2453, CEA, IRAMIS, Laboratoire Interactions Dynamique et Lasers, Bât 522, F-91191 Gif/Yvette (France)

    2014-10-07

    The present combined theoretical and experimental investigation concerns the single photoionization of gas-phase acetyl cyanide and the fragmentation pathways of the resulting cation. Acetyl cyanide (AC) is inspired from both the chemistry of cyanoacetylene and the Strecker reaction which are thought to be at the origin of medium sized prebiotic molecules in the interstellar medium. AC can be formed by reaction from cyanoacetylene and water but also from acetaldehyde and HCN or the corresponding radicals. In view of the interpretation of vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) experimental data obtained using synchrotron radiation, we explored the ground potential energy surface (PES) of acetyl cyanide and of its cation using standard and recently implemented explicitly correlated methodologies. Our PES covers the regions of tautomerism (between keto and enol forms) and of the lowest fragmentation channels. This allowed us to deduce accurate thermochemical data for this astrobiologically relevant molecule. Unimolecular decomposition of the AC cation turns out to be very complex. The implications for the evolution of prebiotic molecules under VUV irradiation are discussed.

  13. Energy Yield Determination of Concentrator Solar Cells using Laboratory Measurements: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geisz, John F.; Garcia, Ivan; McMahon, William E.; Steiner, Myles A.; Ochoa, Mario; France, Ryan M.; Habte, Aron; Friedman, Daniel J.

    2015-09-14

    The annual energy conversion efficiency is calculated for a four junction inverted metamorphic solar cell that has been completely characterized in the laboratory at room temperature using measurements fit to a comprehensive optoelectronic model of the multijunction solar cells. A simple model of the temperature dependence is used to predict the performance of the solar cell under varying temperature and spectra characteristic of Golden, CO for an entire year. The annual energy conversion efficiency is calculated by integrating the predicted cell performance over the entire year. The effects of geometric concentration, CPV system thermal characteristics, and luminescent coupling are highlighted. temperature and spectra characteristic of Golden, CO for an entire year. The annual energy conversion efficiency is calculated by integrating the predicted cell performance over the entire year. The effects of geometric concentration, CPV system thermal characteristics, and luminescent coupling are highlighted.

  14. Laboratory measurement of aggression in high school age athletes: provocation in a nonsporting context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, D B; Cherek, D R; Lane, S D

    1999-12-01

    This study investigated the relationship between aggression and type of sports involvement in high school age boys. Athletes (16 boys), ages 15 to 18 years, were separated into two groups, one of 8 athletes who participated in sports with high physical contact, e.g., football and basketball, and the other of 8 athletes who participated in low contact sports, e.g., track and baseball. Students participated in six 25-min. Point Subtraction Aggression Paradigm sessions. The paradigm is an established laboratory model of aggression with three response options: (1) a point-maintained response, (2) an aggressive response, and (3) an escape response. Analysis indicated that the only difference between the groups was that individuals who participated in high contact sports emitted significantly more aggressive responses than individuals who participated in low contact sports. Similarly, psychometric measures of aggression indicated that individuals in the former group self-reported more behavioral incidents of aggression than those in the latter group.

  15. Unexpected methyl migrations of ethanol dimer under synchrotron VUV radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Weizhan; Hu, Yongjun, E-mail: yjhu@scnu.edu.cn, E-mail: lssheng@ustc.edu.cn; Li, Weixing; Guan, Jiwen [MOE Key Laboratory of Laser Life Science and Institute of Laser Life Science, College of Biophotonics, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510631 (China); Liu, Fuyi; Shan, Xiaobin; Sheng, Liusi, E-mail: yjhu@scnu.edu.cn, E-mail: lssheng@ustc.edu.cn [National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230029 (China)

    2015-01-14

    While methyl transfer is well known to occur in the enzyme- and metal-catalyzed reactions, the methyl transfer in the metal-free organic molecules induced by the photon ionization has been less concerned. Herein, vacuum ultraviolet single photon ionization and dissociation of ethanol dimer are investigated with synchrotron radiation photoionization mass spectroscopy and theoretical methods. Besides the protonated clusters cation (C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH) ⋅ H{sup +} (m/z = 47) and the β-carbon-carbon bond cleavage fragment CH{sub 2}O ⋅ (C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH)H{sup +} (m/z = 77), the measured mass spectra revealed that a new fragment (C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH) ⋅ (CH{sub 3}){sup +} (m/z = 61) appeared at the photon energy of 12.1 and 15.0 eV, where the neutral dimer could be vertically ionized to higher ionic state. Thereafter, the generated carbonium ions are followed by a Wagner-Meerwein rearrangement and then dissociate to produce this new fragment, which is considered to generate after surmounting a few barriers including intra- and inter-molecular methyl migrations by the aid of theoretical calculations. The appearance energy of this new fragment is measured as 11.55 ± 0.05 eV by scanning photoionization efficiency curve. While the signal intensity of fragment m/z = 61 starts to increase, the fragments m/z = 47 and 77 tend to slowly incline around 11.55 eV photon energy. This suggests that the additional fragment channels other than (C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH) ⋅ H{sup +} and CH{sub 2}O ⋅ (C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH)H{sup +} have also been opened, which consume some dimer cations. The present report provides a clear description of the photoionization and dissociation processes of the ethanol dimer in the range of the photon energy 12-15 eV.

  16. JCL roundtable: Future of the lipid laboratory: Choosing valuable measures among the lipoproteins (part 1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, William Virgil; Handelsman, Yehuda; Martin, Seth S; Morris, Pamela B

    The measurement of cholesterol and triglycerides as indicators of metabolic disorders and most particularly of vascular disease risk has been of growing importance to physicians and epidemiologists over the past century. This was refocused on the lipoproteins, the specific packages in blood that carry these lipids, by John Gofman, MD, PhD, and Don Fredrickson, MD, more than 50 years ago. We continue to learn about the metabolism of these large molecular structures and their relationship to arteriosclerosis as new genetic and interventional studies are published. The clinical laboratory has evolved to provide more focused information with measures that can help us assess risk and target our therapy more effectively. In this roundtable discussion, I had the opportunity to talk with physicians who consider lipoprotein management to be central features of their practice every day. They personally care for patients with metabolic disorders in which the lipoproteins have caused disease or are predicted to do so. They are well-versed on the way that science is leading us in our field. I believe that you will learn from their view of current needs regarding lipoprotein measures and the changes that may derive from ongoing scientific studies in our field. Copyright © 2017 National Lipid Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Silicon Carbide Temperature Monitor Measurements at the High Temperature Test Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. L. Rempe; K. G. Condie; D. L. Knudson; L. L. Snead

    2010-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) temperature monitors are now available for use as temperature sensors in Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) irradiation test capsules. Melt wires or paint spots, which are typically used as temperature sensors in ATR static capsules, are limited in that they can only detect whether a single temperature is or is not exceeded. SiC monitors are advantageous because a single monitor can be used to detect for a range of temperatures that may have occurred during irradiation. As part of the efforts initiated by the ATR National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to make SiC temperature monitors available, a capability was developed to complete post-irradiation evaluations of these monitors. As discussed in this report, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) selected the resistance measurement approach for detecting peak irradiation temperature from SiC temperature monitors. This document describes the INL efforts to develop the capability to complete these resistance measurements. In addition, the procedure is reported that was developed to assure that high quality measurements are made in a consistent fashion.

  18. Identifying innovation in laboratory studies of cultural evolution: rates of retention and measures of adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Christine A; Cornish, Hannah; Kandler, Anne

    2016-03-19

    In recent years, laboratory studies of cultural evolution have become increasingly prevalent as a means of identifying and understanding the effects of cultural transmission on the form and functionality of transmitted material. The datasets generated by these studies may provide insights into the conditions encouraging, or inhibiting, high rates of innovation, as well as the effect that this has on measures of adaptive cultural change. Here we review recent experimental studies of cultural evolution with a view to elucidating the role of innovation in generating observed trends. We first consider how tasks are presented to participants, and how the corresponding conceptualization of task success is likely to influence the degree of intent underlying any deviations from perfect reproduction. We then consider the measures of interest used by the researchers to track the changes that occur as a result of transmission, and how these are likely to be affected by differing rates of retention. We conclude that considering studies of cultural evolution from the perspective of innovation provides us with valuable insights that help to clarify important differences in research designs, which have implications for the likely effects of variation in retention rates on measures of cultural adaptation. © 2016 The Author(s).

  19. Laboratory measurements and model sensitivity studies of dust deposition ice nucleation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Kulkarni

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the ice nucleating properties of mineral dust particles to understand the sensitivity of simulated cloud properties to two different representations of contact angle in the Classical Nucleation Theory (CNT. These contact angle representations are based on two sets of laboratory deposition ice nucleation measurements: Arizona Test Dust (ATD particles of 100, 300 and 500 nm sizes were tested at three different temperatures (−25, −30 and −35 °C, and 400 nm ATD and kaolinite dust species were tested at two different temperatures (−30 and −35 °C. These measurements were used to derive the onset relative humidity with respect to ice (RHice required to activate 1% of dust particles as ice nuclei, from which the onset single contact angles were then calculated based on CNT. For the probability density function (PDF representation, parameters of the log-normal contact angle distribution were determined by fitting CNT-predicted activated fraction to the measurements at different RHice. Results show that onset single contact angles vary from ~18 to 24 degrees, while the PDF parameters are sensitive to the measurement conditions (i.e. temperature and dust size. Cloud modeling simulations were performed to understand the sensitivity of cloud properties (i.e. ice number concentration, ice water content, and cloud initiation times to the representation of contact angle and PDF distribution parameters. The model simulations show that cloud properties are sensitive to onset single contact angles and PDF distribution parameters. The comparison of our experimental results with other studies shows that under similar measurement conditions the onset single contact angles are consistent within ±2.0 degrees, while our derived PDF parameters have larger discrepancies.

  20. Laboratory measurements and model sensitivity studies of dust deposition ice nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, G.; Fan, J.; Comstock, J. M.; Liu, X.; Ovchinnikov, M.

    2012-08-01

    We investigated the ice nucleating properties of mineral dust particles to understand the sensitivity of simulated cloud properties to two different representations of contact angle in the Classical Nucleation Theory (CNT). These contact angle representations are based on two sets of laboratory deposition ice nucleation measurements: Arizona Test Dust (ATD) particles of 100, 300 and 500 nm sizes were tested at three different temperatures (-25, -30 and -35 °C), and 400 nm ATD and kaolinite dust species were tested at two different temperatures (-30 and -35 °C). These measurements were used to derive the onset relative humidity with respect to ice (RHice) required to activate 1% of dust particles as ice nuclei, from which the onset single contact angles were then calculated based on CNT. For the probability density function (PDF) representation, parameters of the log-normal contact angle distribution were determined by fitting CNT-predicted activated fraction to the measurements at different RHice. Results show that onset single contact angles vary from ~18 to 24 degrees, while the PDF parameters are sensitive to the measurement conditions (i.e. temperature and dust size). Cloud modeling simulations were performed to understand the sensitivity of cloud properties (i.e. ice number concentration, ice water content, and cloud initiation times) to the representation of contact angle and PDF distribution parameters. The model simulations show that cloud properties are sensitive to onset single contact angles and PDF distribution parameters. The comparison of our experimental results with other studies shows that under similar measurement conditions the onset single contact angles are consistent within ±2.0 degrees, while our derived PDF parameters have larger discrepancies.

  1. Laboratory Measurements of Sulfuric Acid Vapor Opacity at Millimeter Wavelengths Under Venus Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akins, Alexander Brooks; Steffes, Paul G.

    2017-10-01

    Radio astronomical observations of the lower-cloud and sub-cloud regions of the Venusian atmosphere at millimeter wavelengths can provide insight into the nature of the sub-cloud sulfur chemistry. Previous observations (de Pater et al., Icarus 90, 1991 and Sagawa, J. Natl. Inst. of Inf. And Comm. Tech. 55, 2008) indicate substantial variations in Venus disc brightness at millimeter wavelengths, likely due to variations in SO2 and H2SO4 vapor abundances. Although previous measurements of H2SO4 vapor opacity provide accurate information at centimeter wavelengths (Kolodner and Steffes, Icarus 132, 1998), extrapolation to millimeter wavelength observations is speculative. A Fabry-Perot open resonator with a quality factor in excess of 15,000 has been designed to measure the opacity of H2SO4 vapor in a CO2 atmosphere under Venus temperature and pressure conditions below the clouds. The resonator system has been designed using corrosion-resistant materials to ensure data integrity. Opacity measurements made with this system target the 2-4 millimeter wavelength range, applicable to recent Atacama Large Millimeter Array observations of Venus. Initial laboratory results for H2SO4 vapor opacity will be presented, and the implications of these results for pressure broadened opacity formalisms will be discussed. In addition to radio astronomical observations, these results of these measurements can aid in the interpretation of radiometer and radio occultation measurements from future Venus missions, such as the Venera D orbiter. This work is supported by the NASA Solar System Workings Program under grant NNX17AB19G.

  2. How compliant are technicians with universal safety measures in medical laboratories in Croatia?--A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukic, Kristina; Zoric, Matea; Pozaic, Petra; Starcic, Jelena; Culjak, Marija; Saracevic, Andrea; Miler, Marijana

    2015-01-01

    This pilot study aimed to investigate the use of personal protective equipment (PPE) and compliance to the code of conduct (rules defined in institutional, governmental and professional guidelines) among laboratory technicians in Croatian medical laboratories. In addition, we explored the differences in compliance between participants of different age groups, laboratory ownership and accreditation status. An anonymous and voluntary survey with 15 questions was conducted among Croatian medical laboratory technicians (N=217). The questions were divided into two groups: demographic characteristics and the use of PPE. The questions of the second part were graded according to the Likert scale (1-4) and an overall score, shown as median and range (min-max), was calculated for each participant. Differences between the overall scores were tested for each group of participants. The majority of participants always wear protective clothes at work, 38.7% of them always wear gloves in daily routine, more than 30.0% consume food and almost half of them drink beverages at workplace. A significantly lower overall score was found for participants working in public compared to private laboratories (36 (16-40) vs. 40 (31-40), Plaboratory accreditation status (P=0.081). A considerable percentage of laboratory technicians in Croatian medical laboratories do not comply with safety measures. Lack of compliance is observed in all personnel regardless laboratory accreditation and participants' age. However, those working in private laboratories adhere more to the code of conduct.

  3. VUV photo-oxidation of gaseous benzene combined with ozone-assisted catalytic oxidation: Effect on transition metal catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Haibao, E-mail: seabao8@gmail.com [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University (China); Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Environmental Pollution Control and Remediation Technology (Sun Yat-sen University) (China); Lu, Haoxian; Zhan, Yujie; Liu, Gaoyuan; Feng, Qiuyu; Huang, Huiling; Wu, Muyan; Ye, Xinguo [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University (China)

    2017-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Mn nanoparticles are highly dispersed on ZSM-5 and most efficient in benzene degradation in the VUV-OZCO process. - Highlights: • Vacuum UV irradiation is well combined with O{sub 3} catalytic oxidation. • O{sub 3} byproducts was used to enhance catalytic oxidation of VOCs. • Mn/ZSM-5 achieved the best catalytic activity for benzene degradation. - Abstract: Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) cause the major air pollution concern. In this study, a series of ZSM-5 supported transition metals were prepared by impregnation method. They were combined with vacuum UV (VUV) photo-oxidation in a continuous-flow packed-bed reactor and used for the degradation of benzene, a typical toxic VOCs. Compared with VUV photo-oxidation alone, the introduction of catalysts can greatly enhance benzene oxidation under the help of O{sub 3}, the by-products from VUV irradiation, via ozone-assisted catalytic oxidation (OZCO). The catalytic activity of transition metals towards benzene oxidation followed the order: Mn > Co > Cu > Ni > Fe. Mn achieved the best catalytic activity due to the strongest capability for O{sub 3} catalytic decomposition and utilization. Benzene and O{sub 3} removal efficiency reached as high as 97% and 100% after 360 min, respectively. O{sub 3} was catalytically decomposed, generating highly reactive oxidants such as ·OH and ·O for benzene oxidation.

  4. Comparison of different undulator schemes with superimposed alternating gradients for the VUV-FEL at the TESLA Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pflueger, J.; Nikitina, Y.M. [DESY/HASYLAB, Hamburg (Germany)

    1995-12-31

    For the VUV-FEL at the TESLA Test Facility an undulator with a total length of 30 m is needed. In this study three different approaches to realize an undulator with a sinusoidal plus a superimposed quadrupolar field were studied with the 3D code MAFIA.

  5. Variable speed rotary compressor and adjustable speed drive efficiencies measured in the laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, W. A.

    Two state-of-the-art variable-speed rotary compressors, of nominal one ton cooling capacity, were instrumented and tested in the laboratory. Both compressors were identical except for their respective variable-speed drive systems (i.e., motor and inverter). One compressor had an inverter driven induction motor (IDIM) drive, and the other had a permanent magnet electronically commutated motor drive (PM-ECM). The laboratory study evaluated the compressor's efficiency under representative variable-speed conditions. Testing was conducted as a function of compressor drive frequency and of refrigerant condensing and evaporating conditions. Saturated refrigerant conditions, inlet superheat, and subcooling were controlled using a secondary refrigerant calorimeter. Spectrum analysis was conducted on the current input to one phase of the three-phase drive systems to measure motor speed and characterize harmonic content of the inverters. An optimal volt per Hz ratio was determined at 120-, 90-, 60-, and 30-Hz drive frequencies and at different load conditions for the rotary with induction motor as driven by a PWM inverter and also by a motor generator set (ideal induction motor drive). Variation of voltage input to the compressor had the largest effect at the lowest drive frequency (30Hz). A 5 percent variation about the optimal voltage at 30 Hz frequency caused a roughly 5 percent drop in compressor isentropic efficiency. Calorimeter data were used to develop modulating compressor and drive system performance maps. Performances of the two compressors were compared and the rotary with PM-ECM drive showed better efficiency trends at 30-Hz drive frequency. Above the 30-Hz drive frequency no clear advantage was observed for the PM-ECM vs the IDIM, possibly due to oversizing of the PM-ECM inverter.

  6. Measurements of air contaminants during the Cerro Grande fire at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eberhart, Craig

    2010-08-01

    Ambient air sampling for radioactive air contaminants was continued throughout the Cerro Grande fire that burned part of Los Alamos National Laboratory. During the fire, samples were collected more frequently than normal because buildup of smoke particles on the filters was decreasing the air flow. Overall, actual sampling time was 96% of the total possible sampling time for the May 2000 samples. To evaluate potential human exposure to air contaminants, the samples were analyzed as soon as possible and for additional specific radionuclides. Analyses showed that the smoke from the fire included resuspended radon decay products that had been accumulating for many years on the vegetation and the forest floor that burned. Concentrations of plutonium, americium, and depleted uranium were also measurable, but at locations and concentrations comparable to non-fire periods. A continuous particulate matter sampler measured concentrations that exceeded the National Ambient Air Quality Standard for PM-10 (particles less than 10 micrometers in diameter). These high concentrations were caused by smoke from the fire when it was close to the sampler.

  7. Laboratory-scale measurements of effective relative permeability for layered sands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butts, M.G.; Korsgaard, S.

    1996-12-31

    Predictions of the impact of remediation or the extent of contamination resulting from spills of gasoline, solvents and other petroleum products, must often be made in complex geological environments. Such problems can be treated by introducing the concept of effective parameters that incorporate the effects of soil layering or other heterogeneities into a large-scale flow description. Studies that derive effective multiphase parameters are few, and approximations are required to treat the non-linear multiphase flow equations. The purpose of this study is to measure effective relative permeabilities for well-defined multi-layered soils at the laboratory scale. Relative permeabilities were determined for homogeneous and layered, unconsolidated sands using the method of Jones and Roszelle (1978). The experimental data show that endpoint relative permeabilities are important in defining the shape of the relative permeability curves, but these cannot be predicted by estimation methods base on capillary pressure data. The most significant feature of the measured effective relative permeability curves is that the entrapped (residual) oil saturation is significantly larger than the residual saturation of the individual layers. This observation agrees with previous theoretical predictions of large-scale entrapment Butts, 1993 and (1995). Enhanced entrapment in heterogeneous soils has several important implications for spill remediation, for example, the reduced efficiency of direct recovery. (au) 17 refs.

  8. Velocity measurements in the wake of laboratory-scale vertical axis turbines and rotating circular cylinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araya, Daniel; Dabiri, John

    2014-11-01

    We present experimental data to compare the wake characteristics of a laboratory-scale vertical-axis turbine with that of a rotating circular cylinder. The cylinder is constructed to have the same diameter and height as the turbine in order to provide a comparison that is independent of the tunnel boundary conditions. Both the turbine and cylinder are motor-driven to tip-speed ratios based on previous experiments. An analysis of the effect of the motor-driven flow is also presented. These measurements are relevant for exploring the complex structure of the vertical axis turbine wake relative to the canonical wake of a circular cylinder. 2D particle image velocimetry is used to measure the velocity field in a two-dimensional plane normal to the axis of rotation. This velocity field is then used to compare time-averaged streamwise velocity, phase-averaged vorticity, and the velocity power spectrum in the wake of the two configurations. The results give insight into the extent to which solid cylinders could be used as a simplified model of the flow around vertical axis turbines in computational simulations, especially for turbine array optimization.

  9. Measurement of angioplasty lumen volume and wall compliance: a laboratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, A; Allen, V

    1997-02-01

    We have developed a device and technique for measuring the pressure-volume characteristics of an arterial segment from a standard angioplasty balloon, enabling us in this laboratory study to investigate the ability of the technique to measure changes in lumen volume and wall compliance. Percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) is a valuable clinical procedure for alleviating arterial stenosis, but the long-term success of the technique is less than ideal. The ability to monitor the effect of the balloon on the artery during inflations could lead to improvements in the technique. In this study, 10 different lumen diameters (1.6 to 3.4 mm) were produced in a Perspex block, and six different wall compliances produced with silicone tubes of constant inner diameter (2.0 mm) but different outer diameters (3.5 to 6.0 mm) A standard PTCA balloon was inflated under automatic control at a constant rate of 0.05 ml s-1 to 800 kPa (8 bar). Pressure and volume data were recorded to computer continuously throughout the procedure. Differences in lumen volume of +/-0.01 ml and wall compliance of +/-5% could be differentiated with greater than 95% confidence. We conclude that our technique allows small changes in lumen volume and wall compliance to be differentiated using a standard angioplasty catheter and balloon.

  10. Proton Lateral Broadening Distribution Comparisons Between GRNTRN, MCNPX, and Laboratory Beam Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertens, Christopher J.; Moyers, Michael F.; Walker, Steven A.; Tweed, John

    2010-01-01

    Recent developments in NASA s deterministic High charge (Z) and Energy TRaNsport (HZETRN) code have included lateral broadening of primary ion beams due to small-angle multiple Coulomb scattering, and coupling of the ion-nuclear scattering interactions with energy loss and straggling. This new version of HZETRN is based on Green function methods, called GRNTRN, and is suitable for modeling transport with both space environment and laboratory boundary conditions. Multiple scattering processes are a necessary extension to GRNTRN in order to accurately model ion beam experiments, to simulate the physical and biological-effective radiation dose, and to develop new methods and strategies for light ion radiation therapy. In this paper we compare GRNTRN simulations of proton lateral broadening distributions with beam measurements taken at Loma Linda University Proton Therapy Facility. The simulated and measured lateral broadening distributions are compared for a 250 MeV proton beam on aluminum, polyethylene, polystyrene, bone substitute, iron, and lead target materials. The GRNTRN results are also compared to simulations from the Monte Carlo MCNPX code for the same projectile-target combinations described above.

  11. Estimation of subsurface dielectric target depth for GPR planetary exploration: Laboratory measurements and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauro, Sebastian Emanuel; Mattei, Elisabetta; Barone, Pier Matteo; Pettinelli, Elena; Vannaroni, Giuliano; Valerio, Guido; Comite, Davide; Galli, Alessandro

    2013-06-01

    In order to test the accuracy of Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) in the detection of subsurface targets for planetary exploration, a laboratory scale experiment is performed based on a 'sand box' setup using two different bistatic GPR commercial instruments. Specific attention is paid to the challenging case of buried dielectric scatterers whose location and dimensions are of the same order of magnitude of the GPR antenna separation and signal wavelengths. The target depth is evaluated by using the wave propagation velocity measured with Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR). By means of a proper modeling of the different wave-propagation contributions to the gathered signal, the position of buried targets is correctly estimated with both GPRs even for rather shallow and small-size scatterers in near-field conditions. In this frame, relevant results for a basalt block buried in a silica soil are discussed. The experimental configuration is also simulated with an ad-hoc numerical code, whose synthetic radar sections fully confirm the measured results. The acquired information is of paramount importance for the analysis of various scenarios involving GPR on-site application in future space missions.

  12. Second Order Harmonics Suppression With Glass Filters for Synchrotron UV Radiation Calibration Measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Burattini, E; Gambicorti, L; Malvezzi, F; Marcelli, A; Monti, F; Pace, E

    2005-01-01

    This development is the latest result of the cooperation between the National Laboratories of Frascati and the Department of Astronomy and Space Science of the University of Florence to improve the capabilities of the existing DXR-2 beam line at the DAΦNE-LIGHT laboratories. This collaboration has assessed a new facility in order to characterize optics and sensors in a wide spectral range (ranging from VUV to IR). Previous measurements [1] have highlighted some limitations in the present setup, as higher signal levels due to the diffracted radiation of the grating in the second order have to be removed to allow an accurate detection. In this work a glass filter is used to remove such spurious signal present in the spectral region with λ > 360 nm. The characteristics of the filter and its application to the optical system used to measure the sensitivity of a diamond-based photoconductor have been discussed.

  13. Advanced Optical Diagnostics for Ice Crystal Cloud Measurements in the NASA Glenn Propulsion Systems Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencic, Timothy J.; Fagan, Amy; Van Zante, Judith F.; Kirkegaard, Jonathan P.; Rohler, David P.; Maniyedath, Arjun; Izen, Steven H.

    2013-01-01

    A light extinction tomography technique has been developed to monitor ice water clouds upstream of a direct connected engine in the Propulsion Systems Laboratory (PSL) at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). The system consists of 60 laser diodes with sheet generating optics and 120 detectors mounted around a 36-inch diameter ring. The sources are pulsed sequentially while the detectors acquire line-of-sight extinction data for each laser pulse. Using computed tomography algorithms, the extinction data are analyzed to produce a plot of the relative water content in the measurement plane. To target the low-spatial-frequency nature of ice water clouds, unique tomography algorithms were developed using filtered back-projection methods and direct inversion methods that use Gaussian basis functions. With the availability of a priori knowledge of the mean droplet size and the total water content at some point in the measurement plane, the tomography system can provide near real-time in-situ quantitative full-field total water content data at a measurement plane approximately 5 feet upstream of the engine inlet. Results from ice crystal clouds in the PSL are presented. In addition to the optical tomography technique, laser sheet imaging has also been applied in the PSL to provide planar ice cloud uniformity and relative water content data during facility calibration before the tomography system was available and also as validation data for the tomography system. A comparison between the laser sheet system and light extinction tomography resulting data are also presented. Very good agreement of imaged intensity and water content is demonstrated for both techniques. Also, comparative studies between the two techniques show excellent agreement in calculation of bulk total water content averaged over the center of the pipe.

  14. Critical analysis of laboratory measurements and monitoring system of water-pipe network corrosion-case study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agata Jazdzewska

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Case study of corrosion failure of urban water supply system caused by environmental factors was presented. Nowadays corrosion monitoring of water distribution systems is an object of major concern. There is possibility of application broad range of techniques like gravimetric and electrochemical. Both kinds of techniques can be applied in laboratory and field conditions. In many cases researches limit the case analysis to measurements in laboratory conditions. Presented work contain critical analysis of results obtained in laboratory and field conditions based on corrosion monitoring of three pipelines systems failure in Krakow.

  15. Inter-laboratory comparisons of hexenuronic acid measurements in kraft eucalyptus pulps using a UV-Vis spectroscopic method

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.Y. Zhu; H.F Zhou; Chai X.S.; Donna Johannes; Richard Pope; Cristina Valls; M. Blanca Roncero

    2014-01-01

    An inter-laboratory comparison of a UV-Vis spectroscopic method (TAPPI T 282 om-13 “Hexeneuronic acid content of chemical pulp”) for hexeneuronic acid measurements was conducted using three eucalyptus kraft pulps. The pulp samples were produced in a laboratory at kappa numbers of approximately 14, 20, and 35. The hexeneuronic acid contents of the three pulps were...

  16. Interlaboratory comparability, bias, and precision for four laboratories measuring constituents in precipitation, November 1982-August 1983

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, M.H.; Schroder, L.J.; Malo, B.A.

    1985-01-01

    Four laboratories were evaluated in their analysis of identical natural and simulated precipitation water samples. Interlaboratory comparability was evaluated using analysis of variance coupled with Duncan 's multiple range test, and linear-regression models describing the relations between individual laboratory analytical results for natural precipitation samples. Results of the statistical analyses indicate that certain pairs of laboratories produce different results when analyzing identical samples. Analyte bias for each laboratory was examined using analysis of variance coupled with Duncan 's multiple range test on data produced by the laboratories from the analysis of identical simulated precipitation samples. Bias for a given analyte produced by a single laboratory has been indicated when the laboratory mean for that analyte is shown to be significantly different from the mean for the most-probable analyte concentrations in the simulated precipitation samples. Ion-chromatographic methods for the determination of chloride, nitrate, and sulfate have been compared with the colorimetric methods that were also in use during the study period. Comparisons were made using analysis of variance coupled with Duncan 's multiple range test for means produced by the two methods. Analyte precision for each laboratory has been estimated by calculating a pooled variance for each analyte. Analyte estimated precisions have been compared using F-tests and differences in analyte precisions for laboratory pairs have been reported. (USGS)

  17. Geomechanics Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Geomechanics Laboratory allows its users to measure rock properties under a wide range of simulated service conditions up to very high pressures and complex load...

  18. High-brightness VUV sources based on plasma-dynamic magnetoplasma compressor discharges in gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamrukov, A. S.; Kozlov, N. P.; Protasov, Iu. S.; Shashkovskii, S. G.

    1989-02-01

    The paper is concerned with the physical and technical aspects of the use of plasma-dynamic methods for generating high-power electromagnetic pulses over a wide spectral region, particularly in the UV and VUV spectral bands. In the experimental studies reviewed here, these methods are implemented by using high-current discharges of an erosion-type magnetoplasma compressor in gases. Approaches to the optimization of the energy and spectral-brightness characteristics of such discharges are discussed. The development of high power (1.5 GW) open-type plasma sources with a tunable emission spectrum and a light efficiency of 40-60 percent which can operate in the repetitively pulsed mode is reported.

  19. DISCREPANCY BETWEEN TRAINING, COMPETITION AND LABORATORY MEASURES OF MAXIMUM HEART RATE IN NCAA DIVISION 2 DISTANCE RUNNERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvah C. Stahlnecker IV

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A percentage of either measured or predicted maximum heart rate is commonly used to prescribe and measure exercise intensity. However, maximum heart rate in athletes may be greater during competition or training than during laboratory exercise testing. Thus, the aim of the present investigation was to determine if endurance-trained runners train and compete at or above laboratory measures of 'maximum' heart rate. Maximum heart rates were measured utilising a treadmill graded exercise test (GXT in a laboratory setting using 10 female and 10 male National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA division 2 cross-country and distance event track athletes. Maximum training and competition heart rates were measured during a high-intensity interval training day (TR HR and during competition (COMP HR at an NCAA meet. TR HR (207 ± 5.0 b·min-1; means ± SEM and COMP HR (206 ± 4 b·min-1 were significantly (p < 0.05 higher than maximum heart rates obtained during the GXT (194 ± 2 b·min-1. The heart rate at the ventilatory threshold measured in the laboratory occurred at 83.3 ± 2.5% of the heart rate at VO2 max with no differences between the men and women. However, the heart rate at the ventilatory threshold measured in the laboratory was only 77% of the maximal COMP HR or TR HR. In order to optimize training-induced adaptation, training intensity for NCAA division 2 distance event runners should not be based on laboratory assessment of maximum heart rate, but instead on maximum heart rate obtained either during training or during competition

  20. Pre-Harvest Sugarcane Burning: Determination of Emission Factors through Laboratory Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Andrade Carvalho

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Sugarcane is an important crop for the Brazilian economy and roughly 50% of its production is used to produce ethanol. However, the common practice of pre-harvest burning of sugarcane straw emits particulate material, greenhouse gases, and tropospheric ozone precursors to the atmosphere. Even with policies to eliminate the practice of pre-harvest sugarcane burning in the near future, there is still significant environmental damage. Thus, the generation of reliable inventories of emissions due to this activity is crucial in order to assess their environmental impact. Nevertheless, the official Brazilian emissions inventory does not presently include the contribution from pre-harvest sugarcane burning. In this context, this work aims to determine sugarcane straw burning emission factors for some trace gases and particulate material smaller than 2.5 μm in the laboratory. Excess mixing ratios for CO2, CO, NOX, UHC (unburned hydrocarbons, and PM2.5 were measured, allowing the estimation of their respective emission factors. Average estimated values for emission factors (g kg−1 of burned dry biomass were 1,303 ± 218 for CO2, 65 ± 14 for CO, 1.5 ± 0.4 for NOX, 16 ± 6 for UHC, and 2.6 ± 1.6 for PM2.5. These emission factors can be used to generate more realistic emission inventories and therefore improve the results of air quality models.

  1. Measuring the spatial resolution of an optical system in an undergraduate optics laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Calvin; Donnelly, T. D.

    2017-06-01

    Two methods of quantifying the spatial resolution of a camera are described, performed, and compared, with the objective of designing an imaging-system experiment for students in an undergraduate optics laboratory. With the goal of characterizing the resolution of a typical digital single-lens reflex (DSLR) camera, we motivate, introduce, and show agreement between traditional test-target contrast measurements and the technique of using Fourier analysis to obtain the modulation transfer function (MTF). The advantages and drawbacks of each method are compared. Finally, we explore the rich optical physics at work in the camera system by calculating the MTF as a function of wavelength and f-number. For example, we find that the Canon 40D demonstrates better spatial resolution at short wavelengths, in accordance with scalar diffraction theory, but is not diffraction-limited, being significantly affected by spherical aberration. The experiment and data analysis routines described here can be built and written in an undergraduate optics lab setting.

  2. Laboratory measurements of super-resolving Toraldo pupils for radio astronomical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmi, Luca; Bolli, Pietro; Cresci, Luca; D'Agostino, Francesco; Migliozzi, Massimo; Mugnai, Daniela; Natale, Enzo; Nesti, Renzo; Panella, Dario; Stefani, Lorenzo

    2017-06-01

    The concept of super-resolution refers to various methods for improving the angular resolution of an optical imaging system beyond the classical diffraction limit. Although several techniques to narrow the central lobe of the illumination Point Spread Function have been developed in optical microscopy, most of these methods cannot be implemented on astronomical telescopes. A possible exception is represented by the variable transmittance filters, also known as "Toraldo Pupils" (TPs) since they were introduced for the first time by G. Toraldo di Francia in 1952 (Toraldo di Francia, Il Nuovo Cimento (Suppl.) 9, 426, 1952). In the microwave range, the first successful laboratory test of TPs was performed in 2003 (Mugnai et al. Phys. Lett. A 311, 77-81, 2003). These first results suggested that TPs could represent a viable approach to achieve super-resolution in Radio Astronomy. We have therefore started a project devoted to a more exhaustive analysis of TPs, in order to assess their potential usefulness to achieve super-resolution on a radio telescope, as well as to determine their drawbacks. In the present work we report on the results of extensive microwave measurements, using TPs with different geometrical shapes, which confirm the correctness of the first experiments in 2003. We have also extended the original investigation to carry out full-wave electromagnetic numerical simulations and also to perform planar scanning of the near-field and transform the results into the far-field.

  3. VUV treatment combined with mechanical strain of stretchable polymer foils resulting in cell alignment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barb, R.-A. [Institute of Applied Physics, Johannes Kepler University Linz (Austria); Magnus, B. [Innovacell Biotechnologie AG, Innsbruck (Austria); Innerbichler, S. [Innerbichler GmbH, Breitenbach am Inn (Austria); Greunz, T. [CDL-MS-MACH, Johannes Kepler University Linz (Austria); Wiesbauer, M. [Institute of Applied Physics, Johannes Kepler University Linz (Austria); Marksteiner, R. [Innovacell Biotechnologie AG, Innsbruck (Austria); Stifter, D. [CDL-MS-MACH, Johannes Kepler University Linz (Austria); Heitz, J., E-mail: johannes.heitz@jku.at [Institute of Applied Physics, Johannes Kepler University Linz (Austria)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Elastic polyurethane (PU) foils were exposed to the vacuum-UV in reactive atmosphere. • The photomodification resulted in improved cytocompatibilty. • Parallel microgrooves formed on the irradiated PU surfaces after strong elongation. • Cells seeded onto microgrooves aligned their shapes in the direction of the grooves. • Elongation occurred also for cells on PU subjected to cyclic mechanical stretching. - Abstract: Cell-alignment along a defined direction can have a direct effect on the cell functionality and differentiation. Oriented micro- or nanotopographic structures on cell culture substrates can induce cell-alignment. Surface chemistry, wettability, and stiffness of the substrate are also important material features as they strongly influence the cell–substrate interactions. For improved bio-compatibility, highly elastic polyurethane (PU) foils were exposed to the vacuum-UV (VUV) light of a Xe{sub 2}{sup *} excimer lamp at 172 nm in a nitrogen containing atmosphere (N{sub 2} or NH{sub 3}). The irradiation resulted in a change in the chemical surface composition. Additionally, the formation of regular parallel microgrooves was observed on the irradiated surfaces after strong uni-axial deformation (i.e., more than about 50% strain) of the photo-modified PU foils. Cell seeding experiments demonstrated that the VUV modified polymer foils strongly enhance cell adhesion and proliferation. Cells seeded onto microgrooves aligned their shapes and elongated in the direction of the grooves. A similar effect was observed for cells seeded on photo-modified PU foils subjected to cyclic mechanical stretching at lower strain levels (i.e., typically 10% strain) without groove-formation. The cells had also here an elongated shape, however they not always align in a defined direction relative to the stretching.

  4. Laboratory Measurements of Fe xxiv Line Emission: 3[r arrow]2 Transitions near Excitation Threshold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, M.F.; Kahn, S.M.; Savin, D.W. (Department of Physics and Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States)); Beiersdorfer, P.; Brown, G.V.; Liedahl, D.A.; Reed, K.J. (Department of Physics and Space Technology, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore CA 94550 (United States)); Bhalla, C.P.; Grabbe, S.R. (Department of Physics, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506 (United States))

    1999-06-01

    Using the Electron Beam Ion Trap facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we have measured relative cross sections for Fe xxiv line emission at electron energies between 0.7 and 3.0 keV. The measurements include line formation by direct electron impact excitation (DE), radiative cascades, resonant excitation (RE), and dielectronic recombination (DR) satellites with captured electrons in n[ge]5 levels. Good agreement with [ital R]-matrix and distorted wave calculations is found. In collisionally ionized plasmas, at temperatures near where the ion abundance peaks (kT[sub e] [approximately]1.7 keV), the RE contributions arefound to be [approx lt]5[percent] of the line emission, while the DR satellites contribute [approx lt]10[percent]. While good agreement with state-of-the-art atomic physics calculations is found, there is less good agreement with existingspectral synthesis codes in common astrophysical use. For the Fe xxiv 3p[sub 3/2] [r arrow]2s[sub 1/2], 3p[sub 1/2] [r arrow]2s[sub 1/2], and 3d[sub 5/2] [r arrow]2p[sub 3/2] transitions, the synthesis code MEKAL underestimates the emissivity in coronal equilibrium by [approximately]20[percent] at temperatures near where the ion abundance peaks. In situations where the ionization balance is not solely determined by the electron temperature, RE and DR satellites may contribute a considerable fraction of the line emission. [copyright] [ital [copyright] 1999.] [ital The American Astronomical Society

  5. Measurement of Chlorophyll Loss Due to Phytoremediation of Ag Nanoparticles in the First-Year Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkelmann, Kurt; Bernas, Leonard; Swiger, Brendan; Brown, Shannon

    2017-01-01

    A two-week experiment is presented in which students can observe the impact of nanoparticles on the concentration of chlorophyll in plants. First-year students in an introductory nanotechnology laboratory course and a general chemistry laboratory course synthesized silver nanoparticles and then exposed stalks of "Egeria densa" ("E.…

  6. Laboratory measurements for the wavelength dependence of the linear polarization with the PROGRA2 instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renard, Jean-Baptiste; Hadamcik, Edith; Levasseur-Regourd, Anny-Chantal; Carrasco, Nathalie; Couté, Benoit; Duverger, Vincent; Guerrini, Vincent

    2017-04-01

    Clouds of solid particles are present in many regions of the Solar System (comets, interplanetary dust cloud, planetary atmospheres). These clouds can be remotely studied by the light they scatter. There is a need for a data base of the light scattered by a large variety of samples at different wavelengths to interpret such measurements. The PROGRA2 instruments are used for this purpose. The PROGRA2 instruments, PROGRA2-VIS and PROGRA2-IR, are imaging polarimeters with a rotating arm to change the phase angle (angle between directions of illumination and observation). They allow to retrieve the complete polarization phase function between 10° and 165°. The light sources are at around 550 and 650 nm for PROGRA2-VIS, and 1000 and 1500 nm for PROGRA2-IR. The detectors are cameras, with a spatial resolution between 20 and 40 micrometers per pixel (PROGRA2-IR uses now new high sensitivity cameras). Measurements are conducted in the laboratory by an air draught technique for grains smaller than about 20 micrometers (which can be included in porous aggregates), and during parabolic flights on-board the A300 ZeroG and now the A310 ZeroG for larger grains; these flights campaigns are funded by the French and European Space Agencies. Hundreds of scattering phase functions have been obtained since 20 years, for a large number of samples (sands, silicon carbide, basalt, volcanic ashes, lunar and Martian simulants, tholins, meteoritic material, black carbon, carbonaceous compounds, …); the main results are available at www.icare.univ-lille1.fr/progra2/. Several samples have been already studied by the two instruments, showing a large diversity of wavelength dependences, from close-to-zero dependence for yellow and ocher sand grains to high dependence for silicon carbide and anthracite grains. These variations should be related to the wavelength dependence of the real and imaginary parts of the refractive index of the particles. We present a summary of the main results of

  7. First Measurements of the Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS) on the Mars Science Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Torres, F. J.; Zorzano-Mier, M.; Gomez-Elvira, J.

    2012-12-01

    The Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS) on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission has sensors recording air and ground temperature, pressure, relative humidity, wind speed in the horizontal and vertical directions, as well as ultraviolet radiation in different bands. Typical daily REMS observations will collect 180 minutes of data from all sensors simultaneously (arranged in 5 minute hourly samples plus 60 additional minutes taken at times to be decided, daily, during the course of the mission). REMS will add significantly to the environmental record collected by prior missions through the range of simultaneous observations including water vapor; the ability to take measurements routinely through the night; the intended minimum of one Martian year of observations; and the first measurement of surface UV irradiation. The capability of multiple, consistent, and simultaneous data is essential for meaningful interpretation of near-surface processes including the characterization of soil thermal properties. The Martian atmosphere is generally transparent to solar radiation, but atmospheric dust absorbs solar radiation and heats the atmosphere, while UV radiation ionizes atmospheric gases and is harmful to any potential Martian organisms (past or present). For this reason, knowledge of the UV radiation flux at the surface of Mars is important for the understanding habitability conditions, one of the main goals of the MSL mission. Moreover UV radiation is a significant driver in the photochemistry of the atmosphere and surface. In this paper we present a first analysis of REMS measurements, the status of the different sensors and the potential of REMS for Mars environmental studies. REMS Team: C. Armiens, I. Carrasco, F. Gómez, A. Lepinette, J. Martín, J. Martínez-Frías, L. Mora, S. Navarro, V. Peinado, J. Rodríguez-Manfredi, J. Romeral, E. Sebastián, J. Torres, J. Verdasca (Centro de Astrobiología (CSIC-INTA), Carretera de Ajalvir, km. 4, 28850 Torrej

  8. Field and laboratory measurements of biomass burning and vehicle exhaust using a PTR-MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanderSchelden, Graham Samuel

    The Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS) is a powerful tool for analyzing organic compounds in air and has been applied in field and laboratory applications to assess emissions from biomass burning and vehicles. Biomass burning is an important source of air pollution globally in the form of wild fires, burning of crop stubble, and combustion of organic material for home energy. In the United States, residential wood combustion combined with low inversion heights in winter time has caused air quality problems. Through field deployment of the PTR-MS in Xi'an China during August of 2011, it was determined that 27%, 16%, 26%, and 12% of ambient carbon monoxide (CO), acetaldehyde, benzene, and toluene could be attributed to biomass burning. The PTR-MS was also deployed to Yakima, Washington in January of 2013, finding that residential wood combustion was a substantial source of air toxics and PM. Residential wood combustion contributed 100%, 73%, 69%, 55%, 36%, 19%, 19%, and 17% of organic PM1, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, black carbon, benzene, toluene, C2-alkylbenzenes, and CO respectively. Diesel vehicles are becoming a larger fraction of the vehicle fleet and can be held responsible for a substantial fraction of air pollution emissions from on and off road mobile sources. Diesel engines are a source of low volatility products that are difficult to measure and are thought to be important in the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). This work focuses on measuring important diesel exhaust compounds with the PTR-MS and assessing oxidation processes of these compounds. When the PTR-MS was deployed to the field along with a thermal desorption pre-concentration system, we estimated that diesel vehicles were about 3-15% of the vehicle activity influencing our study site in Yakima, WA using the ratio of m/z 157 to m/z 129. SOA yields of diesel exhaust compounds were assessed and about 48% of the SOA was attributed to compounds measured by the PTR

  9. Quartz measurement in coal dust with high-flow rate samplers: laboratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Taekhee; Lee, Eun Gyung; Kim, Seung Won; Chisholm, William P; Kashon, Michael; Harper, Martin

    2012-05-01

    A laboratory study was performed to measure quartz in coal dust using high-flow rate samplers (CIP10-R, GK2.69 cyclone, and FSP10 cyclone) and low-flow rate samplers [10-mm nylon and Higgins-Dewell type (BGI4L) cyclones] and to determine whether an increased mass collection from high-flow rate samplers would affect the subsequent quartz measurement by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analytical procedures. Two different sizes of coal dusts, mass median aerodynamic diameter 4.48 μm (Coal Dust A) and 2.33 μm (Coal Dust B), were aerosolized in a calm air chamber. The mass of coal dust collected by the samplers was measured gravimetrically, while the mass of quartz collected by the samplers was determined by FTIR (NIOSH Manual of Analytical Method 7603) and XRD (NIOSH Manual of Analytical Method 7500) after one of two different indirect preparations. Comparisons between high-flow rate samplers and low-flow rate samplers were made by calculating mass concentration ratios of coal dusts, net mass ratios of coal dusts, and quartz net mass. Mass concentrations of coal dust from the FSP10 cyclone were significantly higher than those from other samplers and mass concentrations of coal dust from 10-mm nylon cyclone were significantly lower than those from other samplers, while the CIP10-R, GK2.69, and BGI4L samplers did not show significant difference in the comparison of mass concentration of coal dusts. The BGI4L cyclone showed larger mass concentration of ∼9% compared to the 10-mm nylon cyclone. All cyclones provided dust mass concentrations that can be used in complying with the International Standard Organization standard for the determination of respirable dust concentration. The amount of coal dust collected from the high-flow rate samplers was found to be higher with a factor of 2-8 compared to the low-flow rate samplers but not in direct proportion of increased flow rates. The high-flow rate samplers collected more quartz compared to

  10. Laboratory and field measurements of enantiomeric monoterpene emissions as a function of chemotype, light and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, W.; Staudt, M.; Bourgeois, I.; Williams, J.

    2014-03-01

    Plants emit significant amounts of monoterpenes into the earth's atmosphere, where they react rapidly to form a multitude of gas phase species and particles. Many monoterpenes exist in mirror-image forms or enantiomers. In this study the enantiomeric monoterpene profile for several representative plants (Quercus ilex L., Rosmarinus officinalis L., and Pinus halepensis Mill.) was investigated as a function of chemotype, light and temperature both in the laboratory and in the field. Analysis of enantiomeric monoterpenes from 19 Quercus ilex individuals from Southern France and Spain revealed four regiospecific chemotypes (genetically fixed emission patterns). In agreement with previous work, only Quercus ilex emissions increased strongly with light. However, for all three plant species no consistent enantiomeric variation was observed as a function of light, and the enantiomeric ratio of α-pinene was found to vary by less than 20% from 100 and 1000 μmol m-2 s-1 PAR (photosynthetically active radiation). The rate of monoterpene emission increased with temperature from all three plant species, but little variation in the enantiomeric distribution of α-pinene was observed with temperature. There was more enantiomeric variability between individuals of the same species than could be induced by either light or temperature. Field measurements of α-pinene enantiomer mixing ratios in the air, taken at a Quercus ilex forest in Southern France, and several other previously reported field enantiomeric ratio diel cycle profiles are compared. All show smoothly varying diel cycles (some positive and some negative) even over changing wind directions. This is surprising in comparison with variations of enantiomeric emission patterns shown by individuals of the same species.

  11. Explaining differences between Bioaccumulation Measurements in laboratory and field data through use of probabilistic modeling approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Selck, H.; Drouillard, K.; Eisenreich, K.; Koelmans, A.A.; Palmqvist, A.; Ruus, A.; Salvito, D.; Schultz, I.; Stewart, R.; Weisbrod, A.; Brink, van den N.W.; Heuvel-Greve, van den M.J.

    2012-01-01

    In the regulatory context, bioaccumulation assessment is often hampered by substantial data uncertainty as well as by the poorly understood differences often observed between results from laboratory and field bioaccumulation studies. Bioaccumulation is a complex, multifaceted process, which calls

  12. Accelerated degradation of sulfamethazine in water by VUV/UV photo-Fenton process: Impact of sulfamethazine concentration on reaction mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Dong; Wu, Zhengdi; Tang, Yubin; Li, Mengkai; Qiang, Zhimin

    2018-02-15

    The degradation of sulfamethazine (SMN) by VUV/UV photo-Fenton (VPF) process was investigated with a mini-fluidic VUV/UV photoreaction system. Compared with the conventional UV photo-Fenton process, the VPF process significantly enhanced the degradation and mineralization of SMN, because the VUV irradiation photolyzed H2O and accelerated the redox cycle of Fe3+/Fe2+ to generate more reactive oxygen species (ROS). Initial pH and concentrations of SMN, H2O2, Fe3+, inorganic anions (NO3-, HCO3-, and Cl-), and humic acid all considerably impacted SMN degradation in the VPF process. In particular, the initial SMN concentration significantly affected the absorption distributions of UV and VUV photons in the reaction solution, thus inducing a different reaction mechanism. At a lower SMN concentration (1.8μM), most of UV and VUV photons were absorbed by Fe3+ and H2O, respectively, so indirect oxidation by ROS mainly accounted for SMN degradation. However, at a higher SMN concentration (90μM), 89.2% of UV photons and 59.0% of VUV photons were absorbed by SMN, so direct photolysis also played an important role. In addition, HO and HO2 were identified as the main ROS in the VPF process. This study demonstrates that the VPF process can effectively remove organic micropollutants from water. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. How accurately and consistently do laboratories measure workplace concentrations of respirable crystalline silica?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Louis Anthony Tony

    2016-11-01

    Permissible exposure limits (PELs) for respirable crystalline silica (RCS) have recently been reduced from 0.10 to 0.05 mg/m3. This raises an important question: do current laboratory practices and standards for assessing RCS concentrations permit reliable discrimination between workplaces that are in compliance and workplaces that are not? To find out, this paper examines recent laboratory performance in quantifying RCS amounts on filters sent to them to assess their proficiency. A key finding is that accredited laboratories do not reliably (e.g., with 95% confidence) estimate RCS quantities to within a factor of 2. Thus, laboratory findings indicating that RCS levels are above or below a PEL provide little confidence that this is true. The current accreditation standard only requires laboratories to achieve estimates within three standard deviations of the correct (reference) value at least two thirds of the time, rather than a more usual standard such as within 25% of the correct value at least 95% of the time. Laboratory practices may improve as the new PEL is implemented, but they are presently essentially powerless to discriminate among RCS levels over most of the range of values that have been tested, leaving employers and regulators without a reliable means to ascertain when workplace RCS levels are above or below the PEL. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Numerical Modeling of Surfactant-Induced Flow During Laboratory Measurement of Air-Water Interfacial Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, E. J.; Costanza-Robinson, M. S.

    2010-12-01

    An understanding of the relationship between air-water interfacial area (AI) and moisture saturation (SW) is necessary for the accurate prediction of the subsurface transport of solutes that partition to the interface or are readily transferred across the interface. Interfacial areas are commonly measured in a laboratory soil column using the aqueous interfacial-partitioning tracer methodology (IPT), in which AI is calculated based on the ratio of travel times of interfacial and non-reactive tracers. IPTs are conducted in uniformly-wetted soil columns and therefore, allow the determination of AI at a particular value of SW. The interfacial tracers used are typically surfactants, such as sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS), which are reversibly retained the air-water interface. At the SDBS concentrations often used, the aqueous surface tension of the interfacial tracer solution is approximately 30% lower than that of the non-reactive tracer solution. Because capillary pressure gradients caused by surfactant-induced surface tension gradients can induce unsaturated flow, we used numerical modeling to examine the potential for perturbations in unsaturated flow, and thus non-uniform distributions in SW, to occur during IPT tests. We used HYDRUS 1D, modified to include concentration-dependent surfactant effects on capillary pressure, in order to simulate a typical IPT experimental configuration in which SDBS was the interfacial tracer. Linear partitioning of the tracer to the air-water interface and sorption to the solid were included as SDBS retention mechanisms. The simulation results indicated that the surface tension changes caused by SDBS were sufficient to induce significant transient unsaturated flow, which was manifested as localized drainage and wetting as the SDBS passed through the column. Average SW in the column subsequently rebounded and reached a new steady-state flow condition once SDBS had displaced resident tracer-free water. The average SW at the

  15. Gold Electrodes Modified with Self-Assembled Monolayers for Measuring L-Ascorbic Acid: An Undergraduate Analytical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Takashi; Perera, D. M. Neluni T.; Nagasaka, Shinobu

    2008-01-01

    This article describes an undergraduate electrochemistry laboratory experiment in which the students measure the L-ascorbic acid content of a real sample. Gold electrodes modified with self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of thioctic acid and cysteamine are prepared to study the effects of surface modification on the electrode reaction of L-ascorbic…

  16. Measuring Norfloxacin Binding to Trypsin Using a Fluorescence Quenching Assay in an Upper-Division, Integrated Laboratory Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Katherine A.

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence quenching assays are often used to measure dissociation constants that quantify the binding affinity between small molecules and proteins. In an upper-division undergraduate laboratory course, where students work on projects using a guided inquiry-based approach, a binding titration experiment at physiological pH is performed to…

  17. Laboratory Measures of Filtration by Freshwater Mussels: An Activity to Introduce Biology Students to an Increasingly Threatened Group of Organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael J.; Shaffer, Julie J.; Koupal, Keith D.; Hoback, W. Wyatt

    2012-01-01

    Many aquatic organisms survive by filter feeding from the surrounding water and capturing food particles. We developed a laboratory exercise that allows students to measure the effects of filtering by fresh water mussels on water turbidity. Mussels were acquired from Wards Scientific and exposed to a solution of baker's yeast. Over a period of one…

  18. Comparison of a New Cobinamide-Based Method to a Standard Laboratory Method for Measuring Cyanide in Human Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swezey, Robert; Shinn, Walter; Green, Carol; Drover, David R.; Hammer, Gregory B.; Schulman, Scott R.; Zajicek, Anne; Jett, David A.; Boss, Gerry R.

    2013-01-01

    Most hospital laboratories do not measure blood cyanide concentrations, and samples must be sent to reference laboratories. A simple method is needed for measuring cyanide in hospitals. The authors previously developed a method to quantify cyanide based on the high binding affinity of the vitamin B12 analog, cobinamide, for cyanide and a major spectral change observed for cyanide-bound cobinamide. This method is now validated in human blood, and the findings include a mean inter-assay accuracy of 99.1%, precision of 8.75% and a lower limit of quantification of 3.27 µM cyanide. The method was applied to blood samples from children treated with sodium nitroprusside and it yielded measurable results in 88 of 172 samples (51%), whereas the reference laboratory yielded results in only 19 samples (11%). In all 19 samples, the cobinamide-based method also yielded measurable results. The two methods showed reasonable agreement when analyzed by linear regression, but not when analyzed by a standard error of the estimate or paired t-test. Differences in results between the two methods may be because samples were assayed at different times on different sample types. The cobinamide-based method is applicable to human blood, and can be used in hospital laboratories and emergency rooms. PMID:23653045

  19. Prediction of pork quality with near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS): 1. Feasibility and robustness of NIRS measurements at laboratory scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kapper, C.; Klont, R.E.; Verdonk, J.M.A.J.; Urlings, H.A.P.

    2012-01-01

    The objective was to study prediction of pork quality by near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) technology in the laboratory. A total of 131 commercial pork loin samples were measured with NIRS. Predictive equations were developed for drip loss %, colour L*, a*, b* and pH ultimate (pHu). Equations with

  20. Red-F* Laser and VUV-F2 Emission Pumped at Low Pressure by Longitudinal, Lamp-Like Discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, Kazuyuki; Nakamura, Kenshi; Goto, Tatsumi; Jitsuno, Takahisa

    Red-fluorine-atom (Red-F* ) laser oscillation (λ = 630-780 nm) and strong fluorescence of VUV-F2 emission (λ = 157 nm) are observed in a lamp-like discharge in a longitudinal discharge excitation tube. The laser tube consists of a 30 cm long Pyrex glass pipe with an inner diameter of 2 mm, and a step-up transformer coupled directly to the discharge tube without a high-voltage switch. Excitation is produced by wall-coupled discharge. The laser pulse width is 6.1 ns at 100 Torr (13.3 kPa, with an F2 concentration of 5 %) when a slow-rising voltage pulse of -40 kV (rise time: 253 ns) is applied. VUV-F2 emission of a 24.5 ns (FWHM) pulse width was generated simultaneously with the red-F* laser.

  1. Comparison of blood gas, electrolyte and metabolite results measured with two different blood gas analyzers and a core laboratory analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uyanik, Metin; Sertoglu, Erdim; Kayadibi, Huseyin; Tapan, Serkan; Serdar, Muhittin A; Bilgi, Cumhur; Kurt, Ismail

    2015-04-01

    Blood gas analyzers (BGAs) are important in assessing and monitoring critically ill patients. However, the random use of BGAs to measure blood gases, electrolytes and metabolites increases the variability in test results. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the correlation of blood gas, electrolyte and metabolite results measured with two BGAs and a core laboratory analyzer. A total of 40 arterial blood gas samples were analyzed with two BGAs [(Nova Stat Profile Critical Care Xpress (Nova Biomedical, Waltham, MA, USA) and Siemens Rapidlab 1265 (Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics Inc., Tarrytown, NY, USA)) and a core laboratory analyzer [Olympus AU 2700 autoanalyzer (Beckman-Coulter, Inc., Fullerton, CA, USA)]. The results of pH, pCO₂, pO₂, SO₂, sodium (Na⁺), potassium (K⁺), calcium (Ca⁺²), chloride (Cl⁻), glucose, and lactate were compared by Passing-Bablok regression analysis and Bland-Altman plots. The present study showed that there was negligible variability of blood gases (pCO₂, pO₂, SO₂), K⁺ and lactate values between the blood gas and core laboratory analyzers. However, the differences in pH were modest, while Na⁺, Cl⁻, Ca²⁺ and glucose showed poor correlation according to the concordance correlation coefficient. BGAs and core laboratory autoanalyzer demonstrated variable performances and not all tests met minimum performance goals. It is important that clinicians and laboratories are aware of the limitations of their assays.

  2. Hydraulic Hybrid and Conventional Parcel Delivery Vehicles' Measured Laboratory Fuel Economy on Targeted Drive Cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lammert, M. P.; Burton, J.; Sindler, P.; Duran, A.

    2014-10-01

    This research project compares laboratory-measured fuel economy of a medium-duty diesel powered hydraulic hybrid vehicle drivetrain to both a conventional diesel drivetrain and a conventional gasoline drivetrain in a typical commercial parcel delivery application. Vehicles in this study included a model year 2012 Freightliner P100H hybrid compared to a 2012 conventional gasoline P100 and a 2012 conventional diesel parcel delivery van of similar specifications. Drive cycle analysis of 484 days of hybrid parcel delivery van commercial operation from multiple vehicles was used to select three standard laboratory drive cycles as well as to create a custom representative cycle. These four cycles encompass and bracket the range of real world in-use data observed in Baltimore United Parcel Service operations. The NY Composite cycle, the City Suburban Heavy Vehicle Cycle cycle, and the California Air Resources Board Heavy Heavy-Duty Diesel Truck (HHDDT) cycle as well as a custom Baltimore parcel delivery cycle were tested at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Renewable Fuels and Lubricants Laboratory. Fuel consumption was measured and analyzed for all three vehicles. Vehicle laboratory results are compared on the basis of fuel economy. The hydraulic hybrid parcel delivery van demonstrated 19%-52% better fuel economy than the conventional diesel parcel delivery van and 30%-56% better fuel economy than the conventional gasoline parcel delivery van on cycles other than the highway-oriented HHDDT cycle.

  3. THE APSIS EXPERIMENT: SIMULATING TITAN'S UPPER ATMOSPHERE AND ITS PHOTOCHEMISTRY IN THE VACUUM ULTRA-VIOLET (VUV)

    OpenAIRE

    Tigrine, Sarah; Carrasco, Nathalie; Vettier, Ludovic; Nahon, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    International audience; Titan, the largest moon of Saturn, has a dense atmosphere whose upper layers are mainly composed of methane (CH4) and molecular nitrogen (N2). The Cassini mission revealed that the interaction between those molecules and the solar VUV photons, as well as the electrons from Saturn’s magnetosphere, leads to a complex chemistry.Moreover, this naturally ionized environment contains heavy organic molecules like benzene (C6H6) even at altitudes higher than 900 km.The presenc...

  4. Photocatalytic oxidation of indoor toluene: Process risk analysis and influence of relative humidity, photocatalysts, and VUV irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Weirong, E-mail: weirong@mail.hz.zj.cn [Department of Environmental Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Dai, Jiusong; Liu, Feifei; Bao, Jiaze; Wang, Yan; Yang, Yong; Yang, Yanan [Department of Environmental Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Zhao, Dongye [Environmental Engineering Program, Department of Civil Engineering, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849 (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Concentrations of 13 gaseous intermediates in photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) of toluene in indoor air were determined in real-time by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry and desorption intensities of 7 adsorbed intermediates on the surface of photocatalysts were detected by temperature-programmed desorption-mass spectrometry. Effects of relative humidity (RH), photocatalysts, and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) irradiation on the distribution and category of the intermediates and health risk influence index ({eta}) were investigated. RH enhances the formation rate of hydroxide radicals, leading to more intermediates with higher oxidation states in gas phase. N doping promotes the separation of photo-generated electrons and holes and enhances PCO activity accordingly. VUV irradiation results in higher mineralization rate and more intermediates with higher oxidation states and lower toxicity e.g. carboxylic acids. Health risk analysis indicates that higher RH, N doping of TiO{sub 2}, and VUV lead to 'greener' intermediates and smaller {eta}. Finally, a conceptual diagram was proposed to exhibit the scenario of {eta} varied with extent of mineralization for various toxicities of inlet pollutants. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 13 volatile intermediates in PCO of toluene were determined in real-time by PTR-MS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 7 adsorbed intermediates on surface of photocatalyst were determined by TPD-MS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Higher RH, N doping of TiO{sub 2}, and VUV irradiation lead to 'greener' intermediates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Health risk index relies on extent of mineralization and toxicities of inlet VOCs.

  5. Water and organic nitrate detection in an AMS. Laboratory characterization and application to ambient measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mensah, Amewu A.

    2011-08-12

    Atmospheric aerosols were studied by three different means. Laboratory experiments determined the relative ionization efficiency of water (RIE{sub H2O}) in an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometers (AMS), simulation chamber experiments gave insight to the reaction products of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) oxidation products, and the findings were applied to two field campaign measurements at Cabauw, NL, in May 2008 and February 2009. Knowing the liquid water content of aerosol particles is vital for the assessment of their climate forcing potential. A value of 2 for RIE{sub H2O} was determined by studying oxalate salts with different amounts of crystal water. BVOCs contribute much more to the global budget of VOCs than anthropogenic ones but oxidation products in terms of secondary organic aerosol often correlate to anthropogenic tracers such as NO{sub x} from fossil fuel burning. In atmospheric simulation chamber experiments, organic nitrates from BVOC-NO{sub 3} oxidation showed higher vapor pressures than pure organic compounds produced in the same reactions. Organic nitrates comprised up to approx. 41 % of the particulate phase. A specific fragmentation ratio of nitrate (NO{sub 2}{sup +}/NO{sup +}) of 0.1 was found by high resolution AMS analysis differing strongly from the value of 0.4 known for the most abundant ambient NO{sub 3} specie (NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3}). Ambient average particulate mass loadings were 9.72 {mu}g/m{sup 3} dominated by organics (40 %) in 2008 and 5.62 {mu}g/m{sup 3} dominated by nitrate (42 %) in 2009. Data comparison to collocated instruments showed good agreement. Positive Matrix Factorization analysis of the particulate organic fraction distinguished semi and low volatile oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA) as well as hydrocarbon like organic aerosol (HOA) in both campaigns. An additional highly oxygenated OA with a mass spectrum very similar to fulvic acid was found in 2008. The average contribution of organic nitrate to the

  6. Environmental Measurements Laboratory. Environmental report, September 1, 1981-March 1, 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, Jr, E P; Toonkel, L E

    1982-05-01

    This report presents current information from the EML environmental programs, the Radiological and Environmental Research Division at Argonne National Laboratory and the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Two reports on radionuclide data quality assurance are presented in the initial section: one dealing with fallout and biological samples and the other with filtered air samples. These are followed by a report on stratospheric tritium injection by the October 1980 Chinese test. The second section presents recent data from EML progams strontium-90 fallout, radionuclides and trace metals in surface air, radioactivity and trace gases sampled in the stratosphere by aircraft and balloons, strontium-90 in San Francisco and New York diet, milk, and tap water, and cesium-137 in tap water. The third section presents data from Argonne National Laboratory on cesium-137 in Chicago food and from Los Alamos National Laboratory on tritium in the stratosphere. A bibliography of recent publications related to environmental studies is presented. Each section has been abstracted and indexed individually for ERA/EDB.

  7. A Measure of the Effectiveness of Incorporating 3D Human Anatomy into an Online Undergraduate Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbelink, Amy J.

    2009-01-01

    Results of a study designed to determine the effectiveness of implementing three-dimensional (3D) stereo images of a human skull in an undergraduate human anatomy online laboratory were gathered and analysed. Mental model theory and its applications to 3D relationships are discussed along with the research results. Quantitative results on 62 pairs…

  8. PREVENTIVE MEASURES FOR THE IMPROVEMENT OF THE SAFETY OF BLOOD TRANSFUSION AND VIRTUAL TRANSFUSION LABORATORY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Primož Rožman

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Background. Even though blood transfusion is a relatively safe form of therapy, because of the eventual administrative errors in the transfusion chain between the blood donor and the recipient of blood, transfusion errors still occur. Therefore, it is imperative to ensure an utmost extent of safety and reliability of all transfusion related procedures. The safety of blood transfusion can be improved by preventive actions, i.e. implementation of the total quality management concept, haemovigilance and virtual transfusion laboratory. In the resulting system, the information web, robotics, computer sciences and communication technologies ensure safe and reliable identification of the patients, blood donors, corresponding test samples and blood products. Apart form this; the modern technologies enable the automation of laboratory testing, the integrity of laboratory results and enable an optimal use of blood.Conclusions. For an improved transfusion safety in Slovenia, adoption of corresponding prevention as well as haemovigilance is necessary. Identification errors can be prevented by implementation of the wristbands systems with the code bars for the tagging of the patient and his biological samples, whereas the administrative errors in the blood bank and transfusion laboratory can be prevented by implementation of information systems and automation.We assume that the virtual transfusion laboratory will become an integral part of the new Slovenian transfusion web and will speed up, unify and simplify today’s methods of ordering and administering blood products. To the attending physician, it will enable the choice of optimal transfusion therapy schedule and at the same time, it will enable the supervision of individual orders, deviations and indications, all of which is needed in order to analyse and improve the quality and the costs of the treatment. These services represent the first obligatory step for the modernisation of the transfusion

  9. Time-resolved multi-mass ion imaging: Femtosecond UV-VUV pump-probe spectroscopy with the PImMS camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Ruaridh; Makhija, Varun; Veyrinas, Kévin; Stolow, Albert; Lee, Jason W. L.; Burt, Michael; Brouard, Mark; Vallance, Claire; Wilkinson, Iain; Lausten, Rune; Hockett, Paul

    2017-07-01

    The Pixel-Imaging Mass Spectrometry (PImMS) camera allows for 3D charged particle imaging measurements, in which the particle time-of-flight is recorded along with (x, y) position. Coupling the PImMS camera to an ultrafast pump-probe velocity-map imaging spectroscopy apparatus therefore provides a route to time-resolved multi-mass ion imaging, with both high count rates and large dynamic range, thus allowing for rapid measurements of complex photofragmentation dynamics. Furthermore, the use of vacuum ultraviolet wavelengths for the probe pulse allows for an enhanced observation window for the study of excited state molecular dynamics in small polyatomic molecules having relatively high ionization potentials. Herein, preliminary time-resolved multi-mass imaging results from C2F3I photolysis are presented. The experiments utilized femtosecond VUV and UV (160.8 nm and 267 nm) pump and probe laser pulses in order to demonstrate and explore this new time-resolved experimental ion imaging configuration. The data indicate the depth and power of this measurement modality, with a range of photofragments readily observed, and many indications of complex underlying wavepacket dynamics on the excited state(s) prepared.

  10. Impact of hydrodynamics on pollutant degradation and energy efficiency of VUV/UV and H2O2/UV oxidation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Mehdi; Mohseni, Madjid

    2015-12-01

    The Vacuum-UV/UV process, an incipient catalyst/chemical-free advanced oxidation process (AOP), is potentially a cost-effective solution for the removal of harmful micropollutants from water. Utilizing a novel mechanistic numerical model, this work aimed to establish a thorough understanding of the degradation mechanisms in the VUV/UV process operating under continuous flow conditions, when compared with the widely applied H2O2/UV AOP. Of particular interest was the examination of the impact of flow characteristics (hydrodynamics) on the degradation efficacy of a target micropollutant during the VUV/UV and H2O2/UV AOPs. While hydroxyl radical (OH) oxidation was the dominant degradation pathway in both processes, the degradation efficacy of the VUV/UV process showed much stronger correlation with the extent of mixing in the photoreactor. Under a uniform flow regime, the degradation efficiency of the target pollutant achieved by the H2O2/UV process with 2- and 5 ppm H2O2 was greater than that provided by the VUV/UV process. Nonetheless, introduction of mixing and circulation zones to the VUV/UV reactor resulted in superior performance compared with the H2O2/UV AOP. Based on the electrical energy-per-order (EEO) analysis, incorporation of circulation zones resulted in a reduction of up to 50% in the overall energy cost of the VUV/UV AOP, while the corresponding reduction for the 5-ppm H2O2/UV system was less than 5%. Furthermore, the extent of OH scavenging of natural organic matter (NOM) on energy efficiency of the VUV/UV and H2O2/UV AOPs under continuous flow conditions was assessed using the EEO analysis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Particle Size Measurements from the first Fundamentals of Ice Crystal Icing Physics Test in the NASA Propulsion Systems Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Michael C.; Bachalo, William; Kurek, Andrzej

    2017-01-01

    This presentation shows particle measurements by the Artium Technologies, Inc. Phase Doppler Interferometer and High Speed Imaging instruments from the first Fundamental Ice Crystal Icing Physics test conducted in the NASA Propulsion Systems Laboratory. The work focuses on humidity sweeps at a larger and a smaller median volumetric diameter. The particle size distribution, number density, and water content measured by the Phase Doppler Interferometer and High Speed Imaging instruments from the sweeps are presented and compared. The current capability for these two instruments to measure and discriminate ICI conditions is examined.

  12. Workers’ Exposure to Nano-Objects with Different Dimensionalities in R&D Laboratories: Measurement Strategy and Field Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Boccuni

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available With the increasing interest in the potential benefits of nanotechnologies, concern is still growing that they may present emerging risks for workers. Various strategies have been developed to assess the exposure to nano-objects and their agglomerates and aggregates (NOAA in the workplace, integrating different aerosol measurement instruments and taking into account multiple parameters that may influence NOAA toxicity. The present study proposes a multi-metric approach for measuring and sampling NOAA in the workplace, applied to three case studies in laboratories each dedicated to materials with different shapes and dimensionalities: graphene, nanowires, and nanoparticles. The study is part of a larger project with the aim of improving risk management tools in nanomaterials research laboratories. The harmonized methodology proposed by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD has been applied, including information gathering about materials and processes, measurements with easy-to-use and hand-held real-time devices, air sampling with personal samplers, and off-line analysis using scanning electron microscopy. Significant values beyond which an emission can be attributed to the NOAA production process were identified by comparison of the particle number concentration (PNC time series and the corresponding background levels in the three laboratories. We explored the relations between background PNC and microclimatic parameters. Morphological and elemental analysis of sampled filters was done to identify possible emission sources of NOAA during the production processes: rare particles, spherical, with average diameter similar to the produced NOAA were identified in the nanoparticles laboratory, so further investigation is recommended to confirm the potential for worker exposure. In conclusion, the information obtained should provide a valuable basis for improving risk management strategies in the laboratory at work.

  13. Pre-Harvest Sugarcane Burning: Determination of emission factors through laboratory measurements and quantification of emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Azeredo Franca, D.; Maria Longo, K.; Gomes Soares Neto, T.; Carlos dos Santos, J.; Rudorf, B. F.; Alves de Aguiar, D.; Freitas, S.; Vieira Cortez, E.; Stockler S. Lima, R.; S. Gacita, M.; Anselmo, E.; A. Carvalho, J., Jr.

    2011-12-01

    Sugarcane is a relevant crop to Brazilian economy and roughly 50% of its production is used to produce ethanol. São Paulo state is the largest producer of sugarcane in Brazil being responsible for almost 60% of its production in a cultivated area of 4.5 Mha in 2010. Sugarcane harvest practice can be performed either with green harvest or with pre-harvest burning. A "Green Ethanol" Protocol is underway to eliminate the pre-harvest burning practice by 2014 in most of the sugarcane cultivated land in São Paulo state. During the last five years close to 2 Mha were annually harvested with the pre-harvest burning practice. This practice emits particulate material, greenhouse gases, and tropospheric ozone precursors to the atmosphere. Even with policies to eliminate the burning practice in the near future there is still a significant environmental damage due to the pre-harvest burning practice of sugarcane. Thus the generation of reliable inventories of emissions due to this activity is crucial in order to assess the environmental impact. Presently the official Brazilian emissions inventories do not include the sugarcane pre-harvest burning contribution. Therefore, this work aims to estimate the annual emissions (from 2006 to 2010) associated with pre-harvest sugarcane burning practice in São Paulo state, including the determination of emission factors for some trace gases and particulate material smaller than 2.5 μm. Annual remote sensing based mappings of burned sugarcane fields throughout the harvest season in each crop year made in the context of Canasat Project (http://www.dsr.inpe.br/laf/canasat/en/) were added to the Brazilian Biomass Burning Emission Model (3BEM) in order to estimate trace gases and aerosols emissions. Two laboratory combustion experiments were carried out to determine the emission factors estimation. Samples of different varieties of sugarcane were harvested in dry weather conditions and in distinct sites in the state of São Paulo to assure

  14. Advanced laboratory for testing plasma thrusters and Hall thruster measurement campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szelecka Agnieszka

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Plasma engines are used for space propulsion as an alternative to chemical thrusters. Due to the high exhaust velocity of the propellant, they are more efficient for long-distance interplanetary space missions than their conventional counterparts. An advanced laboratory of plasma space propulsion (PlaNS at the Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion (IPPLM specializes in designing and testing various electric propulsion devices. Inside of a special vacuum chamber with three performance pumps, an environment similar to the one that prevails in space is created. An innovative Micro Pulsed Plasma Thruster (LμPPT with liquid propellant was built at the laboratory. Now it is used to test the second prototype of Hall effect thruster (HET operating on krypton propellant. Meantime, an improved prototype of krypton Hall thruster is constructed.

  15. Design of a mobile aerosol research laboratory and data processing tools for effective stationary and mobile field measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Drewnick

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A compact mobile aerosol research laboratory (MoLa for stationary and mobile measurements of aerosol and trace gas characteristics was developed at the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry (MPIC in Mainz, Germany. Major efforts were made to design an aerosol inlet system which is optimized and characterised for both, stationary and mobile measurements using a particle loss modelling approach. The instrumentation on board allows the determination of a multitude of physical and chemical aerosol parameters, for example particle number and mass concentration (PM1/2.5/10, particle size distributions in the diameter range 6 nm up to 32 μm, and chemical composition of the sub-micron aerosol. Furthermore, trace gas concentrations of O3, SO2, CO, CO2, NO, NO2 and water vapour as well as meteorological parameters like temperature, relative humidity, pressure, wind, solar radiation and precipitation are measured together with various housekeeping parameters. All instruments collect data with high time resolution in the second to minute-range. The measurement platform, as well as data acquisition and handling tools, are optimized for efficient application to various measurement settings. The mobile laboratory is designed to be used for mobile investigation of anthropogenically influenced environments. Possible applications include pollutant mapping, chasing of mobile sources or Lagrangian-type measurements in emission plumes, but also stationary measurements with possible frequent position changes and a well-characterised instrument setup. In addition to the design and features of the mobile laboratory, its inlet system and instrumentation as well as examples of applications of this platform are presented. Challenges associated with such measurements and approaches to extract the desired information from the mobile datasets are discussed.

  16. Full Scale Earth Fault Experiments on 10 kV laboratory network with comparative Measurements on Conventional CT's and VT's

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Stefan; Nielsen, Hans Ove; Bak-Jensen, Birgitte

    2002-01-01

    transformers (CT?s) and voltage transformers (VT?s) by an optical link. Comparison with a similar earlier performed experiment caried out autumn 1998, where current and voltage measurements were measured with high bandwidth Rugowski-coils and high voltage Tektronix probes, gave remarkable results......In this paper we present a result of a full scale earth fault carried out on the 10 kV research/laboratory distribution network at Kyndbyvaerket Denmark in May 2001. The network is compensated through a Petersen-Coil and current and voltage measurements were measured on conventional current....... The necessity of high bandwidth measurement equipment for earth fault measurements on compensated distribution networks can be undermined, since it will be shown that the transient signal transfer through conventional CT?s and VT?s for further signal analysis is sufficient. Caused the inadequacy three phase...

  17. Laboratory experiments on rainfall-induced flowslide from pore pressure and moisture content measurements

    OpenAIRE

    M. R. Hakro; I. S. H. Harahap

    2015-01-01

    During or immediately after rainfall many slope failures have been observed. The slope failure occurred due to rainfall infiltration that rapidly increase the pore pressure and trigger the slope failure. Numerous studies have been conducted to investigate the rainfall-induced slope failure, but the mechanism of slope failure is still not well clarified. To investigate mechanism of rainfall-induced slope failure laboratory experiments have been conducted in f...

  18. Brominated Tyrosine and Polyelectrolyte Multilayer Analysis by Laser Desorption VUV Postionization and Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    University of Illinois at Chicago; Blaze, Melvin M. T.; Takahashi, Lynelle; Zhou, Jia; Ahmed, Musahid; Gasper, Gerald; Pleticha, F. Douglas; Hanley, Luke

    2011-03-14

    The small molecular analyte 3,5-dibromotyrosine (Br2Y) and chitosan-alginate polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEM) with and without adsorbed Br2Y were analyzed by laser desorption postionization mass spectrometry (LDPI-MS). LDPI-MS using 7.87 eV laser and tunable 8 ? 12.5 eV synchrotron vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation found that desorption of clusters from Br2Y films allowed detection by≤8 eV single photon ionization. Thermal desorption and electronic structure calculations determined the ionization energy of Br2Y to be ~;;8.3?0.1 eV and further indicated that the lower ionization energies of clusters permitted their detection at≤8 eV photon energies. However, single photon ionization could only detect Br2Y adsorbed within PEMs when using either higher photon energies or matrix addition to the sample. All samples were also analyzed by 25 keV Bi3 + secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), with the negative ion spectra showing strong parent ion signal which complemented that observed by LDPI-MS. The negative ion SIMS depended strongly on the high electron affinity of this specific analyte and the analyte?s condensed phase environment.

  19. Image Evaluation of the High Resolution VUV Spectrometer at SURF II by Ray Tracing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, N C; Madden, R P; Seyoum, H M

    1998-01-01

    A high resolution VUV spectroscopic facility has been in use for several years at SURF II, the Synchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility at the National Institute of Standards and Technology in Gaithersburg, Maryland. At this facility, a combination of three cylindrical mirrors is utilized to focus the light originating in the storage ring onto the horizontal entrance slit of the spectrometer. The spectrometer uses a 6.65 m concave grating having a groove density of 4800 lines/mm in the off-plane Eagle mounting. In preparation for the installation of an array detector in the exit image plane, a ray tracing program has been formulated and spot diagrams have been constructed by plotting the coordinates of the points of intersection of the diffracted rays with the image plane, which is tangent to the Rowland circle. In creating the spot diagrams, we have considered both parallel and tilted configurations of the entrance slit with respect to the grating grooves. It is shown that the line widths of the spectral images can be reduced when the entrance slit is properly tilted. Finally, we have estimated the spectral widths of the images when they are recorded on an array detector placed tangent to the Rowland circle. We conclude that an image spectral width of 0.41 pm to 0.88 pm in first order can be achieved over the wavelength region of 40 nm to 120 nm.

  20. Effect of the methyl substitution on the combustion of two methylheptane isomers: Flame chemistry using vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization mass spectrometry

    KAUST Repository

    Selim, Hatem

    2015-04-16

    Alkanes with one or more methyl substitutions are commonly found in liquid transportation fuels, so a fundamental investigation of their combustion chemistry is warranted. In the present work, stoichiometric low-pressure (20 Torr) burner-stabilized flat flames of 2-methylheptane and 3-methylheptane were investigated. Flame species were measured via time-of-flight molecular-beam mass spectrometry, with vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron radiation as the ionization source. Mole fractions of major end-products and intermediate species (e.g., alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, aldehydes, and dienes) were quantified axially above the burner surface. Mole fractions of several free radicals were also measured (e.g., CH3, HCO, C2H3, C3H3, and C3H5). Isomers of different species were identified within the reaction pool by an energy scan between 8 and 12 eV at a distance of 2.5 mm away from the burner surface. The role of methyl substitution location on the alkane chain was determined via comparisons of similar species trends obtained from both flames. The results revealed that the change in CH3 position imposed major differences on the combustion of both fuels. Comparison with numerical simulations was performed for kinetic model testing. The results provide a comprehensive set of data about the combustion of both flames, which can enhance the erudition of both fuels combustion chemistry and also improve their chemical kinetic reaction mechanisms. © 2015 American Chemical Society.

  1. VUV photoionization of acetamide studied by electron/ion coincidence spectroscopy in the 8-24 eV photon energy range

    KAUST Repository

    Schwell, Martin

    2012-01-01

    A VUV photoionization study of acetamide was carried out over the 8-24 eV photon energy range using synchrotron radiation and photoelectron/photoion coincidence (PEPICO) spectroscopy. Threshold photoelectron photoion coincidence (TPEPICO) measurements were also made. Photoion yield curves and branching ratios were measured for the parent ion and six fragment ions. The adiabatic ionization energy of acetamide was determined as I.E. (1 2A′) = (9.71 ± 0.02) eV, in agreement with an earlier reported photoionization mass spectrometry (PIMS) value. The adiabatic energy of the first excited state of the ion, 1 2A″, was determined to be ≈10.1 eV. Assignments of the fragment ions and the pathways of their formation by dissociative photoionization were made. The neutral species lost in the principal dissociative photoionization processes are CH 3, NH 2, NH 3, CO, HCCO and NH 2CO. Heats of formation are derived for all ions detected and are compared with literature values. Some astrophysical implications of these results are discussed. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. OH reactivity and potential SOA yields from volatile organic compounds and other trace gases measured in controlled laboratory biomass burns

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. B. Gilman; C. Warneke; W. C. Kuster; P. D. Goldan; P. R. Veres; J. M. Roberts; J. A. de Gouw; I. R. Burling; R. J. Yokelson

    2010-01-01

    A comprehensive suite of instruments were used to characterize volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and other trace gases (e.g., CO, CH4, NO2, etc.) emitted from controlled burns of various fuel types common to the Southeastern and Southwestern United States. These laboratory-based measurements were conducted in February 2009 at the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Fire...

  3. Neonatal transcutaneous bilirubin measurements: an opportunity to enhance laboratory utilization and improve patient care

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Maisels, M Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    ... loss, paralysis of upward gaze, and dental dysplasia. Transcutaneous bilirubinometers measure the yellowness of the skin and subcutaneous tissues, and the contribution of the serum bilirubin to this measurement is minimal (4...

  4. CIV Polarization Measurements Using a Vacuum Ultraviolet Fabry Perot

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Edward A.

    2009-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) is developing a Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) Fabry Perot that will be launched on a sounding rocket for high throughput, high-cadence, extended field of view CIV (155nm) measurements. These measurements will provide (i) Dopplergrams for studies of waves, oscillations, explosive events, and mass motions through the transition region, and, (ii), polarization measurements to study the magnetic field in the transition region. This paper will describe the scientific goals of the instrument, a brief description of the optics and the polarization characteristics of the VUV Fabry Perot.

  5. Electron/positron measurements obtained with the Mars Science Laboratory Radiation Assessment Detector on the surface of Mars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koehler, J.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R.F.; Appel, J. [Kiel Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Experimental and Applied Physics; and others

    2016-04-01

    The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD), on board the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover Curiosity, measures the energetic charged and neutral particles and the radiation dose rate on the surface of Mars. Although charged and neutral particle spectra have been investigated in detail, the electron and positron spectra have not been investigated yet. The reason for that is that they are difficult to separate from each other and because of the technical challenges involved in extracting energy spectra from the raw data. We use GEANT4 to model the behavior of the RAD instrument for electron/positron measurements.We compare Planetocosmics predictions for different atmospheric pressures and different modulation parameters Φ with the obtained RAD electron/positron measurements.We find that the RAD electron/positron measurements agree well with the spectra predicted by Planetocosmics. Both RAD measurements and Planetocosmics simulation show a dependence of the electron/positron fluxes on both atmospheric pressure and solar modulation potential.

  6. Laboratory measurements of contaminant attenuation of uranium mill tailings leachates by sediments and clay liners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serne, R.J.; Peterson, S.R.; Gee, G.W.

    1983-04-01

    We discuss FY82 progress on the development of laboratory tools to aid in the prediction of migration potential of contaminants present in acidic uranium mill tailings leachate. Further, empirical data on trace metal and radionuclide migration through a clay liner are presented. Acidic uranium mill tailings solution from a Wyoming mill was percolated through a composite sediment called Morton Ranch Clay liner. These laboratory columns and subsequent sediment extraction data show: (1) As, Cr, Pb, Ag, Th and V migrate very slowly; (2) U, Cd, Ni, Zn, Fe, Mn and similar transition metals are initially immobilized during acid neutralization but later are remobilized as the tailings solution exhausts the clay liner's acid buffering capacity. Such metals remain immobilized as long as the effluent pH remains above a pH value of 4 to 4.5, but they become mobile once the effluent pH drops below this range; and (3) fractions of the Se and Mo present in the influent tailings solution are very mobile. Possible controlling mechanisms for the pH-dependent immobilization-mobilization of the trace metals are discussed. More study is required to understand the controlling mechanisms for Se and Mo and Ra for which data were not successfully collected. Using several column lengths (from 4.5 to 65 cm) and pore volume residence times (from 0.8 to 40 days) we found no significant differences in contaminant migration rates or types and extent of controlling processes. Thus, we conclude that the laboratory results may be capable of extrapolation to actual disposal site conditions.

  7. Measurement of the sound absorption coefficient for an advanced undergraduate physics laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macho-Stadler, E.; Elejalde-García, M. J.

    2017-09-01

    We present a simple experiment that allows advanced undergraduates to learn the basics of the acoustic properties of materials. The impedance tube-standing wave method is applied to study the normal absorption coefficient of acoustics insulators. The setup includes a tube, a speaker, a microphone, a digital function generator and an oscilloscope, material available in an undergraduate laboratory. Results of the change of the absorption coefficient with the frequency, the sample thickness and the sample density are analysed and compared with those obtained with a commercial system.

  8. Beam-surface scattering studies of the individual and combined effects of VUV radiation and hyperthermal O, O2, or Ar on FEP Teflon surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunsvold, Amy L; Zhang, Jianming; Upadhyaya, Hari P; Minton, Timothy K

    2009-01-01

    Beam-surface scattering experiments were used to probe products that scattered from FEP Teflon surfaces during bombardment by various combinations of atomic and molecular oxygen, Ar atoms, and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light. A laser-breakdown source was used to create hyperthermal (translational energies in the range 4-13 eV) beams of argon and atomic/molecular oxygen. The average incidence energy of these beams was tunable and was controlled precisely with a synchronized chopper wheel. A filtered deuterium lamp provided a source of VUV light in a narrow-wavelength range centered at 161 nm. Volatile products that exited the surfaces were monitored with a rotatable mass spectrometer detector. Hyperthermal O atoms with average translational energies above approximately 4 eV may react directly with a pristine FEP Teflon surface, and the reactivity appears to increase with the translational energy of the incident O atoms. VUV light or highly energetic collisions of O2 or Ar may break chemical bonds and lead to the ejection of volatile products; the ejection of volatile products is enhanced when the surface is subjected to VUV light and energetic collisions simultaneously. Exposure to VUV light or to hyperthermal O2 or Ar may increase the reactivity of an FEP Teflon surface to O atoms.

  9. Sources of Differences in On-Orbit Total Solar Irradiance Measurements and Description of Proposed Laboratory Intercomparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, J.J.; Johnson, B. C.; Rice, J. P.; Shirley, E. L.; Barnes, R.A.

    2008-01-01

    There is a 5 W/sq m (about 0.35 %) difference between current on-orbit Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) measurements. On 18-20 July 2005, a workshop was held at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in Gaithersburg, Maryland that focused on understanding possible reasons for this difference, through an examination of the instrument designs, calibration approaches, and appropriate measurement equations. The instruments studied in that workshop included the Active Cavity Radiometer Irradiance Monitor III (ACRIM III) on the Active Cavity Radiometer Irradiance Monitor SATellite (ACRIMSAT), the Total Irradiance Monitor (TIM) on the Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE), the Variability of solar IRradiance and Gravity Oscillations (VIRGO) on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO), and the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) on the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS). Presentations for each instrument included descriptions of its design, its measurement equation and uncertainty budget, and the methods used to assess on-orbit degradation. The workshop also included a session on satellite- and ground-based instrument comparisons and a session on laboratory-based comparisons and the application of new laboratory comparison techniques. The workshop has led to investigations of the effects of diffraction and of aperture area measurements on the differences between instruments. In addition, a laboratory-based instrument comparison is proposed that uses optical power measurements (with lasers that underEll the apertures of the TSI instruments), irradiance measurements (with lasers that overfill the apertures of the TSI instrument), and a cryogenic electrical substitution radiometer as a standard for comparing the instruments. A summary of the workshop and an overview of the proposed research efforts are presented here.

  10. Inter-laboratory validation of the measurement of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH after various lengths of frozen storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behr Barry

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Serum follicle stimulating hormone (FSH levels are used clinically to evaluate infertility, pituitary and gonadal disorders. With increased frequency of research collaborations across institutions, it is essential that inter-laboratory validation is addressed. Methods An inter-laboratory validation of three commercial FSH immunoassays was performed with human serum samples of varying frozen storage length (2 batches of 15 samples each at -25 degree C. Percentage differences and Bland-Altman limits of agreement were calculated. Results The inter- and intra-laboratory consistency of FSH values with the same assay manufacturer was much higher after shorter-term storage (frozen for less than 11 months, mean percentage degradation less than 4% than after long-term storage (2-3 years, mean percentage degradation = 23%. Comparing assay results from different manufacturers, there was similar overall long term degradation as seen with the same manufacturer (-25%, however the degradation was greater when the original FSH was greater than 20 mIU/mL relative to less than 10 mIU/mL (p Conclusion The findings suggest that degradation of serum samples stored between 11 months and 2-3 years at -25 degrees C can lead to unstable FSH measurements. Inter-laboratory variability due to frozen storage time and manufacturer differences in assay results should be accounted for when designing and implementing research or clinical quality control activities involving serum FSH at multiple study sites.

  11. Blood gas testing and related measurements: National recommendations on behalf of the Croatian Society of Medical Biochemistry and Laboratory Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukić, Lora; Kopčinović, Lara Milevoj; Dorotić, Adrijana; Baršić, Ivana

    2016-01-01

    Blood gas analysis (BGA) is exposed to risks of errors caused by improper sampling, transport and storage conditions. The Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) generated documents with recommendations for avoidance of potential errors caused by sample mishandling. Two main documents related to BGA issued by the CLSI are GP43-A4 (former H11-A4) Procedures for the collection of arterial blood specimens; approved standard – fourth edition, and C46-A2 Blood gas and pH analysis and related measurements; approved guideline – second edition. Practices related to processing of blood gas samples are not standardized in the Republic of Croatia. Each institution has its own protocol for ordering, collection and analysis of blood gases. Although many laboratories use state of the art analyzers, still many preanalytical procedures remain unchanged. The objective of the Croatian Society of Medical Biochemistry and Laboratory Medicine (CSMBLM) is to standardize the procedures for BGA based on CLSI recommendations. The Working Group for Blood Gas Testing as part of the Committee for the Scientific Professional Development of the CSMBLM prepared a set of recommended protocols for sampling, transport, storage and processing of blood gas samples based on relevant CLSI documents, relevant literature search and on the results of Croatian survey study on practices and policies in acid-base testing. Recommendations are intended for laboratory professionals and all healthcare workers involved in blood gas processing. PMID:27812301

  12. Pacific Northwest Laboratory Gulfstream I measurements of the Kuwait oil-fire plume, July--August 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busness, K.M.; Hales, J.M.; Hannigan, R.V.; Thorp, J.M.; Tomich, S.D.; Warren, M.J. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Al-Sunaid, A.A. (Saudi ARAMCO, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)); Daum, P.H.; Mazurek, M. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States))

    1992-11-01

    In 1991, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted a series of aircraft measurements to determine pollutant and radiative properties of the smoke plume from oil fires in Kuwait. This work was sponsored by the US Department emanating of Energy, in cooperation with several other agencies as part of an extensive effort coordinated by the World Meteorological Organization, to obtain a comprehensive data set to assess the characteristics of the plume and its environmental impact. This report describes field measurement activities and introduces the various data collected, but provides only limited analyses of these data. Results of further data analyses will be presented in subsequent open-literature publications.

  13. The Mars Science Laboratory APXS calibration target: Comparison of Martian measurements with the terrestrial calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, J.L., E-mail: icampbel@uoguelph.ca [Guelph-Waterloo Physics Institute, University of Guelph, Ontario N1G2W1 (Canada); King, P.L. [Guelph-Waterloo Physics Institute, University of Guelph, Ontario N1G2W1 (Canada); Institute of Meteoritics, University of New Mexico, NM 87131 (United States); Department of Earth Sciences, Western University, London, Ontario N6A3K7 (Canada); Burkemper, L. [Institute of Meteoritics, University of New Mexico, NM 87131 (United States); Berger, J.A. [Institute of Meteoritics, University of New Mexico, NM 87131 (United States); Department of Earth Sciences, Western University, London, Ontario N6A3K7 (Canada); Gellert, R.; Boyd, N.I.; Perrett, G.M.; Pradler, I. [Guelph-Waterloo Physics Institute, University of Guelph, Ontario N1G2W1 (Canada); Thompson, L. [Planetary and Space Science Centre, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, NB E3B5A3 (Canada); Edgett, K.S. [Malin Space Science Systems, San Diego, CA 92191-0148 (United States); Yingst, R.A. [Planetary Science Institute, Tucson, AZ 85719-2395 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    The Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover carries a basalt calibration target for monitoring the performance of the alpha particle X-ray spectrometer. The spectrum acquired on Sol 34 shows increased contributions from Mg, S, Cl and Fe relative to laboratory spectra recorded before launch. Mars Hand Lens Imager images confirm changes in the appearance of the surface. Spectra taken on Sols 179 and 411 indicate some loss of the deposited material. The observations suggest deposition of a surface film likely consisting of dust mobilized by impingement of the sky crane’s terminal descent engine plumes with surface fines during Curiosity’s landing. New APXS software has been used to model the thin film that coated the calibration target on landing. The results suggest that a film of about 100 nm thickness, and containing predominantly MgO, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, SO{sub 3}, Cl and Na{sub 2}O could give rise to the observed spectral changes. If this film is also present on the alpha particle sources within the APXS, then its effect is negligible and the terrestrial calibration remains appropriate.

  14. Association of quality of life with laboratory measurements and lifestyle factors in community dwelling older people in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tai-Yin; Chie, Wei-Chu; Liu, Jen-Pei; Liaw, Chen-Kun; Netuveli, Gopalakrishnan; Blane, David

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the influence of routine laboratory measurements and lifestyle factors on generic quality of life (QOL) at older ages. We aimed to study the relationship between generic QOL and laboratory measurements and lifestyle factors in community dwelling older Chinese people. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis. Six hundred and ninety nine elders were randomly selected from the examinees of the annual health examination in Taipei City, Taiwan. Blood, urine and stool of the participants were examined and lifestyle data were collected. Participants completed the CASP-19 (control, autonomy, self-realization, pleasure) questionnaire, a 19-item QOL scale. The relationship between QOL and laboratory results and lifestyle factors was explored, using multiple linear regression and profile analysis. The mean age of the participants was 75.5 years (SD = 6.5), and 49.5% were female. Male gender standardized β coefficients (β = 0.122) and exercise habit (β = 0.170) were associated with a better QOL, whereas advanced age (β = -0.242), blurred vision (β = -0.143), depression (β = -0.125), central obesity (β = -0.093), anemia (β = -0.095), rheumatoid arthritis (β = -0.073), Parkinsonism (β = -0.079), malignancy (β = -0.086) and motorcycle riding (β = -0.086) were associated with a lower QOL. Profile analysis revealed that young-old males, social drinkers, regular exercisers and car drivers had the best QOL (all p < 0.001). Of the many laboratory measurements, only anemia was associated with the lower QOL. By contrast, several lifestyle factors, such as social drinking, exercise habit and car driving, were associated with better QOL, whereas abdominal obesity and motorcycle riding were associated with lower QOL.

  15. Comparisons of clinically based outcome measures and laboratory-based outcome measure for balance in patients following total hip and knee arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jogi P

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Pankaj Jogi, Tom Overend, John Kramer School of Physical Therapy, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada Background: Information available in the literature on clinically based and laboratory-based outcome measures of balance is limited. How much information is provided by clinically based outcome measures compared to laboratory-based measure in patients with total hip (THA and knee arthroplasty (TKA is not known. Aim: The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between selected clinically based outcome measures and laboratory-based force platform measure in patients following THA and TKA. Methods: Patients who underwent THA (n = 26 and TKA (n = 28 were evaluated at about 5–7 weeks following surgery. Participants were assessed using four clinically based outcome measures – 1 the Berg Balance Scale (BBS, 2 the Timed Up and Go test (TUG, 3 the Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale (ABC, and 4 the Western Ontario McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index-function subscale (WOMAC-function – and one laboratory-based force plate measure (95% ellipse area. Results: Moderate correlations were observed between the BBS and the 95% ellipse area of force plate (r = 0.46–0.51 for the two-legged stance, the anterior lean stance, and the posterior lean stance. Fair correlations were observed between TUG and the 95% ellipse area of force plate (r = 0.31–0.37 for all the three test conditions. Low correlations were observed for the ABC and the WOMAC-function with the 95% ellipse area of force plate (r = 0.11–0.25 for all the three test conditions. Conclusion: The BBS demonstrated the greatest correlations with the 95% ellipse area of the force plate measure and should be preferred by physical therapists over the TUG, the ABC, and the WOMAC-function to assess balance in patients with THA and TKA. Keywords: total knee arthroplasty, total hip arthroplasty, force plate, clinical measures, balance

  16. Development of a method for reliable power input measurements in conventional and single-use stirred bioreactors at laboratory scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Stephan C; Werner, Sören; Jossen, Valentin; Kraume, Matthias; Eibl, Dieter

    2017-05-01

    Power input is an important engineering and scale-up/down criterion in stirred bioreactors. However, reliably measuring power input in laboratory-scale systems is still challenging. Even though torque measurements have proven to be suitable in pilot scale systems, sensor accuracy, resolution, and errors from relatively high levels of friction inside bearings can become limiting factors at smaller scales. An experimental setup for power input measurements was developed in this study by focusing on stainless steel and single-use bioreactors in the single-digit volume range. The friction losses inside the air bearings were effectively reduced to less than 0.5% of the measurement range of the torque meter. A comparison of dimensionless power numbers determined for a reference Rushton turbine stirrer ( N P = 4.17 ± 0.14 for fully turbulent conditions) revealed good agreement with literature data. Hence, the power numbers of several reusable and single-use bioreactors could be determined over a wide range of Reynolds numbers between 100 and >10 4 . Power numbers of between 0.3 and 4.5 (for Re = 10 4 ) were determined for the different systems. The rigid plastic vessels showed similar power characteristics to their reusable counterparts. Thus, it was demonstrated that the torque-based technique can be used to reliably measure power input in stirred reusable and single-use bioreactors at the laboratory scale.

  17. Surrogate indicators of sensitivity in gynecologic cytology: can they be used to improve the measurement of sensitivity in the laboratory?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renshaw, Andrew A; Brimo, Fadi; Auger, Manon

    2009-10-09

    Measuring the sensitivity of screening in gynecologic cytology in real life is problematic. However, other quality measures may correlate with sensitivity, including the atypical squamous cells (ASC)/squamous intraepithelial lesion (SIL) ratio. Whether these other measures can function as "surrogate indicators" for sensitivity and improve the assessment of sensitivity in the laboratory is not known. We compared multiple quality measures with true screening sensitivity in a variety of situations. The abnormal rate, ASC rate, and ASC/SIL ratio were all highly correlated (r =.83 or greater) with sensitivity when the overall laboratory sensitivity was low (85%) but became less correlated (.64 or less) or uncorrelated when the screening sensitivity was higher (88% or 95%, respectively). Sensitivity was more highly correlated with the abnormal rate than the ASC/SIL ratio at low screening sensitivity. While thresholds could be set that were highly sensitive and specific for suboptimal screening, these thresholds were often less than one standard deviation away from the mean. The correlation of the abnormal rate and the ASC/SIL ratio with sensitivity depends on overall sensitivity. Standards to define minimum screening sensitivity can be defined, but these standards are relatively narrow. These features may limit the utility of these quality measures as surrogates for sensitivity.

  18. Surrogate indicators of sensitivity in gynecologic cytology: Can they be used to improve the measurement of sensitivity in the laboratory?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renshaw Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Measuring the sensitivity of screening in gynecologic cytology in real life is problematic. However, other quality measures may correlate with sensitivity, including the atypical squamous cells (ASC/squamous intraepithelial lesion (SIL ratio. Whether these other measures can function as "surrogate indicators" for sensitivity and improve the assessment of sensitivity in the laboratory is not known. Materials and Methods: We compared multiple quality measures with true screening sensitivity in a variety of situations. Results: The abnormal rate, ASC rate, and ASC/SIL ratio were all highly correlated (r = .83 or greater with sensitivity when the overall laboratory sensitivity was low (85% but became less correlated (.64 or less or uncorrelated when the screening sensitivity was higher (88% or 95%, respectively. Sensitivity was more highly correlated with the abnormal rate than the ASC/SIL ratio at low screening sensitivity. While thresholds could be set that were highly sensitive and specific for suboptimal screening, these thresholds were often less than one standard deviation away from the mean. Conclusion: The correlation of the abnormal rate and the ASC/SIL ratio with sensitivity depends on overall sensitivity. Standards to define minimum screening sensitivity can be defined, but these standards are relatively narrow. These features may limit the utility of these quality measures as surrogates for sensitivity.

  19. Uncertainty Analysis of Certified Photovoltaic Measurements at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emery, K.

    2009-08-01

    Discusses NREL Photovoltaic Cell and Module Performance Characterization Group's procedures to achieve lowest practical uncertainty in measuring PV performance with respect to reference conditions.

  20. Correspondence of Parent Report and Laboratory Measures of Inattention and Hyperactivity in Children with Heavy Prenatal Alcohol Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Leila; Graham, Diana M.; Deweese, Benjamin N.; Jones, Kenneth Lyons; Riley, Edward P.; Mattson, Sarah N.

    2014-01-01

    Clinical research and practice support a multi-method approach to validating behavioral problems in children. We examined whether parent-reported symptoms of hyperactivity and inattention (using the Disruptive Behavior Disorder Rating Scale) were substantiated by objective laboratory measures [hyperactivity measured by wrist-worn actigraphy (ACT) and inattention assessed using a 20-minute continuous performance task (CPT)] in three age- and demographically-matched groups of school-age children: children with prenatal alcohol exposure (AE), non-exposed children with idiopathic ADHD (ADHD), and controls (CON). Results indicated that the clinical groups (AE, ADHD) had significantly higher parent-reported levels for both domains compared to the CON group, and did not differ from each other. On the laboratory measures, the clinical groups were more inattentive than controls on the CPT, but did not differ from each other. In contrast, the ADHD group had higher objective activity on the ACT than AE and CON, which did not differ from each other. Thus, laboratory measures differentially validated parent reports in a group-dependent manner. Actigraphy substantiated parent-reported hyperactivity for children in the ADHD group but not for children in the AE group, while the CPT validated parent-reported inattention for both clinical groups. Although the majority of children in the AE group met criteria for ADHD, objective activity levels were not different from controls, indicating that hyperactivity may be a less prominent feature in the AE group. Thus, while there is considerable overlap between the effects of prenatal alcohol exposure and ADHD, differences in behavioral profiles may be clinically useful in differential diagnosis. Further, these data indicate that objective measures should be used to validate parent reports. PMID:24512965

  1. Comparison of point-of-care analysis using Coaguchek XS and standard laboratory-measured prothrombin time in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newbould, A R; Norman, E J

    2013-01-01

    The Coaguchek XS is a hand-held coagulation monitor, which is widely available for human testing, and could have applications for canine samples. The aim of this study was a preliminary evaluation of the suitability of this point-of-care device to determine prothrombin time (PT) in dogs by measuring the clinical agreement between the results obtained using the device and standard laboratory testing. The PT in 24 samples from 13 dogs with suspected coagulopathy and 40 samples from 40 healthy dogs was determined concurrently using the point-of-care device and standard laboratory analysis. The clinical agreement between methods was assessed using Bland-Altman analysis and error grid analysis. Four of the paired samples were not suitable for analysis. The point-of-care device showed a 1.29 fold positive systematic bias which, when corrected for, gave excellent clinical agreement. Differences in the results obtained would have influenced clinical decision making in only 3 of 60 (5.0%) samples where the point-of-care result suggested a more prolonged PT than laboratory testing. A measurement error occurred in two point-of-care samples which may have been due to the combination of severe anaemia and severely prolonged PT. The point-of-care device can be used in dogs and would provide rapid analysis of PT to aid clinical decision making in dogs with suspected rodenticide toxicity. Development of a device-specific reference range for dogs would improve its value.

  2. Comparison between traditional laboratory tests, permeability measurements and CT-based fluid flow modelling for cultural heritage applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Boever, Wesley; Bultreys, Tom; Derluyn, Hannelore; Van Hoorebeke, Luc; Cnudde, Veerle

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we examine the possibility to use on-site permeability measurements for cultural heritage applications as an alternative for traditional laboratory tests such as determination of the capillary absorption coefficient. These on-site measurements, performed with a portable air permeameter, were correlated with the pore network properties of eight sandstones and one granular limestone that are discussed in this paper. The network properties of the 9 materials tested in this study were obtained from micro-computed tomography (μCT) and compared to measurements and calculations of permeability and the capillary absorption rate of the stones under investigation, in order to find the correlation between pore network characteristics and fluid management characteristics of these sandstones. Results show a good correlation between capillary absorption, permeability and network properties, opening the possibility of using on-site permeability measurements as a standard method in cultural heritage applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Laboratory measurement of secondary pollutant yields from ozone reaction with HVAC filters.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Destaillats, Hugo; Chen, Wenhao; Apte, Michael; Li, Nuan; Spears, Michael; Almosni, J& #233; r& #233; mie; Zhang, Jianshun (Jensen); Fisk, William J.

    2009-09-09

    We used Proton Transfer Reaction - Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) and conventional sampling methods to monitor and identify trace level organic pollutants formed in heterogeneous reactions between ozone and HVAC filters in real time. Experiments were carried out using a bench-scale flow tube reactor operating with dry air and humidified air (50% RH), at realistically high ozone concentrations (150 ppbv). We explored different filter media (i.e., fiberglass and cotton/polyester blends) and different particle loadings (i.e., clean filter and filters loaded with particles for 3 months at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the Port of Oakland, CA). Detailed emission dynamics of very low levels of certain organic pollutants from filter media upon ozone exposure in the presence of moisture have been obtained and analyzed.

  4. Mars' surface radiation environment measured with the Mars science laboratory's curiosity rover

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hassler, D.M.; Zeitlin, C.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R.F.; Ehresmann, B.; Rafkin, S.; Eigenbrode, J.L.; Brinza, D.E.; Weigle, G.; Böttcher, S.; Böhm, E.; Burmeister, S.; Guo, J.; Köhler, J.; Martin, C.; Reitz, G.; Cucinotta, F.A.; Kim, M.-H.; Grinspoon, D.; Bullock, M.A.; Posner, A.; Gómez-Elvira, J.; Vasavada, A.; Grotzinger, J.P.; MSL Science Team, the|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/292012217

    2014-01-01

    The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) on the Mars Science Laboratory’s Curiosity rover began making detailed measurements of the cosmic ray and energetic particle radiation environment on the surface of Mars on 7 August 2012. We report and discuss measurements of the absorbed dose and dose

  5. Pyrolysis of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE). 1. Experimental study with molecular-beam mass spectrometry and tunable synchrotron VUV photoionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Taichang; Wang, Jing; Yuan, Tao; Hong, Xin; Zhang, Lidong; Qi, Fei

    2008-10-23

    An experimental study of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) pyrolysis (3.72% MTBE in argon) has been performed at low pressure (267 Pa) within the temperature range from 700 to 1420 K. The pyrolysis process was detected with the tunable synchrotron vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization and molecular-beam mass spectrometry (MBMS). About thirty intermediates are identified from near-threshold measurements of photoionization mass spectrum and photoionization efficiency spectrum. Among them, H2, CO, CH4, CH3OH and C4H8 are the major pyrolysis products. The radicals such as methyl, methoxy, propargyl, allyl, C4H5 and C4H7 are detected. The isomers of pyrolysis products are identified as well, i.e., propyne and allene, 1,2,3-butatriene and vinylacetylene, isobutene and 1-butene, propanal and acetone. Furthermore, the mole fractions of the pyrolysis products have been evaluated under various temperatures. Meanwhile, the initial formation temperatures of different pyrolysis products can be obtained. This work is anticipated to present a new experimental method for pyrolysis study and help understand the pyrolysis and combustion chemistry of MTBE and other oxygenated fuels.

  6. Vision in laboratory rodents-Tools to measure it and implications for behavioral research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinonen, Henri; Tanila, Heikki

    2017-07-29

    Mice and rats are nocturnal mammals and their vision is specialized for detection of motion and contrast in dim light conditions. These species possess a large proportion of UV-sensitive cones in their retinas and the majority of their optic nerve axons target superior colliculus rather than visual cortex. Therefore, it was a widely held belief that laboratory rodents hardly utilize vision during day-time behavior. This dogma is being questioned as accumulating evidence suggests that laboratory rodents are able to perform complex visual functions, such as perceiving subjective contours, and that declined vision may affect their performance in many behavioral tasks. For instance, genetic engineering may have unexpected consequences on vision as mouse models of Alzheimer's and Huntington's diseases have declined visual function. Rodent vision can be tested in numerous ways using operant training or reflex-based behavioral tasks, or alternatively using electrophysiological recordings. In this article, we will first provide a summary of visual system and explain its characteristics unique to rodents. Then, we present well-established techniques to test rodent vision, with an emphasis on pattern vision: visual water test, optomotor reflex test, pattern electroretinography and pattern visual evoked potentials. Finally, we highlight the importance of visual phenotyping in rodents. As the number of genetically engineered rodent models and volume of behavioral testing increase simultaneously, the possibility of visual dysfunctions needs to be addressed. Neglect in this matter potentially leads to crude biases in the field of neuroscience and beyond. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. A laboratory apparatus for streaming potential and resistivity measurements on soil samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheffer, M R; Reppert, P M; Howie, J A

    2007-09-01

    We describe an apparatus designed to perform streaming potential and resistivity measurements on unconsolidated soil samples. The apparatus enables the use of both unidirectional and oscillatory flow methods to measure the streaming potential coupling coefficient (C); the direct current resistivity method is used to measure the bulk resistivity (rho) of the soil sample. Measuring both of these parameters on the same sample under the same conditions enables us to properly characterize the streaming current cross-coupling coefficient (L). The apparatus is designed to test reconstituted saturated soil samples up to a maximum grain size of 9.5 mm, and hydraulic gradients from less than 0.1 up to a maximum of 4 m of H(2)Om in flow-through experiments. Excellent agreement between C values measured using the unidirectional and oscillatory flow methods validates the oscillatory flow method for unconsolidated samples.

  8. The Infant Version of the Laboratory Temperament Assessment Battery (Lab-TAB): Measurement Properties and Implications for Concepts of Temperament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planalp, Elizabeth M.; Van Hulle, Carol; Gagne, Jeffrey R.; Goldsmith, H. Hill

    2017-01-01

    We describe large-sample research using the Infant Laboratory Temperament Assessment Battery (Lab-TAB; Goldsmith and Rothbart, 1996) in 1,076 infants at 6 and 12 months of age. The Lab-TAB was designed to assess temperament dimensions through a series of episodes that mimic everyday situations. Our goal is to provide guidelines for scoring Lab-TAB episodes to derive temperament composites. We also present a set of analyses examining mean differences and stability of temperament in early infancy, gender differences in infant temperament, as well as a validation of Lab-TAB episodes and composites with parent reported Infant Behavior Questionnaire (IBQ; Rothbart, 1981) scales. In general, laboratory observed temperament was only modestly related to parent reported temperament. However, temperament measures were significantly stable across time and several gender differences that align with previous research emerged. In sum, the Lab-TAB usefully assesses individual differences in infant emotionality. PMID:28596748

  9. Separation of VUV/UV photons and reactive particles in the effluent of a He/O2 atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    CERN Document Server

    Schneider, S; Narberhaus, F; Bandow, J E; Denis, B; Benedikt, J

    2011-01-01

    Cold atmospheric pressure plasmas can be used for treatment of living tissues or for inactivation of bacteria or biological macromolecules. The treatment is usually characterized by a combined effect of UV and VUV radiation, reactive species, and ions. This combination is usually beneficial for the effectiveness of the treatment but it makes the study of fundamental interaction mechanisms very difficult. Here we report on an effective separation of VUV/UV photons and heavy reactive species in the effluent of a micro scale atmospheric pressure plasma jet ($\\mu$-APPJ). The separation is realized by an additional flow of helium gas under well-defined flow conditions, which deflects heavy particles in the effluent without affecting the VUV and UV photons. Both components of the effluent, the photons and the reactive species, can be used separately or in combination for sample treatment. The results of treatment of a model plasma polymer film and vegetative Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli cells are shown an...

  10. A model of genetic guidance for hemoglobinopathy patients and laboratory diagnosis of family members as educational and preventive measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Dela-Sávia Ferreira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The high frequency of hemoglobinopathies in Brazil constitutes a public health problem and thus educational and preventive measures are necessary to reduce the incidence. Genetic guidance, a modality of genetic counseling, and family screening are measures that can assist in reproductive decisions and mitigate clinical, psychological and social problems of families with these disorders. OBJETIVE: The objective of the current study was to evaluate the effectiveness of educational and preventive measures for hemoglobinopathies using genetic guidance and laboratory screening of families. METHODS: The diagnoses of patients with hemoglobinopathies were confirmed and then the level of knowledge about their disease was evaluated and genetic guidance was provided. Three months later, the level of assimilated information of these patients was evaluated. In addition, laboratory diagnosis of family members was carried out. RESULTS: Diagnosis of sickle cell anemia was confirmed for most patients. Moreover, the majority of the patients who had a low level of knowledge before genetic guidance (68.8% demonstrated a higher level of assimilated information after the process (81.8%. Almost 70% of the family members had hemoglobin changes and some had hemoglobinopathies (2.6%. They were duly informed about the results of the examinations, which made it possible to investigate further. CONCLUSION: Genetic guidance and family screening were effective preventive and educational measures that improved the quality of life of patients, preventing complications and sequels and allowed the referral of those who may transmit altered genes for clinical diagnosis and to genetic counseling services.

  11. Multivariate Analysis of Laboratory and in Situ Optical Measurements to Investigate Dom Dynamics in a Tidal Wetland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downing, B. D.; Bergamaschi, B. A.; Fleck, J.; Kraus, T. E. C.; Fujii, R.

    2014-12-01

    The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (Delta) is a source of drinking water for over 30 million people in California and is an important source of carbon and nutrients for aquatic habitats in the San Francisco Estuary (SFE). The pool of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the Delta and SFE represents a mixture of river-derived material — the integration of watershed catchment processes — and locally derived wetland DOM. Physical, biological, and chemical transformation and removal processes influence the composition of this DOM pool on timescales ranging from seconds to hours. Measuring DOM composition and concentration in estuarine environments on scales at which they are forced is impractical using traditional grab sampling and laboratory-based analysis. To better accomplish this, we deployed in-situ instrumentation to provide high frequency measurement of velocity and optically based biogeochemical proxies (absorbance, fluorescence) to investigate DOM dynamics over spring neap tidal cycles in the main slough of Brown's Island, a natural tidal wetland in the Delta. Descriptive statistics and multivariate classification of both the laboratory and in situ optical measurements (absorbance and EEMs) were obtained using parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC), principle component analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA) to obtain useful high frequency optical parameters that describe DOM dynamics qualitatively and quantitatively. In this presentation we report findings from this study designed to derive and use optical indicators to continuously measure cumulative fluxes and chemical composition of wetland-derived DOM.

  12. Review of ultraviolet damage threshold measurements at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowdermilk, W.H.; Milam, D.

    1984-01-01

    The results of damage threshold measurements made at LLNL using ultraviolet wavelength laser pulses are reviewed. Measurements were made with pulses from a krypton fluoride laser with wavelength of 248 nm and pulse duration of 20 ns and with Nd-glass laser pulses converted to the third harmonic wavelength of 355 nm with duration of 0.6 ns. Measurements are presented for transparent window materials, crystals and harmonic generation, single layer dielectric films of oxide and fluoride materials and multilayer high reflectivity and antireflective coatings.

  13. Modification of the Sandia National Laboratories/California advanced coordinate measuring machine for high speed scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldwin, J.M.; Pilkey, R.D. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Cassou, R.M.; Summerhays, K.D. [Univ. of San Francisco, CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-03-01

    The Moore M48V high accuracy coordinate measuring machine (CMM), while mechanically capable of exact measurement of physical artifacts, is not, in its original configuration, well suited for rapid gathering of high density dimensional information. This report describes hardware and software modifications to the original control and data acquisition system that allow relatively high speed scanning of cylindrical features. We also estimate the accuracy of the individual point data on artifacts measured with this system and provide detailed descriptions of the hardware and software apparatus as an aid to others who may wish to apply the system to cylindrical or other simple geometries. 6 refs., 18 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Mars' surface radiation environment measured with the Mars science laboratory's curiosity rover

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hassler, D.M; Zeitlin, C; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R.F; Ehresmann, B; Rafkin, S; Eigenbrode, J.L; Brinza, D.E; Weigle, G; Böttcher, S; Böhm, E; Burmeister, S; Guo, J; Köhler, J; Martin, C; Reitz, G; Cucinotta, F.A; Kim, M.-H; Grinspoon, D; Bullock, M.A; Posner, A; Gómez-Elvira, J; Vasavada, A; Grotzinger, J.P; MSL Science Team, the|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/292012217

    2014-01-01

    The Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) on the Mars Science Laboratory’s Curiosity rover began making detailed measurements of the cosmic ray and energetic particle radiation environment on the surface of Mars on 7 August 2012...

  15. Unsaturated soil moisture drying and wetting diffusion coefficient measurements in the laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    ABSTRACTTransient moisture flow in an unsaturated soil in response to suction changes is controlled by the unsaturated moisture diffusion coefficient. The moisture diffusion coefficient can be determined by measuring suction profiles over time. The l...

  16. Automation of measurements in the dclf laboratory of the CSIR NML

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Marais, EL

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available repetitive, and being performed using measuring instruments that can be connected to a computer with relatively little effort. A number of commercial instrumentation automation software packages were evaluated, but these packages were found to be too...

  17. A laboratory apparatus for the measurement of optical extinction coefficients of postflame soot in the infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widmann, John F.; Yang, Jiann C.; Bundy, Matthew; Tsai, Benjamin K.; Mulholland, George W.

    2003-02-01

    An experimental apparatus for the measurement of optical extinction coefficients of postflame soot aerosol in the infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum is presented. Reproducible soot aerosol is generated using a laminar diffusion burner, and the mass concentration of the aerosol is determined gravimetrically. The instrument, which utilizes an infrared spectrograph for the extinction measurements, provides data over the wavelength range 2.5-5.0 μm. The infrared spectrograph, which provides a near-instantaneous measurement of the incident radiation over a range of wavelengths, is ideal for applications in which the deposition of soot over time on the optical windows can interfere with the measurement. Furthermore, the wavelength dependence of the extinction coefficient can be determined independently of the gravimetric measurements, which represents the dominant source of uncertainty in the measurement of the mass specific extinction coefficient. The spectrograph reported herein has been characterized using a well-characterized sodium heat pipe blackbody, and the responsivity of the instrument has been quantified as a function of wavelength.

  18. Generation of multiple VUV dispersive waves using a tapered gas-filled hollow-core anti-resonant fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Habib, Md Selim; Markos, Christos; Bang, Ole

    2017-01-01

    Hollow-core anti-resonant (HC-AR) fibers are perhaps the best platform for ultrafast nonlinear optics based on light-gas interactions because they offer broadband guidance and low-loss guidance. The main advantage of using gases inside HC fibers is that both the dispersion and nonlinearity can...... the nonlinear process to further blue-shift the generated DWs towards vacuum ultra-violet (VUV), here we numerically demonstrate for the first time (to the best of our knowledge) how the use of a tapered Ar-filled HC-AR fiber leads to multiple DWs in the extreme wavelength region from 143 to 280 nm....

  19. Laboratory Measured Emission Losses of Methyl Isothiocyanate at Pacific Northwest Soil Surface Fumigation Temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhou; Hebert, Vincent R; Miller, Glenn C

    2017-02-01

    Temperature is a major environmental factor influencing land surface volatilization at the time of agricultural field fumigation. Cooler fumigation soil temperatures relevant to Pacific Northwest (PNW) application practices with metam sodium/potassium should result in appreciably reduced methyl isothiocyanate (MITC) emission rates, thus minimizing off target movement and bystander inhalation exposure. Herein, a series of laboratory controlled flow-through soil column assessments were performed evaluating MITC emissions over the range of cooler temperatures (2-13°C). Assessments were also conducted at the maximum allowed label application temperature of 32°C. All assessments were conducted at registration label-specified field moisture capacity, and no more than 50% cumulative MITC loss was observed over the 2-day post-fumigation timeframe. Three-fold reductions in MITC peak fluxes at cooler PNW application temperatures were observed compared to the label maximum temperature. This study supports current EPA metam sodium/potassium label language that indicates surface fumigations during warmer soil conditions should be discouraged.

  20. Validating a universal model of particle transport lengths with laboratory measurements of suspended grain motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqshband, Suleyman; McElroy, Brandon; Mahon, Robert C.

    2017-05-01

    The mechanics of sediment transport are of fundamental importance for fluvio-deltaic morphodynamics. The present study focuses on quantifying particle motions and trajectories across a wide range of flow conditions. In particular, a continuous model is presented that predicts particle travel distances for saltation and suspension based on Rouse number and relative grain roughness. By utilizing a series of eight video cameras in a plexiglass flume direct measurements of the distributions of particle travel distances (excursion lengths) were obtained. To this end, experiments were carried out in dark under black lights with fluorescent painted plastic and quartz sand particles. For relatively high Rouse numbers indicating bed load dominant transport regime (P≥2.5), particle motion is governed by the effect of gravitational forces (settling velocities) and measured excursion lengths closely follow a Gaussian distribution. For P=2.5, particle motion is equally subjected to both gravitational and turbulent forces. Consequently, measured excursion lengths exhibit a bimodal distribution with two distinct peaks. As turbulent fluctuations increase and dominate particle motion over gravity (P(P=1.8-8.9). Furthermore, measured excursion lengths are observed to fit within the predicted range of excursion lengths with no significant difference between measured excursion lengths of plastic and quartz sand particles.

  1. "Albedo dome": a method for measuring spectral flux-reflectance in a laboratory for media with long optical paths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Light, Bonnie; Carns, Regina C; Warren, Stephen G

    2015-06-10

    A method is presented for accurate measurement of spectral flux-reflectance (albedo) in a laboratory, for media with long optical path lengths, such as snow and ice. The approach uses an acrylic hemispheric dome, which, when placed over the surface being studied, serves two functions: (i) it creates an overcast "sky" to illuminate the target surface from all directions within a hemisphere, and (ii) serves as a platform for measuring incident and backscattered spectral radiances, which can be integrated to obtain fluxes. The fluxes are relative measurements and because their ratio is used to determine flux-reflectance, no absolute radiometric calibrations are required. The dome and surface must meet minimum size requirements based on the scattering properties of the surface. This technique is suited for media with long photon path lengths since the backscattered illumination is collected over a large enough area to include photons that reemerge from the domain far from their point of entry because of multiple scattering and small absorption. Comparison between field and laboratory albedo of a portable test surface demonstrates the viability of this method.

  2. Quantification of Uncertainty in Mathematical Models: The Statistical Relationship between Field and Laboratory pH Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurt K. Benke

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The measurement of soil pH using a field portable test kit represents a fast and inexpensive method to assess pH. Field based pH methods have been used extensively for agricultural advisory services and soil survey and now for citizen soil science projects. In the absence of laboratory measurements, there is a practical need to model the laboratory pH as a function of the field pH to increase the density of data for soil research studies and Digital Soil Mapping. The accuracy and uncertainty in pH field measurements were investigated for soil samples from regional Victoria in Australia using both linear and sigmoidal models. For samples in water and CaCl2 at 1 : 5 dilutions, sigmoidal models provided improved accuracy over the full range of field pH values in comparison to linear models (i.e., pH 9. The uncertainty in the field results was quantified by the 95% confidence interval (CI and 95% prediction interval (PI for the models, with 95% CI < 0.25 pH units and 95% PI = ±1.3 pH units, respectively. It was found that the Pearson criterion for robust regression analysis can be considered as an alternative to the orthodox least-squares modelling approach because it is more effective in addressing outliers in legacy data.

  3. Investigation of discharged aerosol nanoparticles during chemical precipitation and spray pyrolysis for developing safety measures in the nano research laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesnikov, Еvgeny; Karunakaran, Gopalu; Godymchuk, Anna; Vera, Levina; Yudin, Andrey Grigorjevich; Gusev, Alexander; Kuznetsov, Denis

    2017-05-01

    Nowadays, the demands for the nanoparticles are increasing due to their tremendous applications in various fields. As a consequence, the discharge of nanoparticles into the atmosphere and environment is also increasing, posing a health threat and environmental damage in terms of pollution. Thus, an extensive research is essential to evaluate the discharge of these nanoparticles into the environment. Keeping this in mind, the present investigation aimed to analyze the discharge of aerosol nanoparticles that are synthesized in the laboratory via chemical precipitation and spray pyrolysis methods. The results indicated that the chemical precipitation method discharges a higher concentration of nanoparticles in the work site when compared to the spray pyrolysis method. The aerosol concentration also varied with the different steps involved during the synthesis of nanoparticles. The average particle's concentration in air for chemical precipitation and spray pyrolysis methods was around 1,037,476 and 883,421particles/cm3. In addition, the average total discharge of nanoparticles in the entire laboratory was also examined. A significant variation in the concentration of nanoparticles was noticed, during the processing of materials and the concentration of particles (14-723nm) exceeding the daily allowed concentration to about 70-170 times was observed over a period of 6 months. Thus, the results of the present study will be very useful in developing safety measures and would help in organizing the rules for people working in nanotechnology laboratories to minimize the hazardous effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Characterizing the Phyllosilicates and Amorphous Phases Found by MSL Using Laboratory XRD and EGA Measurements of Natural and Synthetic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampe, Elizabeth B.; Morris, Richard V.; Chipera, Steve; Bish, David L.; Bristow, Thomas; Archer, Paul Douglas; Blake, David; Achilles, Cherie; Ming, Douglas W.; Vaniman, David; hide

    2013-01-01

    The Curiosity Rover landed on the Peace Vallis alluvial fan in Gale crater on August 5, 2012. A primary mission science objective is to search for past habitable environments, and, in particular, to assess the role of past water. Identifying the minerals and mineraloids that result from aqueous alteration at Gale crater is essential for understanding past aqueous processes at the MSL landing site and hence for interpreting the site's potential habitability. X-ray diffraction (XRD) data from the CheMin instrument and evolved gas analyses (EGA) from the SAM instrument have helped the MSL science team identify phases that resulted from aqueous processes: phyllosilicates and amorphous phases were measure in two drill samples (John Klein and Cumberland) obtained from the Sheepbed Member, Yellowknife Bay Fm., which is believed to represent a fluvial-lacustrine environment. A third set of analyses was obtained from scoop samples from the Rocknest sand shadow. Chemical data from the APXS instrument have helped constrain the chemical compositions of these secondary phases and suggest that the phyllosilicate component is Mg-enriched and the amorphous component is Fe-enriched, relatively Si-poor, and S- and H-bearing. To refine the phyllosilicate and amorphous components in the samples measured by MSL, we measured XRD and EGA data for a variety of relevant natural terrestrial phyllosilicates and synthetic mineraloids in laboratory testbeds of the CheMin and SAM instruments. Specifically, Mg-saturated smectites and vermiculites were measured with XRD at low relative humidity to understand the behavior of the 001 reflections under Mars-like conditions. Our laboratory XRD measurements suggest that interlayer cation composition affects the hydration state of swelling clays at low RH and, thus, the 001 peak positions. XRD patterns of synthetic amorphous materials, including allophane, ferrihydrite, and hisingerite were used in full-pattern fitting (FULLPAT) models to help

  5. Relaxation and excitation electronic processes in dielectrics irradiated by ultrafast IR and VUV pulses; Processus electroniques d'excitation et de relaxation dans les solides dielectriques excites par des impulsions IR et XUV ultracourtes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaudin, J

    2005-11-15

    We studied excitation and relaxation of electrons involved during interaction of visible and VUV femtosecond pulses with dielectrics. The generated population of hot electrons, having energy of few eV to few tens of eV above the bottom of the conduction band, is responsible of phenomena ranging to defect creation to optical breakdown. Owing to two techniques: photoemission and transient photoconductivity we improve the understanding of the The first photoemission experiments deal with dielectrics irradiated by 30 fs IR pulses. The photoemission spectra measured show a large population of electrons which energy rise up to 40 eV. We interpret this result in terms of a new absorption process: direct multi-photons inter-branch transitions. The 2. type of photoemission experiments are time resolved 'pump/probe' investigation. We study the relaxation of electrons excited by a VUV pulses. We used the high order harmonics (HOH) as light sources. We found surprisingly long decay time in the range of ps timescale. Last type of experiments is photoconductivity studies of diamond samples. Using HOH as light source we measure the displacement current induced by excited electrons in the conduction band. Those electrons relax mainly by impact ionisation creating secondary electrons. Hence by probing the number of electrons we were able to measure the efficiency of these relaxation processes. We observe a diminution of this efficiency when the energy of exciting photons is above 20 eV. Owing to Monte-Carlo simulation we interpret this result in terms of band structure effect. (author)

  6. Comparison between traditional laboratory tests, permeability measurements and CT-based fluid flow modelling for cultural heritage applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Boever, Wesley, E-mail: Wesley.deboever@ugent.be [UGCT/PProGRess, Dept. of Geology, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Bultreys, Tom; Derluyn, Hannelore [UGCT/PProGRess, Dept. of Geology, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Van Hoorebeke, Luc [UGCT/Radiation Physics, Dept. of Physics & Astronomy, Ghent University, Proeftuinstraat 86, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Cnudde, Veerle [UGCT/PProGRess, Dept. of Geology, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281, 9000 Ghent (Belgium)

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we examine the possibility to use on-site permeability measurements for cultural heritage applications as an alternative for traditional laboratory tests such as determination of the capillary absorption coefficient. These on-site measurements, performed with a portable air permeameter, were correlated with the pore network properties of eight sandstones and one granular limestone that are discussed in this paper. The network properties of the 9 materials tested in this study were obtained from micro-computed tomography (μCT) and compared to measurements and calculations of permeability and the capillary absorption rate of the stones under investigation, in order to find the correlation between pore network characteristics and fluid management characteristics of these sandstones. Results show a good correlation between capillary absorption, permeability and network properties, opening the possibility of using on-site permeability measurements as a standard method in cultural heritage applications. - Highlights: • Measurements of capillary absorption are compared to in-situ permeability. • We obtain pore size distribution and connectivity by using micro-CT. • These properties explain correlation between permeability and capillarity. • Correlation between both methods is good to excellent. • Permeability measurements could be a good alternative to capillarity measurement.

  7. The study of the elastic properties of carbonate rocks on a base of laboratory and field measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwona Stan-Kłeczek

    2016-04-01

    were carried out from different quarries from the south part of Poland. The shape of samples is a cuboid with dimensions 0,1 x 0,05 x 0,05 m. The Pundit Lab+ equipment was used for tests. It measures the transmission time of an ultrasonic wave. P- and S- wave velocity are obtained for each sample. Seismic velocity values allowed for the calculation of the dynamic elastic moduli. The application of laboratory methods allowed obtaining information about the physical properties of rocks. This knowledge makes easier recognition in preliminary stages during engineering study

  8. Image analysis for measuring the size stratification in sand-gravel laboratory experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orru, C.; Chavarrias Borras, V.; Uijttewaal, W.S.J.; Blom, A.

    2014-01-01

    Measurements of spatial and temporal changes in the grain-size distribution of the bed surface and substrate are crucial to improving the modelling of sediment transport and associated grain-size selective processes. We present three complementary techniques to determine such variations in the

  9. Laboratory and field methods for measurement of hyphal uptake of nutrients in soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schweiger, P.F.; Jakobsen, I.

    2000-01-01

    Experimental systems for measuring nutrient transport by arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi in soil are described. The systems generally include two soil compartments that are separated by fine nylon mesh. Both roots and root-external hyphae grow in one compartment, but only hyphae are fine enough...

  10. Using a Flatbed Scanner to Measure Detergency: A Cost-Effective Undergraduate Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poce-Fatou, J. A.; Bethencourt, M.; Moreno-Dorado, F. J.; Palacios-Santander, J. M.

    2011-01-01

    The efficiency of a laundry-washing process is typically assessed using reflection measurements. A spectrometer and an integrating sphere are used to obtain the reflection data. The similarities between this equipment and a commercially available flatbed scanner are examined, and the way a flatbed scanner can be used to obtain detergent…

  11. Radon Measurement Laboratories. An Educational Experience Based on School and University Cooperation

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Cicco, F.; Balzano, E.; Limata, B. N.; Masullo, M. R.; Quarto, M.; Roca, V.; Sabbarese, C.; Pugliese, M.

    There is a growing interest in engaging students and the general public about the meaning and objectives of doing science. When it is possible students can learn by actively engaging in the practices of science, conducting investigations, sharing ideas with their peers, teachers and scientists, learning to work with measuring apparatuses, to…

  12. Aerosol emissions from prescribed fires in the United States: A synthesis of laboratory and aircraft measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. A. May; G. R. McMeeking; T. Lee; J. W. Taylor; J. S. Craven; I. Burling; A. P. Sullivan; S. Akagi; J. L. Collett; M. Flynn; H. Coe; S. P. Urbanski; J. H. Seinfeld; R. J. Yokelson; S. M. Kreidenweis

    2014-01-01

    Aerosol emissions from prescribed fires can affect air quality on regional scales. Accurate representation of these emissions in models requires information regarding the amount and composition of the emitted species. We measured a suite of submicron particulate matter species in young plumes emitted from prescribed fires (chaparral and montane ecosystems in California...

  13. Measurement of sewer sediments with acoustic technology : From laboratory to field experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lepot, M.J.; Pouzol, Tanguy; Aldea Borruel, Xavier; Suner, David; Bertrand-Krajewski, Jean Luc

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring sewer sediments is necessary to better understand sedimentation and erosion processes. Sonar is one of the available techniques to proceed to sewer sediment measurements. Extraction of numerical data, implementation of a new algorithm to identify the water-sediment interface,

  14. Using Conductivity Measurements to Determine the Identities and Concentrations of Unknown Acids: An Inquiry Laboratory Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, K. Christopher; Garza, Ariana

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a student designed experiment using titrations involving conductivity measurements to identify unknown acids as being either HCl or H[subscript 2]SO[subscript 4], and to determine the concentrations of the acids, thereby improving the utility of standard acid-base titrations. Using an inquiry context, students gain experience…

  15. Biases of chamber methods for measuring soil CO2 efflux demonstrated with a laboratory apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    S. Mark Nay; Kim G. Mattson; Bernard T. Bormann

    1994-01-01

    Investigators have historically measured soil CO2 efflux as an indicator of soil microbial and root activity and more recently in calculations of carbon budgets. The most common methods estimate CO2 efflux by placing a chamber over the soil surface and quantifying the amount of CO2 entering the...

  16. Laboratory Measurements of Charge Transfer on Atomic Hydrogen at Thermal Energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havener, C. C.; Vane, C. R.; Krause, H. F.; Stancil, P. C.; Mroczkowski, T.; Savin, D. W.

    2002-01-01

    We describe our ongoing program to measure velocity dependent charge transfer (CT) cross sections for selected ions on atomic hydrogen using the ion-aloin merged-beams apparatus at Oak Ridge Natioiial Laboralory. Our focus is on those ions for which CT plays an important role in determining the ionization structure, line emis sion, and thermal structure of observed cosmic photoionized plasmas.

  17. ChemDuino: Adapting Arduino for Low-Cost Chemical Measurements in Lecture and Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubínova´, S?te?pa´nka; S?le´gr, Jan

    2015-01-01

    In everyday praxis, we often need demonstration measuring devices (thermometers, pH meters, etc.), with large enough displays to be easily readable from every point in the classroom. Here, we present some of the capabilities of the Arduino platform for the school environment. This microprocessor board can be used for inexpensive construction of…

  18. The Quartz-Crystal Microbalance in an Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment II: Measuring Viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsionsky, Vladimir

    2007-01-01

    Various water-alcohol and alcohol-alcohol based experiments are used to demonstrate how the quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) technique is used for measuring the viscosity of a system. The technique is very advantageous, as it is inexpensive and provides digital output.

  19. 3D Laboratory Measurements of Forces, Flows, and Collimation in Arched Flux Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haw, Magnus; Bellan, Paul

    2016-10-01

    Fully 3D, vector MHD force measurements from an arched, current carrying flux tube (flux rope) are presented. The experiment consists of two arched plasma-filled flux ropes each powered by a capacitor bank. The two loops are partially overlapped, as in a Venn diagram, and collide and reconnect during their evolution. B-field data is taken on the lower plasma arch using a 54 channel B-dot probe. 3D volumetric data is acquired by placing the probe at 2700 locations and taking 5 plasma shots at each location. The resulting data set gives high resolution (2cm, 10ns) volumetric B-field data with high reproducibility (deviation of 3% between shots). Taking the curl of the measured 3D B-field gives current densities (J) in good agreement with measured capacitor bank current. The JxB forces calculated from the data have a strong axial component at the base of the current channel and are shown to scale linearly with axial gradients in current density. Assuming force balance in the flux tube minor radius direction, we infer near-Alfvenic axial flows from the footpoint regions which are consistent with the measured axial forces. Flux tube collimation is observed in conjunction with these axial flows. These dynamic processes are relevant to the stability and dynamics of coronal loops. Supported provided by NSF, AFOSR.

  20. Gamma-Ray Attenuation Measurements as a Laboratory Experiment: Some Remarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamides, E.; Koutroubas, S. K.; Moshonas, N.; Yiasemides, K.

    2011-01-01

    In this article we make some significant remarks on the experimental study of the absorption of gamma radiation passing through matter. These remarks have to do with the seemingly unexpected trend of the measured intensity of radiation versus the thickness of the absorber, which puzzles students and its explanation eludes many laboratory…

  1. Electrical conductivity of the oceanic asthenosphere and its interpretation based on laboratory measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsura, Tomoo; Baba, Kiyoshi; Yoshino, Takashi; Kogiso, Tetsu

    2017-10-01

    We review the currently available results of laboratory experiments, geochemistry and MT observations and attempt to explain the conductivity structures in the oceanic asthenosphere by constructing mineral-physics models for the depleted mid-oceanic ridge basalt (MORB) mantle (DMM) and volatile-enriched plume mantle (EM) along the normal and plume geotherms. The hopping and ionic conductivity of olivine has a large temperature dependence, whereas the proton conductivity has a smaller dependence. The contribution of proton conduction is small in DMM. Melt conductivity is enhanced by the H2O and CO2 components. The effects of incipient melts with high volatile components on bulk conductivity are significant. The low solidus temperatures of the hydrous carbonated peridotite produce incipient melts in the asthenosphere, which strongly increase conductivity around 100 km depth under older plates. DMM has a conductivity of 10- 1.2 - 1.5 S/m at 100-300 km depth, regardless of the plate age. Plume mantle should have much higher conductivity than normal mantle, due to its high volatile content and high temperatures. The MT observations of the oceanic asthenosphere show a relatively uniform conductivity at 200-300 km depth, consistent with the mineral-physics model. On the other hand, the MT observations show large lateral variations in shallow parts of the asthenosphere despite similar tectonic settings and close locations. Such variations are difficult to explain with the mineral-physics model. High conductivity layers (HCL), which are associated with anisotropy in the direction of the plate motion, have only been observed in the asthenosphere under infant or young plates, but they are not ubiquitous in the oceanic asthenosphere. Although the general features of HCL imply their high-temperature melting origin, the mineral-physics model cannot explain them quantitatively. Much lower conductivity under hotspots, compared with the model plume-mantle conductivity suggests the

  2. Laboratory investigations of Titan haze formation: In situ measurement of gas and particle composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hörst, Sarah M.; Yoon, Y. Heidi; Ugelow, Melissa S.; Parker, Alex H.; Li, Rui; de Gouw, Joost A.; Tolbert, Margaret A.

    2018-02-01

    Prior to the arrival of the Cassini-Huygens spacecraft, aerosol production in Titan's atmosphere was believed to begin in the stratosphere where chemical processes are predominantly initiated by far ultraviolet (FUV) radiation. However, measurements taken by the Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) and Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS) indicate that haze formation initiates in the thermosphere where there is a greater flux of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) photons and energetic particles available to initiate chemical reactions, including the destruction of N2. The discovery of previously unpredicted nitrogen species in measurements of Titan's atmosphere by the Cassini Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) indicates that nitrogen participates in the chemistry to a much greater extent than was appreciated before Cassini. The degree of nitrogen incorporation in the haze particles is important for understanding the diversity of molecules that may be present in Titan's atmosphere and on its surface. We have conducted a series of Titan atmosphere simulation experiments using either spark discharge (Tesla coil) or FUV photons (deuterium lamp) to initiate chemistry in CH4/N2 gas mixtures ranging from 0.01% CH4/99.99% N2 to 10% CH4/90% N2. We obtained in situ real-time measurements using a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) to measure the particle composition as a function of particle size and a proton-transfer ion-trap mass spectrometer (PIT-MS) to measure the composition of gas phase products. These two techniques allow us to investigate the effect of energy source and initial CH4 concentration on the degree of nitrogen incorporation in both the gas and solid phase products. The results presented here confirm that FUV photons produce not only solid phase nitrogen bearing products but also gas phase nitrogen species. We find that in both the gas and solid phase, nitrogen is found in nitriles rather than amines and that both the

  3. 8-channel, FPGA based, DSP integrated cavity simulator and controller for VUV-FEL. SIMCON 3.0 Ver. 3.0. rev. 1, 06.2005 - Hardware manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pozniak, K.T.; Czarski, T.; Koprek, W.; Giergusiewicz, W.; Romaniuk, R.S. [Warsaw Univ. of Technology (Poland). Inst. of Electronic Systems ELHEP Laboratory

    2005-07-01

    The note describes integrated, eight channel system of hardware controller and simulator of the resonant superconducting, narrowband niobium cavity, originally considered for the TTF and TESLA in DESY, Hamburg (now tested for the VUV FEL and developed for X-Ray FEL). The controller bases on a programmable circuit Xilinx VirtexII V4000. The solution uses DSP EMBEDDED BOARD module positioned on a Modular LLRF Control Platform. The algorithm and FPGA circuit configuration was done in the VHDL language. The internal hardware multiplication components, present in Virtex II chips, were used, to improve the floating point calculation efficiency. The implementation was achieved of a device working in the real time, according to the demands of the LLRF control system for the TESLA Test Facility (now associated with the VUV FEL machine). The device under consideration will be referred to as superconducting cavity (SCCav) SIMCON throughout this work. The manual describes hardware features of SIMCON, ver. 3.0 in modular solution. The following components are described here in detail: functional layer, parameter programming, foundations of control of particular blocks and monitoring of the real time processes. This note is accompanied by the one describing the multichannel DOOCS interface for the described hardware system. The interface was prepared in DOOCS for Solaris and in Windows. The hardware and software of 8-channel SIMCON was tested in CHECIA and ACC1 module of VUV FEL linac. The measurements results are presented. While giving all necessary technical details required to understand the work of the integrated hardware controller and simulator and to enable its practical copying, this document is a unity with other TESLA technical notes published by the same team on the subject. Thus, some modeling and other subjects were omitted, as they were addressed in detail in the quoted references. Keywords: Super conducting cavity, cavity simulator, CAVITIES CONTROLLER, SIMCON

  4. Competitive and synergistic effects between excimer VUV radiation and O radicals on the etching mechanisms of polyethylene and fluoropolymer surfaces treated by atmospheric He-O$_2$ post-discharge

    CERN Document Server

    Dufour, Thierry; Vandencasteele, Nicolas; Viville, Pascal; Lazzaroni, Roberto; Reniers, François

    2016-01-01

    Among various surface modification techniques, plasma can be used as a source for tailoring the surface properties of diverse materials. HDPE and fluoropolymer surfaces have been treated by the post-discharge of an atmospheric RF-plasma torch supplied with helium and oxygen gases. The plasma-treated surfaces were characterized by measurements of mass losses, water contact angles, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. This experimental approach correlated with an optical characterization of the plasma phase allowed us to propose etching mechanisms occurring at the post-discharge/polymer interface. We discuss how competitive and synergistic effects can result from the oxidation and/or the roughening of the surface but also from the excimer VUV radiation, the He metastable species and the O radicals reaching the plasma-polymer interface.

  5. Using particle tracking to measure flow instabilities in an undergraduate laboratory experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Douglas H.; Ouellette, Nicholas T.

    2011-03-01

    Much of the drama and complexity of fluid flow occurs because its governing equations lack unique solutions. The observed behavior depends on the stability of the multitude of solutions, which can change with the experimental parameters. Instabilities cause sudden global shifts in behavior. We have developed a low-cost experiment to study a classical fluid instability. By using an electromagnetic technique, students drive Kolmogorov flow in a thin fluid layer and measure it quantitatively with a webcam. They extract positions and velocities from movies of the flow using Lagrangian particle tracking and compare their measurements to several theoretical predictions, including the effect of the drive current, the spatial structure of the flow, and the parameters at which instability occurs. The experiment can be tailored to undergraduates at any level or to graduate students by appropriate emphasis on the physical phenomena and the sophisticated mathematics that govern them.

  6. High Altitude Pollution Program Stratospheric Measurement System Laboratory Performance Capability Report Chemical Conversion Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-02-01

    1000, 2500 and 10,,00 ppb Accuracy Limited by calibration sample Linearity ±1% oo full scale Interferences NH3 in NO mode Time Response 11 sec on all...sometimes used to describe this efficiency loss but the definition is loose. Finally, to maintain efficiency, oxidant scavengers or scrubbers are often...Analysis of NO2 and NH3 by NO-Measuring Instruments," JAPCA 23, 128, 1973. Clyne, M., et al., "Kinetics of the Chemiluminescent Reaction between Nitric

  7. Electric Conduction in Solids: a Pedagogical Approach Supported by Laboratory Measurements and Computer Modelling Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonura, A.; Capizzo, M. C.; Fazio, C.; Guastella, I.

    2008-05-01

    In this paper we present a pedagogic approach aimed at modeling electric conduction in semiconductors, built by using NetLogo, a programmable modeling environment for building and exploring multi-agent systems. `Virtual experiments' are implemented to confront predictions of different microscopic models with real measurements of electric properties of matter, such as resistivity. The relations between these electric properties and other physical variables, like temperature, are, then, analyzed.

  8. Hydrothermal alteration and diagenesis of terrestrial lacustrine pillow basalts: Coordination of hyperspectral imaging with laboratory measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberger, Rebecca N; Mustard, John F; Cloutis, Edward A; Mann, Paul; Wilson, Janette H.; Flemming, Roberta L; Robertson, Kevin; Salvatore, Mark R; Edwards, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    We investigate an outcrop of ∼187 Ma lacustrine pillow basalts of the Talcott Formation exposed in Meriden, Connecticut, USA, focusing on coordinated analyses of one pillow lava to characterize the aqueous history of these basalts in the Hartford Basin. This work uses a suite of multidisciplinary measurements, including hyperspectral imaging, other spectroscopic techniques, and chemical and mineralogical analyses, from the microscopic scale up to the scale of an outcrop.

  9. Low Temperature Laboratory Measurements of the Centimeter Wavelength Properties of Phosphine under Simulated Outer Planet Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, J. P.; Steffes, P. G.

    1999-09-01

    We are currently conducting low-temperature measurements of centimeter-wavelength opacity and refractivity of phosphine (PH3) in an H2/He atmosphere. Measurements are being made at 1.5 GHz (20 cm), 2.2 GHz (13.3 cm), 8.3 GHz (3.6 cm), 13.3 GHz (2.3 cm), and 21.6 GHz (1.4 cm) over a range of pressures and at temperatures of 213 K and 173 K. The experimental method is similar to that previously described by DeBoer and Steffes (Astrophys. and Space Sci. 236, 111-124, 1996). Preliminary results indicate that current theories significantly understate the centimeter-wavelength opacity of PH3. Together with our previous room temperature measurements (Hoffman, Steffes, and DeBoer, Icarus August 1999), these data will further elucidate the interpretation of centimeter-wavelength observations from radio telescopes and previous spacecraft (Voyager) radio occultation measurements of the atmospheres of all four Jovian planets with emphasis on Saturn and Neptune. These data will also aid future radio-scientific studies to be conducted by Cassini at Saturn. Further experiments are planned to distinguish between self-broadening and foreign gas broadening by using a test gas mixture with a different mixing ratio of PH3. This will facilitate development of a formalism for accurately determining the expected opacity from phosphine as a function of temperature, pressure, frequency, and mixing ratio. This work is supported by the NASA Planetary Atmospheres Program under grant NAG5-4190.

  10. Oscillator strengths for high-excitation Ti II from laboratory measurements and calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundberg, H.; Hartman, H.; Engström, L.; Nilsson, H.; Persson, A.; Palmeri, P.; Quinet, P.; Fivet, V.; Malcheva, G.; Blagoev, K.

    2016-07-01

    This work reports new experimental radiative lifetimes of six 3d2(3F)5s levels in singly ionized titanium, with an energy around 63 000 cm-1 and four 3d2(3F)4p odd parity levels where we confirm previous investigations. Combining the new 5s lifetimes with branching fractions measured previously by Pickering et al., we report 57 experimental log gf values for transitions from the 5s levels. The lifetime measurements are performed using time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence on ions produced by laser ablation. One- and two-step photon excitation is employed to reach the 4p and 5s levels, respectively. Theoretical calculations of the radiative lifetimes of the measured levels as well as of oscillator strengths for 3336 transitions from these levels are reported. The calculations are carried out by a pseudo-relativistic Hartree-Fock method taking into account core-polarization effects. The theoretical results are in a good agreement with the experiments and are needed for accurate abundance determinations in astronomical objects.

  11. Improved vigilance after sodium oxybate treatment in narcolepsy: a comparison between in-field and in-laboratory measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schie, Mojca K M; Werth, Esther; Lammers, Gert Jan; Overeem, Sebastiaan; Baumann, Christian R; Fronczek, Rolf

    2016-08-01

    This two-centre observational study of vigilance measurements assessed the feasibility of vigilance measurements on multiple days using the Sustained Attention to Response Task and the Psychomotor Vigilance Test with portable task equipment, and subsequently assessed the effect of sodium oxybate treatment on vigilance in patients with narcolepsy. Twenty-six patients with narcolepsy and 15 healthy controls were included. The study comprised two in-laboratory days for the Maintenance of Wakefulness Test and the Oxford Sleep Resistance test, followed by 7-day portable vigilance battery measurements. This procedure was repeated for patients with narcolepsy after at least 3 months of stable treatment with sodium oxybate. Patients with narcolepsy had a higher Sustained Attention to Response Task error count, lower Psychomotor Vigilance Test reciprocal reaction time, higher Oxford Sleep Resistance test omission error count adjusted for test duration (Oxford Sleep Resistance testOMIS / MIN ), and lower Oxford Sleep Resistance test and Maintenance of Wakefulness Test sleep latency compared with controls (all P Treatment with sodium oxybate was associated with a longer Maintenance of Wakefulness Test sleep latency (P narcolepsy, but not with absolute changes in Oxford Sleep Resistance test sleep latency or Psychomotor Vigilance Test reciprocal reaction time. It was concluded that portable measurements of sustained attention as well as in-laboratory Oxford Sleep Resistance test and Maintenance of Wakefulness Test measurements revealed worse performance for narcoleptic patients compared with controls, and that sodium oxybate was associated with an improvement of sustained attention and a better resistance to sleep. © 2016 European Sleep Research Society.

  12. Fracture toughness properties of rocks in Olkiluoto: Laboratory measurements 2008-2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siren, T.

    2012-05-15

    In Olkiluoto an underground rock characterization facility (ONKALO) for the final disposal site of spent nuclear fuel has been under thorough research many years, but further knowledge is needed on fracture toughness parameters. Fracture toughness parameters are important for example in fracture mechanics prediction for Posiva's Olkiluoto Spalling Experiment (POSE). This working report describes a laboratory campaign that was done between 2008 and 2009. The campaign aimed at determining the fracture mechanics parameters as well as density and ultrasonic velocities for Olkiluoto rocks. The specimens delivered were selected by Posiva; the core showed no damage and the quality of the delivered cores was good with varying sample diameter. Most of the test samples (9 out of 12) are gneissic rock. The Mode I fracture toughness was determined using two different methods to account for two different fracturing directions. The methods are the Chevron Bend (CB) test as proposed in the ISRM Suggested Method and a method based on the Brazilian Disk (BD) experiment. The Mode II fracture toughness was determined using the Punch-Through Shear with Confining Pressure experiment on the remaining pieces from the CB testing. The scatter in the results is very large, even within one piece of core sample. Usually the scatter of results is less than 5 %. The high scatter in the data at hand is believed to be due to the very inhomogeneous nature of the rock material. The magnitude of the determined Mode I fracture toughness compares well with available reported data for medium to coarse grained granitoide rocks. However the scatter of the mode II fracture toughness values is higher than experienced on other rock types, but the variability is reasonable for the inhomogeneous rock type. Distinguishing the fracture toughness values for different anisotropy directions would require more thorough testing with quality samples at different anisotropy directions. However since fracture

  13. Acetylene ^1^2C_2H_2 Laboratory Measurements for Astrophysical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquemart, D.; Gomez, L.; Lacome, N.; Mandin, J.-Y.; Pirali, O.; Roy, P.

    2010-06-01

    The acetylene molecule is important for atmospheric, planetary, and astrophysical applications. This organic molecule, known as a precursor of amino acids, shows numerous vibration-rotation bands in the IR. Two recent works on line intensities measurements will be presented. A study around 7.7 μm was motivated by SPITZER observations of C_2H_2 in this spectral region that cannot be modeled using the current line list of HITRAN/GEISA due to the lack of data. High resolution spectra have been recorded with the Bruker HR IFS 120 of the LADIR and analyzed to deduce absolute line intensities of several bands included the one present in HITRAN, the (ν_4+ν_5)^0_+ strong band. On the whole, line intensities of 2 cold bands and 15 hot bands have been studied, and a complete line list has been generated. Another study using SOLEIL synchrotron will be presented in the spectral region around 100 cm^-^1 of interest for astrophysical applications (SPITZER, ALMA, HERSCHEL...). High resolution spectra have been recorded with the Bruker HR IFS 125 of SOLEIL. For accurate line intensities measurement based on the FIR beam of the synchrotron, the strong wavenumber dependence of the beam radius had to be modeled in the apparatus function calculation. Absolute line intensities of the intense ν_5-ν_4 band have been measured, and those of the 4 weaker hot bands are in progress. M. Matzuura et al. Non. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 371, 415-420, 2006. J. Vander Auwera. J. Mol. Spectrosc. 242, 25-30, 2007. L. Gomez, D. Jacquemart, N. Lacome and J.-Y. Mandin. JQSRT 110, 2102-2114, 2009. D. Jacquemart, L. Gomez, N. Lacome, J.-Y. Mandin, O. Pirali and P. Roy. JQSRT in press.

  14. Crustal composition in the Hidaka Metamorphic Belt estimated from seismic velocity by laboratory measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, K.; Ishikawa, M.; Sato, H.; Iwasaki, T.; Toyoshima, T.

    2015-12-01

    To understand the dynamics of the lithosphere in subduction systems, the knowledge of rock composition is significant. However, rock composition of the overriding plate is still poorly understood. To estimate rock composition of the lithosphere, it is an effective method to compare the elastic wave velocities measured under the high pressure and temperature condition with the seismic velocities obtained by active source experiment and earthquake observation. Due to an arc-arc collision in central Hokkaido, middle to lower crust is exposed along the Hidaka Metamorphic Belt (HMB), providing exceptional opportunities to study crust composition of an island arc. Across the HMB, P-wave velocity model has been constructed by refraction/wide-angle reflection seismic profiling (Iwasaki et al., 2004). Furthermore, because of the interpretation of the crustal structure (Ito, 2000), we can follow a continuous pass from the surface to the middle-lower crust. We corrected representative rock samples from HMB and measured ultrasonic P-wave (Vp) and S-wave velocities (Vs) under the pressure up to 1.0 GPa in a temperature range from 25 to 400 °C. For example, the Vp values measured at 25 °C and 0.5 GPa are 5.88 km/s for the granite (74.29 wt.% SiO2), 6.02-6.34 km/s for the tonalites (66.31-68.92 wt.% SiO2), 6.34 km/s for the gneiss (64.69 wt.% SiO2), 6.41-7.05 km/s for the amphibolites (50.06-51.13 wt.% SiO2), and 7.42 km/s for the mafic granulite (50.94 wt.% SiO2). And, Vp of tonalites showed a correlation with SiO2 (wt.%). Comparing with the velocity profiles across the HMB (Iwasaki et al., 2004), we estimate that the lower to middle crust consists of amphibolite and tonalite, and the estimated acoustic impedance contrast between them suggests an existence of a clear reflective boundary, which accords well to the obtained seismic reflection profile (Iwasaki et al., 2014). And, we can obtain the same tendency from comparing measured Vp/Vs ratio and Vp/Vs ratio structure model

  15. Diffraction pattern intensity measurements in the introductory college physics laboratory using microcomputers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soundranayagam, R.; Ramayya, A. V.; Cleeman, L.; Riecken, Mark; Fuson, Nelson; Springer, John

    1983-10-01

    Measurement of the intensity variations in a single slit diffraction pattern formed by a laser beam is made by means of a photoresistor detector interfaced with an Apple II-plus microcomputer through the paddle (game controller) connection. The computer programs, written in BASIC and assembly language, enable the student to (1) determine quantitatively the intensity of the maxima and minima; (2) see the intensity pattern as the data is acquired; (3) obtain a hard copy of the intensity plot observed on the screen monitor; and (4) compare the experimental and theoretical intensity patterns.

  16. ATM Quality of Service Parameters at 45 Mbps Using a Satellite Emulator: Laboratory Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivancic, William D.; Bobinsky, Eric A.

    1997-01-01

    Results of 45-Mbps DS3 intermediate-frequency loopback measurements of asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) quality of service parameters (cell error ratio and cell loss ratio) are presented. These tests, which were conducted at the NASA Lewis Research Center in support of satellite-ATM interoperability research, represent initial efforts to quantify the minimum parameters for stringent ATM applications, such as MPEG-1 and MPEG-2 video transmission. Portions of these results were originally presented to the International Telecommunications Union's ITU-R Working Party 4B in February 1996 in support of their Draft Preliminary Recommendation on the Transmission of ATM Traffic via Satellite.

  17. Run-away electron preionized diffuse discharge as a source of efficient laser emission in the IR, UV, VUV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchenko, A. N.; Panchenko, N. A.; Tarasenko, V. F.

    2017-05-01

    REP DD was suggested as an excitation source of various gas lasers. The efficient lasing was obtained in the IR, UV, and VUV spectral ranges. The ultimate intrinsic efficiency of non-chain chemical lasers on HF(DF) molecules was achieved. REP DD pumped N2 laser with an ultimate electrical efficiency of 0.2% was developed. Lasing on N2 molecules with 2 or 3 peaks in successive REP DD current oscillations was obtained for the first time. The laser action on F2* at 157 nm and rare gas fluorides (KrF*, XeF*) under REP DD pumping was obtained for the first time, as well. It has been shown that the volume stage of REP DD in mixtures with fluorine can last over 50 ns during several current half-cycles. Therewith, the efficiency and the pulse duration of lasers on rare gas fluorides and VUV F2* laser parameters under REP DD excitation are comparable with those obtained in suitable transverse discharges. The results allow the conclusion that the REP DD homogeneity in mixtures with F2 and SF6 is high enough for attaining high laser efficiency.

  18. Photophysical and photochemical effects of UV and VUV photo-oxidation and photolysis on PET and PEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Andrew

    Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET) is a widely used polymer in the bottling, packaging, and clothing industry. In recent years an increasing global demand for PET has taken place due to the Solar Disinfection (SODIS) process. SODIS is a method of sterilizing fresh water into drinkable water. The PET bottles are used in the process to contain the water during solar irradiation due to its highly transparent optical property. Alongside PET, polyethylene 2,6-napthalate (PEN) is used in bottling and flexible electronic applications. The surface of PEN would need to be modified to control the hydrophilicity and the interaction it exudes as a substrate. The UV light absorption properties of PET and PEN are of great importance for many applications, and thus needs to be studied along with its photochemical resistance. The optical and chemical nature of PET was studied as it was treated by UV photo-oxidation, photo-ozonation, and photolysis under atmospheric pressure. Another investigation was also used to study PEN and PET as they are treated by vacuum UV (VUV) photo-oxidation, VUV photolysis, and remote oxygen reactions. The extent of the photoreactions' effect into the depth of the polymers is examined as treatment conditions are changed. The different experimental methods established the rate of several competing photoreactions on PET and PEN during irradiance, and their effect on the optical quality of the polymers.

  19. Photochemical defluorination of aqueous perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) by Fe(0)/GAC micro-electrolysis and VUV-Fenton photolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li-Hong; Cheng, Jian-Hua; You, Xia; Liang, Xiao-Yan; Hu, Yong-You

    2016-07-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is extremely persistent and bioaccumulative in the environment; thus, it is very urgent to investigate an effective and moderate technology to treat the pollution of PFOA. In this study, a process combined iron and granular activated carbon (Fe(0)/GAC) micro-electrolysis with VUV-Fenton system is employed for the remediation of PFOA. Approximately 50 % PFOA (10 mg L(-1)) could be efficiently defluorinated under the following conditions: pH 3.0, dosage of Fe 7.5 g L(-1), dosage of GAC 12.5 g L(-1), and concentration of H2O2 22.8 mmol L(-1). Meanwhile, during the process, evident defluorination was observed and the concentration of fluoride ion was eventually 3.23 mg L(-1). The intermediates including five shorter-chain perfluorinated carboxylic acids (PFCAs), i.e., C7, C6, C5, C4, and C3, were also analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS/MS) and defluorination mechanisms of PFOA was proposed, which involved photochemical of OH·, direct photolysis (185-nm VUV), and photocatalytic degradation of PFOA in the presence of Fe(3+) (254-nm UV).

  20. The Reference Laboratory for Radon Gas Activity Concentration Measurements at PSI; Das Referenzlabor fuer Radongas-Konzentrationsmessungen am PSI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuler, Christoph

    1998-09-01

    Active or passive radon gas measuring instruments are exposed during intercomparison exercises in the radon chamber of the Reference Laboratory for Radon Gas Concentration Measurements at Paul Scherrer Institut: The traceability of radon gas measurements to nationally and internationally acknowledged standards is inspected in the reference atmosphere of the chamber with calibrated {sup 222}Rn activity concentration. The use of secondary standards guarantees the traceability of the radon chamber reference atmosphere. Besides the principal secondary standard, a radon gas standard (secondary standard I), a {sup 226}Ra standard solution (secondary standard II) and a {sup 222}Rn emanation standard (secondary standard III) are used. The {sup 222}Rn activity delivered by one of these standards is quantitatively transferred into a reference volume and hence converted to an activity concentration serving for the calibration of a measuring instrument transfer standard consisting of scintillation cell and counter. By this way, the transfer standard calibration is related and traceable to the internationally acknowledged primary standard laboratories National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland (U.S.A.) or National Physical Laboratory, Teddington, Middlesex (UK). The calibrated transfer standard is then used to calibrate the radon gas activity concentration in the radon chamber. For a single grab sampling determination of the {sup 222}Rn activity concentration in the radon chamber with the transfer standard, the estimation of Type A and Type B uncertainties yields a relative expanded uncertainty (95% confidence level) of minimum 3% for high concentration levels (10 kBqm{sup -3}) and maximum 30% for low concentration levels (0.2 kBqm{sup -3}). Extended evaluations of the reproducibility of calibration factor measurements obtained by calibration of the transfer standard with the secondary standards I, II and III show a very good reproducibility quality

  1. Online Measurements and Modeling of Isoprene Photo-oxidation Products: Insights from the Laboratory and SOAS Field Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ambro, E.; Lopez-Hilfiker, F.; Mohr, C.; Gaston, C.; Lee, B. H.; Liu, J.; Lutz, A.; Hallquist, M.; Shilling, J.; Gold, A.; Zhang, Z.; Surratt, J. D.; Thornton, J. A.; Schobesberger, S.

    2015-12-01

    Isoprene, the most abundant non-methane volatile organic compound emitted globally, has the potential to produce large quantities of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) with implications for climate, air quality, and human health. However, much remains unknown about the mechanisms and processes that lead to isoprene derived SOA. We present measurements and modeling of a suite of newly detected compounds from isoprene oxidation from laboratory studies at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) as well as in the atmosphere from the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) field campaign. Measurements were made with a high resolution time of flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer utilizing iodide adduct ionization coupled to the Filter Inlet for Gas and AEROsol (FIGAERO) for the simultaneous sampling of the gas and aerosol phases. In the PNNL chamber, isoprene photo-oxidation with dry neutral seed and IEPOX multiphase chemistry on aqueous particles was investigated at a variety of atmospherically relevant conditions. Isoprene photo-oxidation under high HO2 produced unexpectedly substantial SOA at a yield similar to but from a distinctly different mechanism than that from IEPOX uptake. The high HO2 chemistry also resulted in di hydroxy di hydroperoxides as a dominant component of the aerosol. By utilizing the same instrument and ion chemistry during both field and chamber experiments, together with an MCM-based model, we assess the degree to which the different mechanisms are operable in the atmosphere and relevant aerosol chemical and physical properties of the SOA such as volatility and oligomer content.

  2. Field and Laboratory Investigation of USS3 Ultrasonic Sensors Capability for Non-contact Measurement of Pistachio Canopy Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Maghsoudi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Electronic canopy characterization to determine structural properties is an important issue in tree crop management. Ultrasonic and optical sensors are the most used sensors for this purpose. The objective of this work was to assess the performance of an ultrasonic sensor under laboratory and field conditions in order to provide reliable estimations of distance measurements to apple tree canopies. To achieve this purpose, a methodology has been designed to analyze sensor performance in relation to foliage distance and to the effects of interference with adjacent sensors when working simultaneously. Results showed that the average error in distance measurement using the ultrasonic sensor in laboratory conditions was 0.64 cm. However, the increase of variability in field conditions reduced the accuracy of this kind of sensors when estimating distances to canopies. The average error in such situations was 3.19 cm. When analyzing interferences of adjacent sensors 30 cm apart, the average error was ±14.65 cm. When adjacent sensors were placed apart by 60 cm, the average error became 6.73 cm. The ultrasonic sensor tested has been proven to be suitable to estimate distances to the canopy in pistachio garden conditions when sensors are 60 cm apart or more and can, therefore, be used in a system to estimate structural canopy parameters in precision horticulture.

  3. Charged Particle Measurements with the Mars Science Laboratory's Radiation Assessment Detector (MSL/RAD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehresmann, B.; Hassler, D.; Zeitlin, C. J.; Kohler, J.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.; Appel, J. K.; Boehm, E.; Böttcher, S. I.; Brinza, D. E.; Burmeister, S.; Guo, J.; Lohf, H.; Martin-Garcia, C.; Matthiae, D.; Posner, A.; Rafkin, S. C.; Reitz, G.

    2014-12-01

    Since the Curiosity rover's landing in Gale crater on the surface of Mars, the Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) on board the rover has been conducting the first-ever measurements of the Martian surface radiation field. This field is induced by Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs) and their interactions with the atoms of the Martian atmosphere and soil. Furthermore, sporadic Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) events can lead to large, but short-term enhancements in the intensity of the radiation field. A large part of the radiation environment is made up of charged particles, e.g., ions and their isotopes, electrons, and positrons amongst others. There are mainly two factors influencing the surface radiation field: the modulation of the incoming GCR flux due to the solar magnetic field correlating with the solar cycle; the amount of atmospheric column mass above Gale crater resulting in changes of GCR penetration depth into the atmosphere, as well as influencing the secondary particle production rate. Here, we focus on the temporal evolution of the radiation environment since the landing, analyzing changes in the measured particle spectra for different phases in the Martian seasonal cycle and solar activity. Furthermore, we present enhancements in the proton flux during directly observed SEP events.

  4. Laboratory measurements of seismic velocity anisotropy of salt diapirs: Implications for wellbore stability and seismic processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Meleza, Liliana; Healy, David

    2013-04-01

    A set of ten evaporite samples collected from outcrops in a single diapiric province in Cape Breton Island (Canada) have been tested for seismic velocity anisotropy using three methods: 1) conventional ultrasonic pulse transmission method, where velocities are found from the travel times and the known dimensions of the samples. In order to obtain the entire suite of elastic constants, both P- and S-wave velocity measurements were taken in three different directions of cuboid rock samples. Velocities have been measured under dry, ambient conditions of temperature and pressure in halite-, gypsum- and anhydrite-dominated samples; 2) optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy on thin sections to define the spatial distribution of minerals, their crystallographic preferred orientations (CPO); and 3) a numerical 'rock-recipe' approach based on Tatham et al. (2008) to calculate seismic velocity anisotropy using arbitrary composites of evaporite minerals and different CPOs. These three methods are then compared to understand the controlling factors of the anisotropic elastic properties. The elasticity data are used to guide geomechanical modeling for wellbore stability and to provide insights for the seismic data processing and seismic imaging of salt diapirs. Reference Tatham, D.J., Lloyd, G.E., Butler, R.W.H. and Casey, M, 2008, Amphibole and lower crustal seismic properties: Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 267, 118-128.

  5. Photovoltaic Characterization Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NIST's PV characterization laboratory is used to measure the electrical performance and opto-electronic properties of solar cells and modules. This facility consists...

  6. Environmental Microbiology Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Environmental Microbiology Laboratory, located in Bldg. 644 provides a dual-gas respirometer for measurement of oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide evolution...

  7. Acoustic Technology Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory contains an electro-magnetic worldwide data collection and field measurement capability in the area of acoustic technology. Outfitted by NASA Langley...

  8. Spectral Properties of Coniferous Forests: A Review of In Situ and Laboratory Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miina Rautiainen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Coniferous species are present in almost all major vegetation biomes on Earth, though they are the most abundant in the northern hemisphere, where they form the northern tree and forest lines close to the Arctic Circle. Monitoring coniferous forests with satellite and airborne remote sensing is active, due to the forests’ great ecological and economic importance. We review the current understanding of spectral behavior of different components forming coniferous forests. We look at the spatial, directional, and seasonal variations in needle, shoot, woody element, and understory spectra in coniferous forests, based on measurements. Through selected case studies, we also demonstrate how coniferous canopy spectra vary at different spatial scales, and in different viewing angles and seasons. Finally, we provide a synthesis of gaps in the current knowledge on spectra of elements forming coniferous forests that could also serve as a recommendation for planning scientific efforts in the future.

  9. Measurements of colloid concentrations in the fracture zone, Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory, Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ledin, A.; Dueker, A.; Karlsson, Stefan; Allard, B. [Linkoeping Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Water and Environmental Studies

    1995-06-01

    The applicability of light scattering in combination with photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS) for determination of concentration and size distribution of colloidal matter in a deep groundwater was tested in situ and on-line. Well-defined reference colloids of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Al(OH){sub 3}, SiO{sub 2}, kaolinite, illite and a high molecular humic acid in aqueous media were used as model substances for calibration of the PCS instrument. The intensity of scattered light was found to be dependent on the composition of the colloids. The colloid concentration in the rather saline groundwater was below the detection limit for the PCS equipment used, which corresponds to a colloid concentration not higher than 0.5 mg/l and probably below 0.1 mg/l according to the measurements on-line and in situ at Aespoe and in comparison to the calibrations performed with reference colloids. The results clearly demonstrated that the stability, concentration and composition of a colloid-size suspended phase in the anoxic groundwater with high content of Fe(II), like the one in Aespoe, is extremely sensitive to exposure to atmospheric conditions during sample handling and preparation. Diffusion of air into the closed measuring cuvette was enough to alter the colloid content significantly within 6 hours. A particle fraction with the size distribution in the range 170-700 nm was formed within 45 min when air was allowed to diffuse into the aqueous phase from the air filled upper part of the cuvette. The corresponding time to generate a significant colloid precipitate was less than 1 min when a stream of air was bubbled through the water samples. The precipitated colloid phase consisted of a mixture of ferric (hydr)oxide and calcium carbonate in all three cases. 53 refs, 8 figs, 2 tabs.

  10. Vehicle emission factors of solid nanoparticles in the laboratory and on the road using Portable Emission Measurement Systems (PEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barouch eGiechaskiel

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Emission inventories are used to quantify sources and identify trends in the emissions of air pollutants. They use vehicle-specific emission factors that are typically determined in the laboratory, through remote-sensing, vehicle chasing experiments and, more recently, on-board Portable Emission Measurement Systems (PEMS. Although PEMS is widely applied to measure gaseous pollutants, their application to Solid Particle Number (SPN emissions is new. In this paper, we discuss the current status of determining SPN emission factors both on the chassis dynamometer and on-road using PEMS-SPN. First, we determine the influence of the measurement equipment, ambient temperature, driving style and cycle characteristics, and the extra mass of the PEMS equipment on the SPN emissions. Afterward, we present the SPN emissions under type-approval conditions as well as on the road of two heavy-duty diesel vehicles equipped with Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF (one Euro VI, two light-duty diesel vehicles equipped with DPF, one light-duty vehicle equipped with a Port Fuel Injection engine (PFI, and seven Gasoline Direct Injection (GDI passenger cars (two Euro 6. We find that cold-start and strong accelerations tend to substantially increase SPN emissions. The two heavy-duty vehicles showed emissions around 2×10^13 p/km (Euro V truck and 6×10^10 p/km (Euro VI truck, respectively. One of the DPF-equipped light-duty vehicles showed emissions of 8×10^11 p/km, while the other one had one order of magnitude lower emissions. The PFI car had SPN emissions slightly higher than 1×10^12 p/km. The emissions of GDI cars spanned approximately from 8×10^11 p/km to 8×10^12 p/km. For the cars without DPF, the SPN emissions remained within a factor of two of the laboratory results. This factor was on average around 0.8 for the Euro 6 and 1.6 for the Euro 5 GDIs. The DPF equipped vehicles showed a difference of almost one order of magnitude between laboratory and on-road tests

  11. Laboratory measurements of reservoir rock from the Geysers geothermal field, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockner, D.A.; Summers, R.; Moore, D.; Byerlee, J.D.

    1982-01-01

    Rock samples taken from two outcrops, as well as rare cores from three well bores at the Geysers geothermal field, California, were tested at temperatures and pressures similar to those found in the geothermal field. Both intact and 30?? sawcut cylinders were deformed at confining pressures of 200-1000 bars, pore pressure of 30 bars and temperatures of 150?? and 240??C. Thin-section and X-ray analysis revealed that some borehole samples had undergone extensive alteration and recrystallization. Constant strain rate tests of 10-4 and 10-6 per sec gave a coefficient of friction of 0.68. Due to the highly fractured nature of the rocks taken from the production zone, intact samples were rarely 50% stronger than the frictional strength. This result suggests that the Geysers reservoir can support shear stresses only as large as its frictional shear strength. Velocity of p-waves (6.2 km/sec) was measured on one sample. Acoustic emission and sliding on a sawcut were related to changes in pore pressure. b-values computed from the acoustic emissions generated during fluid injection were typically about 0.55. An unusually high b-value (approximately 1.3) observed during sudden injection of water into the sample may have been related to thermal cracking. ?? 1982.

  12. Droplet activation, separation, and compositional analysis: laboratory studies and atmospheric measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Hiranuma

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Droplets produced in a cloud condensation nuclei chamber (CCNC as a function of supersaturation have been separated from unactivated aerosol particles using counterflow virtual impaction. Residual material after droplets were evaporated was chemically analyzed with an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS and the Particle Analysis by Laser Mass Spectrometry (PALMS instrument. Experiments were initially conducted to verify activation conditions for monodisperse ammonium sulfate particles and to determine the resulting droplet size distribution as a function of supersaturation. Based on the observed droplet size, the counterflow virtual impactor cut-size was set to differentiate droplets from unactivated interstitial particles. Validation experiments were then performed to verify that only droplets with sufficient size passed through the counterflow virtual impactor for subsequent analysis. A two-component external mixture of monodisperse particles was also exposed to a supersaturation which would activate one of the types (hygroscopic salts but not the other (polystyrene latex spheres or adipic acid. The mass spectrum observed after separation indicated only the former, validating separation of droplets from unactivated particles. Results from ambient measurements using this technique and AMS analysis were inconclusive, showing little chemical differentiation between ambient aerosol and activated droplet residuals, largely due to low signal levels. When employing as single particle mass spectrometer for compositional analysis, however, we observed enhancement of sulfate in droplet residuals.

  13. Stress-Associated Intrinsic and Scattering Attenuation from Laboratory Ultrasonic Measurements on Shales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Junhua; Fu, Li-Yun; Wei, Wei; Zhang, Yan

    2017-10-01

    Seismic attenuation is sensitive to stress-induced subtle changes in the physical state of rocks. In this study, the stress- and frequency-associated attenuation is quantified through ultrasonic measurements on three differently oriented cylindrical shale samples under various axial stresses. As an improvement to the single-scattering model, the elastic Monte Carlo method is employed to investigate multiple-scattering attenuations by incorporating the boundary reflections and wave conversions. Our results show that, as the axial stress increases, the intrinsic attenuation decreases in all directions, while the scattering attenuation decreases slightly in the direction perpendicular to the bedding but increases largely and nonlinearly in other directions. These discrepancies result from different attenuation mechanisms. Both the intrinsic and scattering attenuation are found to be largest in the direction 45° to the bedding, but least in the perpendicular direction. The S-wave attenuation is larger and more sensitive to stress changes than P-wave attenuation due to its shorter wavelength. As expected from sandstone examples, the scattering attenuation in shales is significantly larger and more sensitive to stress changes than the intrinsic attenuation. The frequency dependence of scattering attenuation suggests that the peak frequency with the maximum scattering attenuation is independent of axial stresses, but varies in different directions of an individual rock with different heterogeneity and anisotropy scales. The peak frequency of S-coda is smaller and its peak scattering attenuation is larger than P-coda. In conclusion, the stress and frequency dependence of ultrasonic attenuations in shales differ largely in various directions, indicating significant anisotropy and heterogeneity.

  14. Inferring immobile and in-situ water saturation from laboratory and field measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belen, Rodolfo P., Jr.

    2000-06-01

    Analysis of experimental data and numerical simulation results of dynamic boiling experiments revealed that there is an apparent correlation between the immobile water saturation and the shape of the steam saturation profile. An elbow in the steam saturation profile indicates the sudden drop in steam saturation that marks the transition from steam to two-phase conditions inside the core during boiling. The immobile water saturation can be inferred from this elbow in the steam saturation profile. Based on experimental results obtained by Satik (1997), the inferred immobile water saturation of Berea sandstone was found to be about 0.25, which is consistent with results of relative permeability experiments reported by Mahiya (1999). However, this technique may not be useful in inferring the immobile water saturation of less permeable geothermal rocks because the elbow in the steam saturation profile is less prominent. Models of vapor and liquid-dominated geothermal reservoirs that were developed based on Darcy's law and material and energy conservation equations proved to be useful in inferring the in-situ and immobile water saturations from field measurements of cumulative mass production, discharge enthalpy, and downhole temperature. Knowing rock and fluid properties, and the difference between the stable initial, T{sub o}, and dry-out, T{sub d}, downhole temperatures, the in-situ and immobile water saturations of vapor-dominated reservoirs can be estimated. On the other hand, the in-situ and immobile water saturations, and the change in mobile water content of liquid-dominated reservoirs can be inferred from the cumulative mass production, {Delta}m, and enthalpy, h{prime}, data. Comparison with two-phase, radial flow, numerical simulation results confirmed the validity and usefulness of these models.

  15. The effects of alcohol on laboratory-measured impulsivity after L: -Tryptophan depletion or loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Donald M; Marsh, Dawn M; Mathias, Charles W; Dawes, Michael A; Bradley, Don M; Morgan, Chris J; Badawy, Abdulla A-B

    2007-07-01

    Indirect evidence supports a link between serotonergic activity and individual differences in the behavioral response to alcohol, but few studies have experimentally demonstrated that an individual's biological state can influence the sensitivity to alcohol-induced behaviors. Our purpose was to temporarily modify serotonin synthesis in healthy individuals to determine how altered biological states may interact with alcohol administration to affect impulsive behavior. In a repeated-measures design, 18 normal controls consumed a 50-g L: -tryptophan (Trp) depleting (ATD) or loading (ATL) amino-acid beverage that temporarily decreased or increased (respectively) serotonin synthesis before receiving either a moderate dose of alcohol (0.65 g/kg) or placebo. All participants completed three impulsivity testing sessions on each of the five experimental days. Session one was a baseline session. Session two included testing after ATD-only or ATL-only. Session three included: (1) placebo after ATL (ATL+PBO); (2) placebo after ATD (ATD+PBO); (3) alcohol after ATL (ATL+ALC); (4) alcohol after ATD (ATD+ALC); and (5) Alcohol-only conditions. Impulsivity was assessed using the Immediate Memory Task (Dougherty et al., Behav Res Methods Instrum Comput 34:391-398, 2002), a continuous performance test yielding commission errors that have been previously validated as a component of impulsive behavior. Primary findings were that ATD-only increased impulsive responding compared to ATL-only, and ATD+ALC increased commission errors to levels higher than either the ATL+ALC or Alcohol-only conditions. These findings demonstrate that reduced serotonin synthesis can produce increased impulsivity even among non-impulsive normal controls, and that the behavioral effects of alcohol are, in part, dependent on this biological state.

  16. Quantifying environmental stress-induced emissions of algal isoprene and monoterpenes using laboratory measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meskhidze, N.; Sabolis, A.; Reed, R.; Kamykowski, D.

    2015-02-01

    We report here production rates of isoprene and monoterpene compounds (α-pinene, β-pinene, camphene and d-limonene) from six phytoplankton monocultures as a function of irradiance and temperature. Irradiance experiments were carried out for diatom strains (Thalassiosira weissflogii and Thalassiosira pseudonana), prymnesiophyte strains (Pleurochrysis carterae), dinoflagellate strains (Karenia brevis and Prorocentrum minimum), and cryptophyte strains (Rhodomonas salina), while temperature experiments were carried out for diatom strains (Thalassiosira weissflogii and Thalassiosira pseudonana). Phytoplankton species, incubated in a climate-controlled room, were subject to variable light (90 to 900 μmol m-2 s-1) and temperature (18 to 30 °C) regimes. Compared to isoprene, monoterpene emissions were an order of magnitude lower at all light and temperature levels. Emission rates are normalized by cell count and Chlorophyll a (Chl a) content. Diatom strains were the largest emitters, with ~ 2 × 10-17 g(cell)-1h-1 (~ 35 μg (g Chl a)-1 h-1) for isoprene and ~ 5 × 10-19 g (cell)-1 h-1 (~ 1 μg (g Chl a)-1) h-1) for α-pinene. The contribution to the total monoterpene production was ~ 70% from α-pinene, ~ 20% for d-limonene, and 250 μmol m-2 s-1) irradiance. Measurements revealed different patterns for time-averaged emissions rates over two successive days. On the first day, most of the species showed a distinct increase in production rates within the first 4 h while, on the second day, the emission rates were overall higher, but less variable. The data suggest that enhanced amounts of isoprene and monoterpenes are emitted from phytoplankton as a result of perturbations in environmental conditions that cause imbalance in chloroplasts and force primary producers to acclimate physiologically. This relationship could be a valuable tool for development of dynamic ecosystem modeling approaches for global marine isoprene and monoterpene emissions based on phytoplankton

  17. Quantifying environmental stress induced emissions of algal isoprene and monoterpenes using laboratory measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meskhidze, N.; Sabolis, A.; Reed, R.; Kamykowski, D.

    2014-09-01

    We report here production rates of isoprene and monoterpene compounds (α-pinene, β-pinene, camphene and d-limonene) from six phytoplankton monocultures as a function of irradiance and temperature. Irradiance experiments were carried out for diatom strains - Thalassiosira weissflogii and Thalassiosira pseudonana; prymnesiophyte strains - Pleurochrysis carterae; dinoflagellate strains - Karenia brevis and Prorocentrum minimum; cryptophyte strains - Rhodomonas salina, while temperature experiments were carried out for diatom strains - Thalassiosira weissflogii and Thalassiosira pseudonana. Phytoplankton species, incubated in a climate-controlled room, were subject to variable light (90 to 900 μmol m-2s-1) and temperature (18 to 30 °C) regimes. Compared to isoprene, monoterpene emissions were an order of magnitude lower at all light and temperature levels. Emission rates are normalized by cell count and Chlorophyll a (Chl a) content. Diatom strains were the largest emitters, with ~2x1017g (cell)-1h-1 (~35 μg (g Chl a)-1h-1) for isoprene and ~5x10-19 g (cell)-1h-1 (~1μg (g Chl a)-1) h-1) for α-pinene. The contribution to the total monoterpene production was ~70% from α-pinene, ~20% for d-limonene, and 250 μmol m-2s-1) irradiance. Measurements revealed different patterns for time-averaged emissions rates over two successive days. On the first day most of the species showed distinct increase in production rates within the first four hours, while on the second day the emission rates were overall higher, but less variable. The data suggest that enhanced amounts of isoprene and monoterpenes are emitted from phytoplankton as a result of perturbations in environmental conditions that cause disbalance in chloroplasts and forces primary producers to acclimate physiologically. This relationship could be a valuable tool for development of dynamic ecosystem modeling approaches for global marine isoprene and monoterpene emissions based on phytoplankton physiological

  18. A comparison of analytical laboratory and optical in situ methods for the measurement of nitrate in north Florida water bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozin, A. G.; Clark, M. W.

    2013-12-01

    Assessing the impact of nutrient concentrations on aquatic ecosystems requires an in depth understanding of dynamic biogeochemical cycles that are often a challenge to monitor at the high spatial and temporal resolution necessary to understand these complex processes. Traditional sampling approaches involving discrete samples and laboratory analyses can be constrained by analytical costs, field time, and logistical details that can fail to accurately capture both spatial and temporal changes. Optical in situ instruments may provide the opportunity to continuously monitor a variety of water quality parameters at a high spatial or temporal resolution. This work explores the suitability of a Submersible Ultraviolet Nitrate Analyzer (SUNA), produced by Satlantic, to accurately assess in situ nitrate concentration in several freshwater systems in north Florida. The SUNA was deployed to measure nitrate at five different water bodies selected to represent a range of watershed land uses and water chemistry in the region. In situ nitrate measurements were compared to standard laboratory methods to evaluate the effectiveness of the SUNA's operation. Other optical sensors were used to measure the spectral properties of absorbance, fluorescence, and turbidity (scatter) in the same Florida water bodies. Data from these additional sensors were collected to quantify possible interferences that may affect SUNA performance. In addition, data from the SUNA and other sensors are being used to infer information about the quality and quantity of aqueous constituents besides nitrate. A better understanding of the capabilities and possible limitations of these relatively new analytical instruments will allow researchers to more effectively investigate biogeochemical processes and nutrient transport and enhance decision-making to protect our water bodies.

  19. Comparison of the disinfection effects of vacuum-UV (VUV) and UV light on Bacillus subtilis spores in aqueous suspensions at 172, 222 and 254 nm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ding; Oppenländer, Thomas; El-Din, Mohamed Gamal; Bolton, James R

    2010-01-01

    The efficacy of UV and vacuum-UV (VUV) disinfection of Bacillus subtilis spores in aqueous suspensions at wavelengths of 172, 222 and 254 nm was evaluated. A Xe(2)* excilamp, a KrCl* excilamp and a low-pressure mercury lamp were used as almost monochromatic light sources at these three wavelengths. The first-order inactivation rate constants at 172, 222 and 254 nm were 0.0023, 0.122 and 0.069 cm(2) mJ(-1), respectively. Therefore, a 2 log reduction of B. subtilis spores was reached with fluences (UV doses) of 870, 21.6 and 40.4 mJ cm(-2) at these individual wavelengths. Consequently, for the inactivation of B. subtilis spores, VUV exposure at 172 nm is much less efficient than exposure at the other two wavelengths, while exposure at 222 nm is more efficient than that at 254 nm, which is probably because triplet energy transfer from DPA to thymine bases at 222 nm is higher than that at 254 nm. This research indicated quantitatively that VUV light is not practicable for microorganism disinfection in water and wastewater treatment. However, in comparison with other advanced oxidation processes (e.g. UV/TiO(2), UV/H(2)O(2) or O(3)/H(2)O(2)) the VUV-initiated photolysis of water is likely more efficient in generating hydroxyl radicals and more effective for the inactivation of microorganisms.

  20. The effects of enriching laboratory cages using various physical structures on multiple measures of welfare in singly-housed rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Ismail, Usama A; Mahboub, Hamada D

    2011-07-01

    The single housing of laboratory rats may be recommended in some situations such as hypothesis-driven or test-specific studies, during electroencephalogram recording of phases of sleep and after surgical procedures. However, as single housing of laboratory rats has been shown to be stressful, modification of the housing environment is needed to improve the welfare of these animals. This experiment was carried out to investigate the long-term effects of environmental enrichment on some behavioural, physiological, pathological and psychological measures of welfare. With two batches of animals, 24 rats were housed singly in either enriched cages (EC) (n = 12 cages) or unenriched cages (UC) (n = 12 cages). Behaviour was sampled every week and so was body weight and weight gain over a six-week observation period. Behaviours of the rats in the elevated plus-maze were recorded on the seventh week, whereas organ weights were recorded postmortem. The results revealed that long-term single housing of rats in super-enriched cages increased levels of indicators of good welfare including sleep, exploration, movement and feeding behaviour, body weights, weight gains and the relative weights of the thymus gland and spleen, and decreased levels of indicators of poor welfare such as stationary behaviour and the relative weight of adrenal glands. Thus, enrichment of conventional cages of newly weaned singly-housed laboratory rats with multiple physical structures appeared to improve their ability to control the environment and to promote their species-specific behaviour; changes that can ultimately result in good welfare.

  1. Hydrothermal alteration and diagenesis of terrestrial lacustrine pillow basalts: Coordination of hyperspectral imaging with laboratory measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberger, Rebecca N.; Mustard, John F.; Cloutis, Edward A.; Mann, Paul; Wilson, Janette H.; Flemming, Roberta L.; Robertson, Kevin M.; Salvatore, Mark R.; Edwards, Christopher S.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate an outcrop of ∼187 Ma lacustrine pillow basalts of the Talcott Formation exposed in Meriden, Connecticut, USA, focusing on coordinated analyses of one pillow lava to characterize the aqueous history of these basalts in the Hartford Basin. This work uses a suite of multidisciplinary measurements, including hyperspectral imaging, other spectroscopic techniques, and chemical and mineralogical analyses, from the microscopic scale up to the scale of an outcrop. The phases identified in the sample are albite, large iron oxides, and titanite throughout; calcite in vesicles; calcic clinopyroxene, aegirine, and Fe/Mg-bearing clay in the rind; and fine-grained hematite and pyroxenes in the interior. Using imaging spectroscopy, the chemistry and mineralogy results extend to the hand sample and larger outcrop. From all of the analyses, we suggest that the pillow basalts were altered initially after emplacement, either by heated lake water or magmatic fluids, at temperatures of at least 400-600 °C, and the calcic clinopyroxenes and aegirine identified in the rind are a preserved record of that alteration. As the hydrothermal system cooled to slightly lower temperatures, clays formed in the rind, and, during this alteration, the sample oxidized to form hematite in the matrix of the interior and Fe3+ in the pyroxenes in the rind. During the waning stages of the hydrothermal system, calcite precipitated in vesicles within the rind. Later, diagenetic processes albitized the sample, with albite replacing plagioclase, lining vesicles, and accreting onto the exterior of the sample. This albitization or Na-metasomatism occurred when the lake within the Hartford Basin evaporated during a drier past climatic era, resulting in Na-rich brines. As Ca-rich plagioclase altered to albite, Ca was released into solution, eventually precipitating as calcite in previously-unfilled vesicles, dominantly in the interior of the pillow. Coordinated analyses of this sample permit

  2. RADIATION MEASUREMENTS BY BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY DURING THE WOODS HOLE OCEANOGRAPHIC INSTITUTION INTERCOMPARISON STUDY, MAY-JUNE 2000.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    REYNOLDS, R.M.; BARTHOLOMEW, M.J.; MILLER, M.A.; SMITH, S.; EDWARDS, R.

    2000-12-01

    The WHOI buoy radiometer intercomparison took place during May and June, 2000 at the WHOI facility. The WHOI IMET, JAMSTEC Triton, and NOAA TAO buoy systems were operated from a beach site and the Brookhaven National Laboratory set up two Portable Radiation Package systems (P01 and P02) alongside the WHOI instrumentation on the roof of the Clark Building, about 300 m away. The BNL instruments were named ''P01'' and ''P02'' and were identical. Buoy instruments were all leveled to {+-}1{degree} to horizontal. The purpose of the project was to compare the buoy systems with precision measurements so that any differences in data collection or processing would be evaluated. BNL was pleased to participate so the PRP system could be evaluated as a calibration tool. The Portable Radiation Package is an integral component of the BNL Shipboard Oceanographic and Atmospheric Radiation (SOAR) system. It is designed to make accurate downwelling radiation measurements, including the three solar irradiance components (direct normal, diffuse and global) at six narrowband channels, aerosol optical depth measurements, and broadband longwave and shortwave irradiance measurements.

  3. A Medley with over ten years of (mostly light-ion production measurements at The Svedberg Laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prokofiev A.V.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Over the past years an experimental programme has been run at the neutron beam of The Svedberg Laboratory with the aim to study light-ion production induced by 96 and 175 MeV neutrons for a wide variety of targets. The measurements have been conducted using the Medley facility which allows measurement of p, d, t, He-3 and alpha production at fixed angles (from 20 to 160 degrees in steps of 20 degrees over a wide dynamic range. An overview of the results obtained at the now finished campaign at 96 MeV will be given. Since 2007 we have been running at 175 MeV with C, O, Si, Fe, Bi and U as target material. Preliminary results from these measurements will be shown and compared to model calculations with Talys-1.2. We also summarize the Medley measurements of elastic np and nd scattering and of angular distributions of fission fragments.

  4. Laboratory permittivity measurements of icy planetary analogs in the millimeter and submillimeter domains, in relation with JUICE mission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouet, Y.; Jacob, K.; Murk, A.; Poch, O.; Pommerol, A.; Thomas, N.; Levasseur-Regourd, A. C.

    2015-12-01

    The European Space Agency's JUpiter ICy moons Explorer (JUICE) spacecraft is planned for launch in 2022 and arrival at Jupiter in 2030. It will observe the planet Jupiter and three of its largest moons, Ganymede, Callisto and Europa. One instrument on the JUICE spacecraft is the Sub-millimeter Wave Instrument (SWI), which will measure brightness temperatures from Jupiter's stratosphere and troposphere, and from subsurfaces of Jupiter's icy moons. In the baseline configuration SWI consists of two tunable sub-millimeter wave receivers operating from 530 to 625 GHz. As an alternative one of the receivers could cover the range of 1080 and 1275 GHz. Inversion models are strongly dependent on the knowledge of the complex relative permittivity (hereafter permittivity) of the target material to retrieve the physical properties of the subsurface (e.g. [1][2]). We set up a laboratory experiment allowing us to perform reproducible measurements of the complex scattering parameters S11 and S21 in the ranges of 70 to 110 GHz, of 100 to 160 GHz, of 140 to 220 GHz, of 140 to 220 GHz and of 510 to 715 GHz. These scattering parameters can be used to retrieve the permittivity of icy analogs of the surfaces and subsurfaces of Jupiter's icy moons in order to prepare the data interpretation of SWI [3]. The measurements are performed under laboratory conditions with a quasi-optical bench (Institute of Applied Physics, University of Bern). The icy analogs that we prepare in the Laboratory for Outflow Studies of Sublimating Materials (LOSSy, Physics Institute, University of Bern), include two different porous water ice samples composed of fine-grained ice particles with a size range of 4 to 6 microns and ice particles with a size range of 50 to 100 microns [4][5]; and possibly CO2 ice. We will present the general experimental set-up and the first results in the context to prepare the data interpretation of SWI. [1] Ulaby, F. T., Long, D. G., 2014. Microwave radar and radiometric remote

  5. The tropical forest and fire emissions experiment: laboratory fire measurements and synthesis of campaign data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. J. Yokelson

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available As part of the Tropical Forest and Fire Emissions Experiment (TROFFEE, tropical forest fuels were burned in a large, biomass-fire simulation facility and the smoke was characterized with open-path Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, proton-transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS, gas chromatography (GC, GC/PTR-MS, and filter sampling of the particles. In most cases, about one-third of the fuel chlorine ended up in the particles and about one-half remained in the ash. About 50% of the mass of non-methane organic compounds (NMOC emitted by these fires could be identified with the available instrumentation. The lab fire emission factors (EF, g compound emitted per kg dry fuel burned were coupled with EF obtained during the TROFFEE airborne and ground-based field campaigns. This revealed several types of EF dependence on parameters such as the ratio of flaming to smoldering combustion and fuel characteristics. The synthesis of data from the different TROFFEE platforms was also used to derive EF for all the measured species for both primary deforestation fires and pasture maintenance fires – the two main types of biomass burning in the Amazon. Many of the EF are larger than those in widely-used earlier work. This is mostly due to the inclusion of newly-available, large EF for the initially-unlofted smoldering emissions from residual logs in pastures and the assumption that these emissions make a significant contribution (~40% to the total emissions from pasture fires. The TROFFEE EF for particles with aerodynamic diameter <2.5 microns (EFPM2.5 is 14.8 g/kg for primary deforestation fires and 18.7 g/kg for pasture maintenance fires. These EFPM2.5 are significantly larger than a previous recommendation (9.1 g/kg and lead to an estimated pyrogenic primary PM2.5 source for the Amazon that is 84% larger. New regional budgets for biogenic and pyrogenic emissions were roughly estimated. Coupled with an

  6. Brain-wave measures of workload in advanced cockpits: The transition of technology from laboratory to cockpit simulator, phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horst, Richard L.; Mahaffey, David L.; Munson, Robert C.

    1989-01-01

    The present Phase 2 small business innovation research study was designed to address issues related to scalp-recorded event-related potential (ERP) indices of mental workload and to transition this technology from the laboratory to cockpit simulator environments for use as a systems engineering tool. The project involved five main tasks: (1) Two laboratory studies confirmed the generality of the ERP indices of workload obtained in the Phase 1 study and revealed two additional ERP components related to workload. (2) A task analysis' of flight scenarios and pilot tasks in the Advanced Concepts Flight Simulator (ACFS) defined cockpit events (i.e., displays, messages, alarms) that would be expected to elicit ERPs related to workload. (3) Software was developed to support ERP data analysis. An existing ARD-proprietary package of ERP data analysis routines was upgraded, new graphics routines were developed to enhance interactive data analysis, and routines were developed to compare alternative single-trial analysis techniques using simulated ERP data. (4) Working in conjunction with NASA Langley research scientists and simulator engineers, preparations were made for an ACFS validation study of ERP measures of workload. (5) A design specification was developed for a general purpose, computerized, workload assessment system that can function in simulators such as the ACFS.

  7. The density of the rock covering Gran Sasso Laboratories in Central Apennines, Italy by underground gravity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capuano, P.; De Luca, G.; Di Sena, F.; Gasparini, P.; Scarpa, R.

    1998-05-01

    Various nuclear physics experiments are being carried out in the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Laboratories that have been excavated in the Gran Sasso Massif in the Italian Apennines. These experiments make use of the shield effect provided by a 1400-m-thick rock cover that absorb cosmic rays. It is important to know the real density of the rock cover and the extent of its lateral variation. The density of different sections of the rock cover was determined using the correlation between measured underground gravity data and thickness of the rock cover. Observed gravity was corrected using a 3D model, for the mass deficiency covered by excavation of highway tunnels and the cavities that house the laboratories. The average density of the rock cover was found to be 2720±50 kg m -3. Lateral variations are contained within the uncertainty for most of the sections, except for two sections where densities are lowered by as much as 11% because of the presence of a shallow layer formed by loose Quaternary sediments.

  8. Accurate Laboratory Measurements of Vibration-Rotation Transitions of 36ArH^+ and 38ArH+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cueto, Maite; Cernicharo, Jose; Herrero, Victor Jose; Tanarro, Isabel; Domenech, Jose Luis

    2014-06-01

    The protonated Ar ion 36ArH^+ has recently been identified in space, in the Crab Nebula, from Herschel spectra. Its R(0) and R(1) transitions lie at 617.5 and 1234.6 GHz, respectively, where atmospheric transmission is rather poor, even for a site as good as that of ALMA. As an alternative, especially after the end of the Herschel mission, rovibrational transitions of ArH^+ could be observed in absorption against bright background sources such as the galactic center, or other objects. We report on accurate laboratory wavenumber measurements of 19 lines of the v=1-0 band of 36ArH^+ and 38ArH^+, using a hollow cathode discharge cell, a difference frequency laser spectrometer and Ar with natural isotopic composition. Of those lines, only eight had been reported before and with much less accuracy. The data have also been used in a Dunham-type global fit of all published laboratory data (IR and sub-mm) of all isotopologues. Barlow et al., Science, 342, 1343 (2013) R.R. Filgueira and C.E. Blom, J. Mol. Spectrosc., 127, 279 (1988) M. Cueto et al, Astrophys. J. Lett, 783, L5 (2014)

  9. CIV Polarization Measurements using a Vacuum Ultraviolet Fabry-Perot Interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Edward; Gary, G. Allen; Cirtain, Jonathan; David, John; Kobayashi, Ken; Pietraszewski, Chris

    2009-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) is developing a Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) Fabry-P rot Interferometer that will be launched on a sounding rocket for high throughput, high-cadence, extended field of view CIV (155nm) measurements. These measurements will provide (i) Dopplergrams for studies of waves, oscillations, explosive events, and mass motions through the transition region, and, (ii), polarization measurements to study the magnetic field in the transition region. This paper will describe the scientific goals of the instrument, a brief description of the optics and the polarization characteristics of the VUV Fabry P rot.

  10. Airborne measurements of reactive organic trace gases in the atmosphere - with a focus on PTR-MS measurements onboard NASA's flying laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisthaler, Armin; Mikoviny, Tomas; Müller, Markus; Schiller, Sven Arne; Feil, Stefan; Hanel, Gernot; Jordan, Alfons; Mutschlechner, Paul; Crawford, James H.; Singh, Hanwant B.; Millet, Dylan

    2017-04-01

    Reactive organic gases (ROGs) play an important role in atmospheric chemistry as they affect the rates of ozone production, particle formation and growth, and oxidant consumption. Measurements of ROGs are analytically challenging because of their large variety and low concentrations in the Earth's atmosphere, and because they are easily affected by measurement artefacts. On aircraft, ROGs are typically measured by canister sampling followed by off-line analysis in the laboratory, fast online gas chromatography or online chemical ionization mass spectrometry. In this work, we will briefly sum up the state-of-the-art in this field before focusing on proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) and its deployment onboard NASA's airborne science laboratories. We will show how airborne PTR-MS was successfully used in NASA missions for characterizing emissions of ROGs from point sources, for following the photochemical evolution of ROGs in a biomass burning plume, for determining biosphere-atmosphere fluxes of selected ROGs and for validating satellite data. We will also present the airborne PTR-MS instrument in its most recent evolution which includes a radiofrequency ion funnel and ion guide combined with a compact time-of-flight mass spectrometer and discuss its superior performance characteristics. The development of the airborne PTR-MS instrument was supported by the Austrian Federal Ministry for Transport, Innovation and Technology (bmvit) through the Austrian Space Applications Programme (ASAP) of the Austrian Research Promotion Agency (FFG) (grants #833451, #847967). This work was also partly supported by NASA under grant #NNX14AP89G.

  11. Vehicle fleet emissions of black carbon, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and other pollutants measured by a mobile laboratory in Mexico City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Jiang

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Black carbon (BC and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs are of concern due to their effects on climate and health. The main goal of this research is to provide the first estimate of emissions of BC and particle-phase PAHs (PPAHs from motor vehicles in Mexico City. The emissions of other pollutants including carbon monoxide (CO, oxides of nitrogen (NOx, volatile organic compounds (VOCs, and particulate matter of diameter 2.5 μm and less (PM2.5 are also estimated. As a part of the Mexico City Metropolitan Area field campaign in April 2003 (MCMA-2003, a mobile laboratory was driven throughout the city. The laboratory was equipped with a comprehensive suite of gas and particle analyzers, including an aethalometer that measured BC and a photoionization aerosol sensor that measured PPAHs. While driving through traffic, the mobile lab continuously sampled exhaust plumes from the vehicles around it. We have developed a method of automatically identifying exhaust plumes, which are then used as the basis for calculation of fleet-average emissions. In the approximately 75 h of on-road sampling during the field campaign, we have identified ~30 000 exhaust measurement points that represent a variety of vehicle types and driving conditions. The large sample provides a basis for estimating fleet-average emission factors and thus the emission inventory. Motor vehicles in the Mexico City area are estimated to emit 1700±200 metric tons BC, 57±6 tons PPAHs, 1 190 000±40 000 tons CO, 120 000±3000 tons NOx, 240 000±50 000 tons VOCs, and 4400±400 tons PM2.5 per year, not including cold start emissions. The estimates for CO, NOx, and PPAHs may be low by up to 10% due to the slower response time of analyzers used to measure these species. Compared to the government's official motor vehicle emission inventory for the year 2002, the estimates for CO, NOx, VOCs, and PM2.5 are 38% lower, 23% lower, 27% higher, and 25% higher, respectively. The

  12. A weighting lysimeter for a laboratory experiment on water and energy fluxes measurements and hydrological models verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbari, Chiara; paleari, roberto; mantovani, federico; tarro, stefano; mancini, marco

    2017-04-01

    Weighting lysimeters allow a direct measurement of water loss from the soil, determining the soil water balance, and thus providing an interesting tool to validate hydrological models. Lysimeters, which world originates from the greek words "lysis" (movement) and "metron" (to measure) have been used to measure percolation of water through the soils for over 300 years. The aim of this study is twofold: 1) to perform water and energy flux measurements under different meteorological conditions, irrigation practice (surface flood, drip and groundwater capillary rise), and soil coverage (bare soil and basil crop), 2) to verify hydrological model FEST-EWB parameterization at the lysimeter scale. A weighting lysimeter has been constructed in the Hydraulic Laboratory of Politecnico di Milano. It consists of a steel box of 1.5 x 1.5 x 1 m containing reconstructed soil. The box is mounted on a scale with four load cells with a nominal weight of 6000 kg and a precision of 0,5 kg. The lysimeter is fully instrumented to measure all the main components of the hydrological cycle. Profiles of soil moisture and temperature are provided by 7 probes; ground heat flux is measured by a heat flux plate and two thermocouples; the drainage flux is measured by a tipping bucket rain gauge; the four components of radiation are provided by a net radiometer; air temperature and humidity are measured by a thermo-hygrometer. Data are collected every 10 minutes on a datalogger. A thermal camera is also installed to provide accurate maps of land surface temperature. The different instruments have been subjected to a rigorous calibration process. A low cost station is also installed based on an Arduino micro-controller measuring soil moisture and temperature, air humidity and temperature and solar radiation. The idea is to understand whether low cost instruments can be used to monitor the fundamental hydrological variables. The measured fluxes (e.g. evapotranspiration, soil moisture, land surface

  13. Laboratory Measurements of Solar-Wind/Comet X-Ray Emission and Charge-Exchange Cross Sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chutjian, A.; Ĉade, I.; Greenwood, J. B.; Mawhorter, R. J.; Smith, S. J.; Lozano, J.

    2002-11-01

    The detection of X-rays from comets such as Hyakutake, Hale-Bopp, d'Arrest, and Linear as they approach the Sun has been both unexpected and exciting. This phenomenon, moreover, should be quite general, occurring wherever a fast solar or stellar wind interacts with neutrals in a comet, a planetary atmosphere, or a circumstellar cloud. Comet-modeling calculations to date have (a) used an approximate, over-barrier expression for the charge-exchange (CE) cross section, (b) assumed a flat energy dependence of cross section, and (c) neglected multiple charge exchanges. In support of the understanding of the X-ray emissions (their intensity and spatial extent) laboratory measurements have been carred out at the JPL Highly-Charged Ion Facility [1]. The projectiles have been partially- and fully-stripped H, He, C, N, O, and Ne ions interacting with the comet molecules He, H2, CO, CO2, and H2O. Absolute CE cross sections have been measured, and normalized X-ray emission cross sections reported for these major HCI components of the solar wind [2-5]. The minor, heavier HCI components will produce high-energy X-rays. A large body of data has been acquired on Fe(5-13)+[6]. The experimental approach will be discussed and results given. Future work will be extended to Mgq+ charge states, and include as well NH3 as the target. R. Mawhorter thanks the National Research Council for a fellowship though the NASA-NRC program. This work was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, and was supported under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  14. The K-meson form factor and charge radius: linking low-energy data to future Jefferson Laboratory measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krutov, A.F. [Samara University, Samara (Russian Federation); Troitsky, S.V. [Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 60th October Anniversary Prospect 7a, Moscow (Russian Federation); Troitsky, V.E. [M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, D.V. Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2017-07-15

    Starting from a successful model of the π-meson electromagnetic form factor, we calculate a similar form factor, F{sub K}(Q{sup 2}), of the charged K meson for a wide range of the momentum transfer squared, Q{sup 2}. The only remaining free parameter is to be determined from the measurements of the K-meson charge radius, r{sub K}. We fit this single parameter to the published data of the NA-7 experiment which measured F{sub K}(Q{sup 2}) at Q{sup 2} → 0 and determine our preferred range of r{sub K}, which happens to be close to recent lattice results. Still, the accuracy in the determination of r{sub K} is poor. However, future measurements of the K-meson electromagnetic form factor at Q{sup 2} Laboratory for 2017, will test our approach and will reduce the uncertainty in r{sub K} significantly. (orig.)

  15. Analysis of bias in measurements of potassium, sodium and hemoglobin by an emergency department-based blood gas analyzer relative to hospital laboratory autoanalyzer results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian Bo; Lin, Ji; Zhao, Xiao Dong

    2015-01-01

    The emergency departments (EDs) of Chinese hospitals are gradually being equipped with blood gas machines. These machines, along with the measurement of biochemical markers by the hospital laboratory, facilitate the care of patients with severe conditions who present to the ED. However, discrepancies have been noted between the Arterial Blood Gas (ABG) analyzers in the ED and the hospital laboratory autoanalyzer in relation to electrolyte and hemoglobin measurements. The present study was performed to determine whether the ABG and laboratory measurements of potassium, sodium, and hemoglobin levels are equivalent, and whether ABG analyzer results can be used to guide clinical care before the laboratory results become available. Study power analyses revealed that 200 consecutive patients who presented to our ED would allow this prospective single-center cohort study to detect significant differences between ABG- and laboratory-measured potassium, sodium, and hemoglobin levels. Paired arterial and venous blood samples were collected within 30 minutes. Arterial blood samples were measured in the ED by an ABL 90 FLEX blood gas analyzer. The biochemistry and blood cell counts of the venous samples were measured in the hospital laboratory. The potassium, sodium, and hemoglobin concentrations obtained by both methods were compared by using paired Student's t-test, Spearman's correlation, Bland-Altman plots, and Deming regression. The mean ABG and laboratory potassium values were 3.77±0.44 and 4.2±0.55, respectively (P<0.0001). The mean ABG and laboratory sodium values were 137.89±5.44 and 140.93±5.50, respectively (P<0.0001). The mean ABG and laboratory Hemoglobin values were 12.28±2.62 and 12.35±2.60, respectively (P = 0.24). Although there are the statistical difference and acceptable biases between ABG- and laboratory-measured potassium and sodium, the biases do not exceed USCLIA-determined limits. In parallel, there are no statistical differences and biases

  16. Analysis of bias in measurements of potassium, sodium and hemoglobin by an emergency department-based blood gas analyzer relative to hospital laboratory autoanalyzer results.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Bo Zhang

    Full Text Available The emergency departments (EDs of Chinese hospitals are gradually being equipped with blood gas machines. These machines, along with the measurement of biochemical markers by the hospital laboratory, facilitate the care of patients with severe conditions who present to the ED. However, discrepancies have been noted between the Arterial Blood Gas (ABG analyzers in the ED and the hospital laboratory autoanalyzer in relation to electrolyte and hemoglobin measurements. The present study was performed to determine whether the ABG and laboratory measurements of potassium, sodium, and hemoglobin levels are equivalent, and whether ABG analyzer results can be used to guide clinical care before the laboratory results become available.Study power analyses revealed that 200 consecutive patients who presented to our ED would allow this prospective single-center cohort study to detect significant differences between ABG- and laboratory-measured potassium, sodium, and hemoglobin levels. Paired arterial and venous blood samples were collected within 30 minutes. Arterial blood samples were measured in the ED by an ABL 90 FLEX blood gas analyzer. The biochemistry and blood cell counts of the venous samples were measured in the hospital laboratory. The potassium, sodium, and hemoglobin concentrations obtained by both methods were compared by using paired Student's t-test, Spearman's correlation, Bland-Altman plots, and Deming regression.The mean ABG and laboratory potassium values were 3.77±0.44 and 4.2±0.55, respectively (P<0.0001. The mean ABG and laboratory sodium values were 137.89±5.44 and 140.93±5.50, respectively (P<0.0001. The mean ABG and laboratory Hemoglobin values were 12.28±2.62 and 12.35±2.60, respectively (P = 0.24.Although there are the statistical difference and acceptable biases between ABG- and laboratory-measured potassium and sodium, the biases do not exceed USCLIA-determined limits. In parallel, there are no statistical differences and

  17. V.U.V. plasma spectroscopy diagnostic of electron cyclotron resonance multicharged ion sources; Diagnostic de plasmas crees dans des sources d'ions multicharges a resonance cyclotronique electronique par spectroscopie V.U.V

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berreby, R

    1997-12-15

    To characterize the multicharged ions within the plasma of an E.C.R. ion source, the V.U.V. spectroscopy is used as a non invasive diagnostic of excited matter. In E.C.R.I. S. (electron cyclotron resonance ion source) electrons are heated and magnetically confined within the mirror machine to overcome the successive ionization potentials of the desired elements. As the electrons bounce inside the magnetic configuration in their gyration movement, they interact with the microwaves injected into the source at the resonance frequency. To enhance the performances in high charge states and extracted currents delivered by E.C.R.I.S., the fundamental parameters of the plasma created in these machines must be known. The goal of spectroscopic diagnostics in the V.U.V. range installed on the sources is to determine electron density and temperature on one hand, and the ionic densities and confinement time on the other hand. We used microchannel plates as detector on a 3 meter grazing incidence spectrometer equipped with a 600 lines/mm holographic grating. The calibration of the whole grating with detector was performed by two different methods. These are the branching ratio and charge exchange methods. Identification of lines emitted by a plasma, which gather the whole charge states of ions is necessary to make an exhaustive study of the plasma state. And finally, the determination of plasma parameters like electron density and temperature and ion densities and confinement times that uses theoretical models were the aim of this work. (author)

  18. Synthesis, structural characterization and VUV excited luminescence properties of LixNa(1-x)Sm(PO3)4 polyphosphates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebai, S.; Hammami, S.; Megriche, A.; Zambon, D.; Mahiou, R.

    2016-12-01

    Stoichiometric phosphors Li(x)Na(1-x)Sm(PO3)4(x = 0, 0.5, 1) were prepared in the solid state and were characterized at room temperature using X-ray diffraction, infrared and Raman spectroscopy. The obtained LiSm(PO3)4 and NaSm(PO3)4 polycrystalline samples are single-phased and have centrosymmetric monoclinic structure. The observed results show the presence of characteristic bands due to (PO2)- terminal and P-O-P bridging groups. However, the Li0.5Na0.5Sm(PO3)4 material seems to be a mixture of the Li and Na homologues. The VUV excitation and emission spectra of as-synthesized compounds were measured. It was found that the Sm3+ ions show an orange-red emission which corresponds to the group transitions 4G5/2 → 6HJ (J = 5/2, 7/2, 9/2, 11/2), with the strongest transition (4G5/2 → 6H7/2) peaking at around 597 nm. The decay curves were pure exponential. The derived time constants are comprise between 14 μs and 31 μs, the lowest value is for NaSm(PO3)4. The decays were modeled in the frame of fast diffusion model with a rough estimation of fast cross-relaxation mechanism which returns a cross-relaxation rate of 3-7 × 104 s-1 and diffusion constant of 1-2 × 10-9 cm2 s-1.

  19. Within- and between-laboratory precision in the measurement of body volume using air displacement plethysmography and its effect on body composition assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, A L; Saunders, S; McCarthy, H D; Williams, J E; Fuller, N J

    2004-01-01

    To determine and compare the extent of within- and between-laboratory precision in body volume (BV) measurements using air displacement plethysmography (ADP), the BOD POD body composition system, and to interpret any such variability in terms of body composition estimates. Repeated test procedures of BV assessment using the BOD POD ADP were reproduced at two laboratories for the estimation of precision, both within and between laboratories. In total, 30 healthy adult volunteers, 14 men (age, 19-48 y; body mass index (BMI), 19.7-30.3 kg/m2) and 16 women (age, 19-40 y; BMI, 16.3-35.7 kg/m2), were each subjected to two test procedures at both laboratories. Two additional volunteers were independently subjected to 10 repeated test procedures at both laboratories. Repeated measurements of BV, uncorrected for the effects of isothermal air in the lungs and the surface area artifact, were obtained using the BOD POD ADP, with the identical protocol being faithfully applied at both laboratories. Uncorrected BV measurements were adjusted to give estimates of actual BV that were used to calculate body density (body weight (BWt)/actual BV) from which estimates of body composition were derived. The differences between repeated BV measurements or body composition estimates were used to assess within-laboratory precision (repeatability), as standard deviation (SD) and coefficient of variation; the differences between measurements reproduced at each laboratory were used to determine between-laboratory precision (reproducibility), as bias and 95% limits of agreement (from SD of the differences between laboratories). The extent of within-laboratory methodological precision for BV (uncorrected and actual) was variable according to subject, sample group and laboratory conditions (range of SD, 0.04-0.13 l), and was mostly due to within-individual biological variability (typically 78-99%) rather than to technical imprecision. There was a significant (PBOD POD instrument was reasonably

  20. A gel probe equilibrium sampler for measuring arsenic porewater profiles and sorption gradients in sediments: I. Laboratory development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, K.M.; Root, R.; O'Day, P. A.; Hering, J.G.

    2008-01-01

    A gel probe equilibrium sampler has been developed to study arsenic (As) geochemistry and sorption behavior in sediment porewater. The gels consist of a hydrated polyacrylamide polymer, which has a 92% water content. Two types of gels were used in this study. Undoped (clear) gels were used to measure concentrations of As and other elements in sediment porewater. The polyacrylamide gel was also doped with hydrous ferric oxide (HFO), an amorphous iron (Fe) oxyhydroxide. When deployed in the field, HFO-doped gels introduce a fresh sorbent into the subsurface thus allowing assessment of in situ sorption. In this study, clear and HFO-doped gels were tested under laboratory conditions to constrain the gel behavior prior to field deployment. Both types of gels were allowed to equilibrate with solutions of varying composition and re-equilibrated in acid for analysis. Clear gels accurately measured solution concentrations (??1%), and As was completely recovered from HFO-doped gels (??4%). Arsenic speciation was determined in clear gels through chromatographic separation of the re-equilibrated solution. For comparison to speciation in solution, mixtures of As(III) and As(V) adsorbed on HFO embedded in gel were measured in situ using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Sorption densities for As(III) and As(V) on HFO embedded in gel were obtained from sorption isotherms at pH 7.1. When As and phosphate were simultaneously equilibrated (in up to 50-fold excess of As) with HFO-doped gels, phosphate inhibited As sorption by up to 85% and had a stronger inhibitory effect on As(V) than As(III). Natural organic matter (>200 ppm) decreased As adsorption by up to 50%, and had similar effects on As(V) and As(III). The laboratory results provide a basis for interpreting results obtained by deploying the gel probe in the field and elucidating the mechanisms controlling As partitioning between solid and dissolved phases in the environment. ?? 2008 American Chemical Society.

  1. Combining Nordtest method and bootstrap resampling for measurement uncertainty estimation of hematology analytes in a medical laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Ming; Xu, Lili; Wang, Huimin; Ju, Shaoqing; Xu, Shuizhu; Jing, Rongrong

    2017-12-01

    Measurement uncertainty (MU) is a metrological concept, which can be used for objectively estimating the quality of test results in medical laboratories. The Nordtest guide recommends an approach that uses both internal quality control (IQC) and external quality assessment (EQA) data to evaluate the MU. Bootstrap resampling is employed to simulate the unknown distribution based on the mathematical statistics method using an existing small sample of data, where the aim is to transform the small sample into a large sample. However, there have been no reports of the utilization of this method in medical laboratories. Thus, this study applied the Nordtest guide approach based on bootstrap resampling for estimating the MU. We estimated the MU for the white blood cell (WBC) count, red blood cell (RBC) count, hemoglobin (Hb), and platelets (Plt). First, we used 6months of IQC data and 12months of EQA data to calculate the MU according to the Nordtest method. Second, we combined the Nordtest method and bootstrap resampling with the quality control data and calculated the MU using MATLAB software. We then compared the MU results obtained using the two approaches. The expanded uncertainty results determined for WBC, RBC, Hb, and Plt using the bootstrap resampling method were 4.39%, 2.43%, 3.04%, and 5.92%, respectively, and 4.38%, 2.42%, 3.02%, and 6.00% with the existing quality control data (U [k=2]). For WBC, RBC, Hb, and Plt, the differences between the results obtained using the two methods were lower than 1.33%. The expanded uncertainty values were all less than the target uncertainties. The bootstrap resampling method allows the statistical analysis of the MU. Combining the Nordtest method and bootstrap resampling is considered a suitable alternative method for estimating the MU. Copyright © 2017 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A1c Gear: Laboratory quality HbA1c measurement at the point of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejilemele, Adetoun; Unabia, Jamie; Ju, Hyunsu; Petersen, John R

    2015-05-20

    HbA1c is an important part of assessing the diabetic control and since the use of point-of-care devices for monitoring HbA1c is increasing, it is important to determine how these devices compare to the central laboratory. One hundred and twenty patient samples were analyzed on the Bio-Rad Variant™II and one POC analyzer (Sakae A1c Gear). Three patient sample pools containing ~5%, ~7%, and ~10% HbA1c levels were run over 20 days. Three reagent lots and three instruments were evaluated for the A1c Gear. The 120 patient samples showed strong correlation (R(2)>0.989) when compared to the Variant™II with means=8.06% and 7.81%, for Variant IIand A1c Gear, respectively. Changing reagent lots or instruments had no impact for the A1c Gear. The ~5%, ~7%, and ~10% pools within-run and between-run imprecision was between 0.87-1.33% and 1.03-1.32%, and 1.41-2.35% and 1.24-1.89% with total imprecision of 1.67-2.35% and 1.61-2.31% for the A1c Gear and Variant II, respectively. The A1c Gear showed a small negative bias (0.25% HbA1c) across HbA1c measurement ranges of Gear meets the criteria of total CV Gear can give results as precise as the laboratory at the POC. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Use of Balance Calibration Certificate to Calculate the Errors of Indication and Measurement Uncertainty in Mass Determinations Performed in Medical Laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana VÂLCU

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Based on the reference document, the article proposes the way to calculate the errors of indication and associated measurement uncertainties, by resorting to the general information provided by the calibration certificate of a balance (non-automatic weighing instruments, shortly NAWI used in medical field. The paper may be also considered a useful guideline for: operators working in laboratories accredited in medical (or other various fields where the weighing operations are part of their testing activities; test houses, laboratories, or manufacturers using calibrated non-automatic weighing instruments for measurements relevant for the quality of production subject to QM requirements (e.g. ISO 9000 series, ISO 10012, ISO/IEC 17025; bodies accrediting laboratories; accredited laboratories for the calibration of NAWI. Article refers only to electronic weighing instruments having maximum capacity up to 30 kg. Starting from the results provided by a calibration certificate it is presented an example of calculation.

  4. Medical laboratory science and nursing students' perception of academic learning environment in a Philippine university using Dundee Ready Educational Environment Measure (DREEM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcelo, Jonathan M

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the perception of the academic learning environment between medical laboratory science students and nursing students at Saint Louis University, Baguio City, Philippines. A cross-sectional survey research design was used to measure the perceptions of the participants. A total of 341 students from the Department of Medical Laboratory Science, School of Natural Sciences, and the School of Nursing answered the Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure (DREEM) instrument from April to May 2016. Responses were compared according to course of study, gender, and year level. The total mean DREEM scores of the medical laboratory science students and nursing students did not differ significantly when grouped according to course of study, gender, or year level. Medical laboratory science students had significantly lower mean scores in the sub-domains 'perception of learning' and 'perception of teaching.' Male medical laboratory science students had significantly lower mean scores in the sub-domain 'perception of learning' among second year students. Medical laboratory science students had significantly lower mean scores in the sub-domain 'perception of learning.' Nursing students identified 7 problem areas, most of which were related to their instructors. Medical laboratory science and nursing students viewed their academic learning environment as 'more positive than negative.' However, the relationship of the nursing instructors to their students needs improvement.

  5. Comparison of Martian Surface Radiation Predictions to the Measurements of Mars Science Laboratory Radiation Assessment Detector (MSL/RAD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, M. H. Y.; Cucinotta, F.; Zeitlin, C. J.; Hassler, D.; Ehresmann, B.; Rafkin, S. C.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.; Böttcher, S. I.; Boehm, E.; Guo, J.; Kohler, J.; Martin-Garcia, C.; Reitz, G.; Posner, A.

    2014-12-01

    For the analysis of radiation risks to astronauts and planning exploratory space missions, detailed knowledge of particle spectra is an important factor. Detailed measurements of the energetic particle radiation environment on the surface of Mars have been made by the Mars Science Laboratory Radiation Assessment Detector (MSL-RAD) on the Curiosity rover since August 2012, and particle fluxes for a wide range of ion species (up to several hundred MeV/u) and high energy neutrons (8 - 1000 MeV) have been available for the first 200 sols. Although the data obtained on the surface of Mars for 200 sols are limited in the narrow energy spectra, the simulation results using the Badhwar-O'Neill galactic cosmic ray (GCR) environment model and the high-charge and energy transport (HZETRN) code are compared to the data. For the nuclear interactions of primary GCR through Mars atmosphere and Curiosity rover, the quantum multiple scattering theory of nuclear fragmentation (QMSFRG) is used, which includes direct knockout, evaporation and nuclear coalescence. Daily atmospheric pressure measurements at Gale Crater by the MSL Rover Environmental Monitoring Station are implemented into transport calculations for describing the daily column depth of atmosphere. Particles impinging on top of the Martian atmosphere reach the RAD after traversing varying depths of atmosphere that depend on the slant angles, and the model accounts for shielding of the RAD by the rest of the instrument. Calculations of stopping particle spectra are in good agreement with the RAD measurements for the first 200 sols by accounting changing heliospheric conditions and atmospheric pressure. Detailed comparisons between model predictions and spectral data of various particle types provide the validation of radiation transport models, and thus increase the accuracy of the predictions of future radiation environments on Mars. These contributions lend support to the understanding of radiation health risks to

  6. Combining impact sensor field and laboratory flume measurements with other techniques for studying fluvial bedload transport in steep mountain streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beylich, Achim A.; Laute, Katja

    2014-08-01

    The timing and rate of fluvial bedload transport are of central importance within sediment budget studies and in many applications in river science and engineering. During the years 2010, 2011 and 2012 detailed field measurements with portable impact sensors as a non-invasive technique for indirectly determining fluvial bedload transport intensity were conducted in two instrumented and supply-limited drainage basin systems (Erdalen and Bødalen) in the fjord landscape in western Norway. Additional field measurements with portable impact sensors were carried out in 2010 and 2011 in selected transport-limited fluvial systems in the Coast Mountains of western Canada. The collected impact sensor field data were calibrated with laboratory flume experiments. The data from the impact sensor field measurements in western Norway and the flume experiments were combined with field data from continuous discharge monitoring, repeated surveys of channel morphometry and sediment texture, particle tracer measurements, Helley-Smith samplings, underwater video filming and biofilm analyses. The combination of methods and techniques applied provides insights into the temporal variability and intensity of fluvial bedload transport in the selected mountain streams: (i) in the transport-limited systems with generally high bedload transport rates during high discharge and with bedload material moving in clusters over the impact sensor plates, impact sensor data (based on a 1 s measuring interval) provide the opportunity to detect the start and end of bedload transport, thus to identify discharge thresholds for sediment entrainment, and to roughly estimate the intensity and relative intensity of change of bedload transport during the measuring period; (ii) in the supply-limited systems with low bedload transport rates and bedload components moving separately (as single particles) over the impact sensor plates, impact sensor data (with a 1 s measuring interval) allow the detection of the

  7. The role of the EPA radiation quality assurance program in the measurement quality assurance accreditation program for radioassay laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grady, T.M. [Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    1993-12-31

    As the nature and extent of radiological contamination becomes better documented and more public, radioanalytical laboratories are faced with a constantly expanding variety of new and difficult analytical requirements. Concurrent with those requirements is the responsibility to provide customers, regulatory officials, or the public with defensible data produced in an environment of verifiable, controlled quality. To meet that need, a quality assurance accreditation program for radioassay laboratories has been proposed by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI). The standard will provide the organizational framework and functional requirements needed to assure the quality of laboratory outputs. Under the proposed program, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Laboratory Intercomparison Program plays a key role as a reference laboratory. The current and proposed roles of the EPA Intercomparison Program are discussed, as are the functional relationships between EPA, the accreditating organization, and the service and monitoring laboratories.

  8. Non-invasive measurements of leaf epidermal transmittance of UV radiation using chlorophyll fluorescence: field and laboratory studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, P.W. [Southwest Texas State Univ.. Dept. of Biology, San Marcos, TX (United States); Searles, P.S.; Ryel, R.J.; Caldwell, M.M. [Utah State Univ., Dept. of Rangeland Resources and the Ecology Center, Logan, UT (United States); Ballare, C.L. [IFEVA, Univ. de Buenos Aires, Dept. de Ecologia, Facultad de Agronomia, Buenos Aires, (Argentina)

    2000-07-01

    Ratios of chlorophyll fluorescence induced by ultraviolet (UV) and bluegreen (BG) radiation [F(UV)/F(BG)] were determined with a Xe-PAM fluorometer to test the utility of this technique as a means of non-intrusively assessing changes in the pigmentation and optical properties of leaves exposed to varying UV exposures under laboratory and field conditions. For plants of Vicia faba and Brassica campestris, grown under controlled-environmental conditions, F(UV-B)/F(BG) was negatively correlated with whole-leaf UV-B-absorbing pigment concentrations. Fluorescence ratios of V.faba were similar to, and positively correlated with (r{sup 2} = 0.77 [UV-B]; 0.85 [UV-A]), direct measurements of epidermal transmittance made with an integrating sphere. Leaves of 2 of 4 cultivars of field-grown Glycine max exposed to near-ambient solar UV-B at a mid-latitude site (Buenos Aires, Argentina, 34 degrees S) showed significantly lower abaxial F(UV-B)/F(BG) values (i.e., lower UV-B epidermal transmittance) than those exposed to attenuated UV-B, but solar UV-B reduction had a minimal effect on F(UV-B)/F(BG) in plants growing at a high-latitude site (Tierra del Fuego, Argentina, 55 degrees S). Similarly, the exotic Taraxacum officinale did not show significant changes in F(UV-B)/F(BG) when exposed to very high supplemental UV-B (biologically effective UV-B = 14-15 kJ m{sup -2} day{sup -1}) in the field in Tierra del Fuego, whereas a native species, Gunnera magellanica, showed significant increases in F(UV-B)/F(BG) relative to those receiving ambient UV-B. These anomalous fluorescence changes were associated with increases in BG-absorbing pigments (anthocyanins), but not UV-B-absorbing pigments. These results indicate that non-invasive estimates of epidermal transmittance of UV radiation using chlorophyll fluorescence can detect changes in pigmentation and leaf optical properties induced by UV-B radiation under both field and laboratory conditions. However, this technique may be of limited

  9. Laboratory Earthquake Measurements with the High-speed Digital Image Correlation Method and Applications to Super-shear Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubino, V.; Lapusta, N.; Rosakis, A.

    2012-12-01

    Mapping full-field displacements and strains on the Earth's surface during an earthquake is of paramount importance to enhance our understanding of earthquake mechanics. In this study, the feasibility of such measurements using image correlation methods is investigated in a laboratory earthquake setup. Earthquakes are mimicked in the laboratory by dynamic rupture propagating along an inclined frictional interface formed by two Homalite plates under compression, using the configuration developed by Rosakis and coworkers (e.g., Rosakis et al., 2007). In our study, the interface is partially glued, in order to confine the rupture before it reaches the ends of the specimen. The specimens are painted with a speckle pattern to provide the surface with characteristic features for image matching. Images of the specimens are taken before and after dynamic rupture with a 4 Megapixels resolution CCD camera. The digital images are analyzed with two software packages: VIC-2D (Correlated Solutions Inc.) and COSI-Corr (Leprince et. al, 2007). Both VIC-2D and COSI-Corr are able to characterize the full-field static displacement of a dynamic crack. For example, in a case with secondary mode I cracks, the correlation analysis performed with either software clearly shows (i) the relative displacement (slip) along the frictional interface, (ii) the rupture arrest on the glued boundaries, and (iii) the presence of two wing cracks. The obtained displacement measurements are converted to strains, using de-noising techniques. The digital image correlation method is then used in combination with high-speed photography. We will report our progress on the study of a spontaneously expanding sub-Rayleigh shear crack advancing along an interface containing a patch of favorable heterogeneity, such as a preexisting subcritical crack or a patch with higher prestress. According to the predictions of Liu and Lapusta (2008), intersonic transition and propagation can be achieved in the presence of a

  10. Reduction of the Buildup Contribution in Gamma Ray Attenuation Measurements and a New Way to Study This Experiment in a Student Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamides, E.; Kavadjiklis, A.; Koutroubas, S.K.; Moshonas, N.; Tzedakis, A.; Yiasemides, K.

    2014-01-01

    In continuation of our investigation into the buildup phenomenon appearing in gamma ray attenuation measurements in laboratory experiments we study the dependence of the buildup factor on the area of the absorber in an effort to reduce the buildup of photons. Detailed measurements are performed for up to two mean free paths of [superscript 60]Co…

  11. Vibrationally Excited c-C_3H_2 Re-Visited New Laboratory Measurements and Theoretical Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Harshal; Westerfield, J. H.; Baraban, Joshua H.; Changala, Bryan; Thorwirth, Sven; Stanton, John F.; Martin-Drumel, Marie-Aline; Pirali, Olivier; Gottlieb, Carl A.; McCarthy, Michael C.

    2017-06-01

    Cyclopropenylidene, c-C_3H_2, is one of the more abundant organic molecules in the interstellar medium, as evidenced from astronomical detection of its single ^{13}C and both its singly- and doubly-deuterated isotopic species. For this reason, vibrational satellites are of considerable astronomical interest, and were the primary motivation for the earlier laboratory work by Mollaaghababa and co-workers [1]. The recent detection of intense unidentified lines near 18 GHz in a hydrocarbon discharge by FT microwave spectroscopy has spurred a renewed search for the vibrational satellite transitions of c-C_3H_2. Several strong lines have been definitively assigned to the v_6 progression on the basis of follow-up measurements at 3 mm, double resonance and millimeter-wave absorption spectroscopy, and new theoretical calculations using a rovibrational VMP2 method [2] and a high-quality ab initio potential energy surface. The treatment was applied to several excited states as well as the ground state, and included deperturbation of Coriolis interactions. [1] R. Mollaaghababa, C.A. Gottlieb, J. M. Vrtilek, and P. Thaddeus, J. Chem. Phys., 99, 890-896 (1992). [2] P. B. Changala and J. H. Baraban. J. Chem. Phys., 145, 174106 (2016).

  12. Joint Stability Characteristics of the Ankle Complex After Lateral Ligamentous Injury, Part I: A Laboratory Comparison Using Arthrometric Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovaleski, John E.; Heitman, Robert J.; Gurchiek, Larry R.; Hollis, J. M.; Liu, Wei; IV, Albert W. Pearsall

    2014-01-01

    Context: The mechanical property of stiffness may be important to investigating how lateral ankle ligament injury affects the behavior of the viscoelastic properties of the ankle complex. A better understanding of injury effects on tissue elastic characteristics in relation to joint laxity could be obtained from cadaveric study. Objective: To biomechanically determine the laxity and stiffness characteristics of the cadaver ankle complex before and after simulated injury to the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) and calcaneofibular ligament (CFL) during anterior drawer and inversion loading. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: University research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Seven fresh-frozen cadaver ankle specimens. Intervention(s): All ankles underwent loading before and after simulated lateral ankle injury using an ankle arthrometer. Main Outcome Measure(s): The dependent variables were anterior displacement, anterior end-range stiffness, inversion rotation, and inversion end-range stiffness. Results: Isolated ATFL and combined ATFL and CFL sectioning resulted in increased anterior displacement but not end-range stiffness when compared with the intact ankle. With inversion loading, combined ATFL and CFL sectioning resulted in increased range of motion and decreased end-range stiffness when compared with the intact and ATFL-sectioned ankles. Conclusions: The absence of change in anterior end-range stiffness between the intact and ligament-deficient ankles indicated bony and other soft tissues functioned to maintain stiffness after pathologic joint displacement, whereas inversion loading of the CFL-deficient ankle after pathologic joint displacement indicated the ankle complex was less stiff when supported only by the secondary joint structures. PMID:24568232

  13. Measurement of fine particulate matter nonvolatile and semi-volatile organic material with the Sunset Laboratory Carbon Aerosol Monitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Brett D; Kleinman, Michael; Eatough, Norman L; Eatough, Delbert J; Cary, Robert A; Hopke, Philip K; Wilson, William E

    2008-01-01

    Semi-volatile organic material (SVOM) in fine particles is not reliably measured with conventional semicontinuous carbon monitors because SVOM is lost from the collection media during sample collection. We have modified a Sunset Laboratory Carbon Aerosol Monitor to allow for the determination of SVOM. In a conventional Sunset monitor, gas-phase organic compounds are removed in the sampled airstream by a diffusion denuder employing charcoal-impregnated cellulose filter (CIF) surfaces. Subsequently, particles are collected on a quartz filter and the instrument then determines both the organic carbon and elemental carbon fractions of the aerosol using a thermal/optical method. However, some of the SVOM is lost from the filter during collection, and therefore is not determined. Because the interfering gas-phase organic compounds are removed before aerosol collection, the SVOM can be determined by filtering the particles at the instrument inlet and then replacing the quartz filter in the monitor with a charcoal-impregnated glass fiber filter (CIG), which retains the SVOM lost from particles collected on the inlet filter. The resulting collected SVOM is then determined in the analysis step by measurement of the carbonaceous material thermally evolved from the CIG filter. This concept was tested during field studies in February 2003 in Lindon, UT, and in July 2003 in Rubidoux, CA. The results obtained were validated by comparison with Particle Concentrator-Brigham Young University Organic Sampling System (PC-BOSS) results. The sum of nonvolatile organic material determined with a conventional Sunset monitor and SVOM determined with the modified Sunset monitor agree with the PC-BOSS results. Linear regression analysis of total carbon concentrations determined by the PC-BOSS and the Sunset resulted in a zero-intercept slope of 0.99 +/- 0.02 (R2 = 0.92) and a precision of sigma = +/- 1.5 microg C/m3 (8%).

  14. Accreditation of laboratories measuring environmental radioactivity; L'agrement des laboratoires de mesures de la radioactivite de l'environnement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levelut, M.N. [Autorite de Surete Nucleaire, Direction de l' environnement et des situations d' urgence, 75 - Paris (France)

    2010-06-15

    The radiological state of our environment is a strong concern for the public. The measurement of the radioactivity is an answer to this concern. The French National Network for the Measurement of Environmental Radioactivity (www.mesure-radioactivite.fr.) centralizes all the results of measurements of radioactivity in the environment on the national territory. The web-site provide an easy access to the results. Nevertheless it is needed to ensure the quality of the results obtained by the laboratories before reporting them to the web-site. A new laboratory approval system was created through an ASN decision (decision no 2008-DC-0099 of 29 april 2008), taking into account the new prerogatives granted to ASN by Act of 13 june 2006 and the modification of Public Heath Code towards the protection of individuals against the risks arising from ionising radiations in november 2007. This paper presents this new regulation by specifying the nature of the laboratories concerned and the field of approval with more than forty different kinds of approval, relating to all the environmental compartments and various radionuclide measurements (alpha, beta or gamma emitters). It also details the procedure of approval which in particular include the conformity of the practices of the laboratory to the requirements of standard ISO/CEI 17025 and the regular participation to intercomparison tests organised by IRSN. It draws up the assessment of the laboratories approved on 1 January 2010 and analyzes the distribution of approvals according to the statute of laboratories, the measurement categories and the nature of the measured environmental samples. (author)

  15. Multianalyte Conventional Reference Material (MacRM): A Useful Tool for Nationwide Standardization of Laboratory Measurements for Medical Care-A Model Study in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, Katsuyuki; Hamasaki, Naotaka; Takagi, Yasushi; Yatomi, Yutaka; Kikuchi, Hiroshi; Hosogaya, Shigemi; Kawai, Yohko; Miyachi, Hayato; Kaneko, Kenji; Miyajima, Yoshifumi; Matsumoto, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Yoshikazu; Iwagami, Miyuki; Osawa, Susumu; Umeda, Mamoru; Koide, Hirofumi; Yoshimura, Daisuke; Kato, Hideo

    2016-02-01

    The Japanese Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (JCCLS) has developed a multianalyte conventional reference material (MacRM) for nationwide standardization of laboratory measurements. To prepare the MacRM, pooled sera were obtained from healthy Japanese individuals. Target values of the pooled sera for 30 analytes were assigned on the basis of the measurement results of 45 certified clinical laboratories whose calibration was verified by measuring certified reference materials (CRMs) provided by the National Institute of Standards and Technology, the Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements, and JCCLS. Commutability of MacRM was assessed by comparison with results for 150 individual inpatients at Fukuoka University Chikushi Hospital. Survey samples were prepared by essentially the same method for MacRM but without target values. The survey samples were used to assess agreement among 165 laboratories that used various assay kits and platforms calibrated with the MacRM. The commutability of MacRM was confirmed for 30 analytes with sera from 150 individual patients. The imprecision (CV) of measurements of survey samples (high and low concentrations) among the 165 laboratories was 0.4%-10.0%. Twenty-six of 30 analytes were within the goals for interinstitutional allowable bias. An aliquot of MacRM stored frozen at -80 °C remained stable for ≥4 years. The MacRM was successfully applied as a calibrator to achieve nationwide standardization for 30 analytes measured by 165 laboratories that used various methods from different manufacturers. © 2015 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.

  16. Laboratory measurements of trace gas emissions from biomass burning of fuel types from the southeastern and southwestern United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. R. Burling

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Vegetation commonly managed by prescribed burning was collected from five southeastern and southwestern US military bases and burned under controlled conditions at the US Forest Service Fire Sciences Laboratory in Missoula, Montana. The smoke emissions were measured with a large suite of state-of-the-art instrumentation including an open-path Fourier transform infrared (OP-FTIR spectrometer for measurement of gas-phase species. The OP-FTIR detected and quantified 19 gas-phase species in these fires: CO2, CO, CH4, C2H2, C2H4, C3H6, HCHO, HCOOH, CH3OH, CH3COOH, furan, H2O, NO, NO2, HONO, NH3, HCN, HCl, and SO2. Emission factors for these species are presented for each vegetation type burned. Gas-phase nitrous acid (HONO, an important OH precursor, was detected in the smoke from all fires. The HONO emission factors ranged from 0.15 to 0.60 g kg−1 and were higher for the southeastern fuels. The fire-integrated molar emission ratios of HONO (relative to NOx ranged from approximately 0.03 to 0.20, with higher values also observed for the southeastern fuels. The majority of non-methane organic compound (NMOC emissions detected by OP-FTIR were oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs with the total identified OVOC emissions constituting 61 ± 12% of the total measured NMOC on a molar basis. These OVOC may undergo photolysis or further oxidation contributing to ozone formation. Elevated amounts of gas-phase HCl and SO2 were also detected during flaming combustion, with the amounts varying greatly depending on location and vegetation type. The fuels with the highest HCl emission factors were all located in the coastal regions, although HCl was also observed from fuels farther inland. Emission factors for HCl were generally higher for the southwestern fuels

  17. ACTIVE MEDIA: BaY2F8 single crystals doped with rare-earth ions as promising up-conversion media for UV and VUV lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pushkar', A. A.; Uvarova, T. V.; Molchanov, V. N.

    2008-04-01

    BaY2F8 crystals are studied as promising active media for UV and VUV lasers. The up-conversion pumping of rare-earth activators is proposed to solve problems related to the solarisation of the medium and the selection of pump sources. The technology of growing oriented BaY2F8 single crystals is developed and the influence of the crystal orientation on the growth rate and quality of single crystals is determined.

  18. Characterization of Damage to Bacteria and Bio-macromolecules Caused by (V)UV Radiation and Particles Generated by a Microscale Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackmann, Jan-Wilm; Schneider, Simon; Narberhaus, Franz; Benedikt, Jan; Bandow, Julia E.

    Atmospheric pressure plasma jets effectively inactivate bacteria on ­surfaces including infected tissues. This is due to the combined effects of (V)UV radiation, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, ions, and high electric fields. A well-characterized microscale atmospheric pressure plasma jet (μ-APPJ) operated with He/O2 gas mixture has been modified so that (V)UV radiation and heavy reactive particles (mainly O3 molecules and O atoms) emitted from the plasma source can be separated effectively. The separation is achieved by an additional lateral He flow, which diverts the heavy particles from the jet axis. The new jet geometry is called X-Jet. Separation of different plasma components allows studying their effects on living cells and bio-macromolecules separately. First, the effectiveness of the separation of different plasma components was demonstrated by treatment of monolayers of vegetative Bacillus subtilis cells. To characterize effects on nucleic acids, dried plasmid DNA and total cellular RNA were treated with the separated plasma components. Dried bovine serum albumin was used to study etching effects of (V)UV radiation and heavy particles on proteins. We found that heavy particles emitted from the X-Jet kill vegetative cells more effectively than the (V)UV radiation from this type of plasma source. All bio-macromolecules investigated, DNA, RNA, and proteins, are affected by plasma treatment. DNA exposed to the (V)UV-channel of the jet seems to be prone to thymine dimer formation not only in vitro but also in vivo as indicated by induction of the photolyase in Escherichia coli, while DNA strand breaks occur under both jet channels. Heavy particles seem more effective in degrading RNA and in etching protein in vitro.

  19. Coupling field and laboratory measurements to estimate the emission factors of identified and unidentified trace gases for prescribed fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokelson, R. J.; Burling, I. R.; Gilman, J. B.; Warneke, C.; Stockwell, C. E.; de Gouw, J.; Akagi, S. K.; Urbanski, S. P.; Veres, P.; Roberts, J. M.; Kuster, W. C.; Reardon, J.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Johnson, T. J.; Hosseini, S.; Miller, J. W.; Cocker, D. R., III; Jung, H.; Weise, D. R.

    2013-01-01

    An extensive program of experiments focused on biomass burning emissions began with a laboratory phase in which vegetative fuels commonly consumed in prescribed fires were collected in the southeastern and southwestern US and burned in a series of 71 fires at the US Forest Service Fire Sciences Laboratory in Missoula, Montana. The particulate matter (PM2.5) emissions were measured by gravimetric filter sampling with subsequent analysis for elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC), and 38 elements. The trace gas emissions were measured by an open-path Fourier transform infrared (OP-FTIR) spectrometer, proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS), proton-transfer ion-trap mass spectrometry (PIT-MS), negative-ion proton-transfer chemical-ionization mass spectrometry (NI-PT-CIMS), and gas chromatography with MS detection (GC-MS). 204 trace gas species (mostly non-methane organic compounds (NMOC)) were identified and quantified with the above instruments. Many of the 182 species quantified by the GC-MS have rarely, if ever, been measured in smoke before. An additional 153 significant peaks in the unit mass resolution mass spectra were quantified, but either could not be identified or most of the signal at that molecular mass was unaccounted for by identifiable species. In a second, "field" phase of this program, airborne and ground-based measurements were made of the emissions from prescribed fires that were mostly located in the same land management units where the fuels for the lab fires were collected. A broad variety, but smaller number of species (21 trace gas species and PM2.5) was measured on 14 fires in chaparral and oak savanna in the southwestern US, as well as pine forest understory in the southeastern US and Sierra Nevada mountains of California. The field measurements of emission factors (EF) are useful both for modeling and to examine the representativeness of our lab fire EF. The lab EF/field EF ratio for the pine understory fuels was not

  20. Coupling field and laboratory measurements to estimate the emission factors of identified and unidentified trace gases for prescribed fires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. J. Yokelson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An extensive program of experiments focused on biomass burning emissions began with a laboratory phase in which vegetative fuels commonly consumed in prescribed fires were collected in the southeastern and southwestern US and burned in a series of 71 fires at the US Forest Service Fire Sciences Laboratory in Missoula, Montana. The particulate matter (PM2.5 emissions were measured by gravimetric filter sampling with subsequent analysis for elemental carbon (EC, organic carbon (OC, and 38 elements. The trace gas emissions were measured by an open-path Fourier transform infrared (OP-FTIR spectrometer, proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS, proton-transfer ion-trap mass spectrometry (PIT-MS, negative-ion proton-transfer chemical-ionization mass spectrometry (NI-PT-CIMS, and gas chromatography with MS detection (GC-MS. 204 trace gas species (mostly non-methane organic compounds (NMOC were identified and quantified with the above instruments. Many of the 182 species quantified by the GC-MS have rarely, if ever, been measured in smoke before. An additional 153 significant peaks in the unit mass resolution mass spectra were quantified, but either could not be identified or most of the signal at that molecular mass was unaccounted for by identifiable species.

    In a second, "field" phase of this program, airborne and ground-based measurements were made of the emissions from prescribed fires that were mostly located in the same land management units where the fuels for the lab fires were collected. A broad variety, but smaller number of species (21 trace gas species and PM2.5 was measured on 14 fires in chaparral and oak savanna in the southwestern US, as well as pine forest understory in the southeastern US and Sierra Nevada mountains of California. The field measurements of emission factors (EF are useful both for modeling and to examine the representativeness of our lab fire EF. The lab EF/field EF ratio for

  1. Calculating structural and geometrical parameters by laboratory measurements and X-ray microtomography: a comparative study applied to a limestone sample before and after a dissolution experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luquot, Linda; Hebert, Vanessa; Rodriguez, Olivier

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the structural, geometrical and transport parameters of a limestone rock sample determined by X-ray microtomography (XMT) images and laboratory experiments. Total and effective porosity, pore-size distribution, tortuosity, and effective diffusion coefficient have been estimated. Sensitivity analyses of the segmentation parameters have been performed. The limestone rock sample studied here has been characterized using both approaches before and after a reactive percolation experiment. Strong dissolution process occurred during the percolation, promoting a wormhole formation. This strong heterogeneity formed after the percolation step allows us to apply our methodology to two different samples and enhance the use of experimental techniques or XMT images depending on the rock heterogeneity. We established that for most of the parameters calculated here, the values obtained by computing XMT images are in agreement with the classical laboratory measurements. We demonstrated that the computational porosity is more informative than the laboratory measurement. We observed that pore-size distributions obtained by XMT images and laboratory experiments are slightly different but complementary. Regarding the effective diffusion coefficient, we concluded that both approaches are valuable and give similar results. Nevertheless, we concluded that computing XMT images to determine transport, geometrical, and petrophysical parameters provide similar results to those measured at the laboratory but with much shorter durations.

  2. VUV photochemistry of the H2OCO complex in noble-gas matrices: formation of the OHCO complex and the HOCO radical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryazantsev, Sergey V; Duarte, Luís; Feldman, Vladimir I; Khriachtchev, Leonid

    2016-12-21

    Vacuum ultraviolet (VUV, 130-170 nm) photochemistry of the H2OCO complex is studied by matrix-isolation infrared spectroscopy. The H2OCO complexes in Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe matrices are generated by ultraviolet (UV, 193 and 250 nm) photolysis of formic acid (HCOOH). VUV photolysis of the H2OCO complexes is found to lead to the formation of the OHCO radical-molecule complexes and trans-HOCO radicals. It is shown that the matrix material, local matrix morphology, and possibly the H2OCO complex geometry strongly affect the VUV photolysis pathways. The intrinsic reactivity of the matrix-isolated OHCO complex resulting in the formation of trans-HOCO is directly demonstrated for the first time. This reaction occurs in Ar, Kr, and Xe matrices upon annealing above 25 K and may proceed over the barrier. The case of a Ne matrix is very special because the formation of trans-HOCO from the OHCO complex is observed even at the lowest experimental temperature (4.5 K), which is in sharp contrast to the other matrices. It follows that quantum tunneling is probably involved in this process in the Ne matrix at such a low temperature. Infrared light also promotes this reaction in the Ne matrix at 4.5 K, which is not the case in the other matrices. The last findings show the effect of the environment on the tunneling and infrared-induced rates of this fundamental chemical reaction.

  3. Imaging with Mass Spectrometry: A SIMS and VUV-Photoionization Study of Ion-Sputtered Atoms and Clusters from GaAs and Au

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Lynelle; Zhou, Jia; Wilson, Kevin R.; Leone, Stephen R.; Ahmed, Musahid

    2008-12-05

    A new mass spectrometry surface imaging method is presented in which ion-sputtered neutrals are postionized by wavelength-tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light from a synchrotron source. Mass spectra and signal counts of the photoionized neutrals from GaAs (100) and Au are compared to those of the secondary ions. While clusters larger than dimers are more efficiently detected as secondary ions, certain species, such as As2, Au and Au2, are more efficiently detected through the neutral channel. Continuously tuning the photon wavelength allows photoionization efficiency (PIE) curves to be obtained for sputtered Asm (m=1,2) and Aun (n=1-4). From the observed ionization thresholds, sputtered neutral As and Au show no clear evidence of electronic excitation, while neutral clusters have photoionization onsets shifted to lower energies by ~;;0.3 eV. These shifts are attributed to unresolved vibrational and rotational excitations. High-spatial resolution chemical imaging with synchrotron VUV postionization is demonstrated at two different photon energies using a copper TEM grid embedded in indium. The resulting images are used to illustrate the use of tunable VUV light for verifying mass peak assignments by exploiting the unique wavelength-dependent PIE of each sputtered neutral species. This capability is valuable for identifying compounds when imaging chemically complex systems with mass spectrometry-based techniques.

  4. A new instrument of VUV laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging with micrometer spatial resolution and low level of molecular fragmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jia; Liu, Feng; Mo, Yuxiang; Wang, Zhaoying; Zhang, Sichun; Zhang, Xinrong

    2017-11-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) has important applications in material research, biology, and medicine. The MSI method based on UV laser desorption/ionization (UVLDI) can obtain images of intact samples, but has a high level of molecular fragmentation. In this work, we report a new MSI instrument that uses a VUV laser (125.3 nm) as a desorption/ionization source to exploit its advantages of high single photon energy and small focus size. The new instrument was tested by the mass spectra of Nile red and FGB (Fibrinogen beta chain) samples and mass spectrometric images of a fly brain section. For the tested samples, the VUVDI method offers lower levels of molecular fragmentations and higher sensitivities than those of the UVLDI method and second ion mass spectrometry imaging method using a Bi3+ beam. The ablation crater produced by the focused VUV laser on a quartz plate has an area of 10 μm2. The VUV laser is prepared based on the four-wave mixing method using three collimated laser beams and a heated Hg cell.

  5. Combined use of VUV and UVC photoreactors for the treatment of hospital laundry wastewaters: Reduction of load parameters, detoxification and life cycle assessment of different configurations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira Schwaickhardt, Rômulo; Machado, Ênio Leandro; Lutterbeck, Carlos Alexandre

    2017-07-15

    The present research investigated the treatment of hospital laundry wastewaters by the combined use of photochemical VUV and UVC reactors. Seven different configurations were tested and the performances of each of them were evaluated based on the removal of the load parameters, detoxification and life cycle assessment (LCA). The characterization of studied wastewaters included analysis of the following parameters: COD, BOD5, TKN, total P, pH, turbidity and conductivity. Acute ecotoxicity was evaluated using Daphnia magna. Ultraviolet-Visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy was performed to determine the organic fraction and chromatography coupled to the mass spectrometer (GC-MS) was used for the qualitative characterization of priority pollutants. Characterization parameters showed the presence of drugs like lidocaine and dipyrone and a high organic load with a poor biodegradability. Wastewaters presented an extreme acute toxicity against D. magna (EC50 6.7%). The ozonation process (mainly generated by the VUV reactor) obtained the best results concerning the ratio between the consumed energy and the removed COD and the UVC process presented the lowest environmental impacts for the characterization and normalization parameters of the LCA. Normalization revealed that the highest environmental burdens were associated with human toxicity, ecotoxicity and eutrophication of surface waters as well as to the use of non-renewable resources. VUV/UVC/O3 process presented the best results considering detoxification (EC50 100%). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Laboratory Study of Leakage Current and Measurement of ESDD of Equivalent Insulator Flat Model under Various Polluted Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    N. Narmadhai; Suresh, S; A. Ebenezer Jeyakumar

    2010-01-01

    The phenomenon of flashover in polluted insulators has been continued by the study of the characteristics of contaminating layers deposited on the surface of insulators in high voltage laboratories. This paper proposed the Equivalent insulator flat plate model for studying the flashover phenomena due to pollution under wet conditions even at low voltage. Laboratory based tests were carried out on the model under AC voltage at different pollution levels. Different concentrations of salt soluti...

  7. Laboratory Measures of Postural Control During the Star Excursion Balance Test After Acute First-Time Lateral Ankle Sprain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Cailbhe; Bleakley, Chris M.; Hertel, Jay; Caulfield, Brian; Ryan, John; Delahunt, Eamonn

    2015-01-01

    Context No researchers, to our knowledge, have investigated the immediate postinjury-movement strategies associated with acute first-time lateral ankle sprain (LAS) as quantified by center of pressure (COP) and kinematic analyses during performance of the Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT). Objective To analyze the kinematic and COP patterns of a group with acute first-time LAS and a noninjured control group during performance of the SEBT. Design Case-control study. Setting University biomechanics laboratory. Patients or Other Participants A total of 81 participants with acute first-time LAS (53 men, 28 women; age = 23.22 ± 4.93 years, height = 1.73 ± 0.09 m, mass = 75.72 ± 13.86 kg) and 19 noninjured controls (15 men, 4 women; age = 22.53 ± 1.68 years, height = 1.74 ± 0.08 m, mass = 71.55 ± 11.31 kg). Intervention Participants performed the anterior (ANT), posterolateral (PL), and posteromedial (PM) reach directions of the SEBT. Main Outcome Measure(s) We assessed 3-dimensional kinematics of the lower extremity joints and associated fractal dimension (FD) of the COP path during performance of the SEBT. Results The LAS group had decreased normalized reach distances in the ANT, PL, and PM directions when compared with the control group on their injured (ANT: 58.16% ± 6.86% versus 64.86% ± 5.99%; PL: 85.64% ± 10.62% versus 101.14% ± 8.39%; PM: 94.89% ± 9.26% versus 107.29 ± 6.02%) and noninjured (ANT: 60.98% ± 6.74% versus 64.76% ± 5.02%; PL: 88.95% ± 11.45% versus 102.36% ± 8.53%; PM: 97.13% ± 8.76% versus 106.62% ± 5.78%) limbs (P postural control, as evidenced by the bilateral reduction in angular displacement of the lower extremity joints and reduced reach distances and FD of the COP path on the injured limb during performance of the SEBT. PMID:25811845

  8. HYDROMECHANICS LABORATORY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Naval Academy Hydromechanics LaboratoryThe Naval Academy Hydromechanics Laboratory (NAHL) began operations in Rickover Hall in September 1976. The primary purpose of...

  9. Bioassay Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Bioassay Laboratory is an accredited laboratory capable of conducting standardized and innovative environmental testing in the area of aquatic ecotoxicology. The...

  10. Measurement of low radioactivity in underground laboratories by means of many-dimensional spectrometry; Messung geringer Radioaktivitaet in Untertagelaboratorien mit Hilfe mehrdimensionaler Spektrometrie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niese, Siegfried

    2008-01-15

    In this contribution beside the possibilities for the measurements in underground laboratories also the application of the many-dimensional spectrometry is considered, under which coincidence, anticoincidence, and time-resolving spectrometric are to be understood. Very extensively the interaction of cosmic radiation with matter is considered.

  11. A comparison of the accuracy of self reported intake vs. measured intake of a laboratory overeating episode in obese women with and without binge eating disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose was to: 1) Confirm that those with binge eating disorder (BED) consume significantly more kilocalories (kcal) than obese controls when instructed to overeat in the laboratory and 2) Compare dietary recall data with measured intake. Methods: Fifteen women fulfilling BED criteria and 17 c...

  12. Measuring Heterogeneous Reaction Rates with ATR-FTIR Spectroscopy to Evaluate Chemical Fates in an Atmospheric Environment: A Physical Chemistry and Environmental Chemistry Laboratory Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Jason E.; Zeng, Guang; Maron, Marta K.; Mach, Mindy; Dwebi, Iman; Liu, Yong

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports an undergraduate laboratory experiment to measure heterogeneous liquid/gas reaction kinetics (ozone-oleic acid and ozone-phenothrin) using a flow reactor coupled to an attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectrometer. The experiment is specially designed for an upper-level undergraduate Physical…

  13. Application of the Monte Carlo method to the analysis of measurement geometries for the calibration of a HP Ge detector in an environmental radioactivity laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodenas, Jose [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Nuclear, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Apartado 22012, E-46071 Valencia (Spain)], E-mail: jrodenas@iqn.upv.es; Gallardo, Sergio; Ballester, Silvia; Primault, Virginie [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica y Nuclear, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Apartado 22012, E-46071 Valencia (Spain); Ortiz, Josefina [Laboratorio de Radiactividad Ambiental, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Apartado 22012, E-46071 Valencia (Spain)

    2007-10-15

    A gamma spectrometer including an HP Ge detector is commonly used for environmental radioactivity measurements. The efficiency of the detector should be calibrated for each geometry considered. Simulation of the calibration procedure with a validated computer program is an important auxiliary tool for environmental radioactivity laboratories. The MCNP code based on the Monte Carlo method has been applied to simulate the detection process in order to obtain spectrum peaks and determine the efficiency curve for each modelled geometry. The source used for measurements was a calibration mixed radionuclide gamma reference solution, covering a wide energy range (50-2000 keV). Two measurement geometries - Marinelli beaker and Petri boxes - as well as different materials - water, charcoal, sand - containing the source have been considered. Results obtained from the Monte Carlo model have been compared with experimental measurements in the laboratory in order to validate the model.

  14. Eating under observation: a systematic review and meta-analysis of the effect that heightened awareness of observation has on laboratory measured energy intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Eric; Hardman, Charlotte A; Halford, Jason C G; Jones, Andrew

    2015-08-01

    Laboratory paradigms are commonly used to study human energy intake. However, the extent to which participants believe their eating behavior is being measured may affect energy intake and is a methodologic factor that has received little consideration. Our main objective was to examine available evidence for the effect that heightened awareness of observation has on energy intake in a laboratory setting. We systematically reviewed laboratory studies that allowed for experimental examination of the effect that heightened awareness of observation has on energy intake. From these experimental studies we combined effect estimates using inverse variance meta-analysis, calculating the standardized mean difference (SMD) in energy intake between heightened-awareness and control conditions and qualitatively synthesized potential moderators of this effect. Nine studies, providing 22 comparisons, were eligible for inclusion. These studies largely sampled young women and examined the energy intake of energy-dense snack foods. Evidence indicated that heightened awareness of observation was associated with reduced energy intake when compared with the control condition (random-effects SMD: 0.45; 95% CI: 0.25, 0.66; P energy intake in a laboratory setting. These findings suggest that laboratory studies should attempt to minimize the degree to which participants are aware that their eating behavior is being measured. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  15. A practical tool for monitoring the performance of measuring systems in a laboratory network: report of an ACB Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayling, Pete; Hill, Robert; Jassam, Nuthar; Kallner, Anders; Khatami, Zahra

    2017-11-01

    Background A logical consequence of the introduction of robotics and high-capacity analysers has seen a consolidation to larger units. This requires new structures and quality systems to ensure that laboratories deliver consistent and comparable results. Methods A spreadsheet program was designed to accommodate results from up to 12 different instruments/laboratories and present IQC data, i.e. Levey-Jennings and Youden plots and comprehensive numerical tables of the performance of each item. Input of data was made possible by a 'data loader' by which IQC data from the individual instruments could be transferred to the spreadsheet program on line. Results A set of real data from laboratories is used to populate the data loader and the networking software program. Examples are present from the analysis of variance components, the Levey-Jennings and Youden plots. Conclusions This report presents a software package that allows the simultaneous management and detailed monitoring of the performance of up to 12 different instruments/laboratories in a fully interactive mode. The system allows a quality manager of networked laboratories to have a continuous updated overview of the performance. This software package has been made available at the ACB website.

  16. Product Evaluation Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This laboratory offers the services of highly trained and experienced specialists that have a full complement of measuring equipment. It is equipped with two optical...

  17. Discovering and measuring a layered Earth: A foundational laboratory for developing students' understanding of Earth's interior structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubenthal, M.; Braile, L. W.; Olds, S. E.; Taber, J.

    2010-12-01

    Geophysics research is continuously revealing new insights about Earth’s interior structure. Before students can grasp theses new complexities, they first must internalize the 1st order layered structure of Earth and comprehend how seismology contributes to the development of such models. Earth structure is of course covered in most introductory geoscience courses, though all too often instruction of this content is limited to didactic methods that make little effort to inspire or engage the minds of students. In the process, students are expected to blindly accept our understanding of the unseen and abstract. Thus, it is not surprising then that many students can draw a layered Earth diagram, yet not know that knowledge of Earth’s interior is based on information from earthquakes. Cognitive learning theory would suggest that what has been missing from instruction of Earth structure is a feasible method to present students with seismic evidence in a manner that allows students to become minds-on with the content; discovering or dispelling the presence of a layered Earth for themselves. Recent advances in serving seismic data to a non-seismologist audience have made the development of such laboratory investigations possible. In this exercise students use an inquiry approach to examine seismic evidence and determine that the Earth cannot have a homogeneous composition. Further they use the data to estimate the dimensions of Earth’s outer core. To reach these conclusions, students are divided into two teams, theoreticians and seismologists, to test the simplest hypothesis for Earth's internal structure; a homogeneous Earth. The theoreticians create a scale model of a homogeneous Earth and predict when seismic waves should arrive at various points on the model. Simultaneously, seismologists interpret a seismic record section from a recent earthquake noting when seismic waves arrive at various points around Earth. The two groups of students then compare the

  18. Silicon photomultipliers for the detection of VUV scintillation light in LXe for the nEXO experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziegler, Tobias; Jamil, Ako; Bayerlein, Reimund; Hoessl, Juergen; Hufschmidt, Patrick; Schneider, Judith; Wagenpfeil, Michael; Wrede, Gerrit; Anton, Gisela; Michel, Thilo [Erlangen Centre for Astroparticle Physics, Erlangen 91058 (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The future nEXO (next Enriched Xenon Observatory) experiment with a single phase TPC design will use about 4 m{sup 2} of SiPMs for the detection of the VUV (vacuum ultraviolet) scintillation light (λ=175 nm) from LXe to search for the neutrinoless double beta (0νββ) decay of {sup 136}Xe. Commercially available SiPMs are not sensitive to ultraviolet light, because of an antireflective coating on top of the sensitive area. In addition, they suffer from relatively high dark count rate at room temperature and correlated avalanches, such as crosstalk and afterpulsing. The core criteria, for having an energy resolution of about 1% (σ) at the Q-value of the 0νββ decay of {sup 136}Xe (2457.8 keV), are a photon detection efficiency (PDE) of at least 15% at 175 nm and a correlated avalanche probability (CAP) of less than 20% at -100 C. We considered different approaches for optimizing both PDE and CAP. These improved SiPMs from several vendors were tested in different test setups at temperatures of about -100 C with respect to the criteria required in the nEXO experiment.

  19. Design of a multi-axis cryogenic sample manipulator for soft X-ray and VUV spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, D. J.; Chiu, C. C.; Cheng, C. M.

    2013-03-01

    We have designed and constructed several manipulators for cryogenic samples and soft X-ray and VUV spectra. These manipulators are compatible with ultrahigh vacuum and up to six axis motions - three translational and three angular motions. Three translational and the polar angular motions are implemented with commercial stages. The azimuthal (in the beam direction) and tilting motions are driven with separate gear trains and connected to stepping motors on the top flange (100 CF). The azimuthal angular range is about ±180°, and the tilting range is from 75° to -25° the resolution is better than 0.1°. The sample position is designed to be situated at the center of the polar and azimuthal rotation axes. The tilting axis is designed with an offset to decrease the spatial interference with the analyzer for photoemission spectra. The sample is attached to the sample holder and transferred to the cryogenic stage via a load-lock system. The sample holder is cooled with a continuous-flow cryostat (Janis ST-400) via flexible copper braids. With liquids helium and nitrogen for the cryostat, the lowest temperature of the sample holder attains 9.15 K and 82.4 K, respectively. During tests, the rate of consumption of liquid helium is less than 0.8 L/h.

  20. Measurements of total peroxy and alkyl nitrate abundances in laboratory-generated gas samples by thermal dissociation cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Dipayan; Furgeson, Amanda; Osthoff, Hans D.

    2009-11-01

    A novel measurement technique, thermal dissociation cavity ring-down spectroscopy (TD-CRDS), for rapid (1 s time resolution) and sensitive (precision ˜100 parts per trillion by volume (10-12; pptv)) quantification of total peroxy nitrate (ΣPN) and total alkyl nitrate (ΣAN) abundances in laboratory-generated gas mixtures is described. The organic nitrates are dissociated in a heated inlet to produce NO2, whose concentration is monitored by pulsed-laser CRDS at 532 nm. Mixing ratios are determined by difference relative to a cold inlet reference channel. Conversion of laboratory-generated mixtures of AN in zero air (at an inlet temperature of 450 °C) is quantitative over a wide range of mixing ratios (0-100 parts per billion by volume (10-9, ppbv)), as judged from simultaneous measurements of NOy using a commercial NO-O3 chemiluminescence monitor. Conversion of PN is quantitative up to about 4 ppbv (at an inlet temperature of 250 °C); at higher concentrations, the measurements are affected by recombination reactions of the dissociation products. The results imply that TD-CRDS can be used as a generic detector of dilute mixtures of organic nitrates in air at near-ambient concentration levels in laboratory experiments. Potential applications of the TD-CRDS technique in the laboratory are discussed.

  1. Coupling field and laboratory measurements to estimate the emission factors of identified and unidentified trace gases for prescribed fires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokelson, R. J.; Burling, I. R.; Gilman, J. B.; Warneke, C.; Stockwell, C. E.; de Gouw, J.; Akagi, S. K.; Urbanski, S. P.; Veres, P.; Roberts, J. M.; Kuster, W. C.; Reardon, J.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Johnson, T. J.; Hosseini, S.; Miller, J. W.; Cocker III, D. R.; Jung, H.; Weise, D. R.

    2013-01-01

    Vegetative fuels commonly consumed in prescribed fires were collected from five locations in the southeastern and southwestern U.S. and burned in a series of 77 fires at the U.S. Forest Service Fire Sciences Laboratory in Missoula, Montana. The particulate matter (PM2.5) emissions were measured by gravimetric filter sampling with subsequent analysis for elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC), and 38 elements. The trace gas emissions were measured with a large suite of state-of-the-art instrumentation including an open-path Fourier transform infrared (OP FTIR) spectrometer, proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS), proton-transfer ion-trap mass spectrometry (PIT-MS), negative-ion proton-transfer chemical-ionization mass spectrometry (NI-PT-CIMS), and gas chromatography with MS detection (GC-MS). 204 trace gas species (mostly non-methane organic compounds (NMOC)) were identified and quantified with the above instruments. An additional 152 significant peaks in the unit mass resolution mass spectra were quantified, but either could not be identified or most of the signal at that molecular mass was unaccounted for by identifiable species. As phase II of this study, we conducted airborne and ground-based sampling of the emissions from real prescribed fires mostly in the same land management units where the fuels for the lab fires were collected. A broad variety, but smaller number of species (21 trace gas species and PM2.5) was measured on 14 fires in chaparral and oak savanna in the southwestern US, as well as pine forest understory in the southeastern US and Sierra Nevada mountains of California. These extensive field measurements of emission factors (EF) for temperate biomass burning are useful both for modeling and to examine the representativeness of our lab fire EF. The lab/field EF ratio for the pine understory fuels was not statistically different from one, on average. However, our lab EF for “smoldering compounds” emitted by burning the semi

  2. Measurement of Thermal Properties of Growing Media for Green Roofs: Assessment of a Laboratory Procedure and Experimental Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedetta Barozzi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available While the Italian standard UNI 11235:2015 establishes minimum performance criteria, the thermal resistance of the growing medium of green roofs is not included in national regulations. Instead, thermal transmittance limits for roofs are obtained by referring to other stratigraphic layers. In the absence of specific national and international standards for laboratory calculations of the thermal performance of growing media for green roofs, a multi-year laboratory testing campaign was carried out on 8 samples which aimed to define the thermal resistance reference values of growing media as a function of density and water content. Thermal conductivity varies between 0.046–0.179 W/mK for dry samples as a function of density and between 0.046–0.47 W/mK as a function of moisture content. Defining a reference method, laboratory tests and restitution of the output in performance curves, was based on 108 tests carried out according to and deviating from the standard based on both guarded hot plate and heat flow meter methods. The significance of the results has prompted researchers and industrial partners to engage in further investment and ongoing tests in this area, targeting the definition of a standard laboratory method to be presented worldwide.

  3. Measurement of Henry's Law Constants Using Internal Standards: A Quantitative GC Experiment for the Instrumental Analysis or Environmental Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Chang; Boisvert, Susanne M.; Arida, Ann-Marie C.; Day, Shannon E.

    2008-01-01

    An internal standard method applicable to undergraduate instrumental analysis or environmental chemistry laboratory has been designed and tested to determine the Henry's law constants for a series of alkyl nitriles. In this method, a mixture of the analytes and an internal standard is prepared and used to make a standard solution (organic solvent)…

  4. [Measures to prevent patient identification errors in blood collection/physiological function testing utilizing a laboratory information system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimazu, Chisato; Hoshino, Satoshi; Furukawa, Taiji

    2013-08-01

    We constructed an integrated personal identification workflow chart using both bar code reading and an all in-one laboratory information system. The information system not only handles test data but also the information needed for patient guidance in the laboratory department. The reception terminals at the entrance, displays for patient guidance and patient identification tools at blood-sampling booths are all controlled by the information system. The number of patient identification errors was greatly reduced by the system. However, identification errors have not been abolished in the ultrasound department. After re-evaluation of the patient identification process in this department, we recognized that the major reason for the errors came from excessive identification workflow. Ordinarily, an ultrasound test requires patient identification 3 times, because 3 different systems are required during the entire test process, i.e. ultrasound modality system, laboratory information system and a system for producing reports. We are trying to connect the 3 different systems to develop a one-time identification workflow, but it is not a simple task and has not been completed yet. Utilization of the laboratory information system is effective, but is not yet perfect for patient identification. The most fundamental procedure for patient identification is to ask a person's name even today. Everyday checks in the ordinary workflow and everyone's participation in safety-management activity are important for the prevention of patient identification errors.

  5. The spectral albedo of sea ice and salt crusts on the tropical ocean of Snowball Earth: 1. Laboratory measurements

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Light, Bonnie; Carns, Regina C; Warren, Stephen G

    2016-01-01

    ... snow‐free and cold enough for salts to precipitate within brine inclusions. A proxy surface for such ice was grown in a freezer laboratory using the single salt NaCl and kept below the eutectic temperature (−21.2°C) of the NaCl‐H 2 O binary system...

  6. Elimination of laboratory ozone leads to a dramatic improvement in the reproducibility of microarray gene expression measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scully Adam T

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Environmental ozone can rapidly degrade cyanine 5 (Cy5, a fluorescent dye commonly used in microarray gene expression studies. Cyanine 3 (Cy3 is much less affected by atmospheric ozone. Degradation of the Cy5 signal relative to the Cy3 signal in 2-color microarrays will adversely reduce the Cy5/Cy3 ratio resulting in unreliable microarray data. Results Ozone in central Arkansas typically ranges between ~22 ppb to ~46 ppb and can be as high as 60–100 ppb depending upon season, meteorological conditions, and time of day. These levels of ozone are common in many areas of the country during the summer. A carbon filter was installed in the laboratory air handling system to reduce ozone levels in the microarray laboratory. In addition, the airflow was balanced to prevent non-filtered air from entering the laboratory. These modifications reduced the ozone within the microarray laboratory to ~2–4 ppb. Data presented here document reductions in Cy5 signal on both in-house produced microarrays and commercial microarrays as a result of exposure to unfiltered air. Comparisons of identically hybridized microarrays exposed to either carbon-filtered or unfiltered air demonstrated the protective effect of carbon-filtration on microarray data as indicated by Cy5 and Cy3 intensities. LOWESS normalization of the data was not able to completely overcome the effect of ozone-induced reduction of Cy5 signal. Experiments were also conducted to examine the effects of high humidity on microarray quality. Modest, but significant, increases in Cy5 and Cy3 signal intensities were observed after 2 or 4 hours at 98–99% humidity compared to 42% humidity. Conclusion Simple installation of carbon filters in the laboratory air handling system resulted in low and consistent ozone levels. This allowed the accurate determination of gene expression by microarray using Cy5 and Cy3 fluorescent dyes.

  7. Standardization of clinical enzyme analysis using frozen human serum pools with values assigned by the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine reference measurement procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Qing; Chen, Baorong; Zhang, Rui; Zuo, Chang

    2017-12-09

    Variation in clinical enzyme analysis, particularly across different measuring systems and laboratories, represents a critical but long-lasting problem in diagnosis. Calibrators with traceability and commutability are imminently needed to harmonize analysis in laboratory medicine. Fresh frozen human serum pools were assigned values for alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT), creatine kinase (CK) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) by six laboratories with established International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine reference measurement procedures. These serum pools were then used across 76 laboratories as a calibrator in the analysis of five enzymes. Bias and imprecision in the measurement of the five enzymes tested were significantly reduced by using the value-assigned serum in analytical systems with open and single-point calibration. The median (interquartile range) of the relative biases of ALT, AST, GGT, CK and LDH were 2.0% (0.6-3.4%), 0.8% (-0.8-2.3%), 1.0% (-0.5-2.0%), 0.2% (-0.3-1.0%) and 0.2% (-0.9-1.1%), respectively. Before calibration, the interlaboratory coefficients of variation (CVs) in the analysis of patient serum samples were 8.0-8.2%, 7.3-8.5%, 8.1-8.7%, 5.1-5.9% and 5.8-6.4% for ALT, AST, GGT, CK and LDH, respectively; after calibration, the CVs decreased to 2.7-3.3%, 3.0-3.6%, 1.6-2.1%, 1.8-1.9% and 3.3-3.5%, respectively. The results suggest that the use of fresh frozen serum pools significantly improved the comparability of test results in analytical systems with open and single-point calibration.

  8. Total cholesterol performance of Abell-Levy-Brodie-Kendall reference measurement procedure: Certification of Japanese in-vitro diagnostic assay manufacturers through CDC's Cholesterol Reference Method Laboratory Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Masakazu; Iso, Hiroyasu; Kitamura, Akihiko; Imano, Hironori; Kiyama, Masahiko; Yokoyama, Shinji; Kayamori, Yuzo; Koyama, Isao; Nishimura, Kunihiro; Nakai, Michikazu; Dasti, Mahnaz; Vesper, Hubert W; Teramoto, Tamio; Miyamoto, Yoshihiro

    2015-05-20

    Accurate measurement of total cholesterol (TC) is important for cardiovascular disease risk management. The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and Cholesterol Reference Method Laboratory Network (CRMLN) perform Abell-Levy-Brodie-Kendall (AK) reference measurement procedure (RMP) for TC as a secondary reference method, and implement Certification Protocol for Manufacturers. Japanese CRMLN laboratory at Osaka performed the AK RMP for 22 years, and conducted TC certification for reagent/calibrator/instrument systems of six Japanese manufacturers every 2 years for 16 years. Osaka TC performance was examined and compared to CDC's reference values. AK RMP involved sample hydrolysis, cholesterol extraction, and determination of cholesterol levels by spectrophotometry. The Certification Protocol for Manufacturers includes comparison with AK RMP using at least 40 fresh specimens. Demonstration of average bias ≤3% and total coefficient of variation ≤3% qualified an analytical system for certification. In the AK RMP used in the Osaka CRMLN laboratory, the regression equation for measuring TC was y (Osaka)=1.000x (CDC)+0.032 (n=619, R(2)=1.000). Six Japanese manufacturers had allowable performance for certification. The AK RMP for TC measurement was accurate, precise, and stable for 22 years. Six Japanese manufacturers were certified for 16 years. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. High-Precision Laboratory Measurements Supporting Retrieval of Water Vapor, Gaseous Ammonia, and Aqueous Ammonia Clouds with the Juno Microwave Radiometer (MWR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffes, Paul G.; Hanley, Thomas R.; Karpowicz, Bryan M.; Devaraj, Kiruthika; Noorizadeh, Sahand; Duong, Danny; Chinsomboon, Garrett; Bellotti, Amadeo; Janssen, Michael A.; Bolton, Scott J.

    2017-11-01

    The NASA Juno mission includes a six-channel microwave radiometer system (MWR) operating in the 1.3-50 cm wavelength range in order to retrieve abundances of ammonia and water vapor from the microwave signature of Jupiter (see Janssen et al. 2016). In order to plan observations and accurately interpret data from such observations, over 6000 laboratory measurements of the microwave absorption properties of gaseous ammonia, water vapor, and aqueous ammonia solution have been conducted under simulated Jovian conditions using new laboratory systems capable of high-precision measurement under the extreme conditions of the deep atmosphere of Jupiter (up to 100 bars pressure and 505 K temperature). This is one of the most extensive laboratory measurement campaigns ever conducted in support of a microwave remote sensing instrument. New, more precise models for the microwave absorption from these constituents have and are being developed from these measurements. Application of these absorption properties to radiative transfer models for the six wavelengths involved will provide a valuable planning tool for observations, and will also make possible accurate retrievals of the abundance of these constituents during and after observations are conducted.

  10. The reliability of point-of-care prothrombin time testing. A comparison of CoaguChek S and XS INR measurements with hospital laboratory monitoring.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, F

    2010-02-01

    The development of point-of-care (POC) testing devices enables patients to test their own international normalized ratio (INR) at home. However, previous studies have shown that when compared with clinical laboratory values, statistically significant differences may occur between the two methods of INR measurement. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of the CoaguChek S and XS POC meters relative to clinical laboratory measurements. As part of a randomized, crossover patient self-testing (PST) study at Cork University Hospital, patients were randomized to 6 months PST or 6 months routine care by the anticoagulation management service. During the PST arm of the study, patients measured their INR at home using the CoaguChek S or XS POC meter. External quality control was performed at enrollment, 2 months and 4 months by comparing the POC measured INR with the laboratory determined value. One hundred and fifty-one patients provided 673 paired samples. Good correlation was shown between the two methods of determination (r = 0.91), however, statistically significant differences did occur. A Bland-Altman plot illustrated good agreement of INR values between 2.0 and 3.5 INR units but there was increasing disagreement as the INR rose above 3.5. Eighty-seven per cent of all dual measurements were within the recommended 0.5 INR units of each other. This study adds to the growing evidence that POC testing is a reliable and safe alternative to hospital laboratory monitoring but highlights the importance of external quality control when these devices are used for monitoring oral anticoagulation.

  11. Explaining Differences Between Bioaccumulation Measurements in Laboratory and Field Data Through Use of a Probabilistic Modeling Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selck, Henriette; Drouillard, Ken; Eisenreich, Karen

    2012-01-01

    In the regulatory context, bioaccumulation assessment is often hampered by substantial data uncertainty as well as by the poorly understood differences often observed between results from laboratory and field bioaccumulation studies. Bioaccumulation is a complex, multifaceted process, which calls...... the role of sediment components (black carbon, labile organic matter, and the like) on chemical absorption efficiencies has been identified as a key next steps...... bioaccumulation for 4 species and 2 chemicals, to assess whether uncertainty in these factors can explain the observed differences among laboratory and field studies. The organisms evaluated in simulations including mayfly larvae, deposit-feeding polychaetes, yellow perch, and little owl represented a range...... components. Improvements in the accuracy of aqueous exposure appear to be less relevant when applied to moderate to highly hydrophobic compounds, because this route contributes only marginally to total uptake. The determination of chemical bioavailability and the increase in understanding and qualifying...