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Sample records for vsx1 mutation identified

  1. Mutational screening of VSX1, SPARC, SOD1, LOX, and TIMP3 in keratoconus

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    De Bonis, Patrizia; Laborante, Antonio; Pizzicoli, Costantina; Stallone, Raffaella; Barbano, Raffaela; Longo, Costanza; Mazzilli, Emilio; Zelante, Leopoldo

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the involvement of Visual System Homeobox 1 (VSX1), Secreted Protein Acidic and Rich in Cysteine (SPARC), Superoxide Dismutase 1 (SOD1), Lysyl Oxidase (LOX), and Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase 3 (TIMP3) in sporadic and familial keratoconus. Methods Mutational analysis of the five genes was performed by sequencing and fragment analysis in a large cohort of 302 Italian patients, with a diagnosis of keratoconus based on clinical examination and corneal topography. The variants identified in VSX1 and SPARC were also assessed in the available relatives of the probands. Results A novel mutation p.G239R and previously reported mutations were found in VSX1. Novel and already reported variants were identified in SPARC and SOD1, whose pathogenic significance has not been established. No pathogenic variants have been identified in LOX and TIMP3. Conclusions Molecular analysis of the five genes in a cohort of 225 sporadic and 77 familial keratoconus cases confirms the possible pathogenic role of VSX1 though in a small number of patients; a possible involvement of LOX and TIMP3 could be excluded; and the role played by SOD1 and SPARC in determining the disease as not been definitively clarified. Further studies are required to identify other important genetic factors involved in the pathogenesis and progression of the disease that in the authors’ opinion, and according with several authors, should be considered as a complex disease. PMID:21976959

  2. Evaluating the association of VSX1 mutation with keratoconus and the granular corneal dystrophy in an Iranian family

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    Hossein Aghamollaei

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To evaluate association between mutations in the visual system homeobox 1(VSX1gene and keratoconus(KCNcomplicated with granular corneal dystrophy(GCD, direct sequencing was performed in an Iranian family affected by KCN and GCD in four generations. METHODS: An Iranian pedigree with keratoconus spanning four generations along with GCD was identified. Whole blood sample was used for genomic DNA extraction. The molecular analysis by using polymerase chain reaction(PCRof the entire coding region and intron-exon boundaries of VSX1 gene was preformed to investigate the possible linkage between KCN and GCD. Subsequently, direct sequencing was used for PCR products and mutation analysis was conducted in the patients and controls. RESULTS: Mutation analysis in VSX1 gene did not detect evidence for association between KCN and GCD diseases and VSX1 gene. Our data excluded VSX1 as the disease-causing gene for KCN/GCD in this specific pedigree.CONCLUSION: Despite of no association between KCN patients with GCD and VSX1 gene variations, other probable genes involved in pathogenesis of the KCN and GCD diseases need to be investigated in the patients.

  3. Vsx1 Transiently Defines an Early Intermediate V2 Interneuron Precursor Compartment in the Mouse Developing Spinal Cord

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    Francius, Cédric; Hidalgo-Figueroa, María; Debrulle, Stéphanie; Pelosi, Barbara; Rucchin, Vincent; Ronellenfitch, Kara; Panayiotou, Elena; Makrides, Neoklis; Misra, Kamana; Harris, Audrey; Hassani, Hessameh; Schakman, Olivier; Parras, Carlos; Xiang, Mengqing; Malas, Stavros; Chow, Robert L.; Clotman, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Spinal ventral interneurons regulate the activity of motor neurons, thereby controlling motor activities. Interneurons arise during embryonic development from distinct progenitor domains distributed orderly along the dorso-ventral axis of the neural tube. A single ventral progenitor population named p2 generates at least five V2 interneuron subsets. Whether the diversification of V2 precursors into multiple subsets occurs within the p2 progenitor domain or involves a later compartment of early-born V2 interneurons remains unsolved. Here, we provide evidence that the p2 domain produces an intermediate V2 precursor compartment characterized by the transient expression of the transcriptional repressor Vsx1. These cells display an original repertoire of cellular markers distinct from that of any V2 interneuron population. They have exited the cell cycle but have not initiated neuronal differentiation. They coexpress Vsx1 and Foxn4, suggesting that they can generate the known V2 interneuron populations as well as possible additional V2 subsets. Unlike V2 interneurons, the generation of Vsx1-positive precursors does not depend on the Notch signaling pathway but expression of Vsx1 in these cells requires Pax6. Hence, the p2 progenitor domain generates an intermediate V2 precursor compartment, characterized by the presence of the transcriptional repressor Vsx1, that contributes to V2 interneuron development. PMID:28082864

  4. Identifying driver mutations in sequenced cancer genomes

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    Raphael, Benjamin J; Dobson, Jason R; Oesper, Layla

    2014-01-01

    High-throughput DNA sequencing is revolutionizing the study of cancer and enabling the measurement of the somatic mutations that drive cancer development. However, the resulting sequencing datasets are large and complex, obscuring the clinically important mutations in a background of errors, noise......, and random mutations. Here, we review computational approaches to identify somatic mutations in cancer genome sequences and to distinguish the driver mutations that are responsible for cancer from random, passenger mutations. First, we describe approaches to detect somatic mutations from high-throughput DNA...... sequencing data, particularly for tumor samples that comprise heterogeneous populations of cells. Next, we review computational approaches that aim to predict driver mutations according to their frequency of occurrence in a cohort of samples, or according to their predicted functional impact on protein...

  5. Twelve novel Atm mutations identified in Chinese ataxia telangiectasia patients.

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    Huang, Yu; Yang, Lu; Wang, Jianchun; Yang, Fan; Xiao, Ying; Xia, Rongjun; Yuan, Xianhou; Yan, Mingshan

    2013-09-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized mainly by progressive cerebellar ataxia, oculocutaneous telangiectasia, and immunodeficiency. This disease is caused by mutations of the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (Atm) gene. More than 500 Atm mutations that are responsible for A-T have been identified so far. However, there have been very few A-T cases reported in China, and only two Chinese A-T patients have undergone Atm gene analysis. In order to systemically investigate A-T in China and map their Atm mutation spectrum, we recruited eight Chinese A-T patients from six unrelated families nationwide. Using direct sequencing of genomic DNA and the multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification, we identified twelve pathogenic Atm mutations, including one missense, four nonsense, five frameshift, one splicing, and one large genomic deletion. All the Atm mutations we identified were novel, and no homozygous mutation and founder-effect mutation were found. These results suggest that Atm mutations in Chinese populations are diverse and distinct largely from those in other ethnic areas.

  6. Exome sequencing identifies recurrent somatic RAC1 mutations in melanoma

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    Krauthammer, Michael; Kong, Yong; Ha, Byung Hak; Evans, Perry; Bacchiocchi, Antonella; McCusker, James P.; Cheng, Elaine; Davis, Matthew J.; Goh, Gerald; Choi, Murim; Ariyan, Stephan; Narayan, Deepak; Dutton-Regester, Ken; Capatana, Ana; Holman, Edna C.; Bosenberg, Marcus; Sznol, Mario; Kluger, Harriet M.; Brash, Douglas E.; Stern, David F.; Materin, Miguel A.; Lo, Roger S.; Mane, Shrikant; Ma, Shuangge; Kidd, Kenneth K.; Hayward, Nicholas K.; Lifton, Richard P.; Schlessinger, Joseph; Boggon, Titus J.; Halaban, Ruth (Yale-MED); (UCLA); (Queens)

    2012-10-11

    We characterized the mutational landscape of melanoma, the form of skin cancer with the highest mortality rate, by sequencing the exomes of 147 melanomas. Sun-exposed melanomas had markedly more ultraviolet (UV)-like C>T somatic mutations compared to sun-shielded acral, mucosal and uveal melanomas. Among the newly identified cancer genes was PPP6C, encoding a serine/threonine phosphatase, which harbored mutations that clustered in the active site in 12% of sun-exposed melanomas, exclusively in tumors with mutations in BRAF or NRAS. Notably, we identified a recurrent UV-signature, an activating mutation in RAC1 in 9.2% of sun-exposed melanomas. This activating mutation, the third most frequent in our cohort of sun-exposed melanoma after those of BRAF and NRAS, changes Pro29 to serine (RAC1{sup P29S}) in the highly conserved switch I domain. Crystal structures, and biochemical and functional studies of RAC1{sup P29S} showed that the alteration releases the conformational restraint conferred by the conserved proline, causes an increased binding of the protein to downstream effectors, and promotes melanocyte proliferation and migration. These findings raise the possibility that pharmacological inhibition of downstream effectors of RAC1 signaling could be of therapeutic benefit.

  7. Multigene mutational profiling of cholangiocarcinomas identifies actionable molecular subgroups

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    Mafficini, Andrea; Wood, Laura D.; Corbo, Vincenzo; Melisi, Davide; Malleo, Giuseppe; Vicentini, Caterina; Malpeli, Giorgio; Antonello, Davide; Sperandio, Nicola; Capelli, Paola; Tomezzoli, Anna; Iacono, Calogero; Lawlor, Rita T.; Bassi, Claudio; Hruban, Ralph H.; Guglielmi, Alfredo; Tortora, Giampaolo; de Braud, Filippo; Scarpa, Aldo

    2014-01-01

    One-hundred-fifty-three biliary cancers, including 70 intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas (ICC), 57 extrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas (ECC) and 26 gallbladder carcinomas (GBC) were assessed for mutations in 56 genes using multigene next-generation sequencing. Expression of EGFR and mTOR pathway genes was investigated by immunohistochemistry. At least one mutated gene was observed in 118/153 (77%) cancers. The genes most frequently involved were KRAS (28%), TP53 (18%), ARID1A (12%), IDH1/2 (9%), PBRM1 (9%), BAP1 (7%), and PIK3CA (7%). IDH1/2 (p=0.0005) and BAP1 (p=0.0097) mutations were characteristic of ICC, while KRAS (p=0.0019) and TP53 (p=0.0019) were more frequent in ECC and GBC. Multivariate analysis identified tumour stage and TP53 mutations as independent predictors of survival. Alterations in chromatin remodeling genes (ARID1A, BAP1, PBRM1, SMARCB1) were seen in 31% of cases. Potentially actionable mutations were seen in 104/153 (68%) cancers: i) KRAS/NRAS/BRAF mutations were found in 34% of cancers; ii) mTOR pathway activation was documented by immunohistochemistry in 51% of cases and by mutations in mTOR pathway genes in 19% of cancers; iii) TGF-ß/Smad signaling was altered in 10.5% cancers; iv) mutations in tyrosine kinase receptors were found in 9% cases. Our study identified molecular subgroups of cholangiocarcinomas that can be explored for specific drug targeting in clinical trials. PMID:24867389

  8. MuSiC: identifying mutational significance in cancer genomes.

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    Dees, Nathan D; Zhang, Qunyuan; Kandoth, Cyriac; Wendl, Michael C; Schierding, William; Koboldt, Daniel C; Mooney, Thomas B; Callaway, Matthew B; Dooling, David; Mardis, Elaine R; Wilson, Richard K; Ding, Li

    2012-08-01

    Massively parallel sequencing technology and the associated rapidly decreasing sequencing costs have enabled systemic analyses of somatic mutations in large cohorts of cancer cases. Here we introduce a comprehensive mutational analysis pipeline that uses standardized sequence-based inputs along with multiple types of clinical data to establish correlations among mutation sites, affected genes and pathways, and to ultimately separate the commonly abundant passenger mutations from the truly significant events. In other words, we aim to determine the Mutational Significance in Cancer (MuSiC) for these large data sets. The integration of analytical operations in the MuSiC framework is widely applicable to a broad set of tumor types and offers the benefits of automation as well as standardization. Herein, we describe the computational structure and statistical underpinnings of the MuSiC pipeline and demonstrate its performance using 316 ovarian cancer samples from the TCGA ovarian cancer project. MuSiC correctly confirms many expected results, and identifies several potentially novel avenues for discovery.

  9. Exome sequencing identifies ZNF644 mutations in high myopia.

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    Yi Shi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Myopia is the most common ocular disorder worldwide, and high myopia in particular is one of the leading causes of blindness. Genetic factors play a critical role in the development of myopia, especially high myopia. Recently, the exome sequencing approach has been successfully used for the disease gene identification of Mendelian disorders. Here we show a successful application of exome sequencing to identify a gene for an autosomal dominant disorder, and we have identified a gene potentially responsible for high myopia in a monogenic form. We captured exomes of two affected individuals from a Han Chinese family with high myopia and performed sequencing analysis by a second-generation sequencer with a mean coverage of 30× and sufficient depth to call variants at ∼97% of each targeted exome. The shared genetic variants of these two affected individuals in the family being studied were filtered against the 1000 Genomes Project and the dbSNP131 database. A mutation A672G in zinc finger protein 644 isoform 1 (ZNF644 was identified as being related to the phenotype of this family. After we performed sequencing analysis of the exons in the ZNF644 gene in 300 sporadic cases of high myopia, we identified an additional five mutations (I587V, R680G, C699Y, 3'UTR+12 C>G, and 3'UTR+592 G>A in 11 different patients. All these mutations were absent in 600 normal controls. The ZNF644 gene was expressed in human retinal and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE. Given that ZNF644 is predicted to be a transcription factor that may regulate genes involved in eye development, mutation may cause the axial elongation of eyeball found in high myopia patients. Our results suggest that ZNF644 might be a causal gene for high myopia in a monogenic form.

  10. Identifying cancer genes from cancer mutation profiles by cancer functions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    It is of great importance to identify new cancer genes from the data of large scale genome screenings of gene mutations in cancers. Considering the alternations of some essential functions are indispensable for oncogenesis, we define them as cancer functions and select, as their approximations, a group of detailed functions in GO (Gene Ontology) highly enriched with known cancer genes. To evaluate the efficiency of using cancer functions as features to identify cancer genes, we define, in the screened genes, the known protein kinase cancer genes as gold standard positives and the other kinase genes as gold standard negatives. The results show that cancer associated functions are more efficient in identifying cancer genes than the selection pressure feature. Furthermore, combining cancer functions with the number of non-silent mutations can generate more reliable positive predictions. Finally, with precision 0.42, we suggest a list of 46 kinase genes as candidate cancer genes which are annotated to cancer functions and carry at least 3 non-silent mutations.

  11. An Evolutionary Approach for Identifying Driver Mutations in Colorectal Cancer.

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    Jasmine Foo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The traditional view of cancer as a genetic disease that can successfully be treated with drugs targeting mutant onco-proteins has motivated whole-genome sequencing efforts in many human cancer types. However, only a subset of mutations found within the genomic landscape of cancer is likely to provide a fitness advantage to the cell. Distinguishing such "driver" mutations from innocuous "passenger" events is critical for prioritizing the validation of candidate mutations in disease-relevant models. We design a novel statistical index, called the Hitchhiking Index, which reflects the probability that any observed candidate gene is a passenger alteration, given the frequency of alterations in a cross-sectional cancer sample set, and apply it to a mutational data set in colorectal cancer. Our methodology is based upon a population dynamics model of mutation accumulation and selection in colorectal tissue prior to cancer initiation as well as during tumorigenesis. This methodology can be used to aid in the prioritization of candidate mutations for functional validation and contributes to the process of drug discovery.

  12. Mutation analysis of the WFS1 gene in seven Danish Wolfram syndrome families; four new mutations identified

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars; Eiberg, Hans Rudolf Lytchoff; Barrett, Timothy

    2005-01-01

    Wolfram syndrome (WS) is a neuro-degenerative autosomal recessive (AR) disorder (OMIM #222300) caused by mutations in the WFS1 gene on 4p16.1. More than 120 mutations have been identified in WFS1 associated with AR WS, as well as autosomal dominant nonsyndromic low-frequency sensorineural hearing...

  13. Triangulation of the human, chimpanzee, and Neanderthal genome sequences identifies potentially compensated mutations

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    Zhang, Guojie; Pei, Zhang; Krawczak, Michael;

    2010-01-01

    Triangulation of the human, chimpanzee, and Neanderthal genome sequences with respect to 44,348 disease-causing or disease-associated missense mutations and 1,712 putative regulatory mutations listed in the Human Gene Mutation Database was employed to identify genetic variants that are apparently...

  14. Triangulation of the human, chimpanzee and Neanderthal genome sequences identifies potentially compensated mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Guojie; Zhang,Pei; Krawczak, Michael; Ball, Edward V.; Mort, Matthew; Kehrer-Sawatzki, Hildegard; Cooper, David N.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Triangulation of the human, chimpanzee and Neanderthal genome sequences with respect to 44,348 disease-causing or disease-associated missense mutations and 1,712 putative regulatory mutations listed in the Human Gene Mutation Database was employed to identify genetic variants that are apparently pathogenic in humans but which may represent a `compensated? wild-type state in at least one of the other two species. Of 122 such `potentially compensated mutations? (PCMs) identi...

  15. Spectrum of mutations and phenotypic expression in patients with autosomal dominant hypercholesterolemia identified in Italy.

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    Bertolini, Stefano; Pisciotta, Livia; Rabacchi, Claudio; Cefalù, Angelo B; Noto, Davide; Fasano, Tommaso; Signori, Alessio; Fresa, Raffaele; Averna, Maurizio; Calandra, Sebastiano

    2013-04-01

    To determine the spectrum of gene mutations and the genotype-phenotype correlations in patients with Autosomal Dominant Hypercholesterolemia (ADH) identified in Italy. The resequencing of LDLR, PCSK9 genes and a selected region of APOB gene were conducted in 1018 index subjects clinically heterozygous ADH and in 52 patients clinically homozygous ADH. The analysis was also extended to 1008 family members of mutation positive subjects. Mutations were detected in 832 individuals: 97.4% with LDLR mutations, 2.2% with APOB mutations and 0.36% with PCSK9 mutations. Among the patients with homozygous ADH, 51 were carriers of LDLR mutations and one was an LDLR/PCSK9 double heterozygote. We identified 237 LDLR mutations (45 not previously reported), 4 APOB and 3 PCSK9 mutations. The phenotypic characterization of 1769 LDLR mutation carriers (ADH-1) revealed that in both sexes independent predictors of the presence of tendon xanthomas were age, the quintiles of LDL cholesterol, the presence of coronary heart disease (CHD) and of receptor negative mutations. Independent predictors of CHD were male gender, age, the presence of arterial hypertension, smoking, tendon xanthomas, the scalar increase of LDL cholesterol and the scalar decrease of HDL cholesterol. We identified 13 LDLR mutation clusters, which allowed us to compare the phenotypic impact of different mutations. The LDL cholesterol raising potential of these mutations was found to vary over a wide range. This study confirms the genetic and allelic heterogeneity of ADH and underscores that the variability in phenotypic expression of ADH-1 is greatly affected by the type of LDLR mutation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Identifying and calling insertions, deletions, and single-base mutations efficiently from sequence data

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    Whole genome sequencing studies can directly identify causative mutations for subsequent use in genomic evaluations, but sequence variant identification is a lengthy and sometimes inaccurate process. The speed and accuracy of identifying small insertions and deletions of sequence, collectively terme...

  17. Targeted next generation sequencing of mucosal melanomas identifies frequent NF1 and RAS mutations.

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    Cosgarea, Ioana; Ugurel, Selma; Sucker, Antje; Livingstone, Elisabeth; Zimmer, Lisa; Ziemer, Mirjana; Utikal, Jochen; Mohr, Peter; Pfeiffer, Christiane; Pföhler, Claudia; Hillen, Uwe; Horn, Susanne; Schadendorf, Dirk; Griewank, Klaus G; Roesch, Alexander

    2017-06-20

    Mucosal melanoma represents ~1% of all melanomas, frequently having a poor prognosis due to diagnosis at a late stage of disease. Mucosal melanoma differs from cutaneous melanoma not only in terms of poorer clinical outcome but also on the molecular level having e.g. less BRAF and more frequent KIT mutations than cutaneous melanomas. For the majority of mucosal melanomas oncogenic driver mutations remain unknown. In our study, 75 tumor tissues from patients diagnosed with mucosal melanoma were analyzed, applying a targeted next generation sequencing panel covering 29 known recurrently mutated genes in melanoma. NF1 and RAS mutations were identified as the most frequently mutated genes occurring in 18.3% and 16.9% of samples, respectively. Mutations in BRAF were identified in 8.4% and KIT in 7.0% of tumor samples. Our study identifies NF1 as the most frequently occurring driver mutation in mucosal melanoma. RAS alterations, consisting of NRAS and KRAS mutations, were the second most frequent mutation type. BRAF and KIT mutations were rare with frequencies below 10% each. Our data indicate that in mucosal melanomas RAS/NF1 alterations are frequent, implying a significant pathogenetic role for MAPK and potentially PI3K pathway activation in these tumors.

  18. Description of first germinal mosaic mutation identified in dominant skeletal mutation experiments and considerations about how to deal with this kind of spontaneous mutation in analyses

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    Selby, Paul B.; Earhart, Vicki S.; Garrison, Edna M.; Raymer, G. Douglas

    2004-01-12

    Germinal mosaicism is a well-established mechanism by which new spontaneous mutations enter the human population, but it is only rather recently that clusters of mutations arising in that way have been acknowledged and dealt with in specific-locus experiments on male mice. This paper reports the first cluster of germinal mosaic mutations to have been identified in experiments on the induction of dominant skeletal mutations. The mutation was detected in six offspring of a control male from the radiation part of an Assessment-of-Dominant-Damage (ADD) experiment. Reasons are provided to explain why this one litter of six mutants was excluded from the analysis of induction of dominant mutations causing the more common skeletal anomalies, which is reported in another paper. The effects of excluding this litter from that analysis are fully described. There is discussion of why such clusters should be included in some analyses but omitted in others. They should certainly always be reported because, in some cases, they can have a major impact on conclusions. Details on this one cluster of FCGM mutations provide numerous examples of how a dominant skeletal mutation that causes rare effects can also cause many of the more common anomalies.

  19. Whole-genome sequencing identifies recurrent mutations in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia

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    Puente, Xose S.; Pinyol, Magda; Quesada, Víctor; Conde, Laura; Ordóñez, Gonzalo R.; Villamor, Neus; Escaramis, Georgia; Jares, Pedro; Beà, Sílvia; González-Díaz, Marcos; Bassaganyas, Laia; Baumann, Tycho; Juan, Manel; López-Guerra, Mónica; Colomer, Dolors; Tubío, José M. C.; López, Cristina; Navarro, Alba; Tornador, Cristian; Aymerich, Marta; Rozman, María; Hernández, Jesús M.; Puente, Diana A.; Freije, José M. P.; Velasco, Gloria; Gutiérrez-Fernández, Ana; Costa, Dolors; Carrió, Anna; Guijarro, Sara; Enjuanes, Anna; Hernández, Lluís; Yagüe, Jordi; Nicolás, Pilar; Romeo-Casabona, Carlos M.; Himmelbauer, Heinz; Castillo, Ester; Dohm, Juliane C.; de Sanjosé, Silvia; Piris, Miguel A.; de Alava, Enrique; Miguel, Jesús San; Royo, Romina; Gelpí, Josep L.; Torrents, David; Orozco, Modesto; Pisano, David G.; Valencia, Alfonso; Guigó, Roderic; Bayés, Mónica; Heath, Simon; Gut, Marta; Klatt, Peter; Marshall, John; Raine, Keiran; Stebbings, Lucy A.; Futreal, P. Andrew; Stratton, Michael R.; Campbell, Peter J.; Gut, Ivo; López-Guillermo, Armando; Estivill, Xavier; Montserrat, Emili; López-Otín, Carlos; Campo, Elías

    2012-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL), the most frequent leukaemia in adults in Western countries, is a heterogeneous disease with variable clinical presentation and evolution1,2. Two major molecular subtypes can be distinguished, characterized respectively by a high or low number of somatic hypermutations in the variable region of immunoglobulin genes3,4. The molecular changes leading to the pathogenesis of the disease are still poorly understood. Here we performed whole-genome sequencing of four cases of CLL and identified 46 somatic mutations that potentially affect gene function. Further analysis of these mutations in 363 patients with CLL identified four genes that are recurrently mutated: notch 1 (NOTCH1), exportin 1 (XPO1), myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MYD88) and kelch-like 6 (KLHL6). Mutations in MYD88 and KLHL6 are predominant in cases of CLL with mutated immunoglobulin genes, whereas NOTCH1 and XPO1 mutations are mainly detected in patients with unmutated immunoglobulins. The patterns of somatic mutation, supported by functional and clinical analyses, strongly indicate that the recurrent NOTCH1, MYD88 and XPO1 mutations are oncogenic changes that contribute to the clinical evolution of the disease. To our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive analysis of CLL combining whole-genome sequencing with clinical characteristics and clinical outcomes. It highlights the usefulness of this approach for the identification of clinically relevant mutations in cancer. PMID:21642962

  20. Oncogene Mutations in Colorectal Polyps Identified in the Norwegian Colorectal Cancer Prevention (NORCCAP) Screening Study

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    Lorentzen, Jon A.; Grzyb, Krzysztof; De Angelis, Paula M.; Hoff, Geir; Eide, Tor J.; Andresen, Per Arne

    2016-01-01

    Data are limited on oncogene mutation frequencies in polyps from principally asymptomatic participants of population-based colorectal cancer screening studies. In this study, DNA from 204 polyps, 5 mm or larger, were collected from 176 participants of the NORCCAP screening study and analyzed for mutations in KRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA including the rarely studied KRAS exons 3 and 4 mutations. KRAS mutations were identified in 23.0% of the lesions and were significantly associated with tubulovillous adenomas and large size. A significantly higher frequency of KRAS mutations in females was associated with mutations in codon 12. The KRAS exon 3 and 4 mutations constituted 23.4% of the KRAS positive lesions, which is a larger proportion compared to previous observations in colorectal cancer. BRAF mutations were identified in 11.3% and were associated with serrated polyps. None of the individuals were diagnosed with de novo or recurrent colorectal cancer during the follow-up time (median 11.2 years). Revealing differences in mutation-spectra according to gender and stages in tumorigenesis might be important for optimal use of oncogenes as therapeutic targets and biomarkers. PMID:27656095

  1. Next-generation sequencing identifies novel CACNA1A gene mutations in episodic ataxia type 2.

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    Maksemous, Neven; Roy, Bishakha; Smith, Robert A; Griffiths, Lyn R

    2016-03-01

    Episodic Ataxia type 2 (EA2) is a rare autosomal dominantly inherited neurological disorder characterized by recurrent disabling imbalance, vertigo, and episodes of ataxia lasting minutes to hours. EA2 is caused most often by loss of function mutations of the calcium channel gene CACNA1A. In addition to EA2, mutations in CACNA1A are responsible for two other allelic disorders: familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 (FHM1) and spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6). Herein, we have utilized next-generation sequencing (NGS) to screen the coding sequence, exon-intron boundaries, and Untranslated Regions (UTRs) of five genes where mutation is known to produce symptoms related to EA2, including CACNA1A. We performed this screening in a group of 31 unrelated patients with EA2 symptoms. Both novel and known mutations were detected through NGS technology, and confirmed through Sanger sequencing. Genetic testing showed in total 15 mutation bearing patients (48%), of which nine were novel mutations (6 missense and 3 small frameshift deletion mutations) and six known mutations (4 missense and 2 nonsense).These results demonstrate the efficiency of our NGS-panel for detecting known and novel mutations for EA2 in the CACNA1A gene, also identifying a novel missense mutation in ATP1A2 which is not a normal target for EA2 screening.

  2. Familial adenomatous polyposis patients without an identified APC germline mutation have a severe phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, M L; Ripa, R; Knudsen, Anne Louise;

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Development of more than 100 colorectal adenomas is diagnostic of the dominantly inherited autosomal disease familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). Germline mutations can be identified in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene in approximately 80% of patients. The APC protein...... comprises several regions and domains for interaction with other proteins, and specific clinical manifestations are associated with the mutation assignment to one of these regions or domains. AIMS: The phenotype in patients without an identified causative APC mutation was compared with the phenotype...... in patients with a known APC mutation and with the phenotypes characteristic of patients with mutations in specific APC regions and domains. PATIENTS: Data on 121 FAP probands and 149 call up patients from 70 different families were extracted from the Danish Polyposis register. METHODS: Differences in 16...

  3. Familial adenomatous polyposis patients without an identified APC germline mutation have a severe phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, M L; Ripa, R; Knudsen, Anne Louise

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Development of more than 100 colorectal adenomas is diagnostic of the dominantly inherited autosomal disease familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). Germline mutations can be identified in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene in approximately 80% of patients. The APC protein...... in patients with a known APC mutation and with the phenotypes characteristic of patients with mutations in specific APC regions and domains. PATIENTS: Data on 121 FAP probands and 149 call up patients from 70 different families were extracted from the Danish Polyposis register. METHODS: Differences in 16...... clinical manifestations were analysed according to the patient's mutational status. Two sided independent t sample test, two sided chi(2) test, and odds ratios were calculated. RESULTS: Patients without identified APC mutations had a unique and severe phenotype, which was roughly described as: young age...

  4. Whole-exome sequencing identified mutational profiles of high-grade colon adenomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-Min; Rhee, Je-Keun; Park, Hyeon-Chun; Sung, Min Kim; Kim, Sung Soo; Hyeok, Chang An; Lee Hyung, Sug; Chung, Yeun-Jun

    2017-01-01

    Although gene-to-gene analyses identified genetic alterations such as APC, KRAS and TP53 mutations in colon adenomas, it is largely unknown whether there are any others in them. Mutational profiling of high-grade colon adenoma (HGCA) that just precedes colon carcinoma might identify not only novel adenoma-specific genes but also critical genes for its progression to carcinoma. For this, we performed whole-exome sequencing (WES) of 12 HGCAs and identified 11 non-hypermutated and one hypermutated (POLE-mutated) cases. We identified 22 genes including APC, KRAS, TP53, GNAS, NRAS, SMAD4, ARID2, and PIK3CA with non-silent mutations in the cancer Census Genes. Bi-allelic and mono-allelic APC alterations were found in nine and one HGCAs, respectively, while the other two harbored wild-type APC. Five HGCAs harbored either mono-allelic (four HGCAs) or bi-allelic (one HGCA) SMAD4 mutation or 18q loss that had been known as early carcinoma-specific changes. We identified MTOR, ACVR1B, GNAQ, ATM, CNOT1, EP300, ARID2, RET and MAP2K4 mutations for the first time in colon adenomas. Our WES data is largely matched with the earlier ‘adenoma-carcinoma model’ (APC, KRAS, NRAS and GNAS mutations), but there are newly identified SMAD4, MTOR, ACVR1B, GNAQ, ATM, CNOT1, EP300, ARID2, RET and MAP2K4 mutations in this study. Our findings provide resource for understanding colon premalignant lesions and for identifying genomic clues for differential diagnosis and therapy options for colon adenomas and carcinomas. PMID:28179590

  5. Two novel SCN1A mutations identified in families with familial hemiplegic migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, Claudia M; Pelzer, Nadine; de Vries, Boukje; López, Mercè Artigas; De Fàbregues, Oriol; Pascual, Julio; Arroyo, María A Ramos; Koelewijn, Stephany C; Stam, Anine H; Haan, Joost; Ferrari, Michel D; Terwindt, Gisela M; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M

    2014-11-01

    Familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) is a rare monogenic subtype of migraine with aura, characterized by motor auras. The majority of FHM families have mutations in the CACNA1A and ATP1A2 genes; less than 5% of FHM families are explained by mutations in the SCN1A gene. Here we screened two Spanish FHM families for mutations in the FHM genes. We assessed the clinical features of both FHM families and performed direct sequencing of all coding exons (and adjacent sequences) of the CACNA1A, ATP1A2, PRRT2 and SCN1A genes. FHM patients in both families had pure hemiplegic migraine with highly variable severity and frequency of attacks. We identified a novel SCN1A missense mutation p.Ile1498Met in all three tested hemiplegic migraine patients of one family. In the other family, novel SCN1A missense mutation p.Phe1661Leu was identified in six out of eight tested hemiplegic migraine patients. Both mutations affect amino acid residues that either reside in an important functional domain (in the case of Ile(1498)) or are known to be important for kinetic properties of the NaV1.1 channel (in the case of Phe(1661)). We identified two mutations in families with FHM. SCN1A mutations are an infrequent but important cause of FHM. Genetic testing is indicated in families when no mutations are found in other FHM genes. © International Headache Society 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  6. New mutations in chronic lymphocytic leukemia identified by target enrichment and deep sequencing.

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    Elena Doménech

    Full Text Available Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL is a heterogeneous disease without a well-defined genetic alteration responsible for the onset of the disease. Several lines of evidence coincide in identifying stimulatory and growth signals delivered by B-cell receptor (BCR, and co-receptors together with NFkB pathway, as being the driving force in B-cell survival in CLL. However, the molecular mechanism responsible for this activation has not been identified. Based on the hypothesis that BCR activation may depend on somatic mutations of the BCR and related pathways we have performed a complete mutational screening of 301 selected genes associated with BCR signaling and related pathways using massive parallel sequencing technology in 10 CLL cases. Four mutated genes in coding regions (KRAS, SMARCA2, NFKBIE and PRKD3 have been confirmed by capillary sequencing. In conclusion, this study identifies new genes mutated in CLL, all of them in cases with progressive disease, and demonstrates that next-generation sequencing technologies applied to selected genes or pathways of interest are powerful tools for identifying novel mutational changes.

  7. New mutations in chronic lymphocytic leukemia identified by target enrichment and deep sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doménech, Elena; Gómez-López, Gonzalo; Gzlez-Peña, Daniel; López, Mar; Herreros, Beatriz; Menezes, Juliane; Gómez-Lozano, Natalia; Carro, Angel; Graña, Osvaldo; Pisano, David G; Domínguez, Orlando; García-Marco, José A; Piris, Miguel A; Sánchez-Beato, Margarita

    2012-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a heterogeneous disease without a well-defined genetic alteration responsible for the onset of the disease. Several lines of evidence coincide in identifying stimulatory and growth signals delivered by B-cell receptor (BCR), and co-receptors together with NFkB pathway, as being the driving force in B-cell survival in CLL. However, the molecular mechanism responsible for this activation has not been identified. Based on the hypothesis that BCR activation may depend on somatic mutations of the BCR and related pathways we have performed a complete mutational screening of 301 selected genes associated with BCR signaling and related pathways using massive parallel sequencing technology in 10 CLL cases. Four mutated genes in coding regions (KRAS, SMARCA2, NFKBIE and PRKD3) have been confirmed by capillary sequencing. In conclusion, this study identifies new genes mutated in CLL, all of them in cases with progressive disease, and demonstrates that next-generation sequencing technologies applied to selected genes or pathways of interest are powerful tools for identifying novel mutational changes.

  8. New Quantitative Method to Identify NPM1 Mutations in Acute Myeloid Leukaemia

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    Sarah Huet

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Somatic mutations in the NPM1 gene, which encodes for nucleophosmin, have been reported to be the most frequent genetic abnormalities found in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML. Their identification and quantification remain crucial for the patients’ residual disease monitoring. We investigated a new method that could represent a novel reliable alternative to sequencing for its identification. This method was based on high-resolution melting analysis in order to detect mutated patients and on an allele-specific oligonucleotide real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (ASO-RQ-PCR for the identification and quantification of the transcripts carrying NPM1 mutations (NPM1m. Few patients carrying known NPM1m enabled us to set up a table with the different primers’ ΔCT values, identifying a profile for each mutation type. We then analysed a series of 337 AML patients' samples for NPM1 mutational status characterization and confirmed the ASO-RQ-PCR results by direct sequencing. We identified some mutations in 86 samples, and the results were fully correlated in 100% of the 36 sequenced samples. We also detected other rare NPM1m in two samples, that we confirmed by direct sequencing. This highly specific method provides a novel quick, useful, and costless tool, easy to use in routine practice.

  9. Ethnic disparity in 21-hydroxylase gene mutations identified in Pakistani congenital adrenal hyperplasia patients

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    Jabbar Abdul

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH is a group of autosomal recessive disorders caused by defects in the steroid 21 hydroxylase gene (CYP21A2. We studied the spectrum of mutations in CYP21A2 gene in a multi-ethnic population in Pakistan to explore the genetics of CAH. Methods A cross sectional study was conducted for the identification of mutations CYP21A2 and their phenotypic associations in CAH using ARMS-PCR assay. Results Overall, 29 patients were analyzed for nine different mutations. The group consisted of two major forms of CAH including 17 salt wasters and 12 simple virilizers. There were 14 phenotypic males and 15 females representing all the major ethnic groups of Pakistan. Parental consanguinity was reported in 65% cases and was equally distributed in the major ethnic groups. Among 58 chromosomes analyzed, mutations were identified in 45 (78.6% chromosomes. The most frequent mutation was I2 splice (27% followed by Ile173Asn (26%, Arg 357 Trp (19%, Gln319stop, 16% and Leu308InsT (12%, whereas Val282Leu was not observed in this study. Homozygosity was seen in 44% and heterozygosity in 34% cases. I2 splice mutation was found to be associated with SW in the homozygous. The Ile173Asn mutation was identified in both SW and SV forms. Moreover, Arg357Trp manifested SW in compound heterozygous state. Conclusion Our study showed that CAH exists in our population with ethnic difference in the prevalence of mutations examined.

  10. Bcl11b mutations identified in murine lymphomas increase the proliferation rate of hematopoietic progenitor cells

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    Söderkvist Peter

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The telomeric region of mouse chromosome 12 has previously shown frequent allelic loss in murine lymphoma. The Bcl11b gene has been identified and suggested as a candidate tumor suppressor gene within this region. In this study, we aimed to elucidate whether Bcl11b is mutated in lymphomas with allelic loss, and whether the mutations we detected conferred any effect on cell proliferation and apoptosis. Methods Mouse lymphomas induced by 1,3-butadiene or 2',3'-dideoxycytidine were analysed for mutations in the Bcl11b gene using single strand conformation analysis and direct DNA sequencing. Effects on cell proliferation by the detected mutations were studied by expressing wild-type and mutant Bcl11b in the cytokine-dependent hematopoietic progenitor cell line FDC-P1, lacking endogenous Bcl11b expression. Results Missense and frameshift (FS mutations were identified in 7 of 47 tumors (15%. Interestingly, all mutations were found between amino acids 778–844 which encode the three C-terminal DNA-binding zinc fingers. In FDC-P1 cells, wild-type Bcl11b suppressed cell proliferation, whereas the mutated versions (S778N, K828T, Y844C and FS823 enhanced proliferation several-fold. Conclusion The genetic alterations detected in this study suggest that the three C-terminal zinc fingers of Bcl11b are important for the DNA-binding. Cell proliferation was suppressed by overexpression of wild-type Bcl11b but enhanced by mutant Bcl11b, indicating that these mutations may be an important contributing factor to lymphomagenesis in a subset of tumors.

  11. Familial adenomatous polyposis patients without an identified APC germline mutation have a severe phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, M L; Ripa, R; Knudsen, Anne Louise;

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Development of more than 100 colorectal adenomas is diagnostic of the dominantly inherited autosomal disease familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). Germline mutations can be identified in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene in approximately 80% of patients. The APC protein compri...... they do not themselves more often represent an isolated case. CONCLUSIONS: The severe phenotype should be considered when counselling FAP families in which attenuated FAP is excluded and in which a causative APC mutation has not been identified.......BACKGROUND: Development of more than 100 colorectal adenomas is diagnostic of the dominantly inherited autosomal disease familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). Germline mutations can be identified in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene in approximately 80% of patients. The APC protein...... in patients with a known APC mutation and with the phenotypes characteristic of patients with mutations in specific APC regions and domains. PATIENTS: Data on 121 FAP probands and 149 call up patients from 70 different families were extracted from the Danish Polyposis register. METHODS: Differences in 16...

  12. Spontaneous tyrosinase mutations identified in albinos of three wild frog species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Ikuo; Tagami, Masataka; Fujitani, Takeshi; Ogata, Mitsuaki

    2017-06-30

    The present study reports spontaneous tyrosinase gene mutations identified in oculocutaneous albinos of three Japanese wild frog species, Pelophylax nigromaculatus, Glandirana rugosa and Fejervarya kawamurai. This represents the first molecular analyses of albinic phenotypes in frogs. Albinos of P. nigromaculatus collected from two different populations were found to suffer from frameshift mutations. These mutations were caused by the insertion of a thymine residue within each of exons 1 and 4, while albinos in a third population lacked three nucleotides encoding lysine in exon 1. Albinos from the former two P. nigromaculatus populations were also associated with splicing variants of mRNA that lacked either exons 2-4 or exon 4. In the other two frog species examined, missense mutations that resulted in amino acid substitutions from glycine to arginine and glycine to aspartic acid were identified in exons 1 and 3, respectively. The two glycines in F. kawamurai and G. rugosa, and the lysine deleted in one P. nigromaculatus albino, were highly conserved in vertebrates, which suggested that they were critically important to tyrosinase function. In fact, the glycine of G. rugosa is located within a predicted copper-binding domain. The five mutations identified in the present study are candidates for causing the albinic phenotypes, and, if directly confirmed, they are all unique to the vertebrates, which suggests that molecular analysis of albino frogs could contribute to research on albinos in humans and vertebrates by providing new information about tyrosinase structure and transcript processing.

  13. Whole-exome sequencing identifies somatic ATRX mutations in pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishbein, Lauren; Khare, Sanika; Wubbenhorst, Bradley; DeSloover, Daniel; D'Andrea, Kurt; Merrill, Shana; Cho, Nam Woo; Greenberg, Roger A; Else, Tobias; Montone, Kathleen; LiVolsi, Virginia; Fraker, Douglas; Daber, Robert; Cohen, Debbie L; Nathanson, Katherine L

    2015-01-21

    Pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas (PCC/PGL) are the solid tumour type most commonly associated with an inherited susceptibility syndrome. However, very little is known about the somatic genetic changes leading to tumorigenesis or malignant transformation. Here we perform whole-exome sequencing on a discovery set of 21 PCC/PGL and identify somatic ATRX mutations in two SDHB-associated tumours. Targeted sequencing of a separate validation set of 103 PCC/PGL identifies somatic ATRX mutations in 12.6% of PCC/PGL. PCC/PGL with somatic ATRX mutations are associated with alternative lengthening of telomeres and clinically aggressive behaviour. This finding suggests that loss of ATRX, an SWI/SNF chromatin remodelling protein, is important in the development of clinically aggressive PCC/PGL.

  14. A strategy to identify de novo mutations in common disorders such as autism and schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julie, Gauthier; Hamdan, Fadi F; Rouleau, Guy A

    2011-06-15

    mutation rate. Finally, the effects of paternal age: there is a significantly increased risk of the disease with increasing paternal age, which could result from the age related increase in paternal de novo mutations. This is the case for autism and schizophrenia(3). The male-to-female ratio of mutation rate is estimated at about 4-6:1, presumably due to a higher number of germ-cell divisions with age in males. Therefore, one would predict that de novo mutations would more frequently come from males, particularly older males(4). A high rate of new mutations may in part explain why genetic studies have so far failed to identify many genes predisposing to complexes diseases genes, such as autism and schizophrenia, and why diseases have been identified for a mere 3% of genes in the human genome. Identification for de novo mutations as a cause of a disease requires a targeted molecular approach, which includes studying parents and affected subjects. The process for determining if the genetic basis of a disease may result in part from de novo mutations and the molecular approach to establish this link will be illustrated, using autism and schizophrenia as examples.

  15. New real-time-PCR method to identify single point mutations in hepatitis C virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qian; Belmonte, Irene; Buti, Maria; Nieto, Leonardo; Garcia-Cehic, Damir; Gregori, Josep; Perales, Celia; Ordeig, Laura; Llorens, Meritxell; Soria, Maria Eugenia; Esteban, Rafael; Esteban, Juan Ignacio; Rodriguez-Frias, Francisco; Quer, Josep

    2016-01-01

    AIM To develop a fast, low-cost diagnostic strategy to identify single point mutations in highly variable genomes such as hepatitis C virus (HCV). METHODS In patients with HCV infection, resistance-associated amino acid substitutions within the viral quasispecies prior to therapy can confer decreased susceptibility to direct-acting antiviral agents and lead to treatment failure and virological relapse. One such naturally occurring mutation is the Q80K substitution in the HCV-NS3 protease gene, which confers resistance to PI inhibitors, particularly simeprevir. Low-cost, highly sensitive techniques enabling routine detection of these single point mutations would be useful to identify patients at a risk of treatment failure. LightCycler methods, based on real-time PCR with sequence-specific probe hybridization, have been implemented in most diagnostic laboratories. However, this technique cannot identify single point mutations in highly variable genetic environments, such as the HCV genome. To circumvent this problem, we developed a new method to homogenize all nucleotides present in a region except the point mutation of interest. RESULTS Using nucleotide-specific probes Q, K, and R substitutions at position 80 were clearly identified at a sensitivity of 10% (mutations present at a frequency of at least 10% were detected). The technique was successfully applied to identify the Q80K substitution in 240 HCV G1 serum samples, with performance comparable to that of direct Sanger sequencing, the current standard procedure for this purpose. The new method was then validated in a Catalonian population of 202 HCV G1-infected individuals. Q80K was detected in 14.6% of G1a patients and 0% of G1b in our setting. CONCLUSION A fast, low-cost diagnostic strategy based on real-time PCR and fluorescence resonance energy transfer probe melting curve analysis has been successfully developed to identify single point mutations in highly variable genomes such as hepatitis C virus. This

  16. Whole exome sequencing identifies mutations in Usher syndrome genes in profoundly deaf Tunisian patients.

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    Zied Riahi

    Full Text Available Usher syndrome (USH is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by combined deafness-blindness. It accounts for about 50% of all hereditary deafness blindness cases. Three clinical subtypes (USH1, USH2, and USH3 are described, of which USH1 is the most severe form, characterized by congenital profound deafness, constant vestibular dysfunction, and a prepubertal onset of retinitis pigmentosa. We performed whole exome sequencing in four unrelated Tunisian patients affected by apparently isolated, congenital profound deafness, with reportedly normal ocular fundus examination. Four biallelic mutations were identified in two USH1 genes: a splice acceptor site mutation, c.2283-1G>T, and a novel missense mutation, c.5434G>A (p.Glu1812Lys, in MYO7A, and two previously unreported mutations in USH1G, i.e. a frameshift mutation, c.1195_1196delAG (p.Leu399Alafs*24, and a nonsense mutation, c.52A>T (p.Lys18*. Another ophthalmological examination including optical coherence tomography actually showed the presence of retinitis pigmentosa in all the patients. Our findings provide evidence that USH is under-diagnosed in Tunisian deaf patients. Yet, early diagnosis of USH is of utmost importance because these patients should undergo cochlear implant surgery in early childhood, in anticipation of the visual loss.

  17. Two Novel Mutations Identified in an African-American Child with Chediak-Higashi Syndrome

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    Kerry Morrone

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Chediak-Higashi syndrome (CHS is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder characterized by oculocutaneous albinism, immunodeficiency, coagulopathy and late-onset, progressive neurological dysfunction. It also has an “accelerated phase” characterized by hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH. The disease is caused by mutations in the CHS1/LYST gene located on chromosome 1, which affects lysosome morphology and function. We report the case of an African-American child with CHS in Case. This 16-month old African-American girl presented with fever and lethargy. The proband had pale skin compared to her parents, with light brown eyes, silvery hair and massive hepatosplenomegaly. Her laboratory evaluation was remarkable for pancytopenia, high serum ferritin and an elevated LDH. Bone marrow aspirate revealed large inclusions in granulocytes and erythrophagocytosis consistent with HLH. Genetic evaluation revealed two novel nonsense mutations in the CHS1 gene: c.3622C>T (p.Q1208X and c.11002G>T (p.E3668X. Conclusions. Our patient is one of the few cases of CHS reported in the African American population. We identified 2 nonsense mutations in the CHS1 gene, the first mutation analysis published of an African-American child with Chediak-Higashi Syndrome. These two mutations predict a severe phenotype and thus identification of these mutations has an important clinical significance in CHS.

  18. Simulated Annealing Based Algorithm for Identifying Mutated Driver Pathways in Cancer

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    Hai-Tao Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available With the development of next-generation DNA sequencing technologies, large-scale cancer genomics projects can be implemented to help researchers to identify driver genes, driver mutations, and driver pathways, which promote cancer proliferation in large numbers of cancer patients. Hence, one of the remaining challenges is to distinguish functional mutations vital for cancer development, and filter out the unfunctional and random “passenger mutations.” In this study, we introduce a modified method to solve the so-called maximum weight submatrix problem which is used to identify mutated driver pathways in cancer. The problem is based on two combinatorial properties, that is, coverage and exclusivity. Particularly, we enhance an integrative model which combines gene mutation and expression data. The experimental results on simulated data show that, compared with the other methods, our method is more efficient. Finally, we apply the proposed method on two real biological datasets. The results show that our proposed method is also applicable in real practice.

  19. Thirty-nine novel neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1) gene mutations identified in Slovak patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemethova, Martina; Bolcekova, Anna; Ilencikova, Denisa; Durovcikova, Darina; Hlinkova, Katarina; Hlavata, Anna; Kovacs, Laszlo; Kadasi, Ludevit; Zatkova, Andrea

    2013-09-01

    We performed a complex analysis of the neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) gene in Slovakia based on direct cDNA sequencing supplemented by multiple ligation dependent probe amplification (MLPA) analysis. All 108 patients had café-au-lait spots, 85% had axilary and/or inguinal freckling, 61% neurofibromas, 36% Lisch nodules of the iris and 31% optic pathway glioma, 5% suffered from typical skeletal disorders, and 51% of patients had family members with NF1. In 78 of the 86 (90.7%) index patients our analysis revealed the presence of NF1 mutations, 68 of which were small changes (87.2%), including 39 (50%) novel. Among the identified mutations the most prevalent were small deletions and insertions causing frameshift (42.3%), followed by nonsense (14.1%), missense (12.8%), and typical splicing (11.5%) mutations. Type 1 NF1 deletions and intragenic deletions/duplication were identified in five cases each (6.4%). Interestingly, in five other cases nontypical splicing variants were found, whose real effect on NF1 transcript would have remained undetected if using a DNA-based method alone, thus underlying the advantage of using the cDNA-based sequencing. We show that Slovak NF1 patients have a similar repertoire of NF1 germline mutations compared to other populations, with some prevalence of small deletions/insertions and a decreased proportion of nonsense mutations.

  20. Clinical and molecular characterization of a novel INS mutation identified in patients with MODY phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccini, Barbara; Artuso, Rosangela; Lenzi, Lorenzo; Guasti, Monica; Braccesi, Giulia; Barni, Federica; Casalini, Emilio; Giglio, Sabrina; Toni, Sonia

    2016-11-01

    Correct diagnosis of Maturity-Onset Diabetes of the Young (MODY) is based on genetic tests requiring an appropriate subject selection by clinicians. Mutations in the insulin (INS) gene rarely occur in patients with MODY. This study is aimed at determining the genetic background and clinical phenotype in patients with suspected MODY. 34 patients with suspected MODY, negative for mutations in the GCK, HNF1α, HNF4α, HNF1β and PDX1 genes, were screened by next generation sequencing (NGS). A heterozygous INS mutation was identified in 4 members of the same family. First genetic tests performed identified two heterozygous silent nucleotide substitutions in MODY3/HNF1α gene. An ineffective attempt to suspend insulin therapy, administering repaglinide and sulphonylureas, was made. DNA was re-sequenced by NGS investigating a set of 102 genes. Genes implicated in the pathway of pancreatic β-cells, candidate genes for type 2 diabetes mellitus and genes causative of diabetes in mice were selected. A novel heterozygous variant in human preproinsulin INS gene (c.125T > C) was found in the affected family members. The new INS mutation broadens the spectrum of possible INS phenotypes. Screening for INS mutations is warranted not only in neonatal diabetes but also in MODYx patients and in selected patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus negative for autoantibodies. Subjects with complex diseases without a specific phenotype should be studied by NGS because Sanger sequencing is ineffective and time consuming in detecting rare variants.

  1. Molecular testing of 163 patients with Morquio A (Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA) identifies 39 novel GALNS mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrone, A; Tylee, K L; Al-Sayed, M; Brusius-Facchin, A C; Caciotti, A; Church, H J; Coll, M J; Davidson, K; Fietz, M J; Gort, L; Hegde, M; Kubaski, F; Lacerda, L; Laranjeira, F; Leistner-Segal, S; Mooney, S; Pajares, S; Pollard, L; Ribeiro, I; Wang, R Y; Miller, N

    2014-06-01

    Morquio A (Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA; MPS IVA) is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder caused by partial or total deficiency of the enzyme galactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase (GALNS; also known as N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase) encoded by the GALNS gene. Patients who inherit two mutated GALNS gene alleles have a decreased ability to degrade the glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) keratan sulfate and chondroitin 6-sulfate, thereby causing GAG accumulation within lysosomes and consequently pleiotropic disease. GALNS mutations occur throughout the gene and many mutations are identified only in single patients or families, causing difficulties both in mutation detection and interpretation. In this study, molecular analysis of 163 patients with Morquio A identified 99 unique mutations in the GALNS gene believed to negatively impact GALNS protein function, of which 39 are previously unpublished, together with 26 single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Recommendations for the molecular testing of patients, clear reporting of sequence findings, and interpretation of sequencing data are provided. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. KCNE3 mutation V17M identified in a patient with lone atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundby, Alicia; Ravn, Lasse Steen; Svendsen, Jesper Hastrup

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac rhythm disorder with a lifetime risk for development of 25% for people aged 40 or older. In this study we aim for the functional assessment of a mutation in KCNE3 identified in a proband with early-onset lone AF. METHODS: Screening o...

  3. Screening of 1331 Danish breast and/or ovarian cancer families identified 40 novel BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas V O; Jønson, Lars; Steffensen, Ane Y;

    2011-01-01

    Germ-line mutations in the tumour suppressor genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 predispose to breast and ovarian cancer. Since 1999 we have performed mutational screening of breast and/or ovarian cancer patients in East Denmark. During this period we have identified 40 novel sequence variations in BRCA1...... and BRCA2 in high risk breast and/or ovarian cancer families. The mutations were detected via pre-screening using dHPLC or high-resolution melting and direct sequencing. We identified 16 variants in BRCA1, including 9 deleterious frame-shift mutations, 2 intronic variants, 4 missense mutations, and 1...... interpreted as pathogenic, 3 missense mutations were suggested to be pathogenic based on in silico analysis, 6 mutations were suggested to be benign since they were identified in patients together with a well-known disease-causing BRCA1/BRCA2 mutation, while 12 were variants of unknown significance....

  4. CCR4 frameshift mutation identifies a distinct group of adult T cell leukaemia/lymphoma with poor prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Noriaki; Miyoshi, Hiroaki; Kato, Takeharu; Sakata-Yanagimoto, Mamiko; Niino, Daisuke; Taniguchi, Hiroaki; Moriuchi, Yukiyoshi; Miyahara, Masaharu; Kurita, Daisuke; Sasaki, Yuya; Shimono, Joji; Kawamoto, Keisuke; Utsunomiya, Atae; Imaizumi, Yoshitaka; Seto, Masao; Ohshima, Koichi

    2016-04-01

    Adult T cell leukaemia/lymphoma (ATLL) is an intractable T cell neoplasm caused by human T cell leukaemia virus type 1. Next-generation sequencing-based comprehensive mutation studies have revealed recurrent somatic CCR4 mutations in ATLL, although clinicopathological findings associated with CCR4 mutations remain to be delineated. In the current study, 184 cases of peripheral T cell lymphoma, including 113 cases of ATLL, were subjected to CCR4 mutation analysis. This sequence analysis identified mutations in 27% (30/113) of cases of ATLL and 9% (4/44) of cases of peripheral T cell lymphoma not otherwise specified. Identified mutations included nonsense (NS) and frameshift (FS) mutations. No significant differences in clinicopathological findings were observed between ATLL cases stratified by presence of CCR4 mutation. All ATLL cases with CCR4 mutations exhibited cell-surface CCR4 positivity. Semi-quantitative CCR4 protein analysis of immunohistochemical sections revealed higher CCR4 expression in cases with NS mutations of CCR4 than in cases with wild-type (WT) CCR4. Furthermore, among ATLL cases, FS mutation was significantly associated with a poor prognosis, compared with NS mutation and WT CCR4. These results suggest that CCR4 mutation is an important determinant of the clinical course in ATLL cases, and that NS and FS mutations of CCR4 behave differently with respect to ATLL pathophysiology.

  5. Novel collagen VI mutations identified in Chinese patients with Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-Zhi Zhang; Hui Xiong; Dan-Hua Zhao; Hai-Po Yang; Ai-Jie Liu; Xing-Zhi Chang; Dao-Jun Hong; Carsten Bonnemann; Yun Yuan; Xi-Ru Wu

    2014-01-01

    Background: We determined the clinical and molecular genetic characteristics of 8 Chinese patients with Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD). Methods: Clinical data of probands were collected and muscle biopsies of patients were analyzed. Exons of COL6A1, COL6A2 and COL6A3 were analyzed by direct sequencing. Mutations in COL6A1, COL6A2 and COL6A3 were identifi ed in 8 patients. Results: Among these mutations, 5 were novel [three in the triple helical domain (THD) and 2 in the second C-terminal (C2) domain]. We also identified five known missense or in-frame deletion mutations in THD and C domains. Immunohistochemical studies on muscle biopsies from patients showed reduced level of collagen VI at the muscle basement membrane and mis-localization of the protein in interstitial and perivascular regions. Conclusions: The novel mutations we identified underscore the importance of THD and C2 domains in the assembly and function of collagen VI, thereby providing useful information for the genetic counseling of UCMD patients.

  6. Exome sequencing of hepatocellular carcinomas identifies new mutational signatures and potential therapeutic targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrov, Ludmil B; Calderaro, Julien; Rebouissou, Sandra; Couchy, Gabrielle; Meiller, Clément; Shinde, Jayendra; Soysouvanh, Frederic; Calatayud, Anna-Line; Pinyol, Roser; Pelletier, Laura; Balabaud, Charles; Laurent, Alexis; Blanc, Jean-Frederic; Mazzaferro, Vincenzo; Calvo, Fabien; Villanueva, Augusto; Nault, Jean-Charles; Bioulac-Sage, Paulette; Stratton, Michael R; Llovet, Josep M; Zucman-Rossi, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    Genomic analyses promise to improve tumor characterization in order to optimize personalized treatment for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Exome sequencing analysis of 243 liver tumors revealed mutational signatures associated with specific risk factors, mainly combined alcohol/tobacco consumption, and aflatoxin B1. We identified 161 putative driver genes associated with 11 recurrent pathways. Associations of mutations defined 3 groups of genes related to risk factors and centered on CTNNB1 (alcohol), TP53 (HBV), and AXIN1. Analyses according to tumor stage progression revealed TERT promoter mutation as an early event whereas FGF3, FGF4, FGF19/CCND1 amplification, TP53 and CDKN2A alterations, appeared at more advanced stages in aggressive tumors. In 28% of the tumors we identified genetic alterations potentially targetable by FDA-approved drugs. In conclusion, we identified risk factor-specific mutational signatures and defined the extensive landscape of altered genes and pathways in HCC which will be useful to design clinical trials for targeted therapy. PMID:25822088

  7. Germline mutations in BMP9 are not identified in a series of Danish and French patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tørring, P. M.; Dupuis-Girod, S.; Giraud, S

    2016-01-01

    had a different vascular-anomaly syndrome, the suspicion that BMP9 mutations might cause HHT remained. To evaluate if germline mutations in BMP9 can be identified in HHT patients, we investigated the Danish and the French Lyon cohort of mutation-negative and clinically definite HHT patients. Exons...

  8. Mutations in multidomain protein MEGF8 identify a Carpenter syndrome subtype associated with defective lateralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twigg, Stephen R F; Lloyd, Deborah; Jenkins, Dagan; Elçioglu, Nursel E; Cooper, Christopher D O; Al-Sannaa, Nouriya; Annagür, Ali; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Hüning, Irina; Knight, Samantha J L; Goodship, Judith A; Keavney, Bernard D; Beales, Philip L; Gileadi, Opher; McGowan, Simon J; Wilkie, Andrew O M

    2012-11-02

    Carpenter syndrome is an autosomal-recessive multiple-congenital-malformation disorder characterized by multisuture craniosynostosis and polysyndactyly of the hands and feet; many other clinical features occur, and the most frequent include obesity, umbilical hernia, cryptorchidism, and congenital heart disease. Mutations of RAB23, encoding a small GTPase that regulates vesicular transport, are present in the majority of cases. Here, we describe a disorder caused by mutations in multiple epidermal-growth-factor-like-domains 8 (MEGF8), which exhibits substantial clinical overlap with Carpenter syndrome but is frequently associated with abnormal left-right patterning. We describe five affected individuals with similar dysmorphic facies, and three of them had either complete situs inversus, dextrocardia, or transposition of the great arteries; similar cardiac abnormalities were previously identified in a mouse mutant for the orthologous Megf8. The mutant alleles comprise one nonsense, three missense, and two splice-site mutations; we demonstrate in zebrafish that, in contrast to the wild-type protein, the proteins containing all three missense alterations provide only weak rescue of an early gastrulation phenotype induced by Megf8 knockdown. We conclude that mutations in MEGF8 cause a Carpenter syndrome subtype frequently associated with defective left-right patterning, probably through perturbation of signaling by hedgehog and nodal family members. We did not observe any subject with biallelic loss-of function mutations, suggesting that some residual MEGF8 function might be necessary for survival and might influence the phenotypes observed.

  9. Mutation Analysis of hCDC4 in AML Cells Identifies a New Intronic Polymorphism

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    Daniel Nowak, Maximilian Mossner, Claudia D. Baldus, Olaf Hopfer, Eckhard Thiel, Wolf-Karsten Hofmann

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available hCDC4 (FBW7, FBXW7 is a new potential tumor suppressor gene which provides substrate specificity for SCF (Skp–Cullin–F-box ubiquitin ligases and thereby regulates the degradation of potent oncogenes such as cyclin E, Myc, c-Jun and Notch. Mutations in the hCDC4 gene have been found in several solid tumors such as pancreas, colorectal or endometrial cancer. We carried out a mutation analysis of the hCDC4 gene in 35 samples of patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML to elucidate a possible role of hCDC4 mutations in this disease. By direct DNA sequencing and digestion with Surveyor nuclease one heterozygous mutation in the 5' untranslated region of exon 1, transcript variant 3 was detected. Additionally, we could identify a new intronic SNP downstream of exon 10. The new variation was present in 20% of AML samples and was furthermore confirmed in a panel of 51 healthy individuals where it displayed a frequency of 14%. In conclusion we provide first data that in contrast to several solid tumors, mutations in the hCDC4 gene may not play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of AML. Furthermore, we describe a new intronic polymorphism with high frequency in the intron sequence of the hCDC4 gene.

  10. Functional characterization of rare missense mutations in MLH1 and MSH2 identified in Danish colorectal cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Lise Lotte; Kariola, Reetta; Korhonen, Mari K

    2009-01-01

    Recently, we have performed a population based study to analyse the frequency of colorectal cancer related MLH1 and MSH2 missense mutations in the Danish population. Half of the analyzed mutations were rare and most likely only present in the families where they were identified originally. Some...... of the missense mutations were located in conserved regions in the MLH1 and MSH2 proteins indicating a relation to disease development. In the present study, we functionally characterized 10 rare missense mutations in MLH1 and MSH2 identified in 13 Danish CRC families. To elucidate the pathogenicity...... of the missense mutations, we carried out in vitro functional analyses. The missense mutations were analyzed for their effect on protein expression and repair efficiency. The results of the functional analysis were correlated with clinical data on the families carrying these mutations. Eight missense mutations...

  11. Sequencing EVC and EVC2 identifies mutations in two-thirds of Ellis-van Creveld syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tompson, Stuart W J; Ruiz-Perez, Victor L; Blair, Helen J; Barton, Stephanie; Navarro, Victoria; Robson, Joanne L; Wright, Michael J; Goodship, Judith A

    2007-01-01

    Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EvC) is caused by mutations in EVC and EVC2, genes in a divergent orientation separated by only 2.6 kb. We systematically sought mutations in both genes in a panel of 65 affected individuals to assess the proportion of cases resulting from mutations in each gene. We PCR amplified and sequenced the coding exons of both genes. We investigated mutations that could affect splicing by in vitro splicing assays and cDNA analysis. We have identified EVC mutations in 20 cases (31%); in all of these we have detected the mutation on each allele. We have identified EVC2 mutations in 25 cases (38%); in 22 of these we have isolated a mutation on each allele. The majority of the mutations introduce a premature termination codon. We sequenced the region between the two genes in 10 of the 20 cases in which we had not identified a mutation in either gene, revealing only one SNP that was not a common polymorphism. As we have not identified mutations in either gene in 20 cases (31%) it is possible that there is further genetic heterogeneity.

  12. TP53 mutations identify younger mantle cell lymphoma patients who do not benefit from intensive chemoimmunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskelund, Christian W; Dahl, Christina; Hansen, Jakob W

    2017-01-01

    Despite recent advances in lymphoma treatment, mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) remains incurable and we are still unable to identify patients who will not benefit from the current standard-of-care. Here, we explore the prognostic value of recurrent genetic aberrations in diagnostic bone marrow (BM...... to relapse. TP53-mutated cases had a dismal outcome with a median OS of 1.8 years and 50% relapsed at 1.0 years (compared to not reached (NR) and 12.7 years, respectively, for TP53-unmutated cases, p30%, blastoid morphology, MIPI high......-risk and inferior responses to both induction- and high-dose chemotherapy. In conclusion, we show that TP53 mutations identify a phenotypically distinct and highly aggressive form of MCL with poor or no response to regimens including cytarabine, rituximab and autologous stem-cell transplant (ASCT). We suggest...

  13. A homozygous mutation in PEX16 identified by whole-exome sequencing ending a diagnostic odyssey

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    Carlos A. Bacino

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a patient with a unique neurological phenotype with a progressive neurodegenerative. An 18-year diagnostic odyssey for the patient ended when exome sequencing identified a homozygous PEX16 mutation suggesting an atypical peroxisomal biogenesis disorder (PBD. Interestingly, the patient's peroxisomal biochemical abnormalities were subtle, such that plasma very-long-chain fatty acids initially failed to provide a diagnosis. This case suggests that next-generation sequencing may be diagnostic in some atypical peroxisomal biogenesis disorders.

  14. Progressive retinal atrophy in Schapendoes dogs: mutation of the newly identified CCDC66 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekomien, Gabriele; Vollrath, Conni; Petrasch-Parwez, Elisabeth; Boevé, Michael H; Akkad, Denis A; Gerding, Wanda M; Epplen, Jörg T

    2010-05-01

    Canine generalized progressive retinal atrophy (gPRA) is characterized by continuous degeneration of photoreceptor cells leading to night blindness and progressive vision loss. Until now, mutations in 11 genes have been described that account for gPRA in dogs, mostly following an autosomal recessive inheritance mode. Here, we describe a gPRA locus comprising the newly identified gene coiled-coil domain containing 66 (CCDC66) on canine chromosome 20, as identified via linkage analysis in the Schapendoes breed. Mutation screening of the CCDC66 gene revealed a 1-bp insertion in exon 6 leading to a stop codon as the underlying cause of disease. The insertion is present in all affected dogs in the homozygous state as well as in all obligatory mutation carriers in the heterozygous state. The CCDC66 gene is evolutionarily conserved in different vertebrate species and exhibits a complex pattern of differential RNA splicing resulting in various isoforms in the retina. Immunohistochemically, CCDC66 protein is detected mainly in the inner segments of photoreceptors in mouse, dog, and man. The affected Schapendoes retina lacks CCDC66 protein. Thus this natural canine model for gPRA yields superior potential to understand functional implications of this newly identified protein including its physiology, and it opens new perspectives for analyzing different aspects of the general pathophysiology of gPRA.

  15. Functional study of NIPA2 mutations identified from the patients with childhood absence epilepsy.

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    Han Xie

    Full Text Available Recently many genetic mutations that are associated with epilepsy have been identified. The protein NIPA2 (non-imprinted in Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome region protein 2 is a highly selective magnesium transporter encoded by the gene NIPA2 in which we have found three mutations (p.I178F, p.N244S and p.N334_E335insD within a population of patients with childhood absence epilepsy (CAE. In this study, immunofluorescence labeling, inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES, MTT metabolic rate detection and computational modeling were utilized to elucidate how these mutations result in CAE. We found in cultured neurons that NIPA2 (wild-type proteins were localized to the cell periphery, whereas mutant proteins were not effectively trafficked to the cell membrane. Furthermore, we found a decrease in intracellular magnesium concentration in the neurons transfected with mutant NIPA2, but no effect on the survival of neurons. To understand how low intracellular magnesium resulted in hyperexcitability, we built and analyzed a computational model to simulate the effects of mutations. The model suggested that lower intracellular magnesium concentration enhanced synaptic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR currents. This study primarily reveals that a selective magnesium transporter NIPA2 may play a role in the pathogenesis of CAE.

  16. A Novel COL4A5 Mutation Identified in a Chinese Han Family Using Exome Sequencing

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    Xiaofei Xiu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Alport syndrome (AS is a monogenic disease of the basement membrane (BM, resulting in progressive renal failure due to glomerulonephropathy, variable sensorineural hearing loss, and ocular anomalies. It is caused by mutations in the collagen type IV alpha-3 gene (COL4A3, the collagen type IV alpha-4 gene (COL4A4, and the collagen type IV alpha-5 gene (COL4A5, which encodes type IV collagen α3, α4, and α5 chains, respectively. To explore the disease-related gene in a four-generation Chinese Han pedigree of AS, exome sequencing was conducted on the proband, and a novel deletion mutation c.499delC (p.Pro167Glnfs*36 in the COL4A5 gene was identified. This mutation, absent in 1,000 genomes project, HapMap, dbSNP132, YH1 databases, and 100 normal controls, cosegregated with patients in the family. Neither sensorineural hearing loss nor typical COL4A5-related ocular abnormalities (dot-and-fleck retinopathy, anterior lenticonus, and the rare posterior polymorphous corneal dystrophy were present in patients of this family. The phenotypes of patients in this AS family were characterized by early onset-age and rapidly developing into end-stage renal disease (ESRD. Our discovery broadens the mutation spectrum in the COL4A5 gene associated with AS, which may also shed new light on genetic counseling for AS.

  17. Screening of 1331 Danish breast and/or ovarian cancer families identified 40 novel BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas V O; Jønson, Lars; Steffensen, Ane Y;

    2011-01-01

    Germ-line mutations in the tumour suppressor genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 predispose to breast and ovarian cancer. Since 1999 we have performed mutational screening of breast and/or ovarian cancer patients in East Denmark. During this period we have identified 40 novel sequence variations in BRCA1...... and BRCA2 in high risk breast and/or ovarian cancer families. The mutations were detected via pre-screening using dHPLC or high-resolution melting and direct sequencing. We identified 16 variants in BRCA1, including 9 deleterious frame-shift mutations, 2 intronic variants, 4 missense mutations, and 1...... synonymous variant. The remaining 24 variants were identified in BRCA2, including 10 deleterious mutants (6 frame-shift and 4 nonsense), 2 intronic variants, 10 missense mutations and 2 synonymous variants. The frequency of the variants of unknown significance was examined in control individuals. Moreover...

  18. Prognostic model for brain metastases from lung adenocarcinoma identified with epidermal growth factor receptor mutation status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongwei; Wang, Weili; Jia, Haixia; Lian, Jianhong; Cao, Jianzhong; Zhang, Xiaqin; Song, Xing; Jia, Sufang; Li, Zhengran; Cao, Xing; Zhou, Wei; Han, Songye; Yang, Weihua; Xi, Yanfen; Lian, Shenming

    2017-09-01

    Several indices have been developed to predict survival of brain metastases (BM) based on prognostic factors. However, such models were designed for general brain metastases from different kinds of cancers, and prognostic factors vary between cancers and histological subtypes. Recently, studies have indicated that epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation status may be a potential prognostic biological factor in BM from lung adenocarcinoma. Thus, we sought to define the role of EGFR mutation in prognoses and introduce a prognostic model specific for BM from lung adenocarcinoma. Data of 256 patients with BM from lung adenocarcinoma identified with EGFR mutations were collected. Independent prognostic factors were confirmed using a Cox regression model. The new prognostic model was developed based on the results of multivariable analyses. The score of each factor was calculated by six-month survival. Prognostic groups were divided into low, medium, and high risk based on the total scores. The prediction ability of the new model was compared to the three existing models. EGFR mutation and Karnofsky performance status were independent prognostic factors and were thus integrated into the new prognostic model. The new model was superior to the three other scoring systems regarding the prediction of three, six, and 12-month survival by pairwise comparison of the area under the curve. Our proposed prognostic model specific for BM from lung adenocarcinoma incorporating EGFR mutation status was valid in predicting patient survival. Further verification is warranted, with prospective testing using large sample sizes. © 2017 The Authors. Thoracic Cancer published by China Lung Oncology Group and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  19. Exome analysis of two limb-girdle muscular dystrophy families: mutations identified and challenges encountered.

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    Kristin K McDonald

    Full Text Available The molecular diagnosis of muscle disorders is challenging: genetic heterogeneity (>100 causal genes for skeletal and cardiac muscle disease precludes exhaustive clinical testing, prioritizing sequencing of specific genes is difficult due to the similarity of clinical presentation, and the number of variants returned through exome sequencing can make the identification of the disease-causing variant difficult. We have filtered variants found through exome sequencing by prioritizing variants in genes known to be involved in muscle disease while examining the quality and depth of coverage of those genes. We ascertained two families with autosomal dominant limb-girdle muscular dystrophy of unknown etiology. To identify the causal mutations in these families, we performed exome sequencing on five affected individuals using the Agilent SureSelect Human All Exon 50 Mb kit and the Illumina HiSeq 2000 (2×100 bp. We identified causative mutations in desmin (IVS3+3A>G and filamin C (p.W2710X, and augmented the phenotype data for individuals with muscular dystrophy due to these mutations. We also discuss challenges encountered due to depth of coverage variability at specific sites and the annotation of a functionally proven splice site variant as an intronic variant.

  20. Identifying Coopted Networks and Causative Mutations in the Origin of Novel Complex Traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, A; Gupta, M D

    2016-01-01

    One of the central goals of the field of evo-devo is to understand how novel complex traits originate. Novel complex traits are often old, and this makes understanding the genetic basis of their origin difficult. The traditional genetics approach for identifying the causative mutations for trait origin, of crossing species with and without the trait, is often impossible when the species are too distantly related. Alternatively, if the species are closely related, the genetic basis of their differences is often the recent loss, rather than the gain, of the trait in one of them, and mutations resulting in trait loss are not always equivalent to those that led to trait gain. Here, we reexamine an evo-devo study of the origin of melanic spots in the wings of flies, which is presented in more than one mainstream undergraduate textbook on Evolution, as an example of molecular evolution leading to the origin of a novel trait. We put forth an alternative to the previously proposed scenario and, in our view, a more likely evolutionary framework that explains the data, the CRE-DDC model, and then review other case studies and avenues of research that should help identify where new complex traits come from, as well as the actual causative mutations underlying their origin.

  1. Convergence of mutation and epigenetic alterations identifies common genes in cancer that predict for poor prognosis.

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    Timothy A Chan

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The identification and characterization of tumor suppressor genes has enhanced our understanding of the biology of cancer and enabled the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic modalities. Whereas in past decades, a handful of tumor suppressors have been slowly identified using techniques such as linkage analysis, large-scale sequencing of the cancer genome has enabled the rapid identification of a large number of genes that are mutated in cancer. However, determining which of these many genes play key roles in cancer development has proven challenging. Specifically, recent sequencing of human breast and colon cancers has revealed a large number of somatic gene mutations, but virtually all are heterozygous, occur at low frequency, and are tumor-type specific. We hypothesize that key tumor suppressor genes in cancer may be subject to mutation or hypermethylation. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Here, we show that combined genetic and epigenetic analysis of these genes reveals many with a higher putative tumor suppressor status than would otherwise be appreciated. At least 36 of the 189 genes newly recognized to be mutated are targets of promoter CpG island hypermethylation, often in both colon and breast cancer cell lines. Analyses of primary tumors show that 18 of these genes are hypermethylated strictly in primary cancers and often with an incidence that is much higher than for the mutations and which is not restricted to a single tumor-type. In the identical breast cancer cell lines in which the mutations were identified, hypermethylation is usually, but not always, mutually exclusive from genetic changes for a given tumor, and there is a high incidence of concomitant loss of expression. Sixteen out of 18 (89% of these genes map to loci deleted in human cancers. Lastly, and most importantly, the reduced expression of a subset of these genes strongly correlates with poor clinical outcome. CONCLUSIONS: Using an unbiased genome

  2. Multiple gene mutations identified in patients infected with influenza A (H7N9) virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cuicui; Wang, Mingbang; Zhu, Zhaoqin; Qu, Jieming; Xi, Xiuhong; Tang, Xinjun; Lao, Xiangda; Seeley, Eric; Li, Tao; Fan, Xiaomei; Du, Chunling; Wang, Qin; Yang, Lin; Hu, Yunwen; Bai, Chunxue; Zhang, Zhiyong; Lu, Shuihua; Song, Yuanlin; Zhou, Wenhao

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A (H7N9) virus induced high mortality since 2013. It is important to elucidate the potential genetic variations that contribute to virus infection susceptibilities. In order to identify genetic mutations that might increase host susceptibility to infection, we performed exon sequencing and validated the SNPS by Sanger sequencing on 18 H7N9 patients. Blood samples were collected from 18 confirmed H7N9 patients. The genomic DNA was captured with the Agilent SureSelect Human All Exon kit, sequenced on the Illumina Hiseq 2000, and the resulting data processed and annotated with Genome analysis Tool. SNPs were verified by independent Sanger sequencing. The DAVID database and the DAPPLE database were used to do bioinformatics analysis. Through exon sequencing and Sanger sequencing, we identified 21 genes that were highly associated with H7N9 influenza infection. Protein-protein interaction analysis showed that direct interactions among genetic products were significantly higher than expected (p = 0.004), and DAVID analysis confirmed the defense-related functions of these genes. Gene mutation profiles of survived and non-survived patients were similar, suggesting some of genes identified in this study may be associated with H7N9 influenza susceptibility. Host specific genetic determinants of disease severity identified by this approach may provide new targets for the treatment of H7N9 influenza. PMID:27156515

  3. Exome sequencing identifies novel and recurrent mutations in GJA8 and CRYGD associated with inherited cataract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, Donna S; Bennett, Thomas M; Culican, Susan M; Shiels, Alan

    2014-11-18

    Inherited cataract is a clinically important and genetically heterogeneous cause of visual impairment. Typically, it presents at an early age with or without other ocular/systemic signs and lacks clear phenotype-genotype correlation rendering both clinical classification and molecular diagnosis challenging. Here we have utilized trio-based whole exome sequencing to discover mutations in candidate genes underlying autosomal dominant cataract segregating in three nuclear families. In family A, we identified a recurrent heterozygous mutation in exon-2 of the gene encoding γD-crystallin (CRYGD; c.70C > A, p.Pro24Thr) that co-segregated with 'coralliform' lens opacities. Families B and C were found to harbor different novel variants in exon-2 of the gene coding for gap-junction protein α8 (GJA8; c.20T > C, p.Leu7Pro and c.293A > C, p.His98Pro). Each novel variant co-segregated with disease and was predicted in silico to have damaging effects on protein function. Exome sequencing facilitates concurrent mutation-profiling of the burgeoning list of candidate genes for inherited cataract, and the results can provide enhanced clinical diagnosis and genetic counseling for affected families.

  4. Identifying photoreceptors in blind eyes caused by RPE65 mutations: Prerequisite for human gene therapy success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Samuel G; Aleman, Tomas S; Cideciyan, Artur V; Sumaroka, Alexander; Schwartz, Sharon B; Windsor, Elizabeth A M; Traboulsi, Elias I; Heon, Elise; Pittler, Steven J; Milam, Ann H; Maguire, Albert M; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Stone, Edwin M; Bennett, Jean

    2005-04-26

    Mutations in RPE65, a gene essential to normal operation of the visual (retinoid) cycle, cause the childhood blindness known as Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA). Retinal gene therapy restores vision to blind canine and murine models of LCA. Gene therapy in blind humans with LCA from RPE65 mutations may also have potential for success but only if the retinal photoreceptor layer is intact, as in the early-disease stage-treated animals. Here, we use high-resolution in vivo microscopy to quantify photoreceptor layer thickness in the human disease to define the relationship of retinal structure to vision and determine the potential for gene therapy success. The normally cone photoreceptor-rich central retina and rod-rich regions were studied. Despite severely reduced cone vision, many RPE65-mutant retinas had near-normal central microstructure. Absent rod vision was associated with a detectable but thinned photoreceptor layer. We asked whether abnormally thinned RPE65-mutant retina with photoreceptor loss would respond to treatment. Gene therapy in Rpe65(-/-) mice at advanced-disease stages, a more faithful mimic of the humans we studied, showed success but only in animals with better-preserved photoreceptor structure. The results indicate that identifying and then targeting retinal locations with retained photoreceptors will be a prerequisite for successful gene therapy in humans with RPE65 mutations and in other retinal degenerative disorders now moving from proof-of-concept studies toward clinical trials.

  5. Novel Heterogenous CHS1 Mutations Identified in Five Japanese Patients with Chediak-Higashi Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Fuminori; Kasai, Hirotake; Morimoto, Michiko; Oh, Shigeharu; Takada, Hidetoshi; Hara, Toshiro; Ito, Masahiko

    2010-01-01

    Chediak-Higashi syndrome (CHS) is a rare, autosomal recessive disorder characterized by oculocutaneous albinism, recurrent bacterial infections and progressive neurological dysfunction. We demonstrate novel heterogenous mutations of CHS1, the responsive gene of CHS, identified in five Japanese patients with CHS. Patients 1, 2, and 3 were siblings, and they had albinism of the skin and hair. They all had a heterogenous two-base deletion (c.5541-5542 del AA, p.Q1847fsX1850) in exon 18. Patient 4 had a heterogenous single-base insertion (c.3944-3945 ins C, p.T1315fsX1331) in exon 10. The patient exhibited severe early-onset phenotype and suffered from hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. Patient 5 had two heterogenous nonsense mutations; c.7982C>G, p.S2661X in exon 30 and c.8281A>T, p.R2761X in exon 31. The patient suffered from infections in childhood and had visual disturbance and albinism of the skin and hair. The CHS1 mutations described here have not been reported previously.

  6. Mutation Analysis Identifies GUCY2D as the Major Gene Responsible for Autosomal Dominant Progressive Cone Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitiratschky, Veronique B. D.; Wilke, Robert; Renner, Agnes B.; Kellner, Ulrich; Vadalà, Maria; Birch, David G.; Wissinger, Bernd; Zrenner, Eberhart; Kohl, Susanne

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Heterozygous mutations in the GUCY2D gene, which encodes the membrane-bound retinal guanylyl cyclase-1 protein (RetGC-1), have been shown to cause autosomal dominant inherited cone degeneration and cone–rod degeneration (adCD, adCRD). The present study was a comprehensive screening of the GUCY2D gene in 27 adCD and adCRD unrelated families of these rare disorders. Methods Mutation analysis was performed by direct sequencing as well as PCR and subsequent restriction length polymorphism analysis (PCR/RFLP). Haplotype analysis was performed in selected patients by using microsatellite markers. Results GUCY2D gene mutations were identified in 11 (40%) of 27 patients, and all mutations clustered to codon 838, including two known and one novel missense mutation: p.R838C, p.R838H, and p.R838G. Haplotype analysis showed that among the studied patients only two of the six analyzed p.R838C mutation carriers shared a common haplotype and that none of the p.R838H mutation carriers did. Conclusions GUCY2D is a major gene responsible for progressive autosomal dominant cone degeneration. All identified mutations localize to codon 838. Haplotype analysis indicates that in most cases these mutations arise independently. Thus, codon 838 is likely to be a mutation hotspot in the GUCY2D gene. PMID:18487367

  7. A novel reverse-genetic approach (SIMF) identifies Mutator insertions in new Myb genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinowicz, P D; Grotewold, E

    2000-11-01

    We have developed a new strategy designated SIMF (Systematic Insertional Mutagenesis of Families), to identify DNA insertions in many members of a gene family simultaneously. This method requires only a short amino acid sequence conserved in all members of the family to make a degenerate oligonucleotide, and a sequence from the end of the DNA insertion. The SIMF strategy was successfully applied to the large maize R2R3 Myb family of regulatory genes, and Mutator insertions in several novel Myb genes were identified. Application of this technique to identify insertions in other large gene families could significantly decrease the effort involved in screening at the same time for insertions in all members of groups of genes that share a limited sequence identity.

  8. Exome sequencing identifies rare deleterious mutations in DNA repair genes FANCC and BLM as potential breast cancer susceptibility alleles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ella R Thompson

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite intensive efforts using linkage and candidate gene approaches, the genetic etiology for the majority of families with a multi-generational breast cancer predisposition is unknown. In this study, we used whole-exome sequencing of thirty-three individuals from 15 breast cancer families to identify potential predisposing genes. Our analysis identified families with heterozygous, deleterious mutations in the DNA repair genes FANCC and BLM, which are responsible for the autosomal recessive disorders Fanconi Anemia and Bloom syndrome. In total, screening of all exons in these genes in 438 breast cancer families identified three with truncating mutations in FANCC and two with truncating mutations in BLM. Additional screening of FANCC mutation hotspot exons identified one pathogenic mutation among an additional 957 breast cancer families. Importantly, none of the deleterious mutations were identified among 464 healthy controls and are not reported in the 1,000 Genomes data. Given the rarity of Fanconi Anemia and Bloom syndrome disorders among Caucasian populations, the finding of multiple deleterious mutations in these critical DNA repair genes among high-risk breast cancer families is intriguing and suggestive of a predisposing role. Our data demonstrate the utility of intra-family exome-sequencing approaches to uncover cancer predisposition genes, but highlight the major challenge of definitively validating candidates where the incidence of sporadic disease is high, germline mutations are not fully penetrant, and individual predisposition genes may only account for a tiny proportion of breast cancer families.

  9. Comprehensive genomic analysis of malignant pleural mesothelioma identifies recurrent mutations, gene fusions and splicing alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Raphael; Stawiski, Eric W; Goldstein, Leonard D; Durinck, Steffen; De Rienzo, Assunta; Modrusan, Zora; Gnad, Florian; Nguyen, Thong T; Jaiswal, Bijay S; Chirieac, Lucian R; Sciaranghella, Daniele; Dao, Nhien; Gustafson, Corinne E; Munir, Kiara J; Hackney, Jason A; Chaudhuri, Amitabha; Gupta, Ravi; Guillory, Joseph; Toy, Karen; Ha, Connie; Chen, Ying-Jiun; Stinson, Jeremy; Chaudhuri, Subhra; Zhang, Na; Wu, Thomas D; Sugarbaker, David J; de Sauvage, Frederic J; Richards, William G; Seshagiri, Somasekar

    2016-04-01

    We analyzed transcriptomes (n = 211), whole exomes (n = 99) and targeted exomes (n = 103) from 216 malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) tumors. Using RNA-seq data, we identified four distinct molecular subtypes: sarcomatoid, epithelioid, biphasic-epithelioid (biphasic-E) and biphasic-sarcomatoid (biphasic-S). Through exome analysis, we found BAP1, NF2, TP53, SETD2, DDX3X, ULK2, RYR2, CFAP45, SETDB1 and DDX51 to be significantly mutated (q-score ≥ 0.8) in MPMs. We identified recurrent mutations in several genes, including SF3B1 (∼2%; 4/216) and TRAF7 (∼2%; 5/216). SF3B1-mutant samples showed a splicing profile distinct from that of wild-type tumors. TRAF7 alterations occurred primarily in the WD40 domain and were, except in one case, mutually exclusive with NF2 alterations. We found recurrent gene fusions and splice alterations to be frequent mechanisms for inactivation of NF2, BAP1 and SETD2. Through integrated analyses, we identified alterations in Hippo, mTOR, histone methylation, RNA helicase and p53 signaling pathways in MPMs.

  10. A novel KCNA1 mutation identified in an Italian family affected by episodic ataxia type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbrici, P; Gualandi, F; D'Adamo, M C; Masieri, M Taddei; Cudia, P; De Grandis, D; Mannucci, R; Nicoletti, I; Tucker, S J; Ferlini, A; Pessia, M

    2008-12-02

    Episodic ataxia type 1 (EA1) is a rare human neurological syndrome characterized by continuous myokymia and attacks of generalized ataxia that can be triggered by abrupt movements, emotional stress and fatigue. An Italian family has been identified where related members displayed continuous myokymia, episodes of ataxia, attacks characterized by myokymia only, and neuromyotonia. A novel missense mutation (F414C), in the C-terminal region of the K(+) channel Kv1.1, was identified in the affected individuals. The mutant homotetrameric channels were non-functional in Xenopus laevis oocytes. In addition, heteromeric channels resulting from the co-expression of wild-type Kv1.1 and Kv1.1(F414C), or wild-type Kv1.2 and Kv1.1(F414C) subunits displayed reduced current amplitudes and altered gating properties. This indicates that the pathogenic effect of this KCNA1 mutation is likely to be related to the defective functional properties we have identified.

  11. Spectrum of mutations of the LPL gene identified in Italy in patients with severe hypertriglyceridemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabacchi, Claudio; Pisciotta, Livia; Cefalù, Angelo B; Noto, Davide; Fresa, Raffaele; Tarugi, Patrizia; Averna, Maurizio; Bertolini, Stefano; Calandra, Sebastiano

    2015-07-01

    Monogenic hypertriglyceridemia (HTG) may result from mutations in some genes which impair the intravascular lipolysis of triglyceride (TG)-rich lipoproteins mediated by the enzyme Lipoprotein lipase (LPL). Mutations in the LPL gene are the most frequent cause of monogenic HTG (familial chylomicronemia) with recessive transmission. The LPL gene was resequenced in 149 patients with severe HTG (TG > 10 mmol/L) and 106 patients with moderate HTG (TG > 4.5 and <10 mmol/L) referred to tertiary Lipid Clinics in Italy. In the group of severe HTG, 26 patients (17.4%) were homozygotes, 9 patients (6%) were compound heterozygotes and 15 patients (10%) were simple heterozygotes for rare LPL gene variants. Single or multiple episodes of pancreatitis were recorded in 24 (48%) of these patients. There was no difference in plasma TG concentration between patients with or without a positive history of pancreatitis. Among moderate HTG patients, six patients (5.6%) were heterozygotes for rare LPL variants; two of them had suffered from pancreatitis. Overall 36 rare LPL variants were found, 15 of which not reported previously. Systematic analysis of close relatives of mutation carriers led to the identification of 44 simple heterozygotes (plasma TG 3.2 ± 4.1 mmol/L), none of whom had a positive history of pancreatitis. The prevalence of rare LPL variants in patients with severe or moderate HTG, referred to tertiary lipid clinics, was 50/149 (33.5%) and 6/106 (5.6%), respectively. Systematic analysis of relatives of mutation carriers is an efficient way to identify heterozygotes who may develop severe HTG. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Mutational analysis of EGFR and related signaling pathway genes in lung adenocarcinomas identifies a novel somatic kinase domain mutation in FGFR4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenifer L Marks

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fifty percent of lung adenocarcinomas harbor somatic mutations in six genes that encode proteins in the EGFR signaling pathway, i.e., EGFR, HER2/ERBB2, HER4/ERBB4, PIK3CA, BRAF, and KRAS. We performed mutational profiling of a large cohort of lung adenocarcinomas to uncover other potential somatic mutations in genes of this signaling pathway that could contribute to lung tumorigenesis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analyzed genomic DNA from a total of 261 resected, clinically annotated non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC specimens. The coding sequences of 39 genes were screened for somatic mutations via high-throughput dideoxynucleotide sequencing of PCR-amplified gene products. Mutations were considered to be somatic only if they were found in an independent tumor-derived PCR product but not in matched normal tissue. Sequencing of 9MB of tumor sequence identified 239 putative genetic variants. We further examined 22 variants found in RAS family genes and 135 variants localized to exons encoding the kinase domain of respective proteins. We identified a total of 37 non-synonymous somatic mutations; 36 were found collectively in EGFR, KRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA. One somatic mutation was a previously unreported mutation in the kinase domain (exon 16 of FGFR4 (Glu681Lys, identified in 1 of 158 tumors. The FGFR4 mutation is analogous to a reported tumor-specific somatic mutation in ERBB2 and is located in the same exon as a previously reported kinase domain mutation in FGFR4 (Pro712Thr in a lung adenocarcinoma cell line. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study is one of the first comprehensive mutational analyses of major genes in a specific signaling pathway in a sizeable cohort of lung adenocarcinomas. Our results suggest the majority of gain-of-function mutations within kinase genes in the EGFR signaling pathway have already been identified. Our findings also implicate FGFR4 in the pathogenesis of a subset of lung adenocarcinomas.

  13. Microfluidic screening and whole-genome sequencing identifies mutations associated with improved protein secretion by yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Mingtao; Bai, Yunpeng; Sjostrom, Staffan L.

    2015-01-01

    interest in improving its protein secretion capacity. Due to the complexity of the secretory machinery in eukaryotic cells, it is difficult to apply rational engineering for construction of improved strains. Here we used high-throughput microfluidics for the screening of yeast libraries, generated by UV...... to construct efficient cell factories for protein secretion. The combined use of microfluidics screening and whole-genome sequencing to map the mutations associated with the improved phenotype can easily be adapted for other products and cell types to identify novel engineering targets, and this approach could...

  14. Exome sequencing identifies a DNAJB6 mutation in a family with dominantly-inherited limb-girdle muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couthouis, Julien; Raphael, Alya R; Siskind, Carly; Findlay, Andrew R; Buenrostro, Jason D; Greenleaf, William J; Vogel, Hannes; Day, John W; Flanigan, Kevin M; Gitler, Aaron D

    2014-05-01

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy primarily affects the muscles of the hips and shoulders (the "limb-girdle" muscles), although it is a heterogeneous disorder that can present with varying symptoms. There is currently no cure. We sought to identify the genetic basis of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 1 in an American family of Northern European descent using exome sequencing. Exome sequencing was performed on DNA samples from two affected siblings and one unaffected sibling and resulted in the identification of eleven candidate mutations that co-segregated with the disease. Notably, this list included a previously reported mutation in DNAJB6, p.Phe89Ile, which was recently identified as a cause of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 1D. Additional family members were Sanger sequenced and the mutation in DNAJB6 was only found in affected individuals. Subsequent haplotype analysis indicated that this DNAJB6 p.Phe89Ile mutation likely arose independently of the previously reported mutation. Since other published mutations are located close by in the G/F domain of DNAJB6, this suggests that the area may represent a mutational hotspot. Exome sequencing provided an unbiased and effective method for identifying the genetic etiology of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 1 in a previously genetically uncharacterized family. This work further confirms the causative role of DNAJB6 mutations in limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 1D.

  15. Novel HPS6 mutations identified by whole-exome sequencing in two Japanese sisters with suspected ocular albinism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamichi, Daisuke; Asahina, Miki; Nakajima, Junya; Sato, Miho; Hosono, Katsuhiro; Nomura, Takahito; Negishi, Takashi; Miyake, Noriko; Hotta, Yoshihiro; Ogata, Tsutomu; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2016-09-01

    Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by oculocutaneous albinism, platelet dysfunction and ceroid deposition. We report suspected ocular albinism in two Japanese sisters, caused by mutations in the HPS6 (Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome 6) gene. Trio-based whole-exome sequencing (WES) identified novel compound heterozygous mutations in HPS6 (c.1898delC: mother origin and c.2038C>T: father origin) in the two sisters. To date, 10 associated mutations have been detected in HPS6. Although we detected no general manifestations, including platelet dysfunction, in the sisters, even in long-term follow-up, we established a diagnosis of HPS type 6 based on the HPS6 mutations and absence of dense bodies in the platelets, indicating that WES can identify cases of HPS type 6. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of HPS6 mutations in Japanese patients.

  16. Distinct Afatinib Resistance Mechanisms Identified in Lung Adenocarcinoma Harboring an EGFR Mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaoka, Toshimitsu; Ohmori, Tohru; Ohba, Motoi; Arata, Satoru; Murata, Yasunori; Kusumoto, Sojiro; Ando, Koichi; Ishida, Hiroo; Ohnishi, Tsukasa; Sasaki, Yasutsuna

    2017-03-13

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are associated with significant responses in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients harboring EGFR-activating mutations. However, acquired resistance to reversible EGFR-TKIs remains a major obstacle. In particular, while the second-generation irreversible EGFR-TKI afatinib is currently used for treating NSCLC patients, the mechanisms underlying acquired afatinib resistance remain poorly understood. Here, heterogeneous mechanisms of acquired resistance were identified following long-term exposure to increasing doses of afatinib in EGFR mutant lung adenocarcinoma PC9 cells. Notably, three resistant cell lines, PC-9AFR1, PC-9AFR2, and PC-9AFR3 (AFR1, AFR2, and AFR3, respectively), employed distinct mechanisms for avoiding EGFR inhibition, with increased EGFR expression being detected in all resistant cell lines. Moreover, an activating EGFR mutation was partially lost in AFR1 and AFR2 cells. AFR1 cells exhibited afatinib resistance as a result of wild-type KRAS amplification and overexpression; however, these cells showed a progressive decrease and eventual loss of the acquired KRAS dependence, as well as resensitization to afatinib, following a drug holiday. Meanwhile, AFR2 cells exhibited increased expression of insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 3 (IGFBP3), which promoted insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R) activity and subsequent AKT phosphorylation, thereby indicating a potential bypass signaling pathway associated with IGFR1. Finally, AFR3 cells harbored the secondary EGFR mutation T790M. Our findings constitute the first report showing acquired wild-type KRAS overexpression and attenuation of afatinib resistance following a drug holiday.

  17. A Mismatch EndoNuclease Array-Based Methodology (MENA for Identifying Known SNPs or Novel Point Mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep M. Comeron

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Accurate and rapid identification or confirmation of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, point mutations and other human genomic variation facilitates understanding the genetic basis of disease. We have developed a new methodology (called MENA (Mismatch EndoNuclease Array pairing DNA mismatch endonuclease enzymology with tiling microarray hybridization in order to genotype both known point mutations (such as SNPs as well as identify previously undiscovered point mutations and small indels. We show that our assay can rapidly genotype known SNPs in a human genomic DNA sample with 99% accuracy, in addition to identifying novel point mutations and small indels with a false discovery rate as low as 10%. Our technology provides a platform for a variety of applications, including: (1 genotyping known SNPs as well as confirming newly discovered SNPs from whole genome sequencing analyses; (2 identifying novel point mutations and indels in any genomic region from any organism for which genome sequence information is available; and (3 screening panels of genes associated with particular diseases and disorders in patient samples to identify causative mutations. As a proof of principle for using MENA to discover novel mutations, we report identification of a novel allele of the beethoven (btv gene in Drosophila, which encodes a ciliary cytoplasmic dynein motor protein important for auditory mechanosensation.

  18. A Mismatch EndoNuclease Array-Based Methodology (MENA) for Identifying Known SNPs or Novel Point Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comeron, Josep M.; Reed, Jordan; Christie, Matthew; Jacobs, Julia S.; Dierdorff, Jason; Eberl, Daniel F.; Manak, J. Robert

    2016-01-01

    Accurate and rapid identification or confirmation of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), point mutations and other human genomic variation facilitates understanding the genetic basis of disease. We have developed a new methodology (called MENA (Mismatch EndoNuclease Array)) pairing DNA mismatch endonuclease enzymology with tiling microarray hybridization in order to genotype both known point mutations (such as SNPs) as well as identify previously undiscovered point mutations and small indels. We show that our assay can rapidly genotype known SNPs in a human genomic DNA sample with 99% accuracy, in addition to identifying novel point mutations and small indels with a false discovery rate as low as 10%. Our technology provides a platform for a variety of applications, including: (1) genotyping known SNPs as well as confirming newly discovered SNPs from whole genome sequencing analyses; (2) identifying novel point mutations and indels in any genomic region from any organism for which genome sequence information is available; and (3) screening panels of genes associated with particular diseases and disorders in patient samples to identify causative mutations. As a proof of principle for using MENA to discover novel mutations, we report identification of a novel allele of the beethoven (btv) gene in Drosophila, which encodes a ciliary cytoplasmic dynein motor protein important for auditory mechanosensation. PMID:27600073

  19. Exome sequencing identifies a novel intronic mutation in ENG that causes recurrence of pulmonary arteriovenous malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saji, Naoki; Kawarai, Toshitaka; Miyamoto, Ryosuke; Sato, Takahiro; Morino, Hiroyuki; Orlacchio, Antonio; Oki, Ryosuke; Kimura, Kazumi; Kaji, Ryuji

    2015-05-15

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) occasionally can be discovered in patients with cerebrovascular disease. Pulmonary arteriovenous malformation (PAVM) is one of the complications in HHT and occasionally is causative for life-threatening embolic stroke. Several genetic defects have been reported in patients with HHT. The broad spectrum of phenotype and intrafamilial phenotype variations, including age-at-onset of vascular events, often make an early diagnosis difficult. We present here a Japanese family with a novel intronic heterozygous mutation of ENG, which was identified using whole exome sequencing (WES). The intronic mutation, IVS3+4delAGTG, results in in-frame deletion of exon 3 and would produce a shorter ENG protein lacking the extracellular forty-seven amino acid sequences, which is located within the orphan domain. Our findings highlight the importance of the domain for the downstream signaling pathway of transforming growth factor-beta and bone morphogenesis protein superfamily receptors. Considering the phenotype variations and the available treatment for vascular complications, an early diagnosis using genetic testing, including WES, should be considered for individuals at risk of HHT. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Non-coding cancer driver candidates identified with a sample- and position-specific model of the somatic mutation rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juul, Malene; Bertl, Johanna; Guo, Qianyun; Nielsen, Morten Muhlig; Świtnicki, Michał; Hornshøj, Henrik; Madsen, Tobias; Hobolth, Asger; Pedersen, Jakob Skou

    2017-01-01

    Non-coding mutations may drive cancer development. Statistical detection of non-coding driver regions is challenged by a varying mutation rate and uncertainty of functional impact. Here, we develop a statistically founded non-coding driver-detection method, ncdDetect, which includes sample-specific mutational signatures, long-range mutation rate variation, and position-specific impact measures. Using ncdDetect, we screened non-coding regulatory regions of protein-coding genes across a pan-cancer set of whole-genomes (n = 505), which top-ranked known drivers and identified new candidates. For individual candidates, presence of non-coding mutations associates with altered expression or decreased patient survival across an independent pan-cancer sample set (n = 5454). This includes an antigen-presenting gene (CD1A), where 5’UTR mutations correlate significantly with decreased survival in melanoma. Additionally, mutations in a base-excision-repair gene (SMUG1) correlate with a C-to-T mutational-signature. Overall, we find that a rich model of mutational heterogeneity facilitates non-coding driver identification and integrative analysis points to candidates of potential clinical relevance. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21778.001 PMID:28362259

  1. Targeted next-generation sequencing of cancer genes identified frequent TP53 and ATRX mutations in leiomyosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ching-Yao; Liau, Jau-Yu; Huang, Wei-Ju; Chang, Yu-Ting; Chang, Ming-Chu; Lee, Jen-Chieh; Tsai, Jia-Huei; Su, Yi-Ning; Hung, Chia-Cheng; Jeng, Yung-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Leiomyosarcoma is an aggressive soft tissue sarcoma with poor patient survival. The genetic changes of leiomyosarcoma remain to be discovered. In this study, we analyzed the genetic changes of 44 cancer-related genes by using next-generation sequencing in 54 leiomyosarcomas. We identified TP53 mutations in 19 of the 54 tumors (35%) and ATRX mutations in 9 of the 54 tumors (17%). The TP53-mutated leiomyosarcomas were limited to female patients (P = 0.006). All but 2 of the TP53-mutated leiomyosarcomas were located in the uterus (n = 11) or retroperitoneum (n = 6). The ATRX mutations were associated with poorly differentiated leiomyosarcomas (P = 0.028) and the presence of tumor necrosis (P = 0.015). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed that patients with ATRX-mutated leiomyosarcomas had worse overall survival than did patients with ATRX-wild-type leiomyosarcomas. All of the ATRX-mutated leiomyosarcomas showed the alternative lengthening of telomere phenotype. The ATRX mutations did not correlate with ATRX protein expression, as detected using immunohistochemistry. In conclusion, we identified loss of function of the p53 and ATRX pathways being the main mechanisms for leiomyosarcomas. The molecular mechanisms may provide new opportunities to treat these aggressive neoplasms.

  2. Social Health Insurance-Based Simultaneous Screening for 154 Mutations in 19 Deafness Genes Efficiently Identified Causative Mutations in Japanese Hearing Loss Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Kentaro; Moteki, Hideaki; Miyagawa, Maiko; Nishio, Shin-Ya; Usami, Shin-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss is one of the most common neurosensory disorders in humans. The incidence of SNHL is estimated to be 1 in 500-1000 newborns. In more than half of these patients, the hearing loss is associated with genetic causes. In Japan, genetic testing for the patients with SNHL using the Invader assay to screen for 46 mutations in 13 deafness genes was approved by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare for inclusion in social health insurance coverage in 2012. Furthermore, from August 2015, this genetic testing has been expanded to screen for 154 mutations in 19 deafness genes using targeted genomic enrichment with massively parallel DNA sequencing combined with the Invader assay and TaqMan genotyping. For this study we analyzed 717 unrelated Japanese hearing loss patients. The total allele frequency of 154 mutations in 19 deafness genes was 32.64% (468/1434) and the total numbers of cases associated with at least one mutation was 44.07% (316/717). Among these, we were able to diagnose 212 (30%) patients, indicating that the present screening could efficiently identify causative mutations in hearing loss patients. It is noteworthy that 27 patients (3.8%) had coexistent multiple mutations in different genes. Five of these 27 patients (0.7%, 5/717 overall) were diagnosed with genetic hearing loss affected by concomitant with responsible mutations in more than two different genes. For patients identified with multiple mutations in different genes, it is necessary to consider that several genes might have an impact on their phenotypes.

  3. Haploinsufficiency networks identify targetable patterns of allelic deficiency in low mutation ovarian cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, Joe Ryan; Patel, Chandni B.; Willis, Katelyn McCabe; Haghighiabyaneh, Mina; Axelrod, Joshua; Tancioni, Isabelle; Lu, Dan; Bapat, Jaidev; Young, Shanique; Cadassou, Octavia; Bartakova, Alena; Sheth, Parthiv; Haft, Carley; Hui, Sandra; Saenz, Cheryl; Schlaepfer, David D.; Harismendy, Olivier; Stupack, Dwayne G.

    2017-01-01

    Identification of specific oncogenic gene changes has enabled the modern generation of targeted cancer therapeutics. In high-grade serous ovarian cancer (OV), the bulk of genetic changes is not somatic point mutations, but rather somatic copy-number alterations (SCNAs). The impact of SCNAs on tumour biology remains poorly understood. Here we build haploinsufficiency network analyses to identify which SCNA patterns are most disruptive in OV. Of all KEGG pathways (N=187), autophagy is the most significantly disrupted by coincident gene deletions. Compared with 20 other cancer types, OV is most severely disrupted in autophagy and in compensatory proteostasis pathways. Network analysis prioritizes MAP1LC3B (LC3) and BECN1 as most impactful. Knockdown of LC3 and BECN1 expression confers sensitivity to cells undergoing autophagic stress independent of platinum resistance status. The results support the use of pathway network tools to evaluate how the copy-number landscape of a tumour may guide therapy. PMID:28198375

  4. Phenotype of heterozygotes for low-density lipoprotein receptor mutations identified in different background populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Jensen, Henrik Kjaerulf; Benn, Marianne

    2005-01-01

    The effect of mutations on phenotype is often overestimated because of ascertainment bias. We determined the effect of background population on cholesterol phenotype associated with specific mutations in the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor and the relative importance of background population...... and type of mutation (LDL receptor [LDLR] or APOB R3500Q) for cholesterol phenotype....

  5. Deep sequencing of uveal melanoma identifies a recurrent mutation in PLCB4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Peter; Aoude, Lauren G; Wadt, Karin;

    2016-01-01

    -genome or whole-exome sequencing of 28 tumors or primary cell lines. These samples have a low mutation burden, with a mean of 10.6 protein changing mutations per sample (range 0 to 53). As expected for these sun-shielded melanomas the mutation spectrum was not consistent with an ultraviolet radiation signature...

  6. Mapping and exome sequencing identifies a mutation in the IARS gene as the cause of hereditary perinatal weak calf syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Hirano

    Full Text Available We identified an IARS (isoleucyl-tRNA synthetase c.235G>C (p.Val79Leu substitution as the causative mutation for neonatal weakness with intrauterine growth retardation (perinatal weak calf syndrome. In Japanese Black cattle, the syndrome was frequently found in calves sired by Bull A. Hence, we employed homozygosity mapping and linkage analysis. In order to identify the perinatal weak calf syndrome locus in a 4.04-Mb region of BTA 8, we analysed a paternal half-sibling family with a BovineSNP50 BeadChip and microsatellites. In this critical region, we performed exome sequencing to identify a causative mutation. Three variants were detected as possible candidates for causative mutations that were predicted to disrupt the protein function, including a G>C (p.Val79Leu mutation in IARS c.235. The IARS c.235G>C mutation was not a homozygous risk allele in the 36 healthy offspring of Bull A. Moreover, the IARS Val79 residue and its flanking regions were evolutionarily and highly conserved. The IARS mutant (Leu79 had decreased aminoacylation activity. Additionally, the homozygous mutation was not found in any of 1526 healthy cattle. Therefore, we concluded that the IARS c.235G>C mutation was the cause of hereditary perinatal weak calf syndrome.

  7. A Common Ancestral Mutation in CRYBB3 Identified in Multiple Consanguineous Families with Congenital Cataracts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Jiao

    Full Text Available This study was performed to investigate the genetic determinants of autosomal recessive congenital cataracts in large consanguineous families.Affected individuals underwent a detailed ophthalmological examination and slit-lamp photographs of the cataractous lenses were obtained. An aliquot of blood was collected from all participating family members and genomic DNA was extracted from white blood cells. Initially, a genome-wide scan was performed with genomic DNAs of family PKCC025 followed by exclusion analysis of our familial cohort of congenital cataracts. Protein-coding exons of CRYBB1, CRYBB2, CRYBB3, and CRYBA4 were sequenced bidirectionally. A haplotype was constructed with SNPs flanking the causal mutation for affected individuals in all four families, while the probability that the four familial cases have a common founder was estimated using EM and CHM-based algorithms. The expression of Crybb3 in the developing murine lens was investigated using TaqMan assays.The clinical and ophthalmological examinations suggested that all affected individuals had nuclear cataracts. Genome-wide linkage analysis localized the causal phenotype in family PKCC025 to chromosome 22q with statistically significant two-point logarithm of odds (LOD scores. Subsequently, we localized three additional families, PKCC063, PKCC131, and PKCC168 to chromosome 22q. Bidirectional Sanger sequencing identified a missense variation: c.493G>C (p.Gly165Arg in CRYBB3 that segregated with the disease phenotype in all four familial cases. This variation was not found in ethnically matched control chromosomes, the NHLBI exome variant server, or the 1000 Genomes or dbSNP databases. Interestingly, all four families harbor a unique disease haplotype that strongly suggests a common founder of the causal mutation (p<1.64E-10. We observed expression of Crybb3 in the mouse lens as early as embryonic day 15 (E15, and expression remained relatively steady throughout development.Here, we

  8. Failure to Identify Somatic Mutations in Monozygotic Twins Discordant for Schizophrenia by Whole Exome Sequencing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nan Lyu; Li-Li Guan; Hong Ma; Xi-Jin Wang; Bao-Ming Wu; Fan-Hong Shang; Dan Wang

    2016-01-01

    Background:Schizophrenia (SCZ) is a severe,debilitating,and complex psychiatric disorder with multiple causative factors.An increasing number of studies have determined that rare variations play an important role in its etiology.A somatic mutation is a rare form of genetic variation that occurs at an early stage of embryonic development and is thought to contribute substantially to the development of SCZ.The aim of the study was to explore the novel pathogenic somatic single nucleotide variations (SNVs) and somatic insertions and deletions (indels) of SCZ.Methods:One Chinese family with a monozygotic (MZ) twin pair discordant for SCZ was included.Whole exome sequencing was performed in the co-twin and their parents.Rigorous filtering processes were conducted to prioritize pathogenic somatic variations,and all identified SNVs and indels were further confirmed by Sanger sequencing.Results:One somatic SNV and two somatic indels were identified after rigorous selection processes.However,none was validated by Sanger sequencing.Conclusions:This study is not alone in the failure to identify pathogenic somatic variations in MZ twins,suggesting that exonic somatic variations are extremely rare.Further efforts are warranted to explore the potential genetic mechanism of SCZ.

  9. Whole-exome sequencing identifies ATRX mutation as a key molecular determinant in lower-grade glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, Kasthuri; Inagaki, Akiko; Silber, Joachim; Gorovets, Daniel; Zhang, Jianan; Kastenhuber, Edward R; Heguy, Adriana; Petrini, John H; Chan, Timothy A; Huse, Jason T

    2012-10-01

    The molecular foundations of lower-grade gliomas (LGGs)-astrocytoma, oligodendroglioma, and oligoastrocytoma-remain less well characterized than those of their fully malignant counterpart, glioblastoma. Mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1/2) likely represent initiating pathogenic events. However, while IDH mutations appear to dramatically alter cellular epigenomic landscapes, definitive downstream transformative mechanisms have not been characterized. It remains likely, therefore, that additional genomic abnormalities collaborate with IDH mutation to drive oncogenesis in LGG. We performed whole exome sequencing in 4 LGGs, followed by focused resequencing in an additional 28, and found a high incidence of mutations in the ATRX gene (α thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked). ATRX forms a core component of a chromatin remodeling complex active in telomere biology. Mutations in ATRX have been identified in multiple tumor types and appear to cause alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT), a presumed precursor to genomic instability. In our samples, ATRX mutation was entirely restricted to IDH-mutant tumors, closely correlated with TP53 mutation and astrocytic differentiation, and mutually exclusive with 1p/19q codeletion, the molecular hallmark of oligodendroglioma. Moreover, ATRX mutation was highly enriched in tumors of so-called early progenitor-like transcriptional subclass (~85%), which our prior work has linked to specific cells of origin in the forebrain subventricular zone. Finally, ATRX mutation correlated with ALT, providing a mechanistic link to genomic instability. In summary, our findings both identify ATRX mutation as a defining molecular determinant for a large subset of IDH-mutant gliomas and have direct implications on pathogenic mechanisms across the wide spectrum of LGGs.

  10. Seven new mutations in hMSH2, an HNPCC Gene, identified by denaturing gradient-gel electrophoresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wijnen, J.; Vasen, H.; Khan, P.M.; Klift, H. van der; Leeuwen, C. van; Broek, M. van den; Leeuwen-Cornelisse, I. van; Fodde, R.; Menko, F.H. [Univ. Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Nagengast, F. [Free Univ. Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    1995-05-01

    Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is a relatively common autosomal dominant cancer-susceptibility condition. The recent isolation of the DNA mismatch repair genes (hMSH2, hMLH1, hPMS1, and hPMS2) responsible for HNPCC has allowed the search for germ-line mutations in affected individuals. In this study we used denaturing gradient-gel electrophoresis to screen for mutations in the hMSH2 gene. Analysis of all the 16 exons of HMSH2, in 34 unrelated HNPCC kindreds, has revealed seven novel pathogenic germ-line mutations resulting in stop codons either directly or through frameshifts. Additionally, nucleotide substitutions giving rise to one missense, two silent, and one useful polymorphism have been identified. The proportion of families in which hMSH2 mutations were found is 21%. Although the spectrum of mutations spread at the hMSH2 gene among HNPCC patients appears extremely heterogeneous, we were not able to establish any correlation between the site of the individual mutations and the corresponding tumor spectrum. Our results indicate that, given the genomic size and organization of the hMSH2 gene and the heterogeneity of its mutation spectrum, a rapid and efficient mutation detection procedure is necessary for routine molecular diagnosis and presymptomatic detection of the disease in a clinical setup. 34 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Flow cytometric sorting coupled with exon capture sequencing identifies somatic mutations in archival lymphoma tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Nenggang; Chen, Christopher; Gong, Qiang; Shields, Kristen; Li, Yuping; Chen, YuanYuan; Song, Joo; McKeithan, Timothy W; Chan, Wing C

    2017-08-07

    The enormous number of archived formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues available are a valuable resource of material for research. However, the use of such tissues poses many challenges, among which is the difficulty of isolating different cell populations within the tissue. In this study, we used tissue from two types of non-Hodgkin lymphoma as a model to demonstrate a method we have established and optimized to separate FFPE samples into distinct tumor and nonmalignant populations. Using FFPE reactive tonsil sections, various approaches for antigen retrieval and labeling, and the effectiveness of flow cytometric sorting were tested. We found that, among the 11 cell surface or intracellular antigen markers investigated, CD3ɛ, CD79A, LAT, PD-1, and PAX5 could be successfully labeled after antigen retrieval in Tris-EDTA buffer (pH 8.0) at 65 °C for 60 min, and 1.8-2.7 μg DNA per million cells could be extracted after sorting with DNA quality similar to that of tissue without staining or sorting. To test whether we could perform next-generation sequencing using a custom capture platform on sorted cells, we used three lymphoma cases with FFPE tissues which had been stored for 1 to 4 years. We demonstrated that the DNA from sorted cells was adequate for exon capture sequencing. By comparing the sequencing results between neoplastic and normal populations, somatic mutations could be clearly identified in the tumor population with variant frequencies as low as 11.7%.The corresponding normal fraction clearly helps in the analysis of somatic mutations and the exclusion of artifacts. This study provides an approach using flow cytometric sorting to separate different cellular populations in paraffin-embedded tissues and to unambiguously distinguish somatic mutations from germline variants or artifacts. This approach is also useful in enriching the tumor component in samples with heterogeneous components and low tumor content.Laboratory Investigation advance

  12. Characterization of novel MSX1 mutations identified in Japanese patients with nonsyndromic tooth agenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seishi Yamaguchi

    Full Text Available Since MSX1 and PAX9 are linked to the pathogenesis of nonsyndromic tooth agenesis, we performed detailed mutational analysis of these two genes sampled from Japanese patients. We identified two novel MSX1 variants with an amino acid substitution within the homeodomain; Thr174Ile (T174I from a sporadic hypodontia case and Leu205Arg (L205R from a familial oligodontia case. Both the Thr174 and Leu205 residues in the MSX1 homeodomain are highly conserved among different species. To define possible roles of mutations at these amino acids in the pathogenesis of nonsyndromic tooth agenesis, we performed several functional analyses. It has been demonstrated that MSX1 plays a pivotal role in hard tissue development as a suppressor for mesenchymal cell differentiation. To evaluate the suppression activity of the variants in mesenchymal cells, we used the myoD-promoter, which is one of convenient reporter assay system for MSX1. Although the gene products of these MSX1 variants are stable and capable of normal nuclear localization, they do not suppress myoD-promoter activity in differentiated C2C12 cells. To clarify the molecular mechanisms underlying our results, we performed further analyses including electrophoretic mobility shift assays, and co-immunoprecipitation assays to survey the molecular interactions between the mutant MSX1 proteins and the oligonucleotide DNA with MSX1 consensus binding motif or EZH2 methyltransferase. Since EZH2 is reported to interact with MSX1 and regulate MSX1 mediated gene suppression, we hypothesized that the T174I and L205R substitutions would impair this interaction. We conclude from the results of our experiments that the DNA binding ability of MSX1 is abolished by these two amino acid substitutions. This illustrates a causative role of the T174I and L205R MSX1 homeodomain mutations in tooth agenesis, and suggests that they may influence cell proliferation and differentiation resulting in lesser tooth germ formation in

  13. Exome sequencing identifies frequent inactivating mutations in BAP1, ARID1A and PBRM1 in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selaru, Florin M; Streppel, Mirte M; Lucas, Donald J; Niknafs, Noushin; Guthrie, Violeta Beleva; Maitra, Anirban; Argani, Pedram; Offerhaus, G Johan A; Roa, Juan Carlos; Roberts, Lewis R; Gores, Gregory J; Popescu, Irinel; Alexandrescu, Sorin T; Dima, Simona; Fassan, Matteo; Simbolo, Michele; Mafficini, Andrea; Capelli, Paola; Lawlor, Rita T; Ruzzenente, Andrea; Guglielmi, Alfredo; Tortora, Giampaolo; de Braud, Filippo; Scarpa, Aldo; Jarnagin, William; Klimstra, David; Karchin, Rachel; Velculescu, Victor E; Hruban, Ralph H; Vogelstein, Bert; Kinzler, Kenneth W; Papadopoulos, Nickolas; Wood, Laura D

    2014-01-01

    Through exomic sequencing of 32 intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas, we discovered frequent inactivating mutations in multiple chromatin-remodeling genes (including BAP1, ARID1A and PBRM1), and mutation in one of these genes occurred in almost half of the carcinomas sequenced. We also identified frequent mutations at previously reported hotspots in the IDH1 and IDH2 genes encoding metabolic enzymes in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas. In contrast, TP53 was the most frequently altered gene in a series of nine gallbladder carcinomas. These discoveries highlight the key role of dysregulated chromatin remodeling in intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas. PMID:24185509

  14. Thiamine responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome: a novel homozygous SLC19A2 gene mutation identified.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikstiene, Violeta; Songailiene, Jurgita; Byckova, Jekaterina; Rutkauskiene, Giedre; Jasinskiene, Edita; Verkauskiene, Rasa; Lesinskas, Eugenijus; Utkus, Algirdas

    2015-07-01

    Thiamine responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome (TRMAS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder especially in countries where consanguinity is uncommon. Three main features are characteristic of the disease - megaloblastic anemia, early onset deafness, and non-type I diabetes. TRMAS is a Mendelian disorder; a gene SLC19A2 coding high affinity thiamine transporter mediating vitamin B1 uptake through cell membrane has been identified. We present the first patient with TRMAS in Lithuania - a 3-year-old boy born to a non-consanguineous family with a novel homozygous SLC19A2 gene mutation. The patient had insulin dependent diabetes (onset 11 months), respiratory illness (onset 11 months), bilateral profound hearing loss (onset at 7 months, verified at 20 months), refractory anemia (onset 2 years), and decreased vision acuity and photophobia (onset 2.5 years). The psychomotor abilities developed according to age. Phenotypic evaluation did not reveal any dysmorphic features. The clinical diagnosis of TRMAS was suspected and daily supplementation with thiamine 100 mg was started. The condition of the patient markedly improved several days after the initiation of treatment. The results of SLC19A2 gene molecular testing confirmed the clinical diagnosis - novel homozygous c.[205G>T], p.[(Val69Phe)] mutation changing conserved amino acid residue or even interfering the mRNA splicing. Clinical heterogeneity, diverse dynamics, and wide spectrum of symptoms are aggravating factors in the diagnosis. The possibility of treatment demands early recognition of disorder to facilitate the improvement of the patient's condition. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Amplicon Resequencing Identified Parental Mosaicism for Approximately 10% of "de novo" SCN1A Mutations in Children with Dravet Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaojing; Yang, Xiaoxu; Wu, Qixi; Liu, Aijie; Yang, Xiaoling; Ye, Adam Yongxin; Huang, August Yue; Li, Jiarui; Wang, Meng; Yu, Zhe; Wang, Sheng; Zhang, Zhichao; Wu, Xiru; Wei, Liping; Zhang, Yuehua

    2015-09-01

    The majority of children with Dravet syndrome (DS) are caused by de novo SCN1A mutations. To investigate the origin of the mutations, we developed and applied a new method that combined deep amplicon resequencing with a Bayesian model to detect and quantify allelic fractions with improved sensitivity. Of 174 SCN1A mutations in DS probands which were considered "de novo" by Sanger sequencing, we identified 15 cases (8.6%) of parental mosaicism. We identified another five cases of parental mosaicism that were also detectable by Sanger sequencing. Fraction of mutant alleles in the 20 cases of parental mosaicism ranged from 1.1% to 32.6%. Thirteen (65% of 20) mutations originated paternally and seven (35% of 20) maternally. Twelve (60% of 20) mosaic parents did not have any epileptic symptoms. Their mutant allelic fractions were significantly lower than those in mosaic parents with epileptic symptoms (P = 0.016). We identified mosaicism with varied allelic fractions in blood, saliva, urine, hair follicle, oral epithelium, and semen, demonstrating that postzygotic mutations could affect multiple somatic cells as well as germ cells. Our results suggest that more sensitive tools for detecting low-level mosaicism in parents of families with seemingly "de novo" mutations will allow for better informed genetic counseling.

  16. Whole exome analysis identifies dominant COL4A1 mutations in patients with complex ocular phenotypes involving microphthalmia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deml, B; Reis, L M; Maheshwari, M; Griffis, C; Bick, D; Semina, E V

    2014-11-01

    Anophthalmia/microphthalmia (A/M) is a developmental ocular malformation defined as complete absence or reduction in size of the eye. A/M is a heterogenous disorder with numerous causative genes identified; however, about half the cases lack a molecular diagnosis. We undertook whole exome sequencing in an A/M family with two affected siblings, two unaffected siblings, and unaffected parents; the ocular phenotype was isolated with only mild developmental delay/learning difficulties reported and a normal brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the proband at 16 months. No pathogenic mutations were identified in 71 known A/M genes. Further analysis identified a shared heterozygous mutation in COL4A1, c.2317G>A, p.(Gly773Arg) that was not seen in the unaffected parents and siblings. Analysis of 24 unrelated A/M exomes identified a novel c.2122G>A, p.(Gly708Arg) mutation in an additional patient with unilateral microphthalmia, bilateral microcornea and Peters anomaly; the mutation was absent in the unaffected mother and the unaffected father was not available. Mutations in COL4A1 have been linked to a spectrum of human disorders; the most consistent feature is cerebrovascular disease with variable ocular anomalies, kidney and muscle defects. This study expands the spectrum of COL4A1 phenotypes and indicates screening in patients with A/M regardless of MRI findings or presumed inheritance pattern.

  17. Phenotype of heterozygotes for low-density lipoprotein receptor mutations identified in different background populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Jensen, Henrik Kjaerulf; Benn, Marianne;

    2005-01-01

    The effect of mutations on phenotype is often overestimated because of ascertainment bias. We determined the effect of background population on cholesterol phenotype associated with specific mutations in the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor and the relative importance of background population...

  18. Exome sequencing identifies highly recurrent MED12 somatic mutations in breast fibroadenoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Weng Khong; Ong, Choon Kiat; Tan, Jing; Thike, Aye Aye; Ng, Cedric Chuan Young; Rajasegaran, Vikneswari; Myint, Swe Swe; Nagarajan, Sanjanaa; Nasir, Nur Diyana Md; McPherson, John R; Cutcutache, Ioana; Poore, Gregory; Tay, Su Ting; Ooi, Wei Siong; Tan, Veronique Kiak Mien; Hartman, Mikael; Ong, Kong Wee; Tan, Benita K T; Rozen, Steven G; Tan, Puay Hoon; Tan, Patrick; Teh, Bin Tean

    2014-08-01

    Fibroadenomas are the most common breast tumors in women under 30 (refs. 1,2). Exome sequencing of eight fibroadenomas with matching whole-blood samples revealed recurrent somatic mutations solely in MED12, which encodes a Mediator complex subunit. Targeted sequencing of an additional 90 fibroadenomas confirmed highly frequent MED12 exon 2 mutations (58/98, 59%) that are probably somatic, with 71% of mutations occurring in codon 44. Using laser capture microdissection, we show that MED12 fibroadenoma mutations are present in stromal but not epithelial mammary cells. Expression profiling of MED12-mutated and wild-type fibroadenomas revealed that MED12 mutations are associated with dysregulated estrogen signaling and extracellular matrix organization. The fibroadenoma MED12 mutation spectrum is nearly identical to that of previously reported MED12 lesions in uterine leiomyoma but not those of other tumors. Benign tumors of the breast and uterus, both of which are key target tissues of estrogen, may thus share a common genetic basis underpinned by highly frequent and specific MED12 mutations.

  19. Whole-genome sequencing in autism identifies hot spots for de novo germline mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michaelson, Jacob J.; Shi, Yujian; Gujral, Madhusudan

    2012-01-01

    De novo mutation plays an important role in autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Notably, pathogenic copy number variants (CNVs) are characterized by high mutation rates. We hypothesize that hypermutability is a property of ASD genes and may also include nucleotide-substitution hot spots. We...

  20. CDH1 mutations in gastric cancer patients from northern Brazil identified by Next- Generation Sequencing (NGS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Husny, Antonette; Raiol-Moraes, Milene; Amador, Marcos; Ribeiro-Dos-Santos, André M; Montagnini, André; Barbosa, Silvanira; Silva, Artur; Assumpção, Paulo; Ishak, Geraldo; Santos, Sidney; Pinto, Pablo; Cruz, Aline; Ribeiro-Dos-Santos, Ândrea

    2016-05-13

    Gastric cancer is considered to be the fifth highest incident tumor worldwide and the third leading cause of cancer deaths. Developing regions report a higher number of sporadic cases, but there are only a few local studies related to hereditary cases of gastric cancer in Brazil to confirm this fact. CDH1 germline mutations have been described both in familial and sporadic cases, but there is only one recent molecular description of individuals from Brazil. In this study we performed Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) to assess CDH1 germline mutations in individuals who match the clinical criteria for Hereditary Diffuse Gastric Cancer (HDGC), or who exhibit very early diagnosis of gastric cancer. Among five probands we detected CDH1 germline mutations in two cases (40%). The mutation c.1023T > G was found in a HDGC family and the mutation c.1849G > A, which is nearly exclusive to African populations, was found in an early-onset case of gastric adenocarcinoma. The mutations described highlight the existence of gastric cancer cases caused by CDH1 germline mutations in northern Brazil, although such information is frequently ignored due to the existence of a large number of environmental factors locally. Our report represent the first CDH1 mutations in HDGC described from Brazil by an NGS platform.

  1. Integrative genome analyses identify key somatic driver mutations of small-cell lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peifer, Martin; Fernandez-Cuesta, Lynnette; Sos, Martin L.; George, Julie; Seidel, Danila; Kasper, Lawryn H.; Plenker, Dennis; Leenders, Frauke; Sun, Ruping; Zander, Thomas; Menon, Roopika; Koker, Mirjam; Dahmen, Ilona; Mueller, Christian; Di Cerbo, Vincenzo; Schildhaus, Hans-Ulrich; Altmueller, Janine; Baessmann, Ingelore; Becker, Christian; de Wilde, Bram; Vandesompele, Jo; Boehm, Diana; Ansen, Sascha; Gabler, Franziska; Wilkening, Ines; Heynck, Stefanie; Heuckmann, Johannes M.; Lu, Xin; Carter, Scott L.; Cibulskis, Kristian; Banerji, Shantanu; Getz, Gad; Park, Kwon-Sik; Rauh, Daniel; Gruetter, Christian; Fischer, Matthias; Pasqualucci, Laura; Wright, Gavin; Wainer, Zoe; Russell, Prudence; Petersen, Iver; Chen, Yuan; Stoelben, Erich; Ludwig, Corinna; Schnabel, Philipp; Hoffmann, Hans; Muley, Thomas; Brockmann, Michael; Engel-Riedel, Walburga; Muscarella, Lucia A.; Fazio, Vito M.; Groen, Harry; Timens, Wim; Sietsma, Hannie; Thunnissen, Erik; Smit, Egbert; Heideman, Danielle A. M.; Snijders, Peter J. F.; Cappuzzo, Federico; Ligorio, Claudia; Damiani, Stefania; Field, John; Solberg, Steinar; Brustugun, Odd Terje; Lund-Iversen, Marius; Saenger, Joerg; Clement, Joachim H.; Soltermann, Alex; Moch, Holger; Weder, Walter; Solomon, Benjamin; Soria, Jean-Charles; Validire, Pierre; Besse, Benjamin; Brambilla, Elisabeth; Brambilla, Christian; Lantuejoul, Sylvie; Lorimier, Philippe; Schneider, Peter M.; Hallek, Michael; Pao, William; Meyerson, Matthew; Sage, Julien; Shendure, Jay; Schneider, Robert; Buettner, Reinhard; Wolf, Juergen; Nuernberg, Peter; Perner, Sven; Heukamp, Lukas C.; Brindle, Paul K.; Haas, Stefan; Thomas, Roman K.

    2012-01-01

    Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an aggressive lung tumor subtype with poor prognosis(1-3). We sequenced 29 SCLC exomes, 2 genomes and 15 transcriptomes and found an extremely high mutation rate of 7.4 +/- 1 protein-changing mutations per million base pairs. Therefore, we conducted integrated analys

  2. A high frequent BRCA1 founder mutation identified in the Greenlandic population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harboe, Theresa Larriba; Eiberg, Hans; Kern, Peder;

    2009-01-01

    Approximately 10% of all breast and ovarian cancers are dominantly inherited and mutations are mainly found in the BRCA 1 and 2 genes. The penetrance of BRCA1 mutations is reported to be between 68 and 92% and confers a 36-92% life time risk of breast cancer. Most mutations in BRCA1 are uniquely...... occurring mutations, but founder mutations have been described. In this study we describe a founder mutation with wide spread presence in the Inuit population. We have screened 2,869 persons from Greenland for the presence of a BRCA1 mutation (p.Cys39Gly) only found in the Inuit population. The overall...... carrier frequency was 1.6% in the general population, but the frequency differs geographically from 0.6% on the West coast to 9.7% in the previously isolated population of the East coast. This is to our knowledge the highest population frequency of a BRCA1 mutation ever to be described. To determine...

  3. Cross-comparison of the genome sequences from human, chimpanzee, Neanderthal and a Denisovan hominin identifies novel potentially compensated mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Guojie

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The recent publication of the draft genome sequences of the Neanderthal and a ~50,000-year-old archaic hominin from Denisova Cave in southern Siberia has ushered in a new age in molecular archaeology. We previously cross-compared the human, chimpanzee and Neanderthal genome sequences with respect to a set of disease-causing/disease-associated missense and regulatory mutations (Human Gene Mutation Database and succeeded in identifying genetic variants which, although apparently pathogenic in humans, may represent a 'compensated' wild-type state in at least one of the other two species. Here, in an attempt to identify further 'potentially compensated mutations' (PCMs of interest, we have compared our dataset of disease-causing/disease-associated mutations with their corresponding nucleotide positions in the Denisovan hominin, Neanderthal and chimpanzee genomes. Of the 15 human putatively disease-causing mutations that were found to be compensated in chimpanzee, Denisovan or Neanderthal, only a solitary F5 variant (Val1736Met was specific to the Denisovan. In humans, this missense mutation is associated with activated protein C resistance and an increased risk of thromboembolism and recurrent miscarriage. It is unclear at this juncture whether this variant was indeed a PCM in the Denisovan or whether it could instead have been associated with disease in this ancient hominin.

  4. Cross-comparison of the genome sequences from human, chimpanzee, Neanderthal and a Denisovan hominin identifies novel potentially compensated mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guojie; Pei, Zhang; Ball, Edward V; Mort, Matthew; Kehrer-Sawatzki, Hildegard; Cooper, David N

    2011-07-01

    The recent publication of the draft genome sequences of the Neanderthal and a ∼50,000-year-old archaic hominin from Denisova Cave in southern Siberia has ushered in a new age in molecular archaeology. We previously cross-compared the human, chimpanzee and Neanderthal genome sequences with respect to a set of disease-causing/disease-associated missense and regulatory mutations (Human Gene Mutation Database) and succeeded in identifying genetic variants which, although apparently pathogenic in humans, may represent a 'compensated' wild-type state in at least one of the other two species. Here, in an attempt to identify further 'potentially compensated mutations' (PCMs) of interest, we have compared our dataset of disease-causing/disease-associated mutations with their corresponding nucleotide positions in the Denisovan hominin, Neanderthal and chimpanzee genomes. Of the 15 human putatively disease-causing mutations that were found to be compensated in chimpanzee, Denisovan or Neanderthal, only a solitary F5 variant (Val1736Met) was specific to the Denisovan. In humans, this missense mutation is associated with activated protein C resistance and an increased risk of thromboembolism and recurrent miscarriage. It is unclear at this juncture whether this variant was indeed a PCM in the Denisovan or whether it could instead have been associated with disease in this ancient hominin.

  5. STAT3 mutations identified in human hematologic neoplasms induce myeloid malignancies in a mouse bone marrow transplantation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couronné, Lucile; Scourzic, Laurianne; Pilati, Camilla; Valle, Véronique Della; Duffourd, Yannis; Solary, Eric; Vainchenker, William; Merlio, Jean-Philippe; Beylot-Barry, Marie; Damm, Frederik; Stern, Marc-Henri; Gaulard, Philippe; Lamant, Laurence; Delabesse, Eric; Merle-Beral, Hélène; Nguyen-Khac, Florence; Fontenay, Michaëla; Tilly, Hervé; Bastard, Christian; Zucman-Rossi, Jessica; Bernard, Olivier A.; Mercher, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    STAT3 protein phosphorylation is a frequent event in various hematologic malignancies and solid tumors. Acquired STAT3 mutations have been recently identified in 40% of patients with T-cell large granular lymphocytic leukemia, a rare T-cell disorder. In this study, we investigated the mutational status of STAT3 in a large series of patients with lymphoid and myeloid diseases. STAT3 mutations were identified in 1.6% (4 of 258) of patients with T-cell neoplasms, in 2.5% (2 of 79) of patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma but in no other B-cell lymphoma patients (0 of 104) or patients with myeloid malignancies (0 of 96). Functional in vitro assays indicated that the STAT3Y640F mutation leads to a constitutive phosphorylation of the protein. STA21, a STAT3 small molecule inhibitor, inhibited the proliferation of two distinct STAT3 mutated cell lines. Using a mouse bone marrow transplantation assay, we observed that STAT3Y640F expression leads to the development of myeloproliferative neoplasms with expansion of either myeloid cells or megakaryocytes. Together, these data indicate that the STAT3Y640F mutation leads to constitutive activation of STAT3, induces malignant hematopoiesis in vivo, and may represent a novel therapeutic target in some lymphoid malignancies. PMID:23872306

  6. Frameshift mutation hotspot identified in Smith-Magenis syndrome: case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Hoa T; Dudding, Tracy; Blanchard, Christopher L; Elsea, Sarah H

    2010-10-08

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is a complex syndrome involving intellectual disabilities, sleep disturbance, behavioural problems, and a variety of craniofacial, skeletal, and visceral anomalies. While the majority of SMS cases harbor an ~3.5 Mb common deletion on 17p11.2 that encompasses the retinoic acid induced-1 (RAI1) gene, some patients carry small intragenic deletions or point mutations in RAI1. We present data on two cases of Smith-Magenis syndrome with mutation of RAI1. Both cases are phenotypically consistent with SMS and RAI1 mutation but also have other anomalies not previously reported in SMS, including spontaneous pneumothoraces. These cases also illustrate variability in the SMS phenotype not previously shown for RAI1 mutation cases, including hearing loss, absence of self-abusive behaviours, and mild global delays. Sequencing of RAI1 revealed mutation of the same heptameric C-tract (CCCCCCC) in exon 3 in both cases (c.3103delC one case and and c.3103insC in the other), resulting in frameshift mutations. Of the seven reported frameshift mutations occurring in poly C-tracts in RAI1, four cases (~57%) occur at this heptameric C-tract. Collectively, these results indicate that this heptameric C-tract is a preferential hotspot for single nucleotide insertion/deletions (SNindels) and therefore, should be considered a primary target for analysis in patients suspected for mutations in RAI1. We expect that as more patients are sequenced for mutations in RAI1, the incidence of frameshift mutations in this hotspot will become more evident.

  7. Frameshift mutation hotspot identified in Smith-Magenis syndrome: case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dudding Tracy

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS is a complex syndrome involving intellectual disabilities, sleep disturbance, behavioural problems, and a variety of craniofacial, skeletal, and visceral anomalies. While the majority of SMS cases harbor an ~3.5 Mb common deletion on 17p11.2 that encompasses the retinoic acid induced-1 (RAI1 gene, some patients carry small intragenic deletions or point mutations in RAI1. We present data on two cases of Smith-Magenis syndrome with mutation of RAI1. Both cases are phenotypically consistent with SMS and RAI1 mutation but also have other anomalies not previously reported in SMS, including spontaneous pneumothoraces. These cases also illustrate variability in the SMS phenotype not previously shown for RAI1 mutation cases, including hearing loss, absence of self-abusive behaviours, and mild global delays. Sequencing of RAI1 revealed mutation of the same heptameric C-tract (CCCCCCC in exon 3 in both cases (c.3103delC one case and and c.3103insC in the other, resulting in frameshift mutations. Of the seven reported frameshift mutations occurring in poly C-tracts in RAI1, four cases (~57% occur at this heptameric C-tract. Collectively, these results indicate that this heptameric C-tract is a preferential hotspot for single nucleotide insertion/deletions (SNindels and therefore, should be considered a primary target for analysis in patients suspected for mutations in RAI1. We expect that as more patients are sequenced for mutations in RAI1, the incidence of frameshift mutations in this hotspot will become more evident.

  8. Dissecting protein function: an efficient protocol for identifying separation-of-function mutations that encode structurally stable proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubin, Johnathan W; Rao, Timsi; Mandell, Edward K; Wuttke, Deborah S; Lundblad, Victoria

    2013-03-01

    Mutations that confer the loss of a single biochemical property (separation-of-function mutations) can often uncover a previously unknown role for a protein in a particular biological process. However, most mutations are identified based on loss-of-function phenotypes, which cannot differentiate between separation-of-function alleles vs. mutations that encode unstable/unfolded proteins. An alternative approach is to use overexpression dominant-negative (ODN) phenotypes to identify mutant proteins that disrupt function in an otherwise wild-type strain when overexpressed. This is based on the assumption that such mutant proteins retain an overall structure that is comparable to that of the wild-type protein and are able to compete with the endogenous protein (Herskowitz 1987). To test this, the in vivo phenotypes of mutations in the Est3 telomerase subunit from Saccharomyces cerevisiae were compared with the in vitro secondary structure of these mutant proteins as analyzed by circular-dichroism spectroscopy, which demonstrates that ODN is a more sensitive assessment of protein stability than the commonly used method of monitoring protein levels from extracts. Reverse mutagenesis of EST3, which targeted different categories of amino acids, also showed that mutating highly conserved charged residues to the oppositely charged amino acid had an increased likelihood of generating a severely defective est3(-) mutation, which nevertheless encoded a structurally stable protein. These results suggest that charge-swap mutagenesis directed at a limited subset of highly conserved charged residues, combined with ODN screening to eliminate partially unfolded proteins, may provide a widely applicable and efficient strategy for generating separation-of-function mutations.

  9. Structural and functional analysis of APOA5 mutations identified in patients with severe hypertriglyceridemia[S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Barberá, Elena; Julve, Josep; Nilsson, Stefan K.; Lookene, Aivar; Martín-Campos, Jesús M.; Roig, Rosa; Lechuga-Sancho, Alfonso M.; Sloan, John H.; Fuentes-Prior, Pablo; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    During the diagnosis of three unrelated patients with severe hypertriglyceridemia, three APOA5 mutations [p.(Ser232_Leu235)del, p.Leu253Pro, and p.Asp332ValfsX4] were found without evidence of concomitant LPL, APOC2, or GPIHBP1 mutations. The molecular mechanisms by which APOA5 mutations result in severe hypertriglyceridemia remain poorly understood, and the functional impairment/s induced by these specific mutations was not obvious. Therefore, we performed a thorough structural and functional analysis that included follow-up of patients and their closest relatives, measurement of apoA-V serum concentrations, and sequencing of the APOA5 gene in 200 nonhyperlipidemic controls. Further, we cloned, overexpressed, and purified both wild-type and mutant apoA-V variants and characterized their capacity to activate LPL. The interactions of recombinant wild-type and mutated apoA-V variants with liposomes of different composition, heparin, LRP1, sortilin, and SorLA/LR11 were also analyzed. Finally, to explore the possible structural consequences of these mutations, we developed a three-dimensional model of full-length, lipid-free human apoA-V. A complex, wide array of impairments was found in each of the three mutants, suggesting that the specific residues affected are critical structural determinants for apoA-V function in lipoprotein metabolism and, therefore, that these APOA5 mutations are a direct cause of hypertriglyceridemia. PMID:23307945

  10. Two novel AGXT mutations identified in primary hyperoxaluria type-1 and distinct morphological and structural difference in kidney stones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cui; Lu, Jingru; Lang, Yanhua; Liu, Ting; Wang, Xiaoling; Zhao, Xiangzhong; Shao, Leping

    2016-01-01

    Primary hyperoxaluria type 1 (PH1) is a rare genetic disease characterized by excessive oxalate accumulation in plasma and urine, resulting in various phenotypes because of allelic and clinical heterogeneity. This study aimed to detect disease-associated genetic mutations in three PH1 patients in a Chinese family. All AGXT exons and 3 common polymorphisms which might synergistically interact with mutations, including P11L, I340 M and IVSI+74 bp were analyzed by direct sequencing in all family members. It demonstrated that in each of three patients, a previously reported nonsense mutation p.R333* was in cis with a novel missense mutation p.M49L in the minor allele characterized by the polymorphism of 74-bp duplication in intron 1, while the other novel missense mutation p.N72I was in trans with both p.R333* and P.M49L in the major allele. Kidney stones from two sibling patients were also observed though stereomicroscopic examination and scanning electron microscopy. Distinct morphological and inner-structure differences in calculi were noticed, suggesting clinical heterozygosity of PH1 to a certain extent. In brief, two novel missense mutations were identified probably in association with PH1, a finding which should provide an accurate tool for prenatal diagnosis, genetic counseling and screening for potential presymptomatic individuals. PMID:27644547

  11. A Novel WRN Frameshift Mutation Identified by Multiplex Genetic Testing in a Family with Multiple Cases of Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liu; Wang, Guosheng; Zhao, Xinyi; Ye, Song; Shen, Peng; Wang, Weilin; Zheng, Shusen

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing technology allows simultaneous analysis of multiple susceptibility genes for clinical cancer genetics. In this study, multiplex genetic testing was conducted in a Chinese family with multiple cases of cancer to determine the variations in cancer predisposition genes. The family comprises a mother and her five daughters, of whom the mother and the eldest daughter have cancer and the secondary daughter died of cancer. We conducted multiplex genetic testing of 90 cancer susceptibility genes using the peripheral blood DNA of the mother and all five daughters. WRN frameshift mutation is considered a potential pathogenic variation according to the guidelines of the American College of Medical Genetics. A novel WRN frameshift mutation (p.N1370Tfs*23) was identified in the three cancer patients and in the youngest unaffected daughter. Other rare non-synonymous germline mutations were also detected in DICER and ELAC2. Functional mutations in WRN cause Werner syndrome, a human autosomal recessive disease characterized by premature aging and associated with genetic instability and increased cancer risk. Our results suggest that the WRN frameshift mutation is important in the surveillance of other members of this family, especially the youngest daughter, but the pathogenicity of the novel WRN frameshift mutation needs to be investigated further. Given its extensive use in clinical genetic screening, multiplex genetic testing is a promising tool in clinical cancer surveillance.

  12. Functional analysis of a promoter variant identified in the CFTR gene in cis of a frameshift mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viart, Victoria; Des Georges, Marie; Claustres, Mireille; Taulan, Magali

    2012-02-01

    In monogenic diseases, the presence of several sequence variations in the same allele may complicate our understanding of genotype-phenotype relationships. We described new alterations identified in a cystic fibrosis (CF) patient harboring a 48C>G promoter sequence variation associated in cis of a 3532AC>GTA mutation and in trans with the F508del mutation. Functional analyses including in vitro experiments confirmed the deleterious effect of the 3532GTA frameshift mutation through the creation of a premature termination codon. The analyses also revealed that the 48G promoter variant has a negative effect on both transcription and mRNA level, thus demonstrating the importance of analyzing all mutations or sequence variations with potential impact on CF transmembrane conductance regulator processing, even when the two known disease-causing mutations have already been detected. Our results emphasize the need to perform, wherever possible, functional studies that may greatly assist the interpretation of the disease-causing potential of rare mutation-associated sequence variations.

  13. Sonic Hedgehog Mutations Identified in Holoprosencephaly Patients Can Act in a Dominant Negative Manner

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Samer; Tokhunts, Robert; Baubet, Valerie; Goetz, John A.; Huang, Zhen Jane; Schilling, Neal S.; Black, Kendall E.; MacKenzie, Todd A.; Dahmane, Nadia; Robbins, David J.

    2008-01-01

    Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) plays an important instructional role in vertebrate development, as exemplified by the numerous developmental disorders that occur when the SHH pathway is disrupted. Mutations in the SHH gene are the most common cause of sporadic and inherited Holoprosencephaly (HPE), a developmental disorder that is characterized by defective prosencephalon development. SHH HPE mutations provide a unique opportunity to better understand SHH biogenesis and signaling, and to decipher its r...

  14. Mutations in multidomain protein MEGF8 identify a Carpenter syndrome subtype associated with defective lateralization.

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Carpenter syndrome is an autosomal-recessive multiple-congenital-malformation disorder characterized by multisuture craniosynostosis and polysyndactyly of the hands and feet; many other clinical features occur, and the most frequent include obesity, umbilical hernia, cryptorchidism, and congenital heart disease. Mutations of RAB23, encoding a small GTPase that regulates vesicular transport, are present in the majority of cases. Here, we describe a disorder caused by mutations in multiple epid...

  15. Novel somatic mutations identified by whole-exome sequencing in muscle-invasive transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Huixing; Xu, Xiaojian; Wu, Deyao; Qiu, Qiaocheng; Zhou, Shoujun; He, Xuefeng; Zhou, Yunfeng; Qu, Ping; Hou, Jianquan; He, Jun; Zhou, Jian

    2016-02-01

    Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) is the one of the most commonly observed types of cancer globally. The identification of novel disease-associated genes in TCC has had a significant effect on the diagnosis and treatment of bladder cancer; however, there may be a large number of novel genes that have not been identified. In the present study, the exomes of two individuals who were diagnosed with muscle-invasive TCC (MI-TCC) were sequenced to investigate potential variants. Subsequently, following algorithm and filter analysis, Sanger sequencing was used to validate the results of deep sequencing. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was employed to observe the differences in HECT, C2 and WW domain-containing E3 ubiquitin protein ligase 1 (HECW1) protein expression between tumor tissues and para-carcinoma tissues. A total of 6 nonsynonymous mutation genes were identified in MI-TCC, identified as copine VII, RNA binding motif protein, X-linked-like 3, acyl-CoA synthetase medium-chain family member 2A, HECW1, zinc finger protein 273 and trichohyalin. Furthermore, 5 cases were identified to possess a HECW1 gene mutation in 61 MI-TCC specimens, and all of these were point mutations located at exon 11 on chromosome 7. The mutation categories of HECW1 had 4 missense mutations and 1 nonsense mutation. IHC revealed that HECW1 protein was expressed at significantly increased levels in MI-TCC compared with normal bladder urothelium (PHECW1, which may possess a significant role in the pathogenesis of TCC.

  16. Whole exome sequencing identifies recessive PKHD1 mutations in a Chinese twin family with Caroli disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiwei Hao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mutations in PKHD1 cause autosomal recessive Caroli disease, which is a rare congenital disorder involving cystic dilatation of the intrahepatic bile ducts. However, the mutational spectrum of PKHD1 and the phenotype-genotype correlations have not yet been fully established. METHODS: Whole exome sequencing (WES was performed on one twin sample with Caroli disease from a Chinese family from Shandong province. Routine Sanger sequencing was used to validate the WES and to carry out segregation studies. We also described the PKHD1 mutation associated with the genotype-phenotype of this twin. RESULTS: A combination of WES and Sanger sequencing revealed the genetic defect to be a novel compound heterozygous genotype in PKHD1, including the missense mutation c.2507 T>C, predicted to cause a valine to alanine substitution at codon 836 (c.2507T>C, p.Val836Ala, and the nonsense mutation c.2341C>T, which is predicted to result in an arginine to stop codon at codon 781 (c.2341C>T, p.Arg781*. This compound heterozygous genotype co-segregates with the Caroli disease-affected pedigree members, but is absent in 200 normal chromosomes. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate exome sequencing can be useful in the diagnosis of Caroli disease patients and associate a compound heterozygous genotype in PKHD1 with Caroli disease, which further increases our understanding of the mutation spectrum of PKHD1 in association with Caroli disease.

  17. Functional characterization of a CRH missense mutation identified in an ADNFLE family.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Sansoni

    Full Text Available Nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy has been historically considered a channelopathy caused by mutations in subunits of the neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor or in a recently reported potassium channel. However, these mutations account for only a minority of patients, and the existence of at least a new locus for the disease has been demonstrated. In 2005, we detected two nucleotide variations in the promoter of the CRH gene coding for the corticotropin releasing hormone in 7 patients. These variations cosegregated with the disease and were demonstrated to alter the cellular levels of this hormone. Here, we report the identification in an Italian affected family of a novel missense mutation (hpreproCRH p.Pro30Arg located in the region of the CRH coding for the protein pro-sequence. The mutation was detected in heterozygosity in the two affected individuals. In vitro assays demonstrated that this mutation results in reduced levels of protein secretion in the short time thus suggesting that mutated people could present an altered capability to respond immediately to stress agents.

  18. Exome Sequencing of Uterine Leiomyosarcomas Identifies Frequent Mutations in TP53, ATRX, and MED12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäkinen, Netta; Aavikko, Mervi; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Taipale, Minna; Taipale, Jussi; Koivisto-Korander, Riitta; Bützow, Ralf; Vahteristo, Pia

    2016-02-01

    Uterine leiomyosarcomas (ULMSs) are aggressive smooth muscle tumors associated with poor clinical outcome. Despite previous cytogenetic and molecular studies, their molecular background has remained elusive. To examine somatic variation in ULMS, we performed exome sequencing on 19 tumors. Altogether, 43 genes were mutated in at least two ULMSs. Most frequently mutated genes included tumor protein P53 (TP53; 6/19; 33%), alpha thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked (ATRX; 5/19; 26%), and mediator complex subunit 12 (MED12; 4/19; 21%). Unlike ATRX mutations, both TP53 and MED12 alterations have repeatedly been associated with ULMSs. All the observed ATRX alterations were either nonsense or frameshift mutations. ATRX protein levels were reliably analyzed by immunohistochemistry in altogether 44 ULMSs, and the majority of tumors (23/44; 52%) showed clearly reduced expression. Loss of ATRX expression has been associated with alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT), and thus the telomere length was analyzed with telomere-specific fluorescence in situ hybridization. The ALT phenotype was confirmed in all ULMSs showing diminished ATRX expression. Exome data also revealed one nonsense mutation in death-domain associated protein (DAXX), another gene previously associated with ALT, and the tumor showed ALT positivity. In conclusion, exome sequencing revealed that TP53, ATRX, and MED12 are frequently mutated in ULMSs. ALT phenotype was commonly seen in tumors, indicating that ATR inhibitors, which were recently suggested as possible new drugs for ATRX-deficient tumors, could provide a potential novel therapeutic option for ULMS.

  19. Whole exome sequencing identifies three recessive FIG4 mutations in an apparently dominant pedigree with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, Manoj P; Waddell, Leigh; Lenk, Guy M; Kaur, Simranpreet; MacArthur, Daniel G; Meisler, Miriam H; Clarke, Nigel F

    2014-08-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is genetically heterogeneous and classification based on motor nerve conduction velocity and inheritance is used to direct genetic testing. With the less common genetic forms of CMT, identifying the causative genetic mutation by Sanger sequencing of individual genes can be time-consuming and costly. Next-generation sequencing technologies show promise for clinical testing in diseases where a similar phenotype is caused by different genes. We report the unusual occurrence of CMT4J, caused by mutations in FIG4, in a apparently dominant pedigree. The affected proband and her mother exhibit different disease severities associated with different combinations of compound heterozygous FIG4 mutations, identified by whole exome sequencing. The proband was also shown to carry a de novo nonsense mutation in the dystrophin gene, which may contribute to her more severe phenotype. This study is a cautionary reminder that in families with two generations affected, explanations other than dominant inheritance are possible, such as recessive inheritance due to three mutations segregating in the family. It also emphasises the advantages of next-generation sequencing approaches that screen multiple CMT genes at once for patients in whom the common genes have been excluded. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Broadening of cohesinopathies: exome sequencing identifies mutations in ANKRD11 in two patients with Cornelia de Lange-overlapping phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parenti, I; Gervasini, C; Pozojevic, J; Graul-Neumann, L; Azzollini, J; Braunholz, D; Watrin, E; Wendt, K S; Cereda, A; Cittaro, D; Gillessen-Kaesbach, G; Lazarevic, D; Mariani, M; Russo, S; Werner, R; Krawitz, P; Larizza, L; Selicorni, A; Kaiser, F J

    2016-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) and KBG syndrome are two distinct developmental pathologies sharing common features such as intellectual disability, psychomotor delay, and some craniofacial and limb abnormalities. Mutations in one of the five genes NIPBL, SMC1A, SMC3, HDAC8 or RAD21, were identified in at least 70% of the patients with CdLS. Consequently, additional causative genes, either unknown or responsible of partially merging entities, possibly account for the remaining 30% of the patients. In contrast, KBG has only been associated with mutations in ANKRD11. By exome sequencing we could identify heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in ANKRD11 in two patients with the clinical diagnosis of CdLS. Both patients show features reminiscent of CdLS such as characteristic facies as well as a small head circumference which is not described for KBG syndrome. Patient A, who carries the mutation in a mosaic state, is a 4-year-old girl with features reminiscent of CdLS. Patient B, a 15-year-old boy, shows a complex phenotype which resembled CdLS during infancy, but has developed to a more KBG overlapping phenotype during childhood. These findings point out the importance of screening ANKRD11 in young CdLS patients who were found to be negative for mutations in the five known CdLS genes. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Mutations in the DDR2 Kinase Gene identify a Novel therapeutic target in squamous cell lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hammerman, Peter S.; Sos, Martin L.; Ramos, Alex H.; Xu, Chunxiao; Dutt, Amit; Zhou, Wenjun; Brace, Lear E.; Woods, Brittany A.; Lin, Wenchu; Zhang, Jianming; Deng, Xianming; Lim, Sang Min; Heynck, Stefanie; Peifer, Martin; Simard, Jeffrey R.; Lawrence, Michael S.; Onofrio, Robert C.; Salvesen, Helga B.; Seidel, Danila; Zander, Thomas; Heuckmann, Johannes M.; Soltermann, Alex; Moch, Holger; Koker, Mirjam; Leenders, Frauke; Gabler, Franziska; Querings, Silvia; Ansen, Sascha; Brambilla, Elisabeth; Brambilla, Christian; Lorimier, Philippe; Brustugun, Odd Terje; Helland, Aslaug; Petersen, Iver; Clement, Joachim H.; Groen, Harry; Timens, Wim; Sietsma, Hannie; Stoelben, Erich; Wolf, Juergen; Beer, David G.; Tsao, Ming Sound; Hanna, Megan; Hatton, Charles; Eck, Michael J.; Janne, Pasi A.; Johnson, Bruce E.; Winckler, Wendy; Greulich, Heidi; Bass, Adam J.; Cho, Jeonghee; Rauh, Daniel; Gray, Nathanael S.; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Haura, Eric B.; Thomas, Roman K.; Meyerson, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    Although genomically targeted therapies have improved outcomes for patients with lung adenocarcinoma, little is known about the genomic alterations that drive squamous cell cancer (SCC) of the lung. Sanger sequencing of the tyrosine kinome identified mutations in the DDR2 kinase gene in 3.8% of lung

  2. Somatic mutations in stilbene estrogen-induced Syrian hamster kidney tumors identified by DNA fingerprinting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy Deodutta

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Kidney tumors from stilbene estrogen (diethylstilbestrol-treated Syrian hamsters were screened for somatic genetic alterations by Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA-polymerase chain-reaction (RAPD-PCR fingerprinting. Fingerprints from tumor tissue were generated by single arbitrary primers and compared with fingerprints for normal tissue from the same animal, as well as normal and tumor tissues from different animals. Sixty one of the arbitrary primers amplified 365 loci that contain approximately 476 kbp of the hamster genome. Among these amplified DNA fragments, 44 loci exhibited either qualitative or quantitative differences between the tumor tissues and normal kidney tissues. RAPD-PCR loci showing decreased and increased intensities in tumor tissue DNA relative to control DNA indicate that loci have undergone allelic losses and gains, respectively, in the stilbene estrogen-induced tumor cell genome. The presence or absence of the amplified DNA fragments indicate homozygous insertions or deletions in the kidney tumor DNA compared to the age-matched normal kidney tissue DNA. Seven of 44 mutated loci also were present in the kidney tissues adjacent to tumors (free of macroscopic tumors. The presence of mutated loci in uninvolved (non-tumor surrounding tissue adjacent to tumors from stilbene estrogen-treated hamsters suggests that these mutations occurred in the early stages of carcinogenesis. The cloning and sequencing of RAPD amplified loci revealed that one mutated locus had significant sequence similarity with the hamster Cyp1A1 gene. The results show the ability of RAPD-PCR to detect and isolate, in a single step, DNA sequences representing genetic alterations in stilbene estrogen-induced cancer cells, including losses of heterozygosity, and homozygous deletion and insertion mutations. RAPD-PCR provides an alternative molecular approach for studying cancer cytogenetics in stilbene estrogen-induced tumors in humans and experimental

  3. Exome Sequencing of Uterine Leiomyosarcomas Identifies Frequent Mutations in TP53, ATRX, and MED12.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Netta Mäkinen

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Uterine leiomyosarcomas (ULMSs are aggressive smooth muscle tumors associated with poor clinical outcome. Despite previous cytogenetic and molecular studies, their molecular background has remained elusive. To examine somatic variation in ULMS, we performed exome sequencing on 19 tumors. Altogether, 43 genes were mutated in at least two ULMSs. Most frequently mutated genes included tumor protein P53 (TP53; 6/19; 33%, alpha thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked (ATRX; 5/19; 26%, and mediator complex subunit 12 (MED12; 4/19; 21%. Unlike ATRX mutations, both TP53 and MED12 alterations have repeatedly been associated with ULMSs. All the observed ATRX alterations were either nonsense or frameshift mutations. ATRX protein levels were reliably analyzed by immunohistochemistry in altogether 44 ULMSs, and the majority of tumors (23/44; 52% showed clearly reduced expression. Loss of ATRX expression has been associated with alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT, and thus the telomere length was analyzed with telomere-specific fluorescence in situ hybridization. The ALT phenotype was confirmed in all ULMSs showing diminished ATRX expression. Exome data also revealed one nonsense mutation in death-domain associated protein (DAXX, another gene previously associated with ALT, and the tumor showed ALT positivity. In conclusion, exome sequencing revealed that TP53, ATRX, and MED12 are frequently mutated in ULMSs. ALT phenotype was commonly seen in tumors, indicating that ATR inhibitors, which were recently suggested as possible new drugs for ATRX-deficient tumors, could provide a potential novel therapeutic option for ULMS.

  4. A novel mis-sense mutation (G1381A) in the G6PD gene identified in a Chinese man

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任晓琴; 杜传书; 蒋玮莹; 陈路明; 林群娣; 何永蜀

    2001-01-01

    目的对中国云南省29例G6PD缺乏症患者检查新的基因突变型。 方法用NBT法作G6PD缺乏症筛查、SSCP、ACRS和DNA测序鉴定突变。结果29例中发现G1388A18例、C1004A1例、G1381A1例,另外9例未定型。其中1381突变为新的错义 突变。这一突变导致G6PD丙氨酸被苏氨酸置换(A461T),并导致一天然StuI酶切位点的消失,此特点可 用于该突变的鉴定。 结论我们发现一新的错义突变。此突变导致丙氨酸被苏氨酸置换(A461T),且此突变对酶活性降低是 重要的。%Objective To detect new mutations among 29 glucose-6-phosphatedehydrogenase (G6PD) deficient individuals from Yunnan province. Methods The nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) method was used to screen G6PD deficient individuals. Mutation was identified by single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP), amplification created restriction site (ACRS), amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS) and DNA sequencing. Results Among 29 cases, 18 cases of G1388A, 1 case of C1004A, and 1 case of G1381A were identified. Nine cases remained to be defined. The G1381A mutation is a novel mis-sense mutation, with a substitution of threonine for alanine (A461T). The resultant G6PD had reduced enzymatic activity. In addition, G1381A caused a restriction site of Stu I to disappear, providing a rapid method for the detection of this mutation. Conclusion A novel mis-sense mutation G1381A was found. This mutation results in a substitution of threonine for alanine, producing enzyme with reduced activity. The loss of the Stu I restriction site offers a rapid method for the detection of this mutation.

  5. Aromatase deficiency: a novel compound heterozygous mutation identified in a Chinese girl with severe phenotype and obvious maternal virilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wen-Jiao; Cheng, Tong; Zhu, Hui; Han, Bing; Fan, Meng-Xia; Gu, Ting; Zhao, Shuang-Xia; Liu, Yang; Cheng, Kai-Xiang; Song, Huai-Dong; Qiao, Jie

    2016-09-15

    Aromatase deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder that is caused by an impairment of androgen conversion to estrogens. Affected 46, XX individuals generally present with virilization of external genitalia at birth and mutations in CYP19A1 gene. This study described the clinical features and molecular basis of a Chinese 46, XX girl born with ambiguous genitalia and investigated the functional alteration of two novel mutations of the CYP19A1 gene. Obvious prepartum virilization and remarkably elevated testosterone were observed in the mother, who was initially suspected to have a testosterone-producing ovarian tumor. Clinical phenotypes and hormone profiles of the patient and her mother were investigated. Genotyping analyses of the CYP19A1 gene were performed in the patient and her parents. Functional impairment of the mutations was explored using three-dimensional computer model and mutagenesises in vitro transfection assays. A compound heterozygous mutation of the CYP19A1 gene was revealed in the patient, with a G deletion in nucleotide 264 of exon 3 in one allele and a 23-bp insertion in exon 9 in another allele; both mutations resulted in reading frame-shifts that led to truncated proteins of 87 and 360 amino acids, respectively. Molecular modeling analysis suggested that the two renascent truncated proteins lacked crucial amino acids that were involved in substrate access and catalysis as well as heme-binding region. Functional studies in transfected HEK-293T cells exhibited a nearly complete abolishment of enzyme activity, which may underlie the phenotype and hormone profile. Two novel CYP19A1 mutations were identified in a Chinese girl born with ambiguous genitalia and severe maternal virilization during pregnancy. Maternal virilization should prompt consideration of aromatase deficiency, preventing unnecessary interventions in pregnancy. This study broadens the spectrum of phenotype and genetic mutations of this rare disorder. Copyright © 2016

  6. TumorTracer: a method to identify the tissue of origin from the somatic mutations of a tumor specimen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marquard, Andrea Marion; Birkbak, Nicolai Juul; Thomas, Cecilia Engel

    2015-01-01

    A substantial proportion of cancer cases present with a metastatic tumor and require further testing to determine the primary site; many of these are never fully diagnosed and remain cancer of unknown primary origin (CUP). It has been previously demonstrated that the somatic point mutations...... detected in a tumor can be used to identify its site of origin with limited accuracy. We hypothesized that higher accuracy could be achieved by a classification algorithm based on the following feature sets: 1) the number of nonsynonymous point mutations in a set of 232 specific cancer-associated genes, 2...... %/75 % of tumors with/without copy numbers) from those that were less certain. Accuracy in the independent data sets was 46 %, 53 % and 89 % respectively, similar to the accuracy expected from the training data. Identification of primary site from point mutation and/or copy number data may be accurate enough...

  7. Somatic mutation profiles of MSI and MSS colorectal cancer identified by whole exome next generation sequencing and bioinformatics analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernd Timmermann

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Colorectal cancer (CRC is with approximately 1 million cases the third most common cancer worldwide. Extensive research is ongoing to decipher the underlying genetic patterns with the hope to improve early cancer diagnosis and treatment. In this direction, the recent progress in next generation sequencing technologies has revolutionized the field of cancer genomics. However, one caveat of these studies remains the large amount of genetic variations identified and their interpretation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we present the first work on whole exome NGS of primary colon cancers. We performed 454 whole exome pyrosequencing of tumor as well as adjacent not affected normal colonic tissue from microsatellite stable (MSS and microsatellite instable (MSI colon cancer patients and identified more than 50,000 small nucleotide variations for each tissue. According to predictions based on MSS and MSI pathomechanisms we identified eight times more somatic non-synonymous variations in MSI cancers than in MSS and we were able to reproduce the result in four additional CRCs. Our bioinformatics filtering approach narrowed down the rate of most significant mutations to 359 for MSI and 45 for MSS CRCs with predicted altered protein functions. In both CRCs, MSI and MSS, we found somatic mutations in the intracellular kinase domain of bone morphogenetic protein receptor 1A, BMPR1A, a gene where so far germline mutations are associated with juvenile polyposis syndrome, and show that the mutations functionally impair the protein function. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that with deep sequencing of tumor exomes one may be able to predict the microsatellite status of CRC and in addition identify potentially clinically relevant mutations.

  8. Evaluation of von Willebrand factor phenotypes and genotypes in Hemophilia A patients with and without identified F8 mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boylan, Brian; Rice, Anne S.; De Staercke, Christine; Eyster, M. Elaine; Yaish, Hassan M.; Knoll, Christine M.; Bean, Christopher J.; Miller, Connie H.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Hemophilia A (HA) is an X-linked bleeding disorder caused by a deficiency in factor VIII (FVIII). von Willebrand disease (VWD) is characterized by a quantitative or qualitative defect in von Willebrand Factor (VWF). Patients with VWD with severely low VWF or VWD Type 2N (VWD2N), a VWD subtype distinguished by defective VWF binding to FVIII, may have reduced FVIII levels secondary to their VWD. These patients superficially resemble patients with HA, and pose a potential for misdiagnosis. Objectives Investigate the unexplained cause of bleeding in HA patients without known FVIII mutations by assessing plasma VWF antigen (VWF:Ag), FVIII binding capacities, and VWF genotypes. Patients/Methods Thirty-seven of 1027 patients with HA studied as part of the Hemophilia Inhibitor Research Study lacked identifiable F8 mutations. These patients (cases) and 73 patients with identified F8 mutations (controls) were evaluated for VWF:Ag, patient's VWF capacity to bind FVIII (VWF:FVIIIB), and VWF sequence. Results Four cases had VWF:Ag <3 IU/dL and VWF mutations consistent with Type3 VWD. Six cases and one control were heterozygous for mutations previously reported to cause Type1 VWD (VWD1) (n=5 cases and 1 control) or predicted to be deleterious by Polyphen2 and SIFT prediction tools (n=1 case). One control had VWF:Ag <30 IU/dl, and seven patients (4 cases and 3 controls), including two cases who were heterozygous for a known VWD2N mutation, had reduced VWF:FVIIIB. Conclusions These data emphasize that some patients diagnosed with HA require VWF assessments in order to achieve a comprehensive diagnosis and an optimal treatment strategy. PMID:25780857

  9. A novel SCN1A mutation identified in a Chinese family with familial hemiplegic migraine: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Chen, Ning; Zhou, Muke; Guo, Jian; Guo, Jiang; He, Li

    2016-11-08

    Familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) is a rare type of migraine with aura that is characterized by transient hemiparesis. Mutations in three genes (CACNA1A, ATP1A2, and SCN1A) have been found to cause FHM. Among these, nine SCN1A gene mutations were reported to cause familial hemiplegic migraine type 3 (FHM3). However, none of them was reported in China. The clinical manifestations of a Chinese FHM family were recorded and all coding exons and flanking intronic regions of the CACNA1A, ATP1A2, and SCN1A genes were tested for mutations. All FHM patients in the investigated family have typical hemiplegic migraine attacks characteristic of FHM. We identified a novel mutation (p.Leu1670Trp) of the SCN1A gene. The affected amino acid is highly conserved across different species and therefore likely plays an important role in SCN1A gene function. The identification of a novel mutation in the SCN1A gene in the Chinese population may further aid in the understanding of FHM genetics. © International Headache Society 2016.

  10. A novel nonsense mutation of the GPR143 gene identified in a Chinese pedigree with ocular albinism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naihong Yan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to elucidate the molecular basis of ocular albinism type I in a Chinese pedigree. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Complete ophthalmologic examinations were performed on 4 patients, 7 carriers and 17 unaffected individuals in this five-generation family. All coding exons of four-point-one (4.1, ezrin, radixin, moesin (FERM domain-containing 7 (FRMD7 and G protein-coupled receptor 143 (GPR143 genes were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR, sequenced and compared with a reference database. Ocular albinism and nystagmus were found in all patients of this family. Macular hypoplasia was present in the patients including the proband. A novel nonsense hemizygous mutation c.807T>A in the GPR143 gene was identified in four patients and the heterozygous mutation was found in seven asymptomatic individuals. This mutation is a substitution of tyrosine for adenine which leads to a premature stop codon at position 269 (p.Y269X of GPR143. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first report that p.Y269X mutation of GPR143 gene is responsible for the pathogenesis of familial ocular albinism. These results expand the mutation spectrum of GPR143, and demonstrate the clinical characteristics of ocular albinism type I in Chinese population.

  11. Genetic screening of the FLCN gene identify six novel variants and a Danish founder mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossing, Maria; Albrechtsen, Anders; Skytte, Anne-Bine

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic germline mutations in the folliculin (FLCN) tumor suppressor gene predispose to Birt-Hogg-Dubé (BHD) syndrome, a rare disease characterized by the development of cutaneous hamartomas (fibrofolliculomas), multiple lung cysts, spontaneous pneumothoraces and renal cell cancer. In this study...

  12. Early frameshift mutation in PIGA identified in a large XLID family without neonatal lethality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belet, Stefanie; Fieremans, Nathalie; Yuan, Xuan; Van Esch, Hilde; Verbeeck, Jelle; Ye, Zhaohui; Cheng, Linzhao; Brodsky, Brett R; Hu, Hao; Kalscheuer, Vera M; Brodsky, Robert A; Froyen, Guy

    2014-03-01

    The phosphatidylinositol glycan class A (PIGA) protein is a member of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor pathway. Germline mutations in PIGA located at Xp22.2 are thought to be lethal in males. However, a nonsense mutation in the last coding exon was recently described in two brothers with multiple congenital anomalies-hypotonia-seizures syndrome 2 (MCAHS2) who survived through birth likely because of the hypomorphic nature of the truncated protein, but died in their first weeks of life. Here, we report on a frameshift mutation early in the PIGA cDNA (c.76dupT; p.Y26Lfs*3) that cosegregates with the disease in a large family diagnosed with a severe syndromic form of X-linked intellectual disability. Unexpectedly, CD59 surface expression suggested the production of a shorter PIGA protein with residual functionality. We provide evidence that the second methionine at position 37 may be used for the translation of a 36 amino acids shorter PIGA. Complementation assays confirmed that this shorter PIGA cDNA was able to partially rescue the surface expression of CD59 in a PIGA-null cell line. Taken together, our data strongly suggest that the early frameshift mutation in PIGA produces a truncated hypomorph, which is sufficient to rescue the lethality in males but not the MCAHS2-like phenotype.

  13. 7 NEW MUTATIONS IN HMSH2, AN HNPCC GENE, IDENTIFIED BY DENATURING GRADIENT-GEL ELECTROPHORESIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WIJNEN, J; VASEN, H; KHAN, PM; MENKO, FH; VANDERKLIFT, H; VANLEEUWEN, C; VANDENBROEK, M; VANLEEUWENCORNELISSE, [No Value; NAGENGAST, F; MEIJERSHEIJBOER, A; LINDHOUT, D; GRIFFIOEN, G; CATS, A; KLEIBEUKER, J; VARESCO, L; BERTARIO, L; BISGAARD, ML; MOHR, J; FODDE, R

    1995-01-01

    Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is a relatively common autosomal dominant cancer-susceptibility condition. The recent isolation of the DNA mismatch repair genes (hMSH2, hMLH1, hPMS1, and hPMS2) responsible for HNPCC has allowed the search for germ-line mutations in affected individ

  14. CTNNB1 (beta-catenin) mutation identifies low grade, early stage endometrial cancer patients at increased risk of recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurnit, Katherine C; Kim, Grace N; Fellman, Bryan M; Urbauer, Diana L; Mills, Gordon B; Zhang, Wei; Broaddus, Russell R

    2017-03-10

    Although the majority of low grade, early stage endometrial cancer patients will have good survival outcomes with surgery alone, those patients who do recur tend to do poorly. Optimal identification of the subset of patients who are at high risk of recurrence and would benefit from adjuvant treatment has been difficult. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of somatic tumor mutation on survival outcomes in this patient population. For this study, low grade was defined as endometrioid FIGO grades 1 or 2, while early stage was defined as endometrioid stages I or II (disease confined to the uterus). Next-generation sequencing was performed using panels comprised of 46-200 genes. Recurrence-free and overall survival was compared across gene mutational status in both univariate and multivariate analyses. In all, 342 patients were identified, 245 of which had endometrioid histology. For grades 1-2, stages I-II endometrioid endometrial cancer patients, age (HR 1.07, 95% CI 1.03-1.10), CTNNB1 mutation (HR 5.97, 95% CI 2.69-13.21), and TP53 mutation (HR 4.07, 95% CI 1.57-10.54) were associated with worse recurrence-free survival on multivariate analysis. When considering endometrioid tumors of all grades and stages, CTNNB1 mutant tumors were associated with significantly higher rates of grades 1-2 disease, lower rates of deep myometrial invasion, and lower rates of lymphatic/vascular space invasion. When both TP53 and CTNNB1 mutations were considered, presence of either TP53 mutation or CTNNB1 mutation remained a statistically significant predictor of recurrence-free survival on multivariate analysis and was associated with a more precise confidence interval (HR 4.69, 95% CI 2.38-9.24). Thus, mutational analysis of a 2 gene panel of CTNNB1 and TP53 can help to identify a subset of low grade, early stage endometrial cancer patients who are at high risk of recurrence.Modern Pathology advance online publication, 10 March 2017; doi:10.1038/modpathol.2017.15.

  15. Familial mutations in fibrinogen Aα (FGA) chain identified in renal amyloidosis increase in vitro amyloidogenicity of FGA fragment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivalingam, Vishwanath; Patel, Basant K

    2016-08-01

    Amyloidoses are clinical disorders where deposition of β-sheet rich, misfolded protein aggregates called amyloid occurs in vital organs like brain, kidney, liver or heart etc. Aggregation of several proteins such as immunoglobulin light chain, fibrinogen Aα chain (FGA) and lysozyme have been found to be associated with renal amyloidosis. Fibrinogen amyloidosis (AFib) is predominantly familial and is associated with the deposition of mutant FGA amyloid, primarily in kidneys. Over ten substitution and frame-shift mutations in FGA have been identified from AFib patients. Whether wild-type FGA is also involved in AFib is yet unknown. The affected tissues from AFib patients usually show ∼10 kDA peptide from C-terminal 80 amino acid residues of mutant FGA. Notably, this region also encompasses all known disease-related mutations. Whether these point mutations increase the amyloidogenicity of FGA leading to disease progression, have not been studied yet. Here, we have investigated the role of two disease-related mutations in affecting amyloidogenic propensity of an FGA(496-581) fragment. We found that at physiological pH, the wild-type FGA(496-581) fragment remains monomeric, whereas its E540V mutant forms amyloid-like fibrils as observed by AFM. Also, FGA(496-581) harbouring another familial mutation, R554L, converts in vitro into globular, β-sheet rich aggregates, showing amyloid-like properties. These findings suggest that familial mutations in FGA may have role in renal amyloidosis via enhanced amyloid formation.

  16. Exome sequencing identifies novel and recurrent mutations in GJA8 and CRYGD associated with inherited cataract

    OpenAIRE

    Mackay, Donna S.; Bennett, Thomas M.; Culican, Susan M.; Shiels, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Background Inherited cataract is a clinically important and genetically heterogeneous cause of visual impairment. Typically, it presents at an early age with or without other ocular/systemic signs and lacks clear phenotype-genotype correlation rendering both clinical classification and molecular diagnosis challenging. Here we have utilized trio-based whole exome sequencing to discover mutations in candidate genes underlying autosomal dominant cataract segregating in three nuclear families. Re...

  17. Characterization of SH2D1A missense mutations identified in X-linked lymphoproliferative disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morra, M; Simarro-Grande, M; Martin, M; Chen, A S; Lanyi, A; Silander, O; Calpe, S; Davis, J; Pawson, T; Eck, M J; Sumegi, J; Engel, P; Li, S C; Terhorst, C

    2001-09-28

    X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP) is a primary immunodeficiency characterized by extreme susceptibility to Epstein-Barr virus. The XLP disease gene product SH2D1A (SAP) interacts via its SH2 domain with a motif (TIYXXV) present in the cytoplasmic tail of the cell-surface receptors CD150/SLAM, CD84, CD229/Ly-9, and CD244/2B4. Characteristically, the SH2D1A three-pronged interaction with Tyr(281) of CD150 can occur in absence of phosphorylation. Here we analyze the effect of SH2D1A protein missense mutations identified in 10 XLP families. Two sets of mutants were found: (i) mutants with a marked decreased protein half-life (e.g. Y7C, S28R, Q99P, P101L, V102G, and X129R) and (ii) mutants with structural changes that differently affect the interaction with the four receptors. In the second group, mutations that disrupt the interaction between the SH2D1A hydrophobic cleft and Val +3 of its binding motif (e.g. T68I) and mutations that interfere with the SH2D1A phosphotyrosine-binding pocket (e.g. C42W) abrogated SH2D1A binding to all four receptors. Surprisingly, a mutation in SH2D1A able to interfere with Thr -2 of the CD150 binding motif (mutant T53I) severely impaired non-phosphotyrosine interactions while preserving unaffected the binding of SH2D1A to phosphorylated CD150. Mutant T53I, however, did not bind to CD229 and CD224, suggesting that SH2D1A controls several critical signaling pathways in T and natural killer cells. Because no correlation is present between identified types of mutations and XLP patient clinical presentation, additional unidentified genetic or environmental factors must play a strong role in XLP disease manifestations.

  18. A novel MYOC heterzygous mutation identified in a Chinese Uygur pedigree with primary open-angle glaucoma

    OpenAIRE

    Cai, Su-ping; Muhemaiti, Paerheti; Yin, Yan; Cheng, Hongbo; Di Ya, A.; Keyimu, Maliyamu; Cao, Xu; Fan, Ning; JIANG, LIQIONG; Yan, Naihong; Zhou, Xiaomin; Wang, Yun; Liu, Xuyang

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To characterize the clinical features of a Chinese Uygur pedigree with primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) and to identify mutations in two candidate genes, trabecular meshwork inducible glucocorticoid response (MYOC/TIGR) and human dioxin-inducible cytochrome P450 (CYP1B1). Methods Twenty one members from a Chinese Uygur family of four generations were included in the study. All participants underwent complete ophthalmologic examinations. Five were diagnosed as POAG, four as glaucoma ...

  19. Whole Genome Sequencing of High-Risk Families to Identify New Mutational Mechanisms of Breast Cancer Predisposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Families to Identify New Mutational Mechanisms of Breast Cancer Predisposition 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-13-1-0336 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...An integrative approach to predicting the functional effects of non-coding and coding sequence variation. Bioinformatics. 31:1536-1543. 14 Fu Y...Breast Cancer Predisposition PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Mary-Claire King, PhD CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: University of Washington Seattle, WA, 98195

  20. Whole exome sequencing identifies the first STRADA point mutation in a patient with polyhydramnios, megalencephaly, and symptomatic epilepsy syndrome (PMSE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Weimin; Glass, Ian A; Muzny, Donna M; Gibbs, Richard A; Eng, Christine M; Yang, Yaping; Sun, Angela

    2016-08-01

    Polyhydramnios, megalencephaly, and symptomatic epilepsy syndrome (PMSE) is an ultra rare neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by severe, infantile-onset intractable epilepsy, neurocognitive delay, macrocephaly, and craniofacial dysmorphism. The molecular diagnosis of this condition has thus far only been made in 16 Old Order Mennonite patients carrying a homozygous 7 kb founder deletion of exons 9-13 of STRADA. We performed clinical whole exome sequencing (WES) on a 4-year-old Indian male with global developmental delay, history of failure to thrive, infantile spasms, repetitive behaviors, hypotonia, low muscle mass, marked joint laxity, and dysmorphic facial features including tall forehead, long face, arched eyebrows, small chin, wide mouth, and tented upper lip. A homozygous single nucleotide duplication, c.842dupA (p.D281fs), in exon 10 of STRADA was identified. Sanger sequencing confirmed the mutation in the individual and identified both parents as carriers. In light of the molecular discoveries, the patient's clinical phenotype was considered to be a good fit for PMSE. We identified for the first time a homozygous point mutation in STRADA causing PMSE. Additional bi-allelic mutations related to PMSE thus far have not been observed in Baylor ∼6,000 consecutive clinical WES cases, supporting the rarity of this disorder. Our findings may have treatment implications for the patient since previous studies have shown rapamycin as a potential therapeutic agent for the seizures and cognitive problems in PMSE patients. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Identifying activating mutations in the EGFR gene: prognostic and therapeutic implications in non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Lima Lopes

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstractLung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Promising new therapies have recently emerged from the development of molecular targeted drugs; particularly promising are those blocking the signal transduction machinery of cancer cells. One of the most widely studied cell signaling pathways is that of EGFR, which leads to uncontrolled cell proliferation, increased cell angiogenesis, and greater cell invasiveness. Activating mutations in the EGFR gene (deletions in exon 19 and mutation L858R in exon 21, first described in 2004, have been detected in approximately 10% of all non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients in Western countries and are the most important predictors of a response to EGFR tyrosine-kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs. Studies of the EGFR-TKIs gefitinib, erlotinib, and afatinib, in comparison with platinum-based regimens, as first-line treatments in chemotherapy-naïve patients have shown that the EGFR-TKIs produce gains in progression-free survival and overall response rates, although only in patients whose tumors harbor activating mutations in the EGFR gene. Clinical trials have also shown EGFR-TKIs to be effective as second- and third-line therapies in advanced NSCLC. Here, we review the main aspects of EGFR pathway activation in NSCLC, underscore the importance of correctly identifying activating mutations in the EGFR gene, and discuss the main outcomes of EGFR-TKI treatment in NSCLC.

  2. Massively parallel DNA sequencing successfully identifies new causative mutations in deafness genes in patients with cochlear implantation and EAS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maiko Miyagawa

    Full Text Available Genetic factors, the most common etiology in severe to profound hearing loss, are one of the key determinants of Cochlear Implantation (CI and Electric Acoustic Stimulation (EAS outcomes. Satisfactory auditory performance after receiving a CI/EAS in patients with certain deafness gene mutations indicates that genetic testing would be helpful in predicting CI/EAS outcomes and deciding treatment choices. However, because of the extreme genetic heterogeneity of deafness, clinical application of genetic information still entails difficulties. Target exon sequencing using massively parallel DNA sequencing is a new powerful strategy to discover rare causative genes in Mendelian disorders such as deafness. We used massive sequencing of the exons of 58 target candidate genes to analyze 8 (4 early-onset, 4 late-onset Japanese CI/EAS patients, who did not have mutations in commonly found genes including GJB2, SLC26A4, or mitochondrial 1555A>G or 3243A>G mutations. We successfully identified four rare causative mutations in the MYO15A, TECTA, TMPRSS3, and ACTG1 genes in four patients who showed relatively good auditory performance with CI including EAS, suggesting that genetic testing may be able to predict the performance after implantation.

  3. Identifying activating mutations in the EGFR gene: prognostic and therapeutic implications in non-small cell lung cancer *

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Gabriel Lima; Vattimo, Edoardo Filippo de Queiroz; de Castro, Gilberto

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Promising new therapies have recently emerged from the development of molecular targeted drugs; particularly promising are those blocking the signal transduction machinery of cancer cells. One of the most widely studied cell signaling pathways is that of EGFR, which leads to uncontrolled cell proliferation, increased cell angiogenesis, and greater cell invasiveness. Activating mutations in the EGFR gene (deletions in exon 19 and mutation L858R in exon 21), first described in 2004, have been detected in approximately 10% of all non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients in Western countries and are the most important predictors of a response to EGFR tyrosine-kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs). Studies of the EGFR-TKIs gefitinib, erlotinib, and afatinib, in comparison with platinum-based regimens, as first-line treatments in chemotherapy-naïve patients have shown that the EGFR-TKIs produce gains in progression-free survival and overall response rates, although only in patients whose tumors harbor activating mutations in the EGFR gene. Clinical trials have also shown EGFR-TKIs to be effective as second- and third-line therapies in advanced NSCLC. Here, we review the main aspects of EGFR pathway activation in NSCLC, underscore the importance of correctly identifying activating mutations in the EGFR gene, and discuss the main outcomes of EGFR-TKI treatment in NSCLC. PMID:26398757

  4. Functional and Structural Analysis of Five Mutations Identified in Methylmalonic Aciduria cbIB Type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge-Finnigan, Ana; Aguado, Cristina; Sánchez-Alcudia, Rocio; Abia, David; Richard, Eva; Merinero, Begoña; Gámez, Alejandra; Banerjee, Ruma; Desviat, Lourdes R.; Ugarte, Magdalena; Pérez, Belen

    2010-01-01

    ATP cob(I)alamin adenosyltransferase (ATR, E.C.2.5.1.17) converts reduced cob(I)alamin to the adenosylcobalamin cofactor. Mutations in the MMAB gene encoding ATR are responsible for the cblB type methylmalonic aciduria. Here we report the functional analysis of five cblB mutations to determine the underlying molecular basis of the dysfunction. The transcriptional profile along with minigenes analysis revealed that c.584G>A, c.349-1G>C and c.290G>A affect the splicing process. Wild-type ATR and the p.I96T (c.287T>C) and p.R191W (c.571C>T) mutant proteins were expressed in a prokaryote and a eukaryotic expression systems. The p.I96T protein was enzymatically active with a KM for ATP and KD for cob(I)alamin similar to wild-type enzyme, but exhibited a 40% reduction in specific activity. Both p.I96T and p.R191W mutant proteins are less stable than the wild-type protein, with increased stability when expressed under permissive folding conditions. Analysis of the oligomeric state of both mutants showed a structural defect for p.I96T and also a significant impact on the amount of recovered mutant protein that was more pronounced for p.R191W that, along with the structural analysis, suggest they might be misfolded. These results could serve as a basis for the implementation of pharmacological therapies aimed at increasing the residual activity of this type of mutations. PMID:20556797

  5. Identifying mutation regions for closely related individuals without a known pedigree

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Linkage analysis is the first step in the search for a disease gene. Linkage studies have facilitated the identification of several hundred human genes that can harbor mutations leading to a disease phenotype. In this paper, we study a very important case, where the sampled individuals are closely related, but the pedigree is not given. This situation happens very often when the individuals share a common ancestor 6 or more generations ago. To our knowledge, no algorithm can give good results for this case. Results To solve this problem, we first developed some heuristic algorithms for haplotype inference without any given pedigree. We propose a model using the parsimony principle that can be viewed as an extension of the model first proposed by Dan Gusfield. Our heuristic algorithm uses Clark’s inference rule to infer haplotype segments. Conclusions We ran our program both on the simulated data and a set of real data from the phase II HapMap database. Experiments show that our program performs well. The recall value is from 90% to 99% in various cases. This implies that the program can report more than 90% of the true mutation regions. The value of precision varies from 29% to 90%. When the precision is 29%, the size of the reported regions is three times that of the true mutation region. This is still very useful for narrowing down the range of the disease gene location. Our program can complete the computation for all the tested cases, where there are about 110,000 SNPs on a chromosome, within 20 seconds. PMID:22731852

  6. Genome-Wide Association Studies Identify Two Novel BMP15 Mutations Responsible for an Atypical Hyperprolificacy Phenotype in Sheep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demars, Julie; Fabre, Stéphane; Sarry, Julien; Rossetti, Raffaella; Gilbert, Hélène; Persani, Luca; Tosser-Klopp, Gwenola; Mulsant, Philippe; Nowak, Zuzanna; Drobik, Wioleta; Martyniuk, Elzbieta; Bodin, Loys

    2013-01-01

    Some sheep breeds are naturally prolific, and they are very informative for the studies of reproductive genetics and physiology. Major genes increasing litter size (LS) and ovulation rate (OR) were suspected in the French Grivette and the Polish Olkuska sheep populations, respectively. To identify genetic variants responsible for the highly prolific phenotype in these two breeds, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) followed by complementary genetic and functional analyses were performed. Highly prolific ewes (cases) and normal prolific ewes (controls) from each breed were genotyped using the Illumina OvineSNP50 Genotyping Beadchip. In both populations, an X chromosome region, close to the BMP15 gene, harbored clusters of markers with suggestive evidence of association at significance levels between 1E−05 and 1E−07. The BMP15 candidate gene was then sequenced, and two novel non-conservative mutations called FecXGr and FecXO were identified in the Grivette and Olkuska breeds, respectively. The two mutations were associated with the highly prolific phenotype (pFecXGr = 5.98E−06 and pFecXO = 2.55E−08). Homozygous ewes for the mutated allele showed a significantly increased prolificacy (FecXGr/FecXGr, LS = 2.50±0.65 versus FecX+/FecXGr, LS = 1.93±0.42, p<1E−03 and FecXO/FecXO, OR = 3.28±0.85 versus FecX+/FecXO, OR = 2.02±0.47, p<1E−03). Both mutations are located in very well conserved motifs of the protein and altered the BMP15 signaling activity in vitro using a BMP-responsive luciferase test in COV434 granulosa cells. Thus, we have identified two novel mutations in the BMP15 gene associated with increased LS and OR. Notably, homozygous FecXGr/FecXGr Grivette and homozygous FecXO/FecXO Olkuska ewes are hyperprolific in striking contrast with the sterility exhibited by all other known homozygous BMP15 mutations. Our results bring new insights into the key role played by the BMP15 protein in ovarian function and could

  7. A Mutation Identified in Neonatal Microcephaly Destabilizes Zika Virus NS1 Assembly in Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Deping; Chen, Cheng; Liu, Shengnan; Zhou, Han; Yang, Kailin; Zhao, Qi; Ji, Xiaoyun; Chen, Chen; Xie, Wei; Wang, Zefang; Mi, Li-Zhi; Yang, Haitao

    2017-01-01

    An unprecedented epidemic of Zika virus (ZIKV) infection had spread to South and Central America. ZIKV infection was recently confirmed by CDC (the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) to cause neonatal microcephaly, which posed a significant public health emergency of international concern. No specific vaccines or drugs are currently available to fight ZIKV infection. ZIKV nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) plays an essential role in viral replication and immune evasion. We determined the crystal structure of ZIKV NS1172–352, which forms a head-to-head, symmetric dimer with a unique 14-stranded β-ladder conserved among flaviviruses. The assembly of the β-ladder dimer is concentration dependent. Strikingly, one pathogenic mutation T233A (NCBI accession no. KU527068), found in the brain tissue of infected fetus with neonatal microcephaly, is located at the dimer interface. Thr233, a unique residue found in ZIKV but not in other flaviviruses, organizes a central hydrogen bonding network at NS1 dimer interface. Mutation of Thr233 to Ala disrupts this elaborated interaction network, and destabilizes the NS1 dimeric assembly in vitro. In addition, our structural comparison of epitopes for protective antibody 22NS1, targeting West Nile Virus NS1, could potentially be valuable in understanding its anti-virus specificities and in the development of antibodies against ZIKV. PMID:28198446

  8. A novel MYOC heterozygous mutation identified in a Chinese Uygur pedigree with primary open-angle glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Su-ping; Muhemaiti, Paerheti; Yin, Yan; Cheng, Hongbo; Di Ya, A; Keyimu, Maliyamu; Cao, Xu; Fan, Ning; Jiang, Liqiong; Yan, Naihong; Zhou, Xiaomin; Wang, Yun; Liu, Xuyang

    2012-01-01

    To characterize the clinical features of a Chinese Uygur pedigree with primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) and to identify mutations in two candidate genes, trabecular meshwork inducible glucocorticoid response (MYOC/TIGR) and human dioxin-inducible cytochrome P450 (CYP1B1). Twenty one members from a Chinese Uygur family of four generations were included in the study. All participants underwent complete ophthalmologic examinations. Five were diagnosed as POAG, four as glaucoma suspects, and the rest were asymptomatic. Molecular genetic analysis was performed on all subjects included in the study. All exons of CYP1B1 and MYOC were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), sequenced and compared with a reference database. The variations detected were evaluated in available family members as well as 102 normal controls. Possible changes in structure and function of the protein induced by amino acid variance were predicted by bioinformatics analysis. Elevated intraocular pressure and late-stage glaucomatous cupping of the optic disc were found in five patients of this family. A novel heterozygous missense mutation c.1151 A>G in exon 3 of MYOC was found in all five patients diagnosed as POAG and four glaucoma suspects, but not in the rest of the family members and 102 normal controls. This mutation caused an amino acid substitution of aspartic acid to glycine at position 384 (p. D384G) of the MYOC protein. This substitution may cause structural and functional changes of the protein based on bioinformatics analysis. No mutations were found in CYP1B1. Our study suggests that the novel mutation D384G of MYOC is likely responsible for the pathogenesis of POAG in this pedigree.

  9. A novel nonsense mutation in BBS4 gene identified in a Chinese family with Bardet-Biedl syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Qian; Zhang Yongpeng; Jia Liyun; Peng Xiaoyan

    2014-01-01

    Background Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is a genetically heterogeneous disease,and information about BBS in Chinese populations is very limited.The purpose of the present study was to determine the genetic cause of BBS in a Chinese Han family.Methods Clinical data were recorded for the 4-year-old female proband and the available family members.The proband was screened for mutation by Sanger sequencing for a total of 142 exons of the 12 BBS-causing genes (BBS1-BBS12).The variants detected in the proband were further confirmed in the other family members.Results We identified a novel homozygous nonsense mutation (c.70A>T,p.K24X) in the BBS4 gene exon 2 in the proband.Such mutant allele was predicted to cause a premature truncation in the N-terminal of the BBS4 protein,and probably induced the nonsense-mediated decay of BBS4 messenger RNAs.The proband's parents and brother were heterozygous for the nonsense mutant allele.It was absent in 50 Chinese control subjects.An additional rare heterozygous missense single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) named rs200718870 in BBS10 gene was also detected in the proband,her father and her brother.Some manifestations of the proband including atypical retinitis pigmentosa,choroidal sclerosis,high myopia,and early onset of obesity might be associated with this mutation in BBS4 gene.The proband's father also reported surgical removal of an extra finger during childhood.Conclusions The present study described a novel nonsense mutation in BBS4 gene in a Chinese family.This homozygous mutation was predicted to completely abolish the synthesis of the BBS4 protein.We also detected a rare heterozygous missense SNP in BBS10 gene in the family,but did not find sufficient evidence to support the triallelic inheritance.

  10. Six novel alleles identified in Italian hereditary fructose intolerance patients enlarge the mutation spectrum of the aldolase B gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Gabriella; Santamaria, Rita; Vitagliano, Luigi; Ieno, Luigi; Viola, Antonietta; Fiori, Laura; Parenti, Giancarlo; Zancan, Lucia; Zagari, Adriana; Salvatore, Francesco

    2004-12-01

    Hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) is a recessively inherited disorder of carbohydrate metabolism caused by impaired functioning of human liver aldolase (B isoform; ALDOB). To-date, 29 enzyme-impairing mutations have been identified in the aldolase B gene. Here we report six novel HFI single nucleotide changes identified by sequence analysis in the aldolase B gene. Three of these are missense mutations (g.6846T>C, g.10236G>T, g.10258T>C), one is a nonsense mutation (g.8187C>T) and two affect splicing sites (g.8180G>C and g.10196A>G). We have expressed in bacterial cells the recombinant proteins corresponding to the g.6846T>C (p.I74T), g.10236G>T (p.V222F), and g.10258T>C (p.L229P) natural mutants to study their effect on aldolase B function and structure. All the new variants were insoluble; molecular graphics data suggest this is due to impaired folding.

  11. Exome sequencing identifies compound heterozygous mutations in CYP4V2 in a pedigree with retinitis pigmentosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Wang

    Full Text Available Retinitis pigmentosa (RP is a heterogeneous group of progressive retinal degenerations characterized by pigmentation and atrophy in the mid-periphery of the retina. Twenty two subjects from a four-generation Chinese family with RP and thin cornea, congenital cataract and high myopia is reported in this study. All family members underwent complete ophthalmologic examinations. Patients of the family presented with bone spicule-shaped pigment deposits in retina, retinal vascular attenuation, retinal and choroidal dystrophy, as well as punctate opacity of the lens, reduced cornea thickness and high myopia. Peripheral venous blood was obtained from all patients and their family members for genetic analysis. After mutation analysis in a few known RP candidate genes, exome sequencing was used to analyze the exomes of 3 patients III2, III4, III6 and the unaffected mother II2. A total of 34,693 variations shared by 3 patients were subjected to several filtering steps against existing variation databases. Identified variations were verified in the rest family members by PCR and Sanger sequencing. Compound heterozygous c.802-8_810del17insGC and c.1091-2A>G mutations of the CYP4V2 gene, known as genetic defects for Bietti crystalline corneoretinal dystrophy, were identified as causative mutations for RP of this family.

  12. Erythrocyte Pyruvate Kinase Deficiency mutation identified in multiple breeds of domestic cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grahn Robert A

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Erythrocyte pyruvate kinase deficiency (PK deficiency is an inherited hemolytic anemia that has been documented in the Abyssinian and Somali breeds as well as random bred domestic shorthair cats. The disease results from mutations in PKLR, the gene encoding the regulatory glycolytic enzyme pyruvate kinase (PK. Multiple isozymes are produced by tissue-specific differential processing of PKLR mRNA. Perturbation of PK decreases erythrocyte longevity resulting in anemia. Additional signs include: severe lethargy, weakness, weight loss, jaundice, and abdominal enlargement. In domestic cats, PK deficiency has an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance with high variability in onset and severity of clinical symptoms. Results Sequence analysis of PKLR revealed an intron 5 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP at position 304 concordant with the disease phenotype in Abyssinian and Somali cats. Located 53 nucleotides upstream of the exon 6 splice site, cats with this SNP produce liver and blood processed mRNA with a 13 bp deletion at the 3’ end of exon 5. The frame-shift mutation creates a stop codon at amino acid position 248 in exon 6. The frequency of the intronic SNP in 14,179 American and European cats representing 38 breeds, 76 western random bred cats and 111 cats of unknown breed is 6.31% and 9.35% when restricted to the 15 groups carrying the concordant SNP. Conclusions PK testing is recommended for Bengals, Egyptian Maus, La Perms, Maine Coon cats, Norwegian Forest cats, Savannahs, Siberians, and Singapuras, in addition to Abyssinians and Somalis as well an any new breeds using the afore mentioned breeds in out crossing or development programs.

  13. A novel de novo BRCA2 mutation of paternal origin identified in a Spanish woman with early onset bilateral breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diez, Orland; Gutiérrez-Enríquez, Sara; Mediano, Carmen; Masas, Miriam; Saura, Cristina; Gadea, Neus; Balmaña, Judith

    2010-05-01

    Germ line mutations in either of the two major breast cancer predisposition genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, account for a significant proportion of hereditary breast/ovarian cancer. Identification of breast cancer patients carrying mutations in any of these genes is primarily based on a positive family history of breast/ovarian cancer or early onset of the disease. In the course of mutation screening of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in a hospital based series of patients with risk factors for hereditary breast/ovarian cancer, we identified a novel germ line mutation in the BRCA2 gene (c.51dupA) in a patient with early onset bilateral breast cancer and no family history of the disease. None of her parents carried the mutation, and paternity was confirmed. Subsequent molecular analysis demonstrated that the mutation was a novel de novo germ line mutation located in the paternal allele of the BRCA2 gene.

  14. Functional analysis of non-hotspot AKT1 mutants found in human breast cancers identifies novel driver mutations: implications for personalized medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Yi, Kyung H.; Axtmayer, Jossette; Gustin, John P.; Rajpurohit, Anandita; Lauring, Josh

    2012-01-01

    The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-kinase)-Akt-mTOR pathway is mutated at high frequency in human breast cancer, and this pathway is the focus of active drug discovery and clinical investigation. Trials of personalized cancer therapy seek to leverage knowledge of cancer gene mutations by using mutations to guide the choice of targeted therapies. At the same time, cancer genome sequencing studies are identifying low frequency variants of unknown significance in known cancer genes, as well ...

  15. Tri-allelic pattern of short tandem repeats identifies the murderer among identical twins and suggests an embryonic mutational origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-Feng; Yang, Ying; Zhang, Xiao-Nan; Quan, Xiao-Liang; Wu, Yuan-Ming

    2015-05-01

    Monozygotic twins can be co-identified by genotyping of short tandem repeats (STRs); however, for distinguishing them, STR genotyping is ineffective, especially in the case of murder. Here, a rarely occurring tri-allelic pattern in the vWA locus (16, 18, 19) was identified only in the DNA of one identical twin, which could help to exonerate the innocent twin in a murder charge. This mutation was defined as primary through genotyping of the family and could be detected in blood, buccal and semen samples from the individual; however, two alternative allele-balanced di-allelic patterns (16, 18 or 16, 19) were detected in hair root sheath cells. Such a kind of segregation indicates a one-step mutation occurs in cell mitosis, which is after embryonic zygote formation and during the early development of the individual after the division of the blastocyte. Sequencing revealed the insertion between the allele 18 and 19 is a repeat unit of TAGA/TCTA (plus/minus strand), which belongs to "AGAT/ATCT"-based core repeats identified from all tri-allelic pattern reports recorded in the STR base and a detailed model was proposed for STR repeat length variation caused by false priming during DNA synthesis. Our model illustrates the possible origination of allele-balanced and unbalanced tri-allelic pattern, clarifies that the genotypes of parent-child mismatches, aberrant di-allelic patterns, and type 1 or 2 tri-allelic patterns should be considered as independent, but interconnected forms of STR mutation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Translocation domain mutations affecting cellular toxicity identify the Clostridium difficile toxin B pore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhifen; Park, Minyoung; Tam, John; Auger, Anick; Beilhartz, Greg L; Lacy, D Borden; Melnyk, Roman A

    2014-03-11

    Disease associated with Clostridium difficile infection is caused by the actions of the homologous toxins TcdA and TcdB on colonic epithelial cells. Binding to target cells triggers toxin internalization into acidified vesicles, whereupon cryptic segments from within the 1,050-aa translocation domain unfurl and insert into the bounding membrane, creating a transmembrane passageway to the cytosol. Our current understanding of the mechanisms underlying pore formation and the subsequent translocation of the upstream cytotoxic domain to the cytosol is limited by the lack of information available regarding the identity and architecture of the transmembrane pore. Here, through systematic perturbation of conserved sites within predicted membrane-insertion elements of the translocation domain, we uncovered highly sensitive residues--clustered between amino acids 1,035 and 1,107--that when individually mutated, reduced cellular toxicity by as much as >1,000-fold. We demonstrate that defective variants are defined by impaired pore formation in planar lipid bilayers and biological membranes, resulting in an inability to intoxicate cells through either apoptotic or necrotic pathways. These findings along with the unexpected similarities uncovered between the pore-forming "hotspots" of TcdB and the well-characterized α-helical diphtheria toxin translocation domain provide insights into the structure and mechanism of formation of the translocation pore for this important class of pathogenic toxins.

  17. ENU mutagenesis identifies mice with morbid obesity and severe hyperinsulinemia caused by a novel mutation in leptin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Jee Hong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Obesity is a multifactorial disease that arises from complex interactions between genetic predisposition and environmental factors. Leptin is central to the regulation of energy metabolism and control of body weight in mammals. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To better recapitulate the complexity of human obesity syndrome, we applied N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU mutagenesis in combination with a set of metabolic assays in screening mice for obesity. Mapping revealed linkage to the chromosome 6 within a region containing mouse Leptin gene. Sequencing on the candidate genes identified a novel T-to-A mutation in the third exon of Leptin gene, which translates to a V145E amino acid exchange in the leptin propeptide. Homozygous Leptin(145E/145E mutant mice exhibited morbid obesity, accompanied by adipose hypertrophy, energy imbalance, and liver steatosis. This was further associated with severe insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia, dyslipidemia, and hyperleptinemia, characteristics of human obesity syndrome. Hypothalamic leptin actions in inhibition of orexigenic peptides NPY and AgRP and induction of SOCS1 and SOCS3 were attenuated in Leptin(145E/145E mice. Administration of exogenous wild-type leptin attenuated hyperphagia and body weight increase in Leptin(145E/145E mice. However, mutant V145E leptin coimmunoprecipitated with leptin receptor, suggesting that the V145E mutation does not affect the binding of leptin to its receptor. Molecular modeling predicted that the mutated residue would form hydrogen bond with the adjacent residues, potentially affecting the structure and formation of an active complex with leptin receptor within that region. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Thus, our evolutionary, structural, and in vivo metabolic information suggests the residue 145 as of special function significance. The mouse model harboring leptin V145E mutation will provide new information on the current understanding of leptin biology and novel mouse

  18. Whole-exome sequencing identifies LRIT3 mutations as a cause of autosomal-recessive complete congenital stationary night blindness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeitz, Christina; Jacobson, Samuel G; Hamel, Christian P; Bujakowska, Kinga; Neuillé, Marion; Orhan, Elise; Zanlonghi, Xavier; Lancelot, Marie-Elise; Michiels, Christelle; Schwartz, Sharon B; Bocquet, Béatrice; Antonio, Aline; Audier, Claire; Letexier, Mélanie; Saraiva, Jean-Paul; Luu, Tien D; Sennlaub, Florian; Nguyen, Hoan; Poch, Olivier; Dollfus, Hélène; Lecompte, Odile; Kohl, Susanne; Sahel, José-Alain; Bhattacharya, Shomi S; Audo, Isabelle

    2013-01-10

    Congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous retinal disorder. Two forms can be distinguished clinically: complete CSNB (cCSNB) and incomplete CSNB. Individuals with cCSNB have visual impairment under low-light conditions and show a characteristic electroretinogram (ERG). The b-wave amplitude is severely reduced in the dark-adapted state of the ERG, representing abnormal function of ON bipolar cells. Furthermore, individuals with cCSNB can show other ocular features such as nystagmus, myopia, and strabismus and can have reduced visual acuity and abnormalities of the cone ERG waveform. The mode of inheritance of this form can be X-linked or autosomal recessive, and the dysfunction of four genes (NYX, GRM6, TRPM1, and GPR179) has been described so far. Whole-exome sequencing in one simplex cCSNB case lacking mutations in the known genes led to the identification of a missense mutation (c.983G>A [p.Cys328Tyr]) and a nonsense mutation (c.1318C>T [p.Arg440(∗)]) in LRIT3, encoding leucine-rich-repeat (LRR), immunoglobulin-like, and transmembrane-domain 3 (LRIT3). Subsequent Sanger sequencing of 89 individuals with CSNB identified another cCSNB case harboring a nonsense mutation (c.1151C>G [p.Ser384(∗)]) and a deletion predicted to lead to a premature stop codon (c.1538_1539del [p.Ser513Cysfs(∗)59]) in the same gene. Human LRIT3 antibody staining revealed in the outer plexiform layer of the human retina a punctate-labeling pattern resembling the dendritic tips of bipolar cells; similar patterns have been observed for other proteins implicated in cCSNB. The exact role of this LRR protein in cCSNB remains to be elucidated.

  19. An innovative strategy for the molecular diagnosis of Usher syndrome identifies causal biallelic mutations in 93% of European patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnet, Crystel; Riahi, Zied; Chantot-Bastaraud, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    of vestibular dysfunction, and the age of onset of the retinitis pigmentosa. A total of 10 causal genes, 6 for USH1, 3 for USH2, and 1 for USH3, and an USH2 modifier gene, have been identified. A robust molecular diagnosis is required not only to improve genetic counseling, but also to advance gene therapy.......5% mutation characterization rate, the diagnosis efficiency was substantially improved compared with previously reported methods.European Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, 27 July 2016; doi:10.1038/ejhg.2016.99....

  20. Efficient Culture Adaptation of Hepatitis C Virus Recombinants with Genotype-Specific Core-NS2 by Using Previously Identified Mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheel, Troels Kasper Høyer; Gottwein, Judith M; Carlsen, Thomas H R

    2011-01-01

    ) but not to ED43 (4a). The mutations permitting robust virus production in Huh7.5 cells had no apparent effect on viral replication but allowed efficient assembly of intracellular infectious HCV for adapted novel or previously developed recombinants. In conclusion, previously identified mutations permitted...

  1. An innovative strategy for the molecular diagnosis of Usher syndrome identifies causal biallelic mutations in 93% of European patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, Crystel; Riahi, Zied; Chantot-Bastaraud, Sandra; Smagghe, Luce; Letexier, Mélanie; Marcaillou, Charles; Lefèvre, Gaëlle M; Hardelin, Jean-Pierre; El-Amraoui, Aziz; Singh-Estivalet, Amrit; Mohand-Saïd, Saddek; Kohl, Susanne; Kurtenbach, Anne; Sliesoraityte, Ieva; Zobor, Ditta; Gherbi, Souad; Testa, Francesco; Simonelli, Francesca; Banfi, Sandro; Fakin, Ana; Glavač, Damjan; Jarc-Vidmar, Martina; Zupan, Andrej; Battelino, Saba; Martorell Sampol, Loreto; Claveria, Maria Antonia; Catala Mora, Jaume; Dad, Shzeena; Møller, Lisbeth B; Rodriguez Jorge, Jesus; Hawlina, Marko; Auricchio, Alberto; Sahel, José-Alain; Marlin, Sandrine; Zrenner, Eberhart; Audo, Isabelle; Petit, Christine

    2016-12-01

    Usher syndrome (USH), the most prevalent cause of hereditary deafness-blindness, is an autosomal recessive and genetically heterogeneous disorder. Three clinical subtypes (USH1-3) are distinguishable based on the severity of the sensorineural hearing impairment, the presence or absence of vestibular dysfunction, and the age of onset of the retinitis pigmentosa. A total of 10 causal genes, 6 for USH1, 3 for USH2, and 1 for USH3, and an USH2 modifier gene, have been identified. A robust molecular diagnosis is required not only to improve genetic counseling, but also to advance gene therapy in USH patients. Here, we present an improved diagnostic strategy that is both cost- and time-effective. It relies on the sequential use of three different techniques to analyze selected genomic regions: targeted exome sequencing, comparative genome hybridization, and quantitative exon amplification. We screened a large cohort of 427 patients (139 USH1, 282 USH2, and six of undefined clinical subtype) from various European medical centers for mutations in all USH genes and the modifier gene. We identified a total of 421 different sequence variants predicted to be pathogenic, about half of which had not been previously reported. Remarkably, we detected large genomic rearrangements, most of which were novel and unique, in 9% of the patients. Thus, our strategy led to the identification of biallelic and monoallelic mutations in 92.7% and 5.8% of the USH patients, respectively. With an overall 98.5% mutation characterization rate, the diagnosis efficiency was substantially improved compared with previously reported methods.

  2. Targeted resequencing in epileptic encephalopathies identifies de novo mutations in CHD2 and SYNGAP1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carvill, Gemma L; Heavin, Sinéad B; Yendle, Simone C

    2013-01-01

    Epileptic encephalopathies are a devastating group of epilepsies with poor prognosis, of which the majority are of unknown etiology. We perform targeted massively parallel resequencing of 19 known and 46 candidate genes for epileptic encephalopathy in 500 affected individuals (cases) to identify ...

  3. Genome-wide profiling identifies a DNA methylation signature that associates with TET2 mutations in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmar, Fazila; Punj, Vasu; Christensen, Jesper Aagaard;

    2013-01-01

    The discovery that the Ten-Eleven Translocation (TET) hydroxylases cause DNA demethylation has fundamentally changed the notion of how DNA methylation is regulated. Clonal analysis of the hematopoetic stem cell compartment suggests that TET2 mutations can be early events in hematologic cancers......% carrying loss-of-function and 5% carrying missense mutations. Genome-wide methylation profiling using 450K Illumina arrays identified 315 differentially methylated genes between TET2 mutated and TET2 wild-type cases. TET2 mutations are primarily associated with hypermethylation within CpG islands (70%; P...

  4. Whole Exome Screening Identifies Novel and Recurrent WISP3 Mutations Causing Progressive Pseudorheumatoid Dysplasia in Jammu and Kashmir-India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Ekta; Mahajan, Ankit; Kumar, Parvinder; Angural, Arshia; Dhar, Manoj K; Razdan, Sushil; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy; Wise, Carol A; Ikegawa, Shiro; Pandita, Kamal Kishore; Sharma, Swarkar

    2016-01-01

    We report identification and genetic characterization of a rare skeletal disorder that remained unidentified for decades in a village of Jammu and Kashmir, India. The population residing in this region is highly consanguineous and a lack of understanding of the disorder has hindered clinical management and genetic counseling for the many affected individuals in the region. We collected familial information and identified two large extended multiplex pedigrees displaying apparent autosomal recessive inheritance of an uncharacterized skeletal dysplasia. Whole exome sequencing (WES) in members of one pedigree revealed a rare mutation in WISP3:c.156C > A (NP_003871.1:p.Cys52Ter), that perfectly segregated with the disease in the family. To our surprise, Sanger sequencing the WISP3 gene in the second family identified a distinct, novel splice site mutation c.643 + 1G > A, that perfectly segregated with the disease. Combining our next generation sequencing data with careful clinical documentation (familial histories, genetic data, clinical and radiological findings), we have diagnosed the families with Progressive Pseudorheumatoid Dysplasia (PPD). Our results underscore the utility of WES in arriving at definitive diagnoses for rare skeletal dysplasias. This genetic characterization will aid in genetic counseling and management, critically required to curb this rare disorder in the families.

  5. An extended set of yeast-based functional assays accurately identifies human disease mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Song; Yang, Fan; Tan, Guihong; Costanzo, Michael; Oughtred, Rose; Hirschman, Jodi; Theesfeld, Chandra L.; Bansal, Pritpal; Sahni, Nidhi; Yi, Song; Yu, Analyn; Tyagi, Tanya; Tie, Cathy; Hill, David E.; Vidal, Marc; Andrews, Brenda J.; Boone, Charles; Dolinski, Kara; Roth, Frederick P.

    2016-01-01

    We can now routinely identify coding variants within individual human genomes. A pressing challenge is to determine which variants disrupt the function of disease-associated genes. Both experimental and computational methods exist to predict pathogenicity of human genetic variation. However, a systematic performance comparison between them has been lacking. Therefore, we developed and exploited a panel of 26 yeast-based functional complementation assays to measure the impact of 179 variants (101 disease- and 78 non-disease-associated variants) from 22 human disease genes. Using the resulting reference standard, we show that experimental functional assays in a 1-billion-year diverged model organism can identify pathogenic alleles with significantly higher precision and specificity than current computational methods. PMID:26975778

  6. Mutational analysis of βCOP (Sec26p identifies an appendage domain critical for function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cerione Richard A

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The appendage domain of the γCOP subunit of the COPI vesicle coat bears a striking structural resemblance to adaptin-family appendages despite limited primary sequence homology. Both the γCOP appendage domain and an equivalent region on βCOP contain the FxxxW motif; the conservation of this motif suggested the existence of a functional appendage domain in βCOP. Results Sequence comparisons in combination with structural prediction tools show that the fold of the COOH-terminus of Sec26p is strongly predicted to closely mimic that of adaptin-family appendages. Deletion of the appendage domain of Sec26p results in inviability in yeast, over-expression of the deletion construct is dominant negative and mutagenesis of this region identifies residues critical for function. The ArfGAP Glo3p was identified via suppression screening as a potential downstream modulator of Sec26p in a manner that is independent of the GAP activity of Glo3p but requires the presence of the COOH-terminal ISS motifs. Conclusion Together, these results indicate an essential function for the predicted βCOP appendage and suggest that both COPI appendages perform a biologically active regulatory role with a structure related to adaptin-family appendage domains.

  7. A novel high-throughput in vivo molecular screen for shade avoidance mutants identifies a novel phyA mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuewen; Roig-Villanova, Irma; Khan, Safina; Shanahan, Hugh; Quail, Peter H; Martinez-Garcia, Jaime F; Devlin, Paul F

    2011-05-01

    The shade avoidance syndrome (SAS) allows plants to anticipate and avoid shading by neighbouring plants by initiating an elongation growth response. The phytochrome photoreceptors are able to detect a reduction in the red:far red ratio in incident light, the result of selective absorption of red and blue wavelengths by proximal vegetation. A shade-responsive luciferase reporter line (PHYB::LUC) was used to carry out a high-throughput screen to identify novel SAS mutants. The dracula 1 (dra1) mutant, that showed no avoidance of shade for the PHYB::LUC response, was the result of a mutation in the PHYA gene. Like previously characterized phyA mutants, dra1 showed a long hypocotyl in far red light and an enhanced hypocotyl elongation response to shade. However, dra1 additionally showed a long hypocotyl in red light. Since phyB levels are relatively unaffected in dra1, this gain-of-function red light phenotype strongly suggests a disruption of phyB signalling. The dra1 mutation, G773E within the phyA PAS2 domain, occurs at a residue absolutely conserved among phyA sequences. The equivalent residue in phyB is absolutely conserved as a threonine. PAS domains are structurally conserved domains involved in molecular interaction. Structural modelling of the dra1 mutation within the phyA PAS2 domain shows some similarity with the structure of the phyB PAS2 domain, suggesting that the interference with phyB signalling may be the result of non-functional mimicry. Hence, it was hypothesized that this PAS2 residue forms a key distinction between the phyA and phyB phytochrome species.

  8. Evolutionary Analysis Predicts Sensitive Positions of MMP20 and Validates Newly- and Previously-Identified MMP20 Mutations Causing Amelogenesis Imperfecta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Gasse

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI designates a group of genetic diseases characterized by a large range of enamel disorders causing important social and health problems. These defects can result from mutations in enamel matrix proteins or protease encoding genes. A range of mutations in the enamel cleavage enzyme matrix metalloproteinase-20 gene (MMP20 produce enamel defects of varying severity. To address how various alterations produce a range of AI phenotypes, we performed a targeted analysis to find MMP20 mutations in French patients diagnosed with non-syndromic AI. Genomic DNA was isolated from saliva and MMP20 exons and exon-intron boundaries sequenced. We identified several homozygous or heterozygous mutations, putatively involved in the AI phenotypes. To validate missense mutations and predict sensitive positions in the MMP20 sequence, we evolutionarily compared 75 sequences extracted from the public databases using the Datamonkey webserver. These sequences were representative of mammalian lineages, covering more than 150 million years of evolution. This analysis allowed us to find 324 sensitive positions (out of the 483 MMP20 residues, pinpoint functionally important domains, and build an evolutionary chart of important conserved MMP20 regions. This is an efficient tool to identify new- and previously-identified mutations. We thus identified six functional MMP20 mutations in unrelated families, finding two novel mutated sites. The genotypes and phenotypes of these six mutations are described and compared. To date, 13 MMP20 mutations causing AI have been reported, making these genotypes and associated hypomature enamel phenotypes the most frequent in AI.

  9. Mutational analysis of the yeast TRAPP subunit Trs20p identifies roles in endocytic recycling and sporulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hichem Mahfouz

    Full Text Available Trs20p is a subunit of the evolutionarily conserved TRAPP (TRAnsport Protein Particle complex that mediates various aspects of membrane trafficking. Three TRAPP complexes have been identified in yeast with roles in ER-to-Golgi trafficking, post-Golgi and endosomal-to-Golgi transport and in autophagy. The role of Trs20p, which is essential for viability and a component of all three complexes, and how it might function within each TRAPP complex, has not been clarified to date. To begin to address the role of Trs20p we generated different mutants by random mutagenesis but, surprisingly, no defects were observed in diverse anterograde transport pathways or general secretion in Trs20 temperature-sensitive mutants. Instead, mutation of Trs20 led to defects in endocytic recycling and a block in sporulation/meiosis. The phenotypes of different mutants appear to be separable suggesting that the mutations affect the function of Trs20 in different TRAPP complexes.

  10. Whole exome sequencing in congenital pain insensitivity identifies a novel causative intronic NTRK1-mutation due to uniparental disomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurth, Ingo; Baumgartner, Manuela; Schabhüttl, Maria; Tomni, Cecilia; Windhager, Reinhard; Strom, Tim M; Wieland, Thomas; Gremel, Kurt; Auer-Grumbach, Michaela

    2016-09-01

    Congenital insensitivity to pain and anhidrosis (CIPA), also known as hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy type IV (HSAN IV), is characterized by recurrent episodes of unexplained high fever, loss of pain perception and temperature sensation, absent sweating, repeated traumatic and thermal injuries, and mild mental retardation. After exclusion of obviously pathogenic mutations in NTRK1, the most common cause of CIPA, whole exome sequencing (WES) was carried out in a CIPA patient with unrelated parents. No mutations in known HSAN genes were identified. However, filtering for genes carrying two rare sequence variations detected 13 homozygous single nucleotide variants (SNV), all being located on chromosome 1. Further analysis strongly suggested that this finding might be best explained by uniparental disomy of chromosome 1. Because NTRK1 is also located on chromosome 1, we re-evaluated WES data and detected a novel intronic sequence variation at position c.2188-12 C>A, homozygously because of uniparental disomy. Subsequent analysis of NTRK1 transcripts in peripheral blood cells of the patient revealed an influence of the variant on mRNA splicing. The C>A transversion generated a novel splice-site, which led to the incorporation of 10 intronic bases into the NTRK1 mRNA and consequently to a non-functional gene product. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Whole exome sequencing identifies de novo heterozygous CAV1 mutations associated with a novel neonatal onset lipodystrophy syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Abhimanyu; Kircher, Martin; Del Campo, Miguel; Amato, R Stephen; Agarwal, Anil K

    2015-08-01

    Despite remarkable progress in identifying causal genes for many types of genetic lipodystrophies in the last decade, the molecular basis of many extremely rare lipodystrophy patients with distinctive phenotypes remains unclear. We conducted whole exome sequencing of the parents and probands from six pedigrees with neonatal onset of generalized loss of subcutaneous fat with additional distinctive phenotypic features and report de novo heterozygous null mutations, c.424C>T (p.Q142*) and c.479_480delTT (p.F160*), in CAV1 in a 7-year-old male and a 3-year-old female of European origin, respectively. Both the patients had generalized fat loss, thin mottled skin and progeroid features at birth. The male patient had cataracts requiring extraction at age 30 months and the female patient had pulmonary arterial hypertension. Dermal fibroblasts of the female patient revealed negligible CAV1 immunofluorescence staining compared to control but there were no differences in the number and morphology of caveolae upon electron microscopy examination. Based upon the similarities in the clinical features of these two patients, previous reports of CAV1 mutations in patients with lipodystrophies and pulmonary hypertension, and similar features seen in CAV1 null mice, we conclude that these variants are the most likely cause of one subtype of neonatal onset generalized lipodystrophy syndrome.

  12. Fine-Scale Mapping at 9p22.2 Identifies Candidate Causal Variants That Modify Ovarian Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigorito, Elena; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Beesley, Jonathan; Adlard, Julian; Agnarsson, Bjarni A; Andrulis, Irene L; Arun, Banu K; Barjhoux, Laure; Belotti, Muriel; Benitez, Javier; Berger, Andreas; Bojesen, Anders; Bonanni, Bernardo; Brewer, Carole; Caldes, Trinidad; Caligo, Maria A; Campbell, Ian; Chan, Salina B; Claes, Kathleen B M; Cohn, David E; Cook, Jackie; Daly, Mary B; Damiola, Francesca; Davidson, Rosemarie; Pauw, Antoine de; Delnatte, Capucine; Diez, Orland; Domchek, Susan M; Dumont, Martine; Durda, Katarzyna; Dworniczak, Bernd; Easton, Douglas F; Eccles, Diana; Edwinsdotter Ardnor, Christina; Eeles, Ros; Ejlertsen, Bent; Ellis, Steve; Evans, D Gareth; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Fostira, Florentia; Foulkes, William D; Friedman, Eitan; Frost, Debra; Gaddam, Pragna; Ganz, Patricia A; Garber, Judy; Garcia-Barberan, Vanesa; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Gehrig, Andrea; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Giraud, Sophie; Godwin, Andrew K; Goldgar, David E; Hake, Christopher R; Hansen, Thomas V O; Healey, Sue; Hodgson, Shirley; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Houdayer, Claude; Hulick, Peter J; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Isaacs, Claudine; Izatt, Louise; Izquierdo, Angel; Jacobs, Lauren; Jakubowska, Anna; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Jensen, Uffe Birk; John, Esther M; Vijai, Joseph; Karlan, Beth Y; Kast, Karin; Investigators, KConFab; Khan, Sofia; Kwong, Ava; Laitman, Yael; Lester, Jenny; Lesueur, Fabienne; Liljegren, Annelie; Lubinski, Jan; Mai, Phuong L; Manoukian, Siranoush; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Meindl, Alfons; Mensenkamp, Arjen R; Montagna, Marco; Nathanson, Katherine L; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Niederacher, Dieter; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Ong, Kai-Ren; Osorio, Ana; Park, Sue Kyung; Paulsson-Karlsson, Ylva; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Peissel, Bernard; Peterlongo, Paolo; Pfeiler, Georg; Phelan, Catherine M; Piedmonte, Marion; Poppe, Bruce; Pujana, Miquel Angel; Radice, Paolo; Rennert, Gad; Rodriguez, Gustavo C; Rookus, Matti A; Ross, Eric A; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Simard, Jacques; Singer, Christian F; Slavin, Thomas P; Soucy, Penny; Southey, Melissa; Steinemann, Doris; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Sutter, Christian; Szabo, Csilla I; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Teixeira, Manuel R; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Mary Beth; Thomassen, Mads; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Tihomirova, Laima; Tognazzo, Silvia; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Varesco, Liliana; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Vratimos, Athanassios; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; McGuffog, Lesley; Kirk, Judy; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Hamann, Ute; Lindor, Noralane; Ramus, Susan J; Greene, Mark H; Couch, Fergus J; Offit, Kenneth; Pharoah, Paul D P; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C

    2016-01-01

    Population-based genome wide association studies have identified a locus at 9p22.2 associated with ovarian cancer risk, which also modifies ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. We conducted fine-scale mapping at 9p22.2 to identify potential causal variants in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Genotype data were available for 15,252 (2,462 ovarian cancer cases) BRCA1 and 8,211 (631 ovarian cancer cases) BRCA2 mutation carriers. Following genotype imputation, ovarian cancer associations were assessed for 4,873 and 5,020 SNPs in BRCA1 and BRCA 2 mutation carriers respectively, within a retrospective cohort analytical framework. In BRCA1 mutation carriers one set of eight correlated candidate causal variants for ovarian cancer risk modification was identified (top SNP rs10124837, HR: 0.73, 95%CI: 0.68 to 0.79, p-value 2× 10-16). These variants were located up to 20 kb upstream of BNC2. In BRCA2 mutation carriers one region, up to 45 kb upstream of BNC2, and containing 100 correlated SNPs was identified as candidate causal (top SNP rs62543585, HR: 0.69, 95%CI: 0.59 to 0.80, p-value 1.0 × 10-6). The candidate causal in BRCA1 mutation carriers did not include the strongest associated variant at this locus in the general population. In sum, we identified a set of candidate causal variants in a region that encompasses the BNC2 transcription start site. The ovarian cancer association at 9p22.2 may be mediated by different variants in BRCA1 mutation carriers and in the general population. Thus, potentially different mechanisms may underlie ovarian cancer risk for mutation carriers and the general population.

  13. Fine-Scale Mapping at 9p22.2 Identifies Candidate Causal Variants That Modify Ovarian Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigorito, Elena; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Beesley, Jonathan; Adlard, Julian; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Arun, Banu K.; Barjhoux, Laure; Belotti, Muriel; Benitez, Javier; Berger, Andreas; Bojesen, Anders; Bonanni, Bernardo; Brewer, Carole; Caldes, Trinidad; Caligo, Maria A.; Campbell, Ian; Chan, Salina B.; Claes, Kathleen B. M.; Cohn, David E.; Cook, Jackie; Daly, Mary B.; Damiola, Francesca; Davidson, Rosemarie; de Pauw, Antoine; Delnatte, Capucine; Diez, Orland; Domchek, Susan M.; Dumont, Martine; Durda, Katarzyna; Dworniczak, Bernd; Easton, Douglas F.; Eccles, Diana; Edwinsdotter Ardnor, Christina; Eeles, Ros; Ejlertsen, Bent; Ellis, Steve; Evans, D. Gareth; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Fostira, Florentia; Foulkes, William D.; Friedman, Eitan; Frost, Debra; Gaddam, Pragna; Ganz, Patricia A.; Garber, Judy; Garcia-Barberan, Vanesa; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Gehrig, Andrea; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Giraud, Sophie; Godwin, Andrew K.; Goldgar, David E.; Hake, Christopher R.; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Healey, Sue; Hodgson, Shirley; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Houdayer, Claude; Hulick, Peter J.; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Isaacs, Claudine; Izatt, Louise; Izquierdo, Angel; Jacobs, Lauren; Jakubowska, Anna; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Jensen, Uffe Birk; John, Esther M.; Vijai, Joseph; Karlan, Beth Y.; Kast, Karin; Investigators, KConFab; Khan, Sofia; Kwong, Ava; Laitman, Yael; Lester, Jenny; Lesueur, Fabienne; Liljegren, Annelie; Lubinski, Jan; Mai, Phuong L.; Manoukian, Siranoush; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Meindl, Alfons; Mensenkamp, Arjen R.; Montagna, Marco; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Niederacher, Dieter; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Ong, Kai-ren; Osorio, Ana; Park, Sue Kyung; Paulsson-Karlsson, Ylva; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Peissel, Bernard; Peterlongo, Paolo; Pfeiler, Georg; Phelan, Catherine M.; Piedmonte, Marion; Poppe, Bruce; Pujana, Miquel Angel; Radice, Paolo; Rennert, Gad; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Rookus, Matti A.; Ross, Eric A.; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Simard, Jacques; Singer, Christian F.; Slavin, Thomas P.; Soucy, Penny; Southey, Melissa; Steinemann, Doris; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Sutter, Christian; Szabo, Csilla I.; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Mary Beth; Thomassen, Mads; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Tihomirova, Laima; Tognazzo, Silvia; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Varesco, Liliana; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Vratimos, Athanassios; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; McGuffog, Lesley; Kirk, Judy; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Hamann, Ute; Lindor, Noralane; Ramus, Susan J.; Greene, Mark H.; Couch, Fergus J.; Offit, Kenneth; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C.

    2016-01-01

    Population-based genome wide association studies have identified a locus at 9p22.2 associated with ovarian cancer risk, which also modifies ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. We conducted fine-scale mapping at 9p22.2 to identify potential causal variants in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Genotype data were available for 15,252 (2,462 ovarian cancer cases) BRCA1 and 8,211 (631 ovarian cancer cases) BRCA2 mutation carriers. Following genotype imputation, ovarian cancer associations were assessed for 4,873 and 5,020 SNPs in BRCA1 and BRCA 2 mutation carriers respectively, within a retrospective cohort analytical framework. In BRCA1 mutation carriers one set of eight correlated candidate causal variants for ovarian cancer risk modification was identified (top SNP rs10124837, HR: 0.73, 95%CI: 0.68 to 0.79, p-value 2× 10−16). These variants were located up to 20 kb upstream of BNC2. In BRCA2 mutation carriers one region, up to 45 kb upstream of BNC2, and containing 100 correlated SNPs was identified as candidate causal (top SNP rs62543585, HR: 0.69, 95%CI: 0.59 to 0.80, p-value 1.0 × 10−6). The candidate causal in BRCA1 mutation carriers did not include the strongest associated variant at this locus in the general population. In sum, we identified a set of candidate causal variants in a region that encompasses the BNC2 transcription start site. The ovarian cancer association at 9p22.2 may be mediated by different variants in BRCA1 mutation carriers and in the general population. Thus, potentially different mechanisms may underlie ovarian cancer risk for mutation carriers and the general population. PMID:27463617

  14. Clinical features andMUT gene mutation spectrum in Chinese patients with isolated methylmalonic acidemia:identifi cation of ten novel allelic variants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lian-Shu Han; Zhuo Huang; Feng Han; Jun Ye; Wen-Juan Qiu; Hui-Wen Zhang; Yu Wang; Zhu-Wen Gong; Xue-Fan Gu

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study aims to studyMUT gene mutation spectrum in Chinese patients with isolated methylmalonic academia (MMA) and their clinical features for the potential genotype-phenotype correlation. Methods: Forty-three patients were diagnosed with isolated MMA by elevated blood propionylcarnitine, propionylcarnitine to acetylcarnitine ratio, and urine methylmalonate without hyperhomocysteinemia. The MUT gene was amplifi ed by polymerase chain reaction and directly sequenced. Those patients with at least one variant allele were included. The novel missense mutations were assessed by bioinformatic analysis and screened against alleles sequenced from 50 control participants. Results: Among the 43 patients, 38 had typical clinical presentations, and the majority (30/38) experienced early-onset MMA. Eight patients died and seven were lost to follow-up. Twenty patients had poor outcomes and eight showed normal development. The 43 identifi edMUT gene mutations had at least one variant allele, whereas 35 had two mutant alleles. Of the 33 mutations reported before, eight recurrent mutations were identified in 32 patients, and c.729_730insTT (p.D244Lfs*39) was the most common (12/78) in the mutant alleles. Of the 10 novel mutations, six were missense mutations and four were premature termination codon mutations. The six novel missense mutations seemed to be pathogenic. Conclusions: A total of 10 novelMUT mutations were detected in the Chinese population. c.729_730insTT (p.D244Lfs*39) was the most frequent mutation. A genotype-phenotype correlation could not be found, but the genotypic characterization indicated the need of genetic counseling for MMA patients and early prenatal diagnoses for high-risk families.

  15. New mutation of the desmin gene identified in an extended Indian pedigree presenting with distal myopathy and cardiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atchayaram Nalini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this report, we describe a new mutation located in the coiled 1B domain of desmin and associated with a predominant cardiac involvement and a high degree of cardiac sudden death in a large Indian pedigree with 12 affected members. The index cases was 38-year-old man who presented with progressive difficulty in gripping footwear of 5 years duration with the onset in the left lower limb followed by right lower limb in 6 months. 3 years from onset, he developed lower limb proximal and truncal muscle weakness. There was mild atrophy of the shoulder girdle muscles with grade 3 weakness, moderate wasting of thigh and anterior leg muscles with proximal muscle weakness and foot drop. At 40 years, he had a pacemaker implanted. The 9 exons and intronic boundaries of the desmin gene were sequenced and a heterozygous nucleotide change c. 734A > G in exon 3 was identified.

  16. Recessive RYR1 mutations in a patient with severe congenital nemaline myopathy with ophthalomoplegia identified through massively parallel sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Eri; Nishimura, Takafumi; Kosho, Tomoki; Inaba, Yuji; Mitsuhashi, Satomi; Ishida, Takefumi; Baba, Atsushi; Koike, Kenichi; Nishino, Ichizo; Nonaka, Ikuya; Furukawa, Toru; Saito, Kayoko

    2012-04-01

    Nemaline myopathy (NM) is a group of congenital myopathies, characterized by the presence of distinct rod-like inclusions "nemaline bodies" in the sarcoplasm of skeletal muscle fibers. To date, ACTA1, NEB, TPM3, TPM2, TNNT1, and CFL2 have been found to cause NM. We have identified recessive RYR1 mutations in a patient with severe congenital NM, through high-throughput screening of congenital myopathy/muscular dystrophy-related genes using massively parallel sequencing with target gene capture. The patient manifested fetal akinesia, neonatal severe hypotonia with muscle weakness, respiratory insufficiency, swallowing disturbance, and ophthalomoplegia. Skeletal muscle histology demonstrated nemaline bodies and small type 1 fibers, but without central cores or minicores. Congenital myopathies, a molecularly, histopathologically, and clinically heterogeneous group of disorders are considered to be a good candidate for massively parallel sequencing. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Novel cases of D-2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria with IDH1 or IDH2 mosaic mutations identified by amplicon deep sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nota, Benjamin; Hamilton, Eline M; Sie, Daoud

    2013-01-01

    Mosaic IDH1 mutations are described as the cause of metaphyseal chondromatosis with increased urinary excretion of D-2-hydroxyglutarate (MC-HGA), and mutations in IDH2 as the cause of D-2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria (D-2HGA) type II. Mosaicism for IDH2 mutations has not previously been reported as a...

  18. Massively Parallel Sequencing of a Chinese Family with DFNA9 Identified a Novel Missense Mutation in the LCCL Domain of COCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Gu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available DFNA9 is a late-onset, progressive, autosomal dominantly inherited sensorineural hearing loss with vestibular dysfunction, which is caused by mutations in the COCH (coagulation factor C homology gene. In this study, we investigated a Chinese family segregating autosomal dominant nonsyndromic sensorineural hearing loss. We identified a missense mutation c.T275A p.V92D in the LCCL domain of COCH cosegregating with the disease and absent in 100 normal hearing controls. This mutation leads to substitution of the hydrophobic valine to an acidic amino acid aspartic acid. Our data enriched the mutation spectrum of DFNA9 and implied the importance for mutation screening of COCH in age related hearing loss with vestibular dysfunctions.

  19. The exome sequencing identified the mutation in YARS2 encoding the mitochondrial tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase as a nuclear modifier for the phenotypic manifestation of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy-associated mitochondrial DNA mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Pingping; Jin, Xiaofen; Peng, Yanyan; Wang, Meng; Liu, Hao; Liu, Xiaoling; Zhang, Zengjun; Ji, Yanchun; Zhang, Juanjuan; Liang, Min; Zhao, Fuxin; Sun, Yan-Hong; Zhang, Minglian; Zhou, Xiangtian; Chen, Ye; Mo, Jun Qin; Huang, Taosheng; Qu, Jia; Guan, Min-Xin

    2016-02-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is the most common mitochondrial disorder. Nuclear modifier genes are proposed to modify the phenotypic expression of LHON-associated mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations. By using an exome sequencing approach, we identified a LHON susceptibility allele (c.572G>T, p.191Gly>Val) in YARS2 gene encoding mitochondrial tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase, which interacts with m.11778G>A mutation to cause visual failure. We performed functional assays by using lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from members of Chinese families (asymptomatic individuals carrying m.11778G>A mutation, or both m.11778G>A and heterozygous p.191Gly>Val mutations and symptomatic subjects harboring m.11778G>A and homozygous p.191Gly>Val mutations) and controls lacking these mutations. The 191Gly>Val mutation reduced the YARS2 protein level in the mutant cells. The aminoacylated efficiency and steady-state level of tRNA(Tyr) were markedly decreased in the cell lines derived from patients both carrying homozygous YARS2 p.191Gly>Val and m.11778G>A mutations. The failure in tRNA(Tyr) metabolism impaired mitochondrial translation, especially for polypeptides with high content of tyrosine codon such as ND4, ND5, ND6 and COX2 in cells lines carrying homozygous YARS2 p.191Gly>Val and m.11778G>A mutations. The YARS2 p.191Gly>Val mutation worsened the respiratory phenotypes associated with m.11778G>A mutation, especially reducing activities of complexes I and IV. The respiratory deficiency altered the efficiency of mitochondrial ATP synthesis and increased the production of reactive oxygen species. Thus, mutated YARS2 aggravates mitochondrial dysfunctions associated with the m.11778G>A mutation, exceeding the threshold for the expression of blindness phenotype. Our findings provided new insights into the pathophysiology of LHON that were manifested by interaction between mtDNA mutation and mutated nuclear-modifier YARS2.

  20. Functional examination of MLH1, MSH2, and MSH6 intronic mutations identified in Danish colorectal cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Sanne M; Dandanell, Mette; Rasmussen, Lene J

    2013-01-01

    Germ-line mutations in the DNA mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, and MSH6 predispose to the development of colorectal cancer (Lynch syndrome or hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer). These mutations include disease-causing frame-shift, nonsense, and splicing mutations as well as large genomi...... rearrangements. However, a large number of mutations, including missense, silent, and intronic variants, are classified as variants of unknown clinical significance.......Germ-line mutations in the DNA mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, and MSH6 predispose to the development of colorectal cancer (Lynch syndrome or hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer). These mutations include disease-causing frame-shift, nonsense, and splicing mutations as well as large genomic...

  1. Elevated expression of Ki-67 identifies aggressive prostate cancers but does not distinguish BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitra, A V; Jameson, C; Barbachano, Y;

    2010-01-01

    Prostate cancers in men with germline BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations are more aggressive than morphologically similar cancers in men without these mutations. This study was performed to test the hypothesis that enhanced expression of Ki-67, as a surrogate of cell proliferation, is a characteristic...... feature of prostate cancers occurring in BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers. The study cohort comprised 20 cases of prostate cancer in mutation carriers and 126 control sporadic prostate cancers. Of the combined sample cohort, 65.7% stained only within malignant tissues while 0.7% stained in both malignant...... a background of BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations or as sporadic disease. The data suggest that, since elevated Ki-67 does not distinguish prostate cancers occurring in BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers from sporadic prostatic malignancies, the effects of these genetic mutations are probably independent. While all...

  2. Exome Sequencing Identifies SMAD3 Mutations as a Cause of Familial Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm and Dissection with Intracranial and Other Arterial Aneurysms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regalado, Ellen S.; Guo, Dong-chuan; Villamizar, Carlos; Avidan, Nili; Gilchrist, Dawna; McGillivray, Barbara; Clarke, Lorne; Bernier, Francois; Santos-Cortez, Regie L.; Leal, Suzanne M.; Bertoli-Avella, Aida M.; Shendure, Jay; Rieder, Mark J.; Nickerson, Deborah A; Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Thoracic aortic aneurysms leading to acute aortic dissections (TAAD) can be inherited in families in an autosomal dominant manner. As part of the spectrum of clinical heterogeneity of familial TAAD, we recently described families with multiple members that had TAAD and intracranial aneurysms or TAAD and intracranial and abdominal aortic aneurysms inherited in an autosomal dominant manner. Objective To identify the causative mutation in a large family with autosomal dominant inheritance of TAAD with intracranial and abdominal aortic aneurysms by performing exome sequencing of two distantly related individuals with TAAD and identifying shared rare variants. Methods and Results A novel frame shift mutation, p. N218fs (c.652delA), was identified in the SMAD3 gene and segregated with the vascular diseases in this family with a LOD score of 2.52. Sequencing of 181 probands with familial TAAD identified three additional SMAD3 mutations in 4 families, p.R279K (c.836G>A), p.E239K (c.715G>A), and p.A112V (c.235C>T) resulting in a combined LOD score of 5.21. These four mutations were notably absent in 2300 control exomes. SMAD3 mutations were recently described in patients with Aneurysms Osteoarthritis Syndrome and some of the features of this syndrome were identified in individuals in our cohort, but these features were notably absent in many SMAD3 mutation carriers. Conclusions SMAD3 mutations are responsible for 2% of familial TAAD. Mutations are found in families with TAAD alone, along with families with TAAD, intracranial aneurysms, aortic and bilateral iliac aneurysms segregating in an autosomal dominant manner. PMID:21778426

  3. Whole exome sequencing identifies a POLRID mutation segregating in a father and two daughters with findings of Klippel-Feil and Treacher Collins syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giampietro, Philip F; Armstrong, Linlea; Stoddard, Alex; Blank, Robert D; Livingston, Janet; Raggio, Cathy L; Rasmussen, Kristen; Pickart, Michael; Lorier, Rachel; Turner, Amy; Sund, Sarah; Sobrera, Nara; Neptune, Enid; Sweetser, David; Santiago-Cornier, Alberto; Broeckel, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    We report on a father and his two daughters diagnosed with Klippel-Feil syndrome (KFS) but with craniofacial differences (zygomatic and mandibular hypoplasia and cleft palate) and external ear abnormalities suggestive of Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS). The diagnosis of KFS was favored, given that the neck anomalies were the predominant manifestations, and that the diagnosis predated later recognition of the association between spinal segmentation abnormalities and TCS. Genetic heterogeneity and the rarity of large families with KFS have limited the ability to identify mutations by traditional methods. Whole exome sequencing identified a nonsynonymous mutation in POLR1D (subunit of RNA polymerase I and II): exon2:c.T332C:p.L111P. Mutations in POLR1D are present in about 5% of individuals diagnosed with TCS. We propose that this mutation is causal in this family, suggesting a pathogenetic link between KFS and TCS.

  4. Exome Sequencing Identifies CCDC8 Mutations in 3-M Syndrome, Suggesting that CCDC8 Contributes in a Pathway with CUL7 and OBSL1 to Control Human Growth

    OpenAIRE

    Hanson, Dan; Murray, Philip G.; O'Sullivan, James; Urquhart, Jill; Daly, Sarah; Bhaskar, Sanjeev S.; Biesecker, Leslie G.; Skae, Mars; Smith, Claire; Cole, Trevor; Kirk, Jeremy; Chandler, Kate; Kingston, Helen; Donnai, Dian; Clayton, Peter E.

    2011-01-01

    3-M syndrome, a primordial growth disorder, is associated with mutations in CUL7 and OBSL1. Exome sequencing now identifies mutations in CCDC8 as a cause of 3-M syndrome. CCDC8 is a widely expressed gene that is transcriptionally associated to CUL7 and OBSL1, and coimmunoprecipitation indicates a physical interaction between CCDC8 and OBSL1 but not CUL7. We propose that CUL7, OBSL1, and CCDC8 are members of a pathway controlling mammalian growth.

  5. Impact of Iymph node metastases identified on central neck dissection (CND) on the recurrence of papillary thyroid cancer: potential role of BRAFV600E mutation in defining CND

    OpenAIRE

    Alzahrani, Ali S.; XING, MINGZHAO

    2013-01-01

    The impact of metastasized cervical lymph nodes (CLN) identified on central neck dissection (CND) on the recurrence/persistence of papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) and the extent of CND needed to reduce recurrence/persistence have not been firmly established. To assess the impact of CLN metastasis and BRAF mutation on the recurrence/persistence of PTC and the potential of BRAF mutation in assisting CND, we analysed data of 379 consecutive patients with PTC who underwent thyroidectomy with (n=24...

  6. Biallelic truncating SCN9A mutation identified in four families with congenital insensitivity to pain from Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawal, H A; Harripaul, R; Mikhailov, A; Dad, R; Ayub, M; Jawad Hassan, M; Vincent, J B

    2016-12-01

    (a) Homozygosity-mapping-by-descent of four Bhakkar congenital indifference/insensitivity to pain (CIP) families. (b) Identification of mutation Met1190* in SCN9A. (c) SCN9A/NaV1.7 2D structure (as predicted by CCTOP and SMART) and approximate position of known nonsense (*) and missense (M) mutations ( www.hgmd.cf.ac.uk), as well as the Bhakkar mutation (this study) in red.

  7. Fine-Scale Mapping at 9p22.2 Identifies Candidate Causal Variants That Modify Ovarian Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigorito, E.; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Beesley, J

    2016-01-01

    Population-based genome wide association studies have identified a locus at 9p22.2 associated with ovarian cancer risk, which also modifies ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. We conducted fine-scale mapping at 9p22.2 to identify potential causal variants in BRCA1 and BRCA2 ...

  8. A Presenilin-1 Mutation Identified in Familial Alzheimer Disease with Cotton Wool Plaques Causes a Nearly Complete Loss of γ-Secretase Activity*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilig, Elizabeth A.; Xia, Weiming; Shen, Jie; Kelleher, Raymond J.

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in presenilin-1 and presenilin-2 (PS1 and PS2) are the most common cause of familial Alzheimer disease. PS1 and PS2 are the presumptive catalytic components of the multisubunit γ-secretase complex, which proteolyzes a number of type I transmembrane proteins, including the amyloid precursor protein (APP) and Notch. APP processing by γ-secretase produces β-amyloid peptides (Aβ40 and Aβ42) that accumulate in the Alzheimer disease brain. Here we identify a pathogenic L435F mutation in PS1 in two affected siblings with early-onset familial Alzheimer disease characterized by deposition of cerebral cotton wool plaques. The L435F mutation resides in a conserved C-terminal PAL sequence implicated in active site conformation and catalytic activity. The impact of PS1 mutations in and around the PAL motif on γ-secretase activity was assessed by expression of mutant PS1 in mouse embryo fibroblasts lacking endogenous PS1 and PS2. Surprisingly, the L435F mutation caused a nearly complete loss of γ-secretase activity, including >90% reductions in the generation of Aβ40, Aβ42, and the APP and Notch intracellular domains. Two nonpathogenic PS1 mutations, P433L and L435R, caused essentially complete loss of γ-secretase activity, whereas two previously identified pathogenic PS1 mutations, P436Q and P436S, caused partial loss of function with substantial reductions in production of Aβ40, Aβ42, and the APP and Notch intracellular domains. These results argue against overproduction of Aβ42 as an essential property of presenilin proteins bearing pathogenic mutations. Rather, our findings provide support for the hypothesis that pathogenic mutations cause a general loss of presenilin function. PMID:20460383

  9. Targeted sequencing identifies associations between IL7R-JAK mutations and epigenetic modulators in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente, Carmen; Schwab, Claire; Broux, Michaël; Geerdens, Ellen; Degryse, Sandrine; Demeyer, Sofie; Lahortiga, Idoya; Elliott, Alannah; Chilton, Lucy; La Starza, Roberta; Mecucci, Cristina; Vandenberghe, Peter; Goulden, Nicholas; Vora, Ajay; Moorman, Anthony V.; Soulier, Jean; Harrison, Christine J.; Clappier, Emmanuelle; Cools, Jan

    2015-01-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia is caused by the accumulation of multiple oncogenic lesions, including chromosomal rearrangements and mutations. To determine the frequency and co-occurrence of mutations in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, we performed targeted re-sequencing of 115 genes across 155 diagnostic samples (44 adult and 111 childhood cases). NOTCH1 and CDKN2A/B were mutated/deleted in more than half of the cases, while an additional 37 genes were mutated/deleted in 4% to 20% of cases. We found that IL7R-JAK pathway genes were mutated in 27.7% of cases, with JAK3 mutations being the most frequent event in this group. Copy number variations were also detected, including deletions of CREBBP or CTCF and duplication of MYB. FLT3 mutations were rare, but a novel extracellular mutation in FLT3 was detected and confirmed to be transforming. Furthermore, we identified complex patterns of pairwise associations, including a significant association between mutations in IL7R-JAK genes and epigenetic regulators (WT1, PRC2, PHF6). Our analyses showed that IL7R-JAK genetic lesions did not confer adverse prognosis in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cases enrolled in the UK ALL2003 trial. Overall, these results identify interconnections between the T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia genome and disease biology, and suggest a potential clinical application for JAK inhibitors in a significant proportion of patients with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. PMID:26206799

  10. Structural study of the effects of mutations in proteins to identify the molecular basis of the loss of local structural fluidity leading to the onset of autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Ananya; Ghosh, Semanti; Bagchi, Angshuman

    2017-02-26

    Protein-Protein Interactions (PPIs) are crucial in most of the biological processes and PPI dysfunctions are known to be associated with the onsets of various diseases. One of such diseases is the auto-immune disease. Auto-immune diseases are one among the less studied group of diseases with very high mortality rates. Thus, we tried to correlate the appearances of mutations with their probable biochemical basis of the molecular mechanisms leading to the onset of the disease phenotypes. We compared the effects of the Single Amino Acid Variants (SAVs) in the wild type and mutated proteins to identify any structural deformities that might lead to altered PPIs leading ultimately to disease onset. For this we used Relative Solvent Accessibility (RSA) as a spatial parameter to compare the structural perturbation in mutated and wild type proteins. We observed that the mutations were capable to increase intra-chain PPIs whereas inter-chain PPIs would remain mostly unaltered. This might lead to more intra-molecular friction causing a deleterious alteration of protein's normal function. A Lyapunov exponent analysis, using the altered RSA values due to polymorphic and disease causing mutations, revealed polymorphic mutations have a positive mean value for the Lyapunov exponent while disease causing mutations have a negative mean value. Thus, local spatial stochasticity has been lost due to disease causing mutations, indicating a loss of structural fluidity. The amino acid conversion plot also showed a clear tendency of altered surface patch residue conversion propensity than polymorphic conversions. So far, this is the first report that compares the effects of different kinds of mutations (disease and non-disease causing polymorphic mutations) in the onset of autoimmune diseases.

  11. Dominant mutations in S. cerevisiae PMS1 identify the Mlh1-Pms1 endonuclease active site and an exonuclease 1-independent mismatch repair pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine E Smith

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Lynch syndrome (hereditary nonpolypsis colorectal cancer or HNPCC is a common cancer predisposition syndrome. Predisposition to cancer in this syndrome results from increased accumulation of mutations due to defective mismatch repair (MMR caused by a mutation in one of the mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2/scPMS1. To better understand the function of Mlh1-Pms1 in MMR, we used Saccharomyces cerevisiae to identify six pms1 mutations (pms1-G683E, pms1-C817R, pms1-C848S, pms1-H850R, pms1-H703A and pms1-E707A that were weakly dominant in wild-type cells, which surprisingly caused a strong MMR defect when present on low copy plasmids in an exo1Δ mutant. Molecular modeling showed these mutations caused amino acid substitutions in the metal coordination pocket of the Pms1 endonuclease active site and biochemical studies showed that they inactivated the endonuclease activity. This model of Mlh1-Pms1 suggested that the Mlh1-FERC motif contributes to the endonuclease active site. Consistent with this, the mlh1-E767stp mutation caused both MMR and endonuclease defects similar to those caused by the dominant pms1 mutations whereas mutations affecting the predicted metal coordinating residue Mlh1-C769 had no effect. These studies establish that the Mlh1-Pms1 endonuclease is required for MMR in a previously uncharacterized Exo1-independent MMR pathway.

  12. Impact of lymph node metastases identified on central neck dissection (CND) on the recurrence of papillary thyroid cancer: potential role of BRAFV600E mutation in defining CND.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzahrani, Ali S; Xing, Mingzhao

    2013-02-01

    The impact of metastasized cervical lymph nodes (CLN) identified on central neck dissection (CND) on the recurrence/persistence of papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) and the extent of CND needed to reduce recurrence/persistence have not been firmly established. To assess the impact of CLN metastasis and BRAF mutation on the recurrence/persistence of PTC and the potential of BRAF mutation in assisting CND. Analyses of 379 consecutive patients with PTC who underwent thyroidectomy with (n=243) or without CND (n=136) at a tertiary-care academic hospital during the period 2001-2010 for their clinicopathological outcomes and BRAF mutation status. Increasingly aggressive tumor characteristics were found as the extent of CND was advanced following conventional risk criteria from non-CND to limited CND to formal CND. Disease recurrence/persistence rate also sharply rose from 4.7% to 15.7% and 40.5% in these CND settings respectively (PCND to formal CND (PCND. A strong association of CLN metastasis and BRAF mutation with disease recurrence/persistence was revealed on Kaplan-Meier analysis and BRAF mutation strongly predicted CLN metastasis. CLN metastases found on CND are closely associated with disease recurrence/persistence of PTC, which are both strongly predicted by BRAF mutation. Current selection of PTC patients for CND is appropriate but higher extent of the procedure, once selected, is needed to reduce disease recurrence, which may be defined by combination use of preoperative BRAF mutation testing and conventional risk factors of PTC.

  13. Prognostic value of IDH1 mutations identified with PCR-RFLP assay in acute myeloid leukemia patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghada M. Elsayed

    2014-03-01

    Conclusion: IDH1 mutations are recurring genetic alterations in AML and they may have unfavorable impact on clinical outcome in adult AML. The PCR-RFLP method allows for a fast, inexpensive, and sensitive method for the detection of IDH1 mutations in AML.

  14. Whole Genome Sequencing Identifies a Missense Mutation in HES7 Associated with Short Tails in Asian Domestic Cats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiao; Sun, Xin; Hu, Xue-Song; Zhuang, Yan; Liu, Yue-Chen; Meng, Hao; Miao, Lin; Yu, He; Luo, Shu-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Domestic cats exhibit abundant variations in tail morphology and serve as an excellent model to study the development and evolution of vertebrate tails. Cats with shortened and kinked tails were first recorded in the Malayan archipelago by Charles Darwin in 1868 and remain quite common today in Southeast and East Asia. To elucidate the genetic basis of short tails in Asian cats, we built a pedigree of 13 cats segregating at the trait with a founder from southern China and performed linkage mapping based on whole genome sequencing data from the pedigree. The short-tailed trait was mapped to a 5.6 Mb region of Chr E1, within which the substitution c. 5T > C in the somite segmentation-related gene HES7 was identified as the causal mutation resulting in a missense change (p.V2A). Validation in 245 unrelated cats confirmed the correlation between HES7-c. 5T > C and Chinese short-tailed feral cats as well as the Japanese Bobtail breed, indicating a common genetic basis of the two. In addition, some of our sampled kinked-tailed cats could not be explained by either HES7 or the Manx-related T-box, suggesting at least three independent events in the evolution of domestic cats giving rise to short-tailed traits. PMID:27560986

  15. High-throughput genotyping in metastatic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma identifies phosphoinositide-3-kinase and BRAF mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi Hoon Maeng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Given the high incidence of metastatic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, especially in Asia, we screened for the presence of somatic mutations using OncoMap platform with the aim of defining subsets of patients who may be potential candidate for targeted therapy. METHODS AND MATERIALS: We analyzed 87 tissue specimens obtained from 80 patients who were pathologically confirmed with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and received 5-fluoropyrimidine/platinum-based chemotherapy. OncoMap 4.0, a mass-spectrometry based assay, was used to interrogate 471 oncogenic mutations in 41 commonly mutated genes. Tumor specimens were prepared from primary cancer sites in 70 patients and from metastatic sites in 17 patients. In order to test the concordance between primary and metastatic sites from the patient for mutations, we analyzed 7 paired (primary-metastatic specimens. All specimens were formalin-fixed paraffin embedded tissues and tumor content was >70%. RESULTS: In total, we have detected 20 hotspot mutations out of 80 patients screened. The most frequent mutation was PIK3CA mutation (four E545K, five H1047R and one H1047L (N = 10, 11.5% followed by MLH1 V384D (N = 7, 8.0%, TP53 (R306, R175H and R273C (N = 3, 3.5%, BRAF V600E (N = 1, 1.2%, CTNNB1 D32N (N = 1, 1.2%, and EGFR P733L (N = 1, 1.2%. Distributions of somatic mutations were not different according to anatomic sites of esophageal cancer (cervical/upper, mid, lower. In addition, there was no difference in frequency of mutations between primary-metastasis paired samples. CONCLUSIONS: Our study led to the detection of potentially druggable mutations in esophageal SCC which may guide novel therapies in small subsets of esophageal cancer patients.

  16. Fine-Scale Mapping at 9p22.2 Identifies Candidate Causal Variants That Modify Ovarian Cancer Risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigorito, Elena; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Beesley, Jonathan;

    2016-01-01

    Population-based genome wide association studies have identified a locus at 9p22.2 associated with ovarian cancer risk, which also modifies ovarian cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. We conducted fine-scale mapping at 9p22.2 to identify potential causal variants in BRCA1 and BRCA2...... mutation carriers. Genotype data were available for 15,252 (2,462 ovarian cancer cases) BRCA1 and 8,211 (631 ovarian cancer cases) BRCA2 mutation carriers. Following genotype imputation, ovarian cancer associations were assessed for 4,873 and 5,020 SNPs in BRCA1 and BRCA 2 mutation carriers respectively......, within a retrospective cohort analytical framework. In BRCA1 mutation carriers one set of eight correlated candidate causal variants for ovarian cancer risk modification was identified (top SNP rs10124837, HR: 0.73, 95%CI: 0.68 to 0.79, p-value 2× 10-16). These variants were located up to 20 kb upstream...

  17. Whole exome sequencing identifies a novel NRL mutation in a Chinese family with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Meng; Zhang, Su; Liu, Chunjie; Qin, Yayun; Archacki, Stephen; Jin, Ling; Wang, Yong; Liu, Fei; Chen, Jiaxiang; Liu, Ying; Wang, Jiuxiang; Huang, Mi; Liao, Shengjie; Tang, Zhaohui; Guo, An Yuan; Jiang, Fagang; Liu, Mugen

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the genetic basis and its relationship to the clinical manifestations in a four generation Chinese family with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. Ophthalmologic examinations including fundus photography, fundus autofluorescence imaging, fundus fluorescein angiography, optical coherence tomography, and a best-corrected visual acuity test were performed to define the clinical features of the patients. We extracted the genomic DNA from peripheral blood samples. The proband's genomic DNA was submitted to the whole exome sequencing. Whole exome sequencing and the subsequent data analysis detected six candidate mutations in the proband of this pedigree. The novel c.146 C>T mutation in NRL was found to be the only mutation that co-segregated with the disease in this pedigree. This mutation resulted in a substitution of proline by a leucine at position 49 of NRL protein (p.P49L). Most importantly, the proline residue at position 49 of NRL is highly conserved from zebrafish to humans. The c.146 C>T mutation was not observed in 200 control individuals. What's more, we performed the luciferase activity assay to prove that this mutation we detected alters the NRL protein function. The c.146 C>T mutation in NRL gene causes autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa for this family. Our finding not only expands the mutation spectrum of NRL, but also demonstrates that whole-exome sequencing is a powerful strategy to detect causative genes and mutations in RP patients. This technique may provide a precise diagnosis for rare heterogeneous monogenic disorders such as RP.

  18. Exome screening to identify loss-of-function mutations in the rhesus macaque for development of preclinical models of human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornish, Adam S; Gibbs, Robert M; Norgren, Robert B

    2016-03-02

    Exome sequencing has been utilized to identify genetic variants associated with disease in humans. Identification of loss-of-function mutations with exome sequencing in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) could lead to valuable animal models of genetic disease. Attempts have been made to identify variants in rhesus macaques by aligning exome data against the rheMac2 draft genome. However, such efforts have been impaired due to the incompleteness and annotation errors associated with rheMac2. We wished to determine whether aligning exome reads against our new, improved rhesus genome, MacaM, could be used to identify high impact, loss-of-function mutations in rhesus macaques that would be relevant to human disease. We compared alignments of exome reads from four rhesus macaques, the reference animal and three unrelated animals, against rheMac2 and MacaM. Substantially more reads aligned against MacaM than rheMac2. We followed the Broad Institute's Best Practice guidelines for variant discovery which utilizes the Genome Analysis Toolkit to identify high impact mutations. When rheMac2 was used as the reference genome, a large number of apparent false positives were identified. When MacaM was used as the reference genome, the number of false positives was greatly reduced. After examining the variant analyses conducted with MacaM as reference genome, we identified two putative loss-of-function mutations, in the heterozygous state, in genes related to human health. Sanger sequencing confirmed the presence of these mutations. We followed the transmission of one of these mutations (in the butyrylthiocholine gene) through three generations of rhesus macaques. Further, we demonstrated a functional decrease in butyrylthiocholinesterase activity similar to that observed in human heterozygotes with loss-of-function mutations in the same gene. The new MacaM genome can be effectively utilized to identify loss-of-function mutations in rhesus macaques without generating a high level of

  19. Screening of a large cohort of Leber congenital amaurosis and retinitis pigmentosa patients identifies novel LCA5 mutations and new genotype-phenotype correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Ruifang; van den Born, L. Ingeborgh; Berson, Eliot L.; Ocaka, Louise A.; Davidson, Alice E.; Heckenlively, John R.; Branham, Kari; Ren, Huanan; Lopez, Irma; Maria, Maleeha; Azam, Maleeha; Henkes, Arjen; Blokland, Ellen; Qamar, Raheel; Webster, Andrew R.; Andreasson, Sten; de Baere, Elfride; Bennett, Jean; Chader, Gerald J.; Berger, Wolfgang; Golovleva, Irina; Greenberg, Jacquie; den Hollander, Anneke I.; Klaver, Caroline C.W.; Klevering, B. Jeroen; Lorenz, Birgit; Preising, Markus N.; Ramsear, Raj; Roberts, Lisa; Roepman, Ronald; Rohrschneider, Klaus; Wissinger, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the prevalence of sequence variants in LCA5 in patients with Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), early onset rod-cone dystrophy (EORD) and autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (RP), to delineate the ocular phenotypes, and to provide an overview of all published LCA5 variants in an online database._Patients underwent standard ophthalmic evaluations after providing informed consent. In selected patients, optical coherence tomography (OCT) and fundus autofluorescence imaging was possible. DNA samples from 797 unrelated patients with LCA and 211 with the various types of RP were screened by Sanger sequence analysis of all LCA5 exons and intron/exon junctions. Some LCA patients were pre-screened by APEX technology or selected based on homozygosity mapping. In silico analyses were performed to assess the pathogenicity of the variants. Segregation analysis was performed where possible. Published and novel LCA5 variants were collected, amended for their correct nomenclature, and listed in a Leiden Open Variation Database (LOVD). Sequence analysis identified 18 new probands with 19 different LCA5 variants. Seventeen of the 19 LCA5 variants were novel. Except for two missense variants and one splice site variant, all variants were protein-truncating mutations. Most patients expressed a severe phenotype, typical of LCA. However, some LCA subjects had better vision and intact inner segment/outer segment (IS/OS) junctions on OCT imaging. In two families with LCA5 variants, the phenotype was more compatible with EORD with affected individuals displaying preserved islands of RPE. One of these milder families harbored a homozygous splice site mutation, a second family was found to have a combination of a stop mutation and a missense mutation. This is the largest LCA5 study to date. We sequenced 1008 patients (797 with LCA, 211 with arRP) and identified 18 probands with LCA5 mutations. Mutations in LCA5 are a rare cause of childhood retinal dystrophy accounting for

  20. Novel DDR2 mutation identified by whole exome sequencing in a Moroccan patient with spondylo-meta-epiphyseal dysplasia, short limb-abnormal calcification type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansouri, Maria; Kayserili, Hülya; Elalaoui, Siham Chafai; Nishimura, Gen; Iida, Aritoshi; Lyahyai, Jaber; Miyake, Noriko; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Sefiani, Abdelaziz; Ikegawa, Shiro

    2016-02-01

    Spondylo-meta-epiphyseal dysplasia (SMED), short limb-abnormal calcification type (SMED, SL-AC), is a very rare autosomal recessive disorder with various skeletal changes characterized by premature calcification leading to severe disproportionate short stature. Twenty-two patients have been reported until now, but only five mutations (four missense and one splice-site) in the conserved sequence encoding the tyrosine kinase domain of the DDR2 gene has been identified. We report here a novel DDR2 missense mutation, c.370C > T (p.Arg124Trp) in a Moroccan girl with SMED, SL-AC, identified by whole exome sequencing. Our study has expanded the mutational spectrum of this rare disease and it has shown that exome sequencing is a powerful and cost-effective tool for the diagnosis of clinically heterogeneous disorders such as SMED.

  1. BRAF V600E and TERT promoter mutations cooperatively identify the most aggressive papillary thyroid cancer with highest recurrence

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xing, Mingzhao; Liu, Rengyun; Liu, Xiaoli; Murugan, Avaniyapuram Kannan; Zhu, Guangwu; Zeiger, Martha A; Pai, Sara; Bishop, Justin

    2014-01-01

    ...), individually and in their coexistence, in papillary thyroid cancer (PTC). We performed a retrospective study of the relationship of BRAF and TERT C228T mutations with clinicopathologic outcomes of PTC in 507 patients...

  2. A sodium channel mutation identified in Aedes aegypti selectively reduces cockroach sodium channel sensitivity to type I, but not type II pyrethroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhaonong; Du, Yuzhe; Nomura, Yoshiko; Dong, Ke

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are the primary target of pyrethroid insecticides. Numerous point mutations in sodium channel genes have been identified in pyrethroid-resistant insect species, and many have been confirmed to reduce or abolish sensitivity of channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes to pyrethroids. Recently, several novel mutations were reported in sodium channel genes of pyrethroid-resistant Aedes mosquito populations. One of the mutations is a phenylalanine (F) to cysteine (C) change in segment 6 of domain III (IIIS6) of the Aedes mosquito sodium channel. Curiously, a previous study showed that alanine substitution of this F did not alter the action of deltamethrin, a type II pyrethroid, on a cockroach sodium channel. In this study, we changed this F to C in a pyrethroid-sensitive cockroach sodium channel and examined mutant channel sensitivity to permethrin as well as five other type I or type II pyrethroids in Xenopus oocytes. Interestingly, the F to C mutation drastically reduced channel sensitivity to three type I pyrethroids, permethrin, NRDC 157 (a deltamethrin analogue lacking the α-cyano group) and bioresemthrin, but not to three type II pyrethroids, cypermethrin, deltamethrin and cyhalothrin. These results confirm the involvement of the F to C mutation in permethrin resistance, and raise the possibility that rotation of type I and type II pyrethroids might be considered in the control of insect pest populations where this particular mutation is present.

  3. Whole-exome re-sequencing in a family quartet identifies POP1 mutations as the cause of a novel skeletal dysplasia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeny A Glazov

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in DNA sequencing have enabled mapping of genes for monogenic traits in families with small pedigrees and even in unrelated cases. We report the identification of disease-causing mutations in a rare, severe, skeletal dysplasia, studying a family of two healthy unrelated parents and two affected children using whole-exome sequencing. The two affected daughters have clinical and radiographic features suggestive of anauxetic dysplasia (OMIM 607095, a rare form of dwarfism caused by mutations of RMRP. However, mutations of RMRP were excluded in this family by direct sequencing. Our studies identified two novel compound heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in POP1, which encodes a core component of the RNase mitochondrial RNA processing (RNase MRP complex that directly interacts with the RMRP RNA domains that are affected in anauxetic dysplasia. We demonstrate that these mutations impair the integrity and activity of this complex and that they impair cell proliferation, providing likely molecular and cellular mechanisms by which POP1 mutations cause this severe skeletal dysplasia.

  4. Whole-exome re-sequencing in a family quartet identifies POP1 mutations as the cause of a novel skeletal dysplasia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeny A Glazov

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in DNA sequencing have enabled mapping of genes for monogenic traits in families with small pedigrees and even in unrelated cases. We report the identification of disease-causing mutations in a rare, severe, skeletal dysplasia, studying a family of two healthy unrelated parents and two affected children using whole-exome sequencing. The two affected daughters have clinical and radiographic features suggestive of anauxetic dysplasia (OMIM 607095, a rare form of dwarfism caused by mutations of RMRP. However, mutations of RMRP were excluded in this family by direct sequencing. Our studies identified two novel compound heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in POP1, which encodes a core component of the RNase mitochondrial RNA processing (RNase MRP complex that directly interacts with the RMRP RNA domains that are affected in anauxetic dysplasia. We demonstrate that these mutations impair the integrity and activity of this complex and that they impair cell proliferation, providing likely molecular and cellular mechanisms by which POP1 mutations cause this severe skeletal dysplasia.

  5. Segmental overgrowth syndrome due to an activating PIK3CA mutation identified in affected muscle tissue by exome sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Maria; Sunde, Lone; Weigert, Karen Petra;

    2014-01-01

    Mosaic PIK3CA-mutations have been described in an increasing number of overgrowth syndromes. We describe a patient with a previously unreported segmental overgrowth syndrome with the mutation, PIKCA3 c.3140A>G (p.His1047Arg) in affected tissue diagnosed by exome sequencing. This PIK3CA-associated......-associated segmental overgrowth syndrome overlaps with CLOVES syndrome and fibroadipose hyperplasia but is distinct from each of these entities....

  6. A Novel PRKAR1A Mutation Identified in a Patient with Isolated Primary Pigmented Nodular Adrenocortical Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sira Korpaisarn

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD is a rare cause of Cushing syndrome, especially the isolated form without Carney complex, associated with germline mutations in PRKAR1A, the protein kinase A regulatory subunit type 1 alpha gene. We report a 31-year-old female who presented with secondary amenorrhea, cushingoid appearance, and hypertension without Carney complex. Biochemical laboratory examinations confirmed the ACTH-independent adrenal Cushing syndrome with negative Liddle test. A small right adrenal adenoma of 0.8 cm was shown on computed tomography while magnetic resonance imaging revealed nodularity of both adrenal glands. The histological report confirmed PPNAD using laparoscopic right adrenalectomy, and subsequent left adrenalectomy was performed 6 months later. She had inherited heterozygosity of a novel germline mutation of the PRKAR1A gene (g.114213T>G or c.709-5T>G. This splice site mutation results in exon 8 skipping. Her father carrying the same mutation had no clinical features of either PPNAD or Carney complex. This novel PRKAR1A gene mutation, c.709-5T>G, is reported here for the first time manifesting as an incomplete clinical expression of the isolated form of PPNAD and being inherited with low penetrance unlike other inherited mutations of the Carney complex which have a penetrance of almost 100%.

  7. A scalable method for molecular network reconstruction identifies properties of targets and mutations in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Edison; Szedlak, Anthony; Kang, Yunyi; Smith, Peyton; Smith, Nicholas; McBride, Madison; Finlay, Darren; Vuori, Kristiina; Mason, James; Ball, Edward D; Piermarocchi, Carlo; Paternostro, Giovanni

    2015-04-01

    A key aim of systems biology is the reconstruction of molecular networks. We do not yet, however, have networks that integrate information from all datasets available for a particular clinical condition. This is in part due to the limited scalability, in terms of required computational time and power, of existing algorithms. Network reconstruction methods should also be scalable in the sense of allowing scientists from different backgrounds to efficiently integrate additional data. We present a network model of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In the current version (AML 2.1), we have used gene expression data (both microarray and RNA-seq) from 5 different studies comprising a total of 771 AML samples and a protein-protein interactions dataset. Our scalable network reconstruction method is in part based on the well-known property of gene expression correlation among interacting molecules. The difficulty of distinguishing between direct and indirect interactions is addressed by optimizing the coefficient of variation of gene expression, using a validated gold-standard dataset of direct interactions. Computational time is much reduced compared to other network reconstruction methods. A key feature is the study of the reproducibility of interactions found in independent clinical datasets. An analysis of the most significant clusters, and of the network properties (intraset efficiency, degree, betweenness centrality, and PageRank) of common AML mutations demonstrated the biological significance of the network. A statistical analysis of the response of blast cells from 11 AML patients to a library of kinase inhibitors provided an experimental validation of the network. A combination of network and experimental data identified CDK1, CDK2, CDK4, and CDK6 and other kinases as potential therapeutic targets in AML.

  8. TBX1 mutation identified by exome sequencing in a Japanese family with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome-like craniofacial features and hypocalcemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsutomu Ogata

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although TBX1 mutations have been identified in patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS-like phenotypes including characteristic craniofacial features, cardiovascular anomalies, hypoparathyroidism, and thymic hypoplasia, the frequency of TBX1 mutations remains rare in deletion-negative patients. Thus, it would be reasonable to perform a comprehensive genetic analysis in deletion-negative patients with 22q11.2DS-like phenotypes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We studied three subjects with craniofacial features and hypocalcemia (group 1, two subjects with craniofacial features alone (group 2, and three subjects with normal phenotype within a single Japanese family. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis excluded chromosome 22q11.2 deletion, and genomewide array comparative genomic hybridization analysis revealed no copy number change specific to group 1 or groups 1+2. However, exome sequencing identified a heterozygous TBX1 frameshift mutation (c.1253delA, p.Y418fsX459 specific to groups 1+2, as well as six missense variants and two in-frame microdeletions specific to groups 1+2 and two missense variants specific to group 1. The TBX1 mutation resided at exon 9C and was predicted to produce a non-functional truncated protein missing the nuclear localization signal and most of the transactivation domain. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Clinical features in groups 1+2 are well explained by the TBX1 mutation, while the clinical effects of the remaining variants are largely unknown. Thus, the results exemplify the usefulness of exome sequencing in the identification of disease-causing mutations in familial disorders. Furthermore, the results, in conjunction with the previous data, imply that TBX1 isoform C is the biologically essential variant and that TBX1 mutations are associated with a wide phenotypic spectrum, including most of 22q11.2DS phenotypes.

  9. SNP linkage analysis and whole exome sequencing identify a novel POU4F3 mutation in autosomal dominant late-onset nonsyndromic hearing loss (DFNA15.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee-Jin Kim

    Full Text Available Autosomal dominant non-syndromic hearing loss (AD-NSHL is one of the most common genetic diseases in human and is well-known for the considerable genetic heterogeneity. In this study, we utilized whole exome sequencing (WES and linkage analysis for direct genetic diagnosis in AD-NSHL. The Korean family had typical AD-NSHL running over 6 generations. Linkage analysis was performed by using genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP chip and pinpointed a genomic region on 5q31 with a significant linkage signal. Sequential filtering of variants obtained from WES, application of the linkage region, bioinformatic analyses, and Sanger sequencing validation identified a novel missense mutation Arg326Lys (c.977G>A in the POU homeodomain of the POU4F3 gene as the candidate disease-causing mutation in the family. POU4F3 is a known disease gene causing AD-HSLH (DFNA15 described in 5 unrelated families until now each with a unique mutation. Arg326Lys was the first missense mutation affecting the 3(rd alpha helix of the POU homeodomain harboring a bipartite nuclear localization signal sequence. The phenotype findings in our family further supported previously noted intrafamilial and interfamilial variability of DFNA15. This study demonstrated that WES in combination with linkage analysis utilizing bi-allelic SNP markers successfully identified the disease locus and causative mutation in AD-NSHL.

  10. Social Health Insurance-Based Simultaneous Screening for 154 Mutations in 19 Deafness Genes Efficiently Identified Causative Mutations in Japanese Hearing Loss Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Mori, Kentaro; Moteki, Hideaki; Miyagawa, Maiko; Nishio, Shin-Ya; Usami, Shin-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss is one of the most common neurosensory disorders in humans. The incidence of SNHL is estimated to be 1 in 500–1000 newborns. In more than half of these patients, the hearing loss is associated with genetic causes. In Japan, genetic testing for the patients with SNHL using the Invader assay to screen for 46 mutations in 13 deafness genes was approved by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare for inclusion in social health insurance coverage in 2012. Furthermore, ...

  11. Novel germline mutations in FLCN gene identified in two Chinese patients with Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Teng; Ning, Xianghui; He, Qun; Gong, Kan

    2017-01-09

    Birt-Hogg-Dubé (BHD) syndrome, a hereditary renal cancer syndrome caused by mutations in the folliculin (FLCN) gene, is characterized by the presence of fibrofolliculomas, pulmonary cysts, spontaneous pneumothorax, and renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Few BHD syndrome cases have been reported in Asian countries, and cutaneous presentations are relatively rare in Asian patients. Asian BHD patients may be misdiagnosed due to their atypical manifestations. Here, we report two Chinese BHD patients with novel FLCN mutations (c.946-947delAG in exon 9 and c.770-772delCCT in exon 7). Both of them had RCC and spontaneous pneumothorax without fibrofolliculomas. In patients with RCC and pulmonary cysts but without cutaneous lesions, screening for mutations in the FLCN gene should be performed, especially for those with a family history of RCC or pulmonary cysts (pneumothorax).

  12. Zebrafish Ciliopathy Screen Plus Human Mutational Analysis Identifies C21orf59 and CCDC65 Defects as Causing Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin-Tse, Christina; Halbritter, Jan; Zariwala, Maimoona A.; Gilberti, Renée M.; Gee, Heon Yung; Hellman, Nathan; Pathak, Narendra; Liu, Yan; Panizzi, Jennifer R.; Patel-King, Ramila S.; Tritschler, Douglas; Bower, Raqual; O’Toole, Eileen; Porath, Jonathan D.; Hurd, Toby W.; Chaki, Moumita; Diaz, Katrina A.; Kohl, Stefan; Lovric, Svjetlana; Hwang, Daw-Yang; Braun, Daniela A.; Schueler, Markus; Airik, Rannar; Otto, Edgar A.; Leigh, Margaret W.; Noone, Peadar G.; Carson, Johnny L.; Davis, Stephanie D.; Pittman, Jessica E.; Ferkol, Thomas W.; Atkinson, Jeffry J.; Olivier, Kenneth N.; Sagel, Scott D.; Dell, Sharon D.; Rosenfeld, Margaret; Milla, Carlos E.; Loges, Niki T.; Omran, Heymut; Porter, Mary E.; King, Stephen M.; Knowles, Michael R.; Drummond, Iain A.; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2013-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is caused when defects of motile cilia lead to chronic airway infections, male infertility, and situs abnormalities. Multiple causative PCD mutations account for only 65% of cases, suggesting that many genes essential for cilia function remain to be discovered. By using zebrafish morpholino knockdown of PCD candidate genes as an in vivo screening platform, we identified c21orf59, ccdc65, and c15orf26 as critical for cilia motility. c21orf59 and c15orf26 knockdown in zebrafish and planaria blocked outer dynein arm assembly, and ccdc65 knockdown altered cilia beat pattern. Biochemical analysis in Chlamydomonas revealed that the C21orf59 ortholog FBB18 is a flagellar matrix protein that accumulates specifically when cilia motility is impaired. The Chlamydomonas ida6 mutant identifies CCDC65/FAP250 as an essential component of the nexin-dynein regulatory complex. Analysis of 295 individuals with PCD identified recessive truncating mutations of C21orf59 in four families and CCDC65 in two families. Similar to findings in zebrafish and planaria, mutations in C21orf59 caused loss of both outer and inner dynein arm components. Our results characterize two genes associated with PCD-causing mutations and elucidate two distinct mechanisms critical for motile cilia function: dynein arm assembly for C21orf59 and assembly of the nexin-dynein regulatory complex for CCDC65. PMID:24094744

  13. Lampe1: an ENU-germline mutation causing spontaneous hepatosteatosis identified through targeted exon-enrichment and next-generation sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Sheridan

    Full Text Available Using a small scale ENU mutagenesis approach we identified a recessive germline mutant, designated Lampe1 that exhibited growth retardation and spontaneous hepatosteatosis. Low resolution mapping based on 20 intercrossed Lampe1 mice revealed linkage to a ∼14 Mb interval on the distal site of chromosome 11 containing a total of 285 genes. Exons and 50 bp flanking sequences within the critical region were enriched with sequence capture microarrays and subsequently analyzed by next-generation sequencing. Using this approach 98.1 percent of the targeted DNA was covered with a depth of 10 or more reads per nucleotide and 3 homozygote mutations were identified. Two mutations represented intronic nucleotide changes whereas one mutation affected a splice donor site in intron 11-12 of Palmitoyl Acetyl-coenzyme A oxygenase-1 (Acox1, causing skipping of exon 12. Phenotyping of Acox1(Lampe1 mutants revealed a progression from hepatosteatosis to steatohepatitis, and ultimately hepatocellular carcinoma. The current approach provides a highly efficient and affordable method to identify causative mutations induced by ENU mutagenesis and animal models relevant to human pathology.

  14. GNAS sequencing identifies IPMN-specific mutations in a subgroup of diminutive pancreatic cysts referred to as "incipient IPMNs".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthaei, Hanno; Wu, Jian; Dal Molin, Marco; Shi, Chanjuan; Perner, Sven; Kristiansen, Glen; Lingohr, Philipp; Kalff, Jörg C; Wolfgang, Christopher L; Kinzler, Kenneth W; Vogelstein, Bert; Maitra, Anirban; Hruban, Ralph H

    2014-03-01

    Incipient intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) are poorly described subcentimeter pancreatic cysts with papillae and mucin similar to IPMNs. They are larger than pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia but do not meet the cutoff size for IPMNs (≥ 1 cm). GNAS codon 201 mutations are hallmark genetic alterations of IPMNs. Hence, we sought to determine the GNAS status of incipient IPMNs to better classify these lesions. Incipient IPMNs from 3 institutions were histologically reassessed, manually microdissected, and the genomic DNA was extracted. Using a sensitive digital ligation technique, the mutational status of KRAS at codon 12 and GNAS at codon 201 was determined. We included 21 incipient IPMNs from 7 male and 12 female patients with a median age of 63 years (range, 40 to 76 y). Most patients underwent surgery for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (N = 8) or ampullary adenocarcinoma (N = 3). The median incipient IPMN size was 4 mm (range, 2 to 7 mm), and a majority had gastric-foveolar (N = 11) or intestinal (N = 5) differentiation. The maximum dysplasia observed was intermediate, and most of the lesions had intermediate-grade dysplasia. Mutational analysis revealed KRAS codon 12 mutations in all 21 incipient IPMNs, whereas 7 lesions (33%) in 7 individual patients harbored GNAS codon 201 mutations. The presence of GNAS 201 mutations in incipient IPMNs suggests that a fraction of these cysts are in fact small IPMNs. Morphologically, incipient IPMNs do not appear to be high-risk lesions. Additional studies in a larger cohort are needed to define the relationship of incipient IPMNs to larger IPMNs and, more importantly, to determine their clinical significance.

  15. Missense mutations in SH2D1A identified in patients with X-linked lymphoproliferative disease differentially affect the expression and function of SAP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hare, Nathan J; Ma, Cindy S; Alvaro, Frank; Nichols, Kim E; Tangye, Stuart G

    2006-07-01

    X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP) is an immunodeficiency resulting from mutations in SH2D1A, which encodes signalling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM)-associated protein (SAP). In addition to SLAM, SAP associates with several other cell-surface receptors including 2B4 (CD244), Ly9 (CD229), CD84 and NTB-A. SAP contains a single src-homology-2 domain and acts as an intracellular adaptor protein by recruiting the protein tyrosine kinase FynT to the cytoplasmic domains of some of these receptors, which results in the initiation of specific downstream signal transduction pathways. XLP is likely to result from perturbed signalling through one or more of these SAP-associating receptors. In this study, we identified missense (Y54C, I84T and F87S) and insertion (fs82 --> X103) mutations in four different kindreds affected by XLP. Each mutation dramatically reduced the half-life of SAP, thus diminishing its expression in primary lymphocytes as well as in transfected cell lines. Interestingly, although the Y54C and F87S mutations compromised the ability of SAP to associate with different receptors, the I84T mutation had no effect on the ability of SAP to bind SLAM, CD84 or 2B4. However, signalling downstream of SLAM was reduced in the presence of SAP bearing the I84T mutation. These findings indicate that, irrespective of the type of mutation, signalling through SAP-associating receptors in XLP can be impaired by reducing the expression of SAP, the ability of SAP to bind surface receptors and/or its ability to activate signal transduction downstream of the SLAM-SAP complex.

  16. Immunohistochemistry for BRAF(V600E) antibody VE1 performed in core needle biopsy samples identifies mutated papillary thyroid cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crescenzi, A; Guidobaldi, L; Nasrollah, N; Taccogna, S; Cicciarella Modica, D D; Turrini, L; Nigri, G; Romanelli, F; Valabrega, S; Giovanella, L; Onetti Muda, A; Trimboli, P

    2014-05-01

    BRAF(V600E) is the most frequent genetic mutation in papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) and has been reported as an independent predictor of poor prognosis of these patients. Current guidelines do not recommend the use of BRAF(V600E) mutational analysis on cytologic specimens from fine needle aspiration due to several reasons. Recently, immunohistochemistry using VE1, a mouse anti-human BRAF(V600E) antibody, has been reported as a highly reliable technique in detecting BRAF-mutated thyroid and nonthyroid cancers. The aim of this study was to test the reliability of VE1 immunohistochemistry on microhistologic samples from core needle biopsy (CNB) in identifying BRAF-mutated PTC. A series of 30 nodules (size ranging from 7 to 22 mm) from 30 patients who underwent surgery following CNB were included in the study. All these lesions had had inconclusive cytology. In all cases, both VE1 and BRAF(V600E) genotypes were evaluated. After surgery, final histology demonstrated 21 cancers and 9 benign lesions. CNB correctly diagnosed 20/20 PTC and 5/5 adenomatous nodules. One follicular thyroid cancer and 4 benign lesions were assessed at CNB as uncertain follicular neoplasm. VE1 immunohistochemistry revealed 8 mutated PTC and 22 negative cases. A 100% agreement was found when positive and negative VE1 results were compared with BRAF mutational status. These data are the first demonstration that VE1 immunohistochemistry performed on thyroid CNB samples perfectly matches with genetic analysis of BRAF status. Thus, VE1 antibody can be used on thyroid microhistologic specimens to detect BRAF(V600E)-mutated PTC before surgery.

  17. Candidate gene analysis of tooth agenesis identifies novel mutations in six genes and suggests significant role for WNT and EDA signaling and allele combinations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirpa Arte

    Full Text Available Failure to develop complete dentition, tooth agenesis, is a common developmental anomaly manifested most often as isolated but also as associated with many developmental syndromes. It typically affects third molars or one or few other permanent teeth but severe agenesis is also relatively prevalent. Here we report mutational analyses of seven candidate genes in a cohort of 127 probands with non-syndromic tooth agenesis. 82 lacked more than five permanent teeth excluding third molars, called as oligodontia. We identified 28 mutations, 17 of which were novel. Together with our previous reports, we have identified two mutations in MSX1, AXIN2 and EDARADD, five in PAX9, four in EDA and EDAR, and nine in WNT10A. They were observed in 58 probands (44%, with a mean number of missing teeth of 11.7 (range 4 to 34. Almost all of these probands had severe agenesis. Only few of the probands but several relatives with heterozygous genotypes of WNT10A or EDAR conformed to the common type of non-syndromic tooth agenesis, incisor-premolar hypodontia. Mutations in MSX1 and PAX9 affected predominantly posterior teeth, whereas both deciduous and permanent incisors were especially sensitive to mutations in EDA and EDAR. Many mutations in EDAR, EDARADD and WNT10A were present in several families. Biallelic or heterozygous genotypes of WNT10A were observed in 32 and hemizygous or heterozygous genotypes of EDA, EDAR or EDARADD in 22 probands. An EDARADD variant were in seven probands present together with variants in EDAR or WNT10A, suggesting combined phenotypic effects of alleles in distinct genes.

  18. Homozygosity mapping approach identifies a missense mutation in equine cyclophilin B (PPIB) associated with HERDA in the American Quarter Horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tryon, Robert C; White, Stephen D; Bannasch, Danika L

    2007-07-01

    Hereditary equine regional dermal asthenia (HERDA), a degenerative skin disease that affects the Quarter Horse breed, was localized to ECA1 by homozygosity mapping. Comparative genomics allowed the development of equine gene-specific markers which were used with a set of affected horses to detect a homozygous, identical-by-descent block spanning approximately 2.5 Mb, suggesting a recent origin for the HERDA mutation. We report a mutation in cyclophilin B (PPIB) as a novel, causal candidate gene for HERDA. A c.115G>A missense mutation in PPIB alters a glycine residue that has been conserved across vertebrates. The mutation was homozygous in 64 affected horses and segregates concordant with inbreeding loops apparent in the genealogy of 11 affected horses. Screening of control Quarter Horses indicates a 3.5% carrier frequency. The development of a test that can detect affected horses prior to development of clinical signs and carriers of HERDA will allow Quarter Horse breeders to eliminate this debilitating disease.

  19. A newly identified missense mutation in RET codon 666 is associated with the development of medullary thyroid carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Masanori; Hanamura, Toru; Ito, Ken-ichi; Uchino, Shinya; Sakurai, Akihiro; Komatsu, Mitsuhisa

    2014-01-01

    A 38-year-old woman with a thyroid nodule measuring approximately 2 cm was suspected to have medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) because of markedly elevated serum calcitonin and carcinoembryonic antigen levels. There were no signs of pheochromocytoma, whereas primary hyperparathyroidism was suspected based on the findings of inappropriate hypersecretion of parathyroid hormone although no parathyroid tumor was detected with imaging studies. RET mutation analysis revealed a novel germline missense mutation in codon 666, c.1997A>G (p.K666R). She underwent total thyroidectomy with lymphadenectomy and simultaneous total parathyroidectomy with autotransplantation of parathyroid tissue. She was given calcium lactate and alfacalcidol to prevent postoperative hypocalcemia. Pathological findings of the thyroid tumor were compatible with MTC, but the resected parathyroid glands were intact. To our knowledge, c.1997A>G (p.K666R) is a new RET mutation. This is a minor variant, but it is significant because of the possible pathogenicity in tumor formation. It is often difficult to determine whether MTC is generated as part of MEN2-related disease or familial MTC when it is a unique manifestation. In addition, it is still unclear whether all missense mutations in this codon reported previously will lead to the same clinical course and prognosis. Further careful observations of clinical presentation are required to determine the clinical features associated with this variant.

  20. DFNA8/12 caused by TECTA mutations is the most identified subtype of nonsyndromic autosomal dominant hearing loss

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hildebrand, M.S.; Morin, M.; Meyer, N.C.; Mayo, F.; Modamio-Hoybjor, S.; Mencia, A.; Olavarrieta, L.; Morales-Angulo, C.; Nishimura, C.J.; Workman, H.; DeLuca, A.P.; Castillo, I. del; Taylor, K.R.; Tompkins, B.; Goodman, C.W.; Schrauwen, I.; Wesemael, M.V.; Lachlan, K.; Shearer, A.E.; Braun, T.A.; Huygen, P.L.M.; Kremer, J.M.J.; Camp, G. van; Moreno, F.; Casavant, T.L.; Smith, R.J.; Moreno-Pelayo, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of DFNA8/DFNA12 (DFNA8/12), a type of autosomal dominant nonsyndromic hearing loss (ADNSHL), is unknown as comprehensive population-based genetic screening has not been conducted. We therefore completed unbiased screening for TECTA mutations in a Spanish cohort of 372 probands from AD

  1. Protein C/S ratio, an accurate and simple tool to identify carriers of a protein C gene mutation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Libourel, EJ; Meinardi, [No Value; de Kam, PJ; Ruiters, MHJ; van der Meer, J; van der Schaaf, W; Veenstra, R.

    Hereditary protein C deficiency is demonstrated by lowered protein C plasma levels in a patient and at least one first-degree relative. This approach is insufficient in some cases owing to overlapping protein C levels in carriers and non-carriers of a protein C gene mutation. The protein C/S ratio

  2. Phenotypic spectrum of eleven patients and five novel MTFMT mutations identified by exome sequencing and candidate gene screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haack, T.B.; Gorza, M.; Danhauser, K.; Mayr, J.A.; Haberberger, B.; Wieland, T.; Kremer, L.; Strecker, V.; Graf, E.; Memari, Y.; Ahting, U.; Kopajtich, R.; Wortmann, S.B.; Rodenburg, R.J.T.; Kotzaeridou, U.; Hoffmann, G.F.; Sperl, W.; Wittig, I.; Wilichowski, E.; Schottmann, G.; Schuelke, M.; Plecko, B.; Stephani, U.; Strom, T.M.; Meitinger, T.; Prokisch, H.; Freisinger, P.

    2014-01-01

    Defects of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) are associated with a wide range of clinical phenotypes and time courses. Combined OXPHOS deficiencies are mainly caused by mutations of nuclear genes that are involved in mitochondrial protein translation. Due to their genetic heterogeneit

  3. Exome capture and massively parallel sequencing identifies a novel HPSE2 mutation in a Saudi Arabian child with Ochoa (urofacial) syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Badr, Wisam; Al Bader, Suha; Otto, Edgar; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm; Ackley, Todd; Peng, Weiping; Xu, Jishu; Li, Jun; Owens, Kailey M; Bloom, David; Innis, Jeffrey W

    2011-10-01

    We describe a child of Middle Eastern descent by first-cousin coupling with idiopathic neurogenic bladder and high-grade vesicoureteral reflux at 1 year of age, whose characteristic facial grimace led to the diagnosis of Ochoa (urofacial) syndrome at age 5 years. We used homozygosity mapping, exome capture and paired-end sequencing to identify the disease causing mutation in the proband. We reviewed the literature with respect to the urologic manifestations of Ochoa syndrome. A large region of marker homozygosity was observed at 10q24, consistent with known autosomal recessive inheritance, family consanguinity and previous genetic mapping in other families with Ochoa syndrome. A homozygous mutation was identified in the proband in HPSE2: c.1374_1378delTGTGC, a deletion of 5 nucleotides in exon 10 that is predicted to lead to a frameshift followed by replacement of 132 C-terminal amino acids with 153 novel amino acids (p.Ala458Alafsdel132ins153). This mutation is novel relative to very recently published mutations in HPSE2 in other families. Early intervention and recognition of Ochoa syndrome with control of risk factors and close surveillance will decrease complications and renal failure.

  4. Targeted exome sequencing identifies novel compound heterozygous mutations in P3H1 in a fetus with osteogenesis imperfecta type VIII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yanru; Mei, Libin; Lv, Weigang; Li, Haoxian; Zhang, Rui; Pan, Qian; Tan, Hu; Guo, Jing; Luo, Xiaomei; Chen, Chen; Liang, Desheng; Wu, Lingqian

    2017-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a highly clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders. It is difficult to identify severe OI in the perinatal period. Here, a Chinese woman with a suspected history of fetal OI was referred to our institution at 19weeks of gestation, due to ultrasound inspection during antenatal screening, which revealed bulbous metaphyses, short humeri, and short thick bent femora in the fetus. Using targeted exome sequencing of 248 genes known to be involved in skeletal system diseases, we identified novel compound heterozygous mutation in the P3H1 gene in the fetus with OI type VIII: c.105_120del (p.D36Rfs*16) and c.2164C>T (p.Q722*). These two mutations were inherited from the father and mother, respectively. The mRNA level of P3H1 wasn't changed suggested that mRNA with this mutation escaped from nonsense-mediated RNA decay. Besides, the level of P3H1 was absence while the CRTAP was mildly decreased. In conclusion, our findings imply this novel compound heterozygous mutation as the molecular pathogenetic in a Chinese fetus with OI type VIII, and demonstrate that targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) is an accurate, rapid, and cost-effective method in the genetic diagnosis of fetal skeletal dysplasia with genetic and clinical heterogeneity, especially for autosomal recessive skeletal disorders.

  5. Exome Capture and Massively Parallel Sequencing Identifies a Novel HPSE2 Mutation in a Saudi Arabian Child with Ochoa (Urofacial) Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Badr, Wisam; Al Bader, Suha; Otto, Edgar; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm; Ackley, Todd; Peng, Weiping; Xu, Jishu; Li, Jun; Owens, Kailey M.; Bloom, David; Innis, Jeffrey W.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a child of Middle Eastern descent by first-cousin mating with idiopathic neurogenic bladder and high grade vesicoureteral reflux at 1 year of age, whose characteristic facial grimace led to the diagnosis of Ochoa (Urofacial) syndrome at age 5 years. We used homozygosity mapping, exome capture and paired end sequencing to identify the disease causing mutation in the proband. We reviewed the literature with respect to the urologic manifestations of Ochoa syndrome. A large region of marker homozygosity was observed at 10q24, consistent with known autosomal recessive inheritance, family consanguinity and previous genetic mapping in other families with Ochoa syndrome. A homozygous mutation was identified in the proband in HPSE2: c.1374_1378delTGTGC, a deletion of 5 nucleotides in exon 10 that is predicted to lead to a frameshift followed by replacement of 132 C-terminal amino acids with 153 novel amino acids (p.Ala458Alafsdel132ins153). This mutation is novel relative to very recently published mutations in HPSE2 in other families. Early intervention and recognition of Ochoa syndrome with control of risk factors and close surveillance will decrease complications and renal failure. PMID:21450525

  6. Newly identified mutations at the CSN1S1 gene in Ethiopian goats affect casein content and coagulation properties of their milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestawet, T A; Girma, A; Adnøy, T; Devold, T G; Vegarud, G E

    2013-08-01

    Very high casein content and good coagulation properties previously observed in some Ethiopian goat breeds led to investigating the αs1-casein (CSN1S1) gene in these breeds. Selected regions of the CSN1S1 gene were sequenced in 115 goats from 5 breeds (2 indigenous: Arsi-Bale and Somali, 1 exotic: Boer, and 2 crossbreeds: Boer × Arsi-Bale and Boer × Somali). The DNA analysis resulted in 35 new mutations: 3 in exons, 3 in the 5' untranslated region (UTR), and 29 in the introns. The mutations in exons that resulted in an amino acid shift were then picked to evaluate their influence on individual casein content (αs1-, αs2-, β-, and κ-CN), micellar size, and coagulation properties in the milk from the 5 goat breeds. A mutation at nucleotide 10657 (exon 10) involved a transversion: CAG→CCG, resulting in an amino acid exchange Gln77→Pro77. This mutation was associated with the indigenous breeds only. Two new mutations, at nucleotide 6072 (exon 4) and 12165 (exon 12), revealed synonymous transitions: GTC→GTT in Val15 and AGA→AGG in Arg100 of the mature protein. Transitions G→A and C→T at nucleotides 1374 and 1866, respectively, occurred in the 5' UTR, whereas the third mutation involved a transversion T→G at nucleotide location 1592. The goats were grouped into homozygote new (CC), homozygote reference (AA), and heterozygote (CA) based on the nucleotide that involved the transversion. The content of αs1-CN (15.32g/kg) in milk samples of goats homozygous (CC) for this newly identified mutation, Gln77→Pro77 was significantly higher than in milks of heterozygous (CA; 9.05g/kg) and reference (AA; 7.61g/kg) genotype animals. The αs2-, β-, and κ-CN contents showed a similar pattern. Milk from goats with a homozygous new mutation had significantly lower micellar size. Milk from both homozygote and heterozygote new-mutation goats had significantly shorter coagulation rate and stronger gel than the reference genotype. Except the transversion, the

  7. Genomic Analysis of hESC Pedigrees Identifies De Novo Mutations and Enables Determination of the Timing and Origin of Mutational Events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalit Ben-Yosef

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Given the association between mutational load and cancer, the observation that genetic aberrations are frequently found in human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs is of concern. Prior studies in human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs have shown that deletions and regions of loss of heterozygosity (LOH tend to arise during reprogramming and early culture, whereas duplications more frequently occur during long-term culture. For the corresponding experiments in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs, we studied two sets of hESC lines: one including the corresponding parental DNA and the other generated from single blastomeres from four sibling embryos. Here, we show that genetic aberrations observed in hESCs can originate during preimplantation embryo development and/or early derivation. These early aberrations are mainly deletions and LOH, whereas aberrations arising during long-term culture of hESCs are more frequently duplications. Our results highlight the importance of close monitoring of genomic integrity and the development of improved methods for derivation and culture of hPSCs.

  8. Two novel exonic point mutations in HEXA identified in a juvenile Tay-Sachs patient: role of alternative splicing and nonsense-mediated mRNA decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levit, A; Nutman, D; Osher, E; Kamhi, E; Navon, R

    2010-06-01

    We have identified three mutations in the beta-hexoseaminidase A (HEXA) gene in a juvenile Tay-Sachs disease (TSD) patient, which exhibited a reduced level of HEXA mRNA. Two mutations are novel, c.814G>A (p.Gly272Arg) and c.1305C>T (p.=), located in exon 8 and in exon 11, respectively. The third mutation, c.1195A>G (p.Asn399Asp) in exon 11, has been previously characterized as a common polymorphism in African-Americans. Hex A activity measured in TSD Glial cells, transfected with HEXA cDNA constructs bearing these mutations, was unaltered from the activity level measured in normal HEXA cDNA. Analysis of RT-PCR products revealed three aberrant transcripts in the patient, one where exon 8 was absent, one where exon 11 was absent and a third lacking both exons 10 and 11. All three novel transcripts contain frameshifts resulting in premature termination codons (PTCs). Transfection of mini-gene constructs carrying the c.814G>A and c.1305C>T mutations proved that the two mutations result in exon skipping. mRNAs that harbor a PTC are detected and degraded by the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) pathway to prevent synthesis of abnormal proteins. However, although NMD is functional in the patient's fibroblasts, aberrant transcripts are still present. We suggest that the level of correctly spliced transcripts as well as the efficiency in which NMD degrade the PTC-containing transcripts, apparently plays an important role in the phenotype severity of the unique patient and thus should be considered as a potential target for drug therapy.

  9. Cost-effective screening of DNMT3A coding sequence identifies somatic mutation in pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szarzyńska-Zawadzka, Bronisława; Kosmalska, Maria; Sędek, Łukasz; Sonsala, Alicja; Twardoch, Magdalena; Kowalczyk, Jerzy R; Szczepański, Tomasz; Witt, Michał; Dawidowska, Małgorzata

    2017-09-14

    In pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) risk assignment schemes preclude reliable prediction of outcome and thus new prognostic factors are needed. Mutations in DNMT3A are candidate prognostic and classification markers in adults with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and T-ALL and thus were considered as candidates prognostic markers in pediatric T-ALL. DNMT3A mutational status was investigated in 74 pediatric T-ALL samples collected at diagnosis. We applied high resolution melt (HRM) analysis and Sanger sequencing to study the hotspot position (R882) within catalytic MTase domain and exons coding for other functional domains of the protein, known to be mutated in the wide spectrum of hematological malignancies. We demonstrate a low frequency of mutations in DNMT3A coding sequence in pediatric T-ALL (1.4%, n=1/74). We identified missense mutation, p.Ala644Thr, which has not been described previously in pediatric T-ALL, but is recurrent in adults with T-ALL and AML. Low frequency of DNMT3A mutations in pediatric T-ALL is in striking contrast to adult T-ALL and renders the necessity for the search of other candidate prognostic markers. Combined Sanger sequencing-HRM approach offers a cost-effective option for genotyping DNMT3A coding sequence, with potential clinical application in other hematological malignancies. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. Clinical and Molecular Characterization of a Novel PLIN1 Frameshift Mutation Identified in Patients With Familial Partial Lipodystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Kozusko, Kristina; Tsang, Venessa H M; Bottomley, William; Cho, Yoon-Hi; Gandotra, Sheetal; Mimmack, Michael; Lim, Koini; Isaac, Iona; Patel, Satish; Saudek, Vladimir; O’Rahilly, Stephen; Srinivasan, Shubha; Greenfield, Jerry R.; Barroso, Ines; Campbell, Lesley V.

    2015-01-01

    This is the author accepted manuscript. The final version is available from the American Diabetes Association via http://dx.doi.org/10.2337/db14-0104 Perilipin 1 is a lipid droplet coat protein predominantly expressed in adipocytes, where it inhibits basal and facilitates stimulated lipolysis. Loss-of-function mutations in the PLIN1 gene were recently reported in patients with a novel subtype of familial partial lipodystrophy, designated as FPLD4. We now report the identification and chara...

  11. APOA5 Q97X mutation identified through homozygosity mapping causes severe hypertriglyceridemia in a Chilean consanguineous family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dussaillant, Catalina; Serrano, Valentina; Maiz, Alberto; Eyheramendy, Susana; Cataldo, Luis Rodrigo; Chavez, Matías; Smalley, Susan V; Fuentes, Marcela; Rigotti, Attilio; Rubio, Lorena; Lagos, Carlos F; Martinez, José Alfredo; Santos, José Luis

    2012-11-15

    Severe hypertriglyceridemia (HTG) has been linked to defects in LPL, APOC2, APOA5, LMF1 and GBIHBP1 genes. However, a number of severe HTG cases are probably caused by as yet unidentified mutations. Very high triglyceride plasma levels (>112 mmol/L at diagnosis) were found in two sisters of a Chilean consanguineous family, which is strongly suggestive of a recessive highly penetrant mutation. The aim of this study was to determine the genetic locus responsible for the severe HTG in this family. We carried out a genome-wide linkage study with nearly 300,000 biallelic markers (Illumina Human CytoSNP-12 panel). Using the homozygosity mapping strategy, we searched for chromosome regions with excess of homozygous genotypes in the affected cases compared to non-affected relatives. A large homozygous segment was found in the long arm of chromosome 11, with more than 2,500 consecutive homozygous SNP shared by the proband with her affected sister, and containing the APOA5/A4/C3/A1 cluster. Direct sequencing of the APOA5 gene revealed a known homozygous nonsense Q97X mutation (p.Gln97Ter) found in both affected sisters but not in non-affected relatives nor in a sample of unrelated controls. The Q97X mutation of the APOA5 gene in homozygous status is responsible for the severe hypertriglyceridemia in this family. We have shown that homozygosity mapping correctly pinpointed the genomic region containing the gene responsible for severe hypertriglyceridemia in this consanguineous Chilean family.

  12. APOA5 Q97X Mutation Identified through homozygosity mapping causes severe hypertriglyceridemia in a Chilean consanguineous family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dussaillant Catalina

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Severe hypertriglyceridemia (HTG has been linked to defects in LPL, APOC2, APOA5, LMF1 and GBIHBP1 genes. However, a number of severe HTG cases are probably caused by as yet unidentified mutations. Very high triglyceride plasma levels (>112 mmol/L at diagnosis were found in two sisters of a Chilean consanguineous family, which is strongly suggestive of a recessive highly penetrant mutation. The aim of this study was to determine the genetic locus responsible for the severe HTG in this family. Methods We carried out a genome-wide linkage study with nearly 300,000 biallelic markers (Illumina Human CytoSNP-12 panel. Using the homozygosity mapping strategy, we searched for chromosome regions with excess of homozygous genotypes in the affected cases compared to non-affected relatives. Results A large homozygous segment was found in the long arm of chromosome 11, with more than 2,500 consecutive homozygous SNP shared by the proband with her affected sister, and containing the APOA5/A4/C3/A1 cluster. Direct sequencing of the APOA5 gene revealed a known homozygous nonsense Q97X mutation (p.Gln97Ter found in both affected sisters but not in non-affected relatives nor in a sample of unrelated controls. Conclusion The Q97X mutation of the APOA5 gene in homozygous status is responsible for the severe hypertriglyceridemia in this family. We have shown that homozygosity mapping correctly pinpointed the genomic region containing the gene responsible for severe hypertriglyceridemia in this consanguineous Chilean family.

  13. Altered-function p53 missense mutations identified in breast cancers can have subtle effects on transactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Jennifer J.; Inga, Alberto; Conway, Kathleen; Edmiston, Sharon; Carey, Lisa A.; Wu, Lin; Resnick, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Mutations of the sequence-specific master regulator p53 that alter transactivation function from promoter response elements (REs) could result in changes in the strength of gene activation or spectra of genes regulated. Such mutations in this tumor suppressor might lead to dramatic phenotypic changes and diversification of cell responses to stress. We have determined “functional fingerprints” of sporadic breast cancer-related p53 mutants many of which are also associated with familial cancer proneness such as the Li-Fraumeni Syndrome and germline BRCA1/2 mutant-associated cancers. The ability of p53, wild type and mutants, to transactivate from 11 human target REs has been assessed at variable expression levels using a cellular, isogenomic yeast model system that allows for the rapid analysis of p53 function using a qualitative and a quantitative reporter. Among 50 missense mutants, 29 were classified as loss-of-function. The remaining 21 retained transactivation towards at least one RE. At high levels of galactose induced p53 expression, 12/21 mutants that retain transactivation appeared similar to WT. When the level of galactose was reduced, transactivation defects could be revealed suggesting that some breast cancer related mutants can have subtle changes in transcription. These findings have been compared with clinical data from an ongoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy treatment trial for locally advanced breast tumors. The functional and nonfunctional missense mutations may distinguish tumors in terms of demographics, appearance and relapse, implying that heterogeneity in the functionality of specific p53 mutations could impact clinical behavior and outcome. PMID:20407015

  14. Whole-Exome Sequencing Identifies Homozygous GPR161 Mutation in a Family with Pituitary Stalk Interruption Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaca, Ender; Buyukkaya, Ramazan; Pehlivan, Davut; Charng, Wu-Lin; Yaykasli, Kursat O.; Bayram, Yavuz; Gambin, Tomasz; Withers, Marjorie; Atik, Mehmed M.; Arslanoglu, Ilknur; Bolu, Semih; Erdin, Serkan; Buyukkaya, Ayla; Yaykasli, Emine; Jhangiani, Shalini N.; Muzny, Donna M.; Gibbs, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Pituitary stalk interruption syndrome (PSIS) is a rare, congenital anomaly of the pituitary gland characterized by pituitary gland insufficiency, thin or discontinuous pituitary stalk, anterior pituitary hypoplasia, and ectopic positioning of the posterior pituitary gland (neurohypophysis). The clinical presentation of patients with PSIS varies from isolated growth hormone (GH) deficiency to combined pituitary insufficiency and accompanying extrapituitary findings. Mutations in HESX1, LHX4, OTX2, SOX3, and PROKR2 have been associated with PSIS in less than 5% of cases; thus, the underlying genetic etiology for the vast majority of cases remains to be determined. Objective: We applied whole-exome sequencing (WES) to a consanguineous family with two affected siblings who have pituitary gland insufficiency and radiographic findings of hypoplastic (thin) pituitary gland, empty sella, ectopic neurohypophysis, and interrupted pitiutary stalk—characteristic clinical diagnostic findings of PSIS. Design and Participants: WES was applied to two affected and one unaffected siblings. Results: WES of two affected and one unaffected sibling revealed a unique homozygous missense mutation in GPR161, which encodes the orphan G protein–coupled receptor 161, a protein responsible for transducing extracellular signals across the plasma membrane into the cell. Conclusion: Mutations of GPR161 may be implicated as a potential novel cause of PSIS. PMID:25322266

  15. Novel mutation identified in severe early-onset tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated periodic syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishna, Suhas M; Grimm, Amy; Broderick, Lori

    2017-04-20

    Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor-Associated Periodic Syndrome (TRAPS) is the second most common heritable autoinflammatory disease, typically presenting in pre-school aged children with fever episodes lasting 1-3 weeks. Systemic symptoms can include rash, myalgia, ocular inflammation, and serositis. Here we report an unusual presentation of TRAPS in a 7 month old girl who presented with only persistent fever. She was initially diagnosed with incomplete Kawasaki Disease and received IVIG and infliximab; however, her fevers quickly recurred. Subsequent testing revealed a urinary tract infection, but she did not improve despite appropriate therapy. As fever continued, she developed significant abdominal distension with imaging concerning for appendicitis, followed by hyperthermia and hemodynamic instability. Given her protracted clinical course and maternal history of a poorly defined inflammatory condition, an autoinflammatory disease was considered. Therapy with anakinra was initiated, resulting in rapid resolution of fever and normalization of inflammatory markers. She was found to have a previously unreported mutation, Thr90Pro, in the TNFRSF1A gene associated with TRAPS. This novel mutation was also confirmed in the patient's mother and maternal uncle. This report reviews a severe case of TRAPS in infancy associated with a novel mutation, Thr90Pro, in the TNFRSF1A gene, and emphasizes that autoinflammatory disease should be considered in the differential of infants with fever of unknown origin.

  16. Clinical and molecular characterization of a novel PLIN1 frameshift mutation identified in patients with familial partial lipodystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozusko, Kristina; Tsang, Venessa H M; Bottomley, William; Cho, Yoon-Hi; Gandotra, Sheetal; Mimmack, Michael; Lim, Koini; Isaac, Iona; Patel, Satish; Saudek, Vladimir; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Srinivasan, Shubha; Greenfield, Jerry R; Barroso, Ines; Campbell, Lesley V; Savage, David B

    2015-01-01

    Perilipin 1 is a lipid droplet coat protein predominantly expressed in adipocytes, where it inhibits basal and facilitates stimulated lipolysis. Loss-of-function mutations in the PLIN1 gene were recently reported in patients with a novel subtype of familial partial lipodystrophy, designated as FPLD4. We now report the identification and characterization of a novel heterozygous frameshift mutation affecting the carboxy-terminus (439fs) of perilipin 1 in two unrelated families. The mutation cosegregated with a similar phenotype including partial lipodystrophy, severe insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, extreme hypertriglyceridemia, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in both families. Poor metabolic control despite maximal medical therapy prompted two patients to undergo bariatric surgery, with remarkably beneficial consequences. Functional studies indicated that expression levels of the mutant protein were lower than wild-type protein, and in stably transfected preadipocytes the mutant protein was associated with smaller lipid droplets. Interestingly, unlike the previously reported 398 and 404 frameshift mutants, this variant binds and stabilizes ABHD5 expression but still fails to inhibit basal lipolysis as effectively as wild-type perilipin 1. Collectively, these findings highlight the physiological need for exquisite regulation of neutral lipid storage within adipocyte lipid droplets, as well as the possible metabolic benefits of bariatric surgery in this serious disease.

  17. A novel nonsense mutation in the DMP1 gene identified by a genome-wide association study is responsible for inherited rickets in Corriedale sheep.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Zhao

    Full Text Available Inherited rickets of Corriedale sheep is characterized by decreased growth rate, thoracic lordosis and angular limb deformities. Previous outcross and backcross studies implicate inheritance as a simple autosomal recessive disorder. A genome wide association study was conducted using the Illumina OvineSNP50 BeadChip on 20 related sheep comprising 17 affected and 3 carriers. A homozygous region of 125 consecutive single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP loci was identified in all affected sheep, covering a region of 6 Mb on ovine chromosome 6. Among 35 candidate genes in this region, the dentin matrix protein 1 gene (DMP1 was sequenced to reveal a nonsense mutation 250C/T on exon 6. This mutation introduced a stop codon (R145X and could truncate C-terminal amino acids. Genotyping by PCR-RFLP for this mutation showed all 17 affected sheep were "T T" genotypes; the 3 carriers were "C T"; 24 phenotypically normal related sheep were either "C T" or "C C"; and 46 unrelated normal control sheep from other breeds were all "C C". The other SNPs in DMP1 were not concordant with the disease and can all be ruled out as candidates. Previous research has shown that mutations in the DMP1 gene are responsible for autosomal recessive hypophosphatemic rickets in humans. Dmp1_knockout mice exhibit rickets phenotypes. We believe the R145X mutation to be responsible for the inherited rickets found in Corriedale sheep. A simple diagnostic test can be designed to identify carriers with the defective "T" allele. Affected sheep could be used as animal models for this form of human rickets, and for further investigation of the role of DMP1 in phosphate homeostasis.

  18. Exome sequencing identifies a novel EP300 frame shift mutation in a patient with features that overlap Cornelia de Lange syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Susan A; Robinson, Haynes B; Kohler, Lisa J; Agamanolis, Dimitris; Sterbenz, George; Khalifa, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RTS) and Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) are genetically heterogeneous multiple anomalies syndromes, each having a distinctive facial gestalt. Two genes (CREBBP and EP300) are known to cause RTS, and five (NIPBL, SMC1A, SMC3, RAD21, and HDAC8) have been associated with CdLS. A diagnosis of RTS or CdLS is molecularly confirmed in only 65% of clinically identified cases, suggesting that additional causative genes exist for both conditions. In addition, although EP300 and CREBBP encode homologous proteins and perform similar functions, only eight EP300 positive RTS patients have been reported, suggesting that patients with EP300 mutations might be escaping clinical recognition. We report on a child with multiple congenital abnormalities and intellectual disability whose facial features and complex phenotype resemble CdLS. However, no mutations in CdLS-related genes were identified. Rather, a novel EP300 mutation was found on whole exome sequencing. Possible links between EP300 and genes causing CdLS are evident in the literature. Both EP300 and HDAC8 are involved in the regulation of TP53 transcriptional activity. In addition, p300 and other chromatin associated proteins, including NIPBL, SMCA1, and SMC3, have been found at enhancer regions in different cell types. It is therefore possible that EP300 and CdLS-related genes are involved in additional shared pathways, producing overlapping phenotypes. As whole exome sequencing becomes more widely utilized, the diverse phenotypes associated with EP300 mutations should be better understood. In the meantime, testing for EP300 mutations in those with features of CdLS may be warranted. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Diagnostic exome sequencing identifies two novel IQSEC2 mutations associated with X-linked intellectual disability with seizures: implications for genetic counseling and clinical diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandomi, Stephanie K; Farwell Gonzalez, K D; Parra, M; Shahmirzadi, L; Mancuso, J; Pichurin, P; Temme, R; Dugan, S; Zeng, W; Tang, Sha

    2014-06-01

    Intellectual disability is a heterogeneous disorder with a wide phenotypic spectrum. Over 1,700 OMIM genes have been associated with this condition, many of which reside on the X-chromosome. The IQSEC2 gene is located on chromosome Xp11.22 and is known to play a significant role in the maintenance and homeostasis of the brain. Mutations in IQSEC2 have been historically associated with nonsyndromic X-linked intellectual disability. Case reports of affected probands show phenotypic overlap with conditions associated with pathogenic MECP2, FOXG1, CDKL5, and MEF2C gene mutations. Affected individuals, however, have also been identified as presenting with additional clinical features including seizures, autistic-behavior, psychiatric problems, and delayed language skills. To our knowledge, only 5 deleterious mutations and 2 intragenic duplications have been previously reported in IQSEC2. Here we report two novel IQSEC2 de novo truncating mutations identified through diagnostic exome sequencing in two severely affected unrelated male probands manifesting developmental delay, seizures, hypotonia, plagiocephaly, and abnormal MRI findings. Overall, diagnostic exome sequencing established a molecular diagnosis for two patients in whom traditional testing methods were uninformative while expanding on the mutational and phenotypic spectrum. In addition, our data suggests that IQSEC2 may be more common than previously appreciated, accounting for approximately 9 % (2/22) of positive findings among patients with seizures referred for diagnostic exome sequencing. Further, these data supports recently published data suggesting that IQSEC2 plays a more significant role in the development of X-linked intellectual disability with seizures than previously anticipated.

  20. A Next-Generation Sequencing Approach to Identify Gene Mutations in Early- and Late-Onset Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Patients of an Italian Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubattu, Speranza; Bozzao, Cristina; Pennacchini, Ermelinda; Pagannone, Erika; Musumeci, Beatrice Maria; Piane, Maria; Germani, Aldo; Savio, Camilla; Francia, Pietro; Volpe, Massimo; Autore, Camillo; Chessa, Luciana

    2016-07-30

    Sequencing of sarcomere protein genes in patients fulfilling the clinical diagnostic criteria for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) identifies a disease-causing mutation in 35% to 60% of cases. Age at diagnosis and family history may increase the yield of mutations screening. In order to assess whether Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) may fulfil the molecular diagnostic needs in HCM, we included 17 HCM-related genes in a sequencing panel run on PGM IonTorrent. We selected 70 HCM patients, 35 with early (≤25 years) and 35 with late (≥65 years) diagnosis of disease onset. All samples had a 98.6% average of target regions, with coverage higher than 20× (mean coverage 620×). We identified 41 different mutations (seven of them novel) in nine genes: MYBPC3 (17/41 = 41%); MYH7 (10/41 = 24%); TNNT2, CAV3 and MYH6 (3/41 = 7.5% each); TNNI3 (2/41 = 5%); GLA, MYL2, and MYL3 (1/41=2.5% each). Mutation detection rate was 30/35 (85.7%) in early-onset and 8/35 (22.9%) in late-onset HCM patients, respectively (p < 0.0001). The overall detection rate for patients with positive family history was 84%, and 90.5% in patients with early disease onset. In our study NGS revealed higher mutations yield in patients with early onset and with a family history of HCM. Appropriate patient selection can increase the yield of genetic testing and make diagnostic testing cost-effective.

  1. Reduction in hepatic drug metabolizing CYP3A4 activities caused by P450 oxidoreductase mutations identified in patients with disordered steroid metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flueck, Christa E.; Mullis, Primus E. [Pediatric Endocrinology, Diabetology and Metabolism, Department of Clinical Research, University of Bern, Tiefenaustrasse 120c, CH 3004 Bern (Switzerland); Pandey, Amit V., E-mail: amit@pandeylab.org [Pediatric Endocrinology, Diabetology and Metabolism, Department of Clinical Research, University of Bern, Tiefenaustrasse 120c, CH 3004 Bern (Switzerland)

    2010-10-08

    Research highlights: {yields} Cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4), metabolizes 50% of drugs in clinical use and requires NADPH-P450 reductase (POR). {yields} Mutations in human POR cause congenital adrenal hyperplasia from diminished activities of steroid metabolizing P450s. {yields} We are reporting that mutations in POR may reduce CYP3A4 activity. {yields} POR mutants Y181D, A457H, Y459H, V492E and R616X lost 99%, while A287P, C569Y and V608F lost 60-85% CYP3A4 activity. {yields} Reduction of CYP3A4 activity may cause increased risk of drug toxicities/adverse drug reactions in patients with POR mutations. -- Abstract: Cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4), the major P450 present in human liver metabolizes approximately half the drugs in clinical use and requires electrons supplied from NADPH through NADPH-P450 reductase (POR, CPR). Mutations in human POR cause a rare form of congenital adrenal hyperplasia from diminished activities of steroid metabolizing P450s. In this study we examined the effect of mutations in POR on CYP3A4 activity. We used purified preparations of wild type and mutant human POR and in vitro reconstitution with purified CYP3A4 to perform kinetic studies. We are reporting that mutations in POR identified in patients with disordered steroidogenesis/Antley-Bixler syndrome (ABS) may reduce CYP3A4 activity, potentially affecting drug metabolism in individuals carrying mutant POR alleles. POR mutants Y181D, A457H, Y459H, V492E and R616X had more than 99% loss of CYP3A4 activity, while POR mutations A287P, C569Y and V608F lost 60-85% activity. Loss of CYP3A4 activity may result in increased risk of drug toxicities and adverse drug reactions in patients with POR mutations.

  2. Targeted next generation sequencing of a panel of autism-related genes identifies an EHMT1 mutation in a Kleefstra syndrome patient with autism and normal intellectual performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, István; Németh, Krisztina; Pentelényi, Klára; Balicza, Péter; Balázs, Anna; Molnár, Mária Judit; Román, Viktor; Nagy, József; Lévay, György; Kobolák, Julianna; Dinnyés, András

    2016-12-31

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder with unknown genetic and environmental causation in most of the affected individuals. On the other hand, there are a growing number of ASD-associated syndromes, where the exact genetic origin can be revealed. Here we report a method, which included the targeted next generation sequencing (NGS) and filtering of 101 ASD associated genes, followed by database search. Next, RNA sequencing was used to study the region of interest at the transcriptional level. Using this workflow, we identified a de novo mutation in the euchromatic histone-lysine N-methyltransferase 1 gene (EHMT1) of an autistic patient with dysmorphisms. Sequencing of EHMT1 transcripts showed that the premature termination codon (Trp1138Ter) created by a single nucleotide change elicited nonsense-mediated mRNA decay, which led to haploinsufficiency already at the transcriptional level. Database and literature search provided evidence that this mutation caused Kleefstra syndrome (KS), which was confirmed by the presence of the disorder-specific phenotype in the patient. We provide a proof of principle that the implemented method is capable to elucidate the genetic etiology of individuals with syndromic autism. The novel mutation detected in the EHMT1 gene is responsible for KS's symptoms. In addition, further genetic factors might be involved in the ASD pathogenesis of the patient including a missense DPP6 mutation (Arg322Cys), which segregated with the autistic phenotype within the family.

  3. An Activating Mutation in sos-1 Identifies Its Dbl Domain as a Critical Inhibitor of the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Pathway during Caenorhabditis elegans Vulval Development▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modzelewska, Katarzyna; Elgort, Marc G.; Huang, Jingyu; Jongeward, Gregg; Lauritzen, Amara; Yoon, Charles H.; Sternberg, Paul W.; Moghal, Nadeem

    2007-01-01

    Proper regulation of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK)-Ras-mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways is critical for normal development and the prevention of cancer. SOS is a dual-function guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) that catalyzes exchange on Ras and Rac. Although the physiologic role of SOS and its CDC25 domain in RTK-mediated Ras activation is well established, the in vivo function of its Dbl Rac GEF domain is less clear. We have identified a novel gain-of-function missense mutation in the Dbl domain of Caenorhabditis elegans SOS-1 that promotes epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling in vivo. Our data indicate that a major developmental function of the Dbl domain is to inhibit EGF-dependent MAPK activation. The amount of inhibition conferred by the Dbl domain is equal to that of established trans-acting inhibitors of the EGFR pathway, including c-Cbl and RasGAP, and more than that of MAPK phosphatase. In conjunction with molecular modeling, our data suggest that the C. elegans mutation, as well as an equivalent mutation in human SOS1, activates the MAPK pathway by disrupting an autoinhibitory function of the Dbl domain on Ras activation. Our work suggests that functionally similar point mutations in humans could directly contribute to disease. PMID:17339331

  4. An activating mutation in sos-1 identifies its Dbl domain as a critical inhibitor of the epidermal growth factor receptor pathway during Caenorhabditis elegans vulval development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modzelewska, Katarzyna; Elgort, Marc G; Huang, Jingyu; Jongeward, Gregg; Lauritzen, Amara; Yoon, Charles H; Sternberg, Paul W; Moghal, Nadeem

    2007-05-01

    Proper regulation of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK)-Ras-mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways is critical for normal development and the prevention of cancer. SOS is a dual-function guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) that catalyzes exchange on Ras and Rac. Although the physiologic role of SOS and its CDC25 domain in RTK-mediated Ras activation is well established, the in vivo function of its Dbl Rac GEF domain is less clear. We have identified a novel gain-of-function missense mutation in the Dbl domain of Caenorhabditis elegans SOS-1 that promotes epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling in vivo. Our data indicate that a major developmental function of the Dbl domain is to inhibit EGF-dependent MAPK activation. The amount of inhibition conferred by the Dbl domain is equal to that of established trans-acting inhibitors of the EGFR pathway, including c-Cbl and RasGAP, and more than that of MAPK phosphatase. In conjunction with molecular modeling, our data suggest that the C. elegans mutation, as well as an equivalent mutation in human SOS1, activates the MAPK pathway by disrupting an autoinhibitory function of the Dbl domain on Ras activation. Our work suggests that functionally similar point mutations in humans could directly contribute to disease.

  5. Whole Exome Sequencing Identifies a Novel and a Recurrent Mutation in BBS2 Gene in a Family with Bardet-Biedl Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Mong Bee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS is a rare autosomal recessive disorder known to be caused by mutations in at least 19 BBS genes. We report the genetic analysis of a patient with indisputable features of BBS including cardinal features such as postaxial polydactyly, retinitis pigmentosa, obesity, and kidney failure. Taking advantage of next-generation sequencing technology, we applied whole exome sequencing (WES with Sanger direct sequencing to the proband and her unaffected mother. A pair of heterozygous nonsense mutations in BBS2 gene was identified in the proband, one being novel and the other recurrent. The novel mutation, p.Y644X, resides in exon 16 and was also found in the heterozygous state in the mother. This mutation is not currently found in the dsSNP and 1000 Genome SNP databases and is predicted to be disease causing by in silico analysis. This study highlights the potential for a rapid and precise detection of disease causing gene using WES in genetically heterogeneous disorders such as BBS.

  6. Identification of three novel OA1 gene mutations identified in three families misdiagnosed with congenital nystagmus and carrier status determination by real-time quantitative PCR assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamel Christian

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background X-linked ocular albinism type 1 (OA1 is caused by mutations in OA1 gene, which encodes a membrane glycoprotein localised to melanosomes. OA1 mainly affects pigment production in the eye, resulting in optic changes associated with albinism including hypopigmentation of the retina, nystagmus, strabismus, foveal hypoplasia, abnormal crossing of the optic fibers and reduced visual acuity. Affected Caucasian males usually appear to have normal skin and hair pigment. Results We identified three previously undescribed mutations consisting of two intragenic deletions (one encompassing exon 6, the other encompassing exons 7–8, and a point mutation (310delG in exon 2. We report the development of a new method for diagnosis of heterozygous deletions in OA1 gene based on measurement of gene copy number using real-time quantitative PCR from genomic DNA. Conclusion The identification of OA1 mutations in families earlier reported as families with hereditary nystagmus indicate that ocular albinism type 1 is probably underdiagnosed. Our method of real-time quantitative PCR of OA1 exons with DMD exon as external standard performed on the LightCycler™ allows quick and accurate carrier-status assessment for at-risk females.

  7. Novel PSEN1 mutations (H214N and R220P) associated with familial Alzheimer's disease identified by targeted exome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccoli, Elena; Rossi, Giacomina; Rossi, Tommaso; Pelliccioni, Giuseppe; D'Amato, Ilaria; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Di Fede, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    Autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease (AD) is caused by mutations in amyloid precursor protein, presenilin 1 (PSEN1), and presenilin 2 genes and is mostly associated with early-onset form of AD (EOAD), whereas very few mutations were also found in late-onset AD (LOAD) cases. Because of the clinical overlapping between AD and other degenerative dementias such as frontotemporal dementias, a wide-spectrum genetic analysis should be envisaged in the differential diagnosis of this group of disorders. We used next-generation sequencing techniques to analyze 10 genes involved in dementia on a cohort of 20 EOAD and 20 LOAD cases. We found 5 rare coding variants (frequency <1%). PSEN1 H214N mutation, identified in a case of familial EOAD and PSEN1 R220P, found in a case of familial LOAD, are predicted to be pathogenic. These findings confirm the contribution of PSEN1 genetic variants also to LOAD, underlining the need of extending the genetic screening of presenilin mutations to LOAD patients. Two variants in microtubule-associated protein tau and 1 in progranulin appeared to be benign polymorphisms, showing no major contribution of these genes to AD.

  8. Non syndromic childhood onset congenital sideroblastic anemia: A report of 13 patients identified with an ALAS2 or SLC25A38 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Rouzic, Marie-Amelyne; Fouquet, Cyrielle; Leblanc, Thierry; Touati, Mohamed; Fouyssac, Fanny; Vermylen, Christiane; Jäkel, Nadja; Guichard, Jean-François; Maloum, Karim; Toutain, Fabienne; Lutz, Patrick; Perel, Yves; Manceau, Hana; Kannengiesser, Caroline; Vannier, Jean-Pierre

    2017-07-01

    The most frequent germline mutations responsible for non syndromic congenital sideroblastic anemia are identified in ALAS2 and SLC25A38 genes. Iron overload is a key issue and optimal chelation therapy should be used to limit its adverse effects on the development of children. Our multicentre retrospective descriptive study compared the strategies for diagnosis and management of congenital sideroblastic anemia during the follow-up of six patients with an ALAS2 mutation and seven patients with an SLC25A38 mutation. We described in depth the clinical, biological and radiological phenotype of these patients at diagnosis and during follow-up and highlighted our results with a review of available evidence and data on the management strategies for congenital sideroblastic anemia. This report confirms the considerable variability in manifestations among patients with ALAS2 or SLC25A38 mutations and draws attention to differences in the assessment and the monitoring of iron overload and its complications. The use of an international registry would certainly help defining recommendations for the management of these rare disorders to improve patient outcome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Fine mapping of the 1p36 deletion syndrome identifies mutation of PRDM16 as a cause of cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arndt, Anne-Karin; Schafer, Sebastian; Drenckhahn, Jorg-Detlef

    2013-01-01

    Deletion 1p36 syndrome is recognized as the most common terminal deletion syndrome. Here, we describe the loss of a gene within the deletion that is responsible for the cardiomyopathy associated with monosomy 1p36, and we confirm its role in nonsyndromic left ventricular noncompaction cardiomyopa...... of cardiomyocytes and also revealed evidence of impaired cardiomyocyte proliferative capacity. In conclusion, mutation of PRDM16 causes the cardiomyopathy in 1p36 deletion syndrome as well as a proportion of nonsyndromic LVNC and DCM....

  10. Identifying potential functional impact of mutations and polymorphisms: Linking heart failure, increased risk of arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BENOIT eJAGU

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Researchers and clinicians have discovered several important concepts regarding the mechanisms responsible for increased risk of arrhythmias, heart failure and sudden cardiac death. One major step in defining the molecular basis of normal and abnormal cardiac electrical behaviour has been the identification of single mutations that greatly increase the risk for arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death by changing channel-gating characteristics. Indeed, mutations in several genes encoding ion channels, such as SCN5A, which encodes the major cardiac Na+ channel, have emerged as the basis for a variety of inherited cardiac arrhythmias such as long QT syndrome, Brugada syndrome, progressive cardiac conduction disorder, sinus node dysfunction or sudden infant death syndrome. In addition, genes encoding ion channel accessory proteins, like anchoring or chaperone proteins, which modify the expression, the regulation of endocytosis and the degradation of ion channel α-subunits have also been reported as susceptibility genes for arrhythmic syndromes. The regulation of ion channel protein expression also depends on a fine-tuned balance among different other mechanisms, such as gene transcription, RNA processing, post-transcriptional control of gene expression by miRNA, protein synthesis, assembly and post-translational modification and trafficking.

  11. Whole exome sequencing identifies a novel frameshift mutation in GPC3 gene in a patient with overgrowth syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das Bhowmik, Aneek; Dalal, Ashwin

    2015-11-10

    Overgrowth syndromes are a heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by focal or generalized overgrowth. Many of the syndromes have overlapping clinical features and it is difficult to diagnose the condition based on clinical features alone. In the present study we report on a patient with overgrowth syndrome where extensive investigation did not reveal the cause of disease. Finally exome sequencing revealed a novel hemizygous single base pair deletion in exon 8 of GPC3 gene (chrX:132670203delA) resulting in a frameshift and creating a new stop codon at 62 amino acids downstream to codon 564 (c.1692delT; p.Leu565SerfsTer63) of the protein. The mutation was confirmed by Sanger sequencing. The mother was found to be heterozygous for the mutation. This variation is not reported in the 1000 Genomes, Exome Variant Server (EVS), Exome Aggregation Consortium (ExAC) and dbSNP databases and the region is conserved across primates. Exome sequencing was helpful in establishing diagnosis of Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome type 1 (SGBS1) in a patient with unknown overgrowth syndrome.

  12. DNA-methylome analysis in Burkitt and follicular lymphomas identifies differentially methylated regions linked to somatic mutation and transcriptional control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betts, Matthew J.; Carrillo-de-Santa-Pau, Enrique; Doose, Gero; Gutwein, Jana; Richter, Julia; Hovestadt, Volker; Huang, Bingding; Rico, Daniel; Jühling, Frank; Kolarova, Julia; Lu, Qianhao; Otto, Christian; Wagener, Rabea; Arnolds, Judith; Burkhardt, Birgit; Claviez, Alexander; Drexler, Hans G.; Eberth, Sonja; Eils, Roland; Flicek, Paul; Haas, Siegfried; Humme, Michael; Karsch, Dennis; Kerstens, Hinrik H.D.; Klapper, Wolfram; Kreuz, Markus; Lawerenz, Chris; Lenzek, Dido; Loeffler, Markus; López, Cristina; MacLeod, Roderick A.F.; Martens, Joost H.A.; Kulis, Marta; Martín-Subero, José Ignacio; Möller, Peter; Nage, Inga; Picelli, Simone; Vater, Inga; Rohde, Marius; Rosenstiel, Philip; Rosolowski, Maciej; Russell, Robert B.; Schilhabel, Markus; Schlesner, Matthias; Stadler, Peter F.; Szczepanowski, Monika; Trümper, Lorenz; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G.; Küppers, Ralf; Ammerpohl, Ole; Lichter, Peter; Siebert, Reiner; Hoffmann, Steve; Radlwimmer, Bernhard

    2017-01-01

    In spite of both having features of germinal center B-cells, Burkitt lymphomas and follicular lymphomas are biologically and clinically quite diverse. We here performed whole genome bisulfite, genome and transcriptome sequencing from 13 IG-MYC-translocation positive Burkitt lymphoma, 9 BCL2-translocation positive follicular lymphoma and four normal germinal center B-cell samples. Comparison of Burkitt and follicular lymphoma samples revealed differential methylation of intragenic regions that strongly correlated with expression of associated genes, e.g. genes active in germinal center dark zone and light zone B-cells. Integrative pathway analyses of regions differentially methylated between Burkitt and follicular lymphoma implicated DNA methylation to cooperate with somatic mutation of sphingosine-phosphate signaling, as well as the TCF3/ID3 and SWI/SNF complexes in a large fraction of Burkitt lymphomas. Taken together, our results demonstrate a tight connection between somatic mutation, DNA methylation and transcriptional control in key B-cell pathways deregulated differentially between Burkitt and other germinal center B-cell lymphomas. PMID:26437030

  13. Impaired plasma membrane targeting or protein stability by certain ATP1A2 mutations identified in sporadic or familial hemiplegic migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavraz, Neslihan N; Dürr, Katharina L; Koenderink, Jan B; Freilinger, Tobias; Bamberg, Ernst; Dichgans, Martin; Friedrich, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in three different genes have been implicated in familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM), two of them code for neuronal voltage-gated cation channels, CACNA1A and SCN1A, while the third encodes ATP1A2, the alpha(2)-isoform of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase's catalytic subunit, thus classifying FHM as an ion channel/ion transporter disorder. The Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase maintains the physiological gradients for Na(+) and K(+) ions and is therefore critical for the activity of ion channels and transporters involved in neurotransmitter uptake or Ca(2+) signaling. Diverse functional abnormalities have been identified for disease-linked ATP1A2 mutations, which reach far beyond simple loss-of-function. We have shown recently that ATP1A2 mutations frequently lead to changes in the enzyme's voltage-dependent properties, kinetics or apparent cation affinities. Here, we present functional data on a so far uncharacterized set of ATP1A2 mutations (G301R, R908Q and P979L) upon expression in Xenopus oocytes and HEK293FT cells, and provide evidence for a novel pathophysiological mechanism. Whereas the G301R mutant was inactive, no functional changes were observed for mutants R908Q and P979L in the oocyte expression system. However, the R908Q mutant was less effectively expressed in the plasma membrane of oocytes, making it the first missense mutation to result in defective plasma membrane targeting. Notably, the P979L mutant exhibited the same cellular expression profile as the wild-type protein, both in Xenopus oocytes and in transfected HEK293FT cells grown at 28 degrees C, but much less P979L protein was found upon cell growth at 37 degrees C, showing for the first time that temperature-sensitive effects on protein stability can underlie ATP1A2 loss-of-function.

  14. Whole-exome sequencing, without prior linkage, identifies a mutation in LAMB3 as a cause of dominant hypoplastic amelogenesis imperfecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulter, James A; El-Sayed, Walid; Shore, Roger C; Kirkham, Jennifer; Inglehearn, Chris F; Mighell, Alan J

    2014-01-01

    The conventional approach to identifying the defective gene in a family with an inherited disease is to find the disease locus through family studies. However, the rapid development and decreasing cost of next generation sequencing facilitates a more direct approach. Here, we report the identification of a frameshift mutation in LAMB3 as a cause of dominant hypoplastic amelogenesis imperfecta (AI). Whole-exome sequencing of three affected family members and subsequent filtering of shared variants, without prior genetic linkage, sufficed to identify the pathogenic variant. Simultaneous analysis of multiple family members confirms segregation, enhancing the power to filter the genetic variation found and leading to rapid identification of the pathogenic variant. LAMB3 encodes a subunit of Laminin-5, one of a family of basement membrane proteins with essential functions in cell growth, movement and adhesion. Homozygous LAMB3 mutations cause junctional epidermolysis bullosa (JEB) and enamel defects are seen in JEB cases. However, to our knowledge, this is the first report of dominant AI due to a LAMB3 mutation in the absence of JEB.

  15. Mutations in FGF17, IL17RD, DUSP6, SPRY4, and FLRT3 Are Identified in Individuals with Congenital Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miraoui, Hichem; Dwyer, Andrew A.; Sykiotis, Gerasimos P.

    2013-01-01

    Congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (CHH) and its anosmia-associated form (Kallmann syndrome [KS]) are genetically heterogeneous. Among the >15 genes implicated in these conditions, mutations in FGF8 and FGFR1 account for ∼12% of cases; notably, KAL1 and HS6ST1 are also involved in FGFR1...... of the so-called “FGF8 synexpression” group and (2) validate the ability of a bioinformatics algorithm on the basis of protein-protein interactome data (interactome-based affiliation scoring [IBAS]) to identify high-quality candidate genes. On the basis of sequence homology, expression, and structural...... and functional data, seven genes were selected and sequenced in 386 unrelated CHH individuals and 155 controls. Except for FGF18 and SPRY2, all other genes were found to be mutated in CHH individuals: FGF17 (n = 3 individuals), IL17RD (n = 8), DUSP6 (n = 5), SPRY4 (n = 14), and FLRT3 (n = 3). Independently, IBAS...

  16. An original phylogenetic approach identified mitochondrial haplogroup T1a1 as inversely associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blein, Sophie; Bardel, Claire; Danjean, Vincent; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Barrowdale, Daniel; Lee, Andrew; Dennis, Joe; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Soucy, Penny; Terry, Mary Beth; Chung, Wendy K; Goldgar, David E; Buys, Saundra S; Janavicius, Ramunas; Tihomirova, Laima; Tung, Nadine; Dorfling, Cecilia M; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Neuhausen, Susan L; Ding, Yuan Chun; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ejlertsen, Bent; Nielsen, Finn C; Hansen, Thomas Vo; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier; Conejero, Raquel Andrés; Segota, Ena; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Thelander, Margo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Radice, Paolo; Pensotti, Valeria; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Bonanni, Bernardo; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Scuvera, Giulietta; Manoukian, Siranoush; Varesco, Liliana; Capone, Gabriele L; Papi, Laura; Ottini, Laura; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Garber, Judy; Hamann, Ute; Donaldson, Alan; Brady, Angela; Brewer, Carole; Foo, Claire; Evans, D Gareth; Frost, Debra; Eccles, Diana; Douglas, Fiona; Cook, Jackie; Adlard, Julian; Barwell, Julian; Walker, Lisa; Izatt, Louise; Side, Lucy E; Kennedy, M John; Tischkowitz, Marc; Rogers, Mark T; Porteous, Mary E; Morrison, Patrick J; Platte, Radka; Eeles, Ros; Davidson, Rosemarie; Hodgson, Shirley; Cole, Trevor; Godwin, Andrew K; Isaacs, Claudine; Claes, Kathleen; De Leeneer, Kim; Meindl, Alfons; Gehrig, Andrea; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Sutter, Christian; Engel, Christoph; Niederacher, Dieter; Steinemann, Doris; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Kast, Karin; Rhiem, Kerstin; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Schmutzler, Rita K; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Markov, Nadja Bogdanova; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; de Pauw, Antoine; Lefol, Cédrick; Lasset, Christine; Leroux, Dominique; Rouleau, Etienne; Damiola, Francesca; Dreyfus, Hélène; Barjhoux, Laure; Golmard, Lisa; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Bonadona, Valérie; Sornin, Valérie; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Carter, Jonathan; Van Le, Linda; Piedmonte, Marion; DiSilvestro, Paul A; de la Hoya, Miguel; Caldes, Trinidad; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Jager, Agnes; van den Ouweland, Ans Mw; Kets, Carolien M; Aalfs, Cora M; van Leeuwen, Flora E; Hogervorst, Frans Bl; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne Ej; Oosterwijk, Jan C; van Roozendaal, Kees Ep; Rookus, Matti A; Devilee, Peter; van der Luijt, Rob B; Olah, Edith; Diez, Orland; Teulé, Alex; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Del Valle, Jesús; Jakubowska, Anna; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubinski, Jan; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Agnarsson, Bjarni A; Maugard, Christine; Amadori, Alberto; Montagna, Marco; Teixeira, Manuel R; Spurdle, Amanda B; Foulkes, William; Olswold, Curtis; Lindor, Noralane M; Pankratz, Vernon S; Szabo, Csilla I; Lincoln, Anne; Jacobs, Lauren; Corines, Marina; Robson, Mark; Vijai, Joseph; Berger, Andreas; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Singer, Christian F; Rappaport, Christine; Kaulich, Daphne Geschwantler; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Greene, Mark H; Mai, Phuong L; Rennert, Gad; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Andrulis, Irene L; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Thomassen, Mads; Kruse, Torben A; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Caligo, Maria A; Friedman, Eitan; Zidan, Jamal; Laitman, Yael; Lindblom, Annika; Melin, Beatrice; Arver, Brita; Loman, Niklas; Rosenquist, Richard; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Nussbaum, Robert L; Ramus, Susan J; Nathanson, Katherine L; Domchek, Susan M; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Arun, Banu K; Mitchell, Gillian; Karlan, Beth Y; Lester, Jenny; Orsulic, Sandra; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Thomas, Gilles; Simard, Jacques; Couch, Fergus J; Offit, Kenneth; Easton, Douglas F; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Phelan, Catherine M; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Cox, David G

    2015-04-25

    Individuals carrying pathogenic mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes have a high lifetime risk of breast cancer. BRCA1 and BRCA2 are involved in DNA double-strand break repair, DNA alterations that can be caused by exposure to reactive oxygen species, a main source of which are mitochondria. Mitochondrial genome variations affect electron transport chain efficiency and reactive oxygen species production. Individuals with different mitochondrial haplogroups differ in their metabolism and sensitivity to oxidative stress. Variability in mitochondrial genetic background can alter reactive oxygen species production, leading to cancer risk. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that mitochondrial haplogroups modify breast cancer risk in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. We genotyped 22,214 (11,421 affected, 10,793 unaffected) mutation carriers belonging to the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 for 129 mitochondrial polymorphisms using the iCOGS array. Haplogroup inference and association detection were performed using a phylogenetic approach. ALTree was applied to explore the reference mitochondrial evolutionary tree and detect subclades enriched in affected or unaffected individuals. We discovered that subclade T1a1 was depleted in affected BRCA2 mutation carriers compared with the rest of clade T (hazard ratio (HR) = 0.55; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.34 to 0.88; P = 0.01). Compared with the most frequent haplogroup in the general population (that is, H and T clades), the T1a1 haplogroup has a HR of 0.62 (95% CI, 0.40 to 0.95; P = 0.03). We also identified three potential susceptibility loci, including G13708A/rs28359178, which has demonstrated an inverse association with familial breast cancer risk. This study illustrates how original approaches such as the phylogeny-based method we used can empower classical molecular epidemiological studies aimed at identifying association or risk modification effects.

  17. Clinical Genotyping of Non–Small Cell Lung Cancers Using Targeted Next-Generation Sequencing: Utility of Identifying Rare and Co-mutations in Oncogenic Driver Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura J. Tafe

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Detection of somatic mutations in non–small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs, especially adenocarcinomas, is important for directing patient care when targeted therapy is available. Here, we present our experience with genotyping NSCLC using the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine (PGM and the AmpliSeq Cancer Hotspot Panel v2. We tested 453 NSCLC samples from 407 individual patients using the 50 gene AmpliSeq Cancer Hotspot Panel v2 from May 2013 to July 2015. Using 10 ng of DNA, up to 11 samples were simultaneously sequenced on the Ion Torrent PGM (316 and 318 chips. We identified variants with the Ion Torrent Variant Caller Plugin, and Golden Helix's SVS software was used for annotation and prediction of the significance of the variants. Three hundred ninety-eight samples were successfully sequenced (12.1% failure rate. In all, 633 variants in 41 genes were detected with a median of 2 (range of 0 to 7 variants per sample. Mutations detected in BRAF, EGFR, ERBB2, KRAS, NRAS, and PIK3CA were considered potentially actionable and were identified in 237 samples, most commonly in KRAS (37.9%, EGFR (11.1%, BRAF (4.8%, and PIK3CA (4.3%. In our patient population, all mutations in EGFR, KRAS, and BRAF were mutually exclusive. The Ion Torrent Ampliseq technology can be utilized on small biopsy and cytology specimens, requires very little input DNA, and can be applied in clinical laboratories for genotyping of NSCLC. This targeted next-generation sequencing approach allows for detection of common and also rare mutations that are clinically actionable in multiple patients simultaneously.

  18. [Subchromosomal microdeletion identified by molecular karyotyping using DNA microarrays (array CGH) in Rett syndrome girls negative for MECP2 gene mutations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorsanova, S G; Iurov, I Iu; Voinova, V Iu; Kurinnaia, O S; Zelenova, M A; Demidova, I A; Ulas, E V; Iurov, Iu B

    2013-01-01

    Molecular karyotyping using DNA microarrays (array CGH) was applied for identification of subchromosomal microdeletions in a cohort of 12 girls with clinical features of RETT syndrome, but negative for MECP2 gene mutations. Recurrent microdeletions of MECP2 gene in chromosome X (locus Xq28) were identified in 5 girls of 12 studied. Probably RTT girls with subchromosomic microdeletions in Xq28 could represent a special subtype of the disease, which appears as clinically milder than the classic form of disease. In one case, an atypical form of RTT was associated with genomic abnormalities affecting CDKL5 gene and region critical for microdeletion Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes (15q11.2). In addition, data are presented for the first time that genetic variation in regions 3p13, 3q27.1, and 1q21.1-1q21.2 could associate with RTT-like clinical manifestations. Without application of molecular karyotyping technology and bioinformatic method of assessing the pathogenic significance of genomic rearrangements these RTT-like girls negative for MECP2 gene mutations were considered as cases of idiopathic mental retardation associated with autism. It should be noted that absence of intragenic mutations in MECP2 gene is not sufficient criteria to reject the clinical diagnosis of RTT. To avoid errors in the genetic diagnosis of this genetically heterogeneous brain disease molecular cytogenetic studies using high resolution oligonucleotide array CGH (molecular karyotyping) are needed.

  19. In silico reversal of repeat-induced point mutation (RIP identifies the origins of repeat families and uncovers obscured duplicated genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hane James K

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Repeat-induced point mutation (RIP is a fungal genome defence mechanism guarding against transposon invasion. RIP mutates the sequence of repeated DNA and over time renders the affected regions unrecognisable by similarity search tools such as BLAST. Results DeRIP is a new software tool developed to predict the original sequence of a RIP-mutated region prior to the occurrence of RIP. In this study, we apply deRIP to the genome of the wheat pathogen Stagonospora nodorum SN15 and predict the origin of several previously uncharacterised classes of repetitive DNA. Conclusions Five new classes of transposon repeats and four classes of endogenous gene repeats were identified after deRIP. The deRIP process is a new tool for fungal genomics that facilitates the identification and understanding of the role and origin of fungal repetitive DNA. DeRIP is open-source and is available as part of the RIPCAL suite at http://www.sourceforge.net/projects/ripcal.

  20. Whole-exome sequencing identifies homozygous AFG3L2 mutations in a spastic ataxia-neuropathy syndrome linked to mitochondrial m-AAA proteases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler Mark Pierson

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We report an early onset spastic ataxia-neuropathy syndrome in two brothers of a consanguineous family characterized clinically by lower extremity spasticity, peripheral neuropathy, ptosis, oculomotor apraxia, dystonia, cerebellar atrophy, and progressive myoclonic epilepsy. Whole-exome sequencing identified a homozygous missense mutation (c.1847G>A; p.Y616C in AFG3L2, encoding a subunit of an m-AAA protease. m-AAA proteases reside in the mitochondrial inner membrane and are responsible for removal of damaged or misfolded proteins and proteolytic activation of essential mitochondrial proteins. AFG3L2 forms either a homo-oligomeric isoenzyme or a hetero-oligomeric complex with paraplegin, a homologous protein mutated in hereditary spastic paraplegia type 7 (SPG7. Heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in AFG3L2 cause autosomal-dominant spinocerebellar ataxia type 28 (SCA28, a disorder whose phenotype is strikingly different from that of our patients. As defined in yeast complementation assays, the AFG3L2(Y616C gene product is a hypomorphic variant that exhibited oligomerization defects in yeast as well as in patient fibroblasts. Specifically, the formation of AFG3L2(Y616C complexes was impaired, both with itself and to a greater extent with paraplegin. This produced an early-onset clinical syndrome that combines the severe phenotypes of SPG7 and SCA28, in additional to other "mitochondrial" features such as oculomotor apraxia, extrapyramidal dysfunction, and myoclonic epilepsy. These findings expand the phenotype associated with AFG3L2 mutations and suggest that AFG3L2-related disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis of spastic ataxias.

  1. Whole-exome sequencing identifies homozygous AFG3L2 mutations in a spastic ataxia-neuropathy syndrome linked to mitochondrial m-AAA proteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Tyler Mark; Adams, David; Bonn, Florian; Martinelli, Paola; Cherukuri, Praveen F; Teer, Jamie K; Hansen, Nancy F; Cruz, Pedro; Mullikin For The Nisc Comparative Sequencing Program, James C; Blakesley, Robert W; Golas, Gretchen; Kwan, Justin; Sandler, Anthony; Fuentes Fajardo, Karin; Markello, Thomas; Tifft, Cynthia; Blackstone, Craig; Rugarli, Elena I; Langer, Thomas; Gahl, William A; Toro, Camilo

    2011-10-01

    We report an early onset spastic ataxia-neuropathy syndrome in two brothers of a consanguineous family characterized clinically by lower extremity spasticity, peripheral neuropathy, ptosis, oculomotor apraxia, dystonia, cerebellar atrophy, and progressive myoclonic epilepsy. Whole-exome sequencing identified a homozygous missense mutation (c.1847G>A; p.Y616C) in AFG3L2, encoding a subunit of an m-AAA protease. m-AAA proteases reside in the mitochondrial inner membrane and are responsible for removal of damaged or misfolded proteins and proteolytic activation of essential mitochondrial proteins. AFG3L2 forms either a homo-oligomeric isoenzyme or a hetero-oligomeric complex with paraplegin, a homologous protein mutated in hereditary spastic paraplegia type 7 (SPG7). Heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in AFG3L2 cause autosomal-dominant spinocerebellar ataxia type 28 (SCA28), a disorder whose phenotype is strikingly different from that of our patients. As defined in yeast complementation assays, the AFG3L2(Y616C) gene product is a hypomorphic variant that exhibited oligomerization defects in yeast as well as in patient fibroblasts. Specifically, the formation of AFG3L2(Y616C) complexes was impaired, both with itself and to a greater extent with paraplegin. This produced an early-onset clinical syndrome that combines the severe phenotypes of SPG7 and SCA28, in additional to other "mitochondrial" features such as oculomotor apraxia, extrapyramidal dysfunction, and myoclonic epilepsy. These findings expand the phenotype associated with AFG3L2 mutations and suggest that AFG3L2-related disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis of spastic ataxias.

  2. Functional analysis of three splicing mutations identified in the PMM2 gene: toward a new therapy for congenital disorder of glycosylation type Ia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Ana I; Pérez-Cerdá, Celia; Desviat, Lourdes R; Matthijs, Gert; Ugarte, Magdalena; Pérez, Belén

    2009-05-01

    The congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG) are a group of diseases caused by genetic defects affecting N-glycosylation. The most prevalent form of CDG-type Ia-is caused by defects in the PMM2 gene. This work reports the study of two new nucleotide changes (c.256-1G>C and c.640-9T>G) identified in the PMM2 gene in CDG1a patients, and of a previously described deep intronic nucleotide change in intron 7 (c.640-15479C>T). Cell-based splicing assays strongly suggest that all these are disease-causing splicing mutations. The c.256-1G>C mutation was found to cause the skipping of exons 3 and 4 in fibroblast cell lines and in a minigene expression system. The c.640-9T>G mutation was found responsible for the activation of a cryptic intronic splice-site in fibroblast cell lines and in a hybrid minigene when cotransfected with certain serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins. Finally, the deep intronic change c.640-15479C>T was found to be responsible for the activation of a pseudoexon sequence in intron 7. The use of morpholino oligonucleotides allowed the production of correctly spliced mRNA that was efficiently translated into functional and immunoreactive PMM protein. The present results suggest a novel mutation-specific approach for the treatment of this genetic disease (for which no effective treatment is yet available), and open up therapeutic possibilities for several genetic disorders in which deep intronic changes are seen.

  3. Association of the widespread A149P hereditary fructose intolerance mutation with newly identified sequence polymorphisms in the aldolase B gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brooks, C.C.; Tolan, D.R. (Boston Univ., MA (United States))

    1993-04-01

    Hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) is a potentially fatal autosomal recessive disease resulting from the catalytic deficiency of fructose 1-phosphate aldolase (aldolase B) in fructose-metabolizing tissues. The A149P mutation in exon 5 of the aldolase B gene, located on chromosome 9q2l.3-q22.2, is widespread and the most common HFI mutation, accounting for 57% of HFI chromosomes. The possible origin of this mutation was studied by linkage to polymorphisms within the aldolase B gene. DNA fragments of the aldolase B gene containing the polymorphic marker loci from HFI patients homozygous for the A149P allele were amplified by PCR. Absolute linkage to a common Pvull RFLP allele was observed in 10 A149P homozygotes. In a more informative study, highly heterozygous polymorphisms were detected by direct sequence determination of a PCR-amplified aldolase B gene fragment. Two two-allele, single-base-pair polymorphisms, themselves in absolute linkage disequilibrium, in intron 8 (C at nucleotide 84 and A at nucleotide 105, or T at 84 and G at 105) of the aldolase B gene were identified. Mendelian segregation of these polymorphisms was confirmed in three families. Allele-specific oligonucleotide (ASO) hybridizations with probes for both sequence polymorphisms showed that 47% of 32 unrelated individuals were heterozygous at these loci; the calculated PIC value was .37. Finally, ASO hybridizations of PCR-amplified DNA from 15 HFI patients homozygous for the A149P allele with probes for these sequence polymorphisms revealed absolute linkage disequilibrium between the A149P mutation and the 84T/105G allele. These results are consistent with a single origin of the A149P allele and subsequent spread by genetic drift. 32 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Genome-Wide Association Analysis Identifies a Mutation in the Thiamine Transporter 2 (SLC19A3) Gene Associated with Alaskan Husky Encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernau, Karen M.; Runstadler, Jonathan A.; Brown, Emily A.; Cameron, Jessie M.; Huson, Heather J.; Higgins, Robert J.; Ackerley, Cameron; Sturges, Beverly K.; Dickinson, Peter J.; Puschner, Birgit; Giulivi, Cecilia; Shelton, G. Diane; Robinson, Brian H.; DiMauro, Salvatore; Bollen, Andrew W.; Bannasch, Danika L.

    2013-01-01

    Alaskan Husky Encephalopathy (AHE) has been previously proposed as a mitochondrial encephalopathy based on neuropathological similarities with human Leigh Syndrome (LS). We studied 11 Alaskan Husky dogs with AHE, but found no abnormalities in respiratory chain enzyme activities in muscle and liver, or mutations in mitochondrial or nuclear genes that cause LS in people. A genome wide association study was performed using eight of the affected dogs and 20 related but unaffected control AHs using the Illumina canine HD array. SLC19A3 was identified as a positional candidate gene. This gene controls the uptake of thiamine in the CNS via expression of the thiamine transporter protein THTR2. Dogs have two copies of this gene located within the candidate interval (SLC19A3.2 – 43.36–43.38 Mb and SLC19A3.1 – 43.411–43.419 Mb) on chromosome 25. Expression analysis in a normal dog revealed that one of the paralogs, SLC19A3.1, was expressed in the brain and spinal cord while the other was not. Subsequent exon sequencing of SLC19A3.1 revealed a 4bp insertion and SNP in the second exon that is predicted to result in a functional protein truncation of 279 amino acids (c.624 insTTGC, c.625 C>A). All dogs with AHE were homozygous for this mutation, 15/41 healthy AH control dogs were heterozygous carriers while 26/41 normal healthy AH dogs were wild type. Furthermore, this mutation was not detected in another 187 dogs of different breeds. These results suggest that this mutation in SLC19A3.1, encoding a thiamine transporter protein, plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of AHE. PMID:23469184

  5. Expression of individual mutations and haplotypes in the galactocerebrosidase gene identified by the newborn screening program in New York State and in confirmed cases of Krabbe's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saavedra-Matiz, Carlos A; Luzi, Paola; Nichols, Matthew; Orsini, Joseph J; Caggana, Michele; Wenger, David A

    2016-11-01

    Newborn screening (NBS) for Krabbe's disease (KD) has been instituted in several states, and New York State has had the longest experience. After an initial screening of dried blood spots, samples from individuals with galactocerebrosidase (GALC) values below a given cutoff level were subjected to additional testing, including sequencing of the GALC gene. This resulted in the identification of mutations that had previously been found in confirmed KD patients and of variants that had never previously been reported. Some individuals had variants considered to be polymorphisms, alone or on the same allele as another mutation. To help with counseling of families on the risk for a newborn to develop KD, expression studies were conducted with these variants identified by NBS. GALC activity was measured in COS1 cells for 140 constructs and compared with mutations that had previously been seen in confirmed cases of KD. When a polymorphism was present on the same allele as the variant, expressed activity was measured with and without the polymorphism. In some cases the presence of the polymorphism greatly lowered the measured GALC activity, possibly making it disease causing. Although it is not possible to predict conclusively whether a variant is severe and will result in infantile KD if two such variants are present or whether a variant is mild and will result in late-onset disease, some variants clearly are not disease causing. This is the largest expression study of GALC variants/mutations found in NBS and confirmed KD cases. This work will be helpful for counseling families of screen-positive newborns found to have low GALC activity. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Genome-wide association analysis identifies a mutation in the thiamine transporter 2 (SLC19A3 gene associated with Alaskan Husky encephalopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen M Vernau

    Full Text Available Alaskan Husky Encephalopathy (AHE has been previously proposed as a mitochondrial encephalopathy based on neuropathological similarities with human Leigh Syndrome (LS. We studied 11 Alaskan Husky dogs with AHE, but found no abnormalities in respiratory chain enzyme activities in muscle and liver, or mutations in mitochondrial or nuclear genes that cause LS in people. A genome wide association study was performed using eight of the affected dogs and 20 related but unaffected control AHs using the Illumina canine HD array. SLC19A3 was identified as a positional candidate gene. This gene controls the uptake of thiamine in the CNS via expression of the thiamine transporter protein THTR2. Dogs have two copies of this gene located within the candidate interval (SLC19A3.2 - 43.36-43.38 Mb and SLC19A3.1 - 43.411-43.419 Mb on chromosome 25. Expression analysis in a normal dog revealed that one of the paralogs, SLC19A3.1, was expressed in the brain and spinal cord while the other was not. Subsequent exon sequencing of SLC19A3.1 revealed a 4bp insertion and SNP in the second exon that is predicted to result in a functional protein truncation of 279 amino acids (c.624 insTTGC, c.625 C>A. All dogs with AHE were homozygous for this mutation, 15/41 healthy AH control dogs were heterozygous carriers while 26/41 normal healthy AH dogs were wild type. Furthermore, this mutation was not detected in another 187 dogs of different breeds. These results suggest that this mutation in SLC19A3.1, encoding a thiamine transporter protein, plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of AHE.

  7. Transcriptome analysis of an apple (Malus × domestica) yellow fruit somatic mutation identifies a gene network module highly associated with anthocyanin and epigenetic regulation

    OpenAIRE

    El-sharkawy, Islam; Liang, Dong; Xu, Kenong

    2015-01-01

    Using RNA-seq, this study analysed an apple (Malus×domestica) anthocyanin-deficient yellow-skin somatic mutant ‘Blondee’ (BLO) and its red-skin parent ‘Kidd’s D-8’ (KID), the original name of ‘Gala’, to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the mutation. A total of 3299 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified between BLO and KID at four developmental stages and/or between two adjacent stages within BLO and/or KID. A weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) o...

  8. High-Throughput Genetic Screening of 51 Pediatric Cataract Genes Identifies Causative Mutations in Inherited Pediatric Cataract in South Eastern Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shari Javadiyan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric cataract is a leading cause of childhood blindness. This study aimed to determine the genetic cause of pediatric cataract in Australian families by screening known disease-associated genes using massively parallel sequencing technology. We sequenced 51 previously reported pediatric cataract genes in 33 affected individuals with a family history (cases with previously known or published mutations were excluded using the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine. Variants were prioritized for validation if they were predicted to alter the protein sequence and were absent or rare with minor allele frequency 60% of familial pediatric cataract in Australia, indicating that still more causative genes remain to be identified.

  9. The Y42H mutation in medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, which is prevalent in babies identified by MS/MS-based newborn screening, is temperature sensitive

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Reilly, Linda; Bross, Peter; Corydon, Thomas J;

    2004-01-01

    Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) is a homotetrameric flavoprotein which catalyses the initial step of the beta-oxidation of medium-chain fatty acids. Mutations in MCAD may cause disease in humans. A Y42H mutation is frequently found in babies identified by newborn screening with MS/MS, ...

  10. Genome-Wide Association Study in BRCA1 Mutation Carriers Identifies Novel Loci Associated with Breast and Ovarian Cancer Risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Couch, Fergus J.; Wang, Xianshu; McGuffog, Lesley; Lee, Andrew; Olswold, Curtis; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Soucy, Penny; Fredericksen, Zachary; Barrowdale, Daniel; Dennis, Joe; Gaudet, Mia M.; Dicks, Ed; Kosel, Matthew; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Lee, Adam; Bacot, Francois; Vincent, Daniel; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Peock, Susan; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Jakubowska, Anna; Radice, Paolo; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Domchek, Susan M.; Piedmonte, Marion; Singer, Christian F.; Friedman, Eitan; Thomassen, Mads; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Szabo, Csilla I.; Blanco, Ignacio; Greene, Mark H.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Garber, Judy; Phelan, Catherine M.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Montagna, Marco; Olah, Edith; Andrulis, Irene L.; Godwin, Andrew K.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Goldgar, David E.; Caldes, Trinidad; Nevanlinna, Heli; Osorio, Ana; Terry, Mary Beth; Daly, Mary B.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Hamann, Ute; Ramus, Susan J.; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Caligo, Maria A.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Tung, Nadine; Claes, Kathleen; Beattie, Mary S.; Southey, Melissa C.; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Tischkowitz, Marc; Janavicius, Ramunas; John, Esther M.; Kwong, Ava; Diez, Orland; Balmana, Judith; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Arun, Banu K.; Rennert, Gad; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Ganz, Patricia A.; Campbell, Ian; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; van Deurzen, Carolien H. M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Garcia, Encarna B. Gomez; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Gille, Johannes J. P.; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; Blok, Marinus J.; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J. L.; Rookus, Matti A.; Devilee, Peter; Verhoef, Senno; van Os, Theo A. M.; Wijnen, Juul T.; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve; Fineberg, Elena; Platte, Radka; Evans, D. Gareth; Izatt, Louise; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Adlard, Julian; Eccles, Diana M.; Cook, Jackie; Brewer, Carole; Douglas, Fiona; Hodgson, Shirley; Morrison, Patrick J.; Side, Lucy E.; Donaldson, Alan; Houghton, Catherine; Rogers, Mark T.; Dorkins, Huw; Eason, Jacqueline; Gregory, Helen; McCann, Emma; Murray, Alex; Calender, Alain; Hardouin, Agnes; Berthet, Pascaline; Delnatte, Capucine; Nogues, Catherine; Lasset, Christine; Houdayer, Claude; Leroux, Dominique; Rouleau, Etienne; Prieur, Fabienne; Damiola, Francesca; Sobol, Hagay; Coupier, Isabelle; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Castera, Laurent; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Leone, Melanie; Pujol, Pascal; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Zlowocka-Perlowska, Elzbieta; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubinski, Jan; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Huzarski, Tomasz; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Viel, Alessandra; Peissel, Bernard; Bonanni, Bernardo; Melloni, Giulia; Ottini, Laura; Papi, Laura; Varesco, Liliana; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Peterlongo, Paolo; Volorio, Sara; Manoukian, Siranoush; Pensotti, Valeria; Arnold, Norbert; Engel, Christoph; Deissler, Helmut; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Gehrig, Andrea; Kast, Karin; Rhiem, Kerstin; Meindl, Alfons; Niederacher, Dieter; Ditsch, Nina; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Engert, Stefanie; Sutter, Christian; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Weber, Bernhard H. F.; Arver, Brita; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Loman, Niklas; Rosenquist, Richard; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Blank, Stephanie V.; Cohn, David E.; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Small, Laurie; Friedlander, Michael; Bae-Jump, Victoria L.; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Rappaport, Christine; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Lindor, Noralane M.; Kaufman, Bella; Paluch, Shani Shimon; Laitman, Yael; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Moeller, Sanne Traasdahl; Kruse, Torben A.; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Vijai, Joseph; Sarrel, Kara; Robson, Mark; Kauff, Noah; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Ejlertsen, Bent; Nielsen, Finn C.; Jonson, Lars; Andersen, Mette K.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Steele, Linda; Foretova, Lenka; Teule, Alex; Lazaro, Conxi; Brunet, Joan; Angel Pujana, Miquel; Mai, Phuong L.; Loud, Jennifer T.; Walsh, Christine; Lester, Jenny; Orsulic, Sandra; Narod, Steven A.; Herzog, Josef; Sand, Sharon R.; Tognazzo, Silvia; Agata, Simona; Vaszko, Tibor; Weaver, Joellen; Stavropoulou, Alexandra V.; Buys, Saundra S.; Romero, Atocha; de la Hoya, Miguel; Aittomaki, Kristiina; Muranen, Taru A.; Duran, Mercedes; Chung, Wendy K.; Lasa, Adriana; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; Miron, Alexander; Benitez, Javier; Senter, Leigha; Huo, Dezheng; Chan, Salina B.; Sokolenko, Anna P.; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Tihomirova, Laima; Friebel, Tara M.; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Lu, Karen H.; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; James, Paul A.; Hall, Per; Dunning, Alison M.

    2013-01-01

    BRCA1-associated breast and ovarian cancer risks can be modified by common genetic variants. To identify further cancer risk-modifying loci, we performed a multi-stage GWAS of 11,705 BRCA1 carriers (of whom 5,920 were diagnosed with breast and 1,839 were diagnosed with ovarian cancer), with a furthe

  11. Genome-Wide Association Study in BRCA1 Mutation Carriers Identifies Novel Loci Associated with Breast and Ovarian Cancer Risk.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Couch, F.J.; Wang, X.; McGuffog, L.; Lee, A.; Olswold, C.; Kuchenbaecker, K.B.; Soucy, P.; Fredericksen, Z.; Barrowdale, D.; Dennis, J.; Gaudet, M.M.; Dicks, E.; Kosel, M.; Healey, S.; Sinilnikova, O.M.; Bacot, F.; Vincent, D.; Hogervorst, F.B.; Peock, S.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, D.; Jakubowska, A.; Radice, P.; Schmutzler, R.K.; Domchek, S.M.; Piedmonte, M.; Singer, C.F.; Friedman, E.; Thomassen, M.; Hansen, T.V.; Neuhausen, S.L.; Szabo, C.I.; Blanco, I.; Greene, M.H.; Karlan, B.Y.; Garber, J.; Phelan, C.M.; Weitzel, J.N.; Montagna, M.; Olah, E.; Andrulis, I.L.; Godwin, A.K.; Yannoukakos, D.; Goldgar, D.E.; Caldes, T.; Nevanlinna, H.; Osorio, A.; Terry, M.B.; Daly, M.B.; Rensburg, E.J. van; Hamann, U.; Ramus, S.J.; Ewart Toland, A.; Caligo, M.A.; Olopade, O.I.; Tung, N.; Claes, K.; Beattie, M.S.; Southey, M.C.; Imyanitov, E.N.; Tischkowitz, M.; Janavicius, R.; John, E.M.; Kwong, A.; Diez, O.; Balmana, J.; Barkardottir, R.B.; Arun, B.K.; Rennert, G.; Teo, S.H.; Ganz, P.A.; Campbell, I.; Hout, A.H. van der; Deurzen, C.H. van; Seynaeve, C.; Gomez Garcia, E.B.; Leeuwen, F.E. van; Meijers-Heijboer, H.E.; Gille, J.J.P.; Ausems, M.G.; Blok, M.J.; Ligtenberg, M.J.L.; Rookus, M.A.; Devilee, P.; Verhoef, S.; Os, T.A. van; Wijnen, J.T.; Frost, D.; Ellis, S.; Fineberg, E.; Platte, R.; Evans, D.G.; Izatt, L.; Eeles, R.A.; Adlard, J.; Eccles, D.M.; Cook, J.; Brewer, C.; Douglas, F.; Hodgson, S.; Morrison, P.J.; Side, L.E.; Donaldson, A.; Houghton, C.; Rogers, M.T.; Dorkins, H.; Eason, J.; Gregory, H.; McCann, E.; Murray, A.; Calender, A.; Hardouin, A.; Berthet, P.; Delnatte, C.; Nogues, C.; Lasset, C.; Houdayer, C.; Leroux, D.; Rouleau, E.; Prieur, F.; Damiola, F.; Sobol, H.; Coupier, I.; Venat-Bouvet, L.; Castera, L.; Gauthier-Villars, M.; Leone, M.; Pujol, P.; Mazoyer, S.; Bignon, Y.J.; Zlowocka-Perlowska, E.; Gronwald, J.; Lubinski, J.; Durda, K.; Jaworska, K.; Huzarski, T.; Spurdle, A.B.; Viel, A.; Peissel, B.; Bonanni, B.; Melloni, G.; Ottini, L.; Papi, L.; Varesco, L.; Tibiletti, M.G.; Peterlongo, P.; Volorio, S.; Manoukian, S.; Pensotti, V.; Arnold, N.; Engel, C.; Deissler, H.; Gadzicki, D.; Gehrig, A.; Kast, K.; Rhiem, K.; Meindl, A.; Niederacher, D.; Ditsch, N.; Plendl, H.; Preisler-Adams, S.; Engert, S.; Sutter, C.; Varon-Mateeva, R.; Wappenschmidt, B.; Weber, B.H.; Arver, B.; Stenmark-Askmalm, M.; Loman, N.; Rosenquist, R.; Einbeigi, Z.; Nathanson, K.L.; Rebbeck, T.R.; Blank, S.V.; Cohn, D.E.; Rodriguez, G.C.; Small, L.; Friedlander, M.; Bae-Jump, V.L.; Fink-Retter, A.; Rappaport, C.; Gschwantler-Kaulich, D.; Pfeiler, G.; Tea, M.K.; Lindor, N.M.; Kaufman, B.; Shimon Paluch, S.; Laitman, Y.; Skytte, A.B.; Gerdes, A.M.; Pedersen, I.S.; Moeller, S.T.; Kruse, T.A.; Jensen, U.B.; Vijai, J.; Sarrel, K.; Robson, M.; Kauff, N.; Mulligan, A.M.; Glendon, G.; Ozcelik, H.; Ejlertsen, B.; Nielsen, F.C.; Jonson, L.; Andersen, M.K.; Ding, Y.C.; Steele, L.; Foretova, L.; Teule, A.; Lazaro, C.; Brunet, J.; Pujana, M.A.; Mai, P.L.; Loud, J.T.; Walsh, C.; Lester, J.; Orsulic, S.; Narod, S.A.; Herzog, J.; Sand, S.R.; Tognazzo, S.; Agata, S.; Vaszko, T.; Weaver, J.; Stavropoulou, A.V.; Buys, S.S.; Romero, A.; Hoya, M. de la; Aittomaki, K.; Muranen, T.A.; Duran, M.; Chung, W.K.; Lasa, A.; Dorfling, C.M.; Miron, A.; Benitez, J.; Senter, L.; Huo, D.; Chan, S.B.; Sokolenko, A.P.; Chiquette, J.; Tihomirova, L.; Friebel, T.M.; Agnarsson, B.A.; Lu, K.H.; Lejbkowicz, F.; James, P.A.; Hall, P.; Dunning, A.M.; Tessier, D.; Cunningham, J.; Slager, S.L.; Wang, C.; Hart, S.; Stevens, K.; Simard, J.; Pastinen, T.; Pankratz, V.S.; Offit, K.; Easton, D.F.; Chenevix-Trench, G.; Antoniou, A.C.

    2013-01-01

    BRCA1-associated breast and ovarian cancer risks can be modified by common genetic variants. To identify further cancer risk-modifying loci, we performed a multi-stage GWAS of 11,705 BRCA1 carriers (of whom 5,920 were diagnosed with breast and 1,839 were diagnosed with ovarian cancer), with a

  12. Genome-Wide Association Study in BRCA1 Mutation Carriers Identifies Novel Loci Associated with Breast and Ovarian Cancer Risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Couch, Fergus J.; Wang, Xianshu; McGuffog, Lesley; Lee, Andrew; Olswold, Curtis; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Soucy, Penny; Fredericksen, Zachary; Barrowdale, Daniel; Dennis, Joe; Gaudet, Mia M.; Dicks, Ed; Kosel, Matthew; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Lee, Adam; Bacot, Francois; Vincent, Daniel; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Peock, Susan; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Jakubowska, Anna; Radice, Paolo; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Domchek, Susan M.; Piedmonte, Marion; Singer, Christian F.; Friedman, Eitan; Thomassen, Mads; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Szabo, Csilla I.; Blanco, Ignacio; Greene, Mark H.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Garber, Judy; Phelan, Catherine M.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Montagna, Marco; Olah, Edith; Andrulis, Irene L.; Godwin, Andrew K.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Goldgar, David E.; Caldes, Trinidad; Nevanlinna, Heli; Osorio, Ana; Terry, Mary Beth; Daly, Mary B.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Hamann, Ute; Ramus, Susan J.; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Caligo, Maria A.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Tung, Nadine; Claes, Kathleen; Beattie, Mary S.; Southey, Melissa C.; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Tischkowitz, Marc; Janavicius, Ramunas; John, Esther M.; Kwong, Ava; Diez, Orland; Balmana, Judith; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Arun, Banu K.; Rennert, Gad; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Ganz, Patricia A.; Campbell, Ian; van der Hout, Annemarie; van Deurzen, Carolien H. M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Garcia, Encarna B. Gomez; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Gille, Johannes J. P.; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; Blok, Marinus J.; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J. L.; Rookus, Matti A.; Devilee, Peter; Verhoef, Senno; van Os, Theo A. M.; Wijnen, Juul T.; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve; Fineberg, Elena; Platte, Radka; Evans, D. Gareth; Izatt, Louise; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Adlard, Julian; Eccles, Diana M.; Cook, Jackie; Brewer, Carole; Douglas, Fiona; Hodgson, Shirley; Morrison, Patrick J.; Side, Lucy E.; Donaldson, Alan; Houghton, Catherine; Rogers, Mark T.; Dorkins, Huw; Eason, Jacqueline; Gregory, Helen; McCann, Emma; Murray, Alex; Calender, Alain; Hardouin, Agnes; Berthet, Pascaline; Delnatte, Capucine; Nogues, Catherine; Lasset, Christine; Houdayer, Claude; Leroux, Dominique; Rouleau, Etienne; Prieur, Fabienne; Damiola, Francesca; Sobol, Hagay; Coupier, Isabelle; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Castera, Laurent; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Leone, Melanie; Pujol, Pascal; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Zlowocka-Perlowska, Elzbieta; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubinski, Jan; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Huzarski, Tomasz; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Viel, Alessandra; Peissel, Bernard; Bonanni, Bernardo; Melloni, Giulia; Ottini, Laura; Papi, Laura; Varesco, Liliana; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Peterlongo, Paolo; Volorio, Sara; Manoukian, Siranoush; Pensotti, Valeria; Arnold, Norbert; Engel, Christoph; Deissler, Helmut; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Gehrig, Andrea; Kast, Karin; Rhiem, Kerstin; Meindl, Alfons; Niederacher, Dieter; Ditsch, Nina; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Engert, Stefanie; Sutter, Christian; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Weber, Bernhard H. F.; Arver, Brita; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Loman, Niklas; Rosenquist, Richard; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Blank, Stephanie V.; Cohn, David E.; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Small, Laurie; Friedlander, Michael; Bae-Jump, Victoria L.; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Rappaport, Christine; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Lindor, Noralane M.; Kaufman, Bella; Paluch, Shani Shimon; Laitman, Yael; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Moeller, Sanne Traasdahl; Kruse, Torben A.; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Vijai, Joseph; Sarrel, Kara; Robson, Mark; Kauff, Noah; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Ejlertsen, Bent; Nielsen, Finn C.; Jonson, Lars; Andersen, Mette K.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Steele, Linda; Foretova, Lenka; Teule, Alex; Lazaro, Conxi; Brunet, Joan; Angel Pujana, Miquel; Mai, Phuong L.; Loud, Jennifer T.; Walsh, Christine; Lester, Jenny; Orsulic, Sandra; Narod, Steven A.; Herzog, Josef; Sand, Sharon R.; Tognazzo, Silvia; Agata, Simona; Vaszko, Tibor; Weaver, Joellen; Stavropoulou, Alexandra V.; Buys, Saundra S.; Romero, Atocha; de la Hoya, Miguel; Aittomaki, Kristiina; Muranen, Taru A.; Duran, Mercedes; Chung, Wendy K.; Lasa, Adriana; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; Miron, Alexander; Benitez, Javier; Senter, Leigha; Huo, Dezheng; Chan, Salina B.; Sokolenko, Anna P.; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Tihomirova, Laima; Friebel, Tara M.; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Lu, Karen H.; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; James, Paul A.; Hall, Per; Dunning, Alison M.; Tessier, Daniel; Cunningham, Julie; Slager, Susan L.; Wang, Chen; Hart, Steven; Stevens, Kristen; Simard, Jacques; Pastinen, Tomi; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Offit, Kenneth; Easton, Douglas F.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C.

    2013-01-01

    BRCA1-associated breast and ovarian cancer risks can be modified by common genetic variants. To identify further cancer risk-modifying loci, we performed a multi-stage GWAS of 11,705 BRCA1 carriers (of whom 5,920 were diagnosed with breast and 1,839 were diagnosed with ovarian cancer), with a

  13. Genome-Wide Association Study in BRCA1 Mutation Carriers Identifies Novel Loci Associated with Breast and Ovarian Cancer Risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.J. Couch (Fergus); X. Wang (Xing); L. McGuffog (Lesley); A. Lee; C. Olswold (Curtis); K.B. Kuchenbaecker (Karoline); P. Soucy (Penny); Z. Fredericksen (Zachary); D. Barrowdale (Daniel); J. Dennis (Joe); M.M. Gaudet (Mia); E. Dicks (Ed); M. Kosel (Matthew); S. Healey (Sue); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); F. Bacot (Francois); D. Vincent (Daniel); F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); S. Peock (Susan); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); A. Jakubowska (Anna); P. Radice (Paolo); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); S.M. Domchek (Susan); M. Piedmonte (Marion); C.F. Singer (Christian); E. Friedman (Eitan); M. Thomassen (Mads); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); C. Szabo (Csilla); I. Blanco (Ignacio); M.H. Greene (Mark); B. Karlan; J. Garber; C. Phelan (Catherine); J.N. Weitzel (Jeffrey); M. Montagna (Marco); E. Olah; I.L. Andrulis (Irene); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); D. Yannoukakos (Drakoulis); D. Goldgar (David); T. Caldes (Trinidad); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); A. Osorio (Ana); M.-B. Terry (Mary-Beth); M.B. Daly (Mary); E.J. van Rensburg (Elizabeth); U. Hamann (Ute); S.J. Ramus (Susan); A. Ewart-Toland (Amanda); M.A. Caligo (Maria); O.I. Olopade (Olofunmilayo); N. Tung (Nadine); K. Claes (Kathleen); M.S. Beattie (Mary); M.C. Southey (Melissa); E.N. Imyanitov (Evgeny); M. Tischkowitz (Marc); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); E.M. John (Esther); A. Kwong (Ava); O. Diez (Orland); J. Balmana (Judith); R.B. Barkardottir (Rosa); B.K. Arun (Banu); G. Rennert (Gad); S.-H. Teo; P.A. Ganz (Patricia); I. Campbell (Ian); A.H. van der Hout (Annemarie); C.H.M. van Deurzen (Carolien); C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); E.B. Gómez García (Encarna); F.E. van Leeuwen (F.); H. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); J.J. Gille (Johan); M.G.E.M. Ausems (Margreet); M.J. Blok (Marinus); M.J. Ligtenberg (Marjolijn); M.A. Rookus (Matti); P. Devilee (Peter); S. Verhoef; T.A.M. van Os (Theo); J.T. Wijnen (Juul); D. Frost (Debra); S. Ellis (Steve); E. Fineberg (Elena); R. Platte (Radka); D.G. Evans (Gareth); L. Izatt (Louise); R. Eeles (Rosalind); J.W. Adlard (Julian); D. Eccles (Diana); J. Cook (Jackie); C. Brewer (C.); F. Douglas (Fiona); S.V. Hodgson (Shirley); P.J. Morrison (Patrick); L. Side (Lucy); A. Donaldson (Alan); C. Houghton (Catherine); M.T. Rogers (Mark); H. Dorkins (Huw); J. Eason (Jacqueline); H. Gregory (Helen); E. McCann (Emma); A. Murray (Alexandra); A. Calender (Alain); A. Hardouin (Agnès); P. Berthet (Pascaline); C.D. Delnatte (Capucine); C. Nogues (Catherine); C. Lasset (Christine); C. Houdayer (Claude); D. Leroux (Dominique); E. Rouleau (Etienne); F. Prieur (Fabienne); F. Damiola (Francesca); H. Sobol (Hagay); I. Coupier (Isabelle); L. Vénat-Bouvet (Laurence); L. Castera (Laurent); M. Gauthier-Villars (Marion); M. Léone (Mélanie); P. Pujol (Pascal); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); Y.-J. Bignon (Yves-Jean); E. Złowocka-Perłowska (Elzbieta); J. Gronwald (Jacek); J. Lubinski (Jan); K. Durda (Katarzyna); K. Jaworska (Katarzyna); T. Huzarski (Tomasz); A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); A. Viel (Alessandra); B. Peissel (Bernard); B. Bonnani (Bernardo); G. Melloni (Giulia); L. Ottini (Laura); L. Papi (Laura); L. Varesco (Liliana); M.G. Tibiletti (Maria Grazia); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); S. Volorio (Sara); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); V. Pensotti (Valeria); N. Arnold (Norbert); C. Engel (Christoph); H. Deissler (Helmut); D. Gadzicki (Dorothea); P.A. Gehrig (Paola A.); K. Kast (Karin); K. Rhiem (Kerstin); A. Meindl (Alfons); D. Niederacher (Dieter); N. Ditsch (Nina); H. Plendl (Hansjoerg); S. Preisler-Adams (Sabine); S. Engert (Stefanie); C. Sutter (Christian); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); B.H.F. Weber (Bernhard); B. Arver (Brita Wasteson); M. Stenmark-Askmalm (M.); N. Loman (Niklas); R. Rosenquist (R.); Z. Einbeigi (Zakaria); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); S.V. Blank (Stephanie); D.E. Cohn (David); G.C. Rodriguez (Gustavo); L. Small (Laurie); M. Friedlander (Michael); V.L. Bae-Jump (Victoria L.); A. Fink-Retter (Anneliese); C. Rappaport (Christine); D. Gschwantler-Kaulich (Daphne); G. Pfeiler (Georg); M.-K. Tea; N.M. Lindor (Noralane); B. Kaufman (Bella); S. Shimon Paluch (Shani); Y. Laitman (Yael); A.-B. Skytte (Anne-Bine); A-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); I.S. Pedersen (Inge Sokilde); S.T. Moeller (Sanne Traasdahl); T.A. Kruse (Torben); U.B. Jensen; J. Vijai (Joseph); K. Sarrel (Kara); M. Robson (Mark); N. Kauff (Noah); A.M. Mulligan (Anna Marie); G. Glendon (Gord); H. Ozcelik (Hilmi); B. Ejlertsen (Bent); F.C. Nielsen (Finn); L. Jønson (Lars); M.K. Andersen (Mette); Y.C. Ding (Yuan); L. Steele (Linda); L. Foretova (Lenka); A. Teulé (A.); C. Lazaro (Conxi); J. Brunet (Joan); M.A. Pujana (Miguel); P.L. Mai (Phuong); J.T. Loud (Jennifer); C.S. Walsh (Christine); K.J. Lester (Kathryn); S. Orsulic (Sandra); S. Narod (Steven); J. Herzog (Josef); S.R. Sand (Sharon); S. Tognazzo (Silvia); S. Agata (Simona); T. Vaszko (Tibor); J. Weaver (JoEllen); A. Stavropoulou (Alexandra); S.S. Buys (Saundra); A. Romero (Alfonso); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); T.A. Muranen (Taru); M. Duran; W.K. Chung (Wendy); A. Lasa (Adriana); C.M. Dorfling (Cecelia); A. Miron (Alexander); J. Benítez (Javier); L. Senter (Leigha); D. Huo (Dezheng); S. Chan (Salina); A. Sokolenko (Anna); J. Chiquette (Jocelyne); L. Tihomirova (Laima); M.O.W. Friebel (Mark ); B.A. Agnarsson (Bjarni); K.H. Lu (Karen); F. Lejbkowicz (Flavio); P.A. James (Paul ); A.S. Hall (Alistair); A.M. Dunning (Alison); Y. Tessier (Yann); J. Cunningham (Jane); S. Slager (Susan); C. Wang (Chen); S. Hart (Stewart); K. Stevens (Kristen); J. Simard (Jacques); T. Pastinen (Tomi); V.S. Pankratz (Shane); K. Offit (Kenneth); D.F. Easton (Douglas); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis); H. Thorne (Heather); E. Niedermayr (Eveline); Å. Borg (Åke); H. Olsson; H. Jernström (H.); K. Henriksson (Karin); K. Harbst (Katja); M. Soller (Maria); U. Kristoffersson (Ulf); A. Öfverholm (Anna); M. Nordling (Margareta); P. Karlsson (Per); A. von Wachenfeldt (Anna); A. Liljegren (Annelie); A. Lindblom (Annika); G.B. Bustinza; J. Rantala (Johanna); B. Melin (Beatrice); C.E. Ardnor (Christina Edwinsdotter); M. Emanuelsson (Monica); H. Ehrencrona (Hans); M.H. Pigg (Maritta ); S. Liedgren (Sigrun); M.A. Rookus (M.); S. Verhoef (S.); F.E. van Leeuwen (F.); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); J.L. de Lange (J.); J.M. Collee (Margriet); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); M.J. Hooning (Maartje); C.J. van Asperen (Christi); J.T. Wijnen (Juul); R.A.E.M. Tollenaar (Rob); P. Devilee (Peter); T.C.T.E.F. van Cronenburg; C.M. Kets; A.R. Mensenkamp (Arjen); R.B. van der Luijt (Rob); C.M. Aalfs (Cora); T.A.M. van Os (Theo); Q. Waisfisz (Quinten); E.J. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); E.B. Gomez Garcia (Encarna); J.C. Oosterwijk (Jan); M.J. Mourits; G.H. de Bock (Geertruida); S.D. Ellis (Steve); E. Fineberg (Elena); Z. Miedzybrodzka (Zosia); L. Jeffers (Lisa); T.J. Cole (Trevor); K.-R. Ong (Kai-Ren); J. Hoffman (Jonathan); M. James (Margaret); J. Paterson (Joan); A. Taylor (Amy); A. Murray (Anna); M.J. Kennedy (John); D.E. Barton (David); M.E. Porteous (Mary); S. Drummond (Sarah); C. Brewer (Carole); E. Kivuva (Emma); A. Searle (Anne); S. Goodman (Selina); R. Davidson (Rosemarie); V. Murday (Victoria); N. Bradshaw (Nicola); L. Snadden (Lesley); M. Longmuir (Mark); C. Watt (Catherine); S. Gibson (Sarah); E. Haque (Eshika); E. Tobias (Ed); A. Duncan (Alexis); L. Izatt (Louise); C. Jacobs (Chris); C. Langman (Caroline); A.F. Brady (Angela); S.A. Melville (Scott); K. Randhawa (Kashmir); J. Barwell (Julian); G. Serra-Feliu (Gemma); I.O. Ellis (Ian); F. Lalloo (Fiona); J. Taylor (James); A. Male (Alison); C. Berlin (Cheryl); R. Collier (Rebecca); F. Douglas (Fiona); O. Claber (Oonagh); I. Jobson (Irene); L.J. Walker (Lisa); D. McLeod (Diane); D. Halliday (Dorothy); S. Durell (Sarah); B. Stayner (Barbara); S. Shanley (Susan); N. Rahman (Nazneen); R. Houlston (Richard); A. Stormorken (Astrid); E. Bancroft (Elizabeth); E. Page (Elizabeth); A. Ardern-Jones (Audrey); K. Kohut (Kelly); J. Wiggins (Jennifer); E. Castro (Elena); S.R. Killick; S. Martin (Sue); D. Rea (Dan); A. Kulkarni (Anjana); O. Quarrell (Oliver); C. Bardsley (Cathryn); S. Goff (Sheila); G. Brice (Glen); L. Winchester (Lizzie); C. Eddy (Charlotte); V. Tripathi (Vishakha); V. Attard (Virginia); A. Lehmann (Anna); A. Lucassen (Anneke); G. Crawford (Gabe); D. McBride (Donna); S. Smalley (Sarah); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); F. Damiola (Francesca); L. Barjhoux (Laure); C. Verny-Pierre (Carole); S. Giraud (Sophie); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); B. Buecher (Bruno); V. Moncoutier (Virginie); M. Belotti (Muriel); C. Tirapo (Carole); A. de Pauw (Antoine); B. Bressac-de Paillerets (Brigitte); O. Caron (Olivier); Y.-J. Bignon (Yves-Jean); N. Uhrhammer (Nancy); V. Bonadona (Valérie); S. Handallou (Sandrine); A. hardouin (Agnès); H. Sobol (Hagay); V. Bourdon (Violaine); T. Noguchi (Tetsuro); A. Remenieras (Audrey); F. Eisinger (François); J.-P. Peyrat; J. Fournier (Joëlle); F. Révillion (Françoise); P. Vennin (Philippe); C. Adenis (Claude); R. Lidereau (Rosette); L. Demange (Liliane); D.W. Muller (Danièle); J.P. Fricker (Jean Pierre); E. Barouk-Simonet (Emmanuelle); F. Bonnet (Françoise); V. Bubien (Virginie); N. Sevenet (Nicolas); M. Longy (Michel); C. Toulas (Christine); R. Guimbaud (Rosine); L. Gladieff (Laurence); V. Feillel (Viviane); H. Dreyfus (Hélène); C. Rebischung (Christine); M. Peysselon (Magalie); F. Coron (Fanny); L. Faivre (Laurence); M. Lebrun (Marine); C. Kientz (Caroline); S.F. Ferrer; M. Frenay (Marc); I. Mortemousque (Isabelle); F. Coulet (Florence); C. Colas (Chrystelle); F. Soubrier; J. Sokolowska (Johanna); M. Bronner (Myriam); H. Lynch (Henry); C.L. Snyder (Carrie); M. Angelakos (Maggie); J. Maskiell (Judi); G.S. Dite (Gillian)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBRCA1-associated breast and ovarian cancer risks can be modified by common genetic variants. To identify further cancer risk-modifying loci, we performed a multi-stage GWAS of 11,705 BRCA1 carriers (of whom 5,920 were diagnosed with breast and 1,839 were diagnosed with ovarian cancer), w

  14. Exome sequencing identifies a novel frameshift mutation of MYO6 as the cause of autosomal dominant nonsyndromic hearing loss in a Chinese family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jing; Zhou, Xueya; Lu, Yu; Chen, Jing; Han, Bing; Zhu, Yuhua; Liu, Liyang; Choy, Kwong-Wai; Han, Dongyi; Sham, Pak C; Zhang, Michael Q; Zhang, Xuegong; Yuan, Huijun

    2014-11-01

    Autosomal dominant types of nonsyndromic hearing loss (ADNSHL) are typically postlingual in onset and progressive. High genetic heterogeneity, late onset age, and possible confounding due to nongenetic factors hinder the timely molecular diagnoses for most patients. In this study, exome sequencing was applied to investigate a large Chinese family segregating ADNSHL in which we initially failed to find strong evidence of linkage to any locus by whole-genome linkage analysis. Two affected family members were selected for sequencing. We identified two novel mutations disrupting known ADNSHL genes and shared by the sequenced samples: c.328C>A in COCH (DFNA9) resulting in a p.Q110K substitution and a deletion c. 2814_2815delAA in MYO6 (DFNA22) causing a frameshift alteration p.R939Tfs*2. The pathogenicity of novel coding variants in ADNSHL genes was carefully evaluated by analysis of co-segregation with phenotype in the pedigree and in light of established genotype-phenotype correlations. The frameshift deletion in MYO6 was confirmed as the causative variant for this pedigree, whereas the missense mutation in COCH had no clinical significance. The results allowed us to retrospectively identify the phenocopy in one patient that contributed to the negative finding in the linkage scan. Our clinical data also supported the emerging genotype-phenotype correlation for DFNA22.

  15. Novel somatic mutations identified by whole-exome sequencing in muscle-invasive transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder

    OpenAIRE

    PAN, HUIXING; Xu, Xiaojian; WU, DEYAO; QIU, QIAOCHENG; Zhou, Shoujun; He, Xuefeng; Zhou, Yunfeng; Qu, Ping; Hou, Jianquan; He, Jun; Zhou, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) is the one of the most commonly observed types of cancer globally. The identification of novel disease-associated genes in TCC has had a significant effect on the diagnosis and treatment of bladder cancer; however, there may be a large number of novel genes that have not been identified. In the present study, the exomes of two individuals who were diagnosed with muscle-invasive TCC (MI-TCC) were sequenced to investigate potential variants. Subsequently, follo...

  16. Whole-genome sequencing identifies emergence of a quinolone resistance mutation in a case of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pak, Theodore R; Altman, Deena R; Attie, Oliver; Sebra, Robert; Hamula, Camille L; Lewis, Martha; Deikus, Gintaras; Newman, Leah C; Fang, Gang; Hand, Jonathan; Patel, Gopi; Wallach, Fran; Schadt, Eric E; Huprikar, Shirish; van Bakel, Harm; Kasarskis, Andrew; Bashir, Ali

    2015-11-01

    Whole-genome sequences for Stenotrophomonas maltophilia serial isolates from a bacteremic patient before and after development of levofloxacin resistance were assembled de novo and differed by one single-nucleotide variant in smeT, a repressor for multidrug efflux operon smeDEF. Along with sequenced isolates from five contemporaneous cases, they displayed considerable diversity compared against all published complete genomes. Whole-genome sequencing and complete assembly can conclusively identify resistance mechanisms emerging in S. maltophilia strains during clinical therapy.

  17. Genome-Wide Association Study in BRCA1 Mutation Carriers Identifies Novel Loci Associated with Breast and Ovarian Cancer Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couch, Fergus J; Wang, Xianshu; McGuffog, Lesley;

    2013-01-01

    BRCA1-associated breast and ovarian cancer risks can be modified by common genetic variants. To identify further cancer risk-modifying loci, we performed a multi-stage GWAS of 11,705 BRCA1 carriers (of whom 5,920 were diagnosed with breast and 1,839 were diagnosed with ovarian cancer......), with a further replication in an additional sample of 2,646 BRCA1 carriers. We identified a novel breast cancer risk modifier locus at 1q32 for BRCA1 carriers (rs2290854, P = 2.7 × 10(-8), HR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.09-1.20). In addition, we identified two novel ovarian cancer risk modifier loci: 17q21.31 (rs17631303......, P = 1.4 × 10(-8), HR = 1.27, 95% CI: 1.17-1.38) and 4q32.3 (rs4691139, P = 3.4 × 10(-8), HR = 1.20, 95% CI: 1.17-1.38). The 4q32.3 locus was not associated with ovarian cancer risk in the general population or BRCA2 carriers, suggesting a BRCA1-specific association. The 17q21.31 locus was also...

  18. Exome Sequencing Identifies Compound Heterozygous Mutations in SCN5A Associated with Congenital Complete Heart Block in the Thai Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuphong Thongnak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Congenital heart block is characterized by blockage of electrical impulses from the atrioventricular node (AV node to the ventricles. This blockage can be caused by ion channel impairment that is the result of genetic variation. This study aimed to investigate the possible causative variants in a Thai family with complete heart block by using whole exome sequencing. Methods. Genomic DNA was collected from a family consisting of five family members in three generations in which one of three children in generation III had complete heart block. Whole exome sequencing was performed on one complete heart block affected child and one unaffected sibling. Bioinformatics was used to identify annotated and filtered variants. Candidate variants were validated and the segregation analysis of other family members was performed. Results. This study identified compound heterozygous variants, c.101G>A and c.3832G>A, in the SCN5A gene and c.28730C>T in the TTN gene. Conclusions. Compound heterozygous variants in the SCN5A gene were found in the complete heart block affected child but these two variants were found only in the this affected sibling and were not found in other unaffected family members. Hence, these variants in the SCN5A gene were the most possible disease-causing variants in this family.

  19. Genome-wide association study in BRCA1 mutation carriers identifies novel loci associated with breast and ovarian cancer risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fergus J Couch

    Full Text Available BRCA1-associated breast and ovarian cancer risks can be modified by common genetic variants. To identify further cancer risk-modifying loci, we performed a multi-stage GWAS of 11,705 BRCA1 carriers (of whom 5,920 were diagnosed with breast and 1,839 were diagnosed with ovarian cancer, with a further replication in an additional sample of 2,646 BRCA1 carriers. We identified a novel breast cancer risk modifier locus at 1q32 for BRCA1 carriers (rs2290854, P = 2.7 × 10(-8, HR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.09-1.20. In addition, we identified two novel ovarian cancer risk modifier loci: 17q21.31 (rs17631303, P = 1.4 × 10(-8, HR = 1.27, 95% CI: 1.17-1.38 and 4q32.3 (rs4691139, P = 3.4 × 10(-8, HR = 1.20, 95% CI: 1.17-1.38. The 4q32.3 locus was not associated with ovarian cancer risk in the general population or BRCA2 carriers, suggesting a BRCA1-specific association. The 17q21.31 locus was also associated with ovarian cancer risk in 8,211 BRCA2 carriers (P = 2×10(-4. These loci may lead to an improved understanding of the etiology of breast and ovarian tumors in BRCA1 carriers. Based on the joint distribution of the known BRCA1 breast cancer risk-modifying loci, we estimated that the breast cancer lifetime risks for the 5% of BRCA1 carriers at lowest risk are 28%-50% compared to 81%-100% for the 5% at highest risk. Similarly, based on the known ovarian cancer risk-modifying loci, the 5% of BRCA1 carriers at lowest risk have an estimated lifetime risk of developing ovarian cancer of 28% or lower, whereas the 5% at highest risk will have a risk of 63% or higher. Such differences in risk may have important implications for risk prediction and clinical management for BRCA1 carriers.

  20. Genome-wide association study in BRCA1 mutation carriers identifies novel loci associated with breast and ovarian cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couch, Fergus J; Wang, Xianshu; McGuffog, Lesley; Lee, Andrew; Olswold, Curtis; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Soucy, Penny; Fredericksen, Zachary; Barrowdale, Daniel; Dennis, Joe; Gaudet, Mia M; Dicks, Ed; Kosel, Matthew; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Lee, Adam; Bacot, François; Vincent, Daniel; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Peock, Susan; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Jakubowska, Anna; Radice, Paolo; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Domchek, Susan M; Piedmonte, Marion; Singer, Christian F; Friedman, Eitan; Thomassen, Mads; Hansen, Thomas V O; Neuhausen, Susan L; Szabo, Csilla I; Blanco, Ignacio; Greene, Mark H; Karlan, Beth Y; Garber, Judy; Phelan, Catherine M; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Montagna, Marco; Olah, Edith; Andrulis, Irene L; Godwin, Andrew K; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Goldgar, David E; Caldes, Trinidad; Nevanlinna, Heli; Osorio, Ana; Terry, Mary Beth; Daly, Mary B; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Hamann, Ute; Ramus, Susan J; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Caligo, Maria A; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Tung, Nadine; Claes, Kathleen; Beattie, Mary S; Southey, Melissa C; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Tischkowitz, Marc; Janavicius, Ramunas; John, Esther M; Kwong, Ava; Diez, Orland; Balmaña, Judith; Barkardottir, Rosa B; Arun, Banu K; Rennert, Gad; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Ganz, Patricia A; Campbell, Ian; van der Hout, Annemarie H; van Deurzen, Carolien H M; Seynaeve, Caroline; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B; van Leeuwen, Flora E; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E J; Gille, Johannes J P; Ausems, Margreet G E M; Blok, Marinus J; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J L; Rookus, Matti A; Devilee, Peter; Verhoef, Senno; van Os, Theo A M; Wijnen, Juul T; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve; Fineberg, Elena; Platte, Radka; Evans, D Gareth; Izatt, Louise; Eeles, Rosalind A; Adlard, Julian; Eccles, Diana M; Cook, Jackie; Brewer, Carole; Douglas, Fiona; Hodgson, Shirley; Morrison, Patrick J; Side, Lucy E; Donaldson, Alan; Houghton, Catherine; Rogers, Mark T; Dorkins, Huw; Eason, Jacqueline; Gregory, Helen; McCann, Emma; Murray, Alex; Calender, Alain; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Delnatte, Capucine; Nogues, Catherine; Lasset, Christine; Houdayer, Claude; Leroux, Dominique; Rouleau, Etienne; Prieur, Fabienne; Damiola, Francesca; Sobol, Hagay; Coupier, Isabelle; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Castera, Laurent; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Léoné, Mélanie; Pujol, Pascal; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Złowocka-Perłowska, Elżbieta; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubinski, Jan; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Huzarski, Tomasz; Spurdle, Amanda B; Viel, Alessandra; Peissel, Bernard; Bonanni, Bernardo; Melloni, Giulia; Ottini, Laura; Papi, Laura; Varesco, Liliana; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Peterlongo, Paolo; Volorio, Sara; Manoukian, Siranoush; Pensotti, Valeria; Arnold, Norbert; Engel, Christoph; Deissler, Helmut; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Gehrig, Andrea; Kast, Karin; Rhiem, Kerstin; Meindl, Alfons; Niederacher, Dieter; Ditsch, Nina; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Engert, Stefanie; Sutter, Christian; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Weber, Bernhard H F; Arver, Brita; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Loman, Niklas; Rosenquist, Richard; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Nathanson, Katherine L; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Blank, Stephanie V; Cohn, David E; Rodriguez, Gustavo C; Small, Laurie; Friedlander, Michael; Bae-Jump, Victoria L; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Rappaport, Christine; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Lindor, Noralane M; Kaufman, Bella; Shimon Paluch, Shani; Laitman, Yael; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Moeller, Sanne Traasdahl; Kruse, Torben A; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Vijai, Joseph; Sarrel, Kara; Robson, Mark; Kauff, Noah; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Ejlertsen, Bent; Nielsen, Finn C; Jønson, Lars; Andersen, Mette K; Ding, Yuan Chun; Steele, Linda; Foretova, Lenka; Teulé, Alex; Lazaro, Conxi; Brunet, Joan; Pujana, Miquel Angel; Mai, Phuong L; Loud, Jennifer T; Walsh, Christine; Lester, Jenny; Orsulic, Sandra; Narod, Steven A; Herzog, Josef; Sand, Sharon R; Tognazzo, Silvia; Agata, Simona; Vaszko, Tibor; Weaver, Joellen; Stavropoulou, Alexandra V; Buys, Saundra S; Romero, Atocha; de la Hoya, Miguel; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Muranen, Taru A; Duran, Mercedes; Chung, Wendy K; Lasa, Adriana; Dorfling, Cecilia M; Miron, Alexander; Benitez, Javier; Senter, Leigha; Huo, Dezheng; Chan, Salina B; Sokolenko, Anna P; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Tihomirova, Laima; Friebel, Tara M; Agnarsson, Bjarni A; Lu, Karen H; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; James, Paul A; Hall, Per; Dunning, Alison M; Tessier, Daniel; Cunningham, Julie; Slager, Susan L; Wang, Chen; Hart, Steven; Stevens, Kristen; Simard, Jacques; Pastinen, Tomi; Pankratz, Vernon S; Offit, Kenneth; Easton, Douglas F; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C

    2013-01-01

    BRCA1-associated breast and ovarian cancer risks can be modified by common genetic variants. To identify further cancer risk-modifying loci, we performed a multi-stage GWAS of 11,705 BRCA1 carriers (of whom 5,920 were diagnosed with breast and 1,839 were diagnosed with ovarian cancer), with a further replication in an additional sample of 2,646 BRCA1 carriers. We identified a novel breast cancer risk modifier locus at 1q32 for BRCA1 carriers (rs2290854, P = 2.7 × 10(-8), HR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.09-1.20). In addition, we identified two novel ovarian cancer risk modifier loci: 17q21.31 (rs17631303, P = 1.4 × 10(-8), HR = 1.27, 95% CI: 1.17-1.38) and 4q32.3 (rs4691139, P = 3.4 × 10(-8), HR = 1.20, 95% CI: 1.17-1.38). The 4q32.3 locus was not associated with ovarian cancer risk in the general population or BRCA2 carriers, suggesting a BRCA1-specific association. The 17q21.31 locus was also associated with ovarian cancer risk in 8,211 BRCA2 carriers (P = 2×10(-4)). These loci may lead to an improved understanding of the etiology of breast and ovarian tumors in BRCA1 carriers. Based on the joint distribution of the known BRCA1 breast cancer risk-modifying loci, we estimated that the breast cancer lifetime risks for the 5% of BRCA1 carriers at lowest risk are 28%-50% compared to 81%-100% for the 5% at highest risk. Similarly, based on the known ovarian cancer risk-modifying loci, the 5% of BRCA1 carriers at lowest risk have an estimated lifetime risk of developing ovarian cancer of 28% or lower, whereas the 5% at highest risk will have a risk of 63% or higher. Such differences in risk may have important implications for risk prediction and clinical management for BRCA1 carriers.

  1. Genome-Wide Association Study in BRCA1 Mutation Carriers Identifies Novel Loci Associated with Breast and Ovarian Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xianshu; McGuffog, Lesley; Lee, Andrew; Olswold, Curtis; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Soucy, Penny; Fredericksen, Zachary; Barrowdale, Daniel; Dennis, Joe; Gaudet, Mia M.; Dicks, Ed; Kosel, Matthew; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Lee, Adam; Bacot, François; Vincent, Daniel; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Peock, Susan; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Jakubowska, Anna; Investigators, kConFab; Radice, Paolo; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Domchek, Susan M.; Piedmonte, Marion; Singer, Christian F.; Friedman, Eitan; Thomassen, Mads; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Szabo, Csilla I.; Blanco, Ignacio; Greene, Mark H.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Garber, Judy; Phelan, Catherine M.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Montagna, Marco; Olah, Edith; Andrulis, Irene L.; Godwin, Andrew K.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Goldgar, David E.; Caldes, Trinidad; Nevanlinna, Heli; Osorio, Ana; Terry, Mary Beth; Daly, Mary B.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Hamann, Ute; Ramus, Susan J.; Ewart Toland, Amanda; Caligo, Maria A.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Tung, Nadine; Claes, Kathleen; Beattie, Mary S.; Southey, Melissa C.; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Tischkowitz, Marc; Janavicius, Ramunas; John, Esther M.; Kwong, Ava; Diez, Orland; Balmaña, Judith; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Arun, Banu K.; Rennert, Gad; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Ganz, Patricia A.; Campbell, Ian; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; van Deurzen, Carolien H. M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B.; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Gille, Johannes J. P.; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; Blok, Marinus J.; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J. L.; Rookus, Matti A.; Devilee, Peter; Verhoef, Senno; van Os, Theo A. M.; Wijnen, Juul T.; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve; Fineberg, Elena; Platte, Radka; Evans, D. Gareth; Izatt, Louise; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Adlard, Julian; Eccles, Diana M.; Cook, Jackie; Brewer, Carole; Douglas, Fiona; Hodgson, Shirley; Morrison, Patrick J.; Side, Lucy E.; Donaldson, Alan; Houghton, Catherine; Rogers, Mark T.; Dorkins, Huw; Eason, Jacqueline; Gregory, Helen; McCann, Emma; Murray, Alex; Calender, Alain; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Delnatte, Capucine; Nogues, Catherine; Lasset, Christine; Houdayer, Claude; Leroux, Dominique; Rouleau, Etienne; Prieur, Fabienne; Damiola, Francesca; Sobol, Hagay; Coupier, Isabelle; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Castera, Laurent; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Léoné, Mélanie; Pujol, Pascal; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Złowocka-Perłowska, Elżbieta; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubinski, Jan; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Huzarski, Tomasz; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Viel, Alessandra; Peissel, Bernard; Bonanni, Bernardo; Melloni, Giulia; Ottini, Laura; Papi, Laura; Varesco, Liliana; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Peterlongo, Paolo; Volorio, Sara; Manoukian, Siranoush; Pensotti, Valeria; Arnold, Norbert; Engel, Christoph; Deissler, Helmut; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Gehrig, Andrea; Kast, Karin; Rhiem, Kerstin; Meindl, Alfons; Niederacher, Dieter; Ditsch, Nina; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Engert, Stefanie; Sutter, Christian; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Weber, Bernhard H. F.; Arver, Brita; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Loman, Niklas; Rosenquist, Richard; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Blank, Stephanie V.; Cohn, David E.; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Small, Laurie; Friedlander, Michael; Bae-Jump, Victoria L.; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Rappaport, Christine; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Lindor, Noralane M.; Kaufman, Bella; Shimon Paluch, Shani; Laitman, Yael; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Moeller, Sanne Traasdahl; Kruse, Torben A.; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Vijai, Joseph; Sarrel, Kara; Robson, Mark; Kauff, Noah; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Ejlertsen, Bent; Nielsen, Finn C.; Jønson, Lars; Andersen, Mette K.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Steele, Linda; Foretova, Lenka; Teulé, Alex; Lazaro, Conxi; Brunet, Joan; Pujana, Miquel Angel; Mai, Phuong L.; Loud, Jennifer T.; Walsh, Christine; Lester, Jenny; Orsulic, Sandra; Narod, Steven A.; Herzog, Josef; Sand, Sharon R.; Tognazzo, Silvia; Agata, Simona; Vaszko, Tibor; Weaver, Joellen; Stavropoulou, Alexandra V.; Buys, Saundra S.; Romero, Atocha; de la Hoya, Miguel; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Muranen, Taru A.; Duran, Mercedes; Chung, Wendy K.; Lasa, Adriana; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; Miron, Alexander; Benitez, Javier; Senter, Leigha; Huo, Dezheng; Chan, Salina B.; Sokolenko, Anna P.; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Tihomirova, Laima; Friebel, Tara M.; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Lu, Karen H.; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; James, Paul A.; Hall, Per; Dunning, Alison M.; Tessier, Daniel; Cunningham, Julie; Slager, Susan L.; Wang, Chen; Hart, Steven; Stevens, Kristen; Simard, Jacques; Pastinen, Tomi; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Offit, Kenneth; Antoniou, Antonis C.

    2013-01-01

    BRCA1-associated breast and ovarian cancer risks can be modified by common genetic variants. To identify further cancer risk-modifying loci, we performed a multi-stage GWAS of 11,705 BRCA1 carriers (of whom 5,920 were diagnosed with breast and 1,839 were diagnosed with ovarian cancer), with a further replication in an additional sample of 2,646 BRCA1 carriers. We identified a novel breast cancer risk modifier locus at 1q32 for BRCA1 carriers (rs2290854, P = 2.7×10−8, HR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.09–1.20). In addition, we identified two novel ovarian cancer risk modifier loci: 17q21.31 (rs17631303, P = 1.4×10−8, HR = 1.27, 95% CI: 1.17–1.38) and 4q32.3 (rs4691139, P = 3.4×10−8, HR = 1.20, 95% CI: 1.17–1.38). The 4q32.3 locus was not associated with ovarian cancer risk in the general population or BRCA2 carriers, suggesting a BRCA1-specific association. The 17q21.31 locus was also associated with ovarian cancer risk in 8,211 BRCA2 carriers (P = 2×10−4). These loci may lead to an improved understanding of the etiology of breast and ovarian tumors in BRCA1 carriers. Based on the joint distribution of the known BRCA1 breast cancer risk-modifying loci, we estimated that the breast cancer lifetime risks for the 5% of BRCA1 carriers at lowest risk are 28%–50% compared to 81%–100% for the 5% at highest risk. Similarly, based on the known ovarian cancer risk-modifying loci, the 5% of BRCA1 carriers at lowest risk have an estimated lifetime risk of developing ovarian cancer of 28% or lower, whereas the 5% at highest risk will have a risk of 63% or higher. Such differences in risk may have important implications for risk prediction and clinical management for BRCA1 carriers. PMID:23544013

  2. Oral and craniofacial manifestations and two novel missense mutations of the NTRK1 gene identified in the patient with congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis.

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    Li Gao

    Full Text Available Congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis (CIPA is a rare inherited disorder of the peripheral nervous system resulting from mutations in neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor 1 gene (NTRK1, which encodes the high-affinity nerve growth factor receptor TRKA. Here, we investigated the oral and craniofacial manifestations of a Chinese patient affected by autosomal-recessive CIPA and identified compound heterozygosity in the NTRK1 gene. The affected boy has multisystemic disorder with lack of reaction to pain stimuli accompanied by self-mutilation behavior, the inability to sweat leading to defective thermoregulation, and mental retardation. Oral and craniofacial manifestations included a large number of missing teeth, nasal malformation, submucous cleft palate, severe soft tissue injuries, dental caries and malocclusion. Histopathological evaluation of the skin sample revealed severe peripheral nerve fiber loss as well as mild loss and absent innervation of sweat glands. Ultrastructural and morphometric studies of a shed tooth revealed dental abnormalities, including hypomineralization, dentin hypoplasia, cementogenesis defects and a dysplastic periodontal ligament. Genetic analysis revealed a compound heterozygosity--c.1561T>C and c.2057G>A in the NTRK1 gene. This report extends the spectrum of NTRK1 mutations observed in patients diagnosed with CIPA and provides additional insight for clinical and molecular diagnosis.

  3. Oral and craniofacial manifestations and two novel missense mutations of the NTRK1 gene identified in the patient with congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Li; Guo, Hao; Ye, Nan; Bai, Yudi; Liu, Xin; Yu, Ping; Xue, Yang; Ma, Shufang; Wei, Kewen; Jin, Yan; Wen, Lingying; Xuan, Kun

    2013-01-01

    Congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis (CIPA) is a rare inherited disorder of the peripheral nervous system resulting from mutations in neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor 1 gene (NTRK1), which encodes the high-affinity nerve growth factor receptor TRKA. Here, we investigated the oral and craniofacial manifestations of a Chinese patient affected by autosomal-recessive CIPA and identified compound heterozygosity in the NTRK1 gene. The affected boy has multisystemic disorder with lack of reaction to pain stimuli accompanied by self-mutilation behavior, the inability to sweat leading to defective thermoregulation, and mental retardation. Oral and craniofacial manifestations included a large number of missing teeth, nasal malformation, submucous cleft palate, severe soft tissue injuries, dental caries and malocclusion. Histopathological evaluation of the skin sample revealed severe peripheral nerve fiber loss as well as mild loss and absent innervation of sweat glands. Ultrastructural and morphometric studies of a shed tooth revealed dental abnormalities, including hypomineralization, dentin hypoplasia, cementogenesis defects and a dysplastic periodontal ligament. Genetic analysis revealed a compound heterozygosity--c.1561T>C and c.2057G>A in the NTRK1 gene. This report extends the spectrum of NTRK1 mutations observed in patients diagnosed with CIPA and provides additional insight for clinical and molecular diagnosis.

  4. Systematic interpretation of molecular beacon polymerase chain reaction for identifying rpoB mutations in Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates with mixed resistant and susceptible bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Diana I; Fisher-Hoch, Susan P; Bordt, Andrea S; Quitugua, Teresa N; Robledo, Jaime; Alvarez, Nataly; Correa, Nidia; McCormick, Joseph B; Restrepo, Blanca I

    2010-05-01

    Detection of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB), a frequent cause of treatment failure, takes 2 or more weeks to identify by culture. Rifampicin (RIF) resistance is a hallmark of MDR-TB, and detection of mutations in the rpoB gene of Mycobacterium tuberculosis using molecular beacon probes with real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) is a novel approach that takes Visual and mathematical approaches were used to establish whether the qPCR cycle threshold of the experimental isolate was significantly higher (mutant) compared to a reference wild-type isolate. Visual classification of the beacon qPCR required reader training for strains with a mixture of RIF-susceptible and RIF-resistant bacteria. Only then had the visual interpretation by an experienced reader had 100% sensitivity and 94.6% specificity versus RIF resistance by culture phenotype and 98.1% sensitivity and 100% specificity versus mutations based on DNA sequence. The mathematical approach was 98% sensitive and 94.5% specific versus culture and 96.2% sensitive and 100% specific versus DNA sequence. Our findings indicate the mathematical approach has advantages over the visual reading, in that it uses a Microsoft Excel template to eliminate reader bias or inexperience, and allows objective interpretation from high-throughput analyses even in the presence of a mixture of RIF-resistant and RIF-susceptible isolates without the need for reader training.

  5. An original phylogenetic approach identified mitochondrial haplogroup T1a1 as inversely associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blein, Sophie; Bardel, Claire; Danjean, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    or unaffected individuals. RESULTS: We discovered that subclade T1a1 was depleted in affected BRCA2 mutation carriers compared with the rest of clade T (hazard ratio (HR) = 0.55; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.34 to 0.88; P = 0.01). Compared with the most frequent haplogroup in the general population (that is......, H and T clades), the T1a1 haplogroup has a HR of 0.62 (95% CI, 0.40 to 0.95; P = 0.03). We also identified three potential susceptibility loci, including G13708A/rs28359178, which has demonstrated an inverse association with familial breast cancer risk. CONCLUSIONS: This study illustrates how...

  6. Whole-exome sequencing and genome-wide methylation analyses identify novel disease associated mutations and methylation patterns in idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Christen Lykkegaard; Nielsen, Helene Myrtue; Kristensen, Lasse Sommer

    2015-01-01

    reactive eosinophilic conditions to known clonal and suspected clonal eosinophilia. Somatic missense mutations in cancer-related genes were detected in three IHES patients. These included the spliceosome gene PUF60 and the cadherin gene CDH17. Furthermore, reactive eosinophilia samples could...... be differentiated from known- and suspected clonal eosinophilia samples based on 285 differentially methylated CpG sites corresponding to 128 differentially methylated genes. Using Ingenuity pathway analysis, we found that differentially methylated genes were highly enriched in functional pathways such as cancer...... or hypermethylated tumor suppressor genes. In addition, we identified a DNA methylation signature that is relevant for distinguishing clonal and suspected clonal eosinophilia from reactive eosinophilia per se, which may be useful in daily clinical work....

  7. To the Root of the Curl: A Signature of a Recent Selective Sweep Identifies a Mutation That Defines the Cornish Rex Cat Breed.

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    Barbara Gandolfi

    Full Text Available The cat (Felis silvestris catus shows significant variation in pelage, morphological, and behavioral phenotypes amongst its over 40 domesticated breeds. The majority of the breed specific phenotypic presentations originated through artificial selection, especially on desired novel phenotypic characteristics that arose only a few hundred years ago. Variations in coat texture and color of hair often delineate breeds amongst domestic animals. Although the genetic basis of several feline coat colors and hair lengths are characterized, less is known about the genes influencing variation in coat growth and texture, especially rexoid - curly coated types. Cornish Rex is a cat breed defined by a fixed recessive curly coat trait. Genome-wide analyses for selection (di, Tajima's D and nucleotide diversity were performed in the Cornish Rex breed and in 11 phenotypically diverse breeds and two random bred populations. Approximately 63K SNPs were used in the analysis that aimed to localize the locus controlling the rexoid hair texture. A region with a strong signature of recent selective sweep was identified in the Cornish Rex breed on chromosome A1, as well as a consensus block of homozygosity that spans approximately 3 Mb. Inspection of the region for candidate genes led to the identification of the lysophosphatidic acid receptor 6 (LPAR6. A 4 bp deletion in exon 5, c.250_253_delTTTG, which induces a premature stop codon in the receptor, was identified via Sanger sequencing. The mutation is fixed in Cornish Rex, absent in all straight haired cats analyzed, and is also segregating in the German Rex breed. LPAR6 encodes a G protein-coupled receptor essential for maintaining the structural integrity of the hair shaft; and has mutations resulting in a wooly hair phenotype in humans.

  8. Discrimination of germline V genes at different sequencing lengths and mutational burdens: A new tool for identifying and evaluating the reliability of V gene assignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bochao; Meng, Wenzhao; Prak, Eline T Luning; Hershberg, Uri

    2015-12-01

    Immune repertoires are collections of lymphocytes that express diverse antigen receptor gene rearrangements consisting of Variable (V), (Diversity (D) in the case of heavy chains) and Joining (J) gene segments. Clonally related cells typically share the same germline gene segments and have highly similar junctional sequences within their third complementarity determining regions. Identifying clonal relatedness of sequences is a key step in the analysis of immune repertoires. The V gene is the most important for clone identification because it has the longest sequence and the greatest number of sequence variants. However, accurate identification of a clone's germline V gene source is challenging because there is a high degree of similarity between different germline V genes. This difficulty is compounded in antibodies, which can undergo somatic hypermutation. Furthermore, high-throughput sequencing experiments often generate partial sequences and have significant error rates. To address these issues, we describe a novel method to estimate which germline V genes (or alleles) cannot be discriminated under different conditions (read lengths, sequencing errors or somatic hypermutation frequencies). Starting with any set of germline V genes, this method measures their similarity using different sequencing lengths and calculates their likelihood of unambiguous assignment under different levels of mutation. Hence, one can identify, under different experimental and biological conditions, the germline V genes (or alleles) that cannot be uniquely identified and bundle them together into groups of specific V genes with highly similar sequences.

  9. Systematic interpretation of molecular beacon PCR for identifying rpoB mutations in Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates with mixed resistant and susceptible bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Diana I.; Fisher-Hoch, Susan P.; Bordt, Andrea S.; Quitugua, Teresa N.; Robledo, Jaime; Alvarez, Nataly; Correa, Nidia; McCormick, Joseph B.; Restrepo, Blanca I.

    2010-01-01

    Detection of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB), a frequent cause of treatment failure, takes two or more weeks to identify by culture. Rifampicin (RIF) resistance is a hallmark of MDR-TB, and detection of mutations in the rpoB gene of Mycobacterium tuberculosis using molecular beacon probes with real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) is a novel approach that takes ≤ 2 days. However, qPCR identification of resistant isolates, particularly for isolates with mixed RIF-susceptible and RIF-resistant bacteria, is reader-dependent and limits its clinical use. The aim of this study was to develop an objective, reader independent method to define rpoB mutants using beacon qPCR. This would facilitate the transition from a research protocol to the clinical setting, where high-throughput methods with objective interpretation are required. For this, DNAs from 107 M. tuberculosis clinical isolates with known susceptibility to RIF by culture-based methods were obtained from two regions where isolates have not previously been subjected to evaluation using molecular beacon qPCR: The Texas-Mexico border and Colombia. Using coded DNA specimens, mutations within an 81 bp hot-spot region of rpoB were established by qPCR with five beacons spanning this region. Visual and mathematical approaches were used to establish whether the qPCR cycle threshold (Ct) of the experimental isolate was significantly higher (mutant) compared to a reference wild-type isolate. Visual classification of the beacon qPCR required reader training for strains with a mixture of RIF-susceptible and resistant bacteria. Only then, the visual interpretation by an experienced reader had 100% sensitivity and 94.6% specificity versus RIF-resistance by culture phenotype, and 98.1% sensitivity and 100% specificity versus mutations based on DNA sequence. The mathematical approach was 98% sensitive and 94.5% specific versus culture, and 96.2% sensitive and 100% specific versus DNA sequence. Our findings indicate the

  10. Using diverse U.S. beef cattle genomes to identify missense mutations in EPAS1, a gene associated with pulmonary hypertension [version 2; referees: 2 approved

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    Michael P. Heaton

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The availability of whole genome sequence (WGS data has made it possible to discover protein variants in silico. However, existing bovine WGS databases do not show data in a form conducive to protein variant analysis, and tend to under represent the breadth of genetic diversity in global beef cattle. Thus, our first aim was to use 96 beef sires, sharing minimal pedigree relationships, to create a searchable and publicly viewable set of mapped genomes relevant for 19 popular breeds of U.S. cattle. Our second aim was to identify protein variants encoded by the bovine endothelial PAS domain-containing protein 1 gene (EPAS1, a gene associated with pulmonary hypertension in Angus cattle. The identity and quality of genomic sequences were verified by comparing WGS genotypes to those derived from other methods. The average read depth, genotype scoring rate, and genotype accuracy exceeded 14, 99%, and 99%, respectively. The 96 genomes were used to discover four amino acid variants encoded by EPAS1 (E270Q, P362L, A671G, and L701F and confirm two variants previously associated with disease (A606T and G610S. The six EPAS1 missense mutations were verified with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry assays, and their frequencies were estimated in a separate collection of 1154 U.S. cattle representing 46 breeds. A rooted phylogenetic tree of eight polypeptide sequences provided a framework for evaluating the likely order of mutations and potential impact of EPAS1 alleles on the adaptive response to chronic hypoxia in U.S. cattle. This public, whole genome resource facilitates in silico identification of protein variants in diverse types of U.S. beef cattle, and provides a means of translating WGS data into a practical biological and evolutionary context for generating and testing hypotheses.

  11. Exome sequencing identifies de novo gain of function missense mutation in KCND2 in identical twins with autism and seizures that slows potassium channel inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hane; Lin, Meng-chin A; Kornblum, Harley I; Papazian, Diane M; Nelson, Stanley F

    2014-07-01

    Numerous studies and case reports show comorbidity of autism and epilepsy, suggesting some common molecular underpinnings of the two phenotypes. However, the relationship between the two, on the molecular level, remains unclear. Here, whole exome sequencing was performed on a family with identical twins affected with autism and severe, intractable seizures. A de novo variant was identified in the KCND2 gene, which encodes the Kv4.2 potassium channel. Kv4.2 is a major pore-forming subunit in somatodendritic subthreshold A-type potassium current (ISA) channels. The de novo mutation p.Val404Met is novel and occurs at a highly conserved residue within the C-terminal end of the transmembrane helix S6 region of the ion permeation pathway. Functional analysis revealed the likely pathogenicity of the variant in that the p.Val404Met mutant construct showed significantly slowed inactivation, either by itself or after equimolar coexpression with the wild-type Kv4.2 channel construct consistent with a dominant effect. Further, the effect of the mutation on closed-state inactivation was evident in the presence of auxiliary subunits that associate with Kv4 subunits to form ISA channels in vivo. Discovery of a functionally relevant novel de novo variant, coupled with physiological evidence that the mutant protein disrupts potassium current inactivation, strongly supports KCND2 as the causal gene for epilepsy in this family. Interaction of KCND2 with other genes implicated in autism and the role of KCND2 in synaptic plasticity provide suggestive evidence of an etiological role in autism.

  12. Adrenocortical tumors associated with the TP53 p.R337H germline mutation can be identified during child-care consultations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastellaro, Maria J; Ribeiro, Raul C; Oliveira-Filho, Antônio G; Seidinger, Ana L; Cardinalli, Izilda A; Miranda, Eliana C M; Aguiar, Simone S; Brandalise, Silvia R; Yunes, José A; Barros-Filho, Antônio A

    2017-08-30

    To evaluate the clinical features associated with adrenocortical hormone overexpression and familial cancer profiling as potential markers for early detection of adrenocortical tumors in children from South and Southeast Brazil. The clinical manifestations and anthropometric measurements of 103 children diagnosed with adrenocortical tumors were analyzed. Between 1982 and 2011, 69 girls and 34 boys diagnosed with adrenocortical tumors were followed-up for a median time of 9.0 years (0-34 years). Signs of androgen overproduction alone (n=75) or associated with cortisol (n=18) were present in 90.3%. TP53 p.R337H mutation was found in 90.5% of patients. Stages I, II, III, and IV were observed in 45.6%, 27.2%, 19.4%, and 7.8% of patients, respectively. At diagnosis, there were no significant differences in height (p=0.92) and weight (p=0.22) among children with adrenocortical tumors, but children with virilization alone had significantly higher height-for-age Z-scores (0.92±1.4) than children with hypercortisolism alone or combined (-0.32±1.8; p=0.03). The five-year overall survival was 76.7% (SD±4.2). Patients with advanced-stage disease had a significantly worse prognosis than those with limited disease (pp.R337H carrier parents developed cancer, whereas none of the 55 non-carriers did. Signs of adrenocortical hormone overproduction appear early, even in cases with early-stage. These signs can be identified at the physical examination and anthropometric measurements. In southern Brazil, pediatric adrenocortical tumor is a sentinel cancer for detecting families with germline p.R337H mutation in TP53 gene. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  13. Screening for microsatellite instability identifies frequent 3'-untranslated region mutation of the RB1-inducible coiled-coil 1 gene in colon tumors.

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    Bogdan C Paun

    mutational survey of well-characterized short 3'UTR MSs confirms that MSI incidence in MSI-H colorectal tumors correlates with MS length, but not with sequence conservation level or distance from other genetic elements. This study also identifies RB1CC1 as a novel target of frequent mutation and aberrant upregulation in MSI-H colorectal tumors. The predicted loss of a microRNA-accessible structure in mutant RB1CC1 RNA fits the hypothesis that 3'UTR MSI involves in aberrant RB1CC1 posttranscriptional upregulation. Further direct assessments are indicated to investigate this possibility.

  14. A Nationwide Study of Norwegian Patients with Hereditary Angioedema with C1 Inhibitor Deficiency Identified Six Novel Mutations in SERPING1.

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    Irene Johnsrud

    Full Text Available Hereditary angioedema with C1 inhibitor deficiency (C1-INH-HAE is characterized by relapsing, non-pruritic swelling in skin and submucosal tissue. Symptoms can appear in early infancy when diagnosis is more difficult. In the absence of a correct diagnosis, treatment of abdominal attacks often lead to unnecessary surgery, and laryngeal edema can cause asphyxiation. A cohort study of 52 patients from 25 unrelated families in Norway was studied. Diagnosis of C1-INH-HAE was based on international consensus criteria including low functional and/or antigenic C1-INH values and antigenic C4. As SERPING1 mutations in Norwegian patients with C1-INH-HAE are largely undescribed and could help in diagnosis, we aimed to find and describe these mutations. Mutation analysis of the SERPING1 gene was performed by Sanger sequencing of all protein coding exons and exon-intron boundaries. Samples without detected mutation were further analyzed by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification to detect deletions and duplications. Novel mutations suspected to lead to splice defects were analyzed on the mRNA level. Fifty-two patients from 25 families were included. Forty-four (84,6% suffered from C1-INH-HAE type I and eight (15,4% suffered from C1-INH-HAE type II. Pathogenic or likely pathogenic mutations were found in 22/25 families (88%. Thirteen unique mutations were detected, including six previously undescribed. There were three missense mutations including one mutation affecting the reactive center loop at codon 466, three nonsense mutations, three small deletions/duplications, three gross deletions, and one splice mutation.

  15. A nonsense mutation (Arg-196-Term) in exon 6 of the human TP53 gene identified in small cell lung carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hayes, VM; Oosthuizen, CJJ; Kotze, MJ; Marx, MP; Buys, CHCM

    1996-01-01

    In a search for mutations of the TP53 tumour suppressor gene in lung cancer samples from gold miners from the Witwatersrand, South Africa, using heteroduplex and single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis, a nonsense mutation was found in exon 6, consisting of a C to T transition and re

  16. A dominant nuclear mutation in Chlamydomonas identifies a factor controlling chloroplast mRNA stability by acting on the coding region of the atpA transcript.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drapier, Dominique; Girard-Bascou, Jacqueline; Stern, David B; Wollman, Francis-André

    2002-09-01

    We have characterized a nuclear mutation, mda1-ncc1, that affects mRNA stability for the atpA gene cluster in the chloroplast of Chlamydomonas. Unlike all nuclear mutations altering chloroplast gene expression described to date, mda1-ncc1 is a dominant mutation that still allows accumulation of detectable amounts of atpA mRNAs. At variance with the subset of these mutations that affect mRNA stability through the 5' UTR of a single chloroplast transcript, the mutated version of MDA1 acts on the coding region of the atpA message. We discuss the action of MDA1 in relation to the unusual pattern of expression of atpA that associates particularly short lived-transcripts with a very high translational efficiency.

  17. Enzymatic analysis of the effect of naturally occurring Leu138Pro mutation identified in SHV β-lactamase on hydrolysis of penicillin and ampicillin

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    Yoo Young

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to analyze the significance of leucine to proline substitution at position 138(Leu138Pro on the hydrolysis of penicillin and ampicillin that we identified in the blaSHV gene of clinical Escherichia coli swine isolate. Results Kinetic analysis of the mutant proteins showed that Km value of the purified L138P mutant was comparatively higher than SHV-1, SHV-33 and SHV-33(L138P enzyme for penicillin and ampicillin. Docking simulation of the SHV-1 and SHV-(L138P enzymes also confirmed that β-lactamases preferred penicillin to ampicillin and the SHV-1 had a higher binding affinity for antibiotics compared to the SHV-(L138P and other mutants. Conclusions Our result demonstrated that L138P has a reduced role in penicillin and ampicillin hydrolyzing properties of SHV β-lactamases. These naturally occurring mutations rendering reduced function of the existing protein could trigger the emergence or acquisition of more effective alternative mechanisms for β-lactam hydrolysis.

  18. Intestinal cell barrier function in vitro is severely compromised by keratin 8 and 18 mutations identified in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Zupancic

    Full Text Available Keratin 8 and 18 (K8/K18 mutations have been implicated in the aetiology of certain pathogenic processes of the liver and pancreas. While some K8 mutations (K8 G62C, K8 K464N are also presumed susceptibility factors for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, the only K18 mutation (K18 S230T discovered so far in an IBD patient is thought to be a polymorphism. The aim of our study was to demonstrate that these mutations might also directly affect intestinal cell barrier function. Cell monolayers of genetically engineered human colonocytes expressing these mutations were tested for permeability, growth rate and resistance to heat-stress. We also calculated the change in dissociation constant (Kd, measure of affinity each of these mutations introduces into the keratin protein, and present the first model of a keratin dimer L12 region with in silico clues to how the K18 S230T mutation may affect keratin function. Physiologically, these mutations cause up to 30% increase in paracellular permeability in vitro. Heat-stress induces little keratin clumping but instead cell monolayers peel off the surface suggesting a problem with cell junctions. K18 S230T has pronounced pathological effects in vitro marked by high Kd, low growth rate and increased permeability. The latter may be due to the altered distribution of tight junction components claudin-4 and ZO-1. This is the first time intestinal cells have been suggested also functionally impaired by K8/K18 mutations. Although an in vitro colonocyte model system does not completely mimic the epithelial lining of the intestine, nevertheless the data suggest that K8/K18 mutations may be also able to produce a phenotype in vivo.

  19. Intestinal cell barrier function in vitro is severely compromised by keratin 8 and 18 mutations identified in patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zupancic, Tina; Stojan, Jure; Lane, Ellen Birgitte; Komel, Radovan; Bedina-Zavec, Apolonija; Liovic, Mirjana

    2014-01-01

    Keratin 8 and 18 (K8/K18) mutations have been implicated in the aetiology of certain pathogenic processes of the liver and pancreas. While some K8 mutations (K8 G62C, K8 K464N) are also presumed susceptibility factors for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), the only K18 mutation (K18 S230T) discovered so far in an IBD patient is thought to be a polymorphism. The aim of our study was to demonstrate that these mutations might also directly affect intestinal cell barrier function. Cell monolayers of genetically engineered human colonocytes expressing these mutations were tested for permeability, growth rate and resistance to heat-stress. We also calculated the change in dissociation constant (Kd, measure of affinity) each of these mutations introduces into the keratin protein, and present the first model of a keratin dimer L12 region with in silico clues to how the K18 S230T mutation may affect keratin function. Physiologically, these mutations cause up to 30% increase in paracellular permeability in vitro. Heat-stress induces little keratin clumping but instead cell monolayers peel off the surface suggesting a problem with cell junctions. K18 S230T has pronounced pathological effects in vitro marked by high Kd, low growth rate and increased permeability. The latter may be due to the altered distribution of tight junction components claudin-4 and ZO-1. This is the first time intestinal cells have been suggested also functionally impaired by K8/K18 mutations. Although an in vitro colonocyte model system does not completely mimic the epithelial lining of the intestine, nevertheless the data suggest that K8/K18 mutations may be also able to produce a phenotype in vivo.

  20. Potential Susceptibility Mutations in C Gene for Hepatitis B-Related Hepatocellular Carcinoma Identified by a Two-Stage Study in Qidong, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Lishuai; Zhang, Haifeng; Liu, Jinxia; Liu, Taotao; Shen, Xizhong; Chen, Taoyang; Ni, Zhengpin; Lu, Cuihua

    2016-01-01

    A two stage study was conducted to explore new potential mutations in the full genome of hepatitis B virus (HBV) on the progression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in Qidong, China. In stage 1, full genomes of HBV were compared between 30 HCC cases and 30 controls. In stage 2, an independent case–control study including 100 HCC cases and 100 controls was enrolled to verify the relationship between hot-spot mutations and HCC development. Furthermore, a longitudinal study was conducted on 11 HCC cases with serial serum samples available before HCC diagnosis. A total of 10 mutations (including pre-S2 start codon mutation and pre-S deletion in pre-S gene, G1613A, C1653T, A1762T, and G1764A mutations in X gene, A2159G, A2189Y, G2203W, and C2288R mutations in C gene) showed an increased risk of HCC. In the validation study, pre-S deletion, C1653T, A1762T/G1764A, A2159G, A2189Y, G2203W, and C2288R mutations were associated with increased HCC risk in univariate analysis. Multivariate analysis indicated that pre-S deletion, A1762T/G1764A, A2159G, and A2189Y mutations were independently related with HCC development. Moreover, a significant biological gradient of HCC risk by number of mutations in the C gene was observed. Longitudinal observation demonstrated a gradual combination of the above mutations accumulated during the progression of HCC. PMID:27727182

  1. Potential Susceptibility Mutations in C Gene for Hepatitis B-Related Hepatocellular Carcinoma Identified by a Two-Stage Study in Qidong, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lishuai Qu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A two stage study was conducted to explore new potential mutations in the full genome of hepatitis B virus (HBV on the progression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC in Qidong, China. In stage 1, full genomes of HBV were compared between 30 HCC cases and 30 controls. In stage 2, an independent case–control study including 100 HCC cases and 100 controls was enrolled to verify the relationship between hot-spot mutations and HCC development. Furthermore, a longitudinal study was conducted on 11 HCC cases with serial serum samples available before HCC diagnosis. A total of 10 mutations (including pre-S2 start codon mutation and pre-S deletion in pre-S gene, G1613A, C1653T, A1762T, and G1764A mutations in X gene, A2159G, A2189Y, G2203W, and C2288R mutations in C gene showed an increased risk of HCC. In the validation study, pre-S deletion, C1653T, A1762T/G1764A, A2159G, A2189Y, G2203W, and C2288R mutations were associated with increased HCC risk in univariate analysis. Multivariate analysis indicated that pre-S deletion, A1762T/G1764A, A2159G, and A2189Y mutations were independently related with HCC development. Moreover, a significant biological gradient of HCC risk by number of mutations in the C gene was observed. Longitudinal observation demonstrated a gradual combination of the above mutations accumulated during the progression of HCC.

  2. A founder synonymous COL7A1 mutation in three Danish families with dominant dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa pruriginosa identifies exonic regulatory sequences required for exon 87 splicing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Covaciu, C; Grosso, F; Pisaneschi, E

    2011-01-01

    a previously unrecognized translationally silent exonic COL7A1 mutation that results in skipping of exon 87 and is associated with DDEB-Pr phenotypes in several members of three apparently unrelated Danish families. A haplotype segregation study suggested a common ancestor in these kindred. Functional splicing...... shoulders. DEB-Pr is caused by either dominant (DDEB-Pr) or recessive mutations in the COL7A1 gene encoding type VII collagen (COLVII). The full spectrum of COL7A1 mutations in DEB-Pr remains elusive and the genotype-phenotype correlation is largely incomplete. Here, we report and functionally characterize...... analysis of the mutant exon by a COL7A1 minigene construct and computational prediction for splicing regulatory cis-sequences prove that the mutation alters the activity of an exonic splicing enhancer (ESE) critical for exon inclusion. These findings substantiate for the first time the involvement...

  3. Benign and Deleterious Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Mutations Identified by Sequencing in Positive Cystic Fibrosis Newborn Screen Children from California.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danieli B Salinas

    Full Text Available Of the 2007 Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR mutations, 202 have been assigned disease liability. California's racially diverse population, along with CFTR sequencing as part of newborn screening model, provides the opportunity to examine the phenotypes of children with uncategorized mutations to help inform disease liability and penetrance.We conducted a retrospective cohort study based on children screened from 2007 to 2011 and followed for two to six years. Newborns that screened positive were divided into three genotype groups: those with two CF-causing mutations (CF-C; those with one mutation of varying clinic consequence (VCC; and those with one mutation of unknown disease liability (Unknown. Sweat chloride tests, pancreatic sufficiency status, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization were compared.Children with two CF-causing mutations had a classical CF phenotype, while 5% of VCC (4/78 and 11% of Unknown (27/244 met diagnostic criteria of CF. Children carrying Unknown mutations 2215insG with D836Y, and T1036N had early and classical CF phenotype, while others carrying 1525-42G>A, L320V, L967S, R170H, and 296+28A>G had a benign clinical presentation, suggesting that these are non-CF causing.While most infants with VCC and Unknown CFTR mutations do not meet diagnostic criteria for CF, a small proportion do. These findings highlight the range of genotypes and phenotypes in the first few years of life following CF newborn screening when CFTR sequencing is performed.

  4. A novel splice site mutation of the arginine vasopressin-neurophysin II gene identified in a kindred with autosomal dominant familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tae, Hyun-Jung; Baek, Ki-Hyun; Shim, Sun-Mi; Yoo, Soon-Jib; Kang, Moo-Il; Cha, Bong-Yun; Lee, Kwang-Woo; Son, Ho-Young; Kang, Sung-Koo

    2005-01-01

    Autosomal dominant familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus is an inherited deficiency of arginine vasopressin (AVP), and this is caused by mutations in the AVP-neurophysin II (AVP-NP II) gene. Most of these mutations have been located in the signal peptide or in the NP II moiety. In the present study, we have analyzed the AVP-NP II gene in a Korean family. Clinical and genetic studies were performed on three members of the family, and on a normal healthy unrelated individual. The diagnosis of neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus was done by performing a fluid deprivation test and a vasopressin challenge. For genetic analysis, the genomic DNA was extracted and the AVP-NP II gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Clinical assessment of the affected individuals confirmed the diagnosis of neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus. Genetic analysis of the AVP-NP II gene revealed a novel deletion mutation of a single nucleotide (guanine) within the splice acceptor site of intron 2 (IVS2 +1 delG). The affected individuals were heterozygous for this mutation. We also demonstrated through RT-PCR analysis of the mutant gene that this mutation resulted in the retention of intron 2 during pre-mRNA splicing. We concluded that a novel splicing mutation in the AVP-NP II gene causes neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus in this family.

  5. A KCNJ10 mutation previously identified in the Russell group of terriers also occurs in Smooth-Haired Fox Terriers with hereditary ataxia and in related breeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohdin, Cecilia; Gilliam, Douglas; O'Leary, Caroline A; O'Brien, Dennis P; Coates, Joan R; Johnson, Gary S; Jäderlund, Karin Hultin

    2015-05-23

    Hereditary ataxias with similar phenotypes were reported in the Smooth-Haired Fox Terrier, the Jack Russell Terrier and the Parson Russell Terrier. However, segregation analyses showed differing inheritance modes in these breeds. Recently, molecular genetic studies on the Russell group of terriers found independent mutations in KCNJ10 and CAPN1, each associated with a specific clinical subtype of inherited ataxia. The aim of this study was to clarify whether or not Smooth-Haired Fox Terriers with hereditary ataxia and dogs of other related breeds harbor either of the same mutations. A sub goal was to update the results of KCNJ10 genotyping in Russell group terriers. Three Smooth-Haired Fox Terriers with hereditary ataxia and two Toy Fox Terriers with a similar phenotype were all homozygous for the KCNJ10 mutation. The same mutation was also found in a heterozygous state in clinically unaffected Tenterfield Terriers (n = 5) and, in agreement with previous studies, in Jack Russell Terriers, Parson Russell Terriers, and Russell Terriers. A KCNJ10 mutation, previously associated with an autosomal recessive spinocerebellar ataxia in Jack Russell Terriers, Parson Russell Terriers, and Russell Terriers segregates in at least three more breeds descended from British hunting terriers. Ataxic members of two of these breeds, the Smooth-Haired Fox Terrier and the Toy Fox Terrier, were homozygous for the mutation, strengthening the likelihood that this genetic defect is indeed the causative mutation for the disease known as "hereditary ataxia" in Fox Terriers and "spinocerebellar ataxia with myokymia, seizures or both" in the Russell group of terriers.

  6. Treatment with carbamazepine and gabapentin of a patient with primary erythermalgia (erythromelalgia) identified to have a mutation in the SCN9A gene, encoding a voltage-gated sodium channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natkunarajah, J; Atherton, D; Elmslie, F; Mansour, S; Mortimer, P

    2009-12-01

    Primary erythermalgia (erythromelalgia) is a rare autosomal dominant condition characterized by intermittent attacks of erythema, increased skin temperature and severe burning pain in the extremities, in a bilateral symmetrical distribution. Mutations in the SCN9A gene, which encodes a voltage-gated sodium channel have been shown to cause this disease. We report a family identified to have a mutation in the SCN9A gene, in which one severely affected family member has responded to the therapeutic combination of gabapentin and carbamazepine treatment.

  7. An original phylogenetic approach identified mitochondrial haplogroup T1a1 as inversely associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Blein (Sophie); C. Bardel (Claire); V. Danjean (Vincent); L. McGuffog (Lesley); S. Healey (Sue); D. Barrowdale (Daniel); A. Lee (Andrew); J. Dennis (Joe); K.B. Kuchenbaecker (Karoline); P. Soucy (Penny); M.B. Terry (Mary Beth); W. Chung (Wendy); D. Goldgar (David); S.S. Buys (Saundra); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); L. Tihomirova (Laima); N. Tung (Nadine); C.M. Dorfling (Cecilia); E.J. van Rensburg (Elizabeth); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); Y.C. Ding (Yuan); A-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); B. Ejlertsen (Bent); F. Nielsen (Finn); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); A. Osorio (Ana); J. Benítez (Javier); R.A. Conejero (Raquel Andrés); E. Segota (Ena); J.N. Weitzel (Jeffrey); M. Thelander (Margo); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); P. Radice (Paolo); V. Pensotti (Valeria); R. Dolcetti (Riccardo); B. Bonnani (Bernardo); B. Peissel (Bernard); D. Zaffaroni (D.); G. Scuvera (Giulietta); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); L. Varesco (Liliana); G.L. Capone (Gabriele L.); L. Papi (Laura); L. Ottini (Laura); D. Yannoukakos (Drakoulis); I. Konstantopoulou (I.); J. Garber (Judy); U. Hamann (Ute); A. Donaldson (Alan); A. Brady (A.); C. Brewer (Carole); C. Foo (Claire); D.G. Evans (Gareth); D. Frost (Debra); D. Eccles (Diana); F. Douglas (Fiona); J. Cook (Jackie); L. Adlard; J. Barwell (Julian); L.J. Walker (Lisa); L. Izatt (Louise); L. Side (Lucy); M.J. Kennedy (John); M. Tischkowitz (Marc); M.T. Rogers (Mark); M.E. Porteous (Mary); P.J. Morrison (Patrick); R. Platte (Radka); R. Eeles (Ros); R. Davidson (Rosemarie); S. Hodgson (Shirley); T.J. Cole (Trevor); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); C. Isaacs (Claudine); K.B.M. Claes (Kathleen B.M.); K. De Leeneer (Kim); A. Meindl (Alfons); P.A. Gehrig (Paola A.); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); C. Sutter (Christian); C. Engel (Christoph); D. Niederacher (Dieter); D. Steinemann (Doris); H. Plendl (Hansjoerg); K. Kast (Karin); K. Rhiem (Kerstin); N. Ditsch (Nina); N. Arnold (Norbert); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); S. Preisler-Adams (Sabine); N.B. Markov (Nadja Bogdanova); S. Wang-Gohrke (Shan); A. de Pauw (Antoine); C. Lefol (Cédrick); C. Lasset (Christine); D. Leroux (Dominique); E. Rouleau (Etienne); F. Damiola (Francesca); H. Dreyfus (Hélène); L. Barjhoux (Laure); L. Golmard (Lisa); N. Uhrhammer (Nancy); V. Bonadona (Valérie); V. Sornin (Valérie); Y.-J. Bignon (Yves-Jean); J. Carter (Jonathan); L. van Le (Linda); M. Piedmonte (Marion); P. DiSilvestro (Paul); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); T. Caldes (Trinidad); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); A. Jager (Agnes); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); C.M. Kets; C.M. Aalfs (Cora); F.E. van Leeuwen (F.); F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); E.J. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); J.C. Oosterwijk (Jan); K.E. van Roozendaal (Kees); M.A. Rookus (M.); P. Devilee (Peter); R.B. van der Luijt (Rob); E. Olah; O. Díez (Orland); A. Teulé (A.); C. Lazaro (Conxi); I. Blanco (Ignacio); J. Del Valle (Jesús); A. Jakubowska (Anna); G. Sukiennicki (Grzegorz); J. Gronwald (Jacek); J. Lubinski (Jan); K. Durda (Katarzyna); K. Jaworska-Bieniek (Katarzyna); B.A. Agnarsson (Bjarni); C. Maugard; A. Amadori (Alberto); M. Montagna (Marco); P.J. Teixeira; A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); W.D. Foulkes (William); C. Olswold (Curtis); N.M. Lindor (Noralane); V.S. Pankratz (Shane); C. Szabo (Csilla); A. Lincoln (Anne); L. Jacobs (Lauren); M. Corines (Marina); M. Robson (Mark); J. Vijai (Joseph); A. Berger (Andreas); A. Fink-Retter (Anneliese); C.F. Singer (Christian); C. Rappaport (Christine); D.G. Kaulich (Daphne Gschwantler); G. Pfeiler (Georg); M.-K. Tea; M.H. Greene (Mark); P.L. Mai (Phuong); G. Rennert (Gad); E.N. Imyanitov (Evgeny); A.M. Mulligan (Anna Marie); G. Glendon (Gord); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); S. Tchatchou (Sandrine); A.E. Toland (Amanda); I.S. Pedersen (Inge Sokilde); M. Thomassen (Mads); T.A. Kruse (Torben); U.B. Jensen; M.A. Caligo (Maria); E. Friedman (Eitan); J. Zidan (Jamal); Y. Laitman (Yael); A. Lindblom (Annika); B. Melin (Beatrice); B. Arver (Brita Wasteson); N. Loman (Niklas); R. Rosenquist (R.); O.I. Olopade (Olofunmilayo); R. Nussbaum (Robert); S.J. Ramus (Susan); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); S.M. Domchek (Susan); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); B.K. Arun (Banu); G. Mitchell (Gillian); B. Karlan; K.J. Lester (Kathryn); S. Orsulic (Sandra); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); G. Thomas (Gilles); J. Simard (Jacques); F.J. Couch (Fergus); K. Offit (Kenneth); D.F. Easton (Douglas); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis C.); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); C. Phelan (Catherine); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); D.G. Cox (David)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: Individuals carrying pathogenic mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes have a high lifetime risk of breast cancer. BRCA1 and BRCA2 are involved in DNA double-strand break repair, DNA alterations that can be caused by exposure to reactive oxygen species, a main source of whi

  8. An original phylogenetic approach identified mitochondrial haplogroup T1a1 as inversely associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blein, S.; Bardel, C.; Danjean, V.; McGuffog, L.; Healey, S.; Barrowdale, D.; Lee, A.; Dennis, J.; Kuchenbaecker, K.B.; Soucy, P.; Terry, M.B.; Chung, W.K.; Goldgar, D.E.; Buys, S.S.; Janavicius, R.; Tihomirova, L.; Tung, N.; Dorfling, C.M.; Rensburg, E.J. van; Neuhausen, S.L.; Ding, Y.C.; Gerdes, A.M.; Ejlertsen, B.; Nielsen, F.C.; Hansen, T.V.; Osorio, A.; Benitez, J.; Conejero, R.A.; Segota, E.; Weitzel, J.N.; Thelander, M.; Peterlongo, P.; Radice, P.; Pensotti, V.; Dolcetti, R.; Bonanni, B.; Peissel, B.; Zaffaroni, D.; Scuvera, G.; Manoukian, S.; Varesco, L.; Capone, G.L.; Papi, L.; Ottini, L.; Yannoukakos, D.; Konstantopoulou, I.; Garber, J.; Hamann, U.; Donaldson, A.; Brady, A.; Brewer, C.; Foo, C.; Evans, D.G.; Frost, D.; Eccles, D.; Douglas, F.; Cook, J.; Adlard, J.; Barwell, J.; Walker, L.; Izatt, L.; Side, L.E.; Kennedy, M.J.; Tischkowitz, M.; Rogers, M.T.; Porteous, M.E.; Morrison, P.J.; Platte, R.; Eeles, R.; Davidson, R.; Hodgson, S.; Cole, T.; Godwin, A.K.; Isaacs, C.; Claes, K.; Leeneer, K. De; Meindl, A.; Gehrig, A.; Wappenschmidt, B.; Sutter, C.; Engel, C.; Niederacher, D.; Steinemann, D.; Plendl, H.; Kast, K.; Rhiem, K.; Ditsch, N.; Arnold, N.; Varon-Mateeva, R.; Schmutzler, R.K.; Preisler-Adams, S.; Markov, N.B.; Wang-Gohrke, S.; Pauw, A. de; Lefol, C.; Lasset, C.; Leroux, D.; Rouleau, E.; Damiola, F.; Dreyfus, H.; Barjhoux, L.; Golmard, L.; Uhrhammer, N.; Bonadona, V.; Sornin, V.; Bignon, Y.J.; Carter, J.; Le, L; Piedmonte, M.; DiSilvestro, P.A.; Hoya, M. de la; Caldes, T.; Nevanlinna, H.; Aittomaki, K.; Jager, A.; Ouweland, A.M. van den; Kets, C.M.; Aalfs, C.M.; Leeuwen, F.E. van; Hogervorst, F.B.; Meijers-Heijboer, H.E.; Oosterwijk, J.C.; Roozendaal, K.E. van; Rookus, M.A.; Devilee, P.; Luijt, R.B. van der; Olah, E.; Diez, O.; Teule, A.; Lazaro, C.; Blanco, I.; Valle, J.; Jakubowska, A.; Sukiennicki, G.; Gronwald, J.; Lubinski, J.; Durda, K.; Jaworska-Bieniek, K.; Agnarsson, B.A.; Maugard, C.; Amadori, A.; Montagna, M.; Teixeira, M.R.; Spurdle, A.B.; Foulkes, W.; Olswold, C.; Lindor, N.M.; Pankratz, V.S.; Szabo, C.I.; Lincoln, A.; Jacobs, L.; Corines, M.; Robson, M.; Vijai, J.; Berger, A.; Fink-Retter, A.; Singer, C.F.; Rappaport, C.; Kaulich, D.G.; Pfeiler, G.; Tea, M.K.; Greene, M.H.; Mai, P.L.; Rennert, G.; Imyanitov, E.N.; Mulligan, A.M.; Glendon, G.; Andrulis, I.L.; Tchatchou, S.; Toland, A.E.; Pedersen, I.S.; Thomassen, M.; Kruse, T.A.; Jensen, U.B.; Caligo, M.A.; Friedman, E.; Zidan, J.; Laitman, Y.; Lindblom, A.; Melin, B.; Arver, B.; Loman, N.; Rosenquist, R.; Olopade, O.I.; Nussbaum, R.L.; Ramus, S.J.; Nathanson, K.L.; Domchek, S.M.; Rebbeck, T.R.; Arun, B.K.; Mitchell, G.; Karlan, B.Y.; Lester, J.; Orsulic, S.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, D.; Thomas, G; Simard, J.; Couch, F.J.; Offit, K.; Easton, D.F.; Chenevix-Trench, G.; Antoniou, A.C.; Mazoyer, S.; Phelan, C.M.; Sinilnikova, O.M.; Cox, D.G.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Individuals carrying pathogenic mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes have a high lifetime risk of breast cancer. BRCA1 and BRCA2 are involved in DNA double-strand break repair, DNA alterations that can be caused by exposure to reactive oxygen species, a main source of which are mitoc

  9. Impaired plasma membrane targeting or protein stability by certain ATP1A2 mutations identified in sporadic or familial hemiplegic migraine.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tavraz, N.N.; Durr, K.L.; Koenderink, J.B.; Freilinger, T.; Bamberg, E.; Dichgans, M.; Friedrich, T.

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in three different genes have been implicated in familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM), two of them code for neuronal voltage-gated cation channels, CACNA1A and SCN1A, while the third encodes ATP1A2, the alpha(2)-isoform of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase's catalytic subunit, thus classifying FHM as an

  10. An original phylogenetic approach identified mitochondrial haplogroup T1a1 as inversely associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blein, Sophie; Bardel, Claire; Danjean, Vincent; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Barrowdale, Daniel; Lee, Andrew; Dennis, Joe; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Soucy, Penny; Terry, Mary Beth; Chung, Wendy K.; Goldgar, David E.; Buys, Saundra S.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Tihomirova, Laima; Tung, Nadine; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ejlertsen, Bent; Nielsen, Finn C.; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier; Andres Conejero, Raquel; Segota, Ena; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Thelander, Margo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Radice, Paolo; Pensotti, Valeria; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Bonanni, Bernardo; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Scuvera, Giulietta; Manoukian, Siranoush; Varesco, Liliana; Capone, Gabriele L.; Papi, Laura; Ottini, Laura; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Garber, Judy; Hamann, Ute; Donaldson, Alan; Brady, Angela; Brewer, Carole; Foo, Claire; Evans, D. Gareth; Frost, Debra; Eccles, Diana; Douglas, Fiona; Cook, Jackie; Adlard, Julian; Barwell, Julian; Walker, Lisa; Izatt, Louise; Side, Lucy E.; Kennedy, M. John; Tischkowitz, Marc; Rogers, Mark T.; Porteous, Mary E.; Morrison, Patrick J.; Platte, Radka; Eeles, Ros; Davidson, Rosemarie; Hodgson, Shirley; Cole, Trevor; Godwin, Andrew K.; Isaacs, Claudine; Claes, Kathleen; De Leeneer, Kim; Meindl, Alfons; Gehrig, Andrea; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Sutter, Christian; Engel, Christoph; Niederacher, Dieter; Steinemann, Doris; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Kast, Karin; Rhiem, Kerstin; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Markov, Nadja Bogdanova; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; de Pauw, Antoine; Lefol, Cedrick; Lasset, Christine; Leroux, Dominique; Rouleau, Etienne; Damiola, Francesca; Dreyfus, Helene; Barjhoux, Laure; Golmard, Lisa; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Bonadona, Valerie; Sornin, Valerie; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Carter, Jonathan; Van Le, Linda; Piedmonte, Marion; DiSilvestro, Paul A.; de la Hoya, Miguel; Caldes, Trinidad; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomaki, Kristiina; Jager, Agnes; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; Kets, Carolien M.; Aalfs, Cora M.; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; van Roozendaal, Kees E. P.; Rookus, Matti A.; Devilee, Peter; van der Luijt, Rob B.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/153170824; Olah, Edith; Diez, Orland; Teule, Alex; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Del Valle, Jesus; Jakubowska, Anna; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubinski, Jan; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Maugard, Christine; Amadori, Alberto; Montagna, Marco; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Foulkes, William; Olswold, Curtis; Lindor, Noralane M.; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Szabo, Csilla I.; Lincoln, Anne; Jacobs, Lauren; Corines, Marina; Robson, Mark; Vijai, Joseph; Berger, Andreas; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Singer, Christian F.; Rappaport, Christine; Kaulich, Daphne Geschwantler; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Rennert, Gad; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Andrulis, Irene L.; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Thomassen, Mads; Kruse, Torben A.; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Caligo, Maria A.; Friedman, Eitan; Zidan, Jamal; Laitman, Yael; Lindblom, Annika; Melin, Beatrice; Arver, Brita; Loman, Niklas; Rosenquist, Richard; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Ramus, Susan J.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Arun, Banu K.; Mitchell, Gillian; Karlan, Beth Y.; Lester, Jenny; Orsulic, Sandra; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Thomas, Gilles; Simard, Jacques; Couch, Fergus J.; Offit, Kenneth; Easton, Douglas F.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Phelan, Catherine M.; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Cox, David G.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Individuals carrying pathogenic mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes have a high lifetime risk of breast cancer. BRCA1 and BRCA2 are involved in DNA double-strand break repair, DNA alterations that can be caused by exposure to reactive oxygen species, a main source of which are mitoc

  11. An original phylogenetic approach identified mitochondrial haplogroup T1a1 as inversely associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Blein (Sophie); C. Bardel (Claire); V. Danjean (Vincent); L. McGuffog (Lesley); S. Healey (Sue); D. Barrowdale (Daniel); A. Lee (Andrew); J. Dennis (Joe); K.B. Kuchenbaecker (Karoline); P. Soucy (Penny); M.B. Terry (Mary Beth); W. Chung (Wendy); D. Goldgar (David); S.S. Buys (Saundra); R. Janavicius (Ramunas); L. Tihomirova (Laima); N. Tung (Nadine); C.M. Dorfling (Cecilia); E.J. van Rensburg (Elizabeth); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); Y.C. Ding (Yuan); A-M. Gerdes (Anne-Marie); B. Ejlertsen (Bent); F. Nielsen (Finn); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); A. Osorio (Ana); J. Benítez (Javier); R.A. Conejero (Raquel Andrés); E. Segota (Ena); J.N. Weitzel (Jeffrey); M. Thelander (Margo); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); P. Radice (Paolo); V. Pensotti (Valeria); R. Dolcetti (Riccardo); B. Bonnani (Bernardo); B. Peissel (Bernard); D. Zaffaroni (D.); G. Scuvera (Giulietta); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); L. Varesco (Liliana); G.L. Capone (Gabriele L.); L. Papi (Laura); L. Ottini (Laura); D. Yannoukakos (Drakoulis); I. Konstantopoulou (I.); J. Garber (Judy); U. Hamann (Ute); A. Donaldson (Alan); A. Brady (A.); C. Brewer (Carole); C. Foo (Claire); D.G. Evans (Gareth); D. Frost (Debra); D. Eccles (Diana); F. Douglas (Fiona); J. Cook (Jackie); L. Adlard; J. Barwell (Julian); L.J. Walker (Lisa); L. Izatt (Louise); L. Side (Lucy); M.J. Kennedy (John); M. Tischkowitz (Marc); M.T. Rogers (Mark); M.E. Porteous (Mary); P.J. Morrison (Patrick); R. Platte (Radka); R. Eeles (Ros); R. Davidson (Rosemarie); S. Hodgson (Shirley); T.J. Cole (Trevor); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); C. Isaacs (Claudine); K.B.M. Claes (Kathleen B.M.); K. De Leeneer (Kim); A. Meindl (Alfons); P.A. Gehrig (Paola A.); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); C. Sutter (Christian); C. Engel (Christoph); D. Niederacher (Dieter); D. Steinemann (Doris); H. Plendl (Hansjoerg); K. Kast (Karin); K. Rhiem (Kerstin); N. Ditsch (Nina); N. Arnold (Norbert); R. Varon-Mateeva (Raymonda); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); S. Preisler-Adams (Sabine); N.B. Markov (Nadja Bogdanova); S. Wang-Gohrke (Shan); A. de Pauw (Antoine); C. Lefol (Cédrick); C. Lasset (Christine); D. Leroux (Dominique); E. Rouleau (Etienne); F. Damiola (Francesca); H. Dreyfus (Hélène); L. Barjhoux (Laure); L. Golmard (Lisa); N. Uhrhammer (Nancy); V. Bonadona (Valérie); V. Sornin (Valérie); Y.-J. Bignon (Yves-Jean); J. Carter (Jonathan); L. van Le (Linda); M. Piedmonte (Marion); P. DiSilvestro (Paul); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); T. Caldes (Trinidad); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); A. Jager (Agnes); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); C.M. Kets; C.M. Aalfs (Cora); F.E. van Leeuwen (F.); F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); E.J. Meijers-Heijboer (Hanne); J.C. Oosterwijk (Jan); K.E. van Roozendaal (Kees); M.A. Rookus (M.); P. Devilee (Peter); R.B. van der Luijt (Rob); E. Olah; O. Díez (Orland); A. Teulé (A.); C. Lazaro (Conxi); I. Blanco (Ignacio); J. Del Valle (Jesús); A. Jakubowska (Anna); G. Sukiennicki (Grzegorz); J. Gronwald (Jacek); J. Lubinski (Jan); K. Durda (Katarzyna); K. Jaworska-Bieniek (Katarzyna); B.A. Agnarsson (Bjarni); C. Maugard; A. Amadori (Alberto); M. Montagna (Marco); P.J. Teixeira; A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); W.D. Foulkes (William); C. Olswold (Curtis); N.M. Lindor (Noralane); V.S. Pankratz (Shane); C. Szabo (Csilla); A. Lincoln (Anne); L. Jacobs (Lauren); M. Corines (Marina); M. Robson (Mark); J. Vijai (Joseph); A. Berger (Andreas); A. Fink-Retter (Anneliese); C.F. Singer (Christian); C. Rappaport (Christine); D.G. Kaulich (Daphne Gschwantler); G. Pfeiler (Georg); M.-K. Tea; M.H. Greene (Mark); P.L. Mai (Phuong); G. Rennert (Gad); E.N. Imyanitov (Evgeny); A.M. Mulligan (Anna Marie); G. Glendon (Gord); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); S. Tchatchou (Sandrine); A.E. Toland (Amanda); I.S. Pedersen (Inge Sokilde); M. Thomassen (Mads); T.A. Kruse (Torben); U.B. Jensen; M.A. Caligo (Maria); E. Friedman (Eitan); J. Zidan (Jamal); Y. Laitman (Yael); A. Lindblom (Annika); B. Melin (Beatrice); B. Arver (Brita Wasteson); N. Loman (Niklas); R. Rosenquist (R.); O.I. Olopade (Olofunmilayo); R. Nussbaum (Robert); S.J. Ramus (Susan); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); S.M. Domchek (Susan); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); B.K. Arun (Banu); G. Mitchell (Gillian); B. Karlan; K.J. Lester (Kathryn); S. Orsulic (Sandra); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); G. Thomas (Gilles); J. Simard (Jacques); F.J. Couch (Fergus); K. Offit (Kenneth); D.F. Easton (Douglas); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis C.); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); C. Phelan (Catherine); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); D.G. Cox (David)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: Individuals carrying pathogenic mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes have a high lifetime risk of breast cancer. BRCA1 and BRCA2 are involved in DNA double-strand break repair, DNA alterations that can be caused by exposure to reactive oxygen species, a main source of whi

  12. Targeted high-throughput sequencing identifies a TARDBP mutation as a cause of early-onset FTD without motor neuron disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synofzik, Matthis; Born, Christoph; Rominger, Axel; Lummel, Nina; Schöls, Ludger; Biskup, Saskia; Schüle, Cornelius; Grasshoff, Ute; Klopstock, Thomas; Adamczyk, Christopher

    2014-05-01

    Targeted high-throughput sequencing of many amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and fronto-temporal dementia (FTD) genes in parallel has the potential to reveal novel ALS- and/or FTD-phenotypes and to provide missing links on the ALS-FTD continuum. For example, although the 43-kDa transactive response DNA binding protein is the major pathologic hallmark linking ALS and FTD, mutations in the gene encoding 43-kDa transactive response DNA binding protein (TARDBP) have been appreciated only as a cause of ALS-phenotypes, but not yet of pure FTD. Thus, the genetic link is not yet well substantiated that TARDBP mutations can cause the full spectrum of the ALS-FTD continuum. High-throughput sequencing of 18 ALS and FTD genes in an index patient presenting with early-onset pure (behavioral) FTD and a positive family history for ALS revealed an established TARDBP mutation, A382T. This finding demonstrates that a TARDPB mutation can cause early-onset pure FTD without evidence for ALS even in advanced FTD disease stages. Moreover, it indicates that TARDPB screening might be considered even in young patients with "pure" neuropsychiatric disturbances and without evidence of neurodegenerative disease in the parental generation.

  13. Mutations in the bovine ABCG2 and the ovine MSTN gene added to the few quantitative trait nucleotides identified in farm animals: a mini-review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braunschweig, M H

    2010-01-01

    The progress in molecular genetics in animal breeding is moderately effective as compared to traditional animal breeding using quantitative genetic approaches. There is an extensive disparity between the number of reported quantitative trait loci (QTLs) and their linked genetic variations in cattle, pig, and chicken. The identification of causative mutations affecting quantitative traits is still very challenging and hampered by the cloudy relationship between genotype and phenotype. There are relatively few reports in which a successful identification of a causative mutation for an animal production trait was demonstrated. The examples that have attracted considerable attention from the animal breeding community are briefly summarized and presented in a table. In this mini-review, the recent progress in mapping quantitative trait nucleotides (QTNs) are reviewed, including the ABCG2 gene mutation that underlies a QTL for fat and protein content and the ovine MSTN gene mutation that causes muscular hypertrophy in Texel sheep. It is concluded that the progress in molecular genetics might facilitate the elucidation of the genetic architecture of QTLs, so that also the high-hanging fruits can be harvested in order to contribute to efficient and sustainable animal production.

  14. An original phylogenetic approach identified mitochondrial haplogroup T1a1 as inversely associated with breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blein, Sophie; Bardel, Claire; Danjean, Vincent; McGuffog, Lesley; Healey, Sue; Barrowdale, Daniel; Lee, Andrew; Dennis, Joe; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Soucy, Penny; Terry, Mary Beth; Chung, Wendy K.; Goldgar, David E.; Buys, Saundra S.; Janavicius, Ramunas; Tihomirova, Laima; Tung, Nadine; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Ejlertsen, Bent; Nielsen, Finn C.; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Osorio, Ana; Benitez, Javier; Andres Conejero, Raquel; Segota, Ena; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Thelander, Margo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Radice, Paolo; Pensotti, Valeria; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Bonanni, Bernardo; Peissel, Bernard; Zaffaroni, Daniela; Scuvera, Giulietta; Manoukian, Siranoush; Varesco, Liliana; Capone, Gabriele L.; Papi, Laura; Ottini, Laura; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Garber, Judy; Hamann, Ute; Donaldson, Alan; Brady, Angela; Brewer, Carole; Foo, Claire; Evans, D. Gareth; Frost, Debra; Eccles, Diana; Douglas, Fiona; Cook, Jackie; Adlard, Julian; Barwell, Julian; Walker, Lisa; Izatt, Louise; Side, Lucy E.; Kennedy, M. John; Tischkowitz, Marc; Rogers, Mark T.; Porteous, Mary E.; Morrison, Patrick J.; Platte, Radka; Eeles, Ros; Davidson, Rosemarie; Hodgson, Shirley; Cole, Trevor; Godwin, Andrew K.; Isaacs, Claudine; Claes, Kathleen; De Leeneer, Kim; Meindl, Alfons; Gehrig, Andrea; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Sutter, Christian; Engel, Christoph; Niederacher, Dieter; Steinemann, Doris; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Kast, Karin; Rhiem, Kerstin; Ditsch, Nina; Arnold, Norbert; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Markov, Nadja Bogdanova; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; de Pauw, Antoine; Lefol, Cedrick; Lasset, Christine; Leroux, Dominique; Rouleau, Etienne; Damiola, Francesca; Dreyfus, Helene; Barjhoux, Laure; Golmard, Lisa; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Bonadona, Valerie; Sornin, Valerie; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Carter, Jonathan; Van Le, Linda; Piedmonte, Marion; DiSilvestro, Paul A.; de la Hoya, Miguel; Caldes, Trinidad; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomaki, Kristiina; Jager, Agnes; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; Kets, Carolien M.; Aalfs, Cora M.; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Oosterwijk, Jan C.; van Roozendaal, Kees E. P.; Rookus, Matti A.; Devilee, Peter; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Olah, Edith; Diez, Orland; Teule, Alex; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Del Valle, Jesus; Jakubowska, Anna; Sukiennicki, Grzegorz; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubinski, Jan; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.; Maugard, Christine; Amadori, Alberto; Montagna, Marco; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Foulkes, William; Olswold, Curtis; Lindor, Noralane M.; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Szabo, Csilla I.; Lincoln, Anne; Jacobs, Lauren; Corines, Marina; Robson, Mark; Vijai, Joseph; Berger, Andreas; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Singer, Christian F.; Rappaport, Christine; Kaulich, Daphne Geschwantler; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Greene, Mark H.; Mai, Phuong L.; Rennert, Gad; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Andrulis, Irene L.; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Thomassen, Mads; Kruse, Torben A.; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Caligo, Maria A.; Friedman, Eitan; Zidan, Jamal; Laitman, Yael; Lindblom, Annika; Melin, Beatrice; Arver, Brita; Loman, Niklas; Rosenquist, Richard; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Ramus, Susan J.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Domchek, Susan M.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Arun, Banu K.; Mitchell, Gillian; Karlan, Beth Y.; Lester, Jenny; Orsulic, Sandra; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Thomas, Gilles; Simard, Jacques; Couch, Fergus J.; Offit, Kenneth; Easton, Douglas F.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Phelan, Catherine M.; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Cox, David G.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Individuals carrying pathogenic mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes have a high lifetime risk of breast cancer. BRCA1 and BRCA2 are involved in DNA double-strand break repair, DNA alterations that can be caused by exposure to reactive oxygen species, a main source of which are mitoc

  15. Comparative Evaluation of Sloppy Molecular Beacon and Dual-Labeled Probe Melting Temperature Assays to Identify Mutations in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Resulting in Rifampin, Fluoroquinolone and Aminoglycoside Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong Seok; Via, Laura E.; Barry, Clifton E.; Alland, David; Chakravorty, Soumitesh

    2015-01-01

    Several molecular assays to detect resistance to Rifampin, the Fluoroquinolones, and Aminoglycosides in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) have been recently described. A systematic approach for comparing these assays in the laboratory is needed in order to determine the relative advantage of each assay and to decide which ones should be advanced to evaluation. We performed an analytic comparison of a Sloppy Molecular Beacon (SMB) melting temperature (Tm) assay and a Dual labeled probe (DLP) Tm assay. Both assays targeted the M. tuberculosis rpoB, gyrA, rrs genes and the eis promoter region. The sensitivity and specificity to detect mutations, analytic limit of detection (LOD) and the detection of heteroresistance were tested using a panel of 56 clinical DNA samples from drug resistant M. tuberculosis strains. Both SMB and DLP assays detected 29/29 (100%) samples with rpoB RRDR mutations and 3/3 (100%) samples with eis promoter mutations correctly. The SMB assay detected all 17/17 gyrA mutants and 22/22 rrs mutants, while the DLP assay detected 16/17 (94%) gyrA mutants and 12/22 (55%) rrs mutants. Both assays showed comparable LODs for detecting rpoB and eis mutations; however, the SMB assay LODs were at least two logs better for detecting wild type and mutants in gyrA and rrs targets. The SMB assay was also moderately better at detecting heteroresistance. In summary, both assays appeared to be promising methods to detect drug resistance associated mutations in M. tuberculosis; however, the relative advantage of each assay varied under each test condition. PMID:25938476

  16. Comparative Evaluation of Sloppy Molecular Beacon and Dual-Labeled Probe Melting Temperature Assays to Identify Mutations in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Resulting in Rifampin, Fluoroquinolone and Aminoglycoside Resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandy S Roh

    Full Text Available Several molecular assays to detect resistance to Rifampin, the Fluoroquinolones, and Aminoglycosides in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis have been recently described. A systematic approach for comparing these assays in the laboratory is needed in order to determine the relative advantage of each assay and to decide which ones should be advanced to evaluation. We performed an analytic comparison of a Sloppy Molecular Beacon (SMB melting temperature (Tm assay and a Dual labeled probe (DLP Tm assay. Both assays targeted the M. tuberculosis rpoB, gyrA, rrs genes and the eis promoter region. The sensitivity and specificity to detect mutations, analytic limit of detection (LOD and the detection of heteroresistance were tested using a panel of 56 clinical DNA samples from drug resistant M. tuberculosis strains. Both SMB and DLP assays detected 29/29 (100% samples with rpoB RRDR mutations and 3/3 (100% samples with eis promoter mutations correctly. The SMB assay detected all 17/17 gyrA mutants and 22/22 rrs mutants, while the DLP assay detected 16/17 (94% gyrA mutants and 12/22 (55% rrs mutants. Both assays showed comparable LODs for detecting rpoB and eis mutations; however, the SMB assay LODs were at least two logs better for detecting wild type and mutants in gyrA and rrs targets. The SMB assay was also moderately better at detecting heteroresistance. In summary, both assays appeared to be promising methods to detect drug resistance associated mutations in M. tuberculosis; however, the relative advantage of each assay varied under each test condition.

  17. Mutations Related to Antiretroviral Resistance Identified by Ultra-Deep Sequencing in HIV-1 Infected Children under Structured Interruptions of HAART.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Manuel Vazquez-Guillen

    Full Text Available Although Structured Treatment Interruptions (STI are currently not considered an alternative strategy for antiretroviral treatment, their true benefits and limitations have not been fully established. Some studies suggest the possibility of improving the quality of life of patients with this strategy; however, the information that has been obtained corresponds mostly to studies conducted in adults, with a lack of knowledge about its impact on children. Furthermore, mutations associated with antiretroviral resistance could be selected due to sub-therapeutic levels of HAART at each interruption period. Genotyping methods to determine the resistance profiles of the infecting viruses have become increasingly important for the management of patients under STI, thus low-abundance antiretroviral drug-resistant mutations (DRM's at levels under limit of detection of conventional genotyping (<20% of quasispecies could increase the risk of virologic failure. In this work, we analyzed the protease and reverse transcriptase regions of the pol gene by ultra-deep sequencing in pediatric patients under STI with the aim of determining the presence of high- and low-abundance DRM's in the viral rebounds generated by the STI. High-abundance mutations in protease and high- and low-abundance mutations in reverse transcriptase were detected but no one of these are directly associated with resistance to antiretroviral drugs. The results could suggest that the evaluated STI program is virologically safe, but strict and carefully planned studies, with greater numbers of patients and interruption/restart cycles, are still needed to evaluate the selection of DRM's during STI.

  18. Clinical flow cytometric screening of SAP and XIAP expression accurately identifies patients with SH2D1A and XIAP/BIRC4 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gifford, Carrie E; Weingartner, Elizabeth; Villanueva, Joyce; Johnson, Judith; Zhang, Kejian; Filipovich, Alexandra H; Bleesing, Jack J; Marsh, Rebecca A

    2014-07-01

    X-linked lymphoproliferative disease is caused by mutations in two genes, SH2D1A and XIAP/BIRC4. Flow cytometric methods have been developed to detect the gene products, SAP and XIAP. However, there is no literature describing the accuracy of flow cytometric screening performed in a clinical lab setting. We reviewed the clinical flow cytometric testing results for 656 SAP and 586 XIAP samples tested during a 3-year period. Genetic testing was clinically performed as directed by the managing physician in 137 SAP (21%) and 115 XIAP (20%) samples. We included these samples for analyses of flow cytometric test accuracy. SH2D1A mutations were detected in 15/137 samples. SAP expression was low in 13/15 (sensitivity 87%, CI 61-97%). Of the 122 samples with normal sequencing, SAP was normal in 109 (specificity 89%, CI 82-94%). The positive predictive values (PPVs) and the negative predictive values (NPVs) were 50% and 98%, respectively. XIAP/BIRC4 mutations were detected in 19/115 samples. XIAP expression was low in 18/19 (sensitivity 95%, CI 73-100%). Of the 96 samples with normal sequencing, 59 had normal XIAP expression (specificity 61%, CI 51-71%). The PPVs and NPVs were 33% and 98%, respectively. Receiver-operating characteristic analysis was able to improve the specificity to 75%. Clinical flow cytometric screening tests for SAP and XIAP deficiencies offer good sensitivity and specificity for detecting genetic mutations, and are characterized by high NPVs. We recommend these tests for patients suspected of having X-linked lymphoproliferative disease type 1 (XLP1) or XLP2. © 2014 Clinical Cytometry Society.

  19. Mutations Related to Antiretroviral Resistance Identified by Ultra-Deep Sequencing in HIV-1 Infected Children under Structured Interruptions of HAART

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez-Guillen, Jose Manuel; Palacios-Saucedo, Gerardo C.; Rivera-Morales, Lydia G.; Garcia-Campos, Jorge; Ortiz-Lopez, Rocio; Noguera-Julian, Marc; Paredes, Roger; Vielma-Ramirez, Herlinda J.; Ramirez, Teresa J.; Chavez-Garcia, Marcelino; Lopez-Guillen, Paulo; Briones-Lara, Evangelina; Sanchez-Sanchez, Luz M.; Vazquez-Martinez, Carlos A.; Rodriguez-Padilla, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Although Structured Treatment Interruptions (STI) are currently not considered an alternative strategy for antiretroviral treatment, their true benefits and limitations have not been fully established. Some studies suggest the possibility of improving the quality of life of patients with this strategy; however, the information that has been obtained corresponds mostly to studies conducted in adults, with a lack of knowledge about its impact on children. Furthermore, mutations associated with antiretroviral resistance could be selected due to sub-therapeutic levels of HAART at each interruption period. Genotyping methods to determine the resistance profiles of the infecting viruses have become increasingly important for the management of patients under STI, thus low-abundance antiretroviral drug-resistant mutations (DRM’s) at levels under limit of detection of conventional genotyping (<20% of quasispecies) could increase the risk of virologic failure. In this work, we analyzed the protease and reverse transcriptase regions of the pol gene by ultra-deep sequencing in pediatric patients under STI with the aim of determining the presence of high- and low-abundance DRM’s in the viral rebounds generated by the STI. High-abundance mutations in protease and high- and low-abundance mutations in reverse transcriptase were detected but no one of these are directly associated with resistance to antiretroviral drugs. The results could suggest that the evaluated STI program is virologically safe, but strict and carefully planned studies, with greater numbers of patients and interruption/restart cycles, are still needed to evaluate the selection of DRM’s during STI. PMID:26807922

  20. Digital next-generation sequencing identifies low-abundance mutations in pancreatic juice samples collected from the duodenum of patients with pancreatic cancer and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jun; Sadakari, Yoshihiko; Shindo, Koji; Suenaga, Masaya; Brant, Aaron; Almario, Jose Alejandro Navarro; Borges, Michael; Barkley, Thomas; Fesharakizadeh, Shahriar; Ford, Madeline; Hruban, Ralph H; Shin, Eun Ji; Lennon, Anne Marie; Canto, Marcia Irene; Goggins, Michael

    2017-09-01

    Secretin-stimulated pancreatic juice contains DNA shed from cells lining the pancreatic ducts. Genetic analysis of this fluid may form a test to detect pancreatic ductal neoplasia. We employed digital next-generation sequencing ('digital NGS') to detect low-abundance mutations in secretin-stimulated juice samples collected from the duodenum of subjects enrolled in Cancer of the Pancreas Screening studies at Johns Hopkins Hospital. For each juice sample, digital NGS necessitated 96 NGS reactions sequencing nine genes. The study population included 115 subjects (53 discovery, 62 validation) (1) with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), (2) intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN), (3) controls with non-suspicious pancreata. Cases with PDAC and IPMN were more likely to have mutant DNA detected in pancreatic juice than controls (both pcancer despite close surveillance had SMAD4/TP53 mutations from their cancer detected in juice samples collected over 1 year prior to their pancreatic cancer diagnosis when no suspicious pancreatic lesions were detected by imaging. The detection in pancreatic juice of mutations important for the progression of low-grade dysplasia to high-grade dysplasia and invasive pancreatic cancer may improve the management of patients undergoing pancreatic screening and surveillance. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  1. Exome Sequencing Identifies a Novel LMNA Splice-Site Mutation and Multigenic Heterozygosity of Potential Modifiers in a Family with Sick Sinus Syndrome, Dilated Cardiomyopathy, and Sudden Cardiac Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaragoza, Michael V; Fung, Lianna; Jensen, Ember; Oh, Frances; Cung, Katherine; McCarthy, Linda A; Tran, Christine K; Hoang, Van; Hakim, Simin A; Grosberg, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The goals are to understand the primary genetic mechanisms that cause Sick Sinus Syndrome and to identify potential modifiers that may result in intrafamilial variability within a multigenerational family. The proband is a 63-year-old male with a family history of individuals (>10) with sinus node dysfunction, ventricular arrhythmia, cardiomyopathy, heart failure, and sudden death. We used exome sequencing of a single individual to identify a novel LMNA mutation and demonstrated the importance of Sanger validation and family studies when evaluating candidates. After initial single-gene studies were negative, we conducted exome sequencing for the proband which produced 9 gigabases of sequencing data. Bioinformatics analysis showed 94% of the reads mapped to the reference and identified 128,563 unique variants with 108,795 (85%) located in 16,319 genes of 19,056 target genes. We discovered multiple variants in known arrhythmia, cardiomyopathy, or ion channel associated genes that may serve as potential modifiers in disease expression. To identify candidate mutations, we focused on ~2,000 variants located in 237 genes of 283 known arrhythmia, cardiomyopathy, or ion channel associated genes. We filtered the candidates to 41 variants in 33 genes using zygosity, protein impact, database searches, and clinical association. Only 21 of 41 (51%) variants were validated by Sanger sequencing. We selected nine confirmed variants with minor allele frequencies G, a novel heterozygous splice-site mutation as the primary mutation with rare or novel variants in HCN4, MYBPC3, PKP4, TMPO, TTN, DMPK and KCNJ10 as potential modifiers and a mechanism consistent with haploinsufficiency.

  2. Exome Sequencing Identifies a Novel LMNA Splice-Site Mutation and Multigenic Heterozygosity of Potential Modifiers in a Family with Sick Sinus Syndrome, Dilated Cardiomyopathy, and Sudden Cardiac Death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael V Zaragoza

    Full Text Available The goals are to understand the primary genetic mechanisms that cause Sick Sinus Syndrome and to identify potential modifiers that may result in intrafamilial variability within a multigenerational family. The proband is a 63-year-old male with a family history of individuals (>10 with sinus node dysfunction, ventricular arrhythmia, cardiomyopathy, heart failure, and sudden death. We used exome sequencing of a single individual to identify a novel LMNA mutation and demonstrated the importance of Sanger validation and family studies when evaluating candidates. After initial single-gene studies were negative, we conducted exome sequencing for the proband which produced 9 gigabases of sequencing data. Bioinformatics analysis showed 94% of the reads mapped to the reference and identified 128,563 unique variants with 108,795 (85% located in 16,319 genes of 19,056 target genes. We discovered multiple variants in known arrhythmia, cardiomyopathy, or ion channel associated genes that may serve as potential modifiers in disease expression. To identify candidate mutations, we focused on ~2,000 variants located in 237 genes of 283 known arrhythmia, cardiomyopathy, or ion channel associated genes. We filtered the candidates to 41 variants in 33 genes using zygosity, protein impact, database searches, and clinical association. Only 21 of 41 (51% variants were validated by Sanger sequencing. We selected nine confirmed variants with minor allele frequencies G, a novel heterozygous splice-site mutation as the primary mutation with rare or novel variants in HCN4, MYBPC3, PKP4, TMPO, TTN, DMPK and KCNJ10 as potential modifiers and a mechanism consistent with haploinsufficiency.

  3. A knockin mouse model for human ATP4aR703C mutation identified in familial gastric neuroendocrine tumors recapitulates the premalignant condition of the human disease and suggests new therapeutic strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oriol Calvete

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available By whole exome sequencing, we recently identified a missense mutation (p.R703C in the human ATP4a gene, which encodes the proton pump responsible for gastric acidification. This mutation causes an aggressive familial type I gastric neuroendocrine tumor in homozygous individuals. Affected individuals show an early onset of the disease, characterized by gastric hypoacidity, hypergastrinemia, iron-deficiency anemia, gastric intestinal metaplasia and, in one case, an associated gastric adenocarcinoma. Total gastrectomy was performed as the definitive treatment in all affected individuals. We now describe the generation and characterization of a knockin mouse model for the ATP4aR703C mutation to better understand the tumorigenesis process. Homozygous mice recapitulated most of the phenotypical alterations that were observed in human individuals, strongly suggesting that this mutation is the primary alteration responsible for disease development. Homozygous mice developed premalignant condition with severe hyperplasia, dysplasia and glandular metaplasia in the stomach. Interestingly, gastric acidification in homozygous mice, induced by treatment with 3% HCl acid in the drinking water, prevented (if treated from birth or partially reverted (if treated during adulthood the development of glandular metaplasia and dysplasia in the stomach and partially rescued the abnormal biochemical parameters. We therefore suggest that, in this model, achlorhydria contributes to tumorigenesis to a greater extent than hypergastrinemia. Furthermore, our mouse model represents a unique and novel tool for studying the pathologies associated with disturbances in gastric acid secretion.

  4. A novel stop codon mutation in HBsAg gene identified in a hepatitis B virus strain associated with cryptogenic cirrhosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Yang; Xiao-Peng Tang; Jian-Hua Lei; Hong-Yu Luo; Yong-Hong Zhang

    2003-01-01

    AIM: HBsAg is the most important serological marker for acute or chronic hepatitis B. Nevertheless, there were reports of HBsAg-negative infection caused by hepatitis B virus in recent years. We had a patient with crytogenic cirrhosis who was negative for HBsAg, positive for anti-HBs and HBeAg.This paper was to explore the pathogenic and molecular basis of the unusual serological pattern.METHODS: HBV serologic markers were qualitatively and quantitatively determined. HBV DNA in serum was qualitatively tested using routine Polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and the viral level was determined with real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR. HBsAg gene was amplified and cloned. Four clones were sequenced. The new genomic sequences were compared with GenBank on the DNA level as well as the protein level.RESULTS: The qualitative results of serological markers were HBsAg(-), anti-HBs(+), HBeAg(+), anti-HBe(-) and anti-HBc(+). The quantitative results of serological marker were HBsAg (S/N): 0.77 (cut off of S/N: ≥2.00), HBeAg (S/N): 56.43 (cut off S/N: ≥2.10), anti-HBc (S/Co): 2.03 (cut off of S/Co: ≤ 1.00). The viral level was as high as 1.54×109copies/ml. Sequencing of the HBsAg gene clones revealed a unique point mutation at nucleotide 336 (C to A), which resulted in a novel stop codon at aa 61. The novel HBsAg gene stop mutation had not been described.CONCLUSION: The lack of detection of HBsAg in the presence of high viral levels of replication may be caused by the existence of viral genomes harboring point mutations which resulted in stop codon upstream of the″a″ determinant in HBsAg gene.

  5. TARGET Researchers Identify Mutations in SIX1/2 and microRNA Processing Genes in Favorable Histology Wilms Tumor | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    TARGET researchers molecularly characterized favorable histology Wilms tumor (FHWT), a pediatric renal cancer. Comprehensive genome and transcript analyses revealed single-nucleotide substitution/deletion mutations in microRNA processing genes (15% of FHWT patients) and Sine Oculis Homeobox Homolog 1/2 (SIX1/2) genes (7% of FHWT patients). SIX1/2 genes play a critical role in renal development and were not previously associated with FHWT, thus presenting a novel role for SIX1/2 pathway aberrations in this disease.

  6. A New IL-2RG Gene Mutation in an X-linked SCID Identified through TREC/KREC Screening: a Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Nourizadeh

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID represents a rare group of primary immunodeficiency disorders (PIDs, with known or unknown genetic alterations. Here, we report a new interleukin 2 receptor, gamma chain (IL-2RG mutation in an Iranian SCID newborn.The patient was a 6-day old boy with a family history of PID. The child was screened using a molecular-based analysis for the assessment of T cell receptor excision circles (TRECs and kappa-deleting recombination excision circles (KRECs. Moreover, a complete immunological evaluation and gene sequencing was performed.Results showed undetectable TREC but a high level of KREC copy numbers. Flowcytometric data indicated low numbers of T and NK cells, but elevated number of B cells. A novel substitution in IL2RG: c.675 C>A, leading to p.225 Ser>Arg was found. Based on the functional analysis, the mutation is predicted to be damaging. The patient was diagnosed as a T B+ NK X-linked SCID.

  7. Screening for germline BRCA1, BRCA2, TP53 and CHEK2 mutations in families at-risk for hereditary breast cancer identified in a population-based study from Southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edenir Inêz Palmero

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In Brazil, breast cancer is a public health care problem due to its high incidence and mortality rates. In this study, we investigated the prevalence of hereditary breast cancer syndromes (HBCS in a population-based cohort in Brazils southernmost capital, Porto Alegre. All participants answered a questionnaire about family history (FH of breast, ovarian and colorectal cancer and those with a positive FH were invited for genetic cancer risk assessment (GCRA. If pedigree analysis was suggestive of HBCS, genetic testing of the BRCA1, BRCA2, TP53, and CHEK2 genes was offered. Of 902 women submitted to GCRA, 214 had pedigrees suggestive of HBCS. Fifty of them underwent genetic testing: 18 and 40 for BRCA1/BRCA2 and TP53 mutation screening, respectively, and 7 for CHEK2 1100delC testing. A deleterious BRCA2 mutation was identified in one of the HBOC probands and the CHEK2 1100delC mutation occurred in one of the HBCC families. No deleterious germline alterations were identified in BRCA1 or TP53. Although strict inclusion criteria and a comprehensive testing approach were used, the suspected genetic risk in these families remains unexplained. Further studies in a larger cohort are necessary to better understand the genetic component of hereditary breast cancer in Southern Brazil.

  8. Whole Exome Sequencing, Familial Genomic Triangulation, and Systems Biology Converge to Identify a Novel Nonsense Mutation in TAB2-encoded TGF-beta Activated Kinase 1 in a Child with Polyvalvular Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, Jaeger P; Smestad, John A; Tester, David J; Qureshi, Muhammad Y; Crabb, Beau A; Mendelsohn, Nancy J; Ackerman, Michael J

    2016-09-01

    To use whole exome sequencing (WES) of a family trio to identify a genetic cause for polyvalvular syndrome. A male child was born with mild pulmonary valve stenosis and mild aortic root dilatation, and an atrial septal defect, ventricular septal defect, and patent ductus arteriosus that were closed surgically. Subsequently, the phenotype of polyvalvular syndrome with involvement of both semilunar and both atrioventricular valves emerged. His family history was negative for congenital heart disease. Because of hypotonia, myopia, soft pale skin, joint hypermobility, and mild facial dysmorphism, either Noonan syndrome- or William syndrome-spectrum disorders were suspected clinically. However, chromosomal analysis was normal and commercially available Noonan syndrome and William syndrome genetic tests were negative. Whole exome sequencing of the patient and both parents was performed. Variants were analyzed by sporadic and autosomal recessive inheritance models. A sporadic mutation, annotated as c.1491 T > A, in TAB2, resulting in a nonsense mutation, p.Y497X, in the TAB2-encoded TGF-beta activated kinase 1 (TAK1) was identified as the most likely disease-susceptibility gene. This mutation results in elimination of the terminal 197 amino acids, including the C-terminal binding motif critical for interactions with TRAF6 and TAK1. The combination of WES, genomic triangulation, and systems biology has uncovered perturbations in TGF-beta activated kinase 1 signaling as a novel pathogenic substrate for polyvalvular syndrome. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Robust full-length hepatitis C virus genotype 2a and 2b infectious cultures using mutations identified by a systematic approach applicable to patient strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yi-Ping; Ramirez, Santseharay; Gottwein, Judith M;

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a leading cause of chronic liver diseases worldwide, but treatment options are limited. Basic HCV research required for vaccine and drug development has been hampered by inability to culture patient isolates, and to date only the JFH1 (genotype 2a) recombinant...... replicates spontaneously in hepatoma cells and releases infectious virus. A JFH1 chimera with the 5' end through NS2 from another genotype 2a strain, J6, had enhanced infectivity. However, the full-length J6 clone (J6CF), which we previously found to be fully functional in vivo, was replication incompetent...... of the genetically divergent isolate J8 (genotype 2b), which differed from the J6 nucleotide sequence by 24%. The most efficient recombinant, J8cc, had nine adaptive mutations and was genetically stable after viral passage. The availability of these robust JFH1-independent genotype 2a and 2b culture systems...

  10. An overlapping phenotype of Osteogenesis imperfecta and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome due to a heterozygous mutation in COL1A1 and biallelic missense variants in TNXB identified by whole exome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenroth, Luisa; Fischer-Zirnsak, Björn; Egerer, Johannes; Hecht, Jochen; Kallinich, Tilmann; Stenzel, Werner; Spors, Birgit; von Moers, Arpad; Mundlos, Stefan; Kornak, Uwe; Gerhold, Kerstin; Horn, Denise

    2016-04-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) are variable genetic disorders that overlap in different ways [Cole 1993; Grahame 1999]. Here, we describe a boy presenting with severe muscular hypotonia, multiple fractures, and joint hyperflexibility, features that are compatible with mild OI and hypermobility type EDS, respectively. By whole exome sequencing, we identified both a COL1A1 mutation (c.4006-1G > A) inherited from the patient's mildly affected mother and biallelic missense variants in TNXB (p.Val1213Ile, p.Gly2592Ser). Analysis of cDNA showed that the COL1A1 splice site mutation led to intron retention causing a frameshift (p.Phe1336Valfs*72). Type 1 collagen secretion by the patient's skin fibroblasts was reduced. Immunostaining of a muscle biopsy obtained from the patient revealed a clear reduction of tenascin-X in the extracellular matrix compared to a healthy control. These findings imply that the combination of the COL1A1 mutation with the TNXB variants might cause the patient's unique phenotype.

  11. In situ single cell analysis identifies heterogeneity for PIK3CA mutation and HER2 amplification in HER2+ breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janiszewska, Michalina; Liu, Lin; Almendro, Vanessa; Kuang, Yanan; Paweletz, Cloud; Sakr, Rita A.; Weigelt, Britta; Hanker, Ariella B.; Chandarlapaty, Sarat; King, Tari A.; Reis-Filho, Jorge S.; Arteaga, Carlos L.; Park, So Yeon; Michor, Franziska; Polyak, Kornelia

    2015-01-01

    Detection of minor genetically distinct subpopulations within tumors is a key challenge in cancer genomics. Here we report STAR-FISH (Specific-To-Allele PCR – FISH), a novel method for the combined detection of single nucleotide and copy number alterations in single cells in intact archived tissues. Using this method, we assessed the clinical impact of changes in the frequency and topology of PIK3CA mutation and HER2/ERBB2 amplification within HER2+ breast cancer during neoadjuvant therapy. We found that the two genetic events are not always present within the same cell. Chemotherapy selects for PIK3CA mutant cells, a minor subpopulation in nearly all treatment-naïve samples, and modulates genetic diversity within tumors. Treatment-associated changes in spatial distribution of cellular genetic diversity correlated with poor long-term outcome following adjuvant trastuzumab therapy. Our findings support the use of in situ single-cell based methods in cancer genomics and imply that chemotherapy before HER2-targeted therapy may promote treatment resistance. PMID:26301495

  12. Novel ALOX12B mutation identified in parents following single nucleotide polymorphism microarray testing of banked DNA from a fatal case of congenital ichthyosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smrithi Salian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In genetically and phenotypically heterogeneous conditions like ichthyosis, it is clinically not possible to predict mutation in a specific gene. Sequential testing of all the causative genes is time consuming and expensive. In consanguineous families with autosomal recessive genetically heterogeneous disorders, it is possible to narrow down the candidate gene/genes by recognizing the regions of homozygosity by a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP array. Here, we present a fatal case of autosomal recessive severe congenital ichthyosis born to a consanguineous couple. Two candidate genes were recognized by SNP array on banked DNA of the subject. Sequencing of these candidate genes in parents found them to be carriers of the same variation, a novel heterozygous deletion of single nucleotide in exon 8 (c. 1067delT of ALOX12B gene. The present case illustrates the utility of DNA banking, SNP array and testing of parents to arrive at a definitive molecular diagnosis, essential for genetic counseling, and prenatal testing.

  13. A novel hemoglobin variant beta135(H13) Ala > Asp identified in an asymptomatic Korean family by direct sequencing: suggesting a new insight into Hb Beckman mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S Y; Kim, G Y J; Jo, S A; Lee, E H; Cho, E H; Hwang, S H; Lee, E Y

    2010-02-01

    This article describes the clinical observation of a novel hemoglobin (Hb) variant found during the course of routine blood testing on a 61-year-old subject. The Hb variant was observed during HbA1c testing by ion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography. Alkaline electrophoresis and DNA sequencing confirmed the presence of a new Hb variant, HBB:c.407C > A (p.Ala136Asp). This mutation has been reported to induce Hb Beckman variant in the Globin Gene Server. However, it was different from the only experimental report for Hb Beckman by Rahbar, Lee & Asmeron (p.Ala136Glu; Hb Beckman alpha2 beta2 135(H13) ala-to-glu: a new unstable variant and reduced oxygen affinity. Blood 78, 204a). And our case was asymptomatic with normal lab findings, while Rahbar et al.'s case showed the clinical manifestations of chronic anemia. This would be a report for a novel Hb variant suggesting new insight of Hb Beckman variant. This would be a report of a novel Hb variant suggesting new insights into Hb Beckman variant.

  14. A Novel Locus Harbouring a Functional CD164 Nonsense Mutation Identified in a Large Danish Family with Nonsyndromic Hearing Impairment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyegaard, Mette; Rendtorff, Nanna D.; Nielsen, Morten S.;

    2015-01-01

    Nonsyndromic hearing impairment (NSHI) is a highly heterogeneous condition with more than eighty known causative genes. However, in the clinical setting, a large number of NSHI families have unexplained etiology, suggesting that there are many more genes to be identified. In this study we used SN...

  15. Characterisation of non-obese diabetic patients with marked insulin resistance identifies a novel familial partial lipodystrophy-associated PPAR gamma mutation (Y151C)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, M. E.; Kropman, E.; Kranendonk, M. E.; Koppen, A.; Hamers, N.; Stroes, E. S.; Kalkhoven, E.; Monajemi, H.

    2011-01-01

    Familial partial lipodystrophy (FPLD) is a rare metabolic disorder with clinical features that may not be readily recognised. As FPLD patients require a specific therapeutic approach, early identification is warranted. In the present study we aimed to identify cases of FPLD among non-obese patients

  16. Prediction of conformational changes by single mutation in the hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg identified in HBsAg-negative blood donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roni Martono

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Selection of hepatitis B virus (HBV by host immunity has been suggested to give rise to variants with amino acid substitutions at or around the 'a' determinant of the surface antigen (HBsAg, the main target of antibody neutralization and diagnostic assays. However, there have never been successful attempts to provide evidence for this hypothesis, partly because the 3 D structure of HBsAg molecules has not been determined. Tertiary structure prediction of HBsAg solely from its primary amino acid sequence may reveal the molecular energetic of the mutated proteins. We carried out this preliminary study to analyze the predicted HBsAg conformation changes of HBV variants isolated from Indonesian blood donors undetectable by HBsAg assays and its significance, compared to other previously-reported variants that were associated with diagnostic failure. Results Three HBV variants (T123A, M133L and T143M and a wild type sequence were analyzed together with frequently emerged variants T123N, M133I, M133T, M133V, and T143L. Based on the Jameson-Wolf algorithm for calculating antigenic index, the first two amino acid substitutions resulted in slight changes in the antigenicity of the 'a' determinant, while all four of the comparative variants showed relatively more significant changes. In the pattern T143M, changes in antigenic index were more significant, both in its coverage and magnitude, even when compared to variant T143L. These data were also partially supported by the tertiary structure prediction, in which the pattern T143M showed larger shift in the HBsAg second loop structure compared to the others. Conclusions Single amino acid substitutions within or near the 'a' determinant of HBsAg may alter antigenicity properties of variant HBsAg, which can be shown by both its antigenic index and predicted 3 D conformation. Findings in this study emphasize the significance of variant T143M, the prevalent isolate with highest degree of

  17. A novel Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASP) complex mutation identified in a WAS patient results in an aberrant product at the C-terminus from two transcripts with unusual polyA signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreu, Nuria; García-Rodríguez, Maricruz; Volpini, Victor; Frecha, Cecilia; Molina, Ignacio J; Fontan, Gumersindo; Fillat, Cristina

    2006-01-01

    Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) is an X-linked recessive disorder characterized by immunodeficiency, thrombocytopenia and eczema. A broad spectrum of mutations in the WASP gene has been identified as causing the disease. In the present paper, we report on a patient affected by WAS with a novel complex mutation, characterized by a small 9 bp deletion followed by an inversion of 151 bp and a gross deletion of 4.3 kb within the Xp11.23 region. The small deletion and the inverted fragment are found in intron 11. The large deletion initiates downstream of exon 11 of the WASP gene, including exon 12, and a genomic region upstream of the promoter of the contiguous SUV39H1 gene. Expression studies of the mRNA of the patient's sample showed the presence of two aberrant transcripts that code for a protein of 519 amino acids. We demonstrate that these two transcripts differ in the 3' UTR region, and result from the use of two alternative polyadenylation signals. The severe phenotype of the patient correlates with the presence of an aberrant protein.

  18. Culture-independent sequence analysis of Chlamydia trachomatis in urogenital specimens identifies regions of recombination and in-patient sequence mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putman, Timothy E; Suchland, Robert J; Ivanovitch, John D; Rockey, Daniel D

    2013-10-01

    A culture-independent genome sequencing approach was developed and used to examine genomic variability in Chlamydia trachomatis-positive specimens that were collected from patients in the Seattle, WA, USA, area. The procedure is based on an immunomagnetic separation approach with chlamydial LPS-specific mAbs, followed by DNA purification and total DNA amplification, and subsequent Illumina-based sequence analysis. Quality of genome sequencing was independent of the total number of inclusion-forming units determined for the sample and the amount of non-chlamydial DNA in the Illumina libraries. A geographically and temporally linked clade of isolates was identified with evidence of several different regions of recombination and variable ompA sequence types, suggesting that recombination is common within outbreaks. Culture-independent sequence analysis revealed a linkage pattern at two nucleotide positions that was unique to the genomes of isolates from patients, but not in C. trachomatis recombinants generated in vitro. These data demonstrated that culture-independent sequence analysis can be used to rapidly and inexpensively collect genome data from patients infected by C. trachomatis, and that this approach can be used to examine genomic variation within this species.

  19. A new β(0) frameshift mutation, HBB: c.44delT (p.Leu14ArgfsX5), identified in an Argentinean family associated with secondary genetic modifiers of β-thalassemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepe, Carolina; Eberle, Silvia Eandi; Chaves, Alejandro; Milanesio, Berenice; Aguirre, Fernando M; Gómez, Vanesa Avalos; Diaz, Lilian; Mansini, Adrian P; Fernandez, Diego A; Sciuccati, Gabriela; Candas, Andrea; Cervio, Carolina; Bonduel, Mariana; Feliú-Torres, Aurora

    2014-01-01

    β-Thalassemia intermedia (β-TI) patients present with a wide spectrum of phenotypes depending on the presence of primary, secondary, and tertiary genetic modifiers which modulate, by different mechanisms, the degree of imbalance between α and β chains. Here we describe a new β(0) frameshift mutation, HBB: c.44delT (p.Leu14ArgfsX5), identified in four members of a family, associated with secondary genetic modifiers in three of them. The different genotype present in this family was suspected after hematological analysis and thorough observation of blood smears highlighting their importance in the identification of β-TI patients among members of the same family.

  20. Using diverse U.S. beef cattle genomes to identify missense mutations in EPAS1, a gene associated with high-altitude pulmonary hypertension [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P. Heaton

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The availability of whole genome sequence (WGS data has made it possible to discover protein variants in silico. However, existing bovine WGS databases do not show data in a form conducive to protein variant analysis, and tend to under represent the breadth of genetic diversity in U.S. beef cattle. Thus, our first aim was to use 96 beef sires, sharing minimal pedigree relationships, to create a searchable and publicly viewable set of mapped genomes relevant for 19 popular breeds of U.S. cattle. Our second aim was to identify protein variants encoded by the bovine endothelial PAS domain-containing protein 1 gene (EPAS1, a gene associated with high-altitude pulmonary hypertension in Angus cattle. The identity and quality of genomic sequences were verified by comparing WGS genotypes to those derived from other methods. The average read depth, genotype scoring rate, and genotype accuracy exceeded 14, 99%, and 99%, respectively. The 96 genomes were used to discover four amino acid variants encoded by EPAS1 (E270Q, P362L, A671G, and L701F and confirm two variants previously associated with disease (A606T and G610S. The six EPAS1 missense mutations were verified with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry assays, and their frequencies were estimated in a separate collection of 1154 U.S. cattle representing 46 breeds. A rooted phylogenetic tree of eight polypeptide sequences provided a framework for evaluating the likely order of mutations and potential impact of EPAS1 alleles on the adaptive response to chronic hypoxia in U.S. cattle. This public, whole genome resource facilitates in silico identification of protein variants in diverse types of U.S. beef cattle, and provides a means of translating WGS data into a practical biological and evolutionary context for generating and testing hypotheses.

  1. PRRT2 gene mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, Alice R.; Bhatia, Kailash P.; Stamelou, Maria; Dale, Russell C.; Kurian, Manju A.; Schneider, Susanne A.; Wali, G.M.; Counihan, Tim; Schapira, Anthony H.; Spacey, Sian D.; Valente, Enza-Maria; Silveira-Moriyama, Laura; Teive, Hélio A.G.; Raskin, Salmo; Sander, Josemir W.; Lees, Andrew; Warner, Tom; Kullmann, Dimitri M.; Wood, Nicholas W.; Hanna, Michael

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The proline-rich transmembrane protein (PRRT2) gene was recently identified using exome sequencing as the cause of autosomal dominant paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD) with or without infantile convulsions (IC) (PKD/IC syndrome). Episodic neurologic disorders, such as epilepsy, migraine, and paroxysmal movement disorders, often coexist and are thought to have a shared channel-related etiology. To investigate further the frequency, spectrum, and phenotype of PRRT2 mutations, we analyzed this gene in 3 large series of episodic neurologic disorders with PKD/IC, episodic ataxia (EA), and hemiplegic migraine (HM). Methods: The PRRT2 gene was sequenced in 58 family probands/sporadic individuals with PKD/IC, 182 with EA, 128 with HM, and 475 UK and 96 Asian controls. Results: PRRT2 genetic mutations were identified in 28 out of 58 individuals with PKD/IC (48%), 1/182 individuals with EA, and 1/128 individuals with HM. A number of loss-of-function and coding missense mutations were identified; the most common mutation found was the p.R217Pfs*8 insertion. Males were more frequently affected than females (ratio 52:32). There was a high proportion of PRRT2 mutations found in families and sporadic cases with PKD associated with migraine or HM (10 out of 28). One family had EA with HM and another large family had typical HM alone. Conclusions: This work expands the phenotype of mutations in the PRRT2 gene to include the frequent occurrence of migraine and HM with PKD/IC, and the association of mutations with EA and HM and with familial HM alone. We have also extended the PRRT2 mutation type and frequency in PKD and other episodic neurologic disorders. PMID:23077024

  2. Mutations in GABRB3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Rikke S; Wuttke, Thomas V; Helbig, Ingo

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the role of mutations in GABRB3 encoding the β3 subunit of the GABAA receptor in individual patients with epilepsy with regard to causality, the spectrum of genetic variants, their pathophysiology, and associated phenotypes. METHODS: We performed massive parallel sequencing...... of GABRB3 in 416 patients with a range of epileptic encephalopathies and childhood-onset epilepsies and recruited additional patients with epilepsy with GABRB3 mutations from other research and diagnostic programs. RESULTS: We identified 22 patients with heterozygous mutations in GABRB3, including 3...... probands from multiplex families. The phenotypic spectrum of the mutation carriers ranged from simple febrile seizures, genetic epilepsies with febrile seizures plus, and epilepsy with myoclonic-atonic seizures to West syndrome and other types of severe, early-onset epileptic encephalopathies...

  3. Mapping Mutations on Phylogenies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus

    2005-01-01

    This chapter provides a short review of recent methodologies developed for mapping mutations on phylogenies. Mapping of mutations, or character changes in general, using the maximum parsimony principle has been one of the most powerful tools in phylogenetics, and it has been used in a variety...... of different applications, for example, in the detection of correlated evolution and to identify selection acting on DNA sequences. However, many uses of parsimony mappings have been criticized because they focus on only one of many possible mappings and/or because they do not incorporate statistical...... uncertainty in the mapping. Recently developed probabilistic methods can incorporate statistical uncertainty in the character mappings. In these methods, focus is on a probability distribution of mutational mappings instead of a single estimate of the mutational mapping....

  4. Calreticulin Mutations in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noa Lavi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available With the discovery of the JAK2V617F mutation in patients with Philadelphia chromosome-negative (Ph− myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs in 2005, major advances have been made in the diagnosis of MPNs, in understanding of their pathogenesis involving the JAK/STAT pathway, and finally in the development of novel therapies targeting this pathway. Nevertheless, it remains unknown which mutations exist in approximately one-third of patients with non-mutated JAK2 or MPL essential thrombocythemia (ET and primary myelofibrosis (PMF. At the end of 2013, two studies identified recurrent mutations in the gene encoding calreticulin (CALR using whole-exome sequencing. These mutations were revealed in the majority of ET and PMF patients with non-mutated JAK2 or MPL but not in polycythemia vera patients. Somatic 52-bp deletions (type 1 mutations and recurrent 5-bp insertions (type 2 mutations in exon 9 of the CALR gene (the last exon encoding the C-terminal amino acids of the protein calreticulin were detected and found always to generate frameshift mutations. All detected mutant calreticulin proteins shared a novel amino acid sequence at the C-terminal. Mutations in CALR are acquired early in the clonal history of the disease, and they cause activation of JAK/STAT signaling. The CALR mutations are the second most frequent mutations in Ph− MPN patients after the JAK2V617F mutation, and their detection has significantly improved the diagnostic approach for ET and PMF. The characteristics of the CALR mutations as well as their diagnostic, clinical, and pathogenesis implications are discussed in this review.

  5. Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA mutations in Chinese patients: 16 novel mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Weimin; Wang, Yun; Meng, Yan; Su, Liang; Shi, Huiping; Huang, Shangzhi

    2010-08-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA; Morquio A syndrome) is a lysosomal storage disease caused by deficiency of N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfatase (GALNS) and transmitted as an autosomal recessive trait. This is the first systematic mutation screen in Chinese MPS IVA patients. Mutation detections in 24 unrelated Chinese MPS IVA patients were performed by PCR and direct sequencing of exons or the mRNA of GALNS. A total of 42 mutant alleles were identified, belonging to 27 different mutations. Out of the 27 mutations, 16 were novel, including 2 splicing mutations (c.567-1G>T and c.634-1G>A), 2 nonsense mutations (p.W325X and p.Q422X) and 12 missense mutations (p.T88I, p.H142R, p.P163H, p.G168L, p.H236D, p.N289S, p.T312A, p.G316V, p.A324E, p.L366P, p.Q422K and p.F452L). p.G340D was found to be a common mutation in the Chinese MPS IVA patients, accounting for 16.7% of the total number of mutant alleles. The results show that the mutations in Chinese MPS IVA patients are also family specific but have a different mutation spectrum as compared to those of other populations.

  6. Filaggrin mutations and the skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipankar De

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Filaggrin is very important in the terminal differentiation of the skin and the formation of cornified envelope in the stratum corneum. Several mutations in the filaggrin gene have been identified in the last decade, mostly from the European countries. Loss of function mutations in the filaggrin gene results in reduced production of filaggrin, depending on the type and site of mutation. Such mutations in the filaggrin gene have been shown to be the most significant genetic risk factor for development of atopic dermatitis and undoubtedly has a role in the pathogenesis of ichthyosis vulgaris. Though there is theoretical possibility of association with hand eczema and allergic contact dermatitis; in clinical studies, the strength of these associations was not significantly strong. In this review, we have discussed the structure and function of filaggrin, basic genetics, type of mutations in filaggrin gene, and association of such mutations with different dermatoses.

  7. Filaggrin mutations and the skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, Dipankar; Handa, Sanjeev

    2012-01-01

    Filaggrin is very important in the terminal differentiation of the skin and the formation of cornified envelope in the stratum corneum. Several mutations in the filaggrin gene have been identified in the last decade, mostly from the European countries. Loss of function mutations in the filaggrin gene results in reduced production of filaggrin, depending on the type and site of mutation. Such mutations in the filaggrin gene have been shown to be the most significant genetic risk factor for development of atopic dermatitis and undoubtedly has a role in the pathogenesis of ichthyosis vulgaris. Though there is theoretical possibility of association with hand eczema and allergic contact dermatitis; in clinical studies, the strength of these associations was not significantly strong. In this review, we have discussed the structure and function of filaggrin, basic genetics, type of mutations in filaggrin gene, and association of such mutations with different dermatoses.

  8. Analysis of mucolipidosis II/III GNPTAB missense mutations identifies domains of UDP-GlcNAc:lysosomal enzyme GlcNAc-1-phosphotransferase involved in catalytic function and lysosomal enzyme recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Yi; van Meel, Eline; Flanagan-Steet, Heather; Yox, Alex; Steet, Richard; Kornfeld, Stuart

    2015-01-30

    UDP-GlcNAc:lysosomal enzyme GlcNAc-1-phosphotransferase tags newly synthesized lysosomal enzymes with mannose 6-phosphate recognition markers, which are required for their targeting to the endolysosomal system. GNPTAB encodes the α and β subunits of GlcNAc-1-phosphotransferase, and mutations in this gene cause the lysosomal storage disorders mucolipidosis II and III αβ. Prior investigation of missense mutations in GNPTAB uncovered amino acids in the N-terminal region and within the DMAP domain involved in Golgi retention of GlcNAc-1-phosphotransferase and its ability to specifically recognize lysosomal hydrolases, respectively. Here, we undertook a comprehensive analysis of the remaining missense mutations in GNPTAB reported in mucolipidosis II and III αβ patients using cell- and zebrafish-based approaches. We show that the Stealth domain harbors the catalytic site, as some mutations in these regions greatly impaired the activity of the enzyme without affecting its Golgi localization and proteolytic processing. We also demonstrate a role for the Notch repeat 1 in lysosomal hydrolase recognition, as missense mutations in conserved cysteine residues in this domain do not affect the catalytic activity but impair mannose phosphorylation of certain lysosomal hydrolases. Rescue experiments using mRNA bearing Notch repeat 1 mutations in GNPTAB-deficient zebrafish revealed selective effects on hydrolase recognition that differ from the DMAP mutation. Finally, the mutant R587P, located in the spacer between Notch 2 and DMAP, was partially rescued by overexpression of the γ subunit, suggesting a role for this region in γ subunit binding. These studies provide new insight into the functions of the different domains of the α and β subunits.

  9. Inactivating CUX1 mutations promote tumorigenesis

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    A major challenge for cancer genetics is to determine which low frequency somatic mutations are drivers of tumorigenesis. Here we interrogate the genomes of 7,651 diverse human cancers to identify novel drivers and find inactivating mutations in the homeodomain transcription factor CUX1 (cut-like homeobox 1) in ~1-5% of tumors. Meta-analysis of CUX1 mutational status in 2,519 cases of myeloid malignancies reveals disruptive mutations associated with poor survival, highlighting the clinical si...

  10. Anaerobically Grown Escherichia coli Has an Enhanced Mutation Rate and Distinct Mutational Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shewaramani, Sonal; Finn, Thomas J.; Kassen, Rees; Rainey, Paul B.

    2017-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a major cause of mutation but little is known about how growth in the absence of oxygen impacts the rate and spectrum of mutations. We employed long-term mutation accumulation experiments to directly measure the rates and spectra of spontaneous mutation events in Escherichia coli populations propagated under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. To detect mutations, whole genome sequencing was coupled with methods of analysis sufficient to identify a broad range of mutational classes, including structural variants (SVs) generated by movement of repetitive elements. The anaerobically grown populations displayed a mutation rate nearly twice that of the aerobic populations, showed distinct asymmetric mutational strand biases, and greater insertion element activity. Consistent with mutation rate and spectra observations, genes for transposition and recombination repair associated with SVs were up-regulated during anaerobic growth. Together, these results define differences in mutational spectra affecting the evolution of facultative anaerobes. PMID:28103245

  11. Whole Genome Sequencing of Newly Established Pancreatic Cancer Lines Identifies Novel Somatic Mutation (c.2587G>A in Axon Guidance Receptor Plexin A1 as Enhancer of Proliferation and Invasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Sorber

    Full Text Available The genetic profile of human pancreatic cancers harbors considerable heterogeneity, which suggests a possible explanation for the pronounced inefficacy of single therapies in this disease. This observation has led to a belief that custom therapies based on individual tumor profiles are necessary to more effectively treat pancreatic cancer. It has recently been discovered that axon guidance genes are affected by somatic structural variants in up to 25% of human pancreatic cancers. Thus far, however, some of these mutations have only been correlated to survival probability and no function has been assigned to these observed axon guidance gene mutations in pancreatic cancer. In this study we established three novel pancreatic cancer cell lines and performed whole genome sequencing to discover novel mutations in axon guidance genes that may contribute to the cancer phenotype of these cells. We discovered, among other novel somatic variants in axon guidance pathway genes, a novel mutation in the PLXNA1 receptor (c.2587G>A in newly established cell line SB.06 that mediates oncogenic cues of increased invasion and proliferation in SB.06 cells and increased invasion in 293T cells upon stimulation with the receptor's natural ligand semaphorin 3A compared to wild type PLXNA1 cells. Mutant PLXNA1 signaling was associated with increased Rho-GTPase and p42/p44 MAPK signaling activity and cytoskeletal expansion, but not changes in E-cadherin, vimentin, or metalloproteinase 9 expression levels. Pharmacologic inhibition of the Rho-GTPase family member CDC42 selectively abrogated PLXNA1 c.2587G>A-mediated increased invasion. These findings provide in-vitro confirmation that somatic mutations in axon guidance genes can provide oncogenic gain-of-function signals and may contribute to pancreatic cancer progression.

  12. Suspected pathogenic mutation identified in two cases with oculocutaneous albinism%眼皮肤白化病基因一种可疑致病突变二例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贺江梅; 郑梅玲; 张桂林; 化爱玲

    2015-01-01

    目的 对两对曾生育白化病患儿的夫妇进行非综合征型眼皮肤白化病Ⅰ~Ⅳ型和眼白化病Ⅰ型相关基因的突变筛查,以了解携带者的突变类型.方法 对非综合征型白化病相关基因TYR、OCA2、TYRP-1、MITF、SLC45A2和GPR143各外显子进行深度测序,并通过Sanger测序验证结果.结果 两位女性携带者均在TYR基因编码区发现了1个框移突变c.925_926insC,分析其为可疑致病突变.一例男性携带者在TYR基因编码区发现1个无义突变c.832C>T,为已知致病突变,另一例男性携带者则在其TYR基因的编码区发现了一种已知的致病无义突变c.346C>T.结论 TYR基因编码区的c.925_926insC为OCA1型的可疑致病性框移突变.%Objective To detect potential mutations in genes related with non syndromic oculocutaneous albinism Ⅰ-Ⅳ and ocular albinism type Ⅰ in two couples who had given births to children with albinism.Methods All exons of the non-syndromic albinism related genes TYR,OCA2,TYRP-1,MITF,SLC45A2 and GPR143 were subjected to deep sequencing.The results were verified with Sanger sequencing.Results For the two female carriers,the coding region of the TYR gene was found to harbor a frameshift mutation c.925_926insC,which was also suspected to have been pathogenic.In one of the male partners,a nonsense mutations c.832C>T was found,which was also known to be pathogenic.Another male partner was found to harbor a TYR gene mutation c.346C>T,which was also known to be a pathogenic nonsense mutation.Conclusion The coding region of the TYR gene c.925_ 926insC (p.Thr309ThrfsX9) probably underlies the OCA1 disease phenotype.

  13. Mutational profiling reveals PIK3CA mutations in gallbladder carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bardeesy Nabeel

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genetics of advanced biliary tract cancers (BTC, which encompass intra- and extra-hepatic cholangiocarcinomas as well as gallbladder carcinomas, are heterogeneous and remain to be fully defined. Methods To better characterize mutations in established known oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes we tested a mass spectrometric based platform to interrogate common cancer associated mutations across a panel of 77 formalin fixed paraffin embedded archived BTC cases. Results Mutations among three genes, KRAS, NRAS and PIK3CA were confirmed in this cohort. Activating mutations in PIK3CA were identified exclusively in GBC (4/32, 12.5%. KRAS mutations were identified in 3 (13% intra-hepatic cholangiocarcinomas and 1 (33% perihillar cholangiocarcinoma but were not identified in gallbladder carcinomas and extra-hepatic cholangiocarcinoma. Conclusions The presence of activating mutations in PIK3CA specifically in GBC has clinical implications in both the diagnosis of this cancer type, as well as the potential utility of targeted therapies such as PI3 kinase inhibitors.

  14. Evaluation of TP53 Pro72Arg and MDM2 SNP285-SNP309 polymorphisms in an Italian cohort of LFS suggestive patients lacking identifiable TP53 germline mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponti, Francesca; Corsini, Serena; Gnoli, Maria; Pedrini, Elena; Mordenti, Marina; Sangiorgi, Luca

    2016-10-01

    Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) is a rare genetic cancer predisposition disease, partly determined by the presence of a TP53 germline mutation; lacking thereof, in presence of a typical LFS phenotype, defines a wide group of 'LFS Suggestive' patients. Alternative LFS susceptibility genes have been investigated without promising results, thus suggesting other genetic determinants involvement in cancer predisposition. Hence, this study explores the single and combined effects of cancer risk, age of onset and cancer type of three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)-TP53 Pro72Arg, MDM2 SNP285 and SNP309-already described as modifiers on TP53 mutation carriers but not properly investigated in LFS Suggestive patients. This case-control study examines 34 Italian LFS Suggestive lacking of germline TP53 mutations and 95 tumour-free subjects. A significant prevalence of homozygous MDM2 SNP309 G in the LFS Suggestive group (p TP53 positive families. Conversely its anticipating role on tumour onset has not been confirmed, as in our results it was associated with the SNP309 T allele. A strong combined outcome with a 'dosage' effect has also been reported for TP53 P72 and MDM2 SNP309 G allele on cancer susceptibility (p < 0.0005). Whereas the MDM2 SNP285 C allele neutralizing effect on MDM2 SNP309 G variant is not evident in our population. Although it needs further evaluations, obtained results strengthen the role of MDM2 SNP309 as a genetic factor in hereditary predisposition to cancer, so improving LFS Suggestive patients management.

  15. Strategy of mutual compensation of green and red mutants of firefly luciferase identifies a mutation of the highly conservative residue E457 with a strong red shift of bioluminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koksharov, Mikhail I; Ugarova, Natalia N

    2013-11-01

    Bioluminescence spectra of firefly luciferases demonstrate highly pH-sensitive spectra changing the color from green to red light when pH is lowered from alkaline to acidic. This reflects a change of ratio of the green and red emitters in the bimodal spectra of bioluminescence. We show that the mutations strongly stabilizing green (Y35N) or red (H433Y) emission compensate each other leading to the WT color of firefly luciferase. We further used this compensating ability of Y35N to search for strong red-shifting mutations in the C-domain of firefly luciferase by random mutagenesis. The discovered mutation E457K substantially increased the contribution of the red emitter and caused a 12 nm red shift of the green emitter as well. E457 is highly conservative not only in beetle luciferases but also in a whole ANL superfamily of adenylating enzymes and forms a conservative structural hydrogen bond with V471. Our results suggest that the removal of this hydrogen bond only mildly affects luciferase properties and that most of the effect of E457K is caused by the introduction of positive charge. E457 forms a salt bridge with R534 in most ANL enzymes including pH-insensitive luciferases which is absent in pH-sensitive firefly luciferases. The mutant A534R shows that this salt bridge is not important for pH-sensitivity but considerably improves in vivo thermostability. Although E457 is located far from the oxyluciferin-binding site, the properties of the mutant E457K suggest that it affects color by influencing the AMP binding.

  16. Mutations in galactosemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichardt, J.K.V. [Univ. of Southern California School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    This Letter raises four issues concerning two papers on galactosemia published in the March 1995 of the Journal. First, table 2 in the paper by Elsas et al. incorrectly attributes seven galactose-l-phosphate uridyl transferase (GALT) mutations (S135L, L195P, K285N, N314D, R333W, R333G, and K334R). The table also fails to mention that others have reported the same two findings attributed to {open_quotes}Leslie et al.; Elsas et al. and in press{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}Leslie et al.; Elsas et al.{close_quotes} The first finding on the prevalence of the Q188R galactosemia mutation in the G/G Caucasian population has also been described by Ng et al., and the second finding on the correlation of the N314D GALT mutation with the Duarte variant was reported by Lin et al. Second, Elsas et al. suggest that the E203K and N314D mutations may {open_quotes}produce intra-allelic complementation when in cis{close_quotes}. This speculation is supported by the activity data of individual III-2 but is inconsistent with the activities of three other individuals I-1, II-1, and III-1 of the same pedigree. The GALT activity measured in these three individuals suggests a dominant negative effect of E203K in E203K-N314D chromosomes, since they all have less than normal activity. Thus, the preponderance of the data in this paper is at odds with the authors speculation. It is worth recalling that Lin et al. also identified four N314D GALT mutations on 95 galactosemic chromosomes examined. A similar situation also appears to be the case in proband III-1 (with genotype E203K-N314D/IVSC) in the Elsas et al. paper. 9 refs.

  17. Mutations in ANTXR1 Cause GAPO Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stranecky, V.; Hoischen, A.; Hartmannova, H.; Zaki, M.S.; Chaudhary, A.; Zudaire, E.; Noskova, L.; Baresova, V.; Pristoupilova, A.; Hodanova, K.; Sovova, J.; Hulkova, H.; Piherova, L.; Hehir-Kwa, J.Y.; Silva, D. De; Senanayake, M.P.; Farrag, S.; Zeman, J.; Martasek, P.; Baxova, A.; Afifi, H.H.; Croix, B. St.; Brunner, H.G.; Temtamy, S.; Kmoch, S.

    2013-01-01

    The genetic cause of GAPO syndrome, a condition characterized by growth retardation, alopecia, pseudoanodontia, and progressive visual impairment, has not previously been identified. We studied four ethnically unrelated affected individuals and identified homozygous nonsense mutations (c.262C>T [

  18. A novel missense mutation, GGC(Arg454)→TGC(Cys), of CYP11B1 gene identified in a Chinese family with steroid 11β-hydroxylase deficiency

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE Zheng-qin; ZHANG Man-na; ZHANG Hui-jie; JIANG Jing-jing; LI Xiao-ying; ZHANG Ke-qin

    2010-01-01

    Background Steroid 11β-hydroxylase deficiency (11β-OHD), an autosomal recessive inherited disease, accounts for 5%-8% of congenital adrenal hyperplasia.It was scarcely reported in China.This article reports two Chinese girls with 11β-OHD.Methods The two patients were sisters and presented with hypertrichosis, skin pigmentation, laryngeal prominence and virilization of external genitalia.The patients were followed up for their clinical symptoms and signs, hormone profile,and adrenal image.The genomic deoxyribonucleic acids of the patients and their parents were isolated.11β-hydroxylase gene (CYP11B1) was amplified by polymerase chain reaction and directly sequenced.Results Hormone tests showed that serum cortisol was in the low limit of normal range, whereas the concentrations of adrenocorticotropic hormone, testosterone and progesterone were much higher than those of normal adult females.There were obvious adrenal hyperplasia and advance of bone age.After 11 months of treatment with dexamethasone,the skin pigment became regressed; the breast, uterus and ovary gradually developed and normal menstrual cycle started while the manifestations of virilization did not change.A single point mutation of CYP11B1 (R454C, GGC → TGC)in all the members of this family was detected.The sisters were homozygous and their parents were heterozygous.Conclusions The clinical manifestation of 11β-OHD is complicated.The manifestation of virilization could not regress after treatment with dexamethasone.The novel missense mutation of CYP11B1 (R454C, GGC → TGC) is the pathogenesis of 11β-OHD at least in some Chinese patients.

  19. CF Mutation Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Testing; Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Mutation Analysis; CFTR Mutation Analysis Formal name: Cystic Fibrosis Gene Mutation ... an elevated immunoreactive trypsinogen (IRT) or positive sweat chloride test , to confirm the diagnosis of cystic fibrosis. ...

  20. HNPCC: Six new pathogenic mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Epplen Joerg T

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC is an autosomal dominant disease with a high risk for colorectal and endometrial cancer caused by germline mutations in DNA mismatch-repair genes (MMR. HNPCC accounts for approximately 2 to 5% of all colorectal cancers. Here we present 6 novel mutations in the DNA mismatch-repair genes MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6. Methods Patients with clinical diagnosis of HNPCC were counselled. Tumor specimen were analysed for microsatellite instability and immunohistochemistry for MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 protein was performed. If one of these proteins was not detectable in the tumor mutation analysis of the corresponding gene was carried out. Results We identified 6 frameshift mutations (2 in MLH1, 3 in MSH2, 1 in MSH6 resulting in a premature stop: two mutations in MLH1 (c.2198_2199insAACA [p.N733fsX745], c.2076_2077delTG [p.G693fsX702], three mutations in MSH2 (c.810_811delGT [p.C271fsX282], c.763_766delAGTGinsTT [p.F255fsX282], c.873_876delGACT [p.L292fsX298] and one mutation in MSH6 (c.1421_1422dupTG [p.C475fsX480]. All six tumors tested for microsatellite instability showed high levels of microsatellite instability (MSI-H. Conclusions HNPCC in families with MSH6 germline mutations may show an age of onset that is comparable to this of patients with MLH1 and MSH2 mutations.

  1. Disease: H00789 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 78802 (description, gene) Edwards M, McGhee CN, Dean S The genetics of keratoconus. Clin Experiment Ophthalm...te L, Bisceglia L Mutational screening of VSX1, SPARC, SOD1, LOX, and TIMP3 in keratoconus. Mol Vis 17:2482-94 (2011) ...

  2. MAX mutations cause hereditary and sporadic pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burnichon, N.; Cascon, A.; Schiavi, F.; Morales, N.P.; Comino-Mendez, I.; Abermil, N.; Inglada-Perez, L.; Cubas, A.A. de; Amar, L.; Barontini, M.; Quiros, S.B. de; Bertherat, J.; Bignon, Y.J.; Blok, M.J.; Bobisse, S.; Borrego, S.; Castellano, M.; Chanson, P.; Chiara, M.D.; Corssmit, E.P.; Giacche, M.; Krijger, R.R. de; Ercolino, T.; Girerd, X.; Gomez-Garcia, E.B.; Gomez-Grana, A.; Guilhem, I.; Hes, F.J.; Honrado, E.; Korpershoek, E.; Lenders, J.W.; Leton, R.; Mensenkamp, A.R.; Merlo, A.; Mori, L.; Murat, A.; Pierre, P.; Plouin, P.F.; Prodanov, T.; Quesada-Charneco, M.; Qin, N.; Rapizzi, E.; Raymond, V.; Reisch, N.; Roncador, G.; Ruiz-Ferrer, M.; Schillo, F.; Stegmann, A.P.; Suarez, C.; Taschin, E.; Timmers, H.J.L.M.; Tops, C.M.; Urioste, M.; Beuschlein, F.; Pacak, K.; Mannelli, M.; Dahia, P.L.; Opocher, G.; Eisenhofer, G.; Gimenez-Roqueplo, A.P.; Robledo, M.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: Pheochromocytomas (PCC) and paragangliomas (PGL) are genetically heterogeneous neural crest-derived neoplasms. Recently we identified germline mutations in a new tumor suppressor susceptibility gene, MAX (MYC-associated factor X), which predisposes carriers to PCC. How MAX mutations

  3. Mutations causative of familial hypercholesterolaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benn, Marianne; Watts, Gerald F; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: Ideally, familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH) is diagnosed by testing for mutations that decrease the catabolism of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol; however, genetic testing is not universally available. The aim of the present study was to assess the frequency and predictors of FH....... The prevalence of the four FH mutations was 0.18% (1:565), suggesting a total prevalence of FH mutations of 0.46% (1:217). Using the Dutch Lipid Clinic Network (DLCN) criteria, odds ratios for an FH mutation were 439 (95% CI: 170-1 138) for definite FH, 90 (53-152) for probable FH, and 18 (13-25) for possible FH......-cholesterol concentration to discriminate between mutation carriers and non-carriers was 4.4 mmol/L. CONCLUSION: Familial hypercholesterolaemia-causing mutations are estimated to occur in 1:217 in the general population and are best identified by a definite or probable phenotypic diagnosis of FH based on the DLCN criteria...

  4. Somatic mutations of calreticulin in myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klampfl, Thorsten; Gisslinger, Heinz; Harutyunyan, Ashot S; Nivarthi, Harini; Rumi, Elisa; Milosevic, Jelena D; Them, Nicole C C; Berg, Tiina; Gisslinger, Bettina; Pietra, Daniela; Chen, Doris; Vladimer, Gregory I; Bagienski, Klaudia; Milanesi, Chiara; Casetti, Ilaria Carola; Sant'Antonio, Emanuela; Ferretti, Virginia; Elena, Chiara; Schischlik, Fiorella; Cleary, Ciara; Six, Melanie; Schalling, Martin; Schönegger, Andreas; Bock, Christoph; Malcovati, Luca; Pascutto, Cristiana; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Cazzola, Mario; Kralovics, Robert

    2013-12-19

    Approximately 50 to 60% of patients with essential thrombocythemia or primary myelofibrosis carry a mutation in the Janus kinase 2 gene (JAK2), and an additional 5 to 10% have activating mutations in the thrombopoietin receptor gene (MPL). So far, no specific molecular marker has been identified in the remaining 30 to 45% of patients. We performed whole-exome sequencing to identify somatically acquired mutations in six patients who had primary myelofibrosis without mutations in JAK2 or MPL. Resequencing of CALR, encoding calreticulin, was then performed in cohorts of patients with myeloid neoplasms. Somatic insertions or deletions in exon 9 of CALR were detected in all patients who underwent whole-exome sequencing. Resequencing in 1107 samples from patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms showed that CALR mutations were absent in polycythemia vera. In essential thrombocythemia and primary myelofibrosis, CALR mutations and JAK2 and MPL mutations were mutually exclusive. Among patients with essential thrombocythemia or primary myelofibrosis with nonmutated JAK2 or MPL, CALR mutations were detected in 67% of those with essential thrombocythemia and 88% of those with primary myelofibrosis. A total of 36 types of insertions or deletions were identified that all cause a frameshift to the same alternative reading frame and generate a novel C-terminal peptide in the mutant calreticulin. Overexpression of the most frequent CALR deletion caused cytokine-independent growth in vitro owing to the activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) by means of an unknown mechanism. Patients with mutated CALR had a lower risk of thrombosis and longer overall survival than patients with mutated JAK2. Most patients with essential thrombocythemia or primary myelofibrosis that was not associated with a JAK2 or MPL alteration carried a somatic mutation in CALR. The clinical course in these patients was more indolent than that in patients with the JAK2 V617F

  5. Mutation update for the PORCN gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lombardi, Maria Paola; Bulk, Saskia; Celli, Jacopo

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the PORCN gene were first identified in Goltz-Gorlin syndrome patients in 2007. Since then, several reports have been published describing a large variety of genetic defects resulting in the Goltz-Gorlin syndrome, and mutations or deletions were also reported in angioma serpiginosum,...

  6. Confidence-based somatic mutation evaluation and prioritization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Löwer

    Full Text Available Next generation sequencing (NGS has enabled high throughput discovery of somatic mutations. Detection depends on experimental design, lab platforms, parameters and analysis algorithms. However, NGS-based somatic mutation detection is prone to erroneous calls, with reported validation rates near 54% and congruence between algorithms less than 50%. Here, we developed an algorithm to assign a single statistic, a false discovery rate (FDR, to each somatic mutation identified by NGS. This FDR confidence value accurately discriminates true mutations from erroneous calls. Using sequencing data generated from triplicate exome profiling of C57BL/6 mice and B16-F10 melanoma cells, we used the existing algorithms GATK, SAMtools and SomaticSNiPer to identify somatic mutations. For each identified mutation, our algorithm assigned an FDR. We selected 139 mutations for validation, including 50 somatic mutations assigned a low FDR (high confidence and 44 mutations assigned a high FDR (low confidence. All of the high confidence somatic mutations validated (50 of 50, none of the 44 low confidence somatic mutations validated, and 15 of 45 mutations with an intermediate FDR validated. Furthermore, the assignment of a single FDR to individual mutations enables statistical comparisons of lab and computation methodologies, including ROC curves and AUC metrics. Using the HiSeq 2000, single end 50 nt reads from replicates generate the highest confidence somatic mutation call set.

  7. Genomic Analysis of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Characterizes Strain Diversity for Recent U.S. Salmonellosis Cases and Identifies Mutations Linked to Loss of Fitness under Nitrosative and Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hillary S. Hayden

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is one of the most common S. enterica serovars associated with U.S. foodborne outbreaks. S. Typhimurium bacteria isolated from humans exhibit wide-ranging virulence phenotypes in inbred mice, leading to speculation that some strains are more virulent in nature. However, it is unclear whether increased virulence in humans is related to organism characteristics or initial treatment failure due to antibiotic resistance. Strain diversity and genetic factors contributing to differential human pathogenicity remain poorly understood. We reconstructed phylogeny, resolved genetic population structure, determined gene content and nucleotide variants, and conducted targeted phenotyping assays for S. Typhimurium strains collected between 1946 and 2012 from humans and animals in the United States and abroad. Strains from recent U.S. salmonellosis cases were associated with five S. Typhimurium lineages distributed within three phylogenetic clades, which are not restricted by geography, year of acquisition, or host. Notably, two U.S. strains and four Mexican strains are more closely related to strains associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-infected individuals in sub-Saharan Africa than to other North American strains. Phenotyping studies linked variants specific to these strains in hmpA and katE to loss of fitness under nitrosative and oxidative stress, respectively. These results suggest that U.S. salmonellosis is caused by diverse S. Typhimurium strains circulating worldwide. One lineage has mutations in genes affecting fitness related to innate immune system strategies for fighting pathogens and may be adapting to immunocompromised humans by a reduction in virulence capability, possibly due to a lack of selection for its maintenance as a result of the worldwide HIV epidemic.

  8. Spliceosome mutations exhibit specific associations with epigenetic modifiers and proto-oncogenes mutated in myelodysplastic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mian, Syed A; Smith, Alexander E; Kulasekararaj, Austin G; Kizilors, Aytug; Mohamedali, Azim M; Lea, Nicholas C; Mitsopoulos, Konstantinos; Ford, Kevin; Nasser, Erick; Seidl, Thomas; Mufti, Ghulam J

    2013-07-01

    The recent identification of acquired mutations in key components of the spliceosome machinery strongly implicates abnormalities of mRNA splicing in the pathogenesis of myelodysplastic syndromes. However, questions remain as to how these aberrations functionally combine with the growing list of mutations in genes involved in epigenetic modification and cell signaling/transcription regulation identified in these diseases. In this study, amplicon sequencing was used to perform a mutation screen in 154 myelodysplastic syndrome patients using a 22-gene panel, including commonly mutated spliceosome components (SF3B1, SRSF2, U2AF1, ZRSR2), and a further 18 genes known to be mutated in myeloid cancers. Sequencing of the 22-gene panel revealed that 76% (n=117) of the patients had mutations in at least one of the genes, with 38% (n=59) having splicing gene mutations and 49% (n=75) patients harboring more than one gene mutation. Interestingly, single and specific epigenetic modifier mutations tended to coexist with SF3B1 and SRSF2 mutations (P<0.03). Furthermore, mutations in SF3B1 and SRSF2 were mutually exclusive to TP53 mutations both at diagnosis and at the time of disease transformation. Moreover, mutations in FLT3, NRAS, RUNX1, CCBL and C-KIT were more likely to co-occur with splicing factor mutations generally (P<0.02), and SRSF2 mutants in particular (P<0.003) and were significantly associated with disease transformation (P<0.02). SF3B1 and TP53 mutations had varying impacts on overall survival with hazard ratios of 0.2 (P<0.03, 95% CI, 0.1-0.8) and 2.1 (P<0.04, 95% CI, 1.1-4.4), respectively. Moreover, patients with splicing factor mutations alone had a better overall survival than those with epigenetic modifier mutations, or cell signaling/transcription regulator mutations with and without coexisting mutations of splicing factor genes, with worsening prognosis (P<0.001). These findings suggest that splicing factor mutations are maintained throughout disease

  9. Identification of six pathogenic RAD51C mutations via mutational screening of 1228 Danish individuals with increased risk of hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jønson, Lars; Ahlborn, Lise B; Steffensen, Ane Y;

    2016-01-01

    significance of missense and intronic variants was predicted by in silico analysis. We identified six families with a pathogenic mutation in RAD51C, including three frameshift mutations, one nonsense mutation, and 2 missense mutations. Overall, pathogenic RAD51C mutations were identified in 0.5 % of Danish...

  10. Mutation analysis of NR0B2 among 1545 Danish men identifies a novel c.278G>A (p.G93D) variant with reduced functional activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Echwald, Søren Morgenthaler; Andersen, Kirstine L; Sørensen, Thorkild I A

    2004-01-01

    .G171A] polymorphism was identified. The 171A allele was not associated with obesity (p = 0.07). The 34G, 93D, and 139H-alleles were rare variants, which were found only among obese subjects. Among the four coding region variants, the 93D-allele showed a reduced in vitro inhibition of the HNF-4alpha...

  11. FLG mutations in ichthyosis vulgaris and atopic eczema: spectrum of mutations and population genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, M

    2010-03-01

    Filaggrin is a key protein involved in skin barrier function. Mutations in the gene encoding filaggrin (FLG) have been identified as the cause of ichthyosis vulgaris and have been shown to be major predisposing factors for atopic eczema (AE), initially in European populations. Subsequently, FLG mutations were identified in Japanese, Chinese, Taiwanese and Korean populations. It was demonstrated that FLG mutations are closely associated with AE in the Japanese population. Notably, the same FLG mutations identified in the European population were rarely found in Asians. These results exemplify differences in filaggrin population genetics between Europe and Asia. For mutation screening, background information needs to be obtained on prevalent FLG mutations for each geographical population. It is therefore important to establish the global population genetics maps for FLG mutations. Mutations at any site within FLG, even mutations in C-terminal imperfect filaggrin repeats, cause significant reductions in amounts of profilaggrin/filaggrin peptide in patient epidermis as the C-terminal region is essential for proper processing of profilaggrin into filaggrin. Thus, no genotype-phenotype correlation has been observed in patients with FLG mutations. A restoration of the barrier function seems a feasible and promising strategy for treatment and prevention in individuals with filaggrin deficiency.

  12. Novel PORCN mutations in focal dermal hypoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froyen, G; Govaerts, K; Van Esch, H; Verbeeck, J; Tuomi, M-L; Heikkilä, H; Torniainen, S; Devriendt, K; Fryns, J-P; Marynen, P; Järvelä, I; Ala-Mello, S

    2009-12-01

    Focal dermal hypoplasia (FDH), Goltz or Goltz-Gorlin syndrome, is an X-linked dominant multisystem disorder characterized primarily by involvement of the skin, skeletal system and eyes. We screened for mutations in the PORCN gene in eight patients of Belgian and Finnish origin with firm clinical suspicion of FDH. First, we performed quantitative PCR (qPCR) analysis to define the copy number at this locus. Next, we sequenced the coding regions and flanking intronic sequences of the PORCN gene. Three de novo mutations were identified in our patients with FDH: a 150-kb deletion removing six genes including PORCN, as defined by qPCR and X-array-CGH, and two heterozygous missense mutations; c.992T>G (p.L331R) in exon 11 and c.1094G>A (p.R365Q) in exon 13 of the gene. Both point mutations changed highly conserved amino acids and were not found in 300 control X chromosomes. The three patients in whom mutations were identified all present with characteristic dermal findings together with limb manifestations, which were not seen in our mutation-negative patients. The clinical characteristics of our patients with PORCN mutations were compared with the previously reported mutation-positive cases. In this report, we summarize the literature on PORCN mutations and associated phenotypes.

  13. [TP53 mutations and molecular epidemiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Kazunori; Ishioka, Chikashi

    2007-05-01

    Tumor suppressor p53 protein is activated by a variety of cellular stresses through several pathways and transactivates its downstream genes, including regulators of cell cycle, apoptosis and DNA repair. The loss of p53 function by TP53 gene mutations therefore fails to activate these genes and is thought to be a critical cause of carcinogenesis and/or tumor progression. TP53 is one of the most frequently mutated genes in human cancer. TP53 mutations are found in about 50% of human cancers, although the frequency of TP53 mutations differs among tumor types. However, the degree of functional disorder of mutant p53 varies according to the type of TP53 mutation. And the effects of p53 on cancer formation and/or progression are influenced by the degree of p53 dysfunction. So it is important to analyze the effects of TP53 mutations carefully according to the oncogenicity of each mutation from the molecular epidemiological point of view. Here, together with some cautions needed for analyzing and interpreting the significance of TP53 gene mutations, we present some examples of the identified specific mutation spectrum and the correlation between the prognosis and TP53 mutation in some cancers.

  14. Identification of six new Gaucher disease mutations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beutler, E.; Gelbart, T.; West, C. (Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA (United States))

    1993-01-01

    The four most common mutations account for 97% of the Gaucher disease-producing alleles in Jewish patients and 75% of the alleles in non-Jewish patients. Although at least 15 other mutations and some examples of gene conversion and/or fusion genes have been described, a number of mutations remain unidentified. We have now identified six new mutations, a deletion of a C at the 72 position of the cDNA, a 481C[yields]T mutation (122p[sup Gly[yields]Ser]), a 751T [yields] C (212 [sup Tyr[yields]His]), a 1549G [yields] A (478[sup Gly[yields]Ser]), a 1604G [yields] A (496 [sup Arg[yields]His]), and a 55-bp deletion. All but one of these were found in single families. The 1604A mutation, however, was observed in four unrelated individuals. 7 refs., 2 tabs.

  15. A DSPP mutation causing dentinogenesis imperfecta and characterization of the mutational effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sook-Kyung; Lee, Kyung-Eun; Song, Su Jeong; Hyun, Hong-Keun; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Kim, Jung-Wook

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in the DSPP gene have been identified in nonsyndromic hereditary dentin defects, but the genotype-phenotype correlations are not fully understood. Recently, it has been demonstrated that the mutations of DSPP affecting the IPV leader sequence result in mutant DSPP retention in rough endoplasmic reticulum (ER). In this study, we identified a Korean family with dentinogenesis imperfecta type III. To identify the disease causing mutation in this family, we performed mutational analysis based on candidate gene sequencing. Exons and exon-intron boundaries of DSPP gene were sequenced, and the effects of the identified mutation on the pre-mRNA splicing and protein secretion were investigated. Candidate gene sequencing revealed a mutation (c.50C > T, p.P17L) in exon 2 of the DSPP gene. The splicing assay showed that the mutation did not influence pre-mRNA splicing. However, the mutation interfered with protein secretion and resulted in the mutant protein remaining largely in the ER. These results suggest that the mutation affects ER-to-Golgi apparatus export and results in the reduction of secreted DSPP and ER overload. This may induce cell stress and damage processing and/or transport of dentin matrix proteins or other critical proteins.

  16. A DSPP Mutation Causing Dentinogenesis Imperfecta and Characterization of the Mutational Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sook-Kyung Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the DSPP gene have been identified in nonsyndromic hereditary dentin defects, but the genotype-phenotype correlations are not fully understood. Recently, it has been demonstrated that the mutations of DSPP affecting the IPV leader sequence result in mutant DSPP retention in rough endoplasmic reticulum (ER. In this study, we identified a Korean family with dentinogenesis imperfecta type III. To identify the disease causing mutation in this family, we performed mutational analysis based on candidate gene sequencing. Exons and exon-intron boundaries of DSPP gene were sequenced, and the effects of the identified mutation on the pre-mRNA splicing and protein secretion were investigated. Candidate gene sequencing revealed a mutation (c.50C > T, p.P17L in exon 2 of the DSPP gene. The splicing assay showed that the mutation did not influence pre-mRNA splicing. However, the mutation interfered with protein secretion and resulted in the mutant protein remaining largely in the ER. These results suggest that the mutation affects ER-to-Golgi apparatus export and results in the reduction of secreted DSPP and ER overload. This may induce cell stress and damage processing and/or transport of dentin matrix proteins or other critical proteins.

  17. Mutations in the human TWIST gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gripp, K W; Zackai, E H; Stolle, C A

    2000-01-01

    Saethre-Chotzen syndrome is a relatively common craniosynostosis disorder with autosomal dominant inheritance. Mutations in the TWIST gene have been identified in patients with Saethre-Chotzen syndrome. The TWIST gene product is a transcription factor with DNA binding and helix-loop-helix domains. Numerous missense and nonsense mutations cluster in the functional domains, without any apparent mutational hot spot. Two novel point mutations and one novel polymorphism are included in this review. Large deletions including the TWIST gene have been identified in some patients with learning disabilities or mental retardation, which are not typically part of the Saethre-Chotzen syndrome. Comprehensive studies in patients with the clinical diagnosis of Saethre-Chotzen syndrome have demonstrated a TWIST gene abnormality in about 80%, up to 37% of which may be large deletions [Johnson et al., 1998]. The gene deletions and numerous nonsense mutations are suggestive of haploinsufficiency as the disease-causing mechanism. No genotype phenotype correlation was apparent.

  18. Febrile Episodic Ataxia with Novel Mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available An episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2 kindred with ataxic spells induced by fever or high environmental temperature and a novel CACNA1A mutation were identified and reported from the Universities of Mississippi and Minnesota.

  19. Two missense mutations, E123Q and K151E, identified in the ERG11 allele of an azole-resistant isolate of Candida kefyr recovered from a stem cell transplant patient for acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Célia Couzigou

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We report on the first cloning and nucleotide sequencing of an ERG11 allele from a clinical isolate of Candida kefyr cross-resistant to azole antifungals. It was recovered from a stem cell transplant patient, in an oncohematology unit exhibiting unexpected high prevalence of C. kefyr. Two amino acid substitutions were identified: K151E, whose role in fluconazole resistance was already demonstrated in Candida albicans, and E123Q, a new substitution never described so far in azole-resistant Candida yeast.

  20. Targeted Next Generation Sequencing reveals previously unidentified and mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.D. Nellist (Mark); R.W.W. Brouwer (Rutger); C. Kockx (Christel); M. van Veghel-Plandsoen (Monique); C.J. Withagen-Hermans (C.); L. Prins-Bakker (Lida); M. Hoogeveen-Westerveld (Marianne); A. Mrsic (Alan); M.M.P. van den Berg (Mike M P); A.E. Koopmans (Anna); M.C.Y. de Wit (Marie Claire); F.H. Jansen (Flip); A.A. Maat-Kievit (Anneke); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); D.J.J. Halley (Dicky); A. de Klein (Annelies); W.F.J. van IJcken (Wilfred)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is an autosomal dominant disorder caused by mutations in and . Conventional DNA diagnostic screens identify a or mutation in 75 - 90% of individuals categorised with definite TSC. The remaining individuals either have a mutation that is undete

  1. Risks of lynch syndrome cancers for msh6 mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Baglietto (Laura); N.M. Lindor (Noralane); J.G. Dowty (James); D.M. White (Darren); A. Wagner (Anja); E.B. Gómez García (Encarna); A.H.J.T. Vriends (Anette); N.R. Cartwright (Nicola); R.A. Barnetson (Rebecca); S.M. Farrington (Susan); A. Tenesa (Albert); H. Hampel (Heather); D. Buchanan (Daniel); S. Arnold (Sven); J. Young (Joanne); M.D. Walsh (Michael); J. Jass (Jeremy); F.A. Macrae (Finlay); Y. Antill (Yoland); I.M. Winship (Ingrid); G.G. Giles (Graham); J. Goldblatt (Jack); S. Parry (Susan); G. Suthers (Graeme); B. Leggett (Barbara); M. Butz (Malinda); M. Aronson (Melyssa); J.N. Poynter (Jenny); J.A. Baron (John); L. Le Marchand (Loic); R. Haile (Robert); S. Gallinger (Steve); J.L. Hopper (John); J. Potter (John); A. de La Chapelle (Albert); H. Vasen (Hans); M.G. Dunlop (Malcolm); S.N. Thibodeau (Stephen); M.A. Jenkins (Mark)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Germline mutations in MSH6 account for 10%-20% of Lynch syndrome colorectal cancers caused by hereditary DNA mismatch repair gene mutations. Because there have been only a few studies of mutation carriers, their cancer risks are uncertain. Methods: We identified 113 families

  2. Splice Site Mutations in the ATP7A Gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjørringe, Tina; Tümer, Zeynep; Møller, Lisbeth Birk

    2011-01-01

    Menkes disease (MD) is caused by mutations in the ATP7A gene. We describe 33 novel splice site mutations detected in patients with MD or the milder phenotypic form, Occipital Horn Syndrome. We review these 33 mutations together with 28 previously published splice site mutations. We investigate 12...... mutations for their effect on the mRNA transcript in vivo. Transcriptional data from another 16 mutations were collected from the literature. The theoretical consequences of splice site mutations, predicted with the bioinformatics tool Human Splice Finder, were investigated and evaluated in relation...... to in vivo results. Ninety-six percent of the mutations identified in 45 patients with classical MD were predicted to have a significant effect on splicing, which concurs with the absence of any detectable wild-type transcript in all 19 patients investigated in vivo. Sixty-seven percent of the mutations...

  3. One third of Danish hypertrophic cardiomyopathy patients with MYH7 mutations have mutations [corrected] in MYH7 rod region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougs, Lotte; Havndrup, Ole; Bundgaard, Henning

    2005-01-01

    -causing mutations were identified in the rod region in four probands using capillary electrophoresis single-strand conformation polymorphism as a screening method. All mutations were novel: N1327K, R1712W, and E1753K. Two of the probands had already been shown to carry other FHC-associated mutations. In conclusion...

  4. Parkinson's disease-related LRRK2 G2019S mutation results from independent mutational events in humans.

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    7 pages; International audience; Mutations in the leucine-rich-repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) gene have been identified in families with autosomal dominant Parkinson's disease (PD) and in sporadic cases; the G2019S mutation is the single most frequent. Intriguingly, the frequency of this mutation in PD patients varies greatly among ethnic groups and geographic origins: it is present at

  5. Transgenic Animal Mutation Assays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Chen; Ph.D.D.A.B.T.

    2005-01-01

    @@ The novel transgenic mouse and rat mutation assays have provided a tool for analyzing in vivo mutation in any tissue, thus permitting the direct comparison of cancer incidence with mutant frequency.

  6. Identifying Activity

    CERN Document Server

    Lewis, Adrian S

    2009-01-01

    Identification of active constraints in constrained optimization is of interest from both practical and theoretical viewpoints, as it holds the promise of reducing an inequality-constrained problem to an equality-constrained problem, in a neighborhood of a solution. We study this issue in the more general setting of composite nonsmooth minimization, in which the objective is a composition of a smooth vector function c with a lower semicontinuous function h, typically nonsmooth but structured. In this setting, the graph of the generalized gradient of h can often be decomposed into a union (nondisjoint) of simpler subsets. "Identification" amounts to deciding which subsets of the graph are "active" in the criticality conditions at a given solution. We give conditions under which any convergent sequence of approximate critical points finitely identifies the activity. Prominent among these properties is a condition akin to the Mangasarian-Fromovitz constraint qualification, which ensures boundedness of the set of...

  7. Spectrum of small mutations in the dystrophin coding region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, T W; Bartolo, C; Pearl, D K; Papp, A C; Snyder, P J; Sedra, M S; Burghes, A H; Mendell, J R

    1995-07-01

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies (DMD and BMD) are caused by defects in the dystrophin gene. About two-thirds of the affected patients have large deletions or duplications, which occur in the 5' and central portion of the gene. The nondeletion/duplication cases are most likely the result of smaller mutations that cannot be identified by current diagnostic screening strategies. We screened approximately 80% of the dystrophin coding sequence for small mutations in 158 patients without deletions or duplications and identified 29 mutations. The study indicates that many of the DMD and the majority of the BMD small mutations lie in noncoding regions of the gene. All of the mutations identified were unique to single patients, and most of the mutations resulted in protein truncation. We did not find a clustering of small mutations similar to the deletion distribution but found > 40% of the small mutations 3' of exon 55. The extent of protein truncation caused by the 3' mutations did not determine the phenotype, since even the exon 76 nonsense mutation resulted in the severe DMD phenotype. Our study confirms that the dystrophin gene is subject to a high rate of mutation in CpG sequences. As a consequence of not finding any hotspots or prevalent small mutations, we conclude that it is presently not possible to perform direct carrier and prenatal diagnostics for many families without deletions or duplications.

  8. 一例神经纤维瘤病Ⅰ型患者NF1基因新的插入缺失型突变%A novel indel NF1 mutation identified in a patient with neurofibromatosis type 1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱铁山; 黄尚志; 伍建; 汪春丹; 杨涛

    2015-01-01

    Objective To identify the genetic etiology in a Chinese patient with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF-1).Methods All coding exons and the flanking sequences of neurofibromin 1 (NF1)gene from the patient were captured,individually barcoded and subjected to HiSeq2000 high-throughput sequencing.Suspected mutation was validated in the nuclear family members with Sanger sequencing.Results A novel indel mutation,c.789_790delAGinsT,was identified in the exon 8 of the NF1 gene in the patient but not in her asymptomatic parents.The mutation was predicted to have caused shifting of the reading frame and a premature downstream stop codon (p.K263Nfs * 18).Two known polymorphisms,c.888 + 108 C> T (rs2953000) and c.888 +118 G>T (rs2952999),was detected in the flanking of the indel mutation in the patient and her father.Sequencing chromatogram for the family indicates that above changes are located on the same chromosome.Conclusion The c.789_790delAGinsT,as a de novo mutation occurring on the paternally derived chromosome,is most likely to be causative for the disease.Compared with Sanger sequencing,targeted next-generation sequencing is more efficient and can dramatically reduce the cost for the genetic testing of NF-1.%目的 对1例临床拟诊为神经纤维瘤Ⅰ型(neurofibromatosis type 1,NF-1)患者进行致病基因突变研究.方法 通过探针杂交富集患者神经纤维蛋白1 (neurofibromin 1,NF1)基因的全部编码区外显子及其旁侧序列进行高通量测序确定可疑突变,并用Sanger测序法对核心家系成员的相应目标基因区域进行测序验证.结果 在患者NF1基因的第8外显子检出一插入/缺失型突变(indel)c.789790delAGinsT(p.K263Nfs* 18),造成突变点后的三联密码子阅读框发生改变而导致蛋白质翻译的提前终止.其表型正常父母均无此改变.在患者突变点下游第8内含子中还检出两个源自父亲的杂合多态性改变c.888+ 108C>T(rs2953000)和c.888+ 118G>T(rs2952999

  9. Exonuclease mutations in DNA polymerase epsilon reveal replication strand specific mutation patterns and human origins of replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinbrot, Eve; Henninger, Erin E; Weinhold, Nils; Covington, Kyle R; Göksenin, A Yasemin; Schultz, Nikolaus; Chao, Hsu; Doddapaneni, HarshaVardhan; Muzny, Donna M; Gibbs, Richard A; Sander, Chris; Pursell, Zachary F; Wheeler, David A

    2014-11-01

    Tumors with somatic mutations in the proofreading exonuclease domain of DNA polymerase epsilon (POLE-exo*) exhibit a novel mutator phenotype, with markedly elevated TCT→TAT and TCG→TTG mutations and overall mutation frequencies often exceeding 100 mutations/Mb. Here, we identify POLE-exo* tumors in numerous cancers and classify them into two groups, A and B, according to their mutational properties. Group A mutants are found only in POLE, whereas Group B mutants are found in POLE and POLD1 and appear to be nonfunctional. In Group A, cell-free polymerase assays confirm that mutations in the exonuclease domain result in high mutation frequencies with a preference for C→A mutation. We describe the patterns of amino acid substitutions caused by POLE-exo* and compare them to other tumor types. The nucleotide preference of POLE-exo* leads to increased frequencies of recurrent nonsense mutations in key tumor suppressors such as TP53, ATM, and PIK3R1. We further demonstrate that strand-specific mutation patterns arise from some of these POLE-exo* mutants during genome duplication. This is the first direct proof of leading strand-specific replication by human POLE, which has only been demonstrated in yeast so far. Taken together, the extremely high mutation frequency and strand specificity of mutations provide a unique identifier of eukaryotic origins of replication.

  10. Maize Mutator transposon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yijun WANG; Mingliang XU; Dexiang DENG; Yunlong BIAN

    2008-01-01

    Transposable elements are widely distributed in eukaryotes. Due to its high copy numbers, high forward mutation rate and preferential insertion into low-copy DNA sequences, among others, the Mutator system has been widely used as a mutagen in genomic research. The discovery, classification, transposition specificity and epige-netic regulation of Mutator transposons were described. The application of Mutator tagging in plant genomic research was also presented. The role of Mu-like elements in genome evolution was briefly depicted. Moreover, the direction of Mutator transposon research in the future was discussed.

  11. Mutational screening of the RB1 gene in Italian patients with retinoblastoma reveals 11 novel mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampieri, Katia; Hadjistilianou, Theodora; Mari, Francesca; Speciale, Caterina; Mencarelli, Maria Antonietta; Cetta, Francesco; Manoukian, Siranoush; Peissel, Bernard; Giachino, Daniela; Pasini, Barbara; Acquaviva, Antonio; Caporossi, Aldo; Frezzotti, Renato; Renieri, Alessandra; Bruttini, Mirella

    2006-01-01

    Retinoblastoma (RB, OMIM#180200) is the most common intraocular tumour in infancy and early childhood. Constituent mutations in the RB1 gene predispose individuals to RB development. We performed a mutational screening of the RB1 gene in Italian patients affected by RB referred to the Medical Genetics of the University of Siena. In 35 unrelated patients, we identified germline RB1 mutations in 6 out of 9 familial cases (66%) and in 7 out of 26 with no family history of RB (27%). Using the single-strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) technique, 11 novel mutations were detected, including 3 nonsense, 5 frameshift and 4 splice-site mutations. Only two of these mutations (1 splice site and 1 missense) were previously reported. The mutation spectrum reflects the published literature, encompassing predominately nonsense or frameshift and splicing mutations. RB1 germline mutation was detected in 37% of our cases. Gross rearrangements outside the investigated region, altered DNA methylation, or mutations in non-coding regions, may be the cause of disease in the remainder of the patients. Some cases, e.g. a case of incomplete penetrance, or variable expressivity ranging from retinoma to multiple tumours, are discussed in detail. In addition, a case of pre-conception genetic counselling resolved by rescue of banked cordonal blood of the affected deceased child is described.

  12. MutationAligner: a resource of recurrent mutation hotspots in protein domains in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Nicholas Paul; Reznik, Ed; Gao, Jianjiong; Sumer, Selcuk Onur; Schultz, Nikolaus; Sander, Chris; Miller, Martin L

    2016-01-04

    The MutationAligner web resource, available at http://www.mutationaligner.org, enables discovery and exploration of somatic mutation hotspots identified in protein domains in currently (mid-2015) more than 5000 cancer patient samples across 22 different tumor types. Using multiple sequence alignments of protein domains in the human genome, we extend the principle of recurrence analysis by aggregating mutations in homologous positions across sets of paralogous genes. Protein domain analysis enhances the statistical power to detect cancer-relevant mutations and links mutations to the specific biological functions encoded in domains. We illustrate how the MutationAligner database and interactive web tool can be used to explore, visualize and analyze mutation hotspots in protein domains across genes and tumor types. We believe that MutationAligner will be an important resource for the cancer research community by providing detailed clues for the functional importance of particular mutations, as well as for the design of functional genomics experiments and for decision support in precision medicine. MutationAligner is slated to be periodically updated to incorporate additional analyses and new data from cancer genomics projects. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  13. Multiple mutations and mutation combinations in the sodium channel of permethrin resistant mosquitoes, Culex quinquefasciatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ting; Zhang, Lee; Reid, William R.; Xu, Qiang; Dong, Ke; Liu, Nannan

    2012-10-01

    A previous study identified 3 nonsynonymous and 6 synonymous mutations in the entire mosquito sodium channel of Culex quinquefasciatus, the prevalence of which were strongly correlated with levels of resistance and increased dramatically following insecticide selection. However, it is unclear whether this is unique to this specific resistant population or is a common mechanism in field mosquito populations in response to insecticide pressure. The current study therefore further characterized these mutations and their combinations in other field and permethrin selected Culex mosquitoes, finding that the co-existence of all 9 mutations was indeed correlated with the high levels of permethrin resistance in mosquitoes. Comparison of mutation combinations revealed several common mutation combinations presented across different field and permethrin selected populations in response to high levels of insecticide resistance, demonstrating that the co-existence of multiple mutations is a common event in response to insecticide resistance across different Cx. quinquefasciatus mosquito populations.

  14. 目标区域捕获测序检测到一视网膜色素变性家系ABCA4基因新突变%Targeted next-generation sequencing identifies a novel ABCA4 gene mutation in a Chinese family with retinitis pigmentosa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁思加; 陈雪; 赵堪兴; 盛迅伦; 赵晨

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify the pathogenic mutation in a Chinese family with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and to analyze its genotype-phenotype correlations.Methods Seven participants from one family were recruited for this experimental study,including 2 patients and 5 asymptomatic siblings.All participants underwent comprehensive ophthalmic examinations including best-corrected visual acuity,visual field testing,fundus photography,optical coherence tomography,and full-field flash electroretinography.Targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) was selectively performed on the proband to reveal the RP causative mutation in this family using a microarray targeting 180 reported inherited retinal dystrophies (IRDs) causative genes and 9 potential IRDs relevant genes.All variants initially detected by NGS were then screened and filtered with optimized bioinformatics analyses and validated by intra-familial cosegregation analyses using Sanger sequencing.Genotype-phenotype correlation was also analyzed.Results Ophthalmic examination suggested the clinical diagnosis of typical RP for both patients from this family.Genetic analysis indicated ABCA4 c.419G>A as the RP causative mutation for this family.This mutation induced the amino acid change from arginine to glutamine at residue 140 of the protein encoded by the ABCA4 gene (p.Argl40Gln).Conservational analysis revealed the high conservation of the mutational spot among all tested species,and the online predictive software,PolyPhen-2,suggested the pathogenicity of this mutation.Conclusion By means of a targeted NGS approach,this study identifies a novel mutation,ABCA4 p.Arg140Gln,as the disease causative mutation for a Chinese autosomal recessive RP family,which extends both the genotypic and phenotypic spectrums for the ABCA4 gene.%目的 研究我国一个常染色体隐性遗传的视网膜色素变性(RP)家系患者的临床表型及致病基因突变,并分析表型与基因型间的关系.方法 实验

  15. AChR deficiency due to epsilon-subunit mutations : two common mutations in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faber, Catharina G.; Molenaar, Peter C.; Vles, Johannes S. H.; Bonifati, Domenic M.; Verschuuren, Jan J. G. M.; van Doorn, Pieter A.; Kuks, Jan B. M.; Wokke, John H. J.; Beeson, David; De Baets, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Congenital myasthenic syndromes are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of hereditary disorders affecting neuromuscular transmission. We have identified mutations within the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) epsilon-subunit gene underlying congenital myasthenic syndromes in nine patients

  16. AChR deficiency due to ε-subunit mutations: Two common mutations in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.G. Faber (Carin); P.C. Molenaar (Peter); J.S.H. Vles (Johannes); D.M. Bonifati (Domenic); J.J. Verschuuren (Jan); P.A. van Doorn (Pieter); J.B.M. Kuks (Jan); J.H.J. Wokke (John); D. Beeson (David); M.H. de Baets (Marc)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractCongenital myasthenic syndromes are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of hereditary disorders affecting neuromuscular transmission. We have identified mutations within the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) ε-subunit gene underlying congenital myasthenic syndromes in nine

  17. AChR deficiency due to ε-subunit mutations: Two common mutations in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.G. Faber (Carin); P.C. Molenaar (Peter); J.S.H. Vles (Johannes); D.M. Bonifati (Domenic); J.J. Verschuuren (Jan); P.A. van Doorn (Pieter); J.B.M. Kuks (Jan); J.H.J. Wokke (John); D. Beeson (David); M.H. de Baets (Marc)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractCongenital myasthenic syndromes are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of hereditary disorders affecting neuromuscular transmission. We have identified mutations within the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) ε-subunit gene underlying congenital myasthenic syndromes in nine patie

  18. AChR deficiency due to epsilon-subunit mutations : two common mutations in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faber, Catharina G.; Molenaar, Peter C.; Vles, Johannes S. H.; Bonifati, Domenic M.; Verschuuren, Jan J. G. M.; van Doorn, Pieter A.; Kuks, Jan B. M.; Wokke, John H. J.; Beeson, David; De Baets, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Congenital myasthenic syndromes are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of hereditary disorders affecting neuromuscular transmission. We have identified mutations within the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) epsilon-subunit gene underlying congenital myasthenic syndromes in nine patients (s

  19. AChR deficiency due to epsilon-subunit mutations : two common mutations in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faber, Catharina G.; Molenaar, Peter C.; Vles, Johannes S. H.; Bonifati, Domenic M.; Verschuuren, Jan J. G. M.; van Doorn, Pieter A.; Kuks, Jan B. M.; Wokke, John H. J.; Beeson, David; De Baets, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Congenital myasthenic syndromes are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of hereditary disorders affecting neuromuscular transmission. We have identified mutations within the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) epsilon-subunit gene underlying congenital myasthenic syndromes in nine patients (s

  20. Isocitrate dehydrogenase mutations in gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waitkus, Matthew S; Diplas, Bill H; Yan, Hai

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, extraordinary progress has been made in elucidating the underlying genetic causes of gliomas. In 2008, our understanding of glioma genetics was revolutionized when mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1/2) were identified in the vast majority of progressive gliomas and secondary glioblastomas (GBMs). IDH enzymes normally catalyze the decarboxylation of isocitrate to generate α-ketoglutarate (αKG), but recurrent mutations at Arg(132) of IDH1 and Arg(172) of IDH2 confer a neomorphic enzyme activity that catalyzes reduction of αKG into the putative oncometabolite D-2-hydroxyglutate (D2HG). D2HG inhibits αKG-dependent dioxygenases and is thought to create a cellular state permissive to malignant transformation by altering cellular epigenetics and blocking normal differentiation processes. Herein, we discuss the relevant literature on mechanistic studies of IDH1/2 mutations in gliomas, and we review the potential impact of IDH1/2 mutations on molecular classification and glioma therapy.

  1. IFITM5 mutations and osteogenesis imperfecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanagata, Nobutaka

    2016-03-01

    Interferon-induced transmembrane protein 5 (IFITM5) is an osteoblast-specific membrane protein that has been shown to be a positive regulatory factor for mineralization in vitro. However, Ifitm5 knockout mice do not exhibit serious bone abnormalities, and thus the function of IFITM5 in vivo remains unclear. Recently, a single point mutation (c.-14C>T) in the 5' untranslated region of IFITM5 was identified in patients with osteogenesis imperfecta type V (OI-V). Furthermore, a single point mutation (c.119C>T) in the coding region of IFITM5 was identified in OI patients with more severe symptoms than patients with OI-V. Although IFITM5 is not directly involved in the formation of bone in vivo, the reason why IFITM5 mutations cause OI remains a major mystery. In this review, the current state of knowledge of OI pathological mechanisms due to IFITM5 mutations will be reviewed.

  2. Dysferlin Gene Mutation Spectrum in a Large Cohort of Chinese Patients with Dysferlinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-Qin Jin

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: DYSF mutations in Chinese patients clustered in the N-terminal region of the gene. Exonic rearrangements were found in 23% of patients with only one pathogenic mutation identified by Sanger sequencing or NGS. The novel mutations found in this study greatly expanded the mutational spectrum of dysferlinopathy.

  3. Three kinds of mutation

    CERN Document Server

    Buan, Aslak Bakke; Thomas, Hugh

    2010-01-01

    For a finite dimensional hereditary algebra, we consider: exceptional sequences in the category of finite dimensional modules, silting objects in the bounded derived category, and m-cluster tilting objects in the m-cluster category. There are mutation operations on both the set of m-cluster tilting objects and the set of exceptional sequences. It is also possible to define a mutation operation for silting objects. We compare these three different notions of mutation.

  4. Mutational profiling of kinases in glioblastoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.E. Bleeker (Fonnet); S. Lamba (Simona); C. Zanon (Carlo); R.J. Molenaar (Remco J.); T. Hulsebos (Theo); D. Troost (Dirk); A.A.G. van Tilborg (Angela); W.P. Vandertop (Peter); S. Leenstra (Sieger); C.J.F. van Noorden (Cornelis); A. Bardelli (Alberto)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Glioblastoma is a highly malignant brain tumor for which no cure is available. To identify new therapeutic targets, we performed a mutation analysis of kinase genes in glioblastoma.Methods: Database mining and a literature search identified 76 kinases that have been found to

  5. Novel recurrently mutated genes and a prognostic mutation signature in colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jun; Wu, William K K; Li, Xiangchun; He, Jun; Li, Xiao-Xing; Ng, Simon S M; Yu, Chang; Gao, Zhibo; Yang, Jie; Li, Miao; Wang, Qiaoxiu; Liang, Qiaoyi; Pan, Yi; Tong, Joanna H; To, Ka F; Wong, Nathalie; Zhang, Ning; Chen, Jie; Lu, Youyong; Lai, Paul B S; Chan, Francis K L; Li, Yingrui; Kung, Hsiang-Fu; Yang, Huanming; Wang, Jun; Sung, Joseph J Y

    2015-01-01

    Background Characterisation of colorectal cancer (CRC) genomes by next-generation sequencing has led to the discovery of novel recurrently mutated genes. Nevertheless, genomic data has not yet been used for CRC prognostication. Objective To identify recurrent somatic mutations with prognostic significance in patients with CRC. Method Exome sequencing was performed to identify somatic mutations in tumour tissues of 22 patients with CRC, followed by validation of 187 recurrent and pathway-related genes using targeted capture sequencing in additional 160 cases. Results Seven significantly mutated genes, including four reported (APC, TP53, KRAS and SMAD4) and three novel recurrently mutated genes (CDH10, FAT4 and DOCK2), exhibited high mutation prevalence (6–14% for novel cancer genes) and higher-than-expected number of non-silent mutations in our CRC cohort. For prognostication, a five-gene-signature (CDH10, COL6A3, SMAD4, TMEM132D, VCAN) was devised, in which mutation(s) in one or more of these genes was significantly associated with better overall survival independent of tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) staging. The median survival time was 80.4 months in the mutant group versus 42.4 months in the wild type group (p=0.0051). The prognostic significance of this signature was successfully verified using the data set from the Cancer Genome Atlas study. Conclusions The application of next-generation sequencing has led to the identification of three novel significantly mutated genes in CRC and a mutation signature that predicts survival outcomes for stratifying patients with CRC independent of TNM staging. PMID:24951259

  6. Mutation analysis and prenatal diagnosis of EXT1 gene mutations in Chinese patients with multiple osteochondromas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Hai-yan; HU Ya-li; YANG Ying; WU Xing; ZHU Rui-fang; ZHU Xiang-yu; DUAN Hong-lei; ZHANG Ying; ZHOU Jin-yong

    2011-01-01

    Background Multiple osteochondromas (MO), an inherited autosomal dominant disorder, is characterized by the presence of multiple exostoses on the long bones. MO is caused by mutations in the EXT1 or EXT2 genes which encode glycosyltransferases implicated in heparin sulfate biosynthesis.Methods In this study, efforts were made to identify the underlying disease-causing mutations in patients from two MO families in China.Results Two novel EXT1 gene mutations were identified and no mutation was found in EXT2 gene. The mutation c.497T>A in exon 1 of the EXT1 gene was cosegregated with the disease phenotype in family 1 and formed a stop codon at amino acid site 166. The fetus of the proband was diagnosed negative. In family 2, the mutation c. 1430-1431delCC in exon 6 of the EXT1 gene would cause frameshift and introduce a premature stop codon after the reading frame being open for 42 amino acids. The fetus of this family inherited this mutation from the father.Conclusions Mutation analysis of two MO families in this study demonstrates its further application in MO genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis.

  7. A systematic study of gene mutations in urothelial carcinoma; inactivating mutations in TSC2 and PIK3R1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gottfrid Sjödahl

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Urothelial carcinoma (UC is characterized by frequent gene mutations of which activating mutations in FGFR3 are the most frequent. Several downstream targets of FGFR3 are also mutated in UC, e.g., PIK3CA, AKT1, and RAS. Most mutation studies of UCs have been focused on single or a few genes at the time or been performed on small sample series. This has limited the possibility to investigate co-occurrence of mutations. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed mutation analyses of 16 genes, FGFR3, PIK3CA, PIK3R1 PTEN, AKT1, KRAS, HRAS, NRAS, BRAF, ARAF, RAF1, TSC1, TSC2, APC, CTNNB1, and TP53, in 145 cases of UC. We show that FGFR3 and PIK3CA mutations are positively associated. In addition, we identified PIK3R1 as a target for mutations. We demonstrate a negative association at borderline significance between FGFR3 and RAS mutations, and show that these mutations are not strictly mutually exclusive. We show that mutations in BRAF, ARAF, RAF1 rarely occurs in UC. Our data emphasize the possible importance of APC signaling as 6% of the investigated tumors either showed inactivating APC or activating CTNNB1 mutations. TSC1, as well as TSC2, that constitute the mTOR regulatory tuberous sclerosis complex were found to be mutated at a combined frequency of 15%. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data demonstrate a significant association between FGFR3 and PIK3CA mutations in UC. Moreover, the identification of mutations in PIK3R1 further emphasizes the importance of the PI3-kinase pathway in UC. The presence of TSC2 mutations, in addition to TSC1 mutations, underlines the involvement of mTOR signaling in UC.

  8. Nucleophosmin (NPM1) Mutations in Acute Myeloid Leukemia: An Ongoing (Cytoplasmic) Tale of Dueling Mutations and Duality of Molecular Genetic Testing Methodologies

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    This Commentary highlights two articles that focus on molecular techniques to identify mutations in nucleophosmin (NPM1), which is the most frequently mutated gene in cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (CN-AML)

  9. Clinical Outcomes and Co-Occurring Mutations in Patients with RUNX1-Mutated Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Maliha; Cortes, Jorge; Kadia, Tapan; Naqvi, Kiran; Brandt, Mark; Pierce, Sherry; Patel, Keyur P; Borthakur, Gautam; Ravandi, Farhad; Konopleva, Marina; Kornblau, Steven; Kantarjian, Hagop; Bhalla, Kapil; DiNardo, Courtney D

    2017-07-26

    (1) Runt-related transcription factor 1 (RUNX1) mutations in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are often associated with worse prognosis. We assessed co-occurring mutations, response to therapy, and clinical outcomes in patients with and without mutant RUNX1 (mRUNX1); (2) We analyzed 328 AML patients, including 177 patients younger than 65 years who received intensive chemotherapy and 151 patients >65 years who received hypomethylating agents. RUNX1 and co-existing mutations were identified using next-generation sequencing; (3) RUNX1 mutations were identified in 5.1% of younger patients and 15.9% of older patients, and were significantly associated with increasing age (p = 0.01) as well as intermediate-risk cytogenetics including normal karyotype (p = 0.02) in the elderly cohort, and with lower lactate dehydrogenase (LDH; p = 0.02) and higher platelet count (p = 0.012) overall. Identified co-occurring mutations were primarily ASXL1 mutations in older patients and RAS mutations in younger patients; FLT3-ITD and IDH1/2 co-mutations were also frequent. Younger mRUNX1 AML patients treated with intensive chemotherapy experienced inferior treatment outcomes. In older patients with AML treated with hypomethylating agent (HMA) therapy, response and survival was independent of RUNX1 status. Older mRUNX1 patients with prior myelodysplastic syndrome or myeloproliferative neoplasms (MDS/MPN) had particularly dismal outcome. Future studies should focus on the prognostic implications of RUNX1 mutations relative to other co-occurring mutations, and the potential role of hypomethylating agents for this molecularly-defined group.

  10. Mutation analysis of 28 gaucher disease patients: The Australasian experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, B.D.; Nelson, P.V.; Robertson, E.F.; Morris, C.P. [Women`s and Children`s Hospital, North Adelaide, South Australia (Australia)

    1994-01-15

    Gaucher disease is the most common lysomal storage disease. It is an autosomal recessive disorder that results from a deficiency of {beta}-glucocerrebrosidase. Three clinical phenotypes have been described: non-neuronopathic, acute neuronopathic, and subacuteneuronopathic. Genomic DNA from 28 Australasian patients of diverse ethnic origin with Gaucher disease was screened for 3 common mutations (1226G, 1448C and 84GG) using the amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS), and one uncommon mutation (1504T) by restriction enzyme digestion. Thirty-eight of the 56 independent alleles in these patients were characterized, with 1448C present in 42% and 1226G in 28% of the alleles. The 1226G mutation was associated only with the nonneuronopathic phenotype and 7 of the 15 patients who carried the 1448C mutation developed neuronopathic disease. Three infants who died in the neonatal period following a rapidly progressive neurodegenerative course carried no identifiable mutations. The 84GG mutation was carried by 2 Jewish patients and 1504T was present in one patient. It is now possible to rapidly identify the common Gaucher mutations using ARMS and restriction enzyme digestion, and our findings confirm the heterogeneity of mutations in Gaucher disease. It is also possible to predict in part the phenotypic outcome when screening patients for these mutations. The authors consider mutation analysis to be of most use in prenatal diagnosis and for carrier detection within affected families. 27 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Gestational mutations in radiation carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meza, R.; Luebeck, G.; Moolgavkar, S.

    Mutations in critical genes during gestation could increase substantially the risk of cancer. We examine the consequences of such mutations using the Luebeck-Moolgavkar model for colorectal cancer and the Lea-Coulson modification of the Luria-Delbruck model for the accumulation of mutations during gestation. When gestational mutation rates are high, such mutations make a significant contribution to cancer risk even for adult tumors. Furthermore, gestational mutations ocurring at distinct times during emryonic developmemt lead to substantially different numbers of mutated cells at birth, with early mutations leading to a large number (jackpots) of mutated cells at birth and mutation occurring late leading to only a few mutated cells. Thus gestational mutations could confer considerable heterogeneity of the risk of cancer. If the fetus is exposed to an environmental mutagen, such as ionizing radiation, the gestational mutation rate would be expected to increase. We examine the consequences of such exposures during gestation on the subsequent development of cancer.

  12. NRAS and BRAF mutation frequency in primary oral mucosal melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buery, Rosario Rivera; Siar, Chong Huat; Katase, Naoki; Gunduz, Mehmet; Lefeuvre, Mathieu; Fujii, Masae; Inoue, Masahisa; Setsu, Kojun; Nagatsuka, Hitoshi

    2011-10-01

    Oral mucosal melanoma (OMM) is a fatal sarcoma of unknown etiology. Histological morphology and genetic events are distinct from those of its cutaneous counterpart. Mutation and up-regulation of c-kit has been identified in OMM which may activate downstream molecules such as RAS and RAF. These molecules are involved in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway leading to tremendous cell proliferation and survival. NRAS and BRAF mutation and protein expression have been studied in other melanoma subtypes. The purpose of this study was to determine RAS protein expression and NRAS and BRAF mutation in 18 primary OMM cases using immunohistochemistry and mutation analysis. Results showed that RAS is intensely expressed in both in situ and invasive OMMs. However, NRAS mutation was only observed in 2/15 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplified cases both of which were silent mutations. On the other hand, BRAF missense mutations were observed only in 1/15 cases with PCR amplification. NRAS and BRAF mutations were independent from previously reported c-kit mutations. The classical V600E BRAF mutation was not found; instead a novel V600L was observed suggesting that the oncogenic event in OMM is different from that in skin melanoma. The low frequency of NRAS and BRAF mutations indicate that these genes are not common, but probable events in OMM pathogenesis, most likely independent of c-kit mutation.

  13. Significance of duon mutations in cancer genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Vinod Kumar; Smith, Kyle S.; Flinders, Colin; Mumenthaler, Shannon M.; de, Subhajyoti

    2016-06-01

    Functional mutations in coding regions not only affect the structure and function of the protein products, but may also modulate their expression in some cases. This class of mutations, recently dubbed “duon mutations” due to their dual roles, can potentially have major impacts on downstream pathways. However their significance in diseases such as cancer remain unclear. In a survey covering 4606 samples from 19 cancer types, and integrating allelic expression, overall mRNA expression, regulatory motif perturbation, and chromatin signatures in one composite index called REDACT score, we identified potential duon mutations. Several such mutations are detected in known cancer genes in multiple cancer types. For instance a potential duon mutation in TP53 is associated with increased expression of the mutant allelic gene copy, thereby possibly amplifying the functional effects on the downstream pathways. Another potential duon mutation in SF3B1 is associated with abnormal splicing and changes in angiogenesis and matrix degradation related pathways. Our findings emphasize the need to interrogate the mutations in coding regions beyond their obvious effects on protein structures.

  14. Inherited cardiomyopathies caused by troponin mutations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qun-Wei Lu; Xiao-Yan Wu; Sachio Morimoto

    2013-01-01

    Genetic investigations of cardiomyopathy in the recent two decades have revealed a large number of mutations in the genes encoding sarcomeric proteins as a cause of inherited hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), or restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM). Most functional analyses of the effects of mutations on cardiac muscle contraction have revealed significant changes in the Ca2+-regulatory mechanism, in which cardiac troponin (cTn) plays important structural and functional roles as a key regulatory protein. Over a hundred mutations have been identified in all three subunits of cTn, i.e., cardiac troponins T, I, and C. Recent studies on cTn mutations have provided plenty of evidence that HCM- and RCM-linked mutations increase cardiac myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity, while DCM-linked mutations decrease it. This review focuses on the functional consequences of mutations found in cTn in terms of cardiac myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity, ATPase activity, force generation, and cardiac troponin I phosphorylation, to understand potential molecular and cellular pathogenic mechanisms of the three types of inherited cardiomyopathy.

  15. Novel KRAS gene mutations in sporadic colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walid M Naser

    Full Text Available In this article, we report 7 novel KRAS gene mutations discovered while retrospectively studying the prevalence and pattern of KRAS mutations in cancerous tissue obtained from 56 Saudi sporadic colorectal cancer patients from the Eastern Province.Genomic DNA was extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded cancerous and noncancerous colorectal tissues. Successful and specific PCR products were then bi-directionally sequenced to detect exon 4 mutations while Mutector II Detection Kits were used for identifying mutations in codons 12, 13 and 61. The functional impact of the novel mutations was assessed using bioinformatics tools and molecular modeling.KRAS gene mutations were detected in the cancer tissue of 24 cases (42.85%. Of these, 11 had exon 4 mutations (19.64%. They harbored 8 different mutations all of which except two altered the KRAS protein amino acid sequence and all except one were novel as revealed by COSMIC database. The detected novel mutations were found to be somatic. One mutation is predicted to be benign. The remaining mutations are predicted to cause substantial changes in the protein structure. Of these, the Q150X nonsense mutation is the second truncating mutation to be reported in colorectal cancer in the literature.Our discovery of novel exon 4 KRAS mutations that are, so far, unique to Saudi colorectal cancer patients may be attributed to environmental factors and/or racial/ethnic variations due to genetic differences. Alternatively, it may be related to paucity of clinical studies on mutations other than those in codons 12, 13, 61 and 146. Further KRAS testing on a large number of patients of various ethnicities, particularly beyond the most common hotspot alleles in exons 2 and 3 is needed to assess the prevalence and explore the exact prognostic and predictive significance of the discovered novel mutations as well as their possible role in colorectal carcinogenesis.

  16. Definition of mutations in polyautoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johar, Angad; Sarmiento-Monroy, Juan C; Rojas-Villarraga, Adriana; Silva-Lara, Maria F; Patel, Hardip R; Mantilla, Ruben D; Velez, Jorge I; Schulte, Klaus-Martin; Mastronardi, Claudio; Arcos-Burgos, Mauricio; Anaya, Juan-Manuel

    2016-08-01

    Familial autoimmunity and polyautoimmunity represent extreme phenotypes ideal for identifying major genomic variants contributing to autoimmunity. Whole exome sequencing (WES) and linkage analysis are well suited for this purpose due to its strong resolution upon familial segregation patterns of functional protein coding and splice variants. The primary objective of this study was to identify potentially autoimmune causative variants using WES data from extreme pedigrees segregating polyautoimmunity phenotypes. DNA of 47 individuals across 10 extreme pedigrees, ascertained from probands affected with polyautoimmunity and familial autoimmunity, were selected for WES. Variant calls were obtained through Genome Analysis Toolkit. Filtration and prioritization framework to identify mutation(s) were applied, and later implemented for genetic linkage analysis. Sanger sequencing corroborated variants with significant linkage. Novel and mostly rare variants harbored in SRA1, MLL4, ABCB8, DHX34 and PLAUR showed significant linkage (LOD scores are >3.0). The strongest signal was in SRA1, with a LOD score of 5.48. Network analyses indicated that SRA1, PLAUR and ABCB8 contribute to regulation of apoptotic processes. Novel and rare variants in genetic linkage with polyautoimmunity were identified throughout WES. Genes harboring these variants might be major players of autoimmunity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Mutation and premating isolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, R C; Thompson, J N

    2002-11-01

    While premating isolation might be traceable to different genetic mechanisms in different species, evidence supports the idea that as few as one or two genes may often be sufficient to initiate isolation. Thus, new mutation can theoretically play a key role in the process. But it has long been thought that a new isolation mutation would fail, because there would be no other individuals for the isolation-mutation-carrier to mate with. We now realize that premeiotic mutations are very common and will yield a cluster of progeny carrying the same new mutant allele. In this paper, we discuss the evidence for genetically simple premating isolation barriers and the role that clusters of an isolation mutation may play in initiating allopatric, and even sympatric, species divisions.

  18. TOX3 mutations in breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Owain Jones

    Full Text Available TOX3 maps to 16q12, a region commonly lost in breast cancers and recently implicated in the risk of developing breast cancer. However, not much is known of the role of TOX3 itself in breast cancer biology. This is the first study to determine the importance of TOX3 mutations in breast cancers. We screened TOX3 for mutations in 133 breast tumours and identified four mutations (three missense, one in-frame deletion of 30 base pairs in six primary tumours, corresponding to an overall mutation frequency of 4.5%. One potentially deleterious missense mutation in exon 3 (Leu129Phe was identified in one tumour (genomic DNA and cDNA. Whilst copy number changes of 16q12 are common in breast cancer, our data show that mutations of TOX3 are present at low frequency in tumours. Our results support that TOX3 should be further investigated to elucidate its role in breast cancer biology.

  19. Novel Mutations and Mutation Combinations of TMPRSS3 Cause Various Phenotypes in One Chinese Family with Autosomal Recessive Hearing Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guo-Jian; Xu, Jin-Cao; Su, Yu

    2017-01-01

    Autosomal recessive hearing impairment with postlingual onset is rare. Exceptions are caused by mutations in the TMPRSS3 gene, which can lead to prelingual (DFNB10) as well as postlingual deafness (DFNB8). TMPRSS3 mutations can be classified as mild or severe, and the phenotype is dependent on the combination of TMPRSS3 mutations. The combination of two severe mutations leads to profound hearing impairment with a prelingual onset, whereas severe mutations in combination with milder TMPRSS3 mutations lead to a milder phenotype with postlingual onset. We characterized a Chinese family (number FH1523) with not only prelingual but also postlingual hearing impairment. Three mutations in TMPRSS3, one novel mutation c.36delC [p.(Phe13Serfs⁎12)], and two previously reported pathogenic mutations, c.916G>A (p.Ala306Thr) and c.316C>T (p.Arg106Cys), were identified. Compound heterozygous mutations of p.(Phe13Serfs⁎12) and p.Ala306Thr manifest as prelingual, profound hearing impairment in the patient (IV: 1), whereas the combination of p.Arg106Cys and p.Ala306Thr manifests as postlingual, milder hearing impairment in the patient (II: 2, II: 3, II: 5), suggesting that p.Arg106Cys mutation has a milder effect than p.(Phe13Serfs⁎12). We concluded that different combinations of TMPRSS3 mutations led to different hearing impairment phenotypes (DFNB8/DFNB10) in this family. PMID:28246597

  20. Multiple gene mutations, not the type of mutation, are the modifier of left ventricle hypertrophy in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yubao; Wang, Jizheng; Liu, Xuan; Wang, Yilu; Chen, Yi; Sun, Kai; Gao, Shuo; Zhang, Channa; Wang, Zhimin; Zhang, Yin; Feng, Xinxing; Song, Ying; Wu, Yajie; Zhang, Hongju; Jia, Lei; Wang, Hu; Wang, Dong; Yan, Chaowu; Lu, Minjie; Zhou, Xianliang; Song, Lei; Hui, Rutai

    2013-06-01

    Genotype-phenotype correlation of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) has been challenging because of the genetic and clinical heterogeneity. To determine the mutation profile of Chinese patients with HCM and to correlate genotypes with phenotypes, we performed a systematic mutation screening of the eight most commonly mutated genes encoding sarcomere proteins in 200 unrelated Chinese adult patients using direct DNA sequencing. A total of 98 mutations were identified in 102 mutation carriers. The frequency of mutations in MYH7, MYBPC3, TNNT2 and TNNI3 was 26.0, 18.0, 4.0 and 3.5 % respectively. Among the 200 genotyped HCM patients, 83 harbored a single mutation, and 19 (9.5 %) harbored multiple mutations. The number of mutations was positively correlated with the maximum wall thickness. We found that neither particular gene nor specific mutation was correlated to clinical phenotype. In summary, the frequency of multiple mutations was greater in Chinese HCM patients than in the Caucasian population. Multiple mutations in sarcomere protein may be a risk factor for left ventricular wall thickness.

  1. Rb1 GENE MUTATIONS IN OSTEOSARCOMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Ji-bin; SONG Yue; WANG Yi; SHI Yu-yuan

    1999-01-01

    @@ Genetic alternations, such as mutations caused inactivities of tumor suppressor gene, have been identified in a wide variety of tumors, including osteosarcoma. Osteosarcoma is the most frequent primary malignant bone tumor that occurs in the extremities of young adolescents in most cases. Because of the high frequent occurrence of this type of tumor in hereditary retinoblastoma patients, involvement of the Rb1 gene mutations was suspected in the development of osteosarcoma, and a few reports have shown alternations of the Rb1 gene in osteosarcoma. We studied Rb1 gene mutations in 9 osteosarcoma samples and one cell line (OS 732) to explore the types and mechanism of Rb1 gene mutations in osteosarcoma.

  2. Mutation analysis of Australasian Gaucher disease patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, P.V.; Carey, W.F.; Morris, C.P.; Lewis, B.D. [Women`s and Children`s Hospital, North Adelaide, South Australia (Australia)

    1995-09-25

    We have previously reported phenotype and genotype analyses in 28 Australasian Gaucher patients who were screened for several of the common Gaucher mutations: N370S, L444P, 84GG, and R463C. Horowitz and Zimran have reported that the complex alleles recNciI and recTL, which contain several point mutations including L444P, are relatively common, especially in non-Jewish Gaucher patients. Zimran and Horowitz have also stated that these recombinant alleles could easily be missed by laboratories testing only for the common Gaucher point mutations. Failure to correctly identify these mutations would influence any attempt to correlate genotype with phenotype. We have therefore retested our Gaucher patients for recNciI (L444P, A456P, and V46OV) and recTL (D409H, L444P, A456P, and V46OV) by PCR amplification, followed by hybridization with allele-specific oligonucleotides. 4 refs.

  3. Emerging patterns of somatic mutations in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Ian R; Takahashi, Koichi; Futreal, P Andrew; Chin, Lynda

    2013-10-01

    Recent advances in technological tools for massively parallel, high-throughput sequencing of DNA have enabled the comprehensive characterization of somatic mutations in a large number of tumour samples. In this Review, we describe recent cancer genomic studies that have assembled emerging views of the landscapes of somatic mutations through deep-sequencing analyses of the coding exomes and whole genomes in various cancer types. We discuss the comparative genomics of different cancers, including mutation rates and spectra, as well as the roles of environmental insults that influence these processes. We highlight the developing statistical approaches that are used to identify significantly mutated genes, and discuss the emerging biological and clinical insights from such analyses, as well as the future challenges of translating these genomic data into clinical impacts.

  4. Three new BLM gene mutations associated with Bloom syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amor-Guéret, Mounira; Dubois-d'Enghien, Catherine; Laugé, Anthony; Onclercq-Delic, Rosine; Barakat, Abdelhamid; Chadli, Elbekkay; Bousfiha, Ahmed Aziz; Benjelloun, Meriem; Flori, Elisabeth; Doray, Bérénice; Laugel, Vincent; Lourenço, Maria Teresa; Gonçalves, Rui; Sousa, Silvia; Couturier, Jérôme; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique

    2008-06-01

    Bloom's syndrome (BS) is a rare autosomal recessive disease predisposing patients to all types of cancers affecting the general population. BS cells display a high level of genetic instability, including a 10-fold increase in the rate of sister chromatid exchanges, currently the only objective criterion for BS diagnosis. We have developed a method for screening the BLM gene for mutations based on direct genomic DNA sequencing. A questionnaire based on clinical information, cytogenetic features, and family history was addressed to physicians prescribing BS genetic screening, with the aim of confirming or guiding diagnosis. We report here four BLM gene mutations, three of which have not been described before. Three of the mutations are frameshift mutations, and the fourth is a nonsense mutation. All these mutations introduce a stop codon, and may therefore be considered to have deleterious biological effect. This approach should make it possible to identify new mutations and to correlate them with clinical information.

  5. TERT promoter mutations in melanoma survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagore, Eduardo; Heidenreich, Barbara; Rachakonda, Sívaramakrishna; Garcia-Casado, Zaida; Requena, Celia; Soriano, Virtudes; Frank, Christoph; Traves, Victor; Quecedo, Esther; Sanjuan-Gimenez, Josefa; Hemminki, Kari; Landi, Maria Teresa; Kumar, Rajiv

    2016-07-01

    Despite advances in targeted therapies, the treatment of advanced melanoma remains an exercise in disease management, hence a need for biomarkers for identification of at-risk primary melanoma patients. In this study, we aimed to assess the prognostic value of TERT promoter mutations in primary melanomas. Tumors from 300 patients with stage I/II melanoma were sequenced for TERT promoter and BRAF/NRAS mutations. Cumulative curves were drawn for patients with and without mutations with progression-free and melanoma-specific survival as outcomes. Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to determine the effect of the mutations on survivals. Individually, presence of TERT promoter and BRAF/NRAS mutations associated with poor disease-free and melanoma-specific survival with modification of the effect by the rs2853669 polymorphism within the TERT promoter. Hazard ratio (HR) for simultaneous occurrence of TERT promoter and BRAF/NRAS mutations for disease-free survival was 2.3 (95% CI 1.2-4.4) and for melanoma-specific survival 5.8 (95% CI 1.9-18.3). The effect of the mutations on melanoma-specific survival in noncarriers of variant allele of the polymorphism was significant (HR 4.5, 95% CI 1.4-15.2) but could not be calculated for the carriers due to low number of events. The variant allele per se showed association with increased survival (HR 0.3, 95% CI 0.1-0.9). The data in this study provide preliminary evidence that TERT promoter mutations in combination with BRAF/NRAS mutations can be used to identify patients at risk of aggressive disease and the possibility of refinement of the classification with inclusion of the rs2853669 polymorphism within TERT promoter.

  6. Murine muscular dystrophy caused by a mutation in the laminin alpha 2 (Lama2) gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, H; Wu, X R; Wewer, U M;

    1994-01-01

    The classic murine muscular dystrophy strain, dy, was first described almost 40 years ago. We have identified the molecular basis of an allele of dy, called dy2J, by detecting a mutation in the laminin alpha 2 chain gene--the first identified mutation in laminin-2. The G to A mutation in a splice...

  7. Mutation rates among RNA viruses

    OpenAIRE

    Drake, John W.; Holland, John J.

    1999-01-01

    The rate of spontaneous mutation is a key parameter in modeling the genetic structure and evolution of populations. The impact of the accumulated load of mutations and the consequences of increasing the mutation rate are important in assessing the genetic health of populations. Mutation frequencies are among the more directly measurable population parameters, although the information needed to convert them into mutation rates is often lacking. A previous analysis of mutation rates in RNA viru...

  8. Dissecting genetic and environmental mutation signatures with model organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segovia, Romulo; Tam, Annie S; Stirling, Peter C

    2015-08-01

    Deep sequencing has impacted on cancer research by enabling routine sequencing of genomes and exomes to identify genetic changes associated with carcinogenesis. Researchers can now use the frequency, type, and context of all mutations in tumor genomes to extract mutation signatures that reflect the driving mutational processes. Identifying mutation signatures, however, may not immediately suggest a mechanism. Consequently, several recent studies have employed deep sequencing of model organisms exposed to discrete genetic or environmental perturbations. These studies exploit the simpler genomes and availability of powerful genetic tools in model organisms to analyze mutation signatures under controlled conditions, forging mechanistic links between mutational processes and signatures. We discuss the power of this approach and suggest that many such studies may be on the horizon.

  9. Update of the androgen receptor gene mutations database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, B; Beitel, L K; Lumbroso, R; Pinsky, L; Trifiro, M

    1999-01-01

    The current version of the androgen receptor (AR) gene mutations database is described. The total number of reported mutations has risen from 309 to 374 during the past year. We have expanded the database by adding information on AR-interacting proteins; and we have improved the database by identifying those mutation entries that have been updated. Mutations of unknown significance have now been reported in both the 5' and 3' untranslated regions of the AR gene, and in individuals who are somatic mosaics constitutionally. In addition, single nucleotide polymorphisms, including silent mutations, have been discovered in normal individuals and in individuals with male infertility. A mutation hotspot associated with prostatic cancer has been identified in exon 5. The database is available on the internet (http://www.mcgill.ca/androgendb/), from EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute (ftp.ebi.ac.uk/pub/databases/androgen), or as a Macintosh FilemakerPro or Word file (MC33@musica.mcgill.ca).

  10. A molecular modelling approach to understand the effect of co-evolutionary mutations (V344M, I354L) identified in the PB2 subunit of influenza A 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus on m7GTP ligand binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhoye, Dipali; Behera, Abhisek Kumar; Cherian, Sarah S

    2016-08-01

    The cap binding domain of the polymerase basic 2 (PB2) subunit of influenza polymerases plays a critical role in mediating the 'cap-snatching' mechanism by binding the 5' cap of host pre-mRNAs during viral mRNA transcription. Monitoring variations in the PB2 protein is thus vital for evaluating the pathogenic potential of the virus. Based on selection pressure analysis of PB2 gene sequences of the pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) viruses of the period 2009-2014, we identified a site, 344V/M, in the vicinity of the cap binding pocket showing evidence of adaptive evolution and another co-evolving residue, 354I/L, in close vicinity. Modelling of the three-dimensional structure of the pH1N1 PB2 cap binding domain, docking of the pre-mRNA cap analogue m7GTP and molecular dynamics simulation studies of the docked complexes performed for four PB2 variants observed showed that the complex possessing V344M with I354L possessed better ligand binding affinity due to additional hydrogen bond contacts between m7GTP and the key residues His432 and Arg355 that was attributed to a displacement of the 424 loop and a flip of the side chain of Arg355, respectively. The co-evolutionary mutations identified (V344M, I354L) were found to be established in the PB2 gene of the pH1N1 viral population over the period 2010-2014. The study demonstrates the molecular basis for the enhanced m7GTP ligand binding affinity with the 344M-354L synergistic combination in PB2. Furthermore, the insight gained into understanding the molecular mechanism of cap binding in pH1N1 viruses may be useful for designing novel drugs targeting the PB2 cap binding domain.

  11. Pathogenic mutations in Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Eng-King; Skipper, Lisa M

    2007-07-01

    Parkinson disease (PD; Parkinson's) is the second most common neurodegenerative disease, characterized by the progressive loss of dopamine neurons and the accumulation of Lewy bodies. Increasing evidence suggests that deficits in mitochondrial function, oxidative and nitrosative stress, the accumulation of aberrant or misfolded proteins, and ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) dysfunction may represent the principal molecular pathways that commonly underlie the pathogenesis. The relative role of genetic and environmental factors has been the focus of research and debate. The recent discovery of a number of disease-causing genes (SNCA, Parkin/PARK2, UCHL1, PINK1, DJ1/PARK7, and LRRK2) in familial and sporadic forms of PD has provided considerable insights into the pathophysiology of this complex disorder. The frequency of these gene mutations may vary according to ethnicity and to the specific gene. A gene dosage effect is observed in some cases, and the phenotype of some of the mutation carriers closely resembles typical PD. Penetrance of some of the recurrent mutations is incomplete and may vary with age. Further research to unravel the etiopathology could identify biochemical or genetic markers for potential neuroprotective trials. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. LHON: Mitochondrial Mutations and More.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirches, E

    2011-03-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a mitochondrial disorder leading to severe visual impairment or even blindness by death of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). The primary cause of the disease is usually a mutation of the mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) causing a single amino acid exchange in one of the mtDNA-encoded subunits of NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase, the first complex of the electron transport chain. It was thus obvious to accuse neuronal energy depletion as the most probable mediator of neuronal death. The group of Valerio Carelli and other authors have nicely shown that energy depletion shapes the cell fate in a LHON cybrid cell model. However, the cybrids used were osteosarcoma cells, which do not fully model neuronal energy metabolism. Although complex I mutations may cause oxidative stress, a potential pathogenetic role of the latter was less taken into focus. The hypothesis of bioenergetic failure does not provide a simple explanation for the relatively late disease onset and for the incomplete penetrance, which differs remarkably between genders. It is assumed that other genetic and environmental factors are needed in addition to the 'primary LHON mutations' to elicit RGC death. Relevant nuclear modifier genes have not been identified so far. The review discusses the unresolved problems of a pathogenetic hypothesis based on ATP decline and/or ROS-induced apoptosis in RGCs.

  13. Founder mutations characterise the mutation panorama in 200 Swedish index cases referred for Long QT syndrome genetic testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stattin Eva-Lena

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Long QT syndrome (LQTS is an inherited arrhythmic disorder characterised by prolongation of the QT interval on ECG, presence of syncope and sudden death. The symptoms in LQTS patients are highly variable, and genotype influences the clinical course. This study aims to report the spectrum of LQTS mutations in a Swedish cohort. Methods Between March 2006 and October 2009, two hundred, unrelated index cases were referred to the Department of Clinical Genetics, Umeå University Hospital, Sweden, for LQTS genetic testing. We scanned five of the LQTS-susceptibility genes (KCNQ1, KCNH2, SCN5A, KCNE1, and KCNE2 for mutations by DHPLC and/or sequencing. We applied MLPA to detect large deletions or duplications in the KCNQ1, KCNH2, SCN5A, KCNE1, and KCNE2 genes. Furthermore, the gene RYR2 was screened in 36 selected LQTS genotype-negative patients to detect cases with the clinically overlapping disease catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT. Results In total, a disease-causing mutation was identified in 103 of the 200 (52% index cases. Of these, altered exon copy numbers in the KCNH2 gene accounted for 2% of the mutations, whereas a RYR2 mutation accounted for 3% of the mutations. The genotype-positive cases stemmed from 64 distinct mutations, of which 28% were novel to this cohort. The majority of the distinct mutations were found in a single case (80%, whereas 20% of the mutations were observed more than once. Two founder mutations, KCNQ1 p.Y111C and KCNQ1 p.R518*, accounted for 25% of the genotype-positive index cases. Genetic cascade screening of 481 relatives to the 103 index cases with an identified mutation revealed 41% mutation carriers who were at risk of cardiac events such as syncope or sudden unexpected death. Conclusion In this cohort of Swedish index cases with suspected LQTS, a disease-causing mutation was identified in 52% of the referred patients. Copy number variations explained 2% of the

  14. Molecular evaluation of a novel missense mutation & an insertional truncating mutation in SUMF1 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udhaya H Kotecha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Multiple suphphatase deficiency (MSD is an autosomal recessive disorder affecting the post translational activation of all enzymes of the sulphatase family. To date, approximately 30 different mutations have been identified in the causative gene, sulfatase modifying factor 1 (SUMF1. We describe here the mutation analysis of a case of MSD. Methods: The proband was a four year old boy with developmental delay followed by neuroregression. He had coarse facies, appendicular hypertonia, truncal ataxia and ichthyosis limited to both lower limbs. Radiographs showed dysostosis multiplex. Clinical suspicion of MSD was confirmed by enzyme analysis of four enzymes of the sulphatase group. Results: The patient was compound heterozygote for a c.451A>G (p.K151E substitution in exon 3 and a single base insertion mutation (c.690_691 InsT in exon 5 in the SUMF1 gene. The bioinformatic analysis of the missense mutation revealed no apparent effect on the overall structure. However, the mutated 151-amino acid residue was found to be adjacent to the substrate binding and the active site residues, thereby affecting the substrate binding and/or catalytic activity, resulting in almost complete loss of enzyme function. Conclusions: The two mutations identified in the present case were novel. This is perhaps the first report of an insertion mutation in SUMF1 causing premature truncation of the protein.

  15. Mutations in ARSB in MPS VI patients in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Juby; Jagadeesh, Sujatha M; Bhat, Meenakshi; Udhaya Kumar, S; Thiyagarajan, Saravanamuthu; Srinivasan, Sudha

    2015-09-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis VI (MPS VI) is an autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism caused by mutations in the arylsulfatase B gene (ARSB) and consequent deficient activity of ARSB, a lysosomal enzyme. We present here the results of a study undertaken to identify the mutations in ARSB in MPS VI patients in India. Around 160 ARSB mutations, of which just 4 are from India, have been reported in the literature. Our study covered nine MPS VI patients from eight families. Both familial mutations were found in seven families, and only one mutation was found in one family. Seven mutations were found - four novel (p.G38_G40del3, p.C91R, p.L98R and p.R315P), two previously reported from India (p.D53N and p.W450C), and one reported from outside India (p.R160Q). One mutation, p.W450C, was present in two families, and the other six mutations were present in one family each. Analysis of the molecular structure of the enzyme revealed that most of these mutations either cause loss of an active site residue or destabilize the structure of the enzyme. The only previous study on mutations in ARSB in Indian MPS VI patients, by Kantaputra et al. 2014 [1], reported four novel mutations of which two (p.D53N and p.W450C) were found in our study as well. Till date, nine mutations have been reported from India, through our study and the Kantaputra study. Eight out of these nine mutations have been found only in India. This suggests that the population studied by us might have its own typical set of mutations, with other populations equally likely to have their own set of mutations.

  16. Differential expression of GNAS and KRAS mutations in pancreatic cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Linda S; Doyle, Leona A; Houghton, Jeffrey; Sah, Sachin; Bellizzi, Andrew M; Szafranska-Schwarzbach, Anna E; Conner, James R; Kadiyala, Vivek; Suleiman, Shadeah L; Banks, Peter A; Andruss, Bernard F; Conwell, Darwin L

    2014-11-28

    KRAS mutations play an important role in pancreatic cancer. GNAS mutations were discovered in intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMN). Our aim was to identify the frequency of KRAS and GNAS mutations in pancreatic cystic neoplasms and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Sixty-eight surgically resected formalin fixed, paraffin embedded pancreatic specimens were analyzed, including: 1) benign (20 serous cystadenoma (SCA)), 2) pre-malignant (10 mucinous cystic neoplasm (MCN), 10 branch duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (BD-IPMN), 9 main duct IPMN (MD-IPMN)), 3) malignant (19 PDAC). Total nucleic acid extraction was performed. KRAS codon 12/13 and GNAS codon 201 mutations were interrogated via targeted sequencing using the Ion Torrent's Personal Genome Machine (PGM). Mean age of 68 patients was 61.9±8.4 with 72% female. KRAS and GNAS mutations were more common in PDAC and IPMN. KRAS mutations predominated in PDAC compared to pancreatic cysts (16/19, 84% versus 10/49, 20%; P<0.001). GNAS mutations were more common in IPMN compared to non-IPMN lesions (8/19, 42% versus 2/49, 4%; P=0.0003). No GNAS mutations were detected in PDAC and MCN while 2 SCA carried GNAS mutations. Double mutations with KRAS and GNAS were only present in IPMN (5/19 versus 0/30 SCA and MCN, P=0.006). KRAS and GNAS mutations were more common in PDAC and IPMN with KRAS mutations primarily in PDAC and GNAS mutations more frequent in IPMN. No GNAS mutations occurred in MCN and double mutations were only present in IPMN.

  17. The mutational spectrum in Treacher Collins syndrome reveals a predominance of mutations that create a premature-termination codon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, S.J.; Gladwin, A.J.; Dixon, M.J. [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom)

    1997-03-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is an autosomal dominant disorder of craniofacial development, the features of which include conductive hearing loss and cleft palate. The TCS locus has been mapped to human chromosome 5q31.3-32 and the mutated gene identified. In the current investigation, 25 previously undescribed mutations, which are spread throughout the gene, are presented. This brings the total reported to date to 35, which represents a detection rate of 60%. Of the mutations that have been reported to date, all but one result in the introduction of a premature-termination codon into the predicted protein, treacle. Moreover, the mutations are largely family specific, although a common 5-bp deletion in exon 24 (seven different families) and a recurrent splicing mutation in intron 3 (two different families) have been identified. This mutational spectrum supports the hypothesis that TCS results from haploin-sufficiency. 49 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. BRCA1 and BRCA2 germline mutation analysis among Indian women from south India: identification of four novel mutations and high-frequency occurrence of 185delAG mutation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kannan Vaidyanathan; Smita Lakhotia; H M Ravishankar; Umaira Tabassum; Geetashree Mukherjee; Kumaravel Somasundaram

    2009-09-01

    Mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes profoundly increase the risk of developing breast and/or ovarian cancer among women. To explore the contribution of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in the development of hereditary breast cancer among Indian women, we carried out mutation analysis of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in 61 breast or ovarian cancer patients from south India with a positive family history of breast and/or ovarian cancer. Mutation analysis was carried out using conformation-sensitive gel electrophoresis (CSGE) followed by sequencing. Mutations were identified in 17 patients (28.0%); 15 (24.6%) had BRCA1 mutations and two (3.28%) had BRCA2 mutations. While no specific association between BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations with cancer type was seen, mutations were more often seen in families with ovarian cancer. While 40% (4/10) and 30.8% (4/12) of families with ovarian or breast and ovarian cancer had mutations, only 23.1% (9/39) of families with breast cancer carried mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. In addition, while BRCA1 mutations were found in all age groups, BRCA2 mutations were found only in the age group of ≤ 40 years. Of the BRCA1 mutations, there were three novel mutations (295delCA; 4213T → A; 5267T → G) and three mutations that have been reported earlier. Interestingly, 185delAG, a BRCA1 mutation which occurs at a very high frequency in Ashkenazi Jews, was found at a frequency of 16.4% (10/61). There was one novel mutation (4866insT) and one reported mutation in BRCA2. Thus, our study emphasizes the importance of mutation screening in familial breast and/or ovarian cancers, and the potential implications of these findings in genetic counselling and preventive therapy.