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Sample records for vulgaris hildenborough transition

  1. The adaptive genome of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Margarida; Crasnier-Mednansky, Martine

    2006-07-01

    Peculiar attributes revealed by sequencing the genome of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough are analyzed, particularly in relation to the presence of a phosphotransferase system (PTS). The PTS is a typical bacterial carbohydrate transport system functioning via group translocation. Novel avenues for investigations are proposed emphasizing the metabolic diversity of D. vulgaris Hildenborough, especially the likely utilization of mannose-type sugars. Comparative analysis with PTS from other Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria indicates regulatory functions for the PTS of D. vulgaris Hildenborough, including catabolite repression and inducer exclusion. Chemotaxis towards PTS substrates is considered. Evidence suggests that this organism may not be a strict anaerobic sulfate reducer typical of the ocean, but a versatile organism capable of bidirectional transmigration and adaptation to both water and terrestrial environments.

  2. Temporal transcriptomic analysis of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough transition into stationary phase growth during electrondonor depletion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, M.E.; He, Q.; He, Z.; Huang, K.H.; Alm, E.J.; Wan, X.-F.; Hazen, T.C.; Arkin, A.P.; Wall, J.D.; Zhou, J.-Z.; Fields, M.W.

    2006-08-01

    Desulfovibrio vulgaris was cultivated in a defined medium, and biomass was sampled for approximately 70 h to characterize the shifts in gene expression as cells transitioned from the exponential to the stationary phase during electron donor depletion. In addition to temporal transcriptomics, total protein, carbohydrate, lactate, acetate, and sulfate levels were measured. The microarray data were examined for statistically significant expression changes, hierarchical cluster analysis, and promoter element prediction and were validated by quantitative PCR. As the cells transitioned from the exponential phase to the stationary phase, a majority of the down-expressed genes were involved in translation and transcription, and this trend continued at the remaining times. There were general increases in relative expression for intracellular trafficking and secretion, ion transport, and coenzyme metabolism as the cells entered the stationary phase. As expected, the DNA replication machinery was down-expressed, and the expression of genes involved in DNA repair increased during the stationary phase. Genes involved in amino acid acquisition, carbohydrate metabolism, energy production, and cell envelope biogenesis did not exhibit uniform transcriptional responses. Interestingly, most phage-related genes were up-expressed at the onset of the stationary phase. This result suggested that nutrient depletion may affect community dynamics and DNA transfer mechanisms of sulfate-reducing bacteria via the phage cycle. The putative feoAB system (in addition to other presumptive iron metabolism genes) was significantly up-expressed, and this suggested the possible importance of Fe{sup 2+} acquisition under metal-reducing conditions. The expression of a large subset of carbohydrate-related genes was altered, and the total cellular carbohydrate levels declined during the growth phase transition. Interestingly, the D. vulgaris genome does not contain a putative rpoS gene, a common attribute

  3. Salt Stress in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough: An integratedgenomics approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; He, Zhili; Alm, Eric J.; Arkin, Adam P.; Baidoo, Edward E.; Borglin, Sharon C.; Chen, Wenqiong; Hazen, Terry C.; He, Qiang; Holman, Hoi-Ying; Huang, Katherine; Huang, Rick; Hoyner,Dominique C.; Katz, Natalie; Keller, Martin; Oeller, Paul; Redding,Alyssa; Sun, Jun; Wall, Judy; Wei, Jing; Yang, Zamin; Yen, Huei-Che; Zhou, Jizhong; Keasling Jay D.

    2005-12-08

    The ability of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough to reduce, and therefore contain, toxic and radioactive metal waste has made all factors that affect the physiology of this organism of great interest. Increased salinity is an important and frequent fluctuation faced by D. vulgaris in its natural habitat. In liquid culture, exposure to excess salt resulted in striking elongation of D. vulgaris cells. Using data from transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolite assays, phospholipid fatty acid profiling, and electron microscopy, we used a systems approach to explore the effects of excess NaCl on D. vulgaris. In this study we demonstrated that import of osmoprotectants, such as glycine betaine and ectoine, is the primary mechanism used by D. vulgaris to counter hyperionic stress. Several efflux systems were also highly up-regulated, as was the ATP synthesis pathway. Increases in the levels of both RNA and DNA helicases suggested that salt stress affected the stability of nucleic acid base pairing. An overall increase in the level of branched fatty acids indicated that there were changes in cell wall fluidity. The immediate response to salt stress included up-regulation of chemotaxis genes, although flagellar biosynthesis was down-regulated. Other down-regulated systems included lactate uptake permeases and ABC transport systems. The results of an extensive NaCl stress analysis were compared with microarray data from a KCl stress analysis, and unlike many other bacteria, D. vulgaris responded similarly to the two stresses. Integration of data from multiple methods allowed us to develop a conceptual model for the salt stress response in D. vulgaris that can be compared to those in other microorganisms.

  4. Mutualistic growth of the sulfate-reducer Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough with different carbohydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, M M; Portillo, M C; Gonzalez, J M

    2012-01-01

    Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough genome presents a phosphotransferase system putatively involved in the transport of carbohydrates. However, utilization of sugars by this sulfate-reducing bacterium has never been reported. Herein, we have observed proliferation of D. vulgaris Hildenborough with some carbohydrates, in mutualism with Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, a non-fermentative, gram-negative gammaproteobacterium, or Microbacterium, a gram-positive actinobacterium. These results suggest the importance of feedback interactions between different heterotrophic bacterial species including the alternative for D. vulgaris of exploiting additional organic resources and novel habitats. Thus, D. vulgaris strongly participates in the mineralization of carbohydrates both in complex natural and artificial systems.

  5. Global Analysis of Heat Shock Response in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chhabra, S.R.; He, Q.; Huang, K.H.; Gaucher, S.P.; Alm, E.J.; He,Z.; Hadi, M.Z.; Hazen, T.C.; Wall, J.D.; Zhou, J.; Arkin, A.P.; Singh, A.K.

    2005-09-16

    Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough belongs to a class ofsulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and is found ubiquitously in nature.Given the importance of SRB-mediated reduction for bioremediation ofmetal ion contaminants, ongoing research on D. vulgaris has been in thedirection of elucidating regulatory mechanisms for this organism under avariety of stress conditions. This work presents a global view of thisorganism's response to elevated growth temperature using whole-celltranscriptomics and proteomics tools. Transcriptional response (1.7-foldchange or greater; Z>1.5) ranged from 1,135 genes at 15 min to 1,463genes at 120 min for a temperature up-shift of 13oC from a growthtemperature of 37oC for this organism and suggested both direct andindirect modes of heat sensing. Clusters of orthologous group categoriesthat were significantly affected included posttranslationalmodifications; protein turnover and chaperones (up-regulated); energyproduction and conversion (down-regulated), nucleotide transport,metabolism (down-regulated), and translation; ribosomal structure; andbiogenesis (down-regulated). Analysis of the genome sequence revealed thepresence of features of both negative and positive regulation whichincluded the CIRCE element and promoter sequences corresponding to thealternate sigma factors ?32 and ?54. While mechanisms of heat shockcontrol for some genes appeared to coincide with those established forEscherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis, the presence of unique controlschemes for several other genes was also evident. Analysis of proteinexpression levels using differential in-gel electrophoresis suggestedgood agreement with transcriptional profiles of several heat shockproteins, including DnaK (DVU0811), HtpG (DVU2643), HtrA (DVU1468), andAhpC (DVU2247). The proteomics study also suggested the possibility ofposttranslational modifications in the chaperones DnaK, AhpC, GroES(DVU1977), and GroEL (DVU1976) and also several periplasmic ABCtransporters.

  6. Energy metabolism in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough: insights from transcriptome analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Patricia M.; He, Qiang; Valente, Filipa M.A.; Xavier, Antonio V.; Zhou, Jizhong; Pereira, Ines A.C.; Louro, Ricardo O.

    2007-11-01

    Sulphate-reducing bacteria are important players in the global sulphur and carbon cycles, with considerable economical and ecological impact. However, the process of sulphate respiration is still incompletely understood. Several mechanisms of energy conservation have been proposed, but it is unclear how the different strategies contribute to the overall process. In order to obtain a deeper insight into the energy metabolism of sulphate-reducers whole-genome microarrays were used to compare the transcriptional response of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough grown with hydrogen/sulphate, pyruvate/sulphate, pyruvate with limiting sulphate, and lactate/thiosulphate, relative to growth in lactate/sulphate. Growth with hydrogen/sulphate showed the largest number of differentially expressed genes and the largest changes in transcript levels. In this condition the most up-regulated energy metabolism genes were those coding for the periplasmic [NiFeSe]hydrogenase, followed by the Ech hydrogenase. The results also provide evidence for the involvement of formate cycling and the recently proposed ethanol pathway during growth in hydrogen. The pathway involving CO cycling is relevant during growth on lactate and pyruvate, but not during growth in hydrogen as the most down-regulated genes were those coding for the CO-induced hydrogenase. Growth on lactate/thiosulphate reveals a down-regulation of several energymetabolism genes similar to what was observed in the presence of nitrite. This study identifies the role of several proteins involved in the energy metabolism of D. vulgaris and highlights several novel genes related to this process, revealing a more complex bioenergetic metabolism than previously considered.

  7. Global analysis of heat shock response in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arkin, A. P. (Physical Biosciences Division, Berkeley, CA); Wall, J. D. (University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, MO); Hazen, T. C. (Physical Biosciences Division, Berkeley, CA); He, Z. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Zhou, J. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Huang, K. H. (Physical Biosciences Division, Berkeley, CA); Gaucher, Sara P.; He, Q. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Hadi, Masood Z.; Chhabra, Swapnil R.; Alm, Eric J. (Physical Biosciences Division, Berkeley, CA); Singh, A. K.

    2005-08-01

    Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough belongs to a class of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and is found ubiquitously in nature. Given the importance of SRB-mediated reduction for bioremediation of metal ion contaminants, ongoing research on D. vulgaris has been in the direction of elucidating regulatory mechanisms for this organism under a variety of stress conditions. This work presents a global view of this organism's response to elevated growth temperature using whole-cell transcriptomics and proteomics tools. Transcriptional response (1.7-fold change or greater; Z {ge} 1.5) ranged from 1,135 genes at 15 min to 1,463 genes at 120 min for a temperature up-shift of 13 C from a growth temperature of 37 C for this organism and suggested both direct and indirect modes of heat sensing. Clusters of orthologous group categories that were significantly affected included posttranslational modifications; protein turnover and chaperones (up-regulated); energy production and conversion (down-regulated), nucleotide transport, metabolism (down-regulated), and translation; ribosomal structure; and biogenesis (down-regulated). Analysis of the genome sequence revealed the presence of features of both negative and positive regulation which included the CIRCE element and promoter sequences corresponding to the alternate sigma factors {sigma}{sup 32} and {sigma}{sup 54}. While mechanisms of heat shock control for some genes appeared to coincide with those established for Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis, the presence of unique control schemes for several other genes was also evident. Analysis of protein expression levels using differential in-gel electrophoresis suggested good agreement with transcriptional profiles of several heat shock proteins, including DnaK (DVU0811), HtpG (DVU2643), HtrA (DVU1468), and AhpC (DVU2247). The proteomics study also suggested the possibility of posttranslational modifications in the chaperones DnaK, AhpC, GroES (DVU1977), and GroEL (DVU

  8. Identification of Small RNAs in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, Andrew; Joachimiak, Marcin; Deutschbauer, Adam; Arkin, Adam; Bender, Kelly

    2010-05-17

    Desulfovibrio vulgaris is an anaerobic sulfate-reducing bacterium capable of facilitating the removal of toxic metals such as uranium from contaminated sites via reduction. As such, it is essential to understand the intricate regulatory cascades involved in how D. vulgaris and its relatives respond to stressors in such sites. One approach is the identification and analysis of small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs); molecules ranging in size from 20-200 nucleotides that predominantly affect gene regulation by binding to complementary mRNA in an anti-sense fashion and therefore provide an immediate regulatory response. To identify sRNAs in D. vulgaris, a bacterium that does not possess an annotated hfq gene, RNA was pooled from stationary and exponential phases, nitrate exposure, and biofilm conditions. The subsequent RNA was size fractionated, modified, and converted to cDNA for high throughput transcriptomic deep sequencing. A computational approach to identify sRNAs via the alignment of seven separate Desulfovibrio genomes was also performed. From the deep sequencing analysis, 2,296 reads between 20 and 250 nt were identified with expression above genome background. Analysis of those reads limited the number of candidates to ~;;87 intergenic, while ~;;140 appeared to be antisense to annotated open reading frames (ORFs). Further BLAST analysis of the intergenic candidates and other Desulfovibrio genomes indicated that eight candidates were likely portions of ORFs not previously annotated in the D. vulgaris genome. Comparison of the intergenic and antisense data sets to the bioinformatical predicted candidates, resulted in ~;;54 common candidates. Current approaches using Northern analysis and qRT-PCR are being used toverify expression of the candidates and to further develop the role these sRNAs play in D. vulgaris regulation.

  9. Global transcriptional, physiological and metabolite analyses of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough responses to salt adaptation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Z.; Zhou, A.; Baidoo, E.; He, Q.; Joachimiak, M. P.; Benke, P.; Phan, R.; Mukhopadhyay, A.; Hemme, C.L.; Huang, K.; Alm, E.J.; Fields, M.W.; Wall, J.; Stahl, D.; Hazen, T.C.; Keasling, J.D.; Arkin, A.P.; Zhou, J.

    2009-12-01

    The response of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough to salt adaptation (long-term NaCl exposure) was examined by physiological, global transcriptional, and metabolite analyses. The growth of D. vulgaris was inhibited by high levels of NaCl, and the growth inhibition could be relieved by the addition of exogenous amino acids (e.g., glutamate, alanine, tryptophan) or yeast extract. Salt adaptation induced the expression of genes involved in amino acid biosynthesis and transport, electron transfer, hydrogen oxidation, and general stress responses (e.g., heat shock proteins, phage shock proteins, and oxidative stress response proteins). Genes involved in carbon metabolism, cell motility, and phage structures were repressed. Comparison of transcriptomic profiles of D. vulgaris responses to salt adaptation with those of salt shock (short-term NaCl exposure) showed some similarity as well as a significant difference. Metabolite assays showed that glutamate and alanine were accumulated under salt adaptation, suggesting that they may be used as osmoprotectants in D. vulgaris. A conceptual model is proposed to link the observed results to currently available knowledge for further understanding the mechanisms of D. vulgaris adaptation to elevated NaCl.

  10. Investigating the role of CheA-3 in Dusulfovibrio Vulgaris Hildenborough

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ray, Jayashee; Keller, Kimberley; Krierim, Bernhard; Auer, Manfred; Keasling, Jay; Wall, Judy; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila

    2010-05-22

    Multiple sets of chemotaxis genes including three cheA homologs were identified in the genome sequence of the anaerobic bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough. Each CheA is a histidine kinase (HK) and part of a two component signal transduction system. Knock out mutants in the three cheA genes were created using single cross-over homologous recombination insertion. We studied the phenotypes of the cheA mutants in detail and discovered that ?cheA-3 has a non swarming/swimming phenotype both in the soft agar plates and Palleroni chamber assays. CheA-3 shows similarity to the Shewanella oneidensis CheA-3 and the Vibrio cholerae CheA-2 that are responsible for chemotaxis in the respective organisms. We did not find any morphological or structural differences between the three Delta cheA mutants and the wild type cells in electron microscopy. Our results from these studies are presented.

  11. Cell-Wide Responses to Low-Oxygen Exposure in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Redding, Alyssa [University of California, Berkeley; Joachimiak, Marcin [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Arkin, Adam [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Borglin, sharon [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Dehal, Paramvir [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Chakraborty, Romy [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Geller, Jil [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Hazen, Terry [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); HE, Qiang [ORNL; Joyner, Dominique C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Martin, Vincent [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Wall, Judy [University of Missouri, Columbia; Yang, Zamin Koo [ORNL; Zhou, Jizhong [University of Oklahoma; Keasling, Jay [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)

    2007-08-01

    The responses of the anaerobic, sulfate-reducing organism Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough to low-oxygen exposure (0.1% O2) were monitored via transcriptomics and proteomics. Exposure to 0.1% O2 caused a decrease in the growth rate without affecting viability. Concerted upregulation of the predicted peroxide stress response regulon (PerR) genes was observed in response to the 0.1% O2 exposure. Several of the candidates also showed increases in protein abundance. Among the remaining small number of transcript changes was the upregulation of the predicted transmembrane tetraheme cytochrome c3 complex. Other known oxidative stress response candidates remained unchanged during the low-O2 exposure. To fully understand the results of the 0.1% O2 exposure, transcriptomics and proteomics data were collected for exposure to air using a similar experimental protocol. In contrast to the 0.1% O2 exposure, air exposure was detrimental to both the growth rate and viability and caused dramatic changes at both the transcriptome and proteome levels. Interestingly, the transcripts of the predicted PerR regulon genes were downregulated during air exposure. Our results highlight the differences in the cell-wide responses to low and high O2 levels in D. vulgaris and suggest that while exposure to air is highly detrimental to D. vulgaris, this bacterium can successfully cope with periodic exposure to low O2 levels in its environment.

  12. Transcriptional Response of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough to Oxidative Stress Mimicking Environmental Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Patricia M.; He, Qiang; Xavier, Antonio V.; Zhou, Jizhong; Pereira, Ines A.C.; Louro, Ricardo O.

    2008-03-12

    Sulphate-reducing bacteria are anaerobes readily found in oxic-anoxic interfaces. Multiple defence pathways against oxidative conditions were identified in these organisms and proposed to be differentially expressed under different concentrations of oxygen, contributing to their ability to survive oxic conditions. In this study, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough cells were exposed to the highest concentration of oxygen that sulphate-reducing bacteria are likely to encounter in natural habitats, and the global transcriptomic response was determined. 307 genes were responsive, with cellular roles in energy metabolism, protein fate, cell envelope and regulatory functions, including multiple genes encoding heat shock proteins, peptidases and proteins with heat shock promoters. Of the oxygen reducing mechanisms of D. vulgaris only the periplasmic hydrogen-dependent mechanism is up-regulated, involving the [NiFeSe]hydrogenase, formate dehydrogenase(s) and the Hmc membrane complex. The oxidative defence response concentrates on damage repair by metal-free enzymes. These data, together with the down regulation of the Fur operon, which restricts the availability of iron, and the lack of response of the PerR operon, suggest that a major effect of this oxygen stress is the inactivation and/or degradation of multiple metalloproteins present in D. vulgaris as a consequence of oxidative damage to their metal clusters.

  13. Post-Translational Modifications of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough Sulfate Reduction Pathway Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaucher, S.P.; Redding, A.M.; Mukhopadhyay, A.; Keasling, J.D.; Singh, A.K.

    2008-03-01

    Recent developments in shotgun proteomics have enabled high-throughput studies of a variety of microorganisms at a proteome level and provide experimental validation for predicted open reading frames in the corresponding genome. More importantly, advances in mass spectrometric data analysis now allow mining of large proteomics data sets for the presence of post-translational modifications(PTMs). Although PTMs are a critical aspectof cellular activity, such information eludes cell-wide studies conducted at the transcript level. Here, we analyze several mass spectrometric data sets acquired using two-dimensional liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, 2D-LC/MS/MS, for the sulfate reducing bacterium, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough. Our searches of the raw spectra led us to discover several post-translationally modified peptides in D. vulgaris. Of these, several peptides containing a lysine with a +42 Da modification were found reproducibly across all data sets. Both acetylation and trimethylation have the same nominal +42 Da mass, and are therefore candidates for this modification. Several spectra were identified having markers for trimethylation, while one is consistent with an acetylation. Surprisingly, these modified peptides predominantly mapped to proteins involved in sulfate respiration. Other highly expressed proteins in D. vulgaris, such as enzymes involved in electron transport and other central metabolic processes, did not contain this modification. Decoy database searches were used to control for random spectrum/sequence matches. Additional validation for these modifications was provided by alternate workflows, for example, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by mass spectrometry analysis of the dissimilatory sulfite reductase gamma-subunit(DsrC) protein. MS data for DsrC in this alternate workflow also contained the +42 Da modification at the same loci. Furthermore, the DsrC homologue in another sulfate reducing bacterium

  14. Generalized schemes for high throughput manipulation of the Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chhabra, S.R.; Butland, G.; Elias, D.; Chandonia, J.-M.; Fok, V.; Juba, T.; Gorur, A.; Allen, S.; Leung, C.-M.; Keller, K.; Reveco, S.; Zane, G.; Semkiw, E.; Prathapam, R.; Gold, B.; Singer, M.; Ouellet, M.; Sazakal, E.; Jorgens, D.; Price, M.; Witkowska, E.; Beller, H.; Hazen, T.C.; Biggin, M.; Auer, M.; Wall, J.; Keasling, J.

    2011-07-15

    The ability to conduct advanced functional genomic studies of the thousands of sequenced bacteria has been hampered by the lack of available tools for making high- throughput chromosomal manipulations in a systematic manner that can be applied across diverse species. In this work, we highlight the use of synthetic biological tools to assemble custom suicide vectors with reusable and interchangeable DNA “parts” to facilitate chromosomal modification at designated loci. These constructs enable an array of downstream applications including gene replacement and creation of gene fusions with affinity purification or localization tags. We employed this approach to engineer chromosomal modifications in a bacterium that has previously proven difficult to manipulate genetically, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, to generate a library of over 700 strains. Furthermore, we demonstrate how these modifications can be used for examining metabolic pathways, protein-protein interactions, and protein localization. The ubiquity of suicide constructs in gene replacement throughout biology suggests that this approach can be applied to engineer a broad range of species for a diverse array of systems biological applications and is amenable to high-throughput implementation.

  15. Generalized Schemes for High Throughput Manipulation of the Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough Genome.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chhabra, Swapnil [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Butland, Gareth [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Elias, Dwayne A [ORNL; Chandonia, John-Marc [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Fok, Olivia [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Juba, tom [University of Missouri; Gorur, A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Allen, S. [University of California, San Francisco; Leung, C. M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Keller, Kim [University of Missouri; Reveco, S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Zane, Mr. Grant M. [University of Missouri, Columbia; Semkiw, Elizabeth M. [University of Missouri; Prathapam, R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Gold, B. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Singer, Mary [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Ouellet, M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Sazakal, E. D. [University of California, San Francisco; Jorgens, Dominique [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Price, Morgan N. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Witkowska, Ewa [University of California, San Francisco; Beller, Harry R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Hazen, Terry [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Biggin, Mark D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Auer, Dr. Manfred [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Wall, Judy D. [University of Missouri; Keasling, Jay [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)

    2011-01-01

    The ability to conduct advanced functional genomic studies of the thousands of 38 sequenced bacteria has been hampered by the lack of available tools for making high39 throughput chromosomal manipulations in a systematic manner that can be applied across 40 diverse species. In this work, we highlight the use of synthetic biological tools to 41 assemble custom suicide vectors with reusable and interchangeable DNA parts to 42 facilitate chromosomal modification at designated loci. These constructs enable an array 43 of downstream applications including gene replacement and creation of gene fusions with 44 affinity purification or localization tags. We employed this approach to engineer 45 chromosomal modifications in a bacterium that has previously proven difficult to 46 manipulate genetically, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, to generate a library of 47 662 strains. Furthermore, we demonstrate how these modifications can be used for 48 examining metabolic pathways, protein-protein interactions, and protein localization. The 49 ubiquity of suicide constructs in gene replacement throughout biology suggests that this 50 approach can be applied to engineer a broad range of species for a diverse array of 51 systems biological applications and is amenable to high-throughput implementation.

  16. Genetic Adaptation to Salt Stress in Experimental Evolution of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Aifen; Hillesland, Kristina; He, Zhili; Joachimiak, Marcin; Zane, Grant; Dehal, Paramvir; Arkin, Adam; Stahl, David; Wall, Judy; Hazen, Terry; Zhou, Jizhong; Baidoo, Edward; Benke, Peter; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila

    2010-05-17

    High salinity is one of the most common environmental stressors. In order to understand how environmental organisms adapt to salty environment, an experiment evolution with sulfate reducing bacteria Desulfovibrio vugaris Hildenborough was conducted. Control lines and salt-stressed lines (6 lines each) grown in minimal medium LS4D or LS4D + 100 mM NaCl were transferred for 1200 generations. The salt tolerance was tested with LS4D supplemented with 250 mM NaCl. Statistical analysis of the growth data suggested that all lines adapted to their evolutionary environment. In addition, the control lines performed better than the ancestor with faster growth rate, higher biomass yield and shorter lag phase under salty environment they did not evolve in. However, the salt-adapted lines performed better than the control lines on measures of growth rate and yield under salty environment, suggesting that the salt?evolved lines acquired mutations specific to having extra salt in LS4D. Growth data and gene transcription data suggested that populations tended to improve till 1000 generations and active mutations tended to be fixed at the stage of 1000 generations. Point mutations and insertion/deletions were identified in isolated colonies from salt-adapted and control lines via whole genome sequencing. Glu, Gln and Ala appears to be the major osmoprotectant in evolved salt-stressed line. Ongoing studies are now characterizing the contribution of specific mutations identified in the salt-evolved D. vulgaris.

  17. Study of Nitrate Stress in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough Using iTRAQ Proteomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redding, A.M.; Mukhopadhyay, A.; Joyner, D.; Hazen, T.C.; Keasling, J.D.

    2006-10-12

    The response of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough (DvH),a sulphate-reducing bacterium, to nitrate stress was examined usingquantitative proteomic analysis. DvH was stressed with 105 m M sodiumnitrate(NaNO3), a level that caused a 50 percent inhibition in growth.The protein profile of stressed cells was compared with that of cellsgrown in the absence of nitrate using the iTRAQ peptide labellingstrategy and tandem liquid chromatography separation coupled with massspectrometry (quadrupoletime-of-flight) detection. A total of 737 uniqueproteins were identified by two or more peptides, representing 22 percentof the total DvH proteome and spanning every functional category. Theresults indicate that this was a mild stress, as proteins involved incentral metabolism and the sulphate reduction pathway were unperturbed.Proteins involved in the nitrate reduction pathway increased. Increasesseen in transport systems for proline, glycine^ betaineandglutamateindicate that the NaNO3 exposure led to both salt stress and nitratestress.Up-regulation observed in oxidative stress response proteins (Rbr,RbO, etc.) and a large number of ABC transport systems as well as in iron^ sulphur -cluster-containing proteins, however, appear to be specific tonitrate exposure. Finally, a number of hypothetical proteins were amongthe most significant changers, indicating that there may be unknownmechanisms initiated upon nitrate stress in DvH.

  18. Single-cell analysis of growth and cell division of the anaerobe Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anouchka eFievet

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent years have seen significant progress in understanding basic bacterial cell cycle properties such as cell growth and cell division. While characterization and regulation of bacterial cell cycle is quite well documented in the case of fast growing aerobic model organisms, no data has been so far reported for anaerobic bacteria. This lack of information in anaerobic microorganisms can mainly be explained by the absence of molecular and cellular tools such as single cell microscopy and fluorescent probes usable for anaerobes and essential to study cellular events and/or subcellular localization of the actors involved in cell cycle.In this study, single-cell microscopy has been adapted to study for the first time, in real time, the cell cycle of a bacterial anaerobe, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough (DvH. This single-cell analysis provides mechanistic insights into the cell division cycle of DvH, which seems to be governed by the recently discussed so-called incremental model that generates remarkably homogeneous cell sizes. Furthermore, cell division was reversibly blocked during oxygen exposure. This may constitute a strategy for anaerobic cells to cope with transient exposure to oxygen that they may encounter in their natural environment, thereby contributing to their aerotolerance. This study lays the foundation for the first molecular, single-cell assay that will address factors that cannot otherwise be resolved in bulk assays and that will allow visualization of a wide range of molecular mechanisms within living anaerobic cells.

  19. Energetic Consequences of nitrite stress in Desulfovibrio vulgarisHildenborough, inferred from global transcriptional analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Qiang; Huang, Katherine H.; He, Zhili; Alm, Eric J.; Fields,Matthew W.; Hazen, Terry C.; Arkin, Adam P.; Wall, Judy D.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2005-11-03

    Many of the proteins that are candidates for bioenergetic pathways involved with sulfate respiration in Desulfovibrio spp. have been studied, but complete pathways and overall cell physiology remain to be resolved for many environmentally relevant conditions. In order to understand the metabolism of these microorganisms under adverse environmental conditions for improved bioremediation efforts, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough was used as a model organism to study stress response to nitrite, an important intermediate in the nitrogen cycle. Previous physiological studies demonstrated that growth was inhibited by nitrite and that nitrite reduction was observed to be the primary mechanism of detoxification. Global transcriptional profiling with whole-genome microarrays revealed coordinated cascades of responses to nitrite in pathways of energy metabolism, nitrogen metabolism, oxidative stress response, and iron homeostasis. In agreement with previous observations, nitrite-stressed cells showed a decrease in the expression of genes encoding sulfate reduction functions in addition to respiratory oxidative phosphorylation and ATP synthase activity. Consequently, the stressed cells had decreased expression of the genes encoding ATP-dependent amino acid transporters and proteins involved in translation. Other genes up-regulated in response to nitrite include the genes in the Fur regulon, which is suggested to be involved in iron homeostasis, and genes in the Per regulon, which is predicted to be responsible for oxidative stress response.

  20. Distinctive Oxidative Stress Responses to Hydrogen Peroxide in Sulfate Reducing Bacteria Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Aifen; He, Zhili; Redding, A.M.; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Hemme, Christopher L.; Joachimiak, Marcin P.; Bender, Kelly S.; Keasling, Jay D.; Stahl, David A.; Fields, Matthew W.; Hazen, Terry C.; Arkin, Adam P.; Wall, Judy D.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2009-01-01

    Response of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, 1 mM) was investigated with transcriptomic, proteomic and genetic approaches. Microarray data demonstrated that gene expression was extensively affected by H2O2 with the response peaking at 120 min after H2O2 treatment. Genes affected include those involved with energy production, sulfate reduction, ribosomal structure and translation, H2O2 scavenging, posttranslational modification and DNA repair as evidenced by gene coexpression networks generated via a random matrix-theory based approach. Data from this study support the hypothesis that both PerR and Fur play important roles in H2O2-induced oxidative stress response. First, both PerR and Fur regulon genes were significantly up-regulated. Second, predicted PerR regulon genes ahpC and rbr2 were derepressedin Delta PerR and Delta Fur mutants and induction of neither gene was observed in both Delta PerR and Delta Fur when challenged with peroxide, suggesting possible overlap of these regulons. Third, both Delta PerR and Delta Fur appeared to be more tolerant of H2O2 as measured by optical density. Forth, proteomics data suggested de-repression of Fur during the oxidative stress response. In terms of the intracellular enzymatic H2O2 scavenging, gene expression data suggested that Rdl and Rbr2 may play major roles in the detoxification of H2O2. In addition, induction of thioredoxin reductase and thioredoxin appeared to be independent of PerR and Fur. Considering all data together, D. vulgaris employed a distinctive stress resistance mechanism to defend against increased cellular H2O2, and the temporal gene expression changes were consistent with the slowdown of cell growth at the onset of oxidative stress.

  1. Hydrogen-peroxide-induced oxidative stress responses in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, A.; He, Z.; Redding-Johanson, A.M.; Mukhopadhyay, A.; Hemme, C.L.; Joachimiak, M.P.; Bender, K.S.; Keasling, J.D.; Stahl, D.A.; Fields, M.W.; Hazen, T.C.; Arkin, A.P.; Wall, J.D.; Zhou, J.; Luo, F.; Deng, Y.; He, Q.

    2010-07-01

    To understand how sulphate-reducing bacteria respond to oxidative stresses, the responses of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough to H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced stresses were investigated with transcriptomic, proteomic and genetic approaches. H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and induced chemical species (e.g. polysulfide, ROS) and redox potential shift increased the expressions of the genes involved in detoxification, thioredoxin-dependent reduction system, protein and DNA repair, and decreased those involved in sulfate reduction, lactate oxidation and protein synthesis. A gene coexpression network analysis revealed complicated network interactions among differentially expressed genes, and suggested possible importance of several hypothetical genes in H{sub 2}O{sub 2} stress. Also, most of the genes in PerR and Fur regulons were highly induced, and the abundance of a Fur regulon protein increased. Mutant analysis suggested that PerR and Fur are functionally overlapped in response to stresses induced by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and reaction products, and the upregulation of thioredoxin-dependent reduction genes was independent of PerR or Fur. It appears that induction of those stress response genes could contribute to the increased resistance of deletion mutants to H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced stresses. In addition, a conceptual cellular model of D. vulgaris responses to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} stress was constructed to illustrate that this bacterium may employ a complicated molecular mechanism to defend against the H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced stresses.

  2. Toward a rigorous network of protein-protein interactions of the model sulfate reducer Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chhabra, S.R.; Joachimiak, M.P.; Petzold, C.J.; Zane, G.M.; Price, M.N.; Gaucher, S.; Reveco, S.A.; Fok, V.; Johanson, A.R.; Batth, T.S.; Singer, M.; Chandonia, J.M.; Joyner, D.; Hazen, T.C.; Arkin, A.P.; Wall, J.D.; Singh, A.K.; Keasling, J.D.

    2011-05-01

    Protein–protein interactions offer an insight into cellular processes beyond what may be obtained by the quantitative functional genomics tools of proteomics and transcriptomics. The aforementioned tools have been extensively applied to study E. coli and other aerobes and more recently to study the stress response behavior of Desulfovibrio 5 vulgaris Hildenborough, a model anaerobe and sulfate reducer. In this paper we present the first attempt to identify protein-protein interactions in an obligate anaerobic bacterium. We used suicide vector-assisted chromosomal modification of 12 open reading frames encoded by this sulfate reducer to append an eight amino acid affinity tag to the carboxy-terminus of the chosen proteins. Three biological replicates of the 10 ‘pulled-down’ proteins were separated and analyzed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Replicate agreement ranged between 35% and 69%. An interaction network among 12 bait and 90 prey proteins was reconstructed based on 134 bait-prey interactions computationally identified to be of high confidence. We discuss the biological significance of several unique metabolic features of D. vulgaris revealed by this protein-protein interaction data 15 and protein modifications that were observed. These include the distinct role of the putative carbon monoxide-induced hydrogenase, unique electron transfer routes associated with different oxidoreductases, and the possible role of methylation in regulating sulfate reduction.

  3. Overcoming the anaerobic hurdle in phenotypic microarrays: Generation andvisualization of growth curve data for Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borglin, Sharon E; Joyner, Dominique; Jacobsen, Janet; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Hazen, Terry C.

    2008-10-04

    Growing anaerobic microorganisms in phenotypic microarrays (PM) and 96-well microtiter plates is an emerging technology that allows high throughput survey of the growth and physiology and/or phenotype of cultivable microorganisms. For non-model bacteria, a method for phenotypic analysis is invaluable, not only to serve as a starting point for further evaluation, but also to provide a broad understanding of the physiology of an uncharacterized wild-type organism or the physiology/phenotype of a newly created mutant of that organism. Given recent advances in genetic characterization and targeted mutations to elucidate genetic networks and metabolic pathways, high-throughput methods for determining phenotypic differences are essential. Here we outline challenges presented in studying the physiology and phenotype of a sulfate reducing anaerobic delta proteobacterium, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough. Modifications of the commercially available OmniLog(TM) system (Hayward, CA) for experimental setup, and configuration, as well as considerations in PM data analysis are presented. Also highlighted here is data viewing software that enables users to view and compare multiple PM data sets. The PM method promises to be a valuable strategy in our systems biology approach to D. vulgaris studies and is readily applicable to other anaerobic and aerobic bacteria.

  4. Localization of cytochromes in the outer membrane of Desulfovibrio vulgaris (Hildenborough) and their role in anaerobic biocorrosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Ommen Kloeke, F; Bryant, R D; Laishley, E J

    1995-12-01

    A protocol was developed whereby the outer and cytoplasmic membranes of the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris (Hildenborough) were isolated and partially characterized. The isolated outer membrane fractions from cultures grown under high (100 ppm) and low (5 ppm) Fe2+ conditions were compared by SDS-PAGE electrophoresis, and showed that several protein bands were derepressed under the low iron conditions, most notably at 50 kDa, and 77.5 kDa. Outer membrane isolated from low iron cultured cells was found to contain two proteins, 77.5 kDa and 62.5 kDa in size, that reacted with a heme-specific stain and were referred to as high molecular weight cytochromes. Studies conducted on the low iron isolated outer membrane by a phosphate/mild steel hydrogen evolution system showed that addition of the membrane fraction caused an immediate acceleration in H2 production. A new model for the anaerobic biocorrosion of mild steel is proposed.

  5. Analysis of a Ferric Uptake Regulator (Fur) Mutant ofDesulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, Kelly S.; Yen, Huei-Che Bill; Hemme, Christopher L.; Yang, Zamin K.; He, Zhili; He, Qiang; Zhou, Jizhong; Huang, Katherine H.; Alm, Eric J.; Hazen, Terry C.; Arkin, Adam P.; Wall, Judy D.

    2007-09-21

    Previous experiments examining the transcriptional profileof the anaerobe Desulfovibrio vulgaris demonstrated up-regulation of theFur regulon in response to various environmental stressors. To test theinvolvement of Fur in the growth response and transcriptional regulationof D. vulgaris, a targeted mutagenesis procedure was used for deletingthe fur gene. Growth of the resulting ?fur mutant (JW707) was notaffected by iron availability, but the mutant did exhibit increasedsensitivity to nitrite and osmotic stresses compared to the wild type.Transcriptional profiling of JW707 indicated that iron-bound Fur acts asa traditional repressor for ferrous iron uptake genes (feoAB) and othergenes containing a predicted Fur binding site within their promoter.Despite the apparent lack of siderophore biosynthesis genes within the D.vulgaris genome, a large 12-gene operon encoding orthologs to TonB andTolQR also appeared to be repressed by iron-bound Fur. While other genespredicted to be involved in iron homeostasis were unaffected by thepresence or absence of Fur, alternative expression patterns that could beinterpreted as repression or activation by iron-free Fur were observed.Both the physiological and transcriptional data implicate a globalregulatory role for Fur in the sulfate-reducing bacterium D.vulgaris.

  6. Sustainable syntrophic growth of Dehalococcoides ethenogenes strain 195 with Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough and Methanobacterium congolense: global transcriptomic and proteomic analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Men, Yujie [University of California, Berkeley; Feil, Helene [University of California, Berkeley; Verberkmoes, Nathan C [ORNL; Shah, Manesh B [ORNL; Johnson, David R. [University of California, Berkeley; Lee, Patrick K. H. [University of California, Berkeley; West, Kimberlee A [University of California, Berkeley; Zinder, Stephen H. [Cornell University; Andersen, Gary L. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)

    2012-01-01

    Dehalococcoides ethenogenes strain 195 (DE195) was grown in a sustainable syntrophic association with Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough (DVH) as a co-culture, as well as with DVH and the hydrogenotrophic methanogen Methanobacterium congolense (MC) as a tri-culture using lactate as the sole energy and carbon source. In the co- and tri-cultures, maximum dechlorination rates of DE195 were enhanced by approximately three times (11.0 0.01 lmol per day for the co-culture and 10.1 0.3 lmol per day for the tri-culture) compared with DE195 grown alone (3.8 0.1 lmol per day). Cell yield of DE195 was enhanced in the co-culture (9.0 0.5107 cells per lmol Cl released, compared with 6.8 0.9107 cells per lmol Cl released for the pure culture), whereas no further enhancement was observed in the tri-culture (7.3 1.8107 cells per lmol Cl released). The transcriptome of DE195 grown in the co-culture was analyzed using a wholegenome microarray targeting DE195, which detected 102 significantly up- or down-regulated genes compared with DE195 grown in isolation, whereas no significant transcriptomic difference was observed between co- and tri-cultures. Proteomic analysis showed that 120 proteins were differentially expressed in the co-culture compared with DE195 grown in isolation. Physiological, transcriptomic and proteomic results indicate that the robust growth of DE195 in co- and tri-cultures is because of the advantages associated with the capabilities of DVH to ferment lactate to provide H2 and acetate for growth, along with potential benefits from proton translocation, cobalamin-salvaging and amino acid biosynthesis, whereas MC in the tri-culture provided no significant additional benefits beyond those of DVH.

  7. Sustainable syntrophic growth of Dehalococcoides ethenogenes strain 195 with Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough and Methanobacterium congolense: Global transcriptomic and proteomic analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Men, Y.; Feil, H.; VerBerkmoes, N.C.; Shah, M.B.; Johnson, D.R.; Lee, P.K.H; West, K.A.; Zinder, S.H.; Andersen, G.L.; Alvarez-Cohen, L.

    2011-03-01

    Dehalococcoides ethenogenes strain 195 (DE195) was grown in a sustainable syntrophic association with Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough (DVH) as a co-culture, as well as with DVH and the hydrogenotrophic methanogen Methanobacterium congolense (MC) as a tri-culture using lactate as the sole energy and carbon source. In the co- and tri-cultures, maximum dechlorination rates of DE195 were enhanced by approximately three times (11.0±0.01 lmol per day for the co-culture and 10.1±0.3 lmol per day for the tri-culture) compared with DE195 grown alone (3.8±0.1 lmol per day). Cell yield of DE195 was enhanced in the co-culture (9.0±0.5 x 107 cells per lmol Cl{sup -} released, compared with 6.8±0.9x 107 cells per lmol Cl{sup -} released for the pure culture), whereas no further enhancement was observed in the tri-culture (7.3±1.8x 107 cells per lmol Cl{sup -} released). The transcriptome of DE195 grown in the co-culture was analyzed using a whole-genome microarray targeting DE195, which detected 102 significantly up- or down-regulated genes compared with DE195 grown in isolation, whereas no significant transcriptomic difference was observed between co- and tri-cultures. Proteomic analysis showed that 120 proteins were differentially expressed in the co-culture compared with DE195 grown in isolation. Physiological, transcriptomic and proteomic results indicate that the robust growth of DE195 in co- and tri-cultures is because of the advantages associated with the capabilities of DVH to ferment lactate to provide H2 and acetate for growth, along with potential benefits from proton translocation, cobalamin-salvaging and amino acid biosynthesis, whereas MC in the tri-culture provided no significant additional benefits beyond those of DVH.

  8. Pathway confirmation and flux analysis of central metabolicpathways in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough using GasChromatography-Mass Spectrometry and Fourier Transform-Ion CyclotronResonance Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Yinjie; Pingitore, Francesco; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Phan,Richard; Hazen, Terry C.; Keasling, Jay D.

    2007-03-15

    Flux distribution in central metabolic pathways ofDesulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough was examined using 13C tracerexperiments. Consistent with the current genome annotation andindependent evidence from enzyme activity assays, the isotopomer resultsfrom both GC-MS and Fourier Transform-Ion Cyclotron Resonance massspectrometry (FT-ICR MS) indicate the lack of oxidatively functional TCAcycle and an incomplete pentose phosphate pathway. Results from thisstudy suggest that fluxes through both pathways are limited tobiosynthesis. The data also indicate that>80 percent of the lactatewas converted to acetate and the reactions involved are the primary routeof energy production (NAD(P)H and ATP production). Independent of the TCAcycle, direct cleavage of acetyl-CoA to CO and 5,10-methyl-THF also leadsto production of NADH and ATP. Although the genome annotation implicatesa ferredoxin-dependentoxoglutarate synthase, isotopic evidence does notsupport flux through this reaction in either the oxidative or reductivemode; therefore, the TCA cycle is incomplete. FT-ICR MS was used tolocate the labeled carbon distribution in aspartate and glutamate andconfirmed the presence of an atypical enzyme for citrate formationsuggested in previous reports (the citrate synthesized by this enzyme isthe isotopic antipode of the citrate synthesized by the (S)-citratesynthase). These findings enable a better understanding of the relationbetween genome annotation and actual metabolic pathways in D. vulgaris,and also demonstrate FT-ICR MS as a powerful tool for isotopomeranalysis, overcoming problems in both GC-MS and NMRspectroscopy.

  9. Development of a Markerless Genetic Exchange System in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough and Its Use in Generating a Strain with Increased Transformation Efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, Kimberly L.; Bender, Kelly S.; Wall, Judy D.

    2009-07-21

    In recent years, the genetic manipulation of the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough has seen enormous progress. In spite of this progress, the current marker exchange deletion method does not allow for easy selection of multiple sequential gene deletions in a single strain because of the limited number of selectable markers available in D. vulgaris. To broaden the repertoire of genetic tools for manipulation, an in-frame, markerless deletion system has been developed. The counterselectable marker that makes this deletion system possible is the pyrimidine salvage enzyme, uracil phosphoribosyltransferase, encoded by upp. In wild-type D. vulgaris, growth was shown to be inhibited by the toxic pyrimidine analog 5-fluorouracil (5-FU); whereas, a mutant bearing a deletion of the upp gene was resistant to 5-FU. When a plasmid containing the wild-type upp gene expressed constitutively from the aph(3')-II promoter (promoter for the kanamycin resistance gene in Tn5) was introduced into the upp deletion strain, sensitivity to 5-FU was restored. This observation allowed us to develop a two-step integration and excision strategy for the deletion of genes of interest. Since this inframe deletion strategy does not retain an antibiotic cassette, multiple deletions can be generated in a single strain without the accumulation of genes conferring antibiotic resistances. We used this strategy to generate a deletion strain lacking the endonuclease (hsdR, DVU1703) of a type I restriction-modification system, that we designated JW7035. The transformation efficiency of the JW7035 strain was found to be 100 to 1000 times greater than that of the wild-type strain when stable plasmids were introduced via electroporation.

  10. Gene Expression by the Sulfate-Reducing Bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough Grown on an Iron Electrode under Cathodic Protection Conditions▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffrey, Sean M.; Park, Hyung Soo; Been, Jenny; Gordon, Paul; Sensen, Christoph W.; Voordouw, Gerrit

    2008-01-01

    The genome sequence of the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough was reanalyzed to design unique 70-mer oligonucleotide probes against 2,824 probable protein-coding regions. These included three genes not previously annotated, including one that encodes a c-type cytochrome. Using microarrays printed with these 70-mer probes, we analyzed the gene expression profile of wild-type D. vulgaris grown on cathodic hydrogen, generated at an iron electrode surface with an imposed negative potential of −1.1 V (cathodic protection conditions). The gene expression profile of cells grown on cathodic hydrogen was compared to that of cells grown with gaseous hydrogen bubbling through the culture. Relative to the latter, the electrode-grown cells overexpressed two hydrogenases, the hyn-1 genes for [NiFe] hydrogenase 1 and the hyd genes, encoding [Fe] hydrogenase. The hmc genes for the high-molecular-weight cytochrome complex, which allows electron flow from the hydrogenases across the cytoplasmic membrane, were also overexpressed. In contrast, cells grown on gaseous hydrogen overexpressed the hys genes for [NiFeSe] hydrogenase. Cells growing on the electrode also overexpressed genes encoding proteins which promote biofilm formation. Although the gene expression profiles for these two modes of growth were distinct, they were more closely related to each other than to that for cells grown in a lactate- and sulfate-containing medium. Electrochemically measured corrosion rates were lower for iron electrodes covered with hyn-1, hyd, and hmc mutant biofilms than for wild-type biofilms. This confirms the importance, suggested by the gene expression studies, of the corresponding gene products in D. vulgaris-mediated iron corrosion. PMID:18310429

  11. Effect of the deletion of qmoABC and the promoter distal gene encoding a hypothetical protein on sulfate-reduction in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zane, Grant M.; Yen, Huei-chi Bill; Wall, Judy D.

    2010-03-18

    The pathway of electrons required for the reduction of sulfate in sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) is not yet fully characterized. In order to determine the role of a transmembrane protein complex suggested to be involved in this process, a deletion of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough was created by marker exchange mutagenesis that eliminated four genes putatively encoding the QmoABC complex and a hypothetical protein (DVU0851). The Qmo complex (quinone-interacting membrane-bound oxidoreductase) is proposed to be responsible for transporting electrons to the dissimilatory adenosine-5?phosphosulfate (APS) reductase in SRB. In support of the predicted role of this complex, the deletion mutant was unable to grow using sulfate as its sole electron acceptor with a range of electron donors. To explore a possible role for the hypothetical protein in sulfate reduction, a second mutant was constructed that had lost only the gene that codes for DVU0851. The second constructed mutant grew with sulfate as the sole electron acceptor; however, there was a lag that was not present with the wild-type or complemented strain. Neither deletion strain was significantly impaired for growth with sulfite or thiosulfate as terminal electron acceptor. Complementation of the D(qmoABC-DVU0851) mutant with all four genes or only the qmoABC genes restored its ability to grow by sulfate respiration. These results confirmed the prediction that the Qmo complex is in the electron pathway for sulfate-reduction and revealed that no other transmembrane complex could compensate when Qmo was lacking.

  12. CO2 exposure at pressure impacts metabolism and stress responses in the model sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris strain Hildenborough

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkins, Michael J.; Hoyt, David W.; Marshall, Matthew J.; Alderson, Paul A.; Plymale, Andrew E.; Markillie, Lye Meng; Tucker, Abigail E.; Walter, Eric D.; Linggi, Bryan E.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Taylor, Ronald C.

    2014-09-01

    Geologic carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration drives physical and geochemical changes in deep subsurface environments that impact indigenous microbial activities. The combined effects of pressurized CO2 on a model sulfate-reducing microorganism, Desulfovibrio vulgaris, have been assessed using a suite of genomic and kinetic measurements. Novel high-pressure NMR time-series measurements using 13C-lactate were used to track D. vulgaris metabolism. We identified cessation of respiration at CO2 pressures of 10 bar, 25 bar, 50 bar, and 80 bar. Concurrent experiments using N2 as the pressurizing phase had no negative effect on microbial respiration, as inferred from reduction of sulfate to sulfide. Complementary pressurized batch incubations and fluorescence microscopy measurements supported NMR observations, and indicated that non-respiring cells were mostly viable at 50 bar CO2 for at least four hours, and at 80 bar CO2 for two hours. The fraction of dead cells increased rapidly after four hours at 80 bar CO2. Transcriptomic (RNA-Seq) measurements on mRNA transcripts from CO2-incubated biomass indicated that cells up-regulated the production of certain amino acids (leucine, isoleucine) following CO2 exposure at elevated pressures, likely as part of a general stress response. Evidence for other poorly understood stress responses were also identified within RNA-Seq data, suggesting that while pressurized CO2 severely limits the growth and respiration of D. vulgaris cells, biomass retains intact cell membranes at pressures up to 80 bar CO2. Together, these data show that geologic sequestration of CO2 may have significant impacts on rates of sulfate reduction in many deep subsurface environments where this metabolism is a key respiratory process.

  13. CO2 exposure at pressure impacts metabolism and stress responses in the model sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris strain Hildenborough

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J Wilkins

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Geologic carbon dioxide (CO2 sequestration drives physical and geochemical changes in deep subsurface environments that impact indigenous microbial activities. The combined effects of pressurized CO2 on a model sulfate-reducing microorganism, Desulfovibrio vulgaris, have been assessed using a suite of genomic and kinetic measurements. Novel high-pressure NMR time-series measurements using 13C-lactate were used to track D. vulgaris metabolism. We identified cessation of respiration at CO2 pressures of 10 bar, 25 bar, 50 bar, and 80 bar. Concurrent experiments using N2 as the pressurizing phase had no negative effect on microbial respiration, as inferred from reduction of sulfate to sulfide. Complementary pressurized batch incubations and fluorescence microscopy measurements supported NMR observations, and indicated that non-respiring cells were mostly viable at 50 bar CO2 for at least four hours, and at 80 bar CO2 for two hours. The fraction of dead cells increased rapidly after four hours at 80 bar CO2. Transcriptomic (RNA-Seq measurements on mRNA transcripts from CO2-incubated biomass indicated that cells up-regulated the production of certain amino acids (leucine, isoleucine following CO2 exposure at elevated pressures, likely as part of a general stress response. Evidence for other poorly understood stress responses were also identified within RNA-Seq data, suggesting that while pressurized CO2 severely limits the growth and respiration of D. vulgaris cells, biomass retains intact cell membranes at pressures up to 80 bar CO2. Together, these data show that geologic sequestration of CO2 may have significant impacts on rates of sulfate reduction in many deep subsurface environments where this metabolism is a key respiratory process.

  14. Vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukaddes Kavala

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Thyroid disorders may affect all of the organ systems of the body and they are also highly associated with a wide variety of skin disorders. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of thyroid function abnormalities and thyroid autoimmunity in patients with pemphigus vulgaris (PV and to determine the association between thyroid disorders and clinical involvement and systemic corticosteroid treatment in patients with PV. Methods. The study consisted of eighty patients with PV and eighty healthy individuals. Thyroid functions (fT3, fT4, and TSH and thyroid autoimmunity (anti-thyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO, and anti-thyroglobulin (anti-Tg antibodies were investigated in both groups. Primary thyroid disease (PTD was diagnosed with one or more of the following diagnostic criteria: (i positive antithyroid antibodies, (ii primary thyroid function abnormalities. Results. Significant changes in the serum thyroid profile were found in 16% (13/80 of the PV group and 5% (4/80 of the control group. Positive titers of antithyroid antibodies (anti-TPO and anti-Tg were observed in 7 patients (9% with PV and one in the control group (1,2%. Hashimoto thyroiditis was diagnosed in 9% of PV patients and it was found to be more prevalent in the mucosal form of PV. PTD was found in 13 of (%16 PV patients which was significantly high compared to controls. PTD was not found to be associated with systemic corticosteroid use. Free T3 levels were significantly lower in PV group compared to the control group and free T4 levels were significantly higher in PV group compared to the controls. Conclusions. PV may exist together with autoimmune thyroid diseases especially Hashimoto thyroiditis and primer thyroid diseases. Laboratory work-up for thyroid function tests and thyroid autoantibodies should be performed to determine underlying thyroid diseases in patients with PV.

  15. Cell wide responses to low oxygen exposure in Desulfovibriovulgaris Hildenborough

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukhopadhyay, A.; Redding, A.; Joachimiak, M.; Arkin, A.; Borglin, S.; Dehal, P.; Chakraborty, R.; Geller, J.; Hazen, T.; He, Q.; Joyner, D.; Martin, V.; Wall, J.; Yang, Z.; Zhou, J.; Keasling, J.

    2007-03-11

    The responses of the anaerobic, sulfate-reducing Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough to low oxygen exposure (0.1% O{sub 2}) were monitored via transcriptomics and proteomics. Exposure to 0.1% O{sub 2} caused a decrease in growth rate without affecting viability. A concerted up regulation in the predicted peroxide stress response regulon (PerR) genes was observed in response to the 0.1% O{sub 2} exposure. Several of these candidates also showed increases in protein abundance. Among the remaining small number of transcript changes was the up regulation of the predicted transmembrane tetraheme cytochrome c3 complex. Other known oxidative stress response candidates remained unchanged during this low O{sub 2} exposure. To fully understand the results of the 0.1% O{sub 2} exposure, transcriptomics and proteomics data were collected for exposure to air using a similar experimental protocol. In contrast to the 0.1% O{sub 2} exposure, air exposure was detrimental to both the growth rate and viability and caused dramatic changes at both the transcriptome and proteome levels. Interestingly, the transcripts of the predicted PerR regulon genes were down regulated during air exposure. Our results highlight the differences in the cell wide response to low and high O{sub 2} levels of in D. vulgaris and suggest that while exposure to air is highly detrimental to D. vulgaris, this bacterium can successfully cope with periodic exposure to low O{sub 2} levels in its environment.

  16. Response of Desulfovibrio vulgaris to Alkaline Stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stolyar, S.; He, Q.; He, Z.; Yang, Z.; Borglin, S.E.; Joyner, D.; Huang, K.; Alm, E.; Hazen, T.C.; Zhou, J.; Wall, J.D.; Arkin, A.P.; Stahl, D.A.

    2007-11-30

    The response of exponentially growing Desulfovibrio vulgarisHildenborough to pH 10 stress was studied using oligonucleotidemicroarrays and a study set of mutants with genes suggested by microarraydata to be involved in the alkaline stress response deleted. The datashowed that the response of D. vulgaris to increased pH is generallysimilar to that of Escherichia coli but is apparently controlled byunique regulatory circuits since the alternative sigma factors (sigma Sand sigma E) contributing to this stress response in E. coli appear to beabsent in D. vulgaris. Genes previously reported to be up-regulated in E.coli were up-regulated in D. vulgaris; these genes included three ATPasegenes and a tryptophan synthase gene. Transcription of chaperone andprotease genes (encoding ATP-dependent Clp and La proteases and DnaK) wasalso elevated in D. vulgaris. As in E. coli, genes involved in flagellumsynthesis were down-regulated. The transcriptional data also identifiedregulators, distinct from sigma S and sigma E, that are likely part of aD. vulgaris Hildenborough-specific stress response system.Characterization of a study set of mutants with genes implicated inalkaline stress response deleted confirmed that there was protectiveinvolvement of the sodium/proton antiporter NhaC-2, tryptophanase A, andtwo putative regulators/histidine kinases (DVU0331 andDVU2580).

  17. Ichthyosis vulgaris

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, J P; Godoy-Gijon, E; Elias, P M

    2013-01-01

    Ichthyosis vulgaris is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the filaggrin gene (FLG) and is characterized clinically by xerosis, scaling, keratosis pilaris, palmar and plantar hyperlinearity, and a strong association with atopic disorders. According to the published studies presented...... in this review article, FLG mutations are observed in approximately 7·7% of Europeans and 3·0% of Asians, but appear to be infrequent in darker-skinned populations. This clinical review article provides an overview of ichthyosis vulgaris epidemiology, related disorders and pathomechanisms. Not only does...... ichthyosis vulgaris possess a wide clinical spectrum, recent studies suggest that carriers of FLG mutations may have a generally altered risk of developing common diseases, even beyond atopic disorders. Mechanistic studies have shown increased penetration of allergens and chemicals in filaggrin...

  18. Pemphigus vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandhya Tamgadge

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pemphigus vulgaris is a chronic autoimmune mucocutaneous disease that initially manifests in the form of intraoral lesions, which spread to other mucous membranes and the skin. The etiology of pemphigus vulgaris is still unknown, although the disease has attracted considerable interest. The pemphigus group of disease is characterized by the production of autoantibodies against intercellular substances and is thus classified as autoimmune diseases. Most patients are initially misdiagnosed and improperly treated for months or even years. Dental professionals must be sufficiently familiar with the clinical manifestations of pemphigus vulgaris to ensure early diagnosis and treatment, since this in turn determines the prognosis and course of the disease. This article presents a case report with unknown etiology along with an overview of the disease.

  19. Mapping the Two-component Regulatory Networks in Desulfovibrio vulgaris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajeev, Lara; Luning, Eric; Dehal, Paramvir; Joachimiak, Marcin; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila

    2010-05-17

    D. vulgaris Hildenborough has 72 response regulators. The Desulfovibrio are sulfate reducing bacteria that are important in the sulfur and carbon cycles in anoxic habitats. Its large number of two componenent systems are probably critical to its ability to sense and respond to its environment. Our goal is to map these RRs to the genes they regulate using a DNA-affinity-purification-chip (DAP-chip) protocol. First target determined usuing EMSA. A positive target was determined for as many RRs as possible using EMSA. Targets were selected based on gene proximity, regulon predictions and/or predicted sigma54 dependent promoters. qPCR was used to ensure that the target was enriched from sheared genomic DNA before proceeding to the DAP-chip.

  20. Acne vulgaris

    OpenAIRE

    Purdy, Sarah; DeBerker, David

    2008-01-01

    Acne vulgaris affects over 80% of teenagers, and persists beyond the age of 25 years in 3% of men and 12% of women. Typical lesions of acne include comedones, inflammatory papules, and pustules. Nodules and cysts occur in more severe acne, and can cause scarring and psychological distress.

  1. Acne vulgaris

    OpenAIRE

    Purdy, Sarah; de Berker, David

    2011-01-01

    Acne vulgaris affects over 80% of teenagers, and persists beyond the age of 25 years in 3% of men and 12% of women. Typical lesions of acne include comedones, inflammatory papules, and pustules. Nodules and cysts occur in more severe acne, and can cause scarring and psychological distress.

  2. The electron transfer system of syntrophically grown Desulfovibrio vulgaris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, C.B.; He, Z.; Yang, Z.K.; Ringbauer, Jr., J.A.; He, Q.; Zhou, J.; Voordouw, G.; Wall, J.D.; Arkin, A.P.; Hazen, T.C.; Stolyar, S.; Stahl, D.A.

    2009-05-01

    Interspecies hydrogen transfer between organisms producing and consuming hydrogen promotes the decomposition of organic matter in most anoxic environments. Although syntrophic couplings between hydrogen producers and consumers are a major feature of the carbon cycle, mechanisms for energy recovery at the extremely low free energies of reactions typical of these anaerobic communities have not been established. In this study, comparative transcriptional analysis of a model sulfate-reducing microbe, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, suggested the use of alternative electron transfer systems dependent upon growth modality. During syntrophic growth on lactate with a hydrogenotrophic methanogen, D. vulgaris up-regulated numerous genes involved in electron transfer and energy generation when compared with sulfate-limited monocultures. In particular, genes coding for the putative membrane-bound Coo hydrogenase, two periplasmic hydrogenases (Hyd and Hyn) and the well-characterized high-molecular weight cytochrome (Hmc) were among the most highly expressed and up-regulated. Additionally, a predicted operon coding for genes involved in lactate transport and oxidation exhibited up-regulation, further suggesting an alternative pathway for electrons derived from lactate oxidation during syntrophic growth. Mutations in a subset of genes coding for Coo, Hmc, Hyd and Hyn impaired or severely limited syntrophic growth but had little affect on growth via sulfate-respiration. These results demonstrate that syntrophic growth and sulfate-respiration use largely independent energy generation pathways and imply that understanding of microbial processes sustaining nutrient cycling must consider lifestyles not captured in pure culture.

  3. The Electron Transfer System of Syntrophically Grown Desulfovibrio vulgaris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PBD; ENIGMA; GTL; VIMSS; Walker, Christopher B.; He, Zhili; Yang, Zamin K.; Ringbauer Jr., Joseph A.; He, Qiang; Zhou, Jizhong; Voordouw, Gerrit; Wall, Judy D.; Arkin, Adam P.; Hazen, Terry C.; Stolyar, Sergey; Stahl, David A.

    2009-06-22

    Interspecies hydrogen transfer between organisms producing and consuming hydrogen promotes the decomposition of organic matter in most anoxic environments. Although syntrophic couplings between hydrogen producers and consumers are a major feature of the carbon cycle, mechanisms for energy recovery at the extremely low free energies of reactions typical of these anaerobic communities have not been established. In this study, comparative transcriptional analysis of a model sulfate-reducing microbe, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, suggested the use of alternative electron transfer systems dependent upon growth modality. During syntrophic growth on lactate with a hydrogenotrophic methanogen, D. vulgaris up-regulated numerous genes involved in electron transfer and energy generation when compared with sulfate-limited monocultures. In particular, genes coding for the putative membrane-bound Coo hydrogenase, two periplasmic hydrogenases (Hyd and Hyn) and the well-characterized high-molecular weight cytochrome (Hmc) were among the most highly expressed and up-regulated. Additionally, a predicted operon coding for genes involved in lactate transport and oxidation exhibited up-regulation, further suggesting an alternative pathway for electrons derived from lactate oxidation during syntrophic growth. Mutations in a subset of genes coding for Coo, Hmc, Hyd and Hyn impaired or severely limited syntrophic growth but had little affect on growth via sulfate-respiration. These results demonstrate that syntrophic growth and sulfate-respiration use largely independent energy generation pathways and imply that understanding of microbial processes sustaining nutrient cycling must consider lifestyles not captured in pure culture.

  4. Probing the interaction induced conformation transitions in acid phosphatase with cobalt ferrite nanoparticles: Relation to inhibition and bio-activity of Chlorella vulgaris acid phosphatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Farooq; Zhou, Xing; Yao, Hongzhou; Zhou, Ying; Xu, Chao

    2016-09-01

    The present study explored the interaction and kinetics of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles (NPs) with acid phosphatase (ACP) by utilizing diverse range of spectroscopic techniques. The results corroborate, the CoFe2O4 NPs cause fluorescence quenching in ACP by static quenching mechanism. The negative values of van't Hoff thermodynamic expressions (ΔH=-0.3293Jmol(-1)K(-1) and ΔG=-3.960kJmol(-1)K(-1)) corroborate the spontaneity and exothermic nature of static quenching. The positive value of ΔS (13.2893Jmol(-1)K(-1)) corroborate that major contributors of higher and stronger binding affinity among CoFe2O4 NPs with ACP were electrostatic. In addition, FTIR, UV-CD, UV-vis spectroscopy and three dimensional fluorescence (3D) techniques confirmed that CoFe2O4 NPs binding induces microenvironment perturbations leading to secondary and tertiary conformation changes in ACP to a great extent. Furthermore, synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy (SFS) affirmed the comparatively significant changes in microenvironment around tryptophan (Trp) residue by CoFe2O4 NPs. The effect of CoFe2O4 NPs on the activation kinetics of ACP was further examined in Chlorella vulgaris. Apparent Michaelis constant (Km) values of 0.57 and 26.5mM with activation energy values of 0.538 and 3.428kJmol(-1) were determined without and with 200μM CoFe2O4 NPs. Apparent Vmax value of -7Umml(-1) corroborate that enzyme active sites were completely captured by the NPs leaving no space for the substrate. The results confirmed that CoFe2O4 NPs ceased the activity by unfolding of ACP enzyme. This suggests CoFe2O4 NPs perturbed the enzyme activity by transitions in conformation and hence the metabolic activity of ACP. This study provides the pavement for novel and simple approach of using sensitive biomarkers for sensing NPs in environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Acne vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi Tuchayi, Sara; Makrantonaki, Evgenia; Ganceviciene, Ruta; Dessinioti, Clio; Feldman, Steven R; Zouboulis, Christos C

    2015-09-17

    Acne vulgaris is a chronic inflammatory disease - rather than a natural part of the life cycle as colloquially viewed - of the pilosebaceous unit (comprising the hair follicle, hair shaft and sebaceous gland) and is among the most common dermatological conditions worldwide. Some of the key mechanisms involved in the development of acne include disturbed sebaceous gland activity associated with hyperseborrhoea (that is, increased sebum production) and alterations in sebum fatty acid composition, dysregulation of the hormone microenvironment, interaction with neuropeptides, follicular hyperkeratinization, induction of inflammation and dysfunction of the innate and adaptive immunity. Grading of acne involves lesion counting and photographic methods. However, there is a lack of consensus on the exact grading criteria, which hampers the conduction and comparison of randomized controlled clinical trials evaluating treatments. Prevention of acne relies on the successful management of modifiable risk factors, such as underlying systemic diseases and lifestyle factors. Several treatments are available, but guidelines suffer from a lack of data to make evidence-based recommendations. In addition, the complex combination treatment regimens required to target different aspects of acne pathophysiology lead to poor adherence, which undermines treatment success. Acne commonly causes scarring and reduces the quality of life of patients. New treatment options with a shift towards targeting the early processes involved in acne development instead of suppressing the effects of end products will enhance our ability to improve the outcomes for patients with acne.

  6. Identification of Molecular and Cellular Responses of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Biofilms under Culture Conditions Relevant to Field Conditions for Bioreduction of Toxic Metals and Radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judy D. Wall

    2011-06-09

    Our findings demonstrated that D. vulgaris surface-adhered populations produce extracellular structures, and that that the cells have altered carbon and energy flux compared to planktonic cells. Biofilms did not have greatly increased carbohydrate accumulation. Interestingly genes present on the native plasmid found in D. vulgaris Hildenborough were necessary for wild type biofilm formation. In addition, extracellular appendages dependent on functions or proteins encoded by flaG or fliA also contributed to biofilm formation. Studies with SRB biofilms have indicated that the reduction and precipitation of metals can occur within the biofilm matrix; however, little work has been done to elucidate the physiological state of surface-adhered cells during metal reduction (Cr6+, U6+) and how this process is affected by nutrient feed levels (i.e., the stimulant).

  7. Suppression of LPS-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition by aqueous extracts of Prunella vulgaris through inhibition of the NF-κB/Snail signaling pathway and regulation of EMT-related protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, In-Hye; Jang, Eun Hyang; Hong, Darong; Jung, Bom; Park, Min-Ju; Kim, Jong-Ho

    2015-11-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a pivotal event in the invasion and metastasis of cancer cells. Prunella vulgaris (PV) inhibits the proliferation of various cancer cells; however, its possible role in EMT has not been demonstrated. In the present study, we explored the effect of PV aqueous extract (PVAE), a typical medicine for decoction, on EMT. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced EMT-like phenotype changes in cancer cell lines that enhanced cell migration and invasion. PVAE markedly inhibited these effects and produced accompanying changes in the expression of EMT markers, including decreased expression of N-cadherin and vimentin, and increased expression of β-catenin. We found that PVAE effects on LPS-induced EMT were mediated by inhibition of the NF-κB/Snail signaling pathway. Our findings provide new evidence that PVAE suppresses cancer invasion and migration by inhibiting EMT. Therefore, we suggest that PVAE is an effective dietary chemopreventive agent with antimetastatic activity against malignant tumors.

  8. Antimicrobial Effects of Free Nitrous Acid on Desulfovibrio vulgaris: Implications for Sulfide-Induced Corrosion of Concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shu-Hong; Ho, Jun Yuan; Fan, Lu; Richardson, David J; Yuan, Zhiguo; Bond, Philip L

    2016-09-15

    Hydrogen sulfide produced by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in sewers causes odor problems and asset deterioration due to the sulfide-induced concrete corrosion. Free nitrous acid (FNA) was recently demonstrated as a promising antimicrobial agent to alleviate hydrogen sulfide production in sewers. However, details of the antimicrobial mechanisms of FNA are largely unknown. Here, we report the multiple-targeted antimicrobial effects of FNA on the SRB Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough by determining the growth, physiological, and gene expression responses to FNA exposure. The activities of growth, respiration, and ATP generation were inhibited when exposed to FNA. These changes were reflected in the transcript levels detected during exposure. The removal of FNA was evident by nitrite reduction that likely involved nitrite reductase and the poorly characterized hybrid cluster protein, and the genes coding for these proteins were highly expressed. During FNA exposure, lowered ribosome activity and protein production were detected. Additionally, conditions within the cells were more oxidizing, and there was evidence of oxidative stress. Based on an interpretation of the measured responses, we present a model depicting the antimicrobial effects of FNA on D. vulgaris These findings provide new insight for understanding the responses of D. vulgaris to FNA and will provide a foundation for optimal application of this antimicrobial agent for improved control of sewer corrosion and odor management.IMPORTANCE Hydrogen sulfide produced by SRB in sewers causes odor problems and results in serious deterioration of sewer assets that requires very costly and demanding rehabilitation. Currently, there is successful application of the antimicrobial agent free nitrous acid (FNA), the protonated form of nitrite, for the control of sulfide levels in sewers (G. Jiang et al., Water Res 47:4331-4339, 2013, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.watres.2013.05.024). However, the details of the

  9. Lupus vulgaris of external nose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandary, Satheesh Kumar; Ranganna, B Usha

    2008-12-01

    Lupus vulgaris is the commonest form of cutaneous tuberculosis which commonly involve trunk and buttocks. Lupus vulgaris affecting nose and face, are rarely reported in India. This study reports an unusual case of lupus vulgaris involving the external nose that showed dramatic outcome after six months of anti- tubercular treatment.

  10. Lupus vulgaris: difficulties in diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Julia; Caccetta, Tony Philip; Tait, Clare

    2013-05-01

    Lupus vulgaris is one of the most common forms of cutaneous tuberculosis. It presents a diagnostic challenge due to its paucibacillary nature. This is a report of a case of a delayed diagnosis of lupus vulgaris, presenting as perianal and peristomal plaques, followed by a review of the diagnostic tools for lupus vulgaris and their limitations.

  11. Psoriasiform lupus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmavathy, L; Rao, L Lakshmana; Ethirajan, N; Dhanlaklshmi, M

    2008-04-01

    Tuberculosis is a major public health problem in both developing and developed countries. Cutaneous Tuberculosis constitutes a minor proportion of extra-pulmonary manifestations of Tuberculosis. Lupus Vulgaris (LV) is one of the clinical variants of Cutaneous Tuberculosis. A case of a large plaque type psoriasiform lesion of lupus vulgaris on the thigh, of 15 years' duration, in an 18-year-old girl is reported. This case highlights the ignorance level among the patients and consequent failure to avail proper anti-tuberculous treatment despite campaign in print and audio visual media.

  12. Strongylus vulgaris and colic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Martin Krarup; Jacobsen, Stine; Olsen, Susanne Nautrup

    Strongylus vulgaris is regarded the most pathogenic helminth parasite infecting horses. It was once estimated to be the primary cause of colic in horses and has been termed the horse killer. Disease is ascribed to thromboembolism caused by larvae migrating in the mesenteric arteries eventually le...

  13. Lung and lupus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukta, V; Jayachandran, K

    2011-04-01

    Lupus vulgaris is chronic, postprimary, paucibacillary cutaneous tuberculosis found in individuals with moderate immunity and high degree of tuberculin sensitivity. Eighty percent of the lesions are on the head and neck. We present the case of a 38 year old lady who was admitted with complaints of worsening breathlessness and low grade fever of one month duration. Examination showed multiple, nontender skin ulcers on bilateral lumbar areas, two oozing serosanguinous discharge and others scarred in the centre. Respiratory system examination and chest X-ray revealed right sided pleural effusion. On investigation, pleural fluid was tuberculous in nature. Skin biopsy from the edge of ulcer was also suggestive of tuberculosis. Patient is doing well on antituberculous drugs. This case highlights the importance of cutaneous manifestations of systemic disease and is an example of the unusual presentation of lupus vulgaris in a case of pleural effusion.

  14. Pemphigus vulgaris in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzberg, Kelsey W; Gero, Melanie J; Ragsdale, Bruce D

    2014-10-01

    We report the case of a 34-year-old woman who was diagnosed with pemphigus vulgaris (PV) during pregnancy. The patient presented with widespread blistering dermatitis and associated burning and pruritus. At 6 weeks' gestation the patient was admitted to the hospital to expedite her diagnosis and initiate treatment. A skin biopsy revealed suprabasal acantholysis, and direct immunofluorescence demonstrated diffuse intercellular IgG in the epidermis and basal intercellular C3, which confirmed the diagnosis of PV. Treatment with corticosteroids was instituted after discussions with the patient about possible adverse effects to the fetus. Pemphigus vulgaris is rare in pregnancy and active PV presents potential threats of fetal spread and transient lesion production, which is associated with increased mortality and morbidity in the fetus. Our patient had active PV and required treatment throughout her pregnancy. The pregnancy progressed to premature delivery of the neonate without skin lesions or apparent complications.

  15. Depsides from Prunella vulgaris

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A novel depsides 1, together with three known ones 2~4 and two phenylpropanoids 5~6 were isolated from the ethanol extract of the spikes of Prunella vulgaris. On the basis of spectral and chemical evidence, their structures were deternined as butyl rosmarinate 1, ethyl rosmarinate 2, methyl rosmarinate 3, rosmarinic acid 4, 3,4,a -trihydroxy-methyl phenylpropionate 5 and p-coumaric acid 6, respectively.

  16. Survey of large protein complexes D. vulgaris reveals great structural diversity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, B.-G.; Dong, M.; Liu, H.; Camp, L.; Geller, J.; Singer, M.; Hazen, T. C.; Choi, M.; Witkowska, H. E.; Ball, D. A.; Typke, D.; Downing, K. H.; Shatsky, M.; Brenner, S. E.; Chandonia, J.-M.; Biggin, M. D.; Glaeser, R. M.

    2009-08-15

    An unbiased survey has been made of the stable, most abundant multi-protein complexes in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough (DvH) that are larger than Mr {approx} 400 k. The quaternary structures for 8 of the 16 complexes purified during this work were determined by single-particle reconstruction of negatively stained specimens, a success rate {approx}10 times greater than that of previous 'proteomic' screens. In addition, the subunit compositions and stoichiometries of the remaining complexes were determined by biochemical methods. Our data show that the structures of only two of these large complexes, out of the 13 in this set that have recognizable functions, can be modeled with confidence based on the structures of known homologs. These results indicate that there is significantly greater variability in the way that homologous prokaryotic macromolecular complexes are assembled than has generally been appreciated. As a consequence, we suggest that relying solely on previously determined quaternary structures for homologous proteins may not be sufficient to properly understand their role in another cell of interest.

  17. Expression profiling of hypothetical genes in Desulfovibrio vulgaris leads to improved functional annotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elias, Dwayne A.; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Joachimiak, Marcin P.; Drury, Elliott C.; Redding, Alyssa M.; Yen, Huei-Che B.; Fields, Matthew W.; Hazen, Terry C.; Arkin, Adam P.; Keasling, Jay D.; Wall, Judy D.

    2008-10-27

    Hypothetical and conserved hypothetical genes account for>30percent of sequenced bacterial genomes. For the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, 347 of the 3634 genes were annotated as conserved hypothetical (9.5percent) along with 887 hypothetical genes (24.4percent). Given the large fraction of the genome, it is plausible that some of these genes serve critical cellular roles. The study goals were to determine which genes were expressed and provide a more functionally based annotation. To accomplish this, expression profiles of 1234 hypothetical and conserved genes were used from transcriptomic datasets of 11 environmental stresses, complemented with shotgun LC-MS/MS and AMT tag proteomic data. Genes were divided into putatively polycistronic operons and those predicted to be monocistronic, then classified by basal expression levels and grouped according to changes in expression for one or multiple stresses. 1212 of these genes were transcribed with 786 producing detectable proteins. There was no evidence for expression of 17 predicted genes. Except for the latter, monocistronic gene annotation was expanded using the above criteria along with matching Clusters of Orthologous Groups. Polycistronic genes were annotated in the same manner with inferences from their proximity to more confidently annotated genes. Two targeted deletion mutants were used as test cases to determine the relevance of the inferred functional annotations.

  18. Construction and Evaluation of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Whole-Genome Oligonucleotide Microarrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Z. He; Q. He; L. Wu; M.E. Clark; J.D. Wall; Jizhong Zhou; Matthew W. Fields

    2004-03-17

    Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough has been the focus of biochemical and physiological studies in the laboratory, and the metabolic versatility of this organism has been largely recognized, particularly the reduction of sulfate, fumarate, iron, uranium and chromium. In addition, a Desulfovibrio sp. has been shown to utilize uranium as the sole electron acceptor. D. vulgaris is a d-Proteobacterium with a genome size of 3.6 Mb and 3584 ORFs. The whole-genome microarrays of D. vulgaris have been constructed using 70mer oligonucleotides. All ORFs in the genome were represented with 3471 (97.1%) unique probes and 103 (2.9%) non-specific probes that may have cross-hybridization with other ORFs. In preparation for use of the experimental microarrays, artificial probes and targets were designed to assess specificity and sensitivity and identify optimal hybridization conditions for oligonucleotide microarrays. The results indicated that for 50mer and 70mer oligonucleotide arrays, hybridization at 45 C to 50 C, washing at 37 C and a wash time of 2.5 to 5 minutes obtained specific and strong hybridization signals. In order to evaluate the performance of the experimental microarrays, growth conditions were selected that were expected to give significant hybridization differences for different sets of genes. The initial evaluations were performed using D. vulgaris cells grown at logarithmic and stationary phases. Transcriptional analysis of D. vulgaris cells sampled during logarithmic phase growth indicated that 25% of annotated ORFs were up-regulated and 3% of annotated ORFs were downregulated compared to stationary phase cells. The up-regulated genes included ORFs predicted to be involved with acyl chain biosynthesis, amino acid ABC transporter, translational initiation factors, and ribosomal proteins. In the stationary phase growth cells, the two most up-regulated ORFs (70-fold) were annotated as a carboxynorspermidine decarboxylase and a 2C-methyl-D-erythritol-2

  19. Thymus vulgaris subsp. mansanetianus subsp. nov. (Lamiaceae)

    OpenAIRE

    Pedro Pablo Ferrer-Gallego; Albert J. Navarro Peris; Emilio Laguna Lumbreras; Gonzalo Mateo Sanz

    2013-01-01

    RESUMEN: Se describe una nueva subespecie de Thymus vulgaris L. (Lamiaceae); Th. vulgaris subsp. mansanetianus subsp. nov., caracterizada por presentar un hábito postrado, tallos estoloníferos, decumbentes y radicantes, hojas muy estrechas y una floración otoñal. ABSTRACT: Thymus vulgaris subsp. mansanetianus subsp. nov. (Lamiaceae). A new subspecies of Thymus vulgaris L. (Lamiaceae); Th. vulgaris subsp. mansanetianus subsp. nov. is described. This new subspecies is characterized by its prost...

  20. Pathway confirmation and flux analysis of central metabolicpathways in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough using gaschromatography-mass spectrometry and fourier transform-ion cyclotronresonance mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Yinjie; Pingitore, Francesco; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Phan,Richard; Hazen, Terry C.; Keasling, Jay D.

    2006-07-11

    It has been proposed that during growth under anaerobic oroxygen-limited conditions Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 uses theserine-isocitrate lyase pathway common to many methylotrophic anaerobes,in which formaldehyde produced from pyruvate is condensed with glycine toform serine. The serine is then transformed through hydroxypyruvate andglycerate to enter central metabolism at phosphoglycerate. To examine itsuse of the serine-isocitrate lyase pathway under anaerobic conditions, wegrew S. oneidensis MR-1 on [1-13C]lactate as the sole carbon source witheither trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) or fumarate as an electron acceptor.Analysis of cellular metabolites indicates that a large percentage(>75 percent) of lactate was partially oxidized to either acetate orpyruvate. The 13C isotope distributions in amino acids and other keymetabolites indicate that, under anaerobic conditions, a complete serinepathway is not present, and lactate is oxidized via a highly reversibleserine degradation pathway. The labeling data also suggest significantactivity in the anaplerotic (malic enzyme and phosphoenolpyruvatecarboxylase) and glyoxylate shunt (isocitrate lyase and malate synthase)reactions. Although the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle is often observedto be incomplete in many other anaerobes (absence of 2-oxoglutaratedehydrogenase activity), isotopic labeling supports the existence of acomplete TCA cycle in S. oneidensis MR-1 under TMAO reductioncondition.

  1. Development of a Model, Metal-reducing Microbial Community for a System Biology Level Assessment of Desulfovibrio vulgaris as part of a Community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elias, Dwayne; Schadt, Christopher; Miller, Lance; Phelps, Tommy; Brown, S. D.; Arkin, Adam; Hazen, Terry; Drake, Megin; Yang, Z.K.; Podar, Mircea

    2010-05-17

    One of the largest experimental gaps is between the simplicity of pure cultures and the complexity of open environmental systems, particularly in metal-contaminated areas. These microbial communities form ecosystem foundations, drive biogeochemical processes, and are relevant for biotechnology and bioremediation. A model, metal-reducing microbial community was constructed as either syntrophic or competitive to study microbial cell to cell interactions, cell signaling and competition for resources. The microbial community was comprised of the metal-reducing Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough and Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA. Additionally, Methanococcus maripaludis S2 was added to study complete carbon reduction and maintain a low hydrogen partial pressure for syntrophism to occur. Further, considerable work has been published on D. vulgaris and the D. vulgaris/ Mc. maripaludis co-culture both with and without stress. We are extending this work by conducting the same stress conditions on the model community. Additionally, this comprehensive investigation includes physiological and metabolic analyses as well as specially designed mRNA microarrays with the genes for all three organisms on one slide so as to follow gene expression changes in the various cultivation conditions as well as being comparable to the co- and individual cultures. Further, state-of -the-art comprehensive AMT tag proteomics allows for these comparisons at the protein level for a systems biology assessment of a model, metal-reducing microbial community. Preliminary data revealed that lactate oxidation by D. vulgaris was sufficient to support both G. sulfurreducens and M. maripaludis via the excretion of H2 and acetate. Fumarate was utilized by G. sulfurreducens and reduced to succinate since neither of the other two organisms can reduce fumarate. Methane was quantified, suggesting acetate and H2 concentrations were sufficient for M. maripaludis. Steady state community cultivation will allow for

  2. The immunogenetics of pemphigus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazit, Ephraim; Loewenthal, Ron

    2005-01-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is an autoimmune blistering disease of the skin of unknown etiology. While various environmental factors have been implicated as triggering agents, HLA association is probably the most important predisposing factor. The aim of this review is to highlight the association of HLA with pemphigus vulgaris. In addition, we present recent results showing a possible association with the nonclassical HLA-G antigen.

  3. Nail manifestations in pemphigus vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cahali Juliana Burihan

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Nail involvement in pemphigus vulgaris is rare. We describe 5 patients with pemphigus vulgaris presenting nail involvement. In this disease, nail manifestations present, by order of frequency, as chronic paronychia, onychomadesis, onycholysis, Beau's lines and trachyonychia. All our 5 cases presented with paronychia, and 1 of them also had Beau's lines. Treatment with prednisone and/or cyclophosphamide controlled mucocutaneous and nail manifestations in all cases.

  4. [Acne vulgaris: endocrine aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekkers, O M; Thio, B H; Romijn, J A; Smit, J W A

    2006-06-10

    Androgens play an important part in the development of acne vulgaris. Androgen levels in patients with acne are higher than those in controls and people with the androgen insensitivity syndrome do not develop acne. Local factors other than androgen plasma levels, also play a part in the development of acne. The skin contains enzymes that convert precursor hormones to the more potent androgens such as testosterone and dihydrotestosterone. Androgen synthesis can therefore be regulated locally. The effects of androgens on the skin are the result of circulating androgens and enzyme activity in local tissues and androgen receptors. Acne is a clinical manifestation of some endocrine diseases. The polycystic ovary syndrome has the highest prevalence. In women with acne that persists after puberty, in 10-200% of cases polycystic ovary syndrome is later diagnosed. The mechanism of hormonal anti-acne therapy may work by blocking the androgen-production (oestrogens) or by blocking the androgen receptor (cyproterone, spironolactone).

  5. Pemphigus Vulgaris Presented with Cheilitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaheer Abbas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Pemphigus vulgaris is an autoimmune blistering disease affecting the mucous membrane and skin. In 50 to 70% of cases, the initial manifestations of pemphigus vulgaris are oral lesions which may be followed by skin lesions. But it is unusual for the disease to present with initial and solitary persistent lower lip lesions without progression to any other location. Main Observations. We report a 41-year-old woman with dry crusted lesions only on the lower lip, clinically resembling actinic cheilitis and erosive lichen planus, but histopathological evaluation showed unexpected results of suprabasal acantholysis and cleft compatible with pemphigus vulgaris. We treated her with intralesional triamcinolone 10 mg/mL for 2 sessions and 2 g cellcept daily. Patient showed excellent response and lesions resolved completely within 2 months. In one-year follow-up, there was no evidence of relapse or any additional lesion on the other sites. Conclusion. Cheilitis may be the initial and sole manifestation of pemphigus vulgaris. Localized and solitary lesions of pemphigus vulgaris can be treated and controlled without systemic corticosteroids.

  6. Signalling pathways in pemphigus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoguang; Ishii, Norito; Ohata, Chika; Furumura, Minao; Hashimoto, Takashi

    2014-03-01

    Acantholysis in pemphigus vulgaris is induced by binding of autoantibodies to desmoglein 3 (Dsg3). The roles of signalling pathways on development of acantholysis have recently been extensively studied. In the study by Sayar et al., recently published in Exp Dermatol, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signalling was activated in both in vivo and in vitro pemphigus vulgaris experimental models. However, while EGFR inhibitors suppressed activity of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK) linearly, they suppressed activity of c-Myc and acantholysis in a non-linear, V-shaped relationship. These findings indicated complicated interactions among EGFR, p38MAPK and c-Myc in pemphigus vulgaris pathology.

  7. Atopic dermatitis and ichthyosis vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinowitz, L G; Esterly, N B

    1994-06-01

    Atopic dermatitis remains a common skin problem in the pediatric age group. General approaches to management focus on reducing inflammation and pruritus as well as preventing xerosis. Ichthyosis vulgaris is the most common form of the ichthyoses and often is associated with atopic dermatitis. Recognition of these conditions is necessary to institute therapy that will alleviate the discomfort experienced by affected individuals.

  8. Porokeratosis Masquerading As Lupus Vulgaris

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    Das Sudip

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Porokeratosis is a specific disorder of kerstinization characterized histologically by cornoid lamella. Lesions of porokeratosis present varied features, often mimicking other dermatological disorders. Herein, we report a case of porokeratosis of Mibelli presenting with verrucous lesions simulating lupus vulgaris.

  9. Disseminated lupus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Taru; Ramchander; Shrihar, Rashmi; Gupta, Tanvi Pal; Aggarwal, Shilpi

    2011-01-01

    follicular plugging and multiple epithelioid cell granulomas, rimmed by lymphocytes in the deeper portion of the dermis, mainly peri-appendageal. Stain for acid-fast bacteria was negative. Cultures from the skin lesions were negative. The patient was diagnosed as having lupus vulgaris with multiple lesions of varying morphology at different sites with pulmonary tuberculosis and healed lymph node involvement.

  10. Pemphigus vulgaris in adolescence: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, Jean Paulo Rodolfo [UNESP; Araújo, Paula Caetano [UNESP; SAliba, Marcos Tadeu Adas [UNESP; Consolaro,Renata Bianco; Garbin,Cléa Adas Saliba

    2013-01-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris is an autoimmune disease, normally associated with oral lesions that generally affects patients aged 40 - 60 years. The aim of this study was to report a case of pemphigus vulgaris presenting at an uncommon age with advanced periodontal disease, and to describe the treatment performed from the time of diagnosis through oral environment restoration and follow-up monitoring. One gingival vesicular lesion was biopsied. After the histological confirmation of pemphigus vulgaris,...

  11. Extensive keloid formation after pemphigus vulgaris

    OpenAIRE

    Sako, Eric Y; Worswick, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris is an immunobullous disease characterized by intraepidermal blister formation. These blisters eventually rupture, leaving erosions that are slow to heal, often leaving hyperpigmented patches, but no scars. We describe a case of a 67- year-old man with pemphigus vulgaris who suffered severe keloidal scarring after the pemphigus lesions became infected. His keloids were treated with intralesional corticosteroids with some improvement. Pemphigus vulgaris, a process confined to...

  12. Extensive keloid formation after pemphigus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sako, Eric Y; Workwick, Scott

    2015-11-18

    Pemphigus vulgaris is an immunobullous disease characterized by intraepidermal blister formation. These blisters eventually rupture, leaving erosions that are slow to heal, often leaving hyperpigmented patches, but no scars. We describe a case of a 67- year-old man with pemphigus vulgaris who suffered severe keloidal scarring after the pemphigus lesions became infected. His keloids were treated with intralesional corticosteroids with some improvement. Pemphigus vulgaris, a process confined to the epidermis, may lead to scarring in predisposed individuals, particularly if infection occurs.

  13. Therapeutic Agents in Acne Vulgaris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Wm. D.; Maddin, Stuart; Nelson, A. J.; Danto, J. L.

    1963-01-01

    A total of 120 consecutive patients with pustular and cystic acne vulgaris were selected for study. Patients were assigned a placebo and a tetracycline medication in a random method. Of the 53 patients who were given tetracycline, 45 showed some response, which was fair in 19 and excellent in 26. Of the 55 patients who received placebo, 24 showed no response while 31 showed some improvement. No side effects were reported. The difference in response between the two groups is statistically significant. It is concluded that administration of 250 mg. tetracycline four times daily, even for periods as short as two weeks, enhances the likelihood of improvement of cystic or pustular acne vulgaris. PMID:14079132

  14. Aspek Imunologis pada Pemphigus Vulgaris

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    Saraventi Saraventi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Pemphigus vulgaris is a relatively uncommon autoimmune disease marked with blister appearance of the skin tissue and mucosal membrane, resulting in loss of intercellular adhesion as well as the intact of epithelial cells, or so-called acantholysis. In this autoimmune disease the immune system forms autoantibodies attacking desmoglein, a specific protein at the skin tissue. The predisposing factors are presumed to include genetic and ethnic origin of the patient. Although at first usually without symptoms, after proceeding to the ulcerating stage the disease can result in fatal complications. Considering that almost 60% of the cases are first manifested in the oral mucosa, it is important that the dentists are aware of the basic etiology and immunology of the disease for correct diagnosis and therapy. This work reviews the etiopathogenesis of Pemphigus vulgaris, with emphasis on immunological aspects and immunotherapy.

  15. GLYCOSIDES FROM LINARIA VULGARIS MILL

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    Natalia Mashcenko

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A new flavonol glycoside, 5,4′-dimethylkaempferol 3-O-β-D-(6′′-α-Lrhamnopyranosyl -glucopyranoside, together with three known compounds were isolated from the n-butanolic soluble fraction of underground and aerial parts of Linaria vulgaris Mill, collected on the territory of Moldova. The characterisation of these compounds was achieved by various chromatographic and spectroscopic methods (IR, UV, 13C-NMR, 1H-NMR and MS.

  16. Fermentative hydrogen production in an up-flow anaerobic biofilm reactor inoculated with a co-culture of Clostridium acetobutylicum and Desulfovibrio vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barca, Cristian; Ranava, David; Bauzan, Marielle; Ferrasse, Jean-Henry; Giudici-Orticoni, Marie-Thérèse; Soric, Audrey

    2016-12-01

    Dark fermentation systems often show low H2 yields and unstable H2 production, as the result of the variability of microbial dynamics and metabolic pathways. Recent batch investigations have demonstrated that an artificial consortium of two anaerobic bacteria, Clostridium acetobutylicum and Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, may redirect metabolic fluxes and improve H2 yields. This study aimed at evaluating the scale-up from batch to continuous H2 production in an up-flow anaerobic packed-bed reactor (APBR) continuously fed with a glucose-medium. The effects of various parameters, including void hydraulic retention time (HRTv), pH, and alkalinity, on H2 production performances and metabolic pathways were investigated. The results demonstrated that a stable H2 production was reached after 3-4days of operation. H2 production rates increased significantly with decreasing HRTv from 4 to 2h. Instead, H2 yields remained almost stable despite the change in HRTv, indicating that the decrease in HRTv did not affect the global metabolism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Unrecognized dermatophyte infection in ichthyosis vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grahovac, Maja; Budimcić, Dragomir

    2009-01-01

    A case of unrecognized widespread dermatophyte infection associated with ichthyosis vulgaris and atopy is described. Our patient was a young woman in which the diagnosis of ichthyosis vulgaris and atopic dermatitis blocked the recognition of widespread dermatophyte infection for more than six months. The case showed some clinical peculiarities in terms of both extent of lesions and their clinical appearance.

  18. Sporotrichoid lupus vulgaris: A rare presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheshwari, Anshul; Tiwari, Siddhi; Mathur, Deepak K; Bhargava, Puneet

    2015-01-01

    Lupus vulgaris is the most common presentation of cutaneous tuberculosis in India and can present as papular, nodular, plaque, ulcerative, vegetating, and tumid forms. Unusual variants include the frambesiform, gangrenous, ulcerovegetating, lichen simplex chronicus, myxomatous, and sporotrichoid types. We describe a rare sporotrichoid presentation of lupus vulgaris on the leg of a 28-year-old female of 12 years duration.

  19. Pemphigus vulgaris with solitary toxic thyroid nodule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfishawy, Mostafa; Anwar, Karim; Elbendary, Amira; Daoud, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Background. Pemphigus vulgaris is an autoimmune vesiculobullous disease, affecting the skin and mucous membranes. It is reported to be associated with other autoimmune diseases including autoimmune thyroid diseases. However we report herein a case of pemphigus vulgaris associated with autonomous toxic nodule. Case Presentation. A 51-year-old woman was evaluated for blisters and erosions that develop on her trunk, face, and extremities, with a five-year history of progressively enlarging neck mass, and a past medical history of pemphigus vulgaris seven years ago. The condition was associated with palpitation, dyspnea, and heat intolerance. Thyroid function tests and thyroid scan were compatible with the diagnosis of thyrotoxicosis due to autonomous toxic nodule. Exacerbation of pemphigus vulgaris was proved by skin biopsy from the patient which revealed histologic picture of pemphigus vulgaris. Conclusion. Autoimmune thyroid diseases are reported to associate pemphigus vulgaris. To our knowledge, this case is the first in the English literature to report association between pemphigus vulgaris and autonomous toxic nodule and highlights the possibility of occurrence of pemphigus vulgaris with a nonautoimmune thyroid disease raising the question: is it just a coincidence or is there an explanation for the occurrence of both conditions together?

  20. Pemphigus Vulgaris with Solitary Toxic Thyroid Nodule

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    Mostafa Alfishawy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Pemphigus vulgaris is an autoimmune vesiculobullous disease, affecting the skin and mucous membranes. It is reported to be associated with other autoimmune diseases including autoimmune thyroid diseases. However we report herein a case of pemphigus vulgaris associated with autonomous toxic nodule. Case Presentation. A 51-year-old woman was evaluated for blisters and erosions that develop on her trunk, face, and extremities, with a five-year history of progressively enlarging neck mass, and a past medical history of pemphigus vulgaris seven years ago. The condition was associated with palpitation, dyspnea, and heat intolerance. Thyroid function tests and thyroid scan were compatible with the diagnosis of thyrotoxicosis due to autonomous toxic nodule. Exacerbation of pemphigus vulgaris was proved by skin biopsy from the patient which revealed histologic picture of pemphigus vulgaris. Conclusion. Autoimmune thyroid diseases are reported to associate pemphigus vulgaris. To our knowledge, this case is the first in the English literature to report association between pemphigus vulgaris and autonomous toxic nodule and highlights the possibility of occurrence of pemphigus vulgaris with a nonautoimmune thyroid disease raising the question: is it just a coincidence or is there an explanation for the occurrence of both conditions together?

  1. Lupus vulgaris with squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motswaledi, Mojakgomo Hendrick; Doman, Chantal

    2007-12-01

    Tuberculosis is still a significant problem in developing countries. Cutaneous forms of tuberculosis account for approximately 10% of all cases of extrapulmonary tuberculosis. Cutaneous tuberculosis may be because of true infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis or because of tuberculids. Tuberculids are immunological reactions to haematogenously spread antigenic components of M. tuberculosis. True cutaneous tuberculosis may be because of inoculation or haematogenous spread of M. tuberculosis to the skin. Lupus vulgaris is the commonest form of true cutaneous tuberculosis. Other forms of true cutaneous tuberculosis are tuberculous chancre, tuberculosis verrucosa cutis, scrofuloderma, periorificial tuberculosis and miliary tuberculosis of the skin. Lupus vulgaris is usually chronic and progressive. It occurs in patients with moderate to high immunity against M. tuberculosis as evidenced by strongly positive tuberculin test. Long-standing cases of lupus vulgaris may be complicated by squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). We describe a patient who had undiagnosed lupus vulgaris for 35 years until she developed SCC on the lesion of lupus vulgaris.

  2. Pseudoainhum associated with Psoriasis vulgaris

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    Mrinal Gupta

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Pseudoainhum is the term applied to constricting bands around the digits or the limb which are either congenital or secondary to another disease. Progression of the constriction bands can lead to irreversible damage and autoamputation of the affected digit. Congenital pseudoainhum usually results due to amniotic bands or adhesions in utero while acquired pseudoainhum is usually secondary to trauma, neuropathy, systemic sclerosis or infections like leprosy. Psoriasis is a rare cause of acquired pseudoainhum with only five cases reported till date. We report a case of pseudoainhum secondary to psoriasis vulgaris in a 45 year old male which was successfully treated with topical corticosteroids and systemic methotrexate therapy.

  3. Lupus vulgaris of the auricle

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    Hojat Eftekhari

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays despite decrease in the tuberculosis (TB incidence around the world with standard anti tubercular treatment, atypical forms of TB is increasing due to extensive use of immunosuppressive therapy for autoimmune diseases and increasing prevalence of HIV infection, so early diagnosis of pulmonary and extra pulmonary TB in these patients is very important. Cutaneous TB could be a great imitator and confused with other granulomatous lesions. It has different morphological patterns. Lupus vulgaris (LV is the most common type of cutaneous TB which usually involves head and neck. We present herein a case of LV in auricular region without apparent systemic involvement.

  4. Vegetative propagation of Bambusa vulgaris

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    Rafael Malfitano Braga

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Bamboo is an important source of raw material of multiple uses. The development of simple techniques for its propagation is a practical way to enable its implementation in ownership of low technology. The present work had the objective of evaluating artisanal propagation methods for Bambusa vulgaris. Two types of propagules were tested, with buds budded or not, and three relative positions to the removal of vegetative material on the culm. The best propagule was with only one node, extracted from the lower thirds of the stem, presenting 72% of rooting. This result demonstrates its potential for seedling production of this species under low tech.

  5. Management strategies for acne vulgaris

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    Whitney KM

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Kristen M Whitney1, Chérie M Ditre21Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 2Skin Enhancement Center and Cosmetic Dermatology, Department of Dermatology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USADate of preparation: 30th November 2010Conflicts of interest: None declaredClinical question: What are the most effective treatment(s for mild, moderate, severe, and hormonally driven acne?Results: Mild acne responds favorably to topical treatments such as benzoyl peroxide, salicylic acid, and a low-dose retinoid. Moderate acne responds well to combination therapy comprising-topical benzoyl peroxide, antibiotics, and/or retinoids, as well as oral antibiotics in refractory cases and oral contraceptive pills for female acne patients. Severe nodulocystic acne vulgaris responds best to oral isotretinoin therapy. In female patients with moderate to severe acne, facial hair, loss of scalp hair and irregular periods, polycystic ovarian syndrome should be considered and appropriate treatment with hormonal modulation given. Adjunctive procedures can also be considered for all acne patients.Implementation: Pitfalls to avoid when treating acne: treatment of acne in women of childbearing age; familiarization of all acne treatments in order to individualize management for patients; indications for specialist referral.Keywords: acne vulgaris, benzoyl peroxide, retinoids, antibiotics, light and laser therapy, photodynamic therapy, photopneumatic therapy, chemical peels

  6. PATIENT WITH VERUCCA VULGARIS RECCURENT

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    Ni Made Gita Saraswati

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 The common wart or verruca vulgaris are benign lesions, elevated, firm nodules with characteristic papillomatous surface projections. This lession could appear anywhere in the body, mostly in fingers. The lesion could spread anywhere in the body, leaving a scar and also have a high incidence of reccurency. This report describe a man with verruca vulgaris recurrent. Preventive is important to prevent the reccurency, beside electrodesication as a curative therapy. /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

  7. Hypertrophic lupus vulgaris: an unusual presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Vijay K; Aggarwal, Kamal; Jain, Sarika; Singh, Sunita

    2009-07-01

    Lupus vulgaris is the most common form of cutaneous tuberculosis occurring in previously sensitized individuals with a high degree of tuberculin sensitivity. Various forms including plaque, ulcerative, hypertrophic, vegetative, papular, and nodular forms have been described. A 30-year-old male patient presented with a very large hypertrophic lupus vulgaris lesion over left side of chest since 22 years. Histopathological examination showed granulomatous infiltration without caseation necrosis. The Mantoux reaction was strongly positive. Hypertrophic lupus vulgaris of such a giant size and that too at an unusual site is extremely rare and hence is being reported.

  8. Extensive keloidal healing of pemphigus vulgaris

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    Khanna Neena

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Bullae of pemphigus vulgaris heal without scarring. We here report a patient of pemphigus vulgaris whose lesions healed with a one-month history of extensive flaccid bullae and uninfected erosions on the trunk and extremities along with superficial erosions in the oral mucosa. The clinical suspicion of pemphigus vulgaris was confirmed by histopathological and immunohistological examination. Pulse therapy with monthly parenteral dexamethasone and cyclophosphamide pulse was instituted. The cutaneous lesions on healing formed extensive keloidal scars despite high dose of monthly corticosteroid therapy.

  9. Phaseolus vulgaris endornavirus 1 and Phaseolus vulgaris endornavirus 2 infecting common bean Phaseolus vulgaris genotypes show differential infection patterns between gene pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    We investigated the occurrence of two plant endornaviruses, Phaseolus vulgaris endornavirus 1 (PvEV-1) and Phaseolus vulgaris endornavirus 2 (PvEV-2), in breeding-lines, cultivars, landraces, and wild genotypes of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) as well as other Phaseolus species collected from two...

  10. Berberis Vulgaris and Berberine: An Update Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imenshahidi, Mohsen; Hosseinzadeh, Hossein

    2016-11-01

    Berberine is an isoquinoline alkaloid present in several plants, including Coptis sp. and Berberis sp. Berberine is a customary component in Chinese medicine, and is characterized by a diversity of pharmacological effects. An extensive search in electronic databases (PubMed, Scopus, Ovid, Wiley, ProQuest, ISI, and Science Direct) were used to identify the pharmacological and clinical studies on Berberis vulgaris and berberine, during 2008 to 2015, using 'berberine' and 'Berberis vulgaris' as search words. We found more than 1200 new article studying the properties and clinical uses of berberine and B. vulgaris, for treating tumor, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, hyperlipidemia, inflammation, bacterial and viral infections, cerebral ischemia trauma, mental disease, Alzheimer disease, osteoporosis, and so on. In this article, we have updated the pharmacological effects of B. vulgaris and its active constituent, berberine. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Pulse Clarithromycin Therapy In Severe ACNE Vulgaris

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    Rathi Sanjay K

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Three patients with severe acne vulgaris, not responding with long courses of doxycycline, minocycline and erythromycin were given oral clarithromycin in pulsed regimen. The patients were given 7 days course of clarithromycin 250mg twice daily, which was repeated after a gap of 10 days. Such 3 courses were given. The lesions responded significantly. No significant side effect was noted. Pulse clarithromycin therapy seems to be a good alternative and effective tool in the management of severe acne vulgaris.

  12. Neonatal and infantile acne vulgaris: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serna-Tamayo, Cristian; Janniger, Camila K; Micali, Giuseppe; Schwartz, Robert A

    2014-07-01

    Acne may present in neonates, infants, and small children. Neonatal and infantile acne vulgaris are not considered to be rare. The presentation of acne in this patient population sometimes represents virilization and may portend later development of severe adolescent acne. Neonatal and infantile acne vulgaris must be distinguished from other cutaneous disorders seen in newborns and infants. Infantile acne tends to be more pleomorphic and inflammatory, thus requiring more vigorous therapy than neonatal acne.

  13. Pemphigus vulgaris presenting with multiple lesion morphologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Philip In; Divito, Sherrie J; Kroshinsky, Daniela

    2014-12-14

    Pemphigus vulgaris is an uncommon intraepidermal blistering disorder that typically presents with flaccid bullae or erosions. We report a patient with pemphigus vulgaris who presented with several unusual clinical features: tense bullae with dependently layered pus, true target lesions coalescing into annular configurations, and diffuse desquamation that initially raised concern for toxic epidermal necrolysis. We discuss the differential diagnosis and implications of these morphological findings.

  14. Management of pemphigus vulgaris: challenges and solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Gregoriou S; Efthymiou O; Stefanaki C; Rigopoulos D

    2015-01-01

    Stamatis Gregoriou, Ourania Efthymiou, Christina Stefanaki, Dimitris Rigopoulos 2nd Department of Dermatology and Venereology, University of Athens Medical School, Attikon Hospital, Athens, Greece Abstract: The main objective in the treatment of pemphigus vulgaris is to control the disease, prevent relapses, and avoid adverse events associated with the prolonged use of steroids and immunosuppressive agents. Systemic corticosteroids remain the gold standard treatment for pemphigus vulgaris. A...

  15. Serum angiotensin converting enzyme in pemphigus vulgaris

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    Reza M Robati

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pemphigus vulgaris is an autoimmune blistering skin disease with unknown etiology. Drugs such as angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitors may contribute in the pathogenesis of pemphigus. Objective: We plan this essay to evaluate the serum ACE level in pemphigus vulgaris patients in comparison with healthy controls to recognize its possible role in disease pathogenesis or activity. Methods: This study was planned and performed in the dermatology clinics of Shahid Beheshti University of MedicalSciences′ Hospitals between July 2010 and June 2011. Patients with new onset of pemphigus vulgaris were enrolled in our study. Control subjects were frequency-matched to cases by sex and age. Serum ACE was determined by the spectrophotometric method. Results: Thirty-four patients with pemphigus vulgaris and 35 healthy individuals were recruited in the study. No statistical significant difference was detected in the mean level of serum ACE of the two groups (t-test, P = 0.11. The mean ACE level was significantly lower in male patients compared with male controls (P = 0.04. Moreover, a significant higher serum ACE level of patients with cutaneous involvement was observed compared to patients with mucosal involvement (P = 0.02. Conclusions: Despite lack of any significant difference of serum ACE level between pemphigus and control group, the serum ACE level was considerably lower in male pemphigus vulgaris patients compared with male controls. Therefore, ACE might have some association with pemphigus vulgaris especially in male patients; however, further studies are required to confirm this association.

  16. Pemphigus vulgaris: approach to treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Animesh A; Hoffman, Melissa B; Janicke, Elise C

    2015-04-01

    The therapeutic management of pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is centered around immunosuppression, which can be generalized, as in the use of corticosteroids or steroid sparing agents, or specific, as in therapeutic blockage of autoantibody production, certain cytokines, or signaling pathways. Currently, the backbone of treatment for PV, particularly, first line therapy, remains systemic corticosteroids. Although very effective, the significant side effects of long-term corticosteroid usage are well documented. Adjunctive therapies aim to eliminate, or at least decrease, the necessary dose of corticosteroids. Specifically, azathioprine, cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, cyclosporine, mycophenolate mofetil and dapsone are now widely used in PV. Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), plasmapheresis, immunoadsorption, and most recently, rituximab, are other members of the therapeutic armamentarium. However, despite the widening range of treatment options in PV, well-controlled clinical trials and consensus guidelines are lacking.

  17. Sunflower Seed and Acne Vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohebbipour, Alireza; Sadeghi-Bazargani, Homayoun; Mansouri, Mona

    2015-09-01

    Regardless of the overall association between diet and acne which cannot be easily ignored, there might be an association between specific nutrients and acne development or improvement. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of dietary intake of sunflower seeds on acne severity and the pattern of acne lesions. In a randomized controlled trial, 50 patients aged 15 - 30 years old with acne vulgaris were enrolled through consecutive convenient sampling, in a dermatology clinic in Ardabil, Iran. They were randomly allocated into two trial arms. Those in the control group were asked to stop eating sunflower seeds if they did before. In the intervention group, they consumed 25 g sunflower-containing food daily for seven days. The primary outcome of interest was 10% increase/decrease in the baseline acne severity index (ASI), sustained to the end of the follow-up period on day 14. The mean ASI did not change significantly through the study period in the control group, but it increased in the sunflower group from 62 at the baseline to 86.8 after two weeks (P acne grading score (GAGS) did not significantly change in any of the groups and the difference in the change of GAGS was not significant between the groups (2.4 in the sunflower group versus 1.6 in the control group). Twenty two subjects (88%) in the sunflower group versus 9 (36%) in the control group had at least 10% increment in ASI throughout the follow-up period (P acne vulgaris; however, further evidence is needed to ban sunflower seed intake in patients with acne. Considering the observed potential negative effect in this trial, future randomized clinical trials may base their design on randomly assigning the exposed patients to give up use of sunflower seed intake.

  18. PEMANFAATAN MIKROALGA LAUT Chlorella vulgaris SUMBER DHA DAN EPA

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Penelitian tentang mikroalga laut jenis Chlorella vulgaris telah dilakukan. Chlorella vulgaris dipilih sebagai bahan penambah gizi untuk di fortifikasi kedalam makanan . Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui kandungan gizi dengan menganalisis kandungan DHA dan EPA. Penelitian ini dilakukan dengan mengkultur fitoplankton Chlorella vulgaris dan dipanen setelah media kultur mencapai fase Stasioner. Kemudian, dikeringkan dengan menggunakan freeze dryer, biomassa kering dianalisis kandungan DH...

  19. Complementary therapies for acne vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Huijuan; Yang, Guoyan; Wang, Yuyi; Liu, Jian Ping; Smith, Caroline A; Luo, Hui; Liu, Yueming

    2015-01-19

    Acne is a chronic skin disease characterised by inflamed spots and blackheads on the face, neck, back, and chest. Cysts and scarring can also occur, especially in more severe disease. People with acne often turn to complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), such as herbal medicine, acupuncture, and dietary modifications, because of their concerns about the adverse effects of conventional medicines. However, evidence for CAM therapies has not been systematically assessed. To assess the effects and safety of any complementary therapies in people with acne vulgaris. We searched the following databases from inception up to 22 January 2014: the Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2014,Issue 1), MEDLINE (from 1946), Embase (from 1974), PsycINFO (from 1806), AMED (from 1985), CINAHL (from 1981), Scopus (from 1966), and a number of other databases listed in the Methods section of the review. The Cochrane CAM Field Specialised Register was searched up to May 2014. We also searched five trials registers and checked the reference lists of articles for further references to relevant trials. We included parallel-group randomised controlled trials (or the first phase data of randomised cross-over trials) of any kind of CAM, compared with no treatment, placebo, or other active therapies, in people with a diagnosis of acne vulgaris. Three authors collected data from each included trial and evaluated the methodological quality independently. They resolved disagreements by discussion and, as needed, arbitration by another author. We included 35 studies, with a total of 3227 participants. We evaluated the majority as having unclear risk of selection, attrition, reporting, detection, and other biases. Because of the clinical heterogeneity between trials and the incomplete data reporting, we could only include four trials in two meta-analyses, with two trials in each meta-analysis. The categories of CAM included

  20. Ocular involvement in pemphigus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhyani, Maryam; Keshtkar-Jafari, Alireza; Chams-Davatchi, Cheyda; Lajevardi, Vahide; Beigi, Sara; Aghazadeh, Nessa; Rayati Damavandi, Maede; Arami, Shabnam

    2014-07-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is an autoimmune disorder affecting the skin and mucous membranes. Ocular involvement in PV has been reported but its prevalence and clinical characteristics are not well defined. This prospective cross-sectional study of 103 PV patients was designed to determine the prevalence, clinical types and epidemiological trends of ocular involvement in a population of Iranian patients with PV. Ocular involvement was present in 17 (16.5%) patients. Conjunctivitis was the most prevalent type of ocular involvement (9/17, 52.9%), followed by erosion of the palpebral conjunctiva (7/17, 41.2%). Erosion of the bulbar conjunctiva was noted in only one patient (5.9%). The most commonly reported symptoms were eye irritation (76.5%) and redness (76.5%). No significant relation was found between ocular involvement and disease activity (partial remission or relapse). Mucoid discharge was significantly more common in patients with conjunctival erosions as compared to patients with conjunctivitis (P = 0.038). We conclude that ocular involvement is not rare in PV; 16.5% of PV patients develop ocular disease independent of the disease activity and extension. Conjunctivitis is the most common type of involvement, however, palpebral conjunctival erosion is more frequent than previously realized.

  1. Twins with neonatal pemphigus vulgaris born to a mother with pemphigus vulgaris: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itsukaichi, Mina; Takakuwa, Koichi; Yamaguchi, Masayuki; Serikawa, Takehiro; Tanaka, Kenichi; Kojima, Kinuko; Sakakibara, Seiichi; Usuda, Tohei; Matsunaga, Masamichi; Hashimoto, Tsuyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Dichorionic diamniotic twins were born at 37 weeks of gestation by cesarean section to a 34-year-old primigravid Japanese woman because the first twin was in breech presentation. The mother had been diagnosed with pemphigus vulgaris prior to her pregnancy. In addition to a high antidesmoglein 3 autoantibody titer, flaccid bullae and erosions on both of the twins' lips and in their oral cavities at 13 days of age led to the diagnosis of neonatal pemphigus vulgaris. This case highlights the need for awareness that pemphigus vulgaris may not occur immediately after birth.

  2. THERAPEUTIC AGENTS IN ACNE VULGARIS. I. TETRACYCLINE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    STEWART, W D; MADDIN, S; NELSON, A J; DANTO, J L

    1963-11-23

    A total of 120 consecutive patients with pustular and cystic acne vulgaris were selected for study. Patients were assigned a placebo and a tetracycline medication in a random method. Of the 53 patients who were given tetracycline, 45 showed some response, which was fair in 19 and excellent in 26. Of the 55 patients who received placebo, 24 showed no response while 31 showed some improvement. No side effects were reported. The difference in response between the two groups is statistically significant. It is concluded that administration of 250 mg. tetracycline four times daily, even for periods as short as two weeks, enhances the likelihood of improvement of cystic or pustular acne vulgaris.

  3. Photodynamic therapy of acne vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ershova, Ekaterina Y.; Karimova, Lubov N.; Kharnas, Sergey S.; Kuzmin, Sergey G.; Loschenov, Victor B.

    2003-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) with topical 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) was tested for the treatment of acne vulgaris. Patients with acne were treated with ALA plus red light. Ten percent water solution of ALA was applied with 1,5-2 h occlusion and then 18-45 J/cm2 630 nm light was given. Bacterial endogenous porphyrins fluorescence also was used for acne therapy. Treatment control and diagnostics was realized by fluorescence spectra and fluorescence image. Light sources and diagnostic systems were used: semiconductor laser (λ=630 nm, Pmax=1W), (LPhT-630-01-BIOSPEC); LED system for PDT and diagnostics with fluorescent imager (λ=635 nm, P=2W, p=50 mW/cm2), (UFPh-630-01-BIOSPEC); high sensitivity CCD video camera with narrow-band wavelength filter (central wavelength 630 nm); laser electronic spectrum analyzer for fluorescent diagnostics and photodynamic therapy monitoring (LESA-01-BIOSPEC). Protoporphyrin IX (PP IX) and endogenous porphyrins concentrations were measured by fluorescence at wavelength, correspondingly, 700 nm and 650 nm. It was shown that topical ALA is converted into PP IX in hair follicles, sebaceous glands and acne scars. The amount of resulting PP IX is sufficient for effective PDT. There was good clinical response and considerable clearance of acne lesion. ALA-PDT also had good cosmetic effect in treatment acne scars. PDT with ALA and red light assist in opening corked pores, destroying Propionibacterium acnes and decreasing sebum secretion. PDT treatment associated with several adverse effects: oedema and/or erytema for 3-5 days after PDT, epidermal exfoliation from 5th to 10th day and slight pigmentation during 1 month after PDT. ALA-PDT is effective for acne and can be used despite several side effects.

  4. Light attenuation on Chlorella vulgaris cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krol, Tadeusz; Lotocka, Maria

    1993-12-01

    The laboratory measurements of spectrum of light attenuation on phytoplankton particles i.e. monoculture of unicellural green algae Chlorella vulgaris are presented. The measurements were carried out for alive culture and the cultures subjected to chemical (NaOH) or physical (ultrasounds) modification. The distinct changes in the light attenuation spectrum were a result of modification of the internal cell structures.

  5. Primary structure of hemocyanin from Palinurus vulgaris

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jekel, PA; Neuteboom, B; Beintema, JJ

    1996-01-01

    The primary structure of hemocyanin from the spiny lobster Palinurus vulgaris was determined using a mixture of at least four slightly different subunits. Heterogeneities were observed in 32 (5%) of the positions. The amino acid sequence differs at about 20% of the positions from that of subunit a o

  6. Chlorotic mottle of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jayasinghe, W.U.

    1982-01-01

    For the past years there have been outbreaks of a disease of bean ( Phaseolus vulgaris L.) in Colombia called bean chlorotic mottle. The etiology of bean chlorotic mottle was not known, but the disease was generally believed to be incited by the same whitefly-transmitted virus that causes variegatio

  7. Ichthyosis vulgaris: the filaggrin mutation disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyssen, J P; Godoy-Gijon, E; Elias, P M

    2013-06-01

    Ichthyosis vulgaris is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the filaggrin gene (FLG) and is characterized clinically by xerosis, scaling, keratosis pilaris, palmar and plantar hyperlinearity, and a strong association with atopic disorders. According to the published studies presented in this review article, FLG mutations are observed in approximately 7·7% of Europeans and 3·0% of Asians, but appear to be infrequent in darker-skinned populations. This clinical review article provides an overview of ichthyosis vulgaris epidemiology, related disorders and pathomechanisms. Not only does ichthyosis vulgaris possess a wide clinical spectrum, recent studies suggest that carriers of FLG mutations may have a generally altered risk of developing common diseases, even beyond atopic disorders. Mechanistic studies have shown increased penetration of allergens and chemicals in filaggrin-deficient skin, and epidemiological studies have found higher levels of hand eczema, irritant contact dermatitis, nickel sensitization and serum vitamin D levels. When relevant, individuals should be informed about an increased risk of developing dermatitis when repeatedly or continuously exposed to nickel or irritants. Moreover, with our current knowledge, individuals with ichthyosis vulgaris should be protected against neonatal exposure to cats to prevent atopic dermatitis and should abstain from smoking to prevent asthma. Finally, they should be advised against excessive exposure to factors that decrease skin barrier functions and increase the risk of atopic dermatitis.

  8. Chlorotic mottle of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jayasinghe, W.U.

    1982-01-01

    For the past years there have been outbreaks of a disease of bean ( Phaseolus vulgaris L.) in Colombia called bean chlorotic mottle. The etiology of bean chlorotic mottle was not known, but the disease was generally believed to be incited by the same whitefly-transmitted virus

  9. Filipendula vulgaris Moench teruggevonden bij Gennep

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westhoff, V.; Leeuwen, v. Chr.G.

    1957-01-01

    De in Nederland als enig bekende groeiplaats van Filipendula vulgaris Moench (F. hexapetala Gilib.) nabij het Sanatorium “Zonlichtheide” te Gennep, is enkele jaren geleden ten offer gevallen aan de zandwinning, die daar in de Maasuiterwaard heeft plaatsgevonden. Onze vreugde was dan ook groot toen w

  10. Transcriptomic and proteomic analyses of Desulfovibrio vulgaris biofilms: Carbon and energy flow contribute to the distinct biofilm growth state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clark Melinda E

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough is a sulfate-reducing bacterium (SRB that is intensively studied in the context of metal corrosion and heavy-metal bioremediation, and SRB populations are commonly observed in pipe and subsurface environments as surface-associated populations. In order to elucidate physiological changes associated with biofilm growth at both the transcript and protein level, transcriptomic and proteomic analyses were done on mature biofilm cells and compared to both batch and reactor planktonic populations. The biofilms were cultivated with lactate and sulfate in a continuously fed biofilm reactor, and compared to both batch and reactor planktonic populations. Results The functional genomic analysis demonstrated that biofilm cells were different compared to planktonic cells, and the majority of altered abundances for genes and proteins were annotated as hypothetical (unknown function, energy conservation, amino acid metabolism, and signal transduction. Genes and proteins that showed similar trends in detected levels were particularly involved in energy conservation such as increases in an annotated ech hydrogenase, formate dehydrogenase, pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase, and rnf oxidoreductase, and the biofilm cells had elevated formate dehydrogenase activity. Several other hydrogenases and formate dehydrogenases also showed an increased protein level, while decreased transcript and protein levels were observed for putative coo hydrogenase as well as a lactate permease and hyp hydrogenases for biofilm cells. Genes annotated for amino acid synthesis and nitrogen utilization were also predominant changers within the biofilm state. Ribosomal transcripts and proteins were notably decreased within the biofilm cells compared to exponential-phase cells but were not as low as levels observed in planktonic, stationary-phase cells. Several putative, extracellular proteins (DVU1012, 1545 were also detected in the

  11. Transcriptomic and proteomic analyses of Desulfovibrio vulgaris biofilms: carbon and energy flow contribute to the distinct biofilm growth state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Melinda E; He, Zhili; Redding, Alyssa M; Joachimiak, Marcin P; Keasling, Jay D; Zhou, Jizhong Z; Arkin, Adam P; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Fields, Matthew W

    2012-04-16

    Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough is a sulfate-reducing bacterium (SRB) that is intensively studied in the context of metal corrosion and heavy-metal bioremediation, and SRB populations are commonly observed in pipe and subsurface environments as surface-associated populations. In order to elucidate physiological changes associated with biofilm growth at both the transcript and protein level, transcriptomic and proteomic analyses were done on mature biofilm cells and compared to both batch and reactor planktonic populations. The biofilms were cultivated with lactate and sulfate in a continuously fed biofilm reactor, and compared to both batch and reactor planktonic populations. The functional genomic analysis demonstrated that biofilm cells were different compared to planktonic cells, and the majority of altered abundances for genes and proteins were annotated as hypothetical (unknown function), energy conservation, amino acid metabolism, and signal transduction. Genes and proteins that showed similar trends in detected levels were particularly involved in energy conservation such as increases in an annotated ech hydrogenase, formate dehydrogenase, pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase, and rnf oxidoreductase, and the biofilm cells had elevated formate dehydrogenase activity. Several other hydrogenases and formate dehydrogenases also showed an increased protein level, while decreased transcript and protein levels were observed for putative coo hydrogenase as well as a lactate permease and hyp hydrogenases for biofilm cells. Genes annotated for amino acid synthesis and nitrogen utilization were also predominant changers within the biofilm state. Ribosomal transcripts and proteins were notably decreased within the biofilm cells compared to exponential-phase cells but were not as low as levels observed in planktonic, stationary-phase cells. Several putative, extracellular proteins (DVU1012, 1545) were also detected in the extracellular fraction from biofilm cells

  12. Mycophenolate mofetil as adjuvant in pemphigus vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarma Nilendu

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Pemphigus vulgaris (PV is a life threatening autoimmune blistering disease of skin and mucous membranes. Advent of systemic steroids has greatly reduced the mortality rate. However, steroids and adjuvant immunosuppressive therapy are nowadays frequent contributory agents of morbidity and mortality of PV. Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF has been reported to be an effective adjuvant to systemic steroids. It helps in increasing the immunosuppressive effect and minimizing the toxicities by steroid sparing effect. However, its efficacy in refractory cases of PV is not well documented. The lowest possible dose with satisfactory therapeutic efficacy and least side effects is known. We used MMF 1 g/day and systemic steroids in 3 Indian patients with pemphigus vulgaris who were resistant to systemic steroid monotherapy or combination treatment with azathioprine. In our experience, MMF offers an effective adjuvant with minimal side-effects in the treatment of resistant PV.

  13. Light scattering on chlorella vulgaris cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krol, Tadeusz; Zielinski, Andrzej; Witkowski, Konrad

    1992-12-01

    Laboratory measurements of light scattering on the axenic cultures of unicellular alga Chlorella vulgaris monoculture confirm the thesis of multi-level light scattering by the cell i.e., both by outer cell membrane and the internal structure of the cell, as well as by its molecular structures. In the measurements, the technique of dynamic light scattering and analysis by the regulation method was used, indicate that the light scattering phenomenon is affected by particles of sizes corresponding either to overall dimensions of the cell or to the dimensions of its internal structures. A correlation was found between the suggested sizes and the stage of physiological evolution of the culture. The measurements of 10 functions constituting the elements of the scattering matrix for an alive Chlorella vulgaris culture and cultures with internal cell structures modified by chemical and mechanical agents evidence that the internal structures of cells play an important role in the interaction of phytoplankton and light.

  14. Giant lupus vulgaris: A rare presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacchidanand, S; Sharavana, S; Mallikarjun, M; Nataraja, H V

    2012-01-01

    Cutaneous tuberculosis continues to be an important public health problem even with the availability of highly effective anti-tuberculous drugs. It constitutes 0.1% of all cases of extrapulmonary tuberculosis. Lupus vulgaris is the most common form of cutaneous tuberculosis that occurs in previously sensitized individuals with a moderate degree of immunity against tubercle bacilli. The different types of lupus vulgaris include plaque, ulcerative, vegetative, papular and nodular, and tumor forms. A 40-year-old man presented with large multiple plaques over right upper limb, right side of chest and back, and right lower limb for the past 30 years. Histopathology showed numerous noncaseating granulomas with Langhan's type of giant cells. The Mantoux test showed strong positivity and there was excellent response to anti-tuberculous treatment. This case is being reported because of its extreme chronicity of 30 years duration, unusually large size and multiplicity of lesions.

  15. Acne vulgaris related to androgens - a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khondker, L; Khan, S I

    2014-01-01

    Sebum production is stimulated by androgens and is the key in the development of acne vulgaris. Several investigators have looked for direct relationships between serum androgen levels, sebum secretion rate and the presence of acne. The presence of acne in prepubertal girls and sebum production in both sexes correlate with serum dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) levels. Although increased serum androgen levels correlate with the presence of severe nodular acne in men and women, these levels are often within the normal range in mild to moderate acne. This raises the question of whether there is an increased local production of androgens within the sebaceous gland of patients with acne vulgaris that leads to increased sebum secretion.

  16. Pemphigus vulgaris: a rare cause of dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Janabi, Ali; Greenfield, Simon

    2015-10-22

    Pemphigus vulgaris is a rare autoimmune blistering disease of the skin and mucous membranes. The case reported presented unusually with dyspepsia that was not responsive to protein pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy. This progressed to severe dysphagia and odynophagia. An esophagogastroduodenoscopy showed extensive ulceration of the esophagus, and direct immunofluorescence of an esophageal biopsy showed bright intercellular staining with C3 and IgG, confirming the diagnosis of pemphigus vulgaris. Immunological remission was achieved after a number of courses of pulsed intravenous methylprednisolone and cyclophosphamide. The patient has remained in remission for 5 years, but has required regular dilation of esophageal strictures for symptom relief. During this period, a chronic lymphocytosis was incidentally noted on routine blood tests, and chronic lymphocytic leukaemia was diagnosed. It is essential to investigate PPI-resistant symptoms, dysphagia and odynophagia, as they may indicate a serious underlying cause.

  17. The psychosocial impact of acne vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neirita Hazarika

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acne vulgaris causes erythematous papulopustular lesions in active stage and often leave behind residual scarring and pigmentation. Its onset in adolescence may add to the emotional and psychological challenges experienced during this period. Aims: To assess the impact of acne on the various psychosocial domains of daily life. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective, cross-sectional study done in the dermatology out-patient department of a tertiary care hospital from January to March 2015. A total of 100 consecutive, newly diagnosed patients of acne vulgaris, aged 15 years and above were included in this study. The relationship between acne vulgaris and its sequelae was analyzed with ten different domains of daily life by using dermatology life quality index (DLQI questionnaire. Results: Females (56%, 15–20 year olds (61%, facial lesions (60%, and Grade II acne (70% were most common. Acne scars were noted in 75% patients, whereas 79% cases had post-acne hyperpigmentation. Thirty-seven percent patients had DLQI scores of (6–10 interpreted as moderate effect on patient's life. Statistically significant correlation (P < 0.05 found were as follows: Physical symptoms with grade of acne; embarrassment with site and grade of acne; daily activities with grade of acne and post-acne pigmentation; choice of clothes with site of acne; social activities with gender, site and grade of acne; effect on work/study with grade of acne; interpersonal problems with site and post-acne pigmentation; sexual difficulties with grade of acne. Limitation: It was a hospital-based study with small sample size. Conclusion: Significant impact of acne and its sequelae was noted on emotions, daily activities, social activities, study/work, and interpersonal relationships. Assurance and counseling along with early treatment of acne vulgaris is important to reduce disease-related psychosocial sequelae and increase the efficacy of treatment.

  18. The psychosocial impact of acne vulgaris

    OpenAIRE

    Neirita Hazarika; M Archana

    2016-01-01

    Background: Acne vulgaris causes erythematous papulopustular lesions in active stage and often leave behind residual scarring and pigmentation. Its onset in adolescence may add to the emotional and psychological challenges experienced during this period. Aims: To assess the impact of acne on the various psychosocial domains of daily life. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective, cross-sectional study done in the dermatology out-patient department of a tertiary care hospital from January...

  19. [ACNE VULGARIS--AETIOLOGY, CLASSIFICATION, TREATMENT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janda, Katarzyna; Chwilkowska, Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    A spotless skin is a rarity. Both women and men have different problems related to the complexion. One of the most common problems is acne, which affects an increasing number of people of all ages. Seborrhea skin areas rich in sebaceous glands, the formation of comedones, inflammation, and scars are characteristic for this disease. The aim of the study was to discuss the causes of acne vulgaris, methods of treatment, and proper care of the skin affected by this problem.

  20. The Historic Panorama of Acne Vulgaris

    OpenAIRE

    Humyra Tabasum; Tanzeel Ahmad; Farzana Anjum; Hina Rehman

    2013-01-01

    Although acne is described in very ancient writings dating back to Eber’s Papyrus, its clear description is found after Fuch’s coined the term ‘Acne Vulgaris’ and Erasmus Wilson separated it from acne rosacea. The early treatment of acne was based upon the witchcraft. Later new therapies got evolved with the discoveries in the field of anatomy, physiology and biochemistry. The following review focuses the historical overview of acne vulgaris, highlighting persons and discoveries in medival an...

  1. The Psychosocial Impact of Acne Vulgaris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazarika, Neirita; Archana, M

    2016-01-01

    Background: Acne vulgaris causes erythematous papulopustular lesions in active stage and often leave behind residual scarring and pigmentation. Its onset in adolescence may add to the emotional and psychological challenges experienced during this period. Aims: To assess the impact of acne on the various psychosocial domains of daily life. Materials and Methods: This was a prospective, cross-sectional study done in the dermatology out-patient department of a tertiary care hospital from January to March 2015. A total of 100 consecutive, newly diagnosed patients of acne vulgaris, aged 15 years and above were included in this study. The relationship between acne vulgaris and its sequelae was analyzed with ten different domains of daily life by using dermatology life quality index (DLQI) questionnaire. Results: Females (56%), 15–20 year olds (61%), facial lesions (60%), and Grade II acne (70%) were most common. Acne scars were noted in 75% patients, whereas 79% cases had post-acne hyperpigmentation. Thirty-seven percent patients had DLQI scores of (6–10) interpreted as moderate effect on patient's life. Statistically significant correlation (P embarrassment with site and grade of acne; daily activities with grade of acne and post-acne pigmentation; choice of clothes with site of acne; social activities with gender, site and grade of acne; effect on work/study with grade of acne; interpersonal problems with site and post-acne pigmentation; sexual difficulties with grade of acne. Limitation: It was a hospital-based study with small sample size. Conclusion: Significant impact of acne and its sequelae was noted on emotions, daily activities, social activities, study/work, and interpersonal relationships. Assurance and counseling along with early treatment of acne vulgaris is important to reduce disease-related psychosocial sequelae and increase the efficacy of treatment. PMID:27688440

  2. Insulin resistance in severe acne vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emiroğlu, Nazan; Cengiz, Fatma Pelin; Kemeriz, Funda

    2015-08-01

    Acne vulgaris is a pilosebaceous gland disease that usually affects people from puberty to young adulthood. It is seen especially on the face, neck, trunk and arms. Its severity differs from patient to patient and its pathogenesis is multifactorial. The main pathogenic factors of acne are high sebaceous gland secretion, follicular hyperproliferation, high androgen effects, propionibacterium acnes colonization and inflammation. Diet is always thought a probable reason for acne and many studies are done about acne and diet. To determine the effect of insulin resistance in severe acne vulgaris. Two hundred and forty-three acne vulgaris patients and 156 healthy controls were enrolled into the study. The blood levels of insulin and glucose were measured. Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA) Index was calculated. The values were compared with the control group. All of the patients were in the severe acne group according to their scores on the global acne scoring scale. While fasting blood glucose levels were not different between the groups (p > 0.05, 82.91 ±9.76 vs. 80.26 ±8.33), the fasting insulin levels were significantly higher in the patient group than in the control group (p acne.

  3. Pemfigus Vulgaris Manifestasi di Mulut dan Penatalaksanaannya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metawati Tarmidi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Pemfigus is an autoimmune disease involving the skin and mucosa and characterized by intraepidermal bullae formation. The four variations of pemphigus are pemphigus vulgaris, vegetans, foliaceus, and erythematosus. Although several clinical variants are recognized, pemphigus vulgaris is the most common form and the type most likely to exhibit oral manifestations. There are from 0,1 to 0,5 cases reported each year per 100,000 population with the highest incidence occurring in the fourth and seventh decades of life. Only rare cases have been reported in children and the elderly. Before the advent of systemic corticosteroid therapy, pemphigus vulgaris was fatal within few months to two years. A characteristic feature is the nikolsky sign which is the ability to elicit the formation of bullae by the application of firm lateral pressure on normal-appearing skin. The oral lesions often have a slow, insidious onset with symptoms present for many months before a diagnosis is made or skin lesions develop. Lesions may be found anywhere but are most common on the palate, buccal mucosa, and gingiva. Although the oral lesions are vesicobullous in nature, intact blisters are rarely seen. Diagnosis is established by biopsy and immunofluorescent studies. Titers on indirect immunofluorescence often correlate to the severity of the disease. The aim of this study is to promote and support early dental diagnosis when the prognosis is good.

  4. Variation in the Breeding System of Prunella vulgaris L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prunella vulgaris (Lamiaceae), commonly known as selfheal, is a perennial herb with a long history of use in traditional medicine. Recent studies have found that P. vulgaris possesses anti-inflammatory, antiviral and anti-bacterial properties, which may lead to increased commercial demand. To date...

  5. A new pyrroloquinazoline alkaloid from Linaria vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Huiming; Cheng, Maosheng; Li, Xian; Pei, Yuehu

    2002-10-01

    A new alkaloid, 1,2,3,9-tetrahydropyrrolo(2,1-b)quinazolin-1-carboxylic acid (1), together with eight known compounds, 7-hydroxy vasicine (2), benzyl alcohol beta-D-(2'-O-beta-xylopyranosyl)glucopyranoside (3), benzyl alcohol O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (4), benzyl alcohol O-beta-D-primveroside (5), 3,5-dimethyl-4-hydroxy benzaldehyde (6), gluco-syringic acid (7), syringin (8), and liriodendrin (9), were isolated from the plants of Linaria vulgaris. Their structures were established by spectroscopic methods.

  6. The Historic Panorama of Acne Vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humyra Tabasum

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Although acne is described in very ancient writings dating back to Eber’s Papyrus, its clear description is found after Fuch’s coined the term ‘Acne Vulgaris’ and Erasmus Wilson separated it from acne rosacea. The early treatment of acne was based upon the witchcraft. Later new therapies got evolved with the discoveries in the field of anatomy, physiology and biochemistry. The following review focuses the historical overview of acne vulgaris, highlighting persons and discoveries in medival and modern period.

  7. Annular lupus vulgaris mimicking tinea cruris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Young Soo; Shin, Won Woong; Kim, Yong Ju; Song, Hae Jun; Oh, Chil Hwan

    2010-05-01

    Cutaneous tuberculosis is an infrequent form of extrapulmonary tuberculosis. It is often clinically and histopathologically confused with various cutaneous disorders. A 36-year-old man attended our clinic with slowly progressive, asymptomatic, annular skin lesions on both the thighs and buttocks for 10 years. He consulted with many physicians and was improperly treated with an oral antifungal agent for several months under the diagnosis of tinea cruris, but no resolution of his condition was observed. A diagnosis of lupus vulgaris was made based on the histopathologic examination and the polymerase chain reaction assay. Anti-tuberculosis therapy was administered and the lesions started to regress.

  8. Clinico- Pathological Study Of Ichthyosis Vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandy Utpal

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available A clinico- pathological study of 28 cases of ichthyosis vulgaris appeared with in the age of 5 years. The presence of the disease since birth was also found. While most (24 patients showed a diminution of severity in summer with an aggravation during winter, 4 patients followed the opposite seasonal pattern. Only in 4 patients, fine scales in the scalp were detected. One patient showed an affection of flexures. There was also a low occurrence of palmo- planter hyperkeratosis, follicular keratosis, fissuring of hands and feet and atopy.

  9. Disseminated lupus vulgaris: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Can, Burce; Zindanci, Ilkin; Turkoglu, Zafer; Kavala, Mukaddes; Ulucay, Vasfiye; Demir, Filiz Topaloglu

    2014-01-01

    Lupus vulgaris is a secondary form of cutaneous tuberculosis which persists for years if not treated. The head and neck are the most commonly affected sites. While less frequently arms and legs, and rarely the trunk and the scalp are involved. Herein, we describe a 73-year-old man with a 5-year history of slowly growing, atrophic, some eroded and ulcerated, red-brown plaques on his forehead, nose, cheeks, ear lobes, trunk and extremites. All of his disseminated lesions healed after antituberculosis therapy.

  10. Lupus vulgaris in a young girl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Tarang; Varshney, Anupam; Bakshi, S K

    2013-01-01

    With the estimated global burden of TB being 8.8 million incident cases and 1.1 million deaths from TB in HIV-negative cases and additional 0.35 million deaths in HIV-associated cases,1 the total number of cutaneous TB cases ( lupus vulgaris in a young girl with rapid progression of a large plaque with hypertrophic features in the periphery. The case is unusual due to its rapid progression, unusual site and extensive giant form which have never been reported previously.

  11. Annular Lupus Vulgaris Mimicking Tinea Cruris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Young Soo; Shin, Won Woong; Kim, Yong Ju; Song, Hae Jun

    2010-01-01

    Cutaneous tuberculosis is an infrequent form of extrapulmonary tuberculosis. It is often clinically and histopathologically confused with various cutaneous disorders. A 36-year-old man attended our clinic with slowly progressive, asymptomatic, annular skin lesions on both the thighs and buttocks for 10 years. He consulted with many physicians and was improperly treated with an oral antifungal agent for several months under the diagnosis of tinea cruris, but no resolution of his condition was observed. A diagnosis of lupus vulgaris was made based on the histopathologic examination and the polymerase chain reaction assay. Anti-tuberculosis therapy was administered and the lesions started to regress. PMID:20548922

  12. Nootropic effect of meadowsweet (Filipendula vulgaris) extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilova, I V; Suslov, N I

    2015-03-01

    The effects of the extracts of the aboveground parts of Filipendula vulgaris Moench on the behavior and memory of mice after hypoxic injury and their physical performance in the open-field test were studied using the models of hypoxia in a sealed volume, conditioned passive avoidance response (CPAR), and forced swimming with a load. The extracts improved animal resistance to hypoxia, normalized orientation and exploration activities, promoted CPAR retention after hypoxic injury, and increased physical performance. Aqueous extract of meadowsweet had the most pronounced effect that corresponded to the effect of the reference drug piracetam. These effects were probably caused by modulation of hippocampal activity.

  13. The association of acne vulgaris with diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veith, Whitney B; Silverberg, Nanette B

    2011-08-01

    Acne vulgaris is a common disorder of the pilosebaceous unit affecting adolescents and adults. The rise in incidence of acne in the United States may relate to the Western diet--which is rich in dairy and refined sugars, and high in glycemic load--and to the obesity epidemic. We reviewed the literature on diet and acne. Evidence exists highlighting the association of acne and high glycemic loads, certain dairy products, and refined sugar product ingestion. Future studies are required to determine if dietary modification will reduce long-term acne burden.

  14. Hormonal treatment of acne vulgaris: an update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsaie, Mohamed L

    2016-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is a common skin condition associated with multiple factors. Although mostly presenting alone, it can likewise present with features of hyperandrogenism and hormonal discrepancies. Of note, hormonal therapies are indicated in severe, resistant-to-treatment cases and in those with monthly flare-ups and when standard therapeutic options are inappropriate. This article serves as an update to hormonal pathogenesis of acne, discusses the basics of endocrinal evaluation for patients with suspected hormonal acne, and provides an overview of the current hormonal treatment options in women. PMID:27621661

  15. Pemphigus vulgaris and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtari, Fatemeh; Matin, Marzieh; Rajati, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is an autoimmune bullous and erosive mucocutaneous disease. Rarely, it occurs in patients with other autoimmune disease. The relation between PV and neurological disorders is unclear and needs to be more studied. Here, we report a case of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), followed by dermatologic involvement. Histopathological evidence and direct immunofluorescence are consistent with PV. Systemic corticosteroid and azathioprine were effective in the treatment of mucocutaneous lesions. PV seems to be accidentally associated with ALS. Expression of major histocompatibility complex Class II in autoimmune disease and production of autoantibodies have been proposed to describe the association of PV with ALS. PMID:28163728

  16. Berberis vulgaris for cardiovascular disorders: a scoping literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelrahman Abushouk

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disorders are the leading cause of mortality worldwide. Berberis vulgaris (B. vulgaris is a commonly used plant in traditional medicine. In recent studies, B. vulgaris showed antiarrhythmic, antihypertensive, anticholinergic, and cardioprotective effects. We reviewed the literature to explore the possible prophylactic and therapeutic roles of B. vulgaris in cardiovascular medicine. A computer literature search was conducted to identify all relevant studies that have investigated the role of B. vulgaris in prevention or treatment of cardiovascular diseases.We also searched the citations of the retrieved articles. Using a systematic approach, we conducted a scoping review that included a total of 37 articles. Twelve studies examined the antihypertensive effects of B. vulgaris, seven studies investigated its antiarrhythmic effects, while its inotropic and cardioprotective effects were evaluated in four and eight studies, respectively. B. vulgaris showed a beneficial effect in reducing blood pressure, enhancing cardiac contractility, and protection from reperfusion injury. However, the mechanisms of these effects are still under investigation. Moreover, it could modify major risk factors for cardiovascular disorders, such as oxidative stress, hyperglycemia, and hyperlipidemia. Further studies are needed to translate these findings into effective cardiovascular medications.

  17. The epidemiology of acne vulgaris in late adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, Darren D; Umari, Tamara; Dunnick, Cory A; Dellavalle, Robert P

    2016-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is the most common skin condition affecting late adolescents across the globe. Although prior studies have evaluated epidemiologic patterns of acne vulgaris in various ethnicities and regions, adequate understanding of the worldwide burden of the disease associated with patients in their late adolescence (15-19-year olds) remains lacking. To assess the global burden of the disease associated with acne vulgaris for late adolescents (15-19-year olds) and provide an overview of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and treatment options for acne in this population. Database summary study. Global Burden of Disease Study 2010 database. Global Burden of Disease regions comprised countries with prevalence of acne vulgaris between the ages of 15 and 19 years. Geographic region-level disability-adjusted life year rates (per 100,000 persons) associated with acne vulgaris in years 1990 through 2010. Median percentage change in disability-adjusted life year rates was estimated for each region across the specified study period. Acne vulgaris-associated disease burden exhibits global distribution and has continued to grow in prevalence over time within this population. This continued growth suggests an unmet dermatologic need worldwide for this disorder and potential opportunities for improved access and delivery of dermatologic care. Our analysis of the literature reveals numerous opportunities for enhanced patient care. To that end, we highlight some of the effective and promising treatments currently available and address important factors, such as sex, nationality, genetics, pathophysiology, and diet, as they relate to acne vulgaris in late adolescence.

  18. Role of olfaction in Octopus vulgaris reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polese, Gianluca; Bertapelle, Carla; Di Cosmo, Anna

    2015-01-01

    The olfactory system in any animal is the primary sensory system that responds to chemical stimuli emanating from a distant source. In aquatic animals "Odours" are molecules in solution that guide them to locate food, partners, nesting sites, and dangers to avoid. Fish, crustaceans and aquatic molluscs possess sensory systems that have anatomical similarities to the olfactory systems of land-based animals. Molluscs are a large group of aquatic and terrestrial animals that rely heavily on chemical communication with a generally dispersed sense of touch and chemical sensitivity. Cephalopods, the smallest class among extant marine molluscs, are predators with high visual capability and well developed vestibular, auditory, and tactile systems. Nevertheless they possess a well developed olfactory organ, but to date almost nothing is known about the mechanisms, functions and modulation of this chemosensory structure in octopods. Cephalopod brains are the largest of all invertebrate brains and across molluscs show the highest degree of centralization. The reproductive behaviour of Octopus vulgaris is under the control of a complex set of signal molecules such as neuropeptides, neurotransmitters and sex steroids that guide the behaviour from the level of individuals in evaluating mates, to stimulating or deterring copulation, to sperm-egg chemical signalling that promotes fertilization. These signals are intercepted by the olfactory organs and integrated in the olfactory lobes in the central nervous system. In this context we propose a model in which the olfactory organ and the olfactory lobe of O. vulgaris could represent the on-off switch between food intake and reproduction.

  19. Lupus vulgaris: unusual presentation on face.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilani, A; Vora, R V

    2014-01-01

    Lupus vulgaris is a variant of cutaneous tuberculosis. As the disease has potential to mutilate when left untreated, leaving deforming scars and disfigurement, an early diagnosis is of paramount importance. Though the common type is plaque type, rarely mutilating and vegetative forms also are found. A 28 year old female, labourer presented with progressive annular plaque over right side of cheek extending upto right lower lid and ala of nose. There were two satellite plaques near the right side of giant lesion. On diascopy apple jelly nodule was seen. There was no regional lymhadenopathy. Histopathological examination showed many granulomas in upper dermis extending to deep dermis comprising of epitheloid cells with langhans' type of giant cells, lymphocytic infiltration & focal necrosis suggestive of lupus vulgaris. The consequences of failing to make an early diagnosis can be disastrous for the patients, as the progression of the disease can lead to necrosis, destruction of bones and cartilage leading to permanent deformity. Thus it is vital for clinicians to have a high index of suspicion of such atypical forms and take biopsy samples for histological and bacteriological studies.

  20. Calcinosis cutis secondary to facial acne vulgaris: A rare complication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srimanta Kumar Sahu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acne vulgaris is a common dermatological disease commonly affecting the adolescent and young adults. It is characterized by the presence of pleomorphic skin lesions such as comadones, papules, pustules, and nodules. The common complications are postacne hyperpigmentation and scarring causing psychological impact. Calcinosis cutis is the pathologic deposition of insoluble calcium salt in the skin and subcutaneous tissue. Calcinosis cutis following acne vulgaris is rarely reported in the literature. We report a case of calcinosis cutis in acne vulgaris in a 55-year-old man.

  1. Calcinosis cutis secondary to facial acne vulgaris: A rare complication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Srimanta Kumar; Gupta, Nikhil; Vohra, Suruchi

    2015-12-01

    Acne vulgaris is a common dermatological disease commonly affecting the adolescent and young adults. It is characterized by the presence of pleomorphic skin lesions such as comadones, papules, pustules, and nodules. The common complications are postacne hyperpigmentation and scarring causing psychological impact. Calcinosis cutis is the pathologic deposition of insoluble calcium salt in the skin and subcutaneous tissue. Calcinosis cutis following acne vulgaris is rarely reported in the literature. We report a case of calcinosis cutis in acne vulgaris in a 55-year-old man.

  2. Vascular cognitive impairment in Pemphigus vulgaris: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ibiapina Siqueira- Neto

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Pemphigus vulgaris is a systemic auto-immune medical condition that mainly manifests with changes in skin and vasculopathy. This is a case report of a 69-year-old male with confirmed histopathologic diagnosis of Pemphigus vulgaris presenting ulterior Cognitive Impairment, mostly in executive function. The patient was treated using steroids, immunomodulatory therapy, fluoxetine and galantamine. Neuropsychological testing and magnetic resonance (MRI were performed. This is the first report of correlational cognitive impairment with Pemphigus vulgaris in the literature. Physicians should be aware of vascular causes for cognitive impairment in patients presenting auto-immune conditions.

  3. Propionibacterium acnes in the pathogenesis and immunotherapy of acne vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pei-Feng; Hsieh, Yao-Dung; Lin, Ya-Ching; Two, Aimee; Shu, Chih-Wen; Huang, Chun-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Acne vulgaris, a multi-factorial disease, is one of the most common skin diseases, affecting an estimated 80% of Americans at some point during their lives. The gram-positive and anaerobic Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes) bacterium has been implicated in acne inflammation and pathogenesis. Therapies for acne vulgaris using antibiotics generally lack bacterial specificity, promote the generation of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains, and cause adverse effects. Immunotherapy against P. acnes or its antigens (sialidase and CAMP factor) has been demonstrated to be effective in mice, attenuating P. acnes-induced inflammation; thus, this method may be applied to develop a potential vaccine targeting P. acnes for acne vulgaris treatment. This review summarizes reports describing the role of P. acnes in the pathogenesis of acne and various immunotherapy-based approaches targeting P. acnes, suggesting the potential effectiveness of immunotherapy for acne vulgaris as well as P. acnes-associated diseases.

  4. Plant Anticancer Agents XXXIII. Constituents of Passerina vulgaris1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji-Xian, G; Handa, S S; Pezzuto, J M; Kinghorn, A D; Farnsworth, N R

    1984-06-01

    Two lignans of known structure, (+)-syringaresinol, a cytotoxic agent, and (+)-nortrachelogenin, a compound with demonstrated antileukemic activity, were isolated from a biologically active extract of the stems of PASSERINA VULGARIS.

  5. Using bamboo (Bambusa vulgaris) as a field drainage material in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Bamboo (Bambusa vulgaris), one of the most widespread member of its genus, was ... climatic conditions and soil types (United Nations, 1972). ... concrete pipes are still being used as well. .... Tropical rain Forest zone with an annual rainfall of.

  6. Phenotypic Diversity among Croatian Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) Landraces

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Monika Vidak; Sara Malešević; Martina Grdiša; Zlatko Šatović; Boris Lazarević; Klaudija Carović-Stanko

    2016-01-01

    Phenotypic diversity among Croatian common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) landraces was assessed by analysing 12 qualitative and six quantitative traits in 338 accessions collected from all production areas in Croatia...

  7. Polyphosphate during the Regreening of Chlorella vulgaris under Nitrogen Deficiency

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chu, Fei-Fei; Shen, Xiao-Fei; Lam, Paul K S; Zeng, Raymond J

    2015-01-01

    Polyphosphate (Poly-P) accumulation has been reported in Chlorella vulgaris under nitrogen deficiency conditions with sufficient P supply, and the process has been demonstrated to have great impact on lipid productivity...

  8. [Mapping of pathogenic genes in two families with autosomal dominant ichthyosis vulgaris].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Hui-Yong; Zhang, Jing; Hu, Zheng-Mao; Wu, Ling-Qian; Liang, De-Sheng; Xie, Zhi-Guo; Pan, Qian; Bu, Feng-Xiao; Peng, Yu; Xia, Kun; Xia, Jia-Hui

    2008-07-01

    To localize the pathogenic genes of autosomal dominant ichthyosis vulgaris, we ascertained two ichthyosis vulgaris families from Hunan Province. Venous blood samples were collected from affected and unaffected family members and genomic DNA was extracted. We then performed genome scan and linkage analysis using microsatellite markers around known ichthyosis vulgaris loci in chromosomes 1 and 10. In family 1, the locus linked to ichthyosis vulgaris was located near D1S498 (1q21), which overlapped with known ichthyosis vulgaris loci. In family 2, however, all known loci for ichthyosis vulgaris were excluded and the new locus remains to be identified.

  9. Potential Health Effects of Enzymatic Protein Hydrolysates from Chlorella vulgaris

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective: Chlorella vulgaris is a multi-cellular edible algal species with abundant proteins. Extraction of high value protein fractions for pharmaceutical and nutritional applications can significantly increase the commercial value of microalga biomasses. There is no known report on the anticancer peptides derived from the Chlorella vulgaris abundant protein.Materials and Methods: This study examined the antimicrobial and anticancer effects of peptides from a hydrolyzed Chlor...

  10. Ichthyosis Vulgaris Coexisted with Acrokeratosis Verruciformis: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamze Serarslan

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Ichthyosis vulgaris is an autosomal dominant inherited, keratinization disorder and characterized by diffuse scaling. Acrokeratosis verruciformis is also an autosomal dominant, rare keratinization disorder and characterized by warty, brownish to skin colored papules on the dorsa of the hands and feet. We present a case of ichthyosis vulgaris coexisted with acrokeratosis verruciformis in a 24-year-old woman. (Turkderm 2008; 42: 134-6

  11. Lupus vulgaris of external nose--a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arunkumar, J S; Naveen, K N; Prasad, K C; Santhosh, S G; Hegde, J S

    2013-02-01

    Lupus vulgaris is the most common morphological variant of cutaneous tuberculosis accounting for approximately 59% of cases of cutaneous tuberculosis in India. We present a case of lupus vulgaris of external nose diagnosed early and treated with CAT-3 RNTCP regimen for six months without any nasal deformity except for a small scar over the dorsum of the nose. Patient followed up for one year after completion of the prescribed regimen, there being no recurrence of the lesion.

  12. Effects of processing on bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) protein quality.

    OpenAIRE

    Poel, van der, A.F.B.

    1990-01-01

    In animal production, feeding has an important impact on productivity and health of animals and feed composition is known to influence protein and energy metabolism directly. For monogastric animals complete diets are manufactured in which feed ingredients are used to supply the energy yielding and other nutrients. The common bean ( Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is such an ingredient.In common beans ( Phaseolus vulgaris L.) the supply of nutrients is often lower than is expected from its chemical an...

  13. Influence of diet in acne vulgaris and atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokeen, Divya

    2016-09-01

    Diet has been considered as an influence in dermatology for several years. Unfortunately, although correlation has been breached, causation is yet to be determined. Over the last couple years, a few reviews of the literature have been published regarding the influence of diet in acne vulgaris and atopic dermatitis. This article reviews some dietary restrictions and supplements that may have beneficial effects in managing patients with acne vulgaris and atopic dermatitis.

  14. Chlorella vulgaris: A Multifunctional Dietary Supplement with Diverse Medicinal Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panahi, Yunes; Darvishi, Behrad; Jowzi, Narges; Beiraghdar, Fatemeh; Sahebkar, Amirhossein

    2016-01-01

    Chlorella vulgaris is a green unicellular microalgae with biological and pharmacological properties important for human health. C. vulgaris has a long history of use as a food source and contains a unique and diverse composition of functional macro- and micro-nutrients including proteinsChlorella vulgaris is a green unicellular microalgae with biological and pharmacological properties important for human health. C. vulgaris has a long history of use as a food source and contains a unique and diverse composition of functional macro- and micro-nutrients including proteins, omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, polysaccharides, vitamins and minerals. Clinical trials have suggested that supplementation with C. vulgaris can ameliorate amelioration hyperlipidemia and hyperglycemia, and protect against oxidative stress, cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In this review, we summarize the findings on the health benefits of Chlorella supplementation and the molecular mechanisms underlying these effects., omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, polysaccharides, vitamins and minerals. Clinical trials have suggested that supplementation with C. vulgaris can ameliorate amelioration hyperlipidemia and hyperglycemia, and protect against oxidative stress, cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In this review, we summarize the findings on the health benefits of Chlorella supplementation and the molecular mechanisms underlying these effects.

  15. Essential Oil Characterization of Thymus vulgaris from Various Geographical Locations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satyal, Prabodh; Murray, Brittney L; McFeeters, Robert L; Setzer, William N

    2016-10-27

    Thyme (Thymus vulgaris L.) is a commonly used flavoring agent and medicinal herb. Several chemotypes of thyme, based on essential oil compositions, have been established, including (1) linalool; (2) borneol; (3) geraniol; (4) sabinene hydrate; (5) thymol; (6) carvacrol, as well as a number of multiple-component chemotypes. In this work, two different T. vulgaris essential oils were obtained from France and two were obtained from Serbia. The chemical compositions were determined using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. In addition, chiral gas chromatography was used to determine the enantiomeric compositions of several monoterpenoid components. The T. vulgaris oil from Nyons, France was of the linalool chemotype (linalool, 76.2%; linalyl acetate, 14.3%); the oil sample from Jablanicki, Serbia was of the geraniol chemotype (geraniol, 59.8%; geranyl acetate, 16.7%); the sample from Pomoravje District, Serbia was of the sabinene hydrate chemotype (cis-sabinene hydrate, 30.8%; trans-sabinene hydrate, 5.0%); and the essential oil from Richerenches, France was of the thymol chemotype (thymol, 47.1%; p-cymene, 20.1%). A cluster analysis based on the compositions of these essential oils as well as 81 additional T. vulgaris essential oils reported in the literature revealed 20 different chemotypes. This work represents the first chiral analysis of T. vulgaris monoterpenoids and a comprehensive description of the different chemotypes of T. vulgaris.

  16. Essential Oil Characterization of Thymus vulgaris from Various Geographical Locations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabodh Satyal

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Thyme (Thymus vulgaris L. is a commonly used flavoring agent and medicinal herb. Several chemotypes of thyme, based on essential oil compositions, have been established, including (1 linalool; (2 borneol; (3 geraniol; (4 sabinene hydrate; (5 thymol; (6 carvacrol, as well as a number of multiple-component chemotypes. In this work, two different T. vulgaris essential oils were obtained from France and two were obtained from Serbia. The chemical compositions were determined using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. In addition, chiral gas chromatography was used to determine the enantiomeric compositions of several monoterpenoid components. The T. vulgaris oil from Nyons, France was of the linalool chemotype (linalool, 76.2%; linalyl acetate, 14.3%; the oil sample from Jablanicki, Serbia was of the geraniol chemotype (geraniol, 59.8%; geranyl acetate, 16.7%; the sample from Pomoravje District, Serbia was of the sabinene hydrate chemotype (cis-sabinene hydrate, 30.8%; trans-sabinene hydrate, 5.0%; and the essential oil from Richerenches, France was of the thymol chemotype (thymol, 47.1%; p-cymene, 20.1%. A cluster analysis based on the compositions of these essential oils as well as 81 additional T. vulgaris essential oils reported in the literature revealed 20 different chemotypes. This work represents the first chiral analysis of T. vulgaris monoterpenoids and a comprehensive description of the different chemotypes of T. vulgaris.

  17. Essential Oil Characterization of Thymus vulgaris from Various Geographical Locations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satyal, Prabodh; Murray, Brittney L.; McFeeters, Robert L.; Setzer, William N.

    2016-01-01

    Thyme (Thymus vulgaris L.) is a commonly used flavoring agent and medicinal herb. Several chemotypes of thyme, based on essential oil compositions, have been established, including (1) linalool; (2) borneol; (3) geraniol; (4) sabinene hydrate; (5) thymol; (6) carvacrol, as well as a number of multiple-component chemotypes. In this work, two different T. vulgaris essential oils were obtained from France and two were obtained from Serbia. The chemical compositions were determined using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. In addition, chiral gas chromatography was used to determine the enantiomeric compositions of several monoterpenoid components. The T. vulgaris oil from Nyons, France was of the linalool chemotype (linalool, 76.2%; linalyl acetate, 14.3%); the oil sample from Jablanicki, Serbia was of the geraniol chemotype (geraniol, 59.8%; geranyl acetate, 16.7%); the sample from Pomoravje District, Serbia was of the sabinene hydrate chemotype (cis-sabinene hydrate, 30.8%; trans-sabinene hydrate, 5.0%); and the essential oil from Richerenches, France was of the thymol chemotype (thymol, 47.1%; p-cymene, 20.1%). A cluster analysis based on the compositions of these essential oils as well as 81 additional T. vulgaris essential oils reported in the literature revealed 20 different chemotypes. This work represents the first chiral analysis of T. vulgaris monoterpenoids and a comprehensive description of the different chemotypes of T. vulgaris. PMID:28231164

  18. Changes in serum desnutrin levels in patients with acne vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Betul; Ucak, Haydar; Cicek, Demet; Aydin, Suleyman; Erden, Ilker; Dertlioglu, Selma Bakar

    2014-01-01

    Androgens and insulin may contribute to increased sebum production in the pathogenesis of acne vulgaris. We investigated the association between serum desnutrin levels and acne vulgaris in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance. 25 patients presenting with acne vulgaris and 25 control subjects participated in this study. Fasting blood glucose, triglycerides, LDL, VLDL, HDL, total cholesterol, insulin, C-peptide and thyroid function tests were measured. The homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was used to calculate insulin resistance. Desnutrin levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) according to the manufacturer's protocol. Patients with acne vulgaris had a mean serum desnutrin level of (8.83 ± 1.13 μIU/mL), which was statistically significantly lower in the control group (10:58 ± 3.43 μIU/mL). In patients with acne vulgaris the serum glucose levels, insulin levels and HOMA-IR values (87.92 ± 7:46 mg/dL, 11.33 ± 5.93 μIU/mL, 2.49 ± 1.40, respectively) were significantly higher than the control group (77.36 ± 9.83 mg/dL, 5.82 ± 2.68 μIU/mL, 1.11 ± 0.51, respectively) (p = 0.01, pacne vulgaris, as a result of increased levels of serum glucose and insulin, the function of desnutrin was suppressed, perhaps contributing to insulin resistance.

  19. Pemphigus Vulgaris and Infections: A Retrospective Study on 155 Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nafiseh Esmaili

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Autoimmune process and immunosuppressive therapy of pemphigus vulgaris would predispose the patients to infections. Aim. We aimed to study the prevalence of infection and pathogenic agents in pemphigus vulgaris patients admitted to dermatology service. Material and methods. This retrospective study was conducted on 155 pemphigus vulgaris patients (68 males, 87 females admitted to dermatology service between 2009 and 2011. In this study, the diagnosis of pemphigus vulgaris was confirmed by light microscopic and direct immunofluorescence findings. Data were collected through a questionnaire. Results. Of 155 pemphigus vulgaris patients, 33 had infection at admission and 9 acquired nosocomial infection. In addition, 37 cases of oral candidiasis and 15 cases of localized herpes simplex were recorded. Totally, 94 cases of infection were recorded. The occurrence of infection was significantly related to the severity of disease, number of hospital admissions, and presence of diabetes mellitus. The most common pathogenic germs isolated from cultures were Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. Conclusion. Severity of pemphigus vulgaris and diabetes were directly related with tendency to infections. Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli were the most common pathogenic agents. Due to limitations of retrospective study, a prospective study is recommended.

  20. Acne vulgaris and rosacea: evaluation and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, G F

    2001-01-01

    Acne vulgaris, commonly termed acne, is an extremely common disease. It can be found in nearly all teenagers to some degree as well as in women in their 30s. Regardless of severity, acne often has a greater psychologic effect than cutaneous effect. Indeed, most patients overestimate the severity of their disease, while most physicians underestimate its impact on their patients. Studies have shown that people with severe acne as teens are less employable as adults and that self-esteem is low. When combined with other adolescent tensions, acne can be a difficult disease to treat. Rosacea, which usually starts in the late 20s, may affect the eyes as well as the skin. This article describes the pathogenesis of acne and rosacea and treatment approaches the primary care physician can use.

  1. Ichthyosis vulgaris and pycnodysostosis: an unusual occurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kshirsagar, Vinayak Y; Ahmed, Minhajuddin; Nagarsenkar, Suhel; Sahoo, Kulmani; Shah, Kuldeep B

    2012-01-01

    Pycnodysostosis is a rare autosomal recessive disorder whose gene responsible for this phenotype (CTSK), mapped to human chromosome 1q21, code for the enzyme cathepsin K, a lysosomal cysteine protease; with an estimated incidence of 1.7 per 1 million births. This clinical entity includes micromelic dwarfism, increased radiological bone density, dysplasia of the skull, acro-osteolysis, straightening of the mandibular angle and in some cases, dysplasia of the acromial end of the clavicle. Oral and maxillo-facial manifestations of this disease are very clear. Herein we reported a case of pycnodysostosis, showing short stature with widening of the sutures, unfused anterior and posterior fontanelles, crowding of teeth with dental caries and typical radiological features associated with ichthyosis vulgaris and palmoplantar keratoderma.

  2. Pemphigus vulgaris: a multidisciplinary approach to management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinall, Christopher; Stevens, Lucy; McArdle, Paul

    2013-12-16

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is a rare but potentially life-threatening autoimmune disease affecting the mucosa and the skin. The disease is caused by circulating antibodies to desmosomes (important adhesion proteins linking cells together). Disruption of these intercellular connections results in a loss of cohesion between cells (acantholysis). The clinical result of this process is the development of multiple blisters that easily rupture, leaving behind painful sloughing eroded areas of mucosa and/or skin. We report a case of severe PV in a 56-year-old man presenting with widespread, painful, eroded mucocutaneous lesions. The severity of the disease demanded a range of medical and surgical specialties to successfully manage the problem. This paper highlights the importance of an early multidisciplinary team approach to improve the outcome of patients suffering with this disease.

  3. Plastid transformation in sugar beet: Beta vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Marchis, Francesca; Bellucci, Michele

    2014-01-01

    Chloroplast biotechnology has assumed great importance in the past 20 years and, thanks to the numerous advantages as compared to conventional transgenic technologies, has been applied in an increasing number of plant species but still very much limited. Hence, it is of utmost importance to extend the range of species in which plastid transformation can be applied. Sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) is an important industrial crop of the temperate zone in which chloroplast DNA is not transmitted trough pollen. Transformation of the sugar beet genome is performed in several research laboratories; conversely sugar beet plastome genetic transformation is far away from being considered a routine technique. We describe here a method to obtain transplastomic sugar beet plants trough biolistic transformation. The availability of sugar beet transplastomic plants should avoid the risk of gene flow between these cultivated genetic modified sugar beet plants and the wild-type plants or relative wild species.

  4. Pemphigus vulgaris-associated interstitial lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yi-Xiu; Chu, Jin-Gang; Xiao, Ting; Chen, Hong-Duo

    2016-07-01

    Autoimmune bullous diseases (AIBDs)-associated interstitial lung disease (ILD) is extremely rare. Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is an intraepidermal autoimmune blistering disease caused by circulating autoantibodies against desmoglein. To date, PV-associated ILD has rarely been reported in English literature. We report a rare association of PV and ILD. A 53-year-old Chinese female with PV for 8 months developed ILD after a relapse of PV for 2 months due to discontinuation of oral prednisone by herself. She was successfully treated by systemic methylprednisolone. Taken previously reported bullous pemphigoid-associated ILD and linear IgA/IgG bullous dermatosis-associated ILD together, in general, AIBDs-associated ILD occurs when AIBDs relapse or are not controlled, responds well to systemic corticosteroids, and has a relatively better prognosis when compared with rheumatoid arthritis- or dermatomyositis-associated ILD.

  5. Pregnancy-Associated "Cutaneous Type" Pemphigus Vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel, Javier

    2016-01-01

    The development of pemphigus, including pemphigus vulgaris (PV) and pemphigus foliaceus, during pregnancy is rare. PV manifests with mucosal and/or cutaneous erosions with flaccid bullae that are histologically characterized by suprabasilar acantholysis. In contrast, pemphigus foliaceus manifests with cutaneous-only involvement and superficial epidermal acantholysis. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay specific for autoantibodies against desmoglein 1 and desmoglein 3 aids in the diagnosis and differentiation between pemphigus subtypes. High-dose systemic corticosteroids are first-line agents in management of PV, yet their potential long-term use raises complex management issues associated with pregnancy and fetal risk. Here we report a rare case of cutaneous-limited PV in association with pregnancy.

  6. Setting the target for pemphigus vulgaris therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellebrecht, Christoph T.

    2017-01-01

    Despite the rising incidence of autoimmunity, therapeutic options for patients with autoimmune disease still rely on decades-old immunosuppressive strategies that risk severe and potentially fatal complications. Thus, novel therapeutic approaches for autoimmune diseases are greatly needed in order to minimize treatment-related toxicity. Such strategies would ideally target only the autoreactive immune components to preserve beneficial immunity. Here, we review how several decades of basic, translational, and clinical research on the immunology of pemphigus vulgaris (PV), an autoantibody-mediated skin disease, have enabled the development of targeted immunotherapeutic strategies. We discuss research to elucidate the pathophysiology of PV and how the knowledge afforded by these studies has led to the preclinical and clinical testing of targeted approaches to neutralize autoantibodies, to induce antigen-specific tolerance, and to specifically eliminate autoreactive B cells in PV. PMID:28289723

  7. Ichthyosis vulgaris and pycnodysostosis: An unusual occurrence

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    Vinayak Y. Kshirsagar

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Pycnodysostosis is a rare autosomal recessive disorder whose generesponsible for this phenotype (CTSK, mapped to human chromosome1q21, code for the enzyme cathepsin K, a lysosomal cysteineprotease; with an estimated incidence of 1.7 per 1 million births. This clinical entity includes micromelic dwarfism, increased radiological bone density, dysplasia of the skull, acro-osteolysis, straightening of the mandibular angle and in some cases, dysplasia of the acromial end of the clavicle. Oral and maxillo-facial manifestations of this disease are very clear. Herein we reported a case of pycnodysostosis, showing short stature with widening of the sutures, unfused anterior and posterior fontanelles, crowding of teeth with dental caries and typical radiological features associated with ichthyosis vulgaris and palmoplantar keratoderma.

  8. Genetics, chemistry and ecology of a qualitative glucosinolate polymorphism in Barbarea vulgaris

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Leur, H.

    2008-01-01

    Like many other plants, chemical defence compounds are involved in the defense of Barbarea vulgaris against natural enemies. Barbarea vulgaris produces glucosinolates, which are present in most crucifers such as cabbage, mustard, and the scientific model species Arabidopsis thaliana. Glucosinolates

  9. Genetics, chemistry and ecology of a qualitative glucosinolate polymorphism in Barbarea vulgaris

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Leur, H.

    2008-01-01

    Like many other plants, chemical defence compounds are involved in the defense of Barbarea vulgaris against natural enemies. Barbarea vulgaris produces glucosinolates, which are present in most crucifers such as cabbage, mustard, and the scientific model species Arabidopsis thaliana. Glucosinolates

  10. DRY CALCAREOUS GRASSLAND COMMUNITIES (FILIPENDULA VULGARIS-HELICTOTRICHON PRATENSE IN WESTERN AND CENTRAL LATVIA

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    S. RUSINA

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The dry calcareous grassland vegetation of Westem and Central Latvia is described based on 93 rclevés, Ali relevés could be assigned to one community type Filipendula vulgaris-Helictotrichon pratense named according to dominant species. Four variants were distinguished: typicum, Viscaria vulgaris, Astragalus danicus and Carex flacca. Ellenberg indìcator values were calculated to study the ecology of communities. Floristic differences among variants are associated mainly with soil reaction (Ellenberg indicator values for soil pH range from 6.0 to 7.6, but conditions of moisture and fertility are similar among the variants. The calcareous grassland vegetation in Latvia represents transition vegetation between the c1asses Molinio-Arrhenatheretea and Festuco-Brometea. However, ecologically and floristically, these communities are closer to the class Festuco-Brometea and could be assigned to the order Brometalia. For designation to alliance and associations, more data is required. The results are compared with similar communities in other European countries.

  11. DRY CALCAREOUS GRASSLAND COMMUNITIES (FILIPENDULA VULGARIS-HELICTOTRICHON PRATENSE IN WESTERN AND CENTRAL LATVIA

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    S. RUSINA

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The dry calcareous grassland vegetation of Westem and Central Latvia is described based on 93 rclevés, Ali relevés could be assigned to one community type Filipendula vulgaris-Helictotrichon pratense named according to dominant species. Four variants were distinguished: typicum, Viscaria vulgaris, Astragalus danicus and Carex flacca. Ellenberg indìcator values were calculated to study the ecology of communities. Floristic differences among variants are associated mainly with soil reaction (Ellenberg indicator values for soil pH range from 6.0 to 7.6, but conditions of moisture and fertility are similar among the variants. The calcareous grassland vegetation in Latvia represents transition vegetation between the c1asses Molinio-Arrhenatheretea and Festuco-Brometea. However, ecologically and floristically, these communities are closer to the class Festuco-Brometea and could be assigned to the order Brometalia. For designation to alliance and associations, more data is required. The results are compared with similar communities in other European countries.

  12. Fractionation of Sulfur Isotopes by Desulfovibrio vulgaris Mutants Lacking Periplasmic Hydrogenases or the Type I Tetraheme Cytochrome c3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, M.; Ono, S.; Bosak, T.

    2012-12-01

    A large fraction of anaerobic mineralization of organic compounds relies on microbial sulfate reduction. Sulfur isotope fractionation by these microbes has been widely used to trace the biogeochemical cycling of sulfur and carbon, but intracellular mechanisms behind the wide range of fractionations observed in nature and cultures are not fully understood. In this study, we investigated the influence of electron transport chain components on the fractionation of sulfur isotopes by culturing Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough mutants lacking hydrogenases or type I tetraheme cytochrome c3 (Tp1-c3). The mutants were grown both in batch and continuous cultures. All tested mutants grew on lactate or pyruvate as the sole carbon and energy sources, generating sulfide. Mutants lacking cytoplasmic and periplasmic hydrogenases exhibited similar growth physiologies and sulfur isotope fractionations to their parent strains. On the other hand, a mutant lacking Tp1-c3 (ΔcycA) fractionated the 34S/32S ratio more than the wild type, evolving H2 in the headspace and exhibiting a lower specific respiration rate. In the presence of high concentrations of pyruvate, the growth of ΔcycA relied largely on fermentation rather than sulfate reduction, even when sulfate was abundant, producing the largest sulfur isotope effect observed in this study. Differences between sulfur isotope fractionation by ΔcycA and the wild type highlight the effect of electron transfer chains on the magnitude of sulfur isotope fractionation. Because Tp1-c3 is known to exclusively shuttle electrons from periplasmic hydrogenases to transmembrane complexes, electron transfers in the absence of Tp1-c3 should bypass the periplasmic hydrogen cycling, and the loss of reducing equivalents in the form of H2 can impair the flow of electrons from organic acids to sulfur, increasing isotope fractionation. Larger fractionation by ΔcycA can inform interpretations of sulfur isotope data at an environmental scale as well

  13. Changes in Botrytis cinerea Conidia Caused by Berberis vulgaris Extract

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    Marcel PARVU

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Testing plant extracts for controlling fungal diseases is a main biocontrol method. More interesting is to see what happens to the fungus treated with the plant extract. Therefore, the aim of the study was to evaluate the antifungal activity of Berberis vulgaris extract on Botrytis cinerea and to examine the ultrastructural changes in B. cinerea conidia caused by the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC, using SEM and TEM. The antifungal activity of B. vulgaris bark extract was investigated using agar dilution method, and compared to that of berberine. Fluconazole was used as the positive antimycotic control. It was found that (1 B. vulgaris bark extract had significant antifungal activity against B. cinerea, and its effect was stronger than that of pure berberine. It was also noted that (2B. vulgaris MIC caused severe structural changes of the conidia, comparable with berberine MIC effect; therefore (3 B. vulgaris bark extract might be recommended to be tested as a biocontrol agent against B. cinerea.

  14. [Lupus vulgaris manifestation as a destructive nose and facial tumor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, D; Reisser, C

    2009-04-01

    Lupus vulgaris is the most frequent manifestation of cutaneous tuberculosis, but in Europe it is limited to isolated cases. Mainly immunocompetent individuals are affected by this result of an endogenous reinfection on a lymphogenous-less frequently hematogenous-pathway. Lupus vulgaris has been observed to develop in more than 50% of all patients who already suffer from other manifestations of tuberculosis. The development of a squamous cell carcinoma in the lupus vulgaris is a rare complication; therefore, lupus vulgaris is deemed a facultative precancerosis.A 68-year-old female Serbo-Croatian patient presented with an extensive ulcerative nose and facial tumor. Her anamnesis included a squamous cell carcinoma of the nose that had been excised alio loco 3 years before. Further examinations revealed enlarged cervical lymphoma on both sides, and pulmonary metastases were also suspected. The tumor biopsy revealed a necrotic, granulomatous inflammation. No acid-fast rods were seen on Ziehl-Neelsen stain. The tuberculous origin of this ulcerative skin tumor-the lupus vulgaris-as an endogenous reinfection of pulmonary tuberculosis manifestation was confirmed by the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA in polymerase chain reaction and the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis colonies in the bacterial culture (skin biopsy and bronchial secretion). The skin tumor as well as the pulmonary manifestation were successfully treated with combined tuberculostatic therapy and showed a dramatic response within 3 months.

  15. Acne vulgaris: diagnosis and management by the family physician

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    Ana Margarida Ferreira da Silva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acne vulgaris is the most common skin disease worldwide. It affects 85-100% of the population at any point in life. Consequently, it is a frequent reason for primary care visits. It usually begins at puberty, reaching its peak between the age of 14-17 in girls, and 16-19 in boys, and it is more severe and prevalent in males. Although widely discussed, Acne vulgaris still requires constant updating. We conducted a survey of clinical guidelines, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses published over the past 15 years, concerning acne vulgaris and its treatment. Acne vulgaris is usually divided in three clinical types: comedonal, papulopustular, and nodular. The diagnosis is based on clinical signs; however, other conditions should be considered. There are several pharmacological therapies available, especially retinoids, antimicrobials, and hormone therapy, which should be used after considering its indications (type of acne and its severity and side effects. Thus, the family physician plays a leading role in addressing acne vulgaris, from diagnosis to management of therapeutic options. 

  16. Gender-based variability in disease presentation in pemphigus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naseer, Sahar Y; Gill, Liza; Shah, Jay; Sinha, Animesh A

    2014-10-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris is a chronic autoimmune blistering disorder of the skin. As with many autoimmune diseases, a female predominance in pemphigus vulgaris is well established. The genetic and physiological basis for this gender bias is not well understood. Moreover, it is unclear whether the affect of gender extends beyond disease susceptibility to influence disease presentation. To address this issue, we performed a comprehensive analysis of 72 male and 125 female pemphigus vulgaris patients across a set of defined demographic (HLA type, ethnicity) and clinical (age at disease onset, anti-desmoglein antibody levels, site of lesions, and history of autoimmune disease) factors. We find that male patients are more likely to present with disease onset before age 40 than females. Additionally, we find that males have increased cutaneous involvement and display greater co-expression of anti-Dsg1 and anti-Dsg3 antibodies, while females tend to have mucosal predominance and stronger personal and family histories of autoimmunity. We do not find any differences in the distribution of HLA type or ethnicity between male and female pemphigus vulgaris patients. Our findings establish that gender does influence disease presentation in pemphigus vulgaris, supporting a role for genetic and hormonal factors in immune dysregulation and perpetuation of the autoimmune phenotype.

  17. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris ssp. vulgaris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Han; Cao, Hua; Cai, Yan-Fei; Wang, Ji-Hua; Qu, Su-Ping; Huang, Xing-Qi

    2014-06-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of the sugar beet (Beta vulgaris ssp. vulgaris) chloroplast genome (cpDNA) was determined in this study. The cpDNA was 149,637 bp in length, containing a pair of 24,439 bp inverted repeat regions (IR), which were separated by small and large single copy regions (SSC and LSC) of 17,701 and 83,057 bp, respectively. 53.4% of the sugar beet cpDNA consisted of gene coding regions (protein coding and RNA genes). The gene content and relative positions of 113 individual genes (79 protein encoding genes, 30 tRNA genes, 4 rRNA genes) were almost identical to those of tobacco cpDNA. The overall AT contents of the sugar beet cpDNA were 63.6% and in the LSC, SSC and IR regions were 65.9%, 70.8% and 57.8%, respectively. Fifteen genes contained one intron, while three genes had two introns.

  18. Treatment of acne vulgaris in pregnant patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugashetti, Rupa; Shinkai, Kanade

    2013-01-01

    The management of acne vulgaris in the setting of pregnancy raises important clinical considerations regarding the efficacy and safety of acne treatments in this special patient population. Particular challenges include the absence of safety data, discrepancy in safety data between different safety rating systems, and lack of evidence-based recommendations for the treatment of acne during pregnancy. Nonetheless, many therapeutic options exist, and the treatment of acne in pregnant women can be safely and often effectively accomplished. For mild or moderate disease, patients can be treated with topical antimicrobial agents, anti-inflammatory agents, as well as glycolic and salicylic acid. Several topical agents, notably benzoyl peroxide, previously viewed as potentially dangerous are cited by many sources as being considered safe. When necessary, systemic therapies that can be safely added include penicillins, amoxicillin, cephalosporins, erythromycin, clindamycin, and tetracyclines or sulfonamides, depending on the stage of fetal development. Adjunct therapy may include phototherapy or laser treatments. Physicians should work with this often highly motivated, safety-conscious patient population to tailor an individualized treatment regimen. This treatment regimen will likely shift throughout the different stages of fetal development, as distinct safety considerations are raised prior to conception as well as during each of the trimesters of pregnancy. Important considerations regarding acne management in breast-feeding mothers is also discussed.

  19. Topical and oral antibiotics for acne vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Rosso, James Q

    2016-06-01

    Antibiotics, both oral and topical, have been an integral component of the management of acne vulgaris (AV) for approximately 6 decades. Originally thought to be effective for AV due to their ability to inhibit proliferation of Propionibacterium acnes, it is now believed that at least some antibiotics also exert anti-inflammatory effects that provide additional therapeutic benefit. To add, an increase in strains of P acnes and other exposed bacteria that are less sensitive to antibiotics used to treat AV have emerged, with resistance directly correlated geographically with the magnitude of antibiotic use. Although antibiotics still remain part of the therapeutic armamentarium for AV treatment, current recommendations support the following when used to treat AV: 1) monotherapy use should be avoided; 2) use benzoyl peroxide concomitantly to reduce emergence of resistant P acnes strains; 3) oral antibiotics should be used in combination with a topical regimen for moderate-to-severe inflammatory AV; and 4) use oral antibiotics over a limited duration to achieve control of inflammatory AV with an exit plan in place to discontinue their use as soon as possible. When selecting an oral antibiotic to treat AV, potential adverse effects are important to consider.

  20. Impaired water barrier function in acne vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, A; Takenouchi, K; Ito, M

    1995-01-01

    In acne vulgaris, abnormal follicular keratinization is important for comedo formation, yet the precise mechanisms of comedogenesis are not known. The present study examined the interrelationship between sebum secretion rate (SSR), lipid content and water barrier function (WBF) of the stratum corneum (SC) in 36 acne patients and 29 control subjects. All major SC lipid classes were separated and quantified by thin-layer chromatography/photodensitometry. WBF was evaluated by measuring transepidermal water loss (TEWL), and the hygroscopic properties and waterholding capacity of the SC. The SSR over a period of 3 h was significantly higher in patients with moderate acne than in control subjects, but no significant difference was noticed between patients with mild acne and control subjects. Significant differences between patients with both moderate and mild acne and control subjects were noted in the amount of sphingolipids (ceramides and free sphingosine), but not for any other lipid classes. Furthermore in acne patients, lower amounts of sphingolipids were observed corresponding with a diminished WBF. These results suggest that an impaired WBF caused by decreased amounts of ceramides may be responsible for comedo formation, since barrier dysfunction is accompanied by hyperkeratosis of the follicular epithelium.

  1. Acne vulgaris in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnopp, C; Mempel, M

    2011-08-01

    Acne vulgaris is a very common inflammatory skin disease originating from the pilosebaceous unit. Peak incidence is at puberty, but acne can affect all age groups. Prepubertal acne is rare, but important to recognize as diagnostic and therapeutic procedures differ from pubertal acne. Acne neonatorum is a mild, self-limiting disease, whereas acne infantum commonly presents with moderate to severe lesions and high risk of scarring thus requiring early intervention. Mid-childhood or prepubertal acne raises the suspicion of hyperandrogenemia, further investigations are indicated to rule out underlying disease. The same applies to any patient with very severe acne, acne not responding to therapy or unusual clinical presentation. Etiopathogenesis of acne is not yet fully understood. Familiy history is the most important risk factor to develop severe acne and scarring. The relevance of life style factors such as smoking or diet is controversial. Lately high carbohydrate diet and dairy products have been implicated as aggravating factors. Mild acne normally responds to topical monotherapy, in moderate disease combination of two synergistically acting substances (e.g. benzoyl peroxid plus antibiotic, benzoyl peroxid plus retinoid, retinoid plus antibiotic, benzoyl peroxid plus azelaic acid) will improve clinical response. Retinoids and/or benzoylperoxid have been shown to be effective in maintenance therapy. In patients with severe disease or high risk of scarring systemic therapy with antibiotics, oral contraceptives with antiandrogenic properties and in particularly isotretinoin as most effective acne treatment should be considered early to avoid physical and emotional scars.

  2. Lupus vulgaris in a pediatric patient: a clinicohistopathological diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afsar, F Sule; Afsar, Ilhan; Diniz, Gulden; Asilsoy, Suna; Sorguc, Yelda

    2008-04-01

    Lupus vulgaris is the most common form of cutaneous tuberculosis which usually occurs in patients previously sensitized to Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We present a case of a 10-year-old boy who was diagnosed as lupus vulgaris clinically and histopathologically. He had well demarcated, irregularly bordered, pink, infiltrated plaques on his left cheek showing apple-jelly appearance on diascopy. The histopathological examination showed tuberculoid granulomas with Langhans type giant cells. The Mantoux reactivity was in normal limits, and no acid-fast bacilli was found in the lesion, either by direct stained smears or by culture. The lesions showed marked improvement on anti-tuberculosis treatment. We want to emphasize that histopathological examination has diagnostic value in lupus vulgaris in correlation with clinical appearance, when direct analysis or culture is negative.

  3. Lupus vulgaris occurring in a locus minoris resistentiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Richard; Beatch, Anita; Lee, Mao-Cheng; Cheung-Lee, Melody; Wasel, Norman

    2009-01-01

    The pathogenesis of lupus vulgaris, a form of cutaneous tuberculosis, is not always clear, especially in patients who do not have coexistent extracutaneous tuberculosis and in patients with single lesions. To report a case of lupus vulgaris in a locus minoris resistentiae (a site of reduced resistance) and to use a unique set of clinical circumstances and laboratory tests to reconstruct the pathogenesis of the lesion and the response to treatment. Lupus vulgaris can occur in a locus minoris resistentiae; local trauma and possibly other factors, such as increased temperature, topical corticosteroids, and the virulence of the infecting strain, may facilitate the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis present at a locus minoris resistentiae as a result of a silent bacillemia.

  4. Lupus vulgaris in a pediatric patient: a clinicohistopathological diagnosis

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    F. Sule Afsar

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Lupus vulgaris is the most common form of cutaneous tuberculosis which usually occurs in patients previously sensitized to Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We present a case of a 10-year-old boy who was diagnosed as lupus vulgaris clinically and histopathologically. He had well demarcated, irregularly bordered, pink, infiltrated plaques on his left cheek showing apple-jelly appearance on diascopy. The histopathological examination showed tuberculoid granulomas with Langhans type giant cells. The Mantoux reactivity was in normal limits, and no acid-fast bacilli was found in the lesion, either by direct stained smears or by culture. The lesions showed marked improvement on anti-tuberculosis treatment. We want to emphasize that histopathological examination has diagnostic value in lupus vulgaris in correlation with clinical appearance, when direct analysis or culture is negative.

  5. The innate immunity in the cnidarian Hydra vulgaris

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    B Altincicek

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Hydra vulgaris is currently receiving increased attention as a genetically tractable invertebrate model system for studying important processes of life such as the innate immune defense. Similar to complex animals, H. vulgaris polyps respond to injury by abrupt muscle contraction, by limited escape behavior, and by healing the damaged tissue. Simultaneously, cellular processes such as phagocytosis and programmed cell death as well as the massive production of antimicrobial peptides are induced. Recent studies identified several molecular pathways controlling these responses; however, the interdependence of innate immunity and, for example, regeneration and tissue remodeling is not well elucidated yet. H. vulgaris belongs to the Cnidaria representing the phylogenic sister group of bilaterian animals; hence, a better understanding of evolutionarily conserved as well as Hydra/Cnidaria-specific immune responses will provide deep insight into both origin and evolution of the animal innate immune system

  6. Recycling of food waste as nutrients in Chlorella vulgaris cultivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Kin Yan; Pleissner, Daniel; Lin, Carol Sze Ki

    2014-10-01

    Heterotrophic cultivation of Chlorella vulgaris was investigated in food waste hydrolysate. The highest exponential growth rate in terms of biomass of 0.8day(-1) was obtained in a hydrolysate consisting of 17.9gL(-1) glucose, 0.1gL(-1) free amino nitrogen, 0.3gL(-1) phosphate and 4.8mgL(-1) nitrate, while the growth rate was reduced in higher concentrated hydrolysates. C. vulgaris utilized the nutrients recovered from food waste for the formation of biomass and 0.9g biomass was produced per gram glucose consumed. The microalgal biomass produced in nutrient sufficient batch cultures consisted of around 400mgg(-1) carbohydrates, 200mgg(-1) proteins and 200mgg(-1) lipids. The conversion of nutrients derived from food waste and the balanced biomass composition make C. vulgaris a promising strain for the recycling of food waste in food, feed and fuel productions.

  7. Timely recognition of pemphigus vulgaris by dental professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatahzadeh, Mahnaz

    2013-07-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris is a potentially fatal mucocutaneous, vesiculobullous disorder of autoimmune etiology. Regrettably, affected patients frequently experience considerable discomfort and diagnostic delay for months in spite of multiple clinician contacts. The high likelihood of disease manifestations in the oral cavity and serious nature of potential oral and systemic complications mandates dental professionals to recognize early oral signs and symptoms of pemphigus vulgaris and contribute to timely diagnosis and medical intervention to prevent disease progression. This case report presents a young man with pemphigus vulgaris whose oral disease caused him significant suffering and spread to the skin before he was finally diagnosed 3 months after the onset. The signs and symptoms of the disease are reviewed and the potential role of dental providers in timely recognition and management is emphasized.

  8. Autoreactive T cells in the immune pathogenesis of pemphigus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amber, Kyle T; Staropoli, Patrick; Shiman, Michael I; Elgart, George W; Hertl, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris is a life-threatening autoimmune blistering disease caused by anti-desmoglein IgG autoantibodies that finally lead to acantholysis presenting clinically as progressive blistering. Whilst the production of pathogenic antibodies is key to the development of pemphigus vulgaris, many immunological steps are required prior to autoantibody induction. We review advances in the understanding of these immunologic processes with a focus on human leucocyte antigen polymorphisms and antigen recognition, epitope spreading, central and peripheral tolerance, T helper differentiation, induction of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and T-cell regulation of B cells. Targeting autoaggressive T cells as regulators and stimulators of B-cell antibody production should allow for more specific therapeutic immune interventions, avoiding the global immunosuppression seen with many commonly used immunosuppressants in pemphigus vulgaris.

  9. Respuesta de Phaseolus vulgaris a microorganismos promotores de crecimiento vegetal

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    Violeta Edith Romero - García

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de esta investigaci ón fue analizar la respuesta de P. vulgaris a la inoculación individual y consorcio de MPCV a dosis reducida al 50% del FN. Para ello se inoculó P. vulgaris individualmente con: B. cereus, R. etli y T. harzianum y en consorcio de M PCV en jarras de Leonard tratada c on NH 4 NO 3 al 50 %, bajo un diseño experimental de bloques al azar; con variables respuestas: porcentaje y días a germinación, altura de planta y longitud radical, peso fresco/seco aéreo y radical (PFA/PSA/PFR/PSR a plántula y floración; los datos experimentales se analizaron por Tukey , p ≤ 0 , 05. Los resultados mostraron que P. vulgaris inoculado con R. etli y T. harzianum tuvo un 100 % y 95,8% de germinación o emergencia en 4,8 y 4 , 5 días, respectivamente, valores con diferencia estadística en comparación con el 91,7% en 7,17 días en P. vu lgaris sin inocular con el 100% de FN o testigo fertilizado (TF. En la etapa de plántula de P. vulgaris con T. harzianum y R. etli fue de 1,12 g y 0,72 g PSA, así como de 0,31 g y 0,21 de PSR, respectivamente , superior a P. vulgaris (TF de 0,52 g de PSA y 0,19 g de PSR. Lo anterior apoya el potencial de R. etli y T. harzianum para la producción de P. vulgaris a dosis reducida de FN, comparado con el efecto positivo individual de B. cereus y en consorcio en la misma leguminosa .

  10. Transcriptome analysis of the Octopus vulgaris central nervous system.

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    Xiang Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cephalopoda are a class of Mollusca species found in all the world's oceans. They are an important model organism in neurobiology. Unfortunately, the lack of neuronal molecular sequences, such as ESTs, transcriptomic or genomic information, has limited the development of molecular neurobiology research in this unique model organism. RESULTS: With high-throughput Illumina Solexa sequencing technology, we have generated 59,859 high quality sequences from 12,918,391 paired-end reads. Using BLASTx/BLASTn, 12,227 contigs have blast hits in the Swissprot, NR protein database and NT nucleotide database with E-value cutoff 1e(-5. The comparison between the Octopus vulgaris central nervous system (CNS library and the Aplysia californica/Lymnaea stagnalis CNS ESTs library yielded 5.93%/13.45% of O. vulgaris sequences with significant matches (1e(-5 using BLASTn/tBLASTx. Meanwhile the hit percentage of the recently published Schistocerca gregaria, Tilapia or Hirudo medicinalis CNS library to the O. vulgaris CNS library is 21.03%-46.19%. We constructed the Phylogenetic tree using two genes related to CNS function, Synaptotagmin-7 and Synaptophysin. Lastly, we demonstrated that O. vulgaris may have a vertebrate-like Blood-Brain Barrier based on bioinformatic analysis. CONCLUSION: This study provides a mass of molecular information that will contribute to further molecular biology research on O. vulgaris. In our presentation of the first CNS transcriptome analysis of O. vulgaris, we hope to accelerate the study of functional molecular neurobiology and comparative evolutionary biology.

  11. Pemphigus vulgaris in a pregnant woman and her neonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Sameera Begum Kader; BM, Yashodhara; Umakanth, Shashikiran; Kanagasabai, Sachchithanatham

    2012-01-01

    A 23-year-old pregnant woman in her second trimester of pregnancy presented with blisters on the face, abdomen and the leg. Based on the clinical presentation and skin biopsy (histopathology and direct immunofluorescence) the diagnosis of pemphigus vulgaris was established. The child born to this patient also had similar skin lesions. The lesions in the mother and the child improved after treatment. The authors report a rare case of pemphigus vulgaris in a pregnant lady and neonatal pemphigus in her child, both of whom were treated successfully. PMID:22744241

  12. [Mutations in the gene encoding filaggrin cause ichthyosis vulgaris].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Sumangali Chandra; Rasmussen, Kirsten; Bygum, Anette

    2011-02-14

    Ichthyosis vulgaris is a common genetic skin disorder with an estimated prevalence of 1:250 caused by mutations in the gene encoding filaggrin. This disorder manifests itself within the first year of life and is clinically characterized by dry, scaly skin, keratosis pilaris, palmar hyperlinearity and atopic manifestations. Patients with a severe phenotype are homozygous or compound heterozygous for the mutations, whereas heterozygous patients show mild disease, suggesting semidominant inheritance with incomplete penetrance. We present a patient with classic severe ichthyosis vulgaris, atopic eczema and two loss-of-function mutations.

  13. Coincident systemic lupus erythematosus and psoriasis vulgaris: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y; Da, G; Yu, Y; Han, J; Li, H

    2015-12-01

    Psoriasis vulgaris is an autoimmune chronic inflammatory skin disease, but its association with other typical autoimmune disease such as systemic lupus erythematosus has only occasionally been reported. We presented a 25-year-old female who developed systemic lupus erythematosus associated with psoriasis vulgaris. Her conditions were in good control after she got administration of prednisolone (5 mg/day) and Tripterygium Wilfordii Hook (20 mg/day). It is necessary to integrate past history and physical examination to diagnose coincident SLE and psoriasis, and combined treatment with prednisolone and Tripterygium Wilfordii Hook proves effective.

  14. The dual nature of Interleukin-10 in pemphigus vulgaris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Michael Jeffrey; Ellebrecht, Christoph T.; Payne, Aimee S.

    2014-01-01

    The immunomodulatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10) plays beneficial but also potentially detrimental roles in inflammation, infection, and autoimmunity. Recent studies suggest a regulatory role for IL-10-expressing B cells in the autoimmune blistering disease pemphigus vulgaris. Here we review the studies on IL-10 in pemphigus vulgaris and discuss the potential pathophysiological significance of these findings in comparison to prior studies of IL-10 in other human conditions. A better understanding of the complex roles of IL-10 in immune regulation may improve our understanding of pemphigus pathogenesis and treatment. PMID:25464924

  15. Novel protocol for lutein extraction from microalga Chlorella vulgaris

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Este, Martina; De Francisci, Davide; Angelidaki, Irini

    2017-01-01

    Lutein is a pigment generally extracted from marigold flowers. However, lutein is also found in considerable amounts in microalgae. In this study a novel method was developed to improve the extraction efficiency of lutein from microalga C. vulgaris. Differently from conventional methods, ethanol...... was used instead of water in the saponification step, which was conducted simultaneously to the solvent extraction, performed using dichloromethane. The amount of lutein extracted from C. vulgaris dried biomass increased more than threefold, from 0.20 ± 0.00 mgLutein/gDM to 0.69 ± 0.08 mgLutein/gDM. Lutein...

  16. Acne Vulgaris and Acne Rosacea: An Update in Etiopathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozlem Ekiz

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Acne vulgaris is a chronic inflammatory disease of the pilosebaceous unit, characterized by comedones, papules, pustules, nodules, and scars rarely. The major pathogenic factors are abnormal follicular differentiation and increased ductal cornification, abnormal activity of sebaceous glands, microbial colonization of pilosebaceous units by Propionibacterium acnes and inflammation. Rosacea is a common, chronic inflammatory relapsing skin disorder of the central area of the face characterized by transient or persistent erythema, telangiectasia, papules and pustules. Although several hypotheses have been suggested for the etiopathogenesis of rosacea, the exact etiology is still unknown. In this review, we tried to summarize up-to-date information about etiopathogenesis of acne vulgaris and rosocea.

  17. The dual nature of interleukin-10 in pemphigus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Michael Jeffrey; Ellebrecht, Christoph T; Payne, Aimee S

    2015-06-01

    The immunomodulatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10) plays beneficial but also potentially detrimental roles in inflammation, infection, and autoimmunity. Recent studies suggest a regulatory role for IL-10-expressing B cells in the autoimmune blistering disease pemphigus vulgaris. Here we review the studies on IL-10 in pemphigus vulgaris and discuss the potential pathophysiological significance of these findings in comparison to prior studies of IL-10 in other human conditions. A better understanding of the complex roles of IL-10 in immune regulation may improve our understanding of pemphigus pathogenesis and treatment.

  18. Management of pemphigus vulgaris during acute phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kar P

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available We present our experience with 21 patients of pemphigus vulgaris seen over a period of 10 years managed in service hospitals during acute phase of the disease. Age groups of patients ranged from 25-45 years. Eighteen (85.7% were young adults, 30-40 years of age. Fifteen (71.4% were men and 6(28.6% were women. All the cases were hospitalized in ICU, till the acute phase of the disease subsided. Complete hematological profile, urinalysis, serum biochemistry and repeated bacterial cultures from the skin were carried out in all patients at the time of admission and thereafter weekly. The treatment comprised of potassium permanganate lotion bath (1:10000 and 1 framycetin gauze dressing of the denuded areas, maintenance of fluid and electrolyte balance. All suspected infections and septicemia were treated with appropriate antibiotics. The corticosteroids were usually administered as a single dose of prednisolone 1 mg/kg/day. Cyclophosphamide was given at an initial dose of 50mg/day and the dose was escalated to 100mg/day. Once the bulk of the lesions were healed, the dose of corticosteroids was gradually lowered by approximately 50% every two weeks and cyclophosphamide was continued till patients were symptomfree. Out of 21 patients receiving corticosteroids, cyclophosphamide and other supportive therapy, 20(95% had undergone clinical resolution of the disease. During follow up study 15(71.4% patients remained symptom-free and undergone clinical remission. Five patients (23.8% had relapse, out of which 4(19% remained symptom free, after subsequent treatment. There was one death (4.7% in our study.

  19. Differential expression patterns of non-symbiotic hemoglobins in sugar beet (Beta vulgaris ssp. vulgaris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiva-Eriksson, Nélida; Pin, Pierre A; Kraft, Thomas; Dohm, Juliane C; Minoche, André E; Himmelbauer, Heinz; Bülow, Leif

    2014-04-01

    Biennial sugar beet (Beta vulgaris spp. vulgaris) is a Caryophyllidae that has adapted its growth cycle to the seasonal temperature and daylength variation of temperate regions. This is the first time a holistic study of the expression pattern of non-symbiotic hemoglobins (nsHbs) is being carried out in a member of this group and under two essential environmental conditions for flowering, namely vernalization and length of photoperiod. BvHb genes were identified by sequence homology searches against the latest draft of the sugar beet genome. Three nsHb genes (BvHb1.1, BvHb1.2 and BvHb2) and one truncated Hb gene (BvHb3) were found in the genome of sugar beet. Gene expression profiling of the nsHb genes was carried out by quantitative PCR in different organs and developmental stages, as well as during vernalization and under different photoperiods. BvHb1.1 and BvHb2 showed differential expression during vernalization as well as during long and short days. The high expression of BvHb2 indicates that it has an active role in the cell, maybe even taking over some BvHb1.2 functions, except during germination where BvHb1.2 together with BvHb1.1-both Class 1 nsHbs-are highly expressed. The unprecedented finding of a leader peptide at the N-terminus of BvHb1.1, for the first time in an nsHb from higher plants, together with its observed expression indicate that it may have a very specific role due to its suggested location in chloroplasts. Our findings open up new possibilities for research, breeding and engineering since Hbs could be more involved in plant development than previously was anticipated.

  20. Bioremediation of the textile waste effluent by Chlorella vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hala Yassin El-Kassas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The microalgae biomass production from textile waste effluent is a possible solution for the environmental impact generated by the effluent discharge into water sources. The potential application of Chlorella vulgaris for bioremediation of textile waste effluent (WE was investigated using 22 Central Composite Design (CCD. This work addresses the adaptation of the microalgae C. vulgaris in textile waste effluent (WE and the study of the best dilution of the WE for maximum biomass production and for the removal of colour and Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD by this microalga. The cultivation of C. vulgaris, presented maximum cellular concentrations Cmax and maximum specific growth rates μmax in the wastewater concentration of 5.0% and 17.5%, respectively. The highest colour and COD removals occurred with 17.5% of textile waste effluent. The results of C. vulgaris culture in the textile waste effluent demonstrated the possibility of using this microalga for the colour and COD removal and for biomass production. There was a significant negative relationship between textile waste effluent concentration and Cmax at 0.05 level of significance. However, sodium bicarbonate concentration did not significantly influence the responses of Cmax and the removal of colour and COD.

  1. Separation of Chlorella vulgaris from liquid phase using bioflocculants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gizem Günay

    2014-12-01

    results showed that C. vulgaris was partially separated from the liquid phase. However, the experiments will continue for the purpose of increasing the flocculating activity. Getting successfully experimental results with kaolin showed that bioflocculant has a potential use in wastewater treatment. For this reason, it also is thought to analyze the effect of bioflocculant on the wastewater treatment with further studies.[¤

  2. Acne vulgaris: A review of causes and treatment options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Well, Danielle

    2013-10-10

    Acne vulgaris is a disorder of the sebaceous follicle. The cause is multifactorial, and both adolescents and adults can be affected. Acne is associated with a significant financial burden and considerable psychological distress. Treatment options are reviewed, including over-the-counter medications, prescription medications, and in-office procedures.

  3. [Molecular genetic investigation of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butorina, A K; Kornienko, A V

    2011-10-01

    Molecular genetic studies of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) are reviewed as a basis for the development of genomics of this species. The methods used to study structural and functional genomics are considered. The results and their application to increase the efficiency of sugar beet breeding are discussed.

  4. Dapsone 7.5% Gel: A Review in Acne Vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Salama, Zaina T; Deeks, Emma D

    2017-02-01

    Dapsone 7.5% gel (Aczone(®)) is indicated for the once-daily topical treatment of acne vulgaris in patients aged ≥12 years. Dapsone is a sulfone antibacterial with anti-inflammatory actions, which are thought to be largely responsible for its efficacy in treating acne vulgaris. In two phase III trials of 12 weeks' duration in patients aged ≥12 years with moderate acne vulgaris, once-daily dapsone 7.5% gel reduced acne severity (as per the Global Acne Assessment Score) and lesion counts versus vehicle. The benefits of dapsone 7.5% gel over vehicle were seen as early as week 2 for inflammatory lesion counts, and from week 4 or 8 for other outcomes. Dapsone 7.5% gel was well tolerated, with a low incidence of treatment-related adverse events, with the majority of adverse events being administration-site related and mild or moderate in severity. Thus, dapsone 7.5% gel is an effective and well tolerated option for the topical treatment of acne vulgaris in patients aged ≥12 years, with the convenience of once-daily application.

  5. Gallium-67-citrate uptake in a case of acne vulgaris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kipper, M.S.; Taylor, A.; Ashburn, W.L.

    1981-09-01

    A case of increased Ga-67 uptake in a patient with active acne vulgaris is reported. The scan was requested in a search for metastatic testicular carcinoma or bleomycin pulmonary toxicity. Careful clinical evaluation including physical examination was necessary in order to avoid an erroneous scan interpretation.

  6. An update on the management of acne vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonette Keri

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Jonette Keri1,2, Michael Shiman11Department of Dermatology and Cutaneous Surgery, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, USA; 2Dermatology Service, Miami VA Hospital, FL, USAAbstract: Acne vulgaris is a common skin disorder that can affect individuals from childhood to adulthood, most often occurring in the teenage years. Acne can have a significant physical, emotional, and social impact on an individual. Many different treatment options are available for the treatment of acne vulgaris. Commonly used topical treatments include benzoyl peroxide, antibiotics, sulfur and sodium sulfacetamide, azelaic acid, and retinoids. Systemic treatment is frequently used and includes the use of systemic antibiotics, oral contraceptives, antiandrogens, and retinoids. Other treatment modalities exist such as the use of superficial chemical peels as well as using laser and light devices for the treatment of acne. With the multitude of treatment options and the rapidly expanding newer technologies available to clinicians, it is important to review and be aware of the current literature and studies regarding the treatment of acne vulgaris.Keywords: acne vulgaris, treatment, benzoyl peroxide, antibiotics, retinoids, lasers

  7. Vegetative propagation of Syringa vulgaris L. in vitro.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pierik, R.L.M.; Steegmans, H.H.M.; Elias, A.A.; Stiekema, O.T.J.; Velde, van der A.J.

    1988-01-01

    Excised shoot tips from adult Syringa vulgaris L. plants were rejuvenated by repeated subculturing in vitro. The number of subcultures required to rejuvenate the shoots was strongly dependent on the age and genotype of the plant material. Three rootstocks (K8, A2 and A3) and 5 cultivars (Mademoisell

  8. Evaluation of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) response to charcoal rot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charcoal rot in common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), caused by Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi) Gold. (Mph), is an endemic disease in the prevailing hot and dry conditions in southern Puerto Rico. This study evaluated the 120 bean genotypes that compose the BASE 120 panel under screenhouse conditio...

  9. Pemphigus Vulgaris Activity Score and Assessment of Convergent Validity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheyda Chams-Davatchi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Pemphigus is a rare autoimmune blistering disease with different phenotypes. The evaluation of therapeutic interventions requires a reliable, valid and feasible to use measurement. However, there is no gold standard to measure the disease activity in clinical trials. In this study we aimed to introduce the pemphigus vulgaris activity score (PVAS measurement and to assess the convergent validity with the experts’ opinion of disease activity. In PVAS scoring, the distribution of pemphigus vulgaris antigen expression in different anatomical regions is taking in to account with special consideration of the healing process. PVAS is a 0-18 scale, based on the extent of mucocutaneous involvement, type of lesion and the presence of Nikolsky’s sign. The sum of the scores of total number of lesions, number of different anatomic regions involvement and Nikolsky’s sign is weighted by the type of lesion. In the present study, PVAS was assessed in 50 patients diagnosed with pemphigus vulgaris by one dermatologist. Independently, five blinded experts scored all the patients through physician’s global assessment (PGA. The convergent validity with experts’ opinion was assessed. The Spearman coefficient of correlation showed the acceptable value of 0.751 (95%CI: 0.534- 0.876. PVAS is a valid, objective and simple-to-use scoring measurement. It showed a good correlation with PGA of pemphigus disease activity in Iranian patients with pemphigus vulgaris

  10. Variation in Breeding Systems in Hypericum Perforatum and Prunella Vulgaris

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effective conservation of new crop germplasm and its efficient use in new-crop development both rely on a clear understanding of the crop's reproductive biology. Hypericum perforatum (St. John's wort) and Prunella vulgaris (Common selfheal) are two medicinal plant species with potential for crop...

  11. Pemphigus vulgaris activity score and assessment of convergent validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chams-Davatchi, Cheyda; Rahbar, Ziba; Daneshpazhooh, Maryam; Mortazavizadeh, Seyed Mohammad Ali; Akhyani, Maryam; Esmaili, Nafiseh; Balighi, Kamran

    2013-05-07

    Pemphigus is a rare autoimmune blistering disease with different phenotypes. The evaluation of therapeutic interventions requires a reliable, valid and feasible to use measurement. However, there is no gold standard to measure the disease activity in clinical trials. In this study we aimed to introduce the pemphigus vulgaris activity score (PVAS) measurement and to assess the convergent validity with the experts' opinion of disease activity. In PVAS scoring, the distribution of pemphigus vulgaris antigen expression in different anatomical regions is taking in to account with special consideration of the healing process. PVAS is a 0-18 scale, based on the extent of mucocutaneous involvement, type of lesion and the presence of Nikolsky's sign. The sum of the scores of total number of lesions, number of different anatomic regions involvement and Nikolsky's sign is weighted by the type of lesion. In the present study, PVAS was assessed in 50 patients diagnosed with pemphigus vulgaris by one dermatologist. Independently, five blinded experts scored all the patients through physician's global assessment (PGA). The convergent validity with experts' opinion was assessed. The Spearman coefficient of correlation showed the acceptable value of 0.751 (95%CI: 0.534- 0.876). PVAS is a valid, objective and simple-to-use scoring measurement. It showed a good correlation with PGA of pemphigus disease activity in Iranian patients with pemphigus vulgaris.

  12. Anaphylaxis to pine nut: cross-reactivity to Artemisia vulgaris?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues-Alves, R; Pregal, A; Pereira-Santos, M C; Branco-Ferreira, M; Lundberg, M; Oman, H; Pereira-Barbosa, M

    2008-01-01

    The use of pine nuts, the seeds of Pinus pinea, is on the increasing in the modern Mediterranean diet. Little more than 20 cases of allergy to this tree nut have been published, and cross-reactivity with pine pollen, peanut and almond has already been reported. We describe the case of a young boy with several episodes of anaphylaxis after pine nut ingestion. Specific IgE to pine nut and Artemisia vulgaris was demonstrated by skin prick tests and in vitro determination of specific IgE, although no IgE to pine pollen or other nuts was detected. Immunoblotting of Artemisia vulgaris and pine nut revealed two matching diffuse bands, just below 14 kDa and 30 kDa. The ImmunoCAP inhibition assays showed complete inhibition of pine nut specific IgE after serum incubation with Artemisia vulgaris extract. As far as we know, this is the first reported case of documented cross-reactivity between pine nut and Artemisia vulgaris.

  13. The epidemiology of acne vulgaris in late adolescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynn DD

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Darren D Lynn,1 Tamara Umari,1 Cory A Dunnick,2,3 Robert P Dellavalle2–4 1Department of Dermatology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, 2Department of Dermatology, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, 3Dermatology Service, US Department of Veterans Affairs, Eastern Colorado Health Care System, Denver, 4Department of Epidemiology, Colorado School of Public Health, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO, USA Importance: Acne vulgaris is the most common skin condition affecting late adolescents across the globe. Although prior studies have evaluated epidemiologic patterns of acne vulgaris in various ethnicities and regions, adequate understanding of the worldwide burden of the disease associated with patients in their late adolescence (15–19-year olds remains lacking. Objective: To assess the global burden of the disease associated with acne vulgaris for late adolescents (15–19-year olds and provide an overview of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and treatment options for acne in this population. Design: Database summary study. Setting: Global Burden of Disease Study 2010 database. Participants: Global Burden of Disease regions comprised countries with prevalence of acne vulgaris between the ages of 15 and 19 years. Main outcomes and measures: Geographic region-level disability-adjusted life year rates (per 100,000 persons associated with acne vulgaris in years 1990 through 2010. Median percentage change in disability-adjusted life year rates was estimated for each region across the specified study period. Conclusion and relevance: Acne vulgaris-associated disease burden exhibits global distribution and has continued to grow in prevalence over time within this population. This continued growth suggests an unmet dermatologic need worldwide for this disorder and potential opportunities for improved access and delivery of dermatologic care. Our analysis of the literature reveals numerous

  14. ICG laser therapy of acne vulgaris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuchin, Valery V.; Altshuler, Gregory B.; Genina, Elina A.; Bashkatov, Alexey N.; Simonenko, Georgy V.; Odoevskaya, Olga D.; Yaroslavsky, Ilya V.

    2004-07-01

    The near-infrared (NIR) laser radiation due to its high penetration depth is widely used in phototherapy. In application to skin appendages a high selectivity of laser treatment is needed to prevent light action on surrounding tissues. Indocyanine Green (ICG) dye may provide a high selectivity of treatment due to effective ICG uploading by a target and its narrow band of considerable absorption just at the wavelength of the NIR diode laser. The goal of this study is to demonstrate the efficacy of the NIR diode laser phototherapy in combination with topical application of ICG suggested for soft and thermal treatment of acne vulgaris. 28 volunteers with facile or back-located acne were enrolled. Skin sites of subjects were stained by ICG and irradiated by NIR laser-diode light (803 or 809 nm). Untreated, only stained and only light irradiated skin areas served as controls. For soft acne treatment, the low-intensity (803 nm, 10 - 50 mW/cm2, 5-10 min) or the medium-intensity (809 nm, 150 - 190 mW/cm2, 15 min) protocols were used. The single and multiple (up to 8-9) treatments were provided. The individual acne lesions were photothermally treated at 18 W/cm2 (803 nm, 0.5 sec) without skin surface cooling or at 200 W/cm2 (809 nm, 0.5 sec) with cooling. The results of the observations during 1-2 months after the completion of the treatment have shown that only in the case of the multiple-wise treatment a combined action of ICG and NIR irradiation reduces inflammation and improves skin state during a month without any side effects. At high power densities (up to 200 W/cm2) ICG stained acne inflammatory elements were destructed for light exposures of 0.5 sec. Based on the concept that hair follicle, especially sebaceous gland, can be intensively and selectively stained by ICG due to dye diffusion through pilosebaceous canal and its fast uptake by living microorganisms, by vital keratinocytes of epithelium of the canal and sebaceous duct, and by rapidly proliferating

  15. Pemphigus vulgaris autoantibody profiling by proteomic technique.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina Kalantari-Dehaghi

    Full Text Available Pemphigus vulgaris (PV is a mucocutaneous blistering disease characterized by IgG autoantibodies against the stratified squamous epithelium. Current understanding of PV pathophysiology does not explain the mechanism of acantholysis in patients lacking desmoglein antibodies, which justifies a search for novel targets of pemphigus autoimmunity. We tested 264 pemphigus and 138 normal control sera on the multiplexed protein array platform containing 701 human genes encompassing many known keratinocyte cell-surface molecules and members of protein families targeted by organ-non-specific PV antibodies. The top 10 antigens recognized by the majority of test patients' sera were proteins encoded by the DSC1, DSC3, ATP2C1, PKP3, CHRM3, COL21A1, ANXA8L1, CD88 and CHRNE genes. The most common combinations of target antigens included at least one of the adhesion molecules DSC1, DSC3 or PKP3 and/or the acetylcholine receptor CHRM3 or CHRNE with or without the MHC class II antigen DRA. To identify the PV antibodies most specific to the disease process, we sorted the data based on the ratio of patient to control frequencies of antigen recognition. The frequency of antigen recognition by patients that exceeded that of control by 10 and more times were the molecules encoded by the CD33, GP1BA, CHRND, SLC36A4, CD1B, CD32, CDH8, CDH9, PMP22 and HLA-E genes as well as mitochondrial proteins encoded by the NDUFS1, CYB5B, SOD2, PDHA1 and FH genes. The highest specificity to PV showed combinations of autoantibodies to the calcium pump encoded by ATP2C1 with C5a receptor plus DSC1 or DSC3 or HLA-DRA. The results identified new targets of pemphigus autoimmunity. Novel autoantibody signatures may help explain individual variations in disease severity and treatment response, and serve as sensitive and specific biomarkers for new diagnostic assays in PV patients.

  16. Developmental and physiological challenges of octopus (Octopus vulgaris) early life stages under ocean warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repolho, Tiago; Baptista, Miguel; Pimentel, Marta S; Dionísio, Gisela; Trübenbach, Katja; Lopes, Vanessa M; Lopes, Ana Rita; Calado, Ricardo; Diniz, Mário; Rosa, Rui

    2014-01-01

    The ability to understand and predict the effects of ocean warming (under realistic scenarios) on marine biota is of paramount importance, especially at the most vulnerable early life stages. Here we investigated the impact of predicted environmental warming (+3 °C) on the development, metabolism, heat shock response and antioxidant defense mechanisms of the early stages of the common octopus, Octopus vulgaris. As expected, warming shortened embryonic developmental time by 13 days, from 38 days at 18 °C to 25 days at 21 °C. Concomitantly, survival decreased significantly (~29.9 %). Size at hatching varied inversely with temperature, and the percentage of smaller premature paralarvae increased drastically, from 0 % at 18 °C to 17.8 % at 21 °C. The metabolic costs of the transition from an encapsulated embryo to a free planktonic form increased significantly with warming, and HSP70 concentrations and glutathione S-transferase activity levels were significantly magnified from late embryonic to paralarval stages. Yet, despite the presence of effective antioxidant defense mechanisms, ocean warming led to an augmentation of malondialdehyde levels (an indicative of enhanced ROS action), a process considered to be one of the most frequent cellular injury mechanisms. Thus, the present study provides clues about how the magnitude and rate of ocean warming will challenge the buffering capacities of octopus embryos and hatchlings' physiology. The prediction and understanding of the biochemical and physiological responses to warmer temperatures (under realistic scenarios) is crucial for the management of highly commercial and ecologically important species, such as O. vulgaris.

  17. The optimal hyperspectral quantitative models for chlorophyll-a of chlorella vulgaris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Qian; Wu, Xiuju

    2009-09-01

    Chlorophyll-a of Chlorella vulgaris had been related with spectrum. Based on hyperspectral measurement for Chlorella vulgaris, the hyperspectral characteristics of Chlorella vulgaris and their optimal hyperspectral quantitative models of chlorophyll-a (Chla) estimation were researched in situ experiment. The results showed that the optimal hyperspectral quantitative model of Chlorella vulgaris was Chla=180.5+1125787(R700)'+2.4 *109[(R700)']2 (P0Chlorella vulgaris, two reflectance crests were around 540 nm and 700 nm and their locations moved right while Chl-a concentration increased. The reflectance of Chlorella vulgaris decreases with Cha concentration increase in 540 nm, but on the contrary in 700nm.

  18. A preliminary screening study on the associated proteins in human psoriasis vulgaris by serum proteomics technologies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhankui Liu; Shengshun Tan; Chunshui Yu; Jinghua Fan; Zhuanli Bai; Junjie Li

    2007-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the optimum screening conditions of associated proteins in human psoriasis vulgaris by serum proteomics technique, and to screen the different expression proteins related with psoriasis vulgaris. Methods:Serum samples of peripheral blood were collected from newly diagnosed psoriasis vulgaris patients in the clinic, and 20 matched healthy persons.Serum albumin IgG was removed by filtering with ProteoExtract Albumin/IgG. After comparative proteomics analysis the different protein spots were identified using 2-DE and MS. Results :Electrophoresis figures with high resolution and reproducibility were obtained. Three different expression proteins were found only in the serum from psoriasis vulgaris patients,while nine other different proteins expressing from healthy volunteers. Conclusion:The protein expression was different in the serum between the psoriasis vulgaris patients and healthy volunteers. It was hoped that we could find the biomarkers related to psoriasis vulgaris by using proteomics.

  19. OXIDANT/ANTIOXIDANT STATUS IN OBESE ADOLESCENT FEMALES WITH ACNE VULGARIS

    OpenAIRE

    Abulnaja Khalid

    2009-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Acne vulgaris is a distressing skin condition, which can carry with it significant psychological disability. Oxidant/antioxidant imbalance leads to increased production of free radicals, that cause many diseases. Some nutrients, along with systemic oxidative stress, have been implicated in acne vulgaris. The goal of the present study was to assess oxidant and antioxidant status in correlation with the incidence of acne vulgaris in adolescent obese females. Materia...

  20. Interaction between Chlorella vulgaris and bacteria:interference and resource competition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QU Liang; WANG Renjun; ZHAO Peng; CHEN Ruinan; ZHOU Wenli; TANG Liuqing; TANG Xuexi

    2014-01-01

    Research of interaction mechanism between Chlorella vulgaris and two bacterial strains (Z-QD08 and Z-QS01) were conducted under laboratory conditions. Growth rates of bacteria and C. vulgaris were tested under co-culture conditions to evaluate the effects of concentrations of C. vulgaris and bacteria on their interactions. To test whether the availability of inorganic nutrients, vitamins and trace metals affects the interactions between C. vulgaris and bacteria, experiments were performed with or without the culture medium filtrate of C. vulgaris or bacteria. The results showed that the growth of C. vulgaris was promot-ed at low concentrations of bacteria (5×106 cells/ml), and expressed a positive correlation with the bacteria density, whereas opposite trend was observed for treatments with high bacteria density (10×106 cells/ml and 20×106 cells/ml). The growth rate of bacteria decreased with the increasing concentrations of C. vul-garis. The growth of bacteria Z-QD08 was inhibited by C. vulgaris through interference competition, while the mechanism for interaction between bacteria Z-QS01 and C. vulgaris was resource competition. The influence of cell density on the interaction between microalgae and bacteria was also discussed. These ex-periments confirm some elements of published theory on interactions between heterotrophic bacteria and microalgae and suggest that heterotrophic bacteria play an important role in the development of blooms in natural waters.

  1. Mucosal-dominant pemphigus vulgaris in a captopril-taking woman with angioedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gornowicz-Porowska, Justyna; Dmochowski, Marian; Pietkiewicz, Pawel; Bowszyc-Dmochowska, Monika

    2015-01-01

    We describe a 39-year-old woman with an apparent captopril-induced, contact mucosal-dominant pemphigus vulgaris and angioedema, who took captopril during a bout of arterial hypertension. This exposure suggests that captopril and pathophysiology of angioedema stimulated the development of pemphigus vulgaris, which was diagnosed using the novel, indirect immunofluorescence BIOCHIP mosaic, with the modification to detect serum IgG4 autoantibodies. We discuss the patient, who experienced a chain of events leading to the active stage of pemphigus vulgaris, and review concepts of pemphigus vulgaris inducible by drugs and pathological immunity.

  2. Thymus vulgaris essential oil: chemical composition and antimicrobial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borugă, O; Jianu, C; Mişcă, C; Goleţ, I; Gruia, A T; Horhat, F G

    2014-01-01

    The study was designed to determine the chemical composition and antimicrobial properties of the essential oil of Thymus vulgaris cultivated in Romania. The essential oil was isolated in a yield of 1.25% by steam distillation from the aerial part of the plant and subsequently analyzed by GC-MS. The major components were p-cymene (8.41%), γ-terpinene (30.90%) and thymol (47.59%). Its antimicrobial activity was evaluated on 7 common food-related bacteria and fungus by using the disk diffusion method. The results demonstrate that the Thymus vulgaris essential oil tested possesses strong antimicrobial properties, and may in the future represent a new source of natural antiseptics with applications in the pharmaceutical and food industry.

  3. Case of lupus vulgaris diagnosed 50 years after onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uttawichai, Pattanawadee; Igarashi, Tsukasa; Kawana, Seiji

    2009-02-01

    Cutaneous tuberculosis is an infrequent form of extrapulmonary tuberculosis, but is a symptom that can lead to diagnosis of tuberculosis. We describe a case of lupus vulgaris in a 79-year-old woman who had a 50-year history of a slowly growing plaque on her right cheek. She visited many hospitals without resolution and the plaque gradually enlarged. Recently, she was misdiagnosed with eczema and prescribed topical steroids that had no effect, and she subsequently visited our outpatient clinic. A diagnosis of lupus vulgaris was made based on histopathology, culture and polymerase chain reaction, and isoniazid, rifampicin and ethambutol were administered as antituberculosis treatment. Although the incidence of cutaneous tuberculosis has decreased significantly in developed countries, knowledge and awareness of the disease are still of importance for proper diagnosis and treatment.

  4. Biodiesel production in crude oil contaminated environment using Chlorella vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xaaldi Kalhor, Aadel; Mohammadi Nassab, Adel Dabbagh; Abedi, Ehsan; Bahrami, Ahmad; Movafeghi, Ali

    2016-12-01

    Biodiesel is a valuable alternative to fossil fuels and many countries choose biodiesel as an unconventional energy source. A large number of investigations have been done on microalgae as a source of oil production. In recent years, wastewater pollutions have caused many ecological problems, and therefore, wastewater phycoremediation has attracted the international attention. This paper studied the cultivation of Chlorella vulgaris in a crude oil polluted environment for biodiesel production. Intended concentrations were 10 and 20gperliter (crude oil/water) at two times. The results showed that the growth of C. vulgaris was improved in wastewater and the maximum amount of dry mass and oil was produced at the highest concentration of crude oil (0.41g and 0.15g/l, respectively). In addition, dry mass and oil yield of the microalga were significantly enhanced by increasing the experiment duration.

  5. EFFECT OF CAPSAICIN ON SUBSTANCE P IN PSORIASIS VULGARIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王万卷; 谭升顺

    2003-01-01

    Objective To the investigate the mechanism of capsaicin in psoriasis vulgaris. Methods Substance P(SP) in psoriatic lesions before and 6 weeks after the treatment with capsaicin was detedted by radioimmunoassary. Results After 3 weeks and 6 weeks treatment with capsaicin, SP in psoriatic lesions was decreased (P<0.05), while it in the self-control group was not decreased; Overall the efficient incidence in therapeutic group was 78.8% , while it in the control group was 36.8%. There was significant difference between them (χ2=16.30, P<0.001). Conclusion Capsaicin inhibits dermal inflammatory responses and proliferation of keratinocytes by decreasing the expression of SP in psoriasis vulgaris.

  6. Ulcerative lupus vulgaris of face: an uncommon presentation in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmavathy, L; Rao, L Lakshmana; Ethirajan, N; Krishnaswami, B

    2007-01-01

    Tuberculosis affects the population world wide, more among those living in developing countries. The incidence of tuberculosis registered an upward trend even in developed countries, with the advent of HIV infection. Cutaneous tuberculosis accounts for about 1% of cases of extra-pulmonary tuberculosis. Cutaneous tuberculosis presents with various lesions ranging from ulcerative to proliferative or hyperkeratotic lesions. The lesions may sometimes be associated with marked destruction of the tissues resulting in marked disfigurement, especially when it involves face as seen in cases of Lupus Vulgaris. A case of Lupus Vulgaris in a young woman with extensive ulceration of face which responded to ATT resulting in scarring of the face is reported for its rarity amongst Indian population as against western population.

  7. Annular lupus vulgaris: an unusual case undiagnosed for five years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gönül, Müzeyyen; Kiliç, Arzu; Külcü Cakmak, Seray; Gül, Ulker; Koçak, Oğuzhan; Demiriz, Murat

    2007-01-01

    Tuberculosis is still a serious problem in both developing and developed countries. It is often confused with various cutaneous disorders both clinically and histopathologically.A 46-year-old woman attended our clinic with progressive, asymptomatic, annular skin lesions on her right upper extremity for 5 years. She had received many different therapies for these lesions at other institutions previously but these medications were not effective and the lesions deteriorated. On dermatological examination, well-demarcated, irregular bordered, violaceous colored, elevated and crusted annular lesions on her right hand dorsum and forearm were observed. She was diagnosed as having lupus vulgaris clinically and histopathologically. Antituberculosis therapy was administered and regression of the lesions started in the second week of medication.We report a case of long-standing, undiagnosed and uncommon, annular form of lupus vulgaris. We want to stress that clinical and histopathological findings are still important for the diagnosis of cutaneous tuberculosis.

  8. Phaseolus vulgaris RbohB functions in lateral root development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montiel, Jesús; Arthikala, Manoj-Kumar; Quinto, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory burst oxidase homologs (RBOHs) catalyze the reduction of oxygen to generate superoxide anion, a kind of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The ROS produced by RBOHs play essential roles in diverse processes, such as root hair development, stomata closure and signaling mechanisms in response to abiotic stimuli and during plant-pathogen interactions. Recently, we found that PvRbohB silencing in transgenic Phaseolus vulgaris roots had a negative impact on lateral root density. In this work, we show that the downregulation of PvRbohB affects both the growth and ROS levels in recently emerged lateral roots. In addition, we found that the PvRbohB promoter was activated during lateral root primordium initiation in the pericycle, and remained active throughout lateral root development. This study identifies RBOHs as potentially important players in lateral root development in P. vulgaris. PMID:23221754

  9. Respose of Phaseolus vulgaris L. cultivars to drought stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amalia Domínguez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tolerance to drought is a desired cultivars of Phaseolus vulgaris L. The present study aimed to determine the response of 22 cultivars of common bean during the early stages of vegetative development character. The plants were subjected to irrigation at 70% or 20% of field capacity (FC for seven days and the indicators were measured relative water content, stomatal opening, stomatal index, proline content and total phenols in leaves. The data obtained were processed using a principal component analysis and the variables studied were represented by a bivariate graph (biplot. It was possible to group the cultivars based on their response in tolerant, moderately tolerant and susceptible to water stress condition induced by irrigation at 20% FC. Stomatal opening and relative water content were recommended to be used as criteria for selecting cultivars tolerant to water stress indicators bean. Key words: PCA, Phaseolus vulgaris L., proline, water stress

  10. Significance of diet in treated and untreated acne vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicja Kucharska

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between diet and acne is highly controversial. Several studies during the last decade have led dermatologists to reflect on a potential link between diet and acne. This article presents the latest findings on a potential impact that diet can have on pathogenesis of acne vulgaris. The association between diet and acne can no longer be dismissed. Compelling evidence shows that high glycemic load diets may exacerbate acne. Dairy ingestion appears to be weakly associated with acne and the roles of omega-3 fatty acids, dietary fiber, antioxidants, vitamin A, zinc and iodine remain to be elucidated. The question of what the impact of diet is on the course of acne vulgaris still remains unclear.

  11. Significance of diet in treated and untreated acne vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucharska, Alicja; Szmurło, Agnieszka; Sińska, Beata

    2016-04-01

    The relationship between diet and acne is highly controversial. Several studies during the last decade have led dermatologists to reflect on a potential link between diet and acne. This article presents the latest findings on a potential impact that diet can have on pathogenesis of acne vulgaris. The association between diet and acne can no longer be dismissed. Compelling evidence shows that high glycemic load diets may exacerbate acne. Dairy ingestion appears to be weakly associated with acne and the roles of omega-3 fatty acids, dietary fiber, antioxidants, vitamin A, zinc and iodine remain to be elucidated. The question of what the impact of diet is on the course of acne vulgaris still remains unclear.

  12. [Clinical features and genetics of the ichthyosis vulgaris group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traupe, H; Happle, R

    1980-12-11

    Combined application of clinical, genetic and histological criteria in general allows a definite diagnosis of autosomal dominant ichthyosis vulgaris and of X-linked recessive ichthyosis. For differential diagnosis, the following rare syndromes should be considered: ichthyosis bullosa: Refsum syndrome; Jung-Vogel syndrome; ichthyosis with corneal opacity, pili torti and alopecia; ichthyosis with deafness, pili torti and dental anomalies; and ichthyosis with hepatosplenomegaly and cerebellar degeneration.

  13. The morphology and adhesion mechanism of Octopus vulgaris suckers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tramacere, Francesca; Beccai, Lucia; Kuba, Michael; Gozzi, Alessandro; Bifone, Angelo; Mazzolai, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    The octopus sucker represents a fascinating natural system performing adhesion on different terrains and substrates. Octopuses use suckers to anchor the body to the substrate or to grasp, investigate and manipulate objects, just to mention a few of their functions. Our study focuses on the morphology and adhesion mechanism of suckers in Octopus vulgaris. We use three different techniques (MRI, ultrasonography, and histology) and a 3D reconstruction approach to contribute knowledge on both morphology and functionality of the sucker structure in O. vulgaris. The results of our investigation are two-fold. First, we observe some morphological differences with respect to the octopus species previously studied (i.e., Octopus joubini, Octopus maya, Octopus bimaculoides/bimaculatus and Eledone cirrosa). In particular, in O. vulgaris the acetabular chamber, that is a hollow spherical cavity in other octopuses, shows an ellipsoidal cavity which roof has an important protuberance with surface roughness. Second, based on our findings, we propose a hypothesis on the sucker adhesion mechanism in O. vulgaris. We hypothesize that the process of continuous adhesion is achieved by sealing the orifice between acetabulum and infundibulum portions via the acetabular protuberance. We suggest this to take place while the infundibular part achieves a completely flat shape; and, by sustaining adhesion through preservation of sucker configuration. In vivo ultrasonographic recordings support our proposed adhesion model by showing the sucker in action. Such an underlying physical mechanism offers innovative potential cues for developing bioinspired artificial adhesion systems. Furthermore, we think that it could possibly represent a useful approach in order to investigate any potential difference in the ecology and in the performance of adhesion by different species.

  14. Acne Vulgaris and Acne Rosacea: An Update in Etiopathogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Ozlem Ekiz

    2014-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is a chronic inflammatory disease of the pilosebaceous unit, characterized by comedones, papules, pustules, nodules, and scars rarely. The major pathogenic factors are abnormal follicular differentiation and increased ductal cornification, abnormal activity of sebaceous glands, microbial colonization of pilosebaceous units by Propionibacterium acnes and inflammation. Rosacea is a common, chronic inflammatory relapsing skin disorder of the central area of the face characterized b...

  15. Human platelet aggregation inhibitors from thyme (Thymus vulgaris L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, Kenji; Kawazoe, Kazuyoshi; Takaishi, Yoshihisa

    2002-06-01

    Two antiaggregant compounds, thymol (compound 1) and 3,4,3',4'-tetrahydroxy-5,5'-diisopropyl-2,2'-dimethylbiphenyl (compound 2) were isolated from the leaves of thyme (Thymus vulgaris L.). The structures were determined by (1)H-, (13)C-NMR and mass spectra (MS) studies. These compounds inhibited platelet aggregation induced by collagen, ADP, arachidonic acid (AA) and thrombin except that compound 2 did not inhibit platelet aggregation induced by thrombin.

  16. Standardization of phaseolus vulgaris valves by macro- and microscopic characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Анна Ігорівна Крюкова

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available During the last years on the Ukrainian pharmaceutical market a tendency to increase the range of the national herbal remedies is observed. Native flora herbs, having a sufficient resource base, deserve special attention and are characterized by a number of economic benefits for manufacturers. The implementation of herbal remedies in medical practice is accompanied by the necessity to improve the quality control of herbal material and to develop normative documents. Macro- and microscopy analysis becomes important at standardization of herbal material especially cut and powdered.Aim. The aim of our work was to carry out macro- and microscopy research of Phaseolus vulgaris and to determine its diagnostic morphologic and anatomic features.Methods. The conventional research methods in pharmacognosy have been used; photomicrography has been taken by using microscope MC-10 and Samsung PL 50 camera.Results. As a result of research, the microscopic diagnostic characteristics for Phaseolus vulgaris valves have been proposed, e.g.: the valves are elongated, straight, navicular or grooved, twisted to some extent; the external surface is smooth or slightly undulating, mat, pale yellow or yellow; the internal surface is shiny, white or yellowish-white. Sometimes carpophore (stalk may occur. The microscopic diagnostic features have been determined and offered, e.g.: cells of outer epidermis are pentagonal and hexagonal, with plicated cuticle; stomata are surrounded by 3–4 subsidiary narrow cells, additionally surrounded by 5–6 narrow cells; cover trichomes and glandular trichomes are elongated, pointed and unbranched; xylem vessels and tracheids; non-bundled structure stalk fragments with pericyclic sclerenchyma and secretory cells in the phloem.Conclusion. Research on determination of the macro- and microscopic characteristics of Phaseolus vulgaris valves has been carried out. The diagnostic morphological and anatomic elements in herbal material have

  17. An unusual central retinal dystrophy associated with ichthyosis vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saatci, O A; Ozbek, Z; Köse, S; Durak, I; Kavukçu, S

    2000-06-01

    A number of ichthyosis syndromes may have retinal abnormalities such as the retinitis pigmentosa-like diffuse rod-cone dystrophy in Refsum's syndrome and the maculopathy in Sjögren-Larsson syndrome. We present two sisters who have an unusual, almost identical, bilaterally symmetric central retinal dystrophy associated with ichthyosis vulgaris in the absence of other systemic disorders. We believe that this dystrophy has not been previously described in patients with any of the known varieties of ichthyosis.

  18. Lupus vulgaris of the popliteal fossa: a delayed diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altunay, Ilknur Kivanc; Kayaoglu, Semra; Ekmekci, Tugba Rezan; Kutlu, Safiye; Arpag, Esra Saygin

    2007-07-13

    Lupus vulgaris (LV) is the most common form of cutaneous tuberculosis. It commonly presents on the head and neck regions. The diagnosis may be difficult when LV occurs at unexpected regions or in unusual clinical forms. Sometimes special stains for the organism and mycobacterial cultures may be negative. Nevertheless, it is usually possible to reach the correct diagnosis of LV using clinical and histopathological findings. But at times, a therapeutic trial with antitubercular agents may be required.

  19. Anti-androgens in treatment of acne vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amer, M; Ramadan, A; Abdel Monem, A

    1985-10-01

    Seventy-five women suffering from acne vulgaris classified into three groups according to the grade of the disease. Anti-androgenic tablets cyproterone acetate (CPA), were given in three cycles. The total number of patients whose condition improved was 52% after the first cycle, 55% after the second cycle, and 81.3% after the third cycle. No serious side effects were encountered. CPA is a suitable therapeutic modility for AV in women who use contraceptives.

  20. Distribution and Development of the TCM Syndromes in Psoriasis Vulgaris

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Guang-zhong; WANG Ju-sheng; WANG Ping; JIANG Chun-yan; DENG Bing-xu; LI Ping; ZHAO Yi-ming; LIU Wa-li; Qu Xing; CHEN Wei-wen; ZENG Lin; ZHOU Dong-mei; SUN Li-yun; LI Ruo-yu

    2009-01-01

    Objective:To study the distribution and development rules of the TCM syndromes in psoriasis vulgaris.Methods:Based on the clinical epidemiologic mass survey, the study was carried out by means of a status survey, multi-center and large-sample research.The data base was set up by EPIINFO6.0.The SPSS was used to do the statistical analyses in 2651 cases of psoriasis vulgaris to study the correlations among the distribution and development of the TCM syndromes, the stages of the disease, nationality, psoriasis history,family history, smoking history, alcohol drinking history, and severity of the disease.Results:The TCM syndromes in psoriasis vulgaris mainly include the blood-heat syndrome (53.8%), blood-dryness syndrome (27.4%), and blood-stasis syndrome (18.1%).Other syndromes were rarely seen, covering 0.6%.The concurrent syndromes mainly involve dampness, heat, blood stasis and toxin.The distribution differences of the main syndromes at different stages of the disease had statistical significance (P<0.01).The syndrome distribution is not related with nationality and family history (P>0.05), but it was closely related with the psoriasis history, smoking history, alcohol drinking history, and severity of the disease (P<0.01).Conclusion:At the initial stage, psoriasis vulgaris usually manifests itself as the blood-heat syndrome, and later it may be improved or turn into the blood-dryness or blood-stasis syndrome.Smoking, alcohol consumption, and severity of the disease may play a role in the syndrome's transformation.

  1. The morphology and adhesion mechanism of Octopus vulgaris suckers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Tramacere

    Full Text Available The octopus sucker represents a fascinating natural system performing adhesion on different terrains and substrates. Octopuses use suckers to anchor the body to the substrate or to grasp, investigate and manipulate objects, just to mention a few of their functions. Our study focuses on the morphology and adhesion mechanism of suckers in Octopus vulgaris. We use three different techniques (MRI, ultrasonography, and histology and a 3D reconstruction approach to contribute knowledge on both morphology and functionality of the sucker structure in O. vulgaris. The results of our investigation are two-fold. First, we observe some morphological differences with respect to the octopus species previously studied (i.e., Octopus joubini, Octopus maya, Octopus bimaculoides/bimaculatus and Eledone cirrosa. In particular, in O. vulgaris the acetabular chamber, that is a hollow spherical cavity in other octopuses, shows an ellipsoidal cavity which roof has an important protuberance with surface roughness. Second, based on our findings, we propose a hypothesis on the sucker adhesion mechanism in O. vulgaris. We hypothesize that the process of continuous adhesion is achieved by sealing the orifice between acetabulum and infundibulum portions via the acetabular protuberance. We suggest this to take place while the infundibular part achieves a completely flat shape; and, by sustaining adhesion through preservation of sucker configuration. In vivo ultrasonographic recordings support our proposed adhesion model by showing the sucker in action. Such an underlying physical mechanism offers innovative potential cues for developing bioinspired artificial adhesion systems. Furthermore, we think that it could possibly represent a useful approach in order to investigate any potential difference in the ecology and in the performance of adhesion by different species.

  2. [Correction of experimental anxiety behavior by meadowsweet (Filipendula vulgaris) extracts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vengerovskiĭ, A I; Suslov, N I; Kaĭgorodtsev, A V

    2011-01-01

    Influence of aqueous and aqueous-ethanol extracts of meadowsweet (Filipendula vulgaris) on the behavior of albino mice in anxiety models has been studied. It is established that the aqueous and 95% aqueous ethanol extracts of meadowsweet produce the most expressed anxiolytic action in the elevated plus-maze, open field, and emotional reaction tests. The anxiolytic activity of these extracts exceeds that of the reference valerian extract.

  3. Nail changes in female pemphigus vulgaris patients on immunosuppressive therapy

    OpenAIRE

    M.M. El-Komy, MD; D.M. Abdel Halim, MD; N. Samir, MD; R.A. Hegazy, MD; H.I. Gawdat, MD; S.A. Shoeb, MD

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) patients receiving immunosuppressive therapy may develop nail alterations resulting from infection, skin disorder, or drug regimen. Objective: This study aims to describe nail changes in PV female patients receiving immunosuppressive therapy and to report the frequency of associated fungal and bacterial growth in the patients’ nails. Methods: Twenty-five female PV patients who had at least one acquired finger or toenail abnormality and had been admini...

  4. Vitreoscilla hemoglobin gene ( vgb) improves lutein production in Chlorella vulgaris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ruijuan; Lin, Xiangzhi

    2014-03-01

    Vitreoscilla hemoglobin is an oxygen-binding protein that promotes oxygen delivery and reduces oxygen consumption under low oxygen conditions to increase the efficiency of cell respiration and metabolism. In this study, we introduced a Vitreoscilla hemoglobin gene ( vgb) into Chlorella vulgaris by Agrobacterium tumefaciens -mediated transformation (ATMT). PCR analysis confirmed that the vgb gene was successfully integrated into the Chlorella vulgaris genome. Analysis of biomass obtained in shake flasks revealed transformant biomass concentrations as high as 3.28 g/L, which was 38.81% higher than that of the wild-type strain. Lutein content of transformants also increased slightly. Further experiments recovered a maximum lutein yield of 2.91 mg/L from the transformants, which was 36.77% higher than that of the wild-type strain. The above results suggest that integrated expression of the vgb gene may improve cell growth and lutein yield in Chlorella vulgaris, with applications to lutein production from Chlorella during fermentation.

  5. Photon up-conversion increases biomass yield in Chlorella vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Kavya R; Jose, Steffi; Suraishkumar, Gadi K

    2014-12-01

    Photon up-conversion, a process whereby lower energy radiations are converted to higher energy levels via the use of appropriate phosphor systems, was employed as a novel strategy for improving microalgal growth and lipid productivity. Photon up-conversion enables the utilization of regions of the solar spectrum, beyond the typical photosynthetically active radiation, that are usually wasted or are damaging to the algae. The effects of up-conversion of red light by two distinct sets of up-conversion phosphors were studied in the model microalgae Chlorella vulgaris. Up-conversion by set 1 phosphors led to a 2.85 fold increase in biomass concentration and a 3.2 fold increase in specific growth rate of the microalgae. While up-conversion by set 2 phosphors resulted in a 30% increase in biomass and 12% increase in specific intracellular neutral lipid, while the specific growth rates were comparable to that of the control. Furthermore, up-conversion resulted in higher levels of specific intracellular reactive oxygen species in C. vulgaris. Up-conversion of red light (654 nm) was shown to improve biomass yields in C. vulgaris. In principle, up-conversion can be used to increase the utilization range of the electromagnetic spectrum for improved cultivation of photosynthetic systems such as plants, algae, and microalgae.

  6. Photosynthetic and cellular toxicity of cadmium in Chlorella vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou-Yang, Hui-Ling; Kong, Xiang-Zhen; Lavoie, Michel; He, Wei; Qin, Ning; He, Qi-Shuang; Yang, Bin; Wang, Rong; Xu, Fu-Liu

    2013-12-01

    The toxic effects of cadmium (Cd) on the green alga Chlorella vulgaris were investigated by following the response to Cd of various toxicity endpoints (cell growth, cell size, photochemical efficiency of PSII in the light or Φ(PSII), maximal photochemical efficiency or Fv/Fm, chlorophyll a fluorescence, esterase activity, and cell viability). These toxicity endpoints were studied in laboratory batch cultures of C. vulgaris over a long-term 96-h exposure to different Cd concentrations using flow cytometry and pulse amplitude modulated fluorometry. The sequence of sensitivity of these toxicity endpoints was: cell yield > Φ(PSII) ≈ esterase activity > Fv/Fm > chlorophyll a fluorescence ≈ cell viability. It is shown that cell apoptosis or cell death only accounted for a minor part of the reduction in cell yield even at very high algistatic free Cd²⁺ concentrations, and other mechanisms such as blocked cell divisions are major contributors to cell yield inhibition. Furthermore, cadmium may affect both the electron donors and acceptors of the electron transport chain at high free Cd²⁺ concentration. Finally, the resistance of cells to cell death was size-dependent; medium-sized cells had the highest toxicity threshold. The present study brings new insights into the toxicity mechanisms of Cd in C. vulgaris and provides a detailed comparison of the sensitivity of various Cd toxicity endpoints.

  7. Ammonium reduces chromium toxicity in the freshwater alga Chlorella vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jingqing; Sun, Zhengqi; Lavoie, Michel; Fan, Xiaoji; Bai, Xiaocui; Qian, Haifeng

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the protective effect of ammonium (NH4 (+)) on Cr toxicity to the freshwater alga Chlorella vulgaris. We followed an array of cellular functions and biomolecules in C. vulgaris cells exposed to 50 or 100 μM Cr at three different initial NH4 (+) concentrations (0.5, 3, and 10 mM). The results showed that Cr strongly inhibited cell yield of C. vulgaris, but 10 mM NH4 (+) could decrease by more than two-fold Cr toxicity on cell yield compared to exposure to 0.5 mM NH4 (+). Cr toxicity on gene transcripts and cellular substructure was also much lower at high than at low NH4 (+). Our results suggest that this protecting effect of NH4 (+) on intracellular Cr toxicity could be due to several factors, such as enhance uptake of phosphorus, increase in C and N assimilation efficiency, and increase transcription of photosynthesis-related genes.

  8. Growth of Chlorella vulgaris and associated bacteria in photobioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakaniemi, Aino-Maija; Intihar, Veera M; Tuovinen, Olli H; Puhakka, Jaakko A

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test three flat plate photobioreactor configurations for growth of Chlorella vulgaris under non-axenic conditions and to characterize and quantify associated bacterial communities. The photobioreactor cultivations were conducted using tap water-based media to introduce background bacterial population. Growth of algae was monitored over time with three independent methods. Additionally, the quantity and quality of eukaryotes and bacteria were analysed using culture-independent molecular tools based on denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR). Static mixers used in the flat plate photobioreactors did not generally enhance the growth at the low light intensities used. The maximum biomass concentration and maximum specific growth rate were 1.0 g l(-1) and 2.0 day(-1) respectively. Bacterial growth as determined by QPCR was associated with the growth of C. vulgaris. Based on PCR-DGGE, bacteria in the cultures mainly originated from the tap water. Bacterial community profiles were diverse but reproducible in all flat plate cultures. Most prominent bacteria in the C. vulgaris cultures belonged to the class Alphaproteobacteria and especially to the genus Sphingomonas. Analysis of the diversity of non-photosynthetic microorganisms in algal mass cultures can provide useful information on the public health aspects and unravel community interactions.

  9. Metastasized squamous cell carcinoma developed on lupus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pătraşcu, V; Georgescu, Claudia Valentina; Tănase, Loredana Elena; Mogoantă, S S

    2008-01-01

    Lupus vulgaris (LV) is the most frequent cutaneous tuberculosis, representing more than 55% of the tuberculoses with this location. Malignization can occur after a long latency (10-30 years), in 1-2% of the cases, and it is mainly in squamous cell carcinoma. The histological exam is highly important in the observation of neoplasic transformations. The authors present a 59-years-old female patient, from the rural environment, working as a farmer, with lupus vulgaris developing since her first childhood years. It started at the age of 2 years, at the right ear lobule, after the empiric perforation for earrings. The evolution was progressive, eccentric, interesting the pinna and the right cheek in the meanwhile. At the first examination, in 2002, a diffuse mass of red-yellowish infiltration was found at the level of the right ear and the right cheek. In the following two years, an ulcero-vegetating tumor developed at the level of the right ear lobule, accompanied by the presence of a right retromandibular adenopathy, of about 1 cm, which was proved by the histopathologic exam to be a squamous cell carcinoma developed from a lupus vulgaris. After scraping out the right retromandibular ganglion, detected by palpation, a histological exam showed ganglion metastasis.

  10. Detection of apoptosis in pemphigus vulgaris by TUNEL technique*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuevas-Gonzalez, Juan Carlos; Vega-Memíje, Maria Elisa; García-Vázquez, Francisco Javier; Aguilar-Urbano, Marco António

    2016-01-01

    Background Pemphigus is part of a group of blistering diseases that affect the skin and mucous membranes. Based on its autoimmune origin, autoantibodies develop in pemphigus that are directed toward cell surface components of keratinocytes. However, some data cannot be explained, such as the lack of a relationship between autoantibody levels and the severity of clinical manifestations, treatment resistance, the presence of inflammatory infiltrates and the potential occurrence of apoptosis as determinants of vesicle formation. Objective To examine the presence of apoptosis in pemphigus vulgaris by TUNEL technique. Methods In this cross-sectional study, we selected 15 paraffin-embedded tissues from subjects who were diagnosed with pemphigus vulgaris by hematoxylin and eosin staining. The samples were subjected to TUNEL assay and examined under an Olympus BX61 fluorescence microscope. Positivity was categorized dichotomously, and the statistical analysis was performed using the X2 test. Results Positivity was observed in basal layer cells in 14 (93.3%) cases. In 13 (86.7%) of the positive cases, we noted espinosum and granular layers that formed the blister roof, and in 12 cases (80%), positive acantholytic cells were observed. Conclusions TUNEL positivity was observed in pemphigus vulgaris, implicating apoptosis in the pathophysiology of this condition, which can help guide the development of apoptotic blockers as therapeutics. PMID:27438195

  11. Profile of acne vulgaris-A hospital-based study from South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adityan Balaji

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acne vulgaris is believed to be the most common disease of the skin. There is no Indian study on the profile of acne vulgaris, markers of severe forms of acne vulgaris and a possible correlation between acne vulgaris and markers of androgenicity in females. Aim: To study the profile of acne vulgaris, its seasonal variation, relationship with smoking and possible correlation between acne vulgaris and markers of androgenicity in females. Methods: The study was conducted between August 2006 and June 2008. All patients with acne vulgaris who consented to participate in the study were included. The parameters evaluated included age, gender, age of onset, duration of lesions, site of lesions, grade, relation with menstrual cycle, markers of androgenicity, number of acne lesions such as comedones, papules pustules and nodules, number and site of post-acne scarring, post-acne hyperpigmentation, seasonal variation and history of smoking. Results: A total of 309 patients with acne vulgaris were included in the study. The frequency of acne vulgaris in our study was 1.068%. Mean age of the study group was 19.78 years. Male to female ratio was 1.25:1. The most common age group involved was 16 to 20 years (59.8%. Mean age of onset was 15.97 years. Face was involved in all the patients, followed by back (28.2%, chest (20.1%, neck (9.4% and arms (10%. In the older age groups, women were more likely to report having acne vulgaris than men ( P = 0.01. The closed comedones outnumbered open comedones by a factor of 4.9:1. A total of 186 patients (60.2% had grade 1 acne vulgaris, 85 (27.5% had grade 2 acne, 8 (2.6% had grade 3 acne and 30 (9.7% had grade 4 acne vulgaris. There was a higher incidence of scarring (39.5% and post-acne hyperpigmentation (24.6% in our study. In female patients, 57.7% had premenstrual flare and 12.4% had cutaneous markers of androgenicity. There was no association between severity of acne vulgaris and other markers of

  12. Antibacterial activity of Thymus vulgaris essential oil alone and in combination with other essential oils

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    MAHENDRA RAI

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Kon K, Rai M. 2012. Antibacterial activity of Thymus vulgaris essential oil alone and in combination with other essential oils. Nusantara Bioscience 4: 50-56. Essential oils (EOs from plants represent an alternative approach in combating antibiotic-resistant bacteria. One of the EOs with proven antibacterial properties is Thymus vulgaris EO. The purpose of the present work was to investigate in vitro antibacterial activity of T. vulgaris EO alone and in combination with other EOs. The activity of T. vulgaris EO was screened in combination with 34 EOs against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli by disk diffusion method; then the most effective combinations were evaluated by broth microdilution method. Against S. aureus the synergistic effect was found in combination of T. vulgaris and Cinnamomum zeylonicum EOs with fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC index of 0.26; Juniperus communis and Picea abies EOs showed additive effect (FIC indexes were 0.74 and 0.78, respectively. Combination of T. vulgaris EO with Aniba rosaeodora and Melissa officinalis EOs demonstrated synergistic effect against E. coli (FIC indexes were 0.23 and 0.34, respectively; combination of T. vulgaris and Mentha piperita EOs was additive (FIC index 0.55. Therefore, combining T. vulgaris EO with other EOs has potential in further enhancing its antibacterial properties.

  13. High social phobia frequency and related disability in patients with acne vulgaris.

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    Bez, Yasin; Yesilova, Yavuz; Kaya, Mehmet Cemal; Sir, Aytekin

    2011-01-01

    Acne is an easily recognizable abnormality which may cause some adverse psychosocial consequences. We aimed to determine the social phobia frequency, social anxiety level, and disease related disability in a group of acne vulgaris patients. One-hundred and forty acne vulgaris patients and 98 healthy control subjects were included in the study. Acne severity was determined by the Global Acne Grading System (GAGS). A psychiatrist interviewed each participant and the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale (LSAS) was administered to all participants, who also completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and Sheehan Disability Scale (SDS). Social phobia was diagnosed in 45.7% of acne vulgaris patients and in 18.4% of control subjects. Acne vulgaris patients demonstrated higher performance avoidance and total avoidance scores in LSAS than controls. Acne vulgaris patients without social phobia had higher scores in HADS and LSAS than the acne vulgaris patients with social phobia. They were more disabled in their occupational, social, and familial lives. Social phobia diagnosis predicted disability at work, whereas education level predicted the disability in family life of acne vulgaris patients. Social phobia seems to be a common psychiatric comorbidity which may give rise to some additional disability among acne vulgaris patients.

  14. Insect resistance to sugar beet pests mediated by a Beta vulgaris proteinase inhibitor transgene

    Science.gov (United States)

    We transformed sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) hairy roots and Nicotiana benthamiana plants with a Beta vulgaris root gene (BvSTI) that codes for a serine proteinase inhibitor. BvSTI is a root gene cloned from the F1016 breeding line that has moderate levels of resistance to the sugar beet root maggot ...

  15. Climatotherapy at the dead sea for pediatric-onset psoriasis vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Amitai, Dan; David, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Climatotherapy at the Dead Sea is highly effective and safe for the treatment of psoriasis vulgaris in adults. We examine the efficacy and safety of climatotherapy at the Dead Sea in children with psoriasis vulgaris. More than 75% improvement in the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index was noted in 35.3% of the patients. None of the patients had side effects.

  16. Cardiac surgery in a patient with pemphigus vulgaris: anesthetic and surgical considerations.

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    Takahashi, Mitsuko; Rhee, Amanda J; Rakasi, Raghuveer R; Yildirim, Asu; Silvay, George; Reddy, Ramachandra C

    2014-03-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris is an autoimmune disorder that causes blistering of the skin and mucous membranes. We present a patient with pemphigus vulgaris who required combined coronary artery bypass grafting and mitral valve repair. The challenges that we faced and modifications to the technique required in this situation are described and reviewed.

  17. [Research on characteristic of interrelationship between toxic organic compound BPA and Chlorella vulgaris].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shan-Jia; Chen, Xiu-Rong; Yan, Long; Zhao, Jian-Guo; Zhang, Fei; Jiang, Zi-Jian

    2014-04-01

    The effects of different concentrations of bisphenol A (BPA) on Chlorella vulgaris and removal capacity of BPA by Chlorella vulgaris were investigated. Results showed that a low concentration (0-20 mg x L(-1)) of BPA promoted the growth of Chlorella vulgaris, whereas a relative high concentration (20-50 mg x L(-1)) of BPA inhibited the growth of Chlorella vulgaris, and the inhibition effect was positively correlated with the concentration of BPA. Likewise, a high dose of initial BPA (> 20 mg x L(-1)) led to a decline in the content of chlorephyll a. Chlorella vulgaris had BPA removal capacity when initial BPA concentration ranged from 2 mg x L(-1) to 50 mg x L(-1). There was positive correlation between the removal rate of BPA per cell and initial BPA concentration. The removal rate of BPA was the highest when initial BPA was 50 mg x L(-1), which appeared between lag phase and logarithmic phase.

  18. Nitrogen assimilation by nodulate plants of Phaseolus vulgaris l. and Vigna unguiculata (l. ) walp

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    Neves, M.C.P.; Fernandes, M.S.; Sa, M.F.M. (Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro (Brazil). Dept. de Solos)

    1982-05-01

    Under field conditions, the processes of nitrogen assimilation via nitrogenase and nitrate-reductase, the transport and the accumulation of nitrogen in nodulated plants of Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Rio Tibagi and Vigna unguiculata cv. Vita 34 were compared and contrasted. V. unguiculata showed better nodulation than P. vulgaris and consequently had higher rates of nitrogenase activity. The small nodulation of P. vulgaris resulted in greater dependence on soil mineral nitrogen as indicated by the higher rates of nitrate-reductase acitivty compared with V. unguiculata, especially during reproductive stage of growth. The superiority of V. unguiculata in terms of assimilation and remobilization of stored nitrogen resulted in a seed yield 28% greater than that of P. vulgaris. P. vulgaris showed a negative correlation between the nitrate-reductase activity and the ureide content of the sap indicating that the metabolic pathways leading to ureide production operates alternatively to nitrate assimilation.

  19. Potential Health Effects of Enzymatic Protein Hydrolysates from Chlorella vulgaris

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    Mahsa Sedighi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Chlorella vulgaris is a multi-cellular edible algal species with abundant proteins. Extraction of high value protein fractions for pharmaceutical and nutritional applications can significantly increase the commercial value of microalga biomasses. There is no known report on the anticancer peptides derived from the Chlorella vulgaris abundant protein.Materials and Methods: This study examined the antimicrobial and anticancer effects of peptides from a hydrolyzed Chlorella vulgaris protein with 62 kDa molecular weight. Protein hydrolysis was done by pepsin as a gastrointestinal protease, and was monitored through protein content measurement, sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and high performance liquidchromatography measurements. Inhibitory effect of the produced peptides on Escherichia coli cells and breast cancer cell lines was assayed.Results and Conclusion: Hydrolyzed peptides induced a decrease of about 34.1% in the growth of Escherichia coli, and the peptides of 3 to 5 kDa molecular weight had strong impact on the viability of breast cancer cells with IC50 value of 50 μg μl-1. The peptide fractions demonstrating antimicrobial and anti-cancer activities have the potential for use as functional food ingredients for health benefits. These results demonstrate that inexpensive algae proteinscould be a new alternative to produce anticancer peptides.Conflict of interest: The authors declare that there is no conflict of interest.

  20. Efficacy and Safety of Topical Niacinamide for Acne Vulgaris

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    Zeynep Nurhan Saraçoğlu

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: To investigate the efficacy and safety of topical 4% naicinamide gel cream in the treatment of mild to moderate acne vulgaris and to assess the quality of life of acne patients.Material and Method: Twenty-nine female patients aged 16-38 (mean: 23.57±5.42 years with mild to moderate acne vulgaris who presented in dermatology outpatient clinic were enrolled in the study. All patients applied 4% niacinamide gel cream (Vivatinell-acnecinamide gel cream® on their faces twice daily for eight weeks. The number of lesions (inflammatory and non-inflammatory was counted at 0, 2, 4 and 8 weeks. The side effects (erythema, desquamation, burning and dryness were recorded. The Skindex-29, a quality-of-life measure for patients with skin disease, was administered to the subjects at the beginning and the end of treatment.Results: The decrease in the mean number of inflammatory lesions was statistically significant at the end of the treatment (pre-treatment vs. post-treatment: 12.24 vs. 6.14; p =0.000. However, there was no statistically significant decrease in the number of non-inflammatory lesions at the end of the eight weeks. The niacinamide gel cream was generally well tolerated. There was statistically significant improvement in the Skindex-29 scale scores (p =0.000 at the end of the treatment.Conclusion: Topical 4% niacinamide gel cream may be an alternative treatment for inflammatory lesions of mild to moderate acne vulgaris.

  1. Fluctuations and symmetry breaking during regeneration of Hydra vulgaris tissue toroids

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    Krahe, Michael; Lin, Kao-Nung; Fischer, Julia; Fütterer, Claus

    2012-01-01

    While much is known in single cell mechanics, the mechanics of regeneration of naturally grown tissues and cell assemblies is largely unexplored. We found a symmetry breaking scenario accompanied by shape fluctuations in dissected regenerating Hydra vulgaris tissue tori. A subsequent folding and merging process leads finally to a regenerating spheroid. These phenomena are related to the dynamics of fluorescent beta- and trans-cellular alpha-actin structures. By embedding the tissues in a hydro-gel the fluctuations could be studied over a longer period of time. The power spectrum of the torus-fluctuations shows a non-trivial energy distribution dynamics depending on the gel stiffness. During the transition, many higher modes where found but in the end the 2nd mode wins in most cases. The toroid builds up an uniform alpha-actin ring along the inner edge of the torus. We found this ring in the inner cellular layer to be responsible for the force generation destabilizing the toroid shape. This actin structure is ...

  2. Managing nonteratogenic adverse reactions to isotretinoin treatment for acne vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Bridget K; Ritsema, Tamara S

    2015-07-01

    Isotretinoin is the strongest, most effective oral treatment for patients with severe acne vulgaris, with remission rates of 89% and higher. Because of its potency, isotretinoin causes many adverse reactions. This article reviews common and severe adverse reactions to isotretinoin and how providers can best manage these reactions. Because of inconclusive research on the correlation between isotretinoin and depression and irritable bowel syndrome, providers should ask patients about symptoms monthly. Prescribing micronized isotretinoin and starting at the lowest dose with gradual upward titration also can help reduce the incidence of adverse reactions.

  3. Monoterpenes from thyme (Thymus vulgaris) as potential mosquito repellents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Byeoung-Soo; Choi, Won-Sik; Kim, Jeong-Han; Kim, Kap-Ho; Lee, Sung-Eun

    2005-03-01

    Five monoterpenes (carvacrol, p-cymene, linalool, alpha-terpinene, and thymol) derived from the essential oil of thyme (Thymus vulgaris) were examined for their repellency against the mosquito Culex pipiens pallens. All 5 monoterpenes effectively repelled mosquitoes based on a human forearm bioassay. Alpha-terpinene and carvacrol showed significantly greater repellency than a commercial formulation, N,N-diethyl-m-methylbenzamide (deet), whereas thymol showed similar repellency to that of deet. The duration of repellency after application for all these monoterpenes was equal to or higher than that of deet. These findings indicate that a spray-type solution containing 2% alpha-terpinene may serve as an alternative mosquito repellent.

  4. Supercritical CO2 extraction of essential oils from Thymus vulgaris

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    S.A.B. Vieira de Melo

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Supercritical CO2 extraction of essential oil from Thymus vulgaris leaves was studied using experimental data recently obtained in the Florys S.p.A. laboratory. Mass transfer coefficients in the supercritical and solid phases from extraction curves at 40°C and 20 MPa were evaluated using a mathematical model based on the local adsorption equilibrium of essential oil on lipid in leaves. The adsorption equilibrium constant was fitted to these experimental data, and internal and external mass transfer resistances were calculated, allowing identification of the mechanism controlling the extraction process.

  5. Lupus vulgaris with tubercular lymphadenitis and IgA nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaira, Ambar; Rathi, Om P; Mahajan, Sandeep; Sharma, Alok; Dinda, Amit K; Tiwari, Suresh C

    2008-02-01

    A 14-year-old girl presented with a 10-year history of a large crusted plaque over the right thigh for 10 years and small reddish plaque over the left upper back for 3 months. On routine evaluation, she was found to have hematuria. Skin biopsy from the lesion was suggestive of skin tuberculosis (lupus vulgaris), and kidney biopsy showed features of IgA nephropathy (IgAN). Fine-needle aspiration from the inguinal lymph node was consistent with granulomatous disease. The patient has been on anti-tubercular treatment, and the hematuria has subsided.

  6. Ulcerative lupus vulgaris over nose, leading to cosmetic deformity.

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    Nair, Pragya A; Mehta, Malay J; Patel, Bhumi B

    2015-01-01

    Lupus vulgaris (LV), is a chronic and progressive form of secondary cutaneous tuberculosis. In India, it is commonly seen over buttocks, thighs, and legs whereas involvement of nose is quite rare. Ulcerative variant particularly over nose causes destruction of cartilage, leading to irreversible deformities and contracture. High-index of suspicion is required for early diagnosis and prevention of cosmetic deformity. A case of LV over nose in a young male with ulceration is reported who responded well to anti-tubercular therapy, but left with scarring of nose, which could have been prevented if adequate awareness regarding extra-pulmonary cases would have been practiced.

  7. Azetidine-2-carboxylic acid in garden beets (Beta vulgaris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubenstein, Edward; Zhou, Haihong; Krasinska, Karolina M; Chien, Allis; Becker, Christopher H

    2006-05-01

    Azetidine-2-carboxylic acid (L-Aze) is a toxic and teratogenic non-protein amino acid. In many species, including man, L-Aze is misincorporated into protein in place of proline, altering collagen, keratin, hemoglobin, and protein folding. In animal models of teratogenesis, it causes a wide range of malformations. The role of L-Aze in human disease has been unexplored, probably because the compound has not been associated with foods consumed by humans. Herein we report the presence of L-Aze in the garden or table beet (Beta vulgaris).

  8. Spina ventosa with lupus vulgaris and lymphadenopathy: Multifocal tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sanjeev; Sood, Shikha; Gupta, Mudita

    2015-12-01

    Tuberculous dactylitis is a rare yet well-recognized disease of small bones of the hands and feet. It occurs in young children below five years of age. Tubercular dactylitis with lupus vulgaris and lymphadenopathy was suspected clinically and radiologically in an 8-year-old girl who had multiple soft tissue swelling of hands and feet with ulceration, encrustations, and an atrophic scar with lytic expansile lesions of the small bones of the hands and feet. Tubercular lymph node involvement was confirmed histopathologically.

  9. The Paleobiolinguistics of the Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.

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    Cecil H. Brown

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Paleobiolinguistics is used to determine when and where the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. developed significance for prehistoric groups of Native America. Dates and locations of proto-languages for which common bean terms reconstruct generally accord with crop-origin and dispersal information from plant genetics and archaeobotany. Paleobiolinguistic and other lines of evidence indicate that human interest in the common bean became significant primarily with the widespread development of a village‐farming way of life in the New World rather than earlier when squash and maize and a few other crops became important.

  10. Efecto del AIB y el TDZ en el enraizamiento in vitro de plantas de Bambusa vulgaris var vulgaris Schrad. ex Wendl

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    Yudith García Ramírez

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false ES-CO X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Título en ingles: Effect of IBA and TDZ on in vitro rooting of plants Bambusa vulgaris var. vulgaris Schrad. ex Wendl. Resumen: Bambusa vulgaris var. vulgaris Schard. ex Wendl. sobresale dentro del género por sus propiedades físico-mecánicas y por el tamaño de sus culmos. Desarrollar la propagación vía organogénesis sería una alternativa para propagar esta especie. Sin embargo, los bajos porcentajes de enraizamiento y de superviviencia ex vitro han sido elementos que han afectado la propagación de diferentes especies de bambúes. Con el objetivo de determinar el efecto de diferentes concentraciones de AIB y TDZ en la emisión de raíces in vitro, se evaluó el número de plantas con raíces, la altura de las plantas (cm desde la base hasta el punto de inserción de la primera hoja y el largo de la raíz (cm. Los resultados demostraron que tanto el AIB como el TDZ influyeron en el enraizamiento in vitro de Bambusa vulgaris var vulgaris. Al adicionar al medio de cultivo TDZ (0,6 mg.L-1 se obtuvieron los mayores porcentajes de formación de raíces (88,2% y estas fueron emitidas mostrando un geotropismo positivo. Palabras clave: bambú; cultivo de tejidos; reguladores de crecimiento. Abstract: Bambusa vulgaris var. vulgaris Schard. ex Wendl. stands out into the genus by its physic - mechanical properties and the culms size. Propagation via organogenesis would be an alternative to propagate this species. However, the low percentages of rooting and ex vitro survival have been elements that have affected the propagation of different bamboo species. The number of plants with roots, plant height (cm (from the base to the insertion point of the first leaf and root length (cm were evaluated in order to determine the effect of different concentrations of IBA and TDZ in the emission of roots in vitro. Results demonstrated that both, AIB and TDZ, influenced the in vitro

  11. Effects of sodium pentaborate pentahydrate exposure on Chlorella vulgaris growth, chlorophyll content, and enzyme activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xueqing; Pei, Yuansheng

    2016-10-01

    Sodium pentaborate pentahydrate (SPP) is a rare mineral. In this study, SPP was synthesized from boric acid and borax through low-temperature crystallization, and its effects on the growth of the alga, Chlorella vulgaris (C. vulgaris) were assessed. The newly synthesized SPP was characterized by chemical analysis, X-ray diffraction, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and differential thermal analysis. The changes in C. vulgaris growth, chlorophyll content, and enzyme activities upon exposure to SPP for 168h were evaluated. Results showed that SPP treatment was detrimental to C. vulgaris growth during the first 24-120h of exposure. The harmful effects, however, diminished over time (168h), even at an effective medium concentration of 226.37mg BL(-1) (the concentration of boron applied per liter of culture medium). A similar trend was observed for chlorophyll content (chlorophyll a and b) and indicated that the photosynthesis of C. vulgaris was not affected and that high levels of SPP may even promote chlorophyll synthesis. Superoxide dismutase and catalase activities of C. vulgaris increased during 24-120h exposure to SPP, but these activities gradually decreased as culture time progressed. In other words, the initial detrimental effects of synthetic SPP on C. vulgaris were temporary and reversible. This research provides a scientific basis for applications of SPP in the environment.

  12. A meta-analysis of association between acne vulgaris and Demodex infestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ya-E; Hu, Li; Wu, Li-Ping; Ma, Jun-Xian

    2012-03-01

    Until now, etiology of acne vulgaris is still uncertain. Although clinicians usually deny the association between Demodex infestation and acne vulgaris, it has been proved in some clinical practices. To confirm the association between Demodex infestation and acne vulgaris, a meta-analysis was conducted. Predefined selection criteria were applied to search all published papers that analyzed the association between Demodex infestation and acne vulgaris (January 1950 to August 2011) in ISI Web of Knowledge, MEDLINE, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) databases. A meta-analysis was performed to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) based on fixed effects models or random effects models. We enrolled the 60 Chinese and 3 English papers in this meta-analysis, which covered Turkey and 25 different provinces/municipalities in China and 42130 participants including students and residents, aged from 1 to 78 years. The pooled OR in random effects models is 2.80 (95% CI, 2.34-3.36). Stability is robust according to sensitivity analysis. The fail-safe number is 18477, suggesting that at least 18477 articles with negative conclusions would be needed to reverse the conclusion that acne vulgaris was related to Demodex infestation. So the effect of publication bias was insignificant and could be ignored. It was concluded that acne vulgaris is associated with Demodex infestation. This indicates that when regular treatments for acne vulgaris are ineffective, examination of Demodex mites and necessary acaricidal therapies should be considered.

  13. Inhibitory effects of Iranian Thymus vulgaris extracts on in vitro growth of Entamoeba histolytica.

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    Behnia, Maryam; Haghighi, Ali; Komeylizadeh, Hossein; Tabaei, Seyyed-Javadi Seyyed; Abadi, Alireza

    2008-09-01

    One of the most common drugs used against a wide variety of anaerobic protozoan parasites is metronidazole. However, this drug is mutagenic for bacteria and is a potent carcinogen for rodents. Thymus vulgaris is used for cough suppression and relief of dyspepsia. Also it has antibacterial and antifungal properties. The aim of this study was to investigate antiamebic effect of Thymus vulgaris against Entamoeba histolytica in comparison with metronidazole. One hundred gram air-dried T. vulgaris plant was obtained and macerated at 25 degrees C for 14 days using n-hexane and a mixture of ethanol and water. For essential oil isolation T. vulgaris was subjected to hydrodistillation using a clevenger-type apparatus for 3 hr. E. histolytica, HM-1: IMSS strain was used in all experiments. It was found that the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) for T. vulgaris hydroalcoholic, hexanic extracts, and the essential oil after 24 hr was 4 mg/mL, 4 mg/mL, and 0.7 mg/mL, respectively. After 48 hr the MIC for T. vulgaris hydroalcoholic and hexanic extracts was 3 and 3 mg/mL, respectively. Therefore, it can be concluded that the Iranian T. vulgaris is effective against the trophozoites of E. histolytica.

  14. Inhibitory effect ofThymus vulgaris extract on memory impairment induced by scopolamine in rat

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    Zahra Rabiei; Shiva Mokhtari; Samira Asgharzade; Mostafa Gholami; Samira Rahnama; Mahmoud Rafieian-kopaei

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the effect ofThymus vulgaris (T. vulgaris) on learning and memory functions in scopolamine-induced memory deficit in rats. Memory enhancing activity in scopolamine-induced amnesic rats was investigated by assessing the Morris water maze and passive avoidance paradigm. Methods:A total of 42 male Wistar rats were divided into 6 equal groups as follow: control group: received water, scopolamine treated group: received scopolamine 1 mg/kg for 15 days, two scopolamine+T. vulgaris treated groups: received scopolamine andT. vulgaris extract 50 and 100 mg/kg body weight per day for 15 days, two intact groups: receivedT. vulgaris extract 50 and 100 mg/kg body weight per day for 15 days. Results: Administration ofT. vulgaris extract significantly restored memory and learning impairments induced by scopolamine in the passive avoidance test and Morris water maze test. Conclusions:T. vulgaris extract has repairing effects on memory and behavioral disorders produced by scopolamine and may have beneficial effects in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

  15. Inhibitory effect of Thymus vulgaris extract on memory impairment induced by scopolamine in rat简

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zahra; Rabiei; Shiva; Mokhtari; Samira; Asgharzade; Mostafa; Gholami; Samira; Rahnama; Mahmoud; Rafieian-kopaei

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of Thymus vulgaris(T. vulgaris) on learning and memory functions in scopolamine-induced memory deficit in rats. Memory enhancing activity in scopolamine-induced amnesic rats was investigated by assessing the Morris water maze and passive avoidance paradigm.Methods: A total of 42 male Wistar rats were divided into 6 equal groups as follow:control group: received water, scopolamine treated group: received scopolamine 1 mg/kg for 15 days, two scopolamine + T. vulgaris treated groups: received scopolamine and T. vulgaris extract 50 and 100 mg/kg body weight per day for 15 days, two intact groups:received T. vulgaris extract 50 and 100 mg/kg body weight per day for 15 days.Results: Administration of T. vulgaris extract significantly restored memory and learning impairments induced by scopolamine in the passive avoidance test and Morris water maze test.Conclusions: T. vulgaris extract has repairing effects on memory and behavioral disorders produced by scopolamine and may have beneficial effects in the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease.

  16. In Vitro and In Vivo Anti-inflammatory Effects of Struthanthus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Franciane Martins; da Costa, Maycow Rodrigues; Vittorazzi, Cátia; Gramma, Luciane De Souza Dos Santos; Barth, Thiago; de Andrade, Tadeu Uggere; Endringer, Denise Coutinho; Scherer, Rodrigo; Fronza, Marcio

    2017-06-01

    Struthanthus vulgaris is probably the most common medicinal mistletoe plant in Brazil, and has been used in folk medicine as an anti-inflammatory agent and for cleaning skin wounds. Our proposal was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory activity of S. vulgaris ethanol leaf extract and provide further insights of how this biological action could be explained using in vitro and in vivo assays. In vitro anti-inflammatory activity was preliminarily investigated in lipopolysaccharide/interferon gamma-stimulated macrophages based on their ability to inhibit nitric oxide production and tumor necrosis factor-alpha. In vivo anti-inflammatory activity of S. vulgaris ethanol leaf extract was investigated in the mice carrageenan-induced inflammation air pouch model. The air pouches were inoculated with carrageenan and then treated with 50 and 100 mg/kg of S. vulgaris ethanol leaf extract or 1 mg/kg of dexamethasone. Effects on the immune cell infiltrates, pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin 1, interleukin 10, and nitric oxide, were evaluated. The chemical composition of S. vulgaris ethanol leaf extract was characterized by LC-MS/MS. In vitro S. vulgaris ethanol leaf extract significantly decreased the production of nitric oxide and tumor necrosis factor-alpha in macrophages and did not reveal any cytotoxicity. In vivo, S. vulgaris ethanol leaf extract significantly suppressed the influx of leukocytes, mainly neutrophils, protein exudation, nitric oxide, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and interleukin 1 concentrations in the carrageenan-induced inflammation air pouch. In conclusion, S. vulgaris ethanol leaf extract exhibited prominent anti-inflammatory effects, thereby endorsing its usefulness as a medicinal therapy against inflammatory diseases, and suggesting that S. vulgaris ethanol leaf extract may be a source for the discovery of novel anti-inflammatory agents. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  17. Quality of life, self-esteem and psychosocial factors in adolescents with acne vulgaris*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilar, Gustavo Nunes; dos Santos, Laís Araújo; Sobral Filho, Jader Freire

    2015-01-01

    Background Dermatological diseases, among which acne vulgaris, have psychological impact on the affected generating feelings of guilt, shame and social isolation. Objectives To compare quality of life, self-esteem and other psychosocial variables amongst adolescents with and without acne vulgaris, and between levels of severity. Methods Cross-sectional observational study in a sample of 355 high school students from the city of João Pessoa. Data collection was performed with questionnaires and clinical-dermatological evaluation. The primary variables were the incidence of AV; quality of life, set by the Children's Dermatology Quality of Life Index and Dermatology Quality of Life Index; and self-esteem, measured by the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale. For calculation of statistical tests, we used the SPSS 20.0 software, considering p=0.05. Results The sample, with an average age of 16, showed 89.3% prevalence of acne vulgaris. The most prevalent psychosocial issue was "afraid that acne will never cease", present in 58% of affected youth. The median score of Quality of Life in Children's Dermatology Index was different amongst students with and without acne vulgaris (p=0.003), as well as the Quality of Life in Dermatology (p=0.038) scores, so that students with acne vulgaris have worse QoL. There was a correlation between the severity of acne vulgaris and worse quality of life. Self-esteem was not significantly associated with the occurrence or severity of acne vulgaris. Conclusions acne vulgaris assumes significance in view of its high prevalence and the effect on quality of life of adolescents, more severe at the more pronounced stages of disease (p<0.001). The psychosocial impact of acne vulgaris should be valued in the management of patients with this condition. PMID:26560206

  18. Quality of life, self-esteem and psychosocial factors in adolescents with acne vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilar, Gustavo Nunes; Santos, Laís Araújo dos; Sobral Filho, Jader Freire

    2015-01-01

    Dermatological diseases, among which acne vulgaris, have psychological impact on the affected generating feelings of guilt, shame and social isolation. To compare quality of life, self-esteem and other psychosocial variables amongst adolescents with and without acne vulgaris, and between levels of severity. Cross-sectional observational study in a sample of 355 high school students from the city of João Pessoa. Data collection was performed with questionnaires and clinical-dermatological evaluation. The primary variables were the incidence of AV; quality of life, set by the Children's Dermatology Quality of Life Index and Dermatology Quality of Life Index; and self-esteem, measured by the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale. For calculation of statistical tests, we used the SPSS 20.0 software, considering p=0.05. The sample, with an average age of 16, showed 89.3% prevalence of acne vulgaris. The most prevalent psychosocial issue was "afraid that acne will never cease", present in 58% of affected youth. The median score of Quality of Life in Children's Dermatology Index was different amongst students with and without acne vulgaris (p=0.003), as well as the Quality of Life in Dermatology (p=0.038) scores, so that students with acne vulgaris have worse QoL. There was a correlation between the severity of acne vulgaris and worse quality of life. Self-esteem was not significantly associated with the occurrence or severity of acne vulgaris. acne vulgaris assumes significance in view of its high prevalence and the effect on quality of life of adolescents, more severe at the more pronounced stages of disease (p<0.001). The psychosocial impact of acne vulgaris should be valued in the management of patients with this condition.

  19. Treatment of acne vulgaris with fractional radiofrequency microneedling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang Tae; Lee, Kang Hoon; Sim, Hyung Jun; Suh, Kee Suck; Jang, Min Soo

    2014-07-01

    Fractional radiofrequency microneedling is a novel radiofrequency technique that uses insulated microneedles to deliver energy to the deep dermis at the point of penetration without destruction of the epidermis. It has been used for the treatment of various dermatological conditions including wrinkles, atrophic scars and hypertrophic scars. There have been few studies evaluating the efficacy of fractional radiofrequency microneedling in the treatment of acne, and none measuring objective parameters like the number of inflammatory and non-inflammatory acne lesions or sebum excretion levels. The safety and efficacy of fractional radiofrequency microneedling in the treatment of acne vulgaris was investigated. In a prospective clinical trial, 25 patients with moderate to severe acne were treated with fractional radiofrequency microneedling. The procedure was carried out three times at 1-month intervals. Acne lesion count, subjective satisfaction score, sebum excretion level and adverse effects were assessed at baseline and at 4, 8 and 12 weeks after the first treatment as well as 4, 8 and 12 weeks after the last treatment. Number of acne lesions (inflammatory and non-inflammatory) decreased. Sebum excretion and subjective satisfaction were more favorable at every time point compared with the baseline values (P acne vulgaris.

  20. Recently approved systemic therapies for acne vulgaris and rosacea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Rosso, James Q

    2007-08-01

    Until recently, with the exception of oral isotretinoin for the treatment of severe recalcitrant nodular acne, systemic therapy for acne vulgaris and rosacea has been based on anecdotal support, clinical experience, and small clinical trials. Tetracycline derivatives are the predominant systemic agents that have been used for both disease states, prescribed in dose ranges that produce antibiotic activity. Anti-inflammatory dose doxycycline, a controlled-release (CR) 40-mg capsule formulation of doxycycline that is devoid of antibiotic activity when administered once daily, was US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved for the treatment of inflammatory lesions (papules and pustules) of rosacea, based on large-scale phase 3 pivotal trials and long-term microbiologic and safety data. Also, an extended-release (ER) tablet formulation of minocycline was approved by the FDA for the treatment of inflammatory lesions of moderate to severe acne vulgaris in patients 12 years and older based on large-scale phase 3 clinical trials that evaluated efficacy and safety, dose-response analysis, and long-term data. This article discusses the studies and clinical applications related to the use of these agents.

  1. Measurement of bone mineral density in patients with psoriasis vulgaris

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    Nurgül Köse

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to determine thechanges of bone mineral density in patients with psoriasisvulgaris.Methods: 33 patients, diagnosed with psoriasis vulgarisin Erciyes University, Medical School, Department of Dermatology,and 23 healthy subjects as control group wereincluded in this study. Lumbar and femur bone mineraldensity of all patients and control group were measured.Biochemical tests related to bone metabolism were performed.Results: We did not find statistically significant differencebetween patient and control groups’ bone mineral density.However, the lumbar spine t score of men, were found tobe significantly lower in the patient group than the controlgroup (p<0.05. There was no statistically significant differencein bone mineral density of women between thepatient and control groups. The effects on bone mineraldensity of disease period and using the topical corticosteroidswere not statistically significant.Conclusion: Our study indicates that bone mineral densityof patients with psoriasis vulgaris was not differentfrom healthy subject.Key words: Psoriasis vulgaris, bone mineral density, osteoporosis

  2. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Propionibacterium acnes isolated from acne vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurokawa, I; Nishijima, S; Kawabata, S

    1999-01-01

    Systemic and topical antimicrobial treatment for acne vulgaris remains the mainstay method of therapy in Japan. Strains of Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes) resistant to erythromycin (EM), clindamycin (CLDM), tetracycline (TC), doxycycline (DOXY) and minocycline (MINO) have been reported. The aim of the present study was to examine the antimicrobial susceptibility to 10 currently used antimicrobial agents of 50 strains of P. acnes isolated from acne lesions and identified using a Rap ID ANA II panel. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) were determined by the agar dilution method according to the criteria of the Japan Society of Chemotherapy. EM, ampicillin (ABPC), and CLDM were the most potent drugs, followed by MINO, nadifloxacin (NDFX), cephalexin (CEX), DOXY, ofloxacin (OFLX), and TC. In terms of the MIC80, EM and ABPC were the most potent, followed by CLDM, NDFX, MINO, CEX, DOXY, OFLX, TC and gentamycin (GM). Although most of the strains used were susceptible to the antimicrobial agents tested, strains of P. acnes resistant (MIC 12.5 mug/ml) to EM (4%), CLDM (4%), DOXY (2%) and TC (2%) were observed. In this study, no strains of P. acnes resistant to MINO were seen, suggesting that oral MINO is the most useful treatment for acne vulgaris with minimal risk of bacterial resistance.

  3. Heteroplasmy and atrazine resistance in Chenopodium album and Senecio vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bühler, Michaela; Bogenrieder, Arno; Sandermann, Heinrich; Ernst, Dieter

    Atrazine-resistant weeds are well known, and the resistance is primarily caused by a point mutation in the psbA chloroplast gene encoding the photosystem II D1 protein. Heteroplasmy, the presence of different types of chloroplasts in an individual plant, is also very common. Thus, atrazine-resistant weeds may also partly possess the atrazine-binding sequence and vice versa. The region of the psbA gene containing the mutation was sequenced from atrazine-resistant and atrazine-sensitive Chenopodium album and Senecio vulgaris plants. In atrazine-sensitive C. album plants, the expected AGT triplet was found. The atrazine-resistant plants contained the expected base substitution (AGT to GGT); however, in addition the AGT triplet was found. The atrazine-resistant S. vulgaris plants contained the expected GGT sequence, whereas the atrazine-sensitive plants contained both the AGT and GGT sequences. This clearly indicates that in addition to Gly264 also Ser264 is present in atrazine-resistant plants, and vice versa in atrazine-sensitive plants, indicating heteroplasmy in these weeds.

  4. Stability and loading properties of curcumin encapsulated in Chlorella vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Yaser; Sabahi, Hossein; Rahaie, Mahdi

    2016-11-15

    Curcumin (Cur), a polyphenols with pharmacological function, was successfully encapsulated in algae (Alg) cell (Chlorella vulgaris) as confirmed by fluorescence microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). Fluorescence micrographs, TGA, DSC and FTIR spectra suggested the hypothesis inclusion Cur in Nano-empty spaces inside cell wall of Alg. The TGA analysis showed that the thermal stability of Alg and Cur at algae/curcumin complex was 3.8% and 33% higher than their free forms at 0-300°C and 300-600°C ranges, respectively. After encapsulation in Alg cells, the photostability of Cur was enhanced by about 2.5-fold. Adsorption isotherm of Cur into Alg was fitted with the Freundlich isotherm. The microcapsules were loaded with Cur up to about 55% w/w which is much higher than other reported bio-carriers. In conclusion, the data proved that Chlorella vulgaris cell can be used as a new stable carrier for Cur.

  5. Hubungan Konsumsi Makanan Cepat Saji Terhadap Kejadian Akne Vulgaris pada Mahasiswa FK USU Stambuk 2007

    OpenAIRE

    Bancin, Berry Eka Parda

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Acne vulgaris is a very common disease found in public, especially in adolescence. About 85% of people in their life have had acne vulgaris, so it’s often assumed as a physiological state. High-calorie foods have been long suspected as one of the causes of this disease, this opinion is supported by the increased incidence of acne vulgaris in developing countries today. Since 1946 to 2007 various studies have been conducted on the relationship of food to the occurrence of acne vu...

  6. Detection of filaggrin gene mutation (2282del4) in Pakistani Ichthyosis vulgaris families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naz, Naghma; Samdani, Azam Jah

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was to detect an 811 bp filaggrin (FLG) gene fragment known to carry a mutation 2282del4 which causes ichthyosis vulgaris. Seven clinically examined ichthyosis vulgaris families were included in this study. An 811 bp FLG gene fragment was targeted in the genomic DNA of all the members of the seven families by PCR amplification using known primers RPT1P7 and RPT2P1. Successful amplification of an 811 bp FLG gene fragment in all the families suggested the possible role of the 2282del4 mutation in causing ichthyosis vulgaris in Pakistani population.

  7. Terms referring to psoriasis vulgaris in the classical Chinese medicine literature: a systematic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Claire Shuiqing; May, Brian; Yan, Yuhong; Yu, Jason Jingjie; Yao, Danni; Chang, Suyueh; Zhang, Anthony Lin; Guo, Xinfeng; Lu, Chuanjian; Xue, Charlie Changli

    2016-04-01

    Psoriasis vulgaris is a modern medical term. In the classical Chinese medicine (CM) literature, this disorder could be classified under a diversity of terms. In order to explore how psoriasis vulgaris was conceptualized and managed throughout Chinese medical history, we undertook a systematic longitudinal analysis of descriptions in the classical CM literature of skin disorders consistent with psoriasis vulgaris. Candidate search terms were identified from 33 contemporary CM books as relevant to psoriasis vulgaris. Thirteen terms were used to search the Zhong Hua Yi Dian--'Encyclopaedia of Traditional Chinese Medicine', 4th edition, a digital collection of over 1000 medical books. Search results were entered in a spreadsheet, citations that were consistent with psoriasis vulgaris were identified based on: (i) a description of the features of psoriasis vulgaris and (ii) judgment by two clinicians regarding relevance to psoriasis vulgaris. Analysis focused on the use of terms by historical period (Chinese dynasty) and whether the terms were specific for psoriasis vulgaris 608 citations dating from 363 to 1947AD were included. The two criteria for determining inclusion of citations were combined to select the pool of citations most relevant to psoriasis vulgaris. Sixty citations from eight search terms were found in this pool. Among the eight terms, Bai Bi, She Shi and Bi Feng consistently identified citations that were likely to be psoriasis. The earliest was from 1368AD (Ming dynasty). The remaining five terms yielded inconsistent results. Citations of disorders consistent with psoriasis vulgaris appear prior to 1368-1644AD (Ming dynasty), but the terms used were not specific for psoriasis. Bai Bi, She Shi and Bi Feng are the terms most consistently used to refer to psoriasis vulgaris. They first appeared in 1368-1644AD (Ming dynasty) and Bai bi remains in use. Regarding the other terms, certain citations may have referred to psoriasis vulgaris, but in other cases

  8. Changes in hemostasis in foals naturally infected with Strongylus vulgaris

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pihl, Tina Holberg; Krarup Nielsen, Martin; Jacobsen, Stine

    2017-01-01

    enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay values in all foals using a linear mixed effects model with repeated measures and to total numbers of S. vulgaris larvae in nine foals at necropsy with Pearson linear correlation. In the first week of life, all evaluated indices of hemostasis were significantly different...... 4. Strongylus vulgaris antibody levels were statistically associated with D-dimer (P = .0076) and fibrinogen (P = .0004) concentrations. Naturally acquired infection with S. vulgaris was associated with changes suggestive of mild activation of coagulation, fibrinolysis, and inflammation. The results...

  9. Perbandingan Konsumsi Lemak Berdasarkan Tingkat Keparahan Akne Vulgaris pada Siswa SMK Negeri 1 Kota Jambi

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    Nisa Sulistia

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstrak Salah satu faktor pencetus akne vulgaris adalah diet tinggi lemak, terutama lemak jenuh. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah untuk mengetahui perbandingan konsumsi lemak berdasarkan tingkat keparahan akne vulgaris menurut kriteria Lehmann. Penelitian ini berupa studi analitik observasional dengan desain cross sectional melalui pemeriksaan statusdermatologikus menurut kriteria Lehmann dan pengambilan data konsumsi menggunakan FFQ (Food Frequency Questionnaire pada 138 siswa kelas X dan XI SMK Negeri 1 Kota Jambi. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan terdapat akne vulgaris derajat ringan (49%, akne vulgaris derajat sedang (42%, dan akne vulgaris derajat berat (9%. Reratakonsumsi lemak total 89,35 ± 17,63 gram. Rerata konsumsi SFA (Saturated Fatty Acid 37,07 ± 9,97 gram. Rerata konsumsi MUFA (Monounsaturated Fatty Acid 15,30 ± 11,79 gram. Rerata konsumsi PUFA (Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid 12,03 ± 9,25 gram.Uji oneway Anova menunjukkan tidak ada perbedaan bermakna rerata konsumsi lemak total (p > 0,05 dan SFA (p > 0,05 berdasarkan tingkat keparahan akne vulgaris. Uji Kruskal-Wallis menunjukkan tidak ada perbedaan bermakna MUFA (p > 0,05, dan PUFA (p > 0,05 berdasarkan tingkat keparahan akne vulgaris. Penelitian ini menunjukkan tidak ada perbedaan konsumsi lemak berdasarkan tingkat keparahan akne vulgaris pada siswa SMKNegeri 1 Kota Jambi.Kata kunci: akne vulgaris, FFQ, lemak total, SFA, MUFA, PUFA Abstract One of the precipited factors is high fat diet, especially saturated fats. The objective of this study was to determine the comparison of fat consumption which is based on the severity of acne vulgaris.This research wasanalytic observational study using cross sectional design, by examining dermatologic status according to Lehmann criteria and  taking consumption record with FFQ (Food Frequency Questionnaire of  138 tenth and eleventh grade student in SMKN 1 Jambi. The result showed that mild acne vulgaris (49%, moderate acne vulgaris (42%, and

  10. Shelf-life extension of minimally processed and gamma irradiated red beet (Beta vulgaris ssp. vulgaris L.), Cv. early wonder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandes, Nilber Kenup; Vital, Helio de Carvalho [Centro Tecnologico do Exercito (CTEx), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Div. de Defesa Quimica, Biologica e Nuclear (DDQBN)]. E-mail: nilberkenup@ctex.eb.br; vital@ctex.eb.br; Coneglian, Regina Celi Cavestre [Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro (UFRRJ), Seropedica, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst.de Agronomia. Dept. de Fitotecnia]. E-mail: rccconeg@ufrrj.br; Godoy, Ronoel Luiz de Oliveira [EMBRAPA Agroindustria de Alimentos, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: ronoel@ctaa.embrapa.br

    2007-07-01

    This work investigated the effects of gamma irradiation on the shelf-life extension and safety of minimally processed red beet (Beta vulgaris ssp. vulgaris L.) by performing microbiological, chemical and sensory analyses. Red beets were harvested 73 days after transplanting and their tuberous parts were minimally processed and separated in two groups: control (non-irradiated) and irradiated (0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 kGy). Tests for Salmonella sp., total and fecal coliforms, total count of aerobic mesophilic and lactic-acid bacteria were performed during the 21-day storage at 8 deg C. They indicated that the samples irradiated with 1.0 and 1.5 kGy remained in good conditions throughout storage while the unirradiated samples did not last 7 days. Chemical analyses indicated that the concentrations of vitamins B1 and B2 were not affected by irradiation. In contrast the amounts of fructose and glucose increased during storage while the one for sucrose decreased. In addition four series of sensory evaluations including appearance and aroma indicated that the samples irradiated with 1.0 and 1.5 kGy remained good for consumption for 20 days. Therefore it was concluded that the use of the doses of 1.0 and 1.5 kGy produced the best effects on the conservation of the samples without harming the sensory characteristics and nutritional constituents tested. (author)

  11. Genetic resources of Thymus vulgaris L. and T. vulgaris x T. Marschallianus Willd. in the Czech Republic

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    Duskova, Elena

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Two varieties of Thymus vulgaris L. (´Krajový´ and ´Winter´ and three its hybrids with T. Marschallianus Will. (variety ´Mixta´ and two accessions of variety ´Lemona´ were evaluated according the Draft Descriptor List Thymus vulgaris L. and analysed for the essential oil content and composition in years 2014 and 2015. All evaluated accessions were found morphologically and/or chemically different. Varieties ´Krajový´, ´Winter´ and ´Mixta´ were assessed as a thymol type with the thymol (39.1 – 69.6 %, o-cymene (6.3 – 24.9 % and γ-terpinene (2.75 – 13.8 % as main oil components. The two accessions of ´Lemona´ variety were found significantly different each other: one of them (income No. 3239 was assessed as a terpineol type with the terpineol acetate (75.7 % and α-terpineol (16.9 % as main oil components and the other one (income No. 2757 as a geraniol type with the geranyl acetate (±42.4 % and geraniol (±20.8 % as main oil components. Only the accession with income No. 3239 was proved as a ´Lemona´ variety due its citral (±9.3 % content, though even this content is too small compare to original ´Lemona´ where about 20 % of citral was declared.

  12. An alternative to estimate the atmospheric carbon sequestration by Bambusa vulgaris var. vulgaris Schrad. ex J.C. Wendl.

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    Alicia Mercadet

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The estimation of atmospheric carbon sequestration by a woody plant has two alternatives for implementation: by identifying the average annual increase in volume or by determining the appropriate method for calculating the volume stand. The aim of this work was to obtain a reliable and simple method for estimating the carbon in plants and culms of bamboo (Bambusa vulgaris var. vulgaris existing in a territory. Single samples were taken without replacement in different areas and each culm was measured in total length, outside diameter and wall thickness every two meters from the base to the segment in the upper left to present an interior cavity identifiable, in which the remaining length to the top was measured. Graphical analyses were conducted with the data collected of trends in relations between the variables considered along the culm. By regression analysis with different models and the use of determination coefficient (R2 as an adjustment indicator, we selected those that best allow estimating the solid volume of the culm. After obtaining the calibration models and their results, we prepared a spreadsheet that facilitates to take down the values of the different variables by culm and scion as well as the characterization of the scion average culm. The results are a first attempt to develop a method for estimating the carbon sequestered by the bamboo culm at both as scion and territory to include this element among the criteria for the management plans of this non-wood forest resource. Key words: allometric models, bamboo, regression analysis

  13. Primer registro de Vespula vulgaris (Hymenoptera: Vespidae en la Argentina First record of Vespula vulgaris (Hymenoptera: Vespidae in Argentina

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    Maité Masciocchi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Vespula vulgaris (Linnaeus es un véspido social nativo de la región Holártica. En este trabajo reportamos la primera detección de esta especie en Argentina. Obreras de esta avispa fueron capturadas cerca de la ciudad de San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina en Febrero de 2010, mientras se tomaban muestras de otra avispa invasora, Vespula germanica (Fabricius o chaqueta amarilla, de morfología externa y hábitos similares a la anteriormente mencionada. Además, detallamos algunos caracteres de identificación y características biológicas.Vespula vulgaris (Linnaeus is a social vespid native to the Holarctic region. The first detection of this species in Argentina is here reported. Workers were captured close to San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina during February 2010, while sampling for another successful invader, the German wasp or Yellowjacket, Vespula germanica (Fabricius. Both these wasp species are very similar morphologically and share a number of common habits. Also, some identification features and biological characters are here explained.

  14. Rhizofiltration using sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) and bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. var. vulgaris) to remediate uranium contaminated groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Minhee, E-mail: heelee@pknu.ac.kr [Department of Environmental Geosciences, Pukyong National University, 599-1 Daeyondong, Namgu, Busan 608-737 (Korea, Republic of); Yang, Minjune [Department of Environmental Geosciences, Pukyong National University, 599-1 Daeyondong, Namgu, Busan 608-737 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-01-15

    The uranium removal efficiencies of rhizofiltration in the remediation of groundwater were investigated in lab-scale experiments. Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) and bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. var. vulgaris) were cultivated and an artificially uranium contaminated solution and three genuine groundwater samples were used in the experiments. More than 80% of the initial uranium in solution and genuine groundwater, respectively, was removed within 24 h by using sunflower and the residual uranium concentration of the treated water was lower than 30 {mu}g/L (USEPA drinking water limit). For bean, the uranium removal efficiency of the rhizofiltration was roughly 60-80%. The maximum uranium removal via rhizofiltration for the two plant cultivars occurred at pH 3-5 of solution and their uranium removal efficiencies exceeded 90%. The lab-scale continuous rhizofiltration clean-up system delivered over 99% uranium removal efficiency, and the results of SEM and EDS analyses indicated that most uranium accumulated in the roots of plants. The present results suggested that the uranium removal capacity of two plants evaluated in the clean-up system was about 25 mg/kg of wet plant mass. Notably, the removal capacity of the root parts only was more than 500 mg/kg.

  15. Rhizofiltration using sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) and bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. var. vulgaris) to remediate uranium contaminated groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Minhee; Yang, Minjune

    2010-01-15

    The uranium removal efficiencies of rhizofiltration in the remediation of groundwater were investigated in lab-scale experiments. Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) and bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. var. vulgaris) were cultivated and an artificially uranium contaminated solution and three genuine groundwater samples were used in the experiments. More than 80% of the initial uranium in solution and genuine groundwater, respectively, was removed within 24h by using sunflower and the residual uranium concentration of the treated water was lower than 30 microg/L (USEPA drinking water limit). For bean, the uranium removal efficiency of the rhizofiltration was roughly 60-80%. The maximum uranium removal via rhizofiltration for the two plant cultivars occurred at pH 3-5 of solution and their uranium removal efficiencies exceeded 90%. The lab-scale continuous rhizofiltration clean-up system delivered over 99% uranium removal efficiency, and the results of SEM and EDS analyses indicated that most uranium accumulated in the roots of plants. The present results suggested that the uranium removal capacity of two plants evaluated in the clean-up system was about 25mg/kg of wet plant mass. Notably, the removal capacity of the root parts only was more than 500 mg/kg.

  16. Mixotrophic growth and biochemical analysis of Chlorella vulgaris cultivated with diluted monosodium glutamate wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yan; Hu, Wenrong; Li, Xiuqing; Ma, Guixia; Song, Mingming; Pei, Haiyan

    2014-01-01

    Monosodium glutamate wastewater (MSGW) is a potential medium for microbial cultivation because of containing abundant organic nutrient. This paper seeks to evaluate the feasibility of growing Chlorella vulgaris with MSGW and assess the influence of MSGW concentration on the biomass productivity and biochemical compositions. The MSGW diluted in different concentrations was prepared for microalga cultivation. C. vulgaris growth was greatly promoted with MSGW compared with the inorganic BG11 medium. C. vulgaris obtained the maximum biomass concentration (1.02 g/L) and biomass productivity (61.47 mg/Ld) with 100-time diluted MSGW. The harvested biomass was rich in protein (36.01-50.64%) and low in lipid (13.47-25.4%) and carbohydrate (8.94-20.1%). The protein nutritional quality and unsaturated fatty acids content of algal increased significantly with diluted MSGW. These results indicated that the MSGW is a feasible alternative for mass cultivation of C. vulgaris.

  17. Influence of plaque-forming bacterium, Rhodobacteraceae sp. on the growth of Chlorella vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhangran; Zhang, Jingyan; Lei, Xueqian; Zhang, Bangzhou; Cai, Guanjing; Zhang, Huajun; Li, Yi; Zheng, Wei; Tian, Yun; Xu, Hong; Zheng, Tianling

    2014-10-01

    Experiments were conducted to find out the molecular features, infection process of a special alga plaque-forming microorganism and its potential influence on the biomass of Chlorella vulgaris during the infection process. Direct contact between the algal cell and the bacterium may be the primary steps needed for the bacterium to lyse the alga. Addition of C. vulgaris cells into f/2 medium allowed us obtain the object bacterium. The 16S rRNA gene sequence comparisons results showed that the plaque-forming bacterium kept the closest relationship with Labrenzia aggregata IAM 12614(T) at 98.90%. The existence of the bacterium could influence both the dry weight and lipid content of C. vulgaris. This study demonstrated that direct cell wall disruption of C. vulgaris by the bacterium would be a potentially effective method to utilize the biomass of microalgae.

  18. Th-17 and the lack of efficacy of ustekinumab in pemphigus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirado-Sánchez, Andrés; Ponce-Olivera, Rosa María; Vazquez-González, Denisse; Bonifaz, Alexandro

    2013-03-15

    Systemic corticosteroids represent an effective treatment for pemphigus vulgaris (PV). However, this treatment is related to many adverse side effects. Herein, we report a case of PV treated with ustekinumab.

  19. Cranial Mesenteric Arterial Obstruction Due To Strongylus vulgaris Larvae in a Donkey (Equus asinus.

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    Hassan Borji

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Arteritis due to Strongylus vulgaris is a well-known cause of colic in horses and donkeys. The current report describes a fatal incidence of arterial obstruction in cranial mesenteric artery caused by S. vulgaris infection in an adult donkey in which anthelmintic treatment was not regularly administered. Necropsy findings of the abdominal cavity revealed a complete cranial mesenteric arterial obstruction due to larvae of S. vulgaris, causing severe colic. To the authors' knowledge, a complete cranial mesenteric arterial obstruction due to verminous arteritis has rarely been described in horses and donkeys. Based on recent reports of fatal arterial obstruction due to S. vulgaris infection in donkeys, it may be evident to consider acute colic caused by this pathogenic parasite a re-emerging disease in donkeys and horses.

  20. Composition and antimicrobial studies of essential oil of Thymus vulgaris from Montenegro

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    Damjanović-Vratnica, B.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Chemical composition of the hydrodistilled essential oil of Thymus vulgaris L. (thyme from Montenegro was analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and its antimicrobial activity was evaluated against 10 microorganisms, including reference and clinically isolated strains. T. vulgaris essential oil yield was 0.42% (v/w, based on the dry leaves weight whereas the analysis showed that major components, amongst 22 identified in the oil, were geraniol (25.66%, geranyl-acetate (20.34%, linalool (10.89% and caryophyllene oxide (9.89%. The results of the antimicrobial activity tests revealed that the essential oil of T .vulgaris from Montenegro has rather strong antimicrobial activity, especially against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Candida albicans and Klebsiella pneumoniae. These results confirm the potential use of T. vulgaris essential oil in food products the as well as for therapeutic applications.

  1. Synergistic antibacterial activity between Thymus vulgaris and Pimpinella anisum essential oils and methanol extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Bayati, Firas A

    2008-03-28

    Essential oils (EOs) and methanol extracts obtained from aerial parts of Thymus vulgaris and Pimpinella anisum seeds were evaluated for their single and combined antibacterial activities against nine Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria: Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, Escherichia coli, Proteus vulgaris, Proteus mirabilis, Salmonella typhi, Salmonella typhimurium, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The essential oils and methanol extracts revealed promising antibacterial activities against most pathogens using broth microdilution method. Maximum activity of Thymus vulgaris and Pimpinella anisum essential oils and methanol extracts (MIC 15.6 and 62.5mug/ml) were observed against Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus and Proteus vulgaris. Combinations of essential oils and methanol extracts showed an additive action against most tested pathogens especially Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

  2. Lupus Vulgaris Erythematoides: report of a patient initially misdiagnosed as dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez-Lopez, Francisco; Fueyo-Casado, Alejandro; Gonzalez-Lara, Leire

    2013-05-15

    A small percentage of patients with tuberculosis present with cutaneous findings, which may be difficult to diagnose. We present a patient diagnosed with a rare, non-scarring form of cutaneous tuberculosis (CTB), classically termed as lupus vulgaris erythematoides.

  3. Induction of tryptophanase in short cells and swarm cells of Proteus vulgaris.

    OpenAIRE

    Hoffman, P S; Falkinham, J O

    1981-01-01

    Tryptophanase was noninducible in swarm cells of Proteus vulgaris despite transport of the inducer tryptophan. Further, cyclic AMP, which stimulated increased levels of tryptophanase in short cells, had no effect on swarm cells.

  4. Octopus vulgaris (Cuvier, 1797) in the Mediterranean Sea: Genetic Diversity and Population Structure: e0149496

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Daniele De Luca; Gaetano Catanese; Gabriele Procaccini; Graziano Fiorito

    2016-01-01

      The common octopus, Octopus vulgaris Cuvier 1797, is a largely exploited cephalopod species in the Mediterranean Sea and the Atlantic Ocean, as well as along the coasts of Africa, Brazil and Japan...

  5. Transcriptome analysis of salt tolerant common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) under saline conditions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hiz, Mahmut Can; Canher, Balkan; Niron, Harun; Turet, Muge

    2014-01-01

    .... Common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris L., a major protein source in developing countries, is highly affected by soil salinity and the information on genes that play a role in salt tolerance is scarce...

  6. Serological diagnosis of Strongylus vulgaris infection: use of a recombinant protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ulla Vestergaard; Howe, Daniel K.; Olsen, Susanne Nautrup

    , an immunoreactive cDNA clone was subcloned into E. coli and the plasmid sequenced, the open reading frame encoding the mature protein was cloned into a pET22b expression vector and expressed as a His-tagged recombinant protein in BL21 expression cells. The recombinant protein was used in an indirect enzyme...... the pathogenic migrating larval stages of S. vulgaris ante mortem. A cDNA library was constructed from RNA extracted from migrating S. vulgaris larvae. Excretory-secretory antigens from S. vulgaris adult specimens were used to immunise a rat. Hyperimmune serum was used to immunoscreen the cDNA library....... vulgaris (n=9) reacted against the recombinant protein, expressed as optic density (OD) readings of >24 % of a positive control, while sera from negative horses had OD readings

  7. Medicinal Plants for the Treatment of Acne Vulgaris: A Review of Recent Evidences

    OpenAIRE

    Nasri, Hamid; Bahmani, Mahmoud; Shahinfard, Najmeh; Moradi Nafchi, Atefeh; Saberianpour, Shirin; Rafieian Kopaei, Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    Context: Acne vulgaris affects about 85% of teenagers and may continue to adulthood. There are about two million visits to physicians per year for teenagers and the direct cost of acne treatment in the US exceeds $1 billion per year. Evidence Acquisition: A wide variety of treatment regimens exist for acne vulgaris including benzoil peroxide, retinoids, isotretinoids, keratolytic soaps, alpha hydroxy acids, azelaic acid, salicilic acid as well as hormonal, anti-androgen or antiseborrheic trea...

  8. Clinical cross-reactivity between Artemisia vulgaris and Matricaria chamomilla (chamomile).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Torre Morín, F; Sánchez Machín, I; García Robaina, J C; Fernández-Caldas, E; Sánchez Triviño, M

    2001-01-01

    Artemisia vulgaris is a common weed and an important source of allergens on the subtropical island of Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain. It pollinates mainly from July to September, although, due to some local climatic conditions, it may flower throughout the year. Cross-reactivity with hazelnut, kiwi, birch, several Compositae (Ambrosia, Chrysanthemum, Matricaria, Solidago) and grass allergens has been suggested. Few studies have addressed the issue of in vivo cross-reactivity between A. vulgaris and Matricaria chamomilla. The objective of this study was to perform conjunctival and bronchial challenges with A. vulgaris and M. chamomilla and oral challenge with chamomile in 24 patients with asthma and/or rhinitis sensitized primarily to A. vulgaris. Skin prick tests with M. chamomilla were positive in 21 patients. Eighteen patients had a positive conjunctival provocation test with a A. vulgaris pollen extract and 13 patients had a positive conjunctival provocation test with a M. chamomilla pollen extract. Bronchial provocation tests with A. vulgaris were positive in 15 patients and with M. chamomilla pollen in another 16 individuals. Oral provocation tests, conducted with a commercial chamomile infusion were positive in 13 patients. Nine of these individuals were skin test positive to food allergens and 17 to others pollens of the Compositae family. This study confirms a high degree of in vivo cross-reactivity between A. vulgaris and M. chamomilla. Sensitization to A. vulgaris seems to be a primary risk factor for experiencing symptoms after the ingestion of chamomile infusions. Based on the results of bronchial provocation tests, M. chamomilla pollen could be a relevant inhalant allergen.

  9. Clinical characteristics and epidermal barrier function of papulopustular rosacea: A comparison study with acne vulgaris

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Maosong; Xie, Hongfu; Cheng, Lin; Li, Ji

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical characteristics and epidermal barrier function of papulopustular rosacea by comparing with acne vulgaris. Methods: Four hundred and sixty-three papulopustular rosacea patients and four hundred and twelve acne vulgaris patients were selected for the study in Xiangya Hospital of Central South University from March 2015 to May 2016. They were analyzed for major facial lesions, self-conscious symptoms and epidermal barrier function. Results: Erythema, burning, ...

  10. The genome sequence of Barbarea vulgaris facilitates the study of ecological biochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byrne, Stephen L.; Erthmann, Pernille Østerbye; Agerbirk, Niels

    2017-01-01

    The genus Barbarea has emerged as a model for evolution and ecology of plant defense compounds, due to its unusual glucosinolate profile and production of saponins, unique to the Brassicaceae. One species, B. vulgaris, includes two ‘types’, G-type and P-type that differ in trichome density, and t...... deter larvae to the extent that they die. The B. vulgaris genome will promote the study of mechanisms in ecological biochemistry to benefit crop resistance breeding....

  11. Identification of an Alternative to Proteus vulgaris as a Laboratory Standard for Hydrogen Sulfide Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nar'Asha Randall

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This project involved the evaluation of a biosafety level 1 alternative to Proteus vulgaris as a positive control for the production of hydrogen sulfide. We determined that Citrobacter freundii could serve as an excellent substitute for P. vulgaris, and that lead acetate strips used in conjunction with triple sugar iron media allows for consistent results following evaluation after up to one week.

  12. XML Investigating the Phytochemical, Antibacterial and Antifungal Effects of Thymus Vulgaris and Cuminum Cyminum Essential Oils

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the chemical composition, antibacterial and antifungal effects of Thymus vulgaris and Cuminum Cyminum essential oils against foodborne pathogens and Candida species in vitro. Methods: The essential oils were extracted from the aerial parts of Thymus vulgaris and dried Cuminum Cyminum seeds using a Clevenger apparatus for 3 hours. Analysis of the essential oils’ constituents was performed using gas chromatography-mass s...

  13. DRY CALCAREOUS GRASSLAND COMMUNITIES (FILIPENDULA VULGARIS-HELICTOTRICHON PRATENSE) IN WESTERN AND CENTRAL LATVIA

    OpenAIRE

    S. RUSINA

    2003-01-01

    The dry calcareous grassland vegetation of Westem and Central Latvia is described based on 93 rclevés, Ali relevés could be assigned to one community type Filipendula vulgaris-Helictotrichon pratense named according to dominant species. Four variants were distinguished: typicum, Viscaria vulgaris, Astragalus danicus and Carex flacca. Ellenberg indìcator values were calculated to study the ecology of communities. Floristic differences among variants are associated mainly w...

  14. Dispersal of Calluna vulgaris (L. Hull. seeds on severely burnt upland moorland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.A. Gilbert

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available From natural and manipulated experiments at 460 m a.s.l., traps were used to record the dispersal range of Calluna vulgaris seeds on an unvegetated post-wildfire site. Seeds were trapped to 50 m from source, although most (73% were deposited within one metre of the parent plant. C. vulgaris seeds were not dispersed as far in these experiments as recorded in previous workers’ experiments on lowland grassland.

  15. DRY CALCAREOUS GRASSLAND COMMUNITIES (FILIPENDULA VULGARIS-HELICTOTRICHON PRATENSE) IN WESTERN AND CENTRAL LATVIA

    OpenAIRE

    Rusina, S.

    2003-01-01

    The dry calcareous grassland vegetation of Westem and Central Latvia is described based on 93 rclevés, Ali relevés could be assigned to one community type Filipendula vulgaris-Helictotrichon pratense named according to dominant species. Four variants were distinguished: typicum, Viscaria vulgaris, Astragalus danicus and Carex flacca. Ellenberg indìcator values were calculated to study the ecology of communities. Floristic differences among variants are associa...

  16. Therapeutic plasma exchange-A new dawn in the treatment of pemphigus vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pemphigus vulgaris is an autoimmune disorder that involves intraepithelial blistering and sores of skin and mucous membrane. It generally correlates with the levels of circulating autoantibodies; their removal seems a reasonable therapeutic approach. Therapeutic plasma exchange is hypothesized to remove pathogenic autoantibodies and has been used in refractory or severe cases. It may be considered for rapid control of severe or recalcitrant pemphigus vulgaris and should be combined with use of concomitant immuno-suppressive.

  17. Two-Component Signal Transduction Systems of Desulfovibrio Vulgaris: Structural and Phylogenetic Analysis and Deduction of Putative Cognate Pairs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Weiwen; Culley, David E.; Wu, Gang; Brockman, Fred J.

    2006-01-20

    ABSTRACT-Two-component signal transduction systems (TCSTS) composed of sensory histidine kinases (HK) and response regulators (RR), constitute a key element of the mechanism by which bacteria sense and respond to changes in environments. A large number of TCSTSs including 59 putative HKs and 55 RRs were identified from the Desulfovibrio vulgaris genome, indicating their important roles in regulation of cellular metabolism. In this study, the structural and phylogenetic analysis of all putative TCSTSs in D. vulgaris was performed. The results showed D. vulgaris contained an unexpectedly large number of hybrid-type HKs, implying that multiple-step phosphorelay may be a common signal transduction mechanism in D. vulgaris. Most TCSTS components of D. vulgaris were found clustered into several subfamilies previously recognized in other bacteria and extensive co-evolution between D. vulgaris HKs and RRs was observed, suggesting that the concordance of HKs and RRs in cognate phylogenetic groups could be indicative of cognate TCSTSs...

  18. Study of the effect of extract of Thymus vulgaris on anxiety in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komaki, Alireza; Hoseini, Faeghe; Shahidi, Siamak; Baharlouei, Negar

    2016-07-01

    There is some evidence in traditional medicine for the effectiveness of Thymus vulgaris ( bǎi lǐ xiāng) in the treatment of anxiety in humans. The elevated plus-maze (EPM) has broadly been used to investigate anxiolytic and anxiogenic compounds. The present study investigated the effects of extract of T. vulgaris on rat behavior in the EPM. In the present study, the data were obtained from male Wistar rats. Animals were divided into four groups: saline group and T. vulgaris groups (50 mg/kg, 100 mg/kg, and 200 mg/kg infusion for 7 days by feeding). During the test period, the total distance covered by animals, the number of open- and closed-arm entries, and the time spent in open and closed arms of the EPM were recorded. T. vulgaris increased open-arm exploration and open-arm entry in the EPM, whereas extract of this plant has no effects on the total distance covered by animals and the number of closed-arm entries. The results of the present experiment indicate that T. vulgaris may have an anxiolytic profile in rat behavior in the EPM test, which is not influenced by the locomotor activity. Further research is required to determine the mechanisms by which T. vulgaris extract exerts an anxiolytic effect in rats.

  19. Prevalence and risk factors of facial acne vulgaris among Chinese adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tie-Qang; Mei, Shu-Qing; Zhang, Jin-Xin; Gong, Long-Fen; Wu, Fen-Jin; Wu, Wei-Hong; Li, Jun; Lin, Min; Diao, Jian-Xing

    2007-01-01

    Acne vulgaris, a very common condition among adolescents, can result in psychological distress, including anxiety and depression. The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence and risk factors of acne vulgaris among Chinese adolescents. In the Zhou Hai district of Guangdong Province, 3163 students 10 to 18 years old were selected from 7 schools. Information was collected using self-administrated questionnaIres and physician examinations. The prevalence of acne vulgaris was calculated from the collected data. Potential risk factors including age, gender, diet, skin type, sleeping habits, and facial make-up use were analyzed using stepwise logistic regression. The results showed a prevalence of acne vuglaris of 53.5% in all adolescents, with 51.3% in males and 58.6% in females. The prevalence of inflammatory acne in males and females combined was 25.8% and of acne scarring 7.1%. Increased age was related to higher prevalence and severity of acne vulgaris: 15.6%, 44.9%, and 70.4% for 10, 13, and 16 year olds, respectively. Acne vulgaris was more prevalent in girls under and boys over 14 years of age. Significant risk factors of acne vuglaris included age, skin type (oily, mixed, or neutral skin in comparison with dry skin), insufficient sleep, and cosmetic make-up use. Acne vulgaris is prevalent among Chinese adolescents 10 to 18 years old. Health education to address this condition in Chinese adolescents could have important implications for public health.

  20. Polyphosphate during the Regreening of Chlorella vulgaris under Nitrogen Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Fei-Fei; Shen, Xiao-Fei; Lam, Paul K S; Zeng, Raymond J

    2015-09-28

    Polyphosphate (Poly-P) accumulation has been reported in Chlorella vulgaris under nitrogen deficiency conditions with sufficient P supply, and the process has been demonstrated to have great impact on lipid productivity. In this article, the utilization of polyphosphates and the regreening process under N resupplying conditions, especially for lipid production reviving, were investigated. This regreening process was completed within approximately 3-5 days. Polyphosphates were first degraded within 3 days in the regreening process, with and without an external P supply, and the degradation preceded the assimilation of phosphate in the media with an external P offering. Nitrate assimilation was markedly influenced by the starvation of P after polyphosphates were exhausted in the medium without external phosphates, and then the reviving process of biomass and lipid production was strictly impeded. It is, thus, reasonable to assume that simultaneous provision of external N and P is essential for overall biodiesel production revival during the regreening process.

  1. Polyphosphate during the Regreening of Chlorella vulgaris under Nitrogen Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei-Fei Chu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Polyphosphate (Poly-P accumulation has been reported in Chlorella vulgaris under nitrogen deficiency conditions with sufficient P supply, and the process has been demonstrated to have great impact on lipid productivity. In this article, the utilization of polyphosphates and the regreening process under N resupplying conditions, especially for lipid production reviving, were investigated. This regreening process was completed within approximately 3–5 days. Polyphosphates were first degraded within 3 days in the regreening process, with and without an external P supply, and the degradation preceded the assimilation of phosphate in the media with an external P offering. Nitrate assimilation was markedly influenced by the starvation of P after polyphosphates were exhausted in the medium without external phosphates, and then the reviving process of biomass and lipid production was strictly impeded. It is, thus, reasonable to assume that simultaneous provision of external N and P is essential for overall biodiesel production revival during the regreening process.

  2. Cannibalistic behavior of octopus (Octopus vulgaris) in the wild.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Urcera, Jorge; Garci, Manuel E; Roura, Alvaro; González, Angel F; Cabanellas-Reboredo, Miguel; Morales-Nin, Beatriz; Guerra, Angel

    2014-11-01

    The first description of cannibalism in wild adult Octopus vulgaris is presented from 3 observations made in the Ría de Vigo (NW Spain), which were filmed by scuba divers. These records document common traits in cannibalistic behavior: (a) it was intercohort cannibalism; (b) attacks were made by both males and females; (c) in 2 of the records, the prey were transported to the den, which was covered with stones of different sizes; (d) the predator started to eat the tip of the arms of its prey; (e) predation on conspecifics occurred even if there were other abundant prey available (i.e., mussels); and (f) the prey/predator weight ratio in the 3 cases ranged from 20% to 25% body weight. The relationships between this behavior and sex, defense of territory, energy balance, food shortage, competition and predation, as well as how the attacker kills its victim are discussed.

  3. Physiological and biochemical responses of Chlorella vulgaris to Congo red.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Zamora, Miriam; Perales-Vela, Hugo Virgilio; Flores-Ortíz, César Mateo; Cañizares-Villanueva, Rosa Olivia

    2014-10-01

    Extensive use of synthetic dyes in many industrial applications releases large volumes of wastewater. Wastewaters from dying industries are considered hazardous and require careful treatment prior to discharge into receiving water bodies. Dyes can affect photosynthetic activities of aquatic flora and decrease dissolved oxygen in water. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of Congo red on growth and metabolic activity of Chlorella vulgaris after 96h exposure. Exposure of the microalga to Congo red reduced growth rate, photosynthesis and respiration. Analysis of chlorophyll a fluorescence emission showed that the donor side of photosystem II was affected at high concentrations of Congo red. The quantum yield for electron transport (φEo), the electron transport rate (ETR) and the performance index (PI) also decreased. The reduction in the ability to absorb and use the quantum energy increased non-photochemical (NPQ) mechanisms for thermal dissipation. Overall, Congo red affects growth and metabolic activity in photosynthetic organisms in aquatic environments.

  4. Pemphigus Vulgaris Confined to the Gingiva: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuhiro Ohta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pemphigus Vulgaris (PV is an autoimmune intraepithelial blistering disease involving the skin and mucous membranes. Oral mucosa is frequently affected in patients with PV, and oral lesions may be the first sign of the disease in majority of patients. In some patients, oral lesions may also be followed by skin involvement. Therefore, timely recognition and therapy of oral lesions is critical as it may prevent skin involvement. Early oral lesions of PV are, however, often regarded as difficult to diagnose, since the initial oral lesions may be relatively nonspecific, manifesting as superficial erosions or ulcerations, and rarely presenting with the formation of intact bullae. Lesions may occur anywhere on the oral mucosa including gingiva; however; desquamtive gingivitis is less common with PV than other mucocutaneous conditions such as pemphigoid or lichen planus. This paper describes the case of a patient presenting with a one-year history of painful gingival, who is finally diagnosed as having PV.

  5. A Novel Rhodopsin Gene from Octopus vulgaris for Optobioelectronics Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Zhgun

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The unique photochromic retinal protein from rhabdomeric octopus membranes – octopus rhodopsin (OctR has emerged as promising material for biomolecular photonic applications due to its unique properties and advantages. Here we report isolation of the novel full length octR gene from retina cDNA of Octopus vulgaris eyes and its sequence comparison with rhodopsins of other cephalopods and vertebrates. The isolated gene can be used to develop various expression systems for production of recombinant OctR for structural studies and novel optobioelectronic applications. The alignment of amino acid (a.a. sequence with different opsins revealed similarity to cephalopoda rhodopsins (Rho and to human melanopsin from intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells. The alingment of OctR a.a. sequence with mammalian and cephalopoda Rho with known 3D structures revealed promising substitutions V2C and W292C for developing stable and functionally active recombinant OctR after heterologous expression.

  6. Antibacterial activity of Beta vulgaris L. pomace extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velićanski Aleksandra S.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Antibacterial activity of Beta vulgaris L. (beetroot pomace extract (concentration 100 mg/ml was tested against five Gram positive and seven Gram negative bacterial strains (reference cultures and natural isolates. Disc diffusion method with 15 µl of extract and agar-well diffusion method with 50 and 100 µl were used. Antibiotic (cefotaxime/clavulanic acid was used as a control sample. The tested extract showed the highest activity against Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus cereus, where clear zones (without growth appeared. There was no any activity against other tested Gram-positive bacteria, except for Staphylococcus epidermidis, with a small zone of reduced growth. Growth of all tested Gram-negative bacteria was inhibited usually with 100 µl of extract. The most susceptible were Citrobacter freundii and Salmonella typhymurium. The tested antibiotic gave clear, usually large zones for all tested strains except for Staphylococcus cohni spp. cohni, where only a zone of reduced growth appeared.

  7. Treatment Of ACNE Vulgaris With New Polyherbal Formulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachidananda Y N

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available One hundred and five patients with active lesions of acne vulgaris were included in the open clinical trial. All the patients were administered tablets containing multiple herbal drugs (purim, at a dose of 2 tablets twice daily for four weeks. Simultaneously, they were instructed to apply A herbal cream (Clarina twice daily on the affected area of acne lesion twice daily for four weeks. The response to treatment was excellent in mild to moderate acne (Grade I & II after 4 weeks of treatment. In severe acne with large papules and pustules, the response was also significantly good, in healing the papules and pustules. There were no local or systemic side effects seen in all these patients. Thus, this polyherbal cream (Clarina along with a polyherbal tablet (Purim tablets was useful in treating patients with various degrees of acne.

  8. Oxidation of Octopus vulgaris hemocyanin by nitrogen oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvato, B.; Giacometti, G.M.; Beltramini, M.; Zilio, F.; Giacometti, G.; Magliozzo, R.S.; Peisach, J.

    1989-01-24

    The reaction of Octopus vulgaris hemocyanin with nitrite was studied under a variety of conditions in which the green half-met derivative is formed. Analytical evidence shows that the amount of chemically detectable nitrite in various samples of the derivative is not proportional to the cupric copper detected by EPR. The kinetics of oxidation of hemocyanin as a function of protein concentration and pH, in the presence of nitrite and ascorbate, is consistent with a scheme in which NO/sub 2/ is the reactive oxidant. We suggest that the green half-methemocyanin contains a metal center with one cuprous and one cupric copper without an exogenous nitrogen oxide ligand.

  9. Volatile compounds of dry beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oomah, B Dave; Liang, Lisa S Y; Balasubramanian, Parthiba

    2007-12-01

    Volatile compounds of uncooked dry bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) cultivars representing three market classes (black, dark red kidney and pinto) grown in 2005 were isolated with headspace solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME), and analyzed with gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). A total of 62 volatiles consisting of aromatic hydrocarbons, aldehydes, alkanes, alcohols and ketones represented on average 62, 38, 21, 12, and 9 x 10(6) total area counts, respectively. Bean cultivars differed in abundance and profile of volatiles. The combination of 18 compounds comprising a common profile explained 79% of the variance among cultivars based on principal component analysis (PCA). The SPME technique proved to be a rapid and effective method for routine evaluation of dry bean volatile profile.

  10. Nootropic Effects of Filipendula Vulgaris Moench Water Extract Fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilova, I V; Suslov, N I; Amelchenko, V P

    2015-07-01

    Nootropic activity of water extract fractions from aerial parts of Filipendula vulgaris Moench was demonstrated on the models of hermetic volume hypoxia, conditioned passive avoidance response, open field test, and forced swimming with a load. The fractions stimulated hypoxic resistance, normalized orientation and exploratory behavior, improved conditioned response reproduction during testing after hypoxic injury, and increased exercise tolerance. Fractionation of the extract led to dissociation of the effect components, which suggests that individual constituents have specific characteristics. Ethylacetate fraction exhibited most pronounced nootropic activity and was superior to plant extract by some characteristics. The detected effects seemed to be caused by modulation of the hippocampus activity the under the effects of phenol and triterpene compounds.

  11. Injury response of Phaseolus vulgaris to ozone flux density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiro, B. D.; Gillespie, T. J.; Thurtell, G. W.

    This study describes a quantitative relationship between mean O 3 flux density and the length of exposure needed for the occurrence of visual injury to Phaseolus vulgaris L. Similar relationships were found for 14 day old and 6 week old plants using a whole leaf gas exchange cuvette system. Cultivars Seafarer (O 3 sensitive) and Gold Crop (O 3 resistant) exhibited similar responses at flux densities > 3 mg m -2 h -1 but only Seafarer was injured below this flux density. O 3 concentration and length of exposure period alone did not contain sufficient information to describe the onset of visual foliar injury. The use of O 3 concentrations in excess of normal ambient conditions compensated for low leaf conductances so that flux densities in the cuvette were similar to those found in the field.

  12. Lichen striatus associated with psoriasis vulgaris treated with oral acitretin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enzo Errichetti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lichen striatus (LS is an uncommon dermatosis of unknown etiology that presents as a continuous or interrupted linear band of pink, tan, red or skin-colored papules in a blaschkoid distribution. The lesions are generally solitary and unilateral, but unusual extensive cases with multiple and bilateral lesions have been also described. Albeit LS is typically an asymptomatic and self-limited dermatosis, it may cause a significant psychological distress in some patients, thus requiring an appropriate therapy. Topical steroid is the most commonly used treatment but it is not always effective. We report a case of LS unresponsive to topical steroid therapy associated with psoriasis vulgaris successfully treated with oral acitretin.

  13. PRODUCTIVITY OF MICROALGAE CHLORELLA VULGARIS IN LABORATORY CONDITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Patyna

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Algae biomass is increasingly regarded as a potential resource that could be used to produce biofuels, electricity and heat. Algae contain a lot of nutrients, so they can be used as food for humans and livestock. Because of their valuable composition (many nutrients they are used as supplements of balanced diet, in turn taking into account their biosorption abbility they are used to detoxification of human body. Algae cultivation does not demand large areas of land to expose cells to sunlight, so their production rate is higher than vascular plants. Moreover algae cultivation lets to achieve high biomass concentration. Important cultivation factors are: illumination (light intensity is an important factor because it drives photosynthesis, CO2 supply, culture medium and mixing. The experimental research was conducted using Chlorella vulgaris BA 002 strain. The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of biomass growth in laboratory condition.

  14. Thermogravimetric analysis of the gasification of microalgae Chlorella vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueira, Camila Emilia; Moreira, Paulo Firmino; Giudici, Reinaldo

    2015-12-01

    The gasification of microalgae Chlorella vulgaris under an atmosphere of argon and water vapor was investigated by thermogravimetric analysis. The data were interpreted by using conventional isoconversional methods and also by the independent parallel reaction (IPR) model, in which the degradation is considered to happen individually to each pseudo-component of biomass (lipid, carbohydrate and protein). The IPR model allows obtaining the kinetic parameters of the degradation reaction of each component. Three main stages were observed during the gasification process and the differential thermogravimetric curve was satisfactorily fitted by the IPR model considering three pseudocomponents. The comparison of the activation energy values obtained by the methods and those found in the literature for other microalgae was satisfactory. Quantification of reaction products was performed using online gas chromatography. The major products detected were H2, CO and CH4, indicating the potential for producing fuel gas and syngas from microalgae.

  15. Oral pemphigus vulgaris: A case report with direct immunofluorescence study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sangeetha Jeevan; Nehru Anand, SP; Gunasekaran, Nandhini; Krishnan, Rajkumar

    2016-01-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is a chronic, autoimmune, intraepidermal blistering disease of the skin and mucous membranes. The initial clinical manifestation is frequently the development of intraoral lesions, and later, the lesions involve the other mucous membranes and skin. The etiology of this disease still remains obscure although the presence of autoantibodies is consistent with an autoimmune disease. These antibodies are targeted against the adhesion proteins of keratinocytes, leading to acantholysis (disruption of spinous layer, leading to intraepidermal clefting) and blister formation. Because only oral lesions are present initially, the chances of misdiagnosing the disease as another condition are increased, leading to inappropriate therapy. In this article, we report a case of PV with only oral manifestations in a 36-year-old male. PMID:27721634

  16. Four cases of recalcitrant pemphigus vulgaris salvaged with rituximab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samyak Ganjre

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the long-term use of immunosuppressives – supplemented with more aggressive treatments such as immunoadsorption, intravenous immunoglobulins, or plasmapheresis in recalcitrant cases has dramatically improved the prognosis of pemphigus vulgaris, opportunistic infections secondary to immunosuppression continue to cause significant mortality. We report four cases– three old ones, who had accumulated significant morbidities over their disease duration ranging from 5 to 10 years, and the fourth, a teenage female intolerant to corticosteroids and idiosyncratic to methotrexate– who achieved complete remission on administration of rituximab by the lymphoma protocol. One of the old cases who had recalcitrant mucositis experienced its complete subsidence without any adjuvant whatsoever. All continue to remain asymptomatic for 11–20 months. None had infusion reactions or any delayed side effects.

  17. Future therapies for pemphigus vulgaris: Rituximab and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Amy; Madan, Raman K; Levitt, Jacob

    2016-04-01

    The conventional treatment for patients with pemphigus vulgaris (PV) centers on global immunosuppression, such as the use of steroids and other immunosuppressive drugs, to decrease titers of antidesmoglein autoantibodies responsible for the acantholytic blisters. Global immunosuppressants, however, cause serious side effects. The emergence of anti-CD20 biologic medications, such as rituximab, as an adjunct to conventional therapy has shifted the focus to targeted destruction of autoimmune B cells. Next-generation biologic medications with improved modes of delivery, pharmacology, and side effect profiles are constantly being developed, adding to the diversity of options for PV treatment. We review promising monoclonal antibodies, including veltuzumab, obinutuzumab (GA-101), ofatumumab, ocaratuzumab (AME-133v), PRO131921, and belimumab.

  18. Uric acid : A new antioxidant in patients with pemphigus vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Yousefi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Increased reactive oxygen species (ROS and lipid peroxidation are seen in many dermatologic disorders, for example, atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, vitiligo, acne vulgaris, pemphigus vulgaris (PV, lichen planus, and alopecia areata. ROS has an important role in the inflammation process. In PV, increased production of ROS leads to decline of antioxidants in plasma and red blood cells which results in oxidative stress. We aimed to evaluate the level of these antioxidants in PV patients and compare it to the controls. Materials and Methods: Among patients attending the dermatology clinics, 30 patients with PV, who had never been on treatment, were enrolled to the study. The control group consisted of 30 age- and sex-matched healthy non-smoker individuals. Venous blood was collected from the subjects for the evaluation of plasma levels of glutathione peroxidase, vitamin C, selenium, bilirubin, and uric acid. Results: Age mean and standard deviation of the patients (40.83, 12.74 was comparable to the controls (41.96, 13.08. Mean level of uric acid was significantly lower in PV patients compared to the controls (P = 0.006. Other antioxidants were not different between the two groups. Uric acid of the patients with mucosal involvement was significantly lower than patients with mucocutaneous involvement (P = 0.049. Limitations: The blood level of other antioxidants (e.g. malondialdehyde was not evaluated. Conclusions: Uric acid as an antioxidant in our study had similar changes to previous studies in the field of other diseases but selenium, bilirubin, and glutathione peroxidase did not differ between patients and controls.

  19. Clonal propagation of Bambusa vulgaris by leafy branch cuttings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.S.Islam; M.K.Bhuiyan; M.M.Hossain; M.A.Hossain

    2011-01-01

    Bambusa vulgaris Schrad ex wendl is a widely cultivated bamboo species in rural Bangladesh for its versatile uses. The vegetative propagation becomes the only viable alternative for this species because B. vulgaris does not set seed after sparse flowering, which makes seed- ling progenies unavailable. A low-cost propagation trial was conducted to explore the clonal propagation techniques for the species with two types of small branch cuttings, nodal leafy cuttings and tip cuttings. The cuttings, after treating with 0, 0.1%, 0.4%, and 0.8% IBA solutions, were kept in non-mist propagator to let them to root for assessing the rooting ability. The cuttings were rooted in four weeks and were allowed to grow in the polybags for 10 months under nursery condition to assess their steckling capacity. The study reveals that both types of branch cuttings are able to develop roots, shoots, to survive and to form rhizome under the nursery condition. Rooting ability of the cuttings was significantly enhanced by the application of rooting hormone - IBA. The highest root- ing percentage in nodal leafy cuttings and the tip cuttings (56.67% and 51.0%, respectively) were observed in 0.8% IBA treatment, followed by 0.4% IBA and the lowest (34.3% and 30.0%, respectively) was in control. The highest number of root developed per cutting (9.77 and 8.33 in nodal leafy cuttings and the tip cuttings, respectively) was also obtained from the cuttings treated with 0.8% IBA solution, followed 0.4% IBA treat- ment and the lowest (3.1 and 2.1, respectively) was in the cuttings with- out treatment. However, the length of the longest root varied significantly neither with the cutting types nor the concentrations of IBA solution. Survival percentage of the stecklings in nursery condition was signifi- cantly enhanced by IBA.

  20. Transcriptome Profiling of the Phaseolus vulgaris - Colletotrichum lindemuthianum Pathosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padder, Bilal A; Kamfwa, Kelvin; Awale, Halima E; Kelly, James D

    2016-01-01

    Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) anthracnose caused by the hemi-biotrophic pathogen Colletotrichum lindemuthianum is a major factor limiting production worldwide. Although sources of resistance have been identified and characterized, the early molecular events in the host-pathogen interface have not been investigated. In the current study, we conducted a comprehensive transcriptome analysis using Illumina sequencing of two near isogenic lines (NILs) differing for the presence of the Co-1 gene on chromosome Pv01 during a time course following infection with race 73 of C. lindemuthianum. From this, we identified 3,250 significantly differentially expressed genes (DEGs) within and between the NILs over the time course of infection. During the biotrophic phase the majority of DEGs were up regulated in the susceptible NIL, whereas more DEGs were up-regulated in the resistant NIL during the necrotrophic phase. Various defense related genes, such as those encoding PR proteins, peroxidases, lipoxygenases were up regulated in the resistant NIL. Conversely, genes encoding sugar transporters were up-regulated in the susceptible NIL during the later stages of infection. Additionally, numerous transcription factors (TFs) and candidate genes within the vicinity of the Co-1 locus were differentially expressed, suggesting a global reprogramming of gene expression in and around the Co-1 locus. Through this analysis, we reduced the previous number of candidate genes reported at the Co-1 locus from eight to three. These results suggest the dynamic nature of P. vulgaris-C. lindemuthianum interaction at the transcriptomic level and reflect the role of both pathogen and effector triggered immunity on changes in plant gene expression.

  1. Enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidant potentials of Chlorella vulgaris grown in effluent of a confectionery industry

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidant potentials of Chlorella vulgaris have gained considerable importance in recent decades. C. vulgaris strain highly tolerant to extreme pH variations was isolated and mass-cultivated in the wastewater from a confectionery industry. C.vulgaris showed better growth in wastewater than in improvised CFTRI medium. The microalgal biomass was then screened for the following antioxidants: peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, polyphenol oxidase, glutathione peroxidas...

  2. Hubungan Stres dengan Kejadian Akne Vulgaris Di kalangan Mahasiswa Fakultas Kedokteran Universitas Sumatera Utara Angkatan 2007-2009

    OpenAIRE

    Perumal, Nitya

    2011-01-01

    Background: Acne or acne vulgaris has always been well concerned among teenagers and adolescent age. Acne vulgaris is a common disorder of the follicle sebaceous unit that predominantly occurs in adolescence. Acne vulgaris which is suffered by 95 to 100 percent boys and 83 to 85 percent girls. This skin disease is caused by multifactoral of skin disease, which is stress. With the increased studying burden, packed time table and inadequate sleep has caused medical students in University of Nor...

  3. Phase transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Solé, Ricard V

    2011-01-01

    Phase transitions--changes between different states of organization in a complex system--have long helped to explain physics concepts, such as why water freezes into a solid or boils to become a gas. How might phase transitions shed light on important problems in biological and ecological complex systems? Exploring the origins and implications of sudden changes in nature and society, Phase Transitions examines different dynamical behaviors in a broad range of complex systems. Using a compelling set of examples, from gene networks and ant colonies to human language and the degradation o

  4. Hepatoprotective Effect of Pretreatment with Thymus vulgaris Essential Oil in Experimental Model of Acetaminophen-Induced Injury

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Grespan, Renata; Aguiar, Rafael Pazinatto; Giubilei, Frederico Nunes; Fuso, Rafael Rocco; Damião, Marcio José; Silva, Expedito Leite; Mikcha, Jane Graton; Hernandes, Luzmarina; Bersani Amado, Ciomar; Cuman, Roberto Kenji Nakamura

    2014-01-01

    .... This study investigated the hepatoprotective effect of Thymus vulgaris essential oil (TEO), which is used popularly for various beneficial effects, such as its antiseptic, carminative, and antimicrobial effects...

  5. Uranium and cesium accumulation in bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. var. vulgaris) and its potential for uranium rhizofiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Minjune; Jawitz, James W; Lee, Minhee

    2015-02-01

    Laboratory scale rhizofiltration experiments were performed to investigate uranium and cesium accumulation in bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. var. vulgaris) and its potential for treatment of uranium contaminated groundwater. During 72 h of rhizofiltration, the roots of the bean accumulated uranium and cesium to concentrations 317-1019 times above the initial concentrations, which ranged from 100 to 700 μg l(-1) in artificially contaminated solutions. When the pH of the solution was adjusted to 3, the ability to accumulate uranium was 1.6 times higher than it was for solutions of pH 7 and pH 9. With an initial uranium concentration of 240 μg l(-1) in genuine groundwater at pH 5, the bean reduced the uranium concentration by 90.2% (to 23.6 μg l(-1)) within 12 h and by 98.9% (to 2.8 μg l(-1)) within 72 h. A laboratory scale continuous clean-up system reduced uranium concentrations from 240 μg l(-1) to below 10 μg l(-1) in 56 h; the whole uranium concentration in the bean roots during system operation was more than 2600 μg g(-1) on a dry weight basis. Using SEM and EDS analyses, the uranium removal in solution at pH 7 was determined based on adsorption and precipitation on the root surface in the form of insoluble uranium compounds. The present results demonstrate that the rhizofiltration technique using beans efficiently removes uranium and cesium from groundwater as an eco-friendly and cost-effective method.

  6. Effect of starvation stress on morphological changes and production of adhesive exopolysaccharide (EPS by Proteus vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamila Myszka

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available   Background. Proteus vulgaris attach to available surfaces in industrial environments, can develop into extensive biofilm. Such bacterial layer is a potential source of contamination of foods that may lead to spoilage or transmission foodborne pathogens. The purpose of these investigations was to evaluate the influence of limited nutrients availability in the medium on the morphological changes and biosynthesis of bacterial surface-associated EPS by P. vulgaris. The relationship between the dimension of cells, EPS production and P. vulgaris biofilm development process on stainless steel surfaces (type 316L was also examined. Material and methods. P. vulgaris ATCC 6380 was used in this study. The cultures were incubated at 37°C on the Enterobacteriaceae enrichment broth according to Mossel [1962]. During the investigations the medium with optimal and 10 times diluted optimal of nutrient availability were used. For cells dimension analysis a Carl-Zeiss Axiovert 200 inverted microscope and a scanning electron microscope (LEO 435VP was applied. Isolation of exopolysaccharides was based on the procedure employed by Forde and Fitzgerald [1999]. To determine the level of P. vulgaris adhesion to the surface of stainless steel, the method described by Le Thi et al. [2001] was used. Results. In all experimental variants the area of P. vulgaris cells was changed upon long-term starvation. Altering of physical dimension of bacteria was effected by the decreasing value of the cell length. The change of P. vulgaris morphology promoted the beginning stages of biofilm formation process on the surface of stainless steel. Under starvation conditions P. vulgaris produced more EPS. It was observed with an increase of incubation period. These extracellular molecules initiated more advanced stages of P. vulgaris biofilm formation on examined surfaces. Conclusion. The data support the notion thatcellular factors influencing P. vulgaris adhesion process to abiotic

  7. XML Investigating the Phytochemical, Antibacterial and Antifungal Effects of Thymus Vulgaris and Cuminum Cyminum Essential Oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soghra Valizadeh (MSc

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the chemical composition, antibacterial and antifungal effects of Thymus vulgaris and Cuminum Cyminum essential oils against foodborne pathogens and Candida species in vitro. Methods: The essential oils were extracted from the aerial parts of Thymus vulgaris and dried Cuminum Cyminum seeds using a Clevenger apparatus for 3 hours. Analysis of the essential oils’ constituents was performed using gas chromatography-mass spectrophotometry. The antibacterial activity of Cuminum Cyminum essential oil and essential oil of Thymus vulgaris against Bacillus cereus, Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium were evaluated in agar culture medium. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of these essential oils against fungal strains of Candida albicans, C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis and C. dubliniensis was measured. Results: Thymol (64.45% and cuminaldehyde (29.02% were the main components of the essential oil of Thymus vulgaris and Cuminum Cyminum, respectively. The largest inhibition zone diameter in the essential oils of Thymus vulgaris and Cuminum Cyminum in the agar disk diffusion method was related to B. cereus with 30 and 21 mm diameter, respectively. The largest growth inhibition zone diameter by the essential oil of Thymus vulgaris in the well diffusion method was 21 mm and against B. cereus. The MIC of essential oil of Thymus vulgaris in the microdilution method was 0.09% against all the four Candida strains. The MIC of Cuminum Cyminum essential oil against strains of C. albicans and C. tropicalis was 0.39%, while it was found as 0.19% against C. parapsilosis and C. dubliniensis. Conclusion: In this study, Cuminum Cyminum essential oil and essential oil of Thymus vulgaris show suitable inhibitory effects against the growth of bacteria using well and disk diffusion methods. Regarding the antifungal effects, the MIC of essential oil of Thymus vulgaris is

  8. A meta-analysis of association between acne vulgaris and Demodex infestation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ya-e ZHAO; Li HU; Li-ping WU; Jun-xian MA

    2012-01-01

    Until now,etiology of acne vulgaris is still uncertain.Although clinicians usually deny the association between Demodex infestation and acne vulgaris,it has been proved in some clinical practices.To confirm the association between Demodex infestation and acne vulgaris,a meta-analysis was conducted.Predefined selection criteria were applied to search all published papers that analyzed the association between Demodex infestation and acne vulgaris (January 1950 to August 2011) in ISl Web of Knowledge,MEDLINE,and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) databases.A meta-analysis was performed to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs)based on fixed effects models or random effects models.We enrolled the 60 Chinese and 3 English papers in this meta-analysis,which covered Turkey and 25 different provinces/municipalities in China and 42130 participants including students and residents,aged from 1 to 78 years.The pooled OR in random effects models is 2.80 (95% Cl,2.34-3.36).Stability is robust according to sensitivity analysis.The fail-safe number is 18477,suggesting that at least 18477 articles with negative conclusions would be needed to reverse the conclusion that acne vulgaris was related to Demodex infestation.So the effect of publication bias was insignificant and could be ignored.It was concluded that acne vulgaris is associated with Demodex infestation.This indicates that when regular treatments for acne vulgaris are ineffective,examination of Demodex mites and necessary acaricidal therapies should be considered.

  9. The culture of Chlorella vulgaris with human urine in multibiological life support system experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Liu, Hong; Tong, Ling; Fu, Yuming; He, Wenting; Hu, Enzhu; Hu, Dawei

    The Integrative Experimental System (IES) was established as a tool to evaluate the rela-tionship of the subsystems in Bioregenerative Life Support System, and Multibiological Life Support System Experiments (MLSSE) have been conducted in the IES. The IES consists of a higher plant chamber, an animal chamber and a plate photo bioreactor (PPB) which cultivated lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.), silkworm (Bombyx Mori L.) and microalgae (Chlorella vulgaris), respectively. In MLSSE, four volunteers took turns breathing the system air through a tube connected with the animal chamber periodically. According to the CO2 concentration in the IES, the automotive control system of the PPB changed the light intensity regulating the photosynthesis of Chlorella vulgaris to make CO2 /O2 in the system maintain at stable levels. Chlorella vulgaris grew with human urine by carrying certain amount of alga liquid out of the bioreactor every day with synthetic urine replenished into the system, and O2 was regenerated, at the same time human urine was purified. Results showed that this IES worked stably and Chlorella vulgaris grew well; The culture of Chlorella vulgaris could be used to keep the balance of CO2 and O2 , and the change of light intensity could control the gas composition in the IES; Microalgae culture could be used in emergency in the system, the culture of Chlorella vulgaris could recover to original state in 5 days; 15.6 ml of condensation water was obtained every day by the culture of Chlorella vulgaris; The removal efficiencies of N, P in human urine could reach to 98.2% and 99.5%.

  10. Decreased eicosapentaenoic acid levels in acne vulgaris reveals the presence of a proinflammatory state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslan, İbrahim; Özcan, Filiz; Karaarslan, Taner; Kıraç, Ebru; Aslan, Mutay

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to determine circulating levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2), lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and measure circulating protein levels of angiopoietin-like protein 3 (ANGPTL3), ANGPTL4, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in patients with acne vulgaris. Serum from 21 control subjects and 31 acne vulgaris patients were evaluated for levels of arachidonic acid (AA, C20:4n- 6), dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid (DGLA, C20:3n-6), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, C20:5n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, C22:6n-3). PUFA levels were determined by an optimized multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) method using ultra fast-liquid chromatography (UFLC) coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Lipid profile, routine biochemical and hormone parameters were assayed by standard kit methods Serum EPA levels were significantly decreased while AA/EPA and DGLA/EPA ratio were significantly increased in acne vulgaris patients compared to controls. Serum levels of AA, DGLA and DHA showed no significant difference while activity of sPLA2 and LPL were significantly increased in acne vulgaris compared to controls. Results of this study reveal the presence of a proinflammatory state in acne vulgaris as shown by significantly decreased serum EPA levels and increased activity of sPLA2, AA/EPA and DGLA/EPA ratio. Increased LPL activity in the serum of acne vulgaris patients can be protective through its anti-dyslipidemic actions. This is the first study reporting altered EPA levels and increased sPLA2 activity in acne vulgaris and supports the use of omega-3 fatty acids as adjuvant treatment for acne patients.

  11. Carum copticum and Thymus vulgaris oils inhibit virulence in Trichophyton rubrum and Aspergillus spp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Sajjad Ahmad Khan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Emergence of drug-resistant strains has demanded for alternative means of combating fungal infections. Oils of Carum copticum and Thymus vulgaris have long been used in ethnomedicine for ailments of various fungal infections. Since their activity has not been reported in particular against drug-resistant fungi, this study was aimed to evaluate the effects of oils of C. copticum and T. vulgaris on the growth and virulence of drug-resistant strains of Aspergillus spp. and Trichophyton rubrum. The gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis revealed thymol constituting 44.71% and 22.82% of T. vulgaris and C. copticum, respectively. Inhibition of mycelial growth by essential oils was recorded in the order of thymol > T. vulgaris > C. copticum against the tested strains. RBC lysis assay showed no tested oils to be toxic even up to concentration two folds higher than their respective MFCs. Thymol exhibited highest synergy in combination with fluconazole against Aspergillus fumigatus MTCC2550 (FICI value 0.187 and T. rubrum IOA9 (0.156 as determined by checkerboard method. Thymol and T. vulgaris essential oil were equally effective against both the macro and arthroconidia growth (MIC 72 µg/mL. A > 80% reduction in elastase activity was recorded for A. fumigatus MTCC2550 by C. copticum, T. vulgaris oils and thymol. The effectiveness of these oils against arthroconidia and synergistic interaction of thymol and T. vulgaris with fluconazole can be exploited to potentiate the antifungal effects of fluconazole against drug-resistant strains of T. rubrum and Aspergillus spp.

  12. Carum copticum and Thymus vulgaris oils inhibit virulence in Trichophyton rubrum and Aspergillus spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohd Sajjad Ahmad; Ahmad, Iqbal; Cameotra, Swaranjit Singh

    2014-01-01

    Emergence of drug-resistant strains has demanded for alternative means of combating fungal infections. Oils of Carum copticum and Thymus vulgaris have long been used in ethnomedicine for ailments of various fungal infections. Since their activity has not been reported in particular against drug-resistant fungi, this study was aimed to evaluate the effects of oils of C. copticum and T. vulgaris on the growth and virulence of drug-resistant strains of Aspergillus spp. and Trichophyton rubrum. The gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis revealed thymol constituting 44.71% and 22.82% of T. vulgaris and C. copticum, respectively. Inhibition of mycelial growth by essential oils was recorded in the order of thymol > T. vulgaris > C. copticum against the tested strains. RBC lysis assay showed no tested oils to be toxic even up to concentration two folds higher than their respective MFCs. Thymol exhibited highest synergy in combination with fluconazole against Aspergillus fumigatus MTCC2550 (FICI value 0.187) and T. rubrum IOA9 (0.156) as determined by checkerboard method. Thymol and T. vulgaris essential oil were equally effective against both the macro and arthroconidia growth (MIC 72 μg/mL). A > 80% reduction in elastase activity was recorded for A. fumigatus MTCC2550 by C. copticum, T. vulgaris oils and thymol. The effectiveness of these oils against arthroconidia and synergistic interaction of thymol and T. vulgaris with fluconazole can be exploited to potentiate the antifungal effects of fluconazole against drug-resistant strains of T. rubrum and Aspergillus spp.

  13. Inhibition of lentivirus replication by aqueous extracts of Prunella vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hauck Cathy

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Various members of the mint family have been used historically in Chinese and Native American medicine. Many of these same family members, including Prunella vulgaris, have been reported to have anti-viral activities. To further characterize the anti-lentiviral activities of P. vulgaris, water and ethanol extractions were tested for their ability to inhibit equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV replication. Results Aqueous extracts contained more anti-viral activity than did ethanol extracts, displaying potent anti-lentiviral activity against virus in cell lines as well as in primary cell cultures with little to no cellular cytotoxicity. Time-of-addition studies demonstrated that the extracts were effective when added during the first four h of the viral life cycle, suggesting that the botanical constituents were targeting the virion itself or early entry events. Further analysis revealed that the extracts did not destroy EIAV virion integrity, but prevented viral particles from binding to the surface of permissive cells. Modest levels of anti-EIAV activity were also detected when the cells were treated with the extracts prior to infection, indicating that anti-EIAV botanical constituents could interact with both viral particles and permissive cells to interfere with infectivity. Size fractionation of the extract demonstrated that eight of the nine fractions generated from aqueous extracts displayed anti-viral activity. Separation of ethanol soluble and insoluble compounds in the eight active fractions revealed that ethanol-soluble constituents were responsible for the anti-viral activity in one fraction whereas ethanol-insoluble constituents were important for the anti-viral activity in two of the other fractions. In three of the five fractions that lost activity upon sub-fractionation, anti-viral activity was restored upon reconstitution of the fractions, indicating that synergistic anti-viral activity is present in several

  14. Protective Effect of Zizphus Vulgaris Extract, on Liver Toxicity in Laboratory Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Ebrahimi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Some of natural and synthetic products have antioxidant properties which protect the liver against the destructive factors. This study aimed to investigate the effect of Zizphus Vulgaris extracts on mice liver. Materials & Methods: This experimental study was conducted at Yasouj University of Medical Sciences in 2010 on 30 healthy adult male Wistar rats. Animals were randomly divided into five equal groups: the control group (receiving, olive oil, control group (receiving olive oil and carbon tetrachloride and three intervention groups (receiving different dose of carbon tetrachloride and olive oil groups. The intervention group was given daily doses of 200, 400 and 600 mg per Kg of Zizphus Vulgaris extract by gavage respectively. After 45 days, the amount of liver enzymes, total protein, albumin and bilirubin in animal’s sera were measured. Data were analyzed by the SPSS software, using ANOVA and t-test. Results: The concentration of total protein, albumin, AST, ALT, ALP in test groups I, II and III receiving Z.Vulgaris extract (200, 400 and 600 mg/kg weight compared with control group were statistically not significant. Consumption of Z.Vulgaris reduced the bilirubin concentration in test groups I and II but this decrease was significant only in the test group I Increasing of Z.Vulgaris dose in the test group III (600 mg Z.Vulgaris per kg body weight showed increase in the level of serum bilirubin. Increase in the ratio of liver weight to body weight of rats in groups I and III in comparison with control groups was noticed although this difference was not statistically significant. Findings of this study revealed that dosage of 600 mg/kg extract of Z.Vulgaris caused significant improvements in CCl4 induced liver necrosis (P <0.01 and reduced portal cells inflammation (P <0.01. Dose of 400 mg/kg of Z.Vulgaris induced some destruction and necrosis of liver cells in animals but significant reduction of portal cells

  15. Orally administered extract from Prunella vulgaris attenuates spontaneous colitis in mdr1a-/-mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kelley; MK; Haarberg; Meghan; J; Wymore; Brand; Anne-Marie; C; Overstreet; Catherine; C; Hauck; Patricia; A; Murphy; Jesse; M; Hostetter; Amanda; E; Ramer-Tait; Michael; J; Wannemuehler

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the ability of a Prunella vulgaris(P. vulgaris) ethanolic extract to attenuate spontaneous typhlocolitis in mdr1a-/- mice. METHODS: Vehicle(5% ethanol) or P. vulgaris ethanolic extract(2.4 mg/d) were administered daily by oral gavage to mdr1a-/- or wild type FVBWT mice from 6 wk of age up to 20 wk of age. Clinical signs of disease were noted by monitoring weight loss. Mice experiencingweight loss in excess of 15% were removed from the study. At the time mice were removed from the study, blood and colon tissue were collected for analyses that included histological evaluation of lesions, inflammatory cytokine levels, and myeloperoxidase activity. RESULTS: Administration of P. vulgaris extracts to mdr1a-/- mice delayed onset of colitis and reduced severity of mucosal inflammation when compared to vehicle-treated mdr1a-/- mice. Oral administration of the P. vulgaris extract resulted in reduced(P < 0.05) serum levels of IL-10(4.6 ± 2 vs 19.4 ± 4), CXCL9(1319.0 ± 277 vs 3901.0 ± 858), and TNFα(9.9 ± 3 vs 14.8 ± 1) as well as reduced gene expression by more than two-fold for Ccl2, Ccl20, Cxcl1, Cxcl9, IL-1 α, Mmp10, VCAM-1, ICAM, IL-2, and TNFα in the colonic mucosa of mdr1a-/- mice compared to vehicle-treated mdr1a-/-mice. Histologically, several microscopic parameters were reduced(P < 0.05) in P. vulgaris-treated mdr1a-/-mice, as was myeloperoxidase activity in the colon(2.49 ± 0.16 vs 3.36 ± 0.06, P < 0.05). The numbers of CD4+ T cells(2031.9 ± 412.1 vs 5054.5 ± 809.5) and germinal center B cells(2749.6 ± 473.7 vs 4934.0 ± 645.9) observed in the cecal tonsils of P. vulgaris-treated mdr1a-/- were significantly reduced(P < 0.05) from vehicle-treated mdr1a-/- mice. Vehicle-treated mdr1a-/- mice were found to produce serum antibodies to antigens derived from members of the intestinal microbiota, indicative of severe colitis and a loss of adaptive tolerance to the members of the microbiota. These serum antibodies were greatly reduced or

  16. Effects of magnetic field on the antioxidant defense system of recirculation-cultured Chlorella vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hai-Ying; Zeng, Xiao-Bo; Guo, Si-Yuan; Li, Zong-Tao

    2008-01-01

    Little is known about the influence of magnetic fields (MF) on growth of microalgae such as Chlorella vulgaris, which has been consumed as health food for various nutritional and pharmacological effects. This preliminary study investigated whether static MF can modulate the antioxidant system in C. vulgaris by exposing the cells to static MF generated by dual yoke electromagnets with magnetic flux density of 10-50 mT for 12 h. After exposure to 10-35 mT for 12 h, the activity of superoxide dismutases and peroxidase increased significantly compared to control cells. However, a remarkable increase of catalase activity occurred at 45 and 50 mT. The lipid peroxidation of algae cells determined by production of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances was much increased when exposed to 35, 45, and 50 mT of MF. The scavenging ability of 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical was decreased markedly while there was no variation of total carotenoids content in C. vulgaris cells. Assay of specific growth rate in 72 h cultivation after MF exposure was also conducted. In groups after exposure to 10-35 mT of MF, specific growth rate was significantly increased. These results suggest that 10-35 mT of static MF exposure could promote the growth of C. vulgaris and regulate its antioxidant defense system to protect cells efficiently, which could possibly enhance the growth of C. vulgaris in industrialized cultivation by MF.

  17. Magnesium Uptake by the Green Microalga Chlorella vulgaris in Batch Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Amor-Ben Ayed, Hela; Taidi, Behnam; Ayadi, Habib; Pareau, Dominique; Stambouli, Moncef

    2016-03-01

    The accumulation (internal and superficial distribution) of magnesium ions (Mg(2+)) by the green freshwater microalga Chlorella vulgaris (C. vulgaris) was investigated under autotrophic culture in a stirred photobioreactor. The concentrations of the three forms of Mg(2+) (dissolved, extracellular, and intracellular) were determined with atomic absorption spectroscopy during the course of C. vulgaris growth. The proportions of adsorbed (extracellular) and absorbed (intracellular) Mg(2+) were quantified. The concentration of the most important pigment in algal cells, chlorophyll a, increased over time in proportion to the increase in the biomass concentration, indicating a constant chlorophyll/biomass ratio during the linear growth phase. The mean-average rate of Mg(2+) uptake by C. vulgaris grown in a culture medium starting with 16 mg/l of Mg(2+) concentration was measured. A clear relationship between the biomass concentration and the proportion of the Mg(2+) removal from the medium was observed. Of the total Mg(2+) present in the culture medium, 18% was adsorbed on the cell wall and 51% was absorbed by the biomass by the end of the experiment (765 h). Overall, 69% of the initial Mg(2+) were found to be removed from the medium. This study supported the kinetic model based on a reversible first-order reaction for Mg(2+) bioaccumulation in C. vulgaris, which was consistent with the experimental data.

  18. Mechanisms of Eu(III) and Cm(III) Association With Chlorella Vulgaris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozaki, T.; Kimura, T.; Ohnuki, T.; Francis, A. J.

    2002-12-01

    Association of Eu(III) and Cm(III) with Chlorella vulgaris and cellulose was studied by a batch method, time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS). The kinetics study performed by a batch method showed that the maximum adsorption of Eu(III) and Cm(III) on C. vulgaris was attained within three minutes of contact time, and afterwards the percentage adsorption decreased with time due to exudates released from C. vulgaris with affinity for Eu(III) and Cm(III). TRLFS showed that the short-term adsorption of Eu(III) on C. vulgaris was attributed to their coordination with the cell wall components comprised of cellulose. TRLFS also demonstrated that Eu(III) coordinated with the functional groups of cellulose very weakly in spite of the large distribution coefficients observed. EXAFS analysis showed the local structure around the Eu(III) adsorbed on cellulose and with C. vulgaris was similar. These results indicate that the reactions both at cell surfaces through the adsorption as well as in solution phases through chelation with the exudates are important in estimating the environmental behavior of Eu(III) and Cm(III) in aqueous environments.

  19. Development of novel microsatellite markers for strain-specific identification of Chlorella vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Beom-Ho; Lee, Chang Soo; Song, Hae-Ryong; Lee, Hyung-Gwan; Oh, Hee-Mock

    2014-09-01

    A strain-specific identification method is required to secure Chlorella strains with useful genetic traits, such as a fast growth rate or high lipid productivity, for application in biofuels, functional foods, and pharmaceuticals. Microsatellite markers based on simple sequence repeats can be a useful tool for this purpose. Therefore, this study developed five novel microsatellite markers (mChl-001, mChl-002, mChl-005, mChl-011, and mChl-012) using specific loci along the chloroplast genome of Chlorella vulgaris. The microsatellite markers were characterized based on their allelic diversities among nine strains of C. vulgaris with the same 18S rRNA sequence similarity. Each microsatellite marker exhibited 2~5 polymorphic allele types, and their combinations allowed discrimination between seven of the C. vulgaris strains. The two remaining strains were distinguished using one specific interspace region between the mChl-001 and mChl-005 loci, which was composed of about 27 single nucleotide polymorphisms, 13~15 specific sequence sites, and (T)n repeat sites. Thus, the polymorphic combination of the five microsatellite markers and one specific locus facilitated a clear distinction of C. vulgaris at the strain level, suggesting that the proposed microsatellite marker system can be useful for the accurate identification and classification of C. vulgaris.

  20. Quality of life in acne vulgaris: Relationship to clinical severity and demographic data

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    Aayush Gupta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acne vulgaris is known to impair many aspects of quality of life. However, the correlation of this impairment with clinical severity remains equivocal despite various school, community and hospital-based studies. Aim: A hospital-based study was undertaken to measure the impairment of quality of life of patients of acne vulgaris and correlate it with the severity of lesions. Methods: This was a cross-sectional, questionnaire-based study in a cohort of 100 patients of acne vulgaris attending the outpatient department of our referral hospital. A physician measured the severity of lesions using the global acne grading system, and patients assessed quality of life by completing a questionnaire (Cardiff acne disability index. A correlation of these two was done; some additional correlations were brought out through demographic data collected from the patients. Results: There was no correlation between the severity of acne vulgaris and an impaired quality of life. Patients who consumed alcohol and/or smoked cigarettes were found to have an impaired quality of life. While the severity of acne progressively lessened in older patients, the impact on quality of life increased. Limitations: The sample size was small and there was a lack of guaranteed reliability on the self-reported quality of life. Conclusion: The severity of acne vulgaris does not correlate with impairment in quality of life.

  1. The use of sodium sulfacetamide 10%-sulfur 5% emollient foam in the treatment of acne vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Rosso, James Q

    2009-08-01

    Acne vulgaris is the most common disorder encountered in ambulatory clinical practice comprising 11.3 percent of office visits to dermatologists in 2005.(1) By comparison, eczematous dermatoses, psoriasis, and skin cancer accounted for 6.2, 3.5, and 10 percent of office visits, respectively.(1) A variety of topical therapeutic options are available for treatment of acne vulgaris, including benzoyl peroxide, antibiotics, retinoids, azelaic acid, and sodium sulfacetamide-sulfur.(2,3) Sodium sulfacetamide 10%-sulfur 5% has been used for the topical treatment of seborrheic dermatitis, acne vulgaris, and rosacea since the mid-1950s and is available in a variety of formulations, including lotions, creams, cleansers, and emollient foams.(4) Recently, an emollient foam sodium sulfacetamide 10%-sulfur 5% formulation indicated for topical therapy of acne vulgaris, rosacea, and seborrheic dermatitis has become available.(5) This article provides an overview of the sodium sulfacetamide 10%-sulfur 5% emollient foam and reports the results of a case report series of patients with acne vulgaris treated with sodium sulfacetamide 10%-sulfur 5% emollient foam as monotherapy or in combination with other topical acne products.

  2. The Optimizing of Growth and Quality of Chlorella vulgaris as ASUH feed supplement for Broiler

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    Salvia Salvia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chlorella is spherical single celled freshwater micro-algae.   Chlorella  has potentials as element of ration or natural ASUH (safe, healthy, whole and halal feed supplement for it contains nutrition and active component, decreases cholesterol level and resulting darker yolk.  Chlorella vulgaris  is type of green algae   which, its economical potential need to be revealed. Variety of components of growing media is one of factors determining quality of microalgae. In terms of mass production, it is important to find correct, cheap and easy to feed nutrition for breeders. The objective of the research is to find out the optimizing of growth and quality of Chlorella vulgaris   as ASUH feed supplement for broiler. Test using sedgwick rafter method conducted to find out the optimizing of growth and quality of  Chlorella vulgaris  while AOAC method applied to test quality of its nutrition. The result shows that.  Chlorella vulgaris  grew well at technical medium 10 % of Phyto-s, crude protein 57.63%, fat  5.84%, b Carotene 6.44 mg/gram, Vitamin C 4.12 mg/gram and vitamin E 1.32 mg/gram. We can say that Chlorella vulgaris  potential to be natural and ASUH feed supplement and Phyto-s can be used as nutrition for mass production.

  3. Evaluating of Life Quality in Patients with Acne Vulgaris Using Generic and Specific Questionnaires

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    Reza Ghaderi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Acne vulgaris is a common skin disease that can adversely affect the quality of life of patients. Objective. The aim of this study was to determine the quality of life in patients with acne vulgaris. Methods. This study was carried out on 70 patients with acne vulgaris (28 males, 42 females. All the patients filled out two Persian versions of questionnaires: short form 36 (SF-36 and Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI. The obtained data were analyzed by using SPSS software (version 17. Results. The scores for physical functioning, social functioning, and bodily pain domains in patients were over 70%, but the scores for role physical, general health, vitality, role emotional, and mental health in patients were under 70%. Scores on the DLQI in patients with acne vulgaris ranged from 0 to 22 (mean ± SD, 8.18 ± 4.83. After comparing mean score of DLQI with respect to gender and age, it was found that the difference between the two groups was not statistically significant. Conclusion. Acne vulgaris has a significant effect on the quality of life. There was not any significant gender or age related difference in QOL.

  4. Efficacy of Essential Oils of Thymus vulgaris and Origanum vulgare on Echinococcus granulosus

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    P. E. Pensel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present work was to determine the in vitro effect of T. vulgaris and O. vulgare essential oils against E. granulosus protoscoleces and cysts. Essential oils were added to the medium resulting in thymol final concentrations of 10 μg/mL. The essential oils had a time-dependent effect provoking the complete loss of protoscolex viability after 72 days of postincubation. The results were confirmed at the ultrastructure level. Loss of infectivity in protoscoleces incubated with O. vulgare after 60 days was observed. On the other hand, the weight of cysts recorded in mice inoculated with T. vulgaris treated protoscoleces was significantly lower than that obtained in control group. Gamma-glutamyl-transpeptidase activity was readily detected in the culture supernatant of protoscoleces treated either with the essential oils or thymol. T. vulgaris and O. vulgare essential oils and thymol can induce cell apoptosis of protoscoleces after short incubation times. The efficacy of T. vulgaris and O. vulgare essential oils was also demonstrated in vitro on E. granulosus murine cysts. Our data suggest that essential oils of T. vulgaris and O. vulgare have anthelmintic effect against protoscoleces and cysts of E. granulosus.

  5. Decreased profilaggrin expression in ichthyosis vulgaris is a result of selectively impaired posttranscriptional control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirunsuksiri, W; Presland, R B; Brumbaugh, S G; Dale, B A; Fleckman, P

    1995-01-13

    Ichthyosis vulgaris is an autosomal dominant disorder of keratinization characterized by mild hyperkeratosis and reduced or absent keratohyalin granules in the epidermis. Profilaggrin, a major component of keratohyalin granules, is reduced or absent from the skin of individuals with ichthyosis vulgaris. In this report, we have further characterized the molecular basis of low profilaggrin expression, which occurs in this disease. In situ hybridization revealed little profilaggrin mRNA in ichthyosis vulgaris-affected epidermis. In keratinocytes cultured from the epidermis of affected individuals, the abundance of profilaggrin was reduced to less than 10% of normal controls, while the mRNA level was decreased to 30-60% of controls. Expression of K1 and loricrin, other markers of epidermal differentiation, were not affected. Nuclear run-on assays indicated that the decrease in mRNA levels was not caused by aberrant transcription. Nucleotide sequencing of 5'-upstream, 3'-non-coding, and flanking regions of the profilaggrin gene from ichthyosis vulgaris-affected individuals revealed only minor changes, probably due to genetic polymorphisms. Our results indicate that defective profilaggrin expression in ichthyosis vulgaris is a result of selectively impaired posttranscriptional control.

  6. Efficacy of Essential Oils of Thymus vulgaris and Origanum vulgare on Echinococcus granulosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pensel, P E; Maggiore, M A; Gende, L B; Eguaras, M J; Denegri, M G; Elissondo, M C

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to determine the in vitro effect of T. vulgaris and O. vulgare essential oils against E. granulosus protoscoleces and cysts. Essential oils were added to the medium resulting in thymol final concentrations of 10 μg/mL. The essential oils had a time-dependent effect provoking the complete loss of protoscolex viability after 72 days of postincubation. The results were confirmed at the ultrastructure level. Loss of infectivity in protoscoleces incubated with O. vulgare after 60 days was observed. On the other hand, the weight of cysts recorded in mice inoculated with T. vulgaris treated protoscoleces was significantly lower than that obtained in control group. Gamma-glutamyl-transpeptidase activity was readily detected in the culture supernatant of protoscoleces treated either with the essential oils or thymol. T. vulgaris and O. vulgare essential oils and thymol can induce cell apoptosis of protoscoleces after short incubation times. The efficacy of T. vulgaris and O. vulgare essential oils was also demonstrated in vitro on E. granulosus murine cysts. Our data suggest that essential oils of T. vulgaris and O. vulgare have anthelmintic effect against protoscoleces and cysts of E. granulosus.

  7. In vitro activity of heather [Calluna vulgaris (L.) Hull] extracts on selected urinary tract pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vučić, Dragana M.; Petković, Miroslav R.; Rodić-Grabovac, Branka B.; Stefanović, Olgica D.; Vasić, Sava M.; Čomić, Ljiljana R.

    2014-01-01

    Calluna vulgaris L. Hull (Ericaceae) has been used for treatment of urinary tract infections in traditional medicine. In this study we analyzed in vitro antibacterial activity of the plant extracts on different strains of Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis and Proteus vulgaris, as well as the concentrations of total phenols and flavonoids in the extracts. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) were determined. The concentrations of total phenols were examined by using Folin-Ciocalteu reagent and ranged between 67.55 to 142.46 mg GAE/g. The concentrations of flavonoids in extracts were determined using spectrophotometric method with aluminum chloride and the values ranged from 42.11 to 63.68 mg RUE/g. The aqueous extract of C. vulgaris showed a significant antibacterial activity. The values of MIC were in the range from 2.5 mg/ml to 20 mg/ml for this extract. Proteus vulgaris strains were found to be the most sensitive. The results obtained suggest that all tested extracts of C. vulgaris inhibit the growth of human pathogens, especially the aqueous extract. PMID:25428676

  8. Polymorphism of the catechol-O-methyltransferase gene in Han Chinese patients with psoriasis vulgaris

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    Lin Gao

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Psoriasis vulgaris is defined by a series of linked cellular changes in the skin: hyperplasia of epidermal keratinocytes, vascular hyperplasia and ectasia, and infiltration of T lymphocytes, neutrophils and other types of leukocytes in the affected skin. Catechol-O-methyltransferase ( COMT 158 polymorphism can reduce the activity of the COMT enzyme that may trigger defective differentiation of keratinocytes in psoriasis. Immunocytes can degrade and inactivate catecholamines via monamine oxidase (MAO and COMT in the cells. We hypothesized that the COMT-158 G > A polymorphism was associated with the risk of psoriasis vulgaris in Han Chinese people. In a hospital-based case-control study, 524 patients with psoriasis vulgaris and 549 psoriasis-free controls were studied. COMT-158 G > A polymorphism was genotyped using the PCR sequence-specific primer (PCR-SSP technique. We found no statistically significant association between the COMT-158 allele A and the risk of psoriasis vulgaris (p = 0.739 adjusted OR = 1.03; 95% CI = 0.81-1.31. This suggests that the COMT-158 G > A polymorphism may not contribute to the etiology of psoriasis vulgaris in the Han Chinese population.

  9. Efficacy of Essential Oils of Thymus vulgaris and Origanum vulgare on Echinococcus granulosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pensel, P. E.; Maggiore, M. A.; Gende, L. B.; Eguaras, M. J.; Denegri, M. G.; Elissondo, M. C.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to determine the in vitro effect of T. vulgaris and O. vulgare essential oils against E. granulosus protoscoleces and cysts. Essential oils were added to the medium resulting in thymol final concentrations of 10 μg/mL. The essential oils had a time-dependent effect provoking the complete loss of protoscolex viability after 72 days of postincubation. The results were confirmed at the ultrastructure level. Loss of infectivity in protoscoleces incubated with O. vulgare after 60 days was observed. On the other hand, the weight of cysts recorded in mice inoculated with T. vulgaris treated protoscoleces was significantly lower than that obtained in control group. Gamma-glutamyl-transpeptidase activity was readily detected in the culture supernatant of protoscoleces treated either with the essential oils or thymol. T. vulgaris and O. vulgare essential oils and thymol can induce cell apoptosis of protoscoleces after short incubation times. The efficacy of T. vulgaris and O. vulgare essential oils was also demonstrated in vitro on E. granulosus murine cysts. Our data suggest that essential oils of T. vulgaris and O. vulgare have anthelmintic effect against protoscoleces and cysts of E. granulosus. PMID:25180033

  10. Epidemiology of pemphigus vulgaris in the Northeast China: a 10-year retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaoling; Pan, Jisheng; Yu, Zhiming; Wang, Yanhua; Cai, Limin; Zheng, Shuyun

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the incidence, epidemiological, clinical and therapeutic features of patients with pemphigus vulgaris in China. We retrospectively investigated a total of 221 patients with pemphigus vulgaris. The parameters including age at diagnosis/onset, sex, diagnostic methods, hospitalizations, side-effects with different treatments, pemphigus vulgaris-associated diseases, the therapeutic features and duration of follow up were evaluated. The male : female ratio was 1:1.40. The incidence rate was obviously higher in two age groups, 31-40 years and 41-50 years. The mean age at onset was 44.19 ± 21.45 years. The majority of patients (56.56%) presented the mucocutaneous type. In addition, we found that various doses of corticosteroids (including the mean initial dose, maximum control dose, total dose before reducing and hospitalized total dose) exhibited statistical differences between only corticosteroids and corticosteroids-immunosuppressant groups in mild, moderate and severe pemphigus vulgaris (P pemphigus vulgaris most frequently occurred in the 41-50-year age group in China and the majority of patients manifested mucocutaneous lesions. Importantly, the incidence rate in females was higher than in males. The patients who needed combined immunosuppressant treatment, usually needed higher doses of corticosteroids initially, to control the disease and over the total course of treatment.

  11. The use of biochip immunofluorescence microscopy for the diagnosis of Pemphigus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Irene; Saponeri, Andrea; Peserico, Andrea; Alaibac, Mauro

    2014-06-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris is an autoimmune intraepithelial blistering skin disease characterized by the presence of circulating autoantibodies directed against surfaces of keratinocytes. Diagnosis is generally based on clinical features, histology, direct and indirect immunofluorescence and ELISA. This study describes a new BIOCHIP mosaic-based indirect immunofluorescence technique based on recombinant antigenic substrates and transfected cells. We investigated the diagnostic use of BIOCHIP for the serological diagnosis of Pemphigus vulgaris. Autoantibodies against desmoglein 3 were detected in 97.62% of patients (41/42) with P. vulgaris. There were no positive results in the negative control group. Our study revealed that BIOCHIP has high sensitivity and specificity comparable to that of the ELISA assays. Therefore the BIOCHIP technique seems to be an appropriate method for the diagnosis of P. vulgaris as it has been shown to be a simple, standardized and readily available novel tool, which could facilitate the diagnosis of this autoimmune bullous disease. We suggest that it could be used as an initial screening test to identify patients with P. vulgaris before using the ELISA approach.

  12. Association of HSD17B3 and HSD3B1 polymorphisms with acne vulgaris in Southwestern Han Chinese.

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    Yang, Xiao-Yan; Wu, Wen-Juan; Yang, Cheng; Yang, Ting; He, Jun-Dong; Yang, Zhi; He, Li

    2013-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is a very common skin disorder. Previous studies have indicated that genetic background factors play key roles in the onset of acne. Our previous investigation implicated several genes in the androgen metabolism pathway with acne vulgaris in the Han Chinese population. Thus, we further investigated genes and genetic variants that play important roles in this pathway for their relationship with the pathology of acne. In this study, a total of 610 subjects, including 403 acne patients and 207 healthy controls, were genotyped for 15 single-nucleotide polymorphisms in HSD3B1 and HSD17B3 genes. This study shows that rs6428829 in HSD3B1 was associated with acne vulgaris in Han patients from Southwest China, even after adjusting for age and sex. The GG genotype was associated with an increased risk of acne vulgaris (p acne vulgaris (p acne vulgaris in the case-control study (p acne vulgaris. Based on these analyses, our study indicates that the cutaneous androgen metabolism-regulated genes HSD3B1 and HSD17B3 increase the susceptibility to acne vulgaris in Han Chinese from Southwest China.

  13. A study on aromatic profiles of Thymus hyemalis and Spanish T. vulgaris essential oils at five physiological stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrubs of clonal selections of Thymus hyemalis L. and Spanish T. vulgaris subsp. vulgaris were harvested at five phenological stages during the plant growing cycle: vegetative (VEG), floral (FL), floral-fructification (FL-FR), fructification (FR), and passed fructification (FR-pas). The volatile pro...

  14. The inhibitory effect of Thymus vulgaris extracts on the planktonic form and biofilm structures of six human pathogenic bacteria

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    Zinab Mohsenipour

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Microorganisms are responsible for many problems in industry and medicine because of biofilm formation. Therefore, this study was aimed to examine the effect of Thymus vulgaris (T. vulgaris extracts on the planktonic form and biofilm structures of six pathogenic bacteria. Materials and methods: Antimicrobial activities of the plant extracts against the planktonic form of the bacteria were determined using the disc diffusion method. MIC and MBC values were evaluated using macrobroth dilution technique. Anti-biofilm effects were assessed by microtiter plate method. Results: According to disc diffusion test (MIC and MBC, the ability of Thymus vulgaris (T. vulgaris extracts for inhibition of bacteria in planktonic form was confirmed. In dealing with biofilm structures, the inhibitory effect of the extracts was directly correlated to their concentration. Except for the inhibition of biofilm formation, efficacy of each extract was independent from type of solvent. Conclusion: According to the potential of Thymus vulgaris (T. vulgaris extracts to inhibit the test bacteria in planktonic and biofilm form, it can be suggested that Thymus vulgaris(T. vulgaris extracts can be applied as antimicrobial agents against the pathogenic bacteria particularly in biofilm forms.

  15. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of different organic crude extracts from the local medicinal plant of Thymus vulgaris L

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Laila Salim Al Hashmi; Mohammad Amzad Hossain; Afaf Mohammed Weli; Qasim Al-Riyami; Jamal Nasser Al-Sabahi

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To isolate and analyze the chemical composition in different crude extracts of from the leaves of locally grown of Thymus vulgaris L (T. vulgaris) by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Methods: The shade dried leaves powder was extracted with methanol by using Soxhlet extractor. Methanol crude extracts of T. vulgaris and the derived fractions of hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate and butanol were obtained. Results: Qualitative analyses of various organic crude extracts of T. vulgaris by using GC-MS showed that there were different types of high and low molecular weight compounds. Most of the isolated and identified compounds by GC-MS in the crude extracts are basically biologically important. Further, the T. vulgaris leaf possessed certain characteristics that can be ascribed to cultivation on a domestic plantation. The crude extracts were prepared from the powder leaves of T. vulgaris for respective compounds can be chosen on the basis of above GC-MS analysis. Conclusions: All the major compounds were identified and characterized by spectroscopic method in different organic crude extracts of T. vulgaris are biologically active molecules. Thus the identification of a good number of compounds in various crude extracts of T. vulgaris might have some ecological role.

  16. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of different organic crude extracts from the local medicinal plant of Thymus vulgaris L

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Laila; Salim; Al; Hashmi; Mohammad; Amzad; Hossain; Afaf; Mohammed; Weli; Qasim; Al-Riyami; Jamal; Nasser; Al-Sabahi

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To isolate and analyze the chemical composition in different crude extracts of from the leaves of locally grown of Thymus vulgaris L(T.vulgaris)by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry(GC-MS).Methods:The shade dried leaves powder was extracted with methanol by using Soxhlet extractor.Methanol crude extracts of T.vulgaris and the derived fractions of hexane,chloroform,ethyl acetate and butanol were obtained.Results:Qualitative analyses of various organic crude extracts of T.vulgaris by using GC-MS showed that there were different types of high and low molecular weight compounds.Most of the isolated and identified compounds by GC-MS in the crude extracts are basically biologically important.Further,the T.vulgaris leaf possessed certain characteristics that can be ascribed to cultivation on a domestic plantation.The crude extracts were prepared from the powder leaves of T.vulgaris for respective compounds can be chosen on the basis of above GC-MS analysis.Conclusions:All the major compounds were identified and characterized by spectroscopic method in different organic crude extracts of T.vulgaris are biologically active molecules.Thus the identification of a good number of compounds in various crude extracts of T.vulgaris might have some ecological role.

  17. Gas chromatography–mass spectrometry analysis of different organic crude extracts from the local medicinal plant of Thymus vulgaris L

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    Laila Salim Al Hashmi

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: All the major compounds were identified and characterized by spectroscopic method in different organic crude extracts of T. vulgaris are biologically active molecules. Thus the identification of a good number of compounds in various crude extracts of T. vulgaris might have some ecological role.

  18. Atividade antimicrobiana de Struthanthus vulgaris (erva-de-passarinho Antimicrobial activity of Struthantus vulgaris (erva-de-passarinho

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    O.M.C. Vieira

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available As plantas do gênero Struthanthus são conhecidas como ervas-de-passarinho e parasitam pomares no Brasil, principalmente os de laranjeiras e goiabeiras. Na medicina popular são usadas nas afecções das vias respiratórias. O extrato hidroetanólico a 70% de folhas frescas de Struthanthus vulgaris apresentou atividade antimicrobiana contra amostras bacterianas Gram positiva e Gram negativa. Este extrato não apresentou, nas condições testadas, atividade contra fungos. As amostras bacterianas mais sensíveis ao extrato foram Bacillus cereus (ATCC 11778, Micrococcus luteus (ATCC 9341, Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 6538, S. epidermidis (ATCC 12228 e P. aeruginosa (ATCC 27853, usando o método de difusão em agar. As frações obtidas, pela partição líquido-líquido do extrato hidroetanólico a 70%, com solventes de polaridades crescentes (clorofórmio, acetato de etila, n-butanol e água, apresentaram diferentes atividades inibitórias. A fração que apresentou a maior atividade contra bactéria Gram positiva (B. cereus e Gram negativa (P. aeruginosa foi aquela obtida com n-butanol. Nessa fração foram detectados flavonóides, taninos condensados (proantocianidinas e saponinas.Struthantus vulgaris (mistletoe is one of the most common hemiparasite species in Brazil. It occurs as a parasite of orchards, mainly in orange and guava trees. Some authors mention Struthantus use in traditional medicine for respiratory diseases treatment. Fresh leaves concentrated hydroalcoholic extract showed antimicrobial activity against Gram positive and Gram negative bacterial samples. In tested conditions, these extracts did not show activity against fungi. The more susceptible bacterial samples to fresh leaves hydroalcoholic extract were Bacillus cereus (ATCC 11778, Micrococcus luteus (ATCC 9341, Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 6538, S. epidermidis (ATCC 12228 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 27853. The method used for assessment of antimicrobial activity was agar

  19. Use of diluted urine for cultivation of Chlorella vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaatinen, Sanna; Lakaniemi, Aino-Maija; Rintala, Jukka

    2016-01-01

    Our aim was to study the biomass growth of microalga Chlorella vulgaris using diluted human urine as a sole nutrient source. Batch cultivations (21 days) were conducted in five different urine dilutions (1:25-1:300), in 1:100-diluted urine as such and with added trace elements, and as a reference, in artificial growth medium. The highest biomass density was obtained in 1:100-diluted urine with and without additional trace elements (0.73 and 0.60 g L(-1), respectively). Similar biomass growth trends and densities were obtained with 1:25- and 1:300-diluted urine (0.52 vs. 0.48 gVSS L(-1)) indicating that urine at dilution 1:25 can be used to cultivate microalgal based biomass. Interestingly, even 1:300-diluted urine contained sufficiently nutrients and trace elements to support biomass growth. Biomass production was similar despite pH-variation from < 5 to 9 in different incubations indicating robustness of the biomass growth. Ammonium formation did not inhibit overall biomass growth. At the beginning of cultivation, the majority of the biomass consisted of living algal cells, while towards the end, their share decreased and the estimated share of bacteria and cell debris increased.

  20. Indocyanine green-laser thermolysis of acne vulgaris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genina, Elina A.; Bashkatov, Alexey N.; Simonenko, Georgy V.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Yaroslavsky, Ilya V.; Altshuler, Gregory B.

    2005-08-01

    The near-infrared (NIR) laser radiation due to its high penetration depth is widely used in phototherapy and photothermolysis. In application to skin appendages a high selectivity of laser treatment is needed to prevent light action on surrounding tissues. Indocyanine Green (ICG) dye may provide a high selectivity of treatment due to effective ICG uploading by a target and its narrow band of considerable absorption just at the wavelength of the NIR diode laser. The goal of this study is to demonstrate the efficacy of the NIR diode laser photothermolysis in combination with topical application of ICG suggested for treatment of acne vulgaris. Two volunteers with back-located acne were enrolled. Skin sites of subjects were stained by ICG and irradiated by NIR laser-diode light (803 or 809 nm). The individual acne lesions were photothermally treated at 18 W/cm2 (803 nm, 0.5 sec) without skin surface cooling or at 200 W/cm2 (809 nm, 0.5 sec) with cooling. The results of the observations during a month after the treatment have shown that ICG stained acne inflammatory elements were destructed for light exposures of 0.5 sec.

  1. Structure and mechanical properties of Octopus vulgaris suckers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tramacere, Francesca; Kovalev, Alexander; Kleinteich, Thomas; Gorb, Stanislav N; Mazzolai, Barbara

    2014-02-06

    In this study, we investigate the morphology and mechanical features of Octopus vulgaris suckers, which may serve as a model for the creation of a new generation of attachment devices. Octopus suckers attach to a wide range of substrates in wet conditions, including rough surfaces. This amazing feature is made possible by the sucker's tissues, which are pliable to the substrate profile. Previous studies have described a peculiar internal structure that plays a fundamental role in the attachment and detachment processes of the sucker. In this work, we present a mechanical characterization of the tissues involved in the attachment process, which was performed using microindentation tests. We evaluated the elasticity modulus and viscoelastic parameters of the natural tissues (E ∼ 10 kPa) and measured the mechanical properties of some artificial materials that have previously been used in soft robotics. Such a comparison of biological prototypes and artificial material that mimics octopus-sucker tissue is crucial for the design of innovative artificial suction cups for use in wet environments. We conclude that the properties of the common elastomers that are generally used in soft robotics are quite dissimilar to the properties of biological suckers.

  2. Activity of Thymus vulgaris essential oil against Anisakis larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giarratana, F; Muscolino, D; Beninati, C; Giuffrida, A; Panebianco, A

    2014-07-01

    Anisakiasis is an important food-borne disease especially in countries with high fish consumption. The increase of cases of human disease and the virtual absence of effective treatments have prompted the research on new active compounds against Anisakis larvae. As well known, the disease is related to the consumption of raw or almost raw seafood products, but also marinated and/or salted fishery products, if the processing is insufficient to destroy nematode larvae can represent a risks for the consumers. In the light of the biocidal efficacy against different pathogens demonstrated for various essential oils, the aim of this work is to evaluate the effect of Thymus vulgaris essential oil (TEO) against anisakidae larvae. The TEO at 10% and 5% concentration in oil sunflower seeds, caused in vitro the death of all larvae within 14 h, with cuticle and intestinal wall damages. The results obtained showing a significant activity against Anisakis larvae, suggest further investigation on TEO as a larvicidal agent and on its potential use in the industrial marinating process. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Antinociceptive effects of hydroalcoholic extract of Thymus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taherian, Abbas Ali; Babaei, Mahdi; Vafaei, Abbas Ali; Jarrahi, Morteza; Jadidi, Majid; Sadeghi, Hassan

    2009-01-01

    Previous investigation has shown that Thymus Vulgaris (TV) modulates pain. The aim of this work was to examine the role of TV on acute and chronic pain and compares its effect with dexamethasone (DEX) and stress (ST) by using hot plate, tail flick and formalin tests in mice. In this study male albino mice (25-30 g.) in 21 groups (n=147) were used. TV (100, 500 and 1000 mg/kg), DEX (0.5, 1 and 2 mg/kg) and vehicle (VEH) were injected 30 minutes before pain assessment tests. Stress was applied by 1 min swimming in cold water (18-22 degrees ). Acute and chronic pain was assessed by hot plate, tail flick and formalin tests. For assessment of the role of opioid receptors in antinoceception of TV extract, Naloxon (NAL, 2mg/kg, ip) as opioid receptor antagonist was injected before the injection of the more effective dose (500 mg/kg) of TV extract. Results indicated that TV, DEX and ST have analgesic effects in all tests (P<0.01 in comparison with control group). Above findings showed that TV extract, DEX and ST have modulatory effects on acute and chronic pain. Further research is required to determine the mechanisms by which TV extract has an inhibitory effect on pain sensation.

  4. Evaluation of solar dried thyme (Thymus vulgaris Linne) herbs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balladin, Derrick A.; Headley, Oliver [University of the West Indies, Center for Resource Management and Environmental Studies, St Michael (Barbados)

    1999-07-01

    Thyme (Thymus vulgaris Linne) herbs can be dried at about 50degC reached an equilibrium moisture content after 12 h and 9.5 h using the wire basket solar dryer and oven drying method respectively. The initial moisture content (wet wt. basis), (final moisture content, dry wt. basis (dwb)) determined by the Dean-Stark toluene method, oven and microwave were 75.15% (10.0%), 75.12% (11.85%) and 72.31% (12.50%) respectively. Paired t-test ({alpha} = 0.05, 10 degrees of freedom) showed no significant difference between the Dean-Stark toluene and the oven methods, but a significant difference between these two methods and the microwaves method. The % essential oils extracted after drying by the oven and the wire basket solar methods were 0.5 and 0.6% (per 100 g dwb) respectively. The % oleoresin and ash content were 27% for both drying methods and 1.60, 2.03 and 2.25% for the fresh, oven dried and the wire basket solar dried herb respectively. (Author)

  5. Antioxidative effect of thyme (Thymus vulgaris in sunflower oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zofia Zaborowska

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available   Background. Lipid oxidation is a main problem during food processing, storage and consumption leading to losses of quality, stability, safety and nutritive value. Antioxidants have been used to prevent oxidation changes and off – flavor development in food products. Aim of the research was to evaluate antioxidative effect of thyme ethanol extract on sunflower oil during its storage in different temperature conditions. Oil samples were stored in darkness at 4°C, 18°C, 38°C. Material and methods. Samples of thyme (thymus vulgaris were purchased at a local pharmacy in Poznań, Poland and sunflower oil was acquired from a local supermarket. Thyme extract was characterized by total polyphenol content. Antioxidant activity was estimated with use of DPPHand ABTSradicals scavenging methods. Ethanol extract of thyme at 1% level was added to sunflower oil. Peroxide value (PV, anisidine value (AV, totox value (TxV and fatty acids (FA content were taken as parameters for evaluation of effectiveness of thyme extract in stabilization of sunflower oil. Results. High polyphenol content, DPPHand ABTSradicals scavenging activity of ethanol thyme extract were evaluated. Results from different parameters were in agreement with other researchers, suggesting the antioxidant effect of thyme on antioxidant stability. Results show that thyme extract prolonged stability of sunflower oil and it may be a potent antioxidant for its stabilization. Conclusions. Ethanol thyme extract may be used as a natural antioxidant to prolong stability of oils.  

  6. Signaling dependent and independent mechanisms in pemphigus vulgaris blister formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Masataka; Stahley, Sara N; Caughman, Christopher Y; Mao, Xuming; Tucker, Dana K; Payne, Aimee S; Amagai, Masayuki; Kowalczyk, Andrew P

    2012-01-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is an autoimmune epidermal blistering disease caused by autoantibodies directed against the desmosomal cadherin desmoglein-3 (Dsg3). Significant advances in our understanding of pemphigus pathomechanisms have been derived from the generation of pathogenic monoclonal Dsg3 antibodies. However, conflicting models for pemphigus pathogenicity have arisen from studies using either polyclonal PV patient IgG or monoclonal Dsg3 antibodies. In the present study, the pathogenic mechanisms of polyclonal PV IgG and monoclonal Dsg3 antibodies were directly compared. Polyclonal PV IgG cause extensive clustering and endocytosis of keratinocyte cell surface Dsg3, whereas pathogenic mouse monoclonal antibodies compromise cell-cell adhesion strength without causing these alterations in Dsg3 trafficking. Furthermore, tyrosine kinase or p38 MAPK inhibition prevents loss of keratinocyte adhesion in response to polyclonal PV IgG. In contrast, disruption of adhesion by pathogenic monoclonal antibodies is not prevented by these inhibitors either in vitro or in human skin explants. Our results reveal that the pathogenic activity of polyclonal PV IgG can be attributed to p38 MAPK-dependent clustering and endocytosis of Dsg3, whereas pathogenic monoclonal Dsg3 antibodies can function independently of this pathway. These findings have important implications for understanding pemphigus pathophysiology, and for the design of pemphigus model systems and therapeutic interventions.

  7. An antifungal defensin from Phaseolus vulgaris cv. 'Cloud Bean'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiangli; Sun, Jian; Zhang, Guoqing; Wang, Hexiang; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2011-01-15

    An antifungal peptide with a defensin-like sequence and exhibiting a molecular mass of 7.3kDa was purified from dried seeds of Phaseolus vulgaris 'Cloud Bean'. The isolation procedure entailed anion exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose, affinity chromatography an Affi-gel blue gel, cation exchange chromatography on SP-Sepharose, and gel filtration by fast protein liquid chromatography on Superdex 75. Although the antifungal peptide was unadsorbed on DEAE-cellulose, it was adsorbed on both Affi-gel blue gel and SP-Sepharose. The antifungal peptide exerted antifungal activity against Mycosphaerella arachidicola with an IC(50) value of 1.8 μM. It was also active against Fusarium oxysporum with an IC(50) value of 2.2 μM. It had no inhibitory effect on HIV-1 reverse transcriptase when tested up to 100 μM. Proliferation of L1210 mouse leukemia cells and MBL2 lymphoma cells was inhibited by the antifungal peptide with an IC(50) of 10 μM and 40 μM, respectively.

  8. An antifungal peptide from Phaseolus vulgaris cv. brown kidney bean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yau Sang Chan; Jack Ho Wong; Evandro Fei Fang; Wen Liang Pan; Tzi Bun Ng

    2012-01-01

    A 5.4-kDa antifungal peptide,with an N-terminal sequence highly homologous to defensins and inhibitory activity against Mycosphaerella arachidicola (IC5o=3 μM),Setospaeria turcica and Bipolaris maydis,was isolated from the seeds of Phaseolus vulgaris cv.brown kidney bean.The peptide was purified by employing a protocol that entailed adsorption on Affi-gel blue gel and Mono S and finally gel filtration on Superdex 75.The antifungal activity of the peptide against M.arachidicola was stable in the pH range 3-12 and in the temperature range 0℃ to 80℃.There was a slight reduction of the antifungal activity at pH 2 and 13,and the activity was indiscernible at pH 0,1,and 14.The activity at 90℃ and 100℃ was slightly diminished.Deposition of Congo red at the hyphal tips of M.arachidicola was induced by the peptide indicating inhibition of hyphal growth.The lack of antiproliferative activity of brown kidney bean antifungal peptide toward tumor cells,in contrast to the presence of such activity of other antifungal peptides,indicates that different domains are responsible for the antifungal and antiproliferative activities.

  9. An antifungal peptide from Phaseolus vulgaris cv. brown kidney bean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Yau Sang; Wong, Jack Ho; Fang, Evandro Fei; Pan, Wen Liang; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2012-04-01

    A 5.4-kDa antifungal peptide, with an N-terminal sequence highly homologous to defensins and inhibitory activity against Mycosphaerella arachidicola (IC(50)= 3 μM), Setospaeria turcica and Bipolaris maydis, was isolated from the seeds of Phaseolus vulgaris cv. brown kidney bean. The peptide was purified by employing a protocol that entailed adsorption on Affi-gel blue gel and Mono S and finally gel filtration on Superdex 75. The antifungal activity of the peptide against M. arachidicola was stable in the pH range 3-12 and in the temperature range 0°C to 80°C. There was a slight reduction of the antifungal activity at pH 2 and 13, and the activity was indiscernible at pH 0, 1, and 14. The activity at 90°C and 100°C was slightly diminished. Deposition of Congo red at the hyphal tips of M. arachidicola was induced by the peptide indicating inhibition of hyphal growth. The lack of antiproliferative activity of brown kidney bean antifungal peptide toward tumor cells, in contrast to the presence of such activity of other antifungal peptides, indicates that different domains are responsible for the antifungal and antiproliferative activities.

  10. Redox Enzymes of Red Beetroot Vacuoles (Beta vulgaris L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.V. Pradedova

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Years of research have shown that some of the redox elements (enzymes, coenzymes, and co-substrate are isolated from each other kinetic and spatial manner (compartmentalization in the eukaryotic cells. The redox elements forming the "highly" and "widely" specialized redox system are found in all cell structures: mitochondria, plastids, peroxisomes, apoplast, nucleus etc. In recent years the active involvement of the central vacuole in the maintenance of the plant cell redox homeostasis is discussed, actually the information about the vacuolar redox system is very small. The high-priority redox processes and "redox-specialization" of the vacuolar compartment are not known. We have begun a study of red beet-root vacuole redox systems (Beta vulgaris L. and have identified redox enzymes such as: phenol peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.7, superoxide dismutase (EC 1.15.1.1 and glutathione reductase (EC 1.8.1.7. This paper presents some of the characteristics of these enzymes and considers the probable ways of their functioning in vacuolar redox chains.

  11. Chlorella vulgaris triggers apoptosis in hepatocarcinogenesis-induced rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Emey Suhana MOHD AZAMAI; Suhaniza SULAIMAN; Shafina Hanim MOHD HABIB; Mee Lee LOOI; Srijit DAS; Nor Aini ABDUL HAMID; Wan Zurinah WANG NGAH; Yasmin Anum MOHD YUSOF

    2009-01-01

    Chlorella vulgaris (CV) has been reported to have antioxidant and anticancer properties. We evaluated the effect of CV on apoptotic regulator protein expression in liver cancer-induced rats. Male Wistar rats (200-250 g) were divided into eight groups: control group (normal diet), CDE group (choline deficient diet supplemented with ethionine in drinking water to induce hepatocarcinogenesis), CV groups with three different doses of CV (50, 150, and 300 mg/kg body weight), and CDE groups treated with different doses of CV (50, 150, and 300 mg/kg body weight). Rats were sacrificed at various weeks and liver tissues were embedded in paraffin blocks for immunohistochemistry studies. CV, at increasing doses, decreased the expression of anti-apoptotic protein, Bcl-2, but increased the expression of pro-apoptotic protein, caspase 8, in CDE rats, which was correlated with decreased hepatoctyes proliferation and increased apoptosis as determined by bromodeoxy-uridine (BrdU) labeling and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay, respectively. Our study shows that CV has definite chemopreventive effect by inducing apoptosis via decreasing the expression of Bcl-2 and increasing the expression of caspase 8 in hepatocarcinogenesis-induced rats.

  12. Efficient in vitro micropropagation and regeneration of Artemisia vulgaris L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujatha Govindaraj

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes efficient propagation of Artemisia vulgaris using shoot tip explants isolated from 35 daysold in vitro grown seedlings. Optimum proliferation was obtained on Murashige and Skoog’s salts and B5 vitamins supplementedwith 3% sucrose, 4.44 μM BA, and 0.7% agar. Shoot proliferation was maximal (99.8% with 14-23 shoots per explant after6 weeks of culture. Shoots with a minimum length of 1.5 cm were transferred to shoot elongation medium supplemented with0.44 μM BA and 1.44 μM GA3. The successfully elongated shoots with a height of 7.2-12.1 cm were transferred to rootingmedium augmented with 8.56 μM IAA. Rooted plantlets were transferred to plastic cups containing autoclaved garden soil,farmyard soil and sand (2:1:1 for hardening. Plantlets were initially maintained under culture room conditions (5 weeks,followed by normal laboratory conditions (4 weeks and finally transferred to a Botanical Evaluation Garden and maintainedthere.

  13. Inheritance of resistance to ozone in Phaseolus vulgaris L

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, L.K.; Tibbitts, T.W.; Bliss, F.A.

    1979-03-01

    Ozone sensitivity was compared in F/sub 1/ and F/sub 2/ populations from crosses between 2 ozone-sensitive bean cultivars, Spurt and Blue Lake Stringless, and 2 ozone-resistant cultivars, Black Turtle Soup and French's Horticultural, under controlled environmental conditions. F/sub 1/ plants were as sensitive as the sensitive parent. About 10% of the F/sub 2/ progeny obtained by selfing F/sub 1/ plants appeared to be as resistant as the resistant parent and 90% of the progeny could be divided equally between a group as sensitive as the sensitive parent and a group intermediate in sensitivity between the parent plants. However, precise separation of F/sub 2/ progeny was not possible because of the variability in injury expression. The average injury on the F/sub 2/ plants was greater than the parental midpoint value and the variance in injury on the F/sub 2/ plants was about 3.5x greater than that for the parents. The heritability of resistance to ozone was estimated to be 0.83. It was concluded that ozone resistance is recessive in P. vulgaris and appears to be regulated by a few major genes. 12 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  14. Systemic lupus erythematosus and pemphigus vulgaris: association or coincidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calebotta, A; Cirocco, A; Giansante, E; Reyes, O

    2004-01-01

    Few cases have been published relating systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and pemphigus vulgaris (PV). We describe a patient with this association. A 35-year old woman who started to develop persistent pain and morning stiffness of proximal inter and metacarpo-phalangeal joints. During the following year, the patient recalled the onset of blisters on both legs, face, arms and thorax, as well as erosions appearing on oral mucous membranes. We observed generalized multiple erosions on her trunk and legs, flaccid bullae located on her right thigh and multiple erosions on oral mucous membranes. A skin biopsy reported PV Direct immunofluorescence on the perilesional skin specimen, showed beehive intercellular IgG deposits in the epidermis (+++), suggesting PV; granular discontinuous IgM and C3 deposits in the dermal-epidermal union (+++), suggesting SLE. Direct immunofluorescence of the healthy unexposed skin specimen, reported granular discontinuous IgG deposits in the dermal-epidermal union and beehive intercellular IgG deposits in the lower levels of the epidermis (+++); granular continuous IgM deposits in the dermal-epidermal union (+++). The results of rheumatic studies were obtained as follows: ANA :3 +, Anti-DNA, Anti-Sm, Anti-Ro and Anti-La :4 + . The definite diagnosis was PVand SLE. Treatment with 50 mg of prednisone daily with good evolution.

  15. A Rare Case of Cranial Osteomyelitis Caused by Proteus Vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Uslu

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Osteomyelitis of the calvarial bones can cause serious complications such as brain abscess, due to the close proximity to adjacent brain structures. Development of the purulent secretion in surgery and traumatic scalp injuries must be considered as a possibility of osteomyelitis possibility. Generally gram positive, rarely gram negative bacteria and mix agents, can be isolated in infection. Especially chronic pyogenic osteomyelitis agents can be isolated from chronic infections such as tuberculosis. In cranial osteomyelitis diagnosis, radiological diagnosis has a very important place together with the clinical diagnosis. However, infection can usually show late findings radiologically. In treatment, antibiotic treatment is absolutely essential as well as removal of the infected part of the bone. Due to antibiotic treatment lasting between 6-12 weeks, organizing the antibiotic protocols according to the results of culture-antibiograms, which were provided from purulent secretions, has the most important role in the success of surgical treatment. In Proteus sp. infections, for choice of suitable treatment, determination of the type of bacteria is important. For exact diagnosis, histopathological examination of the bone tissue must be carried out. In this report, a case with cranial osteomyelitis caused by Proteus vulgaris which is a gram negative bacteria causing anaerobic infections and classified in the Enterobacteriaceae family is presented. The patient was treated with surgery and appropriate antibiotics. Early recognition of this condition, planning the best treatment strategy and taking precautions to prevent complications, is mandatory for a better outcome.

  16. Family study of monozygotic twins affected by pemphigus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salathiel, Adriana Martinelli; Brochado, Maria José Franco; Kim, Olivia; Deghaide, Neifi Hassan Saloum; Donadi, Eduardo Antonio; Roselino, Ana Maria

    2016-07-01

    Rare are the family studies that include siblings affected by pemphigus vulgaris (PV) and in whom HLA class II alleles are related. HLA-DR and -DQ genotyping and profiling of antibodies against desmogleins (Dsg) 1 and Dsg3 were performed in ten members of a family including monozygotic twins affected by PV. The twin sisters were heterozygotes; they presented the haplotypes most commonly associated with increased susceptibility to PV (DRB1∗04:02-DQA1∗03:01-DQB1∗03:02 and DRB1∗14:04-DQA1∗01:01-DQB1∗05:03). Their parents and five siblings had only one or none of these two haplotypes in combination with the alleles or haplotypes associated with resistance to PV (DRB1∗07:01-DQA1∗02:01-DQB1∗02:02 and DRB1∗13:01-DQA1∗01:03-DQB1∗06:03). Only the monozygotic twins presented IgG antibodies against both Dsg1 and Dsg3. According to our knowledge based on a review of published literature on the topic, this is the first report of PV affecting monozygotic twins.

  17. Landscape genetics, adaptive diversity and population structure in Phaseolus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Monica; Rau, Domenico; Bitocchi, Elena; Bellucci, Elisa; Biagetti, Eleonora; Carboni, Andrea; Gepts, Paul; Nanni, Laura; Papa, Roberto; Attene, Giovanna

    2016-03-01

    Here we studied the organization of genetic variation of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) in its centres of domestication. We used 131 single nucleotide polymorphisms to investigate 417 wild common bean accessions and a representative sample of 160 domesticated genotypes, including Mesoamerican and Andean genotypes, for a total of 577 accessions. By analysing the genetic spatial patterns of the wild common bean, we documented the existence of several genetic groups and the occurrence of variable degrees of diversity in Mesoamerica and the Andes. Moreover, using a landscape genetics approach, we demonstrated that both demographic processes and selection for adaptation were responsible for the observed genetic structure. We showed that the study of correlations between markers and ecological variables at a continental scale can help in identifying local adaptation genes. We also located putative areas of common bean domestication in Mesoamerica, in the Oaxaca Valley, and the Andes, in southern Bolivia-northern Argentina. These observations are of paramount importance for the conservation and exploitation of the genetic diversity preserved within this species and other plant genetic resources.

  18. Plasma androgenic activity in women with acne vulgaris and in healthy girls before, during and after puberty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odlind, V; Carlström, K; Michaëlsson, G; Vahlqvist, A; Victor, A; Mellbin, T

    1982-03-01

    The possible relationship between plasma androgenic activity and acne vulgaris was investigated. Plasma testosterone and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) levels were determined in healthy girls during different stages of puberty, in healthy adult women and in women with acne vulgaris. Testosterone increase during puberty, whereas SHBG decreased during the early stages before it increased and stabilized plasma concentrations of testosterone and SHBG. Women with severe acne vulgaris had testosterone levels in the same range but the SHBG levels were significantly lower than those of healthy women and women with mild acne. These results show a high androgenic activity in the intermediate stages of puberty, when acne vulgaris is a common complaint and an increased androgenic activity in adult women with severe acne vulgaris.

  19. Tessellations & Transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, Joan

    1998-01-01

    Describes two sixth-grade lessons on the work of M. C. Escher: (1) the first lesson instructs students on tessellations, or tiles that interlock in a repeated pattern; (2) the second lesson explores Escher's drawings of transitions from two- to three-dimensional space. (DSK)

  20. Presidential Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-09

    Morton Mintz and Stuart Auerbach, “Ford Solicits Suggestions on No. 2 Man,” Washington Post, Aug. 11, 1974, p. A1. 64 Fred Austin, “Ford Begins Move...representatives of the federal departments and agencies to ensure a smooth transition. Management and organizational issues should be CRS-23 105 Carl Brauer

  1. Lipid accumulation from pinewood pyrolysates by Rhodosporidium diobovatum and Chlorella vulgaris for biodiesel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque, Luis; Orr, Valerie C A; Chen, Sean; Westerhof, Roel; Oudenhoven, Stijn; Rossum, Guus van; Kersten, Sascha; Berruti, Franco; Rehmann, Lars

    2016-08-01

    This study evaluated the suitability of pinewood pyrolysates as a carbon source for lipid production and cultivation of the oleaginous yeast Rhodosporidium diobovatum and the microalgae Chlorella vulgaris. Thermal decomposition of pinewood and fractional condensation were used to obtain an oil rich in levoglucosan which was upgraded to glucose by acid hydrolysis. Blending of pyrolytic sugars with pure glucose in both nitrogen rich and nitrogen limited conditions was studied for R. diobovatum, and under nitrogen limited conditions for C. vulgaris. Glucose consumption rate decreased with increasing proportions of pyrolytic sugars increasing cultivation time. While R. diobovatum was capable of growth in 100% (v/v) pyrolytic sugars, C. vulgaris growth declined rapidly in blends greater than 20% (v/v) until no growth was detected in blends >40%. Finally, the effects of pyrolysis sugars on lipid composition was evaluated and biodiesel fuel properties were estimated based on the lipid profiles.

  2. Characterization and optimization of carbohydrate production from an indigenous microalga Chlorella vulgaris FSP-E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Shih-Hsin; Huang, Shu-Wen; Chen, Chun-Yen; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Kondo, Akihiko; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2013-05-01

    In this study, three indigenous microalgae isolates were examined for their ability to produce carbohydrates. Among them, Chlorella vulgaris FSP-E displayed relatively high cell growth rate and carbohydrate content. The carbohydrate productivity of C. vulgaris FSP-E was further improved by using engineering strategies. The results show that using an appropriate light intensity and inoculum size could effectively promote cell growth and carbohydrate productivity. Nitrogen starvation triggered the accumulation of carbohydrates in the microalga, achieving a carbohydrate content of 51.3% after 4-day starvation. Under the optimal conditions, the highest biomass and carbohydrate productivity were 1.437 and 0.631 g L(-1) d(-1), respectively. This performance is better than that reported in most related studies. Since glucose accounted for nearly 93% of the carbohydrates accumulated in C. vulgaris FSP-E, the microalga is an excellent feedstock for bioethanol fermentation.

  3. Caleosin from Chlorella vulgaris TISTR 8580 is salt-induced and heme-containing protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charuchinda, Pairpilin; Waditee-Sirisattha, Rungaroon; Kageyama, Hakuto; Yamada, Daisuke; Sirisattha, Sophon; Tanaka, Yoshito; Mahakhant, Aparat; Takabe, Teruhiro

    2015-01-01

    Physiological and functional properties of lipid droplet-associated proteins in algae remain scarce. We report here the caleosin gene from Chlorella vulgaris encodes a protein of 279 amino acid residues. Amino acid sequence alignment showed high similarity to the putative caleosins from fungi, but less to plant caleosins. When the C. vulgaris TISTR 8580 cells were treated with salt stress (0.3 M NaCl), the level of triacylglycerol increased significantly. The mRNA contents for caleosin in Chlorella cells significantly increased under salt stress condition. Caleosin gene was expressed in E. coli. Crude extract of E. coli cells exhibited the cumene hydroperoxide-dependent oxidation of aniline. Absorption spectroscopy showed a peak around 415 nm which was decreased upon addition of cumene hydroperoxide. Native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis suggests caleosin existed as the oligomer. These data indicate that a fresh water C. vulgaris TISTR 8580 contains a salt-induced heme-protein caleosin.

  4. In Vitro Antimicrobial Activity of Thymus vulgaris Essential Oil Against Major Oral Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fani, Mohammadmehdi; Kohanteb, Jamshid

    2017-01-01

    The objective of present investigation was to determine antimicrobial activity of Thymus vulgaris oil on some oral pathogens. Thymus vulgaris oil was prepared by hydrodistillation and tested against 30 clinical isolates of each of Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus mutans, Candida albicans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, prepared from related oral infections using agar disk diffusion and broth microdilution methods. Thymus vulgaris oil at concentrations of 16 to 256 μg/mL exhibited strong inhibitory activity on all clinical isolates producing inhibition zones of 7.5 to 42 mm as measured by agar disk diffusion method. Streptococcus pyogenes and Streptococcus mutans were the most sensitive isolates with minimum inhibitory concentrations of 1.9 and 3.6 μg/mL, respectively. The minimum inhibitory concentration values for C albicans, A actinomycetemcomitans, and P gingivalis were 16.3, 32, and 32 μg/mL, respectively.

  5. Antispasmodic effect of hydroalcoholic extract of Thymus vulgaris on the guinea-pig ileum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaei, Mehdi; Abarghoei, Mitra Emmami; Ansari, Reza; Vafaei, Abbas Ali; Taherian, Abbas Ali; Akhavan, Maziar Mohammad; Toussy, Gafar; Mousavi, Shahrokh

    2008-01-01

    The effects of Thymus vulgaris hydroalcoholic extract on the contractile responses of the isolated guinea-pig ileum were investigated. Contraction changes in the terminal ileum of guinea pigs were monitored using a force displacement transducer amplifier connected to a physiograph. Thymus vulgaris extract inhibited the contractile responses in a dose-dependent manner and also decreased the amplitude of peristaltic waves. It is concluded that T. vulgaris has an antispasmodic action on guinea pig ileum by decreasing the amplitudes of the muscle contractions during peristalsis. The EC50 was calculated as 1.7 mg mL(-1). In guinea-pig ileum the extract led to an antispasmodic effect, possibly by affecting the anticholinergic and serotoninergic pathways.

  6. Topical, Biological and Clinical Challenges in the Management of Patients with Acne Vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anwar Al-Hammadi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Acne vulgaris is one of the most common chronic inflammatory skin disorders among adolescents and young adults. It is associated with substantial morbidity and, rarely, with mortality. The exact worldwide incidence and prevalence are currently unknown. Current challenges involve improving understanding of the underlying pathophysiology of acne vulgaris and developing a practical treatment consensus. Expert panel discussions were held in 2013 and 2014 among a group of scientists and clinicians from the Omani and United Arab Emirate Dermatology Societies to ascertain the current optimal management of acne vulgaris, identify clinically relevant end-points and construct suitable methodology for future clinical trial designs. This article reviews the discussions of these sessions and recent literature on this topic.

  7. A comparative study of phytohaemagglutinin and extract of Phaseolus vulgaris seeds by characterization and cytogenetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badari Nath, A. R. S.; Sivaramakrishna, A.; Marimuthu, K. M.; Saraswathy, Radha

    2015-01-01

    Phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) is a lectin obtained from Phaseolus vulgaris (red kidney beans), that acts as a mitogen in human leucocyte culture and is commercially available from Gibco®. This PHA (Gibco®) was found to be very expensive, hence other inexpensive sources that can be used in all kinds of cytogenetics labs (rich and poor), were attempted. One such successful attempt was PHA extract from seeds of P.vulgaris. This paper details the methodology of extraction and application of PHA from seeds of P.vulgaris. Attempts has been made to identify the chemical and physical properties of the products in the extract, analyzed by various spectroscopic and analytical techniques. The analysis clearly indicates that the product from Phaseolus seeds extract was found to be similar to the commercially available PHA (Gibco®) in the cytogenetic study of human leucocyte cultures. The present study enforces the possible utility of the plant extract directly for human leucocyte cultures.

  8. Mangifera indica and Phaseolus vulgaris in the bioindication of air pollution in Bahia, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, J S; Fernandes, E B; Fawcett, W N

    2000-07-01

    In this article are reported the results of a study on the concentration of ascorbic acid (AA) in Mangifera indica as passive monitor and in Phaseolus vulgaris as active monitor with the intention to study the effects of industrial emissions from the Petrochemical Complex of Camaçari (PCC), Bahia, Brazil, on the vegetation. Leaves from M. indica were collected in two sites in the region under direct influence of industrial emissions and in one presumed nonpolluted reference (background) site. Pots with P. vulgaris were exposed in the same sites. The AA increase in the leaves of M. indica from PCC sites indicates a stress situation. The small AA increase in the P. vulgaris exposed in the more polluted site indicates that the active monitor is a sensitive one. The decrease of its leaf area indicates the inability of this species to activate physiological protection mechanisms like an increase in AA production.

  9. Clinical Observation on Effect of Triptolide Tablet in Treating Patients with Psoriasis Vulgaris

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Shao-xi; GUO Ning-ru

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of triptolide tablet in the treatment of patients with psoriasis vulgaris. Methods: By an open clinical study of 103 patients with psoriasis vulgaris. Psoriasis area severity index (PASI) was measured and recorded before and after treatment for efficacy evaluation. Results:Of the 103 patients, markedly effective was got in 41 (39.7%), improved in 37 (35.8%) and ineffective in 25 (24.5 % ), the total effective rate being 75.7%, and the adverse reaction was shown only in few patients with decreased WBC during the treatment period. Conclusion: Triptolide tablet is effective for the treatment of psoriasis vulgaris during the one-year follow-up.

  10. Antifungal activity of extracts of Rosmarinus officinalis and Thymus vulgaris against Aspergillus flavus and A. ochraceus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centeno, S; Calvo, M A; Adelantado, C; Figueroa, S

    2010-05-01

    The antifungal activity of ethanolic extracts of Rosmarinus officinalis and Thymus vulgaris were tested against strains of Aspergillus flavus and A. ochraceus, since these two species are common contaminants of cereals and grains and are able to produce and accumulate mycotoxins. The methodology used is based on measuring the inhibition halos produced by discs impregnated with the extracts and establishing their Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) as well as the Minimum Fungicide Concentration (MFC). The results obtained suggest that the assayed extracts affect the proper development of A. flavus and A. ochraceus; leading to a lower MIC (1200 ppm) and MFC (2400 ppm) for T. vulgaris extract against A. ochraceus than against A. flavus. The results show, that the extracts of Rosmarinus officinalis and Thymus vulgaris used at low concentrations could have significant potential for the biological control of fungi in foodstuffs.

  11. Removal Cu(II ions from water using sulphuric acid treated Lagenaria vulgaris Shell (Cucurbitaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljupković, R.B.

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Removal of Cu(II ions from water solutions by sulphuric acid treated Lagenaria vulgaris shell (ccLVB was studied. Batch experiments were done by shaking a fixed mass of biosorbent (1.0 g with 250 cm3 of 50.0 mg dm–3 Cu(II solutions, at pH ranged from 2 up to 6. Metal concentration in the filtrates as well as in the initial solution was determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. Results show that efficiency of Cu(II ions uptake by sulphuric acid treated Lagenaria vulgaris shell is significantly greater than raw Lagenaria vulgaris biosorbent. In addition, there is no significant effect of initial pH of solution on Cu(II ions uptake by ccLVB and obtained biosorbent can be applied in a wide range of pH.

  12. Topical, Biological and Clinical Challenges in the Management of Patients with Acne Vulgaris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hammadi, Anwar; Al-Ismaily, Abla; Al-Ali, Sameer; Ramadurai, Rajesh; Jain, Rishi; McKinley-Grant, Lynn; Mughal, Tariq I.

    2016-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is one of the most common chronic inflammatory skin disorders among adolescents and young adults. It is associated with substantial morbidity and, rarely, with mortality. The exact worldwide incidence and prevalence are currently unknown. Current challenges involve improving understanding of the underlying pathophysiology of acne vulgaris and developing a practical treatment consensus. Expert panel discussions were held in 2013 and 2014 among a group of scientists and clinicians from the Omani and United Arab Emirate Dermatology Societies to ascertain the current optimal management of acne vulgaris, identify clinically relevant end-points and construct suitable methodology for future clinical trial designs. This article reviews the discussions of these sessions and recent literature on this topic. PMID:27226905

  13. Topical, Biological and Clinical Challenges in the Management of Patients with Acne Vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hammadi, Anwar; Al-Ismaily, Abla; Al-Ali, Sameer; Ramadurai, Rajesh; Jain, Rishi; McKinley-Grant, Lynn; Mughal, Tariq I

    2016-05-01

    Acne vulgaris is one of the most common chronic inflammatory skin disorders among adolescents and young adults. It is associated with substantial morbidity and, rarely, with mortality. The exact worldwide incidence and prevalence are currently unknown. Current challenges involve improving understanding of the underlying pathophysiology of acne vulgaris and developing a practical treatment consensus. Expert panel discussions were held in 2013 and 2014 among a group of scientists and clinicians from the Omani and United Arab Emirate Dermatology Societies to ascertain the current optimal management of acne vulgaris, identify clinically relevant end-points and construct suitable methodology for future clinical trial designs. This article reviews the discussions of these sessions and recent literature on this topic.

  14. Severe multi-resistant pemphigus vulgaris: prolonged remission with a single cycle of rituximab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corral, Isabela Soubhia; Freitas, Thais Helena Proença de; Aquino, Renata Telles Rudge de; Koller, Daniella Abbruzzini S; Magliari, Maria Elisa Ruffolo; Muller, Helena

    2013-01-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris is an autoimmune bullous disease whose therapy is based on systemic corticosteroids, with or without immunosuppressants. Rituximab is a chimeric monoclonal antibody of the IgG class, directed at a specific CD20 B cell surface antigen, used in pemphigus vulgaris empirically since 2002, with success in 90% of the cases and long periods of remission. Male patient, 33 years old, diagnosed with pemphigus vulgaris, confirmed by histopathology and direct immunofluorescence. He was treated for seven months with numerous treatments, including immunosuppressive drugs, with an unsatisfactory response, until he had complete remission with the use of rituximab. During a 34-month follow-up period, the patient presented a slight clinical relapse, which was successfully controlled with prednisone in a daily dose of 120 mg, soon reduced to 20mg.

  15. Influence of green algae Chlorella vulgaris on initial growth of different agricultural crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajnal-Jafari Timea I.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to evaluate the effect of green algae Chlorella vulgaris on the initial growth of wheat, maize, bean and lettuce and the microbiological activity of rhizospheric soil. The experiment was conducted in controlled conditions. The inocula were applied as foliar fertilizer by spraying. Plant material was taken 30 days after plant emergance. Chlorella vulgaris affected positively the length (28.5% increase and fresh mass (17.9% increase of maize root, stem length of wheat (24.2% increase and stem mass of lettuce (56.34% increase. Application of Chlorella vulgaris led to the increase of the total number of bacteria and the number of aminoheterotrophs in the maize rhizosphere, total bacterial number in the wheat rhizosphere, and the number of fungi in the rhizosphere of bean. The number of other investigated groups of microorganisms did not change significantly. The activity of dehydrogenase enzyme was not affected by inoculation with green algae.

  16. [Effect of inorganic carbon source on lipid production with autotrophic Chlorella vulgaris].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hongli; Gao, Zhen; Zhang, Qi; Huang, He; Ji, Xiaojun; Sun, Honglei; Dou, Chang

    2011-03-01

    We studied the effects of three inorganic carbon sources, Na2CO3, NaHCO3 and CO2, and their initial concentrations on lipid production of Chlorella vulgaris. Chlorella vulgaris could utilize Na2CO3, NaHCO3 and CO2 to produce lipids. After 10-day cultivation with each of the three inorganic carbon sources, lipid yield of Chlorella vulgaris reached its peak with the concentration increase of the inorganic carbon source, but dropped again by further increase of the concentration. The pH value of the culture medium for Chlorella vulgaris increased after the cultivation on inorganic carbon source. The optimal concentration of both Na2CO3 and NaHCO3 was 40 mmol/L, and their corresponding biomass dry weight was 0.52 g/L and 0.67 g/L with their corresponding lipid yield 0.19 g/L and 0.22 g/L. When the concentration of CO2 was 6%, Chlorella vulgaris grew the fastest and its biomass dry weight was 2.42 g/L with the highest lipid yield of 0.72 g/L. When the concentration of CO2 was too low, the supply of inorganic carbon was insufficient and lipid yield was low. A too high concentration of CO2 caused a low pH and lipid accumulation was inhibited. Na2CO3 and NaHCO3 were more favorable for Chlorella vulgaris to accumulate unsaturated fatty acids than that of CO2.

  17. Toxicological Response of the Green Alga Chlorella vulgaris, to Some Heavy Metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Afkar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problems statement: The disturbance of aquatic ecosystems provoked by heavy metals pollution from industrial and domestic sources, has as consequence the loss of biological diversity, as well as increased bioaccumulation and magnification of toxicants in the food chain. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of some heavy metals on some physiological activities of Chlorella vulgaris beyerinck with special references to metal bioaccumulation. Approach: Chlorella vulgaris Beyerinck was isolated from Al-Asfar Lake, Al-Hassa, Saudi Arabia. A standard initial inoculum of the isolated algae was inoculated to culture flasks. The culture flasks were supplied with various concentrations of Cobalt, Copper and Zinc ranging from 10-6-10-9 M. At the end of the incubation period cultures were filtered and washed several times by distilled water for measurements the various experimental parameters. Results: The data show that the lower doses of the three tested metals had stimulatory effect in biomass yield of Chlorella vulgaris, whereas the higher doses were inhibitory depending on the type of the metal. The inhibitory effect of copper to the growth parameters of Chlorella vulgaris was more pronounced than other two tested metals. The total protein content, total carbohydrate and the total free amino acids of the tested green alga Chlorella vulgaris gradually decreased in a manner dependent on the metal concentration in the medium. On the other hand, bioaccumulation of cobalt, copper and zinc by Chlorella vulgaris cells were parallel to increasing the concentrations in the culture medium. Conclusion: The inhibitory and stimulatory effects of either of the used heavy metals depend on concentration. Different organisms, however, have different sensitivities to the same metal and the same organisms may be more or less damaged by different metals. The uptake of an element from the surrounding medium is seldom exactly proportional to the amount present

  18. Inhibition of the catalase activity from Phaseolus vulgaris and Medicago sativa by sodium chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejera García, Noel A; Iribarne, Carmen; Palma, Francisco; Lluch, Carmen

    2007-08-01

    Changes in catalase activity during the development of the Rhizobium-legume symbiosis as well as its response in salinized plants of Phaseolus vulgaris and Medicago sativa, was studied. Besides, it was examined the behavior of the enzyme, isolated from leaves and root nodules, during in vitro incubation with NaCl doses. Nodule catalase activities of both legumes were assayed with several enzyme inhibitors and also purified. Leaf catalase activity of Phaseolus vulgaris and Medicago sativa decreased and increased respectively throughout the ontogeny, but root nodule catalase kept a high and stable value. This last result suggests that both legumes require the maintenance of high nodule catalase in nitrogen-fixing nodules. Under salt stress conditions leaf and nodule catalase activity decreased in both, grain and pasture legumes. Because catalase from leaf of Medicago sativa and nodules of Phaseolus vulgaris were relatively sensitive to NaCl during in vitro experiments, the detoxifying role of this enzyme for H(2)O(2) should be limited in such conditions. Both catalases, from determinate and indeterminate nodules, were affected neither by oxygen nor superoxide radicals but showed a strong (Phaseolus vulgaris) or partial (Medicago sativa) inhibition with dithiothreitol, dithionite and beta-mercaptoethanol. Besides, cyanide was the most potent inhibitor of nodule catalases. Finally, catalases partially purified by immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography migrated at 42 (Phaseolus vulgaris) and 46kDa (Medicago sativa) on SDS-PAGE, whereas native forms on sephacryl S-300 columns exhibited a molecular mass of 59 and 48kDa (Phaseolus vulgaris) and 88 and 53kDa (Medicago sativa).

  19. Evaluation of leptin, adiponectin, and ghrelin levels in patients with acne vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozuguz, P; Kacar, S D; Asik, G; Ozuguz, U; Karatas, S

    2016-02-09

    The research evaluating adipokines are very few in patients with acne vulgaris. The hypothesis that hyperinsulinemic and high glycemic index diet plays a role in the pathogenesis of acne is still controversial. In this study, we aimed to evaluate adipokines such as leptin (L), adiponectin (A), ghrelin and A levels, and A/L rates that indicate insulin resistance in nonobese patients with severe acne vulgaris. Thirty patients who are nonobese with moderate acne vulgaris, aged 18 to 25 years, and 15 age-sex compatible controls were included in our study. The acne lesions were assessed using the Global Acne Grading Scale (GAGS). All participants were evaluated for the parameters that may affect the metabolism of serum L, A, and ghrelin levels in blood, and their body mass index were calculated. The significance level was determined as p ≤ 0.05. Of the 30 patients, 17 were women and 13 were men. The mean age was 20.60 years and the mean duration of the disease were 2.8 years. All of patients had moderate acne vulgaris (GAGS 19-30). Of the 15 controls, 11 were women and 4 were men. The mean age was 21.20 years. There were not a statistically significant difference in L, ghrelin, A levels, and A/L ratio between the two groups. Adipokines may have a role in the pathogenesis of acne vulgaris. L, A, ghrelin, and insulin resistance may not participate in the responsible mechanisms in nonobese patients with moderate acne vulgaris. © The Author(s) 2016.

  20. The influence of aluminium availability on phosphate uptake in Phaseolus vulgaris L. and Phaseolus lunatus L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimmo, Tanja; Sciortino, Marco; Ghizzi, Massimiliano; Gianquinto, Giorgio; Gessa, Carlo E

    2009-01-01

    Aluminium toxicity is one of the major limiting factors of crop productivity on acid soils. High levels of available aluminium in soil may induce phosphorus deficiency in plants. This study investigates the influence of Aluminium (Al) on the phosphate (P(i)) uptake of two Phaseolus species, Phaseolus vulgaris L. var. Red Kidney and Phaseolus lunatus L. The two bean species were treated first with solutions of Al at different concentrations (0, 25, 50 and 100microM, pH 4.50) and second with solutions of P(i) (150microM) at pH 4.50. The higher the Al concentration the higher the Al concentration sorbed but P. vulgaris L var. Red Kidney adsorbed significantly more Al than P. lunatus L. Both species released organic acids: P. vulgaris L var. Red Kidney released fumaric acid and P. lunatus L. fumaric and oxalic acids which could have hindered further Al uptake. The two bean species showed a sigmoid P(i) uptake trend but with two different mechanisms. P. vulgaris L var. Red Kidney showed a starting point of 3h whereas P. lunatus L. adsorbed P(i) immediately within the first minutes. In addition, P. vulgaris L var. Red Kidney presented significantly higher P(i) uptake (higher uptake rate 'k' and higher maximum adsorption 'a' of the kinetic uptake model). The Al treatments did not significantly influence P(i) uptake. Results suggest that P. lunatus L. might adopt an external Al detoxification mechanism by the release of oxalic acid. P. vulgaris L var. Red Kidney on the other hand seemed to adopt an internal detoxification mechanism even if the Al sorbed is poorly translocated into the shoots. More detailed studies will be necessary to better define Al tolerance and/or resistance of Phaseolus spp.

  1. PRESCRIPTION AUDIT OF ACNE VULGARIS IN SKIN OUTPATIENT DEPARTMENT OF A TERTIARY CARE TEACHING HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal Prakash

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available : OBJECTIVE: To evaluate prescribing pattern in acne vulgaris cases at a tertiary care teaching hospital in south India. METHODS: Prescriptions of 120 patients of acne vulgaris who attended Dermatology OPD of a tertiary care teaching hospital were selected for study and their drug data were analyzed. RESULTS: Topical Benzoyl peroxide, adapalene, ketoconazole were prescribed as monotherapy, while aloevera, liquid paraffin and white soft paraffin as polytherapy. Azithromycin, antibiotics, anti histaminics were prescribed as systemic monotherapy and polytherapy. Statistical analysis revealed p-value was > 0.05. CONCLUSIONS: Prescription patterns were in consensus with the general guidelines, with few changes, in the choice of established therapeutic agents.

  2. Antifungal activity of the essential oil of Thymus vulgaris L. and thymol on experimentally induced dermatomycoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soković, M; Glamoclija, J; Cirić, A; Kataranovski, D; Marin, P D; Vukojević, J; Brkić, D

    2008-12-01

    The in vivo evaluation of the toxicological and antifungal activity of the essential oil of Thymus vulgaris L. and its main component thymol was made on 2-month-old male Wistar rats. We examined the therapeutic potency against experimentally induced dermatomycoses in rats, using the most frequent dermatomycetes, Trichophyton mentagrophytes, T. rubrum, and T. tonsurans. The therapeutic efficacy of a 1% solution of the essential oil of Thymus vulgaris and thymol as well as the commercial preparation bifonazole was evaluated. During the 37-day observation period the oil-treated animals were cured.

  3. Static and dynamic superheated water extraction of essential oil components from Thymus vulgaris L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawidowicz, Andrzej L; Rado, Ewelina; Wianowska, Dorota

    2009-09-01

    Superheated water extraction (SWE) performed in both static and dynamic condition (S-SWE and D-SWE, respectively) was applied for the extraction of essential oil from Thymus vulgaris L. The influence of extraction pressure, temperature, time, and flow rate on the total yield of essential oil and the influence of extraction temperature on the extraction of some chosen components are discussed in the paper. The SWE extracts are related to PLE extracts with n-hexane and essential oil obtained by steam distillation. The superheated water extraction in dynamic condition seems to be a feasible option for the extraction of essential oil components from T. vulgaris L.

  4. Radiation-induced pemphigus vulgaris of the breast; Pemphigus vulgaire radio-induit du sein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigna-Taglianti, R.; Russi, E.G. [Department of radiotherapy, Santa Croce e Carle general hospital, Via M. Coppino, 12100 Cuneo (Italy); Denaro, N. [Oncology department, university of Messina, Via consolare Valeria no 1, 98100 Messina (Italy); Numico, G. [Department of medical oncology, U. Parini hospital, 11100 Aosta (Italy); Brizio, R. [Department of histopathology, Santa Croce e Carle general hospital, Via M. Coppino, 12100 Cuneo (Italy)

    2011-07-15

    Pemphigus vulgaris is a rare autoimmune muco-cutaneous bullous disease. Patients with a history of pemphigus vulgaris - who need radiotherapy - may show a long lasting bullous cutaneous manifestation, typical of pemphigus, within radiation fields. The literature describes fewer than 20 radio-induced cases. While systematic corticosteroid therapy has proven to be useful, topical treatment used in association with corticosteroid therapy is rarely described. To our knowledge the use of modern dressing products has never been described. We report our experience in a case in which modern dressing products were usefully associated to systemic therapy. (authors)

  5. A preliminary investigation of Nigerian Gmelina arborea and Bambusa vulgaris for pulp and paper production

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Azeez, MA

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available 18(1): 65 - 78, 2016 DOI: 10.4067/S0718-221X2016005000007 ISSN impresa 0717-3644 ISSN online 0718-221X A PRELIMINARY INVESTIGATION OF NIGERIAN Gmelina arborea AND Bambusa vulgaris FOR PULP AND PAPER PRODUCTION... Mayowa Akeem Azeez1,♠, Jerome E. Andrew2, B. Bruce Sithole3 ABSTRACT Two common Nigerian-grown biomasses, gmelina (Gmelina arborea) and bamboo (Bambusaa vulgaris) have been pulped and their fibre characteristics and paper properties examined. The results...

  6. Effect of feeding Cuminum cyminum fruits, Thymus vulgaris leaves or their mixture to rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haroun, E M; Mahmoud, O M; Adam, S E I

    2002-04-01

    Cuminum cyminum fruits and T. vulgaris leaves were fed to male Wistar rats at 2% or 10% of standard diet for 6 w. A mixture (5% +5%) of the 2 plants was also fed to rats for a similar period. Diets containing 2% C. cyminum fruits, 2% or 10% T. vulgaris leaves were not toxic to rats. Impairment of growth and enterohepatonephropathy were observed in the rats fed a diet containing 10% C. cyminum fruits. These changes were also seen in the rats fed the mixture of the 2 plants and were accompanied by leukopenia, anemia and increases in serum AST activity and urea and by decreased total protein and albumin levels.

  7. Bindi Tuberculosis - Lupus Vulgaris Associated with Bindi Use: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Gyanshankar; Rathi, Sushil; Mulani, Jasmin

    2015-05-01

    Cutaneous lesions are relatively uncommon manifestations of tuberculosis (TB). A 40-year-old female presented with skin lesion over the forehead since two months. She used to apply bindi over the same area since past 25 years. Based on skin biopsy and other ancillary investigations, she was diagnosed as a case of lupus vulgaris and initiated on anti TB medications following which, the lesion regressed. Thus, we herein report the first case of cutaneous tuberculosis (lupus vulgaris) associated with long term use of bindi.

  8. Performance of conventional pcr for screening for strongylus vulgaris on horse farms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Marianne K.; Wøhlk, Chamilla B.M.; Petersen, Stig L.

      Strongyle parasites are ubiquitous in grazing horses. Of these, the bloodworm Strongylus vulgaris is regarded most pathogenic. Increasing levels of anthelmintic resistance in strongyle parasites has lead to recommendations of decreased treatment intensities, and there is now a pronounced need...... for reliable tools for detection of parasite burdens in general and S. vulgaris in particular. The only method currently available is the larval culture, which is laborious and time-consuming, so veterinary practitioners most often pool samples from several horses together in one culture to save time...

  9. Effects of copper on reserve mobilization in embryo of Phaseolus vulgaris L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmous, Inès; Bellani, Lorenza M; Chaoui, Abdelilah; El Ferjani, Ezzedine; Muccifora, Simonetta

    2015-07-01

    The present research reports a biochemical and micro-submicroscopic analysis of copper effect on reserve mobilization during germination of Phaseolus vulgaris L. var. soisson nain hatif seeds. Dry embryonic cells are rich in protein bodies and little starch grains. In Cu-treated embryos copper inhibited 50% of albumin and globulin mobilization after 72 h imbibition. The severe alterations in treated embryo cells, observed by electron microscope, were probably the cause of the inability to utilize the amino acids freed by protein mobilization and so possibly the cause of the inhibition of P. vulgaris embryonic axis elongation.

  10. Impact of light quality on biomass production and fatty acid content in the microalga Chlorella vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultberg, Malin; Jönsson, Helene Larsson; Bergstrand, Karl-Johan; Carlsson, Anders S

    2014-05-01

    In this study, the green microalga Chlorella vulgaris was exposed to monochromatic light at six different wavelengths in order to study the effect on biomass productivity and fatty acid content. A significantly higher amount of biomass by produced in the treatments with yellow, red and white light compared with blue, green and purple light. There were also significant differences in total lipid content and fatty acid profile between the treatments. The green light regime gave the lowest concentration of lipids, but increased the concentration of polyunsaturated fatty acids. Thus it can be concluded that light quality significantly affects biomass productivity, total lipid concentration and fatty acid profile in the microalga C. vulgaris.

  11. TERMINALIA CHEBULA: A TREATMENT AGAINST PATHOGENIC PROTEUS VULGARIS STRAINS ASSOCIATED WITH URINARY TRACT INFECTION

    OpenAIRE

    Tariq. A. L; Reyaz. A. L

    2013-01-01

    Terminalia chebula was used to find out the new sort of treatment for the urinary tract infections caused by Proteus vulgaris. The causative agent was identified as Proteus vulgaris by staining and biochemical methods. It is responsible to cause urinary tract infection and most of strains show the resistance against the broad spectrum antibiotics: Ceftazidime (30μg), Ofloxacin (50μg), Norfloxacin (30μg), Tetracycline (30μg), Ampicillin (30μg), Chloramphenicol (25μg) and Gentamycin (20μg). The...

  12. Autoimmune bullous diseases with skin and eye involvement: Cicatricial pemphigoid, pemphigus vulgaris, and pemphigus paraneoplastica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broussard, Karen C; Leung, Theresa G; Moradi, Ahmadreza; Thorne, Jennifer E; Fine, Jo-David

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune blistering diseases are a heterogeneous group of disorders that mostly affect the skin and mucous membranes. Occasionally, other organ systems may be involved, depending on the unique pathophysiology of each disease. Cicatricial pemphigoid, pemphigus vulgaris, and paraneoplastic pemphigus are distinct entities, but all have the potential to have cutaneous and ocular involvement. Awareness and early recognition of ocular involvement in these diseases is important given the increased risk for vision loss and blindness with delay in management. Several skin diseases may be associated with involvement of the external eye. The most common autoimmune diseases are cicatricial pemphigoid, pemphigus vulgaris, and paraneoplastic pemphigus.

  13. Current Pathophysiological Aspects and Therapeutic Modalities for Pemphigus Vulgaris : A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Raviraj

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Pemphigus vulgaris (PV is an autoimmune disorder manifesting primarily as blisters involving the mucocutaneous systems. The current medical literature indicates many breakthroughs in the research of pathophysiology and treatment aspects of PV. This article tries to describe some of the novel aspects briefing the role of nondesmoglein antibodies and the role of TNF-alpha in the etiopathogenesis of pemphigus vulgaris and the role of newer therapeutic modalities like Rituximab, Etanercept, intravenous Immunoglobulins, cholinergic drugs, arid the like in the treatment of PV.

  14. Sustainable Transition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    What. The chapter addresses designing for sustainability as interventions in socio-technical systems and social practices of users and communities. It calls for reflexive design practices challenging dominant regimes and shaping alternative design spaces. The specific case is the reconfiguration...... of agendas/vision, technologies, actors and institutions in the emergent design of an urban mobility system based on an electric car sharing system. Why. Designing for sustainability is a fundamental challenge for future design practices; designers have to obtain an ability to contribute to sustainable...... transition processes. Where. Addresses design processes aimed at sustainable transition enacted in complex social settings, socio-technical systems involving many different actors and agendas. How. The chapter outlines a conceptual and analytic framework for a reflexive design practice for sustainability...

  15. Transition Operators

    CERN Document Server

    Alcock-Zeilinger, Judith

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we give a generic algorithm of the transition operators between Hermitian Young projection operators corresponding to equivalent irreducible representations of SU(N), using the compact expressions of Hermitian Young projection operators derived in a companion paper. We show that the Hermitian Young projection operators together with their transition operators constitute a fully orthogonal basis for the algebra of invariants of $V^{\\otimes m}$ that exhibits a systematically simplified multiplication table. We discuss the full algebra of invariants over $V^{\\otimes 3}$ and $V^{\\otimes 4}$ as explicit examples. In our presentation we make use of various standard concepts such as Young projection operators, Clebsch-Gordan operators, and invariants (in birdtrack notation). We tie these perspectives together and use them to shed light on each other.

  16. [Physiological and cell biological characterization of the protease producer Thermoactinomyces vulgaris during prolonged culture in a stirred fermenter].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kretschmer, S; Körner, D; Strohbach, G; Klingenberg, P; Jacob, H E; Gumpert, J; Ruttloff, H

    1982-01-01

    The physiological behaviour of Thermoactinomyces vulgaris - producing a thermostable serine-protease - was analyzed during fermentation. During 38 h the consumption of nutrients and oxygen as well as the rates of macromolecular and protease synthesis were measured. The morphological and ultrastructural changes of the mycelia were also studied. The mycelia grew exponentially for about 5 hours. After a short lag and a second slower growth phase, growth continued about linearly until the end, as was indicated by a constant rate of incorporation of labelled thymidine. However, at the same time a changing portion of hyphae - up to 45% - underwent lysis. According to the changing ratio of growing and lysing material, regarding the physiological activity of the culture the fermentation process could be divided into 4 periods. The formation of the protease started at the transition to the slow growth phase and continued linearly. The ability to produce the protease was attributed to a mycelium being formed after the shift down caused by limitation of supply of utilizable nitrogen compounds. The end of protease production 10 h later was correlated to a drastic decrease of the respiratory activity of the mycelia, probably caused by exhaustion of easily utilizable carbohydrates.

  17. Acne vulgaris: Perceptions and beliefs of Saudi adolescent males

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Natour, Sahar H.

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Although acne vulgaris is common in adolescents, information on their understanding of acne is minimal. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the perceptions and beliefs of Saudi youth on acne. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Three hundred twenty-nine male students (aged 13–22 years) from 6 secondary schools in the Eastern Saudi Arabia completed a self-reported questionnaire on knowledge, causation, exacerbating and relieving factors of acne. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 15.0. Results of subjects with acne, a family history of acne, and parents' educational levels were compared. Differences between the analyzed groups were assessed by a Chi-square test; p ≤ 0.05 was considered statistically significant. RESULTS: Over half (58.9%) of the participants considered acne a transient condition not requiring therapy. Only 13.1% knew that the proper treatment of acne could take a long time, even several years. Over half (52%) thought acne can be treated from the first or after few visits to the doctor. Popular sources of information were television/radio (47.7%), friends (45.6%), and the internet (38%). Only 23.4% indicated school as a source of knowledge. Reported causal factors included scratching (88.5%) and squeezing (82.1%) of pimples, poor hygiene (83.9%), poor dietary habits (71.5%), and stress (54.1%). Ameliorating factors included frequent washing of the face (52.9%), exercise (41.1%), sunbathing (24.1%), and drinking of mineral water (21%). The correlations of these facts are discussed. CONCLUSION: Results of this study point out that misconceptions of acne are widespread among Saudi youth. A health education program is needed to improve the understanding of the condition. PMID:28163574

  18. I know my neighbour: individual recognition in Octopus vulgaris.

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    Elena Tricarico

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Little is known about individual recognition (IR in octopuses, although they have been abundantly studied for their sophisticated behaviour and learning capacities. Indeed, the ability of octopuses to recognise conspecifics is suggested by a number of clues emerging from both laboratory studies (where they appear to form and maintain dominance hierarchies and field observations (octopuses of neighbouring dens display little agonism between each other. To fill this gap in knowledge, we investigated the behaviour of 24 size-matched pairs of Octopus vulgaris in laboratory conditions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The experimental design was composed of 3 phases: Phase 1 (acclimatization: 12 "sight-allowed" (and 12 "isolated" pairs were maintained for 3 days in contiguous tanks separated by a transparent (and opaque partition to allow (and block the vision of the conspecific; Phase 2 (cohabitation: members of each pair (both sight-allowed and isolated were transferred into an experimental tank and were allowed to interact for 15 min every day for 3 consecutive days; Phase 3 (test: each pair (both sight-allowed and isolated was subject to a switch of an octopus to form pairs composed of either familiar ("sham switches" or unfamiliar conspecifics ("real switches". Longer latencies (i.e. the time elapsed from the first interaction and fewer physical contacts in the familiar pairs as opposed to the unfamiliar pairs were used as proxies for recognition. CONCLUSIONS: Octopuses appear able to recognise conspecifics and to remember the individual previously met for at least one day. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first experimental study showing the occurrence of a form of IR in cephalopods. Future studies should clarify whether this is a "true" IR.

  19. Diversification and population structure in common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L..

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    Matthew W Blair

    Full Text Available Wild accessions of crops and landraces are valuable genetic resources for plant breeding and for conserving alleles and gene combinations in planta. The primary genepool of cultivated common beans includes wild accessions of Phaseolus vulgaris. These are of the same species as the domesticates and therefore are easily crossable with cultivated accessions. Molecular marker assessment of wild beans and landraces is important for the proper utilization and conservation of these important genetic resources. The goal of this research was to evaluate a collection of wild beans with fluorescent microsatellite or simple sequence repeat markers and to determine the population structure in combination with cultivated beans of all known races. Marker diversity in terms of average number of alleles per marker was high (13 for the combination of 36 markers and 104 wild genotypes that was similar to the average of 14 alleles per marker found for the 606 cultivated genotypes. Diversity in wild beans appears to be somewhat higher than in cultivated beans on a per genotype basis. Five populations or genepools were identified in structure analysis of the wild beans corresponding to segments of the geographical range, including Mesoamerican (Mexican, Guatemalan, Colombian, Ecuadorian-northern Peruvian and Andean (Argentina, Bolivia and Southern Peru. The combined analysis of wild and cultivated accessions showed that the first and last of these genepools were related to the cultivated genepools of the same names and the penultimate was found to be distinct but not ancestral to the others. The Guatemalan genepool was very novel and perhaps related to cultivars of race Guatemala, while the Colombian population was also distinct. Results suggest geographic isolation, founder effects or natural selection could have created the different semi-discrete populations of wild beans and that multiple domestications and introgression were involved in creating the diversity of

  20. Importance of the dentist in early diagnosis of pemphigus vulgaris

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    Thiago de Santana Santos

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The vulgar pemphigus is a chronic, rare, vesicle-bubble disease of autoimmune origin and with a possibility of following a dangerous clinical course when it is not diagnosed and treated in its initial stage. It usually affects people from 40 to 60 years old, being rare in children. In the majority of cases, oral manifestations are the first signs of the disease, so that dentists play an important rol in its early diagnosis. The authors present a case report of vulgar pemphigus in a 17 year-old patient, attended by the Bucco-Maxillo-Facial Surgery Service of the “Fundação de Beneficência Hospital de Cirurgia” in Aracaju-SE, Brazil. The patient was admitted with a complaint of the presence of numerous scattered painful ulcers in the mouth that had developed in approximately two months, and reported that at first, blisters that broke quickly appeared, leading to extremely painful ulcerations. Incisional biopsies were performed in the jugal mucosa and retromolar regions, and also a complete hemogram to discard the hypothesis of leukemia. In view of the clinical and histopathological findings, the final diagnosis of pemphigus vulgaris was made. Before receiving specialized treatment, the patient presented marked worsening of the clinical condition, with exacerbation of intraoral signs and symptoms and development of skin lesions around the body surface. The patient was hospitalized in the “Hospital Universitário da Universidade Federal de Sergipe” and treated with prednisone, cimetidine and nystatin, showing significant improvement of symptoms in approximately two weeks. At present, the patient is under the care of an interdisciplinary team that includes dermatologists and dentists.

  1. Mechanisms of Mitochondrial Damage in Keratinocytes by Pemphigus Vulgaris Antibodies*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalantari-Dehaghi, Mina; Chen, Yumay; Deng, Wu; Chernyavsky, Alex; Marchenko, Steve; Wang, Ping H.; Grando, Sergei A.

    2013-01-01

    The development of nonhormonal treatment of pemphigus vulgaris (PV) has been hampered by a lack of clear understanding of the mechanisms leading to keratinocyte (KC) detachment and death in pemphigus. In this study, we sought to identify changes in the vital mitochondrial functions in KCs treated with the sera from PV patients and healthy donors. PV sera significantly increased proton leakage from KCs, suggesting that PV IgGs increase production of reactive oxygen species. Indeed, measurement of intracellular reactive oxygen species production showed a drastic increase of cell staining in response to treatment by PV sera, which was confirmed by FACS analysis. Exposure of KCs to PV sera also caused dramatic changes in the mitochondrial membrane potential detected with the JC-1 dye. These changes can trigger the mitochondria-mediated intrinsic apoptosis. Although sera from different PV patients elicited unique patterns of mitochondrial damage, the mitochondria-protecting drugs nicotinamide (also called niacinamide), minocycline, and cyclosporine A exhibited a uniform protective effect. Their therapeutic activity was validated in the passive transfer model of PV in neonatal BALB/c mice. The highest efficacy of mitochondrial protection of the combination of these drugs found in mitochondrial assay was consistent with the ability of the same drug combination to abolish acantholysis in mouse skin. These findings provide a theoretical background for clinical reports of the efficacy of mitochondria-protecting drugs in PV patients. Pharmacological protection of mitochondria and/or compensation of an altered mitochondrial function may therefore become a novel approach to development of personalized nonhormonal therapies of patients with this potentially lethal autoimmune blistering disease. PMID:23599429

  2. Dissecting Phaseolus vulgaris innate immune system against Colletotrichum lindemuthianum infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oblessuc, Paula Rodrigues; Borges, Aline; Chowdhury, Bablu; Caldas, Danielle Gregório Gomes; Tsai, Siu Mui; Camargo, Luis Eduardo Aranha; Melotto, Maeli

    2012-01-01

    The genus Colletotrichum is one of the most economically important plant pathogens, causing anthracnose on a wide range of crops including common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). Crop yield can be dramatically decreased depending on the plant cultivar used and the environmental conditions. This study aimed to identify potential genetic components of the bean immune system to provide environmentally friendly control measures against this fungus. As the common bean is not amenable to reverse genetics to explore functionality and its genome is not fully curated, we used putative Arabidopsis orthologs of bean expressed sequence tag (EST) to perform bioinformatic analysis and experimental validation of gene expression to identify common bean genes regulated during the incompatible interaction with C. lindemuthianum. Similar to model pathosystems, Gene Ontology (GO) analysis indicated that hormone biosynthesis and signaling in common beans seem to be modulated by fungus infection. For instance, cytokinin and ethylene responses were up-regulated and jasmonic acid, gibberellin, and abscisic acid responses were down-regulated, indicating that these hormones may play a central role in this pathosystem. Importantly, we have identified putative bean gene orthologs of Arabidopsis genes involved in the plant immune system. Based on experimental validation of gene expression, we propose that hypersensitive reaction as part of effector-triggered immunity may operate, at least in part, by down-regulating genes, such as FLS2-like and MKK5-like, putative orthologs of the Arabidopsis genes involved in pathogen perception and downstream signaling. We have identified specific bean genes and uncovered metabolic processes and pathways that may be involved in the immune response against pathogens. Our transcriptome database is a rich resource for mining novel defense-related genes, which enabled us to develop a model of the molecular components of the bean innate immune system regulated upon

  3. Dissecting Phaseolus vulgaris innate immune system against Colletotrichum lindemuthianum infection.

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    Paula Rodrigues Oblessuc

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The genus Colletotrichum is one of the most economically important plant pathogens, causing anthracnose on a wide range of crops including common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.. Crop yield can be dramatically decreased depending on the plant cultivar used and the environmental conditions. This study aimed to identify potential genetic components of the bean immune system to provide environmentally friendly control measures against this fungus. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: As the common bean is not amenable to reverse genetics to explore functionality and its genome is not fully curated, we used putative Arabidopsis orthologs of bean expressed sequence tag (EST to perform bioinformatic analysis and experimental validation of gene expression to identify common bean genes regulated during the incompatible interaction with C. lindemuthianum. Similar to model pathosystems, Gene Ontology (GO analysis indicated that hormone biosynthesis and signaling in common beans seem to be modulated by fungus infection. For instance, cytokinin and ethylene responses were up-regulated and jasmonic acid, gibberellin, and abscisic acid responses were down-regulated, indicating that these hormones may play a central role in this pathosystem. Importantly, we have identified putative bean gene orthologs of Arabidopsis genes involved in the plant immune system. Based on experimental validation of gene expression, we propose that hypersensitive reaction as part of effector-triggered immunity may operate, at least in part, by down-regulating genes, such as FLS2-like and MKK5-like, putative orthologs of the Arabidopsis genes involved in pathogen perception and downstream signaling. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We have identified specific bean genes and uncovered metabolic processes and pathways that may be involved in the immune response against pathogens. Our transcriptome database is a rich resource for mining novel defense-related genes, which enabled us to

  4. Mechanisms of mitochondrial damage in keratinocytes by pemphigus vulgaris antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalantari-Dehaghi, Mina; Chen, Yumay; Deng, Wu; Chernyavsky, Alex; Marchenko, Steve; Wang, Ping H; Grando, Sergei A

    2013-06-07

    The development of nonhormonal treatment of pemphigus vulgaris (PV) has been hampered by a lack of clear understanding of the mechanisms leading to keratinocyte (KC) detachment and death in pemphigus. In this study, we sought to identify changes in the vital mitochondrial functions in KCs treated with the sera from PV patients and healthy donors. PV sera significantly increased proton leakage from KCs, suggesting that PV IgGs increase production of reactive oxygen species. Indeed, measurement of intracellular reactive oxygen species production showed a drastic increase of cell staining in response to treatment by PV sera, which was confirmed by FACS analysis. Exposure of KCs to PV sera also caused dramatic changes in the mitochondrial membrane potential detected with the JC-1 dye. These changes can trigger the mitochondria-mediated intrinsic apoptosis. Although sera from different PV patients elicited unique patterns of mitochondrial damage, the mitochondria-protecting drugs nicotinamide (also called niacinamide), minocycline, and cyclosporine A exhibited a uniform protective effect. Their therapeutic activity was validated in the passive transfer model of PV in neonatal BALB/c mice. The highest efficacy of mitochondrial protection of the combination of these drugs found in mitochondrial assay was consistent with the ability of the same drug combination to abolish acantholysis in mouse skin. These findings provide a theoretical background for clinical reports of the efficacy of mitochondria-protecting drugs in PV patients. Pharmacological protection of mitochondria and/or compensation of an altered mitochondrial function may therefore become a novel approach to development of personalized nonhormonal therapies of patients with this potentially lethal autoimmune blistering disease.

  5. Autoantibodies other than Anti-desmogleins in Pemphigus Vulgaris Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Marwah Adly; Salem, Hedayat; El Azizy, Hoda

    2017-01-01

    Background: Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is an immunoglobulin G-mediated autoimmune bullous skin disease. Nonorgan-specific antibodies were detected in Tunisian and Brazilian pemphigus patients with different prevalence. Materials and Methods: Fifty PV patients and fifty controls were screened for antinuclear antibodies (ANAs), anti-smooth muscle antibodies (ASMAs), anti-parietal antibodies (APAs), anti-mitochondrial antibodies, and Anti-nuclear cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) by indirect immunofluorescence. Results: Thirty-nine patients were female and 11 were male. Fifteen patients did not receive treatment before while 35 patients were on systemic steroid treatment ± azathioprine. Twenty (40%) of the PV patients and 1 (2%) control had positive ANA. ANA was significantly higher in PV patients than controls, P < 0.0001. ASMAs were detected in 20 (40%) PV patients and none of the controls. ASMA was significantly higher in PV patients than controls, P < 0.0001. No significant difference was detected between treated and untreated regarding ANA, P - 0.11. However, there was a significant difference between treated and untreated regarding ASMA, P - 0.03. Six patients (12%) and none of the controls had positive APA. There was a significant difference between the patients and the controls in APA. P - 0.027. Conclusion: Egyptian PV patients showed more prevalent ANA, ASMA, and APA than normal controls. Follow-up of those patients is essential to detect the early development of concomitant autoimmune disease. Environmental factors might account for the variability of the nonorgan-specific antibodies among different populations. PMID:28216725

  6. Autoantibodies other than anti-desmogleins in pemphigus vulgaris patients

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    Marwah Adly Saleh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pemphigus vulgaris (PV is an immunoglobulin G-mediated autoimmune bullous skin disease. Nonorgan-specific antibodies were detected in Tunisian and Brazilian pemphigus patients with different prevalence. Materials and Methods: Fifty PV patients and fifty controls were screened for antinuclear antibodies (ANAs, anti-smooth muscle antibodies (ASMAs, anti-parietal antibodies (APAs, anti-mitochondrial antibodies, and Anti-nuclear cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA by indirect immunofluorescence. Results: Thirty-nine patients were female and 11 were male. Fifteen patients did not receive treatment before while 35 patients were on systemic steroid treatment ± azathioprine. Twenty (40% of the PV patients and 1 (2% control had positive ANA. ANA was significantly higher in PV patients than controls, P< 0.0001. ASMAs were detected in 20 (40% PV patients and none of the controls. ASMA was significantly higher in PV patients than controls, P< 0.0001. No significant difference was detected between treated and untreated regarding ANA, P - 0.11. However, there was a significant difference between treated and untreated regarding ASMA, P- 0.03. Six patients (12% and none of the controls had positive APA. There was a significant difference between the patients and the controls in APA. P- 0.027. Conclusion: Egyptian PV patients showed more prevalent ANA, ASMA, and APA than normal controls. Follow-up of those patients is essential to detect the early development of concomitant autoimmune disease. Environmental factors might account for the variability of the nonorgan-specific antibodies among different populations.

  7. Management of acne vulgaris: an evidence-based update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, J R; Grindlay, D J C; Williams, H C

    2010-06-01

    This review summarizes clinically important findings from 3 systematic reviews, 1 updated guideline and a selection from the 62 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published between February 2007 and January 2009 on the topic of acne vulgaris. Low glycaemic-load diets might reduce acne severity but this remains unproven. Written patient information leaflets have not been surpassed by other communication methods. New combination topical treatments have not shown convincing advantages over current combination products such as clindamycin/benzoyl peroxide. Topical dapsone is superior to placebo but has yet to be compared with standard topical treatments. Long-term topical tretinoin to prevent nonmelanoma skin cancer in elderly men was associated with higher all-cause mortality, but there is currently no evidence of increased mortality for topical retinoid use when treating acne. All oral tetracyclines have similar efficacy, yet minocycline is the most costly. Oral isotretinoin monotherapy remains the gold-standard treatment for severe acne. Flutamide plus the oral contraceptive pill is beneficial for acne associated with polycystic ovary syndrome. Photodynamic therapy, phototherapy and laser therapy cannot be recommended universally for acne until minimal postinflammatory pigmentation and longer-term benefit can be shown, especially with current high costs. Development of non-antibiotic therapies is preferable to minimize the risk of community antibiotic resistance. Future trials should use active comparators at optimum doses and avoid noninferiority comparisons unless appropriately powered. Trials need to shift from using multiple, unvalidated outcome measures to including patient-reported and quality-of-life outcomes, and all trials should be registered on a public clinical-trials database.

  8. Effect of the glycemic index of carbohydrates on Acne vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Rebecca C; Lee, Stephen; Choi, James Y J; Atkinson, Fiona S; Stockmann, Karola S; Petocz, Peter; Brand-Miller, Jennie C

    2010-10-01

    Acne vulgaris may be improved by dietary factors that increase insulin sensitivity. We hypothesized that a low-glycemic index diet would improve facial acne severity and insulin sensitivity. Fifty-eight adolescent males (mean age ± standard deviation 16.5 ± 1.0 y and body mass index 23.1 ± 3.5 kg/m(2)) were alternately allocated to high or low glycemic index diets. Severity of inflammatory lesions on the face, insulin sensitivity (homeostasis modeling assessment of insulin resistance), androgens and insulin-like growth factor-1 and its binding proteins were assessed at baseline and at eight weeks, a period corresponding to the school term. Forty-three subjects (n = 23 low glycemic index and n = 20 high glycemic index) completed the study. Diets differed significantly in glycemic index (mean ± standard error of the mean, low glycemic index 51 ± 1 vs. high glycemic index 61 ± 2, p = 0.0002), but not in macronutrient distribution or fiber content. Facial acne improved on both diets (low glycemic index -26 ± 6%, p = 0.0004 and high glycemic index -16 ± 7%, p = 0.01), but differences between diets did not reach significance. Change in insulin sensitivity was not different between diets (low glycemic index 0.2 ± 0.1 and high glycemic index 0.1 ± 0.1, p = 0.60) and did not correlate with change in acne severity (Pearson correlation r = -0.196, p = 0.244). Longer time frames, greater reductions in glycemic load or/and weight loss may be necessary to detect improvements in acne among adolescent boys.

  9. GAMBARAN KARAKTERISTIK KASUS PSORIASIS VULGARIS DI POLIKLINIK PENYAKIT KULIT DAN KELAMIN RSUD KABUPATEN BULELENG TAHUN 2012-2013

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    Komang Aditya Yudistira

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Psoriasis merupakan penyakit kulit kronis yang sering mengalami kekambuhan. Penyakit psoriasis tidak segera mengancam nyawa akan tetapi sangat mempengaruhi kualitas hidup penderitanya. Tujuan dari studi ini adalah untuk mengetahui profil dari pasien psoriasis vulgaris dan gambaran karakteristik pasien dengan psoriasis vulgaris. Penelitian ini adalah penelitian deskriptif dengan mengambil data sekunder pasien psoriasis vulgaris yang berobat ke poliklinik kulit dan kelamin RSUD Buleleng pada tahun 2012 sampai 2013. Sampel penelitian ini adalah pasien dengan psoriasis vulgaris yang berobat ke poliklinik kulit dan kelamin RSUD Buleleng. Dari hasil penelitian ini didapatkan sebanyak 54 pasien mengalami penyakit psoriasis vulgaris pada tahun 2012 dan sebanyak 50 pasien mengalami penyakit psoriasis vulgaris pada tahun 2013. Dari kedua tahun ini hampir sebagian besar merupakan kasus lama, persebaran kelompok usia hampir sama di semua kelompok usia dan jenis kelamin. Dari karakteristik pasien, sebanyak 74,1% dengan BMI normal pada tahun 2012 dan 54% pasien dengan BMI normal pada tahun 2013. 25,9% pasien yang memiliki kebiasaan merokok pada tahun 2012 dan 28% pasien di tahun 2013. Sebanyak 16,7% pasien memiliki kebiasaan minum alkohol pada tahun 2012 dan 24% pasien di tahun 2013. Untuk riwayat penyakit lain pada pasien psoriasis vulgaris, 24% pasien dengan diabetes mellitus di tahun 2012 dan 20% pasien di tahun 2013,  5% pasien dengan rheumatoid artritis di tahun 2012 dan 4% pasien di tahun 2013.

  10. In Vitro Inhibitory Effect of Berberis vulgaris (Berberidaceae and Its Main Component, Berberine against Different Leishmania Species.

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    Hossein Mahmoudvand

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Leishmaniasis has been identified as a major public health problem in tropical and sub-tropical countries. The present study was aimed to investigate antileishmanial effects of various extracts of Berberis vulgaris also its active compoenent, berberine against Leishmania tropica and L. infantum species on in vitro experiments.In this study in vitro antileishmanial activity of various extracts of B. vulgaris also its active compoenent, berberine against promastigote and amastigote stages of L. tropica and L. infantum was evaluated, using MTT assay and in a macrophage model, respectively. Furthermore, infectivity rate and cytotoxicity effects of B. vulgaris and berberine in murine macrophage cells were investigated.The findings of optical density (OD and IC50 indicated that B. vulgaris particulary berberine significantly (P<0.05 inhibited the growth rate of promastigote stage of L.tropica and L.infantum in comparison to meglumine antimoniate (MA. In addition, B. vulgaris and berberine significantly (P<0.05 decreased the mean number of amastigotes in each macrophage as compared with positive control. In the evaluation of cytotoxicity effects, it could be observed that berberine as compared with B. vulgaris exhibited more cytotoxicity against murine macrophages. Results also showed that when parasites were pre-incubated with B. vulgaris their ability to infect murine macrophages was significantly decreased.B.vulgaris particularly berberine exhibited potent in vitro leishmanicidal effects against L. tropica and L.infantum. Further works are required to evaluate the antileishmanial effects of B.vulgaris on Leishmania species using clinical settings.

  11. Comparison between the efficacy of metronidazole vaginal gel and Berberis vulgaris (Berberis vulgaris) combined with metronidazole gel alone in the treatment of bacterial vaginosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoudi, Mansoure; Kopaei, Mahmoud Rafieian; Miraj, Sepideh

    2016-01-01

    Background Bacterial vaginosis is one of the most prevalent complications among reproductive-aged women. Antibacterial and antifungal effects of Berberis vulgaris have been demonstrated in vitro and in vivo. Objectives This study aimed to compare the therapeutic effects of the vaginal gel of Berberis vulgaris 5% (in metronidazole base) with metronidazole vaginal gel 0.75% on bacterial vaginosis on 80 patients referred to the Hajar Hospital from January 2012 to April 2013. Methods This study was a randomized clinical trial research on 80 women affected by bacterial vaginosis, who were randomly divided into two groups of 40 participants. Diagnostic criteria were Amsel’s criteria and Gram stain. Berberis vulgaris 5% (in metronidazole gel base) or metronidazole vaginal gel for five-night usage was prescribed to each group, and after two to seven days therapeutic effects and Amsel criteria were assessed. Data analysis was performed by SPSS 16 using Student t-test, chi-square, and ANOVA tests. Results Findings of the study showed a statistically significant difference with regard to treatment response between the study groups (pvaginosis therapy. Clinical trial registration The trial was registered at the Iranian Registry of Clinical Trials (http://www.irct.ir) with the IRCT ID: IRCT201411102085N13. Funding Shahrekord University of Medical Sciences supported this research. PMID:27757195

  12. Comparison between the efficacy of metronidazole vaginal gel and Berberis vulgaris (Berberis vulgaris) combined with metronidazole gel alone in the treatment of bacterial vaginosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoudi, Mansoure; Kopaei, Mahmoud Rafieian; Miraj, Sepideh

    2016-08-01

    Bacterial vaginosis is one of the most prevalent complications among reproductive-aged women. Antibacterial and antifungal effects of Berberis vulgaris have been demonstrated in vitro and in vivo. This study aimed to compare the therapeutic effects of the vaginal gel of Berberis vulgaris 5% (in metronidazole base) with metronidazole vaginal gel 0.75% on bacterial vaginosis on 80 patients referred to the Hajar Hospital from January 2012 to April 2013. This study was a randomized clinical trial research on 80 women affected by bacterial vaginosis, who were randomly divided into two groups of 40 participants. Diagnostic criteria were Amsel's criteria and Gram stain. Berberis vulgaris 5% (in metronidazole gel base) or metronidazole vaginal gel for five-night usage was prescribed to each group, and after two to seven days therapeutic effects and Amsel criteria were assessed. Data analysis was performed by SPSS 16 using Student t-test, chi-square, and ANOVA tests. Findings of the study showed a statistically significant difference with regard to treatment response between the study groups (pbacterial vaginosis therapy. The trial was registered at the Iranian Registry of Clinical Trials (http://www.irct.ir) with the IRCT ID: IRCT201411102085N13. Shahrekord University of Medical Sciences supported this research.

  13. Conformational Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerminski, Ryszard; Roitberg, Adrian; Choi, Chyung; Ulitsky, Alexander; Elber, Ron

    1991-10-01

    Two computational approaches to study plausible conformations of biological molecules and the transitions between them are presented and discussed. The first approach is a new search algorithm which enhances the sampling of alternative conformers using a mean field approximation. It is argued and demonstrated that the mean field approximation has a small effect on the location of the minima. The method is a combination of the LES protocol (Locally Enhanced Sampling) and simulated annealing. The LES method was used in the past to study the diffusion pathways of ligands from buried active sites in myoglobin and leghemoglobin to the exterior of the protein. The present formulation of LES and its implementation in a Molecular Dynamics program is described. An application for side chain placement in a tetrapeptide is presented. The computational effort associated with conformational searches using LES grows only linearly with the number of degrees of freedom, whereas in the exact case the computational effort grows exponentially. Such saving is of course associated with a mean field approximation. The second branch of studies pertains to the calculation of reaction paths in large and flexible biological systems. An extensive mapping of minima and barriers for two different tetrapeptides is calculated from the known minima and barriers of alanine tetrapeptide which we calculated recently.1 The tetrapeptides are useful models for the formation of secondary structure elements since they are the shortest possible polymers of this type which can still form a complete helical turn. The tetrapeptides are isobutyryl-val(χ1=60)-ala-ala and isobutyryl-val(χ1=-60)-ala-ala. Properties of the hundreds of minima and of the hundreds intervening barriers are discussed. Estimates for thermal transition times between the many conformers (and times to explore the complete phase space) are calculated and compared. It is suggested that the most significant effect of the side chain size is

  14. Rapid transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamrin, J.G.

    1980-01-01

    Solar energy programs are entering a critical transitional period as we move from the initial marketing of solar technologies into a phase of widespread commercialization. We face the dual challenge of trying to get enough solar systems in place fast enough to prove solar is a viable alternative, while trying to ensure the systems are designed and installed properly, proving the energy savings as promised. This is a period of both great opportunity and high risk as the field becomes crowded with new solar cheerleaders and supporters but seldom enough competent players. The status of existing and proposed programs for the accelerated commercialization of solar energy in California is described.

  15. Transit space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raahauge, Kirsten Marie

    2008-01-01

    This article deals with representations of one specific city, Århus, Denmark, especially its central district. The analysis is based on anthropological fieldwork conducted in Skåde Bakker and Fedet, two well-off neighborhoods. The overall purpose of the project is to study perceptions of space...... and the interaction of cultural, social, and spatial organizations, as seen from the point of view of people living in Skåde Bakker and Fedet. The focus is on the city dwellers’ representations of the central district of Århus with specific reference to the concept of transit space. When applied to various Århusian...

  16. Genetic diversity analysis with ISSR PCR on green algae Chlorella vulgaris and Chlorella pyrenoidosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Songdong

    2008-11-01

    In the present study, genetic polymorphism and diversity in unicellular clones of Chlorella vulgaris Beijerinck and Chlorella pyrenoidosa Chick were studied with Inter Simple Sequence Repeats PCR (ISSR PCR). Samples including four clones of C. vulgaris and three clones of C. pyrenoidosa were purified by single-clone-choice method. For four C. vulgaris unicellular clones, the total number of the bands scored for 18 primers was 298; and the number of the polymorphic bands was 118, of which 39.6% were polymorphic. The size of PCR products ranged from 200 to 2 500 bp. The total number of bands scored for 18 primers, the number of polymorphic bands and the percentage of three C. pyrenoidosa unicellular clones was 194.83 and 30.8%, respectively. POPGENE analysis show that the average Nei genetic diversity (h*) and Shannon index of diversity (I*) in the four C. vulgaris unicellular clones was 0.2181 and 0.3208, respectively, which is slightly higher than those of the three C. pyrenoidosa unicellular clones (0.190 3 and 0.274 8), which agreed with the percentage of polymorphic bands in the mixed samples of the two species. The results suggest that ISSR is a useful method to Chlorella for intraspecies genetic analysis.

  17. Inhibitory effects of silver nanoparticles in two green algae, Chlorella vulgaris and Dunaliella tertiolecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oukarroum, Abdallah; Bras, Sébastien; Perreault, François; Popovic, Radovan

    2012-04-01

    Freshwater microalga Chlorella vulgaris and marine microalga Dunaliella tertiolecta were used to investigate toxic effects induced by 50 nm silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). To induce AgNPs effect, we exposed Chlorella vulgaris and Dunaliella tertiolecta for 24h to 0-10 mg/L. We showed that growth media had different effects in AgNPs agglomerates' formation. Cellular viability, reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and lipids peroxidation were employed to assess the toxic effects of AgNPs. AgNPs were able to interact directly with the Chlorella vulgaris cells surface and large aggregates were observed. AgNPs have a negative effect on Chlorella vulgaris and Dunaliella tertiolecta, as manifested by a strong decrease in chlorophyll content, viable algal cells, increased ROS formation and lipids peroxidation. The variability in sensitivity of both algae towards AgNPs was observed. We conclude that AgNPs have a negative effect on aquatic algae and these alterations might have serious consequences on structure and function of aquatic plant communities.

  18. Mutual facilitations of food waste treatment, microbial fuel cell bioelectricity generation and Chlorella vulgaris lipid production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Qingjie; Pei, Haiyan; Hu, Wenrong; Jiang, Liqun; Yu, Ze

    2016-03-01

    Food waste contains large amount of organic matter that may be troublesome for handing, storage and transportation. A microbial fuel cell (MFC) was successfully constructed with different inoculum densities of Chlorella vulgaris for promoting food waste treatment. Maximum COD removal efficiency was registered with 44% and 25 g CODL(-1)d(-1) of substrate degradation rate when inoculated with the optimal initial density (150 mg L(-1)) of C. vulgaris, which were 2.9 times and 3.1 times higher than that of the abiotic cathode. With the optimum inoculum density of C. vulgaris, the highest open circuit voltage, working voltage and power density of MFC were 260 mV, 170 mV and 19151 mW m(-3), respectively. Besides the high biodiesel quality, promoted by MFC stimulation the biomass productivity and highest total lipid content of C. vulgaris were 207 mg L(-1)d(-1) and 31%, which were roughly 2.7 times and 1.2 times higher than the control group.

  19. [Using Excess Activated Sludge Treated 4-Chlorophenol Contained Waste Water to Cultivate Chlorella vulgaris].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu; Chen, Xiu-rong; Yan, Long; He, Yi-xuan; Shi, Zhen-dong

    2015-04-01

    Using different rations of sludge extracts and supernate from 4-Chlorophenol (4-CP) simulated wastewater's excess sludge after centrifugation to cultivate the Chlorella vulgaris to achieve the goal of excess sludge utilization together with chlorella cultivating. The experiments were performed in 500 mL flasks with different rations of sludge extracts & BG-11 and supernate & BG-11 in a light growth chamber respectively. Number of algal cells, Chlorophyll, enzyme activity, oil and water total nitrogen (TN), total phosphorus (TP), total organic carbon (TOC), toxicity index were investigated. Result showed that the nutrition supplies and toxicity in the excess sludge were removed efficiently via Chlorella vulgaris, the removal rates of TN and TP were at least 40% and 90% respectively; After 10 days cultivation, the density growth of 50% sludge extracts was 20 times higher of the beginning while its chlorophyll content was lower than that of the blank group. Sludge extracts could promote the proliferation of algae, but were not conducive to the synthesis of chlorophyll. The quantity of SOD in per cell showed Chlorella vulgaris gave a positive response via stimulation from toxicant in sludge extracts and supernate. The best time for collecting chlorella vulgaris was the fifth day of cultivation, taking neutral oil accumulation as the evaluating indicator for its utilization combined with the removal of supplies and toxicity.

  20. The Bioconcentration and Degradation of Nonylphenol and Nonylphenol Polyethoxylates by Chlorella vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Wen Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonylphenol polyethoxylates (NPnEOs, a major class of nonionic surfactants, can easily enter into aquatic environments through various pathways due to their wide applications, which leads to the extensive existence of their relative stable metabolites, namely nonylphenol (NP and mono- to tri-ethoxylates. This study investigated the bioconcentration and degradation of NP and NPnEO oligomers (n = 1–12 by a green algae, Chlorella vulgaris. Experimental results showed that C. vulgaris can remove NP from water phase efficiently, and bioconcentration and degradation accounted for approximately half of its loss, respectively, with a 48 h BCF (bioconcentration factor of 2.42 × 103. Moreover, C. vulgaris could concentrate and degrade NPnEOs, distribution profiles of the series homologues of the NPnEOs in algae and water phase were quite different from the initial homologue profile. The 48 h BCF of the NPnEO homologues increased with the length of the EO chain. Degradation extent of total NPnEOs by C. vulgaris was 95.7%, and only 1.1% remained in water phase, and the other 3.2% remained in the algal cells. The algae removed the NPnEOs mainly through degradation. Due to rapid degradation, concentrations of the long chain NPnEO homologous in both water (n ≥ 2 and the algal phase (n ≥ 5 was quite low at the end of a 48 h experiment.

  1. Lipid accumulation from pinewood pyrolysates by rhodosporidium diobovatum and chlorella vulgaris for biodiesel production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luque, L.; Orr, V.C.A.; Chen, S.; Westerhof, R.J.M.; Oudenhoven, S.R.G; Rossum, van G.; Kersten, S.R.A.; Berruti, F.; Rehmann, L.

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the suitability of pinewood pyrolysates as a carbon source for lipid production and cultivation of the oleaginous yeast Rhodosporidium diobovatum and the microalgae Chlorella vulgaris. Thermal decomposition of pinewood and fractional condensation were used to obtain an oil rich

  2. Mild disintegration of the green microalgae Chlorella vulgaris using bead milling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, P.R.; Miron, T.L.; Olivieri, G.; Barbosa, M.J.; Wijffels, R.H.; Eppink, M.H.M.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the mild disintegration of the microalgae Chlorella vulgaris for the release of intracellular products has been studied. By means of bead milling the microalgae suspensions were successfully disintegrated at different biomass concentrations (25–145 gDW kg-1) over a range of agitator sp

  3. Soil-borne microorganisms and soil-type affect pyrrolizidine alkaloids in Jacobaea vulgaris

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosten, L.; Mulder, P.P.J.; Klinkhamer, P.G.L.; Veen, van J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Secondary metabolites like pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) play a crucial part in plant defense. We studied the effects of soil-borne microorganisms and soil-type on pyrrolizidine alkaloids in roots and shoots of Jacobaea vulgaris. We used clones of two genotypes from a dune area (Meijendel), propagat

  4. Transcriptomic and Proteomic Analysis of Arion vulgaris--Proteins for Probably Successful Survival Strategies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulat, Tanja; Smidak, Roman; Sialana, Fernando J; Jung, Gangsoo; Rattei, Thomas; Bilban, Martin; Sattmann, Helmut; Lubec, Gert; Aradska, Jana

    2016-01-01

    The Spanish slug, Arion vulgaris, is considered one of the hundred most invasive species in Central Europe. The immense and very successful adaptation and spreading of A. vulgaris suggest that it developed highly effective mechanisms to deal with infections and natural predators. Current transcriptomic and proteomic studies on gastropods have been restricted mainly to marine and freshwater gastropods. No transcriptomic or proteomic study on A. vulgaris has been carried out so far, and in the current study, the first transcriptomic database from adult specimen of A. vulgaris is reported. To facilitate and enable proteomics in this non-model organism, a mRNA-derived protein database was constructed for protein identification. A gel-based proteomic approach was used to obtain the first generation of a comprehensive slug mantle proteome. A total of 2128 proteins were unambiguously identified; 48 proteins represent novel proteins with no significant homology in NCBI non-redundant database. Combined transcriptomic and proteomic analysis revealed an extensive repertoire of novel proteins with a role in innate immunity including many associated pattern recognition, effector proteins and cytokine-like proteins. The number and diversity in gene families encoding lectins point to a complex defense system, probably as a result of adaptation to a pathogen-rich environment. These results are providing a fundamental and important resource for subsequent studies on molluscs as well as for putative antimicrobial compounds for drug discovery and biomedical applications.

  5. Transcriptomic and Proteomic Analysis of Arion vulgaris--Proteins for Probably Successful Survival Strategies?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja Bulat

    Full Text Available The Spanish slug, Arion vulgaris, is considered one of the hundred most invasive species in Central Europe. The immense and very successful adaptation and spreading of A. vulgaris suggest that it developed highly effective mechanisms to deal with infections and natural predators. Current transcriptomic and proteomic studies on gastropods have been restricted mainly to marine and freshwater gastropods. No transcriptomic or proteomic study on A. vulgaris has been carried out so far, and in the current study, the first transcriptomic database from adult specimen of A. vulgaris is reported. To facilitate and enable proteomics in this non-model organism, a mRNA-derived protein database was constructed for protein identification. A gel-based proteomic approach was used to obtain the first generation of a comprehensive slug mantle proteome. A total of 2128 proteins were unambiguously identified; 48 proteins represent novel proteins with no significant homology in NCBI non-redundant database. Combined transcriptomic and proteomic analysis revealed an extensive repertoire of novel proteins with a role in innate immunity including many associated pattern recognition, effector proteins and cytokine-like proteins. The number and diversity in gene families encoding lectins point to a complex defense system, probably as a result of adaptation to a pathogen-rich environment. These results are providing a fundamental and important resource for subsequent studies on molluscs as well as for putative antimicrobial compounds for drug discovery and biomedical applications.

  6. Genetic diversity analysis with ISSR PCR on green algae Chlorella vulgaris and Chlorella pyrenoidosa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Songdong

    2008-01-01

    In the present study, genetic polymorphism and diversity in unicellular clones of Chlorella vulgaris Beijerinck and Chlorella pyrenoidosa Chick were studied with Inter Simple Sequence Repeats PCR (ISSR PCR). Samples including four clones of C. vulgaris and three clones of C. pyrenoidosa were purified by single-clone-choice method. For four C. vulgaris unicellular clones, the total number of the bands scored for 18 primers was 298; and the number of the polymorphic bands was 118, of which 39.6% were polymorphic. The size of PCR products ranged from 200 to 2 500 bp. The total number of bands scored for 18 primers, the number of polymorphic bands and the percentage of three C. pyrenoidosa unicellular clones was 194.83 and 30.8%, respectively. POPGENE analysis show that the average Nei genetic diversity (h *) and Shannon index of diversity (I *) in the four C. vulgaris unicellular clones was 0.2181 and 0.3208, respectively, which is slightly higher than those of the three C. pyrenoidosa unicellular clones (0.190 3 and 0.274 8), which agreed with the percentage of polymorphic bands in the mixed samples of the two species. The results suggest that ISSR is a useful method to Chlorella for intra-species genetic analysis.

  7. Green Tea and Other Tea Polyphenols: Effects on Sebum Production and Acne Vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saric, Suzana; Notay, Manisha; Sivamani, Raja K

    2016-12-29

    Polyphenols are antioxidant molecules found in many foods including nuts, fruits, vegetables, chocolate, wine, and tea. Polyphenols have antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, and antineoplastic properties. Recent studies suggest that tea polyphenols may be used for reducing sebum production in the skin and for treatment of acne vulgaris. This review examines the evidence for use of topically and orally ingested tea polyphenols against sebum production and for acne treatment and prevention. The PubMed database was searched for studies on tea polyphenols, sebum secretion, and acne vulgaris. Of the 59 studies found, eight met the inclusion criteria. Two studies evaluated tea polyphenol effects on sebum production; six studies examined tea polyphenol effects on acne vulgaris. Seven studies evaluated topical tea polyphenols; one study examined systemic tea polyphenols. None of the studies evaluated both topical and systemic tea polyphenols. Tea polyphenol sources included green tea (six studies) and tea, type not specified (two studies). Overall, there is some evidence that tea polyphenols in topical formulation may be beneficial in reducing sebum secretion and in treatment of acne. Research studies of high quality and with large sample sizes are needed to assess the efficacy of tea polyphenols in topical and oral prevention of acne vulgaris and lipid synthesis by the sebaceous glands.

  8. Clinical practice guidelines for treatment of acne vulgaris: a critical appraisal using the AGREE II instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanclemente, Gloria; Acosta, Jorge-Luis; Tamayo, Maria-Eulalia; Bonfill, Xavier; Alonso-Coello, Pablo

    2014-04-01

    A significant number of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) about the treatment of acne vulgaris in adolescents and adults have been published worldwide. However, little is known about the quality of CPGs in this field. The aim of this study was to appraise the methodological quality of published acne vulgaris CPGs. We performed a systematic review of published CPGs on acne vulgaris therapy from July 2002 to July 2012. Three reviewers independently assessed each CPG using the AGREE II instrument. A standardized score was calculated for each of the six domains. Our search strategy identified 103 citations but just six met our inclusion criteria. Agreement among reviewers was very good: 0.981. The domains that scored better were: "scope and purpose" and "clarity and presentation". Those that scored worse were "stakeholder involvement", "rigor of development", and "applicability". The European and the Malaysian CPGs were the only recommended with no further modifications. In addition, the Mexican, Colombian and the United States guidelines were recommended with provisos, with lower scores regarding stakeholder involvement, rigor of development and applicability. Only two guidelines clearly reported outcome measures for evaluating efficacy or included quality of life outcomes. CPGs varied regarding the consideration of light/laser therapy or consideration of complementary/alternative medicines. None of them included cost considerations of drugs such as systemic isotretinoin. In conclusion, published acne vulgaris CPGs for acne therapy vary in quality with a clear need to improve their methodological rigor. This could be achieved with the adherence to current CPGs development standards.

  9. Learning and memory in Octopus vulgaris: a case of biological plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarrella, Ilaria; Ponte, Giovanna; Baldascino, Elena; Fiorito, Graziano

    2015-12-01

    Here we concisely summarize major aspects of the learning capabilities of the cephalopod mollusc Octopus vulgaris, a solitary living marine invertebrate. We aim to provide a backdrop against which neurobiology of these animals can be further interpreted and thus soliciting further interest for one of the most advanced members of invertebrate animals.

  10. Soil-borne microorganisms and soil-type affect pyrrolizidine alkaloids in Jacobaea vulgaris

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosten, L.; Mulder, P.P.J.; Klinkhamer, P.G.L.; Veen, van J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Secondary metabolites like pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) play a crucial part in plant defense. We studied the effects of soil-borne microorganisms and soil-type on pyrrolizidine alkaloids in roots and shoots of Jacobaea vulgaris. We used clones of two genotypes from a dune area (Meijendel),

  11. Changes in quality of selected red beet (Beta vulgaris L. cultivars during the growing season

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nizioł-Łukaszewska Zofia

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Red beet (Beta vulgaris L. may be consumed at all stages of growth, both in the form of small early vegetable during spring and later, during winter, when stored. Therefore, knowledge of the dynamics of changes in the content of individual components in subsequent stages of growth is very important.

  12. A HPTLC densitometric determination of luteolin in Thymus vulgaris and its extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazylko, A; Strzelecka, H

    2007-09-01

    Luteolin content in Thymus vulgaris and its extracts have been compared. Luteolin was separated on a thin- layer of silica gel with three-step gradient elution and determined by HPTLC-photodensitometry. The proposed method is simple and sensitive and can be used for the routine assay of luteolin in phytomedicines containing thyme extracts.

  13. Isolation and Structure Elucidation of Radical Scavengers from Thymus vulgaris Leaves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dapkevicius, A.; Beek, van T.A.; Lelyveld, G.P.; Veldhuizen, van A.; Groot, de Æ.; Linssen, J.P.H.; Venskutonis, R.

    2002-01-01

    2,2-Diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH*) scavenging activity-guided fractionation of a leaf extract of Thymus vulgaris led to the isolation of the radical scavengers rosmarinic acid 1, eriodictyol, taxifolin, luteolin 7-glucuronide, p-cymene 2,3-diol, p-cymene 2,3-diol 6-6'-dimer, carvacrol, th

  14. Two courses of rituximab (anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody) for recalcitrant pemphigus vulgaris

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faurschou, A.; Gniadecki, R.

    2008-01-01

    Background Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is a severe autoimmune blistering disease involving the skin and mucous membranes. The response to therapy varies greatly amongst patients and treatment may be challenging. Rituximab is a chimeric monoclonal antibody that selectively targets cell surface antigen...

  15. Barbarea vulgaris glucosinolate phenotypes differentially affect performance and preference of two different species of Lepidopteran herbivores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leur, van H.; Vet, L.E.M.; Putten, van der W.H.; Dam, van N.M.

    2008-01-01

    The composition of secondary metabolites and the nutritional value of a plant both determine herbivore preference and performance. The genetically determined glucosinolate pattern of Barbarea vulgaris can be dominated by either glucobarbarin (BAR-type) or by gluconasturtiin (NAS-type). Because of th

  16. Fungal endophytes in germinated seeds of the common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris

    Science.gov (United States)

    The common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) is the most important food legume in the world, but its production is severely limited by several biotic and abiotic stressors. In search of a sustainable solution to this problem, we conducted a survey of fungal endophytes in 582 germinated seeds belonging to 11...

  17. Identifying genes involved in nodulation and symbiotic nitrogen fixation (SNF) in Phaseolus vulgaris using RNAseq technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phaseolus vulgaris (common bean) is one of the most important grain legumes for direct human consumption. It comprises 50% of the grain legumes consumed worldwide and is important as a primary source of dietary protein in developing countries. Legumes form a unique symbiotic relationship with rhizob...

  18. Toxicology effects of Berberis vulgaris (barberry and its active constituent, berberine: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyede Zohre Kamrani Rad

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Berberis vulgaris and berberine, its main component, traditionally have been used for treatment of various disorders. The pharmacological properties of them have been investigated using different in vivo and in vitro models. In spite of beneficial effects of B. vulgaris on different cell lines, there are documents have revealed negative impacts of it on animal and human. In this regards, the determination of its toxicity in a scientific view is necessary. In current report, we provide classified information about the toxicity of B. vulgaris and berberine in different conditions consist of acute, sub-acute, sub-chronic and chronic state. Besides, it discusses the cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, mutagenicity, and carcinogenicity of B. vulgaris and berberine as well as developmental toxicity and clinical studies. Data from the present study indicate that their toxicity is depending on the route and duration of administration. According to present study, they could induce GI upset and ulceration, immunotoxicity, phototoxicity, neurotoxicity, cardiotoxicity and jaundice in a dose dependent manner. They should be used with caution in pregnancy, neonatal and G6PD deficiency. Besides, consideration should be taken in co-administration of berberine with drugs that are metabolized with CYP enzymes due their inhibitory effects on these enzymes. Furthermore, they evoke cytotoxicity on both normal and cancer cell line which is time and concentration dependent.

  19. Virulence of Macrophomina phaseolina isolates in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) genotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charcoal rot caused by Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi) Goid, is an important disease in common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) in the dry and warmer areas of Puerto Rico and in much of the tropics and subtropics worldwide. The virulence of three isolates from Isabela (Mph-ISA-TARS), Juana Diaz (Mph-JD) a...

  20. A greenhouse test for screening sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) for resistance to Rhizoctonia solani

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, O.E.; Panella, L.; Bock, de T.S.M.; Lange, W.

    2001-01-01

    Rhizoctonia solani Kühn is a serious plant pathogenic fungus, causing various types of damage to sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.). In Europe, the disease is spreading and becoming a threat for the growing of this crop. Plant resistance seems to be the most practical and economical way to control the di

  1. Treatment of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in Murine Model by Alcoholic Extract of Berberis vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalalianfard A

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available In order to evaluate the effect of Berberis vulgaris extract on the experimental ulcers of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL on Balb/c mice, a study was undertaken over a 12 months period. Forty Balb/c mice were divided into 2 main groups A and B. Each main group in turn was divided into 5 sub groups of 4 mice and each sub group were inoculated subcutaneously by 0.1ml liquid phase culture containing promastigotes of Leishmania major. After 2-3 weeks, nodules and ulcers appeared on 37 of 40 inoculated mice. Ethanol extract of the stem and leaves as well as roots of Berberis vulgaris in different concentrations, were used topically on CL lesions of 4 sub groups A and B, respectively. Ethanol alone was used on the lesions of control mice. The surface area of lesions were measured before and 1-2 weeks after treatment. Direct Geimsa stained smear prepared 20 days after treatment. The results showed that after 2 weeks, a statistically significant decrease of ulcer size of treated mice observed, while in the control group the lesion growth continued. The examinations showed that using higher concentration of the extract caused more decrease in surface area of CL lesions on day 15 and negative direct smear on day 20. Alcoholic extract of B.vulgaris root was more effective than leaves and stem extract. Alcoholic extract of B vulgaris might be further used in animal model.

  2. Novel FLG mutations associated with ichthyosis vulgaris in the Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Z; Luo, S; Xu, X; Zhang, L; Peng, H; Li, W; Xue, J; Chen, X; Hu, Z; Xia, K

    2012-03-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding filaggrin (FLG) can cause the semidominant keratinizing disorder ichthyosis vulgaris (OMIM 146700). To identify FLG mutations in three Chinese pedigrees with ichthyosis vulgaris, we sequenced the entire coding region of FLG in the proband of each pedigree. We found two novel FLG null mutations (c.477-478insA and c.6218-6219delAA) and a known mutation (c.3321delA). Both novel mutations were identified in the proband of pedigree 1; c.477-478insA was inherited from the proband's father, and the other was a de novo mutation. Neither of these two mutations was found in 200 unrelated controls. These findings extend the spectrum of functional FLG variants possibly causing ichthyosis vulgaris. Interestingly, the proband of pedigree 1 was compound heterozygous for these mutations, but had a mild phenotype, suggesting that an incomplete penetrance factor and perhaps other unknown factors may be involved in the pathogenesis of ichthyosis vulgaris.

  3. Lupus vulgaris diagnosed after 37 years: a case of delayed diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turan, Enver; Yurt, Nurdan; Yesilova, Yavuz; Celik, Ozgur Ilhan

    2012-05-15

    Lupus vulgaris is the most common chronic, progressive form of cutaneous tuberculosis. Lesions are generally solitary and found on the head and neck region. Cutaneous tuberculosis can present with different clinical appearances. Therefore, it does not necessarily have characteristic findings and can be difficult to diagnose. Although there were typical clinical findings, the diagnosis of our case was delayed because of its asymptomatic course.

  4. Ulcerated lupus vulgaris at the site of Bacille Calmette-Guérin vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singal, Archana; Sonthalia, Sidharth; Pandhi, Deepika

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of ulcerated lupus vulgaris occurring in 1.5-year-old boy at the Bacille Calmette-Guérin vaccination site within 6 months, which was diagnosed using histology and polymerase chain reaction. The lesion resolved with isoniazid and rifampicin therapy.

  5. Lupus vulgaris of external nose with septal perforation--a rarity in antibiotic era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Ajay; Wadhera, Raman; Gulati, S P; Singh, Jagjit

    2010-07-01

    Lupus vulgaris (LV) is the commonest morphological variant of cutaneous tuberculosis. Case of LV of external nose extending to internal nose causing septal perforation is documented here. Histopathology of biopsy taken confirmed the diagnosis of LV. Patient responded well to Anti-tubercular therapy (ATT).

  6. Medicinal Plants for the Treatment of Acne Vulgaris: A Review of Recent Evidences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasri, Hamid; Bahmani, Mahmoud; Shahinfard, Najmeh; Moradi Nafchi, Atefeh; Saberianpour, Shirin; Rafieian Kopaei, Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    Context: Acne vulgaris affects about 85% of teenagers and may continue to adulthood. There are about two million visits to physicians per year for teenagers and the direct cost of acne treatment in the US exceeds $1 billion per year. Evidence Acquisition: A wide variety of treatment regimens exist for acne vulgaris including benzoil peroxide, retinoids, isotretinoids, keratolytic soaps, alpha hydroxy acids, azelaic acid, salicilic acid as well as hormonal, anti-androgen or antiseborrheic treatments. However, none of these methods is free of side effects and their exact role in therapy is not clear. In this paper apart from presenting the possible causes of acne vulgaris and its available drugs, recently published papers about medicinal plants used in the treatment of acne vulgaris were reviewed. Results: Consumption of alternative and complementary medicine, including medicinal plants, is increasing and is common amongst patients affected by acne and infectious skin diseases. Medicinal plants have a long history of use and have been shown to possess low side effects. These plants are a reliable source for preparation of new drugs. Conclusions: Many plants seem to have inhibitory effects on the growth of bacteria, fungi and viruses in vitro. However, there are a few clinical evidences about the effectiveness and safety of these plants in the treatment of acne and other skin infections. PMID:26862380

  7. [Glycemic response to consumption of a cereals and legume (Phaseolus vulgaris) bar on healthy individuals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambrano, Rosaura; Granito, Marisela; Valero, Yolmar

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this work was to formulate a cereals and legume (Phaseolus vulgaris) bar and assess its impact on the glycemic response of healthy individuals, in order to contribute to the healthy food supply beneficial to consumers. A mixture of cereals (corn and oats) and different percentages (20 and 30%) of Phaseolus vulgaris was used to formulate the bar. Additionally, a legume cereal bar without legumes (bar control) was prepared. The bar with 30% of Phaseolus vulgaris was selected through sensory evaluation, being scored with better flavor and texture. This combination of cereals and legumes aminoacid improves complementation and reaches the formulation criteria previously established. Chemical characterization indicated a higher protein content in the bar with 30% of Phaseolus vulgaris (13.55%) relative to the bar control (8.5%). The contents of fat, ash and dietary fiber did not differ between the two bars evaluated. However, the soluble fiber and resistant starch of the selected bar was a 32.05% and 18.67%, respectively, than in the control bar; this may contribute to decreasing the rate of glucose uptake. The selected bar presented a low glycemic index (49) and intermediate glycemic load (12.0) in healthy volunteers, which could lead to a possible reduction in the rate of absorption of glucose into the bloodstream, associated with a carbohydrate content of slow absorption. This bar represents a proposal of a healthy snack for the consumer.

  8. THE ACTION OF UV RADIATION ON MITOTIC INDEX AND MITOTIC DIVISION PHASES AT PHASEOLUS VULGARIS L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Csilla Iuliana Bara

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available In this work, damaging effects of UV radiations on bean Phaseolus vulgaris L. plantule root tips were investigated. Our study proves that by bean plants, the decrease of cell division frequency appears to be part of protection mechanism against especially the short waved UV radiation, with variations depending on cultivar.

  9. The Use of Chlorella Vulgaris in a Simple Demonstration of Heavy Metal Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gipps, J. F.; Biro, P.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental system, suitable for secondary schools, uses Chlorella vulgaris to demonstrate the effects of mercury and cadmium. Very low concentrations of mercury or cadmium decrease growth, whereas lead or arsenic have little effect. Further experiments show additive interactions between mercury and cadmium and antagonistic interactions…

  10. Low efficiency processing of an insecticidal Nicotiana proteinase inhibitor precursor in Beta vulgaris hairy roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assimilation of dietary proteins is critical to insect survival; therefore, inhibition of digestive proteolytic enzymes presents itself as an effective strategy for control of insect pests. To specifically target proteases of several insect pests of sugar beet, Beta vulgaris, we used PCR and gene s...

  11. Proteomic analysis of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    The modern cultivated common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) has evolved from wild common beans distributed in Central America, Mexico and the Andean region of South America. It has been reported that wild common bean accessions have higher levels of protein content than the domesticated dry bean cultiva...

  12. Subcellular Localization of Cadmium in Chlorella vulgaris Beijerinck Strain Bt-09

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.B. Lintongan

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Growth response curves of Chlorella vulgaris Beijerinck strain Bt-09 to sublethal concentrations of cadmium were evaluated. The growth responses of this microalgal isolate was determined through analysis of chlorophyll a levels. Cadmium was effectively taken up by the cells as determined by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry (F-AAS. Subcellular fractionation was undertaken to locate sites that accumulate cadmium.

  13. Major genes for resistance to beet necrotic yellow vein virus (BNYVV) in Beta vulgaris

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, Olga E.; Jansen, Ritsert C.; Keizer, L.C. Paul; Bock, Theo S.M. de; Lange, Wouter

    1996-01-01

    Inheritance of resistance to beet necrotic yellow vein virus (BNYVV) was studied in segregating F2 and backcross families obtained from crosses between resistant plants of the sugar beet selection Holly-1-4 or the wild beet accession Beta vulgaris subsp. maritima WB42 and susceptible parents.

  14. A high recombination rate in eusocial Hymenoptera: evidence from the common wasp Vespula vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirviö Anu

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High recombination rates have previously been detected in two groups of eusocial insects; honeybees and ants. In this study we estimate recombination rate in a eusocial wasp Vespula vulgaris that represents a third phylogenetic lineage within eusocial hymenopterans. Results A genetic linkage map of V. vulgaris based on 210 markers shows that the total map length is 2129 cM and the recombination rate is 9.7 cM/Mb (or 103 kb/cM. The present estimate in V. vulgaris is somewhat smaller than in the honeybee Apis mellifera and intermediate between the estimates from two ant species (Acromyrmex echinatior, Pogonomyrmex rugosus. Altogether, the estimates from these eusocial species are higher than in any other insect reported so far. Conlusions The four species (V. vulgaris, A. mellifera, A. echinatior, P. rugosus are characterized by advanced eusociality with large colonies, clear queen-worker dimorphism and well developed task specialization. They also have colonies with a single, normally multiply inseminated (polyandrous queen. Benefits of genotypic diversity within colonies (e.g. through improved task specialization or pathogen and parasite resistance may have selected for both polyandry and high recombination rate in such advanced eusocial insects.

  15. Green Tea and Other Tea Polyphenols: Effects on Sebum Production and Acne Vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzana Saric

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Polyphenols are antioxidant molecules found in many foods including nuts, fruits, vegetables, chocolate, wine, and tea. Polyphenols have antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, and antineoplastic properties. Recent studies suggest that tea polyphenols may be used for reducing sebum production in the skin and for treatment of acne vulgaris. This review examines the evidence for use of topically and orally ingested tea polyphenols against sebum production and for acne treatment and prevention. The PubMed database was searched for studies on tea polyphenols, sebum secretion, and acne vulgaris. Of the 59 studies found, eight met the inclusion criteria. Two studies evaluated tea polyphenol effects on sebum production; six studies examined tea polyphenol effects on acne vulgaris. Seven studies evaluated topical tea polyphenols; one study examined systemic tea polyphenols. None of the studies evaluated both topical and systemic tea polyphenols. Tea polyphenol sources included green tea (six studies and tea, type not specified (two studies. Overall, there is some evidence that tea polyphenols in topical formulation may be beneficial in reducing sebum secretion and in treatment of acne. Research studies of high quality and with large sample sizes are needed to assess the efficacy of tea polyphenols in topical and oral prevention of acne vulgaris and lipid synthesis by the sebaceous glands.

  16. Evaluation of social anxiety, self-esteem, life quality in adolescents with acne vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unal, Dilek; Emiroğlu, Nazan; Cengiz, Fatma Pelin

    2016-08-05

    Acne vulgaris is a visible skin disease commonly seen in adolescence. As it affects the appearance, it is likely to bring stress to the adolescent's life regarding sensitivity about their appearance. The aim of the study was to investigate the social anxiety level, acne-specific life quality, and self-esteem among adolescents with acne vulgaris. In addition, we evaluated the relationship between these parameters, clinical severity, and sociodemographic data. One hundred and two adolescents with acne vulgaris, aged 12-17 years without any psychiatric or medical comorbidity were recruited. The control group consisted of 83 adolescents in the same age range, who had neither psychiatric disease nor acne. Sociodemographic form (SDF), Capa Social Phobia Scale for Children and Adolescents (CSPSCA), and Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale (RSES) were applied to both groups. Additionally, the severity of acne was determined with Global Acne Grading System (GAGS), and life quality of the patients was evaluated with Acne Quality of Life Scale (AQOL). There was no significant difference in social anxiety levels and self-esteem between the study and control groups. Life quality impairment and high social anxiety levels, as well as low self-esteem, were found to be associated regardless of the clinical severity. Clinicians should be aware of the psychiatric comorbidities when treating adolescents with acne vulgaris. Especially, low self-esteem and life quality impairment should warn clinicians to predict high social anxiety levels in adolescent acne patients.

  17. Complex Self-Incompatibility Systems in Ranunculus acris L. and Beta vulgaris L

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundqvist, A.; Østerbye, U.; Larsen, K.

    1973-01-01

    acris, and in Beta vulgaris there are at least four. The observations strongly support the theory of the incompatibility genes being ancient constituents of the breeding systems of the angiosperms. Most probably a complex type of incompatibility control was already present at the presumed common...

  18. Phytotoxic Effect of Landfill and Leachate Pollution Indexes on Germination and Seedling of Phaseolus vulgaris L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márquez-Benavides Liliana

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Appropriate solid waste management includes leachate management, an effluent that results from the degradation of solid waste, moisture content and pluvial additions to the disposal site. Due to poor management of the landfill, sometimes leachate is likely to reach nearby areas, affecting soil water and vegetal area. A powerful tool to assess the pollution potential of a given leachate is the leachate pollution index (LPI developed by Kummar & Alappat (2005 that evaluates 18 parameters in order to calculate a value between 5-100 being 100 the highest in pollution potential. The LPI allows the comparison between leachates from different sites and ages, and also assists in the decision making process on leachate treatment. However, it is currently unknown if this value can also be related to the fitotóxico effect of a leachate on Phaseolus vulgaris L. The aim of this work was to calculate the LPI of two leachates and compare the effect on P. vulgaris L (common bean. A greenhouse scale experiment was set up, the studied variables were seed germination per cent (% and phenotype of P. vulgaris at seedling step after treated with several leachate concentrations from Guanajuato (GTO and Toluca (TOL, México. Results showed that a greater LPI (34.8 from GTO did not correspond to a largest fitotoxic effect on P. vulgaris. This bioassay could be a completely tool with LPI to evaluate pollution potential of leachate approaching to normal environmental conditions.

  19. Effects of brassinazole, an inhibitor of brassinosteroid biosynthesis, on light- and dark-grown Chlorella vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajguz, Andrzej; Asami, Tadao

    2004-03-01

    Treatment of cultured Chlorella vulgaris Beijerinck cells with 0.1-10 microM brassinazole (Brz2001), an inhibitor of brassinosteroid (BR) biosynthesis, inhibits their growth during the first 48 h of cultivation in the light. This inhibition is prevented by the co-application of BR. This result suggests that the presence of endogenous BRs during the initial steps of the C. vulgaris cell cycle is indispensable for their normal growth in the light. In darkness, a treatment with 10 nM brassinolide (BL) promotes growth through the first 24 h of culture, but during the following 24 h the cells undergo complete stagnation. Treatment of dark-grown cells with either Brz2001 alone, or a mixture of 10 nM BL and 0.1/10 microM Brz2001, also stimulates their growth. The effects of treatment with 10 nM BL mixed with 0.1-10 microM of a mevalonate-pathway inhibitor (mevinolin), or a non-mevalonate-pathway inhibitor (clomazone), were also investigated. Mevinolin at these concentrations did not inhibit growth of C. vulgaris; however, clomazone did. Addition of BL overcame the inhibition. These results suggest that the mevalonate pathway does not function in C. vulgaris, and that the non-mevalonate pathway for isopentenyl diphosphate biosynthesis is responsible for the synthesis of one of the primary precursors in BR biosynthesis.

  20. Gene flow and mode of pollination in a dry-grassland species, Filipendula vulgaris (Rosaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidema, I R; Magnussen, L S; Philipp, M

    2000-03-01

    Filipendula vulgaris is a characteristic species of dry nonacidic grasslands in Denmark. This habitat type occurs only on marginal areas not suitable for agriculture or urbanization and that are by their nature fragmented. The population genetic structure of F. vulgaris was investigated in 17 populations within two regions of Denmark, using isozyme electrophoresis. Small populations were found to have significantly fewer polymorphic loci than larger populations, but all populations maintained the same common allelic variants. The degree of isolation of individual populations did not affect the amount of genetic variation. Offspring arrays revealed a very high outcrossing rate (0.96). The field study demonstrated a very high level of gene flow between populations considering that small insects are thought to be the main pollinators of this species. An experiment to verify whether pollen transport by wind could explain the results from the field study demonstrated long-distance transport from isolated plants to bagged plants. Filipendula vulgaris pollen grains are very small and this explains why outcrossed progeny were found using pollination bags with small pore sizes. We conclude that wind pollination is indeed possible and together with insect pollination is causing the observed patterns of genetic variation. The substantial gene flow between populations may be reducing the effects of genetic drift in the small fragmented populations of F. vulgaris.